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Sample records for ad3 fiber knob

  1. A chimeric adenovirus with an Ad 3 fiber knob modification augments glioma virotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Nandi, Suvobroto; Ulasov, Ilya V.; Rolle, Cleo E.; Han, Yu; Lesniak, Maciej S.

    2009-01-01

    Background Malignant gliomas remain refractory to treatment despite advances in chemotherapy and surgical techniques. Viral vectors developed to treat gliomas have had low transduction capabilities, limiting their use. Gliomas over-express CD46, CD80, and CD86, all of which bind adenovirus serotype 3. Methods To increase the infectivity and replication of oncolytic vectors in malignant brain tumors, we created a conditionally replicating adenovirus, CRAd-Survivin-5/3, which contains a survivin promoter-driving E1A and a chimeric fiber consisting of adenovirus serotype 3 knob. Results In vitro, this modified CRAd showed ten- to 100-fold increased cytotoxicity against glioma cells. Ex vivo analysis of primary glioblastoma multiforme samples infected with CRAd-Survivin-5/3 showed an increase in cytotoxicity of 20–30% compared to adenovirus wild-type (AdWT). Innormal human astrocytes and normal brain tissues, CRAd-Survivin-5/3 exhibited 30–40% and 10–15% lower cytotoxicity than AdWT, respectively. In an intracranial xenograft model of glioma, this oncolytic virus increased tumor-free survival and overall lifespan by 50% compared to controls (p < 0.05). Conclusions CRAd-Survivin-5/3 represents an attractive alternative to existing vectors and should be tested further in the pre-clinical setting. PMID:19688792

  2. Structural and Functional Studies on the Interaction of Adenovirus Fiber Knobs and Desmoglein 2

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Yumul, Roma; Cao, Hua; Ran, Liang; Fan, Xiaolong; Richter, Maximilian; Epstein, Forrest; Gralow, Julie; Zubieta, Chloe

    2013-01-01

    Human adenovirus (Ad) serotypes Ad3, Ad7, Ad11, and Ad14, as well as a recently emerged strain of Ad14 (Ad14p1), use the epithelial junction protein desmoglein 2 (DSG2) as a receptor for infection. Unlike Ad interaction with CAR and CD46, structural details for Ad binding to DSG2 are still elusive. Using an approach based on Escherichia coli expression libraries of random Ad3 and Ad14p1 fiber knob mutants, we identified amino acid residues that, when mutated individually, ablated or reduced Ad knob binding to DSG2. These residues formed three clusters inside one groove at the extreme distal end of the fiber knob. The Ad3 fiber knob mutant library was also used to identify variants with increased affinity to DSG2. We found a number of mutations within or near the EF loop of the Ad3 knob that resulted in affinities to DSG2 that were several orders of magnitude higher than those to the wild-type Ad3 knob. Crystal structure analysis of one of the mutants showed that the introduced mutations make the EF loop more flexible, which might facilitate the interaction with DSG2. Our findings have practical relevance for cancer therapy. We have recently reported that an Ad3 fiber knob-containing recombinant protein (JO-1) is able to trigger opening of junctions between epithelial cancer cells which, in turn, greatly improved the intratumoral penetration and efficacy of therapeutic agents (I. Beyer, et al., Clin. Cancer Res. 18:3340–3351, 2012; I. Beyer, et al., Cancer Res. 71:7080–7090, 2011). Here, we show that affinity-enhanced versions of JO-1 are therapeutically more potent than the parental protein in a series of cancer models. PMID:23946456

  3. Localization of neutralization epitopes on adenovirus fiber knob from species C.

    PubMed

    Lang, Shuai; Wang, Lizheng; Wang, Zixuan; Zhu, Rui; Yan, Jingyi; Wang, Baoming; Wu, Jiaxin; Zhang, Haihong; Wu, Hui; Zhou, Yan; Kong, Wei; Yu, Bin; Yu, Xianghui

    2016-04-01

    Although potential neutralization epitopes on the fiber knob of adenovirus (AdV) serotype 2 (Ad2) and Ad5 have been revealed, few studies have been carried out to identify neutralization epitopes on the knob from a broader panel of AdV serotypes. In this study, based on sequence and structural analysis of knobs from Ad1, Ad2, Ad5 and Ad6 (all from species C), several trimeric chimeric knob proteins were expressed in Escherichia coli to identify the locations of neutralization epitopes on the knobs by analysing their reactivity with mouse and rabbit polyclonal sera raised against AdVs and human sera with natural AdV infection. The dominant neutralization epitopes were located mainly in the N-terminal part of knobs from Ad1, Ad2 and Ad5, but they seemed to be located in the C-terminal part of the Ad6 knob, with some individual differences in rabbit and human populations. Our study adds to our understanding of humoral immune responses to AdVs and will facilitate the construction of more desirable capsid-modified recombinant Ad5 vectors. PMID:26801881

  4. Characterization of the knob domain of the adenovirus type 5 fiber protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed Central

    Henry, L J; Xia, D; Wilke, M E; Deisenhofer, J; Gerard, R D

    1994-01-01

    The adenovirus fiber protein is used for attachment of the virus to a specific receptor on the cell surface. Structurally, the protein consists of a long, thin shaft that protrudes from the vertex of the virus capsid and terminates in a globular domain termed the knob. To verify that the knob is the domain which interacts with the cellular receptor, we have cloned and expressed the knob from adenovirus type 5 together with a single repeat of the shaft in Escherichia coli. The protein was purified by conventional chromatography and functionally characterized for its interaction with the adenovirus receptor. The recombinant knob domain bound about 4,700 sites per HeLa cell with an affinity of 3 x 10(9) M-1 and blocked adenovirus infection of human cells. Antibodies raised against the knob also blocked virus infection. By gel filtration and X-ray diffraction analysis of protein crystals, the knob was shown to consist of a homotrimer of 21-kDa subunits. The results confirm that the trimeric knob is the ligand for attachment to the adenovirus receptor. Images PMID:8035520

  5. Characterization of an Adenovirus Vector Containing a Heterologous Peptide Epitope in the HI Loop of the Fiber Knob

    PubMed Central

    Krasnykh, Victor; Dmitriev, Igor; Mikheeva, Galina; Miller, C. Ryan; Belousova, Natalya; Curiel, David T.

    1998-01-01

    The utility of the present generation of recombinant adenovirus vectors for gene therapy applications could potentially be improved by designing targeted vectors capable of gene delivery to selected cell types in vivo. In order to achieve such targeting, we are investigating the possibilities of incorporation of ligands in the adenovirus fiber protein, which mediates primary binding of adenovirus to its cell surface receptor. Based on the proposed structure of the cell-binding domain of the fiber, we hypothesized that the HI loop of the fiber knob can be utilized as a convenient locale for incorporation of heterologous ligands. In this study, we utilized recombinant fiber proteins expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells to demonstrate that the incorporation of the FLAG octapeptide into the HI loop does not ablate fiber trimerization and does not disturb formation of the cell-binding site localized in the knob. We then generated a recombinant adenovirus containing this modified fiber and showed that the short peptide sequence engineered in the knob is compatible with the biological functions of the fiber. In addition, by using a ligand-specific antibody, we have shown that the peptide incorporated into the knob remains available for binding in the context of mature virions containing modified fibers. These findings suggest that heterologous ligands can be incorporated into the HI loop of the fiber knob and that this locale possesses properties consistent with its employment in adenovirus retargeting strategies. PMID:9499035

  6. Characterization of an adenovirus vector containing a heterologous peptide epitope in the HI loop of the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Krasnykh, V; Dmitriev, I; Mikheeva, G; Miller, C R; Belousova, N; Curiel, D T

    1998-03-01

    The utility of the present generation of recombinant adenovirus vectors for gene therapy applications could potentially be improved by designing targeted vectors capable of gene delivery to selected cell types in vivo. In order to achieve such targeting, we are investigating the possibilities of incorporation of ligands in the adenovirus fiber protein, which mediates primary binding of adenovirus to its cell surface receptor. Based on the proposed structure of the cell-binding domain of the fiber, we hypothesized that the HI loop of the fiber knob can be utilized as a convenient locale for incorporation of heterologous ligands. In this study, we utilized recombinant fiber proteins expressed in baculovirus-infected insect cells to demonstrate that the incorporation of the FLAG octapeptide into the HI loop does not ablate fiber trimerization and does not disturb formation of the cell-binding site localized in the knob. We then generated a recombinant adenovirus containing this modified fiber and showed that the short peptide sequence engineered in the knob is compatible with the biological functions of the fiber. In addition, by using a ligand-specific antibody, we have shown that the peptide incorporated into the knob remains available for binding in the context of mature virions containing modified fibers. These findings suggest that heterologous ligands can be incorporated into the HI loop of the fiber knob and that this locale possesses properties consistent with its employment in adenovirus retargeting strategies. PMID:9499035

  7. Fiber knob domain lacking the shaft sequence but fused to a coiled coil is a candidate subunit vaccine against egg-drop syndrome.

    PubMed

    Harakuni, Tetsuya; Andoh, Kiyohiko; Sakamoto, Ryu-Ichi; Tamaki, Yukihiro; Miyata, Takeshi; Uefuji, Hirotaka; Yamazaki, Ken-Ichi; Arakawa, Takeshi

    2016-06-01

    Egg-drop syndrome (EDS) virus is an avian adenovirus that causes a sudden drop in egg production and in the quality of the eggs when it infects chickens, leading to substantial economic losses in the poultry industry. Inactivated EDS vaccines produced in embryonated duck eggs or cell culture systems are available for the prophylaxis of EDS. However, recombinant subunit vaccines that are efficacious and inexpensive are a desirable alternative. In this study, we engineered chimeric fusion proteins in which the trimeric fiber knob domain lacking the triple β-spiral motif in the fiber shaft region was genetically fused to trimeric coiled coils, such as those of the engineered form of the GCN4 leucine zipper peptide or chicken cartilage matrix protein (CMP). The fusion proteins were expressed predominantly as soluble trimeric proteins in Escherichia coli at levels of 15-80mg/L of bacterial culture. The single immunization of chickens with the purified fusion proteins, at a dose equivalent to 10μg of the knob moiety, elicited serum antibodies with high hemagglutination inhibition (HI) activities, similar to those induced by an inactivated EDS vaccine. A dose-response analysis indicated that a single immunization with as little as 1μg of the knob moiety of the CMP-knob fusion protein was as effective as the inactivated vaccine in inducing antibodies with HI activity. The immunization of laying hens had no apparent adverse effects on egg production and effectively prevented clinical symptoms of EDS when the chickens were challenged with pathogenic EDS virus. This study demonstrates that the knob domain lacking the shaft sequence but fused to a trimeric coiled coil is a promising candidate subunit vaccine for the prophylaxis of EDS in chickens. PMID:27105561

  8. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-03-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 10(4) level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  9. Development of a novel efficient method to construct an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob

    PubMed Central

    Yamamoto, Yuki; Goto, Naoko; Miura, Kazuki; Narumi, Kenta; Ohnami, Shumpei; Uchida, Hiroaki; Miura, Yoshiaki; Yamamoto, Masato; Aoki, Kazunori

    2014-01-01

    Redirection of adenovirus vectors by engineering the capsid-coding region has shown limited success because proper targeting ligands are generally unknown. To overcome this limitation, we constructed an adenovirus library displaying random peptides on the fiber knob, and its screening led to successful selections of several particular targeted vectors. In the previous library construction method, the full length of an adenoviral genome was generated by a Cre-lox mediated in vitro recombination between a fiber-modified plasmid library and the enzyme-digested adenoviral DNA/terminal protein complex (DNA-TPC) before transfection to the producer cells. In this system, the procedures were complicated and time-consuming, and approximately 30% of the vectors in the library were defective with no displaying peptide. These may hinder further extensive exploration of cancer-targeting vectors. To resolve these problems, in this study, we developed a novel method with the transfection of a fiber-modified plasmid library and a fiberless adenoviral DNA-TPC in Cre-expressing 293 cells. The use of in-cell Cre recombination and fiberless adenovirus greatly simplified the library-making steps. The fiberless adenovirus was useful in suppressing the expansion of unnecessary adenovirus vectors. In addition, the complexity of the library was more than a 104 level in one well in a 6-well dish, which was 10-fold higher than that of the original method. The results demonstrated that this novel method is useful in producing a high quality live adenovirus library, which could facilitate the development of targeted adenovirus vectors for a variety of applications in medicine. PMID:24380399

  10. Intracellular Signaling and Desmoglein 2 Shedding Triggered by Human Adenoviruses Ad3, Ad14, and Ad14P1

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongjie; Ducournau, Corinne; Saydaminova, Kamola; Richter, Maximilian; Yumul, Roma; Ho, Martin; Carter, Darrick; Zubieta, Chloé

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We recently discovered that desmoglein 2 (DSG2) is a receptor for human adenovirus species B serotypes Ad3, Ad7, Ad11, and Ad14. Ad3 is considered to be a widely distributed human pathogen. Ad3 binding to DSG2 triggers the transient opening of epithelial junctions. Here, we further delineate the mechanism that leads to DSG2-mediated epithelial junction opening in cells exposed to Ad3 and recombinant Ad3 fiber proteins. We identified an Ad3 fiber knob-dependent pathway that involves the phosphorylation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases triggering the activation of the matrix-metalloproteinase ADAM17. ADAM17, in turn, cleaves the extracellular domain of DSG2 that links epithelial cells together. The shed DSG2 domain can be detected in cell culture supernatant and also in serum of mice with established human xenograft tumors. We then extended our studies to Ad14 and Ad14P1. Ad14 is an important research and clinical object because of the recent appearance of a new, more pathogenic strain (Ad14P1). In a human epithelial cancer xenograft model, Ad14P1 showed more efficient viral spread and oncolysis than Ad14. Here, we tested the hypothesis that a mutation in the Ad14P1 fiber knob could account for the differences between the two strains. While our X-ray crystallography studies suggested an altered three-dimensional (3D) structure of the Ad14P1 fiber knob in the F-G loop region, this did not significantly change the fiber knob affinity to DSG2 or the intracellular signaling and DSG2 shedding in epithelial cancer cells. IMPORTANCE A number of widely distributed adenoviruses use the epithelial junction protein DSG2 as a receptor for infection and lateral spread. Interaction with DSG2 allows the virus not only to enter cells but also to open epithelial junctions which form a physical barrier to virus spread. Our study elucidates the mechanism beyond virus-triggered junction opening with a focus on adenovirus serotype 3. Ad3 binds to DSG2 with its fiber

  11. The Arg279Glu Substitution in the Adenovirus Type 11p (Ad11p) Fiber Knob Abolishes EDTA-Resistant Binding to A549 and CHO-CD46 Cells, Converting the Phenotype to That of Ad7p

    PubMed Central

    Gustafsson, Dan J.; Segerman, Anna; Lindman, Kristina; Mei, Ya-Fang; Wadell, Göran

    2006-01-01

    The major determinant of adenovirus (Ad) attachment to host cells is the C-terminal knob domain of the trimeric fiber protein. Ad type 11p (Ad11p; species B2) in contrast to Ad7p (species B1) utilizes at least two different cellular attachment receptors, designated sBAR (species B adenovirus receptor) and sB2AR (species B2 adenovirus receptor). CD46 has recently been identified as one of the Ad11p attachment receptors. However, CD46 did not seem to constitute a functional receptor for Ad7p. Although Ad7p shares high knob amino acid identity with Ad11p, Ad7p is deficient in binding to both sB2AR and CD46. To determine what regions of the Ad11p fiber knob are necessary for sB2AR-CD46 interaction, we constructed recombinant fiber knobs (rFK) with Ad11p/Ad7p chimeras and Ad11p sequences having a single amino acid substitution from Ad7p. Binding of the constructs to A549 and CHO-CD46 BC1 isoform-expressing cells was analyzed by flow cytometry. Our results indicate that an Arg279Glu substitution is sufficient to convert the Ad11p receptor-interaction phenotype to that of Ad7p and abolish sB2AR and CD46 interaction. Also a Glu279Arg substitution in Ad7p rFKs increases CD46 binding. Thus, the lateral HI loop of the Ad11p fiber knob seems to be the key determinant for Ad11p sB2AR-CD46 interaction. This result is comparable to another non-coxsackie-adenovirus receptor binding Ad (Ad37p), where substitution of one amino acid abolishes virus-cell interaction. In conjunction with previous results, our findings also strongly suggest that sB2AR is equivalent to CD46. PMID:16439545

  12. Knob manager (KM) operators guide

    SciTech Connect

    1993-10-08

    KM, Knob Manager, is a tool which enables the user to use the SUNDIALS knob box to adjust the settings of the control system. The followings are some features of KM: dynamic knob assignments with the user friendly interface; user-defined gain for individual knob; graphical displays for operating range and status of each process variable is assigned; backup and restore one or multiple process variable; save current settings to a file and recall the settings from that file in future.

  13. Replication-competent adenoviruses with the type 35-derived fiber-knob region achieve reactive oxygen species-dependent cytotoxicity and produce greater toxicity than those with the type 5-derived region in pancreatic carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, Suguru; Kawamura, Kiyoko; Okamoto, Shinya; Morinaga, Takao; Jiang, Yuanyuan; Shingyoji, Masato; Sekine, Ikuo; Kubo, Shuji; Tada, Yuji; Tatsumi, Koichiro; Shimada, Hideaki; Hiroshima, Kenzo; Tagawa, Masatoshi

    2015-12-01

    Pancreatic carcinoma is relatively resistant to chemotherapy and cell death induced by replication of adenoviruses (Ad) can be one of the therapeutic options. Transduction efficacy of conventional type 5 Ad (Ad5) is however low and the cytotoxic mechanism by replication-competent Ad was not well understood. We constructed replication-competent Ad5 of which the E1A promoter region was replaced with a transcriptional regulatory region of the midkine, the survivin or the cyclooxygenase-2 gene, all of which were expressed at a high level in human tumors. We also prepared replication-competent Ad5 that were activated with the same region but had the type 35 Ad-derived fiber-knob region (AdF35) to convert the major cellular receptor for Ad infection from the coxsackie adenovirus receptor to CD46 molecules. Replication-competent AdF35 that were activated with the exogenous region produced cytotoxic effects on human pancreatic carcinoma cells greater than the corresponding Ad5 bearing with the same regulatory region. Cells infected with the AdF35 showed cytopathic effects and increased sub-G1 fractions. Caspase-9, less significantly caspase-8 and poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase, but not caspase-3 was cleaved and expression of molecules involved in autophagy and caspase-independent cell death pathways remained unchanged. Nevertheless, H2A histone family member X molecules were phosphorylated, and N-acetyl-L-cystein, an inhibitor for reactive oxygen species, suppressed the AdF35-mediated cytotoxicity. These data indicated a novel mechanism of Ad-mediated cell death and suggest a possible clinical application of the fiber-knob modified Ad. PMID:26373551

  14. Multi-Device Knob Utility for LCLS

    SciTech Connect

    Zelazny, Michael; Chevtsov, Sergei; Chu, Chungming Paul; Fairley, Diane; Krejcik, Patrick; Rogind, Deborah; Smith, Howard; White, Greg; Yocky, Gerald; /SLAC

    2009-12-09

    At the SLAC National Accelerator Laboratory (SLAC) the Controls Department (CD) has developed a new Multi-Device Knob Utility (MKB) based on the Experimental Physics and Industrial Control System (EPICS) toolkit for controlling one or more Process Variables (PVs) in unison, or simultaneously, from a physical knob located in the control room, or from various software tools such as the EPICS Extensible Display Manager (EDM) or a Swing slider in Java. A group of devices are hooked up to a knob, and then the value written to the devices is a simple function of the value of the knob. This is used, most commonly, to create a bump in the electron beam for the Linac Coherent Light Source (LCLS). Control system variables typically controlled are magnetic fields, phases, and timing offsets. This paper describes the technologies used to implement this utility.

  15. Bubbling AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martelli, Dario; Morales, Jose F.

    2005-02-01

    In the light of the recent Lin, Lunin, Maldacena (LLM) results, we investigate 1/2-BPS geometries in minimal (and next to minimal) supergravity in D = 6 dimensions. In the case of minimal supergravity, solutions are given by fibrations of a two-torus T2 specified by two harmonic functions. For a rectangular torus the two functions are related by a non-linear equation with rare solutions: AdS3 × S3, the pp-wave and the multi-center string. ``Bubbling'', i.e. superpositions of droplets, is accommodated by allowing the complex structure of the T2 to vary over the base. The analysis is repeated in the presence of a tensor multiplet and similar conclusions are reached, with generic solutions describing D1D5 (or their dual fundamental string-momentum) systems. In this framework, the profile of the dual fundamental string-momentum system is identified with the boundaries of the droplets in a two-dimensional plane.

  16. The Knobbed Acrosome Defect in Beef Bulls

    PubMed Central

    Barth, Albert D.

    1986-01-01

    The knobbed acrosome defect was found at levels of 25 to 100 percent of spermatozoa from 16 of 2054 beef bulls. The incidence of this defect appeared to be particularly high in the Charolais breed. Pedigree analysis of some of the affected Charolais bulls indicated there may be a genetic predisposition for this sperm defect. In eosin-nigrosin stained semen smears the most common form of the abnormality was a flattened or indented apex of the sperm head. A refractile bead at the apex of the sperm head was seen less commonly. Electron microscopy of the spermatozoa from one bull showed that the abnormality was similar to the knobbed sperm defect previously described in Friesian bulls. A breeding trial confirmed that bulls producing spermatozoa with a high incidence of knobbed acrosomes are infertile. ImagesFigure 2 and 3.Figure 4.Figure 5.Figure 6 and 7.Figure 8.Figure 9.Figure 10. PMID:17422706

  17. Instrument adjustment knob locks to prevent accidental maladjustment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1964-01-01

    A device, incorporating a collar with a hexagonal opening which fits snugly over a hexagonal nut used to engage instrument panel components, keeps the adjustment knob locked. A quick release mechanism frees the knob for rotational adjustment.

  18. 14 CFR 25.781 - Cockpit control knob shape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cockpit control knob shape. 25.781 Section 25.781 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 25.781 Cockpit control knob shape. Cockpit control knobs must conform to the general shapes (but...

  19. 14 CFR 25.781 - Cockpit control knob shape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Cockpit control knob shape. 25.781 Section 25.781 Aeronautics and Space FEDERAL AVIATION ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION AIRCRAFT... § 25.781 Cockpit control knob shape. Cockpit control knobs must conform to the general shapes (but...

  20. 14 CFR 23.781 - Cockpit control knob shape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 14 Aeronautics and Space 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Cockpit control knob shape. 23.781 Section... Personnel and Cargo Accommodations § 23.781 Cockpit control knob shape. (a) Flap and landing gear control knobs must conform to the general shapes (but not necessarily the exact sizes or specific...

  1. A CAMAC based knob controller for the LAMPF control system

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, W.; Bjorklund, E.

    1987-01-01

    The control computer for the Los Alamos Meson Physics Facility (LAMPF) has been recently upgraded from an SEL-840 to a VAX 11/780 running the VMS operating system. As part of this upgrade, a CAMAC-based knob controller was developed for the new control system. The knobs allow the facility operators to have slew control over software selectable accelerator devices. An alphanumeric display associated with each knob monitors the progress of the selected device. This paper describes the system requirements for the new LAMPF knob controller, and the resulting hardware and software design.

  2. Meiotic drive of chromosomal knobs reshaped the maize genome.

    PubMed Central

    Buckler, E S; Phelps-Durr, T L; Buckler, C S; Dawe, R K; Doebley, J F; Holtsford, T P

    1999-01-01

    Meiotic drive is the subversion of meiosis so that particular genes are preferentially transmitted to the progeny. Meiotic drive generally causes the preferential segregation of small regions of the genome; however, in maize we propose that meiotic drive is responsible for the evolution of large repetitive DNA arrays on all chromosomes. A maize meiotic drive locus found on an uncommon form of chromosome 10 [abnormal 10 (Ab10)] may be largely responsible for the evolution of heterochromatic chromosomal knobs, which can confer meiotic drive potential to every maize chromosome. Simulations were used to illustrate the dynamics of this meiotic drive model and suggest knobs might be deleterious in the absence of Ab10. Chromosomal knob data from maize's wild relatives (Zea mays ssp. parviglumis and mexicana) and phylogenetic comparisons demonstrated that the evolution of knob size, frequency, and chromosomal position agreed with the meiotic drive hypothesis. Knob chromosomal position was incompatible with the hypothesis that knob repetitive DNA is neutral or slightly deleterious to the genome. We also show that environmental factors and transposition may play a role in the evolution of knobs. Because knobs occur at multiple locations on all maize chromosomes, the combined effects of meiotic drive and genetic linkage may have reshaped genetic diversity throughout the maize genome in response to the presence of Ab10. Meiotic drive may be a major force of genome evolution, allowing revolutionary changes in genome structure and diversity over short evolutionary periods. PMID:10471723

  3. 14 CFR 23.781 - Cockpit control knob shape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... knobs must conform to the general shapes (but not necessarily the exact sizes or specific proportions... general shapes (but not necessarily the exact sizes or specific proportions) in the following figure:...

  4. 14 CFR 23.781 - Cockpit control knob shape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... knobs must conform to the general shapes (but not necessarily the exact sizes or specific proportions... general shapes (but not necessarily the exact sizes or specific proportions) in the following figure:...

  5. 14 CFR 23.781 - Cockpit control knob shape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... knobs must conform to the general shapes (but not necessarily the exact sizes or specific proportions... general shapes (but not necessarily the exact sizes or specific proportions) in the following figure:...

  6. 14 CFR 23.781 - Cockpit control knob shape.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... knobs must conform to the general shapes (but not necessarily the exact sizes or specific proportions... general shapes (but not necessarily the exact sizes or specific proportions) in the following figure:...

  7. Knob linkage permits one-hand control of several operations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Codding, G. C.; Lavender, C. E.

    1965-01-01

    Electromechanical device with single knob provides one-hand control of numerous electrical or mechanical functions. The principle of this design may have application to remote-control switching devices.

  8. 79. Rocky Knob Recreation area housekeeping cabin with stone chimney ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    79. Rocky Knob Recreation area housekeeping cabin with stone chimney mimicking the log cabins of the Southern Appalachians. Looking south. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  9. Characterization of infectivity of knob-modified adenoviral vectors in glioma.

    PubMed

    Paul, C P L; Everts, M; Glasgow, J N; Dent, P; Fisher, P B; Ulasov, I V; Lesniak, M S; Stoff-Khalili, M A; Roth, J C; Preuss, M A; Dirven, C M F; Lamfers, M L M; Siegal, G P; Zhu, Z B; Curiel, D T

    2008-05-01

    Malignant glioma continues to be a major target for gene therapy and virotherapy due to its aggressive growth and the current lack of effective treatment. However, these approaches have been hampered by inefficient infection of glioma cells by viral vectors,particularly vectors derived from serotype 5 adenoviruses (Ad5). This results from limited cell surface expression of the primary adenovirus receptor, coxsackie-adenovirus-receptor (CAR), on tumor cells. To circumvent this problem, Ad fiber pseudotyping,the genetic replacement of either the entire fiber or fiber knob domain with its structural counterpart from another human Ad serotype that recognizes a cellular receptor other than CAR, has been shown to enhance Ad infectivity in a variety of tumor types,including human glioma. Here, we have extended the paradigm of genetic pseudotyping to include fiber domains from non-human or"xenotype" Ads for infectivity enhancement of human glioma cell populations. In this study, we evaluated the gene transfer efficiency of a panel of Ad vectors which express one of five different "xenotype"fiber knob domains, including those derived from murine,ovine, porcine and canine species, in both human glioma cell lines as well as primary glioma tumor cells from patients. Adenovirus vectors displaying either canine Ad or porcine Ad fiber elements had the highest gene transfer to both glioma cell lines and primary tumor cells. The correlation between the viral infectivity of modified adenovirus vectors and expression of human CAR and CD46(an adenovirus type B receptor) on the surfaces of tumor cells was also analyzed. Taken together, human adenovirus vectors modified with "xenotype" fiber elements could be excellent candidates to target human glioma. PMID:18756624

  10. Fibrinogen variant B[beta]D432A has normal polymerization but does not bind knob 'B'

    SciTech Connect

    Bowley, Sheryl R.; Lord, Susan T.

    2009-10-23

    Fibrinogen residue B{beta}432Asp is part of hole 'b' that interacts with knob 'B,' whose sequence starts with Gly-His-Arg-Pro-amide (GHRP). Because previous studies showed B{beta}D432A has normal polymerization, we hypothesized that B{beta}432Asp is not critical for knob 'B' binding and that new knob-hole interactions would compensate for the loss of this Asp residue. To test this hypothesis, we solved the crystal structure of fragment D from B{beta}D432A. Surprisingly, the structure (rfD-B{beta}D432A+GH) showed the peptide GHRP was not bound to hole 'b.' We then re-evaluated the polymerization of this variant by examining clot turbidity, clot structure, and the rate of FXIIIa cross-linking. The turbidity and the rate of - dimer formation for B{beta}D432A were indistinguishable compared with normal fibrinogen. Scanning electron microscopy showed no significant differences between the clots of B{beta}D432A and normal, but the thrombin-derived clots had thicker fibers than clots obtained from batroxobin, suggesting that cleavage of FpB is more important than 'B:b' interactions. We conclude that hole 'b' and 'B:b' knob-hole binding per se have no influence on fibrin polymerization.

  11. AdS3: the NHEK generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bena, Iosif; Heurtier, Lucien; Puhm, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    It was argued in [1] that the five-dimensional near-horizon extremal Kerr (NHEK) geometry can be embedded in String Theory as the infrared region of an infinite family of non-supersymmetric geometries that have D1, D5, momentum and KK monopole charges. We show that there exists a method to embed these geometries into asymptotically- {AdS}_3× {S}^3/{{Z}}_N solutions, and hence to obtain infinite families of flows whose infrared is NHEK. This indicates that the CFT dual to the NHEK geometry is the IR fixed point of a Renormalization Group flow from a known local UV CFT and opens the door to its explicit construction.

  12. Maize chromosomal knobs are located in gene-dense areas and suppress local recombination

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Knobs are conspicuous heterochromatic regions found on the chromosomes of maize and its relatives. The number, locations, and sizes vary dramatically, with most lines containing between four and eight knobs in mid-arm positions. Prior data suggest that some knobs may reduce recombination, but prev...

  13. 77. Rocky Knob Recreation area. View of the valley from ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    77. Rocky Knob Recreation area. View of the valley from Belcher's Curve. Notice that the scenic easement allows A the boundary of the parkway to disappear creating a park that appears bigger than it is. View to west-southwest. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  14. DETAIL OF TRACTION CABLE ENGAGEMENT DEVICE. SMALL, KNOBBED LEVER ON ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    DETAIL OF TRACTION CABLE ENGAGEMENT DEVICE. SMALL, KNOBBED LEVER ON BUCKET HANGER WAS PULLED DOWN BY A CAMEL (FIXED CAM RAIL AT CENTER) AS BUCKET ROLLED PAST IT, CAUSING A CLAMP TO CLOSE AGAINST TRACTION CABLE. A SIMILAR CAMEL (NO LONGER EXTANT) DISENGAGED CLAMP ON RECEIVING SIDE. - Shenandoah-Dives Mill, 135 County Road 2, Silverton, San Juan County, CO

  15. 97. Cumberland knob recreation area. The visitor contact center originally ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    97. Cumberland knob recreation area. The visitor contact center originally opened in 1941 as a combined sandwich shop, picnic area, and comfort station, the central building of the first recreation area to open looking north. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  16. 76. Rocky Knob Recreation area, Belcher's Curve. View of a ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    76. Rocky Knob Recreation area, Belcher's Curve. View of a parkway scenic easement. These have helped preserve the rural character of the landscape through which the parkway passes. Facing east-southeast. - Blue Ridge Parkway, Between Shenandoah National Park & Great Smoky Mountains, Asheville, Buncombe County, NC

  17. Comparison of knobs on Mars to isolated hills in eolian, fluvial and glacial environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Manent, L. S.; El-Baz, F.

    1986-01-01

    The isolated knobs of Mars, characterized in terms of length, width, geographic location, proximity to streaks, and geologic surroundings through Viking Orbiters' photomosaics, are compared to isolated hills on earth eroded by eolian, fluvia, and glacial processes. Comparison of length-to-width ratios indicates similarity of the knobs to the hills formed in a hyperarid environment. The hills formed on earth by fluvial and glacial processes have length-to-width ratios significantly higher than those of the Martian knobs and have other diagnostic features not associated with the knobs. Moreover, streaks, splotches, dunes, and pitted and fluted rocks, all indicative of an eolian regime, are associated with the Martian knobs.

  18. Single-knob beam line for transverse emittance partitioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, C.; Kester, O. K.; Groening, L.; Leibrock, H.; Maier, M.; Rottländer, P.

    2013-04-01

    Flat beams feature unequal emittances in the horizontal and vertical phase space. Such beams were created successfully in electron machines by applying effective stand-alone solenoid fringe fields in the electron gun. Extension of this method to ion beams was proposed conceptually. The present paper is on the decoupling capabilities of an ion beam emittance transfer line. The proposed beam line provides a single-knob tool to partition the horizontal and vertical rms emittances, while keeping the product of the two emittances constant as well as the transverse rms Twiss parameters (αx,y and βx,y) in both planes. It is shown that this single knob is the solenoid field strength.

  19. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-3 - Limitations on expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Limitations on expansion. 240.17Ad-3 Section 240.17Ad-3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... expansion. (a) Any registered transfer agent which is required to file any notice pursuant to §...

  20. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-3 - Limitations on expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Limitations on expansion. 240.17Ad-3 Section 240.17Ad-3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... expansion. (a) Any registered transfer agent which is required to file any notice pursuant to §...

  1. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-3 - Limitations on expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Limitations on expansion. 240.17Ad-3 Section 240.17Ad-3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... expansion. (a) Any registered transfer agent which is required to file any notice pursuant to §...

  2. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-3 - Limitations on expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 4 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Limitations on expansion. 240.17Ad-3 Section 240.17Ad-3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... Limitations on expansion. (a) Any registered transfer agent which is required to file any notice pursuant...

  3. 17 CFR 240.17Ad-3 - Limitations on expansion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 17 Commodity and Securities Exchanges 3 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Limitations on expansion. 240.17Ad-3 Section 240.17Ad-3 Commodity and Securities Exchanges SECURITIES AND EXCHANGE COMMISSION... expansion. (a) Any registered transfer agent which is required to file any notice pursuant to §...

  4. Two Virasoro symmetries in stringy warped AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Guica, Monica; Rodriguez, Maria J.

    2014-12-01

    We study three-dimensional consistent truncations of type IIB supergravity which admit warped AdS3 solutions. These theories contain subsectors that have no bulk dynamics. We show that the symplectic form for these theories, when restricted to the non-dynamical subsectors, equals the symplectic form for pure Einstein gravity in AdS3. Consequently, for each consistent choice of boundary conditions in AdS3, we can define a consistent phase space in warped AdS3 with identical conserved charges. This way, we easily obtain a Virasoro × Virasoro asymptotic symmetry algebra in warped AdS3; two different types of Virasoro × Kač-Moody symmetries are also consistent alternatives.

  5. A spiral scaffold underlies cytoadherent knobs in Plasmodium falciparum–infected erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Watermeyer, Jean M.; Hale, Victoria L.; Hackett, Fiona; Clare, Daniel K.; Cutts, Erin E.; Vakonakis, Ioannis; Fleck, Roland A.; Blackman, Michael J.

    2016-01-01

    Much of the virulence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is caused by cytoadherence of infected erythrocytes, which promotes parasite survival by preventing clearance in the spleen. Adherence is mediated by membrane protrusions known as knobs, whose formation depends on the parasite-derived, knob-associated histidine-rich protein (KAHRP). Knobs are required for cytoadherence under flow conditions, and they contain both KAHRP and the parasite-derived erythrocyte membrane protein PfEMP1. Using electron tomography, we have examined the 3-dimensional structure of knobs in detergent-insoluble skeletons of P falciparum 3D7 schizonts. We describe a highly organized knob skeleton composed of a spiral structure coated by an electron-dense layer underlying the knob membrane. This knob skeleton is connected by multiple links to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. We used immuno-electron microscopy (EM) to locate KAHRP in these structures. The arrangement of membrane proteins in the knobs, visualized by high-resolution freeze-fracture scanning EM, is distinct from that in the surrounding erythrocyte membrane, with a structure at the apex that likely represents the adhesion site. Thus, erythrocyte knobs in P falciparum infection contain a highly organized skeleton structure underlying a specialized region of membrane. We propose that the spiral and dense coat organize the cytoadherence structures in the knob, and anchor them into the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. The high density of knobs and their extensive mechanical linkage suggest an explanation for the rigidification of the cytoskeleton in infected cells, and for the transmission to the cytoskeleton of shear forces experienced by adhering cells. PMID:26637786

  6. Geomorphic knobs of Candor Chasma, Mars: New Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter data and comparisons to terrestrial analogs

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Chan, M.A.; Ormo, J.; Murchie, S.; Okubo, C.H.; Komatsu, G.; Wray, J.J.; McGuire, P.; McGovern, J.A.

    2010-01-01

    High Resolution Imaging Science Experiment (HiRISE) imagery and digital elevation models of the Candor Chasma region of Valles Marineris, Mars, reveal prominent and distinctive positive-relief knobs amidst light-toned layers. Three classifications of knobs, Types 1, 2, and 3, are distinguished from a combination of HiRISE and Thermal Emission Imaging System (THEMIS) images based on physical expressions (geometries, spatial relationships), and spectral data from Compact Reconnaissance Imaging Spectrometer for Mars (CRISM). Type 1 knobs are abundant, concentrated, topographically resistant features with their highest frequency in West Candor, which have consistent stratigraphic correlations of the peak altitude (height). These Type 1 knobs could be erosional remnants of a simple dissected terrain, possibly derived from a more continuous, resistant, capping layer of pre-existing material diagenetically altered through recrystallization or cementation. Types 2 and 3 knobs are not linked to a single stratigraphic layer and are generally solitary to isolated, with variable heights. Type 3 are the largest knobs at nearly an order of magnitude larger than Type 1 knobs. The variable sizes and occasional pits on the tops of Type 2 and 3 knobs suggest a different origin, possibly related to more developed erosion, preferential cementation, or textural differences from sediment/water injection or intrusion, or from a buried impact crater. Enhanced color HiRISE images show a brown coloration of the knob peak crests that is attributable to processing and photometric effects; CRISM data do not show any detectable spectral differences between the knobs and the host rock layers, other than albedo. These intriguing knobs hold important clues to deducing relative rock properties, timing of events, and weathering conditions of Mars history. ?? 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A spiral scaffold underlies cytoadherent knobs in Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Watermeyer, Jean M; Hale, Victoria L; Hackett, Fiona; Clare, Daniel K; Cutts, Erin E; Vakonakis, Ioannis; Fleck, Roland A; Blackman, Michael J; Saibil, Helen R

    2016-01-21

    Much of the virulence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is caused by cytoadherence of infected erythrocytes, which promotes parasite survival by preventing clearance in the spleen. Adherence is mediated by membrane protrusions known as knobs, whose formation depends on the parasite-derived, knob-associated histidine-rich protein (KAHRP). Knobs are required for cytoadherence under flow conditions, and they contain both KAHRP and the parasite-derived erythrocyte membrane protein PfEMP1. Using electron tomography, we have examined the 3-dimensional structure of knobs in detergent-insoluble skeletons of P falciparum 3D7 schizonts. We describe a highly organized knob skeleton composed of a spiral structure coated by an electron-dense layer underlying the knob membrane. This knob skeleton is connected by multiple links to the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. We used immuno-electron microscopy (EM) to locate KAHRP in these structures. The arrangement of membrane proteins in the knobs, visualized by high-resolution freeze-fracture scanning EM, is distinct from that in the surrounding erythrocyte membrane, with a structure at the apex that likely represents the adhesion site. Thus, erythrocyte knobs in P falciparum infection contain a highly organized skeleton structure underlying a specialized region of membrane. We propose that the spiral and dense coat organize the cytoadherence structures in the knob, and anchor them into the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. The high density of knobs and their extensive mechanical linkage suggest an explanation for the rigidification of the cytoskeleton in infected cells, and for the transmission to the cytoskeleton of shear forces experienced by adhering cells. PMID:26637786

  8. 75 FR 68788 - Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Jefferson, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-09

    ... AGENCY Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Jefferson, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement AGENCY... Protection Agency has entered into a settlement for reimbursement of past response costs concerning the Ore..., identified by Docket ID No. EPA-RO4- SFUND-2010-0893 or Site name Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site by one of...

  9. Worldsheet scattering in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundin, Per; Wulff, Linus

    2013-07-01

    We confront the recently proposed exact S-matrices for AdS 3/ CFT 2 with direct worldsheet calculations. Utilizing the BMN and Near Flat Space (NFS) expansions for strings on AdS 3 × S 3 × S 3 × S 1 and AdS 3 × S 3 × T 4 we compute both tree-level and one-loop scattering amplitudes. Up to some minor issues we find nice agreement in the tree-level sector. At the one-loop level however we find that certain non-zero tree-level processes, which are not visible in the exact solution, contribute, via the optical theorem, and give an apparent mismatch for certain amplitudes. Furthermore we find that a proposed one-loop modification of the dressing phase correctly reproduces the worldsheet calculation while the standard Hernandez-Lopez phase does not. We also compute several massless to massless processes.

  10. Dynamic association of PfEMP1 and KAHRP in knobs mediates cytoadherence during Plasmodium invasion

    PubMed Central

    Ganguly, Akshay Kumar; Ranjan, Priyatosh; Kumar, Ashutosh; Bhavesh, Neel Sarovar

    2015-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum infected erythrocytes display membrane knobs that are essential for their adherence to vascular endothelia and for prevention of clearance by the spleen. The knob associated histidine rich protein (KAHRP) is indispensable to knob formation and has been implicated in the recruitment and tethering of P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein–1 (PfEMP1) by binding to its cytoplasmic domain termed VARC. However, the precise mechanism of interaction between KAHRP and VARC is not very well understood. Here we report that both the proteins co-localize to membrane knobs of P. falciparum infected erythrocytes and have identified four positively charged linear sequence motifs of high intrinsic mobility on KAHRP that interact electrostatically with VARC in solution to form a fuzzy complex. The current study provides molecular insight into interaction between KAHRP and VARC in solution that takes place at membrane knobs. PMID:25726759

  11. Experimental demonstration of interaction region beam waist position knob for luminosity leveling

    SciTech Connect

    Hao, Yue; Bai, Mei; Duan, Zhe; Luo, Yun; Marusic, Aljosa; Robert-Demolaize, Guillaume; Shen, Xiaozhe

    2015-05-03

    In this paper, we report the experimental implementation of the model-dependent control of the interaction region beam waist position (s* knob) at Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider (RHIC). The s* adjustment provides an alternative way of controlling the luminosity and is only known method to control the luminosity and reduce the pinch effect of the future eRHIC. In this paper, we will first demonstrate the effectiveness of the s* knob in luminosity controlling and its application in the future electron ion collider, eRHIC, followed by the detail experimental demonstration of such knob in RHIC.

  12. Warped AdS3/dipole-CFT duality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2012-05-01

    String theory contains solutions with {{SL}}( {{2},{R}} ){{R}} × {{U}}{( {1} )_L} -invariant warped AdS3 (WAdS3) factors arising as continuous deformations of ordinary AdS3 factors. We propose that some of these are holographically dual to the IR limits of nonlocal dipole-deformed 2D D-brane gauge theories, referred to as "dipole CFTs". Neither the bulk nor boundary theories are currently well-understood, and consequences of the proposed duality for both sides is investigated. The bulk entropy-area law suggests that dipole CFTs have (at large N) a high-energy density of states which does not depend on the deformation parameter. Putting the boundary theory on a spatial circle leads to closed timelike curves in the bulk, suggesting a relation of the latter to dipole-type nonlocality.

  13. New boundary conditions for AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compère, Geoffrey; Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2013-05-01

    New chiral boundary conditions are found for quantum gravity with matter on AdS3. The associated asymptotic symmetry group is generated by a single right-moving U(1) Kac-Moody-Virasoro algebra with {c_R}={3ℓ}/2G . The Kac-Moody zero mode generates global left-moving translations and equals, for a BTZ black hole, the sum of the total mass and spin. The level is positive about the global vacuum and negative in the black hole sector, corresponding to ergosphere formation. Realizations arising in Chern-Simons gravity and string theory are analyzed. The new boundary conditions are shown to naturally arise for warped AdS3 in the limit that the warp parameter is taken to zero.

  14. Semiclassical Virasoro blocks from AdS3 gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hijano, Eliot; Kraus, Per; Perlmutter, Eric; Snively, River

    2015-12-01

    We present a unified framework for the holographic computation of Virasoro conformal blocks at large central charge. In particular, we provide bulk constructions that correctly reproduce all semiclassical Virasoro blocks that are known explicitly from conformal field theory computations. The results revolve around the use of geodesic Witten diagrams, recently introduced in [1], evaluated in locally AdS3 geometries generated by backreaction of heavy operators. We also provide an alternative computation of the heavy-light semiclassical block — in which two external operators become parametrically heavy — as a certain scattering process involving higher spin gauge fields in AdS3; this approach highlights the chiral nature of Virasoro blocks. These techniques may be systematically extended to compute corrections to these blocks and to interpolate amongst the different semiclassical regimes.

  15. Self-dual warped AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Ning, Bo

    2010-12-01

    We study a new class of solutions of three-dimensional topological massive gravity. These solutions can be taken as nonextremal black holes, with their extremal counterparts being discrete quotients of spacelike warped AdS3 along the U(1)L isometry. We study the thermodynamics of these black holes and show that the first law is satisfied. We also show that for consistent boundary conditions, the asymptotic symmetry generators form only one copy of the Virasoro algebra with central charge cL=(4νℓ)/(G(ν2+3)), with which the Cardy formula reproduces the black hole entropy. We compute the real-time correlators of scalar perturbations and find a perfect match with the dual conformal field theory (CFT) predictions. Our study provides a novel example of warped AdS/CFT correspondence: the self-dual warped AdS3 black hole is dual to a CFT with nonvanishing left central charge. Moreover, our investigation suggests that the quantum topological massive gravity asymptotic to the same spacelike warped AdS3 in different consistent ways may be dual to different two-dimensional CFTs.

  16. On information loss in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fitzpatrick, A. Liam; Kaplan, Jared; Li, Daliang; Wang, Junpu

    2016-05-01

    We discuss information loss from black hole physics in AdS3, focusing on two sharp signatures infecting CFT2 correlators at large central charge c: `forbidden singularities' arising from Euclidean-time periodicity due to the effective Hawking temperature, and late-time exponential decay in the Lorentzian region. We study an infinite class of examples where forbidden singularities can be resolved by non-perturbative effects at finite c, and we show that the resolution has certain universal features that also apply in the general case. Analytically continuing to the Lorentzian regime, we find that the non-perturbative effects that resolve forbidden singularities qualitatively change the behavior of correlators at times t ˜ S BH , the black hole entropy. This may resolve the exponential decay of correlators at late times in black hole backgrounds. By Borel resumming the 1 /c expansion of exact examples, we explicitly identify `information-restoring' effects from heavy states that should correspond to classical solutions in AdS3. Our results suggest a line of inquiry towards a more precise formulation of the gravitational path integral in AdS3.

  17. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... it can help with weight control. Fiber aids digestion and helps prevent constipation . It is sometimes used ... fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  18. Fake gaps in AdS3/CFT2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belin, Alexandre; Castro, Alejandra; Hung, Ling-Yan

    2015-11-01

    We discuss properties of interpolating geometries in three dimensional gravity in the presence of a chiral anomaly. This anomaly, which introduces an unbalance between left and right central charges, is protected under RG flows. For this simple reason it is impossible to gap a system with such an anomaly. Our goal is to discuss how holography captures this basic and robust feature. We demonstrate the absence of a mass gap by analysing the linearized spectrum and holographic entanglement entropy of these backgrounds in the context of AdS3/CFT2.

  19. Late Cenozoic sedimentation in Pilot Knob Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittase, W. M.; Walker, J. D.; Kirby, E.; Andrew, J.; Wan, E.

    2012-12-01

    In Pilot Knob Valley (PKV), active inversion of a Pliocene-mid Pleistocene basin presents the opportunity to understand the spatial and temporal development of an enigmatic basin astride a major transform boundary in California. Here, a ~1000-m-thick package of exposed Late Cenozoic strata has been uplifted and tilted to the northeast. Based on new age and provenance data, we adopt the name Pilot Knob formation (PKfm) to describe much of these exposed rocks north of the Garlock fault (GF) and east of Christmas Canyon gate. Post-Miocene development of PKV is strongly influenced by the sinistral GF, the newly identified Marine Gate fault (MGF) and dextral Eastern California shear zone. The PKfm consists of three lithofacies members, from base to top: (1) rocks derived from Eagle Crags to the south; (2) Randsburg Wash lacustrine rocks; and (3) an upper member derived from the Slate Range. Tephrochronologic data from four PKfm ash samples brackets deposition of lacustrine Randsburg Wash Member rocks between 3.7-3.1 Ma and lacustrine rocks of the Slate Range Member between 1.2-0.6 Ma. A fifth tephrochronologic sample from lacustrine-distal alluvial sediments south of the GF near Christmas Canyon brackets deposition of a possible PKfm facies at ~3.1 Ma. A 3-stage tectonic model for northern PKV explains changing provenance patterns. Prior to ~3.1 Ma, the western PKV paleo-low lay north of the current GF adjacent to the southern Slate Range and connected to Searles Valley. The MGF cuts adjacent to the southern face of the Slate Range and southern Searles Valley with up to 7.5 km of sinistral oblique-normal slip between ~5-2.5 Ma. Eagle Crags fanglomerate deposition may continue after 3.7 Ma west of the Randsburg Wash-Searles Valley spillway, but these rocks have been eroded away. By ~3.7 Ma, northward progradation of Eagle Crags fanglomerate waned and lacustrine sediments were deposited north of the GF and east of the Randsburg Wash-Searles Valley spillway. At ~3.1 Ma

  20. Higher-derivative superparticle in AdS3 space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozyrev, Nikolay; Krivonos, Sergey; Lechtenfeld, Olaf

    2016-03-01

    Employing the coset approach we construct component actions for a superparticle moving in AdS3 with N =(2 ,0 ), D =3 supersymmetry partially broken to N =2 , d =1 . These actions may contain higher time-derivative terms, which are chosen to possess the same (super)symmetries as the free superparticle. In terms of the nonlinear-realization superfields, the component actions always take a simpler form when written in terms of covariant Cartan forms. We also consider in detail the reduction to the nonrelativistic case and construct the corresponding action of a Newton-Hooke superparticle and its higher-derivative generalizations. The structure of these higher time-derivative generalizations is completely fixed by invariance under the supersymmetric Newton-Hooke algebra extended by two central charges.

  1. Aspects of warped AdS3/CFT2 correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Zhang, Jia-Ju; Zhang, Jian-Dong; Zhong, De-Liang

    2013-04-01

    In this paper we apply the thermodynamics method to investigate the holographic pictures for the BTZ black hole, the spacelike and the null warped black holes in three-dimensional topologically massive gravity (TMG) and new massive gravity (NMG). Even though there are higher derivative terms in these theories, the thermodynamics method is still effective. It gives consistent results with the ones obtained by using asymptotical symmetry group (ASG) analysis. In doing the ASG analysis we develop a brute-force realization of the Barnich-Brandt-Compere formalism with Mathematica code, which also allows us to calculate the masses and the angular momenta of the black holes. In particular, we propose the warped AdS3/CFT2 correspondence in the new massive gravity, which states that quantum gravity in the warped spacetime could holographically dual to a two-dimensional CFT with {c_R}={c_L}=24 /{Gm{β^2√{{2( {21-4{β^2}} )}}}}.

  2. Entanglement temperature and perturbed AdS3 geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levine, G. C.; Caravan, B.

    2016-06-01

    Generalizing the first law of thermodynamics, the increase in entropy density δ S (x ) of a conformal field theory (CFT) is proportional to the increase in energy density, δ E (x ) , of a subsystem divided by a spatially dependent entanglement temperature, TE(x ) , a fixed parameter determined by the geometry of the subsystem, crossing over to thermodynamic temperature at high temperatures. In this paper we derive a generalization of the thermodynamic Clausius relation, showing that deformations of the CFT by marginal operators are associated with spatial temperature variations, δ TE(x ) , and spatial energy correlations play the role of specific heat. Using AdS/CFT duality we develop a relationship between a perturbation in the local entanglement temperature of the CFT and the perturbation of the bulk AdS metric. In two dimensions, we demonstrate a method through which direct diagonalizations of the boundary quantum theory may be used to construct geometric perturbations of AdS3 .

  3. Hypodysfibrinogenaemia due to production of mutant fibrinogen alpha-chains lacking fibrinopeptide A and polymerisation knob ‘A’

    PubMed Central

    Vorjohann, Silja; Fish, Richard J.; Biron-Andreani, Christine; Nagaswami, Chandrasekaran; Weisel, John W.; Boulot, Pierre; Reyftmann, Lionel; de Moerloose, Philippe; Neerman-Arbez, Marguerite

    2011-01-01

    Summary Inherited disorders of fibrinogen are rare and affect either the quantity (hypofibrinogenaemia and afibrinogenaemia) or the quality of the circulating fibrinogen (dysfibrinogenaemia) or both (hypodysfibrinogenaemia). Extensive allelic heterogeneity has been found for all these disorders: in congenital afibrinogenaemia for example more than 40 mutations, the majority in FGA, have been identified in homozygosity or in compound heterozygosity. Numerous mutations have also been identified in patients with hypofibrinogenaemia, many of these patients are in fact heterozygous carriers of afibrinogenaemia mutations. Despite the number of genetic analyses performed, the study of additional patients still allows the identification of novel mutations. Here we describe the characterization of a novel FGA intron 2 donor splice-site mutation (Fibrinogen Montpellier II) identified in three siblings with hypodysfibrinogenaemia. Functional analysis of RNA produced by the mutant minigene in COS-7 cells revealed that the mutation led to the in-frame skipping of exon 2. Western blot analysis of COS-7 cells expressing an exon 2 deleted FGA cDNA revealed that an alpha-chain lacking exon 2, which codes in particular for fibrinopeptide A and polymerisation knob ‘A’, has the potential to be assembled into a hexamer and secreted. Analysis of precipitated fibrinogen from patient plasma showed that the defect leads to the presence in the circulation of alpha-chains lacking knob ‘A’ which is essential for the early stages of fibrin polymerisation. Fibrin made from purified patient fibrinogen clotted with thrombin displayed thinner fibers with frequent ends and large pores. PMID:20806111

  4. Need for airbag and seatbelt to reduce orbital injuries from steering wheel knob.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Kun; Kim, Joo Ho

    2014-11-01

    The aims of this study are to report a blowout fracture of the orbital floor and medial wall caused by being struck by a steering wheel knob of an automobile and to discuss the use of airbags and seatbelts as a preventive measure for orbital injuries. A 58-year-old man was struck in the left eye by a steering wheel. His car hit a telephone pole, and he had a frontal collision injury. In this frontal impact, his left eye was hit by a Brodie knob attached to the steering wheel. At the time of injury, the speed of the car was about 65 km/h. He was not wearing a seatbelt, and the airbag had not deployed. Swelling and ecchymosis were observed at the left periorbital area, and he had diplopia on a left-side gaze. A CT revealed fractures in the medial and inferior wall of the left orbit. Entrapped soft tissues were reduced, and the medial wall and floor were reconstructed with a resorbable sheet. His diplopia disappeared 12 days after surgery. To prevent the injury from the steering wheel knob, an airbag should be installed in any vehicle, which has a steering wheel knob. Legislation mandating the use of airbags as well as seatbelts in vehicles with attached steering wheel knobs should be made. PMID:25376138

  5. Supersymmetric giant graviton solutions in AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mandal, Gautam; Raju, Suvrat; Smedbäck, Mikael

    2008-02-01

    We parametrize all classical probe brane configurations that preserve four supersymmetries in (a) the extremal D1-D5 geometry, (b) the extremal D1-D5-P geometry, (c) the smooth D1-D5 solutions proposed by Lunin and Mathur, and (d) global AdS3×S3×T4/K3. These configurations consist of D1 branes, D5 branes, and bound states of D5 and D1 branes with the property that a particular Killing vector is tangent to the brane world volume at each point. We show that the supersymmetric sector of the D5-brane world volume theory may be analyzed in an effective 1+1 dimensional framework that places it on the same footing as D1 branes. In global AdS and the corresponding Lunin-Mathur solution, the solutions we describe are “bound” to the center of AdS for generic parameters and cannot escape to infinity. We show that these probes only exist on the submanifold of moduli space where the background BNS field and theta angle vanish. We quantize these probes in the near-horizon region of the extremal D1-D5 geometry and obtain the theory of long strings discussed by Seiberg and Witten.

  6. Conserved charges in timelike warped AdS3 spaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnay, L.; Fernández-Melgarejo, J. J.; Giribet, G.; Goya, A.; Lavia, E.

    2015-06-01

    We consider the timelike version of warped anti-de Sitter space (WAdS), which corresponds to the three-dimensional section of the Gödel solution of four-dimensional cosmological Einstein equations. This geometry presents closed timelike curves (CTCs), which are inherited from its four-dimensional embedding. In three dimensions, this type of solution can be supported without matter provided the graviton acquires mass. Here, among the different ways to consistently give mass to the graviton in three dimensions, we consider the parity-even model known as new massive gravity (NMG). In the bulk of timelike WAdS3 space, we introduce defects that, from the three-dimensional point of view, represent spinning massive particlelike objects. For this type of source, we investigate the definition of quasilocal gravitational energy as seen from infinity, far beyond the region where the CTCs appear. We also consider the covariant formalism applied to NMG to compute the mass and the angular momentum of spinning particlelike defects and compare the result with the one obtained by means of the quasilocal stress tensor. We apply these methods to special limits in which the WAdS3 solutions coincide with locally AdS3 and locally AdS2×R spaces. Finally, we make some comments about the asymptotic symmetry algebra of asymptotically WAdS3 spaces in NMG.

  7. X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region of two-component heterokaryons of Neurospora crassa. X. Heterozygous effects of multilocus deletion mutations of genotype ad-3A or ad-3B.

    PubMed

    de Serres, F J; Overton, L K; Sadler, B M

    1992-05-01

    Previous studies on X-ray-induced irreparable adenine-3 mutations (designated [ad-3]IR), induced in heterokaryon 12 of Neurospora crassa, demonstrated that they were not recessive and exhibited heterozygous effects in terms of markedly reduced linear growth rates (de Serres, 1965). Complementation tests with a series of tester strains carrying multilocus deletion mutations in the ad-3 and immediately adjacent genetic regions demonstrated that X-ray-induced irreparable mutations map, in the main part, as a series of overlapping multilocus deletion mutations that extend both proximally and distally into the immediately adjacent genetic regions, as well as into the 'X' region (a region of unknown, but essential function) between ad-3A and ad-3B (de Serres, 1968, 1989). Further studies (de Serres and Miller, 1988) have shown that the heterozygous effects of multilocus deletion mutations in the ad-3 region can be modified genetically and biochemically. In the present paper, the heterozygous effects of X-ray-induced multilocus deletion mutations of genotype ad-3A or ad-3B, induced in heterokaryon 12 (Webber and de Serres, 1965; de Serres, 1988, 1989), have been determined. These data show that 57.7% (15/26) of X-ray-induced multilocus deletion mutations covering the ad-3A locus have heterozygous effects, in terms of reduced linear growth rates, in forced dikaryons with a gene/point mutant at the ad-3B locus and 80.0% (20/25) in forced dikaryons with a multilocus deletion mutation covering the ad-3B locus. In addition, 35.1% (20/57) of X-ray-induced multilocus deletion mutations covering the ad-3B locus have heterozygous effects in forced dikaryons with a gene/point mutant at the ad-3A locus, and 100.0% (35/35) in forced dikaryons with a multilocus deletion mutation covering the ad-3A locus. These results demonstrate that the dominant or recessive characteristics of X-ray-induced specific-locus mutations resulting from multilocus deletion mutations are allele specific

  8. 76 FR 77502 - Intent To Prepare a Draft Environmental Impact Statement Regarding the Wolfpen Knob Development...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-12-13

    ... the Wolfpen Knob Development Company's Proposed Mason Dixon Mining Complex, a Deep Coal Mine, Located... Statement (EIS) for the proposed Mason Dixon Mining Complex. The District Engineer is requiring an EIS to be... construction of the proposed Mason Dixon Mining Complex. The Corps will prepare the EIS in accordance with...

  9. Phyllosilcates in the Knob Fields around Ariadnes Colles on Mars: Stratigraphy, Mineralogy and Morphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wendt, L.; Bishop, J. L.; Neukum, G.

    2012-04-01

    The region between Terra Cimmeria and Terra Sirenum contains several fields of enigmatic knobs, in-cluding Ariadnes Colles, Atlantis Chaos and Gorgo-num Chaos. They have been mapped as Hesperian or Amazonian units [1,2] and are located within the shoreline of the Eridania Lake, which might have formed Ma'adim Vallis [3]. The knob fields contain Mg/Fe-rich and locally Al-rich phyllosilicates [5,6, this study]. Following the stratigraphic placement by [1,2], the knobs are younger than the Noachian, in a possible disagreement to [4]. The region also features chloride deposits [7] and valley networks younger than the Hesperian ridged plains (Hr unit [1,2]), named Mid-Latitude Valleys (MLV) by [8], and has been proposed as an MSL landing site by [9]. The knob fields have been mapped by [10] as "surface type 4" of a possible airfall deposit informally named "Electris deposit", which covers the Hesperian ridged plains and cratered uplands. A recent study by [6], suggested that the knob fields are not part of, but postdate the "Electris deposit", yet possibly contain reworked "Electris" material. Our geological mapping shows that the knob fields are indeed one morphological expression consistent with the "Electris deposit" model [10]. However, the "Electris" deposit does not stratigraphically overlay the Hesperian ridged plains (Hr unit) and is eroded back to the level of the ridged plains, as proposed by [6,10]. Instead, the "Electris" deposit, including the knob fields, is covered or embayed by the ridged plains, and thus is older. This results in a late Noachian age for the "Electris deposit", in agreement with [11]. This also reconciles the apparent contradiction of the stratigraphy suggested by [1,2,6,10] to [4], as the clays would then indeed have formed in the "phyllosian" period, as "sedimentary clays" of [12]. Wide valley networks cut into the "Electris" deposit and may have filled the Eridania lake. The knob fields and clays within are observed at varying total

  10. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... broccoli, spinach, and artichokes legumes (split peas, soy, lentils, etc.) almonds Look for the fiber content of ... salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Add lentils or whole-grain barley to your favorite soups. ...

  11. Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... short period of time can cause intestinal gas ( flatulence ), bloating , and abdominal cramps . This problem often goes ... 213. National Research Council. Dietary Reference Intakes for Energy, Carbohydrate, Fiber, Fat, Fatty Acids, Cholesterol, Protein, and ...

  12. 78 FR 47317 - Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-08-05

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY Ore Knob Mine Superfund Site; Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina; Notice of Settlement... Superfund Site located in Laurel Springs, Ashe County, North Carolina. The settlement addresses...

  13. Bedrock knobs, San Francisco Bay: Do navigation hazards outweigh other environment problems?

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carlson, P.R.; Chin, J.L.; Wong, F.L.

    2000-01-01

    Three bedrock knobs (Arch, Harding, and Shag rocks) rise above the unconsolidated sediment of central San Francisco Bay to a water depth of less than -12 m (<-39.4 ft MLLW). These rocks are within the westbound vessel traffic area, and the northernmost, Harding Rock, is ~300 m (984 ft) from the two-way deep water traffic lane. The rocks pose a hazard to deep-draft vessels. Large ships with drafts deeper than -17 m (-55.8 ft) cross central San Francisco Bay bound for and returning from major port cities of the Bay estuary. Acoustic profiling data show that bedrock extends at a gentle to moderate slope away from the knobs. These data also show that two of the knobs, Harding and Shag, may be part of a bedrock ridge that extends to Alcatraz Island and perhaps southeast to Blossom Rock. The tops of these rocks should be lowered to a depth of -17 m (-55.8 ft), with a total volume of as much as 245,000 m3 (320,460 yd3), at an estimated cost of nearly 27 million dollars, to eliminate the possibility that a tanker would strike one and rupture. A resulting large oil spill would likely cost many times more than the 10 million dollars needed to clean up a small 1996 spill. If the rocks were removed, local habitat for striped bass and other game fish would be altered, with potential negative impact on sport fishing. Currently, public officials are studying the benefits to the Bay environment of lowering the rock knobs.

  14. Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocyte Knob Density Is Linked to the PfEMP1 Variant Expressed

    PubMed Central

    Subramani, Ramesh; Quadt, Katharina; Jeppesen, Anine E.; Hempel, Casper; Petersen, Jens Emil Vang; Hassenkam, Tue; Hviid, Lars

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Members of the clonally variant Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family mediate adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs) to vascular receptors. PfEMP1 expression is normally confined to nanoscale knob protrusions on the IE surface membrane. To investigate the relationship between the densities of these IE surface knobs and the PfEMP1 variant expressed, we used specific antibody panning to generate three sublines of the P. falciparum clone IT4, which expresses the PfEMP1 variants IT4VAR04, IT4VAR32b, and IT4VAR60. The knob density in each subline was then determined by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and compared to PfEMP1 and knob-associated histidine-rich protein (KAHRP) expression. Selection for uniform expression of IT4VAR04 produced little change in knob density, compared to unselected IEs. In contrast, selection for IT4VAR32b expression increased knob density approximately 3-fold, whereas IEs selected for IT4VAR60 expression were essentially knobless. When IT4VAR60+ IEs were subsequently selected to express IT4VAR04 or IT4VAR32b, they again displayed low and high knob densities, respectively. All sublines expressed KAHRP regardless of the PfEMP1 expressed. Our study documents for the first time that knob density is related to the PfEMP1 variant expressed. This may reflect topological requirements to ensure optimal adhesive properties of the IEs. PMID:26443460

  15. Ultra-Low Power Dynamic Knob in Adaptive Compressed Sensing Towards Biosignal Dynamics.

    PubMed

    Wang, Aosen; Lin, Feng; Jin, Zhanpeng; Xu, Wenyao

    2016-06-01

    Compressed sensing (CS) is an emerging sampling paradigm in data acquisition. Its integrated analog-to-information structure can perform simultaneous data sensing and compression with low-complexity hardware. To date, most of the existing CS implementations have a fixed architectural setup, which lacks flexibility and adaptivity for efficient dynamic data sensing. In this paper, we propose a dynamic knob (DK) design to effectively reconfigure the CS architecture by recognizing the biosignals. Specifically, the dynamic knob design is a template-based structure that comprises a supervised learning module and a look-up table module. We model the DK performance in a closed analytic form and optimize the design via a dynamic programming formulation. We present the design on a 130 nm process, with a 0.058 mm (2) fingerprint and a 187.88 nJ/event energy-consumption. Furthermore, we benchmark the design performance using a publicly available dataset. Given the energy constraint in wireless sensing, the adaptive CS architecture can consistently improve the signal reconstruction quality by more than 70%, compared with the traditional CS. The experimental results indicate that the ultra-low power dynamic knob can provide an effective adaptivity and improve the signal quality in compressed sensing towards biosignal dynamics. PMID:26800548

  16. Draft Genome Sequence of Zhouia amylolytica AD3, Isolated from Tidal Flat Sediment

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Baolei; Jin, Hyun Mi; Lee, Hyo Jung

    2016-01-01

    Zhouia amylolytica AD3 was isolated from tidal flat sediment at Taean, South Korea. We report here the draft genome sequence of Z. amylolytica AD3, which is the first report of a genome sequence of the genus Zhouia. The genomic information will provide a better understanding of the physiology, adaptation, and evolution of Zhouia species. PMID:27151796

  17. Scaling symmetry and scalar hairy rotating AdS3 black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Byoungjoon; Hyun, Seungjoon; Park, Sang-A.; Yi, Sang-Heon

    2016-01-01

    By using the scaling symmetry in the reduced action formalism, we derive the novel Smarr relation which holds even for the hairy rotating AdS3 black holes. Then, by using the Smarr relation we argue that the hairy rotating AdS3 black holes are stable thermodynamically, compared to the nonhairy ones.

  18. Geometric finiteness, holography and quasinormal modes for the warped AdS3 black hole

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Kumar S.; Harikumar, E.; Sen, Siddhartha; Sivakumar, M.

    2010-08-01

    We show that there exists a precise kinematical notion of holography for the Euclidean warped AdS3 black hole. This follows from the fact that the Euclidean warped AdS3 black hole spacetime is a geometrically finite hyperbolic manifold. For such manifolds a theorem of Sullivan provides a one-to-one correspondence between the hyperbolic structure in the bulk and the conformal structure of its boundary. Using this theorem we obtain the holographic quasinormal modes for the warped AdS3 black hole.

  19. The Density of Knobs on Plasmodium falciparum-Infected Erythrocytes Depends on Developmental Age and Varies among Isolates

    PubMed Central

    Quadt, Katharina A.; Barfod, Lea; Andersen, Daniel; Bruun, Jonas; Gyan, Ben; Hassenkam, Tue; Ofori, Michael F.; Hviid, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Background The virulence of Plasmodium falciparum malaria is related to the parasite’s ability to evade host immunity through clonal antigenic variation and tissue-specific adhesion of infected erythrocytes (IEs). The P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) family expressed on dome-shaped protrusions called knobs on the IE surface is central to both. Differences in receptor specificity and affinity of expressed PfEMP1 are important for IE adhesiveness, but it is not known whether differences in the number and size of the knobs on which the PfEMP1 proteins are expressed also play a role. Therefore, the aim of this study was to provide detailed information on isolate- and time-dependent differences in knob size and density. Methodology/Principal Findings We used atomic force microscopy to characterize knobs on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes. Fourteen ex vivo isolates from Ghanaian children with malaria and 10 P. falciparum isolates selected in vitro for expression of a particular PfEMP1 protein (VAR2CSA) were examined. Knob density increased from ∼20 h to ∼35 h post-invasion, with significant variation among isolates. The knob density ex vivo, which was about five-fold higher than following long-term in vitro culture, started to decline within a few months of culture. Although knob diameter and height varied among isolates, we did not observe significant time-dependent variation in these dimensions. Conclusions/Significance The density of knobs on the P. falciparum-IE surface depends on time since invasion, but is also determined by the infecting isolate in a time-independent manner. This is the first study to quantitatively evaluate knob densities and dimensions on different P. falciparum isolates, to examine ex vivo isolates from humans, and to compare ex vivo and long-term in vitro-cultured isolates. Our findings contribute to the understanding of the interaction between P. falciparum parasites and the infected host. PMID

  20. Complete genome of Martelella sp. AD-3, a moderately halophilic polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons-degrading bacterium.

    PubMed

    Cui, Changzheng; Li, Zhijie; Qian, Jiangchao; Shi, Jie; Huang, Ling; Tang, Hongzhi; Chen, Xin; Lin, Kuangfei; Xu, Ping; Liu, Yongdi

    2016-05-10

    Martelella sp. strain AD-3, a moderate halophilic bacterium, was isolated from a petroleum-contaminated soil with high salinity in China. Here, we report the complete genome of strain AD-3, which contains one circular chromosome and two circular plasmids. An array of genes related to metabolism of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and halophilic mechanism in this bacterium was identified by the whole genome analysis. PMID:26988395

  1. Warped AdS3 , dS3 , and flows from N =(0 ,2 ) SCFTs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Colgáin, Eoin

    2015-05-01

    We present the general form of all timelike supersymmetric solutions to three-dimensional U (1 )3 gauged supergravity, a known consistent truncation of string theory. We uncover a rich vacuum structure, including an infinite class of new timelike-warped AdS3 (Gödel) and timelike-warped dS3 critical points. We outline the construction of supersymmetric flows, driven by irrelevant scalar operators in the SCFT, which interpolate between critical points. For flows from AdS3 to Gödel, the natural candidate for the central charge decreases along the flow. Flows to timelike-warped dS3 exhibit topology change.

  2. Protruding knob-like proteins violate local symmetries in an icosahedral marine virus

    PubMed Central

    Gipson, Preeti; Baker, Matthew L.; Raytcheva, Desislava; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; Piret, Jacqueline; King, Jonathan A.; Chiu, Wah

    2014-01-01

    Marine viruses play crucial roles in shaping the dynamics of oceanic microbial communities and in the carbon cycle on Earth. Here we report a 4.7-Å structure of a cyanobacterial virus, Syn5, by electron cryo-microscopy and modelling. A Cα backbone trace of the major capsid protein (gp39) reveals a classic phage protein fold. In addition, two knob-like proteins protruding from the capsid surface are also observed. Using bioinformatics and structure analysis tools, these proteins are identified to correspond to gp55 and gp58 (each with two copies per asymmetric unit). The non 1:1 stoichiometric distribution of gp55/58 to gp39 breaks all expected local symmetries and leads to non-quasi-equivalence of the capsid subunits, suggesting a role in capsid stabilization. Such a structural arrangement has not yet been observed in any known virus structures. PMID:24985522

  3. Geochemistry and origin of the Bald Knob manganese deposit, North Carolina

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Flohr, M.J.K.

    1992-01-01

    Geochemical and textural evidence for the submarine hydrothermal origin of the Bald Knob Mn deposit, North Carolina, is preserved in a mineralogically diverse suite of rocks that have experienced amphibolite facies metamorphism. Manganese- and Mn-Fe-rich lithologies have high Mn/Fe ratios and low concentrations of Ni, Cu, Zn, U, Th, and rare earth elements that are similar to concentrations reported from other ancient manganiferous deposits and from crusts and sediments which are forming in hydrothermally active regions of the present sea floor. The association of the manganiferous lithologies with chert and meta-igneous rocks is consistent with deposition of the sediments in a rifting environment, such as a back-arc basin, or possibly, a midocean ridge. -from Author

  4. Protruding knob-like proteins violate local symmetries in an icosahedral marine virus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gipson, Preeti; Baker, Matthew L.; Raytcheva, Desislava; Haase-Pettingell, Cameron; Piret, Jacqueline; King, Jonathan A.; Chiu, Wah

    2014-07-01

    Marine viruses play crucial roles in shaping the dynamics of oceanic microbial communities and in the carbon cycle on Earth. Here we report a 4.7-Å structure of a cyanobacterial virus, Syn5, by electron cryo-microscopy and modelling. A Cα backbone trace of the major capsid protein (gp39) reveals a classic phage protein fold. In addition, two knob-like proteins protruding from the capsid surface are also observed. Using bioinformatics and structure analysis tools, these proteins are identified to correspond to gp55 and gp58 (each with two copies per asymmetric unit). The non 1:1 stoichiometric distribution of gp55/58 to gp39 breaks all expected local symmetries and leads to non-quasi-equivalence of the capsid subunits, suggesting a role in capsid stabilization. Such a structural arrangement has not yet been observed in any known virus structures.

  5. The spectrum of strings on warped AdS3 × S3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeyanagi, Tatsuo; Hofman, Diego M.; Song, Wei; Strominger, Andrew

    2013-04-01

    String theory on NS-NS AdS3 × S3 admits an exactly marginal deformation which breaks the {{overline{{SL( {2,{R}} )}}}_R} × SL(2, {R} ) L isometry of AdS3 down to {{overline{{SL( {2,{R}} )}}}_R} × U(1) L . The holographic dual is an exotic and only partially understood type of two-dimensional CFT with a reduced unbroken global conformal symmetry group. In this paper we study the deformed theory on the string worldsheet. It is found to be related by a spectral flow which is nonlocal in spacetime to the undeformed worldsheet theory. An exact formula for the spectrum of massive strings is presented.

  6. Stability of warped AdS3 black holes in topologically massive gravity under scalar perturbations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferreira, Hugo R. C.

    2013-06-01

    We demonstrate that the warped AdS3 black hole solutions of topologically massive gravity are classically stable against massive scalar field perturbations by analyzing the quasinormal and bound state modes of the scalar field. In particular, it is found that although classical superradiance is present it does not give rise to superradiant instabilities. The stability is shown to persist even when the black hole is enclosed by a stationary mirror with Dirichlet boundary conditions. This is a surprising result in view of the similarity between the causal structure of the warped AdS3 black hole and the Kerr spacetime in 3+1 dimensions. This work provides the foundations for the study of quantum field theory in this spacetime.

  7. On holomorphic factorization in asymptotically AdS 3D gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasnov, Kirill

    2003-09-01

    This paper studies aspects of 'holography' for Euclidean signature pure gravity on asymptotically AdS 3-manifolds. This theory can be described as SL(2, Bbb C) CS theory. However, not all configurations of CS theory correspond to asymptotically AdS 3-manifolds. We show that configurations that do have the metric interpretation are parametrized by the so-called projective structures on the boundary. The corresponding asymptotic phase space is shown to be the cotangent bundle over the Schottky space of the boundary. This singles out a 'gravitational' sector of the SL(2, Bbb C) CS theory. It is over this sector that the path integral has to be taken to obtain the gravity partition function. We sketch an argument for holomorphic factorization of this partition function.

  8. Using blocking peptides to control and analyze the mechanical properties of single fibrin fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maddi, Pranav; O'Brien, E. Tim, III; Gorkun, Oleg; Falvo, Michael R.

    2011-10-01

    Fibrin is the main structural protein involved in blood clotting, and exhibits high strength and elasticity. Fibrin study traditionally focuses on fully formed clots, whereas we employ new AFM nanoManipulation techniques to study single fibrin fiber mechanics. We used 4 and 10 residue peptides to interfere with the knob-hole and αC interactions involved in fibrin polymerization to evaluate the contribution of each interaction to the fiber's mechanical properties. We varied the concentration of each peptide present during polymerization to find the concentration that inhibited polymerization by half. The presence of either peptide during fibrin polymerization did not affect single fiber breaking strain (δLL0). The breaking force of all treated fibers reduced from 10-50nN to 2-10nN, suggesting treated fibers are thinner or are the same diameter with some inhibition of interactions. Fibers polymerized with the knob-hole targeting peptide visibly lost elasticity after 100% strain, while fibers polymerized with the αC targeting peptide lost elasticity after reaching 150% strain, suggesting that the knob-hole interactions control single fiber elasticity.

  9. Supergravity background of the λ-deformed AdS3 × S3 supercoset

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chervonyi, Yuri; Lunin, Oleg

    2016-09-01

    We construct the solution of type IIB supergravity describing the integrable λ-deformation of the AdS3 ×S3 supercoset. While the geometry corresponding to the deformation of the bosonic coset has been found in the past, our background is more natural for studying superstrings, and several interesting features distinguish our solution from its bosonic counterpart. We also report progress towards constructing the λ-deformation of the AdS5 ×S5 supercoset.

  10. Yangian of AdS3 / CFT2 and its deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regelskis, Vidas

    2016-08-01

    We construct highest-weight modules and a Yangian extension of the centrally extended sl(1 | 1) 2 superalgebra, that is a symmetry of the worldsheet scattering associated with the AdS3 / CFT2 duality. We demonstrate that the R-matrix intertwining atypical modules has an elegant trigonometric parametrization. We also consider a quantum deformation of this superalgebra, its modules, and obtain a quantum affine extension of the Drinfeld-Jimbo type that describes a deformed worldsheet scattering.

  11. D-brane on deformed AdS 3 × S 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouchen, Malak; Klusoň, Josef

    2015-08-01

    We study D1-brane in AdS 3 × S 3 κ-deformed background with non-trivial dilaton and Ramond-Ramond fields. We consider purely time-dependent and spatially-dependent ansatz where we study the solutions of the equations of motion for D1-brane in given background. We find that the behavior of these solutions crucially depends on the value of the parameter a that was introduced in [7].

  12. Holographic Rényi entropy in AdS3/LCFT2 correspondence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Song, Feng-yan; Zhang, Jia-ju

    2014-03-01

    The recent study in AdS3/CFT2 correspondence shows that the tree level contribution and 1-loop correction of holographic Rényi entanglement entropy (HRE) exactly match the direct CFT computation in the large central charge limit. This allows the Rényi entanglement entropy to be a new window to study the AdS/CFT correspondence. In this paper we generalize the study of Rényi entanglement entropy in pure AdS3 gravity to the massive gravity theories at the critical points. For the cosmological topological massive gravity (CTMG), the dual conformal field theory (CFT) could be a chiral conformal field theory or a logarithmic conformal field theory (LCFT), depending on the asymptotic boundary conditions imposed. In both cases, by studying the short interval expansion of the Rényi entanglement entropy of two disjoint intervals with small cross ratio x, we find that the classical and 1-loop HRE are in exact match with the CFT results, up to order x 6. To this order, the difference between the massless graviton and logarithmic mode can be seen clearly. Moreover, for the cosmological new massive gravity (CNMG) at critical point, which could be dual to a logarithmic CFT as well, we find the similar agreement in the CNMG/LCFT correspondence. Furthermore we read the 2-loop correction of graviton and logarithmic mode to HRE from CFT computation. It has distinct feature from the one in pure AdS3 gravity.

  13. On elliptic string solutions in AdS3 and dS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakas, Ioannis; Pastras, Georgios

    2016-07-01

    Classical string actions in AdS3 and dS3 can be connected to the sinh-Gordon and cosh-Gordon equations through Pohlmeyer reduction. We show that the problem of constructing a classical string solution with a given static or translationally invariant Pohlmeyer counterpart is equivalent to solving four pairs of effective Schrödinger problems. Each pair consists of a flat potential and an n = 1 Lamé potential whose eigenvalues are connected, and, additionally, the four solutions satisfy a set of constraints. An approach for solving this system is developed by employing an interesting connection between the specific class of classical string solutions and the band structure of the Lamé potential. This method is used for the construction of several families of classical string solutions, one of which turns out to be the spiky strings in AdS3. New solutions include circular rotating strings in AdS3 with singular time evolution of their radius and angular velocity as well as classical string solutions in dS3.

  14. Dirac states with knobs on: Interplay of external parameters and the surface electronic properties of three-dimensional topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frantzeskakis, E.; de Jong, N.; Zwartsenberg, B.; Bay, T. V.; Huang, Y. K.; Ramankutty, S. V.; Tytarenko, A.; Wu, D.; Pan, Y.; Hollanders, S.; Radovic, M.; Plumb, N. C.; Xu, N.; Shi, M.; Lupulescu, C.; Arion, T.; Ovsyannikov, R.; Varykhalov, A.; Eberhardt, W.; de Visser, A.; van Heumen, E.; Golden, M. S.

    2015-05-01

    Topological insulators are a novel materials platform with high applications potential in fields ranging from spintronics to quantum computation. In the ongoing scientific effort to demonstrate controlled manipulation of their electronic structure by external means, i.e., the provision of knobs with which to tune properties, stoichiometric variation and surface decoration are two effective approaches that have been followed. In angle-resolved photoelectron spectroscopy (ARPES) experiments, both approaches are seen to lead to electronic band-structure changes. Most importantly, such approaches result in variations of the energy position of bulk and surface-related features and the creation of two-dimensional electron gases. The data presented here demonstrate that a third manipulation handle is accessible by utilizing the amount of super-band-gap light a topological insulator surface has been exposed to under typical ARPES experimental conditions. Our results show that this third knob acts on an equal footing with stoichiometry and surface decoration as a modifier of the electronic band structure, and that it is in continuous and direct competition with the latter. The data clearly point towards surface photovoltage and photoinduced desorption as the physical phenomena behind modifications of the electronic band structure under exposure to high-flux photons. We show that the interplay of these phenomena can minimize and even eliminate the adsorbate-related surface band bending on typical binary, ternary, and quaternary Bi-based topological insulators. Including the influence of the sample temperature, these data set up a detailed framework for the external control of the electronic band structure in topological insulator compounds in an ARPES setting. Four external knobs are available: bulk stoichiometry, surface decoration, temperature, and photon exposure. These knobs can be used in conjunction to fine tune the band energies near the surface and consequently

  15. The Hand Motor Hotspot is not Always Located in the Hand Knob: A Neuronavigated Transcranial Magnetic Stimulation Study.

    PubMed

    Ahdab, Rechdi; Ayache, Samar S; Brugières, Pierre; Farhat, Wassim H; Lefaucheur, Jean-Pascal

    2016-07-01

    The hand motor hot spot (hMHS) is one of the most salient parameters in transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) practice, notably used for targeting. It is commonly accepted that the hMHS corresponds to the hand representation within the primary motor cortex (M1). Anatomical and imaging studies locate this representation in a region of the central sulcus called the "hand knob". The aim of this study was to determine if the hMHS location corresponds to its expected location at the hand knob. Twelve healthy volunteers and eleven patients with chronic neuropathic pain of various origins, but not related to a brain lesion, were enrolled. Morphological magnetic resonance imaging of the brain was normal in all participants. Both hemispheres were studied in all participants except four (two patients and two healthy subjects). Cortical mapping of the hand motor area was conducted using a TMS-dedicated navigation system and recording motor evoked potentials (MEPs) in the contralateral first dorsal interosseous (FDI) muscle. We then determined the anatomical position of the hMHS, defined as the stimulation site providing the largest FDI-MEPs. In 45 % of hemispheres of normal subjects and 25 % of hemispheres of pain patients, the hMHS was located over the central sulcus, most frequently at the level of the hand knob. However, in the other cases, the hMHS was located outside M1, most frequently anteriorly over the precentral or middle frontal gyrus. This study shows that the hMHS does not always correspond to the hand knob and M1 location in healthy subjects or patients. Therefore, image-guided navigation is needed to improve the anatomical accuracy of TMS targeting, even for M1. PMID:26980192

  16. Production of bispecific antibodies in “knobs-into-holes” using a cell-free expression system

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yiren; Lee, John; Tran, Cuong; Heibeck, Tyler H; Wang, Willie D; Yang, Junhao; Stafford, Ryan L; Steiner, Alexander R; Sato, Aaron K; Hallam, Trevor J; Yin, Gang

    2015-01-01

    Bispecific antibodies have emerged in recent years as a promising field of research for therapies in oncology, inflammable diseases, and infectious diseases. Their capability of dual target recognition allows for novel therapeutic hypothesis to be tested, where traditional mono-specific antibodies would lack the needed mode of target engagement. Among extremely diverse architectures of bispecific antibodies, knobs-into-holes (KIHs) technology, which involves engineering CH3 domains to create either a “knob” or a “hole” in each heavy chain to promote heterodimerization, has been widely applied. Here, we describe the use of a cell-free expression system (Xpress CF) to produce KIH bispecific antibodies in multiple scaffolds, including 2-armed heterodimeric scFv-KIH and one-armed asymmetric BiTE-KIH with tandem scFv. Efficient KIH production can be achieved by manipulating the plasmid ratio between knob and hole, and further improved by addition of prefabricated knob or hole. These studies demonstrate the versatility of Xpress CF in KIH production and provide valuable insights into KIH construct design for better assembly and expression titer. PMID:25427258

  17. Genetic sex determination, gender identification and pseudohermaphroditism in the knobbed whelk, Busycon carica (Mollusca: Melongenidae).

    PubMed Central

    Avise, John C.; Power, Alan J.; Walker, DeEtte

    2004-01-01

    We report perhaps the first genic-level molecular documentation of a mammalian-like 'X-linked' mode of sex determination in molluscs. From family inheritance data and observed associations between sex-phenotyped adults and genotypes in Busycon carica, we deduce that a polymorphic microsatellite locus (bc2.2) is diploid and usually heterozygous in females, hemizygous in males, and that its alleles are transmitted from mothers to sons and daughters but from fathers to daughters only. We also employ bc2.2 to estimate near-conception sex ratio in whelk embryos, where gender is indeterminable by visual inspection. Statistical corrections are suggested at both family and population levels to accommodate the presence of homozygous bc2.2 females that could otherwise be genetically mistaken for hemizygous males. Knobbed whelks were thought to be sequential hermaphrodites, but our evidence for genetic dioecy supports an earlier hypothesis that whelks are pseudohermaphroditic (falsely appear to switch functional sex when environmental conditions induce changes in sexual phenotype). These findings highlight the distinction between gender in a genetic versus phenotypic sense. PMID:15156923

  18. Warped AdS3 black holes in higher derivative gravity theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Detournay, Stéphane; Douxchamps, Laure-Anne; Ng, Gim Seng; Zwikel, Céline

    2016-06-01

    We consider warped AdS3 black holes in generic higher derivatives gravity theories in 2+1 dimensions. The asymptotic symmetry group of the phase space containing these black holes is the semi-direct product of a centrally extended Virasoro algebra and an affine u(1) Kac-Moody algebra. Previous works have shown that in some specific theories, the entropy of these black holes agrees with a Cardy-like entropy formula derived for warped conformal field theories. In this paper, we show that this entropy matching continues to hold for the most general higher derivative theories of gravity. We also discuss the existence of phase transitions.

  19. Giant magnon on deformed AdS3×S3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khouchen, Malak; KlusoÅ, Josef

    2014-09-01

    We study giant magnon solutions for strings moving on a deformed AdS3×S3 background. We impose a conformal gauge on the Polyakov action and proceed with solving the Virasoro constraints. The expressions of the conserved charge J and the energy of a single magnon excitation are then computed. Then we determine the dispersion relation of a giant magnon in the infinite J limit configuration and we find that for κ =0 it reduces to the celebrated Hofman-Maldacena dispersion relation.

  20. Emergent AdS3 in the zero entropy extremal black holes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azeyanagi, Tatsuo; Ogawa, Noriaki; Terashima, Seiji

    2011-03-01

    We investigate the zero entropy limit of the near horizon geometries of D = 4 and D = 5 general extremal black holes with {text{SL}}left( {2,mathbb{R}} right) × {text{U}}{(1)^{D - 3}} symmetry. We derive some conditions on the geometries from expectation of regularity. We then show that an AdS3 structure emerges in a certain scaling limit, though the periodicity shrinks to zero. We present some examples to see the above concretely. We also comment on some implications to the Kerr/CFT correspondence.

  1. Pedogenesis of black shale-influenced soils of the Knobs region of eastern Kentucky

    SciTech Connect

    Sobecki, T.M.

    1989-01-01

    Investigation of acid soils on forested hillslopes truncating Devonian-age black shales in the Knobs of eastern Kentucky established the impact of parent material and landscape position on colluvium occurrence and soil properties. Colluvium was thickest in headslopes, thinner in nose- and sideslopes, where illitic Typic Hapludults formed in acid gray and black shale residuum and colluvium, and sandstone colluvium. Base saturation and pH increased with depth in nose- and sideslopes, and decreased with depth in headslopes. The pH of black shale colluvium and residuum was {lt}4.0 in noseslopes, and Al saturation {gt}90%. Morphology, particle size, and TiO{sub 2}/ZrO{sub 2} ratios were used to assess parent material homogeneity and colluvium source. Compositions of soil solutions, mineral stability, and clay mineral analyses were used to evaluate illite weathering. Smectite randomly interstratified with illite was an initial illite weathering product in the noseslope black shale soil. High charge smectite (HCS), randomly interstratified with illite, predominated in noseslope pedons of black and gray shale, however. Vermiculite occurred in black and gray shale headslope pedons. Lithologic discontinuities prevented attribution of clay mineral suites solely to weathering. Soil solution compositions, clay mineral ratios, and thermodynamic stability of the clay minerals, however, suggested a weathering sequence of illite {yields} smectite {yields} HCS or vermiculite {yields} kaolinite or complete dissolution. Column leaching experiments suggested carbon, iron, and sulfur loss as the initial black shale weathering step, with silicate alteration following at a later stage. Young landscapes coupled with the loss of soluble weathering products from these soils is suggested as an explanation for the maintenance of illitic mineralogy despite undersaturation with respect to illite.

  2. Multi-spike strings in AdS3 with mixed three-form fluxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, Aritra; Sadhukhan, Abhishake

    2016-05-01

    The string sigma model in AdS3 × S 3 supported by mixed three-form fluxes has recently been proved to be integrable which led to a plethora of work in this background including proposals for S matrix and study of semiclassical string profiles. Motivated by this, in this paper, we present a study of `spiky' strings in this background. We analyze the string profiles in detail and also find the dispersion relation between the charges in the `long' string limit after solving the equations of motion perturbatively upto the leading order in the Neveu-Schwarz flux b. We find that the dispersion for 2 spikes gets corrected by the term -b^2/2 log S. We also discuss the fate of the solution in the limit of pure NS-NS flux.

  3. A Plasmodium falciparum PHIST protein binds the virulence factor PfEMP1 and comigrates to knobs on the host cell surface

    PubMed Central

    Oberli, Alexander; Slater, Leanne M.; Cutts, Erin; Brand, Françoise; Mundwiler-Pachlatko, Esther; Rusch, Sebastian; Masik, Martin F. G.; Erat, Michèle C.; Beck, Hans-Peter; Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2014-01-01

    Uniquely among malaria parasites, Plasmodium falciparum-infected erythrocytes (iRBCs) develop membrane protrusions, known as knobs, where the parasite adhesion receptor P. falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 (PfEMP1) clusters. Knob formation and the associated iRBC adherence to host endothelium are directly linked to the severity of malaria and are functional manifestations of protein export from the parasite to the iRBC. A family of exported proteins featuring Plasmodium helical interspersed subtelomeric (PHIST) domains has attracted attention, with members being implicated in host-parasite protein interactions and differentially regulated in severe disease and among parasite isolates. Here, we show that PHIST member PFE1605w binds the PfEMP1 intracellular segment directly with Kd = 5 ± 0.6 μM, comigrates with PfEMP1 during export, and locates in knobs. PHIST variants that do not locate in knobs (MAL8P1.4) or bind PfEMP1 30 times more weakly (PFI1780w) used as controls did not display the same pattern. We resolved the first crystallographic structure of a PHIST protein and derived a partial model of the PHIST-PfEMP1 interaction from nuclear magnetic resonance. We propose that PFE1605w reinforces the PfEMP1-cytoskeletal connection in knobs and discuss the possible role of PHIST proteins as interaction hubs in the parasite exportome.—Oberli, A., Slater, L. M., Cutts, E., Brand, F., Mundwiler-Pachlatko, E., Rusch, S., Masik, M. F. G., Erat, M. C., Beck, H.-P., Vakonakis, I. A Plasmodium falciparum PHIST protein binds the virulence factor PfEMP1 and comigrates to knobs on the host cell surface. PMID:24983468

  4. 1-loop partition function in AdS 3/ CFT 2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Wu, Jie-qiang

    2015-12-01

    The 1-loop partition function of the handlebody solutions in the AdS3 gravity have been derived some years ago using the heat kernel techniques and the method of images. In the semiclassical limit, such partition function should correspond to the order O( c 0) part in the partition function of dual conformal field theory(CFT) on the boundary Riemann surface. The higher genus partition function could be computed by the multi-point functions in the Riemann sphere via sewing prescription. In the large central charge limit, the CFT is effectively free in the sense that to the leading order of c the multi-point function is further simplified to be a summation over the products of two-point functions of single-particle states. Correspondingly in the bulk, the graviton is freely propagating without interaction. Furthermore the product of the two-point functions may define the links, each of which is in one-to-one correspondence with the conjugacy class of the Schottky group of the Riemann surface. Moreover, the value of a link is determined by the multiplier of the element in the conjugacy class. This allows us to reproduce exactly the gravitational 1-loop partition function. The proof can be generalized to the higher spin gravity and its dual CFT.

  5. Euclidean Wilson loops and minimal area surfaces in lorentzian AdS 3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Irrgang, Andrew; Kruczenski, Martin

    2015-12-01

    The AdS/CFT correspondence relates Wilson loops in N=4 SYM theory to minimal area surfaces in AdS 5 × S 5 space. If the Wilson loop is Euclidean and confined to a plane ( t, x) then the dual surface is Euclidean and lives in Lorentzian AdS 3 ⊂ AdS 5. In this paper we study such minimal area surfaces generalizing previous results obtained in the Euclidean case. Since the surfaces we consider have the topology of a disk, the holonomy of the flat current vanishes which is equivalent to the condition that a certain boundary Schrödinger equation has all its solutions anti-periodic. If the potential for that Schrödinger equation is found then reconstructing the surface and finding the area become simpler. In particular we write a formula for the Area in terms of the Schwarzian derivative of the contour. Finally an infinite parameter family of analytical solutions using Riemann Theta functions is described. In this case, both the area and the shape of the surface are given analytically and used to check the previous results.

  6. Quaternary N-S shortening across the Garlock fault in Pilot Knob Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittase, W. M.; Walker, J. D.; Kirby, E.; McDonald, E.; Gosse, J.; Spencer, J. Q.; Wan, E.; Herrs, A. J.

    2011-12-01

    New constraints on differential vertical motions along the Garlock fault (GF) in eastern Pilot Knob Valley (PKV) provide insight into the interactions between the Panamint Valley fault system (PVFS) and the GF. The nature of strain transfer between orthogonal active fault systems such as occurs where faults of the Eastern California Shear Zone apparently accommodate dextral shear both north and south of the sinistral GF is a question of first-order importance for both the dynamics of deforming lithosphere and hazard. New mapping (based on field as well as both airborne and ground-based LiDAR) and chronology of Quaternary deposits exposed along the GF place bounds on the vertical components of recent deformation and include: (1) 2 10Be depth profiles, (2) soil descriptions and (3) tephrochronologic correlation of Quaternary volcanic deposits. Here we focus on two terrace treads adjacent to the GF and one adjacent to the southern Slate Range (SSR), which are displaced vertically relative to base-level. Uplift of the two terraces adjacent to the GF are inferred from modern stream channel incisions. A ~46 ka 10Be profile age for a 16-m-high terrace tread adjacent to the GF suggests a minimum differential uplift rate of ~0.34 mm/yr. A ~56 ka 10Be profile age from a 12.5-m-high tread located 4.5 km west on the GF suggests a differential uplift rate of ~0.22 mm/yr. A 25.5-m-high terrace adjacent to the SSR was dated via TCN, OSL and PDI. Acquiring reliable TCN and OSL data were problematic here. However, a soil PDI age estimate of ~164 ka brackets the maximum age of uplift and thus a minimum uplift rate of ~0.16 mm/yr here. Tephrochronologic data bracket the minimum age of the PKV at ~0.7 Ma (new unit). These sediments sit up to 430 m above the modern PKV floor. If faults controlling ~430 m of uplifted PKV sediments dip 70-80°, 155-76 m of N-S shortening is expected between the GF and SSR. A long-term uplift rate of ~0.61 mm/yr and N-S shortening rate of 0.22-0.11 mm

  7. Identification and expression analysis of a potential familial Alzheimer disease gene on chromosome 1 related to AD3.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Ma, J; Potter, H

    1995-01-01

    The inheritance of much early-onset Alzheimer disease (AD) has been linked to a dominant-acting locus on chromosome 14. Recently, the gene likely responsible for this genetic linkage has been identified and termed AD3. Five mutations have been found in AD3 that segregate with the disease phenotype in seven AD families and are not present in unaffected individuals. Here we report the existence of a gene encoding a seven transmembrane domain protein very similar to that encoded by AD3 in structure and sequence. This gene is located on chromosome 1, is expressed in a variety of tissues, including brain, and is predicted to harbor mutations causing nonchromosome 14 familial AD. The presence of several S/TPXX DNA binding motifs in both the AD3 protein and the AD3-like protein /AD4 protein suggests a possible role in intracellular signaling and gene expression or in linking chromatin to the nuclear membrane. Ways in which mutations in either gene could lead to AD are discussed. Images Fig. 3 PMID:8618867

  8. Quasinormal modes of self-dual warped AdS3 black hole in topological massive gravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ran; Ren, Ji-Rong

    2011-03-01

    We consider the scalar, vector and spinor field perturbations in the background of self-dual warped AdS3 black hole of topological massive gravity. The corresponding exact expressions for quasinormal modes are obtained by analytically solving the perturbation equations and imposing the vanishing Dirichlet boundary condition at asymptotic infinity. It is expected that the quasinormal modes agree with the poles of retarded Green’s functions of the CFT dual to self-dual warped AdS3 black hole. Our results provide a quantitative test of the warped AdS/CFT correspondence.

  9. Phase-matching solutions for high-order harmonic generation in hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Serebryannikov, E E; von der Linde, D; Zheltikov, A M

    2004-12-01

    Hollow-core photonic-crystal fibers are shown to allow phase-matched high-order harmonic generation by an isolated guided mode of pump radiation. Regimes of phase matching are analyzed for the fundamental guided mode of pump field with a wavelength around 800 nm, generating harmonics within the wavelength range of 25-50 nm in hollow photonic-crystal fibers filled with argon, krypton, and helium. Geometric parameters of the fiber structure and the pressure of the gas filling the fiber core are shown to serve as important, often orthogonal, control knobs, allowing a fine adjustment of the phase matching for high-order harmonic generation. PMID:15697538

  10. From accelerating and Poincaré coordinates to black holes in spacelike warped AdS3, and back

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jugeau, Frederic; Moutsopoulos, George; Ritter, Patricia

    2011-02-01

    We first review spacelike stretched warped AdS3 and we describe its black hole quotients by using accelerating and Poincaré coordinates. We then describe the maximal analytic extension of the black holes and present their causal diagrams. Finally, we calculate spacetime limits of the black hole phase space (TR, TL). This is done by requiring that the identification vector ∂θ has a finite non-zero limit. The limits we obtain are the self-dual solution in accelerating or Poincaré coordinates, depending respectively on whether the limiting spacetimes are non-extremal or extremal, and warped AdS3 with a periodic proper time identification.

  11. Massless Lüscher terms and the limitations of the AdS3 asymptotic Bethe ansatz

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Michael C.; Aniceto, Inês

    2016-05-01

    In AdS5/CFT4 integrability the Bethe ansatz gives the spectrum of long strings, accurate up to exponentially small corrections. This is no longer true in three-dimensional anti-de Sitter (AdS3 ) space, as we demonstrate here by studying Lüscher F-terms with a massless particle running in the loop. We apply this to the classic test of Hernández and López, in which the s u (2 ) sector Bethe equations (including the one-loop dressing phase) should match the semiclassical string theory result for a circular spinning string. These calculations do not agree in AdS3×S3×T4 , and we show that the sum of all massless Lüscher F-terms can reproduce the difference.

  12. Secret symmetries of type IIB superstring theory on Ad{{S}_{3}} × {{S}^{3}} × {{M}^{4}}

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittelli, Antonio; Torrielli, Alessandro; Wolf, Martin

    2014-11-01

    We establish features of so-called Yangian secret symmetries for AdS3 type IIB superstring backgrounds, thus verifying the persistence of such symmetries to this new instance of the AdS/CFT correspondence. Specifically, we find two a priori different classes of secret symmetry generators. One class of generators, anticipated from the previous literature, is more naturally embedded in the algebra governing the integrable scattering problem. The other class of generators is more elusive and somewhat closer in its form to its higher-dimensional AdS5 counterpart. All of these symmetries respect left-right crossing. In addition, by considering the interplay between left and right representations, we gain a new perspective on the AdS5 case. We also study the RTT-realisation of the Yangian in AdS3 backgrounds, thus establishing a new incarnation of the Beisert-de Leeuw construction.

  13. The complete one-loop BMN S-matrix in AdS 3 × S 3 × T 4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundin, Per; Wulff, Linus

    2016-06-01

    We compute the full one-loop 2-particle S-matrix for excitations of the type IIB AdS 3 × S 3 × T 4 BMN string. The S-matrix is found to respect the expected symmetries and the phases are consistent with the crossing equations. By analyzing how the relevant integrals scale with the IR regulator we show that scattering of massless bosons is trivial at two loops. Based on our results we argue that the additional su(2) S-matrix appearing in the massless sector in the exact solution should trivialize.

  14. The low energy limit of the AdS 3 × S 3 × M 4 spinning string

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sundin, Per; Wulff, Linus

    2013-10-01

    We derive the low-energy effective action for the spinning (GKP) string in AdS 3 × S × M 4 where M 4 = S 3 × S 1 or T 4. In the first case the action consists of two O(4) non-linear sigma models which are coupled through their interaction with four massless Majorana fermions (plus one free decoupled scalar). While in the second case it consists of one O(4) sigma model coupled to four Majorana fermions together with four free scalars from the T 4. We show that these models are classically integrable by constructing their Lax connections.

  15. Dynamical symmetry group and quantum splittings for a free particle on the group manifold AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chenaghlou, A.; Fakhri, H.

    2005-08-01

    It is shown that the set of all quantum states corresponding to the motion of a free particle on the group manifold AdS3 as the bases with two different labels, constitute a Hilbert space. The second label is bounded by the first one however, the first label is semibounded. The Casimir operator corresponding to the simultaneous and agreeable shifting generators of both labels along with the Cartan subalgebra generator describe the Hamiltonian of a free particle on AdS3 with dynamical symmetry group U(1,1) and infinite-fold degeneracy for the energy spectrum. The Hilbert space for the Lie algebra of the dynamical symmetry group is a reducible representation space. But the Hilbert subspaces constructed by all the bases which have a given constant value for the difference of two their labels, constitute an irreducible representation for it. It is also shown that the irreducible representation subspaces of the Lie algebras u(1,1) and u(2) are separately spanned by the bases which have the same value for the second and first labels, respectively. These two bunches of Hilbert subspaces present two different types of quantum splittings on the Hilbert space.

  16. Quasinormal modes of a scalar perturbation coupling with Einstein's tensor in the warped AdS3 black hole spacetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Weiping; Chen, Songbai; Jing, Jiliang

    2011-06-01

    We have studied the quasinormal modes of a massive scalar field coupling to Einstein’s tensor in the spacelike stretched AdS3 black hole spacetime. We find that both the right-moving and left-moving quasinormal frequencies depend not only on the warped parameter v of the black hole, but also on the coupling between the scalar field and Einstein’s tensor. Moreover, we also discuss the warped AdS/CFT correspondence from the quasinormal modes and probe the effects of the coupling on the left and right conformal weights hL and hR of the operators dual to the scalar field in the boundary.

  17. Pre-eruptive storage conditions and eruption dynamics of a small rhyolite dome: Douglas Knob, Yellowstone volcanic field, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Befus, Kenneth S.; Zinke, Robert W.; Jordan, Jacob S.; Manga, Michael; Gardner, James E.

    2014-03-01

    The properties and processes that control the size, duration, and style of eruption of rhyolite magma are poorly constrained because of a paucity of direct observations. Here, we investigate the small-volume, nonexplosive end-member. In particular, we determine the pre-eruptive storage conditions and eruption dynamics of Douglas Knob, a 0.011-km3 obsidian dome that erupted from a 500-m-long fissure in the Yellowstone volcanic system. To determine pre-eruptive storage conditions, we analyzed compositions of phenocrysts, matrix glass, and quartz-hosted glass inclusions by electron microprobe and Fourier-transform infrared analyses. The pre-eruptive melt is a high-silica rhyolite (˜75 wt.% SiO2) and was stored at 760 ± 30 °C and 50 ± 25 MPa prior to eruption, assuming vapor saturation at depth. To investigate emplacement dynamics and kinematics, we measured number densities and orientations of microlites at various locations across the lava dome. Microlites in samples closest to the inferred fissure vent are the most aligned. Alignment does not increase with distance traveled away from the vent, suggesting microlites record conduit processes. Strains of <5 accumulated in the conduit during ascent after microlite formation, imparted by a combination of pure and simple shear. Average microlite number density in samples varies from 104.9 to 105.7 mm-3. Using the magma ascent model of Toramaru et al. (J Volcanol Geotherm Res 175:156-157, 2008), microlite number densities imply decompression rates ranging from 0.03 to 0.11 MPa h-1 (˜0.4-1.3 mm s-1 ascent rates). Such slow ascent would allow time for passive degassing at depth in the conduit, thus resulting in an effusive eruption. Using calculated melt viscosity, we infer that the dike that fed the eruption was 4-8 m in width. Magma flux through this dike, assuming fissure dimensions at the surface represent its geometry at depth, implies an eruption duration of 17-210 days. That duration is also consistent with the

  18. Vaccination to conserved influenza antigens in mice using a novel Simian adenovirus vector, PanAd3, derived from the bonobo Pan paniscus.

    PubMed

    Vitelli, Alessandra; Quirion, Mary R; Lo, Chia-Yun; Misplon, Julia A; Grabowska, Agnieszka K; Pierantoni, Angiolo; Ammendola, Virginia; Price, Graeme E; Soboleski, Mark R; Cortese, Riccardo; Colloca, Stefano; Nicosia, Alfredo; Epstein, Suzanne L

    2013-01-01

    Among approximately 1000 adenoviruses from chimpanzees and bonobos studied recently, the Pan Adenovirus type 3 (PanAd3, isolated from a bonobo, Pan paniscus) has one of the best profiles for a vaccine vector, combining potent transgene immunogenicity with minimal pre-existing immunity in the human population. In this study, we inserted into a replication defective PanAd3 a transgene expressing a fusion protein of conserved influenza antigens nucleoprotein (NP) and matrix 1 (M1). We then studied antibody and T cell responses as well as protection from challenge infection in a mouse model. A single intranasal administration of PanAd3-NPM1 vaccine induced strong antibody and T cell responses, and protected against high dose lethal influenza virus challenge. Thus PanAd3 is a promising candidate vector for vaccines, including universal influenza vaccines. PMID:23536756

  19. Calculating IP Tuning Knobs for the PEP II High Energy Ring using Singular Value Decomposition, Response Matrices and an Adapted Moore Penrose Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wittmer, W.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    The PEP II lattices are unique in their detector solenoid field compensation scheme by utilizing a set of skew quadrupoles in the IR region and the adjacent arcs left and right of the IP. Additionally, the design orbit through this region is nonzero. This combined with the strong local coupling wave makes it very difficult to calculate IP tuning knobs which are orthogonal and closed. The usual approach results either in non-closure, not being orthogonal or the change in magnet strength being too big. To find a solution, the set of tuning quads had to be extended which resulted having more degrees of freedom than constraints. To find the optimal set of quadrupoles which creates a linear, orthogonal and closed knob and simultaneously minimizing the changes in magnet strength, the method using Singular Value Decomposition, Response Matrices and an Adapted Moore Penrose method had to be extended. The results of these simulations are discussed below and the results of first implementation in the machine are shown.

  20. Dietary Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber is a substance in plants. Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. It's a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble fiber or insoluble fiber. Both types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts ...

  1. The kinetics of antibody binding to Plasmodium falciparum VAR2CSA PfEMP1 antigen and modelling of PfEMP1 antigen packing on the membrane knobs

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Infected humans make protective antibody responses to the PfEMP1 adhesion antigens exported by Plasmodium falciparum parasites to the erythrocyte membrane, but little is known about the kinetics of this antibody-receptor binding reaction or how the topology of PfEMP1 on the parasitized erythrocyte membrane influences antibody association with, and dissociation from, its antigenic target. Methods A Quartz Crystal Microbalance biosensor was used to measure the association and dissociation kinetics of VAR2CSA PfEMP1 binding to human monoclonal antibodies. Immuno-fluorescence microscopy was used to visualize antibody-mediated adhesion between the surfaces of live infected erythrocytes and atomic force microscopy was used to obtain higher resolution images of the membrane knobs on the infected erythrocyte to estimate knob surface areas and model VAR2CSA packing density on the knob. Results Kinetic analysis indicates that antibody dissociation from the VAR2CSA PfEMP1 antigen is extremely slow when there is a high avidity interaction. High avidity binding to PfEMP1 antigens on the surface of P. falciparum-infected erythrocytes in turn requires bivalent cross-linking of epitopes positioned within the distance that can be bridged by antibody. Calculations of the surface area of the knobs and the possible densities of PfEMP1 packing on the knobs indicate that high-avidity cross-linking antibody reactions are constrained by the architecture of the knobs and the large size of PfEMP1 molecules. Conclusions High avidity is required to achieve the strongest binding to VAR2CSA PfEMP1, but the structures that display PfEMP1 also tend to inhibit cross-linking between PfEMP1 antigens, by holding many binding epitopes at distances beyond the 15-18 nm sweep radius of an antibody. The large size of PfEMP1 will also constrain intra-knob cross-linking interactions. This analysis indicates that effective vaccines targeting the parasite's vulnerable adhesion receptors should

  2. The Role of Long-Lived Greenhouse Gases as Principal LW Control Knob that Governs the Global Surface Temperature for Past and Future Climate Change

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lacis, Andrew A.; Hansen, James E.; Russell, Gary L.; Oinas, Valdar; Jonas, Jeffrey

    2013-01-01

    The climate system of the Earth is endowed with a moderately strong greenhouse effect that is characterized by non-condensing greenhouse gases (GHGs) that provide the core radiative forcing. Of these, the most important is atmospheric CO2. There is a strong feedback contribution to the greenhouse effect by water vapor and clouds that is unique in the solar system, exceeding the core radiative forcing due to the non-condensing GHGs by a factor of three. The significance of the non-condensing GHGs is that once they have been injected into the atmosphere, they remain there virtually indefinitely because they do not condense and precipitate from the atmosphere, their chemical removal time ranging from decades to millennia. Water vapor and clouds have only a short lifespan, with their distribution determined by the locally prevailing meteorological conditions, subject to Clausius-Clapeyron constraint. Although solar irradiance is the ultimate energy source that powers the terrestrial greenhouse effect, there has been no discernible long-term trend in solar irradiance since precise monitoring began in the late 1970s. This leaves atmospheric CO2 as the effective control knob driving the current global warming trend. Over geological time scales, volcanoes are the principal source of atmospheric CO2, and the weathering of rocks is the principal sink, with the biosphere participating as both a source and a sink. The problem at hand is that human industrial activity is causing atmospheric CO2, to increase by 2 ppm per year, whereas the interglacial rate has been 0.005 ppm per year. This is a geologically unprecedented rate to turn the CO2 climate control knob. This is causing the global warming that threatens the global environment.

  3. Fiber biology

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber cells arising from seed epidermis is the most important agricultural textile commodity in the world. To produce fully mature fibers, approximately two months of fiber developmental process are required. The timing of four distinctive fiber development stages consisting of initiation, ...

  4. The AdS3 × S3 × S3 × S1 Hernández-López phases: a semiclassical derivation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abbott, Michael C.

    2013-11-01

    This note calculates the Hernández-López phases for strings in AdS3 × S3 × S3 × S1 by semiclassical methods using the d(2, 1; α)2 algebraic curve. By working at general α we include modes absent from previous semiclassical calculations of this phase in AdS3 × S3 × T4, and in particular can study the scattering of particles of different mass. By carefully re-deriving the semiclassical formula we clarify some issues of antisymmetrization, cutoffs and surface terms which could safely be ignored in AdS5 × S5, and some issues about the terms c1, s which were absent there. As a result we see agreement with the recently calculated all-loop dressing phase in the AdS3 × S3 × T4 case, and exactly 1/2 this in the general case AdS3 × S3 × S3 × S1, for any α and any (light) polarizations.

  5. 2-Amino-N6-hydroxyadenine induces gene/point mutations and multiple-locus mutations, but not multilocus deletion mutations, in the ad-3 region of a two-component heterokaryon of Neurospora crassa.

    PubMed

    de Serres, F J; Brockman, H E; Overton, L K

    1991-08-01

    The mutagenicity of 2-amino-N6-hydroxyadenine (AHA) has been studied in Neurospora crassa by treating a two-component heterokaryon (H-12) and recovering specific-locus mutations induced in the ad-3 region. This assay system permits the identification of ad-3A and/or ad-3B mutants resulting from gene/point mutations, multilocus deletion mutations, and multiple-locus mutations of various genotypes, involving one or both loci. Genetic characterization of the ad-3 mutants recovered from experiments with AHA in H-12 shows that 98.9% (270/273) of the ad-3 mutants are gene/point mutations (ad-3R), 1.1% (3/270) are unknowns, and none is a multilocus deletion mutation (ad-3IR). Among the gene/point mutations, 3.3% (9/273) are multiple-locus mutations (gene/point mutations with a closely-linked recessive lethal mutation [ad-3R + RLCL]). Another 25.3% (69/273) are multiple-locus mutations with a recessive lethal mutation located elsewhere in the genome [ad-3R + RL]. Heterokaryon tests for allelic complementation among the ad-3BR mutants showed that 90.8% (139/153) of the mutants were complementing, and 20.3% (31/153) were leaky. In addition, 32.5% (38/117) of the ad-3AR mutants were leaky. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that AHA produces specific-locus mutations in the ad-3 region of N. crassa by base-pair substitution. The data from the present experiments are compared with the data for 2-aminopurine (2AP)-induced ad-3 mutants in H-12 (de Serres and Brockman, 1991). Whereas, 2AP is a weak mutagen in H-12, AHA is extremely potent (Brockman et al., 1987). In contrast with 2AP, AHA induces ad-3 mutants exclusively by gene/point mutation in H-12. We conclude that whereas AHA induces ad-3 mutants predominantly by AT to GC base-pair transitions, 2AP induces ad-3 mutants by a wide variety of mechanisms including: (1) AT to GC and GC to AT base-pair transitions, (2) frameshift mutations, (3) other, as yet unidentified, intragenic alterations, (4) small multilocus

  6. Dietary Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    Fiber is a substance in plants. Dietary fiber is the kind you eat. It's a type of carbohydrate. You may also see it listed on a food label as soluble ... types have important health benefits. Good sources of dietary fiber include Whole grains Nuts and seeds Fruit and ...

  7. Heavy and light chain pairing of bivalent quadroma and knobs-into-holes antibodies analyzed by UHR-ESI-QTOF mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Schaefer, Wolfgang; Völger, Hans R; Lorenz, Stefan; Imhof-Jung, Sabine; Regula, Jörg T; Klein, Christian; Mølhøj, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The quadroma antibody represents the first attempt to produce a bispecific heterodimeric IgG antibody by somatic fusion of 2 hybridoma cells each expressing monoclonal antibodies with distinctive specificities. However, because of random heavy and light chain pairing, the desired functional bispecific antibody represents only a small fraction of the protein produced. Subsequently, the knobs-into-holes (KiH) approach was developed to enforce correct heavy chain heterodimerization. Assuming equimolar expression of 4 unmodified chains comprising 2 heavy and 2 light chains, the statistical distribution of all paired combinations can be calculated. With equimolar expression as the goal, we transfected HEK cells with 1:1:1:1 plasmid ratios and analyzed the protein A affinity-purified antibodies from the quadroma and KiH approaches qualitatively and quantitatively with regard to the estimated relative amounts of the products using electrospray quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry. Our results show that all expected species are formed, and that, within the methodological limits, the species distribution in the mixtures corresponds approximately to the statistical distribution. PMID:26496506

  8. Fiber sensing with photorefractive fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Francis T. S.; Guo, Ruyan; Wang, Bo; Liu, Yuexin

    2002-11-01

    Optical fibers have been widely used for transmitting temporal signal. However, the transmission of spatial signal has not been fully exploited. Although multimode fiber has a large space-bandwidth product, transmitting spatial signals by using a fiber is rather difficult. When a laser beam is lached into a multimode fiber, the exit light field produces a complicated speckle pattern caused by the modal phasing of the fiber. It is difficult to recover the transmitted informati from the speckle field. However, the fiber speckle field can be used to fiber sensing with a hologrpahic method. In other words, if a hologram is made with the speckle fiber field, the information of the fiber status can be recovered. Thus by reading the hologram by the same speckle field, the reference beam can be reconstructed, which represents the detection of the speckle field. In other words, instead of exploiting the temporal content, the spatial content from a multimode fiber can be exploited for sensing. Our analyses and experimentations have shown that the fiber specklegram sensor (FSS) is highly senstiive to perturbation, and it is less vulnerable to the environment factors. Applications of the FSS to temperature, transversal displacement, and dynamic sensing are also included.

  9. Probing the structure of the sub-Salinia mantle lithosphere using spinel lherzolite xenoliths from Crystal Knob, Santa Lucia Range, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quinn, D. P.; Saleeby, J.; Ducea, M. N.; Luffi, P. I.

    2013-12-01

    We present the first petrogenetic analysis of a suite of peridotite xenoliths from the Crystal Knob volcanic neck in the Santa Lucia Range, California. The neck was erupted during the Plio-Pleistocene through the Salinia terrane, a fragment of the Late Cretaceous southern Sierra-northwest Mojave supra-subduction core complex that was displaced ~310 km in the late Cenozoic along the dextral San Andreas fault. The marginal tectonic setting makes these xenoliths ideal for testing different models of upper-mantle evolution along the western North American plate boundary. Possible scenarios include the early Cenozoic underplating of Farallon-plate mantle lithosphere nappes (Luffi et al., 2009), Neogene slab window opening (Atwater and Stock, 1998), and the partial subduction and stalling of the Monterey microplate (Pisker et al., 2012). The xenoliths from Crystal Knob are spinel lherzolites, which sample the mantle lithosphere underlying Salinia, and dunite cumulates apparently related to the olivine-basalt host. Initial study is focused on the spinel lherzolites: these display an allotriomorphic granular texture with anisotropy largely absent. However, several samples exhibit a weak shape-preferred orientation in elongate spinels. Within each xenolith, the silicate phases are in Fe-Mg equilibrium; between samples, Mg# [molar Mg/(Mg+Fe)*100] ranges from 87 to 91. Spinels have Cr# [molar Cr/(Cr+Al)*100] ranging from 10 to 27. Clinopyroxene Rb-Sr and Sm-Nd radiogenic isotope data show that the lherzolites are depleted in large-ion lithophile (LIL) elements, with uniform enrichment in 143Nd (ɛNd from +10.3 to +11.0) and depletion in 87Sr (87/86Sr of .702). This data rules out origin in the continental lithosphere, such as that observed in xenoliths from above the relict subduction interface found at at Dish Hill and Cima Dome in the Mojave (Luffi et al., 2009). The Mesozoic mantle wedge, which is sampled by xenoliths from beneath the southern Sierra Nevada batholith

  10. Two Fiber Optical Fiber Thermometry

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Mathew R.; Farmer, Jeffery T.; Breeding, Shawn P.

    2000-01-01

    An optical fiber thermometer consists of an optical fiber whose sensing tip is given a metallic coating. The sensing tip of the fiber is essentially an isothermal cavity, so the emission from this cavity will be approximately equal to the emission from a blackbody. Temperature readings are obtained by measuring the spectral radiative heat flux at the end of the fiber at two wavelengths. The ratio of these measurements and Planck's Law are used to infer the temperature at the sensing tip. Optical fiber thermometers have high accuracy, excellent long-term stability and are immune to electromagnetic interference. In addition, they can be operated for extended periods without requiring re-calibration. For these reasons. it is desirable to use optical fiber thermometers in environments such as the International Space Station. However, it has recently been shown that temperature readings are corrupted by emission from the fiber when extended portions of the probe are exposed to elevated temperatures. This paper will describe several ways in which the reading from a second fiber can be used to correct the corrupted temperature measurements. The accuracy and sensitivity to measurement uncertainty will be presented for each method.

  11. Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghatak, Ajoy; Thyagarajan, K.

    With the development of extremely low-loss optical fibers and their application to communication systems, a revolution has taken fiber glass place during the last 40 years. In 2001, using glass fibers as the transmission medium and lightwaves as carrier wave waves, information was transmitted at a rate more than 1 Tbit/s (which is roughly equivalent to transmission of about 15 million simultaneous telephone conversations) through one hair thin optical fiber. Experimental demonstration of transmission at the rate of 14 Tbit/s over a 160 km long single fiber was demonstrated in 2006, which is equivalent to sending 140 digital high definition movies in 1 s. Very recently record transmission of more than 100 Tbit/s over 165 km single mode fiber has been reported. These can be considered as extremely important technological achievements. In this chapter we will discuss the propagation characteristics of optical fibers with special applications to optical communication systems and also present some of the noncommunication applications such as sensing.

  12. Late Cenozoic N-S shortening across the central Garlock fault in Pilot Knob Valley, California - Implications for structural and kinematic relations with the Panamint Valley fault system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rittase, W. M.; Walker, J. D.; Kirby, E.; McDonald, E.; Gosse, J.; Spencer, J. Q.; Mojave Red Iwbc

    2010-12-01

    The intersection of the dextral (2-3 mm/yr) Panamint Valley fault system (PVFS) with the sinistral (5-15 mm/yr) Garlock fault (GF) in eastern Pilot Knob Valley (PKV) controls the active off-fault tectonic deformation in the southern Slate Range (SSR) and northern PKV. We suggest here that the 430+ m uplift of late Cenozoic sediments adjacent to the SSR partially accommodates decreased slip on the southern PVFS near the GF. We present preliminary data that constrain modern uplift in northern PKV: (1) Be-10 cosmogenic profiles, (2) OSL samples, (3) existing Earthscope 0.5 m airborne LiDAR and newly acquired terrestrial LiDAR, and (4) detailed soil PDI’s. Two uplifted terrace treads adjacent to the GF and one adjacent to the SSF are analyzed herein. A 50 ± 13 ka Be-10 cosmogenic profile age for a 16-m-high terrace tread adjacent to the GF suggests an uplift rate of ~0.32 ± 0.08 mm/yr. An additional Be-10 cosmogenic profile from a 12.5-m-high tread located 4.5 km west on the GF will test for spatial and temporal uplift rate variability. An OSL sample collected from this second cosmogenic profile will check the terrace’s age estimation. A second OSL sample collected from a 25.5-m-high terrace will allow for a slip-rate determination of a reverse fault near the SSR. We attribute the localized uplift between the SSR and the GF in northern PKV as strain accommodation between the southern PVFS and GF. If all reverse faults responsible for 430+ m of uplift are assumed to dip 70-80°, then approximately 155-76 m of horizontal N-S shortening is tenable. Likewise, the ca. 50 ka uplifted terrace adjacent to the GF would indicate a 0.12-0.06 mm/yr component of N-S shortening. Additional reverse faults to the north will add to this value, but lack of surfaces suitable for dating make a regional shortening estimate over this time interval challenging.

  13. Fireblocking Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    PBI was originally developed for space suits. In 1980, the need for an alternative to asbestos and stricter government anti-pollution standards led to commercialization of the fire blocking fiber. PBI is used for auto racing driver suits and aircraft seat covers. The fiber does not burn in air, is durable and easily maintained. It has been specified by a number of airliners and is manufactured by Hoechst-Celanese Corporation.

  14. Y-system for form factors at strong coupling in AdS5 and with multi-operator insertions in AdS3

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Zhiquan; Yang, Gang

    2013-06-01

    We study form factors in {N}=4 SYM at strong coupling in general kinematics and with multi-operator insertions by using gauge/string duality and integrability techniques. This generalizes the AdS3 results of Maldacena and Zhiboedov in two non-trivial aspects. The first generalization to AdS5 space was motivated by its potential connection to strong coupling Higgs-to-three-gluons amplitudes in QCD which was observed recently at weak coupling. The second generalization to multi-operator insertions was motivated as a step towards applying on-shell techniques to compute correlation functions at strong coupling. In this picture, each operator is associated to a monodromy condition on the cusp solutions. We construct Y-systems for both cases. The Y -functions are related to the spacetime (cross) ratios. Their WKB approximations based on a rational function P ( z) are also studied. We focus on the short operators, while the prescription is hopefully also applicable for more general operators.

  15. Massive S-matrix of AdS3×S3×T4 superstring theory with mixed 3-form flux

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hoare, B.; Tseytlin, A. A.

    2013-08-01

    The type IIB supergravity AdS3×S3×T4 background with mixed RR and NSNS 3-form fluxes is a near-horizon limit of a non-threshold bound state of D5-D1 and NS5-NS1 branes. The corresponding superstring world-sheet theory is expected to be integrable, opening the possibility of computing its exact spectrum for any values of the coefficient q of the NSNS flux and the string tension. In arXiv:1303.1447 we have found the tree-level S-matrix for the massive BMN excitations in this theory, which turned out to have a simple dependence on q. Here, by analyzing the constraints of symmetry and integrability, we propose an exact massive-sector dispersion relation and the exact S-matrix for this world-sheet theory. The S-matrix generalizes its recent construction in the q=0 case in arXiv:1303.5995. This is a consequence of the fact that parity symmetry is broken with the introduction of the NSNS flux. However, charge conjugation composed with parity is still a symmetry.

  16. String theory in Ad{{S}_{3}}\\times {{S}^{3}}\\times {{T}^{4}} with mixed flux: semiclassical and 1-loop phase in the S-matrix

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stepanchuk, A.

    2015-05-01

    We present a semiclassical derivation of the tree-level and 1-loop dressing phases in the massive sector of string theory on Ad{{S}3}× {{S}3}× {{T}4} supplemented by Ramond-Ramond and Neveu-Schwarz-Neveu-Schwarz 3-form fluxes. In analogy with the Ad{{S}5}× {{S}5} case, we use the dressing method to obtain scattering solutions for dyonic giant magnons which allows us to determine the semiclassical bound-state S-matrix and its 1-loop correction. We also find that the 1-loop correction to the dyonic giant magnon energy vanishes. Looking at the relation between the bound-state picture and elementary magnons in terms of the fusion procedure we deduce the elementary dressing phases. In both the semiclassical and 1-loop cases we find agreement with recent proposals from finite-gap equations and unitarity cut methods. Further, we find consistency with the finite-gap picture by determining the resolvent for the dyonic giant magnon from the semiclassical bosonic scattering data.

  17. Enhanced chemiluminescent detection scheme for trace vapor sensing in pneumatically-tuned hollow core photonic bandgap fibers.

    PubMed

    Stolyarov, Alexander M; Gumennik, Alexander; McDaniel, William; Shapira, Ofer; Schell, Brent; Sorin, Fabien; Kuriki, Ken; Benoit, Gilles; Rose, Aimee; Joannopoulos, John D; Fink, Yoel

    2012-05-21

    We demonstrate an in-fiber gas phase chemical detection architecture in which a chemiluminescent (CL) reaction is spatially and spectrally matched to the core modes of hollow photonic bandgap (PBG) fibers in order to enhance detection efficiency. A peroxide-sensitive CL material is annularly shaped and centered within the fiber's hollow core, thereby increasing the overlap between the emission intensity and the intensity distribution of the low-loss fiber modes. This configuration improves the sensitivity by 0.9 dB/cm compared to coating the material directly on the inner fiber surface, where coupling to both higher loss core modes and cladding modes is enhanced. By integrating the former configuration with a custom-built optofluidic system designed for concomitant controlled vapor delivery and emission measurement, we achieve a limit-of-detection of 100 parts per billion (ppb) for hydrogen peroxide vapor. The PBG fibers are produced by a new fabrication method whereby external gas pressure is used as a control knob to actively tune the transmission bandgaps through the entire visible range during the thermal drawing process. PMID:22714227

  18. Photovoltaic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gaudiana, Russell; Eckert, Robert; Cardone, John; Ryan, James; Montello, Alan

    2006-08-01

    It was realized early in the history of Konarka that the ability to produce fibers that generate power from solar energy could be applied to a wide variety of applications where fabrics are utilized currently. These applications include personal items such as jackets, shirts and hats, to architectural uses such as awnings, tents, large covers for cars, trucks and even doomed stadiums, to indoor furnishings such as window blinds, shades and drapes. They may also be used as small fabric patches or fiber bundles for powering or recharging batteries in small sensors. Power generating fabrics for clothing is of particular interest to the military where they would be used in uniforms and body armor where portable power is vital to field operations. In strong sunlight these power generating fabrics could be used as a primary source of energy, or they can be used in either direct sunlight or low light conditions to recharge batteries. Early in 2002, Konarka performed a series of proof-of-concept experiments to demonstrate the feasibility of building a photovoltaic cell using dye-sensitized titania and electrolyte on a metal wire core. The approach taken was based on the sequential coating processes used in making fiber optics, namely, a fiber core, e.g., a metal wire serving as the primary electrode, is passed through a series of vertically aligned coating cups. Each of the cups contains a coating fluid that has a specific function in the photocell. A second wire, used as the counter electrode, is brought into the process prior to entering the final coating cup. The latter contains a photopolymerizable, transparent cladding which hardens when passed through a UV chamber. Upon exiting the UV chamber, the finished PV fiber is spooled. Two hundred of foot lengths of PV fiber have been made using this process. When the fiber is exposed to visible radiation, it generates electrical power. The best efficiency exhibited by these fibers is 6% with an average value in the 4

  19. Fiber crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Much research continues to develop renewable, recyclable, sustainable, and bio-based products from agricultural feed stocks such as cotton and flax fiber. Primary requirements are sustainable production, low cost, and consistent and known quality. To better understand these products, research contin...

  20. Mutation in fiber of adenovirus serotype 5 gene therapy vector decreases liver tropism

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Zhen; Wang, Baoming; Lou, Junfang; Yan, Jingyi; Gao, Lei; Geng, Ranshen; Yu, Bin

    2014-01-01

    Recombinant adenovirus (Ad) vectors are widely used for both in vitro and in vivo gene transfer. However, intravenous administration of Ad vectors results mainly in hepatocyte transduction and subsequent hepatotoxicity. Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR) and αvβ integrins, which are functional receptors for the fiber and penton proteins, respectively, are the tropism determinants of Ad type 5 (Ad5). We previously developed a system for rapid construction of fiber-modified Ad5 vectors. We also constructed a fiber-modified Ad5 containing an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) motif in the HI-loop and showed that it could enhance anti-tumor effects in vitro and in vivo. Here, we constructed a novel Ad5 vector containing two amino acid mutations in the AB loop of the fiber-modified Ad5 fiber knob and showed that it could significantly reduce liver tropism and increase gene transfer in low-CAR or CAR-deficient cancer cells following intravascular delivery. However, anti-tumor effects of the fiber-mutated Ad5 expressing HSV-TK under control of the hTERT promoter was not found when compared with an unmodified Ad5 vector in cancer lines expressing different levels of CAR, likely due to the activity of the hTERT promoter being lower than that of the CMV promoter. Nevertheless, this study describes an enhanced Ad5 vector for intravascular gene delivery, and further modifications such as changes in the promoter may facilitate the development of this vector for cancer treatment. PMID:25663991

  1. Fiber distributed feedback laser

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elachi, C.; Evans, G. A.; Yeh, C. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    Utilizing round optical fibers as communication channels in optical communication networks presents the problem of obtaining a high efficiency coupling between the optical fiber and the laser. A laser is made an integral part of the optical fiber channel by either diffusing active material into the optical fiber or surrounding the optical fiber with the active material. Oscillation within the active medium to produce lasing action is established by grating the optical fiber so that distributed feedback occurs.

  2. Strong fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Che-Yu.

    1991-03-01

    This program was directed to a new and generic approach to the development of new materials with novel and interesting properties, and to the precision fabrication of these materials in one and two-dimensional forms. Advanced deposition processes and microfabrication technology were used to produce fibers and grids of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and mixtures of controlled composition and structure, and with new and interesting mechanical and physical properties. Deposition processes included electron beam evaporation, co-deposition of mixtures by dual electron beam evaporation, thermal evaporation, sputtering of a single element or compound, sputtering of a single element in a gaseous atmosphere to produce compounds, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), and selective tungsten chemical vapor deposition (W-CVD). The approach was to use the deposition processes in coordination with patterns generated by optical lithography to produce fibers with transverse dimensions in the micron range, and lengths from less than a millimeter to several centimeters. The approach is also applicable to the production of two-dimensional grids and particulates of controlled sizes and geometries.

  3. Carbon-fiber technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, C. F.; Parker, J. A.

    1980-01-01

    The state of the art of PAN based carbon fiber manufacture and the science of fiber behavior is surveyed. A review is given of the stabilization by oxidation and the subsequent carbonization of fibers, of the apparent structure of fibers deduced from scanning electron microscopy, from X-ray scattering, and from similarities with soft carbons, and of the known relations between fiber properties and heat treatment temperature. A simplified model is invoked to explain the electrical properties of fibers and recent quantum chemical calculations on atomic clusters are used to elucidate some aspects of fiber conductivity. Some effects of intercalation and oxidative modification of finished fibers are summarized.

  4. Flax Fiber - Interfacial Bonding

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Measured flax fiber physical and chemical properties potentially impact bonding and thus stress transfer between the matrix and fiber within composites. These first attempts at correlating flax fiber quality and biofiber composites contain the initial steps towards identifying key flax fiber charac...

  5. High-fiber foods

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary fiber - self-care ... Dietary fiber adds bulk to your diet. Because it makes you feel full faster, it can help you ... Grains are another important source of dietary fiber. Eat more: ... Whole-grain breads Brown rice Popcorn High-fiber cereals, such ...

  6. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, S.; Muhs, J.D.

    1996-10-22

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded are disclosed. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled. 3 figs.

  7. Fiber optic connector

    DOEpatents

    Rajic, Slobodan; Muhs, Jeffrey D.

    1996-01-01

    A fiber optic connector and method for connecting composite materials within which optical fibers are imbedded. The fiber optic connector includes a capillary tube for receiving optical fibers at opposing ends. The method involves inserting a first optical fiber into the capillary tube and imbedding the unit in the end of a softened composite material. The capillary tube is injected with a coupling medium which subsequently solidifies. The composite material is machined to a desired configuration. An external optical fiber is then inserted into the capillary tube after fluidizing the coupling medium, whereby the optical fibers are coupled.

  8. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor); Mattes, Brenton L. (Inventor); Charnetski, Clark J. (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  9. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawatari, Takeo (Inventor); Gaubis, Philip A. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A fiber optic temperature sensor uses a light source which transmits light through an optical fiber to a sensor head at the opposite end of the optical fiber from the light source. The sensor head has a housing coupled to the end of the optical fiber. A metallic reflective surface is coupled to the housing adjacent the end of the optical fiber to form a gap having a predetermined length between the reflective surface and the optical fiber. A detection system is also coupled to the optical fiber which determines the temperature at the sensor head from an interference pattern of light which is reflected from the reflective surface.

  10. Coatings for graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Graphite fibers released from composites during burning or an explosion caused shorting of electrical and electronic equipment. Silicon carbide, silica, silicon nitride and boron nitride were coated on graphite fibers to increase their electrical resistances. Resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than uncoated fiber were attained without any significant degradation of the substrate fiber. An organo-silicone approach to produce coated fibers with high electrical resistance was also used. Celion 6000 graphite fibers were coated with an organo-silicone compound, followed by hydrolysis and pyrolysis of the coating to a silica-like material. The shear and flexural strengths of composites made from high electrically resistant fibers were considerably lower than the shear and flexural strengths of composites made from the lower electrically resistant fibers. The lower shear strengths of the composites indicated that the coatings on these fibers were weaker than the coating on the fibers which were pyrolyzed at higher temperature.

  11. Enhanced antitumor effect and reduced vector dissemination with fiber-modified adenovirus vectors expressing herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase.

    PubMed

    Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Hayakawa, Takao

    2002-03-01

    There are at least two hurdles confronting the use of the adenovirus (Ad)-mediated herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSVtk)/ganciclovir (GCV) system for the treatment of cancer. One is inefficient Ad vector-mediated gene transfer into tumor cells lacking the primary receptor, i.e., the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR). The other is hepatotoxicity due to unwanted vector spread into the liver, even when Ad vectors are injected intratumorally. Herein, we present an attractive strategy for overcoming such limitations based on use of a fiber-modified Ad vector containing an RGD peptide motif in the fiber knob. HSVtk-expressing Ad vectors containing mutant fiber (AdRGD-tk) or wild-type fiber (Ad-tk) were injected intratumorally into CAR-negative B16 melanoma cells inoculated into mice, after which GCV was injected intraperitoneally for 10 days. AdRGD-tk showed approximately 25 times more antitumor activity than Ad-tk. Histopathological studies suggested that liver damage in mice injected with AdRGD-tk was significantly lower than that in mice injected with Ad-tk. Intratumoral administration of luciferase-expressing Ad vectors containing the mutant fiber (AdRGD-L2) resulted in nearly 40 times more luciferase production in the tumor, but 8 times less production in the liver than the conventional Ad vectors (Ad-L2). These results indicate that combination of fiber-modified vectors and a HSVtk/GCV system is a potentially useful and safe approach for the treatment of tumors lacking CAR expression, and that fiber-modified vectors could be of great utility for gene therapy and gene transfer experiments. PMID:11896439

  12. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, James K.

    1993-01-01

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  13. Alumina fiber strength improvement

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pepper, R. T.; Nelson, D. C.

    1982-01-01

    The effective fiber strength of alumina fibers in an aluminum composite was increased to 173,000 psi. A high temperature heat treatment, combined with a glassy carbon surface coating, was used to prevent degradation and improve fiber tensile strength. Attempts to achieve chemical strengthening of the alumina fiber by chromium oxide and boron oxide coatings proved unsuccessful. A major problem encountered on the program was the low and inconsistent strength of the Dupont Fiber FP used for the investigation.

  14. Fiber-mutant technique can augment gene transduction efficacy and anti-tumor effects against established murine melanoma by cytokine-gene therapy using adenovirus vectors.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yuka; Okada, Naoki; Nakagawa, Shinsaku; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Kanehira, Makiko; Nishino, Naoko; Takahashi, Koichi; Mizuno, Nobuyasu; Hayakawa, Takao; Mayumi, Tadanori

    2002-03-01

    Melanoma cells are relatively resistant to adenovirus vector (Ad)-mediated gene transfer due to the low expression of Coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), which acts as a primitive Ad-receptor. Therefore, extremely high doses of Ad are required for effective gene therapy against melanoma. In the present study, we investigated whether fiber-mutant Ad containing the Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) sequence in the fiber knob could promote gene delivery and anti-tumor effects in the murine B16 BL6 tumor model. B16 BL6 cells (in vitro) and tumors (in vivo) infected with RGD fiber-mutant Ad containing a tumor necrosis factor alpha gene (Ad-RGD-TNFalpha) produced more TNFalpha than those infected with conventional Ad-TNFalpha. In addition, Ad-RGD-TNFalpha required about one-tenth the dosage of Ad-TNFalpha for induction of equal therapeutic effects upon intratumoral injection into established B16 BL6 tumors. Furthermore, the combination of both TNFalpha- and interleukin 12-expressing RGD fiber-mutant Ads exhibited more effective tumor regression than the Ad expressing each alone. These results suggested that the fiber-mutant for altering Ad-tropism is a very potent technology for advancing gene therapy for melanoma. PMID:11809531

  15. Specialty optical fibers: revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romaniuk, Ryszard S.

    2011-10-01

    The paper contains description of chosen aspects of analysis and design of tailored optical fibers. By specialty optical fibers we understand here the fibers which have complex construction and which serve for the functional processing of optical signal rather than long distance transmission. Thus, they are called also instrumentation optical fibers. The following issues are considered: transmission properties, transformation of optical signal, fiber characteristics, fiber susceptibility to external reactions. The technology of tailored optical fibers offers a wider choice of the design tools for the fiber itself, and then various devices made from these fiber, than classical technology of communication optical fibers. The consequence is different fiber properties, nonstandard dimensions and different metrological problems. The price to be paid for wider design possibilities are bigger optical losses of these fibers and weaker mechanical properties, and worse chemical stability. These fibers find their applications outside the field of telecommunications. The applications of instrumentation optical fibers combine other techniques apart from the photonics ones like: electronic, chemical and mechatronic.

  16. Ceramic fiber reinforced filter

    DOEpatents

    Stinton, David P.; McLaughlin, Jerry C.; Lowden, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    A filter for removing particulate matter from high temperature flowing fluids, and in particular gases, that is reinforced with ceramic fibers. The filter has a ceramic base fiber material in the form of a fabric, felt, paper of the like, with the refractory fibers thereof coated with a thin layer of a protective and bonding refractory applied by chemical vapor deposition techniques. This coating causes each fiber to be physically joined to adjoining fibers so as to prevent movement of the fibers during use and to increase the strength and toughness of the composite filter. Further, the coating can be selected to minimize any reactions between the constituents of the fluids and the fibers. A description is given of the formation of a composite filter using a felt preform of commercial silicon carbide fibers together with the coating of these fibers with pure silicon carbide. Filter efficiency approaching 100% has been demonstrated with these filters. The fiber base material is alternately made from aluminosilicate fibers, zirconia fibers and alumina fibers. Coating with Al.sub.2 O.sub.3 is also described. Advanced configurations for the composite filter are suggested.

  17. Mutation of the fiber shaft heparan sulphate binding site of a 5/3 chimeric adenovirus reduces liver tropism.

    PubMed

    Koski, Anniina; Karli, Eerika; Kipar, Anja; Escutenaire, Sophie; Kanerva, Anna; Hemminki, Akseli

    2013-01-01

    Natural tropism to the liver is a major obstacle in systemic delivery of adenoviruses in cancer gene therapy. Adenovirus binding to soluble coagulation factors and to cellular heparan sulphate proteoglycans via the fiber shaft KKTK domain are suggested to cause liver tropism. Serotype 5 adenovirus constructs with mutated KKTK regions exhibit liver detargeting, but they also transduce tumors less efficiently, possibly due to altered fiber conformation. We constructed Ad5/3lucS*, a 5/3 chimeric adenovirus with a mutated KKTK region. The fiber knob swap was hypothesized to facilitate tumor transduction. This construct was studied with or without additional coagulation factor ablation. Ad5/3lucS* exhibited significantly reduced transduction of human hepatic cells in vitro and mouse livers in vivo. Combination of coagulation factor ablation by warfarinization to Ad5/3lucS* seemed to further enhance liver detargeting. Cancer cell transduction by Ad5/3lucS* was retained in vitro. In vivo, viral particle accumulation in M4A4-LM3 xenograft tumors was comparable to controls, but Ad5/3lucS* transgene expression was nearly abolished. Coagulation factor ablation did not affect tumor transduction. These studies set the stage for further investigations into the effects of the KKTK mutation and coagulation factor ablation in the context of 5/3 serotype chimerism. Of note, the putative disconnect between tumor transduction and transgene expression could prove useful in further understanding of adenovirus biology. PMID:23585829

  18. Mutation of the Fiber Shaft Heparan Sulphate Binding Site of a 5/3 Chimeric Adenovirus Reduces Liver Tropism

    PubMed Central

    Koski, Anniina; Karli, Eerika; Kipar, Anja; Escutenaire, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    Natural tropism to the liver is a major obstacle in systemic delivery of adenoviruses in cancer gene therapy. Adenovirus binding to soluble coagulation factors and to cellular heparan sulphate proteoglycans via the fiber shaft KKTK domain are suggested to cause liver tropism. Serotype 5 adenovirus constructs with mutated KKTK regions exhibit liver detargeting, but they also transduce tumors less efficiently, possibly due to altered fiber conformation. We constructed Ad5/3lucS*, a 5/3 chimeric adenovirus with a mutated KKTK region. The fiber knob swap was hypothesized to facilitate tumor transduction. This construct was studied with or without additional coagulation factor ablation. Ad5/3lucS* exhibited significantly reduced transduction of human hepatic cells in vitro and mouse livers in vivo. Combination of coagulation factor ablation by warfarinization to Ad5/3lucS* seemed to further enhance liver detargeting. Cancer cell transduction by Ad5/3lucS* was retained in vitro. In vivo, viral particle accumulation in M4A4-LM3 xenograft tumors was comparable to controls, but Ad5/3lucS* transgene expression was nearly abolished. Coagulation factor ablation did not affect tumor transduction. These studies set the stage for further investigations into the effects of the KKTK mutation and coagulation factor ablation in the context of 5/3 serotype chimerism. Of note, the putative disconnect between tumor transduction and transgene expression could prove useful in further understanding of adenovirus biology. PMID:23585829

  19. Fiber optics in adverse environments

    SciTech Connect

    Lyous, P.B.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation effects in optical fibers are considered, taking into account recent progress in the investigation of radiation resistant optical fibers, radiation damage in optical fibers, radiation-induced transient absorption in optical fibers, X-ray-induced transient attenuation at low temperatures in polymer clad silica (PCS) fibers, optical fiber composition and radiation hardness, the response of irradiated optical waveguides at low temperatures, and the effect of ionizing radiation on fiber-optic waveguides. Other topics explored are related to environmental effects on components of fiber optic systems, and radiation detection systems using optical fibers. Fiber optic systems in adverse environments are also discussed, giving attention to the survivability of Army fiber optics systems, space application of fiber optics systems, fiber optic wavelength multiplexing for civil aviation applications, a new fiber optic data bus topology, fiber optics for aircraft engine/inlet control, and application of fiber optics in high voltage substations.

  20. Fiber optic chemical sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chuck C.; McCrae, David A.; Saaski, Elric W.

    1998-09-01

    This paper provides a broad overview of the field of fiber optic chemical sensors. Several different types of fiber optic sensors and probes are described, and references are cited for each category discussed.

  1. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... soluble and insoluble. Both are important for health, digestion, and preventing diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in ...

  2. Omnidirectional fiber optic tiltmeter

    DOEpatents

    Benjamin, B.C.; Miller, H.M.

    1983-06-30

    A tiltmeter is provided which is useful in detecting very small movements such as earth tides. The device comprises a single optical fiber, and an associated weight affixed thereto, suspended from a support to form a pendulum. A light source, e.g., a light emitting diode, mounted on the support transmits light through the optical fiber to a group of further optical fibers located adjacent to but spaced from the free end of the single optical fiber so that displacement of the single optical fiber with respect to the group will result in a change in the amount of light received by the individual optical fibers of the group. Photodetectors individually connectd to the fibers produce corresponding electrical outputs which are differentially compared and processed to produce a resultant continuous analog output representative of the amount and direction of displacement of the single optical fiber.

  3. Soluble vs. insoluble fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... diseases. Soluble fiber attracts water and turns to gel during digestion. This slows digestion. Soluble fiber is found in oat bran, barley, nuts, seeds, beans, lentils, peas, and some fruits and vegetables. It is also found in psyllium, ...

  4. Fiber Optics Instrumentation Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Patrick Hon Man; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Richards, W. Lance

    2010-01-01

    This is a general presentation of fiber optics instrumentation development work being conducted at NASA Dryden for the past 10 years and recent achievements in the field of fiber optics strain sensors.

  5. Fiber Optics Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, William E.

    1986-01-01

    Discusses various applications of fiber optics technology: information systems, industrial robots, medicine, television, transportation, and training. Types of jobs that will be available with fiber optics training (such as electricians and telephone cable installers and splicers) are examined. (CT)

  6. Helical Fiber Amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Koplow, Jeffrey P.; Kliner, Dahy; Goldberg, Lew

    2002-12-17

    A multi-mode gain fiber is provided which affords substantial improvements in the maximum pulse energy, peak power handling capabilities, average output power, and/or pumping efficiency of fiber amplifier and laser sources while maintaining good beam quality (comparable to that of a conventional single-mode fiber source). These benefits are realized by coiling the multimode gain fiber to induce significant bend loss for all but the lowest-order mode(s).

  7. Fiber pulling apparatus modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, Guy A.; Workman, Gary L.

    1992-01-01

    A reduced gravity fiber pulling apparatus (FPA) was constructed in order to study the effects of gravity on glass fiber formation. The apparatus was specifically designed and built for use on NASA's KC-135 aircraft. Four flights have been completed to date during which E-glass fiber was successfully produced in simulated zero, high, and lunar gravity environments. In addition simulated lunar soil samples were tested for their fiber producing properties using the FPA.

  8. Fiber optic coupled optical sensor

    DOEpatents

    Fleming, Kevin J.

    2001-01-01

    A displacement sensor includes a first optical fiber for radiating light to a target, and a second optical fiber for receiving light from the target. The end of the first fiber is adjacent and not axially aligned with the second fiber end. A lens focuses light from the first fiber onto the target and light from the target onto the second fiber.

  9. Advanced Engineering Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edie, Dan D.; Dunham, Michael G.

    1987-01-01

    Describes Clemson University's Advanced Engineered Fibers Laboratory, which was established to provide national leadership and expertise in developing the processing equipment and advance fibers necessary for the chemical, fiber, and textile industries to enter the composite materials market. Discusses some of the laboratory's activities in…

  10. Oxynitride glass fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Parimal J.; Messier, Donald R.; Rich, R. E.

    1991-01-01

    Research at the Army Materials Technology Laboratory (AMTL) and elsewhere has shown that many glass properties including elastic modulus, hardness, and corrosion resistance are improved markedly by the substitution of nitrogen for oxygen in the glass structure. Oxynitride glasses, therefore, offer exciting opportunities for making high modulus, high strength fibers. Processes for making oxynitride glasses and fibers of glass compositions similar to commercial oxide glasses, but with considerable enhanced properties, are discussed. We have made glasses with elastic moduli as high as 140 GPa and fibers with moduli of 120 GPa and tensile strengths up to 2900 MPa. AMTL holds a U.S. patent on oxynitride glass fibers, and this presentation discusses a unique process for drawing small diameter oxynitride glass fibers at high drawing rates. Fibers are drawn through a nozzle from molten glass in a molybdenum crucible at 1550 C. The crucible is situated in a furnace chamber in flowing nitrogen, and the fiber is wound in air outside of the chamber, making the process straightforward and commercially feasible. Strengths were considerably improved by improving glass quality to minimize internal defects. Though the fiber strengths were comparable with oxide fibers, work is currently in progress to further improve the elastic modulus and strength of fibers. The high elastic modulus of oxynitride glasses indicate their potential for making fibers with tensile strengths surpassing any oxide glass fibers, and we hope to realize that potential in the near future.

  11. Mineral Fiber Toxicology

    EPA Science Inventory

    The chemical and physical properties of different forms of mineral fibers impact biopersistence and pathology in the lung. Fiber chemistry, length, aspect ratio, surface area and dose are critical factors determining mineral fiber-associated health effects including cancer and as...

  12. Linearly polarized fiber amplifier

    DOEpatents

    Kliner, Dahv A.; Koplow, Jeffery P.

    2004-11-30

    Optically pumped rare-earth-doped polarizing fibers exhibit significantly higher gain for one linear polarization state than for the orthogonal state. Such a fiber can be used to construct a single-polarization fiber laser, amplifier, or amplified-spontaneous-emission (ASE) source without the need for additional optical components to obtain stable, linearly polarized operation.

  13. The Fiber Optic Connection.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reese, Susan

    2003-01-01

    Describes the fiber optics programs at the Career and Technical Center in Berlin, Pennsylvania and the Charles S. Monroe Technology Center in Loudoun County, Virginia. Discusses the involvement of the Fiber Optic Association with education, research and development, manufacturing, sales, distribution, installation, and maintenance of fiber optic…

  14. Fiber optic monitoring device

    DOEpatents

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1993-10-05

    A device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information. 4 figures.

  15. Fiber optic sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hesse, J.; Sohler, W.

    1984-01-01

    A survey of the developments in the field of fiber optics sensor technology is presented along with a discussion of the advantages of optical measuring instruments as compared with electronic sensors. The two primary types of fiber optics sensors, specifically those with multiwave fibers and those with monowave fibers, are described. Examples of each major sensor type are presented and discussed. Multiwave detectors include external and internal fiber optics sensors. Among the monowave detectors are Mach-Zender interferometers, Michelson interferometers, Sagnac interferometers (optical gyroscopes), waveguide resonators, and polarimeter sensors. Integrated optical sensors and their application in spectroscopy are briefly discussed.

  16. Multimaterial Acoustic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chocat, Noemie

    The emergence of multimaterial fibers that combine a multiplicity of solid materials with disparate electrical, optical, and mechanical properties into a single fiber presents new opportunities for extending fiber applications well beyond optical transmission. Fiber reflectors, thermal detectors, photodetectors, chemical sensors, surface-emitting fiber lasers, fiber diodes, and other functional fiber devices have been demonstrated with this approach. Yet, throughout this development and indeed the development of fibers in general, a key premise has remained unchanged : that fibers are essentially static devices incapable of controllably changing their properties at high frequencies. Unique opportunities would arise if a rapid, electrically-driven mechanism for changing fiber properties existed. A wide spectrum of hitherto passive fiber devices could at once become active with applications spanning electronics, mechanics, acoustics, and optics, with the benefits of large surface-area, structural robustness, and mechanical flexibility. This thesis addresses the challenges and opportunities associated with the realization of electromechanical transduction in fibers through the integration of internal piezoelectric and electrostrictive domains. The fundamental challenges related to the fabrication of piezoelectric devices in fiber form are analyzed from a materials perspective, and candidate materials and geometries are selected that are compatible with the thermal drawing process. The first realization of a thermally drawn piezoelectric fiber device is reported and its piezoelectric response is established over a wide range of frequencies. The acoustic properties of piezoelectric fiber devices are characterized and related to their mechanical and geometric properties. Collective effects in multi-fiber constructs are discussed and demonstrated by the realization of a linear phased array of piezoelectric fibers capable of acoustic beam steering. High strain actuation

  17. Hybrid matrix fiber composites

    DOEpatents

    Deteresa, Steven J.; Lyon, Richard E.; Groves, Scott E.

    2003-07-15

    Hybrid matrix fiber composites having enhanced compressive performance as well as enhanced stiffness, toughness and durability suitable for compression-critical applications. The methods for producing the fiber composites using matrix hybridization. The hybrid matrix fiber composites include two chemically or physically bonded matrix materials, whereas the first matrix materials are used to impregnate multi-filament fibers formed into ribbons and the second matrix material is placed around and between the fiber ribbons that are impregnated with the first matrix material and both matrix materials are cured and solidified.

  18. Fiber optic laser rod

    DOEpatents

    Erickson, G.F.

    1988-04-13

    A laser rod is formed from a plurality of optical fibers, each forming an individual laser. Synchronization of the individual fiber lasers is obtained by evanescent wave coupling between adjacent optical fiber cores. The fiber cores are dye-doped and spaced at a distance appropriate for evanescent wave coupling at the wavelength of the selected dye. An interstitial material having an index of refraction lower than that of the fiber core provides the optical isolation for effective lasing action while maintaining the cores at the appropriate coupling distance. 2 figs.

  19. Fiber optic monitoring device

    SciTech Connect

    Samborsky, J.K.

    1992-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a device for the purpose of monitoring light transmissions in optical fibers comprises a fiber optic tap that optically diverts a fraction of a transmitted optical signal without disrupting the integrity of the signal. The diverted signal is carried, preferably by the fiber optic tap, to a lens or lens system that disperses the light over a solid angle that facilitates viewing. The dispersed light indicates whether or not the monitored optical fiber or system of optical fibers is currently transmitting optical information.

  20. Fiber coating method

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2001-01-01

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  1. Fiber coating method

    DOEpatents

    Corman, Gregory Scot

    2003-04-15

    A coating is applied to reinforcing fibers arranged into a tow by coaxially aligning the tow with an adjacent separation layer and winding or wrapping the tow and separation layer onto a support structure in an interleaved manner so that the separation layer separates a wrap of the tow from an adjacent wrap of the tow. A coating can then be uniformly applied to the reinforcing fibers without defects caused by fiber tow to fiber tow contact. The separation layer can be a carbon fiber veil.

  2. Kinetics of fiber solidification

    PubMed Central

    Mercader, C.; Lucas, A.; Derré, A.; Zakri, C.; Moisan, S.; Maugey, M.; Poulin, P.

    2010-01-01

    Many synthetic or natural fibers are produced via the transformation of a liquid solution into a solid filament, which allows the wet processing of high molecular weight polymers, proteins, or inorganic particles. Synthetic wet-spun fibers are used in our everyday life from clothing to composite reinforcement applications. Spun fibers are also common in nature. Silk solidification results from the coagulation of protein solutions. The chemical phenomena involved in the formation of all these classes of fibers can be quite different but they all share the same fundamental transformation from a liquid to a solid state. The solidification process is critical because it governs the production rate and the strength that fibers can sustain to be drawn and wound. An approach is proposed in this work to investigate the kinetics of fiber solidification. This approach consists in circulating solidifying fibers in the extensional flow of a surrounding liquid. Such as polymers in extensional flows, the fibers break if resultant drag forces exceed the fiber tensile strength. The solidification kinetics of nanotube composite fibers serves as a validation example of this approach. The method could be extended to other systems and advance thereby the science and technology of fiber and textile materials. It is also a way to directly visualize the scission of chain-like systems in extensional flows. PMID:20937910

  3. Kinetics of fiber solidification.

    PubMed

    Mercader, C; Lucas, A; Derré, A; Zakri, C; Moisan, S; Maugey, M; Poulin, P

    2010-10-26

    Many synthetic or natural fibers are produced via the transformation of a liquid solution into a solid filament, which allows the wet processing of high molecular weight polymers, proteins, or inorganic particles. Synthetic wet-spun fibers are used in our everyday life from clothing to composite reinforcement applications. Spun fibers are also common in nature. Silk solidification results from the coagulation of protein solutions. The chemical phenomena involved in the formation of all these classes of fibers can be quite different but they all share the same fundamental transformation from a liquid to a solid state. The solidification process is critical because it governs the production rate and the strength that fibers can sustain to be drawn and wound. An approach is proposed in this work to investigate the kinetics of fiber solidification. This approach consists in circulating solidifying fibers in the extensional flow of a surrounding liquid. Such as polymers in extensional flows, the fibers break if resultant drag forces exceed the fiber tensile strength. The solidification kinetics of nanotube composite fibers serves as a validation example of this approach. The method could be extended to other systems and advance thereby the science and technology of fiber and textile materials. It is also a way to directly visualize the scission of chain-like systems in extensional flows. PMID:20937910

  4. Fiber draw synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Orf, Nicholas D.; Shapira, Ofer; Sorin, Fabien; Danto, Sylvain; Baldo, Marc A.; Joannopoulos, John D.; Fink, Yoel

    2011-01-01

    The synthesis of a high-melting temperature semiconductor in a low-temperature fiber drawing process is demonstrated, substantially expanding the set of materials that can be incorporated into fibers. Reagents in the solid state are arranged in proximate domains within a fiber preform. The preform is fluidized at elevated temperatures and drawn into fiber, reducing the lateral dimensions and bringing the domains into intimate contact to enable chemical reaction. A polymer preform containing a thin layer of selenium contacted by tin–zinc wires is drawn to yield electrically contacted crystalline ZnSe domains of sub-100-nm scales. The in situ synthesized compound semiconductor becomes the basis for an electronic heterostructure diode of arbitrary length in the fiber. The ability to synthesize materials within fibers while precisely controlling their geometry and electrical connectivity at submicron scales presents new opportunities for increasing the complexity and functionality of fiber structures.

  5. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, J.B.; Muhs, J.D.; Tobin, K.W.

    1995-01-10

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity. 2 figures.

  6. Fiber optic vibration sensor

    DOEpatents

    Dooley, Joseph B.; Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Tobin, Kenneth W.

    1995-01-01

    A fiber optic vibration sensor utilizes two single mode optical fibers supported by a housing with one optical fiber fixedly secured to the housing and providing a reference signal and the other optical fiber having a free span length subject to vibrational displacement thereof with respect to the housing and the first optical fiber for providing a signal indicative of a measurement of any perturbation of the sensor. Damping or tailoring of the sensor to be responsive to selected levels of perturbation is provided by altering the diameter of optical fibers or by immersing at least a portion of the free span length of the vibration sensing optical fiber into a liquid of a selected viscosity.

  7. Fiber Accelerating Structures

    SciTech Connect

    Hammond, Andrew P.; /Reed Coll. /SLAC

    2010-08-25

    One of the options for future particle accelerators are photonic band gap (PBG) fiber accelerators. PBG fibers are specially designed optical fibers that use lasers to excite an electric field that is used to accelerate electrons. To improve PBG accelerators, the basic parameters of the fiber were tested to maximize defect size and acceleration. Using the program CUDOS, several accelerating modes were found that maximized these parameters for several wavelengths. The design of multiple defects, similar to having closely bound fibers, was studied to find possible coupling or the change of modes. The amount of coupling was found to be dependent on distance separated. For certain distances accelerating coupled modes were found and examined. In addition, several non-periodic fiber structures were examined using CUDOS. The non-periodic fibers produced several interesting results and promised more modes given time to study them in more detail.

  8. Tapered fiber amplifier

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Russell, Stephen D.; Stamnitz, Timothy C.

    1990-07-01

    A tapered optical fiber amplifier is designed to provide for long-distance, un-repeatered fiber optic communications. Two single-mode fiber portions are tapered to efficiently intensify and couple an information signal from a laser diode and a pump signal at a shorter wavelength into a fused, tapered single-mode fiber optic coupler. The concentrated information signal and concentrated pump signal are combined via the coupler which is coupled to a several-kilometer length of a relatively small core diametered single-mode fiber to create nonlinear optical effect (stimulated Raman scattering) (SRS). The SRS causes Raman shift of the pump light into the small core diametered single-mode fiber length, thereby generating SRS to result in a signal amplification and an efficient extraction of the amplified signal via the tapered output fiber portion or pigtail.

  9. Fiber optic moisture sensor

    DOEpatents

    Kirkham, R.R.

    1984-08-03

    A method and apparatus for sensing moisture changes by utilizing optical fiber technology. One embodiment uses a reflective target at the end of an optical fiber. The reflectance of the target varies with its moisture content and can be detected by a remote unit at the opposite end of the fiber. A second embodiment utilizes changes in light loss along the fiber length. This can be attributed to changes in reflectance of cladding material as a function of its moisture content. It can also be affected by holes or inserts interposed in the cladding material and/or fiber. Changing light levels can also be coupled from one fiber to another in an assembly of fibers as a function of varying moisture content in their overlapping lengths of cladding material.

  10. Indium fluoride glass fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saad, Mohammed

    2012-03-01

    Fluoride glasses are the only material that transmit light from ultraviolet to mid-infrared and can be drawn into industrial optical fibers. The mechanical and optical properties of new indium fluoride glass fibers have been investigated. Multimode fiber 190 microns, has very high mechanical strength greater than 100 kpsi and optical loss as low as 45 dB/km between 2 and 4 microns. Unlike chalcogenide glass fibers, indium fluoride fiber has a wide transmission window from 0.3 to 5.5 microns without any absorption peak. Indium fluoride glass fibers are the technology of choice for all application requiring transmission up to 5 micron such as infrared contour measure (IRCM) and chemical sensing. Furthermore, Indium fluoride glasses have low phonon energy and can be heavily doped and co-doped whit rare-earth elements. Therefore they are very promising candidates for infrared fiber lasers.

  11. A fiber-modified adenovirus co-expressing HSV-TK and Coli.NTR enhances antitumor activities in breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhan, Yang; Yu, Bin; Wang, Zhen; Zhang, Yu; Zhang, Hai-Hong; Wu, Hao; Feng, Xiao; Geng, Ran-Shen; Kong, Wei; Yu, Xiang-Hui

    2014-01-01

    Breast cancers especially in late and metastatic stages remain refractory to treatment despite advances in surgical techniques and chemotherapy. Suicide gene therapy based on adenoviral technology will be promising strategies for such advanced diseases. We previously showed that co-expression of herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (HSV-TK) and Escherichia coli nitroreductase (Coli.NTR) by an hTERT-driven adenovirus vector resulted in additive anti-tumor effects in breast cancer cells in vitro and in vivo. As many tumor tissue and cancer cells express low level of coxsackie-adenovirus receptor (CAR), which is the functional receptor for the fiber protein of human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5), novel Ad5 vectors containing genetically modifi ed fiber are attractive vehicles for achieving targeted gene transfer and improving suicide gene expression in these cancer cells. In the present study, we first built a simplified Ad5 vector platform for fiber modification and quick detection for gene transfer. Then a fiber-modified adenovirus vector containing an RGD motif in the HI loop of the fiber knob was constructed. After recombined with HSV-TK and Coli.NTR gene, this fiber-modified Ad5 vector (Ad-RGD-hT-TK/NTR) was compared with that of our previously constructed Ad5 vector (Ad-hT-TK/NTR) for its therapeutic effects in human breast cancer cell lines. The anti-tumor activity of Ad-RGD-hT-TK/NTR was significantly enhanced compared with Ad-hT-TK/NTR both in vitro and in vivo. This new vector platform provided a robust and simplified approach for capsid modification, and the fiber-modified Ad5 with double suicide genes under the control of hTERT promoter would be a useful gene therapy strategy for breast cancer. PMID:25031704

  12. Fiber optic temperature sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Morey, W. W.; Glenn, W. H.; Snitzer, E.

    1983-01-01

    A temperature sensor has been developed that utilizes the temperature dependent absorption of a rare earth doped optical fiber. The temperature measurement is localized at a remote position by splicing a short section of the rare earth fiber into a loop of commercial data communication fiber that sends and returns an optical probe signal to the temperature sensitive section of fiber. The optical probe signal is generated from two different wavelength filtered LED sources. A four port fiber optic coupler combines the two separate wavelength signals into the fiber sensing loop. Time multiplexing is used so that each signal wavelength is present at a different time. A reference signal level measurement is also made from the LED sources and a ratio taken with the sensor signal to produce a transmission measurement of the fiber loop. The transmission is affected differently at each wavelength by the rare earth temperature sensitive fiber. The temperature is determined from a ratio of the two transmission measurements. This method eliminates any ambiguity with respect to changes in signal level in the fiber loop such as mating and unmating optical connectors. The temperature range of the sensor is limited to about 800 C by the temperature limit fo the feed fibers.

  13. Coatings for Graphite Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galasso, F. S.; Scola, D. A.; Veltri, R. D.

    1980-01-01

    Several approaches for applying high resistance coatings continuously to graphite yarn were investigated. Two of the most promising approaches involved (1) chemically vapor depositing (CVD) SiC coatings on the surface of the fiber followed by oxidation, and (2) drawing the graphite yarn through an organo-silicone solution followed by heat treatments. In both methods, coated fibers were obtained which exhibited increased electrical resistances over untreated fibers and which were not degraded. This work was conducted in a previous program. In this program, the continuous CVD SiC coating process used on HTS fiber was extended to the coating of HMS, Celion 6000, Celion 12000 and T-300 graphite fiber. Electrical resistances three order of magnitude greater than the uncoated fiber were measured with no significant degradation of the fiber strength. Graphite fibers coated with CVD Si3N4 and BN had resistances greater than 10(exp 6) ohm/cm. Lower pyrolysis temperatures were used in preparing the silica-like coatings also resulting in resistances as high as three orders of magnitude higher than the uncoated fiber. The epoxy matrix composites prepared using these coated fibers had low shear strengths indicating that the coatings were weak.

  14. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-12-17

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  15. Efficient Gene Transduction of Dispersed Islet Cells in Culture Using Fiber-Modified Adenoviral Vectors

    PubMed Central

    Hanayama, Hiroyuki; Ohashi, Kazuo; Utoh, Rie; Shimizu, Hirofumi; Ise, Kazuya; Sakurai, Fuminori; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki; Tsuchiya, Hiroyuki; Okano, Teruo; Gotoh, Mitsukazu

    2015-01-01

    To establish novel islet-based therapies, our group has recently developed technologies for creating functional neo-islet tissues in the subcutaneous space by transplanting monolithic sheets of dispersed islet cells (islet cell sheets). Improving cellular function and viability are the next important challenges for enhancing the therapeutic effects. This article describes the adenoviral vector-mediated gene transduction of dispersed islet cells under culture conditions. Purified pancreatic islets were obtained from Lewis rats and dissociated into single islet cells. Cells were plated onto laminin-5-coated temperature-responsive polymer poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-immobilized plastic dishes. At 0 h, islet cells were infected for 1 h with either conventional type 5 adenoviral vector (Ad-CA-GFP) or fiber-modified adenoviral vector (AdK7-CA-GFP) harboring a polylysine (K7) peptide in the C terminus of the fiber knob. We investigated gene transduction efficiency at 48 h after infection and found that AdK7-CA-GFP yielded higher transduction efficiencies than Ad-CA-GFP at a multiplicity of infection (MOI) of 5 and 10. For AdK7-CA-GFP at MOI = 10, 84.4 ± 1.5% of islet cells were found to be genetically transduced without marked vector infection-related cellular damage as determined by viable cell number and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release assay. After AdK7-CA-GFP infection at MOI = 10, cells remained attached and expanded to nearly full confluency, showing that this adenoviral infection protocol is a feasible approach for creating islet cell sheets. We have shown that dispersed and cultured islet cells can be genetically modified efficiently using fiber-modified adenoviral vectors. Therefore, this gene therapy technique could be used for cellular modification or biological assessment of dispersed islet cells. PMID:26858906

  16. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOEpatents

    Davis, D.E.; Ingham, K.T.

    1987-04-28

    A flywheel comprising a hub having at least one radially projecting disc, an annular rim secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface. 2 figs.

  17. Fiber composite flywheel rim

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Donald E.; Ingham, Kenneth T.

    1987-01-01

    A flywheel 2 comprising a hub 4 having at least one radially projecting disc 6, an annular rim 14 secured to said disc and providing a surface circumferential to said hub, a first plurality of resin-impregnated fibers 22 wound about said rim congruent to said surface, and a shell 26 enclosing said first plurality of fibers and formed by a second plurality of resin-impregnated fibers wound about said rim tangentially to said surface.

  18. Fiber optic micro accelerometer

    DOEpatents

    Swierkowski, Steve P.

    2005-07-26

    An accelerometer includes a wafer, a proof mass integrated into the wafer, at least one spring member connected to the proof mass, and an optical fiber. A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially reflective surface on the proof mass and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. The two partially reflective surfaces are used to detect movement of the proof mass through the optical fiber, using an optical detection system.

  19. Continuous Fiber Ceramic Composites

    SciTech Connect

    2002-09-01

    Fiber-reinforced ceramic composites demonstrate the high-temperature stability of ceramics--with an increased fracture toughness resulting from the fiber reinforcement of the composite. The material optimization performed under the continuous fiber ceramic composites (CFCC) included a series of systematic optimizations. The overall goals were to define the processing window, to increase the robustinous of the process, to increase process yield while reducing costs, and to define the complexity of parts that could be fabricated.

  20. Fiber optic choline biosensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hong; Cao, Xiaojian; Jia, Ke; Chai, Xueting; Lu, Hua; Lu, Zuhong

    2001-10-01

    A fiber optic fluorescence biosensor for choline is introduced in this paper. Choline is an important neurotransmitter in mammals. Due to the growing needs for on-site clinical monitoring of the choline, much effect has been devoted to develop choline biosensors. Fiber-optic fluorescence biosensors have many advantages, including miniaturization, flexibility, and lack of electrical contact and interference. The choline fiber-optic biosensor we designed implemented a bifurcated fiber to perform fluorescence measurements. The light of the blue LED is coupled into one end of the fiber as excitation and the emission spectrum from sensing film is monitored by fiber-spectrometer (S2000, Ocean Optics) through the other end of the fiber. The sensing end of the fiber is coated with Nafion film dispersed with choline oxidase and oxygen sensitive luminescent Ru(II) complex (Tris(2,2'-bipyridyl)dichlororuthenium(II), hexahydrate). Choline oxidase catalyzes the oxidation of choline to betaine and hydrogen peroxide while consuming oxygen. The fluorescence intensity of oxygen- sensitive Ru(II) are related to the choline concentration. The response of the fiber-optic sensor in choline solution is represented and discussed. The result indicates a low-cost, high-performance, portable choline biosensor.

  1. ZBLAN, Silica Fiber Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    This graph depicts the increased signal quality possible with optical fibers made from ZBLAN, a family of heavy-metal fluoride glasses (fluorine combined zirconium, barium, lanthanum, aluminum, and sodium) as compared to silica fibers. NASA is conducting research on pulling ZBLAN fibers in the low-g environment of space to prevent crystallization that limits ZBLAN's usefulness in optical fiber-based communications. In the graph, a line closer to the black theoretical maximum line is better. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  2. Plasmonics: An ultrafast plasmonic tuning knob

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagner, Martin; Liu, Mengkun

    2016-04-01

    Near- and mid-infrared plasmonics are exciting research areas with applications in nanoscale energy concentration, sensing or ultrafast switching for telecommunication. Now, a new efficient way to manipulate plasmon resonances in semiconductor nanoarrays at ultrafast timescales has been found.

  3. Hermetically coated specialty optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semjonov, Sergey L.; Bogatyrev, Vladimir A.; Malinin, Alexei A.

    2010-10-01

    Manufacturing processes for different types of hermetically coated fibers are described. Optical and mechanical properties of metal and carbon coated fibers are compared. Prospects of application of both types of hermetically coated fibers in special applications are discussed.

  4. Splicing Efficiently Couples Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, G. F.

    1985-01-01

    Method of splicing single-mode optical fibers results in very low transmission losses through joined fiber ends. Coupling losses between joined optical-fiber ends only 0.1 dB. Method needs no special operator training.

  5. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. ... of the stool. There are two types of dietary fiber, soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber retains water and ...

  6. Ultrafine PBI fibers and yarns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leal, J. R.; Tan, M.

    1979-01-01

    Gentle precisely controlled process is used to draw polybenzimidazole (PBI) fibers to denier as low as 0.17 per fiber. Yarns of lightweight fibers could be useful in applications where lightweight textiles must withstand high temperatures, corrosion, or radiation.

  7. An Adenovirus Vector with Genetically Modified Fibers Demonstrates Expanded Tropism via Utilization of a Coxsackievirus and Adenovirus Receptor-Independent Cell Entry Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Dmitriev, Igor; Krasnykh, Victor; Miller, C. Ryan; Wang, Minghui; Kashentseva, Elena; Mikheeva, Galina; Belousova, Natalya; Curiel, David T.

    1998-01-01

    Recombinant adenoviruses (Ad) have become the vector system of choice for a variety of gene therapy applications. However, the utility of Ad vectors is limited due to the low efficiency of Ad-mediated gene transfer to cells expressing marginal levels of the coxsackievirus and adenovirus receptor (CAR). In order to achieve CAR-independent gene transfer by Ad vectors in clinically important contexts, we proposed modification of viral tropism via genetic alterations to the viral fiber protein. We have shown that incorporation of an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD)-containing peptide in the HI loop of the fiber knob domain results in the ability of the virus to utilize an alternative receptor during the cell entry process. We have also demonstrated that due to its expanded tissue tropism, this novel vector is capable of efficient transduction of primary tumor cells. An increase in gene transfer to ovarian cancer cells of 2 to 3 orders of magnitude was demonstrated by the vector, suggesting that recombinant Ad containing fibers with an incorporated RGD peptide may be of great utility for treatment of neoplasms characterized by deficiency of the primary Ad type 5 receptor. PMID:9811704

  8. ROLE OF FIBER MODIFICATION IN NATURAL FIBER COMPOSITE PROCESSING

    SciTech Connect

    Fifield, Leonard S.; Denslow, Kayte M.; Gutowska, Anna; Simmons, Kevin L.; Holbery, Jim

    2005-11-03

    The prediction and characterization of the adhesion between fiber, surface treatment, and polymer is critical to the success of large-scale natural fiber based polymer composites in automotive semi-structural application. The two primary factors limiting the use of natural fiber in polymer composites are fiber moisture uptake and fiber degradation during high-temperature processing. In this study, we have developed several fiber surface modification techniques and analyzed the fiber-polymer adhesion of modified fibers to more clearly understand the critical parameters controlling moisture uptake, swelling, and fiber degradation due to interfacial structure. We will present a overview of surface modification techniques we have applied to date for hemp fiber sources, and illustrate a path to characterize surface modification effects on natural fiber adhesion in thermoplastic composites.

  9. Super capacitor with fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Farmer, Joseph Collin; Kaschmitter, James

    2015-02-17

    An electrical cell apparatus includes a first current collector made of a multiplicity of fibers, a second current collector spaced from the first current collector; and a separator disposed between the first current collector and the second current collector. The fibers are contained in a foam.

  10. Low dielectric polyimide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorogy, William E., Jr. (Inventor); St.clair, Anne K. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A high temperature resistant polyimide fiber that has a dielectric constant of less than 3 is presented. The fiber was prepared by first reacting 2,2-bis (4-(4aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane with 2,2-bis (3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride in an aprotic solvent to form a polyamic acid resin solution. The polyamic acid resin solution is then extruded into a coagulation medium to form polyamic acid fibers. The fibers are thermally cured to their polyimide form. Alternatively, 2,2-bis(4-(4-aminophenoxy)phenyl) hexafluoropropane is reacted with 2,2-bis(3,4-dicarboxyphenyl) hexafluoropropane dianhydride to form a polyamic acid, and the polyamic acid is chemically converted to its polyimide form. The polyimide is then dissolved in a solvent to form a polyimide resin solution, and the polyimide resin is extruded into a coagulation medium to form a polyimide wet gel filament. In order to obtain polyimide fibers of increased tensile properties, the polyimide wet gel filaments are stretched at elevated temperatures. The tensile properties of the fibers were measured and found to be in the range of standard textile fibers. Polyimide fibers obtained by either method will have a dielectric constant similar to that of the corresponding polymer, viz., less than 3 at 10 GHz.

  11. Diamond fiber field emitters

    DOEpatents

    Blanchet-Fincher, Graciela B.; Coates, Don M.; Devlin, David J.; Eaton, David F.; Silzars, Aris K.; Valone, Steven M.

    1996-01-01

    A field emission electron emitter comprising an electrode formed of at least one diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon composite fiber, said composite fiber having a non-diamond core and a diamond, diamond-like carbon or glassy carbon coating on said non-diamond core, and electronic devices employing such a field emission electron emitter.

  12. FLAX FIBER IN TEXTILES

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    REFINED, SHORT STAPLE FLAX FIBER CAN BE BLENDED WITH COTTON AND SPUN ON DRY SYSTEMS THAT ARE PREVALENT IN THE U.S. RESEARCH IS REQUIRED TO OPTIMIZE THE FIBER PROPERTIES AND THE PROCESSING SYSTEMS TO MORE EFFICIENTLY BLEND FLAX WITH COTTON. INCLUSION OF FLAX WITH COTTON PROVIDES YARN AND FABRIC PROPE...

  13. MEGARA fiber bundles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pérez-Calpena, A.; García-Vargas, María. Luisa; Arrillaga, X.; Gil de Paz, A.; Sánchez-Blanco, E.; Martínez-Delgado, I.; Carrera, M. A.; Gallego, J.; Carrasco, E.; Sánchez-Moreno, F. M.; Iglesias-Páramo, J.

    2014-07-01

    MEGARA (Multi Espectrógrafo en GTC de Alta Resolución para Astronomía) is the future optical Integral-Field Unit (IFU) and Multi-Object Spectrograph (MOS) for the 10.4-m Gran Telescopio CANARIAS (GTC). MEGARA has three different fiber bundles, the Large Central Bundle covering 12.5 arcsec x 11.3 arcsec on sky, the Small Compact Bundle, of 8.5 arcsec x 6.7 arcsec, and a Fiber MOS positioner system that is able to place up to 100 mini-bundles with 7 fibers each in MOS configuration within a 3.5 arcmin x 3.5 arcmin FOV. The MEGARA focal plane subsystems are located at one of the GTC Folded Cassegrain focal stations. A field lens provides a telecentric focal plane, where the fibers are located. Micro-lenses arrays couple the telescope beam to the collimator focal ratio at the entrance of the fibers. Finally, the fibers, organized in bundles conducted the light from the focal plane to the pseudo-slit plates at the entrance of the MEGARA spectrograph, which shall be located at one of the Nasmyth platforms. This article also summarizes the prototypes already done and describes the set-up that shall be used to integrate fibers and micro-lens and characterize the fiber bundles.

  14. Fiber Sensor Technology Today

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotate, Kazuo

    2006-08-01

    Fiber sensor technologies are overviewed. Since the early 1970s, this field has been developed, on the basis of the same devices and photonic principles as fiber communication technologies. Besides simple configurations, in which the fiber acts only as a data transmission line, sophisticated configurations have also been developed, in which the fiber is used as a device to realize unique sensing mechanisms. The fiber optic gyroscope (FOG) is a good example, and has been developed as an absolute rotation sensor used, for example, for navigation and/or attitude control applications. Compared with traditional spinning-mass gyroscopes, the FOG has advantages, such as a short warming-up time, a light weight, and easy handling. A Japanese satellite, which was launched in August 2005 with a mission to observe the aurora, is controlled with a FOG. The FOG has also been used in consumer applications, such as the camera stabilizer, radio-controlled (RC) helicopter navigation, and the control of humanoid robots. Recently, distributed and multiplexed sensing schemes, in particular, have been studied and developed, in which a long fiber acts like a “nerve” for feeling the strain and/or the temperature distribution along the fiber. Performances of artificial nerve systems have markedly improved within the last couple of years, in spatial resolution and measurement speed. By embedding the “fiber-optic nerve system” in aircraft wings, bridges and tall buildings, these materials and structures can sense damage to prevent disasters.

  15. Infrared optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drexhage, Martin G.; Moynihan, Cornelius T.

    1988-11-01

    The development of IR optical fibers for medical, laser, industrial, and telecommunications applications is discussed. IR studies of single and polycrystalline materials, chalcogenide glasses, and heavy-metal fluoride glasses are reviewed. It is suggested that heavy-metal fluoride glasses are the best prospects for obtaining optical losses lower than those in high-quality silica fibers.

  16. Multimode optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Bigot-Astruc, Marianne; Molin, Denis; Sillard, Pierre

    2014-11-04

    A depressed graded-index multimode optical fiber includes a central core, an inner depressed cladding, a depressed trench, an outer depressed cladding, and an outer cladding. The central core has an alpha-index profile. The depressed claddings limit the impact of leaky modes on optical-fiber performance characteristics (e.g., bandwidth, core size, and/or numerical aperture).

  17. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, A.; Yen, S. P. S.; Klein, E. (Inventor)

    1976-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, crosslinked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  18. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  19. Ion-exchange hollow fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rembaum, Alan (Inventor); Yen, Shiao-Ping S. (Inventor); Klein, Elias (Inventor)

    1977-01-01

    An ion-exchange hollow fiber is prepared by introducing into the wall of the fiber polymerizable liquid monomers, and polymerizing the monomers therein to form solid, insoluble, cross-linked, ion-exchange resin particles which embed in the wall of the fiber. Excess particles blocking the central passage or bore of the fiber are removed by forcing liquid through the fiber. The fibers have high ion-exchange capacity, a practical wall permeability and good mechanical strength even with very thin wall dimensions. Experimental investigation of bundles of ion-exchange hollow fibers attached to a header assembly have shown the fiber to be very efficient in removing counterions from solution.

  20. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-10-04

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  1. Fluorescent fiber diagnostics

    DOEpatents

    Toeppen, John S.

    1994-01-01

    A fluorescent fiber (13) having a doped core (16) is pumped (11) by light (18) of a relatively short wavelength to produce fluorescence at a longer wavelength that is detected by detector (24). The level of fluorescence is monitored (26) and evaluated to provide information as to the excitation of the fiber (13) or the environment thereof. In particular, the level of intensity of the detected fluorescence may be used to measure the intensity of a light beam (18) passing axially through an optical fiber system (12) (FIG. 1 ), or the intensity of a light beam (46) passing radially through a fluorescent fiber (13) (FIG. 2 ), or the level of a fluid (32) in a tank (31) (FIG. 3 ), or a scintillation event (37) in a fluorescent fiber (13) pumped to produce amplification of the scintillation event (FIG. 4 ).

  2. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, Paul J.; Davis, Donald T.

    1994-01-01

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optic fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends.

  3. Fiber optic attenuator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buzzetti, Mike F. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A fiber optic attenuator of the invention is a mandrel structure through which a bundle of optical fibers is wrapped around in a complete circle. The mandrel structure includes a flexible cylindrical sheath through which the bundle passes. A set screw on the mandrel structure impacts one side of the sheath against two posts on the opposite side of the sheath. By rotating the screw, the sheath is deformed to extend partially between the two posts, bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius controlled by rotating the set screw. Bending the fiber optic bundle to a small radius causes light in each optical fiber to be lost in the cladding, the amount depending upon the radius about which the bundle is bent.

  4. Python fiber optic seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-08-01

    Sandia National Laboratories has developed a high security fiber optic seal that incorporates tamper resistance features that are not available in commercial fiber optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking that component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that will record the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program then compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL is also developing a Polaroid reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  5. Fiber optic hydrophone

    DOEpatents

    Kuzmenko, P.J.; Davis, D.T.

    1994-05-10

    A miniature fiber optic hydrophone based on the principles of a Fabry-Perot interferometer is disclosed. The hydrophone, in one embodiment, includes a body having a shaped flexible bladder at one end which defines a volume containing air or suitable gas, and including a membrane disposed adjacent a vent. An optical fiber extends into the body with one end terminating in spaced relation to the membrane. Acoustic waves in the water that impinge on the bladder cause the pressure of the volume therein to vary causing the membrane to deflect and modulate the reflectivity of the Fabry-Perot cavity formed by the membrane surface and the cleaved end of the optical fiber disposed adjacent to the membrane. When the light is transmitted down the optical fiber, the reflected signal is amplitude modulated by the incident acoustic wave. Another embodiment utilizes a fluid filled volume within which the fiber optic extends. 2 figures.

  6. Method for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, and carbon fibers made thereby

    SciTech Connect

    Naskar, Amit Kumar; Hunt, Marcus Andrew; Saito, Tomonori

    2015-08-04

    Methods for the preparation of carbon fiber from polyolefin fiber precursor, wherein the polyolefin fiber precursor is partially sulfonated and then carbonized to produce carbon fiber. Methods for producing hollow carbon fibers, wherein the hollow core is circular- or complex-shaped, are also described. Methods for producing carbon fibers possessing a circular- or complex-shaped outer surface, which may be solid or hollow, are also described.

  7. Fiber Pulling Apparatus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.; OBrien, Sue; Adcock, Leonard

    1998-01-01

    The fiber optics industry has grown into a multi-billion marketplace that will continue to grow into the 21st century. Optical fiber communications is currently dominated by silica glass technology. Successful efforts to improve upon the low loss transmission characteristics of silica fibers have propelled the technology into the forefront of the communications industry. However, reaching the theoretical transmission capability of silica fiber through improved processing has still left a few application areas in which other fiber systems can provide an influential role due to specific characteristics of high theoretical transmission in the 2 - 3 micron wavelength region. One of the other major materials used for optical fibers is the systems based upon Heavy Metal Fluoride Glass (HMFG). Commercial interest is driven primarily by the potential for low loss repeaterless infrared fibers. An example of the major communications marketplace which would benefit from the long distance repeaterless capability of infrared fibers is the submarine cables which link the continents. When considering commercial interests, optical fiber systems provide a healthy industrial position which continues to expand. Major investments in the systems used for optical fiber communications have continued to increase each year and are predicted to continue well into the next century. Estimates of 8.5% compounded annually are predicted through 1999 for the North American market and 1 1 % worldwide. The growth for the optical fiber cable itself is expected to continue between 44 and 50 per cent of the optical fiber communications budget through 1999. The total budget in 1999 world-wide is expected to be in the neighborhood of $9 billion. Another survey predicts that long haul telecommunications represents 15% of a world-wide fiber optics market in 1998. The actual amount allotted to cable was not specified. However, another market research had predicted that the cable costs alone represents more

  8. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1992-10-06

    An apparatus and method are described for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer. 4 figs.

  9. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, B.R.; Prather, W.S.

    1991-01-01

    Apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading, by a single spectrophotometer.

  10. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    DOEpatents

    Buchanan, Bruce R.; Prather, William S.

    1992-01-01

    An apparatus and method for detecting a chemical substance by exposing an optic fiber having a core and a cladding to the chemical substance so that the chemical substance can be adsorbed onto the surface of the cladding. The optic fiber is coiled inside a container having a pair of valves for controlling the entrance and exit of the substance. Light from a light source is received by one end of the optic fiber, preferably external to the container, and carried by the core of the fiber. Adsorbed substance changes the transmissivity of the fiber as measured by a spectrophotometer at the other end, also preferably external to the container. Hydrogen is detected by the absorption of infrared light carried by an optic fiber with a silica cladding. Since the adsorption is reversible, a sensor according to the present invention can be used repeatedly. Multiple positions in a process system can be monitored using a single container that can be connected to each location to be monitored so that a sample can be obtained for measurement, or, alternatively, containers can be placed near each position and the optic fibers carrying the partially-absorbed light can be multiplexed for rapid sequential reading by a single spectrophotometer.

  11. Fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Frosch, T.; Yan, D.; Hanf, S.; Popp, J.

    2014-05-01

    Fiber enhanced Raman sensing is presented for versatile and extremely sensitive analysis of pharmaceutical drugs and biogenic gases. Elaborated micro-structured optical fibers guide the light with very low losses within their hollow core and provide at the same time a miniaturized sample container for the analytes. Thus, fiber enhanced Raman spectroscopy (FERS) allows for chemically selective detection of minimal sample amounts with high sensitivity. Two examples are presented in this contribution: (i) the detection of picomolar concentrations of pharmaceutical drugs; and (ii) the analysis of biogenic gases within a complex mixture of gases with analytical sensitivities in the ppm range.

  12. Nanotube composite carbon fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andrews, R.; Jacques, D.; Rao, A. M.; Rantell, T.; Derbyshire, F.; Chen, Y.; Chen, J.; Haddon, R. C.

    1999-08-01

    Single walled carbon nanotubes (SWNTs) were dispersed in isotropic petroleum pitch matrices to form nanotube composite carbon fibers with enhanced mechanical and electrical properties. We find that the tensile strength, modulus, and electrical conductivity of a pitch composite fiber with 5 wt % loading of purified SWNTs are enhanced by ˜90%, ˜150%, and 340% respectively, as compared to the corresponding values in unmodified isotropic pitch fibers. These results serve to highlight the potential that exits for developing a spectrum of material properties through the selection of the matrix, nanotube dispersion, alignment, and interfacial bonding.

  13. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, R.P.

    1957-09-17

    An instrument carried unobtrusively about the person such as in a finger ring to indicate when that person has been exposed to an unusual radiation hazard is described. A metallized quartz fiber is electrically charged to indicate a full scale reading on an etched glass background. The quartz fiber and the scale may be viewed through a magnifying lens for ease of reading. Incident radiation will ionize gaseous particles in the sealed structure thereby allowing the charge to leak off the quartz fiber with its resulting movement across the scale proportionally indicating the radiation exposure.

  14. Fiber optic communication links

    SciTech Connect

    Meyer, R. H.

    1980-01-01

    Fiber optics is a new, emerging technology which offers relief from many of the problems which limited past communications links. Its inherent noise immunity and high bandwidth open the door for new designs with greater capabilities. Being a new technology, certain problems can be encountered in specifying and installing a fiber optic link. A general fiber optic system is discussed with emphasis on the advantages and disadvantages. It is not intended to be technical in nature, but a general discussion. Finally, a general purpose prototype Sandia communications link is presented.

  15. Muscle Fiber Types and Training.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Karp, Jason R.

    2001-01-01

    The specific types of fibers that make up individual muscles greatly influence how people will adapt to their training programs. This paper explains the complexities of skeletal muscles, focusing on types of muscle fibers (slow-twitch and fast-twitch), recruitment of muscle fibers to perform a motor task, and determining fiber type. Implications…

  16. Fiber-Reinforced Composite Foam

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A two-phase method for making fiber-reinforced compositions was developed to achieve uniform fiber dispersion in a composite matrix. The first phase involved mixing together water, fibers, and a portion of a fiber dispersant to form a viscous composition. The high viscosity imparted by the dispersa...

  17. Carbon Fiber Risk Analysis. [conference

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The scope and status of the effort to assess the risks associated with the accidental release of carbon/graphite fibers from civil aircraft is presented. Vulnerability of electrical and electronic equipment to carbon fibers, dispersal of carbon fibers, effectiveness of filtering systems, impact of fiber induced failures, and risk methodology are among the topics covered.

  18. Fiber optics: A research paper

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drone, Melinda M.

    1987-01-01

    Some basic aspects concerning fiber optics are examined. Some history leading up to the development of optical fibers which are now used in the transmission of data in many areas of the world is discussed. Basic theory of the operation of fiber optics is discussed along with methods for improving performance of the optical fiber through much research and design. Splices and connectors are compared and short haul and long haul fiber optic networks are discussed. Fiber optics plays many roles in the commercial world. The use of fiber optics for communication applications is emphasized.

  19. Fiber bundle phase conjugate mirror

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, Benjamin G.

    2012-05-01

    An improved method and apparatus for passively conjugating the phases of a distorted wavefronts resulting from optical phase mismatch between elements of a fiber laser array are disclosed. A method for passively conjugating a distorted wavefront comprises the steps of: multiplexing a plurality of probe fibers and a bundle pump fiber in a fiber bundle array; passing the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle array through a collimating lens and into one portion of a non-linear medium; passing the output from a pump collection fiber through a focusing lens and into another portion of the non-linear medium so that the output from the pump collection fiber mixes with the multiplexed output from the fiber bundle; adjusting one or more degrees of freedom of one or more of the fiber bundle array, the collimating lens, the focusing lens, the non-linear medium, or the pump collection fiber to produce a standing wave in the non-linear medium.

  20. Fiber optic data transmission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shreve, Steven T.

    1987-01-01

    The Ohio University Avionics Engineering Center is currently developing a fiber optic data bus transmission and reception system that could eventually replace copper cable connections in airplanes. The original form of the system will transmit information from an encoder to a transponder via a fiber optic cable. An altimeter and an altitude display are connected to a fiber optic transmitter by copper cable. The transmitter converts the altimetry data from nine bit parallel to serial form and send these data through a fiber optic cable to a receiver. The receiver converts the data using a cable similar to that used between the altimeter and display. The transmitting and receiving ends also include a display readout. After completion and ground testing of the data bus, the system will be tested in an airborne environment.

  1. Ways to Boost Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... and Reproduction Top Articles dad holding baby at apple orchard - Kidney Disease: High- and Moderate-Potassium Foods ... lower its fiber content. For example, one medium apple with the peel contains 4.4 grams of ...

  2. Carbon Fibers and Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    The basic nature of composite materials is considered. Carbon fiber composites and their area of current and planned application in civil aircraft are discussed, specifically within the framework of the various aspects of risk analysis.

  3. Fiber optic gas sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Peng (Inventor); Buric, Michael P. (Inventor); Swinehart, Philip R. (Inventor); Maklad, Mokhtar S. (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A gas sensor includes an in-fiber resonant wavelength device provided in a fiber core at a first location. The fiber propagates a sensing light and a power light. A layer of a material is attached to the fiber at the first location. The material is able to absorb the gas at a temperature dependent gas absorption rate. The power light is used to heat the material and increases the gas absorption rate, thereby increasing sensor performance, especially at low temperatures. Further, a method is described of flash heating the gas sensor to absorb more of the gas, allowing the sensor to cool, thereby locking in the gas content of the sensor material, and taking the difference between the starting and ending resonant wavelengths as an indication of the concentration of the gas in the ambient atmosphere.

  4. Hollow-Fiber Clinostat

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhodes, Percy H.; Miller, Teresa Y.; Snyder, Robert S.

    1990-01-01

    Hollow-fiber clinostat, is bioreactor used to study growth and other behavior of cells in simulated microgravity. Cells under study contained in porous hollow fiber immersed in culture medium inside vessel. Bores in hollow fiber allow exchange of gases, nutrients, and metabolic waste products between living cells and external culture media. Hollow fiber lies on axis of vessel, rotated by motor equipped with torque and speed controls. Desired temperature maintained by operating clinostat in standard tissue-culture incubator. Axis of rotation made horizontal or vertical. Designed for use with conventional methods of sterilization and sanitation to prevent contamination of specimen. Also designed for asepsis in assembly, injection of specimen, and exchange of medium.

  5. Fiber and Your Child

    MedlinePlus

    ... pears green peas legumes (dried beans, split peas, lentils, etc.) artichokes almonds A high-fiber food has ... salsa, taco sauce, and cheese for dinner. Add lentils or whole-grain barley to soups. Create mini- ...

  6. Fiber-Scanned Microdisplays

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crossman-Bosworth, Janet; Seibel, Eric

    2010-01-01

    Helmet- and head-mounted display systems, denoted fiber-scanned microdisplays, have been proposed to provide information in an "augmented reality" format (meaning that the information would be optically overlaid on the user's field of view).

  7. Cerenkov fiber sampling calorimeters

    SciTech Connect

    Arrington, K.; Kefford, D.; Kennedy, J.; Pisani, R.; Sanzeni, C.; Segall, K.; Wall, D.; Winn, D.R. ); Carey, R.; Dye, S.; Miller, J.; Sulak, L.; Worstell, W. ); Efremenko, Y.; Kamyshkov, Y.; Savin, A.; Shmakov, K.; Tarkovsky, E. )

    1994-08-01

    Clear optical fibers were used as a Cerenkov sampling media in Pb (electromagnetic) and Cu (hadron) absorbers in spaghetti calorimeters, for high rate and high radiation dose experiments, such as the forward region of high energy colliders. The fiber axes were aligned close to the direction of the incident particles (1[degree]--7[degree]). The 7 [lambda] deep hadron tower contained 2.8% by volume 1.5 mm diameter core clear plastic fibers. The 27 radiation length deep electromagnetic towers had packing fractions of 6.8% and 7.2% of 1 mm diameter core quartz fibers as the active Cerenkov sampling medium. The energy resolution on electrons and pions, energy response, pulse shapes and angular studies are presented.

  8. High-fiber foods

    MedlinePlus

    ... potatoes with skin Broccoli, artichokes, squashes, and string beans Vegetable smoothies You can also get more fiber by eating: Legumes, such as lentils, black beans, split peas, kidney beans, lima beans, and chickpeas ...

  9. Simulating Optical Fibers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Edgar, Dale

    1988-01-01

    Described is a demonstration of Snell's law using a laser beam and an optical fiber. Provided are the set-up method of the demonstration apparatus and some practical suggestions including "index matching" technique using vaseline. (YP)

  10. Fiber Optics: No Illusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American School and University, 1983

    1983-01-01

    A campus computer center at Hofstra University (New York) that holds 70 terminals for student use was first a gymnasium, then a language laboratory. Strands of fiber optics are used for the necessary wiring. (MLF)

  11. ZBLAN Fiber Comparison

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Sections of ZBLAN fibers pulled in a conventional 1-g process (left) and in experiments aboard NASA's KC-135 low-gravity aircraft. The rough surface of the 1-g fiber indicates surface defects that would scatter an optical signal and greatly degrade its quality. ZBLAN is part of the family of heavy-metal fluoride glasses (fluorine combined zirconium, barium, lanthanum, aluminum, and sodium). NASA is conducting research on pulling ZBLAN fibers in the low-g environment of space to prevent crystallization that limits ZBLAN's usefulness in optical fiber-based communications. ZBLAN is a heavy-metal fluoride glass that shows exceptional promise for high-throughput communications with infrared lasers. Photo credit: NASA/Marshall Space Flight Center

  12. Fiber-modified adenovirus vectors decrease liver toxicity through reduced IL-6 production.

    PubMed

    Koizumi, Naoya; Yamaguchi, Tomoko; Kawabata, Kenji; Sakurai, Fuminori; Sasaki, Tomomi; Watanabe, Yoshiteru; Hayakawa, Takao; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2007-02-01

    Adenovirus (Ad) vectors are one of the most commonly used viral vectors in gene therapy clinical trials. However, they elicit a robust innate immune response and inflammatory responses. Improvement of the therapeutic index of Ad vector gene therapy requires elucidation of the mechanism of Ad vector-induced inflammation and cytokine/chemokine production as well as development of the safer vector. In the present study, we found that the fiber-modified Ad vector containing poly-lysine peptides in the fiber knob showed much lower serum IL-6 and aspartate aminotransferase levels (as a maker of liver toxicity) than the conventional Ad vector after i.v. administration, although the modified Ad vector showed higher transgene production in the liver than the conventional Ad vector. RT-PCR analysis showed that spleen, not liver, is the major site of cytokine, chemokine, and IFN expression. Splenic CD11c(+) cells were found to secret cytokines. The tissue distribution of Ad vector DNA showed that spleen distribution was much reduced in this modified Ad vector, reflecting reduced IL-6 levels in serum. Liver toxicity by the conventional Ad vector was reduced by anti-IL-6R Ab, suggesting that IL-6 signaling is involved in liver toxicity and that decreased liver toxicity of the modified Ad vector was due in part to the reduced IL-6 production. This study contributes to an understanding of the biological mechanism in innate immune host responses and liver toxicity toward systemically administered Ad vectors and will help in designing safer gene therapy methods that can reduce robust innate immunity and inflammatory responses. PMID:17237426

  13. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, Stanley H.; Warren, Mial Evans; Snipes, Jr., Morris Burton; Armendariz, Marcelino Guadalupe; Word, V., James Cole

    1997-01-01

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring.

  14. Fiber alignment apparatus and method

    DOEpatents

    Kravitz, S.H.; Warren, M.E.; Snipes, M.B. Jr.; Armendariz, M.G.; Word, J.C. V

    1997-08-19

    A fiber alignment apparatus includes a micro-machined nickel spring that captures and locks arrays of single mode fibers into position. The design consists of a movable nickel leaf shaped spring and a fixed pocket where fibers are held. The fiber is slid between the spring and a fixed block, which tensions the spring. When the fiber reaches the pocket, it automatically falls into the pocket and is held by the pressure of the leaf spring. 8 figs.

  15. Fiber implantation for pattern baldness.

    PubMed

    Hanke, C W; Bergfeld, W F

    1979-01-12

    Examination of 20 patients who had fiber implantation for the treatment of pattern baldness showed that nearly all the fibers had fallen out by ten weeks. Complications observed were facial swelling, infection, foreign-body granulomas, scarring, and permanent hair loss. Scanning electron microscopy identified the fibers as modacrylic fibers. The complications, high monetary cost, and ultimate futility of fiber implantation make it an unacceptable procedure. PMID:364078

  16. [Carbohydrates and fiber].

    PubMed

    Lajolo, F M; de Menezes, E W; Filisetti-Cozzi, T M

    1988-09-01

    Dietary carbohydrates comprise two fractions that may be classified as digestible, and which are useful as energy sources (simple and complex carbohydrates) and fiber, which is presumed to be of no use to the human body. There are insufficient epidemiologic data on the metabolic effects of simple carbohydrates and it is not advisable to make quantitative recommendations of intake. It is questionable to recommend in developing countries that a fixed proportion of dietary energy be derived from simple sugars, due to the high prevalence of deficient energy intake, cultural habits, and regional differences in food intake and physical activity. In relation to recommendations of complex carbohydrates, it should be considered that their absorption is influenced by many factors inherent to the individual and to the foods. Fiber is defined as a series of different substances derived from tissue structures, cellular residues and undigested chemical substances that may be partially utilized after intestinal bacteria have acted on them. There is not a clear definition of the chemical composition of fiber, but it consists mainly of polysaccharides (such as cellulose, hemicellulose and pectins), lignin and end products of the interactions of various food components. The effects of fiber, such as control of food intake, regulation of gastrointestinal transit, post-prandial blood concentrations of cholesterol, glucose and insulin, flatulence and alterations in nutrient bioavailability are due to various physical properties inherent to its chemical components. Impairment of nutrient absorption may be harmful, mainly among populations whose food intake is lower than their energy needs, and with a high fiber content. This may be particularly important in pregnant women, growing children and the elderly, and should be considered when making nutrient recommendations. A precise knowledge of fiber is also important to calculate the real energy value of foods, mainly for two reasons: 1

  17. Infrared fiber optic materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feigelson, Robert S.

    1987-01-01

    The development of IR fiber optics for use in astronomical and other space applications is summarized. Candidate materials were sought for use in the 1 to 200 micron and the 200 to 1000 micron wavelength range. Synthesis and optical characterization were carried out on several of these materials in bulk form. And the fabrication of a few materials in single crystal fiber optic form were studied.

  18. Production of mullite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tucker, Dennis S. (Inventor); Sparks, J. Scott (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Disclosed here is a process for making mullite fibers wherein a hydrolizable silicon compound and an aluminum compound in the form of a difunctional aluminum chelate are hydrolized to form sols using water and an alcohol with a catalytic amount of hydrochloric acid. The sols are mixed in a molar ratio of aluminum to silicon of 3 to 1 and, under polycondensation conditions, a fibrous gel is formed. From this gel the mullite fibers can be produced.

  19. Fiber optics welder

    DOEpatents

    Higgins, R.W.; Robichaud, R.E.

    A system is described for welding fiber optic waveguides together. The ends of the two fibers to be joined together are accurately, collinearly aligned in a vertical orientation and subjected to a controlled, diffuse arc to effect welding and thermal conditioning. A front-surfaced mirror mounted at a 45/sup 0/ angle to the optical axis of a stereomicroscope mounted for viewing the junction of the ends provides two orthogonal views of the interface during the alignment operation.

  20. Fiber optic detector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Partin, Judy K.; Ward, Thomas E.; Grey, Alan E.

    1990-04-01

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  1. Squeezing in Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boivin, Luc

    The generation of squeezed radiation in single -mode optical fibers is discussed. A self-consistent theory for the quantum propagation of pulses in dispersive and Raman active fibers is developed. A numerical implementation of the corresponding linearized noise theory is presented. This code was used to design a new fiber squeezer operating at 830nm. A closed-form solution to the nonlinear, stochastic and integro-differential equation for the quantum envelope is found at zero dispersion. We use this solution to study the resonance-fluorescence spectrum of a fiber excited by a monochromatic laser field. We also evaluate the mean field and the squeezing level for fiber lengths where the linearized approximation is no longer valid. The predictions of this continuous-time theory are compared with those of the discretized-time model. We show that quantum revivals predicted by the latter are spurious. We show that the linearized approximation in the soliton regime is valid for nonlinear phase shifts up to n_0^ {1/4}. The noise of the four soliton operators is shown to be minimized in a Poisson-Gaussian soliton state. We propose a new method for generating squeezed vacuum using a low birefringence fiber. This method relies on cross-phase modulation between modes with orthogonal polarizations, and does not require a interferometric geometry. We predict the nonlinear depolarization of an intense linearly polarized pulse coupled into a low birefringence fiber due to its interaction with quantum noise. Finally, progress in the construction of a fiber squeezer driven by a high repetition rate modelocked Ti:Sapphire laser is reported. (Copies available exclusively from MIT Libraries, Rm. 14-0551, Cambridge, MA 02139-4307. Ph. 617-253-5668; Fax 617-253-1690.).

  2. Fiber optic detector

    SciTech Connect

    Partin, J.K.; Ward, T.E.; Grey, A.E.

    1990-12-31

    This invention is comprised of a portable fiber optic detector that senses the presence of specific target chemicals by exchanging the target chemical for a fluorescently-tagged antigen that is bound to an antibody which is in turn attached to an optical fiber. Replacing the fluorescently-tagged antigen reduces the fluorescence so that a photon sensing detector records the reduced light level and activates an appropriate alarm or indicator.

  3. Emergence of fiber supercapacitors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Dingshan; Qian, Qihui; Wei, Li; Jiang, Wenchao; Goh, Kunli; Wei, Jun; Zhang, Jie; Chen, Yuan

    2015-02-01

    Supercapacitors (SCs) are energy storage devices which have high power density and long cycle life. Conventional SCs have two-dimensional planar structures. As a new family of SCs, fiber SCs utilize one-dimensional cylindrically shaped fibers as electrodes. They have attracted significant interest since 2011 and have shown great application potential either as micro-scale devices to complement or even replace micro-batteries in miniaturized electronics and microelectromechanical systems or as macro-scale devices for wearable electronics or smart textiles. This tutorial review provides an essential introduction to this new field. We first introduce the basics of performance evaluation for fiber SCs as a foundation to understand different research approaches and the diverse performance metrics reported in the literature. Next, we summarize the current state-of-the-art progress in structure design and electrode fabrication of fiber SCs. This is followed by a discussion on the integration of multiple fiber SCs and the combination with other energy harvesting or storage devices. Last, we present our perspectives on the future development of fiber SCs and highlight key technical challenges with the hope of stimulating further research progress. PMID:25420877

  4. Advances in infrared fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Guangming; Abouraddy, Ayman F.

    2015-05-01

    Infrared (IR) fibers that transmit radiation at wavelengths from ~ 2 μm up to ~ 25 μm, a spectrum that extends across both the mid-IR (MIR) and far-IR (FIR), has gained extensive attention concomitant with the recent availability of MIR semiconductors sources and detectors. Chalcogenide glasses (ChGs) are a leading candidate for IR fibers by virtue of their wide optical transmission windows and high nonlinearity in the IR region. After extensive studies since the 1960s, the development and applications of ChG IR fibers are primarily hindered by their unfavorable mechanical properties. Here, we summarize our recent advances in low-cost, robust multimaterial ChG IR fibers with broad transmission windows and low optical losses, based on our multimaterial fiber preforms produced by several fabrication methodologies. Hundreds of meters of fibers are thermally drawn in an ambient atmosphere with desired step-index structure from a macroscopic multimaterial preform that contains few grams of ChG. These simple and efficient processes overcome many of the traditional obstacles, and therefore enable rapid production in an industrial setting.

  5. Electrospun Amplified Fiber Optics

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    All-optical signal processing is the focus of much research aiming to obtain effective alternatives to existing data transmission platforms. Amplification of light in fiber optics, such as in Erbium-doped fiber amplifiers, is especially important for efficient signal transmission. However, the complex fabrication methods involving high-temperature processes performed in a highly pure environment slow the fabrication process and make amplified components expensive with respect to an ideal, high-throughput, room temperature production. Here, we report on near-infrared polymer fiber amplifiers working over a band of ∼20 nm. The fibers are cheap, spun with a process entirely carried out at room temperature, and shown to have amplified spontaneous emission with good gain coefficients and low levels of optical losses (a few cm–1). The amplification process is favored by high fiber quality and low self-absorption. The found performance metrics appear to be suitable for short-distance operations, and the large variety of commercially available doping dyes might allow for effective multiwavelength operations by electrospun amplified fiber optics. PMID:25710188

  6. Carbon fiber modification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, T. E.

    1979-01-01

    The effect of several chemical treatments on the electrical and mechanical properties of carbon fibers was investigated with an optimum goal of increasing the electrical resistivity by a factor of 1000 without appreciably changing the mechanical properties. It was possible to effect resistivity increases from 10 to 50 percent without adversely affecting the tensile strength or Young's modulus for T-300 and C-6000 PAN fibers by treatments with either AlCl3 or nitric acid mixtures. Larger increases in the resistivity were produced with pitch fibers treated with nitric acid mixtures. This treatment also produced a partial decomposition of the pitch fiber and deterioration of the mechanical properties. The rationale behind the approch was to immobilize the conductivity producing pi electrons in the microscopic aromatic structure of the carbon fibers without destroying the strength producing sigma bonds. The investigations indicate that certain chemical treatments can produce such results, but the total reduction in the electrical conductivity which was achieved was not large enough to impact on problems which might arise from the high conductivities of the fibers.

  7. Chiral fiber optical isolator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kopp, Victor I.; Zhang, Guoyin; Zhang, Sheng; Genack, Azriel Z.; Neugroschl, Dan

    2009-02-01

    We propose an in-fiber chiral optical isolator based on chiral fiber polarizer technology and calculate its performance by incorporating the magnetic field into the scattering matrix. The design will be implemented in a special preform, which is passed through a miniature heat zone as it is drawn and twisted. The birefringence of the fiber is controlled by adjusted the diameter of a dual-core optical fiber. By adjusting the twist, the fiber can convert linear to circular polarization and reject one component of circular polarization. In the novel central portion of the isolator, the fiber diameter is large. The effective birefringence of the circular central core with high Verdet constant embedded in an outer core of slightly smaller index of refraction is small. The central potion is a non-reciprocal polarization converter which passes forward traveling left circularly polarized (LCP) light as LCP, while converting backward propagating LCP to right circularly polarized (RCP) light. Both polarizations of light traveling backwards are scattered out of the isolator. Since it is an all-glass structure, we anticipate that the isolator will be able to handle several watts of power and will be environmentally robust.

  8. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1987-01-01

    The challenge of those involved in control-system hardware development is to accommodate an ever-increasing complexity in aircraft control, while limiting the size and weight of the components and improving system reliability. A technology that displays promise towards this end is the area of fiber optics for controls. The primary advantages of employing optical fibers, passive optical sensors, and optically controlled actuators are weight and volume reduction, immunity from electromagnetic effects, superior bandwidth capabilities, and freedom from short circuits and sparking contacts. Since 1975, NASA Lewis has performed in-house, contract, and grant research in fiber optic sensors, high-temperature electro-optic switches, and fly-by-light control-system architecture. Passive optical sensor development is an essential yet challenging area of work and has therefore received much attention during this period. A major effort to develop fly-by-light control-system technology, known as the Fiber-Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program, was initiated in 1985 as a cooperative effort between NASA and DOD. Phase 1 of FOCSI, completed in 1986, was aimed at the design of a fiber-optic integrated propulsion/flight control system. Phase 2, yet to be initiated, will provide subcomponent and system development, and a system engine test. In addition to a summary of the benefits of fiber optics, the FOCSI program, sensor advances, and future directions in the NASA Lewis program will be discussed.

  9. Study on basalt fiber parameters affecting fiber-reinforced mortar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Orlov, A. A.; Chernykh, T. N.; Sashina, A. V.; Bogusevich, D. V.

    2015-01-01

    This article considers the effect of different dosages and diameters of basalt fibers on tensile strength increase during bending of fiberboard-reinforced mortar samples. The optimal dosages of fiber, providing maximum strength in bending are revealed. The durability of basalt fiber in an environment of cement, by means of microscopic analysis of samples of fibers and fiberboard-reinforced mortar long-term tests is examined. The article also compares the behavior of basalt fiber in the cement stone environment to a glass one and reveals that the basalt fiber is not subject to destruction.

  10. The optimal fiber volume fraction and fiber-matrix property compatibility in fiber reinforced composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pan, Ning

    1992-01-01

    Although the question of minimum or critical fiber volume fraction beyond which a composite can then be strengthened due to addition of fibers has been dealt with by several investigators for both continuous and short fiber composites, a study of maximum or optimal fiber volume fraction at which the composite reaches its highest strength has not been reported yet. The present analysis has investigated this issue for short fiber case based on the well-known shear lag (the elastic stress transfer) theory as the first step. Using the relationships obtained, the minimum spacing between fibers is determined upon which the maximum fiber volume fraction can be calculated, depending on the fiber packing forms within the composites. The effects on the value of this maximum fiber volume fraction due to such factors as fiber and matrix properties, fiber aspect ratio and fiber packing forms are discussed. Furthermore, combined with the previous analysis on the minimum fiber volume fraction, this maximum fiber volume fraction can be used to examine the property compatibility of fiber and matrix in forming a composite. This is deemed to be useful for composite design. Finally some examples are provided to illustrate the results.

  11. Optical fiber stripper positioning apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Fyfe, Richard W.; Sanchez, Jr., Amadeo

    1990-01-01

    An optical fiber positioning apparatus for an optical fiber stripping device is disclosed which is capable of providing precise axial alignment between an optical fiber to be stripped of its outer jacket and the cutting blades of a stripping device. The apparatus includes a first bore having a width approximately equal to the diameter of an unstripped optical fiber and a counter bore axially aligned with the first bore and dimensioned to precisely receive a portion of the stripping device in axial alignment with notched cutting blades within the stripping device to thereby axially align the notched cutting blades of the stripping device with the axis of the optical fiber to permit the notched cutting blades to sever the jacket on the optical fiber without damaging the cladding on the optical fiber. In a preferred embodiment, the apparatus further includes a fiber stop which permits determination of the length of jacket to be removed from the optical fiber.

  12. Self Similar Optical Fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zheng-Xuan

    This research proposes Self Similar optical fiber (SSF) as a new type of optical fiber. It has a special core that consists of self similar structure. Such a structure is obtained by following the formula for generating iterated function systems (IFS) in Fractal Theory. The resulted SSF can be viewed as a true fractal object in optical fibers. In addition, the method of fabricating SSF makes it possible to generate desired structures exponentially in numbers, whereas it also allows lower scale units in the structure to be reduced in size exponentially. The invention of SSF is expected to greatly ease the production of optical fiber when a large number of small hollow structures are needed in the core of the optical fiber. This dissertation will analyze the core structure of SSF based on fractal theory. Possible properties from the structural characteristics and the corresponding applications are explained. Four SSF samples were obtained through actual fabrication in a laboratory environment. Different from traditional conductive heating fabrication system, I used an in-house designed furnace that incorporated a radiation heating method, and was equipped with automated temperature control system. The obtained samples were examined through spectrum tests. Results from the tests showed that SSF does have the optical property of delivering light in a certain wavelength range. However, SSF as a new type of optical fiber requires a systematic research to find out the theory that explains its structure and the associated optical properties. The fabrication and quality of SSF also needs to be improved for product deployment. As a start of this extensive research, this dissertation work opens the door to a very promising new area in optical fiber research.

  13. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, P.B.; Looney, L.D.

    1993-11-30

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resistance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation. 4 figures.

  14. Enhanced radiation resistant fiber optics

    DOEpatents

    Lyons, Peter B.; Looney, Larry D.

    1993-01-01

    A process for producing an optical fiber having enhanced radiation resitance is provided, the process including maintaining an optical fiber within a hydrogen-containing atmosphere for sufficient time to yield a hydrogen-permeated optical fiber having an elevated internal hydrogen concentration, and irradiating the hydrogen-permeated optical fiber at a time while the optical fiber has an elevated internal hydrogen concentration with a source of ionizing radiation. The radiation source is typically a cobalt-60 source and the fiber is pre-irradiated with a dose level up to about 1000 kilorads of radiation.

  15. ZBLAN Fiber Phase B Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Workman, Gary L.; Smith, Guy A.

    1997-01-01

    A Phase B feasibility study will be performed for the study of the effects of microgravity on the preform processing and fiber pulling of ZBLAN optical glass. Continuing from the positive results achieved in the fiber annealing experiments in 20 second intervals at 0.001 g on the KC-135 and the 5 minute experiments on the SPAR rocket, experiments will continue to work towards design of a fiber sting to initiate fiber pulling operations in space. Anticipated results include less homogeneous nucleation than ground-based annealed fibers. Infrared Fiber Systems and Galileo are the participating industrial investigators.

  16. Natural Fiber Composites: A Review

    SciTech Connect

    Westman, Matthew P.; Fifield, Leonard S.; Simmons, Kevin L.; Laddha, Sachin; Kafentzis, Tyler A.

    2010-03-07

    The need for renewable fiber reinforced composites has never been as prevalent as it currently is. Natural fibers offer both cost savings and a reduction in density when compared to glass fibers. Though the strength of natural fibers is not as great as glass, the specific properties are comparable. Currently natural fiber composites have two issues that need to be addressed: resin compatibility and water absorption. The following preliminary research has investigated the use of Kenaf, Hibiscus cannabinus, as a possible glass replacement in fiber reinforced composites.

  17. Integrated Optofluidic Multimaterial Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stolyarov, Alexander Mark

    The creation of integrated microphotonic devices requires a challenging assembly of optically and electrically disparate materials into complex geometries with nanometer-scale precision. These challenges are typically addressed by mature wafer-based fabrication methods, which while versatile, are limited to low-aspect-ratio structures and by the inherent complexity of sequential processing steps. Multimaterial preform-to-fiber drawing methods on the other hand present unique opportunities for realizing optical and optoelectronic devices of extended length. Importantly, these methods allow for monolithic integration of all the constituent device components into complex architectures. My research has focused on addressing the challenges and opportunities associated with microfluidic multimaterial fiber structures and devices. Specifically: (1) A photonic bandgap (PBG) fiber is demonstrated for single mode transmission at 1.55 microm with 4 dB/m losses. This fiber transmits laser pulses with peak powers of 13.5 MW. (Chapter 2) (2) A microfluidic fiber laser, characterized by purely radia l emission is demonstrated. The laser cavity is formed by an axially invariant, 17-period annular PBG structure with a unit cell thickness of 160nm. This laser is distinct from traditional lasers with cylindrically symmetric emission, which rely almost exclusively on whispering gallery modes, characterized by tangential wavevectors. (Chapter 4) (3) An array of independently-controlled liquid-crystal microchannels flanked by viscous conductors is integrated in the fiber cladding and encircles the PBG laser cavity in (2). The interplay between the radially-emitting laser and these liquid-crystal modulators enables controlled directional emission around a full azimuthal angular range. (Chapter 4) (4) The electric potential profile along the length of the electrodes in (3) is characterized and found to depend on frequency. This frequency dependence presents a new means to tune the

  18. Congenital fiber type disproportion.

    PubMed

    Kissiedu, Juliana; Prayson, Richard A

    2016-04-01

    Type I muscle fiber atrophy in childhood can be encountered in a variety of neuromuscular disorders. Congenital fiber type disproportion (CFTD) is one such condition which presents as a nonprogressive muscle weakness. The diagnosis is often made after excluding other differential diagnostic considerations. We present a 2-year-9-month-old full term boy who presented at 2 months with an inability to turn his head to the right. Over the next couple of years, he showed signs of muscle weakness, broad based gait and a positive Gower's sign. He had normal levels of creatine kinase and normal electromyography. A biopsy of the vastus lateralis showed a marked variation in muscle fiber type. The adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-ase stains highlighted a marked type I muscle atrophy with rare scattered atrophic type II muscle fibers. No abnormalities were observed on the nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), succinate dehydrogenase (SDH) or cytochrome oxidase stained sections. Ragged red fibers were not present on the trichrome stain. Abnormalities of glycogen or lipid deposition were not observed on the periodic acid-Schiff or Oil-Red-O stains. Immunostaining for muscular dystrophy associated proteins showed normal staining. Ultrastructural examination showed a normal arrangement of myofilaments, and a normal number and morphology for mitochondria. A diagnosis of CFTD was made after excluding other causes of type I atrophy including congenital myopathy. The lack of specific clinical and genetic disorder associated with CFTD suggests that it is a spectrum of a disease process and represents a diagnosis of exclusion. PMID:26526626

  19. Directionally solidified mullite fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Sayir, A.; Farmer, S.C.

    1995-10-01

    Directionally solidified fibers with nominal mullite compositions of 3Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} {center_dot} 2SiO{sub 2} were grown by the laser heated float zone (LHFZ) method at NASA Lewis. High resolution digital images from an optical microscope evidence the formation of a liquid-liquid miscibility gap during crystal growth. Experimental evidence shows that the formation of mullite in aluminosilicate melts is in fact preceded by liquid immiscibility. The average fiber tensile strength is 1.15 GPa at room temperature. The mullite fibers retained 80% of their room temperature tensile strength at 1,450 C. SEM analysis revealed that the fibers were strongly faceted and that the facets act as critical flaws. Examined in TEM, these mullite single crystals are free of dislocations, low angle boundaries and voids. Single crystal mullite showed a high degree of oxygen vacancy ordering. Regardless of the starting composition, the degree of order observed in polycrystalline fibers was lower than that observed in the mullite single crystals.

  20. Continuous fiber thermoplastic prepreg

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilson, Maywood L. (Inventor); Johnson, Gary S. (Inventor)

    1993-01-01

    A pultrusion machine employing a corrugated impregnator vessel to immerse multiple, continuous strand, fiber tow in an impregnating material, and an adjustable metered exit orifice for the impregnator vessel to control the quantity of impregnating material retained by the impregnated fibers, is provided. An adjustable height insert retains transverse rod elements within each depression of the corrugated vessel to maintain the individual fiber tows spread and in contact with the vessel bottom. A series of elongated heating dies, transversely disposed on the pultrusion machine and having flat heating surfaces with radiused edges, ensure adequate temperature exposed dwell time and exert adequate pressure on the impregnated fiber tows, to provide the desired thickness and fiber/resin ratio in the prepreg formed. The prepreg passing through the pulling mechanism is wound on a suitable take-up spool for subsequent use. A formula is derived for determining the cross sectional area opening of the metering device. A modification in the heating die system employs a heated nip roller in lieu of one of the pressure applying flat dies.

  1. Image fiber skew characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Moriya; Otsubo, Toshimichi; Kitayama, Ken-ichi

    2000-04-01

    Skew of an image fiber, which has more than ten thousands of cores in a common cladding, was measured by a novel measurement method for the first time. This method can measure the time-of-flight difference between individual cores over the whole area of an image circle. The measurement results reveals that a test 100-m-long image fiber has skew of 5 ps/m, and the time-of-flight distributes randomly in the whole area of the image circle due to nonuniformity of the core dimension. It is also experimentally shown that the skew of an image fiber increases by bending. The theoretical analysis reveals that the bending-induced skew depends neither on the radius of curvature nor the shape of the curve but it depends only on the number of turns it is wound. The numerical calculation of skew by using typical parameters of image fibers shows that the winding have to be restricted to less than 12.5 turns to achieve a transmission speed of over 1 Gbps/ch. Lastly we propose twisted image fiber and a 8-shaped bobbin to suppress the skew due to bending.

  2. Tapered fiber bundle couplers for high-power fiber amplifiers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sliwinska, Dorota; Kaczmarek, Pawel; Abramski, Krzysztof M.

    2014-12-01

    In this work, we would like to demonstrate our results on performing (6+1)x1 tapered fiber bundle combiners using a trielectrode fiber splicing system. In our combiners we have used 9/80 μm (core/clad) diameter fibers as single-mode signal input ports. Using this fiber, instead of a conventional 9/125 μm single-mode fiber allowed us to reduce the taper ratio and therefore significantly increase the signal transmission. We have also performed power combiner which is based on the LMA fibers: input signal fiber 20/125μm and passive double clad fiber 25/300 μm at the output.

  3. Optical fiber switch

    DOEpatents

    Early, James W.; Lester, Charles S.

    2002-01-01

    Optical fiber switches operated by electrical activation of at least one laser light modulator through which laser light is directed into at least one polarizer are used for the sequential transport of laser light from a single laser into a plurality of optical fibers. In one embodiment of the invention, laser light from a single excitation laser is sequentially transported to a plurality of optical fibers which in turn transport the laser light to separate individual remotely located laser fuel ignitors. The invention can be operated electro-optically with no need for any mechanical or moving parts, or, alternatively, can be operated electro-mechanically. The invention can be used to switch either pulsed or continuous wave laser light.

  4. Probabilistic Fiber Composite Micromechanics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stock, Thomas A.

    1996-01-01

    Probabilistic composite micromechanics methods are developed that simulate expected uncertainties in unidirectional fiber composite properties. These methods are in the form of computational procedures using Monte Carlo simulation. The variables in which uncertainties are accounted for include constituent and void volume ratios, constituent elastic properties and strengths, and fiber misalignment. A graphite/epoxy unidirectional composite (ply) is studied to demonstrate fiber composite material property variations induced by random changes expected at the material micro level. Regression results are presented to show the relative correlation between predictor and response variables in the study. These computational procedures make possible a formal description of anticipated random processes at the intra-ply level, and the related effects of these on composite properties.

  5. Carbon Fibers Conductivity Studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, C. Y.; Butkus, A. M.

    1980-01-01

    In an attempt to understand the process of electrical conduction in polyacrylonitrile (PAN)-based carbon fibers, calculations were carried out on cluster models of the fiber consisting of carbon, nitrogen, and hydrogen atoms using the modified intermediate neglect of differential overlap (MINDO) molecular orbital (MO) method. The models were developed based on the assumption that PAN carbon fibers obtained with heat treatment temperatures (HTT) below 1000 C retain nitrogen in a graphite-like lattice. For clusters modeling an edge nitrogen site, analysis of the occupied MO's indicated an electron distribution similar to that of graphite. A similar analysis for the somewhat less stable interior nitrogen site revealed a partially localized II electron distribution around the nitrogen atom. The differences in bonding trends and structural stability between edge and interior nitrogen clusters led to a two-step process proposed for nitrogen evolution with increasing HTT.

  6. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Chuck C.; Saaski, Elric W.; McCrae, David A.

    1998-09-01

    This paper describes a novel fiber optic-based hydrogen sensor. The sensor consists of a thin-film etalon, constructed on the distal end of a fiber optic. The exterior mirror of the etalon is palladium or a palladium-alloy, which undergoes an optical change upon exposure to hydrogen. Data is presented on fiber optic sensors constructed with palladium and several alloys of palladium. The linearity of the optical response of these sensors to hydrogen is examined. Etalons made with pure palladium are found to be desirable for sensing low concentrations of hydrogen, or for one-time exposure to high concentrations of hydrogen. Etalons made from palladium alloys are found to be more desirable in applications were repeated cycling in high concentrations of hydrogen occurs.

  7. Fiber coating with suspensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abkarian, Manouk; Nunes, Janine K.; Stone, Howard A.

    2003-11-01

    The basic features of fiber coating with Newtonian fluids are well characterized at low capillary numbers by the Landau-Levich-Derjaguin analysis. Several extensions have been reported including studies of the influence of polymers, surfactants, and emulsions. Here we present an experimental study of fiber coating with suspensions of micron-sized particles where we perform direct visualization of the coating process using fluorescent particles. The addition of particles to the coating liquid produce several novel effects including (a) accumulation of particles in the neighborhood of the meniscus, which changes the dynamics of the coating process, and (b) crystallization can occur on the fiber, in some cases in the form of a continuous film that is at most a few particles thick, and which depends on capillary number. These results using continuous withdrawal will be contrasted with those reported in the literature for colloidal cystallization produced by evaporative processes.

  8. Optical fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Snitzer, E.

    1988-10-25

    This patent describes an optical fiber laser comprising: a gain cavity including a single mode optical fiber of given length and index of refraction and a cladding surrounding the core and having an index of refraction lower than that of the core. The core comprising a host material having incorporated therein a predetermined concentration of just erbium oxide having a fluorescence spectrum with a peak emission line at 1.54 micrometers; filter means optically coupled to each end of the fiber gain cavity for providing feedback in the cavity at the peak emission line of the erbium oxide and for permitting energy to be introduced into the cavity at the absorption band of the erbium oxide in the region of 1.45 to 1.53 micrometers; and a laser diode optically coupled to one end of the core for pumping energy into the end of the gain cavity so that the gain cavity oscillates at just the peak emission line.

  9. Containerless glass fiber processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ethridge, E. C.; Naumann, R. J.

    1986-01-01

    An acoustic levitation furnace system is described that was developed for testing the feasibility of containerless fiber pulling experiments. It is possible to levitate very dense materials such as platinum at room temperature. Levitation at elevated temperatures is much more difficult. Samples of dense heavy metal fluoride glass were levitated at 300 C. It is therefore possible that containerless fiber pulling experiments could be performed. Fiber pulling from the melt at 650 C is not possible at unit gravity but could be possible at reduced gravities. The Acoustic Levitation Furnace is described, including engineering parameters and processing information. It is illustrated that a shaped reflector greatly increases the levitation force aiding the levitation of more dense materials.

  10. Fiber optic calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy, C.; Bayliss, S.; Bracken, D.; Bush, J.; Davis, P.

    1998-01-01

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using fiber for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processing to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian ({mu}rad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% {sup 240}Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium.

  11. Fiber Optic Calorimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Rudy, C.; Bayliss, S.; Bracken, D.; Bush, J.; Davis, P.

    1997-12-12

    A twin-bridge calorimeter using optical fiber as the sensor element was constructed and tested. This system demonstrates the principle and capability of using optical fibers for heat-flow measurements of special nuclear material. This calorimeter uses piezoelectric-generated phase-carrier modulation with subsequent electronic signal processes to allow phase shifts as small as 1 microradian ({micro}rad) to be measured. The sensing element consists of 21-m lengths of single-mode optical fiber wrapped around sample and reference chambers. The sensitivity of the calorimeter was determined to be 74 radians (rad) of phase shift per milliwatt of thermal power. One milliwatt of thermal power is equivalent to 400 mg of plutonium (6% {sup 240}Pu). The system noise base was about 0.2 rad, equivalent to about 1 mg of plutonium.

  12. Carbon Fiber Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    HyComp(R), Inc. development a line of high temperature carbon fiber composite products to solve wear problems in the harsh environment of steel and aluminum mills. WearComp(R), self-lubricating composite wear liners and bushings, combines carbon graphite fibers with a polyimide binder. The binder, in conjunction with the fibers, provides the slippery surface, one that demands no lubrication, yet wears at a very slow rate. WearComp(R) typically lasts six to ten times longer than aluminum bronze. Unlike bronze, WearComp polishes the same surface and imparts a self-lube film for years of service. It is designed for continuous operation at temperatures of 550 degrees Fahrenheit and can operate under high compressive loads.

  13. The crucial fiber components and gain fiber for high power ytterbium-doped fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Lei; Liu, Peng; Xing, Ying-Bin; Wang, Yi-Bo; Dai, Neng-Li; Li, Jin-Yan; He, Bing; Zhou, Jun

    2015-08-01

    We have demonstrated a kW continuous-wave ytterbium-doped all-fiber laser oscillator with 7×1 fused fiber bundle combiner, fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and double-clad gain fiber fabricated by corresponding technologies. The results of experiment that the oscillator had operated at 1079.48nm with 80.94% slope efficiency without the influence of temperature and non-linear effects indicate that fiber components and gain fiber were suitable to high power environment. No evidence of the signal power roll-over showed that this oscillator possess the capacity to highest output with available pump power.

  14. Fiber bundle endocytoscopy

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Michael; Chang, Tou Pin; Yang, Guang-Zhong

    2013-01-01

    Endocytoscopy is an optical biopsy technique which uses a miniaturized camera to capture white light microscopy images through an endoscope. We have developed an alternative design that instead relays images to an external camera via a coherent fiber bundle. In this paper we characterize the device and demonstrate microscopy of porcine tissue ex vivo. One advantage of our approach is the ease with which other bundle-compatible imaging modalities can be deployed simultaneously. We show this by acquiring quasi-simultaneous endocytoscopy and fluorescence confocal endomicroscopy images through a single fiber bundle. This opens up possibilities for multi-modal endomicroscopy, combining white light and fluorescence imaging. PMID:24409380

  15. Fiber optic interferometric accelerometers

    SciTech Connect

    Vohra, S.T.; Danver, B.; Tveten, A.; Dandridge, A.

    1996-04-01

    Recent progress on the development of flexural disk based fiber optic acceleration sensors is reported. Appropriate geometric considerations have resulted in fiber optic accelerometers with many desirable features including (i) high sensitivity ({approx_gt}20 dB rerad/g), (ii) flat frequency response (200 Hz to {approx_gt}10 kHz), and (iii) low pressure ({lt}{minus}180 dB rerad/{mu}Pa) and transverse sensitivity ({lt}{minus}30 dB). Alternate transducer designs are discussed and preliminary results reported. Various optical multiplexing schemes for accelerometer arrays are discussed. {copyright} {ital 1996 American Institute of Physics.}

  16. Silicon fiber optic sensors

    DOEpatents

    Pocha, Michael D.; Swierkowski, Steve P.; Wood, Billy E.

    2007-10-02

    A Fabry-Perot cavity is formed by a partially or wholly reflective surface on the free end of an integrated elongate channel or an integrated bounding wall of a chip of a wafer and a partially reflective surface on the end of the optical fiber. Such a constructed device can be utilized to detect one or more physical parameters, such as, for example, strain, through the optical fiber using an optical detection system to provide measuring accuracies of less than aboutb0.1%.

  17. QUARTZ FIBER ELECTROSCOPES

    DOEpatents

    Henderson, R.P.

    1956-04-17

    This patent pertains to quartz fiber electroscopes of small size for use by personnel to monitor nuclear radiation. The invention resides tn a novel way of charging the electroscope whereby the charging of the electroscope whereby the charging of the electroscope is carried out without obtaining contact with the fiber system or its support and the electroscope can therefore be constructed without a protective cap to prevent wrongful discharge. The electroscope is charged by placing a voltage between an electrode located in close proximity to the element to be charged and the electroscope me metallic case. ABSTRACTS

  18. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, Oliver T.; Lowry, Mark E.

    1999-01-01

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectonic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems.

  19. Ceramic oxide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Sowman, H.G.; Johnson, D.D.

    1985-10-01

    Polycrystalline ceramic fibers now available from commercial sources include those of Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-SiO/sub 2/O/sub 3/, Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/-B/sub 2/O/sub 3/-SiO/sub 2/, and ZrO/sub 2/-SiO/sub 2/. Continuous filaments in roving, yarn, chopped, bulk, fabric or mat forms can be supplied. Properties and uses of these fibers are discussed. 18 references.

  20. Automated fiber pigtailing machine

    DOEpatents

    Strand, O.T.; Lowry, M.E.

    1999-01-05

    The Automated Fiber Pigtailing Machine (AFPM) aligns and attaches optical fibers to optoelectronic (OE) devices such as laser diodes, photodiodes, and waveguide devices without operator intervention. The so-called pigtailing process is completed with sub-micron accuracies in less than 3 minutes. The AFPM operates unattended for one hour, is modular in design and is compatible with a mass production manufacturing environment. This machine can be used to build components which are used in military aircraft navigation systems, computer systems, communications systems and in the construction of diagnostics and experimental systems. 26 figs.

  1. Fiber-Optic Sensing Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Milnes, M.; Baylor, L.C.; Bave, S.

    1996-10-24

    This article offers a basic review of fiber-optic sensing technology, or more specifically, fiber-optic sensing technology as applied to the qualitative or quantitative identification of a chemical sample, and how it works,

  2. A fiber optic damage monitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jen, C. K.; Cielo, P.; Farnell, G. W.; Parker, M.

    A simplified fiber-optic damage monitoring system for on-line assessments of the condition of composite structural materials in F/A-18 fighters is described. Optical fibers are implanted into the composite mesh in a configuration with horizontal and vertical orientations. When light is pumped into the fibers, and failure of transmittance in either the x- or y-coordinates indicates the location of a defect at that coordinate, as revealed by the fiber damage. Attaching photodiodes to the optic fibers and connecting the entire system to a video camera and computer permits on-line monitoring of the mesh-holding panels. Sample results are provided from a system with multimode step index fibers, a VAX 11/780 computer and a video camera with a 488 x 380 cell photodiode array. Image subtraction is an effective means for fast determination of the identities of broken fibers by comparisons of images of arrays of original and damaged fibers.

  3. Boron nitride converted carbon fiber

    DOEpatents

    Rousseas, Michael; Mickelson, William; Zettl, Alexander K.

    2016-04-05

    This disclosure provides systems, methods, and apparatus related to boron nitride converted carbon fiber. In one aspect, a method may include the operations of providing boron oxide and carbon fiber, heating the boron oxide to melt the boron oxide and heating the carbon fiber, mixing a nitrogen-containing gas with boron oxide vapor from molten boron oxide, and converting at least a portion of the carbon fiber to boron nitride.

  4. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, Gregory A.; Hrubesh, Lawrence W.; Poco, John F.; Sandler, Pamela H.

    1997-01-01

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency.

  5. Aerogel-clad optical fiber

    DOEpatents

    Sprehn, G.A.; Hrubesh, L.W.; Poco, J.F.; Sandler, P.H.

    1997-11-04

    An optical fiber is surrounded by an aerogel cladding. For a low density aerogel, the index of refraction of the aerogel is close to that of air, which provides a high numerical aperture to the optical fiber. Due to the high numerical aperture, the aerogel clad optical fiber has improved light collection efficiency. 4 figs.

  6. Fiber microelectrodes for electrophysiological recordings.

    PubMed

    Reitboeck, H J

    1983-07-01

    Methods for the fabrication of tungsten-glass and platinum-rhodium-quartz fiber microelectrodes and of fiber pipettes are described and the electrical and mechanical properties of fiber electrodes are discussed. These properties (minimal tissue damage, good single unit isolation and temporal stability) make them particularly suited for multielectrode recordings from the central nervous system. PMID:6312201

  7. Buying Fiber-Optic Networks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fickes, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Describes consortia formed by college and university administrators to buy, manage, and maintain their own fiber-optic networks with the goals of cutting costs of leasing fiber-optic cable and planning for the future. Growth capacity is the real advantage of owning fiber-optic systems. (SLD)

  8. Carbon fiber counting. [aircraft structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pride, R. A.

    1980-01-01

    A method was developed for characterizing the number and lengths of carbon fibers accidentally released by the burning of composite portions of civil aircraft structure in a jet fuel fire after an accident. Representative samplings of carbon fibers collected on transparent sticky film were counted from photographic enlargements with a computer aided technique which also provided fiber lengths.

  9. Direct spinning of fiber supercapacitor.

    PubMed

    Xu, Tong; Ding, Xiaoteng; Liang, Yuan; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Nan; Qu, Liangti

    2016-06-16

    A direct wet spinning approach is demonstrated for facile and continuous fabrication of a whole fiber supercapacitor using a microfluidic spinneret. The resulting fiber supercapacitor shows good electrochemical properties and possesses high flexibility and mechanical stability. This strategy paves the way for large-scale continuous production of fiber supercapacitors for weavable electronics. PMID:27251420

  10. Large core fiber optic cleaver

    DOEpatents

    Halpin, John M.

    1996-01-01

    The present invention relates to a device and method for cleaving optical fibers which yields cleaved optical fiber ends possessing high damage threshold surfaces. The device can be used to cleave optical fibers with core diameters greater than 400 .mu.m.

  11. COTTON FIBER CHEMISTRY AND TECHNOLOGY

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Annual cotton production exceeds 25 million metric tons and accounts for more than 40 percent of the textile fiber consumed worldwide. A key textile fiber for over 5000 years, this complex carbohydrate is also one of the leading crops to benefit from genetic engineering. Cotton Fiber Chemistry and...

  12. Fabrication of Optical Fiber Devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Andres, Miguel V.

    In this paper we present the main research activities of the Laboratorio de Fibras Opticas del Instituto de Ciencia de los Materiales de la Universidad de Valencia. We show some of the main results obtained for devices based on tapered fibers, fiber Bragg gratings, acousto-optic effects and photonic crystal fibers.

  13. Shedding Light on Fiber Optics.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bunch, Robert M.

    1994-01-01

    Explains the principles of fiber optics as a medium for light-wave communication. Current uses of fiber systems on college campuses include voice, video, and local area network applications. A group of seven school districts in Minnesota are linked via fiber-optic cables. Other uses are discussed. (MLF)

  14. Fiber Optics and Library Technology.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koenig, Michael

    1984-01-01

    This article examines fiber optic technology, explains some of the key terminology, and speculates about the way fiber optics will change our world. Applications of fiber optics to library systems in three major areas--linkage of a number of mainframe computers, local area networks, and main trunk communications--are highlighted. (EJS)

  15. Pulsed Single Frequency Fiber Lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Shibin

    2016-06-01

    Pulsed single frequency fiber lasers with mJ level near 1 micron, 1.55 micron and 2 micron wavelengths were demonstrated by using our proprietary highly doped fibers. These fiber lasers exhibit excellent long term stable operation with M2<1.2.

  16. SINGLE FIBER TESTING VIA FAVIMAT

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber is usually tested in bulk form utilizing a mass or beard of fibers to be presented to a test instrument for measurement. There are many reasons for this, not the least of which is that handling single cotton fibers is tedious and time consuming. Cotton breeders are being pushed to mak...

  17. Fiber optic accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    August, Rudolf R. (Inventor); Strahan, Virgil H. (Inventor); James, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Nichols, Donald K. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    An inexpensive, light weight fiber optic accelerometer to convert input mechanical motion (e.g. acceleration) into digitized optical output signals. The output of the accelerometer may be connected directly to data processing apparatus without the necessity of space consuming analog to digital interface means.

  18. Fiber optic accelerometer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strahan, Virgil H. (Inventor); James, Kenneth A. (Inventor); Quick, William H. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    An inexpensive, light weight fiber optic accelerometer to convert input mechanical motion (e.g. acceleration) into digitized optical output signals. The output of the accelerometer may be connected directly to data processing apparatus without the necessity of space consuming analog to digital interface means.

  19. MICROCRYSTALLINE KERATIN FIBER

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Biopolymers compose the morphological structures generated in all living organisms. The macroscopic physical properties of biopolymers like keratin are due to molecular level structure and micorcrystallinity, the self-consistent packing arrays of molecular order within a defined space. Fiber proce...

  20. Whole Grains and Fiber

    MedlinePlus

    ... fiber. Some examples of refined grains are wheat flour, enriched bread and white rice. Most refined grains are enriched , which means that ... grains. Some examples of enriched grains are wheat flour, enriched bread and white rice. Eating whole grains provides important health benefits: Many ...

  1. Optical Fiber Spectroscopy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buoncristiani, A. M.

    1999-01-01

    This is the final report of work done on NASA Grant NAG-1-443. The work covers the period from July 1, 1992 to December 1, 1998. During this period several distinct but related research studies and work tasks were undertaken. These different subjects are enumerated below with a description of the work done on each of them. The focus of the research was the development of optical fibers for use as distributed temperature and stress sensors. The initial concept was to utilize the utilize the temperature and stress dependence of emission from rare earth and transition metal ions substitutionally doped into crystalline or glass fibers. During the course of investigating this it became clear that fiber Bragg gratings provided a alternative for making the desired measurements and there was a shift of research focus on to include the photo-refractive properties of germano-silicate glasses used for most gratings and to the possibility of developing fiber laser sources for an integrated optical sensor in the research effort. During the course of this work several students from Christopher Newport University and other universities participated in this effort. Their names are listed below. Their participation was an important part of their education.

  2. Fiber-reinforced glass

    SciTech Connect

    Beier, W.; Markman, S.

    1997-12-01

    Fiber-reinforced glass composites are glass or glass ceramic matrices reinforced with long fibers of carbon or silicon carbide. These composites are lighter than steel but just as strong as many steel grades, and can resist higher temperatures. They also have outstanding resistance to impact, thermal shock, and wear, and can be formulated to control thermal and electrical conductivity. With proper tooling, operations such as drilling, grinding, and turning can be completed in half the time required for non-reinforced glass. Currently, fiber-reinforced glass components are primarily used for handling hot glass or molten aluminum during manufacturing operations. But FRG is also under test as an engineering material in a variety of markets, including the aerospace, automotive, and semiconductor industries. Toward this end, research is being carried out to increase the size of components that can be delivered on a production basis, to develop economical methods of achieving complex near-net shapes, and to reduce the cycle time for production of specific shapes. This article focuses on the properties and applications of fiber-reinforced glass composites.

  3. Carbon fiber study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1977-01-01

    A coordinated Federal Government action plan for dealing with the potential problems arising from the increasing use of graphite fiber reinforced composite materials in both military and civilian applications is presented. The required dissemination of declassified information and an outline of government actions to minimize the social and economic consequences of proliferated composite materials applications were included.

  4. Refractory ceramic fibers

    Integrated Risk Information System (IRIS)

    Refractory ceramic fibers ; CASRN Not found Human health assessment information on a chemical substance is included in the IRIS database only after a comprehensive review of toxicity data , as outlined in the IRIS assessment development process . Sections I ( Health Hazard Assessments for Noncarcino

  5. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, David W.

    1997-01-01

    A process and an apparatus for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquified eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciately stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers.

  6. Manufactured Textile Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gupta, Bhupender S.

    The first conversion of naturally occurring fibers into threads strong enough to be looped into snares, knit to form nets, or woven into fabrics is lost in prehistory. Unlike stone weapons, such threads, cords, and fabrics—being organic in nature—have in most part disappeared, although in some dry caves traces remain. There is ample evidence to indicate that spindles used to assist in the twisting of fibers together had been developed long before the dawn of recorded history. In that spinning process, fibers such as wool were drawn out of a loose mass, perhaps held in a distaff, and made parallel by human fingers. (A maidservant so spins in Giotto's The Annunciation to Anne, ca. A.D. 1306, Arena Chapel, Padua, Italy.1) A rod (spindle), hooked to the lengthening thread, was rotated so that the fibers while so held were twisted together to form additional thread. The finished length then was wound by hand around the spindle, which, in becoming the core on which the finished product was accumulated, served the dual role of twisting and storing, and, in so doing, established a principle still in use today.

  7. Bluebonnet Fiber Collages

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sterling, Joan

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a lesson that uses stitching and applique techniques to create a fiber collage in which every child is successful with high-quality work. This lesson was inspired by Tomie dePaola's "The Legend of the Bluebonnet." The back cover had a lovely illustration of the bluebonnet flower the author thought would translate easily to a…

  8. Optical Fiber Protection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    F&S Inc. developed and commercialized fiber optic and microelectromechanical systems- (MEMS) based instrumentation for harsh environments encountered in the aerospace industry. The NASA SBIR programs have provided F&S the funds and the technology to develop ruggedized coatings and coating techniques that are applied during the optical fiber draw process. The F&S optical fiber fabrication facility and developed coating methods enable F&S to manufacture specialty optical fiber with custom designed refractive index profiles and protective or active coatings. F&S has demonstrated sputtered coatings using metals and ceramics and combinations of each, and has also developed techniques to apply thin coatings of specialized polyimides formulated at NASA Langley Research Center. With these capabilities, F&S has produced cost-effective, reliable instrumentation and sensors capable of withstanding temperatures up to 800? C and continues building commercial sales with corporate partners and private funding. More recently, F&S has adapted the same sensing platforms to provide the rapid detection and identification of chemical and biological agents

  9. Infrared Fiber Optic Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Successive years of Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts from Langley Research Center to Sensiv Inc., a joint venture between Foster-Miller Inc. and Isorad, Ltd., assisted in the creation of remote fiber optic sensing systems. NASA's SBIR interest in infrared, fiber optic sensor technology was geared to monitoring the curing cycles of advanced composite materials. These funds helped in the fabrication of an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. Foster-Miller ingenuity allowed infrared transmitting optical fibers to combine with Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy to enable remote sensing. Sensiv probes operate in the mid-infrared range of the spectrum, although modifications to the instrument also permits its use in the near-infrared region. The Sensiv needle-probe is built to be placed in a liquid or powder and analyze the chemicals in the mixture. Other applications of the probe system include food processing control; combustion control in furnaces; and maintenance problem solving.

  10. Drying of fiber webs

    DOEpatents

    Warren, D.W.

    1997-04-15

    A process and an apparatus are disclosed for high-intensity drying of fiber webs or sheets, such as newsprint, printing and writing papers, packaging paper, and paperboard or linerboard, as they are formed on a paper machine. The invention uses direct contact between the wet fiber web or sheet and various molten heat transfer fluids, such as liquefied eutectic metal alloys, to impart heat at high rates over prolonged durations, in order to achieve ambient boiling of moisture contained within the web. The molten fluid contact process causes steam vapor to emanate from the web surface, without dilution by ambient air; and it is differentiated from the evaporative drying techniques of the prior industrial art, which depend on the uses of steam-heated cylinders to supply heat to the paper web surface, and ambient air to carry away moisture, which is evaporated from the web surface. Contact between the wet fiber web and the molten fluid can be accomplished either by submersing the web within a molten bath or by coating the surface of the web with the molten media. Because of the high interfacial surface tension between the molten media and the cellulose fiber comprising the paper web, the molten media does not appreciatively stick to the paper after it is dried. Steam generated from the paper web is collected and condensed without dilution by ambient air to allow heat recovery at significantly higher temperature levels than attainable in evaporative dryers. 6 figs.

  11. Fiber optics for controls

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seng, Gary T.

    1990-01-01

    The design, development, and testing of a fiber optic integrated propulsion/flight control system for an advanced supersonic dash aircraft (flies at supersonic speeds for short periods of time) is the goal of the joint NASA/DOD Fiber Optic Control System Integration (FOCSI) program. Phase 1 provided a comparison of electronic and optical control systems, identified the status of current optical sensor technology, defined the aircraft sensor/actuator environment, proposed architectures for fully optical control systems, and provided schedules for development. Overall, it was determined that there are sufficient continued efforts to develop such a system. It was also determined that it is feasible to build a fiber optic control system for the development of a data base for this technology, but that further work is necessary in sensors, actuators, and components to develop an optimum design, fully fiber optic integrated control system compatible with advanced aircraft environments. Phase 2 is to design, construct, and ground test a fly by light control system. Its first task is to provide a detailed design of the electro-optic architecture.

  12. Multiwavelength fiber laser for the fiber link monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Peng-Chun; Lee, Wei-Yun; Wu, Shin-Shian; Hu, Hsuan-Lun

    2013-10-01

    This work proposes a novel fiber link monitoring system that uses a multiwavelength fiber laser for wavelength-division-multiplexed (WDM) passive optical network (PON). The multiwavelength fiber laser is based on an erbium-doped fiber amplifier (EDFA) and a semiconductor optical amplifier (SOA). Experimental results show the feasibility using the system to monitor a fiber link with a high and stable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of over 26 dB. The link quality of downstream signals as well as the fiber link on WDM channels can be monitored in real time. Favorable carrier-to-noise ratio (CNR), composite second-order (CSO), and composite triple beat (CTB) performance metrics were obtained for cable television (CATV) signals that were transported through 25 km of standard single-mode fiber (SMF).

  13. Polymer-Derived Ceramic Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ichikawa, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    SiC-based ceramic fibers are derived from polycarbosilane or polymetallocarbosilane precursors and are classified into three groups according to their chemical composition, oxygen content, and C/Si atomic ratio. The first-generation fibers are Si-C-O (Nicalon) fibers and Si-Ti-C-O (Tyranno Lox M) fibers. Both fibers contain more than 10-wt% oxygen owing to oxidation during curing and lead to degradation in strength at temperatures exceeding 1,300°C. The maximum use temperature is 1,100°C. The second-generation fibers are SiC (Hi-Nicalon) fibers and Si-Zr-C-O (Tyranno ZMI) fibers. The oxygen content of these fibers is reduced to less than 1 wt% by electron beam irradiation curing in He. The thermal stability of these fibers is improved (they are stable up to 1,500°C), but their creep resistance is limited to a maximum of 1,150°C because their C/Si atomic ratio results in excess carbon. The third-generation fibers are stoichiometric SiC fibers, i.e., Hi-Nicalon Type S (hereafter Type S), Tyranno SA, and Sylramic™ fibers. They exhibit improved thermal stability and creep resistance up to 1,400°C. Stoichiometric SiC fibers meet many of the requirements for the use of ceramic matrix composites for high-temperature structural application. SiBN3C fibers derived from polyborosilazane also show promise for structural applications, remain in the amorphous state up to 1,800°C, and have good high-temperature creep resistance.

  14. Thulium Fiber Laser lithotripsy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blackmon, Richard Leious, Jr.

    The Thulium Fiber Laser (TFL) has been studied as a potential alternative to the conventional Holmium:YAG laser (Ho:YAG) for the treatment of kidney stones. The TFL is more ideally suited for laser lithotripsy because of the higher absorption coefficient of the emitted wavelength in water, the superior Gaussian profile of the laser beam, and the ability to operate at arbitrary temporal pulse profiles. The higher absorption of the TFL by water helps translate into higher ablation of urinary stones using less energy. The Gaussian spatial beam profile allows the TFL to couple into fibers much smaller than those currently being used for Ho:YAG lithotripsy. Lastly, the ability of arbitrary pulse operation by the TFL allows energy to be delivered to the stone efficiently so as to avoid negative effects (such as burning or bouncing of the stone) while maximizing ablation. Along with these improvements, the unique properties of the TFL have led to more novel techniques that have currently not been used in the clinic, such as the ability to control the movement of stones based on the manner in which the laser energy is delivered. Lastly, the TFL has led to the development of novel fibers, such as the tapered fiber and removable tip fiber, to be used for lithotripsy which can lead to safer and less expensive treatment of urinary stones. Overall, the TFL has been demonstrated as a viable alternative to the conventional Ho:YAG laser and has the potential to advance methods and tools for treatment of kidney stones.

  15. Improved Optical Fiber Chemical Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Egalon, Claudio O.; Rogowski, Robert S.

    1994-01-01

    Calculations, based on exact theory of optical fiber, have shown how to increase optical efficiency sensitivity of active-core, step-index-profile optical-fiber fluorosensor. Calculations result of efforts to improve efficiency of optical-fiber chemical sensor of previous concept described in "Making Optical-Fiber Chemical Sensors More Sensitive" (LAR-14525). Optical fiber chemical detector of enhanced sensitivity made in several configurations. Portion of fluorescence or chemiluminescence generated in core, and launched directly into bound electromagnetic modes that propagate along core to photodetector.

  16. Fiber gyroscope with birefringence modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrara, S. L. A.; Kim, B. Y.; Shaw, H. J.

    1987-03-01

    A theoretical analysis of the nonreciprocal phase error in a highly-birefringent fiber gyroscope is presented, characterizing the different types of errors and their sources in a general form. These error terms are due to polarization cross coupling in the fiber and in the fiber components and can be reduced by modulating the magnitude of the fiber birefringence at appropriate locations in the optical circuit and by balancing the optical power between the two polarization eigenmodes of the fiber at the input of the interferometer. Experimental results demonstrating these techniques show a 20 dB relief on the performance requirements of the polarizer usually employed for drift reduction.

  17. Gasifiable carbon-graphite fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Humphrey, Marshall F. (Inventor); Ramohalli, Kumar N. R. (Inventor); Dowler, Warren L. (Inventor)

    1982-01-01

    Fine, carbon-graphite fibers do not combust during the combustion of a composite and are expelled into the air as fine conductive particles. Coating of the fibers with a salt of a metal having a work function below 4.2 eV such as an alkaline earth metal salt, e.g., calcium acetate, catalytically enhances combustion of the fibers at temperatures below 1000.degree. C. such that the fibers self-support combustion and burn to produce a non-conductive ash. Fire-polishing the fibers before application of the coating is desirable to remove sizing to expose the carbon surface to the catalyst.

  18. Multimetallic Electrodeposition on Carbon Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Böttger-Hiller, F.; Kleiber, J.; Böttger, T.; Lampke, T.

    2016-03-01

    Efficient lightweight design requires intelligent materials that meet versatile functions. One approach is to extend the range of properties of carbon fiber reinforced plastics (CFRP) by plating the fiber component. Electroplating leads to metalized layers on carbon fibers. Herein only cyanide-free electrolytes where used. Until now dendrite-free layers were only obtained using current densities below 1.0 A dm-2. In this work, dendrite-free tin and copper coatings were achieved by pre-metalizing the carbon fiber substrates. Furthermore, applying a combination of two metals with different sized thermal expansion coefficient lead to a bimetallic coating on carbon fiber rovings, which show an actuatory effect.

  19. Silica optical fibers: technology update

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krohn, David A.; McCann, Brian P.

    1995-05-01

    Silica-core optical fibers have long been the standard delivery medium for medical laser delivery systems. Their high strength, excellent flexibility, and low cost continue to make them the fiber of choice for systems operating from 300 to 2200 nm. An overview of the current fiber constructions available to the industry is reviewed. Silicone-clad fibers, hard- fluoropolymer clad fibers and silica-clad fibers are briefly compared in terms of mechanical and optical properties. The variety of fiber coatings available is also discussed. A significant product development of silica fiber delivery systems has been in side-firing laser delivery systems for Urology. These devices utilize silica-core fibers to project the laser energy at a substantial lateral angle to the conventional delivery system, typically 40 to 100 degrees off axis. Many unique distal tips have been designed to meet the needs of this potentially enormous application. There are three primary technologies employed in side-firing laser delivery systems: reflection off of an attached medium; reflection within an angle-polished fiber through total internal reflection; and reflection from both an angle-polished fiber and an outside medium. Each technology is presented and compared on the basis of operation modality, transmission efficiency, and power-handling performance.

  20. Fiber optics: A brief introduction

    SciTech Connect

    Gruchalla, M.E.

    1989-01-01

    A basic introduction into the principles of fiber optics is presented. A review of both the underlying physical principles and the individual elements of typical fiber-optic systems are presented. The optical phenomenon of total internal reflection is reviewed. The basic construction of the optical fiber is presented. Both step-index and graded-index fiber designs are reviewed. Multimode and single-mode fiber constructions are considered and typical performance parameters given. Typical optical-fiber bandwidth and loss characteristics are compared to various common coaxial cables, waveguides, and air transmission. The constructions of optical-fiber cables are reviewed. Both loose-tube and tightly-buffered designs are considered. Several optical connection approaches are presented. Photographs of several representative optical connectors are included. Light Emitting Diode and Laser Diode emitters for fiber-optic applications are reviewed, and some advantages and shortcomings of each are considered. The phenomenon of modal noise is briefly explained. Both PIN and Avalanche photodetectors are reviewed and their performance parameters compared. Methods of data transmission over optical fiber are introduced. Principles of Wavelength, Frequency, and Time Division Multiplexing are briefly presented. The technology of fiber-optic sensors is briefly reviewed with basic principles introduced. The performance of a fiber-optic strain sensor is included as a practical example. 7 refs., 10 figs.

  1. Thulium fiber laser lithotripsy using small spherical distal fiber tips

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Christopher R.; Hardy, Luke A.; Kennedy, Joshua D.; Irby, Pierce B.; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    This study tests a 100-μm-core fiber with 300-μm-diameter ball tip during Thulium fiber laser (TFL) lithotripsy. The TFL was operated at 1908 nm wavelength with 35-mJ pulse energy, 500-μs pulse duration, and 300-Hz pulse rate. Calcium oxalate/phosphate stone samples were weighed, laser procedure times measured, and ablation rates calculated for ball tip fibers, with comparison to bare tip fibers. Photographs of ball tips were taken before and after each procedure to observe ball tip degradation and determine number of procedures completed before need to replace fiber. Saline irrigation rates and ureteroscope deflection were measured with and without TFL fiber present. There was no statistical difference (P > 0.05) between stone ablation rates for single-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.4 mg/s) (n=10), multiple-use ball tip fiber (1.3 +/- 0.5 mg/s) (n=44), and conventional single-use bare tip fibers (1.3 +/- 0.2 mg/s) (n=10). Ball tip durability varied widely, but fibers averaged > 4 stone procedures before decline in stone ablation rates due to mechanical damage at front surface of ball tip. The small fiber diameter did not impact ureteroscope deflection or saline flow rates. The miniature ball tip fiber may provide a cost-effective design for safe fiber insertion through the ureteroscope working channel and the ureter without risk of scope damage or tissue perforation, and without compromising stone ablation efficiency during TFL ablation of kidney stones.

  2. Single mode fiber and twin-core fiber connection technique for in-fiber integrated interferometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Tingting; Zhang, Xiaotong; Guan, Chunying; Yang, Xinghua; Yuan, Libo

    2015-09-01

    A novel twin-core fiber connector has been made by two side-polished fibers. By using side polishing technique, we present a connector based on the twin-core fiber (TCF) and two D-shaped single-core fibers. After simple alignment and splicing, all fiber miniaturizing connector can be obtained. Two cores can operate independently and are non-interfering. The coupling loss of this connector is low and the fabrication technologies are mature. The connector device could be used for sensors or particle trapping.

  3. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S. Michael

    1989-01-01

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element (11, 11a to 11j) having a cladding or coating of a material (23, 23a to 23j) which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector (24, 24a to 24j) may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses.

  4. Fiber optic flocculation sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Lun K.; Stelwagen, Uilke

    1994-02-01

    A fiber optic flocculation sensor based on measuring the intensity of light reflected by solid particles in suspension (i.e. paper pulp) in a well defined measurement volume, was constructed. This sensor is designed for monitoring the flocculation state of paper pulp in the papermaking process. The flocculation determines to a great extent the quality of the final product, the paper. Tests with different types of pulp were performed in both a closed loop system and a small paper machine. In this investigation the flocculation state is expressed as a root mean square flocculation index. The flocculation index delivered by this fiber optic system shows a very high correlation with the flocculation index provided by a camera system `looking at' the same pulp, while the latter has a great resemblance with the human perception of the flocculation.

  5. Fiberized fluorescent dye microtubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vladev, Veselin; Eftimov, Tinko

    2013-03-01

    In the present work we study the effect of the length of fluorescent dye-filled micro-capillaries on the fluorescence spectra. Two types of micro-capillaries have been studied: a 100 μm inner diameter fused silica capillary with a transparent coating and one of the holes of a fiber optic glass ferrule with 125 μm inner diameter. The tubes were filled with solutions of Rhodamine 6G dissolved in ethanol and then in glycerin. Experimental data show that the maximum fluorescence and the largest spectral widths are observed for a sample length of about 0.25 mm for the used concentration. This results show that miniature tunable fiberized dye lasers can be developed using available standard micro-and fibre-optic components.

  6. Fiber optic TV direct

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kassak, John E.

    1991-01-01

    The objective of the operational television (OTV) technology was to develop a multiple camera system (up to 256 cameras) for NASA Kennedy installations where camera video, synchronization, control, and status data are transmitted bidirectionally via a single fiber cable at distances in excess of five miles. It is shown that the benefits (such as improved video performance, immunity from electromagnetic interference and radio frequency interference, elimination of repeater stations, and more system configuration flexibility) can be realized if application of the proven fiber optic transmission concept is used. The control system will marry the lens, pan and tilt, and camera control functions into a modular based Local Area Network (LAN) control network. Such a system does not exist commercially at present since the Television Broadcast Industry's current practice is to divorce the positional controls from the camera control system. The application software developed for this system will have direct applicability to similar systems in industry using LAN based control systems.

  7. Optomechanical fiber gyroscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kilic, Onur; Akkaya, Onur Can; Ra, Hyejun; Digonnet, Michel; Kino, Gordon; Solgaard, Olav

    2009-10-01

    We report a miniature mechanical gyroscope that utilizes optical means to detect rotation-induced displacements in a mechanical structure. It utilizes the Foucault pendulum principle used in some existing MEMS gyroscopes: a rotating reference frame induces a Coriolis force that oscillates the structure about an axis orthogonal to the driving-mode axis. The main difference with similar MEMS gyroscopes is that this rotation-induced oscillation is sensed using a pair of high-finesse fiber Fabry-Perot displacement sensors instead of a capacitive device. The drive axis is also driven by radiation pressure inside a set of auxiliary fiber Fabry-Perot cavities, making this device immune to electromagnetic interference. Calculations predict that a rotation sensitivity on the order of 1°/h/Hz1/2 is achievable. We show that this structure solves several problems associated with MEMS gyroscopes utilizing electrostatic sensing methods.

  8. Optical fiber smartphone spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Hossain, Md Arafat; Canning, John; Cook, Kevin; Jamalipour, Abbas

    2016-05-15

    An optical fiber-based smartphone spectrometer incorporating an endoscopic fiber bundle is demonstrated. The endoscope allows transmission of the smartphone camera LED light to a sample, removing complications from varying background illumination. The reflected spectra collected from a surface or interface is dispersed onto the camera CMOS using a reflecting diffraction grating. A spectral resolution as low as δλ∼2.0  nm over a bandwidth of Δλ∼250  nm is obtained using a slit width, ωslit=0.7  mm. The instrument has vast potential in a number of industrial applications including agricultural produce analysis. Spectral analysis of apples shows straightforward measurement of the pigments anthocyanins, carotenoid, and chlorophyll, all of which decrease with increasing storage time. PMID:27176971

  9. Anisotropic metamaterial optical fibers.

    PubMed

    Pratap, Dheeraj; Anantha Ramakrishna, S; Pollock, Justin G; Iyer, Ashwin K

    2015-04-01

    Internal physical structure can drastically modify the properties of waveguides: photonic crystal fibers are able to confine light inside a hollow air core by Bragg scattering from a periodic array of holes, while metamaterial loaded waveguides for microwaves can support propagation at frequencies well below cutoff. Anisotropic metamaterials assembled into cylindrically symmetric geometries constitute light-guiding structures that support new kinds of exotic modes. A microtube of anodized nanoporous alumina, with nanopores radially emanating from the inner wall to the outer surface, is a manifestation of such an anisotropic metamaterial optical fiber. The nanopores, when filled with a plasmonic metal such as silver or gold, greatly increase the electromagnetic anisotropy. The modal solutions in such anisotropic circular waveguides can be uncommon Bessel functions with imaginary orders. PMID:25968741

  10. Fiber optic fluid detector

    DOEpatents

    Angel, S.M.

    1987-02-27

    Particular gases or liquids are detected with a fiber optic element having a cladding or coating of a material which absorbs the fluid or fluids and which exhibits a change of an optical property, such as index of refraction, light transmissiveness or fluoresence emission, for example, in response to absorption of the fluid. The fluid is sensed by directing light into the fiber optic element and detecting changes in the light, such as exit angle changes for example, that result from the changed optical property of the coating material. The fluid detector may be used for such purposes as sensing toxic or explosive gases in the atmosphere, measuring ground water contamination or monitoring fluid flows in industrial processes, among other uses. 10 figs.

  11. Hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Limin; Birks, T A; Loh, W H

    2011-12-01

    We propose and demonstrate hydrophobic photonic crystal fibers (PCFs). A chemical surface treatment for making PCFs hydrophobic is introduced. This repels water from the holes of PCFs, so that their optical properties remain unchanged even when they are immersed in water. The combination of a hollow core and a water-repellent inner surface of the hydrophobic PCF provides an ultracompact dissolved-gas sensor element, which is demonstrated for the sensing of dissolved ammonia gas. PMID:22139276

  12. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, Emil F.

    1991-01-01

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects.

  13. Carbohydrates and dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Suter, P M

    2005-01-01

    The most widely spread eating habit is characterized by a reduced intake of dietary fiber, an increased intake of simple sugars, a high intake of refined grain products, an altered fat composition of the diet, and a dietary pattern characterized by a high glycemic load, an increased body weight and reduced physical activity. In this chapter the effects of this eating pattern on disease risk will be outlined. There are no epidemiological studies showing that the increase of glucose, fructose or sucrose intake is directly and independently associated with an increased risk of atherosclerosis or coronary heart disease (CHD). On the other hand a large number of studies has reported a reduction of fatal and non-fatal CHD events as a function of the intake of complex carbohydrates--respectively 'dietary fiber' or selected fiber-rich food (e.g., whole grain cereals). It seems that eating too much 'fast' carbohydrate [i.e., carbohydrates with a high glycemic index (GI)] may have deleterious long-term consequences. Indeed the last decades have shown that a low fat (and consecutively high carbohydrate) diet alone is not the best strategy to combat modern diseases including atherosclerosis. Quantity and quality issues in carbohydrate nutrient content are as important as they are for fat. Multiple lines of evidence suggest that for cardiovascular disease prevention a high sugar intake should be avoided. There is growing evidence of the high impact of dietary fiber and foods with a low GI on single risk factors (e.g., lipid pattern, diabetes, inflammation, endothelial function etc.) as well as also the development of the endpoints of atherosclerosis especially CHD. PMID:16596802

  14. Fiber Optic Attenuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    Mike Buzzetti designed a fiber optic attenuator while working at Jet Propulsion Laboratory, intended for use in NASA's Deep Space Network. Buzzetti subsequently patented and received an exclusive license to commercialize the device, and founded Nanometer Technologies to produce it. The attenuator functions without introducing measurable back-reflection or insertion loss, and is relatively insensitive to vibration and changes in temperature. Applications include cable television, telephone networks, other signal distribution networks, and laboratory instrumentation.

  15. Optical fiber laser

    SciTech Connect

    Hakimi, F.; Po, H.; Snitzer, E.

    1987-07-14

    An optical fiber laser is described comprising: a gain cavity including a single mode optical fiber of given length having a core with a given index of refraction and a cladding surrounding the core and having an index of refraction lower than that of the core. The core comprises a host glass having incorporated a laser gain material with a fluorescence spectrum having at least one broadband region in which there is at least one peak emission line; filter means optically coupled to one end of the gain cavity and reflective to radiation emitted from the gain material over a predetermined wavelength interval about the peak emission line to provide feedback in the gain cavity; an etalon filter section butt coupled to the remaining end of the gain cavity optical fiber, the etalon filter section comprising a pair of filters spaced apart in parallel by a predetermined length of material transparent to any radiation emitted from the gain cavity. The predetermined length of the transparent material is such that the etalon filter section is no longer than the distance over which the wave train energy from the fiber core remains substantially planar so that the etalon filter section is inside the divergent region to enhance feedback in the gain cavity; and means for pumping energy into the gain cavity to raise the interval energy level such that only a small part of the ion population, corresponding to a predetermined bandwidth about the peak emission line, is raised above laser threshold. The laser emits radiation only over narrow lines over a narrow wavelength interval centered about the peak emission line.

  16. Noncontact fiber optic micrometer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Betancourt Ibarra, F.; Guajardo-Gonzalez, Candelario; Castillo-Guzman, Arturo; Guzman-Ramos, Valentin; Selvas, Romeo

    2010-10-01

    A sensor instrument able to measuring the thickness of different semitransparent objects with a resolution of one micron is described. This is based on a fiber optic reflectometer and a laser autofocus system and permit to measuring the thickness of thin surfaces such as semiconductor films, plastic materials and semitransparent objects. The response time for the measuring was roughly 2 sec and the thickness results were compared with a digital mechanical micrometer and both are in good agreement.

  17. Hydrogen loading to the optic fibers for fiber grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Chun; Zhang, Wen-yu; Zhu, Yuan; Pan, Zhi-yong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, fibers with different depths of hermetically coated carbon are hydrogen loaded and radiated, and it's found that too thick of carbon layer around fiber can't bring best radiation-resistant properties, because the thick carbon layer would make the entering of hydrogen difficult although it can help to stop the hydrogen escaping. We also research the duration of saturated hydrogen loading under the temperature of 60°C and 100°C respectively, and it's found that after 120h and 48h, the fibers' photo sensitivities tend to be flat. We also reload hydrogen into the fibers which have been loaded once, and these fibers are etched then, this help us to deep understand the mechanism of hydrogen loading for the fiber gratings.

  18. Coating of carbon fibers -- The strength of the fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Helmer, T.; Peterlik, H.; Kromp, K.

    1995-01-01

    The 6k carbon fiber Torayca T800H was coated with pyrolytic carbon by a CVD process. Fiber bundles were tested and evaluated. By this procedure, the whole distribution of the failure probability with respect to the fiber strength is obtained in a single experiment. The 50% strength of the fiber bundle, i.e., the strength at which 50% of the fibers in the bundle are broken, is inversely proportional to the square root of the thickness of the coating. By relating the strength to the defect size according to linear-elastic fracture mechanics (LEFM), the probability density function of the defects was derived. It is Weibull-shaped for the uncoated fiber and shows an increasing bimodal shape for the increasing coating thicknesses.

  19. Homogenization of long fiber reinforced composites including fiber bending effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Poulios, Konstantinos; Niordson, Christian F.

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a homogenization method, which accounts for intrinsic size effects related to the fiber diameter in long fiber reinforced composite materials with two independent constitutive models for the matrix and fiber materials. A new choice of internal kinematic variables allows to maintain the kinematics of the two material phases independent from the assumed constitutive models, so that stress-deformation relationships, can be expressed in the framework of hyper-elasticity and hyper-elastoplasticity for the fiber and the matrix materials respectively. The bending stiffness of the reinforcing fibers is captured by higher order strain terms, resulting in an accurate representation of the micro-mechanical behavior of the composite. Numerical examples show that the accuracy of the proposed model is very close to a non-homogenized finite-element model with an explicit discretization of the matrix and the fibers.

  20. Cardiovascular benefits of dietary fiber.

    PubMed

    Satija, Ambika; Hu, Frank B

    2012-12-01

    The relationship between dietary fiber and risk of cardiovascular disease (CVD) has been extensively studied. There is considerable epidemiological evidence indicating an inverse association between dietary fiber intake and CVD risk. The association has been found to be stronger for cereal fiber than for fruit or vegetable fiber, and several studies have also found increased whole grain consumption to be associated with CVD risk reduction. In light of this evidence, recent US dietary guidelines have endorsed increased consumption of fiber rich whole grains. Regular consumption of dietary fiber, particularly fiber from cereal sources, may improve CVD health through multiple mechanisms including lipid reduction, body weight regulation, improved glucose metabolism, blood pressure control, and reduction of chronic inflammation. Future research should focus on various food sources of fiber, including different types of whole grains, legumes, fruits, vegetables, and nuts, as well as resistant starch in relation to CVD risk and weight control; explore the biological mechanisms underlying the cardioprotective effect of fiber-rich diets; and study different ethnic groups and populations with varying sources of dietary fiber. PMID:22872372

  1. Fiber Attachment Module Experiment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Agostini, Reinaldo J.

    2014-01-01

    Hollow Fiber Membrane Bioreactors (HFMB) are ideal systems for biological pretreatment of wastewater, however, optimization is still underway. The Fiber Attachment Module Experiment (FAME) allows the simultaneous testing of potential materials, treatments on these and varying inoculums. Polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), the material chosen for its ideal oxygen permeation properties, was treated with 1 sodium hydroxide 0.1 M ether for 18 seconds and ultraviolet (UV) irradiation oxygen plasma (OP) exposure for 1 hour. Preliminary chemistry and visual data indicate promising treatments when using OP and sodium hydroxide as treatments for PDMS fibers; however, due to the biological nature of the experiment, time is a constraint. Sodium hydroxide treatment chemistry data shows nitrification is occurring as urea and ammonia are decreasing and nitrite is increasing. A higher amount of biofilm can also be observed for this particular case. During the final two weeks of the internship x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and acridine orange (AO) cell counts will be employed for treatment effectiveness on the first batch of treatments (ether and sodium hydroxide). These same strategies will be used for the second batch of experiments due in four weeks (2nd week of August).

  2. [Muscle fiber atrophy].

    PubMed

    Nonaka, Ikuya

    2012-01-01

    Muscle fibers have been classified into two major forms of red (slow twitch) and white (fast twitch) muscles. The red muscle utilizes lipid as energy source through mitochondrial metabolism and function to sustain the position against gravity (sometimes called as antigravity muscle). Under microgravity the red muscle is selectively involved. In our unloading study by hindlimb suspension experiment on rats, the one of the representative red muscle of soleus muscle underwent rapid atrophy; they reduced their weights about 50% after 2 week-unloading. In addition, myofibrils were occasionally markedly disorganized with selective thin filament loss. Mitochondria in the degenerated area were decreased in number. The white muscle fibers in the soleus muscle had mostly transformed to the red ones. It took about 1 month to recover morphologically. The satellite cell playing a major role in muscle regeneration was not activated. There still remained unsolved what are the mechanosensors to keep muscle function under normal gravity. Dr Nikawa's group proposed that one of ubiquitin ligases, Cbl-b is activated under microgravity and induces muscle fiber degeneration. There might be many factors to induce muscle atrophy and degeneration under microgravity. Further study is necessary to explore the pathomechanism of muscle atrophy in disused and under immobility conditions. PMID:23196603

  3. Semiconductor cylinder fiber laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandupatla, Abhinay; Flattery, James; Kornreich, Philipp

    2015-12-01

    We fabricated a fiber laser that uses a thin semiconductor layer surrounding the glass core as the gain medium. This is a completely new type of laser. The In2Te3 semiconductor layer is about 15-nm thick. The fiber laser has a core diameter of 14.2 μm, an outside diameter of 126 μm, and it is 25-mm long. The laser mirrors consist of a thick vacuum-deposited aluminum layer at one end and a thin semitransparent aluminum layer deposited at the other end of the fiber. The laser is pumped from the side with either light from a halogen tungsten incandescent lamp or a blue light emitting diode flash light. Both the In2Te3 gain medium and the aluminum mirrors have a wide bandwidth. Therefore, the output spectrum consists of a pedestal from a wavelength of about 454 to 623 nm with several peaks. There is a main peak at 545 nm. The main peak has an amplitude of 16.5 dB above the noise level of -73 dB.

  4. Critical reviews of fiber-optic communication technology Optical fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kapron, F. P.

    The review begins with brief highlights of the history of fiber optics, followed by a discussion of the attributes of shortwave and longwave transmission. This leads to an investigation of various fiber types, short-haul considerations, and then single-mode aspects. Specialty fiber is briefly covered, followed by a survey of several research trends today that will lead to new systems capabilities in the future. No references are given, since hundreds would be necessary to make the list even partially complete.

  5. Fused fiber components for parallel coherent fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zoubir, A.; Dupriez, P.

    2015-10-01

    The concept of massively parallel coherent fiber lasers holds great promise to generate enormous laser peak power in order to produce highly energetic particle beams. Such technology is expected to provide a route to practical particle colliders or to proton generation for medical applications. Such concept is based on the phasing of thousands of fiber amplifiers each emitting mJ level pulses, in which optical fibers are key components. In this paper, we present important technological building blocks based on optical fibers, which could pave the way for efficient, compact and cost-effective components to address the technological challenges ahead.

  6. Optical Fiber Networks for Remote Fiber Optic Sensors

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered. PMID:22666011

  7. Advances in fiber combined pump modules for fiber lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crum, Trevor; Romero, Oscar; Li, Hanxuan; Jin, Xu; Towe, Terry; Chyr, Irving; Truchan, Tom; Liu, Daming; Cutillas, Serge; Johnson, Kelly; Park, Sang-Ki; Wolak, Ed; Miller, Robert; Bullock, Robert; Mott, Jeff; Fidric, Bernard; Harrison, James

    2009-02-01

    Fiber combining multiple pump sources for fiber lasers has enabled the thermal and reliability advantages of distributed architectures. Recently, mini-bar based modules have been demonstrated which combine the advantages of independent emitter failures previously shown in single-stripe pumps with improved brightness retention yielding over 2 MW/cm2Sr in compact economic modules. In this work multiple fiber-coupled mini-bars are fiber combined to yield an output of over 400 W with a brightness exceeding 1 MW/cm2Sr in an economic, low loss architecture.

  8. Optical fiber networks for remote fiber optic sensors.

    PubMed

    Fernandez-Vallejo, Montserrat; Lopez-Amo, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of optical fiber sensor networks for remote sensing. Firstly, the state of the art of remote fiber sensor systems has been considered. We have summarized the great evolution of these systems in recent years; this progress confirms that fiber-optic remote sensing is a promising technology with a wide field of practical applications. Afterwards, the most representative remote fiber-optic sensor systems are briefly explained, discussing their schemes, challenges, pros and cons. Finally, a synopsis of the main factors to take into consideration in the design of a remote sensor system is gathered. PMID:22666011

  9. Safety and immunogenicity of novel respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) vaccines based on the RSV viral proteins F, N and M2-1 encoded by simian adenovirus (PanAd3-RSV) and MVA (MVA-RSV); protocol for an open-label, dose-escalation, single-centre, phase 1 clinical trial in healthy adults

    PubMed Central

    Green, C A; Scarselli, E; Voysey, M; Capone, S; Vitelli, A; Nicosia, A; Cortese, R; Thompson, A J; Sande, C S; de Lara, Catherine; Klenerman, P; Pollard, A J

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) infection causes respiratory disease throughout life, with infants and the elderly at risk of severe disease and death. RSV001 is a phase 1 (first-in-man), open-label, dose-escalation, clinical trial of novel genetic viral-vectored vaccine candidates PanAd3-RSV and modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA)-RSV. The objective of RSV001 is to characterise the (primary objective) safety and (secondary objective) immunogenicity of these vaccines in healthy younger and older adults. Methods and analysis Heterologous and homologous ‘prime’/boost combinations of PanAd3-RSV and single-dose MVA-RSV are evaluated in healthy adults. 40 healthy adults aged 18–50 years test one of four combinations of intramuscular (IM) or intranasal (IN) PanAd3-RSV prime and IM PanAd3 or IM MVA-RSV boost vaccination, starting at a low dose for safety. The following year an additional 30 healthy adults aged 60–75 years test either a single dose of IM MVA-RSV, one of three combinations of IN or IM PanAd3-RSV prime and PanAd3-RSV or MVA-RSV boost vaccination used in younger volunteers, and a non-vaccinated control group. Study participants are self-selected volunteers who satisfy the eligibility criteria and are assigned to study groups by sequential allocation. Safety assessment includes the daily recording of solicited and unsolicited adverse events for 1 week after vaccination, as well as visit (nursing) observations and safety bloods obtained at all scheduled attendances. Laboratory measures of RSV-specific humoral and cellular immune responses after vaccination will address the secondary end points. All study procedures are performed at the Centre for Clinical Vaccinology and Tropical Medicine (CCVTM), Oxford, UK. Ethics and dissemination RSV001 has clinical trial authorisation from the Medicines and Healthcare Products Regulatory Agency (MHRA) and ethics approval from NRES Berkshire (reference 13/SC/0023). All study procedures adhere

  10. Direct spinning of fiber supercapacitor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Tong; Ding, Xiaoteng; Liang, Yuan; Zhao, Yang; Chen, Nan; Qu, Liangti

    2016-06-01

    A direct wet spinning approach is demonstrated for facile and continuous fabrication of a whole fiber supercapacitor using a microfluidic spinneret. The resulting fiber supercapacitor shows good electrochemical properties and possesses high flexibility and mechanical stability. This strategy paves the way for large-scale continuous production of fiber supercapacitors for weavable electronics.A direct wet spinning approach is demonstrated for facile and continuous fabrication of a whole fiber supercapacitor using a microfluidic spinneret. The resulting fiber supercapacitor shows good electrochemical properties and possesses high flexibility and mechanical stability. This strategy paves the way for large-scale continuous production of fiber supercapacitors for weavable electronics. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Design of the microfluidic spinneret and operation of the spinneret (movie). See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr03116a

  11. Drop impact on a fiber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung-Gil; Kim, Wonjung

    2016-04-01

    We present the results of a combined experimental and theoretical investigation of drop impact on a thin fiber. Using high-speed videography, we analyze the dynamics of droplet collision with a fiber. Based on the systematic experiments, we identify three outcomes of collision: capturing, single drop falling, and splitting. The outcomes are presented in a regime map, where the regime boundaries are explained through a scale analysis of forces. We also measure the liquid retention on the fiber after the droplet impact. By considering a liquid film on the fiber, we develop a mechanical model that predicts the residual water mass. Our model reveals that the residual mass depends critically on the fiber thickness and less on the impact speed. Our study can be extended to predicting the remaining droplet, critical problems in air filtration, water collection, and fiber coating.

  12. Coated metal fiber coalescing cell

    SciTech Connect

    Rutz, W.D.; Swain, R.J.

    1980-12-23

    A cell is described for coalescing oil droplets dispersed in a water emulsion including an elongated perforated tube core into which the emulsion is injected, layers of oleophilic plastic covered metal mat wound about the core through which the emulsion is forced to pass, the fibers of the metal mat being covered by oleophilic plastic such as vinyl, acrylic, polypropylene, polyethylene, polyvinyl chloride, the metal being in the form of layers of expanded metal or metal fibers, either aluminum or stainless steel. In manufacturing the cell a helix wound wire is formed around the cylindrical plastic coated metal to retain it in place and resist pressure drop of fluid flowing through the metal fibers. In addition, the preferred arrangement includes the use of an outer sleeve formed of a mat of fibrous material such as polyester fibers, acrylic fibers, modacrylic fibers and mixtures thereof.

  13. Selenium semiconductor core optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, G. W.; Qian, Q. Peng, K. L.; Wen, X.; Zhou, G. X.; Sun, M.; Chen, X. D.; Yang, Z. M.

    2015-02-15

    Phosphate glass-clad optical fibers containing selenium (Se) semiconductor core were fabricated using a molten core method. The cores were found to be amorphous as evidenced by X-ray diffraction and corroborated by Micro-Raman spectrum. Elemental analysis across the core/clad interface suggests that there is some diffusion of about 3 wt % oxygen in the core region. Phosphate glass-clad crystalline selenium core optical fibers were obtained by a postdrawing annealing process. A two-cm-long crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers, electrically contacted to external circuitry through the fiber end facets, exhibit a three times change in conductivity between dark and illuminated states. Such crystalline selenium semiconductor core optical fibers have promising utility in optical switch and photoconductivity of optical fiber array.

  14. Fiber Laser Development for LISA

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Numata, Kenji; Chen, Jeffrey R.

    2009-01-01

    We have developed a linearly-polarized Ytterbium-doped fiber ring laser with single longitudinal-mode output at 1064nm for LISA and other space applications. Single longitudinal-mode selection was achieved by using a fiber Bragg grating (FBG) and a fiber Fabry-Perot (FFP). The FFP also serves as a frequency-reference within our ring laser. Our laser exhibits comparable low frequency and intensity noise to Non-Planar Ring Oscillator (NPRO). By using a fiber-coupled phase modulator as a frequency actuator, the laser frequency can be electro-optically tuned at a rate of 100kHz. It appears that our fiber ring laser is promising for space applications where robustness of fiber optics is desirable.

  15. Impact resistance of fiber composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chamis, C. C.; Sinclair, J. H.

    1982-01-01

    Stress-strain curves are obtained for a variety of glass fiber and carbon fiber reinforced plastics in dynamic tension, over the stress-strain range of 0.00087-2070/sec. The test method is of the one-bar block-to-bar type, using a rotating disk or a pendulum as the loading apparatus and yielding accurate stress-strain curves up to the breaking strain. In the case of glass fiber reinforced plastic, the tensile strength, strain to peak impact stress, total strain and total absorbed energy all increase significantly as the strain rate increases. By contrast, carbon fiber reinforced plastics show lower rates of increase with strain rate. It is recommended that hybrid composites incorporating the high strength and rigidity of carbon fiber reinforced plastic with the high impact absorption of glass fiber reinforced plastics be developed for use in structures subjected to impact loading.

  16. Fiber optic sensor and method for making

    DOEpatents

    Vartuli, James Scott; Bousman, Kenneth Sherwood; Deng, Kung-Li; McEvoy, Kevin Paul; Xia, Hua

    2010-05-18

    A fiber optic sensor including a fiber having a modified surface integral with the fiber wherein the modified surface includes an open pore network with optical agents dispersed within the open pores of the open pore network. Methods for preparing the fiber optic sensor are also provided. The fiber optic sensors can withstand high temperatures and harsh environments.

  17. Fiber Sagnac interferometer temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Starodumov, A.N.; Zenteno, L.A.; Monzon, D.; De La Rosa, E.

    1997-01-01

    A modified Sagnac interferometer-based fiber temperature sensor is proposed. Polarization independent operation and high temperature sensitivity of this class of sensors make them cost effective instruments for temperature measurements. A comparison of the proposed sensor with Bragg grating and long-period grating fiber sensors is derived. A temperature-induced spectral displacement of 0.99 nm/K is demonstrated for an internal stress birefringent fiber-based Sagnac interferometer. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  18. System for testing optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Golob, J.E.; Looney, L.D.; Lyons, P.B.; Nelson, M.A.; Davies, T.J.

    1980-07-15

    A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector. 2 figs.

  19. System for testing optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Golob, John E. [Olathe, KS; Looney, Larry D. [Los Alamos, NM; Lyons, Peter B. [Los Alamos, NM; Nelson, Melvin A. [Santa Barbara, CA; Davies, Terence J. [Santa Barbara, CA

    1980-07-15

    A system for measuring a combination of optical transmission properties of fiber optic waveguides. A polarized light pulse probe is injected into one end of the optical fiber. Reflections from discontinuities within the fiber are unpolarized whereas reflections of the probe pulse incident to its injection remain polarized. The polarized reflections are prevented from reaching a light detector whereas reflections from the discontinuities reaches the detector.

  20. Making Solid Aromatic Polyimide Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    St. Clair, Anne K.; Ely, Robert M.; Dorogy, William E., Jr.

    1991-01-01

    Improved wet-spinning process makes aromatic polyamic acid fibers containing no voids, and converts to polyimide fibers also free of voids. Elimination of voids found to improve tensile strength and other tensile properties. Improved polyimide fibers prove useful in protective clothing, sealing materials, filters for harsh chemical and/or thermal environments, and other applications taking advantage of excellent chemical resistance, high thermal stability, and good tensile properties.

  1. Fiber-optic measurement standards

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pollitt, Stuart

    1991-09-01

    Measurement needs, some very novel, arise at all stages of the development, manufacture, commercial exploitation and use of optical fibers. Measurement standards for fiber parameters enable users and manufacturers to verify the accuracy of their results and, hence, have confidence in their measurements. The facilities developed at the National Physical Laboratory to provide measurement standards for the physical and transmission properties of optical fibers are described and the sources of error are discussed.

  2. Wear of metal fiber brushes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Lloyd Perryman, Jr.

    The goal of this dissertation was determining the wear mechanism of metal fiber brushes on commutators and slip rings with the goal of achieving the lowest possible wear rate. To this end, metal fiber brushes were operated, while conducting direct current, on gold-plated copper rotors with and without unfilled gaps to simulate slip rings and commutators, respectively. Wear rates on unfilled-groove commutators were found to be only modestly higher than on slip ring style rotors. Three possible causes for enhanced metal fiber brush wear on commutators were considered: (i) accelerated "adhesive" wear controlled by contact spots, (ii) fatigue induced wear and (iii) "fiber chopping". Similarly, SEM analysis of fiber tips and wear particles produced scant, if any, evidence of fiber chopping, which would occur as, again, fiber tips extend elastically into the commutator grooves and small slices of them would be "chopped" off by oncoming edges of commutator bars. Finally considered was "modified chopping", wherein fiber tips would be dragged over groove edges, resulting in tensile fracture and chopping. Only a single fiber fragment showed damage that might be compatible with that mechanism. Moreover, the fact that it was exemplified by a single tenuous case, rules it out as significant. The same conclusion also follows from comparing commutator wear rates with that on slip rings. These show good correlation in terms of effective brush pressure, which on commutators is increased because only bars conduct current and gaps do not support load. (Abstract shortened by UMI.)

  3. Source of released carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, V. L.

    1979-01-01

    The potential for the release of carbon fibers from aircraft crashes/fires is addressed. Simulation of the conditions of aircraft crash fires in order to predict the quantities and forms of fibrous materials which might be released from civilian aircraft crashes/fires is considered. Figures are presented which describe some typical fiber release test activities together with some very preliminary results of those activities. The state of the art of carbon fiber release is summarized as well as some of the uncertainties concerning accidental fiber release.

  4. Health benefits of prebiotic fibers.

    PubMed

    Meyer, Diederick

    2015-01-01

    This chapter describes the various compounds that can act as prebiotic fibers: their structure, occurrence, production, and physiological effects (health effects) will be presented. The basis for the description is the latest definitions for dietary fibers and for prebiotics. Using as much as possible data from human studies, both the fiber and the prebiotic properties will be described of a variety of compounds. Based on the presented data the latest developments in the area of prebiotics, fibers and gut and immune health will be discussed in more detail as they show best what the potential impact of prebiotics on health of the human host might be. PMID:25624035

  5. Preparation of silicon carbide fibers

    DOEpatents

    Wei, G.C.

    1983-10-12

    Silicon carbide fibers suitable for use in the fabrication of dense, high-strength, high-toughness SiC composites or as thermal insulating materials in oxidizing environments are fabricated by a new, simplified method wherein a mixture of short-length rayon fibers and colloidal silica is homogenized in a water slurry. Water is removed from the mixture by drying in air at 120/sup 0/C and the fibers are carbonized by (pyrolysis) heating the mixture to 800 to 1000/sup 0/C in argon. The mixture is subsequently reacted at 1550 to 1900/sup 0/C in argon to yield pure ..beta..-SiC fibers.

  6. Optical fiber dispersion characterization study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geeslin, A.; Arriad, A.; Riad, S. M.; Padgett, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    The theory, design, and results of optical fiber pulse dispersion measurements are considered. Both the hardware and software required to perform this type of measurement are described. Hardware includes a thermoelectrically cooled injection laser diode source, an 800 GHz gain bandwidth produce avalanche photodiode and an input mode scrambler. Software for a HP 9825 computer includes fast Fourier transform, inverse Fourier transform, and optimal compensation deconvolution. Test set construction details are also included. Test results include data collected on a 1 Km fiber, a 4 Km fiber, a fused spliced, eight 600 meter length fibers concatenated to form 4.8 Km, and up to nine optical connectors.

  7. Dynamics of biomolecular fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plewa, Joseph Steven

    We describe theoretical and experimental investigations of biomolecular dynamics. First we demonstrate a lattice Monte Carlo simulation which conserves a topological linking number by forbidding moves through cis conformations. Unlike previous models that conserve linking number, our simulated ring chains have flexibility and the scaling properties of a lattice self-avoiding walk. A linking number of order 0.2 per bond leads to an eight-percent reduction of the radius for 128-bond chains. For ring chains evolving without the conservation of linking number, we demonstrate a substantial anti-correlation between the twist and writhe variables whose sum yields the linking number. We raise the possibility that our observed anti-correlations may have counterparts in biomolecules like DNA. We then discuss experiments which combine digital video microscopy and total-internal reflection microscopy (TIRM) in a single technique (3DTIRM) which allows accurate measurement of the three-dimensional location of microscopic particles. We compare two methods for measuring the total scattered light intensity. The first method uses an external photodiode as in conventional TIRM, the second uses only digitized video frames. We employ 3DTIRM to study the material properties of yeast amyloid fibers, consisting of aggregates of Sup35 protein. We attach one end of a biotin-labelled fiber to a glass slide and the other end to a streptavidin-coated 4.4 mum polystyrene sphere. By studying the equilibrium fluctuations of the colloidal sphere, we determine the elastic modulus of the fibers, and set limits on the twisting persistence length.

  8. Fiber Tracking Cylinder Nesting

    SciTech Connect

    Stredde, H.; /Fermilab

    1999-03-30

    The fiber tracker consists of 8 concentric carbon fiber cylinders of varying diameters, from 399mm to 1032.2mm and two different lengths. 1.66 and 2.52 meters. Each completed cylinder is covered over the entire o.d. with scintillating fiber ribbons with a connector on each ribbon. These ribbons are axial (parallel to the beam line) at one end and stereo (at 3 deg. to the beam line) at the other. The ribbon connectors have dowel pins which are used to match with the connectors on the wave guide ribbons. These dowel pins are also used during the nesting operation, locating and positioning measurements. The nesting operation is the insertion of one cylinder into another, aligning them with one another and fastening them together into a homogeneous assembly. For ease of assembly. the nesting operation is accomplished working from largest diameter to smallest. Although the completed assembly of all 8 cylinders glued and bolted together is very stiff. individual cylinders are relatively flexible. Therefore. during this operation, No.8 must be supported in a manner which maintains its integrity and yet allows the insertion of No.7. This is accomplished by essentially building a set of dummy end plates which replicate a No.9 cylinder. These end plates are mounted on a wheeled cart that becomes the nesting cart. Provisions for a protective cover fastened to these rings has been made and will be incorporated in finished product. These covers can be easily removed for access to No.8 and/or the connection of No.8 to No.9. Another wheeled cart, transfer cart, is used to push a completed cylinder into the cylinder(s) already mounted in the nesting cart.

  9. Fiber sample presentation system for spectrophotometer cotton fiber color measurements

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The Uster® High Volume Instrument (HVI) is used to class U.S. cotton for fiber color, yielding the industry accepted, cotton-specific color parameters Rd and +b. The HVI examines a 9 square inch fiber sample, and it is also used to test large AMS standard cotton “biscuits” or rectangles. Much inte...

  10. Compact fiber optic immunosensor using tapered fibers and acoustic enhancement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Chonghua; Pivarnik, Philip E.; Auger, Steven; Rand, Arthur G.; Letcher, Stephen V.

    1997-06-01

    A compact fiber-optic sensing system that features all-fiber optical design and semiconductor-laser excitation has been developed and tested. A 2X2 fiber coupler directs the input light to the SMA connected sensing fiber tip and the fluorescent signal back to a CCD fiber spectrophotometer. In this system, the fluorescent signal is confined in the fiber system so the signal-to-noise ratio is greatly improved and the system can be operate in ambient light conditions. The utilization of a red laser diode has reduced the background signal of non-essential biomolecules. The fluorescent dye used is Cy5, which has an excitation wavelength of 650 nm and a fluorescent center wavelength of 680 nm. To illustrate the biosensor's diagnostic capabilities, a sandwich immunoassay to detect Salmonella is presented. Tapered fiber tips with different shapes and treatments were studied and optimized. An enhancement system employing ultrasonic concentration of target particles has also been developed and applied to the detection of Salmonella. The immunoassay was conducted in a test chamber that also serves as an ultrasonic standing-wave cell and allows microspheres to be concentrated in a column along the fiber probe. The system demonstrates broad promise in future biomedical application.

  11. BN Bonded BN fiber article from boric oxide fiber

    DOEpatents

    Hamilton, Robert S.

    1978-12-19

    A boron nitride bonded boron nitride fiber article and the method for its manufacture which comprises forming a shaped article with a composition comprising boron oxide fibers and boric acid, heating the composition in an anhydrous gas to a temperature above the melting point of the boric acid and nitriding the resulting article in ammonia gas.

  12. Fiber optic geophysical sensors

    DOEpatents

    Homuth, E.F.

    1991-03-19

    A fiber optic geophysical sensor is described in which laser light is passed through a sensor interferometer in contact with a geophysical event, and a reference interferometer not in contact with the geophysical event but in the same general environment as the sensor interferometer. In one embodiment, a single tunable laser provides the laser light. In another embodiment, separate tunable lasers are used for the sensor and reference interferometers. The invention can find such uses as monitoring for earthquakes, and the weighing of objects. 2 figures.

  13. Fiber for the future

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1982-08-01

    This is an interview with J.P. van Buijtenen, principal geneticist of the Texas Forest Service and professor at the Texas Agriculture Experiment Station, College Station, Texas. The maintenance of adequate supplies of wood and fiber for the pulp and paper industry is discussed. Tree improvement and more intensive forestry are highlighted as critical in attaining increased yields. Other topics discussed include: the establishment of second generation southern pine seed orchards, the economics of hardwood production in the South, and the future of short rotation energy plantations.

  14. Fiber reinforced superalloys

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petrasek, Donald W.; Signorelli, Robert A.; Caulfield, Thomas; Tien, John K.

    1987-01-01

    Improved performance of heat engines is largely dependent upon maximum cycle temperatures. Tungsten fiber reinforced superalloys (TFRS) are the first of a family of high temperature composites that offer the potential for significantly raising hot component operating temperatures and thus leading to improved heat engine performance. This status review of TFRS research emphasizes the promising property data developed to date, the status of TFRS composite airfoil fabrication technology, and the areas requiring more attention to assure their applicability to hot section components of aircraft gas turbine engines.

  15. Fiber optic photoplethysmograph

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bokun, Leszek J.; Domanski, Andrzej W.

    1991-07-01

    Using a very well known characteristic of infrared radiation absorbance by human skin versus the length of radiation wave and by application of the newest achievements of radiation detecting techniques and very fast computing techniques - the authors have designed and manufactured the complete computer system for noninvasive diagnosis of blood vessels in legs. As the basic unit in this system, fiber-optic photoplethysmograph was applied. The measurement method used here was very well described by V. Blazek and some other scientists. This article presents photoplethysmograph and all features of the computer system.

  16. Genetics Home Reference: small fiber neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions small fiber neuropathy small fiber neuropathy Enable Javascript to view the expand/collapse boxes. ... PDF Open All Close All Description Small fiber neuropathy is a condition characterized by severe pain attacks ...

  17. Carbon Fiber Biocompatibility for Implants

    PubMed Central

    Petersen, Richard

    2016-01-01

    Carbon fibers have multiple potential advantages in developing high-strength biomaterials with a density close to bone for better stress transfer and electrical properties that enhance tissue formation. As a breakthrough example in biomaterials, a 1.5 mm diameter bisphenol-epoxy/carbon-fiber-reinforced composite rod was compared for two weeks in a rat tibia model with a similar 1.5 mm diameter titanium-6-4 alloy screw manufactured to retain bone implants. Results showed that carbon-fiber-reinforced composite stimulated osseointegration inside the tibia bone marrow measured as percent bone area (PBA) to a great extent when compared to the titanium-6-4 alloy at statistically significant levels. PBA increased significantly with the carbon-fiber composite over the titanium-6-4 alloy for distances from the implant surfaces of 0.1 mm at 77.7% vs. 19.3% (p < 10−8) and 0.8 mm at 41.6% vs. 19.5% (p < 10−4), respectively. The review focuses on carbon fiber properties that increased PBA for enhanced implant osseointegration. Carbon fibers acting as polymer coated electrically conducting micro-biocircuits appear to provide a biocompatible semi-antioxidant property to remove damaging electron free radicals from the surrounding implant surface. Further, carbon fibers by removing excess electrons produced from the cellular mitochondrial electron transport chain during periods of hypoxia perhaps stimulate bone cell recruitment by free-radical chemotactic influences. In addition, well-studied bioorganic cell actin carbon fiber growth would appear to interface in close contact with the carbon-fiber-reinforced composite implant. Resulting subsequent actin carbon fiber/implant carbon fiber contacts then could help in discharging the electron biological overloads through electrochemical gradients to lower negative charges and lower concentration. PMID:26966555

  18. Coating Carbon Fibers With Platinum

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Effinger, Michael R.; Duncan, Peter; Coupland, Duncan; Rigali, Mark J.

    2007-01-01

    A process for coating carbon fibers with platinum has been developed. The process may also be adaptable to coating carbon fibers with other noble and refractory metals, including rhenium and iridium. The coated carbon fibers would be used as ingredients of matrix/fiber composite materials that would resist oxidation at high temperatures. The metal coats would contribute to oxidation resistance by keeping atmospheric oxygen away from fibers when cracks form in the matrices. Other processes that have been used to coat carbon fibers with metals have significant disadvantages: Metal-vapor deposition processes yield coats that are nonuniform along both the lengths and the circumferences of the fibers. The electrical resistivities of carbon fibers are too high to be compatible with electrolytic processes. Metal/organic vapor deposition entails the use of expensive starting materials, it may be necessary to use a furnace, and the starting materials and/or materials generated in the process may be hazardous. The present process does not have these disadvantages. It yields uniform, nonporous coats and is relatively inexpensive. The process can be summarized as one of pretreatment followed by electroless deposition. The process consists of the following steps: The surfaces of the fiber are activated by deposition of palladium crystallites from a solution. The surface-activated fibers are immersed in a solution that contains platinum. A reducing agent is used to supply electrons to effect a chemical reduction in situ. The chemical reduction displaces the platinum from the solution. The displaced platinum becomes deposited on the fibers. Each platinum atom that has been deposited acts as a catalytic site for the deposition of another platinum atom. Hence, the deposition process can also be characterized as autocatalytic. The thickness of the deposited metal can be tailored via the duration of immersion and the chemical activity of the solution.

  19. Monolithic fiber end cap collimator for high-power free-space fiber-fiber coupling.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Xuanfeng; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Zefeng; Hou, Jing

    2016-05-20

    In this paper, we present the design, construction, and testing of a monolithic fiber end cap collimator for high-power free-space fiber-fiber coupling applications. The collimator is based on a large-sized fiber end cap and a spherical lens design on the output facet. Values of the spot size and working distance are theoretically analyzed based on Gaussian approximation and ABCD transmission matrix. The free-space fiber-fiber coupling process is also analyzed for different lens curvature radii and coupling distances. In the experiment, a collimated laser beam is obtained with Rayleigh length of about 400 mm. A high-power laser with 1.1 kW output is tested on the end cap collimator, which only heats up by 7°C at the output facet without active cooling. Free-space fiber-fiber coupling between two 20/400 μm fibers is achieved based on these collimators, with measured coupling loss lower than 0.3 dB. PMID:27411125

  20. Hydrogen loading to the optic fibers for fiber grating sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Zhi-yong; Zhang, Xiao-qiang; Xiao, Chun; Zhu, Yuan; Wei, Wen-jie

    2015-10-01

    Fibers with different depths of hermetically coated carbon are hydrogen loaded and radiated, and it's found that too thick of carbon layer around fiber can't bring best radiation-resistant properties, because the thick carbon layer would make the entering of hydrogen difficult although it can help to stop the hydrogen escaping. We also research the duration of saturated hydrogen loading under the temperature of 30°C, 50°C and 80°C respectively, and it's found that after 150h, 100h and 48h, the fibers' photo sensitivities tend to be flat. Besides, in order to research the period of validity of hydrogen, some hydrogen loaded fibers are idle for from 1 day to 1 months before etched. The additional loss of these fibers are tested and compared.

  1. Fiber breakage phenomena in long fiber reinforced plastic preparation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Chao-Tsai; Tseng, Huan-Chang; Vlcek, Jiri; Chang, Rong-Yeu

    2015-07-01

    Due to the high demand of smart green, the lightweight technologies have become the driving force for the development of automotives and other industries in recent years. Among those technologies, using short and long fiber-reinforced plastics (FRP) to replace some metal components can reduce the weight of an automotive significantly. However, the microstructures of fibers inside plastic matrix are too complicated to manage and control during the injection molding through the screw, the runner, the gate, and then into the cavity. This study focuses on the fiber breakage phenomena during the screw plastification. Results show that fiber breakage is strongly dependent on screw design and operation. When the screw geometry changes, the fiber breakage could be larger even with lower compression ratio.

  2. Graphite fiber intercalation: Basic properties of copper chloride intercalated fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworske, D. A.; Miller, J. D.

    1986-01-01

    In situ resistance measurements were used to follow the intercalation of copper chloride in pitch-based fibers. Subsequent single fiber resistivity measurements reveal a large range of resistivities, from 13 to 160 micro-ohms cm. Additional density measurements reveal a bimodal distribution of mass densities. The dense fibers have lower resistivities and correspond to the stage III compound identified by X-ray diffraction. Neither resistivity nor density correlate with diameter. Both energy dispersive spectroscopy and mass density data suggest that excess chlorine resides in the intercalated fiber, resulting in a stoichiometry of C4.9n CuCl2.5 (where n is the stage number) for the denser fibers. Finally, thermogravimetric analysis shows a 33 percent loss in mass upon heating to 700C. This loss in mass is attributed to loss of both chlorine and carbon.

  3. Multiplexed fiber-ring laser sensors for ultrasonic detection.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongqing; Hu, Lingling; Han, Ming

    2013-12-16

    We propose and demonstrate a multiplexing method for ultrasonic sensors based on fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs) that are included inside the laser cavity of a fiber-ring laser. The multiplexing is achieved using add-drop filters to route the light signals, according to their wavelengths, into different optical paths, each of which contains a separate span of erbium-doped fiber (EDF) as the gain medium. Because a specific span of EDF only addresses a single wavelength channel, mode completion is avoided and the FBG ultrasonic sensors can be simultaneously demodulated. The proposed method is experimentally demonstrated using a two-channel system with two sensing FBGs in a single span of fiber. PMID:24514624

  4. Continuous method of producing silicon carbide fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barnard, Thomas Duncan (Inventor); Nguyen, Kimmai Thi (Inventor); Rabe, James Alan (Inventor)

    1999-01-01

    This invention pertains to a method for production of polycrystalline ceramic fibers from silicon oxycarbide (SiCO) ceramic fibers wherein the method comprises heating an amorphous ceramic fiber containing silicon and carbon in an inert environment comprising a boron oxide and carbon monoxide at a temperature sufficient to convert the amorphous ceramic fiber to a polycrystalline ceramic fiber. By having carbon monoxide present during the heating of the ceramic fiber, it is possible to achieve higher production rates on a continuous process.

  5. Strong fibers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Che-Yu

    1991-03-01

    This program was directed to a new and generic approach to the development of new materials with novel and interesting properties, and to the precision fabrication of these materials in one and two-dimensional forms. Advanced deposition processes and microfabrication technology were used to produce fibers and grids of metals, semiconductors, ceramics, and mixtures of controlled composition and structure, and with new and interesting mechanical and physical properties. Deposition processes included electron beam evaporation, co-deposition of mixtures by dual electron beam evaporation, thermal evaporation, sputtering of a single element or compound, sputtering of a single element in a gaseous atmosphere to produce compounds, plasma enhanced chemical vapor deposition (PECVD), low pressure chemical vapor deposition (LPCVD), and selective tungsten chemical vapor deposition (W-CVD). The approach was to use the deposition processes in coordination with patterns generated by optical lithography to produce fibers with transverse dimensions in the micron range, and lengths from less than a millimeter to several centimeters. The approach is also applicable to the production of two-dimensional grids and particulates of controlled sizes and geometries.

  6. Fiber optic light sensor.

    PubMed

    Chudyk, Wayne; Flynn, Kyle F

    2015-06-01

    We describe a low-cost fiber optic sensor for measuring photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in turbulent flow. Existing technology was combined in a novel way for probe development addressing the need for a small but durable instrument for use in flowing water. Optical components including fiber optics and a wide-spectrum light detector were used to separate light collection from electronic detection so that measurements could be completed in either the field or laboratory, in air or underwater. Connection of the detector to Arduino open-source electronics and a portable personal computer (PC) enabled signal processing and allowed data to be stored in a spreadsheet for ease of analysis. Calibration to a commercial cosine-corrected instrument showed suitable agreement with the added benefit that the small sensor face allowed measurements in tight spaces such as close to the streambed or within leafy or filamentous plant growth. Subsequently, we applied the probe in a separate study where over 35 experiments were successfully completed to characterize downward light attenuation in filamentous algae in turbulent flow. PMID:26009160

  7. Quantitive DNA Fiber Mapping

    SciTech Connect

    Lu, Chun-Mei; Wang, Mei; Greulich-Bode, Karin M.; Weier, Jingly F.; Weier, Heinz-Ulli G.

    2008-01-28

    Several hybridization-based methods used to delineate single copy or repeated DNA sequences in larger genomic intervals take advantage of the increased resolution and sensitivity of free chromatin, i.e., chromatin released from interphase cell nuclei. Quantitative DNA fiber mapping (QDFM) differs from the majority of these methods in that it applies FISH to purified, clonal DNA molecules which have been bound with at least one end to a solid substrate. The DNA molecules are then stretched by the action of a receding meniscus at the water-air interface resulting in DNA molecules stretched homogeneously to about 2.3 kb/{micro}m. When non-isotopically, multicolor-labeled probes are hybridized to these stretched DNA fibers, their respective binding sites are visualized in the fluorescence microscope, their relative distance can be measured and converted into kilobase pairs (kb). The QDFM technique has found useful applications ranging from the detection and delineation of deletions or overlap between linked clones to the construction of high-resolution physical maps to studies of stalled DNA replication and transcription.

  8. Thermoplastic coating of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Edie, D. D.; Lickfield, G. C.; Allen, L. E.; Mccollum, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    A continuous powder coating system was developed for coating carbon fiber with LaRC-TPI (Langley Research Center-Thermoplastic Polyimide), a high-temperature thermoplastic polymide invented by NASA-Langley. The coating line developed used a pneumatic fiber spreader to separate the individual fibers. The polymer was applied within a recirculating powder coating chamber then melted using a combination of direct electrical resistance and convective heating to make it adhere to the fiber tow. The tension and speed of the line were controlled with a dancer arm and an electrically driven fiber wind-up and wind-off. The effects of heating during the coating process on the flexibility of the prepreg produced were investigated. The uniformity with which the fiber tow could be coated with polymer also was examined. Composite specimens were fabricated from the prepreg and tested to determine optimum process conditions. The study showed that a very uniform and flexible prepeg with up to 50 percent by volume polymer could be produced with this powder coating system. The coating line minimized powder loss and produced prepeg in lengths of up to 300 m. The fiber spreading was found to have a major effect on the coating uniformity and flexibility. Though test results showed low composite tensile strengths, analysis of fracture surfaces under scanning electron microscope indicated that fiber/matrix adhesion was adequate.

  9. Safety Precautions in Fiber Arts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hamilton, Marcia

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses the potential hazards of working with fibers, dyes, and wax in textile art projects: bacteria, dust, poisons, allergies, and fumes. Safety precautions for working with dyes are listed. This article is one of seven in this issue on fiber arts. (SJL)

  10. Optical-Fiber-Welding Machine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goss, W. C.; Mann, W. A.; Goldstein, R.

    1985-01-01

    Technique yields joints with average transmissivity of 91.6 percent. Electric arc passed over butted fiber ends to melt them together. Maximum optical transmissivity of joint achieved with optimum choice of discharge current, translation speed, and axial compression of fibers. Practical welding machine enables delicate and tedious joining operation performed routinely.

  11. Fiber-optic proximity sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bejczy, A. K.; Hermann, W. A.; Primus, H. C.

    1980-01-01

    Proximity sensor for mechanical hand of remote manipulator incorporates fiber optics to conduct signals between light source and light detector. Fiber optics are not prone to noise from electromagnetic interference and radio-frequency interference as are sensors using long electrical cables.

  12. Supercontinuum Generation in Optical Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dudley, J. M.; Taylor, J. R.

    2010-04-01

    1. Introduction and history J. R. Taylor; 2. Supercontinuum generation in microstructure fiber - an historical note J. K. Ranka; 3. Nonlinear fiber optics overview J. C. Travers, M. H. Frosz and J. M. Dudley; 4. Fiber supercontinuum generation overview J. M. Dudley; 5. Silica fibers for supercontinuum generation J. C. Knight and W. Wadsworth; 6. Supercontinuum generation and nonlinearity in soft glass fibers J. H. V. Price and D. J. Richardson; 7. Increasing the blue-shift of a picosecond pumped supercontinuum M. H. Frosz, P. M. Moselund, P. D. Rasmussen, C. L. Thomsen and O. Bang; 8. Continuous wave supercontinuum generation J. C. Travers; 9. Theory of supercontinuum and interactions of solitons with dispersive waves D. V. Skryabin and A. V. Gorbach; 10. Interaction of four-wave mixing and stimulated Raman scattering in optical fibers S. Coen, S. G. Murdoch and F. Vanholsbeeck; 11. Nonlinear optics in emerging waveguides: revised fundamentals and implications S. V. Afshar, M. Turner and T. M. Monro; 12. Supercontinuum generation in dispersion varying fibers G. Genty; 13. Supercontinuum generation in chalcogenide glass waveguides Dong-Il Yeom, M. R. E. Lamont, B. Luther Davies and B. J. Eggleton; 14. Supercontinuum generation for carrier-envelope phase stabilization of mode-locked lasers S. T. Cundiff; 15. Biophotonics applications of supercontinuum generation C. Dunsby and P. M. W. French; 16. Fiber sources of tailored supercontinuum in nonlinear microspectroscopy and imaging A. M. Zheltikov; Index.

  13. System for testing optical fibers

    DOEpatents

    Davies, Terence J.; Franks, Larry A.; Nelson, Melvin A.

    1981-01-01

    A system for nondestructively determining the attenuation coefficient, .alpha.(.lambda.), of low-loss optical fiber wave guides. Cerenkov light pulses are generated at a plurality of locations in the fiber by a beam of charged particles. The transit times of selected spectral components and their intensities are utilized to unfold the .alpha.(.lambda.) values over the measured spectrum.

  14. Radiation damage in WLS fibers

    SciTech Connect

    David, M.; Gomes, A.; Maio, A.; Santos, J.; Varanda, M.

    1998-11-09

    Several types of WLS fibers, candidates to be used in the TILECAL/ATLAS detector, were irradiated in a {sup 60}Co {gamma} source. Bicron, Kuraray and Pol.Hi.Tech fibers were exposed to a total dose of {approx}150 Krad. The degradation of light output was measured just after irradiation and followed during several days. The results are presented.

  15. Radiation damage in WLS fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    David, M.; Gomes, A.; Maio, A.; Santos, J.; Varanda, M.

    1998-11-01

    Several types of WLS fibers, candidates to be used in the TILECAL/ATLAS detector, were irradiated in a 60Co γ source. Bicron, Kuraray and Pol.Hi.Tech fibers were exposed to a total dose of ˜150 Krad. The degradation of light output was measured just after irradiation and followed during several days. The results are presented.

  16. The Future of Modified Fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Edwards, J. V.; Goheen, Steven C.; Buschle-Diller, Gisela

    2006-06-30

    The future of fiber technology for medical and specialty applications depends largely on the future needs of our civilization. It has been said that unmet needs drive the funding that sparks ideas. In this regard recent emphasis on United States homeland security has encouraged new bio-fiber research, resulting in the development of anti-bacterial fibers for producing clothing and filters to eliminate pathogens and enzyme-linked fibers to facilitate decontamination of nerve toxins from human skin [1]. Magnetic fibers may also have future security applications including fiber-based detectors for individual and material recognition. Interest in smart and interactive textiles is increasing with a projected average annual growth rate of 36% by 2009 [2]. More specific markets including medical textiles and enzymes will grow even more rapidly. Among the medical textiles are interactive wound dressings, implantable grafts, smart hygienic materials, and dialysis tubing. Some of the medical and specialty fibers inclusive of these types of product areas are discussed in this book. A recent review of the surface modification of fibers as therapeutic and diagnostic systems relevant to some of these new product areas has been published by Gupta [3]. In his review he examined current technology for medical textile structures [3] with a focus on woven medical textile materials.

  17. Experimental optical fiber communications link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutes, G. F.

    1980-01-01

    An optical fiber communications link 1.5 kilometers in length was installed between the Interim Frequency Standard Test Facility and the Timing and Frequency Systems Research Laboratory at JPL. It is being used to develop optical fiber technology for use in the DSN and particularly for precise time and frequency distribution.

  18. Single mode glass fiber welding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nelson, M. D.; Fearnehough, H. T.; Goldstein, R.; Goss, W. C.

    1979-01-01

    The electric-arc welding of commercially available single-mode optical fiber has been demonstrated. A mean transmission of 92% and a maximum transmission of 98% are reported for welds of fiber waveguide of 4.5 microns core diameter.

  19. Fiber optic-based biosensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ligler, Frances S.

    1991-01-01

    The NRL fiber optic biosensor is a device which measures the formation of a fluorescent complex at the surface of an optical fiber. Antibodies and DNA binding proteins provide the mechanism for recognizing an analyze and immobilizing a fluorescent complex on the fiber surface. The fiber optic biosensor is fast, sensitive, and permits analysis of hazardous materials remote from the instrumentation. The fiber optic biosensor is described in terms of the device configuration, chemistry for protein immobilization, and assay development. A lab version is being used for assay development and performance characterization while a portable device is under development. Antibodies coated on the fiber are stable for up to two years of storage prior to use. The fiber optic biosensor was used to measure concentration of toxins in the parts per billion (ng/ml) range in under a minute. Immunoassays for small molecules and whole bacteria are under development. Assays using DNA probes as the detection element can also be used with the fiber optic sensor, which is currently being developed to detect biological warfare agents, explosives, pathogens, and toxic materials which pollute the environment.

  20. Soluble and insoluble fiber (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Dietary fiber is the part of food that is not affected by the digestive process in the body. Only a small amount of ... grains. Fiber is very important to a healthy diet and can be a ... legumes, the group of food containing dried peas and beans.

  1. Plasma vitrification of asbestos fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Camacho, S.L.

    1995-12-31

    Asbestos is a mineral in the form of long, thread-like fibers. Asbestos fibers have been among the best insulators of pipes, boilers, ducts, tanks, etc., in buildings, ships, and industrial furnaces. Over 150,000 metric tons of asbestos were consumed in the United States in 1984. The Environmental Protection Agency has declared asbestos fibers a known human carcinogen. And today, asbestos insulators are being replaced by manmade non-hazardous fibers. Millions of tons of replaced asbestos fiber insulators are in storage, awaiting the demonstration of effective alternative disposal technologies. Plasma vitrification has been demonstrated during May, June and July 1995 as a viable, cost-effective, safe technology for asbestos fiber disposal. A low-mass plasma arc heater is submerged under the waste asbestos insulating materials, and the intense heat of the plasma flame heats and melts the fibers. The by-product is dark, non-hazardous glass pellets. The vitrification process renders the asbestos waste safe for use as road construction aggregates or other fill materials. This paper will describe the results of start-up of a 1 ton-per-hour Plasma Mobile Asbestos Vitrification (MAV) Plant at a DOD Site in Port Clinton, Ohio. The Plasma MAV Plant is being demonstrated for the on-site disposal of 1.5 million pounds of Amosite asbestos fibers.

  2. Fiber optic refractive index monitor

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan David

    2002-01-01

    A sensor for measuring the change in refractive index of a liquid uses the lowest critical angle of a normal fiber optic to achieve sensitivity when the index of the liquid is significantly less than the index of the fiber core. Another embodiment uses a liquid filled core to ensure that its index is approximately the same as the liquid being measured.

  3. Development of novel fibers for telecoms application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukasa, Kazunori; Imamura, Katsunori; Takahashi, Masanori; Yagi, Takeshi

    2010-12-01

    This paper reviews the current situations of optical fibers used for terrestrial and submarine transmission systems as well as up-to-date R&D on these fibers. The current fibers include standard single mode fibers (SMFs), non-zero dispersion shifted fibers (NZ-DSFs), and dispersion managed lines (DMLs). Even though these fibers show quite high and matured properties, the internet traffic is continuously growing, and around 2015-2020, it is expected that the current transmission fibers would become inadequate. To prepare for the future ultra high-capacity transmission, there are three important R&D directions for transmission fibers. (1) Reducing non-linearity by means of enlarging Aeff and/or reducing attenuation loss. It is very important in the case of transmission systems using new multi-level signal formats. (2) Expanding the transmission band more than the current C- and/or L-Band by utilizing new transmission fibers. For example, holey fibers (HFs), which have an endlessly single mode (ESM) property, are one of the interesting candidates of the new transmission fibers. (3) Using Space Division Multiplexing (SDM) by using multi-core fibers. The multi-core fiber literally multiples the core number within a fiber dimension, which enables multiple transmission capacity per one fiber. In addition to the developments of transmission fibers, component fibers have also been studied and developed. Examples of R&D on these component fibers will be also discussed in the latter part of this paper.

  4. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Yi-Jen

    Long fibers are generally preferred for reinforcing foams for performance reasons. However, uniform dispersion is difficult to achieve because they must be mixed with liquid resin prior to foam expansion. New approaches aiming to overcome such problem have been developed at USC's Composites Center. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams with long fibers (over 6 mm in length) manufactured at USC's Composites Center have achieved promising mechanical properties and demonstrated lower density relative to conventional composite foams. Fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were synthesized from thermosetting polymeric microspheres (amino and phenolic microspheres), as well as thermoplastic PVC heat expandable microspheres (HEMs). Carbon and/or aramid fibers were used to reinforce the syntactic foams. Basic mechanical properties, including shear, tensile, and compression, were measured in syntactic foams and fiber-reinforced syntactic foams. Microstructure and crack propagation behavior were investigated by scanning electron microscope and light microscopy. Failure mechanisms and reinforcing mechanisms of fiber-reinforced syntactic foams were also analyzed. As expected, additions of fiber reinforcements to foams enhanced both tensile and shear properties. However, only limited enhancement in compression properties was observed, and fiber reinforcement was of limited benefit in this regard. Therefore, a hybrid foam design was explored and evaluated in an attempt to enhance compression properties. HEMs were blended with glass microspheres to produce hybrid foams, and hybrid foams were subsequently reinforced with continuous aramid fibers to produce fiber-reinforced hybrid foams. Mechanical properties of these foams were evaluated. Findings indicated that the production of hybrid foams was an effective way to enhance the compressive properties of syntactic foams, while the addition of fiber reinforcements enhanced the shear and tensile performance of syntactic foams. Another approach

  5. Highly scalable coherent fiber combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Antier, M.; Bourderionnet, J.; Larat, C.; Lallier, E.; Brignon, A.

    2015-10-01

    An architecture for active coherent fiber laser beam combining using an interferometric measurement is demonstrated. This technique allows measuring the exact phase errors of each fiber beam in a single shot. Therefore, this method is a promising candidate toward very large number of combined fibers. Our experimental system, composed of 16 independent fiber channels, is used to evaluate the achieved phase locking stability in terms of phase shift error and bandwidth. We show that only 8 pixels per fiber on the camera is required for a stable close loop operation with a residual phase error of λ/20 rms, which demonstrates the scalability of this concept. Furthermore we propose a beam shaping technique to increase the combining efficiency.

  6. Advances In Optical Fiber Sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cole, J. H.; Giallorenzi, T. G.; Bucaro, J. A.

    1981-07-01

    Over the past several years, a new non-communication optical fiber application has emerged. This application utilizes optical fibers for sensing. Initial interest centered around rate rotation sensing. Since that time, however, acoustic, magnetic, and temperature sensing utilizing optical fibers has evolved into a viable research effort with significant potential payoff. As an example, laboratory fiber optic acoustic sensors now rival the best sensitivity obtained with piezoelectric ceramics. These sensors possess a unique geometric versatility previously unavailable. In conjunction with the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA), the Navy has begun a Fiber Optic Sensor System (FOSS) program to develop associated technology necessary to realize these sensors. Substantial effort is ongoing at the Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) and other Navy laboratories with considerable contractual effort from universities and industry. This paper reviews the status of the FOSS program.

  7. Fiber Grating Environmental Sensing System

    DOEpatents

    Schulz, Whitten L.; Udd, Eric

    2003-07-29

    Fiber grating environmental measurement systems are comprised of sensors that are configured to respond to changes in moisture or chemical content of the surrounding medium through the action of coatings and plates inducing strain that is measured. These sensors can also be used to monitor the interior of bonds for degradation due to aging, cracking, or chemical attack. Means to multiplex these sensors at high speed and with high sensitivity can be accomplished by using spectral filters placed to correspond to each fiber grating environmental sensor. By forming networks of spectral elements and using wavelength division multiplexing arrays of fiber grating sensors may be processed in a single fiber line allowing distributed high sensitivity, high bandwidth fiber optic grating environmental sensor systems to be realized.

  8. Fiber optic combiner and duplicator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The investigation of the possible development of two optical devices, one to take two images as inputs and to present their arithmetic sum as a single output, the other to take one image as input and present two identical images as outputs is described. Significant engineering time was invested in establishing precision fiber optics drawing capabilities, real time monitoring of the fiber size and exact measuring of fiber optics ribbons. Various assembly procedures and tooling designs were investigated and prototype models were built and evaluated that established technical assurance that the device was feasible and could be fabricated. Although the interleaver specification in its entirety was not achieved, the techniques developed in the course of the program improved the quality of images transmitted by fiber optic arrays by at least an order of magnitude. These techniques are already being applied to the manufacture of precise fiber optic components.

  9. Fiber-optic fluorescence imaging

    PubMed Central

    Flusberg, Benjamin A; Cocker, Eric D; Piyawattanametha, Wibool; Jung, Juergen C; Cheung, Eunice L M; Schnitzer, Mark J

    2010-01-01

    Optical fibers guide light between separate locations and enable new types of fluorescence imaging. Fiber-optic fluorescence imaging systems include portable handheld microscopes, flexible endoscopes well suited for imaging within hollow tissue cavities and microendoscopes that allow minimally invasive high-resolution imaging deep within tissue. A challenge in the creation of such devices is the design and integration of miniaturized optical and mechanical components. Until recently, fiber-based fluorescence imaging was mainly limited to epifluorescence and scanning confocal modalities. Two new classes of photonic crystal fiber facilitate ultrashort pulse delivery for fiber-optic two-photon fluorescence imaging. An upcoming generation of fluorescence imaging devices will be based on microfabricated device components. PMID:16299479

  10. Python fiber-optic seal

    SciTech Connect

    Ystesund, K.; Bartberger, J.; Brusseau, C.; Fleming, P.; Insch, K.; Tolk, K.

    1993-12-31

    Sandia National Laboratories (SNL) has developed a high-security fiber-optic seal that incorporates tamper-resistance features not available in commercial fiber-optic seals. The Python Seal is a passive fiber-optic loop seal designed to give indication of unauthorized entry. The seal includes a fingerprint feature that provides seal identity information in addition to the unique fiber-optic pattern created when the seal is installed. The fiber-optic cable used for the seal loop is produced with tamper-resistant features that increase the difficulty of attacking this component of a seal. A Seal Reader has been developed that records the seal signature and the fingerprint feature of the seal. A Correlator software program compares seal images to establish a match or mismatch. SNL also is developing a Polaroid Reader to permit hard copies of the seal patterns to be obtained directly from the seal.

  11. Coherent fiber supercontinuum for biophotonics

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Haohua; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2013-01-01

    Biophotonics and nonlinear fiber optics have traditionally been two independent fields. Since the discovery of fiber-based supercontinuum generation in 1999, biophotonics applications employing incoherent light have experienced a large impact from nonlinear fiber optics, primarily because of the access to a wide range of wavelengths and a uniform spatial profile afforded by fiber supercontinuum. However, biophotonics applications employing coherent light have not benefited from the most well-known techniques of supercontinuum generation for reasons such as poor coherence (or high noise), insufficient controllability, and inadequate portability. Fortunately, a few key techniques involving nonlinear fiber optics and femtosecond laser development have emerged to overcome these critical limitations. Despite their relative independence, these techniques are the focus of this review, because they can be integrated into a low-cost portable biophotonics source platform. This platform can be shared across many different areas of research in biophotonics, enabling new applications such as point-of-care coherent optical biomedical imaging. PMID:24358056

  12. Glass fiber manufacturing and fiber safety: the producer's perspective.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, J R; Hadley, J G

    1994-01-01

    Historically, the potential health effects of airborne fibers have been associated with the dose, dimension, and durability. Increasing focus is being placed on the latter category. Concern about airborne fiber safety could be reduced by manufacturing fibers that are not respirable; however, due to performance and manufacturing constraints on glasswool insulations, this is not possible today. These products are an important part of today's economy and as a major manufacturer, Owens-Corning is committed to producing and marketing materials that are both safe and effective in their intended use. To this end, manufacturing technology seeks to produce materials that generate low concentrations of airborne fibers, thus minimizing exposure and irritation. The range of fiber diameters is controlled to assure effective product performance and, as far as possible, to minimize respirability. Glass compositions are designed to allow effective fiber forming and ultimate product function. Fiber dissolution is primarily a function of composition; this too, can be controlled within certain constraints. Coupled with these broad parameters is an extensive product stewardship program to assure the safety of these materials. This article will discuss the factors that influence glasswool insulation production, use, and safety. PMID:7882953

  13. Autotract: Automatic cleaning and tracking of fibers

    PubMed Central

    Prieto, Juan C.; Yang, Jean Y.; Budin, François; Styner, Martin

    2016-01-01

    We propose a new tool named Autotract to automate fiber tracking in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Autotract uses prior knowledge from a source DTI and a set of corresponding fiber bundles to extract new fibers for a target DTI. Autotract starts by aligning both DTIs and uses the source fibers as seed points to initialize a tractography algorithm. We enforce similarity between the propagated source fibers and automatically traced fibers by computing metrics such as fiber length and fiber distance between the bundles. By analyzing these metrics, individual fiber tracts can be pruned. As a result, we show that both bundles have similar characteristics. Additionally, we compare the automatically traced fibers against bundles previously generated and validated in the target DTI by an expert. This work is motivated by medical applications in which known bundles of fiber tracts in the human brain need to be analyzed for multiple datasets. PMID:27065227

  14. Autotract: automatic cleaning and tracking of fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prieto, Juan C.; Yang, Jean Y.; Budin, François; Styner, Martin

    2016-03-01

    We propose a new tool named Autotract to automate fiber tracking in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI). Autotract uses prior knowledge from a source DTI and a set of corresponding fiber bundles to extract new fibers for a target DTI. Autotract starts by aligning both DTIs and uses the source fibers as seed points to initialize a tractography algorithm. We enforce similarity between the propagated source fibers and automatically traced fibers by computing metrics such as fiber length and fiber distance between the bundles. By analyzing these metrics, individual fiber tracts can be pruned. As a result, we show that both bundles have similar characteristics. Additionally, we compare the automatically traced fibers against bundles previously generated and validated in the target DTI by an expert. This work is motivated by medical applications in which known bundles of fiber tracts in the human brain need to be analyzed for multiple datasets.

  15. Genomic landscape of fiber genes in fibered and non-fibered cottons

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Cotton fiber is the largest single cell in the plant kingdom. It is the best model to study cell function, differentiation, maturation, and cell death. Cotton fiber transcriptome can be clustered into two types of regions: conservative areas and recombination hotspots. This study was to investig...

  16. FIBER LENGTH DISTRIBUTION MEASUREMENT FOR LONG GLASS AND CARBON FIBER REINFORCED INJECTION MOLDED THERMOPLASTICS

    SciTech Connect

    Kunc, Vlastimil; Frame, Barbara J; Nguyen, Ba N.; TuckerIII, Charles L.; Velez-Garcia, Gregorio

    2007-01-01

    Procedures for fiber length distribution (FLD) measurement of long fiber reinforced injection molded thermoplastics were refined for glass and carbon fibers. Techniques for sample selection, fiber separation, digitization and length measurement for both fiber types are described in detail. Quantitative FLD results are provided for glass and carbon reinforced polypropylene samples molded with a nominal original fiber length of 12.7 mm (1/2 in.) using equipment optimized for molding short fiber reinforced thermoplastics.

  17. All-fiber optical isolator based on Faraday rotation in highly terbium-doped fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Jiang, S.; Zuegel, J. D.; Marciante, J. R.

    2010-01-01

    An all-fiber isolator with 17 dB optical isolation is demonstrated. The fiber Faraday rotator uses 56 wt. % terbium (Tb)-doped silicate fiber, and the fiber polarizers are Corning SP1060 single-polarization fiber. Finally, the effective Verdet constant of the Tb-doped fiber is measured to be -24.5±1.0 rad/(Tm) at 1053 nm, which is 20 times larger than silica fiber and 22% larger than previously reported results.

  18. Polarized fiber optical parametric amplification in randomly birefringent fibers.

    PubMed

    Wang, S H; Xu, Xinchuan; Wai, P K A

    2015-12-14

    A comprehensive theoretical model to investigate phase matching in degenerate polarized fiber optical parametric amplifiers (FOPAs) in randomly birefringent fibers is developed. We show that in the small signal region, simulation results from the proposed model agree well with the experimental results. It was also shown that four waves mixing (FWM) effect could compensate polarization mode dispersion (PMD) induced phase mismatch. Similar to counter-propagating fiber Raman amplifiers (FRAs), the degree of polarization of FOPAs approaches unity exponentially with the gain but at a larger rate 1/Γ. Thus larger polarization-pulling can be achieved in FOPAs than the counter-propagating FRAs for the same gain. PMID:26699064

  19. Ceramic fiber filter technology

    SciTech Connect

    Holmes, B.L.; Janney, M.A.

    1996-06-01

    Fibrous filters have been used for centuries to protect individuals from dust, disease, smoke, and other gases or particulates. In the 1970s and 1980s ceramic filters were developed for filtration of hot exhaust gases from diesel engines. Tubular, or candle, filters have been made to remove particles from gases in pressurized fluidized-bed combustion and gasification-combined-cycle power plants. Very efficient filtration is necessary in power plants to protect the turbine blades. The limited lifespan of ceramic candle filters has been a major obstacle in their development. The present work is focused on forming fibrous ceramic filters using a papermaking technique. These filters are highly porous and therefore very lightweight. The papermaking process consists of filtering a slurry of ceramic fibers through a steel screen to form paper. Papermaking and the selection of materials will be discussed, as well as preliminary results describing the geometry of papers and relative strengths.

  20. Solitons in lossy fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Boehm, M.; Mitschke, F.

    2007-12-15

    We consider the evolution of fiber-optic solitons in the presence of dissipation. Even very low loss ultimately leads to their decay. We derive an explicit expression for the limit of adiabaticity, and discuss the evolution beyond this limit. In determining the soliton content of the optical pulse, we contrast earlier approaches using inverse scattering with a soliton-radiation beat method. It turns out that the evolution beyond adiabaticity is governed by uncertainty, which earlier published studies had missed. Somewhat in analogy to the uncertainty principle of quantum mechanics, we derive a soliton uncertainty relation. We also give simple relations for the evolution of the pulse width which reproduce numerical studies very well.

  1. Fiber optic hydrogen sensor

    SciTech Connect

    Butler, M.A.; Sanchez, R.; Dulleck, G.R.

    1996-05-01

    This report covers the development of fiber optic hydrogen and temperature sensors for monitoring dissolved hydrogen gas in transformer oil. The concentration of hydrogen gas is a measure of the corona and spark discharge within the transformer and reflects the state of health of the transformer. Key features of the instrument include use of palladium alloys to enhance hydrogen sensitivity, a microprocessor controlled instrument with RS-232, liquid crystal readout, and 4-20 ma. current loop interfaces. Calibration data for both sensors can be down loaded to the instrument through the RS-232 interface. This project was supported by the Technology Transfer Initiative in collaboration with J. W. Harley, Inc. through the mechanism of a cooperative research and development agreement (CRADA).

  2. Dimensional stability of natural fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Driscoll, Mark S.; Smith, Jennifer L.; Woods, Sean; Tiss, Kenneth J.; Larsen, L. Scott

    2013-04-01

    One of the main problems associated with the use of natural fibers as reinforcing agents in composites is their uptake of moisture. Many natural fibers are lignocellulosic, which causes them to swell and shrink as the amount of available moisture changes. Swelling and shrinking can cause composites to prematurely fail. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study that considers the use of two different low molecular weight monomers, hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), polymerized by electron beam ionizing radiation, to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers. Eight different treatments consisting of varying amounts of monomer, encapsulating agent, and cross-linkers, were evaluated for their ability to dimensionally stabilize sisal fiber. Results indicate that both polymerized HEA and HEMA can reduce the swelling of sisal fiber. The effectiveness of HEA and HEMA can be further enhanced with the use of a cross-linker (SR 454). The use of hydroxylated monomers to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers may play an important role in reducing delamination and improving fiber-resin adhesion in composites.

  3. High performance fibers. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Economy, J.

    1994-01-01

    A two and a half year ONR/ARPA funded program to develop a low cost process for manufacture of a high strength/high modulus sigma/E boron nitride (BN) fiber was initiated on 7/1/90 and ended on 12/31/92. The preparation of high sigma/E BN fibers had been demonstrated in the late 1960's by the PI using a batch nitriding of B2O3 fiber with NH3 followed by stress graphitization at approx. 2000 deg C. Such fibers displayed values comparable to PAN based carbon fibers but the mechanicals were variable most likely because of redeposition of volatiles at 2000 deg C. In addition, the cost of the fibers was very high due to the need for many hours of nitriding necessary to convert the B2O3 fibers. The use of batch nitriding negated two possible cost advantages of this concept, namely, the ease of drawing very fine, multi-filament yarn of B2O3 and more importantly the very low cost of the starting materials.

  4. Commercial and Experimental Glass Fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wallenberger, Frederick T.

    Continuous glass fibers can be formed from melts with a wide range of compositions and viscosities. This chapter reviews pure silica fibers which are formed from highly viscous melts, silicate glass fibers with 50-70% SiO2 which are formed from moderately viscous melts, aluminate glass fibers with 50-80% Al2O3, as well as yttria-alumina-garnet (YAG) glass fibers which are formed from inviscid (literally non-viscous) melts. Commercial glass fibers are made for a variety of applications from pure silica rods and from silicate melts containing 50-70% SiO2 and 10-25% Al2O3. Boron-free, essentially boron-free, and borosilicate E-glass are general-purpose fibers. ERC-glass offers high corrosion resistance, HS-glass offers high-strength composites, D-glass offers a low dielectric constant, and A-glass offers the possibility of using waste container glass for less demanding applications.

  5. Dimensional stability of natural fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Driscoll, Mark S.

    2013-04-19

    One of the main problems associated with the use of natural fibers as reinforcing agents in composites is their uptake of moisture. Many natural fibers are lignocellulosic, which causes them to swell and shrink as the amount of available moisture changes. Swelling and shrinking can cause composites to prematurely fail. This paper presents the results of a preliminary study that considers the use of two different low molecular weight monomers, hydroxyethyl methacrylate (HEMA) and hydroxyethyl acrylate (HEA), polymerized by electron beam ionizing radiation, to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers. Eight different treatments consisting of varying amounts of monomer, encapsulating agent, and cross-linkers, were evaluated for their ability to dimensionally stabilize sisal fiber. Results indicate that both polymerized HEA and HEMA can reduce the swelling of sisal fiber. The effectiveness of HEA and HEMA can be further enhanced with the use of a cross-linker (SR 454). The use of hydroxylated monomers to dimensionally stabilize natural fibers may play an important role in reducing delamination and improving fiber-resin adhesion in composites.

  6. Communications satellites versus fiber optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goldman, A. M., Jr.

    Examples of the interfaces encountered in the provision of intercity, long-distance service in the U.S. are examined, and a comparison is conducted of the costs of the Intercity, Long-Distance portion of a single voice circuit derived from either fixed satellite trunking service or fiber optic bulk capacity. It is estimated that by the end of 1988, fiber optic should span the nation connecting New York and Washington with Los Angeles and San Francisco. It is shown that once fiber connects a given pair of cities, it becomes the least costly transmission medium, especially compared to fixed satellite service. Attention is given to equivalent transmission capacities, six providers of fiber optic capacity, a total satellite capacity comparison, an economic lifetime comparison, satellite and fiber optic network maps, satellite city-pair distance and cost matrices, and fiber optic city-pair distance matrices. It is pointed out that certain future CONUS satellite service applications will be inherently invulnerable to terrestrial fiber optics serving fixed routes.

  7. Apparatus and method for combining light from two or more fibers into a single fiber

    DOEpatents

    Klingsporn, Paul Edward

    2007-02-20

    An apparatus and method for combining light signals carried on a plurality of input fibers onto a single receiving fiber with a high degree of efficiency. The apparatus broadly comprises the receiving fiber and a plurality of input fiber-lens assemblies, with each fiber lens assembly including an input fiber; a collimating lens interposed between the input fiber and the receiving fiber and adapted to collimate the light signal; and a focusing lens interposed between the collimating lens and the receiving fiber and adapted to focus the collimated light signal onto the face of the receiving fiber. The components of each fiber-lens assembly are oriented along an optic axis that is inclined relative to the receiving fiber, with the inclination angle depending at least in part on the input fiber's numerical aperture and the focal lengths and diameters of the collimating and focusing lenses.

  8. Apparatus and method for combining light from two or more fibers into a single fiber

    DOEpatents

    Klingsporn, Paul Edward

    2006-03-14

    An apparatus and method for combining light signals carried on a plurality of input fibers onto a single receiving fiber with a high degree of efficiency. The apparatus broadly comprises the receiving fiber and a plurality of input fiber-lens assemblies, with each fiber lens assembly including an input fiber; a collimating lens interposed between the input fiber and the receiving fiber and adapted to collimate the light signal; and a focusing lens interposed between the collimating lens and the receiving fiber and adapted to focus the collimated light signal onto the face of the receiving fiber. The components of each fiber-lens assembly are oriented along an optic axis that is inclined relative to the receiving fiber, with the inclination angle depending at least in part on the input fiber's numerical aperture and the focal lengths and diameters of the collimating and focusing lenses.

  9. Multiplexed displacement fiber sensor using thin core fiber exciter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhen; Hefferman, Gerald; Wei, Tao

    2015-06-01

    This letter reports a multiplexed optical displacement sensor using a thin core fiber (TCF) exciter. The TCF exciter is followed by a stripped single mode optical fiber. A small section of buffer is used as the movable component along the single mode fiber. Ultra-weak cladding mode reflection (< - 75 dB) was employed to probe the refractive index discontinuity between the air and buffer coating boundary. The position change of the movable buffer segment results in a delay change of the cladding mode reflection. Thus, it is a measure of the displacement of the buffer segment with respect to the glass fiber. The insertion loss of one sensor was measured to be less than 3 dB. A linear relationship was evaluated between the measurement position and absolute position of the moving actuator. Multiplexed capability was demonstrated and no cross talk was found between the sensors.

  10. Nozzle for superconducting fiber production

    DOEpatents

    Righi, Jamal

    1992-11-17

    A nozzle apparatus for producing flexible fibers of superconducting material receives melted material from a crucible for containing a charge of the superconducting material. The material is melted in the crucible and falls in a stream through a bottom hole in the crucible. The stream falls through a protecting collar which maintains the stream at high temperatures. The stream is then supplied through the downwardly directed nozzle where it is subjected to a high velocity air flow which breaks the melted superconducting material into ligaments which solidify into the flexible fibers. The fibers are collected by blowing them against a porous cloth.

  11. Interfacial adhesion of carbon fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bascom, Willard D.

    1987-01-01

    Relative adhesion strengths between AS4, AS1, and XAS carbon fibers and thermoplastic polymers were determined using the embedded single filament test. Polymers studied included polycarbonate, polyphenylene oxide, polyetherimide, polysulfone, polyphenylene oxide blends with polystyrene, and polycarbonate blends with a polycarbonate polysiloxane block copolymer. Fiber surface treatments and sizings improved adhesion somewhat, but adhesion remained well below levels obtained with epoxy matrices. An explanation for the differences between the Hercules and Grafil fibers was sought using X ray photon spectroscopy, wetting, scanning electron microscopy and thermal desorption analysis.

  12. Harmonic generation in optical fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Sherborn, H.P.

    1990-05-01

    This patent describes an apparatus for providing second harmonic generated radiation. It comprises: an optical fiber disposed in a laser cavity, the optical fiber having a substantially single-mode core which is doped with an active laser material, the laser material being self-organizable to produce radiation by second harmonic generation, the laser material further being substantially transparent to the second harmonic generated radiation; and means for pumping the core of the optical fiber to produce laser radiation therein and the laser cavity further comprising means for extracting at least a portion of the second harmonic generated radiation.

  13. Fiber optic control system integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Poppel, G. L.; Glasheen, W. M.; Russell, J. C.

    1987-01-01

    A total fiber optic, integrated propulsion/flight control system concept for advanced fighter aircraft is presented. Fiber optic technology pertaining to this system is identified and evaluated for application readiness. A fiber optic sensor vendor survey was completed, and the results are reported. The advantages of centralized/direct architecture are reviewed, and the concept of the protocol branch is explained. Preliminary protocol branch selections are made based on the F-18/F404 application. Concepts for new optical tools are described. Development plans for the optical technology and the described system are included.

  14. Erbium Doped Fiber Sources and Amplifiers for Optical Fiber Sensors.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wagener, Jefferson L.

    1996-08-01

    This thesis explores the use of erbium-doped fiber in lasers, amplified spontaneous emission sources, and amplifiers with particular attention to applications involving fiber sensor technology. Erbium-doped fiber laser output power is shown to be strongly dependent on the erbium dopant concentration in a fiber. Using multiple fibers with various erbium ion concentrations, laser output powers are found to decrease as erbium concentration is increased. Upconversion in paired ions is successfully used to model the lasers, resulting in a better understanding of the loss mechanism involved. Further investigation shows that co-doping an erbium-doped fiber with aluminum helps eliminate upconversion in paired ions, and an optimum ratio of 20 aluminum ions for every erbium ion is established. Upconversion due to paired ions is also used to predict the behavior of erbium-doped fiber amplifiers as a function of the erbium ion concentration. With this knowledge of concentration dependence, a low doped, high output power fiber is chosen for use as an amplified spontaneous emission source in a fiber optic gyroscope. Used as a single pass broadband source in one propagation direction and as a signal amplifier in the other direction, this source is tested experimentally in a high quality fiber gyroscope. Experimental results reveal an unexpected dependence on the polarization states of the optical pump and the gyroscope output signal. A theory of polarization anisotropy in the erbium ions is developed in full and accurately models the experimental observations. Using this model to optimize the source, a fiber gyroscope output stability of 4 parts per million is obtained experimentally, approaching the requirements of inertial navigation. This model is also used to explore novel single polarization amplified spontaneous emission sources. Large scale amplified sensor arrays are examined theoretically to determine component and amplification requirements. For balanced gain and loss

  15. Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Garnier, John E.; Griffith, George W.

    2015-12-01

    Methods of producing continuous boron carbide fibers. The method comprises reacting a continuous carbon fiber material and a boron oxide gas within a temperature range of from approximately 1400.degree. C. to approximately 2200.degree. C. Continuous boron carbide fibers, continuous fibers comprising boron carbide, and articles including at least a boron carbide coating are also disclosed.

  16. Wedged Fibers Suppress Feedback of Laser Beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ladany, I.

    1986-01-01

    When injected laser is coupled into optical fiber, emission instabilities arise because of optical feedback losses from fiber into laser. Coupling efficiencies as high as 80 percent, however, obtained by shaping end of multimode fiber into obtuse-angled wedge. Because slanted sides eliminate back reflection, such wedged fiber achieves high coupling efficiency.

  17. Apollo applications of beta fiber glass

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naimer, J.

    1971-01-01

    The physical characteristics of Beta fiber glass are discussed. The application of Beta fiber glass for fireproofing the interior of spacecraft compartments is described. Tests to determine the flammability of Beta fiber glass are presented. The application of Beta fiber glass for commercial purposes is examined.

  18. Developments in Hollow Graphite Fiber Technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stallcup, Michael; Brantley, Lott W., Jr. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Hollow graphite fibers will be lighter than standard solid graphite fibers and, thus, will save weight in optical components. This program will optimize the processing and properties of hollow carbon fibers developed by MER and to scale-up the processing to produce sufficient fiber for fabricating a large ultra-lightweight mirror for delivery to NASA.

  19. All-Fiber Optical Faraday Mirror Using 56-wt%-Terbium-Doped Fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Sun, L.; Jiang, S.; Marciante, J.R.

    2010-06-22

    An all-fiber optical Faraday mirror that consists of a fiber Faraday rotator and a fiber Bragg grating is demonstrated. The fiber Faraday rotator uses a 21-cm-long section of 56-wt%-terbium-doped silicate fiber. The polarization state of the reflected light is rotated 89 degrees +/- 2 degrees with a 16-dB polarization extinction ratio.

  20. Fiber Amplifier Report for NEPP 2008

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomes, Joe; Ott, Melanie; LaRocca, Frank; Chuska, Rick; Switzer, Rob

    2008-01-01

    Ongoing qualification activities of LiNbO3 modulators. Passive (unpumped) radiation testing of Er-, Yb-, and Er/Yb-doped fibers: a) Yb-doped fibers exhibit higher radiation resistance than Er-doped fibers; b) Er/Yb co-doped fibers exhibit largest radiation resistance. Active (pumped) radiation testing of Yb-doped fibers conducted at NASA GSFC: a) Typical decay behavior observed; b) No comparison could be made to other fibers due to problems with test setup. Development of new high power fiber terminations.

  1. Soft capacitor fibers for electronic textiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Jian Feng; Gorgutsa, Stephan; Skorobogatiy, Maksim

    2010-09-01

    A highly flexible, conductive polymer-based fiber with high electric capacitance is reported. The fiber is fabricated using fiber drawing method, where a multimaterial macroscopic preform is drawn into a submillimeter capacitor microstructured fiber. A typical measured capacitance per unit length of our fibers is 60-100 nF/m which is about 3 orders magnitude higher than that of a coaxial cable of a comparable diameter. The fiber has a transverse resistivity of 5 kΩ m. Softness, lightweight, absence of liquid electrolyte, and ease of scalability to large production volumes make the fibers interesting for various smart textile applications.

  2. IR fiber sources for scene projection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, L. B.; Sanghera, J. S.; Aggarwal, I. D.

    2007-04-01

    Naval Research Laboratory has developed IR transmitting fiber and IR fiber sources which can be used for HWIL testing. IR transmitting fiber is capable of broad transmission from near IR to LWIR and can be formed into bundles for imaging. IR fiber sources are based on rare earth doped glass or nonlinear processes in the glass and are cable of high brightness IR emission. Recently, NRL developed a four emitter MWIR fiber source which is capable of high temperature simulation, high dynamic range, and fast response. New broadband fiber sources based upon IR supercontinuum generation in IR fibers are also being developed. In this paper, we will report on these technologies.

  3. Optical fiber Raman amplifier and distributed fiber Raman sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zaixuan; Jin, Shangzhong; Liu, Honglin; Kim, Insoo S.; Wang, Jianfeng; Wu, Xiaobiao; Guo, Ning; Liu, Tao; Yu, Xiangdong

    2003-06-01

    The backscattering spectrum of optical fiber has been measured by use 1427 nm Raman laser and Q8384 optical spectrum analyzer and Stokes and anti-Stokes ZX band backscattering spectrum has been first observed and discussed, ZX band frequency shift is 1THz, bandwidth 3THz(3dB). Optimum design of S-band negative dispersion DCF discrete fiber Raman amplifier has been researched by OPTIAMP DESIGN 3.3 SOFTWARE (made in Canada Optiwave Corporation) and gain spectrum and gain vs. power of DCF discrete fiber Raman amplifier have been measured, practical including Stokes ZX band backscattering gain effect. Pump on/off small signal gain is 13dB (pump power 700mw; fiber 5.1km) and gain band width is 88nm (1440nm-1528nm). The operation principle, configuration and performance of distributed fiber Raman temperature sensors system has been researched. Amplification of anti-Stokes spontaneity Raman scattering (ARS) effect of fiber and its temperature effect has been first observed and discussed. It has been applied to 30km distributed FRS system.

  4. Effect of fiber orientation on fiber wetting processes.

    PubMed

    Mullins, Benjamin J; Agranovski, Igor E; Braddock, Roger D; Ho, Chi M

    2004-01-15

    The current work incorporates a microscopic study of the effect of fiber orientation on the fiber wetting process and flow of liquid droplets along filter fibers when subjected to airflow and gravity forces. Glass filter fibers in various combinations were oriented at various angles within a plane defined by the airflow direction and were supplied with distilled water in aerosol form. The behavior and flow of the liquid collected by the fibers were observed and measured using a specially developed microscope cell, detailed in the paper. The experimental results were compared to a theoretical model developed to describe the behavior. The theory and experimental results showed good agreement. The developed theory allows an optimum angle to be determined for the internal filter fiber structure in the design of wet filters. A sensitivity analysis of the model was conducted to determine the most important parameters. This will aid design of wet filtration systems such that maximal self-cleaning can be accomplished with minimal water use. PMID:14654406

  5. Thermoplastic-carbon fiber hybrid yarn

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ketterer, M. E.

    1984-01-01

    Efforts were directed to develop processing methods to make carbon fiber/thermoplastic fiber preforms that are easy to handle and drapeable, and to consolidate them into low void content laminates. The objectives were attained with the development of the hybrid yarn concept; whereby, thermoplastic fiber can be intimately intermixed with carbon fiber into a hybrid yarn. This was demonstrated with the intermixing of Celion 3000 with a Celanese liquid crystal polymer fiber, polybutylene terepthalate fiber, or polyetheretherketone fiber. The intermixing of the thermoplastic matrix fiber and the reinforcing carbon fiber gives a preform that can be easily fabricated into laminates with low void content. Mechanical properties of the laminates were not optimized; however, initial results indicated properties typical of a thermoplastic/carbon fiber composites prepared by more conventional methods.

  6. Ethanol extraction of phytosterols from corn fiber

    DOEpatents

    Abbas, Charles; Beery, Kyle E.; Binder, Thomas P.; Rammelsberg, Anne M.

    2010-11-16

    The present invention provides a process for extracting sterols from a high solids, thermochemically hydrolyzed corn fiber using ethanol as the extractant. The process includes obtaining a corn fiber slurry having a moisture content from about 20 weight percent to about 50 weight percent solids (high solids content), thermochemically processing the corn fiber slurry having high solids content of 20 to 50% to produce a hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry, dewatering the hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, washing the residual corn fiber, dewatering the washed, hydrolyzed corn fiber slurry to achieve a residual corn fiber having a moisture content from about 30 to 80 weight percent solids, and extracting the residual corn fiber with ethanol and separating at least one sterol.

  7. Direct writing of fiber optic components in photonic crystal fibers and other specialty fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandes, Luis Andre; Sezerman, Omur; Best, Garland; Ng, Mi Li; Kane, Saidou

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond direct laser writing has recently shown great potential for the fabrication of complex integrated devices in the cladding of optical fibers. Such devices have the advantage of requiring no bulk optical components and no breaks in the fiber path, thus reducing the need for complicated alignment, eliminating contamination, and increasing stability. This technology has already found applications using combinations of Bragg gratings, interferometers, and couplers for the fabrication of optical filters, sensors, and power monitors. The femtosecond laser writing method produces a local modification of refractive index through non-linear absorption of the ultrafast laser pulses inside the dielectric material of both the core and cladding of the fiber. However, fiber geometries that incorporate air or hollow structures, such as photonic crystal fibers (PCFs), still present a challenge since the index modification regions created by the writing process cannot be generated in the hollow regions of the fiber. In this work, the femtosecond laser method is used together with a pre-modification method that consists of partially collapsing the hollow holes using an electrical arc discharge. The partial collapse of the photonic band gap structure provides a path for femtosecond laser written waveguides to couple light from the core to the edge of the fiber for in-line power monitoring. This novel approach is expected to have applications in other specialty fibers such as suspended core fibers and can open the way for the integration of complex devices and facilitate miniaturization of optical circuits to take advantage of the particular characteristics of the PCFs.

  8. Optical fiber feedback SQUID magnetometer

    SciTech Connect

    Naito, S.; Sampei, Y.; Takahashi, T. )

    1989-04-01

    This paper describes an optical fiber feedback superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID) magnetometer which was developed to improve electromagnetic interference characteristics. The SQUID consists of an RF SQUID probe, an RF amplifier, two multimode fibers, and a SQUID control unit. Phase-locked pulse width modulation (PWM) was used to construct a flux locked loop (FLL) circuit in the SQUID control unit. The operation of the optical fiber feedback SQUID is stable when a common mode voltage of ac 100 V/50 Hz is applied. It has an energy resolution of 1 x 10/sup -28/ J/Hz. This paper also describes the measurement of an auditory evoked field from the human brain in a magnetically shielded room using the fiber feedback SQUID with a gradiometer type pickup coil.

  9. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, Tom; Spector, Garry B.

    1994-01-01

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected.

  10. Torsional fatigue of aramid fibers

    SciTech Connect

    Kawabata, S.; Sera, M.

    1993-12-31

    An experimental investigation on the shear fatigue process of aramid fibers is presented. Repeated cycles of the torsional deformation are applied on the aramid single fiber and the reduction of the shear modulus of the fiber with an increasing number of the cycles is observed for different strain amplitudes. It has been found that the reduction process of the shear modulus with an increasing number of the repeated cycles depends on the strain amplitude and the effect of the number of cycles is equivalent to that of the strain amplitude on the modulus reduction and they may be superposed like the time-temperature equivalence superposition observed in the viscoelasticity of amorphous polymeric solids. From this relation, the life prediction for the long term use of aramid fibers becomes possible by using this superimposed relation. A simple rate process theory is applied to interpret this fatigue process and to derive the equation for predicting the life cycle number of the loading.

  11. Fiber optic snapshot hyperspectral imager

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mansur, David J.; Rentz Dupuis, Julia; Vaillancourt, Robert

    2012-06-01

    OPTRA is developing a snapshot hyperspectral imager (HSI) employing a fiber optic bundle and dispersive spectrometer. The fiber optic bundle converts a broadband spatial image to an array of fiber columns which serve as multiple entrance slits to a prism spectrometer. The dispersed spatially resolved spectra are then sampled by a two-dimensional focal plane array (FPA) at a greater than 30 Hz update rate, thereby qualifying the system as snapshot. Unlike snapshot HSI systems based on computed tomography or coded apertures, our approach requires only the remapping of the FPA frame into hyperspectral cubes rather than a complex reconstruction. Our system has high radiometric efficiency and throughput supporting sufficient signal to noise for hyperspectral imaging measurements made over very short integration times (< 33 ms). The overall approach is compact, low cost, and contains no moving parts, making it ideal for unmanned airborne surveillance. In this paper we present a preliminary design for the fiber optic snapshot HSI system.

  12. Strain sensing using optical fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Houghton, Richard; Hiles, Steven

    1994-01-01

    The main source of attenuation which will be studied is the optical fiber's sensitivity to bending at radii that are much larger than the radius of the fiber. This type of environmental attenuation causes losses that are a function of the severity of the bend. The average attenuation caused by bending varies exponentially with the bend radius. There are many different fibers, sources, and testing equipment available. This thesis describes tests that were performed to evaluate the variables that effect bending related attenuation and will discuss the consistency of the results. Descriptions and comparisons will be made between single mode and multimode fibers as well as instrumentation comparisons between detection equipment. Detailed analysis of the effects of the whispering gallery mode will be performed along with theorized methods for characterization of these modes.

  13. Fiber positioning and MRS response

    SciTech Connect

    Pavel Polozov et al.

    2004-05-18

    This paper provides experimental results on the dependence of the output signal from small-area silicon photodetectors, such as MRS (Metal-Resistive layer-Semiconductor) photodiodes, on the fiber alignment.

  14. Scintillator fiber optic long counter

    DOEpatents

    McCollum, T.; Spector, G.B.

    1994-03-29

    A flat response position sensitive neutron detector capable of providing neutron spectroscopic data utilizing scintillator fiber optic filaments embedded in a neutron moderating housing having an open end through which neutrons enter to be detected is described. 11 figures.

  15. Nanomechanics of electrospun phospholipid fiber

    SciTech Connect

    Mendes, Ana C. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Chronakis, Ioannis S. E-mail: ioach@food.dtu.dk; Nikogeorgos, Nikolaos; Lee, Seunghwan

    2015-06-01

    Electrospun asolectin phospholipid fibers were prepared using isooctane as a solvent and had an average diameter of 6.1 ± 2.7 μm. Their mechanical properties were evaluated by nanoindentation using Atomic Force Microscopy, and their elastic modulus was found to be approximately 17.2 ± 1 MPa. At a cycle of piezo expansion-retraction (loading-unloading) of a silicon tip on a fiber, relatively high adhesion was observed during unloading. It is proposed that this was primarily due to molecular rearrangements at the utmost layers of the fiber caused by the indentation of the hydrophilic tip. The phospholipid fibers were shown to be stable in ambient conditions, preserving the modulus of elasticity up to 24 h.

  16. Carbon Fiber Risk Analysis: Conclusions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huston, R. J.

    1979-01-01

    It was concluded that preliminary estimates indicate that the public risk due to accidental release of carbon fiber from air transport aircraft is small. It was also concluded that further work is required to increase confidence in these estimates.

  17. Bidirectional fiber optic cable adapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Linehan, M.; Gee, N. B.; Taylor, R.

    1983-02-01

    The technical objective of the BIFOCS program was to develop, build, and test a full-duplex single fiber, fiber optic link, operating in the 1.0 micron to 1.6 micron region, capable of transmitting 20 Mb/s data (10 to the -9th power BER) over a range of at least 10 km, with a goal of 15 km. The link MTBF goal was 5 X 10 to the 3rd power hours and operation over a temperature range of 0 to 50 C. The fiber optic cable consisted of sections not exceeding 2 km in length joined by commercially available dry fiber optic connectors. The system performed successfully at ambient temperature over 15 km of cable.

  18. Application of Fiber Optic Instrumentation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Richards, William Lance; Parker, Allen R., Jr.; Ko, William L.; Piazza, Anthony; Chan, Patrick

    2012-01-01

    Fiber optic sensing technology has emerged in recent years offering tremendous advantages over conventional aircraft instrumentation systems. The advantages of fiber optic sensors over their conventional counterparts are well established; they are lighter, smaller, and can provide enormous numbers of measurements at a fraction of the total sensor weight. After a brief overview of conventional and fiber-optic sensing technology, this paper presents an overview of the research that has been conducted at NASA Dryden Flight Research Center in recent years to advance this promising new technology. Research and development areas include system and algorithm development, sensor characterization and attachment, and real-time experimentally-derived parameter monitoring for ground- and flight-based applications. The vision of fiber optic smart structure technology is presented and its potential benefits to aerospace vehicles throughout the lifecycle, from preliminary design to final retirement, are presented.

  19. Mobile fiber optic emission spectrograph

    SciTech Connect

    Spencer, W.A.; Coleman, C.J.; McCarty, J.E.; Beck, R.S.

    1997-05-01

    Technical Assistance Request HLW/DWPF-TAR-970064 asked SRTC to evaluate the use of a fiber optic coupled emission spectrometer. The spectrometer would provide additional ICP analyses in the DWPF laboratory.

  20. The fibers of our lives

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Presentation will include information and discussion of plants and how they are important to our lives for food, fiber, and oxygen. The “Learn-By-Doing” project will involve each student making their own sheet of paper....

  1. Arc detector uses fiber optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finnegan, E. J.; Leech, R. A.

    1979-01-01

    Arc detector for protecting high-power microwave klystron oscillators uses fiber optics connected to remote solid-state light-sensing circuits. Detector is more reliable, smaller, and sensitive than other systems that locate detector in waveguide.

  2. Fiber Optics: A Bright Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, James, Jr.

    1980-01-01

    Presents an overview of the impact of fiber optics on telecommunications and its application to information processing and library services, including information retrieval, news services, remote transmission of library services, and library networking. (RAA)

  3. Flame resistant elastic elastomeric fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Howarth, J. T.; Massucco, A. A.

    1972-01-01

    Development of materials to improve flame resistance of elastic elastomeric fibers is discussed. Two approaches, synthesis of polyether based urethanes and modification of synthesized urethanes with flame ratardant additives, are described. Specific applications of both techniques are presented.

  4. Fiber-optic temperature sensor

    SciTech Connect

    O`Rourke, P.E.; Livingston, R.R.; Jantzen, C.M.; Ramsey, W.G.; Hopkins, C.D.

    1993-10-01

    Researchers at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC) have developed a class of fiber-optic temperature sensors based upon temperature induced changes in the absorption spectrum of selected materials. For example, a neodymium (Nd) doped glass sensor can be used over a very broad temperature range ({minus}196 to 500{degree}C) and provide good precision and accuracy ({plus_minus}1{degree}C). This type temperature probe is constructed so that light from a fiber optic cable shines through the Nd glass and is reflected onto a second fiber optic cable. Light from this second fiber optic is measured by a diode array spectrophotometer, and the absorption spectrum of the Nd glass used to compute temperature.

  5. High temperature, flexible, fiber-preform seal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinetz, Bruce M. (Inventor); Strocky, Paul J. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A seal is mounted in a rectangular groove in a movable structural panel. The seal comprises a fiber preform constructed of multiple layers of fiber having a uniaxial core. Helical fibers are wound over the core. The fibers are of materials capable of withstanding high temperatures and are both left-hand and right-hand wound. An outer layer wrapped over said helical fibers prevents abrasion damage.

  6. Fibers And Composites Derived From Silsesquioxanes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hurwitz, Frances I.; Hyatt, Lizbeth H.; Damore, Lisa, A.; Gorecki, Joy P.

    1988-01-01

    In new method, silsesquioxane powders blended to control ratio of carbon to silicon. Powders melted, and excess silanol groups condense with evolution of water. When melt attains suitable viscosity, extruded into fibers through die or drawn into fibers from melt at uniform rate. Fibers cured and heat treated. Enables easy fabrication of thermally stable fibers from inexpensive silsesquioxane precursors. Impregnation of fibers and preforms without solvent minimizes both shrinkage and formation of voids resulting from volatilization of trapped solvent.

  7. Assessment of Carbon Fiber Electrical Effects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    The risks associated with the use of carbon fiber composites in civil aircraft are discussed along with the need for protection of civil aircraft equipment from fire-released carbon fibers. The size and number of carbon fibers released in civil aircraft crash fires, the downwind dissemination of the fibers, their penetration into buildings and equipment, and the vulnerability of electrical/electronic equipment to damage by the fibers are assessed.

  8. Light diffusing fiber optic chamber

    DOEpatents

    Maitland, Duncan J.

    2002-01-01

    A light diffusion system for transmitting light to a target area. The light is transmitted in a direction from a proximal end to a distal end by an optical fiber. A diffusing chamber is operatively connected to the optical fiber for transmitting the light from the proximal end to the distal end and transmitting said light to said target area. A plug is operatively connected to the diffusing chamber for increasing the light that is transmitted to the target area.

  9. Small Business Innovations (Fiber Optics)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1991-01-01

    Foster-Miller, Inc. Waltham, MA developed the In-Situ Fiber Optic Polymer Reaction Monitor which could lead to higher yields and lower costs in complex composite manufacturing. The monitor, developed under a Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contract with Langley Research Center, uses an infrared, fiber optic sensor to track the molecular vibrational characteristics of a composite part while it is being cured. It is the first analytical system capable of directly measuring the chemistry of advanced composite materials.

  10. Novel fiber lasers and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenteno, Luis A.; Walton, Donnell T.

    2003-07-01

    Glass fiber lasers were invented in the 60's by Elias Snitzer at Americal Optical, soon after the invention of the first solid-state glass laser. However, it was not until the 80's when these waveguide devices were deployed in industrial applications, driven largely by the technological success of the semiconductor laser diode, which provided practical and efficient pumps, and by the advent of low loss rare-earth-doped optical fiber.

  11. Fiber-Optic Temperature Sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maram, Jonathan M.

    1987-01-01

    Proposed sensor measures temperatures over wide range, from cryogenic liquids to burning gases. Made in part of optical fibers, sensor lighter in weight than thermocouple and immune to electromagnetic interference. Device does not respond to temperatures elsewhere than at sensing tip. Thermal expansion and contraction of distance between fiber end and mirror alters interference between light reflected from those two surfaces, thereby giving interferometric indication of temperatures.

  12. Fused fiber micro-knots.

    PubMed

    Shahal, Shir; Klein, Avi; Masri, Gilad; Fridman, Moti

    2016-06-10

    We present fusing of a fiber micro-knot by a CO2 laser beam. We demonstrate tuning of the coupling strength and tuning of the spectral resonance of the micro-knot by the fusing process. The experimental results reveal that fusing the fiber micro-knots increases the coupling efficiency and improves the robustness and the stability of the micro-knots. PMID:27409009

  13. Safely splicing glass optical fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Korbelak, K.

    1980-01-01

    Field-repair technique fuses glass fibers in flammable environment. Apparatus consists of v-groove vacuum chucks on manipulators, high-voltage dc power supply and tungsten electrodes, microscope to observe joint alignment and fusion, means of test transmission through joint. Apparatus is enclosed in gas tight bos filled with inert gas during fusion. About 2 feet of fiber end are necessary for splicing.

  14. Mechanochromic Fibers with Structural Color.

    PubMed

    Li, Houpu; Sun, Xuemei; Peng, Huisheng

    2015-12-21

    Responsive photonic crystals have been widely developed to realize tunable structural colors by manipulating the flow of light. Among them, mechanochromic photonic crystals attract increasing attention due to the easy operation, high safety and broad applications. Recently, mechanochromic photonic crystal fibers were proposed to satisfy the booming wearable smart textile market. In this Concept, the fundamental mechanism, fabrication, and recent progress on mechanochromic photonic crystals, especially in fiber shape, are summarized to represent a new direction in sensing and displaying. PMID:26420744

  15. 40 CFR 414.30 - Applicability; description of the other fibers subcategory.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... those fibers and fiber groups listed below. Product groups are indicated with an asterisk (*). *Acrylic...) *Polyaramid (Kevlar) Resin-Fibers *Polyaramid (Nomex) Resin-Fibers *Polyester Fibers *Polyethylene...

  16. Fiber coupler end face wavefront surface metrology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Compertore, David C.; Ignatovich, Filipp V.; Marcus, Michael A.

    2015-09-01

    Despite significant technological advances in the field of fiber optic communications, one area remains surprisingly `low-tech': fiber termination. In many instances it involves manual labor and subjective visual inspection. At the same time, high quality fiber connections are one of the most critical parameters in constructing an efficient communication link. The shape and finish of the fiber end faces determines the efficiency of a connection comprised of coupled fiber end faces. The importance of fiber end face quality becomes even more critical for fiber connection arrays and for in the field applications. In this article we propose and demonstrate a quantitative inspection method for the fiber connectors using reflected wavefront technology. The manufactured and polished fiber tip is illuminated by a collimated light from a microscope objective. The reflected light is collected by the objective and is directed to a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. A set of lenses is used to create the image of the fiber tip on the surface of the sensor. The wavefront is analyzed by the sensor, and the measured parameters are used to obtain surface properties of the fiber tip, and estimate connection loss. For example, defocus components in the reflected light indicate the presence of bow in the fiber end face. This inspection method provides a contact-free approach for quantitative inspection of fiber end faces and for estimating the connection loss, and can potentially be integrated into a feedback system for automated inspection and polishing of fiber tips and fiber tip arrays.

  17. Coiled Fiber Pulsed Laser Simulator

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes simulates the transient output pulse from an optically-pumped coiled fiber amplifier. The input pulse is assumed to have a Gaussian time dependence and a spatial dependence that may be Gaussian or an eigenmode of the straight of bent fiber computed using bend10 or bend20. Only one field component is used (semivectorial approximation). The fully-spatially-dependent fiber gain profile is specified is subroutines "inversion" and "interp_inversion" and is presently read from a datamore » file, although other means of specifying fiber gain could be reallized through modification of these subroutines. The input pulse is propagated through the fiber, including the following physical effects: spatial and temporal gain saturation, self-focusing, bend losses, and confinement from a user-defined fiber index profile. The user can follow the propagation progress with 3D graphics that show an intensity profile via user-modifiable cutting planes through the time space axes. A restart capability is also included. Approximate solutions in the frequency domain may be obtained much faster using the auxilliary codes bendbpm10 (full vector), bendbpm20 (semivectoral), and bendbpm21 (semivectoral with gain sheet spproximation for gain and self-focusing). These codes all include bend loss and spatial (but not temporal) gain saturation.« less

  18. Efficiently mating fibers to spectrographs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brodie, Jean P.; Donnelly, R. H.; Epps, Harland W.; Radovan, Matthew V.; Craig, William W.

    1994-06-01

    We describe the conversion of an existing f/8 Cassegrain spectrograph to a floor-mounted spectrograph fed by 94 fibers from the f/5 prime focus of the Shane 3-meter telescope at Lick Observatory. The spectrography forms part of the automated Multi- Object Spectrograph system developed as a collaboration between UCO/Lick Observatory and the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Fibers from a robotic fiber-positioner at prime focus degrade the f/5.5 beam from the telescope (after it has passed through a wide-field prime focus corrector) into roughly a f/4.5 beam. If the 4/8 spectrograph were fed directly with this f/4.5 beam approximately 68% of the light would be lost. A simple optical system has been designed that converts the light from the fibers into the f/ratio expected by the spectrograph. The conversion optics are mounted at the entrance to the spectrograph. We describe focal ratio degradation tests of a variety of optical fibers and the design of the `pseudoslit' which mounts the fibers in a line at the input to the conversion optics.

  19. Fiber optic frequency transfer link

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Primas, Lori E. (Inventor); Sydnor, Richard L. (Inventor); Lutes, George F. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    A reference frequency distribution system is disclosed for transmitting a reference frequency from a reference unit to a remote unit while keeping the reference frequency at the reference unit and the remote unit in phase. A fiber optic cable connects the reference unit to the remote unit. A frequency source at the reference unit produces a reference frequency having an adjustable phase. A fiber optic transmitter at the reference unit modulates a light beam with the reference frequency and transmits the light beam into the fiber optic cable. A 50/50 reflector at the remote unit reflects a first portion of the light beam from the reference unit back into the fiber optic cable to the reference unit. A first fiber optic receiver disposed at the remote unit receives a second portion of the light beam and demodulates the reference frequency to be used at the remote unit. A second fiber optic receiver disposed at the reference unit receives the first portion of the light beam and demodulates a reference frequency component. A phase conjugator is connected to the frequency source for comparing the phase of the reference frequency component to the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam being transmitted from the reference unit to maintain a conjugate (anti-symmetric) relationship between the reference frequency component and the reference frequency modulating the light beam where virtually no phase difference exists between the phase of the reference frequency component and the phase of the reference frequency modulating the light beam.

  20. Coiled Fiber Pulsed Laser Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Hadley, G. Ronald

    2009-01-29

    This suite of codes simulates the transient output pulse from an optically-pumped coiled fiber amplifier. The input pulse is assumed to have a Gaussian time dependence and a spatial dependence that may be Gaussian or an eigenmode of the straight of bent fiber computed using bend10 or bend20. Only one field component is used (semivectorial approximation). The fully-spatially-dependent fiber gain profile is specified is subroutines "inversion" and "interp_inversion" and is presently read from a data file, although other means of specifying fiber gain could be reallized through modification of these subroutines. The input pulse is propagated through the fiber, including the following physical effects: spatial and temporal gain saturation, self-focusing, bend losses, and confinement from a user-defined fiber index profile. The user can follow the propagation progress with 3D graphics that show an intensity profile via user-modifiable cutting planes through the time space axes. A restart capability is also included. Approximate solutions in the frequency domain may be obtained much faster using the auxilliary codes bendbpm10 (full vector), bendbpm20 (semivectoral), and bendbpm21 (semivectoral with gain sheet spproximation for gain and self-focusing). These codes all include bend loss and spatial (but not temporal) gain saturation.