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Sample records for ad vascular dementia

  1. Vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Korczyn, Amos D; Vakhapova, Veronika; Grinberg, Lea T

    2012-01-01

    The epidemic grow of dementia causes great concern for the society. It is customary to consider Alzheimer’s disease (AD) as the most common cause of dementia, followed by vascular dementia (VaD). This dichotomous view of a neurodegenerative disease as opposed to brain damage caused by extrinsic factors led to separate lines of research in these two entities. Indeed, accumulated data suggest that the two disorders have additive effects and probably interact; however it is still unknown to what degree. Furthermore, epidemiological studies have shown “vascular” risk factors to be associated with AD. Therefore, a clear distinction between AD and VaD cannot be made in most cases, and is furthermore unhelpful. In the absence of efficacious treatment for the neurodegenerative process, special attention must be given to vascular component, even in patients with presumed mixed pathology. Symptomatic treatment of VaD and AD are similar, although the former is less effective. For prevention of dementia it is important to treat aggressively all factors, even in stroke survivors who do not show evidence of cognitive decline,. In this review, we will give a clinical and pathological picture of the processes leading to VaD and discuss it interaction with AD. PMID:22575403

  2. Vascular Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... attack) may increase your risk of developing dementia. Atherosclerosis. This condition occurs when deposits of cholesterol and ... in your arteries and narrow your blood vessels. Atherosclerosis can increase your risk of vascular dementia — and ...

  3. Vascular dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... to dementia. Risk factors for VaD include: Diabetes Hardening of the arteries ( atherosclerosis ) High blood pressure ( hypertension ) ... Control conditions that increase the risk of hardening of the ... saturated fats and salt in the diet Treating related disorders

  4. Aspirin for vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rands, Gianetta; Orrell, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background Aspirin is widely prescribed for patients with a diagnosis of vascular dementia. In a survey of UK geriatricians and psychiatrists 80% of patients with clinical diagnoses of vascular dementia were prescribed aspirin. However, a number of queries remain unanswered. Is there convincing evidence that aspirin benefits patients with vascular dementia? Does aspirin affect cognition and behaviour, or improve prognosis? Does the risk of cerebral or gastric haemorrhage outweigh any benefit? Objectives To assess the randomised trial evidence for efficacy and safety of aspirin in the treatment of vascular dementia. Search methods We searched ALOIS: the Cochrane Dementia and Cognitive Improvement Group’s Specialized Register on 12 March 2012 using the terms: aspirin OR “acetylsalicylic acid”. ALOIS contains records of clinical trials identified from monthly searches of a number of major healthcare databases, numerous trial registries and grey literature sources. In addition, relevant websites were searched and some journals were handsearched. Specialists in the field were approached for unpublished material and any publications found were searched for additional references. Selection criteria Randomised controlled trials investigating the effect of aspirin for vascular dementia were eligible for inclusion. Data collection and analysis Retrieved studies were analysed independently by both review authors. Methodology and results were critically appraised and outcomes scanned included cognition, behavioural change, mortality and institutionalisation. Main results No trials were eligible for inclusion in this review. Authors’ conclusions The most recent search for references to relevant research was carried out in March 2012. No trials were found for inclusion in this systematic review. Low-dose aspirin is frequently used as ‘treatment as normal’ in control groups and as a baseline treatment in pharmacological trials. There is still no good evidence that

  5. Retinal vascular caliber and risk of dementia

    PubMed Central

    de Jong, F.J.; Schrijvers, E.M.C.; Ikram, M.K.; Koudstaal, P.J.; de Jong, P.T.V.M.; Hofman, A.; Vingerling, J.R.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Retinal vessels provide a unique opportunity to study both systemic and cerebrovascular disease. Smaller retinal arteriolar calibers are strongly related to hypertension, whereas larger retinal venular calibers are more related to inflammation, cerebral hypoperfusion, and cerebrovascular disease. Whether retinal vessel calibers are related to dementia remains unclear. Methods: We investigated whether retinal arteriolar and venular calibers are associated with risk of dementia, and its subtypes Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia, in the prospective population-based Rotterdam Study. Digitized retinal images were available in 5,553 participants aged 55 years or over and dementia-free at baseline (1990–1993). Participants were re-examined in 1993–1994, 1997–1999, and 2002–2004 and were continuously monitored for development of dementia. Results: During a mean follow-up of 11.6 years, 655 participants developed dementia. AD was diagnosed in 519 and vascular dementia in 73 participants. Larger venular calibers were associated with an increased risk of dementia, in particular vascular dementia (age- and sex-adjusted hazard ratio per SD increase: 1.31; 95% confidence interval 1.06–1.64), but not AD. The association remained significant after adjustment for stroke and cardiovascular risk factors. Smaller arteriolar calibers were also associated with an increased risk of vascular dementia, yet only when adjusted for venular calibers. Conclusions: Retinal venular widening is associated with an increased risk of vascular dementia. Our findings are in line with previous observations in stroke and cerebral small-vessel disease and suggest that the association between larger retinal venular calibers and dementia may reflect cerebral hypoperfusion and subsequent ischemia. PMID:21288987

  6. What is vascular dementia?

    PubMed

    Kurz, A F

    2001-05-01

    Cerebrovascular disease (CVD) and dementia frequently coexist in elderly patients. The question of whether the CVD causes the dementia depends on how 'dementia' is defined. Traditional definitions specified that dementia involved a decline in intellectual ability as a core feature. However, revised definitions have since stipulated two key elements: 1) a global rather than focal neurobehavioural deficit and 2) impairment in activities of daily living (ADL). When applied to CVD, these latter concepts of dementia raise difficulty: Focal cerebrovascular lesions in the cortex generate location-specific neurobehavioural deficits that are part of the dementia syndrome, but, even in combination, do not represent a global intellectual decline. Most cerebrovascular lesions are associated with physical symptoms that make it difficult to evaluate whether cognitive impairments have an independent impact on ADL. The majority of neurobehavioural symptoms in CVD are caused by small-vessel-type subcortical lesions and are dissimilar to those seen in Alzheimer's disease. There are several pathogenetic mechanisms, however, by which large-vessel or small-vessel CVD can cause global cognitive and intellectual impairments, allowing a diagnosis of vascular dementia (VaD): An accumulation of ischaemic lesions in the cortex may produce global intellectual impairment, particularly if they affect important areas of the brain. Single small infarcts, or haemorrhages in strategic subcortical locations, may interfere with specific circuits connecting the prefrontal cortex to the basal ganglia, or with nonspecific thalamocortical projections. This may generate combinations of executive dysfunction, personality change or apathy, which are associated with hypoperfusion and hypometabolism predominantly in frontal cortical areas. Extensive white matter lesions probably affect cognitive function through a loss of axons, producing a functional disconnection of the cortex. This can manifest as

  7. Vascular lesions in mixed dementia, vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease with cerebrovascular disease: the Kurihara Project.

    PubMed

    Meguro, Kenichi; Tanaka, Naofumi; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Nakamura, Kei; Satoh, Masayuki

    2012-11-15

    The concept and diagnosis for mixed dementia is not simple, since it is difficult to identify the type and regions of cerebrovascular disease (CVD) responsible for causing dementia. An investigation is needed to confirm the presence of mixed dementia, those who met the criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and those for vascular dementia (VaD). According to the community-based stroke, dementia, and bed-confinement prevention in Kurihara, northern Japan (Kurihara Project), the prevalence of dementia and dementing diseases was surveyed in 2008-2010. Five hundred and ninety people finally agreed to participate (47.0%), and 73 (12.4%) people were diagnosed with dementia according to the DSM-IV. Using MRI, intensive evaluations on CVDs were performed for the 49 dementia patients associated with CVDs (mixed dementia, VaD, and AD with CVD). For the mixed dementia group, all had left subcortical strategic CVDs. These included the caudate head and thalamus. For the VaD group, all patients had at least cortical CVDs or subcortical strategic CVDs. The AD with CVD group had non-strategic CVDs in cortical, subcortical, or other areas in 5 or 6 patients each. Two extreme concepts regarding CVD and dementia are possible. One is that there is no concept for mixed dementia or VaD. An alternative is that the vascular factor should be considered as primary. Our data showed an importance of cortical and subcortical "strategic" areas, the latter included thalamus and caudate head.

  8. The pathobiology of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Iadecola, Costantino

    2013-01-01

    Vascular cognitive impairment defines alterations in cognition, ranging from subtle deficits to full-blown dementia, attributable to cerebrovascular causes. Often coexisting with Alzheimer’s disease, mixed vascular and neurodegenerative dementia has emerged as the leading cause of age-related cognitive impairment. Central to the disease mechanism is the crucial role that cerebral blood vessels play in brain health, not only for the delivery of oxygen and nutrients, but also for the trophic signaling that links inextricably the well being of neurons and glia to that of cerebrovascular cells. This review will examine how vascular damage disrupts these vital homeostatic interactions, focusing on the hemispheric white matter, a region at heightened risk for vascular damage, and on the interplay between vascular factors and Alzheimer’s disease. Finally, preventative and therapeutic prospects will be examined, highlighting the importance of midlife vascular risk factor control in the prevention of late-life dementia. PMID:24267647

  9. Vascular aspects of cognitive impairment and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Wiesmann, Maximilian; Kiliaan, Amanda J; Claassen, Jurgen AHR

    2013-01-01

    Hypertension and stroke are highly prevalent risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia. Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common forms of dementia, and both conditions are preceded by a stage of cognitive impairment. Stroke is a major risk factor for the development of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) and VaD; however, stroke may also predispose to AD. Hypertension is a major risk factor for stroke, thus linking hypertension to VCI and VaD, but hypertension is also an important risk factor for AD. Reducing these two major, but modifiable, risk factors—hypertension and stroke—could be a successful strategy for reducing the public health burden of cognitive impairment and dementia. Intake of long-chain omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids (LC-n3-FA) and the manipulation of factors involved in the renin–angiotensin system (e.g. angiotensin II or angiotensin-converting enzyme) have been shown to reduce the risk of developing hypertension and stroke, thereby reducing dementia risk. This paper will review the research conducted on the relationship between hypertension, stroke, and dementia and also on the impact of LC-n3-FA or antihypertensive treatments on risk factors for VCI, VaD, and AD. PMID:24022624

  10. Models and Mechanisms of Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Venkat, Poornima; Chopp, Michael; Chen, Jieli

    2015-01-01

    Vascular Dementia (VaD) is the second leading form of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease (AD) plaguing the elderly population. VaD is a progressive disease caused by reduced blood flow to the brain, and it affects cognitive abilities especially executive functioning. VaD is poorly understood and lacks suitable animal models, which constrain the progress on understanding the basis of the disease and developing treatments. This review article discusses VaD, its risk factors, induced cognitive disability, various animal (rodent) models of VaD, pathology, and mechanisms of VaD and treatment options. PMID:25987538

  11. Contribution of vascular pathology to the clinical expression of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Strozyk, Dorothea; Dickson, Dennis W.; Lipton, Richard B.; Katz, Mindy; Derby, Carol A.; Lee, Sunhee; Wang, Cuiling; Verghese, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Vascular lesions in the brain are common with advancing age; however, the independent and cumulative contributions of postmortem vascular lesions to antemortem cognitive status are not well established. We examined association of six vascular lesions (large infarcts, lacunar infarcts, leukoencephalopathy, microinfarcts, cribriform changes, and cerebral amyloid angiopathy) with antemortem diagnoses of dementia, Alzheimer’s disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VaD) in 190 older adults from an autopsy series. We also developed a summary score based on three macroscopic vascular lesions: large infarcts (0, 1, and≥2), lacunar infarcts (0, 1, and≥2), and leukoencephalopathy (none, mild, and moderate-to-severe). Sixty-eight percent of cases had vascular lesions. Only leukoencephalopathy was associated with dementia (odds ratio (OR) 3.5, 95% CI 1.0–12.4), and only large infarcts were associated with VaD (OR 4.3, 95% CI 1.2–15.4). The vascular score was associated with dementia (OR 1.6, 95% CI 1.2–2.3), AD (OR 1.5, 95% CI 1.0–2.1) and VaD (OR 2.0, 95% CI 1.4–3.0). Leukoencephalopathy, large infarcts, and higher vascular burden is associated with the clinical expression of dementia and subtypes. PMID:18996621

  12. [Vascular dementia: big effects of small lesions].

    PubMed

    Gold, G; Kövari, E

    2011-11-09

    Vascular dementia due to multiple large strokes (multi-infarct dementia) is a well known entity. However, new clinicopathologic and neuroimaging data have highlighted the common occurrence of small vessel and microscopic vascular pathology in aging brains and recognized that vascular dementia due to small lesions is probably the most common form. In such cases, cortical microinfarcts are the strongest correlate of global cognitive function followed by basal ganglia and thalamic lacunes. Demyelination is only weekly associated with cognition and this relation is no longer significant after adjustement for the presence of lacunes. Awareness of the importance of small vascular lesions in brain aging, can improve diagnostic accuracy and help identify new targets, that could lead to novel therapeutic approaches in old age dementia.

  13. Vascular risk factors, cognitive decline, and dementia.

    PubMed

    Duron, E; Hanon, Olivier

    2008-01-01

    Dementia is one of the most important neurological disorders in the elderly. Aging is associated with a large increase in the prevalence and incidence of degenerative (Alzheimer's disease) and vascular dementia, leading to a devastating loss of autonomy. In view of the increasing longevity of populations worldwide, prevention of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. In the past decade, several vascular risk factors have been found to be associated with vascular dementia but also Alzheimer's disease. Some longitudinal studies, have found significant associations between hypertension, diabetus mellitus, and metabolic syndrome, assessed at middle age, and dementia. Studies assessing the link between hypercholesterolemia, atrial fibrillation, smoking, and dementia have given more conflicting results. Furthermore, some studies have highlighted the possible protective effect of antihypertensive therapy on cognition and some trials are evaluating the effects of statins and treatments for insulin resistance. Vascular risk factors and their treatments are a promising avenue of research for prevention of dementia, and further long-term, placebo-controlled, randomized studies, need to be performed.

  14. Citicoline in vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia after stroke.

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Sabín, Jose; Román, Gustavo C

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive decline after stroke is more common than stroke recurrence. Stroke doubles the risk of dementia and is a major contributor to vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia. Neuropathological studies in most cases of dementia in the elderly reveal a large load of vascular ischemic brain lesions mixed with a lesser contribution of neurodegenerative lesions of Alzheimer disease. Nonetheless, few pharmacological studies have addressed vascular cognitive impairment and vascular dementia after stroke. Citicoline has demonstrated neuroprotective effects in acute stroke and has been shown to improve cognition in patients with chronic cerebrovascular disease and in some patients with Alzheimer disease. A recent trial lasting 6 months in patients with first-ever ischemic stroke showed that citicoline prevented cognitive decline after stroke with significant improvement of temporal orientation, attention, and executive function. Experimentally, citicoline exhibits neuroprotective effects and enhances neural repair. Citicoline appears to be a safe and promising alternative to improve stroke recovery and could be indicated in patients with vascular cognitive impairment, vascular dementia, and Alzheimer disease with significant cerebrovascular disease.

  15. [Efficacy of prolonged therapy of vascular dementia].

    PubMed

    2011-01-01

    This open study was designed to assess efficacy and safety of long-term therapy with cerebrolysin in 48 patients aged 59-77 years with mild and moderately severe vascular dementia. The slowdown in the progress of this condition during the 3-year treatment period was evaluated. The efficacy and safety of the drug was assessed clinically and with the use of standard scales and neuropsychological tests. The long-term therapy with cerebrolysin was shown to be safe and highly efficacious as indicated by the improvement of cognitive and motor functions both at early and late stages of the treatment regardless of the severity of the disease. It is concluded that long-term therapy with cerebrolysin slows down the progress of vascular dementia and prevent deterioration of cognitive abilities.

  16. Haemostasis in ischaemic stroke and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Stott, D J; Spilg, E; Campbell, A M; Rumley, A; Mansoor, M A; Lowe, G D

    2001-12-01

    Abnormalities of coagulation and fibrinolysis may play an important role in the pathogenesis of ischaemic stroke and vascular dementia. We aimed to determine whether haemostatic function is altered in acute recent-onset or chronic ischaemic cerebrovascular disease. We studied consecutive patients with ischaemic stroke (n = 74) and vascular dementia (n = 42) compared with healthy controls (n = 40) in a case-control study. The ischaemic stroke group was assessed twice, 3-10 days after the acute stroke and at 1-3 months. Fibrinogen, fibrin D-dimer (marker of fibrin turnover) and von Willebrand factor (vWF) (marker of endothelial disturbance) were elevated acutely (P < 0.0001) and in the convalescent phase after ischaemic stroke (P < 0.0001, P < 0.0001, and P < 0.01 respectively, compared with controls). Similar results were seen in the vascular dementia group. Stepwise multivariate regression analyses showed that cerebrovascular disease correlated independently with fibrinogen (P < 0.001) and fibrin D-dimer levels (P < 0.001), while vWF correlated independently with electrocardiograph evidence of ischaemic heart disease (P = 0.004). Changes between acute and convalescent phases in ischaemic stroke were slightly inconsistent. However, in the acute stage there were tendencies for fibrinogen, D-dimer and vWF to be increased, and factor VIII was significantly higher. Abnormalities of haemostasis, including increased fibrin turnover and endothelial disturbance, are found in both acute and chronic cerebral ischaemia. Many of these patients have co-existent ischaemic heart disease and this may contribute to some of these changes. Acute ischaemic stroke is associated with transient changes in haemostatic factors; however, most abnormalities persist into the convalescent phase, and are also demonstrable in subjects with vascular dementia.

  17. Neuroprotective effects of tetrandrine against vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lv, Yan-ling; Wu, Ze-zhi; Chen, Li-xue; Wu, Bai-xue; Chen, Lian-lian; Qin, Guang-cheng; Gui, Bei; Zhou, Ji-ying

    2016-01-01

    Tetrandrine is one of the major active ingredients in Menispermaceae Stephania tetrandra S. Moore, and has specific therapeutic effects in ischemic cerebrovascular disease. Its use in vascular dementia has not been studied fully. Here, we investigated whether tetrandrine would improve behavioral and cellular impairments in a two-vessel occlusion rat model of chronic vascular dementia. Eight weeks after model establishment, rats were injected intraperitoneally with 10 or 30 mg/kg tetrandrine every other day for 4 weeks. Behavioral assessment in the Morris water maze showed that model rats had longer escape latencies in training trials, and spent less time swimming in the target quadrant in probe trials, than sham-operated rats. However, rats that had received tetrandrine showed shorter escape latencies and longer target quadrant swimming time than untreated model rats. Hematoxylin-eosin and Nissl staining revealed less neuronal necrosis and pathological damage, and more living cells, in the hippocampus of rats treated with tetrandrine than in untreated model rats. Western blot assay showed that interleukin-1β expression, and phosphorylation of the N-methyl-D-aspartate 2B receptor at tyrosine 1472, were lower in model rats that received tetrandrine than in those that did not. The present findings suggest that tetrandrine may be neuroprotective in chronic vascular dementia by reducing interleukin-1β expression, N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor 2B phosphorylation at tyrosine 1472, and neuronal necrosis. PMID:27127485

  18. Altered Expression of Human Mitochondrial Branched Chain Aminotransferase in Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Ashby, Emma L; Kierzkowska, Marta; Hull, Jonathon; Kehoe, Patrick G; Hutson, Susan M; Conway, Myra E

    2017-01-01

    Cytosolic and mitochondrial human branched chain aminotransferase (hBCATc and hBCATm, respectively) play an integral role in brain glutamate metabolism. Regional increased levels of hBCATc in the CA1 and CA4 region of Alzheimer's disease (AD) brain together with increased levels of hBCATm in frontal and temporal cortex of AD brains, suggest a role for these proteins in glutamate excitotoxicity. Glutamate toxicity is a key pathogenic feature of several neurological disorders including epilepsy associated dementia, AD, vascular dementia (VaD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). To further understand if these increases are specific to AD, the expression profiles of hBCATc and hBCATm were examined in other forms of dementia including DLB and VaD. Similar to AD, levels of hBCATm were significantly increased in the frontal and temporal cortex of VaD cases and in frontal cortex of DLB cases compared to controls, however there were no observed differences in hBCATc between groups in these areas. Moreover, multiple forms of hBCATm were observed that were particular to the disease state relative to matched controls. Real-time PCR revealed similar expression of hBCATm mRNA in frontal and temporal cortex for all cohort comparisons, whereas hBCATc mRNA expression was significantly increased in VaD cases compared to controls. Collectively our results suggest that hBCATm protein expression is significantly increased in the brains of DLB and VaD cases, similar to those reported in AD brain. These findings indicate a more global response to altered glutamate metabolism and suggest common metabolic responses that might reflect shared neurodegenerative mechanisms across several forms of dementia.

  19. High b-value diffusion imaging of dementia: application to vascular dementia and alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mayzel-Oreg, Orna; Assaf, Yaniv; Gigi, Ariela; Ben-Bashat, Dafna; Verchovsky, Ruth; Mordohovitch, M; Graif, M; Hendler, Talma; Korczyn, Amos; Cohen, Yoram

    2007-06-15

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) and Vascular Dementia (VaD) are the most common types of dementia and are progressive diseases affecting millions of people. Despite the high sensitivity of MRI to neurological disorders it has not thus far been found to be specific for the detection of either of these pathologies. In the present study high b-value q-space diffusion-weighted MRI (DWI) was applied to VaD and AD. Controls (N=4), VaD patients (N=8) and AD patients (N=6) were scanned with high b-value DWI, which emphasizes the water component which exhibits restricted diffusion. VaD patients were found to present major WM loss while, in AD, the major pathology found was GM changes, as expected. Also, WM changes in VaD and AD were of a different pattern, more specific to frontal and temporal areas in AD and more widespread in VaD. This pattern of WM changes may be utilized as a diagnosis criterion. Conventional diffusion tensor imaging did not show significant changes between either of the groups and controls. These results demonstrate the potential of high b-value DWI in the diagnosis of dementia.

  20. Language Impairment in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lempinen, Maire; And Others

    A study of 21 patients with Alzheimer's Disease and 25 with vascular dementia, the two most common forms of dementia, investigated language impairments in the dementia syndrome to see if analysis of language disturbances is helpful in differential diagnosis. Diagnostic assessment included a neurological examination, detailed medical history,…

  1. Occludin is overexpressed in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Romanitan, Mihaela Oana; Popescu, Bogdan O; Winblad, Bengt; Bajenaru, Ovidiu Alexandru; Bogdanovic, Nenad

    2007-01-01

    Abstract The tight junctions (TJs) are key players in the control of blood-brain barrier (BBB) properties, the most complex TJs in the vascular system being found in the endothelial cells of brain capillaries. One of the main TJs proteins is occludin, which anchors plasma membranes of neighbour cells and is present in large amounts in the brain endothelia. Previous studies demonstrated that disruption of BBB in various pathological situations associates with changes in occludin expression, and this change could be responsible for malfunction of BBB. Therefore in this study, applying an immunohistochemical approach, we decided to explore the occludin expression in frontal cortex (FC) and basal ganglia in ageing control, Alzheimer's disease (AD), and vascular dementia (VD) brains, as far as all these pathologies associate microangiopathy and disruption of BBB. Strikingly, we found selected neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes expressing occludin, in all cases studied. To estimate the number of occludin-expressing neurons, we applied a stereological approach with random systematic sampling and the unbiased optical fractionator method. We report here a significant increase in ratio of occludin-expressing neurons in FC and basal ganglia regions in both AD and VD as compared to ageing controls. Within the cerebral cortex, occludin was selectively expressed by pyramidal neurons, which are the ones responsible for cognitive processes and affected by AD pathology. Our findings could be important in unravelling new pathogenic pathways in dementia disorders and new functions of occludin and TJs. PMID:17635647

  2. 123I-FP-CIT SPECT imaging in early diagnosis of dementia in patients with and without a vascular component

    PubMed Central

    Garriga, Marina; Milà, Marta; Mir, Manzoor; Al-Baradie, Raid; Huertas, Sonia; Castejon, Cesar; Casas, Laura; Badenes, Dolors; Giménez, Nuria; Font, M. Angels; Gonzalez, Jose M.; Ysamat, Maria; Aguilar, Miguel; Slevin, Mark; Krupinski, Jerzy

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most common cause of dementia. Cerebral ischemia is a major risk factor for development of dementia. 123I-FP-CIT SPECT (DaTScan) is a complementary tool in the differential diagnoses of patients with incomplete or uncertain Parkinsonism. Additional application of DaTScan enables the categorization of Parkinsonian disease with dementia (PDD), and its differentiation from pure AD, and may further contribute to change the therapeutic decision. The aim of this study was to analyze the vascular contribution towards dementia and mild cognitive impairment (MCI). We evaluated the utility of DaTScan for the early diagnosis of dementia in patients with and without a clinical vascular component, and the association between neuropsychological function, vascular component and dopaminergic function on DaTScan. One-hundred and five patients with MCI or the initial phases of dementia were studied prospectively. We developed an initial assessment using neurologic examination, blood tests, cognitive function tests, structural neuroimaging and DaTScan. The vascular component was later quantified in two ways: clinically, according to the Framingham Risk Score (FRS) and by structural neuroimaging using Wahlund Scale Total Score (WSTS). Early diagnosis of dementia was associated with an abnormal DaTScan. A significant association was found between a high WSTS and an abnormal DaTScan (p < 0.01). Mixed AD was the group with the highest vascular component, followed by the VaD group, while MCI and pure AD showed similar WSTS. No significant associations were found between neuropsychological impairment and DaTScan independently of associated vascular component. DaTScan seems to be a good tool to discriminate, in a first clinical assessment, patients with MCI from those with established dementia. There was bigger general vascular affectation observable in MRI or CT in patients with abnormal dopaminergic uptake seen on Da

  3. Herbal Medicine for the Treatment of Vascular Dementia: An Overview of Scientific Evidence

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jianxun; Bilinski, Kellie; Xu, Li; Seto, Sai W.

    2016-01-01

    Dementia is a leading cause of mental and physical disability. Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD) constituting 10–15% of the dementia population. Currently there are no approved pharmaceutical options for VaD and the conventional anti-AD therapies provide only modest, short-term relief of symptoms associated with VaD. Herbal medicines have been used for the management of dementia-like symptoms for centuries and may provide viable therapies for VaD due to their multicomponent and multitarget approach. This review is designed to provide an updated overview on the current status of herbal medicine research, with an emphasis on Chinese herbal medicine, for the treatment of VaD or dementia. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the development process of a novel standardized complex herbal formulation for VaD. The article reveals some preliminary evidence to support the use of single and complex herbal preparations for VaD and dementia. Multiple issues in relation to clinical and preclinical research have been identified and future research directions are discussed. PMID:28115971

  4. Herbal Medicine for the Treatment of Vascular Dementia: An Overview of Scientific Evidence.

    PubMed

    Chang, Dennis; Liu, Jianxun; Bilinski, Kellie; Xu, Li; Steiner, Genevieve Z; Seto, Sai W; Bensoussan, Alan

    2016-01-01

    Dementia is a leading cause of mental and physical disability. Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second most common cause of dementia after Alzheimer's disease (AD) constituting 10-15% of the dementia population. Currently there are no approved pharmaceutical options for VaD and the conventional anti-AD therapies provide only modest, short-term relief of symptoms associated with VaD. Herbal medicines have been used for the management of dementia-like symptoms for centuries and may provide viable therapies for VaD due to their multicomponent and multitarget approach. This review is designed to provide an updated overview on the current status of herbal medicine research, with an emphasis on Chinese herbal medicine, for the treatment of VaD or dementia. A case study is also provided to demonstrate the development process of a novel standardized complex herbal formulation for VaD. The article reveals some preliminary evidence to support the use of single and complex herbal preparations for VaD and dementia. Multiple issues in relation to clinical and preclinical research have been identified and future research directions are discussed.

  5. Association between Risk Factors for Vascular Dementia and Adiponectin

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Won Taek; Park, Kyung Ah

    2014-01-01

    Vascular dementia is caused by various factors, including increased age, diabetes, hypertension, atherosclerosis, and stroke. Adiponectin is an adipokine secreted by adipose tissue. Adiponectin is widely known as a regulating factor related to cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Adiponectin plasma levels decrease with age. Decreased adiponectin increases the risk of cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Adiponectin improves hypertension and atherosclerosis by acting as a vasodilator and antiatherogenic factor. Moreover, adiponectin is involved in cognitive dysfunction via modulation of insulin signal transduction in the brain. Case-control studies demonstrate the association between low adiponectin and increased risk of stroke, hypertension, and diabetes. This review summarizes the recent findings on the association between risk factors for vascular dementia and adiponectin. To emphasize this relationship, we will discuss the importance of research regarding the role of adiponectin in vascular dementia. PMID:24860814

  6. Cognitive profiles in degenerative dementia without evidence of small vessel pathology and small vessel vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    De Carolis, Antonella; Cipollini, Virginia; Donato, Nicole; Sepe-Monti, Micaela; Orzi, Francesco; Giubilei, Franco

    2017-01-01

    Although a large number of studies have examined possible differences in cognitive performance between Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD), the data in the literature are conflicting. The aims of this study were to analyze the neuropsychological pattern of subjects affected by degenerative dementia without evidence of small vessel pathology (DD) and small vessel VaD subjects in the early stages and to investigate differences in the progression of cognitive impairment. Seventy-five patients with probable VaD and 75 patients with probable DD were included. All the subjects underwent a standard neuropsychological evaluation, including the following test: Visual Search, Attentional matrices, Story Recall, Raven's Coloured Progressive Matrices, Phonological and Semantic Verbal Fluency, Token, and Copying Drawings. The severity of cognitive impairment was stratified according to the MMSE score. Fifteen subjects with probable DD and 10 subjects with probable VaD underwent a 12-month cognitive re-evaluation. No significant difference was found between DD and VaD subjects in any of the neuropsychological tests except Story Recall in the mild cognitive impairment (P < 0.001). The re-test value was significantly worse than the baseline value in the MMSE (P = 0.037), Corsi (P = 0.041), Story Recall (P = 0.032), Phonological Verbal Fluency (P = 0.02), and Copying Drawings (P = 0.043) in DD patients and in the Visual Search test (P = 0.036) in VaD subjects. These results suggest that a neuropsychological evaluation might help to differentiate degenerative dementia without evidence of small vessel pathology from small vessel VaD in the early stages of these diseases.

  7. Alzheimer and vascular dementia in the elderly patients

    PubMed Central

    Seetlani, Naresh Kumar; Kumar, Narindar; Imran, Khalid; Ali, Asif; Shams, Nadia; Sheikh, Taha

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To find out the frequency of Alzheimer’s and Vascular dementia in the elderly patients. Methods: This cross sectional descriptive study was conducted in Department of Medicine, Ziauddin Hospital Karachi from 1st October 2013 to 31st March 2014. Patients with symptoms of dementia for more than 6 months duration, and Mini Mental State Examination score <24 were included in this study. Patients who fell in category of dementia were assessed for duration of symptoms. Patients underwent CT scan of brain. Patients with generalized atrophy of brain on CT scanning of brain were labeled as Alzheimer’s dementia, while patients with ischemic or hemorrhagic stroke on CT scan of brain were labeled as vascular dementia. Results: Four hundred twenty two patients were included in this study. There were 232 (54.98 %) male and 190 (45.02 %) were female. The mean age ± SD of the patients was 72.58±5.34 years (95% CI: 72.07 to 73.09), similarly average duration of symptoms was 10.14±2.85 months. About 18.96% of patients were illiterate, 32.23% were matric, 28.44% were intermediate and 20.33% were graduate and post graduate. Hypertension and diabetes were the commonest co-morbid i.e. 81.3% and 73.7%, hyperlipedimia and smoking were 38.2% and 45% respectively. Frequency of Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia in the elderly was observed in 3.79% (16/422) and 2.61% (11/422) cases. Conclusion: A good number of patients, 27 out of 422, in this hospital based study were suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. Early detection and prompt treatment can reduce the burden of the disease in our population. PMID:27882038

  8. Cerebral Blood Flow in Ischemic Vascular Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease By Arterial Spin Labeling MRI

    PubMed Central

    Schuff, N.; Matsumoto, S.; Kmiecik, J.; Studholme, C.; Du, A.T.; Ezekiel, F.; Miller, B.L.; Kramer, J.H.; Jagust, W.J.; Chui, H.C.; Weiner, M.W.

    2009-01-01

    Background The objectives were first to compare the effects of subcortical ischemic vascular dementia (SIVD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) on cerebral blood flow (CBF) and second to analyze the relationship between CBF and subcortical vascular disease, measured as volume of white matter lesions (WML). Methods Eight mildly demented patients with SIVD (77 ± 8 years, 26 ± 3 MMSE) and 14 patients with AD were compared to 18 cognitively normal elderly. All subjects had CBF measured using arterial spin labeling MRI and brain volumes assessed using structural MRI. Results AD and SIVD showed marked CBF reductions in frontal (p = 0.001) and parietal (p = 0.001) cortex. In SIVD, increased subcortical WML were associated with reduced CBF in frontal cortex (p = 0.04) in addition to cortical atrophy (frontal: p = 0.05; parietal: p = 0.03). Conclusions Subcortical vascular disease is associated with reduced CBF in the cortex, irrespective of brain atrophy. PMID:19896584

  9. Senile dementia of the Binswanger type: a vascular form of dementia in the elderly

    SciTech Connect

    Roman, G.C.

    1987-10-02

    Computed tomography and magnetic resonance imaging in the elderly have demonstrated the common occurrence of deep white-matter lesions in the aging brain. These radiologic lesions (leukoaraiosis) may represent an early marker of dementia. At autopsy, an ischemic periventricular leukoencephalopathy (Binswanger's disease) has been found in most cases. The clinical spectrum of Binswanger's disease appears to range from asymptomatic radiologic lesions to dementia with focal deficits, frontal signs, pseudobulbar palsy, gait difficulties, and urinary incontinence. The name senile dementia of the Binswanger type (SDBT) is proposed for this poorly recognized, vascular form of subcortical dementia. The SDBT probably results from cortical disconnections most likely caused by hypoperfusion. In contrast, multi-infarct dementia is correlated with multiple large and small strokes that cause a loss of over 50 to 100 mL of brain volume. The periventricular white matter is a watershed area irrigated by long, penetrating medullary arteries. Risk factors for SDBT are small-artery diseases, such as hypertension and amyloid angiopathy, impaired autoregulation of cerebral blood flow in the elderly, and periventricular hypoperfusion due to cardiac failure, arrhythmias, and hypotension. The SDBT may be a potentially preventable and treatable form of dementia.

  10. Neuropsychiatric symptoms in patients with vascular dementia in mainland China

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Yan-ling; Zhang, Hong; Gao, Yong-zhe; Shu, Min; Xu, Yan; Liu, Xi; Zhang, Sheng-ming; Zou, Chao-yu; Cao, Jing; Xiong, Rong-hong

    2015-01-01

    Background Neuropsychiatric deficits can induce marked disability in patients with dementia and increase caregiver distress. Several studies have found that neuropsychiatric symptoms are common both in patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and patients with vascular dementia (VaD). However, there are few studies of the neuropsychiatric disturbances in large clinical samples of patients with mixed (cortical - subcortical) VaD from mainland China. This study aimed to investigate the neuropsychiatric symptoms in VaD patients in mainland China. Methods Eighty patients with mixed VaD for over 6 months duration, and their caregivers (VaD group), were recruited for interview in Zhongnan Hospital of Wuhan University, from June 2010 to June 2012. Eighty age- and sex-matched normal volunteers (control group) were interviewed at the same time. The Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE) and the Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) were administered to the VaD patients, their caregivers, and normal volunteers. Group differences were analyzed using the unpaired t-test. Results The total mean scores of the NPI in the VaD group were higher than in the control group (P < 0.01). The subscale scores of NPI, including delusions, hallucinations, depression, apathy, irritability, agitation, aberrant motor behavior, and change in appetite were significantly higher in the VaD group than in the control group (P < 0.05–0.01). Compared with the mild VaD subgroup, the NPI subscale scores of apathy, irritability and total scores were significantly higher in the moderate VaD subgroup (P < 0.05–0.01); the NPI subscale scores of anxiety, apathy, irritability, and total scores were significantly higher in the severe VaD subgroup (P < 0.01). Compared with the moderate VaD subgroup, the NPI subscale scores of anxiety and apathy were significantly higher in the severe VaD subgroup (P < 0.05–0.01). Conclusions Neuropsychiatric symptoms, such as hallucination, anxiety, apathy, irritability and

  11. Cerebrolysin improves symptoms and delays progression in patients with Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Allegri, R F; Guekht, A

    2012-04-01

    Dementia is the result of various cerebral disorders, leading to an acquired loss of memory and impaired cognitive ability. The most common forms are Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Neurotrophic factors are essential for the survival and differentiation of developing neurons and protecting them against damage under pathologic conditions. Cerebrolysin is a peptide preparation that mimics the pleiotropic effects of neurotrophic factors. Several clinical trials investigating the therapeutic efficacy of Cerebrolysin in AD and VaD have confirmed the proof of concept. The results of these trials have shown statistically significant and clinically relevant treatment effects of Cerebrolysin on cognitive, global and functional domains in mild to moderately severe stages of dementia. Doses of 10 and 30 mL were the most effective, but higher doses of up to 60 mL turned out to be most effective in improving neuropsychiatric symptoms, which become relevant at later stages of the disease. Combining treatment with cholinesterase inhibitors and Cerebrolysin indicated long-term synergistic treatment effects in mild to moderate AD. The efficacy of Cerebrolysin persisted for up to several months after treatment suggesting Cerebrolysin has not merely symptomatic benefits, but a disease-delaying potential. This paper reviews the clinical efficacy of Cerebrolysin in the treatment of dementia. Data were obtained from international, multicenter, randomized clinical trials performed in compliance with Good Clinical Practice and the principles of the Declaration of Helsinki (1964) and subsequent revisions.

  12. Contribution of neuroimaging to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Román, Gustavo; Pascual, Belén

    2012-11-01

    The aim of this study was to review, summarize and analyze recent findings relevant to the contribution of neuroimaging to the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Computerized tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) provide accurate demonstration of the location and rate of progression of atrophic changes affecting the brain in AD and the different types of vascular lesions observed in mixed dementias and in pure VaD. Quantification of cortical thickness allows early diagnosis and rate of progression from mild cognitive impairment (MCI) to dementia. White matter involvement can also be quantified with diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and functional methods including fMRI, functional connectivity, and MR spectroscopy (MRS). Isotope-based techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) allow measurement of regional cerebral glucose metabolism using (18)F-2-fluoro-deoxy-D-glucose (FDG). Cerebral blood flow can be measured using PET with H(2)(15)O or with single photon emission computerized tomography (SPECT) with technetium ((99m)Tc-HMPAO) or, more recently, arterial spin label (ASL) imaging. There are isotope markers for amyloid-beta ((11)O-PIB, (18)F-florbetapir), tau ((18)FDDNP) and activated microglia ((11)C-PK11195). Neuroimaging markers are particularly useful at the early symptomatic and preclinical asymptomatic phases of AD, as well as serving as endpoints in clinical trials.

  13. Distinguishing between vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease by means of the WAIS: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Oosterman, Joukje M; Scherder, Erik J A

    2006-10-01

    This study was intended to, meta-analytically, review whether the subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale are useful in differentiating between vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. We expected the Alzheimer's disease group to outperform the vascular dementia group on those subtests that require executive functions, whereas inferior performance of the Alzheimer's disease patients was expected on memory tests. Two steps in the analysis were undertaken in an attempt to clarify this issue. The first step consisted of including all studies examining Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale subtest performance in vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease patients. Secondly, a subcortical vascular dementia subgroup was distinguished and performance of this subgroup was compared to that of the Alzheimer's disease group.Overall, the analyses showed that both the vascular dementia and, more strongly, the subcortical vascular dementia group revealed decreased executive functions on several subtests compared to the Alzheimer's disease group. The Alzheimer's disease group showed inferior performance on a single semantic memory test only compared to both the vascular dementia and the subcortical vascular dementia groups. These results indicate that several subtests of the Wechsler Adult Intelligence Scale can differentiate between these two clinical groups, and that most of these tests reveal more impaired performance in the vascular dementia group.

  14. Quantification of myelin loss in frontal lobe white matter in vascular dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Ihara, Masafumi; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; Hall, Ros; Slade, Janet Y; Perry, Robert H; Oakley, Arthur E; Englund, Elisabet; O'Brien, John T; Ince, Paul G; Kalaria, Raj N

    2010-05-01

    The aim of this study was to characterize myelin loss as one of the features of white matter abnormalities across three common dementing disorders. We evaluated post-mortem brain tissue from frontal and temporal lobes from 20 vascular dementia (VaD), 19 Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 31 dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) cases and 12 comparable age controls. Images of sections stained with conventional luxol fast blue were analysed to estimate myelin attenuation by optical density. Serial adjacent sections were then immunostained for degraded myelin basic protein (dMBP) and the mean percentage area containing dMBP (%dMBP) was determined as an indicator of myelin degeneration. We further assessed the relationship between dMBP and glutathione S-transferase (a marker of mature oligodendrocytes) immunoreactivities. Pathological diagnosis significantly affected the frontal but not temporal lobe myelin attenuation: myelin density was most reduced in VaD compared to AD and DLB, which still significantly exhibited lower myelin density compared to ageing controls. Consistent with this, the degree of myelin loss was correlated with greater %dMBP, with the highest %dMBP in VaD compared to the other groups. The %dMBP was inversely correlated with the mean size of oligodendrocytes in VaD, whereas it was positively correlated with their density in AD. A two-tier regression model analysis confirmed that the type of disorder (VaD or AD) determines the relationship between %dMBP and the size or density of oligodendrocytes across the cases. Our findings, attested by the use of three markers, suggest that myelin loss may evolve in parallel with shrunken oligodendrocytes in VaD but their increased density in AD, highlighting partially different mechanisms are associated with myelin degeneration, which could originate from hypoxic-ischaemic damage to oligodendrocytes in VaD whereas secondary to axonal degeneration in AD.

  15. Induction of hyperhomocysteinemia models vascular dementia by induction of cerebral microhemorrhages and neuroinflammation

    PubMed Central

    Sudduth, Tiffany L; Powell, David K; Smith, Charles D; Greenstein, Abigail; Wilcock, Donna M

    2013-01-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second leading cause of dementia behind Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is a frequent comorbidity with AD, estimated to occur in as many as 40% of AD patients. The causes of VaD are varied and include chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, microhemorrhages, hemorrhagic infarcts, or ischemic infarcts. We have developed a model of VaD by inducing hyperhomocysteinemia (HHcy) in wild-type mice. By placing wild-type mice on a diet deficient in folate, B6, and B12 and supplemented with excess methionine, we induced a moderate HHcy (plasma level homocysteine 82.93±3.561 μmol). After 11 weeks on the diet, the hyperhomocysteinemic mice showed a spatial memory deficit as assessed by the 2-day radial-arm water maze. Also, magnetic resonance imaging and subsequent histology revealed significant microhemorrhage occurrence. We found neuroinflammation induced in the hyperhomocysteinemic mice as determined by elevated interleukin (IL)-1β, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)α, and IL-6 in brain tissue. Finally, we found increased expression and increased activity of the matrix metalloproteinase 2 (MMP2) and MMP9 systems that are heavily implicated in the pathogenesis of cerebral hemorrhage. Overall, we have developed a dietary model of VaD that will be valuable for studying the pathophysiology of VaD and also for studying the comorbidity of VaD with other dementias and other neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:23361394

  16. Cognitive disconnective syndrome by single strategic strokes in vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Lanna, Maria Elisa de Oliveira; Alves, Carlos Eduardo O; Sudo, Felipe Kenji; Alves, Gilberto; Valente, Letice; Moreira, Denise Madeira; Cavalcanti, José Luiz Sá; Engelhardt, Eliasz

    2012-11-15

    Strategic regions correspond to associative, limbic and paralimbic structures and related circuits, that underpin cognitive/behavioral functions. Strokes in these eloquent sites produce pictures of vascular dementia with syndromic features due to specific site lesion and/or interruption of their interconnections. This study aims at analysing subcortical strategic strokes that express similar cognitive/behavioral elements, by sharing common pathways. Patients (n=6) who attended in specialized ambulatory, were submitted to neuropsychological and neuroimaging assessments through MRI (GE Signa Horizon 1.5T) and brain SPECT (Millennium MG, ECD [TC-99m]). Stroke locations and respective main symptoms were: 1. anteromedian thalamus [L]: anterograde and retrograde amnesia (ARA), expression aphasia (EA), executive dysfunction (ED), apathy, and depression; 2. anterior thalamus [R]: ARA, inattention, apathy, and aggressiveness; 3. dorsomedian thalamus [L]: inattention, ED, anosognosia, and aggressiveness; 4. central paramedian thalamus [R]: EA, visual perception deficits (VPD), ED, infantility, and personality disorder; 5. caudate nucleus (ventral-head) [L]: VPD, ED, delirium, visual hallucinations, and personality disorder; and 6. anterior capsule [L]: VPD, ED, apathy, and depression. Vascular strategic syndromes connote the predominantly impaired cognitive/behavioral symptom of each site. Temporal and frontal disconnection symptoms were produced by disrupted MTT/hippocampal and IML/amygdala circuits expressing amnesic syndrome associated with heterogeneous dysexecutive syndrome, in all the cases, by disrupting frontal-basal ganglia-thalamus-cortical net, in three different levels of their pathway.

  17. The Science of Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia (VCID): A Framework for Advancing Research Priorities in the Cerebrovascular Biology of Cognitive Decline.

    PubMed

    Corriveau, Roderick A; Bosetti, Francesca; Emr, Marian; Gladman, Jordan T; Koenig, James I; Moy, Claudia S; Pahigiannis, Katherine; Waddy, Salina P; Koroshetz, Walter

    2016-03-01

    The World Health Organization reports that 47.5 million people are affected by dementia worldwide. With aging populations and 7.7 million new cases each year, the burden of illness due to dementia approaches crisis proportions. Despite significant advances in our understanding of the biology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), the leading dementia diagnosis, the actual causes of dementia in affected individuals are unknown except for rare fully penetrant genetic forms. Evidence from epidemiology and pathology studies indicates that damage to the vascular system is associated with an increased risk of many types of dementia. Both Alzheimer's pathology and cerebrovascular disease increase with age. How AD affects small blood vessel function and how vascular dysfunction contributes to the molecular pathology of Alzheimer's are areas of intense research. The science of vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) integrates diverse aspects of biology and incorporates the roles of multiple cell types that support the function of neural tissue. Because of the proven ability to prevent and treat cardiovascular disease and hypertension with population benefits for heart and stroke outcomes, it is proposed that understanding and targeting the biological mechanisms of VCID can have a similarly positive impact on public health.

  18. Cortical thinning in subcortical vascular dementia with negative 11C-PiB PET.

    PubMed

    Kim, Chi Hun; Seo, Sang Won; Kim, Geon Ha; Shin, Ji Soo; Cho, Hanna; Noh, Young; Kim, Suk-Hui; Kim, Min Ji; Jeon, Seun; Yoon, Uicheul; Lee, Jong-Min; Oh, Seung Jun; Kim, Jae Seung; Kim, Sung Tae; Lee, Jae-Hong; Na, Duk L

    2012-01-01

    To determine the existence of cortical thinning in subcortical vascular dementia (SVaD) with a negative 11C-Pittsburgh compound B (PiB) positron emission tomography scan and to compare the topography of cortical thinning between PiB-negative SVaD and Alzheimer's disease (AD), we enrolled 24 patients with PiB(-) SVaD, 81 clinically probable AD individuals, and 72 normal cognitive controls. Compared with controls, cortical thinning in PiB(-) SVaD was most profound in the perisylvian area, medial prefrontal area, and posterior cingulate gyri, while the precuneus and medial temporal lobes were relatively spared. When the cortical thickness of AD and PiB(-) SVaD were directly compared, PiB(-) SVaD demonstrated significant cortical thinning in the bilateral inferior frontal, superior temporal gyri, and right medial frontal and orbitofrontal lobes, while AD showed significant cortical thinning in the right medial temporal region. SVaD without amyloid burden may lead to substantial cortical atrophy. Moreover, characteristic topography of cortical thinning in PiB(-) SVaD suggests different mechanisms of cortical thinning in PiB(-) SVaD and AD.

  19. Clinical utility of the informant AD8 as a dementia case finding instrument in primary healthcare.

    PubMed

    Chan, Qun Lin; Xu, Xin; Shaik, Muhammad Amin; Chong, Steven Shih Tsze; Hui, Richard Jor Yeong; Chen, Christopher Li-Hsian; Dong, YanHong

    2016-01-01

    The informant AD8 has excellent discriminant ability for dementia case finding in tertiary healthcare settings. However, its clinical utility for dementia case finding at the forefront of dementia management, primary healthcare, is unknown. Therefore, we recruited participants from two primary healthcare centers in Singapore and measured their performance on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA), Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), and a local formal neuropsychological battery, in addition to the AD8. Logistic regression was conducted to examine the associations between demographic factors and dementia. Area under the receiver operating characteristics (ROC) curve analysis was used to establish the optimal cut-off points for dementia case finding. Of the 309 participants recruited, 243 (78.7%) had CDR = 0, 22 (7.1%) CDR = 0.5, and 44 (14.2%) CDR ≥1. Age was strongly associated with dementia, and the optimal age for dementia case finding in primary healthcare settings was ≥75 years. In this age group, the AD8 has excellent dementia case finding capability and was superior to the MMSE and equivalent to the MoCA [AD8 AUC (95% CI): 0.95 (0.91-0.99), cut-off: ≥3, sensitivity: 0.90, specificity: 0.88, PPV: 0.79 and NPV: 0.94; MMSE AUC (95% CI): 0.87 (0.79-0.94), p = 0.04; MoCA AUC (95% CI): 0.88 (0.82-0.95), p = 0.06]. In conclusion, the AD8 is well suited for dementia case finding in primary healthcare settings.

  20. MTHFR and ACE Gene Polymorphisms and Risk of Vascular and Degenerative Dementias in the Elderly

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pandey, Pratima; Pradhan, Sunil; Modi, Dinesh Raj; Mittal, Balraj

    2009-01-01

    Focal lacunar infarctions due to cerebral small vessel atherosclerosis or single/multiple large cortical infarcts lead to vascular dementia, and different genes and environmental factors have been implicated in causation or aggravation of the disease. Previous reports suggest that some of the risk factors may be common to both vascular as well as…

  1. Alzheimer’s disease—subcortical vascular disease spectrum in a hospital-based setting: Overview of results from the Gothenburg MCI and dementia studies

    PubMed Central

    Nordlund, Arto; Jonsson, Michael; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Öhrfelt, Annika; Stålhammar, Jacob; Eckerström, Marie; Carlsson, Mårten; Olsson, Erik; Göthlin, Mattias; Svensson, Johan; Rolstad, Sindre; Eckerström, Carl; Bjerke, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The ability to discriminate between Alzheimer’s disease (AD), subcortical vascular disease, and other cognitive disorders is crucial for diagnostic purposes and clinical trial outcomes. Patients with primarily subcortical vascular disease are unlikely to benefit from treatments targeting the AD pathogenic mechanisms and vice versa. The Gothenburg mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia studies are prospective, observational, single-center cohort studies suitable for both cross-sectional and longitudinal analysis that outline the cognitive profiles and biomarker characteristics of patients with AD, subcortical vascular disease, and other cognitive disorders. The studies, the first of which started in 1987, comprise inpatients with manifest dementia and patients seeking care for cognitive disorders at an outpatient memory clinic. This article gives an overview of the major published papers (neuropsychological, imaging/physiology, and neurochemical) of the studies including the ongoing Gothenburg MCI study. The main findings suggest that subcortical vascular disease with or without dementia exhibit a characteristic neuropsychological pattern of mental slowness and executive dysfunction and neurochemical deviations typical of white matter changes and disturbed blood–brain barrier function. Our findings may contribute to better healthcare for this underrecognized group of patients. The Gothenburg MCI study has also published papers on multimodal prediction of dementia, and cognitive reserve. PMID:26219595

  2. Serum folic acid and RFC A80G polymorphism in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Mansoori, Nasim; Tripathi, Manjari; Alam, Rizwan; Luthra, Kalpana; Sharma, Sumit; Lakshmy, Ramakrishnan; Kalaivani, Mani; Mukhopadhyay, Asok K

    2014-02-01

    Low level of vitamin B12 and folic acid has been reported to play an important role in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Serum folic acid and vitamin B12 were assayed in 80 AD and 50 VaD cases and in 120 healthy controls. The reduced folate carrier (RFC1) gene, rs1051266, which encodes the RFC 1, protein was analyzed for polymorphism by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. It was observed that the patients having folic acid <8.45 ng/mL had 2.4 (95% confidence interval [CI]: 1.4-4.5) times higher odds of having AD and 2.1 (95% CI: 1.1-4.2) times higher odds of having VaD than patients having folic acid ≥8.45 ng/mL. Serum vitamin B12 level did not show any such statistically significant effect in altering the odds. No direct association was found between variant (G) allele or genotype of rs1051266 with AD and VaD cases. On serum folate level no association was observed with gene polymorphism.

  3. EEG Spectral Features Discriminate between Alzheimer’s and Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Emanuel; Allen, Elena A.; Aurlien, Harald; Nordby, Helge; Eichele, Tom

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) present with similar clinical symptoms of cognitive decline, but the underlying pathophysiological mechanisms differ. To determine whether clinical electroencephalography (EEG) can provide information relevant to discriminate between these diagnoses, we used quantitative EEG analysis to compare the spectra between non-medicated patients with AD (n = 77) and VaD (n = 77) and healthy elderly normal controls (NC) (n = 77). We use curve-fitting with a combination of a power loss and Gaussian function to model the averaged resting-state spectra of each EEG channel extracting six parameters. We assessed the performance of our model and tested the extracted parameters for group differentiation. We performed regression analysis in a multivariate analysis of covariance with group, age, gender, and number of epochs as predictors and further explored the topographical group differences with pair-wise contrasts. Significant topographical differences between the groups were found in several of the extracted features. Both AD and VaD groups showed increased delta power when compared to NC, whereas the AD patients showed a decrease in alpha power for occipital and temporal regions when compared with NC. The VaD patients had higher alpha power than NC and AD. The AD and VaD groups showed slowing of the alpha rhythm. Variability of the alpha frequency was wider for both AD and VaD groups. There was a general decrease in beta power for both AD and VaD. The proposed model is useful to parameterize spectra, which allowed extracting relevant clinical EEG key features that move toward simple and interpretable diagnostic criteria. PMID:25762978

  4. Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia in developing countries: prevalence, management, and risk factors

    PubMed Central

    Kalaria, Raj N; Maestre, Gladys E; Arizaga, Raul; Friedland, Robert P; Galasko, Doug; Hall, Kathleen; Luchsinger, José A; Ogunniyi, Adesola; Perry, Elaine K; Potocnik, Felix; Prince, Martin; Stewart, Robert; Wimo, Anders; Zhang, Zhen-Xin; Antuono, Piero

    2010-01-01

    Despite mortality due to communicable diseases, poverty, and human conflicts, dementia incidence is destined to increase in the developing world in tandem with the ageing population. Current data from developing countries suggest that age-adjusted dementia prevalence estimates in 65 year olds are high (≥5%) in certain Asian and Latin American countries, but consistently low (1–3%) in India and sub-Saharan Africa; Alzheimer's disease accounts for 60% whereas vascular dementia accounts for ∼30% of the prevalence. Early-onset familial forms of dementia with single-gene defects occur in Latin America, Asia, and Africa. Illiteracy remains a risk factor for dementia. The APOE ε4 allele does not influence dementia progression in sub-Saharan Africans. Vascular factors, such as hypertension and type 2 diabetes, are likely to increase the burden of dementia. Use of traditional diets and medicinal plant extracts might aid prevention and treatment. Dementia costs in developing countries are estimated to be US$73 billion yearly, but care demands social protection, which seems scarce in these regions. PMID:18667359

  5. The Spanish version of the Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination - Revised (ACE-R) in subcortical ischemic vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Raimondi, Catalina; Gleichgerrcht, Ezequiel; Richly, Pablo; Torralva, Teresa; Roca, María; Camino, Julieta; Manes, Facundo

    2012-11-15

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is one of the most prevalent causes of dementia, and it is frequently misdiagnosed and undertreated in clinical practice. Because neuropsychological outcome depends, among other factors, on the size and location of the vascular brain injury, characterizing the cognitive profile of VaD has been especially challenging. Yet, there has been sufficient evidence to show a marked impairment of attention and executive functions, in particular in relation to Alzheimer disease. Being able to detect these deficits at bedside is crucial for everyday clinical practice, and yet, brief cognitive screening toots such as the Mini-Mental Sate Examination (MMSE) may overlook at cognitive deficits typical of patients with VaD. The Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination Revised (ACE-R) is also a brief cognitive screening tool designed to incorporate the items of the MMSE and further extend the test to assess orientation, attention, verbal fluency, memory, language, and visuospatial abilities. In this study, we investigated the ability of the Spanish version of the ACE-R to detect the cognitive impairment showed in patients with subcortical ischemic vascular dementia, and we compared its usefulness to that of the MMSE in this population. Scores on these tests were compared to those of patients with Alzheimer disease and matched healthy controls. The 88-point cut-off proposed for the ACE-R was associated with a sensitivity of 100% and a specificity of 100% for the detection of cognitive impairment, demonstrating a stronger capacity than the MMSE (sensitivity of 42% with its 23-point cut-off score). We also found that the verbal fluency subtest of the ACE-R may be potentially useful in discriminating patients with subcortical ischemic vascular dementia from patients with AD. We discuss the utility of these findings in the context of everyday clinical practice and we propose that future studies should evaluate the potential usefulness of combining the ACE-R with a

  6. Neuroprotection against vascular dementia after acupuncture combined with donepezil hydrochloride: P300 event related potential

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qiang; Wang, Xiu-juan; Zhang, Zhe-cheng; Xue, Rong; Li, Ping; Li, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Acupuncture can be used to treat various nervous system diseases. Here, 168 vascular dementia patients were orally administered donepezil hydrochloride alone (5 mg/day, once a day for 56 days), or combined with acupuncture at Shenting (DU24), Tianzhu (BL10), Sishencong (Extra), Yintang (Extra), Renzhong (DU26), Neiguan (PC6), Shenmen (HT7), Fengchi (GB20), Wangu (GB12) and Baihui (DU20) (once a day for 56 days). Compared with donepezil hydrochloride alone, P300 event related potential latency was shorter with an increased amplitude in patients treated with donepezil hydrochloride and acupuncture. Mini-Mental State Examination score was also higher. Moreover, these differences in P300 latency were identified within different infarcted regions in patients treated with donepezil hydrochloride and acupuncture. These findings indicate that acupuncture combined with donepezil hydrochloride noticeably improves cognitive function in patients with vascular dementia, and exerts neuroprotective effects against vascular dementia. PMID:27127486

  7. Ki67 and doublecortin positive cells in the human prefrontal cortices of normal aging and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Lu, Gang; Wai, Sen Mun; Poon, W S; Yew, D T

    2005-12-01

    Immunohistochemical localizing of the proliferation of Ki67 nuclei and doublecortin positive cells were performed in the prefrontal cortex of normal aged and vascular dementia (multiple infarct dementia) patients. Positive Ki67 nuclei and doublecortin positive cells were observed in both groups, with slightly higher density in the prefrontal cortex of vascular dementia. When the Ki67 sites were superimposed with the neuronal specific enolase localizations, only about 5% of the cells was doubly labeled, indicating few proliferating cells were neurons. This percentage did not vary between specimens of normal aging and those of vascular dementia.

  8. Neuronal changes after chronic high blood pressure in animal models and its implication for vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Flores, Gonzalo; Flores-Gómez, Gabriel D; de Jesús Gomez-Villalobos, Ma

    2016-05-01

    Vascular dementia is a devastating disorder not only for the patient, but also for the family because this neurocognitive disorder breaks the patient's independence, and leads to family care of the patient with a high cost for the family. This complex disorder alters memory, learning, judgment, emotional control and social behavior and affects 4% of the elderly world population. The high blood pressure or arterial hypertension is a major risk factor for cerebrovascular disease, which in most cases leads to vascular dementia. Interestingly, this neurocognitive disorder starts after long lasting hypertension, which is associated with reduced cerebral blood flow or hypoperfusion, and complete or incomplete ischemia with cortical thickness. Animal models have been generated to elucidate the pathophysiology of this disorder. It is known that dendritic complexity determines the receptive synaptic contacts, and the loss of dendritic spine and arbor stability are strongly associated with dementia in humans. This review evaluates relevant data of human and animal models that have investigated the link between long-lasting arterial hypertension and neural morphological changes in the context of vascular dementia. We examined the effect of chronic arterial hypertension and aged in vascular dementia. Neural dendritic morphology in the prefrontal cortex and the dorsal hippocampus and nucleus accumbens after chronic hypertension was diskussed in the animal models of hypertension. Chronic hypertension reduced the dendritic length and spine density in aged rats.

  9. Recommendations for CSF AD biomarkers in the diagnostic evaluation of dementia.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Anja Hviid; Herukka, Sanna-Kaisa; Andreasen, Niels; Baldeiras, Ines; Bjerke, Maria; Blennow, Kaj; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan; Frisoni, Giovanni B; Gabryelewicz, Tomasz; Galluzzi, Samantha; Handels, Ron; Kramberger, Milica G; Kulczyńska, Agnieszka; Molinuevo, Jose Luis; Mroczko, Barbara; Nordberg, Agneta; Oliveira, Catarina Resende; Otto, Markus; Rinne, Juha O; Rot, Uroš; Saka, Esen; Soininen, Hilkka; Struyfs, Hanne; Suardi, Silvia; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Winblad, Bengt; Zetterberg, Henrik; Waldemar, Gunhild

    2017-03-01

    This article presents recommendations, based on the Grading of Recommendations, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation method, for the clinical application of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) amyloid-β1-42, tau, and phosphorylated tau in the diagnostic evaluation of patients with dementia. The recommendations were developed by a multidisciplinary working group based on the available evidence and consensus from focused discussions for (i) identification of Alzheimer's disease (AD) as the cause of dementia, (ii) prediction of rate of decline, (iii) cost-effectiveness, and (iv) interpretation of results. The working group found sufficient evidence to support a recommendation to use CSF AD biomarkers as a supplement to clinical evaluation, particularly in uncertain and atypical cases, to identify or exclude AD as the cause of dementia. Because of insufficient evidence, it was uncertain whether CSF AD biomarkers outperform imaging biomarkers. Operational recommendations for the interpretation of ambiguous CSF biomarker results were also provided.

  10. Improved discrimination of autopsy-confirmed Alzheimer's disease (AD) from non-AD dementias using CSF P-tau(181P).

    PubMed

    Koopman, Karen; Le Bastard, Nathalie; Martin, Jean-Jacques; Nagels, Guy; De Deyn, Peter P; Engelborghs, Sebastiaan

    2009-09-01

    To establish diagnostic accuracy (acc) and optimal cut-off levels of CSF tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 (P-tau(181P)) for discriminating Alzheimer's disease (AD) from non-AD dementias in autopsy-confirmed dementia patients, CSF levels of beta-amyloid peptide (Abeta(1-42)), total tau protein (T-tau) and P-tau(181P) from patients with definite AD (n=95) and non-AD dementias (n=50) were determined with single-parameter ELISA kits. Optimal P-tau(181P) cut-off levels for differentiating AD from pooled non-AD dementias, dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) were 50.4pg/mL (acc=0.73), 52.8pg/mL (acc=0.73) and 35.3pg/mL (acc=0.90), respectively. The optimal CSF P-tau(181P) cut-off level for discriminating AD from non-AD dementias was 50.4pg/mL. Optimal CSF P-tau(181P) cut-off levels differed between non-AD diagnostic dementia categories.

  11. Plasma Cystatin C and High-Density Lipoprotein Are Important Biomarkers of Alzheimer’s Disease and Vascular Dementia: A Cross-Sectional Study

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Zhaoyu; Fu, Yongmei; Wei, Xiaobo; Liao, Jinchi; Liu, Xu; He, Bingjun; Xu, Yunqi; Zou, Jing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Weng, Ruihui; Tan, Sheng; McElroy, Christopher; Jin, Kunlin; Wang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Cystatin C (Cys C) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) play critical roles in neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia, Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). However, whether they can be used as reliable biomarkers to distinguish patients with dementia from healthy subjects and to determine disease severity remain largely unknown. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine plasma Cys C and HDL levels of 88 patients with dementia (43 AD patients, 45 VaD patients) and 45 healthy age-matched controls. The severity of dementia was determined based on the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Scale, the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the Lawton Instrumental ADL (IADL) Scale, and the Hachinski Ischemia Scale (Hachinski). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated to determine the diagnostic accuracy of Cys C and HDL levels in distinguishing patients with dementia from healthy subjects. Results: We found that plasma Cys C levels were higher, but HDL levels were lower in AD and VaD patients respectively, compared to healthy control subjects. Yet, Cys C levels were highest among patients with VaD. Interestingly, plasma Cys C levels were significantly correlated with IADL Scale scores. In addition, the ROC curves for Cys C (area under the curve, AUC 0.816 for AD, AUC 0.841 for VaD) and HDL (AUC 0.800 for AD, AUC 0.731 for VaD) exhibited potential diagnostic value in distinguishing AD/VaD patients from healthy subjects. While the ROC curve for the combination of Cys C and HDL (AUC 0.873 for AD, AUC 0.897 for VaD) showed higher diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing AD/VaD patients from healthy subjects than the separate curves for each parameter. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the inflammatory mediators Cys C and HDL may play important roles in the pathogenesis of dementia, and plasma Cys C and HDL levels may be useful screening tools for

  12. Regional MRI Diffusion, White-Matter Hyperintensities, and Cognitive Function in Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Scrascia, Federica; Quattrocchi, Carlo Cosimo; Errante, Yuri; Gangemi, Emma; Curcio, Giuseppe; Ursini, Francesca; Silvestrini, Mauro; Maggio, Paola; Beomonte Zobel, Bruno; Rossini, Paolo Maria; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; Falsetti, Lorenzo; Vernieri, Fabrizio

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose An increase in brain water diffusivity as measured using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) has been recently reported in normal-appearing white matter (NAWM) in patients affected by cognitive impairment. However, it remains to be clarified if this reflects an overt neuronal tissue disruption that leads to degenerative or microvascular lesions. This question was addressed by comparing the regional MRI apparent diffusion coefficients (ADCs) of NAWM in patients affected by Alzheimer's disease (AD) or vascular dementia (VaD). The relationships of ADCs with the white-matter hyperintensity (WMH) burden, carotid atherosclerosis, and cognitive performance were also investigated. Methods Forty-nine AD and 31 VaD patients underwent brain MRI to assess the WMH volume and regional NAWM ADCs, neuropsychological evaluations, and carotid ultrasound to assess the plaque severity and intima-media thickness (IMT). Results Regional ADCs in NAWM did not differ between VaD and AD patients, while the WMH volume was greater in VaD than in AD patients. The ADC in the anterior corpus callosum was related to the WMH volume, while a greater carotid IMT was positively correlated with the temporal ADC and WMH volume. The memory performance was worse in patients with higher temporal ADCs. Constructional praxis scores were related to ADCs in the frontal, and occipital lobes, in the anterior and posterior corpus callosum as well as to the WMH volume. Abstract reasoning was related to frontal, parietal, and temporal ADCs. Conclusions Our data show that higher regional ADCs in NAWM are associated with microcirculatory impairment, as depicted by the WMH volume. Moreover, regional ADCs in NAWM are differently associated with the neuropsychological performances in memory, constructional praxia, and abstract reasoning domains. PMID:27074295

  13. Pathophysiology of white matter perfusion in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Barker, Rachel; Ashby, Emma L; Wellington, Dannielle; Barrow, Vivienne M; Palmer, Jennifer C; Kehoe, Patrick G; Esiri, Margaret M; Love, Seth

    2014-05-01

    Little is known about the contributors and physiological responses to white matter hypoperfusion in the human brain. We previously showed the ratio of myelin-associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 in post-mortem human brain tissue correlates with the degree of ante-mortem ischaemia. In age-matched post-mortem cohorts of Alzheimer's disease (n = 49), vascular dementia (n = 17) and control brains (n = 33) from the South West Dementia Brain Bank (Bristol), we have now examined the relationship between the ratio of myelin-associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 and several other proteins involved in regulating white matter vascularity and blood flow. Across the three cohorts, white matter perfusion, indicated by the ratio of myelin-associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1, correlated positively with the concentration of the vasoconstrictor, endothelin 1 (P = 0.0005), and negatively with the concentration of the pro-angiogenic protein, vascular endothelial growth factor (P = 0.0015). The activity of angiotensin-converting enzyme, which catalyses production of the vasoconstrictor angiotensin II was not altered. In samples of frontal white matter from an independent (Oxford, UK) cohort of post-mortem brains (n = 74), we confirmed the significant correlations between the ratio of myelin-associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 and both endothelin 1 and vascular endothelial growth factor. We also assessed microvessel density in the Bristol (UK) samples, by measurement of factor VIII-related antigen, which we showed to correlate with immunohistochemical measurements of vessel density, and found factor VIII-related antigen levels to correlate with the level of vascular endothelial growth factor (P = 0.0487), suggesting that upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor tends to increase vessel density in the white matter. We propose that downregulation of endothelin 1 and upregulation of vascular endothelial growth factor in the context

  14. Assessment of free and cued recall in Alzheimer's disease and vascular and frontotemporal dementia with 24-item Grober and Buschke test.

    PubMed

    Cerciello, Milena; Isella, Valeria; Proserpi, Alice; Papagno, Costanza

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are the most common forms of dementia. It is well known that memory deficits in AD are different from those in VaD and FTD, especially with respect to cued recall. The aim of this clinical study was to compare the memory performance in 15 AD, 10 VaD and 9 FTD patients and 20 normal controls by means of a 24-item Grober-Buschke test [8]. The patients' groups were comparable in terms of severity of dementia. We considered free and total recall (free plus cued) both in immediate and delayed recall and computed an Index of Sensitivity to Cueing (ISC) [8] for immediate and delayed trials. We assessed whether cued recall predicted the subsequent free recall across our patients' groups. We found that AD patients recalled fewer items from the beginning and were less sensitive to cueing supporting the hypothesis that memory disorders in AD depend on encoding and storage deficit. In immediate recall VaD and FTD showed a similar memory performance and a stronger sensitivity to cueing than AD, suggesting that memory disorders in these patients are due to a difficulty in spontaneously implementing efficient retrieval strategies. However, we found a lower ISC in the delayed recall compared to the immediate trials in VaD than FTD due to a higher forgetting in VaD.

  15. Regional cerebral blood flow and cerebrovascular reactivity in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia assessed by arterial spinlabeling magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yong-Zhe; Zhang, Jun-Jian; Liu, Hui; Wu, Guang-Yao; Xiong, Li; Shu, Min

    2013-02-01

    Hemodynamic disturbance in cerebral blood flow (CBF) is common in both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD).The aim of this study is to investigate the different patterns of regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) change and cerebrovascular reactivity (CVR) in these two types of dementia. Mean flow velocity (MFV) of middle cerebral artery and rCBF were measured by Transcranial Doppler ultrasound (TCD) and arterial spin-labeling (ASL) magnetic resonance, separately. CVR was evaluated by MFV or rCBF change in response to 5% CO2 inhalation. The ASL results showed that, rCBF was significantly lower in both the bilateral frontal and temporal lobes in AD group and lower in left frontal and temporal white matter in patients with VaD. CVR calculated by rCBF was impaired more severely in bilateral frontal cortices in AD. Conversely, TCD tests failed to demonstrate significant difference in MFV and CVR between the two groups. It is concluded that the different patterns detected by ASL in resting rCBF change and cerebrovascular reactivity in response to carbogen inhalation may serve as a potential marker to distinguish AD and VaD.

  16. Pyramidal neurons of the prefrontal cortex in post-stroke, vascular and other ageing-related dementias.

    PubMed

    Foster, Vincent; Oakley, Arthur E; Slade, Janet Y; Hall, Roslyn; Polvikoski, Tuomo M; Burke, Matthew; Thomas, Alan J; Khundakar, Ahmad; Allan, Louise M; Kalaria, Raj N

    2014-09-01

    Dementia associated with cerebrovascular disease is common. It has been reported that ∼30% of elderly patients who survive stroke develop delayed dementia (post-stroke dementia), with most cases being diagnosed as vascular dementia. The pathological substrates associated with post-stroke or vascular dementia are poorly understood, particularly those associated with executive dysfunction. Three separate yet interconnecting circuits control executive function within the frontal lobe involving the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and the orbitofrontal cortex. We used stereological methods, along with immunohistological and related cell morphometric analysis, to examine densities and volumes of pyramidal neurons of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex, anterior cingulate cortex and orbitofrontal cortex in the frontal lobe from a total of 90 elderly subjects (age range 71-98 years). Post-mortem brain tissues from post-stroke dementia and post-stroke patients with no dementia were derived from our prospective Cognitive Function After Stroke study. We also examined, in parallel, samples from ageing controls and similar age subjects pathologically diagnosed with Alzheimer's disease, mixed Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, and vascular dementia. We found pyramidal cell volumes in layers III and V in the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex of post-stroke and vascular dementia and, of mixed and Alzheimer's disease subjects to be reduced by 30-40% compared to post-stroke patients with no dementia and controls. There were no significant changes in neuronal volumes in either the anterior cingulate or orbitofrontal cortices. Remarkably, pyramidal neurons within the orbitofrontal cortex were also found to be smaller in size when compared to those in the other two neocortical regions. To relate the cell changes to cognitive function, we noted significant correlations between neuronal volumes and total CAMCOG, orientation and memory scores and clinical

  17. Plasma Cystatin C and High-Density Lipoprotein Are Important Biomarkers of Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia: A Cross-Sectional Study.

    PubMed

    Wang, Rui; Chen, Zhaoyu; Fu, Yongmei; Wei, Xiaobo; Liao, Jinchi; Liu, Xu; He, Bingjun; Xu, Yunqi; Zou, Jing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Weng, Ruihui; Tan, Sheng; McElroy, Christopher; Jin, Kunlin; Wang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Objectives: Cystatin C (Cys C) and high-density lipoprotein (HDL) play critical roles in neurodegenerative diseases, such as dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). However, whether they can be used as reliable biomarkers to distinguish patients with dementia from healthy subjects and to determine disease severity remain largely unknown. Methods: We conducted a cross-sectional study to determine plasma Cys C and HDL levels of 88 patients with dementia (43 AD patients, 45 VaD patients) and 45 healthy age-matched controls. The severity of dementia was determined based on the Schwab and England Activities of Daily Living (ADL) Scale, the Mini-mental State Examination (MMSE), the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS), the Lawton Instrumental ADL (IADL) Scale, and the Hachinski Ischemia Scale (Hachinski). Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves were calculated to determine the diagnostic accuracy of Cys C and HDL levels in distinguishing patients with dementia from healthy subjects. Results: We found that plasma Cys C levels were higher, but HDL levels were lower in AD and VaD patients respectively, compared to healthy control subjects. Yet, Cys C levels were highest among patients with VaD. Interestingly, plasma Cys C levels were significantly correlated with IADL Scale scores. In addition, the ROC curves for Cys C (area under the curve, AUC 0.816 for AD, AUC 0.841 for VaD) and HDL (AUC 0.800 for AD, AUC 0.731 for VaD) exhibited potential diagnostic value in distinguishing AD/VaD patients from healthy subjects. While the ROC curve for the combination of Cys C and HDL (AUC 0.873 for AD, AUC 0.897 for VaD) showed higher diagnostic accuracy in distinguishing AD/VaD patients from healthy subjects than the separate curves for each parameter. Conclusions: Our findings suggest that the inflammatory mediators Cys C and HDL may play important roles in the pathogenesis of dementia, and plasma Cys C and HDL levels may be useful screening tools for

  18. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... skills) Dementia usually first appears as forgetfulness. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is the stage between normal forgetfulness due to aging and the development of dementia. People with MCI have mild problems ...

  19. Acupuncture for Vascular Dementia: A Pragmatic Randomized Clinical Trial

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Guang-Xia; Li, Qian-Qian; Yang, Bo-Feng; Liu, Yan; Guan, Li-Ping; Wu, Meng-Meng; Wang, Lin-Peng; Liu, Cun-Zhi

    2015-01-01

    In this trial, patients who agreed to random assignment were allocated to a randomized acupuncture group (R-acupuncture group) or control group. Those who declined randomization were assigned to a nonrandomized acupuncture group (NR-acupuncture group). Patients in the R-acupuncture group and NR-acupuncture group received up to 21 acupuncture sessions during a period of 6 weeks plus routine care, while the control group received routine care alone. Cognitive function, activities of daily living, and quality of life were assessed by mini-mental state examination (MMSE), Activities of Daily Living Scale (ADL), and dementia quality of life questionnaire (DEMQOL), respectively. All the data were collected at baseline, after 6-week treatment, and after 4-week follow-up. No significant differences of MMSE scores were observed among the three groups but pooled-acupuncture group had significant higher score than control group. Compared to control group, ADL score significantly decreased in NR-acupuncture group and pooled-acupuncture group. For DEMQOL scores, no significant differences were observed among the three groups, as well as between pooled-acupuncture group and control group. Additional acupuncture to routine care may have beneficial effects on the improvements of cognitive status and activities of daily living but have limited efficacy on health-related quality of life in VaD patients. PMID:26495416

  20. Effect of ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist in experimental diabetes induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and associated dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Jain, Swati; Sharma, Bhupesh

    2016-10-01

    Diabetes mellitus is considered as a main risk factor for vascular dementia. In the past, we have reported the induction of vascular dementia by experimental diabetes. This study investigates the efficacy of a ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone in the pharmacological interdiction of pancreatectomy diabetes (PaD) induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia in rats. Attentional set shifting and Morris water-maze test were used for assessment of learning and memory. Vascular endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, serum glucose, serum nitrite/nitrate, oxidative stress (viz. aortic superoxide anion, brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species and brain glutathione), brain calcium and inflammation (myeloperoxidase) were also estimated. PaD rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, blood brain barrier permeability, learning and memory along with an increase in brain inflammation, oxidative stress and calcium. Administration of ruthenium red and pioglitazone has significantly attenuated PaD induced impairment of learning, memory, blood brain barrier permeability, endothelial function and biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that ruthenium red, a ryanodine receptor antagonist and pioglitazone, a PPAR-γ agonist may be considered as potent pharmacological agent for the management of PaD induced endothelial dysfunction and subsequent vascular dementia. Ryanodine receptor may be explored further for their possible benefits in vascular dementia.

  1. [Hypertrophic cardiomyopathy: a rare cause of vascular dementia. A case report].

    PubMed

    Ben Hamouda, Ibtissem; Tougourti, Mohamed Néjib; Hamza, Mohsen

    2002-07-01

    Herein, we report a case of a 51 year old man who experienced three ischemic cerebral infarcts in a time of few months. The patient consulted after the third accident. Neurological presentation included pseudobulbar syndrome with a mild cognitive deficit, aphasia, left hemiparesia, hemiasomatognosia and homonymous lateral hemianopsia. Cerebral tomodensitometry and magnetic resonance imaging evidenced large infarcts images involving right middle cerebral artery territory and bilateral borderline zones in the junction of the territories of the middle and posterior cerebral arteries. Ambulatory 24 hours ECG recording (Holter) revealed two hits of non-sustained ventricular tachycardia. Transoesophageal echocardiography conveyed to the diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy and displayed the presence of a left auricular thrombus. Anticoagulant therapy and rehabilitation allowed a substantial recovering of the patient's cognitive functions and wasting of the intracardiac thrombus. The clinical features observed in our patient meet the recommended DSM IV diagnosis criteria of vascular dementia, an exceptional complication of HCM. The clinical findings, neuroimagery investigation results, and the chronological link between cerebral attacks and cognitive function deterioration argue for a demential syndrome of vascular origin resulting from multiple embolic infarcts involving medium sized arteries (multi-infarct dementia). The authors emphasize the rarity of such observation. HCM must be considered as a potential cause of embolic stroke and likewise a multi-infarct dementia.

  2. Social withdrawal of persons with vascular dementia associated with disturbance of basic daily activities, apathy, and impaired social judgment.

    PubMed

    Honda, Yukiko; Meguro, Kenichi; Meguro, Mitsue; Akanuma, Kyoko

    2013-01-01

    Patients with vascular dementia (VaD) are often isolated, withdrawn from society because of negative symptoms and functional disabilities. The aim of this study was to detect factors associated with social withdrawal in patients with VaD. The participants were 36 institutionalized patients with VaD. Social withdrawal was assessed with the social withdrawal of the Multidimensional Observation Scale for Elderly Subjects (MOSES). Possible explanatory variables were the MOSES items depression and self-care, Cognitive Abilities Screening Instrument (CASI), apathy evaluation scale (AES), and Behavioral Pathology in Alzheimer's Disease Frequency-Weighted Severity Scale (BEHAVE-AD-FW). Multiple regression analyses were conducted for two groups: Analysis 1 was performed in all patients (N = 36) and Analysis 2 was performed in the patients with the ability to move by themselves (i.e., independent walking or independent movement with a cane or a wheelchair; n = 28). In Analysis 1, MOSES item social withdrawal was correlated with AES and MOSES item self-care. In Analysis 2, MOSES item social withdrawal was correlated with AES and CASI domain abstraction and judgment. Decreased social activities of VaD were not related to general cognitive function or depression. Disturbed activities of daily living (ADLs) for self-care may involve decreased frontal lobe function, indicating that comprehensive rehabilitation for both ADL and dementia are needed to improve the social activities of patients with VaD.

  3. Differences in Rate of Cognitive Decline and Caregiver Burden between Alzheimer’s Disease and Vascular Dementia: a Retrospective Study

    PubMed Central

    Pilon, Marie-Hélène; Poulin, Stéphane; Fortin, Marie-Pierre; Houde, Michèle; Verret, Louis; Bouchard, Rémi W.; Laforce, Robert

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have explored the rate of cognitive decline and caregiver burden within the context of a specialized memory clinic. When this was done, the focus was largely on functional decline related to Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Our goal was to compare the longitudinal decline of AD patients to those with Vascular Dementia (VaD) on Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). We further explored the differential impact on caregiver burden. We retrospectively studied 237 charts from patients seen at our Memory Clinic between 2006 and 2012. The data was collected over 17 years. Cohorts were formed by excluding conditions other than AD and VaD, and including patients who had been assessed at least twice with the MMSE (AD: n = 83; mean age: 67.7 yo; VaD: n = 32; mean age: 73.3yo). A small group of 36 caregivers was surveyed by phone to explore caregiver burden. Results indicated that the natural history of MMSE changes in AD patients differed significantly from that of patients with VaD (F = 10.41, p<0.0014), with AD patients showing more cognitive decline over time. Sadness, stress/anxiety, fatigue, and sleep disorders were reported as the main preoccupations by caregivers and its impact was rated as ‘severe’ in 50% of cases. Altogether, this study provides further insight into the natural history of cognitive decline in AD and VaD. Future studies should explore the progression of dementing disorders in larger cohorts using prospective methodological designs. PMID:27747317

  4. Endogenous Polysialic Acid Based Micelles for Calmodulin Antagonist Delivery against Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Juan; Gao, Yin-Ping; Lu, Nan-Nan; Li, Wei-Shuo; Xu, Ji-Fang; Ying, Xiao-Ying; Wu, Gang; Liao, Mei-Hua; Tan, Chao; Shao, Ling-Xiao; Lu, Ying-Mei; Zhang, Chen; Fukunaga, Kohji; Han, Feng; Du, Yong-Zhong

    2016-12-28

    Clinical treatment for vascular dementia still remains a challenge mainly due to the blood-brain barrier (BBB). Here, a micelle based on polysialic acid (PSA), which is a hydrophilic and endogenous carbohydrate polymer, was designed to deliver calmodulin antagonist for therapy of vascular dementia. PSA was first chemically conjugated with octadecylamine (ODA), and the obtained PSA-ODA copolymer could self-assemble into micelle in aqueous solution with a 120.0 μg/mL critical micelle concentration. The calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle, featuring sustained drug release behavior over a period of 72 h with a 3.6% (w/w) drug content and a 107.0 ± 4.0 nm size was then fabricated. The PSA-ODA micelle could cross the BBB mainly via active endocytosis by brain endothelial cells followed by transcytosis. In a water maze test for spatial learning, calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle significantly reduced the escape latencies of right unilateral common carotid arteries occlusion (rUCCAO) mice with dosage significantly reduced versus free drug. The decrease of hippocampal phospho-CaMKII (Thr286/287) and phospho-synapsin I (Ser603) was partially restored in rUCCAO mice following calmodulin antagonist loaded PSA-ODA micelle treatment. Consistent with the restored CaMKII phosphorylation, the elevation of BrdU/NeuN double-positive cells in the same context was also observed. Overall, the PSA-ODA micelle developed from the endogenous material might promote the development of therapeutic approaches for improving the efficacy of brain-targeted drug delivery and have great potential for vascular dementia treatment.

  5. The hippocampus in spontaneously hypertensive rats: an animal model of vascular dementia?

    PubMed

    Sabbatini, Maurizio; Catalani, Assia; Consoli, Claudia; Marletta, Nunzio; Tomassoni, Daniele; Avola, Roberto

    2002-03-15

    Hypertension is a main risk factor for cerebrovascular disease, including vascular dementia. The present study was designed to evaluate if hypertension-dependent changes of the hippocampus of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) of different ages were related with those occurring in vascular dementia. The hippocampus was chosen as the brain area involved in learning and memory. Systolic pressure was slightly increased in 2-month-old SHR in comparison with age-matched normotensive Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats and augmented progressively with age in SHR. No microanatomical changes were observed in the hippocampus of SHR of 2 months in comparison with age-matched WKY rats. A limited decrease of white matter volume was observed in 4-month-old SHR. In SHR of 6 months, a reduction of grey matter volume both in the CA1 subfield and in the dentate gyrus occurred. Evaluation of phosphorylated 200-kDa neurofilament immunoreactivity revealed a decreased immune reaction area in the CA1 subfield of 6-month-old SHR compared to age-matched WKY rats and no changes in the expression and localization of the dendritic marker microtubule associated protein (MAP)-2. In 6-month-old SHR, an increase of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP)-expression was found by Western blot analysis. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increase in number (hyperplasia), but not in size of astrocytes. These findings indicate the occurrence of cytoskeletal breakdown and astroglial changes primarily in the CA1 subfield of the hippocampus of SHR of 6 months. The occurrence in the hippocampus of SHR of regressive changes and astroglial reaction similar to those occurring in neurodegenerative disorders with cognitive impairment suggests that they represent an animal model of vascular dementia.

  6. Post-mortem assessment of hypoperfusion of cerebral cortex in Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Taya; Miners, Scott; Love, Seth

    2015-04-01

    Perfusion is reduced in the cerebral neocortex in Alzheimer's disease. We have explored some of the mechanisms, by measurement of perfusion-sensitive and disease-related proteins in post-mortem tissue from Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and age-matched control brains. To distinguish physiological from pathological reduction in perfusion (i.e. reduction exceeding the decline in metabolic demand), we measured the concentration of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a protein induced under conditions of tissue hypoxia through the actions of hypoxia-inducible factors, and the myelin associated glycoprotein to proteolipid protein 1 (MAG:PLP1) ratio, which declines in chronically hypoperfused brain tissue. To evaluate possible mechanisms of hypoperfusion, we also measured the levels of amyloid-β40, amyloid-β42, von Willebrand factor (VWF; a measure of microvascular density) and the potent vasoconstrictor endothelin 1 (EDN1); we assayed the activity of angiotensin I converting enzyme (ACE), which catalyses the production of another potent vasoconstrictor, angiotensin II; and we scored the severity of arteriolosclerotic small vessel disease and cerebral amyloid angiopathy, and determined the Braak tangle stage. VEGF was markedly increased in frontal and parahippocampal cortex in Alzheimer's disease but only slightly and not significantly in vascular dementia. In frontal cortex the MAG:PLP1 ratio was significantly reduced in Alzheimer's disease and even more so in vascular dementia. VEGF but not MAG:PLP1 increased with Alzheimer's disease severity, as measured by Braak tangle stage, and correlated with amyloid-β42 and amyloid-β42: amyloid-β40 but not amyloid-β40. Although MAG:PLP1 tended to be lowest in cortex from patients with severe small vessel disease or cerebral amyloid angiopathy, neither VEGF nor MAG:PLP1 correlated significantly with the severity of structural vascular pathology (small vessel disease, cerebral amyloid angiopathy or VWF

  7. Caspase-Cleaved Tau Co-Localizes with Early Tangle Markers in the Human Vascular Dementia Brain

    PubMed Central

    Day, Ryan J.; Mason, Maria J.; Thomas, Chloe; Poon, Wayne W.; Rohn, Troy T.

    2015-01-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is the second most common form of dementia in the United States and is characterized as a cerebral vessel vascular disease that leads to ischemic episodes. Whereas the relationship between caspase-cleaved tau and neurofibrillary tangles (NFTs) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has been previously described, whether caspase activation and cleavage of tau occurs in VaD is presently unknown. To investigate a potential role for caspase-cleaved tau in VaD, we analyzed seven confirmed cases of VaD by immunohistochemistry utilizing a well-characterized antibody that specifically detects caspase-cleaved tau truncated at Asp421. Application of this antibody (TauC3) revealed consistent labeling within NFTs, dystrophic neurites within plaque-rich regions and corpora amylacea (CA) in the human VaD brain. Labeling of CA by the TauC3 antibody was widespread throughout the hippocampus proper, was significantly higher compared to age matched controls, and co-localized with ubiquitin. Staining of the TauC3 antibody co-localized with MC-1, AT8, and PHF-1 within NFTs. Quantitative analysis indicated that roughly 90% of PHF-1-labeled NFTs contained caspase-cleaved tau. In addition, we documented the presence of active caspase-3 within plaques, blood vessels and pretangle neurons that co-localized with TauC3. Collectively, these data support a role for the activation of caspase-3 and proteolytic cleavage of TauC3 in VaD providing further support for the involvement of this family of proteases in NFT pathology. PMID:26161867

  8. Cerebrospinal fluid levels of tau phosphorylated at threonine 181 in patients with Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Ravaglia, Sabrina; Bini, Paola; Sinforiani, Elena; Franciotta, Diego; Zardini, Elisabetta; Tosca, Pietro; Moglia, Arrigo; Costa, Alfredo

    2008-12-01

    In 31 patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD), 19 with probable vascular dementia (VaD) and 20 with Possible AD and Possible VaD, cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) tau levels hyperphosphorylated at threonine 181 (Ptau) were measured by ELISA. Thirty-six age-matched subjects were used as controls. The severity of the cognitive decline was assessed at the time of CSF analysis and after a 12-month follow-up. The groups had comparable age, degree of cognitive impairment and disease duration; these parameters were not related to P-tau levels. P-tau discriminated between demented patients and controls, but no significant difference emerged between AD and the other groups. By contrast, higher P-tau values were found to predict, independently of the clinical diagnosis, a more rapid evolution of cognitive decline. Whether these findings are due to a lack of CSF P-tau specificity or to the low reliability of clinical and radiological criteria remains unclear. P-tau may be useful in the evaluation of disease evolution, by predicting the rate of cognitive decline.

  9. Paeoniflorin attenuates hippocampal damage in a rat model of vascular dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Li-Li; Wu, Yan; Wang, Ning; Wang, Shang-Ming; Zhang, Bin; Shi, Cui-Ge; Zhang, Shu-Cheng

    2016-01-01

    Paeoniflorn (PF), the principal bioactive component of Paeoniae radix prescribed in traditional Chinese medicine, possesses a wide range of biological effects and exhibits neuroprotective effects in numerous diseases. Previous studies have demonstrated that PF significantly attenuates memory impairment in rats with vascular dementia (VD). In the present study, a bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) rat model was used to explore the underlying mechanisms of PF. The expression levels of neuron-specific enolase (NSE), S100β, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), Bcl-2 associated X protein, cytochrome c and brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus were measured by western blot analysis. The results showed that administration of PF for 28 days significantly decreased the expression levels of NSE and S100β, both sensitive markers for brain damage, in vascular dementia (VD) model rats. In addition, PF inhibited the initiation of apoptotic cell death and attenuated the decreased expression levels of BDNF induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion. These data confirm the neuroprotective effects of PF on VD and provide a novel insight into the long-term use of PF as a potential treatment in the stages of early cognitive impairment in VD. PMID:28101164

  10. Posatirelin for the treatment of degenerative and vascular dementia: results of explanatory and pragmatic efficacy analyses.

    PubMed

    Gasbarrini, G; Stefanini, G; Addolorato, G; Foschi, F; Ricci, C; Bertolotti, P; Voltolini, G; Bonavita, E; Bertoncelli, R; Renzi, G; Bianchini, G; Bonaiuto, S; Giannandrea, E; Cavassini, G; Mazzini, V; Chioma, V; Marzara, G; D'Addetta, G; Totaro, G; Dalmonte, E; Tassini, D; Giungi, F; De Nitto, C; Di Fazio, G; Tessitore, A; Guadagnino, M; Tessitore, E; Spina, P; Luppi, M; Bignamini, A; Peracino, L; Fiorentino, M; Beun-Garbe, D; Poli, A; Ambrosoli, L; Girardello, R

    1998-01-01

    In order to confirm the efficacy and safety of posatirelin (L-pyro-2-aminoadipyl-L-leucyl-L-prolinamide), a synthetic peptide having cholinergic, catecholaminergic and neurotrophic activities, a multicentre, double-blind, controlled study versus placebo was planned in elderly patients suffering from Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, according to National Institute of Neurological and Communicative Disorders and Stroke/Alzheimer's Disease and Related Disorders Association (NINCDS-ADRDA) and National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke/Association Internationale pour la Recherche et l'Enseignement en Neurosciences (NINDS-AIREN) criteria, respectively. The trial consisted of a 2-week run-in phase with placebo administered once a day orally, followed by a double-blind period of 3 months, with posatirelin or placebo administered once a day intramuscularly. Efficacy was assessed using the Gottfries-Bråne-Steen (GBS) Rating Scale (primary variable) and the Rey Memory Test (secondary variable). Laboratory tests, vital signs and adverse events were monitored. A total of 360 patients were randomized, the intent-to-treat sample (ITT) being made up of 357 patients and the per protocol sample (PP) of 260 patients. Both pragmatic and explanatory analyses showed significant differences between treatment groups in the GBS Rating Scale and the Rey Memory Test, with no difference in the two types of dementia. No difference between treatments was observed in safety variables, the incidence of adverse events in the posatirelin group being 7.3%. The study confirms previous results showing that treatment with posatirelin can improve cognitive and functional abilities of patients suffering from degenerative or vascular dementia.

  11. Blood pressure and risk of vascular dementia: evidence from 4.3 million adults and a cohort study of TIA and stroke

    PubMed Central

    Emdin, Connor A.; Rothwell, Peter M; Salimi-Khorshidi, Gholamreza; Kiran, Amit; Conrad, Nathalie; Callender, Thomas; Mehta, Ziyah; Pendlebury, Sarah T; Anderson, Simon G.; Mohseni, Hamid; Woodward, Mark; Rahimi, Kazem

    2017-01-01

    Background and Purpose Vascular dementia is the second most common form of dementia but reliable evidence on age-specific associations between blood pressure and risk of vascular dementia is limited and some studies have reported negative associations at older ages. Methods In a cohort of 4.28 million individuals, free of known vascular disease and dementia and identified from linked electronic primary care health records in the UK (Clinical Practice Research Datalink), we related blood pressure to time to physician-diagnosed vascular dementia. We further determined associations between blood pressure and dementia in a prospective population-based cohort of incident TIA and stroke (Oxford Vascular Study). Results Over a median follow-up of 7.0 years, 11 114 initial presentations of vascular dementia were observed in the primary care cohort after exclusion of the first four years of follow-up. The association between usual systolic blood pressure (SBP) and risk of vascular dementia decreased with age (HR per 20 mm Hg higher SBP = 1.62, 95% CI 1.13-2.35 at 30-50 years; 1.26, 1.18-1.35 at 51-70 years; 0.97, 0.92-1.03 at 71-90 years; p trend = 0.006). Usual SBP remained predictive of vascular dementia after accounting for effect mediation by stroke and TIA. In the population-based cohort, prior SBP was predictive of 5-year risk of dementia with no evidence of negative association at older ages. Conclusions Blood pressure is positively associated with risk of vascular dementia, irrespective of preceding TIA or stroke. Previous reports of inverse associations in old age could not be confirmed. PMID:27165956

  12. Cell cycle-related protein expression in vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Smith, M Z; Nagy, Z; Esiri, M M

    1999-08-13

    Recent findings from our and other laboratories indicate that cell cycle-related phenomena may play a key role in the formation of Alzheimer-type pathology and neuronal cell death in both Alzheimer's and cerebro-vascular diseases. In this study we examine the expression patterns of cyclins A, B1, D1 and E in neuronal nuclei in the hippocampus in autopsied healthy elderly individuals, Alzheimer's disease patients and subjects suffering from cerebrovascular disease with and without co-existing Alzheimer's disease. Nuclear cyclin B1 and cyclin E expression was detected in hippocampal neurones in each subject category. However, cyclin B1 expression was significantly elevated in the CA1 of patients suffering from cerebro-vascular disease alone, while cyclin E expression was significantly higher in the CA4 subfield in patients suffering from mixed Alzheimer's and cerebro-vascular diseases compared to subjects in other categories. We hypothesize that cell cycle re-entry may occur in healthy elderly people leading to age-related cell death and mild Alzheimer-type pathology in the hippocampus. However, in pathological conditions, the cell cycle arrest may lead either to the development of severe Alzheimer-related pathology or to excess apoptotic cell death as in vascular dementia.

  13. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... aging. Many different diseases can cause dementia, including Alzheimer's disease and stroke. Drugs are available to treat some ... they may improve symptoms or slow down the disease. NIH: National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke

  14. The Feasibility of a Structured Cognitive Training Protocol to Address Progressive Cognitive Decline in Individuals with Vascular Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mayer, Jamie F.; Bishop, Lilli A.; Murray, Laura L.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: Cerebral autosomal dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy, better known as CADASIL, is a rare, genetic form of early-onset vascular dementia. The purpose of this study was to use a modified version of Attention Process Training--II (APT-II; Sohlberg, Johnson, Paule, Raskin, & Mateer, 2001) with an…

  15. Gastrodin improves cognitive dysfunction and decreases oxidative stress in vascular dementia rats induced by chronic ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yang; Zhang, Zhenxing

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To study the potential protective effects of gastrodin on reducing tissue oxidative stress and attenuating cognitive deficits in vascular dementia induced by cerebral chronic hyperfusion. To explore the detailed molecular mechanisms. Methods: 6 to 8 week old male Wistar rats were adopted as experimental animals. Animals were divided into the following groups: Group 1 (sham group with no occlusion), Group 2 (control group with 2VO procedure), Group 3 (sham group with gastrodin administration), Group 4 (2VO group with gastrodin administration). Morris water maze (MWM) test was adopted to test the learning and memory function of rats within different groups. MDA, glutathione peroxidase and total thiol assessment was done to reflect the oxidative stress in the brain tissue. Cell counting kit-8 (CCK8) and flow cytometry (FCM) were performed to examine the cell viability and apoptosis rate of SH-SY5Y cells induced by hydrogen peroxide and rescued by gastrodin treatments. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined by the 2’, 7’-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. qPCR and Western blot (WB) were adopted to detect the molecular mechanisms related to the anti-apoptosis and ROS scavenging effects of gastrodin. Results: Our results indicated an obvious protective effect of gastrodin on vascular dementia induced brain ischemia. Administration of gastrodin could improve the impaired learning and memory function induced by 2VO procedure in rats. The levels of MDA were partially decreased by the administration of gastrodin. The levels of glutathione peroxidase and total thiol were partially restored by the administration of gastrodin. Cell viability was improved by gastrodin in a dose-dependent pattern on SH-SY5Y cells induced by hydrogen peroxide (P < 0.05). Cell apoptosis rate was reduced by gastrodin in a dose-dependent pattern on SH-SY5Y cells induced by hydrogen peroxide (P < 0.05). Gastrodin could scavenge ROS generation induced by pre

  16. Dynamic information flow analysis in Vascular Dementia patients during the performance of a visual oddball task.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Xu, Jin; Lou, Wutao; Zhao, Songzhen

    2014-09-19

    This study investigated the information flow in patients with Vascular Dementia (VaD). Twelve VaD patients and twelve age-matched controls participated in the study. EEG signal was recorded when subjects were performing a visual oddball task. Information flow was analyzed between 9 electrodes in frontal, central, and parietal lobes using short-window Directed Transfer Function (sDTF). VaD patients presented a significant decline in the information flow from parietal to frontal and central lobes, compared with the healthy elderly. This decline mainly occurred in delta, theta, and lower alpha bands, from about 200ms to 300ms after target stimulus onset. The findings indicated an impaired parietal-to-frontal and parietal-to-central connectivity in VaD patients, which may be one reason for the cognitive deficits in VaD patients.

  17. Cholinergic deficiency involved in vascular dementia: possible mechanism and strategy of treatment

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Juan; Zhang, Hai-yan; Tang, Xi-can

    2009-01-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease with a high prevalence. Several studies have recently reported that VaD patients present cholinergic deficits in the brain and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) that may be closely related to the pathophysiology of cognitive impairment. Moreover, cholinergic therapies have shown promising effects on cognitive improvement in VaD patients. The precise mechanisms of these cholinergic agents are currently not fully understood; however, accumulating evidence indicates that these drugs may act through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, in which the efferent vagus nerve signals suppress pro-inflammatory cytokine release and inhibit inflammation, although regulation of oxidative stress and energy metabolism, alleviation of apoptosis may also be involved. In this paper, we provide a brief overview of the cholinergic treatment strategy for VaD and its relevant mechanisms of anti-inflammation. PMID:19574993

  18. Computerized evaluation method of white matter hyperintensities related to subcortical vascular dementia in brain MR images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arimura, Hidetaka; Kawata, Yasuo; Yamashita, Yasuo; Magome, Taiki; Ohki, Masafumi; Toyofuku, Fukai; Higashida, Yoshiharu; Tsuchiya, Kazuhiro

    2010-03-01

    We have developed a computerized evaluation method of white matter hyperintensity (WMH) regions for the diagnosis of vascular dementia (VaD) based on magnetic resonance (MR) images, and implemented the proposed method as a graphical interface program. The WMH regions were segmented using either a region growing technique or a level set method, one of which was selected by using a support vector machine. We applied the proposed method to MR images acquired from 10 patients with a diagnosis of VaD. The mean similarity index between WMH regions determined by a manual method and the proposed method was 78.2+/-11.0%. The proposed method could effectively assist neuroradiologists in evaluating WMH regions.

  19. Puerarin attenuates cognitive dysfunction and oxidative stress in vascular dementia rats induced by chronic ischemia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing; Guo, Wenshi; Tian, Buxian; Sun, Menghan; Li, Hui; Zhou, Lina; Liu, Xueping

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explored the effects of puerarin on cognitive deficits and tissue oxidative stress and the underlying mechanisms. Methods: 6 to 8 week old male Wistar rats were adopted as experimental animals. Morris water maze (MWM) test was adopted to test the learning and memory function of rats. MDA, glutathione peroxidase and total thiol assessment was done to reflect the oxidative stress in the brain tissue. Cell Counting Kit-8 (CCK8) and flow cytometry (FCM) were performed to examine the cell viability and apoptosis rate. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation was determined by the 2’, 7’-dichlorofluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. qPCR and Western blot (WB) were adopted to test the molecular function mechanisms of puerarin. Results: Our results indicated a protective effect of puerarin on vascular dementia. Administration of puerarin could improve the impaired learning and memory function. The levels of MDA were partially decreased by puerarin. The levels of glutathione peroxidase and total thiol were partially restored. Cell viability was improved in a dose-dependent pattern (P < 0.05). Cell apoptosis rate was reduced in a dose-dependent pattern (P < 0.05). Puerarin could scavenge ROS generation induced by pre-treatment of hydrogen peroxide. The results showed up-regulated levels of Nrf2, FoxO1, FoxO3 and FoxO4 (P < 0.05). Conclusion: Puerarin is protective on the vascular dementia by reducing oxidative stress and improving learning and memory functions. On the molecular level, Nrf2, FoxO1, FoxO3 and FoxO4 were up regulated by puerarin. PMID:26191159

  20. Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... him or her.What should I do if hallucinations are a problem?If hallucinations are not making your loved one scared or ... to confront people who have dementia about their hallucinations. Arguing may just upset your loved one. However, ...

  1. Vascular risk and Aβ interact to reduce cortical thickness in AD vulnerable brain regions

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Bruce R.; Madison, Cindee M.; Wirth, Miranka; Marchant, Natalie L.; Kriger, Stephen; Mack, Wendy J.; Sanossian, Nerses; DeCarli, Charles; Chui, Helena C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Jagust, William J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to define whether vascular risk factors interact with β-amyloid (Aβ) in producing changes in brain structure that could underlie the increased risk of Alzheimer disease (AD). Methods: Sixty-six cognitively normal and mildly impaired older individuals with a wide range of vascular risk factors were included in this study. The presence of Aβ was assessed using [11C]Pittsburgh compound B–PET imaging, and cortical thickness was measured using 3-tesla MRI. Vascular risk was measured with the Framingham Coronary Risk Profile Index. Results: Individuals with high levels of vascular risk factors have thinner frontotemporal cortex independent of Aβ. These frontotemporal regions are also affected in individuals with Aβ deposition, but the latter show additional thinning in parietal cortices. Aβ and vascular risk were found to interact in posterior (especially in parietal) brain regions, where Aβ has its greatest effect. In this way, the negative effect of Aβ in posterior regions is increased by the presence of vascular risk. Conclusion: Aβ and vascular risk interact to enhance cortical thinning in posterior brain regions that are particularly vulnerable to AD. These findings give insight concerning the mechanisms whereby vascular risk increases the likelihood of developing AD and supports the therapeutic intervention of controlling vascular risk for the prevention of AD. PMID:24907234

  2. Cognitive variations among vascular dementia subtypes caused by small-, large-, or mixed-vessel disease

    PubMed Central

    Jianping, Chen; Jianqing, Yuan; Shanquan, Zhong

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Vascular dementia (VaD) is a heterogeneous disease that can vary in clinical presentation and cognitive profile. The cognitive profiles of different VaD subtypes depend on the anatomical distribution of the vascular insults that have been documented. Material and methods We reviewed demographic, cognitive, and imaging data in 402 patients who were clinically diagnosed with VaD between January 2002 and June 2012 at the First Affiliated Hospital of Gan Nan Medical College in Ganzhou, China. Results Based on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) results, patients were classified as having large- (24.1%), small- (70.4%), or mixed-vessel VaD (5.5%). Hypertension was the most prevalent risk factor (81%), followed by smoking (37%), hyperlipidemia (35%), and diabetes (27%). Hyperlipidemia, cardiac risk factors (history of cardiovascular disease, heart valve disorder) and carotid stenosis were more frequent in patients with large-vessel disease compared to those with small-vessel or mixed-vessel disease (p < 0.001). A median of 4 (maximum 11) cognitive domains were impaired in each VaD patient. After memory dysfunction, executive defects were the most prevalent (68.9%), and neurobehavioral dysfunction was the most rare (13.2%). Patients with small-vessel VaD showed more executive dysfunction than patients with large-vessel and mixed-vessel VaD (p < 0.05), whereas patients with large-vessel VaD had a higher prevalence of visuospatial or language dysfunction (p < 0.05). Conclusions The results indicate that specific subtypes and underlying vascular mechanisms will help predict clinical courses and produce more focused treatment and prevention of VaD. PMID:27478455

  3. Bee Venom Ameliorates Cognitive Dysfunction Caused by Neuroinflammation in an Animal Model of Vascular Dementia.

    PubMed

    Cai, Mudan; Lee, Jun Hwan; Yang, Eun Jin

    2016-09-29

    Vascular dementia (VaD) is caused by the reduction of blood supply by vessel occlusion and is characterized by progressive cognitive decline. VaD incidence has been growing due to the aging population, placing greater strain on social and economic resources. However, the pathological mechanisms underlying VaD remain unclear. Many studies have used the bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) animal model to investigate potential therapeutics for VaD. In this study, we investigated whether bee venom (BV) improves cognitive function and reduces neuroinflammation in the hippocampus of BCCAO animals. Animals were randomly divided into three groups: a sham group (n = 15), BCCAO control group (n = 15), and BV-treated BCCAO group (n = 15). BCCAO animals were treated with 0.1 μg/g BV at ST36 ("Joksamli" acupoint) four times every other day. In order to investigate the effect of BV treatment on cognitive function, we performed a Y-maze test. In order to uncover any potential relationship between these results and neuroinflammation, we also performed Western blotting in the BCCAO group. Animals that had been treated with BV showed an improved cognitive function and a reduced expression of neuroinflammatory proteins in the hippocampus, including Iba-1, TLR4, CD14, and TNF-α. Furthermore, we demonstrated that BV treatment increased pERK and BDNF in the hippocampus. The present study thus underlines the neuroprotective effect of BV treatment against BCCAO-induced cognitive impairment and neuroinflammation. Our findings suggest that BV may be an effective complementary treatment for VaD, as it may improve cognitive function and attenuate neuroinflammation associated with dementia.

  4. Influence of education on subcortical hyperintensities and global cognitive status in vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Lane, Elizabeth M; Paul, Robert H; Moser, David J; Fletcher, Thomas D; Cohen, Ronald A

    2011-05-01

    Subcortical hyperintensities (SH) on neuroimaging are a prominent feature of vascular dementia (VaD) and SH severity correlates with cognitive impairment in this population. Previous studies demonstrated that SH burden accounts for a degree of the cognitive burden among VaD patients, although it remains unclear if individual factors such as cognitive reserve influence cognitive status in VaD. To address this issue, we examined 36 individuals diagnosed with probable VaD (age = 77.56; education = 12). All individuals underwent MMSE evaluations and MRI brain scans. We predicted that individuals with higher educational attainment would exhibit less cognitive difficulty despite similar levels of SH volume, compared to individuals with less educational attainment. A regression analysis revealed that greater SH volume was associated with lower scores on the MMSE. Additionally, education moderated the relationship between SH volume and MMSE score, demonstrating that individuals with higher education had higher scores on the MMSE despite similar degrees of SH burden. These results suggest that educational attainment buffers the deleterious effects of SH burden on cognitive status among VaD patients.

  5. Systematic Review on the Efficacy and Safety of Herbal Medicines for Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Man, Sui Cheung; Chan, Kam Wa; Lu, Jia-Hong; Durairajan, Siva Sundara Kumar; Liu, Liang-Feng; Li, Min

    2012-01-01

    We present a systematic review of existing research that aims to assess the efficacy and safety of herbal medications (HM), as either monotherapy or adjunct to orthodox medications (OM), mainly comprised of cholinesterase inhibitors, for vascular dementia (VaD). We included 47 studies conducted in mainland China, each testing different HM. Of 43 HM monotherapy studies, 37 reported HM to be significantly better than OM or placebo; six reported similar efficacy between HM and OM. All four HM adjuvant studies reported significant efficacy. No major adverse events for HM were reported. Heterogeneity in diagnostic criteria, interventions and outcome measures hindered comprehensive data analysis. Studies suggested that HM can be a safe and effective treatment for VaD, either alone or in conjunction with OM. However, methodological flaws in the design of the studies limited the extent to which the results could be interpreted. Thirty most commonly used herbal constituents, including Rhizoma Chuanxiong (Chuanxiong in Chinese), Radix Polygoni Multiflori (Heshouwu in Chinese) and Radix Astragali (Huangqi in Chinese). were ranked. Further multi-center trials with large sample sizes, high methodological quality and standardized HM ingredients are necessary for clinical recommendations to be made. PMID:22235231

  6. The Molecular Mechanisms of Zinc Neurotoxicity and the Pathogenesis of Vascular Type Senile Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Mizuno, Dai; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2013-01-01

    Zinc (Zn) is an essential trace element that is abundantly present in the brain. Despite its importance in normal brain functions, excess Zn is neurotoxic and causes neurodegeneration following transient global ischemia and plays a crucial role in the pathogenesis of vascular-type dementia (VD). We have investigated the molecular mechanisms of Zn-induced neurotoxicity using immortalized hypothalamic neurons (GT1–7 cells) and found that carnosine (β-alanyl histidine) and histidine (His) inhibited Zn2+-induced neuronal death. A DNA microarray analysis revealed that the expression of several genes, including metal-related genes (metallothionein and Zn transporter 1), endoplasmic reticulum (ER)-stress related genes (GADD34, GADD45, and p8), and the calcium (Ca)-related gene Arc (activity-related cytoskeleton protein), were affected after Zn exposure. The co-existence of carnosine or His inhibited the expression of GADD34, p8, and Arc, although they did not influence the expression of the metal-related genes. Therefore, ER-stress and the disruption of Ca homeostasis may underlie the mechanisms of Zn-induced neurotoxicity, and carnosine might be a possible drug candidate for the treatment of VD. PMID:24213606

  7. Influence of Education on Subcortical Hyperintensities and Global Cognitive Status in Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lane, Elizabeth M.; Paul, Robert H.; Moser, David J.; Fletcher, Thomas D.; Cohen, Ronald A.

    2015-01-01

    Subcortical hyperintensities (SH) on neuroimaging are a prominent feature of vascular dementia (VaD) and SH severity correlates with cognitive impairment in this population. Previous studies demonstrated that SH burden accounts for a degree of the cognitive burden among VaD patients, although it remains unclear if individual factors such as cognitive reserve influence cognitive status in VaD. To address this issue, we examined 36 individuals diagnosed with probable VaD (age = 77.56; education = 12). All individuals underwent MMSE evaluations and MRI brain scans. We predicted that individuals with higher educational attainment would exhibit less cognitive difficulty despite similar levels of SH volume, compared to individuals with less educational attainment. A regression analysis revealed that greater SH volume was associated with lower scores on the MMSE. Additionally, education moderated the relationship between SH volume and MMSE score, demonstrating that individuals with higher education had higher scores on the MMSE despite similar degrees of SH burden. These results suggest that educational attainment buffers the deleterious effects of SH burden on cognitive status among VaD patients. PMID:21385518

  8. Common 1H-MRS Characteristics in Patients With Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia Diagnosed With Kidney Essence Deficiency Syndrome: A Preliminary Study.

    PubMed

    Guo, Zhongwei; Liu, Xiaozheng; Cao, Yulin; Hou, Hongtao; Chen, Xingli; Chen, Yongcan; Huang, Feihua; Chen, Wei

    2017-02-27

    Context • Traditional Chinese medicine (TCM) indicates that both Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) should be categorized as dementia and that they have a common etiology and pathogenesis under TCM classification of syndromes, such as with kidney essence deficiency syndrome (KEDS). The pathological location is mainly in the brain. However, it remains unclear whether AD and VD patients with KEDS exhibit a metabolic commonality in the same region of the brain. Objective • The study intended to investigate the metabolic characteristics of the brain using proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy (1H-MRS) in patients with AD and VD who had been diagnosed with KEDS. Design • The research team designed a pilot study, with the participants being allocated to 3 groups: (1) an AD group, (2) a VD group, and (3) a control group. All data analysis was carried out by a trained radiologist who was blinded to each participant's diagnosis. Setting • The study took place at the Tongde Hospital of Zhejiang Province (Zhejiang Sheng, China). Participants • Participants were patients at the Tongde Hospital with mild AD or VD who had been diagnosed with KEDS. The normal controls were patients' spouses or guardians with normal cognitive function. Outcome Measures • All participants underwent 1H-MRS. The N-acetyl aspartate (NAA)/myo-inositol (mI), NAA/creatine (Cr), choline (Cho)/Cr, and mI/Cr ratios were bilaterally measured in the posterior cingulate gyrus (PCG) and anterior cingulate gyrus (ACG) by the Syngo spectroscopy postprocessing package. Demographic characteristics and 1H-MRS data were assessed across the AD, VD, and normal control groups. Results • Thirteen patients with mild AD with KEDS, 15 patients with mild VD with KEDS, and 18 normal controls were recruited from May 2013 through May 2014. The AD and VD groups did not significantly differ in the NAA/mI, NAA/Cr, Cho/Cr, and mI/Cr ratios in either the PCG or the ACG, with the exception being the

  9. The alterations of Ca2+/calmodulin/CaMKII/CaV1.2 signaling in experimental models of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Min, Dongyu; Guo, Feng; Zhu, Shu; Xu, Xiaoxue; Mao, Xiaoyuan; Cao, Yonggang; Lv, Xintong; Gao, Qinghua; Wang, Lei; Chen, Tianbao; Shaw, Chris; Hao, Liying; Cai, Jiqun

    2013-03-22

    The two critical forms of dementia are Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD). The alterations of Ca(2+)/calmodulin/CaMKII/CaV1.2 signaling in AD and VD have not been well elucidated. Here we have demonstrated changes in the levels of CaV1.2, calmodulin, p-CaMKII, p-CREB and BDNF proteins by Western blot analysis and the co-localization of p-CaMKII/CaV1.2 by double-labeling immunofluorescence in the hippocampus of APP/PS1 mice and VD gerbils. Additionally, expression of these proteins and intracellular calcium levels were examined in cultured neurons treated with Aβ1-42. The expression of CaV1.2 protein was increased in VD gerbils and in cultured neurons but decreased in APP/PS1 mice; the expression of calmodulin protein was increased in APP/PS1 mice and VD gerbils; levels of p-CaMKII, p-CREB and BDNF proteins were decreased in AD and VD models. The number of neurons in which p-CaMKII and CaV1.2 were co-localized, was decreased in the CA1 and CA3 regions in two models. Intracellular calcium was increased in the cultured neurons treated with Aβ1-42. Collectively, our results suggest that the alterations in CaV1.2, calmodulin, p-CaMKII, p-CREB and BDNF can be reflective of an involvement in the impairment in memory and cognition in AD and VD models.

  10. Vascular Risk as a Predictor of Cognitive Decline in a Cohort of Elderly Patients with Mild to Moderate Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Curiati, Pedro K.; Magaldi, Regina M.; Suemoto, Claudia K.; Bottino, Cassio M.C.; Nitrini, Ricardo; Farfel, José Marcelo; Jacob-Filho, Wilson

    2014-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of our study was to evaluate vascular risk factors and other clinical variables as predictors of cognitive and functional decline in elderly patients with mild to moderate dementia. Methods The clinical characteristics of 82 elderly patients (mean age 79.0 ± 5.9 years; 67.1% females) with mild to moderate dementia were obtained at baseline, including years of education, Framingham Coronary Heart Disease Risk score, Hachinski Ischemic Score (HIS), Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR), Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) score, Functional Activities Questionnaire (FAQ) score, Burden Interview Scale score, and Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) score. Changes in MMSE and FAQ scores over time were assessed annually. The association between baseline clinical variables and cognitive and functional decline was investigated during 3 years of follow-up through the use of generalized linear mixed effects models. Results A trend was found towards steeper cognitive decline in patients with less vascular burden according to the HIS (β = 0.056, p = 0.09), better cognitive performance according to the CDR score (β = 0.313, p = 0.06) and worse caregiver burden according to the Burden Interview Scale score (β = −0.012, p = 0.07) at baseline. Conclusion Further studies with larger samples are necessary to confirm and expand our findings. PMID:25493090

  11. Hydroxysafflor yellow A increases BDNF and NMDARs in the hippocampus in a vascular dementia rat model.

    PubMed

    Xing, Mengya; Sun, Qingna; Wang, Yiyi; Cheng, Yan; Zhang, Nan

    2016-07-01

    Hydroxysafflor yellow A (HSYA) is a drug that exerts angiogenesis regulatory and neuroprotective effects and has become an effective therapy for brain and heart ischemic disorders. There is no definite evidence supporting a therapeutic effect of HSYA in vascular dementia (VaD). We used HSYA in a rat model of chronic cerebral ischemia to determine its potential therapeutic effects in VaD. The Morris water maze (MWM) was used to evaluate spatial cognitive function, and long-term potentiation (LTP) was tested as a marker of synaptic plasticity. The expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and two subunits of N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR; GluN2A and GluN2B) in the hippocampus were measured via western blotting. The MWM results showed that the experimental VaD group had longer escape latencies than the sham group, whereas the HSYA group had a decreased escape latency compared with the VaD group (P<0.05). The LTP at CA3-CA1 synapses in the hippocampus was also enhanced in the HSYA compared with the VaD group (P<0.05). The western blotting results revealed lower hippocampal BDNF and GluN2B expression in the VaD group compared with the sham group and significantly higher hippocampal expression in the HSYA group compared with the VaD group. No significant change in GluN2A expression was detected. The results indicate that HSYA may enhance the endogenous expression of BDNF and GluN2B, which are associated with the synaptic plasticity of the hippocampus, and may improve spatial learning and memory abilities in a rat model of VaD.

  12. The global deterioration scale: relationships to neuropsychological performance and activities of daily living in patients with vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Paul, Robert H; Cohen, Ronald A; Moser, David J; Zawacki, Tricia; Ott, Brian R; Gordon, Norman; Stone, William

    2002-01-01

    In the present study, we examined the relationships between ratings on the Global Deterioration Scale (GDS) and activities of daily living and cognitive function in 39 individuals with vascular dementia (VaD). The results of the study revealed significant correlations between GDS rating and performance on cognitive tests, including memory and overall cognitive ability. In addition, the GDS was significantly related to ratings of instrumental activities of daily living. Comparisons between patients with VaD with GDS scores between 4 and 6 (n = 21) and patients with scores between 2 and 3 (n = 18) revealed greater cognitive and functional deficits in the group with higher GDS scores. Further, the GDS score accurately classified 87% of the patients with VaD. These findings provide support for the validity of the GDS in general staging of dementia severity of VaD.

  13. Environmental Enrichment Improves Spatial Learning and Memory in Vascular Dementia Rats with Activation of Wnt/β-Catenin Signal Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Xinhao; Li, Tao; Zhang, Lina; Ma, Jingxi; Yu, Lehua; Li, Changqing; Niu, Lingchuan

    2017-01-01

    Background Environmental enrichment (EE) has a beneficial effect on some neuropsychiatric disorders. In this study, we aimed to investigate whether environmental enrichment could improve the spatial learning and memory in rats with vascular dementia (VaD) and the mechanism underpinning it. Material/Methods Bilateral common carotid occlusion (2-vessel occlusion [2VO]) was used to develop the animal model of vascular dementia. Adult male Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats were used in the experiment and were randomly divided into 4 groups: sham group, 2VO group, sham+EE group, and 2VO+EE group (n=19/group). The 2VO group and 2VO+EE group underwent bilateral common carotid occlusion. Two different housing conditions were used in this experiment: standard environment (SE) and enriched environment (EE). Rats in the sham group and 2VO group were put into SE cages for 4 weeks, while rats in the sham+EE group and 2VO+EE group were put in EE cages for 4 weeks. The Morris water maze and Y-maze were used to assess spatial learning and memory. Apoptosis was detected by TUNEL. The damage of neurons in the hippocampus was assessed by Nissl staining. The level of wnt pathway proteins were detected by Western blot. Results Compared with the 2VO group, the rats in the 2VO+EE group had better behavioral performance, fewer apoptotic neurons, and more surviving neurons. Western blot analysis showed that the levels of wnt pathway proteins were higher in 2VO+EE rats than in the 2VO group. Conclusions Environmental enrichment can improve the spatial learning and memory in rats with vascular dementia, and the mechanism may be related to activation of the wnt/β-catenin signal pathway. PMID:28082734

  14. Study of visuospatial skill in patients with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pal, Asutosh; Biswas, Atanu; Pandit, Alak; Roy, Arijit; Guin, Debsankar; Gangopadhyay, Goutam; Senapati, Asit Kumar

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: To assess the visuospatial function in different types of dementia with the visual object and space perception (VOSP) battery and to relate the degree of visuospatial dysfunction with different types and stages of dementia. Materials and Methods: A sample of 53 participants with dementia and equal number of age-, sex-, and education-matched controls were recruited for the study. Participants were evaluated for visuospatial skill using VOSP test battery. The scores of dementia patients were compared with controls and within dementia cohort scores were compared based on stage of dementia. Results: The dementia group scored low in all of the subtests of the VOSP battery in comparison to controls. Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia of Lewy bodies (DLB), and vascular dementia (VaD) patients performed more poorly than controls in all subtests examining object perception and space perception. The three semantic variants of frontotemporal dementia (FTD) patients scored low in all four subtests of object perception, whereas behavioral variant FTD (bvFTD) patients performed normally. The scores deteriorated with the advancement of dementia in all patients from the dementia groups. Conclusions: Visuospatial function is significantly impaired in dementia patients particularly in AD, DLB, and VaD patients from the beginning, and the impairment is severe in advanced disease stages. PMID:27011635

  15. [Diagnosis and treatment of mixed dementia].

    PubMed

    Hanyu, Haruo

    2012-09-01

    Vascular dementia (VaD)--secondary to cerebrovascular disease (CVD)--has been traditionally distinguished from Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is a purely neurodegenerative form of dementia. However, CVDs such as lacunes and white matter lesions are common in patients with AD, whereas certain pathological changes of AD, including senile plaques and tangles, are observed in elderly patients with VaD. These findings indicate that mixed vascular-degenerative dementia (MD) is the most common cause of dementia in the elderly. In the treatment and prevention of dementia, the accurate diagnosis of each individual type of dementia is vital. However, recognizing the distinction between these diseases can be difficult in clinical practice. This article provides an overview of MD, including the incidence, diagnosis, and treatment. In particular, we emphasize that functional brain imaging, including perfusion single photon emission computed tomography and benzodiazepine receptor binding measurement, in combination with morphological imaging (such as magnetic resonance imaging) is useful for distinguishing AD, VaD and MD. In addition to antiplatelet medications, cholinesterase inhibitors and N-methyl-D-aspartic acid antagonists may be effective in treating MD. Moreover the vascular risk factors also should be treated appropriately. The article describes the need for further studies to develop a better understanding of MD.

  16. Copper Enhances Zinc-Induced Neurotoxicity and the Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress Response in a Neuronal Model of Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Ken-ichiro; Kawahara, Masahiro

    2017-01-01

    Zinc (Zn), an essential trace element, is secreted by synaptic vesicles during neuronal excitation and plays several critical roles in neuronal information processing. However, excess Zn ion (Zn2+) is neurotoxic and has a causative role in the pathogenesis of vascular dementia. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism of Zn2+-induced neurotoxicity by using immortalized hypothalamic neurons (GT1-7 cells), which are more vulnerable than other neuronal cells to Zn2+. We examined the effects of other metal ions on the Zn2+-induced neurotoxicity in these cells and found that sub-lethal concentrations of copper ion (Cu2+) markedly exacerbated Zn2+-induced neurotoxicity. The co-administration of Cu2+ and Zn2+ also significantly increased the expression of genes related to the endoplasmic reticulum's stress response, including CHOP, GADD34, and ATF4. Similar to Zn2+, Cu2+ is stored in presynaptic vesicles and secreted during neuronal excitation. Thus, based on our results, we hypothesize here that Cu2+ interacts with Zn2+ in the synapse to synergistically promote neuronal death and significantly influence the pathogenesis of vascular dementia. PMID:28232787

  17. Midlife vascular risk factors and their association with dementia deaths: results from a Norwegian prospective study followed up for 35 years.

    PubMed

    Strand, Bjørn Heine; Langballe, Ellen Melbye; Hjellvik, Vidar; Handal, Marte; Næss, Oyvind; Knudsen, Gunn Peggy; Refsum, Helga; Tambs, Kristian; Nafstad, Per; Schirmer, Henrik; Bergem, Astrid Liv Mina; Selmer, Randi; Engedal, Knut; Magnus, Per; Bjertness, Espen

    2013-01-15

    There is growing evidence that midlife risk factors for vascular disease also are risk factors for dementia, but there is still need for long-term observational studies to address this. Our objective was to investigate the association of midlife vascular disease risk factors with dementia death. Participants were included in The Norwegian Counties Study (NCS) in the period 1974-78, aged 35-50 years at baseline. Information from NCS was linked with the Cause of Death Registry through the year 2009 using the unique personal identification number. The study included 48,793 participants, 1.5 million person years and 486 dementia deaths (187 Alzheimer's; 299 non-Alzheimer's dementia). Cox regression for cause-specific hazards was used. Dementia death was associated with increased total cholesterol levels (>7.80 vs. <5.20 mmol/l: HR=2.01, 95% confidence interval 1.37-2.93); diabetes (HR=2.43, 95% CI 1.40-4.32) and low body mass index (<20 kg/m(2) vs. 20-25 kg/m(2): HR=1.76, 95% CI 1.15-2.68) in midlife. The associations remained after adjustment for other vascular risk factors and educational level. Smoking status or blood pressure in midlife was not significantly associated with risk of dementia death, although the results indicate a possible increased risk in heavy smokers. People suffering from high cholesterol levels, diabetes or underweight in midlife are at increased risk of dying from or with dementia later in life. Our findings add to previous results suggesting that intervention in midlife may be important. To better understand the mechanisms involved in the associations between midlife underweight, diabetes, and elevated cholesterol level and late-life dementia death, these links need to be further investigated.

  18. Astroglial NF-kB contributes to white matter damage and cognitive impairment in a mouse model of vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Saggu, Raman; Schumacher, Toni; Gerich, Florian; Rakers, Cordula; Tai, Khalid; Delekate, Andrea; Petzold, Gabor C

    2016-08-04

    Vascular cognitive impairment is the second most common form of dementia. The pathogenic pathways leading to vascular cognitive impairment remain unclear but clinical and experimental data have shown that chronic reactive astrogliosis occurs within white matter lesions, indicating that a sustained pro-inflammatory environment affecting the white matter may contribute towards disease progression. To model vascular cognitive impairment, we induced prolonged mild cerebral hypoperfusion in mice by bilateral common carotid artery stenosis. This chronic hypoperfusion resulted in reactive gliosis of astrocytes and microglia within white matter tracts, demyelination and axonal degeneration, consecutive spatial memory deficits, and loss of white matter integrity, as measured by ultra high-field magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging. White matter astrogliosis was accompanied by activation of the pro-inflammatory transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-kB in reactive astrocytes. Using mice expressing a dominant negative inhibitor of NF-kB under the control of the astrocyte-specific glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) promoter (GFAP-IkBα-dn), we found that transgenic inhibition of astroglial NF-kB signaling ameliorated gliosis and axonal loss, maintained white matter structural integrity, and preserved memory function. Collectively, our results imply that pro-inflammatory changes in white matter astrocytes may represent an important detrimental component in the pathogenesis of vascular cognitive impairment, and that targeting these pathways may lead to novel therapeutic strategies.

  19. Risk factors for dementia in the epidemiological study of Munguialde County (Basque Country-Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Fernández Martínez, Manuel; Castro Flores, Jessica; Pérez de las Heras, Susana; Mandaluniz Lekumberri, Aitziber; Gordejuela Menocal, María; Zarranz Imirizaldu, Juan José

    2008-01-01

    Background Prevalence of degenerative dementias and dementias associated with cerebrovascular disease is increasing. Dementia is one of the most significant public health problem. In recent years, the role of vascular risk factors (hypertension, diabetes mellitus and hypercholesterolemia) and depression has been evaluated. The incidence of dementia and risk factors has not been fully investigated in Spain. The aim of this study was to identify the risk factors for dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD) in elderly people in Munguialde County (Spain). Methods A two phase, door-to-door populational study was performed. Demographic variables and the presence of vascular risk factors and depression were recorded. The MMSE, the DSM-IV and the conventional criteria for AD and VD were used in the evaluation. The odds ratio for each risk factor was calculated by logistic regression analysis. Results 1756 healthy subjects and 175 patients with dementia participated in the study. Of these, 133 had AD, 15 VD and the remainder other dementias. The risk factors for dementia and AD were female sex (OR = 1.67 and 1.97, respectively); age (OR = 1.14 and 1.15); stroke (OR = 7.84 and 3); and depression (OR = 53.08 and 3.19). Stroke was the only risk factor for VD (OR = 119). Conclusion Greater age, female sex, stroke and depression increase the risk of suffering dementia, AD and VD. The relationship between depression, vascular risk factors and dementia has clear public health implications. Prevention and early treatment of vascular risk factors and depression may have an important impact in lowering the risk of dementia and could modify the natural history of the disease. PMID:18922150

  20. COMPARATIVE EFFECTIVENESS OF MCI and DEMENTIA TREATMENTS IN A COMMUNITY-BASED DEMENTIA PRACTICE

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-08-04

    Mild Cognitive Impairment; Dementia; Hypoxia; Hyperhomocysteinemia; Vitamin B 12 Deficiency; Iron Deficiency; Anemia; TBI; Neurodegenerative Disorders; Alzheimer's Disease; Vascular Dementia; Brain Injuries; Tauopathies; Parkinson's Disease; Lewy Body Dementia; Frontotemporal Dementia; TDP-43 Proteinopathies

  1. Genetics and underlying pathology of dementia.

    PubMed

    Ferencz, Beata; Gerritsen, Lotte

    2015-03-01

    As the population steadily ages, dementia, in all its forms, remains a great societal challenge. Yet, our knowledge of their etiology remains rather limited. To this end, genetic studies can give us insight into the underlying mechanisms that lead to the development of dementia, potentially facilitating treatments in the future. In this review we cover the most recent genetic risk factors associated with the onset of the four most common dementia types today, including Alzheimer's disease (AD), Vascular Dementia (VaD), Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD) and Lewy Body Dementia (LBD). Moreover, we discuss the overlap in major underlying pathologies of dementia derived from their genetic associations. While all four dementia types appear to involve genes associated with tau-pathology and neuroinflammation only LBD, AD and VaD appear to involve amyloid genes while LBD and FTLD share alpha synuclein genes. Together these findings suggest that some of the dementias may exist along a spectrum and demonstrates the necessity to conduct large-scale studies pinpointing the etiology of the dementias and potential gene and environment interactions that may influence their development.

  2. Are vascular factors involved in Alzheimer's disease? Facts and theories.

    PubMed

    Di Iorio, A; Zito, M; Lupinetti, M; Abate, G

    1999-12-01

    The hypothesis that vascular factors may contribute to the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is supported by epidemiologic and pathologic observations. Arterial hypertension and diabetes have been found to be associated not only with vascular dementia, but also with AD; in addition, the treatment of hypertension with calcium antagonists seems to prevent degenerative dementias. Hypertension and hyperinsulinemia favor the deposition of amyloid substance in the brain. The histopathology of AD is marked not only by neurofibrillary tangles and senile plaques, but also by macro and micro congophilic angiopathy and ischemic white matter rarefaction. The specific AD pathological lesions, if isolated, are not able to lead to an evident clinical picture of dementia, which, on the contrary, becomes evident when vascular, mainly subcortical, lesions are associated. These and other observations suggest that vascular factors may have a role in the development of AD. An aggressive approach to these factors could be of value in the prevention of AD.

  3. N-Methyl D-Aspartate (NMDA) Receptor Antagonists and Memantine Treatment for Alzheimer’s Disease, Vascular Dementia and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Olivares, David; Deshpande, Varun K.; Shi, Ying; Lahiri, Debomoy K.; Greig, Nigel H.; Rogers, Jack T.; Huang, Xudong

    2016-01-01

    Memantine, a partial antagonist of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR), approved for moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease (AD) treatment within the US and Europe under brand name Namenda (Forest), Axura and Akatinol (Merz), and Ebixa and Abixa (Lundbeck), may have potential in alleviating additional neurological conditions, such as vascular dementia (VD) and Parkinson’s disease (PD). In various animal models, memantine has been reported to be a neuroprotective agent that positively impacts both neurodegenerative and vascular processes. While excessive levels of glutamate result in neurotoxicity, in part through the over-activation of NMDARs, memantine—as a partial NMDAR antagonist, blocks the NMDA glutamate receptors to normalize the glutamatergic system and ameliorate cognitive and memory deficits. The key to memantine’s therapeutic action lies in its uncompetitive binding to the NMDAR through which low affinity and rapid off-rate kinetics of memantine at the level of the NMDAR-channel preserves the physiological function of the receptor, underpinning memantine’s tolerability and low adverse event profile. As the biochemical pathways evoked by NMDAR antagonism also play a role in PD and since no other drug is sufficiently effective to substitute for the first-line treatment of L-dopa despite its side effects, memantine may be useful in PD treatment with possibly fewer side effects. In spite of the relative modest nature of its adverse effects, memantine has been shown to provide only a moderate decrease in clinical deterioration in AD and VD, and hence efforts are being undertaken in the design of new and more potent memantine-based drugs to hopefully provide greater efficacy. PMID:21875407

  4. Defensive effect of lansoprazole in dementia of AD type in mice exposed to streptozotocin and cholesterol enriched diet.

    PubMed

    Sodhi, Rupinder K; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-01-01

    The present study investigates the potential of lansoprazole (a proton pump inhibitor and agonist of liver x receptors) in experimental dementia of AD type. Streptozotocin [STZ, 3 mg/kg, injected intracerebroventricular (i.c.v), and high fat diet (HFD, administered for 90 days)] were used to induce dementia in separate groups of Swiss mice. Morris water maze (MWM) test was performed to assess learning and memory of the animals. A battery of biochemical and histopathological studies were also performed. Extent of oxidative stress was measured by estimating the levels of brain reduced glutathione (GSH) and thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS). Brain acetylcholinestrase (AChE) activity and serum cholesterol levels were also estimated. The brain level of myeloperoxidase (MPO) was measured as a marker of inflammation. STZ and HFD produced a marked decline in MWM performance of the animals, reflecting impairment of learning and memory. STZ/HFD treated mice exhibited a marked accentuation of AChE activity, TBARS and MPO levels along with a fall in GSH levels. Further, the stained micrographs of STZ/HFD treated mice indicated pathological changes, severe neutrophilic infiltration and amyloid deposition. Lansoprazole treatment significantly attenuated STZ and HFD -induced memory deficits, biochemical and histopathological alterations. It also prevented HFD-induced rise in the cholesterol level. Therefore, the findings demonstrate potential of lansoprazole in memory dysfunctions which may probably be attributed to its anti-cholinesterase, anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory effects. Moreover, both cholesterol-dependent as well as cholesterol-independent effects of lansoprazole appear to play a role. In addition study indicates the role of liver x receptors in dementia.

  5. Screening for Dementia in Older Adults: Comparison of Mini-Mental State Examination, Mini-Cog, Clock Drawing Test and AD8

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Li; Yan, Jing; Jin, Xiaoqing; Jin, Yu; Yu, Wei; Xu, Shanhu; Wu, Haibin

    2016-01-01

    This study was conducted to estimate screening performance of dementia screening tools including Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), Mini-Cog, Clock Drawing Test (CDT) and Ascertain Dementia 8 questionnaire (AD8) for older adults. 2015 participants aged 65 years or more in eastern China were enrolled. 4 screening tests were administered and scored by specifically trained psychiatrists. We used data from two-by-two tables to calculate the sensitivity, specificity, and positive and negative predictive values (PPV/NPV). Our study showed that dementia was highly prevalent among elderly in Zhejiang province. The Mini-Cog, with excellent screening characteristics and spending less time, could be considered to be used as a screening tool among communities to help to diagnose dementia early. PMID:28006822

  6. Why are spousal caregivers more prevalent than nonspousal caregivers as study partners in AD dementia clinical trials?

    PubMed Central

    Cary, Mark S.; Rubright, Jonathan D.; Grill, Joshua D.; Karlawish, Jason

    2014-01-01

    Objectives Most Alzheimer’s disease (AD) caregivers are not spouses and yet most AD dementia trials enroll spousal study partners. This study examines the association between caregiver relationship to the patient and willingness to enroll in an AD clinical trial and how caregiver burden and research attitudes modify willingness. Design Interviews with 103 AD caregivers who met criteria for ability to serve as a study partner. Results 54% of caregivers were spouses or domestic partners and the remaining were adult children. Willingness to enroll a patient in a clinical trial was associated with being a spouse (OR = 2.53, p = 0.01), increasing age (OR = 1.39, p = 0.01), and increasing scores on the Research Attitudes Questionnaire (OR = 1.39, p < 0.001). No measures of caregiver burden or patient health were significant predictors of willingness. In multivariate models both research attitudes (OR = 1.37, p < 0.001) and being a spouse, as opposed to an adult child, (OR = 2.06, p = 0.048) were independently associated with willingness to participate. Conclusions Spousal caregivers had both a higher willingness to participate and a more positive attitude toward research. Caregiver burden had no association with willingness to participate. The strongest predictor of willingness was research attitudes. PMID:24805971

  7. Cross-cultural studies using a modified mini mental test for healthy subjects and patients with various forms of vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Thajeb, Peterus; Thajeb, Teguh; Dai, Daofu

    2007-03-01

    Existing neuropsychological tests are often complex and time-consuming. We designed a modified Mini Mental Test (MMT) battery for clinical assessment of the global and regional higher cortical functions of the brain. We tested its applicability in healthy subjects with different ethnic, cultural and educational backgrounds. The usefulness of our MMT as a tool for the clinical evaluation of patients with various forms of vascular dementia was determined. The MMT comprises five subtests, including clinical evaluations of: (A) orientation (6 points); (B) attention, right-left discrimination, speech, and calculation (20); (C) immediate recall, and recent and remote memory retrieval (10); (D) praxis (10); and (E) visuospatial orientation, agnosia, hemianopsia, and visual hemineglect (14). The MMT was administered to 100 healthy subjects from two different ethnic backgrounds (Indonesian and Chinese/Taiwanese) and diverse cultural and educational backgrounds, and to 61 patients with various forms of vascular dementia. MMT scores were significantly lower in healthy subjects with a low level of education regardless of their ethnic background (p<0.001). Patients with vascular dementia had much lower MMT scores than did the comparable age-adjusted normal controls (p<0.001). Of the patients with vascular dementia, those with Binswanger's disease had the lowest MMT scores (25.5+/-28.9), followed by those with large cerebral infarcts (48.0+/-7.1), cerebral haemorrhage (49.0+/-8.5), and multiple lacunar infarctions (55.0+/-0.5) (P<0.001). With a cut-off point of 33/55 (partial score/total score), the sensitivity and positive predictive value of the MMT were 0.98 and 0.94, respectively. The MMT is a simple and useful tool for clinical assessment of the cognitive functions of healthy subjects and patients with or without vascular dementia. It can be used for individuals with different ethnic, cultural and educational backgrounds.

  8. Improved social interaction and increased anterior cingulate metabolism after group reminiscence with reality orientation approach for vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Akanuma, Kyoko; Meguro, Kenichi; Meguro, Mitsue; Sasaki, Eriko; Chiba, Kentaro; Ishii, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Naofumi

    2011-06-30

    A group reminiscence approach (GRA) with reality orientation (RO) is widely used as a psychosocial intervention for dementia. Since clinical effectiveness was reported for the intervention, interest has been directed toward areas of the neuronal network that might be being stimulated. We hypothesized that the frontal lobe associated with social interaction was being stimulated. To test this hypothesis, we studied 24 patients with vascular dementia. In addition to conventional care, a 1-h session of GRA with RO was provided once a week for 3 months in the GRA-RO arm (n=12). Only supportive care was provided in the control arm (n=12). Before and after the interventions, cognitive function, depressive state, and social activities were assessed. Since glucose metabolism is associated with brain function, cerebral glucose metabolism was measured by positron emission tomography (PET). Regarding behavioral improvement, 10 patients in the GRA-RO arm showed improvement compared with only two patients in the control arm, a significant difference. PET demonstrated that metabolism in the anterior cingulate was increased in the GRA-RO arm, whereas no significant changes were observed in the control arm. These results suggest that GRA-RO stimulates the anterior cingulate and has a positive effect on social interaction.

  9. Poor Gait Performance and Prediction of Dementia: Results From a Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Beauchet, Olivier; Annweiler, Cédric; Callisaya, Michele L.; De Cock, Anne-Marie; Helbostad, Jorunn L.; Kressig, Reto W.; Srikanth, Velandai; Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Blumen, Helena M.; Verghese, Joe; Allali, Gilles

    2017-01-01

    Background Poor gait performance predicts risk of developing dementia. No structured critical evaluation has been conducted to study this association yet. The aim of this meta-analysis was to systematically examine the association of poor gait performance with incidence of dementia. Methods An English and French Medline search was conducted in June 2015, with no limit of date, using the medical subject headings terms “Gait” OR “Gait Disorders, Neurologic” OR “Gait Apraxia” OR “Gait Ataxia” AND “Dementia” OR “Frontotemporal Dementia” OR “Dementia, Multi-Infarct” OR “Dementia, Vascular” OR “Alzheimer Disease” OR “Lewy Body Disease” OR “Frontotemporal Dementia With Motor Neuron Disease” (Supplementary Concept). Poor gait performance was defined by standardized tests of walking, and dementia was diagnosed according to international consensus criteria. Four etiologies of dementia were identified: any dementia, Alzheimer disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), and non-AD (ie, pooling VaD, mixed dementias, and other dementias). Fixed effects meta-analyses were performed on the estimates in order to generate summary values. Results Of the 796 identified abstracts, 12 (1.5%) were included in this systematic review and meta-analysis. Poor gait performance predicted dementia [pooled hazard ratio (HR) combined with relative risk and odds ratio = 1.53 with P < .001 for any dementia, pooled HR = 1.79 with P < .001 for VaD, HR = 1.89 with P value < .001 for non-AD]. Findings were weaker for predicting AD (HR = 1.03 with P value = .004). Conclusions This meta-analysis provides evidence that poor gait performance predicts dementia. This association depends on the type of dementia; poor gait performance is a stronger predictor of non-AD dementias than AD. PMID:26852960

  10. Strategic infarcts in vascular dementia. A clinical and brain imaging experience.

    PubMed

    Tatemichi, T K; Desmond, D W; Prohovnik, I

    1995-03-01

    The mechanisms of dementia resulting from small deep infarctions are incompletely understood. The thesis underlying the concept of "multi-infarct dementia" is that multiple lesions have a synergistic effect on mental functions, resulting in dementia irrespective of specific location or volume. In this report, we summarize our experience with six patients reported previously along with additional patients examined subsequently, whose clinical features and brain imaging findings allow an alternative formulation for dementia resulting from lacunar stroke. The six initial patients presented with an abrupt change in behavior after acute infarction involving the inferior genu of the internal capsule documented by computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The acute syndrome featured fluctuating alertness, inattention, memory loss, apathy, abulia, and psychomotor retardation suggesting frontal lobe dysfunction. Contralateral hemiparesis and dysarthria were generally mild, except when the infarct extended into the posterior limb. Neuropsychological testing in five patients with left-sided infarcts revealed severe verbal memory loss. Additional cognitive deficits consistent with dementia were evident in four patients. A right-sided infarct caused transient impairment in visuospatial memory. Functional brain imaging in three patients using 133xenon regional cerebral blood flow (rCBF) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) showed focal reduction in hemispheric perfusion most prominent in the ipsilateral inferior and medial frontal cortex. Perfusion was also defective in the medial and laterial temporal cortex. Important pathways of the limbic system traverse the inferior capsule in the region of the genu. Corticothalamic and thalamocortical fibers form the thalamic peduncles which detach from the internal capsule and enter the thalamus at its rostral and caudal poles and along its dorsal surface. The anterior thalamic peduncle, conveys

  11. Cognitive training and cognitive rehabilitation for persons with mild to moderate dementia of the Alzheimer's or vascular type: a review

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive impairments, and particularly memory deficits, are a defining feature of the early stages of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Interventions that target these cognitive deficits and the associated difficulties with activities of daily living are the subject of ever-growing interest. Cognitive training and cognitive rehabilitation are specific forms of non-pharmacological intervention to address cognitive and non-cognitive outcomes. The present review is an abridged version of a Cochrane Review and aims to systematically evaluate the evidence for these forms of intervention in people with mild Alzheimer's disease or vascular dementia. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs), published in English, comparing cognitive rehabilitation or cognitive training interventions with control conditions and reporting relevant outcomes for the person with dementia or the family caregiver (or both), were considered for inclusion. Eleven RCTs reporting cognitive training interventions were included in the review. A large number of measures were used in the different studies, and meta-analysis could be conducted for several primary and secondary outcomes of interest. Several outcomes were not measured in any of the studies. Overall estimates of the treatment effect were calculated by using a fixed-effects model, and statistical heterogeneity was measured by using a standard chi-squared statistic. One RCT of cognitive rehabilitation was identified, allowing the examination of effect sizes, but no meta-analysis could be conducted. Cognitive training was not associated with positive or negative effects in relation to any of the reported outcomes. The overall quality of the trials was low to moderate. The single RCT of cognitive rehabilitation found promising results in relation to some patient and caregiver outcomes and was generally of high quality. The available evidence regarding cognitive training remains limited, and the quality of the evidence needs to improve

  12. Consideration on serum triiodothyronine (T3), thyroxine (T4) concentration and T3/T4 ratio in the patients of senile dementia--is it possible to prevent cerebro-vascular dementia?

    PubMed

    Nakanishi, T

    1990-02-01

    Serum T3 concentration and T3/T4 Ratio in the patients of senile dementia (SD) are smaller than those in the healthy. Especially, those in the group of cerebro-vascular dementia (CVD) were remarkably lower than the healthy. However average of serum T4 in the former is very similar to it in the latter. This fact suggests the disturbance of metabolic transformation of T4 to T3 in the post-apoplectic brain. It seems to lead man to the metabolic disturbances of glucose, protein, nucleic acid, etc, and moreover CVD. Basing on the experiences, the author thinks of the next .--'Cerebro-vascular dementia may be able to be prevented, if a very small dose of triiodothyronine (T3) is given to the early stage after an apoplectic attack with a consideration to side-effects of T3. Moreover, T3 may bring a preventive and therapeutic effect even to senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT).' 'The reason why the Japanese people have tended to suffer from CVD more frequently than SDAT, may be due to the customs, of which they have lived in seaside and taken iodine-rich fishes and marine plants as their subsidiary foods, as if the schizophrenic patients in the Alpine regions of iodine-lack were characterized by prevalence of so called negative symptoms'.

  13. White Matter Damage in the Cholinergic System Contributes to Cognitive Impairment in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment, No Dementia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Qing; Zhu, Zude; Teipel, Stefan J; Yang, Jianwei; Xing, Yi; Tang, Yi; Jia, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Cholinergic deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), but the extent of involvement and underlying mechanism remain unclear. In this study, targeting the early stage of VCI, we determined regional atrophy within the basal forebrain and deficiency in cholinergic pathways in 25 patients with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (VCIND) compared to 24 healthy elderly subjects. By applying stereotaxic cytoarchitectonic maps of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NbM), no significant atrophy was identified in VCIND. Using probabilistic tractography analysis, our study tracked the two major white matter tracks which map to cholinergic pathways. We identified significantly lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in VCIND. Mediation analysis demonstrated that FA in the tracked pathways could fully account for the executive dysfunction, and partly mediate the memory and global cognition impairment. Our study suggests that the fibers mapped to the cholinergic pathways, but not the NbM, are significantly impaired in VCIND. MRI-based in vivo tracking of cholinergic pathways together with NbM measurement may become a valuable in vivo marker for evaluating the cholinergic system in cognitive disorders.

  14. White Matter Damage in the Cholinergic System Contributes to Cognitive Impairment in Subcortical Vascular Cognitive Impairment, No Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qing; Zhu, Zude; Teipel, Stefan J.; Yang, Jianwei; Xing, Yi; Tang, Yi; Jia, Jianping

    2017-01-01

    Cholinergic deficiency has been implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular cognitive impairment (VCI), but the extent of involvement and underlying mechanism remain unclear. In this study, targeting the early stage of VCI, we determined regional atrophy within the basal forebrain and deficiency in cholinergic pathways in 25 patients with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (VCIND) compared to 24 healthy elderly subjects. By applying stereotaxic cytoarchitectonic maps of the nucleus basalis of Meynert (NbM), no significant atrophy was identified in VCIND. Using probabilistic tractography analysis, our study tracked the two major white matter tracks which map to cholinergic pathways. We identified significantly lower fractional anisotropy (FA) in VCIND. Mediation analysis demonstrated that FA in the tracked pathways could fully account for the executive dysfunction, and partly mediate the memory and global cognition impairment. Our study suggests that the fibers mapped to the cholinergic pathways, but not the NbM, are significantly impaired in VCIND. MRI-based in vivo tracking of cholinergic pathways together with NbM measurement may become a valuable in vivo marker for evaluating the cholinergic system in cognitive disorders. PMID:28289381

  15. Effect of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on memory and brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in a rat model of vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Sakr, H F; Khalil, K I; Hussein, A M; Zaki, M S A; Eid, R A; Alkhateeb, M

    2014-02-01

    The effect of dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) on memory and cognition in experimental animals is well known, but its efficacy in clinical dementia is unproven. So, the aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of DHEA on learning and memory activities in a rat model of vascular dementia (VD). Forty-eight male rats that positively passed the holeboard memory test were chosen for the study before bilateral permanent occlusion of the common carotid artery. They were divided into four groups (n=12, each) as follows (i) untreated control, (ii) rats exposed to surgical permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid arteries (BCCAO) leading to chronic cerebral hypoperfusion, (iii) rats exposed to BCCAO then received DHEA (BCCAO + DHEA) and (i.v.) rats exposed to BCCAO then received donepezil (BCCAO + DON). Holeboard memory test was used to assess the time, latency, working memory and reference memory. Central level of acetylcholine, norepinephrine and dopamine in the hippocampus were measured. Furthermore, the expression of brain derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) in the hippocampus was determined. Histopathological studies of the cerebral cortex and transmission electron microscope of the hippocampus were performed. BCCAO decreased the learning and memory activities in the holeboard memory. Also, it decreased the expression of BDNF as well as the central level of acetylcholine, noradrenaline and dopamine as compared to control rats. Treatment with DHEA and donepezil increased the working and reference memories, BDNF expression as well as the central acetylcholine in the hippocampus as compared to BCCAO rats. DHEA produced neuroprotective effects through increasing the expression of BDNF as well as increasing the central level of acetylcholine and catecholamines which are non-comparable to donepezil effects.

  16. The Potential for Estrogens in Preventing Alzheimer's Disease and Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Perez, Evelyn; Wang, Xiaofei; Yang, ShaoHua; Wen, Yi; Singh, Meharvan

    2009-01-01

    Estrogens are the best-studied class of drugs for potential use in the prevention of Alzheimer's disease (AD). These steroids have been shown to be potent neuroprotectants both in vitro and in vivo, and to exert effects that are consistent with their potential use in prevention of AD. These include the prevention of the processing of amyloid precursor protein (APP) into beta-amyloid (Aß), the reduction in tau hyperphosphorylation, and the elimination of catastrophic attempts at neuronal mitosis. Further, epidemiological data support the efficacy of early postmenopausal use of estrogens for the delay or prevention of AD. Collectively, this evidence supports the further development of estrogen-like compounds for prevention of AD. Several approaches to enhance brain specificity of estrogen action are now underway in an attempt to reduce the side effects of chronic estrogen therapy in AD. PMID:19890493

  17. Differences of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia in Disease Severity in Four Major Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Kazui, Hiroaki; Yoshiyama, Kenji; Kanemoto, Hideki; Suzuki, Yukiko; Sato, Shunsuke; Hashimoto, Mamoru; Ikeda, Manabu; Tanaka, Hibiki; Hatada, Yutaka; Matsushita, Masateru; Nishio, Yoshiyuki; Mori, Etsuro; Tanimukai, Satoshi; Komori, Kenjiro; Yoshida, Taku; Shimizu, Hideaki; Matsumoto, Teruhisa; Mori, Takaaki; Kashibayashi, Tetsuo; Yokoyama, Kazumasa; Shimomura, Tatsuo; Kabeshita, Yasunobu; Adachi, Hiroyoshi; Tanaka, Toshihisa

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSDs) negatively impact the prognosis of dementia patients and increase caregiver distress. The aims of this study were to clarify the differences of trajectories of 12 kinds of BPSDs by disease severity in four major dementias and to develop charts showing the frequency, severity, and associated caregiver distress (ACD) of BPSDs using the data of a Japan multicenter study (J-BIRD). Methods We gathered Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) data of patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD; n = 1091), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB; n = 249), vascular dementia (VaD; n = 156), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD; n = 102) collected during a 5-year period up to July 31, 2013 in seven centers for dementia in Japan. The NPI composite scores (frequency × severity) of 12 kinds of items were analyzed using a principal component analysis (PCA) in each dementia. The factor scores of the PCA were compared in each dementia by disease severity, which was determined with Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR). Results Significant increases with higher CDR scores were observed in 1) two of the three factor scores which were loaded for all items except euphoria in AD, 2) two of the four factor scores for apathy, aberrant motor behavior (AMB), sleep disturbances, agitation, irritability, disinhibition, and euphoria in DLB, and 3) one of the four factor scores for apathy, depression, anxiety, and sleep disturbances in VaD. However, no increases were observed in any of the five factor scores in FTLD. Conclusions As dementia progresses, several BPSDs become more severe, including 1) apathy and sleep disturbances in AD, DLB, and VaD, 2) all of the BPSDs except euphoria in AD, 3) AMB, agitation, irritability, disinhibition, and euphoria in DLB, and 4) depression and anxiety in VaD. Trajectories of BPSDs in FTLD were unclear. PMID:27536962

  18. Effect of exercise-induced neurogenesis on cognitive function deficit in a rat model of vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Choi, Dong-Hee; Lee, Kyoung-Hee; Lee, Jongmin

    2016-04-01

    Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion (CCH) is strongly correlated with progressive cognitive decline in neurological diseases, such as vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease. Exercise can enhance learning and memory, and delay age-related cognitive decline. However, exercise-induced hippocampal neurogenesis in experimental animals submitted to CCH has not been investigated. The present study aimed to investigate whether hippocampal neurogenesis induced by exercise can improve cognitive deficit in a rat model of VaD. Male Wistar rats (age, 8 weeks; weight, 292±3.05 g; n=12-13/group) were subjected to bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (2VO) or sham‑surgery and each group was then subdivided randomly into no exercise and treadmill exercise groups. Exercise groups performed treadmill exercise daily at 15 m/min for 30 min for 4 weeks from the third to the seventh week after 2VO. It was demonstrated that the number of neural progenitor cells and mature neurons in the subgranular zone of 2VO rats was increased by exercise, and cognitive impairment in 2VO rats was attenuated by treadmill exercise. In addition, mature brain‑derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the hippocampus were increased in the exercise groups. Thus the present study suggests that exercise delays cognitive decline by the enhancing neurogenesis and increasing BDNF expression in the context of VaD.

  19. Improved functional status by comprehensive physical and psychosocial approach through right insula activation in poststroke vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Naofumi; Meguro, Kenichi; Ishikawa, Hiroyasu; Yamaguchi, Satoshi

    2013-10-01

    The aim is to investigate the effect of a comprehensive physical and psychosocial approach on functional outcome and cerebral glucose metabolism in poststroke vascular dementia (PSVaD). Ten PSVaD patients participated in the study. They were diagnosed according to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke and Association Internationale pour la Recherché et l'Enseignement en Neurosciences (NINDS-AIREN) criteria and needed physical assistance in sit-to-stand transfer activities. Six were enrolled in a comprehensive program consisted of an individualized task-specific exercise regimen of transfer training and a psychosocial intervention program. The other 4 patients participated in the control group. The programs were undertaken over a period of 2 months. Outcomes were the scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination and the Functional Independence Measure (FIM), and on cerebral glucose metabolism determined by (18)F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography performed before and at the end of the program. The score on the transfer mobility subscale of the FIM increased at the end of the program in all patients who received the comprehensive program. Regional glucose metabolism was increased in the right insular cortex at the end of the combined program. Control patients showed no change in FIM score or regional cerebral metabolism. A combined approach may be associated with an increase in glucose metabolism of the right insula cortex in PSVaD patients.

  20. Dementia with cerebrovascular disease: the benefits of early treatment.

    PubMed

    Schindler, R J

    2005-10-01

    Patients with vascular dementia (VaD) and Alzheimer's disease with cerebrovascular disease (AD + CVD) have dementia associated with underlying CVD. Although diagnosis of VaD is challenging, VaD is typically characterized by a stepwise progression of dementia that is closely associated with stroke and focal neurological findings, and a symptom profile that often includes executive dysfunction leading to decreased ability to perform instrumental activities of daily living (IADL). In contrast, AD + CVD patients typically present with progressive deterioration of cognition/memory that may also be influenced by concurrent cerebrovascular events. Early diagnosis and intervention are desirable to prevent further decline due to subsequent vascular events. Management of CVD can limit deterioration of cognitive symptoms in VaD patients, and treatment benefits with cholinesterase inhibitors may be realized as improvement above baseline levels in dementia symptoms. Results from a combined analysis of two 24-week, placebo-controlled clinical trials show that donepezil-treated VaD patients improve in cognition, global function, and performance of IADL. In contrast, AD + CVD patients may continue to decline despite management of CVD, and treatment benefits should be recognized as initial improvements followed by stabilization or slowed decline of dementia symptoms over time. In post-marketing studies, donepezil-treated AD and AD + CVD patients show similar benefits in cognition, global function, and quality of life. The results of these studies support the use of donepezil in treatment of patients with VaD or AD + CVD.

  1. [Depression and dementia: perspectives from clinical studies].

    PubMed

    Nozaki, Shoko; Yoshimura, Kimio; Mimura, Masaru

    2012-12-01

    In this review, we present an overview of clinical studies that addressed the relationship between depression and dementia or cognitive decline. Cross-sectional studies and meta-analyses have repeatedly shown an association between late-life depression (LLD) and dementia, particularly Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia; however, the findings of cohort studies have been inconsistent. Furthermore, studies on the association between depression with a younger age of onset and dementia have yielded inconsistent results. Regarding cognitive decline associated with LLD, several studies have reported an association between LLD and mild cognitive impairment, suggesting that depression itself can cause persistent cognitive impairment. Other studies have compared the cognitive profile between LLD and depression with a younger age of onset, but their results have been inconclusive, especially regarding the association between memory impairment and the age of onset of depression. LLD is associated with vascular change and white matter degeneration of the brain, as shown by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). Recently, several studies reported an association between gray matter change and LLD. Studies currently in progress employ functional brain imaging methods such as single-photon emission computed tomography, functional MRI, and positron emission tomography. Clinically, it is important to understand how subtypes of depression can be defined in terms of risk of developing dementia, and to devise effective treatments. One paper explored the possibility of detecting depression associated with AD by measuring the blood Aβ40/Aβ42 levels, and other studies have suggested that symptoms of apathy and loss of interest are associated with conversion of depression to AD. Unfortunately, current antidepressants may have limited efficacy on depression with dementia; therefore, further investigation for devising methods of predicting conversion of depression to dementia and

  2. The effects of educational background on Montreal Cognitive Assessment screening for vascular cognitive impairment, no dementia, caused by ischemic stroke.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yuanbo; Wang, Muqiu; Ren, Mingshan; Xu, Wenhua

    2013-10-01

    It is possible that a patient's educational background has an effect on their Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score, which is used to evaluate patients for vascular cognitive impairment, no dementia (VCIND) after ischemic stroke. Cognitive impairment was evaluated in patients with no cognitive impairment (NCI) or VCIND using the MoCA. The receiver operating characteristic curve and maximal Youden index were used to determine the optimal cut-off values to distinguish between NCI and VCIND. The sensitivity and specificity of MoCA were calculated for patients with primary, secondary and tertiary educational levels. Patients with NCI (n=111) and VCIND (n=95) were tested. In patients with a primary education, a significant difference was found between the two groups in each of the MoCA factors, except for naming. Likewise, a significant difference was found in all factors, except for naming, attention and calculation, for patients with a secondary education. For the patients with a tertiary education, a significant difference was found only in visuospatial/executive abilities, abstraction and memory (p<0.05). The optimal cut-off value for MoCA in order to identify VCIND was 22-23. MoCA showed an overall sensitivity of 65.26% and specificity of 78.73%. The sensitivity in the primary, secondary and tertiary educated groups was 97.06%, 56.10% and 40%, respectively, with the specificity being 47.22%, 87.80% and 100%, respectively. We suggest that the MoCA score needs to be amended according to the patient's educational levels in order to improve the effectiveness of the screening.

  3. Effect of Selective 5-HT6R Agonist on Expression of 5-HT Receptor and Neurotransmitter in Vascular Dementia Rats

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Haining; Chen, Tao; Zhou, Li; Tang, Jiyou

    2017-01-01

    Background 5-HT6 receptor (5-HT6R) has pluripotent roles regulating secretion of neurotransmitters. However, whether 5-HT6R is involved in the development of vascular dementia (VD) remains unclear. To evaluate the role and mechanism of 5-HT6R in VD, this study established a rat VD model to evaluate the effect of selective 5-HT6R agonist on the expression of 5-HT6R mRNA and neurotransmitter. Material/Methods Eighty healthy male SD rats (7 weeks old) were randomly assigned to sham, model, 5-HT6R agonist, and placebo groups (N=20 each). A rat VD model was generated by permeant bilateral ligation of the common carotid artery. 5-HT6R agonist, placebo, or saline were given intraperitoneally for 4 weeks. The Morris water maze was utilized to test learning and memory function. Brains were extracted to separate the cortex and hippocampal tissues, in which glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) levels were analyzed. mRNA and protein levels of 5-HT6R were determined by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC), respectively. Results Model rats had longer escape latency and fewer crossing platform times. Contents of DA, Glu, GABA, and Ach were lowered in cortical and hippocampal tissues, and 5-HT6R expression was suppressed (p<0.05). The application of 5-HT6R agonist shortened escape latency and increased the number of passing through the platform. It also improved hippocampal CA1 neuronal damage and elevated DA, Glu, GABA, and Ach contents and expression of 5-HT6R. Expression of 5-HT6R was not different from the placebo group. Conclusions Selective 5-HT6R agonist can alleviate learning deficit of VD rats, possibly via improving neurotransmitter levels in brain regions. PMID:28196966

  4. Effect of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors on expression of 5-HT1AR and neurotransmitters in rats with vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Guo, K; Yin, G; Zi, X H; Zhu, H X; Pan, Q

    2016-12-02

    5-hydroxytryptamine receptor 1A (5-HT1AR) is closely associated with cognitive functions. Selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs) can protect individuals from brain damage following ischemia/hypoxia. To investigate the function of SSRIs in vascular dementia (VD), we established a rat model of VD, and observed the effect of SSRIs on the expression of 5-HT1AR mRNA and neurotransmitters. Male SD rats (6 months) were randomly assigned into sham, model, and SSRI groups (N = 30). VD was achieved by permanent ligation of the bilateral common carotid artery. Escitalopram, a highly selective 5-HT reabsorption inhibitor, was ip injected into the rats for three consecutive weeks. The Morris water-maze was used to test learning and memory. H&E staining for neuronal injury was conducted on cortical and hippocampal tissues. HPLC was used to determine the levels of dopamine (DA), 5-HT, and norepinephrine (NE). RT-PCR was used to determine expression of 5-HT1AR mRNA. As compared to control rats, model animals demonstrated elongated escape latency, lower platform crossing times, and significant injuries to hippocampal CA1 neurons. This was accompanied by reductions in DA, 5-HT, and NE levels in hippocampal tissues, as well as reduced cortical 5-HT and decreased 5-HT1AR mRNA expression (P < 0.05). Escitalopram treatments reduced escape latency, elevated platform crossing times, improved CA1 neuronal damage, increased DA and 5-HT levels in hippocampal and cortical neurons, as well as elevated expression of 5-HT1AR mRNA (P < 0.05). Therefore, SSRIs may improve cognitive dysfunction of VD rats, possibly by stimulating expression of neurotransmitters and protecting neurons.

  5. Recommendations of the Alzheimer's disease-related dementias conference.

    PubMed

    Montine, Thomas J; Koroshetz, Walter J; Babcock, Debra; Dickson, Dennis W; Galpern, Wendy R; Glymour, M Maria; Greenberg, Steven M; Hutton, Michael L; Knopman, David S; Kuzmichev, Andrey N; Manly, Jennifer J; Marder, Karen S; Miller, Bruce L; Phelps, Creighton H; Seeley, William W; Sieber, Beth-Anne; Silverberg, Nina B; Sutherland, Margaret; Torborg, Christine L; Waddy, Salina P; Zlokovic, Berislav V; Corriveau, Roderick A

    2014-08-26

    The National Alzheimer's Project Act, signed into law in 2011, mandates a National Plan to Address Alzheimer's Disease that is updated annually. In the Plan, the term Alzheimer disease includes not only Alzheimer disease (AD) proper, but also several specified related dementias, namely, frontotemporal, Lewy body, vascular, and mixed dementia. In response to a specific action item in the 2012 National Plan, the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, in collaboration with the National Institute on Aging, convened panels of experts and conducted a 2-day public conference to develop research priorities and timelines for addressing Alzheimer disease-related dementias (ADRD) in 5 topic areas: multiple etiology dementias, health disparities, Lewy body dementias including dementia with Lewy bodies and Parkinson disease dementia, frontotemporal dementia and related tauopathies, and vascular contributions to ADRD. By design, the product was up to 8 prioritized research recommendations in each topic area including estimated timelines from when work on a recommendation is started to completion or to full implementation of an ongoing activity, and recognition of shared research themes across recommendations. These included increased education and training of both researchers and health care professionals, addressing health disparities, fundamental neurobiology research, advanced diagnostics, collaborative biosample repositories, and a focus on developing effective interventions to prevent or treat ADRD by the year 2025 as targeted by the National Plan.

  6. Status of treatment for dementia patients who visited hospital as the first visit.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyuk; Park, HyunYoung; Lee, Hak Seung; Cheong, JinSung; Kang, HyunGu

    2015-01-01

    We are approaching a period of population ageing in which the number of dementia patients will increase rapidly and become a significant social problem. There are many study guides for treatment of dementia, but there are limited numbers of studies and limited amounts of data available for evaluating the treatment used on dementia patients as related to their hospital for the first time. A study was performed using information gathered from 50 domestic hospitals to ensure that the treatment status data was representative of the actual field of clinical dementia. We observed retrospectively the medical records of 4282 patients who visited the hospital and were finally judged to have dementia from January, 2009 to December, 2010. Among the types of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) had the greatest occurrence at 66.57%, with vascular dementia (VD) at 17.63%, AD with CVD at 10.18%, and Parkinson related dementia at 4.25%. The drug primarily used for initial therapy is the same drug primarily used for patients who have undergone long term dementia treatment, namely donepezil (75.22%). Among all 4282 patients, there was addition or transition of drugs used for 389 of the patients. Ineffectiveness of the initial drug treatment was the reason for the addition of drugs or transition to other drugs in almost all cases. In this study, the clinical characteristics observed for dementia treatment is compared as drugs changing, which will be helpful in the preparation of a treatment guide for dementia in the future.

  7. Physical Activity: A Viable Way to Reduce the Risks of Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer’s Disease, and Vascular Dementia in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Gallaway, Patrick J.; Miyake, Hiroji; Buchowski, Maciej S.; Shimada, Mieko; Yoshitake, Yutaka; Kim, Angela S.; Hongu, Nobuko

    2017-01-01

    A recent alarming rise of neurodegenerative diseases in the developed world is one of the major medical issues affecting older adults. In this review, we provide information about the associations of physical activity (PA) with major age-related neurodegenerative diseases and syndromes, including Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia, and mild cognitive impairment. We also provide evidence of PA’s role in reducing the risks of these diseases and helping to improve cognitive outcomes in older adults. Finally, we describe some potential mechanisms by which this protective effect occurs, providing guidelines for future research. PMID:28230730

  8. Physical Activity: A Viable Way to Reduce the Risks of Mild Cognitive Impairment, Alzheimer's Disease, and Vascular Dementia in Older Adults.

    PubMed

    Gallaway, Patrick J; Miyake, Hiroji; Buchowski, Maciej S; Shimada, Mieko; Yoshitake, Yutaka; Kim, Angela S; Hongu, Nobuko

    2017-02-20

    A recent alarming rise of neurodegenerative diseases in the developed world is one of the major medical issues affecting older adults. In this review, we provide information about the associations of physical activity (PA) with major age-related neurodegenerative diseases and syndromes, including Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, and mild cognitive impairment. We also provide evidence of PA's role in reducing the risks of these diseases and helping to improve cognitive outcomes in older adults. Finally, we describe some potential mechanisms by which this protective effect occurs, providing guidelines for future research.

  9. Memantine: an antiglutamatergic option for dementia.

    PubMed

    Molinuevo, José L; Garcia-Gil, Vicente; Villar, Amparo

    2004-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia in occidental countries. Currently approved treatments for AD provide mainly symptomatic benefits without clear evidence of neuroprotection. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor antagonists have therapeutic potential in several central nervous system disorders, including neuroprotective treatment in chronic neurodegenerative diseases, and symptomatic treatment in other neurologic diseases. Memantine, an NMDA antagonist, has been recently approved for the treatment of advanced AD. Due to its mechanism of action, memantine is considered a neuroprotective drug, whose utility has been demonstrated in preclinical studies. In addition, memantine is a useful symptomatic treatment for AD and vascular dementia. This paper reviews both aspects of memantine as well as some basic mechanisms mediating cognition and glutamatergic neurodegeneration.

  10. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of neurovascular dysfunction in mild dementia and Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Sweeney, Melanie D; Sagare, Abhay P; Zlokovic, Berislav V

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of age-related dementias. In addition to genetics, environment, and lifestyle, growing evidence supports vascular contributions to dementias including dementia because of AD. Alzheimer's disease affects multiple cell types within the neurovascular unit (NVU), including brain vascular cells (endothelial cells, pericytes, and vascular smooth muscle cells), glial cells (astrocytes and microglia), and neurons. Thus, identifying and integrating biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury with established AD biomarkers, amyloid-β (Aβ) and tau, has a potential to contribute to better understanding of the disease process in dementias including AD. Here, we discuss the existing literature on cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses during early stages of dementia and AD. We suggest that the clinical usefulness of established AD biomarkers, Aβ and tau, could be further improved by developing an algorithm that will incorporate biomarkers of the NVU cell-specific responses and injury. Such biomarker algorithm could aid in early detection and intervention as well as identify novel treatment targets to delay disease onset, slow progression, and/or prevent AD. PMID:25899298

  11. Cerebrolysin in vascular dementia: improvement of clinical outcome in a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled multicenter trial.

    PubMed

    Guekht, Alla B; Moessler, Herbert; Novak, Philipp H; Gusev, Evgenyi I

    2011-01-01

    No drug to treat vascular dementia (VaD) has yet been approved by the American or European authorities, leaving a large population of patients without effective therapy. Cerebrolysin has a long record of safety and might be efficacious in this condition. We conducted a large, multicenter, double-blind, placebo-controlled study in 242 patients meeting the criteria for VaD. The primary endpoint was the combined outcome of cognition (based on Alzheimer's Disease Assessment Scale Cognitive Subpart, Extended Version [ADAS-cog+] score) and overall clinical functioning (based on Clinician's Interview-Based Impression of Change plus Caregiver Input [CIBIC+] score) assessed after 24 weeks of treatment. Intravenous Cerebrolysin 20 mL was administered once daily over the course of 2 treatment cycles as add-on therapy to basic treatment with acetylsalicylic acid. The addition of Cerebrolysin was associated with significant improvement in both primary parameters. At week 24, ADAS-cog+ score improved by 10.6 points in the Cerebrolysin group, compared with 4.4 points in the placebo group (least squares mean difference, -6.17; P < .0001 vs placebo). CIBIC+ showed a mean improvement of 2.84 in the treatment arm and 3.68 in the placebo arm, a treatment difference of 0.84 (P < .0001 vs placebo). These findings were confirmed by responder analyses demonstrating higher rates in the Cerebrolysin group (ADAS-cog+ improvement of ≥4 points from baseline, 82.1% vs 52.2%; CIBIC+ score of <4 at week 24, 75.3% vs 37.4%; combined response in ADAS-cog+ and CIBIC+, 67.5% vs 27.0%). For Cerebrolysin, the odds ratio for achieving a favorable CIBIC+ response was 5.08 (P < .05), and that for achieving a favorable combined response was 5.63 (P < .05). Our data indicate that the addition of Cerebrolysin significantly improved clinical outcome, and that the benefits persisted for at least 24 weeks. Cerebrolysin was safe and well tolerated.

  12. Risk and Determinants of Dementia in Patients with Mild Cognitive Impairment and Brain Subcortical Vascular Changes: A Study of Clinical, Neuroimaging, and Biological Markers—The VMCI-Tuscany Study: Rationale, Design, and Methodology

    PubMed Central

    Poggesi, Anna; Salvadori, Emilia; Pantoni, Leonardo; Pracucci, Giovanni; Cesari, Francesca; Chiti, Alberto; Ciolli, Laura; Cosottini, Mirco; Del Bene, Alessandra; De Stefano, Nicola; Diciotti, Stefano; Dotti, Maria Teresa; Ginestroni, Andrea; Giusti, Betti; Gori, Anna Maria; Nannucci, Serena; Orlandi, Giovanni; Pescini, Francesca; Valenti, Raffaella; Abbate, Rosanna; Federico, Antonio; Mascalchi, Mario; Murri, Luigi; Inzitari, Domenico

    2012-01-01

    Dementia is one of the most disabling conditions. Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia (VaD) are the most frequent causes. Subcortical VaD is consequent to deep-brain small vessel disease (SVD) and is the most frequent form of VaD. Its pathological hallmarks are ischemic white matter changes and lacunar infarcts. Degenerative and vascular changes often coexist, but mechanisms of interaction are incompletely understood. The term mild cognitive impairment defines a transitional state between normal ageing and dementia. Pre-dementia stages of VaD are also acknowledged (vascular mild cognitive impairment, VMCI). Progression relates mostly to the subcortical VaD type, but determinants of such transition are unknown. Variability of phenotypic expression is not fully explained by severity grade of lesions, as depicted by conventional MRI that is not sensitive to microstructural and metabolic alterations. Advanced neuroimaging techniques seem able to achieve this. Beside hypoperfusion, blood-brain-barrier dysfunction has been also demonstrated in subcortical VaD. The aim of the Vascular Mild Cognitive Impairment Tuscany Study is to expand knowledge about determinants of transition from mild cognitive impairment to dementia in patients with cerebral SVD. This paper summarizes the main aims and methodological aspects of this multicenter, ongoing, observational study enrolling patients affected by VMCI with SVD. PMID:22550606

  13. Protective Effect of 17β-Estradiol Upon Hippocampal Spine Density and Cognitive Function in an Animal Model of Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Ying; Zhang, Quanguang; Zhang, Wenli; Li, Ning; Dai, Yongxin; Tu, Jingyi; Yang, Fang; Brann, Darrell W.; Wang, Ruimin

    2017-01-01

    The current study examined whether the steroid hormone, 17β-estradiol (E2) can exert long-lasting beneficial effects upon axonal health, synaptic plasticity, dementia-related amyloid-beta (Aβ) protein expression, and hippocampal-dependent cognitive function in an animal model of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and vascular dementia (VaD). Chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and VaD was induced by bilateral common carotid artery occlusion (BCCAO) in adult male Sprague Dawley rats. Low dose E2 administered for the first 3-months after BCCAO exerted long-lasting beneficial effects, including significant neuroprotection of hippocampal CA1 neurons and preservation of hippocampal-dependent cognitive function when examined at 6-months after BCCAO. E2 treatment also prevented BCCAO-induced damage to hippocampal myelin sheaths and oligodendrocytes, enhanced expression of the synaptic proteins synaptophysin and PSD95 in the hippocampus, and prevented BCCAO-induced loss of total and mushroom dendritic spines in the hippocampal CA1 region. Furthermore, E2-treatment also reduced BCCAO induction of dementia-related proteins expression such as p-tau (PHF1), total ubiquitin, and Aβ1-42, when examined at 6 m after BCCAO. Taken as a whole, the results suggest that low-dose E2 replacement might be a potentially promising therapeutic modality to attenuate or block negative neurological consequences of chronic cerebral hypoperfusion and VaD. PMID:28205591

  14. Endpoints for Pre-Dementia AD Trials: A Report from the EU/US/CTAD Task Force

    PubMed Central

    Vellas, B.; Bateman, R.; Blennow, K.; Frisoni, G.; Johnson, K.; Katz, R.; Langbaum, J.; Marson, D.; Sperling, R.; Wessels, A.; Salloway, S.; Doody, R.; Aisen, P.

    2015-01-01

    For Alzheimer’s disease treatment trials that focus on the pre-dementia stage of disease, outcome measures are needed that will enable assessment of disease progression in patients who are clinically normal. The EU/US CTAD Task Force, an international collaboration of investigators from industry, academia, non-profit foundations, and regulatory agencies, met in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania, USA, on November 19, 2014 to discuss existing and novel outcome assessments that may be useful in pre-dementia trials. Composite measures that assess changes in episodic memory, executive function, global cognition, and global function have recently been developed by a number of groups and appear to be sensitive at this stage. Functional measures that involve real-life complex tasks also appear to capture early subtle changes in pre-dementia subjects and have the advantage of representing clinically meaningful change. Patient reported outcomes and novel CSF and imaging biomarkers have also shown promise. More studies are needed to validate all of these tests in the pre-dementia population. Many of them have been incorporated as exploratory measures in ongoing or planned trials. PMID:26247004

  15. Epidemiology of early-onset dementia: a review of the literature

    PubMed Central

    Vieira, Renata Teles; Caixeta, Leonardo; Machado, Sergio; Silva, Adriana Cardoso; Nardi, Antonio Egidio; Arias-Carrión, Oscar; Carta, Mauro Giovanni

    2013-01-01

    Presenile Dementia or Early Onset Dementia (EOD) is a public health problem, it differs from Senile Dementia, and encloses a significant number of cases; nevertheless, it is still poorly understood and underdiagnosed. This study aims to review the prevalence and etiology of EOD, comparing EOD with Senile Dementia, as well as to show the main causes of EOD and their prevalence in population and non-population based studies. The computer-supported search used the following databases: Pubmed/Medline, ISI Web of Knowledge and Scielo. The search terms were alcohol-associated dementia, Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, Creutzfeldt-jakob disease, dementia with lewy bodies, early onset dementia, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, Huntington’s disease, mixed dementia, neurodegenerative disorders, Parkinson’s disease dementia, presenile dementia, traumatic brain injury, vascular dementia. Only papers published in English and conducted from 1985 up to 2012 were preferentially reviewed. Neurodegenerative diseases are the most common etiologies seen in EOD. Among the general population, the prevalence of EOD was found to range between 0 to 700 per 100.000 habitants in groups of 25-64 years old, with an increasing incidence with age. The progression of EOD was found to range between 8.3 to 22.8 new cases per 100.000 in those aged under 65 years. Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the major etiology, followed by Vascular Dementia (VaD) and Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration (FTLD). A larger number of epidemiological studies to elucidate how environmental issues contribute to EOD are necessary, thus, we can collaborate in the planning and prevention of services toward dementia patients. PMID:23878613

  16. Diabetes mellitus and dementia.

    PubMed

    Ninomiya, Toshiharu

    2014-01-01

    Growing epidemiologic evidence has suggested that people with diabetes mellitus are at an increased risk for the development of dementia. However, the results for the subtypes of dementia are inconsistent. This review examines the risk of dementia in people with diabetes mellitus, and discusses the possible mechanism underpinning this association. Diabetes mellitus is associated with a 1.5- to 2.5-fold greater risk of dementia among community-dwelling elderly people. Notably, diabetes mellitus is a significant risk factor for not only vascular dementia, but also Alzheimer's disease. The mechanisms underpinning the association are unclear, but it may be multifactorial in nature, involving factors such as cardiovascular risk factors, glucose toxicity, changes in insulin metabolism and inflammation. The optimal management of these risk factors in early life may be important to prevent late-life dementia. Furthermore, novel therapeutic strategies will be needed to prevent or reduce the development of dementia in people with diabetes mellitus.

  17. β-Caryophyllene/Hydroxypropyl-β-Cyclodextrin Inclusion Complex Improves Cognitive Deficits in Rats with Vascular Dementia through the Cannabinoid Receptor Type 2 -Mediated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lou, Jie; Teng, Zhipeng; Zhang, Liangke; Yang, Jiadan; Ma, Lianju; Wang, Fang; Tian, Xiaocui; An, Ruidi; Yang, Mei; Zhang, Qian; Xu, Lu; Dong, Zhi

    2017-01-01

    This work was conducted to prepare β-caryophyllene-hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin inclusion complex (HPβCD/BCP) and investigate its effects and mechanisms on cognitive deficits in vascular dementia (VD) rats. First, HPβCD/BCP was prepared, optimized, characterized, and evaluated. HPβCD/BCP and AM630 were then administered to VD rats to upregulate and downregulate the cannabinoid receptor type 2 (CB2). Results showed that HPβCD/BCP can significantly increase the bioavailability of BCP. Through the Morris water maze test, HPβCD/BCP can attenuate learning and memory deficits in rats. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) monitoring results indicated that HPβCD/BCP can promote the recovery of CBF. Moreover, molecular biology experiments showed that HPβCD/BCP can increase the expression levels of CB2 in brain tissues, particularly the hippocampus and white matter tissues, as well as the expression levels of PI3K and Akt. Overall, the findings demonstrated the protective effects of HPβCD/BCP against cognitive deficits induced by chronic cerebral ischemia and suggested the potential of HPβCD/BCP in the therapy of vascular dementia in the future. PMID:28154534

  18. Detection of cerebral amyloid angiopathy by 3-T magnetic resonance imaging and amyloid positron emission tomography in a patient with subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Kida, Hirotaka; Satoh, Masayuki; Ii, Yuichiro; Fukuyama, Hidenao; Maeda, Masayuki; Tomimoto, Hidekazu

    2017-01-01

    The patient was an 81-year-old man who had been treated for hypertension for several decades. In 2012, he developed gait disturbance and mild amnesia. One year later, his gait disturbance worsened, and he developed urinary incontinence. Conventional brain magnetic resonance imaging using T 2 -weighted images and fluid-attenuated inversion recovery showed multiple lacunar infarctions. These findings fulfilled the diagnostic criteria for subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia. However, susceptibility weighted imaging showed multiple lobar microbleeds in the bilateral occipitoparietal lobes, and double inversion recovery and 3-D fluid-attenuated inversion recovery images on 3-T magnetic resonance imaging revealed cortical microinfarctions in the left parietal-temporo-occipito region. Pittsburgh compound B-positron emission tomography revealed diffuse uptake in the cerebral cortex. Therefore, we diagnosed the patient with subcortical ischaemic vascular dementia associated with Alzheimer's disease. The use of the double inversion recovery and susceptibility weighted imaging on 3-T magnetic resonance imaging may be a supplemental strategy for diagnosing cerebral amyloid angiopathy, which is closely associated with Alzheimer's disease.

  19. Genomics of Dementia: APOE- and CYP2D6-Related Pharmacogenetics

    PubMed Central

    Cacabelos, Ramón; Martínez, Rocío; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; Carril, Juan C.; Lombardi, Valter; Carrera, Iván; Corzo, Lola; Tellado, Iván; Leszek, Jerzy; McKay, Adam; Takeda, Masatoshi

    2012-01-01

    Dementia is a major problem of health in developed societies. Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia, and mixed dementia account for over 90% of the most prevalent forms of dementia. Both genetic and environmental factors are determinant for the phenotypic expression of dementia. AD is a complex disorder in which many different gene clusters may be involved. Most genes screened to date belong to different proteomic and metabolomic pathways potentially affecting AD pathogenesis. The ε4 variant of the APOE gene seems to be a major risk factor for both degenerative and vascular dementia. Metabolic factors, cerebrovascular disorders, and epigenetic phenomena also contribute to neurodegeneration. Five categories of genes are mainly involved in pharmacogenomics: genes associated with disease pathogenesis, genes associated with the mechanism of action of a particular drug, genes associated with phase I and phase II metabolic reactions, genes associated with transporters, and pleiotropic genes and/or genes associated with concomitant pathologies. The APOE and CYP2D6 genes have been extensively studied in AD. The therapeutic response to conventional drugs in patients with AD is genotype specific, with CYP2D6-PMs, CYP2D6-UMs, and APOE-4/4 carriers acting as the worst responders. APOE and CYP2D6 may cooperate, as pleiotropic genes, in the metabolism of drugs and hepatic function. The introduction of pharmacogenetic procedures into AD pharmacological treatment may help to optimize therapeutics. PMID:22482072

  20. ACR-ASNR Practice Parameter for Brain PET/CT Imaging Dementia.

    PubMed

    Frey, Kirk A; Lodge, Martin A; Meltzer, Carolyn Cidis; Peller, Patrick J; Wong, Terence Z; Hess, Christopher P; Petrella, Jeffrey R; Sair, Haris I; Subramaniam, Rathan M

    2016-02-01

    This practice parameter is for both FDG and amyloid brain PET or PET/computed tomography (CT) for patients with cognitive decline, and has been developed collaboratively by the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the American Society for Neuroradiology (ASNR). It is estimated that the number of people with dementia, 36.5 million worldwide in 2010, will increase to 65.7 million in 2030 and to 115 million in 2050. Four primary neurodegenerative etiologies of dementia have been defined: Alzheimer disease (AD), vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB). Alzheimer disease is the most common form of dementia, accounting for approximately 60%-80% of all cases. Indications for FDG and amyloid brain PET and qualifications for personnel are discussed in this practice parameter.

  1. Inter-Dependent Mechanisms Behind Cognitive Dysfunction, Vascular Biology and Alzheimer's Dementia in Down Syndrome: Multi-Faceted Roles of APP

    PubMed Central

    Nizetic, Dean; Chen, Christopher L.; Hong, Wanjin; Koo, Edward H.

    2015-01-01

    People with Down syndrome (DS) virtually all develop intellectual disability (ID) of varying degree of severity, and also have a high risk of early Alzheimer's disease (AD). ID prior to the onset of dementia, and its relationship to the onset of dementia in DS is a complex phenomenon influenced by many factors, and scarcely understood. Unraveling the causative factors and modulators of these processes remains a challenge, with potential to be informative for both ID and AD, for the development of early biomarkers and/or therapeutic approaches. We review the potential relative and inter-connected roles of the chromosome 21 gene for amyloid precursor protein (APP), in both pathological conditions. Rare non-DS people with duplication of APP (dupAPP) get familial early onset AD (FEOAD) with virtually 100% penetrance and prominent cerebrovascular pathology, but don't suffer from ID before dementia onset. All of these features appear to be radically different in DS. On the other hand, rare individuals with partial trisomy 21 (T21) (with APP, but not DS-critical region in trisomy) have been described having ID. Likewise, partial T21 DS (without APP trisomy) show a range of ID, but no AD pathology. We review the multi-faceted roles of APP that might affect cognitive functioning. Given the fact that both Aβ secretion and synaptic maturation/plasticity are dependent on neuronal activity, we explore how this conflicting inter-dependency might affect cognitive pathogenesis in a dynamic way in DS, throughout the lifespan of an individual. PMID:26648852

  2. [Hypertension and dementia].

    PubMed

    Hanon, O

    2014-06-01

    Prevention and treatment of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. Several epidemiological studies have indicated a significant association between the presence of hypertension and the onset of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) several years later. Cognitive disorder may be related to focal cerebral lesions of vascular origin (infarctus, lacunae) and/or chronic ischemia of the white matter (white matter lesions) related to arteriosclerosis and/or lipohyalinosis of small perforating arteries high blood pressure in mid-life to later cognitive decline and dementia. Moreover, disorders of cerebral microcirculation and endothelial dysfunction may be associated to blood brain barrier dysfunction and amyloid plaques formation leading to Alzheimer's process. Few randomized clinical trials have included a cognitive assessment and dementia as outcome in their design. They all raise some major criticisms: cognitive assessment was never the main outcome, too short follow-up to study dementia; incomplete assessment of cognition, lost of follow-up and a small proportion of subjects at risk for dementia at inclusion. However, the results of therapeutic trials (SYST-EUR, PROGRESS) open the way to the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) or cognitive decline by antihypertensive treatments. A meta-analysis including randomized controlled studies, suggests a significant decrease in the risk of dementia with antihypertensive treatment compared to placebo.

  3. Prevalence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in elders of nursing homes and a senior center of Durango City, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Alvarado-Esquivel, Cosme; Hernández-Alvarado, Ana Berthina; Tapia-Rodríguez, Rosa Oralia; Guerrero-Iturbe, Ángel; Rodríguez-Corral, Karina; Martínez, Sergio Estrada

    2004-01-01

    Background Epidemiological reports about dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in elderly people from developing countries are scarce. Therefore, we sought to determine the prevalences of dementia and AD in a population of nursing home residents and senior center attendees of Durango City, Mexico, and to determine whether any socio-demographic characteristics from the subjects associated with dementia or AD exist. Methods One hundred and fifty-five residents of two nursing homes and 125 attendees of a senior center were examined for dementia and Alzheimer's disease. All subjects were tested by the mini-mental state examination, and those who scored twenty-four or less underwent psychiatric and neurological evaluations. Diagnosis of dementia, AD and vascular dementia (VaD) was based on the DSM-IV criteria. Socio-demographic characteristics from each participant were also obtained. Results Residents of nursing homes found to suffer from dementia were 25 out of 155 (16.1%). Eighteen of them (11.6%) had AD, and seven (4.5%) had VaD. None of the attendees of the senior center suffered from dementia. Dementia (pooled AD and VaD cases) correlated with white ethnicity (OR = 3.2; 95%CI = 1.28–8.31), and a history of unemployment (OR = 6.46; 95%CI = 1.42–25.97), while AD correlated with journeymen occupations (OR = 4.55; 95%CI = 1.00–19.29). Conclusion Prevalence of dementia in residents of nursing homes found in this study is much lower than reported from more industrialized countries. AD was more frequent than VaD. Ethnicity and occupation showed effects on the prevalence figures. The prevalence of dementia found has implications for the optimum kind of health care that nursing homes should provide to their residents. PMID:15070420

  4. Decreased levels of serum nitric oxide in different forms of dementia.

    PubMed

    Corzo, Lola; Zas, Raquel; Rodríguez, Susana; Fernández-Novoa, Lucía; Cacabelos, Ramón

    2007-06-15

    Nitric oxide is involved in normal physiological functions and also in pathological processes leading to tissue damage due, in part, to its free radical nature (oxidative stress). Oxidative stress and vascular dysfunction have been recognized as contributing factors in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VD). In order to study the possible links between these processes and dementia, we have analysed plasma amyloid-beta(1-42) levels (Abeta) and total nitric oxide (NOx), apolipoprotein E (ApoE), lipids, vitamin B12, and folate concentrations in the serum of 99 patients with dementia and 55 age-matched non-demented controls. Both nitrate and nitrite levels were measured by a colorimetric method using Griess Reagent and plasma Abeta levels were analysed by a hypersensitive ELISA method. Our data showed a significant decrease of serum NOx levels in dementia, especially in probable AD and VD patients, as compared with controls. We observed a weak correlation between serum NOx levels and cognitive deterioration in dementia; however, NOx levels were not associated with ApoE and Abeta levels. In dementia and controls, a similar correlation pattern between HDL-cholesterol versus NOx was found. No apparent association between NOx, Abeta and AD-related genes [APOE (apolipoprotein E), PSEN1 (Presenilin 1)] was observed. Our data suggest that NOx may contribute to the pathogenesis of dementia through a process mediated by HDL-cholesterol.

  5. Lack of Exercise Might Invite Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... the two. The APOE mutation is the strongest genetic risk factor for vascular dementia, Lewy body dementia, Parkinson's disease and, especially, Alzheimer's disease, the researchers said. People with a single ...

  6. Adenosine Type A2A Receptor in Peripheral Cell from Patients with Alzheimer's Disease, Vascular Dementia, and Idiopathic Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus: A New/Old Potential Target.

    PubMed

    Arosio, Beatrice; Casati, Martina; Gussago, Cristina; Ferri, Evelyn; Abbate, Carlo; Scortichini, Valeria; Colombo, Elena; Rossi, Paolo Dionigi; Mari, Daniela

    2016-09-06

    As the European population gets older, the incidence of neurological disorders increases with significant impact on social costs. Despite differences in disease etiology, several brain disorders in the elderly (e.g., Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, normal pressure hydrocephalus) share dementia as a common clinical feature. The current treatment for the majority of these diseases is merely symptomatic and does not modify the course of the illness. Symptoms of normal pressure hydrocephalus are the only ones that can be modified if they are recognized in time and treated appropriately. Therefore, an important clinical strategy may be disclosed by pathogenic pathways that can be modified and to find drugs that can slow down or even arrest disease progression. Possibly a way to answer this question could be by re-examining all the molecules which have so far succeeded in improving many aspects of cognitive deterioration in some neurodegenerative conditions, that were not considered because of controversial opinions. The main purpose of this summary is to further substantiate the hypothesis that the pathway of adenosine type A2A receptor could be used as a potential target to develop new/old therapeutic strategies.

  7. Kampo formulations, chotosan, and yokukansan, for dementia therapy: existing clinical and preclinical evidence.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Kinzo; Zhao, Qi; Niu, Yimin; Fujiwara, Hironori; Tanaka, Ken; Sasaki-Hamada, Sachie; Oka, Jun-Ichiro

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive deficits and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) are typical features of patients with dementia such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VD), and other forms of senile dementia. Clinical evidence has demonstrated the potential usefulness of chotosan (CTS) and yokukansan (YKS), traditional herbal formulations called Kampo medicines, in the treatment of cognitive disturbance and BPSD in dementia patients, although the indications targeted by CTS and YKS in Kampo medicine differ. The availability of CTS and YKS for treating dementia patients is supported by preclinical studies using animal models of dementia that include cognitive/emotional deficits caused by aging and diabetes, dementia risk factors. These studies have led not only to the concept of a neuronal basis for the CTS- and YKS-induced amelioration of cognitive function and emotional/psychiatric symptom-related behavior in animal models, but also to a proposal that ingredient(s) of Uncariae Uncis cum Ramulus, a medicinal herb included in CTS and YKS, may play an important role in the actions of these formulae in dementia patients. Further studies are needed to clarify the active ingredients of these formulae and their target endogenous molecules implicated in the anti-dementia drug-like actions.

  8. Multiplex analyte assays to characterize different dementias: brain inflammatory cytokines in poststroke and other dementias.

    PubMed

    Chen, Aiqing; Oakley, Arthur E; Monteiro, Maria; Tuomela, Katri; Allan, Louise M; Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta B; O'Brien, John T; Kalaria, Raj N

    2016-02-01

    Both the inflammatory potential and cognitive function decline during aging. The association between the repertoire of inflammatory biomarkers and cognitive decline is unclear. Inflammatory cytokines have been reported to be increased, decreased, or unchanged in the cerebrospinal fluid and sera of subjects with dementia. We assessed 112 postmortem brains from subjects diagnosed with poststroke dementia (PSD), vascular dementia, mixed dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), comparing those to poststroke nondemented (PSND) subjects and age-matched controls. We analyzed 5 brain regions including the gray and white matter from the frontal and temporal lobes for a panel of cytokine and/or chemokine analytes using multiplex-array assays. Of the 37 analytes, 14 were under or near the detection limits, 7 were close to the lowest detection level, and 16 cytokines were within the linear range of the assay. We observed widely variable concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A at the high end (1-150 ng/mg protein), whereas several of the interleukins (IL, interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor) at the low end (1-10 pg/mg). There were also regional variations; most notable being high concentrations of some cytokines (e.g., CRP and angiogenesis panel) in the frontal white matter. Overall, we found decreased concentrations of several cytokines, including IL-1 beta (p = 0.000), IL-6 (p = 0.000), IL-7 (p = 0.000), IL-8 (p = 0.000), IL-16 (p = 0.001), interferon-inducible protein-10 (0.044), serum amyloid A (p = 0.011), and a trend in IL-1 alpha (p = 0.084) across all dementia groups compared to nondemented controls. IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly lower in dementia subjects than in nondemented subjects in every region. In particular, lower levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were notable in the PSD compared to PSND subjects. Because these 2 stroke groups had comparable degree of vascular pathology, the lower production of IL-6 and IL-8 in PSD reaffirms a

  9. Brief Screening of Vascular Cognitive Impairment in Patients With Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy With Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy Without Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Hollocks, Matthew J.; Tan, Rhea Y.Y.; Morris, Robin G.; Markus, Hugh S.

    2016-01-01

    Background and Purpose— Cerebral autosomal-dominant arteriopathy with subcortical infarcts and leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL) is a monogenic form of cerebral small vessel disease leading to early-onset stroke and dementia, with younger patients frequently showing subclinical deficits in cognition. At present, there are no targeted cognitive screening measures for this population. However, the Brief Memory and Executive Test (BMET) and the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) have shown utility in detecting cognitive impairment in sporadic small vessel disease. This study assesses the BMET and the MoCA as clinical tools for detecting mild cognitive deficits in CADASIL. Methods— Sixty-six prospectively recruited patients with CADASIL, and 66 matched controls completed the BMET, with a subset of these also completing the MoCA. Receiver operating characteristic curves were calculated to examine the sensitivity and specificity of clinical cutoffs for the detection of vascular cognitive impairment and reduced activities of daily living. Results— Patients with CADASIL showed more cognitive impairment overall and were poorer on both executive/processing and memory indices of the BMET relative to controls. The BMET showed good accuracy in predicting vascular cognitive impairment (85% sensitivity and 84% specificity) and impaired instrumental activities of daily living (92% sensitivity and 77% specificity). The MoCA also showed good predictive validity for vascular cognitive impairment (80% sensitivity and 78% specificity) and instrumental activities of daily living (75% sensitivity and 76% specificity). The most important background predictor of vascular cognitive impairment was a history of stroke. Conclusions— The results indicate that the BMET and the MoCA are clinically useful and sensitive screening measures for early cognitive impairment in patients with CADASIL. PMID:27625375

  10. Brain function, disease and dementia.

    PubMed

    Sandilyan, Malarvizhi Babu; Dening, Tom

    2015-05-27

    Dementia is a consequence of brain disease. This article, the second in this series on dementia, discusses normal brain function and how certain functions are localised to different areas of the brain. This is important in determining the symptoms of dementia, depending on which parts of the brain are most directly involved. The most common types of dementia - Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies and frontotemporal dementia - affect the brain in different ways and cause different changes at the microscopic level. Dementia is affected by genetics, and recent advances in molecular techniques have improved our understanding of some of the mechanisms involved, which in turns suggests possibilities for new treatments in the future.

  11. Protective Effects of Tao-Hong-Si-Wu Decoction on Memory Impairment and Hippocampal Damage in Animal Model of Vascular Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Han, Lan; Ji, Zhaojie; Chen, Weidong; Yin, Dengke; Xu, Fan; Li, Shanshan; Chen, Fangfang; Zhu, Guangyu; Peng, Daiyin

    2015-01-01

    Tao-Hong-Si-Wu decoction (TSD) as a traditional chinese medicine (TCM) has been developed to treat thrombotic diseases for hundreds of years, and vascular dementia (VD) is a cognitive dysfunction syndrome caused by cerebral embolism. In this study, the protective effect of TSD on memory impairment and brain damage in rat model of VD induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO) was investigated. The study showed that rats in MCAO treatment with TSD for 14 days significantly improved behavioral function, increased densities of neuron, and induced angiogenesis in the brain compared with model rats. TSD also adjusted the neurotransmitter levels, reduced the content of endothelin-1 (ET-1), and induced the activities of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) in hippocampus. Moreover, the immunohistochemical staining and western blotting results also revealed that TSD decreased apoptosis via upregulated B-cell lymphoma-2 (Bcl-2)/Bcl-2 associated X protein (Bax) ratio. These results demonstrated TSD possesses neuroprotective and antidementia properties by preventing the loss of neural cells, adjusting brain neurotransmitter, promoting cerebral blood circulation, and decreasing apoptosis. These results suggested that TSD might be developed as an effective drug for the prevention of VD. PMID:25821478

  12. The effect of Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf flavonoids on spatial learning and memory in chronic cerebral ischemia-induced vascular dementia of rats.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yanjing; Liang, Lizhen; Xu, Jian; Wu, Jiali; Yan, Yongxing; Lin, Ping; Chen, Qiang; Zheng, Fengming; Wang, Qin; Ren, Qian; Gou, Zengmei; Du, Yifeng

    2016-05-01

    Flavonoids have been shown to improve cognitive function and delay the dementia progression. However, the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. In the present study, we examined the effect of Scutellaria baicalensis stem-leaf total flavonoids (SSTFs) extracted from S. baicalensis Georgi on spatial learning and memory in a vascular dementia (VaD) rat model and explored its molecular mechanisms. The VaD rats were developed by permanent bilateral occlusion of the common carotid artery. Seven days after recovery, the VaD rats were treated with either 50 or 100 mg/kg of SSTF for 60 days. The spatial learning and memory was evaluated in the Morris water maze (MWM) test. The tau hyperphosphorylation and the levels of the related protein kinases or phosphatases were examined by western blot analysis. In VaD rats, SSTF treatment at 100 mg/kg significantly reduced the escape latency in training trial in MWM test. In the probe trial, SSTF treatment increased the searching time and travel distance in the target quadrant. SSTF treatment inhibited the tau phosphorylation in both cortex and hippocampus in VaD rats. Meanwhile, SSTF reduced the activity of glycogen synthase kinase 3β and cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in VaD rats. In contrast, SSTF treatment increased the level of the protein phosphatase 2A subunit B in VaD rats. SSTF treatment significantly improved the spatial cognition in VaD rats. Our results suggest that SSTF may alleviate tau-hyperphosphorylation-induced neurotoxicity through coordinating the activity of kinases and phosphatase after a stroke. SSTF may be developed into promising novel therapeutics for VaD.

  13. Natural Phytochemicals in the Treatment and Prevention of Dementia: An Overview.

    PubMed

    Libro, Rosaliana; Giacoppo, Sabrina; Soundara Rajan, Thangavelu; Bramanti, Placido; Mazzon, Emanuela

    2016-04-21

    The word dementia describes a class of heterogeneous diseases which etiopathogenetic mechanisms are not well understood. There are different types of dementia, among which, Alzheimer's disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and frontotemporal dementia (FTD) are the more common. Currently approved pharmacological treatments for most forms of dementia seem to act only on symptoms without having profound disease-modifying effects. Thus, alternative strategies capable of preventing the progressive loss of specific neuronal populations are urgently required. In particular, the attention of researchers has been focused on phytochemical compounds that have shown antioxidative, anti-amyloidogenic, anti-inflammatory and anti-apoptotic properties and that could represent important resources in the discovery of drug candidates against dementia. In this review, we summarize the neuroprotective effects of the main phytochemicals belonging to the polyphenol, isothiocyanate, alkaloid and cannabinoid families in the prevention and treatment of the most common kinds of dementia. We believe that natural phytochemicals may represent a promising sources of alternative medicine, at least in association with therapies approved to date for dementia.

  14. Regularized Linear Discriminant Analysis of EEG Features in Dementia Patients.

    PubMed

    Neto, Emanuel; Biessmann, Felix; Aurlien, Harald; Nordby, Helge; Eichele, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores if EEG spectral parameters can discriminate between healthy elderly controls (HC), Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) using. We considered EEG data recorded during normal clinical routine with 114 healthy controls (HC), 114 AD, and 114 VaD patients. The spectral features extracted from the EEG were the absolute delta power, decay from lower to higher frequencies, amplitude, center and dispersion of the alpha power and baseline power of the entire frequency spectrum. For discrimination, we submitted these EEG features to regularized linear discriminant analysis algorithm with a 10-fold cross-validation. To check the consistency of the results obtained by our classifiers, we applied bootstrap statistics. Four binary classifiers were used to discriminate HC from AD, HC from VaD, AD from VaD, and HC from dementia patients (AD or VaD). For each model, we measured the discrimination performance using the area under curve (AUC) and the accuracy of the cross-validation (cv-ACC). We applied this procedure using two different sets of predictors. The first set considered all the features extracted from the 22 channels. For the second set of features, we automatically rejected features poorly correlated with their labels. Fairly good results were obtained when discriminating HC from dementia patients with AD or VaD (AUC = 0.84). We also obtained AUC = 0.74 for discrimination of AD from HC, AUC = 0.77 for discrimination of VaD from HC, and finally AUC = 0.61 for discrimination of AD from VaD. Our models were able to separate HC from dementia patients, and also and to discriminate AD from VaD above chance. Our results suggest that these features may be relevant for the clinical assessment of patients with dementia.

  15. Regularized Linear Discriminant Analysis of EEG Features in Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Neto, Emanuel; Biessmann, Felix; Aurlien, Harald; Nordby, Helge; Eichele, Tom

    2016-01-01

    The present study explores if EEG spectral parameters can discriminate between healthy elderly controls (HC), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) using. We considered EEG data recorded during normal clinical routine with 114 healthy controls (HC), 114 AD, and 114 VaD patients. The spectral features extracted from the EEG were the absolute delta power, decay from lower to higher frequencies, amplitude, center and dispersion of the alpha power and baseline power of the entire frequency spectrum. For discrimination, we submitted these EEG features to regularized linear discriminant analysis algorithm with a 10-fold cross-validation. To check the consistency of the results obtained by our classifiers, we applied bootstrap statistics. Four binary classifiers were used to discriminate HC from AD, HC from VaD, AD from VaD, and HC from dementia patients (AD or VaD). For each model, we measured the discrimination performance using the area under curve (AUC) and the accuracy of the cross-validation (cv-ACC). We applied this procedure using two different sets of predictors. The first set considered all the features extracted from the 22 channels. For the second set of features, we automatically rejected features poorly correlated with their labels. Fairly good results were obtained when discriminating HC from dementia patients with AD or VaD (AUC = 0.84). We also obtained AUC = 0.74 for discrimination of AD from HC, AUC = 0.77 for discrimination of VaD from HC, and finally AUC = 0.61 for discrimination of AD from VaD. Our models were able to separate HC from dementia patients, and also and to discriminate AD from VaD above chance. Our results suggest that these features may be relevant for the clinical assessment of patients with dementia. PMID:27965568

  16. Cognitive decline and dementia in the oldest-old.

    PubMed

    Kravitz, Efrat; Schmeidler, James; Beeri, Michal Schnaider

    2012-10-01

    The oldest-old are the fastest growing segment of the Western population. Over half of the oldest-old will have dementia, but the etiology is yet unknown. Age is the only risk factor consistently associated with dementia in the oldest-old. Many of the risk and protective factors for dementia in the young elderly, such as ApoE genotype, physical activity, and healthy lifestyle, are not relevant for the oldest-old. Neuropathology is abundant in the oldest-old brains, but specific pathologies of Alzheimer's disease (AD) or vascular dementia are not necessarily correlated with cognition, as in younger persons. It has been suggested that accumulation of both AD-like and vascular pathologies, loss of synaptic proteins, and neuronal loss contribute to the cognitive decline observed in the oldest-old. Several characteristics of the oldest-old may confound the diagnosis of dementia in this age group. A gradual age-related cognitive decline, particularly in executive function and mental speed, is evident even in non-demented oldest-old. Hearing and vision losses, which are also prevalent in the oldest-old and found in some cases to precede/predict cognitive decline, may mechanically interfere in neuropsychological evaluations. Difficulties in carrying out everyday activities, observed in the majority of the oldest-old, may be the result of motor or physical dysfunction and of neurodegenerative processes. The oldest-old appear to be a select population, who escapes major illnesses or delays their onset and duration toward the end of life. Dementia in the oldest-old may be manifested when a substantial amount of pathology is accumulated, or with a composition of a variety of pathologies. Investigating the clinical and pathological features of dementia in the oldest-old is of great importance in order to develop therapeutic strategies and to provide the most elderly of our population with good quality of life.

  17. Neurodegeneration and dementia. Alzheimer's disease as a model.

    PubMed

    Beyreuther, K; Masters, C L

    1995-03-01

    The common feature in neurodegeneration with dementia is neuronal dysfunction which is mainly and primarily expressed as synaptic dysfunction. The consequence of this dysfunction is neuronal disconnection and dementia if the corresponding hippocampal, basal forebrain and cortical structures are damaged. Neuronal loss is not necessarily a prerequisite for dementia, although it may be observed in some neurodegenerative diseases. If neuronal loss is not the major cause of the symptoms, in principle non-invasive treatment with the aim of cure should be possible, provided intervention occurs early enough. In dementias in which neuronal loss is a major event implantation of nerve cells may become an important aspect in treatment. The latter may apply to vascular dementia (VaD). In contrast neuronal dysfunction may apply for the most common form of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD). AD shares some of the characteristic clinical features of VaD, the second most prominent cause of dementia, in which mental deterioration affecting normal brain leads to a loss or impairment of intellectual functions of memory, power of reason and intelligence with interference with patient's conduct of the customary affairs of life. As we begin to understand some of the underlying pathogenetic mechanisms and causes of AD, this most frequent dementing condition is well suited to serve as model system to study the common principles of neurodegenerative diseases. Much of the present knowledge on the molecular and genetic processes that occur in AD came directly or indirectly from the identification of the beta A4 (A beta, beta) amyloid protein and its precursor which is termed amyloid precursor protein, and abbreviated as APP.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  18. Serum uric acid level and association with cognitive impairment and dementia: systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Khan, Aamir A; Quinn, Terence J; Hewitt, Jonathan; Fan, Yuhua; Dawson, Jesse

    2016-02-01

    Serum uric acid (sUA) level may be associated with cognitive impairment/dementia. It is possible this relationship varies with dementia subtype, particularly between vascular dementias (VaD) and Alzheimer's (AD) or Parkinson's disease (PDD)-related dementia. We aimed to present a synthesis of all published data on sUA and relationship with dementia/cognition through systematic review and meta-analysis. We included studies that assessed the association between sUA and any measure of cognitive function or a clinical diagnosis of dementia. We pre-defined subgroup analyses for patients with AD, VaD, PDD, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and mixed or undifferentiated. We assessed risk of bias/generalizability, and where data allowed, we performed meta-analysis to describe pooled measures of association across studies. From 4811 titles, 46 papers (n = 16,688 participants) met our selection criteria. Compared to controls, sUA was lower in dementia (SDM -0.33 (95%CI)). There were differences in association by dementia type with apparent association for AD (SDM -0.33 (95%CI)) and PDD (SDM -0.67 (95%CI)) but not in cases of mixed dementia (SDM 0.19 (95%CI)) or VaD (SDM -0.05 (95%CI)). There was no correlation between scores on Mini-Mental State Examination and sUA level (summary r 0.08, p = 0.27), except in patients with PDD (r 0.16, p = 0.003). Our conclusions are limited by clinical heterogeneity and risk of bias in studies. Accepting this caveat, the relationship between sUA and dementia/cognitive impairment is not consistent across all dementia groups and in particular may differ in patients with VaD compared to other dementia subtypes.

  19. A Comparison of the E-BEHAVE-AD, NBRS and NPI in Quantifying Clinical Improvement in the Treatment of Agitation and Psychosis Associated with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Ismail, Zahinoor; Emeremni, Chetachi A; Houck, Patricia R.; Mazumdar, Sati; Rosen, Jules; Rajji, Tarek K.; Pollock, Bruce G.; Mulsant, Benoit H.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives The aim of this study is to compare the Empirical Behavioral Rating Scale (E-BEHAVE AD), Neurobehavioral Rating Scale (NBRS), and Neuropsychiatric Interview (NPI) in detecting behavioral disturbance and psychotic symptoms in dementia and characterizing changes in response to treatment. Design 87 subjects in the randomized controlled trial “Continuation Pharmacotherapy for Agitation of Dementia” (CPAD) were included in this analysis. We compared the detection and changes over 12 weeks of both agitation and psychosis using these 3 instruments. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis was performed to compare the performance of the three instruments in detecting global improvement. Results The instruments were equally likely to detect agitation. The NBRS was most likely to detect psychosis. While the NPI best detected improvement in agitation, the instruments were equal for detecting improvement in psychosis. In the ROC analysis for overall clinical improvement in response to treatment, there were no differences in the areas under the correlated curves for the three instruments but they demonstrated different sensitivity and specificity at different cut-off points for target symptom reduction. The E-BEHAVE-AD performed best at a cutpoint of 30% target symptom reduction and the NBRS and NPI both performed best at 50%. Conclusion The E-BEHAVE-AD, NBRS, and NPI were more similar than different in characterizing symptoms but differed in detecting response to treatment. Differences in sensitivity and specificity may lead clinicians to prefer a specific instrument, depending on their goal and the expected magnitude of response to any specific intervention. PMID:23290205

  20. Pharmacological inhibition of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH) oxidase, convalesce behavior and biochemistry of hypertension induced vascular dementia in rats.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Bhupesh; Singh, Nirmal

    2013-02-01

    Cognitive disorders are likely to increase over the coming years (5-10). Vascular dementia (VaD) has heterogeneous pathology and is a challenge for clinicians. Current Alzheimer's disease drugs have had limited clinical efficacy in treating VaD and none have been approved by major regulatory authorities specifically for this disease. Role of iNOS and NADPH-oxidase has been reported in various pathological conditions but there role in hypertension (Hypt) induced VaD is still unclear. This research work investigates the salutiferous effect of aminoguanidine (AG), an iNOS inhibitor and 4'-hydroxy-3'-methoxyacetophenone (HMAP), a NADPH oxidase inhibitor in Hypt induced VaD in rats. Deoxycorticosterone acetate-salt (DOCA-S) hypertension has been used for development of VaD in rats. Morris water-maze was used for testing learning and memory. Vascular system assessment was done by testing endothelial function. Mean arterial blood pressure (MABP), oxidative stress [aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) and brain glutathione (GSH)], nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) and cholinergic activity (brain acetyl cholinesterase activity-AChE) were also measured. DOCA-S treated rats have shown increased MABP with impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate & brain GSH levels along with increase in serum & brain TBARS, and brain AChE activity. AG as well as HMAP significantly convalesce Hypt induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that AG, an iNOS inhibitor and HMAP, a NADPH-oxidase inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of Hypt induced VaD.

  1. Repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation enhances spatial learning and synaptic plasticity via the VEGF and BDNF-NMDAR pathways in a rat model of vascular dementia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, N; Xing, M; Wang, Y; Tao, H; Cheng, Y

    2015-12-17

    This study aimed to evaluate the effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) on learning and memory in a rat model of vascular dementia (VaD) and to analyze the associated mechanisms. Bilateral carotid artery occlusion (2-VO) was used to establish a rat model of VaD. High-frequency (5Hz) rTMS was performed on rats for four weeks. Spatial learning and memory abilities were evaluated using the Morris water maze (MWM), and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus was assessed via long-term potentiation (LTP). Hippocampal expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and three subunits of the N-methyl-D-aspartic acid receptor (NMDAR), NR1, NR2A and NR2B, was analyzed by Western blotting. Compared with the VaD group, escape latency was decreased (P<0.05) and the time spent in the target quadrant and the percentage of swimming distance within that quadrant were increased (P<0.05) in the rTMS group. LTP at hippocampal CA3-CA1 synapses was enhanced by rTMS (P<0.05). VEGF expression was up-regulated following 2-VO and was further increased by rTMS (P<0.05). BDNF, NR1 and NR2B expression was decreased in the VaD group and increased by rTMS (P<0.05). There were no significant differences in NR2A expression among the three groups. These results suggest that rTMS improved learning and memory in the VaD model rats via the up-regulation of VEGF, BDNF and NMDARs. In addition, NR2B may be more important than NR2A for LTP induction in the hippocampus during rTMS treatment of VaD.

  2. Vascular Cognitive Impairment.

    PubMed

    Dichgans, Martin; Leys, Didier

    2017-02-03

    Cerebrovascular disease typically manifests with stroke, cognitive impairment, or both. Vascular cognitive impairment refers to all forms of cognitive disorder associated with cerebrovascular disease, regardless of the specific mechanisms involved. It encompasses the full range of cognitive deficits from mild cognitive impairment to dementia. In principle, any of the multiple causes of clinical stroke can cause vascular cognitive impairment. Recent work further highlights a role of microinfarcts, microhemorrhages, strategic white matter tracts, loss of microstructural tissue integrity, and secondary neurodegeneration. Vascular brain injury results in loss of structural and functional connectivity and, hence, compromise of functional networks within the brain. Vascular cognitive impairment is common both after stroke and in stroke-free individuals presenting to dementia clinics, and vascular pathology frequently coexists with neurodegenerative pathology, resulting in mixed forms of mild cognitive impairment or dementia. Vascular dementia is now recognized as the second most common form of dementia after Alzheimer's disease, and there is increasing awareness that targeting vascular risk may help to prevent dementia, even of the Alzheimer type. Recent advances in neuroimaging, neuropathology, epidemiology, and genetics have led to a deeper understanding of how vascular disease affects cognition. These new findings provide an opportunity for the present reappraisal of vascular cognitive impairment. We further briefly address current therapeutic concepts.

  3. Antihypertensive treatments, cognitive decline, and dementia.

    PubMed

    Duron, Emmanuelle; Hanon, Olivier

    2010-01-01

    Chronic hypertension is associated with an increased risk of both vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this context, the role of anti-hypertensive therapy for the prevention and delay of cognitive decline and dementia is of central importance. Most longitudinal studies have shown a significant inverse association between anti-hypertensive therapies and dementia incidence and for some of these, particularly in AD. Seven randomized, double blind placebo-controlled trials have evaluated the benefit of antihypertensive treatments on cognition. Three of them found positive results in term of prevention of dementia (SYST-EUR) or cognitive decline (PROGRESS, HOPE). Others disclosed non-significant results (MRC, SHEP, SCOPE, HYVET-COG). This discrepancy emphasizes the difficulty to perform such trials: the follow-up has to be long enough to disclose a benefit, a large number of patients is needed for these studies, and because of ethical reasons some anti-hypertensive treatments are often prescribed in the placebo group. Results of the two more recent meta-analyses are inconsistent, possibly due to methodological issues. Antihypertensive treatments could be beneficial to cognitive function by lowering blood pressure and/or by specific neuroprotective effect. Three main antihypertensive subclasses have been associated with a beneficial effect on cognitive function beyond blood pressure reduction (calcium channel blockers, angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitor, angiotensin-AT1-receptor-blockers). Further long-term randomized trials, designed especially to assess a link between antihypertensive therapy and cognitive decline or dementia are therefore needed with cognition as the primary outcome. A low blood pressure threshold that could be deleterious for cognitive function should also be determined.

  4. Hypertension and dementia.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier; Seux, Marie Laure; Lenoir, Hermine; Rigaud, Anne Sophie; Forette, Françoise

    2003-11-01

    Hypertension is one of the principal risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases. Several epidemiologic studies have also indicated a positive correlation between cognitive decline or dementia and blood pressure level. Indeed, the results of most longitudinal studies show that cognitive functioning is often inversely proportional to blood pressure values measured 15 or 20 years previously. Cerebral infarcts, lacunae, and white matter changes are implicated in the pathogenesis of vascular dementia, but may also favor the development of Alzheimer's disease. Microcirculation disorders and endothelial dysfunctions are also advanced to explain the deterioration in cognitive functions in hypertensive subjects. Data from recent therapeutic trials open the way to the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) by antihypertensive treatments and must be confirmed by other studies.

  5. [Diabetes mellitus and dementia].

    PubMed

    Kopf, D

    2015-05-01

    Diabetes mellitus, particularly type 2 diabetes, is a risk factor for dementia and this holds true for incident vascular dementia and Alzheimer's disease. Cerebrovascular complications of diabetes and chronic mild inflammation in insulin resistant states partly account for this increased risk. In addition, cellular resistance to the trophic effects of insulin on neurons and glial cells favor the accumulation of toxic metabolic products, such as amyloid and hyperphosphorylated tau protein (pTau). Weight loss frequently precedes overt cognitive symptoms of Alzheimer's disease. This results in an increased risk of hypoglycemic episodes in stable diabetic patients who are on suitably adjusted doses of oral insulin or insulinotropic antidiabetic drugs. In turn, hypoglycemic episodes may induce further damage in the vulnerable brains of type 2 diabetes patients. Patients with unexplained weight loss, hypoglycemic episodes and subjective memory complaints must be screened for dementia. Once dementia has been diagnosed the goals of diabetes management must be reevaluated as prevention of hypoglycemia becomes more important than tight metabolic control. As weight loss accelerates the rate of cognitive decline, nutritional goals must aim at stabilizing body weight. There is no available evidence on whether drug treatment of diabetes in middle-aged persons can help to prevent dementia; however, physical exercise, mental activity and higher education have preventive effects on the risk of dementia in later life. In addition, nutritional recommendations that are effective in preventing cardiovascular events have also been shown to reduce the risk of dementia.

  6. Prevalence of Amyloid PET Positivity in Dementia Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Ossenkoppele, Rik; Jansen, Willemijn J.; Rabinovici, Gil D.; Knol, Dirk L.; van der Flier, Wiesje M.; van Berckel, Bart N. M.; Scheltens, Philip; Visser, Pieter Jelle

    2015-01-01

    y Dementia with Lewy bodies  emsp;APOE ε4 carrier  1663 (48–80)83 (67–92)  emsp;APOE ε4 noncarrier  1829 (15–50)54 (30–77) Frontotemporal dementia  emsp;APOE ε4 carrier  4819 (12–28)43 (35–50)  emsp;APOE ε4 noncarrier160  5 (3–8)14 (11–18) Vascular dementia  emsp;APOE ε4 carrier  3025 (9–52)64 (49–77)  emsp;APOE ε4 noncarrier  77  7 (3–18)29 (17–43) CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Among participants with dementia, the prevalence of amyloid positivity was associated with clinical diagnosis, age, and APOE genotype. These findings indicate the potential clinical utility of amyloid imaging for differential diagnosis in early-onset dementia and to support the clinical diagnosis of participants with AD dementia and noncarrier APOE ε4 status who are older than 70 years. PMID:25988463

  7. Cross-talk between Aβ and endothelial SSAO/VAP-1 accelerates vascular damage and Aβ aggregation related to CAA-AD.

    PubMed

    Solé, Montse; Miñano-Molina, Alfredo J; Unzeta, Mercedes

    2015-02-01

    An association between semicarbazide-sensitive amine oxidase (SSAO) and cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) related to Alzheimer's disease (AD) has been largely postulated. Increased SSAO activity and expression have been detected in cerebrovascular tissue and plasma of AD patients, colocalizing with cerebrovascular amyloid-beta (Aβ) deposits. As an enzyme, SSAO metabolizes primary amines generating hydrogen peroxide, ammonia, and aldehydes. The ability of these products to generate oxidative stress, to enhance the advanced glycation end-product generation, to promote the Aβ aggregation in vitro, and to induce apoptosis supports its role in CAA-related vascular pathology. However, whether the SSAO increase constitutes a cause or it is a consequence of the pathologic process has not been elucidated so far. To set up the nature of this relationship, vascular cell models expressing SSAO were treated with different Aβ forms, simulating the CAA conditions in vitro. It was found that the presence of the vasculotropic Dutch-mutated Aβ1-40 increases (Aβ1-40 D) the SSAO-dependent toxicity, which is accompanied by an increase of SSAO protein availability in endothelial cell membranes. In addition, SSAO enhances Aβ1-40 D and Aβ1-42 deposition on vascular cells by both activity-dependent and -independent mechanisms. Thus, we provide evidences indicating that Aβ itself could be one of the factors inducing SSAO increase in AD, enhancing its toxic effect, and inducing the vascular dysfunction and, in turn, that SSAO stimulates Aβ deposition on the vascular walls, thereby contributing to the CAA-AD progression. Therefore, molecules inhibiting SSAO could provide an alternative treatment for preventing/delaying the progress of CAA-AD-associated vasculopathy.

  8. Diagnosis of Dementia in the Specialist Setting: A Comparison Between the Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem) and the Registry of Dementias of Girona (ReDeGi)

    PubMed Central

    Garre-Olmo, Josep; Garcia-Ptacek, Sara; Calvó-Perxas, Laia; Turró-Garriga, Oriol; López-Pousa, Secundino; Eriksdotter, Maria

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the frequency of dementia diagnoses from two dementia registries in Europe. Patients registered between 2007 and 2013 in the Swedish Dementia Registry (SveDem; Sweden) and in the Registry of Dementias of Girona (ReDeGi; North-East of Spain) were selected. We compared sociodemographic data, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores, dementia subtype, and medication consumption of 22,384 cases from SveDem and 5,032 cases from ReDeGi. The average age (78.1 years SveDem versus 79.7 years ReDeGi) and the gender (female 58.2% SveDem versus 61.5% ReDeGi) did not greatly differ. MMSE score at diagnosis was higher for SveDem cases (22.1 versus 17.8). Alzheimer’s disease (AD) accounted for the main dementia subtype (36.6% SveDem versus 55.6% ReDeGi). The proportion of vascular dementia (VaD) and mixed dementia was higher in SveDem (18.8% versus 6.4% and 24.9 versus 13.4%), with an odds ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) for SveDem relative to the ReDeGi of 3.41 (3.03–3.84) for VaD, and 2.15 (1.97–2.35) for mixed dementia. This was at the expense of a lower frequency of AD in SveDem (OR 0.41; 95% CI 0.39–0.44). Other dementia diagnoses such as frontotemporal dementia or dementia with Lewy bodies did not significantly differ between registries (2.3% versus 2.9%; 1.9 versus 3.1%). Large differences in medication consumption at the time of dementia diagnosis were detected (4.7 treatments SveDem versus 6.8 ReDeGi). Northern and southern European dementia cohorts differ in demographic characteristics, MMSE score at diagnosis, and drug treatment profile. PMID:27392854

  9. Dementia among elderly in Shanghai suburb: a rural community survey.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Qi; Sun, Hong-Xian; Ye, Fu-Lin; Wang, Gang; Ling, Hua-Wei; Chen, Sheng-Di; Jiang, Guo-Xin

    2014-01-01

    The number of elderly in the world is increasing rapidly, especially in China. The prevalence of dementia among elderly was investigated in a community of Sheshan town, located in the Southwest suburb of Shanghai, China. Face-to-face interviews were conducted to collect relevant information with prepared questionnaires. The Chinese version of the Mini-Mental Status Examination was used to screen subjects with cognitive impairment (CI). Physical examinations and neuropsychological assessments were carried out. Dementia and its major subtypes, Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD), were diagnosed by senior neurologists according to relevant diagnostic criteria. In addition, magnetic resonance imaging and EEG (with P300) were performed for a number of cases with AD or VaD. There were 1,472 participants (666 males and 806 females) aged 60 years and over in the study. A total of 167 subjects with CI were screened. Among them, dementia was recognized in 79 cases with a prevalence of 5.37% (95% confidence intervals: 4.22%-6.52%). The diagnosis of AD was made for 53 cases (16 males and 37 females) with a prevalence of 3.60% (95% confidence intervals: 2.65%-4.55%), and VaD for 21 cases (5 males and 16 females) with a prevalence of 1.43% (95% confidence intervals: 0.82%-2.03%); while the ratio of AD to VaD was 2.52. The prevalence rates of dementia among elderly from our study are higher than that previously reported from China, but in line with that reported from most world regions. A nationwide survey and surveillance system on the prevalence of dementia is recommended.

  10. [Dementia and diabetes: casual or causal relationship?].

    PubMed

    Formiga, Francesc; Reñe, Ramón; Pérez-Maraver, Manuel

    2015-02-20

    Several studies have reported the existence of an epidemiological association between diabetes mellitus (DM) and dementia. Although this association is more evident for vascular dementia, it is also described in Alzheimer's disease (AD). In this review we evaluate the different hypotheses that may explain the association between DM and dementia. We can consider the existence of a diabetes type 3 as the situation that occurs when hyperinsulinemia in response to insulin resistance leads to a decrease of the brain insulin and a poor regulation of insulin-degrading enzyme; thus, beta-amyloid accumulates, among other mechanisms, by the decline of its degradation by insulin-degrading enzyme. Consequently, AD may be related, at least in part, to a brain insulin resistance. There are several studies that prove the concept that a better metabolic control, especially in not very old people, is associated with an increased cognitive performance. It is not known whether the use of any specific drug for the treatment of DM is better than any other. It is important for physicians responsible for the metabolic control of diabetic patients to know this possible association, and to explore cognition in the control visits of patients with DM.

  11. Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Treatments with Traditional Chinese Medicine

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xinhua; Cui, Guozhen; Tseng, Hisa Hui Ling; Lee, Simon Ming-Yuen; Leung, George Pak Heng

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of cognitive impairment and dementia caused by cerebrovascular disease is likely to increase with the global aging population. Vascular contributions to cognitive impairment and dementia (VCID) is a wide spectrum term used to include a diverse heterogeneous group of cognitive syndromes with vascular factors regardless of the cause of pathogenesis. VCID ranges from mild cognitive impairment to full-blown dementia with vascular dementia (VaD) as the most severe stage. It is further complexed by the coexistence of other forms of dementia such as Alzheimer's disease (AD). Recent researches in the functions of the neurovascular unit (NVU) suggest that dysfunction of the NVU might be the cause of primary vascular events in the brain that leads to further neurodegeneration. In this review, we have briefly summarized various forms of VCID. There is currently no standard therapy for VCID or dementia. Given the fact that Traditional Chinese Medicine (TCM) has gained popularity worldwide, we also reviewed recent scientific and clinical findings on various antidementia TCM for the treatment of VCID, including Salvia miltiorrhiza, Huperzia serrata, Ligusticum chuanxiong, Ginkgo biloba, Panax ginseng, and also TCM formula Sailuotong capsule (SLT) and Fufangdanshen tablets (FFDS). PMID:28042305

  12. Differential associations of plasma lipids with incident dementia and dementia subtypes in the 3C Study: A longitudinal, population-based prospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Schilling, Sabrina; Tzourio, Christophe; Soumaré, Aïcha; Kaffashian, Sara; Dartigues, Jean-François; Ancelin, Marie-Laure; Dufouil, Carole; Debette, Stéphanie

    2017-01-01

    Background Vascular risk factors have been proposed as important targets for the prevention of dementia. As lipid fractions represent easily modifiable targets, we examined the longitudinal relationship of baseline lipid fractions with 13-y incident dementia and its subtypes (Alzheimer disease [AD] and mixed or vascular dementia) in older community-dwelling persons. Methods and findings Non-institutionalized persons aged 65+ y (n = 9,294) were recruited for the Three-City Study (3C Study), a population-based cohort study from the electoral rolls of the cities of Dijon, Bordeaux, and Montpellier, France, between March 1999 and March 2001. Follow-up examinations were performed every 2 y after the baseline assessment. The final study sample comprised 7,470 participants from the 3C Study (mean age ± standard deviation [SD] 73.8 ± 5.3 y, 61.0% women) who were prospectively followed up for up to 13 y. Fasting lipid fractions (triglycerides [TGs], high-density lipoprotein cholesterol [HDL-C], low-density lipoprotein cholesterol [LDL-C], total cholesterol [TC]) were studied as continuous variables, and results are reported per SD increase of each lipid fraction. Incident dementia and its subtypes were studied as censored variables using Cox models with age as time scale. Analyses were adjusted for sex, study center, and educational level, as well as vascular risk factors and apolipoprotein E (APOE) ε4 genotype. We corrected for multiple testing, yielding a significance threshold of 0.0169. p-Values above the significance threshold but less than 0.05 were considered nominally significant. During a mean (± SD) follow-up period of 7.9 ± 3.6 y, 779 participants developed incident dementia (n = 532 AD and n = 154 mixed or vascular dementia). Higher LDL-C and TC concentrations at baseline were associated with an increased risk of AD (hazard ratio [HR] per SD increase = 1.13 [95% CI 1.04–1.22], p = 0.0045, and HR = 1.12 [1.03–1.22], p = 0.0072, respectively). These

  13. Screening for Very Mild Subcortical Vascular Dementia Patients Aged 75 and Above Using the Montreal Cognitive Assessment and Mini-Mental State Examination in a Community: The Kurihara Project

    PubMed Central

    Kasai, Mari; Meguro, Kenichi; Nakamura, Kei; Nakatsuka, Masahiro; Ouchi, Yoshitaka; Tanaka, Naofumi

    2012-01-01

    Aims To examine the effectiveness of the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) to screen people with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), to associate the MoCA score with the presence of infarction, and to detect the characteristics of people with very mild subcortical vascular dementia (vmSVD). Methods 392 out of 886 community dwellers aged 75 years and above living in Kurihara, Northern Japan, agreed to participate in our study; 164 scored a Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) of 0 (healthy), 184 scored a CDR of 0.5 (MCI) and 44 scored a CDR of 1+ (dementia). The participants scoring a CDR of 0.5 were divided into 2 subtypes: 37 had vmSVD and 147 had other types of dementia. The objective variables were the total MoCA, the MoCA subscale and the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE). Results There was a difference in the MoCA and MMSE scores between the 3 CDR groups. The MoCA score overlapped in participants with CDR 0 and 0.5. There were significant CDR effects, while there were no significant infarction effects for the MoCA and MMSE. vmSVD participants had lower scores on the total MoCA, the MoCA attention subscale and MMSE than healthy elderly people and participants with other types of dementia. Conclusion Our results suggested that MMSE performed rather well and that the MoCA is not superior to MMSE in MCI and vmSVD participants aged 75 and above in a community. PMID:23277783

  14. Prevalence of Dementia and Subtypes in Valladolid, Northwestern Spain: The DEMINVALL Study

    PubMed Central

    Tola-Arribas, Miguel Angel; Yugueros, María Isabel; Garea, María José; Ortega-Valín, Fernando; Cerón-Fernández, Ana; Fernández-Malvido, Beatriz; San José-Gallegos, Antonio; González-Touya, Marta; Botrán-Velicia, Ana; Iglesias-Rodríguez, Vanessa; Díaz-Gómez, Bárbara

    2013-01-01

    Objective To describe the prevalence of dementia and subtypes in a general elderly population in northwestern Spain and to analyze the influence of socio-demographic factors. Methods Cross-sectional, two-phase, door-to-door, population-based study. A total of 870 individuals from a rural region and 2,119 individuals from an urban region of Valladolid, Spain, were involved. The seven-minute screen neurocognitive battery was used in the screening phase. A control group was included. Results A total of 2,170 individuals aged 65 to 104 years (57% women) were assessed. There were 184 subjects diagnosed with dementia. The crude prevalence was 8.5% (95% CI: 7.3-9.7). Age- and sex-adjusted prevalence was 5.5 (95% CI: 4.5-6.5). Main subtypes of dementia were: Alzheimer’s disease (AD) 77.7%, Lewy Body disease, 7.6% and vascular dementia (VD) 5.9%. Crude prevalences were 6.6% (AD), 0.6% (Lewy Body disease), and 0.5% (VD). Dementia was associated with age (OR 1.14 for 1-year increase in age), female sex (OR 1.79) and the absence of formal education (OR 2.53 compared to subjects with primary education or more). Conclusion The prevalence of dementia in the study population was lower than the most recent estimates for Western Europe. There was a high proportion of AD among all dementia cases and very low prevalence of VD. Old age, female sex, and low education level were independent risk factors for dementia and AD. PMID:24147055

  15. [The current diagnostic approach for chronic progressive dementia].

    PubMed

    Bartels, C; Wallesch, C W

    2007-05-01

    This review presents diagnostic criteria for the different dementia syndromes and mild cognitive impairment. It is being claimed that in view of the current pharmacological interventions and after exclusion of symptomatic dementia, a controlled trial with cholinesterase inhibitors or memantine is more efficient than elaborate diagnostics. Efficiency of differential diagnosis will increase when drugs are available that specifically improve the different degenerative dementias and vascular dementia. Clinical pictures of the various dementia syndromes are briefly described.

  16. Associations between APOE polymorphisms and seven diseases with cognitive impairment including Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies in southeast China

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ke-Liang; Sun, Yi-Min; Zhou, Yan; Zhao, Qian-Hua; Ding, Ding

    2016-01-01

    Objective To explore the effect of APOE polymorphisms on patients with cognitive impairments in The Chinese Han population. Materials and methods A total of 1027 cases with Alzheimer’s disease (AD), 40 cases with vascular dementia (VaD), 28 cases with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), 54 cases with semantic dementia (SD), 44 cases with dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), 583 cases with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 32 cases with vascular cognitive impairment no dementia (VCIND) were recruited consecutively from memory disorders clinics in Huashan Hospital between January 2010 and December 2014. The 1149 cognitively normal controls were recruited from the community epidemiologic investigations. The APOE genotypes were determined using the TaqMan assay. Results The distribution of genotype and allele frequencies of APOE differed significantly between control and AD or MCI, with ε4 increasing the risk of AD and MCI in a dose-dependent pattern and ε2 decreasing the risk of AD, but not the risk of MCI. As for VaD, significant differences in the APOE genotype distribution were found compared with the controls. E4/4 increased the risk of VaD and ε4 increased the risk of VCIND in women. The allele distribution differed between bvFTD and controls, but genotype and allele frequencies of APOE did not affect the risk of bvFTD, SD, and DLB. Conclusion In The Chinese Han population, APOE ε4 increased the risk of AD and MCI in a dose-dependent manner and ε2 decreased the risk of AD as reported previously. APOE ε4 might increase risk in VaD and female patients with VCIND, but no effects of APOE on bvFTD, DLB, and SD were found. PMID:26981880

  17. Dementia Friendly, Dementia Capable, and Dementia Positive: Concepts to Prepare for the Future

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Shih-Yin; Lewis, Frances Marcus

    2015-01-01

    With an aging global population, the number of dementia cases is growing exponentially. To address the upcoming dementia crisis, the World Health Organization and Alzheimer’s Disease International (2012) collaborated on an extensive report, Dementia: A Public Health Priority. In the United Kingdom, Prime Minster David Cameron initiated a national challenge on dementia, forming 3 dementia challenge champion groups aimed at improving health and care, creating dementia-friendly communities, and promoting dementia research. In the U.S., President Obama signed the National Alzheimer’s Project Act, which led to the formation of the Advisory Council on Alzheimer’s Research, Care, and Services and the launch of the first National Plan to Address Alzheimer’s Disease. The term “dementia capable” was introduced in the 2012 Recommendations of the Public Members of the Advisory Council and has since been adopted in both the recommendations and annual updates of the national plan. This paper will first compare and contrast government usage of the concepts dementia friendly and dementia capable, along with another valuable concept, dementia positive, that was added after reviewing the literature. Finally, a new vision statement for the U.S.’ national plan will be proposed and recommendations incorporating these 3 concepts in policy, research, and practice will be made. PMID:26035599

  18. Risk of dementia and alcohol and wine consumption: a review of recent results.

    PubMed

    Letenneur, Luc

    2004-01-01

    The term dementia refers to a clinical syndrome of acquired intellectual disturbances produced by brain dysfunction. Dementia may result from a wide variety of disorders, including degenerative (e.g. Alzheimer's disease, AD), vascular (e.g. multi-infarct dementia), and traumatic (e.g. head injury). Long-term abuse of alcohol is related to the development of the Wernicke-Korsakoff's syndrome or alcohol dementia. However, light to moderate alcohol intake might also reduce the risk of dementia and AD. In Bordeaux (France), a population-based prospective study found that subjects drinking 3 to 4 standard glasses of wine per day (> 250 and up to 500 ml), categorized as moderate drinkers, the crude odds ratio (OR) was 0.18 for incident dementia (p < 0.01) and 0.25 for Alzheimer's disease (p < 0.03), as compared to the non-drinkers. After adjusting for age, sex, education, occupation, baseline cognitive performances and other possible confounders, the ORs were respectively 0.19 (p < 0.01) and 0.28 (p < 0.05). In the 922 mild drinkers (< 1 to 2 glasses per day) there was a negative association only with AD. after adjustment (OR = 0.55; p < 0.05). The inverse relationship between moderate wine drinking and incident dementia was explained neither by known predictors of dementia nor by medical, psychological or socio-familial factors. These results were confirmed from data of the Rotterdam study. Light-to-moderate drinking (one to three drinks per day) was significantly associated with a lower risk of any dementia (hazard ratio 0.58 [95% CI 0.38-0.90]) and vascular dementia (hazard ratio 0.29 [0.09-0.93]). No evidence that the relation between alcohol and dementia varied by type of alcoholic beverage was found. Stroke constitutes one of the most common causes of serious functional impairment in developed countries. Ischaemic strokes represent about 80% of all strokes. Several studies have been published and the overall conclusion is that heavy drinking is a risk factor for

  19. Risk of Dementia Associated with Elevated Plasma Homocysteine in a Latin American Population

    PubMed Central

    Chacón, Inara J.; Molero, Aldrín E.; Pino-Ramírez, Gloria; Luchsinger, José A.; Lee, Joseph H.; Maestre, Gladys E.

    2009-01-01

    The relationship between total homocysteine (tHcy) and dementia risk remains controversial, as the association varies among populations and dementia subtypes. We studied a Venezuelan population that has high prevalence of both elevated tHcy and dementia. We tested the hypotheses that (1) elevated tHcy is associated with increased dementia risk, (2) the risk is greater for vascular dementia (VaD) than for Alzheimer's disease (AD), and (3) a history of stroke may partly explain this association. 2100 participants (≥55 years old) of the Maracaibo Aging Study underwent standardized neurological, neuropsychiatric, and cardiovascular assessments. Elevated tHcy was significantly associated with dementia, primarily VaD. When history of stroke and other confounding factors were taken into account, elevated tHcy remained a significant risk factor in older (>66 years), but not in younger (55–66 years) subjects. Ongoing studies of this population may provide insight into the mechanism by which tHcy increases risk for dementia. PMID:20798752

  20. The Impact of Admission Diagnosis on Recurrent or Frequent Hospitalizations in 3 Dementia Subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Nai-Ching; Huang, Chi-Wei; Lui, Chun-Chung; Huang, Shu-Hua; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Chen-Chang; Lai, Wei-An

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increasing numbers of patients with different types of dementia have resulted in the increasing medical care loads. It is not known whether explanatory factors for recurrent or prolong hospitalization were driven by the subtypes of dementia. We analyzed 203 dementia patients aged >65-year-old with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), or Parkinsonism-related dementia (PRD). With a 4-year follow-up period, logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors of dementia diagnosis, cerebrovascular risk factors, chronic systemic diseases, and the etiology for admission for recurrent (>4 times/4 years) or prolonged hospitalization stay (>14 days per hospitalization). There were 48 AD, 96 VaD, and 59 PRD patients that completed the 4-year study. The average length of hospital stay was significant, the shortest in AD and the longest in PRD (P = 0.01), whereas the frequency of hospitalization was not different among 3 dementia subtypes. Although delirium is the most common etiology for admission in the patients, diabetes mellitus (Odds ratio, OR = 2.79, P = 0.02), pneumonia (OR = 11.21, P < 0.001), and fall-related hip fracture (OR = 4.762, P = 0.029) were significantly associated with prolong hospitalization. Patients with coronary artery disease (OR = 9.87, P = 0.02), pneumonia (OR = 84.48, P < 0.001), urinary tract infection (OR = 55.09, P < 0.001), and fall-related fracture (OR = 141.7, P < 0.001) predict recurrent hospitalization. Dementia subtypes did not influence directly on the hospitalization courses. The etiologies for admission carried higher clinical significance, compared with the coexisted systemic diseases. PMID:26579820

  1. Definition and therapy of chronic cerebro-vascular diseases.

    PubMed

    Agnoli, A; Denaro, A; Ruggieri, S

    1982-05-01

    Chronic cerebro-vascular disorders could be considered in a broad sense as a large body of knowledge in which three main categories of clinical disturbances have to be be considered: 1) Pathological aging that manifest itself with light short term memory impairment associated with a mild parkinsonian symptomatology or pseudobulbar signs. 2) Senile dementia Alzheimer type and multi infarct dementia. 3) Chronic cerebro-vascular disorders as defined by the Ad Hoc Committee (Paris, 1980). At present the therapy of chronic cerebro-vascular disorders is based on two main groups of drugs and can be divided into: 1) A treatment of prevention or secondary prevention which tends to correct or modify the different risk factors. 2) A treatment that seeks to control and modify the neurological and neuropsychological after effects and the disorders of the higher nervous activities which result from the lesion.

  2. Genomic characterization of Alzheimer's disease and genotype-related phenotypic analysis of biological markers in dementia.

    PubMed

    Cacabelos, Ramón

    2004-12-01

    More than 180 genes distributed across the human genome are potentially involved in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease (AD). The AD population shows a higher genetic variation rate than the control population. Significant differences in allelic distribution and frequency exist when AD-related polygenic clusters are compared with other forms of dementia, indicating that the genetic component in neurodegenerative dementia differs from that of other CNS disorders. The characterization of AD genotype-related phenotypic profiles reveals substantial differences in biological markers among AD clusters associated with different genes and/or allelic combinations. AD and dementia with vascular component (DVC) are the most prevalent forms of dementia. Both clinical entities share many similarities, but they differ in their major phenotypic and genotypic profiles, as revealed by structural and functional genomics studies. Comparative phenotypic studies have identified significant differences in 25% of more than 100 parametric variables, including anthropometric values, cardiovascular function, blood pressure, lipid metabolism, uric acid metabolism, peripheral calcium homeostasis, liver function, alkaline phosphatase, lactate dehydrogenase, red and white blood cells, regional brain atrophy, and brain blood flow velocity. Functional genomic studies incorporating apolipoprotein E (APOE)-related changes in biological markers extended the difference between AD and DVC by up to 57%. Structural genomic studies with AD-related genes, including APP, MAPT, APOE, PS1, PS2, A2M, ACE, AGT, cFOS, and PRNP, demonstrate different genetic profiles in AD and DVC, with an absolute genetic variation rate in the range of 30-80%, depending upon genes and genetic clusters. The relative polymorphic variation in genetic clusters integrated by two, three or four genes associated with AD ranges from 1 to 3%. The main phenotypic differences in AD are genotype dependent, indicating a powerful

  3. Multiplex analyte assays to characterize different dementias: brain inflammatory cytokines in poststroke and other dementias

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aiqing; Oakley, Arthur E.; Monteiro, Maria; Tuomela, Katri; Allan, Louise M.; Mukaetova-Ladinska, Elizabeta B.; O'Brien, John T.; Kalaria, Raj N.

    2016-01-01

    Both the inflammatory potential and cognitive function decline during aging. The association between the repertoire of inflammatory biomarkers and cognitive decline is unclear. Inflammatory cytokines have been reported to be increased, decreased, or unchanged in the cerebrospinal fluid and sera of subjects with dementia. We assessed 112 postmortem brains from subjects diagnosed with poststroke dementia (PSD), vascular dementia, mixed dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD), comparing those to poststroke nondemented (PSND) subjects and age-matched controls. We analyzed 5 brain regions including the gray and white matter from the frontal and temporal lobes for a panel of cytokine and/or chemokine analytes using multiplex-array assays. Of the 37 analytes, 14 were under or near the detection limits, 7 were close to the lowest detection level, and 16 cytokines were within the linear range of the assay. We observed widely variable concentrations of C-reactive protein (CRP) and serum amyloid A at the high end (1–150 ng/mg protein), whereas several of the interleukins (IL, interferon-gamma and tumor necrosis factor) at the low end (1–10 pg/mg). There were also regional variations; most notable being high concentrations of some cytokines (e.g., CRP and angiogenesis panel) in the frontal white matter. Overall, we found decreased concentrations of several cytokines, including IL-1 beta (p = 0.000), IL-6 (p = 0.000), IL-7 (p = 0.000), IL-8 (p = 0.000), IL-16 (p = 0.001), interferon-inducible protein–10 (0.044), serum amyloid A (p = 0.011), and a trend in IL-1 alpha (p = 0.084) across all dementia groups compared to nondemented controls. IL-6 and IL-8 were significantly lower in dementia subjects than in nondemented subjects in every region. In particular, lower levels of IL-6 and IL-8 were notable in the PSD compared to PSND subjects. Because these 2 stroke groups had comparable degree of vascular pathology, the lower production of IL-6 and IL-8 in PSD reaffirms a

  4. Vascular and metabolic reserve in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Nagata, K; Kondoh, Y; Atchison, R; Sato, M; Satoh, Y; Watahiki, Y; Hirata, Y; Yokoyama, E

    2000-01-01

    Vascular and metabolic reserve were analyzed in probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD). Cerebral blood flow (CBF), cerebral blood volume (CBV), cerebral metabolic rate of oxygen (CMRO(2)), and oxygen extraction fraction (OEF) were measured quantitatively with positron emission tomography (PET). Vascular reactivity (VR) was also calculated by comparing the CBF during 5% CO(2) inhalation with the CBF during normal breathing. Vascular transit time (VTT) that was calculated as a ratio of CBV/CBF and VR reflect vasodilating capacity of the small resistance vessels, whereas OEF designates metabolic (oxygen-extraction) reserve in threatening brain ischemia. Significant increase in OEF was seen in the parieto-temporal cortex and both VTT and VR were preserved in AD patients. By constrast, there was no significant increase in OEF whereas VTT was prolonged and VR was markedly depressed in VaD patients. The increase of OEF and preserved VTT and VR seen in AD patients indicate the possible participation of vascular factors in the pathogenesis of AD perhaps at the capillary level.

  5. Prevention of dementia: lessons from SYST-EUR and PROGRESS.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier; Forette, Françoise

    2004-11-15

    Hypertension is one of the principal risk factors for cerebrovascular diseases, closely correlated also with cognitive decline and dementia. Data from recent therapeutic trials (SYST-EUR, PROGRESS) open the way toward the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) by antihypertensive treatments. The results of these two studies suggest different mechanisms of action of antihypertensive drugs in the prevention of cognitive decline. The use of angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitors, with or without diuretics, resulted in decrease incidence of stroke-related dementia, but dementia without stroke was not reduced. With the dihydropyridine calcium antagonists, a reduction in both Alzheimer's type and vascular dementia was demonstrated.

  6. Blood and CSF biomarkers in brain subcortical ischemic vascular disease: Involved pathways and clinical applicability

    PubMed Central

    Vilar-Bergua, A; Riba-Llena, I; Nafría, C; Bustamante, A; Llombart, V; Delgado, P

    2016-01-01

    Vascular dementia is the second most common type of dementia after Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Subcortical ischemic vascular disease refers to a form of vascular cognitive impairment characterized by the presence of diffuse white matter hyperintensities (WMHs) and multiple lacunar infarcts. These neuroimaging findings are mainly caused by cerebral small-vessel disease (cSVD) and relate to aging and cognitive impairment, but they can also be silent and highly prevalent in otherwise healthy individuals. We aimed to review studies on blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) markers related to the presence of WMHs and lacunar infarcts that have been conducted in the past in large population-based studies and in high-risk selected patients (such as those with vascular risk factors, vascular cognitive impairment, or AD). Relevant associations with the presence and progression of cSVD have been described in the blood for markers related to inflammatory processes, endothelial damage and coagulation/fibrinolysis processes, etc. Also, different combinations of CSF markers might help to differentiate between etiologic types of dementia. In the future, to translate these findings into clinical practice and use biomarkers to early diagnosis and monitoring vascular cognitive impairment would require the replication of candidate markers in large-scale, multicenter, and prospectively designed studies. PMID:25899297

  7. Trends in autopsy-verified dementia prevalence over 29 years of the Hisayama study.

    PubMed

    Honda, Hiroyuki; Sasaki, Kensuke; Hamasaki, Hideomi; Shijo, Masahiro; Koyama, Sachiko; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Suzuki, Satoshi O; Iwaki, Toru

    2016-08-01

    We investigated the trends in dementia over the past 29 years in the town of Hisayama, Japan using 1266 autopsy specimens. The Hisayama study is a prospective cohort study of lifestyle-related diseases that was started in 1961. Clinical examination of dementia was started in 1985 with five detailed cross-sectional assessments conducted in 1985, 1992, 1998, 2005 and 2012. To examine the trends in dementia, we divided the 1266 autopsy samples into five groups according to the year of death: I (1986-1991, 257 cases), II (1992-1997, 268 cases), III (1998-2004, 318 cases), IV (2005-2011, 296 cases) and V (2012-2014, 127 cases). The prevalence of all-cause dementia significantly increased over time (28.4% in group I, 22.4% in group II, 32.1% in group III, 30.1% in group IV, 51.2% in group V; P for trend <0.001). A similar trend was observed for Alzheimer's disease (AD) (15.2%, 11.9%, 17.3%, 20.6% and 33.1%, respectively; P for trend <0.001). A significant increasing trend was observed in both men and women. A rapid increase in senile dementia of the NFT type (SD-NFT) in recent years was notable. Vascular dementia was the most common type of dementia in men prior to 2004; however, its prevalence decreased over time. Our study revealed that tauopathies, including AD and SD-NFT, significantly increased in the aged Japanese population over the course of this study. The neuritic plaque pathology of AD was associated with metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and abnormal lipid metabolism, whereas the risk factors for tau pathology remain unclear. Although aging is considered one of the important risk factors accelerating tau pathology, there could be other risk factors associated with lifestyle diseases.

  8. Luigi Amaducci memorial award winner's paper 2003. A neurologist's view of Alzheimer's disease and dementia.

    PubMed

    Katzman, Robert

    2004-09-01

    Senile dementia was the third most common admission diagnosis for New York psychiatric hospitals at the start of the twentieth century and the distinction between vascular and senile dementia was understood by psychiatrists even then. The term Alzheimer's disease (AD) was originally introduced to distinguish a pre-senile dementia from the common general paresis, but Alzheimer raised the possibility that pre-senile AD might not be distinguishable in clinical or histological terms from senile dementia. By the late 1970s it had become clear that the most common disorder producing dementia in elderly people was clinically and pathologically identical to pre-senile AD. AD is malignant, reducing remaining life expectancy by almost half and raising the risk of death over five years threefold (cancer raises it fourfold). Synapse loss associated with beta amyloid oligomers is a strong determinant of cognitive decline in patients with AD. Tau-containing neurofibrillary tangles usefully track disease severity. Unmodifiable risk factors include mutations in three genes which affect the production or metabolism of beta amyloid, the risk factor gene for Apolipoprotein [see symol in text]4 and female gender. The overriding risk factor is age, the prevalence of AD doubling with every five years of age until 90. Low education, head injury and low folate levels are examples of potentially modifiable risk factors. Since a delay of onset of five years would halve the number of patients with the disease, clinical trials for such putative protective factors as estrogens, folic acid, vitamin E, statins, and NSAIDs have begun. Cognitive and leisure activity may be protective against the development of AD but any protective function can only be confirmed by clinical trials.

  9. The role of neuroinflammation in dementias.

    PubMed

    Pasqualetti, Giuseppe; Brooks, David J; Edison, Paul

    2015-04-01

    The molecular mechanism of neuronal loss and synaptic damage in Alzheimer's disease (AD), Parkinson's disease dementia (PDD), frontotemporal dementia (FTD) and Lewy body dementia (LBD) is poorly understood and could differ among different types of neurodegenerative processes. However, the presence of neuroinflammation is a common feature of dementia. In this setting, reactive microgliosis, oxidative damage and mitochondrial dysfunction are associated with the pathogenesis of all types of neurodegenerative dementia. Moreover, an increased body of evidence suggests that microglia may play a central role in AD progression. In this paper, we review the scientific literature on neuroinflammation related to the most common neurodegenerative dementias (AD, PDD, FTD and LBD) focussing on the possible molecular mechanisms and the available clinical evidence. Furthermore, we discuss the neuroimaging techniques that are currently used for the study of neuroinflammation in human brain.

  10. Magnetic Resonance Imaging and Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy in Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Yuan-Yu; Du, An-Tao; Schuff, Norbert; Weiner, Michael W.

    2007-01-01

    This article reviews recent studies of magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy in dementia, including Alzheimer's disease, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, idiopathic Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, and vascular dementia. Magnetic resonance imaging and magnetic resonance spectroscopy can detect structural alteration and biochemical abnormalities in the brain of demented subjects and may help in the differential diagnosis and early detection of affected individuals, monitoring disease progression, and evaluation of therapeutic effect. PMID:11563438

  11. Stroke injury, cognitive impairment and vascular dementia☆

    PubMed Central

    Kalaria, Raj N.; Akinyemi, Rufus; Ihara, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    The global burden of ischaemic strokes is almost 4-fold greater than haemorrhagic strokes. Current evidence suggests that 25–30% of ischaemic stroke survivors develop immediate or delayed vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) or vascular dementia (VaD). Dementia after stroke injury may encompass all types of cognitive disorders. States of cognitive dysfunction before the index stroke are described under the umbrella of pre-stroke dementia, which may entail vascular changes as well as insidious neurodegenerative processes. Risk factors for cognitive impairment and dementia after stroke are multifactorial including older age, family history, genetic variants, low educational status, vascular comorbidities, prior transient ischaemic attack or recurrent stroke and depressive illness. Neuroimaging determinants of dementia after stroke comprise silent brain infarcts, white matter changes, lacunar infarcts and medial temporal lobe atrophy. Until recently, the neuropathology of dementia after stroke was poorly defined. Most of post-stroke dementia is consistent with VaD involving multiple substrates. Microinfarction, microvascular changes related to blood–brain barrier damage, focal neuronal atrophy and low burden of co-existing neurodegenerative pathology appear key substrates of dementia after stroke injury. The elucidation of mechanisms of dementia after stroke injury will enable establishment of effective strategy for symptomatic relief and prevention. Controlling vascular disease risk factors is essential to reduce the burden of cognitive dysfunction after stroke. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Vascular Contributions to Cognitive Impairment and Dementia edited by M. Paul Murphy, Roderick A. Corriveau and Donna M. Wilcock. PMID:26806700

  12. Is Alzheimer's disease a neurodegenerative or a vascular disorder? Data, dogma, and dialectics.

    PubMed

    de la Torre, Jack C

    2004-03-01

    The cause of Alzheimer's disease (AD) is unknown. This gap in knowledge has created a stumbling block in the search for a genuinely effective treatment or cure for this dementia. This article summarises the arguments for a causal role for either amyloid deposition or cerebrovascular pathology as the primary trigger in the development of non-genetic AD. A bare-bones survey of the published research reveals no compelling evidence that amyloid deposition is neurotoxic in human beings or that it results in neurodegenerative changes involving synaptic, metabolic, or neuronal loss in human or transgenic-mouse brains. By contrast, the data supporting AD as a primary vascular disorder are more convincing. Findings suggesting a vascular cause of AD come from epidemiological, neuroimaging, pathological, pharmacotherapeutic, and clinical studies. The consensus of these studies indicates that chronic brain hypoperfusion is linked to AD risk factors, AD preclinical detection and pharmacotherapeutic action of AD symptoms.

  13. Considering sex and gender in Alzheimer disease and other dementias

    PubMed Central

    Podcasy, Jessica L.; Epperson, C. Neill

    2016-01-01

    Suffering related to dementia is multifaceted because cognitive and physical functioning slowly deteriorates. Advanced age and sex, two of the most prominent risk factors for dementia, are not modifiable. Lifestyle factors such as smoking, excessive alcohol use, and poor diet modulate susceptibility to dementia in both males and females. The degree to which the resulting health conditions (eg, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease) impact dementia risk varies by sex. Depending on the subtype of dementia, the ratio of male to female prevalence differs. For example, females are at greater risk of developing Alzheimer disease dementia, whereas males are at greater risk of developing vascular dementia. This review examines sex and gender differences in the development of dementia with the goal of highlighting factors that require further investigation. Considering sex as a biological variable in dementia research promises to advance our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of these conditions. PMID:28179815

  14. Considering sex and gender in Alzheimer disease and other dementias.

    PubMed

    Podcasy, Jessica L; Epperson, C Neill

    2016-12-01

    Suffering related to dementia is multifaceted because cognitive and physical functioning slowly deteriorates. Advanced age and sex, two of the most prominent risk factors for dementia, are not modifiable. Lifestyle factors such as smoking, excessive alcohol use, and poor diet modulate susceptibility to dementia in both males and females. The degree to which the resulting health conditions (eg, obesity, type 2 diabetes, and cardiovascular disease) impact dementia risk varies by sex. Depending on the subtype of dementia, the ratio of male to female prevalence differs. For example, females are at greater risk of developing Alzheimer disease dementia, whereas males are at greater risk of developing vascular dementia. This review examines sex and gender differences in the development of dementia with the goal of highlighting factors that require further investigation. Considering sex as a biological variable in dementia research promises to advance our understanding of the pathophysiology and treatment of these conditions.

  15. Current issues in dementia pharmacotherapy.

    PubMed

    Daiello, Lori A

    2007-12-01

    Diagnosis and treatment of dementia in nursing homes and assisted living facilities remains challenging since response to treatment and disease course varies for the common degenerative dementias. Four cholinesterase inhibitors and an N-methyl-D-aspartate glutamate receptor antagonist are approved by the US Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of Alzheimer's disease (AD). Treatment with AD medications is clinically efficacious and associated with reduced caregiver burden. Some controlled trials have reported that cholinesterase inhibitors and memantine ameliorate dementia-related behavioral symptoms. Antipsychotic therapy is often used for intractable behavioral symptoms or psychosis not responding to nonpharmacologic interventions and antidementia medications; however, the risk/benefit ratio for each patient should be critically evaluated, because treatment with atypical antipsychotics has been associated with serious adverse events, including increased risk for death in older adults with dementia.

  16. Type 2 diabetes aggravates Alzheimer's disease-associated vascular alterations of the aorta in mice.

    PubMed

    Sena, Cristina M; Pereira, Ana M; Carvalho, Cristina; Fernandes, Rosa; Seiça, Raquel M; Oliveira, Catarina R; Moreira, Paula I

    2015-01-01

    Vascular risk factors are associated with a higher incidence of dementia. In fact, diabetes mellitus is considered a main risk factor for Alzheimer's disease (AD) and both diseases are characterized by vascular dysfunction. However, the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown. Here, the effects of high-sucrose-induced type 2 diabetes (T2D) in the aorta of wild type (WT) and triple-transgenic AD (3xTg-AD) mice were investigated. 3xTg-AD mice showed a significant decrease in body weight and an increase in postprandial glycemia, glycated hemoglobin (HbA1c), and vascular nitrotyrosine, superoxide anion (O2•-), receptor for the advanced glycation end products (RAGE) protein, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) levels when compared to WT mice. High-sucrose intake caused a significant increase in body weight, postprandial glycemia, HbA1c, triglycerides, plasma vascular cell adhesion molecule 1 (VCAM-1), and vascular nitrotyrosine, O2•-, RAGE, and MCP-1 levels in both WT and 3xTg-AD mice when compared to the respective control group. Also, a significant decrease in nitric oxide-dependent vasorelaxation was observed in 3xTg-AD and sucrose-treated WT mice. In conclusion, AD and T2D promote similar vascular dysfunction of the aorta, this effect being associated with elevated oxidative and nitrosative stress and inflammation. Also, AD-associated vascular alterations are potentiated by T2D. These findings support the idea that metabolic alterations predispose to the onset and progression of dementia.

  17. Dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    McKeith, Ian G; Burn, David J; Ballard, Clive G; Collerton, Daniel; Jaros, Evelyn; Morris, Chris M; McLaren, Andrew; Perry, Elaine K; Perry, Robert; Piggott, Margaret A; O'Brien, John T

    2003-01-01

    The objective was to summarize recent findings about the clinical features, diagnosis and investigation of dementia with Lewy (DLB) bodies, together with its neuropathology, neurochemistry and genetics. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is a primary, neurodegenerative dementia sharing clinical and pathological characteristics with both Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD). Antiubiquitin immunocytochemical staining, developed in the early 1990s, allowed the frequency and distribution of cortical LBs to be defined. More recently, alpha-synuclein antibodies have revealed extensive neuritic pathology in DLB demonstrating a neurobiological link with other "synucleinopathies" including PD and multiple system atrophy (MSA). The most significant correlates of cognitive failure in DLB appear to be with cortical LB and Lewy neurites (LNs) rather than Alzheimer type pathology. Clinical diagnostic criteria for DLB, published in 1996, have been subjected to several validation studies against autopsy findings. These conclude that although diagnostic specificity is high (range 79- 100%, mean 92%), sensitivity is lower (range 0- 83 %, mean, 49%). Improved methods of case detection are therefore required. Fluctuating impairments in attention, visual recognition and construction are more indicative of DLB than AD. Relative preservation of medial temporal lobe volume on structural MRI and the use of SPECT tracers for regional blood flow and the dopamine transporter are the most reliable current biomarkers for DLB. There are no genetic or CSF tests recommended for the diagnosis of DLB at present. Between 15 and 20% of all elderly demented cases reaching autopsy have DLB, making it the most common cause of degenerative dementia after AD. Exquisite, not infrequently fatal, sensitivity to neuroleptic drugs and encouraging reports of the effects of cholinesterase inhibitors on cognitive, psychiatric and neurological features, mean that an accurate diagnosis of DLB is more

  18. Alcohol consumption and dementia risk: a dose-response meta-analysis of prospective studies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Wang, Huifu; Wan, Yu; Tan, Chenchen; Li, Jieqiong; Tan, Lan; Yu, Jin-Tai

    2017-01-01

    It is widely believed that light-to-moderate alcohol intake may protect against dementia while excessive drinking may instead increase the risk. Nonetheless, these findings need cautious interpretations due to varying methodologies and lack of standard definition, which hindered our transferring into preventative practice. The objective of this study is to investigate the potential dose-response association between alcohol consumption and risk of dementia. A systematic search was conducted in electronic databases to identify relevant studies. Risk estimates were combined using a random-effect model. Eleven studies with 73,330 participants and 4586 cases for all-cause dementia (ACD), five studies with 52,715 participants and 1267 cases for Alzheimer's dementia (AD) and four studies with 49,535 participants and 542 cases for vascular dementia were included. We observed a nonlinear association between alcohol consumption and ACD risk (p nonlinearity < 0.05). The alcohol dose associated with lower risk of dementia was confined to at most 12.5 g/day, with the risk hitting bottom (RR ≈ 0.9) at roughly 6 g/day. Of note, the ACD risk seemed to be elevated (≈10%) when the dose surpasses certain levels: 23 drinks/week or 38 g/day. For the alcohol type, recommendation for wine is prioritized. The subgroup analysis further indicated that the effect of alcohol may be greater in younger adults (<60 years old) with regard to fighting against dementia. Modest alcohol consumption (≤12.5 g/day) is associated with a reduced risk of dementia with 6 g/day of alcohol conferring a lower risk than other levels while excessive drinking (≥38 g/day) may instead elevate the risk.

  19. [Novel methods for dementia diagnostics].

    PubMed

    Wiltfang, J

    2015-04-01

    Novel diagnostic methods, such as cerebrospinal fluid-based neurochemical dementia diagnostics (CSF-NDD) and [18F] amyloid positron emission tomography (PET) are meanwhile recommended for specific indications by international guidelines for the improved early and differential diagnostics of multigenic (sporadic) Alzheimer's dementia (AD). In the case of CSF-NDD the German neuropsychiatric guidelines have already been validated on the S3 level of evidence (http://www.DGPPN.de) and the additional consideration of [18F] amyloid-PET in the current update of the guidelines is to be expected. By means of CSF-NDD and/or [18F] amyloid-PET a predictive diagnosis of incipient (preclinical) AD is also possible for patients at high risk for AD who are in prodromal stages, such as mild cognitive impairment (MCI). As accompanying (secondary) preventive therapy of AD cannot be offered a predictive molecular dementia diagnostics is not recommended by the German neuropsychiatric dementia guidelines (http://www.DGPPN.de). However, novel diagnostic approaches, which offer molecular positive diagnostics of AD have already gained high relevance in therapy research as they allow promising preventive treatment avenues to be validated directly in the clinical trial. Moreover, future blood-based dementia diagnostics by means of multiplex assays is becoming increasingly more feasible; however, so far corresponding proteomic or epigenetic assays could not be consistently validated in independent studies.

  20. Awareness of memory task impairment versus everyday memory difficulties in dementia.

    PubMed

    Morris, Robin G; Nelis, Sharon M; Martyr, Anthony; Markova, Ivana; Roth, Ilona; Woods, Robert T; Whitaker, Christopher J; Clare, Linda

    2016-03-01

    The study investigated different types of awareness of memory dysfunction in dementia, specifically judgements concerning memory task performance or appraisal of everyday memory functioning and also exploring the neuropsychological correlates of such awareness. This was investigated in 76 people with dementia, comprising 46 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 30 patients with vascular dementia (VaD). The Memory Awareness Rating Scale (Clare et al., 2002, Neuropsychol Rehabil, 12, 341-362) was used, which includes an Objective-Judgement Discrepancy (OJD) technique involving comparison of subjective evaluation of performance on specific memory tasks with actual performance, and a Subjective Rating Discrepancy (SRD) technique, which compares self versus informant judgement of everyday memory function. The AD and VaD groups showed lower awareness than a normal control group for both types of measures, the AD group showing less awareness than the VaD group on the OJD measure. Regression analyses supported associations for both groups between memory impairment and the OJD measure and between naming impairment and the SRD measure. The findings are discussed in terms of neurocognitive theories accounting for loss of awareness in dementia.

  1. The neuropathology and cerebrovascular mechanisms of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Knoefel, Janice; Bhaskar, Kiran

    2016-01-01

    The prevalence of dementia is increasing in our aging population at an alarming rate. Because of the heterogeneity of clinical presentation and complexity of disease neuropathology, dementia classifications remain controversial. Recently, the National Plan to address Alzheimer’s Disease prioritized Alzheimer’s disease-related dementias to include: Alzheimer’s disease, dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia, vascular dementia, and mixed dementias. While each of these dementing conditions has their unique pathologic signature, one common etiology shared among all these conditions is cerebrovascular dysfunction at some point during the disease process. The goal of this comprehensive review is to summarize the current findings in the field and address the important contributions of cerebrovascular, physiologic, and cellular alterations to cognitive impairment in these human dementias. Specifically, evidence will be presented in support of small-vessel disease as an underlying neuropathologic hallmark of various dementias, while controversial findings will also be highlighted. Finally, the molecular mechanisms shared among all dementia types including hypoxia, oxidative stress, mitochondrial bioenergetics, neuroinflammation, neurodegeneration, and blood–brain barrier permeability responsible for disease etiology and progression will be discussed. PMID:26174330

  2. Mixed Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... with Lewy bodies , What Is Alzheimer's? NIA-Funded Memory & Aging Project Reveals Mixed Dementia Common Data from ... commonly with Alzheimer's disease. For example, in the Memory and Aging Project study involving long-term cognitive ...

  3. Music Perception in Dementia.

    PubMed

    Golden, Hannah L; Clark, Camilla N; Nicholas, Jennifer M; Cohen, Miriam H; Slattery, Catherine F; Paterson, Ross W; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Schott, Jonathan M; Mummery, Catherine J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2017-01-01

    Despite much recent interest in music and dementia, music perception has not been widely studied across dementia syndromes using an information processing approach. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 30 patients representing major dementia syndromes of typical Alzheimer's disease (AD, n = 16), logopenic aphasia (LPA, an Alzheimer variant syndrome; n = 5), and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n = 9) in relation to 19 healthy age-matched individuals. We designed a novel neuropsychological battery to assess perception of musical patterns in the dimensions of pitch and temporal information (requiring detection of notes that deviated from the established pattern based on local or global sequence features) and musical scene analysis (requiring detection of a familiar tune within polyphonic harmony). Performance on these tests was referenced to generic auditory (timbral) deviance detection and recognition of familiar tunes and adjusted for general auditory working memory performance. Relative to healthy controls, patients with AD and LPA had group-level deficits of global pitch (melody contour) processing while patients with PNFA as a group had deficits of local (interval) as well as global pitch processing. There was substantial individual variation within syndromic groups. Taking working memory performance into account, no specific deficits of musical temporal processing, timbre processing, musical scene analysis, or tune recognition were identified. The findings suggest that particular aspects of music perception such as pitch pattern analysis may open a window on the processing of information streams in major dementia syndromes. The potential selectivity of musical deficits for particular dementia syndromes and particular dimensions of processing warrants further systematic investigation.

  4. Music perception in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Nicholas, Jennifer M; Cohen, Miriam H; Slattery, Catherine F; Paterson, Ross W; Foulkes, Alexander J M; Schott, Jonathan M; Mummery, Catherine J; Crutch, Sebastian J; Warren, Jason D

    2017-01-01

    Despite much recent interest in music and dementia, music perception has not been widely studied across dementia syndromes using an information processing approach. Here we addressed this issue in a cohort of 30 patients representing major dementia syndromes of typical Alzheimer’s disease (AD, n=16), logopenic aphasia (LPA, an Alzheimer variant syndrome; n=5) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n=9) in relation to 19 healthy age-matched individuals. We designed a novel neuropsychological battery to assess perception of musical patterns in the dimensions of pitch and temporal information (requiring detection of notes that deviated from the established pattern based on local or global sequence features) and musical scene analysis (requiring detection of a familiar tune within polyphonic harmony). Performance on these tests was referenced to generic auditory (timbral) deviance detection and recognition of familiar tunes and adjusted for general auditory working memory performance. Relative to healthy controls, patients with AD and LPA had group-level deficits of global pitch (melody contour) processing while patients with PNFA as a group had deficits of local (interval) as well as global pitch processing. There was substantial individual variation within syndromic groups. No specific deficits of musical temporal processing, timbre processing, musical scene analysis or tune recognition were identified. The findings suggest that particular aspects of music perception such as pitch pattern analysis may open a window on the processing of information streams in major dementia syndromes. The potential selectivity of musical deficits for particular dementia syndromes and particular dimensions of processing warrants further systematic investigation. PMID:27802226

  5. Dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Ferman, Tanis J.; Boeve, Bradley F.

    2009-01-01

    Synopsis The advent of new immunostains have improved our ability to detect limbic and cortical Lewy bodies, and it is now evident that Dementa with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second most common neurodegenerative dementia, after Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Distinguishing DLB from AD has important implications for treatment, in terms of substances that may worsen symptoms (i.e., anticholinergic and certain neuroleptic medications) and those that may improve them (i.e., cholinesterase inhibitors, carbidopa-levodopa). Neurocognitive patterns, psychiatric features, extrapyramidal signs and sleep disturbance are helpful in differentiating DLB from AD early in the disease course. Differences in the severity of cholinergic depletion as well as type and distribution of neuropathology contribute to these clinical differences, though DLB patients with a high density of co-occuring AD pathology are less clinical distinguishable from AD. PMID:17659188

  6. Coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption and prevention of late-life cognitive decline and dementia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Panza, F; Solfrizzi, V; Barulli, M R; Bonfiglio, C; Guerra, V; Osella, A; Seripa, D; Sabbà, C; Pilotto, A; Logroscino, G

    2015-03-01

    A prolonged preclinical phase of more than two decades before the onset of dementia suggested that initial brain changes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and the symptoms of advanced AD may represent a unique continuum. Given the very limited therapeutic value of drugs currently used in the treatment of AD and dementia, preventing or postponing the onset of AD and delaying or slowing its progression are becoming mandatory. Among possible reversible risk factors of dementia and AD, vascular, metabolic, and lifestyle-related factors were associated with the development of dementia and late-life cognitive disorders, opening new avenues for the prevention of these diseases. Among diet-associated factors, coffee is regularly consumed by millions of people around the world and owing to its caffeine content, it is the best known psychoactive stimulant resulting in heightened alertness and arousal and improvement of cognitive performance. Besides its short-term effect, some case-control and cross-sectional and longitudinal population-based studies evaluated the long-term effects on brain function and provided some evidence that coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption or higher plasma caffeine levels may be protective against cognitive impairment/decline and dementia. In particular, several cross-sectional and longitudinal population-based studies suggested a protective effect of coffee, tea, and caffeine use against late-life cognitive impairment/decline, although the association was not found in all cognitive domains investigated and there was a lack of a distinct dose-response association, with a stronger effect among women than men. The findings on the association of coffee, tea, and caffeine consumption or plasma caffeine levels with incident mild cognitive impairment and its progression to dementia were too limited to draw any conclusion. Furthermore, for dementia and AD prevention, some studies with baseline examination in midlife pointed to a lack of association, although

  7. Chronic rapamycin restores brain vascular integrity and function through NO synthase activation and improves memory in symptomatic mice modeling Alzheimer's disease

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ai-Ling; Zheng, Wei; Halloran, Jonathan J; Burbank, Raquel R; Hussong, Stacy A; Hart, Matthew J; Javors, Martin; Shih, Yen-Yu Ian; Muir, Eric; Solano Fonseca, Rene; Strong, Randy; Richardson, Arlan G; Lechleiter, James D; Fox, Peter T; Galvan, Veronica

    2013-01-01

    Vascular pathology is a major feature of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and other dementias. We recently showed that chronic administration of the target-of-rapamycin (TOR) inhibitor rapamycin, which extends lifespan and delays aging, halts the progression of AD-like disease in transgenic human (h)APP mice modeling AD when administered before disease onset. Here we demonstrate that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin treatment started after disease onset restored cerebral blood flow (CBF) and brain vascular density, reduced cerebral amyloid angiopathy and microhemorrhages, decreased amyloid burden, and improved cognitive function in symptomatic hAPP (AD) mice. Like acetylcholine (ACh), a potent vasodilator, acute rapamycin treatment induced the phosphorylation of endothelial nitric oxide (NO) synthase (eNOS) and NO release in brain endothelium. Administration of the NOS inhibitor L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester reversed vasodilation as well as the protective effects of rapamycin on CBF and vasculature integrity, indicating that rapamycin preserves vascular density and CBF in AD mouse brains through NOS activation. Taken together, our data suggest that chronic reduction of TOR activity by rapamycin blocked the progression of AD-like cognitive and histopathological deficits by preserving brain vascular integrity and function. Drugs that inhibit the TOR pathway may have promise as a therapy for AD and possibly for vascular dementias. PMID:23801246

  8. A link between vascular damage and cognitive deficits after whole-brain radiation therapy for cancer: A clue to other types of dementia?

    PubMed

    Yamada, Maki K

    Whole brain radiation therapy for the treatment of tumors can sometimes cause cognitive impairment. Memory deficits were noted in up to 50% of treated patients over a short period of several months. In addition, an increased rate of dementia in young patients has been noted over the longer term, i.e. years. A deficit in neurogenesis after irradiation has been postulated to be the main cause of cognitive decline in patients, but recent data on irradiation therapy for limited parts of the brain appear to indicate other possibilities. Irradiation can directly damage various types of cells other than neuronal stem cells. However, this paper will focus on injury to brain vasculature leading to cognitive decline since vessels represent a better therapeutic target for drug development than other cells in the brain because of the blood-brain barrier.

  9. Memantine: a review of studies into its safety and efficacy in treating Alzheimer’s disease and other dementias

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Stuart J; Grossberg, George T

    2009-01-01

    Memantine is an uncompetitive N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor antagonist with moderate affinity. Its mechanism of action is neuroprotective and potentially therapeutic in several neuropsychiatric diseases. It has been approved by the FDA for the treatment of moderate to severe Alzheimer’s disease (AD) either as a monotherapy or in combination with cholinesterase inhibitors. This review covers key studies of memantine’s safety and efficacy in treating moderate to severe AD. It also covers current research into other dementias including but not exclusively mild AD and vascular dementia. Other studies on the efficacy of memantine for other neuropsychiatric diseases are discussed. Memantine is a safe and effective drug that merits further research on several topics. Clinicians should be aware of new studies and potential uses of memantine because of its safety and efficacy. PMID:19851512

  10. Arsenic toxicity induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia: Pharmacological interdiction by histone deacetylase and inducible nitric oxide synthase inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Bhupesh Sharma, P.M.

    2013-11-15

    Arsenic toxicity has been reported to damage all the major organs including the brain and vasculature. Dementia including Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia (VaD) are posing greater risk to the world population as it is now increasing at a faster rate. We have investigated the role of sodium butyrate, a selective histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor and aminoguanidine, a selective inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) inhibitor in pharmacological interdiction of arsenic toxicity induced vascular endothelial dysfunction and dementia in rats. Arsenic toxicity was done by administering arsenic drinking water to rats. Morris water-maze (MWM) test was used for assessment of learning and memory. Endothelial function was assessed using student physiograph. Oxidative stress (aortic superoxide anion, serum and brain thiobarbituric acid reactive species, brain glutathione) and nitric oxide levels (serum nitrite/nitrate) were also measured. Arsenic treated rats have shown impairment of endothelial function, learning and memory, reduction in serum nitrite/nitrate and brain GSH levels along with increase in serum and brain TBARS. Sodium butyrate as well as aminoguanidine significantly convalesce arsenic induced impairment of learning, memory, endothelial function, and alterations in various biochemical parameters. It may be concluded that arsenic induces endothelial dysfunction and dementia, whereas, sodium butyrate, a HDAC inhibitor as well as aminoguanidine, a selective iNOS inhibitor may be considered as potential agents for the management of arsenic induced endothelial dysfunction and dementia. - Highlights: • As has induced endothelial dysfunction (Edf) and vascular dementia (VaD). • As has increased oxidative stress, AChE activity and decreased serum NO. • Inhibitors of HDAC and iNOS have attenuated As induced Edf and VaD. • Both the inhibitors have attenuated As induced biochemical changes. • Inhibitor of HDAC and iNOS has shown good potential in

  11. The Impact of Admission Diagnosis on Recurrent or Frequent Hospitalizations in 3 Dementia Subtypes: A Hospital-Based Cohort in Taiwan with 4 Years Longitudinal Follow-Ups.

    PubMed

    Chang, Chiung-Chih; Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chang, Ya-Ting; Chen, Nai-Ching; Huang, Chi-Wei; Lui, Chun-Chung; Huang, Shu-Hua; Chang, Yen-Hsiang; Lee, Chen-Chang; Lai, Wei-An

    2015-11-01

    Increasing numbers of patients with different types of dementia have resulted in the increasing medical care loads. It is not known whether explanatory factors for recurrent or prolong hospitalization were driven by the subtypes of dementia. We analyzed 203 dementia patients aged >65-year-old with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), or Parkinsonism-related dementia (PRD). With a 4-year follow-up period, logistic regression analyses were used to identify predictors of dementia diagnosis, cerebrovascular risk factors, chronic systemic diseases, and the etiology for admission for recurrent (>4 times/4 years) or prolonged hospitalization stay (>14 days per hospitalization). There were 48 AD, 96 VaD, and 59 PRD patients that completed the 4-year study. The average length of hospital stay was significant, the shortest in AD and the longest in PRD (P = 0.01), whereas the frequency of hospitalization was not different among 3 dementia subtypes. Although delirium is the most common etiology for admission in the patients, diabetes mellitus (Odds ratio, OR = 2.79, P = 0.02), pneumonia (OR = 11.21, P < 0.001), and fall-related hip fracture (OR = 4.762, P = 0.029) were significantly associated with prolong hospitalization. Patients with coronary artery disease (OR = 9.87, P = 0.02), pneumonia (OR = 84.48, P < 0.001), urinary tract infection (OR = 55.09, P < 0.001), and fall-related fracture (OR = 141.7, P < 0.001) predict recurrent hospitalization. Dementia subtypes did not influence directly on the hospitalization courses. The etiologies for admission carried higher clinical significance, compared with the coexisted systemic diseases.

  12. Treatment of hypertension and prevention of dementia.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier; Forette, Françoise

    2005-07-01

    Because of the aging population, the frequency of dementia will dramatically increase in the coming years. Prevention of cognitive disorders and dementia has become a major public health challenge. High blood pressure is a major risk factor for cerebrovascular diseases and is also correlated closely with cognitive decline and dementia. Several epidemiologic studies have found that cognitive functions are often inversely proportional to blood pressure values measured 15 or 20 years previously. Moreover, the use of antihypertensive drugs has been shown to help prevent cognitive decline, opening the way to the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type). These results indicate that incidence of dementia should constitute a major outcome of future trials comparing different classes of antihypertensive drugs.

  13. Neuroimaging Biomarkers of Neurodegenerative Diseases and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Risacher, Shannon L.; Saykin, Andrew J.

    2014-01-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders leading to dementia are common diseases that affect many older and some young adults. Neuroimaging methods are important tools for assessing and monitoring pathological brain changes associated with progressive neurodegenerative conditions. In this review, the authors describe key findings from neuroimaging studies (magnetic resonance imaging and radionucleotide imaging) in neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and prodromal stages, familial and atypical AD syndromes, frontotemporal dementia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis with and without dementia, Parkinson’s disease with and without dementia, dementia with Lewy bodies, Huntington’s disease, multiple sclerosis, HIV-associated neurocognitive disorder, and prion protein associated diseases (i.e., Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease). The authors focus on neuroimaging findings of in vivo pathology in these disorders, as well as the potential for neuroimaging to provide useful information for differential diagnosis of neurodegenerative disorders. PMID:24234359

  14. Quantitative EEG Neurometric Analysis-Guided Neurofeedback Treatment in Dementia: 20 Cases. How Neurometric Analysis Is Important for the Treatment of Dementia and as a Biomarker?

    PubMed

    Surmeli, Tanju; Eralp, Emin; Mustafazade, Ilhan; Kos, Hadi; Özer, Gül Elif; Surmeli, Orkun H

    2016-04-01

    Dementia is a debilitating degenerative disorder where the sufferer's cognitive abilities decline over time, depending on the type of dementia. The more common types of dementia include Alzheimer's disease and vascular or multi-infarct dementia. In this study, 20 subjects with dementia (9 of Alzheimer's type, and 11 with vascular dementia) were treated using qEEG-guided neurofeedback training. The Mini Mental Status Examination (MMSE) was used as the primary outcome measure. The results showed an increase of the MMSE scores for all subjects regardless of dementia type with an average MMSE score increase of 6 points, which was found to be significant. To our knowledge this is the first time the same modality was shown to be beneficial in both dementia groups.

  15. Caffeine as a protective factor in dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Eskelinen, Marjo H; Kivipelto, Miia

    2010-01-01

    Caffeine has well-known short-term stimulating effects on central nervous system, but the long-term impacts on cognition have been less clear. Dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are rapidly increasing public health problems in ageing populations and at the moment curative treatment is lacking. Thus, the putative protective effects of caffeine against dementia/AD are of great interest. Here, we discuss findings from the longitudinal epidemiological studies about caffeine/coffee/tea and dementia/AD/cognitive functioning with a special emphasis on our recent results from the Cardiovascular Risk Factors, Aging and Dementia (CAIDE) study. The findings of the previous studies are somewhat inconsistent, but most studies (3 out of 5) support coffee's favorable effects against cognitive decline, dementia or AD. In addition, two studies had combined coffee and tea drinking and indicated some positive effects on cognitive functioning. For tea drinking, protective effects against cognitive decline/dementia are still less evident. In the CAIDE study, coffee drinking of 3-5 cups per day at midlife was associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD by about 65% at late-life. In conclusion, coffee drinking may be associated with a decreased risk of dementia/AD. This may be mediated by caffeine and/or other mechanisms like antioxidant capacity and increased insulin sensitivity. This finding might open possibilities for prevention or postponing the onset of dementia/AD.

  16. [A study using positron emission tomography of a case of vascular dementia due to left thalamic haematoma, an example of the diaschisis phenomenon].

    PubMed

    Blanco-Martin, E; Del Mazo-Sanchez, S; Molano-Salazar, A; Bereincua-Gandarias, R; Llorens-Abando, V; Fernandez-Martinez, M

    2016-05-01

    Introduccion. Las lesiones vasculares talamicas que se comportan como ictus estrategicos pueden causar amnesia, disfunciones ejecutivas o disfasia, asi como sintomas comportamentales o psicologicos, y causar una demencia vascular. Caso clinico. Mujer de 58 años, hipertensa y dislipidemica, que, tras una hemorragia talamica izquierda que evoluciono radiologicamente de manera favorable, presento un sindrome amnesico grave y otras alteraciones sutiles en la orientacion y el lenguaje, dificultades en el manejo del dinero y sintomas depresivos que precisaron tratamiento ansiolitico y antidepresivo, todo lo cual fue causa de limitaciones para el normal desempeño de su trabajo. Seguida en la consulta de neurologia, se le practico una tomografia por emision de positrones/tomografia axial computarizada con 18F-2-fluoro-2-desoxi-D-glucosa, donde se aprecio un hipometabolismo en el talamo izquierdo y, ademas, en la region frontal inferior ipsilateral, que se explicaria mediante el fenomeno de diasquisis. Conclusiones. El fenomeno de diasquisis es un hallazgo de neuroimagen y fisiopatologico por el cual los ictus talamicos o de los ganglios basales causan hipoperfusion/hipometabolismo en la corteza ipsilateral o contralateral, y que puede explicar sintomas a distancia corticales. El presente caso evidencia la presencia de conexiones talamocorticales, lo cual ayuda a comprender los circuitos de la memoria y a explicar la asociacion en el de otros sintomas corticales, como la disfasia o las alteraciones ejecutivas.

  17. Isometric Exercise Training for Managing Vascular Risk Factors in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Alzheimer’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hess, Nicole C. L.; Smart, Neil A.

    2017-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia diagnosed amongst the elderly. Mild cognitive impairment (MCI) is a condition often indicative of the earliest symptomatology of AD with 10%–15% of MCI patients reportedly progressing to a diagnosis of AD. Individuals with a history of vascular risk factors (VRF’s) are considered high risk candidates for developing cognitive impairment in later life. Evidence suggests that vascular injury resulting from untreated VRF’s promotes progression from MCI to AD and exacerbates the severity of dementia in AD, and neuroimaging studies have found that the neurodegenerative processes associated with AD are heavily driven by VRF’s that promote cerebral hypoperfusion. Subsequently, common links between vascular disorders such as hypertension and neurodegenerative disorders such as AD include compromised vasculature, cerebral hypoperfusion and chronic low grade inflammation (a hallmark of both hypertension and AD). Exercise has been demonstrated to be an effective intervention for blood pressure management, chronic low grade inflammation and improvements in cognition. Data from recent analyses suggests that isometric exercise training (IET) may improve vascular integrity and elicit blood pressure reductions in hypertensives greater than those seen with dynamic aerobic and resistance exercise. IET may also play an effective role in the management of VRF’s at the MCI stage of AD and may prove to be a significant strategy in the prevention, attenuation or delay of progression to AD. A plausible hypothesis is that the reactive hyperemia stimulated by IET initiates a cascade of vascular, neurotrophic and neuro-endocrine events that lead to improvements in cognitive function. PMID:28316570

  18. Dementia in Urban Black Outpatients: Initial Experience at the Emory Satellite Clinics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Auchus, Alexander P.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the demographic features and clinical diagnoses in a sample of 58 demented urban black outpatients. Results indicate that probable Alzheimer's disease was the most common cause of dementia whereas probable vascular dementia was uncommon. A multiple etiology dementia was identified in more than one-third of the patients. (RJM)

  19. The vascular contribution to Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Altman, Robin; Rutledge, John C.

    2010-01-01

    AD (Alzheimer’s disease) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease of unknown origin. Despite questions as to the underlying cause(s) of this disease, shared risk factors for both AD and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease indicate that vascular mechanisms may critically contribute to the development and progression of both AD and atherosclerosis. An increased risk of developing AD is linked to the presence of the apoE4 (apolipoprotein E4) allele, which is also strongly associated with increased risk of developing atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Recent studies also indicate that cardiovascular risk factors, including elevated blood cholesterol and triacylglycerol (triglyceride), increase the likelihood of AD and vascular dementia. Lipids and lipoproteins in the circulation interact intimately with the cerebrovasculature, and may have important effects on its constituent brain microvascular endothelial cells and the adjoining astrocytes, which are components of the neurovascular unit. The present review will examine the potential mechanisms for understanding the contributions of vascular factors, including lipids, lipoproteins and cerebrovascular Aβ (amyloid β), to AD, and suggest therapeutic strategies for the attenuation of this devastating disease process. Specifically, we will focus on the actions of apoE, TGRLs (triacylglycerol-rich lipoproteins) and TGRL lipolysis products on injury of the neurovascular unit and increases in blood–brain barrier permeability. PMID:20684749

  20. What to Ask: Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... What to Ask: Dementia Tools and Tips The memory loss and other changes seen in dementia can ... can ask your healthcare proffesional about dementia. Is memory loss a normal part of aging? If so, ...

  1. Clinical features and multidisciplinary approaches to dementia care

    PubMed Central

    Grand, Jacob HG; Caspar, Sienna; MacDonald, Stuart WS

    2011-01-01

    Dementia is a clinical syndrome of widespread progressive deterioration of cognitive abilities and normal daily functioning. These cognitive and behavioral impairments pose considerable challenges to individuals with dementia, along with their family members and caregivers. Four primary dementia classifications have been defined according to clinical and research criteria: 1) Alzheimer’s disease; 2) vascular dementias; 3) frontotemporal dementias; and 4) dementia with Lewy bodies/Parkinson’s disease dementia. The cumulative efforts of multidisciplinary healthcare teams have advanced our understanding of dementia beyond basic descriptions, towards a more complete elucidation of risk factors, clinical symptoms, and neuropathological correlates. The characterization of disease subtypes has facilitated targeted management strategies, advanced treatments, and symptomatic care for individuals affected by dementia. This review briefly summarizes the current state of knowledge and directions of dementia research and clinical practice. We provide a description of the risk factors, clinical presentation, and differential diagnosis of dementia. A summary of multidisciplinary team approaches to dementia care is outlined, including management strategies for the treatment of cognitive impairments, functional deficits, and behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia. The needs of individuals with dementia are extensive, often requiring care beyond traditional bounds of medical practice, including pharmacologic and non-pharmacologic management interventions. Finally, advanced research on the early prodromal phase of dementia is reviewed, with a focus on change-point models, trajectories of cognitive change, and threshold models of pathological burden. Future research goals are outlined, with a call to action for social policy initiatives that promote preventive lifestyle behaviors, and healthcare programs that will support the growing number of individuals affected by

  2. Impact of Adult Day Services on Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Femia, Elia E.; Zarit, Steven H.; Stephens, Mary Ann Parris; Greene, Rick

    2007-01-01

    Purpose: This study explored whether adult day service (ADS) use was associated with reductions in behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia (BPSD) in individuals with dementia. Design and Methods: We used a quasi-experimental design to compare a group of 133 persons with dementia (PWDs) who initially enrolled in an ADS program to a…

  3. Updating the Evidence on the Association between Serum Cholesterol and Risk of Late-Life Dementia: Review and Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Anstey, Kaarin J.; Ashby-Mitchell, Kimberly; Peters, Ruth

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cohort studies have reported that midlife high total serum cholesterol (TC) is associated with increased risk of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in late-life but findings have been based on few studies and previous reviews have been limited by a lack of compatible data. Objective: We synthesized all high quality data from cohort studies reporting on the association between total serum cholesterol measured and late-life cognitive outcomes including Alzheimer’s disease (AD), vascular dementia (VaD), any dementia, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and cognitive decline. Methods: The literature was searched up to October 2016 using a registered protocol. Thirty-four articles meeting study criteria were identified. Seventeen studies published from 1996 to 2014, including 23,338 participants were included in meta-analyses. Results: Relative risk of developing AD for adults with high TC in midlife was 2.14 (95% CI 1.33–3.44) compared with normal cholesterol. Individual studies that could not be pooled also reported high TC in midlife increased the risk of MCI and cognitive decline in late-life. High TC in late-life was not associated with MCI, AD, VaD, any dementia, or cognitive decline. Late-life measured HDL cholesterol and triglycerides were not associated with increased risk of VaD, and HDL was not associated with risk of MCI, AD, or any dementia. There were insufficient data to examine other cholesterol sub-fractions, sex differences, or APOE interactions. Conclusions: Significant gaps in the literature regarding TC and late-life dementia remain. Evidence suggests that high midlife TC increases risk of late-life AD, and may correlate with the onset of AD pathology. PMID:27911314

  4. Recognition of dementia in ancient China.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Wang, Lu-Ning; Tian, Jin-Zhou

    2012-12-01

    A search of previous records in the literatures was done to summarize the opinions for dementia in ancient China. The earliest description of dementia was traced in the Yellow emperor's internal classic, a book written 2000 years ago. Hua Tuo (AD 140-208) in Han Dynasty first denominated "dementia" in the book, Hua Tuo Shen Yi Mi Zhuan. The pathogenesis of dementia could be generalized as the insufficiency of Qi, a flowing energy; the stagnation of phlegm, a harmful liquid substance in the body; and the blood stasis, which were also regarded as therapeutic targets. Therefore, we can conclude that dementia has been recognized and investigated in traditional Chinese medicine, which is definitely before the industrial civilization era.

  5. Inhibited Expression of α4β2 Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptor in Blood Leukocytes of Chinese Patients with Vascular Dementia and in Blood Leukocytes as Well as the Hippocampus of Brain from Ischemic Rats.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Yan; Zhao, Liang; Kuang, Shi-Xiang; Guan, Zhi-Zhong

    2016-11-01

    Our present aim was to investigate whether changes in the expression of α4β2 nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR) in patients with vascular dementia (VaD) and ischemic rats are related to cognitive scores. Blood leukocytes for 59 Chinese patients with VaD (diagnosed on the basis of clinical guidelines) and 31 cases as age-matched controls were examined, and the animal model established employing Pulsinelli's four-vessel occlusion. The levels of α4 and β2 subunit mRNA in leukocytes and the hippocampus were analyzed by real-time PCR, and the protein level in the hippocampus by Western blotting. The mini-mental state examination was utilized to characterize the intellectual capacity of the patients with reference to the DSM IV diagnosis and Hachinski Ischemic Scale score, and the Morris Water Maze test to assess the ability of learning and memory of the rats. In patients, the level of α4 mRNA, but not β2, in blood leukocytes was clearly lowered, which was significantly correlated to their clinical cognitive test scores. Smoking exerted no impact on the level of α4 mRNA in the present study. In the blood leukocytes and the hippocampus of the brains of the ischemic rats, the levels of both α4 and β2 mRNA were lowered, and the proteins of these subunits in the hippocampus were decreased. The changes of α4 and β2 mRNA in blood leukocytes, and their protein levels in the hippocampus were significantly correlated with impaired learning and memory. These findings indicate that alterations in expression of the α4β2 subtype of nAChR may be involved in the molecular mechanism(s) underlying the cognitive deficit associated with VaD.

  6. Vascular risk factors and Alzheimer's disease pathogenesis: are conventional pharmacological approaches protective for cognitive decline progression?

    PubMed

    Safouris, Apostolos; Psaltopoulou, Theodora; Sergentanis, Theodoros N; Boutati, Eleni; Kapaki, Elisabeth; Tsivgoulis, Georgios

    2015-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia, accounting for more than half of cases with cognitive impairment. With numbers of patients expected to rise sharply over the following years in parallel with the ageing of population, there is intense clinical interest in discovering modifiable risk factors that may contribute to the increasing prevalence of AD. Accumulating data from in vitro and epidemiological studies have highlighted the vascular component of AD and raised hope that treatment of vascular risk factors could eventually lead to primary prevention of AD. Among all the possible pathologic processes that have been tested for an association with AD, diabetes, hypertension and dyslipidemia are the most prominent. Here, we will briefly review the data highlighting a potential correlation of these diseases with AD. Then, we will present observational studies and clinical trials that assessed the impact of their respective approved medical therapies on AD incidence. We conclude by providing clinical information for the physician on potentially effective and non-effective medical treatments. Further research is ongoing and time will show whether AD will cease to be considered a pure, non-preventable neurodegenerative process or whether vascular risk factor management may also result in primary AD prevention.

  7. Spotlight on cerebrolysin in dementia.

    PubMed

    Plosker, Greg L; Gauthier, Serge

    2010-03-01

    Cerebrolysin is a parenterally administered, porcine brain-derived peptide preparation that has pharmacodynamic properties similar to those of endogenous neurotrophic factors. In several randomized, double-blind trials of up to 28 weeks' duration in patients with Alzheimer's disease, Cerebrolysin was superior to placebo in improving global outcome measures and cognitive ability. A large, randomized comparison of Cerebrolysin, donepezil or combination therapy showed beneficial effects on global measures and cognition for all three treatment groups compared with baseline. Although not as extensively studied in patients with vascular dementia, Cerebrolysin has also shown beneficial effects on global measures and cognition in this patient population. Cerebrolysin was generally well tolerated in clinical trials, with dizziness (or vertigo) being the most frequently reported adverse event. Although further studies with Cerebrolysin, including longer term trials and further exploration of its use in combination with cholinesterase inhibitors, are needed to more clearly determine its place in the management of Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia, available data suggest that Cerebrolysin is a useful addition to the treatment options available for dementia.

  8. The Gothenburg MCI study: Design and distribution of Alzheimer’s disease and subcortical vascular disease diagnoses from baseline to 6-year follow-up

    PubMed Central

    Nordlund, Arto; Jonsson, Michael; Lind, Karin; Edman, Åke; Göthlin, Mattias; Stålhammar, Jacob; Eckerström, Marie; Kern, Silke; Börjesson-Hanson, Anne; Carlsson, Mårten; Olsson, Erik; Zetterberg, Henrik; Blennow, Kaj; Svensson, Johan; Öhrfelt, Annika; Bjerke, Maria; Rolstad, Sindre; Eckerström, Carl

    2016-01-01

    There is a need for increased nosological knowledge to enable rational trials in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and related disorders. The ongoing Gothenburg mild cognitive impairment (MCI) study is an attempt to conduct longitudinal in-depth phenotyping of patients with different forms and degrees of cognitive impairment using neuropsychological, neuroimaging, and neurochemical tools. Particular attention is paid to the interplay between AD and subcortical vascular disease, the latter representing a disease entity that may cause or contribute to cognitive impairment with an effect size that may be comparable to AD. Of 664 patients enrolled between 1999 and 2013, 195 were diagnosed with subjective cognitive impairment (SCI), 274 with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), and 195 with dementia, at baseline. Of the 195 (29%) patients with dementia at baseline, 81 (42%) had AD, 27 (14%) SVD, 41 (21%) mixed type dementia (=AD + SVD = MixD), and 46 (23%) other etiologies. After 6 years, 292 SCI/MCI patients were eligible for follow-up. Of these 292, 69 (24%) had converted to dementia (29 (42%) AD, 16 (23%) SVD, 15 (22%) MixD, 9 (13%) other etiologies). The study has shown that it is possible to identify not only AD but also incipient and manifest MixD/SVD in a memory clinic setting. These conditions should be taken into account in clinical trials. PMID:26174331

  9. [Dementia study using induced pluripotent stem cells].

    PubMed

    Matsuzono, Kosuke; Abe, Koji; Inoue, Haruhisa

    2016-03-01

    Recent developments in induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) technology have facilitated, and have contributed to overcome the difficulty of modeling dementia caused by Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), etc. The following models using iPSCs were reported: the pathophysiology caused by gene mutations such as presenilin or amyloid β precursor protein in AD, α-synuclein in DLB, and microtubule-associated protein tau, fused in sarcoma, progranulin, or chromosome 9 open reading frame 72 in FTLD, anti-AD drug screening, sortilin-related receptor L 1 haplotype influence in sporadic AD, and amyloid β secretion in Down syndrome. Patient-specific iPSC could be expected to reveal the disease pathology and lead to drug discoveries for dementia patients.

  10. Distinguishing Alzheimer's disease from other major forms of dementia

    PubMed Central

    Karantzoulis, Stella; Galvin, James E

    2011-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common and most studied cause of dementia. Significant advances have been made since the first set of clinical criteria for AD were put forth in 1984 that are now captured in the new criteria for AD published in 2011. Key features include recognition of a broad AD spectrum (from preclinical to mild cognitive impairment to AD dementia) and requirement of AD biomarkers for diagnosis. Correctly diagnosing dementia type is increasingly important in an era when potential disease-modifying agents are soon to be marketed. The typical AD dementia syndrome has at its core, an amnestic syndrome of the hippocampal type, followed by associated deficits in word-finding, spatial cognition, executive functions and neuropsychiatric changes. Atypical presentations of AD have also been identified that are presumed to have a different disease course. It can be difficult to distinguish between the various dementia syndromes given the overlap in many common clinical features across the dementias. The clinical difficulty in diagnosis may reflect the underlying pathology, as AD often co-occurs with other pathologies at autopsy, such as cerebrovascular disease or Lewy bodies. Neuropsychological evaluation has provided clinicians and researchers with profiles of cognitive strengths and weaknesses that help to define the dementias. There is yet no single behavioral marker that can reliably discriminate AD from the other dementias. The combined investigation of cognitive and neurobehavioral symptoms coupled with imaging markers could provide a more accurate approach for differentiating between AD and other major dementia syndromes in the future. PMID:22014137

  11. Stereotypic behaviors in degenerative dementias.

    PubMed

    Prioni, S; Fetoni, V; Barocco, F; Redaelli, V; Falcone, C; Soliveri, P; Tagliavini, F; Scaglioni, A; Caffarra, P; Concari, L; Gardini, S; Girotti, F

    2012-11-01

    Stereotypies are simple or complex involuntary/unvoluntary behaviors, common in fronto-temporal dementia (FTD), but not studied in other types of degenerative dementias. The aim was to investigate stereotypy frequency and type in patients with FTD, Alzheimer's disease (AD), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and Parkinson's disease with dementia (PDD) in a multicenter observational study; and to investigate the relation of stereotypies to cognitive, behavioral and motor impairment. One hundred fifty-five consecutive outpatients (45 AD, 40 FTD, 35 PSP and 35 PDD) were studied in four hospitals in northern Italy. Stereotypies were examined by the five-domain Stereotypy Rating Inventory. Cognition was examined by the Mini Mental State and Frontal Assessment Battery, neuropsychiatric symptoms by the Neuropsychiatric Inventory, and motor impairment and invalidity by the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale part III, and activities of daily living. Stereotypies were present in all groups. FTD and PDD had the greatest frequency of one-domain stereotypies; FTD also had the greatest frequency of two-or-more domain stereotypies; movement stereotypies were the most common stereotypies in all groups. AD patients had fewer stereotypies than the other groups. Stereotypies are not exclusive to FTD, but are also fairly common in PSP and PDD, though less so in AD. Stereotypies may be underpinned by dysfunctional striato-frontal circuits, known to be damaged in PSP and PDD, as well as FTD.

  12. Prevalence of dementia and major dementia subtypes in Spanish populations: A reanalysis of dementia prevalence surveys, 1990-2008

    PubMed Central

    de Pedro-Cuesta, Jesús; Virués-Ortega, Javier; Vega, Saturio; Seijo-Martínez, Manuel; Saz, Pedro; Rodríguez, Fernanda; Rodríguez-Laso, Angel; Reñé, Ramón; de las Heras, Susana Pérez; Mateos, Raimundo; Martínez-Martín, Pablo; Manubens, José María; Mahillo-Fernandez, Ignacio; López-Pousa, Secundino; Lobo, Antonio; Reglà, Jordi Llinàs; Gascón, Jordi; García, Francisco José; Fernández-Martínez, Manuel; Boix, Raquel; Bermejo-Pareja, Félix; Bergareche, Alberto; Benito-León, Julián; de Arce, Ana; del Barrio, José Luis

    2009-01-01

    Background This study describes the prevalence of dementia and major dementia subtypes in Spanish elderly. Methods We identified screening surveys, both published and unpublished, in Spanish populations, which fulfilled specific quality criteria and targeted prevalence of dementia in populations aged 70 years and above. Surveys covering 13 geographically different populations were selected (prevalence period: 1990-2008). Authors of original surveys provided methodological details of their studies through a systematic questionnaire and also raw age-specific data. Prevalence data were compared using direct adjustment and logistic regression. Results The reanalyzed study population (aged 70 year and above) was composed of Central and North-Eastern Spanish sub-populations obtained from 9 surveys and totaled 12,232 persons and 1,194 cases of dementia (707 of Alzheimer's disease, 238 of vascular dementia). Results showed high variation in age- and sex-specific prevalence across studies. The reanalyzed prevalence of dementia was significantly higher in women; increased with age, particularly for Alzheimer's disease; and displayed a significant geographical variation among men. Prevalence was lowest in surveys reporting participation below 85%, studies referred to urban-mixed populations and populations diagnosed by psychiatrists. Conclusion Prevalence of dementia and Alzheimer's disease in Central and North-Eastern Spain is higher in females, increases with age, and displays considerable geographic variation that may be method-related. People suffering from dementia and Alzheimer's disease in Spain may approach 600,000 and 400,000 respectively. However, existing studies may not be completely appropriate to infer prevalence of dementia and its subtypes in Spain until surveys in Southern Spain are conducted. PMID:19840375

  13. Dementia beyond 2025: Knowledge and uncertainties.

    PubMed

    Kenigsberg, Paul-Ariel; Aquino, Jean-Pierre; Bérard, Alain; Gzil, Fabrice; Andrieu, Sandrine; Banerjee, Sube; Brémond, François; Buée, Luc; Cohen-Mansfield, Jiska; Mangialasche, Francesca; Platel, Hervé; Salmon, Eric; Robert, Philippe

    2016-01-01

    Given that there may well be no significant advances in drug development before 2025, prevention of dementia-Alzheimer's disease through the management of vascular and lifestyle-related risk factors may be a more realistic goal than treatment. Level of education and cognitive reserve assessment in neuropsychological testing deserve attention, as well as cultural, social, and economic aspects of caregiving. Assistive technologies for dementia care remain complex. Serious games are emerging as virtual educational and pleasurable tools, designed for individual and cooperative skill building. Public policies are likely to pursue improving awareness and understanding of dementia; providing good quality early diagnosis and intervention for all; improving quality of care from diagnosis to the end of life, using clinical and economic end points; delivering dementia strategies quicker, with an impact on more people. Dementia should remain presented as a stand-alone concept, distinct from frailty or loss of autonomy. The basic science of sensory impairment and social engagement in people with dementia needs to be developed. E-learning and serious games programs may enhance public and professional education. Faced with funding shortage, new professional dynamics and economic models may emerge through coordinated, flexible research networks. Psychosocial research could be viewed as an investment in quality of care, rather than an academic achievement in a few centers of excellence. This would help provide a competitive advantage to the best operators. Stemming from care needs, a logical, systems approach to dementia care environment through organizational, architectural, and psychosocial interventions may be developed, to help reduce symptoms in people with dementia and enhance quality of life. Dementia-friendly environments, culture, and domesticity are key factors for such interventions.

  14. Hearing and music in dementia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Julene K; Chow, Maggie L

    2015-01-01

    Music is a complex acoustic signal that relies on a number of different brain and cognitive processes to create the sensation of hearing. Changes in hearing function are generally not a major focus of concern for persons with a majority of neurodegenerative diseases associated with dementia, such as Alzheimer disease (AD). However, changes in the processing of sounds may be an early, and possibly preclinical, feature of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this chapter is to review the current state of knowledge concerning hearing and music perception in persons who have a dementia as a result of a neurodegenerative disease. The review focuses on both peripheral and central auditory processing in common neurodegenerative diseases, with a particular focus on the processing of music and other non-verbal sounds. The chapter also reviews music interventions used for persons with neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. Hearing and music in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Julene K; Chow, Maggie L

    2016-01-01

    Music is a complex acoustic signal that relies on a number of different brain and cognitive processes to create the sensation of hearing. Changes in hearing function are generally not a major focus of concern for persons with a majority of neurodegenerative diseases associated with dementia, such as Alzheimer disease (AD). However, changes in the processing of sounds may be an early, and possibly preclinical, feature of AD and other neurodegenerative diseases. The aim of this chapter is to review the current state of knowledge concerning hearing and music perception in persons who have a dementia as a result of a neurodegenerative disease. The review focuses on both peripheral and central auditory processing in common neurodegenerative diseases, with a particular focus on the processing of music and other non-verbal sounds. The chapter also reviews music interventions used for persons with neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:25726296

  16. The pathophysiology of the aqueduct stroke volume in normal pressure hydrocephalus: can co-morbidity with other forms of dementia be excluded?

    PubMed

    Bateman, Grant A; Levi, Christopher R; Schofield, Peter; Wang, Yang; Lovett, Elizabeth C

    2005-10-01

    Variable results are obtained from the treatment of normal pressure hydrocephalus (NPH) by shunt insertion. There is a high correlation between NPH and the pathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD) on brain biopsy. There is an overlap between AD and vascular dementia (VaD), suggesting that a correlation exists between NPH and other forms of dementia. This study seeks to (1) understand the physiological factors behind, and (2) define the ability of, the aqueduct stroke volume to exclude dementia co-morbidity. Twenty-four patients from a dementia clinic were classified as having either early AD or VaD on the basis of clinical features, Hachinski score and neuropsychological testing. They were compared with 16 subjects with classical clinical findings of NPH and 12 aged-matched non-cognitively impaired subjects. MRI flow quantification was used to measure aqueduct stroke volume and arterial pulse volume. An arterio-cerebral compliance ratio was calculated from the two volumes in each patient. The aqueduct stroke volume was elevated in all three forms of dementia, with no significant difference noted between the groups. The arterial pulse volume was elevated by 24% in VaD and reduced by 35% in NPH, compared to normal (P = 0.05 and P = 0.002, respectively), and was normal in AD. There was a spectrum of relative compliance with normal compliance in VaD and reduced compliance in AD and NPH. The aqueduct stroke volume depends on the arterial pulse volume and the relative compliance between the arterial tree and brain. The aqueduct stroke volume cannot exclude significant co-morbidity in NPH.

  17. Depression and dementias among military veterans.

    PubMed

    Byers, Amy L; Yaffe, Kristine

    2014-06-01

    Depression is very common throughout the course of veterans' lives, and dementia is common in late life. Previous studies suggest an association between depression and dementia in military veterans. The most likely biologic mechanisms that may link depression and dementia among military veterans include vascular disease, changes in glucocorticoid steroids and hippocampal atrophy, deposition of β-amyloid plaques, inflammatory changes, and alterations of nerve growth factors. In addition, military veterans often have depression comorbid with posttraumatic stress disorder or traumatic brain injury. Therefore, in military veterans, these hypothesized biologic pathways going from depression to dementia are more than likely influenced by trauma-related processes. Treatment strategies for depression, posttraumatic stress disorder, or traumatic brain injury could alter these pathways and as a result decrease the risk for dementia. Given the projected increase of dementia, as well as the projected increase in the older segment of the veteran population, in the future, it is critically important that we understand whether treatment for depression alone or combined with other regimens improves cognition. In this review, we summarize the principal mechanisms of this relationship and discuss treatment implications in military veterans.

  18. CSF and clinical hallmarks of subcortical dementias: focus on DLB and PDD.

    PubMed

    Stefani, Alessandro; Brusa, Livia; Olivola, Enrica; Pierantozzi, Mariangela; Martorana, Alessandro

    2012-07-01

    Dementia has become a relevant problem associated with the elderly in our countries. Increased interest in the field has yielded a copious literature, so far mostly centered on Alzheimer's dementia. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis combined with neuropsychology, even in absence of neuroimaging, represents the gold standard to reach a diagnosis when cortical cognitive impairment prevails. In view of this, low levels of CSF amyloid peptides β (Aβ) and high tau/Aβ protein ratio, despite prominent impairment of executive functions or concomitant vascular burden, facilitate the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease. Conversely, an early cognitive impairment occurring in patients suffering from Parkinson's disease (PD) or Lewy body disorders (LBDs), both diagnoses posed on pure clinical grounds, remains quite elusive in term of biomarkers or neuropsychological assessment. Whether PD with dementia (PDD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) represent further steps along with a continuum of the same progressive degeneration due to Lewy bodies deposition, rather then the association of Lewy bodies and Aβ pathology, remains a challenging issue. Aim of this work is to set a state-of-the-art on the neuropsychological profiles of both or DLB. Then, we will focus on the ongoing controversies about the specificity of the standard CSF biomarkers if applied to extrapyramidal disorders. Our conclusions are that the CSF pattern, in PDD and DLB, can certainly be distinct from that in AD, though mechanisms leading to dementia could be shared among them. It is possible that, by combining imaging tracers, neuropsychologically careful assessment and renewed CSF biomarkers, DLB can be better distinguished in subgroups, depending on the presence or absence of a relevant amyloid burden. However, more complete data, possibly collected in fieri during the progressive derangement of cognitive abilities, are needed to improve our ability to decipher and treat these entities.

  19. Clinical Phenotype of Dementia after Traumatic Brain Injury

    PubMed Central

    Sayed, Nasreen; Culver, Carlee; Dams-O'Connor, Kristen; Hammond, Flora

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI) in early to mid-life is associated with an increased risk of dementia in late life. It is unclear whether TBI results in acceleration of Alzheimer's disease (AD)-like pathology or has features of another dementing condition, such as chronic traumatic encephalopathy, which is associated with more-prominent mood, behavior, and motor disturbances than AD. Data from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center (NACC) Uniform Data Set was obtained over a 5-year period. Categorical data were analyzed using Fisher's exact test. Continuous parametric data were analyzed using the Student's t-test. Nonparametric data were analyzed using Mann-Whitney's test. Overall, 877 individuals with dementia who had sustained TBI were identified in the NACC database. Only TBI with chronic deficit or dysfunction was associated with increased risk of dementia. Patients with dementia after TBI (n=62) were significantly more likely to experience depression, anxiety, irritability, and motor disorders than patients with probable AD. Autopsy data were available for 20 of the 62 TBI patients. Of the patients with TBI, 62% met National Institute of Aging-Reagan Institute “high likelihood” criteria for AD. We conclude that TBI with chronic deficit or dysfunction is associated with an increased odds ratio for dementia. Clinically, patients with dementia associated with TBI were more likely to have symptoms of depression, agitation, irritability, and motor dysfunction than patients with probable AD. These findings suggest that dementia in individuals with a history of TBI may be distinct from AD. PMID:23374007

  20. Plasma β-amyloid in Alzheimer’s disease and vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Janelidze, Shorena; Stomrud, Erik; Palmqvist, Sebastian; Zetterberg, Henrik; van Westen, Danielle; Jeromin, Andreas; Song, Linan; Hanlon, David; Tan Hehir, Cristina A.; Baker, David; Blennow, Kaj; Hansson, Oskar

    2016-01-01

    Implementation of amyloid biomarkers in clinical practice would be accelerated if such biomarkers could be measured in blood. We analyzed plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 in a cohort of 719 individuals (the Swedish BioFINDER study), including patients with subjective cognitive decline (SCD), mild cognitive impairment (MCI), Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia and cognitively healthy elderly, using a ultrasensitive immunoassay (Simoa platform). There were weak positive correlations between plasma and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) levels for both Aβ42 and Aβ40, and negative correlations between plasma Aβ42 and neocortical amyloid deposition (measured with PET). Plasma levels of Aβ42 and Aβ40 were reduced in AD dementia compared with all other diagnostic groups. However, during the preclinical or prodromal AD stages (i.e. in amyloid positive controls, SCD and MCI) plasma concentration of Aβ42 was just moderately decreased whereas Aβ40 levels were unchanged. Higher plasma (but not CSF) levels of Aβ were associated with white matter lesions, cerebral microbleeds, hypertension, diabetes and ischemic heart disease. In summary, plasma Aβ is overtly decreased during the dementia stage of AD indicating that prominent changes in Aβ metabolism occur later in the periphery compared to the brain. Further, increased levels of Aβ in plasma are associated with vascular disease. PMID:27241045

  1. A Bayesian Approach to Identifying New Risk Factors for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Wen, Yen-Hsia; Wu, Shihn-Sheng; Lin, Chun-Hung Richard; Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Yang, Pinchen; Chang, Yang-Pei; Tseng, Kuan-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Dementia is one of the most disabling and burdensome health conditions worldwide. In this study, we identified new potential risk factors for dementia from nationwide longitudinal population-based data by using Bayesian statistics. We first tested the consistency of the results obtained using Bayesian statistics with those obtained using classical frequentist probability for 4 recognized risk factors for dementia, namely severe head injury, depression, diabetes mellitus, and vascular diseases. Then, we used Bayesian statistics to verify 2 new potential risk factors for dementia, namely hearing loss and senile cataract, determined from the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database. We included a total of 6546 (6.0%) patients diagnosed with dementia. We observed older age, female sex, and lower income as independent risk factors for dementia. Moreover, we verified the 4 recognized risk factors for dementia in the older Taiwanese population; their odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 3.469 to 1.207. Furthermore, we observed that hearing loss (OR = 1.577) and senile cataract (OR = 1.549) were associated with an increased risk of dementia. We found that the results obtained using Bayesian statistics for assessing risk factors for dementia, such as head injury, depression, DM, and vascular diseases, were consistent with those obtained using classical frequentist probability. Moreover, hearing loss and senile cataract were found to be potential risk factors for dementia in the older Taiwanese population. Bayesian statistics could help clinicians explore other potential risk factors for dementia and for developing appropriate treatment strategies for these patients. PMID:27227925

  2. Dementia: Diagnosis and Tests

    MedlinePlus

    ... our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Dementia Diagnosis & Tests If you or someone you care ... To determine whether an older adult might have dementia, a healthcare professional will: Ask about the person’s ...

  3. Drawing Disorders in Alzheimer's Disease and Other Forms of Dementia.

    PubMed

    Trojano, Luigi; Gainotti, Guido

    2016-04-21

    Drawing is a multicomponential process that can be impaired by many kinds of brain lesions. Drawing disorders are very common in Alzheimer's disease and other forms of dementia, and can provide clinical information for the distinction of the different dementing diseases. In our review we started from an overview of the neural and cognitive bases of drawing, and from a recollection of the drawing tasks more frequently used for assessing individuals with dementia. Then, we analyzed drawing disorders in dementia, paying special attention to those observed in Alzheimer's disease, from the prodromal stages of the amnesic mild cognitive impairment to the stages of full-blown dementia, both in the sporadic forms with late onset in the entorhino-hippocampal structures and in those with early onset in the posterior neocortical structures. We reviewed the drawing features that could differentiate Alzheimer's disease from vascular dementia and from the most frequent forms of degenerative dementia, namely frontotemporal dementia and Lewy body disease. Finally, we examined some peculiar aspects of drawing disorders in dementia, such as perseverations, rotations, and closing-in. We argue that a careful analysis of drawing errors helps to differentiate the different forms of dementia more than overall accuracy in drawing.

  4. Effects of spaced retrieval training with errorless learning in the rehabilitation of patients with dementia

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Jong Sik; Lee, Jae Shin; Yoo, Doo Han

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] Among the non-pharmacological interventions for dementia, spaced retrieval training (SRT) is a good method for rehabilitating cognition. The purpose of this study was to examine effects of SRT with errorless learning (EL) in the rehabilitation of patients with dementia. [Subjects and Methods] Twenty-nine participants with vascular dementia (VD) and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) participated in the present study. The Korean version of the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer’s disease (CERAD-K) and Modified Barthel Index (MBI) were performed to assess the changes in the neuropsychological performance and the independent activities of daily living after SRT with EL. All tests were administered both before and after SRT with EL. Each SRT with EL intervention was performed for 30 minutes per day for 5 weeks. SPSS for Windows version 18.0 was used for statistical analysis. [Results] All items of the CERAD-K score of the VD group except for constructional praxis increased significantly after the SRT with EL intervention, but no significant differences from the AD group were found. The Korean version of the geriatric depression scale (GDS-K) of the VD group increased significantly after the SRT with EL intervention. The mean MBI scores of each group showed no significant difference after the intervention. [Conclusion] SRT with EL is an effective intervention for memory training of patients with dementia. Future research using sufficient sample sizes will be needed to obtain strong evidence for comparing not only the before and after intervention data but also between the groups. PMID:26504282

  5. [Disruptive sexual behaviour among patients with dementia].

    PubMed

    Kämpf, C; Abderhalden, C

    2012-10-01

    In addition to diagnostically decisive cognitive problems, behavioural and psychological symptoms (BPSD) are frequent among people with dementia, including sexually related behavioural problems. This paper provides an overview on the state of knowledge about these problems. Research on this topic is hampered by the absence of unanimous definitions, aetiological classifications, and diagnostic instruments. The wide range of prevalence rates reported (1.8 - 18 %) originate from the heterogenity of study samples as well as in the variety of definitions and instruments employed. Regarding aetiology, dysfunctions in various cortical regions are being discussed. Sexually related behavioural problems are more prevalent in men and among patients with vascular, frontotemporal and Parkinson-associated forms of dementia, as compared with dementias of the Alzheimer type. The pharmacological and non-pharmacological treatment strategies published to date have not been sufficiently studied.

  6. Cognitive performance correlates with cerebrovascular impairments in multi-infarct dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Judd, B.W.; Meyer, J.S.; Rogers, R.L.; Gandhi, S.; Tanahashi, N.; Mortel, K.F.; Tawaklna, T.

    1986-05-01

    Cerebral blood flow (CBF) was measured by the /sup 133/Xe inhalation method in patients with multi-infarct dementia (MID, N = 26), Alzheimer's dementia (AD, N = 19), and among age-matched, neurologically normal, healthy volunteers (N = 26). Cognitive performance was assessed in all subjects using the Cognitive Capacity Screening Examination (CCSE). Cerebral vasomotor responses were calculated from differences in values of mean hemispheric gray matter blood flow (Delta CBF) measured during inhalation of 100% oxygen (hyperoxia) compared with CBF measured while breathing room air. Significant correlations were found between CCSE performance and vasomotor responsiveness in patients with MID (P less than .01), but not in patients with AD or in neurologically normal volunteers. Loss of vasomotor responsiveness is an indicator of cerebrovascular disease with rigidity and/or loss of reactivity of cerebral vessels, which impairs cerebrovascular responses to situational demands and predisposes to cerebral ischemia. Loss of cerebral vasomotor responsiveness among MID patients, which is a biologic marker of cerebrovascular disease, provides confirmatory evidence of the vascular etiology of MID and assists in separating MID from AD patients.

  7. Education, the brain and dementia: neuroprotection or compensation?

    PubMed

    Brayne, Carol; Ince, Paul G; Keage, Hannah A D; McKeith, Ian G; Matthews, Fiona E; Polvikoski, Tuomo; Sulkava, Raimo

    2010-08-01

    The potential protective role of education for dementia is an area of major interest. Almost all older people have some pathology in their brain at death but have not necessarily died with dementia. We have explored these two observations in large population-based cohort studies (Epidemiological Clinicopathological Studies in Europe; EClipSE) in an investigation of the relationships of brain pathology at death, clinical dementia and time in education, testing the hypothesis that greater exposure to education reduces the risk of dementia. EClipSE has harmonized longitudinal clinical data and neuropathology from three longstanding population-based studies that included post-mortem brain donation. These three studies started between 1985 and 1991. Number of years of education during earlier life was recorded at baseline. Incident dementia was detected through follow-up interviews, complemented by retrospective informant interviews, death certificate data and linked health/social records (dependent on study) after death. Dementia-related neuropathologies were assessed in each study in a comparable manner based on the Consortium to Establish a Registry for Alzheimer's Disease protocol. Eight hundred and seventy-two brain donors were included, of whom 56% were demented at death. Longer years in education were associated with decreased dementia risk and greater brain weight but had no relationship to neurodegenerative or vascular pathologies. The associations between neuropathological variables and clinical dementia differed according to the 'dose' of education such that more education reduced dementia risk largely independently of severity of pathology. More education did not protect individuals from developing neurodegenerative and vascular neuropathology by the time they died but it did appear to mitigate the impact of pathology on the clinical expression of dementia before death. The findings suggest that an understanding of the mechanisms leading to functional

  8. Posttraumatic stress disorder and dementia in Holocaust survivors.

    PubMed

    Sperling, Wolfgang; Kreil, Sebastian Konstantin; Biermann, Teresa

    2011-03-01

    The incidence of mental and somatic sequelae has been shown to be very high in the group of people damaged by the Holocaust. Within the context of internal research, 93 Holocaust survivors suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder have been examined. Patients suffered on average from 4.5 (standard deviation ± 1.8) somatic diagnoses as well as 1.8 (standard deviation ± 0.5) psychiatric diagnoses. A diagnosis of dementia was ascertained according to ICD-10 criteria in 14%. Vascular dementia (66%) dominated over Alzheimer's dementia (23%) and other subtypes (11%).

  9. Vascular Cures

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  10. Prevalence and impact of vascular and Alzheimer pathologies in Lewy body disease.

    PubMed

    Jellinger, Kurt A; Attems, Johannes

    2008-04-01

    Whereas the prevalence and impact of vascular pathology in Alzheimer diease (AD) are well established, the role of vascular and Alzheimer pathologies in the progression of neurodegeneration and cognitive impairment in Parkinson disease (PD) is under discussion. A retrospective clinico-pathologic study of 100 patients with autopsy proven PD (including 44 cases with dementia/PDD) and 20 cases of dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) confirmed essential clinical (duration of illness, Mini-Mental State Examination/MMSE, age at death) and morphologic differences between these groups; Lewy body Braak scores and Alzheimer pathologies (neuritic Braak stage, cortical Abeta plaque load, and generalized cerebral amyloid angiopathy or CAA) were significantly higher/more severe in DLB and PDD than in PD without dementia. Duration of illness showed no association to any of the examined pathologic parameters, while there was a moderate association between LB scores and neuritic Braak stages, the latter significantly increasing with age. Significant association between cerebrovascular lesions and neuritic Braak stage was seen in PDD but not in PD subjects without dementia. These data suggest an influence of Alzheimer-related lesions on the progression of the neurodegenerative process and, in particular, on cognitive decline in both PDD and DLB. On the other hand, both these factors in PD and DLB appear to be largely independent from coexistent vascular pathology, except in cases with severe cerebrovascular lesions or those related to neuritic AD pathology. Assessment of ApoE genotype in a small number of cases showed no significant differences in the severity of Abeta plaque load and CAA except for much lower intensities in non-demented epsilon3/3 patients. Despite increasing evidence suggesting synergistic reactions between alpha-synuclein (alphaSyn), tau and Abeta-peptides, the major protein markers of both AD and Lewy body diseases, and of both vascular pathology and AD, the

  11. Overweight in Midlife and Risk of Dementia: A 40-Year Follow-up Study

    PubMed Central

    Hassing, Linda B.; Dahl, Anna K.; Thorvaldsson, Valgeir; Berg, Stig; Gatz, Margaret; Pedersen, Nancy L.; Johansson, Boo

    2011-01-01

    Objective This study examines if overweight in midlife increases dementia risk later in life. Methods In 1963 Body Mass Index was assessed in 1152 participants of The Swedish Twin Registry, then at the age of 45 to 65 years. These participants were later screened for dementia in a prospective study with up to 40 years follow-up. A total of 312 participants were diagnosed with dementia. Results Logistic regression analyses, adjusted for demographic factors, smoking and alcohol habits, indicated that men and women categorized as overweight in their midlife had an elevated risk of dementia (OR = 1.59; 95% CI: 1.21 to 2.07, p = .002), Alzheimer’s disease (OR = 1.71; 95% CI: 1.24 to 2.35, p = .003), and vascular dementia (OR = 1.55; 95% CI: 0.98 to 2.47, p = .059). Further adjustments for diabetes and vascular diseases did not substantially affect the associations, except for vascular dementia (OR = 1.36; 95% CI: 0.82 to 2.56, p = .116), reflecting the significance of diabetes and vascular diseases in the aetiology of vascular dementia. There was no significant interaction between overweight and APOE ε4 status, indicating that having both risk factors does not have a multiplicative effect concerning dementia risk. Conclusions This study gives further support to the notion that overweight in midlife increases later risk of dementia. The risk is increased for both Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia, and follows the same pattern for men and women. PMID:19506566

  12. Altered Sense of Humor in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Camilla N.; Nicholas, Jennifer M.; Gordon, Elizabeth; Golden, Hannah L.; Cohen, Miriam H.; Woodward, Felix J.; Macpherson, Kirsty; Slattery, Catherine F.; Mummery, Catherine J.; Schott, Jonathan M.; Rohrer, Jonathan D.; Warren, Jason D.

    2015-01-01

    Sense of humor is potentially relevant to social functioning in dementias, but has been little studied in these diseases. We designed a semi-structured informant questionnaire to assess humor behavior and preferences in patients with behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD; n = 15), semantic dementia (SD; n = 7), progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n = 10), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD; n = 16) versus healthy age-matched individuals (n = 21). Altered (including frankly inappropriate) humor responses were significantly more frequent in bvFTD and SD (all patients) than PNFA or AD (around 40% of patients). All patient groups liked satirical and absurdist comedy significantly less than did healthy controls. This pattern was reported premorbidly for satirical comedy in bvFTD, PNFA, and AD. Liking for slapstick comedy did not differ between groups. Altered sense of humor is particularly salient in bvFTD and SD, but also frequent in AD and PNFA. Humor may be a sensitive probe of social cognitive impairment in dementia, with diagnostic, biomarker and social implications. PMID:26444779

  13. Dementia in 2014. Towards early diagnosis in Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Nordberg, Agneta

    2015-02-01

    Improved neuroimaging and molecular markers of Alzheimer disease (AD) have aided diagnosis of AD in the very early stages, and have facilitated differential diagnosis between AD and other neurodegenerative disorders with dementia. The finding that some older individuals can show amyloid-β pathology while remaining cognitively intact raises important questions regarding prevention strategies.

  14. Music and dementia.

    PubMed

    Baird, Amee; Samson, Séverine

    2015-01-01

    There is an increasing incidence of dementia in our aging population, and consequently an urgent need to develop treatments and activities that may alleviate the symptoms of dementia. Accumulating evidence shows that persons with dementia enjoy music, and their ability to respond to music is potentially preserved even in the late or severe stages of dementia when verbal communication may have ceased. Media interest in this topic has contributed to the public perception that music abilities are an "island of preservation" in an otherwise cognitively impaired person with dementia. In this chapter, we review the current literature on music cognition in dementia and show that there has been very scarce rigorous scientific investigation of this issue, and that various types of music memory exist and are differentially impaired in the different types of dementia. Furthermore, we discuss the recent development of music activities as a nonpharmacological treatment for dementia and highlight the methodological limitations of the current literature on this topic. While it has been reported that music activities can improve behavior, (particularly agitation), mood, and cognition in persons with dementia, recent large-scale randomized control studies have questioned the specificity of the effect of music and found that it is no more beneficial than other pleasant activities. Nevertheless, music is unique in its powerful ability to elicit both memories and emotions. This can provide an important link to individual's past and a means of nonverbal communication with carers, which make it an ideal stimulus for persons with dementia.

  15. Some observations on the spectrum of dementia.

    PubMed

    Jha, Sanjeev; Patel, R

    2004-06-01

    A study was designed to generate epidemiological and clinical data on dementia, in a teaching hospital in India. It was conducted on 124 (94 male and 30 female) elderly patients (aged more than 60 years) presenting with clinical syndrome of dementia (DSM-3). Their age range was 64-78 (mean 65.7 4.1) years. Detailed clinical, biochemical, radiological and electrophysiological evaluation was done to establish etiology. Patients with psychiatric ailments, cranial trauma and tumors were excluded. The study period was 4.2 years. Multi-infarct dementia (MID) was observed to be commonest cause of dementia and was present in 59 (47.6%) cases. There were 10 (8%) patients each of tuberculosis (TB) and neurocysticercosis (NCC). Alcohol-related dementia was present in 13 (10.5%), while malnutrition (Vitamin B12 deficiency) was present in 9 (7.2%). Alzheimer's Disease (AD) was present (NINCDS-ADRDA criteria) in 6 patients (4.8%). There were 3 (2.4%) cases 1 each of Huntington's disease, Parkinson's and Normal Pressure Hydrocephalus and 2 each of diabetes, hypothyroidism, hyperthyroidism and Creutzfeldt' Jakob Disease. We conclude that AD, which is irreversible and common in the west, is relatively uncommon in India as compared to MID, infections and malnutrition, which are potentially treatable.

  16. Neuropsychological assessment and cerebral vascular disease: the new standards.

    PubMed

    Godefroy, O; Leclercq, C; Bugnicourt, J-M; Roussel, M; Moroni, C; Quaglino, V; Beaunieux, H; Taillia, H; Nédélec-Ciceri, C; Bonnin, C; Thomas-Anterion, C; Varvat, J; Aboulafia-Brakha, T; Assal, F

    2013-10-01

    imaging. The first studies showed that about a third of patients with VaD due to small vessel disease or with poststroke dementia have amyloid PET imaging suggestive of AD. These new techniques will examine the interaction between vascular lesions and promotion of amyloid deposition. Although results of these on-going studies will be available in few years, these data indicate that efforts should be done in clinical practice to reduce underdiagnosis of VCI; VCI should be examined using a specific protocol which will be fully normalized soon for French-speaking patients; the sub-optimal sensitivity of screening tests prompts to use a structured interview to grade Rankin scale and to perform systematically a comprehensive assessment in stroke patients at risk of VCI; poststroke dementia occurring after 3 months poststroke may be preventable by treatment of modifiable vascular risk factors and secondary prevention of stroke recurrence according to recent recommendations.

  17. Content and Quality of Information Provided on Canadian Dementia Websites

    PubMed Central

    Dillon, Whitney A.; Prorok, Jeanette C.; Seitz, Dallas P.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Information about dementia is important for persons with dementia (PWD) and their caregivers and the Internet has become the key source of health information. We reviewed the content and quality of information provided on Canadian websites for Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methods We used the terms “dementia” and “Alzheimer” in Google to identify Canadian dementia websites. The contents of websites were compared to 16 guideline recommendations provided in Canadian Consensus Conference on Diagnosis and Treatment of Dementia. The quality of information provided on websites was evaluated using the DISCERN instrument. The content and quality of information provided on selected websites were then described. Results Seven websites were identified, three of which provided relatively comprehensive and high-quality information on dementia. Websites frequently provided information about diagnosis of dementia, its natural course, and types of dementia, while other topics were less commonly addressed. The quality of information provided on the websites varied, and many websites had several areas where the quality of information provided was relatively low according to the DISCERN instrument. Conclusions There is variation in the content and quality of dementia websites, although some websites provide high-quality and relatively comprehensive information which would serve as a useful resource for PWD, caregivers, and healthcare providers. Improvements in the content and quality of information provided on AD websites would provide PWD and their caregivers with access to better information. PMID:23440180

  18. Uncommon neurodegenerative causes of dementia.

    PubMed

    Kurz, Alexander F

    2005-01-01

    A group of neurodegenerative diseases is outlined that affect cortical and subcortical areas of the brain. These diseases give rise to atypical forms of dementia and, unlike Alzheimer's disease (AD), are often associated with neurological symptoms. Clinical symptoms reflect the localization of the degenerative process rather than the nature of the underlying histopathology. Degeneration of the frontal and anterior temporal lobe presents initially with behavioral alterations, but later in the course, impairment of cognition and activities of daily living develops. Posterior cortical atrophy affects the parietal and occipital association cortices and causes complex visual disturbances. In corticobasal degeneration (CBD) the focus of pathology includes the frontoparietal cortex and several subcortical nuclei, causing symmetrical rigidity, bradykinesia, myoclonus and dystonia. Progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) involves the frontal, temporal and parietal cortex as well as parts of the brain stem. Clinical features include a hypokinetic rigid syndrome with nuchal dystonia and vertical gaze palsy. Huntington's disease is a prototypical autosomal dominant disorder that affects the extrapyramidal system and causes choreatic movements in combination with personality changes and cognitive deterioration. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) with dementia is a neurodegeneration of the frontotemporal cortex and of the anterior horn of the spinal cord. Behavioral change similar to frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is paralleled or followed by the classic features of motor neuron disease.

  19. Dysexecutive versus amnestic Alzheimer disease subgroups: analysis of demographic, genetic, and vascular factors.

    PubMed

    Mez, Jesse; Cosentino, Stephanie; Brickman, Adam M; Huey, Edward D; Manly, Jennifer J; Mayeux, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the demographic and vascular characteristics and APOE genotypes of a dysexecutive subgroup of Alzheimer disease (AD) with an amnestic subgroup of AD early in the disease course. A total of 2224 participants from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center database who carried a diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment (n=1188) or mild AD (clinical dementia rating ≤1) (n=1036) were included in this study. A subset of the mild cognitive impairment (n=61) and mild AD (n=79) participants underwent an autopsy. A dysexecutive subgroup (n=587) was defined as having executive performance >1 SD worse than memory performance, and an amnestic subgroup (n=549) was defined conversely. Among the autopsy subset, the odds of an AD pathologic diagnosis were compared in the 2 subgroups. The demographics, APOE[Latin Small Letter Open E]4 status, and vascular risk factors were compared in the 2 subgroups. Among the autopsy subset, the odds of having an AD pathologic diagnosis did not differ between the dysexecutive and amnestic subgroups. Under an additive model, participants in the dysexecutive subgroup possessed the APOE[Latin Small Letter Open E]4 allele less frequently compared with those in the amnestic subgroup. The dysexecutive subgroup had a history of hypertension less frequently compared with the amnestic subgroup. These distinct characteristics add to accumulating evidence that a dysexecutive subgroup of AD may have a unique underlying pathophysiology.

  20. [A comparative analysis of cognitive disturbances in dementia with Levy's bodies and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Preobrazhenskaia, I S; Mkhitarian, E A; Iakhno, N N

    2005-01-01

    Basing on a neuropsychological study of 50 patients with dementia with Levy's bodies (DLB) and 50 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), peculiarities of cognitive impairment in these diseases are discussed. In similar severity of dementia, patients with DLB demonstrated a greater impairment of executive and visual-spatial functions as well as neurodynamic disturbances and patients with AD had more severe memory impairment.

  1. Comparative analysis of cognitive impairments in lewy body dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Preobrazhenskaya, I S; Mkhitaryan, E A; Yakhno, N N

    2006-01-01

    Neuropsychological studies of 50 patients with Lewy body dementia (LBD) and 50 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) were performed to assess the characteristics of the cognitive impairments in these diseases. In patients with dementias of similar severities, patients with LBD showed greater impairment of executive and visuospatial functions and had more marked neurodynamic dysfunction. Patients with AD showed more profound memory disorders.

  2. Vascular disease and risk factors are associated with cognitive decline in the alzheimer disease spectrum.

    PubMed

    Lorius, Natacha; Locascio, Joseph J; Rentz, Dorene M; Johnson, Keith A; Sperling, Reisa A; Viswanathan, Anand; Marshall, Gad A

    2015-01-01

    We investigated the relationship between vascular disease and risk factors versus cognitive decline cross-sectionally and longitudinally in normal older control, mild cognitive impairment, and mild Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia subjects. A total of 812 participants (229 normal older control, 395 mild cognitive impairment, 188 AD) underwent cognitive testing, brain magnetic resonance imaging, and clinical evaluations at baseline and over a period of 3 years. General linear, longitudinal mixed-effects, and Cox proportional hazards models were used. Greater homocysteine level and white matter hyperintensity volume were associated with processing speed impairment (homocysteine: P=0.02; white matter hyperintensity: P<0.0001); greater Vascular Index score was associated with memory impairment (P=0.007); and greater number of apolipoprotein E ε4 (APOE4) alleles was associated with global cognitive impairment (P=0.007) at baseline. Apolipoprotein E ε4 was associated with greater rate of increase in global cognitive impairment (P=0.002) and processing speed impairment (P=0.001) over time, whereas higher total cholesterol was associated with greater rate of increase in global cognitive impairment (P=0.02) and memory impairment (P=0.06) over time. These results suggest a significant association of increased vascular disease and risk factors with cognitive impairment at baseline and over time in the AD spectrum in a sample that was selected to have low vascular burden at baseline.

  3. The impact of dementia severity on caregiver burden in frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer disease.

    PubMed

    Mioshi, Eneida; Foxe, David; Leslie, Felicity; Savage, Sharon; Hsieh, Sharpley; Miller, Laurie; Hodges, John R; Piguet, Olivier

    2013-01-01

    Caregiver burden is greater in frontotemporal dementia (FTD) than in Alzheimer disease (AD). However, little is known of the impact of the 3 main clinical variants of FTD- behavioral-variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic dementia (SemDem), and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA)-or the role of disease severity in caregiver burden. The Zarit Burden Inventory was used to measure caregiver burden of bvFTD (n=17), SemDem (n=20), PNFA (n=20), and AD (n=19) patients. Symptom duration, caregiver age, and relationship type were matched across groups. Moreover, a number of caregiver (mood, social network) and patient variables (functional disability, behavioral changes, relationship with caregiver, and dementia stage) were addressed to investigate their impact on caregiver burden. Caregivers of bvFTD patients reported the highest burden, whereas SemDem and PNFA caregivers reported burden similar to AD. A regression analysis revealed that caregiver burden in FTD, regardless of subtype, was explained by a model combining disease staging, relationship changes, and caregiver depression. Burden increased with disease severity in FTD. This study is the first to show that caregivers of SemDem, PNFA, and AD patients show similar burden, while confirming that bvFTD caregivers show higher burden than AD caregivers. More importantly, this study demonstrates that burden worsens with disease progression in FTD.

  4. Gene Therapy Models of Alzheimer's Disease and Other Dementias.

    PubMed

    Combs, Benjamin; Kneynsberg, Andrew; Kanaan, Nicholas M

    2016-01-01

    Dementias are among the most common neurological disorders, and Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. AD remains a looming health crisis despite great efforts to learn the mechanisms surrounding the neuron dysfunction and neurodegeneration that accompanies AD primarily in the medial temporal lobe. In addition to AD, a group of diseases known as frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) are degenerative diseases involving atrophy and degeneration in the frontal and temporal lobe regions. Importantly, AD and a number of FTDs are collectively known as tauopathies due to the abundant accumulation of pathological tau inclusions in the brain. The precise role tau plays in disease pathogenesis remains an area of strong research focus. A critical component to effectively study any human disease is the availability of models that recapitulate key features of the disease. Accordingly, a number of animal models are currently being pursued to fill the current gaps in our knowledge of the causes of dementias and to develop effective therapeutics. Recent developments in gene therapy-based approaches, particularly in recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs), have provided new tools to study AD and other related neurodegenerative disorders. Additionally, gene therapy approaches have emerged as an intriguing possibility for treating these diseases in humans. This chapter explores the current state of rAAV models of AD and other dementias, discuss recent efforts to improve these models, and describe current and future possibilities in the use of rAAVs and other viruses in treatments of disease.

  5. Use of the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test in Differentiating Normal Aging from Alzheimer's and Parkinson's Dementia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tierney, Mary C.; And Others

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-eight elderly control subjects performed better than did 18 patients with moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD), 33 with severe AD, and 12 with Parkinson's dementia on all measures of the Rey Auditory Verbal Learning Test. Results indicate that the test is useful in distinguishing AD from Parkinson's dementia. (SLD)

  6. Metal homeostasis in dementia.

    PubMed

    Sensi, Stefano

    2014-10-01

    The molecular determinants of dementia of Alzheimer's tipe (DAT) are still not completely known; however, in the past two decades, a large body of evidence has indicated that an important contributing factor is represented by the unbalanced homeostasis of two cations: calcium (Ca(2) ) and zinc (Zn(2)). The two ions serve a critical role in the physiological signalling of the central nervous system. However, Alzheimer's disease-related neurodegeneration, deregulation of brain levels of Ca(2) and Zn(2) is instrumental in promoting amyloid-β (Aβ) dysmetabolism and tau phosphorylation as well as interference with additional pathogenic factors like energy production failure, hyperexcitabilty, excitotoxicity, and oxidative stress. Hyperexcitabilty and excitotoxicity are key mechanisms in the disease development and progression as an altered glutamatergic activation can further promote both Ca(2) and Zn(2) dyshomeostasis. The two cations can operate synergistically to promote the generation of free radicals that further increase intracellular Ca(2) and Zn(2) rises and set the stage for a self-perpetuating injurious loop. In the talk, we will review mechanisms of AD-related Ca(2) and Zn(2) dyshomeostasis in a preclinical model of DAT and discuss opportunity for disease-modifying strategies based on interventions aimed at restoring brain metal homeostasis.

  7. Dementia, Preclinical Studies in Neurodegeneration and its Potential for Translational Medicine in South America

    PubMed Central

    Cardona-Gómez, Gloria Patricia; Lopera, Francisco

    2016-01-01

    Latin-American people with dementia will increase to an astounding 368% in 2050, higher than USA and Europe. In addition, to sporadic dementia type like Alzheimer, and vascular dementia (VaD) progression after Cerebrovascular disease is also found. These incidences are increased in Colombia by specific populations affected with pure Neurodegenerative and VaDs like Autosomical Dominant familial Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and Cerebral Autosomal-Dominant Arteriopathy with Subcortical Infarcts and Leukoencephalopathy (CADASIL). In spite of the enormous human effort with and economical effort and investment costs, neither sporadic nor genetic kinds of dementia progression have been prevented or blocked yet. Currently, there exist several animal models that partially solve the understanding of the neurodegenerative etiopathogenesis and its treatment. However, when the potential therapies are translated to humans, those do not work or present a limited action. Main difficulties are the diverse comorbility associated to the cause and/or several affected brain regions, reducing the efficacy of some therapies which are limited to a tissue-specific action or modulating a kind of neurotransmission. Global investigation suggests that a general prevention could be achieved with the improvement in the quality of lifestyle, including healthy diet, physical and mental activity, and avoiding mechanical or chemical pro-inflammatory events in an early stage in the most of non-communicable diseases. In this review article, we present some molecular targets and preclinical studies in animal models to propose strategies that could be useful in a future translation to prevent or block neurodegeneration: one is gene therapy; silencing pathogenic genes in critical brain areas where excitotoxicity arise and spread. Another is to take advantage of the natural source and its wide biodiversity of natural products that are capable of identifying, by the blocking and prevention of

  8. A population study of apoE genotype at the age of 85: relation to dementia, cerebrovascular disease, and mortality

    PubMed Central

    Skoog, I.; Hesse, C.; Aevarsson, O.; Landahl, S.; Wahlstrom, J.; Fredman, P.; Blennow, K.

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To study the association of apoE genotypes with dementia and cerebrovascular disorders in a population based sample of 85year old people.
METHODS—A representative sample of 85 year old people (303 non-demented, 109 demented) were given a neuropsychiatric and a medical examination and head CT. The apoE isoforms were determined. Dementia was diagnosed according to DSM-III-R.
RESULTS—At the age of 85, carriers of the apoE ε4 allele had an increased odds ratio (OR) for dementia (1.9; p<0.01) and its subtypes Alzheimer's disease (1.9; p<0.05) and vascular dementia (2.0; p<0.05). Among those categorised as having vascular dementia, the apoE ε4 allele was associated with mixed Alzheimer's disease-multi-infarct dementia (OR 6.5; p<0.05), but not with pure multi-infarct dementia (OR 1.5; NS). Only carriers of the apoE ε4 allele who also had ischaemic white matter lesions on CT of the head had an increased OR for dementia (OR 6.1; p=0.00003), and its main subtypes Alzheimer's disease (OR 6.8; p=0.002) and vascular dementia (OR 5.6; p=0.0007), whereas carriers of the apoE ε4 allele without white matter lesions had an OR for dementia of 1.0 (OR for Alzheimer's disease 1.8; NS and for vascular dementia 0.6; NS) and non-carriers of the apoE ε4 allele with white matter lesions had an OR for dementia of 2.2; NS (OR for Alzheimer's disease 2.7; NS and for vascular dementia 1.6; NS). The apoE allele variants were not related to mortality or incidence of dementia between the ages of 85 and 88. The ε2 allele was related to a higher prevalence of stroke or transient ischaemic attack at the age of 85 (OR 2.1; p<0.05) and a higher incidence of multi-infarct dementia during the follow up (OR 2.9; p<0.05).
CONCLUSIONS—Neither the apoE ε4 allele nor white matter lesions are sufficient risk factors by themselves for dementia at very old ages, whereas possession of both these entities increases the risk for Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia

  9. Hearing and dementia.

    PubMed

    Hardy, Chris J D; Marshall, Charles R; Golden, Hannah L; Clark, Camilla N; Mummery, Catherine J; Griffiths, Timothy D; Bamiou, Doris-Eva; Warren, Jason D

    2016-11-01

    Hearing deficits associated with cognitive impairment have attracted much recent interest, motivated by emerging evidence that impaired hearing is a risk factor for cognitive decline. However, dementia and hearing impairment present immense challenges in their own right, and their intersection in the auditory brain remains poorly understood and difficult to assess. Here, we outline a clinically oriented, symptom-based approach to the assessment of hearing in dementias, informed by recent progress in the clinical auditory neuroscience of these diseases. We consider the significance and interpretation of hearing loss and symptoms that point to a disorder of auditory cognition in patients with dementia. We identify key auditory characteristics of some important dementias and conclude with a bedside approach to assessing and managing auditory dysfunction in dementia.

  10. Associations between Dementia Outcomes and Depressive Symptoms, Leisure Activities, and Social Support

    PubMed Central

    Heser, Kathrin; Wagner, Michael; Wiese, Birgitt; Prokein, Jana; Ernst, Annette; König, Hans-Helmut; Brettschneider, Christian; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.; Luppa, Melanie; Weyerer, Siegfried; Eifflaender-Gorfer, Sandra; Bickel, Horst; Mösch, Edelgard; Pentzek, Michael; Fuchs, Angela; Maier, Wolfgang; Scherer, Martin; Eisele, Marion

    2014-01-01

    Background Social relations and depressive symptoms are intertwined. They both predict subsequent dementia, but only few studies on the association between social life aspects and subsequent dementia exist. Methods The risk of subsequent dementia was estimated over 2 follow-up assessments, each 18 months apart, depending on leisure activity, social support (general scale and the 3 factors emotional support, practical support, and social integration), and depressive symptoms, using proportional hazard models in a cohort of elderly patients (n = 2,300, with a mean age of 82.45 years) recruited for the study by their general practitioners. Results Higher depressive symptoms and lower cognitive and physical activity were associated with an increased risk of subsequent all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's dementia (AD). While neither social engagement nor the general social support scale was associated with subsequent dementia, a higher level of social integration was associated with a lower dementia risk. In combined models, the results for activity variables remained similar, but the strength of the association between depressive symptoms and the subsequent risk of dementia decreased, and the association with social integration disappeared. Conclusions Depressive symptoms increased and activity variables decreased the risk of subsequent dementia; however, activity variables, namely cognitive and physical activity, partly mediated the effect of depressive symptoms on the subsequent risk of all-cause dementia and AD. In many cases, social support was not associated with a risk of subsequent dementia. PMID:25685139

  11. Cardiovascular Risk Factors Promote Brain Hypoperfusion Leading to Cognitive Decline and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    de la Torre, Jack C.

    2012-01-01

    Heart disease is the major leading cause of death and disability in the world. Mainly affecting the elderly population, heart disease and its main outcome, cardiovascular disease, have become an important risk factor in the development of cognitive decline and Alzheimer's disease (AD). This paper examines the evidence linking chronic brain hypoperfusion induced by a variety of cardiovascular deficits in the development of cognitive impairment preceding AD. The evidence indicates a strong association between AD and cardiovascular risk factors, including ApoE4, atrial fibrillation, thrombotic events, hypertension, hypotension, heart failure, high serum markers of inflammation, coronary artery disease, low cardiac index, and valvular pathology. In elderly people whose cerebral perfusion is already diminished by their advanced age, additional reduction of cerebral blood flow stemming from abnormalities in the heart-brain vascular loop ostensibly increases the probability of developing AD. Evidence also suggests that a neuronal energy crisis brought on by relentless brain hypoperfusion may be responsible for protein synthesis abnormalities that later result in the classic neurodegenerative lesions involving the formation of amyloid-beta plaques and neurofibrillary tangles. Insight into how cardiovascular risk factors can induce progressive cognitive impairment offers an enhanced understanding of the multifactorial pathophysiology characterizing AD and ways at preventing or managing the cardiovascular precursors of this dementia. PMID:23243502

  12. Dementia with Lewy bodies: a comprehensive review for nurses.

    PubMed

    Ajon Gealogo, Gretchel

    2013-12-01

    Much of the current nursing literature on dementia focuses on Alzheimer disease (AD), the dementia subtype most commonly diagnosed in the older adults. There is a paucity of nursing literature on dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), the second most common subtype of dementia, which is closely associated with Parkinson disease with dementia (PDD), considered the third most common dementia subtype. Both are aging-related disorders attributed to Lewy bodies, abnormal protein aggregates or "clumps" found to cause cumulative neurodegeneration over time. DLB is defined as dementia onset that is preceded by Parkinsonian symptoms for 1 year or less, whereas in PDD, 2 or more years of Parkinsonian symptoms precede dementia onset. Although basic science knowledge of DLB has increased exponentially, the lack of nursing research on DLB indicates that this knowledge excludes the nursing perspective and its implications for nursing practice. The purpose of this article is to provide nurses with a comprehensive overview of DLB as it compares with PDD and Alzheimer disease and to propose key nursing interventions for clinical practice.

  13. Implicit emotional awareness in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Ibáñez, Agustín; Velásquez, María Marcela; Caro, Miguel Martorell; Manes, Facundo

    2013-01-01

    The preserved "implicit awareness" in patients with Alzheimer disease (AD) presenting anosognosia has opened a new branch of research regarding explicit-implicit integration. The behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), contrary to AD, would present impaired anosognosia-related implicit awareness due to a dysfunctional implicit integration of contextual information caused by an abnormal fronto-insular-temporal network. Loss of insight and anosognosia are pervasive in bvFTD, but no reports have assessed the implicit emotional awareness in this condition. We emphasize the need to investigate and extend our knowledge of implicit contextual integration impairments and their relation with anosognosia in bvFTD vs AD.

  14. Diagnosis of dementia with single photon emission computed tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J.; Budinger, T.F.; Reed, B.R.

    1987-03-01

    Single photon emission computed tomography is a practical modality for the study of physiologic cerebral activity in vivo. We utilized single photon emission computed tomography and N-isopropyl-p-iodoamphetamine iodine 123 to evaluate regional cerebral blood flow in nine patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD), five healthy elderly control subjects, and two patients with multi-infarct dementia. We found that all subjects with AD demonstrated flow deficits in temporoparietal cortex bilaterally, and that the ratio of activity in bilateral temporoparietal cortex to activity in the whole slice allowed the differentiation of all patients with AD from both the controls and from the patients with multi-infarct dementia. Furthermore, this ratio showed a strong correlation with disease severity in the AD group. Single photon emission computed tomography appears to be useful in the differential diagnosis of dementia and reflects clinical features of the disease.

  15. Similarities of cerebral glucose metabolism in Alzheimer's and Parkinsonian dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Kuhl, D.E.; Metter, E.J.; Benson, D.F.; Ashford, J.W.; Riege, W.H.; Fujikawa, D.G.; Markham, C.H.; Maltese, A.

    1985-05-01

    In the dementia of probable Alzheimer's Disease (AD), there is a decrease in the metabolic ratio of parietal cortex/caudate-thalamus which relates measures in the most and in the least severely affected locations. Since some demented patients with Parkinson's Disease (PDD) are known to share pathological and neurochemical features with AD patients, the authors evaluated if the distribution of cerebral hypometabolism in PDD and AD were the same. Local cerebral metabolic rates were determined using the FDG method and positron tomography in subjects with AD (N=23), and PDD (N=7), multiple infarct dementia (MID)(N=6), and controls (N=10). In MID, the mean par/caudthal ratio was normal (0.79 +- 0.9, N=6). In AD and PDD patients, this ratio correlated negatively with both the severity (r=-0.624, rho=0.001) and duration (r=-0.657, rho=0.001) of dementia. The ratio was markedly decreased in subjects with mild to severe dementia (0.46 +- 0.09, N=21) and with dementia duration greater than two years (0.44 +- 0.08, N=18), but the ratio was also significantly decreased in patients with less advanced disease, i.e., when dementia was only questionable (0.64 +- 0.14, N=9) (t=2.27, rho<0.037) and when duration was two years or less (0.62 +- 0.13, N=12)(t=2.88, rho<0.009). This similarity of hypometabolism in AD and PDD is additional evidence that a common mechanism may operate in both disorders. The par/caud-thal metabolic ratio may be an index useful in the differential diagnosis of early dementia.

  16. Diagnosis and Evaluation of a Patient with Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Bucelli, Robert C.; Ances, Beau M.

    2014-01-01

    While the most common dementia is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), a detailed history is needed to rule out rapidly progressive dementias (RPDs). RPDs are less than two years in duration and have a rate of progression faster typical neurodegenerative diseases. Identification of RPDs is important as some are treatable. This review focuses on the spectrum of RPDs, with special emphasis on paraneoplastic disorders and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD). PMID:24279195

  17. Delirium Superimposed on Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Steis, Melinda R.; Fick, Donna M.

    2012-01-01

    Delirium is an acute, fluctuating confusional state that results in poor outcomes for older adults. Dementia causes a more convoluted course when coexisting with delirium. This study examined 128 days of documentation to describe what nurses document when caring for patients with dementia who experience delirium. Nurses did not document that they recognized delirium. Common descriptive terms included words and phrases indicating fluctuating mental status, lethargy, confusion, negative behavior, delusions, and restlessness. Delirium is a medical emergency. Nurses are in need of education coupled with clinical and decisional support to facilitate recognition and treatment of underlying causes of delirium in individuals with dementia. PMID:21761816

  18. [Dementia: management and prevention].

    PubMed

    Daher, Oscar; Nguyen, Sylvain; Smith, Cindi; Büla, Christophe; Démonet, Jean-François

    2016-04-20

    Dementia represents a great challenge for health care providers. Detection of cognitive impairment is critical for early diagnosis of dementia. Early diagnosis allows to initiate individualized management that focuses on maintaining patient's autonomy and supporting their caregivers. Proposed multimodal interventions include physical activity, cognitive training, mediterranean diet, and management of cardiovascular risk factors. Before the initiation of pro-cognitive therapy, medication review is essential to evaluate current treament and determine specific therapeutic objectives, based on patient's overall health and preferences. Overall risk reduction for dementia revolves around similar measures that target physical activity, cognition, diet and management of cardiovascular risk factors.

  19. Subclinical hyperthyroidism and dementia: the Sao Paulo Ageing & Health Study (SPAH)

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Several epidemiologic studies have shown a possible association between thyroid function and cognitive decline. Our aim was to evaluate the association of subclinical hyperthyroidism and dementia in a population sample of older people Methods A cross-sectional study - São Paulo Ageing & Health Study (SPAH) - in a population sample of low-income elderly people ≥ 65 years-old to evaluate presence of subclinical thyroid disease as a risk factor for dementia. Thyroid function was assessed using thyrotropic hormone and free-thyroxine as well as routine use of thyroid hormones or antithyroid medications. Cases of dementia were assessed using a harmonized one-phase dementia diagnostic procedure by the "10/66 Dementia Research Group" including Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia. Logistic regression models were used to test a possible association between subclinical hyperthyroidism and dementia. Results and discussion Prevalence of dementia and of subclinical hyperthyroidism were respectively of 4.4% and 3.0%. After age adjustment, we found an association of subclinical hyperthyroidism and any type of dementia and vascular dementia (Odds Ratio, 4.1, 95% Confidence Interval [95% CI] 1.3-13.1, and 5.3 95% CI, 1.1-26.4; respectively). Analyzing data by gender, we found an association of subclinical hyperthyroidism with dementia and Alzheimer's disease only for men (OR, 8.0; 95% CI, 1.5-43.4; OR, 12.4; 95% CI, 1.2-128.4; respectively). No women with subclinical hypothyroidism presented Alzheimer's disease in the sample. Conclusion The results suggest a consistent association among people with subclinical hyperthyroidism and dementia. PMID:20515500

  20. The Effects of Anti-Dementia and Nootropic Treatments on the Mortality of Patients with Dementia: A Population-Based Cohort Study in Taiwan

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chen-Yi; Hu, Hsiao-Yun; Chow, Lok-Hi; Chou, Yiing-Jenq; Huang, Nicole; Wang, Pei-Ning; Li, Chung-Pin

    2015-01-01

    Background Few studies have examined the contribution of treatment on the mortality of dementia based on a population-based study. Objective To investigate the effects of anti-dementia and nootropic treatments on the mortality of dementia using a population-based cohort study. Methods 12,193 incident dementia patients were found from 2000 to 2010. Their data were compared with 12,193 age- and sex-matched non-dementia controls that were randomly selected from the same database. Dementia was classified into vascular (VaD) and degenerative dementia. Mortality incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) were calculated. Results The median survival time was 3.39 years (95% confidence interval [CI]: 2.88–3.79) for VaD without medication, 6.62 years (95% CI: 6.24–7.21) for VaD with nootropics, 3.01 years (95% CI: 2.85–3.21) for degenerative dementia without medication, 8.11 years (95% CI: 6.30–8.55) for degenerative dementia with anti-dementia medication, 6.00 years (95% CI: 5.73–6.17) for degenerative dementia with nootropics, and 9.03 years (95% CI: 8.02–9.87) for degenerative dementia with both anti-dementia and nootropic medications. Compared to the non-dementia group, the HRs among individuals with degenerative dementia were 2.69 (95% CI: 2.55–2.83) without medication, 1.46 (95% CI: 1.39–1.54) with nootropics, 1.05 (95% CI: 0.82–1.34) with anti-dementia medication, and 0.92 (95% CI: 0.80–1.05) with both nootropic and anti-dementia medications. VaD with nootropics had a lower mortality (HR: 1.25, 95% CI: 1.15–1.37) than VaD without medication (HR: 2.46, 95% CI: 2.22–2.72). Conclusion Pharmacological treatments have beneficial effects for patients with dementia in prolonging their survival. PMID:26098910

  1. Multicentre population-based dementia prevalence survey in Japan: a preliminary report.

    PubMed

    Ikejima, Chiaki; Hisanaga, Akito; Meguro, Kenichi; Yamada, Tatsuo; Ouma, Shinji; Kawamuro, Yu; Hyouki, Kazushi; Nakashima, Kenji; Wada, Kenji; Yamada, Shigeto; Watanabe, Itaru; Kakuma, Tatsuyuki; Aoyama, Yoshiko; Mizukami, Katsuyoshi; Asada, Takashi

    2012-06-01

    Community-based surveys were performed in seven rural areas in Japan to investigate the prevalence of dementia and illnesses causing dementia. A total of 5431 elderly subjects were selected based on census data from 1 October 2009. In total, 3394 participants were examined (participation rate: 62.5%), and 768 dementia cases and 529 mild cognitive impairment cases were identified. Of the illnesses causing dementia, Alzheimer's disease was the most frequent (67.4%), followed by vascular dementia (18.9%), dementia with Lewy body disease (4.6%), mixed dementia (4.2%) and other illnesses. The prevalence of dementia according to 5-year age strata between 65 and 99 years was 5.8-77.7% among the participants. The prevalence of dementia in this study was higher than in previous reports in Japan and other countries. To verify the upward trend of dementia prevalence and its background factors, we have scheduled surveys for three other urban areas in 2011-2012.

  2. Vascular Risk Factors: Imaging and Neuropathologic Correlates

    PubMed Central

    Knopman, David S.; Roberts, Rosebud

    2010-01-01

    Cerebrovascular disease plays an important role in cognitive disorders in the elderly. Cerebrovascular disease and Alzheimer’s disease interact on several levels, one important level being the overlap in risk factors. The major vascular risk factors such as diabetes and impaired glycemic control, hypertension, obesity and hyper- or dyslipidemia have been associated both with Alzheimer’s disease and vascular dementia. The purpose of this review is to consider the context in which vascular dementia is diagnosed, place the pathophysiological consequences of cerebrovascular disease on cognition in the context of clinical and pathological Alzheimer’s disease, and then to consider the evidence for the role of major vascular risk factors in late-life cognitive impairment, changes in brain imaging and neuropathological changes. Midlife diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity are established risk factors for clinically defined Alzheimer’s disease as well as vascular dementia. The basis for these relationships could either be that the risk factors lead to microvascular brain disease, promote Alzheimer pathology or both. The associations of late-life onset diabetes mellitus, hypertension and obesity with cognitive impairment are either attenuated or reversed. The role of vascular risk factors in midlife should be the focus of public health efforts to reduce the burden of late-life cognitive impairment. PMID:20182020

  3. Neurochemical profile of dementia pugilistica.

    PubMed

    Kokjohn, Tyler A; Maarouf, Chera L; Daugs, Ian D; Hunter, Jesse M; Whiteside, Charisse M; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Rodriguez, Emma; Kalback, Walter; Jacobson, Sandra A; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Beach, Thomas G; Roher, Alex E

    2013-06-01

    Dementia pugilistica (DP), a suite of neuropathological and cognitive function declines after chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI), is present in approximately 20% of retired boxers. Epidemiological studies indicate TBI is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). Some biochemical alterations observed in AD and PD may be recapitulated in DP and other TBI persons. In this report, we investigate long-term biochemical changes in the brains of former boxers with neuropathologically confirmed DP. Our experiments revealed biochemical and cellular alterations in DP that are complementary to and extend information already provided by histological methods. ELISA and one-dimensional and two dimensional Western blot techniques revealed differential expression of select molecules between three patients with DP and three age-matched non-demented control (NDC) persons without a history of TBI. Structural changes such as disturbances in the expression and processing of glial fibrillary acidic protein, tau, and α-synuclein were evident. The levels of the Aβ-degrading enzyme neprilysin were reduced in the patients with DP. Amyloid-β levels were elevated in the DP participant with the concomitant diagnosis of AD. In addition, the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the axonal transport proteins kinesin and dynein were substantially decreased in DP relative to NDC participants. Traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for dementia development, and our findings are consistent with permanent structural and functional damage in the cerebral cortex and white matter of boxers. Understanding the precise threshold of damage needed for the induction of pathology in DP and TBI is vital.

  4. Neurochemical Profile of Dementia Pugilistica

    PubMed Central

    Kokjohn, Tyler A.; Maarouf, Chera L.; Daugs, Ian D.; Hunter, Jesse M.; Whiteside, Charisse M.; Malek-Ahmadi, Michael; Rodriguez, Emma; Kalback, Walter; Jacobson, Sandra A.; Sabbagh, Marwan N.; Beach, Thomas G.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Dementia pugilistica (DP), a suite of neuropathological and cognitive function declines after chronic traumatic brain injury (TBI), is present in approximately 20% of retired boxers. Epidemiological studies indicate TBI is a risk factor for neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer disease (AD) and Parkinson disease (PD). Some biochemical alterations observed in AD and PD may be recapitulated in DP and other TBI persons. In this report, we investigate long-term biochemical changes in the brains of former boxers with neuropathologically confirmed DP. Our experiments revealed biochemical and cellular alterations in DP that are complementary to and extend information already provided by histological methods. ELISA and one-dimensional and two dimensional Western blot techniques revealed differential expression of select molecules between three patients with DP and three age-matched non-demented control (NDC) persons without a history of TBI. Structural changes such as disturbances in the expression and processing of glial fibrillary acidic protein, tau, and α-synuclein were evident. The levels of the Aβ–degrading enzyme neprilysin were reduced in the patients with DP. Amyloid-β levels were elevated in the DP participant with the concomitant diagnosis of AD. In addition, the levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor and the axonal transport proteins kinesin and dynein were substantially decreased in DP relative to NDC participants. Traumatic brain injury is a risk factor for dementia development, and our findings are consistent with permanent structural and functional damage in the cerebral cortex and white matter of boxers. Understanding the precise threshold of damage needed for the induction of pathology in DP and TBI is vital. PMID:23268705

  5. Dementia and driving

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000028.htm Dementia and driving To use the sharing features on this page, ... their independence is being taken away. Signs That Driving May No Longer be Safe People with signs ...

  6. Lewy Body Dementia Research

    MedlinePlus

    ... According to a new RAND Corporation study, the monetary cost of dementia in the United States ranges ... Caregivers Professionals Volunteer Shop Search Sitemap Terms and Policies Disclaimer Careers State Fundraising Notices latest tweets Tweets ...

  7. Young onset dementia

    PubMed Central

    Sampson, E; Warren, J; Rossor, M

    2004-01-01

    Young onset dementia is a challenging clinical problem with potentially devastating medical and social consequences. The differential diagnosis is wide, and includes a number of rare sporadic and hereditary diseases. However, accurate diagnosis is often possible, and all patients should be thoroughly investigated to identify treatable processes. This review presents an approach to the diagnosis, investigation, and management of patients with young onset dementia, with particular reference to common and treatable causes. PMID:15016933

  8. Neuroimaging and dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Benson, D.F.

    1986-05-01

    The tremendous increase in dementia has created a need for improved diagnostic techniques, and each of the newly established brain imaging techniques has been applied to this problem. Several, particularly computerized tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), and isotope emission tomography, have proved valuable. Each procedure has strengths--specific disorders that can be diagnosed--and weaknesses--types of dementia that cannot be demonstrated.

  9. Value of neuropsychological testing, imaging, and CSF biomarkers for the differential diagnosis and prognosis of clinically ambiguous dementia.

    PubMed

    Boutoleau-Bretonnière, Claire; Lebouvier, Thibaud; Delaroche, Odile; Lamy, Estelle; Evrard, Christelle; Charriau, Tiphaine; Bretonnière, Cédric; Damier, Philippe; Derkinderen, Pascal; Vercelletto, Martine

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine the diagnostic accuracy of imaging and CSF biomarkers in clinically ambiguous dementia (CAD). 69 patients were prospectively followed. The endpoint was clinical diagnosis at follow-up of 24 months based upon existing criteria. Medial temporal lobe atrophy score on MRI, distinctive patterns on 99 mTc-HMPAO-SPECT, and CSF levels of amyloid-β peptide, total tau protein, and P-tau181P were used together with neuropsychological testing to assess Se (sensitivity) and Sp (specificity) of separate and combined markers. 60 patients reached the endpoint. A definite diagnosis was achieved in 48 patients. CSF biomarkers had a Sp of 71% and a Se of 100% for Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis. Sp increased to 88% and 93% when MRI and MRI + SPECT were combined, at the expense of Se. CSF biomarkers levels also provided clues to frontotemporal (FTD) or vascular dementias (VaD) diagnosis when situated in an intermediate range between normal and pathological values. MRI and SPECT contributed mostly to the diagnosis of VaD (Se 88%, Sp 75%) and FTD (Se 73%, Sp 78%), respectively. Initial neuropsychological testing had a poor diagnostic accuracy, except for a neuropsychiatric inventory score >40 for the diagnosis of FTD (Se 73%, Sp 84%). Independent of the clinical diagnosis, medial temporal lobe atrophy and total-tau were best correlated with cognitive decline at 2 years. In conclusion, CSF biomarkers efficiently predict evolution toward an AD phenotype in CAD. Imaging biomarkers mostly contribute to the differential diagnosis between non-AD dementias. Initial neuropsychological testing was poorly contributive in CAD diagnosis.

  10. Prescribing patterns in dementia: a multicentre observational study in a German network of CAM physicians

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Dementia is a major and increasing health problem worldwide. This study aims to investigate dementia treatment strategies among physicians specialised in complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) by analysing prescribing patterns and comparing them to current treatment guidelines in Germany. Methods Twenty-two primary care physicians in Germany participated in this prospective, multicentre observational study. Prescriptions and diagnoses were reported for each consecutive patient. Data were included if patients had at least one diagnosis of dementia according to the 10th revision of the International Classification of Diseases during the study period. Multiple logistic regression was used to determine factors associated with a prescription of any anti-dementia drug including Ginkgo biloba. Results During the 5-year study period (2004-2008), 577 patients with dementia were included (median age: 81 years (IQR: 74-87); 69% female). Dementia was classified as unspecified dementia (57.2%), vascular dementia (25.1%), dementia in Alzheimer's disease (10.4%), and dementia in Parkinson's disease (7.3%). The prevalence of anti-dementia drugs was 25.6%. The phytopharmaceutical Ginkgo biloba was the most frequently prescribed anti-dementia drug overall (67.6% of all) followed by cholinesterase inhibitors (17.6%). The adjusted odds ratio (AOR) for receiving any anti-dementia drug was greater than 1 for neurologists (AOR = 2.34; CI: 1.59-3.47), the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease (AOR = 3.28; CI: 1.96-5.50), neuroleptic therapy (AOR = 1.87; CI: 1.22-2.88), co-morbidities hypertension (AOR = 2.03; CI: 1.41-2.90), and heart failure (AOR = 4.85; CI: 3.42-6.88). The chance for a prescription of any anti-dementia drug decreased with the diagnosis of vascular dementia (AOR = 0.64; CI: 0.43-0.95) and diabetes mellitus (AOR = 0.55; CI: 0.36-0.86). The prescription of Ginkgo biloba was associated with sex (female: AOR = 0.41; CI: 0.19-0.89), patient age (AOR = 1.06; CI: 1

  11. Early Dementia Screening.

    PubMed

    Panegyres, Peter K; Berry, Renee; Burchell, Jennifer

    2016-01-21

    As the population of the world increases, there will be larger numbers of people with dementia and an emerging need for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Early dementia screening is the process by which a patient who might be in the prodromal phases of a dementing illness is determined as having, or not having, the hallmarks of a neurodegenerative condition. The concepts of mild cognitive impairment, or mild neurocognitive disorder, are useful in analyzing the patient in the prodromal phase of a dementing disease; however, the transformation to dementia may be as low as 10% per annum. The search for early dementia requires a comprehensive clinical evaluation, cognitive assessment, determination of functional status, corroborative history and imaging (including MRI, FDG-PET and maybe amyloid PET), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination assaying Aβ1-42, T-τ and P-τ might also be helpful. Primary care physicians are fundamental in the screening process and are vital in initiating specialist investigation and treatment. Early dementia screening is especially important in an age where there is a search for disease modifying therapies, where there is mounting evidence that treatment, if given early, might influence the natural history-hence the need for cost-effective screening measures for early dementia.

  12. Early Dementia Screening

    PubMed Central

    Panegyres, Peter K.; Berry, Renee; Burchell, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    As the population of the world increases, there will be larger numbers of people with dementia and an emerging need for prompt diagnosis and treatment. Early dementia screening is the process by which a patient who might be in the prodromal phases of a dementing illness is determined as having, or not having, the hallmarks of a neurodegenerative condition. The concepts of mild cognitive impairment, or mild neurocognitive disorder, are useful in analyzing the patient in the prodromal phase of a dementing disease; however, the transformation to dementia may be as low as 10% per annum. The search for early dementia requires a comprehensive clinical evaluation, cognitive assessment, determination of functional status, corroborative history and imaging (including MRI, FDG-PET and maybe amyloid PET), cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) examination assaying Aβ1–42, T-τ and P-τ might also be helpful. Primary care physicians are fundamental in the screening process and are vital in initiating specialist investigation and treatment. Early dementia screening is especially important in an age where there is a search for disease modifying therapies, where there is mounting evidence that treatment, if given early, might influence the natural history—hence the need for cost-effective screening measures for early dementia. PMID:26838803

  13. Is complexity of work associated with risk of dementia? The Canadian Study of Health And Aging.

    PubMed

    Kröger, Edeltraut; Andel, Ross; Lindsay, Joan; Benounissa, Zohra; Verreault, René; Laurin, Danielle

    2008-04-01

    The authors evaluated the association of complexity of work with data, people, and things with the incidence of dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and vascular dementia in the Canadian Study of Health and Aging, while adjusting for work-related physical activity. The Canadian Study of Health and Aging is a 10-year population study, from 1991 to 2001, of a representative sample of persons aged 65 years or older. Lifetime job history allowed application of complexity scores and classification of work-related physical activity. Analyses included 3,557 subjects, of whom 400 were incident dementia cases, including 299 with Alzheimer's disease and 93 with vascular dementia. In fully adjusted Cox regression models, high complexity of work with people or things reduced risk of dementia (hazard ratios were 0.66 (95% confidence interval: 0.44, 0.98) and 0.72 (95% confidence interval: 0.52, 0.99), respectively) but not Alzheimer's disease. For vascular dementia, hazard ratios were 0.36 (95% confidence interval: 0.15, 0.90) for high complexity of work with people and 0.50 (95% confidence interval: 0.25, 1.00) for high complexity of work with things. Subgroup analyses according to median duration (23 years) of principal occupation showed that associations with complexity varied according to duration of employment. High complexity of work appears to be associated with risk of dementia, but effects may vary according to subtype.

  14. [Neuroepigenetics: Desoxyribonucleic acid methylation in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias].

    PubMed

    Mendioroz Iriarte, Maite; Pulido Fontes, Laura; Méndez-López, Iván

    2015-05-21

    DNA methylation is an epigenetic mechanism that controls gene expression. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), global DNA hypomethylation of neurons has been described in the human cerebral cortex. Moreover, several variants in the methylation pattern of candidate genes have been identified in brain tissue when comparing AD patients and controls. Specifically, DNA methylation changes have been observed in PSEN1 and APOE, both genes previously being involved in the pathophysiology of AD. In other degenerative dementias, methylation variants have also been described in key genes, such as hypomethylation of the SNCA gene in Parkinson's disease and dementia with Lewy bodies or hypermethylation of the GRN gene promoter in frontotemporal dementia. The finding of aberrant DNA methylation patterns shared by brain tissue and peripheral blood opens the door to use those variants as epigenetic biomarkers in the diagnosis of neurodegenerative diseases.

  15. [Hypertension in the elderly and risk of dementia].

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier

    2010-05-20

    Prevention and treatment of dementia has turned into a major public health challenge. Recent epidemiological studies have shown a significant association between the presence of hypertension and the occurrence of cognitive decline or dementia (including Alzheimer's disease). Indeed, the summation of vascular brain damage and degenerative changes may contribute to an early expression of a still subclinical Alzheimer's disease, causing the threshold of dementia to be reached earlier. Some recent randomized controlled trials (SYST-EUR, PROGRESS, HOPE, SCOPE, HYVET) included cognition as secondary endpoint. Their results open the way for prevention of dementia by antihypertensive treatments. It is therefore necessary that further randomized trials are conducted with the primary objective to assess the impact of antihypertensive treatment on cognitive decline or dementia. In clinical practice, it is important to identify, among hypertensive patients, the subjects at risk for dementia, i.e those who already have mild cognitive impairment or extensive cerebral white matter lesions, in order to optimize blood pressure control and monitor cognitive function (regular cognitive assessment, drugs adherence).

  16. Strategies for molecular imaging dementia and neurodegenerative diseases

    PubMed Central

    Schaller, Bernhard J

    2008-01-01

    Dementia represents a heterogeneous term that has evolved to describe the behavioral syndromes associated with a variety of clinical and neuropathological changes during continuing degenerative disease of the brain. As such, there lacks a clear consensus regarding the neuropsychological and other constituent characteristics associated with various cerebrovascular changes in this disease process. But increasing this knowledge has given more insights into memory deterioration in patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease and other subtypes of dementia. The author reviews current knowledge of the physiological coupling between cerebral blood flow and metabolism in the light of state-of-the-art-imaging methods and its changes in dementia with special reference to Alzheimer’s disease. Different imaging techniques are discussed with respect to their visualizing effect of biochemical, cellular, and/or structural changes in dementia. The pathophysiology of dementia in advanced age is becoming increasingly understood by revealing the underlying basis of neuropsychological changes with current imaging techniques, genetic and pathological features, which suggests that alterations of (neuro) vascular regulatory mechanisms may lead to brain dysfunction and disease. The current view is that cerebrovascular deregulation is seen as a contributor to cerebrovascular pathologies, such as stroke, but also to neurodegenerative conditions, such as Alzheimer’s disease. The better understanding of these (patho) physiological mechanisms may open an approach to new interventional strategies in dementia to enhance neurovascular repair and to protect neurovascular coupling. PMID:18830391

  17. Neurochemistry of dementia: establishing the links.

    PubMed

    Whitehouse, P J; Gambetti, P; Harik, S I; Kalaria, R N; Perry, G; Younkin, S I; Tabaton, M; Unnerstall, J R

    1989-01-01

    Neurochemical research in dementia needs to move beyond descriptive inventories of neurotransmitter systems affected in the specific disorders and to link to molecular studies of mechanism and clinical studies of cognition. New advances in Alzheimer's Disease (AD), Huntington's Disease (HD), and Parkinson's Disease (PD) are being guided by models of how nerve cells die in these disorders. Theories of pathophysiology which address the cellular level need to explain the selective vulnerability of neuronal populations in the different diseases. Clinically, the importance of neurochemical studies will be increased by understanding the bridges between neural and cognitive processes. Clinicians are concerned about the nosology of dementias, diagnostic tests, and more effective therapies. The value of neurochemical studies will be enhanced to the extent that they can contribute to understanding and modifying the clinical phenomenology of these disorders. In this paper, we will briefly review what is known about the neurochemistry of dementia but focus most of our attention on establishing the linkage between this level of description and the levels of description which are either "downstream" (molecular biology) or "upstream" (cognition) in terms of a reductionistic conception of understanding the disease process. We will explore how understanding neurochemistry relates to our understanding of disease mechanism and what constraints neurochemical studies place on understanding clinical aspects of disease. We will conclude by briefly discussing some of the problems with our current understanding of the neurochemistry of dementia and how we can address those problems in the future.

  18. Physiological imaging with PET and SPECT in Dementia

    SciTech Connect

    Jagust, W.J. . Dept. of Neurology Lawrence Berkeley Lab., CA )

    1989-10-01

    Dementia is a medical problem of increasingly obvious importance. The most common cause of dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD) accounts for at least 50% of all cases of dementia, with multi-infarct dementia the next most common cause of the syndrome. While the accuracy of diagnosis of AD may range from 80 to 90%, there is currently no laboratory test to confirm the diagnosis. Functional imaging techniques such as positron emission tomography (PET) and single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) offer diagnostic advantages since brain function is unequivocally disturbed in all dementing illnesses. Both PET and SPECT have been utilized in the study of dementia. While both techniques rely on principles of emission tomography to produce three dimensional maps of injected radiotracers, the differences between positron and single photon emission have important consequences for the practical applications of the two procedures. This briefly reviews the technical differences between PET and SPECT, and discusses how both techniques have been used in our laboratory to elucidate the pathophysiology of dementia. 32 refs., 2 figs.

  19. A Bayesian Approach to Identifying New Risk Factors for Dementia: A Nationwide Population-Based Study.

    PubMed

    Wen, Yen-Hsia; Wu, Shihn-Sheng; Lin, Chun-Hung Richard; Tsai, Jui-Hsiu; Yang, Pinchen; Chang, Yang-Pei; Tseng, Kuan-Hua

    2016-05-01

    Dementia is one of the most disabling and burdensome health conditions worldwide. In this study, we identified new potential risk factors for dementia from nationwide longitudinal population-based data by using Bayesian statistics.We first tested the consistency of the results obtained using Bayesian statistics with those obtained using classical frequentist probability for 4 recognized risk factors for dementia, namely severe head injury, depression, diabetes mellitus, and vascular diseases. Then, we used Bayesian statistics to verify 2 new potential risk factors for dementia, namely hearing loss and senile cataract, determined from the Taiwan's National Health Insurance Research Database.We included a total of 6546 (6.0%) patients diagnosed with dementia. We observed older age, female sex, and lower income as independent risk factors for dementia. Moreover, we verified the 4 recognized risk factors for dementia in the older Taiwanese population; their odds ratios (ORs) ranged from 3.469 to 1.207. Furthermore, we observed that hearing loss (OR = 1.577) and senile cataract (OR = 1.549) were associated with an increased risk of dementia.We found that the results obtained using Bayesian statistics for assessing risk factors for dementia, such as head injury, depression, DM, and vascular diseases, were consistent with those obtained using classical frequentist probability. Moreover, hearing loss and senile cataract were found to be potential risk factors for dementia in the older Taiwanese population. Bayesian statistics could help clinicians explore other potential risk factors for dementia and for developing appropriate treatment strategies for these patients.

  20. Non-native language use and risk of incident dementia in the elderly.

    PubMed

    Sanders, Amy E; Hall, Charles B; Katz, Mindy J; Lipton, Richard B

    2012-01-01

    Cognitive reserve is invoked to explain the protective effects of education and cognitively-stimulating activities against all-cause dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD). For non-native English speakers (n-NES), speaking English may be a cognitive activity associated with lower dementia risk. We hypothesized that n-NES have lower risk of incident dementia/AD and that educational level might modify this relationship. Participants took part in the Einstein Aging Study (Bronx, NY), a longitudinal study of aging and dementia. All (n = 1779) spoke fluent English and self-reported birthplace and whether English was their first language. n-NES additionally reported mother tongue, age of English acquisition, and current percentile-use of a non-English language. Nested Cox proportional hazards models progressively adjusted for gender, race, education, and immigrant and marital status estimated hazard ratios (HR) for incident dementia/AD as a function of n-NES status. 390 (22%) participants were n-NES. 126 incident dementia cases occurred during 4174 person-years of follow-up (median 1.44; range 0-16); 101 individuals met criteria for probable/possible AD. There was no statistically-significant association between n-NES status and incident dementia in the fully-adjusted model (HR 1.26; 95% CI 0.76-2.09; p = 0.36). Results were similar for AD. Stratification of education into three groups revealed increased risk of dementia for n-NES with ≥ 16 years of education (HR 3.97; 95% CI 1.62-9.75; p = 0.003). We conclude that n-NES status does not appear to have an independent protective effect against incident dementia/AD, and that n-NES status may contribute to risk of dementia in an education-dependent manner.

  1. Dementia screening using computerized tests.

    PubMed

    Gualtieri, C Thomas

    2004-01-01

    The preclinical phase of dementia usually precedes the clinical diagnosis by many years. Early detection of dementing conditions during this preclinical phase may provide opportunities for treatments that may slow or mitigate progression. Conventional assessment tools usually can only detect dementia when the symptoms are overt and the disease is well-established. Computerized neurocognitive screening tools hold promise for diagnosing dementia in its early phase. The use, performance and development of several computerized screening tools to diagnose and monitor patients with pre-dementias and dementia are reviewed. The ability to accurately assess the presence of dementia clearly has direct relevance to insurance risk assessment and risk management. As new treatments appear, their role in clinical management of dementia patients will increase as well. In a future issue, the differential diagnosis of dementias related to the findings on these screening tools will be reviewed.

  2. Symptoms of Lewy Body Dementia

    MedlinePlus

    ... usually memory problems, changes in their way of speaking, such as forgetting words, and personality problems. Cognitive symptoms of dementia include poor problem solving, difficulty with learning new skills and impaired decision making. Other causes of dementia ...

  3. Trajectories of Behavioral Disturbance in Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Tiffany W.; Fridhandler, Jonathan D.; Binns, Malcolm A.; Lee, Albert; Merrilees, Jennifer; Rosen, Howie J.; Ketelle, Robin; Miller, Bruce L.

    2015-01-01

    Predicting the progression of dementia is a challenge for clinicians yet this information is highly valued by patients’ families. An informally observed 4-stage model of dementia can be helpful in educating caregivers and preparing them for what lies ahead. In the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), this model describes the evolution of behavioral disturbances and is characterized by an inflection point between stage 2 (progressively severe behavioral aberration) and stage 3 (increasing apathy and remission of behavior problems). In this study we sought evidence for this model using a database of serial Neuropsychiatric Inventory (NPI) scores for 45 patients with FTD and 47 patients with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). We transformed the NPI scores into a single variable for each participant that represented the rate of change in NPI score over time (NPI slope) and used this as the dependent variable in a multivariate linear regression. Age at onset of dementia, NPI score at initial visit, and duration of illness at first NPI all contributed significantly to the regression model for NPI slope in the bvFTD group. Participants with an initial NPI acquired before 6 years of disease duration tended to have a more positive NPI slope (representing worsening behavioral disturbances) than those with an initial NPI performed after 6 years. None of the aforementioned variables were significantly associated with NPI slope in the AD group. These results support a crescendo-decrescendo trajectory of behavioral symptoms in bvFTD but do not suggest that there is a similar pattern in AD, and further longitudinal data collection is necessary. PMID:22531424

  4. Non-Alzheimer's disease-related memory impairment and dementia.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Sönke

    2013-12-01

    Although Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common cause of memory impairment and dementia in the elderly disturbed memory function is a widespread subjective and/or objective symptom in a variety of medical conditions. The early detection and correct distinction of AD from non-AD memory impairment is critically important to detect possibly treatable and reversible underlying causes. In the context of clinical research, it is crucial to correctly distinguish between AD or non-AD memory impairment in order to build homogenous study populations for the assessment of new therapeutic possibilities. The distinction of AD from non-AD memory impairment may be difficult, especially in mildly affected patients, due to an overlap of clinical symptoms and biomarker alterations between AD and certain non-AD conditions. This review aims to describe recent aspects of the differential diagnosis of AD and non-AD related memory impairment and how these may be considered in the presence of memory deficits.

  5. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  6. The influence of relationships on personhood in dementia care: a qualitative, hermeneutic study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background In dementia personhood can be understood as increasingly concealed rather than lost. The sense of being a person evolves in relationships with others. The aim of this study was to increase the understanding of the nature and quality of relationships between persons with dementia, family carers and professional caregivers and how these relationships influenced personhood in people with dementia. Methods This Norwegian study had a qualitative hermeneutical design based on ten cases. Each case consisted of a triad: the person with dementia, the family carer and the professional caregiver. Inclusion criteria for persons with dementia were (1) 67 years or older (2) diagnosed with dementia (3) Clinical Dementia Rating score 2 ie. moderate dementia (4) able to communicate verbally. A semi-structured interview guide was used in interviews with family carers and professional caregivers. Field notes were written after participant observation of interactions between persons with dementia and professional caregivers during morning care or activities at a day care centre. Data were analysed in two steps: (1) inductive analysis with an interpretive approach and (2) deductive analysis, applying a theoretical framework for person-centred care. Results Relationships that sustained personhood were close emotional bonds between family carers and persons with dementia and professional relationships between caregivers and persons with dementia. Relationships that diminished personhood were task-centred relationships and reluctant helping relationships between family carers and persons with dementia and unprofessional relationships between caregivers and persons with dementia. Conclusions A broad range of relationships was identified. Understanding the complex nature and quality of these relationships added insight as to how they influenced the provision of care and the personhood of persons with dementia. Personhood was not only bestowed upon them by family carers and

  7. Dementia as a cultural metaphor.

    PubMed

    Zeilig, Hannah

    2014-04-01

    This article contributes to debates about the category "dementia," which until recently has been dominated by biomedical models. The perspectives of critical gerontology are pertinent for extending knowledge about dementia and guiding this analysis. These perspectives encourage examination of cultural and historical influences and thus question how societies have constructed and defined dementia. This article queries the stories told about dementia and the language that we use to tell these stories. Central to the article is an analysis of some of the stories about dementia that are contained within and framed by contemporary culture. A number of films, TV documentaries, news reports, theatre, memoirs, novels, and poems that portray some of the experiences associated with dementia are interrogated. These representations are examined as they either perpetrate or challenge stereotypes about living with dementia. Analysis of these representations demonstrates the sociocultural construction of dementia and the extent to which dementia is a diachronic phenomenon. Above all, the article considers (a) the social and political dimensions of dementia, (b) the ways in which the metaphors persistently used to explain dementia shape our consciousness about this condition, and (c) the extent to which dementia is an inherent part of contemporary life.

  8. Prediction of Dementia in Primary Care Patients

    PubMed Central

    Jessen, Frank; Wiese, Birgitt; Bickel, Horst; Eiffländer-Gorfer, Sandra; Fuchs, Angela; Kaduszkiewicz, Hanna; Köhler, Mirjam; Luck, Tobias; Mösch, Edelgard; Pentzek, Michael; Riedel-Heller, Steffi G.; Wagner, Michael; Weyerer, Siegfried; Maier, Wolfgang; van den Bussche, Hendrik

    2011-01-01

    Background Current approaches for AD prediction are based on biomarkers, which are however of restricted availability in primary care. AD prediction tools for primary care are therefore needed. We present a prediction score based on information that can be obtained in the primary care setting. Methodology/Principal Findings We performed a longitudinal cohort study in 3.055 non-demented individuals above 75 years recruited via primary care chart registries (Study on Aging, Cognition and Dementia, AgeCoDe). After the baseline investigation we performed three follow-up investigations at 18 months intervals with incident dementia as the primary outcome. The best set of predictors was extracted from the baseline variables in one randomly selected half of the sample. This set included age, subjective memory impairment, performance on delayed verbal recall and verbal fluency, on the Mini-Mental-State-Examination, and on an instrumental activities of daily living scale. These variables were aggregated to a prediction score, which achieved a prediction accuracy of 0.84 for AD. The score was applied to the second half of the sample (test cohort). Here, the prediction accuracy was 0.79. With a cut-off of at least 80% sensitivity in the first cohort, 79.6% sensitivity, 66.4% specificity, 14.7% positive predictive value (PPV) and 97.8% negative predictive value of (NPV) for AD were achieved in the test cohort. At a cut-off for a high risk population (5% of individuals with the highest risk score in the first cohort) the PPV for AD was 39.1% (52% for any dementia) in the test cohort. Conclusions The prediction score has useful prediction accuracy. It can define individuals (1) sensitively for low cost-low risk interventions, or (2) more specific and with increased PPV for measures of prevention with greater costs or risks. As it is independent of technical aids, it may be used within large scale prevention programs. PMID:21364746

  9. Multi-infarct dementia, subcortical dementia, and hydrocephalus.

    PubMed

    Nadeau, S E

    1991-05-01

    The diagnostic evaluation of dementia is directed toward the identification of treatable causes. It can be facilitated by classification of the dementia into one of four categories: attentional, amnestic, cognitive, and intentional. Intentional dementia reflects dysfunction of frontal lobe systems, components of which include the frontal cortex, basal ganglia, thalamus, limbic structures, and subcortical white matter. Disorders that affect one or more of these components and produce intentional dementia include Binswanger's disease, Parkinson's disease, Huntington's disease, HIV infection, closed head injury, normal pressure hydrocephalus, neoplasms, syphilis, vitamin B12 deficiency, multiple sclerosis, and a number of uncommon degenerative and acquired syndromes. Depression may resemble intentional dementia. Guidelines for diagnosis and management are discussed.

  10. Post-stroke dementia - a comprehensive review.

    PubMed

    Mijajlović, Milija D; Pavlović, Aleksandra; Brainin, Michael; Heiss, Wolf-Dieter; Quinn, Terence J; Ihle-Hansen, Hege B; Hermann, Dirk M; Assayag, Einor Ben; Richard, Edo; Thiel, Alexander; Kliper, Efrat; Shin, Yong-Il; Kim, Yun-Hee; Choi, SeongHye; Jung, San; Lee, Yeong-Bae; Sinanović, Osman; Levine, Deborah A; Schlesinger, Ilana; Mead, Gillian; Milošević, Vuk; Leys, Didier; Hagberg, Guri; Ursin, Marie Helene; Teuschl, Yvonne; Prokopenko, Semyon; Mozheyko, Elena; Bezdenezhnykh, Anna; Matz, Karl; Aleksić, Vuk; Muresanu, DafinFior; Korczyn, Amos D; Bornstein, Natan M

    2017-01-18

    Post-stroke dementia (PSD) or post-stroke cognitive impairment (PSCI) may affect up to one third of stroke survivors. Various definitions of PSCI and PSD have been described. We propose PSD as a label for any dementia following stroke in temporal relation. Various tools are available to screen and assess cognition, with few PSD-specific instruments. Choice will depend on purpose of assessment, with differing instruments needed for brief screening (e.g., Montreal Cognitive Assessment) or diagnostic formulation (e.g., NINDS VCI battery). A comprehensive evaluation should include assessment of pre-stroke cognition (e.g., using Informant Questionnaire for Cognitive Decline in the Elderly), mood (e.g., using Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale), and functional consequences of cognitive impairments (e.g., using modified Rankin Scale). A large number of biomarkers for PSD, including indicators for genetic polymorphisms, biomarkers in the cerebrospinal fluid and in the serum, inflammatory mediators, and peripheral microRNA profiles have been proposed. Currently, no specific biomarkers have been proven to robustly discriminate vulnerable patients ('at risk brains') from those with better prognosis or to discriminate Alzheimer's disease dementia from PSD. Further, neuroimaging is an important diagnostic tool in PSD. The role of computerized tomography is limited to demonstrating type and location of the underlying primary lesion and indicating atrophy and severe white matter changes. Magnetic resonance imaging is the key neuroimaging modality and has high sensitivity and specificity for detecting pathological changes, including small vessel disease. Advanced multi-modal imaging includes diffusion tensor imaging for fiber tracking, by which changes in networks can be detected. Quantitative imaging of cerebral blood flow and metabolism by positron emission tomography can differentiate between vascular dementia and degenerative dementia and show the interaction between

  11. [Delirium and dementia].

    PubMed

    Marín Carmona, José Manuel

    2008-01-01

    Delirium and dementia are highly prevalent neurocognitive syndromes in the elderly. These syndromes are defined by level of consciousness, clinical onset, and potential reversibility, etc. Frequently, both syndromes coincide in the elderly patient and share many epidemiologic, pathogenic and clinical features, which are reviewed in this article. There is no solid scientific evidence that explains the association between delirium and dementia. The present article proposes a change of paradigm in the diagnostic, preventive and therapeutic approach to delirium in the elderly that recognizes the inherent complexity of this geriatric syndrome and, unlike dichotomic models, explores the complex interrelations between both geriatric syndromes. Delirium is viewed as an important model to investigate cognitive disorders and dementia.

  12. Nutrition in Severe Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Pivi, Glaucia Akiko Kamikado; Bertolucci, Paulo Henrique Ferreira; Schultz, Rodrigo Rizek

    2012-01-01

    An increasing proportion of older adults with Alzheimer's disease or other dementias are now surviving to more advanced stages of the illness. Advanced dementia is associated with feeding problems, including difficulty in swallowing and respiratory diseases. Patients become incompetent to make decisions. As a result, complex situations may arise in which physicians and families decide whether artificial nutrition and hydration (ANH) is likely to be beneficial for the patient. The objective of this paper is to present methods for evaluating the nutritional status of patients with severe dementia as well as measures for the treatment of nutritional disorders, the use of vitamin and mineral supplementation, and indications for ANH and pharmacological therapy. PMID:22645608

  13. Management of Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    ŞAHİN CANKURTARAN, Eylem

    2014-01-01

    Symptoms of disturbed perception, thought content, mood, or behavior that frequently occur in patients with dementia are defined as the term “Behavioral and Psychological Symptoms of Dementia (BPSD).” The behavioral symptoms of dementia include physical/verbal aggression, agitation, disinhibition, restlessness, wandering, culturally inappropriate behaviors, sexual disinhibition, and hoarding, and the psychological symptoms of dementia are anxiety, depressive mood, hallucinations and delusions, apathy, and misidentification syndrome. With the cognitive decline in Alzheimer’s Dementia (AD), the frequency of neuropsychiatric symptoms increases. Apathy, depression, irritability, agitation, and anxiety are the most frequently detected neuropsychiatric symptoms of AD. In the mild stage of AD, affective symptoms are more likely to occur; agitated and psychotic behaviors are frequent in patients with moderately impaired cognitive function. When neuropsychiatric symptoms are first detected, medical conditions, such as delirium, infection, dehydration, diarrhea, and drug interactions, must be ruled out. The treatment of mild BPSD must be started with psychosocial approaches, such as behavioral management, caregiver education, and physical activity. Medications are indicated for BPSD symptoms that are refractory to non-pharmacological interventions or severe or jeopardizing the safety of a patient or others, often in conjunction with non-pharmacological interventions.

  14. Nutritional factors, cognitive decline, and dementia.

    PubMed

    Del Parigi, Angelo; Panza, Francesco; Capurso, Cristiano; Solfrizzi, Vincenzo

    2006-03-15

    Nutritional factors and nutritional deficiencies have been repeatedly associated with cognitive impairment. Most of the evidence is based on cross-sectional studies, which cannot prove whether a nutritional deficit is the cause or the consequence of an impaired cognitive status. In fact, cognitive impairment, in turn, can determine changes in dietary habits and consequent nutritional deficiencies. We reviewed clinical and epidemiological studies from January 1983 to June 2004. Several cross-sectional and fewer prospective studies reported an association between dietary or supplemental intake of antioxidants and protection from cognitive decline and dementia. There are negative reports as well and some methodological biases might have affected the consistencies across studies. Deficiencies of several B vitamins have been associated with cognitive dysfunction in many observational studies. More recently, deficiencies of folate (B9) and cobalamine (B12) have been studied in relation to hyperhomocysteinemia as potential determinants of cognitive impairment, dementia, and Alzheimer's disease (AD). A small number of studies assessed the association between intake of macronutrients and cognitive function or dementia. Among the others, the intake of fatty acids and cholesterol has received particular attention. Although the results are not always consistent, most studies have reported a protective role of dietary intakes of poly- and mono-unsaturated fatty acids against cognitive decline and AD. We point out that well designed intervention studies are warranted in order to establish specific levels of micro- and macronutrient deficiencies and to set general recommendations for the population.

  15. What is the Relationship of Traumatic Brain Injury to Dementia?

    PubMed

    Mendez, Mario F

    2017-03-02

    There is a long history linking traumatic brain injury (TBI) with the development of dementia. Despite significant reservations, such as recall bias or concluding causality for TBI, a summary of recent research points to several conclusions on the TBI-dementia relationship. 1) Increasing severity of a single moderate-to-severe TBI increases the risk of subsequent Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common type of dementia. 2) Repetitive, often subconcussive, mild TBIs increases the risk for chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE), a degenerative neuropathology. 3) TBI may be a risk factor for other neurodegenerative disorders that can be associated with dementia. 4) TBI appears to lower the age of onset of TBI-related neurocognitive syndromes, potentially adding "TBI cognitive-behavioral features". The literature further indicates several specific risk factors for TBI-associated dementia: 5) any blast or blunt physical force to the head as long as there is violent head displacement; 6) decreased cognitive and/or neuronal reserve and the related variable of older age at TBI; and 7) the presence of apolipoprotein E ɛ4 alleles, a genetic risk factor for AD. Finally, there are neuropathological features relating TBI with neurocognitive syndromes: 8) acute TBI results in amyloid pathology and other neurodegenerative proteinopathies; 9) CTE shares features with neurodegenerative dementias; and 10) TBI results in white matter tract and neural network disruptions. Although further research is needed, these ten findings suggest that dose-dependent effects of violent head displacement in vulnerable brains predispose to dementia; among several potential mechanisms is the propagation of abnormal proteins along damaged white matter networks.

  16. [Psychosocial interventions in dementia].

    PubMed

    Kurz, A

    2013-01-01

    Psychosocial interventions improve cognitive abilities (cognitive stimulation, cognitive training), enhance emotional well-being (activity planning, reminiscence), reduce behavioral symptoms (aromatherapy, music therapy) and promote everyday functioning (occupational therapy). Through these effects they reinforce and augment pharmacological treatments for dementia. In addition, psychosocial interventions complement the treatment of patients by supporting family caregivers (educational groups, support programs). The potential of psychosocial interventions in dementia needs to be explored further in studies using improved methodology to determine effective components, clinical relevance and duration of effects, predictors of individual treatment response and health-economic implications.

  17. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.; Shu, Huidy; Haman, Aissa; Sejvar, James J.; Miller, Bruce L.

    2009-01-01

    In contrast with more common dementing conditions that typically develop over years, rapidly progressive dementias can develop subacutely over months, weeks, or even days and be quickly fatal. Because many rapidly progressive dementias are treatable, it is paramount to evaluate and diagnose these patients quickly. This review summarizes recent advances in the understanding of the major categories of RPD and outlines efficient approaches to the diagnosis of the various neurodegenerative, toxic-metabolic, infectious, autoimmune, neoplastic, and other conditions that may progress rapidly. PMID:18668637

  18. Financial errors in dementia: testing a neuroeconomic conceptual framework.

    PubMed

    Chiong, Winston; Hsu, Ming; Wudka, Danny; Miller, Bruce L; Rosen, Howard J

    2014-08-01

    Financial errors by patients with dementia can have devastating personal and family consequences. We developed and evaluated a neuroeconomic conceptual framework for understanding financial errors across different dementia syndromes, using a systematic, retrospective, blinded chart review of demographically-balanced cohorts of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD, n=100) and behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD, n=50). Reviewers recorded specific reports of financial errors according to a conceptual framework identifying patient cognitive and affective characteristics, and contextual influences, conferring susceptibility to each error. Specific financial errors were reported for 49% of AD and 70% of bvFTD patients (p = 0.012). AD patients were more likely than bvFTD patients to make amnestic errors (p < 0.001), while bvFTD patients were more likely to spend excessively (p = 0.004) and to exhibit other behaviors consistent with diminished sensitivity to losses and other negative outcomes (p < 0.001). Exploratory factor analysis identified a social/affective vulnerability factor associated with errors in bvFTD, and a cognitive vulnerability factor associated with errors in AD. Our findings highlight the frequency and functional importance of financial errors as symptoms of AD and bvFTD. A conceptual model derived from neuroeconomic literature identifies factors that influence vulnerability to different types of financial error in different dementia syndromes, with implications for early diagnosis and subsequent risk prevention.

  19. Cerebrospinal fluid tau and amyloid-β1-42 in patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Skillbäck, Tobias; Farahmand, Bahman Y; Rosén, Christoffer; Mattsson, Niklas; Nägga, Katarina; Kilander, Lena; Religa, Dorota; Wimo, Anders; Winblad, Bengt; Schott, Jonathan M; Blennow, Kaj; Eriksdotter, Maria; Zetterberg, Henrik

    2015-09-01

    Progressive cognitive decline in combination with a cerebrospinal fluid biomarker pattern of low levels of amyloid-β1-42 and high levels of total tau and phosphorylated tau is typical of Alzheimer's disease. However, several neurodegenerative disorders may overlap with Alzheimer's disease both in regards to clinical symptoms and neuropathology. In a uniquely large cohort of dementia patients, we examined the associations of cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers for Alzheimer's disease molecular pathology with clinical dementia diagnoses and disease severity. We cross-referenced the Swedish Dementia Registry with the clinical laboratory database at the Sahlgrenska University Hospital. The final data set consisted of 5676 unique subjects with a clinical dementia diagnosis and a complete set of measurements for cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42, total tau and phosphorylated tau. In cluster analysis, disregarding clinical diagnosis, the optimal natural separation of this data set was into two clusters, with the majority of patients with early onset Alzheimer's disease (75%) and late onset Alzheimer's disease (73%) assigned to one cluster and the patients with vascular dementia (91%), frontotemporal dementia (94%), Parkinson's disease dementia (94%) and dementia with Lewy bodies (87%) to the other cluster. Frontotemporal dementia had the highest cerebrospinal fluid levels of amyloid-β1-42 and the lowest levels of total tau and phosphorylated tau. The highest levels of total tau and phosphorylated tau and the lowest levels of amyloid-β1-42 and amyloid-β1-42:phosphorylated tau ratios were found in Alzheimer's disease. Low amyloid-β1-42, high total tau and high phosphorylated tau correlated with low Mini-Mental State Examination scores in Alzheimer's disease. In Parkinson's disease dementia and vascular dementia low cerebrospinal fluid amyloid-β1-42 was associated with low Mini-Mental State Examination score. In the vascular dementia, frontotemporal dementia, dementia with

  20. Behavioral and endocrinological evaluation of music therapy for elderly patients with dementia.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Mizue; Kanamori, Masao; Watanabe, Motoko; Nagasawa, Shingo; Kojima, Emi; Ooshiro, Hajime; Nakahara, Daiichirou

    2004-03-01

    The present study investigated the effectiveness of music therapy for dementia patients using endocrinological and behavioral evaluations. The study comprised 10 patients with senile dementia who received music therapy; six had Alzheimer's dementia and four had vascular dementia. Music therapy was performed twice a week for 8 consecutive weeks (16 sessions). As a result, total scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) did not significantly change, but the scores of a subscale, "language", improved significantly. According to the Multidimensional Observation Scale For Elderly Subjects (MOSES), scores for "irritability" decreased significantly. Regarding changes in salivary chromogranin A (CgA) levels, the average was significantly decreased before session 16 compared to after this. These results suggest that the combination of endocrinological measurements, behavioral evaluations and functional assessment methods are useful in evaluating the effects of music therapy in persons with senile dementia.

  1. Montessori-based dementia care.

    PubMed

    Cline, Janet

    2006-10-01

    Montessori-based Dementia Care is an approach used in Alzheimer's care that does not involve chemical or physical restraints. This program works by giving the elder with Alzheimer/Dementia a purpose by getting them involved. When staff/families care for a confused Alzheimer/Dementia patient, who is having behaviors, the Montessori program teaches them to look at what is causing the behavior. When assessing the elder to determine what is causing the behavior, the goal is to find the answer, but the answer cannot be dementia. The goal of the program is to bring meaning to the life of an Alzheimer/Dementia elder.

  2. Vascular action of polyphenols.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Dilip; Scheepens, Arjan

    2009-03-01

    Dietary patterns are widely recognised as contributors to cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease. Endothelial function, the elastic properties of large arteries and the magnitude and timing of wave reflections are important determinants of cardiovascular performance. Several epidemiological studies suggest that the regular consumption of foods and beverages rich in flavonoids is associated with a reduction in the risk of several pathological conditions ranging from hypertension to coronary heart disease, stroke and dementia. The impairment of endothelial function is directly related to ageing and an association between decreased cerebral perfusion and dementia has been shown to exist. Cerebral blood flow (CBF) must be maintained to ensure a constant delivery of oxygen and glucose as well as the removal of waste products. Increasing blood flow is one potential way for improving brain function and the prospect for increasing CBF with dietary polyphenols is extremely promising. The major polyphenols shown to have some of these effects in humans are primarily from cocoa, wine, grape seed, berries, tea, tomatoes (polyphenolics and nonpolyphenolics), soy and pomegranate. There has been a significant paradigm shift in polyphenol research during the last decade. This review summarises our current knowledge in this area and points the way for the development of new types of functional foods targeted to brain health through improving vascular health.

  3. Disease-modifying therapeutic directions for Lewy-Body dementias

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Qiang; Kim, Young-Cho; Narayanan, Nandakumar S.

    2015-01-01

    Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) is the second leading cause of dementia following Alzheimer's disease (AD) and accounts for up to 25% of all dementia. DLB is distinct from AD in that it involves extensive neuropsychiatric symptoms as well as motor symptoms, leads to enormous societal costs in terms of direct medical care and is associated with high financial and caregiver costs. Although, there are no disease-modifying therapies for DLB, we review several new therapeutic directions in treating DLB. We discuss progress in strategies to decrease the level of alpha-synuclein, to prevent the cell to cell transmission of misfolded alpha-synuclein, and the potential of brain stimulation in DLB. PMID:26347604

  4. Agitation in Dementia: Relation to Core Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarker Levels

    PubMed Central

    Bloniecki, Victor; Aarsland, Dag; Cummings, Jeffrey; Blennow, Kaj; Freund-Levi, Yvonne

    2014-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to examine the associations of agitation with the cerebrospinal fluid dementia biomarkers total-tau (T-tau), phosphorylated-tau (P-tau) and Aβ1-42. Methods One hundred patients (mean age ± SD, 78.6 ± 7.5 years) with dementia and neuropsychiatric symptoms, of whom 67% were female, were included. Agitation was measured using the Cohen-Mansfield Agitation Inventory (CMAI; 46.5 ± 11.8 points). Results Total CMAI correlated with T-tau [rs (31) = 0.36, p = 0.04] and P-tau [rs (31) = 0.35, p = 0.05] in patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD; n = 33) but not in the total dementia population (n = 95). Conclusions Our results suggest that tau-mediated pathology including neurofibrillary tangles and the intensity of the disease process might be associated with agitation in AD. PMID:25298777

  5. Creativity and dementia: a review.

    PubMed

    Palmiero, Massimiliano; Di Giacomo, Dina; Passafiume, Domenico

    2012-08-01

    In these last years, creativity was found to play an important role for dementia patients in terms of diagnosis and rehabilitation strategies. This led us to explore the relationships between dementia and creativity. At the aim, artistic creativity and divergent thinking are considered both in non-artists and artists affected by different types of dementia. In general, artistic creativity can be expressed in exceptional cases both in Alzheimer's disease and Frontotemporal dementia, whereas divergent thinking decreases in dementia. The creation of paintings or music is anyway important for expressing emotions and well-being. Yet, creativity seems to emerge when the right prefrontal cortex, posterior temporal, and parietal areas are relatively intact, whereas it declines when these areas are damaged. However, enhanced creativity in dementia is not confirmed by controlled studies conducted in non-artists, and whether artists with dementia can show creativity has to be fully addressed. Future research directions are suggested.

  6. Dementia in the oldest old: a multi-factorial and growing public health issue.

    PubMed

    Gardner, Raquel C; Valcour, Victor; Yaffe, Kristine

    2013-01-01

    The population of oldest old, or people aged 85 and older, is growing rapidly. A better understanding of dementia in this population is thus of increasing national and global importance. In this review, we describe the major epidemiological studies, prevalence, clinical presentation, neuropathological and imaging features, risk factors, and treatment of dementia in the oldest old. Prevalence estimates for dementia among those aged 85+ ranges from 18 to 38%. The most common clinical syndromes are Alzheimer's dementia, vascular dementia, and mixed dementia from multiple etiologies. The rate of progression appears to be slower than in the younger old. Single neuropathological entities such as Alzheimer's dementia and Lewy body pathology appear to have declining relevance to cognitive decline, while mixed pathology with Alzheimer's disease, vascular disease (especially cortical microinfarcts), and hippocampal sclerosis appear to have increasing relevance. Neuroimaging data are sparse. Risk factors for dementia in the oldest old include a low level of education, poor mid-life general health, low level of physical activity, depression, and delirium, whereas apolipoprotein E genotype, late-life hypertension, hyperlipidemia, and elevated peripheral inflammatory markers appear to have less relevance. Treatment approaches require further study, but the oldest old may be more prone to negative side effects compared with younger patients and targeted therapies may be less efficacious since single pathologies are less frequent. We also highlight the limitations and challenges of research in this area, including the difficulty of defining functional decline, a necessary component for a dementia diagnosis, the lack of normative neuropsychological data, and other shortcomings inherent in existing diagnostic criteria. In summary, our understanding of dementia in the oldest old has advanced dramatically in recent years, but more research is needed, particularly among varied racial

  7. Imaging neuroinflammation in Alzheimer's disease and other dementias: Recent advances and future directions.

    PubMed

    Varley, James; Brooks, David J; Edison, Paul

    2015-09-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies, frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and Huntington's disease (HD) are the main neurodegenerative causes of dementia. Causes and mechanisms of these diseases remain elusive. Neuroinflammation is increasingly emerging as an important pathological factor in their development. Positron emission tomography (PET) using [11C]PK11195 represents a method of visualizing the microglial component of neuroinflammation via the translocator protein (TSPO) and we discuss the valuable insights this has yielded in neurodegenerative diseases. We discuss the limitations of this method and the development of second generation TSPO PET ligands which hope to overcome these limitations. We also discuss other methods of visualizing neuroinflammation and review the state of current dementia treatments targeted at neuroinflammation. It is our view that a multimodal investigation into neuroinflammation in AD, Parkinson's disease dementia, FTD and HD will yield valuable pathological insights which will usefully inform development of therapeutic targets and biomarkers.

  8. An Overview of Systematic Reviews of Ginkgo biloba Extracts for Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Hong-Feng; Huang, Li-Bo; Zhong, Yan-Biao; Zhou, Qi-Hui; Wang, Hui-Lin; Zheng, Guo-Qing; Lin, Yan

    2016-01-01

    Ginkgo biloba extracts (GBEs) have been recommended to improve cognitive function and to prevent cognitive decline, but earlier evidence was inconclusive. Here, we evaluated all systematic reviews of GBEs for prevention of cognitive decline, and intervention of mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and dementia. Six databases from their inception to September 2015 were searched. Ten systematic reviews were identified, including reviews about Alzheimer's disease (n = 3), about vascular dementia (n = 1), about both Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia (n = 2), about Alzheimer's disease, vascular dementia and mixed dementia (n = 3), and a review about MCI (n = 1). Based on the overview quality assessment questionnaire, eight studies were scored with at least 5 points, while the other two scored 4 points and 3 points, respectively. Medication with GBEs showed improvement in cognition, neuropsychiatric symptoms, and daily activities, and the effect was dose-dependent. Efficacy was convincingly demonstrated only when high daily dose (240 mg) was applied. Compared with placebo, overall adverse events and serious adverse events were at the same level as placebo, with less adverse events in favor of GBE in the subgroup of Alzheimer's disease patients, and fewer incidences in vertigo, tinnitus, angina pectoris, and headache. In conclusion, there is clear evidence to support the efficacy of GBEs for MCI and dementia, whereas the question on efficacy to prevent cognitive decline is still open. In addition, GBEs seem to be generally safe. PMID:27999539

  9. Psychotropic Medication Burden and Factors Associated with Antipsychotic Use: An Analysis of a Population-Based Sample of Community-Dwelling Older Persons with Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Rhee, YongJoo; Csernansky, John G.; Emanuel, Linda L.; Chang, Chang-Gok; Shega, Joseph W.

    2011-01-01

    Objectives To estimate the proportion of community dwelling older adults with dementia being prescribed a psychotropic and identify patient and caregiver factors associated with antipsychotics use. Methods Retrospective cohort study of The Aging, Demographics, and Memory Study (ADAMS) from 2002 to 2004 designed to assess dementia severity and service use among community-dwelling older adults. The frequency of psychotropic medication (antipsychotics, antidepressants, anticonvulsants and benzodiazepines) use was tabulated and weighted to the US population by dementia diagnosis. Logistic regression analysis identified factors associated with antipsychotic use. Results The 307 participants of ADAMS had the following dementia diagnosis: Alzheimer’s disease (69.29%), vascular dementia (17.74%) and other dementia (12.39%). The proportion of participants prescribed a psychotropic medication broken down by therapeutic class was as 19.07% antipsychotics, 29.08% antidepressants, 9.84% benzodiazepines, and 8.85% anticonvulsants. Older adults with dementia were significantly more likely to receive an antipsychotic if they had moderate dementia (OR =7.4, p<0.05), or severe dementia (OR=5.80, p<0.05), compared to mild dementia or were diagnosed with Alzheimer (OR =6.7, p<0.05) dementia compared to vascular dementia. Older adults with dementia who lived with their caregivers in were significantly less likely to be medicated with antipsychotics (OR= 0.19, p<0.05) compared to those who lived alone. Also, persons with dementia were significantly less likely to be prescribed an antipsychotic if the caregivers were clinically depressed (OR=0.03, p<0.05) compared to those who were not depressed. Conclusion We found psychotropic medication use is common among community-dwelling older adults with dementia. Caregivers appear to have a substantial impact on whether or not an antipsychotic is prescribed, which adds additional complexity to conversations discussing the risk-benefit ratio of

  10. Hairy AdS solitons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anabalón, Andrés; Astefanesei, Dumitru; Choque, David

    2016-11-01

    We construct exact hairy AdS soliton solutions in Einstein-dilaton gravity theory. We examine their thermodynamic properties and discuss the role of these solutions for the existence of first order phase transitions for hairy black holes. The negative energy density associated to hairy AdS solitons can be interpreted as the Casimir energy that is generated in the dual filed theory when the fermions are antiperiodic on the compact coordinate.

  11. Treatment for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Jirka; Marjanovic, Sonja; Nolte, Ellen; Pollitt, Alexandra; Rubin, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The past few decades have seen a number of medical breakthroughs that enabled the effective treatment of a range of conditions, transforming them from fatal into manageable ones. Examples include certain cancers and HIV. Conversely, progress on dementia has been limited. There are currently no treatments that will cure or even alter the progressive course of dementia, despite ongoing research investigating new therapies and care options. The UK Department of Health is interested in the potential to learn from other disease areas to better understand the particular social, economic, political, legislative and scientific contexts that have contributed to accelerating progress and breakthroughs in treatment. Such learning could helpfully inform dementia research and innovation efforts, and help identify levers for supportive policy development. This project analysed breakthroughs in the treatment of four selected conditions of ill health and seeks to identify potentially transferable lessons for the dementia context. Using evidence review and key informant interviews we sought to identify the series of “events” that eventually led to a given breakthrough, and the key milestones in the process that have helped improve understanding and potential for treatment. We also aimed to capture the temporal and causal relationships between “notable” events looking at a variety of factors implicated in the breakthrough pathway. The focus of this work was on political, economic, social, scientific and technological, and legal, regulatory and environmental factors. PMID:28083433

  12. Dementia and driving.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, D; Neubauer, K; Boyle, M; Gerrard, J; Surmon, D; Wilcock, G K

    1992-04-01

    Many European countries test cars, but not their drivers, as they age. There is evidence to suggest that human factors are more important than vehicular factors as causes of motor crashes. The elderly also are involved in more accidents per distance travelled than middle-aged drivers. As the UK relies on self-certification of health by drivers over the age of 70 years, we examined the driving practices of patients with dementia attending a Memory Clinic. Nearly one-fifth of 329 patients with documented dementia continued to drive after the onset of dementia, and impaired driving ability was noted in two-thirds of these. Their families experienced great difficulty in persuading patients to stop driving, and had to invoke outside help in many cases. Neuropsychological tests did not help to identify those who drove badly while activity of daily living scores were related to driving ability. These findings suggest that many patients with dementia drive in an unsafe fashion after the onset of the illness. The present system of self-certification of health by the elderly for driver-licensing purposes needs to be reassessed.

  13. Malnutrition and dementia.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, Karen

    2016-07-13

    What was the nature of the CPD activity and/or practice-related feedback and/or event or experience in your practice? The CPD article outlined the effects dementia may have on a person's ability to eat and drink safely. It discussed assessment tools to identify patients at risk of malnutrition and management strategies to help maintain nutritional intake.

  14. Lewy Body Dementia Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... as part of their protocols. Participating in research studies is a good way to benefit others with Lewy body dementia. Medications Medications are one of the most controversial subjects in dealing with LBD. A medication that doesn't work for one person may work for another person. ...

  15. Extrapyramidal signs by dementia severity in Alzheimer disease and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Kaur, Berneet; Harvey, Danielle J; Decarli, Charles S; Zhang, Lin; Sabbagh, Marwan N; Olichney, John M

    2013-01-01

    Alzheimer disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) are common etiologies of dementia with overlapping clinical features. Our objective was to determine which extrapyramidal signs (EPSs) are most helpful in identifying DLB. We analyzed data from the National Alzheimer's Coordinating Center, including demographics, Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores, Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE) scores, and clinical diagnosis. The subjects were divided into 3 groups: AD, DLB, or Lewy body variant (LBV). The UPDRS motor scores were totaled and analyzed within and across the MMSE strata using regression techniques. Further, we divided UPDRS subscores into 9 EPSs, dichotomized as either present or absent. Logistic regression analysis was used to compare each of the EPS in the AD and Lewy body (DLB+LBV) groups. DLB subjects (n=130) were more likely to be male individuals, younger, and have higher MMSE scores (P<0.001) compared with that in AD (n=1826) or LBV (n=105) subjects. Differences were found for total UPDRS score and number of EPSs (P<0.001), after controlling for age, sex, and MMSE. Logistic regression models demonstrated that masked facies best differentiated AD from Lewy body (odds ratio=6.5, P<0.001, 95% confidence interval, 3.8-11.1). If these findings are neuropathologically validated, then the presence of specific EPS may help clinicians better differentiate AD and DLB.

  16. Apraxias in Neurodegenerative Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Chandra, Sadanandavalli Retnaswami; Issac, Thomas Gregor; Abbas, Mirza Masoom

    2015-01-01

    Background: Apraxia is a state of inability to carry out a learned motor act in the absence of motor, sensory or cerebellar defect on command processed through the Praxis circuit. Breakdown in default networking is one of the early dysfunction in cortical dementias and result in perplexity, awkwardness, omission, substitution errors, toying behavior and unrecognizable gestures in response to command with voluntary reflex dissociation where, when unobserved patient will carry out reflex movements normally. Awareness into the organicity of these phenomenas will help in early diagnosis, which will help in initiating appropriate treatment and slowing down the progression of the disease. Aims and Objectives: The aim was to look for the various kinds of apraxias in patients with dementia using appropriate simple tests. Patients and Methods: Three hundred patients satisfying Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition criteria for dementia were evaluated in detail with mandatory investigations for dementia followed by testing for ideational, ideomotor, limb-kinetic, buccopharyngeal, dressing apraxia, constructional apraxia and gait apraxias in addition to recording of rare apraxias when present. Results: Alzheimer's disease showed maximum association with apraxias in all the phases of the disease ideational, ideomotor, dressing and constructional apraxias early and buccopharyngeal and gait apraxia late. Frontotemporal lobe dementia showed buccopharyngeal and gait apraxias late into the disease. Cortical basal ganglionic degeneration showed limb apraxias and diffuse Lewy body disease showed more agnosias and less apraxias common apraxias seen was Ideational and Ideomotor. Conclusion: Recognition of the apraxias help in establishing organicity, categorization, caregiver education, early strategies for treatment, avoiding anti-psychotics and introducing disease modifying pharmacotherapeutic agents and also prognosticating. PMID:25722511

  17. Optimizing patient care and research: the Amsterdam Dementia Cohort.

    PubMed

    van der Flier, Wiesje M; Pijnenburg, Yolande A L; Prins, Niels; Lemstra, Afina W; Bouwman, Femke H; Teunissen, Charlotte E; van Berckel, Bart N M; Stam, Cornelis J; Barkhof, Frederik; Visser, Pieter Jelle; van Egmond, Evan; Scheltens, Philip

    2014-01-01

    Since its opening in 2000, patient care and research go hand in hand at the Alzheimer center of the VU University Medical Center, both organized in such a way that they mutually strengthen each other. Our mission is to give patients a voice by lifting the stigma on dementia, to find new diagnostic and treatment strategies, and, ultimately, to cure diseases that cause dementia. Our healthcare pathway is uniquely designed to accommodate all necessary investigations for the diagnostic work-up of dementia in one day (one-stop shop). A second unique feature is that research has been fully integrated in the healthcare pathway. The resulting Amsterdam Dementia Cohort now includes over 4000 patients, and for the majority of these, we have MRI, EEG, blood (serum, plasma), DNA, and CSF available. The Amsterdam Dementia Cohort forms the basis of much of our research, which focuses on four major research lines: 1) variability in manifestation, 2) early diagnosis, 3) vascular factors, and 4) interventions. By answering research questions closely related to clinical practice, the results of our research can be looped back to improve clinical work-up for our patients.

  18. [Dementia and lifestyle-related diseases in Japanese aging society].

    PubMed

    Iwamoto, Toshihiko

    2011-05-01

    Recently, the number of elderly patients with dementia has been increasing in Japan because of both the extension of average life expectancy and a considerable rise in the incidence of dementia with age. For these reasons, dementia in Japan has become common, and more than half of all cases are Alzheimer disease. This disease has typically been considered to be a degenerative disorder due to genetic abnormalities, but recent epidemiological studies have indicated that lifestyle-related diseases such as hypertension, diabetes, dyslipidemia, and obesity in midlife could accelerate the dementing process, via either vascular changes in cerebral infarction or Alzheimer-related pathological changes with plaque and tangle formations which result in dementia in later life. Furthermore, several studies have suggested that a high intake of vegetables and fish, an active daily life, and lifelong education might positively influence cognitive function as neuroprotective factors. Therefore, we should try to prevent dementia based on the clinical and hygienic management of the lifestyles and lifestyle-related diseases, even in the youth.

  19. Dementia and Mortality In Persons with Down's Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coppus, A.; Evenhuis, H.; Verberne, G.-J.; Visser, F.; van Gool, P.; Eikelenboom, P.; van Duijin, C.

    2006-01-01

    Background: Numerous studies have documented that persons with Downs syndrome (DS) are at an increased risk of Alzheimers disease (AD). However, at present it is still not clear whether or not all persons with DS will develop dementia as they reach old age. Methods: We studied 506 people with DS, aged 45 years and above. A standardized assessment…

  20. Knowledge of Natural Kinds in Semantic Dementia and Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cross, Katy; Smith, Edward E.; Grossman, Murray

    2008-01-01

    We examined the semantic impairment for natural kinds in patients with probable Alzheimer's disease (AD) and semantic dementia (SD) using an inductive reasoning paradigm. To learn about the relationships between natural kind exemplars and how these are distinguished from manufactured artifacts, subjects judged the strength of arguments such as…

  1. Comorbidity in Dementia: Update of An Ongoing Autopsy Study

    PubMed Central

    Magaki, Shino; Yong, William H.; Khanlou, Negar; Tung, Spencer; Vinters, Harry V.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To examine systemic and central nervous system (CNS) comorbidities of patients with dementia evaluated during general autopsy. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING A large tertiary academic medical center in Los Angeles, California. PARTICIPANTS A cohort of 86 participants with clinically and neuropathologically diagnosed dementia who received complete autopsies and 132 participants with dementia who received partial (brain only) autopsies. MEASUREMENTS The causes of death as well as systemic and CNS comorbidities were obtained from autopsy reports and clinical information as available from the medical records. Findings were tabulated with respect to type of dementia, semiquantitative assessment of the severity of cerebral amyloid angiopathy, semiquantitative assessment of the severity of cerebrovascular disease, and evidence of ischemic damage in the brain. RESULTS Out of a total of 218 subjects with dementia, 175 (80.3%) had Alzheimer’s disease (AD) either in isolation or in combination with other lesions that might contribute to cognitive impairment, such as cerebrovascular disease and diffuse Lewy body disease (DLBD), 14 (6.4%) had frontotemporal dementia (FTD), and 7 (3.2%) had isolated DLBD. The most common cause of death among demented patients was pneumonia (57 cases, 66.3%) followed by cardiovascular disease (14 cases, 16.3%). Eighteen subjects (20.9%) had lung disease and 16 (18.6%) had evidence of old or recent myocardial infarct. Clinically undiagnosed neoplasms included colonic adenocarcinoma, metastatic pulmonary neuroendocrine carcinoma, meningioma, and Schwannoma. CONCLUSION Significant comorbidities were discovered at autopsy in patients with dementia. Understanding the causes of death and associated comorbidities in patients with various subtypes of dementia is important in the assessment of end of life care in these subjects. PMID:25039832

  2. Cholinergic and other neurotransmitter mechanisms in Parkinson's disease, Parkinson's disease dementia, and dementia with Lewy bodies.

    PubMed

    Francis, Paul T; Perry, Elaine K

    2007-09-01

    It is now 30 years since the beginning of intensive efforts to understand the neurotransmitter biochemistry of dementia as exemplified by Alzheimer's disease and such studies have led to the development of rational treatment strategies, which are continuing to benefit patients. However, as studies became more sophisticated and clinicians rediscovered an interest in dementia, because of the potential for symptomatic treatment, it has become clear that there are several different neurodegenerative conditions that gives rise to dementia syndromes and that each has distinct neurochemical pathology. This has important treatment implications since what works for one may not work for another or at the extreme, may make matters worse. Therefore it is clear that a detailed understanding of the neurotransmitter function in each condition is not merely academic but can lead to rationale drug design and treatment strategies appropriate for that group of patients. Dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) has clinico-pathological features, which overlap with either AD or Parkinson's disease (PD) as well as features that help to distinguish it, such as fluctuations in cognitive impairment and a higher prevalence of visual hallucinations. On this basis, it would be expected that the neurochemistry would have some similarities with both disorders.

  3. Nutrition and dementia: are we asking the right questions?

    PubMed

    Shea, Thomas B; Rogers, Eugene; Remington, Ruth

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has no cure or nullifying pharmacological interventions. Nutritional supplementation represents a systemic approach that in some studies has provided benefit and has augmented pharmacological approaches. However, additional studies report no benefit of supplementation. We review herein how studies of nutrition on dementia, including those combining nutrition and dementia, are inherently compromised. We also review studies with mice, which demonstrate that nutritional supplementation can alleviate multiple genetic risk factors for AD. An individual diagnosed with AD has by definition undergone considerable cognitive decline; anticipating restoration/maintenance of cognitive performance following nutritional supplementation alone may be misdirected. Nutrition declines in aging, and even more so in AD. While optimization of nutrition should ideally be initiated well before any cognitive decline, we present evidence that the systemic benefit alone of nutritional supplementation at the very minimum warrants initiation along with pharmacological intervention.

  4. Gait phenotype from MCI to moderate dementia: results from the GOOD initiative

    PubMed Central

    Allali, Gilles; Annweiler, Cédric; Blumen, Helena M.; Callisaya, Michele L.; De Cock, Anne-Marie; Kressig, Reto W.; Srikanth, Velandai; Steinmetz, Jean-Paul; Verghese, Joe; Beauchet, Olivier

    2015-01-01

    Background The differences in gait abnormalities from the earliest to the latter stages of dementia and in the different subtypes of dementia have not been fully examined. This study aims to compare spatio-temporal gait parameters in cognitively healthy individuals, patients with amnestic (aMCI) and non-amnestic (naMCI) MCI, and patients with mild and moderate stages of Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and non-Alzheimer’s disease (non-AD). Methods Based on a cross-sectional design, 1719 participants (77.4±7.3 years, 53.9% female) were recruited from cohorts from seven countries participating in the “Gait, cOgnitiOn & Decline” initiative. Mean values and coefficients of variation of spatio-temporal gait parameters were measured during normal pace walking with the GAITRite system at all sites. Results Performance of spatio-temporal gait parameters declined in parallel to the stage of cognitive decline from MCI status to moderate dementia. Gait parameters of patients with naMCI were more disturbed compared to patients with aMCI, and MCI subgroups performed better than demented patients. Patients with non-AD dementia had worse gait performance than those with AD dementia. This degradation of the gait parameters was similar between mean values and coefficients of variation of spatio-temporal gait parameters in the earliest stages of cognitive decline, but different in the most advanced stages, especially in the non-AD subtypes. Conclusions Spatio-temporal gait parameters were more disturbed in the advanced stages of dementia, and more affected in the non-AD dementias than in AD. These findings suggest that quantitative gait parameters could be used as a surrogate marker for improving the diagnosis of dementia. PMID:26662508

  5. Incidence of dementia among atomic-bomb survivors--Radiation Effects Research Foundation Adult Health Study.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Michiko; Kasagi, Fumiyoshi; Mimori, Yasuyo; Miyachi, Takafumi; Ohshita, Tomohiko; Sasaki, Hideo

    2009-06-15

    Radiotherapy has been reported to cause neuropsychological dysfunction. Here we examined whether exposure to atomic bomb radiation affected the incidence of dementia among 2286 atomic bomb survivors and controls - all members of the Adult Health Study cohort. Study subjects were non-demented and aged >or=60 years at baseline examination and had been exposed in 1945 at >or=13 years of age to a relatively low dose (Dementia diagnoses were made during biennial health examinations with a two-phase procedure. DSM IV criteria were used for diagnosing dementia, NINCDS-ADRDA for Alzheimer disease, and NINDS-AIREN for vascular disease. To estimate the effect of radiation on the dementia incidence rate, we applied Poisson regression analysis. Incidence per 1000 person-years was 16.3 in the <5 mGy group, 17.0 in the 5-499 mGy group, and 15.2 in the >or=500 mGy group. Alzheimer disease was the predominant type of dementia in each dose category. After adjustment for potential risk factors, radiation exposure did not affect the incidence rate of either all dementia or any of its subtypes. No case of dementia had a history of therapeutic cranial irradiation. Although we found no relationship between radiation exposure and the development of dementia among atomic bomb survivors exposed at >or=13 years old in this longitudinal study, effects on increased risk of early death among atomic bomb survivors will be considered.

  6. Age of dementia diagnosis in community dwelling bilingual and monolingual Hispanic Americans.

    PubMed

    Lawton, Deborah M; Gasquoine, Philip G; Weimer, Amy A

    2015-05-01

    Bilingualism has been reported to delay the age of retrospective report of first symptom in dementia. This study determined if the age of clinically diagnosed Alzheimer's disease and vascular dementia occurred later for bilingual than monolingual, immigrant and U.S. born, Hispanic Americans. It involved a secondary analysis of the subset of 81 bi/monolingual dementia cases identified at yearly follow-up (1998 through 2008) using neuropsychological test results and objective diagnostic criteria from the Sacramento Area Latino Study on Aging that involved a random sampling of community dwelling Hispanic Americans (N = 1789). Age of dementia diagnosis was analyzed in a 2 × 2 (bi/monolingualism × immigrant/U.S. born) ANOVA that space revealed both main effects and the interaction were non-significant. Mean age of dementia diagnosis was descriptively (but not significantly) higher in the monolingual (M = 81.10 years) than the bilingual (M = 79.31) group. Overall, bilingual dementia cases were significantly better educated than monolinguals, but U.S. born bilinguals and monolinguals did not differ significantly in education. Delays in dementia symptomatology pertaining to bilingualism are less likely to be found in studies: (a) that use age of clinical diagnosis vs. retrospective report of first dementia symptom as the dependent variable; and (b) involve clinical cases derived from community samples rather than referrals to specialist memory clinics.

  7. Prevalence of dementia in Al-Quseir city, Red Sea Governorate, Egypt

    PubMed Central

    El Tallawy, Hamdy N; Farghly, Wafaa M; Badry, Reda; Rageh, Tarek A; Shehata, Ghaydaa A; Hakeem M, N Abdel; El Hamed, Mohamed Abd; Sayd, Mohamed AM; Hamed, Yasser; Kandil, Mahmoud R

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is one of the most important public health problems as a result of the rapid increase in the number of elderly persons worldwide. Improvement of prevention strategies and caring for people with dementia should be undertaken. We performed a door-to-door study to screen all subjects aged 50 years and older (n=4,329 of 33,285 inhabitants) in Al-Quseir city. The screening was performed by 3 neuropsychiatrists, using a modified form of the Mini-Mental State Examination. Suspected cases were subjected to case ascertainment according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fourth Edition, Text Revision, diagnostic criteria for dementia; full clinical assessment; psychometric assessment using Cognitive Abilities Screening Instruments, Hachinski Ischaemic Score, Instrumental Activities of Daily Living Scale and the Geriatric Depression Scale; neuroimaging (computed tomography and/or magnetic resonance imaging); and laboratory investigations for selected patients when indicated. The prevalence of dementia was 2.01% for participants aged 50 years or older and 3.83% for those aged 60 years or older. It increased steeply with increasing age to a maximum of 13.5% for those aged 80 years or older. Alzheimer’s dementia (48.3%) was the most common subtype, followed by vascular dementia (36.8%), dementia resulting from general medical conditions (11.5%), and last, dementia resulting from multiple etiologies (3.4%). PMID:24353410

  8. Rates and risk factors for progression to incident dementia vary by age in a population cohort

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Ching-Wen; Snitz, Beth E.; Hughes, Tiffany F.; McDade, Eric; Chang, Chung-Chou H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To estimate rate of progression from normal cognition or mild impairment to dementia, and to identify potential risk and protective factors for incident dementia, based on age at dementia onset in a prospective study of a population-based cohort (n = 1,982) aged 65 years and older. Methods: Following the cohort annually for up to 5 years, we estimated incidence of dementia (Clinical Dementia Rating ≥1) among individuals previously normal or mildly impaired (Clinical Dementia Rating 0 or 0.5). In the whole cohort, and also stratified by median onset age, we examined several vascular, metabolic, and inflammatory variables as potential risk factors for developing dementia, using interval-censored survival models. Results: Based on 67 incident cases of dementia, incidence rate (per 1,000 person-years) was 10.0 overall, 5.8 in those with median onset age of 87 years or younger, and 31.5 in those with onset age after 87 years. Adjusting for demographics, the risk of incident dementia with onset age of 87 years or younger (n = 33) was significantly increased by baseline smoking, stroke, low systolic blood pressure, and APOE*4 genotype, and reduced by current alcohol use. Among those with dementia with onset after 87 years (n = 34), no risk or protective factor was significant. Conclusion: Risk and protective factors were only found for incident dementia with onset before the median onset age of 87 years, and not for those with later onset. Either unexplored risk factors explain the continued increase in incidence with age, or unknown protective factors are allowing some individuals to delay onset into very old age. PMID:25471390

  9. Reporting of clinically diagnosed dementia on death certificates: retrospective cohort study

    PubMed Central

    Perera, Gayan; Stewart, Robert; Higginson, Irene J.; Sleeman, Katherine E.

    2016-01-01

    Background: mortality statistics are a frequently used source of information on deaths in dementia but are limited by concerns over accuracy. Objective: to investigate the frequency with which clinically diagnosed dementia is recorded on death certificates, including predictive factors. Methods: a retrospective cohort study assembled using a large mental healthcare database in South London, linked to Office for National Statistics mortality data. People with a clinical diagnosis of dementia, aged 65 or older, who died between 2006 and 2013 were included. The main outcome was death certificate recording of dementia. Results: in total, 7,115 people were identified. Dementia was recorded on 3,815 (53.6%) death certificates. Frequency of dementia recording increased from 39.9% (2006) to 63.0% (2013) (odds ratio (OR) per year increment 1.11, 95% CI 1.07–1.15). Recording of dementia was more likely if people were older (OR per year increment 1.02, 95% CI 1.01–1.03), and for those who died in care homes (OR 1.89, 95% CI 1.50–2.40) or hospitals (OR 1.14, 95% CI 1.03–1.46) compared with home, and less likely for people with less severe cognitive impairment (OR 0.95, 95% CI 0.94–0.96), and if the diagnosis was Lewy body (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.15–0.62) or vascular dementia (OR 0.79, 95% CI 0.68–0.93) compared with Alzheimer's disease. Conclusions: changes in certification practices may have contributed to the rise in recorded prevalence of dementia from mortality data. However, mortality data still considerably underestimate the population burden of dementia. Potential biases affecting recording of dementia need to be taken into account when interpreting mortality data. PMID:27146301

  10. Dementia and legal competency.

    PubMed

    Filaković, Pavo; Erić, Anamarija Petek; Mihanović, Mate; Glavina, Trpimir; Molnar, Sven

    2011-06-01

    The legal competency or capability to exercise rights is level of judgment and decision-making ability needed to manage one's own affairs and to sign official documents. With some exceptions, the person entitles this right in age of majority. It is acquired without legal procedures, however the annulment of legal capacity requires a juristic process. This resolution may not be final and could be revoked thorough the procedure of reverting legal capacity - fully or partially. Given the increasing number of persons with dementia, they are often subjects of legal expertise concerning their legal capacity. On the other part, emphasis on the civil rights of mentally ill also demands their maximal protection. Therefore such distinctive issue is approached with particular attention. The approach in determination of legal competency is more focused on gradation of it's particular aspects instead of existing dual concept: legally capable - legally incapable. The main assumption represents how person with dementia is legally capable and should enjoy all the rights, privileges and obligations as other citizens do. The aspects of legal competency for which person with dementia is going to be deprived, due to protection of one's rights and interests, are determined in legal procedure and then passed over to the guardian decided by court. Partial annulment of legal competency is measure applied when there is even one existing aspect of preserved legal capability (pension disposition, salary or pension disposition, ability of concluding contract, making testament, concluding marriage, divorce, choosing whereabouts, independent living, right to vote, right to decide course of treatment ect.). This measure is most often in favour of the patient and rarely for protection of other persons and their interests. Physicians are expected to precisely describe early dementia symptoms which may influence assessment of specific aspects involved in legal capacity (memory loss, impaired task

  11. Added Sugars

    MedlinePlus

    ... need sugar to function properly. Added sugars contribute zero nutrients but many added calories that can lead to extra pounds or even obesity, thereby reducing heart health. If you think of your daily calorie needs as a budget, you want to “spend” ...

  12. Value Added?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    UCLA IDEA, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Value added measures (VAM) uses changes in student test scores to determine how much "value" an individual teacher has "added" to student growth during the school year. Some policymakers, school districts, and educational advocates have applauded VAM as a straightforward measure of teacher effectiveness: the better a teacher,…

  13. Nuclear techniques applied to dementia studies

    SciTech Connect

    Ehmann, W.D.

    1996-12-31

    Trace element imbalances have been implicated in the etiology and/or pathogenesis of several dementing disorders related to aging. Of these diseases, Alzheimer`s disease (AD) is by far the most prevalent. Many elemental imbalances have been reported in AD brain, compared to neurologically normal controls. Using instrumental neutron activation analysis (INAA), we have observed significant increases (p {le} 0.05) in bromine, chlorine, mercury, sodium, and phosphorus and decreased amounts of cesium, nitrogen, and rubidium in AD brain, compared to age-matched control brain. Because INAA is a simultaneous multielement method that does not require tissue dissolution, fewer opportunities for contamination exist than with otherwise powerful analytical methods, such as inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry or atomic absorption spectrometry. Although INAA is a very important tool in the study of potential trace element involvement in dementia, we have often found it necessary to go beyond conventional INAA methods.

  14. Collaborative transdisciplinary team approach for dementia care.

    PubMed

    Galvin, James E; Valois, Licet; Zweig, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) has high economic impact and places significant burden on patients, caregivers, providers and healthcare delivery systems, fostering the need for an evaluation of alternative approaches to healthcare delivery for dementia. Collaborative care models are team-based, multicomponent interventions that provide a pragmatic strategy to deliver integrated healthcare to patients and families across a wide range of populations and clinical settings. Healthcare reform and national plans for AD goals to integrate quality care, health promotion and preventive services, and reduce the impact of disease on patients and families reinforcing the need for a system-level evaluation of how to best meet the needs of patients and families. We review collaborative care models for AD and offer evidence for improved patient- and family-centered outcomes, quality indicators of care and potential cost savings.

  15. Impact of Physical Activity on Cognitive Decline, Dementia, and Its Subtypes: Meta-Analysis of Prospective Studies

    PubMed Central

    Ibrahim, Noor A.; Adam, Mohd B.; Said, Salmiah Md

    2017-01-01

    The association of physical activity with dementia and its subtypes has remained controversial in the literature and has continued to be a subject of debate among researchers. A systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies on the relationship between physical activity and the risk of cognitive decline, all-cause dementia, Alzheimer's disease, and vascular dementia among nondemented subjects are considered. A comprehensive literature search in all available databases was conducted up until April 2016. Well-defined inclusion and exclusion criteria were developed with focus on prospective studies ≥ 12 months. The overall sample from all studies is 117410 with the highest follow-up of 28 years. The analyses are performed with both Bayesian parametric and nonparametric models. Our analysis reveals a protective effect for high physical activity on all-cause dementia, odds ratio of 0.79, 95% CI (0.69, 0.88), a higher and better protective effect for Alzheimer's disease, odds ratio of 0.62, 95% CI (0.49, 0.75), cognitive decline odds ratio of 0.67, 95% CI (0.55, 0.78), and a nonprotective effect for vascular dementia of 0.92, 95% CI (0.62, 1.30). Our findings suggest that physical activity is more protective against Alzheimer's disease than it is for all-cause dementia, vascular dementia, and cognitive decline. PMID:28271072

  16. Cerebrospinal fluid cortisol and clinical disease progression in MCI and dementia of Alzheimer's type.

    PubMed

    Popp, Julius; Wolfsgruber, Steffen; Heuser, Isabella; Peters, Oliver; Hüll, Michael; Schröder, Johannes; Möller, Hans-Jürgen; Lewczuk, Piotr; Schneider, Anja; Jahn, Holger; Luckhaus, Christian; Perneczky, Robert; Frölich, Lutz; Wagner, Michael; Maier, Wolfgang; Wiltfang, Jens; Kornhuber, Johannes; Jessen, Frank

    2015-02-01

    Increased peripheral and central nervous system cortisol levels have been reported in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and may reflect dysfunction of cerebral components of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. However, brain exposure to high cortisol concentrations may also accelerate disease progression and cognitive decline. The objectives of this study were to investigate whether HPA-axis dysregulation occurs at early clinical stages of AD and whether plasma and CSF cortisol levels are associated with clinical disease progression. Morning plasma and CSF cortisol concentrations were obtained from the subjects with AD dementia, mild cognitive impairment of AD type (MCI-AD), MCI of other type (MCI-O), and controls with normal cognition included in a multicenter study from the German Dementia Competence Network. A clinical and neuropsychological follow-up was performed in a subgroup of participants with MCI-AD, MCI-O, and AD dementia. CSF cortisol concentrations were increased in the subjects with AD dementia or MCI-AD compared with subjects with MCI-O or normal cognition. After controlling for possible confounders including CSF measures of amyloid beta1-42 and total tau, higher baseline CSF cortisol levels were associated with faster clinical worsening and cognitive decline in MCI-AD. The findings suggest that HPA-axis dysregulation occurs at the MCI stage of AD and may accelerate disease progression and cognitive decline.

  17. Dementia in Ayurveda.

    PubMed

    Manyam, B V

    1999-02-01

    The ancient Indian medical system, Ayurveda, included geriatrics as 1 of 8 medical divisions. Well-documented evidence exists for treating aging and age-related disorders including dementia. Geriatrics was termed Rasayanatantra. Cognitive function was well recognized and Sanskrit terms existed such as Buddhi for intelligence and Cittanasa (Citta means mind, nasa means loss of) for dementia. A normal human life span was considered to be 100 years. It could be prolonged to 116-120 years through the use of preventive treatments, if they were started during late youth or middle age. Treatments included herbal preparations, diet, exercise, and attention to general mode of life and social behavior. Several herbal formulations are described, including details of their composition and preparation. The mode of action of antiaging drugs was believed to occur at 3 levels. Detailed descriptions of the mode of action of several herbs are provided, and recent research confirms some of this activity.

  18. A physical model for dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sotolongo-Costa, O.; Gaggero-Sager, L. M.; Becker, J. T.; Maestu, F.; Sotolongo-Grau, O.

    2017-04-01

    Aging associated brain decline often result in some kind of dementia. Even when this is a complex brain disorder a physical model can be used in order to describe its general behavior. A probabilistic model for the development of dementia is obtained and fitted to some experimental data obtained from the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative. It is explained how dementia appears as a consequence of aging and why it is irreversible.

  19. Doing dementia better: anthropological insights.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Elizabeth Herskovits

    2011-05-01

    Dementia, or neurodegenerative disease, is a disease category, and yet it is widely described in popular and professional media as a horror story. Patients with dementia and their families frequently report that they are less than pleased with their clinical encounters. This article reveals the deleterious impact that cultural assumptions about dementia have on the care provided, and, through an exploration of anthropological theories of personhood, suggests strategies for seeking improved quality of life through personhood-centered care.

  20. Macronutrients, aluminium from drinking water and foods, and other metals in cognitive decline and dementia.

    PubMed

    Solfrizzi, Vincenzo; Colacicco, Anna Maria; D'Introno, Alessia; Capurso, Cristiano; Parigi, Angelo Del; Capurso, Sabrina A; Torres, Francesco; Capurso, Antonio; Panza, Francesco

    2006-11-01

    A possible role of the macronutrients and the basic elements of carbohydrates (glucose administration or depletion), proteins (amino acids such as tryptophan and tyrosine), and fat (unsaturated fatty acids) was recently proposed for age-related changes of cognitive function, and the cognitive decline of degenerative (AD) or vascular origin. The availability and utilization of glucose has been implicated in cognitive function not only as a result of nutritional and systemic metabolic conditions, but also, although speculatively, as a crucial phase of the mechanism of action of molecules used as cognitive-enhancers. Furthermore, many lines of evidence have focused on the importance of oxidative stress mechanisms and free radical damage in AD pathogenesis. In addition, epidemiological studies have recently reported an association between alcohol and the incidence of AD and predementia syndromes. Foods with large amounts of aluminium-containing additives or aluminium from drinking water may affect the risk of developing AD, aluminium more likely acting as a cofactor somewhere in the cascade of events leading to the demented brain. A role for other metals in dementia have been speculated, given the encouraging results reported from studies on peripheral zinc concentrations, zinc supplementation, serum copper, either bound with ceruloplasmin or not, and iron metabolism in AD. Nonetheless, more data are needed to support a possible role of these metals in dementing diseases. Healthy diets, antioxidant supplements, and the prevention of nutritional deficiencies or exposure to foods and water with high content of metals could be considered the first line of defence against the development and progression of cognitive decline.

  1. Polymorphisms in BACE2 may affect the age of onset Alzheimer's dementia in Down syndrome.

    PubMed

    Mok, Kin Y; Jones, Emma L; Hanney, Marisa; Harold, Denise; Sims, Rebecca; Williams, Julie; Ballard, Clive; Hardy, John

    2014-06-01

    It is known that Alzheimer's disease (AD) presents at an early age in people with Down syndrome (DS). The trisomy 21 in DS provides an opportunity to study the effect of duplicated genes in AD. APP and BACE2 are 2 genes located in chromosome 21 and related to AD. We looked into our cohort of 67 DS cases with dementia for the effect of BACE2 variants in age of onset of dementia. Of the 83 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), 6 were associated with age of onset and another 8 SNPs were borderline associated. Our finding also replicated a previous study showing association of rs2252576 with AD.

  2. Rapidly Progressive Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Geschwind, Michael D.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose of Review This article presents a practical and informative approach to the evaluation of a patient with a rapidly progressive dementia (RPD). Recent Findings Prion diseases are the prototypical causes of RPD, but reversible causes of RPD might mimic prion disease and should always be considered in a differential diagnosis. Aside from prion diseases, the most common causes of RPD are atypical presentations of other neurodegenerative disorders, curable disorders including autoimmune encephalopathies, as well as some infections, and neoplasms. Numerous recent case reports suggest dural arterial venous fistulas sometimes cause RPDs. Summary RPDs, in which patients typically develop dementia over weeks to months, require an alternative differential than the slowly progressive dementias that occur over a few years. Because of their rapid decline, patients with RPDs necessitate urgent evaluation and often require an extensive workup, typically with multiple tests being sent or performed concurrently. Jakob-Creutzfeldt disease, perhaps the prototypical RPD, is often the first diagnosis many neurologists consider when treating a patient with rapid cognitive decline. Many conditions other than prion disease, however, including numerous reversible or curable conditions, can present as an RPD. This chapter discusses some of the major etiologies for RPDs and offers an algorithm for diagnosis. PMID:27042906

  3. Sleep, Cognition and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Porter, Verna R; Buxton, William G; Avidan, Alon Y

    2015-12-01

    The older patient population is growing rapidly around the world and in the USA. Almost half of seniors over age 65 who live at home are dissatisfied with their sleep, and nearly two-thirds of those residing in nursing home facilities suffer from sleep disorders. Chronic and pervasive sleep complaints and disturbances are frequently associated with excessive daytime sleepiness and may result in impaired cognition, diminished intellect, poor memory, confusion, and psychomotor retardation all of which may be misinterpreted as dementia. The key sleep disorders impacting patients with dementia include insomnia, hypersomnolence, circadian rhythm misalignment, sleep disordered breathing, motor disturbances of sleep such as periodic leg movement disorder of sleep and restless leg syndrome, and parasomnias, mostly in the form of rapid eye movement (REM) sleep behavior disorder (RBD). RBD is a pre-clinical marker for a class of neurodegenerative diseases, the "synucleinopathies", and requires formal polysomnographic evaluation. Untreated sleep disorders may exacerbate cognitive and behavioral symptoms in patients with dementia and are a source of considerable stress for bed partners and family members. When left untreated, sleep disturbances may also increase the risk of injury at night, compromise health-related quality of life, and precipitate and accelerate social and economic burdens for caregivers.

  4. Driving and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda; Molnar, Frank

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To provide primary care physicians with an approach to driving safety concerns when older persons present with memory difficulties. Sources of information The approach is based on an accredited memory clinic training program developed by the Centre for Family Medicine Primary Care Collaborative Memory Clinic. Main message One of the most challenging aspects of dementia care is the assessment of driving safety. Drivers with dementia are at higher risk of motor vehicle collisions, yet many drivers with mild dementia might be safely able to continue driving for several years. Because safe driving is dependent on multiple cognitive and functional skills, clinicians should carefully consider many factors when determining if cognitive concerns affect driving safety. Specific findings on corroborated history and office-based cognitive testing might aid in the physician’s decisions to refer for comprehensive on-road driving evaluation and whether to notify transportation authorities in accordance with provincial reporting requirements. Sensitive communication and a person-centred approach are essential. Conclusion Primary care physicians must consider many factors when determining if cognitive concerns might affect driving safety in older drivers. PMID:28115437

  5. [Dementia and music].

    PubMed

    Kerer, Manuela; Marksteiner, Josef; Hinterhuber, Hartmann; Mazzola, Guerino; Steinberg, Reinhard; Weiss, Elisabeth M

    2009-01-01

    Patients suffering from dementia are nevertheless still able to render exceptional musical performances. For example, they can recognize music from childhood and reproduce lyrics and melodies of songs with four verses. Furthermore, behavioural symptoms such as psycho- motor agitation and crying, but also aggressive behaviour can be positively influenced by music and motivation and positive emotions can be increased. A variety of physiological and psychological changes occur when patients are listening to music. Previous research could show that music activated different parts of the brain especially in the temporal cortex, but also motoric areas in the frontal cortex, thalamus and cerebellum were essential for rhythm, melody and harmony perception and processing. Music therapy is an interpersonal process in which music is used within a therapeutic relationship to address physical, emotional, cognitive, and social needs of individuals with various psychiatric or medical conditions. However, until now only little research has been directed towards non-pharmacological treatments like music therapy in dementia patients. Further research is warranted to investigate the long term influence of music therapy on patients suffering from dementia.

  6. Specialised design for dementia.

    PubMed

    Habell, Martin

    2013-05-01

    Demographic trends point to a fast-rising demand for elderly dementia care - but ordinary elderly care environments are unsuitable for dementia, which requires specialised accommodation. This paper concerns itself with the health and behaviour benefits of the special environment and not the available care and medication. Compared with traditional elderly care, space requirements are larger, there are security and care issues, as well as light, sleep, sensory and exercise aspects. The internal environment can be used for therapeutic benefit, using movement, memory trails, behaviour cues, signage, sun light therapy, light spectrum control and landscape. Special planning can mitigate antisocial behaviour, agitation, anxiety and confusion. It can provide scope for family involvement. To date, care has made blanket unspecialised provision. There is a need for a coherent and comprehensive approach to the total environment and to view it as a tool for care. This paper records the features developed in the design of specialised dementia care buildings by the author as part of a sequence of care homes evolved and adapted with feedback.

  7. Emotional function in dementia patients.

    PubMed

    Fujii, Masahiko; Butler, James P; Sasaki, Hidetada

    2014-09-01

    Behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia, which can be considered as hyperreactivity of the emotional functioning of dementia, can be alleviated or aggravated by the behavioural and psychological symptoms of the caregiver. Comfortable stimulations of emotional function through sensory stimulations are effective methods for alleviating behavioural and psychological symptoms of dementia. Although cognitive function deteriorates with age, emotional function is often retained even in advanced years. Thus, it is recommended that care in patients with dementia be focused mainly on the stimulation of emotional function (e.g. sympathy and empathy, which are human traits), rather than relying solely on the stimulation of cognitive function.

  8. Dementia: getting the environment right.

    PubMed

    Yates-Bolton, Natalie; Codinhoto, Ricardo

    2013-03-01

    An IHEEM-supported conference staged recently at Salford University by the University's Dementia Design Group (HEJ - November 2012), examined the impact that different hospital environments have on people with dementia. Ricardo Codinhoto of the International Dementia Design Network, a qualified architect with practical, teaching, and research experience, and his co-chair on the Network, Natalie Yates-Bolton, a lecturer in Nursing at the University, explain the thinking behind the Group's approach to well-designed mental healthcare environments, and report on some of the key topics discussed at this first ever National Dementia Design Conference.

  9. Improving the accuracy and precision of cognitive testing in mild dementia.

    PubMed

    Wouters, Hans; Appels, Bregje; van der Flier, Wiesje M; van Campen, Jos; Klein, Martin; Zwinderman, Aeilko H; Schmand, Ben; van Gool, Willem A; Scheltens, Philip; Lindeboom, Robert

    2012-03-01

    The CAMCOG, ADAS-cog, and MMSE, designed to grade global cognitive ability in dementia have inadequate precision and accuracy in distinguishing mild dementia from normal ageing. Adding neuropsychological tests to their scale might improve precision and accuracy in mild dementia. We, therefore, pooled neuropsychological test-batteries from two memory clinics (ns = 135 and 186) with CAMCOG data from a population study and 2 memory clinics (n = 829) and ADAS-cog data from 3 randomized controlled trials (n = 713) to estimate a common dimension of global cognitive ability using Rasch analysis. Item difficulties and individuals' global cognitive ability levels were estimated. Difficulties of 57 items (of 64) could be validly estimated. Neuropsychological tests were more difficult than the CAMCOG, ADAS-cog, and MMSE items. Most neuropsychological tests had difficulties in the ability range of normal ageing to mild dementia. Higher than average ability levels were more precisely measured when neuropsychological tests were added to the MMSE than when these were measured with the MMSE alone. Diagnostic accuracy in mild dementia was consistently better after adding neuropsychological tests to the MMSE. We conclude that extending dementia specific instruments with neuropsychological tests improves measurement precision and accuracy of cognitive impairment in mild dementia.

  10. Saturated and trans fats and dementia: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Barnard, Neal D; Bunner, Anne E; Agarwal, Ulka

    2014-09-01

    Cognitive disorders of later life are potentially devastating. To estimate the relationship between saturated and trans fat intake and risk of cognitive disorders. PubMed, EMBASE, and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials were searched for studies reporting saturated or trans fat intake and incident dementia, Alzheimer's disease (AD), or mild cognitive impairment (MCI) or cognitive decline. Only observational studies met the inclusion criteria: 4 for AD or other dementias, 4 for MCI, and 4 for cognitive decline. Saturated fat intake was positively associated with AD risk in 3 of 4 studies, whereas the fourth suggested an inverse relationship. Saturated fat intake was also positively associated with total dementia in 1 of 2 studies, with MCI in 1 of 4 studies, and with cognitive decline in 2 of 4 studies. Relationships between trans fat intake and dementia were examined in 3 reports with mixed results. Several, although not all, prospective studies indicate relationships between saturated and trans fat intake and risk of cognitive disorders.

  11. Gene Therapy Models of Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Combs, Benjamin; Kneynsberg, Andrew; Kanaan, Nicholas M.

    2016-01-01

    Dementias are among the most common neurological disorders, and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia worldwide. AD remains a looming health crisis despite great efforts to learn the mechanisms surrounding the neuron dysfunction and neurodegeneration that accompanies AD primarily in the medial temporal lobe. In addition to AD, a group of diseases known as frontotemporal dementias (FTDs) are degenerative diseases involving atrophy and degeneration in the frontal and temporal lobe regions. Importantly, AD and a number of FTDs are collectively known as tauopathies due to the abundant accumulation of pathological tau inclusions in the brain. The precise role tau plays in disease pathogenesis remains an area of strong research focus. A critical component to effectively study any human disease is the availability of models that recapitulate key features of the disease. Accordingly, a number of animal models are currently being pursued to fill the current gaps in our knowledge of the causes of dementias and to develop effective therapeutics. Recent developments in gene therapy-based approaches, particularly in recombinant adeno-associated viruses (rAAVs), have provided new tools to study AD and other related neurodegenerative disorders. Additionally, gene therapy approaches have emerged as an intriguing possibility for treating these diseases in humans. This chapter explores the current state of rAAV models of AD and other dementias, discuss recent efforts to improve these models, and describe current and future possibilities in the use of rAAVs and other viruses in treatments of disease. PMID:26611599

  12. Distinct Neuroanatomical Substrates and Cognitive Mechanisms of Figure Copy Performance in Alzheimer's Disease and Behavioral Variant Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Possin, Katherine L.; Laluz, Victor R.; Alcantar, Oscar Z.; Miller, Bruce L.; Kramer, Joel H.

    2011-01-01

    Figure copy is the most common method of visual spatial assessment in dementia evaluations, but performance on this test may be multifactorial. We examined the neuroanatomical substrates of figure copy performance in 46 patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 48 patients with the behavioral variant of Frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD). A group of…

  13. Vascular pathology in Alzheimer disease: correlation of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and arteriosclerosis/lipohyalinosis with cognitive decline.

    PubMed

    Thal, Dietmar Rudolf; Ghebremedhin, Estifanos; Orantes, Mario; Wiestler, Otmar D

    2003-12-01

    Sporadic, late-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) constitutes the most frequent cause of dementia in the elderly population. AD-related pathology is often accompanied by vascular changes. The predominant vascular lesions in AD are cerebral amyloid angiopathy (CAA) and arteriosclerosis/lipohyalinosis (AS/LH). The present study was carried out to examine the coincidence of these small vessel pathologies during the development of cognitive deficits, amyloid beta-protein (A beta) deposition, and neurofibrillary tangle (NFT) formation in sporadic late-onset AD. We correlated the clinical dementia rating (CDR) score, the sequential extension of AD-related A beta deposition into different parts of the brain, and the extension of NFTs to involve more brain regions with the distribution of CAA and AS/LH in 52 human autopsy brains. The extension of CAA and AS/LH to involve different areas of the brain was associated with a rise of CDR scores and an increase in the extension of A beta deposition and NFT generation. AD cases showed a higher number of regions with CAA and AS/LH compared to nondemented patients with AD-related pathology and controls. Moreover, we demonstrated a hierarchical sequence in which the different regions of the brain exhibited CAA and AS/LH-affected vessels, allowing the distinction of 3 stages in the development of CAA and AS/LH. The first stage of CAA involved leptomeningeal and neocortical vessels. The second stage was characterized by additional A beta deposition in allocortical and midbrain vessels. Finally, in a third stage, CAA was observed in the basal ganglia, the thalamus, and in the lower brainstem. In contrast, AS/LH initially affected the basal ganglia in stage A. In stage B this pathology made inroads into the deep white matter, the leptomeningeal arteries of the cortex, the cerebellum, and into the thalamus. Stage C was characterized by AS/LH in brainstem vessels. Our results demonstrate widespread CAA and AS/LH to be associated with the

  14. Comparing Cognitive Profiles of Licensed Drivers with Mild Alzheimer's Disease and Mild Dementia with Lewy Bodies

    PubMed Central

    Gagnon, Sylvain

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. Alzheimer's disease (AD) and dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) constitute two of the most common forms of dementia in North America. Driving is a primary means of mobility among older adults and the risk of dementia increases with advanced age. The purpose of this paper is to describe the cognitive profile of licensed drivers with mild AD and mild DLB. Method. Licensed drivers with mild AD, mild DLB, and healthy controls completed neuropsychological tests measuring general cognition, attention, visuospatial/perception, language, and cognitive fluctuations. Results. The results showed differences between healthy controls and demented participants on almost all neuropsychological measures. Participants with early DLB were found to perform significantly worse on some measures of attention and visuospatial functioning in comparison with early AD. Discussion. Future research should examine the relationship between neuropsychological measures and driving outcomes among individuals with mild AD and mild DLB. PMID:27774333

  15. Anti-dementia Activity of Nobiletin, a Citrus Flavonoid: A Review of Animal Studies.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Akira; Ohizumi, Yasushi; Yamada, Kiyofumi

    2014-08-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by the progressive decline of cognitive function and has a detrimental impact worldwide. Despite intensive laboratory and clinical research over the last three decades, pharmacological options for the prevention and effective long-term treatment of AD are not currently available. Consequently, successful therapeutic and preventive treatments for AD are needed. When researching materials from natural resources having anti-dementia drug activity, we identified nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavone from the peel of Citrus depressa. Nobiletin exhibited memory-improving effects in various animal models of dementia and exerted a wide range of beneficial effects against pathological features of AD including amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology, tau hyperphosphorylation, oxidative stress, cholinergic neurodegeneration and dysfunction of synaptic plasticity-related signaling, suggesting this natural compound could become a novel drug for the treatment and prevention of AD.

  16. Anti-dementia Activity of Nobiletin, a Citrus Flavonoid: A Review of Animal Studies

    PubMed Central

    Nakajima, Akira

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD), the most common form of dementia among the elderly, is characterized by the progressive decline of cognitive function and has a detrimental impact worldwide. Despite intensive laboratory and clinical research over the last three decades, pharmacological options for the prevention and effective long-term treatment of AD are not currently available. Consequently, successful therapeutic and preventive treatments for AD are needed. When researching materials from natural resources having anti-dementia drug activity, we identified nobiletin, a polymethoxylated flavone from the peel of Citrus depressa. Nobiletin exhibited memory-improving effects in various animal models of dementia and exerted a wide range of beneficial effects against pathological features of AD including amyloid-β (Aβ) pathology, tau hyperphosphorylation, oxidative stress, cholinergic neurodegeneration and dysfunction of synaptic plasticity-related signaling, suggesting this natural compound could become a novel drug for the treatment and prevention of AD. PMID:25191498

  17. Cortical Thickness in Dementia with Lewy Bodies and Alzheimer's Disease: A Comparison of Prodromal and Dementia Stages

    PubMed Central

    Blanc, Frederic; Colloby, Sean J.; Philippi, Nathalie; de Pétigny, Xavier; Jung, Barbara; Demuynck, Catherine; Phillipps, Clélie; Anthony, Pierre; Thomas, Alan; Bing, Fabrice; Lamy, Julien; Martin-Hunyadi, Catherine; O'Brien, John T.; Cretin, Benjamin; McKeith, Ian; Armspach, Jean-Paul; Taylor, John-Paul

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To assess and compare cortical thickness (CTh) of patients with prodromal Dementia with Lewy bodies (pro-DLB), prodromal Alzheimer's disease (pro-AD), DLB dementia (DLB-d), AD dementia (AD-d) and normal ageing. Methods Study participants(28 pro-DLB, 27 pro-AD, 31 DLB-d, 54 AD-d and 33 elderly controls) underwent 3Tesla T1 3D MRI and detailed clinical and cognitive assessments. We used FreeSurfer analysis package to measure CTh and investigate patterns of cortical thinning across groups. Results Comparison of CTh between pro-DLB and pro-AD (p<0.05, FDR corrected) showed more right anterior insula thinning in pro-DLB, and more bilateral parietal lobe and left parahippocampal gyri thinning in pro-AD. Comparison of prodromal patients to healthy elderly controls showed the involvement of the same regions. In DLB-d (p<0.05, FDR corrected) cortical thinning was found predominantly in the right temporo-parietal junction, and insula, cingulate, orbitofrontal and lateral occipital cortices. In AD-d(p<0.05, FDR corrected),the most significant areas affected included the entorhinal cortices, parahippocampal gyri and parietal lobes. The comparison of AD-d and DLB-d demonstrated more CTh in AD-d in the left entorhinal cortex (p<0.05, FDR corrected). Conclusion Cortical thickness is a sensitive measure for characterising patterns of grey matter atrophy in early stages of DLB distinct from AD. Right anterior insula involvement may be a key region at the prodromal stage of DLB and needs further investigation. PMID:26061655

  18. [Evaluation of animal-assisted therapy for the elderly with senile dementia in a day care program].

    PubMed

    Kanamori, M; Suzuki, M; Yamamoto, K; Kanda, M; Matsui, Y; Kozima, E; Takeuchi, S; Oshiro, H

    2001-09-01

    We conducted animal-assisted therapy (AAT) for the elderly with senile dementia in a day care center. AAT was performed between July 27 and October 12, 1999 for a total of six biweekly sessions. The AAT group consisted of 7 subjects; 5 with senile dementia of Alzheimer's type (SDAT) and 2 with vascular dementia (VD). The control group was 20 elderly subjects (7 SDAT, 13 VD). The results were as follows: Comparing between MMS scores at the baseline and those three months later, the average score on MMS before AAT (baseline) was 11.43 (+/- 9.00), and that three months later was 12.29 (+/- 9.69). In the AAT group, the average baseline N-ADL score was 28.43 (+/- 14.00) and that after ATT was 29.57 (+/- 14.47). In the AAT group, the average baseline score on Behave-AD was 11.14 (+/- 4.85), and that three months after AAT was 7.29 (+/- 7.11) (p < 0.05). In the control group, the average baseline score was 5.45 (+/- 3.27) and that three month later was 5.63 (+/- 3.59). However, the results of eight subscales of communication behavior three months later were significantly low comparing to those at the baseline in the control group. The evaluation of CgA, which was a mental stress index, showed a decreasing tendency in the AAT group. Our findings suggested we should use several evaluation methods for evaluation of the changes of patients receiving AAT.

  19. Injury markers but not amyloid markers are associated with rapid progression from mild cognitive impairment to dementia in Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    van Rossum, Ineke A; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Knol, Dirk L; van der Flier, Wiesje M; Teunissen, Charlotte E; Barkhof, Frederik; Blankenstein, Marinus A; Scheltens, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is a common cause of mild cognitive impairment (MCI). However, the time between the diagnosis of MCI and the diagnosis of dementia is highly variable. In this study we investigated which known risk factors and biomarkers of AD pathology were associated with rapid progression from MCI to dementia. Of the 203 subjects with MCI, 91 progressed to AD-type dementia and were considered to have MCI-AD at baseline. Subjects with MCI-AD were older, more frequently female and carrier of the APOE-ε4 allele, had lower scores on the Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE), more medial temporal lobe atrophy (MTA) and lower levels of Aβ1-42 and increased levels of t-tau and p-tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) compared to subjects without AD-type dementia at follow up. Of the 91 subjects with MCI-AD, we had data available of CSF (n = 56), MTA (n = 76), and APOE-genotype (n = 63). Among the subjects with MCI-AD, MTA (hazard ratio (HR) 2.2, p = 0.004) and low MMSE score (HR 2.0 p = 0.007) were associated with rapid progression to dementia. High CSF t-tau (HR 1.7, p = 0.07) and p-tau (1.7, p = 0.08) tended to be associated with rapid progression to dementia. CSF Aβ1-42, APOE status, age, gender, and educational level were not associated with time to dementia. Our findings implicate a different role for biomarkers in diagnosis and prognosis of MCI-AD. While amyloid markers can be used to identify MCI-AD, injury markers may predict rapid progression to dementia.

  20. Nutritional management of older adults with cognitive decline and dementia.

    PubMed

    Ogawa, Sumito

    2014-04-01

    Age-related cognitive decline is a main predictor of disability among elderly people, and with the continued expansion of the aging population and the increase in life expectancy, the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment and dementia represented by Alzheimer's disease (AD), which is a multifactorial neurodegenerative disorder of older adults, have increased. Recent epidemiological and observational studies suggest a relationship exists between lifestyle factors, including nutrition and diet, and cognitive function in aging adults. It is also suggested that malnutrition and nutrient deficiencies are associated with cognitive decline in patients with dementia. There are a variety of nutritional factors, including nutritional status and dietary patterns, that might be associated with cognitive function, and specific micronutrients and dietary components have been suggested to have an association with cognitive function as well. Based on these findings and evidence, evaluation of nutritional state, as well as nutritional intervention, might be able to play a role in the management and prevention of dementia.

  1. Disruption of the Postsynaptic Density in Alzheimer’s Disease and Other Neurodegenerative Dementias

    PubMed Central

    Gong, Yuesong; Lippa, Carol F.

    2010-01-01

    The most common causes of neurodegenerative dementia include Alzheimer’s disease (AD), dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB), and frontotemporal dementia (FTD). We believe that, in all 3, aggregates of pathogenic proteins are pathological substrates which are associated with a loss of synaptic function/plasticity. The synaptic plasticity relies on the normal integration of glutamate receptors at the postsynaptic density (PSD). The PSD organizes synaptic proteins to mediate the functional and structural plasticity of the excitatory synapse and to maintain synaptic homeostasis. Here, we will discuss the relevant disruption of the protein network at the PSD in these dementias and the accumulation of the pathological changes at the PSD years before clinical symptoms. We suggest that the functional and structural plasticity changes of the PSD may contribute to the loss of molecular homeostasis within the synapse (and contribute to early symptoms) in these dementias. PMID:20858652

  2. Raising awareness of research evidence among health professionals delivering dementia care: Are knowledge translation workshops useful?

    PubMed

    Goodenough, Belinda; Fleming, Richard; Young, Michael; Burns, Kim; Jones, Cindy; Forbes, Fallon

    2016-10-24

    Providing information about the latest research via educational sessions to health professionals caring for people with dementia may be insufficient to drive change. This project explored self-reported impacts on practice change of adding information about knowledge translation (KT) to a national dementia education program. Six national workshop days were held. Each provided the option of participating in a Principles of KT and innovation implementation seminar in addition to a clinical topic update (sexualities and dementia, or managing behavioral and psychological symptoms of dementia). Six months postworkshop, 321 participants were invited to complete a research utilization survey. Seventy-five responded. KT seminar participants were more likely to report instrumental outcomes (e.g. changed policies, procedures) than those who did not participate in the KT seminar. Including KT information in educational sessions for health professionals may increase the likelihood of practice change in the field of dementia care and warrants further research.

  3. Bridging the Translation Gap: From Dementia Risk Assessment to Advice on Risk Reduction

    PubMed Central

    Anstey, Kaarin J.; Eramudugolla, Ranmalee; Hosking, Diane E.; Lautenschlager, Nicola T.; Dixon, Roger A.

    2015-01-01

    Dementia risk reduction is a global health and fiscal priority given the current lack of effective treatments and the projected increased number of dementia cases due to population ageing. There are often gaps among academic research, clinical practice, and public policy. We present information on the evidence for dementia risk reduction and evaluate the progress required to formulate this evidence into clinical practice guidelines. This narrative review provides capsule summaries of current evidence for 25 risk and protective factors associated with AD and dementia according to domains including biomarkers, demographic, lifestyle, medical, and environment. We identify the factors for which evidence is strong and thereby especially useful for risk assessment with the goal of personalising recommendations for risk reduction. We also note gaps in knowledge, and discuss how the field may progress towards clinical practice guidelines for dementia risk reduction. PMID:26380232

  4. Ultrasound -- Vascular

    MedlinePlus

    ... plan for their effective treatment. detect blood clots (deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in the major veins of ... What are the limitations of Vascular Ultrasound? Vessels deep in the body are harder to see than ...

  5. Midlife psychological stress and risk of dementia: a 35-year longitudinal population study.

    PubMed

    Johansson, Lena; Guo, Xinxin; Waern, Margda; Ostling, Svante; Gustafson, Deborah; Bengtsson, Calle; Skoog, Ingmar

    2010-08-01

    The number of people with dementia has increased dramatically with global ageing. Nevertheless, the pathogeneses of these diseases are not sufficiently understood. The present study aims to analyse the relationship between psychological stress in midlife and the development of dementia in late-life. A representative sample of females (n = 1462) aged 38-60 years were examined in 1968-69 and re-examined in 1974-75, 1980-81, 1992-93 and 2000-03. Psychological stress was rated according to a standardized question in 1968, 1974 and 1980. Dementia was diagnosed according to Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders criteria based on information from neuropsychiatric examinations, informant interviews, hospital records and registry data. During the 35-year follow-up, 161 females developed dementia (105 Alzheimer's disease, 40 vascular dementia and 16 other dementias). We found that the risk of dementia (hazard ratios, 95% confidence intervals) was increased in females reporting frequent/constant stress in 1968 (1.60, 1.10-2.34), in 1974 (1.65, 1.12-2.41) and in 1980 (1.60, 1.01-2.52). Frequent/constant stress reported in 1968 and 1974 was associated with Alzheimer's disease. Reporting stress at one, two or three examinations was related to a sequentially higher dementia risk. Compared to females reporting no stress, hazard ratios (95% confidence intervals) for incident dementia were 1.10 (0.71-1.71) for females reporting frequent/constant stress at one examination, 1.73 (1.01-2.95) for those reporting stress at two examinations and 2.51 (1.33-4.77) at three examinations. To conclude, we found an association between psychological stress in middle-aged women and development of dementia, especially Alzheimer's disease. More studies are needed to confirm our findings and to study potential neurobiological mechanisms of these associations.

  6. Vitamin B1 (thiamine) and dementia.

    PubMed

    Gibson, Gary E; Hirsch, Joseph A; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Jordan, Barry D; Cirio, Rosanna T; Elder, Jessica

    2016-03-01

    The earliest and perhaps best example of an interaction between nutrition and dementia is related to thiamine (vitamin B1). Throughout the last century, research showed that thiamine deficiency is associated with neurological problems, including cognitive deficits and encephalopathy. Multiple similarities exist between classical thiamine deficiency and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in that both are associated with cognitive deficits and reductions in brain glucose metabolism. Thiamine-dependent enzymes are critical components of glucose metabolism that are reduced in the brains of AD patients and by thiamine decline, and a decrease in their levels could account for the reduction in glucose metabolism. In preclinical models, reduced thiamine can drive AD-like abnormalities, including memory deficits, neuritic plaques, and hyperphosphorylation of tau. Furthermore, excess thiamine diminishes AD-like pathologies. In addition to dietary deficits, drugs or other manipulations that interfere with thiamine absorption can cause thiamine deficiency. Elucidating the reasons why the brains of AD patients are functionally thiamine deficient and determining the effects of thiamine restoration may provide critical information to help treat patients with AD.

  7. Vitamin B1 (thiamine) and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Gibson, Gary E.; Hirsch, Joseph A.; Fonzetti, Pasquale; Jordon, Barry D.; Cirio, Rosanna T.; Elder, Jessica

    2016-01-01

    The earliest and perhaps best example of an interaction between nutrition and dementia is related to thiamine (vitamin B1). Throughout the last century, research showed that thiamine deficiency is associated with neurological problems, including cognitive deficits and encephalopathy. Multiple similarities exist between classical thiamine deficiency and Alzheimer’s disease (AD) in that both are associated with cognitive deficits and reductions in brain glucose metabolism. Thiamine-dependent enzymes are critical components of glucose metabolism that are reduced in the brains of AD patients and by thiamine deficiency, and their decline could account for the reduction in glucose metabolism. In preclinical models, reduced thiamine can drive AD-like abnormalities, including memory deficits, plaques, and hyperphosphorylation of tau. Furthermore, excess thiamine diminishes AD-like pathologies. In addition to dietary deficits, drugs, or other manipulations that interfere with thiamine absorption can cause thiamine deficiency. Elucidating the reasons why the brains of AD patients are functionally thiamine deficient and determining the effects of thiamine restoration may provide critical information to help treat patients with AD. PMID:26971083

  8. [Automobile driving capacity in dementia].

    PubMed

    Seeger, Rolf

    2015-04-01

    Dementia influences at an early stage the driving aptitude of motor vehicle steering persons. Every year in Switzerland, around 16'000 driving permit holders suffer newly from dementia; therefore the driving aptitude is questioned, especially because of possibly limited executive functions. Individuals with early-stage dementia often may show a dangerous driving stile. However, a mild dementia does not a priori exclude the driving aptitude, and less than half of these drivers can continue driving for another 1 - 3 years. In contrast, there is no further driving aptitude in presence of moderate dementia. In the assessment of driving aptitude, the underlying cause of dementia is always taken into account. Cognitive short tests such as the Mini-Mental Status Exam, Clock Drawing Test and Trail-Making Test are not suitable to make reliable statements about the aptitude to drive, but these tests are very important for the initial diagnosis of dementia in primary care practice and can lead the way for further examination concerning driving aptitude. The legally prescribed regular check-up for motorists aged over 70 years in Switzerland provides an ideal opportunity for early detection of incipient dementia. The practical procedure for the assessment of aptitude to drive in the primary care practice is presented. The physician-guided on-road driving test represents a meaningful, practical and relatively cost-effective tool for the evaluation of driving aptitude in cases of doubt.

  9. Shared neural correlates of limb apraxia in early stages of Alzheimer's dementia and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed

    Johnen, Andreas; Brandstetter, Lisa; Kärgel, Christian; Wiendl, Heinz; Lohmann, Hubertus; Duning, Thomas

    2016-11-01

    Limb apraxia denotes a cognitive impairment of gesture production. Lesion studies in patients with stroke point towards distinct neural processing streams for limb imitation and object-pantomime within left parietal and temporal cortex, respectively. Despite its frequent occurrence as an early symptom in both, Alzheimer's dementia (AD) and behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), neural correlates of limb apraxia within these patient groups remain unexplored. Using voxel-based morphometry and multiple regression models, associations between limb apraxia and gray matter (GM) volume were investigated in 36 dementia patients (18 AD, 18 bvFTD) in early disease stages. Both dementia subtypes showed a comparable degree of limb apraxia. Although the patient groups showed distinct atrophy patterns with significantly more severe frontal GM loss in bvFTD, we found similar neural correlates of limb apraxia within posterior brain regions for both dementia subtypes: limb-imitation was associated with bilateral atrophy of superior, inferior and medial parietal cortex. Object-pantomime showed associations with GM volume in right middle temporal and angular gyrus. Our results argue for shared neural correlates of limb apraxia in AD and bvFTD and validate the syndrome as an important neuropsychological feature across different etiologies. Moreover, our results are compatible with neural models derived from patients with stroke, suggesting partly distinct neural representations of imitation and pantomime. Compared to patients with stroke however, AD and bvFTD showed more bilateral or even right lateralized neural representations of limb apraxia, proposing a greater influence of visuospatial impairments and spatial body representation deficits on praxis performance.

  10. Increased Susceptibility to Oxidative Death of Lymphocytes from Alzheimer Patients Correlates with Dementia Severity

    PubMed Central

    Ponce, Daniela P.; Salech, Felipe; SanMartin, Carol D.; Silva, Monica; Xiong, Chengjie; Roe, Catherine M.; Henriquez, Mauricio; Quest, Andrew F.; Behrens, Maria I.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported on enhanced susceptibility to death of lymphocytes from Alzheimer’s disease (AD) patients when exposed to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2)-induced oxidative stress and an increased resistance to death in those of patients with a history of skin cancer. This is consistent with our hypothesis proposing that the cellular machinery controlling cell death is deregulated in opposite directions in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and cancer, to explain the inverse association observed in epidemiological studies. Here we investigated whether the observed increased susceptibility correlates with the degree of dementia severity. Peripheral lymphocytes from 23 AD patients, classified using the Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) into severe dementia (CDR 3, n=10) and mild-to-moderate dementia (CDR 1–2, n=13), and 15 healthy controls (HC) (CDR 0), were exposed to H2O2 for 20 hours. Lymphocyte death was determined by flow cytometry and propidium iodide staining. The greatest susceptibility to H2O2-induced death was observed for lymphocytes from severe dementia patients, whereas those with mild-to-moderate dementia exhibited intermediate values, compared to healthy controls. A significant increase in the apoptosis/necrosis ratio was found in AD patients. Poly (ADP-ribosyl) polymerase-1 (PARP-1) inhibition significantly protected from H2O2-induced death of lymphocytes, whereby a lower degree of protection was observed in severe AD patients. Moreover, inhibition of PARP-1 abolished the differences in apoptosis/necrosis ratios observed between the three groups of patients. These results support the notion that AD is a systemic disorder, whereby enhanced susceptibility to H2O2-induced death in peripheral lymphocytes correlates with dementia severity and enhanced death in AD patients is attributable to a PARP-dependent increase in the apoptosis/necrosis ratio. PMID:25274115

  11. Hippocampal volumes predict risk of dementia with Lewy bodies in mild cognitive impairment

    PubMed Central

    Lesnick, Timothy; Ferman, Tanis J.; Przybelski, Scott A.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Smith, Glenn E.; Kremers, Walter K.; Knopman, David S.; Jack, Clifford R.; Petersen, Ronald C.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To predict the risk of probable dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) competing with Alzheimer disease (AD) dementia by hippocampal volume (HV) in patients with mild cognitive impairment (MCI) with impairments in amnestic or nonamnestic cognitive domains. Methods: Patients with MCI (n = 160) from the Mayo Clinic Alzheimer's Disease Research Center, who participated in an MRI study at baseline from 2005 to 2014, were followed with approximately annual clinical evaluations. HVs were analyzed from 3T MRIs using FreeSurfer (5.3). Hippocampal atrophy was determined from the most normal 10th percentile of the measurement distributions in a separate cohort of clinically diagnosed patients with AD dementia. The subdistribution hazard ratios for progression to probable DLB and AD dementia were estimated by taking into account the competing risks. Results: During a median (range) follow-up of 2.0 (0.7–8.1) years, 20 (13%) patients with MCI progressed to probable DLB, and 61 (38%) progressed to AD dementia. The estimated subdistribution hazard ratio (95% confidence interval) for normal HV relative to hippocampal atrophy for progression to AD dementia was 0.56 (0.34–0.91; p = 0.02) after taking into account the competing risks. The estimated hazard ratio for normal HV relative to hippocampal atrophy for progression to probable DLB was 4.22 (1.42–12.6; p = 0.01) after adjusting for age and after including the MCI subtype in the model. Conclusions: Preserved hippocampal volumes are associated with increased risk of probable DLB competing with AD dementia in patients with MCI. Preservation of HV may support prodromal DLB over AD, particularly in patients with MCI with nonamnestic features. PMID:27807186

  12. Profile of dementia in a Nigerian community--types, pattern of impairment, and severity rating.

    PubMed Central

    Ogunniyi, A.; Gureje, O.; Baiyewu, O.; Unverzagt, F.; Hall, K. S.; Oluwole, S.; Osuntokun, B. O.; Hendrie, H. C.

    1997-01-01

    Out of 2494 subjects screened in a Nigerian community, 28 patients with dementia were identified. Alzheimer's disease was diagnosed in 18 patients (64.3%), 16 of whom had probable Alzheimer's disease. Eight patients (28.6%) had vascular dementia while one patient each had parkinsonism with dementia and depression with dementia. Patients with Alzheimer's disease were significantly older, predominantly females and illiterates. Cognitive deficit commonly took the form of memory and judgment impairment while financial mismanagement was the most frequent impaired activity of daily living. More than half of the cases had mild disease on severity rating and were comprised mainly of Alzheimer's disease subjects. These results confirm the higher frequency of Alzheimer's disease over the other types as reported in other communities. PMID:9195799

  13. Caregiver- and Patient-Directed Interventions for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    2008-01-01

    , in seniors with mild to moderate dementia? 3.2 Nonpharmacologic and Nonexercise Interventions to Improve Cognitive Functioning in Seniors With Dementia – Secondary Prevention What is the effectiveness of nonpharmacologic interventions to improve cognitive functioning in seniors with mild to moderate dementia? 3.3 Physical Exercise for Delaying the Onset of Dementia – Primary Prevention Can exercise decrease the risk of subsequent cognitive decline/dementia? 3.4 Cognitive Interventions for Delaying the Onset of Dementia – Primary Prevention Does cognitive training decrease the risk of cognitive impairment, deterioration in the performance of basic ADLs or instrumental activities of daily living (IADLs),1 or incidence of dementia in seniors with good cognitive and physical functioning? Clinical Need: Target Population and Condition Secondary Prevention2 Exercise Physical deterioration is linked to dementia. This is thought to be due to reduced muscle mass leading to decreased activity levels and muscle atrophy, increasing the potential for unsafe mobility while performing basic ADLs such as eating, bathing, toileting, and functional ability. Improved physical conditioning for seniors with dementia may extend their independent mobility and maintain performance of ADL. Nonpharmacologic and Nonexercise Interventions Cognitive impairments, including memory problems, are a defining feature of dementia. These impairments can lead to anxiety, depression, and withdrawal from activities. The impact of these cognitive problems on daily activities increases pressure on caregivers. Cognitive interventions aim to improve these impairments in people with mild to moderate dementia. Primary Prevention3 Exercise Various vascular risk factors have been found to contribute to the development of dementia (e.g., hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, overweight). Physical exercise is important in promoting overall and vascular health. However, it is unclear whether physical

  14. [Proposal of criteria for clinical diagnosis of mild cognitive impairment, dementia and Alzheimer's disease].

    PubMed

    Robles, A; Del Ser, T; Alom, J; Peña-Casanova, J

    2002-01-01

    The most widely accepted criteria for Alzheimer's disease (AD) diagnosis (NINCDS-ADRDA and DSM-IV) do not allow to differentiate accurately between AD and other degenerative dementias which have recently formulated criteria for its clinical diagnosis. Therefore, it is necessary to bring AD diagnostic criteria up to date in order to optimise their specificity, by assessing its most specific clinical manifestations, its most representative markers and those features typical of other diseases which are usually taken into account for a differential diagnosis. According to the latest reports on the subject, the disturbances suffered by memory, behaviour and the rest of cognitive and executive functions must be equally considered when establishing the syndromic diagnosis of dementia; this will always require the coexistence of an evident functional impairment. Due to this, the concepts of "dementia" and "mild cognitive impairment" should be clearly distinguished. For the time being, AD can only be diagnosed when dementia has been proved and this shows a series of cognitive, behavioural and neurological features which are representative of it. Nevertheless, some diagnostic markers appear to be precocious and specific enough to try to identify those patients who suffer from mild cognitive impairment due to an incipient stage of AD. We are suggesting some criteria for the clinical diagnosis of dementia, mild cognitive impairment and AD that seem to be more detail

  15. Adding Value.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Orsini, Larry L.; Hudack, Lawrence R.; Zekan, Donald L.

    1999-01-01

    The value-added statement (VAS), relatively unknown in the United States, is used in financial reports by many European companies. Saint Bonaventure University (New York) has adapted a VAS to make it appropriate for not-for-profit universities by identifying stakeholder groups (students, faculty, administrators/support personnel, creditors, the…

  16. Prevention of dementia and cerebroprotection with antihypertensive drugs.

    PubMed

    Hanon, Olivier; Seux, Marie Laure; Lenoir, Hermine; Rigaud, Anne Sophie; Forette, Françoise

    2004-06-01

    High blood pressure is a major risk factor for stroke and is also closely correlated with cognitive decline and dementia. Indeed, most longitudinal studies showed that cognitive functioning is often inversely proportional to blood pressure values measured 15 or 20 years previously. Because of the aging of the population, the frequency of stroke and dementia will dramatically increase in the coming years. Therefore, the prevention of cerebrovascular and cognitive disorders represents a major challenge. Antihypertensive drugs have shown clinical benefits in both primary and secondary prevention of strokes. Consensus is generally that blood-pressure lowering represents the major determinant of the benefit conferred by the antihypertensive treatment for stroke prevention; however, recent studies have suggested some differences between classes of antihypertensive drugs. The results of therapeutic trials (Systolic Hypertension in Europe, Perindopril Protection Against Recurrent Stroke Study [PROGRESS]) open the way to the prevention of dementia (vascular or Alzheimer's type) by antihypertensive treatments. These two studies suggest different mechanisms for the prevention of cognitive decline using antihypertensive drugs. In this context, reduced incidence of dementia should be the primary outcome of future trials comparing different classes of antihypertensive drugs.

  17. Teaching Mands to Older Adults with Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Oleson, Chelsey R.; Baker, Jonathan C.

    2014-01-01

    Millions of Americans are diagnosed with dementia, and that number is only expected to rise. The diagnosis of dementia comes with impairments, especially in language. Furthermore, dementia-related functional declines appear to be moderated by environmental variables (Alzheimer's Association, "Alzheimer's & Dementia: The Journal of the…

  18. Cortical function in Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Pan; Zhang, Huihong; Han, Lu

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objectives Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and the behavioral variant of frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD) are the most common causes of dementia; however, their overlapping clinical syndromes and involved brain regions make a differential diagnosis difficult. We aimed to identify the differences in the cognition and motor cortex excitability between AD and bvFTD patients. Methods Twenty-seven AD patients and 30 bvFTD patients were included in the study. Each participant received a neurological evaluation. Cognitive event-related potentials (P300) were recorded during an auditory oddball task. Next, the excitability of the motor cortex, including the resting, facilitated motor threshold (RMT and FMT) and cortical silent period (CSP), were assessed during transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). Results The bvFTD patients exhibited significantly longer P300 latencies compared with AD patients. There was a significant negative correlation between cognition and P300 latency in the bvFTD group. The AD patients showed significantly reduced RMT and FMT values compared to the bvFTD group; however, no significant correlation was found between AD severity and the excitability of the motor cortex. Conclusions Cognition and motor cortical functions are different between AD and bvFTD patients. Noninvasive electrophysiological examinations have the potential to identify unique pathophysiological features that can be used to differentially diagnose AD and bvFTD patients. PMID:28123831

  19. The diagnosis of dementia due to Alzheimer’s disease: Recommendations from the National Institute on Aging-Alzheimer’s Association workgroups on diagnostic guidelines for Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    McKhann, Guy M.; Knopman, David S.; Chertkow, Howard; Hyman, Bradley T.; Jack, Clifford R.; Kawas, Claudia H.; Klunk, William E.; Koroshetz, Walter J.; Manly, Jennifer J.; Mayeux, Richard; Mohs, Richard C.; Morris, John C.; Rossor, Martin N.; Scheltens, Philip; Carrillo, Maria C.; Thies, Bill; Weintraub, Sandra; Phelps, Creighton H.

    2012-01-01

    The National Institute on Aging and the Alzheimer’s Association charged a workgroup with the task of revising the 1984 criteria for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) dementia. The workgroup sought to ensure that the revised criteria would be flexible enough to be used by both general healthcare providers without access to neuropsychological testing, advanced imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid measures, and specialized investigators involved in research or in clinical trial studies who would have these tools available. We present criteria for all-cause dementia and for AD dementia. We retained the general framework of probable AD dementia from the 1984 criteria. On the basis of the past 27 years of experience, we made several changes in the clinical criteria for the diagnosis. We also retained the term possible AD dementia, but redefined it in a manner more focused than before. Bio-marker evidence was also integrated into the diagnostic formulations for probable and possible AD dementia for use in research settings. The core clinical criteria for AD dementia will continue to be the cornerstone of the diagnosis in clinical practice, but biomarker evidence is expected to enhance the pathophysiological specificity of the diagnosis of AD dementia. Much work lies ahead for validating the biomarker diagnosis of AD dementia. PMID:21514250

  20. Cognitive-behavioral treatment for anxiety in patients with dementia: two case studies.

    PubMed

    Kraus, Cynthia A; Seignourel, Paul; Balasubramanyam, Valli; Snow, A Lynn; Wilson, Nancy L; Kunik, Mark E; Schulz, Paul E; Stanley, Melinda A

    2008-05-01

    Anxiety is common in dementia and is associated with decreased independence and increased risk of nursing home placement. However, little is known about the treatment of anxiety in dementia. This article reports results from two patients who were treated with a modified version of cognitive-behavioral therapy for anxiety in dementia (CBT-AD). Modifications were made in the content, structure, and learning strategies of CBT to adapt skills to the cognitive limitations of these patients and include collaterals (i.e., family members, friends, or other caregivers) in the treatment process. The patients received education and awareness training and were taught the skills of diaphragmatic breathing, coping self-statements, exposure, and behavioral activation. The Clinical Dementia Rating (CDR) Scale was used to characterize dementia severity and determine eligibility for treatment (a CDR score of 0.5 to 2.0 was required for participation). Other measures included the Rating Anxiety in Dementia scale, the Neuropsychiatric Inventory Anxiety subscale, and the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview. Outcome data showed improvement in anxiety as measured by standardized rating scales. We conclude that CBT-AD is potentially useful in treating anxiety in dementia patients and that this technique merits further study.

  1. Oxytocin for frontotemporal dementia

    PubMed Central

    MacKinley, Julia; Blair, Mervin; Oliver, Lindsay D.; Jesso, Sarah; Tartaglia, Maria C.; Borrie, Michael; Wells, Jennie; Dziobek, Isabel; Pasternak, Stephen; Mitchell, Derek G.V.; Rankin, Katherine; Kertesz, Andrew; Boxer, Adam

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To determine the safety and tolerability of 3 doses of intranasal oxytocin (Syntocinon; Novartis, Bern, Switzerland) administered to patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Methods: We conducted a randomized, parallel-group, double-blind, placebo-controlled study using a dose-escalation design to test 3 clinically feasible doses of intranasal oxytocin (24, 48, or 72 IU) administered twice daily for 1 week to 23 patients with behavioral variant FTD or semantic dementia (clinicaltrials.gov registration number NCT01386333). Primary outcome measures were safety and tolerability at each dose. Secondary measures explored efficacy across the combined oxytocin vs placebo groups and examined potential dose-related effects. Results: All 3 doses of intranasal oxytocin were safe and well tolerated. Conclusions: A multicenter trial is warranted to determine the therapeutic efficacy of long-term intranasal oxytocin for behavioral symptoms in FTD. Classification of evidence: This study provides Class I evidence that for patients with FTD, intranasal oxytocin is not significantly associated with adverse events or significant changes in the overall neuropsychiatric inventory. PMID:25503617

  2. Interrogating personhood and dementia

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Paul; Gilleard, Chris

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objectives: To interrogate the concept of personhood and its application to care practices for people with dementia. Method: We outline the work of Tom Kitwood on personhood and relate this to conceptualisations of personhood in metaphysics and in moral philosophy. Results: The philosophical concept of personhood has a long history. The metaphysical tradition examines the necessary and sufficient qualities that make up personhood such as agency, consciousness, identity, rationality and second-order reflexivity. Alternative viewpoints treat personhood as a matter of degree rather than as a superordinate category. Within moral philosophy personhood is treated as a moral status applicable to some or to all human beings. Conclusion: In the light of the multiple meanings attached to the term in both metaphysics and moral philosophy, personhood is a relatively unhelpful concept to act as the foundation for developing models and standards of care for people with dementia. Care, we suggest, should concentrate less on ambiguous and somewhat abstract terms such as personhood and focus instead on supporting people's existing capabilities, while minimising the harmful consequences of their incapacities. PMID:26708149

  3. Increased blood-brain barrier permeability is associated with dementia and diabetes but not amyloid pathology or APOE genotype.

    PubMed

    Janelidze, Shorena; Hertze, Joakim; Nägga, Katarina; Nilsson, Karin; Nilsson, Christer; Wennström, Malin; van Westen, Danielle; Blennow, Kaj; Zetterberg, Henrik; Hansson, Oskar

    2017-03-01

    Blood-brain barrier (BBB) dysfunction might be an important component of many neurodegenerative disorders. In this study, we investigated its role in dementia using large clinical cohorts. The cerebrospinal fluid (CSF)/plasma albumin ratio (Qalb), an indicator of BBB (and blood-CSF barrier) permeability, was measured in a total of 1015 individuals. The ratio was increased in patients with Alzheimer's disease, dementia with Lewy bodies or Parkinson's disease dementia, subcortical vascular dementia, and frontotemporal dementia compared with controls. However, this measure was not changed during preclinical or prodromal Alzheimer's disease and was not associated with amyloid positron emission tomography or APOE genotype. The Qalb was increased in diabetes mellitus and correlated positively with CSF biomarkers of angiogenesis and endothelial dysfunction (vascular endothelial growth factor, intracellular adhesion molecule 1, and vascular cell adhesion molecule 1). In healthy elderly, high body mass index and waist-hip ratio predicted increased Qalb 20 years later. In summary, BBB permeability is increased in major dementia disorders but does not relate to amyloid pathology or APOE genotype. Instead, BBB impairment may be associated with diabetes and brain microvascular damage.

  4. Brain atrophy in frontotemporal dementia.

    PubMed Central

    Frisoni, G B; Beltramello, A; Geroldi, C; Weiss, C; Bianchetti, A; Trabucchi, M

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate the pattern of regional brain atrophy in patients with frontotemporal dementia by comparing it with that in patients with Alzheimer's disease and normal controls. METHODS--Fourteen patients with frontotemporal dementia, 13 with moderate, and 33 with mild Alzheimer's disease, and 31 controls were studied. Atrophy was evaluated with linear measures in the anterior brain, medial temporal lobe, and hippocampal formation regions using MRI. RESULTS--Patients with frontotemporal dementia had greater atrophy in the anterior brain regions than patients with Alzheimer's disease or controls. Atrophy of the hippocampal formation, which best discriminates Alzheimer's disease from controls, was present also in patients with frontotemporal dementia. By contrast, atrophy of the medial temporal lobe, which is also present in Alzheimer's disease, was absent in frontotemporal dementia. CONCLUSION--A pattern of atrophy in the frontal lobes and hippocampal formation with sparing of the medial temporal lobe might be distinctive of frontotemporal dementia. Hippocampal involvement might not be specific for Alzheimer's disease and specific patterns of atrophy might be distinctive of some forms of degenerative dementia. Images PMID:8708683

  5. [FALLS IN PATIENTS WITH DEMENTIA].

    PubMed

    Aizen, Efraim

    2015-05-01

    Older people with dementia are at increased risk of falls and their consequences. Patients with dementia fall twice as often as elderly cognitively intact people and are at greater risk of injurious falls. Falls in older people with dementia cause higher rates of morbidity, mortality and institutionalization. There is limited literature attempting to show specific risk factors for falls in this population, mainly: Lewy body dementia, dementia related to Parkinson's disease and depression, psychotropic medication, functional disability and behavioral disturbances. The Physiological Profile Assessment (PPAJ has been found to be a good fall risk screening tool in this population. There are few trials that have shown limited effectiveness of targeted fall prevention programs in community-dwelling cognitively impaired elderly. The evidence from hospitals and residential care is not conclusive. However, it has been demonstrated that some interventions, primarily exercise interventions, can modify certain risk factors in patients with dementia. Further research is required in specifically targeting fall prevention in older people with dementia.

  6. The Role and Timing of Palliative Care in Supporting Persons with Intellectual Disability and Advanced Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, Mary; McCallion, Philip; Fahey-McCarthy, Elizabeth; Connaire, Kevin

    2011-01-01

    Aim: To better describe the role and timing of palliative care in supporting persons with intellectual disabilities and advanced dementia (AD). Background: Specialist palliative care providers have focused mostly on people with cancers. Working with persons with intellectual disabilities and AD offers opportunities to expand such palliative care…

  7. Health Co-Morbidities in Ageing Persons with Down Syndrome and Alzheimer's Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCarron, M.; Gill, M.; McCallion, P.; Begley, C.

    2005-01-01

    Consideration of the relationship between physical and mental health co-morbidities in ageing persons with Down syndrome (DS) and Alzheimer's dementia (AD) is of clinical importance both from a care and resource perspective. To investigate and measure health co-morbidities in ageing persons with Down syndrome with and without AD. Recorded physical…

  8. A Measure of Subjective Burden for Dementia Care: The Caregiving Difficulty Scale Intellectual Disability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCallion, P.; McCarron, M.; Force, L. T.

    2005-01-01

    It has been suggested in the literature on family caregiving for persons with Alzheimer's dementia (AD) that levels of objective and subjective burden among carers often predict institutionalization of the persons with AD. There is a paucity of measures to assess whether perceived burden among formal caregivers may also predict movement to more…

  9. Verb Agreements during On-Line Sentence Processing in Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Price, C.C.; Grossman, M.

    2005-01-01

    An on-line ''word detection'' paradigm was used to assess the comprehension of thematic and transitive verb agreements during sentence processing in individuals diagnosed with probable Alzheimer's Disease (AD, n=15) and Frontotemporal Dementia (FTD, n=14). AD, FTD, and control participants (n=17) were asked to listen for a word in a sentence.…

  10. Averting Dementia of the Alzheimer's Type in Women: Can Counselors Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Douthit, Kathryn Z.

    2007-01-01

    Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common cause of dementia in late life, taking its greatest toll on women over age 80. This article provides an overview of AD, including risk factors and counseling strategies targeting risk. Counseling strategies address stress, cardiovascular health, social integration, depression, and holistic wellness.

  11. An Experimental Approach to Detecting Dementia in Down Syndrome: A Paradigm for Alzheimer's Disease

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Linda D.; Scheibel, Kevin E.; Ringman, John M.; Sayre, James W.

    2007-01-01

    Measures developed from animal models of aging may detect dementia of the Alzheimer's type in a population at-risk for Alzheimer's disease (AD). Although, by middle age, individuals with Down syndrome (DS) show an extraordinarily high prevalence of AD-type pathology, their severe idiopathic cognitive deficits tend to confound the "clinical"…

  12. [Non cognitive symptoms in dementias].

    PubMed

    Vilalta Franch, J; López Pousa, S; Llinas Reglà, J

    1999-01-01

    In the phenomenology of dementia, the cognitive symptoms surround most of the interests both for investigators as clinicians. However, the non cognitive symptoms are shown so often they should become a major one in the clinical evaluation of the dementia syndrome. Moreover, the presence of this symptoms means more clinical severity, increases the institutionalization risk and causes a larger emotional burden for demented carers. On this work, the authors argue about the possible physiopathogenic causes related to cognitive and non cognitive aspects of dementia.

  13. Distributed cognition, dementia, and technology.

    PubMed

    Alm, Norman

    2015-01-01

    The devastating effects of dementia result from cognitive degradation, in particular, working-memory (short-term memory) and planning processes. In supporting people with dementia, carers must take over these cognitive functions on behalf of the other person. This is an exhausting job. Technology may be able to offer assistance here. Its development will be encouraged by viewing cognition as a distributed process, and not just as something that happens inside one person's head. This paper argues for this approach, with examples from existing technical and non-technical systems of support for people with dementia which have been proven to work.

  14. Cerebrospinal Fluid Biomarkers in Familial Forms of Alzheimer's Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia.

    PubMed

    Rostgaard, Nina; Waldemar, Gunhild; Nielsen, Jørgen Erik; Simonsen, Anja Hviid

    2015-01-01

    As dementia is a fast-growing health care problem, it is becoming an increasingly urgent need to provide an early diagnosis in order to offer patients the best medical treatment and care. Validated biomarkers which reflect the pathology and disease progression are essential for diagnosis and are important when developing new therapies. Today, the core protein biomarkers amyloid-β42, total tau and phosphorylated tau in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) are used to diagnose Alzheimer's disease (AD), because these biomarkers have shown to reflect the underlying amyloid and tau pathology. However, the biomarkers have proved insufficient predictors of dementias with a different pathology, e.g. frontotemporal dementia (FTD); furthermore, the biomarkers are not useful for early AD diagnosis. Familial dementias with a known disease-causing mutation can be extremely valuable to study; yet the biomarker profiles in patients with familial dementias are not clear. This review summarizes CSF biomarker findings from studies on symptomatic and presymptomatic individuals carrying a mutation in one of the genes known to cause early-onset familial AD or FTD. In conclusion, the biomarker profile of inherited AD is quite similar between carriers of different mutations as well as similar to the profile found in sporadic AD, whereas familial FTD does not seem to have a clear biomarker profile. Hence, new biomarkers are needed for FTD.

  15. Impact of Interventions to Reduce Alzheimer’s Disease Pathology on the Prevalence of Dementia in the Oldest-Old

    PubMed Central

    Brookmeyer, Ron; Kawas, Claudia H.; Abdallah, Nada; Paganini-Hill, Annlia; Kim, Ronald C.; Corrada, Maria M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The number of persons aged over 90 years will grow significantly in coming decades. This group has the highest rates of dementia, most commonly Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Methods Using The 90+ Study we developed a statistical model for dementia risk based on brain pathologies. Intervention scenarios which reduce or eliminate AD pathology were considered and the numbers of dementia cases among the U.S. oldest-old that could be prevented were estimated. Results U.S. dementia prevalence among the oldest-old will increase from 1.35 million in 2015 to 4.72 million in 2050.If interventions eliminate AD pathology, dementia prevalence would be reduced by approximately 50%, averting nearly 2.4 million cases in 2050. However, large numbers of dementia cases would still remain. Discussion Reducing AD pathology would significantly decrease the public health burden of dementia. However, other interventions are needed to address the burden associated with other dementing pathologies prevalent in the oldest-old. PMID:26900132

  16. Improving Dementia Health Literacy Using the FLOW Mnemonic: Pilot Findings from the Old SCHOOL Hip-Hop Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Noble, James M.; Hedmann, Monique G.; Williams, Olajide

    2015-01-01

    Background: Dementia health literacy is low among the public and likely poses a significant barrier to Alzheimer's disease (AD) symptom recognition and treatment, particularly among minority populations already facing higher AD burden. We evaluated the pilot phase of a novel AD health education program, Old SCHOOL (Seniors Can Have Optimal…

  17. What Is Vascular Disease?

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  18. Vascular Disease Foundation

    MedlinePlus

    ... Contact Us Vascular Disease What is Vascular Disease? Education and Awareness Vascular Diseases Abdominal Aortic Aneurysm Aortic Dissection Arteriovenous Malformation Atherosclerosis Buerger's Disease Carotid Artery Disease ...

  19. Dementia - behavior and sleep problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000029.htm Dementia - behavior and sleep problems To use the sharing features on this ... get to sleep and stay asleep Tips for Behavior and Sleep Problems Having a daily routine may help. Calmly ...

  20. [The cost of severe dementia].

    PubMed

    Joël, Marie-Eve

    2005-03-01

    The aim of the present article is to analyse the methodological difficulties to assess the economic cost of severe dementia from the available data, and the shortcomings of an exclusively economic approach. It is very difficult to provide a reliable account of the cost of severe dementia, when ignoring the initial assessment of the severity and the socio-economic context of the care given to demented persons. When assessing the cost of severe dementia, one needs to know who are the affected individuals, and what medical care they are given - whether at home or inside an institution. While the direct cost can be easily assessed, the indirect cost is more difficult to calculate, and particularly the productivity loss for the caring persons, when they are in occupational activity. Setting up reliable indicators for the cost of dementia is a long process, which needs a clear definition of the target population of the measurement.

  1. Dementia: Unique to Older Adults

    MedlinePlus

    ... other diseases, thyroid gland problems, serious head injuries, vitamin deficiencies, and long-term heavy drinking. Dementia caused by infections, vitamin deficiencies, and medications can be cured by treating the ...

  2. Dementia due to metabolic causes

    MedlinePlus

    ... a medical condition causing the dementia may include: Ammonia level in the blood Blood chemistry , electrolytes Blood ... Liver disease Low blood sugar Low sodium level Metabolism Pellagra Pheochromocytoma Porphyria Prerenal azotemia Vitamin B12 Review ...

  3. The `subcortical dementia' of progressive supranuclear palsy

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Martin L.; Feldman, Robert G.; Willis, Anne L.

    1974-01-01

    Progressive supranuclear palsy (Steele et al.) has a characteristic pattern of dementia: (1) forgetfulness, (2) slowing of thought processes, (3) emotional or personality changes (apathy or depression with occasional outbursts of irritability), and (4) impaired ability to manipulate acquired knowledge. In many neurological disease states associated with subcortical pathology a similar pattern of dementia exists. The neurobehavioural changes of progressive supranuclear palsy thus typify a clinical pattern which may be referred to as subcortical dementia. The subcortical dementias have a striking clinical resemblance to the dementia which occurs after bifrontal lobe disease. However, the subcortical dementias can be clearly distinguished clinically from cortical dementias, other than frontal dementias. We propose as a tentative hypothesis that there may be common pathophysiological mechanisms underlying the subcortical dementias—in particular, disturbances of timing and activation. There are immediate practical implications of this hypothesis: drugs which have an effect on subcortical timing and activating mechanisms may be useful in the treatment of subcortical dementias. PMID:4819905

  4. Presenile dementia presenting as aphasia.

    PubMed Central

    Wechsler, A F

    1977-01-01

    A focal aphasic syndrome was the first and outstanding manifestation of a degenerative, presenile dementia in a 67 year old man. Computerised axial tomography showed a strikingly dilated left Sylvian fissure--particularly in its posterior aspect--in the presence of moderate diffuse cortical atrophy. The radiographic findings correlated well with the clinical data. This is the first report of an aphasic disturbance of language as the initial symptom is presenile dementia. Images PMID:886357

  5. A review of ethical issues in dementia.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Rebecca A; Karlawish, Jason

    2015-10-01

    Dementia raises many ethical issues. The present review, taking note of the fact that the stages of dementia raise distinct ethical issues, focuses on three issues associated with stages of dementia's progression: (1) how the emergence of preclinical and asymptomatic but at-risk categories for dementia creates complex questions about preventive measures, risk disclosure, and protection from stigma and discrimination; (2) how despite efforts at dementia prevention, important research continues to investigate ways to alleviate clinical dementia's symptoms, and requires additional human subjects protections to ethically enroll persons with dementia; and (3) how in spite of research and prevention efforts, persons continue to need to live with dementia. This review highlights two major themes. First is how expanding the boundaries of dementias such as Alzheimer's to include asymptomatic but at-risk persons generate new ethical questions. One promising way to address these questions is to take an integrated approach to dementia ethics, which can include incorporating ethics-related data collection into the design of a dementia research study itself. Second is the interdisciplinary nature of ethical questions related to dementia, from health policy questions about insurance coverage for long-term care to political questions about voting, driving, and other civic rights and privileges to economic questions about balancing an employer's right to a safe and productive workforce with an employee's rights to avoid discrimination on the basis of their dementia risk. The review highlights these themes and emerging ethical issues in dementia.

  6. Type 2 Diabetes as a Risk Factor for Dementia in Women Compared With Men: A Pooled Analysis of 2.3 Million People Comprising More Than 100,000 Cases of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Saion; Peters, Sanne A.E.; Woodward, Mark; Mejia Arango, Silvia; Batty, G. David; Beckett, Nigel; Beiser, Alexa; Borenstein, Amy R.; Crane, Paul K.; Haan, Mary; Hassing, Linda B.; Hayden, Kathleen M.; Kiyohara, Yutaka; Larson, Eric B.; Li, Chung-Yi; Ninomiya, Toshiharu; Ohara, Tomoyuki; Peters, Ruth; Russ, Tom C.; Seshadri, Sudha; Strand, Bjørn H.; Walker, Rod; Xu, Weili

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Type 2 diabetes confers a greater excess risk of cardiovascular disease in women than in men. Diabetes is also a risk factor for dementia, but whether the association is similar in women and men remains unknown. We performed a meta-analysis of unpublished data to estimate the sex-specific relationship between women and men with diabetes with incident dementia. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A systematic search identified studies published prior to November 2014 that had reported on the prospective association between diabetes and dementia. Study authors contributed unpublished sex-specific relative risks (RRs) and 95% CIs on the association between diabetes and all dementia and its subtypes. Sex-specific RRs and the women-to-men ratio of RRs (RRRs) were pooled using random-effects meta-analyses. RESULTS Study-level data from 14 studies, 2,310,330 individuals, and 102,174 dementia case patients were included. In multiple-adjusted analyses, diabetes was associated with a 60% increased risk of any dementia in both sexes (women: pooled RR 1.62 [95% CI 1.45–1.80]; men: pooled RR 1.58 [95% CI 1.38–1.81]). The diabetes-associated RRs for vascular dementia were 2.34 (95% CI 1.86–2.94) in women and 1.73 (95% CI 1.61–1.85) in men, and for nonvascular dementia, the RRs were 1.53 (95% CI 1.35–1.73) in women and 1.49 (95% CI 1.31–1.69) in men. Overall, women with diabetes had a 19% greater risk for the development of vascular dementia than men (multiple-adjusted RRR 1.19 [95% CI 1.08–1.30]; P < 0.001). CONCLUSIONS Individuals with type 2 diabetes are at ∼60% greater risk for the development of dementia compared with those without diabetes. For vascular dementia, but not for nonvascular dementia, the additional risk is greater in women. PMID:26681727

  7. Anatomical Correlates of Non-Verbal Perception in Dementia Patients

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Pin-Hsuan; Chen, Hsiu-Hui; Chen, Nai-Ching; Chang, Wen-Neng; Huang, Chi-Wei; Chang, Ya-Ting; Hsu, Shih-Wei; Hsu, Che-Wei; Chang, Chiung-Chih

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Patients with dementia who have dissociations in verbal and non-verbal sound processing may offer insights into the anatomic basis for highly related auditory modes. Methods: To determine the neuronal networks on non-verbal perception, 16 patients with Alzheimer’s dementia (AD), 15 with behavior variant fronto-temporal dementia (bv-FTD), 14 with semantic dementia (SD) were evaluated and compared with 15 age-matched controls. Neuropsychological and auditory perceptive tasks were included to test the ability to compare pitch changes, scale-violated melody and for naming and associating with environmental sound. The brain 3D T1 images were acquired and voxel-based morphometry (VBM) was used to compare and correlated the volumetric measures with task scores. Results: The SD group scored the lowest among 3 groups in pitch or scale-violated melody tasks. In the environmental sound test, the SD group also showed impairment in naming and also in associating sound with pictures. The AD and bv-FTD groups, compared with the controls, showed no differences in all tests. VBM with task score correlation showed that atrophy in the right supra-marginal and superior temporal gyri was strongly related to deficits in detecting violated scales, while atrophy in the bilateral anterior temporal poles and left medial temporal structures was related to deficits in environmental sound recognition. Conclusions: Auditory perception of pitch, scale-violated melody or environmental sound reflects anatomical degeneration in dementia patients and the processing of non-verbal sounds are mediated by distinct neural circuits. PMID:27630558

  8. RBANS embedded measures of suboptimal effort in dementia: effort scale has a lower failure rate than the effort index.

    PubMed

    Burton, Rachel L; Enright, Joe; O'Connell, Megan E; Lanting, Shawnda; Morgan, Debra

    2015-02-01

    The importance of evaluating effort in neuropsychological assessments has been widely acknowledged, but measuring effort in the context of dementia remains challenging due to the impact of dementia severity on effort measure scores. Two embedded measures have been developed for the repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS; Randolph, C., Tierney, M. C., Mohr, E., & Chase, T. N. (1998). The repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS): Preliminary clinical validity. Journal of Clinical and Experimental Neuropsychology, 20 (3), 310-319): the Effort Index (EI; Silverberg, N. D., Wertheimer, J. C., & Fichtenberg, N. L. (2007). An effort index for the repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status (RBANS). Clinical Neuropsychologist, 21 (5), 841-854) and the Effort Scale (ES; Novitski, J., Steele, S., Karantzoulis, S., & Randolph, C. (2012). The repeatable battery for the assessment of neuropsychological status effort scale. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 27 (2), 190-195). We explored failure rates on these effort measures in a non-litigating mixed dementia sample (N = 145). Failure rate on the EI was high (48%) and associated with dementia severity. In contrast, failure on the ES was 14% but differed based on type of dementia. ES failure was low (4%) when dementia was due to Alzheimer disease (AD), but high (31%) for non-AD dementias. These data raise concerns about use of the RBANS embedded effort measures in dementia evaluations.

  9. Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Serum Levels and Hippocampal Volume in Mild Cognitive Impairment and Dementia due to Alzheimer Disease

    PubMed Central

    Borba, Ericksen Mielle; Duarte, Juliana Avila; Bristot, Giovana; Scotton, Ellen; Camozzato, Ana Luiza; Chaves, Márcia Lorena Fagundes

    2016-01-01

    Background/Aims Hippocampal atrophy is a recognized biomarker of Alzheimer disease (AD) pathology. Serum brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) reduction has been associated with neurodegeneration. We aimed to evaluate BDNF serum levels and hippocampal volume in clinical AD (dementia and mild cognitive impairment [MCI]). Methods Participants were 10 patients with MCI and 13 with dementia due to AD as well as 10 healthy controls. BDNF serum levels were determined by ELISA and volumetric measures with NeuroQuant®. Results MCI and dementia patients presented lower BDNF serum levels than healthy participants; dementia patients presented a smaller hippocampal volume than MCI patients and healthy participants. Discussion The findings support that the decrease in BDNF might start before the establishment of neuronal injury expressed by the hippocampal reduction. PMID:28101102

  10. Evaluating pathogenic dementia variants in posterior cortical atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Barber, Imelda; Lincoln, Sarah J.; Murray, Melissa E.; Camsari, Gamze Balci; Khan, Qurat ul Ain.; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Bisceglio, Gina D.; Crook, Julia E.; Younkin, Steven G.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Boeve, Bradley F.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Morgan, Kevin; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2015-01-01

    Posterior cortical atrophy (PCA) is an understudied visual impairment syndrome most often due to “posterior Alzheimer’s disease (AD)” pathology. Case studies detected mutations in PSEN1, PSEN2, GRN, MAPT and PRNP in subjects with clinical PCA. To detect the frequency and spectrum of mutations in known dementia genes in PCA, we screened 124 European-American subjects with clinical PCA (n=67) or posterior AD neuropathology (n=57) for variants in genes implicated in AD, frontotemporal dementia, and prion disease using NeuroX, a customized exome array. Frequencies in PCA of the variants annotated as pathogenic or potentially pathogenic were compared against ~4,300 European-American population controls from the NHLBI Exome Sequencing Project (ESP). We identified two rare variants not previously reported in PCA, TREM2 Arg47His and PSEN2 Ser130Leu. No other pathogenic or potentially pathogenic variants were detected in the screened dementia genes. In this first systematic variant screen of a PCA cohort, we report two rare mutations in TREM2 and PSEN2, validate our previously reported APOE ε4 association, and demonstrate the utility of NeuroX. PMID:26507310

  11. The Appropriate Use of Neuroimaging in the Diagnostic Work-Up of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Diagnosis of dementia is challenging and requires both ruling out potentially treatable underlying causes and ruling in a diagnosis of dementia subtype to manage patients and suitably plan for the future. Objectives This analysis sought to determine the appropriate use of neuroimaging during the diagnostic work-up of dementia, including indications for neuroimaging and comparative accuracy of alternative technologies. Data Sources A literature search was performed using Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid Embase, the Wiley Cochrane Library, and the Centre for Reviews and Dissemination database, for studies published between 2000 and 2013. Review Methods Data on diagnostic accuracy and impact on clinical decision making were abstracted from included studies. Quality of evidence was assessed using GRADE. Results The search yielded 5,374 citations and 15 studies were included. Approximately 10% of dementia cases are potentially treatable, though less than 1% reverse partially or fully. Neither prediction rules nor clinical indications reliably select the subset of patients who will likely benefit from neuroimaging. Clinical utility is highest in ambiguous cases or where dementia may be mixed, and lowest for clinically diagnosed Alzheimer disease or clinically excluded vascular dementia. There is a lack of evidence that MRI is superior to CT in detecting a vascular component to dementia. Accuracy of structural imaging is moderate to high for discriminating different types of dementia. Limitations There was significant heterogeneity in estimates of diagnostic accuracy, which often prohibited a statistical summary of findings. The quality of data reported by studies prohibited calculation of likelihood ratios in the present analysis. No studies from primary care were found; thus, generalizability beyond tertiary care settings may be limited. Conclusions A diagnosis of reversible dementia is rare. Imaging has the most

  12. Evaluating abuse in the patient with dementia.

    PubMed

    Tronetti, Pamela

    2014-11-01

    For patients with dementia, abuse ranges from subtle scams to outright physical violence. As dementia progresses, abuse escalates. The stages of dementia--mild cognitive impairment, mild dementia, moderate dementia, and severe dementia--lend themselves to varied presentations of abuse. Knowing which types of abuse are more prominent at each stage aids the clinician in anticipating risk of abuse and patient and caregiver needs. Interviewing the victim is crucial in uncovering, documenting, and intervening in an abuse situation. A clinician who is skilled in drawing out the facts while remaining supportive of the patient is key in ending the victimization.

  13. Ocular Fundus Photography as a Tool to Study Stroke and Dementia.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Carol Y; Chen, Christopher; Wong, Tien Y

    2015-10-01

    Although cerebral small vessel disease has been linked to stroke and dementia, due to limitations of current neuroimaging technology, direct in vivo visualization of changes in the cerebral small vessels (e.g., cerebral arteriolar narrowing, tortuous microvessels, blood-brain barrier damage, capillary microaneurysms) is difficult to achieve. As the retina and the brain share similar embryological origin, anatomical features, and physiologic properties with the cerebral small vessels, the retinal vessels offer a unique and easily accessible "window" to study the correlates and consequences of cerebral small vessel diseases in vivo. The retinal microvasculature can be visualized, quantified and monitored noninvasively using ocular fundus photography. Recent clinic- and population-based studies have demonstrated a close link between retinal vascular changes seen on fundus photography and stroke and dementia, suggesting that ocular fundus photography may provide insights to the contribution of microvascular disease to stroke and dementia. In this review, we summarize current knowledge on retinal vascular changes, such as retinopathy and changes in retinal vascular measures with stroke and dementia as well as subclinical makers of cerebral small vessel disease, and discuss the possible clinical implications of these findings in neurology. Studying pathologic changes of retinal blood vessels may be useful for understanding the etiology of various cerebrovascular conditions; hence, ocular fundus photography can be potentially translated into clinical practice.

  14. SPECT in Alzheimer`s disease and the dementias

    SciTech Connect

    Bonte, F.J.

    1991-12-31

    Among 90 patients with a clinical diagnosis of Alzheimer`s disease (AD), two subgroups were identified for special study, including 42 patients who had a history of dementia in one or more first-degree relatives, and 14 who had a diagnosis of early AD. Of the 42 patients with a family history of dementia, 34 out of the 35 patients whose final clinical diagnosis was possible or probable AD had positive SPECT rCBF studies. Studies in the 14 patients thought to have very early AD were positive in 11 cases. This finding suggests that altered cortical physiology, and hence, rCBF, occurs quite early in the course of AD, perhaps before the onset of symptoms. It is possible that Xenon 133 rCBF studies might be used to detect the presence of subclinical AD in a population of individuals at risk to this disorder. Despite the drawbacks of a radionuclide with poor photon energy, Xenon 133, with its low cost and round-the-clock availability, deserves further study. Although the physical characteristics of Xenon 127 might make it preferable as a SPECT tracer, it is still not regularly available, and some instrument systems are not designed to handle its higher photon energies.

  15. The Role of the Carboxyl-Terminal Sequence of Tau and MAP2 in the Pathogenesis of Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Ce; Miyasaka, Tomohiro

    2016-01-01

    Dementia includes several diseases characterized by acquired and irreversible brain dysfunctions that interfere with daily life. According to the etiology, dementia can be induced by poisoning or metabolic disorders, and other cases of dementia have a clear pathogenesis. However, half of neurodegenerative diseases have an unclear pathogenesis and etiology. Alzheimer’s disease (AD), Lewy body dementia and frontal-temporal dementia are the three most common types of dementia. These neurodegenerative diseases are characterized by the appearance of the following specific protein inclusions: amyloid beta and tau in AD; α-synuclein in Lewy body dementia; and tau, TDP-43, or FUS in frontal-temporal dementia. Thus far, studies on the pathogenesis of dementia mainly focus aberrant inclusions formed by the aforementioned proteins. As a historically heavily studied protein tau is likely to be associated with the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases that cause dementia. The role of tau in neurodegeneration has been unknown for many years. However, both pathological and genetic analyses have helped tau become gradually recognized as an important factor in the pathogenesis of tauopathy. Currently, especially in the field of AD, tau is attracting more attention and is being considered a potential target for drug development. In this review article, previously discovered biochemical and pathological features of tau are highlighted, and current opinions regarding the neurotoxicity of tau are summarized. Additionally, we introduce key amino acid sequences responsible for tau neurotoxicity from our studies using transgenic Caenorhabditis elegans. Finally, a new hypothesis regarding the roles of microtubule-associated protein 2 (MAP2) and tau in the pathogenesis of tauopathy is discussed. PMID:28082867

  16. PET radioligands reveal the basis of dementia in Parkinson disease and dementia with Lewy bodies

    PubMed Central

    Gomperts, Stephen N.; Marquie, Marta; Locascio, Joseph J.; Bayer, Stephen; Johnson, Keith A.; Growdon, John H.

    2015-01-01

    Background Effective therapies for dementia with Lewy bodies (DLB) and Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) will require accurate diagnosis and an understanding of the contribution of distinct molecular pathologies to these diseases. We seek to use imaging biomarkers to improve diagnostic accuracy and to clarify the contribution of molecular species to cognitive impairment in DLB and PD. Summary We have performed cross-sectional and prospective cohort studies in subjects with DLB, PD with normal cognition (PD-nl), PD with mild cognitive impairment (PD-MCI), and PD with dementia (PDD), contrasted with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and healthy control subjects (HCS). Subjects underwent formal neurologic examination, detailed neuropsychological assessments, MRI, and PET scans with radioligands altropane (DAT: dopamine transporter) and PiB (Aβ amyloid). Putamen DAT concentrations were similar in DLB and PD and differentiated them from HCS and AD. Decreased caudate DAT concentration related to functional impairment in DLB but not PD. PiB uptake was greatest in DLB. However, cortical PiB retention was common in PD and predicted cognitive decline. PET imaging of tau aggregates holds promise both to clarify the contribution of tau to cognitive decline in these diseases and to differentiate DLB and PD from the parkinsonian tauopathies. Key messages Together, DAT and amyloid PET imaging discriminate DLB from PD and from other disease groups and identify pathologic processes that contribute to their course. Multimodal PET imaging has potential to increase diagnostic accuracy of DLB and PD in the clinic, improve cohort uniformity for clinical trials, and serve as biomarkers for targeted molecular therapies. PMID:26655867

  17. Curcumin as a therapeutic agent in dementia: a mini systematic review of human studies.

    PubMed

    Brondino, Natascia; Re, Simona; Boldrini, Annalisa; Cuccomarino, Antonella; Lanati, Niccolò; Barale, Francesco; Politi, Pierluigi

    2014-01-01

    Dementia is a leading health problem worldwide, with Alzheimer's disease (AD) representing up to 60% of all dementia cases. A growing interest has recently risen on the potential use of natural molecules in this condition. Curcumin is a polyphenolic compound traditionally used in Indian medicine. Several in vitro and in vivo studies have found a protective effect of curcumin in AD. In the present systematic review we aimed to evaluate the state-of-the-art of clinical trials of curcumin in AD. We retrieved three published studies, while there are several ongoing clinical trials. To date there is insufficient evidence to suggest the use of curcumin in dementia patients. Of note, short-term use of curcumin appears to be safe. Several reasons could be responsible for the discrepancy between in vitro and in vivo findings and human trials, such as low bioavailability and poor study design.

  18. Effects of ApoE4 and maternal history of dementia on hippocampal atrophy

    PubMed Central

    Andrawis, John P.; Hwang, Kristy S.; Green, Amity E.; Kotlerman, Jenny; Elashoff, David; Morra, Jonathan H.; Cummings, Jeffrey L.; Toga, Arthur W.; Thompson, Paul M.; Apostolova, Liana G.

    2010-01-01

    We applied an automated hippocampal segmentation technique based on adaptive boosting (AdaBoost) to the 1.5T MRI baseline and 1-year follow-up data of 243 subjects with mild cognitive impairment (MCI), 96 with Alzheimer's disease (AD) and 145 normal controls (NC) scanned as part of the Alzheimer's Disease Neuroimaging Initiative (ADNI). MCI subjects with positive maternal history of dementia had smaller hippocampal volumes at baseline and at follow-up, and greater 12-month atrophy rates than subjects with negative maternal history. 3D maps and volumetric multiple regression analyses demonstrated a significant effect of positive maternal history of dementia on hippocampal atrophy in MCI and AD after controlling for age, ApoE4 genotype and paternal history of dementia, resp. ApoE4 showed an independent effect on hippocampal atrophy in MCI and AD and in the pooled sample. PMID:20833446

  19. Activities enjoyed by patients with dementia together with their spouses and psychological morbidity in carers.

    PubMed

    Searson, R; Hendry, A M; Ramachandran, R; Burns, A; Purandare, N

    2008-03-01

    Caring for a spouse with dementia is stressful and respite care is sometimes used to reduce this burden. Spouses may find some aspects of caring rewarding but the literature on positive aspects of caring is limited. To describe activities enjoyed by patients with dementia together with their spouses, and examine their relationship with psychological morbidity in carers. A convenience sample of 46 patients with mild to moderate dementia (91% with Alzheimer's disease, AD) and their spouses were interviewed at home. Spouses completed the Pleasant Events Schedule (PES-AD) to identify activities enjoyed by patients and spouses on their own and together. Psychological morbidity in spouses was assessed using the General Health Questionnaire (GHQ-12). Cognitive functions, and non-cognitive symptoms were also assessed in patients. Multiple regression analysis using age, Mini-Mental State Examination, Cornell Scale for Depression in Dementia, Revised Memory and Behaviour Problems (RMBP) checklist frequency, and PES-AD- together scores as independent variables found PES-AD-together and RMBP-frequency to be independent predictors of GHQ-12 scores in spouses, but the model could explain only 28% of variance. Facilitating activities that are enjoyed by both patients with dementia and spouses may be an alternative intervention strategy to reduce carer burden.

  20. [Hypertension as a source of cognitive regression, or dementia].

    PubMed

    Birkenhäger, W H; de Leeuw, P W; Richart, T; Staessen, J A

    2007-11-03

    Cognitive deterioration and its sequelae of vascular or Alzheimer's dementia is rapidly increasing all over the world. This is primarily caused by the worldwide increase of the ageing population. Additional causes may be sought in factors such as genetics and a habitually unhealthy life style. The significance of high blood pressure in the process leading to cognitive deterioration is relatively unknown. However, timely detection and treatment of hypertension seems to contribute to the preservation of cognition. Experience has shown that this applies in particular to dihydropyridine calcium antagonists. Medical care tends to make insufficient use of the existing possibilities for treating hypertension.

  1. Exercise for Individuals with Lewy Body Dementia: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Inskip, Michael; Mavros, Yorgi; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A.

    2016-01-01

    Background Individuals with Lewy body Dementia (LBD), which encompasses both Parkinson disease dementia (PDD) and Dementia with Lewy Bodies (DLB) experience functional decline through Parkinsonism and sedentariness exacerbated by motor, psychiatric and cognitive symptoms. Exercise may improve functional outcomes in Parkinson’s disease (PD), and Alzheimer’s disease (AD). However, the multi-domain nature of the LBD cluster of symptoms (physical, cognitive, psychiatric, autonomic) results in vulnerable individuals often being excluded from exercise studies evaluating physical function in PD or cognitive function in dementia to avoid confounding results. This review evaluated existing literature reporting the effects of exercise interventions or physical activity (PA) exposure on cluster symptoms in LBD. Methods A high-sensitivity search was executed across 19 databases. Full-length articles of any language and quality, published or unpublished, that analysed effects of isolated exercise/physical activity on indicative Dementia with Lewy Bodies or PD-dementia cohorts were evaluated for outcomes inclusive of physical, cognitive, psychiatric, physiological and quality of life measures. The protocol for this review (Reg. #: CRD42015019002) is accessible at http://www.crd.york.ac.uk/PROSPERO/. Results 111,485 articles were initially retrieved; 288 full articles were reviewed and 89.6% subsequently deemed ineligible due to exclusion of participants with co-existence of dementia and Parkinsonism. Five studies (1 uncontrolled trial, 1 randomized controlled trial and 3 case reports) evaluating 16 participants were included. Interventions were diverse and outcome homogeneity was low. Habitual gait speed outcomes were measured in 13 participants and increased (0.18m/s, 95% CI -0.02, 0.38m/s), exceeding moderate important change (0.14m/s) for PD cohorts. Other outcomes appeared to improve modestly in most participants. Discussion Scarce research investigating exercise in LBD

  2. Frontotemporal Dementias: Diagnosis

    MedlinePlus

    ... the hallmark of Alzheimer’s disease is loss of memory. FTD often begins earlier than AD with an ... their own behaviors), but retain cardinal features of memory (keeping track of day-to-day events, orientation ...

  3. Optimal feature selection for automated classification of FDG-PET in patients with suspected dementia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serag, Ahmed; Wenzel, Fabian; Thiele, Frank; Buchert, Ralph; Young, Stewart

    2009-02-01

    FDG-PET is increasingly used for the evaluation of dementia patients, as major neurodegenerative disorders, such as Alzheimer's disease (AD), Lewy body dementia (LBD), and Frontotemporal dementia (FTD), have been shown to induce specific patterns of regional hypo-metabolism. However, the interpretation of FDG-PET images of patients with suspected dementia is not straightforward, since patients are imaged at different stages of progression of neurodegenerative disease, and the indications of reduced metabolism due to neurodegenerative disease appear slowly over time. Furthermore, different diseases can cause rather similar patterns of hypo-metabolism. Therefore, classification of FDG-PET images of patients with suspected dementia may lead to misdiagnosis. This work aims to find an optimal subset of features for automated classification, in order to improve classification accuracy of FDG-PET images in patients with suspected dementia. A novel feature selection method is proposed, and performance is compared to existing methods. The proposed approach adopts a combination of balanced class distributions and feature selection methods. This is demonstrated to provide high classification accuracy for classification of FDG-PET brain images of normal controls and dementia patients, comparable with alternative approaches, and provides a compact set of features selected.

  4. Treatment of Frontotemporal Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Boxer, Adam L.

    2016-01-01

    Opinion statement Frontotemporal dementia (FTD) encompasses a spectrum of neurodegenerative diseases with heterogeneous clinical presentations and two predominant types of underlying neuropathology. FTD typically comprises three distinct clinical syndromes: behavioral variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), semantic variant primary progressive aphasia (svPPA), and nonfluent variant primary progressive aphasia (nfvPPA). FTD also frequently overlaps both clinically and neuropathologically with three other neurodegenerative syndromes: corticobasal syndrome (CBS), progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP), and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS). Each syndrome can be associated with one or more underlying neuropathological diagnoses and are referred to as frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). Although the various FTD syndromes can substantially differ in terms of clinical symptoms and underlying pathology, the symptoms can be broadly categorized into behavioral, cognitive and motor domains. Currently there are no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved therapies for the above syndromes except riluzole for ALS. FTD treatment strategies generally rely on off-label use of medications for symptomatic management, and most therapies lack quality evidence from randomized, placebo-controlled clinical trials. For behavioral symptoms, selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors may be effective, while case reports hint at possible efficacy with antipsychotics or antiepileptics, but use of these latter agents is limited due to concerns regarding side effects. There are no effective therapies for cognitive complaints in FTD, which frequently involve executive function, memory, and language. Motor difficulties associated with FTD may present with parkinsonian symptoms or motor neuron disease, for which riluzole is indicated as therapy. Compared to idiopathic Parkinson’s disease, FTD-related atypical parkinsonism is generally not responsive to dopamine replacement therapies, but a

  5. Frontotemporal dementia: a bridge between dementia and neuromuscular disease

    PubMed Central

    Ng, Adeline SL; Rademakers, Rosa; Miller, BL

    2015-01-01

    The concept that frontotemporal dementia (FTD) is a purely “cortical” dementia has largely been refuted by the recognition of its close association with motor neuron disease, and the identification of transactive response DNA-binding protein 43 (TDP-43) as a major pathological substrate underlying both diseases. Genetic findings have transformed this field and revealed connections between disorders that were previous thought clinically unrelated. The discovery of the C9ORF72 locus as responsible for majority of hereditary FTD, ALS and FTD-ALS cases and the understanding that repeat-containing RNA plays a crucial role in pathogenesis of both disorders has paved the way for development of potential biomarkers and therapeutic targets for these devastating diseases. In this review, we summarize the historical aspects leading up to our current understanding of the genetic, clinical and neuropathological overlap between FTD and ALS, and include brief discussions on chronic traumatic encephalopathy (CTE) given its association with TDP-43 pathology, increased dementia risk and reports of ALS in CTE patients. Additionally we describe other genetic associations between dementia and neuromuscular disease, such as inclusion body myositis with Paget’s disease and frontotemporal dementia (IBMPFD). PMID:25557955

  6. Polyphenols in dementia: From molecular basis to clinical trials.

    PubMed

    Molino, Silvia; Dossena, Maurizia; Buonocore, Daniela; Ferrari, Federica; Venturini, Letizia; Ricevuti, Giovanni; Verri, Manuela

    2016-09-15

    Dementia is common in the elderly, but there are currently no effective therapies available to prevent or treat this syndrome. In the last decade, polyphenols (particularly curcumin, resveratrol and tea catechins) have been under very close scrutiny as potential therapeutic agents for neurodegenerative diseases, diabetes, inflammatory diseases and aging. Data were collected from Web of Science (ISI Web of Knowledge), Pubmed and Medline (from 2000 to 2015), by searching for the keywords "dementia" AND "curcumin", "resveratrol", "EGCG", "tea catechins". The same keywords were used to investigate the current state of clinical trials recorded in the NIH clinicaltrials.gov registry. Starting from the intrinsic properties of the compounds, we explain their specific action in patients with AD and the most common types of dementia. The pharmacological actions of curcumin, resveratrol and tea catechins have mainly been attributed to their antioxidant activity, interaction with cell signaling pathways, anti-inflammatory effect, chelation of metal ions, and neuroprotection. Evidence from in vitro and in vivo studies on polyphenols have demonstrated that they may play an integral role in preventing and treating diseases associated with neurodegeneration. Furthermore, we critically analyze the clinical trials that we found, which investigate the real pharmacological actions and the possible side effects of these compounds. This review highlights the potential role of polyphenols in the prevention/treatment of dementia and describes the current limitations of research in this field.

  7. Prediction of Alzheimer dementia with short neuropsychological instruments.

    PubMed

    Jungwirth, Susanne; Zehetmayer, Sonja; Bauer, Peter; Weissgram, Silvia; Tragl, Karl Heinz; Fischer, Peter

    2009-11-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the neuropsychological instruments in predicting Alzheimer dementia after 5 years in the context of a longitudinal population-based cohort study. A total of 585 nondemented 75-year-old individuals completed neuropsychological examination at the baseline investigation; 479 subjects were followed after 30 months and 404 after 60 months. Cognition, depression and memory complaints were evaluated with psychometric instruments. Known risk factors for Alzheimer dementia were included in the analyses. Univariate logistic regression analyses and stepwise multiple models were calculated. A combination of reduced verbal memory, reduced visual motor speed, subjective memory complaints and the APOE epsilon4 carriage was best in predicting incident probable Alzheimer dementia (R(2) = 0.42, ROC curve = 0.91). The model achieved a positive predictive value of 23.3%, a negative predictive value of 98.7%, a sensitivity of 82.8% and a specificity of 82.4%. Alzheimer dementia can be predicted by neuropsychological instruments measuring episodic memory and motor speed. A high percentage of 98.7% subjects at age 75 years could be predicted as remaining non-demented at age 80 years. The prediction of those unlikely to develop AD would be more important in the future to spare further expensive diagnostic testing and protective therapies in individuals at low risk.

  8. The Mini-Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination: A New Assessment Tool for Dementia

    PubMed Central

    Hsieh, Sharpley; McGrory, Sarah; Leslie, Felicity; Dawson, Kate; Ahmed, Samrah; Butler, Chris R.; Rowe, James B.; Mioshi, Eneida; Hodges, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Background/Aims We developed and validated the Mini-Addenbrooke's Cognitive Examination (M-ACE) in dementia patients. Comparisons were also made with the Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE). Method The M-ACE was developed using Mokken scaling analysis in 117 dementia patients [behavioural variant frontotemporal dementia (bvFTD), n = 25; primary progressive aphasia (PPA), n = 49; Alzheimer's disease (AD), n = 34; corticobasal syndrome (CBS), n = 9] and validated in an independent sample of 164 dementia patients (bvFTD, n = 23; PPA, n = 82; AD, n = 38; CBS, n = 21) and 78 controls, who also completed the MMSE. Results The M-ACE consists of 5 items with a maximum score of 30. Two cut-offs were identified: (1) ≤25/30 has both high sensitivity and specificity, and (2) ≤21/30 is almost certainly a score to have come from a dementia patient regardless of the clinical setting. The M-ACE is more sensitive than the MMSE and is less likely to have ceiling effects. Conclusion The M-ACE is a brief and sensitive cognitive screening tool for dementia. Two cut-offs (25 or 21) are recommended. PMID:25227877

  9. Adverse Vascular Risk is Related to Cognitive Decline in Older Adults

    PubMed Central

    Jefferson, Angela L.; Hohman, Timothy J.; Liu, Dandan; Haj-Hassan, Shereen; Gifford, Katherine A.; Benson, Elleena M.; Skinner, Jeannine S.; Lu, Zengqi; Sparling, Jamie; Sumner, Emily C.; Bell, Susan; Ruberg, Frederick L.

    2014-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular disease (CVD) and related risk factors are associated with Alzheimer’s disease (AD). This association is less well-defined in normal cognition (NC) or prodromal AD (mild cognitive impairment (MCI)). Objective Cross-sectionally and longitudinally relate a vascular risk index to cognitive outcomes among elders free of clinical dementia. Methods 3117 MCI (74±8 years, 56% female) and 6603 NC participants (72±8 years, 68% female) were drawn from the National Alzheimer’s Coordinating Center. A composite measure of vascular risk was defined using the Framingham Stroke Risk Profile (FSRP) score (i.e., age, systolic blood pressure, anti-hypertensive medication, diabetes, cigarette smoking, CVD history, atrial fibrillation). Ordinary linear regressions and generalized linear mixed models related baseline FSRP to cross-sectional and longitudinal cognitive outcomes, separately for NC and MCI, adjusting for age, sex, race, education, and follow-up time (in longitudinal models). Results In NC participants, increasing FSRP was related to worse baseline global cognition, information processing speed, and sequencing abilities (p-values<0.0001) and a worse longitudinal trajectory on all cognitive measures (p-values<0.0001). In MCI, increasing FSRP correlated with worse longitudinal delayed memory (p=0.004). In secondary models using an age-excluded FSRP score, associations persisted in NC participants for global cognition, naming, information processing speed, and sequencing abilities. Conclusions An adverse vascular risk profile is associated with worse cognitive trajectory, especially global cognition, naming, and information processing speed, among NC elders. Future studies are needed to understand how effective management of CVD and related risk factors can modify cognitive decline to identify the ideal timeframe for primary prevention implementation. PMID:25471188

  10. [The long-term course of depression and dementia in the aged].

    PubMed

    Oesterreich, K

    1989-01-01

    Results of measurements of geropsychiatric syndromes are different. The statements are based on application of various methods and investigations of non-comparable populations. Nevertheless it is possible to draw the following conclusions out of the scientific papers and experiences of our own: A chronicity of depressive long-term courses is expected on old and higher age. Somatic diseases and organic brain syndrome render more difficult the amelioration and pharmacotherapy. The symptoms of affective disorders in old age most differ from depression in early and adult biographic phase. The course of dementias take off age and attendant somatic illness. In old age increase dementias. Their prognosis is worse. Added somatic process affects the further course negatively and renders more difficult the therapy. Long-term courses of dementias in old and higher age complicate the precise differential-diagnostic attach on pathogenetics. Social influences take effect on the course of depression and dementia advantageously or disadvantageously.

  11. Dementia - what to ask your doctor

    MedlinePlus

    What to ask your doctor about dementia; Alzheimer disease - what to ask your doctor; Cognitive impairment - what to ask your doctor ... AE, Solomon PR. Life adjustments for memory loss, Alzheimer's disease, and dementia. In: Budson AE, Solomon PR, eds. ...

  12. Apolipoproteins and HDL cholesterol do not associate with the risk of future dementia and Alzheimer's disease: the National Finnish population study (FINRISK).

    PubMed

    Tynkkynen, Juho; Hernesniemi, Jussi A; Laatikainen, Tiina; Havulinna, Aki S; Sundvall, Jouko; Leiviskä, Jaana; Salo, Perttu; Salomaa, Veikko

    2016-12-01

    Data on associations of apolipoproteins A-I and B (apo A-I, apo B) and HDL cholesterol (HDL-C) with dementia and Alzheimer's disease (AD) are conflicting. Our aim was to examine, whether apo B, apoA-I, their ratio, or HDL-C are significant, independent predictors of incident dementia and AD in the general population free of dementia at baseline. We analyzed the results from two Finnish prospective population-based cohort studies in a total of 13,275 subjects aged 25 to 74 years with mainly Caucasian ethnicity. The follow-up time for both cohorts was 10 years. We used Cox proportional hazards regression to evaluate hazard ratios (HR) for incident dementia (including AD) (n = 220) and for AD (n = 154). Cumulative incidence function (CIF) analysis was also performed to adjust the results for competing risks of death. Adjusted for multiple dementia and AD risk factors, log-transformed apo A-I, log HDL-C, log apo B, and log apo B/A-I ratio were not associated with incident dementia or AD. HDL-C was inversely associated with AD risk when adjusted for competing risks but no other statistically significant associations were observed in the CIF analyses. Apo A-I, HDL-C, apo B, or apo B/A-I ratio were not associated with future dementia or AD. HDL-C was inversely associated with incident AD risk when adjusted for competing risks of death, but the finding is unlikely to be of clinical relevance. Our study does not support the use of these risk markers to predict incident dementia or AD.

  13. Flavonoids and dementia: an update.

    PubMed

    Orhan, I E; Daglia, M; Nabavi, S F; Loizzo, M R; Sobarzo-Sánchez, E; Nabavi, S M

    2015-01-01

    Dementia is a strongly age-related syndrome due to cognitive decline that can be considered a typical example of the combination of physiological and pathological aging-associated changes occurring in old people; it ranges from intact cognition to mild cognitive impairment, which is an intermediate stage of cognitive deterioration, and dementia. The spread of this syndrome has induced to study and try to reduce dementia modifiable risk factors. They include insulin resistance and hyperinsulinaemia, high blood pressure, obesity, smoking, depression, cognitive inactivity or low educational attainment as well as physical inactivity and incorrect diet, which can be considered one of the most important factors. One emerging strategy to decrease the prevalence of mild cognitive impairment and dementia may be the use of nutritional interventions. In the last decade, prospective data have suggested that high fruit and vegetable intakes are related to improved cognitive functions and reduced risks of developing a neurodegenerative process. The protective effects against neurodegeneration could be in part due to the intake of flavonoids that have been associated with several health benefits such as antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activities, increased neuronal signaling, and improved metabolic functions. The present article is aimed at reviewing scientific studies that show the protective effects of flavonoid intake against mild cognitive impairment and dementia.

  14. Decreased synaptic proteins in neuronal exosomes of frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Goetzl, Edward J; Kapogiannis, Dimitrios; Schwartz, Janice B; Lobach, Iryna V; Goetzl, Laura; Abner, Erin L; Jicha, Gregory A; Karydas, Anna M; Boxer, Adam; Miller, Bruce L

    2016-12-01

    Synaptic dysfunction occurs early in senile dementias, presumably as a result of decreased levels of functional synaptic proteins as found in autopsied brains of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD) or frontotemporal dementia (FTD). Plasma neuronal-derived exosomes (NDEs) were recovered by precipitation and immunoabsorption from 12 patients with AD, 16 with FTD, and 28 controls in a cross-sectional study, and from 9 patients with AD, 10 with FTD, and 19 controls in a longitudinal study. Six synaptic proteins in NDE extracts were quantified by ELISAs and normalized for exosome amounts. NDE levels of synaptophysin, synaptopodin, synaptotagmin-2, and neurogranin were significantly lower in patients with FTD and AD than in controls, but those of growth-associated protein 43 and synapsin 1 were reduced only in patients with AD. Functionally relevant phosphorylation of synapsin 1 serine 9 was reduced in patients with FTD and AD, although total synapsin 1 protein was higher in FTD than in controls. NDE levels of synaptotagmin, synaptophysin, and neurogranin were decreased years before dementia in patients with FTD and AD. NDE levels of synaptopodin, synaptotagmin, and synaptophysin, but not of amyloid β-peptide 42 or P-T181-tau, were correlated significantly with cognition assessed by mini-mental state examination or AD assessment scale-cognitive subscale. NDE synaptic proteins may be useful preclinical indices and progression measures in senile dementias.-Goetzl, E. J., Kapogiannis, D., Schwartz, J. B., Lobach, I. V., Goetzl, L., Abner, E. L., Jicha, G. A., Karydas, A. M., Boxer, A., Miller, B. L. Decreased synaptic proteins in neuronal exosomes of frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer's disease.

  15. Accent processing in dementia

    PubMed Central

    Hailstone, Julia C.; Ridgway, Gerard R.; Bartlett, Jonathan W.; Goll, Johanna C.; Crutch, Sebastian J.; Warren, Jason D.

    2012-01-01

    Accented speech conveys important nonverbal information about the speaker as well as presenting the brain with the problem of decoding a non-canonical auditory signal. The processing of non-native accents has seldom been studied in neurodegenerative disease and its brain basis remains poorly understood. Here we investigated the processing of non-native international and regional accents of English in cohorts of patients with Alzheimer's disease (AD; n=20) and progressive nonfluent aphasia (PNFA; n=6) in relation to healthy older control subjects (n=35). A novel battery was designed to assess accent comprehension and recognition and all subjects had a general neuropsychological assessment. Neuroanatomical associations of accent processing performance were assessed using voxel-based morphometry on MR brain images within the larger AD group. Compared with healthy controls, both the AD and PNFA groups showed deficits of non-native accent recognition and the PNFA group showed reduced comprehension of words spoken in international accents compared with a Southern English accent. At individual subject level deficits were observed more consistently in the PNFA group, and the disease groups showed different patterns of accent comprehension impairment (generally more marked for sentences in AD and for single words in PNFA). Within the AD group, grey matter associations of accent comprehension and recognition were identified in the anterior superior temporal lobe. The findings suggest that accent processing deficits may constitute signatures of neurodegenerative disease with potentially broader implications for understanding how these diseases affect vocal communication under challenging listening conditions. PMID:22664324

  16. Vascular cognitive impairment, a cardiovascular complication

    PubMed Central

    Frances, Adiukwu; Sandra, Ofori; Lucy, Ugbomah

    2016-01-01

    Over the past two decades, the term vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) has been used to refer to a spectrum of cognitive decline characterized by executive dysfunction, associated with vascular pathology. With 30% of stroke survivors showing cognitive impairments, it is regarded as the most common cause of cognitive impairment. This is a narrative review of available literature citing sources from PubMed, MEDLINE and Google Scholar. VCI has a high prevalence both before and after a stroke and is associated with great economic and caregiver burden. Despite this, there is no standardized diagnostic criteria for VCI. Hypertension has been identified as a risk factor for VCI and causes changes in cerebral vessel structure and function predisposing to lacuna infarcts and small vessel haemorrhages in the frontostriatal loop leading to executive dysfunction and other cognitive impairments. Current trials have shown promising results in the use of antihypertensive medications in the management of VCI and prevention of disease progression to vascular dementia. Prevention of VCI is necessary in light of the looming dementia pandemic. All patients with cardiovascular risk factors would therefore benefit from cognitive screening with screening instruments sensitive to executive dysfunction as well as prompt and adequate control of hypertension. PMID:27354961

  17. Vascular cognitive impairment, a cardiovascular complication.

    PubMed

    Frances, Adiukwu; Sandra, Ofori; Lucy, Ugbomah

    2016-06-22

    Over the past two decades, the term vascular cognitive impairment (VCI) has been used to refer to a spectrum of cognitive decline characterized by executive dysfunction, associated with vascular pathology. With 30% of stroke survivors showing cognitive impairments, it is regarded as the most common cause of cognitive impairment. This is a narrative review of available literature citing sources from PubMed, MEDLINE and Google Scholar. VCI has a high prevalence both before and after a stroke and is associated with great economic and caregiver burden. Despite this, there is no standardized diagnostic criteria for VCI. Hypertension has been identified as a risk factor for VCI and causes changes in cerebral vessel structure and function predisposing to lacuna infarcts and small vessel haemorrhages in the frontostriatal loop leading to executive dysfunction and other cognitive impairments. Current trials have shown promising results in the use of antihypertensive medications in the management of VCI and prevention of disease progression to vascular dementia. Prevention of VCI is necessary in light of the looming dementia pandemic. All patients with cardiovascular risk factors would therefore benefit from cognitive screening with screening instruments sensitive to executive dysfunction as well as prompt and adequate control of hypertension.

  18. Recognition of dementia in hospitalized older adults.

    PubMed

    Maslow, Katie; Mezey, Mathy

    2008-01-01

    Many hospital patients with dementia have no documented dementia diagnosis. In some cases, this is because they have never been diagnosed. Recognition of Dementia in Hospitalized Older Adults proposes several approaches that hospital nurses can use to increase recognition of dementia. This article describes the Try This approaches, how to implement them, and how to incorporate them into a hospital's current admission procedures. For a free online video demonstrating the use of these approaches, go to http://links.lww.com/A216.

  19. Delaying onset of dementia: are two languages enough?

    PubMed

    Freedman, Morris; Alladi, Suvarna; Chertkow, Howard; Bialystok, Ellen; Craik, Fergus I M; Phillips, Natalie A; Duggirala, Vasanta; Raju, Surampudi Bapi; Bak, Thomas H

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging literature suggesting that speaking two or more languages may significantly delay the onset of dementia. Although the mechanisms are unknown, it has been suggested that these may involve cognitive reserve, a concept that has been associated with factors such as higher levels of education, occupational status, social networks, and physical exercise. In the case of bilingualism, cognitive reserve may involve reorganization and strengthening of neural networks that enhance executive control. We review evidence for protective effects of bilingualism from a multicultural perspective involving studies in Toronto and Montreal, Canada, and Hyderabad, India. Reports from Toronto and Hyderabad showed a significant effect of speaking two or more languages in delaying onset of Alzheimer's disease by up to 5 years, whereas the Montreal study showed a significant protective effect of speaking at least four languages and a protective effect of speaking at least two languages in immigrants. Although there were differences in results across studies, a common theme was the significant effect of language use history as one of the factors in determining the onset of Alzheimer's disease. Moreover, the Hyderabad study extended the findings to frontotemporal dementia and vascular dementia.

  20. Delaying Onset of Dementia: Are Two Languages Enough?

    PubMed Central

    Freedman, Morris; Alladi, Suvarna; Chertkow, Howard; Bialystok, Ellen; Craik, Fergus I. M.; Phillips, Natalie A.; Duggirala, Vasanta; Raju, Surampudi Bapi; Bak, Thomas H.

    2014-01-01

    There is an emerging literature suggesting that speaking two or more languages may significantly delay the onset of dementia. Although the mechanisms are unknown, it has been suggested that these may involve cognitive reserve, a concept that has been associated with factors such as higher levels of education, occupational status, social networks, and physical exercise. In the case of bilingualism, cognitive reserve may involve reorganization and strengthening of neural networks that enhance executive control. We review evidence for protective effects of bilingualism from a multicultural perspective involving studies in Toronto and Montreal, Canada, and Hyderabad, I