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Sample records for adakitic intrusive rocks

  1. Potassic volcanic rocks and adakitic intrusions in southern Tibet: Insights into mantle-crust interaction and mass transfer from Indian plate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Dong; Zhao, Zhidan; DePaolo, Donald J.; Zhu, Di-Cheng; Meng, Fan-Yi; Shi, Qingshang; Wang, Qing

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating geodynamic processes at depth relies on a correct interpretation of petrological and geochemical features in magmatic records. In southern Tibet, both potassic volcanic rocks and adakitic intrusions exhibit high Sr/Y and La/Yb, and low Y and Yb concentrations. But these two rock types have contrasting temporal-spatial distributions and isotopic variations. Here we present a systematic study on the postcollisional potassic and adakitic rocks in order to investigate their petrogenetic links with the coeval mantle-derived ultrapotassic rocks and shed light on the potential input from underthrusted Indian continental crust. We found that adakitic intrusions with higher K2O/Na2O tend to display lower Y and higher SiO2, suggesting that the mantle-derived ultrapotassic melts, showing relatively high Y and Yb concentrations, only played a minor role in adakitic magmatism. Therefore, the unradiogenic 143Nd/144Nd and the dramatic decrease of zircon εHf(t) values since 35 Ma shown by postcollisional adakites should be interpreted as reflecting the crustal input from Indian plate. Unlike adakitic intrusions in southern Lhasa subterrane, potassic volcanic rocks share similar spatial distributions with ultrapotassic rocks, and their isotopic discrepancy is diminishing with volcanic activity becomes younger and migrates eastward. Evidence from whole-rock Pb and zircon Hf isotopes further indicates that potassic volcanic rocks are more likely to originate from partial melting of the overthickened and isotopically heterogeneous Lhasa terrane crust rather than the underthrusted Indian continental crust. The elevated Rb/Sr and varying Sr/CaO in potassic volcanic rocks provide an argument for sanidine + plagioclase + clinopyroxene as the major fractionating phases during magmatic differentiation. These findings not only highlight the significance of potassic and adakitic rocks in providing constraints on the geodynamic processes beneath southern Tibet, but also imply that

  2. Late Triassic Porphyritic Intrusions And Associated Volcanic Rocks From The Shangri-La Region, Yidun Terrane, Eastern Tibetan Plateau: Implications For Adakitic Magmatism And Porphyry Copper Mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, B.; Zhou, M.; Li, J.; Yan, D.

    2011-12-01

    The Yidun terrane, located on the eastern margin of the Tibetan plateau, has been commonly considered to be a Triassic volcanic arc produced by subduction of the Ganzi-Litang oceanic lithosphere. The Yidun terrane is characterized by numerous arc-affinity granitic intrusions located along a 500-km-long, north-south-trending belt. Among these granitic bodies, several small porphyritic intrusions in the southern segment of the terrane (Shangri-La region) are associated with large porphyry copper deposits. These porphyritc intrusions are composed of diorite and quartz diorite, and spatially associated with andesites and dacites. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb ages of the intrusions range from 230 to 215 Ma. The andesites and dacites are intercalated with slates and sandstones and have ages of around 220 Ma. The intrusive and volcanic rocks have SiO2 contents from 56.6 to 67.1 wt.%, Al2O3 from 14.2 to 17.4 wt.% and MgO from 1.9 to 4.2 wt.%. They show significant negative Nb-Ta anomalies on primitive mantle-normalized spidergrams. They have high La/Yb (13-49) ratios with no prominent Eu anomalies. All the rocks have high Sr (258-1980 ppm), and low Y (13-21 ppm) with high Sr/Y ratios (29-102). The geochemical features indicate that both the volcanic rocks and porphyritic intrusions were derived from adakitic magmas. They have similar initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7058 to 0.7077) and ɛNd (-1.88 to -4.93) values, but can be further divided into two groups: high silica (HSA) and low silica adakitic rocks (LSA). The HSA, representing an early stage of magmatism (230 to 215 Ma), were derived from oceanic slab melts with limited interaction with the overlying mantle wedge. At 215 Ma, more extensive interaction resulted in the formation of LSA. We propose that HSA were produced by flat subduction leading to melting of oceanic slab, whereas subsequent slab break-off caused the significant interaction between slab melts and the mantle wedge and thus the generation of the LSA. Compared with

  3. High Sr/Y rocks are not all adakites!

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moyen, Jean-François

    2010-05-01

    The name of "adakite" is used to describe a far too large group of rocks, whose sole common feature is high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios. Defining adakites only by this criterion is misleading, as the definition of this group of rocks does include many other criteria, including major elements. In itself, high (or commonly moderate!) Sr/Y ratios can be achieved via different processes: melting of a high Sr/Y (and La/Yb) source; deep melting, with abundant residual garnet; fractional crystallization or AFC; or interactions of felsic melts with the mantle, causing selective enrichment in LREE and Sr over HREE. A database of the compositions of "adakitic" rocks - including "high silica" and "low silica" adakites, "continental" adakites and Archaean adakites—was assembled. Geochemical modeling of the potential processes is used to interpret it, and reveals that (1) the genesis of high-silica adakites requires high pressure evolution (be it by melting or fractionation), in equilibrium with large amounts of garnet; (2) low-silica adakites are explained by garnet-present melting of an adakite-metasomatized mantle, i.e at depths greater than 2.5 GPa; (3) "Continental" adakites is a term encompassing a huge range of rocks, with a corresponding diversity of petrogenetic processes, and most of them are different from both low- and high- silica adakites; in fact in many cases it is a complete misnomer and the rocks studied are high-K calc-alkaline granitoids or even S-type granites; (4) Archaean adakites show a bimodal composition range, with some very high Sr/Y examples (similar to part of the TTG suite) reflecting deep melting (> 2.0 GPa) of a basaltic source with a relatively high Sr/Y, while lower Sr/Y rocks formed by shallower (1.0 GPa) melting of similar sources. Comparison with the Archaean TTG suite highlights the heterogeneity of the TTGs, whose composition spreads the whole combined range of HSA and Archaean adakites, pointing to a diversity of sources and processes

  4. Late Triassic syn-exhumation magmatism in central Qiangtang, Tibet: Evidence from the Sangehu adakitic rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Han; Wang, Bao-di; Ma, Long; Gao, Rui; Chen, Li; Li, Xiao-bo; Wang, Li-quan

    2016-12-01

    The geodynamic setting of Late Triassic magmatic activity along the Longmu Co-Shuanghu suture zone (LSSZ) in central Qiangtang, Tibet is a matter of debate. This paper presents zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb ages, zircon Hf isotopic compositions, and whole-rock geochemical data for the Sangehu (SGH) granitic intrusion in central Qiangtang, and addresses the petrogenesis of Late Triassic magmatism, and the history of collision between the northern and southern Qiangtang terranes. The SGH pluton consists mainly of biotite adamellite with mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs), and small amounts of K-feldspar granite. The biotite adamellite, MMEs, and K-feldspar granite give ages of 207.8 ± 3.0 Ma, 212.4 ± 31 Ma, and 211.6 ± 3.8 Ma, respectively. The MMEs show magmatic textures and acicular apatite, and are coeval with the host biotite adamellite, suggesting they were produced by magma mixing. All samples from the SGH pluton show high Sr and low Y contents, and positive Eu anomalies, similar to adakitic rocks. The high K2O contents and low Mg#, Cr, and Ni contents, and enriched Hf isotopic characteristics of the zircons indicate that these magmas were derived from the partial melting of thickened crust. However, the whole-rock geochemical data and zircon Hf isotopic compositions also reveal heterogeneity at the source. The combined magmatic and metamorphic records suggest that Triassic magmatic activity in central Qiangtang was closely related to the collision of the northern and southern Qiangtang terranes. The large-scale Late Triassic (225-200 Ma) magmatic event in central Qiangtang may have resulted from the breakoff of the Longmu Co-Shuanghu Tethys Ocean lithospheric slab in the early Late Triassic (236-230 Ma). The Late Triassic magmatic rocks, including adakitic rocks, are coeval with retrograde high-pressure (HP) to ultrahigh-pressure (UHP) metamorphic rocks in central Qiangtang, and show characteristics of syn-exhumation magmatism. The early adakitic rocks (>220 Ma

  5. Partial melting of subducted paleo-Pacific plate during the early Cretaceous: Constraint from adakitic rocks in the Shaxi porphyry Cu-Au deposit, Lower Yangtze River Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Jianghong; Yang, Xiaoyong; Li, Shuang; Gu, Huangling; Mastoi, Abdul Shakoor; Sun, Weidong

    2016-10-01

    A large porphyry Cu-Au deposit associated with early Cretaceous intrusive rocks has been discovered and explored in the Shaxi area, Lower Yangtze River Belt (LYRB), eastern China. We studied two types of intrusive rocks in the Shaxi area: Cu-Au mineralization related diorites and quartz-diorites (adakitic rocks), and newly found high Sr/Y ratio biotite-gabbros. They were formed almost simultaneously with crystallization ages of ca. 130 to 129 Ma, younger than the early stage shoshonitic rocks (Longmenyuan, Zhuanqiao and Shuangmiao Fm.) in the Luzong volcanic basin, 10 km south of the Shaxi area. These intrusive rocks show similar distribution patterns of trace elements (enriched in LILEs and depleted in HFSEs) and REEs (enriched in LREEs and depleted in HREEs, no Eu negative anomaly, flat HREE patterns). The diorites and quartz-diorites are adakitic rocks with calc-alkaline affinity, distinguished from other adakitic rocks in the LYRB which are high-K calc-alkaline series. The biotite-gabbros are not adakitic rocks, although they are characterized by high Sr/Y ratios.

  6. Generation of continental adakitic rocks: Crystallization modeling with variable bulk partition coefficients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dai, Hong-Kun; Zheng, Jianping; Zhou, Xiang; Griffin, W. L.

    2017-02-01

    The geochemical signatures (i.e., high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios) of adakitic rocks in continental settings, which are derived from the continental lower crust rather than from subducted slabs, may reflect high-pressure melting in the lower crust or may be inherited from their sources. The North China Craton (NCC) is an ideal place for investigation of this type of adakites due to its ubiquitous distribution. As an example, we explore the petrogenesis of the Jurassic ( 163 Ma) adakitic rocks in western Liaoning, in the NE part of the NCC, using elemental and Sr-Nd isotopic analysis and crystallization modeling based on Rhyolite-MELTS. The modeling demonstrates that adakitic signatures can be generated by fractional crystallization of magmas within crust of normal thickness (i.e., 33 km). Partial-melting modeling based on the composition of the lower continental crust shows that only the adakitic rocks from orogenic belts require a thickened crust (i.e., 45 km). We suggest that continental adakitic rocks are not necessarily linked to high-pressure processes and their use as an indicator of thickened/delaminated continental crust should be regarded with caution.

  7. Early Cretaceous continental delamination in the Yangtze Block: Evidence from high-Mg adakitic intrusions along the Tanlu fault, central Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Liqiong; Mo, Xuanxue; Santosh, M.; Yang, Zhusen; Yang, Dan; Dong, Guochen; Wang, Liang; Wang, Xinchun; Wu, Xuan

    2016-09-01

    Early Cretaceous high-Mg adakitic rocks from central Eastern China provide important insights into the thinning mechanism of the over-thickened lithosphere in the Yangtze Block (YB) as well as the North China Block (NCB). The Tanlu fault (TLF), located between the North China and Yangtze Blocks, and has been considered as a prominent pathway of magmas and fluids that resulted in lithosphere thinning of the YB during the Mesozoic-Cenozoic. Here we report the petrology, whole-rock geochemistry, zircon U-Pb geochronology, in situ Hf isotopes, and whole-rock Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes of four high-Mg adakitic intrusions along the TLF in northeastern Langdai. These adakitic intrusions consist of monzodiorite, quartz monzonite porphyry, and quartz monzodiorite. Zircon LA-MC-ICPMS analyses of five samples yield weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 127.58 ± 0.80, 126.90 ± 0.81, 120.71 ± 0.64, 122.75 ± 0.57, and 129.2 ± 1.1 Ma, indicating their emplacement during the Early Cretaceous. The intrusions have intermediate SiO2 (53.18-65.48 wt%) and high potassium (K2O = 3.07-3.95 wt%; Na2O/K2O = 1.02-1.26) and are classified as shoshonitic to high-K calc-alkaline series. They are characterized by high MgO (1.80-7.35 wt%), Mg# (50-65), Sr (591-1183 ppm), Ni (20.3-143.0 ppm), and Cr (51.40-390.0 ppm) contents, high (La/Yb)N (11.60-28.33) and Sr/Y (27.9-113.5) ratios, and low Y (7.79-22.4 ppm) and Yb (0.60-2.01 ppm) contents, comparable with high-Mg adakites. The samples are enriched in light rare earth elements but depleted in heavy rare earth elements and high field strength elements with slightly negative to positive Eu anomalies (δEu = 0.81-1.30), resembling the features of high-Mg adakitic rocks. Their whole-rock εNd(t) = -16.2 to -15.0, initial (87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7060-0.7074, low radiogenic Pb (206Pb/204Pb(t) = 16.208-16.509, 207Pb/204Pb(t) = 15.331-15.410, and 208Pb/204Pb(t) = 36.551-36.992), and zircon εHf(t) = -36.6 to -16.6 suggest magma derivation from a continental crustal

  8. Petrogenesis and tectonic significance of the Eocene adakite-like rocks in western Yunnan, southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Huixia; Hou, Qingye; Zhang, Zeming

    2016-02-01

    Eocene magmatic rocks are widespread in western Yunnan, southeastern Tibetan Plateau. However, their petrogenesis and tectonic significance remain controversial. In this paper, we report geochemical and geochronological data of adakite-like rocks from the eastern part of western Yunnan. Zircon U-Pb dating reveals that they were emplaced at ca. 35 Ma. A geochemical study shows that these rocks have high SiO2 (68.97-72.44 wt.%), K2O (4.35-5.87 wt.%) and low MgO (0.61-1.16 wt.%), Y (6.65-12.6 ppm) and Yb (0.58-1.02 ppm) contents as well as high Sr/Y (74-228) and La/Yb (59-131) values, belonging to high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic adakite-like rocks. These rocks have high (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.70623-0.70653), low εNd(t) (- 4.5 to - 7.5) and slightly low radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions with (206Pb/204Pb)i = 18.042-18.179. Zircons of these rocks show εHf(t) values ranging from - 6.3 to + 1.2 and model ages (TDM2) of 1513-1035 Ma. The geochemical characteristics indicate that the Eocene adakite-like rocks from the eastern part of western Yunnan were derived from the partial melting of Neoproterozoic mafic rocks underplated in the lower crust of the western margin of the Yangtze Plate with input of mantle-derived potassic-ultrapotassic melt. Integration of published geochemical data clearly shows that zircon εHf(t) and whole-rock εNd(t) values of Eocene adakite-like rocks from the whole western Yunnan exhibit a trend of westward increase. We infer that the adakite-like rocks from the western part of western Yunnan were derived from the partial melting of late Paleozoic-Mesozoic mafic rocks formed as the lower crust of a continental magmatic arc during eastward subduction of the Paleo-Tethyan Ocean, and the Eocene magmatic rocks in western Yunnan were generated during the removal of thickened continental lithosphere triggered by the India and Asia collision.

  9. Evidence From Adakitic Rocks For Lithosphere Recycling At The U.S. East Coast Volcanic Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, R.; Van Wijk, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatism at magmatic rifted margins is dominated by asthenospheric melts generated during decompression melting from the upwelling asthenosphere. However reported magma compositions are diverse, giving clues about additional processes during rifting and continental rupture. We report here on adakites from the U.S. East Coast that are related to breakup of the North Atlantic. The sampled adakites are bi-modal, and show a clear high-Si and low-Si major and trace element chemistry. During the closure of the proto-Atlantic and its related back-arc basins, the Appalachian lithosphere sampled an ophiolitic mélange within major sutures. Subsequent metamorphic events in the Blue Ridge province of the U.S. East Coast increased the rock density of the ophiolites (eclogite) and partly hydrated these mafic to ultramafic rocks. Such a preconditioned lithosphere will likely develop gravitational instabilities at the asthenosphere-lithosphere boundary during rifting. We use geodynamic models to show when gravitational instabilities form below the East Coast margin, and how they eventually delaminate mantle lithosphere and lower crust material. After foundering, the delaminated lithosphere undergoes metamorphism, heats up, and interacts with fluids and melts in the surrounding convecting mantle. Partial melting of this metamorphic lithology produces high-Si adakitic melts. These melts percolated upwards through the mantle and were partially injected into the Valley and Ridge province. Where melt-to-peridotite (asthenosphere) ratios were small, the melts and fluids leaving the sinking lithospheric block became fixed within the peridotites. Geochemical modeling suggests, that 5 to 10% melting degrees of such a metasomatically overprinted and fertile asthenosphere produced the low-Si adakitic rocks of the Virginia adakites.

  10. Paleozoic adakitic rocks in the northern Altyn Tagh, northwest China: Evidence for progressive crustal thickening beneath the Dunhuang Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Weihang; Long, Xiaoping; Yuan, Chao; Sun, Min; Zhao, Guochun; Wang, Yujing; Guan, Yili; Zhang, Yunying

    2017-02-01

    To constrain the Phanerozoic crustal evolution of the Dunhuang Block, new whole-rock geochemistry, zircon U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic data were determined for three Paleozoic granitic plutons in the northern Altyn Tagh, northwest China. Zircon U-Pb dating of these plutons, including gneissic granite, mylonitic granite and augen gneiss, yielded Middle Devonian to Early Carboniferous crystallization ages of 358 ± 4 Ma, 382 ± 4 Ma and 332 ± 2 Ma, respectively. The gneissic granites are characterized by a small SiO2 variation (69.11-70.33 wt.%) with moderate K2O (3.07-3.55 wt.%), Na2O (3.61-4.08 wt.%), low Fe2O3T (2.25-2.84 wt.%) and MgO (1.04-1.25 wt.%). The granites are weakly peraluminous with moderate aluminium saturation indexes (ASI = 1.02-1.08) and exhibit the geochemical features of high-K calc-alkaline igneous rocks. Although the major element contents of the mylonitic granites and the augen gneisses are different from those of the gneissic granites, all three plutons show similar REE patterns and trace element variations. Rocks from these plutons are all LREE-enriched and show relatively flat HREE patterns with pronounced depletions in Ba, Nb, Ta, Ti and negative Eu anomalies. Moreover, the rocks are characterized by high Sr (330.7-656 ppm), low Yb (0.513-1.521 ppm) and Y (5.199-13.73 ppm), and thus have high Sr/Y ratios (32-122), showing geochemical affinities of adakitic rocks. Their negative εHf(t) values, low MgO, Cr, Co and Ni contents indicate a continental crust origin without significant involvement of mantle-derived materials. The negative Eu anomalies, low Yb and Y contents of these granitic rocks reveal that plagioclase and garnet are major residue minerals in the magma source. All the geochemical characteristics demonstrate that these adakitic plutons were produced by partial melting of thickened lower crust at relatively shallow depths under high amphibolite or granulite facies and did not reach the eclogite facies. Combining this with the

  11. High-Mg adakitic rocks and their complementary cumulates formed by crystal fractionation of hydrous mafic magmas in a continental crustal magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiang; Xu, Yi-Gang; Zheng, Jian-Ping; Sun, Min; Griffin, William L.; Wei, Ying; Ma, Liang; Yu, Xiaolu

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how adakitic magmas form is important for understanding the formation of the continental crust. Generating such high-Sr/Y rocks by crystal fractionation of basalts/basaltic andesites in magma chambers has been proposed in a wide range of tectonic settings. However, the complementary cumulates predicted by this scenario have rarely been observed. The late Triassic ( 227 Ma) Ningcheng complex from the North China Craton is composed of a websterite - (Ol -/Hbl-) pyroxenite - gabbro unit and a quartz-diorite unit. They are interpreted as the products (cumulates and derivative melts, respectively) of fractionation from hydrous mafic magmas at mid- to lower-crustal pressures (4.9 8.3 kbar). The quartz diorites are high-Mg intermediate rocks with moderate SiO2 (57.0 62.9 wt%), high Mg# (> 49) and adakitic trace element signatures, such as high Sr (≥ 636 ppm) and light rare earth elements (REEs), low Y (≤ 17 ppm) and heavy REEs (Yb ≤ 1.8 ppm), lack of obvious Eu anomalies, and high Sr/Y (≥ 31) and La/Yb (≥ 24)). These adakitic signatures reflect differentiation of hydrous mantle-derived magmas in the deep crust, leaving behind a plagioclase-free residual solid assemblage in the early stages, which is represented by the coeval websterite-pyroxenite complex. This study therefore not only demonstrates that hydrous crystal fractionation is an important mechanism to form adakitic rocks, but also presents an example of a preserved fractionating system, i.e. high-Sr/Y rocks and their complementary cumulates. A geochemical comparison is made between representative adakitic rocks formed by fractionation of hydrous magmas and Archean TTGs. It is suggested that crystal fractionation is an efficient process for making Phanerozoic high Sr/Y rocks but was not responsible for the formation of Archean granitoids.

  12. What is the Significance of Adakitic Granitoids and Zircon Inheritance in Juvenile Arc Rocks of the Neoproterozoic Makkah Batholith, Saudi Arabia?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hargrove, U. S.; Stern, R. J.; Kimura, J.; Johnson, P. R.

    2004-12-01

    medium-K series, show strong subduction signatures, and plot as volcanic arc granites on discrimination diagrams. Nearly half the samples show characteristics of adakites (high Sr/Y <130, low Y, steep REE patterns). Adakitic rocks previously recognized in the ANS were attributed to the subduction and melting of young, hot oceanic crust. However, the production of adakites from slab-melting should wane with time. That adakitic rocks occur in all 3 magmatic pulses (>50 Ma) suggests they were produced by a more sustained mechanism, such as melting of thickened eclogitic or garnet-granulitic lower crust. Anatexis in the lower crust is an appealing explanation for the adakitic chemistries, and for the source of the inherited zircons, but is not consistent with the arc characteristics and juvenile isotopic signatures of the Jiddah terrane. Could subduction of young oceanic crust be sustained long enough to produce adakitic magmas for >50 Ma (e.g. by oblique subduction of ridge segments)? If so, could the subduction of ridge segments at ca. 25 Ma intervals have produced the 3 magmatic pulses? Also, could large volumes of juvenile arc magmas melt enough older crust to inherit abundant zircons yet retain their original arc characteristics and isotopic signatures? We are using this opportunity to invite constructive dialogue to help resolve these questions.

  13. Intrusive Rock Database for the Digital Geologic Map of Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nutt, C.J.; Ludington, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Digital geologic maps offer the promise of rapid and powerful answers to geologic questions using Geographic Information System software (GIS). Using modern GIS and database methods, a specialized derivative map can be easily prepared. An important limitation can be shortcomings in the information provided in the database associated with the digital map, a database which is often based on the legend of the original map. The purpose of this report is to show how the compilation of additional information can, when prepared as a database that can be used with the digital map, be used to create some types of derivative maps that are not possible with the original digital map and database. This Open-file Report consists of computer files with information about intrusive rocks in Utah that can be linked to the Digital Geologic Map of Utah (Hintze et al., 2000), an explanation of how to link the databases and map, and a list of references for the databases. The digital map, which represents the 1:500,000-scale Geologic Map of Utah (Hintze, 1980), can be obtained from the Utah Geological Survey (Map 179DM). Each polygon in the map has a unique identification number. We selected the polygons identified on the geologic map as intrusive rock, and constructed a database (UT_PLUT.xls) that classifies the polygons into plutonic map units (see tables). These plutonic map units are the key information that is used to relate the compiled information to the polygons on the map. The map includes a few polygons that were coded as intrusive on the state map but are largely volcanic rock; in these cases we note the volcanic rock names (rhyolite and latite) as used in the original sources Some polygons identified on the digital state map as intrusive rock were misidentified; these polygons are noted in a separate table of the database, along with some information about their true character. Fields may be empty because of lack of information from references used or difficulty in finding

  14. Early Carboniferous adakitic rocks in the area of the Tuwu deposit, eastern Tianshan, NW China: Slab melting and implications for porphyry copper mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin-Hong; Xue, Chun-Ji; Liu, Jia-Jun; Wang, Jian-Ping; Yang, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Zhao, Ze-Nan; Zhao, Yun-Jiang; Liu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Existing geochronological and geochemical data for the Early Carboniferous magmatic rocks in the eastern Tianshan, Xinjiang, have been interpreted in a variety of theories regarding petrogenesis and geodynamic setting. The proposed settings include rift, back-arc basin, passive continental margin, island arc, ridge subduction, and post-collisional environment. To evaluate these possibilities, we present new SHRIMP zircon U-Pb geochronology and geochemical data, whole-rock geochemical, Hf isotope, and S isotope data for tonalitic rocks and ores associated with the Tuwu porphyry copper deposit located in the center of the late Paleozoic Dananhu-Tousuquan arc, eastern Tianshan. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating indicates that the magmatic activity and thus associated copper mineralization occurred ca.332 Ma. The tonalitic rocks are calc-alkaline granites with A/CNK values ranging from 1.16 to 1.58; are enriched in K, Rb, Sr, and Ba; and are markedly depleted in Nb, Ta, Ti, and Th. They show geochemical affinities similar to adakites, with high Sr, Al2O3, and Na2O contents and La/Yb ratios; low Y and Yb contents; and slight positive Eu anomalies. In situ Hf isotopic analyses of zircons yielded positive initial εHf(t) values ranging from 6.9 to 17.2. The δ34S values of the ore sulfides range from -3.0‰ to +1.7‰, reflecting a deep sulfur source. Our results indicate that the paleo-Tianshan oceanic slab was being simultaneously subducted northward beneath the Dananhu-Tousuquan arc, and southward beneath the Aqishan-Yamansu arc during the Early Carboniferous. The Tuwu adakitic tonalitic rocks were derived from the partial melting of the subducted paleo-Tianshan oceanic slab, which was subsequently hybridized by mantle wedge peridotites. The slab-derived magmas have considerably high copper contents and are highly oxidized, thus leading to porphyry copper mineralization. Such Early Carboniferous tonalitic rocks that are widespread in the eastern Tianshan define a province

  15. Slab-derived adakites and subslab asthenosphere-derived OIB-type rocks at 156 ± 2 Ma from the north of Gerze, central Tibet: Records of the Bangong-Nujiang oceanic ridge subduction during the Late Jurassic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-Min; Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhidan; Zhang, Liang-Liang; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Chang, Qing-Song; Lu, Ying-Huai; Dai, Jin-Gen; Zheng, Yuan-Chuan

    2016-10-01

    This paper reports zircon U-Pb age and Hf isotope, whole-rock major and trace element, and whole-rock Sr-Nd-Hf isotope data of the dacites from Rena Tso and mafic rocks (diabases and basalts) from Duobuza, north of Gerze, central Tibet. These data reveal the presence of a distinct rock association of slab-derived adakites (154 ± 1 Ma) and subslab asthenosphere-derived OIB-type (oceanic island basalt) mafic rocks (157.6 ± 1.4 Ma). The medium-K calc-alkaline dacites (SiO2 = 66-69 wt.%) from Rena Tso are enriched in Sr (520-1083 ppm) and depleted in heavy rare earth elements (HREEs) and Y (9.8-10.8 ppm), resembling adakites. These adakitic dacites have low whole-rock initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7043-0.7046, positive εNd(t) (+ 1.0 to + 3.4), εHf(t) (+ 6.4 to + 7.0), and zircon εHf(t) (+ 1.9 to + 7.6) values, indicating an oceanic slab origin (crust and sediment). Considering the low Mg# (32-53) and (La/Yb)N (19-23), the adakitic dacites are most likely derived from the partial melting of the subducting slab at shallow depths and the subsequent interaction with peridotite in a thin mantle wedge during magma ascent. The diabases and basalts (SiO2 = 49-53 wt.%) from Duobuza show an alkali signature with enrichment of high field strength elements (HFSEs) (e.g., Zr = 213-285 ppm) and exhibit positive Nb-Ta-Ti anomalies that are geochemically comparable to those of OIB. These samples show positive whole-rock εNd(t) values of + 3.3 to + 3.7, εHf(t) values of + 4.7 to + 5.7, and negative to positive zircon εHf(t) values of - 1.5 to + 5.2. These OIB-type mafic samples are interpreted as the products of low-degree decompression melting of the upwelling subslab asthenosphere with a minor contribution from the sub-continental lithospheric mantle (SCLM). Our new data indicate the presence of a distinct rock association of coeval slab-derived adakites and subslab asthenosphere-derived OIB-type rocks. Such an association along with the normal arc rocks further to the north

  16. Crustal processes cause adakitic chemical signatures in syn-collision magmatism from SE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark; Kheirkhah, Monireh; Neill, Iain

    2015-04-01

    We report new elemental and Nd-Sr isotopic analyses for Late Cenozoic intrusive and extrusive rocks emplaced in SE Iran as part of the wider syn-collision magmatic province within the Turkish-Iranian Plateau. The sample sites are near the town of Dehaj in Kerman Province. Most of the rocks are from stocks and batholiths, interpreted as the roots of central volcanoes. Age controls are not precise, but the rocks are likely to be Late Miocene-Quaternary in age. Basaltic to andesitic lavas crop out nearby; their relationships to the intrusive rocks are uncertain. Geochemically, the entire range of rocks from basalt lavas through to rhyolitic intrusives ranges from 51-71 wt.% silica and isotopic signatures are similar to Bulk Earth, without any clear evidence for large-scale crustal contamination. The basaltic to andesitic lavas appear to have variable and often high La/Yb and Sr/Y such that they range from calc-alkaline arc-like rocks to adakitic compositions depending on the degree of fractionation. The intrusive rocks seem to form a separate suite, with clear indications of increasing Sr/Y and Dy/Yb with fractionation. Previous interpretations relate adakitic magmatism to Tethyan oceanic slab break-off and slab melting beneath the collision zone. However, as the 'adakitic signature' is increasingly apparent in more evolved magmas, at least in the intrusives, adakite generation is more likely to have occurred during melt evolution from an initial low Sr/Y and low La/Yb parent. This parental melt may have been similar in starting composition to proposed non-adakitic basaltic melts from elsewhere in the collision zone. The high Sr/Yb and La/Yb signatures are best explained by the suppression of plagioclase fractionation by high magmatic water contents, promoting incompatible behaviour of Sr. Conversely, Y and Yb are compatible during amphibole and garnet fractionation at crustal or uppermost mantle levels. Rather than a localised slab break-off or melting effect, the

  17. The calc-alkaline and adakitic volcanism of the Sabzevar structural zone (NE Iran): Implications for the Eocene magmatic flare-up in Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Hadi Shafaii; Rossetti, Federico; Lucci, Federico; Chiaradia, Massimo; Gerdes, Axel; Martinez, Margarita Lopez; Ghorbani, Ghasem; Nasrabady, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    A major magmatic flare-up is documented along the Bitlis-Zagros suture zone in Eocene-Oligocene times. The Cenozoic magmatism of intraplate Central Iran is an integrant part of this tectono-magmatic scenario. The Cenozoic magmatism of the Sabzevar structural zone consists of mostly intermediate to felsic intrusions and volcanic products. These igneous rocks have calc-alkaline and adakitic geochemical signatures, with nearly coincident zircon U-Pb and mica Ar-Ar ages of ca. 45 Ma. Adakitic rocks have quite low HREE and high Sr/Y ratio, but share most of their geochemical features with the calc-alkaline rocks. The Sabzevar volcanic rocks have similar initial Sr, Nd and Pb isotope ratios, showing their cogenetic nature. Nd model ages cluster tightly around ~ 0.2-0.3 Ga. The geochemistry of the Sabzevar volcanic rocks, along with their isotopic signatures, might strangle that an upper mantle source, metasomatized by slab-derived melts was involved in generating the Sabzevar calc-alkaline rocks. A bulk rock trace element modeling suggests that amphibole-plagioclase-titanite-dominated replenishment-fractional crystallization (RFC) is further responsible for the formation of the middle Eocene Sabzevar adakitic rocks. Extensional tectonics accompanied by lithospheric delamination, possibly assisted by slab break-off and melting at depth was responsible for the Eocene formation of the Sabzevar magmatic rocks and, more in general, for the magmatic "flare-up" in Iran.

  18. "Normal" to adakite-like arc magmatism associated with the El Abra porphyry copper deposit, Central Andes, Northern Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabbia, Osvaldo M.; Correa, Karen J.; Hernández, Laura B.; Ulrich, Thomas

    2017-03-01

    The El Abra porphyry copper deposit belongs to the Late Eocene—Early Oligocene metallogenic belt of northern Chile, which host several world-class porphyry copper deposits. Our previous geochronological work done on this deposit provides the temporal framework for petrological data interpretation. The magmatic history of the El Abra deposit lasts for 8.6 Ma and can be divided into two stages. An early period, from about 45 to 38.7 Ma, dominated by diorites and quartz monzodiorites with "normal" (non-adakite) arc geochemistry and a late period, with rocks younger than 38.7 Ma that developed adakite-like geochemistry, where equigranular granodiorites are the volumetrically dominant rock type (e.g., Clara granodiorite 38 Ma). These granodiorites are then intruded by leucocratic porphyry dikes and aplites. Most copper mineralization is associated with multiple intrusions of these younger porphyritic rocks, described as the El Abra porphyry unit, and emplaced over a 1.4 Ma period, from 37.5 to 36.1 Ma. The adakite-like geochemistry of the younger rock units (<38.7 Ma) is attested by a significant depletion in REE contents, particularly MREE and HREE (concave MREE distribution patterns), high La/Yb and Sr/Y ratios, and Na2O and Al2O3 contents, along with the absence of the Eu anomaly in normalized REE distribution patterns. The evolution of this large, long-lived magmatic system from "normal" to adakite-like arc magmatism is discussed in a tectonic context of crust overthickening due to a major orogenic episode (Incaic compressive phase). This tectonic setting may have promoted higher pressure conditions at the lower crust "hot zone" and increased the crustal residence time of derivative melts favoring extensive differentiation leading to water-rich (and oxidized?) felsic melts, where amphibole fractionation played an important role. Strontium, Nd, and Pb isotope data suggest a common mantle source for both the non-adakite and adakite-like rocks. This implies that

  19. The formation of Qulong adakites and their relationship with porphyry copper deposit: Geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong-bin; Liu, Ji-qiang; Ling, Ming-xing; Ding, Wei; Liu, Yan; Zartman, Robert E.; Ma, Xiu-feng; Liu, Dun-yi; Zhang, Chan-chan; Sun, Sai-jun; Zhang, Li-peng; Wu, Kai; Sun, Wei-dong

    2015-04-01

    Qulong porphyry Cu deposit is the largest Cu deposit in China so far discovered, with total reserves of 10.6 Mt Cu@0.5% and 0.5 Mt Mo@0.03%. The petrogenesis of the Miocene intrusion and its genetic association with Cu mineralization have been debated. This study presents new results on whole rock major and trace elements, Sr-Nd isotopes, zircon U-Pb dating, Hf-O isotopic compositions of the Qulong ore-bearing and barren adakites. All the Qulong adakites studied here have low MgO (< 2 wt.%), high K2O (between 2 wt.% and 6 wt.%), with K2O/Na2O ratios ranging from 0.2-2.0. The SiO2 contents are mostly higher than 64 wt.%. These are dramatically different from ore-forming adakites in the circum-Pacific region and other places in general. Ore-bearing adakites have systematically higher SiO2 and K2O compared with barren ones, likely due to the addition of Si and K during alteration and mineralization. Magmatic zircons from these two series of intrusions have U-Pb ages of 16.6 ± 0.5-17.0 ± 0.6 Ma and 16.7 ± 0.3-17.4 ± 0.4 Ma, respectively, which are identical to each other within analytical errors but are systematically older than although marginally overlap with the Re-Os isochron ages of 15.36 ± 0.21-16.41 ± 0.48 Ma. The Qulong porphyries have geochemical characteristics of typical adakites, with Sr = 259-1195 ppm, Y = 1.91-9.12 ppm, Yb = 0.2-0.92 ppm, Sr/Y = 49-202 ppm, and (La/Yb)n = 13-49 for both ore-bearing and barren adakites. In a Sr/Y versus (La/Yb)n diagram, most of the samples plot in the low part of circum-Pacific field, close to the field defined by Dabie adakites. Some of the ore-bearing adakites even plot in the Dabie adakite field, indicating that both slab melts and lower continental crust melts have been involved. Zircons from the ore-bearing adakites have δ18O ranging from 5.1 to 7.3‰ (average 6.4‰) and εHf(t) from 1.9 to 10.4‰, which plot close to MORB. Similarly, zircons from the barren adakite have δ18O ranging from 4.0 to 7.4

  20. Rapid intrusion of magma into wet rock: groundwater flow due to pore pressure increases.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.

    1982-01-01

    Analytical and numerical solutions are developed to simulate the pressurization, expansion, and flow of groundwater contained within saturated, intact host rocks subject to sudden heating from the planar surface of an igneous intrusion. For most rocks, water diffuses more rapidly than heat, assuring that groundwater is not heated along a constant-volume pressure path and that thermal expansion and pressurization adjacent to the intrusion drives a flow that extends well beyond the heated region. -from Author

  1. Geochemical Database for Intrusive Rocks of North-Central and Northeast Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.; Ressel, Michael W.; Barnes, Calvin G.

    2007-01-01

    North-central and northeast Nevada contains numerous large plutons and smaller stocks but also contains many small, shallowly emplaced intrusive bodies, including dikes, sills, and intrusive lava dome complexes. Decades of geologic investigations in the study area demonstrate that many ore deposits, representing diverse ore deposit types, are spatially, and probably temporally and genetically, associated with these igneous intrusions. However, despite the number and importance of igneous intrusions in the study area, no synthesis of geochemical data available for these rocks has been completed. This report presents a synthesis of geochemical data for these rocks. The product represents the first phases of an effort to evaluate the time-space-compositional evolution of Mesozoic and Cenozoic magmatism in the study area and identify genetic associations between magmatism and mineralizing processes in this region.

  2. Time, space, and composition relations among northern Nevada intrusive rocks and their metallogenic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    duBray, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    Importantly, modal composition, age, and geochemical characteristics of intrusions associated with large mineral deposits along the trends, are indistinguishable from non-mineralized intrusions in northern Nevada and thus do not identify intrusions associated with significant deposits. Moreover, intrusion age and composition show little correlation with mineral-deposit type, abundance, and size. Given the lack of diagnostic characteristics for intrusions associated with deposits, it is uncertain whether age, modal composition, and geochemical data can identify intrusions associated with mineral deposits. These findings suggest that associations between northern Nevada intrusions and mineral deposits reflect superimposition of many geologic factors, none of which was solely responsible for mineral-deposit formation. These factors might include intrusion size, efficiency of fluid and metal extraction from magma, prevailing redox and sulfidation conditions, or derivation of metals and ligands from host rocks and groundwater. The abundance and diversity of mineral deposits in northern Nevada may partly reflect geochemical inheritance, for example, along the mineral trends rather than the influence of petrologically unique magma or associated fluids.

  3. LANDSAT and radar mapping of intrusive rocks in SE-Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Dossantos, A. R.; Dosanjos, C. E.; Moreira, J. C.; Barbosa, M. P.; Veneziani, P.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of intrusive rock mapping was investigated and criteria for regional geological mapping established at the scale of 1:500,00 in polycyclic and polymetamorphic areas using the logic method of photointerpretation of LANDSAT imagery and radar from the RADAMBRASIL project. The spectral behavior of intrusive rocks, was evaluated using the interactive multispectral image analysis system (Image-100). The region of Campos (city) in northern Rio de Janeiro State was selected as the study area and digital imagery processing and pattern recognition techniques were applied. Various maps at the 2:250,000 scale were obtained to evaluate the results of automatic data processing.

  4. Origin of adakite-like plutons in southern Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Oh, Jeong-Im; Choi, Sung Hi; Yi, Keewook

    2016-10-01

    We present Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic compositions for two adakite-like intrusions in southern Korea (Jindong and Bongnae), including major and trace element concentrations, and the sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) zircon U-Pb age. Our aim is to constrain the origin and tectonomagmatic processes that gave rise to the plutons. A SHRIMP U-Pb zircon age of 88.7 ± 0.7 Ma was obtained from a Jindong granodiorite sample. The Jindong plutons belong to the medium-K calc-alkaline series, and have an overall enrichment in large ion lithophile elements (LILE), such as K, Rb, Ba, and Pb, and a relative depletion in high field strength elements, such as Nb, Ta, and Ti, compared with the neighboring elements in the primitive mantle-normalized multi-trace element variation diagram. It was found that (87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.70475-0.70596, (143Nd/144Nd)i = 0.512547-0.512604, [(εNd)i = + 0.4 to 2.2], and (206Pb/204Pb)i = 18.19-18.37, which fall within the field of the arc-type Cretaceous to Tertiary Bulguksa intrusive rocks in the Sr-Nd and Pb-Pb isotopic correlation diagrams. The elevated Sr/Y (17-40), but low La/Yb (3.7-8.8) ratios of the Jindong plutons, together with their coherent geochemical trends and U-shaped rare earth element (REE) patterns, indicate that they were not formed by slab melting, but by amphibole-dominated fractional crystallization of the Bulguksa-like arc magma. A SHRIMP U-Pb zircon age of 226.5 ± 2.5 Ma was obtained from a Bongnae tonalite sample. The Bongnae plutons belong to the shoshonitic series. Their trace element patterns resemble the Jindong samples, but are characterized by significantly negative U anomalies in mafic rocks. They also have elevated MgO, Ni, Co, Cr, Rb, Ba, Sr, and low Al2O3 and Na2O contents at a given SiO2 concentration compared with the Jindong plutons, and are typified by highly radiogenic Sr and unradiogenic Nd and Pb isotopic compositions: [(87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.71096-0.71290, (143Nd/144Nd)i = 0.511641-0.511681, (εNd)i = - 13

  5. Layering in the wall rock of Valles Marineris: intrusive and extrusive magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jean-Pierre; Paige, David A.; Manning, Craig E.

    2003-06-01

    High-resolution images of the walls exposed in Valles Marineris reveal variations in appearance and degree of layering indicating various lithologies comprise the Tharsis plateau. The layered wall rock has been proposed to result from effusive flood basalt volcanism or interbedded sediments and volcanics. We present observations of unlayered rock that indicate layering extends to a greater depth in the western half of Valles Marineris and is confined to the Tharsis plateau, a region of thickened, uplifted crust resulting from prolonged intrusive activity. Consistent with this view, we propose that the observed layering may be a manifestation of intrusive rocks resulting from crystal fractionation of intruded basaltic magmas. Terrestrial layered plutons provide analogs for comparison such as those of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) a large igneous province associated with crustal rifting and exposures of thick sequences of layered flood basalts and intruded layered cumulates.

  6. Geochemical Constraints on Collision-related Intrusive Rocks in Central, Northwestern and Western Anatolia (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbeyli, Nurdane

    2010-05-01

    The intrusive rocks in Anatolia occupy a broad petrological range from I- to A- type granitoids. Thus, Turkey is a natural laboratory to study collision-related magmatism, its geochemical characteristic, source region and also tectono-magmatic evolution. The central, northwestern and western Anatolian magmatic provinces are defined by a large number of Late Mesozoic to Late Cenozoic collision-related granitoids (Ilbeyli and Kibici 2009). Calc-alkaline, subalkaline and alkaline intrusive rocks in central Anatolia are mainly metaluminous, high-K and I- to A-types. They cover a petrological range from monzodiorite through quartz monzonite to granite/syenite. All these intrusive rocks are enriched in LILE and are also radiogenic in terms of Sr, and unradiogenic in terms of Nd, isotope ratios. Their geochemical characteristics show that the intrusive rocks originated from a mantle source containing large subduction components, and have experienced crustal assimilation and fractional crystallization. Delamination of a thermal boundary layer, and/or slab breakoff is the likely mechanisms for the initiation of the diverse magmatism in the complex (Ilbeyli et al. 2009). Calc-alkaline plutonic rocks in northwestern Anatolia are mainly metaluminous, medium- to high-K and I-types. They are monzonite to granite, and all are enriched in LILE and depleted in HFSE, showing features of arc-related intrusive rocks. Geochemical data reveal that these plutons were derived from partial melting of mafic lower crustal sources. These rocks are related to subduction of the northern branch of the Neo-Tethyan ocean beneath the Sakarya microcontinent during Cretaceous-Paleocene times (Kibici et al. 2008). Calc-alkaline intrusive rocks in western Anatolia are metaluminous, high-K and I-types. They have a compositional range from granodiorite to granite, and are enriched in LILE and depleted in HFSE. Geochemical characteristics of these intrusive rocks indicate that they could have originated

  7. The occurrence of microdiamonds in Mesoproterozoic Chapada Diamantina intrusive rocks--Bahia/Brazil.

    PubMed

    Battilani, Gislaine A; Gomes, Newton S; Guerra, Wilson J

    2007-06-01

    The origin of diamonds from Serra do Espinhaço in Diamantina region (State of Minas Gerais) and in Chapada Diamantina, Lençóis region (State of Bahia) remains uncertain, even taking into account the ample research carried out during the last decades. The lack of typical satellite minerals in both districts makes a kimberlitic source for these diamonds uncertain. In mid 18th century the occurrence of a metamorphosed igneous rock composed of martite, sericite and tourmaline was described in Diamantina region and named hematitic phyllite, considered by some researchers as a possible diamond source. Similar rocks were found in Lençóis and examined petrographically and their heavy mineral concentration was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Petrographic analyses indicated an igneous origin for these rocks and SEM analyses showed the discovery of microdiamonds. Geochronological studies using the Ar/Ar technique in muscovites yielded minimum ages of 1515+/-3 Ma, which may correlate with 1710+/-12 Ma from U-Pb method in igneous zircons from the hematitic phyllites. Both rock types also have the same mineral and chemical composition which leads to the conclusion that the intrusive rocks were protolith of the hematitic phyllites. This first discovery of microdiamonds in intrusive rocks opens the possibility of new investigation models for diamond mineralization in Brazilian Proterozoic terrains.

  8. Petrology, composition, and age of intrusive rocks associated with the Quartz Hill molybdenite deposit, southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, T.; Smith, James G.; Elliott, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A large porphyry molybdenum deposit (Quartz Hill deposit) was recently discovered in the heart of the Coast Range batholithic complex about 70 km E of Ketchikan, SE Alaska. Intrusive rocks associated with the mineral deposit form two composite epizonal to hypabyssal stocks and many dikes in country rocks. All observed metallization and alteration is within the Quartz Hill stock. Molybdenite forms fracture coatings and occurs in veins with quartz. Alteration is widespread and includes development of secondary quartz, pyrite, K-feldspar, biotite, white mica, chlorite, and zeolite. Field relations indicate that the stocks were emplaced after regional uplift and erosion of the Coast Range batholithic complex, and K-Ar data show that intrusion and alteration took place in late Oligocene time, about 27 to 30 Ma ago. Data from the Ketchikan quadrangle indicate that porphyry molybdenum metallization in the Coast Range batholithic complex is associated with regionally extensive but spotty, middle Tertiary or younger, felsic magmatism. -from Authors

  9. Isotopic data for Late Cretaceous intrusions and associated altered and mineralized rocks in the Big Belt Mountains, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.; Unruh, Daniel M.; Hofstra, Albert H.

    2017-03-07

    The quartz monzodiorite of Mount Edith and the concentrically zoned intrusive suite of Boulder Baldy constitute the principal Late Cretaceous igneous intrusions hosted by Mesoproterozoic sedimentary rocks of the Newland Formation in the Big Belt Mountains, Montana. These calc-alkaline plutonic masses are manifestations of subduction-related magmatism that prevailed along the western edge of North America during the Cretaceous. Radiogenic isotope data for neodymium, strontium, and lead indicate that the petrogenesis of the associated magmas involved a combination of (1) sources that were compositionally heterogeneous at the scale of the geographically restricted intrusive rocks in the Big Belt Mountains and (2) variable contamination by crustal assimilants also having diverse isotopic compositions. Altered and mineralized rocks temporally, spatially, and genetically related to these intrusions manifest at least two isotopically distinct mineralizing events, both of which involve major inputs from spatially associated Late Cretaceous igneous rocks. Alteration and mineralization of rock associated with the intrusive suite of Boulder Baldy requires a component characterized by significantly more radiogenic strontium than that characteristic of the associated igneous rocks. However, the source of such a component was not identified in the Big Belt Mountains. Similarly, altered and mineralized rocks associated with the quartz monzodiorite of Mount Edith include a component characterized by significantly more radiogenic strontium and lead, particularly as defined by 207Pb/204Pb values. The source of this component appears to be fluids that equilibrated with proximal Newland Formation rocks. Oxygen isotope data for rocks of the intrusive suite of Boulder Baldy are similar to those of subduction-related magmatism that include mantle-derived components; oxygen isotope data for altered and mineralized equivalents are slightly lighter.

  10. Adakitic-like magmatism in western Ossa-Morena Zone (Portugal): Geochemical and isotopic constraints of the Pavia pluton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, S. M.; Neiva, A. M. R.; Ramos, J. M. F.

    2013-02-01

    Granitic rocks are a major component of the Earth's continental crust and occur in a wide variety of tectonic settings. Their chemical and isotopic characterization is crucial to the recognition of the potential sources and mechanisms involved in their generation. In this study, we present the first whole rock chemical and isotopic (Sr-Nd-O) data for the Pavia pluton (328-317 Ma), located near the western border of the Ossa-Morena Zone (Évora Massif, Portugal). Major and trace element geochemistry suggests that the different granitic phases composing this intrusive body (enclaves, granites (s.l.) and crosscutting dikes) represent independent magma pulses and the majority is similar to TTGs and adakites. The little Sr-Nd-O isotopic variation, with (87Sr/86Sr)328 = 0.70428-0.70560, ɛNd328 ranging between - 3.4 and + 0.4 and δ18O varying from + 5.6‰ to + 8.4‰ implies an isotopically similar protolith for all phases. The most viable mechanism for the generation of the Pavia pluton adakitic-like magmatism is assimilation-fractional crystallization of a mantle-derived magma. This mechanism was also invoked to explain the genesis of other plutons within the Évora Massif but they have a distinct chemistry (typical arc calc-alkaline rocks). The chemical differences between them and the Pavia pluton granitic rocks are interpreted as the result of lower degrees of crustal assimilation and higher degrees of contamination of mantle-derived magmas by the sinking slab (after subduction blocking and subsequent slab break-off).

  11. Amphibole-rich intrusive mafic and ultramafic rocks in arc settings: implications for the H2O budget

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tiepolo, M.; Langone, A.; Morishita, T.; Esna-Ashari, A.; Tribuzio, R.

    2011-12-01

    Although amphibole is rarely a phenocryst of arc lavas, many intermediate and silicic magmas in arc settings are considered residual after cryptic amphibole crystallization at mid-low crustal levels (e.g., Davidson et al., 2007). Amphibole-rich mafic and ultramafic intrusive rocks (hornblendites, amphibole-gabbros to amphibole-diorites) are reported worldwide in orogenic settings. These amphibole-rich plutonics could be the "hidden" amphibole reservoir invoked in the arc crust. They usually possess chemical and textural heterogeneities recording the magmatic processes occurring in the mid to low crust (e.g., Tiepolo et al., 2011). Being amphibole-rich, these intrusive rocks are an important source of information on the possible role played by amphibole in arc magma petrogenesis. In particular, for the capability of amphibole to incorporate H2O and elements with a marked affinity for the fluid phase, these rocks are also useful to track the origin and evolution of subduction related fluids. We present here geochemical and geochronologic data on amphibole-rich ultramafic intrusive rocks from different localities worldwide: i) Alpine Orogen (Adamello Batholith and Bregell intrusions); ii) Ross Orogen (Husky Ridge intrusion - Antarctica); iv) Japan Arc (Shikanoshima Island intrusion); v) Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, Central Iran (Aligoordaz granitoid complex). The coupling of textural information, micro-chemical data and "in situ" zircon geochronology has allowed us to show that these ultramafic intrusive rocks share striking petrologic and geochemical similarities. They are thus the expression of a common magmatic activity that is independent from the age and from the local geological setting and thus related to a specific petrogenetic process. Amphibole-rich mafic and ultramafic intrusive rocks are retained a common feature of collisional-systems worldwide. Amphibole is thus expected to play a major role in the differentiation of arc magmas and in particular in the H2O

  12. Rocks Whose Compositions are NOT Determined by Crystal Sorting: Lessons From the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBirney, A. R.

    2002-12-01

    Wager and Deer's Skaergaard Memoir, published shortly after the appearance of Bowen's "Evolution of Igneous Rocks" was widely viewed as the ideal confirmation of the dominant role of crystal fractionation in magmatic differentiation. The mineralogical sequence followed a course predicted by phase equilibria, and the spectacular layering seemed to offer clear evidence of crystal settling. Although the liquid line of descent proposed by Wager was closer to the "Fenner trend" of iron enrichment than to the one Bowen favored, there was no evidence that the rocks represented liquid compositions; they must have been formed by crystal sorting. This interpretation was supported by the elegant "cumulate" concept proposed a few years later by Wager and Brown. An elaborate system based on petrographic textures seen in the Skaergaard rocks soon became a pervasive paradigm for interpreting coarse-grained igneous rocks. Because of its remote location, nearly half a century passed before the Skaergaard Intrusion was seen by geologists who were not members of Wager's team. When an independent group examined the body they reported two simple observations that conflicted with earlier interpretations. First, it was noted that the plagioclase in graded "sedimentary" layers was less dense than the liquid through which it was said to have settled, and, second, some of the rocks were found to have been severely altered, both in texture and in bulk composition. The most conspicuous evidence was found in swarms of angular anorthositic blocks that had fallen from the roof. The present composition of these blocks is much more felsic than that of the unit from which they fell. Rinds of ferromagnesian minerals appear to be the mafic component that was somehow expelled from the residual plagioclase. When examined under the microscope, the contact between the block and its host, which seems so sharp in outcrops, is seen to be indistinct and gradational. The changes seen in these blocks must have

  13. Intrusive rocks northeast of Steamboat Springs, Park Range, Colorado, with a section on geochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, George L.; Hedge, Carl E.

    1978-01-01

    Major Precambrian and minor Tertiary intrusive rocks northeast of Steamboat Springs in the Park Range between 40?30' and 40?45' N. lat. are described and compared with related rocks elsewhere in Colorado and Wyoming. The Precambrian intrusives were emplaced in a sequence of high-grade interlayered felsic gneisses, amphibolites, and pelitic schists of sedimentary and volcanic origin. These rocks are cut by a major northeast-trending Precambrian shear zone where mainly left lateral movement of 1/ 2 to 1 mile is certain. Cumulative movement of many miles is possible. The Precambrian intrusives consist of a batholith, the Mount Ethel pluton, a smaller Buffalo Pass pluton, and small dikes or lenses of fine-grained porphyry, pegmatites, and ultramafics. The Mount Ethel pluton is an oval shaped body 7 miles wide by about 40 miles long (shown by geophysical data to extend beneath younger sediments in North Park). Outer batholithic contacts are sharp and dip steeply outward at about 85?. Five mappable internal variants consist, in order of decreasing age, of granodiorite, quartz monzonite porphyry of Rocky Peak, quartz monzonite of Roxy Ann Lake, granite and quartz monzonite, and. leucogranite. Internal contacts between these plutonic variants are sharp, and evidence of liquid-solid relationships abounds; despite this, all rocks except the granodiorite contribute to an Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron indicating emplacement about 1.4 b.y. (billion years) ago. The most important variants volumetrically are: the quartz monzonite porphyry of Rocky Peak, which forms an irregular 2-mile-thick carapace or mapped band around the west edge of the pluton and is lithologically similar to nearby Sherman Granite, and the quartz monzonite of Roxy Ann Lake, which forms most of the rest of the pluton and is lithologically similar to Silver Plume Granite. An apparent Sherman -Silver Plume dichotomy with similar rock types and similar relative ages is noted throughout Colorado plutons of that age

  14. Iron isotopic compositions of adakitic and non-adakitic granitic magmas: Magma compositional control and subtle residual garnet effect

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yongsheng; Wu, Hongjie; Ke, Shan; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Wang, Qiang

    2017-04-01

    Here we present iron (Fe) isotopic compositions of 51 well-characterized adakitic and non-adakitic igneous rocks from the Dabie orogen, Central China and Panama/Costa Rica, Central America. Twelve I-type non-adakitic granitoid samples from the Dabie orogen yield δ56Fe ranging from -0.015‰ to 0.184‰. The good correlations between δ56Fe and indices of magma differentiation (e.g., SiO2, FeOt, Mg#, and Fe3+/ΣFe) suggest Fe2+-rich silicate and oxide minerals dominated fractional crystallization with Δ56Femelt-crystal ∼ 0.06‰ may account for the δ56Fe variation in these samples. One A-type granite sample from the Dabie orogen has δ56Fe as high as 0.447‰, likely indicating less magnetite crystallization and an increase in 103lnβmelt with magma (Na + K)/(Ca + Mg). Combined with the literature data, most high silica (SiO2 ⩾ 71 wt.%) granitic rocks define a good positive linear correlation between δ56Fe and (Na + K)/(Ca + Mg): δ56Fe = 0.0062‰ × (Na + K)/(Ca + Mg) + 0.130‰ (R2 = 0.66). Given that fractional crystallization also tends to increase δ56Fe with (Na + K)/(Ca + Mg), this correlation can serve as the maximum estimate of the magma compositional control on Fe isotope fractionation. Low-Mg adakitic samples (LMA) have δ56Fe ranging from 0.114‰ to 0.253‰. The melt compositional control on LMA δ56Fe could be insignificant due to their limited (Na + K)/(Ca + Mg) variation. Except for one sample that may be affected by late differentiation, 14 out of 15 LMA have δ56Fe increasing with (Dy/Yb)N, reflecting a subtle but significant effect of residual garnet proportion. This serves as evidence for that source mineralogy may play an important role in fractionating Fe isotopes during partial melting. Dabie and Central America high-Mg adakitic samples have homogeneous Fe isotopic compositions with mean δ56Fe of 0.098 ± 0.038‰ (2SD, N = 11) and 0.085 ± 0.045‰ (2SD, N = 11), respectively. These samples have undergone melt-mantle interaction

  15. Geochemistry, geochronology and isotope geology of Nakfa intrusive rocks, northern Eritrea: products of a tectonically thickened Neoproterozoic arc crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teklay, M.; Kröner, A.; Mezger, K.

    2001-08-01

    The north-south-trending Neoproterozoic volcano-sedimentary plutonic associations in northern Eritrea are part of the Nubian Shield. The Nakfa intrusive rocks range in composition from gabbro to syeno-diorite to granite and alkaline syenite and intrude supracrustal rocks of volcanic and sedimentary origin. All granitoid rocks are metaluminous or slightly peraluminous and have typical I-type chemical signatures. The calc-alkaline intrusive rocks and the alkaline syenites have geochemical characteristics (e.g. low Nb values) typical of arc intrusives and plot as volcanic arc granites on various discriminant diagrams. Single zircon evaporation Pb-Pb ages and conventional multigrain U-Pb ages on zircons and titanites yielded emplacement ages of ˜620-640 Ma. These are comparable to those of adjacent juvenile terranes in the Nubian Shield. No pre-Pan-African rocks have so far been found in northern Eritrea. Isotopic data show a limited range, with initial ɛ Nd values ranging from 3.5 to 5.6 and initial Sr ratios from 0.7018 to 0.7037. The high positive initial ɛ Nd values and low initial Sr ratios indicate that the granitoid rocks were derived from a mantle and/or juvenile crustal source with no, or only insignificant, contribution from an older continental component. This is further supported by the absence of inherited zircons and the lack of rocks of continental affinity. Leached K-feldspars from Nakfa intrusive rocks have Pb isotope ratios ( 206Pb/ 204Pb = 17.60-17.88, 207Pb/ 204Pb = 15.49-15.53 and 208Pb/ 204Pb = 37.12-37.37) similar to those for 'oceanic leads' from Saudi Arabia, which are interpreted as manifesting a mantle source. Hence, the Pb isotope ratios, in agreement with the Sr and Nd isotopic data, indicate an insignificant involvement of older crustal components in the generation of Pan-African crust in northern Eritrea. The ages and isotopic characteristics of the Nakfa intrusive rocks are comparable to those of adjacent juvenile terranes in the

  16. Quaternary Adakite - Nb-Enriched Basalt Association in the Western - Mexican Volcanic Belt: is There any Slab Melt Evidence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, C. M.; Ferrari, L.

    2007-05-01

    A spatial and temporal association between adakitic rocks and Nb-enriched basalts (NEB) has been recognised for the first time in the western sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt in the San Pedro-Cerro Grande Volcanic Complex (SCVC). The SCVC is composed of subalkalic intermediate to felsic rocks, spanning in composition from high-silica andesites to rhyolites, and by the young transitional hawaiite and mugearite lavas of Amado Nervo shield volcano. Intermediate to felsic rocks of the SCVC show many geochemical characteristics of typical adakites, such as high Sr/Y ratios (up to 180) and low Y (< 18 ppm) and Yb contents. Mafic Amado Nervo rocks have high TiO2 (1.5-2.3 wt), Nb (14-27 ppm), Nb/La (0.5-0.9) and high absolute abundances of HFSE similar to those shown by NEB. However, the Sr and Nd isotopic signature of SCVC rocks is different from that shown by typical adakites and NEB. Although the adakites-NEB association has been traditionally considered as a strong evidence of slab-melting, we suggest that other processes can lead to its generation. Here we show that parental magmas of adakitic rocks of the SCVC derive their adakitic characteristic from high pressure crystal fractionation processes of garnet, amphibole and pyroxene of a normal arc basalt. On the other hand, Amado Nervo Na- alkaline parental magmas have been generated by sediment melting plus MORB-fluid flux melting of a heterogeneous mantle wedge, consisting of a mixture of depleted and an enriched mantle sources (90DM+10EM). We can not exclude a contribution to the subduction component of slab melts, because the component signature is dominated by sediment melt, but we argue that caution is needed in interpreting the adakites-NEB association in a genetic sense

  17. Underplating of basaltic magmas and crustal growth in a continental arc: Evidence from Late Mesozoic intermediate-felsic intrusive rocks in southern Qiangtang, central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lu-Lu; Wang, Qiang; Wyman, Derek A.; Ou, Quan; Dan, Wei; Jiang, Zi-Qi; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Yang, Jin-Hui; Long, Xiao-Ping; Li, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Phanerozoic growth of continental crust has widely been considered as an important geological phenomenon and mainly occurs in an arc setting. However, the crustal growth models (mantle-derived basalt underplating or accretion of island or intra-oceanic arc complexes or oceanic plateau) have been disputed. Here we present new zircon LA-ICPMS U-Pb age, whole-rock major and trace element, Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopic data for Late Mesozoic intermediate-felsic intrusive rocks in the Rena Co area in southern Qiangtang, central Tibet. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating for two granodiorite and three diorite samples and one granodiorite porphyry sample gives ages of ca. 150 Ma, ca. 112 Ma, respectively, indicating they were generated in the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous. All rocks are sub-alkaline in composition and belong to the high-K cal-alkaline series. The ~ 150 Ma diorites (SiO2 = 57.9-61.2 wt.%) exhibit relatively high MgO (3.13-3.88 wt.%) and Cr (52.4-282 ppm) contents and Mg# (47-51) values, similar to magnesian diorites. They are geochemically characterized by uniformly low εNd(t) (- 5.5 to - 5.2), high (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7071 to 0.7078) and Th/La (0.22-0.32), and variable zircon εHf(t) (- 8.7 to + 4.8) values. They were probably generated by melting of oceanic sediment diapirs, followed by interaction with the surrounding mantle during the northward subduction of Bangong-Nujiang Oceanic lithosphere. The ~ 150 Ma granodiorites and ~ 112 Ma granodiorite porphyries are characterized by low MgO (< 3 wt.%) contents and Mg# (< 45) values, high Al2O3 (> 15% wt.%) and Sr (> 400 ppm) and low Y (< 18 ppm) and Yb (< 1.9 ppm) contents, and high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, which are similar to those of typical adakites. The granodiorites have low εNd(t) (- 7.6 to - 3.7) and zircon εHf(t) (- 9.8 to + 0.2) and high (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7069 to 0.7086) values, and were likely produced by partial melting of a thickened and heterogeneous ancient lower continental crust. The relatively

  18. Compositional differences between roof and floor rocks of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmonsen, Lars Peter; Tegner, Christian; Barfod, Gry H.; Lesher, Charles E.

    2014-05-01

    The Skaergaard intrusion solidified inwards from the margins forming the Layered Series on the floor and the Marginal and Upper Border Series on the walls and roof, respectively. Comparison of the roof and floor rocks is the most straight-forward way to contrast differentiation processes controlled by gravity. Here, we present new bulk rock (major and trace elements, Sr and Nd isotopes), mineralogical and petrographic data for the Upper Border Series. The Upper Border Series mainly diverge from equivalent Layered Series rocks by relatively higher concentrations of incompatible elements, lack of igneous lamination and frequent development of interstitial granophyre, whereas the core compositions of minerals and isotopic signatures are similar in the two series. Here, we examine the main explanations for these differences. Firstly, it has been suggested that the roof zone was enriched by assimilation of stoped gneissic blocks. Our new Sr and Nd data of the Upper Border Series exclude this as a first order process as has been shown before. Mixing models suggest that the Layered and Upper Border Series assimilated less than 3 percent Precambrian host gneiss. Furthermore, no correlation exists between incompatible elements and Sr-Nd isotopic ratios. Secondly, magma stratification as a consequence of compositional convection has been invoked. However, by combining petrography and whole rock compositions we show that the crystallization sequence in the Upper Border Series is identical to the Layered Series. Moreover, the anorthite content of plagioclase cores is identical within error in the roof and floor at the cumulus phase boundaries. This is most easily explained by in situ crystallization inwards from the margins of a homogeneous magma. Thirdly, the enrichment of incompatible elements in the Upper Border Series relative to the Layered Series has been explained by the trapping of a higher fraction of intercumulus liquid in the roof rocks relative to the compacted

  19. Geochemical Characteristics and Petrogenesis of Adakites in Sikhote-Alin, Russian Far East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jeremy Tsung Jui; Jahn, Bor-ming; Nechaev, Victor; Chashchin, Alexander; Yokoyama, Kazumi; Tsutsumi, Yukiyasu

    2016-04-01

    The Sikhote-Alin orogenic belt and late Precambrian Khanka block are two major tectonic units in the southernmost Russian Far East. The Sikhote-Alin belt comprises several tectonostratigraphic terranes, including late Precambrian nappes, and Mesozoic accretionary prisms and turbidite basins. These terranes are overlain by Cretaceous to Paleocene felsic to intermediate volcanic rocks and intruded by granitoids. The magmatic rocks are collectively known as "the East Sikhote-Alin volcano-plutonic belt" (ESAVPB), and mainly characterized by acid-to-intermediate compositions. In this work we study the petrogenesis of adakitic rocks and discuss the possible tectonic implications. Adakitic rocks of the Sikhote-Alin orogen were emplaced in two main periods: Early Cretaceous (132-98 Ma) and Eocene (46-45 Ma). They mainly occur in the Khanka block, with a subordinate amount in the ESAVPB. The adakites show a large range of chemical composition: SiO2 = 57-74%, Al2O3 = 15-18%, Na2O = 3.5-6.1%, K2O = 0.7-3.2%, Na2O/K2O = 1.1-3.9, Sr/Y = 33-145, and (La/Yb)N = 11-53. HREE and HFSE are remarkably depleted. The Early Cretaceous adakites show eNd(T) = -1.0 to +3.2; ISr = 0.7040 - 0.7090, and the Eocene adakites have eNd(T) = -2.0 to +2.2; ISr = 0.7042 - 0.7058. Thus, the Cretaceous and Eocene adakites show rather similar Sr-Nd isotopic compositions, but their Nd isotopic signatures (slightly negative to positive eNd(T) values) may distinguish them from the granitoids of the ESAVPB (only negative eNd(T) values). Adakites may have different modes of generation, but partial melting of meta-basic rocks in a subduction zone is considered the most likely mode for the present case. The two periods of adakites have probably formed in the following scenario. The early Cretaceous emplacement ages for the adakites and the oldest granitoids of the ESAVPB, is considered as the time of initiation of the Paleo-Pacific subduction in NE Asia. The Eocene adakites were also generated in subduction

  20. New ages on intrusive rocks and altered zones in the Alaska Peninsula: A section in The United States Geological Survey in Alaska: Accomplishments during 1977

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.; Detterman, Robert L.; Silberman, Miles L.

    1978-01-01

    Preliminary potassium-argon dating of intrusive rocks and altered zones in the Chignik and Sutwik Island quadrangles of the Alaska Peninsula seems to indicate at least three and possibly four Tertiary ages of alteration and mineralization.

  1. Stable isotopic constraints on fluid-rock interaction and Cu-PGE-S redistribution in the Sonju Lake intrusion, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, Y.-R.; Ripley, E.M.; Miller, J.D.; Li, C.; Mariga, J.; Shafer, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Sonju Lake intrusion, part of the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift-related Beaver Bay Complex, is a 1,200-m-thick, strongly differentiated, layered sequence of mafic cumulates located in northeastern Minnesota. Basal melatroctolite and dunite layers are overlain by troctolite, gabbro, Fe-Ti oxide-rich gabbro, apatite diorite, and monzodiorite. Stratigraphic intervals rich in Pt + Pd, Cu, and S occur over ???500 m in the Fe-Ti oxide-rich gabbro and apatite diorite units. Peak concentrations show offsets that are similar to those found in other tholeiitic layered intrusions. Concentrations of Pd in excess of 100 ppb are confined to the lowermost 25 m of the interval. Copper shows a sharp increase to 630 ppm above the Pd-rich interval. Sulfur contents are low (<375 ppm) in the Cu-rich interval, but they increase to values as high as 3,150 ppm above in the apatite diorite. Disseminated sulfides in the intrusion have ??34S values that range from -2.2 to 3 per mil Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) and suggest that contamination by country rock sulfur was not an important process in the formation of the metal-rich interval. ??18O values of plagioclase from the intrusion range from 5.6 to 12.0 per mil (V-SMOW) and indicate that a relatively low-18O fluid (??18O ???3-5 ???) interacted with the rocks of the intrusion at temperatures less than ???275??C. Clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxides (ilmenite with minor amounts of titanomagnetite) show much more restricted ranges in ??18O values (4.6-5.7 and 5.5-6.7 per mil, respectively) and attest to the kinetic control of the oxygen isotope exchange process. The externally derived fluid that interacted with rocks now enriched in platinum group elements (PGE) + Cu- and Fe-sulfide minerals locally liberated sulfur and replaced chalcopyrite and pyrite with goethite. In the Cu-rich zone, goethite that replaces chalcopyrite may contain up to 8.5 weight percent Cu. It is evident that hydrothermal alteration resulted in a decoupling of copper

  2. Crystal Size Distribution of Quartz Grains: A Means for Interpreting Igneous Textures in Dikes and Other Intrusive Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, L. J.; Candela, P. A.; Piccoli, P. M.

    2001-05-01

    Crystal size distribution analysis was applied to quartz crystals in intrusive igneous rocks in an attempt to describe quantitatively the degree to which the size distribution of the intrusive samples differs from that of extrusive rocks unaffected by near-solidus and sub-solidus recrystallization, grain boundary migration, and annealing. The samples include a seriate dike (width scale ~2 meters) found within the Courtright Shear Zone in the central Sierra Nevada (California), and three hypabyssal, Mesozoic-age plutons within the Great Basin (Nevada) including: the McCoy Pluton, granodiorite which exhibits a medium to coarse-grained hypidiomorphic texture; the Mill Canyon Stock, characterized by a hypidiomorphic-granular texture and which plots near the boundary between granite and granodiorite on a Streckeisen diagram; and the Trenton Canyon Pluton, which is a medium-grained hypidiomorphic-granular to slightly porphyritic granodiorite (Ratajeski, K., M.S. Thesis, Univ. MD, 1995). Crystal size distribution (CSD) analysis can be used to analyze quantitatively the texture of an igneous rock to derive information about the kinetics of crystallization. We used a batch crystallization formalism to model the crystallization kinetics of the intrusive rocks. In previous studies, CSD plots associated with extrusive samples have regularly exhibited a power-law crystal size distribution. In an attempt to determine the extent to which the CSD plots associated with intrusive samples approximate the CSD trends found for extrusive rocks, we measured the longest apparent diameters of quartz crystals in each sample for CSD analysis. Quartz was chosen for analysis because its aspect ratio approached unity. Therefore, the quartz grains can be approximated as a sphere in three dimensions, allowing for a simple area-to-volume conversion and minimizing stereological problems. Using the conductive heat transfer equation (dc = (κ t)1/2) applied to a dike with a cooling length of 1 meter

  3. Wall Rock Assimilation and Magma Migration in the Sierra Nevada Batholith: A Study of the Courtright Intrusive Zone, Central California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrez, G.; Putirka, K. D.

    2010-12-01

    The Sierra Nevada Batholith is composed of various plutons that interact with each other, and with pre- and syn-batholith metamorphic rocks. In the central part of the Sierra Nevada Batholith, at Courtright Reservoir in California, the younger Mt. Givens Pluton (87-93 Ma; McNulty et al., 2000) intrudes the Dinkey pluton (103 Ma; Bateman et al., 1964), and metasediments (a metamorphic screen) that, in places, separate the two plutons. This Courtright Reservoir Intrusive zone, as termed by Bateman et al. (1964), provides an ideal setting to examine the dynamics of intrusion and assimilation. Whole rock major and trace element compositions of the plutons, their mafic enclaves, and the metasediments, show that all such samples, from both plutons, fall on a single mixing trend. We thus infer that magmas parental to both plutons were roughly similar in composition, and assimilated significant amounts of the same, or very similar metasedimentary wall rocks. We also examined changes in whole rock compositions within the Mt. Givens pluton, as a function of distance from the two rock units with which it is now in contact (the metasediments, and the Dinkey Creek). In the vicinity of the contact between are an abundance of enclaves that are rounded, and appear to have been transported in vertical pipes. Whole rock analysis of the host granitoid material that surrounds these enclaves is clearly more mafic than the granitoid magmas from interior parts of the pluton. These whole rock compositions indicate that the pluton becomes more homogenous moving away from the contact, with a compositional decay occurring over a span of about 50-100 m. There are at least two possible interpretations. The compositional decay may represent a diffusive exchange of mass between an early crystallizing marginal phase of the pluton and the pluton interior. Another (not mutually incompatible) possibility is that the mafic margins represent pipes or tubes (Paterson, 2010), related to some convective

  4. Study project of intrusive rocks: States of Espirito Santo and Rio de Janeiro, south and east of Minas Gerais and southeast of the state of Sao Paulo. [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Dossantos, A. R.; DOSANJOS; Barbos, M. P.; Veneziani, P.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of mapping intrusive rocks in polycyclic and polymetamorphic areas using the logic method for photointerpretation of LANDSAT and radar imagery was investigated. The resolution, scale and spectral characteristics of the imagery were considered. Spectral characteristics of the intrusive rock units mapped using image 100 were investigated. It was determined that identification of acidic and basic intrusive bodies and determination of their relationships with principal structural directions using the logic method was feasible. Tectonic compartments were subdivided into units according to their predominant lithographic types, ignoring stratigraphy. The principal directions of various foliations, faults, megafolds, and fractural systems were defined. Delineation of the boundaries of intrusive bodies mapped using the spectral characteristics of Image 100 imagery ws determined to be more accurate than visual analysis. A 1:500,000 scale map of intrusions in the areas studied was generated.

  5. Intrusive rocks and plutonic belts of southeastern Alaska, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brew, David A.; Morrell, Robert P.; Roddick, J.A.

    1983-01-01

    About 30 percent of the 175,000-km2 area of southeastern Alaska is underlain by intrusive igneous rocks. Compilation of available information on the distribution, composition, and ages of these rocks indicates the presence of six major and six minor plutonic belts. From west to east, the major belts are: the Fairweather-Baranof belt of early to mid-Tertiary granodiorite; the Muir-Chichagof belt of mid-Cretaceous tonalite and granodiorite; the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt of porphyritic granodiorite, quartz diorite, and diorite of probable Cretaceous age; the Klukwan-Duke belt of concentrically zoned or Alaskan-type ultramafic-mafic plutons of mid-Cretaceous age within the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt; the Coast Plutonic Complex sill belt of tonalite of unknown, but perhaps mid-Cretaceous, age; and the Coast Plutonic Complex belt I of early to mid-Tertiary granodiorite and quartz monzonite. The minor belts are distributed as follows: the Glacier Bay belt of Cretaceous and(or) Tertiary granodiorite, tonalite, and quartz diorite lies within the Fair-weather-Baranof belt; layered gabbro complexes of inferred mid-Tertiary age lie within and are probably related to the Fairweather-Baranof belt; the Chilkat-Chichagof belt of Jurassic granodiorite and tonalite lies within the Muir-Chichagof belt; the Sitkoh Bay alkaline, the Kendrick Bay pyroxenite to quartz monzonite, and the Annette and Cape Fox trondhjemite plutons, all interpreted to be of Ordovician(?) age, together form the crude southern southeastern Alaska belt within the Muir-Chichagof belt; the Kuiu-Etolin mid-Tertiary belt of volcanic and plutonic rocks extends from the Muir-Chichagof belt eastward into the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt; and the Behm Canal belt of mid- to late Tertiary granite lies within and next to Coast Plutonic Complex belt II. In addition, scattered mafic-ultramafic bodies occur within the Fairweather-Baranof, Muir-Chichagof, and Coast Plutonic Complex belts I and II. Palinspastic

  6. Reply to: Comment by Aftabi and Atapour on « Arc magmatism and subduction history beneath the Zagros Mountains, Iran: A new report of adakites and geodynamic consequences »

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Omrani, Jafar; Agard, Philippe; Whitechurch, Hubert; Benoit, Mathieu; Prouteau, Gaëlle; Jolivet, Laurent

    2009-12-01

    We herein answer the comments by Aftabi and Atapour to our paper entitled "Arc magmatism and subduction history beneath the Zagros Mountains, Iran: A new report of adakites and geodynamic consequences". We show that their criticism rests on rather weak grounds and numerous contradictions. We reassess the validity of our analytical results and stress the lack of alteration in our adakitic samples. We further discuss the interpretation of our findings, in particular the fact that the distribution of these adakites is not random in the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc, neither in space nor time (being restricted to the central part and to Upper Miocene to younger rocks). Finally, we point out that Aftabi and Atapour even somewhat support our model when they suggest "slab break-off (as a cause) for the Miocene-Pliocene adakitic rocks" .

  7. Geochemistry of intrusive rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field, New Mexico, and contrasts between evolution of plutonic and volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; Czamanske, G.K.; Lipman, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonic rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field comprise three groups: 1) ???25 Ma high-level resurgent plutons composed of monzogranite and silicic metaluminous and peralkaline granite, 2) 23-25 Ma syenogranite, and alkali-feldspar granite intrusions emplaced along the southern caldera margin, and 3) 19-23 Ma granodiorite and granite plutons emplaced south of the caldera. Major-element compositions of both extrusive and intrusive suites in the Latir field are broadly similar; both suites include high-SiO2 rocks with low Ba and Sr, and high Rb, Nb, Th, and U contents. Moreover, both intermediateto siliciccomposition volcanic and plutonic rocks contain abundant accessory sphene and apatite, rich in rare-earth elements (REE), as well as phases in which REE's are essential components. Strong depletion in Y and REE contents, with increasing SiO2 content, in the plutonic rocks indicate a major role for accessory mineral fractionation that is not observed in volcanic rocks of equivalent composition. Considerations of the rheology of granitic magma suggest that accessory-mineral fractionation may occur primarily by filter-pressing evolved magmas from crystal-rich melts. More limited accessory-mineral crystallization and fractionation during evolution of the volcanic magmas may have resulted from markedly lower diffusivities of essential trace elements than major elements. Accessory-mineral fractionation probably becomes most significant at high crystallinities. The contrast in crystallization environments postulated for the extrusive and intrusive rocks may be common to other magmatic systems; the effects are particularly pronounced in highly evolved rocks of the Latir field. High-SiO2 peralkaline porphyry emplaced during resurgence of the Questa caldera represents non-erupted portions of the magma that produced the Amalia Tuff during caldera-forming eruption. The peralkaline porphyry continues compositional and mineralogical trends found in the tuff. Amphibole

  8. Rock Magnetic and Remanence Properties of Synthetic Martian Basaltic Intrusions: Implications for Mars crustal anomalies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuomo, D. M.; Petrochilos, L.; Brachfeld, S. A.; Bowles, J. A.; Hammer, J. E.

    2009-12-01

    Two basalts deemed relevant to the crust of Mars were synthesized to examine contrasts in rock magnetic and remanence properties following identical thermal histories and oxygen fugacity conditions. The composition denoted T-type is rich in Al and poor in Fe, reflecting constraints provided by thermal emission spectroscopy that the Martian crust is somewhat terrestrial in character. The M-type composition is poor in Al and rich in Fe, reflecting the composition of basaltic liquid in equilibrium with Martian meteorite phase assemblages. The two compositions are identical with respect to MgO, SiO2, and TiO2. Batches of each composition were cooled from > 1200 °C to 1070 °C at 4 °C/h and annealed at 1070°C for 100 h, then quenched. Samples were then held at 650°C for periods ranging from 21 to 158 days under quartz-fayalite-magnetite (QFM) fO2 buffer conditions, then quenched. The experimental conditions are germane to shallow igneous intrusions, which might be a significant volumetric fraction of the Martian crust and potential carriers of crustal magnetic anomalies, and provide an important contrast to a previous set of fast-cooled (3-230 °C/h) basalts our group performed on the same two compositions. M-type samples contain Fe-Ti-Al-Mg oxide grains 40-50 μm in diameter with skeletal morphologies. T-type samples contain equant euhedral Fe-Ti-Al-Mg oxides with grain diameters ranging from 15-30 μm as well as elongated anhedral ilmenite grains. For M-type samples both the starting material and the samples annealed at 650 °C have narrow multidomain hysteresis loops and similar hysteresis parameters. T-type starting materials and samples annealed at 650 °C have pseudo single domain (PSD) hysteresis loops, but the annealed samples plot lower and to the right within the PSD field on a Day plot, indicating coarser magnetic grains. Alternating field demagnetization of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (ARM) shows median destructive fields < 10 mT. M-type samples

  9. Niobium-enriched basalts from the Wabigoon subprovince, Canada: evidence for adakitic metasomatism above an Archean subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, D. A.; Ayer, J. A.; Devaney, J. R.

    2000-06-01

    Late Archean niobium-enriched basalts from the Central Sturgeon Lake assemblage and Neepawa group of the western Wabigoon subprovince have mantle-normalized Nb/La between 0.8 and 1.3 and Zr/Y between 4 and 7. They are compositionally similar to basalts attributed to adakite metasomatism of mantle wedge regions in Cenozoic subduction zones [Sajona et al., J. Petrol. 37 (1996) 693-726]. In detail, their Sc-REE systematics suggest the Archean basalts were generated above the garnet stability field. An association with adakite-like volcanic rocks, an absence of komatiites and the arc-like attributes of their host sequences suggest a subduction-related origin for the basalts. If current models of adakite and Niobium-enriched basalt genesis are valid, then additional examples of these rocks should be relatively common in other Archean greenstone belts.

  10. Transition from adakitic to bimodal magmatism induced by the paleo-Pacific plate subduction and slab rollback beneath SE China: Evidence from petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the dike swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Xu, Xisheng; Liu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    The late Mesozoic magmatic record of SE China is dominated by felsic volcanics and intrusions. However, this magmatism mainly occurred in coastal areas at 110-80 Ma, in contrast to poorly researched dike swarms that were emplaced inland at 165-120 Ma. Here, we focus on Early Cretaceous mafic and felsic dike swarms that provide new insights into the tectono-magmatic evolution of SE China. The swarms were intruded into Neoproterozoic plutons and include granodioritic porphyry, granitic porphyry, and diabase dikes. The granodioritic porphyry (128 ± 2 Ma) dikes are geochemically similar to adakitic rocks, suggesting that inland adakitic magmatism occurred between ca. 175 and ca. 130 Ma. The majority of these adakitic rocks are calc-alkaline and have Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotopic compositions that are indicative of derivation from a Neoproterozoic magmatic arc source within the lower crust. The granitic porphyry and diabase dikes were emplaced coevally at ca. 130 Ma, and the former contain high alkali and high field strength element (HFSE; e.g., Zr, Nb, Ce, and Y) concentrations that together with their high Ga/Al and FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) ratios imply an A-type affinity. The widespread ca. 130 Ma magmatism that formed the A-type granites and coeval diabase dikes defines a NE-SW trending inland belt of bimodal magmatism in SE China. The presence of mafic enclaves in some of the A-type granites, and the Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of the latter are indicative of inadequate mixing between the basement sediment-derived and coeval mantle-derived basaltic melts that define the bimodal magmatism. The transition from adakitic rocks to bimodal magmatism in the inland region of SE China indicates a change in the prevailing tectonic regime. This change was associated with an increase in the dip angle of the northwestward-subducting paleo-Pacific Plate beneath SE China between the Middle Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous. This resulted in a transition from a local intra-plate extensional

  11. Intrusive rocks of the Holden and Lucerne quadrangles, Washington; the relation of depth zones, composition, textures, and emplacement of plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cater, Fred W.

    1982-01-01

    The core of the northern Cascade Range in Washington consists of Precambrian and upper Paleozoic metamorphic rocks cut by numerous plutons, ranging in age from early Triassic to Miocene. The older plutons have been eroded to catazonal depths, whereas subvolcanic rocks are exposed in the youngest plutons. The Holden and Lucerne quadrangles span a -sizeable and representative part of this core. The oldest of the formations mapped in these quadrangles is the Swakane Biotite Gneiss, which was shown on the quadrangle maps as Cretaceous and older in age. The Swakane has yielded a middle Paleozoic metamorphic age, and also contains evidence of zircon inherited from some parent material more than 1,650 m.y. old. In this report, the Swakane is assigned an early Paleozoic or older age. It consists mostly of biotite gneiss, but interlayered with it are scattered layers and lenses of hornblende schist and gneiss, clinozoisite-epidote gneiss, and quartzite. Thickness of the Swakane is many thousands of meters, and the base is not exposed. The biotite gneiss is probably derived from a pile of siliceous volcanic rocks containing scattered sedimentary beds and basalt flows. Overlying the Swakane is a thick sequence of eugeosynclinal upper Paleozoic rocks metamorphosed to amphibolite grade. The sequence includes quartzite and thin layers of marble, hornblende schist and gneiss, graphitic schist, and smaller amounts of schist and gneiss of widely varying compositions. The layers have been tightly and complexly folded, and, in places, probably had been thrust over the overlying Swakane prior to metamorphism. Youngest of the supracrustal rocks in the area are shale, arkosic sandstone, and conglomerate of the Paleocene Swauk Formation. These rocks are preserved in the Chiwaukum graben, a major structural element of the region. Of uncertain age, but possibly as old as any of the intrusive rocks in the area, are small masses of ultramafic rocks, now almost completely altered to

  12. Estimation of Pressure and Temperature of Intrusive Rocks Crystallisation: A Case Study of Naqadeh, Pasveh and Delkeh Plutons, W Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhari, Seyed Ali; Bea, Fernando; Amini, Sadraddin; Ghalamghash, Jalil

    The Naqadeh, Pasveh and Delkeh plutons of North Sanandaj-Sirjan Zone, W Iran, are medium to high potassium calc-alkaline intrusive rocks composed of mafic and felsic rocks. Six samples were selected as representative of different units of these plutons for estimation of pressure and temperature of magmatic crystallisation. Al-in-hornblende barometry and crosstie contents of amphiboles suggest <4.5 kbar (1.6-4.5 kbar) pressure for emplacement depth of intrusives. Different thermometer methods indicate various stages of magmatic evolution from near liquidus to sub-solidus temperatures. The highest temperature resulted from orthopyroxene-clinopyroxene solvus thermometry which is more than 1100°C, reflecting initial crystallisation of pyroxene from dioritic magma. Hornblende-clinopyroxene thermometry show another hyper-solidus crystallisation phase during magmatic cooling. The temperature come from hornblende-plagioclase thermometer (695-760°C) probably refer to late stage crystallisation of the magma near solidus condition. Calculated temperature of feldspar thermometry show scatter results (281-1086°C) implies sub-solidus re-equilibration of the feldspar during magmatic and post-magmatic evolution.

  13. Geochronological and geochemical study of the Pan African intrusive rocks along the Najd Fault system in El Wajh area, Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Mahmoud; Abu-Alam, Tamer; Hauzenberger, Christoph; Stüwe, Kurt; Tiepolo, Massimo

    2014-05-01

    In the active tectonic regions, shear zones play an important role to re-configure the structure of the lithosphere. One of the largest shear zones on the Earth is the Najd Fault system of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. Literature data record the main active phase of this shear zone during the last stages of the Pan-African Orogeny (ca. 650-550 Ma). Compilation of new geochronological and geochemical data in addition to field relation is used to figure the tectonic history of the Najd Fault system. Different relationships between igneous intrusions and the Najd Fault System are observed. Some igneous bodies predate the activity of the shear zone, others intruded during the shearing process and a later phase intruded after the activity of the Najd Fault system ceased. The intrusive rocks in the study area show a geochemical and compositional diversity. Intrusives with dioritic composition were derived from a metaluminous tholeiitic magma around 700 Ma, and granodiorite-tonalite intrusions have calcalkaline characters and display a metaluminous to peraluminous character (ca. 740 and 660 Ma) then the magmatic activity terminated with peraluminous calcalkaline intrusives which formed granitic rocks with intrusion ages of 605-580 Ma. These magmatic events are identical for the Arabian-Nubian Shield but contamination from the crust or different rates of fractionation are recorded in our samples which are responsible for variations in the geochemical signature of the intrusive rocks. Based on field observations and contact relations, the intrusive rocks within the Ajjaj shear zone were studied in details in order to determine the age and the tectonic history of this shear zone that marks the termination of the Najd System against the eastern margin of the Red Sea. The provided zircon U-Pb dating by LA-ICP-MS and field relationships confine the activation age of the Ajjaj shear zone in limited period between 605 Ma and 580 Ma.

  14. Thermo-physical rock properties of greywacke basement rock and intrusive lavas from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, P.; Weinert, S.; Bignall, G.; Sass, I.

    2016-09-01

    Greywacke of the Waipapa and Torlesse (Composite) Terrane form the basement of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand. Together with inferred buried lavas, domes and igneous complexes they are likely to be the dominant rock type prevailing at depths > 4 km beneath the TVZ. A fundamental understanding of the rock properties of the deep formations is of utmost importance for the exploration of deep unconventional geothermal resources. An outcrop analogue study was conducted to improve the understanding of the thermo-physical rock properties of likely deep buried rock formations beneath the TVZ. A total of 145 core samples were taken at 10 locations inside and outside the TVZ and their grain and bulk density, porosity, matrix permeability, bulk thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, and the compressional and shear wave velocities measured on oven-dry samples. Additional tests of the unconfined compressive strength were conducted for selected greywacke samples to quantify their mechanical rock strength. The obtained data indicates that the thermo-physical rock properties are mainly controlled by porosity, and minor by mineralogy, texture and grain size. Samples from Waipapa-type and Torlesse-type greywacke exhibit minor rheological differences, with Waipapa-type greywacke having lowest porosity (about 1% vs. 3%) and highest bulk thermal conductivity (2.5 W m- 1 K- 1 vs. 1.7 W m- 1 K- 1) and specific heat capacity (0.8 kJ kg- 1 K- 1 vs. 0.7 kJ kg- 1 K- 1). Matrix permeability is < 1E-16 m2 for all greywacke samples. Tested lavas exhibit heterogeneous rock properties due to their wide range of porosity (< 1% up to 32%). The thermo-physical rock properties were tested at laboratory conditions (ambient temperature and pressure), which do not reflect the in situ conditions at greater depth. With depth, thermal conductivity and acoustic wave velocity are likely to decrease caused by micro fractures resulting from thermal cracking of the rock, while specific

  15. Metasomatized and hybrid rocks associated with a Palaeoarchaean layered ultramafic intrusion on the Johannesburg Dome, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhaeusser, Carl R.

    2015-02-01

    The Johannesburg Dome occurs as an inlier of Palaeoarchaean-Mesoarchaean granitic rocks, gneisses and greenstones in the central part of the Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa. In the west-central part of the dome a large greenstone remnant is surrounded and intruded by ca. 3114 Ma porphyritic granodiorites. Referred to locally as the Zandspruit greenstone remnant, it consists of a shallow-dipping ultramafic complex comprised of a number of alternating layers of harzburgite and pyroxenite. The ultramafic rocks are metamorphosed to greenschist grade and have largely been altered to serpentinite and amphibolite (tremolite-actinolite). In the granite-greenstone contact areas the porphyritic granodiorite has partially assimilated the greenstones producing a variety of hybrid rocks of dioritic composition. The hybrid rocks contain enclaves or xenoliths of greenstone and, in places, orbicular granite structures. Particularly noteworthy is an unusual zone of potash-metasomatized rock, occurring adjacent to the porphyritic granodiorite, consisting dominantly of biotite and lesser amounts of carbonate, quartz and sericite. Large potash-feldspar megacrysts and blotchy aggregated feldspar clusters give the rocks a unique texture. An interpretation placed on these rocks is that they represent metasomatized metapyroxenites of the layered ultramafic complex. Field relationships and geochemical data suggest that the rocks were influenced by hydrothermal fluids emanating from the intrusive porphyritic granodiorite. The adjacent greenstones were most likely transformed largely by the process of infiltration metasomatism, rather than simple diffusion, as CO2, H2O as well as dissolved components were added to the greenstones. Element mobility appears to have been complex as those generally regarded as being immobile, such as Ti, Y, Zr, Hf, Ta, Nb, Th, Sc, Ni, Cr, V, and Co, have undergone addition or depletion from the greenstones. Relative to all the rocks analyzed from the greenstones

  16. Fluorian garnets from the host rocks of the Skaergaard intrusion: implications for metamorphic fluid composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, C.E.; Bird, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    Zoned, silica-deficient, calcic garnets containing up to 5 mol% F substitution for O formed during contact metamorphism of basalts by the Skaergaard intrusion in East Greenland. Fluorian calcic garnets occur as a retrograde alteration of prograde wollastonite and clinopyroxene that fills vesicles and vugs in lavas 30-70 m from the intrusion. The F content of garnet is extremely sensitive to minor changes in fluid composition. The calculations show that a decrease in pH or an increase in log aF- of 0.3 at constant pressure and temperature will decrease the F concentration in garnet from 5 to 0 mol%. The results of this study show that fluorian hydrous grandites provide a mineralogical record of the activities of F species in coexisting metamorphic and hydrothermal fluids. -from Authors

  17. Investigation of rock samples using X-ray-microcomputer-tomography before and after mercury intrusion porosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Klobes, P.; Riesemeier, H.; Meyer, K.; Goebbels, J.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Hellmuth, K.H.

    1997-12-31

    A new method for the physical characterization of rock matrices for use in site investigations of nuclear waste repositories has been developed. The method can provide information needed in the assessment of the performance of the geosphere working as a natural barrier retarding the migration of radionuclides by diffusion into the rock matrix. Most conventional methods for the physical characterization of rocks give only bulk information. The combination of mercury porosimetry and computer tomography can give 3-D data on mineral-specific porosity distributions with additional pore size information. Additionally, limits for mineral-specific internal surface areas can be estimated, which is essential for the assessment of water-rock interaction and reactive interaction with radionuclides (sorption). Results of measurements on granitic rock (granodiorite) from the Baltic shield are discussed and integrated with results by complementary methods.

  18. Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions of Adakitic magma from the Wakurayama Dacite in San-in district, SW Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, D.; Shibata, T.; Matsumoto, I.

    2011-12-01

    The Wakuraya Dacite, San-in district, SW Japan was described as Adakite (Defant and Drummond, 1990, Nature) by Sato et al. (2011, JGS). Adakitic rocks are characterized by higher Al2O3 and Sr, and lower MgO, K2O, Y and Yb. Many Quaternary silicate volcanoes in Southwest Japan are considered to be adakitic magmas that have been generated by partial melting of the subducted Philippine Sea plate (e.g. the Daisen volcano; Morris, 1995, Geology). The Wakurayama Dacite is distributed within a 5 km radius in Shimane prefecture, Southwest Japan. The Wakurayama Dacite was erupted in the Late Miocene to Pliocene (ca. 5 Ma; Morris et al., 1990, JSAES), the activity in advance of the Daisen volcano. We present major and trace elements and isotopic compositions (Sr, Nd and Pb) to discuss the origin of the end-members that are related to magma genesis of the Wakurayama Dacite. The chemical characteristics of these rocks, which have higher Al2O3 (17.6-19.7 wt.%) and Sr (552-799 ppm), and lower MgO (0.28-2.14 wt.%), K2O (1.26-1.48 wt.%), Y (5-15 ppm) and Yb (0.4-0.7 ppm) contents, are similar to typical adakite. The isotopic compositions of the Wakurayama Dacite show similar to those of the Daisen volcano (Tamura et al., 2003, J. Petrol.). According to Defant and Drummond (1990), adakites are characterized by similar low 87Sr/86Sr ratios (usually < 0.7040) to those of MORB, but the Wakurayama Dacite and the Daisen volcano have higher 87Sr/86Sr ratio (ca. 0.7046 to 0.7052). Kimura et al. (2005) proposed that the origin of Daisen adakitic magmas have been primarily created by mixing between subducted oceanic crust and its associated sediments from the Philippine Sea plate. The isotopic compositions (Sr, Nd and Pb) of the Wakurayama Dacite are shown the two component-mixing curve between oceanic crust (Shikoku basin basalt; Hicky-Vargas, 1991, EPSL) and sediments (the Nankai Trough terrigenous sediments; Shimoda et al., 1998, EPSL). Above results suggest that the partial melting of

  19. Composition, age, and petrogenesis of Late Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the central Big Belt Mountains, Broadwater and Meagher counties, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Bray, E.A.; Snee, L.W.

    2002-01-01

    Cretaceous intrusions hosted by the Proterozoic Newland Formation. The northern intrusion, centered on Boulder Baldy, consists of outer, intermediate, and core zones composed of aegirine-augite quartz monzonite, hornblende quartz monzodiorite, and biotite granodiorite, respectively. The southern intrusion, north of Mount Edith, is compositionally indistinguishable from the intermediate zone of the northern intrusion.

  20. Geochronology and correlation of Tertiary volcanic and intrusive rocks in part of the southern Toquima Range, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shawe, Daniel R.; Snee, Lawrence W.; Byers, Frank M.; du Bray, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive volcanic and intrusive igneous activity, partly localized along regional structural zones, characterized the southern Toquima Range, Nevada, in the late Eocene, Oligocene, and Miocene. The general chronology of igneous activity has been defined previously. This major episode of Tertiary magmatism began with emplacement of a variety of intrusive rocks, followed by formation of nine major calderas and associated with voluminous extrusive and additional intrusive activity. Emplacement of volcanic eruptive and collapse megabreccias accompanied formation of some calderas. Penecontemporaneous volcanism in central Nevada resulted in deposition of distally derived outflow facies ash-flow tuff units that are interleaved in the Toquima Range with proximally derived ash-flow tuffs. Eruption of the Northumberland Tuff in the north part of the southern Toquima Range and collapse of the Northumberland caldera occurred about 32.3 million years ago. The poorly defined Corcoran Canyon caldera farther to the southeast formed following eruption of the tuff of Corcoran Canyon about 27.2 million years ago. The Big Ten Peak caldera in the south part of the southern Toquima Range Tertiary volcanic complex formed about 27 million years ago during eruption of the tuff of Big Ten Peak and associated air-fall tuffs. The inferred Ryecroft Canyon caldera formed in the south end of the Monitor Valley adjacent to the southern Toquima Range and just north of the Big Ten Peak caldera in response to eruption of the tuff of Ryecroft Canyon about 27 million years ago, and the Moores Creek caldera just south of the Northumberland caldera developed at about the same time. Eruption of the tuff of Mount Jefferson about 26.8 million years ago was accompanied by collapse of the Mount Jefferson caldera in the central part of the southern Toquima Range. An inferred caldera, mostly buried beneath alluvium of Big Smoky Valley southwest of the Mount Jefferson caldera, formed about 26.5 million years

  1. The Fate and Environmental Consequences of Reduced gas Mixtures Resulting from Magmatic Intrusion into Carbonaceous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iacono-Marziano, Giada; Marecal, Virginie; Pirre, Michel; Arndt, Nicolas; Ganino, Clément; Gaillard, Fabrice

    2010-05-01

    Recent developments on the impacts of Large Igneous Provinces on climate changes and extinction rates emphasize the fundamental role of country rocks in gas emissions. Contact metamorphism of country rocks intruded by sills and dikes of mafic melts can be particularly important due to their long exposure to high temperatures. When the host rocks are composed of carbonates, sulphates, salts, or organic-compounds such as bituminous shales or coals, their heating can inject into the atmosphere a quantity of volatiles that greatly exceeds the amount delivered by purely magmatic degassing. We focus here on the interaction between magma and carbonaceous rocks. Recent studies have estimated the gas released by contact metamorphism of bituminous shales in the Karoo Province; we calculate the composition of the volcanic gases which results on this interaction, taking into account the magmatic contribution too. We then present an evaluation of the fate of such gases during their diffusion in the atmosphere. The modelling of the composition of the modified volcanic gases is based on gas-melt thermodynamic calculations that take into account S-H-O-C gaseous species at temperatures and pressures in equilibrium with basaltic liquids. We simulate the incorporation into the gas-melt system of organic compounds as CH or CH2, depending on the maturity of the carbonaceous rocks (coal or oil). Addition of C and H has a dramatic effect on the amount and the redox state of the gas in equilibrium with the basalt. With the incorporation of only 0.2 wt% CH, the gas composition changes from CO2-H2O dominated (typical of basaltic gases on Earth), to CO-H2 dominated (a strongly reduced mixture, which resembles Martian volcanic gases). Addition of more than 0.2 wt% CH can trigger graphite saturation, such as reported in few locations where carbonaceous rocks have been ingested by basalts. In the famous Disko Island location, for example, we calculate that an incorporation of 1 wt% CH led to

  2. Crystallization processes and 'adakitic' magmas: mutually exclusive ? (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muntener, O.; Ulmer, P.

    2009-12-01

    There are at least 6 different processes that contribute to the genesis of so-called ‘adakitic’ magmas (see session description V05) that all require some sort of (partial) melting of crustal lithologies. Since subduction zone geotherms derived from more complex numerical models that include temperature dependent viscosity became higher, partial melting of subducted crustal rocks is an attractive model to explain a wide variety of geochemical observations in arcs. Melting models plausibly explain highly incompatible elements in arcs such as Th, but probably less so major and moderately incompatible elements. Here we ask if the formation of ‘adakitic’ magmas requires polybaric crystal fractionation at all, and if so, what are the potential consequences for 'adakite' genesis. We review the results of crystallization experiments of primary, mantle-derived hydrous magmas and their derivatives under conditions prevailing in the uppermost mantle, at the base and in the lower part of island arc crust (0.8-1.5 GPa) and compare them to the results of partial melting experiments of metabasalts. We consider the mutual phase relations of the principal phases olivine, cpx, opx, garnet, amphibole, plagioclase and spinel at variable water contents and their bearing on the control of important trace elements and trace element ratios of arc magmas. At pressures exceeding 0.8 GPa (25km), between 45 and 70% of the initial liquid mass produced ultramafic, garnet- bearing, clinopyroxene and amphibole dominated cumulates and derivative andesitic to dacitic magmas that are typical for evolved island-arc magmas and plutonic rocks (tonalites) forming the upper part of the igneous arc crust. Delayed plagioclase crystallization at the expense of early amphibole saturation shifts derivative liquids close to or even into the peraluminous field, so peraluminous compositions are not a straightforward criterion for melting. Based on well studied and relatively complete arc sections, we

  3. Occurrence of uranium in rocks of the intrusive complex at Ekiek Creek, western Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wallace, Alan R.

    1979-01-01

    Uranium in the Ekiek Creek Complex of western Alaska is related to a niobium-rich pyrochlore in the nepheline syenite of the complex. The complex consists of an aegirine-phlogopite pyroxenite that has been intruded and partly replaced by nepheline syenite. The contact zone between the two igneous units varies from a sharp contact to a diffuse zone where the pyroxenite has been metasomatically replaced by the syenite. The entire complex was intruded into an older Cretaceous monzonite. The pyrochlore occurs as an accessory mineral in the syenite, and is visible in rocks containing over 50 ppm uranium. Chemical analyses indicate that, in all samples of syenite, there is a positive correlation between uranium and niobium; this suggests that the uranium-pyrochlore association persists even when pyrochlore is not readily visible in thin section. The small amount of pyrochlore, and its refractory nature, make the complex an unfavorable source for secondary uranium leaching or heavy-mineral concentration.

  4. Uniaxial creep as a control on mercury intrusion capillary pressure in consolidating rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.; Leigh, Christi D.

    2015-09-01

    The nature of geologic disposal of nuclear waste in salt formations requires validated and verified two - phase flow models of transport of brine and gas through intact, damaged, and consolidating crushed salt. Such models exist in oth er realms of subsurface engineering for other lithologic classes (oil and gas, carbon sequestration etc. for clastics and carbonates) but have never been experimentally validated and parameterized for salt repository scenarios or performance assessment. Mo dels for waste release scenarios in salt back - fill require phenomenological expressions for capillary pressure and relative permeability that are expected to change with degree of consolidation, and require experimental measurement to parameterize and vali date. This report describes a preliminary assessment of the influence of consolidation (i.e. volume strain or porosity) on capillary entry pressure in two phase systems using mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP). This is to both determine the potent ial usefulness of the mercury intrusion porosimetry method, but also to enable a better experimental design for these tests. Salt consolidation experiments are performed using novel titanium oedometers, or uniaxial compression cells often used in soil mech anics, using sieved run - of - mine salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as starting material. Twelve tests are performed with various starting amounts of brine pore saturation, with axial stresses up to 6.2 MPa (%7E900 psi) and temperatures to 90 o C. This corresponds to UFD Work Package 15SN08180211 milestone "FY:15 Transport Properties of Run - of - Mine Salt Backfill - Unconsolidated to Consolidated". Samples exposed to uniaxial compression undergo time - dependent consolidation, or creep, to various deg rees. Creep volume strain - time relations obey simple log - time behavior through the range of porosities (%7E50 to 2% as measured); creep strain rate increases with temperature and applied stress as

  5. U-Pb and K-Ar geochronology in Paleozoic and Mesozoic intrusive rocks of the Coastal Cordillera, Valparaiso, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gana, Paulina; Tosdal, Richard M.

    1996-01-01

    The U-Pb and K-Ar geochronology applied to intrusive rocks from the Coastal Batholith of Central Chile, demonstrates the existence of a basement block of the Mirasol Unit, with a crystallization age of 299??10 Ma, exposed in the northern block of the Melipilla Fault. The age of 214??1 Ma obtained in the 'Dioritas Gne??isicas de Cartagena Unit', indicates that a Late Triassic magmatism took place in this region; it coincides with the end of an extensive crustal melting period, proposed for northern Chile. The ages of the Jurassic plutonic units (Laguna Verde, Sauce, Pen??uelas and Limache) are restricted to the 156-161 Ma interval, showing in certain cases, inherited zircons from an unknown source. The difference between ages obtained using both chronological methods is a few million years, indicating that a short time passed between the crystallization and the cooling of the plutonic bodies, as well as a fast magmatic differentiation process. The Laguna Verde and Sauce Units, experienced a fast uplift, probably as a result of an extensional tectonic process in the magmatic arc, or induced by the magmatic pressure through fracture zones during Middle Jurassic.

  6. Double-layer mode of acid intrusive rocks from Xiuwacu Porphyry Mo deposit, Northwestern Yunnan SW China: U-Pb geochronology evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haijun; Li, Wenchang

    2016-04-01

    Recent research infer that, the south-north extension of the Xiuwacu-Tongchanggou acidic intrusive belt along the Geza island arc have been developed of intense molybdenum-mutimetallic mineralization(Li et al., 2012, 2013; Yu et al., 2015). The northern section of this intrusive belt exposed widly and occur much monzonitic granite, biotite-granite, granodiorite, biotite-monzogranite; while in southern section, intrusions are cocealed. The Tongchanggou district in south section have been obtained large breakthrough of porphyry-skarn type molybdenum-multimetallic deposits exploration recent years(Yu et al., 2014), the Mo-W mineral resources also increased year after year in north section of the belt. The Mo-mineral resouree potential of porphyry-skarn type Mo-mutimetallic deposits in whole area are tremendous. Xiuwacu Porphyry molybdenum deposit was explored in Geza island arc, and widespread Biotite granite and monzonitic granite that is closely related to mineralization. We have understood poorly about this ore deposit for the harsh geographical circumstance, through, some referential result in chronology have accumulated, it still lack of systematic lithogeochemical study and reliable chronology data about intrusions. We yield biotite granite and monzonitic zircons U-Pb ages(200.93±0.65Ma, 83.57±0.32Ma, respectively) of Xiuwacu. There are two periods of intermediate-acid intrusive rocks of Xiuwacu area. Indosinian Biotite granite and Yanshanian monzonitic granite were formed as superposition phenomenon.

  7. Hydrothermal alteration and tectonic setting of intrusive rocks from East Brawley, Imperial Valley: an application of petrology to geothermal reservoir analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keskinen, M.; Sternfeld, J.

    1982-01-01

    A geothermal well near East Brawley intersected a series of thin (3 to 35m) diabasic to dioritic intrusives. The petrology and chemistry of these meta-igneous rocks can provide insight into the thermal and fluid chemical characteristics of the reservoir and into the processes of magma generation at depth. A description of the rock types and their hydrothermal alteration is presented in order to increase the petrologic data base relating to this important facet of the geothermal potential of the Salton Trough and to provide a case study illustrating how detailed petrologic examination of well cuttings can provide important input in the construction of a geothermal reservoir model.

  8. Eocene Adakites Associated With Initiation of Cascade Subduction, Puget Lowlands, WA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tepper, J.; Clark, K.; Asmerom, Y.; McIntosh, W.

    2002-12-01

    Hornblende-bearing dacites from two localities in the Puget Lowlands have geochemical traits of adakites and represent a previously unrecognized early phase of Cascade arc magmatism that occurred ~90 km west of the main volcanic front. In the Bremerton Hills area (BH) these dacites occur as dikes up to 4m wide that intrude 50 Ma Crescent Formation basalts. Sixty kilometers to the north, in the Port Townsend area (PT), chemically similar dacites occur as clasts up to 1m in diameter within monolithologic lahar deposits that underlie the ~40 Ma Lyre Formation. Samples from BH and PT are porphyritic (amph + plag + quartz) and range from 62-69 wt.% SiO2. On spider diagrams they have Ta and Nb depletions characteristic of arc magmas, and they share a broad spectrum of adakite characteristics including high Al2O3 (15.4 - 17.9 wt.%), high Na2O (4.2-6.1 wt.%), high Sr/Y (>40), high La/YbN(13-22), low Yb (<1 ppm) and low Y (5-11 ppm). However the PT samples are distinguished from BH samples by lower CaO and Na2O, and by higher Th and U. The lack of bedrock exposures between BH and PT has made it impossible to determine whether the two localities are part of a magmatic belt, two isolated volcanic centers, or remnants of a single center that was subsequently displaced along the Bremerton fault. The adakites are chemically distinct from the Crescent Formation rocks, which have OIB / MORB affinities and are interpreted to have originated in a rift setting. Ongoing Ar-Ar dating and Sr and Nd isotopic analysis of BH adakites will better constrain the timing of this transition in magmatism and geodynamic setting. Generation of modern adakites is commonly associated with subduction of young lithosphere and/or with the initiation of subduction; both conditions likely applied in this region during the Eocene. In addition, heating of the lithosphere by possible plume magmatism during the preceding episode of OIB-like Crescent Formation magmatism may have played a role.

  9. The questa magmatic system: Petrologic, chemical and isotopic variations in cogenetic volcanic and plutonic rocks of the latir volcanic field and associated intrusives, northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Field, chemical and isotopic data demonstrate that nearly all igneous rocks at Questa resulted from interactions between mantle-derived parental magmas and the crust. Strontium, neodymium and lead isotope ratios of early andesites to rhyolites (28 to 26 Ma) indicate that these magmas assimilated > 25% lower crust. Injection of basaltic magmas extensively modified the strontium and neodymium but not the lead isotope compositions of the lower crust. Eruption of comendite magmas and the peralkaline Amalia Tuff 26 Ma is correlated with inception of regional extension. Lead isotope ratios identify different sources for the metaluminous granites and the peralkaline rocks. 26 Ma metaluminous granite to granodiorite intrusions have chemical and isotopic compositions to those of the precaldera intermediate-composition rocks, and are interpreted as representing the solidified equivalents of the precaldera magmatic episode. However, both conventional and ion-microprobe isotopic data prohibit significant assimilation of crustal rocks at the level of exposure, suggesting that the plutons were emplaced a relatively crystal-rich mushes which did not have sufficient heat to assimilate country rocks. This suggest that in some cases plutonic rocks are better than volcanic rocks in representing the isotopic compositions of their source regions, because the assimilation potential of crystal-rich magmas is significantly less than that of largely liquid magmas.

  10. Direct observation of adakite melts generated in the lower continental crust, Fiordland, New Zealand.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stevenson, J.; Daczko, N.; Clarke, G.; Pearson, N.; Klepeis, K.

    2003-04-01

    Adakite igneous rocks have a distinctive chemistry that links them to melting of a mafic source at high pressure (P > 1.2 - 1.5 GPa; e.g. Peacock et al. 1994). They have been attributed to melting of subducted oceanic crust (Kay, 1978; Defant and Drummond, 1990) or melting of the crustal roots of thick continental arcs (Atherton and Petford, 1993). We report the first direct evidence for the generation of adakite melts in mafic lower continental crust. The Pembroke Granulite represents the deepest crust (P = 12 - 14 kbar , T = 750 - 800^oC; Daczko et al. 2001) in an exhumed Cretaceous arc in the South Island of New Zealand (Clarke et al., 2000). The Pembroke Granulite has the bulk chemistry, assemblage, and partial melting textures involving peritectic garnet, to be the source region for an adakite melt. The partial melting textures form the source for numerous trondhjemitic vein-filled fractures, which we suggest were the initial conduit for the adakite melt as it migrated away from its source. LA-ICMPS point analyses of minerals in the dioritic gneiss host rock, partial melting textures, and trondhjemitic veins of the Pembroke Granulite are consistent with this interpretation. The originally overlying Separation Point Batholith contains rocks of adakitic composition thought to have been formed through melting in a continental arc (Muir et al., 1995; 1998); the melts formed in the Pembroke Granulite are texturally, compositionally, geochemically, and structurally consistent with being the source of the Separation Point adakites. References: Atherton, M. P. and Petford, N.: Generation of sodium-rich magmas from newly underplated basaltic crust. Nature, 362, 144--146, 1993. Clarke, G. L., Klepeis, K. A. and Daczko, N. R.: Cretaceous high-P granulites at Milford Sound, New Zealand: their metamorphic history and emplacement in a convergent margin setting. J. Metamorphic Geol., 18, 359--374, 2000. Daczko, N. R., Klepeis, K. A. and Clarke, G. L.: Evidence of Early

  11. Geochemistry and zircon U-Pb geochronology of granitic rocks in the Buqingshan tectonic mélange belt, northern Tibet Plateau, China and its implications for Prototethyan evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruibao; Pei, Xianzhi; Li, Zuochen; Pei, Lei; Liu, Chengjun; Chen, Youxin; Chen, Guochao; Liu, Zhanqing; Yang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    The Yikehalaer intrusives are distributed in the Buqingshan tectonic mélange belt at the southern margin of East Kunlun, China. They tectonically intruded the conglomerate of Permian Gequ Formation to the south and the marble of Mesoproterozoic Kuhai Group to the north. These intrusives mainly consist of off-white coarse- and fine-grained granodiorite and granite. U-Pb dating of zircons from the intrusive samples yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 436 ± 7 Ma and 437 ± 6 Ma, indicating Early Silurian crystallization age. The intrusives are high-silica, Na-rich, I-type calc-alkalic rocks. They are divisible into two subgroups on the basis of their trace element content: adakitic rocks in the northern part and normal calc-alkalic arc rocks in the southern part. Rocks in the northern part exhibit high Sr (280-493 ppm), low Y (3.8-11.7 ppm), high Sr/Y ratios (23.9-125.0), high light rare earth elements (LREE)/ heavy rare earth elements (HREE) (15.1-35.7), and invisible Eu/Eu∗. They resemble adakites formed by slab melting in subduction zones. However, the rocks in the southern part possess the attributes of normal arc rocks. In addition, the εHf(t) values of the intrusives are consistently positive (0.6-7.6), implying that they were generated by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle source, with insignificant contributions from crustal materials. The source residues likely contained 10-20% garnet and hornblende, and plagioclase was either absent or totally consumed during partial melting. Combining the regional tectonic data, we conclude that the Buqingshan paleo-ocean may have started to subduct in Middle Cambrian until Early Silurian (436 Ma), generating an important adakitic magma event during the late stage of oceanic crust subduction. Moreover, the Proto-Tethyan Ocean closed, and the Bayan Har, East Kunlun, and Qaidam blocks collided during the Middle-Late Silurian.

  12. Formation of low-δ18O magmas of the Kangerlussuaq Intrusion by addition of water derived from dehydration of foundered basaltic roof rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riishuus, Morten S.; Harris, Chris; Peate, David W.; Tegner, Christian; Wilson, J. Richard; Brooks, C. Kent

    2015-05-01

    The Kangerlussuaq Intrusion in East Greenland is concentrically zoned from quartz nordmarkite (quartz syenite) at the margin, through pulaskite, to foyaite (nepheline syenite) in the centre, with no apparent intrusive contacts. The δ18O values of coexisting minerals are consistent with oxygen isotope equilibrium at magmatic temperatures. Most of the intrusion formed from low-δ18O magma; magma δ18O values generally increased upwards from about 3.3 ‰ in the quartz nordmarkites to 5.6 ‰ in the foyaites. The lowest magma δ18O value of about -1.0 ‰ is from the upper part of the nordmarkites, where there is a high concentration of foundered basaltic xenoliths (stoped from the roof of the intrusion). The amphiboles in the syenites have δD values that range from those typical of hydrous mantle-derived minerals to much lower values (-86 to -157 ‰), as do whole-rock samples of xenolith and country rock (-125 to -148 ‰). The low magma δ18O and δD values are consistent with continuous incorporation, exchange and upward escape of low-δ18O and δD fluids released from stoped basaltic roof material. Mass balance suggests that the integrated amount of water involved was 7 wt% of the volume of the magma, but locally reached 30 wt% water. The requirement for large amounts of water with low δ18O value is satisfied only if the foundered basalt contained most of its water in cavities as opposed to hydrous minerals. Even with this requirement, the volume of stoped basalt would have been equal to the volume of the magma. Repeated recharge of the residual magma with progressively less contaminated silica undersaturated melt resulted in a gradual shift across the low-pressure thermal divide. Crystallisation was suppressed by the depression of the liquidus due to water saturation of the residual magma (pH2O ~1 kbar).

  13. New paleomagnetic results from Middle and Late Proterozoic intrusive rocks of the central and southern Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, S.S. )

    1993-04-01

    Paleomagnetic results from Proterozoic intrusive rocks from the central and southern Rocky Mountains yield data that provide definition to the North American APW path. Results from the ca. 1420 Ma Laramie anorthosite (LA) and Sherman Granite (SG) yield dual polarity magnetizations; a combined pole (7[degree]S, 215[degree]E, A[sub 95] = 4[degree]) is essentially identical to 1400 Ma poles from elsewhere in North America. Group A dikes from the Tobacco Root (TR) Mtns, MT, along the southern margin of the Belt Basin, have a dual-polarity remanence with a pole at 10[degree]N, 222[degree]E (A[sub 95] = 11[degree]) that plots slightly north of the LA/SG and other poles of ca. 1450 Ma. Comparison of Belt Supergroup poles, assuming coherence of the Belt terrane and interior Laurentia, with 1400 Ma poles and those of the well-defined western arm of the Logan Loop of the N. American APW path, would seem to indicate that the age of most Belt poles are in the range of 1300--1400 Ma, although this age assignment conflicts with available geochronologic data. Results from 1100 Ma diabase sheets from central AZ yield two distinct, normal and reverse polarity magnetizations: ADn and ADr. ADn gives a pole at 23[degree]N, 181[degree]E (A[sub 95] = 8[degree]) that overlaps poles of ca. 1100 Ma from the midcontinent rift (MR). Pole ADr is located at 38[degree]N, 248[degree]E (A[sub 95] = 39[degree]); the large uncertainty of this pole precludes its use in defining the APW path. All dikes are of WNW trend and several from the TR Mtns and the Christmas Lake dike from the Beartooth uplift give hornblende [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages of 760--770 Ma. The data are interpreted to provide evidence for Late Proterozoic mafic magmatism along the W and SW margin of the Wyoming Province, possibly related to crustal extension accompanying deposition of the Windermere Group in the northern part of the Cordillera and volcanism and sedimentation in SE Idaho and NE Washington.

  14. Geochemical constraints on adakites of different origins and copper mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, W.-D.; Ling, M.-X.; Chung, S.-L.; Ding, X.; Yang, X.-Y.; Liang, H.-Y.; Fan, W.-M.; Goldfarb, R.; Yin, Q.-Z.

    2012-01-01

    The petrogenesis of adakites holds important clues to the formation of the continental crust and copper ?? gold porphyry mineralization. However, it remains highly debated as to whether adakites form by slab melting, by partial melting of the lower continental crust, or by fractional crystallization of normal arc magmas. Here, we show that to form adakitic signature, partial melting of a subducting oceanic slab would require high pressure at depths of >50 km, whereas partial melting of the lower continental crust would require the presence of plagioclase and thus shallower depths and additional water. These two types of adakites can be discriminated using geochemical indexes. Compiled data show that adakites from circum-Pacific regions, which have close affinity to subduction of young hot oceanic plate, can be clearly discriminated from adakites from the Dabie Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau, which have been attributed to partial melting of continental crust, in Sr/Y-versus-La/Yb diagram. Given that oceanic crust has copper concentrations about two times higher than those in the continental crust, whereas the high oxygen fugacity in the subduction environment promotes the release of copper during partial melting, slab melting provides the most efficient mechanism to concentrate copper and gold; slab melts would be more than two times greater in copper (and also gold) concentrations than lower continental crust melts and normal arc magmas. Thus, identification of slab melt adakites is important for predicting exploration targets for copper- and gold-porphyry ore deposits. This explains the close association of ridge subduction with large porphyry copper deposits because ridge subduction is the most favorable place for slab melting. ?? 2012 by The University of Chicago.

  15. Contrasting fluid/rock interaction between the Notch Peak granitic intrusion and argillites and limestones in western Utah: evidence from stable isotopes and phase assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nabelek, P.I.; Labotka, T.C.; O'Neil, J.R.; Papike, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Jurassic Notch Peak granitic stock, western Utah, discordantly intrudes Cambrian interbedded pure limestones and calcareous argillites. Contact metamorphosed argillite and limestone samples, collected along traverses away from the intrusion, were analyzed for ??18O, ??13C, and ??D. The ??13C and ??18O values for the limestones remain constant at about 0.5 (PDB) and 20 (SMOW), respectively, with increasing metamorphic grade. The whole rock ??18O values of the argillites systematically decrease from 19 to as low as 8.1, and the ??13C values of the carbonate fraction from 0.5 to -11.8. The change in ??13C values can be explained by Rayleigh decarbonation during calcsilicate reactions, where calculated {Mathematical expression} is about 4.5 permil for the high-grade samples and less for medium and low-grade samples suggesting a range in temperatures at which most decarbonation occurred. However, the amount of CO2 released was not anough to decrease the whole rock ??18O to the values observed in the argillites. The low ??18O values close to the intrusion suggest interaction with magmatic water that had a ??18O value of 8.5. The extreme lowering of ??13C by fractional devolatilization and the lowering of ??18O in argillites close to the intrusion indicates oxgen-equivalent fluid/rock ratios in excess of 1.0 and X(CO2)F of the fluid less than 0.2. Mineral assemblages in conjunction with the isotopic data indicate a strong influence of water infiltration on the reaction relations in the argillites and separate fluid and thermal fronts moving thru the argillites. The different stable isotope relations in limestones and argillites attest to the importance of decarbonation in the enhancement of permeability. The flow of fluids was confined to the argillite beds (argillite aquifers) whereas the limestones prevented vertical fluid flow and convective cooling of the stock. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  16. Geochronology and geochemistry of Eocene potassic felsic intrusions in the Nangqian basin, eastern Tibet: Tectonic and metallogenic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yue; Bi, Xian-Wu; Hu, Rui-Zhong; Chen, You-wei; Liu, He-qing; Xu, Lei-luo

    2016-03-01

    The Jinshajiang-Ailaoshan copper belt is the most significant porphyry copper belt in eastern Tibet. In the northern segment of this belt within the Nangqian basin, which occurs 100 km east of the Yulong porphyry copper deposit, several felsic intrusions have been recently discovered. The Yulong porphyry copper deposit is one of the largest porphyry copper deposits in China, and it is associated with peraluminous adakitic rocks formed in a post-collisional setting. The Nangqian felsic intrusions vary from syenite porphyry to monzonite porphyry in rock types. No significant Cu-Au mineralization has been found in the Nangqian felsic intrusions despite extensive exploration in recent years. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating reveals that the Nangqian syenite porphyry and monzonite porphyry were emplaced at 35.6±0.3 Ma and from 39.5±0.3 to 37.4±0.3 Ma, respectively, similar to the age of the Yulong porphyry copper deposit. The Nangqian felsic intrusions are characterized by metaluminous compositions (A/CNK = 0.82-1.01), and they share some common features with shoshonites such as high K2O contents (4.58-5.58 wt.%), high K2O/Na2O ratios (0.92-1.28), LREE-LILE enrichments and negative Nb-Ta-Ti-P anomalies, as well as with adakites derived from an eclogite-facies source with high Al2O3 (14.98-15.74 wt.%), Sr (954-2190 ppm), Sr/Y (68-132) and La/Yb (53-85), and low Y and Yb contents. The Nangqian felsic intrusions have high initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.7050-0.7055), variable εNd(t) (- 0.31-1.43) and small variations in (206Pb/204Pb)i (18.68-18.74), (207Pb/204Pb)i (15.53-15.62) and (208Pb/204Pb)i (38.51-38.80). Zircon crystals from both syenite and monzonite porphyries are characterized by positive εHf(t) from 5.2 to 8.5. The results suggest that the syenite and monzonite magmas were differentiated from parental shoshonitic melts by fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene and minor feldspar. The parent magmas originated from a lithospheric mantle metasomatized by slab

  17. Implications of Late Cretaceous U-Pb zircon ages of granitic intrusions cutting ophiolitic and volcanogenic rocks for the assembly of the Tauride allochthon in SE Anatolia (Helete area, Kahramanmaraş Region, SE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurlu, Nusret; Parlak, Osman; Robertson, Alastair; von Quadt, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    An assemblage of NE-SW-trending, imbricate thrust slices (c. 26 km E-W long × 6.3 km N-S) of granitic rocks, basic-felsic volcanogenic rocks (Helete volcanics), ophiolitic rocks (Meydan ophiolite) and melange (Meydan melange) is exposed near the Tauride thrust front in SE Anatolia. The volcanogenic rocks were previously assumed to be Eocene because of associated Nummulitic limestones. However, ion probe U-Pb dating of zircons extracted from the intrusive granitic rocks yielded ages of 92.9 ± 2.2-83.1 ± 1.5 Ma (Cenomanian-Campanian). The Helete volcanic unit and the overlying Meydan ophiolitic rocks both are intruded by granitic rocks of similar age and composition. Structurally underlying ophiolite-related melange includes similar-aged, but fragmented granitic intrusions. Major, trace element and rare earth element analyses coupled with electron microprobe analysis of the granitic rocks show that they are metaluminus to peraluminus and calc-alkaline in composition. A magmatic arc setting is inferred from a combination of tectonomagmatic discrimination, ocean ridge granite-normalized multi-element patterns and biotite geochemistry. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data further suggest that the granitoid rocks were derived from variably mixed mantle and crustal sources. Granitic rocks cutting the intrusive rocks are inferred to have crystallized at ~5-16 km depth. The volcanogenic rocks and granitic rocks originated in a supra-subduction zone setting that was widely developed throughout SE Anatolia. Initial tectonic assembly took place during the Late Cretaceous probably related to northward subduction and accretion beneath the Tauride continent (Keban and Malatya platforms). Initial tectonic assembly was followed by exhumation and then transgression by shelf-depth Nummulitic limestones during Mid-Eocene, as documented in several key outcrops. Final emplacement onto the Arabian continental margin took place during the Early Miocene.

  18. Geochronology and geochemistry of Late Pan-African intrusive rocks in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block, NE China: Petrogenesis and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Ge, Wen-chun; Zhao, Guo-chun; Dong, Yu; Bi, Jun-hui; Wang, Zhi-hui; Yu, Jie-jiang; Zhang, Yan-long

    2014-11-01

    To constrain the early Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the Jiamusi-Khanka Block and its relationship to the Late Pan-African event in Gondwana, we undertook zircon U-Pb dating and geochemical analyses (major and trace elements, and Hf isotopic compositions) of early Paleozoic intrusive rocks in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block, NE China. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb age data demonstrate that these intrusive rocks were emplaced at three stages during the Late Pan-African event, represented by ~ 540 Ma syenogranite, ~ 515 Ma quartz syenite, and ~ 500 Ma monzogranite and gabbro. Geochemically, the ~ 500 Ma gabbros in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block have low SiO2 (50.26-51.21 wt.%), relatively high MgO (4.08-5.67 wt.%), Ni (13.1-14.1 ppm) and Cr (28.4-56.0 ppm), and are slightly enriched in LILEs (e.g., Ba, K) and LREEs, and depleted in Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta and P. The εHf(t) values of zircons in the gabbro range from + 2.6 to + 6.4. All these geochemical features indicate that the gabbros were likely produced by the partial melting of a depleted mantle that had been metasomatized by fluids derived from a subducted slab. In contrast, the ca.540-500 Ma granites and quartz syenites contain high SiO2 (64.49-72.20 wt.%) and low MgO (0.40-0.75 wt.%), Cr (1.69-6.88 ppm) and Ni (1.26-3.26 ppm). They have relatively low 176Hf/177Hf ratios of 0.282247-0.282599 with Hf two-stage model ages of 1173-2280 Ma, and most of the magmatic zircons have positive εHf(t) values varying from + 0.2 - + 4.8, indicating that these granites and quartz syenites were probably derived from a dominantly Paleo-Mesoproterozoic "old" crustal source with possible different degrees of addition of juvenile materials. According to the geochemical data and global geological investigations, we propose that the 541-498 Ma intrusive rocks in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block formed in a post-collisional or post-orogenic extensional setting linked to the collapse of a Late Pan-African orogen associated within the Gondwana.

  19. The Relationship Between Amphibole Cumulates and Adakite Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, T. O.

    2009-12-01

    Amphibole, while uncommon as a primary fractioning phase is increasingly recognized as a key constituent in the petrogenesis of arc magmas. Fractional crystallization of water-saturated arc magmas in the lower crust can yield substantial volumes amphibole cumulates that, depending on the pressure of crystallization, may also contain garnet. Fractionation of this higher pressure assemblage has been invoked as a possible mechanism in the production adakite magmas. The origin of adakites, defined by their heavy REE and Y depletion and Sr enrichments, have vigorously debated since their re-discovery in Panama two decades ago. In addition to widespread modern adakitic volcanism, the Panamanian portion of the Central American Arc preserves the magmatic record of arc development in close spatial association with younger magmatism. Late-Oligocene hypabyssal crystal-rich andesites from Cerro Patacon are preserved near the Panama Canal region. These contain nodules of amphibole cumulates, and may be used to examine the amphibole-fractionation model for adakite origin. The cumulate nodules are ~6 cm in diameter and are almost entirely composed of 5-10mm amphibole crystals (dominantly ferri-tschermakite), and are accompanied in the host andesites by amphibole phenocrysts, antecrysts and megacryts. Cerro Patacon andesites have REE concentrations that plot at the most depleted end of the array defined by similarly differentiated (58-60% SiO2) Central American Arc magmas, and exhibit a distinctive depletion in the middle REE. These geochemical and petrographic observations strongly support significant amphibole fractionation during formation of the Cerro Patacon andesite. Sr/Y which is used as a geochemical tool for discriminating adakites from other arc magams, is transitional in the Cerro Patcon andesites. However La/Yb is within the range for ‘normal’ arc magmas and shows that amphibole fractionation alone is insufficient to generate adakite magmas - some garnet

  20. Acid-neutralizing potential of minerals in intrusive rocks of the Boulder batholith in northern Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desborough, George A.; Briggs, Paul H.; Mazza, Nilah; Driscoll, Rhonda

    1998-01-01

    Experimental studies show that fresh granitic rocks of the Boulder batholith in the Boulder River headwaters near Basin, Montana have significant acid-neutralizing potential and are capable of neutralizing acidic water derived from metal-mining related wastes or mine workings. Laboratory studies show that in addition to the acidneutralizing potential (ANP) of minor amounts of calcite in these rocks, biotite, tremolite, and feldspars will contribute significantly to long-term ANP. We produced 0.45 micrometer-filtered acidic (pH = 2.95) leachate for use in these ANP experiments by exposing metal-mining related wastes to deionized water in a waste:leachate ratio of 1:20. We then exposed these leachates to finely-ground and sized fractions of batholith rocks, and some of their mineral fractions for extended and repeated periods, for which results are reported here. The intent was to understand what reactions of metal-rich acidic water and fresh igneous rocks would produce. The reactions between the acidic leachates and the bulk rocks and mineral fractions are complex. Factors such as precipitation of phases like Fe-hydroxides and Alhydroxides and the balance between dissolved cations and anions that are sulfate dominated complicate analysis of the results. Research by others of acid neutralization by biotite and tremolite attributed a rise in pH to proton (H+) adsorption in sites vacated by K, Mg, and Ca. Destruction of the silicate framework and liberation of associated structural hydroxyl ions may contribute to ANP. Studies by others have indicated that the conversion of biotite to a vermiculite-type structure by removal of K at a pH of 4 consumes about six protons for every mole of biotite, but at a pH of 3 there is pronounced dissolution of the tetrahedral lattice. The ANP of fresh granitic rocks is much higher than anticipated. The three bulk Boulder igneous rock samples studied have minimum ANP equivalent to about 10-14 weight percent calcite. This ANP is in

  1. The Quaternary adakite distribution of Kyushu Island, Ryukyu Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Takemura, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Quaternary volcanoes are widely distributed in Kyusu Island, Japan. Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath Kyushu. Clear distribution of deep seismic foci is observed below the Quaternary volcanoes in southern area, but not in northern area. Notsu et al. (1990, JVGR) examined the contribution of subduction to the magma source, and emphasized that no slab derived material is observed in northern area from Sr isotopic compositions. Volcanic activity similar to the within-plate type volcanism has been also emphasized for the magma genesis of this area (e.g. Kita et al, 2001, JVGR). However, we found adakitic rocks, which show high Sr/Y ratios and low Y concentrations (e.g. Defant and Drummond, 1990, Nature) from some Quaternary volcanoes in north Kyushu on the basis of published data (Otha et al, 1990, GANKO; Itoh, 1990, GANKO). Therefore, the magma genesis is still controversial. We studied lateral variations of Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic and trace element compositions for Quaternary volcanics from Kyushu to investigate the magma genesis. From the results, a clear variation of Sr/Y ratio, decreasing from north to south, is observed along the volcanic front. Some of the Sr/Y ratio of the most northern part of Kyusu shows the value >100. The all analyzed Pb isotope compositions show a single liner trend in 208Pb/204Pb v.s. 206Pb/204Pb diagram. The liner trend of Pb isotope ratios can be explained by the binary mixing of the Shikoku Basin basalt and tereginious sediment which might be a constituent of the subducting slab. The similar binary mixing relationships are found in Sr and Nd isotopic systematics. The isotopic characteristics of the Quaternary magma in Kyushu can be explained by the magma generation process of island arc, in spite of the lack of deep seismic foci in northern area. It is considered that high and low Sr/Y ratios suggest the contributions of partial melt in the north and aqueous fluid derived from subducting slab in the south, respectively. If

  2. Geochemical studies of mafic and other low silica, Precambrian intrusive rocks in the Adirondack lowlands, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Antibus, J.; Carl, J.D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Mafic metaigneous rocks in the Adirondack Lowlands include gabbros, amphibolites and diorites that are associated with, and hard to distinguish from, a host of dark colored, low-silica, alkali feldspar-bearing rocks that include syenogabbros, syenites and monzonites. All rocks intrude metasedimentary and metavolcanic host rocks and occur as isolated, pre- to syn-metamorphic bodies, generally with elongate, sheet-like form. Some occur within or marginal to deformation zones. Lacking are the massive igneous complexes of the Highlands where anorthosites, charnockites and mangerites comprise a common field association. Amphibolites vary from mappable sheets that are hundreds of meters thick to thin (<1 m) layers within the host gneisses. Gabbros and diorites vary from circular to oval-shaped bodies, generally <2 km across, that may be infolded with the host rocks. Pervasive shear in Lowland granitic rocks (Hyde School Gneiss) that resulted in major sheath folds, as proposed by Tewksbury, extends into the mafic bodies whose margins show strong gneissic textures and grain size reduction, but the cores are less deformed. The Balmat gabbro varies inwardly and systematically from monzonitic to gabbroic composition in decreasing Si, Na, K, Rb, Zr and Ba, and in increasing Ca, Mg, Fe, Ti, P, Sr, Cr, V and Ni content. Y/Nb ratios remain constant at 3-4. Among explanations of assimilation and metasomatism, the authors tentatively prefer an hypothesis of exclusion of alkali material during crystallization of mafic magma. Calc alkali and low potassium tholeiites are indicated in plots of the Balmat and other mafic bodies on Ti/100-Zr-Yx3 and Ti-Zr discrimination diagrams, although there is much scatter of data. Within-plate basalts are lacking, and ocean floor basalts are indicated for some amphibolites.

  3. Catastrophic erosion of Hellas basin rim on Mars induced by magmatic intrusion into volatile-rich rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, K.L.; Kargel, J.S.; MacKinnon, D.J.; Hare, T.M.; Hoffman, N.

    2002-01-01

    Malea and Hesperia Plana form large sectors of the rim of Hellas basin that display partly eroded volcanic shields and plains. These regions have topographic profiles that appear to be several hundred meters lower than those of adjacent rim sectors and lack prominent massifs of remnant basement that would be expected to stand above the lava plains. We interpret that before the volcanic edifices were constructed, these regions were denuded by an early stage of voluminous sill intrusion into friable, volatile-rich impact breccia. Magma-volatile interactions may have resulted in catastrophic generation of debris flows deposited into the adjacent basin, particularly if CO2 were involved. Later, lavas covered the eroded terrain; in turn, the lavas were eroded locally by volatile interactions. Across Mars, huge channel systems, erosional features in volcanic terranes, and vast layered deposits may be due to magma-volatile interactions.

  4. Origin and evolution of the granitic intrusions in the Brusque Group of the Dom Feliciano Belt, south Brazil: Petrostructural analysis and whole-rock/isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueck, Mathias; Basei, Miguel Angelo Stipp; Castro, Neivaldo Araújo de

    2016-08-01

    In the southern Brazilian state of Santa Catarina the Dom Feliciano Belt, formed by the tectonic juxtaposition of different crustal blocks during the Brasiliano-Pan African Orogenic cycle, can be divided into three domains. In the central domain, three granitic suites intrude the metavolcanosedimentary sequence of the Brusque Group: São João Batista (SJBS), Valsungana (VS) and Nova Trento (NTS), from the oldest to the youngest. This extensive magmatism, here referred to as granitic intrusions in the Brusqe Group (GIBG), is coeval with the thermal peak in the host metamorphic successions, but postdates its main foliation. A progressive deformation starting from the magmatic stage throughout the cooling history points to the influence of the late stages of deformation recorded in the Brusque Group. The SJBS consists of gray to white leucocratic, equigranular granites, with aluminous minerals such as muscovite, garnet and tourmaline. The porphyritic VS is the largest of the suites and is characterized by its cm-sized K-feldspar megacrysts in a coarse-grained biotite-rich matrix. The granites from the NTS are equigranular, light gray to pink in color and have biotite as the main mafic mineral, but magmatic muscovite, tourmaline and hornblende can occur as well. Geochemically, the GIBG are mildly peraluminous and show a calc-alkaline affinity. Most intrusions have a high REE fractionation, but some SJBS granites show a characteristic pattern with no fractionation and strong negative Eu anomalies ("seagull pattern"). Elevated Sr(i) values, between 0.707 and 0.735, and negative εNd values as low as -24 points to the melting of old evolved crust. The Nd (TDM) ages are scattered between 1.54 and 2.76 Ga, with a predominance of values around 2.0 Ga. The GIBG have a strong crustal signature that most closely connects, within the regional units, to that of the metasedimentary rocks of the Brusque Group and its crystalline basement, the Camboriú Complex. All three suites

  5. Deformation of host rocks and flow of magma during growth of minette dikes and breccia-bearing intrusions near Ship Rock, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, Paul T.; Pollard, David D.

    1981-01-01

    We have studied a small group of minette dikes and plugs that crop out within a flat-lying sequence of siltstone and shale near Ship Rock, a prominent volcanic throat of tuff breccia in northwestern New Mexico. Seven dikes form a radial pattern about Ship Rock we describe in detail the northeastern dike, which has an outcrop length of about 2,900 m, an average thickness of 2.3 m, and a maximum thickness of 7.2 m. The dike is composed of 35 discrete segments arranged in echelon; orientation. of dike segments ranges systematically from N. 52? E. to N. 66? E. A prominent joint set strikes parallel to the segments and is localized within several tens of meters of the dike. Regional joint patterns display no obvious relation to dike orientation. Small offsets of segment contacts, as well as wedge-shaped bodies of crumpled host rock within segments mark the sites of coalescence of smaller segments during dike growth. Bulges in the dike contact, which represent a nondilational component of growth, indicate that wall rocks were brecciated and eroded during the flow of magma. Breccias make up about 9 percent of the 7,176-m 2 area of the dike, are concentrated in its southwest half, and are commonly associated with its thickest parts. We also describe three subcircular plugs; each plug is smaller than 30 m in diameter, is laterally associated with a dike, and contains abundant breccias. Field evidence indicates that these plugs grew from the dikes by brecciation and erosion of wallrocks and that the bulges in the contact of the northeastern dike represent an initial stage of this process. From continuum-mechanical models of host-rock deformation, we conclude that dike propagation was the dominant mechanism for creating conduits for magma ascent where the host rock was brittle and elastic. At a given driving pressure, dikes dilate to accept greater volumes of magma than plugs, and for a given dilation, less work is done on the host rocks. In addition, the pressure required

  6. Age and origin of earliest adakitic-like magmatism in Panama: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whattam, Scott A.; Montes, Camilo; McFadden, Rory R.; Cardona, Agustin; Ramirez, Diego; Valencia, Victor

    2012-06-01

    40-20 Ma marks a fundamental interval in the evolution of the 70-0 Ma Panamanian magmatic arc system. During this period, there is no evidence of Panamanian magmatic arc activity to the east of the Panama Canal Basin while to the west and in localized regions to the east of the Panama Canal Basin a phase of intrusive-only activity is recorded. Fundamentally, geochemical and geochronological evidence presented herein indicate that this intrusive activity was predominantly 'adakitic-like' and becomes younger from west to east along an approximately W-E striking lineament. Granodiorites of the Petaquilla batholith, western Panama yield LAM-ICP-MS 206Pb/238U zircon ages of 29.0 + 0.7, - 0.6 Ma, 28.5 + 0.7, - 0.5 Ma, 28.3 + 0.5, - 0.4 Ma and 26.2 + 0.5, - 0.9 Ma. To the east of the Panama Canal Basin zircons from a hypabyssal diorite of the mainly intermediate Majé subvolcanic suite, cedes a mean 206Pb/238U age of 18.9 + 0.4 Ma. Relative to other 70-5 Ma Panamanian magmatic arc lavas and intrusives, Majé and Petaquilla intrusives yield adakitic-like major and trace element abundances (e.g., > 15 wt.% Al2O3, generally > 3.5 wt.% Na2O, > 400 ppm Sr, < 1.9 ppm Yb, < 18 ppm Y, Sr/Y that ranges to > 120) and strongly fractionated HREE patterns. These 30-26 Ma (Petaquilla) and 19 Ma (Majé) suites are also compositionally similar to a subvolcanic suite of rare, circa 25 Ma adakitic-like, andesitic intrusives which occur within the Panama Canal Basin midway between Petaquilla and Majé and at the same approximate latitude as Petaquilla and Majé. Collectively, the geochemical and geochronological data for the adakitic-like intrusives arc consistent with formation via partial melting of lowermost, mafic crust above a sub-horizontal slab tear that propagated from the west (Petaquilla) to the east (Majé) between 30 and 19 Ma. Our new tectonic model postulates that collision between the Panamanian magmatic arc system and an 'indentor' (e.g., a tract of thickened buoyant

  7. Post-collisional adakitic volcanism in the eastern part of the Sakarya Zone, Turkey: evidence for slab and crustal melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokuz, Abdurrahman; Uysal, İbrahim; Siebel, Wolfgang; Turan, Mehmet; Duncan, Robert; Akçay, Miğraç

    2013-11-01

    New geochemical and isotopic data for post-collisional Early Eocene and Late Miocene adakitic rocks from the eastern part of the Sakarya Zone, Turkey, indicate that slab and lower crustal melting, respectively, played key roles in the petrogenesis of these rocks. The Early Eocene Yoncalık dacite (54.4 Ma) exhibits high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, low Y and HREE concentrations, moderate Mg# (44-65), and relatively high ɛNd and low ISr values, similar to adakites formed by slab melting associated with subduction. Geochemical composition of the Yoncalık dacite cannot be explained by simple crystal fractionation and/or crustal contamination of andesitic parent magma, but is consistent with the participation of different proportions of melts derived from subducted basalt and sediments. Sr/Y correlates horizontally with Rb/Y, and Pb/Nd correlates vertically with Nd isotopic composition, indicating that Sr and Pb budgets are strongly controlled by melt addition from the subducting slab, whereas positive correlations between Th/Nd and Pb/Nd, and Rb/Y and Nb/Y point to some contribution of sediment melt. In addition to low concentrations of heavy rare earth elements (~2-3 times chondrite), a systematic decrease in their concentrations and Nb/Ta ratios with increasing SiO2 contents suggests that slab partial melting occurred in the garnet stability field and that these elements were mobilized by fluid flux. These geochemical and isotopic signatures are best explained by slab breakoff and fusion shortly after the initiation of collision. Although the Late Micone Tavdağı rhyolite (8.75 Ma) has some geochemical features identical to adakites, such as high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, low Y and HREE concentrations, other requirements, such as sodic andesite and/or dacite with relatively high MgO and Mg# (>50), relatively high Ni and Cr, low K2O/Na2O (<0.4), high Sr (>400 ppm), for slab-derived adakites are not provided. It is sodic in composition and shows no traces of fractionation

  8. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  9. Genesis of adakitic granitoids by partial melting of thickened lower crust and its implications for early crustal growth: A case study from the Huichizi pluton, Qinling orogen, central China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Zhengwei; Wu, Yuanbao; Siebel, Wolfgang; Gao, Shan; Wang, Hao; Abdallsamed, Mohammed. I. M.; Zhang, Wenxiang; Yang, Saihong

    2015-12-01

    Adakitic rocks are often considered as a key to deciphering the genesis of Archean TTGs and the early crustal growth. Granites from the Huichizi pluton in the North Qinling (NQ) unit have high Sr/Y and (La/Yb)N ratios similar to adakites. Their relatively high SiO2, K2O, and Na2O and very low MgO, Cr, and Ni contents are in the range of high-SiO2 adakites and early Archean TTGs and are compositionally similar to experimental melts derived from metabasalt sources. New SIMS zircon U-Pb dating constrains the emplacement age of the Huichizi pluton at 422 ± 5 Ma. Rock samples from the Huichizi pluton have εNd(t) and zircon εHf(t) values similar to the Neoproterozoic metabasalts in the NQ unit. In combination with their normal mantle-like δ18Ozir values, these adakites are best explained by partial melting of the Neoproterozoic mafic crustal root due to subduction of the Shangdan ocean. Regional geological data suggest that the crust was probably thickened by a ca. 490 Ma arc-collision process prior to the emplacement of the Huichizi pluton. Our results confirm that underplating of mafic magma and its subsequent fusion triggered by slab subduction under high pressure conditions could be an important mechanism for the formation of early continental crust.

  10. Discordant paleomagnetic data for middle-Cretaceous intrusive rocks from northern Baja California: Latitude displacement, tilt, or vertical axis rotation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BöHnel, Harald; Delgado-Argote, Luis A.; Kimbrough, David L.

    2002-10-01

    Paleomagnetic results and U/Pb zircon dating from the San Marcos dike swarm and the El Testerazo pluton in the Cretaceous Peninsular Ranges batholith of northern Baja California are used to evaluate alternative pre-Neogene paleogeographic reconstructions of the Baja California peninsula. The San Marcos dike swarm is a dense, northwest striking, regional dike swarm that is exposed over an ˜100 km long segment of the batholith and has yielded a U/Pb zircon crystallization age of 120 ± 1 Ma. Dike attitudes from the swarm suggest a regionally consistent average ˜320°E strike and ˜79°NE dip. The El Testerazo pluton is a younger tonalite intrusion that truncates the northern end of the dike swarm. All but one of 36 sites sampled in this study show remanence of normal polarity. Paleopoles for the San Marcos dike swarm and El Testerazo pluton are indistinguishable and were combined into a paleopole at 248.1°E, 86.6°N, A95 = 4.8°, which is displaced with respect to the 122 Ma reference pole for stable North America at 198.2°E, 72.3°N, A95 = 3.3°. The displacement may be described by an apparent clockwise rotation of 18° ± 6° and an apparent northward shift of 8° ± 5°. Restoring a northward shift of about 3°, related to the separation of Baja California from North America since 10 Ma, only a marginal northward displacement of 5° ± 5° is left. The clockwise rotation may be the result of crustal block rotations within the right-lateral shear systems in northern Baja California, although there is no geological evidence that supports this possibility. Alternatively, the difference between paleopole and reference pole may be due to tilting of the study area. Restoring a northeastward tilt of 11°, based on the mean dip measured for the San Marcos dike swarm in the study area, yields a paleopole at 187.6°E, 70.8°N, A95 = 5.6°, which is indistinguishable from the 122 Ma North American reference pole. The tilting hypothesis suggested previously as a

  11. Two-types of Early Cretaceous adakitic porphyries from the Luxi terrane, eastern North China Block: Melting of subducted Paleo-Pacific slab and delaminated newly underplated lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Xu, Zhaowen; Lu, Xiancai; Fu, Bin; Lu, Jianjun; Yang, Xiaonan; Zhao, Zengxia

    2016-01-01

    The origin and tectonic setting of Early Cretaceous adakitic rocks from the Luxi terrane in the eastern North China Block (NCB) remain debated. To resolve this issue, we determined whole-rock geochemistry, zircon U-Pb ages, and in situ Hf-O isotopes of the Mengyin and Liujing adakitic porphyries from the Luxi terrane. Zircon U-Pb dating results reveal that both the Mengyin and Liujing plutons were emplaced during the Early Cretaceous, with weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 130 ± 1 Ma (2σ) and 131 ± 2 Ma (2σ), respectively. In addition, abundant Neoarchean-Paleoproterozoic inherited zircon cores are identified in the Mengyin adakitic porphyry with 207Pb/206Pb ages ranging from 2.53 to 2.42 Ga. Rocks of both plutons are silicic (SiO2 = 65.4-70.2 wt.%), metaluminous, and alkaline in composition, comprising mainly quartz syenite porphyries. Samples from both plutons are enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) (e.g., Rb, Sr, and Ba), and light rare earth elements (LREEs), depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs) (e.g., Nb, Ta, and Ti), and heavy rare earth elements (HREEs), and have either positive or no Eu anomalies. In addition, both adakitic porphyries have high Mg# values (51-64), high Sr and La contents, low Y and Yb contents, and high Sr/Y (Mengyin = 149-264; Liujing = 58-110) and (La/Yb)N (Mengyin = 32.4-45.3; Liujing = 43.8-53.1) ratios, similar to adakitic rocks worldwide. The Mengyin adakitic porphyry has higher whole-rock εNd(t) values (-5.8 to - 4.1), more radiogenic Pb [(206Pb/204Pb)i = 18.35-18.39, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.55-15.56, (208Pb/204Pb)i = 38.20-38.23], higher zircon rim εHf(t) values (+ 3.3 to + 8.8) and δ18O values (+ 6.5‰ to + 7.9‰), and lower (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios (0.7049-0.7050) than the Liujing adakitic porphyry [εNd(t) = - 12.4 to - 12.2, (206Pb/204Pb)i = 17.63-17.72, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.56-15.58, (208Pb/204Pb)i = 37.76-37.94, εHf(t) = - 14.8 to - 11.2, δ18O = + 5.9‰ to + 7.1‰, (87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7090-0.7091]. The

  12. Zircon age range and sources of alkaline rocks from the Kurgusul intrusion, Kuznetsk Alatau: The first U-Pb (SHRIMP II) and Sm-Nd isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrublevskii, V. V.; Gertner, I. F.; Tishin, P. A.; Bayanova, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    U-Pb isotope analysis of basic feldspathoid rocks (juvites) of the Kurgusul intrusion, NE Kuznetsk Alatau, revealed three generations of zircons of various ages (˜1.3-1.5 Ga; 484.3 ± 5.5 and 393.6 ± 9.2Ma). This suggests several stages of regional alkaline basic magmatism in the Middle Cambrian-Early Ordovician and Early-Middle Devonian and melting of the Mesoproterozoic continental crust, which form part of the basement of the Kuznetsk Alatau terrane. The trace element geochemical data indicate a continental margin setting characterized by the complex interaction of a plume-related, supra-subduction zone and crustal materials. A possible model of the magmatic evolution assumes that the ascent of a plume at the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary induced generation of the initial alkaline basaltic magmas and metasomatism and erosion of the lower lithosphere. Repeated partial melting of the lower crust after a 100 Myr period produced new magma batches of alkaline composition, which inherited zircons from the preceding episode of magma generation. The inherited juvenile magmatic source (PREMA + E-type MORB + EM) is confirmed by similarities in the Sm-Nd isotopic signatures (ɛNd( T) ≈ +4.5 to +5.7, T(Nd)DM ≈ 0.8-0.9 Ga) of derivatives of regional alkaline basic complexes of different ages.

  13. Geochronological and geochemical implications of Early to Middle Jurassic continental adakitic arc magmatism in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Won; Kwon, Sanghoon; Ko, Kyoungtae; Yi, Keewook; Cho, Deung-Lyong; Kee, Weon-Seo; Kim, Bok Chul

    2015-06-01

    Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock chemical compositions of Early to Middle Jurassic plutons from the central to southern Korean Peninsula are reported to investigate the effect of paleo-Pacific plate subduction preserved along the continental margin. Twenty-one plutonic rocks from the Yeongnam massif (i.e., Sunchang and Namwon plutons), the Okcheon belt (Jeongup, Boeun, and Mungyeong plutons), the northeast (Gangreung pluton), and the Gyeonggi massif (Gonam, Anheung, and Ganghwa plutons) have age ranges from ca. 189-186 Ma to 177 Ma, 177-166 Ma, and 177-173 Ma, respectively. Most plutonic rocks have chemical compositions similar to adakites, showing high SiO2 (45.62-74.96 wt.%), low MgO (0.01-2.84 wt.%), high Na2O (2.65-4.83 wt.%), high Sr/Y and La/Yb, low Y and Yb, as well as low HFSEs (Nb and Ta), but initial Sr ratios (0.7048-0.7262), K2O (0.50-5.88 wt.%), and K2O/Na2O (0.34-2.1) were unlikely to have been formed by melting of either a thickened and/or delaminated lower continental crust, or an altered oceanic crust. These suggest that the "adakitic" plutonic rocks in this region resulted from partial melting of an enriched mantle source metasomatized by dewatering from a delaminated flat-slab. The spatial distributions of this continental adakitic plutonic belt, based on the present study, together with previously reported geochronological results, indicate that magmatic pulses gradually migrated toward the continent across the Korean Peninsula as a result of slab shallowing caused by periodic slab buckling. The similar geochronological and geochemical characteristics, petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the plutonic belt spanning the Korean Peninsula, Japan, eastern China, and eastern Russia indicate a possible link to an active subduction system that existed during the Early to Middle Jurassic, although the products of the plate subduction might differ in different locations along the East Asian continental

  14. Geochronology, geochemistry, and deformation history of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the Erguna Massif, NE China: Constraints on the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Shuo; Li, Yu

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents new zircon and sphene U-Pb ages, biotite and hornblende 40Ar/39Ar ages, Hf isotopic data, and geochemical data for five Mesozoic plutons in the Erguna Massif of NE China. These data are used to constrain the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk orogenic belt. This new dating, when combined with previously published ages, indicates that the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous (J3-K1) intrusive rocks can be subdivided into three stages that represent periods of magmatism during the Late Jurassic ( 155 Ma), early Early Cretaceous ( 137 Ma), and late Early Cretaceous ( 123 Ma). In addition, the rocks have undergone later deformation recorded by peak ages of 137 and 123 Ma. The Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the study area are dominantly syenogranites and are either A-type granites or are classified as alkaline series, suggesting that they formed in an extensional environment. The late Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in this area are generally monzogranitic and were emplaced as dikes in an extensional environment, along with coeval bimodal volcanics. These data, combined with the presence of regional unconformities in the northern part of Hebei Province and western part of Liaoning Province, and the spatial distribution of coeval volcanic rocks in NE China, suggest the Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous magmatisms and the early Early Cretaceous deformation in this area occurred in an extensional environment related to the delamination of a thickened part of the crust after closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. In comparison, the late Early Cretaceous deformation and magmatism occurred in an extensional environment related to either delamination of the previously thickened crust related to the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime or the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate, or the combined influence of these two tectonic regimes.

  15. Carboniferous magmatism in the Evora Massif (southwest Portugal, Ossa-Morena Zone): from typical arc calc-alkaline to adakitic-like magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Selma M.; Neiva, Ana M. R.; Ramos, Joao M. F.

    2014-05-01

    The Evora Massif is one of the subdivisions of western Ossa-Morena Zone. It is a dome-like structure mainly composed of Ediacaran, Cambrian and Ordovician country rocks, affected by medium- and high-grade metamorphism coeval with the emplacement of several mafic to felsic intrusive bodies. The last magmatic event recorded in this area (Carboniferous) consists of calc-alkaline volcanism and voluminous plutonism (mainly composed by tonalites, gabbros, diorites and late-orogenic granodiorites and granites) [1]. Detailed chemical and isotopic studies from Evora Massif plutons were performed in the last few years. Whole-rock chemical and isotopic data suggest that the Hospitais tonalite (HT), Alto de Sao Bento area (ASB) and Reguengos de Monsaraz pluton (RM) resulted from fractional crystallization of mantle-derived magmas followed by mixing with variable proportions of crustal melts [2-4]. U-Pb ID-TIMS data indicate an age of 337-335 for the RM [4]. The Pavia pluton is a multiphase granitic body constructed incrementally by the episodic emplacement of several batches of magma (at 328 Ma, ca. 324 Ma and 319-317 Ma) [5]. The main granitic phases range from tonalite to two-mica granite that contain rare surmicaceous and fine-grained enclaves, and granitic and amphibolitic xenoliths. On the other hand, they are cut by abundant rhyodacite porphyries, microgranites (s.l.) and pegmatite dikes, predominantly oriented NE-SW and NW-SE. Although each phase seems to represent a distinct batch of magma, whole-rock Sr-Nd isotopic data suggest a similar and fairly homogenous source for all the constituent phases. Initial 87Sr/86Sr varies between 0.70428 and 0.7058 and ɛ Ndt ranges from -3.4 to +0.4, pointing towards a mantle or juvenile crust origin. A higher variation is observed in whole-rock δ18O (5.6-9.6 o), consistent with assimilation of crust. The PP was interpreted as the result of assimilation-fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma. Substantial differences between

  16. Petrogenesis and economic potential of the Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic intrusion in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, NW China: Constraints from olivine chemistry, U-Pb age and Hf isotopes of zircons, and whole-rock Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Qian, Zhuang-Zhi; Li, Chusi; Xia, Ming-Zhe; Yang, Su-Hong

    2013-12-01

    The Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic intrusion is located in the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt in northern Xinjiang where many early-Permian mafic-ultramafic intrusions host important Ni-Cu sulfide deposits. In this paper we report zircon U-Pb age, olivine chemistry and integrated whole-rock chemical and isotopic compositions for the Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic intrusion. This intrusion is composed of lherzolites and gabbroic rocks. The U-Pb age of zircon from a large olivine gabbro sample from the intrusion is 283.1 ± 1.5 Ma, which indicates that the Erhongwa intrusion is contemporaneous with the early-Permian sulfide ore-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the central Tianshan region. Olivine from the Erhongwa intrusion contains up to 89.5 mol% Fo and 3000 ppm Ni, which are the highest among all known early-Permian mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the region. The occurrence of small sulfide inclusions in the most primitive olivine and significant Ni depletion in more fractionated olivine in the Erhongwa intrusion indicate that sulfide segregation took place during olivine fractional crystallization. The Erhongwa intrusive rocks are characterized by light REE enrichment relative to heavy REE, negative Nb anomalies, positive εNd (t = 283 Ma) values from + 6.3 to + 7.7, low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7034 to 0.7036, initial 206Pb/204Pb ratios from 17.8 to 17.9 and zircon εHf values from 8.0 to 15.5. The Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic rocks and coeval A-type granites in the region have similar isotopic compositions but the former have lower Th/Nb ratios than the latter. These similarities and differences are consistent with the interpretation that the Erhongwa magma formed by the mixing of a mafic magma derived from a depleted mantle with a granitic melt derived from a juvenile arc crust. It is deduced that sulfide saturation in the Erhongwa magmatic system was related to the magma mixing event at depth. More significant sulfide mineralization may

  17. Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vapor intrusion occurs when there is a migration of volatile chemicals from contaminated groundwater or soil into an overlying building. Volatile chemicals can emit vapors that may migrate through subsurface soils and into indoor air spaces.

  18. Effect of ultramafic intrusions and associated mineralized rocks on the aqueous geochemistry of the Tangle Lakes Area, Alaska: Chapter C in Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Bronwen; Gough, Larry P.; Wanty, Richard B.; Lee, Gregory K.; Vohden, James; O’Neill, J. Michael; Kerin, L. Jack

    2013-01-01

    Stream water was collected at 30 sites within the Tangle Lakes area of the Delta mineral belt in Alaska. Sampling focused on streams near the ultramafic rocks of the Fish Lake intrusive complex south of Eureka Creek and the Tangle Complex area east of Fourteen Mile Lake, as well as on those within the deformed metasedimentary, metavolcanic, and intrusive rocks of the Specimen Creek drainage and drainages east of Eureka Glacier. Major, minor, and trace elements were analyzed in aqueous samples for this reconnaissance aqueous geochemistry effort. The lithologic differences within the study area are reflected in the major-ion chemistry of the water. The dominant major cation in streams draining mafic and ultramafic rocks is Mg2+; abundant Mg and low Ca in these streams reflect the abundance of Mg-rich minerals in these intrusions. Nickel and Cu are detected in 84 percent and 87 percent of the filtered samples, respectively. Nickel and Cu concentrations ranged from Ni <0.4 to 10.1 micrograms per liter (mg/L), with a median of 4.2 mg/L, and Cu <0.5 to 27 mg/L, with a median of 1.2 mg/L. Trace-element concentrations in water are generally low relative to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency freshwater aquatic-life criteria; however, Cu concentrations exceed the hardness-based criteria for both chronic and acute exposure at some sites. The entire rare earth element (REE) suite is found in samples from the Specimen Creek sites MH5, MH4, and MH6 and, with the exception of Tb and Tm, at site MH14. These samples were all collected within drainages containing or downstream from Tertiary gabbro, diabase, and metagabbro (Trgb) exposures. Chondrite and source rock fractionation profiles for the aqueous samples were light rare earth element depleted, with negative Ce and Eu anomalies, indicating fractionation of the REE during weathering. Fractionation patterns indicate that the REE are primarily in the dissolved, as opposed to colloidal, phase.

  19. Important role of magma mixing in generating the Mesozoic monzodioritic-granodioritic intrusions related to Cu mineralization, Tongling, East China: Evidence from petrological and in situ Sr-Hf isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Z. Q.

    2016-04-01

    The Mesozoic ore-bearing high-Mg monzodioritic-granodioritic rocks in the Tongling mining district (East China) have been described as having adakitic affinities, and their origin has been attributed to partial melting of delaminated eclogite at depth in the mantle, followed by interaction of the resultant granitic magma with mantle peridotite. Here we present petrological data and in situ Sr isotopic data for zoned plagioclase that are inconsistent with the eclogite-derived model and instead propose a model that involves magma mixing of siliceous crustal melts and basaltic magma that was derived from metasomatized mantle in a back-arc extensional regime. The principal geochemical signatures of these Mesozoic rocks include a high-K calc-alkaline affinity, high values of Mg#, high Sr-Ba abundances, high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, εNd(t) = - 13.1 to - 9.0, and ISr = 0.70707-0.70824. The magma mixing model is supported by (1) the common existence of mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) and the disequilibrium textures of plagioclase and amphibole, (2) the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of embayed high-Ca cores of plagioclase that are distinctly lower than in the euhedral low-Ca overgrowth rims, (3) the negative correlations between whole-rock Nd and Sr isotopic ratios, and (4) the significant differences in the values of εHf(t) (- 9.5 to - 26) within different zircons from the same intrusion.

  20. New age and geochemical constraints on the origin of Quaternary adakite-like lavas in the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, Kwan-Nang; Chung, Sun-Lin; Zarrinkoub, Mohammad Hossein; Li, Xian-Hua; Lee, Hao-Yang; Lin, Te-Hsien; Chiu, Han-Yi

    2016-11-01

    Adakite-like lavas from the Iranian segment of the Arabia-Eurasia collision zone have been considered as partial melts derived from a subducted Neotethyan slab, a hypothesis that cannot be further evaluated due to the lack of systematic age and radiogenic isotopic data. Here, we revisit the Anar region, Iran where such lavas were reported by providing these data to examine their probable origin as slab melts. New SIMS zircon U-Pb ages attest to eruption at ca. 1 to 2 Ma, postdating the Arabia-Eurasia collision. The lavas are characterized by dacitic to rhyolitic, metaluminous to slightly peraluminous and trondhjemitic compositions, and incompatible element patterns similar to continental crustal rocks. Extreme depletion in Nb, Ta, Y and the heavy REE relative to the light and middle REEs reflects control by garnet and rutile. Except one sample presumably affected by secondary gain of radiogenic Sr, the depleted Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions relative to the Bulk Silicate Earth [(87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7040 to 0.7043; εNd(t) = + 3.2 to + 5.3; εHf(t) = + 10.5 to + 11.3] indicate magma genesis from juvenile source rocks. A slab melt origin for the Anar lavas is very unlikely and the reason is twofold. First, the Y and HREE of the source rocks estimated by inversed batch melting models assuming garnet pyroxenite residue are far too low compared with MORB-like lithologies and subducted sediments. Second, the low MgO, Ni and Cr of the lavas point to limited interaction with peridotites in a mantle wedge. Fractionation-related models are also unlikely due to the apparent lack of broadly coeval, mafic precursor magmas without adakitic signature. The low-Y and low-HREE source rocks revealed by the melting models, together with the low MgO, Ni and Cr of the Anar lavas, can be explained by lower crustal melting under eclogite-facies conditions. These source rocks were most likely high-pressure cumulates in the root of the Urumieh-Dokhtar magmatic arc, a Neotethyan arc that was

  1. Petrogenesis of the Kuangshancun and Hongshan intrusive complexes from the Handan-Xingtai district: Implications for iron mineralization associated with Mesozoic magmatism in the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi; Xiao, Long; Zhan, Qiongyao; Wu, Jianxun; Zhu, Dan; Huang, Wan; Bai, Ming; Zhang, Yanhai

    2015-12-01

    The Handan-Xingtai district in eastern China exposes numerous late Mesozoic intrusions. Among these, the Kuangshancun intrusive complex is one of the major ore-related intrusions whereas the Hongshan complex is barren, although both intrusions display similar geochemical characteristics. The Kuangshancun complex consists of diorite and monzonite, with zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age of 133.7 ± 1 Ma. The Hongshan complex mainly consists of syenite and shows zircon U-Pb age of 134.5 ± 1 Ma. The mineral chemistry of plagioclase from both complexes reveals normal zoning, consistent with the fractional crystallization process. Rocks of the Kuangshancun complex show SiO2 in the range of 58.92-63.84 wt.%, Na2O of 4.63-8.81 wt.%, and Al2O3 of 16.14-18.18 wt.%, together high Sr/Y (14-54) and high LaN/YbN (8.30-16.18) ratios. They show enrichment in LREE and depletion in HREE and HFSE, with no remarkable Eu anomalies, similar to the features of adakites. The whole rock initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios range from 0.706661 to 0.706722 and εNd (t = 134 Ma) between -15.26 and -15.12, which are consistent with zircon 176Hf/177Hf ratios of 0.281940-0.282059 and εHf (t) values of -27.0 to -22.7. Samples of the Hongshan complex show SiO2 in the range of 56.57-68.16 wt.%, high Sr/Y (19-112) and high LaN/YbN (11.39-16.82) ratios. The zircon εHf (t) values are in the range of -15.9 to -12.8 and εNd (t = 134 Ma) is between -9.82 and -8.62. The Kuangshancun complex was derived through partial melting of an enriched lithospheric mantle contaminated by lower continental crust components. The Hongshan complex was also derived from the EM I-like mantle source. However, the calculated zircon Ce4+/Ce3+ and Eu/Eu∗ ratios indicate that the source magma of the Kuangshancun complex were characterized by higher oxygen fugacity as compared to that the Hongshan complex. The high oxidation states and high water contents are considered as possible key factors that led to the iron mineralization in the

  2. Isotopic ages from intrusive rocks near the Stuyahok gold placer deposits, south-central Holy Cross quadrangle, Alaska: A section in Geologic studies in Alaska by the U.S. Geological Survey, 1998

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, Marti L.; Tucker, Robert D.; Layer, Paul W.; Bundtzen, Thomas K.

    2000-01-01

    In the Stuyahok area of the south-central Holy Cross quadrangle, Alaska, felsic to intermediate dikes and sills intrude Lower Cretaceous volcanic and volcaniclastic rocks of the Koyukuk terrane. These previously undated intrusions are the probable source of at least 933 kg (30,000 oz) of past placer gold production. Additional placer, and perhaps lode, resources are likely present at Stuyahok. New U/Pb and 40Ar/39Ar isotopic data indicate two of the dikes are early Tertiary in age (63.6+0.2 Ma and 60.4+1.1 Ma, respectively). In addition to helping constrain the age of gold mineralization, these early Tertiary ages suggest the Stuyahok dikes are part of a Late Cretaceous and early Tertiary belt of gold mineralized felsic dikes that lie in the Kuskokwim mineral belt. Also reported herein are previously unpublished conventional K-Ar ages of 69.4+2.1 Ma and 69.3+2.1 Ma for two felsic intrusions from the western edge of this mineralized belt, the Marshall–Kako Creek area, which lies about 40 km west-southwest of the Stuyahok area.

  3. Timing, petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the Late Paleozoic gabbro-granodiorite-granite intrusions in the Shalazhashan of northern Alxa: Constraints on the southernmost boundary of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xingjun; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Castro, Antonio; Xiao, XuChang; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Jianjun; Guo, Lei; Yang, Qidi

    2014-11-01

    The Late Paleozoic tectonic setting and location of the southernmost boundary of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) with respect to the Alxa Block or Alxa-North China Craton (ANCC) are debated. This paper presents new geochronological, petrological, geochemical and zircon Hf isotopic data of the Late Paleozoic intrusions from the Shalazhashan in northern Alxa and discusses the tectonic setting and boundary between the CAOB and ANCC. Using zircon U-Pb dating, intrusions can be broadly grouped as Late Carboniferous granodiorites (~ 301 Ma), Middle Permian gabbros (~ 264 Ma) and granites (~ 266 Ma) and Late Permian granodiorites, monzogranites and quartz monzodiorites (254-250 Ma). The Late Carboniferous granodiorites are slightly peraluminous and calcic. The remarkably high zircon Hf isotopes (εHf(t) = + 6-+ 10) and characteristics of high silica adakites suggest that these granodiorites were mainly derived from "hot" basaltic slab-melts of the subducted oceanic crust. The Middle Permian gabbros exhibited typical cumulate textures and were derived from the partial melting of depleted mantle. The Middle Permian granites are slightly peraluminous with high-K calc-alkaline and low εHf(t) values from - 0.9 to + 2.9. These granites were most likely derived from juvenile materials mixed with old crustal materials. The Late Permian granodiorites, monzogranites and quartz monzodiorites are characterized as metaluminous to slightly peraluminous, with variable Peacock alkali-lime index values from calc-alkalic to alkali-calcic. These rocks were mainly derived from juvenile crustal materials, as evidenced by their high εHf(t) values (+ 3.3 to + 8.9). The juvenile sources of the above intrusions in the Shalazhashan are similar to those of the granitoids from the CAOB but distinct from the granitoids within the Alxa Block. These findings suggest that the Shalazhashan Zone belongs to the CAOB rather than the Alxa Block and that its boundary with the Alxa block can be

  4. Origin of titanian pargasite in gabbroic rocks from the Northern Apennine ophiolites (Italy): insights into the late-magmatic evolution of a MOR-type intrusive sequence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tribuzio, Riccardo; Tiepolo, Massimo; Thirlwall, Matthew F.

    2000-03-01

    Gabbroic rocks from Northern Apennine ophiolites contain accessory titanian pargasite, in interstices between plagioclase and clinopyroxene, and as rims around interstitial Fe-Ti-oxide phases. The origin of titanian pargasite has been evaluated by combining major, volatile and trace element microanalyses. Titanian pargasites show variable amounts of F and low Cl (0.03-0.23 and ≤0.03 wt%, respectively), and mg# value ranging from 0.78 to 0.70 and from 0.61 to 0.53 in Mg- and Fe-rich rocks, respectively. Geothermometric calculations based on amphibole-plagioclase equilibrium yield temperatures of 900±50°C and 840±50°C for Mg- and Fe-rich rocks, respectively. Titanian pargasites are characterized by LREE depletion, nearly flat HREE and variable negative Eu anomalies. Total REE contents in titanian pargasites are higher and lower than in associated clinopyroxenes and apatites, respectively. In the chondrite-normalized patterns of titanian pargasites, Ba, K and Sr are markedly depleted relative to LREE, whereas Nb, Zr and Ti are slightly enriched to slightly depleted relative to neighboring REE. A separate of titanian pargasite from a Fe-rich gabbroic rock was analyzed for Sr isotopic composition; its initial 87Sr/ 86Sr falls within the range of modern N-MORB and is consistent with those of fresh Mg-rich gabbroic rocks. Titanian pargasite most likely formed by an igneous liquid with relatively high H 2O content (4.4-6.1 wt%) and a slight LREE enrichment. The origin of this liquid has been ascribed to the percolation in the gabbroic crystal mush of a H 2O-rich agent of igneous origin, WHICH could be a trondhjemite liquid or an exsolved fluid. Probably, such interaction triggered a post-cumulus crystallization process that finally yielded the precipitation of titanian pargasite.

  5. Geotechnical Descriptions of Rock and Rock Masses.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1985-04-01

    user of the field log can relate to the general class of rock being described. For example, the rock name " syenite " might be qualified by adding "the...FELDSPAR PRE-S---- Coarne Texture Granite Syenite Qts ononite Honzonite Cabbro Peridotite (Platonic or to Qtx Diorite to Diorite Pyroxenite intrusive

  6. Petrogenesis of Early-Middle Jurassic intrusive rocks in northern Liaoning and central Jilin provinces, northeast China: Implications for the extent of spatial-temporal overprinting of the Mongol-Okhotsk and Paleo-Pacific tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Hong; Wang, Feng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Cao, Hua-Hua; Pei, Fu-Ping

    2016-07-01

    The Mesozoic tectonic evolution of NE China was controlled mainly by the Mongol-Okhotsk and Paleo-Pacific tectonic regimes. However, the extent of the spatial and temporal overprinting of these two regimes is poorly understood. Here, we report new zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating and geochemical analyses of Jurassic intrusive rocks in northern Liaoning and central Jilin provinces, northeast China, to discuss their petrogenesis and outline the extent of spatial and temporal overprinting of these two tectonic regimes. Dating results indicate that Jurassic magmatism occurred in two stages during the Early (ca. 175 Ma) and Middle Jurassic (170-163 Ma). These rocks represent two-stage typical bimodal igneous rock associations composed mainly of olivine gabbro, gabbro, and gneissic granitoids. The Early and Middle Jurassic gabbros have low rare earth element (REE) abundances, positive Eu anomalies, depletion in high field strength elements (HFSEs), and positive εHf(t) values (+ 4.0 to + 10.3, except for one value of - 17.8), suggesting that the primary magma was derived from partial melting of depleted lithospheric mantle metasomatized by subducted-slab-derived fluids. The Early Jurassic monzogranite exhibit high REE abundances (195-201 ppm), weak negative Eu anomalies (δEu = 0.63-0.64), and negative εHf(t) values (- 11.9 to - 8.2), suggesting a primary magma that was derived from partial melting of lower continental crust of the NCC. The Middle Jurassic granodiorites are enriched in light REEs (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), and are depleted in heavy REEs (HREEs) and HFSEs, as well as high Sr/Y (29-132) and (La/Yb)N (15-44) ratios. In addition, the Middle Jurassic granitoids near or within the NCC exhibit negative εHf(t) values (- 18.9 to + 0.2), whereas those within the Xing'an-Mongolia Orogenic Belt (XMOB) have generally positive εHf(t) values (- 0.6 to + 6.4), suggesting their origin from partial melting of thickened ancient NCC and newly accreted

  7. Superfund Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    In addition to basic information about vapor intrusion, the site contains technical and policy documents, tools and other resources to support vapor intrusion environmental investigations and mitigation activities.

  8. Hydrothermal alteration and Cu-Ni-PGE mobilization in the charnockitic rocks of the footwall of the South Kawishiwi intrusion, Duluth Complex, USA.

    PubMed

    Benkó, Zsolt; Mogessie, Aberra; Molnár, Ferenc; Krenn, Kurt; Poulson, Simon R; Hauck, Steven; Severson, Mark; Arehart, Greg B

    2015-06-01

    In the Neoarchean (~ 2.7 Ga) contact metamorphosed charnockitic footwall of the Mesoproterosoic (1.1 Ga) South Kawishiwi intrusion of the Duluth Complex, the primary metamorphic mineral assemblage and Cu-Ni-PGE sulfide mineralization is overprinted by an actinolite + chlorite + cummingtonite + prehnite + pumpellyite + quartz + calcite hydrothermal mineral assemblage along 2-3 cm thick veins. In calcite, hosted by the hydrothermal alteration zones and in a single recrystallized quartz porphyroblast, four different fluid inclusion assemblages are documented; the composition of these fluid inclusions provide p-T conditions of the fluid flow, and helps to define the origin of the fluids and evaluate their role in the remobilization and reprecipitation of the primary metamorphic sulfide assemblage. Pure CO2 fluid inclusions were found as early inclusions in recrystallized quartz porphyroblast. These inclusions may have been trapped during the recrystallization of the quartz during the contact metamorphism of the footwall charnockite in the footwall of the SKI. The estimated trapping pressure (1.6-2.0 kbar) and temperature (810-920 °C) conditions correspond to estimates based on felsic veins in the basal zones of the South Kawishiwi intrusion. Fluid inclusion assemblages with CO2-H2O-NaCl and CH4-N2-H2O-NaCl compositions found in this study along healed microfractures in the recrystallized quartz porphyroblast establish the heterogeneous state of the fluids during entrapment. The estimated trapping pressure and temperature conditions (240-650 bar and 120-150 °C for CO2-H2O-NaCl inclusions and 315-360 bar and 145-165 °C for CH4-N2-H2O-NaCl inclusions) are significantly lower than the p-T conditions (> 700 °C and 1.6-2 kbar) during the contact metamorphism, indicating that this fluid flow might not be related to the cooling of the Duluth Complex and its contact aureole. The presence of chalcopyrite inclusions in these fluid inclusions and in

  9. Hydrothermal alteration and Cu–Ni–PGE mobilization in the charnockitic rocks of the footwall of the South Kawishiwi intrusion, Duluth Complex, USA

    PubMed Central

    Benkó, Zsolt; Mogessie, Aberra; Molnár, Ferenc; Krenn, Kurt; Poulson, Simon R.; Hauck, Steven; Severson, Mark; Arehart, Greg B.

    2015-01-01

    In the Neoarchean (~ 2.7 Ga) contact metamorphosed charnockitic footwall of the Mesoproterosoic (1.1 Ga) South Kawishiwi intrusion of the Duluth Complex, the primary metamorphic mineral assemblage and Cu–Ni–PGE sulfide mineralization is overprinted by an actinolite + chlorite + cummingtonite + prehnite + pumpellyite + quartz + calcite hydrothermal mineral assemblage along 2–3 cm thick veins. In calcite, hosted by the hydrothermal alteration zones and in a single recrystallized quartz porphyroblast, four different fluid inclusion assemblages are documented; the composition of these fluid inclusions provide p–T conditions of the fluid flow, and helps to define the origin of the fluids and evaluate their role in the remobilization and reprecipitation of the primary metamorphic sulfide assemblage. Pure CO2 fluid inclusions were found as early inclusions in recrystallized quartz porphyroblast. These inclusions may have been trapped during the recrystallization of the quartz during the contact metamorphism of the footwall charnockite in the footwall of the SKI. The estimated trapping pressure (1.6–2.0 kbar) and temperature (810–920 °C) conditions correspond to estimates based on felsic veins in the basal zones of the South Kawishiwi intrusion. Fluid inclusion assemblages with CO2–H2O–NaCl and CH4–N2–H2O–NaCl compositions found in this study along healed microfractures in the recrystallized quartz porphyroblast establish the heterogeneous state of the fluids during entrapment. The estimated trapping pressure and temperature conditions (240–650 bar and 120–150 °C for CO2–H2O–NaCl inclusions and 315–360 bar and 145–165 °C for CH4–N2–H2O–NaCl inclusions) are significantly lower than the p–T conditions (> 700 °C and 1.6–2 kbar) during the contact metamorphism, indicating that this fluid flow might not be related to the cooling of the Duluth Complex and its contact aureole. The presence of chalcopyrite

  10. Zircon U-Pb age, Hf isotope and geochemistry of Carboniferous intrusions from the Langshan area, Inner Mongolia: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Da; Xiong, Guangqiang; Zhao, Hongtao; Di, Yongjun; Wang, Zhong; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2016-04-01

    Late Paleozoic was a critical period for the tectonic evolution of the northern margin of the Alxa-North China craton, but the evolutionary history is not well constrained. The Carboniferous intrusions in the Langshan area in the western part of the northern margin of the Alxa-North China craton are mainly composed of tonalite, quartz diorite, olivine gabbro and pyroxene peridotite. Zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating indicates that the Langshan Carboniferous intrusions were emplaced at ca. 338-324 Ma. The quartz diorites are characterized by high amounts of compatible trace elements (Cr, Ni and V) and high Mg# values, which may suggest a significant mantle source. The positive Pb and negative Nb-Ta-Ti anomalies, the variable εHf(t) (-6.9 to 2.0) values and the old Hf model ages (1218-1783 Ma) imply some involvement of ancient continental materials in its petrogenesis. The tonalite has relatively high Sr/Y ratios, low Mg#, Yb and Y contents, features of adakite-like rocks, negative εHf(t) values (-9.8 to -0.1) and older Hf model ages (1344-1953 Ma), which suggest significant involvement of ancient crust materials and mantle-derived basaltic component in its petrogenesis. The high Mg# values, high Cr and Ni contents, and low Zr and Hf contents of the mafic-ultramafic rocks show evidence of a mantle source, and the relatively low zircon εHf(t) values (-5.9 to 3.2) might point to an enriched mantle. The trace element characteristics indicate the influence of subducted sediments and slab-derived fluids. In the tectonic discrimination diagrams, all the rocks plot in subduction-related environment, such as volcanic arc and continental arc. Considering the regional geology, we suggest that the Carboniferous intrusions in the Langshan area were likely emplaced during the late stage of the southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian Ocean plate, which formed a continental arc along the northern margin of the Alxa-North China craton.

  11. Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes of the intrusive rocks in the Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolite, southern Tibet: Constraints on its formation setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang-Liang; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Zhang, Chang; Ji, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Jian-Gang

    2016-08-01

    The Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolite is best exposed at the central part of the Yarlung-Zangbo Suture Zone, Tibet Plateau. It consists of a thick section of mantle peridotites, but a relatively thin mafic sequence. This study presents geochronological and geochemical data for intrusive dykes (both mafic and felsic) and basalts to revisit the formation setting of the Xigaze ophiolite. The rodingites are characterized by high CaO and low Na2O contents relative to mafic dykes and show big variations in trace element compositions. Both gabbros and diabases have similar geochemical compositions, with MgO contents of 6.42-11.48 wt% and Mg# of 0.56-0.71. They display REE patterns similar to N-MORB and are variably enriched in large ion lithophile elements. Basalts have fractionated compositions and display LREE-depleted patterns very similar to N-MORB. They do not show obvious enrichment in LILE and depletion in high-field-strength elements, but a negative Nb anomaly is present. The studied plagiogranites have compositions of trondhjemite to tonalite, with high Na2O and low K2O contents. They have low TiO2 contents less than 1 wt%, consistent with melts formed by anatexis of gabbros rather than by differentiation of basalts. Zircons from seven samples, including three rodingites, three plagiogranites, and one gabbro, have been dated and yielded U-Pb ages of 124.6 ~ 130.5 Ma, indicating the Xigaze ophiolite was formed during the Early Cretaceous. They have mantle-like δ18O values of + 4.92 ~ + 5.26‰ and very positive εHf(t) values of + 16 ~ + 13.3. Ages of the rodingites and less altered gabbros indicate that serpentinization was occurred at ~ 125 Ma. Occurrence of both gabbroic and diabase dykes within the serpentinites suggests that the mantle lithosphere of the Xigaze ophiolite was rapidly exhumed. Both mafic and felsic dykes have slightly more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr ratios relative to MORB, but depleted Hf-Nd isotpe compositions. They have a limited range of ε

  12. Age and geochemistry of host rocks of the Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, central Panama: Implications for the Paleogene evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Michael J.; Hollings, Peter; Thompson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Jay M.; Burge, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, located in the Petaquilla district of central Panama, is hosted by a sequence of medium- to high-K calc-alkaline volcanic and sub-volcanic rocks. New crystallisation ages obtained from a granodiorite Petaquilla batholith and associated mineralised diorite to granodiorite porphyry stocks and dikes at Cobre Panama indicate that the batholith was emplaced as a multi-phase intrusion, over a period of ~ 4 million years from 32.20 ± 0.76 Ma to 28.26 ± 0.61 Ma, while the porphyritic rocks were emplaced over a ~ 2 million year period from 28.96 ± 0.62 Ma to 27.48 ± 0.68 Ma. Both the volcanic to sub-volcanic host rocks and intrusive rocks of the Cobre Panama deposit evolved via fractional crystallisation processes, as demonstrated by the major elements (e.g. Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2 and MgO) displaying negative trends with increasing SiO2. The Petaquilla intrusive rocks, including the diorite-granodiorite porphyries and granodiorite batholith, are geochemically evolved and appear to have formed from more hydrous magmas than the preceding host volcanic rocks, as evidenced by the presence of hornblende phenocrysts, higher degrees of large-ion lithophile element (LILE) and light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment and heavy rare earth element (HREE) depletion, and higher Sr/Y and La/Yb values. However, the degree of LREE enrichment, HREE depletion and La/Yb values are insufficient for the intrusive rocks to be considered as adakites. Collectively, the volcanic and intrusive rocks have LILE, REE and mobile trace element concentrations similar to enriched Miocene-age Cordilleran arc magmatism found throughout central and western Panama. Both the Petaquilla and Cordilleran arc magmatic suites are geochemically more evolved than the late Cretaceous to Eocene Chagres-Bayano arc magmas from northeastern Panama, as they display higher degrees of LILE and LREE enrichment. The geochemical similarities between the Petaquilla and Cordilleran arc

  13. Geochemical characteristics of the Shujiadian Cu deposit related intrusion in Tongling: Petrogenesis and implications for the formation of porphyry Cu systems in the Middle-Lower Yangtze River Valley metallogenic belt, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiwei; Zhou, Taofa; Yuan, Feng; Fan, Yu; Cooke, David R.; Zhang, Lejun; Fu, Bin; White, Noel C.

    2016-05-01

    Porphyry Cu deposits can form in intracontinental or post-collision settings; however, both the genesis of fertile magmas and the mechanism of metal enrichment remain controversial. The Shujiadian porphyry Cu deposit is located in the Tongling area of the Middle-Lower Yangtze River Valley metallogenic belt. It is hosted by the Shujiadian complex, which mainly consists of quartz diorite porphyry (143.7 ± 1.7 Ma) and pyroxene diorite (139.8 ± 1.6 Ma). They both belong to the calc-alkaline series, with enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE), depletion in high field-strength elements (HFSE) and heavy rare earth elements (HREE), and slightly negative Eu anomalies. Both quartz diorite porphyry and pyroxene diorite have geochemical affinities with adakite, and their low MgO (1.5-3.7 wt%), and Ni (3.7-6.9 ppm), Cr (2.0-44 ppm), and Th/Ce contents (0.06-0.11) indicate that the intrusive rocks have some characteristics of adakite-like rocks derived from thickened lower crust and melts from metabasaltic rocks and eclogites. Plagioclases from the quartz diorite porphyry are andesine (An value = 31.8-40.5) and from the pyroxene diorite are felsic albite and oligoclase with large-scale zones and variable An value (An value = 8.9-18.3), Fe and Sr contents, which indicate that mixing of mafic and felsic magma may have occurred in the shallow magma chamber. Compared to the barren quartz diorite porphyry, relatively lower SiO2 contents (49.5-55.2 wt.%), higher εNd(t) values (- 7.4 to - 6.9), εHf(t) values (- 11.0 to - 9.1) compositions, Ti-in-zircon temperatures (714-785 °C), and variations of HREE contents of the mineralization-related pyroxene diorite suggest mixing with high-temperature mafic magma. Calculated Ce4 +/Ce3 + values of pyroxene diorite plot between the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO) and magnetite-hematite buffer (MH), and barren quartz diorite porphyry samples plot below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO). Geochemical features of

  14. Numerical modeling of shallow magma intrusions with finite element method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Tielin; Cheng, Shaozhen; Fang, Qian; Zhou, Cheng

    2017-03-01

    A numerical approach for simulation of magma intrusion process, considering the couplings of the stress distribution, the viscous fluid flow of magma, and the fracturing of host rock, has been developed to investigate the mechanisms of fracture initiation and propagation in host rock during magma intrusion without pre-placing a set of fractures. The study focused on the dike intrusions filled with injected viscous magma in shallow sediments. A series of numerical modellings were carried out to simulate the process of magma intrusion in host rocks, with particular attention on the magma propagation processes and the formation of intrusion shapes. The model materials were Mohr-Coulomb materials with tension failure and shear failure. The scenarios of both stochastically heterogeneous host rocks and layered host rocks were analyzed. The injected magma formed intrusions shapes of (a) dyke, (b) sill, (c) cup-shaped intrusion, (d) saucer-shaped intrusion. The numerical results were in agreement with the experimental and field observed results, which confirmed the adequacy and the power of the numerical approach.

  15. O and radiogenic isotopic constraints on the origin of adakitic signatures: a case study from Solander and Little Solander Islands, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foley, Fiona V.; Turner, Simon; Rushmer, Tracy; Caulfield, John T.; Daczko, Nathan R.; Bierman, Paul; Robertson, Matthew; Barrie, Craig D.; Boyce, Adrian J.

    2014-09-01

    Subduction-related Quaternary volcanic rocks from Solander and Little Solander Islands, south of mainland New Zealand, are porphyritic trachyandesites and andesites (58.20-62.19 wt% SiO2) with phenocrysts of amphibole, plagioclase and biotite. The Solander and Little Solander rocks are incompatible element enriched (e.g. Sr ~931-2,270 ppm, Ba ~619-798 ppm, Th ~8.7-21.4 ppm and La ~24.3-97.2 ppm) with MORB-like Sr and Nd isotopic signatures. Isotopically similar quench-textured enclaves reflect mixing with intermediate (basaltic-andesite) magmas. The Solander rocks have geochemical affinities with adakites (e.g. high Sr/Y and low Y), whose origin is often attributed to partial melting of subducted oceanic crust. Solander sits on isotopically distinct continental crust, thus excluding partial melting of the lower crust in the genesis of the magmas. Furthermore, the incompatible element enrichments of the Solander rocks are inconsistent with partial melting of newly underplated mafic lower crust; reproduction of their major element compositions would require unrealistically high degrees of partial melting. A similar argument precludes partial melting of the subducting oceanic crust and the inability to match the observed trace element patterns in the presence of residual garnet or plagioclase. Alternatively, an enriched end member of depleted MORB mantle source is inferred from Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic compositions, trace element enrichments and ɛHf ≫ 0 CHUR in detrital zircons, sourced from the volcanics. 10Be and Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic systematics are inconsistent with significant sediment involvement in the source region. The trace element enrichments and MORB-like Sr and Nd isotopic characteristics of the Solander rocks require a strong fractionation mechanism to impart the high incompatible element concentrations and subduction-related (e.g. high LILE/HFSE) geochemical signatures of the Solander magmas. Trace element modelling shows that this can be achieved by

  16. Origin and evolution of the Tengchong block, southeastern margin of the Tibetan Plateau: Zircon U-Pb and Lu-Hf isotopic evidence from the (meta-) sedimentary rocks and intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dapeng; Chen, Yuelong; Hou, Kejun; Luo, Zhaohua

    2016-09-01

    U-Pb ages and Hf isotopic data from detrital zircons of Gaoligongshan metamorphic complex and the Carboniferous Menghong Group and igneous zircons from intrusions constrain the origin, tectonic affinity (East Gondwana), crustal evolution processes, and the properties of regional high-grade metamorphic rocks in the Tengchong block of southeastern China. Three granites intruded into the Tengchong block at 72 Ma, 114 Ma and 122 Ma. Detrital zircons range in age from Archean to Late Ordovician for both the Carboniferous Menghong Group and the Gaoligongshan metamorphic complex. Analyses for these two units yield similar age clusters at 2.5 Ga, 1.6 Ga, 1.17 Ga, 0.95 Ga, and 0.65-0.5 Ga as well as parallel Hf isotopic distributions. The protolith of the studied Gaoligongshan complex in the Tengchong block should deposit in the Late Paleozoic. Detrital zircon age distribution patterns of the Carboniferous Menghong Group and the Gaoligongshan complex show dominant younger Grenvillian age peaks at 0.95 Ga, indicating the strong paleogeographic connection of the Tengchong block with the Indian margin. The Hf isotopic comparison of both detrital and igneous dated-zircon shows that the Tengchong block can be represented by the post-Archean Indian continental margin. After 250 Ma, the intensive magma events affected the region and considerable juvenile material accreted to the crust of the Tengchong block.

  17. A Review on Forearc Ophiolite Obduction, Adakite-Like Generation, and Slab Window Development at the Chile Triple Junction Area: Uniformitarian Framework for Spreading-Ridge Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgois, Jacques; Lagabrielle, Yves; Martin, Hervé; Dyment, Jérôme; Frutos, Jose; Cisternas, Maria Eugenia

    2016-10-01

    This paper aggregates the main basic data acquired along the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ) area (45°-48°S), where an active spreading center is presently subducting beneath the Andean continental margin. Updated sea-floor kinematics associated with a comprehensive review of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data provide new constraints on the geodynamics of this puzzling area. We discuss: (1) the emplacement mode for the Pleistocene Taitao Ridge and the Pliocene Taitao Peninsula ophiolite bodies. (2) The occurrence of these ophiolitic complexes in association with five adakite-like plutonic and volcanic centers of similar ages at the same restricted locations. (3) The inferences from the co-occurrence of these sub-coeval rocks originating from the same subducting oceanic lithosphere evolving through drastically different temperature-pressure ( P- T) path: low-grade greenschist facies overprint and amphibolite-eclogite transition, respectively. (4) The evidences that document ridge-jump events and associated microplate individualization during subduction of the SCR1 and SCR-1 segments: the Chonos and Cabo Elena microplates, respectively. The ridge-jump process associated with the occurrence of several closely spaced transform faults entering subduction is controlling slab fragmentation, ophiolite emplacement, and adakite-like production and location in the CTJ area. Kinematic inconsistencies in the development of the Patagonia slab window document an 11- km westward jump for the SCR-1 spreading segment at ~6.5-to-6.8 Ma. The SCR-1 spreading center is relocated beneath the North Patagonia Icefield (NPI). We argue that the deep-seated difference in the dynamically sustained origin of the high reliefs of the North and South Patagonia Icefield (NPI and SPI) is asthenospheric convection and slab melting, respectively. The Chile Triple Junction area provides the basic constraints to define the basic signatures for spreading-ridge subduction beneath an Andean

  18. Zircon Recycling in Arc Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Barth, A.; Matzel, J.; Wooden, J.; Burgess, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of zircon has been well established in arc intrusions and arc volcanoes, but a better understanding of where and how zircons are recycled can help illuminate how arc magma systems are constructed. To that end, we are conducting age, trace element (including Ti-in-zircon temperatures; TzrnTi) and isotopic studies of zircons from the Late Cretaceous (95-85 Ma) Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS) in the Sierra Nevada Batholith (CA). Within the TIS zircons inherited from ancient basement sources and/or distinctly older host rocks are uncommon, but recycled zircon antecrysts from earlier periods of TIS-related magmatism are common and conspicuous in the inner and two most voluminous units of the TIS, the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak Granodiorites. All TIS units have low bulk Zr ([Zr]<150 ppm) and thus low calculated zircon saturation temperatures (Tzrnsat). Within the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak, TzrnTi values are predominantly at or below average Tzrnsat, and there is no apparent correlation between age and TzrnTi. At temperatures appropriate for granodiorite/tonalite melt generation (at or above biotite dehydration; >825°C), [Zr] in the TIS is a factor of 2 to 3 lower than saturation values. Low [Zr] in TIS rocks might be attributed to a very limited supply of zircon in the source, by disequilibrium melting and rapid melt extraction [1], by melting reactions involving formation of other phases that can incorporate appreciable Zr [2], or by removal of zircon at an earlier stage of magma evolution. Based on a preliminary compilation of literature data, low [Zr] is common to Late Cretaceous N.A. Cordilleran granodioritic/tonalitic intrusions (typically <200 ppm and frequently 100-150 ppm for individual large intrusions or intrusive suites). We infer from this that [Zr] in anatectic melts is probably not limited by zircon supply and is primarily controlled by melting parameters. Comparison of the data from TIS with one of these intrusions, the smaller but otherwise

  19. Petroleum Vapor Intrusion

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    One type of vapor intrusion is PVI, in which vapors from petroleum hydrocarbons such as gasoline, diesel, or jet fuel enter a building. Intrusion of contaminant vapors into indoor spaces is of concern.

  20. Adakitic volcanism in the eastern Aleutian arc: Petrology and geochemistry of Hayes volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, K.; Hart, W. K.; Coombs, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Located in south-central Alaska, 135 km northwest of Anchorage, Hayes volcano is responsible for the most widespread tephra fall deposit in the regional Holocene record (~3,500 BP). Hayes is bounded to the west by the Cook Inlet volcanoes (CIV; Mt. Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine) and separated from the nearest volcanism to the east, Mount Drum of the Wrangell Volcanic Field (WVF), by a 400 km-wide volcanic gap. We report initial results of the first systematic geochemical and petrologic study of Hayes volcano. Hayes eruptive products are calc-alkaline dacites and rhyolites that have anomalous characteristics within the region. Major and trace element analyses reveal that the Hayes rhyolites are more silicic (~74 wt. % SiO2) than compositions observed in other CIV, and its dacitic products possess the distinctive geochemical signatures of adakitic magmas. Key aspects of the Hayes dacite geochemistry include: 16.03 - 17.54 wt. % Al2O3, 0.97 - 2.25 wt. % MgO, Sr/Y = 60 - 78, Yb = 0.9 - 1.2 ppm, Ba/La = 31 - 79. Such signatures are consistent with melting of a metamorphosed basaltic source that leaves behind a residue of garnet ± amphibole ± pyroxene via processes such as melting of a subducting oceanic slab or underplated mafic lower crust, rather than flux melting of the mantle wedge by dehydration of the down-going slab. Additionally, Hayes tephras display a distinctive mineralogy of biotite with amphibole in greater abundance than pyroxene, a characteristic not observed at other CIV. Furthermore, Hayes rhyolites and dacites exhibit little isotopic heterogeneity (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70384 - 0.70395, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.866 - 18.889) suggesting these lavas originate from the same source. Hayes volcano is approximately situated above the western margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane and where the dip of the Pacific slab beneath Cook Inlet shallows northward. Due to its position along the margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane, it is plausible that Hayes magmas

  1. Modeling sill intrusion in volcanic calderas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Macedonio, Giovanni; Giudicepietro, Flora; D'Auria, Luca; Martini, Marcello

    2015-04-01

    We present a numerical model for describing sill intrusion in volcanic calderas. The dynamics of volcanic calderas are often subject to long-term unrests, with remarkable ground deformation, seismicity, and geochemical changes, that do not culminate in an eruption. On the contrary, in some cases, unrests with minor geophysical changes are followed, in few months, by an eruption, as in the case of Rabaul Caldera in 1994 and Sierra Negra (Galapagos) in 2005. The main common features of calderas are the relevant ground deformations with intense uplift episodes, often followed by subsidence. We think that the process of sill intrusion can explain the common features observed on different calderas. In our model, the sill, fed by a deeper magma reservoir, intrudes below a horizontal elastic plate, representing the overlying rocks and expands radially. The model is based on the numerical solution of the equation for the elastic plate, coupled with a Navier-Stokes equation for simulating magma intrusion in the viscous regime. The numerical simulations show that during the feeding process, the ground is subject to uplift. When the feeding stops a subsidence occurs in the central zone. For very low flexural rigidity of the elastic plate, the subsidence can occur even during the intrusion of the sill. The stress field produced by the intrusion is mainly concentrated in a circular zone that follows the sill intrusion front.

  2. SHRIMP U-Pb dating and geochemistry of the Cretaceous plutonic rocks in the Korean Peninsula: A new tectonic model of the Cretaceous Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Won; Kwon, Sanghoon; Park, Seung-Ik; Lee, Changyeol; Cho, Deung-Lyong; Lee, Hong-Jin; Ko, Kyoungtae; Kim, Sook Ju

    2016-10-01

    The Cretaceous tectonomagmatism of the Korean Peninsula was examined based on geochemical and geochronological data of the Cretaceous plutonic rocks, along with distribution of volcano-sedimentary nonmarine N- to NE-trending fault bounded sedimentary basins. We conducted sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock geochemical compositions of 21 Cretaceous plutonic rocks, together with previously published data, from the central to southern Korean Peninsula. Four age groups of plutonic rocks were identified: Group I (ca. 119-106 Ma) in the northern to central area, Group II (ca. 99-87 Ma) in the central southern area, Group III (ca. 85-82 Ma) in the central to southern area, and Group IV (ca. 76-67 Ma) in the southernmost area. These results indicate a sporadic trenchward-younging trend of the Cretaceous magmatism in the Korean Peninsula. The Group I, II, and III rocks are dominated by high-K calc-alkaline I-type rocks with rift-related A-type granitoids. In contrast, the Group IV rocks are high-K calc-alkaline I-type plutonic rocks with no A-type rocks. The geochemical signatures of the entire groups indicated LREEs (light rare earth elements) enrichments and negative Nb, Ta, and Ti anomalies, indicating normal arc magmatism. A new tectonic model of the Cretaceous Korean Peninsula was proposed based on temporal and spatial distribution of the Cretaceous plutons represented by four age groups; 1) magmatic quiescence throughout the Korean Peninsula from ca. 160 to 120 Ma, 2) intrusions of the I- and A-type granitoids in the northern and central Korean Peninsula (Group I plutonic rocks from ca. 120 to 100 Ma) resulted from the partial melting of the lower continental crust due to the rollback of the Izanagi plate expressed as the conversion from flat-lying subduction to normal subduction. The Gyeongsang nonmarine sedimentary rift basin in the Korean Peninsula and adakite magmatism preserved in the present-day Japanese Islands

  3. Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    ECONOMY,KATHLEEN M.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; VAUGHN,PALMER

    1999-10-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptions used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes is a

  4. Petrogenesis and geodynamic setting of Early Cretaceous mafic-ultramafic intrusions, South China: A case study from the Gan-Hang tectonic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Youqiang; Hu, Ruizhong; Liu, Shen; Coulson, Ian M.; Qi, Huawen; Tian, Jianji; Zhu, Jingjing

    2016-08-01

    A study using whole-rock major-trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb dating has been carried out on Early Cretaceous mafic-ultramafic intrusions from the Gan-Hang tectonic belt (GHTB), South China, to understand the origin of mantle sources and the sequential evolution of the underlying Late Mesozoic lithospheric mantle of this area. The study focused on two intrusions, one at Quzhou and the other at Longyou (see Fig. 1). They are primarily composed of mafic-ultramafic rocks with wide range of chemical compositions. The Quzhou mafic rocks have relatively narrow ranges of SiO2 (48.94-51.79 wt%), MgO (6.07-7.21 wt%), Fe2O3 (10.48-11.56 wt%), CaO (8.20-8.81 wt%), and Mg# (51.7-56.5) with relatively low K2O (0.56-0.67 wt%) and Na2O (3.09-3.42 wt%). By contrast, the ultramafic rocks from Longyou have distinct lower SiO2 (41.50-45.11 wt%) and higher MgO (9.05-9.90 wt%), Fe2O3 (12.14-12.62 wt%), CaO (8.64-10.67 wt%), and Mg# (59.5-61.1) with relatively higher K2O (1.32-1.75 wt%) and Na2O (4.53-5.08 wt%). They are characterized by Ocean Island Basalts (OIB)-type trace element distribution patterns, with a significant enrichment of light rare earth elements (LREE), large ion lithophile elements (LILE, i.e., Rb, Ba, K, and Sr) and high field strength elements (HFSE, i.e., Nb, Ta), and slight depletion of Th, U, Ti, and Y. The intrusions exhibit relatively depleted Sr-Nd isotope compositions, with (87Sr/86Sr)i range of 0.7035 to 0.7055 (143Nd/144Nd)i of 0.51264 to 0.51281 and εNd(t) values of + 3.0 to + 6.6. Zircon U-Pb dating of Longyou and Quzhou intrusions yields consistent magma emplacement ages of 129.0 ± 3.9 to 126.2 ± 2.4 Ma, respectively. The dating results are consistent with the peak of extension in Early Cretacerous throughout the Gan-Hang tectonic belt. Their magmas were principally derived from near-solidus partial melting of pyroxenites with different content of silica, and the pyroxenites were resulted from a juvenile SCLM peridotite

  5. Interior intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. ); Dry, B. )

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  6. Lunar igneous intrusions.

    PubMed

    El-Baz, F

    1970-01-02

    Photographs taken from Apollo 10 and 11 reveal a number of probable igneous intrusions, including three probable dikes that crosscut the wall and floor of an unnamed 75-kilometer crater on the lunar farside. These intrusions are distinguished by their setting, textures, structures, and brightness relative to the surrounding materials. Recognition of these probable igneous intrusions in the lunar highlands slupports the indications of the heterogeneity of lunar materials and the plausibility of intrusive igneous activity, in addition to extrusive volcanism, on the moon.

  7. Petrography and petrology of Smoky Butte intrusives, Garfield County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matson, Robert E.

    1960-01-01

    The Smoky Butte intrusives are located in T. 18 N., R. 36 E. Garfield County, Montana on the extreme eastern edge of the petrographic province of Central Montana. They consist of dikes and plugs arranged in linear, en-echelon pattern with a northeast trend and intrude the Tullock member (Paleocene age) of the Fort Union formation. Extrusive rocks are absent. The rocks are potassium-rich volcanic types showing a disequilibrium mineral assemblage consisting of sanidine, leucite, biotite, olivine, pyroxene, magnetite plus. ilmenite, apatite, calcite, quartz, and a yellowish to dark greenish glassy groundmass. Two chemical analyses of Smoky Butte rocks show high magnesium, potassium, titanium, and phosphorous and low aluminum and sodium content. The two norm calculations show that the rocks are oversaturated with 1.3 and 3.1 per-cent excess silica. Because of the peculiar nature of the Smoky Butte rocks, descriptive names have been applied to them. They are divided into six different types. Three periods of intrusion are proposed for Smoky Butte quarry where three rock types crop out. Other evidence for multiple injection occurs in several multiple dikes. The upper contact of the intrusion is visible on a few plugs and dikes. Smoky Butte rocks show some similarities to the undersaturated potassium-rich rocks of the Highwood and Bearpaw Mountains of Montana, the rocks of the Leucite Hills of Wyoming, and the oversaturated rocks of the West Kimberly District of Australia.

  8. Igneous intrusions in coal-bearing sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.B.; Shishlov, S.B.

    1987-08-01

    Intrusions of various compositions, sizes, and shapes have been observed in 115 out of 620 coal basins or deposits on all the continents. They are mainly subvolcanic and hypabyssal, with depths of emplacement estimated as ranging from a few hundred meters to 6 km, but usually 3-4 km. Compositionally, 42% are basic, 31% intermediate, 23% acid, and 4% ultrabasic. Mafic (and related) rock types include dolerites, trachydolerites, gabbro-dolerites, gabbro-monzonites, monzonites, diabases, gabbrodiabases, and less often gabbros and basalts (subvolcanic bodies). These mafic intrusions occur in coal formations of various ages from Carboniferous through Neogene, but predominate in Paleozoic (47%) and Cenozoic beds (45%). They also occur in coal formations of all genetic types, apart from those on ancient stable platforms, where there are no signs of intrusive activity. The mafic intrusions are almost everywhere associated with comagmatic lavas and tuffs (mainly in the younger strata), and the coal beds themselves are to some extent enriched in pyroclastic material, particularly in the upper horizons. This paper gives a worldwide review of igneous intrusions in coal beds. 24 references.

  9. Computer Intrusions and Attacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1999-01-01

    Examines some frequently encountered unsolicited computer intrusions, including computer viruses, worms, Java applications, trojan horses or vandals, e-mail spamming, hoaxes, and cookies. Also discusses virus-protection software, both for networks and for individual users. (LRW)

  10. Important role of magma mixing in generating the Mesozoic monzodioritic-granodioritic intrusions related to Cu mineralization, Tongling, East China: evidence from petrological and in situ Sr-Hf isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Chen, ChangJian

    2016-04-01

    The Mesozoic ore-bearing high-Mg monzodioritic-granodioritic rocks in the Tongling mining district (East China) have been described as having adakitic affinities, and their origin has been attributed to partial melting of delaminated eclogite at depth in the mantle, followed by interaction of the resultant granitic magma with mantle peridotite. Here we present petrological data and in situ Sr isotopic data for zoned plagioclase that are inconsistent with the eclogite-derived model, and instead propose a model that involves magma mixing of siliceous crustal melts and basaltic magma that was derived from metasomatized mantle by subduction zone fluids in an extensional regime. The principal geochemical signatures of these Mesozoic rocks include a hydrous and high-K calc-alkaline affinity, high values of Mg#, high Sr abundances, high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, ɛNd(t)=-13.1 to -9.0, and ISr=0.70707-0.70824. The magma mixing model is supported by (1) the common existence of mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) and the disequilibrium textures of plagioclase and hornblende, (2) the increase in Ti and Al(IV) from hornblende cores to rims, and the overgrowths of high-Ca pyroxene around hornblende grains as well, indicative of episode of heating and rejuvenation of the magma chamber as a result of recharge of mafic magma, (3) the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of embayed high-Ca cores of plagioclase that are distinctly lower than in the euhedral low-Ca overgrowth rims, (4) negative correlations between whole-rock Nd and Sr isotopic ratios, and (5) the significant differences in the values of ɛHf(t) (-9.5 to -26) within different zircons from the same intrusion. We propose that underplating of hydrous basaltic magma from the metasomatized lithospheric mantle in the lower crust resulted in partial melting of the lower crustal rocks (Precambrian TTG gneisses and amphibolite/granulite) under water-saturated conditions, during which plagioclase decomposed, leaving hornblende-rich restites and

  11. Detecting Signs of Intrusion.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-08-01

    your systems, you should investigate any warnings they sound. Although monitors are not fool- proof, they can be part of an effective early warning ...Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute Detecting Signs of Intrusion Robert Firth Gary Ford Barbara Fräser John Kochmar...1997 Detecting Signs of Intrusion Robert Firth Gary Ford Barbara Fräser John Kochmar Suresh Konda John Richael Derek Simmel Networked Systems

  12. Origin of primitive andesites by melt-rock reaction in the sub-arc mantle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    The genetic relationship between primitive granitoids, including high-Mg andesites (HMAs) and bajaites, and primary granitoids, or "pristine" adakites, has been vigorously debated since Defant and Drummond (1991; henceforth D&D) first applied the term "adakite" to refer to Cenozoic arc magmas (andesites and dacites) "associated with young subducting lithosphere", with low Y and Yb, low high-field strength elements (HFSEs), high Sr, and high Sr/Y and (La/Yb)N ratios "relative to island arc andesite-dacite-rhyolite". These characteristics were attributed to an origin for adakites by partial melting of basaltic crust within the subducting slab (hence "slab melts"). That such a process can produce melts with the characteristics described by D&D has since been largely confirmed by dehydration melting experiments on hydrous metabasalt at ~1-4 GPa. Attention was also drawn to the geochemical similarities between "adakites" and large-ion lithophile element (LILE)-enriched, high-field strength element (HFSE) depleted magnesian andesites (HMAs) from Adak Island in the western Aleutians, first described by Kay (1978), implying a genetic relationship between primary granitoid (adakites) formed by partial melting of basaltic ocean crust in the subducting slab, transformed to garnet-amphibolite or eclogite, and primitive magnesian andesites (HMAs) with high Mg-numbers (Mg# = molar Mg/(Mg+Fe)x100) and high concentrations of Ni and Cr. What then is the true origin of these enigmatic arc magmas, with both crustal and mantle, derivative and primitive, geochemical signatures? Kay (1978) suggested a "hybrid" model, in which "hydrous melting of eclogite (slab melting) results in a small volume of dacitic melt ("pristine adakite"), which rises into the hotter overlying peridotite wedge and equilibrates with olivine and orthopyroxene, reacting with olivine until it becomes andesitic". In this paper, I will discuss the results of melt-rock reaction experiments modelling this peridotite

  13. Magma mixing in a zoned alkalic intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.G.; Henry, C.D.; Barker, D.S.; Rubin, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The Marble Canyon stock is unique among the alkalic intrusions of the Trans-Pecos magmatic province in being zoned from a critically silica-undersaturated rim of alkali gabbro (AG) to a silica-oversaturated core of quartz syenite (QS). Hybrid rocks of intermediate chemical and mineralogical compositions occur between the rim and core. Nepheline-syenite dikes occur only within the AG. Silica-rich dikes of quartz trachyte, pegmatite, and aplite cut the AG, QS, and hybrid rocks. Thermodynamic calculations of silica activity in the magmas illustrate the presence of two trends with decreasing temperature: a silica-poor trend from AG to nepheline syenite and a silica-rich trend from hybrid rocks to QS. Least-square modeling of rock and mineral compositions suggests 1) the nepheline syenites were derived by crystal-liquid fractionation from nearly solidified AG at the rim of the stock, 2) AG magma farther from the rim mixed with a small proportion of granitic magma, and 3) the mixture then differentiated to produce the hybrid rocks and QS. Zirconium dioxide inclusions in plagioclase crystals of the hybrid rocks and QS indicate that the AG magma contained some crystals before it mixed with the granitic magma. Two origins for the granitic magma are possible: 1) a late-stage differentiate of a mantle-derived hypersthene-normative magma and 2) melting of crustal material by the AG magma. Recognition of magma mixing might not have been possible if the AG had been hypersthene-normative.

  14. Geochronology of the Neogene intrusive magmatism of the Oaș—Gutâi Mountains, Eastern Carpathians (NW Romania)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovacs, Marinel; Pécskay, Zoltán; Fülöp, Alexandrina; Jurje, Maria; Edelstein, Oscar

    2013-12-01

    Earlier geological work in the Oaș-Gutâi Mts (OG), Eastern Carpathians, has revealed the extensive presence of shallow subvolcanic intrusive bodies, both exposed on the surface and covered by Paleogene-Neogene sedimentary sequences and Neogene volcanic formations. This study is based on detailed mapping and sampling of the OG Neogene intrusive magmatic rocks. Thirty seven representative intrusions (sills, dykes, microlaccoliths, etc.) were selected for radiometric dating. These intrusions show a wide variety of petrographic rock-types: from microgabbros to microgranodiorites and from basalts to andesites. However, the intrusions consist of typical calc-alkaline, medium-K rocks, similar to the volcanic rocks which outcrop in the same areas. The K-Ar age determinations on whole-rock samples of intrusions yielded ages between 11.9 Ma and 7.0 Ma (from Late Sarmatian to Middle Pannonian). The results are in good agreement with the common assumption, based on the biostratigraphic and geological data, that large volumes of intrusions have formed during the paroxysm of the intermediate volcanic activity in the OG. Except for the Firiza basalt intrusive complex of the Gutâi Mts (8.1-7.0 Ma), the OG intrusions show similar K-Ar ages as the intrusions of the "Subvolcanic Zone" and Călimani Mts from Eastern Carpathians. The timing of the OG intrusive magmatism partially overlaps with the timing of the intrusive magmatic activity in the Eastern Moravia and Pieniny Mts. The systematic radiometric datings in the whole OG give clear evidence that the hydrothermal activity related to the epithermal systems always postdates intrusion emplacement.

  15. Petrology of the igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    Papers published during the 1983-1986 period on the petrology and geochemistry of igneous rocks are discussed, with emphasis on tectonic environment. Consideration is given to oceanic rocks, subdivided into divergent margin suites (mid-ocean ridge basalts, ridge-related seamounts, and back-arc basin basalts) and intraplate suites (oceanic island basalts and nonridge seamounts), and to igneous rocks formed at convergent margins (island arc and continental arc suites), subdivided into volcanic associations and plutonic associations. Other rock groups discussed include continental flood basalts, layered mafic intrusions, continental alkalic associations, komatiites, ophiolites, ash-flow tuffs, anorthosites, and mantle xenoliths.

  16. The vernon supersuite: Mesoproterozoic A-type granitoid rocks in the New Jersey highlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volkert, R.A.; Drake, A.A.

    1998-01-01

    Abundant Mesoproterozoic A-type granitoid rocks of two intrusive suites underlie approximately 50 percent of the New Jersey Highlands. These rocks, the Byram Intrusive and Lake Hopatcong Intrusive Suites, consist of granite, alaskite, quartz monzonite, monzonite, and minor pegmatite. Byram and Lake Hopatcong rocks, although different mineralogically, are similar geochemically and contain overlapping abundances of most major and trace elements. Petrographic relationships, geochronology, field relationships, and geochemical similarities support a comagmatic origin for both suites. They constitute the here named Vernon Supersuite.

  17. Geochemistry and stratigraphic relations of middle Proterozoic rocks of the New Jersey Highlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volkert, Richard A.; Drake, Avery Ala

    1999-01-01

    Middle Proterozoic rocks of the New Jersey Highlands consist of a basement of dacitic, tonalitic, trondhjemitic, and charnockitic rocks that constitute the Losee metamorphic suite. These rocks are unconformably overlain by a layered supracrustal sequence of quartzo-feldspathic and calcareous rocks. Abundant sheets of hornblende- and biotite-bearing rocks of the Byram intrusive suite and clinopyroxene-bearing rocks of the Lake Hopatcong intrusive suite were synkinematically emplaced at about 1,090 Ma. These intrusive suites constitute the Vernon Supersuite. The postorogenic Mount Eve Granite has been dated at 1,020?4 Ma and is confined to the extreme northern Highlands.

  18. Water-saturated magmas in the Panama Canal region: a precursor to adakite-like magma generation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Tyrone O.; Franceschi, Pastora; Hall, Chris M.

    2011-03-01

    Amphibole, while uncommon as a phenocryst in arc lavas, is increasingly recognized as a key constituent in the petrogenesis of arc magmas. Fractional crystallization of water-saturated arc magmas in the lower crust can yield substantial volumes of amphibole cumulates that, depending on the pressure of crystallization, may also contain garnet. Fractionation of this higher pressure assemblage has been invoked as a possible mechanism in the production of magmas that contain an adakitic signature. This study examines newly dated Late-Oligocene (25.37 ± 0.13 Ma) hypabyssal amphibole-rich andesites from Cerro Patacon in the Panama Canal region. These andesites contain nodules of amphibole cumulates that are ~4-6 cm in diameter and are almost entirely composed of 5-10-mm amphibole crystals (dominantly ferri-tschermakite). Geochemical variations, optical and chemical zoning of the Cerro Patacon amphiboles are consistent with their evolution in a crystal mush environment that had at least one recharge event prior to entrainment in the host andesite. Amphiboles hosted within the cumulate nodules differ from those hosted in the Cerro Patacon andesite and contain consistently higher values of Ti. We suggest these nodules represent the early stages of fractionation from a water-saturated magma. Cerro Patacon andesites have REE concentrations that plot at the most depleted end of Central American Arc magmas and exhibit a distinctive depletion in the middle REE. These geochemical and petrographic observations strongly support significant amphibole fractionation during formation of the Cerro Patacon andesite, consistent with the petrographic evidence. Fractionation of water-saturated magmas is a mechanism by which adakitic compositions may be produced, and the Cerro Patacon andesites do exhibit adakite-like geochemical characteristics (e.g., elevated Sr/Y; 28-34). However, the relatively elevated concentrations of Y and HREE indicate garnet was not stable in the fractionating

  19. Lithologic mapping of mafic intrusions in East Greenland using Landsat Thematic Mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naslund, H. Richard; Birnie, R. W.; Parr, J. T.

    1989-01-01

    The East Greenland Tertiary Igneous Province contains a variety of intrusive and extrusive rock types. The Skaergaard complex is the most well known of the intrusive centers. Landsat thematic mapping (TM) was used in conjunction with field spectrometer data to map these mafic intrusions. These intrusions are of interest as possible precious metal ore deposits. They are spectrally distinct from the surrounding Precambrian gneisses. However, subpixel contamination by snow, oxide surface coatings, lichen cover and severe topography limit the discrimination of lithologic units within the gabbro. Imagery of the Skaergaard and surrounding vicinity, and image processing and enhancement techniques are presented. Student theses and other publications resulting from this work are also listed.

  20. Sr, Nd and Pb isotope and geochemical data from the Quaternary Nevado de Toluca volcano, a source of recent adakitic magmatism, and the Tenango Volcanic Field, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martínez-Serrano, Raymundo G.; Schaaf, Peter; Solís-Pichardo, Gabriela; Hernández-Bernal, Ma. del Sol; Hernández-Treviño, Teodoro; Julio Morales-Contreras, Juan; Macías, José Luis

    2004-11-01

    Volcanic activity at Nevado de Toluca (NT) volcano began 2.6 Ma ago with the emission of andesitic lavas, but over the past 40 ka, eruptions have produced mainly lava flows and pyroclastic deposits of predominantly orthopyroxene-hornblende dacitic composition. In the nearby Tenango Volcanic Field (TVF) pyroclastic products and lava flows ranging in composition from basaltic andesite to andesite were erupted at most of 40 monogenetic volcanic centers and were coeval with the last stages of NT. All volcanic rocks in the study area are characterized by a calc-alkaline affinity that is consistent with a subduction setting. Relatively high concentrations of Sr (>460 ppm) coupled with low Y (<21 ppm), along with relatively low HREE contents and Pb isotopic values similar to MORB-EPR, suggest a possible geochemical adakitic signature for the majority of the volcanic rocks of NT. The HFS- and LIL-element patterns for most rocks of the TVF suggest a depleted source in the subcontinental lithosphere modified by subduction fluids, similar to most rocks from the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt (TMVB). The isotopic compositions are similar for volcanic rocks of NT and TVF regions ( 87Sr/ 86Sr: 0.703853-0.704226 and 0.703713-0.704481; ɛNd: +4.23-+5.34 and +2.24-+6.85; 206Pb/ 204Pb: 18.55-18.68 and 18.58-18.69; 207Pb/ 204Pb: 15.54-15.62 and 15.56-15.61; 208Pb/ 204Pb: 38.19-38.47 and 38.28-38.50, respectively), suggesting a MORB-like source with low crustal contamination. Metamorphic xenoliths from deeper continental crust beneath NT volcano show isotopic patterns similar to those of Grenvillian rocks of north-central Mexico ( 87Sr/ 86Sr: 0.715653-0.721984, ɛNd: -3.8 to -7.2, 206Pb/ 204Pb: 18.98-19.10, 207Pb/ 204Pb: 15.68-15.69, 208Pb/ 204Pb: 39.16-39.26 and Nd model age (T DM) of 1.2-1.3 Ga). In spite of a thick continental crust (>45 km) that underlies the volcanoes of the study area, the geochemical and isotopic patterns of these rocks indicate low interaction with this crust. NT

  1. Music effects on EEG in intrusive and withdrawn mothers with depressive symptoms.

    PubMed

    Tornek, Alexandra; Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Diego, Miguel; Jones, Nancy

    2003-01-01

    The EEG patterns of 48 intrusive and withdrawn mothers with depressive symptoms were assessed following a 20-minute music session to determine if the music had mood-altering effects. Half the mothers listened to classical music while half listened to rock music. Intrusive mothers were expected to have more positive responses and more symmetrical EEG following the calming classical music, while withdrawn mothers were expected to have a more positive response and symmetrical EEG following the energizing rock music. Although more positive EEGs were noted for rock music in both groups, only the withdrawn mothers showed a significant change in EEG toward symmetry following rock music, and only the intrusive mothers showed a decrease in cortisol levels following the rock music. Their State Anxiety Inventory (STAI) anxiety levels also decreased, while the Profile of Mood States (POMS) depressed mood levels decreased significantly for all four groups following music.

  2. How Big is the Dufek Intrusion? Paleomagnetic Constraints on the Cooling History of the Dufek Layered Intrusion (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gee, J. S.; Cheadle, M. J.; Meurer, W. P.; Grimes, C. B.

    2013-12-01

    Large, slowly cooled layered intrusions can provide a temporal record of geomagnetic field variations. Geomagnetic reversals may be reflected as stratigraphically confined polarity intervals if the cooling front migrates vertically. Cooling over multiple polarity intervals may also be reflected in multiple polarity magnetizations within a single specimen, and thermal demagnetization of such samples can yield a more detailed record of field variations. For a stratigraphic sequence with relatively uniform magnetic characteristics, the pattern of multicomponent remanence unblocking can provide strong constraints on the thermal history of the intrusion as well. Here we illustrate how thermal demagnetization data from two densely sampled stratigraphic sections in the Jurassic (~182 Ma) Dufek Layered Intrusion, Antarctica, can be used to constrain the cooling history of the intrusion. The Dufek intrusion is a large (>6600 km2) mafic intrusion with exposed stratigraphic thicknesses of ~1.8 km in the Dufek Massif and ~1.7 km of compositionally more evolved rocks in the Forrestal Range. Although consistent variation in mineral compositions suggests that the Dufek Massif and the Forrestal Range are respectively the lower part and the top of a much thicker intrusion, aeromagnetic studies suggest they may represent separate, contemporaneous intrusions. We collected more than 800 oriented cores from two sections in the Dufek Massif: the Neuberg (NW) section spanning the lowermost ~500m of the intrusion and an additional ~100m section (Hannah Peak, HP) from higher in the stratigraphy. Samples from the NW section have up to three magnetization components, with directions consistent with the expected Jurassic direction. The transition between magnetization components is typically sharp and, together with discrete high unblocking temperatures (maximum ~580°C), suggests the magnetization is a thermal remanence carried primarily by fine grained magnetite. Samples from the HP section

  3. IRA: Intrusion - Reaction - Appats

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2004-11-01

    méthodes d ’attaques Détection d ’intrusion Cas particulier des Canaux Cachés Notion d ’appât (Honey Pot & Honey Net) Protection entre environnements de...aspects suivants : La notion de « Pot de miel » peut s ’étendre d ’un simple leurre (mot de passe constructeur conservé) à des environnement dédié...d’Attaques Logiques .........................................................................7-10 2.3 Environnement Technique étudié

  4. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  5. UThPb age of Apollo 12 rock 12013

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tatsumoto, M.

    1970-01-01

    A UThPb isotopic study of three chips from lunar rock 12013 indicates that parental material of the intrusion breccia formed quite early in the moon's history, possibly 3.9 to 4.3 by ago. The UThPb characteristics of the rock are distinctly different from those of other Apollo 12 igneous rocks and suggest a different origin. ?? 1970.

  6. Thermal aureoles of igneous intrusions: some possible indications of hydrothermal convective cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parmentier, E.M.; Schedl, A.

    1981-01-01

    The size and shape of metamorphic aureoles is investigated as a possible indicator of hydrothermal convective cooling of epizonal igneous intrusions. A simple family of numerical models illustrates the effect of convective cooling on maximum temperatures attained in the country rock surrounding an intrusion. Boundary layer approximations have also been applied to describe convection of vaporizing groundwater near the contact of an intrusion early in its cooling history. Maximum temperature isotherms are taken to reflect the width and shape of thermal aureoles defined by preserved mineral assemblages as appears to be reasonable based on several well-studied conductively cooled intrusions. The thermal aureoles of intrusions for which oxygen and hydrogen isotope data indicate convective groundwater circulation have been examined on the basis of the simple numerical and boundary layer models. The shape of the low temperature alteration aureole of the well-mapped El Salvador porphyry copper deposit suggests convective cooling of a permeable intrusion. The width of the low temperature (greenschist) aureole of the Mull intrusive complex can be explained by convective cooling of permeable intrusive rock. The narrow high temperature (amphibolite) aureole of the Cuillin gabbro on Skye can be explained by strong convective cooling; but the low temperature (greenschist) aureole is wide enough to be consistent with conductive cooling, thus suggesting decreasing permeabilities during the cooling history. This is consistent with oxygen isotope sampling and other geologic observations.

  7. Solvents and vapor intrusion pathways.

    PubMed

    Phillips, Scott D; Krieger, Gary R; Palmer, Robert B; Waksman, Javier C

    2004-08-01

    Vapor intrusion must be recognized appropriately as a separate pathway of contamination. Although many issues resemble those of other forms of contamination (particularly its entryway, which is similar to that of radon seepage), vapor intrusion stands apart as a unique risk requiring case-specific action. This article addresses these issues and the current understanding of the most appropriate and successful remedial actions.

  8. The petrogenesis of late Neoproterozoic mafic dyke-like intrusion in south Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azer, M. K.; Abu El-Ela, F. F.; Ren, M.

    2012-08-01

    New field, petrographical and geochemical studies are presented here for the late Neoproterozoic Rimm intrusion (˜15 km long) exposed in the southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt in the northernmost Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). Field relations indicate that the Rimm intrusion is younger than the surrounding metamorphic rocks and calc-alkaline syn-tectonic granodiorite and it was not affected by regional metamorphism. The anorogenic peralkaline granite of Gebel Serbal crosscuts the Rimm intrusion. The Rimm intrusion is made up of several consanguineous rock types with gradational contacts. It is composed chiefly of pyroxene-hornblende gabbro, hornblende gabbro and minor quartz diorite. The chemical composition of the mafic minerals indicated that the studied rocks derived from calc-alkaline mafic magma. Geochemically, the studied rocks are characterized by enrichment in LILE relative to HFSE and LREE relative to HREE [(Ce/Yb)N = 4.50-6.36]. Quartz diorite display slightly concave HREE pattern and slightly negative Eu-anomaly [(Eu/Eu*)n = 0.91] which may be the result of fractionation of amphibole and plagioclase from the source melt, respectively. The Rimm intrusion evolved from mafic mantle magma into different type rocks by fractional crystallization with minor crustal contamination. The initial magma corresponds to pyroxene-hornblende gabbro and the crystallization of hornblende was caused by slight H2O increase in magma after crystallization of near-liquidus clinopyroxene and Ca-rich plagioclase. Amphiboles geobarometer indicate that the gabbroic rocks of the Rimm intrusion crystallized at pressures between 4.8 and 6.4 Kb, while quartz diorite crystallized at 1.3-2.1 Kb. Crystallization temperatures range between 800 and 926 °C for the gabbros and between 667 and 784 °C for the quartz diorite. The Rimm intrusion represents a post-orogenic phase formed during the crustal thinning and extension of the Arabian-Nubian Shield.

  9. Episodic intrusion, internal differentiation, and hydrothermal alteration of the miocene tatoosh intrusive suite south of Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, E.A.; Bacon, C.R.; John, D.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Miocene Tatoosh intrusive suite south of Mount Rainier is composed of three broadly granodioritic plutons that are manifestations of ancestral Cascades arc magmatism. Tatoosh intrusive suite plutons have individually diagnostic characteristics, including texture, mineralogy, and geochemistry, and apparently lack internal contacts. New ion-microprobe U-Pb zircon ages indicate crystallization of the Stevens pluton ca. 19.2 Ma, Reflection-Pyramid pluton ca. 18.5 Ma, and Nisqually pluton ca. 17.5 Ma. The Stevens pluton includes rare, statistically distinct ca. 20.1 Ma zircon antecrysts. Wide-ranging zircon rare earth element (REE), Hf, U, and Th concentrations suggest late crystallization from variably evolved residual liquids. Zircon Eu/Eu*-Hf covariation is distinct for each of the Reflection-Pyramid, Nisqually, and Stevens plutons. Although most Tatoosh intrusive suite rocks have been affected by weak hydrothermal alteration, and sparse mineralized veins cut some of these rocks, significant base or precious metal mineralization is absent. At the time of shallow emplacement, each of these magma bodies was largely homogeneous in bulk composition and petrographic features, but, prior to final solidification, each of the Tatoosh intrusive suite plutons developed internal compositional variation. Geochemical and petrographic trends within each pluton are most consistent with differential loss of residual melt, possibly represented by late aplite dikes or erupted as rhyolite, from crystal-rich magma. Crystal-rich magma that formed each pluton evidently accumulated in reservoirs below the present level of exposure and then intruded to a shallow depth. Assembled by episodic intrusion, the Tatoosh intrusive suite may be representative of midsized composite plutonic complexes beneath arc volcanoes. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  10. Geologic and geophysical investigations of Climax stock intrusive, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    1983-12-31

    This document contains three parts of a survey of Climax stock intrusive, Nevada by the US Geological Survey. The first contains the results of a conventional survey of the site and an investigation of rock composition. The second contains the results of a gravity survey and the third contains the results of a magnetic aerial survey. Each of the three documents contains a separate abstract.

  11. Modal Composition and Age of Intrusions in North-Central and Northeast Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.; Crafford, A. Elizabeth Jones

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Data presented in this report characterize igneous intrusions of north-central and northeast Nevada and were compiled as part of the Metallogeny of the Great Basin project conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) between 2001 and 2007. The compilation pertains to the area bounded by lats 38.5 and 42 N., long 118.5 W., and the Nevada-Utah border (fig. 1). The area contains numerous large plutons and smaller stocks but also contains equally numerous smaller, shallowly emplaced intrusions, including dikes, sills, and endogenous dome complexes. Igneous intrusions (hereafter, intrusions) of multiple ages are major constituents of the geologic framework of north-central and northeast Nevada (Stewart and Carlson, 1978). Mesozoic and Cenozoic intrusions are particularly numerous and considered to be related to subduction along the west edge of the North American plate during this time. Henry and Ressel (2000) and Ressel and others (2000) have highlighted the association between magmatism and ore deposits along the Carlin trend. Similarly, Theodore (2000) has demonstrated the association between intrusions and ore deposits in the Battle Mountain area. Decades of geologic investigations in north-central and northeast Nevada (hereafter, the study area) demonstrate that most hydrothermal ore deposits are spatially, and probably temporally and genetically, associated with intrusions. Because of these associations, studies of many individual intrusions have been conducted, including those by a large number of Master's and Doctoral thesis students (particularly University of Nevada at Reno students and associated faculty), economic geologists working on behalf of exploration and mining companies, and USGS earth scientists. Although the volume of study area intrusions is large and many are associated with ore deposits, no synthesis of available data that characterize these rocks has been assembled. Compilations that have been produced for intrusions in Nevada

  12. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  13. Gas intrusion into SPR caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T.; Giles, H.N.

    1995-12-01

    The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

  14. Deformation structures associated with the Trachyte Mesa intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah: Implications for sill and laccolith emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Penelope I. R.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.; Wilson, Robert W.; Jarvis, Ian; Holdsworth, Robert E.

    2016-06-01

    Deformation structures in the wall rocks of igneous intrusions emplaced at shallow crustal depths preserve an important record of how space was created for magma in the host rocks. Trachyte Mesa, a small Oligocene age intrusion in the Henry Mountains, Utah, is composed of a series of stacked tabular, sheet-like intrusions emplaced at 3-3.5 km depth into sandstone-dominated sedimentary sequences of late Palaeozoic-Mesozoic age. New structural analysis of the spatial distribution, geometry, kinematics and relative timings of deformation structures in the host rocks of the intrusion has enabled the recognition of distinct pre-, syn-, and late-stage-emplacement deformation phases. Our observations suggest a two-stage growth mechanism for individual sheets where radial growth of a thin sheet was followed by vertical inflation. Dip-slip faults formed during vertical inflation; they are restricted to the tips of individual sheets due to strain localisation, with magma preferentially exploiting these faults, initiating sill (sheet) climbing. The order in which sheets are stacked impacts on the intrusion geometry and associated deformation of wall rocks. Our results offer new insights into the incremental intrusion geometries of shallow-level magmatic bodies and the potential impact of their emplacement on surrounding host rocks.

  15. Recent advances in vapor intrusion site investigations.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Thomas; Loll, Per; Eklund, Bart

    2017-02-22

    Our understanding of vapor intrusion has evolved rapidly since the discovery of the first high profile vapor intrusion sites in the late 1990s and early 2000s. Research efforts and field investigations have improved our understanding of vapor intrusion processes including the role of preferential pathways and natural barriers to vapor intrusion. This review paper addresses recent developments in the regulatory framework and conceptual model for vapor intrusion. In addition, a number of innovative investigation methods are discussed.

  16. Constraints on the formation of geochemically variable plagiogranite intrusions in the Troodos Ophiolite, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Sarah; Haase, Karsten M.; Keith, Manuel; Beier, Christoph; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2014-02-01

    The geochemistry and petrology of tonalitic to trondhjemitic samples ( n = 85) from eight different plagiogranite intrusions at the gabbro/sheeted dyke transition of the Troodos Ophiolite were studied in order to determine their petrogenetic relationship to the mafic plutonic section and the lava pile. The plagiogranitic rocks have higher SiO2 contents than the majority of the glasses of the Troodos lava pile, but lie on a continuation of the chemical trends defined by the extrusive rocks, indicating that the shallow intrusions generally represent crystallised magmas. We define three different groups of plagiogranites in the Troodos Ophiolite based on different incompatible element contents and ratios. The first and most common plagiogranite group has geochemical similarities to the tholeiitic lavas forming the lavas and sheeted dyke complex in the Troodos crust, implying that these magmas formed at a spreading axis. The second plagiogranite group occurs in one intrusion that is chemically related to late-stage and off-axis boninitic lavas and dykes. One intrusion next to the Arakapas fault zone consists of incompatible element-enriched plagiogranites which are unrelated to any known mafic crustal rocks. The similarities of incompatible element ratios between plagiogranites, lavas and mafic plutonic rocks, the continuous chemical trends defined by plagiogranites and mafic rocks, as well as incompatible element modelling results, all suggest that shallow fractional crystallisation is the dominant process responsible for formation of the felsic magmas.

  17. Fusion of arkosic sand by intrusive andesite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Roy A.

    1954-01-01

    An andesite dike in the Valles Mountains of northern New Mexico has intruded and partly fused arkosic sediments for a distance of 50 feet from its contacts. The dike is semi-circular in form, has a maximum width of about 100 feet, and is about 500 feet long. Small associated arcuate dikes are arranged in spiral fashion around the main dike, suggesting that they were intruded along shear fractures similar to those described by Burbank (1941). The fused rocks surrounding the andesite dike are of three general types: 1) partly fused arkosic sand, 2) fused clay, and 3) hybrid rocks. The fused arkosic sand consists of relict detrital grains of quartz, orthoclose, and plagioclase, imbedded in colorless glass containing microlites of tridymite, cordierite, and magnetite. The relict quartz grains are corroded and embayed by glass; the orthoclase is sanidinized and partly fused; and the plagioclase is inverted to the high temperature form and is partly fused. The fused clay, which was originally a mixture of montmorillonite and hydromica, consists primarily of cordierite but also contains needle-like crystals of sillimanite (?) or mullite (?). The hybrid rocks originated in part by intermixing of fused arkosic sediments and andesitic liquid and in part by diffusion of mafic constituents through the fused sediments. They are rich in cordierite and magnetite and also contain hypersthene, augite, and plagioclase. The composition of pigeonite in the andesite indicates that the temperature of the andesite at the time of intrusion probably did not exceed 1200?C. Samples of arkosic sand were fused in the presence of water in a Morey bomb at 1050?C. Stability relations of certain minerals in the fused sand suggest that fusion may have taken place at a lower temperature, however, and the fluxing action of volatiles from the andesite are thought to have made this possible.

  18. Geochemical constraints on the origin of the Permian Baimazhai mafic-ultramafic intrusion, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Christina Yan; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Keays, Reid R.

    2006-09-01

    The ˜260 Ma Baimazhai mafic-ultramafic intrusion is considered to be part of the Emeishan large igneous province and consists of orthopyroxenite surrounded by websterite and gabbro. The intrusion is variably mineralized with a massive sulfide ore body (˜20 vol.%) in the core of the intrusion. Silicate rocks have Ni/Cu ratios ranging from 0.3 to 46 with majority less than 7 and are rich in LREE relative to HREE and show Nb and Ta anomalies in primitive mantle-normalized trace element patterns, with low Nb/Th (1.0-4.5) and Nb/La (0.3-1.0) ratios. Their ɛ Nd( t) values range from -3.3 to -8.4. Uniform Pd/Pt (0.7-3.5) and Cu/Pd (100,000-400,000) ratios throughout the intrusion indicate that all the sulfides in the rocks were formed in a single sulfide-saturation event. Modeling suggests that the Baimazhai rocks were formed when an Mg-rich magma became crustally contaminated in a deep-seated staging chamber. Crustal contamination (up to ˜35%) drove the magma to S-saturation and forced orthopyroxene (Opx) onto the liquidus. The crystal-bearing magma forced out of the staging chamber was migrated by flow differentiation and consequently, the denser sulfide melt and the Opx crystals became centrally disposed in the flowing magma to form the Baimazhai intrusion.

  19. Petrogenesis of the Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide-bearing Tamarack Intrusive Complex, Midcontinent Rift System, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranovic, Valentina; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi; Rossell, Dean

    2015-01-01

    The Tamarack Intrusive Complex (TIC, 1105.6 ± 1.2 Ma) in NE Minnesota, was emplaced during the early stages of the development of the Midcontinent Rift System (MRS, "Early Stage": 1110-1106 Ma). Country rocks of the TIC are those of the Paleoproterozoic Thomson Formation, part of the Animikie Group including sulfide-bearing metasedimentary black shale. The magmatic system is composed of at least two principal mafic-ultramafic intrusive sequences: the sulfide-barren Bowl Intrusion in the south and the "dike" area intrusions in the north which host Ni-Cu-Platinum Group Elements (PGE) mineralization with up to 2.33% Ni, 1.24% Cu, 0.34 g/t Pt, 0.23 g/t Pd and 0.18 g/t Au. Two distinct intrusive units in the "dike" area are the CGO (coarse-grained olivine-bearing) Intrusion, a sub-vertical dike-like body, and the overlying sub-horizontal FGO (fine-grained olivine-bearing) Intrusion. Both intrusions comprise peridotite, feldspathic peridotite, feldspathic pyroxenite, melatroctolite and melagabbro. Massive sulfides are volumetrically minor and mainly occur as lenses emplaced into the country rocks associated with both intrusions. Semi-massive (net-textured) sulfides are distributed at the core of the CGO Intrusion, surrounded by a halo of the disseminated sulfides. Disseminated sulfides also occur in lenses along the base of the FGO Intrusion. Olivine compositions in the CGO Intrusion are between Fo89 and Fo82 and in the FGO Intrusion from Fo84 to Fo82. TIC intrusions have more primitive olivine compositions than that of olivine in the sheet-like intrusions in the Duluth Complex (below Fo70), as well as olivine from the smaller, conduit-related, Eagle and East Eagle Intrusions in Northern Michigan (Fo86 to Fo75). The FeO/MgO ratios of the CGO and FGO Intrusion parental magmas, inferred from olivine compositions, are similar to those of picritic basalts erupted during the early stages of the MRS formation. Trace element ratios differ slightly from other intrusions in the

  20. Final OSWER Vapor Intrusion Guidance

    EPA Science Inventory

    EPA is preparing to finalize its guidance on assessing and addressing vapor intrusion, which is defined as migration of volatile constituents from contaminated media in the subsurface (soil or groundwater) into the indoor environment. In November 2002, EPA issued draft guidance o...

  1. Pre-Elsonian mafic magmatism in the Nain Igneous Complex, Labrador: the bridges layered intrusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashwal, L.D.; Wiebe, R.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Whitehouse, M.J.; Snyder, Diane

    1992-01-01

    Decades of work on the pristine, unmetamorphosed, and well exposed anorthositic, mafic and granitic rocks of the Nain igneous complex, Labrador, have led to the conclusion that all plutonic rocks in that area were emplaced in a short time intercal at about 1300 ?? 10 Ma). We report here new isotopic data for mafic intrusive rocks that appear to have crystallized several hundred Ma earlier than the bulk of the plutonic activity in the Nain complex. The Bridges layered intrusion (BLI) is a small (15-20 km2) lens of layered mafic rocks about 1.5 km thick, surrounded and intruded by anorthositic, leuconoritic and leucotroctolitic plutons in the middle of the coastal section of the Nain igneous complex. BLI shows very well developed magmatic structures, including channel scours, slump structures, and ubiquitous modally graded layering. Most rocks, however, show granular textures indicative of recrystallization, presumably caused by emplacement of younger anorthositic rocks. BLI contains cumulate rocks with slightly more primitive mineral compositions (An60-83, Fo66-71) than those of other mafic intrusions in the Nain igneous complex, including Kiglapait. SmNd isotopic data for 7 BLI whole-rocks ranging in composition between olivine melagabbro and olivine leucogabbro yield an age of 1667 ?? 75 Ma, which we interpret as the time of primary crystallization. The internal isotopic systematics of the BLI have been reset, probably by intrusion of adjacent anorthositic plutons. A SmNd mineral isochron (plag, whole-rock, mafics) for a BLI olivine melagabbro gives an age of 1283 ?? 22 Ma, equivalent within error of a mineral array (plag, whole-rock, opx, cpx) for an adjacent, igneous-textured, leuconorite vein (1266 ?? 152 Ma). The initial Nd ratio for BLI corresponds to ??{lunate}Nd = -3.18 ?? 0.44. Other whole-rock samples, however, some with vein-like alteration (Chlorite, serpentine, amphiboles), show ??{lunate}Nd values as low as -9.1, suggesting variable contamination by

  2. Composite synvolcanic intrusions associated with Precambrian VMS-related hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galley, Alan G.

    2003-06-01

    Large subvolcanic intrusions are recognized within most Precambrian VMS camps. Of these, 80% are quartz diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite composite intrusions. The VMS camps spatially associated with composite intrusions account for >90% of the aggregate sulfide tonnage of all the Precambrian, intrusion-related VMS camps. These low-alumina, low-K, and high-Na composite intrusions contain early phases of quartz diorite and tonalite, followed by more voluminous trondhjemite. They have a high proportion of high silica (>74% SiO2) trondhjemite which is compositionally similar to the VMS-hosting rhyolites within the volcanic host-rock successions. The quartz-diorite and possibly tonalite phases follow tholeiitic fractionation trends whereas the trondhjemites fall within the composition field for primitive crustal melts. These transitional M-I-type primitive intrusive suites are associated with extensional regimes within oceanic-arc environments. Subvolcanic composite intrusions related to the Archean Sturgeon Lake and Noranda, and Paleoproterozoic Snow Lake VMS camps range in volume from 300 to 1,000 km3. Three have a sill morphology with strike lengths between 15 and 22 km and an average thickness between 1,500 and 2,000 m. The fourth has a gross stock-like shape. The VMS deposits are principally restricted to the volcanic strata above the strike length of the intrusions, as are areally extensive, thin exhalite units. The composite intrusions contain numerous internal phases which are commonly clustered within certain parts of the composite intrusion. These clusters underlie eruptive centers surrounded by areas of hydrothermal alteration and which contain most of the VMS deposits. Early quartz-diorite and tonalite phases appear to have intruded in rapid succession. Evidence includes gradational contacts, magma mixing and disequilibrium textures. They appear to have been emplaced as sill-dike swarms. These early phases are present as pendants and xenoliths within later

  3. Aeromagnetic and radio echo ice-sounding measurements over the Dufek intrusion, Antarctica.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.; Drewry, D.J.; Jankowski, E.; Grim, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons of the magnetic and subglacial topographic profiles illustrate the usefulness of this combination of methods in studying bedrock geology beneath ice-covered areas. Rocks are exposed in only 3% of the inferred area of the intrusion.-from Authors

  4. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  5. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  6. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  7. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?"…

  8. Geologic and geophysical investigations of Climax Stock intrusive, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    ,

    1983-01-01

    The Climax stock is a composite granitic intrusive of Cretaceous age, composed of quartz monzonite and granodiorite, which intrudes rocks of Paleozoic and Precambrian age. Tertiary volcanic rocks, consisting of ashflow and ash-fall tuffs, and tuffaceous sedimentary rocks overlie the sedimentary rocks and the stock. Erosion has removed much of the Tertiary volcanic rocks. Hydrothermal alteration of quartz monzonite and granodiorite is found mainly along joints and faults and varies from location to location. The Paleozoic carbonate rocks have been thermally and metasomatically altered to marble and tactite as much as 457 m (1,500 ft) from the contact with the stock, although minor discontinuous metasomatic effects are noted in all rocks out to 914 m (3,000 ft). Three major faults which define the Climax area structurally are the Tippinip, Boundary and Yucca faults. North of the junction of the Boundary and Yucca faults, the faults are collectively referred to as the Butte fault. The dominant joint sets and their average attitudes are N. 32? W., 22? NE; N. 60? W., vertical and N. 35? E., vertical. Joints in outcrop are weathered and generally open, but in subsurface, the joints are commonly filled and healed with secondary mineral s. The location of the water table and the degree of saturation of the granitic rocks are presently unknown. Measurement from drill holes indicated that depth to perched water levels ranges from 30 to 244 m (100-800 ft). Recent field investigations have shown the contact between the Pogonip marble and the granodiorite is a contact rather than a fault as previously mapped. The thickness of the weathered granodiorite is estimated to be 8 to 46 m (25 to 150 ft).

  9. 'Escher' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Chemical Changes in 'Endurance' Rocks

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Figure 1

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock dubbed 'Escher' on the southwestern slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists believe the rock's fractures, which divide the surface into polygons, may have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Opportunity has spent the last 14 sols investigating Escher, specifically the target dubbed 'Kirchner,' and other similar rocks with its scientific instruments. This image was taken on sol 208 (Aug. 24, 2004) by the rover's panoramic camera, using the 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

    The graph above shows that rocks located deeper into 'Endurance Crater' are chemically altered to a greater degree than rocks located higher up. This chemical alteration is believed to result from exposure to water.

    Specifically, the graph compares ratios of chemicals between the deep rock dubbed 'Escher,' and the more shallow rock called 'Virginia,' before (red and blue lines) and after (green line) the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity drilled into the rocks. As the red and blue lines indicate, Escher's levels of chlorine relative to Virginia's went up, and sulfur down, before the rover dug a hole into the rocks. This implies that the surface of Escher has been chemically altered to a greater extent than the surface of Virginia. Scientists are still investigating the role water played in influencing this trend.

    These data were taken by the rover's alpha particle X-ray spectrometer.

  10. 'Earhart' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock informally named 'Earhart' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the pilot Amelia Earhart. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe fractures in Earhart could have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Rover team members do not have plans to investigate Earhart in detail because it is located across potentially hazardous sandy terrain. This image was taken on sol 219 (Sept. 4) by the rover's panoramic camera, using its 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  11. Platinum-group element geochemistry of zoned ultramafic intrusive suites, Klamath Mountains, California and Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, F.; Page, N.J.; Carlson, C.A.; Wilson, S.A.; Carlson, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    Analyses for platinum-group elements of the varied rock suites of three Alaskan-type ultramafic to mafic multi-intrusive bodies are reported. Ir and Ru are less than analytical sensitivities of 100 and 20 ppb; Rh is less than or near 1 ppb. Average Pd assays vary among the rocks within intrusive complexes and between the three complexes (6.3, 13.7, 36.4 ppb); average Pt assays vary little among the same samples (27.9, 60.9, 34.0 ppb). Statistically adjusted Pt/(Pt + Pd) ratios increase in each suite from gabbro through clinopyroxenite to olivine-rich rocks, possibly owing to Pd fractionation.-G.J.N.

  12. Triggers on sulfide saturation in Fe-Ti oxide-bearing, mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions in the Tarim large igneous province, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jun; Wang, Christina Yan; Xu, Yi-Gang; Xing, Chang-Ming; Ren, Ming-Hao

    2016-08-01

    Three Fe-Ti oxide-bearing layered intrusions (Mazaertag, Wajilitag, and Piqiang) in the Tarim large igneous province (NW China) have been investigated for understanding the relationship of sulfide saturation, Platinum-group element (PGE) enrichment, and Fe-Ti oxide accumulation in layered intrusions. These mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions have low PGE concentrations (<0.4 ppb Os, <0.7 ppb Ir, <1 ppb Ru, <0.2 ppb Rh, <5 ppb Pt, and <8 ppb Pd) and elevated Cu/Pd (2.2 × 104 to 3.3 × 106). The low PGE concentrations of the rocks are mainly attributed to PGE-depleted, parental magma that was produced by low degrees of partial melting of the mantle. The least contaminated rocks of the Mazaertag and Wajilitag intrusions have slightly enriched Os isotopic compositions with γOs(t = 280 Ma) values ranging from +13 to +23, indicating that the primitive magma may have been generated from a convecting mantle, without appreciable input of lithospheric mantle. The Mazaertag and Wajilitag intrusions have near-chondritic γOs(t) values (+13 to +60) against restricted ɛ Nd(t) values (-0.4 to +2.8), indicating insignificant crustal contamination. Rocks of the Piqiang intrusion have relatively low ɛ Nd(t) values of -3.1 to +1.0, consistent with ˜15 to 25 % assimilation of the upper crust. The rocks of the Mazaertag and Wajilitag intrusions have positive correlation of PGE and S, pointing to the control of PGE by sulfide. Poor correlation of PGE and S for the Piqiang intrusion is attributed to the involvement of multiple sulfide-stage liquids with different PGE compositions or sulfide-oxide reequilibration on cooling. These three layered intrusions have little potential of reef-type PGE mineralization. Four criteria are summarized in this study to help discriminate between PGE-mineralized and PGE-unmineralized mafic-ultramafic intrusions.

  13. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  14. Late Eocene-Oligocene post-collisional monzonitic intrusions from the Alborz magmatic belt, NW Iran. An example of monzonite magma generation from a metasomatized mantle source

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Antonio; Aghazadeh, Mehraj; Badrzadeh, Zahra; Chichorro, Martim

    2013-11-01

    A potassic magmatic association in the Zagros hinterland of the Tethyan orogen in Iran is identified and characterized for relevant geochronologic and petrologic features. New data, including a combination of field relations, U-Pb zircon geochronology and rock geochemistry, come from seven plutons (Khankandi, Shaivar-Dagh, Yuseflu, Mizan, Saheb-Divan, Roudbar and Abhar) that form the Arasbaran-Taroum batholith (ATB), which forms part of the Alborz magmatic belt (AMB) of NW Iran. Zircon SHRIMP ages range from 38.32 ± 0.17 Ma, 38.94 ± 0.42 Ma and 37.78 ± 0.28 Ma for magma pulses of the Abhar pluton, at the East of the batholith, to 24.51 ± 0.27 Ma and 23.55 ± 0.47 Ma for pulses of the Mizan pluton at the West. Considering these ages and the previously published ones together, emplacement of the batholith took place during Late Eocene and Oligocene, from 38 to 23 Ma, with an age progression from SE to NW at a rate of 2 cm/year. The whole batholith is characterized by potassic rocks with K2O > 2 wt.% in gabbros and diorites (SiO2 < 50 wt.%). Higher contents of K2O, of up to > 6 wt.%, are normally found in rocks with intermediate silica contents of about 60 wt.% SiO2. These intermediate silica rocks are truly monzonites and are the most abundant in each pluton. With regard to trace elements, the monzonitic rocks of the ATB show some of the typical signatures of arc magmatism (depletion in Nb and Ti). Most samples contain moderate contents of Sr (500-800 ppm), close to similar potassic magmas forming Cenozoic complexes in Central Iran. The relatively moderate Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios suggest that ATB magmas retain some adakitic signatures from the source region. Geochemical modeling is performed by using melt compositions and phase relations calculated with MELTS software, combined with experimental data and trace element signatures. We conclude that monzonitic and shoshonitic magmas of some plutons of the ATB (Shaivar-Dagh, Kahnkandi and Yuseflu) have an adakitic

  15. Linking magnetic fabric and cumulate texture in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O Driscoll, B.; Stevenson, C.; Magee, C.

    2013-12-01

    Research on the magnetic fabrics of igneous rocks, pioneered by Balsley and Buddington[1] and Khan[2], has greatly contributed to our understanding of magma dynamics in lava flows, sheet intrusions and plutons over the past five decades. However, considerably few magnetic fabric studies have focused on layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions, particularly ';lopolithic' intrusions, despite the fact that such rocks may preserve a large range of small-scale kinematic structures potentially related to important magma chamber processes. This may be partly due to the fact that mafic-ultramafic cumulates commonly exhibit visible planar fabrics (mineral lamination), as well as compositional layering, in contrast to the frequent absence of such features in granite bodies or fine-grained mafic lava flows. Indeed, debates in the 1970s and 1980s on the development of layering and mineral fabrics in mafic-ultramafic intrusions, focused around the crystal settling versus in situ crystallisation paradigms, are classic in the subject of igneous petrology. Central to these debates is the notion that a wide range of magma chamber processes occur in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions that are not frequently considered to occur in their relatively viscous granitic counterparts; in essence, the latter have historically been viewed as much more likely to ';freeze-in' a primary magma flow fabric whilst mafic-ultramafic intrusions are subjected to a more protracted solidification history. This wide array of potential initial sources for layering and mineral fabrics in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions, together with the possible modification of textures at the postcumulus stage, demands a cautious application of any fabric analysis and presents a problem well-suited to interrogation by the AMS technique. The purpose of this contribution is to provide specific context on the application of AMS to elucidating the formation of cumulates in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions. Examples of AMS

  16. An international perspective on Facebook intrusion.

    PubMed

    Błachnio, Agata; Przepiorka, Aneta; Benvenuti, Martina; Cannata, Davide; Ciobanu, Adela Magdalena; Senol-Durak, Emre; Durak, Mithat; Giannakos, Michail N; Mazzoni, Elvis; Pappas, Ilias O; Popa, Camelia; Seidman, Gwendolyn; Yu, Shu; Wu, Anise M S; Ben-Ezra, Menachem

    2016-08-30

    Facebook has become one of the most popular social networking websites in the world. The main aim of the study was to present an international comparison of Facebook intrusion and Internet penetration while examining possible gender differences. The study consisted of 2589 participants from eight countries: China, Greece, Israel, Italy, Poland, Romania, Turkey, USA. Facebook intrusion and Internet penetration were taken into consideration. In this study the relationship between Facebook intrusion and Internet penetration was demonstrated. Facebook intrusion was slightly negatively related to Internet penetration in each country.

  17. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  18. Deformation coupling between the Archean Pukaskwa intrusive complex and the Hemlo shear zone, Superior Province, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liodas, Nathaniel T.; Gébelin, Aude; Ferré, Eric C.; Misgna, Girmay M.

    2013-11-01

    Archean greenstone belts typically form narrow sheared basins separating bulbous tonalo-trondjhemo-granodioritic (TTG) intrusive complexes. The role played by gravity in the development of such dome-and-keel structures constitutes a key question in Archean tectonics. The Pukaskwa intrusive complex (PIC)-Hemlo greenstone belt system stands as a remarkable example of the dome-and-keel architecture that commonly occurs in Archean terrains. Abundant strain markers in the greenstone belt and in the Hemlo shear zone (HSZ) attest of late sinistral strike-slip kinematics (D2) whereas, in general, the quartzofeldspathic coarse-grained rocks of the Pukaskwa intrusive complex bear little macroscopically visible kinematic indicators, most likely due to pervasive recrystallization. The PIC consists dominantly of a heterogeneous assemblage of TTG plutonic rocks and gneisses, which overall are less dense than the greenstone rocks. The study of anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (AMS), based on 120 stations and 1947 specimens from the PIC, reveals east-west trending prolate and plano-linear fabrics across the northern margin of the complex, i.e., along the HSZ. Since geotherms were higher in the Archean than in the present, the effective viscosity of the TTG units would have been sufficiently low to allow their diapiric ascent through denser greenstone rocks. Here we propose an alternative model where thrust tectonics is responsible for the early structuration of the PIC. Later transpressive tectonics causes strain localization along internal strike-slip shear zones and along lithological boundaries.

  19. Opportunity Rocks!

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This high-resolution image captured by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's panoramic camera shows in superb detail a portion of the puzzling rock outcropping that scientists are eagerly planning to investigate. Presently, Opportunity is on its lander facing northeast; the outcropping lies to the northwest. These layered rocks measure only 10 centimeters (4 inches) tall and are thought to be either volcanic ash deposits or sediments carried by water or wind. The small rock in the center is about the size of a golf ball.

  20. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    27 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in northern Terby Crater. Terby is located along the north edge of Hellas Planitia. The sedimentary rocks might have been deposited in a greater, Hellas-filling sea -- or not. Today, the rocks are partly covered by dark-toned sediment and debris.

    Location near: 27.2oS, 285.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  1. Non-intrusive speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L.

    1986-01-01

    In Phase I of the Non-Intrusive Speed Sensor program, a computerized literature search was performed to identify candidate technologies for remote, non-intrusive speed sensing applications in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. The three most promising technologies were subjected to experimental evaluation to quantify their performance characteristics under the harsh environmental requirements within the turbopumps. Although the infrared and microwave approaches demonstrated excellent cavitation immunity in laboratory tests, the variable-source magnetic speed sensor emerged as the most viable approach. Preliminary design of this speed sensor encountered no technical obstacles and resulted in viable and feasible speed nut, sensor housing, and sensor coil designs. Phase II of this program developed the variable-source magnetic speed sensor through the detailed design task and guided the design into breadboard fabrication. The speed sensor and its integral speed nut were evaluated at both unit and system level testing. The final room-temperature and cryogenic spin testing of the hardware demonstrated that the sensor was capable of generating sufficient output signal to enable remote speed sensing from 1500 to 40000 rpm over a speed nut/sensor separation of 3.5 inches.

  2. Intrusive Images in Psychological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brewin, Chris R.; Gregory, James D.; Lipton, Michelle; Burgess, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Involuntary images and visual memories are prominent in many types of psychopathology. Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder, other anxiety disorders, depression, eating disorders, and psychosis frequently report repeated visual intrusions corresponding to a small number of real or imaginary events, usually extremely vivid, detailed, and with highly distressing content. Both memory and imagery appear to rely on common networks involving medial prefrontal regions, posterior regions in the medial and lateral parietal cortices, the lateral temporal cortex, and the medial temporal lobe. Evidence from cognitive psychology and neuroscience implies distinct neural bases to abstract, flexible, contextualized representations (C-reps) and to inflexible, sensory-bound representations (S-reps). We revise our previous dual representation theory of posttraumatic stress disorder to place it within a neural systems model of healthy memory and imagery. The revised model is used to explain how the different types of distressing visual intrusions associated with clinical disorders arise, in terms of the need for correct interaction between the neural systems supporting S-reps and C-reps via visuospatial working memory. Finally, we discuss the treatment implications of the new model and relate it to existing forms of psychological therapy. PMID:20063969

  3. A new interpretation of the structure of the Sept Iles Intrusive suite, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Higgins, Michael D.

    2005-08-01

    chamber, indicating lateral transport of magma. Chemically distinct syenites in the upper part of the intrusion are part of the Point du Criade intrusion, a large, late composite sill. Diabase and leucogabbro components show a close link with the SIMI and all the acidic magmas may have originally formed by differentiation of the main magma in cupolas towards the centre of the intrusion. A series of late gabbro intrusions that cut the SIMI may represent a rejuvenation of magmatism. The Border zone is a mass of fine-grained rocks that occurs along the border of the SIMI: it may be another magmatic component, or just the lateral border series of the SIMI.

  4. Structural consequences of the emplacement of Ubehebe Peak Intrusion, Death Valley, California

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Müller, Th.; Michel, J.; Baumgartner, L. P.; Passchier, C. W.

    2003-04-01

    The quartz-monzonitic Ubehebe Peak Intrusion is located in Death Valley National Park, California (USA). It belongs to a series of alcalic intrusions, which formed the Hunter Mountain Batholith. The emplacement of the intrusion took place at 173±1 Ma (D2) into a sequence of Palaeozoic carbonates. It intruded at ˜1,5 kbar and produced 675^oC at the contact. Interpretation of deformation is complicated by pre-existing structures and the occurrence of syn-intrusive deformation. The pre-intrusive permian to triassic compressional event of the Sonoma orogeny formed a SW dipping thrust-sheet-system (D1). Deformation in the area is heterogeneous, but D1 related strain clearly increases towards the west, where a foliation is formed in carbonates. Ductile deformation in the west is characterized by mylonites with sinistral movement accompanied by SSW-vergent folds. Lineations plunge 40 degrees, indicating top towards SSE movements. The dip of the fold-axes in the east are 100/60, while in the west they dip with more than 80 degrees towards SSW, and are overturned in places. Syn-intrusive deformation (D2) affected host rocks proximal to the intrusion (˜800m). No new foliation is recognized. It led to a preferred orientation of c-axes of recristallized carbonates and folding of the pre-existing D1 fold-axes. The axial planes of folds outside the contact zone strike N-S, while closer towards the intrusion, fold hinges are deflected towards the edges of the intrusion. In the west they are deflected towards SW and in the east towards SE respectively. South of the intrusion a kilometre scale fold hinge was bend anticlockwise about 90 degrees, to strike E-W. It is now aligned between the Hunter Mountain main mass and its satellite, the Ubehebe Peak Intrusion. Tremolite in the metamorphic aureole locally defines a lineation in the D1 foliation. We interpret this to show that growth was controlled by the pre-existing foliation. Neither tremolite nor delicate tabular forsterite

  5. Enhanced rock discrimination using Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blodget, H. W.; Andre, C. G.; Marcell, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The application of TM data to rock discrimination is discussed. Sixteen specific terrains derived from geologic maps are examined on TM images of the Arabian shield obtained on Apr. 14, 1984; visual enhancement procedures are applied to the images. The rock types observed in the test site are described; the major sedimentary formations in the test area are laterite and sandstone. The data reveal that the layered rocks in the outcrop consist of a variety of metamorphosed volcanics, metamorphosed sediments, and amphibolite, and the intrusive complex is composed of several classes of mafic and acidic rocks.

  6. Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This false color composite image of the Rock Garden shows the rocks 'Shark' and 'Half Dome' at upper left and middle, respectively. Between these two large rocks is a smaller rock (about 0.20 m wide, 0.10 m high, and 6.33 m from the Lander) that was observed close-up with the Sojourner rover (see PIA00989).

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  7. The Torres del Paine intrusion as a model for a shallow magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Lukas; Bodner, Robert; Leuthold, Julien; Muntener, Othmar; Putlitz, Benita; Vennemann, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    The shallow magmatic Torres del Paine Intrusive Complex (TPIC) belongs to a series of sub-volcanic and plutonic igneous bodies in Southern Chile and Argentina. This trench-parallel belt is located in a transitional position between the Patagonia Batholith in the West, and the alkaline Cenozoic plateau lavas in the East. While volumetrically small amounts of magmatism started around 28 my ago in the Torres del Paine area, and a second period occurred between 17-16 Ma, it peaked with the TPIC 12.59-12.43 Ma ago. The spectacular cliffs of the Torres del Paine National park provide a unique opportunity to study the evolution of a very shallow magma chamber and the interaction with its host rocks. Intrusion depth can be estimated based on contact metamorphic assemblages and granite solidus thermobarometry to 750±250 bars, corresponding to an intrusion depth of ca. 3km, ca. 500m above the base of the intrusion. Hornblende thermobarometry in mafic rocks agrees well with these estimates (Leuthold et al., 2014). The TPIC is composed of a granitic laccolith emplaced over 90ka (Michel et al., 2008) in 3 major, several 100m thick sheets, forming an overall thickness of nearly 2 km. Contacts are sharp between sheets, with the oldest sheet on the top and the youngest on the bottom (Michel et al., 2008). The granitic laccolith is under-plated by a ca. 400m thick mafic laccolith, built up over ca. 50ka (Leuthold et al. 2012), constructed from the bottom up. Granitic and mafic sheets are themselves composed of multiple metric to decametric pulses, mostly with ductile contacts between them, resulting in outcrop patterns resembling braided stream sediments. The contact of the TPIC with the Cretaceous flysch sediments document intrusion mechanism. Pre-existing sub-horizontal fold axes are rotated in the roof of the TPIC, clearly demonstrating ballooning of the roof; no ballooning was observed in the footwall of the intrusion. Extension during ballooning of the roof is indicated by

  8. Legal Vs. Psychological Aspects of Intrusiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Virginia L.

    Court decisions stressing the rights of mental patients have necessitated a radical revision in the management of behavioral treatment programs. The client's rights to the least intrusive procedures to achieve treatment goals have become important in case law. Factors which identify intrusiveness include: (1) the extent to which the "new…

  9. A Teacher's Checklist for Evaluating Treatment Intrusiveness

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carter, Stacy L.; Mayton, Michael R.; Wheeler, John J.

    2011-01-01

    Teachers are frequently involved in developing and evaluating treatments for problematic behaviors. Along with other members of the interdisciplinary team, they must determine the level of intrusiveness that a treatment may have on a student. Several factors that influence the intrusiveness of treatment procedures are described. These factors were…

  10. Vapour Intrusion into Buildings - A Literature Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides a review of recent research on vapour intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings. The chapter builds on a report from Tillman and Weaver (2005) which reviewed the literature on vapour intrusion through 2005. Firstly, the term ‘vapour intru...

  11. The fate of mafic and ultramafic intrusions in the continental crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roman, Alberto; Jaupart, Claude

    2016-11-01

    Geochemical and petrological data indicate that the bulk continental crust results from the fractionation of basaltic magmas followed by the foundering of residual mafic cumulates. Structural and geological evidence for foundering has been elusive and it is argued that it lies in the shapes of mafic intrusions that have been preserved in the crust. Numerical calculations of visco-elasto-plastic deformation induced by a dense intrusive body in continental crust have been carried out for a wide range of physical conditions. Three regimes are defined on the basis of the amount of dense material that remains at the original emplacement level as well as on the shape of the residual body. With strong encasing rocks, the intrusion deforms weakly in a sagging regime characterized by downwarping of the floor. At the other extreme, the intrusion sinks through weak surroundings, leaving behind a very small volume of material. In an intermediate regime, the intrusion does not sink wholesale and undergoes a dramatic change of shape. A residual body is preserved with a shape that depends on the aspect ratio of the initial intrusion. For aspect ratios of order one, the residual body is funnel-shaped above a thin and deep vertical extension. For the small aspect ratios that typify large igneous complexes such as the Bushveld, South Africa, the residual body is characterized by thick peripheral lobes with inward-dipping igneous layers and a thinner central area that has lost some of the basal cumulates. The transitions between these regimes depend on the rheology and temperature of encasing rocks.

  12. Petrogenesis and tectonic implications of the Triassic volcanic rocks in the northern Yidun Terrane, Eastern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Bai-Qiu; Zhou, Mei-Fu; Chen, Wei Terry; Gao, Jian-Feng; Yan, Dan-Ping

    2013-08-01

    Triassic Paleo-Tethyan subduction-related volcanic rocks are extensively distributed in the Xiangcheng and Changtai regions, northern Yidun Terrane, eastern Tibet. The ~ 228 Ma volcanic rocks in the Xiangcheng region have intermediate-felsic composition (60.1 to 64.7 wt.% SiO2) with relatively low Y (14-18 ppm) and high Sr (630-1830 ppm) yielding high Sr/Y ratios (43-94). They have LREE-enriched and HREE-depleted REE patterns (La/Yb = 19-26), typical of adakites. Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of these volcanic rocks are similar to those of the contemporaneous high silica adakitic rocks in the southern Yidun Terrane. The ~ 231-230 Ma volcanic rocks in the Changtai region are composed of basalts, andesites, dacites and rhyolites with SiO2 ranging from 47.7 to 81.0 wt.%. Basalts in the Changtai region have initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7052 to 0.7058 and εNd(t) from + 1.1 to + 1.5. They display OIB-like geochemical signatures, and were likely derived from low degrees of partial melting of an OIB-like mantle source with subordinate input of subduction components indicated by increasing Th content. Andesites and dacites show elemental and isotopic compositions that evolved from the basalts, indicative of derivation via crustal contamination and fractional crystallization (AFC) of basaltic magmas. Rhyolites have lower initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios and higher εNd(t) values than andesites/dacites, inconsistent with an AFC process and, are suggested to have been derived from anatexis of crustal materials. Emplacement of volcanic rocks in the Changtai and Xiangcheng regions could be attributed to the subduction of the Ganzi-Litang Ocean, a branch of the Paleo-Tethys Ocean. Volcanic rocks in the Changtai and Xiangchang regions have zircon U-Pb ages about 4-6 myr older than that of arc granites in the eastern Yidun Terrane. The spatio-temporal distribution of the volcanic rocks indicates that the subduction was initiated under the southern Yidun Terrane in the Middle Triassic and

  13. Petrogenesis of the Pt-Pd mineralized Jinbaoshan ultramafic intrusion in the Permian Emeishan Large Igneous Province, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yan; Li, Chusi; Hu, Ruizhong; Ripley, Edward M.; Du, Andao; Zhong, Hong

    2007-03-01

    The Jinbaoshan ultramafic intrusion is a sheet-like body with a thick wehrlite unit in the center and thin pyroxenite units at the margins. PGE are enriched in several disseminated sulfide zones in the intrusion. Olivine from the intrusion has low Fo and depleted Ni contents compared to olivine from coeval Emeishan picrites. Whole rock major and trace element concentrations suggest that the Jinbaoshan wehrlites originally contained <30% trapped liquid. The total amount of sulfide in the rocks exceeds that which could have been dissolved in the trapped liquid. The Jinbaoshan wehrlites are interpreted to represent residual assemblages formed by dissolution of plagioclase by passing magma. No clear evidence of crustal contamination is indicated by S, Nd and Os isotopes. We envision that sulfide saturation occurred at depth due to olivine and chromite crystallization. Immiscible sulfide droplets were transported to the Jinbaoshan conduit where they accumulated and reacted with magma successively passing through the conduit to achieve high PGE concentrations.

  14. Timescale for Incremental Construction of the Silurian Vinalhaven Intrusive Complex, Coastal Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hawkins, D. P.; Wiebe, R. A.

    2004-12-01

    U-Pb dates with Pb-Pb dates ranging from 1465 to 460 Ma. These ages extend well beyond the ages of the exposed country rocks, and the inherited zircon crystals were probably derived from the crust beneath the intrusion. In contrast, inherited zircon is less common in the three samples of cg granite and the dates they yield are no older than 427 Ma, well within the age range of the exposed country rocks. Moreover, two zircon crystals from the youngest granite overlap in age (weighted mean 421.3 Ma) with the samples from the lower portion of intrusion. Although these inheritance patterns may reflect sampling bias, we think it is more likely that they reflect magmatic processes during pluton growth. If so, we suggest two implications. First, we see field evidence that fg silicic dikes (silicic replenishments) disrupt crystal mush as they intrude. Thus, a recently replenished chamber contains zircon crystals remobilized from older granite mush within the intrusion. If such grains erupted, they would yield unrealistically long residence times. Second, if fresh inputs of magma that replenish a chamber carry inherited zircon, then granite mush accumulating below that chamber could preserve a `layer' of cg granite that is relatively enriched in inherited zircon. Such layers could be used as stratigraphic markers of successive silicic replenishment events in the solidified pluton.

  15. Intrusion detection using secure signatures

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Trent Darnel; Haile, Jedediah

    2014-09-30

    A method and device for intrusion detection using secure signatures comprising capturing network data. A search hash value, value employing at least one one-way function, is generated from the captured network data using a first hash function. The presence of a search hash value match in a secure signature table comprising search hash values and an encrypted rule is determined. After determining a search hash value match, a decryption key is generated from the captured network data using a second hash function, a hash function different form the first hash function. One or more of the encrypted rules of the secure signatures table having a hash value equal to the generated search hash value are then decrypted using the generated decryption key. The one or more decrypted secure signature rules are then processed for a match and one or more user notifications are deployed if a match is identified.

  16. Geophysical Survey and Detailed Geologic Mapping of an Eroded Stratovolcano's Central Intrusive Complex, Summer Coon, Co.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, A.

    2015-12-01

    Eroded volcanoes expose plumbing systems that provide important information on intrusive geometries, magma propagation directions, and the effects of host rock types and heterogeneities. Summer Coon Volcano, CO, is an Oligocene stratovolcano where erosion has removed much of the original edifice, revealing the intrusive stocks of the central intrusive complex (CIC). Surrounding the CIC are hundreds of radial dikes ranging from basaltic to rhyolitic in composition. Published geologic maps indicate most radial dikes do not connect to the intrusive stocks, supporting published theories that most did not emanate from the central intrusions. However, much of the area surrounding the CIC is covered by alluvium, suggesting that the lack of connection might be an artifact of exposure. We completed a ground magnetic survey and detailed geological mapping to determine if the dikes continue beneath the alluvium and into the intrusive stocks. Linear magnetic anomalies indicate four NW-SE trending rhyodacite dikes continue beneath the alluvium for up to 250 m, and mapping indicates that at least two of the rhyodacite dikes do extend into the CIC. Shorter linear anomalies are attributed to seven NW-SE trending basaltic dikes ~100-500-m-long which are sparsely exposed in the alluvium. Mapping shows that three rhyodacite dikes extend into the CIC and to within 200 m of their possible source, an 800-m-wide granodiorite stock. Additionally, three rhyolitic dikes extend to within several meters of a 200×500-m-wide tuff breccia zone of similar composition, likely their source. In summary, magnetic data and detailed mapping indicate that radial dikes do extend into the central intrusive complex in contrast to some model predictions.

  17. Evaluation of geologic materials to limit biological intrusion into low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hakonson, T.E.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes the results of a three-year research program to evaluate the performance of selected soil and rock trench cap designs in limiting biological intrusion into simulated waste. The report is divided into three sections including a discussion of background material on biological interactions with waste site trench caps, a presentation of experimental data from field studies conducted at several scales, and a final section on the interpretation and limitations of the data including implications for the user.

  18. 'Wopmay' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This approximate true-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows an unusual, lumpy rock informally named 'Wopmay' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the Canadian bush pilot Wilfrid Reid 'Wop' May. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe the lumps in Wopmay may be related to cracking and alteration processes, possibly caused by exposure to water. The area between intersecting sets of cracks eroded in a way that created the lumpy appearance. Rover team members plan to drive Opportunity over to Wopmay for a closer look in coming sols. This image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 248 (Oct. 4, 2004), using its 750-, 530- and 480-nanometer filters.

  19. Zircon U-Pb age, Lu-Hf isotope, mineral chemistry and geochemistry of Sundamalai peralkaline pluton from the Salem Block, southern India: Implications for Cryogenian adakite-like magmatism in an aborted-rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renjith, M. L.; Santosh, M.; Li, Tang; Satyanarayanan, M.; Korakoppa, M. M.; Tsunogae, T.; Subba Rao, D. V.; Kesav Krishna, A.; Nirmal Charan, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Sundamalai peralkaline pluton is one among the Cryogenian alkaline plutons occurring in the Dharmapuri Rift Zone (DRZ) of the Salem Block in the Southern Granulite Terrane (SGT) of India. Here we present zircon U-Pb age and Lu-Hf isotopic composition, mineral chemistry and geochemistry of the pluton to explore the petrogenesis and geodynamic implications. Systematic modal variation of orthoclase, Na-plagioclase, Ca-amphibole (ferro-edenite and hastingsite) and quartz developed quartz-monzonite and granite litho units in the Sundamalai pluton. Thermometry based on amphibole-plagioclase pair suggests that the pluton was emplaced and solidified at around 4.6 kbar pressure with crystallization of the major phases between 748 and 661 °C. Estimated saturation temperature of zircon (712-698 °C) is also well within this range. However, apatite saturation occurred at higher temperatures between 835 and 870 °C, in contrast with monazite saturation (718-613 °C) that continued up to the late stage of crystallization. Estimated oxygen fugacity values (log fO2: -14 to -17) indicate high oxidation state for the magma that stabilized titanite and magnetite. The magmatic zircons from Sundamalai pluton yielded a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 832.6 ± 3.2 Ma. Geochemically, the Sundamalai rocks are high-K to shoshonitic, persodic (Na2O/K2O ratio > 1), silica-saturated (SiO2:65-72 wt.%), and peralkaline in composition (aluminum saturation index, ASI < 1; Alkalinity index, AI < 0). The initial magma was mildly metaluminous which evolved to strongly peralkaline as result of fractional crystallization (plagioclase effect) controlled differentiation between quartz-monzonite and granite. Both rock types have high content of Na2O (5.1-6.3 wt.%), Ba (350-2589 ppm) and Sr (264-1036 ppm); low content of Y (8.7-17 ppm) and Yb (0.96-1.69 ppm); elevated ratios of La/Yb (11-46) and Sr/Y (46-69) and are depleted in Ti, with a positive Sr anomaly suggesting an adakite-like composition and

  20. Field Observation of Joint Structures in Various Types of Igneous Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Shingo; Tsuchiya, Noriyoshi

    2006-05-01

    In this study, field observations of natural fracture network systems in some intrusive and extrusive rocks were undertaken, to clarify the fracturing mechanism in the rocks. Shallow intrusives, whose depth of emplacement was less than several hundred metres, include the Momo-iwa Dacite dome on Rebun Island (Hokkaido), and Jodogahama Rhyolite in Iwate prefecture. Extrusive complexes studied include the Tojinbo Andesite and Ojima Rhyodacite in Fukui prefecture. Rocks of `granitic' composition were collected from the Takidani (Japan Alps) and Hijiori (Yamagata prefecture) plutons. The joint structure in Hijiori Granite was evaluated by analysis of core samples extracted from the HDR-3 geothermal production well. Based on detailed field observation, joint structures related to thermal contraction of a rock mass could be classified according to their inferred depth of formation. Joints from a near surface setting, such as shallow intrusive rocks and extrusives, tend to form pentagonal — hexagonal columnar structures (for a variety of rock types), whilst granitic rocks (from a deeper setting) typically exhibit a parallelepiped structure. The apparent differences in joint form are inferred to be dependent on the confining pressure, which acts on joint generation and propagation. In cases of non-confining pressure, such as the near-surface (shallow intrusive/extrusive) setting, joint networks typically form a columnar structure. On the contrary, confining pressure is considerably greater for deeper rock masses, and these form a parallelepiped joint structure.

  1. The role of estrogen in intrusive memories.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jessica; Chervonsky, Liza; Felmingham, Kim L; Bryant, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    Intrusive memories are highly vivid, emotional and involuntary recollections which cause significant distress across psychological disorders including posttraumatic disorder (PTSD). Recent evidence has potentially extended our understanding of the development of intrusive memories by identifying biological factors which significantly impact on memories for emotionally arousing stimuli. This study investigated the role of stress on the development of intrusions for negative and neutral images, and indexed the potential contributions of sex (estrogen and progesterone) and stress (noradrenaline and cortisol) hormones. Whilst viewing the images, half the participants underwent a cold pressor stress (CPS) procedure to induce stress while the control participants immersed their hands in warm water. Saliva samples were collected to index estrogen, progesterone and noradrenergic and cortisol response. Participants (55 university students, 26 men, 29 women) viewed a series of negatively arousing and neutral images. Participants completed recall and intrusions measures 2 days later. Negative images resulted in greater recall and more intrusions than neutral images. In the cold water condition females recalled fewer neutral memories than males. Cortisol increase predicted decreased recall of negative memories in males, and estrogen predicted increased intrusions of negative images in women. These findings are consistent with evidence that circulating levels of ovarian hormones influence memory for emotionally arousing events, and provides the first evidence of the influence of sex hormones on intrusive memories. These results provide one possible explanation for the higher incidence of anxiety disorders in women.

  2. Saltwater intrusion as potential driver of phosphorus release from limestone bedrock in a coastal aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flower, Hilary; Rains, Mark; Lewis, David; Zhang, Jia-Zhong; Price, René

    2017-01-01

    An important but often overlooked consequence of saltwater intrusion is the potential increase of groundwater soluble reactive phosphorus concentrations. The phosphorus sorption dynamics of two limestone rocks of different composition were investigated by simulating seawater intrusion over a wide range of mixing ratios between freshwater and saltwater. Both rocks exhibited a logarithmic loss of sorption efficiency in mixtures containing more than approximately 3 mM Cl- concentration (100 mg Cl-/L; about <1% saltwater). We infer that aquifer solids immersed in freshwater would undergo phosphorus desorption in response to the introduction of this minor amount of seawater. This Cl- concentration is within the range designated as fresh water. Thus we conclude that increased soluble reactive phosphorus availability from saltwater-induced desorption may occur at the ion exchange front, which is actually landward of the saltwater intrusion front as it is commonly defined. Sorption efficiency in our experiments continued to decline as salinity increased, until Cl- concentration reached a second threshold of 50 or 200 mM (1700 or 7700 mg Cl-/L), depending on the rock composition, particularly iron content. Further increase in salinity would produce little increase in groundwater soluble reactive phosphorus concentration. Our results have implications for soluble reactive phosphorus availability in estuaries that receive mixing zone groundwater discharge.

  3. The age and origin of felsic intrusions of the Thetford Mines ophiolite, Quebec.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Frankel, C.S.; Eaby, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    This ophiolite was obducted in the early Ordovician during the closing of the proto-Atlantic. The tectonized peridotite of the lower unit of the ophiolite is intruded by felsic dykes and pods, including isolated lenses of massive rodingite, small bodies of strongly deformed diorite, and younger, less deformed monzonite. These intrusions are found only near the base of the ophiolite, and are considered to have been emplaced before the ophiolite reached its present position. The young group of intrusions consists of biotite-muscovite quartz monzonite and leuco-quartz monzonite. Analysed samples have high K2O, high (K2O X 100)/Na2O + K2O) ratios, and high initial Sr ratios, indicating that the magma source was continental and that these felsic rocks formed by partial melting of continental sediments. Whole-rock and mineral isochron ages suggest that the felsic intrusions are approx 456 + or - 4 m.y. old and that they were metamorphosed approx 418 + or - 7 m.y. ago. The detachment of the ophiolite occurred approx 491 + or - 3 m.y. ago. The felsic dykes were intruded approx 35 m.y. later, during the Taconic orogeny. The lengthy time between detachment and final nappe emplacement recorded by the felsic dykes may be a requirement for formation of abundant asbestiform chrysotile. Whole-rock analyses (16) and Rb, Sr and 87Sr/86Sr data from the Colline de Granite, King Mts., Vimy Ridge and Black Lake samples are presented.-P.Br.

  4. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of The Geysers reservoir rocks, California

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Richard P.; Moore, Joseph N.

    1994-01-20

    Whole-rock oxygen isotopic compositions of Late Mesozoic graywacke, the dominant host rock at The Geysers, record evidence of a large liquid-dominated hydrothermal system that extended beyond the limits of the present steam reservoir. The graywackes show vertical and lateral isotopic variations that resulted from gradients in temperature, permeability, and fluid composition during this early liquid-dominated system. All of these effects are interpreted to have resulted from the emplacement of the granitic "felsite" intrusion 1-2 million years ago. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the graywacke are strongly zoned around a northwest-southeast trending low located near the center of and similar in shape to the present steam system. Vertical isotopic gradients show a close relationship to the felsite intrusion. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the graywacke decrease from approximately 15 per mil near the surface to 4-7 per mil 300 to 600 m above the intrusive contact. The {delta}{sup 18}O values then increase downward to 8-10 per mil at the felsite contact, thereafter remaining nearly constant within the intrusion itself. The large downward decrease in {delta}{sup 18}O values are interpreted to be controlled by variations in temperature during the intrusive event, ranging from 150{degree}C near the surface to about 425{degree}C near the intrusive contact. The upswing in {delta}{sup 18}O values near the intrusive contact appears to have been caused by lower rock permeability and/or heavier fluid isotopic composition there. Lateral variations in the isotopic distributions suggests that the effects of temperature were further modified by variations in rock permeability and/or fluid-isotopic composition. Time-integrated water:rock ratios are thought to have been highest within the central isotopic low where the greatest isotopic depletions are observed. We suggest that this region of the field was an area of high permeability within the main upflow zone of the liquid

  5. Classic Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Edgar Allen

    2004-01-01

    While "early college" programs designed for high-school-age students are beginning to proliferate nationwide, a small New England school has been successfully educating teens for nearly four decades. In this article, the author features Simon's Rock, a small liberal arts college located in the Great Barrington, Massachusetts, that has…

  6. Mineralogy, geochemistry and stratigraphy of the Maslovsky Pt-Cu-Ni sulfide deposit, Noril'sk Region, Russia. Implications for relationship of ore-bearing intrusions and lavas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krivolutskaya, Nadezhda Alexandrovna; Sobolev, Alexandr Vladimirovich; Snisar, Sergey Grigor'evich; Gongalskiy, Bronislav Iosiphovich; Kuzmin, Dmitry Vladimirovich; Hauff, Folkmar; Tushentsova, Irina Nikolaevna; Svirskaya, Natalya Mikhailovna; Kononkova, Natalya Nikolaevna; Schlychkova, Tatyana B.

    2012-01-01

    We report new data on the stratigraphy, mineralogy and geochemistry of the rocks and ores of the Maslovsky Pt-Cu-Ni sulfide deposit which is thought to be the southwestern extension of the Noril'sk 1 intrusion. Variations in the Ta/Nb ratio of the gabbro-dolerites hosting the sulfide mineralization and the compositions of their pyroxene and olivine indicate that these rocks were produced by two discrete magmatic pulses, which gave rise to the Northern and Southern Maslovsky intrusions that together host the Maslovsky deposit. The Northern intrusion is located inside the Tungusska sandstones and basalt of the Ivakinsky Formation. The Southern intrusion cuts through all of the lower units of the Siberian Trap tuff-lavas, including the Lower Nadezhdinsky Formation; demonstrating that the ore-bearing intrusions of the Noril'sk Complex post-date that unit. Rocks in both intrusions have low TiO2 and elevated MgO contents (average mean TiO2 <1 and MgO = 12 wt.%) that are more primitive than the lavas of the Upper Formations of the Siberian Traps which suggests that the ore-bearing intrusions result from a separate magmatic event. Unusually high concentrations of both HREE (Dy+Yb+Er+Lu) and Y (up to 1.2 and 2.1 ppm, respectively) occur in olivines (Fo79.5 and 0.25% NiO) from picritic and taxitic gabbro-dolerites with disseminated sulfide mineralization. Thus accumulation of HREE, Y and Ni in the melts is correlated with the mineral potential of the intrusions. The TiO2 concentration in pyroxene has a strong negative correlation with the Mg# of both host mineral and Mg# of host rock. Sulfides from the Northern Maslovsky intrusion are predominantly chalcopyrite-pyrrhotite-pentlandite with subordinate and minor amounts of cubanite, bornite and millerite and a diverse assemblage of rare precious metal minerals including native metals (Au, Ag and Pd), Sn-Pd-Pt-Bi-Pb compounds and Fe-Pt alloys. Sulfides from the Southern Maslovsky intrusion have δ 34S = 5-6‰ up to 10.8‰ in

  7. AIDE - Advanced Intrusion Detection Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Cathy L.

    2013-04-28

    Would you like to know when someone has dropped an undesirable executable binary on our system? What about something less malicious such as a software installation by a user? What about the user who decides to install a newer version of mod_perl or PHP on your web server without letting you know beforehand? Or even something as simple as when an undocumented config file change is made by another member of the admin group? Do you even want to know about all the changes that happen on a daily basis on your server? The purpose of an intrusion detection system (IDS) is to detect unauthorized, possibly malicious activity. The purpose of a host-based IDS, or file integrity checker, is check for unauthorized changes to key system files, binaries, libraries, and directories on the system. AIDE is an Open Source file and directory integrity checker. AIDE will let you know when a file or directory has been added, deleted, modified. It is included with the Red Hat Enterprise 6. It is available for other Linux distros. This is a case study describing the process of configuring AIDE on an out of the box RHEL6 installation. Its goal is to illustrate the thinking and the process by which a useful AIDE configuration is built.

  8. Adapting safety requirements analysis to intrusion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, R.

    2001-01-01

    Several requirements analysis techniques widely used in safety-critical systems are being adapted to support the analysis of secure systems. Perhaps the most relevant system safety techique for Intrusion Detection Systems is hazard analysis.

  9. Indoor Air Vapor Intrusion Mitigation Approaches

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The National Risk Management Research Laboratory has developed a technology transfer document regarding management and treatment of vapor intrusion into building structures. This document describes the range of mitigation technologies available.

  10. A Citizen's Guide to Vapor Intrusion Mitigation

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This guide describes how vapor intrusion is the movement of chemical vapors from contaminated soil and groundwater into nearby buildings.Vapors primarily enter through openings in the building foundation or basement walls.

  11. Autonomous Rule Creation for Intrusion Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Vollmer; Jim Alves-Foss; Milos Manic

    2011-04-01

    Many computational intelligence techniques for anomaly based network intrusion detection can be found in literature. Translating a newly discovered intrusion recognition criteria into a distributable rule can be a human intensive effort. This paper explores a multi-modal genetic algorithm solution for autonomous rule creation. This algorithm focuses on the process of creating rules once an intrusion has been identified, rather than the evolution of rules to provide a solution for intrusion detection. The algorithm was demonstrated on anomalous ICMP network packets (input) and Snort rules (output of the algorithm). Output rules were sorted according to a fitness value and any duplicates were removed. The experimental results on ten test cases demonstrated a 100 percent rule alert rate. Out of 33,804 test packets 3 produced false positives. Each test case produced a minimum of three rule variations that could be used as candidates for a production system.

  12. 10 CFR 63.322 - Human intrusion scenario.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Human intrusion scenario. 63.322 Section 63.322 Energy... REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Postclosure Public Health and Environmental Standards Human Intrusion Standard § 63.322 Human intrusion scenario. For the purposes of the analysis of human intrusion, DOE...

  13. 10 CFR 63.322 - Human intrusion scenario.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human intrusion scenario. 63.322 Section 63.322 Energy... REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Postclosure Public Health and Environmental Standards Human Intrusion Standard § 63.322 Human intrusion scenario. For the purposes of the analysis of human intrusion, DOE...

  14. A General Model for Shallow Magmatic Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorey, C.; Michaut, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow magmatic intrusions make room for themselves by upward bending of the elastic overburden. Previous studies have shown that the bending of the overlying layer first controls the dynamics. Then, when the radius reaches a few times the flexural wavelength of the overburden, it transitions to a gravity current regime. This model predicts the appropriate geometry for both terrestrial laccoliths and large mafic sills. However, it underestimates the absolute dimensions of these magmatic intrusions; in particular, it requires abnormally high viscosity to reconcile both observations and predictions. To get some insights into the effective flow viscosity, we develop a model that account for the cooling of such elastic-plated gravity currents. We show that the coupling between the temperature field and the flow itself leads to the formation of a highly viscous region at the tip that slows down the spreading in both regimes. The intrusions are predicted to be thicker and their dimensions, especially in the bending regime, are now consistent with observations. By introducing the potentially complex structure of the overburden, we also show that the topography largely contributes to constrain the final intrusion morphology. For instance, in the case of an intrusion centered below a circular depression, the model predicts that the lithostatic increase at the crater rim prevents the magma from spreading laterally and enhances the thickening of the intrusion. This model has already proven successful in reproducing the deformations observed on potential intrusion centered below lunar impact craters. Caldera complexes often exhibit ground deformations that might be associated to the formation of shallow magmatic intrusions. InSAR imaging and GPS measurements now provide efficient tools to monitor these deformations. We conclude this study by examining the ability of the model to reproduce the deformation observed in several caldera complexes.

  15. Preventing Point-of-Sale System Intrusions

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-06-01

    month Crimina l intent may be more focused on identity theft than payme nt card fraud 37 Unknown Zero day or custom keylogger TBD TBD 4...Several major United States retailers have suffered large-scale thefts of payment card information as the result of intrusions against point-of-sale...ABSTRACT Several major United States retailers have suffered large-scale thefts of payment card information as the result of intrusions against point

  16. A Radiating Cable Intrusion Detection System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1980-06-01

    RtADC-Th40O1"ř June 1930 A RADIATING CABLE INTRUSION 0 DETECTION SYSTEM Northeastern University Spencer d. Rochefort Raimundas Sukys Norman C...J.7[ochefortF168R. Raimundas/ Sukys SADDROSSAMfELEMENT,.PROJECT. TASK Electronics Research Labe.*&tory 11. CONTROLLING OFFICE NAME AND ADDRESS Hanscom...stable threshold levels. -a- -22- REFERENCES 1. Rochefort, J.S., Sukys , R. and Poirier, N.C. (1978), "An Area Intrusion Detection and Alarm System

  17. A system for distributed intrusion detection

    SciTech Connect

    Snapp, S.R.; Brentano, J.; Dias, G.V.; Goan, T.L.; Heberlein, L.T.; Ho, Che-Lin; Levitt, K.N.; Mukherjee, B. . Div. of Computer Science); Grance, T. ); Mansur, D.L.; Pon, K.L. ); Smaha, S.E. )

    1991-01-01

    The study of providing security in computer networks is a rapidly growing area of interest because the network is the medium over which most attacks or intrusions on computer systems are launched. One approach to solving this problem is the intrusion-detection concept, whose basic premise is that not only abandoning the existing and huge infrastructure of possibly-insecure computer and network systems is impossible, but also replacing them by totally-secure systems may not be feasible or cost effective. Previous work on intrusion-detection systems were performed on stand-alone hosts and on a broadcast local area network (LAN) environment. The focus of our present research is to extend our network intrusion-detection concept from the LAN environment to arbitarily wider areas with the network topology being arbitrary as well. The generalized distributed environment is heterogeneous, i.e., the network nodes can be hosts or servers from different vendors, or some of them could be LAN managers, like our previous work, a network security monitor (NSM), as well. The proposed architecture for this distributed intrusion-detection system consists of the following components: a host manager in each host; a LAN manager for monitoring each LAN in the system; and a central manager which is placed at a single secure location and which receives reports from various host and LAN managers to process these reports, correlate them, and detect intrusions. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  18. Tropospheric intrusions associated with the secondary tropopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, L. L.; Randel, W. J.; Gille, J. C.; Hall, W. D.; Nardi, B.; Massie, S.; Yudin, V.; Khosravi, R.; Konopka, P.; Tarasick, D.

    2009-05-01

    Deep intrusions of tropospheric air into the lower stratosphere above the subtropical jet are investigated using new observations and meteorological analyses. These intrusions are characterized by low ozone concentration and low static stability. The low-ozone layer is consistently observed from ozonesonde profiles and satellite remote sensing data from Aura/HIRDLS. The intruding layer occurs along and under the poleward extending tropical tropopause, which becomes the secondary tropopause in middle to high latitudes. The association of the ozone and the thermal structure provides evidence for the physical significance of the subtropical tropopause break and the secondary tropopause. The core of the intruding layer is typically between 370 and 400 K potential temperature (˜15 km), but the vertical extent of the intrusion can impact ozone above 400 K, the lower boundary of the overworld. Two intrusion events over the continental United States in the spring of 2007 are analyzed to show the spatial extent and the temporal evolution of the intruding air mass. These examples demonstrate the effectiveness of potential temperature lapse rate, i.e., static stability, as a diagnostic for the intrusion event. Comparison with the potential vorticity field is made to show the complementarity of the two dynamical fields. The static stability diagnostic provides a tool to map out the horizontal extent of the intruding layer and to investigate its evolution. Furthermore, the diagnostic makes it possible to forecast the intrusion event for field studies.

  19. Contact relations and petrography of the Solarya intrusive complex (NW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Güraslan, Işıl; Ünal, Alp; Altunkaynak, Şafak

    2016-04-01

    Solarya pluton is a N-S trending intrusive body exposed in the North of the Balikesir city in NW Anatolia. It is Early Miocene in age and intruded into the Nilüfer and Hodul unit of Karakaya complex representing Triassic metamorphic and non-metamorphic basement of Sakarya Continent. Solarya plutonic complex consists of three granitic rock members: Porphyritic granodiorite with K-feldspar (orthoclase) megacrystals, microgranite-microgranodiorite and haplogranite. Coarse grained porphyritic granodiorite is common in northern part of the pluton while the southern part of the pluton is formed from microgranite-microgranodiorite. Haplogranite was emplaced between the pluton and the metamorphic country rocks and surrounds the pluton as a thin light coloured outer zone along northern half of the border. Haplogranitic envelope zone display graphic and granophyric textures. Main plutonic body also contains mafic enclaves and syn-plutonic mafic dykes. Along the southern border, the fine grained chilled margin of Solarya pluton gradually passes into the hypabyssal and volcanic rocks. At the western border of the pluton, a young fault separates the pluton from non-metamorphic Hodul Unit of Karakaya complex. Along the northern and eastern margin, Solarya pluton intruded into metamorphic rocks of Nilüfer Unit which consist mainly of marbles, metapelites and metabasites. Solarya intrusive complex developed contact metamorphism in a narrow zone (150-200 m) around its eastern margin between the marbles which reaches to hornblende-hornfels facies conditions. The grain sizes of the marbles grow towards the margin of the pluton. Contact metamorphic rocks surrounding the intrusive body are common with granoblastic texture and display calcite + plagioclase + tremolite + diopside + garnet ± quartz mineral paragenesis dominantly. This mineral paragenesis suggest that the contact metamorphic aureole has developed under 500-550 C° and 2-3 kbar temperature and pressure conditions, which

  20. Extreme high field strength element (HFSE) depletion and near-chondritic Nb/Ta ratios in Central Andean adakite-like lavas (~ 28°S, ~ 68°W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, A. R.; Kay, S. M.

    2009-03-01

    The eruption of andesites with steep REE patterns and high Sr concentrations (adakite-like) in the northernmost Chilean flatslab region of the Central Andes spatially and temporally corresponds with the appearance of a marked HFSE (high field strength element) depletion in these lavas (La/Ta up to 95). Known as the Dos Hermanos and Pircas Negras andesites, these lavas erupted at the beginning (˜ 8 Ma), during (7-3 Ma), and immediately following (3-2 Ma) a period of tectonic instability characterized by eastward migration of the frontal volcanic arc. ICP-MS analyses of the HFSE reveal a range of chondritic (20-18) to subchondritic (18-11) Nb/Ta ratios in these lavas. Evident temporal trace element trends support a change from a rutile-bearing to an amphibole-bearing eclogitic residual assemblage in equilibrium with the mafic precursor magmas of these andesites. This change in residual mineralogy is contemporaneous with the onset of frontal arc migration in the region. Potential eclogitic sources for the Dos Hermanos and Pircas Negras adakitic andesites include mafic Andean lower crust and an additional flux of forearc crust transported to the sub-arc mantle via subduction erosion during the height of arc migration and Pircas Negras magmatism. Batch melting models of rutile- or amphibole-bearing eclogitic arc basalt in tandem with magma mixing calculations generate the observed adakitic signatures and near-chondritic Nb/Ta ratios of these Central Andean andesites.

  1. Water in evolved lunar rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Katharine Lynn

    The Moon was thought to be completely anhydrous until indigenous water was found in lunar samples in 2008. This discovery raised two fundamental questions about the Moon: how much water is present in the bulk Moon and is water uniformly distributed in the lunar interior? To address these questions, I studied a suite of lunar samples rich in a chemical component called KREEP (K, Rare Earth Elements, P), all of which are incompatible elements. Water behaves as an incompatible element in magmas, so KREEP-rich lunar samples are potentially water rich. In this dissertation, I present the results of a petrologic study of KREEP-rich lunar rocks, measurements of their water contents and deuterium (D) to hydrogen (H) ratios (D/H), and examined where these rocks fit into our understanding of water in the Moon as a whole. We performed a study of highly evolved, KREEP-rich lunar rocks called felsites and determined that they contain quartz. Using cooling rates derived from quartz-Ti thermometry, we show the felsites originated at a minimum pressure of ˜1 kbar, corresponding to a minimum depth of 20-25 km in the lunar crust. We calculate that at that pressure water would have been soluble in the melt, indicating that degassing of H2O from the felsite parental melts was likely minimal and hydrogen isotopes in intrusive rocks are likely unfractionated. We then measured D/H in apatite in KREEP-rich intrusive rocks to clarify the solar system source of the Moon's water. When viewed in the context of other lunar D/H studies, our results indicate there are at least three distinctive reservoirs in the lunar interior, including an ultra-low D reservoir that could represent a primitive component in the Moon's interior. Furthermore, our measurements of residual glass in a KREEP basalt show that the KREEP basaltic magmas contained 10 times less water than the source of the Apollo 17 pyroclastic glass beads, indicating that, though wetter than previously thought, the concentration of

  2. Poohbear Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image, taken by Sojourner's front right camera, was taken when the rover was next to Poohbear (rock at left) and Piglet (not seen) as it looked out toward Mermaid Dune. The textures differ from the foreground soil containing a sorted mix of small rocks, fines and clods, from the area a bit ahead of the rover where the surface is covered with a bright drift material. Soil experiments where the rover wheels dug in the soil revealed that the cloudy material exists underneath the drift.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  3. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  4. High precision ages from the Torres del Paine Intrusion, Chile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michel, J.; Baumgartner, L.; Cosca, M.; Ovtcharova, M.; Putlitz, B.; Schaltegger, U.

    2006-12-01

    The upper crustal bimodal Torres del Paine Intrusion, southern Chile, consists of the lower Paine-Mafic- Complex and the upper Paine-Granite. Geochronologically this bimodal complex is not well studied except for a few existing data from Halpern (1973) and Sanchez (2006). The aim of this study is to supplement the existing data and to constrain the age relations between the major magmatic pulses by applying high precision U-Pb dating on accessory zircons and 40Ar/39Ar-laser-step-heating-ages on biotites from the Torres del Paine Intrusion. The magmatic rocks from mafic complex are fine to medium-grained and vary in composition from quartz- monzonites to granodiorites and gabbros. Coarse-grained olivine gabbros have intruded these rocks in the west. The granitic body is represented by a peraluminous, biotite-orthoclase-granite and a more evolved leucocratic granite in the outer parts towards the host-rock. Field observations suggest a feeder-zone for the granite in the west and that the granite postdates the mafic complex. Two granite samples of the outermost margins in the Northeast and South were analyzed. The zircons were dated by precise isotope-dilution U-Pb techniques of chemically abraded single grains. The data are concordant within the analytical error and define weighted mean 206/238U ages of 12.59 ± 0.03 Ma and 12.58 ± 0.01 Ma for the two samples respectively. A 40Ar/39Ar-age for the second sample yield a date of 12.37 ± 0.11 Ma. Three 40Ar/39Ar -ages of biotites were obtained for rocks belonging to the mafic complex. A hbl-bio- granodiorite from the central part, approximately 150 m below the subhorizontal contact with the granite, gives an age of 12.81 ± 0.11 Ma. A hbl-bio-granodiorite and an olivine-gabbro west of the feeder-zone date at 12.42 ± 0.14 Ma and 12.49 ± 0.11 Ma, respectively. The obtained older age of 12.81 Ma for the granodiorite in the central part is consistent with structural relationships of brittle fracturing of the mafic

  5. 916 Ma Pole for southwestern Baltica: palaeomagnetism of the Bjerkreim-Sokndal layered intrusion, Rogaland Igneous Complex, southern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie L.; McEnroe, Suzanne A.

    2015-10-01

    The Rogaland Igneous Complex (RIC) in southern Norway intruded into post-Sveconorwegian granulite facies crust ˜930 Ma. It includes three massif anorthosites, several small leuconorite bodies and the ˜7 km thick norite-quartz mangerite layered Bjerkreim-Sokndal (BKS) intrusion. The intrusion consists of five rhythmic megaunits created by repeated magma influxes topped by a transition zone and more evolved mangerites and quartz mangerites. Over 70 palaeomagnetic sites have been collected in the BKS, sampling all the megacyclic subunits and overlying mangerites. Remanence within the BKS is held in hemo-ilmenite-only rocks (lower parts of the megacyclic units), mixed hemo-ilmenite and magnetite rocks (upper parts of the lower megacyclic units) and magnetite only rocks in the upper highest megacyclic unit and overlying mangerites. Due to the different oxides present magnetic susceptibility varies over four orders of magnitude with a bimodal distribution (mean susceptibility of 6.4 × 10-3 SI for hemo-ilmenite rocks, and 8.7 × 10-2 SI for magnetite rocks). NRM values do not show a strong bimodal distribution as many of the rocks lacking magnetite have hemo-ilmenite with strong lamellar magnetism; average NRM for the entire suite is 8.83 A m-1. All sites within the cyclic part of the intrusion have stable remanence and produce well-clustered site means. Samples from the upper mangerite rocks, dominated by MD magnetite, are commonly unstable and not all sites provide acceptable data. Mean directions for 66 sites spanning the entire intrusion are I = -73.5°, D = 303.4°, with α95 = 3.7° and k = 24. The resulting pole position is at 35.9°S and 217.9°E, with a palaeolatitude for this part of Baltica of -59.4°. Examination of the magnetic mineralogy combined with geochronology for RIC rocks and cooling rates for the region yields an age of magnetization of 916 Ma. Metamorphic country rocks yield similar directions at least 10 km from the contact, confirming the

  6. Lead-alpha age determinations of granitic rocks from Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzko, John J.; Jaffe, H.W.; Waring, C.L.

    1957-01-01

    Lead-alpha activity age determinations were made on zircon from seven granitic rocks of central and southeastern Alaska. The results of the age determinations indicate two periods of igneous intrusion, one about 95 million years ago, during the Cretaceous period, and another about 53 million years ago, during the early part of the Tertiary. The individual ages determined on zircon from 2 rocks from southeastern Alaska and 1 from east-central Alaska gave results of 90, 100, and 96 million years; those determined on 4 rocks from central Alaska gave results of 47, 56, 58, and 51 million years.

  7. Isotopic variation in the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite, central Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, R.W.; Chappell, B.W.; Peck, D.L.; Bateman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Granitoid rocks of the compositionally zoned Late Cretaceous Toulumne Intrusive Suite in the central Sierra Nevada, California, have initial87Sr/86Sr values (Sri) and143Nd/144Nd values (Ndi) that vary from 0.7057 to 0.7067 and from 0.51239 to 0.51211 respectively. The observed variation of both Sri and Ndi and of chemical composition in rocks of the suite cannot be due to crystal fractionation of magma solely under closed system conditons. The largest variation in chemistry, Ndi, and Sri is present in the outer-most equigranular units of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite. Sri varies positively with SiO2, Na2O, K2O, and Rb concentrations, and negatively with Ndi, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, FeO, CaO, MnO, P2O5, TiO2, and Sr concentrations. This covariation of Sri, Ndi and chemistry can be modeled by a process of simple mixing of basaltic and granitic magmas having weight percent SiO2 of 48.0 and 73.3 respectively. Isotopic characteristic of the mafic magma are Sri=0.7047, Ndi=0.51269 and ??18O=6.0, and of the felsic magma are Sri=0.7068, Ndi=0.51212 and ??18O=8.9. The rocks sampled contain from 50 to 80% of the felsic component. An aplite in the outer equigranular unit of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite apparently was derived by fractional crystallization of plagioclase and hornblende from magma with granudiorite composition that was a product of mixing of the magmas described above. Siliceous magmas derived from the lower crust, having a maximum of 15 percent mantle-derived mafic component, are represented by the inner prophyritic units of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  8. Extreme High Field Strength Element Depletion and Chondritic Nb/Ta in Central Andean Adakite-like Lavas (~27° S, ~68° W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, A. R.; Kay, S. M.

    2005-12-01

    We present new high precision ICP-MS HFSE data on ~30 samples from the adakite-like Pircas Negras (SiO2 =57-62 %; La/Yb= 20-60; Sr = 600-900 ppm, Cr to 200 ppm) and Dos Hermanos (SiO2 =56-59 %; La/Yb= 57-61; Sr = 1200-1500 ppm, Cr to 60 ppm) andesites from the southernmost Andean Central Volcanic Zone (CVZ). These andesites erupted in a broadened arc as the volcanic front was displaced about 50 km to the east between 8 and 3 Ma and likely reflect melting of a garnet bearing crustal source. Our data reveal a discrete change from chondritic Nb/Ta ratios (19-21) and low Zr/Sm (25-30) in older 8-7 Ma Dos Hermanos lavas to dominantly subchondritic Nb/Ta ratios (11-18) and higher Zr/Sm (30-45) in <6 Ma Pircas Negras lavas. These ratios are uncommon since frontal arc lavas worldwide typically have subchondritic Nb/Ta ratios (<19.9 ± 2) consistent with flux melting of uniformly subchondritic sources (i.e. depleted mantle, subducted sediments, crustal assimilation). The highest Nb/Ta ratios begin to approach those of kimberlitic eclogites (mean Nb/Ta = 24) from Siberia and western Africa where residual rutile controls the budget of eclogitic Nb and Ta (Rudnick et al., 2003). Extreme depletions in HFSE in both Pircas Negras (La/Ta = 40-80) and Dos Hermanos (La/Ta= 90-100) lavas are best explained as hydrous and oxidizing conditions within the mantle wedge initially stabilized Ti-oxides (i.e. rutile) as the arc front migrated. These steeper REE patterns and high La/Ta are a transient feature measured in lavas erupting during the peak of arc migration, as mafic <2 Ma CVZ lavas to the north (~26° S) have lower La/Yb (< 20) and La/Ta (< 40). The observed temporal shift in Nb/Ta coupled with a general increase in Zr/Sm suggests a change from residual rutile to low-Mg amphibole within an eclogitic/granulitic crustal residue during the course of arc migration. A potential factor in explaining these data is that a transient period of increased subduction erosion associated with

  9. Complete Analytical Data for Samples of Jurassic Igneous Rocks in the Bald Mountain Mining District, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents all petrographic, major oxide, and trace element data for a set of 109 samples collected during an investigation of Jurassic igneous rocks in the Bald Mountain mining district, Nevada. Igneous rocks in the district include the Bald Mountain stock, quartz-feldspar porphyry dikes, basaltic andesite dikes, aplite sills, and rare lamprophyre dikes. These rocks, although variably altered near intrusion-related mineral deposits, are fresh in many parts of the district. Igneous rocks in the district are hosted by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks.

  10. K-Ar ages on intrusive and altered zones in the Chignik and Sutwik Island quadrangles: A section in The United States Geological Survey in Alaska: Accomplishments during 1979

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wilson, Frederic H.

    1981-01-01

    Continued K-Ar dating of intrusive rocks and hydrothermal alteration zones in the Chignik and Sutwik Island quadrangles of the Alaska Peninsula, supplemental to that by Wilson, Detterman, and Silberman (1978) and Wilson (1978), has refined our knowledge of the ages of the igneous rocks and clarified relations between altered zones and igneous events in the area.

  11. Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of sedimentary rocks in a crater located just north of the Sinus Meridiani region. Perhaps the crater was once the site of a martian lake.

    Location near: 2.9oN, 359.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  12. Origin of the Lyme Dome and implications for the timing of multiple Alleghanian deformational and intrusive events in southern Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, G.J.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Wintsch, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Geologic mapping, structural analysis, and geochronology in the area of the Lyme dome, southern Connecticut provides constraints on the origin of the rocks in the core of the dome, the absolute timing of the principal deformational and thermal events attributed to Alleghanian orogenesis, and the processes that generated the dome. Detrital zircon geochronology in combination with ages on intrusive rocks brackets the deposition of quartzite in the core of the dome sometime between ca. 925 and 620 Ma. Granite and granodiorite intruded the Neoproteorozic metasedimentary rocks in the core of the dome at ca. 620 to 610 Ma. Four major early Permian events associated with the Alleghanian orogeny affected the rocks in the Lyme dome area. Syn-tectonic migmatization and widespread penetrative deformation (D1, ca. 300 - 290 Ma) included emplacement of alaskite at 290 ?? 4 Ma during regional foliation development and aluminosilicate-orthoclase metamorphic conditions. Rocks of the Avalon terrane may have wedged between Gander cover rocks and Gander basement in the core of the Lyme during D1. Limited structural evidence for diapiric uplift of the Lyme dome indicates that diapirism started late in D1 and was completed by D2 (ca. 290 - 280 Ma) when horizontal WNW contractional stresses dominated over vertical stresses. Second sillimanite metamorphism continued and syn-tectonic D2 granite pegmatite (288 ?? 4 Ma) and the Joshua Rock Granite Gniess (284 ?? 3 Ma) intruded at this time. North-northwest extension during D3 (ca. 280 - 275 Ma) led to granitic pegmatite intrusion along S3 cleavage planes and in extensional zones in boudin necks during hydraulic failure and decompression melting. Intrusion of a Westerly Granite dike at 275 ?? 4 Ma suggests that D3 extension was active, and perhaps concluding, by ca. 275 Ma. Late randomly oriented but gently dipping pegmatite dikes record a final stage of intrusion during D4 (ca. 275 - 260 Ma), and a switch from NNW extension to vertical

  13. Calcic myrmekite in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffries, C.M.; Dymek, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Myrmekite is a common feature of granitic plutonic rocks and quartzo-feldspathic gneisses, but it is rarely reported in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks. The authors have identified myrmekitic intergrowths of quartz and calcic plagioclase in a variety of plagioclase-rich cumulate rocks, including samples from a number of massif anorthosites and layered igneous intrusions. It appears that calcic myrmekite has been frequently overlooked, and is a common accessory feature in these rock types. Chemical and textural characteristics of myrmekite in the St-Urbain massif anorthosite (Quebec) and the Bushveld Igneous Complex (South Africa) have several features in common, but this myrmekite appears to be fundamentally different from that described by most previous investigators. Whereas myrmekite typically consists of a vermicular intergrowth of sodic plagioclase and quartz that occurs adjacent to alkali feldspar, the intergrowths in these rocks contain highly calcic plagioclase and lack the intervening alkali feldspar. In addition, the plagioclase in the myrmekite is more calcic than that in the surrounding rock. The boundary between the myrmekite and the host material is generally extremely sharp, although reverse zoning of host plagioclase may obscure the contact in some cases. The textural and chemical evidence is consistent with a replacement origin for these intergrowths; the proportion of quartz in the myrmekite is in close agreement with the predicted amount of silica that is generated by the theoretical replacement reaction. It appears that water played a key role in the replacement process.

  14. Petrogenesis of selected A-type granitic intrusions from Central Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, Tharwat; Asran, Asran; Amron, Taha; Hauzenberger, Christoph

    2014-05-01

    The Pan-African orogeny in the Arabian-Nubian Shield was terminated by intrusion of A-type granites (~ 595 Ma; Greenberg, 1981) and its volcanic equivalents. Subsequent to the intrusions of these granitic bodies the shield was exhumed. Eroded A-type granite pebbles were found in the molasse sediments that were deposited in intermountain basins. Therefore the A-type granites provide information about the last stage of the Pan-African geochemical system. Preliminary whole-rock geochemical data of three granitic intrusions (Kadabora, Um Naggat and El shiekh Salem) from the Central Eastern Desert of Egypt; indicate that all of them are peraluminous and with A-type characteristics. These intrusions show low CaO content (average 0.43 %wt), high FeOT/MgO ratio (10.46-121.88), high Na2O+K2O (average 8.04 %wt), marked enrichment of high field strength elements (Y, Nb and Ga except Zr), depletion in MgO (0.01-0.11 %wt) and with low concentration of Sr and Ba. The studied granitoids were emplaced in within plate tectonic regime. References: Greenberg, J.K. (1981): Characteristic and origin of Egyptian younger granites. Bull. Geol. Soc. Am. Part 1, v.92: 224-232.

  15. Age and nature of Triassic magmatism in the Netoni Intrusive Complex, West Papua, Indonesia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webb, Max; White, Lloyd T.

    2016-12-01

    We report field observations together with petrological, geochemical and geochronological data from granitoids of the Netoni Intrusive Complex of West Papua. Until now, our knowledge of the timing of granitic magmatism in this region has been limited to a wide range of ages (241-6.7 Ma) obtained from K-Ar measurements of hornblende, biotite and plagioclase, primarily from samples of river detritus. We collected in situ samples along several traverses into the intrusive complex to: (1) develop a better understanding of the lithologies within the intrusive complex; and (2) determine the timing of magmatism using U-Pb dating of zircon. We also dated zircons from two river sand samples to identify other potential pulses of magmatism that may have been missed due to a sampling bias. The zircons extracted from the river sands yield age spectra similar to those obtained from the in situ samples. The combined data demonstrate that magmatism in the Netoni Intrusive Complex occurred between 248 Ma and 213 Ma. The petrological and geochemical data indicate that the granitoids were most likely emplaced in an ocean-continent (Andean style) subduction setting. This builds on previous work which suggests that a magmatic belt extended along eastern Gondwana (now New Guinea and eastern Australia) throughout much of the Paleozoic. The volcanic ejecta that were produced along this arc and the subsequent erosion of the mountain chain are a potential source of detritus for Triassic and younger sedimentary rocks in New Guinea, eastern Indonesia and north/northwestern Australia.

  16. Assessment of Mitigation Systems on Vapor Intrusion ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vapor intrusion is the migration of subsurface vapors, including radon and volatile organic compounds (VOCs), in soil gas from the subsurface to indoor air. Vapor intrusion happens because there are pressure and concentration differentials between indoor air and soil gas. Indoor environments are often negatively pressurized with respect to outdoor air and soil gas (for example, from exhaust fans or the stack effect), and this pressure difference allows soil gas containing subsurface vapors to flow into indoor air through advection. In addition, concentration differentials cause VOCs and radon to migrate from areas of higher to lower concentrations through diffusion, which is another cause of vapor intrusion. Current practice for evaluating the vapor intrusion pathway involves a multiple line of evidence approach based on direct measurements in groundwater, external soil gas, subslab soil gas, and/or indoor air. No single line of evidence is considered definitive, and direct measurements of vapor intrusion can be costly, especially where significant spatial and temporal variability require repeated measurements at multiple locations to accurately assess the chronic risks of long-term exposure to volatile organic compounds (VOCs) like chloroform, perchloroethylene (PCE), and trichloroethylene (TCE).

  17. The Hidden Zone of the Skaergaard Intrusion Revealed

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, Christian; Salmonsen, Lars Peter

    2013-04-01

    The Hidden Zone of Skaergaard was hypothesized by LR Wager and co-workers as representing a large, unexposed, basal cumulate series rich in calcic plagioclase and with subordinate olivine and pyroxene. Although the size, shape and composition of this subzone have been debated, all subsequent works include it in their models. In 1966 a team from Oxford and Cambridge drilled a core penetrating most of Lower Zone a of the exposed Layered Series and c. 150 metres into the Hidden Zone. This core was drilled close to the western margin of the intrusion but did not reach the base although S. Maaløe argued it stopped near to the basement contact. Recent work on this core is underway by M. Holness and co-workers. Here we report on "new" outcrops at Dobbeltgletscheren in the central, basal zone of the northern part of the intrusion; these outcrops appear to be exposed only recently due to melting of the glaciers. A c. 200 m thick section is exposed. Upwards the section grades into typical Lower Zone rocks. Downwards the section is covered by ice and moraine, and the contact to the underlying basement is not exposed. The lowermost outcrops are composed of fine-grained, olivine-rich micro-troctolite layered on a scale of centimetres to decimetres. The melanocratic layers have a distinct sugary texture due to abundant (up to 60% by volume), equant olivine grains typically 0.5-1 mm across. The plagioclase is of similar size and with habits ranging from subhedral laths to anhedral grains interstitial to olivine, and oikocrysts of Ca-rich and Ca-poor pyroxene enclose equant olivine and subhedral plagioclase laths as chadacrysts. The lighter coloured mesocratic layers show the same mineralogy with less olivine (up to 40%) and more and slightly larger plagioclase relative to the melanocratic layers. Upsection the layering largely fades away and the grain size increases gradually reaching textures similar to typical Lower Zone a. Olivine (Fo72-64, 0.22-0.17 wt% NiO) and plagioclase

  18. Petrology of the Upper Border Series of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmonsen, L.; Tegner, C.; Jakobsen, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    The Upper Border Series crystallized downwards from the roof of the Skaergaard magma chamber. It met with the Layered Series that crystallized upwards from the floor in the Sandwich Horizon that contains the last and most evolved rocks of the intrusion. Previous investigations of the Upper Border Series (Naslund, 1984) have shown that the compositional trends of plagioclase, olivine and pyroxene largely mirror those of the Layered Series. At the same time it was argued that the crystallization sequence in Upper Border Series differed from the Layered Series in that apatite precipitated before magnetite that, in turn, appeared before Ca-rich pyroxene. From the existing data the magma from which the Upper Border Series crystallized was inferred to be enriched in SiO2, K2O, P2O5 and H2O relative to the magma in the lower parts of the intrusion. This has lead to the conception that the Upper Border Series crystallized from a chemically different magma. Here we present new petrography, mineralogy and bulk compositions for samples collected in three profiles through the Upper Border Series (Kilen, Hammerpas and Brødretoppen transects). Although euhedral apatite is present throughout most of the Upper Border Series, we interpret a marked increase in modal apatite late in the crystallization sequence as marking its first appearance on the liquidus at the crystallization front. The plagioclase An% at this level in the Upper Border Series is ˜40 and is identical with plagioclase An% at the level of apatite-in in the Layered Series. Similarly, we find that the plagioclase An% at the onset of FeTi-oxide and sulphide precipitation in the Upper Border Series (52 and 47, respectively) and Layered Series are alike. Finally, we interpret abundant augite in Upper Border Series rocks before magnetite-in as a cumulus phase. We therefore conclude that the crystallization sequences of the two series are identical. The new bulk rock data reveal that the Upper Border Series and the

  19. Lateral Reactive Infiltration in a Vertical Gabbroic Crystal Mush, Skaergaard Intrusion, East Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Namur, O.; Humphreys, M.; Holness, M. B.

    2012-12-01

    The Marginal Border Series of the Skaergaard intrusion (East Greenland) is comprised of rocks having crystallized in situ along the vertical walls of the magma chambers. It is subdivided into an outer Unbanded Division and an inner Banded Division. The Banded Division contains abundant cm- to dm-thick bands dominated by fine-grained mafic minerals, with a morphology evolving from almost planar to deeply scalloped and fingered with increasing distance from the intrusion margin. The morphology of these bands is reminiscent of the reaction fronts described in sedimentary basins infiltrated by reactive fluid. We propose that the banding in the Skaergaard Marginal Border Series is produced by chemical disequilibrium into the crystal mush resulting from the suction of primitive liquid from the main magma body into the crystal mush. Shrinkage of the mush during solidification is the driving force for liquid migration. Liquid porous flow produces partial dissolution of evolved pre-existing mafic minerals in the mush, which changes the new mush liquid composition to one capable of crystallizing mafic rocks with a very minor plagioclase component. Abrupt solidification of this liquid, which results in the formation of the actual colloform bands, is explained by supersaturation of some mafic mineral components (e.g. olivine, clinopyroxene, Fe-Ti oxides) in the infiltrating melt. The morphological evolution of the colloform bands, from almost planar to deeply scalloped and fingered with increasing distance from the intrusion margin, is thought to result from increasing crystal mush thickness with progressive differentiation.

  20. Rock mechanics. Second edition

    SciTech Connect

    Jumikis, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    Rock Mechanics, 2nd Edition deals with rock as an engineering construction material-a material with which, upon which, and within which civil engineers build structures. It thus pertains to hydraulic structures engineering; to highway, railway, canal, foundation, and tunnel engineering; and to all kinds of rock earthworks and to substructures in rock. Major changes in this new edition include: rock classification, rock types and description, rock testing equipment, rock properties, stability effects of discontinuity and gouge, grouting, gunite and shotcrete, and Lugeon's water test. This new edition also covers rock bolting and prestressing, pressure-grouted soil anchors, and rock slope stabilization.

  1. Rock Driller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    The next series of planetary exploration missions require a method of extracting rock and soil core samples. Therefore a prototype ultrasonic core driller (UTCD) was developed to meet the constraints of Small Bodies Exploration and Mars Sample Return Missions. The constraints in the design are size, weight, power, and axial loading. The ultrasonic transducer requires a relatively low axial load, which is one of the reasons this technology was chosen. The ultrasonic generator breadboard section can be contained within the 5x5x3 limits and weighs less than two pounds. Based on results attained the objectives for the first phase were achieved. A number of transducer probes were made and tested. One version only drills, and the other will actually provide a small core from a rock. Because of a more efficient transducer/probe, it will run at very low power (less than 5 Watts) and still drill/core. The prototype generator was built to allow for variation of all the performance-effecting elements of the transducer/probe/end effector, i.e., pulse, duty cycle, frequency, etc. The heart of the circuitry is what will be converted to a surface mounted board for the next phase, after all the parameters have been optimized and the microprocessor feedback can be installed.

  2. Experimental effects of pressure and fluorine on apatite saturation in mafic magmas, with reference to layered intrusions and massif anorthosites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tollari, N.; Baker, D. R.; Barnes, S.-J.

    2008-08-01

    Apatite is a cumulate phase in the upper parts of some mafic layered intrusions and anorthositic complexes. We investigated the effect of pressure and fluorine on apatite saturation in mafic magmas to better understand under which conditions this mineral crystallizes. Apatite saturation gives information about the formation of silicate rocks, and is of interest in explaining the formation of apatite-oxide-rich rocks (e.g. nelsonites comprising approximately, one-third apatite and two-third Fe-Ti oxide). Two models of formation are proposed for this rock type: crystal fractionation followed by accumulation of apatite and Fe-Ti oxides and liquid immiscibility. New experiments carried out with mafic compositions at 500 MPa confirm that the most important variables on phosphate saturation are SiO2 and CaO. Fluorine addition leads to apatite saturation at lower SiO2 and higher CaO concentrations. Comparison of our results with those of previous experimental studies on liquid-liquid immiscibility at upper-to-mid-crustal conditions allows us to investigate the relative importance of apatite saturation versus liquid-liquid immiscibility in the petrogenesis of nelsonites and similar rocks. The liquid line of descent of three natural examples studied (the Sept-Îles intrusive suite, the anorthositic Complex of the Lac-St-Jean and the Skaergaard layered intrusion) do not cross the liquid-liquid immiscibility field before they reach apatite saturation. Thus, the apatite-oxide-rich rock associated with these three intrusive suites are best explained by crystal fractionation followed by accumulation of apatite and Fe-Ti oxides.

  3. Comparative petrogenesis of anorthositic and troctolitic series rocks of the Duluth Complex, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D. Jr.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of new mapping in the NW part of the Middle Proterozoic Duluth Complex in NE Minnesota reinforces the view that the Complex consists dominantly of two major lithostratigraphic units: an Anorthositic Series (AS) and a Troctolitic Series (TS) dominated by troctolite and olivine gabbro. Consistent intrusive and inclusive relationships confirm that AS rocks are older than TS. Interpretations of field, petrographic, and petrochemical data imply that the petrogenesis of the two rock series differed in at least four significant ways: 1) While parent magmas to both rock series could have been derived from high-Al olivine tholeiite primary magmas by fractional crystallization of Pl+Ol+Cpx+Sp in lower to intermediate crustal (40-15 km) chambers, AS parent magmas were generally more evolved than TS magmas upon their introduction into the Duluth Complex. 2) As magmas were intruded as plagioclase crystal muses (less than or equal to50% crystals), whereas later TS intrusions contained rare or minor intratelluric plagioclase and olivine. Periodic intrusions of viscous AS mushes probably caused much of the structural complexity ubiquitous to these rocks. 3) Although parent magmas to both rock series were saturated in plagioclase upon intrusion, AS magmas were less often saturated in olivine than were TS magmas. 4) TS rocks record fractional crystallization within Duluth Complex chambers; however, the extent and pattern of differentiation often reflects repeated replenishment of more primitive magmas.

  4. SW U. S. diabase province: A 1. 1-Ga intrusion event of middle Grenville and middle Keweenawan age

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, C.M.; Elston, D.P. ); Wrucke, C.T. )

    1993-02-01

    Diabase in the southwestern US intrudes Middle Proterozoic stratified rocks as sills and Early and Middle Proterozoic crystalline rocks as subhorizontal sheets and subvertical dikes. It is discontinuous in a broad belt extending from western Texas to southeastern California. The best known intrusions are sills in Middle Proterozoic strata in Death Valley, Grand Canyon, and central Arizona. Sparse to rare dikes in some of these strata trend mostly north but range from north-northeast to west-northwest. Diabase dikes widespread in crystalline rocks in western Arizona and adjacent parts of southeastern California strike from north to west-northwest, but are predominantly northwesterly. Dikes and sheets are also present in crystalline rocks in the southern Pinaleno Mountains, southeastern Arizona, where dikes strike west-northwest. The northwest trend of the diabase province and prevalent northwesterly trend of dikes in crystalline rocks suggest that intrusion was controlled by an approximately horizontal least compressive stress field roughly parallel to the Grenville Front. Radiometric ages of Arizona and California diabase indicate emplacement at [approximately]1,100 Ma. Paleomagnetic poles from diabase sills and enclosing stratified rocks in Arizona correlate with poles reported from middle and early-late Keweenawan rocks of Lake Superior. Emplacement of the diabase coincides with: (1) the middle Keweenawan eruptive and intrusive episode of the Midcontinent Rift System; (2) a major episode of (middle) Grenville thrusting and deformation documented in the Van Horn area; and (3) a time of abrupt reversal in North American apparent polar wander. These interrelated manifestations presumably arose in response to a major episode of plate interaction and collision between North American and a plate that encroached from the southeast.

  5. Dynamic immune intrusion detection system for IPv6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yao, Li; Li, Zhi-tang; Hao, Tu

    2005-03-01

    We have set up a project aimed at developing a dynamical immune intrusion detection system for IPv6 and protecting the next generation Internet from intrusion. We focus on investigating immunelogical principles in designing a dynamic multi-agent system for intrusion detection in IPv6 environment, instead of attempting to describe all that is intrusion in the network try and describe what is normal use and define "non-self" as intrusion. The proposed intrusion detection system is designed as flexible, extendible, and adaptable in order to meet the needs and preferences of network administrators for IPv6 environment.

  6. Monoclinal bending of strata over laccolithic intrusions

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Koch, F.G.; Johnson, A.M.; Pollard, D.D.

    1981-01-01

    Sedimentary strata on top of some laccolithic intrusions are nearly horizontal and little deformed, but are bent into steeply dipping monoclinal flexures over the peripheries of these intrusions. This form of bending is not explained by previous theories of laccolithic intrusion, which predict either horizontal undeformed strata over the center and faulted strata around the periphery, or strata bent continuously into a dome. However, a slight generalization of these theories accomodates the observed form and contains the previous forms as special cases. A critical assumption is that the strength of contacts within a multilayered overburden is overcome locally by layer-parallel shear. If this strength is less than the strength of the layers themselves, then layers over the center remain bonded together and display negligible bending, whereas layers over the periphery slip over one another and are readily bent into a monoclinal flexure. ?? 1981.

  7. High-resolution insights into episodes of crystallization, hydrothermal alteration and remelting in the Skaergaard intrusive complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wotzlaw, Jörn-Frederik; Bindeman, Ilya N.; Schaltegger, Urs; Brooks, C. Kent; Naslund, H. Richard

    2012-11-01

    This paper presents a new high-precision zircon U-Pb geochronological view on the crystallization and assembly process of one of the most important and intensely studied intrusive bodies on Earth—the Skaergaard intrusion in East Greenland. With analytical uncertainties of a few tens of thousands of years, we were able to resolve several important events during cooling of this intrusion. Initial cooling of the shallowly intruded ˜300 km3 of tholeiitic basaltic magma from liquidus to zircon saturation at ˜1000 °C is recorded by a precise zircon crystallization age of 55.960±0.018 Ma of an intercumulus gabbroic pegmatite in the lower portion of the intrusion. Based on this zircon crystallization age and a published cooling model we estimate the "true" age of emplacement to be ˜56.02 Ma. The last portions of Skaergaard appear to crystallize completely ˜100 ka after emplacement as recorded by abundant ˜55.91-55.93 Ma zircons in the Sandwich Horizon (SH), where lower and upper solidification fronts met. Intrusion of an isotopically distinct new magma batch, the ˜600 m thick Basistoppen Sill, into the solidified upper portion of Skaergaard, happened at 55.895±0.018 Ma, suggesting close timing between crystallization of evolved rocks around the SH and intrusion of the Basistoppen Sill. The novel result of this work is the demonstration that zircons in the SH, >100 m below the Basistoppen contact, have a bimodal age distribution, with the youngest population of 55.838±0.019 Ma postdating intrusion of the Basistoppen Sill by 57±37 ka. Oxygen isotope analyses reveal that SH zircons are low and heterogeneous with respect to δ18O. These results support the proposed conclusion that the SH crystallized twice: it was fully crystalline, then hydrothermally-altered by low-δ18O surface waters and subsequently partially remelted, triggered by heat of the Basistoppen Sill. The low-degree partial melt generated during remelting partially migrated upward by intergranular

  8. An automatically tuning intrusion detection system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhenwei; Tsai, Jeffrey J P; Weigert, Thomas

    2007-04-01

    An intrusion detection system (IDS) is a security layer used to detect ongoing intrusive activities in information systems. Traditionally, intrusion detection relies on extensive knowledge of security experts, in particular, on their familiarity with the computer system to be protected. To reduce this dependence, various data-mining and machine learning techniques have been deployed for intrusion detection. An IDS is usually working in a dynamically changing environment, which forces continuous tuning of the intrusion detection model, in order to maintain sufficient performance. The manual tuning process required by current systems depends on the system operators in working out the tuning solution and in integrating it into the detection model. In this paper, an automatically tuning IDS (ATIDS) is presented. The proposed system will automatically tune the detection model on-the-fly according to the feedback provided by the system operator when false predictions are encountered. The system is evaluated using the KDDCup'99 intrusion detection dataset. Experimental results show that the system achieves up to 35% improvement in terms of misclassification cost when compared with a system lacking the tuning feature. If only 10% false predictions are used to tune the model, the system still achieves about 30% improvement. Moreover, when tuning is not delayed too long, the system can achieve about 20% improvement, with only 1.3% of the false predictions used to tune the model. The results of the experiments show that a practical system can be built based on ATIDS: system operators can focus on verification of predictions with low confidence, as only those predictions determined to be false will be used to tune the detection model.

  9. Paleomagnetism of the Miocene intrusive suite of Kidd Creek: Timing of deformation in the Cascade arc, southern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Swanson, D.A.; Snee, L.W.

    1998-01-01

    Paleomagnetic study of the intrusive suite of Kidd Creek in the southern Washington Cascades (23 sites in dikes and sills) was undertaken to help determine if these rocks are comagmatic and whether they postdate regional folding of the volcanic arc. Fission track and 40Ar-39Ar age determinations indicate an age of ???12.7 Ma (middle Miocene) for these rocks. The similarity of normal-polarity characteristic directions for most samples corroborate the available geochemical data indicating that these rocks are most likely comagmatic. Reversed-polarity directions for samples from four sites, however, show that emplacement of Kidd Creek intrusions spanned at least one reversal of the geomagnetic field. The paleomagnetic directions for the dikes and sills fail a fold test at the 99% confidence level indicating that the Kidd Creek rocks postdate regional folding. The mean in situ direction also indicates that the Kidd Creek and older rocks have been rotated 22?? ?? 6?? clockwise about a vertical or near-vertical axis from the expected Miocene direction. Compression and regional folding of the Cascade arc in southern Washington therefore had ended by ???12 Ma prior to the onset of deformation resulting in rotation of these rocks.

  10. Sulfur Isotopic Composition and Behavior in Granitoid Intrusions, southwestern New Brunswick, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Lentz, D. R.

    2004-05-01

    Bulk sulfur isotopic composition and sulfur content were determined for 12 granitoid intrusions (48 samples) associated with various types of mineralization (e.g., Au, Sb-W-Mo-Au, W-Sn-In-Zn-Pb-Cu) and the pertinent wallrocks (7 samples), in southwestern New Brunswick, Canada. This data together with data from field relations, magnetic susceptibility, sulfide mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry, were used to characterize these intrusions. Two distinct groups can be established, although both show some features of I-type grantiods: (1) a Late Devonian granitic series (GS) including the Mount Pleasant, True Hill, Beech Hill, Pleasant Ridge, Kedron, Sorrel Ridge granites, and (2) a Late Silurian to Early Devonian granodioritic to monzogranitic series (GMS) including the Magaguadavic, Bocabec, Utopia, Tower Hill, Evandale, and Lake George intrusions. The former occur along the northwestern flank of the Saint George Batholith as satellite plutons, and the later form parts of this batholith and the Pokiok Batholith to the north. The GS rocks show the attributes of evolved I-type with some A-type features, whereas the GMS rocks are either reduced I-type (ilmenite-series), or normal I-type (magnetite-series). Strong assimilation and contamination by local metasedimentary rocks lead to the Tower Hill granite resembling S-type, e.g., the presence of muscovite and garnet. The GS type rocks have δ 34S values between -7.1 and +13 per mil with bulk-S content ranging from 33 to 3434 ppm. The GMS type rocks have relatively narrower variation in δ 34S values (-4.4 to +7.3 per mil), but with larger ranges of bulk-S content (45 to 11100 ppm). The granite samples with S contents much higher than its solubility in felsic melts are interpreted to be affected either by local metasedimentary rocks or by late stage hydrothermal alteration. The metasedimentary rocks contain variable S contents (707 to 14000 ppm) with δ 34S values of -10.6 to 0.1 per mil. In terms of mass balance, a

  11. Magma rheology variation in sheet intrusions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C.; O'Driscoll, B.; Petronis, M. S.; Stevenson, C.

    2013-12-01

    The rheology of magma fundamentally controls igneous intrusion style as well as the explosivity and type of volcanic eruptions. Importantly, the dynamic interplay between the viscosity of magma and other processes active during intrusion (e.g., crystallisation, magma mixing, assimilation of crystal mushes and/or xenolith entrainment) will likely bear an influence on the temporal variation of magma rheology. Constraining the timing of rheological changes during magma transit therefore plays an important role in understanding the nuances of volcanic systems. However, the rheological evolution of actively emplacing igneous intrusions cannot be directly studied. While significant advances have been made via experimental modelling and analysis of lava flows, how these findings relate to intruding magma remains unclear. This has led to an increasing number of studies that analyse various characteristics of fully crystallised intrusions in an attempt to ';back-out' the rheological conditions governing emplacement. For example, it has long been known that crystallinity affects the rheology and, consequently, the velocity of intruding magma. This means that quantitative textural analysis of crystal populations (e.g., crystal size distribution; CSD) used to elucidate crystallinity at different stages of emplacement can provide insights into magma rheology. Similarly, methods that measure flow-related fabrics (e.g., anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility; AMS) can be used to discern velocity profiles, a potential proxy for the magma rheology. To illustrate these ideas, we present an integrated AMS and petrological study of several sheet intrusions located within the Ardnamurchan Central Complex, NW Scotland. We focus on the entrainment and transport dynamics of gabbroic inclusions that were infiltrated by the host magma upon entrainment. Importantly, groundmass magnetic fabrics within and external to these inclusions are coaxial. This implies that a deviatoric stress was

  12. Computationally Efficient Neural Network Intrusion Security Awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Vollmer; Milos Manic

    2009-08-01

    An enhanced version of an algorithm to provide anomaly based intrusion detection alerts for cyber security state awareness is detailed. A unique aspect is the training of an error back-propagation neural network with intrusion detection rule features to provide a recognition basis. Network packet details are subsequently provided to the trained network to produce a classification. This leverages rule knowledge sets to produce classifications for anomaly based systems. Several test cases executed on ICMP protocol revealed a 60% identification rate of true positives. This rate matched the previous work, but 70% less memory was used and the run time was reduced to less than 1 second from 37 seconds.

  13. Convective, intrusive geothermal plays: what about tectonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santilano, A.; Manzella, A.; Gianelli, G.; Donato, A.; Gola, G.; Nardini, I.; Trumpy, E.; Botteghi, S.

    2015-09-01

    We revised the concept of convective, intrusive geothermal plays, considering that the tectonic setting is not, in our opinion, a discriminant parameter suitable for a classification. We analysed and compared four case studies: (i) Larderello (Italy), (ii) Mt Amiata (Italy), (iii) The Geysers (USA) and (iv) Kizildere (Turkey). The tectonic settings of these geothermal systems are different and a matter of debate, so it is hard to use this parameter, and the results of classification are ambiguous. We suggest a classification based on the age and nature of the heat source and the related hydrothermal circulation. Finally we propose to distinguish the convective geothermal plays as volcanic, young intrusive and amagmatic.

  14. Assessment of the long-term risks of inadvertent human intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wuschke, D.M. )

    1993-01-01

    Canada has conducted an extensive research program on the safe disposal of nuclear fuel wastes. The program has focused on the concept of disposal of spent fuel in durable containers in an engineered facility, or vault, 500 to 1000 m deep in intrusive igneous rock in the Canadian Shield. An essential goal of this program has been to develop and demonstrate a methodology to evaluate the performance of the facility against safety criteria established by Canada's regulatory agency, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). These criteria are expressed in terms of risk, where risk is defined as the sum over all significant scenarios of the product of the probability of the scenario, the magnitude of the resultant dose, and the probability of a health effect per unit dose. This paper describes the methodology developed to assess the long-term risk from inadvertent human intrusion into such a facility and the results of its application to a conceptual design of such a facility.

  15. 40Ar/39Ar dates from alkaline intrusions of the northern Crazy Mountains, south-central Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlan, S. S.

    2005-05-01

    The Crazy Mountains basin of south-central Montana is a complex foreland basin that formed during the interaction of thin-skinned, decollement-style folds of the Montana thrust belt and the basement-involved folds and thrust faults of the Rocky Mountain foreland province. Near the depositional center of the basin, synorogenic strata of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation have been intruded and locally thermally metamorphosed by strongly alkaline to subalkaline Tertiary intrusive rocks. The subalkaline rocks are found mostly in the southern Crazy Mountains and form stocks (Big Timber stock, Loco Mountain stock), radiating dikes and sills. With the exception of the Ibex Mountain sill (?), the alkaline rocks are restricted to the northern Crazy Mountains. New 40Ar/39Ar dates are reported from the strongly alkaline rocks, including the Comb Creek stock and dike swarm, the Ibex Mountain sill(?), and sills from the Robinson anticline intrusive complex. The alkaline rocks of the Robinson anticline intrusive complex are exposed in the easternmost folds of the Cordilleran fold and thrust belt, but despite their arcuate and apparently folded map geometry they have been shown to post-date folding. Hornblende from a trachyte sill in the Robinson anticline intrusive complex yielded a relatively simple age spectrum with a weighted mean of 50.61 ± 0.14 Ma (2σ), which probably records the age of sill emplacement. Nepheline syenite and mafic nepheline syenites of the Comb Creek stock and a dike from its radial dike swarm, two sills from the Robinson antlicline intrusive complex, and the Ibex Mountains sill(?) gave biotite plateau dates ranging from 50.03 to 50.22 Ma, with 2σ errors of ± 0.11 to 0.19 Ma. Because these dates are from fairly small, hypabyssal intrusions, they must have cooled quickly and thus these dates closely approximate the emplacement age of the intrusions. These data indicate that the strongly alkaline intrusions were emplaced during a fairly restricted

  16. Paleomagnetism of Middle Proterozoic mafic intrusions and Upper Proterozoic (Nankoweap) red beds from the Lower Grand Canyon Supergroup, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Arlo B.; Geissman, John W.; Heizler, Matt; Van der Voo, Rob

    2003-11-01

    Paleomagnetic data from lavas and dikes of the Unkar igneous suite (16 sites) and sedimentary rocks of the Nankoweap Formation (7 sites), Grand Canyon Supergroup (GCSG), Arizona, provide two primary paleomagnetic poles for Laurentia for the latest Middle Proterozoic (ca. 1090 Ma) at 32°N, 185°E (dp=6.8°, dm=9.3°) and early Late Proterozoic (ca. 850-900 Ma) at 10°S, 163°E (dp=3.5°, dm=7.0°). A new 40Ar/ 39Ar age determination from an Unkar dike gives an interpreted intrusion age of about 1090 Ma, similar to previously reported geochronologic data for the Cardenas Basalts and associated intrusions. The paleomagnetic data show no evidence of any younger, middle Late Proterozoic tectonothermal event such as has been revealed in previous geochronologic studies of the Unkar igneous suite. The pole position for the Unkar Group Cardenas Basalts and related intrusions is in good agreement with other ca. 1100 Ma paleomagnetic poles from the Keweenawan midcontinent rift deposits and other SW Laurentia diabase intrusions. The close agreement in age and position of the Unkar intrusion (UI) pole with poles derived from rift related rocks from elsewhere in Laurentia indicates that mafic magmatism was essentially synchronous and widespread throughout Laurentia at ca. 1100 Ma, suggesting a large-scale continental magmatic event. The pole position for the Nankoweap Formation, which plots south of the Unkar mafic rocks, is consistent with a younger age of deposition, at about 900 to 850 Ma, than had previously been proposed. Consequently, the inferred ˜200 Ma difference in age between the Cardenas Basalts and overlying Nankoweap Formation provides evidence for a third major unconformity within the Grand Canyon sequence.

  17. BTSC VAPOR INSTRUSION PRIMER "VAPOR INTRUSION CONSIDERATION FOR REDEVELOPMENT"

    EPA Science Inventory

    This primer is designed for brownfields stakeholders concerned about vapor intrusion, including property owners, real estate developers, and contractors performing environmental site investigations. It provides an overview of the vapor intrusion issue and how it can impact the ap...

  18. Vapor Intrusion Characterization Report (Revision 1.0)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Vapor Intrusion Characterization Report (Revision 1) - February 5, 2015: This report, which was approved by the EPA on February 18, 2015, documents the results from implementation of the Final Vapor Intrusion Characterization Work Plan.

  19. The Diamond Model of Intrusion Analysis

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-07-05

    Frederick. Intrusion Signatures and Analysis. New Riders Publishing, Indianapolis, IN, USA, 2001. [9] SANS. [ONLINE] http://www.sans.org. [10] Bernhard ...1):29–46, 1997. [29] John D. Howard and Thomas A. Longstaff. A common lanaguage for computer security incidents. Technical Report SAND98-8667, Sandia

  20. Chemical Observations of a Polar Vortex Intrusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Douglass, A. R.; McGee, T. J.; Browell, E.; Waters, J.; Livesey, N.; Read, W.; Froidevaux, L.

    2006-01-01

    An intrusion of vortex edge air in D the interior of the Arctic polar vortex was observed on the January 31,2005 flight of the NASA DC-8 aircraft. This intrusion was identified as anomalously high values of ozone by the AROTAL and DIAL lidars. Our analysis shows that this intrusion formed when a blocking feature near Iceland collapsed, allowing edge air to sweep into the vortex interior. along the DC-8 flight track also shows the intrusion in both ozone and HNO3. Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were observed by the DIAL lidar on the DC-8. The spatial variability of the PSCs can be explained using MLS HNO3 and H2O observations and meteorological analysis temperatures. We also estimate vortex denitrification using the relationship between N2O and HNO3. Reverse domain fill back trajectory calculations are used to focus on the features in the MLS data. The trajectory results improve the agreement between lidar measured ozone and MLS ozone and also improve the agreement between the HNO3 measurements PSC locations. The back trajectory calculations allow us to compute the local denitrification rate and reduction of HCl within the filament. We estimate a denitrification rate of about lO%/day after exposure to below PSC formation temperature. Analysis of Aura MLS observations made

  1. ON-LINE CALCULATOR: VAPOR INTRUSION MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion (VI). Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors, which may migrate through subsurface soils and may enter the indoor air of overlying build...

  2. Intrusion of Soil Water through Pipe Cracks

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a series of experiments conducted at U.S. EPA’s Test and Evaluation Facility in 2013-2014 to study the intrusion of contaminated soil water into a pipe crack during simulated backflow events. A test rig was used consisting of a 3’ x 3’ x 3’ acrylic soil bo...

  3. Non-Intrusive Grammar in Writing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Claudette M.; Boggase, Barbara A.

    Since introducing a grammar unit can be daunting and frustrating for both teachers and students, a collaborative unit for a 10th-grade class was planned that would satisfy an administrative requirement but also maintain the integrity of the writing program. The unit was planned by developing an approach of non-intrusive grammar instruction at the…

  4. An Adaptive Database Intrusion Detection System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrios, Rita M.

    2011-01-01

    Intrusion detection is difficult to accomplish when attempting to employ current methodologies when considering the database and the authorized entity. It is a common understanding that current methodologies focus on the network architecture rather than the database, which is not an adequate solution when considering the insider threat. Recent…

  5. Evaluation of Seawater Intrusion Potential into a Coastal Underground Oil Storage Cavern in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Lim, J.; Moon, H.; Lee, K.

    2010-12-01

    Underground oil storage caverns have been operated in Korea since 1990s, and the facility at Yeosu, south coast of Korea, is one of the largest underground oil storage facilities in Korea. Hydrologic and water quality monitoring of the facility has been performed to find out whether the facility maintains secure containment condition and long-term stability. Recently, seawater intrusion into the base of the storage cavern was suspected based on the long-term monitoring of water levels and chemical analyses of seepage water pumped out from cavern bottom. The sudden decrease of water pressure during the construction of storage tunnel seems to cause the inland movement of saline water. In this study, numerical analysis was performed to estimate the potential of seawater intrusion into underground oil storage cavern using a three dimensional groundwater simulation model, FEFLOW (Diersch, 2005). The geometry of the cavern and water curtain was represented by using the implemented functions. The groundwater flow field and seawater intrusion in response to construction activity was also estimated. The simulation results were validated by comparing EC and salinity of seepage water monitoring data. Sensitivity analyses on hydraulic conductivity and water pressure from the water curtain or injection well were also conducted. Relatively high groundwater level was observed at this site due to the low hydraulic conductivity of base rock and high altitude of the mountains. Therefore, the amount of intruded seawater does not seem to be significant. However, apparent decrease of water level was observed along the main fracture zone and seawater could be intruded along these paths. Simulation results show that the seawater intrusion to the cavern is mainly controlled by the fracture zone, which would be the main channel of groundwater movement. The injection of fresh water to the injection wells along the coast may retard the intrusion of seawater.

  6. Geochemical reconnaissance for uranium occurrences in the Notch Peak intrusive area, House Range, Millard County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, R.A.; Robinson, Keith

    1982-01-01

    Samples collected from the contact metamorphic zone of the Notch Peak intrusive area, House Range, Millard County, Utah, indicate the occurrence of low-grade uranium and thorium ore. Maximum abundances in the altered mineralized rocks in the contact zone are 450 ppm uranium and 480 ppm thorium. Interpretation of factor analysis of the spectrochemical and delayed neutron analytical data suggests the presence of five geological factors which account for 82 percent of element covariance of 34 elements in 61 samples. The factors are identified as (1) limestone source rock reactions; (2) monzonite source rock reactions; (3) hydrothermal element group 1; (4) rare earth group; and (5) hydrothermal element group 2. The last factor effects the distribution of, primarily, beryllium, uranium, copper, molybdenum, tungsten, niobium, and secondarily, thorium, tin, and zinc; it is identified as the prime mineralization factor. The Notch Peak intrusive area has been a tungsten producing area since before the 1940's and the location of small-scale gold placer operations. This reconnaissance study was a 'follow-up' of uranium anomaly data which were developed during the U.S. Dept. of Energy National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program in 1978-80.

  7. How stratospheric are deep stratospheric intrusions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickl, T.; Vogelmann, H.; Giehl, H.; Scheel, H.-E.; Sprenger, M.; Stohl, A.

    2014-06-01

    Preliminary attempts of quantifying the stratospheric ozone contribution in the observations at the Zugspitze summit (2962 m a.s.l.) next to Garmisch-Partenkirchen in the German Alps had yielded an approximate doubling of the stratospheric fraction of the Zugspitze ozone during the time period 1978 and 2004. These investigations had been based on data filtering by using low relative humidity and elevated 7Be as the criteria for selecting half-hour intervals of ozone data representative of stratospheric intrusion air. For quantifying the residual stratospheric component in stratospherically influenced air masses, however, the mixing of tropospheric air into the stratospheric intrusion layers must be taken into account. In fact, the dew-point-mirror instrument at the Zugspitze summit station rarely registers relative humidity (RH) values lower than 10% in stratospheric air intrusions. Since 2007 a programme of routine lidar sounding of ozone, water vapour and aerosol has been conducted in the Garmisch-Partenkirchen area. The lidar results demonstrate that the intrusion layers are dryer by roughly one order of magnitude than indicated in the in-situ measurements. Even in thin layers frequently RH values clearly below 1% have been observed. These thin, undiluted layers present an important challenge for atmospheric modelling. Although the ozone values never reach values typical of the lower-stratosphere it becomes, thus, obvious that, without strong wind shear or convective processes, mixing of stratospheric and tropospheric air must be very slow in most of the free troposphere. As a consequence, the analysis the Zugspitze data can be assumed to be more reliable than anticipated. Finally, the concentrations of Zugspitze carbon monoxide rarely drop inside intrusion layers and normally stay clearly above full stratospheric values. This indicates that most of the CO and, thus, the intrusion air mass originate in the shallow "mixing layer" around the thermal tropopause

  8. How stratospheric are deep stratospheric intrusions?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trickl, T.; Vogelmann, H.; Giehl, H.; Scheel, H.-E.; Sprenger, M.; Stohl, A.

    2014-09-01

    Preliminary attempts of quantifying the stratospheric ozone contribution in the observations at the Zugspitze summit (2962 m a.s.l.) next to Garmisch-Partenkirchen in the German Alps had yielded an approximate doubling of the stratospheric fraction of the Zugspitze ozone during the time period 1978 to 2004. These investigations had been based on data filtering by using low relative humidity (RH) and elevated 7Be as the criteria for selecting half-hour intervals of ozone data representative of stratospheric intrusion air. To quantify the residual stratospheric component in stratospherically influenced air masses, however, the mixing of tropospheric air into the stratospheric intrusion layers must be taken into account. In fact, the dewpoint mirror instrument at the Zugspitze summit station rarely registers RH values lower than 10% in stratospheric air intrusions. Since 2007 a programme of routine lidar sounding of ozone, water vapour and aerosol has been conducted in the Garmisch-Partenkirchen area. The lidar results demonstrate that the intrusion layers are drier by roughly one order of magnitude than indicated in the in situ measurements. Even in thin layers RH values clearly below 1% have frequently been observed. These thin, undiluted layers present an important challenge for atmospheric modelling. Although the ozone values never reach values typical of the lower-stratosphere it becomes, thus, obvious that, without strong wind shear or convective processes, mixing of stratospheric and tropospheric air must be very slow in most of the free troposphere. As a consequence, the analysis the Zugspitze data can be assumed to be more reliable than anticipated. Finally, the concentrations of Zugspitze carbon monoxide rarely drop inside intrusion layers and normally stay clearly above full stratospheric values. This indicates that most of the CO, and thus the intrusion air mass, originates in the shallow "mixing layer" around the thermal tropopause. The CO mixing ratio in

  9. High-precision temporal constraints on intrusive magmatism of the Siberian Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Seth; Bowring, Sam; Pavlov, Volodia E.; Veselovsky, Roman V.

    2014-05-01

    The broad temporal coincidence between large igneous province magmatism and some of the most severe biotic/environmental crises in Earth history has led many to infer a causal connection between the two. Notable examples include the end-Permian mass extinction and eruption/emplacement of the Siberian Traps large igneous province (LIP) and the end-Triassic mass extinction and the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. In models proposing a causal connection between LIP magmatism and the environmental changes that lead to mass extinction, gases and particulates injected into the atmosphere are thought to cause abrupt changes in climate and ocean chemistry sufficient to drive mass extinction of marine and terrestrial biota. Magmatism has been proposed to cause voluminous volatile release via contact metamorphism of the sedimentary rocks. In the case of the Siberian Traps LIP, the compositions of sedimentary rocks (carbonates, evaporates, organic-rich shales) that host sills and dikes are ideal for greenhouse gas generation. When coupled with the enormous volume of Siberian LIP intrusive rocks, there is the potential for volatile generation on a scale necessary to drive environmental changes and mass extinction. This model must be tested by comparing the timing of intrusive magmatism with that of the mass extinction. Coupled high-precision geochronology and astrochronology have constrained the timing of biotic crisis and associated environmental perturbations from the deca-millennial to sub-millennial timescale, suggesting that the biotic crisis was abrupt, occurring over < 100 ka. Published geochronology on sills and dikes from the LIP are sparse and lack the necessary precision to resolve the relative timing of the two events outside of age uncertainty. We present new high-precision U-Pb zircon geochronology on seventeen gabbroic sills from throughout the magmatic province. This includes samples from the mineralized and differentiated intrusions in the Noril'sk region

  10. Modelling of deformation around magmatic intrusions with application to gold-related structures in the Yilgarn Craton, Western Australia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Y.; Karrech, A.; Schaubs, P. M.; Regenauer-Lieb, K.; Poulet, T.; Cleverley, J. S.

    2012-03-01

    This study simulates rock deformation around high temperature granite intrusions and explores how gold bearing shear zones near intrusions were developed in the Yilgarn, using a new continuum damage mechanics algorithm that considers the temperature and time dependent elastic-visco-plastic constitutive behaviour of crustal materials. The results demonstrate that strain rates have the most significant effects on structural patterns for both extensional and compressional cases. Smaller strain rates promote the formation of narrow high-strain shear zones and strong strain localisation along the flank or shoulder areas of the intrusion and cold granite dome. Wider diffuse shear zones are developed under higher strain rates due to strain hardening. The cooling of the intrusion to background temperatures occurred over a much shorter time interval when compared to the duration of deformation and shear zones development. Strong strain localisation near the intrusion and shear zone development in the crust occurred under both extensional and compressional conditions. There is always clear strain localisation around the shoulders of the intrusion and the flanks of the "cold" granitic dome in early deformation stages. In the models containing a pre-existing fault, strain localisation near the intrusion became asymmetric with much stronger localisation and the development of a damage zone at the shoulder adjacent to the reactivated fault. At higher deformation stages, the models produced a range of structural patterns including graben and half graben basin (extension), "pop-up" wedge structures (compression), tilted fault blocks and switch of shear movement from reverse to normal on shear zones. The model explains in part why a number of gold deposits (e.g. Wallaby and Paddington deposits) in the Yilgarn were formed near the flank of granite-cored domes and deep "tapping" faults, and shows that the new modelling approach is capable of realistically simulating high strain

  11. Intrusive Memories in Perpetrators of Violent Crime: Emotions and Cognitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ceri; Ehlers, Anke; Mezey, Gillian; Clark, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated factors that may determine whether perpetrators of violent crime develop intrusive memories of their offense. Of 105 young offenders who were convicted of killing or seriously harming others, 46% reported distressing intrusive memories, and 6% had posttraumatic stress disorder. Intrusions were associated with lower…

  12. Lunar Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1969-01-01

    The second manned lunar landing mission, Apollo 12 launched from launch pad 39-A at Kennedy Space Center in Florida on November 14, 1969 via a Saturn V launch vehicle. The Saturn V vehicle was developed by the Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) under the direction of Dr. Wernher von Braun. Aboard Apollo 12 was a crew of three astronauts: Alan L. Bean, pilot of the Lunar Module (LM), Intrepid; Richard Gordon, pilot of the Command Module (CM), Yankee Clipper; and Spacecraft Commander Charles Conrad. The LM, Intrepid, landed astronauts Conrad and Bean on the lunar surface in what's known as the Ocean of Storms while astronaut Richard Gordon piloted the CM, Yankee Clipper, in a parking orbit around the Moon. Lunar soil activities included the deployment of the Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package (ALSEP), finding the unmanned Surveyor 3 that landed on the Moon on April 19, 1967, and collecting 75 pounds (34 kilograms) of rock samples, some of which can be seen in this photograph. Apollo 12 safely returned to Earth on November 24, 1969.

  13. Petrogenesis of postcollisional magmatism at Scheelite Dome, Yukon, Canada: Evidence for a lithospheric mantle source for magmas associated with intrusion-related gold systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mair, John L.; Farmer, G. Lang; Groves, David I.; Hart, Craig J.R.; Goldfarb, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    The type examples for the class of deposits termed intrusion-related gold systems occur in the Tombstone-Tungsten belt of Alaska and Yukon, on the eastern side of the Tintina gold province. In this part of the northern Cordillera, extensive mid-Cretaceous postcollisional plutonism took place following the accretion of exotic terranes to the continental margin. The most cratonward of the resulting plutonic belts comprises small isolated intrusive centers, with compositionally diverse, dominantly potassic rocks, as exemplified at Scheelite Dome, located in central Yukon. Similar to other spatially and temporally related intrusive centers, the Scheelite Dome intrusions are genetically associated with intrusion-related gold deposits. Intrusions have exceptional variability, ranging from volumetrically dominant clinopyroxene-bearing monzogranites, to calc-alkaline minettes and spessartites, with an intervening range of intermediate to felsic stocks and dikes, including leucominettes, quartz monzonites, quartz monzodiorites, and granodiorites. All rock types are potassic, are strongly enriched in LILEs and LREEs, and feature high LILE/HFSE ratios. Clinopyroxene is common to all rock types and ranges from salite in felsic rocks to high Mg augite and Cr-rich diopside in lamprophyres. Less common, calcic amphibole ranges from actinolitic hornblende to pargasite. The rocks have strongly radiogenic Sr (initial 87Sr/86Sr from 0.711-0.714) and Pb isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb from 19.2-19.7), and negative initial εNd values (-8.06 to -11.26). Whole-rock major and trace element, radiogenic isotope, and mineralogical data suggest that the felsic to intermediate rocks were derived from mafic potassic magmas sourced from the lithospheric mantle via fractional crystallization and minor assimilation of metasedimentary crust. Mainly unmodified minettes and spessartites represent the most primitive and final phases emplaced. Metasomatic enrichments in the underlying lithospheric mantle

  14. Magnetic anomalies in Bahia Esperanza: A window of magmatic arc intrusions and glacier erosion over the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruiz-Constán, Ana; Pedrera, Antonio; Ghidella, Marta; Montes, Manuel; Nozal, Francisco; Rodríguez-Fernandez, Luis Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Bahia Esperanza, constituting the NE tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, is made up of Paleozoic clastic sedimentary rocks overlain by a Jurassic volcano-sedimentary series and intruded by Cretaceous gabbros and diorites. The area is located along the southern part of the Pacific Margin magnetic anomaly belt. Field magnetic researches during February 2010 contribute to determining the deep geometry of the intermediate and basic intrusive rocks. Moreover, the new field data help constrain the regional Pacific Margin Anomaly, characterized up to now only by aeromagnetic and marine data. Field magnetic susceptibility measurements of intrusive intermediate and basic rocks, responsible for magnetic anomalies, ranges from 0.5 × 10- 3 SI in diorites to values between 0.75 × 10- 3 SI and 1.3 × 10- 3 SI in gabbros. In addition, a significant remanent magnetism should also have contributed to the anomalies. The regional magnetic anomaly is characterized by a westward increase from 100 nT up to 750 nT, associated with large intrusive diorite bodies. They probably underlie most of the western slopes of Mount Flora. Gabbros in the Nobby Nunatak determine local residual rough anomalies that extend northwards and westwards, pointing to the irregular geometry of the top of the basic rocks bodies below the Pirámide Peak Glacier. However, the southern and eastern boundaries with the Buenos Aires Glacier are sharp related to deep glacier incision. As a result of the glacier dynamics, magnetic anomalies are also detected north of the Nobby Nunatak due to the extension of the anomalous body and the presence of gabbro blocks in the moraines. The Bahia Esperanza region is a key area where onshore field geological and magnetic research allows us to constrain the shape of the crustal igneous intrusions and the basement glacier geometry, providing accurate data that complete regional aeromagnetic research.

  15. Mapping faults and intrusions onshore Disko Island by use of Vibroseismic data, shallow marine seismic data and electromagnetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Ole R.; Nørmark, Egon; Gulbrandsen, Pelle; Sabra, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    The west Greenland margin is characterized by sedimentary basins containing high density of intrusions (dikes and sills) originating from the Cenozoic breakup and separation of Greenland and North American. The magmatic rocks have lately attracted interest due to observations of hydrocarbons associated to the intrusions but here due to the ore potential associated to the same intrusions. In 2000 a marine seismic campaign by GEUS in the coastal areas of West Greenland showed that it is possible to identify magmatic intrusions in the sedimentary succession as well as map normal faults, and that the intrusions are heterogeneous distributed and probably related to the normal faults. The presence of normal faults is known from the regional onshore geological mapping campaigns performed by GEUS. However, the marine seismic data indicate a much more complicated structural pattern than presented in the onshore maps, which is a well-known phenomenon (Marcussen et al., 2002). In 2012 and 2013 seismic data were acquired onshore on the northern coast of Disko as part of a research project funded by Avannaa Resources . The objective was initially to test whether it is possible to acquire data of a quality enabling the observation and mapping of intrusions in the subsurface. Later it was followed by a more extensive survey where it was attempted to map the depth to and geometry of the intrusions. The relatively dense seismic grid onshore -compared to the marine seismic data offshore west Greenland- enable the identification and more important the mapping of several intrusions. They show some of the same characteristics as intrusions observed at e.q. the Norwegian margin of the North Atlantic (Hansen et al., 2004). The preliminary results which integrate both marine and onshore seismic data revise the structural understanding of the area and indicate a close relation between the intrusions and the rift related normal faults. The results are consistent with remote sensing methods

  16. Igneous layering in the peralkaline intrusions ,Kola Peninsula :leading role of gravitational differentiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kogarko, L. N..

    2012-04-01

    In the center of Kola Peninsula there are two large layered intrusions of agpaitic nepheline syenites - Khibina and Lovozero. . The Khibina alkaline massif (Kola Peninsula,Russia) hosts the world's largest and economically most important apatite deposit. The Khibina massif is a complex multiphase body built up from a number of ring-like and conical intrusions. The apatite bearing intrusion is ring-like and is represented by a layered body of ijolitic composition with a thickness of about 1 - 2 km. The upper zone is represented by different types of apatite ores. These rocks consist of 60-90% euhedral very small (tenths of mm)apatite crystals. The lower zone has mostly ijolitic composition. The lower zone grades into underlying massive urtite consisting of 75-90% large (several mm) euhedral nepheline. Our experimental studies of systems with apatite demonstrated the near-eutectic nature of the apatite-bearing intrusion, resulting in practically simultaneous crystallization of nepheline, apatite and pyroxene. The mathematical model of the formation of the layered apatite-bearing intrusion based on the processes of sedimentation under the conditions of steady state convection taking account of crystal sizes is proposed. Under the conditions of steady-state convection large crystals of nepheline continuously had been settling forming massive underlying urtite whereas smaller crystals of pyroxenes, nepheline and apatite had been stirred in the convecting melt. During the cooling the intensity of convection decreased causing a settling of smaller crystals of nepheline and pyroxene and later very small crystalls of apatite in the upper part of alkaline magma chamber. The Lovozero massif, the largest of the Globe layered peralkaline intrusion, comprises super-large rare-metal (Nb, Ta, REE) deposit. The main ore mineral is loparite (Na, Ce, Ca)2 (Ti, Nb)2O6 which was mined during many years. The composition of cumulus loparite changed systematically upward through the

  17. Workshop on Pristine Highlands Rocks and the early History of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, J. (Editor); Ryder, G. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Oxide composition of the Moon, evidence for an initially totally molten Moon, geophysical contraints on lunar composition, random sampling of a layered intrusion, lunar highland rocks, early evolution of the Moon, mineralogy and petrology of the pristine rocks, relationship of the pristine nonmore rocks to the highlands soils and breccias, ferroan anorthositic norite, early lunar igneous history, compositional variation in ferroan anosthosites, a lunar magma ocean, deposits of lunar pristine rocks, lunar and planetary compositions and early fractionation in the solar nebula, Moon composition models, petrogenesis in a Moon with a chondritic refractory lithophile pattern, a terrestrial analog of lunar ilmenite bearing camulates, and the lunar magma ocean are summarized.

  18. Transition element distribution in stony meteorites and in terrestrial and lunar rocks.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mason, B.; Jarosewich, E.; Nelen, J.

    1971-01-01

    Discussion of the distribution of the transition elements (Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Fe, Co, Ni, Cu, and Zn) among the individual minerals of stony meteorites, and comparison with data on comparable lunar and terrestrial minerals. As an example of meteorite distribution patterns, data on the Modoc meteorite are presented. For the lunar rocks, microprobe data are used, along with published information from other investigators. For comparison with terrestrial igneous rocks, Skaergaard intrusion rocks are used. They present some striking analogies in mineralogy and petrology with the lunar igneous rocks and are thus peculiarly suitable for this cross comparison.

  19. Layered intrusions of the Duluth Complex, Minnesota, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Miller, J.D.; Ripley, E.M.; ,

    1996-01-01

    The Duluth Complex and associated subvolcanic intrusions comprise a large (5000 km2) intrusive complex in northeastern Minnesota that was emplaced into comagmatic volcanics during the development of the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift in North America. In addition to anorthositic and felsic intrusions, the Duluth Complex is composed of many individual mafic layered intrusions of tholeiitic affinity. The cumulate stratigraphies and cryptic variations of six of the better exposed and better studied intrusions are described here to demonstrate the variability in their cumulus mineral paragenesis.

  20. Psychological impact of illness intrusiveness in epilepsy - comparison of treatments.

    PubMed

    Poochikian-Sarkissian, Sonia; Sidani, Souraya; Wennberg, Richard A; Devins, Gerald M

    2008-03-01

    Chronic illnesses are associated with multiple stressors that compromise quality of life (QOL). Implicit in many of these is the concept of illness intrusiveness, the disruption of lifestyles and activities attributable to constraints imposed by chronic disease and its treatment. This study tested the illness intrusiveness theoretical framework in epilepsy and compared the impact of pharmacological and surgical treatments on illness intrusiveness and QOL. Cross-sectional data compared three epilepsy groups (N = 145): (a) 40 patients admitted for presurgical evaluation to an Epilepsy Monitoring Unit; (b) 52 patients treated pharmacologically; and (c) 53 post-surgical patients. Illness intrusiveness differed significantly across epilepsy patients with the differences primarily related to seizure control. Illness intrusiveness varied inversely with seizure control (p < .05). Seizure freedom, whether achieved by surgical or pharmacological treatments, was associated with maximal reduction of illness intrusiveness. Increased illness intrusiveness correlated significantly with decreased QOL and increased depressive symptoms. Perceived control over diverse life domains correlated positively with QOL and psychosocial outcomes. Path analysis supported the validity of the illness intrusiveness theoretical framework in epilepsy. Illness intrusiveness is an important determinant of the psychosocial impact of epilepsy and its treatment. Effective pharmacological or surgical treatment may reduce illness intrusiveness in epilepsy. Findings also offer encouragement that QOL in epilepsy, as in other chronic conditions, may be enhanced by multidisciplinary bio-psychosocial efforts. Health care providers should consider multifaceted interventions to reduce illness intrusiveness and, thereby, improve QOL.

  1. Uranium and other element analyses of igneous rocks of Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, K.F.

    1982-05-01

    Seventy-six samples of igneous rocks representing a variety of rock types and locations in Arkansas were analyzed by neutron activation analysis for the elements U, Th, Na, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Dy, Yb, Lu, and Hf. Samples were collected from the major igneous intrusions at Granite Mountain, Bauxite, Magnet Cove, Potash Sulfur Springs, and Murfreesboro, representing various syenites, lamprophyres, carbonatite, kimberlite, and periodotite. To make the data available for public use without further delay, this report is being issued without the normal technical and copy editing.

  2. Liquidus temperatures for the layered series of the Skaergaard intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thy, P.; Tegner, C.; Lesher, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    using the new plagioclase compositions. Plagioclase saturation in one-atmosphere melting experiments on evolved North Atlantic basalts is a function of An-content (mole %) and can be described by an empirical linear relationship (T oC = 899 + 3.6 An; 1σ = 20 oC). This relationship predicts a total crystallization interval for the intrusion of ~150 oC. Plagioclase crystallized in the Hidden Zone (An71) at 1155 oC, at the base of the Lower Zone (An66) at 1137 oC, and finally in the Sandwich Horizon (An30) at 1007 oC. These temperatures are in good agreements with previous estimates based on melting studies of suitable chilled margin rocks and gabbros from the Skaergaard intrusion and liquid line of descent modeling. Proposed variations in magmatic pressure during Skaergaard evolution and reasonable estimates of magmatic water contents do not alter these conclusions.

  3. Do the Columbia Hills of Gusev Crater Represent a Layered Igneous Intrusion on Mars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Francis, D.

    2009-12-01

    The Martian Rover Spirit has now collected some 60 whole-rock chemical analyses on rock outcrops and boulders on its traverse from its landing site on the Gusev crater plains into the nearby Columbia Hills. Although Fe-rich “basaltic” compositions dominate the data set, there is a relatively wide range of mafic compositions that define a striking trend of increasing Fe with increasing Mg, and a small subset of ultramafic compositions at higher Mg. Although many of the analyzed samples have been shown to have experienced the effects of acidic chemical weathering, only the minor elements S, P, and K appear to have been seriously disturbed. Comparisons of analyses of rocks before and after abrasion suggests that it is unlikely that the co-variation between Fe and Mg in the Spirit whole rock analyses is a weathering effect. Despite the coherence of the array of Spirit data in Fe-Mg space, however, no plausible crystal fractionation model can explain the decrease in Fe with Mg within the mafic samples, nor relate the ultramafic samples to the mafic ones, if the samples of the data set are assumed to represent volcanic compositions defining a liquid line of descent. This reflects a fundamental inconsistency between the compositions of the olivine present (Fo~50-60), as estimated by Mössbauer analysis, and that predicted on the basis of Fe/Mg partitioning (Fo ~ 80). Positively correlated linear arrays in Fe - Mg space are, however, a common feature of whole rock data collected across cyclic feldspar-rich and mafic-rich cumulates in layered igneous intrusions. In such cyclically layered sequences, the whole rock compositions reflect magmatic crystal sorting, and scatter along mixing lines between the compositions of dominant cumulate phases. There is in fact a striking correspondence between the Fe-Mg array of Spirit data and those of dunite to troctolite cumulate layers in the Fe-rich Lac Raudot Troctolite Complex of the Grenville Province of Québec. If the Spirit

  4. Non-intrusive refrigerant charge indicator

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.; Kweller, Esher

    2005-03-22

    A non-intrusive refrigerant charge level indicator includes a structure for measuring at least one temperature at an outside surface of a two-phase refrigerant line section. The measured temperature can be used to determine the refrigerant charge status of an HVAC system, and can be converted to a pressure of the refrigerant in the line section and compared to a recommended pressure range to determine whether the system is under-charged, properly charged or over-charged. A non-intrusive method for assessing the refrigerant charge level in a system containing a refrigerant fluid includes the step of measuring a temperature at least one outside surface of a two-phase region of a refrigerant containing refrigerant line, wherein the temperature measured can be converted to a refrigerant pressure within the line section.

  5. A Survey on Intrusion Detection in MANETs.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    BakeyaLakshmi, P.; Santhi, K.

    2012-10-01

    A mobile ad hoc network is an infrastructureless network that changes its links dynamically, which makes routing in MANET a difficult process. As Mobile Ad-Hoc Network (MANET) has become a very important technology, research concerning its security problem, especially, in intrusion detection has attracted many researchers. Feature selection methodology plays a vital role in the data analysis process. PCA is used to analyze the selected features. This is because, redundant and irrelevant features often reduce performance of the intrusion detection system. It performs better in increasing speed and predictive accuracy. This survey aims to select and analyze the network features using principal component analysis. While performing various experiments, normal and attack states are simulated and the results for the selected features are analyzed.

  6. Distributed fiber optic moisture intrusion sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2003-06-24

    Method and system for monitoring and identifying moisture intrusion in soil such as is contained in landfills housing radioactive and/or hazardous waste. The invention utilizes the principle that moist or wet soil has a higher thermal conductance than dry soil. The invention employs optical time delay reflectometry in connection with a distributed temperature sensing system together with heating means in order to identify discrete areas within a volume of soil wherein temperature is lower. According to the invention an optical element and, optionally, a heating element may be included in a cable or other similar structure and arranged in a serpentine fashion within a volume of soil to achieve efficient temperature detection across a large area or three dimensional volume of soil. Remediation, moisture countermeasures, or other responsive action may then be coordinated based on the assumption that cooler regions within a soil volume may signal moisture intrusion where those regions are located.

  7. In-situ trainable intrusion detection system

    DOEpatents

    Symons, Christopher T.; Beaver, Justin M.; Gillen, Rob; Potok, Thomas E.

    2016-11-15

    A computer implemented method detects intrusions using a computer by analyzing network traffic. The method includes a semi-supervised learning module connected to a network node. The learning module uses labeled and unlabeled data to train a semi-supervised machine learning sensor. The method records events that include a feature set made up of unauthorized intrusions and benign computer requests. The method identifies at least some of the benign computer requests that occur during the recording of the events while treating the remainder of the data as unlabeled. The method trains the semi-supervised learning module at the network node in-situ, such that the semi-supervised learning modules may identify malicious traffic without relying on specific rules, signatures, or anomaly detection.

  8. Decoding low dihedral angles in gabbroic layered intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holness, M. B.; Humphreys, M.; Veksler, I. V.

    2010-12-01

    Texturally equilibrated rocks are granular with a unimodal grain size, smoothly curved grain boundaries, and angles at three-grain junctions of 110-140°. Gabbros are not texturally equilibrated: primocrysts commonly have planar faces whereas later-formed phases fill in the interstitial spaces. Augite-plagioclase-plagioclase dihedral angles (Θcpp) rarely attain the equilibrium value in gabbros and the population of disequilibrium angles preserves otherwise inaccessible information about rock history. The Θcpp population varies significantly between different basaltic bodies. In a rapidly cooled dolerite Θcpp has a low median (60-70°) and a high standard deviation (20-25°). The plagioclase-augite grain boundaries are generally planar. In more slowly cooled gabbros in layered intrusions, the angle populations have a higher median (80-110°) with a low standard deviation (10-15°). The plagioclase-augite grain boundaries are generally planar far from the triple junction, but curve within 10 microns of the junction. This curvature is commonly asymmetric. The angle population in solidified gabbros infiltrated by low-temperature melts is similar to that in dolerites, although the low angles are associated with cuspate interstitial grains. The dihedral angle is a function of both the original solidification process and subsequent high-temperature (melt-absent) grain boundary migration. Infilling of a melt pocket by overgrowth of the bounding solid phases necessitates supersaturation, and this is easier to attain for planar faces, resulting in inhibition of augite growth into pores bounded by planar plagioclase grains and an asymmetry of the initial augite-plag-plag junction. If the solidified gabbro is kept sufficiently hot these initial junction geometries can change during textural equilibration. In the Skaergaard, Rum and Bushveld intrusions, the median Θcpp varies with liquidus assemblage, increasing step-wise on the addition of a new liquidus phase. Locally

  9. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  10. Increasing Intrusion Tolerance via Scalable Redundancy

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-01

    versioning can be used as a mechanism to aid the provision of strong concurrent semantics and intrusion tolerance in a very different way. To illustrate...need for services (e.g., namespace, key management, metadata, and LDAP ) and distributed data structures (e.g., b-trees, queues, and logs) to be...caption. Structures, enumerations and types used in the pseudo-code are given on lines 100-107. The definition of a Candidate includes the

  11. Non-intrusive appliance monitor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.; Schweppe, Fred C.

    1989-08-15

    A non-intrusive monitor of energy consumption of residential appliances is described in which sensors, coupled to the power circuits entering a residence, supply analog voltage and current signals which are converted to digital format and processed to detect changes in certain residential load parameters, i.e., admittance. Cluster analysis techniques are employed to group change measurements into certain categories, and logic is applied to identify individual appliances and the energy consumed by each.

  12. Non-intrusive appliance monitor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.; Schweppe, F.C.

    1989-08-15

    A non-intrusive monitor of energy consumption of residential appliances is described in which sensors, coupled to the power circuits entering a residence, supply analog voltage and current signals which are converted to digital format and processed to detect changes in certain residential load parameters, i.e., admittance. Cluster analysis techniques are employed to group change measurements into certain categories, and logic is applied to identify individual appliances and the energy consumed by each. 9 figs.

  13. [The removal of organs and intrusion].

    PubMed

    Breynaert, Sophie; Tournier-Vervliet, Anne

    2015-04-01

    Approaching the family of a brain dead patient to enquire about the deceased's wishes with regard to the donation of their organs is a delicate matter. It is also a difficult time for the medical and paramedical teams, in intensive care as well as the operating theatre. Describing the phenomena of potential intrusions and the methods of guidance and support can help those involved adjust their practice to the specific situation of the families and professionals concerned.

  14. Fracture fillings and intrusive pyroclasts, Inyo Domes, California

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.; Wohletz, K.; Eichelberger, J.

    1988-05-10

    Fractures containing juvenile magmatic pyroclasts were encountered during drilling into a 600-year-old feeder dike beneath the Inyo Domes chain, California. The Inyo Domes consist of a north-south trending, 10-km-long chain of domes, rhyolitic tuff rings, and phreatic craters. Boreholes were cored through the 51-m-diameter conduit of Obsidian Dome, the largest of the Inyo Domes, and through an unvented portion of the intrusion (dike) 1 km to the south. Pyroclast-bearing fractures were intersected in both holes: (1) 7- to 40-cm-thick fractures in welded basaltic scoria and quartz monzonite country rock are adjacent to the conduit at depths of 400--411 m and 492--533 m; they contain gray, clastic deposits, which show truncated cross bedding and convolute bedding; (2) adjacent to the dike, massive fracture fillings occur at depths of 289--302 m (129 m east of the dike) and 366--384 m (95--87 m east of the dike).

  15. Lower-crustal intrusion on the North Atlantic continental margin.

    PubMed

    White, R S; Smith, L K; Roberts, A W; Christie, P A F; Kusznir, N J; Roberts, A M; Healy, D; Spitzer, R; Chappell, A; Eccles, J D; Fletcher, R; Hurst, N; Lunnon, Z; Parkin, C J; Tymms, V J

    2008-03-27

    When continents break apart, the rifting is sometimes accompanied by the production of large volumes of molten rock. The total melt volume, however, is uncertain, because only part of it has erupted at the surface. Furthermore, the cause of the magmatism is still disputed-specifically, whether or not it is due to increased mantle temperatures. We recorded deep-penetration normal-incidence and wide-angle seismic profiles across the Faroe and Hatton Bank volcanic margins in the northeast Atlantic. Here we show that near the Faroe Islands, for every 1 km along strike, 360-400 km(3) of basalt is extruded, while 540-600 km(3) is intruded into the continent-ocean transition. We find that lower-crustal intrusions are focused mainly into a narrow zone approximately 50 km wide on the transition, although extruded basalts flow more than 100 km from the rift. Seismic profiles show that the melt is intruded into the lower crust as sills, which cross-cut the continental fabric, rather than as an 'underplate' of 100 per cent melt, as has often been assumed. Evidence from the measured seismic velocities and from igneous thicknesses are consistent with the dominant control on melt production being increased mantle temperatures, with no requirement for either significant active small-scale mantle convection under the rift or the presence of fertile mantle at the time of continental break-up, as has previously been suggested for the North Atlantic Ocean.

  16. Accelerated Weathering of Rocks.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1977-08-01

    Dry tests en polished specimens with alternating heating and co- oling actions; ii) Wet tests in destilled water, with alternating...Rock-type Dry tests KxlO2 Wet tests KxlO2 Sound rock SR 3.64 8.31 Medium altered rock MAR 4.96 31.58 Very altered rock VAR 8.89 116.20 TABLE X...Sound rock SR Medium altered rock Very altered rock" KAR VAR ’ Reflectivity R (%) dry test wet test dry test wet test dry test wet

  17. Non-intrusive electric field sensing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schultz, S. M.; Selfridge, R.; Chadderdon, S.; Perry, D.; Stan, N.

    2014-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of non-intrusive electric field sensing. The non-intrusive nature is attained by creating a sensor that is entirely dielectric, has a small cross-sectional area, and has the interrogation electronics a long distance away from the system under test. One non-intrusive electric field sensing technology is the slab coupled optical fiber sensor (SCOS). The SCOS consists of an electro-optic crystal attached to the surface of a D-shaped optical fiber. It is entirely dielectric and has a cross-sectional area down to 0.3mm by 0.3mm. The SCOS device functions as an electric field sensor through use of resonant mode coupling between the crystal waveguide and the core of a D-shaped optical fiber. The resonant mode coupling of a SCOS device occurs at specific wavelengths whose spectral locations are determined in part by the effective refractive index of the modes in the slab. An electric field changes the refractive index of the slab causing a shift in the spectral position of the resonant modes. This paper describes an overview of the SCOS technology including the theory, fabrication, and operation. The effect of crystal orientation and crystal type are explained with respect to directional sensitivity and frequency response.

  18. Intrusion detection using rough set classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian-hua; Zhang, Guan-hua; Zhang, Jie; Bai, Ying-cai

    2004-09-01

    Recently machine learning-based intrusion detection approaches have been subjected to extensive researches because they can detect both misuse and anomaly. In this paper, rough set classification (RSC), a modern learning algorithm, is used to rank the features extracted for detecting intrusions and generate intrusion detection models. Feature ranking is a very critical step when building the model. RSC performs feature ranking before generating rules, and converts the feature ranking to minimal hitting set problem addressed by using genetic algorithm (GA). This is done in classical approaches using Support Vector Machine (SVM) by executing many iterations, each of which removes one useless feature. Compared with those methods, our method can avoid many iterations. In addition, a hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed to increase the convergence speed and decrease the training time of RSC. The models generated by RSC take the form of "IF-THEN" rules, which have the advantage of explication. Tests and comparison of RSC with SVM on DARPA benchmark data showed that for Probe and DoS attacks both RSC and SVM yielded highly accurate results (greater than 99% accuracy on testing set).

  19. Melt inclusions in the olivine from the Nantianwan intrusion: Implications for the parental magma of Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions of the ∼260 Ma Emeishan large igneous province (SW China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Le; Ren, Zhong-Yuan; Wang, Christina Yan

    2017-02-01

    Olivine-hosted melt inclusions provide an archive of the parental magma and early magma history that is unavailable from bulk-rock analyses of cumulates. For those olivine-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions, a combined in situ analysis of major elements and Pb isotopic compositions for the melt inclusions and host olivine crystals may provide an effective way to understand the nature of the parental magma of the intrusions. In this study, we take the Nantianwan intrusion in the Emeishan large igneous province (SW China) as an example to analyze the melt inclusions and the host olivine. The Nantianwan intrusion is mainly composed of gabbronorite, with minor olivine gabbro. The olivine crystals in the olivine gabbro have Fo contents varying from 81.1 to 89.2 and Ni from 0.05 to 0.30 wt.%. The melt inclusion hosted in the most Mg-rich olivine has 50.9 wt.% SiO2, 1.0 wt.% TiO2, 15.1 wt.% MgO and 2.9 wt.% Na2O + K2O, indicating that the parental magma of the intrusion was of high-Mg basaltic composition. The melt inclusions overall have 208Pb/206Pb ratios of 2.0567-2.1032 and 207Pb/206Pb of 0.8287-0.8481, similar to the Pb isotopic compositions of the Emeishan flood basalts and consistent with insignificant crustal contamination. Given that the Nantianwan intrusion contains the most Mg-rich olivine among the Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the Emeishan LIP, we infer that the composition of the melt inclusion in the most Mg-rich olivine from the Nantianwan intrusion may represent the least evolved parental magma of the Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the Emeishan LIP. This can be further used to constrain the magma process related to Ni-Cu-(PGE) sulfide mineralization.

  20. Efficient Mining and Detection of Sequential Intrusion Patterns for Network Intrusion Detection Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shyu, Mei-Ling; Huang, Zifang; Luo, Hongli

    In recent years, pervasive computing infrastructures have greatly improved the interaction between human and system. As we put more reliance on these computing infrastructures, we also face threats of network intrusion and/or any new forms of undesirable IT-based activities. Hence, network security has become an extremely important issue, which is closely connected with homeland security, business transactions, and people's daily life. Accurate and efficient intrusion detection technologies are required to safeguard the network systems and the critical information transmitted in the network systems. In this chapter, a novel network intrusion detection framework for mining and detecting sequential intrusion patterns is proposed. The proposed framework consists of a Collateral Representative Subspace Projection Modeling (C-RSPM) component for supervised classification, and an inter-transactional association rule mining method based on Layer Divided Modeling (LDM) for temporal pattern analysis. Experiments on the KDD99 data set and the traffic data set generated by a private LAN testbed show promising results with high detection rates, low processing time, and low false alarm rates in mining and detecting sequential intrusion detections.

  1. Episodic growth of a Late Cretaceous and Paleogene intrusive complex of pegmatitic leucogranite, Ruby Mountains core complex, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, K.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Gneissic pegmatitic leucogranite forms a dominant component (>600 km3) of the midcrustal infrastructure of the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range core complex (Nevada, USA), and was assembled and modified episodically into a batholithic volume by myriad small intrusions from ca. 92 to 29 Ma. This injection complex consists of deformed sheets and other bodies emplaced syntectonically into a stratigraphic framework of marble, calc-silicate rocks, quartzite, schist, and other granitoids. Bodies of pegmatitic granite coalesce around host-rock remnants, which preserve relict or ghost stratigraphy, thrusts, and fold nappes. Intrusion inflated but did not disrupt the host-rock structure. The pegmatitic granite increases proportionally downward from structurally high positions to the bottoms of 1-km-deep canyons where it constitutes 95%-100% of the rock. Zircon and monazite dated by U-Pb (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe, SHRIMP) for this rock type cluster diffusely at ages near 92, 82(?), 69, 38, and 29 Ma, and indicate successive or rejuvenated igneous crystallization multiple times over long periods of the Late Cretaceous and the Paleogene. Initial partial melting of unexposed pelites may have generated granite forerunners, which were remobilized several times in partial melting events. Sources for the pegmatitic granite differed isotopically from sources of similar-aged interleaved equigranular granites. Dominant Late Cretaceous and fewer Paleogene ages recorded from some pegmatitic granite samples, and Paleogene-only ages from the two structurally deepest samples, together with varying zircon trace element contents, suggest several disparate ages of final emplacement or remobilization of various small bodies. Folded sills that merge with dikes that cut the same folds suggest that there may have been in situ partial remobilization. The pegmatitic granite intrusions represent prolonged and recurrent generation, assembly, and partial melting modification of a

  2. Episodic growth of a Late Cretaceous and Paleogene intrusive complex of pegmatitic leucogranite, Ruby Mountains core complex, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, Keith A.; Wooden, J.L.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Gneissic pegmatitic leucogranite forms a dominant component (>600 km3) of the midcrustal infrastructure of the Ruby Mountains–East Humboldt Range core complex (Nevada, USA), and was assembled and modified episodically into a batholithic volume by myriad small intrusions from ca. 92 to 29 Ma. This injection complex consists of deformed sheets and other bodies emplaced syntectonically into a stratigraphic framework of marble, calc-silicate rocks, quartzite, schist, and other granitoids. Bodies of pegmatitic granite coalesce around host-rock remnants, which preserve relict or ghost stratigraphy, thrusts, and fold nappes. Intrusion inflated but did not disrupt the host-rock structure. The pegmatitic granite increases proportionally downward from structurally high positions to the bottoms of 1-km-deep canyons where it constitutes 95%–100% of the rock. Zircon and monazite dated by U-Pb (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe, SHRIMP) for this rock type cluster diffusely at ages near 92, 82(?), 69, 38, and 29 Ma, and indicate successive or rejuvenated igneous crystallization multiple times over long periods of the Late Cretaceous and the Paleogene. Initial partial melting of unexposed pelites may have generated granite forerunners, which were remobilized several times in partial melting events. Sources for the pegmatitic granite differed isotopically from sources of similar-aged interleaved equigranular granites. Dominant Late Cretaceous and fewer Paleogene ages recorded from some pegmatitic granite samples, and Paleogene-only ages from the two structurally deepest samples, together with varying zircon trace element contents, suggest several disparate ages of final emplacement or remobilization of various small bodies. Folded sills that merge with dikes that cut the same folds suggest that there may have been in situ partial remobilization. The pegmatitic granite intrusions represent prolonged and recurrent generation, assembly, and partial melting modification of a

  3. Broad accommodation of rift-related extension recorded by dyke intrusion in Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.; McCausland, W.A.; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Lu, Zhiming; Zahran, H.M.; El, Hadidy S.; Aburukbah, A.; Stewart, I.C.F.; Lundgren, P.R.; White, R.A.; Moufti, M.R.H.

    2010-01-01

    The extensive harrat lava province of Arabia formed during the past 30 million years in response to Red Sea rifting and mantle upwelling. The area was regarded as seismically quiet, but between April and June 2009 a swarm of more than 30,000 earthquakes struck one of the lava fields in the province, Harrat Lunayyir, northwest Saudi Arabia. Concerned that larger damaging earthquakes might occur, the Saudi Arabian government evacuated 40,000 people from the region. Here we use geologic, geodetic and seismic data to show that the earthquake swarm resulted from magmatic dyke intrusion. We document a surface fault rupture that is 8 km long with 91 cm of offset. Surface deformation is best modelled by the shallow intrusion of a north-west trending dyke that is about 10 km long. Seismic waves generated during the earthquakes exhibit overlapping very low- and high-frequency components. We interpret the low frequencies to represent intrusion of magma and the high frequencies to represent fracturing of the crystalline basement rocks. Rather than extension being accommodated entirely by the central Red Sea rift axis, we suggest that the broad deformation observed in Harrat Lunayyir indicates that rift margins can remain as active sites of extension throughout rifting. Our analyses allowed us to forecast the likelihood of a future eruption or large earthquake in the region and informed the decisions made by the Saudi Arabian government to return the evacuees.

  4. River Valley pluton, Ontario - A late-Archean/early-Proterozoic anorthositic intrusion in the Grenville Province

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, Lewis D.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic data indicating a late-Archean/early-Proterozoic age for the River Valley anorthositic pluton of the southwestern Grenville Province of Sudbury, Ontario. Pb-Pb isotopic data on 10 whole-rock samples ranging in composition from anorthosite to gabbro yield an age of 2560 + or - 155 Ma. The River Valley pluton is thus the oldest anorthositic intrusive yet recognized within the Grenville Province. The Sm-Nd isotopic system records an age of 2377 + or - 68 Ma. High Pb-208/Pb-204 of deformed samples relative to igneous-textured rocks implies Th introduction and/or U loss during metamorphism in the River Valley area. Rb-Sr data from igneous-textured and deformed samples and from mineral separates give an age of 2185 + or - 105 Ma, indicating substantial disturbance of the Rb-Sr isotopic system.

  5. Plutonic rock types series: discrimination of various granitoid series and related rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lameyre, Jean; Bowden, Peter

    1982-10-01

    The Streckeisen QAP diagram discriminates four characteristic type series among the large variety of granitoids associated in intrusions. Three of them integrate varied compositions from basic to acid terms: (1) the calcalkaline series with its low K (or trondhiemite), medium K (or granodioritic), high K (or monzonitic) variants; (2) the alkaline series with its characteristic syenitic members; (3) the tholeiitic series, deprived of K feldspars. The fourth (4) corresponds to mobilizates associated with migmatites of varied composition but always quartz rich. The generalization in the QAPF system, allowing the plotting of undersaturated alkaline series, provides an excellent visual display of the major associations and trends for the plutonic rocks.

  6. Metamorphic charnockite in contact aureoles around intrusive enderbite from Natal, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van den Kerkhof, Alfons M.; Grantham, Geoffrey H.

    In the Port Edward area of southern Kwa-Zulu Natal, South Africa, charnockitic aureoles up to 10m in width in the normally garnetiferous Nicholson's Point Granite, are developed adjacent to intrusive contacts with the Port Edward Enderbite and anhydrous pegmatitic veins. Mineralogical differences between the country rock and charnockitic aureole suggest that the dehydration reaction Bt+Qtz-->Opx+Kfs+H2O and the reaction of Grt+Qtz-->Opx+Pl were responsible for the charnockitization. The compositions of fluid inclusions show systematic variation with: (1) the Port Edward Enderbite being dominated by CO2 and N2 fluid inclusions; (2) the non-charnockitized granite by saline aqueous inclusions with 18-23 EqWt% NaCl; (3) the charnockitic aureoles by low-salinity and pure water inclusions (<7 EqWt% NaCl); (4) the pegmatites by aqueous inclusions of various salinity with minor CO2. As a result of the thermal event the homogenization temperatures of the inclusions in charnockite show a much larger range (up to 390°C) compared to the fluid inclusions in granite (mostly <250°C). Contrary to fluid-controlled charnockitization (brines, CO2) which may have taken place along shear zones away from the intrusive body, the present ``proximal'' charnockitized granite formed directly at the contact with enderbite. The inclusions indicate contact metamorphism induced by the intrusion of ``dry'' enderbitic magma into ``wet'' granite resulting in local dehydration. This was confirmed by cathodoluminescence microscopy showing textures indicative for the local reduction of structural water in the charnockite quartz. Two-pyroxene thermometry on the Port Edward Enderbite suggests intrusion at temperatures of 1000-1050°C into country rock with temperature of <700°C. The temperature of aureole formation must have been between 700°C (breakdown of pyrite to form pyrrhotite) and 1000°C. Charnockitization was probably controlled largely by heat related to anhydrous intrusions causing

  7. An origin of marginal reversal of the Fongen-Hyllingen layered intrusion by prolonged magma emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V.; Latypov, R.

    2012-04-01

    The ~100 m thick marginal zone of the Fongen-Hyllingen Intrusion (FHI) consists of nonlayered, highly iron-enriched ferrodiorites that are overlain by a ~6 km thick layered sequence of gabbroic to dioritic rocks of the Layered Series. From the base upwards the marginal zone become more primitive as exemplified by a significant increase in whole-rock MgO, Mg-number, and normative An. The reverse trends are also evident from an upward increase in An-content of plagioclase (from ~30 to ~43 at.%) and Mg-number of amphibole (from ~9 to ~23 at.%) and clinopyroxene (from ~23 to ~37 at.%). The marginal zone is abruptly terminated at the contact with the overlying Layered Series as is evident from a step-like increase in Mg-number of mafic minerals and An-content of plagioclase, as well as a sharp increase in whole-rock MgO and Mg-number in overlying olivine gabbronorites of the Layered Series. Based on these features the marginal zone of the FHI can be interpreted as an aborted marginal reversal. Reverse trends in whole-rock and mineral compositions, as well as a sharp break in these parameters are indicative of its formation in an open system with the involvement of the prolonged emplacement of magma that became increasingly more primitive. Such development of the marginal reversal was interrupted by the emplacement of a major influx of more primitive magma that produced the Layered Series. The open system evolution of a basaltic magma chamber may represent a general mechanism for the origin of marginal reversals in mafic sills and layered intrusions.

  8. Platinum-Group Element Mineralization in the Fedorovatundra layered intrusion, Kola Peninsula, Russia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groshev, Nikolay; Subbotin, Victor; Korchagin, Alexey

    2016-04-01

    The 2526 to 2485 Ma Fedorovatundra layered mafic intrusion in the central part of the Kola Peninsula, Russia, is the western massif of the Fedorova-Pana Complex (2526-2446 Ma), which is situated along the northern contact of the Early Proterozoic Imandra-Varzuga rift and Archean granite gneiss. The Fedorovatundra intrusion of approximately 4 km thick has two major parts: (1) located at the bottom of the intrusion Taxitic series (10 to 900 m) and composing the main volume of the massif Layered series (4000 m). The Taxitic series is distinctive, due to its predominant vary-textured often quartz-saturated norites and gabbronorites (with fewer amounts of leucogabbro, melanorite and Ol-gabbronorite) and abundant pyroxenite, less harzburgite xenoliths. Medium to coarse-grained mottled or massive leucocratic gabbronorite and leucogabbro prevails in the Layered series with mesocratic gabbronorite, pyroxenite and troctolite as subordinate rocks. Depending on its localization, geochemical features, mineral composition and economic value platinum-group element (PGE) mineralization of the Fedorovatundra intrusion is divided into 'marginal' (basal, contact) and 'reef' types. 'Marginal' type of mineralization is presented by irregular disseminated interstitial sulfides (1-2 vol. %) of pentlandite-pyrrhotite-chalcopyrite association (Cu/Ni = 1.8) in the Taxitic series. Less sulfides occur as uniformly disseminated aggregates, thin massive lenses and nests. PGE and base metals are concentrated in several ore horizons of 3.5 km long complicated structure. Thickness of ore horizons varies generally within 10-150 m, but it can rise up to 280 m in bulges. In the most common ore-bearing rock (taxitic gabbronorite) average Pt + Pd content is 1.6 ppm (Pd/Pt 4.5). The pyroxenite xenoliths occurring within the Taxitic series are practically barren of sulfide and can dilute higher PGE and base metal grades in the gabbronorite matrix. 'Marginal' mineralization of the Fedorovotundrovsky

  9. Geology and geochronology of the Arnea, Sithonia and Ouranopolis intrusions, Chalkidiki peninsula, northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Wet, A. P.; Miller, J. A.; Bickle, M. J.; Chapman, H. J.

    1989-04-01

    The Chalkidiki Peninsula comprises the Greek geotectonic units of the Vardar-Axios Zone and the Serbo-Macedonian Massif. Several granitic bodies of various ages intrude this area and many of them are of unknown or disputed age. The ages of the Arnea, Sithonia and Ouranopolis granitoids are investigated using 40Ar- 39Ar stepheated mineral and Rb-Sr whole rock analyses. The Arnea granite has experienced intense but variable deformation, recrystallization and retrogression. In general it lacks easily datable minerals because of it's highly evolved silica rich composition. However coarse-grained phlogopitic mica separated from a minor less evolved porphyritic part of the intrusion yields an excellent 40Ar- 39Ar plateau age of 136 ± 1 Ma. Rb-Sr whole rock samples give a regression line of age 155 ± 11Ma and an initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratio of 0.7174 ± 0.0017 (MSWD 280). The scatter may reflect the widespread recrystallization and deformation of the Arnea granite. The Arnea granite is at least Late Jurassic in age and has undergone regional greenschist metamorphism during the Early Cretaceous. Biotite from the Sithonia granitoid yields a plateau age of 43 ± 0.6 Ma. Muscovites from crosscutting pegmatites within the granitoid give slightly saddle-shaped age spectra with minimum ages of 49 Ma and 50 Ma, suggesting Argon-40 excess. Biotite and muscovite from the Ouranopolis granitoid yield plateau ages of 44 ±1.1 Ma and 47 ± 0.7 Ma respectively. It is suggested that this granitoid is coeval and cogenetic with the Sithonia granitoid. Both intrusions are Eocene in age. Rb-Sr whole rock samples from the Sithonia and Ouranopolis granitoids failed to provide any isochrons. This is interpreted to be due to inhomogeneities in these young intrusions. The age data strongly suggest that the Sithonia and Ouranopolis granitoids are unrelated to the Arnea granite. Coupled with geochemical and petrographic data these results clarify the relationships between some of the granitic

  10. Bald Mountain gold mining district, Nevada: A Jurassic reduced intrusion-related gold system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nutt, C.J.; Hofstra, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    The Bald Mountain mining district has produced about 2 million ounces (Moz) of An. Geologic mapping, field relationships, geochemical data, petrographic observations, fluid inclusion characteristics, and Pb, S, O, and H isotope data indicate that An mineralization was associated with a reduced Jurassic intrusion. Gold deposits are localized within and surrounding a Jurassic (159 Ma) quartz monzonite porphyry pluton and dike complex that intrudes Cambrian to Mississippian carbonate and clastic rocks. The pluton, associated dikes, and An mineralization were controlled by a crustal-scale northwest-trending structure named the Bida trend. Gold deposits are localized by fracture networks in the pluton and the contact metamorphic aureole, dike margins, high-angle faults, and certain strata or shale-limestone contacts in sedimentary rocks. Gold mineralization was accompanied by silicification and phyllic alteration, ??argillic alteration at shallow levels. Although An is typically present throughout, the system exhibits a classic concentric geochemical zonation pattern with Mo, W, Bi, and Cu near the center, Ag, Pb, and Zn at intermediate distances, and As and Sb peripheral to the intrusion. Near the center of the system, micron-sized native An occurs with base metal sulfides and sulfosalts. In peripheral deposits and in later stages of mineralization, Au is typically submicron in size and resides in pyrite or arsenopyrite. Electron microprobe and laser ablation ICP-MS analyses show that arsenopyrite, pyrite, and Bi sulfide minerals contain 10s to 1,000s of ppm Au. Ore-forming fluids were aqueous and carbonic at deep levels and episodically hypersaline at shallow levels due to boiling. The isotopic compositions of H and O in quartz and sericite and S and Pb in sulfides are indicative of magmatic ore fluids with sedimentary sulfur. Together, the evidence suggests that Au was introduced by reduced S-bearing magmatic fluids derived from a reduced intrusion. The reduced

  11. Eddy flow and associated particle dynamics during magma intrusion: the Basement Sill, Antarctica

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petford, Nick; Mirhadizadeh, Seyed

    2014-05-01

    The McMurdo Dry Valleys magmatic system Antarctica forms part of the Ferrar dolerite Large Igneous Province. The intrusions comprise a vertical stack of four interconnected sills linked to surface flows of the Kirkpatrick flood basalts. Together the complex provides a world-class example of pervasive lateral flow of magma on a continental scale. In addition the Basement Sill offers unprecedented two and three dimensional sections through the now frozen particle macrostructure of a congested magma slurry. Using image-based numerical modelling (the intrusion geometry defines its unique finite element mesh) it is possible to simulate aspects of the flow regime and rheology that have bearing on the formation of mesostructures including compositional layering. A distinction between structures formed during flow, where the shearing regime dominates, and post-emplacement features due to local crystal-melt segregation constrained by thermal modeling, is made. In the former regime we describe a potentially novel crystal-liquid segregation that may have been overlooked because it is so simple. The critical boundary condition is an undulating base or roof in the intrusion where magma eddies can develop during low Reynolds Number flow. Numerical particle tracing is used to show that wall eddies can either trap (and ultimately freeze) crystals in-situ or retain and eject them back into the flow at a later time according to their mass density. The mechanism has potential to develop local variations in magma chemistry and structure that would not otherwise arise where the contact between magma and country rock is linear. We refer to this local fluid dynamical effect as 'slingshot' fractionation and are not aware of any previous quantitative description of this effect in igneous rocks.

  12. Stabilization of volcanic flanks by dike intrusion: An example from Kilauea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.; Denlinger, R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Dike propagation and dilation increases the compression of adjacent rocks. On volcanoes, especially oceanic shields, dikes are accordingly thought to be structurally destabilizing. As compression is incremented, volcanic flanks are driven outward or downslope and thus increase their susceptibility to destructive earthquakes and giant landslides. We show, however, that the 2-m-thick dike emplaced along the east rift zone of Kilauea in 1983 actually stabilized that volcano's flank. Specifically, production of flank earthquakes dropped more than twofold after 1983 as maximum downslope motion slowed to 6 cm ?? year-1 from approximately 40 cm ?? year-1 during 1980-1982. As much as 65 cm of deflationary subsidence above Kilauea's summit and upper rift zones accompanied the dike intrusion. According to recent estimates, this deflation corresponds to a reduction in magma-reservoir pressure of approximately 4 MPa, probably about as much as the driving pressure of the 1983 dike. The volume of the dike, approximately 0.10-0.15 km3, is orders of magnitude less than the estimated 200- to 250-km3 volume of Kilauea's reservoir of magma and nearby hot, mushy rock. Thus, deflation of that reservoir reduces the compressional load on the flank over a much larger area than intrusion of the dike adds to it, particularly at the dominant depth of seismicity, 8-9 km. A Coulomb block model for flank motion during intervals between major earthquakes requires the low-angle fault beneath Kilauea's flank to exhibit slip weakening, conducive to earthquake instability. Accordingly, the triggering mechanism of destructive earthquakes, several of which have struck Hawaii during the past 150 years, need not require stresses accumulated by dike intrusions.

  13. Corticostriatal circuitry in regulating diseases characterized by intrusive thinking.

    PubMed

    Kalivas, Benjamin C; Kalivas, Peter W

    2016-03-01

    Intrusive thinking triggers clinical symptoms in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Using drug addiction as an exemplar disorder sustained in part by intrusive thinking, we explore studies demonstrating that impairments in corticostriatal circuitry strongly contribute to intrusive thinking. Neuroimaging studies have long implicated this projection in cue-induced craving to use drugs, and preclinical models show that marked changes are produced at corticostriatal synapses in the nucleus accumbens during a relapse episode. We delineate an accumbens microcircuit that mediates cue-induced drug seeking becoming an intrusive event. This microcircuit harbors many potential therapeutic targets. We focus on preclinical and clinical studies, showing that administering N-acetylcysteine restores uptake of synaptic glutamate by astroglial glutamate transporters and thereby inhibits intrusive thinking. We posit that because intrusive thinking is a shared endophenotype in many disorders, N-acetylcysteine has positive effects in clinical trials for a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction, gambling, trichotillomania, and depression.

  14. Rapid laccolith intrusion driven by explosive volcanic eruption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Castro, Jonathan M.; Cordonnier, Benoit; Schipper, C. Ian; Tuffen, Hugh; Baumann, Tobias S.; Feisel, Yves

    2016-11-01

    Magmatic intrusions and volcanic eruptions are intimately related phenomena. Shallow magma intrusion builds subsurface reservoirs that are drained by volcanic eruptions. Thus, the long-held view is that intrusions must precede and feed eruptions. Here we show that explosive eruptions can also cause magma intrusion. We provide an account of a rapidly emplaced laccolith during the 2011 rhyolite eruption of Cordón Caulle, Chile. Remote sensing indicates that an intrusion began after eruption onset and caused severe (>200 m) uplift over 1 month. Digital terrain models resolve a laccolith-shaped body ~0.8 km3. Deformation and conduit flow models indicate laccolith depths of only ~20-200 m and overpressures (~1-10 MPa) that likely stemmed from conduit blockage. Our results show that explosive eruptions may rapidly force significant quantities of magma in the crust to build laccoliths. These iconic intrusions can thus be interpreted as eruptive features that pose unique and previously unrecognized volcanic hazards.

  15. Corticostriatal circuitry in regulating diseases characterized by intrusive thinking

    PubMed Central

    Kalivas, Benjamin C.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Intrusive thinking triggers clinical symptoms in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Using drug addiction as an exemplar disorder sustained in part by intrusive thinking, we explore studies demonstrating that impairments in corticostriatal circuitry strongly contribute to intrusive thinking. Neuroimaging studies have long implicated this projection in cue-induced craving to use drugs, and preclinical models show that marked changes are produced at corticostriatal synapses in the nucleus accumbens during a relapse episode. We delineate an accumbens microcircuit that mediates cue-induced drug seeking becoming an intrusive event. This microcircuit harbors many potential therapeutic targets. We focus on preclinical and clinical studies, showing that administering N-acetylcysteine restores uptake of synaptic glutamate by astroglial glutamate transporters and thereby inhibits intrusive thinking. We posit that because intrusive thinking is a shared endophenotype in many disorders, N-acetylcysteine has positive effects in clinical trials for a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction, gambling, trichotillomania, and depression. PMID:27069381

  16. Evaluation of vapor intrusion using controlled building pressure.

    PubMed

    McHugh, Thomas E; Beckley, Lila; Bailey, Danielle; Gorder, Kyle; Dettenmaier, Erik; Rivera-Duarte, Ignacio; Brock, Samuel; MacGregor, Ian C

    2012-05-01

    The use of measured volatile organic chemical (VOC) concentrations in indoor air to evaluate vapor intrusion is complicated by (i) indoor sources of the same VOCs and (ii) temporal variability in vapor intrusion. This study evaluated the efficacy of utilizing induced negative and positive building pressure conditions during a vapor intrusion investigation program to provide an improved understanding of the potential for vapor intrusion. Pressure control was achieved in five of six buildings where the investigation program was tested. For these five buildings, the induced pressure differences were sufficient to control the flow of soil gas through the building foundation. A comparison of VOC concentrations in indoor air measured during the negative and positive pressure test conditions was sufficient to determine whether vapor intrusion was the primary source of VOCs in indoor air at these buildings. The study results indicate that sampling under controlled building pressure can help minimize ambiguity caused by both indoor sources of VOCs and temporal variability in vapor intrusion.

  17. Kontay intrusion (Polar Siberia)- an example of strong magmatic differentiation in the single magmatic body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Kontay intrusion is located in the north-west part of Maimecha-Kotuy province, (part of Siberian Large Igneous Province) in the northern part of the Siberian Platform. Intrusion is fully overlaid and practically not studied before. Geophysical data evident that intrusion has form of laccolite with diameter ˜7.5 km and thickness ˜ 2.5 km [1]. Initially lower part of intrusion was described as "gabbro-anortozite and anortositic gabbro" and higher part - as "leucocratic granophyric anortosites" [2]. Complex mineralo-petrological-geochemical study allow to divide intrusion section on three zones: Lower zone (below 1100 m) - layered sequence of leucocratic and melanocratic of biotite- and ortopyroxene-bearing gabbro, with minor alkaline feldspar, Middle zone (1100-700m) - biotite- and K-feldspar bearing gabbro and monzonotes, interstitial space often contain micrographical structures. Biotite corroded clinopyroxene and form interstitial crystals and Upper zone (700-214 m) - petrographically monotone porthyric quartz-monzonites and granosyenites with rare phenocrysts of plagioclase, magnetite, clinopyroxene and biotite. The main secondary minerals are albite, amphibole (edenite-feroedenite), secondary biotite, chlorite, and F,Al-bearing titanite. Rocks of the all parts fall in the same trends on the binary petrochemical diagrams, they belong to the High-K calc-alkaline seria. They are clearly more alkaline then intrusions of Norilsk district and less alkaline then alkaline-ultramafic intrusions of Maymecha-Kotuy province. Volcanic rocks of Norilsk and Maymecha-Kotuy area was subdivided for four geochemical types, mainly by the Ti-content, Th/U, Gd/Yb and Sm/Yb ratio: Low-Ti-1 (predominated), Low-Ti-2 (well -developed in Norilsk region), Moderate-Ti (developed only in the lower part of volcanic formation in Norilsk region), High-Ti (rare in Norilsk region, but widely spread in Mailecha-Kotuy area) [3]. Kontay intrusion rocks belong to Moderate-Ti group. The closest

  18. Derivation of S and Pb in phanerozoic intrusion-related metal deposits from neoproterozoic sedimentary pyrite, Great Basin, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vikre, P.G.; Poulson, S.R.; Koenig, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    The thick (???8 km), regionally extensive section of Neoproterozoic siliciclastic strata (terrigenous detrital succession, TDS) in the central and eastern Great Basin contains sedimentary pyrite characterized by mostly high d34S values (-11.6 to 40.8%, <70% exceed 10%; 51 analyses) derived from reduction of seawater sulfate, and by markedly radiogenic Pb isotopes ( 207Pb/204Pb <19.2; 15 analyses) acquired from clastic detritus eroded from Precambrian cratonal rocks to the east-southeast. In the overlying Paleozoic section, Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag-Au deposits associated with Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary granitic intrusions (intrusion-related metal deposits) contain galena and other sulfide minerals with S and Pb isotope compositions similar to those of TDS sedimentary pyrite, consistent with derivation of deposit S and Pb from TDS pyrite. Minor element abundances in TDS pyrite (e.g., Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, and Au) compared to sedimentary and hydrothermal pyrite elsewhere are not noticeably elevated, implying that enrichment in source minerals is not a precondition for intrusion-related metal deposits. Three mechanisms for transferring components of TDS sedimentary pyrite to intrusion-related metal deposits are qualitatively evaluated. One mechanism involves (1) decomposition of TDS pyrite in thermal aureoles of intruding magmas, and (2) aqueous transport and precipitation in thermal or fluid mixing gradients of isotopically heavy S, radiogenic Pb, and possibly other sedimentary pyrite and detrital mineral components, as sulfide minerals in intrusion-related metal deposits. A second mechanism invokes mixing and S isotope exchange in thermal aureoles of Pb and S exsolved from magma and derived from decomposition of sedimentary pyrite. A third mechanism entails melting of TDS strata or assimilation of TDS strata by crustal or mantle magmas. TDS-derived or assimilated magmas ascend, decompress, and exsolve a mixture of TDS volatiles, including isotopically heavy S and radiogenic Pb

  19. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology and thermal modeling of multilayer granitoid intrusions. Implications for the building and thermal evolution of the Central System batholith, Iberian Massif, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Alvarado, Juan; Fernández, Carlos; Castro, Antonio; Moreno-Ventas, Ignacio

    2013-08-01

    This work shows the results of a U-Pb SHRIMP zircon geochronological study of the central part of the Gredos massif (Spanish Central System batholith). The studied batholith is composed of several granodiorite and monzogranite tabular bodies, around 1 km thick each, intruded into partially molten pelitic metasediments. Granodiorites and monzogranites, belonging to three distinct intrusive bodies, and samples of anatectic leucogranites have been selected for SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology. Distinct age groups, separated by up to 20 Ma, have been distinguished in each sample. Important age differences have also been determined among the most representative age groups of the three analyzed granitoid bodies: 312.6 ± 2.8 Ma for the Circo de Gredos Bt-granodiorites (floor intrusive layer), 306.9 ± 1.5 Ma for the Barbellido-Plataforma granitoids (top intrusive layer) and 303.5 ± 2.8 Ma for Las Pozas Crd-monzogranites (middle intrusive layer). These age differences are interpreted in terms of sequential emplacement of the three intrusive bodies, contemporary with the Late Paleozoic D3 deformation phase. The anatectic leucogranites are coeval to slightly younger than the adjacent intrusive granodiorites and monzogranites (305.4 ± 1.6 Ma for Refugio del Rey leucogranites and 303 ± 2 Ma for migmatitic hornfelses). It is suggested that these anatectic magmas were generated in response to the thermal effects of granodiorite intrusions. Thermal modeling with COMSOL Multiphysics® reveals that sequential emplacement was able to keep the thermal conditions of the batholith around the temperature of zircon crystallization in granitic melts (around 750 °C) for several million of years, favoring the partial melting of host rocks and the existence of large magma chambers composed of crystal mush prone to be rejuvenated after new intrusions.

  20. Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy of CIA and CNA Intrusion Arches

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Sambhav; Pandey, Vinisha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Excessive overbite is one of the most common problems that confront the orthodontist. Deep bite can be due to infraocclusion of posterior teeth, supraocclusion of anterior teeth or a combination of the two. Correction of same can be carried out by extrusion of molars, intrusion of incisors or by a combination of both respectively. Various intrusion arches are recommended for correcting deep bite by true intrusion of anterior teeth, Utility arches, Segmental arch, Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA) and Connecticut New Arch (CNA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of CIA and CNA intrusion arches. Materials and Methods Tracings recorded from pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms of 25 patients treated by CIA (Group I) and another 25 patients treated by CNA (Group II) intrusion arches in deep bite cases after four months of treatment were analysed and findings were recorded. Statistical Analysis Paired t-test was used to compare pre and post-treatment changes within Groups I and II and unpaired t-test was used to compare treatment changes between Group I and Group II. A P-value of < 0.05 was set for statistical significance. Results Findings of this study demonstrate that an average of 1mm of intrusion takes place with CIA intrusion arch and 1.3mm with CNA intrusion arch in a period of 4 months. Both intrusion arches do not affect the position of molar in vertical or anteroposterior plane. Interpretation & Conclusion Both CIA and CNA intrusion arches are effective in bringing about intrusion of lower incisors. PMID:26501008

  1. Intrusion Detection With Quantum Mechanics: A Photonic Quantum Fence

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-12-01

    computing and quantum key distribution (QKD). Some of the most remarkable examples include quantum teleportation for the non-local transfer of...1 INTRUSION DETECTION WITH QUANTUM MECHANICS: A PHOTONIC QUANTUM FENCE T. S. Humble*, R. S. Bennink, and W. P. Grice Oak Ridge National...use of quantum -mechanically entangled photons for sensing intrusions across a physical perimeter. Our approach to intrusion detection uses the no

  2. APHID: Anomaly Processor in Hardware for Intrusion Detection

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-03-01

    APHID : Anomaly Processor in Hardware for Intrusion Detection THESIS Samuel Hart, Captain, USAF AFIT/GCE/ENG/07-04 DEPARTMENT OF THE AIR FORCE AIR...the United States Government. AFIT/GCE/ENG/07-04 APHID : Anomaly Processor in Hardware for Intrusion Detection THESIS Presented to the Faculty...Captain, USAF March 2007 APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED. AFIT/GCE/ENG/07-04 APHID : Anomaly Processor in Hardware for Intrusion

  3. Bounded Error Approximation Algorithms for Risk-Based Intrusion Response

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-17

    AFRL-AFOSR-VA-TR-2015-0324 Bounded Error Approximation Algorithms for Risk-Based Intrusion Response K Subramani West Virginia University Research...2015. 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Bounded Error Approximation Algorithms for Risk-Based Intrusion Response 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER FA9550-12-1-0199. 5b. GRANT... Algorithms for Risk-Based Intrusion Response DISTRIBUTION A: Distribution approved for public release. Definition 1.7 Given an integer k, an undirected

  4. The architecture of a network level intrusion detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Heady, R.; Luger, G.; Maccabe, A.; Servilla, M.

    1990-08-15

    This paper presents the preliminary architecture of a network level intrusion detection system. The proposed system will monitor base level information in network packets (source, destination, packet size, and time), learning the normal patterns and announcing anomalies as they occur. The goal of this research is to determine the applicability of current intrusion detection technology to the detection of network level intrusions. In particular, the authors are investigating the possibility of using this technology to detect and react to worm programs.

  5. The growth of large mafic intrusions: Comparing Niquelândia and Ivrea igneous complexes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Ciro Teixeira; Sinigoi, Silvano; Girardi, Vicente Antonio Vitorio; Mazzucchelli, Maurizio; Tassinari, Colombo Celso Gaeta; Giovanardi, Tommaso

    2012-12-01

    The Niquelândia Complex, Brazil, is one of the world's largest mafic-ultramafic plutonic complexes. Like the Mafic Complex of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone, it is affected by a pervasive high-T foliation and shows hypersolidus deformation structures, contains significant inclusions of country-rock paragneiss, and is subdivided into a Lower and an Upper Complex. In this paper, we present new SHRIMP U-Pb zircon ages that provide compelling evidence that the Upper and the Lower Niquelândia Complexes formed during the same igneous event at ca. 790 Ma. Coexistence of syn-magmatic and high-T subsolidus deformation structures indicates that both complexes grew incrementally as large crystal mush bodies which were continuously stretched while fed by pulses of fresh magma. Syn-magmatic recrystallization during this deformation resulted in textures and structures which, although appearing metamorphic, are not ascribable to post-magmatic metamorphic event(s), but are instead characteristic of the growth process in huge and deep mafic intrusions such as both the Niquelândia and Ivrea Complexes. Melting of incorporated country-rock paragneiss continued producing hybrid rocks during the last, vanishing stages of magmatic crystallization. This resulted in the formation of minor, late-stage hybrid rocks, whose presence obscures the record of the main processes of interaction between mantle magmas and crustal components, which may be active at the peak of the igneous events and lead to the generation of eruptible hybrid magmas.

  6. Diabetes Intrusiveness and Wellness among Elders: A Test of the Illness Intrusiveness Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn A.; Killian, Tim; Roessler, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Using data collected from 147 predominately African American senior citizens in Arkansas, this research examined the Illness Intrusiveness Model (Devins, 1991; Devins & Seland, 1987; Devins & Shnek, 2000) to explain variations in wellness specifically related to participants' adaptation to diabetes. The theoretical model hypothesized that…

  7. Ortigalita Peak gabbro, Franciscan complex: U-Pb dates of intrusion and high-pressure low-temperature metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattinson, James M.; Echeverria, Lina M.

    1980-12-01

    Paleontological and isotopic age data from the Franciscan complex in the Ortigalita Peak quadrangle, Diablo Range, California, provide new insight into the tectonic evolution of at least part of the Franciscan complex. Graywacke, shale, pillowed greenstone, and chert in the quadrangle were deposited in Late Jurassic (Tithonian) time, about 135 to 150 m.y. ago, on the basis of radiolaria. These rocks then were incorporated in an accretionary wedge prior to the intrusion of gabbroic magma 95 m.y. ago (U-Pb dating on zircons). Subduction (metamorphism of gabbro and surrounding sedimentary rocks to blueschist grade) closely followed intrusion at about 92 m.y. ago (U-Pb dating on metamorphic titanite and “plagioclase” = albite + pumpellyite ± quartz). The brief interval between intrusion and subduction confirms the idea that the gabbro was intruded into the accretionary wedge, essentially at the site of plate convergence. The much longer interval (about 40 to 55 m.y.) between deposition and subduction reveals that the Franciscan had a long presubduction history and provides a time frame within which more speculative concepts such as extensive northward translation of the Franciscan must be constrained.

  8. Deformation-driven differentiation during in-situ crystallization of the Iguilid mafic intrusion (West African craton)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Julien; Diot, Hervé; Lo, Khalidou

    2015-04-01

    The 2.7 Ga Iguilid mafic body is a small (9x2 km) magmatic intrusion with preserved igneous textures and not affected by metamorphism and deformation. It intrudes the metamorphic Archean basement of the Amsaga domain in the West African craton in Mauritania. The dominant lithology is a gabbronorite with subordinate gabbros and norites. We investigated 45 oriented samples for fabric analysis, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and geochemical analyses to explore the link between chemical differentiation and emplacement of the plutonic body. According to the limited variations in modal proportions and in major element compositions within the intrusion, the Iguilid pluton crystallized via an in-situ mechanism where solidification fronts progressively thickens from the rim to the core of the cooling intrusion and where the trace-element composition is controlled by the amount of interstitial liquid (containing most incompatible trace-elements) preserved between cumulus minerals before total solidification. An in-situ crystallization process alone normally does not produce chemical differentiation but the mafic cumulates at Iguilid have been deformed during their crystallization (i.e. when melt was still present). The vertical foliations and the randomly oriented lineations argue for horizontal flattening as the main deformation mechanism. We estimated the amount of trapped interstitial liquid preserved between the network of cumulate minerals with geochemical modelling in 12 samples and found that it is negatively correlated to the anisotropy degree determined by fabric analysis. The rocks located close to the margins of the intrusion were not deformed, probably because the degree of crystallization and, hence, the viscosity of the mush was too high. The most deformed rocks with the lowest trapped interstitial liquid content are found in the center of the intrusion where the crystal mushes were rich enough in melt to record significant strain. Deformation leaded to

  9. Rocks in Our Pockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Donna; Kuhlman, Wilma

    2005-01-01

    To introduce students to rocks and their characteristics, teacher can begin rock units with the activities described in this article. Students need the ability to make simple observations using their senses and simple tools.

  10. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  11. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C.-H.; Lan, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Wing rock is one type of lateral-directional instabilities at high angles of attack. To predict wing rock characteristics and to design airplanes to avoid wing rock, parameters affecting wing rock characteristics must be known. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model is developed to investigate the main aerodynamic nonlinearities causing wing rock. In the present theory, the Beecham-Titchener asymptotic method is used to derive expressions for the limit-cycle amplitude and frequency of wing rock from nonlinear flight dynamics equations. The resulting expressions are capable of explaining the existence of wing rock for all types of aircraft. Wing rock is developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  12. The Rock Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raman J.; Bushee, Jonathan

    1977-01-01

    Presents a rock cycle diagram suitable for use at the secondary or introductory college levels which separates rocks formed on and below the surface, includes organic materials, and separates products from processes. (SL)

  13. Platinum mineralization in the Kapalagulu Intrusion, western Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmij, Harry R.; Cabri, Louis J.

    2016-03-01

    Low-grade copper and nickel mineralization was found near the eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika at Kungwe Bay in the early part of the twentieth century. The mineralization occurs in harzburgite at the base of a layered gabbro complex known as the Kapalagulu Intrusion, emplaced between the Paleoproterozoic Ubendian basement and overlying Neoproterozoic Itiaso Group metasediments. Several mining and exploration companies continued the geophysical and drilling exploration for base metals throughout the last century culminating in the discovery of high-grade platinum-group element (PGE) mineralization associated with chromitite and sulfide-bearing harzburgite within the southeastern extension of the Kapalagulu Intrusion (known as the Lubalisi Zone) that is covered by a layer of nickel-rich laterite regolith. The poorly layered southeastern harzburgite forms part of the >1500 m-thick Lower Ultramafic Sequence and resembles a dike-like body that flares upwards into a succession of well-layered gabbroic rocks of the Upper Mafic Sequence. No PGE mineralization has been found in the layered gabbro; all the mineralization is associated with the chromite- and sulfide-rich harzburgite of the Lower Ultramafic Sequence and the laterite regolith overlying the mineralized harzburgite. The Lubalisi Zone harzburgite is underlain by basal dunite and overlain by an interval of layered harzburgite and troctolite and this ultramafic sequence is folded into a syncline that plunges towards the northwest that has been modified by major dolerite-filled faults orientated subparallel to the fold axial surface. Extensive deep drilling in the Lubalisi Zone of the Kapalagulu Intrusion shows that the folded harzburgite can be subdivided into a lower feldspathic harzburgite, a harzburgite containing chromitite seams and intervals of sulfide and chromite mineralization known as the Main Chromite Sulfide Succession (MCSS), an overlying sulfide-rich harzburgite, and an upper feldspathic harzburgite

  14. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  15. 68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 4; MAY, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. My Pet Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  17. From Intrusion Detection to Self Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Frincke, Deb; Wespi, Andreas; Zamboni, Diego

    2007-04-11

    Modern computer systems have become so complex and interdependent that the traditional model of system defense, utilizing layers and including an intrusion detection system that provides alerts to a human who responds to them, is becoming unfeasible. Effective human-guided real-time responses are no longer a reasonable expectation for large scale systems--this is particularly troublesome because a failure to respond correctly and rapidly can have disastrous consequences. In an ideal world, our systems would automatically detect and respond to threats of all kinds, including but not limited to automated attacks, human-guided attacks, and the constant onslaught of unsolicited email (spam). Traditionally, these threats have been dealt with by separate communities--the anti-virus community, the intrusion-detection/firewall community, and the anti-spam community. Today however, we see an increasing need for integrating different technologies toward achieving a common goal. In this special issue, we surveyed the research community with the intent of identifying novel, multidisciplinary and integrated approaches to system defense that contribute towards development of true self-protecting and self-healing systems. The result is reflected in the articles we selected.

  18. Characterizing and Improving Distributed Intrusion Detection Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, Steven A; Proebstel, Elliot P.

    2007-11-01

    Due to ever-increasing quantities of information traversing networks, network administrators are developing greater reliance upon statistically sampled packet information as the source for their intrusion detection systems (IDS). Our research is aimed at understanding IDS performance when statistical packet sampling is used. Using the Snort IDS and a variety of data sets, we compared IDS results when an entire data set is used to the results when a statistically sampled subset of the data set is used. Generally speaking, IDS performance with statistically sampled information was shown to drop considerably even under fairly high sampling rates (such as 1:5). Characterizing and Improving Distributed Intrusion Detection Systems4AcknowledgementsThe authors wish to extend our gratitude to Matt Bishop and Chen-Nee Chuah of UC Davis for their guidance and support on this work. Our thanks are also extended to Jianning Mai of UC Davis and Tao Ye of Sprint Advanced Technology Labs for their generous assistance.We would also like to acknowledge our dataset sources, CRAWDAD and CAIDA, without which this work would not have been possible. Support for OC48 data collection is provided by DARPA, NSF, DHS, Cisco and CAIDA members.

  19. Mafic intrusions triggering eruptions in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.

    2012-04-01

    The last two eruptions in Iceland, Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Grímsvötn 2011, were both provoked by an intrusion of more mafic magma into pre-existing magmatic system. Injection into the latter volcano, which is located in the main rift-zone of the island, above the presumed centre of the mantle plume and is the most active volcano of Iceland, has been gradual since the last eruption in 2004. In contrast, at Eyjafjallajökull volcano, one of the least active volcano in Iceland and located at the southern part of a propagating rift-zone where extensional tectonics are poorly developed, mafic magma intrusion occurred over less than a year. Beneath Eyjafjallajökull, a silicic intrusion at approximately 6 km depth was recharged with mantle derived alkali basalt that was injected into residual rhyolite from the penultimate eruption in the years 1821-23. The resulting magma mingIing process was highly complex, but careful sampling of tephra during the entire eruption allows the dynamics of the mingling process to be unravelled. Short-lived disequilibria between the gaseous nuclide 210Po and the much less volatile nuclide 210Pb, suggest that basalt accumulated beneath the silicic intrusion over approximately 100 days, or from early January 2010 until the onset of the explosive summit eruption on 14 April. Due to the degassing, crystal fractionation modified the composition of the injected mafic magma producing evolved Fe-and Ti-rich basalt, similar in composition to that of the nearby Katla volcano. This evolved basalt was intruded into the liquid part of the silicic intrusion only a few hours before the onset of the explosive summit eruption. The short time between intrusion and eruption led to the production of very heterogeneous (of basaltic, intermediate and silicic composition) and fine-grained tephra during the first days of explosive eruption. The fine grained tephra resulted from combined effects of magma fragmentation due to degassing of stiff magma rich in

  20. Periodicity of Kı¯lauea's Dike Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery-Brown, E. K.; Miklius, A.

    2015-12-01

    Magmatic intrusions commonly occur in the rift zones of Kı¯lauea Volcano. Individual dike intrusions observed by geodetic methods are usually 5 to 10 km long, and can occur repeatedly in the same region. Five such intrusions in Kı¯lauea's East Rift Zone, with inferred locations downrift of the bend where the NNW trending upper ERZ turns to the ENE trending ERZ, have occurred since the start of the ongoing ERZ eruption in 1983. The intrusions occur on one of two segments that correlate with seismic segments (Wright and Klein, USGS PP1806, 2014): Makaopuhi (1993 and 2007) and Nāpau (1983, 1997, and 2011). During each intrusion, the amount of dike opening was between 2 and 3 meters. Intrusions into the UERZ tend to be much smaller (~10 cm of dike opening) and occur more frequently. The time between ERZ intrusions for same-segment pairs are: 14.07 (1983-1997), 14.09 (1997-2011), and 13.95 (1993-2007) years, with the Nāpau segment becoming active about 3.5 years after the Makaopuhi segment in each case. The amount of modeled dike opening during each of these events roughly corresponds to the amount of seaward south flank motion and deep rift opening accumulated in the time between events, as was noted by Owen et al. (GRL, 2000) for the 1983 and 1997 intrusions. The recurrence interval of ~14 years appears to be unaffected by the magma surge of 2003-2007 (Poland et al., Nature, 2012), suggesting that flank motion, rather than magma supply, could be a controlling factor in the periodicity of intrusions. The long duration of the seismic catalog and the coincidence of repeated dike intrusions with the seismic segments suggest that on the timescale of decades, Kı¯lauea's East Rift Zone segments are persistent rather than ephemeral features related to single intrusion events.

  1. Molar Intrusion in Open-bite Adults Using Zygomatic Miniplates.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Eiman S; Abdallah, Essam Mohamed; El-Kenany, Walid A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the skeletal, dental and soft tissue changes that arise after intrusion of the maxillary molars using zygomatic miniplates in adult skeletal anterior open bite patients. In addition to measuring the amount and rate of molar intrusion; with special emphasis on changes in the axial inclination of the intruded molars. The study group was composed of 13 anterior open bite patients (mean age 18 years, 8 months ± 2 years, 2 months) with posterior dentoalveolar excess. Mini-plates were placed in the zygomatic buttress bilaterally. The upper arch was segmentally leveled and a double Trans-Palatal Arch (TPA) was bonded. Closed NiTi coil spring was placed bilaterally between the book of the mini-plate just mesial and distal to the first molar buccal tube applying intrusive force of 450 gper side. Lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms were taken before intrusion (T1: post upper segmental leveling) and after intrusion (T2). Comparison between means before and after the intrusion was done using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test (WSRT). Mandibular autorotation followed the molar intrusion, SNB and SN-Pog angles significantly increased while the ANB, MP-SN angle and N-S-Gn angle significantly decreased. The mean amount of accomplished molar intrusion was 3.1mm ± 0.74mm, with a rate of 0.36mm per month ± 0.08mm per month and a bite closure of 6.55mm ± 1.83mm. There was no significant buccal tip in the right and left molars upon intrusion. Conclusion: Miniplates zygomatic anchorage can be used effectively for skeletal open bite correction through posterior dento-alveolar intrusion. Intrusion of the posterior teeth with skeletal anchorage induced counterclockwise rotation of the mandible and, as a consequence, corrected the anteroposterior intermaxillary relationship with a dramatic improvement in the facial soft tissue convexity.

  2. Characterization of argilites heated by A Basaltic Intrusion at Laumiere (Aveyron, France), evolution of mineral combination with depth and intrusion proximity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, E.; Pozo, C.; Raynal, J.; Jullien, M.; Beaucaire, C.; Pitsch, H.; Cabrera, J.

    2003-04-01

    During high-level radioactive waste disposal in a clayey formation, the resulting thermal field may induce transformations of the host rock in the vicinity of the waste. Particularly, physicochemical alteration of clayey minerals could impact the capacity of confinement and the durability of the clayey barrier. An experimental simulation of the phenomena is complex because of the large time scale (hundreds to thousands of years), so the study of a natural analogue is adopted. The one studied here is situated at Laumière (Aveyron,France), in Toarcian argilites crosscut by a volcanic intrusion (dyke) eight million years ago. The sampling was hand made in surface and by drilling in depth, with the objective to distinguish the thermal impact and meteoritic influence on the rock alteration. The analytical techniques used, sometimes after a chemical treatment, are infrared spectroscopy, optical microscopy and scanning electronic microscopy. The analytical results are compared with those obtained on a reference sample taken at IRSN experimental station at Tournemire, at the same geological level.. Toarcian argilites consist of quartz and calcite in a micro-crystalline matrix of illite, smectite and kaolinite. In depth, the distribution profiles of chemical elements as a function of the distance to the dyke are almost flat. Calcite subsists in association with a new crystallized mixed carbonate (ankerite type) at the contact with the dyke. On the contrary, in surface, within the 0-10cm interval from the dyke, a great variation of the proportion of quartz, calcite and clay minerals is observed : calcite disappears and the proportion of smectite increases conversely to that of kaolinite. These preliminary observations show that the dyke influences the nature and the distribution of the mineralogical phases in its immediate proximity. They seem to indicate an asymmetry of the conditions of intrusion and/or of the hydrothermal circulation. Characterization of the

  3. Isotope-geochemical Nd-Sr evidence of Palaeoproterozoic plume magmatism in Fennoscandia and mantle-crust interaction on stages of layered intrusions formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Pavel; Bayanova, Tamara; Kunakkuzin, Evgeniy; Steshenko, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    Palaeoproterozoic Fennoscandian layered intrusions belong to the pyroxenite-gabbronorite-anorthosite formation and spread on a vast area within the Baltic Shield. Based on isotope U-Pb, Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr and Re-Os data the duration of this formation can be to 100-130 Ma (2.53-2.40 Ga) [Serov et. al., 2008; Bayanova et. al., 2009]. We have studied rocks of layered PGE-bearing Fedorovo-Pansky, Monchetundra, Burakovsky, Olanga group intrusions and Penikat intrusion. According to recent and new complex Nd-Sr-REE data magma source of the vast majority of these intrusions was a mantle reservoir with unusual characteristics: negative values of ɛNd (from 0 to -4) and ISr = 0.702-0.706, flat spectra of REE (value of (La/Yb)N ~ 1.0-5.8) with positive Eu-anomalies [Bayanova et. al., 2009; Bayanova et. al., 2014]. However, the distribution of REE for ore-bearing gabbronorite intrusions Penikat (Sm-Nd age is 2426 ± 38 Ma [Ekimova et. al., 2011]) has a negative Eu-anomalies. This may be due to the formation of plagioclase and its removal from the magma chamber. One of the aims of isotope geochemical investigations is to establish the contribution of mantle components in the formation of layered intrusions rocks and the degrees of contamination of the magma source by crustal material. To calculate the proportion of mantle component model binary mixture was used [Jahn et. al., 2000]. As the mantle components we used data for CHUR: ɛNd = 0, [Nd] = 1.324 [Palm, O'Neil, 2003] and for crustal components were used host-rocks Nd-data. The proportion of mantle component for the studied intrusions was 77-99%. Also, data were obtained for the Monchetundra dike complex and amphibolized gabbro, for which the proportion of mantle material was 20-40%. For these rocks a significant crustal contamination is most likely. This process resulted in low values of ɛNd, a direct relationship between ɛNd and Nd concentration, and significant differences between the U-Pb and Sm-Nd model ages. A

  4. Chineysky Layered Intrusion with unique V and PGE-Cu ores (Siberia, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gongalskiy, Bronislav; Krivolutskaya, Nadezda

    2010-05-01

    South of the Siberian platform is an extraordinary metallogenic province. Many giant deposits of different genetic types are concentrated here: Udokan (Cu), Chiney (Ti-Fe-V, Pd-Cu), Katugin (Ta, Nb), Sulumat (Fe) etc. It is his considered this massif is the largest component of the Proterozoic volcanic-plutonic system of the Kodar-Udokan district. Chineisky massif located among Cu-rich sedimentary rocks is represented by interlayering horizons of gabbronorite and titanomagnetite gabbro in its lower zone and gabbro and anorthosite in the upper zone.The intrusive rocks were proved to be genetically interrelated and show certain similar geochemical features: they have elevated TiO2 concentrations and have similar trace element patterns and (La/Sm)N and (Gd/Yb)N ratios (1.5-2.3 and 1.87-2.06, respectively). The Chineisky massif is thought to have been formed by the successive emplacement of genetically similar basic magmas, which produced four rock groups with fine and coarse layering and cyclicity of variable rank (micro-rhythms, rhythms, units, and series). The results of cluster analysis indicate that the rocks can be classified into 13 petrochemical types. The phase and chemical characteristics of the parental melts of these compositions were simulated with the use of the COMAGMAT-3.5 computer model, which was also applied to evaluate the composition of the most primitive initial magma of the whole Chineisky massif. Our results indicate that the primitive magma was heterogeneous (olivine + plagioclase titanomagnetite + melt) at a temperature of approximately 1130 C. The initial melt had a ferrobasaltic composition and was close to saturation with magnetite at ~NNO 0.5 The basic and ultrabasic rocks of the Luktur pluton are supposed to be the Mg-rich fraction of the parental melt. Gravimetric and magnetic geophysical data show that ultrabasic and basic rocks occur at shallow depths at the Chiney pluton and around it. These facts show the existence of huge magmatic

  5. Immiscible iron- and silica-rich melts in basalt petrogenesis documented in the Skaergaard intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, J. K.; Veksler, I. V.; Tegner, C.; Brooks, C. K.

    2005-11-01

    Silicate liquid immiscibility in basalt petrogenesis is a contentious issue. Immiscible iron- and silica-rich liquids were reported in melt inclusions of lunar basalt and in groundmass glasses of terrestrial volcanics. In fully crystallized plutonic rocks, however, silicate liquid immiscibility has yet to be proven. Here we report the first finding of natural, immiscible iron- and silica-rich melts in a plutonic environment documented in the Skaergaard intrusion, East Greenland. Primary melt inclusions (now finely crystallized) in apatite are either dark or light colored. The predominant dark colored type contains 30.9 ± 4.2 wt% FeOt and 40.7 ± 3.6 wt% SiO2, whereas the light colored type contains 8.6 ± 5.9 wt% FeOt and 65.6 ± 7.3 wt% SiO2. Similar light colored melt inclusions in olivine and fine-grained dark and light colored interstitial pockets also give evidence of crystallization from emulsion of silica and iron-rich liquids. On the outcrop scale, silica-rich (melanogranophyre) pods and layers in iron-rich ferrodiorite of the Upper Zone of the Skaergaard intrusion witness segregation of the two liquids. These findings demand that silicate immiscibility is considered in basalt petrogenesis. Some granitic rocks may represent unmixed silica-rich melt, whereas the dense, iron-rich melt is likely to sink in the crust and could mix with hot mantle-derived magma to form unusual rocks, like ferropicrites, otherwise interpreted as products of heterogeneous mantle sources.

  6. Geochemistry of Rock Samples Collected from the Iron Hill Carbonatite Complex, Gunnison County, Colorado

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Van Gosen, Bradley S.

    2008-01-01

    A study conducted in 2006 by the U.S. Geological Survey collected 57 surface rock samples from nine types of intrusive rock in the Iron Hill carbonatite complex. This intrusive complex, located in Gunnison County of southwestern Colorado, is known for its classic carbonatite-alkaline igneous geology and petrology. The Iron Hill complex is also noteworthy for its diverse mineral resources, including enrichments in titanium, rare earth elements, thorium, niobium (columbium), and vanadium. This study was performed to reexamine the chemistry and metallic content of the major rock units of the Iron Hill complex by using modern analytical techniques, while providing a broader suite of elements than the earlier published studies. The report contains the geochemical analyses of the samples in tabular and digital spreadsheet format, providing the analytical results for 55 major and trace elements.

  7. Emplacement and geochemical evolution of eocene plutonic rocks in the Colville batholith

    SciTech Connect

    Holder, R.W.

    1986-01-01

    Eocene plutonic rocks in the Colville batholith are divided on the basis of field evidence and chemical composition into, in order of decreasing age, (1) several calc-alkalic biotite-hornblende monzodiorite to granodiorite intrusions referred to as the Devils Elbow suite, and (2) compositionally variable calc-alkalic to alkali-calcic intrusions referred to as the Herron Creek suite. These Eocene suites are distinct from older, more voluminous, leucocratic granite and granodiorite intrusions, designated the Keller Butte suite, which are calcic and characteristically lack hornblende. Results of qualitative and computer modeling of major element variation and quantitative models of trace element variation in the chemically coherent Bridge Creek intrusions, a member of the Herron Creek suite, are compatible with fractionation of plagioclase feldspar + hornblende + biotite + magnetite + apatite from a parent magma of andesitic composition to account for the observed variation. Strongly curved variation trends preclude mixing as the primary mechanism for the observed variation. It is suggested that parallel variation trends in the other Eocene intrusions are also the result of crystal fractionation. Lateral chemical variations including a decrease in silica saturation suggest the chemical characteristics of these rocks reflect those of parental magmas derived from the mantle, with an unknown amount of crustal contribution. Rotated and angular xenoliths, discordant contacts, and temporal and spatial proximity to graben structures indicate that the Eocene plutons were passively implaced into the upper crust along graben-bounding faults during graben formation, the earlier stages of which appear to have been contemporaneous with regional mylonitic deformation.

  8. Elastic Properties of Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melendez Martinez, Jaime

    Sedimentary rocks are an important research topic since such rocks are associated to sources of ground water as well as oil, gas, and mineral reservoirs. In this work, elastic and physical properties of a variety of sedimentary samples that include glacial sediments, carbonates, shales, one evaporite, and one argillite from a variety of locations are investigated. Assuming vertical transverse isotropy, ultrasonic compressional- and shear-waves (at 1 MHz central frequency) were measured as a function of confining pressure on all samples with the exception of glacial samples which were tested assuming isotropy. Tensile strength tests (Brazilian test) were also carried out on selected glacial samples and, in addition, static-train measurements were conducted on shales and argillite samples. Lithological and textural features of samples were obtained through thin section techniques, scanning electron microscopy images and micro-tomography images. X-ray diffraction and X-Ray fluorescence provided the mineralogical oxides content information. Porosity, density, and pore structure were studied by using a mercury intrusion porosimeter and a helium pycnometer. The wide range of porosities of the studied samples (ranging from a minimum of 1% for shales to a maximum 45% for some glacial sediments) influence the measured velocities since high porosity sample shows an noticeable velocity increment as confining pressure increases as a consequence of closure of microcracks and pores, unlike low porosity samples where increment is quasi-lineal. Implementation of Gassmann's relation to ultrasonic velocities obtained from glacial samples has negligible impact on them when assuming water saturated samples, which suggests that state of saturation it is no so important in defining such velocities and instead they are mainly frame-controlled. On the other hand, velocities measured on carbonate and evaporite samples show that samples are at best weak anisotropic, thus the intrinsic

  9. Structural control on the shape of intrusions in the Koktokay ore district, Chinese Altai, north western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Qin, Ke Zhang; Zhou, Qi Feng; Paterson, Greig

    2016-02-01

    The Koktokay pegmatite-type rare-metal-bearing ore district in the Altai orogen is famous for both its large scale and its diversity of rare metals. However, the emplacement mechanisms of the ore-bearing pegmatite intrusions in the Koktokay ore district are still unclear. Based on field observations, the emplacement of the ore-bearing pegmatite intrusions falls into two types. The first type is typical of the formation of dykes and sills, whereby they intruded into fan shaped, moderate dipping, joints within plutonic rocks. The second type involves the formation of a punched laccolith that was fed by a pegmatite sill. Magmatic stoping is the main mechanism of the laccolith emplacement. The peripheral faults played an important role in helping the emplacement of the laccolith. The trend of dykes and sills indicate two potential prospecting areas, which are located in the western and northern regions of the Koktokay ore district.

  10. Prior-List Intrusions in Serial Recall Are Positional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osth, Adam F.; Dennis, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Henson (1996) provided a number of demonstrations of error patterns in serial recall that contradict chaining models. One such error pattern concerned when participants make intrusions from prior lists: Rather than originating from random positions in the prior list, intrusions tend to be recalled in the same position as their position in the…

  11. Intrusive Thought and Relativity Associated with Task Performance

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1995-01-23

    skin conductance, than when the film was shown silently such as in Horowitz’ model (Lazarus, Speisman, Mordkoff, & Davison, 1962; Speisman, Lazarus...including intrusions, were experienced. Rabavilas and Boulougouris (1974 ) recorded heart rate and skin conductance from eight patients suffering from...longstanding intrusions during exposure to neutral and obsessional fantasies . They found that both heart rate and maximum deflection of skin

  12. Intrusive Memories of Distressing Information: An fMRI Study

    PubMed Central

    Battaglini, Eva; Liddell, Belinda; Das, Pritha; Malhi, Gin; Felmingham, Kim

    2016-01-01

    Although intrusive memories are characteristic of many psychological disorders, the neurobiological underpinning of these involuntary recollections are largely unknown. In this study we used functional magentic resonance imaging (fMRI) to identify the neural networks associated with encoding of negative stimuli that are subsequently experienced as intrusive memories. Healthy partipants (N = 42) viewed negative and neutral images during a visual/verbal processing task in an fMRI context. Two days later they were assessed on the Impact of Event Scale for occurrence of intrusive memories of the encoded images. A sub-group of participants who reported significant intrusions (n = 13) demonstrated stronger activation in the amygdala, bilateral ACC and parahippocampal gyrus during verbal encoding relative to a group who reported no intrusions (n = 13). Within-group analyses also revealed that the high intrusion group showed greater activity in the dorsomedial (dmPFC) and dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (dlPFC), inferior frontal gyrus and occipital regions during negative verbal processing compared to neutral verbal processing. These results do not accord with models of intrusions that emphasise visual processing of information at encoding but are consistent with models that highlight the role of inhibitory and suppression processes in the formation of subsequent intrusive memories. PMID:27685784

  13. SAMPLING-BASED APPROACH TO INVESTIGATING VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vapor intrusion is defined as the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into occupied buildings from contaminated soil or ground water. EPA recently developed guidance to facilitate assessment of vapor intrusion at sites regulated by RCRA and CERCLA. The EPA guidance e...

  14. Identification and Control of Pollution from Salt Water Intrusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This document contains informational guidelines for identifying and evaluating the nature and extent of pollution from salt water intrusion. The intent of these guidelines is to provide a basic framework for assessing salt water intrusion problems and their relationship to the total hydrologic system, and to provide assistance in developing…

  15. Evaluation of Two Host-Based Intrusion Prevention Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL MONTEREY, CALIFORNIA THESIS Approved for public release; distribution is unlimited. AN EVALUATION OF TWO...HOST BASED INTRUSION PREVENTION SYSTEMS by Keith Labbe June 2005 Thesis Advisors: Neil Rowe J.D. Fulp...AND DATES COVERED Master’s Thesis 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE: Evaluation of Two Host-Based Intrusion Prevention Systems 6. AUTHOR(S) Keith Labbe 5

  16. An improved unsupervised clustering-based intrusion detection method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hai, Yong J.; Wu, Yu; Wang, Guo Y.

    2005-03-01

    Practical Intrusion Detection Systems (IDSs) based on data mining are facing two key problems, discovering intrusion knowledge from real-time network data, and automatically updating them when new intrusions appear. Most data mining algorithms work on labeled data. In order to set up basic data set for mining, huge volumes of network data need to be collected and labeled manually. In fact, it is rather difficult and impractical to label intrusions, which has been a big restrict for current IDSs and has led to limited ability of identifying all kinds of intrusion types. An improved unsupervised clustering-based intrusion model working on unlabeled training data is introduced. In this model, center of a cluster is defined and used as substitution of this cluster. Then all cluster centers are adopted to detect intrusions. Testing on data sets of KDDCUP"99, experimental results demonstrate that our method has good performance in detection rate. Furthermore, the incremental-learning method is adopted to detect those unknown-type intrusions and it decreases false positive rate.

  17. Parental Intrusiveness and Children's Separation Anxiety in a Clinical Sample

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wood, Jeffrey J.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, a theoretical model of the role of parental intrusiveness in the development of childhood separation anxiety disorder is presented and tested. Parents who act intrusively tend to take over tasks that children are (or could be) performing independently, thereby limiting mastery experiences and inducing dependence on caregivers.…

  18. Intrusive and Withdrawn Depressed Mothers and Their Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Diego, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This review of the literature on two different interaction styles of depressed mothers, intrusive and withdrawn, shows that withdrawn versus intrusive mothers typically have an EEG pattern that is associated with negative affect (i.e., greater relative right frontal EEG activation) as well as lower levels of the activating neurotransmitter,…

  19. Young women's experiences of intrusive behavior in 12 countries.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Lorraine; Scott, Adrian J; Roberts, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The present study provides international comparisons of young women's (N = 1,734) self-reported experiences of intrusive activities enacted by men. Undergraduate psychology students from 12 countries (Armenia, Australia, England, Egypt, Finland, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Scotland, and Trinidad) indicated which of 47 intrusive activities they had personally experienced. Intrusive behavior was not uncommon overall, although large differences were apparent between countries when women's personal experiences of specific intrusive activities were compared. Correlations were carried out between self-reported intrusive experiences, the Gender Empowerment Measure (GEM), and Hofstede's dimensions of national cultures. The primary associations were between women's experiences of intrusive behavior and the level of power they are afforded within the 12 countries. Women from countries with higher GEM scores reported experiencing more intrusive activities relating to courtship and requests for sex, while the experiences of women from countries with lower GEM scores related more to monitoring and ownership. Intrusive activities, many of them constituent of harassment and stalking, would appear to be widespread and universal, and their incidence and particular form reflect national level gender inequalities.

  20. Petrology of mafic and ultramafic intrusions from the Portneuf-Mauricie Domain, Grenville Province, Canada: Implications for plutonic complexes in a Proterozoic island arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sappin, A.-A.; Constantin, M.; Clark, T.

    2012-12-01

    The Portneuf-Mauricie Domain (PMD), located in the south-central part of the Grenville Province, comprises several mafic and ultramafic intrusions hosting Ni-Cu ± platinum-group element (PGE) prospects and a former small mining operation (Lac Édouard mine). These meter- to kilometer-scale, sulfide-bearing intrusions display diverse forms, such as layered and tabular bodies with no particular internal structure, and zoned plutons. They were injected ~ 1.40 Ga into a mature oceanic arc, before and during accretion of the arc to the Laurentian margin. The pressure-temperature conditions of the magmas at the beginning of their emplacement were 3 kbar and 1319-1200 °C (according to the petrologic modeling results from this study). The PMD mineralized intrusions are interpreted to represent former magma chambers or magma conduits in the roots of the oceanic arc. The parent magmas of the mineralized intrusions resulted mainly from the partial melting of a mantle source composed of spinel-bearing lherzolite. Petrologic modeling and the occurrence of primary amphibole in the plutonic rocks indicate that these parent melts were basaltic and hydrous. In addition, fractional crystallization modeling and Mg/Fe ratios suggest that most of the intrusions may have formed from evolved magmas, with Mg# = 60, resulting from the fractionation of more primitive magmas (primary magmas, with Mg# = 68). Petrologic modeling demonstrates that 30% fractional crystallization resulted in the primitive to evolved characteristics of the studied intrusive rocks (as indicated by the crystallization sequences and mineral chemistry). Exceptions are the Réservoir Blanc, Boivin, and Rochette West parent magmas, which may have undergone more extensive fractional crystallization, since these intrusions contain pyroxenes that are more iron rich and have lower Mg numbers than pyroxenes in the other PMD intrusions. The PMD mafic and ultramafic intrusions were intruded into an island arc located

  1. Intrusive Thoughts Mediate the Association between Neuroticism and Cognitive Function.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Elizabeth; Sliwinski, Martin J; Smyth, Joshua M; Almeida, David M; King, Heather A

    2013-11-01

    Although research has established a negative association between trait neuroticism and cognition, little is known about the mechanisms that underlie this relationship. We examined the tendency to experience intrusive thoughts and negative affect as potential mediators of the relationship between neuroticism and cognitive performance. We hypothesized that the tendency to experience intrusive thoughts reflects ineffective attentional control and would account for the relationship between neuroticism and cognitive performance over and above the mediating effect of negative affect. Three hundred seventeen adults (Mage =49.43) completed a series of attention-demanding cognitive tasks as well as self-report measures of intrusive thoughts, negative affect, and neuroticism. Intrusive thoughts mediated the association between trait neuroticism and cognitive performance beyond negative affect. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that the tendency to experience intrusive thoughts is a mechanism through which trait neuroticism influences cognitive performance.

  2. Coastal Marsh Monitoring for Persistent Saltwater Intrusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Callie M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's work on the project that supports the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) Governors Action Plan to monitor the coastal wetlands for saltwater intrusion. The action items that relate to the task are: (1) Obtain information on projected relative sea level rise, subsidence, and storm vulnerability to help prioritize conservation projects, including restoration, enhancement, and acquisition, and (2) Develop and apply ecosystem models to forecast the habitat structure and succession following hurricane disturbance and changes in ecological functions and services that impact vital socio-economic aspects of coastal systems. The objectives of the program are to provide resource managers with remote sensing products that support ecosystem forecasting models requiring salinity and inundation data. Specifically, the proposed work supports the habitat-switching modules in the Coastal Louisiana Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration (CLEAR) model, which provides scientific evaluation for restoration management.

  3. Petrological and Geochemical Studies of the Igneous Rocks at Cerro EL Borrego, Chihuahua, Mexico

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estrada, V. M.; Espejel-Garcia, V. V.; Villalobos-Aragon, A.

    2013-05-01

    Cerro El Borrego, which is a hill composed of igneous rocks, is located 13.7 km to the SW of Chihuahua city, in northern Mexico. The coordinates of the hill are 28° 11' 07'' N latitude and 105° 33' 23'' W longitude. The study area is within the Basin and Range Physiographic Province, characterized by a complex tectonic-structural pattern, such as elongated ranges with folds and igneous rock formations of Paleogene age. A lava flow of Oligocene age is part of the large volcanic and plutonic activity at the early times of the Cenozoic, which occurred to the NW portion of Mexico. In Cerro El Borrego, the rocks that outcrop are middle Oligocene's rhyolitic tuff to the NW of the hill, while to its SE there is a Pleistocene polymictic conglomerate. Previous work shows different interpretations about the origin and composition of the igneous rocks at Cerro El Borrego. This project includes whole rock and textural analyses, which helped to discern the petrogenesis of these rocks. Preliminary petrographic analyses indicate that the Cerro El Borrego, is a structural dome, and its feldspar-rich rocks contain large crystals that can be appreciated without a microscope. The presence of a porphyritic texture, suggest a sallow intrusion origin. A preliminary conclusion is that Cerro El Borrego is a shallow depth intrusive body with a syenitic composition derived from the Oligocene plutonic activity.

  4. Tertiary alkaline Roztoky Intrusive Complex, České středohoří Mts., Czech Republic: petrogenetic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, Roman; Ulrych, Jaromír; Ackerman, Lukáš; Jelínek, Emil; Dostál, Jaroslav; Hegner, Ernst; Řanda, Zdeněk

    2014-07-01

    The České středohoří Mts. is the dominant volcanic center of the Ohře (Eger) rift zone. It hosts the Roztoky Intrusive Complex (RIC), which is made up of a caldera vent and intrusions of 33-28-Ma-old hypabyssal bodies of essexite-monzodiorite-sodalite syenite series accompanied by a radially oriented 30-25-Ma-old dike swarm comprising about 1,000 dikes. The hypabyssal rocks are mildly alkaline mostly foid-bearing types of mafic to intermediate compositions. The dike swarm consists of chemically mildly alkaline and rare strongly alkaline rocks (tinguaites). The geochemical signatures of the mildly alkaline hypabyssal and associated dike rocks of the RIC are consistent with HIMU mantle sources and contributions from lithospheric mantle. The compositional variations of essexite and monzodiorite can be best explained by fractional crystallization of parent magma without significant contributions of crustal material. On the other hand, the composition of monzosyenite, leuco-monzodiorite and sodalite syenite reflects fractional crystallization coupled with variable degrees of crustal assimilation. It is suggested that the parent magmas in the Ohře rift were produced by an adiabatic decompression melting of ambient upper mantle in response to lithospheric extension associated with the Alpine Orogeny.

  5. Welded tuff porosity characterization using mercury intrusion, nitrogen and ethylene glycol monoethyl ether sorption and epifluorescence microscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Claassen, H.C.; Rutherford, D.W.; Chiou, C.T.

    1994-01-01

    Porosity of welded tuff from Snowshoe Mountain, Colorado, was characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), nitrogen sorption porosimetry, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME) gas phase sorption and epifluorescence optical microscopy. Crushed tuff of two particle-size fractions (1-0.3 mm and less than 0.212 mm), sawed sections of whole rock and crushed tuff that had been reacted with 0.1 N hydrochloric acid were examined. Average MIP pore diameter values were in the range of 0.01-0.02??m. Intrusion volume was greatest for tuff reacted with 0.1 N hydrochloric acid and least for sawed tuff. Cut rock had the smallest porosity (4.72%) and crushed tuff reacted in hydrochloric acid had the largest porosity (6.56%). Mean pore diameters from nitrogen sorption measurements were 0.0075-0.0187 ??m. Nitrogen adsorption pore volumes (from 0.005 to 0.013 cm3/g) and porosity values (from 1.34 to 3.21%) were less than the corresponding values obtained by MIP. More than half of the total tuff pore volume was associated with pore diameters < 0.05??m. Vapor sorption of EGME demonstrated that tuff pores contain a clay-like material. Epifluorescence microscopy indicated that connected porosity is heterogeneously distributed within the tuff matix; mineral grains had little porosity. Tuff porosity may have important consequences for contaminant disposal in this host rock. ?? 1994.

  6. High Temperature Metamorphism In The Conductive Boundary Layer Of An Intrusion Of Rhyolite Magma In The Krafla Geothermal System, Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schiffman, P.; Zierenberg, R. A.; Fridleifsson, G. O.; Elders, W. A.; Mortensen, A. K.

    2011-12-01

    A rhyolite magma body within the Krafla geothermal system- encountered at a depth of 2.1 km during drilling of the Iceland Deep Drilling Project's IDDP-1 borehole - is producing high temperature metamorphism within adjacent country rocks. Cuttings recovered during drilling within a few meters of the intrusive contact are undergoing recrystallization into granoblastic, pyroxene hornfelses. In mafic rocks, clinopyroxene-orthopyroxene-plagioclase-magnetite-ilmenite assemblages record temperatures in the range of 800-950°C. Silicic lithologies - mainly older felsitic intrusions -contain pockets of rhyolite melt, quenched to glass during drilling, amongst alkali feldspar, plagioclase, quartz, clinopyroxene, and magnetite. Curiously, no lower grade metamorphic assemblages have been identified in the drill cuttings, and country rocks at distances beyond 30 m of the contact are essentially unaltered. These findings suggest that the intruding rhyolite magma body has created a thin conductive boundary layer above it, but that a contact metamorphic aureole has not as yet developed beyond this. The heat flow across the boundary layer is calculated to be a minimum of 23 W m-2. This flux is capable of supplying steam to a geothermal power plant that can produce approximately 40 MW of electrical generation from a single well that has a measured well-head temperature of up to 415°C.

  7. Mafic and felsic igneous rocks at Gale crater

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sautter, Violaine; Cousin, Agnès; Mangold, Nicolas; Toplis, Michael; Fabre, Cécile; Forni, Olivier; Payré, Valérie; Gasnault, Olivier; Ollila, Anne; Rapin, William; Fisk, Martin; Meslin, Pierre-Yves; Wiens, Roger; Maurice, Sylvestre; Lasue, Jérémie; Newsom, Horton; Lanza, Nina

    2015-04-01

    The Curiosity rover landed at Gale, an early Hesperian age crater formed within Noachian terrains on Mars. The rover encountered a great variety of igneous rocks to the west of the Yellow Knife Bay sedimentary unit (from sol 13 to 800) which are float rocks or clasts in conglomerates. Textural and compositional analyses using MastCam and ChemCam Remote micro Imager (RMI) and Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with a ˜300-500 µm laser spot lead to the recognition of 53 massive (non layered) igneous targets, both intrusive and effusive, ranging from mafic rocks where feldspars form less than 50% of the rock to felsic samples where feldspar is the dominant mineral. From morphology, color, grain size, patina and chemistry, at least 5 different groups of rocks have been identified: (1) a basaltic class with shiny aspect, conchoidal frature, no visible grains (less than 0.2mm) in a dark matrix with a few mm sized light-toned crystals (21 targets) (2) a porphyritic trachyandesite class with light-toned, bladed and polygonal crystals 1-20 mm in length set in a dark gray mesostasis (11 targets); (3) light toned trachytes with no visible grains sometimes vesiculated or forming flat targets (6 targets); (4) microgabbro-norite (grain size < 1mm) and gabbro-norite (grain size >1 mm) showing dark and light toned crystals in similar proportion ( 8 targets); (5) light-toned diorite/granodiorite showing coarse granular (>4 mm) texture either pristine or blocky, strongly weathered rocks (9 rock targets). Overall, these rocks comprise 2 distinct geochemical series: (i) an alkali-suite: basanite, gabbro trachy-andesite and trachyte) including porphyritic and aphyric members; (ii) quartz-normative intrusives close to granodioritic composition. The former looks like felsic clasts recently described in two SNC meteorites (NWA 7034 and 7533), the first Noachian breccia sampling the martian regolith. It is geochemically consistent with differentiation of liquids produced by low

  8. Effects of magmatic and metamorphic volatiles on the evolution of fluid-rock interactions and fluid pressure during contact metamorphism

    SciTech Connect

    Hanson, R.B. )

    1992-01-01

    Finite difference models of hydrothermal flow around a cooling intrusion that include fluid production from the magma during crystallization and from wall rocks during heating are used to investigate the evolution of fluid pressure and fluid-rock interactions during the contact metamorphism. For a granodiorite intrusion with a width of 9 km and releasing just 1: H[sub 2]O linearly during crystallization, fluid production elevates fluid pressures to lithostatic values above and adjacent to the intrusion when permeabilities are less than 1 [mu]D (10[sup [minus]18] m[sup 2]). Alternatively, hydrofracturing resulting from fluid production would be sufficient to create and maintain a time-averaged permeability of 1 [mu]D for 50,000 years: permeability decreases gradually with time afterward until the magma crystallizes (350,000 years). In detail, the history depends strongly on how fluids are released from the crystallizing magma. The effect is comparable to that obtained for devolatilization of 5% H[sub 2]O by weight over heating of 400 C in adjacent wall rocks. Fluid production dominates other mechanisms for elevating fluid pressures such as thermal expansion of pore fluids or ductile strain. In models with both magmatic and metamorphic fluids, fluid flow is outward from the inner aureole for much of the cooling history at wall-rock permeabilities of [le]100 [mu]D. Extensive up-temperature flow is not predicted. The evolution of flow is such that magmatic fluids can initially dominate fluid-rock interactions in a plume above the intrusion, although the timing of interaction of magmatic and metamorphic waters is sensitive to the detailed devolatilization histories. Initial pore fluids rapidly become insignificant in the overall fluid budget. Surface or external fluids infiltrate only late in the cooling history, as rocks within a few kilometers of the intrusion are cooling.

  9. Carbonate-silicate melt immiscibility, REE mineralising fluids, and the evolution of the Lofdal Intrusive Suite, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bodeving, Sarah; Williams-Jones, Anthony E.; Swinden, Scott

    2017-01-01

    The Lofdal Intrusive Suite, Namibia, consists of calcio-carbonatite and silica-undersaturated alkaline intrusive rocks ranging in composition from phono-tephrite to phonolite (and nepheline syenite). The most primitive of these rocks is the phono-tephrite, which, on the basis of its Y/Ho and Nb/Ta ratios, is interpreted to have formed by partial melting of the mantle. Roughly linear trends in major and trace element contents from phono-tephrite to phonolite and nepheline syenite indicate that the latter two rock types evolved from the phono-tephrite by fractional crystallisation. The nepheline syenite, however, has a lower rare earth element (REE) content than the phonolite. The carbonatite has a primitive mantle-normalised REE profile roughly parallel to that of the silica-undersaturated alkaline igneous rocks, although the absolute REE concentrations are higher. Like the phono-tephrite, it also has a mantle Y/Ho ratio. However, the Nb/Ta and Zr/Hf ratios are significantly higher. Moreover, the carbonatite displays strong negative Ta, Zr and Hf anomalies on spidergrams, whereas the silicate rocks display positive anomalies for these elements. Significantly, this behaviour is predicted by the corresponding carbonatite-silicate melt partition coefficients, as is the behaviour of the REE. Based on these observations, we interpret the carbonatite to represent an immiscible liquid that exsolved from the phono-tephrite or possibly the phonolite melt. The result was a calcio-carbonatite that is enriched in the heavy REE (HREE) relative to most other carbonatites. Fluids released from the corresponding magma are interpreted to have been the source of the REE mineralisation that is currently the target of exploration.

  10. Titaniferous magnetite in the layered intrusive complex at Lakathah, Kingdom of Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Martin, Conrad; Roberts, Ralph Jackson; Stoeser, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    The Lakathah layered intrusive complex about 90 km east of Qunfudhah contains significant resources of low-grade titanium-bearing rock. The complex is about 10 km in diameter and consists of three principal units: an outer syenite ring, an intermediate diorite-gabbro zone, and a central pyroxenite-hornblendite core. The principal mineralization zone is in the ultramafic core of the complex. The titanium is mainly in titaniferous magnetite, but some is in ilmenite intergrown with magnetite and in the titanium-bearing hornblende, kaersutite. The titaniferous magnetite is in concordant lenses and veinlets and is disseminated throughout the host rock. The lenses and veins range from a few centimeters to 3 m in width and are as much as 50 m long. The layered disseminated bodies contain as much as 25 percent magnetite. Exploratory drilling showed that an area 500 by 1000 m contains titaniferous rock averaging about 6.2 percent TiO2. This mineralized zone contains about 175,000,000 tons per 100 m depth. Material of this grade is not commercial at this time, but may be a future resource. Alluvial deposits along the Red Sea near Al Qunfudhah should be tested for possible deposits of titaniferous sand.

  11. A reconnaissance 40Ar/39Ar geochronologic study of ore-bearing and related rocks, Siberian Russia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Dalrymple, G.B.; Czamanske, G.K.; Fedorenko, V.A.; Simonov, O.N.; Lanphere, M.A.; Likhachev, A.P.

    1995-01-01

    40Ar/39Ar age spectra of biotite from a mineralized vein in the ore-bearing, Noril'sk I intrusion and from picritic-like gabbrodolerite from the weakly mineralized, Lower Talnakh intrusion show that these bodies were emplaced at 249 ?? 2 Ma, which is not significantly different from the age of the Permian-Triassic boundary. The ore-bearing intrusions postdate the lower third of the flood-basalt sequence in the Noril'sk area and, on the basis of geochemistry, can best be correlated with lavas slightly younger than those which they cut. Thus, flood basalt was erupted at the time of the Permian-Triassic mass extinction event, although its role in this event is, as yet, ill defined. Additional new 40Ar/39Ar age data for a group of intrusive and extrusive rocks on the western margin of the Siberian craton are discussed. -from Authors

  12. Re-Os isotopic evidence for an enriched-mantle source for the Noril'sk-type, ore-bearing intrusions, Siberia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walker, R.J.; Morgan, J.W.; Horan, M.F.; Czamanske, G.K.; Krogstad, E.J.; Fedorenko, V.A.; Kunilov, V.E.

    1994-01-01

    Magmatic Cu-Ni sulfide ores and spatially associated ultramafic and mafic rocks from the Noril'sk I, Talnakh, and Kharaelakh intrusions are examined for Re-Os isotopic systematics. Neodymium and lead isotopic data also are reported for the ultramafic and mafic rocks. The Re-Os data for most samples indicate closed-system behavior since the ca. 250 Ma igneous crystallization age of the intrusions. There are small but significant differences in the initial osmium isotopic compositions of samples from the three intrusions. Ores from the Noril'sk I intrusion have ??Os values that vary from +0.4 to +8.8, but average +5.8. Ores from the Talnakh intrusion have ??Os values that range from +6.7 to +8.2, averaging +7.7. Ores from the Kharaelakh intrusion have ??Os values that range from +7.8 to +12.9, with an average value of +10.4. The osmium isotopic compositions of the ore samples from the Main Kharaelakh orebody exhibit minimal overlap with those for the Noril'sk I and Talnakh intrusions, indicating that these Kharaelakh ores were derived from a more radiogenic source of osmium than the other ores. Combined osmium and lead data for major orebodies in the three intrusions plot in three distinct fields, indicating derivation of osmium and lead from at least three isotopically distinct sources. Some of the variation in lead isotopic compositions may be the result of minor lower-crustal contamination. However, in contrast to most other isotopic and trace element data, Os-Pb variations are generally inconsistent with significant crustal contamination or interaction with the subcontinental lithosphere. Thus, the osmium and lead isotopic compositions of these intrusions probably reflect quite closely the compositions of their mantle source, and suggest that these two isotope systems were insensitive to lithospheric interaction. Ultramafic and mafic rocks have osmium and lead isotopic compositions that range only slightly beyond the compositions of the ores. These rocks also

  13. Friction of rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Byerlee, J.

    1978-01-01

    Experimental results in the published literature show that at low normal stress the shear stress required to slide one rock over another varies widely between experiments. This is because at low stress rock friction is strongly dependent on surface roughness. At high normal stress that effect is diminished and the friction is nearly independent of rock type. If the sliding surfaces are separated by gouge composed of Montmorillonite or vermiculite the friction can be very low. ?? 1978 Birkha??user Verlag.

  14. Contribution of hydrochemical and geoelectrical approaches to investigate salinization process and seawater intrusion in the coastal aquifers of Chaouia, Morocco.

    PubMed

    Najib, Saliha; Fadili, Ahmed; Mehdi, Khalid; Riss, Joëlle; Makan, Abdelhadi

    2017-01-31

    This study aims to identify groundwater salinization origin and to determine seawater intrusion extension toward the inland in Chaouia, Morocco. To reach these objectives, firstly, 46 groundwater samples were analyzed for major chemical elements during January 2012 and, secondly, 10 electrical resistivity tomography (ERT) profiles were performed perpendicularly to the coastal fringe. Statistical analysis provided the distinction between three Clusters reflecting different hydrochemical processes. Cluster I and Cluster II-a showed a high water electrical conductivity (EC) (from 2.3 to 11.2mS/cm) with the dominance of Na(+) (668mg/L on average) and Cl(-) (1735mg/L on average) ions as a consequence of seawater intrusion. However, Cluster II-b presented low ECs (from 0.5 to 1.7mS/cm) and Ca(2+) (99.6mg/L on average) and HCO3(2-) (235.2mg/L on average) ions dominance. Water chemistry in these wells was controlled by water-rock interaction, cation exchange, and anthropogenic activities. The Hydrochemical Facies Evolution Diagram highlighted the succession of different water facies developed between intrusion and freshening phases. The formation of Na-HCO3 facies, which characterizes the last facies of freshening phase, followed the succession of Na-Cl, MixNa-MixCl, MixCa-MixCl, MixCa-MixHCO3, and Na-HCO3. In contrast, Na-Cl facies formation, which characterizes the last facies of intrusion phase, followed the evolution of Ca-HCO3, Ca-MixHCO3, Ca-MixCl, MixCa-MixCl, MixCa-Cl, and Na-Cl. Moreover, the obtained ERT results allowed determining the extent of different hydrochemical facies and provided more details about seawater intrusion extension. The conductive level assigned to seawater contamination showed a resistivity less than 36Ω.m, which remains limited to 3000m from the ocean, where Na-Cl water type dominates. The seawater intrusion depth varied between 5 and 40m from the surface. Overall, this original study in Chaouia region demonstrated the effectiveness of

  15. 2.5-D gravity model of the NiCuPGM mineralized Mount Ayliff Intrusion (Insizwa Complex), South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sander, B. K.; Cawthorn, R. G.

    1996-08-01

    The Mount Ayliff Intrusion is the largest and thickest Karoo-aged sill in South Africa. It contains a small NiCu-platinum-group metal (PGM) sulphide deposit, Waterfall Gorge, at the base of its largest lobe called Insizwa. The deposit was once mined for its Cu. In September 1990, a 900-m-deep, vertical diamond drill exploration borehole was drilled through a thick, central portion of the intrusion. This new geological control confirms an earlier gravity survey-based hypothesis that the intrusion has a thick, hidden keel of ultramafic rock with finite depth extent below the centre of the Insizwa lobe. Along with other new geological evidence, the borehole log affords a unique opportunity to further constrain models for three regional gravity profiles and to arrive at a new, 3-dimensional model for the Insizwa lobe. The background residual terrain-corrected Bouguer gravity anomaly of the Mount Ayliff Intrusion reaches up to +9 mgal. This results from an igneous slab of 0-150 m of picrite overlain by about 600 m of gabbronorite. Superimposed on this anomaly over the central and northwestern Insizwa lobe is a 10-km-wide gravity anomaly with an amplitude of +8 to + 17 mgal and having steep edges. This is interpreted to represent thickening of picrite to 400-800 m in a major, hidden basin bordered by two NW-striking fault lineaments that are believed to mark a hidden graben structure with major geological transgressions at the base of the Insizwa lobe. At least three discrete, thinner picrite basins are interpreted to extend above and beyond both flanks of the graben. Picrite in these basins is modelled to be less than 200 m in thickness. The basins are separated either by the major NW-striking geological transgressions, or by domes in the footwall of the Insizwa lobe, above which no picrite has developed. Locations of several hidden, narrow, discontinuous feeder dykes below the Mount Ayliff Intrusion are postulated. The role of ponding of picrite at the mostly hidden

  16. Realistic computer network simulation for network intrusion detection dataset generation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Payer, Garrett

    2015-05-01

    The KDD-99 Cup dataset is dead. While it can continue to be used as a toy example, the age of this dataset makes it all but useless for intrusion detection research and data mining. Many of the attacks used within the dataset are obsolete and do not reflect the features important for intrusion detection in today's networks. Creating a new dataset encompassing a large cross section of the attacks found on the Internet today could be useful, but would eventually fall to the same problem as the KDD-99 Cup; its usefulness would diminish after a period of time. To continue research into intrusion detection, the generation of new datasets needs to be as dynamic and as quick as the attacker. Simply examining existing network traffic and using domain experts such as intrusion analysts to label traffic is inefficient, expensive, and not scalable. The only viable methodology is simulation using technologies including virtualization, attack-toolsets such as Metasploit and Armitage, and sophisticated emulation of threat and user behavior. Simulating actual user behavior and network intrusion events dynamically not only allows researchers to vary scenarios quickly, but enables online testing of intrusion detection mechanisms by interacting with data as it is generated. As new threat behaviors are identified, they can be added to the simulation to make quicker determinations as to the effectiveness of existing and ongoing network intrusion technology, methodology and models.

  17. The role of stress during memory reactivation on intrusive memories.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jessica; Garber, Benjamin; Bryant, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    Intrusive memories are unwanted recollections that maintain distress in psychological disorders. Increasing evidence suggests that memories that are reactivated through retrieval become temporarily vulnerable to environmental or pharmacological manipulation, including changes in levels of circulating stress hormones. This study investigated the influence of stress during memory reactivation of an emotionally arousing trauma film on subsequent intrusive memories. Three groups of participants (N=63) viewed a trauma film depicting a serious car accident at baseline. Two days later (Time 2), one group received a reactivation induction following a socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT; Stress/Reactivation condition), whilst the second group reactivated the memory after a control procedure (Reactivation condition). A third group underwent the SECPT but was not asked to reactivate memory of the trauma film (Stress condition). Two days later (Time 3), all participants received a surprise cued memory recall test and intrusions questionnaire which they completed online. Results showed that those in the Stress/Reactivation group had higher intrusions scores than the other two groups, suggesting that acute stress promotes intrusive memories only when the memory trace is reactivated shortly afterwards. Increased cortisol predicted enhanced intrusive experiences in the Stress/Reactivation condition but not in the other conditions. This pattern of results suggests that acute stress during the reactivation of emotional material impacts on involuntary emotional memories. These findings suggest a possible explanation for the mechanism underlying the maintenance of intrusive memories in clinical disorders.

  18. Development of a deep-crustal shear zone in response to syntectonic intrusion of mafic magma into the lower crust, Ivrea-Verbano zone, Italy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snoke, A.W.; Kalakay, T.J.; Quick, J.E.; Sinigoi, S.

    1999-01-01

    A 1 to 1.5 km-thick, high-temperature shear zone is localized in wall rocks subparallel to the eastern intrusive contact of the Permian Mafic Complex of the Ivrea-Verbano zone (IVZ), Italy. The shear zone is characterized by concentrated ductile deformation manifested by a penetrative foliation subparallel to the intrusive contact and a northeast-plunging sillimanite lineation. Evidence of noncoaxial strain and transposition is widespread in the shear zone including such features as rootless isoclinal folds, dismemberment of competent layers, and scattered kinematic indicators. The metasedimentary rocks in the shear zone are migmatitic, and the accumulation of leucosome is variable within the shear zone. Near the intrusive contact with the Mafic Complex leucosome forms ~20 vol% of the wall rock, whereas leucosome concentrations may locally reach ~60 vol% of the wall rock near the outer limits of the shear zone. This variation in vol% leucosome suggests melt/magma migration from the inferred site of anatexis along the intrusive contact to lower-strain regions within and near the margins of the shear zone. The leucosome accumulations chiefly occur as layer-parallel concentrations, but are also folded and boudined, and locally are associated with tension gashes and fracture arrays. Networks of granitic dikes and small plutons in the eastern IVZ suggest that some magmas migrated out of the high-temperature shear zone. Some magma apparently migrated laterally along the strike of the shear zone and concentrated in areas of lower strain where the intrusive contact takes a major westward bend. The high-temperature shear zone is interpreted as a 'stretching fault' (or stretching shear zone) after Means [W.D. Means, Stretching faults, Geology 17 (1989) 893-896], whereupon the metasedimentary wall rocks and associated leucosome deformed synchronously with the multistage emplacement and deformation flow of the Mafic Complex. The recognition of a high-temperature shear zone

  19. Water in evolved lunar rocks: Evidence for multiple reservoirs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Robinson, Katharine L.; Barnes, Jessica J.; Nagashima, Kazuhide; Thomen, Aurélien; Franchi, Ian A.; Huss, Gary R.; Anand, Mahesh; Taylor, G. Jeffrey

    2016-09-01

    We have measured the abundance and isotopic composition of water in apatites from several lunar rocks representing Potassium (K), Rare Earth Elements (REE), and Phosphorus (P) - KREEP - rich lithologies, including felsites, quartz monzodiorites (QMDs), a troctolite, and an alkali anorthosite. The H-isotope data from apatite provide evidence for multiple reservoirs in the lunar interior. Apatite measurements from some KREEP-rich intrusive rocks display moderately elevated δD signatures, while other samples show δD signatures similar to the range known for the terrestrial upper mantle. Apatite grains in Apollo 15 quartz monzodiorites have the lowest δD values measured from the Moon so far (as low as -749‰), and could potentially represent a D-depleted reservoir in the lunar interior that had not been identified until now. Apatite in all of these intrusive rocks contains <267 ppm H2O, which is relatively low compared to apatites from the majority of studied mare basalts (200 to >6500 ppm H2O). Complexities in partitioning of volatiles into apatite make this comparison uncertain, but measurements of residual glass in KREEP basalt fragments in breccia 15358 independently show that the KREEP basaltic magmas were low in water. The source of 15358 contained ∼10 ppm H2O, about an order of magnitude lower than the source of the Apollo 17 pyroclastic glass beads, suggesting potential variations in the distribution of water in the lunar interior.

  20. Opaque rock fragments

    SciTech Connect

    Abhijit, B.; Molinaroli, E.; Olsen, J.

    1987-05-01

    The authors describe a new, rare, but petrogenetically significant variety of rock fragments from Holocene detrital sediments. Approximately 50% of the opaque heavy mineral concentrates from Holocene siliciclastic sands are polymineralic-Fe-Ti oxide particles, i.e., they are opaque rock fragments. About 40% to 70% of these rock fragments show intergrowth of hm + il, mt + il, and mt + hm +/- il. Modal analysis of 23,282 opaque particles in 117 polished thin sections of granitic and metamorphic parent rocks and their daughter sands from semi-arid and humid climates show the following relative abundances. The data show that opaque rock fragments are more common in sands from igneous source rocks and that hm + il fragments are more durable. They assume that equilibrium conditions existed in parent rocks during the growth of these paired minerals, and that the Ti/Fe ratio did not change during oxidation of mt to hm. Geothermometric determinations using electron probe microanalysis of opaque rock fragments in sand samples from Lake Erie and the Adriatic Sea suggest that these rock fragments may have equilibrated at approximately 900/sup 0/ and 525/sup 0/C, respectively.

  1. Bounce Rock Dimple

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image shows the hole drilled by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's rock abrasion tool into the rock dubbed 'Bounce' on Sol 65 of the rover's journey. The tool drilled about 7 millimeters (0.3 inches) into the rock and generated small piles of 'tailings' or rock dust around the central hole, which is about 4.5 centimeters (1.7 inches) across. The image from sol 66 of the mission was acquired using the panoramic camera's 430 nanometer filter.

  2. Petrology, major and trace element geochemistry, geochronology, and isotopic composition of granitic intrusions from the vicinity of the Bosumtwi impact crater, Ghana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Losiak, Anna; Schulz, Toni; Buchwaldt, Robert; Koeberl, Christian

    2013-09-01

    The Bosumtwi crater is 10.5 km in diameter, 1.07 Ma old, well preserved impact structure located in Ghana (centered at 06°30‧N, 01°25‧W). It was excavated in rocks of the Early Proterozoic Birimian Supergroup, part of the West African craton. Here, we present a full and detailed characterization of the three granitoid complexes and one mafic dike in the vicinity of the Bosumtwi crater in terms of petrology, major and trace element geochemistry, geochronology, and isotopic composition. This allows us to characterize magmatic evolution of the West African Craton in this area and better understand the geological framework and target rocks of the impact. This study shows that the similar composition (strongly peraluminous muscovite granites and granodiorites) and age (between 2092 ± 6 Ma and 2098 ± 6 Ma) of all granitic intrusions in the proximity of the Bosumtwi crater suggest that they are co-genetic. Granitoids were probably formed as a result of anatexis of TTGs (or rocks derived from them) at relatively low pressure and temperature. We propose that the intrusions from the Bosumtwi area are genetically related to the Banso granite occurring to the east of the crater and can be classified as basin-type, late-stage granitoids. Also a mafic dike located to the NE of the Bosumtwi crater seems to be genetically related to those felsic intrusions. Based on those findings a revised version of the geological map of the Bosumtwi crater area is proposed.

  3. Tracking intercumulus crystallisation at the Skaergaard intrusion using immobile trace elements: Evidence for liquid immiscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Humphreys, Madeleine

    2010-05-01

    A key target in the study of a layered intrusion is to constrain the liquid line of descent of the magma. However, the liquid line of descent of the intercumulus liquid is rarely considered, and is often assumed to be equivalent to that of the bulk magma. If the bulk liquid and interstitial liquids follow the same liquid line of descent, then intercumulus zoning profiles should be similar to the cryptic compositional variations seen with stratigraphic height. Because of extensive sub-solidus and diffusional changes that occur in slowly cooled rocks, clues to the composition of the intercumulus liquid can only be obtained using very slowly diffusing trace elements and components; the anorthite content of plagioclase and its Ti concentration are ideal in this respect. For the Skaergaard Intrusion, east Greenland, anorthite content (XAn) decreases monotonically as temperature decreases and the liquid becomes more evolved. The Ti content decreases in both cumulus and intercumulus plagioclase, as a result of falling liquid Ti after Fe-Ti oxides start to crystallise. However, Ti-XAn zoning in intercumulus plagioclase does not match the cryptic variations observed with increasing stratigraphic height, which demonstrates that the cumulus and intercumulus liquid lines of descent are not equivalent. In the intercumulus plagioclase, different trends develop adjacent to fine-grained, mafic and felsic interstitial pockets, which represent the crystallised products of trapped, late-stage immiscible liquids. The zoning trends vary systematically as a function of stratigraphic height and spatial location within the intrusion. The distribution and composition of the reversed plagioclase are used to infer the spatial distribution and differential movement of interstitial immiscible liquids throughout the Layered Series, and processes affecting the intercumulus liquid.

  4. Structure and petrology of the La Perouse gabbro intrusion, Fairweather Range, southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Loney, R.A.; Himmelberg, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The gabbro was intruded during the Middle Tertiary into a Mesozoic granulite-facies metamorphic environment dominated by strike-slip fault movement, compression and possible minor subduction. The asymmetric funnel form of the intrusion is due to subsidence from magmatic loading at high T, coupled with control from pre-existing structures, and not from tectonic compression. The intrusion is 12 X 27 km and has exposed cumulate layering of approx 6000 m. Probe analyses of olivines (24), Ca-poor pyroxenes (28), augites (22) and plagioclases (35) are tabulated. Cumulus mineral compositions in the basal cumulates are: olivine Fo86-71, plagioclase An81-63, bronzite Ca3Mg82Fe15 - Ca4Mg75Fe21, augite Ca45Mg47Fe8 - Ca42Mg48Fe10. The layered gabbro above the basal cumulates consists dominantly of lenticularly interlayered plagioclase-augite-orthopyroxene-olivine, plagioclase-augite- olivine and plagioclase-orthopyroxene-augite cumulates, the composition ranges being olivine Fo75-50, plagioclase An78-42, orthopyroxene and inverted pigeonite Ca2.8Mg76.4Fe20.8 - Ca1.4Mg31.0Fe67.6, augite Ca43.1Mg46.9Fe10.0 - Ca40.5Mg27.1Fe32.4. The most iron-rich pyroxene and albite-rich plagioclase occur in a zone near the margin of the intrusion and are probably related to exchange reactions with the country rock. It is considered that the gabbro did not accumulate by simple fractional crystallization of a single or even several large batches of magma, but by numerous influxes of previously fractionated magma from a deeper reservoir. Conditions of crystallization are interpreted as approx 1055oC, 5.4 kbar and fO2 near the wustite-magnetite buffer.-R.A.H.

  5. Mapping of hydrothermally altered rocks using airborne multispectral scanner data, Marysvale, Utah, mining district

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Podwysocki, M.H.; Segal, D.B.; Jones, O.D.

    1983-01-01

    containing zeolites and some ash-fall tuffs containing montmorillonite were readily recognized on the color-coded density slice as having less intense 2.2-??m absorption than areas of highly altered rocks. The areas of most intense absorption, as depicted in the color-coded density slice, are dominated by highly altered rocks containing large amounts of alunite and kaolinite. These areas form an annulus, approximately 10 km in diameter, which surrounds a quartz monzonite intrusive body of Miocene age. The patterns of most intense alteration are interpreted as the remnants of paleohydrothermal convective cells set into motion during the emplacement of the central intrusive body. ?? 1983.

  6. Effect of igneous intrusive bodies on sedimentary thermal maturity

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, X.; Lerche, I.; Walter, C. )

    1989-09-01

    The high temperatures of igneous intrusives cause localized thermal maturity of sediments far in excess of the regional variation. Previous studies have shown that igneous bodies cool in less than about 1 million years for all but the most exceptional geological conditions. Three case studies are provided which show how the increase in thermal maturity around an igneous body can be used to assess the temperature of the intrusive at emplacement and also the time of intrusion. Corollative implications for localized hydrocarbon generation, migration, and accumulation are also discussed briefly.

  7. Laboratory experiments of salt water intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crestani, Elena; Camporese, Matteo; Salandin, Paolo

    2015-04-01

    The problem of saltwater intrusion in coastal aquifers is dealt with by the proper setup of a sand-box device to develop laboratory experiments in a controlled environment. Saline intrusion is a problem of fundamental importance and affects the quality of both surface water and groundwater in coastal areas. In both cases the phenomenon may be linked to anthropogenic (construction of reservoirs, withdrawals, etc.) and/or natural (sea-level excursions, variability of river flows, etc.) changes. In recent years, the escalation of this problem has led to the development of specific projects and studies to identify possible countermeasures, typically consisting of underground barriers. Physical models are fundamental to study the saltwater intrusion problem, since they provide benchmarks for numerical model calibrations and for the evaluation of the effectiveness of solutions to contain the salt wedge. In order to study and describe the evolution of the salt wedge, the effectiveness of underground barriers, and the distance from the coast of a withdrawal that guarantees a continuous supply of fresh water, a physical model has been realized at the University of Padova to represent the terminal part of a coastal aquifer. It consists of a laboratory flume 500 cm long, 30 cm wide and 60 cm high, filled for an height of 45 cm with glass beads with a d50 of 0.6 mm and a uniformity coefficient d60/d10~= 1.5. The material is homogeneous and characterized by a porosity of about 0.37 and by an hydraulic conductivity of about 1.8×10-3 m/s. Upstream from the sand-box, a tank, continuously supplied by a pump, provides fresh water to recharge the aquifer, while the downstream tank, filled with salt water, simulates the sea. The volume of the downstream tank (~= 2 m3) is about five times the upstream one, so that density variations due to the incoming fresh water flow are negligible. The water level in the two tanks is continuously monitored by means of two level probes and is

  8. Sulfide mineralization associated with arc magmatism in the Qilian Block, western China: zircon U-Pb age and Sr-Nd-Os-S isotope constraints from the Yulonggou and Yaqu gabbroic intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhao-Wei; Li, Wen-Yuan; Gao, Yong-Bao; Li, Chusi; Ripley, Edward M.; Kamo, Sandra

    2014-02-01

    The sulfide-bearing Yulonggou and Yaqu mafic intrusions are located in the southern margin of the Qilian Block, Qinghai Province, western China. They are small dike-like bodies mainly composed of gabbros and diorites. Disseminated sulfides (pyrrhotite, pentlandite, and chalcopyrite) are present as concordant lenses within the intrusions. Precise CA-ID-TIMS zircon U-Pb dating yields the crystallization ages of 443.39 ± 0.42 and 440.74 ± 0.33 Ma for the Yulonggou and Yaqu intrusions, respectively. Whole rock samples from both intrusions show light rare earth element (REE) enrichments relative to heavy REE and pronounced negative Nb-Ta anomalies relative to Th and La, which are consistent with the products of arc basaltic magmatism. The Yulonggou intrusion has negative ɛ Nd values from -5.7 to -7.7 and elevated (87Sr/86Sr) i ratios from 0.711 to 0.714. In contrast, the Yaqu intrusion has higher ɛ Nd values from -4.1 to +8.4 and lower (87Sr/86Sr) i ratios from 0.705 to 0.710. The δ34S values of sulfide separates from the Yulonggou and Yaqu deposits vary from 0.8 to 2.4 ‰ and from 2 to 4.3 ‰, respectively. The γ Os values of sulfide separates from the Yulonggou and Yaqu deposits vary between 80 and 123 and between 963 and 1,191, respectively. Higher γ Os values coupled with higher δ34S values for the Yaqu deposit relative to the Yulonggou deposit indicate that external sulfur played a bigger role in sulfide mineralization in the Yaqu intrusion than in the Yulonggou intrusion. Mixing calculations using Sr-Nd isotope data show that contamination with siliceous crustal materials is more pronounced in the Yulonggou intrusion (up to 20 wt%) than in the Yaqu intrusion (<15 wt%). The distribution of sulfides in both intrusions is consistent with multiple emplacements of sulfide-saturated magmas from depth. The Yulonggou and Yaqu sulfide deposits are not economically valuable under current market condition due to small sizes and low Ni grades, which can be explained

  9. Episodic Growth and Solidification of the Vinalhaven Intrusive Complex, Maine, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wiebe, R. A.; Hawkins, D. P.; Wark, D. A.

    2007-12-01

    The Silurian Vinalhaven intrusive complex is about 12 km in diameter and consists mainly of cg granite, a thick section of inward-dipping gabbro-diorite sheets in the SE half of the complex, and a core of fg granite. The lowest exposed part of the complex occurs on its S margin. Along its NW margin, granite intrudes the older, cogenetic Vinalhaven rhyolite, which consists of effusive and pyroclastic units of largely high-silica rhyolite. It is probable that plutonic rocks coeval with the exposed rhyolite units occur at depth and younger rhyolite units, coeval with the plutonic complex, were eroded. The complex was fed by multiple replenishments of isotopically distinct basaltic and granitic magmas. Basaltic replenishments typically produced gabbroic sheets that ponded on granitic crystal mush at the base of a silicic chamber. Where basalt encountered only crystal-rich granitic magma, it locally remelted and mixed with granite, producing bodies of porphyry with corroded phenocrysts and mafic enclaves. CL and Ti zoning in quartz phenocrysts records corrosion followed by growth of high T rims (based on Ti-in-qtz thermometer of Wark and Watson, 2006). Fg granitic dikes and the fg granitic core of the complex represent silicic replenishments. Contact relationships between these dikes and the surrounding granite provide insight into the rheology of the granite at the time of intrusion. Where the resident granitic magma was crystal rich, aphyric magma in the dikes intimately mixed and commingled with the resident cg granite mush. Convective mixing was important in the silicic magma chambers. Where mafic sheets are present in granite, upward gradations through hybrid rocks back into granite and the occurrence of mafic enclaves in granite far above the mafic sheets demonstrate mixing within overlying silicic magma. Complex CL and Ti zoning in the cores of granitic quartz far from the mafic input also records thermal perturbations caused by the mafic input. The oldest

  10. Plagioclase in the Skaergaard intrusion. Part 1: Core and rim compositions in the layered series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Toplis, Michael J.; Brown, William L.; Pupier, Elsa

    2008-03-01

    The anorthite content of plagioclase grains (XAn) in 12 rocks from the layered series of the Skaergaard intrusion has been studied by electron microprobe (typically ˜30 core and ˜70 rim analyses per thin section). Mean core compositions vary continuously from An66 at the base of the layered series (LZa) to An32-30 at the top. On the other hand, crystal rims are of approximately constant composition (An50 ± 1) from the LZa to the lower Middle Zone (MZ). Above the MZ, core and rim compositions generally overlap. Profiles across individual plagioclase grains from the lower zone show that most crystals have an external zone buffered at XAn ˜50 ± 1. The simplest explanation for these features is that during postcumulus crystallization in the lower zone, interstitial liquids passed through a density maximum. This interpretation is consistent with proposed liquid lines of descent that predict silica enrichment of the liquid associated with the appearance of cumulus magnetite.

  11. Luna 24 - Systematics in spinel mineral chemistry in the context of an intrusive petrogenetic grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haggerty, S. E.

    1978-01-01

    Spinels in the Luna 24 gabbroic fragments have a restricted bimodal distribution of aluminum chromite and ulvospinel, whereas those in the Luna 24 basalts form a continuous sequence which defines a compositional variation from Al-Mg-chromites to ulvospinels containing 1 wt% Al2O3. A comparison of these spinel mineral chemistries with basaltic spinels from other mare regions and with spinels from other lunar intrusive rocks suggest that the Luna 24 gabbroic spinels lie at the low pressure end of a P-T spinel grid, and that titanium enrichment trends on Mg-Al-Cr rich spinel cores are related to extrusion and formed at the terminal stages of magmatic crystallization.

  12. Theoretical prediction of gold vein location in deposits originated by a wall magma intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Pablo; Maass-Artigas, Fernando; Cortés-Vega, Luis

    2016-05-01

    The isotherm time-evolution resulting from the intrusion of a hot dike in a cold rock is analized considering the general case of nonvertical walls. This is applied to the theoretical prediction of the gold veins location due to isothermal evolution. As in previous treatments earth surface effects are considered and the gold veins are determined by the envelope of the isotherms. The locations of the gold veins in the Callao mines of Venezuela are now well predicted. The new treatment is now more elaborated and complex that in the case of vertical walls, performed in previous papers, but it is more adequated to the real cases as the one in El Callao, where the wall is not vertical.

  13. Mafic intrusion remobilising silicic magma under El Hierro, Canary Islands

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.; Laporte, D.; Marti, J.; Devouard, B.; Cluzel, N.

    2012-04-01

    The 2011 submarine eruption at El Hierro, Canary Islands, has produced volcanic bombs that degas at sea surface, boil seawater and sink when cooled and degassed. At the beginning of the eruption white coloured pumices enveloped in darker coloured spatters floated on land. These composite pumices show evidence of magma mingling with folds and undulations of the darker coloured magma within the white pumice suggesting magma mingling in a viscous regime. The white pumice is highly vesicular and resembles foam. Most of the vesicular structure is made of tightly packed, polygonal bubbles of uniform size (˜ 100 μm), suggesting a single event of homogeneous bubble nucleation. An earlier event of heterogeneous bubble nucleation is indicated by the presence of a few large bubbles developed around tiny quartz crystals. Both the darker and lighter coloured pumices are almost aphyric. A few olivine crystals with perfect euhedral morphology occur within the darker part. Rare olivines of same composition are also found in the white pumice glass but then display somewhat rounded outlines and hopper-type structure. Melt inclusions in olivines of the darker pumice are of the same composition as the enveloping mafic glass, whereas olivines in the mixing boundary layer have melt inclusions of less mafic composition. The whole-rock composition and slightly more evolved glass composition are of basanitc and alkali rhyolitic composition (at the limit of the trachyte field) according to the TAS classification. Such rhyolitic compositions are rare in the Canaries. Analyses of residual volatile concentration in the glasses show that the silicic glass is highly degassed (F: 511 ±222; Cl: 202 ±58; S: below detection limit; values in ppm,1SD, n=10), whereas the basanitic glass still has very high halogene concentrations (F: 1354 ±151; Cl: 1026 ±47; S: 362 ±29; 1SD, n=10). In-situ analysis of trace element compositions of the dark glasses reveal typical basanitic compositions with

  14. Drilling the Bushveld Complex- the world's largest layered mafic intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashwal, L. D.; Webb, S. J.; Trumbull, R. B.

    2013-12-01

    The fact that surprising new discoveries can be made in layered mafic intrusions (e.g., subtle 100-150 m cyclicity in apparently homogeneous cumulates over 1000s of m) means that we are still in the first-order characterization phase of understanding these objects. Accordingly, we have secured funding from ICDP for a planning workshop to be held in Johannesburg in early 2014, aimed at scientific drilling of the Bushveld Complex, the world's largest layered mafic intrusion. Science objectives include, but are not limited to: 1. Magma chamber processes & melt evolution. How many melts/magmas/mushes were involved, what were their compositions and how did they interact? What, if anything, is missing from the Complex, and where did it go? Did Bushveld magmatism have an effect upon Earth's atmosphere at 2 Ga? 2. Crust-mantle interactions & origin of Bushveld granitoids. Are Bushveld granites & rhyolites crustal melts, differentiates from the mafic magmas or products of immiscibility? How can the evolved isotopic signatures in the mafic rocks (e.g., epsilon Nd to -8) be understood? 3. Origin of ore deposits. What were the relative roles of gravity settling, magma mixing, immiscibility and hydrothermal fluid transport in producing the PGE, Cr and V deposits? We have identified 3 potential drilling targets representing a total of ~12 km of drill core. Exact locations of drill sites are to be discussed at the workshop. Target A- East-Central Bushveld Complex. We propose 3 overlapping 3 km boreholes that will provide the first roof-to-floor continuous coverage of the Rustenburg Layered Suite. These boreholes will represent a curated, internationally available reference collection of Bushveld material for present and future research. Target B- Southeastern Bushveld Complex. We propose a single borehole of ~2 km depth, collared in Rooiberg felsite, and positioned to intersect the Roof Zone, Upper Zone, Main Zone and floor of the Complex. Amongst other things, this site will

  15. Geochemical signature variation of pre-, syn-, and post-shearing intrusives within the Najd Fault System of western Saudi Arabia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hassan, M.; Abu-Alam, T. S.; Hauzenberger, C.; Stüwe, K.

    2016-10-01

    Late Precambrian intrusive rocks in the Arabian-Nubian Shield emplaced within and around the Najd Fault System of Saudi Arabia feature a great compositional diversity and a variety of degrees of deformation (i.e. pre-shearing deformed, sheared mylonitized, and post-shearing undeformed) that allows placing them into a relative time order. It is shown here that the degree of deformation is related to compositional variations where early, usually pre-shearing deformed rocks are of dioritic, tonalitic to granodioritic, and later, mainly post-shearing undeformed rocks are mostly of granitic composition. Correlation of the geochemical signature and time of emplacement is interpreted in terms of changes in the source region of the produced melts due to the change of the stress regime during the tectonic evolution of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. The magma of the pre-shearing rocks has tholeiitic and calc-alkaline affinity indicating island arc or continental arc affinity. In contrast, the syn- and post-shearing rocks are mainly potassium rich peraluminous granites which are typically associated with post-orogenic uplift and collapse. This variation in geochemical signature is interpreted to reflect the change of the tectonic regime from a compressional volcanic arc nature to extensional within-plate setting of the Arabian-Nubian Shield. Within the context of published geochronological data, this change is likely to have occurred around 605-580 Ma.

  16. Modal Petrology and Geostatistics of the Blue Hills Igneous Complex, Boston, Massachusetts, by Rietveld X-ray Diffraction: Multi-scalar Investigation of Volcanic and Intrusive Relationships

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Besancon, J. R.; Spence, T. M.

    2004-12-01

    The Blue Hills Igneous Complex of eastern Massachusetts consists of mildly peralkaline volcanic and intrusive units including the Quincy Granite, the Blue Hills Porphyry, and a set of mainly pyroclastic rhyolite flow units traditionally called the Aporhyolite. Similar whole-rock chemistry has led most workers to assume that they are related rocks, despite some unclear field relationships. Kaktins (1976) divided the volcanic rocks into six units, but buried contacts do not permit confidence in either their number or stratigraphic position. To test a new method of modal analysis of these rocks, thirty-five samples were crushed, ground to approximately 5 micrometers, spray-dried to produce randomly oriented powder, and analyzed by x-ray diffraction. A constant eleven-phase Rietveld starting model was applied to the x-ray spectra, and then refined to produce a modal database of phase proportions in each sample. Geostatistical analysis with GIS software delineates a number of trends, with statistical measures of uncertainty. Aegirine in volcanics decreases in abundance with distance south from the E-W contact of volcanic rocks and granite. Riebeckite is found in the granite (both as veins and as apparently magmatic crystals) and the porphyry, but is less abundant or absent among the volcanic rocks. Where both amphibole and pyroxene are present, they are negatively correlated. The goal is to develop an additional tool for correlation of volcanic rocks, one based on mineral proportions in both aphanitic and phaneritic rocks.

  17. Rock Bites into 'Bounce'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image from the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity features the 6.44 millimeter (0.25 inch) deep hole ground into the rock dubbed 'Bounce' by the rover's rock abrasion tool. The tool took 2 hours and 15 minutes to grind the hole on sol 66 of the rover's journey. A combination of limited solar power and the rock's jagged texture led the rock abrasion tool team to set very aggressive grinding parameters to ensure that the end result was a full circle, suitable for a thorough read from the rover's spectrometers.

    Bounce's markedly different appearance (when compared to the rocks that were previously examined in the Eagle Crater outcrop) made it a natural target for rover research. In order to achieve an ideal position from which to grind into the rock, Opportunity moved in very close with its right wheel next to Bounce. In this image, the panoramic camera on the rover's mast is looking down, catching the tip of the solar panel which partially blocks the full circle ground by the rock abrasion tool.

    The outer ring consists of the cuttings from the rock, pushed out by the brushes on the grinding instrument. The dark impression at the top of the outer circle was caused by the instrument's contact mechanism which serves to stabilize it while grinding.

  18. Welcome to Rock Day

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Varelas, Maria; Benhart, Jeaneen

    2004-01-01

    At the beginning of the school year, the authors, a first-grade teacher and a teacher educator, worked together to "spice up" the first-grade science curriculum. The teacher had taught the unit Rocks, Sand, and Soil several times, conducting hands-on explorations and using books to help students learn about properties of rocks, but she felt the…

  19. Session: Hard Rock Penetration

    SciTech Connect

    Tennyson, George P. Jr.; Dunn, James C.; Drumheller, Douglas S.; Glowka, David A.; Lysne, Peter

    1992-01-01

    This session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of five presentations: ''Hard Rock Penetration - Summary'' by George P. Tennyson, Jr.; ''Overview - Hard Rock Penetration'' by James C. Dunn; ''An Overview of Acoustic Telemetry'' by Douglas S. Drumheller; ''Lost Circulation Technology Development Status'' by David A. Glowka; ''Downhole Memory-Logging Tools'' by Peter Lysne.

  20. Rock Cycle Roulette.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schmidt, Stan M.; Palmer, Courtney

    2000-01-01

    Introduces an activity on the rock cycle. Sets 11 stages representing the transitions of an earth material in the rock cycle. Builds six-sided die for each station, and students move to the stations depending on the rolling side of the die. Evaluates students by discussing several questions in the classroom. Provides instructional information for…

  1. Management of aquifer recharge in Lebanon by removing seawater intrusion from coastal aquifers.

    PubMed

    Masciopinto, Costantino

    2013-11-30

    This study investigates the feasibility of management of aquifer recharge (MAR) in Lebanon by designing well barriers to remove seawater intrusion from the fractured carbonate aquifers. Groundwater flow and saltwater/freshwater 50% sharp interface have been modeled along the coastal area using the Ghyben-Herzberg theory. The groundwater flow simulations have been supported by field transmissivity estimations and depth measurements carried out on 44 wells during 2003. Results have shown the seawater intrusion in coastal aquifers at Jieh and Damour regions. Three well-injection barriers have been proposed. The water volumes for recharge and the barrier positions have been defined by means of groundwater flow simulations. MAR can provide a valuable contribution to colloid (even pathogen) removal from injectant water, although during water infiltration in subsoil the reduction of aquifer permeability causes clogging. A simple new model for estimating the soil-rock permeability reduction due to the well clogging has been presented. The MAR, including the soil aquifer treatment at Damour and Jieh regions, has been studied by considering aquifer transmissivity (and soil porosity) reduction caused by clogging. Furthermore, the appropriate mixing of the injectant water by using reclaimed water, groundwater and surface water can be simulated using the proposed models. The time required to achieve 5% of rock permeability reduction at the proposed well barriers ranged from 71 to 935 d, by changing water quality and flow rate for recharge. This study can assist regional governments with water management in areas affected by scarcity of freshwater by implementing appropriate well-barrier projects.

  2. 3D modeling of a dolerite intrusion from the photogrammetric and geophysical data integration.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duarte, João; Machadinho, Ana; Figueiredo, Fernando; Mira, Maria

    2015-04-01

    The aims of this study is create a methodology based on the integration of data obtained from various available technologies, which allow a credible and complete evaluation of rock masses. In this particular case of a dolerite intrusion, which deployed an exploration of aggregates and belongs to the Jobasaltos - Extracção e Britagem. S.A.. Dolerite intrusion is situated in the volcanic complex of Serra de Todo-o-Mundo, Casais Gaiola, intruded in Jurassic sandstones. The integration of the surface and subsurface mapping, obtained by technology UAVs (Drone) and geophysical surveys (Electromagnetic Method - TEM 48 FAST), allows the construction of 2D and 3D models of the study local. The combination of the 3D point clouds produced from two distinct processes, modeling of photogrammetric and geophysical data, will be the basis for the construction of a single model of set. The rock masses in an integral perspective being visible their development above the surface and subsurface. The presentation of 2D and 3D models will give a perspective of structures, fracturation, lithology and their spatial correlations contributing to a better local knowledge, as well as its potential for the intended purpose. From these local models it will be possible to characterize and quantify the geological structures. These models will have its importance as a tool to assist in the analysis and drafting of regional models. The qualitative improvement in geological/structural modeling, seeks to reduce the value of characterization/cost ratio, in phase of prospecting, improving the investment/benefit ratio. This methodology helps to assess more accurately the economic viability of the projects.

  3. A review of vapor intrusion models.

    PubMed

    Yao, Yijun; Shen, Rui; Pennell, Kelly G; Suuberg, Eric M

    2013-03-19

    A complete vapor intrusion (VI) model, describing vapor entry of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) into buildings located on contaminated sites, generally consists of two main parts: one part describing vapor transport in the soil and the other describing its entry into the building. Modeling the soil vapor transport part involves either analytically or numerically solving the equations of vapor advection and diffusion in the subsurface. Contaminant biodegradation must often also be included in this simulation, and can increase the difficulty of obtaining a solution, especially when explicitly considering coupled oxygen transport and consumption. The models of contaminant building entry pathway are often coupled to calculations of indoor air contaminant concentration, and both are influenced by building construction and operational features. The description of entry pathway involves consideration of building foundation characteristics, while calculation of indoor air contaminant levels requires characterization of building enclosed space and air exchange within this. This review summarizes existing VI models, and discusses the limits of current screening tools commonly used in this field.

  4. A Review of Vapor Intrusion Models

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Yijun; Suuberg, Eric M.

    2013-01-01

    A complete vapor intrusion (VI) model, describing vapor entry of volatile organic chemicals (VOCs) into buildings located on contaminated sites, generally consists of two main parts-one describing vapor transport in the soil and the other its entry into the building. Modeling the soil vapor transport part involves either analytically or numerically solving the equations of vapor advection and diffusion in the subsurface. Contaminant biodegradation must often also be included in this simulation, and can increase the difficulty of obtaining a solution, especially when explicitly considering coupled oxygen transport and consumption. The models of contaminant building entry pathway are often coupled to calculations of indoor air contaminant concentration, and both are influenced by building construction and operational features. The description of entry pathway involves consideration of building foundation characteristics, while calculation of indoor air contaminant levels requires characterization of building enclosed space and air exchange within this. This review summarizes existing VI models, and discusses the limits of current screening tools commonly used in this field. PMID:23360069

  5. Layered Rocks in Crater

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    19 June 2004 Exposures of layered, sedimentary rock are common on Mars. From the rock outcrops examined by the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, in Meridiani Planum to the sequence in Gale Crater's central mound that is twice the thickness of of the sedimentary rocks exposed by Arizona's Grand Canyon, Mars presents a world of sediment to study. This unusual example, imaged by the Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC), shows eroded layer outcrops in a crater in Terra Tyrrhena near 15.4oS, 270.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past climates and events. Perhaps someday the story told by the rocks in this image will be known via careful field work. The image covers an area about 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated by sunlight from the left.

  6. An expert system application for network intrusion detection

    SciTech Connect

    Jackson, K.A.; Dubois, D.H.; Stallings, C.A.

    1991-01-01

    The paper describes the design of a prototype intrusion detection system for the Los Alamos National Laboratory's Integrated Computing Network (ICN). The Network Anomaly Detection and Intrusion Reporter (NADIR) differs in one respect from most intrusion detection systems. It tries to address the intrusion detection problem on a network, as opposed to a single operating system. NADIR design intent was to copy and improve the audit record review activities normally done by security auditors. We wished to replace the manual review of audit logs with a near realtime expert system. NADIR compares network activity, as summarized in user profiles, against expert rules that define network security policy, improper or suspicious network activities, and normal network and user activity. When it detects deviant (anomalous) behavior, NADIR alerts operators in near realtime, and provides tools to aid in the investigation of the anomalous event. 15 refs., 2 figs.

  7. User's Guide for Evaluating Subsurface Vapor Intrusion into Buildings

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    This revised version of the User's Guide corresponds with the release of Version 3.1 of the Johnson and Ettinger (1991) model (J E) spreadsheets for estimating subsurface vapor intrusion into buildings.

  8. Nuclear waste disposal facility intrusion: an archeologist's perspective

    SciTech Connect

    Virginia, C.; Christie, L.

    1981-01-01

    A scenario is presented for the intrusion of a shallow land burial site by archeologists from a future generation. A description is given for the potential widespread exposure and contamination of populations by recovered artifacts. (DMC)

  9. Tropical upper tropospheric humidity variations due to potential vorticity intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sandhya, M.; Sridharan, S.; Indira Devi, M.

    2015-09-01

    Four cases (March 2009, May 2009, April 2010 and February 2012) are presented in which the ERA-interim relative humidity (RH) shows consistent increase by more than 50 % in the upper troposphere (200-250 hPa) over tropics at the eastward side of the potential vorticity (PV) intrusion region. The increase in RH is confirmed with the spaceborne microwave limb sounder observations and radiosonde observations over Gadanki (13.5° N, 79.2° E) and is observed irrespective of whether the PV intrusions are accompanied by deep convection or not. It is demonstrated that the increase in RH is due to poleward advection induced by the PV intrusions in their eastward side at the upper tropospheric heights. It is suggested that the low-latitude convection, which is not necessarily triggered by the PV intrusion, might have transported water vapour to the upper tropospheric heights.

  10. Organizational coevolutionary classifiers with fuzzy logic used in intrusion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhenguo

    2009-07-01

    Intrusion detection is an important technique in the defense-in-depth network security framework and a hot topic in computer security in recent years. To solve the intrusion detection question, we introduce the fuzzy logic into Organization CoEvolutionary algorithm [1] and present the algorithm of Organization CoEvolutionary Classification with Fuzzy Logic. In this paper, we give an intrusion detection models based on Organization CoEvolutionary Classification with Fuzzy Logic. After illustrating our model with a representative dataset and applying it to the real-world network datasets KDD Cup 1999. The experimental result shown that the intrusion detection based on Organizational Coevolutionary Classifiers with Fuzzy Logic can give higher recognition accuracy than the general method.

  11. Developing a Cooperative Intrusion Detection System for Wireless Sensor Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-11-01

    security measures out. AWISSENET (Ad-hoc personal area network & WIreless Sensor SEcure NETwork) is a project funded by the European Union...Information and Communication Technologies Program that is focused on security and resilience across ad-hoc personal area networks and wireless sensor networks...and provides a security toolbox for trusted route selection, secure service discovery and intrusion detection. This paper deals with intrusion

  12. Managing Temporal and Spatial Variability in Vapor Intrusion Data

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-03-28

    Managing Temporal and Spatial Variability in Vapor Intrusion Data Todd McAlary, M.Sc., P.Eng., P.G. Geosyntec Consultants, Inc...TITLE AND SUBTITLE Managing Temporal and Spatial Variability in Vapor Intrusion Data 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER...Koc (mL/g) OSWER indoor conc. at 10-6 risk (ppb) Vapour pressure (atm) Water solubility (g/l) 1,1,1-Trichloroethane 110 400

  13. Petrogenesis of the Elzevir batholith and related trondhjemitic intrusions in the grenville province of eastern Ontario, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pride, C.; Moore, J. M.

    1983-06-01

    The Elzevir batholith belongs to a suite of trondhjemitic intrusions emplaced at ca. 1,240 Ma in the Grenville Province of eastern Ontario. New major and trace element data, including REE, combined with isotopic and petrographic data indicate that: 1) the batholith has calc-alkalic affinities; 2) the Elzevir parental magma is very similar to that of dacites in the nearby, coeval metavolcanic rocks; the magma formed by partial melting of crustal material at granulite grade; 3) chemical differences between the plutonic and volcanic rocks can be best explained by accumulation of plagioclase in the plutonic environment; 4) fractionation was dominated by plagioclase and quartz, with lesser biotite and epidote, and minor zircon and apatite. It is suggested that melting of sialic crust took place during the ‘docking’ of a partly-evolved, originally ensimatic arc system against the main cratonic mass to the northwest.

  14. Layered amphibolite sequence in NE Sardinia, Italy: remnant of a pre-Variscan mafic silicic layered intrusion?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Franceschelli, Marcello; Puxeddu, Mariano; Cruciani, Gabriele; Dini, Andrea; Loi, Marilisa

    2005-04-01

    A banded amphibolite sequence of alternating ultramafic, mafic (amphibolite) and silicic layers, tectonically enclosed within Variscan migmatites, outcrops at Monte Plebi (NE Sardinia) and shows similarities with leptyno-amphibolite complexes. The ultramafic layers consist of amphibole (75-98%), garnet (0-20%), opaque minerals (1-5%) and biotite (0-3%). The mafic rocks are made up of amphibole (65-80%), plagioclase (15-30%), quartz (0-15%), opaque minerals (2-3%) and biotite (0-2%). The silicic layers consist of plagioclase (60-75%), amphibole (15-30%) and quartz (10-15%). Alteration, metasomatic, metamorphic and hydrothermal processes did not significantly modify the original protolith chemistry, as proved by a lack of K2O-enrichment, Rb-enrichment, CaO-depletion, MgO-depletion and by no shift in the rare earth element (REE) patterns. Field, geochemical and isotopic data suggest that ultramafic, mafic and silicic layers represent repeated sequences of cumulates, basic and acidic rocks similar to macrorhythmic units of mafic silicic layered intrusions. The ultramafic layers recall the evolved cumulates of Skaergaard and Pleasant Bay mafic silicic layered intrusions. Mafic layers resemble Thingmuli tholeiites and chilled Pleasant Bay mafic rocks. Silicic layers with Na2O: 4-6 wt%, SiO2: 67-71 wt% were likely oligoclase-rich adcumulates common in many mafic silicic layered intrusions. Some amphibolite showing a strong Ti-, P-depletion and REE-depletion are interpreted as early cumulates nearly devoid of ilmenite and phosphates. All Monte Plebi rocks have extremely low Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf content and high LILE/HFSE ratios, a feature inherited from the original mantle sources. The mafic and ultramafic layers show slight and strong LREE enrichment respectively. Most mafic layer samples plot in the field of continental tholeiites in the TiO2-K2O-P2O5 diagram and are completely different from N-MORB, E-MORB and T-MORB as regards REE patterns and Nd, Sr isotope ratios but show

  15. Emplacement and cooling history of a mafic intrusion into the deep crust of the Ivrea-Verbano Zone, NW Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peressini, G.; Sinigoi, S.; Quick, J. E.; Hofmann, A. W.

    2003-04-01

    The Ivrea Zone represents a section of the lower crust, cropping out in a vertical orientation to the South of the Insubric Line, after tilting and obduction in the Alpine collision. Within this section, metapelitic schists and paragneiss, calc-silicate rocks and amphibolites of the Kinzigite Formation were intruded in Permian time by gabbroic to dioritic rocks of the Mafic Complex (MC). The MC is a pluton of mantle origin about 10 km thick per ca. 50 km wide; its structure and relationship to the country rock can be studied directly in cross section, due to the tilting of about 90°. Alpine tectonics, though, have not dismembered the section, leaving its original features basically undisturbed: the Mafic Complex has an internal arcuate structure, defined by high-T foliation and banding, that are discordant to the roof of the intrusion. Heat introduced by the mafic magma did not cause the regional granulite-facies metamorphism: rocks in the roof of the Mafic Complex attain upper-amphibolite grade. A large data-set of SHRIMP U-Pb ages has been produced on samples from the Mafic Complex and from anatectic granites within the Kinzigite Formation, with the aim of determining time and timing of their emplacement. Geochronologic constraints allow considerations on their relative time of emplacement and on the thermal impact of the mafic pluton on the lower crustal country rock. Intrusion of the MC in extending continental crust, suggested by pre-Triassic, high-T, extensional shear zones in the Ivrea Zone, is not directly constrained by the time of activity of these: the Anzola shear Zone in Val d'Ossola, prior to 280 Ma (Brodie, 1989), and the CMB, recently dated at 285 Ma (Mulch, 2002); from this study, we know the Mafic Complex intrusion had a main phase between 285 and 290 Ma. Following the mafic intrusion, partial melting of the country rock with extraction and transfer of anatectic granites to higher crustal levels was triggered, between 285±5 and 270±5 Ma. Due to

  16. Rapid laccolith intrusion driven by explosive volcanic eruption.

    PubMed

    Castro, Jonathan M; Cordonnier, Benoit; Schipper, C Ian; Tuffen, Hugh; Baumann, Tobias S; Feisel, Yves

    2016-11-23

    Magmatic intrusions and volcanic eruptions are intimately related phenomena. Shallow magma intrusion builds subsurface reservoirs that are drained by volcanic eruptions. Thus, the long-held view is that intrusions must precede and feed eruptions. Here we show that explosive eruptions can also cause magma intrusion. We provide an account of a rapidly emplaced laccolith during the 2011 rhyolite eruption of Cordón Caulle, Chile. Remote sensing indicates that an intrusion began after eruption onset and caused severe (>200 m) uplift over 1 month. Digital terrain models resolve a laccolith-shaped body ∼0.8 km(3). Deformation and conduit flow models indicate laccolith depths of only ∼20-200 m and overpressures (∼1-10 MPa) that likely stemmed from conduit blockage. Our results show that explosive eruptions may rapidly force significant quantities of magma in the crust to build laccoliths. These iconic intrusions can thus be interpreted as eruptive features that pose unique and previously unrecognized volcanic hazards.

  17. Three Dimensional Vapor Intrusion Modeling: Model Validation and Uncertainty Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbariyeh, S.; Patterson, B.; Rakoczy, A.; Li, Y.

    2013-12-01

    Volatile organic chemicals (VOCs), such as chlorinated solvents and petroleum hydrocarbons, are prevalent groundwater contaminants due to their improper disposal and accidental spillage. In addition to contaminating groundwater, VOCs may partition into the overlying vadose zone and enter buildings through gaps and cracks in foundation slabs or basement walls, a process termed vapor intrusion. Vapor intrusion of VOCs has been recognized as a detrimental source for human exposures to potential carcinogenic or toxic compounds. The simulation of vapor intrusion from a subsurface source has been the focus of many studies to better understand the process and guide field investigation. While multiple analytical and numerical models were developed to simulate the vapor intrusion process, detailed validation of these models against well controlled experiments is still lacking, due to the complexity and uncertainties associated with site characterization and soil gas flux and indoor air concentration measurement. In this work, we present an effort to validate a three-dimensional vapor intrusion model based on a well-controlled experimental quantification of the vapor intrusion pathways into a slab-on-ground building under varying environmental conditions. Finally, a probabilistic approach based on Monte Carlo simulations is implemented to determine the probability distribution of indoor air concentration based on the most uncertain input parameters.

  18. Saltwater intrusion in coastal regions of North America

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barlow, Paul M.; Reichard, Eric G.

    2010-02-01

    Saltwater has intruded into many of the coastal aquifers of the United States, Mexico, and Canada, but the extent of saltwater intrusion varies widely among localities and hydrogeologic settings. In many instances, the area contaminated by saltwater is limited to small parts of an aquifer and to specific wells and has had little or no effect on overall groundwater supplies; in other instances, saltwater contamination is of regional extent and has resulted in the closure of many groundwater supply wells. The variability of hydrogeologic settings, three-dimensional distribution of saline water, and history of groundwater withdrawals and freshwater drainage has resulted in a variety of modes of saltwater intrusion into coastal aquifers. These include lateral intrusion from the ocean; upward intrusion from deeper, more saline zones of a groundwater system; and downward intrusion from coastal waters. Saltwater contamination also has occurred along open boreholes and within abandoned, improperly constructed, or corroded wells that provide pathways for vertical migration across interconnected aquifers. Communities within the coastal regions of North America are taking actions to manage and prevent saltwater intrusion to ensure a sustainable source of groundwater for the future. These actions can be grouped broadly into scientific monitoring and assessment, engineering techniques, and regulatory approaches.

  19. Rapid laccolith intrusion driven by explosive volcanic eruption

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Jonathan M.; Cordonnier, Benoit; Schipper, C. Ian; Tuffen, Hugh; Baumann, Tobias S.; Feisel, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Magmatic intrusions and volcanic eruptions are intimately related phenomena. Shallow magma intrusion builds subsurface reservoirs that are drained by volcanic eruptions. Thus, the long-held view is that intrusions must precede and feed eruptions. Here we show that explosive eruptions can also cause magma intrusion. We provide an account of a rapidly emplaced laccolith during the 2011 rhyolite eruption of Cordón Caulle, Chile. Remote sensing indicates that an intrusion began after eruption onset and caused severe (>200 m) uplift over 1 month. Digital terrain models resolve a laccolith-shaped body ∼0.8 km3. Deformation and conduit flow models indicate laccolith depths of only ∼20–200 m and overpressures (∼1–10 MPa) that likely stemmed from conduit blockage. Our results show that explosive eruptions may rapidly force significant quantities of magma in the crust to build laccoliths. These iconic intrusions can thus be interpreted as eruptive features that pose unique and previously unrecognized volcanic hazards. PMID:27876800

  20. Intrusion Detection in Control Systems using Sequence Characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kiuchi, Mai; Onoda, Takashi

    Intrusion detection is considered effective in control systems. Sequences of the control application behavior observed in the communication, such as the order of the control device to be controlled, are important in control systems. However, most intrusion detection systems do not effectively reflect sequences in the application layer into the detection rules. In our previous work, we considered utilizing sequences for intrusion detection in control systems, and demonstrated the usefulness of sequences for intrusion detection. However, manually writing the detection rules for a large system can be difficult, so using machine learning methods becomes feasible. Also, in the case of control systems, there have been very few observed cyber attacks, so we have very little knowledge of the attack data that should be used to train the intrusion detection system. In this paper, we use an approach that combines CRF (Conditional Random Field) considering the sequence of the system, thus able to reflect the characteristics of control system sequences into the intrusion detection system, and also does not need the knowledge of attack data to construct the detection rules.

  1. Influence of seawater intrusion on microbial communities in groundwater.

    PubMed

    Unno, Tatsuya; Kim, Jungman; Kim, Yumi; Nguyen, Son G; Guevarra, Robin B; Kim, Gee Pyo; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Sadowsky, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Groundwater is the sole source of potable water on Jeju Island in the Republic of (South) Korea. Groundwater is also used for irrigation and industrial purposes, and it is severely impacted by seawater intrusion in coastal areas. Consequently, monitoring the intrusion of seawater into groundwater on Jeju is very important for health and environmental reasons. A number of studies have used hydrological models to predict the deterioration of groundwater quality caused by seawater intrusion. However, there is conflicting evidence of intrusion due to complicated environmental influences on groundwater quality. Here we investigated the use of next generation sequencing (NGS)-based microbial community analysis as a way to monitor groundwater quality and detect seawater intrusion. Pristine groundwater, groundwater from three coastal areas, and seawater were compared. Analysis of the distribution of bacterial species clearly indicated that the high and low salinity groundwater differed significantly with respect to microbial composition. While members of the family Parvularculaceae were only identified in high salinity water samples, a greater percentage of the phylum Actinobacteria was predominantly observed in pristine groundwater. In addition, we identified 48 shared operational taxonomic units (OTUs) with seawater, among which the high salinity groundwater sample shared a greater number of bacterial species with seawater (6.7%). In contrast, other groundwater samples shared less than 0.5%. Our results suggest that NGS-based microbial community analysis of groundwater may be a useful tool for monitoring groundwater quality and detect seawater intrusion. This technology may also provide additional insights in understanding hydrological dynamics.

  2. The effects of nicotine on intrusive memories in nonsmokers.

    PubMed

    Hawkins, Kirsten A; Cougle, Jesse R

    2013-12-01

    Correlational research suggests that smoking increases risk of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD), though such research by nature cannot rule out third variable explanations for this relationship. The present study used an analogue trauma film design to experimentally test the effects of nicotine on the occurrence of intrusive memories. Fifty-four healthy nonsmokers were randomly assigned to ingest either a nicotine or placebo lozenge before viewing a film depicting motor vehicle accidents. Participants recorded intrusive memories immediately after the film and for a week via diary. Participants in the nicotine condition reported significantly more intrusive memories immediately after watching the film, yet no group differences emerged on intrusions or intrusion-related distress reported during the following week. Among participants low in dispositional rumination, those who had ingested a nicotine lozenge reported more intrusions in the subsequent week than those in the placebo condition. These findings provide novel experimental evidence for the role of nicotine in increasing risk of PTSD and suggest that nicotine may contribute to trauma-related rumination but not heightened reactivity to trauma cues.

  3. Configurable Middleware-Level Intrusion Detection for Embedded Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Naess, Eivind; Frincke, Deborah A.; McKinnon, A. D.; Bakken, David E.

    2005-06-20

    Embedded systems have become integral parts of a diverse range of systems from automobiles to critical infrastructure applications such as gas and electric power distribution. Unfortunately, research on computer security in general and intrusion detection in particular, has not kept pace. Furthermore, embedded systems, by their very nature, are application specific and therefore frameworks for developing application-specific intrusion detection systems for distributed embedded systems must be researched, designed, and implemented. In this paper, we present a configurable middleware-based intrusion detection framework. In particular, this paper presents a system model and a concrete implementation of a highly configurable intrusion detection framework that is integrated into MicroQoSCORBA, a highly configurable middleware framework developed for embedded systems. By exploiting the application-specific logic available to a middleware framework (e.g., object interfaces and method signatures), our integrated framework is able to autogenerate application-specific intrusion detection systems. Next, a set of configurable intrusion detection mechanisms suitable for embedded systems is presented. A performance evaluation of these mechanisms, run on two hardware platforms, is presented at the end of the paper.

  4. Biochemical and Clinical Assessments of Segmental Maxillary Posterior Tooth Intrusion

    PubMed Central

    Tasanapanont, Jintana; Wattanachai, Tanapan; Apisariyakul, Janya; Pothacharoen, Peraphan; Kongtawelert, Prachya; Midtbø, Marit

    2017-01-01

    Objective. To compare chondroitin sulphate (CS) levels around maxillary second premolars, first molars, and second molars between the unloaded and the loaded periods and to measure the rates of intrusion of maxillary posterior teeth during segmental posterior tooth intrusion. Materials and Methods. In this prospective clinical study, 105 teeth (from 15 patients exhibiting anterior open bite and requiring maxillary posterior tooth intrusion) were studied. Competitive ELISA was used to detect CS levels. Dental casts (during the unloaded and loaded periods) were scanned, and posterior tooth intrusion distances were measured. Results. During the unloaded period, the median CS levels around maxillary second premolars, first molars, second molars (experimental teeth), and mandibular first molars (negative control) were 0.006, 0.055, 0.056, and 0.012 and during the loaded period were 2.592, 5.738, 4.727, and 0.163 ng/μg of total protein, respectively. The median CS levels around experimental teeth were significantly elevated during the loaded period. The mean rates of maxillary second premolar and first and second molar intrusion were 0.72, 0.58, and 0.40 mm/12 weeks, respectively. Conclusions. Biochemical and clinical assessments suggested that the segmental posterior tooth intrusion treatment modality with 50 g of vertical force per side was sufficient. Trial Registration. The study is registered as TCTR20170206006. PMID:28321256

  5. Liquids of the Skaergaard intrusion traced by melt inclusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakobsen, J. K.; Veksler, I. V.; Tegner, C.

    2009-12-01

    The Skaergaard intrusion, East Greenland, has for the past 75 years played a central role in the understanding of differentiation of tholeiitic magma. However, there is still no agreement on the general line of liquid descent. Here we compile the inference from melt inclusion in cumulus apatite and plagioclase as a direct tracer of the parental melt composition and its evolution. Compositions of crystallized melt inclusions have been estimated by broad beam analysis, mass balance summation and by remelting and homogenization. Melt inclusions in apatite are found in the Upper Zone and are of two types: One is dark brownish or opaque and contains finely crystallized daughter phases of plagioclase, ilmenite, magnetite, iron-rich biotite (lepidomelane) and a fine-grained matrix; a less abundant type is light-colored, transparent and consists of quartz, orthoclase, albite, minor magnetite and finely intergrown matrix. The predominant dark melt inclusions are extremely rich in FeOT (30.9 ± 4.2 wt%) and low in SiO2 (40.7 ± 3.6 wt%) whereas the light colored type contains 8.6 ± 5.9 wt% FeOT and 65.6 ± 7.3 wt% SiO2. The contrasting compositions is interpreted as entrapment of conjugate end-members of two immiscible liquids. Before apatite is saturated (Lower- and Middle Zone), melt inclusions in plagioclase represent the best available tracer of liquid compositions. The melt inclusions are fully crystallized and consist of a uniform daughter phase assemblage of highly variable modal proportions: plagioclase (42-59 %), clinopyroxene (29-41 %), ilmenite (6-9 %), magnetite (4-10%), apatite (1-9 %), and accessory phases (<1 %). The bulk compositions of homogenized melt inclusions vary considerably in SiO2 (40-54 wt.%), FeOT (7-23 wt.%), P2O5 (0-1.9 wt.%), K2O (0-2.9 wt.%) and Ca/Al ratios. These modal and compositional variations, especially those of K and P, are best explained by heterogeneous trapping of an emulsion of immiscible Fe-rich and silica-rich melts. Our results

  6. Metamorphic modifications of the Muremera mafic-ultramafic intrusions, eastern Burundi, and their effect on chromite compositions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Evans, David M.

    2015-01-01

    The Muremera mafic-ultramafic intrusions were emplaced into metasedimentary rocks of the Karagwe-Ankole Belt in eastern Burundi, as part of the Mesoproterozoic Kibaran tectonomagmatic event. Igneous minerals of the Muremera intrusions have been partly altered to hydrous and carbonated metamorphic assemblages, although in most cases, the original igneous textures are well-preserved. Rounded, subhedral cumulus olivine has been partially and pseudomorphically replaced by lizardite-magnetite mesh-rim and lizardite-brucite mesh-centre assemblages, while anhedral interstitial plagioclase has been replaced by chlorite-tremolite. A later and localized event results in prograde alteration to antigorite-magnetite-chlorite-talc-carbonate and talc-carbonate-chlorite assemblages. The rocks are inferred to have undergone at least three separate metamorphic/alteration events resulting in: AS1 - an early alteration assemblage (mesh-rim lizardite-magnetite) characterized by very low fluid/rock ratios and widespread distribution; AS2 - a later, widespread low-temperature retrogressive (mesh-centre lizardite-brucite) assemblage associated with abundant close-spaced parallel veins; AS3 - later, prograde (antigorite-magnetite) and AT4 (talc-chlorite-carbonate) assemblages associated with more localized shearing and higher fluid/rock ratios. The AS1 assemblage most likely represents deuteric alteration that occurred soon after intrusion and cooling. The AS2 assemblage may relate to a continuation of this cooling, or may be correlated with the regional upright D2 folding event, while the AS3 and AT4 alteration assemblages are most likely correlated with the N-S oriented D3 faulting episode linked to the distal East African Orogeny. Euhedral to subhedral chromite grains are essentially unaltered where enclosed in primary unaltered olivine, pyroxene or plagioclase, as well as in AS1 lizardite-magnetite and AS2 lizardite-brucite altered olivine or pyroxene. In samples which show alteration

  7. Searching for a better understanding of differentiation in the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBirney, A. R.; Sonnenthal, E. L.

    2007-12-01

    The Skaergaard Intrusion is probably the most intensely studied body of igneous rocks on Earth, and yet it seems that the more we have learned about it the less confident we are that we understand the basic processes of magmatic differentiations that it so magnificently displays. The elegant model of differentiation by crystal settling that Lawrence Wager and his colleagues left us is in shambles and is yet to be replaced by a coherent alternative. Interpretations based on so-called cumulate textures have been discredited by our recognition that few if any of the rocks preserve their original textures, compositions, or modal proportions; they re-equilibrated during a long period of slow cooling. Many of these rocks have undergone extensive metasomatism that, in some instances, produced nearly mono-mineralic mafic and felsic assemblages. An abrupt change in the volatile components midway through the course of crystallization was accompanied by marked changes in the oxygen fugacity, partitioning of trace elements, and crystal-liquid equilibria. Equally important, our recognition that compositional changes had a greater effect on liquid densities than thermal expansion has forced us to reject the earlier interpretation of the convective regime, and this in turn led to the realization that the Layered Series did not crystallize from the main reservoir of liquid but from liquids that ponded on the floor after evolving during partial crystallization on the steep walls. In an effort to sort out all these new developments and find better explanations for the trends of compositioal evolution, we have abandoned all our previous assumptions in favor of letting the rocks themselves tell us how they reached their final state. To do this, we are constructing a numerical model that incorporates as many known physical-chemical processes as possible in the hope that it may lead to a better understanding of the fundamental principles of magmatic differentiation.

  8. Our World: The Rock Cycle

    NASA Video Gallery

    Find out how rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts have helped NASA learn more about the rock cycle. Compare igneous, sedimentary and metamorphic rocks found on Earth to three types of ro...

  9. Oxygen isotope studies of early Precambrian granitic rocks from the Giants Range batholith, northeastern Minnesota, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Viswanathan, S.

    1974-01-01

    Oxygen isotope studies of granitic rocks from the 2.7 b.y.-old composite Giants Range batholith show that: (1) ??(O18)quartz values of 9 to 10 permil characterize relatively uncontaminated Lower Precambrian, magmatic granodiorites and granites; (2) granitic rocks thought to have formed by static granitization have ??(O18)quartz values that are 1 to 2 permil higher than magmatic granitic rocks; (3) satellite leucogranite bodies have values nearly identical to those of the main intrusive phases even where they transect O18-rich metasedimentary wall rocks; (4) oxygen isotopic interaction between the granitic melts and their O18-rich wall rocks was minimal; and (5) O18/O18 ratios of quartz grains in a metasomatic granite are largely inherited from the precursor rock, but during the progression - sedimentary parent ??? partially granitized parent ??? metasomatic granite ??? there is gradual decrease in ??(O18)quartz by 1 to 2 permil. ?? 1974.

  10. Titanium in plagioclase as a monitor of magma differentiation in the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmonsen, L.; Tegner, C.; Humphreys, M.

    2011-12-01

    There is a general consensus that the Skaergaard Intrusion formed by inwards crystallization from the margins. Furthermore, it is agreed that the magma evolved largely due to crystal fractionation. However, the resulting liquid line of descent has been debated and it remains unclear which processes govern the required mass transport, and whether magma zonation developed. In recent studies, the influence of diffusion, crystal mush compaction, compositional convection and segregation of immiscible liquids are under dispute. The liquid line of descent is commonly approached by simple mass balance calculations, which hinge on assumptions regarding the composition of the parent magma and the shape of the intrusion. Moreover, this approach only provides information on the average composition of the main magma and thus, does not address whether the magma was zoned or homogenous. As an alternative, we here invoke an analytical approach; microprobe analyses of unzoned plagioclase cores from a new suite of samples from the Upper Border Series are compared to those in the Layered Series. We find (1) that the Ti concentrations at given anorthite contents in the two series are identical and (2) Ti increases gradually from 0.07 wt% in the most primitive plagioclase analysed (An70) and peaks at 0.13 wt% (An52). It then decreases continuously toward 0.02 wt% in plagioclase from the Sandwich Horizon (An23). Based on experimentally determined distribution coefficients, we calculate a parent magma containing 2.0 wt% Ti. During the early stages of differentiation it gradually increases to 4.3 wt% and subsequently decreases towards 2.3 wt% in the most evolved liquid. As expected, the onset of Ti depletion occurs where the calculated magma crosses the theoretical solubility curve. Consistently, this coincides with appearance of cumulus FeTi oxides in the cumulates at the floor and roof of the intrusion, as indicated by a sudden peak in whole rock Ti and V. Key implications of this study

  11. Granite provenance and intrusion in arcs: Evidence from diverse zircon types in Big Bear Lake Intrusive Suite, USA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A. P.; Wooden, J. L.; Mueller, P. A.; Economos, R. C.

    2016-03-01

    Textural, geochemical and hafnium isotopic data from diverse zircon domains allow discrimination between source and emplacement-level processes in the formation of a large-volume calc-alkalic intrusion. The Big Bear Lake Intrusive Suite is composed of satellite plutons and a main intrusive mass zoned from mafic granodiorites at its margins to central biotite ± muscovite granites, and is estimated to be 7-10 km thick and have a volume of 3500-5100 km3. Zircons in the main intrusive mass and in the satellite plutons are composed of one or more of four domain types: (a) Archean to Proterozoic premagmatic domains and (b) Mesozoic premagmatic domains, both occurring as cores, which are overgrown by (c) luminescent early magmatic domains with low U + Th and relatively high estimated crystallization temperatures and (d) high U + Th main phase magmatic domains. U-Pb zircon geochronology indicates the main intrusive mass was emplaced 78-77 Ma, preceded by satellite plutons intruded 85-81 Ma. Zircon hafnium isotope ratios span 54 epsilon units, recording age and compositional diversity in magma sources and magma batches. We propose a model for assembly of the intrusive suite involving mixing between lithospheric mantle-derived magma and a hybrid lower crustal source, followed by incremental emplacement of magmas in the upper crust at 0.003-0.005 km3 my- 1. This flux rate was sufficiently rapid to generate a large volume of mobile magma that underwent differentiation by limited and imperfect fractional crystallization to form the granodioritic margins and central granites. The estimated flux rate is several times higher than that estimated for other Cretaceous, incrementally emplaced intrusive suites in the California arc, indicating that both source-level and emplacement-level processes played roles in forming these intrusions.

  12. Space Weathering of Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noble, Sarah

    2011-01-01

    Space weathering discussions have generally centered around soils but exposed rocks will also incur the effects of weathering. On the Moon, rocks make up only a very small percentage of the exposed surface and areas where rocks are exposed, like central peaks, are often among the least space weathered regions we find in remote sensing data. However, our studies of weathered Ap 17 rocks 76015 and 76237 show that significant amounts of weathering products can build up on rock surfaces. Because rocks have much longer surface lifetimes than an individual soil grain, and thus record a longer history of exposure, we can study these products to gain a deeper perspective on the weathering process and better assess the relative impo!1ance of various weathering components on the Moon. In contrast to the lunar case, on small asteroids, like Itokowa, rocks make up a large fraction of the exposed surface. Results from the Hayabusa spacecraft at Itokowa suggest that while the low gravity does not allow for the development of a mature regolith, weathering patinas can and do develop on rock surfaces, in fact, the rocky surfaces were seen to be darker and appear spectrally more weathered than regions with finer materials. To explore how weathering of asteroidal rocks may differ from lunar, a set of ordinary chondrite meteorites (H, L, and LL) which have been subjected to artificial space weathering by nanopulse laser were examined by TEM. NpFe(sup 0) bearing glasses were ubiquitous in both the naturally-weathered lunar and the artificially-weathered meteorite samples.

  13. Differentiation and compaction in the Skaergaard intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tegner, C.; Thy, P.; Holness, M.; Jakobsen, J. K.; Salmonsen, L.; Humphreys, M.; Lesher, C. E.

    2009-12-01

    Although it is largely agreed that crystallization occurs inwardly in crystal mushes along the margins of magma chambers, the efficiency and mechanisms of differentiation are contended. The fractionation paradigm hinges on mass exchange between a crystal mush and the main magma reservoir resulting in coarse-grained, refractory (cumulate) rocks of primary crystals, and complementary enrichment of incompatible elements in the main magma. Diffusion, convection, liquid immiscibility and compaction have been proposed as mechanisms driving this mass exchange. We examine the efficiency of differentiation in basaltic crystal mushes of the Skaergaard magma chamber. The contents of incompatible elements such as phosphorus and calculated final porosities are smallest in cumulate rocks at the floor (~5% final porosity above the level of magnetite-in), intermediate at the walls (~20%) and highest at the roof (~55%). Mass exchange and differentiation are thus highly efficient at the floor but inefficient at the roof. This is best explained by compaction squeezing interstitial liquid out of the crystal mush preferentially at the floor. At the walls only mush with porosity less than ~20% was able to stick rather than collapsing into the chamber, resulting in moderately efficient differentiation. We conclude that compaction moderates the final crystal mush porosity and the efficiency of magma differentiation depending on chamber dynamics.

  14. Brumalia Tholus: Magmatic Intrusion on Vesta?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buczkowski, Debra L.; DeSanctis, M. Christina; Raymond, Carol A.; Ammannito, Eleonora; Frigeri, Alessandro; Wyrick, Danielle Y.; Williams, David; Russell, Christopher T.

    2013-04-01

    Geologic mapping of Vesta was based on Dawn spacecraft Framing Camera (FC) images and compositional data from the Visible & Infrared Spectrometer (VIR). Mapping reveals that while the equatorial region of Vesta displays numerous wide, flat-floored troughs [1], these troughs do not cut the Vestalia Terra plateau (VT) [2]. However, three large pit crater chains are observed on the VT surface [2,3]. Pit crater chains are hypothesized to form when dilational motion on buried normal faults causes overlying material to collapse into the opening portions of the buried fault [4]. The merged pits of the VT pit crater chains show signs of collapse but distinct fault faces can also be observed [3]. It has thus been suggested that the VT pit crater chains are representative of subsurface faulting of the plateau [2]. The pit crater chain Albalonga Catena phases from being a topographically low feature of merged pits into being the topographically high Brumalia Tholus, an elongate hill. If Albalonga Catena represents a buried normal fault, then the topographic high that emerges along its length could have been formed by a magmatic intrusion utilizing the subsurface fracture as a conduit to the surface. Brumalia Tholus should thus be comprised of diogenite, a plutonic vestan material. Teia crater impacts Brumalia Tholus and likely samples Brumalia's core material. FC data indicates that Teia ejecta have a smeared, flow-like texture and a distinct compostion. VIR analysis has shown that while background VT material is howarditic [5], these Teia ejecta are more diogenitic. VIR also detected small diogenite deposits on top of Brumalia Tholus. The identification of diogenite on the top of Brumalia Tholus and in the Teia ejecta is consistent with the hill being the surface representation of a magmatic intrusion. We present a possible sequence of events. Global equatorial fracturing and faulting occurred, resulting in sub-surface faulting of VT. The surface of VT was covered by

  15. Vulnerability indicators of sea water intrusion.

    PubMed

    Werner, Adrian D; Ward, James D; Morgan, Leanne K; Simmons, Craig T; Robinson, Neville I; Teubner, Michael D

    2012-01-01

    In this paper, simple indicators of the propensity for sea water intrusion (SWI) to occur (referred to as "SWI vulnerability indicators") are devised. The analysis is based on an existing analytical solution for the steady-state position of a sharp fresh water-salt water interface. Interface characteristics, that is, the wedge toe location and sea water volume, are used in quantifying SWI in both confined and unconfined aquifers. Rates-of-change (partial derivatives of the analytical solution) in the wedge toe or sea water volume are used to quantify the aquifer vulnerability to various stress situations, including (1) sea-level rise; (2) change in recharge (e.g., due to climate change); and (3) change in seaward discharge. A selection of coastal aquifer cases is used to apply the SWI vulnerability indicators, and the proposed methodology produces interpretations of SWI vulnerability that are broadly consistent with more comprehensive investigations. Several inferences regarding SWI vulnerability arise from the analysis, including: (1) sea-level rise impacts are more extensive in aquifers with head-controlled rather than flux-controlled inland boundaries, whereas the opposite is true for recharge change impacts; (2) sea-level rise does not induce SWI in constant-discharge confined aquifers; (3) SWI vulnerability varies depending on the causal factor, and therefore vulnerability composites are needed that differentiate vulnerability to such threats as sea-level rise, climate change, and changes in seaward groundwater discharge. We contend that the approach is an improvement over existing methods for characterizing SWI vulnerability, because the method has theoretical underpinnings and yet calculations are simple, although the coastal aquifer conceptualization is highly idealized.

  16. Rock Garden Mosaic

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image mosaic of part of the 'Rock Garden' was taken by the Sojourner rover's left front camera on Sol 71 (September 14). The rock 'Shark' is at left center and 'Half Dome' is at right. Fine-scale textures on the rocks are clearly seen. Broken crust-like material is visible at bottom center.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  17. Dirty Rotten Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Spirit shows a collection of rocks (upper right) at Gusev Crater that have captured the attention of scientists for their resemblance to rotting loaves of bread. The insides of the rocks appear to have been eroded, while their outer rinds remain more intact. These outer rinds are reminiscent of those found on rocks at Meridiani Planum's 'Eagle Crater.' This image was captured on sol 158 (June 13, 2004).

  18. Zapping Rocks on Mars

    ScienceCinema

    Wiens, Roger

    2016-07-12

    Better understanding Mars means better understanding its geology. That’s why, sitting atop NASA’s Curiosity rover, is ChemCam, an instrument built by Los Alamos National Laboratory that shoots lasers at Martian rocks and analyzes the data. After nearly 1,500 rock zaps, ChemCam has uncovered some surprising facts about the Red Planet, including the discovery of igneous rocks. Soon, a new Los Alamos-built instrument—the SuperCam—will ride aboard the Mars 2020 rover and bring with it enhanced capabilities to unlock new secrets about the planet.

  19. Zapping Rocks on Mars

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, Roger

    2016-05-16

    Better understanding Mars means better understanding its geology. That’s why, sitting atop NASA’s Curiosity rover, is ChemCam, an instrument built by Los Alamos National Laboratory that shoots lasers at Martian rocks and analyzes the data. After nearly 1,500 rock zaps, ChemCam has uncovered some surprising facts about the Red Planet, including the discovery of igneous rocks. Soon, a new Los Alamos-built instrument—the SuperCam—will ride aboard the Mars 2020 rover and bring with it enhanced capabilities to unlock new secrets about the planet.

  20. Detached rock evaluation device

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, David R.

    1986-01-01

    A rock detachment evaluation device (10) having an energy transducer unit 1) for sensing vibrations imparted to a subject rock (172) for converting the sensed vibrations into electrical signals, a low band pass filter unit (12) for receiving the electrical signal and transmitting only a low frequency segment thereof, a high band pass filter unit (13) for receiving the electrical signals and for transmitting only a high frequency segment thereof, a comparison unit (14) for receiving the low frequency and high frequency signals and for determining the difference in power between the signals, and a display unit (16) for displaying indicia of the difference, which provides a quantitative measure of rock detachment.

  1. Weird 'Endurance' Rock Ahead

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image taken by the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a bizarre, lumpy rock dubbed 'Wopmay' on the inner slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' Scientists say the rock's unusual texture is unlike any others observed so far at Meridiani Planum. Wopmay measures approximately 1 meter (3.3 feet) across. The image was taken by the rover's panoramic camera on sol 195 (Aug. 11, 2004). Opportunity will likely travel to this or a similar rock in coming sols for a closer look at the alien surface.

  2. Basement influences on dolomite-hosted vertical sedimentary intrusions in marine erg-margin deposits from the Pennsylvanian of Northern Wyoming (USA)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blanchard, Sébastien; Frank, Tracy D.; Fielding, Christopher R.

    2016-06-01

    Understanding soft-sediment deformation structures and their triggers can help in assessing the influence of tectonics, climate, and diagenesis on the stratigraphic record. Such features commonly record processes that would not otherwise be preserved. The description of soft-sediment deformation in Pennsylvanian deposits of the western United States, characterized by orbitally driven alternations between eolian sandstones, marine dolomites, and shales, has been limited to contorted cross-beds. We document discordant, sheet-like sedimentary intrusions in three marine intervals over a 45-km-wide area. Intrusions consist of very well to moderately cemented, very fine to fine-grained quartz sandstone. Body widths range from 5 to 50 cm, and heights up to 2 m. The orientations of 103 vertical bodies were measured. Based on upward- and downward-tapering, and the presence of deformed, microfractured fragments of host rocks, these intrusions are interpreted to result from seismically induced fluidization of water-saturated sands. Their sheet-like morphology indicates injection through fractures. Two predominant directions (WNW-ESE and N-S) were recognized and interpreted as pre-injection fracture sets. Folding of surrounding layers around the intrusions suggests negligible compaction prior to injection, indicating penecontemporaneous or shallow burial fluidization. The intraplate location of Wyoming implies that seismicity did not originate at a plate boundary. The area within which intrusions are found is crossed by a zone characterized by localized development of thick eolian stories at the top of the formation, interpreted to reflect the rejuvenation of a basement lineament. The seismically active character of lineaments may explain overpressure and fluidization, substantiating the notion that Precambrian structures repeatedly affected Phanerozoic sedimentation. Similar intrusive features may be wrongly identified or overlooked in deposits of arid environments, but their

  3. Rare earth mineralisation in the Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion of the Loch Loyal Syenite Complex, northern Scotland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Walters, A. S.; Hughes, H. S. R.; Goodenough, K. M.; Gunn, A. G.; Lacinska, A.

    2012-04-01

    Due to growing global concerns about security of rare earth element (REE) supply, there is considerable interest in identifying new deposits and in understanding the processes responsible for their formation. Ongoing studies by BGS on potential indigenous resources have focused on the Caledonian alkaline intrusive complexes of north-west Scotland. The highest values of total rare earth oxide (TREO) have been found in the Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion of the Loch Loyal Complex in Sutherland. The Loch Loyal Syenite Complex comprises three intrusions: Ben Loyal, Beinn Stumanadh and Cnoc nan Cuilean. The Cnoc nan Cuilean intrusion, which covers an area of about 3 km2, can be subdivided into two zones: a Mixed Syenite Zone (MSZ) and a later Massive Leucosyenite Zone (MLZ). Evidence from field mapping and 3D-modelling suggests that the melasyenites were passively emplaced to form a lopolith concordant with the Moine and Lewisian country rocks. A later episode of leucosyenitic magmatism caused mixing and mingling with the melasyenite forming the MSZ. Continued intrusion of leucosyenite melts then formed the MLZ [1]. The melasyenites are enriched in TREO relative to the leucosyenites with average values of 3800 ppm and 1400 ppm respectively. The highest contents, up to 20 000 ppm TREO, are found in narrow biotite-magnetite-rich veins identified in a single stream section near the eastern margin of the intrusion. All lithologies are light rare earth element (LREE) dominated with high concentrations of Ba and Sr and low levels of Nb and Ta. Various REE-bearing minerals are present but allanite is dominant, being present in all major magmatic lithologies and the biotite-magnetite veins. Three generations of allanite have been identified: a late-magmatic phase rimming apatite; allanite micro veinlets cross-cutting the syenite; and a third phase only observed in the biotite-magnetite veins. TREO concentrations of the different allanite generations are similar, averaging 22%. The

  4. Scattering from Rock and Rock Outcrops

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-30

    distribution, bulk properties), (2) Acquiring and analyzing acoustic and environmental data collected during field tests in areas of known rock...resulted in good agreement between models and data. Figure 7 Scattering strength results from glacially plucked surface. The shape of the curves is...fact provide very similar fits to the SAS input data. Further analysis has shown that these estimate are only separated because their confidence

  5. Scattering from Rock and Rock Outcrops

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-09-30

    display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE 30 SEP 2014 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2014 to 00-00-2014 4. TITLE AND...outcrops are intended to address many of the open questions which exist for scattering from these types of surfaces and include increasing our basic...understanding of: 1) geoacoustic characteristics of rock relevant to scattering, 2) scattering strength versus grazing angle, and 3

  6. Controls on magmatic PGE and Au mineralization in the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keays, Reid; Tegner, Christian

    2013-04-01

    The Skaergaard Intrusion of East Greenland is the host for significant magmatic PGE and Au mineralization (the Platinova Reefs). It was formed from a single batch of magma that crystallized in its entirety as a closed system. Unlike all other examples of significant magmatic PGE and Ni-Cu-PGE mineralization, the Skaergaard rocks exhibit no evidence of crustal contamination, the major factor responsible for driving magmas to sulphide saturation and ore genesis. Although the Skaergaard rocks and mineralized zones have extremely low S contents, the mineralization is believed to be the product of late stage sulphide saturation of the magma. Three factors drove the magma to sulphide saturation, viz: (1) prolonged build up of S in the residual melt of the fractionating magma; (2) crystallization of magnetite which slowed down the build up of FeO in the fractionating magma; and (3) cooling of the magma against the walls of the intrusion. High quality PGE, Au, Cu, S, Se data and other geochemical data for samples from a detailed stratigraphic section through the Skaergaard intrusion are used to model these elements throughout its crystallization history, estimate their concentrations in the Skaergaard parental magma, and to establish the timing of sulphide saturation and the causes of PGE-Au mineralization. The model indicates that the parental magma contained 4.0 ppb Au, 18.7 ppb Pd, 9.0 ppb Pt, 95 ppb Se and 240 ppm Cu. The high Pd/Pt ratio indicates that the magma had undergone a significant amount of fractionation prior to entry into the Skaergaard magma chamber, consistent with the silicate mineralogy. A sharp increase in PGE contents (but not Cu or incompatible lithophile trace elements) 300m below the Platinova Reefs coincides with the first appearance of cumulus magnetite and marks the stratigraphic position at which tiny amounts of cumulus PGE-rich sulphides segregated from the magma. Although the S contents of all rocks below the Platinova Reefs are below the

  7. Late orogenic mafic magmatism in the North Cascades, Washington: Petrology and tectonic setting of the Skymo layered intrusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Whitney, D.L.; Tepper, J.H.; Hirschmann, M.M.; Hurlow, H.A.

    2008-01-01

    The Skymo Complex in the North Cascades, Washington, is a layered mafic intrusion within the Ross Lake fault zone, a major orogen-parallel structure at the eastern margin of the Cascades crystalline core. The complex is composed dominantly of troctolite and gabbro, both with inclusions of primitive olivine gabbro. Low-pressure minerals in the metasedimentary contact aureole and early crystallization of olivine + plagioclase in the mafic rocks indicate the intrusion was emplaced at shallow depths (<12 km). The Skymo rocks have trace-element characteristics of arc magmas, but the association of Mg-rich olivine (Fo88-80) with relatively sodic plagioclase (An75-60) and the Al/Ti ratios of clinopyroxene are atypical of arc gabbros and more characteristic of rift-related gabbros. A Sm-Nd isochron indicates crystallization in the early Tertiary (ca. 50 Ma), coeval with the nearby Golden Horn alkaline granite. Mantle melting to produce Skymo magma likely occurred in a mantle wedge with a long history of arc magmatism. The Skymo mafic complex and the Golden Horn granite were emplaced during regional extension and collapse of the North Cascades orogen and represent the end of large-scale magmatism in the North Cascades continental arc. ?? 2008 Geological Society of America.

  8. Petrological evidence for non-linear increase of magmatic intrusion rates before eruption at open vent mafic volcanoe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ruth, D. C. S.; Costa Rodriguez, F.

    2015-12-01

    The most active volcanoes on earth erupt in a yearly to decadal time scales, typically erupt mafic magmas and are open-vent systems with prominent degassing plumes (e.g. Mayon, Arenal, Llaima, Etna). Here we investigate the plumbing systems, dynamics, and processes that drive eruptions at these systems. These are key questions for improving hazard evaluation, and better understanding the unrest associated with these types of volcanoes. The petrology and geochemistry from six historical eruptions (1947-2006) of Mayon volcano (Philippines) shows that all lavas are basaltic andesite with phenocrysts of plagioclase + orthopyroxene (Opx) + clinopyroxene. Opx crystals show a variety of compositions and zoning patterns (reverse, normal or complex) with Mg# (= 100 *Mg/[Mg+Fe]) varying from 67 to 81. The simplest interpretation is that the low Mg# parts of the crystals resided on an upper crustal and crystal rich reservoir that was intruded by more primitive magmas from which the high Mg# parts of the crystals grew. Modelling Mg-Fe diffusion in Opx shows that times since magma injection and eruption range from a few days up to 3.5 years in all of the investigated eruptions. The longest diffusion times are shorter than the repose times between the eruptions, which implies that crystal recycling between eruptive events is negligible. This is a surprising result that shows that for each eruption a different part of the evolved crystal-rich plumbing system is activated. This can be due to random intrusion location or an irreversibility of the plumbing system that prevents multiple eruptions from the same crystal-rich part. Moreover, we find that the number of intrusions markedly increases before each eruption in a non-linear manner. Such an increased rate of intrusions with time might reflect non-linear rheological properties of the crystal-rich system, of the enclosing rocks, or the non-linear evolution of crystal-melt reaction-dissolution fronts during magma intrusions.

  9. Plume-orogenic lithosphere interaction recorded in the Haladala layered intrusion in the Southwest Tianshan Orogen, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Peng-Li; Huang, Xiao-Long; Xu, Yi-Gang; Li, Hong-Yan; Wang, Xue; Li, Wu-Xian

    2016-03-01

    The plume-orogenic lithosphere interaction may be common and important for the generation of large igneous provinces. The information regarding such a process is recorded by the Haladala gabbroic intrusion (~300 Ma), the largest layered ultramafic-mafic intrusion hosting V-Ti magnetite deposits in the Southwest Tianshan Orogen, NW China. The Haladala gabbros exhibit unfractionated chondrite-normalized rare earth element patterns with negative Nb and Ta anomalies and positive Pb anomaly on the primitive mantle-normalized multielement variation diagram. They are characterized by low initial Sr isotopes, slightly decoupled but high positive bulk rock ɛNd(t) and ɛHf(t), and high 207Pb/204Pb and 208Pb/204Pb relative to 206Pb/204Pb, delineating a DUPAL signature in the sources. The Haladala gabbros cannot be arc or postcollisional magmatism, given the lack of hydrous minerals and low K contents, respectively. This is further supported by the relatively low oxygen fugacity required for the gradual enrichment of V-Ti magnetite during the magma fractionation and by an overall anhydrous mantle source suggested by troctolite mineral assemblage (olivine + plagioclase). The emplacement age of the Haladala gabbros is identical to that of the Wajilitag kimberlites in the Tarim's interior, which have been interpreted as the first magmatic expression of the Tarim mantle plume. We thus propose that the Haladala gabbroic intrusion was generated in a hybrid geodynamic setting in which the Southwest Tianshan Orogen was impacted by an upwelling mantle plume. In this sense, the Haladala layered gabbroic intrusion records the early phase of magmatism of the Tarim plume, which was preferentially emplaced in a lithospheric weak zone.

  10. Contact zone permeability at intrusion boundaries: New results from hydraulic testing and geophysical logging in the Newark Rift Basin, New York, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matter, J.M.; Goldberg, D.S.; Morin, R.H.; Stute, M.

    2006-01-01

    Hydraulic tests and geophysical logging performed in the Palisades sill and the underlying sedimentary rocks in the NE part of the Newark Rift Basin, New York, USA, confirm that the particular transmissive zones are localized within the dolerite-sedimentary rock contact zone and within a narrow interval below this contact zone that is characterized by the occurrence of small layers of chilled dolerite. Transmissivity values determined from fluid injection, aquifer testing, and flowmeter measurements generally fall in the range of 8.1E-08 to 9.95E-06 m2/s and correspond to various scales of investigation. The analysis of acoustic and optical BHTV images reveals two primary fracture sets within the dolerite and the sedimentary rocks - subhorizontal fractures, intersected by subvertical ones. Despite being highly fractured either with subhorizontal, subvertical or both fracture populations, the dolerite above and the sedimentary rocks below the contact zone and the zone with the layers of chilled dolerite are significantly less conductive. The distribution of the particular conductive intervals is not a function of the two dominant fracture populations or their density but rather of the intrusion path of the sill. The intrusion caused thermal fracturing and cracking of both formations, resulting in higher permeability along the contact zone. ?? Springer-Verlag 2005.

  11. Evidence for multiple pulses of crystal-bearing magma during emplacement of the Doros layered intrusion, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen-Smith, T. M.; Ashwal, L. D.

    2015-12-01

    The Doros Complex is a relatively small (maximum 3.5 km × 7.5 km) shallow-level, lopolithic, layered mafic intrusion in the early Cretaceous Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province. The stratigraphy broadly comprises a minor, fine-grained gabbroic sill and a sequence of primitive olivine-cumulate melagabbros, with a basal chilled margin, an intermediate plagioclase-cumulate olivine gabbro, and a sequence of mineralogically and texturally variable, intermediate, strongly foliated, plagioclase-, olivine- or magnetite-cumulate gabbros. An evolved syenitic (bostonite) phase occurs as cross-cutting dykes or as enclaves within the foliated gabbros. Major element modelling of the liquid line of descent shows that the spectrum of rock types, including the bostonite, is consistent with the fractionation of a basaltic parental magma that crystallised olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, magnetite, K-feldspar and apatite. However, the stratigraphic succession does not correspond to a simple progressive differentiation trend but instead shows a series of punctuated trends, each defined by a compositional reversal or hiatus. Incompatible trace element concentrations do not increase upwards though the body of the intrusion. The major units show similar, mildly enriched rare earth element patterns, with minimal Eu anomalies. Back-calculation of the rare earth element concentrations of these cumulate rocks produces relatively evolved original liquid compositions, indicating fractionation of this liquid from a more primitive precursor. Based on combined field, petrographic, geochemical and geophysical evidence, we propose an origin for the Doros Complex by a minimum of seven closely spaced influxes of crystal-bearing magmas, each with phenocryst contents between 5% and 55%. These findings represent a departure from the traditional single-pulse liquid model for the formation of layered mafic intrusions and suggest the presence of an underlying magmatic mush column, i.e., a large

  12. The prediction of intrusions following an analogue traumatic event: peritraumatic cognitive processes and anxiety-focused rumination versus rumination in response to intrusions.

    PubMed

    Laposa, Judith M; Rector, Neil A

    2012-09-01

    Intrusions are often considered the hallmark of posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Despite this, relatively little is known about factors that give rise to intrusions. Cognitive models of PTSD highlight the importance of pre-existing cognitive vulnerabilities, cognitive processing and anxiety during a traumatic event, as well as negative responses to trauma sequelae. However, few studies have examined multiple forms of peritraumatic processes, and rumination in response to trauma intrusions using analogue trauma tasks, and none have examined whether broader anxious ruminative processes contribute to intrusion development. In addition, little work has investigated the role of post-state anxiety in intrusions, and anxiety may be related to both peritraumatic processing and rumination. The current study employed a distressing film paradigm to examine key tenets of cognitive models of PTSD. Ninety-one female university students completed measures of anxiety, rumination in response to anxious symptoms, peritraumatic dissociation, data driven processing, lack of self referent processing, intrusions, and rumination in response to intrusions of the distressing film. Results revealed that peritraumatic dissociation, data driven processing, and self referent processing were associated with intrusion development, with lack of self referent processing being a strong predictor of intrusion development. Post-state anxiety and rumination in response to intrusions also predicted intrusion development. Discussion focuses on implications of cognitive processes and anxiety in theories of intrusion development.

  13. Tithonium Chasma's Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-565, 5 December 2003

    Exposures of light-toned, layered, sedimentary rocks are common in the deep troughs of the Valles Marineris system. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows an example from western Tithonium Chasma. The banding seen here is an eroded expression of layered rock. Sedimentary rocks can be composed of (1) the detritus of older, eroded and weathered rocks, (2) grains produced by explosive volcanism (tephra, also known as volcanic ash), or (3) minerals that were chemically precipitated out of a body of liquid such as water. These outcrops are located near 4.8oS, 89.7oW. The image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) wide and is illuminated from the lower left.

  14. Broken Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    18 May 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows broken-up blocks of sedimentary rock in western Candor Chasma. There are several locations in western Candor that exhibit this pattern of broken rock. The manner in which these landforms were created is unknown; it is possible that there was a landslide or a meteoritic impact that broke up the materials. One attribute that is known: in some of these cases, it seems that the rock was broken and then buried by later sedimentary rocks, before later being exhumed so that they can be seen from orbit today.

    Location near: 6.9oS, 75.5oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  15. Ancient Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2003-01-01

    MGS MOC Release No. MOC2-469, 31 August 2003

    The terraced area in this Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image is an outcropping of ancient, sedimentary rock. It occurs in a crater in western Arabia Terra near 10.8oN, 4.5oW. Sedimentary rocks provide a record of past environments on Mars. Field work will likely be required to begin to get a good understanding of the nature of the record these rocks contain. Their generally uniform thickness and repeated character suggests that deposition of fine sediment in this crater was episodic, if not cyclic. These rocks might be indicators of an ancient lake, or they might have been deposited from grains settling out of an earlier, thicker, martian atmosphere. This image covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across and is illuminated from the lower left.

  16. Writing Rock Music Reviews.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brown, Donal

    1980-01-01

    Suggests ways student reviewers of rock music groups can write better reviews. Among the suggestions made are that reviewers occasionally discuss the audience or what makes a particular group unique, support general comment with detail, and avoid ecstatic adjectives. (TJ)

  17. Rock in Its Elements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    MacCluskey, Thomas

    1969-01-01

    A discussion of the following musical elements of rock: rhythm, melody, harmony, and form. A impromptu analysis made at a session of the Youth Music Symposium, July 25, 1969. Remarks transcribed from tape. (Author/AP)

  18. Terby's Layered Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    14 March 2004 Layered rock outcrops are common all across Mars, and the Mars rover, Opportunity, has recently investigated some layered rocks in Meridiani Planum. This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows layered sedimentary rocks in northern Terby Crater, located just north of the giant Hellas Basin near 27.5oS, 285.8oW. Hundreds of layers are exposed in a deposit several kilometers thick within Terby. A history of events that shaped the northern Hellas region is recorded in these rocks, just waiting for a person or robot to investigate. The picture covers an area 3 km (1.9 mi) across. Sunlight illuminates the scene from the left.

  19. Focus on the Rock.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shewell, John

    1994-01-01

    Describes historical accounts of the manipulation and importance of the Earth and its mineral resources. A foldout, "Out of the Rock," provides a collection of activities and information that helps make integration of the aforementioned concepts easy. (ZWH)

  20. Rock Outcrop Spectra

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    The color image on the lower left shows a rock outcrop at Meridiani Planum, Mars. This image was taken by the panoramic camera on the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity, looking north, and was acquired on the 4th sol, or martian day, of the rover's mission (Jan. 27, 2004). The yellow box outlines an area detailed in the top left image, which is a monochrome (single filter) image from the rover's panoramic camera. The top image uses solid colors to show several regions on or near the rock outcrop from which spectra were extracted: the dark soil above the outcrop (yellow), the distant horizon surface (aqua), a bright rock in the outcrop (green), a darker rock in the outcrop (red), and a small dark cobblestone (blue). Spectra from these regions are shown in the plot to the right.

  1. East Candor Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    24 September 2004 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a thick, massive outcrop of light-toned rock exposed within eastern Candor Chasma, part of the vast Valles Marineris trough system. Dark, windblown sand has banked against the lower outcrop slopes. Outcrops such as this in the Valles Marineris chasms have been known since Mariner 9 images were obtained in 1972. However, the debate as to whether these represent sedimentary or igneous rocks has not been settled within the Mars science community. In either case, they have the physical properties of sedimentary rock (that is, they are formed of fine-grained materials), but some igneous rocks made up of volcanic ash may also exhibit these properties. This image is located near 7.8oS, 65.3oW, and covers an area approximately 3 km (1.9 mi) across. The scene is illuminated by sunlight from the lower left.

  2. Our World: Lunar Rock

    NASA Video Gallery

    Learn about NASA'€™s Lunar Sample Laboratory Facility at Johnson Space Center in Houston, Texas. See how NASA protects these precious moon rocks brought to Earth by the Apollo astronauts. Explore t...

  3. Number of Waste Package Hit by Igneous Intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    M. Wallace

    2004-10-13

    The purpose of this scientific analysis report is to document calculations of the number of waste packages that could be damaged in a potential future igneous event through a repository at Yucca Mountain. The analyses include disruption from an intrusive igneous event and from an extrusive volcanic event. This analysis supports the evaluation of the potential consequences of future igneous activity as part of the total system performance assessment for the license application (TSPA-LA) for the Yucca Mountain Project (YMP). Igneous activity is a disruptive event that is included in the TSPA-LA analyses. Two igneous activity scenarios are considered: (1) The igneous intrusion groundwater release scenario (also called the igneous intrusion scenario) considers the in situ damage to waste packages or failure of waste packages that occurs if they are engulfed or otherwise affected by magma as a result of an igneous intrusion. (2) The volcanic eruption scenario depicts the direct re