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Sample records for ada mutant strains

  1. Mutant strain of C. acetobutylicum and process for making butanol

    DOEpatents

    Jain, Mahendra K.; Beacom, Daniel; Datta, Rathin

    1993-01-01

    A biologically pure asporogenic mutant of Clostridium acetobutylicum is produced by growing sporogenic C. acetobutylicum ATCC 4259 and treating the parent strain with ethane methane sulfonate. The mutant which as been designated C. acetobutylicum ATCC 55025 is useful in an improved ABE fermentation process, and produces high concentrations of butanol and total solvents.

  2. Molecular basis for paradoxical carriers of adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency that show extremely low levels of ADA activity in peripheral blood cells without immunodeficiency.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Oda, N; Sanstisteban, I; Arredondo-Vega, F X; Shioda, M; Ueno, H; Terada, K; Kobayashi, K; Hershfield, M S; Sakiyama, Y

    2001-02-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency causes an autosomal recessive form of severe combined immunodeficiency and also less severe phenotypes, depending to a large degree on genotype. In general, ADA activity in cells of carriers is approximately half-normal. Unexpectedly, healthy first-degree relatives of two unrelated ADA-deficient severe combined immunodeficient patients (mother and brother in family I; mother in family II) had only 1-2% of normal ADA activity in PBMC, lower than has previously been found in PBMC of healthy individuals with so-called "partial ADA deficiency." The level of deoxyadenosine nucleotides in erythrocytes of these paradoxical carriers was slightly elevated, but much lower than levels found in immunodeficient patients with ADA deficiency. ADA activity in EBV-lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCL) and T cell lines established from these carriers was 10-20% of normal. Each of these carriers possessed two mutated ADA alleles. Expression of cloned mutant ADA cDNAs in an ADA-deletion strain of Escherichia coli indicated that the novel mutations G239S and M310T were responsible for the residual ADA activity. ADA activity in EBV-LCL extracts of the paradoxical carriers was much more labile than ADA from normal EBV-LCL. Immunoblotting suggested that this lability was due to denaturation rather than to degradation of the mutant protein. These results further define the threshold level of ADA activity necessary for sustaining immune function.

  3. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  4. Applications of mutant yeast strains with low glycogen storage capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Petersen, G. R.; Schubert, W. W.; Stokes, B. O.

    1981-01-01

    Several strains of Hansenula polymorpha were selected for possible low glycogen storage characteristics based on a selective I2 staining procedure. The levels of storage carbohydrates in the mutant strains were found to be 44-70% of the levels in the parent strain for cultures harvested in stationary phase. Similar differences generally were not found for cells harvested in exponential phase. Yeast strains deficient in glycogen storage capability are valuable in increasing the relative protein value of microbial biomass and also may provide significant cost savings in substrate utilization in fermentative processes.

  5. Characterization of glycoinositolphosphoryl ceramide structure mutant strains of Cryptococcus neoformans.

    PubMed

    Gutierrez, Ana L S; Farage, Layla; Melo, Manuel N; Mohana-Borges, Ronaldo S; Guerardel, Yann; Coddeville, Bernadete; Wieruszeski, Jean-Michel; Mendonça-Previato, Lucia; Previato, Jose O

    2007-06-01

    In fungi, glycoinositolphosphoryl ceramide (GIPC) biosynthetic pathway produces essential molecules for growth, viability, and virulence. In previous studies, we demonstrated that the opportunistic fungus Cryptococcus neoformans synthesizes a complex family of xylose-(Xyl) branched GIPCs, all of which have not been previously reported in fungi. As an effort to understand the biosynthesis of these sphingolipids, we have now characterized the structures of GIPCs from C. neoformans wild-type (KN99alpha) and mutant strains that lack UDP-Xyl, by disruption of either UDP-glucose dehydrogenase (NE321) or UDP-glucuronic acid decarboxylase (NE178). The structures of GIPCs were determined by a combination of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy, tandem mass spectrometry (MS), and gas chromatography-MS. The main and largest GIPC from wild-type strain was identified as an alpha-Manp(1 --> 6)alpha-Manp(1 --> 3)alpha-Manp[beta-Xylp(1 --> 2)]alpha-Manp(1 --> 4)beta-Galp(1 --> 6)alpha-Manp(1 --> 2) Ins-1-P-Ceramide, whereas the most abundant GIPC from both mutant strains was found to be an alpha-Manp(1 --> 3)alpha-Manp(1 --> 4)beta-Galp(1 --> 6)alpha-Manp(1 --> 2)Ins-1-P-Ceramide. The ceramide moieties of C. neoformans wild-type and mutant strains were composed of a C(18) phytosphingosine, which was N-acylated with 2-hydroxy tetra-, or hexacosanoic acid, and 2,3-dihydroxy-tetracosanoic acid. Our structural analysis results indicate that the C. neoformans mutant strains are unable to complete the assembly of the GIPC-oligosaccharide moiety due the absence of Xyl side chain.

  6. ADA3: a gene, identified by resistance to GAL4-VP16, with properties similar to and different from those of ADA2.

    PubMed Central

    Piña, B; Berger, S; Marcus, G A; Silverman, N; Agapite, J; Guarente, L

    1993-01-01

    We describe the isolation of a yeast gene, ADA3, mutations in which prevent the toxicity of GAL4-VP16 in vivo. Toxicity was previously proposed to be due to the trapping of general transcription factors required at RNA polymerase II promoters (S. L. Berger, B. Piña, N. Silverman, G. A. Marcus, J. Agapite, J. L. Regier, S. J. Triezenberg, and L. Guarente, Cell 70:251-265, 1992). trans activation by VP16 as well as the acidic activation domain of GCN4 is reduced in the mutant. Other activation domains, such as those of GAL4 and HAP4, are only slightly affected in the mutant. This spectrum is similar to that observed for mutants with lesions in ADA2, a gene proposed to encode a transcriptional adaptor. The ADA3 gene is not absolutely essential for cell growth, but gene disruption mutants grow slowly and are temperature sensitive. Strains doubly disrupted for ada2 and ada3 grow no more slowly than single mutants, providing further evidence that these genes function in the same pathway. Selection of initiation sites by the general transcriptional machinery in vitro is altered in the ada3 mutant, providing a clue that ADA3 could be a novel general transcription factor involved in the response to acidic activators. Images PMID:8413201

  7. Mutant prevention concentrations of pradofloxacin for susceptible and mutant strains of Escherichia coli with reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility.

    PubMed

    Marcusson, Linda L; Komp Lindgren, Patricia; Olofsson, Sara K; Hughes, Diarmaid; Cars, Otto

    2014-10-01

    Pharmacodynamic and mutant prevention properties of the fluoroquinolone pradofloxacin (PRA) were measured against a set of 17 Escherichia coli strains carrying no, one or two known mutations conferring reduced fluoroquinolone susceptibility. The strains included susceptible wild-types, isogenic constructed mutants, isogenic selected mutants and clinical isolates. The effectiveness of PRA was determined with regard to preventing the selection of resistant mutants, using static and changing concentrations of drug. Ciprofloxacin was used as a reference drug. Minimum inhibitory concentrations (MICs) and mutant prevention concentrations (MPCs) of PRA for the susceptible wild-type strains were in the range 0.012-0.016mg/L and 0.2-0.3mg/L, respectively, giving a mean±standard deviation mutant prevention index (MPI=MPC/MIC) of 17.7±1.1. The mean MPI PRA of the 14 mutant strains was 19.2±12, and the mean MPI across all 17 strains was 18.9±10.8. In an in vitro kinetic model in which PRA was diluted with a half-life of 7h to mimic in vivo conditions, an initial concentration of PRA of 1.6-2.4mg/L (8-10× MPC), giving a PRA AUC/MPC ratio of 73-92, and a T>MPC of 21-23h was sufficient to prevent the selection of resistant mutants from the three susceptible wild-type strains. Dosing to reduce selection for antibiotic resistance in veterinary therapy has a role in reducing the reservoir of resistant mutants. We conclude that a level of dosing that prevents the selection of resistant mutants during therapy should be achievable in vivo. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. and the International Society of Chemotherapy. All rights reserved.

  8. Mutants of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strain IVIC Pb9 affected in dimorphism.

    PubMed

    San-Blas, F; San-Blas, G

    1992-01-01

    Morphological mutants were isolated after nitrosoguanidine treatment of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis strain IVIC Pb9. Two of these mutants, Pb257 and Pb258, developed a typical mycelia at 23 degrees C, however, the yeast cells which developed at 37 degrees C were indistinguishable from those of the parental strain. A third mutant, strain Pb267, was thermosensitive, grew as yeast-like cells at 23 degrees C, but was unable to survive at 37 degrees C. Morphological observations as well as serological and segregation tests confirmed that the mutant strains originated from P. brasiliensis. Cell wall chemical analyses of the mutant strains grown at 23 degrees C indicated the presence of alkali-soluble, acid-insoluble polysaccharides absent in the parental wild-type strain Pb9 grown under the same conditions. The phenotypes shown by the mutant strains may be related to deficiencies in the proper synthesis of cell wall components of the mycelial phase of this fungus.

  9. Revealing Differences in Metabolic Flux Distributions between a Mutant Strain and Its Parent Strain Gluconacetobacter xylinus CGMCC 2955

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Miao; Yang, Xiao-Ning; Zhu, Hui-Xia; Jia, Yuan-Yuan; Jia, Shi-Ru; Piergiovanni, Luciano

    2014-01-01

    A better understanding of metabolic fluxes is important for manipulating microbial metabolism toward desired end products, or away from undesirable by-products. A mutant strain, Gluconacetobacter xylinus AX2-16, was obtained by combined chemical mutation of the parent strain (G. xylinus CGMCC 2955) using DEC (diethyl sulfate) and LiCl. The highest bacterial cellulose production for this mutant was obtained at about 11.75 g/L, which was an increase of 62% compared with that by the parent strain. In contrast, gluconic acid (the main byproduct) concentration was only 5.71 g/L for mutant strain, which was 55.7% lower than that of parent strain. Metabolic flux analysis indicated that 40.1% of the carbon source was transformed to bacterial cellulose in mutant strain, compared with 24.2% for parent strain. Only 32.7% and 4.0% of the carbon source were converted into gluconic acid and acetic acid in mutant strain, compared with 58.5% and 9.5% of that in parent strain. In addition, a higher flux of tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle was obtained in mutant strain (57.0%) compared with parent strain (17.0%). It was also indicated from the flux analysis that more ATP was produced in mutant strain from pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) and TCA cycle. The enzymatic activity of succinate dehydrogenase (SDH), which is one of the key enzymes in TCA cycle, was 1.65-fold higher in mutant strain than that in parent strain at the end of culture. It was further validated by the measurement of ATPase that 3.53–6.41 fold higher enzymatic activity was obtained from mutant strain compared with parent strain. PMID:24901455

  10. Biofilm formation by exopolysaccharide mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain NRRL B-1355 produces the soluble exopolysaccharides alternan and dextran in planktonic cultures. A set of mutants of this strain are available that are deficient in the production of alternan, dextran, or both. Another mutant of NRRL B-1355, strain R1510, produces ...

  11. Isolation and characterization of mutant strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica lacking dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability.

    PubMed Central

    Nagano, H; Nakai, T; Horiguchi, Y; Kume, K

    1988-01-01

    Mutant strains of Bordetella bronchiseptica, named B-42, B-76, B-84, and B-119, were obtained after serial passages of a parent strain, L3, on Bordet-Gengou agar plates containing 20% horse blood and 200 micrograms of nalidixic acid per ml (BGN-20 agar plates) at 42 degrees C. Mutant strains completely lacked dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability, and lethal activity of the strains for mice was apparently reduced compared with that of strain L3. Mutant strains were able to grow at 42 degrees C, and the strains were nalidixic acid resistant. The mutant strains showed domed (Dom+) colony morphology with smooth texture (Scs+) and no production of zone of hemolysis (Hly-), but the agglutinability of these strains to antiserum prepared with Dom+ Scs+ Hly+ organisms of strain L3 was the same as that of strain L3. When strain B-42 was inoculated intramuscularly or intranasally into guinea pigs, all the animals survived without manifesting clinical signs and produced a high-level of serum agglutination antibodies against strain L3. These inoculated animals were protected against intranasal challenge with strain L3. These properties of mutant strains are hereditarily stable after 50 subcultures on BGN-20 agar plates or 20 passages in mice. These data suggest that the mutant strains lacking dermonecrotic toxin-producing ability can be used as a live attenuated vaccine against swine atrophic rhinitis. PMID:3182989

  12. The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis encodes two DNA methyltransferases for inducible repair of DNA alkylation damage.

    PubMed

    Yang, Mingyi; Aamodt, Randi M; Dalhus, Bjørn; Balasingham, Seetha; Helle, Ina; Andersen, Pernille; Tønjum, Tone; Alseth, Ingrun; Rognes, Torbjørn; Bjørås, Magnar

    2011-06-10

    The ada operon of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, which encodes a composite protein of AdaA and AlkA and a separate AdaB/Ogt protein, was characterized. M. tuberculosis treated with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine induced transcription of the adaA-alkA and adaB genes, suggesting that M. tuberculosis mount an inducible response to methylating agents. Survival assays of the methyltransferase defective Escherichia coli mutant KT233 (ada ogt), showed that expression of the adaB gene rescued the alkylation sensitivity. Further, adaB but not adaA-alkA complemented the hypermutator phenotype of KT233. Purified AdaA-AlkA and AdaB possessed methyltransferase activity. These data suggested that AdaB counteract the cytotoxic and mutagenic effect of O(6)-methylguanine, while AdaA-AlkA most likely transfers methyl groups from innocuous methylphosphotriesters. AdaA-AlkA did not possess alkylbase DNA glycosylase activity nor rescue the alkylation sensitivity of the E. coli mutant BK2118 (tag alkA). We propose that AdaA-AlkA is a positive regulator of the adaptive response in M. tuberculosis. It thus appears that the ada operon of M. tuberculosis suppresses the mutagenic effect of alkylation but not the cytotoxic effect of lesions such as 3-methylpurines. Collectively, these data indicate that M. tuberculosis hypermutator strains with defective adaptive response genes might sustain robustness to cytotoxic alkylation DNA damage and confer a selective advantage contributing to host adaptation.

  13. Rhizobium japonicum mutant strains unable to grow chemoautotrophically with H2.

    PubMed Central

    Maier, R J

    1981-01-01

    Rhizobium japonicum strain SR grows chemoautotrophically on a mineral salts medium when incubated in an H2- and CO2-containing atmosphere. Mutant strains unable to grow or that grow very poorly chemoautotrophically with H2 have been isolated from strain SR. The mutant isolation procedure involved mutagenesis with ethyl methane sulfonate, penicillin selection under chemoautotrophic growth conditions, and plating of the survivors onto medium containing carbon. The resulting colonies were replica plated onto medium that did not contain carbon, and the plates were incubated in an H2- and CO2-containing atmosphere. Mutant strains unable to grow under these conditions were chosen. Over 100 mutant strains with defects in chemoautotrophic metabolism were obtained. The phenotypes of the mutants fall into various classes. These include strains unable to oxidize H2 and strains deficient in CO2 uptake. Some of the mutant strains were capable of oxidizing H2 only when artificial electron acceptors were provided. Two mutant strains specifically lack activity of the key CO2-fixing enzyme ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase. Other mutant strains lack both H2-oxidizing ability and ribulose 1,5-bisphosphate carboxylase activity. PMID:6780521

  14. Mutant Strains of Escherichia coli K-12 Unable to Form Ubiquinone

    PubMed Central

    Cox, G. B.; Gibson, F.; Pittard, James

    1968-01-01

    A strain of Escherichia coli was isolated which was unable to form ubiquinone. This mutant was obtained by selecting strains unable to grow on malate as sole source of carbon. Such strains were further screened by examination of the quinone content of cells grown on a glucose medium. A mutant unable to form vitamin K was also isolated by this procedure. A genetic analysis of the ubiquinoneless strain showed that it possessed two mutations affecting ubiquinone biosynthesis. Images PMID:4870277

  15. Gastrointestinal Colonization by Candida albicans Mutant Strains in Antibiotic-Treated Mice

    PubMed Central

    Wiesner, Stephen M.; Jechorek, Robert P.; Garni, Robb M.; Bendel, Catherine M.; Wells, Carol L.

    2001-01-01

    Antibiotic-treated mice orally inoculated with one of three Candida albicans strains (including two mutant strains) or indigenous Candida pelliculosa showed levels of candidal gastrointestinal colonization that were strain specific. However, regardless of strain, the numbers of viable candida were intermediate to high in the stomach, were consistently lowest in the upper small intestine, and increased progressively down the intestinal tract. PMID:11139219

  16. Comparative metabolic flux analysis of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a high riboflavin-producing mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Jeong, Bo-Young; Wittmann, Christoph; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2015-01-01

    In the present study, we analyzed the central metabolic pathway of an Ashbya gossypii wild type strain and a riboflavin over-producing mutant strain developed in a previous study in order to characterize the riboflavin over-production pathway. (13)C-Metabolic flux analysis ((13)C-MFA) was carried out in both strains, and the resulting data were fit to a steady-state flux isotopomer model using OpenFLUX. Flux to pentose-5-phosphate (P5P) via the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) was 9% higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. The flux from purine synthesis to riboflavin in the mutant strain was 1.6%, while that of the wild type strain was only 0.1%, a 16-fold difference. In addition, the flux from the cytoplasmic pyruvate pool to the extracellular metabolites, pyruvate, lactate, and alanine, was 2-fold higher in the mutant strain compared to the wild type strain. This result demonstrates that increased guanosine triphosphate (GTP) flux through the PPP and purine synthesis pathway (PSP) increased riboflavin production in the mutant strain. The present study provides the first insight into metabolic flux through the central carbon pathway in A. gossypii and sets the foundation for development of a quantitative and functional model of the A. gossypii metabolic network.

  17. Increased riboflavin production from activated bleaching earth by a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii.

    PubMed

    Tajima, Satoshi; Itoh, Yoko; Sugimoto, Takashi; Kato, Tatsuya; Park, Enoch Y

    2009-10-01

    The production of riboflavin from vegetable oil was increased using a mutant strain of Ashbya gossypii. This mutant was generated by treating the wild-type strain with N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). Riboflavin production was 10-fold higher in the mutant compared to the wild-type strain. The specific intracellular catalase activity after 3 d of culture was 6-fold higher in the mutant than in the wild-type strain. For the mutant, riboflavin production in the presence of 40 mM hydrogen peroxide was 16% less than that in the absence of hydrogen peroxide, whereas it was 56% less for the wild-type strain. The isocitrate lyase (ICL) activity of the mutant was 0.26 mU/mg of protein during the active riboflavin production phase, which was 2.6-fold higher than the wild-type strain. These data indicate that the mutant utilizes the carbon flux from the TCA cycle to the glyoxylate cycle more efficiently than the wild-type strain, resulting in enhanced riboflavin production. This novel mutant has the potential to be of use for industrial-scale riboflavin production from waste-activated bleaching earth (ABE), thereby transforming a useless material into a valuable bioproduct.

  18. Comparison of adhesion, invasion, motility, and toxin production of Campylobacter strains and their resistant mutants.

    PubMed

    Zeitouni, Salman; Guyard-Nicodème, Muriel; Kempf, Isabelle

    2013-04-01

    The objectives of this study were to compare the in vitro adhesion and invasion of human epithelial cells, motility, and toxin production characteristics of Campylobacter-susceptible strains and their fluoroquinolone- or macrolide-resistant mutants. Susceptible strains and resistant mutants demonstrated similar adhesion capacities to epithelial cells. For Campylobacter coli, fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants with Thr86Ile or Asp90Asn substitutions showed a higher rate of invasion of Caco-2 cells than their isogenic parental strain. Fluoroquinolone resistance did not impact C. coli motility. Mutants harboring Asp90Asn had greater cytotoxic activity than the parental strain. Macrolide resistance had no impact on the studied characteristics of C. coli. For Campylobacter jejuni, fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants had slightly different invasiveness levels and significantly lower motility than the isogenic parental strain. C. jejuni macrolide-resistant mutants with A2074G substitution in the 23S rRNA gene had a higher invasiveness level than its parental strain, but mutants with A2074C in 23S rRNA and G221A in rplD showed reduced motility and similar invasion levels to the susceptible strains. Neither fluoroquinolone nor macrolide resistance appears to affect C. jejuni cytotoxicity. In conclusion, mutations that are frequently encountered in Campylobacter-resistant strains can enhance the invasiveness in Caco-2 cells.

  19. Susceptibility of lipopolysaccharide-defective mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO to dyes, detergents, and antibiotics.

    PubMed Central

    Kropinski, A M; Chan, L; Milazzo, F H

    1978-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide-defective mutants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa strain PAO have been isolated on the basis of their resistance to lipopolysaccharide-specific bacteriophages. These mutants have been differentiated by their agglutination in NaCl and acriflavine, phage sensitivity, and chemical analysis of the lipopolysaccharides. The susceptibility of the wild-type strain and four mutants to a series of twenty-six agents, including dyes, detergents, antibiotics, and lysozyme, was examined. The roughest mutant (AK-43) exhibited increased susceptibility to sodium deoxycholate, hexadecylpyridinium chloride, benzalkonium chloride, ampicillin, penicillin G, erythromycin, colymycin, and polymyxin B. The role of cell envelope fractions in antibiotic resistance in P. aeruginosa is discussed. PMID:122525

  20. Molecular construction and characterization of nif mutants of the obligate methanotroph Methylosinus sp. strain 6.

    PubMed Central

    Toukdarian, A E; Lidstrom, M E

    1984-01-01

    We describe here a method for constructing mutants in bacteria that are not amenable to mutant isolation by conventional means. A one-step marker exchange procedure was used to construct nitrogen fixation (nif) mutants of the obligate methane-utilizing bacterium Methylosinus sp. strain 6, using transposon 5 (Tn5)-containing nif genes cloned into pBR325. The resultant mutants appeared to contain defects in nif structural genes, and DNA hybridization analysis showed that although one out of five had apparently been produced as a result of double-crossover homologous recombination, a variety of molecular events had led to the production of the other four mutants. Images PMID:6321452

  1. Mutant strains of Tetrahymena thermophila defective in thymidine kinase activity: Biochemical and genetic characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Cornish, K.V.; Pearlman, R.E.

    1982-08-01

    Three mutant strains, one conditional, of Tetrahymena thermophila were defective in thymidine phosphorylating activity in vivo and in thymidine kinase activity in vitro. Nucleoside phosphotransferase activity in mutant cell extracts approached wild-type levels, suggesting that thymidine kinase is responsible for most, if not all, thymidine phosphorylation in vivo. Thymidine kinase activity in extracts of the conditional mutant strain was deficient when the cells were grown or assayed or both at the permissive temperature, implying a structural enzyme defect. Analysis of the reaction products from in vitro assays with partially purified enzymes showed that phosphorylation by thymidine kinase and nucleoside phosphotransferase occurred at the 5' position. Genetic analyses showed that the mutant phenotype was recessive and that mutations in each of the three mutant strains did not complement, suggesting allelism.

  2. Characterization of Brucella abortus mutant strain Δ22915, a potential vaccine candidate.

    PubMed

    Bao, Yanqing; Tian, Mingxing; Li, Peng; Liu, Jiameng; Ding, Chan; Yu, Shengqing

    2017-04-04

    Brucellosis, caused by Brucella spp., is an important zoonosis worldwide. Vaccination is an effective strategy for protection against Brucella infection in livestock in developing countries and in wildlife in developed countries. However, current vaccine strains including S19 and RB51 are pathogenic to humans and pregnant animals, limiting their use. In this study, we constructed the Brucella abortus (B. abortus) S2308 mutant strain Δ22915, in which the putative lytic transglycosylase gene BAB_RS22915 was deleted. The biological properties of mutant strain Δ22915 were characterized and protection of mice against virulent S2308 challenge was evaluated. The mutant strain Δ22915 showed reduced survival within RAW264.7 cells and survival in vivo in mice. In addition, the mutant strain Δ22915 failed to escape fusion with lysosomes within host cells, and caused no observable pathological damage. RNA-seq analysis indicated that four genes associated with amino acid/nucleotide transport and metabolism were significantly upregulated in mutant strain Δ22915. Furthermore, inoculation of ∆22915 at 10(5) colony forming units induced effective host immune responses and long-term protection of BALB/c mice. Therefore, mutant strain ∆22915 could be used as a novel vaccine candidate in the future to protect animals against B. abortus infection.

  3. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2001-09-25

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  4. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, M.; Millard, C.S.; Stols, L.

    1998-06-23

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria. 2 figs.

  5. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    1998-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which as been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  6. Mutant E. coli strain with increased succinic acid production

    DOEpatents

    Donnelly, Mark; Millard, Cynthia S.; Stols, Lucy

    2002-01-01

    A method for isolating succinic acid producing bacteria is provided comprising increasing the biomass of an organism which lacks the ability to catabolize pyruvate, and then subjecting the biomass to glucose-rich medium in an anaerobic environment to enable pyruvate-catabolizing mutants to grow. The invention also provides for a mutant that produces high amounts of succinic acid, which has been derived from a parent which lacked the genes for pyruvate formate lyase and lactate dehydrogenase, and which belongs to the E.coli Group of Bacteria.

  7. Ada COCOMO and the Ada Process Model

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-01-01

    language, the use of incremental development, and the use of the Ada process model capitalizing on the strengths of Ada to improve the efficiency of software...development. This paper presents the portions of the revised Ada COCOMO dealing with the effects of Ada and the Ada process model . The remainder of...this section of the paper discusses the objectives of Ada COCOMO. Section 2 describes the Ada Process Model and its overall effects on software

  8. Characterization of a spontaneous adhesion-defective mutant of Ruminococcus albus strain 20.

    PubMed

    Mosoni, P; Gaillard-Martinie, B

    2001-07-01

    A spontaneous adhesion-defective mutant (mutant D5) of Ruminococcus albus strain 20 was isolated and compared to the parent to investigate the impact of the mutation on cellulolysis and to identify the adhesion mechanism of R. albus. The comparison of kinetics of cellulose degradation by strain 20 and mutant D5 showed that the mutation delayed and reduced bacterial growth on cellulose and cellulose degradation. These results were partly explained by a twofold lower cellulase activity in the mutant than in the parent. The glycocalyx of strain 20, observed by transmission electron microscopy, was large and homogeneous, and linked cells to cellulose. The mutant glycocalyx was aggregated at its periphery and cells attached loosely to cellulose. A glycoprotein of 25 kDa (GP25), present in the membrane fraction and the extracellular medium of strain 20, was not detected in the same fractions of mutant D5. Though glycoprotein GP25 did not bind to cellulose, it may be involved in adhesion as an intermediate component. Different cell-surface features of mutant D5 (cellulases, glycoprotein GP25, glycocalyx) were thus affected, any or all of which may be involved in its adhesion-defective phenotype. These results suggest that adhesion and cellulolysis are linked and that adhesion is a multifactorial phenomenon that involves at least the extracellular glycocalyx.

  9. Electrical Phenotypes of Calcium Transport Mutant Strains of a Filamentous Fungus, Neurospora crassa

    PubMed Central

    Hamam, Ahmed

    2012-01-01

    We characterized the electrical phenotypes of mutants with mutations in genes encoding calcium transporters—a mechanosensitive channel homolog (MscS), a Ca2+/H+ exchange protein (cax), and Ca2+-ATPases (nca-1, nca-2, nca-3)—as well as those of double mutants (the nca-2 cax, nca-2 nca-3, and nca-3 cax mutants). The electrical characterization used dual impalements to obtain cable-corrected current-voltage measurements. Only two types of mutants (the MscS mutant; the nca-2 mutant and nca-2-containing double mutants) exhibited lower resting potentials. For the nca-2 mutant, on the basis of unchanged conductance and cyanide-induced depolarization of the potential, the cause is attenuated H+-ATPase activity. The growth of the nca-2 mutant-containing strains was inhibited by elevated extracellular Ca2+ levels, indicative of lesions in Ca2+ homeostasis. However, the net Ca2+ effluxes of the nca-2 mutant, measured noninvasively with a self-referencing Ca2+-selective microelectrode, were similar to those of the wild type. All of the mutants exhibited osmosensitivity similar to that of the wild type (the turgor of the nca-2 mutant was also similar to that of the wild type), suggesting that Ca2+ signaling does not play a role in osmoregulation. The hyphal tip morphology and tip-localized mitochondria of the nca-2 mutant were similar to those of the wild type, even when the external [Ca2+] was elevated. Thus, although Ca2+ homeostasis is perturbed in the nca-2 mutant (B. J. Bowman et al., Eukaryot. Cell 10:654–661, 2011), the phenotype does not extend to tip growth or to osmoregulation but is revealed by lower H+-ATPase activity. PMID:22408225

  10. Characterization of mutant strains of Candida albicans deficient in expression of a surface determinant.

    PubMed Central

    Chaffin, W L; Collins, B; Marx, J N; Cole, G T; Morrow, K J

    1993-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody (MAb) 17E4 reacts with a surface carbohydrate determinant and agglutinates cells of Candida albicans. Using this MAb, we have isolated N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine-induced nonagglutinating mutants. Eleven of these were characterized for the presence and expression of the surface antigen recognized by MAb 17E4 by immunoblot analysis of whole cells and by fluorescence flow cytometry. Soluble cell wall extracts from five mutant strains were negative by immunoblot analysis. The reactivities of the strains with several other MAbs and commercial antisera (Candida Check; Iatron Laboratories, Tokyo, Japan) which also recognize carbohydrate determinants were examined by immunoblot analysis of whole cells. Mutant strains showed no or reduced expression of the MAb 17E4 antigen and could be placed into at least two distinct phenotypic classes. Recognition by the other MAbs tested showed a similar pattern, while recognition by the commercial antisera was unchanged in the mutant strains. 1H and 13C nuclear magnetic resonance spectral analysis of mannan prepared from the wild type and nonexpressing mutant-strain 4A showed that the spectra from the mutant strain were simpler than those of the wild type. Most of the beta-1,2 linkages and all of the C-1 phosphate linkages were absent in the 4A mannan spectra, which suggested that the mutant mannan lacked the phosphate-bound beta-1,2-linked mannooligosaccharides. The effect of the surface defect on the ability of mutant strain 4A to adhere and to invade host tissue was examined in two murine models. In ex vivo binding assays, strain 4A showed reduced binding to the marginal zone and increased binding to the white pulp of splenic tissue, decreased binding to kidney tissue, and no change in binding to liver tissue compared with the wild type. In vivo, no difference was observed in translocation of the wild type or strain 4A to liver following immuno-compromising treatment of infant mice which had been

  11. Effects of a Mutant Strain and a Wild Type Strain of Verticillium lecanii on Heterodera glycines Populations in the Greenhouse

    PubMed Central

    Meyer, Susan L. F.; Meyer, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    A wild type strain ofVerticillium lecanii and a mutant strain with increased tolerance to the fungicide benomyl were evaluated in greenhouse experiments for effects on Heterodera glycines populations. Nematodes were applied at 300 eggs and juveniles per 4,550-cm³ pot (two soybean plants in 4,990 g loamy sand per pot) and at both 300 and 10,000 eggs and juveniles per 1,720-cm³ pot (one soybean plant in 2,060 g sand per pot). With 300 nematodes added per pot, both V. lecanii strains significantly reduced nematode populations in loamy sand (fungus applied at 0.02% dry weight per dry weight loamy sand) and sand (0.006% and 0.06% fungus application rates). The mutant strain applied at 0.002% to sand also significantly reduced cyst numbers. When 10,000 nematodes were added per pot, only the mutant strain at 0.06% significantly decreased population. Various media were tested for isolation of the fungus strains from prills, loamy sand, and sand, but the fungi were recovered from few of the greenhouse pots. PMID:19277306

  12. Phosphoregulation of an Inner Dynein Arm Complex in Chlamydomonas reinhardtii Is Altered in Phototactic Mutant Strains

    PubMed Central

    King, Stephen J.; Dutcher, Susan K.

    1997-01-01

    To gain a further understanding of axonemal dynein regulation, mutant strains of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that had defects in both phototactic behavior and flagellar motility were identified and characterized. ptm1, ptm2, and ptm3 mutant strains exhibited motility phenotypes that resembled those of known inner dynein arm region mutant strains, but did not have biochemical or genetic phenotypes characteristic of other inner dynein arm mutations. Three other mutant strains had defects in the f class of inner dynein arms. Dynein extracts from the pf9-4 strain were missing the entire f complex. Strains with mutations in pf9/ida1, ida2, or ida3 failed to assemble the f dynein complex and did not exhibit phototactic behavior. Fractionated dynein from mia1-1 and mia2-1 axonemes exhibited a novel f class inner dynein arm biochemical phenotype; the 138-kD f intermediate chain was present in altered phosphorylation forms. In vitro axonemal dynein activity was reduced by the mia1-1 and mia2-1 mutations. The addition of kinase inhibitor restored axonemal dynein activity concomitant with the dephosphorylation of the 138-kD f intermediate chain. Dynein extracts from uni1-1 axonemes, which specifically assemble only one of the two flagella, contained relatively high levels of the altered phosphorylation forms of the 138-kD intermediate chain. We suggest that the f dynein complex may be phosphoregulated asymmetrically between the two flagella to achieve phototactic turning. PMID:9008712

  13. Genetics of Peripheral Vestibular Dysfunction: Lessons from Mutant Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sherri M.; Jones, Timothy A.

    2015-01-01

    Background A considerable amount of research has been published about genetic hearing impairment. Fifty to sixty percent of hearing loss is thought to have a genetic cause. Genes may also play a significant role in acquired hearing loss due to aging, noise exposure, or ototoxic medications. Between 1995 and 2012, over 100 causative genes have been identified for syndromic and nonsyndromic forms of hereditary hearing loss (see Hereditary Hearing Loss Homepage http://hereditaryhearingloss.org). Mouse models have been extremely valuable in facilitating the discovery of hearing loss genes, and in understanding inner ear pathology due to genetic mutations or elucidating fundamental mechanisms of inner ear development. Purpose Whereas much is being learned about hereditary hearing loss and the genetics of cochlear disorders, relatively little is known about the role genes may play in peripheral vestibular impairment. Here we review the literature with regard to genetics of vestibular dysfunction and discuss what we have learned from studies using mutant mouse models and direct measures of peripheral vestibular neural function. Results Several genes are considered that when mutated lead to varying degrees of inner ear vestibular dysfunction due to deficits in otoconia, stereocilia, hair cells, or neurons. Behavior often does not reveal the inner ear deficit. Many of the examples presented are also known to cause human disorders. Conclusions Knowledge regarding the roles of particular genes in the operation of the vestibular sensory apparatus is growing and it is clear that gene products co-expressed in the cochlea and vestibule may play different roles in the respective end organs. The discovery of new genes mediating critical inner ear vestibular function carries the promise of new strategies in diagnosing, treating and managing patients as well as predicting the course and level of morbidity in human vestibular disease. PMID:25032973

  14. Antifolate Agents Against Wild and Mutant Strains of Plasmodium falciparum

    PubMed Central

    Shaikh, M. S.; Rana, J.; Gaikwad, D.; Leartsakulpanich, U.; Ambre, Premlata K.; Pissurlenkar, R. R. S.; Coutinho, E. C.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase is an important target for antimalarial chemotherapy. The emergence of resistance has significantly reduced the efficacy of the classic antifolate drugs cycloguanil and pyrimethamine. In this paper we report new dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors identified using molecular modelling principles with the goal of designing new antifolate agents active against both wild and tetramutant dihydrofolate reductase strains three series of trimethoprim analogues were designed, synthesised and tested for biological activity. Pyrimethamine and cycloguanil have been reported to loose efficacy because of steric repulsion in the active site pocket produced due to mutation in Plasmodium falciparum dihydrofolate reductase. The synthesised molecules have sufficient flexibility to withstand this steric repulsion to counteract the resistance. The molecules have been synthesised by conventional techniques and fully characterised by spectroscopic methods. The potency of these molecules was evaluated by in vitro enzyme specific assays. Some of the molecules were active in micromolar concentrations and can easily be optimised to improve binding and activity. PMID:24843184

  15. Failure of Surface Ring Mutant Strains of Helicobacter mustelae To Persistently Infect the Ferret Stomach

    PubMed Central

    Patterson, M. M.; O'Toole, P. W.; Forester, N. T.; Noonan, B.; Trust, T. J.; Xu, S.; Taylor, N. S.; Marini, R. P.; Ihrig, M. M.; Fox, J. G.

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter mustelae, the gastric pathogen of ferrets, produces an array of surface ring structures which have not been described for any other member of the genus Helicobacter, including H. pylori. The unique ring structures are composed of a protein named Hsr. To investigate whether the Hsr rings are important for colonization of the ferret stomach, ferrets specific pathogen free for H. mustelae were inoculated with an Hsr-deficient mutant strain or the wild-type H. mustelae strain. Quantitative cultures from antral biopsy specimens obtained at 3, 6, and 9 weeks postinoculation demonstrated no significant difference in the levels of bacteria in the ferrets that received the Hsr-negative strain and the ferrets infected with the parent strain. However, when the ferrets were biopsied at 12 and 15 weeks and necropsied at 18 weeks after infection, the levels of bacteria of the Hsr-negative strain in the stomach antrum were significantly reduced. This decline contrasted the robust antral colonization by the wild-type strain. The Hsr-negative strain did not efficiently colonize the gastric body of the study ferrets. Histological examination at 18 weeks postinoculation revealed minimal gastric inflammation in the animals that received the mutant H. mustelae strain, a finding consistent with its waning infection status, whereas lesions characteristic of helicobacter infection were present in ferrets infected with the wild-type strain. Scant colonization by the Hsr-negative H. mustelae strain at the end of the 18-week study, despite initial successful colonization, indicates an inability of the mutant to persist, perhaps due to a specific host response. PMID:12704104

  16. Mechanical properties of elytra from Tribolium castaneum wild-type and body color mutant strains

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Cuticle tanning in insects involves simultaneous cuticular hardening and pigmentation. The dynamic mechanical properties of the highly modified and cuticle-rich forewings (elytra) from Tribolium castaneum (red flour beetle) body color mutant strains were investigated to determine the relationship b...

  17. A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus, lacking flagella, has unusual growth physiology.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Derrick L; Notey, Jaspreet S; Chandrayan, Sanjeev K; Loder, Andrew J; Lipscomb, Gina L; Adams, Michael W W; Kelly, Robert M

    2015-03-01

    A mutant ('lab strain') of the hyperthermophilic archaeon Pyrococcus furiosus DSM3638 exhibited an extended exponential phase and atypical cell aggregation behavior. Genomic DNA from the mutant culture was sequenced and compared to wild-type (WT) DSM3638, revealing 145 genes with one or more insertions, deletions, or substitutions (12 silent, 33 amino acid substitutions, and 100 frame shifts). Approximately, half of the mutated genes were transposases or hypothetical proteins. The WT transcriptome revealed numerous changes in amino acid and pyrimidine biosynthesis pathways coincidental with growth phase transitions, unlike the mutant whose transcriptome reflected the observed prolonged exponential phase. Targeted gene deletions, based on frame-shifted ORFs in the mutant genome, in a genetically tractable strain of P. furiosus (COM1) could not generate the extended exponential phase behavior observed for the mutant. For example, a putative radical SAM family protein (PF2064) was the most highly up-regulated ORF (>25-fold) in the WT between exponential and stationary phase, although this ORF was unresponsive in the mutant; deletion of this gene in P. furiosus COM1 resulted in no apparent phenotype. On the other hand, frame-shifting mutations in the mutant genome negatively impacted transcription of a flagellar biosynthesis operon (PF0329-PF0338).Consequently, cells in the mutant culture lacked flagella and, unlike the WT, showed minimal evidence of exopolysaccharide-based cell aggregation in post-exponential phase. Electron microscopy of PF0331-PF0337 deletions in P. furiosus COM1 showed that absence of flagella impacted normal cell aggregation behavior and, furthermore, indicated that flagella play a key role, beyond motility, in the growth physiology of P. furiosus.

  18. Ada issues in implementing ART-Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Due to the Ada mandate of a number of government agencies, interest in deploying expert systems such as Ada has increased. Recently, several Ada-based expert system tools have been developed. According to a recent benchmark report, these tools do not perform as well as similar tools written in C. While poorly implemented Ada compilers contribute to the poor benchmark result, some fundamental problems of the Ada language itself have been uncovered. Here, the authors describe Ada language issues encountered during the deployment of ART-Ada, an expert system tool for Ada deployment. ART-Ada is being used to implement several prototype expert systems for the Space Station Freedom and the U.S. Air Force.

  19. Selenite-stress selected mutant strains of probiotic bacteria for Se source production.

    PubMed

    Pusztahelyi, Tünde; Kovács, Szilvia; Pócsi, István; Prokisch, József

    2015-04-01

    Selenium deficiency is a major health problem worldwide for about 1 billion people. Bacterial cells usually possess low tolerance to selenite stress and also low ability to reduce high concentrations of toxic selenite. Here, high tolerance to selenite and selenium bioaccumulation capability were developed in mutated clones of probiotic and starter bacteria including Enterococcus faecium, Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis, Lactobacillus casei and Lactococcus lactis ssp. lactis by food-level strain development process and clone selection. All mutant clones possessed increased glutathione concentration and glutathione reductase activity. The selenite treatment increased further these values in L. casei mutant strain pointing at a different selenite reduction pathway and/or stress response in this organism. Considerable conversion of selenite to cell bound selenium forms with a concomitant high biomass production was detected in E. faecium and B. animalis ssp. lactis cultures. Possible application of these strains as food and feed supplements is under investigation.

  20. Spontaneous Gac Mutants of Pseudomonas Biological Control Strains: Cheaters or Mutualists? ▿

    PubMed Central

    Driscoll, William W.; Pepper, John W.; Pierson, Leland S.; Pierson, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Bacteria rely on a range of extracellular metabolites to suppress competitors, gain access to resources, and exploit plant or animal hosts. The GacS/GacA two-component regulatory system positively controls the expression of many of these beneficial external products in pseudomonad bacteria. Natural populations often contain variants with defective Gac systems that do not produce most external products. These mutants benefit from a decreased metabolic load but do not appear to displace the wild type in nature. How could natural selection maintain the wild type in the presence of a mutant with enhanced growth? One hypothesis is that Gac mutants are “cheaters” that do not contribute to the public good, favored within groups but selected against between groups, as groups containing more mutants lose access to ecologically important external products. An alternative hypothesis is that Gac mutants have a mutualistic interaction with the wild type, so that each variant benefits by the presence of the other. In the biocontrol bacterium Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain 30-84, Gac mutants do not produce phenazines, which suppress competitor growth and are critical for biofilm formation. Here, we test the predictions of these alternative hypotheses by quantifying interactions between the wild type and the phenazine- and biofilm-deficient Gac mutant within growing biofilms. We find evidence that the wild type and Gac mutants interact mutualistically in the biofilm context, whereas a phenazine-defective structural mutant does not. Our results suggest that the persistence of alternative Gac phenotypes may be due to the stabilizing role of local mutualistic interactions. PMID:21873476

  1. [Ribosome engineering of streptomyces sp. FJ3 from Three Gorges reservoir area and metabolic product of the selected mutant strain].

    PubMed

    Hai, Le; Huang, Yuqi; Liao, Guojian; Hu, Changhua

    2011-07-01

    To explore new resource from inactive actinomycete strains, we screened resistant mutant strains by ribosome engineering, and analyzed the products derived from the selected mutant strains. Three Gorges reservoir area-derived actinomycete strains including BD20, FJ3, WZ20 and FJ5 were used as initial strains, which showed no-antibacterial activities. The streptomycin-resistant (str(R)) mutants and rifampicin-resistant (rif(R)) mutants were screened by single colony isolation on streptomycin-containing plates and rifampicin-containing plates according to the method for obtaining drug-resistant mutants in ribosome engineering. The four initial strains and their str(R)-mutants and rif(R)-mutants were fermented in a liquid medium with the same composition. Mutants with anti-Staphylococcus aureus activity were obtained by paper chromatography. The components of fermentation broth were analyzed by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) and high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry (LC-MS). Furthermore, FJ3 strain was identified by 16S rDNA and morphology. The minimal inhibitory concentration (MIC) of streptomycin and rifampicin for FJ3 was: 0.5 microg/mL and 110 microg/mL, respectively. Twenty-four strR-mutant strains and 20 rif(R)-mutant strains of FJ3 mutant strains were selected for bioassay. The result of the antibacterial activity screening demonstrated that six strains inhibited bacteria. Two strains (FJ3-2 and FJ3-6) were screened from the streptomycin-resistance mutants of inactive strain FJ3. The result of bioassay showed that the fermentation broth of FJ3-2 and FJ3-6 exhibited obvious anti-Staphylococcus aureus activity. The assay of paper chromatography showed that the active substance may be nucleic acid class antibiotic via using solvent system Doskochilova. Moreover, the results of HPLC and LC-MS exhibited that this substance may be thiolutin. Ribosome engineering for changing the secondary metabolic function of the inactive wild

  2. Keratinase production and keratin degradation by a mutant strain of Bacillus subtilis *

    PubMed Central

    Cai, Cheng-gang; Lou, Bing-gan; Zheng, Xiao-dong

    2008-01-01

    A new feather-degrading bacterium was isolated from a local feather waste site and identified as Bacillus subtilis based on morphological, physiochemical, and phylogenetic characteristics. Screening for mutants with elevated keratinolytic activity using N-methyl-N′-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine mutagenesis resulted in a mutant strain KD-N2 producing keratinolytic activity about 2.5 times that of the wild-type strain. The mutant strain produced inducible keratinase in different substrates of feathers, hair, wool and silk under submerged cultivation. Scanning electron microscopy studies showed the degradation of feathers, hair and silk by the keratinase. The optimal conditions for keratinase production include initial pH of 7.5, inoculum size of 2% (v/v), age of inoculum of 16 h, and cultivation at 23 °C. The maximum keratinolytic activity of KD-N2 was achieved after 30 h. Essential amino acids like threonine, valine, methionine as well as ammonia were produced when feathers were used as substrates. Strain KD-N2, therefore, shows great promise of finding potential applications in keratin hydrolysis and keratinase production. PMID:18196614

  3. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Lynd, Lee R; Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Zhu, Mingjun

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1 2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  4. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum

    SciTech Connect

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  5. Mutant selection and phenotypic and genetic characterization of ethanol-tolerant strains of Clostridium thermocellum.

    PubMed

    Shao, Xiongjun; Raman, Babu; Zhu, Mingjun; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Brown, Steven D; Guss, Adam M; Lynd, Lee R

    2011-11-01

    Clostridium thermocellum is a model microorganism for converting cellulosic biomass into fuels and chemicals via consolidated bioprocessing. One of the challenges for industrial application of this organism is its low ethanol tolerance, typically 1-2% (w/v) in wild-type strains. In this study, we report the development and characterization of mutant C. thermocellum strains that can grow in the presence of high ethanol concentrations. Starting from a single colony, wild-type C. thermocellum ATCC 27405 was sub-cultured and adapted for growth in up to 50 g/L ethanol using either cellobiose or crystalline cellulose as the growth substrate. Both the adapted strains retained their ability to grow on either substrate and displayed a higher growth rate and biomass yield than the wild-type strain in the absence of ethanol. With added ethanol in the media, the mutant strains displayed an inverse correlation between ethanol concentration and growth rate or biomass yield. Genome sequencing revealed six common mutations in the two ethanol-tolerant strains including an alcohol dehydrogenase gene and genes involved in arginine/pyrimidine biosynthetic pathway. The potential role of these mutations in ethanol tolerance phenotype is discussed.

  6. Isolation and characterization of the E. coli membrane protein production strain Mutant56(DE3)

    PubMed Central

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Schlegel, Susan; Wagner, Samuel; Löw, Mirjam; Eriksson, Jonas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgård, Markus J.; Heipieper, Hermann J.; Nørholm, Morten H. H.; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2017-01-01

    Membrane protein production is usually toxic to E. coli. However, using genetic screens strains can be isolated in which the toxicity of membrane protein production is reduced, thereby improving production yields. Best known examples are the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, which are both derived from the T7 RNA polymerase (P)-based BL21(DE3) protein production strain. In C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) mutations lowering t7rnap expression levels result in strongly reduced T7 RNAP accumulation levels. As a consequence membrane protein production stress is alleviated in the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, thereby increasing membrane protein yields. Here, we isolated Mutant56(DE3) from BL21(DE3) using a genetic screen designed to isolate BL21(DE3)-derived strains with mutations alleviating membrane protein production stress other than the ones in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). The defining mutation of Mutant56(DE3) changes one amino acid in its T7 RNAP, which weakens the binding of the T7 RNAP to the T7 promoter governing target gene expression rather than lowering T7 RNAP levels. For most membrane proteins tested yields in Mutant56(DE3) were considerably higher than in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). Thus, the isolation of Mutant56(DE3) shows that the evolution of BL21(DE3) can be promoted towards further enhanced membrane protein production. PMID:28338018

  7. Isolation and characterization of the E. coli membrane protein production strain Mutant56(DE3).

    PubMed

    Baumgarten, Thomas; Schlegel, Susan; Wagner, Samuel; Löw, Mirjam; Eriksson, Jonas; Bonde, Ida; Herrgård, Markus J; Heipieper, Hermann J; Nørholm, Morten H H; Slotboom, Dirk Jan; de Gier, Jan-Willem

    2017-03-24

    Membrane protein production is usually toxic to E. coli. However, using genetic screens strains can be isolated in which the toxicity of membrane protein production is reduced, thereby improving production yields. Best known examples are the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, which are both derived from the T7 RNA polymerase (P)-based BL21(DE3) protein production strain. In C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) mutations lowering t7rnap expression levels result in strongly reduced T7 RNAP accumulation levels. As a consequence membrane protein production stress is alleviated in the C41(DE3) and C43(DE3) strains, thereby increasing membrane protein yields. Here, we isolated Mutant56(DE3) from BL21(DE3) using a genetic screen designed to isolate BL21(DE3)-derived strains with mutations alleviating membrane protein production stress other than the ones in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). The defining mutation of Mutant56(DE3) changes one amino acid in its T7 RNAP, which weakens the binding of the T7 RNAP to the T7 promoter governing target gene expression rather than lowering T7 RNAP levels. For most membrane proteins tested yields in Mutant56(DE3) were considerably higher than in C41(DE3) and C43(DE3). Thus, the isolation of Mutant56(DE3) shows that the evolution of BL21(DE3) can be promoted towards further enhanced membrane protein production.

  8. Comparative analysis of salt-tolerant gene HOG1 in a Zygosaccharomyces rouxii mutant strain and its parent strain.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yonghua; Wang, Cong; Wang, Meng; Cao, Xiaohong; Hou, Lihua

    2013-08-30

    A higher-salt-tolerant mutant strain Zygosaccharomyces rouxii 3-2 (strain S3-2) that could be used for improving the flavour of high-salt liquid state soy sauce was previously constructed from parent strain Z. rouxii (strain S) by genome shuffling. However, whether the mutations in this strain affect HOG1 encoding MAPK Hog1p and improve intracellular glycerol production remains to be elucidated. Although two mutations in the ORF and one in the promoter of the HOG1 gene sequence of strain S3-2 occurred compared with that of strain S, there was no significant difference in secondary and tertiary structures between S3-2Hog1p and SHog1p. It was found that the expression level of S3-2HOG1 was higher than that of SHOG1 in YPDN medium with high salt concentration. Furthermore, overexpression of S3-2HOG1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae W303-1A could improve the salt tolerance and osmotolerance of engineered yeast compared with that of SHOG1. Enhancement of the transcription level of HOG1 induced by mutation in the promoter region may be one of the main reasons for the improved salt tolerance of strain S3-2 compared with that of strain S. Considering food security, the conservation of S3-2HOG1 would be beneficial for application of strain S3-2 in the fermentation of soy sauce. © 2013 Society of Chemical Industry.

  9. Production of a thermal stress resistant mutant Euglena gracilis strain using Fe-ion beam irradiation.

    PubMed

    Yamada, Koji; Kazama, Yusuke; Mitra, Sharbanee; Marukawa, Yuka; Arashida, Ryo; Abe, Tomoko; Ishikawa, Takahiro; Suzuki, Kengo

    2016-08-01

    Euglena gracilis is a common phytoplankton species, which also has motile flagellate characteristics. Recent research and development has enabled the industrial use of E. gracilis and selective breeding of this species is expected to further expand its application. However, the production of E. gracilis nuclear mutants is difficult because of the robustness of its genome. To establish an efficient mutation induction procedure for E. gracilis, we employed Fe-ion beam irradiation in the RIKEN RI beam factory. A decrease in the survival rate was observed with the increase in irradiation dose, and the upper limit used for E. gracilis selective breeding was around 50 Gy. For a practical trial of Fe-ion irradiation, we conducted a screening to isolate high-temperature-tolerant mutants. The screening yielded mutants that proliferated faster than the wild-type strain at 32 °C. Our results demonstrate the effectiveness of heavy-ion irradiation on E. gracilis selective breeding.

  10. Immunological roles of Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) using a PMT mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Kim, Tae Jung; Toan, Nguyen Tat; Jang, Eun Jin; Jung, Bock Gie; Lee, Jae Il; Lee, Bong Joo

    2007-08-01

    The immunological role of the Pasteurella multocida toxin (PMT) in mice was examined using a PMT mutant strain. After a nasal inoculation, the mutant strain failed to induce interstitial pneumonia. Moreover, PMT had no significant effect on the populations of CD4+, CD8+, CD3+, and CD19+ immunocytes in blood or on the populations of CD4+ and CD8+ splenocytes (P<0.01). However, there was a significant increase in the total number of cells in the BAL samples obtained from the wild-type P. multocida-inoculated mice. On the other hand, the level of IL-1 expression decreased when the macrophages from the bronchio-alveolar lavage were stimulated with PMT. Overall, PMT appears to play some role (stimulating and/or inhibiting) in the immunological responses but further studies will be required to confirm this.

  11. Regulation of nitrogen metabolism is altered in a glnB mutant strain of Rhizobium leguminosarum.

    PubMed

    Amar, M; Patriarca, E J; Manco, G; Bernard, P; Riccio, A; Lamberti, A; Defez, R; Iaccarino, M

    1994-02-01

    We isolated a Rhizobium leguminosarum mutant strain altered in the glnB gene. This event, which has never been described in the Rhizobiaceae, is rare in comparison to mutants isolated in the contiguous gene, glnA. The glnB mutation removes the glnBA promoter but in vivo does not prevent glnA expression from its own promoter, which is not nitrogen regulated. The glnB mutant strain does not grow on nitrate as a sole nitrogen source and it is Nod+, Fix+. Two -24/-12 promoters, for the glnII and glnBA genes, are constitutively expressed in the glnB mutant, while two -35/-10-like promoters for glnA and ntrBC are unaffected. We propose that the glnB gene product, the PII protein, plays a negative role in the ability of NtrC to activate transcription from its target promoters and a positive role in the mechanism of nitrate utilization.

  12. Cytological characterization of an Aspergillus Nidulans mutant from a strain with chromosomic duplication

    PubMed Central

    Giancoli, Ágata Cristiane Huppert; de Azevedo, João Lúcio; Pizzirani-Kleiner, Aline Aparecida

    2010-01-01

    A development mutant, named V103, was obtained spontaneously from the A strain of A. nidulans. The A strain contains a duplicated segment of chromosome I that has undergone translocation to chromosome II (I II). It is mitotically unstable and generates phenotypically deteriorated types, some with enhanced stability. The deteriorated variants of A. nidulans show abnormal development, exhibiting slower colony growth, variations in colony pigmentation and changes in conidiophore structure. The alterations observed in the conidiophore include fewer metulae and phialides, further elongation and ramification of these structures, delayed nuclear migration and the presence of secondary conidiophores. PMID:24031489

  13. A cysG mutant strain of Rhizobium etli pleiotropically defective in sulfate and nitrate assimilation.

    PubMed Central

    Tate, R; Riccio, A; Iaccarino, M; Patriarca, E J

    1997-01-01

    By its inability to grow on sulfate as the sole sulfur source, a mutant strain (CTNUX8) of Rhizobium etli carrying Tn5 was isolated and characterized. Sequence analysis showed that Tn5 is inserted into a cysG (siroheme synthetase)-homologous gene. By RNase protection assays, it was established that the cysG-like gene had a basal level of expression in thiosulfate- or cysteine-grown cells, which was induced when sulfate or methionine was used. Unlike its wild-type parent (strain CE3), the mutant strain, CTNUX8, was also unable to grow on nitrate as the sole nitrogen source and was unable to induce a high level of nitrite reductase. Despite its pleiotropic phenotype, strain CTNUX8 was able to induce pink, effective (N2-fixing) nodules on the roots of Phaseolus vulgaris plants. However, mixed inoculation experiments showed that strain CTNUX8 is significantly different from the wild type in its ability to nodulate. Our data support the notion that sulfate (or sulfite) is the sulfur source of R. etli in the rhizosphere, while cysteine, methionine, or glutathione is supplied by the root cells to bacteria growing inside the plant. PMID:9393698

  14. New modified trichothecenes accumulated in solid culture by mutant strains of Fusarium sporotrichioides.

    PubMed Central

    McCormick, S P; Taylor, S L; Plattner, R D; Beremand, M N

    1989-01-01

    Mutant strains of Fusarium sporotrichioides NRRL 3299 deficient in the ability to synthesize T-2 toxin were examined on solid rice medium. Five novel alicyclic trichothecenes were isolated: 11 alpha-hydroxytrichodiene; tricho-9-ene-2 alpha,3 alpha,11 alpha-triol; tricho-9-ene-2 alpha,3 alpha,8 alpha,11 alpha-tetraol; tricho-9-ene-2 alpha,3 alpha,8 beta,11 alpha-tetraol; and tricho-9-ene-2 alpha,3 alpha,11 alpha,16-tetraol. PMID:2802605

  15. Ada task scheduling: A focused Ada investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legrand, Sue

    1988-01-01

    The types of control that are important for real time task scheduling are discussed. Some closely related real time issues are mentioned and major committee and research activities in this area are delineated. Although there are some problems with Ada and its real time task scheduling, Ada presents fewer than any known alternative. Ada was designed for the domain of real time embedded systems, but Ada compilers may not contain a level of task scheduling support that is adequate for all real time applications. The question addressed is which implementations of Ada's task scheduling are adequate for effective real time systems for NASA applications.

  16. Coenzyme Q10 production in a 150-l reactor by a mutant strain of Rhodobacter sphaeroides.

    PubMed

    Kien, Nguyen Ba; Kong, In-Soo; Lee, Min-Gyu; Kim, Joong Kyun

    2010-05-01

    For the commercial production of CoQ(10), batch-type fermentations were attempted in a 150-l fermenter using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides. Optimum temperature and initial aeration rate were found to be 30 degrees C and 2 vvm, respectively. Under optimum fermentation conditions, the maximum value of specific CoQ(10) content was achieved reproducibly as 6.34 mg/g DCW after 24 h, with 3.02 g/l of DCW. During the fermentation, aeration shift (from the adequate aeration at the early growth phase to the limited aeration in active cellular metabolism) was a key factor in CoQ(10) production for scale-up. A higher value of the specific CoQ(10) content (8.12 mg/g DCW) was achieved in fed-batch fermentation and comparable to those produced by the pilot-scale fed-batch fermentations of A. tumefaciens, which indicated that the mutant strain of R. sphaeroides used in this study was a potential high CoQ(10) producer. This is the first detailed study to demonstrate a pilot-scale production of CoQ(10) using a mutant strain of R. sphaeroides.

  17. Transforming AdaPT to Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsack, Stephen J.; Holzbach-Valero, A. A.; Waldrop, Raymond S.; Volz, Richard A.

    1991-01-01

    This paper describes how the main features of the proposed Ada language extensions intended to support distribution, and offered as possible solutions for Ada9X can be implemented by transformation into standard Ada83. We start by summarizing the features proposed in a paper (Gargaro et al, 1990) which constitutes the definition of the extensions. For convenience we have called the language in its modified form AdaPT which might be interpreted as Ada with partitions. These features were carefully chosen to provide support for the construction of executable modules for execution in nodes of a network of loosely coupled computers, but flexibly configurable for different network architectures and for recovery following failure, or adapting to mode changes. The intention in their design was to provide extensions which would not impact adversely on the normal use of Ada, and would fit well in style and feel with the existing standard. We begin by summarizing the features introduced in AdaPT.

  18. Draft Genome Sequences for Clostridium thermocellum Wild-Type Strain YS and Derived Cellulose Adhesion-Defective Mutant Strain AD2

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven D; Lamed, Raphael; Morag, Ely; Borovok, Ilya; Shoham, Yuval; Klingeman, Dawn Marie; Johnson, Courtney M; Yang, Zamin; Land, Miriam L; Utturkar, Sagar M; Keller, Martin; Bayer, Edward A

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium thermocellum wild-type strain YS is an anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium capable of directly converting cellulosic substrates into ethanol. Strain YS and a derived cellulose adhesion-defective mutant strain AD2 played pivotal roles in describing the original cellulosome concept. We present their draft genome sequences.

  19. Altered Regulation of Escherichia coli Biotin Biosynthesis in BirA Superrepressor Mutant Strains

    PubMed Central

    Chakravartty, Vandana

    2012-01-01

    Transcription of the Escherichia coli biotin (bio) operon is directly regulated by the biotin protein ligase BirA, the enzyme that covalently attaches biotin to its cognate acceptor proteins. Binding of BirA to the bio operator requires dimerization of the protein, which is triggered by BirA-catalyzed synthesis of biotinoyl-adenylate (biotinoyl-5′-AMP), the obligatory intermediate of the ligation reaction. Although several aspects of this regulatory system are well understood, no BirA superrepressor mutant strains had been isolated. Such superrepressor BirA proteins would repress the biotin operon transcription in vivo at biotin concentrations well below those needed for repression by wild-type BirA. We isolated mutant strains having this phenotype by a combined selection-screening approach and resolved multiple mutations to give several birA superrepressor alleles, each having a single mutation, all of which showed repression dominant over that of the wild-type allele. All of these mutant strains repressed bio operon transcription in vivo at biotin concentrations that gave derepression of the wild-type strain and retained sufficient ligation activity for growth when overexpressed. All of the strains except that encoding G154D BirA showed derepression of bio operon transcription upon overproduction of a biotin-accepting protein. In BirA, G154D was a lethal mutation in single copy, and the purified protein was unable to transfer biotin from enzyme-bound biotinoyl-adenylate either to the natural acceptor protein or to a biotin-accepting peptide sequence. Consistent with the transcriptional repression data, each of the purified mutant proteins showed increased affinity for the biotin operator DNA in electrophoretic mobility shift assays. Surprisingly, although most of the mutations were located in the catalytic domain, all of those tested, except G154D BirA, had normal ligase activity. Most of the mutations that gave superrepressor phenotypes altered residues

  20. N-acetylcysteine potentiates diclofenac toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: stronger potentiation in ABC transporter mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Al-Attrache, Houssein; Chamieh, Hala; Hamzé, Monzer; Morel, Isabelle; Taha, Samir; Abdel-Razzak, Ziad

    2017-05-15

    Diclofenac (DCF) adverse reactions involve diverse mechanisms in different models. We recently demonstrated that DCF-induced toxicity in HepaRG decreases as they express DCF-metabolizing enzymes. DCF metabolism promotes toxicity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing heterologous cytochromes-P450. N-Acetylcysteine (NAC) is used to treat diverse medical conditions due to its multiple properties (antioxidant, metal chelator, thiol-disulfide disruption). The latter property accounts for its mucolytic effects and broadens its potential molecular targets to signal transduction proteins, ABC transporters and others. Interaction of NAC with DCF effects depends on the experimental model. This study aims to investigate NAC/DCF interaction and the involvement of ABC transporters in wild type and mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae. DCF inhibited yeast growth in a dose- and time-dependent manner and the cells started adapting to DCF 24-h post-treatment. NAC potentiated DCF-induced toxicity if added prior or parallel to DCF. Pretreatment with NAC increased its potentiation effect and compromised cells adaption to DCF. Post-treatment with NAC potentiated DCF toxicity without compromising adaptation. Moreover, mutant strains in ABC transporters Pdr5, Yor1, Bpt1 or Pdr15, were more sensitive to DCF; while mutant strains in Pdr5, Vmr1 or Pdr12 were more sensitive to NAC/DCF interaction. DCF ± NAC elicited on the mutant strain in Yap1, an oxidative stress-related protein, the same effects as on the wild type. Therefore, oxidative stress does not seem to be key actor in DCF toxicity in our model. Our hypothesis is that NAC potentiation effect is at least due to its ability to disrupt disulfide bridge in proteins required to overcome DCF toxicity in yeast.

  1. Interaction of mutant lpr gene with background strain influences renal disease.

    PubMed

    Kelley, V E; Roths, J B

    1985-11-01

    The mutant gene lpr on the MRL/Mp strain of mice is responsible for converting a late onset glomerulonephritis into an early, aggressive, and fatal renal disease. This gene induces the proliferation of a unique subset of lymphocytes, the production of a variety of autoantibodies and shortened survival in MRL/Mp as well as in the genetically distinct strains C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, and AKR/J. The present study examined in detail the role of the lpr gene in the formation of lupus nephritis. The results show that C3H-lpr and B6-lpr mice do not develop nephritis while the AKR-lpr strain has a mild form of renal disease. None of these newly constructed congenic mutant strains have the severity of proteinuria or the degree of renal pathology characteristic of MRL-lpr mice. Thus, the lpr gene alone is insufficient in producing severe renal injury. The interaction of the lpr gene with other factors is required for the induction of life-threatening lupus nephritis.

  2. Transition to Ada

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-02-01

    languages other than Ada that were authorized and being used in full- scale development may continue to be used through deployment and for software...point scale ). The third substudy, completed by CrA, concluded, "Ada projects have reported 15% higher productivity with increased quality and double the...mature over the next few years. On the other hand, as aggressive overseas Ada initiatives stimulate even wider domestic Ada interest, as Ada tools

  3. Flagellar mutants of Chlamydomonas: Studies of radial spoke-defective strains by dikaryon and revertant analysis

    PubMed Central

    Luck, David; Piperno, Gianni; Ramanis, Zenta; Huang, B.

    1977-01-01

    The motility mutant of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii pf14 lacks radial spoke structures in its flagellar axonemes, and 12 proteins present in wild type are missing from a two-dimensional map (isoelectrofocusing/sodium dodecyl sulfate electrophoresis) of its 35S-labeled flagellar proteins. Six of these same proteins are missing in pf1, which lacks spoke-heads. To determine whether any of the missing proteins represent the mutant gene product two experimental approaches have been applied. The first makes use of the fact that gametes of either mutant strain when fused with wild-type gametes to form quadriflagellate dikaryons undergo recovery of flagellar function. Recovery at the molecular level was monitored by prelabeling the mutant proteins with 35S and allowing recovery to occur in the absence of protein synthesis. It is to be expected that the mutant gene product would not be restored as a radioactive protein and that recovery would depend on the assembly of the wild-type counterpart that is not labeled. The second technique makes use of revertants induced by UV irradiation. Dikaryon rescue in the case of pf14 leads to restoration of 11 radioactive components; only protein 3 fails to appear as a radioactive spot. For pf1 only two radioactive proteins are restored; proteins 4, 6, 9, and 10 were not radioactive. Analysis of revertants of pf1 gave evidence (altered map positions) that protein 4 is the mutant gene product. In the case of pf14, analysis of 22 revertants has not provided similar positive evidence that protein 3 is the gene product. Images PMID:269405

  4. Classic-Ada(TM)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Valley, Lois

    1989-01-01

    The SPS product, Classic-Ada, is a software tool that supports object-oriented Ada programming with powerful inheritance and dynamic binding. Object Oriented Design (OOD) is an easy, natural development paradigm, but it is not supported by Ada. Following the DOD Ada mandate, SPS developed Classic-Ada to provide a tool which supports OOD and implements code in Ada. It consists of a design language, a code generator and a toolset. As a design language, Classic-Ada supports the object-oriented principles of information hiding, data abstraction, dynamic binding, and inheritance. It also supports natural reuse and incremental development through inheritance, code factoring, and Ada, Classic-Ada, dynamic binding and static binding in the same program. Only nine new constructs were added to Ada to provide object-oriented design capabilities. The Classic-Ada code generator translates user application code into fully compliant, ready-to-run, standard Ada. The Classic-Ada toolset is fully supported by SPS and consists of an object generator, a builder, a dictionary manager, and a reporter. Demonstrations of Classic-Ada and the Classic-Ada Browser were given at the workshop.

  5. Gluco-oligosaccharides synthesized by glucosyltransferases from constitutive mutants of Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain Lm 28.

    PubMed

    Iliev, I; Vassileva, T; Ignatova, C; Ivanova, I; Haertlé, T; Monsan, P; Chobert, J-M

    2008-01-01

    To find different types of glucosyltransferases (GTFs) produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides strain Lm 28 and its mutant forms, and to check the effectiveness of gluco-oligosaccharide synthesis using maltose as the acceptor. Constitutive mutants were obtained after chemical mutagenesis by ethyl methane sulfonate. Lm M281 produced more active GTFs than that obtained by the parental strain cultivated on sucrose. GTF from Lm M286 produced a resistant glucan, based on endo-dextranase and amyloglucosidase hydrolysis. The extracellular enzymes from Lm M286 catalyse acceptor reactions and transfer the glucose unit from sucrose to maltose to produce gluco-oligosaccharides (GOS). By increasing the sucrose/maltose ratio, it was possible to catalyse the synthesis of oligosaccharides of increasing degree of polymerization (DP). Different types of GTFs (dextransucrase, alternansucrase and levansucrase) were produced from new constitutive mutants of Leuc. mesenteroides. GTFs from Lm M286 can catalyse the acceptor reaction in the presence of maltose, leading to the synthesis of branched oligosaccharides. Conditions were optimized to synthesize GOS by using GTFs from Lm M286, with the aim of producing maximum quantities of branched-chain oligosaccharides with DP 3-5. This would allow the use of the latter as prebiotics.

  6. Comparative metabolic profiling of mce1 operon mutant vs wild-type Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains.

    PubMed

    Queiroz, Adriano; Medina-Cleghorn, Daniel; Marjanovic, Olivera; Nomura, Daniel K; Riley, Lee W

    2015-11-01

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis disrupted in a 13-gene operon (mce1) accumulates free mycolic acids (FM) in its cell wall and causes accelerated death in mice. Here, to more comprehensively analyze differences in their cell wall lipid composition, we used an untargeted metabolomics approach to compare the lipid profiles of wild-type and mce1 operon mutant strains. By liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry, we identified >400 distinct lipids significantly altered in the mce1 mutant compared to wild type. These lipids included decreased levels of saccharolipids and glycerophospholipids, and increased levels of alpha-, methoxy- and keto mycolic acids (MA), and hydroxyphthioceranic acid. The mutant showed reduced expression of mmpL8, mmpL10, stf0, pks2 and papA2 genes involved in transport and metabolism of lipids recognized to induce proinflammatory response; these lipids were found to be decreased in the mutant. In contrast, the transcripts of mmpL3, fasI, kasA, kasB, acpM and RV3451 involved in MA transport and metabolism increased; MA inhibits inflammatory response in macrophages. Since the mce1 operon is known to be regulated in intracellular M. tuberculosis, we speculate that the differences we observed in cell wall lipid metabolism and composition may affect host response to M. tuberculosis infection and determine the clinical outcome of such an infection. © FEMS 2015. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  7. Colonization of gnotobiotic piglets by a luxS mutant strain of Escherichia coli O157:H7.

    PubMed

    Jordan, Dianna M; Sperandio, Vanessa; Kaper, James B; Dean-Nystrom, Evelyn A; Moon, Harley W

    2005-02-01

    Gnotobiotic piglets inoculated with Escherichia coli O157:H7, its luxS mutant derivative, or nonpathogenic E. coli were evaluated for attaching and effacing lesions. Although no differences in clinical symptoms were seen between pigs inoculated with the parent and those inoculated with the luxS mutant, the luxS mutant-inoculated pigs had a lower frequency of attaching and effacing lesions in the spiral colon than parent strain-inoculated pigs.

  8. Combinatorial depletion analysis to assemble the network architecture of the SAGA and ADA chromatin remodeling complexes.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kenneth K; Sardiu, Mihaela E; Swanson, Selene K; Gilmore, Joshua M; Torok, Michael; Grant, Patrick A; Florens, Laurence; Workman, Jerry L; Washburn, Michael P

    2011-07-05

    Despite the availability of several large-scale proteomics studies aiming to identify protein interactions on a global scale, little is known about how proteins interact and are organized within macromolecular complexes. Here, we describe a technique that consists of a combination of biochemistry approaches, quantitative proteomics and computational methods using wild-type and deletion strains to investigate the organization of proteins within macromolecular protein complexes. We applied this technique to determine the organization of two well-studied complexes, Spt-Ada-Gcn5 histone acetyltransferase (SAGA) and ADA, for which no comprehensive high-resolution structures exist. This approach revealed that SAGA/ADA is composed of five distinct functional modules, which can persist separately. Furthermore, we identified a novel subunit of the ADA complex, termed Ahc2, and characterized Sgf29 as an ADA family protein present in all Gcn5 histone acetyltransferase complexes. Finally, we propose a model for the architecture of the SAGA and ADA complexes, which predicts novel functional associations within the SAGA complex and provides mechanistic insights into phenotypical observations in SAGA mutants.

  9. A Mutant Strain of a Surfactant-Producing Bacterium with Increased Emulsification Activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Qingmei; Yao, Jianming; Pan, Renrui; Yu, Zengliang

    2005-06-01

    As reported in this paper, a strain of oil-degrading bacterium Sp-5-3 was determined to belong to Enterobacteriaceae, which would be useful for microbial enhanced oil recovery (MEOR). The aim of our study was to generate a mutant using low energy N+ beam implantation. With 10 keV of energy and 5.2 × 1014 N+/cm2 of dose - the optimum condition, a mutant, S-34, was obtained, which had nearly a 5-fold higher surface and a 13-fold higher of emulsification activity than the wild type. The surface activity was measured by two methods, namely, a surface tension measuring instrument and a recording of the repulsive circle of the oil film; the emulsification activity was scaled through measuring the separating time of the oil-fermentation mixture. The metabolic acid was determined as methane by means of gas chromatography.

  10. Screening of mutant strain Streptomyces mediolani sp. AC37 for (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin production enhancement.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Jakeline Trejos; Sturdíková, Maria; Brezová, Vlasta; Svajdlenka, Emil; Novotová, Marta

    2012-12-01

    Streptomyces mediolani sp. AC37 was isolated from the root system of higher plant Taxus baccata and produced metabolite identified as (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin according to LC/MS/MS analysis. In our screening program for improvements of bioactive secondary metabolites from plant associate streptomycetes, mutation was used as a tool for the induction of genetic variations for selection of higher (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin producers of isolates. S. mediolani sp. AC37 was treated with UV irradiation and chemical mutagenic treatment (N-nitroso-N-methyl-urea). The radical scavenging and antioxidant capacity of (-)-8-O-methyltetrangomycin and extracts isolated from mutants were tested using EPR spin trapping technique and ABTS(·+) assay. Comparison of electron microscopic images of Streptomyces sp. AC37 and mutant strains of Streptomyces sp. AC37 revealed substantial differences in morphology and ultrastructure.

  11. Enhanced production of thrombinase by Streptomyces venezuelae: kinetic studies on growth and enzyme production of mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Naveena, Balakrishnan; Gopinath, Kannapan Panchamoorthy; Sakthiselvan, Punniavan; Partha, Nagarajan

    2012-05-01

    This investigation provides the enhanced production of thrombinase, a fibrinolytic enzyme using mutant Streptomyces venezuelae. Initially the mutagenesis of the marine isolate was done by UV and Ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS) and their mutational efficiencies were compared. The mutants were selected based on their high thrombinase activity and used for further studies. The mutant was found to be more halo and thermo tolerant comparing to wild. The effect of Dissolved oxygen level was also determined and the mutant offered the maximum specific growth rate as 0.2404 (h(-1)). The mutant showed high resistance to higher initial lactose concentration and the inhibition concentration was found to be 155.1mg/mL. The effect of S(0)/X(0) ratio on specific substrate consumption and production rate were also investigated. Both mutant and wild showed increase in specific substrate consumption and production rate at higher S(0)/X(0) ratio but the mutant showed better values than the wild strain.

  12. GSFC Ada programming guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Daniel M.; Nelson, Robert W.

    1986-01-01

    A significant Ada effort has been under way at Goddard for the last two years. To ease the center's transition toward Ada (notably for future space station projects), a cooperative effort of half a dozen companies and NASA personnel was started in 1985 to produce programming standards and guidelines for the Ada language. The great richness of the Ada language and the need of programmers for good style examples makes Ada programming guidelines an important tool to smooth the Ada transition. Because of the natural divergence of technical opinions, the great diversity of our government and private organizations and the novelty of the Ada technology, the creation of an Ada programming guidelines document is a difficult and time consuming task. It is also a vital one. Steps must now be taken to ensure that the guide is refined in an organized but timely manner to reflect the growing level of expertise of the Ada community.

  13. Production and downstream processing of (1→3)-β-D-glucan from mutant strain of Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31750

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We isolated a mutant that produced higher levels of curdlan than the wild strain Agrobacterium sp. ATCC 31750 by chemical mutagenesis using N-methyl-N-nitro-nitrosoguanidine. The mutant strain produced 66 g/L of curdlan in 120 h with a yield of (0.88) while, the wild strain produced 41 g/L in 120 h with a yield of (0.62) in a stirred bioreactor. The mutant could not produce curdlan when the pH was shifted from 7.0 to 5.5 after nitrogen depletion as followed for wild strain. In contrast, pH optimum for cell growth and curdlan production for mutant was found to be 7.0. We optimized the downstream processing of curdlan by varying different volumes of NaOH and HCl for extraction and precipitation of curdlan. The molecular weight of the purified curdlan from the wild and mutant strain was 6.6 × 105 Da and 5.8 × 105 Da respectively. The monosaccharide analyses confirm that curdlan from both wild and mutant strain contains only glucose units. From the NMR and FTIR data, it has been confirmed that curdlan was exclusively composed of β (1 → 3)-D-glucan residues. PMID:22681895

  14. Characterisation of a cold adapted esterase and mutants from a psychotolerant Pseudomonas sp. strain.

    PubMed

    Dong, Juan; Gasmalla, Mohammed A A; Zhao, Wei; Sun, Jingtao; Liu, Wenyu; Wang, Mingming; Han, Liang; Yang, Ruijin

    2016-07-13

    A cold-adapted esterase-producing strain named T1-39 was isolated from Glacier No.1, Tianshan, China, and identified as Pseudomonas sp. from 16S rRNA sequence analysis. The esterase (EstT1-39) secreted by this strain preferentially hydrolyzed esters of glycerol with short- and medium-chain fatty acids. Mutants of T1-39 were generated by the atmospheric and room-temperature plasma (ARTP) method and screened for enhanced esterase activity. Among all the mutants, strain TB11 had 4.45-fold higher esterase productivity than T1-39, with high genetic stability over 10 generations of continuous cultivation. Maximum activity of EstT1-39 and EstTB11 was observed at 30°C, pH 9.0 and 25°C, pH 8.5, respectively. EstTB11 was thermally more stable (50°C for 1 hour) and active over a broader pH range than EstT1-39. EstTB11 also retained 38% of its maximal activity at 0°C and was found to be able to hydrolyze milk fats into short- and medium-chain fatty acids at 4°C. The characteristics of EstT1-39 made it a cold-adapted enzyme and the EstTB11 from the mutant, with its higher activity at lower temperatures, may be suitable for the production of aromas and flavors in the dairy industry. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  15. Establishment of markerless gene deletion tools in thermophilic Bacillus smithii and construction of multiple mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Bosma, Elleke F; van de Weijer, Antonius H P; van der Vlist, Laurens; de Vos, Willem M; van der Oost, John; van Kranenburg, Richard

    2015-07-07

    Microbial conversion of biomass to fuels or chemicals is an attractive alternative for fossil-based fuels and chemicals. Thermophilic microorganisms have several operational advantages as a production host over mesophilic organisms, such as low cooling costs, reduced contamination risks and a process temperature matching that of commercial hydrolytic enzymes, enabling simultaneous saccharification and fermentation at higher efficiencies and with less enzymes. However, genetic tools for biotechnologically relevant thermophiles are still in their infancy. In this study we developed a markerless gene deletion method for the thermophile Bacillus smithii and we report the first metabolic engineering of this species as a potential platform organism. Clean deletions of the ldhL gene were made in two B. smithii strains (DSM 4216(T) and compost isolate ET 138) by homologous recombination. Whereas both wild-type strains produced mainly L-lactate, deletion of the ldhL gene blocked L-lactate production and caused impaired anaerobic growth and acid production. To facilitate the mutagenesis process, we established a counter-selection system for efficient plasmid removal based on lacZ-mediated X-gal toxicity. This counter-selection system was applied to construct a sporulation-deficient B. smithii ΔldhL ΔsigF mutant strain. Next, we demonstrated that the system can be used repetitively by creating B. smithii triple mutant strain ET 138 ΔldhL ΔsigF ΔpdhA, from which also the gene encoding the α-subunit of the E1 component of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex is deleted. This triple mutant strain produced no acetate and is auxotrophic for acetate, indicating that pyruvate dehydrogenase is the major route from pyruvate to acetyl-CoA. In this study, we developed a markerless gene deletion method including a counter-selection system for thermophilic B. smithii, constituting the first report of metabolic engineering in this species. The described markerless gene deletion system

  16. Enhancement of photohydrogen production using phbC deficient mutant Rhodopseudomonas palustris strain M23.

    PubMed

    Yang, Chu-Fang; Lee, Chi-Mei

    2011-05-01

    This study used a DNA recombination method to knock out the poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) synthesis gene phbC in the photosynthetic bacterium Rhodopseudomonas palustris WP3-5. The experimental results indicated that the mutant strain Rps. palustris M23 could be successfully screened. Fluorescent observation with Nile blue staining showed no significant PHB granule accumulation in the mutant cells. Batch mode experiments using acetic acid as a carbon source revealed a 29.1% and 25.9% hydrogen gas content from M23 and WP3-5, respectively. However, this trend did not appear when using propionic acid as carbon source. Under continuous operation, the hydrogen gas content from M23 could be maintained above 72%. The average hydrogen production rates of the WP3-5 and M23 strains were 264 mL-H(2)/L/day and 457 mL-H(2)/L/day, respectively. The total biogas volume collected from M23 was 1.7 times higher than that from the wild type. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Prediction of dynamic behavior of mutant strains from limited wild-type data.

    PubMed

    Song, Hyun-Seob; Ramkrishna, Doraiswami

    2012-03-01

    Metabolic engineering is the field of introducing genetic changes in organisms so as to modify their function towards synthesizing new products of high impact to society. However, engineered cells frequently have impaired growth rates thus seriously limiting the rate at which such products are made. The problem is attributable to inadequate understanding of how a metabolic network functions in a dynamic sense. Predictions of mutant strain behavior in the past have been based on steady state theories such as flux balance analysis (FBA), minimization of metabolic adjustment (MOMA), and regulatory on/off minimization (ROOM). Such predictions are restricted to product yields and cannot address productivity, which is of focal interest to applications. We demonstrate that our framework ( [Song and Ramkrishna, 2010] and [Song and Ramkrishna, 2011]), based on a “cybernetic” view of metabolic systems, makes predictions of the dynamic behavior of mutant strains of Escherichia coli from a limited amount of data obtained from the wild-type. Dynamic frameworks must necessarily address the issue of metabolic regulation, which the cybernetic approach does by postulating that metabolism is an optimal dynamic response of the organism to the environment in driving reactions towards ensuring survival. The predictions made in this paper are without parallel in the literature and lay the foundation for rational metabolic engineering. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. A mutant Tat protein inhibits infection of human cells by strains from diverse HIV-1 subtypes.

    PubMed

    Rustanti, Lina; Jin, Hongping; Lor, Mary; Lin, Min Hsuan; Rawle, Daniel J; Harrich, David

    2017-03-14

    Nullbasic is a mutant HIV-1 Tat protein that inhibits HIV-1 replication via three independent mechanisms that disrupts 1) reverse transcription of the viral RNA genome into a DNA copy, 2) HIV-1 Rev protein function required for viral mRNA transport from the nucleus to the cytoplasm and 3) HIV-1 mRNA transcription by RNA Polymerase II. The Nullbasic protein is derived from the subtype B strain HIV-1BH10 and has only been tested against other HIV-1 subtype B strains. However, subtype B strains only account for ~10% of HIV-1 infections globally and HIV-1 Tat sequences vary between subtypes especially for subtype C, which is responsible for ~50% HIV-1 infection worldwide. These differences could influence the ability of Tat to interact with RNA and cellular proteins and thus could affect the antiviral activity of Nullbasic. Therefore, Nullbasic was tested against representative HIV-1 strains from subtypes C, D and A/D recombinant to determine if it can inhibit their replication. Nullbasic was delivered to human cells using a self-inactivating (SIN) γ-retroviral system. We evaluated Nullbasic-mCherry (NB-mCh) fusion protein activity against the HIV-1 strains in TZM-bl cell lines for inhibition of transactivation and virus replication. We also examined antiviral activity of Nullbasic-ZsGreen1 (NB-ZSG1) fusion protein against the same strains in primary CD4(+) T cells. The Nullbasic expression was monitored by western blot and flow cytometry. The effects of Nullbasic on primary CD4(+) T cells cytotoxicity, proliferation and apoptosis were also examined. The results show that Nullbasic inhibits Tat-mediated transactivation and virus replication of all the HIV-1 strains tested in TZM-bl cells. Importantly, Nullbasic inhibits replication of the HIV-1 strains in primary CD4(+) T cells without affecting cell proliferation, cytotoxicity or level of apoptotic cells. A SIN-based γ-retroviral vector used to express Nullbasic fusion proteins improved protein expression

  19. Induction of various autoantibodies by mutant gene lpr in several strains of mice.

    PubMed

    Izui, S; Kelley, V E; Masuda, K; Yoshida, H; Roths, J B; Murphy, E D

    1984-07-01

    The effect of the autosomal mutant gene lpr (lymphoproliferation) on the development of various autoantibodies and immune complex (IC) glomerulonephritis was investigated in four genetically distinct strains of mice: MRL/ MpJ , C3H/HeJ, C57BL/6J, and AKR/J. The presence of the lpr gene not only enhanced the production of autoantibodies in the autoimmune MRL/ MpJ strain, but also induced the formation of various kinds of autoantibodies in the three other strains of mice without any apparent predisposition to autoimmune disease. Autoantibodies induced by the lpr gene included anti-double-stranded DNA, anti-single-stranded DNA, anti-IgG, anti-thymocyte, and anti-serum glycoprotein gp70. This indicates that the action of the lpr gene on the development of autoantibody response does not require the particular abnormalities of the MRL genome. The differences in amounts and types of autoantibodies among the lpr strains reflect the difference in the background genome of each strain, suggesting the participation of other genes or factors determining the quantity and/or specificity of autoantibodies. In addition to the development of autoantibodies, the three nonautoimmune strains of mice produced high levels of unidentified IC in the presence of the lpr gene, detectable by the C1q and the conglutinin binding tests. Their glomerular lesions, however, were relatively limited when compared with MRL/ MpJ -lpr/lpr mice, which developed severe glomerulonephritis early in their life. These results suggest that the lpr gene is able to induce the formation of various autoantibodies and IC at significant concentrations in nonautoimmune mice, but for the full manifestation of systemic lupus erythematosus there may be a requirement for supplemental genetic abnormalities or factors.

  20. ART/Ada and CLIPS/Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbert, Chris

    1990-01-01

    Although they have reached a point of commercial viability, expert systems were originally developed in artificial intelligence (AI) research environments. Many of the available tools still work best in such environments. These environments typically utilize special hardware such as LISP machines and relatively unfamiliar languages such as LISP or Prolog. Space Station applications will require deep integration of expert system technology with applications developed in conventional languages, specifically Ada. The ability to apply automation to Space Station functions could be greatly enhanced by widespread availability of state-of-the-art expert system tools based on Ada. Although there have been some efforts to examine the use of Ada for AI applications, there are few, if any, existing products which provide state-of-the-art AI capabilities in an Ada tool. The goal of the ART/Ada Design Project is to conduct research into the implementation in Ada of state-of-the-art hybrid expert systems building tools (ESBT's). This project takes the following approach: using the existing design of the ART-IM ESBT as a starting point, analyze the impact of the Ada language and Ada development methodologies on that design; redesign the system in Ada; and analyze its performance. The research project will attempt to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the potential for embedding expert systems in Ada systems for eventual application in future Space Station Freedom projects. During Phase 1 of the project, initial requirements analysis, design, and implementation of the kernel subset of ART-IM functionality was completed. During Phase 2, the effort has been focused on the implementation and performance analysis of several versions with increasing functionality. Since production quality ART/Ada tools will not be available for a considerable time, and additional subtask of this project will be the completion of an Ada version of the CLIPS expert system shell developed by NASA

  1. A phenotype survey of 36 mutant mouse strains with gene-targeted defects in glycosyltransferases or glycan-binding proteins

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Sally L; Le, Dzung; Long, Jeffrey M; Sobieszczuk, Peter; Ma, Bo; Tian, Hua; Fang, Xiaoqun; Paulson, James C; Marth, Jamey D; Varki, Nissi

    2013-01-01

    The consortium for functional glycomics (CFG) was a large research initiative providing networking and resources for investigators studying the role of glycans and glycan-binding proteins in health and disease. Starting in 2001, six scientific cores were established to generate data, materials and new technologies. By the end of funding in 2011, the mouse phenotype core (MPC) submitted data to a website from the phenotype screen of 36 mutant mouse strains deficient in a gene for either a glycan-binding protein (GBP) or glycosyltransferase (GT). Each mutant strain was allotted three months for analysis and screened by standard phenotype assays used in the fields of immunology, histology, hematology, coagulation, serum chemistry, metabolism and behavior. Twenty of the deficient mouse strains had been studied in other laboratories, and additional tests were performed on these strains to confirm previous observations and discover new data. The CFG constructed 16 new homozygous mutant mouse strains and completed the initial phenotype screen of the majority of these new mutant strains. In total, >300 phenotype changes were observed, but considering the over 100 assays performed on each strain, most of the phenotypes were unchanged. Phenotype differences include abnormal testis morphology in GlcNAcT9- and Siglec-H-deficient mice and lethality in Pomgnt1-deficient mice. The numerous altered phenotypes discovered, along with the consideration of the significant findings of normality, will provide a platform for future characterization to understand the important roles of glycans and GBPs in the mechanisms of health and disease. PMID:23118208

  2. Ada concurrent programming

    SciTech Connect

    Gehani, N.

    1984-01-01

    In this book, Narain Gehani explains the concurrent programming facilities in Ada and shows how to use them effectively in writing concurrent programs. He also surveys concurrent programming facilities in other languages, discusses issues specific to concurrent programming, and examines the limitations of the concurrent programming facilities in Ada. Topics considered include an introduction to concurrent programming, the concurrent programming model in Ada, and a survey of other concurrent programming models; tasking, i.e., concurrent programming facilities in Ada; task types; exceptions and tasking; device drivers; real-time programming; topics related to concurrent programming; more examples of concurrent programming; and synopsis of sequential programming in Ada.

  3. Ada 9X overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weller, David G.

    1992-01-01

    The current version of Ada has been an ANSI standard since 1983. In 1988, the Ada Joint Program Office was tasked with reevaluating the language and proposing changes to the standard. Since that time, the world has seen a tremendous explosion in object-oriented languages, as well as other growing fields such as distributed computing and support for very large software systems. The speaker will discuss new features being added to the next version of Ada, currently called Ada 9X, and what transition issues must be considered for current Ada projects.

  4. Gas exchange in the filamentous cyanobacterium Nostoc punctiforme strain ATCC 29133 and Its hydrogenase-deficient mutant strain NHM5.

    PubMed

    Lindberg, Pia; Lindblad, Peter; Cournac, Laurent

    2004-04-01

    Nostoc punctiforme ATCC 29133 is a nitrogen-fixing, heterocystous cyanobacterium of symbiotic origin. During nitrogen fixation, it produces molecular hydrogen (H(2)), which is recaptured by an uptake hydrogenase. Gas exchange in cultures of N. punctiforme ATCC 29133 and its hydrogenase-free mutant strain NHM5 was studied. Exchange of O(2), CO(2), N(2), and H(2) was followed simultaneously with a mass spectrometer in cultures grown under nitrogen-fixing conditions. Isotopic tracing was used to separate evolution and uptake of CO(2) and O(2). The amount of H(2) produced per molecule of N(2) fixed was found to vary with light conditions, high light giving a greater increase in H(2) production than N(2) fixation. The ratio under low light and high light was approximately 1.4 and 6.1 molecules of H(2) produced per molecule of N(2) fixed, respectively. Incubation under high light for a longer time, until the culture was depleted of CO(2), caused a decrease in the nitrogen fixation rate. At the same time, hydrogen production in the hydrogenase-deficient strain was increased from an initial rate of approximately 6 micro mol (mg of chlorophyll a)(-1) h(-1) to 9 micro mol (mg of chlorophyll a)(-1) h(-1) after about 50 min. A light-stimulated hydrogen-deuterium exchange activity stemming from the nitrogenase was observed in the two strains. The present findings are important for understanding this nitrogenase-based system, aiming at photobiological hydrogen production, as we have identified the conditions under which the energy flow through the nitrogenase can be directed towards hydrogen production rather than nitrogen fixation.

  5. A Quantitative Survey of Gravity Receptor Function in Mutant Mouse Strains

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Kenneth R.; Yu, Heping; Erway, Lawrence C.; Alagramam, Kumar N.; Pollak, Natasha; Jones, Timothy A.

    2005-01-01

    The purpose of this research was to identify vestibular deficits in mice using linear vestibular evoked potentials (VsEPs). VsEP thresholds, peak latencies, and peak amplitudes from 24 strains with known genetic mutations and 6 inbred background strains have been analyzed and descriptive statistics generated for each strain. Response parameters from mutant homozygotes were compared with heterozygote and/or background controls, and all strain averages were contrasted to normative ranges. Previous work established average values for normal screening VsEP parameters at +6 dB re: 1.0 g/ms: P1 = 1.3 ms, P2 = 2.2 ms, P3 = 2.8 ms; P1/N1 = 2 μV; P2/N2 = 1.6 μV. Normal thresholds averaged −8 dB re: 1.0 g/ms. Homozygotes of the following recessive mutations had absent VsEPs at the ages tested: Espnje, Atp2b2dfw-2J, Spnb4qv-lnd2J, Spnb4qv-3J, Myo7ash1, Tmiesr, Myo6sv, jc, Pcdh15av-J, Pcdh15av-2J, Pcdh15av-3J, Cdh23v-2J, Sansjs, hr, Kcne1pkr, and Pou3f4del. These results suggest profound gravity receptor deficits for these homozygotes, which is consistent with the structural deficits that have been documented for many of these strains. Homozygotes of Catna2cdf, Grid2ho4J, Wnt1sw, qk, and Mbpshi strains and heterozygotes of Grid2lc had measurable VsEPs, but one or more response parameters differed from the respective control group (heterozygote or background strain) or were outside normal ranges. For example, qk and Mbpshi homozygotes showed significantly prolonged latencies consistent with the abnormal myelin that has been described for these strains. Prolonged latencies may suggest deficits in neural conduction; elevated thresholds suggest reduced sensitivity, and reduced amplitudes may be suggestive for reduced neural synchrony. One mutation, Otx1jv, had all VsEP response parameters within normal limits, an expected finding because the abnormality in Otx1jv is presumably restricted to the lateral semicircular canal. Interestingly, some heterozygote groups also

  6. Recovery of Nonpathogenic Mutant Bacteria from Tumors Caused by Several Agrobacterium tumefaciens Strains: a Frequent Event?▿

    PubMed Central

    Llop, Pablo; Murillo, Jesús; Lastra, Beatriz; López, María M.

    2009-01-01

    We have evaluated the interaction that bacterial genotypes and plant hosts have with the loss of pathogenicity in tumors, using seven Agrobacterium tumefaciens strains inoculated on 12 herbaceous and woody hosts. We performed a screening of the agrobacteria present inside the tumors, looking for nonpathogenic strains, and found a high variability of those strains in this niche. To verify the origin of the putative nonpathogenic mutant bacteria, we applied an efficient, reproducible, and specific randomly amplified polymorphic DNA analysis method. In contrast with previous studies, we recovered a very small percentage (0.01%) of nonpathogenic strains that can be considered true mutants. Of 5,419 agrobacterial isolates examined, 662 were nonpathogenic in tomato, although only 7 (from pepper and tomato tumors induced by two A. tumefaciens strains) could be considered to derive from the inoculated strain. Six mutants were affected in the transferred DNA (T-DNA) region; one of them contained IS426 inserted into the iaaM gene, whereas the whole T-DNA region was apparently deleted in three other mutants, and the virulence of the remaining two mutants was fully restored with the T-DNA genes as well. The plasmid profile was altered in six of the mutants, with changes in the size of the Ti plasmid or other plasmids and/or the acquisition of new plasmids. Our results also suggest that the frequent occurrence of nonpathogenic clones in the tumors is probably due to the preferential growth of nonpathogenic agrobacteria, of either endophytic or environmental origin, but different from the bacterial strain inducing the tumor. PMID:19700547

  7. Mutant human myocilin induces strain specific differences in ocular hypertension and optic nerve damage in mice.

    PubMed

    McDowell, Colleen M; Luan, Tomi; Zhang, Zhang; Putliwala, Tasneem; Wordinger, Robert J; Millar, J Cameron; John, Simon W M; Pang, Iok-Hou; Clark, Abbot F

    2012-07-01

    Elevated intraocular pressure (IOP) is a causative risk factor for the development and progression of glaucoma. Glaucomatous mutations in myocilin (MYOC) damage the trabecular meshwork and elevate IOP in humans and in mice. Animal models of glaucoma are important to discover and better understand molecular pathogenic pathways and to test new glaucoma therapeutics. Although a number of different animal models of glaucoma have been developed and characterized, there are no true models of human primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). The overall goal of this work is to develop the first inducible mouse model of POAG using a human POAG relevant transgene (i.e. mutant MYOC) expression in mouse eyes to elevate IOP and cause pressure-induced damage to the optic nerve. Four mouse strains (A/J, BALB/cJ, C57BL/6J, and C3H/HeJ) were used in this study. Ad5.MYOC.Y437H (5 × 10(7) pfu) was injected intravitreally into one eye, with the uninjected contralateral eye serving as the control eye. Conscious IOP measurements were taken using a TonoLab rebound tonometer. Optic nerve damage was determined by scoring PPD stained optic nerve cross sections. Retinal ganglion cell and superior colliculus damage was assessed by Nissl stain cell counts. Intravitreal administration of viral vector Ad5.MYOC.Y437H caused a prolonged, reproducible, and statistically significant IOP elevation in BALB/cJ, A/J, and C57BL/6J mice. IOPs increased to approximately 25 mm Hg for 8 weeks (p < 0.0001). In contrast, the C3H/HeJ mouse strain was resistant to Ad5.MYOC.Y437H induced IOP elevation for the 8-week time period. IOPs were stable (12-15 mm Hg) in the uninjected control eyes. We also determined whether there were any strain differences in pressure-induced optic nerve damage. Even though IOP was similarly elevated in three of the strains tested (BALB/cJ, C57BL/6J, and A/J) only the A/J strain had considerable and significant optic nerve damage at the end of 8 weeks with optic nerve damage score of 2.64

  8. Characterization of xanthan gum produced from glycerol by a mutant strain Xanthomonas campestris CCTCC M2015714.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zichao; Wu, Jianrong; Zhu, Li; Zhan, Xiaobei

    2017-02-10

    Xanthan gum was produced by a mutant strain X. campestris CCTCC M2015714 with glycerol as the sole carbon source. The monosaccharide composition and molar ratio of xanthan gum produced from glycerol are glucose: mannose: glucuronic acid=2.0:1.65:1.0. Meanwhile, chemical structure of xanthan gum produced from glycerol is similar to that of the commercial xanthan through FT-IR and NMR. Remarkably, the molecular weight of xanthan gum produced using our method (3.0±0.14×10(6)Da) is about half that of the commercial one (5.8±0.25×10(6)Da), and the consistency index (K) of which is less than 1/10 that of the commercial xanthan. This work paves the way for xanthan production from glycerol and is useful for studying the structure/application of xanthan gum.

  9. Localization of 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase in Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Egorova, O V; Nikolayeva, V M; Suzina, N E; Donova, M V

    2005-04-01

    The localization of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (17beta-OH SDH) was studied using cell fractionation and cytochemical investigation. Mycobacterium sp. Et1 mutant strain derived from Mycobacterium sp. VKM Ac-1815D and characterized by increased 17beta-OH SDH activity was used as a model organism. Subcellular distribution study showed both soluble and membrane-bound forms of mycobacterial 17beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase. The cytochemical method based on a copper ferrocyanide procedure followed by electron microscopic visualization was applied in order to investigate the intracellular localization of bacterial 17beta-OH SDH in more detail. The enzyme was found to be located in the peripheral cytoplasmic zone adjoining the cytoplasmic membrane (CM). 17beta-OH SDH was loosely membrane bound and easily released into the environment under the cell integrity failure.

  10. Purification and characterisation of α-amylase produced by mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae EMS-18.

    PubMed

    Abdullah, Roheena; Ikram-ul-Haq

    2015-01-01

    α-Amylase produced by a mutant strain of Aspergillus oryzae EMS-18 has been purified to homogeneity as judged by sodium dodecyle sulphate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE). The enzyme was purified by using 70% ammonium sulphate precipitation followed by anion exchange chromatography on DEAE-Sephadex column and gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. An enzyme purification factor of 9.5-fold was achieved with a final specific activity of 1987.7 U/mg protein and overall yield of 23.8%. The molecular weight of purified α-amylase was estimated to be 48 kDa by SDS-PAGE. The purified enzyme revealed an optimum assay temperature and pH 40°C and 5.0, respectively. Except Ca(++) all other metal ions such as Mg, Mn, Na, Zn, Ni, Fe, Cu, Co and Ba were found to be inhibitory to enzyme activity.

  11. Sensitivity of dark mutants of various strains of luminescent bacteria to reactive oxygen species.

    PubMed

    Lyzeń, Robert; Wegrzyn, Grzegorz

    2005-03-01

    Recent studies indicated that bioluminescence of the marine bacterium Vibrio harveyi may both stimulate DNA repair and contribute to detoxification of deleterious oxygen derivatives. Therefore, it was also proposed that these reactions can be considered biological roles of bacterial luminescence and might act as evolutionary drives in development of luminous systems. However, experimental evidence for the physiological role of luciferase in protection of cells against oxidative stress has been demonstrated only in one bacterial species, raising the question whether this is a specific or a more general phenomenon. Here we demonstrate that in the presence of various oxidants (hydrogen peroxide, cumene hydroperoxide, t-butyl hydroperoxide and ferrous ions) growth of dark mutants of different strains of Vibrio fischeri and Photobacterium leiognathi is impaired relative to wild-type bacteria, though to various extents. Deleterious effects of oxidants on the mutants could be reduced (with different efficiency) by addition of antioxidants, A-TEMPO or 4OH-TEMPO. These results support the hypotheses that (1) activities of bacterial luciferases may detoxify deleterious oxygen derivatives, and (2) significantly different efficiencies of this reaction are characteristic for various luciferases.

  12. A mutant of Saccharomyces cerevisiae lacking catabolic NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase. Growth characteristics of the mutant and regulation of enzyme synthesis in the wild-type strain.

    PubMed

    Middelhoven, W J; van Eijk, J; van Renesse, R; Blijham, J M

    1978-01-01

    NAD-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-B) was induced in a wild-type strain derived of alpha-sigma 1278b by alpha-amino acids, the nitrogen of which according to known degradative pathways is transferred to 2-oxoglutarate. A recessive mutant (gdhB) devoid of GDH-B activity grew more slowly than the wild type if one of these amino acids was the sole source of nitrogen. Addition of ammonium chloride, glutamine, asparagine or serine to growth media with inducing alpha-amino acids as the main nitrogen source increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant to the wild-type level and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the wild type. Arginine, urea and allantoin similarly increased the growth rate of the gdhB mutant and repressed GDH-B synthesis in the presence of glutamate, but not in the presence of aspartate, alanine or proline as the main nitrogen source. These observations are consistent with the view that GDH-B in vivo deaminates glutamate. Ammonium ions are required for the biosynthesis of glutamine, asparagine, arginine, histidine and purine and pyrimidine bases. Aspartate and alanine apparently are more potent inducers of GDH-B than glutamate. Anabolic NADP-specific glutamate dehydrogenase (GDH-A) can not fulfil the function of GDH-B in the gdhB mutant. This is concluded from the equal growth rates in glutamate, aspartate and proline media as observed with a gdhB mutant and with a gdhA, gdhB double mutant in which both glutamate dehydrogenases area lacking. The double mutant showed an anomalous growth behaviour, growth rates on several nitrogen sources being unexpectedly low.

  13. Combinatorial depletion analysis to assemble the network architecture of the SAGA and ADA chromatin remodeling complexes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kenneth K; Sardiu, Mihaela E; Swanson, Selene K; Gilmore, Joshua M; Torok, Michael; Grant, Patrick A; Florens, Laurence; Workman, Jerry L; Washburn, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    Despite the availability of several large-scale proteomics studies aiming to identify protein interactions on a global scale, little is known about how proteins interact and are organized within macromolecular complexes. Here, we describe a technique that consists of a combination of biochemistry approaches, quantitative proteomics and computational methods using wild-type and deletion strains to investigate the organization of proteins within macromolecular protein complexes. We applied this technique to determine the organization of two well-studied complexes, Spt–Ada–Gcn5 histone acetyltransferase (SAGA) and ADA, for which no comprehensive high-resolution structures exist. This approach revealed that SAGA/ADA is composed of five distinct functional modules, which can persist separately. Furthermore, we identified a novel subunit of the ADA complex, termed Ahc2, and characterized Sgf29 as an ADA family protein present in all Gcn5 histone acetyltransferase complexes. Finally, we propose a model for the architecture of the SAGA and ADA complexes, which predicts novel functional associations within the SAGA complex and provides mechanistic insights into phenotypical observations in SAGA mutants. PMID:21734642

  14. Mating-Type Mutations in SCHIZOSACCHAROMYCES POMBE: Isolation of Mutants and Analysis of Strains with an h- or h+ Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Meade, James H.; Gutz, Herbert

    1976-01-01

    Mutants defective in various steps of the sexual cycle have been isolated from homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by Bresch, Müller and Egel (1968). These mutants include heterothallic h+ and h- strains. We have isolated additional h+ and h- mutants from homothallic strains. Those mutants which are due to mutations in the mating-type region were analyzed in detail. Our results show that the mating-type gene mat2 not only has a function in copulation and meiosis, but that it also regulates the formation of the map1 gene product (map1 is a mating-type auxiliary gene). Some of the h - mutants have lost only one of the three functions while others are defective in at least two, and perhaps all three, functions. Further, we show that the mat1- allele of h90 strains can mutate to mat1+ but that mutations in mat2 appear to affect the mutational behavior of mat1. Finally, we describe a new inactive mating-type allele, mat2*, which is different from mat20 in that it can mutate to mat2+. PMID:17248713

  15. Mating-Type Mutations in SCHIZOSACCHAROMYCES POMBE: Isolation of Mutants and Analysis of Strains with an h or h Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Meade, J H; Gutz, H

    1976-06-01

    Mutants defective in various steps of the sexual cycle have been isolated from homothallic strains of Schizosaccharomyces pombe by Bresch, Müller and Egel (1968). These mutants include heterothallic h(+) and h(-) strains. We have isolated additional h(+) and h(- ) mutants from homothallic strains. Those mutants which are due to mutations in the mating-type region were analyzed in detail. Our results show that the mating-type gene mat2 not only has a function in copulation and meiosis, but that it also regulates the formation of the map1 gene product (map1 is a mating-type auxiliary gene). Some of the h( -) mutants have lost only one of the three functions while others are defective in at least two, and perhaps all three, functions. Further, we show that the mat1(-) allele of h(90) strains can mutate to mat1(+) but that mutations in mat2 appear to affect the mutational behavior of mat1. Finally, we describe a new inactive mating-type allele, mat2*, which is different from mat2(0) in that it can mutate to mat2(+).

  16. Proteomic Analysis of Anti-Cancerous Scopularide Production by a Marine Microascus brevicaulis Strain and Its UV Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Kramer, Annemarie; Beck, Hans Christian; Kumar, Abhishek; Kristensen, Lars Peter; Imhoff, Johannes F.; Labes, Antje

    2015-01-01

    The marine fungus Microascus brevicaulis strain LF580 is a non-model secondary metabolite producer with high yields of the two secondary metabolites scopularides A and B, which exhibit distinct activities against tumour cell lines. A mutant strain was obtained using UV mutagenesis, showing faster growth and differences in pellet formation besides higher production levels. Here, we show the first proteome study of a marine fungus. Comparative proteomics were applied to gain deeper understanding of the regulation of production and of the physiology of the wild type strain and its mutant. For this purpose, an optimised protein extraction protocol was established. In total, 4759 proteins were identified. The central metabolic pathway of strain LF580 was mapped using the KEGG pathway analysis and GO annotation. Employing iTRAQ labelling, 318 proteins were shown to be significantly regulated in the mutant strain: 189 were down- and 129 upregulated. Proteomics are a powerful tool for the understanding of regulatory aspects: The differences on proteome level could be attributed to limited nutrient availability in the wild type strain due to a strong pellet formation. This information can be applied for optimisation on strain and process level. The linkage between nutrient limitation and pellet formation in the non-model fungus M. brevicaulis is in consensus with the knowledge on model organisms like Aspergillus niger and Penicillium chrysogenum. PMID:26460745

  17. Mitochondrial genome expression in a mutant strain of D. subobscura, an animal model for large scale mtDNA deletion.

    PubMed Central

    Beziat, F; Morel, F; Volz-Lingenhol, A; Saint Paul, N; Alziari, S

    1993-01-01

    A mitochondrial mutant strain of D. subobscura has two mitochondrial genome populations (heteroplasmy): the first (20-30% of the population, 15.9 kb) is the same as could be found in the wild type; the second (70-80% of the population, 11 kb) has lost by deletion several genes coding for complex I and III subunits, and four tRNAs. In human pathology, this kind of mutation has been correlated with severe diseases such as the Kearns-Sayre syndrome, but the mutant strain, does not seem to be affected by the mutation (1). Studies reported here show that: a) Transcripts from genes not concerned by the mutation are present at the same level in both strains. b) In contrast, transcript concentrations from genes involved in the deletion are significantly decreased (30-50%) in the mutant. c) Deleted DNA was expressed as shown by the detection of the fusion transcript. d) The mtDNA/nuc.DNA ratio is 1.5 times higher in the mutant strain than in the wild type. The mutation leads to change in the transcript level equilibrium. The apparent innocuousness of the mutation may suggest some post-transcriptional compensation mechanisms. This drosophila strain is an interesting model to study the consequence of this type of mitochondrial genome deletion. Images PMID:8441651

  18. Efficient method for generation of bacteriophage insensitive mutants of Streptococcus thermophilus yoghurt and mozzarella strains.

    PubMed

    Mills, S; Coffey, A; McAuliffe, O E; Meijer, W C; Hafkamp, B; Ross, R P

    2007-07-01

    Bacteriophage infection of Streptococcus thermophilus is becoming increasingly problematic in many industry fermentations such as yoghurt and mozzarella manufacture. This study describes the development of an efficient and rapid 3-step approach for the generation of bacteriophage insensitive mutants (BIMs) of these starter strains. The method initially involves infection of a culture in solid media at a multiplicity of infection (M.O.I.) of 10 which is then incubated in milk overnight. BIMs are then isolated following successive rounds (20-25) of growth in 10% reconstituted skimmed milk (RSM) in the presence of high phage titres. The method selects for BIMs which can grow efficiently in milk. Using this approach BIMs of two industrial strains were generated, whose starter performance was comparable to the parent starters in terms of performance in milk. Genomic fingerprinting used to validate the identity of each BIM, revealed a number of restriction fragment length polymorphisms (RFLPs) in two of the resultant BIMs. This method provides a simple and reliable method for generation of BIMs of industrial starters which does not require any specialised equipment and should be widely applicable.

  19. Induced drought tolerance through wild and mutant bacterial strain Pseudomonas simiae in mung bean (Vigna radiata L.).

    PubMed

    Kumari, Sarita; Vaishnav, Anukool; Jain, Shekhar; Varma, Ajit; Choudhary, Devendra Kumar

    2016-01-01

    The present study focused on the overproducing mutant of a plant growth promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) Pseudomonas simiae strain AU (MTCC-12057) for significant drought tolerance in mung bean plants. Five mutants namely AU-M1, AU-M2, AU-M3, AU-M4 and AU-M5 were made after treatment of wild type strain with N-methyl-N-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine. Mutant strain AU-M4 was recorded for enhanced ACC deaminase (ACC-D) activity, indole acetic acid (IAA) production and inorganic phosphate (Pi) solubilization compared to wild strain and other four mutant strains under drought condition. AU-M4 showed higher phosphate solubilization index (8.17) together with higher ACC-D activity (98 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (69.35 µg/ml) compared with the wild type P. simiae strain AU ACC-D activity (79 nmol/mg/h) and IAA concentration (38.98 µg/ml) respectively. In this report, we investigated the effect of both wild and mutant type bacterial strain on mung bean plants under drought stress. Results showed that mutant AU-M4 and wild type strain AU inoculated plants exhibited superior tolerance against drought stress, as shown by their enhanced plant biomass (fresh weight), higher water content, higher proline accumulation and lower osmotic stress injury. Mutant AU-M4 and wild strain AU inoculated plants reduced the ethylene level by 59 and 45% respectively, compared to the control under stress condition. Furthermore, bacterial inoculated plants showed enhanced induced systemic drought tolerance by reducing stomata size and net photosynthesis resulting higher water content in mung bean plants that may help in survival of plants during drought condition. To mitigate the effects of drought stress, use of PGPR will be needed to ensure sufficient production of food from crop plants. Taking current leads available, concerted future research is needed in this area, particularly on field evaluation with application of potential microorganisms.

  20. Managing Ada development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Green, James R.

    1986-01-01

    The Ada programming language was developed under the sponsorship of the Department of Defense to address the soaring costs associated with software development and maintenance. Ada is powerful, and yet to take full advantage of its power, it is sufficiently complex and different from current programming approaches that there is considerable risk associated with committing a program to be done in Ada. There are also few programs of any substantial size that have been implemented using Ada that may be studied to determine those management methods that resulted in a successful Ada project. The items presented are the author's opinions which have been formed as a result of going through an experience software development. The difficulties faced, risks assumed, management methods applied, and lessons learned, and most importantly, the techniques that were successful are all valuable sources of management information for those managers ready to assume major Ada developments projects.

  1. Ada Advanced Error Detector.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-01-01

    COES) I199 KEY SRU (Oswaii. on owso imds Of neem , awl ~~ for MugS wmlm Ada. Programing Language Evasive Action Programming Ada Programming Support...this project. runtime monitoring systems of production quality standards for analysis and debugging of Ada tasking programs can be available for...incorporation into Ads Program Support Environments in the next 2 .4 years, depending on the level of effort. Such production quality tools would

  2. Enhancing cellulase production by overexpression of xylanase regulator protein gene, xlnR, in Talaromyces cellulolyticus cellulase hyperproducing mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Okuda, Naoyuki; Fujii, Tatsuya; Inoue, Hiroyuki; Ishikawa, Kazuhiko; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-10-01

    We obtained strains with the xylanase regulator gene, xlnR, overexpressed (HXlnR) and disrupted (DXlnR) derived from Talaromyces cellulolyticus strain C-1, which is a cellulase hyperproducing mutant. Filter paper degrading enzyme activity and cellobiohydrolase I gene expression was the highest in HXlnR, followed by C-1 and DXlnR. These results indicate that the enhancement of cellulase productivity was succeeded by xlnR overexpression.

  3. Functional analysis of an feoB mutant in Clostridium perfringens strain 13.

    PubMed

    Awad, Milena M; Cheung, Jackie K; Tan, Joanne E; McEwan, Alastair G; Lyras, Dena; Rood, Julian I

    2016-10-01

    Bacterial pathogens have adopted numerous mechanisms for acquiring iron from host proteins during an infection, including the direct acquisition of ferric iron from heme-associated proteins or from iron-scavenging siderophores. Ferric iron then is transported into the cytosol, where it can be utilized by the bacterial pathogen. Under anaerobic conditions bacteria can also transport ferrous iron using the transmembrane complex FeoAB, but little is known about iron transport systems in anaerobic bacteria such as the pathogenic clostridia. In this study we sought to characterize the iron acquisition process in Clostridium perfringens. Bioinformatic analysis of the Clostridium perfringens strain 13 genome sequence revealed that it has seven potential iron acquisition systems: three siderophore-mediated systems, one ferric citrate uptake system, two heme-associated acquisition systems and one ferrous iron uptake system (FeoAB). The relative level of expression of these systems was determined using quantitative real-time RT-PCR assays that were specific for one gene from each system. Each of these genes was expressed, with the feoAB genes generating the most abundant iron-uptake related transcripts. To further examine the role of this system in the growth of C. perfringens, insertional inactivation was used to isolate a chromosomal feoB mutant. Growth of this mutant in the presence and absence of iron revealed that it had altered growth properties and a markedly reduced total iron and manganese content compared to the wild type; effects that were reversed upon complementation with the wild-type feoB gene. These studies suggest that under anaerobic conditions FeoB is the major protein required for the uptake of iron into the cell and that it may play an important role in the pathogenesis of C. perfringens infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Lactococcus lactis SpOx Spontaneous Mutants: a Family of Oxidative-Stress-Resistant Dairy Strains§

    PubMed Central

    Rochat, Tatiana; Gratadoux, Jean-Jacques; Corthier, Gérard; Coqueran, Bérard; Nader-Macias, Maria-Elena; Gruss, Alexandra; Langella, Philippe

    2005-01-01

    Numerous industrial bacteria generate hydrogen peroxide (H2O2), which may inhibit the growth of other bacteria in mixed ecosystems. We isolated spontaneous oxidative-stress-resistant (SpOx) Lactococcus lactis mutants by using a natural selection method with milk-adapted strains on dairy culture medium containing H2O2. Three SpOx mutants displayed greater H2O2 resistance. One of them, SpOx3, demonstrated better behavior in different oxidative-stress situations: (i) higher long-term survival upon aeration in LM17 and milk and (ii) the ability to grow with H2O2-producing Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. delbrueckii strains. Furthermore, the transit kinetics of the SpOx3 mutant in the digestive tract of a human flora-associated mouse model was not affected. PMID:15870374

  5. Comparison of the metabolic activities of four wild-type Clostridium perfringens strains with their gatifloxacin-selected resistant mutants.

    PubMed

    Rafii, Fatemeh; Park, Miseon; Gamboa da Costa, Gonçalo; Camacho, Luisa

    2009-12-01

    The production of short-chain fatty acids, reductive enzymes, and hydrolytic enzymes by four gatifloxacin-selected, fluoroquinolone-resistant, mutant strains of C. perfringens, with stable mutations either in DNA gyrase or in both DNA gyrase and topoisomerase IV, was compared with that produced by the wild-type parent strains to investigate the effect of mutations associated with the selection of gatifloxacin resistance on bacterial metabolic activities. The mutants differed from their respective wild-type parent strains in the enzymatic activities of azoreductase, nitroreductase, and beta-glucosidase and in the ratio of butyric acid to acetic acid production. Microarray analysis of one wild type and the corresponding mutant revealed different levels of mRNA expression for the enzymes involved in short-chain fatty acid (SCFA) synthesis and for beta-glucosidase and oxidoreductases. In addition to mutations in the target genes, selection of resistance to gatifloxacin resulted in strain-specific physiological changes in the resistant mutants of C. perfringens that affected their metabolic activities.

  6. Simplifying multidimensional fermentation dataset analysis and visualization: One step closer to capturing high-quality mutant strains

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiang; Xu, Dan; Jiang, Ting-Ting

    2017-01-01

    In this study, we analyzed mutants of Clostridium acetobutylicum, an organism used in a broad range of industrial processes related to biofuel production, to facilitate future studies of bioreactor and bioprocess design and scale-up, which are very important research projects for industrial microbiology applications. To accomplish this, we generated 329 mutant strains and applied principal component analysis (PCA) to fermentation data gathered from these strains to identify a core set of independent features for comparison. By doing so, we were able to explain the differences in the mutant strains’ fermentation expression states and simplify the analysis and visualization of the multidimensional datasets related to the strains. Our study has produced a high-efficiency PCA application based on a data analytics tool that is designed to visualize screening results and to support several hundred sets of data on fermentation interactions to assist researchers in more precisely screening and capturing high-quality mutant strains. More importantly, although this study focused on the use of PCA in microbial fermentation engineering, its results are broadly applicable. PMID:28045110

  7. Synthesis of nitrogenase in mutants of the cyanobacterium Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 affected in heterocyst development or metabolism.

    PubMed Central

    Ernst, A; Black, T; Cai, Y; Panoff, J M; Tiwari, D N; Wolk, C P

    1992-01-01

    Mutants of Anabaena sp. strain PCC 7120 that are incapable of sustained growth with air as the sole source of nitrogen were generated by using Tn5-derived transposons. Nitrogenase was expressed only in mutants that showed obvious morphological signs of heterocyst differentiation. Even under rigorously anaerobic conditions, nitrogenase was not synthesized in filaments that were unable to develop heterocysts. These results suggest that competence to synthesize nitrogenase requires a process that leads to an early stage of visible heterocyst development and are consistent with the idea that synthesis of nitrogenase is under developmental control (J. Elhai and C. P. Wolk, EMBO J. 9:3379-3388, 1990). We isolated mutants in which differentiation was arrested at an intermediate stage of heterocyst formation, suggesting that differentiation proceeds in stages; those mutants, as well as mutants with aberrant heterocyst envelopes and a mutant with defective respiration, expressed active nitrogenase under anaerobic conditions only. These results support the idea that the heterocyst envelope and heterocyst respiration are required for protection of nitrogenase from inactivation by oxygen. In the presence of air, such mutants contained less nitrogenase than under anaerobic conditions, and the Fe-protein was present in a posttranslationally modified inactive form. We conclude that internal partial oxygen pressure sufficient to inactivate nitrogenase is insufficient to repress synthesis of the enzyme completely. Among mutants with an apparently intact heterocyst envelope and normal respiration, three had virtually undetectable levels of dinitrogenase reductase under all conditions employed. However, three others expressed oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase activity, suggesting that respiration and barrier to diffusion of gases may not suffice for oxygen protection of nitrogenase in these mutants; two of these mutants reduced acetylene to ethylene and ethane. Images PMID:1328150

  8. Control of Salmonella Enteritidis and Salmonella Gallinarum in birds by using live vaccine candidate containing attenuated Salmonella Gallinarum mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Penha Filho, Rafael Antonio Casarin; de Paiva, Jacqueline Boldrin; da Silva, Mariana Dias; de Almeida, Adriana Maria; Berchieri, Angelo

    2010-04-01

    The ideal live vaccine to control Salmonella in commercial chicken flocks should engender protection against various strains. The purpose of the present study was to confirm the attenuation of a Salmonella Gallinarum (SG) mutant strain with deletion on genes cobS and cbiA, that are involved in the biosynthesis of cobalamin. Furthermore, evaluate its use as a live vaccine against Salmonella. For the evaluation of the vaccine efficacy, two experiments were conducted separately. Birds from a commercial brown line of chickens were used to perform challenge with SG wild type strain and birds from a commercial white line of chickens were used to perform challenge with Salmonella Enteritidis (SE) wild type strain. In both experiments, the birds were separated in three groups (A, B and C). Birds were orally vaccinated with the SG mutant as the following programme: group A, one dose at 5 days of age; group B, one dose at 5 days of age and a second dose at 25 days of age; and group C, birds were kept unvaccinated as controls. At 45 days of age, birds from all groups, including the control, were challenged orally by SG wild type (brown line) or SE wild type (white line). Lastly, another experiment was performed to evaluate the use of the SG mutant strain to prevent caecal colonization by SE wild type on 1-day-old broiler chicks. Mortality and systemic infection by SG wild type strain were assessed in brown chickens; faecal shedding and systemic infection by SE wild type were assessed in white chickens and caecal colonization was assessed in broiler chicks. Either vaccination with one or two doses of SG mutant, were capable to protect brown chickens against SG wild type. In the experiment with white chickens, only vaccination with two doses of SG mutant protected the birds against challenge with SE wild type. Although, SG mutant could not prevent caecal colonization in 1-day-old broiler chicks by the challenge strain SE wild type. Overall, the results indicated that SG mutant

  9. The Annona muricata leaf ethanol extract affects mobility and reproduction in mutant strain NB327 Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    Bustos, A V Gualteros; Jiménez, M Gómez; Mora, R M Sánchez

    2017-07-01

    The C. elegans NB327 mutant strain is characterized for the knockdown of the dic-1 gene. The dic-1 gene is homologous to the dice-1 gene in humans, encoding the protein DICE-1 as a tumor suppressor. Absence or under-regulation of the dice-1 gene can be reflected in lung and prostate cancer [17], [18]. This study evaluated the effect of EEAML on the C. elegans NB327 mutant strain. Phenotypic aspects such as morphology, body length, locomotion, and reproductive behaviour were analyzed. It is important to emphasize that the strain presents a phenotype characteristic with respect to egg laying and hatching. Reported studies showed that Annona muricata extract and its active components evidence anti-cancer and anti-tumor effects, through experimentation in vivo and in vitro models. However, neurotoxicity has been reported as a side effect. The results showed that the mutant strain NB327 was exposed to EEAML (5 mg/ml) concentration, it showed a significant decrease in average locomotion, resulting in 13 undulations in 30 s. This contrasts with the control strain's 17.5 undulations in 30 s. Similarly, the number of progenies was reduced from 188 progenies (control strain) to 114 and 92 progenies at the dose of (1 mg/ml and 5 mg/m) EEAML. The results of this study suggest that EEAML has a possible neurotoxic effect in concentrations equal to or greater than 5 mg/ml. Also, it does not have positive effects on the mutant strain of Caenorhabditis elegans NB327 phenotype.

  10. Inhibition of the SOS response of Escherichia coli by the Ada protein

    SciTech Connect

    Vericat, J.A.; Guerrero, R.; Barbe, J.

    1988-03-01

    Induction of the adaptive response by N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) caused a decrease in the UV-mediated expression of both recA and sfiA genes but not of the umuDC gene. On the other hand, the adaptive response did not affect the temperature-promoted induction of SOS response in a RecA441 mutant. The inhibitory effect on the UV-triggered expression of the recA and sfiA genes was not dependent on either the alkA gene or the basal level of RecA protein, but rather required the ada gene. Furthermore, an increase in the level of the Ada protein, caused by the runaway plasmid pYN3059 in which the ada gene is regulated by the lac promoter, inhibited UV-mediated recA gene expression even in cells to which the MNNG-adaptive treatment had not been applied. This inhibitory effect of the adaptive pretreatment was not observed either in RecBC- strains or in RecBC mutants lacking exonuclease V-related nuclease activity. However, RecF- mutants showed an adaptive response-mediated decrease in UV-promoted induction of the recA gene.

  11. Righting the ADA

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Council on Disability, 2004

    2004-01-01

    Many Americans with disabilities feel that a series of negative court decisions is reducing their status to that of "second-class citizens," a status that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) was supposed to remedy forever. In this report, the National Council on Disability (NCD), which first proposed the enactment of an ADA and…

  12. The effect of gamma irradiation on astaxanthin synthetase encoding gene in two mutant strains of Phaffia rhodozyma

    PubMed Central

    Najafi, Naeimeh; Hosseini, Ramin; Ahmadi, Ali-Reza

    2013-01-01

    Background and Objectives Astaxanthin, an orange-red carotenoid pigment, acts as a protective agent against oxidative damage to cells in vivo. The astaxanthin synthetase gene (crtS) size consists of 3995 bp. This gene has been suggested to catalyse β-carotene to astaxanthin in Phaffia rhodozyma. The aim of this research was to find any possible changes in this gene in two mutant strains, Gam1 and Gam2 (with high astaxanthin pigment production), previously created by gamma irradiation. Materials and Methods The astaxanthin synthetase gene sequence of Phaffia rhodozyma in the NCBI Gene bank was used to design primer. In Gam1, this gene was amplified using primers Asta F1, Asta R2, Asta F3, Asta R4. In Gam2, primers asta F1, asta R4 were used to amplify the gene. The amplified fragments were 8 sequenced using primers Asta F1, Asta R1, Asta F2, Asta R2, Asta F3, Asta R3 and Asta F4, Asta R4. Astaxanthin synthetase gene from two mutant strains, Gam1 and Gam2 were amplified using PCR. The amplified products were sequenced and aligned using the ClustalW software. Conclusion The comparison of this gene showed 98% and 99% similarities between the reference sequence and Gam1 and Gam2 mutant strains, respectively, whereas the comparison of this gene in Gam1 and Gam2 mutant strains showed 97% similarity. However, the deduced proteins showed 78% and 83% between the reference protein obtained from the wild type and Gam1 and Gam2, respectively. This similarity was 75% between the mutant strains. PMID:24475339

  13. Assessing benzene-induced toxicity on wild type Euglena gracilis Z and its mutant strain SMZ.

    PubMed

    Peng, Cheng; Arthur, Dionne M; Sichani, Homa Teimouri; Xia, Qing; Ng, Jack C

    2013-11-01

    Benzene is a representative member of volatile organic compounds and has been widely used as an industrial solvent. Groundwater contamination of benzene may pose risks to human health and ecosystems. Detection of benzene in the groundwater using chemical analysis is expensive and time consuming. In addition, biological responses to environmental exposures are uninformative using such analysis. Therefore, the aim of this study was to employ a microorganism, Euglena gracilis (E. gracilis) as a putative model to monitor the contamination of benzene in groundwater. To this end, we examined the wild type of E. gracilis Z and its mutant form, SMZ in their growth rate, morphology, chlorophyll content, formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and DNA damage in response to benzene exposure. The results showed that benzene inhibited cell growth in a dose response manner up to 48 h of exposure. SMZ showed a greater sensitivity compared to Z in response to benzene exposure. The difference was more evident at lower concentrations of benzene (0.005-5 μM) where growth inhibition occurred in SMZ but not in Z cells. We found that benzene induced morphological changes, formation of lipofuscin, and decreased chlorophyll content in Z strain in a dose response manner. No significant differences were found between the two strains in ROS formation and DNA damage by benzene at concentrations affecting cell growth. Based on these results, we conclude that E. gracilis cells were sensitive to benzene-induced toxicities for certain endpoints such as cell growth rate, morphological change, depletion of chlorophyll. Therefore, it is a potentially suitable model for monitoring the contamination of benzene and its effects in the groundwater.

  14. Cellulase production and saccharification of rice straw by the mutant strain Hypocrea koningii RSC1.

    PubMed

    Palaniyandi, Sasikumar Arunachalam; Yang, Seung Hwan; Suh, Joo-Won

    2014-01-01

    The production of cellulase using solid-state fermentation of rice straw by the mutant strain Hypocrea koningii RSC1 was studied. Optimization of culture conditions, such as the nitrogen source, pH, and temperature, resulted in a maximum filter paper cellulase activity of 44.15 U g(-1) substrate, a carboxymethylcellulase activity of 324.6 U g(-1) substrate, and a β-glucosidase activity of 7.45 U g(-1) substrate. Saccharification of untreated, 1% H(2)SO(4)-treated, and 2.5% NaOH-treated rice straw using the RSC1 cellulase resulted in 19, 17, and 34 g L(-1) of reducing sugar, respectively. Further studies on the morphological and compositional changes of rice straw upon treatment with the cellulase by scanning electron microscopy analysis and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy revealed the disruption of the arrangement of fibers and changes in the functional groups that occur in cellulose. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed a reduction in crystallinity of the rice straw upon treatment with the cellulase. Our study shows that H. koningii RSC1 could be a good choice for the production of cellulase and reducing sugars from rice straw.

  15. Residual virulence and immunogenicity of CGV26 and CGV2631 B. melitensis Rev. 1 deletion mutant strains in sheep after subcutaneous or conjunctival vaccination.

    PubMed

    Guilloteau, Laurence A; Laroucau, Karine; Olivier, Michel; Grillo, Maria Jesus; Marin, Clara M; Verger, Jean-Michel; Blasco, Jose-Maria

    2006-04-24

    The CGV26 and CGV2631 strains are novel engineered Brucella melitensis Rev.1 mutant strains deleted for the bp26 gene or for both bp26 and omp31 genes, respectively, coding for proteins of diagnostic significance. The residual virulence and immunogenicity of both mutants were compared to the parental Rev.1 strain in sheep after subcutaneous or conjunctival vaccination. The deletion of the bp26 gene or both bp26 and omp31 genes had no significant effect on the intracellular survival of the Rev.1 strain in ovine macrophage cultures. The kinetics of infection induced by both mutants in sheep was similar to the Rev.1 strain, and inoculation by the subcutaneous route produced wider and more generalized infections than the conjunctival route. All strains were cleared from lymph nodes and organs within 3 months after inoculation. The CGV26 and CGV2631 mutants induced both specific systemic antibody response and lymphoproliferation in sheep. The kinetics of the responses induced by the mutants was quite similar to that of the parental Rev.1 strain, except for the intensity of the lymphoproliferative response, which was attenuated for the CGV2631 mutant. In conclusion, the residual virulence of both CGV26 and CGV2631 mutants in sheep was similar to that of the parental Rev.1 vaccine strain. These mutants induced also significant specific antibody and cell-mediated immunity in sheep and are suitable to be evaluated as potential vaccine candidates against B. melitensis and B. ovis infections in sheep.

  16. Annotated Ada 95 Reference Manual.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-12-21

    A. Strohmeier (Swiss Fed Inst of Technology: Switzerland); W. Taylor (consultant: UK); J. Tokar ( Tartan ); E. Vasilescu (Grumman); J. Vladik...Language Preci- 69 sion Team (Odyssey Research Associates), the Ada 9X User/Implementer Teams (AETECH, Tartan , TeleSoft), the Ada 9X Implementation...the RM83. [Ada Issue (AI)) (All An Ada Issue (AT) is a numbered ruling from the ARG. {Ada Commentary Integration Document ( ACID )) ( ACID ) The Ada

  17. In vitro induction and selection of fluoroquinolone-resistant mutants of Streptococcus pyogenes strains with multiple emm types.

    PubMed

    Billal, Dewan S; Fedorko, Daniel P; Yan, S Steve; Hotomi, Muneki; Fujihara, Keiji; Nelson, Nancy; Yamanaka, Noboru

    2007-01-01

    To perform a systematic analysis of point mutations in the quinolone resistance determining regions (QRDRs) of the DNA gyrase and topoisomerase genes of emm type 6 and other emm types of Streptococcus pyogenes strains after in vitro exposure to stepwise increasing concentrations of levofloxacin. Twelve parent strains of S. pyogenes, each with a different emm type, were chosen for stepwise exposure to increasing levels of levofloxacin followed by selection of resistant mutants. The QRDRs of gyrA, gyrB, parC and parE correlating to mutants with increased MICs were analysed for point mutations. Multiple mutants with significantly increased MICs were generated from each strain. The amino acid substitutions identified were consistent regardless of emm type and were similar to the mechanisms of resistance reported in clinical isolates of S. pyogenes. The number of induction/selection cycles required for the emergence of key point mutations in gyrA and parC was variable among strains. For each parent-mutant set, when MIC increased, serine-81 of gyrA and serine-79 of parC were the primary targets for amino acid substitutions. No point mutations were found in the QRDRs of gyrB and parE in any of the resistant mutants sequenced. Despite its intrinsic polymorphism in the QRDR of parC, emm type 6 is not more likely to develop high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones when compared with other emm types. All emm types seem equally inducible to high-level fluoroquinolone resistance.

  18. Functional complementation of Leishmania (Leishmania) amazonensis AP endonuclease gene (lamap) in Escherichia coli mutant strains challenged with DNA damage agents

    PubMed Central

    Verissimo-Villela, Erika; Kitahara-Oliveira, Milene Yoko; dos Reis, Ana Beatriz de Bragança; Albano, Rodolpho Mattos; Da-Cruz, Alda Maria; Bello, Alexandre Ribeiro

    2016-01-01

    During its life cycle Leishmania spp. face several stress conditions that can cause DNA damages. Base Excision Repair plays an important role in DNA maintenance and it is one of the most conserved mechanisms in all living organisms. DNA repair in trypanosomatids has been reported only for Old World Leishmania species. Here the AP endonuclease from Leishmania (L.) amazonensis was cloned, expressed in Escherichia coli mutants defective on the DNA repair machinery, that were submitted to different stress conditions, showing ability to survive in comparison to the triple null mutant parental strain BW535. Phylogenetic and multiple sequence analyses also confirmed that LAMAP belongs to the AP endonuclease class of proteins. PMID:27223868

  19. The N-terminus region of the putative C2H2 transcription factor Ada1 harbors a species-specific activation motif that regulates asexual reproduction in Fusarium verticillioides.

    PubMed

    Malapi-Wight, Martha; Kim, Jung-Eun; Shim, Won-Bo

    2014-01-01

    Fusarium verticillioides is an important plant pathogenic fungus causing maize ear and stalk rots. In addition, the fungus is directly associated with fumonisin contamination of food and feeds. Here, we report the functional characterization of Ada1, a putative Cys2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor with a high level of similarity to Aspergillus nidulans FlbC, which is required for the activation of the key regulator of conidiation brlA. ADA1 is predicted to encode a protein with two DNA binding motifs at the C terminus and a putative activator domain at the N terminus region. Deletion of the flbC gene in A. nidulans results in "fluffy" cotton-like colonies, with a defect in transition from vegetative growth to asexual development. In this study we show that Ada1 plays a key role in asexual development in F. verticillioides. Conidia production was significantly reduced in the knockout mutantada1), in which aberrant conidia and conidiophores were also observed. We identified genes that are predicted to be downstream of ADA1, based on A. nidulans conidiation signaling pathway. Among them, the deletion of stuA homologue, FvSTUA, resulted in near absence of conidia production. To further investigate the functional conservation of this transcription factor, we complemented the Δada1 strain with A. nidulans flbC, F. verticillioides ADA1, and chimeric constructs. A. nidulans flbC failed to restore conidia production similar to the wild-type level. However, the Ada1N-terminal domain, which contains a putative activator, fused to A. nidulans FlbC C-terminal motif successfully complemented the Δada1 mutant. Taken together, Ada1 is an important transcriptional regulator of asexual development in F. verticillioides and that the N-terminus domain is critical for proper function of this transcription factor. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Dynamics of Photosynthesis in a Glycogen-Deficient glgC Mutant of Synechococcus sp. Strain PCC 7002

    PubMed Central

    Jackson, Simon A.; Eaton-Rye, Julian J.; Bryant, Donald A.; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2015-01-01

    Cyanobacterial glycogen-deficient mutants display impaired degradation of light-harvesting phycobilisomes under nitrogen-limiting growth conditions and secrete a suite of organic acids as a putative reductant-spilling mechanism. This genetic background, therefore, represents an important platform to better understand the complex relationships between light harvesting, photosynthetic electron transport, carbon fixation, and carbon/nitrogen metabolisms. In this study, we conducted a comprehensive analysis of the dynamics of photosynthesis as a function of reductant sink manipulation in a glycogen-deficient glgC mutant of Synechococcus sp. strain PCC 7002. The glgC mutant showed increased susceptibility to photoinhibition during the initial phase of nitrogen deprivation. However, after extended periods of nitrogen deprivation, glgC mutant cells maintained higher levels of photosynthetic activity than the wild type, supporting continuous organic acid secretion in the absence of biomass accumulation. In contrast to the wild type, the glgC mutant maintained efficient energy transfer from phycobilisomes to photosystem II (PSII) reaction centers, had an elevated PSII/PSI ratio as a result of reduced PSII degradation, and retained a nitrogen-replete-type ultrastructure, including an extensive thylakoid membrane network, after prolonged nitrogen deprivation. Together, these results suggest that multiple global signals for nitrogen deprivation are not activated in the glgC mutant, allowing the maintenance of active photosynthetic complexes under conditions where photosynthesis would normally be abolished. PMID:26150450

  1. Mutant strains of Spirulina (Arthrospira) platensis to increase the efficiency of micro-ecological life support systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Igor

    The European Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) is an advanced idea for organizing a bioregenerative system for long term space flights and extraterrestrial settlements (Hendrickx, De Wever et al., 2005). Despite the hostility of both lunar and Martian environments to unprotected life, it seems possible to cultivate photosynthetic bacteria using closed bioreactors illuminated and heated by solar energy. Such reactors might be employed in critical processes, e.g. air revitalization, foodcaloric and protein source, as well as an immunomodulators production. The MELiSSA team suggested cyanobacterium Spirulina as most appropriate agent to revitalize air and produce a simple "fast" food. This is right suggestion because Spirulina was recently shown to be an oxygenic organism with the highest level of O2 production per unit mass (Ananyev et al., 2005). Chemical composition of Spirulina includes proteins (55Aiming to make Spirulina cultivation in life support systems like MELiSSA more efficient, we selected Spirulina mutant strains with increased fraction of methionine in the biomass of this cyanobacterium and compared the effect of parental wild strain of Spirulina and its mutants on the tendency of such experimental illnesses as radiationinduced lesions and hemolythic anemia. Results: It was found that mutant strains 198B and 27G contain higher quantities of total protein, essential amino acids, c-phycocyanin, allophycocyanin and chlorophyll a than parental wild strain of S. platensis. The strain 198B is also characterized with increased content of carotenoids. Revealed biochemical peculiarities of mutant strains suggest that these strains can serve as an additional source of essential amino acids as well as phycobiliproteins and carotenoids for the astronauts. Feeding animals suffering from radiation-induced lesions, c-phycocyanin, extracted from strain 27G, led to a correction in deficient dehydrogenase activity and energy-rich phosphate levels

  2. Transcriptome Profiling of Wild-Type and pga-Knockout Mutant Strains Reveal the Role of Exopolysaccharide in Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans.

    PubMed

    Shanmugam, Mayilvahanan; El Abbar, Faiha; Ramasubbu, Narayanan

    2015-01-01

    Exopolysaccharides have a diverse set of functions in most bacteria including a mechanistic role in protecting bacteria against environmental stresses. Among the many functions attributed to the exopolysaccharides, biofilm formation, antibiotic resistance, immune evasion and colonization have been studied most extensively. The exopolysaccharide produced by many Gram positive as well as Gram negative bacteria including the oral pathogen Aggregatibacter actinomycetemcomitans is the homopolymer of β(1,6)-linked N-acetylglucosamine. Recently, we reported that the PGA-deficient mutant of A. actinomycetemcomitans failed to colonize or induce bone resorption in a rat model of periodontal disease, and the colonization genes, apiA and aae, were significantly down regulated in the mutant strain. To understand the role of exopolysaccharide and the pga locus in the global expression of A. actinomycetemcomitans, we have used comparative transcriptome profiling to identify differentially expressed genes in the wild-type strain in relation to the PGA-deficient strain. Transcriptome analysis revealed that about 50% of the genes are differently expressed (P < 0.05 and fold change >1.5). Our study demonstrated that the absence of the pga locus affects the genes involved in peptidoglycan recycling, glycogen storage, and virulence. Further, using confocal microscopy and plating assays, we show that the viability of pga mutant strain is significantly reduced during biofilm growth. Thus, this study highlights the importance of pga genes and the exopolysaccharide in the virulence of A. actinomycetemcomitans.

  3. Acetoin production by wild-type strains and a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Hillman, J D; Andrews, S W; Dzuback, A L

    1987-06-01

    Eleven different laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans representing the various serogroups were found to produce an average of 6.0 +/- 4.8 mM acetoin when grown in glucose-containing medium under aerobic conditions. None of the strains produced detectable acetoin when grown anaerobically. A lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant produced acetoin both aerobically and anaerobically and in substantially greater amounts than the wild-type strains did. Substitution of mannitol for glucose resulted in decreased acetoin production by wild-type strains and the lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant, indicating a role for NADH2 in the regulation of the acetoin pathway. Pyruvate incorporated into the growth medium of a wild-type strain caused acetoin to be produced anaerobically and stimulated acetoin production aerobically. Cell extracts of a wild-type S. mutans strain were capable of producing acetoin from pyruvate and were (partly) dependent on thiamine PPi. Extracts prepared from aerobically grown cells had approximately twice the acetoin-producing activity as did extracts prepared from anaerobically grown cells. The results indicate that acetoin production by S. mutans may represent an auxiliary reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase in this organism.

  4. Acetoin production by wild-type strains and a lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant of Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed Central

    Hillman, J D; Andrews, S W; Dzuback, A L

    1987-01-01

    Eleven different laboratory strains of Streptococcus mutans representing the various serogroups were found to produce an average of 6.0 +/- 4.8 mM acetoin when grown in glucose-containing medium under aerobic conditions. None of the strains produced detectable acetoin when grown anaerobically. A lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant produced acetoin both aerobically and anaerobically and in substantially greater amounts than the wild-type strains did. Substitution of mannitol for glucose resulted in decreased acetoin production by wild-type strains and the lactate dehydrogenase-deficient mutant, indicating a role for NADH2 in the regulation of the acetoin pathway. Pyruvate incorporated into the growth medium of a wild-type strain caused acetoin to be produced anaerobically and stimulated acetoin production aerobically. Cell extracts of a wild-type S. mutans strain were capable of producing acetoin from pyruvate and were (partly) dependent on thiamine PPi. Extracts prepared from aerobically grown cells had approximately twice the acetoin-producing activity as did extracts prepared from anaerobically grown cells. The results indicate that acetoin production by S. mutans may represent an auxiliary reaction of pyruvate dehydrogenase in this organism. PMID:3570471

  5. Phenotypic analysis of mutant and overexpressing strains of lipid metabolism genes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: implication in growth at low temperatures.

    PubMed

    López-Malo, María; Chiva, Rosana; Rozes, Nicolas; Guillamon, José Manuel

    2013-03-01

    The growing demand for wines with a more pronounced aromatic profile calls for low temperature alcoholic fermentations (10-15°C). However, there are certain drawbacks to low temperature fermentations such as reduced growth rate, long lag phase and sluggish or stuck fermentations. The lipid metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae plays a central role in low temperature adaptation. The aim of this study was to detect lipid metabolism genes involved in cold adaptation. To do so, we analyzed the growth of knockouts in phospholipids, sterols and sphingolipids, from the EUROSCARF collection S. cerevisiae BY4742 strain at low and optimal temperatures. Growth rate of these knockouts, compared with the control, enabled us to identify the genes involved, which were also deleted or overexpressed in a derivative haploid of a commercial wine strain. We identified genes involved in the phospholipid (PSD1 and OPI3), sterol (ERG3 and IDI1) and sphingolipid (LCB3) pathways, whose deletion strongly impaired growth at low temperature and whose overexpression reduced generation or division time by almost half. Our study also reveals many phenotypic differences between the laboratory strain and the commercial wine yeast strain, showing the importance of constructing mutant and overexpressing strains in both genetic backgrounds. The phenotypic differences in the mutant and overexpressing strains were correlated with changes in their lipid composition. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Ada Test and Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-05-01

    llEllllEIlE III HA i28 5__ BIH~~ ~ 2 __I.,11 LZ AFAL-TR-80-1024 Ada TEST AND EVALUATION Alfred J. Scarpelli System Technology Branch Systen Avionics...V. 2 AFWAL-TR-80-1024 SECTION II OVERVIEW OF THE Ada LANGUAGE Ada is a powerful language. It is designed for use in both applications and systems...may generate code that will not fit Into memory. There is concern for possible inefficient accessing methois which will slow down the systen (i.e

  7. Deploying expert systems in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. Daniel; Allen, Bradley P.

    1989-01-01

    As the Department of Defense Ada mandate begins to be enforced actively, interest in deploying expert systems in Ada has increased. A prototype Ada based expert system tool is introduced called ART/Ada. This prototype was built to support research into the language and operational issues of expert systems in Ada. ART/Ada allows applications of a conventional expert system tool called ART-IM (Automated Reasoning Tool for Information Management) to be deployed in various Ada environments with efficient use of time and space. ART-IM, a C-based expert system tool, is used to generate Ada source code which is compiled and linked with an Ada base inference engine to produce an Ada executable image. ART/Ada will be used to implement several prototype expert systems for the Space Station Freedom Program testbeds.

  8. Binding of purified and radioiodinated capsular polysaccharides from Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A strains to capsule-free mutants

    SciTech Connect

    Small, J.M.; Mitchell, T.G.

    1986-12-01

    Strains 6, 15, 98, 110, and 145 of Cryptococcus neoformans serotype A vary in capsule size, animal virulence, and susceptibility to in vitro phagocytosis. The isolated capsular polysaccharides (CPSs) differ in monosaccharide composition ratios and molecular size, as determined by gel filtration. The purpose of this investigation was to characterize the binding of CPSs to capsule-free mutants of C. neoformans and to examine CPSs from these strains for differences in their ability to bind, to determine whether such differences might explain the variation in the pathobiology of these strains. CPSs were partially periodate oxidized, tyraminated, iodinated with /sup 125/I, and used in binding studies with two capsule-free mutants of C. neoformans, strain 602 and Cap59. Binding was specific for yeast species and for polysaccharide and was saturable, which is consistent with a receptor-mediated mechanism of attachment. Binding occurred rapidly and was only slowly reversible. Binding was also independent of pH from pH 5.5 to 8, of cation concentrations, and of competition by sugars up to 1.0 M concentrations. Only a portion of CPS was capable of binding, and strains varied in the extent to which their CPS bound. CPS-15-IV (peak IV was the major polysaccharide peak on DEAE-cellulose chromatography of CPS from strain 15) had the highest proportion of binding (40%), followed by CPS from strains 98, 6, 145, 110, and 15-III (peak III was an earlier eluting fraction of CPS from strain 15). The CPSs differed similarly in their ability to competitively inhibit binding. Treatment of CPS, but not yeast cells, with proteinase XIV abolished binding without altering the CPS gross structure. Treatment of yeast cells with proteases, heat, or formaldehyde did not alter binding, and both strain 602 and Cap59 bound CPS similarly. Binding to encapsulated yeast cells was minimal.

  9. Behavior of two Tannerella forsythia strains and cell surface mutants in multispecies oral biofilms.

    PubMed

    Bloch, Susanne; Thurnheer, Thomas; Murakami, Yukitaka; Belibasakis, Georgios N; Schäffer, Christina

    2017-04-05

    As a member of subgingival multispecies biofilms, Tannerella forsythia is commonly associated with periodontitis. The bacterium has a characteristic cell surface (S-) layer modified with a unique O-glycan. Both the S-layer and the O-glycan were analyzed in this study for their role in biofilm formation by employing an in vitro multispecies biofilm model mimicking the situation in the oral cavity. Different T. forsythia strains and mutants with characterized defects in cell surface composition were incorporated into the model, together with nine species of select oral bacteria. The influence of the T. forsythia S-layer and attached glycan on the bacterial composition of the biofilms was analyzed quantitatively using colony forming unit counts and quantitative real-time PCR, as well as qualitatively by fluorescence in situ hybridization and confocal laser scanning microscopy. This revealed that changes of the T. forsythia cell surface did not affect the quantitative composition of the multispecies consortium, with the exception of Campylobacter rectus cell numbers. The localization of T. forsythia within the bacterial agglomeration varied depending on changes in the S-layer glycan, and this also affected its aggregation with Porphyromonas gingivalis. This suggests a selective role for the glycosylated T. forsythia S-layer in the positioning of this species within the biofilm, its co-localization with P. gingivalis, and the prevalence of C. rectus. These findings might translate into a potential role of T. forsythia cell surface structures in the virulence of this species when interacting with host tissues and immune system, from within or beyond the biofilm. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  10. Software engineering capability for Ada (GRASP/Ada Tool)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, James H., II

    1995-01-01

    The GRASP/Ada project (Graphical Representations of Algorithms, Structures, and Processes for Ada) has successfully created and prototyped a new algorithmic level graphical representation for Ada software, the Control Structure Diagram (CSD). The primary impetus for creation of the CSD was to improve the comprehension efficiency of Ada software and, as a result, improve reliability and reduce costs. The emphasis has been on the automatic generation of the CSD from Ada PDL or source code to support reverse engineering and maintenance. The CSD has the potential to replace traditional prettyprinted Ada Source code. A new Motif compliant graphical user interface has been developed for the GRASP/Ada prototype.

  11. ART-Ada: An Ada-based expert system tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. Daniel; Allen, Bradley P.

    1990-01-01

    The Department of Defense mandate to standardize on Ada as the language for software systems development has resulted in an increased interest in making expert systems technology readily available in Ada environments. NASA's Space Station Freedom is an example of the large Ada software development projects that will require expert systems in the 1990's. Another large scale application that can benefit from Ada based expert system tool technology is the Pilot's Associate (PA) expert system project for military combat aircraft. The Automated Reasoning Tool-Ada (ART-Ada), an Ada expert system tool, is explained. ART-Ada allows applications of a C-based expert system tool called ART-IM to be deployed in various Ada environments. ART-Ada is being used to implement several prototype expert systems for NASA's Space Station Freedom program and the U.S. Air Force.

  12. Absence of light-induced proton extrusion in a cotA-less mutant of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Katoh, A; Sonoda, M; Katoh, H; Ogawa, T

    1996-09-01

    cotA of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC6803 was isolated as a gene that complemented a mutant defective in CO2 transport and is homologous to cemA that encodes a chloroplast envelope membrane protein (A. Katoh, K.S. Lee, H. Fukuzawa, K. Ohyama, and T. Ogawa, Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 93:4006-4010, 1996). A mutant (M29) constructed by replacing cotA in the wild-type (WT) Synechocystis strain with the omega fragment was unable to grow in BG11 medium (approximately 17 mM Na+) at pH 6.4 or at any pH in a low-sodium medium (100 microM Na+) under aeration with 3% (vol/vol) CO2 in air. The WT cells grew well in the pH range between 6.4 and 8.5 in BG11 medium but only at alkaline pH in the low-sodium medium. Illumination of the WT cells resulted in an extrusion followed by an uptake of protons. In contrast, only proton uptake was observed for the M29 mutant in the light without proton extrusion. There was no difference in sodium uptake activity between the WT and mutant. The mutant still possessed 51% of the WT CO2 transport activity in the presence of 15 mM NaCl. On the basis of these results we concluded that cotA has a role in light-induced proton extrusion and that the inhibition of CO2 transport in the M29 mutant is a secondary effect of the inhibition of proton extrusion.

  13. Multi-omics approach to study global changes in a triclosan-resistant mutant strain of Acinetobacter baumannii ATCC 17978.

    PubMed

    Fernando, Dinesh M; Chong, Patrick; Singh, Manu; Spicer, Victor; Unger, Mark; Loewen, Peter C; Westmacott, Garrett; Kumar, Ayush

    2017-01-01

    Acinetobacter baumannii AB042, a triclosan-resistant mutant strain, was examined for modulated gene expression using whole-genome sequencing, transcriptomics and proteomics in order to understand the mechanism of triclosan resistance as well as its impact on A. baumannii. Data revealed modulated expression of the fatty acid metabolism pathway, co-factors known to play a role in the synthesis of fatty acids, as well as several transcriptional regulators. The membrane composition of the mutant revealed a decrease in C18 with a corresponding increase in C16 fatty acids compared with the parent strain A. baumannii ATCC 17978. These data indicate that A. baumannii responds to triclosan by altering the expression of genes involved in fatty acid metabolism, antibiotic resistance and amino acid metabolism.

  14. Anthraquinone dyes decolorization capacity of anamorphic Bjerkandera adusta CCBAS 930 strain and its HRP-like negative mutants.

    PubMed

    Korniłłowicz-Kowalska, Teresa; Rybczyńska, Kamila

    2014-06-01

    Cultures of the anamorphic fungus Bjerkandera adusta CCBAS 930 decolorizing, in stationary cultures, 0.01 % solutions of carminic acid and Poly R-478, were characterised by a strong increase in the activity of the horseradish peroxidase (HRP-like) and manganese-dependent peroxidase (MnP) at a low activity of lignin peroxidase. Genotypically modified mutants of B. adusta CCBAS 930: 930-5 and 930-14, with total or partial loss of decolorization capabilities relative to anthraquinonic dyes, showed inhibition of the activity of HRP-like peroxidase and MnP. Whereas, compared to the parental strain, in the mutant cultures there was an increase in the activity of lignin peroxidase and laccase. The paper presents a discussion of the role of the studied enzymatic activities in the process of decolorization of anthraquinonic dyes by the strain B. adusta CCBAS 930.

  15. [Study of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon in Drosophila melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus].

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Urusov, F A; Romanova, N I; Shmel'kova, A O; Kim, A I

    2012-11-01

    Transpositions of the gypsy retrotransposon in the Drosophila melanogaster genome are controlled by the flamenco locus, which is represented as an accumulation of defective copies of transposable elements. In the present work, genetic control by the flamenco locus of the transcriptional and transpositional activities of the Tirant retrotransposon from the gypsy group was studied. Tissue-specific expression of Tirant was detected in the tissues of ovaries in a strain mutant for the flamenco locus. Tirant was found to be transpositionally active in isogenic D. melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco locus. The sites of two new insertions have been localized by the method of subtractive hybridization. It has been concluded from the results obtained that the flamenco locus is involved in the genetic control of Tirant transpositions.

  16. Characterization of oxidative phosphorylation enzymes in Euglena gracilis and its white mutant strain W(gm)ZOflL.

    PubMed

    Krnáčová, Katarína; Rýdlová, Ivana; Vinarčíková, Michaela; Krajčovič, Juraj; Vesteg, Matej; Horváth, Anton

    2015-03-12

    The enzymes involved in Euglena oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) were characterized in this study. We have demonstrated that Euglena gracilis strain Z and its stable bleached non-photosynthetic mutant strain WgmZOflL both possess fully functional OXPHOS apparatus as well as pathways requiring terminal alternative oxidase(s) and alternative mitochondrial NADH-dehydrogenase(s). Light (or dark) and plastid (non)functionality seem to have little effect on oxygen consumption, the activities of the enzymes involved in OXPHOS and the action of respiration inhibitors in Euglena. This study also demonstrates biochemical properties of complex III (cytochrome c reductase) in Euglena.

  17. The Use of NF1 and NF2 Mutant Mouse Strains in the Investigation of Gene Function and Disease Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-10-01

    percentage of which show features of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ). Importantly, human NFl patients also develop MPNSTs at high...significant subset (at least 50%) are malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ). This evaluation is based on the presence of S 100 staining...percentage of MPNSTs that develop in NF1 patients have mutations in p53. Thus, the Nfl/p53 mutant strain represents an animal model of the more malignant

  18. Expression of the cloned Escherichia coli O9 rfb gene in various mutant strains of Salmonella typhimurium.

    PubMed Central

    Sugiyama, T; Kido, N; Komatsu, T; Ohta, M; Kato, N

    1991-01-01

    To investigate the effect of chromosomal mutation on the synthesis of rfe-dependent Escherichia coli O9 lipopolysaccharide (LPS), the cloned E. coli O9 rfb gene was introduced into Salmonella typhimurium strains defective in various genes involved in the synthesis of LPS. When E. coli O9 rfb was introduced into S. typhimurium strains possessing defects in rfb or rfc, they synthesized E. coli O9 LPS on their cell surfaces. The rfe-defective mutant of S. typhimurium synthesized only very small amounts of E. coli O9 LPS after the introduction of E. coli O9 rfb. These results confirmed the widely accepted idea that the biosynthesis of E. coli O9-specific polysaccharide does not require rfc but requires rfe. By using an rfbT mutant of the E. coli O9 rfb gene, the mechanism of transfer of the synthesized E. coli O9-specific polysaccharide from antigen carrier lipid to the R-core of S. typhimurium was investigated. The rfbT mutant of the E. coli O9 rfb gene failed to direct the synthesis of E. coli O9 LPS in the rfc mutant strain of S. typhimurium, in which rfaL and rfbT functions are intact, but directed the synthesis of the precursor. Because the intact E. coli O9 rfb gene directed the synthesis of E. coli O9 LPS in the same strain, it was suggested that the rfaL product of S. typhimurium and rfbT product of E. coli O9 cooperate to synthesize E. coli O9 LPS in S. typhimurium. Images PMID:1987133

  19. Construction of an Efficient Mutant Strain of Trichosporonoides oedocephalis with HOG1 Gene Deletion for Production of Erythritol.

    PubMed

    Li, Liangzhi; Yang, Tianyi; Guo, Weiqiang; Ju, Xin; Hu, Cuiying; Tang, Bingyu; Fu, Jiaolong; Gu, Jingsheng; Zhang, Haiyang

    2016-04-28

    The mitogen-activated protein kinase HOG1 (high-osmolarity glycerol response pathway) plays a crucial role in the response of yeast to hyperosmotic shock. Trichosporonoides oedocephalis produces large amounts of polyols (,e.g., erythritol and glycerol) in a culture medium. However, the effects of HOG1 gene knockout and environmental stress on the production of these polyols have not yet been studied. In this study, a To-HOG1 null mutation was constructed in T. oedocephalis using the loxP-Kan-loxP/Cre system as replacement of the targeted genes, and the resultant mutants showed much smaller colonies than the wild-type controls. Interestingly, compared with the wild-type strains, the results of shake-flask culture showed that To-HOG1 null mutation increased erythritol production by 1.44-fold while decreasing glycerol production by 71.23%. In addition, this study investigated the effects of citric acid stress on the T. oedocephalis HOG1 null mutants and the wild-type strain. When the supplementation of citric acid in the fermentation medium was controlled at 0.3% (w/v), the concentration of erythritol produced from the wild-type and To-HOG1 knockout mutant strains improved by 18.21% and 21.65%, respectively.

  20. Effects of Pyrogallol on Growth and Cytotoxicity of Wild-Type and katG Mutant Strains of Vibrio vulnificus

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Ju Young; Kim, Choon-Mee; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Kim, Young Ran

    2016-01-01

    Vibrio vulnificus is a causative agent of fatal septicemia and necrotic wound infection and the pathogen infection became an important public health problem in many counties. Vibrio vulnificus causes RtxA1 toxin-induced acute cell death. We tried to identify natural products that inhibit the acute cytotoxicity of V. vulnificus using a lactate hydrogenase assay. A polyphenol pyrogallol protected HeLa cells from V. vulnificus-induced cytotoxicity. Pyrogallol also decreased the growth of V. vulnificus; this inhibitory effect was more significant during log phase than stationary phase. To further elucidate the inhibitory mechanism, pyrogallol-induced toxicity was compared between a V. vulnificus catalase-peroxidase mutant (katG−) and the isogenic wild-type MO6-24/O strains. No growth was observed for the katG− mutant in the presence of pyrogallol (50 μg/mL) even after 24 h, whereas the wild-type strain demonstrated growth recovery following a prolonged lag phase. Pyrogallol-mediated growth inhibition of the katG− mutant strain was partially rescued by exogenous catalase treatment. These results indicate that the mechanism by which pyrogallol inhibits the growth and cytotoxicity of V. vulnificus likely involves polyphenol-induced prooxidant damage. Taken together, these results suggest that pyrogallol has potential for development as a new paradigm drug to treat infectious diseases. PMID:27936080

  1. Free mycolic acid accumulation in the cell wall of the mce1 operon mutant strain of Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Cantrell, Sally A; Leavell, Michael D; Marjanovic, Olivera; Iavarone, Anthony T; Leary, Julie A; Riley, Lee W

    2013-10-01

    The lipid-rich cell wall of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the agent of tuberculosis, serves as an effective barrier against many chemotherapeutic agents and toxic host cell effector molecules, and it may contribute to the mechanism of persistence. Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains mutated in a 13-gene operon called mce1, which encodes a putative ABC lipid transporter, induce aberrant granulomatous response in mouse lungs. Because of the postulated role of the mce1 operon in lipid importation, we compared the cell wall lipid composition of wild type and mce1 operon mutant M. tuberculosis H37Rv strains. High resolution mass spectrometric analyses of the mce1 mutant lipid extracts showed unbound mycolic acids to accumulate in the cell wall. Quantitative analysis revealed a 10.7 fold greater amount of free mycolates in the mutant compared to that of the wild type strain. The free mycolates were comprised of alpha, methoxy and keto mycolates in the ratio 1:0.9:0.6, respectively. Since the mce1 operon is regulated in vivo, the free mycolates that accumulate during infection may serve as a barrier for M. tuberculosis against toxic products and contribute to the pathogen's persistence.

  2. Sheathless Mutant of Cyanobacterium Gloeothece sp. Strain PCC 6909 with Increased Capacity To Remove Copper Ions from Aqueous Solutions▿

    PubMed Central

    Micheletti, Ernesto; Pereira, Sara; Mannelli, Francesca; Moradas-Ferreira, Pedro; Tamagnini, Paula; De Philippis, Roberto

    2008-01-01

    The cyanobacterium Gloeothece sp. strain PCC 6909 and its sheathless mutant were tested for their abilities to remove copper ions from aqueous solutions, with the aim of defining the role of the various outermost polysaccharidic investments in the removal of the metal ions. Microscopy studies and chemical analyses revealed that, although the mutant does not possess a sheath, it releases large amounts of polysaccharidic material (released exocellular polysaccharides [RPS]) into the culture medium. The RPS of the wild type and the mutant are composed of the same 11 sugars, although they are present in different amounts, and the RPS of the mutant possesses a larger amount of acidic sugars and a smaller amount of deoxysugars than the wild type. Unexpectedly, whole cultures of the mutant were more effective in the removal of the heavy metal than the wild type (46.3 ± 3.1 and 26.7 ± 1.5 mg of Cu2+ removed per g of dry weight, respectively). Moreover, we demonstrated that the contribution of the sheath to the metal-removal capacity of the wild type is scarce and that the RPS of the mutant is more efficient in removing copper. This suggests that the metal ions are preferably bound to the cell wall and to RPS functional groups rather than to the sheath. Therefore, the increased copper binding efficiency observed with the sheathless mutant can be attributed to the release of a polysaccharide containing larger amounts and/or more accessible functional groups (e.g., carboxyl and amide groups). PMID:18326679

  3. Constitutive expression of the tzs gene from Agrobacterium tumefaciens virG mutant strains is responsible for improved transgenic plant regeneration in cotton meristem transformation.

    PubMed

    Ye, Xudong; Chen, Yurong; Wan, Yuechun; Hong, Yun-Jeong; Ruebelt, Martin C; Gilbertson, Larry A

    2016-03-01

    KEY MESSAGE : virG mutant strains of a nopaline type of Agrobacterium tumefaciens increase the transformation frequency in cotton meristem transformation. Constitutive cytokinin expression from the tzs gene in the virG mutant strains is responsible for the improvement. Strains of Agrobacterium tumefaciens were tested for their ability to improve cotton meristem transformation frequency. Two disarmed A. tumefaciens nopaline strains with either a virGN54D constitutively active mutation or virGI77V hypersensitive induction mutation significantly increased the transformation frequency in a cotton meristem transformation system. The virG mutant strains resulted in greener explants after three days of co-culture in the presence of light, which could be attributed to a cytokinin effect of the mutants. A tzs knockout strain of virGI77V mutant showed more elongated, less green explants and decreased cotton transformation frequency, as compared to a wild type parental strain, suggesting that expression of the tzs gene is required for transformation frequency improvement in cotton meristem transformation. In vitro cytokinin levels in culture media were tenfold higher in the virGN54D strain, and approximately 30-fold higher in the virGI77V strain, in the absence of acetosyringone induction, compared to the wild type strain. The cytokinin level in the virGN54D strain is further increased upon acetosyringone induction, while the cytokinin level in the virGI77V mutant is decreased by induction, suggesting that different tzs gene expression regulation mechanisms are present in the two virG mutant strains. Based on these data, we suggest that the increased cytokinin levels play a major role in increasing Agrobacterium attachment and stimulating localized division of the attached plant cells.

  4. [Analysis of the structure and expression of the DIP1 gene in Drosophila melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco gene].

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Potanova, M V; Romanova, N I; Kim, A I

    2009-02-01

    DIP1 gene transcription was analyzed with the use of RT-PCR in three Drosophila melanogaster strains with the flamenco- phenotype (flam(SS), flam(MS), and flam(Ore)) and in one flamenco+ strain at the stages of embryos (0-24 h), third-instar larvae, and adult flies. The mutant strains flam(SS) and flam(Ore) lack an active copy of transposon gypsy. Theflam(MS) strain was obtained by introducing an active copy of gypsy in flies of theflam(SS) strain and is characterized by a high rate of gypsy transpositions. The experiments showed that at least five forms of DIP1 gene transcripts are produced. The form of cDNA corresponding to CDS DIP1-d was discovered only in embryos. It was found that DIP1 gene transcription depends on the age of flies: at the larval stage the level of transcription is significantly reduced. However, no reduction of gene transcription is observed in theflam(Ore) strain. These results suggest that the flamenco- phenotype may be associated with an alteration of DIP1 gene transcription, as in differentflamenco- strains the DIP1 gene expression is changed differently.

  5. ART-Ada: An Ada-based expert system tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. Daniel; Allen, Bradley P.

    1991-01-01

    The Department of Defense mandate to standardize on Ada as the language for software systems development has resulted in increased interest in making expert systems technology readily available in Ada environments. NASA's Space Station Freedom is an example of the large Ada software development projects that will require expert systems in the 1990's. Another large scale application that can benefit from Ada based expert system tool technology is the Pilot's Associate (PA) expert system project for military combat aircraft. Automated Reasoning Tool (ART) Ada, an Ada Expert system tool is described. ART-Ada allow applications of a C-based expert system tool called ART-IM to be deployed in various Ada environments. ART-Ada is being used to implement several prototype expert systems for NASA's Space Station Freedom Program and the U.S. Air Force.

  6. Potentiometric analysis of the cytochromes of an Escherichia coli mutant strain lacking the cytochrome d terminal oxidase complex.

    PubMed Central

    Lorence, R M; Green, G N; Gennis, R B

    1984-01-01

    A combination of potentiometric analysis and electrochemically poised low-temperature difference spectroscopy was used to examine a mutant strain of Escherichia coli that was previously shown by immunological criteria to be lacking the cytochrome d terminal oxidase. It was shown that this strain is missing cytochromes d, a1, and b558 and that the cytochrome composition of the mutant is similar to that of the wild-type strain grown under conditions of high aeration. The data indicate that the high-aeration branch of the respiratory chain contains two cytochrome components, b556 (midpoint potential [Em] = +35 mV) and cytochrome o (Em = +165 mV). The latter component binds to CO and apparently has a reduced-minus-oxidized split-alpha band with peaks at 555 and 562 nm. When the wild-type strain was grown under conditions of low aeration, the components of the cytochrome d terminal oxidase complex were observed: cytochrome d (Em = +260 mV), cytochrome a1 (Em = +150 mV) and cytochrome b558 (Em = +180 mV). All cytochromes appeared to undergo simple one-electron oxidation-reduction reactions. In the absence of CO, cytochromes b558 and o have nearly the same Em values. In the presence of CO, the Em of cytochrome o is raised, thus allowing cytochromes b558 and o to be individually quantitated by potentiometric analysis when they are both present. PMID:6317644

  7. GENERAL PURPOSE ADA PACKAGES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Ten families of subprograms are bundled together for the General-Purpose Ada Packages. The families bring to Ada many features from HAL/S, PL/I, FORTRAN, and other languages. These families are: string subprograms (INDEX, TRIM, LOAD, etc.); scalar subprograms (MAX, MIN, REM, etc.); array subprograms (MAX, MIN, PROD, SUM, GET, and PUT); numerical subprograms (EXP, CUBIC, etc.); service subprograms (DATE_TIME function, etc.); Linear Algebra II; Runge-Kutta integrators; and three text I/O families of packages. In two cases, a family consists of a single non-generic package. In all other cases, a family comprises a generic package and its instances for a selected group of scalar types. All generic packages are designed to be easily instantiated for the types declared in the user facility. The linear algebra package is LINRAG2. This package includes subprograms supplementing those in NPO-17985, An Ada Linear Algebra Package Modeled After HAL/S (LINRAG). Please note that LINRAG2 cannot be compiled without LINRAG. Most packages have widespread applicability, although some are oriented for avionics applications. All are designed to facilitate writing new software in Ada. Several of the packages use conventions introduced by other programming languages. A package of string subprograms is based on HAL/S (a language designed for the avionics software in the Space Shuttle) and PL/I. Packages of scalar and array subprograms are taken from HAL/S or generalized current Ada subprograms. A package of Runge-Kutta integrators is patterned after a built-in MAC (MIT Algebraic Compiler) integrator. Those packages modeled after HAL/S make it easy to translate existing HAL/S software to Ada. The General-Purpose Ada Packages program source code is available on two 360K 5.25" MS-DOS format diskettes. The software was developed using VAX Ada v1.5 under DEC VMS v4.5. It should be portable to any validated Ada compiler and it should execute either interactively or in batch. The largest package

  8. GENERAL PURPOSE ADA PACKAGES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    Ten families of subprograms are bundled together for the General-Purpose Ada Packages. The families bring to Ada many features from HAL/S, PL/I, FORTRAN, and other languages. These families are: string subprograms (INDEX, TRIM, LOAD, etc.); scalar subprograms (MAX, MIN, REM, etc.); array subprograms (MAX, MIN, PROD, SUM, GET, and PUT); numerical subprograms (EXP, CUBIC, etc.); service subprograms (DATE_TIME function, etc.); Linear Algebra II; Runge-Kutta integrators; and three text I/O families of packages. In two cases, a family consists of a single non-generic package. In all other cases, a family comprises a generic package and its instances for a selected group of scalar types. All generic packages are designed to be easily instantiated for the types declared in the user facility. The linear algebra package is LINRAG2. This package includes subprograms supplementing those in NPO-17985, An Ada Linear Algebra Package Modeled After HAL/S (LINRAG). Please note that LINRAG2 cannot be compiled without LINRAG. Most packages have widespread applicability, although some are oriented for avionics applications. All are designed to facilitate writing new software in Ada. Several of the packages use conventions introduced by other programming languages. A package of string subprograms is based on HAL/S (a language designed for the avionics software in the Space Shuttle) and PL/I. Packages of scalar and array subprograms are taken from HAL/S or generalized current Ada subprograms. A package of Runge-Kutta integrators is patterned after a built-in MAC (MIT Algebraic Compiler) integrator. Those packages modeled after HAL/S make it easy to translate existing HAL/S software to Ada. The General-Purpose Ada Packages program source code is available on two 360K 5.25" MS-DOS format diskettes. The software was developed using VAX Ada v1.5 under DEC VMS v4.5. It should be portable to any validated Ada compiler and it should execute either interactively or in batch. The largest package

  9. The effect of Clostridium perfringens type C strain CN3685 and its isogenic beta toxin null mutant in goats.

    PubMed

    Garcia, J P; Beingesser, J; Fisher, D J; Sayeed, S; McClane, B A; Posthaus, H; Uzal, F A

    2012-06-15

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and/or enterocolitis in several animal species, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses and humans. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia and the enteric lesions and associated systemic effects are thought to be caused primarily by beta toxin (CPB), one of two typing toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. This has been demonstrated recently by fulfilling molecular Koch's postulates in rabbits and mice. We present here an experimental study to fulfill these postulates in goats, a natural host of C. perfringens type C disease. Nine healthy male or female Anglo Nubian goat kids were inoculated with the virulent C. perfringens type C wild-type strain CN3685, an isogenic CPB null mutant or a strain where the cpb null mutation had been reversed. Three goats inoculated with the wild-type strain presented abdominal pain, hemorrhagic diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary edema, hydropericardium and death within 24h of inoculation. Two goats inoculated with the CPB null mutant and two goats inoculated with sterile culture media (negative controls) remained clinically healthy during 24h after inoculation and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in the tissues of any of them. Reversal of the null mutation to partially restore CPB production also increased virulence; 2 goats inoculated with this reversed mutant presented clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in goats inoculated with the wild-type strain, except that spontaneous death was not observed. These results indicate that CPB is required for C. perfringens type C to induce disease in goats, supporting a key role for this toxin in natural C. perfringens type C disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. The effect of Clostridium perfringens type C strain CN3685 and its isogenic beta toxin null mutant in goats

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, J. P.; Beingesser, J.; Fisher, D. J.; Sayeed, S.; McClane, B. A.; Posthaus, H.; Uzal, F. A.

    2012-01-01

    Clostridium perfringens type C is an important cause of enteritis and/or enterocolitis in several animal species, including pigs, sheep, goats, horses and humans. The disease is a classic enterotoxemia and the enteric lesions and associated systemic effects are thought to be caused primarily by beta toxin (CPB), one of two typing toxins produced by C. perfringens type C. This has been demonstrated recently by fulfilling molecular Koch’s postulates in rabbits and mice. We present here an experimental study to fulfill these postulates in goats, a natural host of C. perfringens type C disease. Nine healthy male or female Anglo Nubian goat kids were inoculated with the virulent C. perfringens type C wild-type strain CN3685, an isogenic CPB null mutant or a strain where the cpb null mutation had been reversed. Three goats inoculated with the wild-type strain presented abdominal pain, hemorrhagic diarrhea, necrotizing enterocolitis, pulmonary edema, hydropericardium and death within 24 h of inoculation. Two goats inoculated with the CPB null mutant and two goats inoculated with sterile culture media (negative controls) remained clinically healthy during 24 h after inoculation and no gross or histological abnormalities were observed in the tissues of any of them. Reversal of the null mutation to partially restore CPB production also increased virulence; 2 goats inoculated with this reversed mutant presented clinical and pathological changes similar to those observed in goats inoculated with the wild-type strain, except that spontaneous death was not observed. These results indicate that CPB is required for C. perfringens type C to induce disease in goats, supporting a key role for this toxin in natural C. perfringens type C disease pathogenesis. PMID:22296994

  11. Flocculation characteristics of an isolated mutant flocculent Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain and its application for fuel ethanol production from kitchen refuse.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kedong; Wakisaka, Minato; Sakai, Kenji; Shirai, Yoshihito

    2009-04-01

    A stable mutant flocculent yeast strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae KRM-1 was isolated during repeated-batch ethanol fermentation using kitchen refuse as the medium. The mechanism of flocculation and interaction with the medium was investigated. According to sugar inhibition assay, it was found that the mutant flocculent strain was a NewFlo phenotype. Flocculation was completely inhibited by protease, proteinase K and partially reduced by treatments with carbohydrate-hydrolyzing enzymes. Flocculation ability showed no difference for pH 3.0-6.0. Furthermore, the mutant flocculent yeast provided repeated-batch cultivations employing cell recycles by flocculation over 10 rounds of cultivation for the production of ethanol from kitchen refuse medium, resulting in relatively high productivity averaging 8.25 g/L/h over 10 batches and with a maximal of 10.08 g/L/h in the final batch. Cell recycle by flocculation was fast and convenient, and could therefore be applicable for industrial-scale ethanol production.

  12. Isolation of a cytochrome-deficient mutant strain of Sporomusa sphaeroides not capable of oxidizing methyl groups.

    PubMed Central

    Kamlage, B; Blaut, M

    1993-01-01

    The homoacetogenic anaerobic bacterium Sporomusa sphaeroides was mutagenized with UV light. Taking advantage of the ampicillin enrichment technique and a newly developed test for the detection of heme in bacterial colonies, the cytochrome-deficient mutant strain S. sphaeroides BK824 was isolated. In contrast to the wild type, this mutant strain failed to grow on betaine, betaine plus methanol, H2 plus CO2, and methanol plus CO2. Growth on betaine plus formate, betaine plus H2, betaine plus pyruvate, methanol plus H2 and CO2, and acetoin was not impaired. All enzymes of the Wood pathway as well as hydrogenase and carbon monoxide dehydrogenase were detectable at comparable activities in both the wild type and the cytochrome-deficient mutant. Labeling experiments with [14C]methanol demonstrated the inability of S. sphaeroides BK824 to oxidize methyl groups. The role of cytochromes in electron transport steps associated with the Wood pathway enzymes and their possible role in energy conservation during autotrophic growth in acetogens are discussed. PMID:8491723

  13. Tissue persistence and vaccine efficacy of tricarboxylic acid cycle and one-carbon metabolism mutant strains of Edwardsiella ictaluri.

    PubMed

    Dahal, Neeti; Abdelhamed, Hossam; Karsi, Attila; Lawrence, Mark L

    2014-06-30

    Edwardsiella ictaluri causes enteric septicemia in fish. Recently, we reported construction of E. ictaluri mutants with single and double gene deletions in tricarboxylic acid cycle (TCA) and one-carbon (C-1) metabolism. Here, we report the tissue persistence, virulence, and vaccine efficacy of TCA cycle (EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, and EiΔmdh), C-1 metabolism (EiΔgcvP and EiΔglyA), and combination mutants (EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, EiΔgcvPΔsdhC, EiΔmdhΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔglyA) in channel catfish. The tissue persistence study showed that EiΔsdhC, EiΔfrdA, EiΔfrdAΔsdhC, and EiΔgcvPΔsdhC were able to invade catfish and persist until 11 days post-infection. Vaccination of catfish fingerlings with all nine mutants provided significant (P<0.05) protection against subsequent challenge with the virulent parental strain. Vaccinated catfish fingerlings had 100% survival when subsequently challenged by immersion with wild-type E. ictaluri except for EiΔgcvPΔglyA and EiΔgcvP. Mutant EiΔgcvPΔsdhC was found to be very good at protecting catfish fry, as evidenced by 10-fold higher survival compared to non-vaccinated fish.

  14. Parallel programming with Ada

    SciTech Connect

    Kok, J.

    1988-01-01

    To the human programmer the ease of coding distributed computing is highly dependent on the suitability of the employed programming language. But with a particular language it is also important whether the possibilities of one or more parallel architectures can efficiently be addressed by available language constructs. In this paper the possibilities are discussed of the high-level language Ada and in particular of its tasking concept as a descriptional tool for the design and implementation of numerical and other algorithms that allow execution of parts in parallel. Language tools are explained and their use for common applications is shown. Conclusions are drawn about the usefulness of several Ada concepts.

  15. Ada Namelist Package

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, Allan R.

    1991-01-01

    Ada Namelist Package, developed for Ada programming language, enables calling program to read and write FORTRAN-style namelist files. Features are: handling of any combination of types defined by user; ability to read vectors, matrices, and slices of vectors and matrices; handling of mismatches between variables in namelist file and those in programmed list of namelist variables; and ability to avoid searching entire input file for each variable. Principle benefits derived by user: ability to read and write namelist-readable files, ability to detect most file errors in initialization phase, and organization keeping number of instantiated units to few packages rather than to many subprograms.

  16. The Chlamydomonas zygospore: mutant strains of Chlamydomonas monoica blocked in zygospore morphogenesis comprise 46 complementation groups.

    PubMed Central

    VanWinkle-Swift, K; Baron, K; McNamara, A; Minke, P; Burrascano, C; Maddock, J

    1998-01-01

    Chlamydomonas monoica undergoes homothallic sexual reproduction in response to nitrogen starvation. Mating pairs are established in clonal culture via flagellar agglutination and fuse by way of activated mating structures to form the quadriflagellate zygote. The zygote further matures into a dormant diploid zygospore through a series of events that we collectively refer to as zygosporulation. Mutants that arrest development prior to the completion of zygosporulation have been obtained through the use of a variety of mutagens, including ultraviolet irradiation, 5-fluorodeoxyuridine, ethyl methanesulfonate, and methyl methanesulfonate. Complementation analysis indicates that the present mutant collection includes alleles affecting 46 distinct zygote-specific functions. The frequency with which alleles at previously defined loci have been recovered in the most recent mutant searches suggests that as many as 30 additional zygote-specific loci may still remain to be identified. Nevertheless, the present collection should provide a powerful base for ultrastructural, biochemical, and molecular analysis of zygospore morphogenesis and dormancy in Chlamydomonas. PMID:9475727

  17. A genome-scale Escherichia coli kinetic metabolic model k-ecoli457 satisfying flux data for multiple mutant strains

    DOE PAGES

    Khodayari, Ali; Maranas, Costas D.

    2016-12-20

    Kinetic models of metabolism at a genome scale that faithfully recapitulate the effect of multiple genetic interventions would be transformative in our ability to reliably design novel overproducing microbial strains. Here, we introduce k-ecoli457, a genome-scale kinetic model of Escherichia coli metabolism that satisfies fluxomic data for wild-type and 25 mutant strains under different substrates and growth conditions. The k-ecoli457 model contains 457 model reactions, 337 metabolites and 295 substrate-level regulatory interactions. Parameterization is carried out using a genetic algorithm by simultaneously imposing all available fluxomic data (about 30 measured fluxes per mutant). Furthermore, the Pearson correlation coefficient between experimentalmore » data and predicted product yields for 320 engineered strains spanning 24 product metabolites is 0.84. This is substantially higher than that using flux balance analysis, minimization of metabolic adjustment or maximization of product yield exhibiting systematic errors with correlation coefficients of, respectively, 0.18, 0.37 and 0.47.« less

  18. A genome-scale Escherichia coli kinetic metabolic model k-ecoli457 satisfying flux data for multiple mutant strains

    PubMed Central

    Khodayari, Ali; Maranas, Costas D.

    2016-01-01

    Kinetic models of metabolism at a genome scale that faithfully recapitulate the effect of multiple genetic interventions would be transformative in our ability to reliably design novel overproducing microbial strains. Here, we introduce k-ecoli457, a genome-scale kinetic model of Escherichia coli metabolism that satisfies fluxomic data for wild-type and 25 mutant strains under different substrates and growth conditions. The k-ecoli457 model contains 457 model reactions, 337 metabolites and 295 substrate-level regulatory interactions. Parameterization is carried out using a genetic algorithm by simultaneously imposing all available fluxomic data (about 30 measured fluxes per mutant). The Pearson correlation coefficient between experimental data and predicted product yields for 320 engineered strains spanning 24 product metabolites is 0.84. This is substantially higher than that using flux balance analysis, minimization of metabolic adjustment or maximization of product yield exhibiting systematic errors with correlation coefficients of, respectively, 0.18, 0.37 and 0.47 (k-ecoli457 is available for download at http://www.maranasgroup.com). PMID:27996047

  19. T-cell lines from 2 patients with adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency showed the restoration of ADA activity resulted from the reversion of an inherited mutation.

    PubMed

    Ariga, T; Oda, N; Yamaguchi, K; Kawamura, N; Kikuta, H; Taniuchi, S; Kobayashi, Y; Terada, K; Ikeda, H; Hershfield, M S; Kobayashi, K; Sakiyama, Y

    2001-05-01

    Inherited deficiency of adenosine deaminase (ADA) results in one of the autosomal recessive forms of severe combined immunodeficiency. This report discusses 2 patients with ADA deficiency from different families, in whom a possible reverse mutation had occurred. The novel mutations were identified in the ADA gene from the patients, and both their parents were revealed to be carriers. Unexpectedly, established patient T-cell lines, not B-cell lines, showed half-normal levels of ADA enzyme activity. Reevaluation of the mutations in these T-cell lines indicated that one of the inherited ADA gene mutations was reverted in both patients. At least one of the patients seemed to possess the revertant cells in vivo; however, the mutant cells might have overcome the revertant after receiving ADA enzyme replacement therapy. These findings may have significant implications regarding the prospects for stem cell gene therapy for ADA deficiency.

  20. In Vitro and In Vivo Characterization of a Bordetella bronchiseptica Mutant Strain with a Deep Rough Lipopolysaccharide Structure

    PubMed Central

    Sisti, Federico; Fernández, Julieta; Rodríguez, María Eugenia; Lagares, Antonio; Guiso, Nicole; Hozbor, Daniela Flavia

    2002-01-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is closely related to Bordetella pertussis, which produces respiratory disease primarily in mammals other than humans. However, its importance as a human pathogen is being increasingly recognized. Although a large amount of research on Bordetella has been generated regarding protein virulence factors, the participation of the surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS) during B. bronchiseptica infection is less understood. To get a better insight into this matter, we constructed and characterized the behavior of an LPS mutant with the deepest possible rough phenotype. We generated the defective mutant B. bronchiseptica LP39 on the waaC gene, which codes for a heptosyl transferase involved in the biosynthesis of the core region of the LPS molecule. Although in B. bronchiseptica LP39 the production of the principal virulence determinants adenylate cyclase-hemolysin, filamentous hemagglutinin, and pertactin persisted, the quantity of the two latter factors was diminished, with the levels of pertactin being the most greatly affected. Furthermore, the LPS of B. bronchiseptica LP39 did not react with sera obtained from mice that had been infected with the parental strain, indicating that this defective LPS is immunologically different from the wild-type LPS. In vivo experiments demonstrated that the ability to colonize the respiratory tract is reduced in the mutant, being effectively cleared from lungs within 5 days, whereas the parental strain survived at least for 30 days. In vitro experiments have demonstrated that, although B. bronchiseptica LP39 was impaired for adhesion to human epithelial cells, it is still able to survive within the host cells as efficiently as the parental strain. These results seem to indicate that the deep rough form of B. bronchiseptica LPS cannot represent a dominant phenotype at the first stage of colonization. Since isolates with deep rough LPS phenotype have already been obtained from human B. bronchiseptica chronic

  1. Deglycosylation of the NS1 protein of dengue 2 virus, strain 16681: construction and characterization of mutant viruses.

    PubMed

    Crabtree, M B; Kinney, R M; Miller, B R

    2005-04-01

    The dengue 2 virus (DENV-2) NS1 glycoprotein contains two potential sites for N-linked glycosylation at Asn-130 and Asn-207. NS1 produced in infected cells is glycosylated at both of these sites. We used site-directed mutagenesis of a DENV-2, strain 16681, full length infectious clone to create mutant viruses lacking the Asn-130, Asn-207 or both of these NS1 glycosylation sites in order to investigate the effects of deglycosylation. Ablation of both NS1 glycosylation sites resulted in unstable viruses that acquired numerous additional mutations; these viruses were not further characterized. Viruses altered at the Asn-130 site exhibited growth characteristics similar to the wild-type (WT) 16681 virus in LLC-MK(2) cells and reduced growth in C6/36 cells. Viruses mutated at the Asn-207 site achieved similar titers in LLC-MK(2) cells compared to WT, however, the appearance of cytopathic effect was delayed and growth of these viruses in C6/36 cells was also reduced compared to WT virus. The plaque size of mutant viruses altered at the Asn-130 site did not differ from that of the WT virus, while mutants altered at the Asn-207 site exhibited a reduced and mixed plaque size. Temperature sensitivity studies comparing the growth of the viruses at 37 degrees C and 39 degrees C showed no significant differences compared to the WT virus. Immunofluorescent antibody staining of infected cells showed that for WT 16681 virus or the Asn-130 site mutant viruses NS1 was located throughout the cytoplasm, however, Asn-207 site mutant virus NS1 protein appeared to be localized to the perinuclear region. Viruses deglycosylated at either site exhibited a significant reduction in mouse neurovirulence compared to the WT virus. The results of our studies indicate that glycosylation of the DENV-2 virus NS1 protein may influence NS1 protein processing/transport as well as the pathogenicity of the virus.

  2. Competitive growth experiments with a high-lipid Chlamydomonas reinhardtii mutant strain and its wild-type to predict industrial and ecological risks.

    PubMed

    Russo, David A; Beckerman, Andrew P; Pandhal, Jagroop

    2017-12-01

    Key microalgal species are currently being exploited as biomanufacturing platforms using mass cultivation systems. The opportunities to enhance productivity levels or produce non-native compounds are increasing as genetic manipulation and metabolic engineering tools are rapidly advancing. Regardless of the end product, there are both environmental and industrial risks associated to open pond cultivation of mutant microalgal strains. A mutant escape could be detrimental to local biodiversity and increase the risk of algal blooms. Similarly, if the cultivation pond is invaded by a wild-type (WT) microalgae or the mutant reverts to WT phenotypes, productivity could be impacted. To investigate these potential risks, a response surface methodology was applied to determine the competitive outcome of two Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains, a WT (CC-124) and a high-lipid accumulating mutant (CC-4333), grown in mixotrophic conditions, with differing levels of nitrogen and initial WT to mutant ratios. Results of the growth experiments show that mutant cells have double the exponential growth rate of the WT in monoculture. However, due to a slower transition from lag phase to exponential phase, mutant cells are outcompeted by the WT in every co-culture treatment. This suggests that, under the conditions tested, outdoor cultivation of the C. reinhardtii cell wall-deficient mutant strains does not carry a significant environmental risk to its WT in an escape scenario. Furthermore, lipid results show the mutant strain accumulates over 200% more TAGs per cell, at 50 mg L(-1) NH4Cl, compared to the WT, therefore, the fragility of the mutant strain could impact on overall industrial productivity.

  3. A LISP-Ada connection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jaworski, Allan; Lavallee, David; Zoch, David

    1987-01-01

    The prototype demonstrates the feasibility of using Ada for expert systems and the implementation of an expert-friendly interface which supports knowledge entry. In the Ford LISP-Ada Connection (FLAC) system LISP and Ada are used in ways which complement their respective capabilities. Future investigation will concentrate on the enhancement of the expert knowledge entry/debugging interface and on the issues associated with multitasking and real-time expert systems implementation in Ada.

  4. Emergence of Potential Superbug Mycobacterium Tuberculosis, Lessons from New Delhi Mutant-1 Bacterial Strains

    PubMed Central

    Nazir, Taha; Abraham, Suraj; Islam, Azharul

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that certain bacterial strains attain the New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) enzyme and become resistant to a broad range of antibiotics. Similarly, more dangerous “superbugs” of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensive drug resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are gradually emerging through rapid genetic mutation caused by prescription non-compliance or unsupervised indiscriminate use of anti-tubercular drugs or other antibiotics. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases have been reported in highly susceptible population groups including the aboriginal communities of US and Canada. In Canada alone, the total number of reported tuberculosis cases has decreased over the past decade. However, there is a steady increase in HIV cases in certain communities including the aboriginal communities. Reintroduction of MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis is possible in these susceptible communities, which in turn may pose serious public health situation. MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis are virtually untreatable using current anti-tubercular medication protocols. Thus, MDR/XDR tuberculosis presents a grave global public health threat. The unpredictable genetic mechanism involved in generating MDR/XDR resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may pose greater challenges in developing appropriate treatment strategies. In this article, we briefly review potential genetic mechanism of emerging NDM-1 bacterial strains and draw a rationale parallel to the underlying genetic mechanism of MDR/XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain development. PMID:23267308

  5. Emergence of potential superbug mycobacterium tuberculosis, lessons from new delhi mutant-1 bacterial strains.

    PubMed

    Nazir, Taha; Abraham, Suraj; Islam, Azharul

    2012-01-01

    Recent reports have shown that certain bacterial strains attain the New Delhi Metallo-beta-lactamase-1 (NDM-1) enzyme and become resistant to a broad range of antibiotics. Similarly, more dangerous "superbugs" of multi-drug resistant (MDR) and extensive drug resistant (XDR) Mycobacterium tuberculosis strains are gradually emerging through rapid genetic mutation caused by prescription non-compliance or unsupervised indiscriminate use of anti-tubercular drugs or other antibiotics. Mycobacterium tuberculosis cases have been reported in highly susceptible population groups including the aboriginal communities of US and Canada. In Canada alone, the total number of reported tuberculosis cases has decreased over the past decade. However, there is a steady increase in HIV cases in certain communities including the aboriginal communities. Reintroduction of MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis is possible in these susceptible communities, which in turn may pose serious public health situation. MDR/XDR strains of tuberculosis are virtually untreatable using current anti-tubercular medication protocols. Thus, MDR/XDR tuberculosis presents a grave global public health threat. The unpredictable genetic mechanism involved in generating MDR/XDR resistant strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis may pose greater challenges in developing appropriate treatment strategies. In this article, we briefly review potential genetic mechanism of emerging NDM-1 bacterial strains and draw a rationale parallel to the underlying genetic mechanism of MDR/XDR Mycobacterium tuberculosis strain development.

  6. Increased Lipid Accumulation in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii sta7-10 Starchless Isoamylase Mutant and Increased Carbohydrate Synthesis in Complemented Strains

    PubMed Central

    Work, Victoria H.; Radakovits, Randor; Jinkerson, Robert E.; Meuser, Jonathan E.; Elliott, Lee G.; Vinyard, David J.; Laurens, Lieve M. L.; Dismukes, G. Charles; Posewitz, Matthew C.

    2010-01-01

    The accumulation of bioenergy carriers was assessed in two starchless mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (the sta6 [ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase] and sta7-10 [isoamylase] mutants), a control strain (CC124), and two complemented strains of the sta7-10 mutant. The results indicate that the genetic blockage of starch synthesis in the sta6 and sta7-10 mutants increases the accumulation of lipids on a cellular basis during nitrogen deprivation relative to that in the CC124 control as determined by conversion to fatty acid methyl esters. However, this increased level of lipid accumulation is energetically insufficient to completely offset the loss of cellular starch that is synthesized by CC124 during nitrogen deprivation. We therefore investigated acetate utilization and O2 evolution to obtain further insights into the physiological adjustments utilized by the two starchless mutants in the absence of starch synthesis. The results demonstrate that both starchless mutants metabolize less acetate and have more severely attenuated levels of photosynthetic O2 evolution than CC124, indicating that a decrease in overall anabolic processes is a significant physiological response in the starchless mutants during nitrogen deprivation. Interestingly, two independent sta7-10:STA7 complemented strains exhibited significantly greater quantities of cellular starch and lipid than CC124 during acclimation to nitrogen deprivation. Moreover, the complemented strains synthesized significant quantities of starch even when cultured in nutrient-replete medium. PMID:20562225

  7. Increased lipid accumulation in the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii sta7-10 starchless isoamylase mutant and increased carbohydrate synthesis in complemented strains.

    PubMed

    Work, Victoria H; Radakovits, Randor; Jinkerson, Robert E; Meuser, Jonathan E; Elliott, Lee G; Vinyard, David J; Laurens, Lieve M L; Dismukes, G Charles; Posewitz, Matthew C

    2010-08-01

    The accumulation of bioenergy carriers was assessed in two starchless mutants of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii (the sta6 [ADP-glucose pyrophosphorylase] and sta7-10 [isoamylase] mutants), a control strain (CC124), and two complemented strains of the sta7-10 mutant. The results indicate that the genetic blockage of starch synthesis in the sta6 and sta7-10 mutants increases the accumulation of lipids on a cellular basis during nitrogen deprivation relative to that in the CC124 control as determined by conversion to fatty acid methyl esters. However, this increased level of lipid accumulation is energetically insufficient to completely offset the loss of cellular starch that is synthesized by CC124 during nitrogen deprivation. We therefore investigated acetate utilization and O(2) evolution to obtain further insights into the physiological adjustments utilized by the two starchless mutants in the absence of starch synthesis. The results demonstrate that both starchless mutants metabolize less acetate and have more severely attenuated levels of photosynthetic O(2) evolution than CC124, indicating that a decrease in overall anabolic processes is a significant physiological response in the starchless mutants during nitrogen deprivation. Interestingly, two independent sta7-10:STA7 complemented strains exhibited significantly greater quantities of cellular starch and lipid than CC124 during acclimation to nitrogen deprivation. Moreover, the complemented strains synthesized significant quantities of starch even when cultured in nutrient-replete medium.

  8. Benchmark Lisp And Ada Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gloria; Galant, David; Lim, Raymond; Stutz, John; Gibson, J.; Raghavan, B.; Cheesema, P.; Taylor, W.

    1992-01-01

    Suite of nonparallel benchmark programs, ELAPSE, designed for three tests: comparing efficiency of computer processing via Lisp vs. Ada; comparing efficiencies of several computers processing via Lisp; or comparing several computers processing via Ada. Tests efficiency which computer executes routines in each language. Available for computer equipped with validated Ada compiler and/or Common Lisp system.

  9. Benchmark Lisp And Ada Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Gloria; Galant, David; Lim, Raymond; Stutz, John; Gibson, J.; Raghavan, B.; Cheesema, P.; Taylor, W.

    1992-01-01

    Suite of nonparallel benchmark programs, ELAPSE, designed for three tests: comparing efficiency of computer processing via Lisp vs. Ada; comparing efficiencies of several computers processing via Lisp; or comparing several computers processing via Ada. Tests efficiency which computer executes routines in each language. Available for computer equipped with validated Ada compiler and/or Common Lisp system.

  10. Regulators of pseudohyphal differentiation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae identified through multicopy suppressor analysis in ammonium permease mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, M C; Heitman, J

    1998-01-01

    Nitrogen-starved diploid cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae differentiate into a filamentous, pseudohyphal growth form. Recognition of nitrogen starvation is mediated, at least in part, by the ammonium permease Mep2p and the Galpha subunit Gpa2p. Genetic activation of the pheromone-responsive MAP kinase cascade, which is also required for filamentous growth, only weakly suppresses the filamentation defect of Deltamep2/Deltamep2 and Deltagpa2/Deltagpa2 strain. Surprisingly, deletion of Mep1p, an ammonium permease not previously thought to regulate differentiation, significantly enhances the potency of MAP kinase activation, such that the STE11-4 allele induces filamentation to near wild-type levels in Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 and Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltagpa2/Deltagpa2 strains. To identify additional regulatory components, we isolated high-copy suppressors of the filamentation defect of the Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 mutant. Multicopy expression of TEC1, PHD1, PHD2 (MSS10/MSN1/FUP4), MSN5, CDC6, MSS11, MGA1, SKN7, DOT6, HMS1, HMS2, or MEP2 each restored filamentation in a Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 strain. Overexpression of SRK1 (SSD1), URE2, DAL80, MEP1, or MEP3 suppressed only the growth defect of the Deltamep1/Deltamep1 Deltamep2/Deltamep2 mutant strain. Characterization of these genes through deletion analysis and epistasis underscores the complexity of this developmental pathway and suggests that stress conditions other than nitrogen deprivation may also promote filamentous growth. PMID:9832522

  11. Industrial Robustness: Understanding the Mechanism of Tolerance for the Populus Hydrolysate-Tolerant Mutant Strain of Clostridium thermocellum

    PubMed Central

    Linville, Jessica L.; Rodriguez, Miguel; Land, Miriam; Syed, Mustafa H.; Engle, Nancy L.; Tschaplinski, Timothy J.; Mielenz, Jonathan R.; Cox, Chris D.

    2013-01-01

    Background An industrially robust microorganism that can efficiently degrade and convert lignocellulosic biomass into ethanol and next-generation fuels is required to economically produce future sustainable liquid transportation fuels. The anaerobic, thermophilic, cellulolytic bacterium Clostridium thermocellum is a candidate microorganism for such conversions but it, like many bacteria, is sensitive to potential toxic inhibitors developed in the liquid hydrolysate produced during biomass processing. Microbial processes leading to tolerance of these inhibitory compounds found in the pretreated biomass hydrolysate are likely complex and involve multiple genes. Methodology/Principal Findings In this study, we developed a 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate tolerant mutant strain of C. thermocellum by directed evolution. The genome of the wild type strain, six intermediate population samples and seven single colony isolates were sequenced to elucidate the mechanism of tolerance. Analysis of the 224 putative mutations revealed 73 high confidence mutations. A longitudinal analysis of the intermediate population samples, a pan-genomic analysis of the isolates, and a hotspot analysis revealed 24 core genes common to all seven isolates and 8 hotspots. Genetic mutations were matched with the observed phenotype through comparison of RNA expression levels during fermentation by the wild type strain and mutant isolate 6 in various concentrations of Populus hydrolysate (0%, 10%, and 17.5% v/v). Conclusion/Significance The findings suggest that there are multiple mutations responsible for the Populus hydrolysate tolerant phenotype resulting in several simultaneous mechanisms of action, including increases in cellular repair, and altered energy metabolism. To date, this study provides the most comprehensive elucidation of the mechanism of tolerance to a pretreated biomass hydrolysate by C. thermocellum. These findings make important contributions to the development of industrially

  12. Establishing a Markerless Genetic Exchange System for Methanosarcina mazei Strain Gö1 for Constructing Chromosomal Mutants of Small RNA Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ehlers, Claudia; Jäger, Dominik; Schmitz, Ruth A.

    2011-01-01

    A markerless genetic exchange system was successfully established in Methanosarcina mazei strain Gö1 using the hpt gene coding for hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase. First, a chromosomal deletion mutant of the hpt gene was generated conferring resistance to the purine analog 8-aza-2,6-diaminopurine (8-ADP). The nonreplicating allelic exchange vector (pRS345) carrying the pac-resistance cassette for direct selection of chromosomal integration, and the hpt gene for counterselection was introduced into this strain. By a pop-in and ultimately pop-out event of the plasmid from the chromosome, allelic exchange is enabled. Using this system, we successfully generated a M. mazei deletion mutant of the gene encoding the regulatory non-coding RNA sRNA154. Characterizing M. mazeiΔsRNA 154 under nitrogen limiting conditions demonstrated differential expression of at least three cytoplasmic proteins and reduced growth strongly arguing for a prominent role of sRNA154 in regulation of nitrogen fixation by posttranscriptional regulation. PMID:21941461

  13. AN ADA NAMELIST PACKAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Ada Namelist Package, developed for the Ada programming language, enables a calling program to read and write FORTRAN-style namelist files. A namelist file consists of any number of assignment statements in any order. Features of the Ada Namelist Package are: the handling of any combination of user-defined types; the ability to read vectors, matrices, and slices of vectors and matrices; the handling of mismatches between variables in the namelist file and those in the programmed list of namelist variables; and the ability to avoid searching the entire input file for each variable. The principle user benefits of this software are the following: the ability to write namelist-readable files, the ability to detect most file errors in the initialization phase, a package organization that reduces the number of instantiated units to a few packages rather than to many subprograms, a reduced number of restrictions, and an increased execution speed. The Ada Namelist reads data from an input file into variables declared within a user program. It then writes data from the user program to an output file, printer, or display. The input file contains a sequence of assignment statements in arbitrary order. The output is in namelist-readable form. There is a one-to-one correspondence between namelist I/O statements executed in the user program and variables read or written. Nevertheless, in the input file, mismatches are allowed between assignment statements in the file and the namelist read procedure statements in the user program. The Ada Namelist Package itself is non-generic. However, it has a group of nested generic packages following the nongeneric opening portion. The opening portion declares a variety of useraccessible constants, variables and subprograms. The subprograms are procedures for initializing namelists for reading, reading and writing strings. The subprograms are also functions for analyzing the content of the current dataset and diagnosing errors. Two nested

  14. AN ADA NAMELIST PACKAGE

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.

    1994-01-01

    The Ada Namelist Package, developed for the Ada programming language, enables a calling program to read and write FORTRAN-style namelist files. A namelist file consists of any number of assignment statements in any order. Features of the Ada Namelist Package are: the handling of any combination of user-defined types; the ability to read vectors, matrices, and slices of vectors and matrices; the handling of mismatches between variables in the namelist file and those in the programmed list of namelist variables; and the ability to avoid searching the entire input file for each variable. The principle user benefits of this software are the following: the ability to write namelist-readable files, the ability to detect most file errors in the initialization phase, a package organization that reduces the number of instantiated units to a few packages rather than to many subprograms, a reduced number of restrictions, and an increased execution speed. The Ada Namelist reads data from an input file into variables declared within a user program. It then writes data from the user program to an output file, printer, or display. The input file contains a sequence of assignment statements in arbitrary order. The output is in namelist-readable form. There is a one-to-one correspondence between namelist I/O statements executed in the user program and variables read or written. Nevertheless, in the input file, mismatches are allowed between assignment statements in the file and the namelist read procedure statements in the user program. The Ada Namelist Package itself is non-generic. However, it has a group of nested generic packages following the nongeneric opening portion. The opening portion declares a variety of useraccessible constants, variables and subprograms. The subprograms are procedures for initializing namelists for reading, reading and writing strings. The subprograms are also functions for analyzing the content of the current dataset and diagnosing errors. Two nested

  15. Fluoroquinolone and Quinazolinedione Activities against Wild-Type and Gyrase Mutant Strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis▿

    PubMed Central

    Malik, Muhammad; Marks, Kevin R.; Mustaev, Arkady; Zhao, Xilin; Chavda, Kalyan; Kerns, Robert J.; Drlica, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Quinazolinediones (diones) are fluoroquinolone-like inhibitors of bacterial gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV. To assess activity against mycobacteria, C-8-methoxy dione derivatives were compared with cognate fluoroquinolones by using cultured Mycobacterium smegmatis. Diones exhibited higher MIC values than fluoroquinolones; however, MICs for fluoroquinolone-resistant gyrA mutants, normalized to the MIC for wild-type cells, were lower. Addition of a 3-amino group to the 2,4-dione core increased relative activity against mutants, while alteration of the 8-methoxy group to a methyl or of the 2,4-dione core to a 1,3-dione core lowered activity against mutants. A GyrA G89C bacterial variant was strikingly susceptible to most of the diones tested; in contrast, low susceptibility to fluoroquinolones was observed. Many of the bacteriostatic differences between diones and fluoroquinolones were explained by interactions at the N terminus of GyrA helix IV revealed by recently published X-ray structures of drug-topoisomerase-DNA complexes. When lethal activity was normalized to the MIC in order to minimize the effects of drug uptake, efflux, and ternary complex formation, a 3-amino-2,4-dione exhibited killing activity comparable to that of a cognate fluoroquinolone. Surprisingly, the lethal activity of the dione was inhibited less by chloramphenicol than that of the cognate fluoroquinolone. This observation adds the 2,4-dione structural motif to the list of structural features known to impart lethality to fluoroquinolone-like compounds in the absence of protein synthesis, a phenomenon that is not explained by X-ray structures of drug-enzyme-DNA complexes. PMID:21383100

  16. Fluoroquinolone and quinazolinedione activities against wild-type and gyrase mutant strains of Mycobacterium smegmatis.

    PubMed

    Malik, Muhammad; Marks, Kevin R; Mustaev, Arkady; Zhao, Xilin; Chavda, Kalyan; Kerns, Robert J; Drlica, Karl

    2011-05-01

    Quinazolinediones (diones) are fluoroquinolone-like inhibitors of bacterial gyrase and DNA topoisomerase IV. To assess activity against mycobacteria, C-8-methoxy dione derivatives were compared with cognate fluoroquinolones by using cultured Mycobacterium smegmatis. Diones exhibited higher MIC values than fluoroquinolones; however, MICs for fluoroquinolone-resistant gyrA mutants, normalized to the MIC for wild-type cells, were lower. Addition of a 3-amino group to the 2,4-dione core increased relative activity against mutants, while alteration of the 8-methoxy group to a methyl or of the 2,4-dione core to a 1,3-dione core lowered activity against mutants. A GyrA G89C bacterial variant was strikingly susceptible to most of the diones tested; in contrast, low susceptibility to fluoroquinolones was observed. Many of the bacteriostatic differences between diones and fluoroquinolones were explained by interactions at the N terminus of GyrA helix IV revealed by recently published X-ray structures of drug-topoisomerase-DNA complexes. When lethal activity was normalized to the MIC in order to minimize the effects of drug uptake, efflux, and ternary complex formation, a 3-amino-2,4-dione exhibited killing activity comparable to that of a cognate fluoroquinolone. Surprisingly, the lethal activity of the dione was inhibited less by chloramphenicol than that of the cognate fluoroquinolone. This observation adds the 2,4-dione structural motif to the list of structural features known to impart lethality to fluoroquinolone-like compounds in the absence of protein synthesis, a phenomenon that is not explained by X-ray structures of drug-enzyme-DNA complexes.

  17. Software Engineering in Ada

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-03-22

    Avo Valmu - An aces value provides the locationi of. or "polnah. to". ani 4bjec which has been craea~d by the evaluation of an allocator. Keyword: amis...and traininp need.. of the DOD community. including methodologies and materials to rill those needu. Ada Va~lidation Orgamluatlo ( AVO ) - The component...type we the tesis for equality and inequality and the assignment operation. unless the type is limited.. in which case no operations awe implicitly

  18. Initial Ada components evaluation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moebes, Travis

    1989-01-01

    The SAIC has the responsibility for independent test and validation of the SSE. They have been using a mathematical functions library package implemented in Ada to test the SSE IV and V process. The library package consists of elementary mathematical functions and is both machine and accuracy independent. The SSE Ada components evaluation includes code complexity metrics based on Halstead's software science metrics and McCabe's measure of cyclomatic complexity. Halstead's metrics are based on the number of operators and operands on a logical unit of code and are compiled from the number of distinct operators, distinct operands, and total number of occurrences of operators and operands. These metrics give an indication of the physical size of a program in terms of operators and operands and are used diagnostically to point to potential problems. McCabe's Cyclomatic Complexity Metrics (CCM) are compiled from flow charts transformed to equivalent directed graphs. The CCM is a measure of the total number of linearly independent paths through the code's control structure. These metrics were computed for the Ada mathematical functions library using Software Automated Verification and Validation (SAVVAS), the SSE IV and V tool. A table with selected results was shown, indicating that most of these routines are of good quality. Thresholds for the Halstead measures indicate poor quality if the length metric exceeds 260 or difficulty is greater than 190. The McCabe CCM indicated a high quality of software products.

  19. Ribitol dehydrogenase of Klebsiella aerogenes. Sequence and properties of wild-type and mutant strains.

    PubMed Central

    Dothie, J M; Giglio, J R; Moore, C B; Taylor, S S; Hartley, B S

    1985-01-01

    Evidence is presented for the sequence of 249 amino acids in ribitol dehydrogenase-A from Klebsiella aerogenes. Continuous culture on xylitol yields strains that superproduce 'wild-type' enzyme but mutations appear to have arisen in this process. Other strains selected by such continuous culture produce enzymes with increased specific activity for xylitol but without loss of ribitol activity. One such enzyme, ribitol dehydrogenase-D, has Pro-196 for Gly-196. Another, ribitol dehydrogenase-B, has a different mutation. PMID:3904726

  20. Structural analysis and characterization of dextran produced by wild and mutant strains of Leuconostoc mesenteroides.

    PubMed

    Siddiqui, Nadir Naveed; Aman, Afsheen; Silipo, Alba; Qader, Shah Ali Ul; Molinaro, Antonio

    2014-01-01

    An exopolysaccharide known as dextran was produced by Leuconostoc mesenteroides KIBGE-IB22 (wild) and L. mesenteroides KIBGE-IB22M20 (mutant). The structure was characterized using FTIR, (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR and 2D NMR spectroscopic techniques, whereas surface morphology was analyzed using SEM. A clear difference in the spectral chemical shift patterns was observed in both samples. All the spectral data indicated that the exopolysaccharide produced by KIBGE-IB22 is a mixture of two biopolymers. One was dextran in α-(1 → 6) configuration with a small proportion of α-(1 → 3) branching and the other was levan containing β-(2 → 6) fructan fructofuranosyl linkages. However, remarkably the mutant only produced dextran without any concomitant production of levan. Study suggested that the property of KIBGE-IB22M20, regarding improved production of high molecular weight dextran in a shorter period of fermentation time without any contamination of other exopolysaccharide, could be employed to make the downstream process more feasible and cost effective on large scale. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Pigmentation restored in mutant laboratory strain of the lady beetle Coleomegilla maculata through dietary supplementation

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A laboratory colony of Coleomegilla maculata (DeGeer), ye, selected for a pigmentation deficiency, was restored to near wild type cuticle coloration by adding crushed heads and wings of the red colored parental strain to the diet. While the wings and other colored portions of the cuticle regained th...

  2. Activity, reconstitution, and accumulation of nitrogenase components in Azotobacter vinelandii mutant strains containing defined deletions within the nitrogenase structural gene cluster.

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, A C; Burgess, B K; Dean, D R

    1986-01-01

    The Azotobacter vinelandii genes encoding the nitrogenase structural components are clustered and ordered: nifH (Fe protein)-nifD (MoFe protein alpha subunit)-nifK (MoFe protein beta subunit). In this study various A. vinelandii mutant strains which contain defined deletions within the nitrogenase structural genes were isolated and studied. Mutants deleted for the nifD or nifK genes were still able to accumulate significant amounts of the unaltered MoFe protein subunit as well as active Fe protein. Extracts of such nifD or nifK deletion strains had no MoFe protein activity. However, active MoFe protein could be reconstituted by mixing extracts of the mutant strains. These results establish an approach for the purification of the individual MoFe protein subunits. Mutants lacking either or both of the MoFe protein subunits were still able to synthesize the iron-molybdenum cofactor (FeMo-cofactor), indicating that in A. vinelandii the FeMo-cofactor is preassembled and inserted into the MoFe protein. In contrast, a mutant strain lacking both the Fe protein and the MoFe protein failed to accumulate any detectable FeMo-cofactor. The further utility of specifically altered A. vinelandii strains for the study of the assembly, structure, and reactivity of nitrogenase is discussed. Images PMID:3457004

  3. Isolation of a Saccharomyces cerevisiae mutant strain deficient in deoxycytidylate deaminase activity and partial characterization of the enzyme.

    PubMed Central

    McIntosh, E M; Haynes, R H

    1984-01-01

    Deoxycytidylate deaminase activity in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been partially characterized. The yeast enzyme was found to exhibit properties similar to those of dCMP deaminases isolated from higher eucaryotes. A mutant strain completely deficient in dCMP deaminase activity was isolated by selection for resistance to 5-fluoro-2'-deoxycytidylate followed by screening for cross sensitivity to 5-fluoro-2'-deoxyuridylate, a potent inhibitor of the yeast thymidylate synthetase. We have designated this new allele dcd1 . A strain exhibiting an auxotrophic requirement for dUMP was isolated after mutagenesis of a dcd1 tup7 haploid. Genetic analysis revealed that this auxotrophic phenotype resulted from a combination of the dcd1 allele and a second, unlinked, nuclear mutation that we designated dmp1 . This allele, which by itself conveys no readily discernible phenotype, presumably impairs efficient synthesis of dUMP from UDP. The auxotrophic requirement of dcd1 dmp1 tup7 strains also can be satisfied by exogenous dTMP but not deoxyuridine. PMID:6373725

  4. Modelling Hepatitis B Virus Antiviral Therapy and Drug Resistant Mutant Strains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bernal, Julie; Dix, Trevor; Allison, Lloyd; Bartholomeusz, Angeline; Yuen, Lilly

    Despite the existence of vaccines, the Hepatitis B virus (HBV) is still a serious global health concern. HBV targets liver cells. It has an unusual replication process involving an RNA pre-genome that the reverse transcriptase domain of the viral polymerase protein translates into viral DNA. The reverse transcription process is error prone and together with the high replication rates of the virus, allows the virus to exist as a heterogeneous population of mutants, known as a quasispecies, that can adapt and become resistant to antiviral therapy. This study presents an individual-based model of HBV inside an artificial liver, and associated blood serum, undergoing antiviral therapy. This model aims to provide insights into the evolution of the HBV quasispecies and the individual contribution of HBV mutations in the outcome of therapy.

  5. FACS selection of valuable mutant mouse round spermatids and strain rescue via round spermatid injection.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Lian; Zhou, Wei; Kong, Peng-Cheng; Wang, Mei-Shan; Zhu, Yan; Feng, Li-Xin; Chen, Xue-Jin; Jiang, Man-Xi

    2015-06-01

    Round spermatid injection (ROSI) into mammalian oocytes can result in the development of viable embryos and offspring. One current limitation to this technique is the identification of suitable round spermatids. In the current paper, round spermatids were selected from testicular cells with phase contrast microscopy (PCM) and fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS), and ROSI was performed in two strains of mice. The rates of fertilization, embryonic development and offspring achieved were the same in all strains. Significantly, round spermatids selected by PCM and FACS were effectively used to rescue the infertile Pten-null mouse. The current results indicate that FACS selection of round spermatids can not only provide high-purity and viable round spermatids for use in ROSI, but also has no harmful effects on the developmental capacity of subsequently fertilized embryos. It was concluded that round spermatids selected by FACS are useful for mouse strain rederivation and rescue of infertile males; ROSI should be considered as a powerful addition to the armamentarium of assisted reproduction techniques applicable in the mouse.

  6. Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strains expressing nitrate reductase under control of the cabII-1 promoter: isolation of chlorate resistant mutants and identification of new loci for nitrate assimilation.

    PubMed

    Navarro, María Teresa; Mariscal, Vicente; Macías, María Isabel; Fernández, Emilio; Galván, Aurora

    2005-01-01

    The Chlamydomonas reinhardtii strain Tx11-8 is a transgenic alga that bears the nitrate reductase gene (Nia1) under control of the CabII-1 gene promoter (CabII-1-Nia1). Approximately nine copies of the chimeric CabII-1-Nia1 gene were found to be integrated in this strain and to confer a phenotype of chlorate sensitivity in the presence of ammonium. We have used this strain for the isolation of spontaneous chlorate resistant mutants in the presence of ammonium that were found to be defective at loci involved in MoCo metabolism and light-dependent growth in nitrate media. Of a total of 45 mutant strains analyzed first, 44 were affected in the MoCo activity (16 Nit(-), unable to grow in nitrate, and 28 Nit(+), able to grow in nitrate). All the Nit(-) strains lacked MoCo activity. Diploid complementation of Nit(-), MoCo(-) strains with C. reinhardtii MoCo mutants and genetic analysis indicated that some strains were defective at known loci for MoCo biosynthesis, while three strains were defective at two new loci, hereafter named Nit10 and Nit11. The other 28 Nit(+) strains showed almost undetectable MoCo activity or activity was below 20% of the parental strain. Second, only one strain (named 23c(+)) showed MoCo and NR activities comparable to those in the parental strain. Strain 23c(+) seems to be affected in a locus, Nit12, required for growth in nitrate under continuous light. It is proposed that this locus is required for nitrate/chlorate transport activity. In this work, mechanisms of chlorate toxicity are reviewed in the light of our results.

  7. ADAS Update and Maintainability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watson, Leela R.

    2010-01-01

    Since 2000, both the National Weather Service Melbourne (NWS MLB) and the Spaceflight Meteorology Group (SMG) have used a local data integration system (LOIS) as part of their forecast and warning operations. The original LOIS was developed by the Applied Meteorology Unit (AMU) in 1998 (Manobianco and Case 1998) and has undergone subsequent improvements. Each has benefited from three-dimensional (3-D) analyses that are delivered to forecasters every 15 minutes across the peninsula of Florida. The intent is to generate products that enhance short-range weather forecasts issued in support of NWS MLB and SMG operational requirements within East Central Florida. The current LDIS uses the Advanced Regional Prediction System (ARPS) Data Analysis System (AD AS) package as its core, which integrates a wide variety of national, regional, and local observational data sets. It assimilates all available real-time data within its domain and is run at a finer spatial and temporal resolution than current national or regional-scale analysis packages. As such, it provides local forecasters with a more comprehensive understanding of evolving fine-scale weather features. Over the years, the LDIS has become problematic to maintain since it depends on AMU-developed shell scripts that were written for an earlier version of the ADAS software. The goals of this task were to update the NWS MLB/SMG LDIS with the latest version of ADAS, incorporate new sources of observational data, and upgrade and modify the AMU-developed shell scripts written to govern the system. In addition, the previously developed ADAS graphical user interface (GUI) was updated. Operationally, these upgrades will result in more accurate depictions of the current local environment to help with short-range weather forecasting applications, while also offering an improved initialization for local versions of the Weather Research and Forecasting (WRF) model used by both groups.

  8. Effects of tazobactam on the frequency of the emergence of resistant strains from Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii, and Proteus vulgaris (beta-lactamase derepressed mutants).

    PubMed

    Higashitani, F; Nishida, K; Hyodo, A; Inoue, M

    1995-09-01

    When Enterobacter cloacae, Citrobacter freundii, and Proteus vulgaris were treated with piperacillin (PIPC) in combination with tazobactam (TAZ), the in vitro frequency of emergence of resistant strains (beta-lactamase producing mutants) was lower than with PIPC or ceftazidime (CAZ) treated bacteria. In a mouse intraperitoneal infection model caused by E. cloacae, beta-lactamase derepressed mutants were detected following therapy with PIPC or CAZ, although no derepressed mutants were detected after treatment with PIPC in combination with TAZ. This suppression of the selection of derepressed mutants, which produce large amounts of beta-lactamases, by the combination of TAZ and PIPC suggests that the combination delays the increase of resistant mutants compared with PIPC alone.

  9. ADA Integrated Environment III.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    2eloas4 I Disklbution Unlimited- DISTRIBUTION STATEMENT ACCESSION FOR NTIS GRAMD lyric TAB DTIC,, ,o u dqELECTEI JUSMIICATION S L C E BY D DISTRIBUTION...example of a dynamic analysis tool that maps the memory image of an executing Ada program to the source program text and data definitions, allowing a user...References to external items are symbolic and not resolved until the object modules for a program are bound to form a memory image. F Object code can be

  10. Safety, efficacy and efficiency of laser-assisted IVF in subfertile mutant mouse strains

    PubMed Central

    Li, Ming-Wen; Kinchen, Kristy L; Vallelunga, Jadine M; Young, Diana L; Wright, Kaleb D K; Gorano, Lisa N; Wasson, Katherine; Lloyd, K C Kent

    2013-01-01

    In the present report we studied the safety, efficacy and efficiency of using an infrared laser to facilitate IVF by assessing fertilization, development and birth rates after laser-zona drilling (LZD) in 30 subfertile genetically modified (GM) mouse lines. We determined that LZD increased the fertilization rate four to ten times that of regular IVF, thus facilitating the derivation of 26 of 30 (86.7%) GM mouse lines. Cryopreserved two-cell stage embryos derived by LZD-assisted IVF were recovered and developed to blastocysts in vitro at the same rate as frozen–thawed embryos derived by regular IVF. Surprisingly after surgical transfer to pseudopregnant recipients the birth rate of embryos derived by LZD-assisted IVF was significantly lower than that of embryos derived by regular IVF. However this result could be completely mitigated by the addition of 0.25 M sucrose to the culture medium during LZD which caused the oocyte to shrink in volume relative to the perivitelline space. By increasing the distance from the laser target site on the zona pellucida, we hypothesize that the hyperosmotic effect of sucrose reduced the potential for laser-induced cytotoxic thermal damage to the underlying oocytes. With appropriate preparation and cautious application, our results indicate that LZD-assisted IVF is a safe, efficacious and efficient assisted reproductive technology for deriving mutant mouse lines with male factor infertility and subfertility caused by sperm–zona penetration defects. PMID:23315689

  11. AdaNET executive summary

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digman, R. Michael

    1988-01-01

    The goal of AdaNET is to transfer existing and emerging software engineering technology from the Federal government to the private sector. The views and perspectives of the current project participants on long and short term goals for AdaNET; organizational structure; resources and returns; summary of identified AdaNET services; and the summary of the organizational model currently under discussion are presented.

  12. Introduction to Image Algebra Ada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Joseph N.

    1991-07-01

    Image Algebra Ada (IAA) is a superset of the Ada programming language designed to support use of the Air Force Armament Laboratory's image algebra in the development of computer vision application programs. The IAA language differs from other computer vision languages is several respects. It is machine independent, and an IAA translator has been implemented in the military standard Ada language. Its image operands and operations can be used to program a range of both low- and high-level vision algorithms. This paper provides an overview of the image algebra constructs supported in IAA and describes the embodiment of these constructs in the IAA extension of Ada. Examples showing the use of IAA for a range of computer vision tasks are given. The design of IAA as a superset of Ada and the implementation of the initial translator in Ada represent critical choices. The authors discuss the reasoning behind these choices as well as the benefits and drawbacks associated with them. Implementation strategies associated with the use of Ada as an implementation language for IAA are also discussed. While one can look on IAA as a program design language (PDL) for specifying Ada programs, it is useful to consider IAA as a separate language superset of Ada. This admits the possibility of directly translating IAA for implementation on special purpose architectures. This paper explores strategies for porting IAA to various architectures and notes the critical language and implementation features for porting to different architectures.

  13. AdaNET research project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Digman, R. Michael

    1988-01-01

    The components necessary for the success of the commercialization of an Ada Technology Transition Network are reported in detail. The organizational plan presents the planned structure for services development and technical transition of AdaNET services to potential user communities. The Business Plan is the operational plan for the AdaNET service as a commercial venture. The Technical Plan is the plan from which the AdaNET can be designed including detailed requirements analysis. Also contained is an analysis of user fees and charges, and a proposed user fee schedule.

  14. Incidence of various gyrA mutants in 451 Staphylococcus aureus strains isolated in Japan and their susceptibilities to 10 fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed Central

    Takenouchi, T; Ishii, C; Sugawara, M; Tokue, Y; Ohya, S

    1995-01-01

    Point mutations in the gyrA genes of 451 clinical strains of Staphylococcus aureus isolated in Japan were detected by a combination of nonradioisotopic single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and by direct sequencing. Six types of gyrA mutations were observed in 149 of the 451 strains (33%), and ofloxacin MICs were greater than 6.25 micrograms/ml for 147 of the 149 strains (98.7%). These mutations were localized between codons 84 and 88, and they were associated with fluoroquinolone resistance. Two types of silent mutations were also found. Among these eight types of mutations, three types are novel, i.e., the serine at position 84 (Ser-84)-->Val (TCA-->GTA), Ser-84-->Leu (TCA-->TTA) plus Ile-86 (ATT-->ATC, silent), and Phe-110 (TTT-->TTC, silent). Among GyrA mutants, strains with a Ser-84-->Leu alteration and strains with a Glu-88-->Lys alteration were dominant. In contrast, few strains had Ser-84-->Ala and Glu-88-->Gly alterations. All fluoroquinolones tested showed greater than a fourfold decrease in their activities in terms of their MICs that inhibited 50% of strains tested for each GyrA mutant, in comparison with their MICs that inhibited 50% of strains tested for susceptible strains. Most of the currently available fluoroquinolones, such as norfloxacin, enoxacin, ofloxacin, ciprofloxacin, tosufloxacin, lomefloxacin, sparfloxacin, and fleroxacin, were ineffective against each mutant. Mutants containing a Ser-84-->Leu or Val alteration showed high-level resistance to fluoroquinolones, and one containing a Ser-84-->Ala alteration showed relatively low-level resistance. Double mutations were associated with a higher level of resistance than single mutations. PMID:7492077

  15. Equine herpesvirus type 1 mutant defective in glycoprotein E gene as candidate vaccine strain.

    PubMed

    TSUJIMURA, Koji; SHIOSE, Tomoki; YAMANAKA, Takashi; NEMOTO, Manabu; KONDO, Takashi; MATSUMURA, Tomio

    2009-11-01

    An equine herpesvirus type 1 (EHV-1) mutant, DeltagE, defective in glycoprotein E (gE) was evaluated as a modified live virus (MLV) vaccine. Colostrum-deprived Thoroughbred foals inoculated intranasally (i.n.) or intramuscularly (i.m.) with DeltagE did not exhibit any clinical signs of respiratory disease except for a mild nasal discharge in 1 i.n. inoculated foal on Days 1 and 3 post-infection. In contrast, the intranasal inoculation of foals with the revertant of DeltagE resulted in biphasic pyrexia, mucopurulent nasal discharge and swelling of submandibular lymph nodes. These results indicated that gE plays an important role as regards EHV-1 virulence in horses. The ability of DeltagE to protect against wild type EHV-1 challenge infection was assessed using i.m. vaccinated foals. Foals inoculated twice i.m. with 10(5) or 10(6) plaque-forming units (pfu) of DeltagE at an interval of 3 weeks exhibited no clinical evidence of local inflammation, respiratory disease or deleterious systemic responses. Remarkable increases in SN antibody titer to EHV-1 were observed in all vaccinated foals after the 2nd inoculation with DeltagE. Following a wild type EHV-1 challenge infection, vaccinated foals showed milder clinical symptoms than foals vaccinated with a placebo. Specifically, 1 of 3 foals vaccinated with 10(6) pfu of DeltagE exhibited no clinical symptoms other than a mild nasal discharge for 1 day. Additionally, the virus load of nasal shedding and viremia were reduced by vaccination. These results suggest that DeltagE would be a good candidate as an MLV vaccine.

  16. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant strain shows increased cellular efficiency in response to Populus hydrolysate compared to the wild type strain

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum is a model organism for consolidated processing due to its efficient fermentation of cellulose. Constituents of dilute acid pretreatment hydrolysate are known to inhibit C. thermocellum and other microorganisms. To evaluate the biological impact of this type of hydrolysate, a transcriptomic analysis of growth in hydrolysate-containing medium was conducted on 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant (PM) and wild type (WT) strains of C. thermocellum. Results In two levels of Populus hydrolysate medium (0% and 10% v/v), the PM showed both gene specific increases and decreases of gene expression compared to the wild-type strain. The PM had increased expression of genes in energy production and conversion, and amino acid transport and metabolism in both standard and 10% v/v Populus hydrolysate media. In particular, expression of the histidine metabolism increased up to 100 fold. In contrast, the PM decreased gene expression in cell division and sporulation (standard medium only), cell defense mechanisms, cell envelope, cell motility, and cellulosome in both media. The PM downregulated inorganic ion transport and metabolism in standard medium but upregulated it in the hydrolysate media when compared to the WT. The WT differentially expressed 1072 genes in response to the hydrolysate medium which included increased transcription of cell defense mechanisms, cell motility, and cellulosome, and decreased expression in cell envelope, amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and lipid metabolism, while the PM only differentially expressed 92 genes. The PM tolerates up to 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate and growth in it elicited 489 genes with differential expression, which included increased expression in energy production and conversion, cellulosome production, and inorganic ion transport and metabolism and decreased expression in transcription and cell

  17. Transcriptomic analysis of Clostridium thermocellum Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant strain shows increased cellular efficiency in response to Populus hydrolysate compared to the wild type strain.

    PubMed

    Linville, Jessica L; Rodriguez, Miguel; Brown, Steven D; Mielenz, Jonathan R; Cox, Chris D

    2014-08-16

    The thermophilic, anaerobic bacterium, Clostridium thermocellum is a model organism for consolidated processing due to its efficient fermentation of cellulose. Constituents of dilute acid pretreatment hydrolysate are known to inhibit C. thermocellum and other microorganisms. To evaluate the biological impact of this type of hydrolysate, a transcriptomic analysis of growth in hydrolysate-containing medium was conducted on 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate-tolerant mutant (PM) and wild type (WT) strains of C. thermocellum. In two levels of Populus hydrolysate medium (0% and 10% v/v), the PM showed both gene specific increases and decreases of gene expression compared to the wild-type strain. The PM had increased expression of genes in energy production and conversion, and amino acid transport and metabolism in both standard and 10% v/v Populus hydrolysate media. In particular, expression of the histidine metabolism increased up to 100 fold. In contrast, the PM decreased gene expression in cell division and sporulation (standard medium only), cell defense mechanisms, cell envelope, cell motility, and cellulosome in both media. The PM downregulated inorganic ion transport and metabolism in standard medium but upregulated it in the hydrolysate media when compared to the WT. The WT differentially expressed 1072 genes in response to the hydrolysate medium which included increased transcription of cell defense mechanisms, cell motility, and cellulosome, and decreased expression in cell envelope, amino acid transport and metabolism, inorganic ion transport and metabolism, and lipid metabolism, while the PM only differentially expressed 92 genes. The PM tolerates up to 17.5% v/v Populus hydrolysate and growth in it elicited 489 genes with differential expression, which included increased expression in energy production and conversion, cellulosome production, and inorganic ion transport and metabolism and decreased expression in transcription and cell defense mechanisms. These

  18. Isolation of a novel mutant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae by an ethyl methane sulfonate-induced mutagenesis approach as a high producer of bioethanol.

    PubMed

    Mobini-Dehkordi, Mohsen; Nahvi, Iraj; Zarkesh-Esfahani, Hamid; Ghaedi, Kamran; Tavassoli, Manoochehr; Akada, Rinji

    2008-04-01

    In order to obtain mutant strains showing higher bioethanol production than wild-type strains, a commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae type was subjected to mutagenesis using ethyl methane sulfonate (EMS). After adding EMS to a shaken yeast suspension, the viability of yeast cells was assessed by diluted sample inoculation to solid yeast-extract peptone glucose (YEPG) medium at 15-min intervals. At 45 min, the viability of yeast cells was estimated to be about 40%. Mutagenized cells were recovered from YEPG broth after incubation at 30 degrees C for 18 h. After this period, EMS-treated yeast cells were grown on solid aerobic low-peptone (ALP) medium containing 2-12% (v/v) ethanol. All plates were incubated at 30 degrees C for 2-6 d in order to form colonies. The mutant strains that tolerated high concentrations of ethanol were selected for bioethanol production in microfuge tubes containing fermentation medium. Formation of bioethanol in small tubes was detected by the distillation-colorimetric method. In addition, trehalose content and invertase activity were determined in each mutant strain. Among many isolated mutant strains, there were six isolated colonies that grew on ALP medium supplemented with 10% (v/v) ethanol and one of them produced bioethanol 17.3% more than the wild type.

  19. Construction of "Toxin Complex" in a Mutant Serotype C Strain of Clostridium botulinum Harboring a Defective Neurotoxin Gene.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Tomonori; Nagano, Thomas; Niwa, Koichi; Uchino, Masataka; Tomizawa, Motohiro; Sagane, Yoshimasa; Watanabe, Toshihiro

    2017-01-01

    A non-toxigenic mutant of the toxigenic serotype C Clostridium botulinum strain Stockholm (C-St), C-N71, does not produce the botulinum neurotoxin (BoNT). However, the original strain C-St produces botulinum toxin complex, in which BoNT is associated with non-toxic non-hemagglutinin (NTNHA) and three hemagglutinin proteins (HA-70, HA-33, and HA-17). Therefore, in this study, we aimed to elucidate the effects of bont gene knockout on the formation of the "toxin complex." Nucleotide sequence analysis revealed that a premature stop codon was introduced in the bont gene, whereas other genes were not affected by this mutation. Moreover, we successfully purified the "toxin complex" produced by C-N71. The "toxin complex" was identified as a mixture of NTNHA/HA-70/HA-17/HA-33 complexes with intact NTNHA or C-terminally truncated NTNHA, without BoNT. These results indicated that knockout of the bont gene does not affect the formation of the "toxin complex." Since the botulinum toxin complex has been shown to play an important role in oral toxin transport in the human and animal body, a non-neurotoxic "toxin complex" of C-N71 may be valuable for the development of an oral drug delivery system.

  20. Decreased coenzyme A levels in ridA mutant strains of Salmonella enterica result from inactivated serine hydroxymethyltransferase.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Jeffrey M; Christopherson, Melissa R; Downs, Diana M

    2013-08-01

    The RidA/Yer057/UK114 family of proteins is well represented across the domains of life and recent work has defined both an in vitro activity and an in vivo role for RidA. RidA proteins have enamine deaminase activity, and in their absence the reactive 2-aminoacrylate (2-AA) accumulates and inactivates at least some pyridoxal 5'-phosphate (PLP)-containing enzymes in Salmonella enterica. The conservation of RidA suggested that 2-AA was a ubiquitous cellular stressor that was generated in central metabolism. Phenotypically, strains of S. enterica that lack RidA accumulated significantly more pyruvate in the growth medium than wild-type strains. Here we dissected this ridA mutant phenotype and showed it was an indirect consequence of damage to serine hydroxymethyltransferase (GlyA; E.C. 2.1.2.1). The results here identified a fourth PLP enzyme as a target of enamine stress in Salmonella.

  1. Characterization of a novel ENU-generated myosin VI mutant mouse strain with congenital deafness and vestibular dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Williams, Louise H; Miller, Kerry A; Dahl, Hans-Henrik M; Manji, Shehnaaz S M

    2013-05-01

    Myosin VI (Myo6) is known to play an important role in the mammalian auditory and vestibular systems. We have identified a novel N-ethyl-N-nitrosourea mutagenised mouse strain, charlie, carrying an intronic Myo6 splice site mutation. This mutation (IVS5+5G > A) results in skipping of exon 5, and is predicted to cause a frameshift and premature termination of the protein. We detected essentially no Myo6 transcript in tissue from charlie homozygous mutant mice (Myo6(chl/chl)). Myo6(chl/chl) mice exhibit vestibular dysfunction and profound hearing impairment when first tested at four weeks of age. Analysis of vestibular and cochlear hair cells by scanning electron microscopy and immunohistochemistry revealed highly disorganised hair bundles with irregular orientation and kinocilium position at postnatal stage P2-P3. Within a few weeks, the majority of hair cell stereocilia are missing, or fused and elongated, and degeneration of the sensory epithelium occurs. This novel mouse strain will be an important resource in elucidating the role myosin VI plays in the mammalian auditory system, as well as its non-auditory functions.

  2. Comparison of alcohol dehydrogenases from wild-type and mutant strain, JW200 Fe 4, of `Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus`

    SciTech Connect

    Bryant, F.O.; Ljungdahl, L.G.; Wiegel, J.

    1992-12-31

    A mutant strain of `Thermoanaerobacter ethanolicus` (ATCC 31550) designated JW200 Fe 4 contains primary and secondary alcohol dehydrogenases (ADHs). The primary ADH from JW200 Fe 4 was formed early in the growth cycle compared to the primary ADH from the wild-type strain (JW200 wt). The secondary ADH displayed 2.5-fold greater activity during the growth cycle of JW200 Fe 4 compared to the secondary ADH from JW200 Fe 4 were purified to homogeneity as determined by sodium dodecyl sulphate-gel electrophoresis. Relative molecular weight estimations indicated that both ADHs were tetrameric. Each ADH from JW200 Fe 4 contained approximately four Zn atoms per subunit and displayed Arrhenius plots similar to the ADHs from JW200 wt. The substrate specificity for the ADHs from JW200 Fe 4 was similar to that of the ADHs from JW200 wt. The secondary ADH oxidized 2-propanol at 51 times the rate of ethanol. Both ADHs from JW200 Fe 4 apparently reduce acetaldehyde to ethanol while only the secondary ADH from JW200 wt was suggested to contribute significantly to ethanol production.

  3. Transforming AdaPT to Ada9x

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goldsack, Stephen J.; Holzbach-Valero, A. A.; Volz, Richard A.; Waldrop, Raymond S.

    1993-01-01

    How the concepts of AdaPT can be transformed into programs using the object oriented features proposed in the preliminary mapping for Ada9x are described. Emphasizing, as they do, the importance of data types as units of program, these features match well with the development of partitions as translations into Abstract Data Types which was exploited in the Ada83 translation covered in report R3. By providing a form of polymorphic type, the Ada83 version also gives support for the conformant partition idea which could be achieved in Ada83 only by using UNCHECKED CONVERSIONS. It is assumed that the reader understands AdaPT itself, but the translation into Ada83 is briefly reviewed, by applying it to a small example. This is then used to show how the same translation would be achieved in the 9x version. It is important to appreciate that the distribution features which are proposed in current mapping are not used or discussed in any detail, as those are not well matched to the AdaPT approach. Critical evaluation and comparison of these approaches is given in a separate report.

  4. Distributed and parallel Ada and the Ada 9X recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Richard A.; Goldsack, Stephen J.; Theriault, R.; Waldrop, Raymond S.; Holzbacher-Valero, A. A.

    1992-01-01

    Recently, the DoD has sponsored work towards a new version of Ada, intended to support the construction of distributed systems. The revised version, often called Ada 9X, will become the new standard sometimes in the 1990s. It is intended that Ada 9X should provide language features giving limited support for distributed system construction. The requirements for such features are given. Many of the most advanced computer applications involve embedded systems that are comprised of parallel processors or networks of distributed computers. If Ada is to become the widely adopted language envisioned by many, it is essential that suitable compilers and tools be available to facilitate the creation of distributed and parallel Ada programs for these applications. The major languages issues impacting distributed and parallel programming are reviewed, and some principles upon which distributed/parallel language systems should be built are suggested. Based upon these, alternative language concepts for distributed/parallel programming are analyzed.

  5. Distributed and parallel Ada and the Ada 9X recommendations

    SciTech Connect

    Volz, R.A.; Goldsack, S.J.; Theriault, R.; Waldrop, R.S.; Holzbacher-Valero, A.A.

    1992-04-01

    Recently, the DoD has sponsored work towards a new version of Ada, intended to support the construction of distributed systems. The revised version, often called Ada9x, will become the new standard sometimes in the 1990s. It is intended that Ada9x should provide language features giving limited support for distributed system construction. The requirements for such features are given. Many of the most advanced computer applications involve embedded systems that are comprised of parallel processors or networks of distributed computers. If Ada is to become the widely adopted language envisioned by many, it is essential that suitable compilers and tools be available to facilitate the creation of distributed and parallel Ada programs for these applications. The major languages issues impacting distributed and parallel programming are reviewed, and some principles upon which distributed/parallel language systems should be built are suggested. Based upon these, alternative language concepts for distributed/parallel programming are analyzed.

  6. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development.

    PubMed

    Mott, Tiffany M; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Endsley, Janice J; Torres, Alfredo G

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001) deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis. Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 10(4) CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001. Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis.

  7. Characterization of the Burkholderia mallei tonB Mutant and Its Potential as a Backbone Strain for Vaccine Development

    PubMed Central

    Mott, Tiffany M.; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Sbrana, Elena; Endsley, Janice J.; Torres, Alfredo G.

    2015-01-01

    Background In this study, a Burkholderia mallei tonB mutant (TMM001) deficient in iron acquisition was constructed, characterized, and evaluated for its protective properties in acute inhalational infection models of murine glanders and melioidosis. Methodology/Principal Findings Compared to the wild-type, TMM001 exhibits slower growth kinetics, siderophore hyper-secretion and the inability to utilize heme-containing proteins as iron sources. A series of animal challenge studies showed an inverse correlation between the percentage of survival in BALB/c mice and iron-dependent TMM001 growth. Upon evaluation of TMM001 as a potential protective strain against infection, we found 100% survival following B. mallei CSM001 challenge of mice previously receiving 1.5 x 104 CFU of TMM001. At 21 days post-immunization, TMM001-treated animals showed significantly higher levels of B. mallei-specific IgG1, IgG2a and IgM when compared to PBS-treated controls. At 48 h post-challenge, PBS-treated controls exhibited higher levels of serum inflammatory cytokines and more severe pathological damage to target organs compared to animals receiving TMM001. In a cross-protection study of acute inhalational melioidosis with B. pseudomallei, TMM001-treated mice were significantly protected. While wild type was cleared in all B. mallei challenge studies, mice failed to clear TMM001. Conclusions/Significance Although further work is needed to prevent chronic infection by TMM001 while maintaining immunogenicity, our attenuated strain demonstrates great potential as a backbone strain for future vaccine development against both glanders and melioidosis. PMID:26114445

  8. Binding of cycloheximide to ribosomes from wild-type and mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed Central

    Stöcklein, W; Piepersberg, W

    1980-01-01

    Cycloheximide bound to cytoplasmic (80S) ribosomes of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae with an association constant (Ka) of 2.0 (+/- 0.5) x 10(7) M-1. The number of binding sites found per ribosome was between 0.4 and 0.6; it was reduced by high-salt treatment of ribosomes 60S particles prepared in the presence of high salt had a lower affinity (Ka: 5.5 [+/- 0.5] x 10(6) M-1) than did 80S ribosomes, but a greater proportion of particles (0.8) were able to bind. No specific binding to 40S subunits was observed. The addition of supernatant fractions (S100, high-salt wash fraction) increased the number of binding sites found per 80S ribosome up to 0.8, leaving the association constant unchanged. In contrast, the affinity of 60S subunits was enhanced to a Ka value of 3.5 x 10(-7) M-1 by the addition of supernatant fractions, whereas the number of binding sites stayed constant. A model to explain these facts is proposed. 80S ribosomes, as well as 60S subunits of strain cy32, which is highly resistant to cycloheximide and altered in ribosomal protein L29 (18), showed a drastically reduced affinity for the drug (Ka values of 2.0 x 10(6) M-1). PMID:7016025

  9. Update of GRASP/Ada reverse engineering tools for Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, James H., II

    1992-01-01

    The GRASP/Ada project (Graphical Representations of Algorithms, Structures, and Processes for Ada) has successfully created and prototyped a new algorithmic level graphical representation of Ada software, the Control Structure Diagram (CSD). The primary impetus for creation of the CSD was to improve the comprehension efficiency of Ada software and, as a result, improve reliability and reduce costs. The emphasis was on the automatic generation of the CSD from Ada PDL or source code to support reverse engineering and maintenance. The CSD has the potential to replace traditional prettyprinted Ada source code. In Phase 1 of the GRASP/Ada project, the CSD graphical constructs were created and applied manually to several small Ada programs. A prototype (Version 1) was designed and implemented using FLEX and BISON running under VMS on a VAS 11-780. In Phase 2, the prototype was improved and ported to the Sun 4 platform under UNIX. A user interface was designed and partially implemented using the HP widget toolkit and the X Windows System. In Phase 3, the user interface was extensively reworked using the Athena widget toolkit and X Windows. The prototype was applied successfully to numerous Ada programs ranging in size from several hundred to several thousand lines of source code. Following Phase 3, the prototype was evaluated by software engineering students at Auburn University and then updated with significant enhancements to the user interface including editing capabilities. Version 3.2 of the prototype was prepared for limited distribution to facilitate further evaluation. The current prototype provides the capability for the user to generate CSD's from Ada PDL or source code in a reverse engineering as well as forward engineering mode with a level of flexibility suitable for practical application.

  10. An attenuated Shigella mutant lacking the RNA-binding protein Hfq provides cross-protection against Shigella strains of broad serotype.

    PubMed

    Mitobe, Jiro; Sinha, Ritam; Mitra, Soma; Nag, Dhrubajyoti; Saito, Noriko; Shimuta, Ken; Koizumi, Nobuo; Koley, Hemanta

    2017-07-01

    Few live attenuated vaccines protect against multiple serotypes of bacterial pathogen because host serotype-specific immune responses are limited to the serotype present in the vaccine strain. Here, immunization with a mutant of Shigella flexneri 2a protected guinea pigs against subsequent infection by S. dysenteriae type 1 and S. sonnei strains. This deletion mutant lacked the RNA-binding protein Hfq leading to increased expression of the type III secretion system via loss of regulation, resulting in attenuation of cell viability through repression of stress response sigma factors. Such increased antigen production and simultaneous attenuation were expected to elicit protective immunity against Shigella strains of heterologous serotypes. Thus, the vaccine potential of this mutant was tested in two guinea pig models of shigellosis. Animals vaccinated in the left eye showed fewer symptoms upon subsequent challenge via the right eye, and even survived subsequent intestinal challenge. In addition, oral vaccination effectively induced production of immunoglobulins without severe side effects, again protecting all animals against subsequent intestinal challenge with S. dysenteriae type 1 or S. sonnei strains. Antibodies against common virulence proteins and the O-antigen of S. flexneri 2a were detected by immunofluorescence microscopy. Reaction of antibodies with various strains, including enteroinvasive Escherichia coli, suggested that common virulence proteins induced protective immunity against a range of serotypes. Therefore, vaccination is expected to cover not only the most prevalent serotypes of S. sonnei and S. flexneri 2a, but also various Shigella strains, including S. dysenteriae type 1, which produces Shiga toxin.

  11. ADA Guide for Small Businesses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Department of Justice, Washington, DC. Civil Rights Div.

    This guide presents an informal overview of some basic Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requirements for small businesses that provide goods or services to the public. References to key sections of the regulations or other information are included. The first section describes the ADA briefly. Section two lists the 12 categories of public…

  12. Using Ada: The deeper challenges

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feinberg, David A.

    1986-01-01

    The Ada programming language and the associated Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) and Ada Run Time Environment (ARTE) provide the potential for significant life-cycle cost reductions in computer software development and maintenance activities. The Ada programming language itself is standardized, trademarked, and controlled via formal validation procedures. Though compilers are not yet production-ready as most would desire, the technology for constructing them is sufficiently well known and understood that time and money should suffice to correct current deficiencies. The APSE and ARTE are, on the other hand, significantly newer issues within most software development and maintenance efforts. Currently, APSE and ARTE are highly dependent on differing implementer concepts, strategies, and market objectives. Complex and sophisticated mission-critical computing systems require the use of a complete Ada-based capability, not just the programming language itself; yet the range of APSE and ARTE features which must actually be utilized can vary significantly from one system to another. As a consequence, the need to understand, objectively evaluate, and select differing APSE and ARTE capabilities and features is critical to the effective use of Ada and the life-cycle efficiencies it is intended to promote. It is the selection, collection, and understanding of APSE and ARTE which provide the deeper challenges of using Ada for real-life mission-critical computing systems. Some of the current issues which must be clarified, often on a case-by-case basis, in order to successfully realize the full capabilities of Ada are discussed.

  13. Adenosine deaminase deficiency: genotype-phenotype correlations based on expressed activity of 29 mutant alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Arredondo-Vega, F X; Santisteban, I; Daniels, S; Toutain, S; Hershfield, M S

    1998-01-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency causes lymphopenia and immunodeficiency due to toxic effects of its substrates. Most patients are infants with severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID), but others are diagnosed later in childhood (delayed onset) or as adults (late onset); healthy individuals with "partial" ADA deficiency have been identified. More than 50 ADA mutations are known; most patients are heteroallelic, and most alleles are rare. To analyze the relationship of genotype to phenotype, we quantitated the expression of 29 amino acid sequence-altering alleles in the ADA-deleted Escherichia coli strain SO3834. Expressed ADA activity of wild-type and mutant alleles ranged over five orders of magnitude. The 26 disease-associated alleles expressed 0.001%-0.6% of wild-type activity, versus 5%-28% for 3 alleles from "partials." We related these data to the clinical phenotypes and erythrocyte deoxyadenosine nucleotide (dAXP) levels of 52 patients (49 immunodeficient and 3 with partial deficiency) who had 43 genotypes derived from 42 different mutations, including 28 of the expressed alleles. We reduced this complexity to 13 "genotype categories," ranked according to the potential of their constituent alleles to provide ADA activity. Of 31 SCID patients, 28 fell into 3 genotype categories that could express <=0.05% of wild-type ADA activity. Only 2 of 21 patients with delayed, late-onset, or partial phenotypes had one of these "severe" genotypes. Among 37 patients for whom pretreatment metabolic data were available, we found a strong inverse correlation between red-cell dAXP level and total ADA activity expressed by each patient's alleles in SO3834. Our system provides a quantitative framework and ranking system for relating genotype to phenotype. PMID:9758612

  14. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Heat-Resistant Mutant Strains (A52 and B41) of the Photosynthetic Hydrogen-Producing Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus

    PubMed Central

    Gokce, Abdulmecit; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Yucel, Meral; Ozcan, Orhan; Sencan, Sevde; Sertdemir, Ibrahim; Erguner, Bekir; Yuceturk, Betul; Sarac, Aydan; Yuksel, Bayram

    2016-01-01

    The draft genome sequences of two heat-resistant mutant strains, A52 and B41, derived from Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710, and with different hydrogen production levels, are reported here. These sequences may help understand the molecular basis of heat resistance and hydrogen production in R. capsulatus. PMID:27284151

  15. Draft Genome Sequences of Two Heat-Resistant Mutant Strains (A52 and B41) of the Photosynthetic Hydrogen-Producing Bacterium Rhodobacter capsulatus.

    PubMed

    Gokce, Abdulmecit; Cakar, Zeynep Petek; Yucel, Meral; Ozcan, Orhan; Sencan, Sevde; Sertdemir, Ibrahim; Erguner, Bekir; Yuceturk, Betul; Sarac, Aydan; Yuksel, Bayram; Ozturk, Yavuz

    2016-06-09

    The draft genome sequences of two heat-resistant mutant strains, A52 and B41, derived from Rhodobacter capsulatus DSM 1710, and with different hydrogen production levels, are reported here. These sequences may help understand the molecular basis of heat resistance and hydrogen production in R. capsulatus. Copyright © 2016 Gokce et al.

  16. A Candida albicans petite mutant strain with uncoupled oxidative phosphorylation overexpresses MDR1 and has diminished susceptibility to fluconazole and voriconazole.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Shaoji; Clancy, Cornelius J; Nguyen, Katherine T; Clapp, William; Nguyen, M Hong

    2007-05-01

    We showed that a Candida albicans petite mutant in which oxidative phosphorylation is uncoupled was eightfold more resistant to fluconazole and voriconazole than SC5314 but equally susceptible to ketoconazole, itraconazole, and amphotericin B. Strain P5 significantly overexpressed MDR1, which likely accounts for the decreased drug susceptibility.

  17. Genetic stability and mutant selection in Sabin 2 strain of oral poliovirus vaccine grown under different cell culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Taffs, R E; Chumakov, K M; Rezapkin, G V; Lu, Z; Douthitt, M; Dragunsky, E M; Levenbook, I S

    1995-06-01

    Mutations that consistently accumulated in the attenuated Sabin 2 strain of poliovirus during propagation in cell cultures were identified by sequence heterogeneity assay and quantified by mutant analysis by PCR and restriction enzyme cleavage (MAPREC). Eight additional sites previously identified in stool isolates were also examined by MAPREC in the virus passages. The pattern of selectable mutations and the rate of their accumulation depended on the type and confluence of the cell culture and the temperature of virus growth. Five unstable genomic sites were identified in Sabin 2 virus passaged 10 times at 34 degrees in African green monkey kidney (AGMK) cells, with the mutations accumulating in the range 1 to 24%. Accumulation of these mutations did not appear to result in a loss of attenuated phenotype since the virus passaged under these conditions passed the monkey neurovirulence test (MNVT). The content of the 481-G revertant known to be related to neurovirulence in monkeys did not increase. Thus, our results suggest that upon growth of Sabin 2 virus in AGMK cells at 34 degrees, the key determinant(s) of attenuation remained stable, and the mutations that occurred did not affect monkey neurovirulence. In virus passaged 10 times at 37 degrees in AGMK cells, 4 unstable genomic sites were identified, in some of them accumulating up to 12% of the mutants. This virus sample severely failed the MNVT. Virus passaged in Vero cells at 34 and 37 degrees accumulated mutants at 7 and 14 genomic sites, respectively, including 481-G in both cases, with almost complete substitution of the original nucleotides at some of the sites. We tested 44 commercial monopools of Type 2 OPV and found out that all of them contained 481-G revertants in the range 0.4-1.1%. An increase in the 481-G revertants in passaged viruses to the level of 4% and above correlated with failure of these samples by the MNVT. Since the pattern of selectable mutations differed in viruses grown in the two

  18. Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle vaccines derived from mutant strains engineered to express factor H binding proteins from antigenic variant groups 1 and 2.

    PubMed

    Koeberling, Oliver; Giuntini, Serena; Seubert, Anja; Granoff, Dan M

    2009-02-01

    Meningococcal outer membrane vesicle (OMV) vaccines, which are treated with detergents to decrease endotoxin activity, are safe and effective in humans. However, the vaccines elicit serum bactericidal antibody responses largely directed against PorA, which is antigenically variable. We previously prepared a native (non-detergent-treated) OMV vaccine from a mutant of group B strain H44/76 in which the lpxL1 gene was inactivated, which resulted in penta-acylated lipid A with attenuated endotoxin activity. To enhance protection, we overexpressed factor H binding protein (fHbp) from the antigenic variant 1 group. The vaccine elicited broad serum bactericidal antibody responses in mice against strains with fHbp variant 1 (approximately 70% of group B isolates) but not against strains with variant 2 or 3. In the present study, we constructed a mutant of group B strain NZ98/254 with attenuated endotoxin that expressed both endogenous variant 1 and heterologous fHbp variant 2. A mixture of the two native OMV vaccines from the H44/76 and NZ98/254 mutants stimulated proinflammatory cytokine responses by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells similar to those stimulated by control, detergent-treated OMV vaccines from the wild-type strains. In mice, the mixture of the two native OMV vaccines elicited broad serum bactericidal antibody responses against strains with heterologous PorA and fHbp in the variant 1, 2, or 3 group. By adsorption studies, the principal bactericidal antibody target was determined to be fHbp. Thus, native OMV vaccines from mutants expressing fHbp variants have the potential to be safe for humans and to confer broad protection against meningococcal disease from strains expressing fHbp from each of the antigenic variant groups.

  19. A mutant lacking the glutamine synthetase gene (glnA) is impaired in the regulation of the nitrate assimilation system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J

    1994-01-01

    The existence in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 of two genes (glnA and glnN) coding for glutamine synthetase (GS) has been recently reported (J.C. Reyes and F.J. Florencio, J. Bacteriol. 176:1260-1267, 1994). In the current work, the regulation of the nitrate assimilation system was studied with a glnA-disrupted Synechocystis mutant (strain SJCR3) in which the only GS activity is that corresponding to the glnN product. This mutant was unable to grow in ammonium-containing medium because of its very low levels of GS activity. In the SJCR3 strain, nitrate and nitrite reductases were not repressed by ammonium, and short-term ammonium-promoted inhibition of nitrate uptake was impaired. In Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, nitrate seems to act as a true inducer of its assimilation system, in a way similar to that proposed for the dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. A spontaneous derivative strain from SJCR3 (SJCR3.1), was able to grow in ammonium-containing medium and exhibited a fourfold-higher level of GS activity than but the same amount of glnN transcript as its parental strain (SJCR3). Taken together, these finding suggest that SJCR3.1 is a mutant affected in the posttranscriptional regulation of the GS encoded by glnN. This strain recovered regulation by ammonium of nitrate assimilation. SJCR3 cells were completely depleted of intracellular glutamine shortly after addition of ammonium to cells growing with nitrate, while SJCR3.1 cells maintained glutamine levels similar to that reached in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Our results indicate that metabolic signals that control the nitrate assimilation system in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 require ammonium metabolism through GS. Images PMID:8002575

  20. A mutant lacking the glutamine synthetase gene (glnA) is impaired in the regulation of the nitrate assimilation system in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Reyes, J C; Florencio, F J

    1994-12-01

    The existence in the unicellular cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 of two genes (glnA and glnN) coding for glutamine synthetase (GS) has been recently reported (J.C. Reyes and F.J. Florencio, J. Bacteriol. 176:1260-1267, 1994). In the current work, the regulation of the nitrate assimilation system was studied with a glnA-disrupted Synechocystis mutant (strain SJCR3) in which the only GS activity is that corresponding to the glnN product. This mutant was unable to grow in ammonium-containing medium because of its very low levels of GS activity. In the SJCR3 strain, nitrate and nitrite reductases were not repressed by ammonium, and short-term ammonium-promoted inhibition of nitrate uptake was impaired. In Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, nitrate seems to act as a true inducer of its assimilation system, in a way similar to that proposed for the dinitrogen-fixing cyanobacteria. A spontaneous derivative strain from SJCR3 (SJCR3.1), was able to grow in ammonium-containing medium and exhibited a fourfold-higher level of GS activity than but the same amount of glnN transcript as its parental strain (SJCR3). Taken together, these finding suggest that SJCR3.1 is a mutant affected in the posttranscriptional regulation of the GS encoded by glnN. This strain recovered regulation by ammonium of nitrate assimilation. SJCR3 cells were completely depleted of intracellular glutamine shortly after addition of ammonium to cells growing with nitrate, while SJCR3.1 cells maintained glutamine levels similar to that reached in the wild-type Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803. Our results indicate that metabolic signals that control the nitrate assimilation system in Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803 require ammonium metabolism through GS.

  1. Booster vaccination with safe, modified, live-attenuated mutants of Brucella abortus strain RB51 vaccine confers protective immunity against virulent strains of B. abortus and Brucella canis in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Truong, Quang Lam; Cho, Youngjae; Kim, Kiju; Park, Bo-Kyoung; Hahn, Tae-Wook

    2015-11-01

    Brucella abortus attenuated strain RB51 vaccine (RB51) is widely used in prevention of bovine brucellosis. Although vaccination with this strain has been shown to be effective in conferring protection against bovine brucellosis, RB51 has several drawbacks, including residual virulence for animals and humans. Therefore, a safe and efficacious vaccine is needed to overcome these disadvantages. In this study, we constructed several gene deletion mutants (ΔcydC, ΔcydD and ΔpurD single mutants, and ΔcydCΔcydD and ΔcydCΔpurD double mutants) of RB51 with the aim of increasing the safety of the possible use of these mutants as vaccine candidates. The RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔpurD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD and RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants exhibited significant attenuation of virulence when assayed in murine macrophages in vitro or in BALB/c mice. A single intraperitoneal immunization with RB51ΔcydC, RB51ΔcydD, RB51ΔcydCΔcydD or RB51ΔcydCΔpurD mutants was rapidly cleared from mice within 3 weeks, whereas the RB51ΔpurD mutant and RB51 were detectable in spleens until 4 and 7 weeks, respectively. Vaccination with a single dose of RB51 mutants induced lower protective immunity in mice than did parental RB51. However, a booster dose of these mutants provided significant levels of protection in mice against challenge with either the virulent homologous B. abortus strain 2308 or the heterologous Brucella canis strain 26. In addition, these mutants were found to induce a mixed but T-helper-1-biased humoral and cellular immune response in immunized mice. These data suggest that immunization with a booster dose of attenuated RB51 mutants provides an attractive strategy to protect against either bovine or canine brucellosis.

  2. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: NYU Ada/ED, Version 19.7 V-001.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-04-11

    SCz25 C~z37 EC85 C37304A- ABADA P SCa22 CTs63 1.7.10.9 £7.38 Validation Summary Report for NYU Ada/ED April 11, 1983 A-6 A CMplete Li3t Of Tst3 and...9 NOa 352002E- ABADA PM SWaS CT*23 ECz2 B520021-8. ADA P SCs5 CTs11 EC.1 55202- ABADA P SC85 CT89 ECul Validation Summary Report for M! Ad a/ ED April... ABADA , P SCx17 C7.16 M~al B9710OA.AB.ADA P4 SC.18 CTx18 ECal C97101AADA PH SCu13 CT.66 1..1.6£75 C9711GA-A.ADi PM SCs1 CTx17 LT.13. 76 B97115A-B.ADA

  3. Dynamics of the Emergence of a Human Cytomegalovirus UL97 Mutant Strain Conferring Ganciclovir Resistance in a Pediatric Stem-Cell Transplant Recipient

    PubMed Central

    Göhring, Katharina; Feuchtinger, Tobias; Mikeler, Elfriede; Lang, Peter; Jahn, Gerhard; Handgretinger, Rupert; Hamprecht, Klaus

    2009-01-01

    Stem-cell transplant recipients are at risk of developing ganciclovir-resistant human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection caused by mutations in the viral UL97 gene. Knowledge of the relative proportions of coexisting HCMV wild-type and mutant strains may contribute to a better understanding of the dynamics of in vivo mutant strain selection under ganciclovir. Currently, genotype resistance screening for UL97 is routinely performed by restriction fragment length polymorphism detection and sequencing. We present here the longitudinal course of a pediatric recipient of an allogeneic stem-cell transplant infected with a ganciclovir-resistant HCMV strain. EDTA-treated blood samples were analyzed longitudinally. The patient acquired a primary HCMV infection shortly before transplantation and reactivated the virus following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, thus receiving an intensive antiviral treatment schedule. Three different methods for UL97 mutation analysis, restriction fragment length polymorphism detection, sequencing, and a new, real-time PCR approach were performed. In conclusion, for our pediatric patient, during peak viral load, the UL97 wild-type strain predominates, while during clinical deterioration with low viral load, the predominant mutant strain persists. PMID:19477945

  4. Ada Structure Design Language (ASDL)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chedrawi, Lutfi

    1986-01-01

    An artist acquires all the necessary tools before painting a scene. In the same analogy, a software engineer needs the necessary tools to provide their design with the proper means for implementation. Ada provide these tools. Yet, as an artist's painting needs a brochure to accompany it for further explanation of the scene, an Ada design also needs a document along with it to show the design in its detailed structure and hierarchical order. Ada could be self-explanatory in small programs not exceeding fifty lines of code in length. But, in a large environment, ranging from thousands of lines and above, Ada programs need to be well documented to be preserved and maintained. The language used to specify an Ada document is called Ada Structure Design Language (ASDL). This language sets some rules to help derive a well formatted Ada detailed design document. The rules are defined to meet the needs of a project manager, a maintenance team, a programmer and a systems designer. The design document templates, the document extractor, and the rules set forth by the ASDL are explained in detail.

  5. Dataset of differentially regulated proteins in HUVECs challenged with wild type and UGM1 mutant Aspergillus fumigatus strains.

    PubMed

    Neves, Gabriela Westerlund Peixoto; Curty, Nathália; Kubitschek-Barreira, Paula Helena; Fontaine, Thierry; Souza, Gustavo Henrique Martins Ferreira; Cunha, Marcel Lyra; Goldman, Gustavo H; Beauvais, Anne; Latgé, Jean-Paul; Lopes-Bezerra, Leila M

    2016-12-01

    Invasive aspergillosis is the primary opportunistic invasive fungal infection described in neutropenic hematologic patients, caused by the angioinvasive pathogen Aspergillus fumigatus. The molecular mechanisms associated with A. fumigatus infection in the vascular endothelium are poorly understood. In this context, we used a high-throughput proteomic approach to unveil the proteins modulated in HUVECs after interaction with a wild type strain and the UGM1 mutant (Δugm1) of A. fumigatus. The proteomic analysis was also performed in HUVECs challenged with a galactosaminogalactan (GAG) purified from A. fumigatus cell wall. The dataset presented here correspond to all proteins identified that fit a 2-fold change criteria (log 2 ratio ≥ 1 or ≤ -1), disregarding the statistical validation cut off, in order to supplement the research article entitled "Modifications to the composition of the hyphal outer layer of Aspergillus fumigatus modulates the HUVEC proteins associated with inflammatory and stress responses" (G.W.P. Neves, N.A. Curty, P.H. Kubitschek-Barreira, T. Fontaine, G.H.M.F. Souza, M. Lyra Cunha, G.H. Goldman, A. Beauvais, J.P. Latgé, L.M. Lopes-Bezerra, 2016) [1]. The mass spectrometry proteomic data have been deposited in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository with the dataset identifier PRIDE: PXD002823.

  6. Stability of DNA repeats in Escherichia coli dam mutant strains indicates a Dam methylation-dependent DNA deletion process.

    PubMed

    Troester, H; Bub, S; Hunziker, A; Trendelenburg, M F

    2000-11-27

    In this study we report on the stabilization of short direct repetitive DNA elements. We arranged a 20 bp SK-primer element in a direct repeat manner within the cloning vector pBluescript KS (+). This resulted in an array of 27 direct repeats consisting of 24 bp units. We show that this plasmid could only be propagated without deletion of repeats in dam mutant Escherichia coli hosts, whereas all efforts to use strains that were defective in the methylation-dependent restriction system and the recA- or the mismatch repair-dependent deletion system failed. The deletions always affected whole repeat units and not parts of them, leading to an unpredictable reduction of the unit number down to a range of between 12 and two during propagation. We conclude that a Dam methylation-dependent, but recA- and mismatch repair-independent, deletion mechanism caused the DNA rearrangements without an obvious involvement of the known methylated-DNA restriction systems.

  7. Update of GRASP/Ada reverse engineering tools for Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, James H., II

    1993-01-01

    The GRASP/Ada project (Graphical Representations of Algorithms, Structures, and Processes for Ada) successfully created and prototyped a new algorithmic level graphical representation for Ada software, the Control Structure Diagram (CSD). The primary impetus for creation of the CSD was to improve the comprehension efficiency of Ada software and, as a result, improve reliability and reduce costs. The emphasis was on the automatic generation of the CSD from Ada PDL or source code to support reverse engineering and maintenance. The CSD has the potential to replace traditional pretty printed Ada source code. In Phase 1 of the GRASP/Ada project, the CSD graphical constructs were created and applied manually to several small Ada programs. A prototype CSD generator (Version 1) was designed and implemented using FLEX and BISON running under VMS on a VAX 11-780. In Phase 2, the prototype was improved and ported to the Sun 4 platform under UNIX. A user interface was designed and partially implemented using the HP widget toolkit and the X Windows System. In Phase 3, the user interface was extensively reworked using the Athena widget toolkit and X Windows. The prototype was applied successfully to numerous Ada programs ranging in size from several hundred to several thousand lines of source code. Following Phase 3,e two update phases were completed. Update'92 focused on the initial analysis of evaluation data collected from software engineering students at Auburn University and the addition of significant enhancements to the user interface. Update'93 (the current update) focused on the statistical analysis of the data collected in the previous update and preparation of Version 3.4 of the prototype for limited distribution to facilitate further evaluation. The current prototype provides the capability for the user to generate CSD's from Ada PDL or source code in a reverse engineering as well as forward engineering mode with a level of flexibility suitable for practical

  8. Detection of Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides SC in bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of cows based on a TaqMan real-time PCR discriminating wild type strains from an lppQ− mutant vaccine strain used for DIVA-strategies

    PubMed Central

    Vilei, Edy M.; Frey, Joachim

    2010-01-01

    Contagious bovine pleuropneumonia (CBPP) is the most serious cattle disease in Africa, caused by Mycoplasma mycoides subsp. mycoides small-colony type (SC). CBPP control strategies currently rely on vaccination with a vaccine based on live attenuated strains of the organism. Recently, an lppQ− mutant of the existing vaccine strain T1/44 has been developed (Janis et al., 2008). This T1lppQ− mutant strain is devoid of lipoprotein LppQ, a potential virulence attribute of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC. It is designated as a potential live DIVA (Differentiating Infected from Vaccinated Animals) vaccine strain allowing both serological and etiological differentiation. The present paper reports on the validation of a control strategy for CBPP in cattle, whereby a TaqMan real-time PCR based on the lppQ gene has been developed for the direct detection of M. mycoides subsp. mycoides SC in ex vivo bronchoalveolar lavage fluids of cows and for the discrimination of wild type strains from the lppQ− mutant vaccine strain. PMID:20381545

  9. Ada Linear-Algebra Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, A. R.; Lawson, C. L.

    1988-01-01

    Routines provided for common scalar, vector, matrix, and quaternion operations. Computer program extends Ada programming language to include linear-algebra capabilities similar to HAS/S programming language. Designed for such avionics applications as software for Space Station.

  10. Distributing program entities in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rogers, Patrick; Mckay, Charles W.

    1986-01-01

    In any discussion of distributing programs and entities of programs written in a high order language (HOL), certain issues need to be included because they are generally independent of the particular language involved and have a direct impact on the feasibility of distribution. Of special interest is the distribution of Ada program entities, but many of the issues involved are not specific to Ada and would require resolution whether written in PASCAL, PL/1, Concurrent PASCAL, HAL/S, or any language which provides similar functionality. The following sections will enumerate some of these issues, and will show in what ways they relate to Ada. Also, some (but by no means all) of the issues involved in the distribution of Ada programs and program entities will be discussed.

  11. GRASP/Ada 95: Reverse Engineering Tools for Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, James H., II

    1996-01-01

    The GRASP/Ada project (Graphical Representations of Algorithms, Structures, and Processes for Ada) has successfully created and prototyped an algorithmic level graphical representation for Ada software, the Control Structure Diagram (CSD), and a new visualization for a fine-grained complexity metric called the Complexity Profile Graph (CPG). By synchronizing the CSD and the CPG, the CSD view of control structure, nesting, and source code is directly linked to the corresponding visualization of statement level complexity in the CPG. GRASP has been integrated with GNAT, the GNU Ada 95 Translator to provide a comprehensive graphical user interface and development environment for Ada 95. The user may view, edit, print, and compile source code as a CSD with no discernible addition to storage or computational overhead. The primary impetus for creation of the CSD was to improve the comprehension efficiency of Ada software and, as a result, improve reliability and reduce costs. The emphasis has been on the automatic generation of the CSD from Ada 95 source code to support reverse engineering and maintenance. The CSD has the potential to replace traditional prettyprinted Ada source code. The current update has focused on the design and implementation of a new Motif compliant user interface, and a new CSD generator consisting of a tagger and renderer. The Complexity Profile Graph (CPG) is based on a set of functions that describes the context, content, and the scaling for complexity on a statement by statement basis. When combined graphicafly, the result is a composite profile of complexity for the program unit. Ongoing research includes the development and refinement of the associated functions, and the development of the CPG generator prototype. The current Version 5.0 prototype provides the capability for the user to generate CSDs and CPGs from Ada 95 source code in a reverse engineering as well as forward engineering mode with a level of flexibility suitable for

  12. An Ada programming support environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tyrrill, AL; Chan, A. David

    1986-01-01

    The toolset of an Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) being developed at North American Aircraft Operations (NAAO) of Rockwell International, is described. The APSE is resident on three different hosts and must support developments for the hosts and for embedded targets. Tools and developed software must be freely portable between the hosts. The toolset includes the usual editors, compilers, linkers, debuggers, configuration magnagers, and documentation tools. Generally, these are being supplied by the host computer vendors. Other tools, for example, pretty printer, cross referencer, compilation order tool, and management tools were obtained from public-domain sources, are implemented in Ada and are being ported to the hosts. Several tools being implemented in-house are of interest, these include an Ada Design Language processor based on compilable Ada. A Standalone Test Environment Generator facilitates test tool construction and partially automates unit level testing. A Code Auditor/Static Analyzer permits the Ada programs to be evaluated against measures of quality. An Ada Comment Box Generator partially automates generation of header comment boxes.

  13. Ada To X-Window Bindings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Souleles, Dean

    1993-01-01

    Ada to X-Window Bindings computer program developed to provide Ada programmers with complete interfaces to Xt Intrinsics and OSF Motif toolkits. Provides "Ada view" of some mostly C-language programming libraries. Package of software written in Ada and C languages.

  14. Arabidopsis thaliana transcriptional co-activators ADA2b and SGF29a are implicated in salt stress responses.

    PubMed

    Kaldis, Athanasios; Tsementzi, Despoina; Tanriverdi, Oznur; Vlachonasios, Konstantinos E

    2011-04-01

    The transcriptional co-activator ADA2b is a component of GCN5-containing complexes in eukaryotes. In Arabidopsis, ada2b mutants result in pleiotropic developmental defects and altered responses to low-temperature stress. SGF29 has recently been identified as another component of GCN5-containing complexes. In the Arabidopsis genome there are two orthologs of yeast SGF29, designated as SGF29a and SGF29b. We hypothesized that, in Arabidopsis, one or both SGF29 proteins may work in concert with ADA2b to regulate genes in response to abiotic stress, and we set out to explore the role of SGF29a and ADA2b in salt stress responses. In root growth and seed germination assays, sgf29a-1 mutants were more resistant to salt stress than their wild-type counterparts, whereas ada2b-1 mutant was hypersensitive. The sgf29a;ada2b double mutant displayed similar phenotypes to ada2b-1 mutant with reduced salt sensitivity. The expression of several abiotic stress-responsive genes was reduced in ada2b-1 mutants after 3 h of salt stress in comparison with sgf29a-1 and wild-type plants. In the sgf29a-1;ada2b-1 double mutant, the salt-induced gene expression was affected similarly to ada2b-1. These results suggest that under salt stress the function of SGF29a was masked by ADA2b and perhaps SGF29a could play an auxiliary role to ADA2b action. In chromatin immunoprecipitation assays, reduced levels of histone H3 and H4 acetylation in the promoter and coding region of COR6.6, RAB18, and RD29b genes were observed in ada2b-1 mutants relative to wild-type plants. In conclusion, ADA2b positively regulates salt-induced gene expression by maintaining the locus-specific acetylation of histones H4 and H3.

  15. Effect of carbon and nitrogen sources on phosphate solubilization by a wild-type strain and UV-induced mutants of Aspergillus tubingensis.

    PubMed

    Relwani, Loveleen; Krishna, Pankaj; Sudhakara Reddy, M

    2008-11-01

    The mechanisms of action of phosphate solubilization were studied in the wild-type strain Aspergillus tubingensis and the phenotypic mutants derived from it. The P solubilization activities of these isolates were measured in liquid media using different carbon and nitrogen sources. All the mutants showed higher P solubilization compared to the wild type. Glucose and sucrose significantly promoted P solubilization compared to fructose, lactose, galactose, and xylose. Potassium nitrate significantly increased P solubilization compared to other nitrogen sources such as ammonium sulfate, ammonium nitrate, aspargine, and tryptophan. The P solubilization activity was strongly associated with the production of organic acids, especially succinic acid and acetic acid. The enzyme activities such as acid phosphatase and phytase also increased significantly in mutants compared to the wild type. These results suggested the role of these enzymes in P solubilization apart from the organic acid exudation and H+ pump in A. tubingensis.

  16. Paranoia.Ada: Sample output reports

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Paranoia.Ada is a program to diagnose floating point arithmetic in the context of the Ada programming language. The program evaluates the quality of a floating point arithmetic implementation with respect to the proposed IEEE Standards P754 and P854. Paranoia.Ada is derived from the original BASIC programming language version of Paranoia. The Paranoia.Ada replicates in Ada the test algorithms originally implemented in BASIC and adheres to the evaluation criteria established by W. M. Kahan. Paranoia.Ada incorporates a major structural redesign and employs applicable Ada architectural and stylistic features.

  17. ART-Ada design project, phase 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. Daniel; Allen, Bradley P.

    1990-01-01

    Interest in deploying expert systems in Ada has increased. An Ada based expert system tool is described called ART-Ada, which was built to support research into the language and methodological issues of expert systems in Ada. ART-Ada allows applications of an existing expert system tool called ART-IM (Automated Reasoning Tool for Information Management) to be deployed in various Ada environments. ART-IM, a C-based expert system tool, is used to generate Ada source code which is compiled and linked with an Ada based inference engine to produce an Ada executable image. ART-Ada is being used to implement several expert systems for NASA's Space Station Freedom Program and the U.S. Air Force.

  18. Ada/POSIX binding: A focused Ada investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legrand, Sue

    1988-01-01

    NASA is seeking an operating system interface definition (OSID) for the Space Station Program (SSP) in order to take advantage of the commercial off-the-shelf (COTS) products available today and the many that are expected in the future. NASA would also like to avoid the reliance on any one source for operating systems, information system, communication system, or instruction set architecture. The use of the Portable Operating System Interface for Computer Environments (POSIX) is examined as a possible solution to this problem. Since Ada is already the language of choice for SSP, the question of an Ada/POSIX binding is addressed. The intent of the binding is to provide access to the POSIX standard operation system (OS) interface and environment, by which application portability of Ada applications will be supported at the source code level. A guiding principle of Ada/POSIX binding development is a clear conformance of the Ada interface with the functional definition of POSIX. The interface is intended to be used by both application developers and system implementors. The objective is to provide a standard that allows a strictly conforming application source program that can be compiled to execute on any conforming implementation. Special emphasis is placed on first providing those functions and facilities that are needed in a wide variety of commercial applications

  19. Oligonucleotide-directed mutagenesis of psbB, the gene encoding CP47, employing a deletion mutant strain of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Eaton-Rye, J J; Vermaas, W F

    1991-12-01

    A mutant strain of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC (Pasteur Culture Collection) 6803 has been developed in which psbB, the gene coding for the chlorophyl alpha-binding protein CP47 in Photosystem II (PSII), has been deleted. This deletion mutant can be used for the reintroduction of modified psbB into the cyanobacterium. To study the role of a large hydrophilic region in CP47, presumably located on the lumenal side of the thylakoid membrane between the fifth and sixth membrane-spanning regions, specific deletions have been introduced in psbB coding for regions within this domain. One psbB mutation leads to deletion of Gly-351 to Thr-365 in CP47, another psbB mutation was targeted towards deletion of Arg-384 to Val-392 in this protein. The deletion from Gly-351 to Thr-365 results in a loss of PSII activity and of photoautotrophic growth of the mutant, but the deletion between Arg-384 and Val-392 retains PSII activity and the ability to grow photoautotrophically. The mutant strain with the deletion from Gly-351 to Thr-365 does not assemble a stable PSII reaction center complex in its thylakoid membranes, and exhibits diminished levels of CP47 and of the reaction center proteins D1 and D2. In contrast to the Arg-384 to Val-392 portion of this domain, the region between Gly-351 and Thr-365 appears essential for the normal structure and function of photosystem II.

  20. Effects of static magnetic fields on growth and membrane lipid composition of Salmonella typhimurium wild-type and dam mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Mihoub, Mouadh; El May, Alya; Aloui, Amine; Chatti, Abdelwaheb; Landoulsi, Ahmed

    2012-07-02

    This study was carried out to explore the adaptive mechanisms of S. typhimurium particularly, the implication of the Dam methyltransferase in the remodelling of membrane lipid composition to overcome magnetic field stress. With this aim, we focused our analyses on the increase in viable numbers and membrane lipid modifications of S. typhimurium wild-type and dam mutant cells exposed for 10h to static magnetic fields (SMF; 200 mT). For the wild-type strain, exposure to SMF induced a significant decrease (p<0.05) of CFU at 6h, followed by an increase between 8 and 10h. Growth of the dam mutant was significantly affected (p<0.05) after 6h and no recovery was observed until 10h, highlighting a different behavior of SMF stressed wild-type and dam mutant strains. SMF significantly affected the phospholipid proportions in the two strains. The most affected were those of the acidic phospholipids, cardiolipins (CL). In the dam strain the phospholipid response to SMF followed a globally similar trend as in the wild-type with however lower effects, leading mainly to an unusual accumulation of CL. This would in part explain the different behavior of the wild-type and the dam strain. Results showed a significant increase of membrane cyclic fatty acids Cyc17 and Cyc19 in the wild-type strain but only the Cyc17 in the dam strain and a meaningful increase of the total unsaturated fatty acids (UFAs) to total saturated fatty acids (SFAs) ratios of the exposed cells compared to controls from 3 to 9h (p<0.05) for both strains. The net increase of the total UFAs to total SFAs ratios seemed to result mainly from the increase of (C18:1) proportion (p<0.05) and to a lower extent from that of (C16:1) (p<0.05). These modifications of cyclic and unsaturated fatty acid proportions constitute an adaptive response to SMF stress in S. typhimurium wild-type and dam mutants to maintain an optimum level of membrane fluidity under SMF.

  1. Isolation of an Escherichia coli K-12 mutant strain able to form biofilms on inert surfaces: involvement of a new ompR allele that increases curli expression.

    PubMed

    Vidal, O; Longin, R; Prigent-Combaret, C; Dorel, C; Hooreman, M; Lejeune, P

    1998-05-01

    Classical laboratory strains of Escherichia coli do not spontaneously colonize inert surfaces. However, when maintained in continuous culture for evolution studies or industrial processes, these strains usually generate adherent mutants which form a thick biofilm, visible with the naked eye, on the wall of the culture apparatus. Such a mutant was isolated to identify the genes and morphological structures involved in biofilm formation in the very well characterized E. coli K-12 context. This mutant acquired the ability to colonize hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (polystyrene) surfaces and to form aggregation clumps. A single point mutation, resulting in the replacement of a leucine by an arginine residue at position 43 in the regulatory protein OmpR, was responsible for this phenotype. Observations by electron microscopy revealed the presence at the surfaces of the mutant bacteria of fibrillar structures looking like the particular fimbriae described by the Olsén group and designated curli (A. Olsén, A. Jonsson, and S. Normark, Nature 338:652-655, 1989). The production of curli (visualized by Congo red binding) and the expression of the csgA gene encoding curlin synthesis (monitored by coupling a reporter gene to its promoter) were significantly increased in the presence of the ompR allele described in this work. Transduction of knockout mutations in either csgA or ompR caused the loss of the adherence properties of several biofilm-forming E. coli strains, including all those which were isolated in this work from the wall of a continuous culture apparatus and two clinical strains isolated from patients with catheter-related infections. These results indicate that curli are morphological structures of major importance for inert surface colonization and biofilm formation and demonstrate that their synthesis is under the control of the EnvZ-OmpR two-component regulatory system.

  2. Functional analysis of DNA gyrase mutant enzymes carrying mutations at position 88 in the A subunit found in clinical strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis resistant to fluoroquinolones.

    PubMed

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Veziris, Nicolas; Mayer, Claudine; Jarlier, Vincent; Truffot-Pernot, Chantal; Camuset, Juliette; Bouvet, Elisabeth; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Aubry, Alexandra

    2006-12-01

    We investigated the enzymatic efficiency and inhibition by quinolones of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrases carrying the previously described GyrA G88C mutation and the novel GyrA G88A mutation harbored by two multidrug-resistant clinical strains and reproduced by site-directed mutagenesis. Fluoroquinolone MICs and 50% inhibitory concentrations for both mutants were 2- to 43-fold higher than for the wild type, demonstrating that these mutations confer fluoroquinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis.

  3. Functional Analysis of DNA Gyrase Mutant Enzymes Carrying Mutations at Position 88 in the A Subunit Found in Clinical Strains of Mycobacterium tuberculosis Resistant to Fluoroquinolones▿

    PubMed Central

    Matrat, Stéphanie; Veziris, Nicolas; Mayer, Claudine; Jarlier, Vincent; Truffot-Pernot, Chantal; Camuset, Juliette; Bouvet, Elisabeth; Cambau, Emmanuelle; Aubry, Alexandra

    2006-01-01

    We investigated the enzymatic efficiency and inhibition by quinolones of Mycobacterium tuberculosis DNA gyrases carrying the previously described GyrA G88C mutation and the novel GyrA G88A mutation harbored by two multidrug-resistant clinical strains and reproduced by site-directed mutagenesis. Fluoroquinolone MICs and 50% inhibitory concentrations for both mutants were 2- to 43-fold higher than for the wild type, demonstrating that these mutations confer fluoroquinolone resistance in M. tuberculosis. PMID:17015625

  4. High Production of 2,3-butanediol by a Mutant Strain of the Newly Isolated Klebsiella pneumoniae SRP2 with Increased Tolerance Towards Glycerol

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Md. Shafiqur; Xu, Chunbao (Charles); Ma, Kesen; Nanda, Malaya; Qin, Wensheng

    2017-01-01

    Biodiesel, a renewable fuel produced by transesterification of animal fats and vegetable oils, generates about 10% (v/v) of crude glycerol as a core byproduct. The high volume of this non bio-degradable glycerol is becoming of a great environmental and economical concern due to its worldwide ever-growing surplus. Herein we report a high production of 2,3-butanediol (2,3-BD) from pure and biodiesel derived crude glycerol using a mutant K. pneumoniae SRM2 obtained from a newly isolated strain Klebsiella pneumoniae SRP2. The mutant strain SRM2 with standing high glycerol concentration (220 g L-1 of medium) could rapidly convert glycerol aerobically to 2,3-BD, a versatile product extensively used in chemical, pharmaceutical and fuel industries Our study revealed that an increased GDH activity led to a substantially enhanced production of 2,3-BD. The mutant strain exhibited 1.3-fold higher activity of GDH than that of parent strain (500.08 vs. 638.6 µmol min -1 mg -1 protein), yielding of 32.3 g L-1 and 77.5 g L-1 2,3-BD with glycerol in batch and fed-batch process respectively. However, in batch culture with crude glycerol, cell growth and glycerol consumption were expressively boosted, and 2,3-BD production was 27.7 g L-1 from 75.0 g/L crude glycerol. In this report, the optimal conditions for high production of 2,3-BD were defined in a completely aerobic process, and 0.59 g g-1 product yield of 2,3-BD was attained by the mutated strain K. pneumoniae SRM2, which is the highest amount obtained from batch biotransformation process of glycerol metabolism till today. These results indicated that our newly developed mutant can tolerate high concentration of glycerol, have a high glycerol utilization rate, and high product yield of 2,3-BD. It is demonstrated that the mutant strain K. pneumoniae SRM2 has an ability to produce fewer co-products at trace concentrations at higher glycerol concentrations, and could be a potential candidate for 2,3-DB production in an industrial

  5. Nitrogen fixation ability of exopolysaccharide synthesis mutants of Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 and Rhizobium trifolii is restored by the addition of homologous exopolysaccharides.

    PubMed Central

    Djordjevic, S P; Chen, H; Batley, M; Redmond, J W; Rolfe, B G

    1987-01-01

    Several transposon Tn5-induced mutants of the broad-host-range Rhizobium sp. strain NGR234 produce little or no detectable acidic exopolysaccharide (EPS) and are unable to induce nitrogen-fixing nodules on Leucaena leucocephala var. Peru or siratro plants. The ability of these Exo- mutants to induce functioning nodules on Leucaena plants was restored by coinoculation with a Sym plasmid-cured (Nod- Exo+) derivative of parent strain NGR234, purified EPS from the parent strain, or the oligosaccharide from the EPS. Coinoculation with EPS or related oligosaccharide also resulted in formation of nitrogen-fixing nodules on siratro plants. In addition, an Exo- mutant (ANU437) of Rhizobium trifolii ANU794 was able to form nitrogen-fixing nodules on white clover in the presence of added EPS or related oligosaccharide from R. trifolii ANU843. These results demonstrate that the absence of Rhizobium EPSs can result in failure of effective symbiosis with both temperate and subtropical legumes. Images PMID:3025187

  6. Use of the quorum sensing inhibitor furanone C-30 to interfere with biofilm formation by Streptococcus mutans and its luxS mutant strain.

    PubMed

    He, Zhiyan; Wang, Qian; Hu, Yuejian; Liang, Jingping; Jiang, Yuntao; Ma, Rui; Tang, Zisheng; Huang, Zhengwei

    2012-07-01

    Streptococcus mutans is recognised as a major aetiological agent of dental caries. One of its important virulence factors is its ability to form biofilms on tooth surfaces. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of the quorum sensing inhibitor furanone C-30 on biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain. The effects of furanone C-30 on biofilms of both strains formed on 96-well microtitre plates at 37 °C were determined by a colorimetric technique (MTT assay). Different concentrations of furanone C-30 (0.0, 2.0 and 4.0 μg/mL) and different time points of biofilm formation (4, 14 and 24 h) were investigated. The structures and thickness of the biofilms were observed by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Quorum sensing-related gene expression (ftf, smu630, brpA, gbpB, gtfB, vicR, comDE and relA) was investigated by real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). The results showed that synthetic furanone C-30 can inhibit biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain, although it does not affect the bacterial growth rate itself. The quantities of biofilm formed by both strains significantly decreased (P<0.05) and the biofilms became thinner and looser as revealed by CLSM with increasing concentrations of furanone C-30. Expression of the genes tested was downregulated in the biofilms by the addition of furanone C-30. These results revealed that synthetic furanone C-30 can effectively inhibit biofilm formation by S. mutans and its luxS mutant strain.

  7. Immunological responses induced by asd and wzy/asd mutant strains of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium in BALB/c mice.

    PubMed

    Piao, Hong Hua; Tam, Vo Thi Minh; Na, Hee Sam; Kim, Hyun Ju; Ryu, Phil Youl; Kim, Soo Young; Rhee, Joon Haeng; Choy, Hyon E; Kim, Suhng Wook; Hong, Yeongjin

    2010-08-01

    Attenuated bacteria have long been developed as vaccine candidates but can have some disadvantages, such as the potential for damage to immune organs due to insufficient clearance. To minimize these disadvantages, we generated Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium mutants SHJ2104 (asd::cm) and HTSaYA (wzy::km, asd::cm). The wzy gene codes for the O-antigen polymerase, which is involved in lipopolysaccharide (LPS) biosynthesis, and asd codes for aspartate beta-semialdehyde dehydrogenase, which participates in cell wall formation. The strains synthesized LPS with a short-chain length, and showed lower cytotoxicity and reduced intracellular proliferation in animal cells compared to wild-type bacteria. After oral infection, the mutants were cleared in immune tissues, including the Peyer's patch, mesenteric lymph node, and spleen, within 5 days. The LD50 of the mutants in Balb/c mice was estimated to be 10(6) higher than wild-type bacteria when administered either via an oral or i.p. route, indicating that the two strains are highly attenuated. To compare the immune response to and protective effects of the mutants against wild-type bacterial infection, we inoculated the mutants into mice via an oral (1x10(10)CFU) or i.p. (1x10(7) CFU) route once or twice at a two week interval. All immune responses, such as serum IgG and secretory IgA levels, cytokine production, and delayed hypersensitivity, were highly induced by two rounds of immunization. HTSaYA and SHJ2104 induced similar immune responses, and mice immunized with HTSaYA or SHJ2104 via an i.p. route were protected against wild-type Salmonella infection even at 100-fold of the LD(50) (5x10(6) CFU). Taken together, these data indicate that HTSaYA and SHJ2104 could be developed as live attenuated Salmonella vaccine candidates.

  8. AdaNET research plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, John G.

    1990-01-01

    The mission of the AdaNET research effort is to determine how to increase the availability of reusable Ada components and associated software engineering technology to both private and Federal sectors. The effort is structured to define the requirements for transfer of Federally developed software technology, study feasible approaches to meeting the requirements, and to gain experience in applying various technologies and practices. The overall approach to the development of the AdaNET System Specification is presented. A work breakdown structure is presented with each research activity described in detail. The deliverables for each work area are summarized. The overall organization and responsibilities for each research area are described. The schedule and necessary resources are presented for each research activity. The estimated cost is summarized for each activity. The project plan is fully described in the Super Project Expert data file contained on the floppy disk attached to the back cover of this plan.

  9. Multiprocessor performance modeling with ADAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Paul J.; Andrews, Asa M.

    1989-01-01

    A graph managing strategy referred to as the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) appears useful for the time-optimized execution of application algorithm graphs in embedded multiprocessors and for the performance prediction of graph designs. This paper reports the modeling of ATAMM in the Architecture Design and Assessment System (ADAS) to make an independent verification of ATAMM's performance prediction capability and to provide a user framework for the evaluation of arbitrary algorithm graphs. Following an overview of ATAMM and its major functional rules are descriptions of the ADAS model of ATAMM, methods to enter an arbitrary graph into the model, and techniques to analyze the simulation results. The performance of a 7-node graph example is evaluated using the ADAS model and verifies the ATAMM concept by substantiating previously published performance results.

  10. Multiprocessor performance modeling with ADAS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes, Paul J.; Andrews, Asa M.

    1989-01-01

    A graph managing strategy referred to as the Algorithm to Architecture Mapping Model (ATAMM) appears useful for the time-optimized execution of application algorithm graphs in embedded multiprocessors and for the performance prediction of graph designs. This paper reports the modeling of ATAMM in the Architecture Design and Assessment System (ADAS) to make an independent verification of ATAMM's performance prediction capability and to provide a user framework for the evaluation of arbitrary algorithm graphs. Following an overview of ATAMM and its major functional rules are descriptions of the ADAS model of ATAMM, methods to enter an arbitrary graph into the model, and techniques to analyze the simulation results. The performance of a 7-node graph example is evaluated using the ADAS model and verifies the ATAMM concept by substantiating previously published performance results.

  11. Systematic strain construction and process development: Xylitol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae expressing Candida tenuis xylose reductase in wild-type or mutant form.

    PubMed

    Pratter, S M; Eixelsberger, T; Nidetzky, B

    2015-12-01

    A novel Saccharomyces cerevisiae whole-cell biocatalyst for xylitol production based on Candida tenuis xylose reductase (CtXR) is presented. Six recombinant strains expressing wild-type CtXR or an NADH-specific mutant were constructed and evaluated regarding effects of expression mode, promoter strength, biocatalyst concentration and medium composition. Intracellular XR activities ranged from 0.09 U mgProt(-1) to 1.05 U mgProt(-1) but did not correlate with the strains' xylitol productivities, indicating that other factors limited xylose conversion in the high-activity strains. The CtXR mutant decreased the biocatalyst's performance, suggesting use of the NADPH-preferring wild-type enzyme when (semi-)aerobic conditions are applied. In a bioreactor process, the best-performing strain converted 40 g L(-1) xylose with an initial productivity of 1.16 g L(-1)h(-1) and a xylitol yield of 100%. The obtained results underline the potential of CtXR wild-type for xylose reduction and point out parameters to improve "green" xylitol production.

  12. General screening procedure for RNA modificationless mutants: isolation of Escherichia coli strains with specific defects in RNA methylation.

    PubMed Central

    Björk, G R; Kjellin-Stråby, K

    1978-01-01

    A general method for the isolation of mutants of Escherichia coli that are defective in RNA modification is described. The method is based on the fact that RNA with specific undermodifications accumulates under nonpermissive growth conditions and that such a defect can be detected by remodification either in vivo at permissive conditions or in vitro. The method provides a means by which to study mutations affecting essential modification reactions. The usefulness of the method was demonstrated by the isolation of two rRNA and two tRNA methylation defective mutants. Both rRNA mutants accept methyl groups into their 23S rRNA in vitro. Analyses of in vitro methylated 23S rRNA from one of the mutants revealed the presence of several methylated nucleosides, of which 6-methyladenosine was the most abundant (40% of recovered radioactivity). In 23S rRNA from the other mutant, the only product formed in vitro was 5-methylcytidine. The tRNA mutants are characterized in the accompanying paper. Images PMID:342494

  13. Ada Implementation Guide. Software Engineering With Ada. Volume 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1994-04-01

    Standards and Technology ............. A-4 DON Software Executive Official ...................... A-4 DON Ada Representative...Cost Analysis ........................ A-6 Software Technology Support Center .................... A-6 Software Engineering Institute...A-7 Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS) ....................................... A-7 A.1.2 Training

  14. Ada style guide (version 1.1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidewitz, Edwin V.; Agresti, William; Ferry, Daniel; Lavallee, David; Maresca, Paul; Nelson, Robert; Quimby, Kelvin; Rosenberg, Jacob; Roy, Daniel; Shell, Allyn

    1987-01-01

    Ada is a programming language of considerable expressive power. The Ada Language Reference Manual provides a thorough definition of the language. However, it does not offer sufficient guidance on the appropriate use of Ada's powerful features. For this reason, the Goddard Space Flight Center Ada User's Group has produced this style guide which addresses such program style issues. The guide covers three areas of Ada program style: the structural decomposition of a program; the coding and the use of specific Ada features; and the textural formatting of a program.

  15. Comparison of wild-type and UV-mutant beta-glucanase-producing strains of Talaromyces emersonii with potential in brewing applications.

    PubMed

    McCarthy, Tracey C; Lalor, Eoin; Hanniffy, Orla; Savage, Angela V; Tuohy, Maria G

    2005-04-01

    A screen of 46 UV-mutant strains of the moderately thermophilic fungus Talaromyces emersonii yielded two mutants (TC2, TC5) that displayed gross morphological differences to the parent strain and enhanced activity against mixed linkage cereal beta-glucans. Activity against beta-(1, 3)(1, 4)-D: -glucan from barley (BBGase) was measured during growth of the mutant and wild-type strains on a variety of carbon sources, ranging from solka floc to crude cereal fractions. In liquid culture, TC2 and TC5 secreted 1.2- to 8.6-fold more BBGase than the parent strain and markedly less beta-glucosidase (exo-activity); enzyme levels were dependent on the carbon source. Cellulose induced high BBGase. However, beet pulp, wheat bran, carob and tea-leaves were cheap and effective inducers. T. emersonii wild-type, TC2 and TC5 crude enzyme preparations achieved similar end-points during the hydrolysis of commercial barley beta-glucan (13.0-16.9%), but were more active against crude beta-glucan from barley (16.0-24.2% hydrolysis). The products of hydrolysis were quantified by high-performance anion-exchange chromatography. Mash trials indicated that enzyme preparations from all three organisms effected a significant reduction in wort viscosity and residual mash beta-glucan. Finally, TC2 and TC5 produce more efficient beta-glucan-depolymerizing enzymes; and wheat bran and solka floc can be used to provide inexpensive and potent enzyme cocktails with potential in brewing applications.

  16. Evaluation of the G145R Mutant of the Hepatitis B Virus as a Minor Strain in Mother-to-Child Transmission

    PubMed Central

    Komatsu, Haruki; Inui, Ayano; Umetsu, Shuichiro; Tsunoda, Tomoyuki; Sogo, Tsuyoshi; Konishi, Yasuhiro; Fujisawa, Tomoo

    2016-01-01

    The role of the hepatitis B virus (HBV) mutant G145R, with a single change in amino acid 145 of the surface protein, as a minor population remains unknown in mother-to-child transmission. The minor strain as well as the major strain of the G145R mutant were evaluated in three cohorts using a locked nucleic acid probe-based real-time PCR. The breakthrough cohort consisted of children who were born to HBV carrier mothers and became HBV carriers despite immnoprophylaxis (n = 25). The control cohort consisted of HBV carriers who had no history of receiving the hepatitis B vaccine, hepatitis B immunoglobulin or antiviral treatment (n = 126). The pregnant cohort comprised pregnant women with chronic HBV infection (n = 31). In the breakthrough cohort, 6 showed positive PCR results (major, 2; minor, 4). In the control cohort, 13 showed positive PCR results (major, 0; minor, 13). HBeAg-positive patients were prone to have the G145R mutant as a minor population. Deep sequencing was performed in a total of 32 children (PCR positive, n = 13; negative, n = 19). In the breakthrough cohort, the frequency of the G145R mutant ranged from 0.54% to 6.58%. In the control cohort, the frequency of the G145R mutant ranged from 0.42% to 4.1%. Of the 31 pregnant women, 4 showed positive PCR results (major, n = 0; minor, n = 4). All of the pregnant women were positive for HBeAg and showed a high viral load. Three babies born to 3 pregnant women with the G145R mutant were evaluated. After the completion of immunoprophylaxis, 2 infants became negative for HBsAg. The remaining infant became negative for HBsAg after the first dose of HB vaccine. G145R was detected in one-fourth of the children with immunoprophylaxis failure. However, the pre-existence of the G145R mutant as a minor population in pregnant women does not always cause breakthrough infection in infants. PMID:27812178

  17. Development of a pyrG Mutant of Aspergillus oryzae Strain S1 as a Host for the Production of Heterologous Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Ling, Selina Oh Siew; Storms, Reginald; Zheng, Yun; Rodzi, Mohd Rohaizad Mohd; Mahadi, Nor Muhammad; Illias, Rosli Md

    2013-01-01

    The ease with which auxotrophic strains and genes that complement them can be manipulated, as well as the stability of auxotrophic selection systems, are amongst the advantages of using auxotrophic markers to produce heterologous proteins. Most auxotrophic markers in Aspergillus oryzae originate from chemical or physical mutagenesis that may yield undesirable mutations along with the mutation of interest. An auxotrophic A. oryzae strain S1 was generated by deleting the orotidine-5′-monophosphate decarboxylase gene (pyrG) by targeted gene replacement. The uridine requirement of the resulting strain GR6 pyrGΔ0 was complemented by plasmids carrying a pyrG gene from either Aspergillus nidulans or A. oryzae. β-Galactosidase expression by strain GR6 pyrGΔ0 transformed with an A. niger plasmid encoding a heterologous β-galactosidase was at least 150 times more than that obtained with the untransformed strain. Targeted gene replacement is thus an efficient way of developing auxotrophic mutants in A. oryzae and the auxotrophic strain GR6 pyrGΔ0 facilitated the production of a heterologous protein in this fungus. PMID:24381522

  18. Correlation between biofilm production, antibiotic susceptibility and exopolysaccharide composition in Burkholderia pseudomallei bpsI, ppk, and rpoS mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Mongkolrob, Rungrawee; Taweechaisupapong, Suwimol; Tungpradabkul, Sumalee

    2015-11-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei is the cause of melioidosis, a fatal tropical infectious disease, which has been reported to have a high rate of recurrence, even when an intensive dose of antibiotics is used. Biofilm formation is believed to be one of the possible causes of relapse because of its ability to increase drug resistance. EPS in biofilms have been reported to be related to the limitation of antibiotic penetration in B. pseudomallei. However, the mechanisms by which biofilms restrict the diffusion of antibiotics remain unclear. The present study presents a correlation between exopolysaccharide production in biofilm matrix and antibiotic resistance in B. pseudomallei using bpsI, ppk, and rpoS mutant strains. CLSM revealed a reduction in exopolysaccharide production and disabled micro-colony formation in B. pseudomallei mutants, which paralleled the antibiotic resistance. Different ratios of carbohydrate contents in the exopolysaccharides of the mutants were detected, although they have the same components, including glucose, galactose, mannose, and rhamnose, with the exception being that no detectable rhamnose peak was observed in the bpsI mutant. These results indicate that the correlation between these phenomena in the B. pseudomallei biofilm at least results from the exopolysaccharide, which may be under the regulation of bpsI, ppk, or rpoS genes.

  19. Poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) production from biodiesel by-product and propionic acid by mutant strains of Pandoraea sp.

    PubMed

    de Paula, Fabrício C; Contiero, Jonas; de Paula, Carolina B C; Gomez, José Gregório C; Steinbüchel, Alexander

    2017-04-10

    Pandoraea sp. MA03 wild type strain was subjected to UV mutation in order to obtain mutants unable to grow on propionic acid (PA) but still able to produce poly(3-hydroxybutyrate-co-3-hydroxyvalerate) [P(3HB-co-3HV)] from glycerol and PA at high 3HV yields. In shake flask experiments, mutant prp25 was selected from 52 mutants affected in the propionate metabolism exhibiting a conversion rate of PA into 3HV units of 0.78 gg(-1) . The utilization of crude glycerol (CG) plus PA or valeric acid resulted in a copolymer with 3HV contents varying from 21.9 to 30 mol% and 22.2 to 36.7 mol%, respectively. Fed-batch fermentations were performed using CG and PA and reached a 3HV yield of 1.16 gg(-1) , which is 86% of the maximum theoretical yield. Nitrogen limitation was a key parameter for polymer accumulation reaching up to 63.7% content and 18.1 mol% of 3HV. Henceforth, mutant prp25 is revealed as an additional alternative to minimize costs and support the P(3HB-co-3HV) production from biodiesel by-products. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  20. Software reuse issues affecting AdaNET

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcbride, John G.

    1989-01-01

    The AdaNet program is reviewing its long-term goals and strategies. A significant concern is whether current AdaNet plans adequately address the major strategic issues of software reuse technology. The major reuse issues of providing AdaNet services that should be addressed as part of future AdaNet development are identified and reviewed. Before significant development proceeds, a plan should be developed to resolve the aforementioned issues. This plan should also specify a detailed approach to develop AdaNet. A three phased strategy is recommended. The first phase would consist of requirements analysis and produce an AdaNet system requirements specification. It would consider the requirements of AdaNet in terms of mission needs, commercial realities, and administrative policies affecting development, and the experience of AdaNet and other projects promoting the transfer software engineering technology. Specifically, requirements analysis would be performed to better understand the requirements for AdaNet functions. The second phase would provide a detailed design of the system. The AdaNet should be designed with emphasis on the use of existing technology readily available to the AdaNet program. A number of reuse products are available upon which AdaNet could be based. This would significantly reduce the risk and cost of providing an AdaNet system. Once a design was developed, implementation would proceed in the third phase.

  1. A new osteopetrosis mutant mouse strain (ntl) with odontoma-like proliferations and lack of tooth roots.

    PubMed

    Lu, Xincheng; Rios, Hector F; Jiang, Baichun; Xing, Lianping; Kadlcek, Renata; Greenfield, Edward M; Luo, Guangbin; Feng, Jian Q

    2009-12-01

    A new spontaneous mouse mutant (ntl) with autosomal-recessive osteopetrosis was characterized. These mice formed tartrate-resistant acid phosphate (TRAP)-positive osteoclasts but their osteoclasts had no ruffled border and did not resorb bone. These mice displayed no tooth eruption or tooth root formation. Adult mutant mice developed odontoma-like proliferations near the proximal ends of the incisors. Intraperitoneal injection of progenitor cells from the liver of 16.5 days postcoitum wild-type embryos into newborn mutants rescued the osteopetrosis phenotype, indicating that the defects were intrinsic to the osteoclasts. Our findings not only provide further support for a critical role of osteoclasts in tooth eruption and tooth root development, but also suggest that the perturbation of the homeostasis of the odontogenic precursors of the incisors is primarily responsible for the development of the odontoma-like proliferations in this osteopetrosis mutant. Genetic mapping has narrowed down the location of the mutant allele to a genetic interval of 3.2 cM on mouse chromosome 17.

  2. Renovating To Meet ADA Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Judy; Jones, Garry

    2003-01-01

    Using the examples of Owen D. Young School in Van Hornesville, New York, and the Tonawanda City school district in Buffalo, New York, describes how school planners should take the accessibility standards mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) into account when renovating. (EV)

  3. Renovating To Meet ADA Standards.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huber, Judy; Jones, Garry

    2003-01-01

    Using the examples of Owen D. Young School in Van Hornesville, New York, and the Tonawanda City school district in Buffalo, New York, describes how school planners should take the accessibility standards mandated by the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) into account when renovating. (EV)

  4. How I treat ADA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, H Bobby; Aiuti, Alessandro; Porta, Fulvio; Candotti, Fabio; Hershfield, Michael S; Notarangelo, Luigi D

    2009-10-22

    Adenosine deaminase deficiency is a disorder of purine metabolism leading to severe combined immunodeficiency (ADA-SCID). Without treatment, the condition is fatal and requires early intervention. Haematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the major treatment for ADA-SCID, although survival following different donor sources varies considerably. Unlike other SCID forms, 2 other options are available for ADA-SCID: enzyme replacement therapy (ERT) with pegylated bovine ADA, and autologous haematopoietic stem cell gene therapy (GT). Due to the rarity of the condition, the lack of large scale outcome studies, and availability of different treatments, guidance on treatment strategies is limited. We have reviewed the currently available evidence and together with our experience of managing this condition propose a consensus management strategy. Matched sibling donor transplants represent a successful treatment option with high survival rates and excellent immune recovery. Mismatched parental donor transplants have a poor survival outcome and should be avoided unless other treatments are unavailable. ERT and GT both show excellent survival, and therefore the choice between ERT, MUD transplant, or GT is difficult and dependent on several factors, including accessibility to the different modalities, response of patients to long-term ERT, and the attitudes of physicians and parents to the short- and potential long-term risks associated with different treatments.

  5. Computational studies on the resistance of penicillin-binding protein 2B (PBP2B) of wild-type and mutant strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae against β-lactam antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Ramalingam, Jothi; Vennila, Jannet; Subbiah, Parthasarathy

    2013-09-01

    Mutations within transpeptidase domain of penicillin-binding protein 2B of the strains of Streptococcus pneumoniae leads to resistance against β-lactam antibiotics. To uncover the important residues responsible for sensitivity and resistance, the recently determined three dimensional structures of penicillin-binding protein 2B of both wild-type R6 (sensitive) and mutant 5204 (resistant) strains along with the predicted structures of other mutant strains G54, Hungary19A-6 and SP195 were considered for the interaction study with β-lactam antibiotics using induced-fit docking of Schrödinger. Associated binding energies of the complexes and their intermolecular interactions in the binding site clearly show that the wild-type R6 as sensitive, mutant strains 5204 and G54 as highly resistant, and the mutant strains Hungary19A-6 and SP195 as intermediate resistant. The study also reveals that the mutant strains Hungary19A-6 and SP195 exhibit intermediate resistant because of the existence of mutations till the intermediate 538th and 516th positions, respectively, and not till the end of the C-terminus. Furthermore, our investigations show that if the mutations are extended till the end of the C terminus, then the antibiotic resistance of induced-mutated strains increases from intermediate to high as in the strains 5204 and G54. The binding patterns obtained in the study are useful in designing potential inhibitors against multidrug resistant S. pneumoniae.

  6. A genome-scale Escherichia coli kinetic metabolic model k-ecoli457 satisfying flux data for multiple mutant strains

    SciTech Connect

    Khodayari, Ali; Maranas, Costas D.

    2016-12-20

    Kinetic models of metabolism at a genome scale that faithfully recapitulate the effect of multiple genetic interventions would be transformative in our ability to reliably design novel overproducing microbial strains. Here, we introduce k-ecoli457, a genome-scale kinetic model of Escherichia coli metabolism that satisfies fluxomic data for wild-type and 25 mutant strains under different substrates and growth conditions. The k-ecoli457 model contains 457 model reactions, 337 metabolites and 295 substrate-level regulatory interactions. Parameterization is carried out using a genetic algorithm by simultaneously imposing all available fluxomic data (about 30 measured fluxes per mutant). Furthermore, the Pearson correlation coefficient between experimental data and predicted product yields for 320 engineered strains spanning 24 product metabolites is 0.84. This is substantially higher than that using flux balance analysis, minimization of metabolic adjustment or maximization of product yield exhibiting systematic errors with correlation coefficients of, respectively, 0.18, 0.37 and 0.47.

  7. Mature and developing visual system of Ceratitis capitata (Diptera, Tephritidae): histochemical evidence of nitric oxide synthase in the wild type and the white eye mutant strains.

    PubMed

    Conforti, E; Torti, C; Malacrida, A R; Bernocchi, G

    1999-10-02

    Nitric oxide (NO) is acknowledged as a messenger molecule in the nervous system. It has a role in the modulation of the chemosensory information and seems implicated also in visual processes and visually guided behaviour of some insects. In the present study, we used two different strains of the medfly Ceratitis capitata (Diptera, Tephritidae), a wild type eye colour and a white eye mutant line, as models to clarify the involvement of NO in the mature and developing visual system. The comparison between the pattern of enzyme histochemical localization of NO synthase (NOS), through NADPH diaphorase (NADPHd) staining, in the optic lobes of the two strains revealed for adults a stronger intensity of reaction in all the neuropiles and the sub-retinic monopolar cell layer of the wild type flies, with respect to the white eye mutant correspondent areas. Anti-NOS immunocytochemistry correlated with these results, underlying reactivity both in fine fibres and varicosities and in cell bodies and supporting the idea of presence of NOS also in the retina of the medfly optic lobes. NADPHd reactivity was present in the first developmental stages of the white eye mutant also, but at lower intensity than wild type, and it decreased in some areas during the transition to adult fly stage both in the wild type and in the white eye mutant. All these observations together indicate that changes in the NO system of C. capitata could be related to the visual information processing, when the visual response or discrimination are altered. Furthermore, NO may be involved in the establishment of the retinal projection pattern and in the control of optic lobes morphogenesis.

  8. Signal strains that can detect certain DNA replication and membrane mutants of Escherichia coli: isolation of a new ssb allele, ssb-3.

    PubMed Central

    Schmellik-Sandage, C S; Tessman, E S

    1990-01-01

    Mutations in several dna genes of Escherichia coli, when introduced into a strain with a lac fusion in the SOS gene sulA, resulted in formation of blue colonies on plates containing 5-bromo-4-chloro-3-indolyl-beta-D-galactoside (X-Gal). Unexpectedly, several lines of evidence indicated that the blue colony color was not primarily due to induction of the SOS system but rather was due to a membrane defect, along with the replication defect, making the cell X-Gal extrasensitive (phenotypically Xgx), possibly because of enhanced permeability to X-Gal or leakage of beta-galactosidase. (i) In most cases, beta-galactosidase specific activity increased only two- to threefold. (ii) Mutations conferring tolerance to colicin E1 resulted in blue colony color with no increase in beta-galactosidase specific activity. (iii) Mutations in either the dnaA, dnaB, dnaC, dnaE, dnaG, or ssb gene, when introduced into a strain containing a bioA::lac fusion, produced a blue colony color without an increase in beta-galactosidase synthesis. These lac fusion strains can serve as signal strains to detect dna mutations as well as membrane mutations. By localized mutagenesis of the 92-min region of the chromosome of the sulA::lac signal strain and picking blue colonies, we isolated a novel ssb allele that confers the same extreme UV sensitivity as a delta recA allele, which is a considerably greater sensitivity than that conferred by the two well-studied ssb alleles, ssb-1 and ssb-113. The technique also yielded dnaB mutants; fortuitously, uvrA mutants were also found. PMID:2142938

  9. Sulphide Resistance in the Cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa: a Comparative Study of Morphology and Photosynthetic Performance Between the Sulphide-Resistant Mutant and the Wild-Type Strain.

    PubMed

    Bañares-España, Elena; del Mar Fernández-Arjona, María; García-Sánchez, María Jesús; Hernández-López, Miguel; Reul, Andreas; Mariné, Mariona Hernández; Flores-Moya, Antonio

    2016-05-01

    The cyanobacterium Microcystis aeruginosa is a mesophilic freshwater organism, which cannot tolerate sulphide. However, it was possible to isolate a sulphide-resistant (S(r)) mutant strain that was able to survive in a normally lethal medium sulphide. In order to evaluate the cost of the mutation conferring sulphide resistance in the S(r) strain of M. aeruginosa, the morphology and the photosynthetic performance were compared to that found in the wild-type, sulphide-sensitive (S(s)) strain. An increase in size and a disrupted morphology was observed in S(r) cells in comparison to the S(s) counterpart. Phycoerythrin and phycocyanin levels were higher in the S(r) than in the S(s) cells, whereas a higher carotenoid content, per unit volume, was found in the S(s) strain. The irradiance-saturated photosynthetic oxygen-production rate (GPR max) and the photosynthetic efficiency (measured both by oxygen production and fluorescence, α(GPR) and α(ETR)) were lower in the S(r) strain than in the wild-type. These results appear to be the result of package effect. On the other hand, the S(r) strain showed higher quantum yield of non-photochemical quenching, especially those regulated mechanisms (estimated throughout qN and Y(NPQ)) and a significantly lower slope in the maximum quantum yield of light-adapted samples (Fv'/Fm') compared to the S(s) strain. These findings point to a change in the regulation of the quenching of the transition states (qT) in the S(r) strain which may be generated by a change in the distribution of thylakoidal membranes, which somehow could protect metalloenzymes of the electron transport chain from the lethal effect of sulphide.

  10. NAD(P)+-Malic Enzyme Mutants of Sinorhizobium sp. Strain NGR234, but Not Azorhizobium caulinodans ORS571, Maintain Symbiotic N2 Fixation Capabilities

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ye; Aono, Toshihiro; Poole, Phillip

    2012-01-01

    C4-dicarboxylic acids appear to be metabolized via the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle in N2-fixing bacteria (bacteroids) within legume nodules. In Sinorhizobium meliloti bacteroids from alfalfa, NAD+-malic enzyme (DME) is required for N2 fixation, and this activity is thought to be required for the anaplerotic synthesis of pyruvate. In contrast, in the pea symbiont Rhizobium leguminosarum, pyruvate synthesis occurs via either DME or a pathway catalyzed by phosphoenolpyruvate carboxykinase (PCK) and pyruvate kinase (PYK). Here we report that dme mutants of the broad-host-range Sinorhizobium sp. strain NGR234 formed nodules whose level of N2 fixation varied from 27 to 83% (plant dry weight) of the wild-type level, depending on the host plant inoculated. NGR234 bacteroids had significant PCK activity, and while single pckA and single dme mutants fixed N2 at reduced rates, a pckA dme double mutant had no N2-fixing activity (Fix−). Thus, NGR234 bacteroids appear to synthesize pyruvate from TCA cycle intermediates via DME or PCK pathways. These NGR234 data, together with other reports, suggested that the completely Fix− phenotype of S. meliloti dme mutants may be specific to the alfalfa-S. meliloti symbiosis. We therefore examined the ME-like genes azc3656 and azc0119 from Azorhizobium caulinodans, as azc3656 mutants were previously shown to form Fix− nodules on the tropical legume Sesbania rostrata. We found that purified AZC3656 protein is an NAD(P)+-malic enzyme whose activity is inhibited by acetyl-coenzyme A (acetyl-CoA) and stimulated by succinate and fumarate. Thus, whereas DME is required for symbiotic N2 fixation in A. caulinodans and S. meliloti, in other rhizobia this activity can be bypassed via another pathway(s). PMID:22307295

  11. Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). Feature Issue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lakin, Charlie, Ed.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    This feature issue focuses on the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), with articles discussing provisions of the ADA and its impact on people with developmental disabilities. Articles have the following titles and authors: "The ADA: What Does It Mean for People with Developmental Disabilities?" (Deborah L. McFadden and Edward P.…

  12. Ada--Programming Language of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, David

    1983-01-01

    Ada is a programing language developed for the Department of Defense, with a registered trademark. It was named for Ada Augusta, coworker of Charles Babbage and the world's first programer. The Department of Defense hopes to prevent variations and to establish Ada as a consistent, standardized language. (MNS)

  13. Software unit testing in Ada environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warnock, Glenn

    1986-01-01

    A validation procedure for the Ada binding of the Graphical Kernel System (GKS) is being developed. PRIOR Data Sciences is also producing a version of the GKS written in Ada. These major software engineering projects will provide an opportunity to demonstrate a sound approach for software testing in an Ada environment. The GKS/Ada validation capability will be a collection of test programs and data, and test management guidelines. These products will be used to assess the correctness, completeness, and efficiency of any GKS/Ada implementation. The GKS/Ada developers will be able to obtain the validation software for their own use. It is anticipated that this validation software will eventually be taken over by an independent standards body to provide objective assessments of GKS/Ada implementations, using an approach similar to the validation testing currently applied to Ada compilers. In the meantime, if requested, this validation software will be used to assess GKS/Ada products. The second project, implementation of GKS using the Ada language, is a conventional software engineering tasks. It represents a large body of Ada code and has some interesting testing problems associated with automatic testing of graphics routines. Here the normal test practices which include automated regression testing, independent quality assistance, test configuration management, and the application of software quality metrics will be employed. The software testing methods emphasize quality enhancement and automated procedures. Ada makes some aspects of testing easier, and introduces some concerns. These issues are addressed.

  14. Structuring the formal definition of Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hansen, Kurt W.

    1986-01-01

    The structure of the formal definition of Ada are described. At present, a difficult subset of Ada has been defined and the experience gained so far by this work is reported. Currently, the work continues towards the formal definition of the Ada language.

  15. Ada--Programming Language of the Future.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudd, David

    1983-01-01

    Ada is a programing language developed for the Department of Defense, with a registered trademark. It was named for Ada Augusta, coworker of Charles Babbage and the world's first programer. The Department of Defense hopes to prevent variations and to establish Ada as a consistent, standardized language. (MNS)

  16. Alteration/Deficiency in Activation 3 (ADA3) Protein, a Cell Cycle Regulator, Associates with the Centromere through CENP-B and Regulates Chromosome Segregation.

    PubMed

    Mohibi, Shakur; Srivastava, Shashank; Wang-France, Jun; Mirza, Sameer; Zhao, Xiangshan; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2015-11-20

    ADA3 (alteration/deficiency in activation 3) is a conserved component of several transcriptional co-activator and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. Recently, we generated Ada3 knock-out mice and demonstrated that deletion of Ada3 leads to early embryonic lethality. The use of Ada3(FL/FL) mouse embryonic fibroblasts with deletion of Ada3 using adenovirus Cre showed a critical role of ADA3 in cell cycle progression through mitosis. Here, we demonstrate an association of ADA3 with the higher order repeat region of the α-satellite region on human X chromosome centromeres that is consistent with its role in mitosis. Given the role of centromere proteins (CENPs) in mitosis, we next analyzed whether ADA3 associates with the centromere through CENPs. Both an in vivo proximity ligation assay and immunofluorescence studies confirmed the association of ADA3 with CENP-B protein, a highly conserved centromeric protein that binds to the 17-bp DNA sequences on α-satellite DNA. Deletional analysis showed that ADA3 directly associates with CENP-B through its N terminus, and a CENP-B binding-deficient mutant of ADA3 was incompetent in cell proliferation rescue. Notably, knockdown of ADA3 decreased binding of CENP-B onto the centromeres, suggesting that ADA3 is required for the loading of CENP-B onto the centromeres. Finally, we show that deletion of Ada3 from Ada3(FL/FL) mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited various chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel ADA3 interaction with CENP-B-centromere that may account for its previously known function in mitosis. This study, together with its known function in maintaining genomic stability and its mislocalization in cancers, suggests an important role of ADA3 in mitosis.

  17. Alteration/Deficiency in Activation 3 (ADA3) Protein, a Cell Cycle Regulator, Associates with the Centromere through CENP-B and Regulates Chromosome Segregation*

    PubMed Central

    Mohibi, Shakur; Srivastava, Shashank; Wang-France, Jun; Mirza, Sameer; Zhao, Xiangshan; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2015-01-01

    ADA3 (alteration/deficiency in activation 3) is a conserved component of several transcriptional co-activator and histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. Recently, we generated Ada3 knock-out mice and demonstrated that deletion of Ada3 leads to early embryonic lethality. The use of Ada3FL/FL mouse embryonic fibroblasts with deletion of Ada3 using adenovirus Cre showed a critical role of ADA3 in cell cycle progression through mitosis. Here, we demonstrate an association of ADA3 with the higher order repeat region of the α-satellite region on human X chromosome centromeres that is consistent with its role in mitosis. Given the role of centromere proteins (CENPs) in mitosis, we next analyzed whether ADA3 associates with the centromere through CENPs. Both an in vivo proximity ligation assay and immunofluorescence studies confirmed the association of ADA3 with CENP-B protein, a highly conserved centromeric protein that binds to the 17-bp DNA sequences on α-satellite DNA. Deletional analysis showed that ADA3 directly associates with CENP-B through its N terminus, and a CENP-B binding-deficient mutant of ADA3 was incompetent in cell proliferation rescue. Notably, knockdown of ADA3 decreased binding of CENP-B onto the centromeres, suggesting that ADA3 is required for the loading of CENP-B onto the centromeres. Finally, we show that deletion of Ada3 from Ada3FL/FL mouse embryonic fibroblasts exhibited various chromosome segregation defects. Taken together, we demonstrate a novel ADA3 interaction with CENP-B-centromere that may account for its previously known function in mitosis. This study, together with its known function in maintaining genomic stability and its mislocalization in cancers, suggests an important role of ADA3 in mitosis. PMID:26429915

  18. Reduced virulence of an adenylosuccinate lyase transposon mutant of a serotype 4b strain of Listeria monocytogenes

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    A severe outbreak of listeriosis occurred in 1998-99 as a result of contamination of frankfurters with a serotype 4b strain of Listeria monocytogenes. We compared several characteristics of strain H7550, isolated from frankfurters from this outbreak, and a plasmid-free derivative (H7550cds) of this...

  19. Ada 9X Project Report: Ada 9X Requirements Document

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-08-27

    Reviewers which include E. Ploedereder - DR Chair ( Tartan ), G. Booch (Rational), B. Brosgol (Alsys), N. Cohen (IBM), R. Dewar (NYU), G. Dismukes...developing a report (the Ada Com- mentary Integration Document ( ACID )) that reflects the impact of the approved commentaries by suggesting revised...wording for appropriate sections of the standard. ACID would be a good starting point for satisfying this requirement. Of course, some of the approved

  20. CLIPS/Ada: An Ada-based tool for building expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, W. A.

    1990-01-01

    Clips/Ada is a production system language and a development environment. It is functionally equivalent to the CLIPS tool. CLIPS/Ada was developed in order to provide a means of incorporating expert system technology into projects where the use of the Ada language had been mandated. A secondary purpose was to glean information about the Ada language and its compilers. Specifically, whether or not the language and compilers were mature enough to support AI applications. The CLIPS/Ada tool is coded entirely in Ada and is designed to be used by Ada systems that require expert reasoning.

  1. Ada technology support for NASA-GSFC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Utilization of the Ada programming language and environments to perform directorate functions was reviewed. The Mission and Data Operations Directorate Network (MNET) conversion effort was chosen as the first task for evaluation and assistance. The MNET project required the rewriting of the existing Network Control Program (NCP) in the Ada programming language. The DEC Ada compiler running on the VAX under WMS was used for the initial development efforts. Stress tests on the newly delivered version of the DEC Ada compiler were performed. The new Alsys Ada compiler was purchased for the IBM PC AT. A prevalidated version of the compiler was obtained. The compiler was then validated.

  2. Cross-Resistance between Triclosan and Antibiotics in Pseudomonas aeruginosa Is Mediated by Multidrug Efflux Pumps: Exposure of a Susceptible Mutant Strain to Triclosan Selects nfxB Mutants Overexpressing MexCD-OprJ

    PubMed Central

    Chuanchuen, Rungtip; Beinlich, Kerry; Hoang, Tung T.; Becher, Anna; Karkhoff-Schweizer, RoxAnn R.; Schweizer, Herbert P.

    2001-01-01

    Triclosan is an antiseptic frequently added to items as diverse as soaps, lotions, toothpaste, and many commonly used household fabrics and plastics. Although wild-type Pseudomonas aeruginosa expresses the triclosan target enoyl-acyl carrier protein reductase, it is triclosan resistant due to expression of the MexAB-OprM efflux system. Exposure of a susceptible Δ(mexAB-oprM) strain to triclosan selected multidrug-resistant bacteria at high frequencies. These bacteria hyperexpressed the MexCD-OprJ efflux system due to mutations in its regulatory gene, nfxB. The MICs of several drugs for these mutants were increased up to 500-fold, including the MIC of ciprofloxacin, which was increased 94-fold. Whereas the MexEF-OprN efflux system also participated in triclosan efflux, this antimicrobial was not a substrate for MexXY-OprM. PMID:11158736

  3. The Use of NF1 and NF2 Mutant Mouse Strains in the Investigation of Gene Function and Disease Development

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1999-10-01

    combined germline Nfl/p53 mutant model that develops MPNSTs . Genetic modifier screens using the Nfl/p53 model have proceeded to the point of identifying...34 model of malignant peripheral nerve sheath tumors ( MPNSTs ) was recently published (10) and will not be described further here. The use of the Nfi...phosphorylation sites) will allow us to test this hypothesis in the context of our existing and future mouse models of neurofibroma and MPNST formation

  4. Open fermentative production of fuel ethanol from food waste by an acid-tolerant mutant strain of Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kedong; Ruan, Zhiyong; Shui, Zongxia; Wang, Yanwei; Hu, Guoquan; He, Mingxiong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of present study was to develop a process for open ethanol fermentation from food waste using an acid-tolerant mutant of Zymomonas mobilis (ZMA7-2). The mutant showed strong tolerance to acid condition of food waste hydrolysate and high ethanol production performance. By optimizing fermentation parameters, ethanol fermentation with initial glucose concentration of 200 g/L, pH value around 4.0, inoculum size of 10% and without nutrient addition was considered as best conditions. Moreover, the potential of bench scales fermentation and cell reusability was also examined. The fermentation in bench scales (44 h) was faster than flask scale (48 h), and the maximum ethanol concentration and ethanol yield (99.78 g/L, 0.50 g/g) higher than that of flask scale (98.31 g/L, 0.49 g/g). In addition, the stable cell growth and ethanol production profile in five cycles successive fermentation was observed, indicating the mutant was suitable for industrial ethanol production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Sodium dodecyl sulphate, a strong inducer of thermostable glucanhydrolase secretion from a derepressed mutant strain of Bacillus alcalophilus GCBNA-4.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Nadia; Ali, Sikander; Ul-Haq, Ikram

    2013-04-01

    In the present study, we report the optimisation of batch conditions for improved α-1,4-glucan-glucanohydrolase (GGH) secretion by a nitrous acid (NA)-treated Bacillus alcalophilus. The wild (isolate GCB-18) and NA-derivative (mutant GCBNA-4) were grown in a medium containing 10 g/L nutrient broth, 10 g/L starch, 5 g/L lactose, 2 g/L ammonium sulphate, 2 g/L CaCl2 and phosphate buffer (pH 7.6). Sodium dodecyl sulphate (SDS) was used as an enzyme inducer while batch fermentations were carried out at 40 °C. The mutant produced GGH in 40 h which was 15-fold higher than the wild in presence of SDS. Thermodynamic studies revealed that the mutant culture exhibited the capability for improved enzyme activity over a broad range of temperature (35-70 °C). The enzyme was purified by cation-exchange column chromatography with ~80 % recovery. The performance of fuzzy-logic system control was found to be highly promising for the improved substrate conversion rate. The correlation (1.045E + 0025) among variables demonstrated the model terms as highly significant indicating commercial utility of the culture used (P < 0.05).

  6. Evaluation of the virulence of Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris mutant strains lacking functional genes in the OxyR regulon.

    PubMed

    Charoenlap, Nisanart; Buranajitpakorn, Sarinya; Duang-Nkern, Jintana; Namchaiw, Poommaree; Vattanaviboon, Paiboon; Mongkolsuk, Skorn

    2011-08-01

    Xanthomonas campestris pv. campestris causes black rot in cruciferous crops. Hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)) production and accumulation is an important initial response in plant defense against invading microbes. The role of genes involved in the bacterial H(2)O(2) protection system in pathogenicity was evaluated. Mutants of katA (encoding a monofunctional catalase) and, to a lesser extent, katG (encoding a catalase-peroxidase) and oxyR (encoding a H(2)O(2) sensor and a transcription regulator), are hypersensitive to H(2)O(2) treatments that mimic the plant H(2)O(2) burst. These data correlate with the results of pathogenicity testing that show katA, katG, and oxyR mutants are avirulent on a compatible plant. Moreover, exposure to H(2)O(2) (1, 2, and 4 mM) highly induces the expression of genes in the OxyR regulon, including katA, katG, and ahpC. The avirulent phenotype of the oxyR mutant is partly because of its inability to mount an adaptive response upon exposure to an H(2)O(2) burst. Our data provide insights into important roles of a transcription regulator and other genes involved in peroxide stress protection in the virulence of X. campestris pv. campestris.

  7. Eye pigments in wild-type and eye-color mutant strains of the African malaria vector Anopheles gambiae.

    PubMed

    Beard, C B; Benedict, M Q; Primus, J P; Finnerty, V; Collins, F H

    1995-01-01

    Chromatographic analysis of pigments extracted from wild-type eyes of the mosquito Anopheles gambiae reveals the presence of the ommatin precursor 3-hydroxykynurenine, its transamination derivative xanthurenic acid, and a dark, red-brown pigment spot that probably is composed of two or more low mobility xanthommatins. No colored or fluorescent pteridines are evident. Mosquitoes homozygous for an autosomal recessive mutation at the red-eye (r) locus have a brick-red eye color in larvae, pupae, and young adults, in contrast to the almost black color of the wild eye. Mosquitoes homozygous for this mutant allele have levels of ommochrome precursors that are indistinguishable from the wild-type, but the low-mobility xanthommatin spot is ochre-brown in color rather than red-brown as in the wild-type. Mosquitoes with two different mutant alleles at the X-linked pink-eye locus (p, which confers a pink eye color, and pw, which confers a white eye phenotype in homozygotes or hemizygous males) have normal levels of ommochrome precursors but no detectable xanthommatins. Mosquitoes homozygous for both the r and p mutant alleles have apricot-colored eyes and show no detectable xanthommatins. Both the pink-eye and red-eye mutations appear to involve defects in the transport into or assembly of pigments in the membrane-bound pigment granules rather then defects in ommochrome synthesis.

  8. Transmitter data collection using Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Conroy, B. L.

    1988-01-01

    A data collection system installed on the 400 kilowatt X-band transmitter of the Goldstone Solar System Radar is described. The data collection system is built around the off-the-shelf IEEE 488 instrumentation, linked with fiber optics, controlled by an inexpensive computer, and uses software written in the Ada language. The speed and accuracy of the system is discussed, along with programming techniques used for both data collection and reduction.

  9. Cloning, sequencing, and expression of nitrile hydratase gene of mutant 4D strain of Rhodococcus rhodochrous PA 34 in E. coli.

    PubMed

    Pratush, Amit; Seth, Amit; Bhalla, T C

    2012-10-01

    The NHase encoding gene of mutant 4D was isolated by PCR amplification. The NHase gene of mutant 4D was successfully cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli by using Ek/LIC Duet cloning kits (Novagen). For the active expression of the NHase gene, the co-expression of small cobalt transporter gene (P-protein gene) has also been co-expressed with NHase gene E. coli. The nucleotide sequence of this NHase gene revealed high homology with the H-NHase of Rhodococcus rhodochrous J1. The recombinant E. coli cells showed higher NHase activity (5.9 U/mg dcw) as compared to the wild (4.1 U/mg dcw) whereas it is less than the mutant strain (8.4 U/mg dcw). Addition of cobalt ion in Luria-Bertani medium is needed up to a very small concentration (0.4 mM) for NHase activity. The recombinant E. coli exhibited maximum NHase activity at 6 h of incubation and was purified with a yield of 56 % with specific activity of 37.1 U/mg protein.

  10. Morphological and genetic characterization of group I Clostridium botulinum type B strain 111 and the transcriptional regulator spoIIID gene knockout mutant in sporulation.

    PubMed

    Hosomi, Koji; Kuwana, Ritsuko; Takamatsu, Hiromu; Kohda, Tomoko; Kozaki, Shunji; Mukamoto, Masafumi

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium botulinum is a heat-resistant spore-forming bacterium that causes the serious paralytic illness botulism. Heat-resistant spores may cause food sanitation hazards and sporulation plays a central role in the survival of C. botulinum. We observed morphological changes and investigated the role of the transcriptional regulator SpoIIID in the sporulation of C. botulinum type B strain 111 in order to elucidate the molecular mechanism in C. botulinum. C. botulinum type B formed heat-resistant spores through successive morphological changes corresponding to those of Bacillus subtilis, a spore-forming model organism. An analysis of the spoIIID gene knockout mutant revealed that the transcriptional regulator SpoIIID contributed to heat-resistant spore formation by C. botulinum type B and activated the transcription of the sigK gene later during sporulation. Transcription of the spoIIID gene, which differed from that in B. subtilis and Clostridium difficile, was observed in the sigE gene knockout mutant of C. botulinum type B. An analysis of the sigF gene knockout mutant showed that the sporulation-specific sigma factor SigF was essential for transcription of the spoIIID gene in C. botulinum type B. These results suggest that the regulation of sporulation in C. botulinum is not similar to that in B. subtilis and other clostridia.

  11. Comparative Study of Nonautolytic Mutant and Wild-Type Strains of Coprinopsis cinerea Supports an Important Role of Glucanases in Fruiting Body Autolysis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zhonghua; Niu, Xin; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Wenming; Yang, Mingmei; Liu, Cuicui; Xiong, Yuanjing; Zhao, Yan; Pei, Siyu; Qin, Qin; Zhang, Yu; Yu, Yuan; Yuan, Sheng

    2015-11-04

    Autolysis of Coprinopsis cinerea fruiting bodies affects its commercial value. In this study, a mutant of C. cinerea that exhibits pileus expansion without pileus autolysis was obtained using ultraviolet mutagenesis. This suggests that pileus expansion and pileus autolysis involve different enzymes or proteins. Among the detected hydrolytic enzymes, only β-1,3-glucanase activity increased with expansion and autolysis of pilei in the wild-type strain, but the increase was abolished in the mutant. This suggests that β-1,3-glucanases plays a major role in the autolysis. Although there are 43 possible β-1,3-glucoside hydrolases genes, only 4 known genes, which have products that are thought to act synergistically to degrade the β-1,3-glucan backbone of cell walls during fruiting body autolysis, and an unreported gene were upregulated during pileus expansion and autolysis in the wild-type stain but were suppressed in the mutant. This suggests that expression of these β-1,3-glucanases is potentially controlled by a single regulatory mechanism.

  12. Comparative evaluation of agroindustrial byproducts for the production of alkaline protease by wild and mutant strains of Bacillus subtilis in submerged and solid state fermentation.

    PubMed

    Mukhtar, Hamid; Haq, Ikramul

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the screening of different agroindustrial byproducts for enhanced production of alkaline protease by a wild and EMS induced mutant strain of Bacillus subtilis IH-72(EMS8). During submerged fermentation, different agro-industrial byproducts were tested which include defatted seed meals of rape, guar, sunflower, gluten, cotton, soybean, and gram. In addition to these meals, rice bran, wheat bran, and wheat flour were also evaluated for protease production. Of all the byproducts tested, soybean meal at a concentration of 20 g/L gave maximum production of the enzyme, that is, 5.74  ±  0.26 U/mL from wild and 11.28  ±  0.45 U/mL from mutant strain, during submerged fermentation. Different mesh sizes (coarse, medium, and fine) of the soybean meal were also evaluated, and a finely ground soybean meal (fine mesh) was found to be the best. In addition to the defatted seed meals, their alkali extracts were also tested for the production of alkaline protease by Bacillus subtilis, but these were proved nonsignificant for enhanced production of the enzyme. The production of the enzyme was also studied in solid state fermentation, and different agro-industrial byproducts were also evaluated for enzyme production. Wheat bran partially replaced with guar meal was found as the best substrate for maximum enzyme production under solid state fermentation conditions.

  13. Comparative Evaluation of Agroindustrial Byproducts for the Production of Alkaline Protease by Wild and Mutant Strains of Bacillus subtilis in Submerged and Solid State Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Haq, Ikramul

    2013-01-01

    The present study describes the screening of different agroindustrial byproducts for enhanced production of alkaline protease by a wild and EMS induced mutant strain of Bacillus subtilis IH-72EMS8. During submerged fermentation, different agro-industrial byproducts were tested which include defatted seed meals of rape, guar, sunflower, gluten, cotton, soybean, and gram. In addition to these meals, rice bran, wheat bran, and wheat flour were also evaluated for protease production. Of all the byproducts tested, soybean meal at a concentration of 20 g/L gave maximum production of the enzyme, that is, 5.74  ±  0.26 U/mL from wild and 11.28  ±  0.45 U/mL from mutant strain, during submerged fermentation. Different mesh sizes (coarse, medium, and fine) of the soybean meal were also evaluated, and a finely ground soybean meal (fine mesh) was found to be the best. In addition to the defatted seed meals, their alkali extracts were also tested for the production of alkaline protease by Bacillus subtilis, but these were proved nonsignificant for enhanced production of the enzyme. The production of the enzyme was also studied in solid state fermentation, and different agro-industrial byproducts were also evaluated for enzyme production. Wheat bran partially replaced with guar meal was found as the best substrate for maximum enzyme production under solid state fermentation conditions. PMID:24294129

  14. Production of acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) by a hyper-producing mutant strain of Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 and recovery by pervaporation.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, N; Blaschek, H P

    1999-01-01

    A silicone membrane was used to study butanol separation from model butanol solutions and fermentation broth. Depending upon the butanol feed concentration in the model solution and pervaporation conditions, butanol selectivities of 20.88-68.32 and flux values of 158.7-215.4 g m(-)(2) h(-)(1) were achieved. Higher flux values (400 g m(-)(2) h(-)(1)) were obtained at higher butanol concentrations using air as sweep gas. In an integrated process of butanol fermentation-recovery, solvent productivities were improved to 200% of the control batch fermentation productivities. In a batch reactor the hyper-butanol-producing mutant strain C. beijerinckii BA101 utilized 57.3 g/L glucose and produced 24.2 g/L total solvents, while in the integrated process it produced 51.5 g/L (culture volume) total solvents. Concentrated glucose medium was also fermented. The C. beijerinckii BA101 mutant strain was not negatively affected by the pervaporative conditions. In the integrated experiment, acids were not produced. With the active fermentation broth, butanol selectivity was reduced by a factor of 2-3. However, the membrane flux was not affected by the active fermentation broth. The butanol permeate concentration ranged from 26.4 to 95.4 g/L, depending upon butanol concentration in the fermentation broth. Since the permeate of most membranes contains acetone, butanol, and ethanol (and small concentrations of acids), it is suggested that distillation be used for further purification.

  15. Production of acetone butanol ethanol (ABE) by a hyper-producing mutant strain of Clostridium beijerinckii BA101 and recovery by pervaporation

    SciTech Connect

    Qureshi, N.; Blaschek, H.P.

    1999-07-01

    A silicone membrane was used to study butanol separation from model butanol solutions and fermentation broth. Depending upon the butanol feed concentration in the model solution and pervaporation conditions, butanol selectivities of 20.88--68.32 and flux values of 158.7--215.4 g m{sup {minus}2} h{sup {minus}1} were achieved. Higher flux values were obtained at higher butanol concentrations using air as sweep gas. In an integrated process of butanol fermentation--recovery, solvent productivities were improved to 200% of the control batch fermentation productivities. In a batch reactor the hyper-butanol-producing mutant strain C. beijerinckii BA101 utilized 57.3 g/L glucose and produced 24.2 g/L total solvents, while in the integrated process it produced 51.5 g/L (culture volume) total solvents. Concentrated glucose medium was also fermented. The C. beijerinckii BA101 mutant strain was not negatively affected by the pervaporative conditions. In the integrated experiment, acids were not produced. With the active fermentation broth, butanol selectivity was reduced by a factor of 2--3. However, the membrane flux was not affected by the active fermentation broth. The butanol permeate concentration ranged from 26.4 to 95.4 g/L, depending upon butanol concentration in the fermentation broth. Since the permeate of most membranes contains acetone, butanol, and ethanol, it is suggested that distillation be used for further purification.

  16. Comparative genomic analysis of Klebsiella pneumonia (LCT-KP214) and a mutant strain (LCT-KP289) obtained after spaceflight

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background With the development of space science, it is important to analyze the relationship between the space environment and genome variations that might cause phenotypic changes in microbes. Klebsiella pneumoniae is commonly found on the human body and is resistant to multiple drugs. To study space-environment-induced genome variations and drug resistance changes, K. pneumoniae was carried into outer space by the Shenzhou VIII spacecraft. Results The K. pneumoniae strain LCT-KP289 was selected after spaceflight based on its phenotypic differences compared to the ground-control strain. Analysis of genomic structural variations revealed one inversion, 25 deletions, fifty-nine insertions, two translocations and six translocations with inversions. In addition, 155 and 400 unique genes were observed in LCT-KP214 and LCT-KP289, respectively, including the gene encoding dihydroxyacetone kinase, which generates the ATP and NADH required for microbial growth. Furthermore, a large number of mutant genes were related to transport and metabolism. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that most genes in these two strains had a dN/dS value greater than 1, indicating that the strain diversity increased after spaceflight. Analysis of drug-resistance phenotypes revealed that the K. pneumoniae strain LCT-KP289 was resistant to sulfamethoxazole, whereas the control strain, LCT-KP214, was not; both strains were resistant to benzylpenicillin, ampicillin, lincomycin, vancomycin, chloramphenicol and streptomycin. The sulfamethoxazole resistance may be associated with sequences in Scaffold7 in LCT-KP289, which were not observed in LCT-K214; this scaffold contained the gene sul1. In the strain LCT-KP289, we also observed a drug-resistance integron containing emrE (confers multidrug resistance) and ant (confers resistance to spectinomycin, streptomycin, tobramycin, kanamycin, sisomicin, dibekacin, and gentamicin). The gene ampC (confers resistance to penicillin, cephalosporin-ii and

  17. Development of a nuclear transformation system for Oleaginous Green Alga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris) incisa and genetic complementation of a mutant strain, deficient in arachidonic acid biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Zorin, Boris; Grundman, Omer; Khozin-Goldberg, Inna; Leu, Stefan; Shapira, Michal; Kaye, Yuval; Tourasse, Nicolas; Vallon, Olivier; Boussiba, Sammy

    2014-01-01

    Microalgae are considered a promising source for various high value products, such as carotenoids, ω-3 and ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFA). The unicellular green alga Lobosphaera (Parietochloris) incisa is an outstanding candidate for the efficient phototrophic production of arachidonic acid (AA), an essential ω-6 PUFA for infant brain development and a widely used ingredient in the baby formula industry. Although phototrophic production of such algal products has not yet been established, estimated costs are considered to be 2-5 times higher than competing heterotrophic production costs. This alga accumulates unprecedented amounts of AA within triacylglycerols and the molecular pathway of AA biosynthesis in L. incisa has been previously elucidated. Thus, progress in transformation and metabolic engineering of this high value alga could be exploited for increasing the efficient production of AA at competitive prices. We describe here the first successful transformation of L. incisa using the ble gene as a selection marker, under the control of the endogenous RBCS promoter. Furthermore, we have succeeded in the functional complementation of the L. incisa mutant strain P127, containing a mutated, inactive version of the delta-5 (Δ5) fatty acid desaturase gene. A copy of the functional Δ5 desaturase gene, linked to the ble selection marker, was transformed into the P127 mutant. The resulting transformants selected for zeocine resistant, had AA biosynthesis partially restored, indicating the functional complementation of the mutant strain with the wild-type gene. The results of this study present a platform for the successful genetic engineering of L. incisa and its long-chain PUFA metabolism.

  18. Metabolic Engineering of Light and Dark Biochemical Pathways in Wild-Type and Mutant Strains of Synechocystis PCC 6803 for Maximal, 24-Hour Production of Hydrogen Gas

    SciTech Connect

    Ely, Roger L.; Chaplen, Frank W.R.

    2014-03-11

    enhanced H2 production profiles using selected culture conditions and inhibitors of specific pathways in WT cells and an NDH-1 mutant; 3. Create Synechocystis PCC 6803 mutant strains with modified hydrogenases exhibiting increased O2 tolerance and greater H2 production; and 4. Integrate enhanced hydrogenase mutants and culture and metabolic factor studies to maximize 24-hour H2 production.

  19. Protective effects of recombinant staphylococcal enterotoxin type C mutant vaccine against experimental bovine infection by a strain of Staphylococcus aureus isolated from subclinical mastitis in dairy cattle.

    PubMed

    Chang, Byoung Sun; Moon, Jin San; Kang, Hyun-Mi; Kim, Young-In; Lee, Hong-Kyun; Kim, Jong-Duk; Lee, Byung-Saeng; Koo, Hye Cheong; Park, Yong Ho

    2008-04-16

    Staphylococcus aureus is one of the main etiological agents of bovine mastitis; however, antibiotics that are effective against bovine strains of S. aureus are not currently available. Staphylococcal enterotoxin type C (SEC), a superantigen, is the enterotoxin most frequently expressed by bovine strains of S. aureus and one of immunogenic determinants. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the protective effectiveness of recombinant SEC mutant vaccine (MastaVactrade mark) against experimentally induced bovine infection. Three representative SEC secreting strains were selected from 9 candidate isolates that showed various intensities of pathogenicity on mice and inoculated into 5 lactating dairy cattle at a concentration of 50-5.0x10(8) CFU per quarter. The optimal experimental bovine subclinical mastitis model was produced by inoculation with 50 CFU of S. aureus 409 per quarter, a level which was not lethal to mice. After the experimental model was determined, other 3 cattle were intramuscularly administered three doses of vaccine at day 0, at 2 wks and at 6 wks. Nine quarters of 3 vaccinated cattle and 8 quarters of 3 control cattle were then challenged with S. aureus 409. An SEC-specific ELISA test conducted at 4 wks post-immunization confirmed the presence of a high antibody titer against SEC in all vaccinated cattle. The somatic cell counts from the vaccinated group remained relatively low, whereas those of control group increased significantly after challenge with S. aureus. After challenge, S. aureus was not isolated from any cattle in the vaccinated group, whereas it was isolated from 75% of the cattle in the control group. These results indicate that recombinant SEC mutant vaccine had a protective effect against S. aureus intramammary infection in lactating cattle.

  20. Acetylation of Mammalian ADA3 Is Required for Its Functional Roles in Histone Acetylation and Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Mohibi, Shakur; Srivastava, Shashank; Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Band, Hamid; Band, Vimla

    2016-10-01

    Alteration/deficiency in activation 3 (ADA3) is an essential component of specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. We have previously shown that ADA3 is required for establishing global histone acetylation patterns and for normal cell cycle progression (S. Mohibi et al., J Biol Chem 287:29442-29456, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M112.378901). Here, we report that these functional roles of ADA3 require its acetylation. We show that ADA3 acetylation, which is dynamically regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, reflects a balance of coordinated actions of its associated HATs, GCN5, PCAF, and p300, and a new partner that we define, the deacetylase SIRT1. We use mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis to identify major sites of ADA3 acetylated by GCN5 and p300. Acetylation-defective mutants are capable of interacting with HATs and other components of HAT complexes but are deficient in their ability to restore ADA3-dependent global or locus-specific histone acetylation marks and cell proliferation in Ada3-deleted murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Given the key importance of ADA3-containing HAT complexes in the regulation of various biological processes, including the cell cycle, our study presents a novel mechanism to regulate the function of these complexes through dynamic ADA3 acetylation.

  1. Acetylation of Mammalian ADA3 Is Required for Its Functional Roles in Histone Acetylation and Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Mohibi, Shakur; Srivastava, Shashank; Bele, Aditya; Mirza, Sameer; Band, Hamid

    2016-01-01

    Alteration/deficiency in activation 3 (ADA3) is an essential component of specific histone acetyltransferase (HAT) complexes. We have previously shown that ADA3 is required for establishing global histone acetylation patterns and for normal cell cycle progression (S. Mohibi et al., J Biol Chem 287:29442–29456, 2012, http://dx.doi.org/10.1074/jbc.M112.378901). Here, we report that these functional roles of ADA3 require its acetylation. We show that ADA3 acetylation, which is dynamically regulated in a cell cycle-dependent manner, reflects a balance of coordinated actions of its associated HATs, GCN5, PCAF, and p300, and a new partner that we define, the deacetylase SIRT1. We use mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis to identify major sites of ADA3 acetylated by GCN5 and p300. Acetylation-defective mutants are capable of interacting with HATs and other components of HAT complexes but are deficient in their ability to restore ADA3-dependent global or locus-specific histone acetylation marks and cell proliferation in Ada3-deleted murine embryonic fibroblasts (MEFs). Given the key importance of ADA3-containing HAT complexes in the regulation of various biological processes, including the cell cycle, our study presents a novel mechanism to regulate the function of these complexes through dynamic ADA3 acetylation. PMID:27402865

  2. Live Attenuated Mutants of Francisella tularensis Protect Rabbits against Aerosol Challenge with a Virulent Type A Strain

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Le'Kneitah P.; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Santiago, Araceli E.; Mann, Barbara J.; Barry, Eileen M.

    2014-01-01

    Francisella tularensis, a Gram-negative bacterium, is the causative agent of tularemia. No licensed vaccine is currently available for protection against tularemia, although an attenuated strain, dubbed the live vaccine strain (LVS), is given to at-risk laboratory personnel as an investigational new drug (IND). In an effort to develop a vaccine that offers better protection, recombinant attenuated derivatives of a virulent type A strain, SCHU S4, were evaluated in New Zealand White (NZW) rabbits. Rabbits vaccinated via scarification with the three attenuated derivatives (SCHU S4 ΔguaBA, ΔaroD, and ΔfipB strains) or with LVS developed a mild fever, but no weight loss was detected. Twenty-one days after vaccination, all vaccinated rabbits were seropositive for IgG to F. tularensis lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Thirty days after vaccination, all rabbits were challenged with aerosolized SCHU S4 at doses ranging from 50 to 500 50% lethal doses (LD50). All rabbits developed fevers and weight loss after challenge, but the severity was greater for mock-vaccinated rabbits. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives provided partial protection against death (27 to 36%) and a prolonged time to death compared to results for the mock-vaccinated group. In contrast, LVS and the ΔfipB strain both prolonged the time to death, but there were no survivors from the challenge. This is the first demonstration of vaccine efficacy against aerosol challenge with virulent type A F. tularensis in a species other than a rodent since the original work with LVS in the 1960s. The ΔguaBA and ΔaroD SCHU S4 derivatives warrant further evaluation and consideration as potential vaccines for tularemia and for identification of immunological correlates of protection. PMID:24614653

  3. QUEST/Ada (Query Utility Environment for Software Testing) of Ada: The development of a program analysis environment for Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, David B.

    1988-01-01

    A history of the Query Utility Environment for Software Testing (QUEST)/Ada is presented. A fairly comprehensive literature review which is targeted toward issues of Ada testing is given. The definition of the system structure and the high level interfaces are then presented. The design of the three major components is described. The QUEST/Ada IORL System Specifications to this point in time are included in the Appendix. A paper is also included in the appendix which gives statistical evidence of the validity of the test case generation approach which is being integrated into QUEST/Ada.

  4. Comparative transcriptome analysis between an evolved abscisic acid-overproducing mutant Botrytis cinerea TBC-A and its ancestral strain Botrytis cinerea TBC-6

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Zhongtao; Zhang, Zhi; Zhong, Juan; Luo, Di; Zhou, Jinyan; Yang, Jie; Xiao, Liang; Shu, Dan; Tan, Hong

    2016-01-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical phytohormone which plays an important role in plant stress resistance. Moreover, ABA is also found to regulate the activation of innate immune cells and glucose homeostasis in mammals. Therefore, this ‘stress hormone’ is of great importance to theoretical research and agricultural and medical applications. Botrytis cinerea is a well-known phytopathogenic ascomycete that synthesizes ABA via a pathway substantially different from higher plants. Identification of the functional genes involved in ABA biosynthesis in B. cinerea would be of special interest. We developed an ABA-overproducing mutant strain, B. cinerea TBC-A, previously and obtained a 41.5-Mb genome sequence of B. cinerea TBC-A. In this study, the transcriptomes of B. cinerea TBC-A and its ancestral strain TBC-6 were sequenced under identical fermentation conditions. A stringent comparative transcriptome analysis was performed to identify differentially expressed genes participating in the metabolic pathways related to ABA biosynthesis in B. cinerea. This study provides the first global view of the transcriptional changes underlying the very different ABA productivity of the B. cinerea strains and will expand our knowledge of the molecular basis for ABA biosynthesis in B. cinerea. PMID:27892476

  5. Synthesis of Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs) from vegetable oils and free fatty acids by wild-type and mutant strains of Pseudomonas chlororaphis.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Parveen Kumar; Munir, Rifat; de Kievit, Teresa; Levin, David B

    2017-10-05

    Pseudomonas chlororaphis strain PA23 was isolated from soybean roots as a plant growth-promoting rhizobacterium (PGPR) and secretes a wide-range of compounds, including the antibiotics phenazine-1-caroxymide (PCA), pyrrolnitrin, and 2-hydroxyphenazine. We have determined that P. chlororaphis PA23 can synthesize medium chain length polyhydroxyalkanoate (PHA) polymers utilizing free fatty acids, such as octanoic acid and nonanoic acid, as well as vegetable oils as sole carbon sources. Genome analysis identified a pha operon containing 7 genes in P. chlororaphis PA23 which were highly conserved. A non-pigmented strain that does not synthesize PCA, P. chlororaphis PA23-63, was also studied for PHA production. P. chlororaphis PA23-63 produced 2.42 - 5.14 g/L cell biomass and accumulated PHAs from 11.7 - 32.5% of cdw when cultured with octanoic acid, nonanoic acid, fresh canola oil, waste canola fryer oil, or biodiesel-derived waste free fatty acids under batch culture conditions. The subunit composition of the PHAs produced from fresh canola oil, waste canola fryer oil, or biodiesel-derived free fatty acids did not differ significantly. Addition of octanoic acid and nonanoic acid to canola oil cultures increased PHA production, but addition of glucose did not. PHA production in the phz- mutant, P. chlororaphis PA23-63, was greater than the parent strain.

  6. In vivo recruitment analysis and a mutant strain without any group 2 σ factor reveal roles of different σ factors in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Koskinen, Satu; Hakkila, Kaisa; Gunnelius, Liisa; Kurkela, Juha; Wada, Hajime; Tyystjärvi, Taina

    2016-01-01

    In eubacteria, replacement of one σ factor in the RNA polymerase (RNAP) holoenzyme by another one changes the transcription pattern. Cyanobacteria are eubacteria characterized by oxygenic photosynthesis, and they typically encode numerous group 2 σ factors that closely resemble the essential primary σ factor. A mutant strain of the model cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 without functional group 2 σ factors (named as ΔsigBCDE) could not acclimate to heat, high salt or bright light stress, but in standard conditions ΔsigBCDE grew only 9% slower than the control strain. One-fifth of the genes in ΔsigBCDE was differently expressed compared with the control strain in standard growth conditions and several physiological changes in photosynthesis, and pigment and lipid compositions were detected. To directly analyze the σ factor content of RNAP holoenzyme in vivo, a His-tag was added to the γ subunit of RNAP in Synechocystis and RNAPs were collected. The results revealed that all group 2 σ factors were recruited by RNAP in standard conditions, but recruitment of SigB and SigC increased in heat stress, SigD in bright light, SigE in darkness and SigB, SigC and SigE in high salt, explaining the poor acclimation of ΔsigBCDE to these stress conditions.

  7. Unusual ∆7,12,19 C35:3 Alkenone Produced by the Mutant Emiliania huxleyi strain CCMP2758 in Culture

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Y.; Huang, Y.; Zhang, Y.; Dillon, J. T.

    2015-12-01

    Alkenones with chain length ranging from C37 to C40 are highly specific biomarkers for certain haptophyte algae in ocean and lake sediments and have been widely used for paleoclimate studies. Short chain alkenones (e.g., C35 and C36) have been found in environmental and culture samples but the origin and structures of these compounds are not fully understood. The benchmark marine alkenone producer, Emiliania huxleyi CCMP2758 strain (the mutant of strain CCMP1742, NEPCC55a) was reported to make 35:2 alkenone when cultured at 15 °C (Prahl et al., 2006). Here we show, when this strain is cultured at lower temperatures (e.g., 4°C), CCMP2758 produces large amount of 35:3 alkenone with unusual double bond positions of ∆7,12,19. We determined the double bond positions of the C35:3 methyl ketonee based on GC-MS analysis of cyclobutylimine derivatives and dimethyl disulfide derivatives respectively, and provide the first temperature calibrations based on the unsaturation ratios of C35 alkenones. Previous studies have found 35:2 alkenone with three methylene interruption in the Black Sea sediment, but it is the first time that an alkenone with a mixed three and five methylene interruption is found. The discovery of short chain alkenones with unusual double bond positions may shed new light to alkenone biosynthesis.

  8. Gain/loss of poly(Glu50Tyr50)/poly(Glu60Ala30Tyr10) responsiveness in the bm12 mutant strain

    PubMed Central

    1982-01-01

    The development of inbred strains of mutant mice has proven useful in ascribing specific gene functions to particular genetic loci within the regions and subregions of the H-2 complex. The B6.C-H-2bm12 (bm12) strain is of particular interest in that, compared to parental C57Bl/6Kh (B6) mice, it bears a presumptive single gene mutation altering the Ab beta chain encoded by the I-A subregion. Our data show that bm12 mice have gained the ability to respond to poly(Glu50Tyr50)(GT) and have lost the ability to make plaque-forming cell or delayed-type hypersensitivity responses to the closely related copolymer, poly(Glu60Ala30Tyr10)(GAT), although retaining the ability to mount a GAT-specific T cell proliferative response. This is in sharp contrast to the parental B6 strain, which is a GT nonresponder and a GAT responder. Thus, this study is the first to report the establishment of responder status as a consequence of mutation. Possible mechanisms accounting for the gain/loss of GT/GAT responsiveness in the context of a two-step helper T cell model are discussed. PMID:7047670

  9. Vaccination with Brucella abortus rough mutant RB51 protects BALB/c mice against virulent strains of Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella ovis.

    PubMed Central

    Jiménez de Bagüés, M P; Elzer, P H; Jones, S M; Blasco, J M; Enright, F M; Schurig, G G; Winter, A J

    1994-01-01

    Vaccination of BALB/c mice with live Brucella abortus RB51, a stable rough mutant, produced protection against challenge with virulent strains of Brucella abortus, Brucella melitensis, and Brucella ovis. Passive-transfer experiments indicated that vaccinated mice were protected against B. abortus 2308 through cell-mediated immunity, against B. ovis PA through humoral immunity, and against B. melitensis 16M through both forms of immunity. Live bacteria were required for the induction of protective cell-mediated immunity; vaccination with whole killed cells of strain RB51 failed to protect mice against B. abortus 2308 despite development of good delayed-type hypersensitivity reactions. Protective antibodies against the heterologous species were generated in vaccinated mice primarily through anamnestic responses following challenge infections. Growth of the antigenically unrelated bacterium Listeria monocytogenes in the spleens of vaccinated mice indicated that nonspecific killing by residual activated macrophages contributed minimally to protection. These results encourage the continued investigation of strain RB51 as an alternative vaccine against heterologous Brucella species. However, its usefulness against B. ovis would be limited if, as suggested here, epitopes critical for protective cell-mediated immunity are not shared between B. abortus and B. ovis. Images PMID:7927779

  10. 2-DE based proteomic analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae wild and K+ transport-affected mutant (trk1,2) strains at the growth exponential and stationary phases.

    PubMed

    Curto, Miguel; Valledor, Luis; Navarrete, Clara; Gutiérrez, Dolores; Sychrova, Hana; Ramos, José; Jorrin, Jesús

    2010-11-10

    By using a 2-DE based workflow, the proteome of wild and potassium transport mutant trk1,2 under optimal growth potassium concentration (50mM) has been analyzed. At the exponential and stationary phases, both strains showed similar growth, morphology potassium content, and Vmax of rubidium transport, the only difference found being the Km values for this potassium analogue transport, higher for the mutant (20mM) than for the wild (3-6mM) cells. Proteins were buffer-extracted, precipitated, solubilized, quantified, and subjected to 2-DE analysis in the 5-8 pH range. More differences in protein content (37-64mgg(-1) cell dry weight) and number of resolved spots (178-307) were found between growth phases than between strains. In all, 164 spots showed no differences between samples and a total of 105 were considered to be differential after ANOVA test. 171 proteins, corresponding to 71 unique gene products have been identified, this set being dominated by cytosolic species and glycolitic enzymes. The ranking of the more abundant spots revealed no differences between samples and indicated fermentative metabolism, and active cell wall biosynthesis, redox homeostasis, biosynthesis of amino acids, coenzymes, nucleotides, and RNA, and protein turnover, apart from cell division and growth. PCA analysis allowed the separation of growth phases (PC1 and 2) and strains at the stationary phase (PC3 and 4), but not at the exponential one. These results are also supported by clustering analysis. As a general tendency, a number of spots newly appeared at the stationary phase in wild type, and to a lesser extent, in the mutant. These up-accumulated spots corresponded to glycolitic enzymes, indicating a more active glucose catabolism, accompanied by an accumulation of methylglyoxal detoxification, and redox-homeostasis enzymes. Also, more extensive proteolysis was observed at the stationary phase with this resulting in an accumulation of low Mr protein species. Copyright © 2010

  11. COMPASS: An Ada based scheduler

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcmahon, Mary Beth; Culbert, Chris

    1992-01-01

    COMPASS is a generic scheduling system developed by McDonnell Douglas and funded by the Software Technology Branch of NASA Johnson Space Center. The motivation behind COMPASS is to illustrate scheduling technology and provide a basis from which custom scheduling systems can be built. COMPASS was written in Ada to promote readability and to conform to DOD standards. COMPASS has some unique characteristics that distinguishes it from commercial products. This paper discusses these characteristics and uses them to illustrate some differences between scheduling tools.

  12. EXAFS of Klebsiella pneumoniae nitrogenase MoFe protein from wild-type and nif V mutant strains

    SciTech Connect

    Eidsness, M.K.; Flank, A.M.; Smith, B.E.; Flood, A.C.; Garner, C.D.; Cramer. S.P.

    1986-05-14

    The enzyme nitrogenase catalyzes the biological reduction of N/sub 2/ to NH/sub 3/. In Klebsiella pneumoniae a cluster of 17 genes in seven transcriptional units has been associated with nitrogen fixation. The nitrogenase enzyme from the nif V mutants is relatively ineffective at dinitrogen reduction, is more efficient than the wild-type enzyme at HCN reduction, and has its hydrogen evolution activity inhibited up to 80% by CO. This altered substrate specificity has been shown to be associated with the iron-molybdenum cofactor, FeMo-co, of the enzyme. X-ray absorption spectroscopy has been a valuable tool for probing the molybdenum environment of wild-type nitrogenase, and the authors report here similar studies on the Nif V/sup -/ enzyme.

  13. Progress in using mouse inbred strains, consomics, and mutants to identify genes related to stress, anxiety, and alcohol phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Goldowitz, Daniel; Matthews, Douglas B; Hamre, Kristin M; Mittleman, Guy; Chesler, Elissa J; Becker, Howard C; Lopez, Marcelo F; Jones, Sara R; Mathews, Tiffany A; Miles, Michael F; Kerns, Robnet; Grant, Kathleen A

    2006-06-01

    This article summarizes the proceedings of a symposium that took place at the 2005 meeting of the Research Society on Alcoholism. The organizers/chairs were Daniel Goldowitz and Katheen A. Grant. The presentations were as follows: (1) High-Throughput Screening for Ethanol Phenotypes, by Douglas B. Matthews and Kristin M. Hamre; (2) Genetic Basis of Schedule-Induced Polydipsia in Mice, by Guy Mittleman and Elissa J. Chesler; (3) Effects of Stress and Ethanol Dependence on Ethanol Self-administration in Inbred and Mutant Mice, by Howard C. Becker and Marcelo F. Lopez; (4) Changes in Dopaminergic Mechanisms Associated With Ethanol Dependence, by Sara R. Jones and Tiffany A. Mathews; and (5) Defining Brain Region-Specific Gene Networks Relevant to Ethanol Behaviors, by Michael F. Miles and Robnet Kerns.

  14. Analysis of Ada as a prototyping language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holloway, C. Michael

    1987-01-01

    This paper examines the suitability of Ada as a language for developing software prototypes. The differences between software prototypes and traditional engineering prototypes are discussed; the approaches to software prototyping are identified. Ada's potential as a language for prototyping is evaluated according to the writability, expressiveness, and flexibility of the language; Ada is found to be inadequate as a prototyping language because it lacks writability and expressiveness. Possible approaches to improving the expressiveness of the language are discussed.

  15. C Language Integrated Production System, Ada Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbert, Chris; Riley, Gary; Savely, Robert T.; Melebeck, Clovis J.; White, Wesley A.; Mcgregor, Terry L.; Ferguson, Melisa; Razavipour, Reza

    1992-01-01

    CLIPS/Ada provides capabilities of CLIPS v4.3 but uses Ada as source language for CLIPS executable code. Implements forward-chaining rule-based language. Program contains inference engine and language syntax providing framework for construction of expert-system program. Also includes features for debugging application program. Based on Rete algorithm which provides efficient method for performing repeated matching of patterns. Written in Ada.

  16. C Language Integrated Production System, Ada Version

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Culbert, Chris; Riley, Gary; Savely, Robert T.; Melebeck, Clovis J.; White, Wesley A.; Mcgregor, Terry L.; Ferguson, Melisa; Razavipour, Reza

    1992-01-01

    CLIPS/Ada provides capabilities of CLIPS v4.3 but uses Ada as source language for CLIPS executable code. Implements forward-chaining rule-based language. Program contains inference engine and language syntax providing framework for construction of expert-system program. Also includes features for debugging application program. Based on Rete algorithm which provides efficient method for performing repeated matching of patterns. Written in Ada.

  17. Ada in Introductory Computer Science Courses

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    Sacred Heart University’s current computer science curriculum has been modified in the 1992-1993 school year after receiving an ARPA grant(Advanced...grant entitled Ada in Introductory Computer Science Course, allowed for the modification of both introductory programming courses to use Ada as the...introductory computer science courses CS050 (Introduction to Computer Science ) and CS051 (Data Structures) were developed to include Ada and software

  18. [Characteristics of the structural organization of the DIP1 gene in Drosophila melanogaster strains mutant for the flamenco gene].

    PubMed

    Nefedova, L N; Romanova, N I; Kim, A I

    2007-01-01

    Molecular cloning of the DIP1 gene located in the 20A4-5 region has been performed from the following strains with the flamenco phenotype: flamSS (SS) and flamMS (MS) characterized by a high transposition rate of retrotransposon gypsy (mdg4), flampy + (P) carrying the insertion of a construction based on the P element into the region of the flamenco gene, and flamenco+. The results of restriction analysis and sequencing cloned DNA fragments has shown that strains flamSS, flamMS, flampy +(P), and flamenco+ considerably differ from one another in the structure of DIP1. Strains flamss and flamMS have no Dral restriction site at position 1765 in the coding region of the gene, specifically, in the domain determining the signal of the nuclear localization of the DIP1 protein. This mutation has been found to consist in a nucleotide substitution in the recognition site of DraI restriction endonuclease, which is transformed from TTTAAA into TTTAAG and, hence, is not recognized by the enzyme. This substitution changes codon AAA into AAG and is translationally insignificant, because both triplets encode the same amino acid, lysine. The Dral gene of strainsflamSS andflamMS has been found to contain a 182-bp insertion denoted IdSS (insertion in DIP1 strain SS); it is located in the second intron of the gene. The IdSS sequence is part of the open reading frame encoding the putative transposase of the mobile genetic element HB1 belonging to the Tcl/mariner family. This insertion is presumed to disturb the conformations of DNA and the chromosome, in particular, by forming loops, which alters the expression of DIPI and, probably, neighboring genes. In strains flamenco+ and flampy + (P), the IdSS insertion within the HB1 sequence is deleted. The deletion encompasses five C-terminal amino acid residues of the conserved domain and the entire C-terminal region of the putative HB1 transposase. The obtained data suggest that DIP1 is involved in the control of gypsy transpositions either

  19. ART/Ada design project, phase 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    An Ada-Based Expert System Building Tool Design Research Project was conducted. The goal was to investigate various issues in the context of the design of an Ada-based expert system building tool. An attempt was made to achieve a comprehensive understanding of the potential for embedding expert systems in Ada systems for eventual application in future projects. The current status of the project is described by introducing an operational prototype, ART/Ada. How the project was conducted is explained. The performance of the prototype is analyzed and compared with other related works. Future research directions are suggested.

  20. An evaluation of Ada for Al applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wallace, David R.

    1986-01-01

    Expert system technology seems to be the most promising type of Artificial Intelligence (AI) application for Ada. An expert system implemented with an expert system shell provides a highly structured approach that fits well with the structured approach found in Ada systems. The current commercial expert system shells use Lisp. In this highly structured situation a shell could be built that used Ada just as well. On the other hand, if it is necessary to deal with some AI problems that are not suited to expert systems, the use of Ada becomes more problematical. Ada was not designed as an AI development language, and is not suited to that. It is possible that an application developed in say, Common Lisp could be translated to Ada for actual use in a particular application, but this could be difficult. Some standard Ada packages could be developed to make such a translation easier. If the most general AI programs need to be dealt with, a Common Lisp system integrated with the Ada Environment is probably necessary. Aside from problems with language features, Ada, by itself, is not well suited to the prototyping and incremental development that is well supported by Lisp.

  1. Genetic stability of A/Ann Arbor/6/60 cold-mutant (temperature-sensitive) live influenza virus genes: analysis by oligonucleotide mapping of recombinant vaccine strains before and after replication in volunteers.

    PubMed

    Cox, N J; Kendal, A P

    1984-02-01

    Ten cold-adapted (ca) recombinant influenza viruses that had been derived by reassortment between the ca temperature-sensitive (ts) A/Ann Arbor/6/60 mutant and selected wild-type viruses were examined by RNA oligonucleotide mapping for the presence or absence of several previously identified oligonucleotide markers. These markers comprise oligonucleotides that appeared only in the mutant donor strain after cold adaptation and other oligonucleotides present only in the parent A/Ann Arbor/6/60 wild-type virus. The markers in the mutant donor strain were transferred without change to the recombinant ca vaccine strains, and reversion causing a reappearance of markers for the wild-type A/Ann Arbor/6/60 virus did not occur. Furthermore, examination by oligonucleotide mapping of 10 isolates from vaccinated, seronegative children revealed a high degree of genetic stability of the viral genome; an oligonucleotide change was detected in only one of the 10 isolates examined.

  2. A competitive index assay identifies several Ralstonia solanacearum type III effector mutant strains with reduced fitness in host plants.

    PubMed

    Macho, Alberto P; Guidot, Alice; Barberis, Patrick; Beuzón, Carmen R; Genin, Stéphane

    2010-09-01

    Ralstonia solanacearum, the causal agent of bacterial wilt, is a soil bacterium which can naturally infect a wide range of host plants through the root system. Pathogenicity relies on a type III secretion system which delivers a large set of approximately 75 type III effectors (T3E) into plant cells. On several plants, pathogenicity assays based on quantification of wilting symptoms failed to detect a significant contribution of R. solanacearum T3E in this process, thus revealing the collective effect of T3E in pathogenesis. We developed a mixed infection-based method with R. solanacearum to monitor bacterial fitness in plant leaf tissues as a virulence assay. This accurate and sensitive assay provides evidence that growth defects can be detected for T3E mutants: we identified 12 genes contributing to bacterial fitness in eggplant leaves and 3 of them were also implicated in bacterial fitness on two other hosts, tomato and bean. Contribution to fitness of several T3E appears to be host specific, and we show that some known avirulence determinants such as popP2 or avrA do provide competitive advantages on some susceptible host plants. In addition, this assay revealed that the efe gene, which directs the production of ethylene by bacteria in plant tissues, and hdfB, involved in the biosynthesis of the secondary metabolite 3-hydroxy-oxindole, are also required for optimal growth in plant leaf tissues.

  3. Ada training evaluation and recommendations from the Gamma Ray Observatory Ada Development Team

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The Ada training experiences of the Gamma Ray Observatory Ada development team are related, and recommendations are made concerning future Ada training for software developers. Training methods are evaluated, deficiencies in the training program are noted, and a recommended approach, including course outline, time allocation, and reference materials, is offered.

  4. Ada training evaluation and recommendations from the Gamma Ray Observatory Ada Development Team

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1985-10-01

    The Ada training experiences of the Gamma Ray Observatory Ada development team are related, and recommendations are made concerning future Ada training for software developers. Training methods are evaluated, deficiencies in the training program are noted, and a recommended approach, including course outline, time allocation, and reference materials, is offered.

  5. Proceedings of the 2nd NASA Ada User's Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Several presentations, mostly in viewgraph form, on various topics relating to Ada applications are given. Topics covered include the use of Ada in NASA, Ada and the Space Station, the software support environment, Ada in the Software Engineering Laboratory, Ada at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the Flight Telerobotic Servicer, and lessons learned in prototyping the Space Station Remote Manipulator System control.

  6. Degradation of trichloroethylene by Pseudomonas cepacia G4 and the constitutive mutant strain G4 5223 PR1 in aquifer microcosms

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Krumme, M.L.; Timmis, K.N.; Dwyer, D.F.

    1993-01-01

    Pseudomonas cepacia G4 degrades trichloroethylene (TCE) via a degradation pathway for aromatic compounds which is induced by substrates such as phenol and tryptophan. P. cepacia G4 5223 PR1 (PR1) is a Tn5 insertion mutant which constitutively expresses the toluene ortho-monooxygenase responsible for TCE degradation. In groundwater microcosms, phenol-induced strain G4 and noninduced strain PR1 degraded TCE (20 and 50 microM) to nondetectable levels (< 0.1 microM) within 24 h at densities of 10(8) cells per ml; at lower densities, degradation of TCE was not observed after 48 h. In aquifer sediment microcosms, TCE was reduced from 60 to < 0.1 microM within 24 h at 5 x 10(8) PR1 organisms per g (wet weight) of sediment and from 60 to 26 microM over a period of 10 weeks at 5 x 10(7) PR1 organisms per g. Viable G4 and PR1 cells decreased from approximately 10(7) to 10(4) per g over the 10-week period.

  7. Mapping of internal monophosphate 5′ ends of Bacillus subtilis messenger RNAs and ribosomal RNAs in wild-type and ribonuclease-mutant strains

    PubMed Central

    DiChiara, Jeanne M.; Liu, Bo; Figaro, Sabine; Condon, Ciarán; Bechhofer, David H.

    2016-01-01

    The recent findings that the narrow-specificity endoribonuclease RNase III and the 5′ exonuclease RNase J1 are not essential in the Gram-positive model organism, Bacillus subtilis, facilitated a global analysis of internal 5′ ends that are generated or acted upon by these enzymes. An RNA-Seq protocol known as PARE (Parallel Analysis of RNA Ends) was used to capture 5′ monophosphorylated RNA ends in ribonuclease wild-type and mutant strains. Comparison of PARE peaks in strains with RNase III present or absent showed that, in addition to its well-known role in ribosomal (rRNA) processing, many coding sequences and intergenic regions appeared to be direct targets of RNase III. These target sites were, in most cases, not associated with a known antisense RNA. The PARE analysis also revealed an accumulation of 3′-proximal peaks that correlated with the absence of RNase J1, confirming the importance of RNase J1 in degrading RNA fragments that contain the transcription terminator structure. A significant result from the PARE analysis was the discovery of an endonuclease cleavage just 2 nts downstream of the 16S rRNA 3′ end. This latter observation begins to answer, at least for B. subtilis, a long-standing question on the exonucleolytic versus endonucleolytic nature of 16S rRNA maturation. PMID:26883633

  8. CMS-2 to Ada Translator Evaluation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-09-01

    these translators, and to provide information to CMS -2 project managers to assist them in the evaluation of costs and risks of translating CMS -2 to Ada....The objective of this evaluation was to determine the maturity of the CMS -2 to Ada translators and associated tools, to determine the capabilities of

  9. Learning Disabilities, Employment Discrimination, and the ADA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Peggy L.; And Others

    1995-01-01

    This article discusses aspects of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) which may be of particular interest to individuals with learning disabilities preparing for employment. Case studies are presented to illustrate applications of the ADA to typical workplace situations, and suggestions are given with regard to employment preparation…

  10. General-Purpose Ada Software Packages

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klumpp, Allan R.

    1991-01-01

    Collection of subprograms brings to Ada many features from other programming languages. All generic packages designed to be easily instantiated for types declared in user's facility. Most packages have widespread applicability, although some oriented for avionics applications. All designed to facilitate writing new software in Ada. Written on IBM/AT personal computer running under PC DOS, v.3.1.

  11. Paranoia.Ada: A diagnostic program to evaluate Ada floating-point arithmetic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hjermstad, Chris

    1986-01-01

    Many essential software functions in the mission critical computer resource application domain depend on floating point arithmetic. Numerically intensive functions associated with the Space Station project, such as emphemeris generation or the implementation of Kalman filters, are likely to employ the floating point facilities of Ada. Paranoia.Ada appears to be a valuabe program to insure that Ada environments and their underlying hardware exhibit the precision and correctness required to satisfy mission computational requirements. As a diagnostic tool, Paranoia.Ada reveals many essential characteristics of an Ada floating point implementation. Equipped with such knowledge, programmers need not tremble before the complex task of floating point computation.

  12. A small evaluation suite for Ada compilers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilke, Randy; Roy, Daniel M.

    1986-01-01

    After completing a small Ada pilot project (OCC simulator) for the Multi Satellite Operations Control Center (MSOCC) at Goddard last year, the use of Ada to develop OCCs was recommended. To help MSOCC transition toward Ada, a suite of about 100 evaluation programs was developed which can be used to assess Ada compilers. These programs compare the overall quality of the compilation system, compare the relative efficiencies of the compilers and the environments in which they work, and compare the size and execution speed of generated machine code. Another goal of the benchmark software was to provide MSOCC system developers with rough timing estimates for the purpose of predicting performance of future systems written in Ada.

  13. The development of a program analysis environment for Ada: Reverse engineering tools for Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cross, James H., II

    1991-01-01

    The Graphical Representations of Algorithms, Structures, and Processes for Ada (GRASP/Ada) has successfully created and prototyped a new algorithm level graphical representation for Ada software, the Control Structure Diagram (CSD). The primary impetus for creation of the CSD was to improve the comprehension efficiency of Ada software and thus improve reliability and reduce costs. The emphasis was on the automatic generation of the CSD from Ada source code to support reverse engineering and maintenance. The CSD has the potential to replace traditional prettyprinted Ada source code. In Phase 1 of the GRASP/Ada project, the CSD graphical constructs were created and applied manually to several small Ada programs. A prototype (Version 1) was designed and implemented using FLEX and BISON running under the Virtual Memory System (VMS) on a VAX 11-780. In Phase 2, the prototype was improved and ported to the Sun 4 platform under UNIX. A user interface was designed and partially implemented. The prototype was applied successfully to numerous Ada programs ranging in size from several hundred to several thousand lines of source code. In Phase 3 of the project, the prototype was prepared for limited distribution (GRASP/Ada Version 3.0) to facilitate evaluation. The user interface was extensively reworked. The current prototype provides the capability for the user to generate CSD from Ada source code in a reverse engineering mode with a level of flexibility suitable for practical application.

  14. Towards a vaccine for attaching/effacing Escherichia coli: a LEE encoded regulator (ler) mutant of rabbit enteropathogenic Escherichia coli is attenuated, immunogenic, and protects rabbits from lethal challenge with the wild-type virulent strain.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Chengru; Feng, Shuzhang; Thate, Timothy E; Kaper, James B; Boedeker, Edgar C

    2006-05-01

    The ler (LEE encoded regulator) gene product is a central regulator for the genes encoded on the locus of enterocyte effacement (LEE) pathogenicity island of attaching/effacing (A/E) pathogens, including human enteropathogenic E. coli (EPEC) and enterohemorrhagic E. coli (EHEC) as well as animal isolates. Although an in vivo role for Ler in bacterial virulence has not been documented, we hypothesized that a Ler deletion mutant should be attenuated for virulence but might retain immunogenicity. The goals of this study were to genetically characterize ler of a rabbit EPEC (rEPEC) strain (O103:H2), to examine the effect of ler on in vivo virulence, and to determine if intragastric inoculation of an attenuated rEPEC ler mutant was immunogenic and could protect rabbits against subsequent challenge with the wild-type virulent parent strain. The predicted ler gene product of rEPEC strain O103:H2 shares high homology (over 95% amino acid identity) with the Lers of another rEPEC strain RDEC-1 (O15:H-) and human EPEC and EHEC. A defined internal ler deletion mutant of rEPEC O103:H2 showed reduced production of secreted proteins. Although orogastric inoculation of rabbits with the virulent parent O103:H2 strain induced severe diarrhea, significant weight loss and early mortality with adherent mucosal bacteria found at sacrifice, the isogeneic ler mutant strain was well tolerated. Animals gained weight and showed no clinical signs of disease. Examination of histological sections of intestinal segments revealed the absence of mucosal bacterial adherence. This result demonstrates an essential role for Ler in in vivo pathogenicity of A/E E. coli. Single dose orogastric immunization with the rEPEC ler mutant induced serum IgG antibody to whole bacteria (but not to intimin). Immunized animals were protected against enteric infection with the WT virulent parent strain exhibiting normal weight gain, absence of diarrhea and absence of mucosally adherent bacteria at sacrifice. Such

  15. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: New York University (NYU Ada/Ed) Compiler, Version 1.4 for VAX 11/780, Using VMS 3.5.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-08-10

    AB.ADA P CT=9 EC=1 B55AOK- ABADA CT= EC= B55AO1K-AB.ADA P CT=10 EC=1 B55AO1L-AB.ADA P CT=10 EC=1 B55AO1M-AB.ADA P CT: 15 EC=1 B55AO10-AB.ADA P CT=26 EC=1... ABADA CT= EC= B71001L-AB.ADA P CT=10 EC=4 B71001M-AB.ADA P CT:10 EC=1 B71001N-AB.ADA P CT:? EC=1 B71001O-AB.ADA P CT=6 EC=1 B71001P-AB.ADA P CT=8 EC:1

  16. Survey of Ada (Trademark)-Based PDLs (Program Design Language).

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-01-01

    4.0 Description of Ada-Based POLS 11 4.1 Summary Descriptions 11 4.2 Detailed Description of Ada-Based PDLs 23 4.2.1 ADA/SDP ( Mayda Software...discussed in Section 3.2. 4.2.1 ADA/SPD ( Mayda Software Engineering, IL Ltd.) ADA/SDP is based on an earlier non-Ada PDL called SOP and, as a result of...reaction of one group of Ada-based PDL developers, which includes TRW, IBM, and MAYDA , has been to impose Ada syntax on the PDL which has served the

  17. Bioconversion of Ferulic Acid into Vanillic Acid by Means of a Vanillate-Negative Mutant of Pseudomonas fluorescens Strain BF13

    PubMed Central

    Civolani, Claudio; Barghini, Paolo; Roncetti, Anna Rita; Ruzzi, Maurizio; Schiesser, Alma

    2000-01-01

    From a ferulic-acid-degrading Pseudomonas fluorescens strain (BF13), we have isolated a transposon mutant, which retained the ability to bioconvert ferulic acid into vanillic acid but lost the ability to further degrade the latter acid. The mutant, BF13-97, was very stable, and therefore it was suitable to be used as a biocatalyst for the preparative synthesis of vanillic acid from ferulic acid. By use of resting cells we determined the effect on the bioconversion rate of several parameters, such as the addition of nutritional factors, the concentration of the biomass, and the carbon source on which the biomass was grown. The optimal yield of vanillic acid was obtained with cells pregrown on M9 medium containing p-coumaric acid (0.1% [wt/vol]) as a sole carbon source and yeast extract (0.001% [wt/vol]) as a source of nutritional factors. Under these conditions, 1 mg (wet weight) of biomass produced 0.23 mg of vanillic acid per h. The genomic region of BF13-97 flanking the transposon's site of insertion was cloned and sequenced revealing two open reading frames of 1,062 (vanA) and 954 (vanB) bp, respectively. The van genes are organized in a cluster and encode the subunits of the vanillate-O-demethylase, which catalyzes the first step of the vanillate catabolism. Amino acid sequences deduced from vanA and vanB genes were shown to have high identity with known VanAs and VanBs from Pseudomonas and Acinetobacter spp. Highly conserved regions known to exist in class IA oxygenases were also found in the vanillate-O-demethylase components from P. fluorescens BF13. The terminal oxygenase VanA is characterized by a conserved Rieske-type [2Fe-2S]R ligand center. The reductase VanB contains a plant-type ferredoxin [2Fe-2S]Fd, flavin mononucleotide, and NAD-ribose binding domains which are located in its C-terminal and N-terminal halves, respectively. Transfer of wild-type vanAB genes to BF13-97 complemented this mutant, which recovered its ability to grow on either vanillic

  18. Development of an Ada programming support environment database SEAD (Software Engineering and Ada Database) administration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liaw, Morris; Evesson, Donna

    1988-01-01

    Software Engineering and Ada Database (SEAD) was developed to provide an information resource to NASA and NASA contractors with respect to Ada-based resources and activities which are available or underway either in NASA or elsewhere in the worldwide Ada community. The sharing of such information will reduce duplication of effort while improving quality in the development of future software systems. SEAD data is organized into five major areas: information regarding education and training resources which are relevant to the life cycle of Ada-based software engineering projects such as those in the Space Station program; research publications relevant to NASA projects such as the Space Station Program and conferences relating to Ada technology; the latest progress reports on Ada projects completed or in progress both within NASA and throughout the free world; Ada compilers and other commercial products that support Ada software development; and reusable Ada components generated both within NASA and from elsewhere in the free world. This classified listing of reusable components shall include descriptions of tools, libraries, and other components of interest to NASA. Sources for the data include technical newletters and periodicals, conference proceedings, the Ada Information Clearinghouse, product vendors, and project sponsors and contractors.

  19. Screening of High-Level 4-Hydroxy-2 (or 5)-Ethyl-5 (or 2)-Methyl-3(2H)-Furanone-Producing Strains from a Collection of Gene Deletion Mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, Jun; Akao, Takeshi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Mogi, Yoshinobu; Shimoi, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    4-Hydroxy-2 (or 5)-ethyl-5 (or 2)-methyl-3(2H)-furanone (HEMF) is an important flavor compound that contributes to the sensory properties of many natural products, particularly soy sauce and soybean paste. The compound exhibits a caramel-like aroma and several important physiological activities, such as strong antioxidant activity. HEMF is produced by yeast species in soy sauce manufacturing; however, the enzymes involved in HEMF production remain unknown, hindering efforts to breed yeasts with high-level HEMF production. In this study, we identified high-level HEMF-producing mutants among a Saccharomyces cerevisiae gene deletion mutant collection. Fourteen deletion mutants were screened as high-level HEMF-producing mutants, and the ADH1 gene deletion mutant (adh1Δ) exhibited the maximum HEMF production capacity. Further investigations of the adh1Δ mutant implied that acetaldehyde accumulation contributes to HEMF production, agreeing with previous findings. Therefore, acetaldehyde might be a precursor for HEMF. The ADH1 gene deletion mutant of Zygosaccharomyces rouxii, which is the dominant strain of yeast found during soy sauce fermentation, also produces HEMF effectively, suggesting that acetaldehyde accumulation might be a benchmark for breeding industrial yeasts with excellent HEMF production abilities. PMID:25362059

  20. Experiences with Ada in an embedded system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Labaugh, Robert J.

    1988-01-01

    Recent experiences with using Ada in a real time environment are described. The application was the control system for an experimental robotic arm. The objectives of the effort were to experiment with developing embedded applications in Ada, evaluating the suitability of the language for the application, and determining the performance of the system. Additional objectives were to develop a control system based on the NASA/NBS Standard Reference Model for Telerobot Control System Architecture (NASREM) in Ada, and to experiment with the control laws and how to incorporate them into the NASREM architecture.

  1. A distributed programming environment for Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brennan, Peter; Mcdonnell, Tom; Mcfarland, Gregory; Timmins, Lawrence J.; Litke, John D.

    1986-01-01

    Despite considerable commercial exploitation of fault tolerance systems, significant and difficult research problems remain in such areas as fault detection and correction. A research project is described which constructs a distributed computing test bed for loosely coupled computers. The project is constructing a tool kit to support research into distributed control algorithms, including a distributed Ada compiler, distributed debugger, test harnesses, and environment monitors. The Ada compiler is being written in Ada and will implement distributed computing at the subsystem level. The design goal is to provide a variety of control mechanics for distributed programming while retaining total transparency at the code level.

  2. Abest: The Ada - Based Expert System Tool

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Semeco, Antonio C.; Ho, David

    1987-05-01

    This article describes the design and implementation of ABEST, the ADA Based Expert System Tool. ABEST is a general purpose software tool intended for use in the development of expert system applications in an ADA environment. Since it may not be clear whether it is feasible (or even desirable) to use ADA in such applications, a discussion of the advantages and disadvantages of the language in that respect is included in the Introduction. An overview of ABEST follows, illustrating its main features through a sample application in digital circuit fault diagnosis. A discussion of planned enhancements and extensions is also provided.

  3. Development of an Ada package library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burton, Bruce; Broido, Michael

    1986-01-01

    A usable prototype Ada package library was developed and is currently being evaluated for use in large software development efforts. The library system is comprised of an Ada-oriented design language used to facilitate the collection of reuse information, a relational data base to store reuse information, a set of reusable Ada components and tools, and a set of guidelines governing the system's use. The prototyping exercise is discussed and the lessons learned from it have led to the definition of a comprehensive tool set to facilitate software reuse.

  4. Enzymes of the Entner-Doudoroff and pyruvate decarboxylation pathways in Zymomonas mobilis wild-type CP4 and mutant strains grown in continuous culture.

    PubMed

    Savvides, A L; Chalkou, K I; Typas, M A; Karagouni, A D

    2001-12-01

    The osmotolerant Zymomonas mobilis strain suc40, (containing plasmid pDS3154-inaZ), which is capable of producing simultaneously ethanol and ice nuclei protein, was cultivated in a chemically defined complete sucrose medium, as well as in a sugar beet molasses medium in continuous culture. The strain exhibited the normal Monod's relationship between biomass and dilution rate, and between growth substrate concentration and dilution rate. Specific activities of a number of enzymes that appear to control important steps in the metabolic flux of the Entner-Doudoroff and pyruvate decarboxylation pathways were investigated over a range of growth rates in steady state cultures. With the exception of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase and gluconate kinase, all of the enzymes exhibited a very similar pattern for the wild type Z. mobilis CP4 and for the osmotolerant mutants, independent of the media used; the enzyme patterns remained relatively constant over the studied growth range. The specific activity of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase was increased 2-fold by decreasing dilution rate in sugar beet molasses. The specific activity of gluconate kinase was 2-fold lower at medium growth rates compared with that at either low or high growth rates. Pyruvate kinase, pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase activities were significantly higher compared with those of the enzymes governing the early steps of the Entner-Doudoroff pathway. The present study, which was designed to determine the behaviour of important enzymes in sucrose metabolism of Z. mobilis suc40/pDS3154-inaZ grown in continuous culture showed that the microorganism required regulation of specific enzyme activities at the transcriptional level when sugar beet molasses were used as the growth medium.

  5. Hydrogen production by hup(-) mutant and wild-type strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus from dark fermentation effluent of sugar beet thick juice in batch and continuous photobioreactors.

    PubMed

    Uyar, Basar; Gürgan, Muazzez; Özgür, Ebru; Gündüz, Ufuk; Yücel, Meral; Eroglu, Inci

    2015-10-01

    Photofermentative production of hydrogen is a promising and sustainable process; however, it should be coupled to dark fermentation to become cost effective. In order to integrate dark fermentation and photofermentation, the suitability of dark fermenter effluents for the photofermentative hydrogen production must be demonstrated. In this study, thermophilic dark fermenter effluent (DFE) of sugar beet thick juice was used as a substrate in photofermentation process to compare wild-type and uptake hydrogenase-deficient (hup (-)) mutant strains of Rhodobacter capsulatus by means of hydrogen production and biomass growth. The tests were conducted in small-scale (50 mL) batch and large-scale (4 L) continuous photobioreactors in indoor conditions under continuous illumination. In small scale batch conditions, maximum cell concentrations were 0.92 gdcw/L c and 1.50 gdcw/L c, hydrogen yields were 34 % and 31 %, hydrogen productivities were 0.49 mmol/(L c·h) and 0.26 mmol/(Lc·h), for hup (-) and wild-type cells, respectively. In large-scale continuous conditions, maximum cell concentrations were 1.44 gdcw/L c and 1.87 gdcw/L c, hydrogen yields were 48 and 46 %, and hydrogen productivities were 1.01 mmol/(L c·h) and 1.05 mmol/(L c·h), for hup (-) and wild-type cells, respectively. Our results showed that Rhodobacter capsulatus hup (-) cells reached to a lower maximum cell concentration but their hydrogen yield and productivity were in the same range or superior compared to the wild-type cells in both batch and continuous operating modes. The maximum biomass concentration, yield and productivity of hydrogen were higher in continuous mode compared to the batch mode with both bacterial strains.

  6. The transcriptional landscape of the deep-sea bacterium Photobacterium profundum in both a toxR mutant and its parental strain

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The deep-sea bacterium Photobacterium profundum is an established model for studying high pressure adaptation. In this paper we analyse the parental strain DB110 and the toxR mutant TW30 by massively parallel cDNA sequencing (RNA-seq). ToxR is a transmembrane DNA-binding protein first discovered in Vibrio cholerae, where it regulates a considerable number of genes involved in environmental adaptation and virulence. In P. profundum the abundance and activity of this protein is influenced by hydrostatic pressure and its role is related to the regulation of genes in a pressure-dependent manner. Results To better characterize the ToxR regulon, we compared the expression profiles of wt and toxR strains in response to pressure changes. Our results revealed a complex expression pattern with a group of 22 genes having expression profiles similar to OmpH that is an outer membrane protein transcribed in response to high hydrostatic pressure. Moreover, RNA-seq allowed a deep characterization of the transcriptional landscape that led to the identification of 460 putative small RNA genes and the detection of 298 protein-coding genes previously unknown. We were also able to perform a genome-wide prediction of operon structure, transcription start and termination sites, revealing an unexpected high number of genes (992) with large 5′-UTRs, long enough to harbour cis-regulatory RNA structures, suggesting a correlation between intergenic region size and UTR length. Conclusion This work led to a better understanding of high-pressure response in P. profundum. Furthermore, the high-resolution RNA-seq analysis revealed several unexpected features about transcriptional landscape and general mechanisms of controlling bacterial gene expression. PMID:23107454

  7. Effect of multiple short highly energetic X-ray pulses on the synthesis of endoglucanase by a mutant strain of Trichoderma reesei-M7.

    PubMed

    Gemishev, Orlin; Zapryanov, Stanislav; Blagoev, Alexander; Markova, Maya; Savov, Valentin

    2014-09-03

    Bioconversion of cellulose-containing substrate to glucose represents an important area of modern biotechnology. Enzymes for the degradation of the polysaccharide part of biomass have been produced, mostly by fungi belonging to genus Trichoderma. Studies were carried out with the mutant strain Trichoderma reesei-M7, a cellulase producer. Spores of the enzyme producer were irradiated with different doses of characteristic X-ray radiation from metallic tungsten (mainly the W Kα1 and Kα2 lines) with a high dose rate. The latter is a specific property of the dense plasma focus (DPF) device, which has pulsed operation and thus gives short and highly energetic pulses of multiple types of rays and particles. In this case, we focused our study on the influence of hard X-rays. The doses of X-rays absorbed by the spores varied in the range of approximately 5-11,000 mSv measured with thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). The influence of the applied doses in combination with exceptionally high dose rates (in the order of tens of millisieverts per microsecond) on the activity of the produced endoglucanase, amount of biomass and extra-cellular protein, was studied in batch cultivation conditions. In the dose range of 200-1200 mSv, some enhancement of endoglucanase activity was obtained: around 18%-32%, despite the drop of the biomass amount, compared with the untreated material.

  8. High-yield production of aryl alcohol oxidase under limited growth conditions in small-scale systems using a mutant Aspergillus nidulans strain.

    PubMed

    Pardo-Planas, Oscar; Prade, Rolf A; Wilkins, Mark R

    2017-02-01

    Aryl alcohol oxidase (MtGloA) is an enzyme that belongs to the ligninolytic consortium and can play an important role in the bioenergy industry. This study investigated production of an MtGloA client enzyme by a mutant strain of Aspergillus nidulans unable to synthesize its own pyridoxine. Pyridoxine limitation can be used to control cell growth, diverting substrate to protein production. In agitated culture, enzyme production was similar when using media with 1 mg/L and without pyridoxine (26.64 ± 6.14 U/mg mycelia and 26.14 ± 8.39 U/mg mycelia using media with and without pyridoxine, respectively). However, the treatment lacking pyridoxine had to be supplemented with pyridoxine after 156 h of fermentation to sustain continued enzyme production. Use of extremely diluted pyridoxine levels allowed reduced fungal growth while maintaining steady enzyme production. Concentrations of 9 and 13.5 µg/L pyridoxine allowed MtGloA production with a growth rate of only 5% of that observed when using the standard 1 mg/L pyridoxine media.

  9. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: ROLM Ada Compiler, Version 4.42 V-002.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-12

    test. The name is interpreted as follows, where the first column below indicates the character position in the name and the second column , the...a class B test is indicated by EC. The results for each test file were as follows: B22001A.TST PS SC : 26 EC s 8 B22001B.TST PS SCx 8 EC- 3...43 -:C34001H-B.ADA P SC c 24 C3140011-8.ADA P SC z 29 C34001K-B.ADA P SCx 54 C34001L-8.ADA P SC = 48 C34001M-B.ADA P SC =28 C34001N-B.ADA P SC z 28

  10. Elevated levels of petite formation in strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae restored to respiratory competence. I. Association of both high and moderate frequencies of petite mutant formation with the presence of aberrant mitochondrial DNA.

    PubMed

    Evans, R J; Oakley, K M; Clark-Walker, G D

    1985-11-01

    When recently arisen spontaneous petite mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are crossed, respiratory competent diploids can be recovered. Such restored strains can be divided into two groups having sectored or unsectored colony morphology, the former being due to an elevated level of spontaneous petite mutation. On the basis of petite frequency, the sectored strains can be subdivided into those with a moderate frequency (5-16%) and those with a high frequency (greater than 60%) of petite formation. Each of the three categories of restored strains can be found on crossing two petites, suggesting either that the parental mutants contain a heterogeneous population of deleted mtDNAs at the time of mating or that different interactions can occur between the defective molecules. Restriction endonuclease analysis of mtDNA from restored strains that have a wild-type petite frequency showed that they had recovered a wild-type mtDNA fragmentation pattern. Conversely, all examined cultures from both categories of sectored strains contained aberrant mitochondrial genomes that were perpetuated without change over at least 200 generations. In addition, sectored colony siblings can have different aberrant mtDNAs. The finding that two sectored, restored strains from different crosses have identical but aberrant mtDNAs provides evidence for preferred deletion sites from the mitochondrial genome. Although it appears that mtDNAs from sectored strains invariably contain duplications, there is no apparent correlation between the size of the duplication and spontaneous petite frequency.

  11. Elevated Levels of Petite Formation in Strains of SACCHAROMYCES CEREVISIAE Restored to Respiratory Competence. I. Association of Both High and Moderate Frequencies of Petite Mutant Formation with the Presence of Aberrant Mitochondrial DNA

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R. J.; Oakley, K. M.; Clark-Walker, G. D.

    1985-01-01

    When recently arisen spontaneous petite mutants of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are crossed, respiratory competent diploids can be recovered. Such restored strains can be divided into two groups having sectored or unsectored colony morphology, the former being due to an elevated level of spontaneous petite mutation. On the basis of petite frequency, the sectored strains can be subdivided into those with a moderate frequency (5–16%) and those with a high frequency (>60%) of petite formation. Each of the three categories of restored strains can be found on crossing two petites, suggesting either that the parental mutants contain a heterogeneous population of deleted mtDNAs at the time of mating or that different interactions can occur between the defective molecules. Restriction endonuclease analysis of mtDNA from restored strains that have a wild-type petite frequency showed that they had recovered a wild-type mtDNA fragmentation pattern. Conversely, all examined cultures from both categories of sectored strains contained aberrant mitochondrial genomes that were perpetuated without change over at least 200 generations. In addition, sectored colony siblings can have different aberrant mtDNAs. The finding that two sectored, restored strains from different crosses have identical but aberrant mtDNAs provides evidence for preferred deletion sites from the mitochondrial genome. Although it appears that mtDNAs from sectored strains invariably contain duplications, there is no apparent correlation between the size of the duplication and spontaneous petite frequency. PMID:3902563

  12. Software engineering and Ada in design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oneill, Don

    1986-01-01

    Modern software engineering promises significant reductions in software costs and improvements in software quality. The Ada language is the focus for these software methodology and tool improvements. The IBM FSD approach, including the software engineering practices that guide the systematic design and development of software products and the management of the software process are examined. The revised Ada design language adaptation is revealed. This four level design methodology is detailed including the purpose of each level, the management strategy that integrates the software design activity with the program milestones, and the technical strategy that maps the Ada constructs to each level of design. A complete description of each design level is provided along with specific design language recording guidelines for each level. Finally, some testimony is offered on education, tools, architecture, and metrics resulting from project use of the four level Ada design language adaptation.

  13. Ada (Trade Name) Bibliography. Volume 1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-05-01

    A SOFTWARE TRANSITION TOOL FILIPSKI, GARY L.; MOORE, DONALD R.; NEWTON, JOHN E. DOCUMENT NUMBER: 3312 TYPE: JOURNAL ARTICLE ACM SIGPLAN NOTICES VOL 15...AGENCYARLINGTON,VA TRANSFORMATION OF ADA PROGRAMS INTO SILICON ORGANICK, DR. ELLIOTT I. ; LINDSTROM, GARY ; SMITH, D.K. ; SUBRAHMANYAM, T. CARTER; CARTER, T. M... GARY DOCUMENT NUMBER: 4104 TYPE: JOURNAL ARTICLE ACM ADA LETTERS VOL 2 ISSUE 1 PP. 33-49 This article discusses the design and development of the

  14. JOVIAL (J73) to Ada Translator.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-06-01

    untranslatable code and will venerate stub ,s for additional Ada code required bY the translated Program. F-5 JOVIAL TO ADA TRANSLATOR INVESTIGATION...completing the translation of a Program (manually translating or reProgramming the untranslatable Portions) would be much less than the time and... untranslatable constructs, the error detector is called by the parser to detect Problematical J73 constructs (see Appendix 1 of the Functional Description) and

  15. Real-Time Ada Problem Study

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-24

    define this set of problems. The authors were chosen because of their proven expertise in real-time development with Ada. They could enrich the results of...for Real-Time Embedded Systems". LabTek Corporation, the author , had proven expertise in embedded system design utilizing Motorola MC680XO- based...processors. The second report is entitledSoftware Enineering Problems Using Ada in Computers Integral to Weapons Systems. Its author , Sonicraft, had

  16. A W-Grammar Description for ADA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-12-01

    Language Reference Manual. In MT opinion, the W- gramars fall short of this goal since they are less readable than BNF for determining Ada’s syntax, and...37 Summary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .... . 39 V. Conclusion .. . . . . . . . . . .. . . .* . . . . 40 Ada Constructs Not Covered in W- gramar B...library unit. The problem with the Language Reference Manual description is not that BNF is too antiquated for language definition, but that English

  17. Ada programming guidelines for deterministic storage management

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Auty, David

    1988-01-01

    Previous reports have established that a program can be written in the Ada language such that the program's storage management requirements are determinable prior to its execution. Specific guidelines for ensuring such deterministic usage of Ada dynamic storage requirements are described. Because requirements may vary from one application to another, guidelines are presented in a most-restrictive to least-restrictive fashion to allow the reader to match appropriate restrictions to the particular application area under investigation.

  18. Ada developers' supplement to the recommended approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, Rush; Landis, Linda

    1993-01-01

    This document is a collection of guidelines for programmers and managers who are responsible for the development of flight dynamics applications in Ada. It is intended to be used in conjunction with the Recommended Approach to Software Development (SEL-81-305), which describes the software development life cycle, its products, reviews, methods, tools, and measures. The Ada Developers' Supplement provides additional detail on such topics as reuse, object-oriented analysis, and object-oriented design.

  19. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report: ROLM Ada Compiler, Version 4.52 V-003.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-06-03

    00 00:06 1 B97101C-AB.ADA P 11 00:00 00:04 1 89V1O1D- ABADA P 11 00:00 00:04 1 B97101E-AB.ADA P 13 00:01 00:04 4 B97102A-AB.ADA P 29 00:01 00:05 13... ABADA P 42 00:13 01:13 03:00 4 D55A03D-AB.ADA P 34 00:14 01:18 02:57 4 D55AO3E-AB.ADA P 53 00:22 01:25 02:36 3 D55AO3F-AB.ADA P 56 00:23 01:33 02:56 3...17 3 CC2002A-AB.ADA P 22 00:04 01:08 02:19 3 CC3004A-B.ADA P 28 00:07 01:16 02:20 2 CC3007A- ABADA P 53 00:11 01:32 02:22 2 CC 3011A... 5ADA P 60 00

  20. Parallel Ada benchmarks for the SVMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collard, Philippe E.

    1990-01-01

    The use of parallel processing paradigm to design and develop faster and more reliable computers appear to clearly mark the future of information processing. NASA started the development of such an architecture: the Spaceborne VHSIC Multi-processor System (SVMS). Ada will be one of the languages used to program the SVMS. One of the unique characteristics of Ada is that it supports parallel processing at the language level through the tasking constructs. It is important for the SVMS project team to assess how efficiently the SVMS architecture will be implemented, as well as how efficiently Ada environment will be ported to the SVMS. AUTOCLASS II, a Bayesian classifier written in Common Lisp, was selected as one of the benchmarks for SVMS configurations. The purpose of the R and D effort was to provide the SVMS project team with the version of AUTOCLASS II, written in Ada, that would make use of Ada tasking constructs as much as possible so as to constitute a suitable benchmark. Additionally, a set of programs was developed that would measure Ada tasking efficiency on parallel architectures as well as determine the critical parameters influencing tasking efficiency. All this was designed to provide the SVMS project team with a set of suitable tools in the development of the SVMS architecture.

  1. 49 CFR 37.125 - ADA paratransit eligibility: Process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false ADA paratransit eligibility: Process. 37.125... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Paratransit as a Complement to Fixed Route Service § 37.125 ADA... § 37.121 of this part shall establish a process for determining ADA paratransit eligibility. (a)...

  2. 49 CFR 37.123 - ADA paratransit eligibility: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false ADA paratransit eligibility: Standards. 37.123... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Paratransit as a Complement to Fixed Route Service § 37.123 ADA... complementary paratransit service shall provide the service to the ADA paratransit eligible...

  3. 49 CFR 37.123 - ADA paratransit eligibility: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false ADA paratransit eligibility: Standards. 37.123... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Paratransit as a Complement to Fixed Route Service § 37.123 ADA... complementary paratransit service shall provide the service to the ADA paratransit eligible...

  4. 49 CFR 37.123 - ADA paratransit eligibility: Standards.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false ADA paratransit eligibility: Standards. 37.123... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Paratransit as a Complement to Fixed Route Service § 37.123 ADA... complementary paratransit service shall provide the service to the ADA paratransit eligible...

  5. 49 CFR 37.125 - ADA paratransit eligibility: Process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false ADA paratransit eligibility: Process. 37.125... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Paratransit as a Complement to Fixed Route Service § 37.125 ADA... § 37.121 of this part shall establish a process for determining ADA paratransit eligibility. (a)...

  6. 49 CFR 37.125 - ADA paratransit eligibility: Process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false ADA paratransit eligibility: Process. 37.125... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Paratransit as a Complement to Fixed Route Service § 37.125 ADA... § 37.121 of this part shall establish a process for determining ADA paratransit eligibility. (a)...

  7. Toward the efficient implementation of expert systems in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, S. Daniel

    1990-01-01

    Here, the authors describe Ada language issues encountered during the development of ART-Ada, an expert system tool for Ada deployment. ART-Ada is being used to implement several expert system applications for the Space Station Freedom and the U.S. Air Force. Additional information is given on dynamic memory allocation.

  8. 49 CFR 37.125 - ADA paratransit eligibility: Process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false ADA paratransit eligibility: Process. 37.125... INDIVIDUALS WITH DISABILITIES (ADA) Paratransit as a Complement to Fixed Route Service § 37.125 ADA... § 37.121 of this part shall establish a process for determining ADA paratransit eligibility. (a)...

  9. Functional complementation of an Escherichia coli gap mutant supports an amphibolic role for NAD(P)-dependent glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase of Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803.

    PubMed Central

    Valverde, F; Losada, M; Serrano, A

    1997-01-01

    The gap-2 gene, encoding the NAD(P)-dependent D-glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH2) of the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. strain PCC 6803, was cloned by functional complementation of an Escherichia coli gap mutant with a genomic DNA library; this is the first time that this cloning strategy has been used for a GAPDH involved in photosynthetic carbon assimilation. The Synechocystis DNA region able to complement the E. coli gap mutant was narrowed down to 3 kb and fully sequenced. A single complete open reading frame of 1,011 bp encoding a protein of 337 amino acids was found and identified as the putative gap-2 gene identified in the complete genome sequence of this organism. Determination of the transcriptional start point, identification of putative promoter and terminator sites, and orientation of the truncated flanking genes suggested the gap-2 transcript should be monocystronic, a possibility further confirmed by Northern blot studies. Both natural and recombinant homotetrameric GAPDH2s were purified and found to exhibit virtually identical physicochemical and kinetic properties. The recombinant GAPDH2 showed the dual pyridine nucleotide specificity characteristic of the native cyanobacterial enzyme, and similar ratios of NAD- to NADP-dependent activities were found in cell extracts from Synechocystis as well as in those from the complemented E. coli clones. The deduced amino acid sequence of Synechocystis GAPDH2 presented a high degree of identity with sequences of the chloroplastic NADP-dependent enzymes. In agreement with this result, immunoblot analysis using monospecific antibodies raised against GAPDH2 showed the presence of the 38-kDa GAPDH subunit not only in crude extracts from the gap-2-expressing E. coli clones and all cyanobacteria that were tested but also in those from eukaryotic microalgae and plants. Western and Northern blot experiments showed that gap-2 is conspicuously expressed, although at different levels, in Synechocystis

  10. An Embedded Rule-Based Diagnostic Expert System in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Robert E.; Liberman, Eugene M.

    1992-01-01

    Ada is becoming an increasingly popular programming language for large Government-funded software projects. Ada with it portability, transportability, and maintainability lends itself well to today's complex programming environment. In addition, expert systems have also assumed a growing role in providing human-like reasoning capability expertise for computer systems. The integration is discussed of expert system technology with Ada programming language, especially a rule-based expert system using an ART-Ada (Automated Reasoning Tool for Ada) system shell. NASA Lewis was chosen as a beta test site for ART-Ada. The test was conducted by implementing the existing Autonomous Power EXpert System (APEX), a Lisp-based power expert system, in ART-Ada. Three components, the rule-based expert systems, a graphics user interface, and communications software make up SMART-Ada (Systems fault Management with ART-Ada). The rules were written in the ART-Ada development environment and converted to Ada source code. The graphics interface was developed with the Transportable Application Environment (TAE) Plus, which generates Ada source code to control graphics images. SMART-Ada communicates with a remote host to obtain either simulated or real data. The Ada source code generated with ART-Ada, TAE Plus, and communications code was incorporated into an Ada expert system that reads the data from a power distribution test bed, applies the rule to determine a fault, if one exists, and graphically displays it on the screen. The main objective, to conduct a beta test on the ART-Ada rule-based expert system shell, was achieved. The system is operational. New Ada tools will assist in future successful projects. ART-Ada is one such tool and is a viable alternative to the straight Ada code when an application requires a rule-based or knowledge-based approach.

  11. Viability of HEK 293 cells on poly-β-hydroxybutyrate (PHB) biosynthesized from a mutant Azotobacter vinelandii strain. Cast film and electrospun scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Romo-Uribe, Angel; Meneses-Acosta, Angelica; Domínguez-Díaz, Maraolina

    2017-12-01

    Sterilization, cytotoxicity and cell viability are essential properties defining a material for medical applications and these characteristics were investigated for poly(β-hydroxybutyrate) (PHB) of 230kDa obtained by bacterial synthesis from a mutant strain of Azotobacter vinelandii. Cell viability was investigated for two types of PHB scaffolds, solution cast films and non-woven electrospun fibrous membranes, and the efficiency was compared against a culture dish. The biosynthesized PHB was sterilized by ultraviolet radiation and autoclave, it was found that the thermal properties and intrinsic viscosity remained unchanged indicating that the sterilization methods did not degrade the polymer. Sterilized scaffolds were then seeded with human embryonic kidney 293 (HEK 293) cells to evaluate the cytotoxic response. The cell viability of these cells was evaluated for up to six days, and the results showed that the cell morphology was normal, with no cytotoxic effects. The films and electrospun membranes exhibited over 95% cell viability whereas the viability in culture dishes reached only ca. 90%. The electrospun membrane, however, exhibited significantly higher cell density than the cast film suggesting that the fibrous morphology enables better nutrients transfer. The results indicate that the biosynthesized PHB stands UV and autoclave sterilization methods, it is biocompatible and non-toxic for cell growth of human cell lines. Furthermore, cell culture for up to 18 days showed that 62% and 90% of mass was lost for the film and fibrous electrospun scaffold, respectively. This is a favorable outcome for use in tissue engineering where material degradation, as tissue regenerates, is desirable. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Ada Run Time Support Environments and a common APSE Interface Set. [Ada Programming Support Environment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mckay, C. W.; Bown, R. L.

    1985-01-01

    The paper discusses the importance of linking Ada Run Time Support Environments to the Common Ada Programming Support Environment (APSE) Interface Set (CAIS). A non-stop network operating systems scenario is presented to serve as a forum for identifying the important issues. The network operating system exemplifies the issues involved in the NASA Space Station data management system.

  13. Microevolution of the Chromosomal Region of Acute Disease Antigen A (adaA) in the Query (Q) Fever Agent Coxiella burnetii

    PubMed Central

    Frangoulidis, Dimitrios; Splettstoesser, Wolf D.; Landt, Olfert; Dehnhardt, Jasmin; Henning, Klaus; Hilbert, Angela; Bauer, Tilman; Antwerpen, Markus; Meyer, Hermann

    2013-01-01

    The acute disease antigen A (adaA) gene is believed to be associated with Coxiella burnetii strains causing acute Q fever. The detailed analysis of the adaA genomic region of 23 human- and 86 animal-derived C. burnetii isolates presented in this study reveals a much more polymorphic appearance and distribution of the adaA gene, resulting in a classification of C. burnetii strains of better differentiation than previously anticipated. Three different genomic variants of the adaA gene were identified which could be detected in isolates from acute and chronic patients, rendering the association of adaA positive strains with acute Q fever disease disputable. In addition, all adaA positive strains in humans and animals showed the occurrence of the QpH1 plasmid. All adaA positive isolates of acute human patients except one showed a distinct SNP variation at position 431, also predominant in sheep strains, which correlates well with the observation that sheep are a major source of human infection. Furthermore, the phylogenetic analysis of the adaA gene revealed three deletion events and supported the hypothesis that strain Dugway 5J108-111 might be the ancestor of all known C. burnetii strains. Based on our findings, we could confirm the QpDV group and we were able to define a new genotypic cluster. The adaA gene polymorphisms shown here improve molecular typing of Q fever, and give new insights into microevolutionary adaption processes in C. burnetii. PMID:23301072

  14. O-Antigen-Deficient Francisella tularensis Live Vaccine Strain Mutants Are Ingested via an Aberrant Form of Looping Phagocytosis and Show Altered Kinetics of Intracellular Trafficking in Human Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bai-Yu; Horwitz, Marcus A.

    2012-01-01

    We examined the uptake and intracellular trafficking of F. tularensis Live Vaccine Strain (LVS) and LVS with disruptions of wbtDEF and wbtI genes essential for synthesis of the O antigen of lipopolysaccharide. Unlike parental bacteria, O-antigen-deficient LVS is efficiently killed by serum with intact complement but not by serum lacking terminal complement components. Opsonization of O-antigen-deficient LVS in serum lacking terminal complement components allows efficient uptake of these live bacteria by macrophages. In the presence of complement, whereas parental F. tularensis LVS is internalized within spacious pseudopod loops, mutant LVS is internalized within tightly juxtaposed multiple onion-like layers of pseudopodia. Without complement, both parental and mutant LVSs are internalized within spacious pseudopod loops. Thus, molecules other than O antigen are important in triggering dramatic pseudopod extensions and uptake by spacious pseudopod loops. Following uptake, both parental and mutant LVSs enter compartments that show limited staining for the lysosomal membrane glycoprotein CD63 and little fusion with secondary lysosomes. Subsequently, both parental and mutant LVSs lose their CD63 staining. Whereas the majority of parental LVS escapes into the cytosol by 6 h after uptake, mutant LVS shows a marked lag but does escape by 1 day after uptake. Despite the altered kinetics of phagosome escape, both mutant and parental strains grow to high levels within human macrophages. Thus, the O antigen plays a role in the morphology of uptake in the presence of complement and the kinetics of intracellular growth but is not essential for escape, survival, altered membrane trafficking, or intramacrophage growth. PMID:22202123

  15. Proceedings of the First NASA Ada Users' Symposium

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1988-01-01

    Ada has the potential to be a part of the most significant change in software engineering technology within NASA in the last twenty years. Thus, it is particularly important that all NASA centers be aware of Ada experience and plans at other centers. Ada activity across NASA are covered, with presenters representing five of the nine major NASA centers and the Space Station Freedom Program Office. Projects discussed included - Space Station Freedom Program Office: the implications of Ada on training, reuse, management and the software support environment; Johnson Space Center (JSC): early experience with the use of Ada, software engineering and Ada training and the evaluation of Ada compilers; Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC): university research with Ada and the application of Ada to Space Station Freedom, the Orbital Maneuvering Vehicle, the Aero-Assist Flight Experiment and the Secure Shuttle Data System; Lewis Research Center (LeRC): the evolution of Ada software to support the Space Station Power Management and Distribution System; Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL): the creation of a centralized Ada development laboratory and current applications of Ada including the Real-time Weather Processor for the FAA; and Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC): experiences with Ada in the Flight Dynamics Division and the Extreme Ultraviolet Explorer (EUVE) project and the implications of GSFC experience for Ada use in NASA. Despite the diversity of the presentations, several common themes emerged from the program: Methodology - NASA experience in general indicates that the effective use of Ada requires modern software engineering methodologies; Training - It is the software engineering principles and methods that surround Ada, rather than Ada itself, which requires the major training effort; Reuse - Due to training and transition costs, the use of Ada may initially actually decrease productivity, as was clearly found at GSFC; and real-time work at LeRC, JPL and GSFC shows

  16. An Ada inference engine for expert systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lavallee, David B.

    1986-01-01

    The purpose is to investigate the feasibility of using Ada for rule-based expert systems with real-time performance requirements. This includes exploring the Ada features which give improved performance to expert systems as well as optimizing the tradeoffs or workarounds that the use of Ada may require. A prototype inference engine was built using Ada, and rule firing rates in excess of 500 per second were demonstrated on a single MC68000 processor. The knowledge base uses a directed acyclic graph to represent production lines. The graph allows the use of AND, OR, and NOT logical operators. The inference engine uses a combination of both forward and backward chaining in order to reach goals as quickly as possible. Future efforts will include additional investigation of multiprocessing to improve performance and creating a user interface allowing rule input in an Ada-like syntax. Investigation of multitasking and alternate knowledge base representations will help to analyze some of the performance issues as they relate to larger problems.

  17. Physiological consequences of mitochondrial antibiotic-resistant mutations in Paramecium: growth-rates, cytochromic defects and cyanide-insensitive respiration of mutant and erythromycin-treated wild-type strains.

    PubMed

    Adoutte, A; Doussiere, J

    1978-05-03

    A set of mitochondrial antibiotic-resistant mutants of Paramecium have been analyzed with respect to their growth-rates, cytochromic content and respiratory properties. The mutants could be arranged in a continuous series ranging from strains equivalent to wild-type to severely affected ones; affected strains display longer generation times, reduced amount of cytochrome oxidase and very high levels of cyanideinsensitive respiration. Perfect phenocopies of the mutants were obtained by treating wild-type cells with low concentrations of erythromycin suggesting that the mutations exert their pleiotropic effect by perturbating mitochondria protein synthesis in agreement with the idea that these mutations affect the mitochondrial ribosomes. In the mitochondria of some of the mutants, electrons can be channelled with equal efficiency into the "classical" cyanide-sensitive pathway and the alternate cyanide insensitive (and SHAM-sensitive) one, providing direct demonstration of the branching of these two respiratory pathways. In the absence of any added inhibitor, however, electrons tend to be channelled in the cyanide-sensitive pathway. All the physiological data fit perfectly the genetic data concerning the "stability" of the various mutations in "mixed mitochondrial populations", i.e., markers that were known to be strongly counter-selected with respect to wild-type in such populations correspond to severely affected strains, while markers that were known to be "stable" correspond to "healthy" strains. A more quantitative analysis of the data shows that that there is little or no "complementation" between wild-type and mutated mitochondria in mixed cells indicating a high extent of functional autonomy of mitochondria in Paramecium.

  18. Effect of Trehalose and Trehalose Transport on the Tolerance of Clostridium perfringens to Environmental Stress in a Wild Type Strain and Its Fluoroquinolone-Resistant Mutant

    PubMed Central

    Park, Miseon; Mitchell, Wilfrid J.

    2016-01-01

    Trehalose has been shown to protect bacterial cells from environmental stress. Its uptake and osmoprotective effect in Clostridium perfringens were investigated by comparing wild type C. perfringens ATCC 13124 with a fluoroquinolone- (gatifloxacin-) resistant mutant. In a chemically defined medium, trehalose and sucrose supported the growth of the wild type but not that of the mutant. Microarray data and qRT-PCR showed that putative genes for the phosphorylation and transport of sucrose and trehalose (via phosphoenolpyruvate-dependent phosphotransferase systems, PTS) and some regulatory genes were downregulated in the mutant. The wild type had greater tolerance than the mutant to salts and low pH; trehalose and sucrose further enhanced the osmotolerance of the wild type to NaCl. Expression of the trehalose-specific PTS was lower in the fluoroquinolone-resistant mutant. Protection of C. perfringens from environmental stress could therefore be correlated with the ability to take up trehalose. PMID:28058047

  19. Polymorphic Variation in Susceptibility and Metabolism of Triclosan-Resistant Mutants of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae Clinical Strains Obtained after Exposure to Biocides and Antibiotics

    PubMed Central

    Curiao, Tânia; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco R.; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to biocides may result in cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Changes in biocide and antibiotic susceptibilities, metabolism, and fitness costs were studied here in biocide-selected Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants. E. coli and K. pneumoniae mutants with various degrees of triclosan susceptibility were obtained after exposure to triclosan (TRI), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC), and ampicillin or ciprofloxacin. Alterations in antimicrobial susceptibility and metabolism in mutants were tested using Phenotype MicroArrays. The expression of AcrAB pump and global regulators (SoxR, MarA, and RamA) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the central part of the fabI gene was sequenced. The fitness costs of resistance were assessed by a comparison of relative growth rates. Triclosan-resistant (TRIr) and triclosan-hypersusceptible (TRIhs) mutants of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were obtained after selection with biocides and/or antibiotics. E. coli TRIr mutants, including those with mutations in the fabI gene or in the expression of acrB, acrF, and marA, exhibited changes in susceptibility to TRI, CHX, and antibiotics. TRIr mutants for which the TRI MIC was high presented improved metabolism of carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. In TRIr mutants, resistance to one antimicrobial provoked hypersusceptibility to another one(s). TRIr mutants had fitness costs, particularly marA-overexpressing (E. coli) or ramA-overexpressing (K. pneumoniae) mutants. TRI, BKC, and CIP exposure frequently yielded TRIr mutants exhibiting alterations in AraC-like global regulators (MarA, SoxR, and RamA), AcrAB-TolC, and/or FabI, and influencing antimicrobial susceptibility, fitness, and metabolism. These various phenotypes suggest a trade-off of different selective processes shaping the evolution toward antibiotic/biocide resistance and influencing other adaptive traits. PMID

  20. Atomic Data and Modelling for Fusion: the ADAS Project

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Summers, H. P.; O'Mullane, M. G.

    2011-05-01

    The paper is an update on the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure, ADAS, since ICAM-DATA06 and a forward look to its evolution in the next five years. ADAS is an international project supporting principally magnetic confinement fusion research. It has participant laboratories throughout the world, including ITER and all its partner countries. In parallel with ADAS, the ADAS-EU Project provides enhanced support for fusion research at Associated Laboratories and Universities in Europe and ITER. OPEN-ADAS, sponsored jointly by the ADAS Project and IAEA, is the mechanism for open access to principal ADAS atomic data classes and facilitating software for their use. EXTENDED-ADAS comprises a variety of special, integrated application software, beyond the purely atomic bounds of ADAS, tuned closely to specific diagnostic analyses and plasma models. The current scientific content and scope of these various ADAS and ADAS related activities are briefly reviewed. These span a number of themes including heavy element spectroscopy and models, charge exchange spectroscopy, beam emission spectroscopy and special features which provide a broad baseline of atomic modelling and support. Emphasis will be placed on `lifting the fundamental data baseline'—a principal ADAS task for the next few years. This will include discussion of ADAS and ADAS-EU coordinated and shared activities and some of the methods being exploited.

  1. Atomic Data and Modelling for Fusion: the ADAS Project

    SciTech Connect

    Summers, H. P.; O'Mullane, M. G.

    2011-05-11

    The paper is an update on the Atomic Data and Analysis Structure, ADAS, since ICAM-DATA06 and a forward look to its evolution in the next five years. ADAS is an international project supporting principally magnetic confinement fusion research. It has participant laboratories throughout the world, including ITER and all its partner countries. In parallel with ADAS, the ADAS-EU Project provides enhanced support for fusion research at Associated Laboratories and Universities in Europe and ITER. OPEN-ADAS, sponsored jointly by the ADAS Project and IAEA, is the mechanism for open access to principal ADAS atomic data classes and facilitating software for their use. EXTENDED-ADAS comprises a variety of special, integrated application software, beyond the purely atomic bounds of ADAS, tuned closely to specific diagnostic analyses and plasma models.The current scientific content and scope of these various ADAS and ADAS related activities are briefly reviewed. These span a number of themes including heavy element spectroscopy and models, charge exchange spectroscopy, beam emission spectroscopy and special features which provide a broad baseline of atomic modelling and support. Emphasis will be placed on 'lifting the fundamental data baseline'--a principal ADAS task for the next few years. This will include discussion of ADAS and ADAS-EU coordinated and shared activities and some of the methods being exploited.

  2. A database management capability for Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chan, Arvola; Danberg, SY; Fox, Stephen; Landers, Terry; Nori, Anil; Smith, John M.

    1986-01-01

    The data requirements of mission critical defense systems have been increasing dramatically. Command and control, intelligence, logistics, and even weapons systems are being required to integrate, process, and share ever increasing volumes of information. To meet this need, systems are now being specified that incorporate data base management subsystems for handling storage and retrieval of information. It is expected that a large number of the next generation of mission critical systems will contain embedded data base management systems. Since the use of Ada has been mandated for most of these systems, it is important to address the issues of providing data base management capabilities that can be closely coupled with Ada. A comprehensive distributed data base management project has been investigated. The key deliverables of this project are three closely related prototype systems implemented in Ada. These three systems are discussed.

  3. Ada Programming for Solving Nonlinear Equations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Trong

    This paper introduces the Ada programming for solving non-linear equations over a new class of real numbers which are based on the concepts of model numbers and rough numbers for a given computer system. We will study structures of Ada interval computation over model numbers and rough numbers. To do these, we must revise commonly interval computation from compact intervals to closed-open intervals for their initial intervals. This way, we can promise that the final resulting interval will always be a shorter than the result from the ordinary interval computation. Two examples are presented, one is use Newton method and the other is apply iterative method for solving non-line equations. The Ada programs and their the approximated solutions are given in both decimal and binary values.

  4. Ada software productivity prototypes: A case study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hihn, Jairus M.; Habib-Agahi, Hamid; Malhotra, Shan

    1988-01-01

    A case study of the impact of Ada on a Command and Control project completed at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) is given. The data for this study was collected as part of a general survey of software costs and productivity at JPL and other NASA sites. The task analyzed is a successful example of the use of rapid prototyping as applied to command and control for the U.S. Air Force and provides the U.S. Air Force Military Airlift Command with the ability to track aircraft, air crews and payloads worldwide. The task consists of a replicated database at several globally distributed sites. The local databases at each site can be updated within seconds after changes are entered at any one site. The system must be able to handle up to 400,000 activities per day. There are currently seven sites, each with a local area network of computers and a variety of user displays; the local area networks are tied together into a single wide area network. Using data obtained for eight modules, totaling approximately 500,000 source lines of code, researchers analyze the differences in productivities between subtasks. Factors considered are percentage of Ada used in coding, years of programmer experience, and the use of Ada tools and modern programming practices. The principle findings are the following. Productivity is very sensitive to programmer experience. The use of Ada software tools and the use of modern programming practices are important; without such use Ada is just a large complex language which can cause productivity to decrease. The impact of Ada on development effort phases is consistent with earlier reports at the project level but not at the module level.

  5. ADA Integrated Environment I. System Specification.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-12-01

    returned. UNCLASSIFIED SECt AITY CLASSIFICATION O r THiS PAGE ("On’ Dese ,9nA.,d)l ,_ REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE BEFO scOL’No RM 1. RqEPl~ORT, NUM1191N 2...statements, symbols, names, etc.; 2. build and develop (and maintain) Ada programs by linking (and maintaining) collections of separate Ada...program build by selecting a consistent set of library units for input to the Linker. Only those units actually used shall be included; 22 INTERMETRICS

  6. Knowledge representation into Ada parallel processing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masotto, Tom; Babikyan, Carol; Harper, Richard

    1990-01-01

    The Knowledge Representation into Ada Parallel Processing project is a joint NASA and Air Force funded project to demonstrate the execution of intelligent systems in Ada on the Charles Stark Draper Laboratory fault-tolerant parallel processor (FTPP). Two applications were demonstrated - a portion of the adaptive tactical navigator and a real time controller. Both systems are implemented as Activation Framework Objects on the Activation Framework intelligent scheduling mechanism developed by Worcester Polytechnic Institute. The implementations, results of performance analyses showing speedup due to parallelism and initial efficiency improvements are detailed and further areas for performance improvements are suggested.

  7. Formal specification and verification of Ada software

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hird, Geoffrey R.

    1991-01-01

    The use of formal methods in software development achieves levels of quality assurance unobtainable by other means. The Larch approach to specification is described, and the specification of avionics software designed to implement the logic of a flight control system is given as an example. Penelope is described which is an Ada-verification environment. The Penelope user inputs mathematical definitions, Larch-style specifications and Ada code and performs machine-assisted proofs that the code obeys its specifications. As an example, the verification of a binary search function is considered. Emphasis is given to techniques assisting the reuse of a verification effort on modified code.

  8. Ada in AI or AI in Ada. On developing a rationale for integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Collard, Philippe E.; Goforth, Andre

    1988-01-01

    The use of Ada as an Artificial Intelligence (AI) language is gaining interest in the NASA Community, i.e., by parties who have a need to deploy Knowledge Based-Systems (KBS) compatible with the use of Ada as the software standard for the Space Station. A fair number of KBS and pseudo-KBS implementations in Ada exist today. Currently, no widely used guidelines exist to compare and evaluate these with one another. The lack of guidelines illustrates a fundamental problem inherent in trying to compare and evaluate implementations of any sort in languages that are procedural or imperative in style, such as Ada, with those in languages that are functional in style, such as Lisp. Discussed are the strengths and weakness of using Ada as an AI language and a preliminary analysis provided of factors needed for the development of criteria for the integration of these two families of languages and the environments in which they are implemented. The intent for developing such criteria is to have a logical rationale that may be used to guide the development of Ada tools and methodology to support KBS requirements, and to identify those AI technology components that may most readily and effectively be deployed in Ada.

  9. Gamma ray observatory dynamics simulator in Ada (GRODY)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1990-01-01

    This experiment involved the parallel development of dynamics simulators for the Gamma Ray Observatory in both FORTRAN and Ada for the purpose of evaluating the applicability of Ada to the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's flight dynamics environment. The experiment successfully demonstrated that Ada is a viable, valuable technology for use in this environment. In addition to building a simulator, the Ada team evaluated training approaches, developed an Ada methodology appropriate to the flight dynamics environment, and established a baseline for evaluating future Ada projects.

  10. Gamma ray observatory dynamics simulator in Ada (GRODY)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-09-01

    This experiment involved the parallel development of dynamics simulators for the Gamma Ray Observatory in both FORTRAN and Ada for the purpose of evaluating the applicability of Ada to the NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center's flight dynamics environment. The experiment successfully demonstrated that Ada is a viable, valuable technology for use in this environment. In addition to building a simulator, the Ada team evaluated training approaches, developed an Ada methodology appropriate to the flight dynamics environment, and established a baseline for evaluating future Ada projects.

  11. Characterization of Mutants Deficient in the l,d-Carboxypeptidase (DacB) and WalRK (VicRK) Regulon, Involved in Peptidoglycan Maturation of Streptococcus pneumoniae Serotype 2 Strain D39▿†

    PubMed Central

    Barendt, Skye M.; Sham, Lok-To; Winkler, Malcolm E.

    2011-01-01

    Peptidoglycan (PG) hydrolases play critical roles in the remodeling of bacterial cell walls during division. PG hydrolases have been studied extensively in several bacillus species, such as Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis, but remain relatively uncharacterized in ovococcus species, such as Streptococcus pneumoniae (pneumococcus). In this work, we identified genes that encode proteins with putative PG hydrolytic domains in the genome of S. pneumoniae strain D39. Knockout mutations in these genes were constructed, and the resulting mutants were characterized in comparison with the parent strain for growth, cell morphology, PG peptide incorporation, and in some cases, PG peptide composition. In addition, we characterized deletion mutations in nonessential genes of unknown function in the WalRKSpn two-component system regulon, which also contains the essential pcsB cell division gene. Several mutants did not show overt phenotypes, which is perhaps indicative of redundancy. In contrast, two new mutants showed distinct defects in PG biosynthesis. One mutation was in a gene designated dacB (spd_0549), which we showed encodes an l,d-carboxypeptidase involved in PG maturation. Notably, dacB mutants, similar to dacA (d,d-carboxypeptidase) mutants, exhibited defects in cell shape and septation, consistent with the idea that the availability of PG peptide precursors is important for proper PG biosynthesis. Epistasis analysis indicated that DacA functions before DacB in d-Ala removal, and immunofluorescence microscopy showed that DacA and DacB are located over the entire surface of pneumococcal cells. The other mutation was in WalRKSpn regulon gene spd_0703, which encodes a putative membrane protein that may function as a type of conserved streptococcal shape, elongation, division, and sporulation (SEDS) protein. PMID:21378199

  12. Two Drosophila Ada2 Homologues Function in Different Multiprotein Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Kusch, Thomas; Guelman, Sebastián; Abmayr, Susan M.; Workman, Jerry L.

    2003-01-01

    The reversible acetylation of the N-terminal tails of histones is crucial for transcription, DNA repair, and replication. The enzymatic reaction is catalyzed by large multiprotein complexes, of which the best characterized are the Gcn5-containing N-acetyltransferase (GNAT) complexes. GNAT complexes from yeast to humans share several conserved subunits, such as Ada2, Ada3, Spt3, and Tra1/TRRAP. We have characterized these factors in Drosophila and found that the flies have two distinct Ada2 variants (dAda2a and dAda2b). Using a combination of biochemical and cell biological approaches we demonstrate that only one of the two Drosophila Ada2 homologues, dAda2b, is a component of Spt-Ada-Gcn5-acetyltransferase (SAGA) complexes. The other Ada2 variant, dAda2a, can associate with dGcn5 but is not incorporated into dSAGA-type complexes. This is the first example of a complex-specific association of the Ada-type transcriptional adapter proteins with GNATs. In addition, dAda2a is part of Gcn5-independent complexes, which are concentrated at transcriptionally active regions on polytene chromosomes. This implicates novel functions for dAda2a in transcription. Humans and mice also possess two Ada2 variants with high homology to dAda2a and dAda2b, respectively. This suggests that the mammalian and fly homologues of the transcriptional adapter Ada2 form two functionally distinct subgroups with unique characteristics. PMID:12697829

  13. Alma Flor Ada: Writer, Translator, Storyteller.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brodie, Carolyn S.

    2003-01-01

    Discusses the work of children's author Alma Flor Ada, a Cuban native who has won awards honoring Latino writers and illustrators. Includes part of an interview that explores her background, describes activity ideas, and presents a bibliography of works written by her (several title published in both English and Spanish) as well as sources of…

  14. Is Your Queuing System ADA-Compliant?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lawrence, David

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the Americans with Disabilities (ADA) and Uniform Federal Accessibility Standards (UFAS) regulations regarding public facilities' crowd control stanchions and queuing systems. The major elements are protruding objects and wheelchair accessibility. Describes how to maintain compliance with the regulations and offers a list of additional…

  15. The ADA Mandate for Social Change.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wehman, Paul, Ed.

    This book analyzes the effectiveness and implications for social change of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA). It outlines several issues--legal implications, physical accessibility, transportation options, employment opportunities, and recreation--that stimulate community action for full inclusion. Part I, titled "Definitions and…

  16. Implementing an ADA Kernel on NEBULA.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    DAAG29 P1 K 0059 9-3 PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME AND ADDRESS 10. PROGRAM ELEMENT. PROJECT , TASK AREA & WORK UNIT NUMBERS STemple University Philadelphia...these operations It is found that NEBULA supports admirably the control structures oil Ada, but its Memory Mamagement system is not very suitable. Entry

  17. Using ADA Tasks to Simulate Operating Equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    DeAcetis, Louis A.; Schmidt, Oron; Krishen, Kumar

    1990-01-01

    A method of simulating equipment using ADA tasks is discussed. Individual units of equipment are coded as concurrently running tasks that monitor and respond to input signals. This technique has been used in a simulation of the space-to-ground Communications and Tracking subsystem of Space Station Freedom.

  18. The Courts, the ADA, and the Academy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cope, David D.

    2005-01-01

    Litigation influences what goes on in the classroom. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), other statutes, and legal precedent have defined reasonable restrictions on what qualifies as a handicap. Still, universities tend to go overboard--out of ignorance, and influenced by a culture that seems to champion every conceivable victim--in…

  19. Using Ada tasks to simulate operating equipment

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deacetis, Louis A.; Schmidt, Oron; Krishen, Kumar

    1990-01-01

    A method of simulating equipment using Ada tasks is discussed. Individual units of equipment are coded as concurrently running tasks that monitor and respond to input signals. This technique has been used in a simulation of the space-to-ground Communications and Tracking subsystem of Space Station Freedom.

  20. AdaNET prototype library administration manual

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hanley, Lionel

    1989-01-01

    The functions of the AdaNET Prototype Library of Reusable Software Parts is described. Adopted from the Navy Research Laboratory's Reusability Guidebook (V.5.0), this is a working document, customized for use the the AdaNET Project. Within this document, the term part is used to denote the smallest unit controlled by a library and retrievable from it. A part may have several constituents, which may not be individually tracked. Presented are the types of parts which may be stored in the library and the relationships among those parts; a concept of trust indicators which provide measures of confidence that a user of a previously developed part may reasonably apply to a part for a new application; search and retrieval, configuration management, and communications among those who interact with the AdaNET Prototype Library; and the AdaNET Prototype, described from the perspective of its three major users: the part reuser and retriever, the part submitter, and the librarian and/or administrator.

  1. Polymorphic variation in susceptibility and metabolism of triclosan-resistant mutants of Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae clinical strains obtained after exposure to biocides and antibiotics.

    PubMed

    Curiao, Tânia; Marchi, Emmanuela; Viti, Carlo; Oggioni, Marco R; Baquero, Fernando; Martinez, José Luis; Coque, Teresa M

    2015-01-01

    Exposure to biocides may result in cross-resistance to other antimicrobials. Changes in biocide and antibiotic susceptibilities, metabolism, and fitness costs were studied here in biocide-selected Escherichia coli and Klebsiella pneumoniae mutants. E. coli and K. pneumoniae mutants with various degrees of triclosan susceptibility were obtained after exposure to triclosan (TRI), benzalkonium chloride (BKC), chlorhexidine (CHX) or sodium hypochlorite (SHC), and ampicillin or ciprofloxacin. Alterations in antimicrobial susceptibility and metabolism in mutants were tested using Phenotype MicroArrays. The expression of AcrAB pump and global regulators (SoxR, MarA, and RamA) was measured by quantitative reverse transcription-PCR (qRT-PCR), and the central part of the fabI gene was sequenced. The fitness costs of resistance were assessed by a comparison of relative growth rates. Triclosan-resistant (TRI(r)) and triclosan-hypersusceptible (TRI(hs)) mutants of E. coli and K. pneumoniae were obtained after selection with biocides and/or antibiotics. E. coli TRI(r) mutants, including those with mutations in the fabI gene or in the expression of acrB, acrF, and marA, exhibited changes in susceptibility to TRI, CHX, and antibiotics. TRI(r) mutants for which the TRI MIC was high presented improved metabolism of carboxylic acids, amino acids, and carbohydrates. In TRI(r) mutants, resistance to one antimicrobial provoked hypersusceptibility to another one(s). TRI(r) mutants had fitness costs, particularly marA-overexpressing (E. coli) or ramA-overexpressing (K. pneumoniae) mutants. TRI, BKC, and CIP exposure frequently yielded TRI(r) mutants exhibiting alterations in AraC-like global regulators (MarA, SoxR, and RamA), AcrAB-TolC, and/or FabI, and influencing antimicrobial susceptibility, fitness, and metabolism. These various phenotypes suggest a trade-off of different selective processes shaping the evolution toward antibiotic/biocide resistance and influencing other adaptive

  2. Transition Educators: Instrumental Personnel in Fulfilling the Promise of ADA.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casper, Marta W.

    1995-01-01

    Discusses the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and its implementation at the local level. Identifies barriers to implementation and outlines suggestions for transition educators who are instrumental in fulfilling the promise of ADA. (Author/JOW)

  3. Evaluation of ADA gene expression and transduction efficiency in ADA/SCID patients undergoing gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Carlucci, F; Tabucchi, A; Aiuti, A; Rosi, F; Floccari, F; Pagani, R; Marinello, E

    2004-10-01

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE) method was developed for ADA/SCID diagnosis and monitoring of enzyme replacement therapy, as well as for exploring the transfection efficiency for different retroviral vectors in gene therapy.

  4. Differential ability of novel attenuated targeted deletion mutants of Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis strain SCHU S4 to protect mice against aerosol challenge with virulent bacteria: effects of host background and route of immunization

    PubMed Central

    Conlan, J. Wayne; Shen, Hua; Golovliov, Igor; Zingmark, Carl; Oyston, Petra C.F.; Chen, Wangxue; House, Robert V.; Sjöstedt, Anders

    2009-01-01

    Francisella tularensis subspecies tularensis is a highly virulent facultative intracellular pathogen of humans and a potential biological weapon. A live vaccine strain, F. tularensis LVS, was developed more than 50 years ago by pragmatic attenuation of a strain of the less virulent holarctica subspecies. LVS was demonstrated to be highly effective in human volunteers who were exposed to intradermal challenge with fully virulent subsp. tularensis, but was less effective against aerosol exposure. LVS faces regulatory hurdles that to date have prevented its licensure for general use. Therefore, a better defined and more effective vaccine is being sought. To this end we have created gene deletion mutants in the virulent subsp. tularensis strain and tested them for their ability to elicit a protective immune response against systemic or aerosol challenge with the highly virulent wild-type subsp. tularensis strain, SCHU S4. Both oral and Intradermal (ID) primary vaccination routes were assessed in BALB/c and C3H/HeN mice as was oral boosting. One SCHU S4 mutant missing the heat shock gene, clpB, was significantly more attenuated than LVS whereas a double deletion mutant missing genes FTT0918 and capB was as attenuated as LVS. In general mice immunized with SCHU S4ΔclpB were significantly better protected against aerosol challenge than mice immunized with LVS. A single ID immunization of BALB/c mice with SCHU S4ΔclpB was at least as effective as any other regimen examined. Mice immunized with SCHU S4Δ0918ΔcapB were generally protected to a similar degree as mice immunized with LVS. A preliminary examination of immune responses to vaccination with LVS, SCHU S4ΔclpB, or SCHU S4Δ0918ΔcapB provided no obvious correlate to their relative efficacies. PMID:20018266

  5. Preliminary Version: Ada (Trade Name)/SQL: A Standard, Portable Ada-DBMS Interface.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-04-01

    process the SQL functions of ’ SELECT, UPDATE, INSERT, and DELETE. 2.4. Application and Tool Portability Concerns Ada/SQL is more than just an interface...database to the underlying DBMS. Once the database has been defined, the application programs may use Ada/SQL statements to process the data stored...totally transportable. Output can also be targeted for bulk load of a database, if warranted by the data volumes and processing speed. As already noted

  6. Ada 9X Project Report: Ada 9X Revision Issues. Release 2

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-05-01

    priority-with- preemption model be adopted as the Ada standard with some escape mechanism to be available for those times when this model is not...solved by expanding the run- time model , and by including other paradigms such as rate-monotonic. %reference RI-7010 This RI addresses the need to... Time -out on Operations) Ada 9X shall provide a mechanism by which a sequence of operations is guarded by a time -out, i.e. if the sequence takes

  7. Ada (Trade Name) Compiler Validation Summary Report: Intermetrics, Inc. I2Ada Compiler, Version 17.08 for the IBM 370 Architecture under UTS 2.3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-10

    SPEC-AE.ADA P REPORTBODY-B.ADA P *CHECK FILE-B.ADA P CZ110A- ABADA *CZ11O1A-AB.ADA P CZ11O2A-B.ADA P *CZ121A-B.ADA P CZ12O1A-AB.ADA P CZ12O1B-AB.ADA P...B55AO1E-AB.ADA P B59001H- ABADA P B52003B-AB.ADA P B55AO1F-AB.ADA P B590011-AB.ADA P B52003C-AB.ADA P B55AO1G-AB.ADA P C51002A-AB.ADA P *B52OO04A...AB.ADA P P C95012A-B.ADA P C96005B-B.TST P C97203E-AB.ADA P *C95013A-B.ADA P C96005C-B.TST P C97204A-B.ADA P C95021A-B.ADA P C96005D-B.ADA P C97303A- ABADA

  8. The computerization of programming: Ada (R) lessons learned

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Struble, Dennis D.

    1986-01-01

    One of the largest systems yet written in Ada has been constructed. This system is the Intermetrics Ada compiler. Many lessons have been learned during the implementation of this Ada compiler. Some of these lessons, concentrating on those lessons relevant to large system implementations are described. The characteristics of the Ada compiler implementation project at Intermetrics are also described. Some specific experiences during the implementation are pointed out.

  9. Immunologic reconstitution during PEG-ADA therapy in an unusual mosaic ADA deficient patient.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ping; Santisteban, Ines; Burroughs, Lauri M; Ochs, Hans D; Torgerson, Troy R; Hershfield, Michael S; Rawlings, David J; Scharenberg, Andrew M

    2009-02-01

    We report detailed genetic and immunologic studies in a patient diagnosed with adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency and combined immune deficiency at age 5 years. At the time of diagnosis, although all other lymphocyte subsets were depleted, circulating CD8(+) T cells with a terminally differentiated phenotype were abundant and expressed normal ADA activity due to a reversion mutation in a CD8(+) T cell or precursor. Over the first 9 months of replacement therapy with PEG-ADA, the patient steadily accumulated mature naïve CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells, as well as CD4(+)/FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells, consistent with restoration of a functional cellular immune system. While CD19(+) naïve B cells also accumulated in response to PEG-ADA therapy, a high proportion of these B cells exhibited an immature surface marker phenotype even after 9 months, and immunization with neoantigen bacteriophage varphiX174 demonstrated a markedly subnormal humoral immune response. Our observations in this single patient have important implications for gene therapy of human ADA deficiency, as they indicate that ADA expression within even a large circulating lymphocyte population may not be sufficient to support adequate immune reconstitution. They also suggest that an immature surface marker phenotype of the peripheral B cell compartment may be a useful surrogate marker for incomplete humoral immune reconstitution during enzyme replacement, and possibly other forms of hematopoietic cell therapies.

  10. Knowledge, programming, and programming cultures: LISP, C, and Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochowiak, Daniel

    1990-01-01

    The results of research 'Ada as an implementation language for knowledge based systems' are presented. The purpose of the research was to compare Ada to other programming languages. The report focuses on the programming languages Ada, C, and Lisp, the programming cultures that surround them, and the programming paradigms they support.

  11. A Salmonella Enteritidis hilAssrAfliG deletion mutant is a safe live vaccine strain that confers protection against colonization by Salmonella Enteritidis in broilers.

    PubMed

    De Cort, W; Geeraerts, S; Balan, V; Elroy, M; Haesebrouck, F; Ducatelle, R; Van Immerseel, F

    2013-10-17

    Consumption of contaminated poultry meat is an important cause of Salmonella infections in humans. Therefore, there is a need for control methods that protect broilers from day-of-hatch until slaughter age against infection with Salmonella. Colonization-inhibition, a concept in which a live Salmonella strain is orally administered to day-old chickens and protects against subsequent challenge, can potentially be used as control method. In this study, the safety and efficacy of a Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain as a colonization-inhibition strain for protection of broilers against Salmonella Enteritidis was evaluated. After administration of the Salmonella Enteritidis ΔhilAssrAfliG strain to day-old chickens, this strain could not be isolated from the gut, internal organs or faeces after 21 days of age. In addition, administration of this strain to one-day-old broiler chickens decreased faecal shedding and caecal and internal organ colonization of a Salmonella Enteritidis challenge strain administered one day later using a seeder bird model. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an attenuated Salmonella strain for which both the safety and efficacy has been shown in long-term experiments (until slaughter age) in broiler strain can potentially be used as a live colonization-inhibition strain for controlling Salmonella Enteritidis infections in broilers.

  12. Quenching of the antibacterial activity of chlorhexidine and benzalkonium by Letheen broth and Letheen agar in relation to wild-type and envelope mutant strains of gram-negative bacteria.

    PubMed

    el-Falaha, B M; Furr, J R; Russell, A D

    1987-01-01

    Letheen broth and Letheen agar have been investigated for their ability to act as neutralising and recovery media for wild-type and envelope mutants exposed to chlorhexidine diacetate and benzalkonium chloride. At high dilutions, untreated cells of the envelope mutant of Pseudomonas aeruginosa 799/61 were unable to produce colonies on Letheen agar. As a result of various procedures, it was concluded that dilution in Letheen broth and plating in Isosensitest agar was a suitable method for quenching cationic bactericides without harming the test strains, and that the increasing use of Gram-negative bacteria with outer membrane defects means that considerable care may be necessary in selecting media for evaluating bactericidal activity.

  13. Ada (Trade Name) Compiler Validation Summary Report: Harris Corporation. Harris Ada Compiler, Version 3.1. Harris H1200.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-06-03

    DATE Ada Joint Pi’ogram Office 33 June 1987 United States Department of Defense 13. NUMBER Of PAGLS Washington, DC 20301-3081 37 14. MONITORING...Prepared By: Ada Validation Facility ASD/SCOL l Wright-Patterson AFB OH 454133-6503 Prepared For: Ada Joint Program Office United States Department of...Defense Washington, D.C. MAda. is a registered trademark of the United States Government (Ada Joint Program Office). + + + Place NTIS form here

  14. Identification of concomitant infection with Chlamydia trachomatis IncA-negative mutant and wild-type strains by genomic, transcriptional, and biological characterizations.

    PubMed

    Suchland, Robert J; Jeffrey, Brendan M; Xia, Minsheng; Bhatia, Ajay; Chu, Hencelyn G; Rockey, Daniel D; Stamm, Walter E

    2008-12-01

    Clinical isolates of Chlamydia trachomatis that lack IncA on their inclusion membrane form nonfusogenic inclusions and have been associated with milder, subclinical infections in patients. The molecular events associated with the generation of IncA-negative strains and their roles in chlamydial sexually transmitted infections are not clear. We explored the biology of the IncA-negative strains by analyzing their genomic structure, transcription, and growth characteristics in vitro and in vivo in comparison with IncA-positive C. trachomatis strains. Three clinical samples were identified that contained a mixture of IncA-positive and -negative same-serovar C. trachomatis populations, and two more such pairs were found in serial isolates from persistently infected individuals. Genomic sequence analysis of individual strains from each of two serovar-matched pairs showed that these pairs were very similar genetically. In contrast, the genome sequence of an unmatched IncA-negative strain contained over 5,000 nucleotide polymorphisms relative to the genome sequence of a serovar-matched but otherwise unlinked strain. Transcriptional analysis, in vitro culture kinetics, and animal modeling demonstrated that IncA-negative strains isolated in the presence of a serovar-matched wild-type strain are phenotypically more similar to the wild-type strain than are IncA-negative strains isolated in the absence of a serovar-matched wild-type strain. These studies support a model suggesting that a change from an IncA-positive strain to the previously described IncA-negative phenotype may involve multiple steps, the first of which involves a translational inactivation of incA, associated with subsequent unidentified steps that lead to the observed decrease in transcript level, differences in growth rate, and differences in mouse infectivity.

  15. A dnaN Plasmid Shuffle Strain for Rapid In Vivo Analysis of Mutant Escherichia coli β Clamps Provides Insight Into the Role of Clamp in umuDC-Mediated Cold Sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Babu, Vignesh M. P.; Sutton, Mark D.

    2014-01-01

    The E. coli umuDC gene products participate in two temporally distinct roles: UmuD2C acts in a DNA damage checkpoint control, while UmuD'2C, also known as DNA polymerase V (Pol V), catalyzes replication past DNA lesions via a process termed translesion DNA synthesis. These different roles of the umuDC gene products are managed in part by the dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein. Co-overexpression of the β clamp and Pol V severely blocked E. coli growth at 30°C. We previously used a genetic assay that was independent of the ability of β clamp to support E. coli viability to isolate 8 mutant clamp proteins (βQ61K, βS107L, βD150N, βG157S, βV170M, βE202K, βM204K and βP363S) that failed to block growth at 30°C when co-overexpressed with Pol V. It was unknown whether these mutant clamps were capable of supporting E. coli viability and normal umuDC functions in vivo. The goals of this study were to answer these questions. To this end, we developed a novel dnaN plasmid shuffle assay. Using this assay, βD150N and βP363S were unable to support E. coli viability. The remaining 6 mutant clamps, each of which supported viability, were indistinguishable from β+ with respect to umuDC functions in vivo. In light of these findings, we analyzed phenotypes of strains overexpressing either β clamp or Pol V alone. The strain overexpressing β+, but not those expressing mutant β clamps, displayed slowed growth irrespective of the incubation temperature. Moreover, growth of the Pol V-expressing strain was modestly slowed at 30°, but not 42°C. Taken together, these results suggest the mutant clamps were identified due to their inability to slow growth rather than an inability to interact with Pol V. They further suggest that cold sensitivity is due, at least in part, to the combination of their individual effects on growth at 30°C. PMID:24896652

  16. A dnaN plasmid shuffle strain for rapid in vivo analysis of mutant Escherichia coli β clamps provides insight into the role of clamp in umuDC-mediated cold sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Babu, Vignesh M P; Sutton, Mark D

    2014-01-01

    The E. coli umuDC gene products participate in two temporally distinct roles: UmuD2C acts in a DNA damage checkpoint control, while UmuD'2C, also known as DNA polymerase V (Pol V), catalyzes replication past DNA lesions via a process termed translesion DNA synthesis. These different roles of the umuDC gene products are managed in part by the dnaN-encoded β sliding clamp protein. Co-overexpression of the β clamp and Pol V severely blocked E. coli growth at 30°C. We previously used a genetic assay that was independent of the ability of β clamp to support E. coli viability to isolate 8 mutant clamp proteins (βQ61K, βS107L, βD150N, βG157S, βV170M, βE202K, βM204K and βP363S) that failed to block growth at 30°C when co-overexpressed with Pol V. It was unknown whether these mutant clamps were capable of supporting E. coli viability and normal umuDC functions in vivo. The goals of this study were to answer these questions. To this end, we developed a novel dnaN plasmid shuffle assay. Using this assay, βD150N and βP363S were unable to support E. coli viability. The remaining 6 mutant clamps, each of which supported viability, were indistinguishable from β+ with respect to umuDC functions in vivo. In light of these findings, we analyzed phenotypes of strains overexpressing either β clamp or Pol V alone. The strain overexpressing β+, but not those expressing mutant β clamps, displayed slowed growth irrespective of the incubation temperature. Moreover, growth of the Pol V-expressing strain was modestly slowed at 30°, but not 42°C. Taken together, these results suggest the mutant clamps were identified due to their inability to slow growth rather than an inability to interact with Pol V. They further suggest that cold sensitivity is due, at least in part, to the combination of their individual effects on growth at 30°C.

  17. Ada (Trade Name)/SQL (Structured Query Language) Binding Specification

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-06-01

    which it is contained. 6) A libary package is an <authorization package>; a <schema package>; a <global variable pack- age>; the Ada/SQL definition...Ada/SQL DML unit>s, however, may reference arbitrary Ada library units. SRld is designed to enable Ada/SQL automated tools to readily determine...restriction is designed to minimize confusion about what is being refer- enced, as well as to simplify the development of Ada/SQL automated took. 3) A non

  18. Ada and software management in NASA: Assessment and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    Recent NASA missions have required software systems that are larger, more complex, and more critical than NASA software systems of the past. The Ada programming language and the software methods and support environments associated with it are seen as potential breakthroughs in meeting NASA's software requirements. The findings of a study by the Ada and Software Management Assessment Working Group (ASMAWG) are presented. The study was chartered to perform three tasks: (1) assess the agency's ongoing and planned Ada activities; (2) assess the infrastructure (standards, policies, and internal organizations) supporting software management and the Ada activities; and (3) present an Ada implementation and use strategy appropriate for NASA over the next 5 years.

  19. Attenuated Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae double-deletion mutant S-8∆clpP/apxIIC confers protection against homologous or heterologous strain challenge.

    PubMed

    Xie, Fang; Li, Gang; Zhou, Long; Zhang, Yanhe; Cui, Ning; Liu, Siguo; Wang, Chunlai

    2017-01-06

    Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae is the etiological agent of porcine pleuropneumonia, which leads to large economic losses to the swine industry worldwide. In this study, S-8△clpP△apxIIC, a double-deletion mutant of A. pleuropneumoniae was constructed, and its safety and protective efficacy were evaluated in pigs. The S-8△clpP△apxIIC mutant exhibited attenuated virulence in a murine (BALB/c) model, and caused no detrimental effects on pigs even at a dose of up to 1.0 × 10(9) CFU. Furthermore, the S-8△clpP△apxIIC mutant was able to induce a strong immune response in pigs, which included high levels of IgG1 and IgG2, stimulated gamma interferon (IFN-γ), interleukin 12 (IL-12), and interleukin 4 (IL-4) production, and conferred effective protection against the lethal challenge with A. pleuropneumoniae serovars 7 or 5a. The pigs in the S-8△clpP△apxIIC immunized groups have no lesions and reduced bacterial loads in the lung tissue after challenge. The data obtained in this study suggest that the S-8△clpP△apxIIC mutant can serve as a highly immunogenic and potential live attenuated vaccine candidate against A. pleuropneumoniae infection.

  20. Defective excision and postreplication repair of UV-damaged DNA in a recL mutant strain of E. coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Rothman, R H; Clark, A J

    1977-10-24

    The mutation recL152 leads to a reduction of excision repair as measured by an increase in the time required to close uvrA uvrB dependent incision breaks, and by a reduction of host cell reactivation ability. Postreplication repair is also delayed when measured in a uvrB5 recL152 double mutant. Such a determination could not be made using the recL152 single mutant because the excision defect led to an accumulation of breaks in the unlabeled high molecular weight DNA to which the labeled DNA synthesized after irradiation must attach in order to achieve normal high molecular weight. Further, the recL gene product seems to be required to rejoin breaks in parental strand DNA which are generated during postreplication repair, since such gaps accumulate in a recL152 uvrB5 double mutant but not in a recL+ uvrB5 single mutant. We have noticed a striking phenotypic similarity between recL152 and polA1 and suggest that recL152 is required for full in vivo activity of DNA polymerase I.

  1. The Outer Membrane of Brucella ovis Shows Increased Permeability to Hydrophobic Probes and Is More Susceptible to Cationic Peptides than Are the Outer Membranes of Mutant Rough Brucella abortus Strains

    PubMed Central

    Freer, Enrique; Pizarro-Cerdá, Javier; Weintraub, Andrej; Bengoechea, José-Antonio; Moriyón, Ignacio; Hultenby, Kjell; Gorvel, Jean-Pierre; Moreno, Edgardo

    1999-01-01

    The permeability of the outer membrane (OM) to hydrophobic probes and its susceptibility to bactericidal cationic peptides were investigated for natural rough Brucella ovis and for mutant rough Brucella abortus strains. The OM of B. ovis displayed an abrupt and faster kinetic profile than rough B. abortus during the uptake of the hydrophobic probe N-phenyl-naphthylamine. B. ovis was more sensitive than rough B. abortus to the action of cationic peptides. Bactenecins 5 and 7 induced morphological alterations on the OMs of both rough Brucella strains. B. ovis lipopolysaccharide (LPS) captured considerably more polymyxin B than LPSs from both rough and smooth B. abortus strains. Polymyxin B, poly-l-lysine, and poly-l-ornithine produced a thick coating on the surfaces of both strains, which was more evident in B. ovis than in rough B. abortus. The distinct functional properties of the OMs of these two rough strains correlate with some structural differences of their OMs and with their different biological behaviors in animals and culture cells. PMID:10531286

  2. Ada Compiler Validation Summary Report, Dansk Datamatik Center, VAX 11 Compiler Version 1.1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-11-06

    B37303A.ADA P B3T307B-AB.ADA P B37309B-AB.ADA P B373103-B.ADA P B37311A-AB.ADA P B38001A.ADA P B38003A-AB.ADA P B38008A-B.ADA P B38008B- ABADA P B38101A-B.ADA...B452O8C-BADA P 8J45208G-AB.ADA P B45208H-B. ADA P B45208I-B.ADA P B45208M-AB.ADA P B45208N-AB.ADA P B45208S- ABADA P D45208T-AB.ADA P B45261A-kB.ADA P...B55AOIC-AB-ADA P B55AO1D-AB.ADA P B55AOlE-A3.ADA P B55A01F-AB.ADA P B55A0O-AB.ADA P B55A0IH-AB.ADA P B55A01I-AB-ADA P B55A014-AB.ADA P B55A01K- ABADA P

  3. Complete Genome Sequence of Klebsiella pneumoniae Strain ATCC 43816 KPPR1, a Rifampin-Resistant Mutant Commonly Used in Animal, Genetic, and Molecular Biology Studies

    PubMed Central

    Broberg, Christopher A.; Wu, Weisheng; Cavalcoli, James D.; Miller, Virginia L.

    2014-01-01

    Klebsiella pneumoniae is an urgent public health threat due to the spread of carbapenem-resistant strains causing serious, and frequently fatal, infections. To facilitate genetic, molecular, and immunological studies of this pathogen, we report the complete chromosomal sequence of a genetically tractable, prototypical strain used in animal models. PMID:25291761

  4. Genetic analysis of membrane differentiation in Paramecium. Freeze- fracture study of the trichocyst cycle in wild-type and mutant strains

    PubMed Central

    1976-01-01

    Using a series of mutants of Paramecium tetraurelia, we demonstrate, for the first time, changes in the internal structure of the cell membrane, as revealed by freeze-fracture, that correspond to specific single gene mutations. On the plasma membrane of Paramecium circular arrays of particles mark the sites of attachment of the tips of the intracellular secretory organelles-trichocysts. In wild-type paramecia, where attached trichocysts can be expelled by exocytosis under various stimuli, the plasma membrane array is composed of a double outer ring of particles (300 nm in diameter) and inside the ring a central rosette (fusion rosette) of particles (76 nm in diameter). Mutant nd9, characterized by a thermosensitive ability to discharge trichocysts, shows the same organization in cells grown at the permissive temperature (18 degrees C), while in cells grown at the nonpermissive temperature (27 degrees C) the rosette is missing. In mutant tam 8, characterized by normal but unattached trichocysts, and in mutant tl, completely devoid of trichocysts, no rosette is formed and the outer rings always show a modified configuration called "parentheses", also found in wild-type and in nd9 (18 degrees C) cells. From this comparison between wild type and mutants, we conclude: (a) that the formation of parentheses is a primary differentiation of the plasma membrane, independent of the presence of trichocysts, while the secondary transformation of parentheses into circular arrays and the formation of the rosette are triggered by interaction between trichocysts and plasma membranes; and (b) that the formation of the rosette is a prerequisite for trichocyst exocytosis. PMID:1254639

  5. The effects of modeled microgravity on growth kinetics, antibiotic susceptibility, cold growth, and the virulence potential of a Yersinia pestis ymoA-deficient mutant and its isogenic parental strain.

    PubMed

    Lawal, Abidat; Kirtley, Michelle L; van Lier, Christina J; Erova, Tatiana E; Kozlova, Elena V; Sha, Jian; Chopra, Ashok K; Rosenzweig, Jason A

    2013-09-01

    Previously, we reported that there was no enhancement in the virulence potential (as measured by cell culture infections) of the bacterial pathogen Yersinia pestis (YP) following modeled microgravity/clinorotation growth. We have now further characterized the effects of clinorotation (CR) on YP growth kinetics, antibiotic sensitivity, cold growth, and YP's virulence potential in a murine model of infection. Surprisingly, none of the aforementioned phenotypes were altered. To better understand why CR did not enhance YP's virulence potential as it did for other bacterial pathogens, a YP ΔymoA isogenic mutant in the KIM/D27 background strain that is unable to produce the histone-like YmoA protein and influences DNA topography was used in both cell culture and murine models of infection. YmoA represses type three secretion system (T3SS) virulence gene expression in the yersiniae. Similar to our CR-grown parental YP strain data, the CR-grown ΔymoA mutant induced reduced HeLa cell cytotoxicity with concomitantly decreased Yersinia outer protein E (YopE) and low calcium response V (LcrV) antigen production and secretion. Important, however, were our findings that, although no significant differences were observed in survival of mice infected intraperitoneally with either normal gravity (NG)- or CR-grown parental YP, the ΔymoA mutant induced significantly more mortality in infected mice than did the parental strain following CR growth. Taken together, our data demonstrate that CR did enhance the virulence potential of the YP ΔymoA mutant in a murine infection model (relative to the CR-grown parental strain), despite inducing less HeLa cell rounding in our cell culture infection assay due to reduced T3SS activity. Therefore, CR, which induces a unique type of bacterial stress, might be enhancing YP's virulence potential in vivo through a T3SS-independent mechanism when the histone-like YmoA protein is absent.

  6. Ada (Trade Name) Bibliography. Volume 2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-01

    GEORGE, DENNIS: GUSTAFSON, DAVID A.; HENRY, SALLIE; HUTCHENS, DAVID: KAFURA, DENNIS; SAYLER , JOHN SOFTWARE ENGINEERING NOTES (ACM SIGSOFT), VOL 7, ISSUE...LANGUAGE PROGRAM UTNITS INTO VLSI STRUCTURES ORGANICK, ELLIOTT I.; LINDSTROM, GARY COMPCON 󈨖, PP. 15-18, 1982 This paper discusses a transformation...GUEST EDITOR’S INTRODUCTION 4127-1 ADA TRAINING CONSIDERATIONS 4162-1 USING HIGH ORDER LANGUAGES EASES SOFT WARE DEVELOPMENT BRAY, GARY . INTERMETRICS INC

  7. Feasibility Assessment of JOVIAL to Ada Translation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-08-01

    Literals (a) Numeric Literals (b) Bit Literals (c) Boolean Literals (d) Character Literals (4) Comments i. Directives 2. Summary of Untranslatable ...statement or mark it as untranslatable . (Both languages contain definitions of more than just "statements." Here, reference to a "statement" is intended...problem described in Section III.l.b.(5). 2. SUMMARY OF UNTRANSLATABLE FEATURES J73 and Ada have a variety of incompatibilities. There are several

  8. Ada for Embedded Systems: Issues and Questions.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-12-01

    systems targets such as the Motorola 68000 family, the Intel iAPX86 family, and the MIL- STD-1750A microprocessors, but the state of embedded system...successes that were realized because of its use * A very early version of the TeleSoft Ada compiler was used for developing the sotlware for a M68000 ...engine monitoring system. Implementations are for VAX, IBM PC/AT, Motorola 68000, and Intel 80286 and 8086 targets. The strategy is to reimplement

  9. Nif- Hup- mutants of Rhizobium japonicum.

    PubMed Central

    Moshiri, F; Stults, L; Novak, P; Maier, R J

    1983-01-01

    Two H2 uptake-negative (Hup-) Rhizobium japonicum mutants were obtained that also lacked symbiotic N2 fixation (acetylene reduction) activity. One of the mutants formed green nodules and was deficient in heme. Hydrogen oxidation activity in this mutant could be restored by the addition of heme plus ATP to crude extracts. Bacteroid extracts from the other mutant strain lacked hydrogenase activity and activity for both of the nitrogenase component proteins. Hup+ revertants of the mutant strains regained both H2 uptake ability and nitrogenase activity. Images PMID:6874648

  10. The Katydid system for compiling KEE applications to Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Filman, Robert E.; Bock, Conrad; Feldman, Roy

    1990-01-01

    Components of a system known as Katydid are developed in an effort to compile knowledge-based systems developed in a multimechanism integrated environment (KEE) to Ada. The Katydid core is an Ada library supporting KEE object functionality, and the other elements include a rule compiler, a LISP-to-Ada translator, and a knowledge-base dumper. Katydid employs translation mechanisms that convert LISP knowledge structures and rules to Ada and utilizes basic prototypes of a run-time KEE object-structure library module for Ada. Preliminary results include the semiautomatic compilation of portions of a simple expert system to run in an Ada environment with the described algorithms. It is suggested that Ada can be employed for AI programming and implementation, and the Katydid system is being developed to include concurrency and synchronization mechanisms.

  11. Ada education in a software life-cycle context

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clough, Anne J.

    1986-01-01

    Some of the experience gained from a comprehensive educational program undertaken at The Charles Stark Draper Lab. to introduce the Ada language and to transition modern software engineering technology into the development of Ada and non-Ada applications is described. Initially, a core group, which included manager, engineers and programmers, received training in Ada. An Ada Office was established to assume the major responsibility for training, evaluation, acquisition and benchmarking of tools, and consultation on Ada projects. As a first step in this process, and in-house educational program was undertaken to introduce Ada to the Laboratory. Later, a software engineering course was added to the educational program as the need to address issues spanning the entire software life cycle became evident. Educational efforts to date are summarized, with an emphasis on the educational approach adopted. Finally, lessons learned in administering this program are addressed.

  12. Ada (trademark) projects at NASA. Runtime environment issues and recommendations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roy, Daniel M.; Wilke, Randall W.

    1988-01-01

    Ada practitioners should use this document to discuss and establish common short term requirements for Ada runtime environments. The major current Ada runtime environment issues are identified through the analysis of some of the Ada efforts at NASA and other research centers. The runtime environment characteristics of major compilers are compared while alternate runtime implementations are reviewed. Modifications and extensions to the Ada Language Reference Manual to address some of these runtime issues are proposed. Three classes of projects focusing on the most critical runtime features of Ada are recommended, including a range of immediately feasible full scale Ada development projects. Also, a list of runtime features and procurement issues is proposed for consideration by the vendors, contractors and the government.

  13. ADA interpretative system for image algebra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Murillo, Juan J.; Wilson, Joseph N.

    1992-06-01

    An important research problem in image processing is to find appropriate tools to support algorithm development. There have been efforts to build algorithm development support systems for image algebra in several languages, but these systems still have the disadvantage of the time consuming algorithm development style associated with compilation-oriented programming. This paper starts with a description of the Run-Time Support Library (RTSL), which serves as the base for executing programs on both the Image Algebra Ada Translator (IAAT) and Image Algebra Ada Interpreter (IAAI). A presentation on the current status of IAAT and its capabilities is followed by a brief introduction to the utilization of the Image Display Manager (IDM) for image manipulation and analysis. We then discuss in detail the current development stage of IAAI and its relation with RTSL and IDM. The last section describes the design of a syntax-directed graphical user interface for IAAI. We close with an analysis of the current performance of IAAI, and future trends are discussed. Appendix A gives a brief introduction to Image Algebra (IA), and in Appendix B the reader is presented to the Image Algebra Ada (IAA) grammar.

  14. SEL Ada reuse analysis and representations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kester, Rush

    1990-01-01

    Overall, it was revealed that the pattern of Ada reuse has evolved from initial reuse of utility components into reuse of generalized application architectures. Utility components were both domain-independent utilities, such as queues and stacks, and domain-specific utilities, such as those that implement spacecraft orbit and attitude mathematical functions and physics or astronomical models. The level of reuse was significantly increased with the development of a generalized telemetry simulator architecture. The use of Ada generics significantly increased the level of verbatum reuse, which is due to the ability, using Ada generics, to parameterize the aspects of design that are configurable during reuse. A key factor in implementing generalized architectures was the ability to use generic subprogram parameters to tailor parts of the algorithm embedded within the architecture. The use of object oriented design (in which objects model real world entities) significantly improved the modularity for reuse. Encapsulating into packages the data and operations associated with common real world entities creates natural building blocks for reuse.

  15. SDI satellite autonomy using AI and Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fiala, Harvey E.

    1990-01-01

    The use of Artificial Intelligence (AI) and the programming language Ada to help a satellite recover from selected failures that could lead to mission failure are described. An unmanned satellite will have a separate AI subsystem running in parallel with the normal satellite subsystems. A satellite monitoring subsystem (SMS), under the control of a blackboard system, will continuously monitor selected satellite subsystems to become alert to any actual or potential problems. In the case of loss of communications with the earth or the home base, the satellite will go into a survival mode to reestablish communications with the earth. The use of an AI subsystem in this manner would have avoided the tragic loss of the two recent Soviet probes that were sent to investigate the planet Mars and its moons. The blackboard system works in conjunction with an SMS and a reconfiguration control subsystem (RCS). It can be shown to be an effective way for one central control subsystem to monitor and coordinate the activities and loads of many interacting subsystems that may or may not contain redundant and/or fault-tolerant elements. The blackboard system will be coded in Ada using tools such as the ABLE development system and the Ada Production system.

  16. Object-oriented programming with mixins in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Seidewitz, ED

    1992-01-01

    Recently, I wrote a paper discussing the lack of 'true' object-oriented programming language features in Ada 83, why one might desire them in Ada, and how they might be added in Ada 9X. The approach I took in this paper was to build the new object-oriented features of Ada 9X as much as possible on the basic constructs and philosophy of Ada 83. The object-oriented features proposed for Ada 9X, while different in detail, are based on the same kind of approach. Further consideration of this approach led me on a long reflection on the nature of object-oriented programming and its application to Ada. The results of this reflection, presented in this paper, show how a fairly natural object-oriented style can indeed be developed even in Ada 83. The exercise of developing this style is useful for at least three reasons: (1) it provides a useful style for programming object-oriented applications in Ada 83 until new features become available with Ada 9X; (2) it demystifies many of the mechanisms that seem to be 'magic' in most object-oriented programming languages by making them explicit; and (3) it points out areas that are and are not in need of change in Ada 83 to make object-oriented programming more natural in Ada 9X. In the next four sections I will address in turn the issues of object-oriented classes, mixins, self-reference and supertyping. The presentation is through a sequence of examples. This results in some overlap with that paper, but all the examples in the present paper are written entirely in Ada 83. I will return to considerations for Ada 9X in the last section of the paper.

  17. Control of protein synthesis in herpesvirus-infected cells: analysis of the polypeptides induced by wild type and sixteen temperature-sensitive mutants of HSV strain 17.

    PubMed

    Marsden, H S; Crombie, I K; Subak-Sharpe, J H

    1976-06-01

    The polypeptides induced in cells infected with a Glasgow isolate of HSV-I (17 syn+) have been characterized by SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Study of the kinetics of synthesis in three cell lines has detected a total of 52 polypeptides, 33 of which can be identified in polypeptide profiles of purified virions. These include six low mol. wt. polypeptides that have not been previously reported. Several polypeptides were labelled with glucosamine in infected BHK cells. The different polypeptide patterns obtained at permissive (31 degrees C) and nonpermissive (38 degrees C) temperature in cells infected with 16 temperature-sensitive (ts) mutants are reported. The effect of multiplicity of infection (m.o.i.) on the polypeptide profile has been examined for two of the DNA -ve mutants: below ten, the profile varied with the m.o.i. whereas above ten it was constant. All mutants were therefore examined at an m.o.i. of approx. 20. Mutants from the same complementation group showed very similar profiles. A number of general conclusions concerning control of protein synthesis in HSV infected cells can be made: (I) As most of the 16 ts mutants affected the synthesis of several or many polypeptides it follows that a large proportion of genome specifies controlling functions. (2) The high frequency with which some polypeptides were affected suggests they are at or near the terminus of biosynthetic pathways which are under multiple control. (3) Conversely, some polypeptides were affected with a low frequency suggesting that their synthesis is not dependent on the expression of many virus functions. (4) Several individual ts mutations lead to the synthesis of increased amounts of different large polypeptides. (5) Analysis of every band detectably affected by at least one ts mutation has disclosed nine classes of dependence relationship between polypeptide synthesis and the DNA phenotype of the mutants, illustrating that this relationship is complex and different for

  18. An organic acid-tolerant HAA1-overexpression mutant of an industrial bioethanol strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its application to the production of bioethanol from sugarcane molasses.

    PubMed

    Inaba, Takuya; Watanabe, Daisuke; Yoshiyama, Yoko; Tanaka, Koichi; Ogawa, Jun; Takagi, Hiroshi; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Shima, Jun

    2013-12-30

    Bacterial contamination is known as a major cause of the reduction in ethanol yield during bioethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Acetate is an effective agent for the prevention of bacterial contamination, but it negatively affects the fermentation ability of S. cerevisiae. We have proposed that the combined use of organic acids including acetate and lactate and yeast strains tolerant to organic acids may be effective for the elimination of principally lactic acid bacterial (LAB) contamination. In a previous study employing laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, we showed that overexpression of the HAA1 gene, which encodes a transcriptional activator, could be a useful molecular breeding method for acetate-tolerant yeast strains. In the present study, we constructed a HAA1-overexpressing diploid strain (MATa/α, named ER HAA1-OP) derived from the industrial bioethanol strain Ethanol Red (ER). ER HAA1-OP showed tolerance not only to acetate but also to lactate, and this tolerance was dependent on the increased expression of HAA1 gene. The ethanol production ability of ER HAA1-OP was almost equivalent to that of the parent strain during the bioethanol production process from sugarcane molasses in the absence of acetate. The addition of acetate at 0.5% (w/v, pH 4.5) inhibited the fermentation ability of the parent strain, but such an inhibition was not observed in the ethanol production process using ER HAA1-OP.

  19. An organic acid-tolerant HAA1-overexpression mutant of an industrial bioethanol strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and its application to the production of bioethanol from sugarcane molasses

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Bacterial contamination is known as a major cause of the reduction in ethanol yield during bioethanol production by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Acetate is an effective agent for the prevention of bacterial contamination, but it negatively affects the fermentation ability of S. cerevisiae. We have proposed that the combined use of organic acids including acetate and lactate and yeast strains tolerant to organic acids may be effective for the elimination of principally lactic acid bacterial (LAB) contamination. In a previous study employing laboratory S. cerevisiae strains, we showed that overexpression of the HAA1 gene, which encodes a transcriptional activator, could be a useful molecular breeding method for acetate-tolerant yeast strains. In the present study, we constructed a HAA1-overexpressing diploid strain (MATa/α, named ER HAA1-OP) derived from the industrial bioethanol strain Ethanol Red (ER). ER HAA1-OP showed tolerance not only to acetate but also to lactate, and this tolerance was dependent on the increased expression of HAA1 gene. The ethanol production ability of ER HAA1-OP was almost equivalent to that of the parent strain during the bioethanol production process from sugarcane molasses in the absence of acetate. The addition of acetate at 0.5% (w/v, pH 4.5) inhibited the fermentation ability of the parent strain, but such an inhibition was not observed in the ethanol production process using ER HAA1-OP. PMID:24373204

  20. Properties of S-adenosyl-L-methionine:macrocin O-methyltransferase in extracts of Streptomyces fradiae strains which produce normal or elevated levels of tylosin and in mutants blocked in specific O-methylations.

    PubMed Central

    Seno, E T; Baltz, R H

    1981-01-01

    An efficient assay for S-adenosyl-L-methionine:macrocin O-methyltransferase, the enzyme which carries out the terminal step in tylosin biosynthesis, is described. Macrocin O-methyltransferase requires Mg2+ and S-adenosyl-L-methionine for activity, has a temperature optimum of about 31 degrees C, and has a pH optimum of 7.5 to 8.2. Macrocin O-methyltransferase specifically converts macrocin to tylosin by O-methylation of the 3" ' position of macrocin. In vitro methylation studies with extracts from a tylosin-producing Streptomyces fradiae strain and from mutant strains blocked in 2" '- or 3" '-O-methylations indicated that: (i) the 2" '- and 3" '-O-methylations occur after 6-deoxy-D-allose is attached to the macrolide ring; (ii) the 2" '- and 3" '-O-methylations are carried out by separate enzymes; and (iii) the 2" '-O-methylation precedes the 3" '-O-methylation. Macrocin O-methyltransferase was inhibited by high levels of its substrate, macrocin, by its product, tylosin, and by other tylosin analogs which contained mycinose or demethyl analogs of mycinose. Macrocin O-methyltransferase was produced early in the tylosin fermentation cycle by S. fradiae and preceded the onset of rapid tylosin biosynthesis by about 24 h. The enzyme specific activity reached maximum at about 72 h and then slowly declined. A mutant strain of S. fradiae selected for increased tylosin production synthesized macrocin O-methyltransferase more rapidly and accumulated a higher enzyme specific activity than a wild-type strain. PMID:7305323

  1. Expression and Immunogenicity of a Mutant Diphtheria Toxin Molecule, CRM197, and Its Fragments in Salmonella typhi Vaccine Strain CVD 908-htrA

    PubMed Central

    Orr, Nadav; Galen, James E.; Levine, Myron M.

    1999-01-01

    Mutant diphtheria toxin molecule CRM197 and fragments thereof were expressed in attenuated Salmonella typhi CVD 908-htrA, and the constructs were tested for their ability to induce serum antitoxin. Initially, expressed proteins were insoluble, and the constructs failed to induce neutralizing antitoxin. Soluble CRM197 was expressed at low levels by utilizing the hemolysin A secretion system from Escherichia coli. PMID:10417208

  2. Two New Point Mutations at A2062 Associated with Resistance to 16-Membered Macrolide Antibiotics in Mutant Strains of Mycoplasma hominis

    PubMed Central

    Furneri, Pio Maria; Rappazzo, Giancarlo; Musumarra, Maria Pia; Di Pietro, Patrizia; Catania, Lucrezia S.; Roccasalva, Lucia Silvana

    2001-01-01

    We describe two mutants of Mycoplasma hominis PG-21 which show resistance to 16-membered macrolides but susceptibility to lincosamides, obtained by in vitro exposure to increasing doses of josamycin. The 23S rRNA gene showed that each had a mutation (A2062G and A2062T) corresponding to nucleotide 2062 in Escherichia coli, which was associated with the acquired phenotype. PMID:11557502

  3. Isolation of a catabolite repression mutant of yeast as a revertant of a strain that is maltose negative in the respiratory-deficient state.

    PubMed Central

    Schamhart, D H; Ten Berge, A M; Van De Poll, K W

    1975-01-01

    A character originating from Saccharomyces cerevisiae 1403-7A is described which interferes with maltose growth in the respiratory-deficient state. This character is inherited in an apparently non-Mendelian way, but at present no statement can be made concerning the localization of this character on a plasmid or the involvement of multiple genes. As a revertant of this character, a flaky mutant was isolated, showing a heavy flocculation during growth on liquid medium and resistance to catabolite repression for maltase, alpha-methyl-glucosidase, invertase, and succinate dehydrogenase. In wild-type cells, repression (caused by growth on 2% glucose) and derepression (caused by growth on 2% galactose) can be correlated with a lower and a higher level of cyclic 3',5'-adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), respectively. In cells of flaky mutant, growth on these carbon sources results in the same levels of cAMP as observed for the wild type. Consequently, in this mutant derepression in the presence of 2% glucose is not reflected in a higher level of cAMP. PMID:163813

  4. Biological Control of Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Colonization, and pAgK84 Transfer with Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 and the Tra- Mutant Strain K1026

    PubMed Central

    Vicedo, Begonya; Peñalver, Ramón; Asins, María José; López, María M.

    1993-01-01

    The efficacies of Agrobacterium radiobacter K84 and K1026 in root colonization, crown gall control, and plasmid transfer were compared. Levels of root colonization by K84 and K1026 of Montclar and Nemaguard peach seedlings were similar during the 21 days of the experiment. Four strains of A. tumefaciens bv. 1 were used for soil inoculations in biological control experiments on GF677 and Adafuel peach × almond rootstocks; two were sensitive and two were resistant to agrocin 84. Both strains K84 and K1026 were very efficient in controlling the sensitive strains, but some tumors appeared with both treatments. In the biocontrol of resistant strains, no galls were observed in K1026-treated plants, but some K84-treated plants had galls. Recovery of agrobacteria from galls in experiments with sensitive and resistant strains showed that all of the isolates from the controls or K1026-treated plants and most of the isolates from K84-treated plants had the same characteristics as the inoculated strains. Nine isolates from the K84-treated plants growing in soil inoculated with one resistant strain were virulent and produced agrocin 84. These isolates had a plasmid that hybridized with a probe prepared with the BamHI C fragment from pAgK84. These results show the efficiency of K1026 in biocontrol of agrocin 84-sensitive and -resistant strains of A. tumefaciens and suggest the use of K1026 as a safer organism than K84 for biological control of crown gall. Images PMID:16348854

  5. Locating a modifier gene of Ovum mutant through crosses between DDK and C57BL/6J inbred strains in mice.

    PubMed

    Tan, Jing; Song, Gen Di; Song, Jia Sheng; Ren, Shi Hao; Li, Chun Li; Zheng, Zhen Yu; Zhao, Wei Dong

    2016-06-01

    A striking infertile phenotype has been discovered in the DDK strain of mouse. The DDK females are usually infertile when crossed with males of other inbred strains, whereas DDK males exhibit normal fertility in reciprocal crosses. This phenomenon is caused by mutation in the ovum (Om) locus on chromosome 11 and known as the DDK syndrome. Previously, some research groups reported that the embryonic mortality deviated from the semilethal rate in backcrosses between heterozygous (Om/+) females and males of other strains. This embryonic mortality exhibited an aggravated trend with increasing background genes of other strains. These results indicated that some modifier genes of Om were present in other strains. In the present study, a population of N₂2 (Om/+) females from the backcrosses between C57BL/6J (B6) and F₁ (B6♀ × DDK♂) was used to map potential modifier genes of Om. Quantitative trait locus showed that a major locus, namely Amom1 (aggravate modifier gene of Om 1), was located at the middle part of chromosome 9 in mice. The Amom1 could increase the expressivity of Om gene, thereby aggravating embryonic lethality when heterozygous (Om/+) females mated with males of B6 strain. Further, the 1.5 LOD-drop analysis indicated that the confidence interval was between 37.54 and 44.46 cM, ~6.92 cM. Amom1 is the first modifier gene of Om in the B6 background.

  6. Procedures and tools for building large Ada systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hyde, Ben

    1986-01-01

    Some of the problems unique to building a very large Ada system are addressed. This is done through examples from experience. In the winter of 1985 and 1986, Intermetrics bootstrapped the Ada compiler, which was being built over the last few years. This system consists of about one million lines of full Ada. Over the last few years a number of procedures and tools were adopted for managing the life cycle of each of the many parts of an Ada system. Many of these procedures are well known to most system builders: release management, quality assurance testing; and source file revision control. Others are unique to working in an Ada language environment; i.e., recompilation management, Ada program library management, and managing multiple implementations. First a look is taken at how a large Ada system is broken down into pieces. The Ada definition leaves unspecified a number of issues that the system builder must address: versions, subsystems, multiple implementations, and synchronization of branched development paths. Having introduced how the Ada systems are decomposed, a look is taken, via a series of examples, at how the life cylces of those parts is managed. The procedures and tools used to manage the evolution of the system are examined. It is hoped that other Ada system builders can build upon the experience of the last few years.

  7. QUEST/Ada: Query utility environment for software testing of Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, David B.

    1989-01-01

    Results of research and development efforts are presented for Task 1, Phase 2 of a general project entitled, The Development of a Program Analysis Environment for Ada. A prototype of the QUEST/Ada system was developed to collect data to determine the effectiveness of the rule-based testing paradigm. The prototype consists of five parts: the test data generator, the parser/scanner, the test coverage analyzer, a symbolic evaluator, and a data management facility, known as the Librarian. These components are discussed at length. Also presented is an experimental design for the evaluations, an overview of the project, and a schedule for its completion.

  8. The complete nucleotide sequence of two cold-adapted, temperature-sensitive attenuated mutant vaccine viruses (cp12 and cp45) derived from the JS strain of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3).

    PubMed

    Stokes, A; Tierney, E L; Sarris, C M; Murphy, B R; Hall, S L

    1993-10-01

    Two cold-passaged mutant vaccine viruses (cp12 and cp45) derived from the JS wild-type (wt) strain of human parainfluenza virus type 3 (PIV3) have been sequenced. These mutant viruses display the cold-adapted (ca), temperature-sensitive (ts), and attenuation (att) phenotypes. Sequence data indicate that both cp12 and cp45 sustained nucleotide substitutions during cold passage and subsequent cloning. Fifteen nucleotide changes were present in cp12 and 18 in cp45. Of these changes, some were present in the sequence of the prototype wt strain (Wash/47885/57) or were non-coding changes present in the open reading frames (ORFs). These were considered unlikely to be of significance in contributing to phenotypic differences between the mutants and the JS wt. There were nine remaining changes in cp12 and eight in cp45 that would most likely contribute to their phenotypes. For cp12, two were non-coding changes in regulatory regions, one in the 3' genome leader and one in the NP gene transcription start signal. The remaining seven changes resulted in amino acid substitutions in NP, F, HN, and L. For cp45, two mutations were in a non-coding regulatory region, the 3' genome leader. The remaining six changes resulted in amino acid substitutions in F, HN, and L. Only one amino acid substitution was conserved between cp12 and cp45 (a valine to alanine change at position 384 of the HN gene). These results should prove useful in the future in understanding the genetic basis of attenuation of the cold-passaged PIV3 candidate vaccine viruses.

  9. Comparison of Gen-probe transcription-mediated amplification, Abbott PCR, and Roche PCR assays for detection of wild-type and mutant plasmid strains of Chlamydia trachomatis in Sweden.

    PubMed

    Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Pedersen, Lisbeth Nørum; Persson, Kenneth

    2008-12-01

    The clinical performance of two nucleic acid amplification assays targeting the cryptic plasmid and two assays targeting rRNA molecules in Chlamydia trachomatis was examined. First-catch urine samples from Malmoe, Sweden, were tested for C. trachomatis with the Abbott real-time PCR assay m2000 and an in-house PCR for the new variant strain of C. trachomatis with a deletion in the cryptic plasmid. Aliquots of the urine samples were sent to Aarhus, Denmark, and further examined with the Roche COBAS Amplicor CT (RCA) PCR, the Gen-Probe Aptima Combo 2 assay (AC2) targeting the C. trachomatis 23S rRNA, and the Aptima C. trachomatis assay (ACT) targeting the 16S rRNA molecule. A positive prevalence of 9% (163/1,808 urine samples examined) was detected according to the combined reference standard. The clinical sensitivity and specificity of the four assays were as follows: for ACT, 100% (163/163) and 99.9% (1,643/1,645), respectively; for AC2, 100% (163/163) and 99.6% (1,640/1,645); for m2000, 68.7% (112/163) and 99.9% (1,644/1,645); for RCA, 63.8% (104/163) and 99.9% (1,643/1,645). The two Gen-Probe assays detected all mutant strains characterized by the in-house PCR as having the deletion in the cryptic plasmid, whereas the Roche and the Abbott PCRs targeting the plasmid were both unable to detect the plasmid mutant. The difference in clinical sensitivity between the plasmid PCR assays m2000 and RCA, on the one hand, and the rRNA assays AC2 and ACT, on the other, could be attributed almost exclusively to the presence of the plasmid mutant in about one-quarter of the Chlamydia-positive samples examined.

  10. A mutant pyruvate dehydrogenase E1 subunit allows survival of Escherichia coli strains defective in 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate synthase.

    PubMed

    Sauret-Güeto, Susanna; Urós, Eva María; Ibáñez, Ester; Boronat, Albert; Rodríguez-Concepción, Manuel

    2006-02-06

    The 2-C-methyl-D-erythritol 4-phosphate pathway has been proposed as a promising target to develop new antimicrobial agents. However, spontaneous mutations in Escherichia coli were observed to rescue the otherwise lethal loss of the first two enzymes of the pathway, 1-deoxy-D-xylulose 5-phosphate (DXP) synthase (DXS) and DXP reductoisomerase (DXR), with a relatively high frequency. A mutation in the gene encoding the E1 subunit of the pyruvate dehydrogenase complex was shown to be sufficient to rescue the lack of DXS but not DXR in vivo, suggesting that the mutant enzyme likely allows the synthesis of DXP or an alternative substrate for DXR.

  11. Association of G22A and A4223C ADA1 gene polymorphisms and ADA activity with PCOS.

    PubMed

    Salehabadi, Mahshid; Farimani, Marzieh; Tavilani, Heidar; Ghorbani, Marzieh; Poormonsefi, Faranak; Poorolajal, Jalal; Shafiei, Gholamreza; Ghasemkhani, Neda; Khodadadi, Iraj

    2016-06-01

    Adenosine deaminase-1 (ADA1) regulates the concentration of adenosine as the main modulator of oocyte maturation. There is compelling evidence for the association of ADA1 gene polymorphisms with many diseases but the importance of ADA1 polymorphisms in polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) has not been studied before. This study investigates serum total ADA activity (tADA), ADA1 and ADA2 isoenzyme activities, and genotype and allele frequencies of G22A and A4223C polymorphisms in healthy and PCOS women. In this case-control study 200 PCOS patients and 200 healthy women were enrolled. Genomic DNA was extracted from whole blood and the PCR-RFLP technique was used to determine the G22A and A4223C variants. The genotype frequencies were calculated and the association between polymorphic genotypes and enzyme activities were determined. tADA activity was significantly lower in the PCOS group compared with the control group (27.76±6.0 vs. 39.63±7.48, respectively). PCOS patients also showed reduced activity of ADA1 and ADA2. PCOS was not associated with G22A polymorphism whereas AA, AC, and CC genotypes of A4223C polymorphism were found distributed differently between the control and the PCOS women where the C allele showed a strong protective role for PCOS (odds ratio=1.876, p=0.033). The present study for the first time showed that lower ADA activity may be involved in pathogenesis of PCOS by maintaining a higher concentration of adenosine affecting follicular growth. As a novel finding, we also showed great differences in genotype distribution and allele frequencies of A4223C polymorphism between groups indicating a protective role for C allele against PCOS. AbbreviationsADA: adenosine deaminase PCOS: polycystic ovary syndrome PCR-RFLP: polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism tADA: total adenosine deaminase.

  12. Real-Time Ada Demonstration Project

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-05-31

    CENER OR OFTAREENGINEERING ADVANCED SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY Subject: Final Report - Real-Time Ada Demonstration Proj e-t- --.-. SEP 0 1989 D SEA)~ CIN...C02 0921I 6))00 I 31 MAY 1989 *:i ’C O~ 0"ed ~ 842 190 ?’ 45 DEMONSTRATION PROJECT FINAL REPORT PREPARED FOR: U.S. Army HQ CECOM Center for Software ...Engineering Advanced Software Technology Fort Monmouth, NJ 07703-5000 Accession For NTIS G1A&I DTIC TAB PREPARED BY: unannou:1r2d E LabTek Corporation

  13. Restoring balance to B cells in ADA deficiency.

    PubMed

    Luning Prak, Eline T

    2012-06-01

    It is paradoxical that immunodeficiency disorders are associated with autoimmunity. Adenosine deaminase (ADA) deficiency, a cause of X-linked severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), is a case in point. In this issue of the JCI, Sauer and colleagues investigate the B cell defects in ADA-deficient patients. They demonstrate that ADA patients receiving enzyme replacement therapy had B cell tolerance checkpoint defects. Remarkably, gene therapy with a retrovirus that expresses ADA resulted in the apparent correction of these defects, with normalization of peripheral B cell autoantibody frequencies. In vitro, agents that either block ADA or overexpress adenosine resulted in altered B cell receptor and TLR signaling. Collectively, these data implicate a B cell-intrinsic mechanism for alterations in B cell tolerance in the setting of partial ADA deficiency that is corrected by gene therapy.

  14. The genetic control of molybdoflavoproteins in Aspergillus nidulans. A xanthine dehydrogenase I half-molecule in cnx- mutant strains of Aspergillus nidulans.

    PubMed

    Lewis, N J; Scazzocchio, C

    1977-06-15

    The cnx- group of mutants of Aspergillus nidulans lacks xanthine dehydrogenase (xanthine: NAD+ oxidoreductase, EC 1.2.1.37) and nitrate reductase (EC 1.6.6.3) activities and are thought to be defective in the synthesis of a molybdenum-containing cofactor, 'cnx', common to xanthine dehydrogenase and nitrate reductase [Pateman, J.A., Rever, B.M., Cove, D.J. and Roberts, D.B. (1964) Nature (Lond.) 201, 58-60]. The cnx cofactor has a role in maintaining the aggregated multimeric structure of nitrate reductase [MacDonald, D.W., Cove, D.J. and Coddington, A. (1974) Mol. Gen. Genet. 128, 187-199]. We report here that, in cnx- mutants grown under conditions inducing xanthine dehydrogenase I, a species cross-reacting with antisera to the native enzyme and of half its molecular weight is present, together with cross-reacting molecules of similar molecular weight to the native enzyme. This suggests that the cnx cofactor has a role in maintaining the aggregated structure of xanthine dehydrogenase I. Both cross-reacting species are capable of passing reducing equivalents from NADH to a tetrazolium salt, showing that the cnx cofactor is not necessary for enzymic activity towards NADH.

  15. Software engineering and the role of Ada: Executive seminar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freedman, Glenn B.

    1987-01-01

    The objective was to introduce the basic terminology and concepts of software engineering and Ada. The life cycle model is reviewed. The application of the goals and principles of software engineering is applied. An introductory understanding of the features of the Ada language is gained. Topics addressed include: the software crises; the mandate of the Space Station Program; software life cycle model; software engineering; and Ada under the software engineering umbrella.

  16. ART/Ada design project, phase 1: Project plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Bradley P.

    1988-01-01

    The plan and schedule for Phase 1 of the Ada based ESBT Design Research Project is described. The main platform for the project is a DEC Ada compiler on VAX mini-computers and VAXstations running the Virtual Memory System (VMS) operating system. The Ada effort and lines of code are given in tabular form. A chart is given of the entire project life cycle.

  17. Towards a formal semantics for Ada 9X

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Guaspari, David; Mchugh, John; Wolfgang, Polak; Saaltink, Mark

    1995-01-01

    The Ada 9X language precision team was formed during the revisions of Ada 83, with the goal of analyzing the proposed design, identifying problems, and suggesting improvements, through the use of mathematical models. This report defines a framework for formally describing Ada 9X, based on Kahn's 'natural semantics', and applies the framework to portions of the language. The proposals for exceptions and optimization freedoms are also analyzed, using a different technique.

  18. Ada (Tradename) Compiler Validation Summary Report. Symbolics, Inc., Symbolics Ada, Version 1.0. Symbolics 3600.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-06-11

    foo.a.b.c ........ An illegal extiernal file name that either contains invalid characters or is too long. $FILE NAME WITH WILD CARD CHAR "eno: >testing...ada>-tests>c*.." An extiernal file name that either contains a wild card character or is too long. $GREATER THAN DURATION 864~01.0 A univeral real value

  19. ADA (adenosine deaminase) gene therapy enters the competition

    SciTech Connect

    Culliton, B.J.

    1990-08-31

    Around the world, some 70 children are members of a select and deadly club. Born with an immune deficiency so severe that they will die of infection unless their immune systems can be repaired, they have captured the attention of would-be gene therapists who believe that a handful of these kids--the 15 or 20 who lack functioning levels of the enzyme adenosine deaminase (ADA)--could be saved by a healthy ADA gene. A team of gene therapists is ready to put the theory to the test. In April 1987, a team of NIH researchers headed by R. Michael Blaese and W. French Anderson came up with the first formal protocol to introduce a healthy ADA gene into an unhealthy human. After 3 years of line-by-line scrutiny by five review committees, they have permission to go ahead. Two or three children will be treated in the next year, and will be infused with T lymphocytes carrying the gene for ADA. If the experiment works, the ADA gene will begin producing normal amounts of ADA. An interesting feature of ADA deficiency, that makes it ideal for initial gene studies, is that the amount of ADA one needs for a healthy immune system is quite variable. Hence, once inside a patient's T cells, the new ADA gene needs only to express the enzyme in moderate amounts. No precise gene regulation is necessary.

  20. Assessment of the Ada (Trade Name) Validation Process.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-12-01

    Sincerely,’ Warren Berger Intermetr±os, Inc. Ada Systems Division733 Concord Ave Cambridge, MA 02146 (617) 661-1840 ’C-79 Arpanet: ima!inmet!ada-uts!wkb...Warren Berger S Intermetrics, Inc. Ada Systems Division 733 Concord Ave I Cambridge, MA 02146 (617) 661-1840 Arpanet: imalinmetiada-utsiwkb@CCA-UNIX.ARPA...MA 02146 (617) 661-1840 Arpanet: ima!inmetiada-uts wkb@CCA-UNIX.ARPA -- CA5004B-B.ADA -- CHECK THAT PRAGMA ELABORATE IS ACCEPTED AND OBEYED EVEN IF

  1. Implementation of a production Ada project: The GRODY study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godfrey, Sara; Brophy, Carolyn Elizabeth

    1989-01-01

    The use of the Ada language and design methodologies that encourage full use of its capabilities have a strong impact on all phases of the software development project life cycle. At the National Aeronautics and Space Administration/Goddard Space Flight Center (NASA/GSFC), the Software Engineering Laboratory (SEL) conducted an experiment in parallel development of two flight dynamics systems in FORTRAN and Ada. The differences observed during the implementation, unit testing, and integration phases of the two projects are described and the lessons learned during the implementation phase of the Ada development are outlined. Included are recommendations for future Ada development projects.

  2. Transferring data objects: A focused Ada investigation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Legrand, Sue

    1988-01-01

    The use of the Ada language does not guarantee that data objects will be in the same form or have the same value after they have been stored or transferred to another system. There are too many possible variables in such things as the formats used and other protocol conditions. Differences may occur at many different levels of support. These include program level, object level, application level, and system level. A standard language is only one aspect of making a complex system completely homogeneous. Many components must be standardized and the various standards must be integrated. The principal issues in providing for interaction between systems are of exchanging files and data objects between systems which may not be compatible in terms of their host computer, operating system or other factors. A typical resolution of the problem of invalidating data involves at least a common external form, for data objects and for representing the relationships and attributes of data collections. Some of the issues dealing with the transfer of data are listed and consideration is given on how these issues may be handled in the Ada language.

  3. Ada and the rapid development lifecycle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Deforrest, Lloyd; Gref, Lynn

    1991-01-01

    JPL is under contract, through NASA, with the US Army to develop a state-of-the-art Command Center System for the US European Command (USEUCOM). The Command Center System will receive, process, and integrate force status information from various sources and provide this integrated information to staff officers and decision makers in a format designed to enhance user comprehension and utility. The system is based on distributed workstation class microcomputers, VAX- and SUN-based data servers, and interfaces to existing military mainframe systems and communication networks. JPL is developing the Command Center System utilizing an incremental delivery methodology called the Rapid Development Methodology with adherence to government and industry standards including the UNIX operating system, X Windows, OSF/Motif, and the Ada programming language. Through a combination of software engineering techniques specific to the Ada programming language and the Rapid Development Approach, JPL was able to deliver capability to the military user incrementally, with comparable quality and improved economies of projects developed under more traditional software intensive system implementation methodologies.

  4. Elevated levels of petite formation in strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae restored to respiratory competence. II. Organization of mitochondrial genomes in strains having high and moderate frequencies of petite mutant formation.

    PubMed

    Evans, R J; Clark-Walker, G D

    1985-11-01

    Restriction enzyme analysis of aberrant mtDNA molecules in restored strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that displays an elevated level of petite formation has shown the occurrence of novel junction fragments and nonstoichiometric amounts for some unaltered bands. Five aberrant mitochondrial genomes from high-frequency petite-forming (hfp) strains (greater than 60% petites per generation) contain like-oriented duplications and single copy regions. High-frequency petite formation is postulated to arise from increased intramolecular recombination between duplicated segments. Mitochondrial DNA structures in two other hfp strains cannot be easily interpreted and might arise from intramolecular recombination. Mitochondria DNA from moderate-frequency petite-forming (mfp) strains (5-16% petites per generation) contains inverted duplications in two cases. The elevated petite formation is postulated to arise from homologous recombination between directly repeated sequences. In mtDNA from one mfp strain, deletion end-points have been shown to overlap. Such deletion endpoint overlap is postulated to be required for the maintenance of the tandem duplication in hfp strains. Two regions of the wild-type mtDNA (between cyb and oli2 and between SrRNA and oxi2) appear to be dispensable for mitochondrial function.

  5. Ada (Trade Name) Complier Validation Summary Report: Verdix Ada Development System, Version 5.2 for the Sequent Balance under DYNIX, Release 1.3.2.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-15

    ADAP B4 2 -B.DA B5001AAB-DA A54BO2A-B.ADA P B54A21A-B.ADA P B57001A-BADA P A55ISO2A- ABADA P B54A25BA-ADA P B5T001B-B.ADA P A55Bl3A-AB.ADA P B54A27B...B91001B-AB.ADA P B950BAA-B.ADA P C92003A.ADA P B91001C-AB.ADA P B950DHA-B.ADA P C92OAJA-B.ADA P B91001D- ABADA P B96002A-B.ADA P C920BAA-B.ADA P *B91001E...TESTS AND RESULTS Chapter 11 660 BB201A-k.AD P C100A- ABADA P CB003-kB.DA 82002A-AB.ADA P CB1003A-AB.ADA P CB4003A-B.ADA P BB2003A-AB.ADA P CB200IIA

  6. Transcript and proteomic analyses of wild-type and gpa2 mutant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains suggest a role for glycolytic carbon source sensing in pseudohyphal differentiation.

    PubMed

    Medintz, Igor L; Vora, Gary J; Rahbar, Amir M; Thach, Dzung C

    2007-09-01

    In response to limited nitrogen and abundant carbon sources, diploid Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains undergo a filamentous transition in cell growth as part of pseudohyphal differentiation. Use of the disaccharide maltose as the principal carbon source, in contrast to the preferred nutrient monosaccharide glucose, has been shown to induce a hyper-filamentous growth phenotype in a strain deficient for GPA2 which codes for a Galpha protein component that interacts with the glucose-sensing receptor Gpr1p to regulate filamentous growth. In this report, we compare the global transcript and proteomic profiles of wild-type and Gpa2p deficient diploid yeast strains grown on both rich and nitrogen starved maltose media. We find that deletion of GPA2 results in significantly different transcript and protein profiles when switching from rich to nitrogen starvation media. The results are discussed with a focus on the genes associated with carbon utilization, or regulation thereof, and a model for the contribution of carbon sensing/metabolism-based signal transduction to pseudohyphal differentiation is proposed.

  7. Growth of wildtype and mutant E. coli strains in minimal media for optimal production of nucleic acids for preparing labeled nucleotides.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Chandar S; Brown, Margaret E; Sama, Jacob N; Jackson, Melantha E; Dayie, T Kwaku

    2010-10-01

    Since RNAs lie at the center of most cellular processes, there is a need for synthesizing large amounts of RNAs made from stable isotope-labeled nucleotides to advance the study of their structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A particularly effective means of obtaining labeled nucleotides is to harvest these nucleotides from bacteria grown in defined minimal media supplemented with 15NH4Cl and various carbon sources. Given the high cost of carbon precursors required for labeling nucleic acids for NMR studies, it becomes important to evaluate the optimal growth for commonly used strains under standard minimal media conditions. Such information is lacking. In this study, we characterize the growth for Escherichia coli strains K12, K10zwf, and DL323 in three minimal media with isotopic-labeled carbon sources of acetate, glycerol, and glycerol combined with formate. Of the three media, the LeMaster-Richards and the Studier media outperform the commonly used M9 media and both support optimal growth of E. coli for the production of nucleotides. However, the growth of all three E. coli strains in acetate is reduced almost twofold compared to growth in glycerol. Analysis of the metabolic pathway and previous gene array studies help to explain this differential growth in glycerol and acetate. These studies should benefit efforts to make selective 13C-15N isotopic-labeled nucleotides for synthesizing biologically important RNAs.

  8. Analysis of Training-Related Issues in the Transition to Ada in the DON

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-09-01

    Ada was previously taught as a first language at the Naval Academy, but was dropped from the curriculum because it was "too difficult." A recent...as a First Language 10-15 Days x x Ada Refresher Programming 5 Days x x Ada Data Structures 5 Days x x Ada Tasking 5-10 Days x x Ada Project

  9. Induction of Unconventional T Cells by a Mutant Mycobacterium bovis BCG Strain Formulated in Cationic Liposomes Correlates with Protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis Infections of Immunocompromised Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yabe, Idalia; Morris, Sheldon; Cowley, Siobhan

    2016-01-01

    Earlier studies aimed at defining protective immunity induced by Mycobacterium bovis BCG immunization have largely focused on the induction of antituberculosis CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses. Here we describe a vaccine consisting of a BCGΔmmaA4 deletion mutant formulated in dimethyl dioctadecyl-ammonium bromide (DDA) with d-(+)-trehalose 6,6′-dibehenate (TDB) (DDA/TDB) adjuvant (A4/Adj) that protected TCRδ−/− mice depleted of CD4+, CD8+, and NK1.1+ T cells against an aerosol challenge with M. tuberculosis. These mice were significantly protected relative to mice immunized with a nonadjuvanted BCGΔmmaA4 (BCG-A4) mutant and nonvaccinated controls at 2 months and 9 months postvaccination. In the absence of all T cells following treatment with anti-Thy1.2 antibody, the immunized mice lost the ability to control the infection. These results indicate that an unconventional T cell population was mediating protection in the absence of CD4+, CD8+, NK1.1+, and TCRγδ T cells and could exhibit memory. Focusing on CD4− CD8− double-negative (DN) T cells, we found that these cells accumulated in the lungs postchallenge significantly more in A4/Adj-immunized mice and induced significantly greater frequencies of pulmonary gamma interferon (IFN-γ)-producing cells than were seen in the nonvaccinated or nonadjuvanted BCG control groups. Moreover, pulmonary DN T cells from the A4/Adj group exhibited significantly higher IFN-γ integrated median fluorescence intensity (iMFI) values than were seen in the control groups. We also showed that enriched DN T cells from mice immunized with A4/Adj could control mycobacterial growth in vitro significantly better than naive whole-spleen cells. These results suggest that formulating BCG in DDA/TDB adjuvant confers superior protection in immunocompromised mice and likely involves the induction of long-lived memory DN T cells. PMID:27226281

  10. Growth of wildtype and mutant E. coli strains in minimal media for optimal production of nucleic acids for preparing labeled nucleotides

    PubMed Central

    Thakur, Chandar S.; Brown, Margaret E.; Sama, Jacob N.; Jackson, Melantha E.

    2010-01-01

    Since RNAs lie at the center of most cellular processes, there is a need for synthesizing large amounts of RNAs made from stable isotope-labeled nucleotides to advance the study of their structure and dynamics by nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy. A particularly effective means of obtaining labeled nucleotides is to harvest these nucleotides from bacteria grown in defined minimal media supplemented with 15NH4Cl and various carbon sources. Given the high cost of carbon precursors required for labeling nucleic acids for NMR studies, it becomes important to evaluate the optimal growth for commonly used strains under standard minimal media conditions. Such information is lacking. In this study, we characterize the growth for Escherichia coli strains K12, K10zwf, and DL323 in three minimal media with isotopic-labeled carbon sources of acetate, glycerol, and glycerol combined with formate. Of the three media, the LeMaster-Richards and the Studier media outperform the commonly used M9 media and both support optimal growth of E. coli for the production of nucleotides. However, the growth of all three E. coli strains in acetate is reduced almost twofold compared to growth in glycerol. Analysis of the metabolic pathway and previous gene array studies help to explain this differential growth in glycerol and acetate. These studies should benefit efforts to make selective 13C-15N isotopic-labeled nucleotides for synthesizing biologically important RNAs. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00253-010-2813-y) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20730533

  11. Attenuated Shigella flexneri 2a Vaccine Strain CVD 1204 Expressing Colonization Factor Antigen I and Mutant Heat-Labile Enterotoxin of Enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli

    PubMed Central

    Koprowski, Hilary; Levine, Myron M.; Anderson, Richard J.; Losonsky, Genevieve; Pizza, Mariagrazia; Barry, Eileen M.

    2000-01-01

    A multivalent live oral vaccine against both Shigella spp. and enterotoxigenic Escherichia coli (ETEC) is being developed based on the hypothesis that protection can be achieved if attenuated shigellae express ETEC fimbrial colonization factors and genetically detoxified heat-labile toxin from a human ETEC isolate (LTh). Two detoxified derivatives of LTh, LThK63 and LThR72, were engineered by substitution—serine to lysine at residue 63, or lysine to arginine at residue 72. The genes encoding these two derivatives were cloned separately on expression plasmids downstream from the CFA/I operon. Following electroporation into S. flexneri 2a vaccine strain CVD 1204, coexpression of CFA/I and LThK63 or LThR72 was demonstrated by Western blot analysis, GM1 binding assays, and agglutination with anti-CFA/I antiserum. Hemagglutination and electron microscopy confirmed surface expression of CFA/I. Guinea pigs immunized intranasally on days 0 and 15 with CVD 1204 expressing CFA/I and LThK63 or LThR72 exhibited high titers of both serum immunoglobulin G (IgG) and mucosal secretory IgA anti-CFA/I; 40% of the animals produced antibodies directed against LTh. All immunized guinea pigs also produced mucosal IgA (in tears) and serum IgG anti-S. flexneri 2a O antibodies. Furthermore, all immunized animals were protected from challenge with wild-type S. flexneri 2a. This prototype Shigella-ETEC hybrid vaccine demonstrates the feasibility of expressing multiple ETEC antigens on a single plasmid in an attenuated Shigella vaccine strain and engendering immune responses against both the heterologous antigens and vector strain. PMID:10948101

  12. 59 FR- Realty Action; Ada and Owyhee, ID

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    1994-05-03

    ...-332A-02; IDI-29516] Realty Action; Ada and Owyhee, ID AGENCY: Bureau of Land Management, Interior. ACTION: Notice of Realty Action--IDI-29516; Exchange of public and private lands in Ada and Owyhee.... Containing 640 acres, more or less, in Owyhee County. The purpose of this exchange is to dispose of...

  13. The ADA and IDEA Basics: Inclusion of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motwani, Mona

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The ADA is a federal civil rights law that was passed in 1990 with the aim of securing equal rights for persons with disabilities in the employment, housing, government, transportation, and public accommodation contexts. It…

  14. Fine-Tuning ADAS Algorithm Parameters for Optimizing Traffic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    With the development of the Connected Vehicle technology that facilitates wirelessly communication among vehicles and road-side infrastructure, the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) can be adopted as an effective tool for accelerating traffic safety and mobility optimization at various highway facilities. To this end, the traffic management centers identify the optimal ADAS algorithm parameter set that enables the maximum improvement of the traffic safety and mobility performance, and broadcast the optimal parameter set wirelessly to individual ADAS-equipped vehicles. After adopting the optimal parameter set, the ADAS-equipped drivers become active agents in the traffic stream that work collectively and consistently to prevent traffic conflicts, lower the intensity of traffic disturbances, and suppress the development of traffic oscillations into heavy traffic jams. Successful implementation of this objective requires the analysis capability of capturing the impact of the ADAS on driving behaviors, and measuring traffic safety and mobility performance under the influence of the ADAS. To address this challenge, this research proposes a synthetic methodology that incorporates the ADAS-affected driving behavior modeling and state-of-the-art microscopic traffic flow modeling into a virtually simulated environment. Building on such an environment, the optimal ADAS algorithm parameter set is identified through an optimization programming framework to enable th

  15. 49 CFR 37.125 - ADA paratransit eligibility: Process.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 1 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false ADA paratransit eligibility: Process. 37.125... paratransit eligibility: Process. Each public entity required to provide complementary paratransit service by § 37.121 of this part shall establish a process for determining ADA paratransit eligibility. (a)...

  16. Alma Flor Ada and the Quest for Change

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Manna, Anthony, L.; Hill, Janet; Kellogg, Kathy

    2004-01-01

    Alma Flor Ada, a folklorist, novelist, scholar, teacher, and children's book author has passionate dedication to education for social justice, equality, and peace. As a faculty member at the University of San Francisco, Ada has developed programs that help students and others transform their lives and has written several bilingual legends and…

  17. Artificial Intelligence in ADA: Pattern-Directed Processing. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reeker, Larry H.; And Others

    To demonstrate to computer programmers that the programming language Ada provides superior facilities for use in artificial intelligence applications, the three papers included in this report investigate the capabilities that exist within Ada for "pattern-directed" programming. The first paper (Larry H. Reeker, Tulane University) is…

  18. The ADA and IDEA Basics: Inclusion of Children with Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Motwani, Mona

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses the American with Disabilities Act (ADA) and the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA). The ADA is a federal civil rights law that was passed in 1990 with the aim of securing equal rights for persons with disabilities in the employment, housing, government, transportation, and public accommodation contexts. It…

  19. A Student Affairs Guide to the ADA & Disability Issues. Monograph.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Dan, Ed.; McCarthy, Maureen, Ed.

    Recent passage of the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) has rekindled debates on the responsibilities of postsecondary institutions to serve students with disabilities. This book provides a comprehensive guide to an institutional response to the ADA. It gives practical advice for responding to students and professionals with disabilities, and…

  20. A Practical Guide to the ADA and Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joffee, Elga

    Designed to be used as a companion to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), this guide provides information on how the law applies to individuals with visual impairments. Section 1, "The ADA and Visual Impairment," gives an overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act and discusses visual impairment and accessibility. Examples of…

  1. Fine-Tuning ADAS Algorithm Parameters for Optimizing Traffic ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    With the development of the Connected Vehicle technology that facilitates wirelessly communication among vehicles and road-side infrastructure, the Advanced Driver Assistance Systems (ADAS) can be adopted as an effective tool for accelerating traffic safety and mobility optimization at various highway facilities. To this end, the traffic management centers identify the optimal ADAS algorithm parameter set that enables the maximum improvement of the traffic safety and mobility performance, and broadcast the optimal parameter set wirelessly to individual ADAS-equipped vehicles. After adopting the optimal parameter set, the ADAS-equipped drivers become active agents in the traffic stream that work collectively and consistently to prevent traffic conflicts, lower the intensity of traffic disturbances, and suppress the development of traffic oscillations into heavy traffic jams. Successful implementation of this objective requires the analysis capability of capturing the impact of the ADAS on driving behaviors, and measuring traffic safety and mobility performance under the influence of the ADAS. To address this challenge, this research proposes a synthetic methodology that incorporates the ADAS-affected driving behavior modeling and state-of-the-art microscopic traffic flow modeling into a virtually simulated environment. Building on such an environment, the optimal ADAS algorithm parameter set is identified through an optimization programming framework to enable th

  2. A Practical Guide to the ADA and Visual Impairment.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Joffee, Elga

    Designed to be used as a companion to the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), this guide provides information on how the law applies to individuals with visual impairments. Section 1, "The ADA and Visual Impairment," gives an overview of the Americans with Disabilities Act and discusses visual impairment and accessibility. Examples of…

  3. A design for a reusable Ada library

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Litke, John D.

    1986-01-01

    A goal of the Ada language standardization effort is to promote reuse of software, implying the existence of substantial software libraries and the storage/retrieval mechanisms to support them. A searching/cataloging mechanism is proposed that permits full or partial distribution of the database, adapts to a variety of searching mechanisms, permits a changine taxonomy with minimal disruption, and minimizes the requirement of specialized cataloger/indexer skills. The important observation is that key words serve not only as indexing mechanism, but also as an identification mechanism, especially via concatenation and as support for a searching mechanism. By deliberately separating these multiple uses, the modifiability and ease of growth that current libraries require, is achieved.

  4. Service dogs, psychiatric hospitalization, and the ADA.

    PubMed

    Muramatsu, Russ S; Thomas, Kelly Jones; Leong, Stephanie L; Ragukonis, Frank

    2015-01-01

    A service dog is defined as "any dog that is individually trained to do work or perform tasks for the benefit of an individual with a disability, including a physical, sensory, psychiatric, intellectual, or other mental disability." Some psychiatric patients may depend on a service dog for day-to-day functioning. The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) established certain rights and responsibilities for individuals with disabilities and health care providers. Psychiatric hospitalization of a patient with a service dog may pose a problem and involves balancing the requirement to provide safe and appropriate psychiatric care with the rights of individuals with disabilities. This Open Forum examines issues that arise in such circumstances, reviews the literature, and provides a foundation for the development of policies and procedures.

  5. Bacillus pumilus KatX2 confers enhanced hydrogen peroxide resistance to a Bacillus subtilis PkatA::katX2 mutant strain.

    PubMed

    Handtke, Stefan; Albrecht, Dirk; Zühlke, Daniela; Otto, Andreas; Becher, Dörte; Schweder, Thomas; Riedel, Kathrin; Hecker, Michael; Voigt, Birgit

    2017-04-26

    Bacillus pumilus cells exhibit a significantly higher resistance to hydrogen peroxide compared to closely related Bacilli like Bacillus subtilis. In this study we analyzed features of the catalase KatX2 of B. pumilus as one of the most important parts of the cellular response to hydrogen peroxide. KatX2, the vegetative catalase expressed in B. pumilus, was compared to the vegetative catalase KatA of B. subtilis. Data of our study demonstrate that B. pumilus can degrade toxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide faster than B. subtilis. By replacing B. subtilis katA gene by katX2 we could significantly enhance its resistance to H2O2 and its potential to eliminate this toxic compound. Mutant cells showed a 1.5- to 2-fold higher survival to toxic concentrations of hydrogen peroxide compared to wild type cells. Furthermore, we found reversible but also irreversible oxidations of the KatX2 protein which, in contrast to KatA, contains several cysteine residues. Our study indicates that the catalase KatX2 plays a major role in the increased resistance of B. pumilus to oxidative stress caused by hydrogen peroxide. Resistance to hydrogen peroxide of other Bacilli can be enhanced by exchanging the native catalase in the cells with katX2.

  6. Comparison of the Exposure Time Dependence of the Activities of Synthetic Ozonide Antimalarials and Dihydroartemisinin against K13 Wild-Type and Mutant Plasmodium falciparum Strains

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tuo; Xie, Stanley C.; Cao, Pengxing; Giannangelo, Carlo; McCaw, James; Creek, Darren J.; Charman, Susan A.; Klonis, Nectarios

    2016-01-01

    Fully synthetic endoperoxide antimalarials, namely, OZ277 (RBx11160; also known as arterolane) and OZ439 (artefenomel), have been approved for marketing or are currently in clinical development. We undertook an analysis of the kinetics of the in vitro responses of Plasmodium falciparum to the new ozonide antimalarials. For these studies we used a K13 mutant (artemisinin resistant) isolate from a region in Cambodia and a genetically matched (artemisinin sensitive) K13 revertant. We used a pulsed-exposure assay format to interrogate the time dependence of the response. Because the ozonides have physicochemical properties different from those of the artemisinins, assay optimization was required to ensure that the drugs were completely removed following the pulsed exposure. Like that of artemisinins, ozonide activity requires active hemoglobin degradation. Short pulses of the ozonides were less effective than short pulses of dihydroartemisinin; however, when early-ring-stage parasites were exposed to drugs for periods relevant to their in vivo exposure, the ozonide antimalarials were markedly more effective. PMID:27161632

  7. Safety, infectivity, immunogenicity, and in vivo stability of two attenuated auxotrophic mutant strains of Salmonella typhi, 541Ty and 543Ty, as live oral vaccines in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Levine, M M; Herrington, D; Murphy, J R; Morris, J G; Losonsky, G; Tall, B; Lindberg, A A; Svenson, S; Baqar, S; Edwards, M F

    1987-01-01

    Two Salmonella typhi mutants, 541Ty (Vi+) and 543Ty (Vi-), auxotrophic for p-aminobenzoate and adenine, were evaluated as live oral vaccines. 33 volunteers ingested single doses of 10(8), 10(9), or 10(10) vaccine organisms, while four others received two 2 X 10(9) organism doses 4 d apart. No adverse reactions were observed. Vaccine was recovered from coprocultures of 29 of 37 vaccinees (78%) and from duodenal string cultures of two; repeated blood cultures were negative. The humoral antibody response to S. typhi O, H, Vi, and lysate antigens in serum and intestinal fluid was meager. In contrast, all vaccinees manifested cell-mediated immune responses. After vaccination, 69% of vaccinees overall and 89% of recipients of doses greater than or equal to 10(9) responded to S. typhi particulate or purified O polysaccharide antigens in lymphocyte replication studies but not to antigens of other Salmonella or Escherichia coli. All individuals, postvaccination, demonstrated a significant plasma-dependent mononuclear cell inhibition of wild S. typhi. PMID:3818953

  8. Studies on the genetic linkage of bilirubin and androsterone UDP-glucuronyltransferases by cross-breeding of two mutant rat strains.

    PubMed Central

    Nagai, F; Homma, H; Tanase, H; Matsui, M

    1988-01-01

    Gunn rats, which have defects in bilirubin and 4-nitrophenol UDP-glucuronyltransferases (GT), were crossed with LA Wistar rats with a defect in androsterone GT. The F1 hybrids showed normal GT activities towards androsterone, bilirubin and 4-nitrophenol, demonstrating that Gunn and LA ('low activity') Wistar rats inherit a homozygous dominant trait for androsterone GT and bilirubin GT respectively. The F2 progeny showed four different combinations of bilirubin and androsterone GT activities: defects in both GT activities, a single defect in bilirubin GT activity, a single defect in androsterone GT activity and two normal GT activities. They were segregated in the approximate ratio of 1:3:3:9, which is compatible with Mendel's Principle of Independent Assortment. These results provide evidence that androsterone GT and bilirubin GT are located on different chromosomes. In the F2 generation, defective bilirubin and 4-nitrophenol GT activities were not segregated, indicating that these two mutant genes are closely linked on the same chromosome. PMID:3138978

  9. Assessment of Metabolic Changes in Mycobacterium smegmatis Wild-Type and alr Mutant Strains: Evidence of a New Pathway of d-Alanine Biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Marshall, Darrell D; Halouska, Steven; Zinniel, Denise K; Fenton, Robert J; Kenealy, Katie; Chahal, Harpreet K; Rathnaiah, Govardhan; Barletta, Raúl G; Powers, Robert

    2017-03-03

    In mycobacteria, d-alanine is an essential precursor for peptidoglycan biosynthesis. The only confirmed enzymatic pathway to form d-alanine is through the racemization of l-alanine by alanine racemase (Alr, EC 5.1.1.1). Nevertheless, the essentiality of Alr in Mycobacterium tuberculosis and Mycobacterium smegmatis for cell survivability in the absence of d-alanine has been a point of controversy with contradictory results reported in the literature. To address this issue, we examined the effects of alr inactivation on the cellular metabolism of M. smegmatis. The M. smegmatis alr insertion mutant TAM23 exhibited essentially identical growth to wild-type mc(2)155 in the absence of d-alanine. NMR metabolomics revealed drastically distinct phenotypes between mc(2)155 and TAM23. A metabolic switch was observed for TAM23 as a function of supplemented d-alanine. In the absence of d-alanine, the metabolic response directed carbon through an unidentified transaminase to provide the essential d-alanine required for survival. The process is reversed when d-alanine is available, in which the d-alanine is directed to peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Our results provide further support for the hypothesis that Alr is not an essential function of M. smegmatis and that specific Alr inhibitors will have no bactericidal action.

  10. Isolation of a novel mutant from Bacillus subtilis natto.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kazuo

    2006-01-01

    For the construction of strains with full probiotics function in intestines, deoxycholate resistant mutants were isolated from Bacillus subtilis natto. The partial characterization of the mutants was carried out and described.

  11. Kinetic studies of the modulation of ada promoter activity by upstream elements.

    PubMed

    Bertrand-Burggraf, E; Dunand, J; Fuchs, R P; Lefèvre, J F

    1990-07-01

    We have determined the kinetics of initiation of transcription of the wild-type ada promoter by abortive initiation assays. In the absence of activation, it is a weak promoter, with an association constant KB and an isomerization rate constant k2 comparable to those obtained under the same conditions for other positively regulated promoters (0.36 x 10(7) M-1 and 1.7 x 10(-2) s-1, respectively, at 37 degrees C and 50 mM NaCl, on a supercoiled template). As already observed for other promoters, these constants are modulated by varying the supercoiling of the plasmid. However, the strength of the promoter (given by the KB.k2 product) remains almost constant, because the maximum value of KB and k2 are obtained for different values of the superhelical density. The ada promoter has a stretch of seven adenosine residues (A7) in its upstream region. We have analysed the effect of this upstream sequence on the efficiency of initiation of the ada promoter by comparing the wild-type sequence with an up-mutant promoter characterized by the inversion of the central base pair in the sequence (A7) leading to the sequence (A3TA3). Although the mutation, which is located outside the promoter consensus regions, has no effect on the isomerization step, it affects the equilibrium constant KB that characterizes the association step. In the mutant promoters, the supercoiling of the plasmid modulates the isomerization and association constants in such a way that both KB and k2 are maximum for the same superhelical density (-0.05), leading to a 12-fold increase of the strength of the promoter, on a supercoiled template.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  12. Simulation of the space station information system in Ada

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spiegel, James R.

    1986-01-01

    The Flexible Ada Simulation Tool (FAST) is a discrete event simulation language which is written in Ada. FAST has been used to simulate a number of options for ground data distribution of Space Station payload data. The fact that Ada language is used for implementation has allowed a number of useful interactive features to be built into FAST and has facilitated quick enhancement of its capabilities to support new modeling requirements. General simulation concepts are discussed, and how these concepts are implemented in FAST. The FAST design is discussed, and it is pointed out how the used of the Ada language enabled the development of some significant advantages over classical FORTRAN based simulation languages. The advantages discussed are in the areas of efficiency, ease of debugging, and ease of integrating user code. The specific Ada language features which enable these advances are discussed.

  13. Advances in gene therapy for ADA-deficient SCID.

    PubMed

    Aiuti, Alessandro

    2002-10-01

    Adenosine deaminase (ADA)-deficient severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) was the first inherited disease treated with gene therapy. The pilot gene therapy studies demonstrated the safety, therapeutic potential and limitations of ADA gene transfer into hematopoietic cells using retroviral vectors. This review describes the latest progress in ADA-SCID dinical trials using peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). PBL gene therapy was able to restore T-cell functions after discontinuation of ADA enzyme replacement therapy, but only partially corrected the purine metabolic defect. The development of improved HSC gene transfer protocols, combined with low intensity conditioning, allowed full correction of the immunological and metabolic ADA defects, with clinic benefit. These results have important implications for future applications of gene therapy in other disorders involving the hemapoietic system.

  14. Translation and execution of distributed Ada programs - Is it still Ada?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Volz, Richard A.; Mudge, Trevor N.; Buzzard, Gregory D.; Krishnan, Padmanabhan

    1987-01-01

    Some of the fundamental issues and tradeoffs for distributed execution systems for the Ada language are examined. Steps that need to be taken to deal with heterogeneity of addressing program objects, of processing resources, and of the individual processor environment are considered. The ways in which program elements can be assigned are examined in the context of four issues: implied remote object access, object visibility and recursive execution, task termination problems, and distributed types.

  15. Its Ada: An Intelligent Tutoring System for the ADA Programming Language

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-12-01

    interchange programs and programmers and virtually impossible for effective software maintenance (Sammet, 1986, p. 722). In 1975, at the request of DoD...for a Xerox machine exclusively. PROUST receives a complete program produced by the student as input for diagnosis and prints out a comprehensive bug... printed on the screen, the student will be placed directly into the editor to write Ada code in response to the • pic problem just presented. The editing

  16. Ada (Tradename) Compiler Validation Summary Report. Digital Equipment Corporation VAX Ada VI.3.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-11-07

    Summary Report: 7 NOV 1986 to 7 NOV 1987 Digital Equipmont Corp. VAX Ada Vl.3 6. PERFORMING ORG . REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTHOR(s) 8. CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER(s...the identifiers TIME or SPA-CE as the single arg,:ent. I lhi< ragma is only allowed within a d,. iara !ive part and it applies to the block or body

  17. ADA 9X project report: ADA 9X requirements document. Draft report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-08-27

    This document contains a distillation of requests for language changes submitted by the general public and from special workshops held to identify potential areas for revision. The purpose of this document is to specify needs that are considered to be the appropriate focus of the Ada 9X revision effort and to identify revision requirements that are to be satisfied by the Mapping/Revision Team.

  18. Ada (Trade Name) Compiler Validation Summary Report: Verdix Corporation Verdix Ada Development System, Version 5.2 for the Tektronix 6130 under UTek, Release 2.1.1.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-11-16

    AB.ADA P C64103A-B.ADA P C67003B-B.ADA P D- 12 %7I COMPLETE LIST OF TESTS AND RESULTS C67003C- ABADA P D64OO5FOM C D64005GD C V C67003D-BADA P D64005FA C...P C100 - ABADA P CB003-AB.DA BB2002A-AB.ADA P CB1003A-AB.ADA P CB1IOO3A-B.ADA P BB2003A-AB.ADA P CB2004A-B.ADA P CB4005A-B.ADA P BB2003A-AB.ADA P

  19. First International Conference on Ada (R) Programming Language Applications for the NASA Space Station, volume 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bown, Rodney L. (Editor)

    1986-01-01

    Topics discussed include: test and verification; environment issues; distributed Ada issues; life cycle issues; Ada in Europe; management/training issues; common Ada interface set; and run time issues.

  20. Altered Antibiotic Transport in OmpC Mutants Isolated from a Series of Clinical Strains of Multi-Drug Resistant E. coli

    PubMed Central

    Ceccarelli, Matteo; Mach, Tivadar; Beis, Konstantinos; Low, Alison S.; Bamford, Victoria A.; Booth, Ian R.; Bayley, Hagan; Naismith, James H.

    2011-01-01

    Antibiotic-resistant bacteria, particularly Gram negative species, present significant health care challenges. The permeation of antibiotics through the outer membrane is largely effected by the porin superfamily, changes in which contribute to antibiotic resistance. A series of antibiotic resistant E. coli isolates were obtained from a patient during serial treatment with various antibiotics. The sequence of OmpC changed at three positions during treatment giving rise to a total of four OmpC variants (denoted OmpC20, OmpC26, OmpC28 and OmpC33, in which OmpC20 was derived from the first clinical isolate). We demonstrate that expression of the OmpC K12 porin in the clinical isolates lowers the MIC, consistent with modified porin function contributing to drug resistance. By a range of assays we have established that the three mutations that occur between OmpC20 and OmpC33 modify transport of both small molecules and antibiotics across the outer membrane. This results in the modulation of resistance to antibiotics, particularly cefotaxime. Small ion unitary conductance measurements of the isolated porins do not show significant differences between isolates. Thus, resistance does not appear to arise from major changes in pore size. Crystal structures of all four OmpC clinical mutants and molecular dynamics simulations also show that the pore size is essentially unchanged. Molecular dynamics simulations suggest that perturbation of the transverse electrostatic field at the constriction zone reduces cefotaxime passage through the pore, consistent with laboratory and clinical data. This subtle modification of the transverse electric field is a very different source of resistance than occlusion of the pore or wholesale destruction of the transverse field and points to a new mechanism by which porins may modulate antibiotic passage through the outer membrane. PMID:22053181