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Sample records for adakitic intrusive rocks

  1. Late Cretaceous (ca. 90 Ma) adakitic intrusive rocks in the Kelu area, Gangdese Belt (southern Tibet): Slab melting and implications for Cu-Au mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Zi-Qi; Wang, Qiang; Li, Zheng-Xiang; Wyman, Derek A.; Tang, Gong-Jian; Jia, Xiao-Hui; Yang, Yue-Heng

    2012-07-01

    The Gangdese Belt in southern Tibet (GBST) is a major Cu-Au-Mo mineralization zone that mostly formed after the India-Asia collision in association with the small-volume, though widespread, Miocene (18-10 Ma) adakitic porphyries. Cu-Au mineralization has scarcely been found in the regional Jurassic-Early Tertiary batholiths related to subduction of the Neo-Tethyan oceanic plate. Here, we report petrological, zircon geochronological and geochemical data for Late Cretaceous (˜90 Ma) intrusive rocks that contain Cu-Au mineralization from the Kelu area in the GBST. These rocks consist of quartz monzonites and diorites. The quartz monzonites, with SiO2 of 58-59 wt.% and Na2O/K2O of 1.1-1.2, are geochemically similar to slab-derived adakites characterized by apparent depletions in heavy rare earth elements (e.g., Yb = 1.4-1.5 ppm) and Y (16-18 ppm) contents, positive Sr but negative Nb and Ti anomalies on multi-element variation diagrams. They have relatively low (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7038-0.7039) ratios and high ɛNd(t) (+3.4 to +3.9) and in situ zircon ɛHf(t) (+9.3 to +15.8) values. The diorites exhibit high Mg-numbers (0.57-0.61) similar to those of magnesian andesites, and have (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7040-0.7041) and ɛNd(t) (+3.0 to +4.4) values similar to those of the quartz monzonites. We suggest that the quartz monzonitic magmas were most likely generated by partial melting of the subducted Neo-Tethyan basaltic oceanic crust and minor associated oceanic sediments, with subsequent melt-mantle interaction, and the dioritic magmas were mainly derived by the interaction between slab melts and mantle wedge peridotites, with fractionation of apatite and hornblende. These slab-derived adakitic magmas have high oxygen fugacity that may have facilitated Cu-Au mineralization. The close association of the Late Cretaceous adakitic intrusive rocks and Cu-Au mineralization in the Kelu area suggests that the arc magmatic rocks in the GBST may have higher potential than previously thought

  2. Origin of adakitic intrusives generated during mid-Miocene east-west extension in southern Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Z.-Q.; Gao, Y.-F.; Qu, X.-M.; Rui, Z.-Y.; Mo, X.-X.

    2004-03-01

    Adakite is an intermediate to felsic rock with low K, high Al, Na and Sr, and depleted in Y and HREE, usually occurring in arc settings related to subduction of an oceanic slab. Here we report the occurrence of potassic adakites from south Tibet in an orogenic belt produced by the Indo-Asian continent collision. These adakitic intrusives, as a product of Neogene east-west extension, occur in a Miocene Cu-bearing porphyry belt, which developed along the Gangdese arc paralleling the Yarlung-Zangbo suture, but is locally controlled by NS-striking normal faulting systems. Available age data define a duration of magmatism of 10-18 Ma for the adakitic intrusives and related extrusive analogues in south Tibet, which occur in a post-collisional extensional setting. Geochemical data indicate that these adakitic intrusives are shoshonitic and exhibit calc-alkaline composition with high K, and high Sr/Y and La/Y coupled with low Y and HREE, similar to adakites derived from slab melting. However, a wide range for ɛNd(t) (-6.18 to +5.52), initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.7049-0.7079), 207Pb/204Pb (15.502-15.626), and 208Pb/204Pb (38.389-38.960), as well as high K2O contents (2.6-8.6 wt%) and relatively high Mg# values (0.32-0.74) indicate that these adakitic magmas were formed by a complex mechanism involving partial melting of mafic materials in a thickened lower crust with input of enriched mantle and/or upper crust components. Absence of a negative Eu anomaly, extreme depletion in Y, Nb and Ti, and variable high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios suggest that the lower crustal source is probably a hydrous amphibole eclogite or garnet amphibolite, as exhumed in the western and eastern Himalayan syntaxes on the Tibetan plateau. Partial melting of the lower crust was most likely triggered by mantle-derived ultra-potassic magmatism (17-25 Ma) formed by slab breakoff or mantle thinning. During the formation and migration of pristine adakitic melts, additional input of ultra-potassic magmas and upper

  3. Magma storage and plumbing of adakite-type post-ophiolite intrusions in the Sabzevar ophiolitic zone, NE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi, K.; Ghasemi, H.; Troll, V. R.; Sadeghian, M.; Dahren, B.

    2014-08-01

    Subduction-related adakite-type intrusive rocks emplaced into the late Cretaceous-Paleocene Sabzevar ophiolite zone, NE Iran, range from Mg-andesite to rhyodacite in composition. Here we investigate the magma supply system to these subvolcanic intrusive rocks by applying thermobarometric mineral and mineral-melt equilibrium models, including amphibole thermobarometry, plagioclase-melt thermobarometry and clinopyroxene-melt barometry. Based on the results of these thermobarometric models, plagioclase crystallized dominantly at pressures of ~ 350 (468-130) MPa, while amphiboles record both low pressures (~ 300 MPa) and very high pressures (> 700 MPa) of crystallization. The latter is supported by the calculated pressures for clinopyroxene crystallization (550 to 730 MPa). The association of amphibole with clinopyroxene and no plagioclase in the most primitive samples (Mg-andesites) is consistent with amphibole fractionation from very hydrous magmas at deep crustal levels of the plumbing system, which may have been a key process to intensify adakite-type affinities in this rock suite. Barometry, combined with frequent disequilibrium features, such as oscillatory-zoned and sieve-textured plagioclase crystals with An-rich overgrowths in more evolved samples, imply final magma differentiation occurred in an open upper crustal magma system that developed progressively stronger compositional modifications during high-level magma storage.

  4. Magma storage and plumbing of adakite-type post-ophiolite intrusions in the Sabzevar ophiolitic zone, northeast Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jamshidi, K.; Ghasemi, H.; Troll, V. R.; Sadeghian, M.; Dahren, B.

    2015-01-01

    Subduction-related adakite-type intrusive rocks emplaced into the late Cretaceous-Paleocene Sabzevar ophiolite zone, northeast Iran, range from Mg-andesite to rhyodacite in composition. Here we investigate the magma supply system to these subvolcanic intrusive rocks by applying thermobarometric mineral and mineral-melt equilibrium models, including amphibole thermobarometry, plagioclase-melt thermobarometry and clinopyroxene-melt barometry. Based on the results of these thermobarometric models, plagioclase crystallized dominantly at pressures of ~350 (130 to 468) MPa, while amphiboles record both low pressures (~300 MPa) and very high pressures (>700 MPa) of crystallization. The latter is supported by the calculated pressures for clinopyroxene crystallization (550 to 730 MPa). The association of amphibole with clinopyroxene and no plagioclase in the most primitive samples (Mg-andesites) is consistent with amphibole fractionation from very hydrous magmas at deep crustal levels of the plumbing system, which may have been a key process in intensifying adakite-type affinities in this rock suite. Barometry, combined with frequent disequilibrium features such as oscillatory-zoned and sieve-textured plagioclase crystals with An-rich overgrowths in more evolved samples, implies that final magma differentiation occurred in an open upper crustal magma system that developed progressively stronger compositional modifications during high-level magma storage.

  5. Early Cretaceous continental delamination in the Yangtze Block: Evidence from high-Mg adakitic intrusions along the Tanlu fault, central Eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jia, Liqiong; Mo, Xuanxue; Santosh, M.; Yang, Zhusen; Yang, Dan; Dong, Guochen; Wang, Liang; Wang, Xinchun; Wu, Xuan

    2016-09-01

    Early Cretaceous high-Mg adakitic rocks from central Eastern China provide important insights into the thinning mechanism of the over-thickened lithosphere in the Yangtze Block (YB) as well as the North China Block (NCB). The Tanlu fault (TLF), located between the North China and Yangtze Blocks, and has been considered as a prominent pathway of magmas and fluids that resulted in lithosphere thinning of the YB during the Mesozoic-Cenozoic. Here we report the petrology, whole-rock geochemistry, zircon U-Pb geochronology, in situ Hf isotopes, and whole-rock Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes of four high-Mg adakitic intrusions along the TLF in northeastern Langdai. These adakitic intrusions consist of monzodiorite, quartz monzonite porphyry, and quartz monzodiorite. Zircon LA-MC-ICPMS analyses of five samples yield weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 127.58 ± 0.80, 126.90 ± 0.81, 120.71 ± 0.64, 122.75 ± 0.57, and 129.2 ± 1.1 Ma, indicating their emplacement during the Early Cretaceous. The intrusions have intermediate SiO2 (53.18-65.48 wt%) and high potassium (K2O = 3.07-3.95 wt%; Na2O/K2O = 1.02-1.26) and are classified as shoshonitic to high-K calc-alkaline series. They are characterized by high MgO (1.80-7.35 wt%), Mg# (50-65), Sr (591-1183 ppm), Ni (20.3-143.0 ppm), and Cr (51.40-390.0 ppm) contents, high (La/Yb)N (11.60-28.33) and Sr/Y (27.9-113.5) ratios, and low Y (7.79-22.4 ppm) and Yb (0.60-2.01 ppm) contents, comparable with high-Mg adakites. The samples are enriched in light rare earth elements but depleted in heavy rare earth elements and high field strength elements with slightly negative to positive Eu anomalies (δEu = 0.81-1.30), resembling the features of high-Mg adakitic rocks. Their whole-rock εNd(t) = -16.2 to -15.0, initial (87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7060-0.7074, low radiogenic Pb (206Pb/204Pb(t) = 16.208-16.509, 207Pb/204Pb(t) = 15.331-15.410, and 208Pb/204Pb(t) = 36.551-36.992), and zircon εHf(t) = -36.6 to -16.6 suggest magma derivation from a continental crustal

  6. Petrogenesis of Cretaceous adakite-like intrusions of the Gangdese Plutonic Belt, southern Tibet: Implications for mid-ocean ridge subduction and crustal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Yuan-chuan; Hou, Zeng-qian; Gong, Ying-li; Liang, Wei; Sun, Qing-Zhong; Zhang, Song; Fu, Qiang; Huang, Ke-Xian; Li, Qiu-Yun; Li, Wei

    2014-03-01

    least 70% of the magma source region was juvenile materials. Combined with the presence of HT (high temperature) charnockitic magmatism, HT granulite facies metamorphism, and large volumes of Late Cretaceous batholiths, the oceanic-slab-derived Nuri adakitic rocks indicate a substantial high heat flux in the Gangdese batholith belt during the Late Cretaceous, which may have been related to subduction of a Neo-Tethyan mid-ocean ridge system. According to this model, hot asthenosphere would rise up through the corresponding slab window, and come into direct contact with both the oceanic slab and the base of the overlying plate. This would cause melting of both the oceanic slab and the overlying plate by the addition of heat that was ultimately linked with peak magmatism and the significant growth and chemical differentiation of juvenile crust in southern Tibet during the Late Cretaceous (105-76 Ma). In addition, the petrogenesis of the Langxian adakite-like two-mica granite indicates that the southern Tibetan crust was still of normal thickness prior to the emplacement of these intrusions at ca. 76 Ma. This probably means that large parts of southern Tibet were not very highly elevated prior to the Indian-Asian collision.

  7. Petrogenesis and tectonic significance of the Eocene adakite-like rocks in western Yunnan, southeastern Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Huixia; Hou, Qingye; Zhang, Zeming

    2016-02-01

    Eocene magmatic rocks are widespread in western Yunnan, southeastern Tibetan Plateau. However, their petrogenesis and tectonic significance remain controversial. In this paper, we report geochemical and geochronological data of adakite-like rocks from the eastern part of western Yunnan. Zircon U-Pb dating reveals that they were emplaced at ca. 35 Ma. A geochemical study shows that these rocks have high SiO2 (68.97-72.44 wt.%), K2O (4.35-5.87 wt.%) and low MgO (0.61-1.16 wt.%), Y (6.65-12.6 ppm) and Yb (0.58-1.02 ppm) contents as well as high Sr/Y (74-228) and La/Yb (59-131) values, belonging to high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic adakite-like rocks. These rocks have high (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.70623-0.70653), low εNd(t) (- 4.5 to - 7.5) and slightly low radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions with (206Pb/204Pb)i = 18.042-18.179. Zircons of these rocks show εHf(t) values ranging from - 6.3 to + 1.2 and model ages (TDM2) of 1513-1035 Ma. The geochemical characteristics indicate that the Eocene adakite-like rocks from the eastern part of western Yunnan were derived from the partial melting of Neoproterozoic mafic rocks underplated in the lower crust of the western margin of the Yangtze Plate with input of mantle-derived potassic-ultrapotassic melt. Integration of published geochemical data clearly shows that zircon εHf(t) and whole-rock εNd(t) values of Eocene adakite-like rocks from the whole western Yunnan exhibit a trend of westward increase. We infer that the adakite-like rocks from the western part of western Yunnan were derived from the partial melting of late Paleozoic-Mesozoic mafic rocks formed as the lower crust of a continental magmatic arc during eastward subduction of the Paleo-Tethyan Ocean, and the Eocene magmatic rocks in western Yunnan were generated during the removal of thickened continental lithosphere triggered by the India and Asia collision.

  8. Evidence From Adakitic Rocks For Lithosphere Recycling At The U.S. East Coast Volcanic Rifted Margin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meyer, R.; Van Wijk, J. W.

    2014-12-01

    Magmatism at magmatic rifted margins is dominated by asthenospheric melts generated during decompression melting from the upwelling asthenosphere. However reported magma compositions are diverse, giving clues about additional processes during rifting and continental rupture. We report here on adakites from the U.S. East Coast that are related to breakup of the North Atlantic. The sampled adakites are bi-modal, and show a clear high-Si and low-Si major and trace element chemistry. During the closure of the proto-Atlantic and its related back-arc basins, the Appalachian lithosphere sampled an ophiolitic mélange within major sutures. Subsequent metamorphic events in the Blue Ridge province of the U.S. East Coast increased the rock density of the ophiolites (eclogite) and partly hydrated these mafic to ultramafic rocks. Such a preconditioned lithosphere will likely develop gravitational instabilities at the asthenosphere-lithosphere boundary during rifting. We use geodynamic models to show when gravitational instabilities form below the East Coast margin, and how they eventually delaminate mantle lithosphere and lower crust material. After foundering, the delaminated lithosphere undergoes metamorphism, heats up, and interacts with fluids and melts in the surrounding convecting mantle. Partial melting of this metamorphic lithology produces high-Si adakitic melts. These melts percolated upwards through the mantle and were partially injected into the Valley and Ridge province. Where melt-to-peridotite (asthenosphere) ratios were small, the melts and fluids leaving the sinking lithospheric block became fixed within the peridotites. Geochemical modeling suggests, that 5 to 10% melting degrees of such a metasomatically overprinted and fertile asthenosphere produced the low-Si adakitic rocks of the Virginia adakites.

  9. The Cretaceous Duimiangou adakite-like intrusion from the Chifeng region, northern North China Craton: Crustal contamination of basaltic magma in an intracontinental extensional environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fu, Lebing; Wei, Junhao; Kusky, Timothy M.; Chen, Huayong; Tan, Jun; Li, Yanjun; Shi, Wenjie; Chen, Chong; Zhao, Shaoqing

    2012-03-01

    Zircon U-Pb ages, major and trace element and Sr, Nd and Pb isotope compositions of the Duimiangou (DMG) quartz monzonite from the Chifeng region on the northern North China Craton (NCC) were studied to investigate its derivation, evolution and geodynamic significance. Laser ablation inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) zircon U-Pb dating yields an emplacement age of 128 ± 1 Ma for this intrusion, with numerous Mesozoic inherited zircons clustering at 219 ± 12 Ma and 161 ± 3 Ma, along with some ancient zircons with ages of 2.5 Ga, 1.77 Ga and 324 Ma. Bulk-rock analyses show that this intrusion is characterized by variable SiO2 (63.4-69.4 wt.%), Al2O3 (14.5-16.3 wt.%), Na2O + K2O (8.01-8.95 wt.%), and Mg# (41.3-48.0). They are enriched in large ion lithophile elements and light rare earth elements without significant Eu anomalies (mostly between 0.89-1.10), and depleted in heavy rare earth elements and high field strength elements, with high Sr/Y (63.7-101.7) and (La/Yb)N (20.5-31.0) ratios. The DMG intrusion formed in an intracontinental extensional setting contemporaneous with the formation of pull-apart basins, metamorphic core complexes and intense magmatism, rather than in a convergent margin. It has homogeneous Sr ((87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7059-0.7066), Nd (εNd(t) = - 6.2 to - 7.2) and Pb ((206Pb/204Pb)i = 17.289-17.375, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.359-15.463, (208Pb/204Pb)i = 37.130-37.472) isotope compositions. Sr-Nd isotope modeling results, plus relatively young Nd model ages (1522-1618 Ma) and the presence of relict zircons, suggest that this intrusion could have originated from crustal contamination of newly formed basaltic melts derived from asthenospheric mantle, accompanied by fractional crystallization of K-feldspar, biotite, apatite, Fe-Ti oxides and minor hornblende and plagioclase. Thus, the DMG adakite-like intrusion may record the magmatic event associated with underplating of asthenospheric magma in an intracontinental extensional

  10. Geochronological and geochemical constraints on genesis of the adakitic rocks in Outang, South Tan-Lu Fault Belt (Northeastern Yangtze Block)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Zilong; Yang, Xiaoyong; Duan, Liuan; Sun, Weidong

    2014-06-01

    The Outang intrusion was newly found near the South Tan-Lu fault belt (STLF) of the northeastern margin of Yangtze block due to the excavating construction of the Beijing-Shanghai high-speed railway. Observations show that lithology of the Outang intrusion is intermediate rock series, mainly composed of monzodiorite and quartz monzonite. Major and trace elements, zircon U-Pb dating and Hf isotope were analyzed. Two ages of 124.6 ± 2.9 Ma (MSWD = 0.60, n = 29) and 129.2 ± 4.1 Ma (MSWD = 1.5, n = 21) are obtained, showing that the regional igneous activity was in early Cretaceous, being consistent with the massive Yanshanian magmatic events in Eastern China. The quartz monzonite was identified as a high-Mg adakitic rocks, showing geochemical features of high Si, high K, and low Sr, which indicates that the igneous genesis may be results of partial melting of the delaminated lower crust. The negative εHf(t) values with much older tDM2 ages indicate that the original magma may derive from remelting of ancient continental crust. A tectonic model has been proposed to account for the massive subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath eastern China in Jurassic with effect of delamination and thinning, from which we conjecture that the Archean materials could compose the basement of the STLF caused by massive subduction of the Pacific Plate beneath the eastern China continent.

  11. Contrasting zircon Hf-O isotopes and trace elements between ore-bearing and ore-barren adakitic rocks in central-eastern China: Implications for genetic relation to Cu-Au mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Fangyue; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Li, Shuguang; He, Yongsheng

    2013-01-01

    The petrogenesis of Early Cretaceous adakitic intrusions in the Lower Yangtze River belt (LYRB), central-eastern China, and their genetic association with Cu-Au mineralization have recently been debated. This study presented integrated in-situ zircon U-Pb-Hf-O isotopic and trace elemental data for the LYRB adakites, and a comparison with ore-barren adakites from the south Tan-Lu fault (STLF) adjacent to the LYRB. Magmatic zircons from these two series of intrusions have U-Pb ages of 145-132 Ma and 136-132 Ma respectively. The STLF zircons have δ18O ranging from 5.6 to 6.7‰ and ɛHf(t) from - 28.8 to - 16.4, plotted within the range of global lower crustal metabasaltic xenoliths, consistent with low-radiogenic Pb of the host adakitic rocks. In contrast, both Hf and O isotopic compositions of zircons from the LYRB are greatly variable with heavier δ18O (4.7 to 9.6‰) and higher ɛHf(t) values (- 25.5 to + 2.0) compared with the STLF series. The co-variations of Hf-O isotopes in the LYRB series reflect source heterogeneity as a result of mixing of basaltic oceanic crust with sediments (10-20%), consistent with high-radiogenic Pb and enriched Sr-Nd isotopic compositions of the host adakites. The high La, U and low Ti concentrations in the LYRB zircons also imply a volatile (perhaps, CO32 --rich, carbonatite-like) source. Combined with whole-rock geochemical data, the new results further suggest contrasting origins of the LYRB and STLF adakites from subducted oceanic crust and foundering lower continental crust, respectively. The LYRB zircons have much higher ratios of Ce4 +/Ce3 + (avg.417) and Eu/Eu* (avg. 0.67) than the STLF zircons (avg. 84 and 0.44). This difference confirms that the ore-bearing adakitic magmas are more oxidized relative to the ore-barren ones. There is roughly a positive correlation between zircon Ce4 +/Ce3 + and δ18O in the LYRB series, probably indicating that the elevated fO2 was related to components enriched in heavy oxygen isotopes. A

  12. High-Mg adakitic rocks and their complementary cumulates formed by crystal fractionation of hydrous mafic magmas in a continental crustal magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Qiang; Xu, Yi-Gang; Zheng, Jian-Ping; Sun, Min; Griffin, William L.; Wei, Ying; Ma, Liang; Yu, Xiaolu

    2016-09-01

    Understanding how adakitic magmas form is important for understanding the formation of the continental crust. Generating such high-Sr/Y rocks by crystal fractionation of basalts/basaltic andesites in magma chambers has been proposed in a wide range of tectonic settings. However, the complementary cumulates predicted by this scenario have rarely been observed. The late Triassic (~ 227 Ma) Ningcheng complex from the North China Craton is composed of a websterite - (Ol -/Hbl-) pyroxenite - gabbro unit and a quartz-diorite unit. They are interpreted as the products (cumulates and derivative melts, respectively) of fractionation from hydrous mafic magmas at mid- to lower-crustal pressures (4.9 ~ 8.3 kbar). The quartz diorites are high-Mg intermediate rocks with moderate SiO2 (57.0 ~ 62.9 wt%), high Mg# (> 49) and adakitic trace element signatures, such as high Sr (≥ 636 ppm) and light rare earth elements (REEs), low Y (≤ 17 ppm) and heavy REEs (Yb ≤ 1.8 ppm), lack of obvious Eu anomalies, and high Sr/Y (≥ 31) and La/Yb (≥ 24)). These adakitic signatures reflect differentiation of hydrous mantle-derived magmas in the deep crust, leaving behind a plagioclase-free residual solid assemblage in the early stages, which is represented by the coeval websterite-pyroxenite complex. This study therefore not only demonstrates that hydrous crystal fractionation is an important mechanism to form adakitic rocks, but also presents an example of a preserved fractionating system, i.e. high-Sr/Y rocks and their complementary cumulates. A geochemical comparison is made between representative adakitic rocks formed by fractionation of hydrous magmas and Archean TTGs. It is suggested that crystal fractionation is an efficient process for making Phanerozoic high Sr/Y rocks but was not responsible for the formation of Archean granitoids.

  13. Early Cretaceous low-Mg# adakitic rocks in the southern margin of the central North China Craton: Partial melting of thickened lower continental crust and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, D.

    2015-12-01

    This paper reports new whole-rock geochemical, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopic, and zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic data for Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the Sanmenxia-Houma area of central China, and uses these data to constrain the petrogenesis of low-Mg adakitic rocks (LMAR) and the spatial extent of the influence of the deeply subducted Yangtze slab during the Triassic evolution of this region. New zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb data indicate that the early- and late-stage southern Quli, Qiligou, and Gaomiao porphyritic quartz diorites, the Canfang granodiorite, and the northern Wangmao porphyritic quartz monzodiorite were emplaced during the Early Cretaceous (~130 Ma) and the late Early Cretaceous (116 Ma). These rocks are characterized by high Na2O/K2O, Sr/Y, and (La/Yb)n ratios as well as high Sr concentrations, low Mg# values, and low heavy rare earth element and Y concentrations, all of which indicate an LMAR affinity. The samples have relatively high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7054-0.7095), and low eNd(t) (-11.90 to -22.20) and eHf(t) (-16.7 to -32.7) values, indicative of a lower continental crust origin. The presence of Neoproterozoic (754-542 Ma) and inherited Late Triassic (220 Ma) metamorphic zircons within the late Early Cretaceous LMAR and the relatively high 206Pb/204Pb ratios of these rocks suggest that they formed from primary magmas derived from partial melting of Yangtze Craton (YC) basement material that had undergone ultrahigh-pressure metamorphism. In contrast, the presence of Paleoproterozoic and Archean inherited zircons within early Early Cretaceous LMAR in this area and the relatively low 206Pb/204Pb ratios of these rocks are indicative of derivation from primary magmas generated by partial melting of the thickened lower continental crust of the North China Craton (NCC). These rocks may have formed in an extensional environment associated with the upwelling of asthenospheric mantle material. The presence of YC basement material within the NCC in the

  14. Timing and genesis of the adakitic and shoshonitic intrusions in the Laoniushan complex, southern margin of the North China Craton: Implications for post-collisional magmatism associated with the Qinling Orogen

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Li-Xue; Ma, Chang-Qian; Li, Jian-Wei; Robinson, Paul T.; Deng, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Chao; Xu, Wang-Chun

    2011-10-01

    The NWW-striking Qinling Orogen formed in the Triassic by collision between the North China and Yangtze Cratons. Triassic granitoid intrusions, mostly middle- to high-K, calc-alkaline, are widespread in this orogen, but contemporaneous intrusions are rare in the southern margin of the North China Craton, an area commonly considered as the hinterland belt of the orogen. In this paper, we report zircon U-Pb ages, elemental geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Hf isotope data for the Laoniushan granitoid complex that was emplaced in the southern margin of the North China Craton. Zircon U-Pb dating shows that the complex was emplaced in the late Triassic (228 ± 1 to 215 ± 4 Ma), indicating that it is part of the post-collisional magmatism in the Qinling Orogen. The complex consists of, from early to late, biotite monzogranite, quartz diorite, quartz monzonite, and hornblende monzonite, which span a wide compositional range, e.g., SiO 2 = 55.9-70.6 wt.%, K 2O + Na 2O = 6.6-10.2 wt.%, and Mg # of 24 to 54. The biotite monzogranite has high Al 2O 3 (15.5-17.4 wt.%), Sr (396-1398 ppm) and Ba (1284-3993 ppm) contents and relatively high La/Yb (mostly 14-30) and Sr/Y (mostly 40-97) ratios, but low Yb (mostly 1.3-1.6 ppm) and Y (mostly14-19 ppm) contents, features typical of adakitic rocks. The quartz monzonite, hornblende monzonite and quartz diorite have a shoshonitic affinity, with K 2O up to 5.58 wt.% and K 2O/Na 2O ratios averaging 1.4. The rocks are characterized by strong LREE/HREE fractionation in chondrite-normalized REE pattern, without obvious Eu anomalies, and show enrichment in large ion lithophile elements but depletion in high field strength elements (Nb, Ta, Ti). The biotite monzogranite (228 Ma) has initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios of 0.7061 to 0.7067, ɛNd(t) values of - 9.2 to - 12.6, and ɛ Hf(t) values of - 9.0 to - 15.1; whereas the shoshonitic granitoids (mainly 217-215 Ma) have similar initial 87Sr/ 86Sr ratios (0.7065 to 0.7075) but more radiogenic ɛNd(t) (- 12.4 to

  15. The relationship between adakitic, calc-alkaline volcanic rocks and TTGs: implications for the tectonic setting of the Karelian greenstone belts, Baltic Shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samsonov, A. V.; Bogina, M. M.; Bibikova, E. V.; Petrova, A. Yu.; Shchipansky, A. A.

    2005-01-01

    Two types of coeval acid-intermediate rocks with different petrological, geochemical and isotopic features have been discovered among volcanic rocks and surrounding synkinematic tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) plutons of Late Archaean greenstone belts in the Karelian granite-greenstone terrane. Type-1 rocks comprise trondhjemites and sub-volcanic, occasionally volcanic dacite-rhyolite rocks. They are characterized by high Sr, low Y and HREE contents, high Sr/Y ratios, and strongly fractionated REE patterns with no significant positive or negative Eu anomaly. Initial ɛNd is positive, indicating a generation from juvenile source with little or no contribution of ancient continental crust. Type 2 is represented by diorite-granodiorites and calc-alkaline basalt-andesite-dacite-rhyolite (BADR) series. As compared to type 1, these rocks differ by their lower Sr, higher Y and HREE contents, lower Sr/Y ratios and less fractionated HREE patterns with negative Eu anomalies. Initial ɛNd varies from negative to positive values, thus indicating a variable contribution of sialic crust. Geochemistry of the two magmatic series suggests their formation in a convergent plate margin setting. The type-1 rocks resemble Phanerozoic adakites, which represent slab-derived melts contaminated by overlying mantle wedge. The type-2 rocks resemble BADR series, which were derived from a mantle wedge metasomatized by slab-derived fluids and melts, with subsequent variable crustal contamination. The spatial distribution of these two types of magmatic series defines the asymmetry of the studied granite-greenstone structures, which presumably reflects the primary lateral zoning of island arc formed under specific thermal conditions in the Archaean mantle. Adakite melts upraised to the surface in the frontal part of the island arc, where mantle wedge was thin, showing no or little interaction with metasomatized mantle, and formed adakite-type plutonic and sub-volcanic rocks. At greater

  16. Adakite-like geochemical signature produced by amphibole-dominated fractionation of arc magmas: An example from the Late Cretaceous magmatism in Gangdese belt, south Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Wang-Chun; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Luo, Bi-ji; Guo, Liang; Yang, He

    2015-09-01

    Late Cretaceous (~ 106-76 Ma) adakite-like intrusive rocks in the middle-eastern Gangdese belt occur in an E-W trending belt paralleling the Indus-Yarlung suture, south Tibet. Their petrogenesis and geodynamic processes have been a subject of debate. We report here U-Pb zircon ages, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data for adakite-like intrusive rocks as well as the normal arc rocks (gabbros and gabbroic diorites) in the middle Gangdese belt. LA-ICPMS U-Pb zircon analyses yielded an identical age of ~ 88 Ma for two adakite-like rocks, which are slightly younger than the gabbro and gabbroic diorite (ca. 94-90 Ma). Both the adakite-like rocks and the normal arc rocks have similar whole-rock Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotope compositions, indicating that they have been derived from a common source. Similarly, the adakite-like and normal arc intrusive rocks in the eastern Gangdese belt also show similar Sr-Nd-Hf isotope compositions. In the middle-eastern Gangdese belt, the > 85 Ma Late Cretaceous intrusive rocks consist of a magma series from gabbro to granodiorite, including both normal arc rocks and adakite-like rocks. These rocks overlap in space and time that conform to a normal arc differentiation trend. In terms of major and trace elements, they also show a clear evolution from the normal arc magmatic into adakitic field. Thus, we suggest that these > 85 Ma Late Cretaceous intrusive rocks were ultimately derived from melting of the hydrated mantle wedge and the adakite-like rocks can be generated in normal arc magmas by amphibole-dominated fractionation. Taking into accounting for the spatial and temporal distribution of the Cretaceous magmatic rocks in the Lhasa terrane, we prefer a model of early Late Cretaceous rollback following Early Cretaceous low-angle oceanic slab subduction. At intermediate pressure and H2O-rich conditions, fractionation of amphibole changes the major and trace element compositions of arc magmas, and will efficiently drives basaltic

  17. Intrusive Rock Database for the Digital Geologic Map of Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nutt, C.J.; Ludington, Steve

    2003-01-01

    Digital geologic maps offer the promise of rapid and powerful answers to geologic questions using Geographic Information System software (GIS). Using modern GIS and database methods, a specialized derivative map can be easily prepared. An important limitation can be shortcomings in the information provided in the database associated with the digital map, a database which is often based on the legend of the original map. The purpose of this report is to show how the compilation of additional information can, when prepared as a database that can be used with the digital map, be used to create some types of derivative maps that are not possible with the original digital map and database. This Open-file Report consists of computer files with information about intrusive rocks in Utah that can be linked to the Digital Geologic Map of Utah (Hintze et al., 2000), an explanation of how to link the databases and map, and a list of references for the databases. The digital map, which represents the 1:500,000-scale Geologic Map of Utah (Hintze, 1980), can be obtained from the Utah Geological Survey (Map 179DM). Each polygon in the map has a unique identification number. We selected the polygons identified on the geologic map as intrusive rock, and constructed a database (UT_PLUT.xls) that classifies the polygons into plutonic map units (see tables). These plutonic map units are the key information that is used to relate the compiled information to the polygons on the map. The map includes a few polygons that were coded as intrusive on the state map but are largely volcanic rock; in these cases we note the volcanic rock names (rhyolite and latite) as used in the original sources Some polygons identified on the digital state map as intrusive rock were misidentified; these polygons are noted in a separate table of the database, along with some information about their true character. Fields may be empty because of lack of information from references used or difficulty in finding

  18. Early Carboniferous adakitic rocks in the area of the Tuwu deposit, eastern Tianshan, NW China: Slab melting and implications for porphyry copper mineralization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yin-Hong; Xue, Chun-Ji; Liu, Jia-Jun; Wang, Jian-Ping; Yang, Jun-Tao; Zhang, Fang-Fang; Zhao, Ze-Nan; Zhao, Yun-Jiang; Liu, Bin

    2015-05-01

    Existing geochronological and geochemical data for the Early Carboniferous magmatic rocks in the eastern Tianshan, Xinjiang, have been interpreted in a variety of theories regarding petrogenesis and geodynamic setting. The proposed settings include rift, back-arc basin, passive continental margin, island arc, ridge subduction, and post-collisional environment. To evaluate these possibilities, we present new SHRIMP zircon U-Pb geochronology and geochemical data, whole-rock geochemical, Hf isotope, and S isotope data for tonalitic rocks and ores associated with the Tuwu porphyry copper deposit located in the center of the late Paleozoic Dananhu-Tousuquan arc, eastern Tianshan. SHRIMP zircon U-Pb dating indicates that the magmatic activity and thus associated copper mineralization occurred ca.332 Ma. The tonalitic rocks are calc-alkaline granites with A/CNK values ranging from 1.16 to 1.58; are enriched in K, Rb, Sr, and Ba; and are markedly depleted in Nb, Ta, Ti, and Th. They show geochemical affinities similar to adakites, with high Sr, Al2O3, and Na2O contents and La/Yb ratios; low Y and Yb contents; and slight positive Eu anomalies. In situ Hf isotopic analyses of zircons yielded positive initial εHf(t) values ranging from 6.9 to 17.2. The δ34S values of the ore sulfides range from -3.0‰ to +1.7‰, reflecting a deep sulfur source. Our results indicate that the paleo-Tianshan oceanic slab was being simultaneously subducted northward beneath the Dananhu-Tousuquan arc, and southward beneath the Aqishan-Yamansu arc during the Early Carboniferous. The Tuwu adakitic tonalitic rocks were derived from the partial melting of the subducted paleo-Tianshan oceanic slab, which was subsequently hybridized by mantle wedge peridotites. The slab-derived magmas have considerably high copper contents and are highly oxidized, thus leading to porphyry copper mineralization. Such Early Carboniferous tonalitic rocks that are widespread in the eastern Tianshan define a province

  19. Crustal processes cause adakitic chemical signatures in syn-collision magmatism from SE Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, Mark; Kheirkhah, Monireh; Neill, Iain

    2015-04-01

    We report new elemental and Nd-Sr isotopic analyses for Late Cenozoic intrusive and extrusive rocks emplaced in SE Iran as part of the wider syn-collision magmatic province within the Turkish-Iranian Plateau. The sample sites are near the town of Dehaj in Kerman Province. Most of the rocks are from stocks and batholiths, interpreted as the roots of central volcanoes. Age controls are not precise, but the rocks are likely to be Late Miocene-Quaternary in age. Basaltic to andesitic lavas crop out nearby; their relationships to the intrusive rocks are uncertain. Geochemically, the entire range of rocks from basalt lavas through to rhyolitic intrusives ranges from 51-71 wt.% silica and isotopic signatures are similar to Bulk Earth, without any clear evidence for large-scale crustal contamination. The basaltic to andesitic lavas appear to have variable and often high La/Yb and Sr/Y such that they range from calc-alkaline arc-like rocks to adakitic compositions depending on the degree of fractionation. The intrusive rocks seem to form a separate suite, with clear indications of increasing Sr/Y and Dy/Yb with fractionation. Previous interpretations relate adakitic magmatism to Tethyan oceanic slab break-off and slab melting beneath the collision zone. However, as the 'adakitic signature' is increasingly apparent in more evolved magmas, at least in the intrusives, adakite generation is more likely to have occurred during melt evolution from an initial low Sr/Y and low La/Yb parent. This parental melt may have been similar in starting composition to proposed non-adakitic basaltic melts from elsewhere in the collision zone. The high Sr/Yb and La/Yb signatures are best explained by the suppression of plagioclase fractionation by high magmatic water contents, promoting incompatible behaviour of Sr. Conversely, Y and Yb are compatible during amphibole and garnet fractionation at crustal or uppermost mantle levels. Rather than a localised slab break-off or melting effect, the

  20. Dykes, cups, saucers and sills: Analogue experiments on magma intrusion into brittle rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, L.; van Wyk de Vries, B.; Holohan, Eoghan P.; Troll, Valentin R.

    2008-07-01

    Magma is transported in the crust by blade-like intrusions such as dykes, sills, saucers, and also collects in thicker laccoliths, lopoliths and plutons. Recently, the importance and great number of shallow (< 5 km) saucer-shaped intrusions has been recognized. Lopoliths and cup-shaped intrusions have also been reported in many geological contexts. Our field observations indicate that many intrusions, especially those emplaced into breccias or fractured rocks, have bulging, lobate margins and have shear faults at their bulbous terminations. Such features suggest that magma can propagate along a self-induced shear fault rather than a hydraulic tension-fracture. To investigate this we use analogue models to explore intrusion propagation in a brittle country rock. The models consist of the injection of analogue magma (honey or Golden syrup) in a granular material (sand or sieved ignimbrite) that is a good analogue for brittle or brecciated rocks. These models have the advantage (over other models that use gelatin) to well represent the properties of brittle materials by allowing both shear-faults and tension fractures to be produced at suitable stresses. In our experiments we mainly obtain vertical dykes and inverted-cone like structures that we call cup-shaped intrusions. Dykes bifurcate into cup-shaped intrusions at depths depending on their viscosity. All cup-shaped intrusions uplift a central block. By injecting against a vertical glass plate we obtain detailed observations of the intrusion propagation style. We observe that dykes commonly split and produce cup-shaped intrusions near the surface and that shear zone-related intrusions develop at the dyke tip. We conclude that many dykes propagate as a viscous indenter resulting from shear failure of host rock rather than tensional hydraulic fracturing of host rocks. The shear propagation model provides an explanation for the shape and formation of cup-shaped intrusions, saucer-sills and lopoliths.

  1. The calc-alkaline and adakitic volcanism of the Sabzevar structural zone (NE Iran): Implications for the Eocene magmatic flare-up in Central Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moghadam, Hadi Shafaii; Rossetti, Federico; Lucci, Federico; Chiaradia, Massimo; Gerdes, Axel; Martinez, Margarita Lopez; Ghorbani, Ghasem; Nasrabady, Mohsen

    2016-04-01

    A major magmatic flare-up is documented along the Bitlis-Zagros suture zone in Eocene-Oligocene times. The Cenozoic magmatism of intraplate Central Iran is an integrant part of this tectono-magmatic scenario. The Cenozoic magmatism of the Sabzevar structural zone consists of mostly intermediate to felsic intrusions and volcanic products. These igneous rocks have calc-alkaline and adakitic geochemical signatures, with nearly coincident zircon U-Pb and mica Ar-Ar ages of ca. 45 Ma. Adakitic rocks have quite low HREE and high Sr/Y ratio, but share most of their geochemical features with the calc-alkaline rocks. The Sabzevar volcanic rocks have similar initial Sr, Nd and Pb isotope ratios, showing their cogenetic nature. Nd model ages cluster tightly around ~ 0.2-0.3 Ga. The geochemistry of the Sabzevar volcanic rocks, along with their isotopic signatures, might strangle that an upper mantle source, metasomatized by slab-derived melts was involved in generating the Sabzevar calc-alkaline rocks. A bulk rock trace element modeling suggests that amphibole-plagioclase-titanite-dominated replenishment-fractional crystallization (RFC) is further responsible for the formation of the middle Eocene Sabzevar adakitic rocks. Extensional tectonics accompanied by lithospheric delamination, possibly assisted by slab break-off and melting at depth was responsible for the Eocene formation of the Sabzevar magmatic rocks and, more in general, for the magmatic "flare-up" in Iran.

  2. Trace element geochemistry of the 1991 Mt. Pinatubo silicic melts, Philippines: Implications for ore-forming potential of adakitic magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Anastassia Yu.; Pichavant, Michel; Polvé, Mireille; Wiedenbeck, Michael; Freydier, Remi; Candaudap, Frédéric

    2006-07-01

    The dacite pumice erupted from Mt. Pinatubo on June 15, 1991 (whole-rock, rhyolitic groundmass glasses and homogenized melt inclusions) has been analyzed using inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS), nanosecond and femtosecond laser ablation ICP-MS and secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) to evaluate its ore-forming potential. Data suggest that adakite magmas are metal-rich and concentrate ore metals during magmatic differentiation. Sulfides segregate in limited amounts under the hydrous, oxidizing conditions typical of adakitic magmas resulting in incompatible behavior for Au (6-22 ppb), Cu (26-77 ppm), and Pb, Mo, As, and Sb in melts of dacitic to rhyolitic compositions. Metal transfer from this adakite magma to the coexisting aqueous phase was favored by the peraluminous composition of the rhyolitic melt and high aqueous chloride concentrations. Mass balance calculations suggest that the pre-eruptive aqueous phase could have extracted a minimum of 100 t Au and 5 × 10 5 t Cu from the Mt. Pinatubo magma. Our data suggest that intrusives having adakitic signatures are genetically associated with Au-Cu and Cu-Mo mineralization, auriferous porphyry copper deposits, and epithermal gold veins. High H 2O, Cl, Sr/Y, Pb/Ce, Mo/Ce, As/Ce and Sb/Ce in Mt. Pinatubo melts reflect the contribution of deep fluids derived from subducted sediments and altered MORBs in the dacite genesis. The slab-derived fluids carrying mobile elements are likely responsible for the enrichment of adakite magmas in gold, associated metals and H 2O, and may explain the exceptional ore-forming potential of adakite magmatism.

  3. Early Silurian (~ 440 Ma) adakites and high-Nb basaltic rocks in the southern Altay Range (Northern Xinjiang): Slab melting and implications for crustal growth in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, X.; Zhang, H.; Wang, Q.; Ma, L.

    2012-12-01

    As an important part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), the Altay Range contain large-scale Paleozoic magmatic rocks. However, owing to lack of precise age constraints, the tectonic setting and petrogenesis of the magmatic rocks in this area have been controversial, which cause the debate on Phanerozoic crustal growth mechanism and accretionary orogenic processes in CAOB. Here we report geochronological and geochemical data of the Suoerkuduke adakites and associated high-Nb basaltic rocks in the southern margin of the southern Altay Range. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb isotopic data for five adakite and high-Nb basaltic rock samples indicate that they were generated in the Early Silurian (~ 440 Ma). The adakites are geochemically characterized by high Na2O/K2O (1.3 to 16.7), Sr/Y (21 to 117), Al2O3 (13.0 to 18.3 wt.%), Sr (405 to 1813 ppm), ɛNd(t) (+3.6 to +6.5) and zircon ɛHf(t) (+10.8 to +18.9) values and relatively low (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios (0.7046 to 0.7049). The high-Nb basaltic rocks are sodium-rich (Na2O/K2O = 1.5-5.5) and have higher TiO2 (2.99 to 3.49 wt.%), P2O5 (1.09 to 1.56 wt.%), Zr (335 to 431 ppm), Nb (17.7 to 20.9 ppm), and Nb/U (11.7 to 30.2) values than those of typical arc basalts. They also have positive ɛNd(t) values (+5.4 to +8.4) and positive and variable zircon ɛHf(t) values (+0.71 - +16.9). We suggest that the Suoerkuduke adakites were derived by partial melting of subducted oceanic crust with minor overlying sediments, and the high-Nb basaltic rocks were possibly generated by partial melting of mantle wedge peridotite metasomatized by slab-derived adakitic melts and minor fluids. In combination with the occurrence of voluminous Silurian-Devonian granitoids, coeval ophiolite mélanges, and a series of intra-arc basins, a slab window model triggered by slab tearing or breakoff is proposed to interpret the formation of the Suoerkuduke adakite and high-Nb basaltic rock suites. The upwelling of asthenospheric mantle through the slab window

  4. The formation of Qulong adakites and their relationship with porphyry copper deposit: Geochemical constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Yong-bin; Liu, Ji-qiang; Ling, Ming-xing; Ding, Wei; Liu, Yan; Zartman, Robert E.; Ma, Xiu-feng; Liu, Dun-yi; Zhang, Chan-chan; Sun, Sai-jun; Zhang, Li-peng; Wu, Kai; Sun, Wei-dong

    2015-04-01

    Qulong porphyry Cu deposit is the largest Cu deposit in China so far discovered, with total reserves of 10.6 Mt Cu@0.5% and 0.5 Mt Mo@0.03%. The petrogenesis of the Miocene intrusion and its genetic association with Cu mineralization have been debated. This study presents new results on whole rock major and trace elements, Sr-Nd isotopes, zircon U-Pb dating, Hf-O isotopic compositions of the Qulong ore-bearing and barren adakites. All the Qulong adakites studied here have low MgO (< 2 wt.%), high K2O (between 2 wt.% and 6 wt.%), with K2O/Na2O ratios ranging from 0.2-2.0. The SiO2 contents are mostly higher than 64 wt.%. These are dramatically different from ore-forming adakites in the circum-Pacific region and other places in general. Ore-bearing adakites have systematically higher SiO2 and K2O compared with barren ones, likely due to the addition of Si and K during alteration and mineralization. Magmatic zircons from these two series of intrusions have U-Pb ages of 16.6 ± 0.5-17.0 ± 0.6 Ma and 16.7 ± 0.3-17.4 ± 0.4 Ma, respectively, which are identical to each other within analytical errors but are systematically older than although marginally overlap with the Re-Os isochron ages of 15.36 ± 0.21-16.41 ± 0.48 Ma. The Qulong porphyries have geochemical characteristics of typical adakites, with Sr = 259-1195 ppm, Y = 1.91-9.12 ppm, Yb = 0.2-0.92 ppm, Sr/Y = 49-202 ppm, and (La/Yb)n = 13-49 for both ore-bearing and barren adakites. In a Sr/Y versus (La/Yb)n diagram, most of the samples plot in the low part of circum-Pacific field, close to the field defined by Dabie adakites. Some of the ore-bearing adakites even plot in the Dabie adakite field, indicating that both slab melts and lower continental crust melts have been involved. Zircons from the ore-bearing adakites have δ18O ranging from 5.1 to 7.3‰ (average 6.4‰) and εHf(t) from 1.9 to 10.4‰, which plot close to MORB. Similarly, zircons from the barren adakite have δ18O ranging from 4.0 to 7.4

  5. The Basal Onaping Intrusion in the North Range: Roof rocks of the Sudbury Igneous Complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anders, Denise; Osinski, Gordon R.; Grieve, Richard A. F.; Brillinger, Derek T. M.

    2015-09-01

    The 1.85 Ga Sudbury impact structure is one of the largest impact structures on Earth. Igneous bodies—the so-called "Basal Onaping Intrusion"—occur at the contact between the Sudbury Igneous Complex (SIC) and the overlying Onaping Formation and occupy ~50% of this contact zone. The Basal Onaping Intrusion is presently considered part of the Onaping Formation, which is a complex series of breccias. Here, we present petrological and geochemical data from two drill cores and field data from the North Range of the Sudbury structure, which suggests that the Basal Onaping Intrusion is not part of the Onaping Formation. Our observations indicate that the Basal Onaping Intrusion crystallized from a melt and has a groundmass comprising a skeletal intergrowth of feldspar and quartz that points to simultaneous cooling of both components. Increasing grain size and decreasing amounts of clasts with increasing depth are general features of roof rocks of coherent impact melt rocks at other impact structures and the Basal Onaping Intrusion. Planar deformation features within quartz clasts of the Basal Onaping Intrusion are indicators for shock metamorphism and, together with the melt matrix, point to the Basal Onaping Intrusion as being an impact melt rock, by definition. Importantly, the contact between Granophyre of the SIC and Basal Onaping Intrusion is transitional and we suggest that the Basal Onaping Intrusion is what remains of the roof rocks of the SIC and, thus, is a unit of the SIC and not the Onaping Formation. We suggest henceforth that this unit be referred to as the "Upper Contact Unit" of the SIC.

  6. The large Bystrinskoe Cu-Au-Fe deposit (Eastern Trans-Baikal Region): Russia's first example of a skarn-porphyry ore-forming system related to adakite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovalenker, V. A.; Abramov, S. S.; Kiseleva, G. D.; Krylova, T. L.; Yazykova, Yu. I.; Bortnikov, N. S.

    2016-06-01

    The Bystrinskoe skarn-porphyry Cu-Au-Fe deposit (Eastern Trans-Baikal Region) is confined to skarn zones, which were formed along the contact of granitoids referred to the Shakhtama intrusive complex (J2-3), with terrigenous-carbonate sedimentary rocks. Commercial (Cu-Au-Fe ± W, Mo) mineralization was formed due to the regional postcollision development involving the intrusion of porphyritic granitoids, the derivatives of oxidized adakite highly magnesian magmas enriched in water, sulfur, and metals, which could develop under melting of garnet-bearing amphibolite in the mafic lower crustal arc.

  7. Geochemical Database for Intrusive Rocks of North-Central and Northeast Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.; Ressel, Michael W.; Barnes, Calvin G.

    2007-01-01

    North-central and northeast Nevada contains numerous large plutons and smaller stocks but also contains many small, shallowly emplaced intrusive bodies, including dikes, sills, and intrusive lava dome complexes. Decades of geologic investigations in the study area demonstrate that many ore deposits, representing diverse ore deposit types, are spatially, and probably temporally and genetically, associated with these igneous intrusions. However, despite the number and importance of igneous intrusions in the study area, no synthesis of geochemical data available for these rocks has been completed. This report presents a synthesis of geochemical data for these rocks. The product represents the first phases of an effort to evaluate the time-space-compositional evolution of Mesozoic and Cenozoic magmatism in the study area and identify genetic associations between magmatism and mineralizing processes in this region.

  8. Pan-African adakitic rocks of the north Arabian-Nubian Shield: petrological and geochemical constraints on the evolution of the Dokhan volcanics in the north Eastern Desert of Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obeid, Mohamed A.; Azer, Mokhles K.

    2015-04-01

    The Precambrian basement of Egypt is part of the Red Sea Mountains and represents the north-western part of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). Five volcanic sections are exposed in the Egyptian basement complex, namely El Kharaza, Monqul, Abu Had, Mellaha and Abu Marwa. They are located in the north Eastern Desert (ED) of Egypt and were selected for petrological and geochemical studies as they represent the Dokhan volcanics. The volcanics divide into two main pulses, and each pulse was frequently accompanied by deposition of immature molasse type sediments, which represent a thick sequence of the Hammamat group in the north ED. Compositionally, the rocks form a continuum from basaltic andesite, andesite, dacite (lower succession) to rhyodacite and rhyolite (upper succession), with no apparent compositional gaps. These high-K calc-alkaline rocks have strong affinities to subduction-related rocks with enriched LILEs (Rb, Ba, K, Th, Ce) relative to high field strength elements (Nb, Zr, P, Ti) and negative Nb anomalies relative to NMORB. The lower succession displays geochemical characteristics of adakitic rocks with SiO2 >53 wt%, Al2O3 >15 wt%, MgO >2.5 wt%, Mg# >49, Sr >650 ppm, Y <17 ppm, Yb <2 ppm, Ni >25 ppm, Cr >50 ppm and Sr/Y >42.4. They also have low Nb, Rb and Zr compared to the coexisting calc-alkaline rhyodacites and rhyolites. The highly fractionated rhyolitic rocks have strong negative Eu anomalies and possess the geochemical characteristics of A-type suites. Trace element geochemical signatures indicate a magma source consistent with post-collisional suites that retain destructive plate signatures associated with subduction zones. The adakitic rocks in the northern ANS are generated through partial melting of delaminated mafic lower crust interacting with overlying mantle-derived magma. The Dokhan volcanics were likely generated by a combination of processes, including partial melting, crystal fractionation and assimilation.

  9. Time, space, and composition relations among northern Nevada intrusive rocks and their metallogenic implications

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    duBray, E.A.

    2007-01-01

    Importantly, modal composition, age, and geochemical characteristics of intrusions associated with large mineral deposits along the trends, are indistinguishable from non-mineralized intrusions in northern Nevada and thus do not identify intrusions associated with significant deposits. Moreover, intrusion age and composition show little correlation with mineral-deposit type, abundance, and size. Given the lack of diagnostic characteristics for intrusions associated with deposits, it is uncertain whether age, modal composition, and geochemical data can identify intrusions associated with mineral deposits. These findings suggest that associations between northern Nevada intrusions and mineral deposits reflect superimposition of many geologic factors, none of which was solely responsible for mineral-deposit formation. These factors might include intrusion size, efficiency of fluid and metal extraction from magma, prevailing redox and sulfidation conditions, or derivation of metals and ligands from host rocks and groundwater. The abundance and diversity of mineral deposits in northern Nevada may partly reflect geochemical inheritance, for example, along the mineral trends rather than the influence of petrologically unique magma or associated fluids.

  10. LANDSAT and radar mapping of intrusive rocks in SE-Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parada, N. D. J. (Principal Investigator); Dossantos, A. R.; Dosanjos, C. E.; Moreira, J. C.; Barbosa, M. P.; Veneziani, P.

    1982-01-01

    The feasibility of intrusive rock mapping was investigated and criteria for regional geological mapping established at the scale of 1:500,00 in polycyclic and polymetamorphic areas using the logic method of photointerpretation of LANDSAT imagery and radar from the RADAMBRASIL project. The spectral behavior of intrusive rocks, was evaluated using the interactive multispectral image analysis system (Image-100). The region of Campos (city) in northern Rio de Janeiro State was selected as the study area and digital imagery processing and pattern recognition techniques were applied. Various maps at the 2:250,000 scale were obtained to evaluate the results of automatic data processing.

  11. Adakitic magmatism in post-collisional setting: An example from the Early-Middle Eocene Magmatic Belt in Southern Bulgaria and Northern Greece

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchev, Peter; Georgiev, Stoyan; Raicheva, Raya; Peytcheva, Irena; von Quadt, Albrecht; Ovtcharova, Maria; Bonev, Nikolay

    2013-11-01

    Post-collisional (56.0-40.4 Ma) adakitic magmatism in the Rhodope Massif and the Kraishte region, including W. Srednogorie, in South Bulgaria followed the collision of the Rhodope and Pelagonian Massifs. It forms a 250 km NW trending belt which continues into the 1000 km long belt of Eocene magmatism in northern Turkey and Iran. The rocks are represented by felsic subvolcanic dykes and sills in the Kraishte and plutons in the Rhodopes. Here, we synthesize new chemical (whole-rock major and trace elements, and Sr and Nd isotopes) and LA-ICP/MS mineral and U-Pb zircon age data along with published similar data in order to constrain the genesis of this magmatism and the early Cenozoic geodynamic evolution of the central Balkan Peninsula. The rocks display typical subduction-related characteristics with enrichment in LILE and LREE and depletion in HFSE (Nb, Ta and Ti). In the Kraishte and western Srednogorie Zones these are calc-alkaline to high-K calc-alkaline rhyolites, displaying a typical adakitic signature, i.e. high La/Yb and Sr/Y ratios. The studied Rhodope Massif rocks are predominantly high-K calc-alkaline and subordinate calc-alkaline granites and granodiorites with a minor amount of tonalites. Petrographically, they are H2O- and accessory-rich (allanite, epidote, titanite, apatite) rocks, showing geochemical affinities from non-adakitic tonalites and mafic granodiorites to adakitic granodiorites and granites. Similarity of Sr and Nd isotopic compositions of the Kraishte subvolcanic and Rhodope intrusive adakitic rocks with the neighboring and coeval NW Anatolian basaltic to dacitic volcanics and plutons suggests that the most likely source for the South Bulgarian adakitic rocks is the subduction-enriched depleted lithospheric mantle. The nearby and contemporaneous East Serbian alkaline basalts are isotopically and compositionally different and, probably, originate from an OIB-like mantle source. Subsequent fractionation within an isotopically similar lower

  12. Geochronology and geochemistry of middle Permian-Middle Triassic intrusive rocks from central-eastern Jilin Province, NE China: Constraints on the tectonic evolution of the eastern segment of the Paleo-Asian Ocean

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zi-Jin; Xu, Wen-Liang; Pei, Fu-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Li, Yu; Cao, Hua-Hua

    2015-12-01

    To constrain the Permian-Early Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the eastern segment of the Paleo-Asian Ocean, we conducted zircon U-Pb dating and whole-rock geochemical analyses on six middle Permian-Middle Triassic intrusive plutons in central-eastern Jilin Province, NE China. Zircons from the six plutons display distinct oscillatory zoning and striped absorption in cathodoluminescence (CL) images, and Th/U ratios of 0.11-1.41, indicating a magmatic origin. Zircon U-Pb dating indicates that the intrusive rocks formed in the middle Permian (ca. 260 Ma) to Middle Triassic (ca. 245 Ma). In central-eastern Jilin Province, the middle Permian and Middle Triassic plutons are composed mainly of strongly deformed monzogranites with affinities to adakitic rocks, which are formed from partial melting of thickened mafic lower crust. In contrast, the late Permian-the Early Triassic plutons in central-eastern Jilin Province consist of a bimodal association (including gabbros and granitoids) and deformed monzonites, which typically form in extensional settings. These observations, along with the results of previous studies on early-middle Permian granitoids in western Jilin Province, indicate that the eastern segment of the Paleo-Asian Ocean underwent the initial closure in central-western Jilin Province during the middle Permian and the final closure in eastern Jilin Province in the Middle Triassic.

  13. Intrusive rocks viewed from fitness landscape diagrams: Evolution and immiscibility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vigneresse, J. D.

    2011-12-01

    We introduce the hard-soft acid-base concepts to magma evolution. Those concepts and their derived chemical parameters provide a new insight into mantle- and continental-derived magmas. Hence magma evolution represents a free suite of chemical reactions, thus showing natural chemical trends. They should be controlled by the principles of maximum hardness and minimum electrophilicity that rule chemical reactions. When plotting into a fitness landscape diagram, rocks suites define two major tendencies. Mantle-derived rocks present all character of an closed chemical system. Conversely, rocks contaminated within the continental crust define two other trends, depending on whether they have affinities toward a silica pole or an alkaline one. They both show the character of an open chemical system. When plotting major igneous minerals onto that diagram shows the importance of olivine, silica and alkali-bearing oxides. It points to the development of immiscibility, depending on the path along which magmas evolve. It thus provides explanation to experimentally observed immiscibility.

  14. Layering in the wall rock of Valles Marineris: intrusive and extrusive magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Jean-Pierre; Paige, David A.; Manning, Craig E.

    2003-06-01

    High-resolution images of the walls exposed in Valles Marineris reveal variations in appearance and degree of layering indicating various lithologies comprise the Tharsis plateau. The layered wall rock has been proposed to result from effusive flood basalt volcanism or interbedded sediments and volcanics. We present observations of unlayered rock that indicate layering extends to a greater depth in the western half of Valles Marineris and is confined to the Tharsis plateau, a region of thickened, uplifted crust resulting from prolonged intrusive activity. Consistent with this view, we propose that the observed layering may be a manifestation of intrusive rocks resulting from crystal fractionation of intruded basaltic magmas. Terrestrial layered plutons provide analogs for comparison such as those of the North Atlantic Igneous Province (NAIP) a large igneous province associated with crustal rifting and exposures of thick sequences of layered flood basalts and intruded layered cumulates.

  15. Geochemical Constraints on Collision-related Intrusive Rocks in Central, Northwestern and Western Anatolia (Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilbeyli, Nurdane

    2010-05-01

    The intrusive rocks in Anatolia occupy a broad petrological range from I- to A- type granitoids. Thus, Turkey is a natural laboratory to study collision-related magmatism, its geochemical characteristic, source region and also tectono-magmatic evolution. The central, northwestern and western Anatolian magmatic provinces are defined by a large number of Late Mesozoic to Late Cenozoic collision-related granitoids (Ilbeyli and Kibici 2009). Calc-alkaline, subalkaline and alkaline intrusive rocks in central Anatolia are mainly metaluminous, high-K and I- to A-types. They cover a petrological range from monzodiorite through quartz monzonite to granite/syenite. All these intrusive rocks are enriched in LILE and are also radiogenic in terms of Sr, and unradiogenic in terms of Nd, isotope ratios. Their geochemical characteristics show that the intrusive rocks originated from a mantle source containing large subduction components, and have experienced crustal assimilation and fractional crystallization. Delamination of a thermal boundary layer, and/or slab breakoff is the likely mechanisms for the initiation of the diverse magmatism in the complex (Ilbeyli et al. 2009). Calc-alkaline plutonic rocks in northwestern Anatolia are mainly metaluminous, medium- to high-K and I-types. They are monzonite to granite, and all are enriched in LILE and depleted in HFSE, showing features of arc-related intrusive rocks. Geochemical data reveal that these plutons were derived from partial melting of mafic lower crustal sources. These rocks are related to subduction of the northern branch of the Neo-Tethyan ocean beneath the Sakarya microcontinent during Cretaceous-Paleocene times (Kibici et al. 2008). Calc-alkaline intrusive rocks in western Anatolia are metaluminous, high-K and I-types. They have a compositional range from granodiorite to granite, and are enriched in LILE and depleted in HFSE. Geochemical characteristics of these intrusive rocks indicate that they could have originated

  16. The occurrence of microdiamonds in Mesoproterozoic Chapada Diamantina intrusive rocks--Bahia/Brazil.

    PubMed

    Battilani, Gislaine A; Gomes, Newton S; Guerra, Wilson J

    2007-06-01

    The origin of diamonds from Serra do Espinhaço in Diamantina region (State of Minas Gerais) and in Chapada Diamantina, Lençóis region (State of Bahia) remains uncertain, even taking into account the ample research carried out during the last decades. The lack of typical satellite minerals in both districts makes a kimberlitic source for these diamonds uncertain. In mid 18th century the occurrence of a metamorphosed igneous rock composed of martite, sericite and tourmaline was described in Diamantina region and named hematitic phyllite, considered by some researchers as a possible diamond source. Similar rocks were found in Lençóis and examined petrographically and their heavy mineral concentration was investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Petrographic analyses indicated an igneous origin for these rocks and SEM analyses showed the discovery of microdiamonds. Geochronological studies using the Ar/Ar technique in muscovites yielded minimum ages of 1515+/-3 Ma, which may correlate with 1710+/-12 Ma from U-Pb method in igneous zircons from the hematitic phyllites. Both rock types also have the same mineral and chemical composition which leads to the conclusion that the intrusive rocks were protolith of the hematitic phyllites. This first discovery of microdiamonds in intrusive rocks opens the possibility of new investigation models for diamond mineralization in Brazilian Proterozoic terrains. PMID:17625685

  17. Petrology, composition, and age of intrusive rocks associated with the Quartz Hill molybdenite deposit, southeastern Alaska.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hudson, T.; Smith, James G.; Elliott, R.L.

    1979-01-01

    A large porphyry molybdenum deposit (Quartz Hill deposit) was recently discovered in the heart of the Coast Range batholithic complex about 70 km E of Ketchikan, SE Alaska. Intrusive rocks associated with the mineral deposit form two composite epizonal to hypabyssal stocks and many dikes in country rocks. All observed metallization and alteration is within the Quartz Hill stock. Molybdenite forms fracture coatings and occurs in veins with quartz. Alteration is widespread and includes development of secondary quartz, pyrite, K-feldspar, biotite, white mica, chlorite, and zeolite. Field relations indicate that the stocks were emplaced after regional uplift and erosion of the Coast Range batholithic complex, and K-Ar data show that intrusion and alteration took place in late Oligocene time, about 27 to 30 Ma ago. Data from the Ketchikan quadrangle indicate that porphyry molybdenum metallization in the Coast Range batholithic complex is associated with regionally extensive but spotty, middle Tertiary or younger, felsic magmatism. -from Authors

  18. Zircon U-Pb geochronology and petrogenesis of the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic intrusive rocks in the eastern segment of the northern margin of the North China Block

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Hua-Hua; Xu, Wen-Liang; Pei, Fu-Ping; Wang, Zhi-Wei; Wang, Feng; Wang, Zi-Jin

    2013-06-01

    Zircon U-Pb dating and whole-rock geochemical analysis have been undertaken on Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic intrusive rocks of central Jilin Province, NE China, with the aim of constraining the tectonic evolution of the eastern segment of the northern margin of the North China Block (NCB) during the Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic. Zircon U-Pb dating indicates that Late Paleozoic-Early Mesozoic magmatic events can be subdivided into four stages: Middle Permian (~ 270 Ma), Late Permian (259-255 Ma), Early Triassic (~ 249 Ma), and Late Triassic (~ 222 Ma). The Middle Permian magmatic event formed peraluminous garnet-bearing monzogranites, indicative of formation under a compressional tectonic regime related to collision between the NCB and the Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range Massif. The Late Permian magmatic event formed gabbros and syenogranites, a bimodal association that is typical of magmatism within post-collisional extensional setting. The Early Triassic magmatic event formed adakitic monzogranites, suggesting that they formed from magmas derived from partial melting of a thickened mafic lower crust. The Late Triassic magmatic event formed a series of mafic-ultramafic intrusive rocks, together with coeval granitoids in adjacent regions, and make up a typical bimodal association suggesting that they formed under an extensional environment related to the final amalgamation of the NCB and the Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range Massif. Taken together, we conclude that the northern margin of the NCB underwent multiple orogenic events between the Middle Permian and the Late Triassic, with final amalgamation of the NCB and the Songnen-Zhangguangcai Range Massif occurring in the Early Triassic, an event that led to the final suturing of the Solonker-Xra Moron-Changchun zone.

  19. Paleomagnetism of Eocene Intrusive Rocks, Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Housen, B. A.; Fawcett, T. C.; Gregiore, P.

    2003-12-01

    The Black Hills of South Dakota and Wyoming are a large Precambrian-cored Laramide uplift. Intruding the Black Hills are a diverse suite of igneous rocks, which include phonolites, trachytes, latites, garnet-bearing rhyolites, and pyroxenites. These intrusive bodies range in size from several meter outcrop-scale bodies, to several 10s of km wide intrusive complexes. New geochronology (40Ar-39Ar) data indicate many of these intrusive rocks are between 58 and 45 Ma in age (Duke at al, 2002). As part of a larger paleomagnetic study aimed at Jurassic strata surrounding the Black Hills, a collection of 20 sites and 145 samples of the Eocene intrusive rocks was made. A combination of alternating field, thermal, and liquid nitrogen step-wise demagnetization revealed that, with a few exceptions, these rocks have two well-defined magnetization components. The first-removed component is interpreted to be a present (dipole) field magnetization, and is removed by 10 to 30 mT a.f., or 200 C thermal demagnetization steps. The second-removed components have either positive or negative inclinations, and are defined by demagnetization steps between 30 and 200 mT a.f., or 300 to 630 C thermal demagnetization steps. These components are interpreted to be ancient, presumably Eocene, magnetizations. A preliminary mean of the normal-polarity sites is D=352, I=59.3, k=26.7, a95=18.2, N=4, and of the reverse-polarity sites is D=154.9, I=-61.3, k=23.1, a95=18.2, N=4. The combined mean direction is D=344.9, I=60.3, k=28.8, a95=10.5, N=8. Two sites of rhyolites at Mt. Theodore Roosevelt have well-defined magnetization components, but either mixed polarity (Site 99Trr1), or reverse-polarity with what might be a transitional-field direction (D=27.7, I=-37.4, k=18.0, a95=18.6, n=5), and are not included in the calculation of means. The magnetizations recorded by these Eocene rocks are essentially identical to the expected direction for the Black Hills calculated from the Diehl et al., 1983

  20. Underplating-related adakites in Xinjiang Tianshan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Z. H.; Xiong, X. L.; Wang, Q.; Wyman, D. A.; Bao, Z. W.; Bai, Z. H.; Qiao, Y. L.

    2008-04-01

    Intermediate to acidic porphyries and dacites in the Awulale and Sanchakou area of the Xinjiang Tianshan region, China, conform to the definition of high-SiO 2 adakite (HSA). These volcanic or subvolcanic rocks are characterized by high Na 2O (Na 2O > K 2O), high Sr/Y (51-327), and strong depletions in HREE and HFSE (Nb, Ta, and Ti). Despite these characteristics, they are distinct from a suite of adakites in the same area that are inferred to be derived from partial melting of subducted slab. Differences between the two suites are evident mainly in their rock association, isotopic ages and compositions of Sr and Nd isotopes. The subducted slab-related adakites are associated with common island arc rocks, niobium-enriched basalt (NEB) and high-Mg andesite (HMA), formed in the late Carboniferous (320-334 Ma) and are characterized by relative high ɛNd( t) (+ 3.4 - + 11.6) and low ( 87Sr/ 86Sr) i ratios(0.7032-0.7063). In contrast, the Awulale and Sanchakou adakites were generated during the middle to late Permian (260-278 Ma), possess a wide range of low ɛNd( t) (+ 0.75 - + 5.69), a greater range of ( 87Sr/ 86Sr) i (0.7039-0.7054) and have young Nd model ages ( T2DM 472-699 Ma). In addition, their Mg# (35-56) and compatible element contents (MgO = 0.93-2.22 wt.%; Cr = 4.95-16.41 ppm; Ni = 2.9-25.8 ppm) are relative low compared to the subducted slab-related adakites(Mg# = 55-71; MgO = 1.22-6.78 wt.%; Cr = 24-132 ppm; Ni = 2.28-45.61 ppm). Based on these characteristics, the regional association of igneous rocks, and evidence from a global geoscience transect (GGT), the Awulale and Sanchakou adakites represent a genetically distinct suite in the Xinjiang region. We proposed that the source of these adakites was basaltic rock underplated to the base of the lower crust, that partial melted at the rutile-bearing amphibole-eclogite facies (> 650 °C and 1.5 Gpa minimum pressure (≥ 50 km)).

  1. Late Permian to Early Triassic mafic to felsic intrusive rocks from North Liaoning, North China: Petrogenesis and implications for Phanerozoic continental crustal growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaohui; Zhang, Hongfu; Wilde, Simon A.; Yang, Yueheng; Chen, Haihong

    2010-06-01

    that the northern Liaoning block forms part of a Phanerozoic accretionary orogenic belt. This observation indicates that the Chifeng-Kaiyuan Fault likely represents the Mesozoic lithospheric boundary between the North China Craton and the Xing-Meng Orogenic Belt in northern Liaoning. The Shijianfang batholith, together with Late Permian to Middle Triassic adakitic and A-type rocks, mafic-ultramafic cumulates and alkaline intrusions from the neighboring areas, constitutes an important post-collisional to intra-plate anorogenic magmatic province within the continental interior of the newly amalgamated North China-Mongolian plate. The unique mafic and felsic coupling in the Shijianfang batholith provides a good proxy record for the multiple-step vertical continental crustal growth in the newly amalgamated continental interior during the Phanerozoic, triggered by continued magmatic underplating due to lithospheric delamination and hot asthenospheric upwelling within a post-collisional to post-orogenic extensional regime.

  2. Zircon U-Pb ages, geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes of the Nuri intrusive rocks in the Gangdese area, southern Tibet: Constraints on timing, petrogenesis, and tectonic transformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Lei; Qin, Ke-Zhang; Li, Guang-Ming; Li, Jin-Xiang; Xiao, Bo; Zhao, Jun-Xing; Fan, Xin

    2015-01-01

    Abundant magmatic rocks of various ages are exposed in Gangdese, southern Tibet. These rocks play an important role in understanding the tectonic transformation from the subduction of Neo-Tethyan oceanic crust to the collision of the Indian and Asian continents. Based on zircon U-Pb ages, geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopic data of the Late Cretaceous to early Oligocene (~ 96-30 Ma) intrusive rocks in the Nuri Cu-W-Mo deposit, we discuss the Late Cretaceous to early Oligocene tectonic transformation of the region and the origin of Oligocene Cu-W-Mo mineralization in southern Gangdese. The Nuri intrusive rocks represent three magmatic episodes: 96-91, 56-52, and 33-30 Ma. The 96-91 and 56-52 Ma rocks have relatively low (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7041 to 0.7060), and high εNd(t) (+ 3.1 to + 3.5) and εHf(t) values (+ 3.7 to + 15); the 33-30 Ma rocks have relatively high (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7061 to 0.7063) and Pb isotopes, and low εNd(t) (- 3.8 to - 1.8) and εHf(t) values (+ 0.6 to + 10.1). The three stages of intrusive rocks have geochemical characteristics that are similar to those of coeval rocks in Gangdese. The 96-91 and 33-30 Ma rocks are adakitic, whereas the 56-52 Ma rocks have characteristics of arc calc-alkaline magmatic rocks. The 96-91 Ma rocks were produced by the partial melting of Neo-Tethyan basaltic oceanic crust and minor sediments, whereas the 56-52 Ma rocks were generated by the partial melting of juvenile crust and the 33-30 Ma rocks were formed by the melting of Indian plate lower crust contaminated with overlying mantle materials. On the basis of the regional tectonic and magmatic characteristics, we suggest that Neo-Tethyan oceanic slab subduction and slab roll-back occurred from ~ 100 to 65 Ma, collision between the Indian and Asian continents occurred at 65 to 40 Ma, Neo-Tethyan oceanic slab break-off took place at ~ 50 Ma, and the Indian continent subducted northwards beneath the Asian continent at ~ 30 Ma. From the Late Cretaceous (96-91 Ma) to

  3. Physical Properties and Distribution of Intrusive Rocks (Plutons) in the Great Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ponce, D. A.; Watt, J. T.; Glen, J. M.

    2010-12-01

    The distribution of intrusive rocks throughout the Great Basin is important because many plutons are associated with base and precious metal mineral deposits, and may provide insights on regional magmatism and tectonism. Combined information on their physical properties and geophysical signatures will allow improvements on their inferred horizontal extent and facilitate modeling their subsurface structure. Physical property measurements of over 1700 plutonic rock samples in the Great Basin, excluding those in the Sierra Nevada, show an average grain density of about 2670 and a range of about 2260 to 3200 kg/m3; show an average saturated bulk density of about 2630 and a range of about 2290 to 3050 kg/m3; an average magnetic susceptibility of about 0.007 and range from essentially non-magnetic to 0.126 SI-units (equivalent to just over 3 per cent magnetite). As a comparison, over 6,000 granitic samples in the Sierra Nevada (Sikora et al., 1991) have an average grain density of about 2690 and a range of about 2420 to 2780 kg/m3; an average magnetic susceptibility of about 0.006 and range from essentially non-magnetic to 0.016 SI-units (equivalent to about 0.4 per cent magnetite). Remanent magnetizations were measured for selected plutons, for example the remanent magnetization of the Ibapah pluton in the Deep Creek Range, Utah is relatively low and has a Koenigsberger ratio (the ratio between remanent and induced magnetization) of about 0.1. In Nevada, previous pluton extents (Grauch et al., 1988; Grauch , 1996) have been only slightly modified. For example, the Cretaceous to Jurassic stock at Blue Mountain, north-central Nevada (Wilden, 1964) is now mapped as a diorite dike swarm (Wyld, 2002) and thought to be mid-Miocene and related to the inception of the Yellowstone Hotspot (Ponce et al, 2010). Magnetic and gravity data indicate that a possible pluton (or other magnetic basement rock), the top of which could be at moderate crustal depths, is skewed from the

  4. Rocks Whose Compositions are NOT Determined by Crystal Sorting: Lessons From the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBirney, A. R.

    2002-12-01

    Wager and Deer's Skaergaard Memoir, published shortly after the appearance of Bowen's "Evolution of Igneous Rocks" was widely viewed as the ideal confirmation of the dominant role of crystal fractionation in magmatic differentiation. The mineralogical sequence followed a course predicted by phase equilibria, and the spectacular layering seemed to offer clear evidence of crystal settling. Although the liquid line of descent proposed by Wager was closer to the "Fenner trend" of iron enrichment than to the one Bowen favored, there was no evidence that the rocks represented liquid compositions; they must have been formed by crystal sorting. This interpretation was supported by the elegant "cumulate" concept proposed a few years later by Wager and Brown. An elaborate system based on petrographic textures seen in the Skaergaard rocks soon became a pervasive paradigm for interpreting coarse-grained igneous rocks. Because of its remote location, nearly half a century passed before the Skaergaard Intrusion was seen by geologists who were not members of Wager's team. When an independent group examined the body they reported two simple observations that conflicted with earlier interpretations. First, it was noted that the plagioclase in graded "sedimentary" layers was less dense than the liquid through which it was said to have settled, and, second, some of the rocks were found to have been severely altered, both in texture and in bulk composition. The most conspicuous evidence was found in swarms of angular anorthositic blocks that had fallen from the roof. The present composition of these blocks is much more felsic than that of the unit from which they fell. Rinds of ferromagnesian minerals appear to be the mafic component that was somehow expelled from the residual plagioclase. When examined under the microscope, the contact between the block and its host, which seems so sharp in outcrops, is seen to be indistinct and gradational. The changes seen in these blocks must have

  5. Intrusive rocks northeast of Steamboat Springs, Park Range, Colorado, with a section on geochronology

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Snyder, George L.; Hedge, Carl E.

    1978-01-01

    Major Precambrian and minor Tertiary intrusive rocks northeast of Steamboat Springs in the Park Range between 40?30' and 40?45' N. lat. are described and compared with related rocks elsewhere in Colorado and Wyoming. The Precambrian intrusives were emplaced in a sequence of high-grade interlayered felsic gneisses, amphibolites, and pelitic schists of sedimentary and volcanic origin. These rocks are cut by a major northeast-trending Precambrian shear zone where mainly left lateral movement of 1/ 2 to 1 mile is certain. Cumulative movement of many miles is possible. The Precambrian intrusives consist of a batholith, the Mount Ethel pluton, a smaller Buffalo Pass pluton, and small dikes or lenses of fine-grained porphyry, pegmatites, and ultramafics. The Mount Ethel pluton is an oval shaped body 7 miles wide by about 40 miles long (shown by geophysical data to extend beneath younger sediments in North Park). Outer batholithic contacts are sharp and dip steeply outward at about 85?. Five mappable internal variants consist, in order of decreasing age, of granodiorite, quartz monzonite porphyry of Rocky Peak, quartz monzonite of Roxy Ann Lake, granite and quartz monzonite, and. leucogranite. Internal contacts between these plutonic variants are sharp, and evidence of liquid-solid relationships abounds; despite this, all rocks except the granodiorite contribute to an Rb-Sr whole-rock isochron indicating emplacement about 1.4 b.y. (billion years) ago. The most important variants volumetrically are: the quartz monzonite porphyry of Rocky Peak, which forms an irregular 2-mile-thick carapace or mapped band around the west edge of the pluton and is lithologically similar to nearby Sherman Granite, and the quartz monzonite of Roxy Ann Lake, which forms most of the rest of the pluton and is lithologically similar to Silver Plume Granite. An apparent Sherman -Silver Plume dichotomy with similar rock types and similar relative ages is noted throughout Colorado plutons of that age

  6. Petrogenesis and geochronology of Cretaceous adakitic, I- and A-type granitoids in the NE Yangtze block: Constraints on the eastern subsurface boundary between the North and South China blocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Yuping; Zheng, Jianping; Griffin, William L.; Zhao, Junhong; O‧Reilly, Suzanne Y.; Tang, Huayun; Ping, Xianquan; Xiong, Qing

    2013-08-01

    The position of the subsurface boundary between the North China block (NCB) and South China block (SCB) has been debated, mainly using evidence from surface geology and geophysical observations. Here, petrochemical and geochronological data on four early Cretaceous granitic plutons from a focused area east of the Tan-Lu fault, NE Yangtze block, are reported to provide constraints on their petrogenesis and tectonic affinity. The Chuzhou intermediate intrusions consist mainly of quartz monzonite and granodiorite, and formed at ca. 125-127 Ma. They have high MgO, Al2O3, Sr, and low Rb, Y and Yb contents, together with high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, indicating an adakitic affinity. They also show strongly negative whole-rock εNd(t) and zircon εHf(t) (- 26 to - 16) values, and old Hf crustal model ages (2.2-2.8 Ga). Coupled with their negative Nb-Ta anomalies, high K2O/Na2O (0.91-1.18) and low Ce/Pb (1.08-5.40) ratios, these data suggest that the Chuzhou adakites were derived from thickened Archean to Paleoproterozoic lower crust. In contrast, the Fanchang, Qingyang and Huangshan intermediate-silicic complexes are dominantly composed of I-type granodiorite and quartz monzonite and A-type monzogranite and alkali feldspar granite. The I-type intrusions (126-138 Ma) were emplaced slightly earlier than the A-type intrusions (121-129 Ma), and distributed around A-type intrusions with clear intrusive boundaries. The I- and A-type rocks have lower MgO, CaO, Co, Sr, and higher Rb, Nb, Th and HREE contents than the adakitic rocks, with strong depletion in Ba, Sr, P, Eu and Ti for the A-type rocks. They have higher whole-rock εNd(t) (- 9 to - 5) and zircon εHf(t) (- 13-0) values, and younger Nd model ages (TDM2 = 1.1-1.4 Ga) and zircon Hf model ages (Tcrust = 1.2-2.0 Ga) than the adakitic rocks. These features indicate that the I- and A-type granites originated by partial melting of Mesoprotorozoic-Neoproterozoic lower crust, followed by fractional crystallization of plagioclase

  7. Compositional differences between roof and floor rocks of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmonsen, Lars Peter; Tegner, Christian; Barfod, Gry H.; Lesher, Charles E.

    2014-05-01

    The Skaergaard intrusion solidified inwards from the margins forming the Layered Series on the floor and the Marginal and Upper Border Series on the walls and roof, respectively. Comparison of the roof and floor rocks is the most straight-forward way to contrast differentiation processes controlled by gravity. Here, we present new bulk rock (major and trace elements, Sr and Nd isotopes), mineralogical and petrographic data for the Upper Border Series. The Upper Border Series mainly diverge from equivalent Layered Series rocks by relatively higher concentrations of incompatible elements, lack of igneous lamination and frequent development of interstitial granophyre, whereas the core compositions of minerals and isotopic signatures are similar in the two series. Here, we examine the main explanations for these differences. Firstly, it has been suggested that the roof zone was enriched by assimilation of stoped gneissic blocks. Our new Sr and Nd data of the Upper Border Series exclude this as a first order process as has been shown before. Mixing models suggest that the Layered and Upper Border Series assimilated less than 3 percent Precambrian host gneiss. Furthermore, no correlation exists between incompatible elements and Sr-Nd isotopic ratios. Secondly, magma stratification as a consequence of compositional convection has been invoked. However, by combining petrography and whole rock compositions we show that the crystallization sequence in the Upper Border Series is identical to the Layered Series. Moreover, the anorthite content of plagioclase cores is identical within error in the roof and floor at the cumulus phase boundaries. This is most easily explained by in situ crystallization inwards from the margins of a homogeneous magma. Thirdly, the enrichment of incompatible elements in the Upper Border Series relative to the Layered Series has been explained by the trapping of a higher fraction of intercumulus liquid in the roof rocks relative to the compacted

  8. The influence of igneous intrusions on the peak temperatures of host rocks: Finite-time emplacement, evaporation, dehydration, and decarbonation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayong; Song, Yongchen; Liu, Yu; Zhao, Minglong; Qi, Tian; Liu, Weiguo

    2012-01-01

    Using a 13-m-thick basic sill and its limestone host rocks of the Permian Irati Formation from the Parana Basin, South America, as an example, this paper presents a numerical investigation based on heat conduction models on the effect of the emplacement mechanism of igneous intrusions, pore-water evaporation, and dehydration and decarbonation of host rocks on the peak temperature ( Tpeak) of host rocks. Our results demonstrate that: (1) the finite-time intrusion mechanism of magma can lower the predicted Tpeak of host rocks by up to 100 °C relative to the instantaneous intrusion mechanism, and although pore-water evaporation together with dehydration and decarbonation reactions can also depress the thermal effect of the sill on its host rocks, the maximum effect of these mechanisms on Tpeak only reaches approximately 50 °C. (2) The effect of pore-water evaporation on Tpeak is obviously greater than that of the dehydration and decarbonation reactions: the former can cause a maximum deviation of 40 °C in the predicted Tpeak, whereas the deviation due to the latter is less than 20 °C. Further, the effect of the dehydration and decarbonation reactions on Tpeak is less than 10 °C if pore-water evaporation is allowed simultaneously in the models and can hence be ignored in thermal modeling. (3) The finite-time intrusion mechanism of magma probably represents the natural condition of the sill. Pore-water evaporation and dehydration and decarbonation of host rocks are also likely to play important roles in lowering the thermal effect of the sill.

  9. Underplating of basaltic magmas and crustal growth in a continental arc: Evidence from Late Mesozoic intermediate-felsic intrusive rocks in southern Qiangtang, central Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Lu-Lu; Wang, Qiang; Wyman, Derek A.; Ou, Quan; Dan, Wei; Jiang, Zi-Qi; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Yang, Jin-Hui; Long, Xiao-Ping; Li, Jie

    2016-02-01

    Phanerozoic growth of continental crust has widely been considered as an important geological phenomenon and mainly occurs in an arc setting. However, the crustal growth models (mantle-derived basalt underplating or accretion of island or intra-oceanic arc complexes or oceanic plateau) have been disputed. Here we present new zircon LA-ICPMS U-Pb age, whole-rock major and trace element, Sr-Nd and zircon Hf isotopic data for Late Mesozoic intermediate-felsic intrusive rocks in the Rena Co area in southern Qiangtang, central Tibet. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating for two granodiorite and three diorite samples and one granodiorite porphyry sample gives ages of ca. 150 Ma, ca. 112 Ma, respectively, indicating they were generated in the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous. All rocks are sub-alkaline in composition and belong to the high-K cal-alkaline series. The ~ 150 Ma diorites (SiO2 = 57.9-61.2 wt.%) exhibit relatively high MgO (3.13-3.88 wt.%) and Cr (52.4-282 ppm) contents and Mg# (47-51) values, similar to magnesian diorites. They are geochemically characterized by uniformly low εNd(t) (- 5.5 to - 5.2), high (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7071 to 0.7078) and Th/La (0.22-0.32), and variable zircon εHf(t) (- 8.7 to + 4.8) values. They were probably generated by melting of oceanic sediment diapirs, followed by interaction with the surrounding mantle during the northward subduction of Bangong-Nujiang Oceanic lithosphere. The ~ 150 Ma granodiorites and ~ 112 Ma granodiorite porphyries are characterized by low MgO (< 3 wt.%) contents and Mg# (< 45) values, high Al2O3 (> 15% wt.%) and Sr (> 400 ppm) and low Y (< 18 ppm) and Yb (< 1.9 ppm) contents, and high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, which are similar to those of typical adakites. The granodiorites have low εNd(t) (- 7.6 to - 3.7) and zircon εHf(t) (- 9.8 to + 0.2) and high (87Sr/86Sr)i (0.7069 to 0.7086) values, and were likely produced by partial melting of a thickened and heterogeneous ancient lower continental crust. The relatively

  10. Petrological and geochemical constraints on the origin of adakites in the Garibaldi Volcanic Complex, southwestern British Columbia, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fillmore, Julie; Coulson, Ian M.

    2013-07-01

    The Garibaldi Volcanic Complex (GVC) is located in southwestern British Columbia and comprises two related but distinct volcanic fields: the Garibaldi Lake and the Mount Garibaldi volcanic fields. The rocks of the GVC range from basalt to rhyolite, and analyses of samples from both fields distinguish these as adakites. The GVC magmas have high Sr/Y, Mg#, and Al2O3; low K2O/Na2O; and fractionated rare earth element compositions. Models of adakite genesis fall into two main groups: slab melting and non-slab melting. Adakites generated by slab melting commonly occur from young subducting crust (≤25 Ma) and are felsic partial melts of the subducting slab that interact with the mantle wedge during ascent. Non-slab melting models vary widely and include basalt fractionation, assimilation, fractional crystallization processes and partial melting of mafic lower crust. Data from the GVC are too limited to fully elucidate the mechanisms of adakite genesis; however, the petrographical and geochemical characteristics of the GVC rocks in this study do not refute an origin by slab partial melts. Variations in trace elements that reflect non-adakitic values (e.g., low La, low Cr) are likely the result of magma mixing at shallow depths within the magma reservoirs of each center, for which there is mineralogical and textural evidence. The adakite rocks of the GVC share geochemical traits akin to both low-SiO2 adakite (LSA) and high-SiO2 adakite (HSA) groups, though additional data are needed to investigate whether LSA- or HSA-type dominates within the GVC, and by extension, which should be the preferred model of adakite genesis.

  11. Adakitic (tonalitic-trondhjemitic) magmas resulting from eclogite decompression and dehydration melting during exhumation in response to continental collision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Shuguang; Niu, Yaoling; Su, Li; Wei, Chunjing; Zhang, Lifei

    2014-04-01

    Modern adakite or adakitic rocks are thought to result from partial melting of younger and thus warmer subducting ocean crust in subduction zones, with the melt interacting with or without mantle wedge peridotite during ascent, or from melting of thickened mafic lower crust. Here we show that adakitic (tonalitic-trondhjemitic) melts can also be produced by eclogite decompression during exhumation of subducted and metamorphosed oceanic/continental crust in response to continental collision, as exemplified by the adakitic rocks genetically associated with the early Paleozoic North Qaidam ultra-high pressure metamorphic (UHPM) belt on the northern margin of the Greater Tibetan Plateau. We present field evidence for partial melting of eclogite and its products, including adakitic melt, volumetrically significant plutons evolved from the melt, cumulate rocks precipitated from the melt, and associated granulitic residues. This “adakitic assemblage” records a clear progression from eclogite decompression and heating to partial melting, to melt fractionation and ascent/percolation in response to exhumation of the UHPM package. The garnetite and garnet-rich layers in the adakitic assemblage are of cumulate origin from the adakitic melt at high pressure, and accommodate much of the Nb-Ta-Ti. Zircon SHRIMP U-Pb dating shows that partial melting of the eclogite took place at ∼435-410 Ma, which postdates the seafloor subduction (>440 Ma) and temporally overlaps the UHPM (∼440-425 Ma). While the geological context and the timing of adakite melt formation we observe differ from the prevailing models, our observations and documentations demonstrate that eclogite melting during UHPM exhumation may be important in contributing to crustal growth.

  12. Petrogenesis of adakite and high-Nb basalt association in the SW of Sabzevar Zone, NE of Iran: Evidence for slab melt-mantle interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazhari, Seyed Ali

    2016-04-01

    Adakitic rocks appear in close association with high Nb basaltic (HNB) rocks in the SW of Sabzevar ophiolitic belt. Adakites are calc-alkaline and include trachy-andesite, teachy-dacite and dacite. These rocks are rich in Na2O, Al2O3 and Sr and show depletion in MgO, Y and Yb. Adakitic samples are defined by high Sr/Y (88-128) and La/Yb (20-45) ratios; as well as a lack of Eu anomaly (Eu/Eu∗ = 0.92-0.99) in REE patterns. Geochemical composition indicates that adakites were generated from slab melting in a high pressure-high heat flow subducting setting. Different adakitic rocks have been formed by various slab partial melting degrees and reaction of adakitic magma with heterogeneous mantle wedge rocks. HNB rocks are alkaline, nepheline normative and sodic (Na2O/K2O = 2.7-3.4) with high concentration of Al2O3, TiO2, MgO, P2O5, LILE and HFSE, especially Nb (30-56 ppm). These basalts show fractionated REE patterns with elevated LREE/HREE (LaN/YbN = 20-25) and trace elements contents suggest their generation by low partial melting degrees (<2%) from garnet-peridotite origin which have already metasomatized by adakitic melts.

  13. Stable isotopic constraints on fluid-rock interaction and Cu-PGE-S redistribution in the Sonju Lake intrusion, Minnesota

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Park, Y.-R.; Ripley, E.M.; Miller, J.D., Jr.; Li, C.; Mariga, J.; Shafer, P.

    2004-01-01

    The Sonju Lake intrusion, part of the 1.1 Ga Midcontinent rift-related Beaver Bay Complex, is a 1,200-m-thick, strongly differentiated, layered sequence of mafic cumulates located in northeastern Minnesota. Basal melatroctolite and dunite layers are overlain by troctolite, gabbro, Fe-Ti oxide-rich gabbro, apatite diorite, and monzodiorite. Stratigraphic intervals rich in Pt + Pd, Cu, and S occur over ???500 m in the Fe-Ti oxide-rich gabbro and apatite diorite units. Peak concentrations show offsets that are similar to those found in other tholeiitic layered intrusions. Concentrations of Pd in excess of 100 ppb are confined to the lowermost 25 m of the interval. Copper shows a sharp increase to 630 ppm above the Pd-rich interval. Sulfur contents are low (<375 ppm) in the Cu-rich interval, but they increase to values as high as 3,150 ppm above in the apatite diorite. Disseminated sulfides in the intrusion have ??34S values that range from -2.2 to 3 per mil Vienna-Canyon Diablo Troilite (V-CDT) and suggest that contamination by country rock sulfur was not an important process in the formation of the metal-rich interval. ??18O values of plagioclase from the intrusion range from 5.6 to 12.0 per mil (V-SMOW) and indicate that a relatively low-18O fluid (??18O ???3-5 ???) interacted with the rocks of the intrusion at temperatures less than ???275??C. Clinopyroxene and Fe-Ti oxides (ilmenite with minor amounts of titanomagnetite) show much more restricted ranges in ??18O values (4.6-5.7 and 5.5-6.7 per mil, respectively) and attest to the kinetic control of the oxygen isotope exchange process. The externally derived fluid that interacted with rocks now enriched in platinum group elements (PGE) + Cu- and Fe-sulfide minerals locally liberated sulfur and replaced chalcopyrite and pyrite with goethite. In the Cu-rich zone, goethite that replaces chalcopyrite may contain up to 8.5 weight percent Cu. It is evident that hydrothermal alteration resulted in a decoupling of copper

  14. Experimental investigation of reservoir rocks by spontaneous imbibition and mercury intrusion porosimetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Z.; Hu, Q.

    2013-12-01

    Spontaneous imbibition (SI), one of the important processes affecting hydrocarbon recovery from fractured reservoirs, is a capillary-force controlled process. The properties of displacing and displaced fluids, pore structure of porous media and their interactions are the main factors affecting the SI process. Many studies have been conducted to investigate these factors and among them scaling of SI is a widely used approach to predicting the oil/gas production behavior in the field based on laboratory imbibition tests. We have conducted SI experiments on different reservoir rocks, including Barnett shale (from different depths), dolomite and Indian sandstone. Because of the layered characteristic of Barnett shale, we also conducted imbibition experiments, with upward imbibition direction parallel or transverse to the shale bedding plane, to investigate its directional dependency. Two imbibing fluids, n-decane and water, were used during SI experiments to displace air, which is always treated as the non-wetting phase in the SI process. Mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP) is a powerful tool of characterizing the pore-throat size distribution of porous media, and many important parameters (e.g. permeability and tortuosity) could be derived from MIP data. The median pore-throat diameter (D50), defined as the pore-throat diameter corresponding to 50% mercury saturation, is an important pore-structural parameter and has been used to predict permeability and tortuosity. Our results showed that Barnett shale (from different depths), dolomite and Indiana sandstone exhibited different SI behaviors. Wettability information was obtained by comparing scaled imbibition curves. Values of D50 obtained from MIP were also used to improve the existing scaling method. Low pore connectivity of Barnett shale was confirmed by both SI and MIP results.

  15. Intrusive rocks and plutonic belts of southeastern Alaska, U.S.A.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Brew, David A.; Morrell, Robert P.

    1983-01-01

    About 30 percent of the 175,000-km2 area of southeastern Alaska is underlain by intrusive igneous rocks. Compilation of available information on the distribution, composition, and ages of these rocks indicates the presence of six major and six minor plutonic belts. From west to east, the major belts are: the Fairweather-Baranof belt of early to mid-Tertiary granodiorite; the Muir-Chichagof belt of mid-Cretaceous tonalite and granodiorite; the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt of porphyritic granodiorite, quartz diorite, and diorite of probable Cretaceous age; the Klukwan-Duke belt of concentrically zoned or Alaskan-type ultramafic-mafic plutons of mid-Cretaceous age within the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt; the Coast Plutonic Complex sill belt of tonalite of unknown, but perhaps mid-Cretaceous, age; and the Coast Plutonic Complex belt I of early to mid-Tertiary granodiorite and quartz monzonite. The minor belts are distributed as follows: the Glacier Bay belt of Cretaceous and(or) Tertiary granodiorite, tonalite, and quartz diorite lies within the Fair-weather-Baranof belt; layered gabbro complexes of inferred mid-Tertiary age lie within and are probably related to the Fairweather-Baranof belt; the Chilkat-Chichagof belt of Jurassic granodiorite and tonalite lies within the Muir-Chichagof belt; the Sitkoh Bay alkaline, the Kendrick Bay pyroxenite to quartz monzonite, and the Annette and Cape Fox trondhjemite plutons, all interpreted to be of Ordovician(?) age, together form the crude southern southeastern Alaska belt within the Muir-Chichagof belt; the Kuiu-Etolin mid-Tertiary belt of volcanic and plutonic rocks extends from the Muir-Chichagof belt eastward into the Admiralty-Revillagigedo belt; and the Behm Canal belt of mid- to late Tertiary granite lies within and next to Coast Plutonic Complex belt II. In addition, scattered mafic-ultramafic bodies occur within the Fairweather-Baranof, Muir-Chichagof, and Coast Plutonic Complex belts I and II. Palinspastic

  16. Quaternary Adakite - Nb-Enriched Basalt Association in the Western - Mexican Volcanic Belt: is There any Slab Melt Evidence?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petrone, C. M.; Ferrari, L.

    2007-05-01

    A spatial and temporal association between adakitic rocks and Nb-enriched basalts (NEB) has been recognised for the first time in the western sector of the Trans-Mexican Volcanic Belt in the San Pedro-Cerro Grande Volcanic Complex (SCVC). The SCVC is composed of subalkalic intermediate to felsic rocks, spanning in composition from high-silica andesites to rhyolites, and by the young transitional hawaiite and mugearite lavas of Amado Nervo shield volcano. Intermediate to felsic rocks of the SCVC show many geochemical characteristics of typical adakites, such as high Sr/Y ratios (up to 180) and low Y (< 18 ppm) and Yb contents. Mafic Amado Nervo rocks have high TiO2 (1.5-2.3 wt), Nb (14-27 ppm), Nb/La (0.5-0.9) and high absolute abundances of HFSE similar to those shown by NEB. However, the Sr and Nd isotopic signature of SCVC rocks is different from that shown by typical adakites and NEB. Although the adakites-NEB association has been traditionally considered as a strong evidence of slab-melting, we suggest that other processes can lead to its generation. Here we show that parental magmas of adakitic rocks of the SCVC derive their adakitic characteristic from high pressure crystal fractionation processes of garnet, amphibole and pyroxene of a normal arc basalt. On the other hand, Amado Nervo Na- alkaline parental magmas have been generated by sediment melting plus MORB-fluid flux melting of a heterogeneous mantle wedge, consisting of a mixture of depleted and an enriched mantle sources (90DM+10EM). We can not exclude a contribution to the subduction component of slab melts, because the component signature is dominated by sediment melt, but we argue that caution is needed in interpreting the adakites-NEB association in a genetic sense

  17. Study project of intrusive rocks: States of Espirito Santo and Rio de Janeiro, south and east of Minas Gerais and southeast of the state of Sao Paulo. [Brazil

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dejesusparada, N. (Principal Investigator); Dossantos, A. R.; DOSANJOS; Barbos, M. P.; Veneziani, P.

    1981-01-01

    The feasibility of mapping intrusive rocks in polycyclic and polymetamorphic areas using the logic method for photointerpretation of LANDSAT and radar imagery was investigated. The resolution, scale and spectral characteristics of the imagery were considered. Spectral characteristics of the intrusive rock units mapped using image 100 were investigated. It was determined that identification of acidic and basic intrusive bodies and determination of their relationships with principal structural directions using the logic method was feasible. Tectonic compartments were subdivided into units according to their predominant lithographic types, ignoring stratigraphy. The principal directions of various foliations, faults, megafolds, and fractural systems were defined. Delineation of the boundaries of intrusive bodies mapped using the spectral characteristics of Image 100 imagery ws determined to be more accurate than visual analysis. A 1:500,000 scale map of intrusions in the areas studied was generated.

  18. Assessing the Compositional Diversity of Intrusive Rocks on the Moon Using Near-Infrared Spectroscopic Data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klima, R. L.

    2016-05-01

    Near-infrared, gamma-ray and neutron, and thermal-infrared observations have advanced our understanding of the compositional diversity, including minor components such as thorium and hydroxyl, of intrusive lithologies exposed on the lunar surface.

  19. Geochemistry of intrusive rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field, New Mexico, and contrasts between evolution of plutonic and volcanic rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Johnson, C.M.; Czamanske, G.K.; Lipman, P.W.

    1989-01-01

    Plutonic rocks associated with the Latir volcanic field comprise three groups: 1) ???25 Ma high-level resurgent plutons composed of monzogranite and silicic metaluminous and peralkaline granite, 2) 23-25 Ma syenogranite, and alkali-feldspar granite intrusions emplaced along the southern caldera margin, and 3) 19-23 Ma granodiorite and granite plutons emplaced south of the caldera. Major-element compositions of both extrusive and intrusive suites in the Latir field are broadly similar; both suites include high-SiO2 rocks with low Ba and Sr, and high Rb, Nb, Th, and U contents. Moreover, both intermediateto siliciccomposition volcanic and plutonic rocks contain abundant accessory sphene and apatite, rich in rare-earth elements (REE), as well as phases in which REE's are essential components. Strong depletion in Y and REE contents, with increasing SiO2 content, in the plutonic rocks indicate a major role for accessory mineral fractionation that is not observed in volcanic rocks of equivalent composition. Considerations of the rheology of granitic magma suggest that accessory-mineral fractionation may occur primarily by filter-pressing evolved magmas from crystal-rich melts. More limited accessory-mineral crystallization and fractionation during evolution of the volcanic magmas may have resulted from markedly lower diffusivities of essential trace elements than major elements. Accessory-mineral fractionation probably becomes most significant at high crystallinities. The contrast in crystallization environments postulated for the extrusive and intrusive rocks may be common to other magmatic systems; the effects are particularly pronounced in highly evolved rocks of the Latir field. High-SiO2 peralkaline porphyry emplaced during resurgence of the Questa caldera represents non-erupted portions of the magma that produced the Amalia Tuff during caldera-forming eruption. The peralkaline porphyry continues compositional and mineralogical trends found in the tuff. Amphibole

  20. Intrusive rocks of the Holden and Lucerne quadrangles, Washington; the relation of depth zones, composition, textures, and emplacement of plutons

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cater, Fred W.

    1982-01-01

    The core of the northern Cascade Range in Washington consists of Precambrian and upper Paleozoic metamorphic rocks cut by numerous plutons, ranging in age from early Triassic to Miocene. The older plutons have been eroded to catazonal depths, whereas subvolcanic rocks are exposed in the youngest plutons. The Holden and Lucerne quadrangles span a -sizeable and representative part of this core. The oldest of the formations mapped in these quadrangles is the Swakane Biotite Gneiss, which was shown on the quadrangle maps as Cretaceous and older in age. The Swakane has yielded a middle Paleozoic metamorphic age, and also contains evidence of zircon inherited from some parent material more than 1,650 m.y. old. In this report, the Swakane is assigned an early Paleozoic or older age. It consists mostly of biotite gneiss, but interlayered with it are scattered layers and lenses of hornblende schist and gneiss, clinozoisite-epidote gneiss, and quartzite. Thickness of the Swakane is many thousands of meters, and the base is not exposed. The biotite gneiss is probably derived from a pile of siliceous volcanic rocks containing scattered sedimentary beds and basalt flows. Overlying the Swakane is a thick sequence of eugeosynclinal upper Paleozoic rocks metamorphosed to amphibolite grade. The sequence includes quartzite and thin layers of marble, hornblende schist and gneiss, graphitic schist, and smaller amounts of schist and gneiss of widely varying compositions. The layers have been tightly and complexly folded, and, in places, probably had been thrust over the overlying Swakane prior to metamorphism. Youngest of the supracrustal rocks in the area are shale, arkosic sandstone, and conglomerate of the Paleocene Swauk Formation. These rocks are preserved in the Chiwaukum graben, a major structural element of the region. Of uncertain age, but possibly as old as any of the intrusive rocks in the area, are small masses of ultramafic rocks, now almost completely altered to

  1. Geochemical Characteristics and Petrogenesis of Adakites in Sikhote-Alin, Russian Far East

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Jeremy Tsung Jui; Jahn, Bor-ming; Nechaev, Victor; Chashchin, Alexander; Yokoyama, Kazumi; Tsutsumi, Yukiyasu

    2016-04-01

    The Sikhote-Alin orogenic belt and late Precambrian Khanka block are two major tectonic units in the southernmost Russian Far East. The Sikhote-Alin belt comprises several tectonostratigraphic terranes, including late Precambrian nappes, and Mesozoic accretionary prisms and turbidite basins. These terranes are overlain by Cretaceous to Paleocene felsic to intermediate volcanic rocks and intruded by granitoids. The magmatic rocks are collectively known as "the East Sikhote-Alin volcano-plutonic belt" (ESAVPB), and mainly characterized by acid-to-intermediate compositions. In this work we study the petrogenesis of adakitic rocks and discuss the possible tectonic implications. Adakitic rocks of the Sikhote-Alin orogen were emplaced in two main periods: Early Cretaceous (132-98 Ma) and Eocene (46-45 Ma). They mainly occur in the Khanka block, with a subordinate amount in the ESAVPB. The adakites show a large range of chemical composition: SiO2 = 57-74%, Al2O3 = 15-18%, Na2O = 3.5-6.1%, K2O = 0.7-3.2%, Na2O/K2O = 1.1-3.9, Sr/Y = 33-145, and (La/Yb)N = 11-53. HREE and HFSE are remarkably depleted. The Early Cretaceous adakites show eNd(T) = -1.0 to +3.2; ISr = 0.7040 - 0.7090, and the Eocene adakites have eNd(T) = -2.0 to +2.2; ISr = 0.7042 - 0.7058. Thus, the Cretaceous and Eocene adakites show rather similar Sr-Nd isotopic compositions, but their Nd isotopic signatures (slightly negative to positive eNd(T) values) may distinguish them from the granitoids of the ESAVPB (only negative eNd(T) values). Adakites may have different modes of generation, but partial melting of meta-basic rocks in a subduction zone is considered the most likely mode for the present case. The two periods of adakites have probably formed in the following scenario. The early Cretaceous emplacement ages for the adakites and the oldest granitoids of the ESAVPB, is considered as the time of initiation of the Paleo-Pacific subduction in NE Asia. The Eocene adakites were also generated in subduction

  2. The nature and origin of Fe-Ti-P-rich rocks in the Qareaghaj mafic-ultramafic intrusion, NW Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirmohammadi, M.; Kananian, A.; Tarkian, M.

    2007-09-01

    Fe-Ti-P-rich rocks (FTP) are unusual with respect to their mineralogy and bulk composition. Varieties of these rocks are mostly related to Proterozoic massif-type anorthosites and to a lesser extent to the upper parts of mafic-ultramafic intracratonic layered complexes and other igneous rock suites. We present results on the geology, mineralogy and geochemistry of a new occurrence of FTP, associated with mafic rocks in the northwestern part of Iran. The Qareaghaj mafic-ultramafic intrusion (QMUI) is a small igneous body situated between Palaeozoic sedimentary rocks and a Precambrian low grade metamorphic complex. The QMUI is composed mainly of non-mineralized mafic and apatite- and Fe-Ti oxide-rich ultramafic rocks. The mafic rocks, mainly coarse-grained gabbro, microgabbro and amphibolite, have a simple mineral assemblage (plagioclase + clinopyroxene + ilmenite) and based on field observations, mineralogy and chemical composition are comagmatic. The ultramafic rocks with high proportion of olivine (˜40-66 vol.%), apatite (˜0.1-16 vol.%), ilmenite (˜11-19 vol.%) and magnetite (˜2-13 vol.%), have unusual bulk compositions (e.g., SiO2 ˜ 21-30 wt.%, total iron expressed as Fe2O3 tot ˜ 26-42 wt.%, TiO2 ˜ 5-11 wt.%, MgO ˜ 9-20 wt.%, P2O5 up to 5.1 wt.%, Cr ˜ 40-160 ppm, Ni ˜ 7-73 ppm). The FTP forms numerous sill-like layers, ranging in thickness from ˜5 cm to few meters. These rocks, totally enclosed in mafic rocks with sharp and concordant contacts, show a magmatic lamination and follow the general NW-SE trend of QMUI. The apatite-rich ultramafic rocks makes up 90-95% of the total ultramafic outcrops and contain Mg-poor olivine (Mg# ˜ 40-58) and low-Mg spinel (Mg# ˜ 30-44) in contrast to apatite-poor ones (˜60-63 and ˜43-46, respectively). Field relationships, mineral compositions and geochemical data suggested that the FTP are not related to the mafic host rocks. On the contrary, they intruded latter into the gabbros during plastic, high temperature

  3. Adakites from collision-modified lithosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haschke, M.; Ben-Avraham, Z.

    2005-08-01

    Adakitic melts from Papua New Guinea (PNG) show adakitic geochemical characteristics, yet their geodynamic context is unclear. Modern adakites are associated with hot-slab melting and/or remelting of orogenic mafic underplate at convergent margins. Rift-propagation over collision-modified lithosphere may explain the PNG adakite enigma, as PNG was influenced by rapid creation and subduction of oceanic microplates since Mesozoic times. In a new (rift) tectonic regime, decompressional rift melts encountered and melted remnant mafic eclogite and/or garnet-amphibolite slab fragments in arc collisional-modified mantle, and partially equilibrated with metasomatized mantle. Alternatively, hot-slab melting in a proposed newborn subduction zone along the Trobriand Trough could generate adakitic melts, but recent seismic P-wave tomographic models lack evidence for subducting oceanic lithosphere in the adakite melt region; however they do show deep subduction zone remnants as a number of high P-wave anomalies at lithospheric depths, which supports our proposed scenario.

  4. Thermo-physical rock properties of greywacke basement rock and intrusive lavas from the Taupo Volcanic Zone, New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mielke, P.; Weinert, S.; Bignall, G.; Sass, I.

    2016-09-01

    Greywacke of the Waipapa and Torlesse (Composite) Terrane form the basement of the Taupo Volcanic Zone (TVZ), New Zealand. Together with inferred buried lavas, domes and igneous complexes they are likely to be the dominant rock type prevailing at depths > 4 km beneath the TVZ. A fundamental understanding of the rock properties of the deep formations is of utmost importance for the exploration of deep unconventional geothermal resources. An outcrop analogue study was conducted to improve the understanding of the thermo-physical rock properties of likely deep buried rock formations beneath the TVZ. A total of 145 core samples were taken at 10 locations inside and outside the TVZ and their grain and bulk density, porosity, matrix permeability, bulk thermal conductivity and specific heat capacity, and the compressional and shear wave velocities measured on oven-dry samples. Additional tests of the unconfined compressive strength were conducted for selected greywacke samples to quantify their mechanical rock strength. The obtained data indicates that the thermo-physical rock properties are mainly controlled by porosity, and minor by mineralogy, texture and grain size. Samples from Waipapa-type and Torlesse-type greywacke exhibit minor rheological differences, with Waipapa-type greywacke having lowest porosity (about 1% vs. 3%) and highest bulk thermal conductivity (2.5 W m- 1 K- 1 vs. 1.7 W m- 1 K- 1) and specific heat capacity (0.8 kJ kg- 1 K- 1 vs. 0.7 kJ kg- 1 K- 1). Matrix permeability is < 1E-16 m2 for all greywacke samples. Tested lavas exhibit heterogeneous rock properties due to their wide range of porosity (< 1% up to 32%). The thermo-physical rock properties were tested at laboratory conditions (ambient temperature and pressure), which do not reflect the in situ conditions at greater depth. With depth, thermal conductivity and acoustic wave velocity are likely to decrease caused by micro fractures resulting from thermal cracking of the rock, while specific

  5. Metasomatized and hybrid rocks associated with a Palaeoarchaean layered ultramafic intrusion on the Johannesburg Dome, South Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Anhaeusser, Carl R.

    2015-02-01

    The Johannesburg Dome occurs as an inlier of Palaeoarchaean-Mesoarchaean granitic rocks, gneisses and greenstones in the central part of the Kaapvaal Craton, South Africa. In the west-central part of the dome a large greenstone remnant is surrounded and intruded by ca. 3114 Ma porphyritic granodiorites. Referred to locally as the Zandspruit greenstone remnant, it consists of a shallow-dipping ultramafic complex comprised of a number of alternating layers of harzburgite and pyroxenite. The ultramafic rocks are metamorphosed to greenschist grade and have largely been altered to serpentinite and amphibolite (tremolite-actinolite). In the granite-greenstone contact areas the porphyritic granodiorite has partially assimilated the greenstones producing a variety of hybrid rocks of dioritic composition. The hybrid rocks contain enclaves or xenoliths of greenstone and, in places, orbicular granite structures. Particularly noteworthy is an unusual zone of potash-metasomatized rock, occurring adjacent to the porphyritic granodiorite, consisting dominantly of biotite and lesser amounts of carbonate, quartz and sericite. Large potash-feldspar megacrysts and blotchy aggregated feldspar clusters give the rocks a unique texture. An interpretation placed on these rocks is that they represent metasomatized metapyroxenites of the layered ultramafic complex. Field relationships and geochemical data suggest that the rocks were influenced by hydrothermal fluids emanating from the intrusive porphyritic granodiorite. The adjacent greenstones were most likely transformed largely by the process of infiltration metasomatism, rather than simple diffusion, as CO2, H2O as well as dissolved components were added to the greenstones. Element mobility appears to have been complex as those generally regarded as being immobile, such as Ti, Y, Zr, Hf, Ta, Nb, Th, Sc, Ni, Cr, V, and Co, have undergone addition or depletion from the greenstones. Relative to all the rocks analyzed from the greenstones

  6. Northward subduction of Bangong-Nujiang Tethys: Insight from Late Jurassic intrusive rocks from Bangong Tso in western Tibet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Shi-Min; Zhu, Di-Cheng; Wang, Qing; Zhao, Zhi-Dan; Sui, Qing-Lin; Liu, Sheng-Ao; Liu, Dong; Mo, Xuan-Xue

    2014-09-01

    New zircon LA-ICPMS U-Pb age data, whole-rock major and trace elements, and zircon Hf isotopic data of intrusive rocks from Larelaxin and Caima plutons in the southern margin of the Western Qiangtang subterrane provide important evidence of northward subduction of the Bangong-Nujiang Tethyan Ocean lithosphere. Host granitoids including quartz diorites, granodiorites, and syenogranites and associated mafic varieties including gabbroic enclaves, dioritic dikes and enclaves, and quartz dioritic enclaves are investigated in this study. Five host granitoid samples are dated at 163-160 Ma, and one dioritic dike and three dioritic enclave samples are dated at 162-158 Ma, which indicates that these rocks were contemporaneous. The quartz diorites and granodiorites are normal calc-alkaline I-type granitoids. The syenogranites are characterized by high SiO2 (74-77 wt.%) and differentiation index (DI = 92-97) and marked depletion in Ba, Nb, Ta, Sr, P, Ti, and Eu, thus indicating that they are highly fractionated I-type granitoids. The host granitoids exhibit uniform zircon εHf(t) values (- 1.4 to + 1.9). Considering the current data and their negative whole-rock εNd(t) values (- 4.7 to - 3.5) reported in recent studies, these rocks can be interpreted to have resulted from the partial melting of ancient mafic lower crust with varying contributions from mantle-derived or juvenile crust-derived components. One gabbroic enclave sample exhibits high Al2O3 (18.3 wt.%), low MgO (3.3 wt.%), high TiO2 (1.4 wt.%), and high Nb (24 ppm) and is geochemically similar to high-alumina basalt (HAB) and high-Nb basalt (HNB). This indicates that the gabbroic enclave originated from the partial melting of mantle wedge peridotite that was metasomatized by slab melting and subsequently experienced significant fractional crystallization of olivine and clinopyroxene. The dioritic dike and enclave samples yield εHf(t) values (- 1.6 to + 3.1) similar to those of the host granitoids. They most likely

  7. Fluorian garnets from the host rocks of the Skaergaard intrusion: implications for metamorphic fluid composition

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Manning, C.E.; Bird, D.K.

    1990-01-01

    Zoned, silica-deficient, calcic garnets containing up to 5 mol% F substitution for O formed during contact metamorphism of basalts by the Skaergaard intrusion in East Greenland. Fluorian calcic garnets occur as a retrograde alteration of prograde wollastonite and clinopyroxene that fills vesicles and vugs in lavas 30-70 m from the intrusion. The F content of garnet is extremely sensitive to minor changes in fluid composition. The calculations show that a decrease in pH or an increase in log aF- of 0.3 at constant pressure and temperature will decrease the F concentration in garnet from 5 to 0 mol%. The results of this study show that fluorian hydrous grandites provide a mineralogical record of the activities of F species in coexisting metamorphic and hydrothermal fluids. -from Authors

  8. Investigation of rock samples using X-ray-microcomputer-tomography before and after mercury intrusion porosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Klobes, P.; Riesemeier, H.; Meyer, K.; Goebbels, J.; Siitari-Kauppi, M.; Hellmuth, K.H.

    1997-12-31

    A new method for the physical characterization of rock matrices for use in site investigations of nuclear waste repositories has been developed. The method can provide information needed in the assessment of the performance of the geosphere working as a natural barrier retarding the migration of radionuclides by diffusion into the rock matrix. Most conventional methods for the physical characterization of rocks give only bulk information. The combination of mercury porosimetry and computer tomography can give 3-D data on mineral-specific porosity distributions with additional pore size information. Additionally, limits for mineral-specific internal surface areas can be estimated, which is essential for the assessment of water-rock interaction and reactive interaction with radionuclides (sorption). Results of measurements on granitic rock (granodiorite) from the Baltic shield are discussed and integrated with results by complementary methods.

  9. The Archaean tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) series is not an analogue of Cenozoic adakite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smithies, R. H.

    2000-10-01

    The tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) series comprises silicic and sodic rocks that form a major component of preserved Archaean crust. TTG are widely considered to have formed during subduction by partial melting of hydrated oceanic crust. This hypothesis relies primarily on compositional similarities with Cenozoic subduction-related felsic rocks called adakites. However, simple geochemical parameters, such as silica content and Mg # [=Mg 2+/(Mg 2++Fe Total)×100, with Fe Total as Fe 2+], show that TTG are distinct from adakite. Most adakite suites comprise, or include, high Mg # and low SiO 2 samples which suggest that these slab melts interacted with the mantle, whereas virtually all samples of pre-3.0 Ga TTG, and more than half of the samples of post-3.0 Ga TTG, show no evidence for such interaction. Convincing evidence for a direct mantle component in TTG is primarily restricted to samples from the late Archaean Superior Province of Canada, where there is also independent evidence for subduction and arc-accretion. Consequently, most early Archaean, and many late Archaean, TTG suites are not analogues of Cenozoic adakite. The composition of these TTG suites does not provide evidence for modern-style subduction processes. Tectonic models that accommodate TTG production through melting of hydrous basaltic material at the base of thickened crust may be more appropriate to the Archaean.

  10. Transition from adakitic to bimodal magmatism induced by the paleo-Pacific plate subduction and slab rollback beneath SE China: Evidence from petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the dike swarms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xia, Yan; Xu, Xisheng; Liu, Lei

    2016-02-01

    The late Mesozoic magmatic record of SE China is dominated by felsic volcanics and intrusions. However, this magmatism mainly occurred in coastal areas at 110-80 Ma, in contrast to poorly researched dike swarms that were emplaced inland at 165-120 Ma. Here, we focus on Early Cretaceous mafic and felsic dike swarms that provide new insights into the tectono-magmatic evolution of SE China. The swarms were intruded into Neoproterozoic plutons and include granodioritic porphyry, granitic porphyry, and diabase dikes. The granodioritic porphyry (128 ± 2 Ma) dikes are geochemically similar to adakitic rocks, suggesting that inland adakitic magmatism occurred between ca. 175 and ca. 130 Ma. The majority of these adakitic rocks are calc-alkaline and have Sr-Nd-Hf-O isotopic compositions that are indicative of derivation from a Neoproterozoic magmatic arc source within the lower crust. The granitic porphyry and diabase dikes were emplaced coevally at ca. 130 Ma, and the former contain high alkali and high field strength element (HFSE; e.g., Zr, Nb, Ce, and Y) concentrations that together with their high Ga/Al and FeOT/(FeOT + MgO) ratios imply an A-type affinity. The widespread ca. 130 Ma magmatism that formed the A-type granites and coeval diabase dikes defines a NE-SW trending inland belt of bimodal magmatism in SE China. The presence of mafic enclaves in some of the A-type granites, and the Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of the latter are indicative of inadequate mixing between the basement sediment-derived and coeval mantle-derived basaltic melts that define the bimodal magmatism. The transition from adakitic rocks to bimodal magmatism in the inland region of SE China indicates a change in the prevailing tectonic regime. This change was associated with an increase in the dip angle of the northwestward-subducting paleo-Pacific Plate beneath SE China between the Middle Jurassic and the Early Cretaceous. This resulted in a transition from a local intra-plate extensional

  11. Niobium-enriched basalts from the Wabigoon subprovince, Canada: evidence for adakitic metasomatism above an Archean subduction zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wyman, D. A.; Ayer, J. A.; Devaney, J. R.

    2000-06-01

    Late Archean niobium-enriched basalts from the Central Sturgeon Lake assemblage and Neepawa group of the western Wabigoon subprovince have mantle-normalized Nb/La between 0.8 and 1.3 and Zr/Y between 4 and 7. They are compositionally similar to basalts attributed to adakite metasomatism of mantle wedge regions in Cenozoic subduction zones [Sajona et al., J. Petrol. 37 (1996) 693-726]. In detail, their Sc-REE systematics suggest the Archean basalts were generated above the garnet stability field. An association with adakite-like volcanic rocks, an absence of komatiites and the arc-like attributes of their host sequences suggest a subduction-related origin for the basalts. If current models of adakite and Niobium-enriched basalt genesis are valid, then additional examples of these rocks should be relatively common in other Archean greenstone belts.

  12. Composition, age, and petrogenesis of Late Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the central Big Belt Mountains, Broadwater and Meagher counties, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Du Bray, E.A.; Snee, L.W.

    2002-01-01

    Cretaceous intrusions hosted by the Proterozoic Newland Formation. The northern intrusion, centered on Boulder Baldy, consists of outer, intermediate, and core zones composed of aegirine-augite quartz monzonite, hornblende quartz monzodiorite, and biotite granodiorite, respectively. The southern intrusion, north of Mount Edith, is compositionally indistinguishable from the intermediate zone of the northern intrusion.

  13. Geochronology and correlation of Tertiary volcanic and intrusive rocks in part of the southern Toquima Range, Nye County, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Shawe, Daniel R.; Snee, Lawrence W.; Byers, Frank M., Jr.; du Bray, Edward A.

    2014-01-01

    Extensive volcanic and intrusive igneous activity, partly localized along regional structural zones, characterized the southern Toquima Range, Nevada, in the late Eocene, Oligocene, and Miocene. The general chronology of igneous activity has been defined previously. This major episode of Tertiary magmatism began with emplacement of a variety of intrusive rocks, followed by formation of nine major calderas and associated with voluminous extrusive and additional intrusive activity. Emplacement of volcanic eruptive and collapse megabreccias accompanied formation of some calderas. Penecontemporaneous volcanism in central Nevada resulted in deposition of distally derived outflow facies ash-flow tuff units that are interleaved in the Toquima Range with proximally derived ash-flow tuffs. Eruption of the Northumberland Tuff in the north part of the southern Toquima Range and collapse of the Northumberland caldera occurred about 32.3 million years ago. The poorly defined Corcoran Canyon caldera farther to the southeast formed following eruption of the tuff of Corcoran Canyon about 27.2 million years ago. The Big Ten Peak caldera in the south part of the southern Toquima Range Tertiary volcanic complex formed about 27 million years ago during eruption of the tuff of Big Ten Peak and associated air-fall tuffs. The inferred Ryecroft Canyon caldera formed in the south end of the Monitor Valley adjacent to the southern Toquima Range and just north of the Big Ten Peak caldera in response to eruption of the tuff of Ryecroft Canyon about 27 million years ago, and the Moores Creek caldera just south of the Northumberland caldera developed at about the same time. Eruption of the tuff of Mount Jefferson about 26.8 million years ago was accompanied by collapse of the Mount Jefferson caldera in the central part of the southern Toquima Range. An inferred caldera, mostly buried beneath alluvium of Big Smoky Valley southwest of the Mount Jefferson caldera, formed about 26.5 million years

  14. Generation of adakites in a cold subduction zone due to double subducting plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, Hitomi; Iwamori, Hikaru

    2013-06-01

    Adakites have been found in various tectonic settings, since the first report for the distinct lavas as a product of slab melting in Adak Island by Kay (J Volcanol Geotherm Res 4:117-132, 1978). In this study, we present geochemical data for an `adakite' and `adakitic rock' suite in central Japan with a cold subduction environment due to the two overlapping subducting plates: the Pacific plate and the Philippine sea plate. Based on the major, trace and isotopic compositions of the rocks, elemental transport from initial slab inventory at the trench to the volcanic rocks as a final product is quantitatively analyzed, considering the thermal structure, slab dehydration, elemental mobility, slab-fluid migration and melting of fluid-added mantle. The analysis demonstrates a large compositional impact of slab-fluid in the arc magma generation in central Japan. The melting conditions have been also estimated inversely by optimizing the predicted magma composition to the observed composition of volcanic rock, with the two parameters: the degree of melting and the proportion of spinel and garnet lherzolites involved in melting. Consequently, a moderately low degree of near-solidus melting of dominantly garnet lherzolite with a high fluid flux from the two overlapping slabs beneath the region has been argued to be responsible for the compositional characteristics, including the adakitic signatures, of the studied rocks. These results imply that the geochemical approach may provide useful constraints on the P- T condition of melting in the mantle wedge and the thermal structure in subduction zones, being complementary to the geophysical approach.

  15. Generation of adakites in a cold subduction zone due to double subducting plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakamura, H.; Iwamori, H.

    2012-12-01

    Adakites have been found in various tectonic settings, since the first report for the distinct lavas as a product of slab melting in Adak Island by Kay (1978). In this study, we present geochemical data for an 'adakite' and 'adakitic rock' suite in central Japan with a cold subduction environment due to the two overlapping subudcting plates, the Pacific Plate and the Philippine Sea Plate. Based on the major, trace and isotopic compositions of the rocks, elemental transport from initial slab inventory at the trench to the volcanic rocks as a final product is quantitatively analyzed, considering the thermal structure, slab dehydration, elemental mobility, slab-fluid migration and melting of fluid-added mantle. The analysis demonstrates a large compositional impact of slab-fluid in the arc magma generation in central Japan. The melting conditions have been also estimated inversely by optimizing the predicted magma composition to the observed composition of volcanic rock, with the two parameters: the degree of melting and the proportion of spinel- and garnet-lherzolites involved in melting. Consequently, a low degree of melting of dominantly garnet-lherzolite with a high fluid flux from the two overlapping slabs beneath the region has been argued to be responsible for the compositional characteristics, including the adakitic signatures, of the studied rocks. These results imply that the geochemical approach may provide useful constraints on the P-T condition of melting in the mantle wedge and the thermal structure in subduction zones, being complementary to the geophysical approach. We have also applied this geochemical approach to the adjacent NE Japan where the Pacific plate subducts, which revealed the thermal regime in the mantle beneath the arc-arc transition.

  16. Geochemistry of the iliniza volcanic complex, ecuador: adakitic suites petrogenesis in the ecuadorian forearc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, S.; Monzier, M.; Martin, H.; Eissen, J. P.; Cotten, J.

    2003-04-01

    The presence of volcanic rocks with an adakitic imprint or even true adakites in the Ecuadorian volcanic arc is known since the late 90s. Adakitic magmas are generated by the partial melting of the subducting oceanic crust, a process that may happen in a special geodynamic context, like a flat subduction or when the subducting lithosphere is young, both being possible in Ecuador. In order to constrain the adakitic magma´s role in the Ecuadorian arc evolution, a geochemical study of the Iliniza Volcanic Complex (IVC) was undertaken, including 58 whole rock analysis, 236 electron microprobe data and 16 LA-ICP-MS analysis. This poorly known volcanic complex is located 60 km south-south-west of Quito in the Western Cordillera of Ecuador. It is comprised of twin peaks (North Iliniza and South Iliniza) and at least three satellite domes (Huayrapungu, Pilongo and Tishigcuchi). This volcanic complex, made up of medium-K andesites and dacites, presents three different geochemical series with a varying adakitic imprint that requires different individual evolutions. The older Iliniza series shows a simple evolution with fractional crystallization of amphibole, plagioclase, clinopyroxene, magnetite and apatite from a parental magma, the product of the mixing of 36% adakitic and 64% calc-alkaline magma. The intermediate Pilongo series magma is the product of a moderate to high degree (26%) of partial melting of the subducting oceanic crust, that arrived to the surface with little or no interaction with the mantle wedge and no crustal contamination. The more recent Tishigcuchi series shows three stages of evolution that includes (1) metasomatism of the mantle wedge peridotite by slab melts, (2) partial melting of this enriched source and (3) minor degree fractional crystallization of amphibole. The relative ages of the edifices do not show a geochemical evolution from a calc-alkaline magma to an adakitic one, as it is observed for several volcanoes of the Ecuadorian arc. The

  17. Release of uranium from rock matrix--a record of glacial meltwater intrusions?

    PubMed

    Rasilainen, Kari; Suksi, Juhani; Ruskeeniemi, Timo; Pitkänen, Petteri; Poteri, Antti

    2003-03-01

    Uranium release observed in a rock matrix around water-carrying fractures was studied using U-series disequilibrium (USD) modelling and mass balance calculations. Several release scenarios were tested, with specific attention to the glacial aspects. The release appears to have occurred in two or three violent episodes during the last 300 ky. A release after the last glaciation can be excluded on mass flow grounds. Continuous release for more than 300 ky can be excluded on radioactive disequilibrium grounds. Repeated inflows of oxic glacial meltwater seem to have triggered the release episodes. PMID:12598107

  18. Uniaxial creep as a control on mercury intrusion capillary pressure in consolidating rock salt

    SciTech Connect

    Dewers, Thomas; Heath, Jason E.; Leigh, Christi D.

    2015-09-01

    The nature of geologic disposal of nuclear waste in salt formations requires validated and verified two - phase flow models of transport of brine and gas through intact, damaged, and consolidating crushed salt. Such models exist in oth er realms of subsurface engineering for other lithologic classes (oil and gas, carbon sequestration etc. for clastics and carbonates) but have never been experimentally validated and parameterized for salt repository scenarios or performance assessment. Mo dels for waste release scenarios in salt back - fill require phenomenological expressions for capillary pressure and relative permeability that are expected to change with degree of consolidation, and require experimental measurement to parameterize and vali date. This report describes a preliminary assessment of the influence of consolidation (i.e. volume strain or porosity) on capillary entry pressure in two phase systems using mercury injection capillary pressure (MICP). This is to both determine the potent ial usefulness of the mercury intrusion porosimetry method, but also to enable a better experimental design for these tests. Salt consolidation experiments are performed using novel titanium oedometers, or uniaxial compression cells often used in soil mech anics, using sieved run - of - mine salt from the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP) as starting material. Twelve tests are performed with various starting amounts of brine pore saturation, with axial stresses up to 6.2 MPa (%7E900 psi) and temperatures to 90 o C. This corresponds to UFD Work Package 15SN08180211 milestone "FY:15 Transport Properties of Run - of - Mine Salt Backfill - Unconsolidated to Consolidated". Samples exposed to uniaxial compression undergo time - dependent consolidation, or creep, to various deg rees. Creep volume strain - time relations obey simple log - time behavior through the range of porosities (%7E50 to 2% as measured); creep strain rate increases with temperature and applied stress as

  19. U-Pb and K-Ar geochronology in Paleozoic and Mesozoic intrusive rocks of the Coastal Cordillera, Valparaiso, Chile

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gana, Paulina; Tosdal, Richard M.

    1996-01-01

    The U-Pb and K-Ar geochronology applied to intrusive rocks from the Coastal Batholith of Central Chile, demonstrates the existence of a basement block of the Mirasol Unit, with a crystallization age of 299??10 Ma, exposed in the northern block of the Melipilla Fault. The age of 214??1 Ma obtained in the 'Dioritas Gne??isicas de Cartagena Unit', indicates that a Late Triassic magmatism took place in this region; it coincides with the end of an extensive crustal melting period, proposed for northern Chile. The ages of the Jurassic plutonic units (Laguna Verde, Sauce, Pen??uelas and Limache) are restricted to the 156-161 Ma interval, showing in certain cases, inherited zircons from an unknown source. The difference between ages obtained using both chronological methods is a few million years, indicating that a short time passed between the crystallization and the cooling of the plutonic bodies, as well as a fast magmatic differentiation process. The Laguna Verde and Sauce Units, experienced a fast uplift, probably as a result of an extensional tectonic process in the magmatic arc, or induced by the magmatic pressure through fracture zones during Middle Jurassic.

  20. Petrogenetic connections between volcanic rocks and intrusive suites in the California arc - toward an integrated model for upper-crustal magma system evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barth, A. P.; Riggs, N.; Walker, J. D.; Andrew, J.; Jacobson, C. E.; Miller, D. M.; Robert, J.

    2014-12-01

    Volcanic and clastic sedimentary rocks in deeply eroded, predominantly plutonic arcs provide records of arc development and the links between volcanic and plutonic processes. We are analyzing existing and new geochronologic and petrologic data from volcanic breccias, ignimbrites and intrusive suites in the Sierra Nevada and Mojave Desert sectors of the Mesozoic California arc, in an effort to construct an integrated volcano-plutonic model for silicic magmatism in arc upper crust. SIMS and TIMS U-Pb zircon ages, immobile element abundances in whole rocks, and trace element abundances in zircons allow us to interpret the magmatic heritage of ignimbrites and components of underlying granodioritic to granitic intrusive suites. Preliminary results suggest several conclusions: (1) first-order magma production was episodic, with plutonic, forearc and retro-arc detrital zircons defining three magmatic pulses of ~40-60 m.y. duration that are largely mimicked by the more limited record of zircons in ignimbrites; (2) in the Triassic and Jurassic, second-order pulses on 2-10 m.y. time scales are recorded in both the intrusive and ignimbrite records, suggesting that eruption of ignimbrites was synchronous at the shortest resolvable time scales with assembly of underlying incrementally emplaced intrusive suites; (3) ignimbrites range from dacite to rhyolite in bulk composition, and are petrographically similar to modern "monotonous intermediate" dacite or phenocryst-poor low-silica rhyolite; (4) these tuffs are as fractionated as intrusive rocks, and commonly, though not always, contain zircons with similarly complex, multi-stage growth histories. Thus ignimbrites and felsic granodiorites in this arc are complementary elements recording lengthy and episodic evolutionary histories in cool and hydrous upper-crustal arc magma systems.

  1. Geochemical Evolution of Baru Volcano and the Origin of the Adakite Signal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, P. J.; Rooney, T. O.

    2012-12-01

    Subduction zones constitute environments where the exchange of mantle and crustal material is possible. This exchange plays a central role in the evolution of the continental crust and the Earth's mantle and may be probed by examining the geochemical properties of arc magmas. At Baru volcano, volcanic products range from "typical" calc-alkaline arc magmas that swiftly transition to adakitic compositions. This compositional transition may have significant implications for the thermal state of subduction zones. Specifically, are adakites the result of slab melting resulting from increased heat within the mantle wedge/subducting slab, or could volatile fluxing of the mantle be responsible for adakite genesis? At Baru volcano, we have used a robust geochronological and geochemical dataset to examine processes that are responsible for generation of magmas from the Miocene to present. For primitive rocks that span Miocene to Quaternary, we have used Arc-Basalt Simulator II to model water contents and degrees of melting. Our data show a distinct drop in modeled water content (3.5%-6% vs. 2%-5%) and degree of melting (20%-23% vs 10%-15%) between the Miocene period of typical arc volcanism and the Quaternary adakitic volcanism. Despite the lower modeled water contents for magmas during the Quaternary adakitic phase, these water values are significantly enriched over those recorded in melts generated by slab melting processes (<0.7 % H2O), and support previous studies suggesting adakites in the Panama arc may be produced by fractional crystallization of amphibole and garnet. The water content of arc magmas is a critical control in the composition of the fractionating assemblage. At moderate pressures (~12 Kb), elevated magmatic water contents promote amphibole stability and fractionation path that yields normal island arc magmas. However, with decreasing magma water contents garnet may become stable at the expense of amphibole, yielding an adakitic magmatic signature. Our

  2. Double-layer mode of acid intrusive rocks from Xiuwacu Porphyry Mo deposit, Northwestern Yunnan SW China: U-Pb geochronology evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Haijun; Li, Wenchang

    2016-04-01

    Recent research infer that, the south-north extension of the Xiuwacu-Tongchanggou acidic intrusive belt along the Geza island arc have been developed of intense molybdenum-mutimetallic mineralization(Li et al., 2012, 2013; Yu et al., 2015). The northern section of this intrusive belt exposed widly and occur much monzonitic granite, biotite-granite, granodiorite, biotite-monzogranite; while in southern section, intrusions are cocealed. The Tongchanggou district in south section have been obtained large breakthrough of porphyry-skarn type molybdenum-multimetallic deposits exploration recent years(Yu et al., 2014), the Mo-W mineral resources also increased year after year in north section of the belt. The Mo-mineral resouree potential of porphyry-skarn type Mo-mutimetallic deposits in whole area are tremendous. Xiuwacu Porphyry molybdenum deposit was explored in Geza island arc, and widespread Biotite granite and monzonitic granite that is closely related to mineralization. We have understood poorly about this ore deposit for the harsh geographical circumstance, through, some referential result in chronology have accumulated, it still lack of systematic lithogeochemical study and reliable chronology data about intrusions. We yield biotite granite and monzonitic zircons U-Pb ages(200.93±0.65Ma, 83.57±0.32Ma, respectively) of Xiuwacu. There are two periods of intermediate-acid intrusive rocks of Xiuwacu area. Indosinian Biotite granite and Yanshanian monzonitic granite were formed as superposition phenomenon.

  3. Hydrothermal alteration and tectonic setting of intrusive rocks from East Brawley, Imperial Valley: an application of petrology to geothermal reservoir analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Keskinen, M.; Sternfeld, J.

    1982-01-01

    A geothermal well near East Brawley intersected a series of thin (3 to 35m) diabasic to dioritic intrusives. The petrology and chemistry of these meta-igneous rocks can provide insight into the thermal and fluid chemical characteristics of the reservoir and into the processes of magma generation at depth. A description of the rock types and their hydrothermal alteration is presented in order to increase the petrologic data base relating to this important facet of the geothermal potential of the Salton Trough and to provide a case study illustrating how detailed petrologic examination of well cuttings can provide important input in the construction of a geothermal reservoir model.

  4. Principal oil and gas plays in the Appalachian Basin (Province 131) (Chapter I). Middle eocene intrusive igneous rocks of the central Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province: Setting, chemistry, and implications for crustal structure (Chapter J). Bulletin

    SciTech Connect

    de Witt, W.; Southworth, C.S.; Gray, K.J.; Sutter, J.F.

    1993-12-31

    ;Contents: Principal Oil and Gas Plays in the Appalachian Basin (Province 131); and Middle Eocene Intrusive Igneous Rocks of the Central Appalachian Valley and Ridge Province - Setting, Chemistry, and Implications for Crustal Structure.

  5. The questa magmatic system: Petrologic, chemical and isotopic variations in cogenetic volcanic and plutonic rocks of the latir volcanic field and associated intrusives, northern New Mexico

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, C.M.

    1986-01-01

    Field, chemical and isotopic data demonstrate that nearly all igneous rocks at Questa resulted from interactions between mantle-derived parental magmas and the crust. Strontium, neodymium and lead isotope ratios of early andesites to rhyolites (28 to 26 Ma) indicate that these magmas assimilated > 25% lower crust. Injection of basaltic magmas extensively modified the strontium and neodymium but not the lead isotope compositions of the lower crust. Eruption of comendite magmas and the peralkaline Amalia Tuff 26 Ma is correlated with inception of regional extension. Lead isotope ratios identify different sources for the metaluminous granites and the peralkaline rocks. 26 Ma metaluminous granite to granodiorite intrusions have chemical and isotopic compositions to those of the precaldera intermediate-composition rocks, and are interpreted as representing the solidified equivalents of the precaldera magmatic episode. However, both conventional and ion-microprobe isotopic data prohibit significant assimilation of crustal rocks at the level of exposure, suggesting that the plutons were emplaced a relatively crystal-rich mushes which did not have sufficient heat to assimilate country rocks. This suggest that in some cases plutonic rocks are better than volcanic rocks in representing the isotopic compositions of their source regions, because the assimilation potential of crystal-rich magmas is significantly less than that of largely liquid magmas.

  6. Intrusive rocks in the ophiolitic mélange of Crete - Witnesses to a Late Cretaceous thermal event of enigmatic geological position

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langosch, Alexander; Seidel, Eberhard; Stosch, Heinz-Günter; Okrusch, Martin

    The ophiolitic mélange in the uppermost tectonic unit of the Cretan nappe pile contains crystalline slices which consist of a low-pressure/high-temperature metamorphic sequence and synmetamorphic intrusions, ranging in composition from diorite to granite. The plutonic rocks conform to two different igneous suites, dominated by diorites in eastern, and granites in central Crete, displaying I-type and A-type characters, respectively. Some of the granites from central Crete are classified as transitional I/S-type. They are closely associated with migmatitic paragneisses. Based on major and trace element, REE, Sr- and Nd-isotope geochemistry, the mafic members of both suites are derived from a depleted mantle source. The higher concentrations of P and Ti in the mafic members of the igneous suite in central Crete and the deviant trend of the whole suite may be explained by a different mantle source or a lower degree of partial melting. In both suites, magmatic evolution was governed by fractional crystallization of amphibole/clinopyroxene, plagioclase and minor phases. In addition, mixing or mingling of compositionally different magmas is indicated for the intrusive suite of eastern Crete whereas in central Crete the magma composition was at least partially modified through assimilation of (meta)pelites. The geochemical results suggest that the plutonic rocks formed in a supra-subduction zone setting. However, a formation during continental lithospheric extension cannot be ruled out. Published and new Rb-Sr and K-Ar dates on amphiboles and biotites from intrusive rocks and their metamorphic country rocks show that the peak of the low-P/high-T metamorphism and the intrusion of the two igneous suites testify to the same thermal event of Late Cretaceous age. A similar Late Cretaceous association of metamorphic and plutonic rocks has been described from the uppermost tectonic unit in the Attic-Cycladic Crystalline Complex. Together with the Cretan occurrences, they form a

  7. Formation of low-δ18O magmas of the Kangerlussuaq Intrusion by addition of water derived from dehydration of foundered basaltic roof rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riishuus, Morten S.; Harris, Chris; Peate, David W.; Tegner, Christian; Wilson, J. Richard; Brooks, C. Kent

    2015-05-01

    The Kangerlussuaq Intrusion in East Greenland is concentrically zoned from quartz nordmarkite (quartz syenite) at the margin, through pulaskite, to foyaite (nepheline syenite) in the centre, with no apparent intrusive contacts. The δ18O values of coexisting minerals are consistent with oxygen isotope equilibrium at magmatic temperatures. Most of the intrusion formed from low-δ18O magma; magma δ18O values generally increased upwards from about 3.3 ‰ in the quartz nordmarkites to 5.6 ‰ in the foyaites. The lowest magma δ18O value of about -1.0 ‰ is from the upper part of the nordmarkites, where there is a high concentration of foundered basaltic xenoliths (stoped from the roof of the intrusion). The amphiboles in the syenites have δD values that range from those typical of hydrous mantle-derived minerals to much lower values (-86 to -157 ‰), as do whole-rock samples of xenolith and country rock (-125 to -148 ‰). The low magma δ18O and δD values are consistent with continuous incorporation, exchange and upward escape of low-δ18O and δD fluids released from stoped basaltic roof material. Mass balance suggests that the integrated amount of water involved was 7 wt% of the volume of the magma, but locally reached 30 wt% water. The requirement for large amounts of water with low δ18O value is satisfied only if the foundered basalt contained most of its water in cavities as opposed to hydrous minerals. Even with this requirement, the volume of stoped basalt would have been equal to the volume of the magma. Repeated recharge of the residual magma with progressively less contaminated silica undersaturated melt resulted in a gradual shift across the low-pressure thermal divide. Crystallisation was suppressed by the depression of the liquidus due to water saturation of the residual magma (pH2O ~1 kbar).

  8. New paleomagnetic results from Middle and Late Proterozoic intrusive rocks of the central and southern Rocky Mountains

    SciTech Connect

    Harlan, S.S. )

    1993-04-01

    Paleomagnetic results from Proterozoic intrusive rocks from the central and southern Rocky Mountains yield data that provide definition to the North American APW path. Results from the ca. 1420 Ma Laramie anorthosite (LA) and Sherman Granite (SG) yield dual polarity magnetizations; a combined pole (7[degree]S, 215[degree]E, A[sub 95] = 4[degree]) is essentially identical to 1400 Ma poles from elsewhere in North America. Group A dikes from the Tobacco Root (TR) Mtns, MT, along the southern margin of the Belt Basin, have a dual-polarity remanence with a pole at 10[degree]N, 222[degree]E (A[sub 95] = 11[degree]) that plots slightly north of the LA/SG and other poles of ca. 1450 Ma. Comparison of Belt Supergroup poles, assuming coherence of the Belt terrane and interior Laurentia, with 1400 Ma poles and those of the well-defined western arm of the Logan Loop of the N. American APW path, would seem to indicate that the age of most Belt poles are in the range of 1300--1400 Ma, although this age assignment conflicts with available geochronologic data. Results from 1100 Ma diabase sheets from central AZ yield two distinct, normal and reverse polarity magnetizations: ADn and ADr. ADn gives a pole at 23[degree]N, 181[degree]E (A[sub 95] = 8[degree]) that overlaps poles of ca. 1100 Ma from the midcontinent rift (MR). Pole ADr is located at 38[degree]N, 248[degree]E (A[sub 95] = 39[degree]); the large uncertainty of this pole precludes its use in defining the APW path. All dikes are of WNW trend and several from the TR Mtns and the Christmas Lake dike from the Beartooth uplift give hornblende [sup 40]Ar/[sup 39]Ar ages of 760--770 Ma. The data are interpreted to provide evidence for Late Proterozoic mafic magmatism along the W and SW margin of the Wyoming Province, possibly related to crustal extension accompanying deposition of the Windermere Group in the northern part of the Cordillera and volcanism and sedimentation in SE Idaho and NE Washington.

  9. Mio-Pliocene adakite generation related to flat subduction in southern Ecuador: the Quimsacocha volcanic center

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beate, Bernardo; Monzier, Michel; Spikings, Richard; Cotten, Joseph; Silva, José; Bourdon, Erwan; Eissen, Jean-Philippe

    2001-11-01

    New geochemical and geochronological data on the Miocene-Pliocene Quimsacocha volcanic center (QVC) have led to the recognition of adakitic lavas generated by slab melting related to the flat slab subduction in southern Ecuador and northern Peru. The QVC, located in the presently inactive southern part of the Ecuadorian arc, was built up during three distinctive volcanic phases. The first phase generated a basal edifice with mainly andesitic lava flows, while the second phase is characterized by the emplacement of cryptodomes, domes and related outflow breccias comprised of andesites and some dacites. The last phase released rhyolitic ignimbrites associated with the formation of a large caldera, which was later partly filled by dacitic-rhyolitic domes. Geochemical data for the QVC indicate higher Al 2O 3, TiO 2, Na 2O, Zr and Sr contents and lower Fe 2O 3*, MgO, Y, MREE and HREE abundances, compared to other eruptive rocks of the Plio-Quaternary volcanic front of Ecuador. Such geochemical features, as well as the frequent presence of an associated epithermal gold deposit, are characteristic of the involvement of slab melts, also known as adakites [1,2], in the generation of these magmas. After a calc-alkaline arc magmatism phase, slab horizontalization - in response to the subduction of a buoyant oceanic plateau - results in increased involvement of a slab melting component in the magmas produced. However, pristine adakites were generated and emplaced during a relatively short period, as indicated by zircon fission-track ages. Then volcanic activity stopped and a volcanic gap formed. The identification of these adakites, their location and age support a model of slab melting associated with flat slab subduction [M.A. Gutscher et al., Geology 28 (2000) 535-538].

  10. Petrogenesis of the Early Cretaceous Laguila bimodal intrusive rocks from the Tethyan Himalaya: Implications for the break-up of Eastern Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zheng; Zhou, Qing; Lai, Yang; Qing, Chengshi; Li, Yingxu; Wu, Jianyang; Xia, Xiangbiao

    2015-11-01

    The Kerguelen mantle plume triggered the rift of Eastern Gondwana to open the eastern Indian Ocean, with the formation of ~ 132 Ma Comei-Bunbury large igneous province (LIP). The Comei area is located in the eastern Tethyan Himalaya, paleogeographically belonging to Greater India. The Laguila bimodal intrusive rocks from the Comei area consist of mafic (gabbro-diabase) and felsic rocks (quartz monzonite-granodiorite). This paper presents detailed LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb chronology, major and trace elements, and Sr-Nd-Pb isotope geochemistry of the Laguila bimodal intrusive rocks, in order to constrain the early activity of the Kerguelen mantle plume. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating shows that the Laguila intrusive rocks were emplaced in the Early Cretaceous (~ 134-130 Ma). The Laguila mafic rocks are enriched in LREE, LILE and HFSE, similar to those of oceanic island basalts (OIB). Their 87Sr/86Sri (0.7054 to 0.7066), 143Νd/144Nd (T) (0.512548 to 0.512619) and (206Pb/204Pb)t ratios (18.492 to 18.859) are comparable with those basalts derived by the Kerguelen hot spot. Elemental and isotopic data suggest that they were likely derived by partial melting of the Kerguelen plume source in the spinel-garnet transition zone (~ 60-80 km). The Laguila felsic rocks share most of the geochemical features of A-type granite and show different 87Sr/86Sri (0.7171 to 0.7204), 143Νd/144Nd (T) (0.511874 to 0.511956) and (206Pb/204Pb)t ratios (19.087 to 19.274) from those of the mafic rocks. They were likely derived by partial melting of crustal rocks at a shallow depth (< 30 km) triggered by underplating of the coeval basaltic magmas. The Laguila intrusive rocks were emplaced in a rift setting during the breakup of eastern Gondwana, associated with the Kerguelen plume activity. We calculated the magmatic volume of Comei-Bunbury basalts and the result is ~ 1.1 × 104 km3. The small volume is not reconciled with those typical models for the initial magmatic eruption of mantle plume. It

  11. Contrasting fluid/rock interaction between the Notch Peak granitic intrusion and argillites and limestones in western Utah: evidence from stable isotopes and phase assemblages

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nabelek, P.I.; Labotka, T.C.; O'Neil, J.R.; Papike, J.J.

    1984-01-01

    The Jurassic Notch Peak granitic stock, western Utah, discordantly intrudes Cambrian interbedded pure limestones and calcareous argillites. Contact metamorphosed argillite and limestone samples, collected along traverses away from the intrusion, were analyzed for ??18O, ??13C, and ??D. The ??13C and ??18O values for the limestones remain constant at about 0.5 (PDB) and 20 (SMOW), respectively, with increasing metamorphic grade. The whole rock ??18O values of the argillites systematically decrease from 19 to as low as 8.1, and the ??13C values of the carbonate fraction from 0.5 to -11.8. The change in ??13C values can be explained by Rayleigh decarbonation during calcsilicate reactions, where calculated {Mathematical expression} is about 4.5 permil for the high-grade samples and less for medium and low-grade samples suggesting a range in temperatures at which most decarbonation occurred. However, the amount of CO2 released was not anough to decrease the whole rock ??18O to the values observed in the argillites. The low ??18O values close to the intrusion suggest interaction with magmatic water that had a ??18O value of 8.5. The extreme lowering of ??13C by fractional devolatilization and the lowering of ??18O in argillites close to the intrusion indicates oxgen-equivalent fluid/rock ratios in excess of 1.0 and X(CO2)F of the fluid less than 0.2. Mineral assemblages in conjunction with the isotopic data indicate a strong influence of water infiltration on the reaction relations in the argillites and separate fluid and thermal fronts moving thru the argillites. The different stable isotope relations in limestones and argillites attest to the importance of decarbonation in the enhancement of permeability. The flow of fluids was confined to the argillite beds (argillite aquifers) whereas the limestones prevented vertical fluid flow and convective cooling of the stock. ?? 1984 Springer-Verlag.

  12. Partial melting of lower crust at 10-15 kbar: constraints on adakite and TTG formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Qing; Hermann, Jörg

    2013-06-01

    The pressure-temperature ( P- T) conditions for producing adakite/tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) magmas from lower crust compositions are still open to debate. We have carried out partial melting experiments of mafic lower crust in the piston-cylinder apparatus at 10-15 kbar and 800-1,050 °C to investigate the major and trace elements of melts and residual minerals and further constrain the P- T range appropriate for adakite/TTG formation. The experimental residues include the following: amphibolite (plagioclase + amphibole ± garnet) at 10-15 kbar and 800 °C, garnet granulite (plagioclase + amphibole + garnet + clinopyroxene + orthopyroxene) at 12.5 kbar and 900 °C, two-pyroxene granulite (plagioclase + clinopyroxene + orthopyroxene ± amphibole) at 10 kbar and 900 °C and 10-12.5 kbar and 1,000 °C, garnet pyroxenite (garnet + clinopyroxene ± amphibole) at 13.5-15 kbar and 900-1,000 °C, and pyroxenite (clinopyroxene + orthopyroxene) at 15 kbar and 1,050 °C. The partial melts change from granodiorite to tonalite with increasing melt proportions. Sr enrichment occurs in partial melts in equilibrium with <20 wt% plagioclase, whereas depletions of Ti, Sr, and heavy rare earth elements (HREE) occur relative to the starting material when the amounts of residual amphibole, plagioclase, and garnet are >20 wt%, respectively. Major elements and trace element patterns of partial melts produced by 10-40 wt% melting of lower crust composition at 10-12.5 kbar and 800-900 °C and 15 kbar and 800 °C closely resemble adakite/TTG rocks. TiO2 contents of the 1,000-1,050 °C melts are higher than that of pristine adakite/TTG. In comparison with natural adakite/TTG, partial melts produced at 10-12.5 kbar and 1,000 °C and 15 kbar and 1,050 °C have elevated HREE, whereas partial melts at 13.5-15 kbar and 900-1,000 °C in equilibrium with >20 wt% garnet have depressed Yb and elevated La/Yb and Gd/Yb. It is suggested that the most appropriate P- T conditions for

  13. Zircon U-Pb geochronology of the basement rocks and dioritic intrusion associated with the Fushan skarn iron deposit, southern Taihang Mountains, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Jun-Feng; Li, Sheng-Rong; Santosh, M.; Dong, Guo-Chen; Wang, Yan-Juan; Liu, Hai-Ming; Peng, Zi-Dong; Zhang, Zhao-Yu

    2015-12-01

    The Fushan iron ores, located in the southern part of the Taihang Mountains (TM) within the Trans-North China Orogen, is among the medium-sized skarn iron deposits in China. In this paper we report U-Pb age data on zircon grains from the magmatic intrusion related with the skarn formation and from the Neoarchean metamorphic basement in the area. The results show that the dioritic intrusion which generated the skarn mineralization was emplaced at 128.8 ± 1.9 Ma. Zircon grains from the basement rocks and xenoliths, as well as inherited zircon in the dioritic intrusion show Neoarchean to Paleoproterozoic ages, corresponding to similar ages reported from elsewhere in the North China Craton. Our results and those from previous studies suggest that the continental lower crust was the major source of Mesozoic magmatism and associated ore mineralization. The Mesozoic magmatism and metallogeny in the Fushan region correlate with the peak of lithospheric destruction of the North China Craton.

  14. Geochemistry and zircon U-Pb geochronology of granitic rocks in the Buqingshan tectonic mélange belt, northern Tibet Plateau, China and its implications for Prototethyan evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Ruibao; Pei, Xianzhi; Li, Zuochen; Pei, Lei; Liu, Chengjun; Chen, Youxin; Chen, Guochao; Liu, Zhanqing; Yang, Jie

    2015-06-01

    The Yikehalaer intrusives are distributed in the Buqingshan tectonic mélange belt at the southern margin of East Kunlun, China. They tectonically intruded the conglomerate of Permian Gequ Formation to the south and the marble of Mesoproterozoic Kuhai Group to the north. These intrusives mainly consist of off-white coarse- and fine-grained granodiorite and granite. U-Pb dating of zircons from the intrusive samples yielded weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 436 ± 7 Ma and 437 ± 6 Ma, indicating Early Silurian crystallization age. The intrusives are high-silica, Na-rich, I-type calc-alkalic rocks. They are divisible into two subgroups on the basis of their trace element content: adakitic rocks in the northern part and normal calc-alkalic arc rocks in the southern part. Rocks in the northern part exhibit high Sr (280-493 ppm), low Y (3.8-11.7 ppm), high Sr/Y ratios (23.9-125.0), high light rare earth elements (LREE)/ heavy rare earth elements (HREE) (15.1-35.7), and invisible Eu/Eu∗. They resemble adakites formed by slab melting in subduction zones. However, the rocks in the southern part possess the attributes of normal arc rocks. In addition, the εHf(t) values of the intrusives are consistently positive (0.6-7.6), implying that they were generated by melting of an isotopically depleted mantle source, with insignificant contributions from crustal materials. The source residues likely contained 10-20% garnet and hornblende, and plagioclase was either absent or totally consumed during partial melting. Combining the regional tectonic data, we conclude that the Buqingshan paleo-ocean may have started to subduct in Middle Cambrian until Early Silurian (436 Ma), generating an important adakitic magma event during the late stage of oceanic crust subduction. Moreover, the Proto-Tethyan Ocean closed, and the Bayan Har, East Kunlun, and Qaidam blocks collided during the Middle-Late Silurian.

  15. Implications of Late Cretaceous U-Pb zircon ages of granitic intrusions cutting ophiolitic and volcanogenic rocks for the assembly of the Tauride allochthon in SE Anatolia (Helete area, Kahramanmaraş Region, SE Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nurlu, Nusret; Parlak, Osman; Robertson, Alastair; von Quadt, Albrecht

    2016-01-01

    An assemblage of NE-SW-trending, imbricate thrust slices (c. 26 km E-W long × 6.3 km N-S) of granitic rocks, basic-felsic volcanogenic rocks (Helete volcanics), ophiolitic rocks (Meydan ophiolite) and melange (Meydan melange) is exposed near the Tauride thrust front in SE Anatolia. The volcanogenic rocks were previously assumed to be Eocene because of associated Nummulitic limestones. However, ion probe U-Pb dating of zircons extracted from the intrusive granitic rocks yielded ages of 92.9 ± 2.2-83.1 ± 1.5 Ma (Cenomanian-Campanian). The Helete volcanic unit and the overlying Meydan ophiolitic rocks both are intruded by granitic rocks of similar age and composition. Structurally underlying ophiolite-related melange includes similar-aged, but fragmented granitic intrusions. Major, trace element and rare earth element analyses coupled with electron microprobe analysis of the granitic rocks show that they are metaluminus to peraluminus and calc-alkaline in composition. A magmatic arc setting is inferred from a combination of tectonomagmatic discrimination, ocean ridge granite-normalized multi-element patterns and biotite geochemistry. Sr-Nd-Pb isotope data further suggest that the granitoid rocks were derived from variably mixed mantle and crustal sources. Granitic rocks cutting the intrusive rocks are inferred to have crystallized at ~5-16 km depth. The volcanogenic rocks and granitic rocks originated in a supra-subduction zone setting that was widely developed throughout SE Anatolia. Initial tectonic assembly took place during the Late Cretaceous probably related to northward subduction and accretion beneath the Tauride continent (Keban and Malatya platforms). Initial tectonic assembly was followed by exhumation and then transgression by shelf-depth Nummulitic limestones during Mid-Eocene, as documented in several key outcrops. Final emplacement onto the Arabian continental margin took place during the Early Miocene.

  16. Geochronology and geochemistry of Eocene potassic felsic intrusions in the Nangqian basin, eastern Tibet: Tectonic and metallogenic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yue; Bi, Xian-Wu; Hu, Rui-Zhong; Chen, You-wei; Liu, He-qing; Xu, Lei-luo

    2016-03-01

    The Jinshajiang-Ailaoshan copper belt is the most significant porphyry copper belt in eastern Tibet. In the northern segment of this belt within the Nangqian basin, which occurs 100 km east of the Yulong porphyry copper deposit, several felsic intrusions have been recently discovered. The Yulong porphyry copper deposit is one of the largest porphyry copper deposits in China, and it is associated with peraluminous adakitic rocks formed in a post-collisional setting. The Nangqian felsic intrusions vary from syenite porphyry to monzonite porphyry in rock types. No significant Cu-Au mineralization has been found in the Nangqian felsic intrusions despite extensive exploration in recent years. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating reveals that the Nangqian syenite porphyry and monzonite porphyry were emplaced at ~ 35.6±0.3 Ma and from 39.5±0.3 to 37.4±0.3 Ma, respectively, similar to the age of the Yulong porphyry copper deposit. The Nangqian felsic intrusions are characterized by metaluminous compositions (A/CNK = 0.82-1.01), and they share some common features with shoshonites such as high K2O contents (4.58-5.58 wt.%), high K2O/Na2O ratios (0.92-1.28), LREE-LILE enrichments and negative Nb-Ta-Ti-P anomalies, as well as with adakites derived from an eclogite-facies source with high Al2O3 (14.98-15.74 wt.%), Sr (954-2190 ppm), Sr/Y (68-132) and La/Yb (53-85), and low Y and Yb contents. The Nangqian felsic intrusions have high initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.7050-0.7055), variable εNd(t) (- 0.31-1.43) and small variations in (206Pb/204Pb)i (18.68-18.74), (207Pb/204Pb)i (15.53-15.62) and (208Pb/204Pb)i (38.51-38.80). Zircon crystals from both syenite and monzonite porphyries are characterized by positive εHf(t) from 5.2 to 8.5. The results suggest that the syenite and monzonite magmas were differentiated from parental shoshonitic melts by fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene and minor feldspar. The parent magmas originated from a lithospheric mantle metasomatized by slab

  17. Geochronology and geochemistry of Late Pan-African intrusive rocks in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block, NE China: Petrogenesis and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Hao; Ge, Wen-chun; Zhao, Guo-chun; Dong, Yu; Bi, Jun-hui; Wang, Zhi-hui; Yu, Jie-jiang; Zhang, Yan-long

    2014-11-01

    To constrain the early Paleozoic tectonic evolution of the Jiamusi-Khanka Block and its relationship to the Late Pan-African event in Gondwana, we undertook zircon U-Pb dating and geochemical analyses (major and trace elements, and Hf isotopic compositions) of early Paleozoic intrusive rocks in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block, NE China. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb age data demonstrate that these intrusive rocks were emplaced at three stages during the Late Pan-African event, represented by ~ 540 Ma syenogranite, ~ 515 Ma quartz syenite, and ~ 500 Ma monzogranite and gabbro. Geochemically, the ~ 500 Ma gabbros in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block have low SiO2 (50.26-51.21 wt.%), relatively high MgO (4.08-5.67 wt.%), Ni (13.1-14.1 ppm) and Cr (28.4-56.0 ppm), and are slightly enriched in LILEs (e.g., Ba, K) and LREEs, and depleted in Zr, Hf, Nb, Ta and P. The εHf(t) values of zircons in the gabbro range from + 2.6 to + 6.4. All these geochemical features indicate that the gabbros were likely produced by the partial melting of a depleted mantle that had been metasomatized by fluids derived from a subducted slab. In contrast, the ca.540-500 Ma granites and quartz syenites contain high SiO2 (64.49-72.20 wt.%) and low MgO (0.40-0.75 wt.%), Cr (1.69-6.88 ppm) and Ni (1.26-3.26 ppm). They have relatively low 176Hf/177Hf ratios of 0.282247-0.282599 with Hf two-stage model ages of 1173-2280 Ma, and most of the magmatic zircons have positive εHf(t) values varying from + 0.2 - + 4.8, indicating that these granites and quartz syenites were probably derived from a dominantly Paleo-Mesoproterozoic "old" crustal source with possible different degrees of addition of juvenile materials. According to the geochemical data and global geological investigations, we propose that the 541-498 Ma intrusive rocks in the Jiamusi-Khanka Block formed in a post-collisional or post-orogenic extensional setting linked to the collapse of a Late Pan-African orogen associated within the Gondwana.

  18. Syn-collisional adakitic granodiorites formed by fractional crystallization: Insights from their enclosed mafic magmatic enclaves (MMEs) in the Qumushan pluton, North Qilian Orogen at the northern margin of the Tibetan Plateau

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shuo; Niu, Yaoling; Li, Jiyong; Sun, Wenli; Zhang, Yu; Hu, Yan; Shao, Fengli

    2016-04-01

    The Qumushan (QMS) syn-collisional granodiorite, which is located in the eastern section of the North Qilian Orogen at the northern margin of the Greater Tibetan Plateau, has typical adakitic characteristics and also contains abundant mafic magmatic enclaves (MMEs). This recognition offers an unprecedented insight into the petrogenesis of both the adakitic host granodiorite and the enclosed MMEs. The MMEs and their host granodiorites share many characteristics in common, including identical crystallization age (~ 430 Ma), same mineralogy, similar mineral chemistry and whole-rock isotopic compositions, indicating their genetic link. The MMEs are most consistent with being of cumulate origin formed at earlier stages of the same magmatic system that produced the QMS adakitic granodiorite. Subsequent replenishment of adakitic magmas could have disturbed the cumulate piles as "MMEs" dispersed in the adakitic granodiorite host during emplacement. The geochemical data and petrogenetic modeling of trace elements suggest that the QMS adakitic host granodiorite is most consistent with fractional crystallization dominated by the mineral assemblage of the MMEs. The parental magma for the QMS granodiorite is best explained as resulting from partial melting of the ocean crust together with recycled terrigenous sediments during continental collision, which may have also experienced interaction with mantle peridotite during ascent.

  19. Acid-neutralizing potential of minerals in intrusive rocks of the Boulder batholith in northern Jefferson County, Montana

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Desborough, George A.; Briggs, Paul H.; Mazza, Nilah; Driscoll, Rhonda

    1998-01-01

    Experimental studies show that fresh granitic rocks of the Boulder batholith in the Boulder River headwaters near Basin, Montana have significant acid-neutralizing potential and are capable of neutralizing acidic water derived from metal-mining related wastes or mine workings. Laboratory studies show that in addition to the acidneutralizing potential (ANP) of minor amounts of calcite in these rocks, biotite, tremolite, and feldspars will contribute significantly to long-term ANP. We produced 0.45 micrometer-filtered acidic (pH = 2.95) leachate for use in these ANP experiments by exposing metal-mining related wastes to deionized water in a waste:leachate ratio of 1:20. We then exposed these leachates to finely-ground and sized fractions of batholith rocks, and some of their mineral fractions for extended and repeated periods, for which results are reported here. The intent was to understand what reactions of metal-rich acidic water and fresh igneous rocks would produce. The reactions between the acidic leachates and the bulk rocks and mineral fractions are complex. Factors such as precipitation of phases like Fe-hydroxides and Alhydroxides and the balance between dissolved cations and anions that are sulfate dominated complicate analysis of the results. Research by others of acid neutralization by biotite and tremolite attributed a rise in pH to proton (H+) adsorption in sites vacated by K, Mg, and Ca. Destruction of the silicate framework and liberation of associated structural hydroxyl ions may contribute to ANP. Studies by others have indicated that the conversion of biotite to a vermiculite-type structure by removal of K at a pH of 4 consumes about six protons for every mole of biotite, but at a pH of 3 there is pronounced dissolution of the tetrahedral lattice. The ANP of fresh granitic rocks is much higher than anticipated. The three bulk Boulder igneous rock samples studied have minimum ANP equivalent to about 10-14 weight percent calcite. This ANP is in

  20. Episodic magmatism at 105 Ma in the Kinki district, SW Japan: Petrogenesis of Nb-rich lamprophyres and adakites, and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Imaoka, T.; Nakashima, K.; Kamei, A.; Itaya, T.; Ohira, T.; Nagashima, M.; Kono, N.; Kiji, M.

    2014-01-01

    Cretaceous episodic magmatism produced Nb-rich lamprophyres and adakitic granitoids in the Kinki district of SW Japan. K-Ar dating of minerals from the lamprophyres, adakites, and hornblende peridotite xenoliths yielded ages of 109-99 Ma, indicating a short-lived episodic magmatism. The lamprophyres generally display primitive high-Mg basaltic to basaltic andesite compositions with high Mg# and high Cr and Ni contents that preclude substantial differentiation. Some high-Nb basalt (HNB) and Nb-enriched basalt (NEB) compositions also occur. The lamprophyres have high large-ion lithophile element (LILE) and high field-strength element (HFSE) contents and variable (La/Yb)n ratios, and can be divided into high-(La/Yb)n (12.5-22.1) and low-(La/Yb)n (3.6-6.1) groups. The former contains nepheline-normative rocks with positive initial ɛNd(T) values, whereas the latter contains hypersthene-normative subalkaline rocks with negative initial ɛNd(T) values. The adakitic granitoids have relatively high TiO2, Nb, and Ta contents compared to more typical high-silica adakites elsewhere, indicating that they were produced by high temperatures (ca. 920 to 970 °C) during slab melting.

  1. Geochemical constraints on adakites of different origins and copper mineralization

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Sun, W.-D.; Ling, M.-X.; Chung, S.-L.; Ding, X.; Yang, X.-Y.; Liang, H.-Y.; Fan, W.-M.; Goldfarb, R.; Yin, Q.-Z.

    2012-01-01

    The petrogenesis of adakites holds important clues to the formation of the continental crust and copper ?? gold porphyry mineralization. However, it remains highly debated as to whether adakites form by slab melting, by partial melting of the lower continental crust, or by fractional crystallization of normal arc magmas. Here, we show that to form adakitic signature, partial melting of a subducting oceanic slab would require high pressure at depths of >50 km, whereas partial melting of the lower continental crust would require the presence of plagioclase and thus shallower depths and additional water. These two types of adakites can be discriminated using geochemical indexes. Compiled data show that adakites from circum-Pacific regions, which have close affinity to subduction of young hot oceanic plate, can be clearly discriminated from adakites from the Dabie Mountains and the Tibetan Plateau, which have been attributed to partial melting of continental crust, in Sr/Y-versus-La/Yb diagram. Given that oceanic crust has copper concentrations about two times higher than those in the continental crust, whereas the high oxygen fugacity in the subduction environment promotes the release of copper during partial melting, slab melting provides the most efficient mechanism to concentrate copper and gold; slab melts would be more than two times greater in copper (and also gold) concentrations than lower continental crust melts and normal arc magmas. Thus, identification of slab melt adakites is important for predicting exploration targets for copper- and gold-porphyry ore deposits. This explains the close association of ridge subduction with large porphyry copper deposits because ridge subduction is the most favorable place for slab melting. ?? 2012 by The University of Chicago.

  2. Geochemical studies of mafic and other low silica, Precambrian intrusive rocks in the Adirondack lowlands, New York

    SciTech Connect

    Antibus, J.; Carl, J.D. . Dept. of Geology)

    1993-03-01

    Mafic metaigneous rocks in the Adirondack Lowlands include gabbros, amphibolites and diorites that are associated with, and hard to distinguish from, a host of dark colored, low-silica, alkali feldspar-bearing rocks that include syenogabbros, syenites and monzonites. All rocks intrude metasedimentary and metavolcanic host rocks and occur as isolated, pre- to syn-metamorphic bodies, generally with elongate, sheet-like form. Some occur within or marginal to deformation zones. Lacking are the massive igneous complexes of the Highlands where anorthosites, charnockites and mangerites comprise a common field association. Amphibolites vary from mappable sheets that are hundreds of meters thick to thin (<1 m) layers within the host gneisses. Gabbros and diorites vary from circular to oval-shaped bodies, generally <2 km across, that may be infolded with the host rocks. Pervasive shear in Lowland granitic rocks (Hyde School Gneiss) that resulted in major sheath folds, as proposed by Tewksbury, extends into the mafic bodies whose margins show strong gneissic textures and grain size reduction, but the cores are less deformed. The Balmat gabbro varies inwardly and systematically from monzonitic to gabbroic composition in decreasing Si, Na, K, Rb, Zr and Ba, and in increasing Ca, Mg, Fe, Ti, P, Sr, Cr, V and Ni content. Y/Nb ratios remain constant at 3-4. Among explanations of assimilation and metasomatism, the authors tentatively prefer an hypothesis of exclusion of alkali material during crystallization of mafic magma. Calc alkali and low potassium tholeiites are indicated in plots of the Balmat and other mafic bodies on Ti/100-Zr-Yx3 and Ti-Zr discrimination diagrams, although there is much scatter of data. Within-plate basalts are lacking, and ocean floor basalts are indicated for some amphibolites.

  3. Magmatic evolution of pre-ore volcanics and porphyry intrusives associated with the Altar Cu-porphyry prospect, Argentina

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatzoubaros, M.; von Quadt, A.; Gallhofer, D.; Rey, R.

    2014-11-01

    Altar is a Cu-porphyry deposit related to several small plagioclase porphyry intrusions of the late Miocene formed on the margin of the Flat-Slab segment along the Andean Cordillera in north-west Argentina. New stratigraphic and structural mapping supported by geochemistry and geochronology of pre-ore volcanics at Altar has revealed that a period of ˜6-7 Ma of volcanism during the late Oligocene-early Miocene formed ˜4000 m of volcano-stratigraphic succession making up the Pachón Formation. It represents a period dominated by explosive to effusive eruption in a dynamic arc basin with local ash fall and flow deposition in lacustrine and fluvial sites. Volcanism is typified by medium- to high-K calc-alkaline arc magmatism with a shift from mafic compositions at the base to felsic rocks at the top of the formation containing zircons aged 21.9 ± 0.2 Ma (2 Std.Dev, U-Pb). A clear geochemical separation exists between early Miocene pre-ore volcanics that show signatures akin to non-adakitic, normal arc, extensional tectonic settings conducive of chemical differentiation at shallow crustal levels and correlate with intra-regional Abanico and Farellones Formations; and the middle to late-Miocene Cu-mineralised porphyry intrusions. After a break of ˜9 Ma in the geological record at Altar, these Cu-fertile bodies are emplaced entirely within the Pachón Rhyolite and represent adakite-like magmas with fractionation trends evolving from a lower crustal MASH zone. This distinction is controlled by a change from an extensional to compressive tectonic regime in the region during the middle Miocene in which magmas were stalled in the lower crust for an extended period, subsequently became enriched in metals and then formed several Cu-porphyry bodies which were emplaced during a relatively short period towards the late Miocene.

  4. Catastrophic erosion of Hellas basin rim on Mars induced by magmatic intrusion into volatile-rich rocks

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Tanaka, K.L.; Kargel, J.S.; MacKinnon, D.J.; Hare, T.M.; Hoffman, N.

    2002-01-01

    Malea and Hesperia Plana form large sectors of the rim of Hellas basin that display partly eroded volcanic shields and plains. These regions have topographic profiles that appear to be several hundred meters lower than those of adjacent rim sectors and lack prominent massifs of remnant basement that would be expected to stand above the lava plains. We interpret that before the volcanic edifices were constructed, these regions were denuded by an early stage of voluminous sill intrusion into friable, volatile-rich impact breccia. Magma-volatile interactions may have resulted in catastrophic generation of debris flows deposited into the adjacent basin, particularly if CO2 were involved. Later, lavas covered the eroded terrain; in turn, the lavas were eroded locally by volatile interactions. Across Mars, huge channel systems, erosional features in volcanic terranes, and vast layered deposits may be due to magma-volatile interactions.

  5. Petrogenesis and tectonic implications of the early Jurassic Fe-Ti oxide-bearing Xialan mafic intrusion in SE China: Constraints from zircon Hf-O isotopes, mineral compositions and whole-rock geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bai, Zhong-Jie; Zhu, Wei-Guang; Zhong, Hong; Li, Chusi; Liao, Jing-Qing; Sun, Hui-Si

    2015-01-01

    Abundant Jurassic bimodal igneous rocks are present in the Nanling region, southeastern China. Their relationship with the tectonic evolution of southeastern China in the Jurassic is still a matter of debate. The ~ 194 Ma Xialan gabbroic intrusion is the oldest mafic intrusion in the Jurassic Nanling igneous belt discovered to date. The intrusion also hosts a significant Fe-Ti oxide deposit. Thus, this intrusion is important for the studies of fundamental controls on the early Jurassic basaltic magmatism in the region and on the Fe-Ti oxide mineralization in this type of intrusion. In this paper we report Hf-O isotopic compositions of zircon for the intrusion and the stratigraphic variations of whole-rock and important mineral compositions in the intrusion. Based on variations in mineral assemblages and the compositions of cumulus minerals, the Xialan intrusion is divided into four cyclic units (I to IV from the base to the top). Our results indicate that each unit represents a new input of magma with composition more primitive than the resident magma. The contents of Fo in olivine, which occurs in the base of Units I and II, are ~ 66 mol%. This indicates that the parental magma for the intrusion is highly fractionated. Extensive fractional crystallization and density-driving crystal sorting appear to have played a critical role in the formation of important Fe-Ti oxide layers in the upper parts of Units I and II. Clinopyroxene trace element analyses indicate that the parental magma for the Xialan intrusion is characterized by pronounced negative Nb-Ta anomalies. Some of the zircon crystals from the Xialan intrusion have εHf(t) > 10 and δ18O between 5.2 and 5.8‰. This, together with the depleted Sr-Nd isotopic compositions in whole rocks reported previously by others, indicates a dominant asthenospheric mantle source with significant contribution of the overlying SCLM. The εHf(t) and δ18O values of zircon from the intrusion are negatively correlated

  6. Origin and evolution of the granitic intrusions in the Brusque Group of the Dom Feliciano Belt, south Brazil: Petrostructural analysis and whole-rock/isotope geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueck, Mathias; Basei, Miguel Angelo Stipp; Castro, Neivaldo Araújo de

    2016-08-01

    In the southern Brazilian state of Santa Catarina the Dom Feliciano Belt, formed by the tectonic juxtaposition of different crustal blocks during the Brasiliano-Pan African Orogenic cycle, can be divided into three domains. In the central domain, three granitic suites intrude the metavolcanosedimentary sequence of the Brusque Group: São João Batista (SJBS), Valsungana (VS) and Nova Trento (NTS), from the oldest to the youngest. This extensive magmatism, here referred to as granitic intrusions in the Brusqe Group (GIBG), is coeval with the thermal peak in the host metamorphic successions, but postdates its main foliation. A progressive deformation starting from the magmatic stage throughout the cooling history points to the influence of the late stages of deformation recorded in the Brusque Group. The SJBS consists of gray to white leucocratic, equigranular granites, with aluminous minerals such as muscovite, garnet and tourmaline. The porphyritic VS is the largest of the suites and is characterized by its cm-sized K-feldspar megacrysts in a coarse-grained biotite-rich matrix. The granites from the NTS are equigranular, light gray to pink in color and have biotite as the main mafic mineral, but magmatic muscovite, tourmaline and hornblende can occur as well. Geochemically, the GIBG are mildly peraluminous and show a calc-alkaline affinity. Most intrusions have a high REE fractionation, but some SJBS granites show a characteristic pattern with no fractionation and strong negative Eu anomalies ("seagull pattern"). Elevated Sr(i) values, between 0.707 and 0.735, and negative εNd values as low as -24 points to the melting of old evolved crust. The Nd (TDM) ages are scattered between 1.54 and 2.76 Ga, with a predominance of values around 2.0 Ga. The GIBG have a strong crustal signature that most closely connects, within the regional units, to that of the metasedimentary rocks of the Brusque Group and its crystalline basement, the Camboriú Complex. All three suites

  7. Tectonic implication of Jurassic adakite arc magmatism in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Won

    2015-04-01

    Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock chemical compositions of Early to Middle Jurassic plutons from the central to southern Korean Peninsula are reported to investigate the effect of paleo-Pacific plate subduction preserved along the continental margin. Twenty-one plutonic rocks from the Yeongnam massif (i.e., Sunchang and Namwon plutons), the Okcheon belt (Jeongup, Boeun, and Mungyeong plutons), the northeast (Gangreung pluton), and the Gyeonggi massif (Gonam, Anheung, and Ganghwa plutons) have age ranges from ca. 189-186 Ma to 177 Ma, 177-166 Ma, and 177-173 Ma, respectively. Most plutonic rocks have chemistry equivalent to adakites, showing high SiO2 (53.96-73.31 wt.%), low MgO (0.33-2.84 wt.%), high Na2O (2.65-4.83 wt.%), high Sr/Y and La/Yb, low Y and Yb, as well as low HFSEs (Nb and Ta), suggesting that the plutonic rocks resulted from partial melting of the basaltic portion of oceanic crust subducted beneath volcanic arcs. Spatial distributions of this adakite-equivalent plutonic belt, based on the present study, together with the previously reported geochronological results, indicate that magmatic pulses had gradually migrated toward the continent at the Korean Peninsula as a result of slab shallowing caused by periodic slab buckling. The petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the similar geochronological and geochemical characteristics of the plutonic belt among the Korean Peninsula, Japan, northeastern China, and Russia provide a possible link to an active subduction system that existed during the Early to Middle Jurassic ages, although the results of the plate subduction might differ in different locations along the East Asian continental margin.

  8. Deformation of host rocks and flow of magma during growth of minette dikes and breccia-bearing intrusions near Ship Rock, New Mexico

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, Paul T.; Pollard, David D.

    1981-01-01

    We have studied a small group of minette dikes and plugs that crop out within a flat-lying sequence of siltstone and shale near Ship Rock, a prominent volcanic throat of tuff breccia in northwestern New Mexico. Seven dikes form a radial pattern about Ship Rock we describe in detail the northeastern dike, which has an outcrop length of about 2,900 m, an average thickness of 2.3 m, and a maximum thickness of 7.2 m. The dike is composed of 35 discrete segments arranged in echelon; orientation. of dike segments ranges systematically from N. 52? E. to N. 66? E. A prominent joint set strikes parallel to the segments and is localized within several tens of meters of the dike. Regional joint patterns display no obvious relation to dike orientation. Small offsets of segment contacts, as well as wedge-shaped bodies of crumpled host rock within segments mark the sites of coalescence of smaller segments during dike growth. Bulges in the dike contact, which represent a nondilational component of growth, indicate that wall rocks were brecciated and eroded during the flow of magma. Breccias make up about 9 percent of the 7,176-m 2 area of the dike, are concentrated in its southwest half, and are commonly associated with its thickest parts. We also describe three subcircular plugs; each plug is smaller than 30 m in diameter, is laterally associated with a dike, and contains abundant breccias. Field evidence indicates that these plugs grew from the dikes by brecciation and erosion of wallrocks and that the bulges in the contact of the northeastern dike represent an initial stage of this process. From continuum-mechanical models of host-rock deformation, we conclude that dike propagation was the dominant mechanism for creating conduits for magma ascent where the host rock was brittle and elastic. At a given driving pressure, dikes dilate to accept greater volumes of magma than plugs, and for a given dilation, less work is done on the host rocks. In addition, the pressure required

  9. Late Carboniferous adakitic granodiorites in the Qiongkusitai area, western Tianshan, NW China: Implications for partial melting of lower crust in the southern Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yin, Jiyuan; Chen, Wen; Xiao, Wenjiao; Yuan, Chao; Long, Xiaoping; Cai, Keda; Zhang, Bin

    2016-07-01

    Carboniferous granitic rocks are wide spread in the western Tianshan, but their tectonic contexts remain controversial. We present zircon U-Pb age, major element, trace element, and in situ zircon Hf isotopic data for the Qiongkusitai granodiorites from the southern part of the Yili block in the western Tianshan. The granodiorites were emplaced in the Late Carboniferous (ca. 314 Ma) and are characterized by high SiO2 (62.1-65.7 wt.%), high Sr (376-485 ppm), low Y (13.7-17.7 ppm) and low Yb (1.34-1.81 ppm) with Sr/Y ratios of 23-34. Such characteristics imply adakitic affinities. Their low concentrations of Cr (3.85-6.75 ppm), Co (7.63-10.7 ppm) and Ni (2.94-6.80 ppm) suggest little, if any, interaction with a mantle source. Compared to the thickened lower crustal-derived adakitic rocks, the relatively low Nb/Ta ratios of the Qiongkusitai adakitic granodiorites indicate that they were probably generated by partial melting of amphibolite facies rocks, but not eclogite facies rocks. The Qiongkusitai adakitic granodiorites have positive zircon εHf(t) values of +0.7 to +5.1 and TDM2 of 1.28-1.68 Ga, and they are interpreted as being derived from remelting of amphibolite facies Mesoproterozoic basement with an input of juvenile material. Late Carboniferous magmatism in the western Tianshan was possibly triggered by asthenospheric upwelling as a result of the roll-back of the subducted southern Tianshan oceanic lithosphere.

  10. Zircon age range and sources of alkaline rocks from the Kurgusul intrusion, Kuznetsk Alatau: The first U-Pb (SHRIMP II) and Sm-Nd isotope data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vrublevskii, V. V.; Gertner, I. F.; Tishin, P. A.; Bayanova, T. B.

    2014-12-01

    U-Pb isotope analysis of basic feldspathoid rocks (juvites) of the Kurgusul intrusion, NE Kuznetsk Alatau, revealed three generations of zircons of various ages (˜1.3-1.5 Ga; 484.3 ± 5.5 and 393.6 ± 9.2Ma). This suggests several stages of regional alkaline basic magmatism in the Middle Cambrian-Early Ordovician and Early-Middle Devonian and melting of the Mesoproterozoic continental crust, which form part of the basement of the Kuznetsk Alatau terrane. The trace element geochemical data indicate a continental margin setting characterized by the complex interaction of a plume-related, supra-subduction zone and crustal materials. A possible model of the magmatic evolution assumes that the ascent of a plume at the Cambrian-Ordovician boundary induced generation of the initial alkaline basaltic magmas and metasomatism and erosion of the lower lithosphere. Repeated partial melting of the lower crust after a 100 Myr period produced new magma batches of alkaline composition, which inherited zircons from the preceding episode of magma generation. The inherited juvenile magmatic source (PREMA + E-type MORB + EM) is confirmed by similarities in the Sm-Nd isotopic signatures (ɛNd( T) ≈ +4.5 to +5.7, T(Nd)DM ≈ 0.8-0.9 Ga) of derivatives of regional alkaline basic complexes of different ages.

  11. Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Alice

    This science unit is designed for limited- and non-English speaking students in a Chinese bilingual education program. The unit covers rock material, classification, characteristics of types of rocks, and rock cycles. It is written in Chinese and simple English. At the end of the unit there is a list of main terms in both English and Chinese, and…

  12. The Relationship Between Amphibole Cumulates and Adakite Magma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, T. O.

    2009-12-01

    Amphibole, while uncommon as a primary fractioning phase is increasingly recognized as a key constituent in the petrogenesis of arc magmas. Fractional crystallization of water-saturated arc magmas in the lower crust can yield substantial volumes amphibole cumulates that, depending on the pressure of crystallization, may also contain garnet. Fractionation of this higher pressure assemblage has been invoked as a possible mechanism in the production adakite magmas. The origin of adakites, defined by their heavy REE and Y depletion and Sr enrichments, have vigorously debated since their re-discovery in Panama two decades ago. In addition to widespread modern adakitic volcanism, the Panamanian portion of the Central American Arc preserves the magmatic record of arc development in close spatial association with younger magmatism. Late-Oligocene hypabyssal crystal-rich andesites from Cerro Patacon are preserved near the Panama Canal region. These contain nodules of amphibole cumulates, and may be used to examine the amphibole-fractionation model for adakite origin. The cumulate nodules are ~6 cm in diameter and are almost entirely composed of 5-10mm amphibole crystals (dominantly ferri-tschermakite), and are accompanied in the host andesites by amphibole phenocrysts, antecrysts and megacryts. Cerro Patacon andesites have REE concentrations that plot at the most depleted end of the array defined by similarly differentiated (58-60% SiO2) Central American Arc magmas, and exhibit a distinctive depletion in the middle REE. These geochemical and petrographic observations strongly support significant amphibole fractionation during formation of the Cerro Patacon andesite. Sr/Y which is used as a geochemical tool for discriminating adakites from other arc magams, is transitional in the Cerro Patcon andesites. However La/Yb is within the range for ‘normal’ arc magmas and shows that amphibole fractionation alone is insufficient to generate adakite magmas - some garnet

  13. The Quaternary adakite distribution of Kyushu Island, Ryukyu Arc, Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shibata, T.; Yoshikawa, M.; Takemura, K.

    2011-12-01

    The Quaternary volcanoes are widely distributed in Kyusu Island, Japan. Philippine Sea plate is subducting beneath Kyushu. Clear distribution of deep seismic foci is observed below the Quaternary volcanoes in southern area, but not in northern area. Notsu et al. (1990, JVGR) examined the contribution of subduction to the magma source, and emphasized that no slab derived material is observed in northern area from Sr isotopic compositions. Volcanic activity similar to the within-plate type volcanism has been also emphasized for the magma genesis of this area (e.g. Kita et al, 2001, JVGR). However, we found adakitic rocks, which show high Sr/Y ratios and low Y concentrations (e.g. Defant and Drummond, 1990, Nature) from some Quaternary volcanoes in north Kyushu on the basis of published data (Otha et al, 1990, GANKO; Itoh, 1990, GANKO). Therefore, the magma genesis is still controversial. We studied lateral variations of Sr, Nd and Pb isotopic and trace element compositions for Quaternary volcanics from Kyushu to investigate the magma genesis. From the results, a clear variation of Sr/Y ratio, decreasing from north to south, is observed along the volcanic front. Some of the Sr/Y ratio of the most northern part of Kyusu shows the value >100. The all analyzed Pb isotope compositions show a single liner trend in 208Pb/204Pb v.s. 206Pb/204Pb diagram. The liner trend of Pb isotope ratios can be explained by the binary mixing of the Shikoku Basin basalt and tereginious sediment which might be a constituent of the subducting slab. The similar binary mixing relationships are found in Sr and Nd isotopic systematics. The isotopic characteristics of the Quaternary magma in Kyushu can be explained by the magma generation process of island arc, in spite of the lack of deep seismic foci in northern area. It is considered that high and low Sr/Y ratios suggest the contributions of partial melt in the north and aqueous fluid derived from subducting slab in the south, respectively. If

  14. Comparing batholith-source connections for the Cadiz Valley Batholith and a deeper sheeted intrusive complex in the Mojave Desert, CA through whole rock and pre-magmatic zircon geochemistry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Economos, R. C.; Barth, A. P.; Wooden, J. L.; Howard, K. A.; Wiegand, B. A.

    2010-12-01

    The Cretaceous Cadiz Valley Batholith (CVB) in the central Mojave is comparable in spatial extent, intrusive depth and calculated flux to batholiths generated further north during the Sierra Crest event. Unlike Sierra Crest batholiths, the CVB was constructed through a full thickness of continental crust, providing improved isotopic leverage for elucidating crustal source components. Smaller volume intrusions that project structurally below the level of the CVB (emplaced at ~2 kbar, Anderson, 1988) are exposed in an oblique tilted crustal section that extends west to near the San Andreas Fault, which exposes rocks to ~20 km paleodepth. This structural feature, along with copious preserved pre-magmatic (inherited) zircons derived from the source region, allows for a host of geochemical constraints on the formation of this batholith. Published whole rock measurements in the CVB include a SiO2 range from 66 to 75 wt% with granitic compositions dominant. Sr isotopic ratios, while more radiogenic that Sierran counterparts, are relatively homogeneous and less radiogenic compared to smaller volume intrusive rocks exposed in the deeper section (51 - 76 wt% SiO2). Low Y concentrations suggest a garnet-bearing source region for the CVB, in contrast to the structurally deeper intrusions that have higher Y contents and lower Sr/Y ratios. The source homogeneity predicted by the tight grouping of 87Sr/86Sr(i) for the CVB is corroborated by geochemical data from pre-magmatic zircons, collected using the Stanford/USGS SHRIMP-RG. Pre-magmatic zircons in samples from across the CVB define a tight grouping of total 3+ REEs and Gd/Yb, in contrast to a diverse compositional range from various smaller intrusions in the deeper tilted section. In addition, samples from within the CVB are compared. Each CVB sample with pre-magmatic zircons has populations that are identical in source age variation and have a similar tightly-grouped range of compositional characteristics. This finding

  15. Geochronology, geochemistry, and deformation history of Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the Erguna Massif, NE China: Constraints on the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk orogenic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Jie; Xu, Wen-Liang; Wang, Feng; Zhao, Shuo; Li, Yu

    2015-09-01

    This paper presents new zircon and sphene U-Pb ages, biotite and hornblende 40Ar/39Ar ages, Hf isotopic data, and geochemical data for five Mesozoic plutons in the Erguna Massif of NE China. These data are used to constrain the late Mesozoic tectonic evolution of the Mongol-Okhotsk orogenic belt. This new dating, when combined with previously published ages, indicates that the Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous (J3-K1) intrusive rocks can be subdivided into three stages that represent periods of magmatism during the Late Jurassic (~ 155 Ma), early Early Cretaceous (~ 137 Ma), and late Early Cretaceous (~ 123 Ma). In addition, the rocks have undergone later deformation recorded by peak ages of ~ 137 and ~ 123 Ma. The Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in the study area are dominantly syenogranites and are either A-type granites or are classified as alkaline series, suggesting that they formed in an extensional environment. The late Early Cretaceous intrusive rocks in this area are generally monzogranitic and were emplaced as dikes in an extensional environment, along with coeval bimodal volcanics. These data, combined with the presence of regional unconformities in the northern part of Hebei Province and western part of Liaoning Province, and the spatial distribution of coeval volcanic rocks in NE China, suggest the Late Jurassic and early Early Cretaceous magmatisms and the early Early Cretaceous deformation in this area occurred in an extensional environment related to the delamination of a thickened part of the crust after closure of the Mongol-Okhotsk Ocean. In comparison, the late Early Cretaceous deformation and magmatism occurred in an extensional environment related to either delamination of the previously thickened crust related to the Mongol-Okhotsk tectonic regime or the subduction of the Paleo-Pacific Plate, or the combined influence of these two tectonic regimes.

  16. Partial melting of thickened continental crust in central Tibet: Evidence from geochemistry and geochronology of Eocene adakitic rhyolites in the northern Qiangtang Terrane

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Long, Xiaoping; Wilde, Simon A.; Wang, Qiang; Yuan, Chao; Wang, Xuan-Ce; Li, Jie; Jiang, Ziqi; Dan, Wei

    2015-03-01

    The composition of the deep crust is a key to understanding the formation of the low-velocity zone in the middle to lower crust of the Tibetan Plateau. The Suyingdi rhyolites exposed in the northern Qiangtang Terrane have high Sr (296-384 ppm) and low Y (5.81-7.93 ppm), with therefore high Sr/Y ratios (42-56), showing geochemical features of adakitic rocks. Zircon U-Pb dating yields an eruption age of 38.2 ± 0.8 Ma (MSWD = 0.78). These adakitic rhyolites are high-K calc-alkaline in composition, displaying a weakly peraluminous character. They have low MgO content (0.20-0.70 wt.%) and Mg# values (24-39), as well as low Sc (2.25-2.76 ppm), Cr (8-14 ppm), Co (1.6-3.5 ppm) and Ni (2-3 ppm) concentrations. The rocks are LREE-enriched ((La/Yb)N = 50-62) and display weakly negative Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.82-0.95) and pronounced negative Nb and Ta anomalies. They have low initial (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios (0.707860 to 0.708342) and enriched Nd isotopic compositions with εNd (t) values ranging from -8.4 to -5.0, which are indistinguishable from those of Cenozoic potassic and ultra-potassic lavas exposed in northern Tibet. Their much higher SiO2 and lower Fe2O3 contents, yet similar MgO, Cr, Co, Ni, and Mg# values to the potassic and ultra-potassic lavas, however, indicate that the rhyolites are unlikely to have formed by fractional crystallization of these lavas. Because of their low Nb/Ta ratios and similar Sr-Nd isotopic compositions to granulite xenoliths within the Cenozoic potassic rocks, we infer that the Suyingdi adakitic rhyolites were most likely produced by partial melting of a thickened lower crust in the garnet stability field. The magma source is most likely dominated by granulite facies metabasalts and clay-poor metamorphosed sedimentary rocks which indicate that the lower crust of northern Tibet is heterogeneous. In combination with data from previously-reported peraluminous and metaluminous adakitic rocks in the same region, the age and petrogenesis of the

  17. Adakite-like granitoid porphyries in the Eastern Pontides, NE Turkey: Potential parental melts and geodynamic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Karsli, Orhan; Ketenci, Murat; Uysal, İbrahim; Dokuz, Abdurrahman; Aydin, Faruk; Chen, Bin; Kandemir, Raif; Wijbrans, Jan

    2011-11-01

    The tectonic setting of the Eastern Pontides during the late Mesozoic to early Cenozoic remains a subject of debate. Petrogenesis of adakite-like granitoid porphyries plays a critical role in determining the nature of the lower continental crust and mantle dynamics during orogenic processes in the region. Here we describe, for the first time, the late Paleocene to early Eocene adakite-like granitoid porphyries from the northern part of the Eastern Pontides although their counterparts in the southern part have recently been found. The adakitic porphyries, which emplaced into the subduction-related Turonian-Santonian volcanics from northern part of the region, consist of I-type calc-alkaline quartz monzonite-tonalite (SiO2 = 62.89-65.07 wt.%) and high-K calc-alkaline granodiorite-granite associations (SiO2 = 69.06-70.43 wt.%). The former displays peraluminous to metaluminous signatures, whereas the latter shows peraluminous geochemical character. The granite-granodiorite porphyries have high K2O (3.32-3.84 wt.%), and low Na2O (3.48-4.61 wt.%) and MgO (0.91-1.04 wt.%) relative to the quartz monzonite-tonalite association (K2O = 1.50-1.92 wt.%; Na2O = 4.08-6.45 wt.%; MgO = 1.44-2.07 wt.%). Ar-Ar geochronology studies on the amphibole separates reveal that the adakite-like porphyries have a crystallization ages of 51.34 ± 0.27 to 53.55 ± 0.34 Ma. Here, we contend that these rocks were formed by partial fusion of a mafic lower continental crust in a collisional phase but not in a subduction setting. All the samples exhibit the typical geochemical characteristics of adakite, that is, high Sr (250-1141 ppm), high Sr/Y ratios (16-147), low Y (6.8-14.8 ppm) and low HREE concentrations; they are similar to adakites formed by slab melting associated with the subduction zone. However, the rocks exhibit heterogeneity in isotopic composition, with ISr ranging from 0.70554 to 0.70986, εNd (51 Ma) from -8.5 to -0.9 and Nd model ages from 0.72 to 1.26 Ga. The samples are

  18. Age and origin of earliest adakitic-like magmatism in Panama: Implications for the tectonic evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Whattam, Scott A.; Montes, Camilo; McFadden, Rory R.; Cardona, Agustin; Ramirez, Diego; Valencia, Victor

    2012-06-01

    40-20 Ma marks a fundamental interval in the evolution of the 70-0 Ma Panamanian magmatic arc system. During this period, there is no evidence of Panamanian magmatic arc activity to the east of the Panama Canal Basin while to the west and in localized regions to the east of the Panama Canal Basin a phase of intrusive-only activity is recorded. Fundamentally, geochemical and geochronological evidence presented herein indicate that this intrusive activity was predominantly 'adakitic-like' and becomes younger from west to east along an approximately W-E striking lineament. Granodiorites of the Petaquilla batholith, western Panama yield LAM-ICP-MS 206Pb/238U zircon ages of 29.0 + 0.7, - 0.6 Ma, 28.5 + 0.7, - 0.5 Ma, 28.3 + 0.5, - 0.4 Ma and 26.2 + 0.5, - 0.9 Ma. To the east of the Panama Canal Basin zircons from a hypabyssal diorite of the mainly intermediate Majé subvolcanic suite, cedes a mean 206Pb/238U age of 18.9 + 0.4 Ma. Relative to other 70-5 Ma Panamanian magmatic arc lavas and intrusives, Majé and Petaquilla intrusives yield adakitic-like major and trace element abundances (e.g., > 15 wt.% Al2O3, generally > 3.5 wt.% Na2O, > 400 ppm Sr, < 1.9 ppm Yb, < 18 ppm Y, Sr/Y that ranges to > 120) and strongly fractionated HREE patterns. These 30-26 Ma (Petaquilla) and 19 Ma (Majé) suites are also compositionally similar to a subvolcanic suite of rare, circa 25 Ma adakitic-like, andesitic intrusives which occur within the Panama Canal Basin midway between Petaquilla and Majé and at the same approximate latitude as Petaquilla and Majé. Collectively, the geochemical and geochronological data for the adakitic-like intrusives arc consistent with formation via partial melting of lowermost, mafic crust above a sub-horizontal slab tear that propagated from the west (Petaquilla) to the east (Majé) between 30 and 19 Ma. Our new tectonic model postulates that collision between the Panamanian magmatic arc system and an 'indentor' (e.g., a tract of thickened buoyant

  19. Post-collisional adakitic volcanism in the eastern part of the Sakarya Zone, Turkey: evidence for slab and crustal melting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokuz, Abdurrahman; Uysal, İbrahim; Siebel, Wolfgang; Turan, Mehmet; Duncan, Robert; Akçay, Miğraç

    2013-11-01

    New geochemical and isotopic data for post-collisional Early Eocene and Late Miocene adakitic rocks from the eastern part of the Sakarya Zone, Turkey, indicate that slab and lower crustal melting, respectively, played key roles in the petrogenesis of these rocks. The Early Eocene Yoncalık dacite (54.4 Ma) exhibits high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, low Y and HREE concentrations, moderate Mg# (44-65), and relatively high ɛNd and low ISr values, similar to adakites formed by slab melting associated with subduction. Geochemical composition of the Yoncalık dacite cannot be explained by simple crystal fractionation and/or crustal contamination of andesitic parent magma, but is consistent with the participation of different proportions of melts derived from subducted basalt and sediments. Sr/Y correlates horizontally with Rb/Y, and Pb/Nd correlates vertically with Nd isotopic composition, indicating that Sr and Pb budgets are strongly controlled by melt addition from the subducting slab, whereas positive correlations between Th/Nd and Pb/Nd, and Rb/Y and Nb/Y point to some contribution of sediment melt. In addition to low concentrations of heavy rare earth elements (~2-3 times chondrite), a systematic decrease in their concentrations and Nb/Ta ratios with increasing SiO2 contents suggests that slab partial melting occurred in the garnet stability field and that these elements were mobilized by fluid flux. These geochemical and isotopic signatures are best explained by slab breakoff and fusion shortly after the initiation of collision. Although the Late Micone Tavdağı rhyolite (8.75 Ma) has some geochemical features identical to adakites, such as high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, low Y and HREE concentrations, other requirements, such as sodic andesite and/or dacite with relatively high MgO and Mg# (>50), relatively high Ni and Cr, low K2O/Na2O (<0.4), high Sr (>400 ppm), for slab-derived adakites are not provided. It is sodic in composition and shows no traces of fractionation

  20. Geochemistry and petrogenesis of intrusions at the Golden Pride gold deposit in the Nzega greenstone belt, Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kwelwa, Shimba; Manya, Shukrani; Vos, Ivo M. A.

    2013-10-01

    The greenstone sequence at Golden Pride gold deposit in Nzega greenstone belt of northern Tanzania is cross-cut by several intrusions whose geochemistry and petrogenesis is unknown. We present major and trace elements geochemistry of the Golden Pride igneous intrusions with the aim of constraining their petrogenesis and their ancient tectonic setting. The Golden Pride intrusions are geochemically categorized into two main rock suites: the granodiorites (which include the porphyries) and the lamprophyres (formerly intermediate intrusions). The granodiorites are characterized by SiO2 contents of 54.5-69.9 wt%, elevated MgO (1.22-3.59 wt%) Cr (up to 54 ppm), Mg# (35-55) pointing to a mantle component in the source. Compared to the TTG and adakites, the granodiorites are characterized by higher K2O (1.52-4.30 wt%), medium HREE (Gd/ErCN = 2.13-3.77) and marked enrichment in Ba and Sr (Ba + Sr = 819-2922 ppm) and are in these respects similar to Archean high Ba-Sr sanukitoids. The rocks in this suite are interpreted to have formed by partial melting of an enriched mantle wedge through two metasomatic events: subduction-related fluids/melts and by metasomatism related to asthenospheric mantle upwelling caused by slab break-off. Compared to the granodiorites, the lamprophyres have higher MgO contents (2.37-3.81 wt%), Cr (60-298 ppm), Co (31-57 ppm) and Mg# (32-40). They also show slight enrichment of the LREE relative to HREE (La/YbCN = 3.3-7.1), moderate Nb-Ti depletion and sub-chondritic Zr/Hf ratios (34-41). These geochemical features are attributed to derivation of the Golden Pride lamprophyres by partial melting of the amphibole-rich metasomatized mantle by slab derived hydrous fluids. Both of the Golden Pride intrusion suites show strong affinity to subduction related magmas and we interpret that the entire greenstone sequence and the associated intrusions at Golden Pride gold deposit formed in a late Archaean convergent margin.

  1. Petrogenesis of a voluminous Quaternary adakitic volcano: the case of Baru volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hidalgo, Paulo J.; Rooney, Tyrone O.

    2014-09-01

    The origin of adakite magmas remains controversial because initially the term adakite had petrogenetic significance implying an origin by direct melting of the eclogitized subducting oceanic crust. Many models have been produced for their origin, and until now there has not been a straightforward method to discriminate between these models in a given adakite suite. Here, we use detailed chronological and geochemical studies of selected adakitic edifices that allows for the determination of the magmatic output rate parameter (Qe), which has been correlated with the rates of magma generation deep within subduction zones. By providing temporal and eruption rate estimates, we provide constraints on the possible petrogenetic processes involved in the generation of adakite-like signatures. Adakite magmas derived from the melting of the subducting slab should be volumetrically insignificant when compared to the adakite-like magmas produced by typical arc magma generation processes. In this study, we use this observation and the extraordinary stratigraphic exposure from Miocene to present in an adakitic volcano in Panama and to study the temporal and chemical variation in erupted magmas to estimate rates of magma generation. Detailed chemical and geochronological analyses of Baru volcano indicate that the volcanic edifice was constructed in its entirety during the Quaternary and magmas display adakite-like features such as steep rare earth elements patterns, pronounced depletions in the heavy rare earth elements, low Y, high Sr, and high Sr/Y. The magmatic output rates (Qe) that we have calculated show that compared to other typical adakitic volcanoes, most of the volcanic edifice of Baru volcano was constructed extremely rapidly (<~213 k.a.) and in time frames that are similar to typical arc volcanoes. The observed chemical and mineralogical variation, coupled with the high magma production rates, indicate that Baru volcano is more representative of a typical arc volcano

  2. Effect of time-evolving age and convergence rate of the subducting plate on the Cenozoic adakites and boninites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Yoon-Mi; Lee, Changyeol

    2014-12-01

    Partial melting of subducting oceanic crust expressed as high-Mg volcanic rocks such as adakites and boninites has been actively studied for decades, and Lee and King (2010) reported that time-evolving subduction parameters such as the age and the subduction rate of the converging oceanic plate play important roles in transient partial melting of the subducting oceanic crust (e.g., Aleutians). However, few subduction model experiments have considered time-evolving subduction parameters, posing problems for studies of transient partial melting of subducting oceanic crust in many subduction zones. Therefore, we constructed two-dimensional kinematic-dynamic subduction models for the Izu-Bonin, Mariana, Northeast Japan, Kuril, Tonga, Java-Sunda, and Aleutian subduction zones that account for the last 50 Myr of their evolution. The models include the time-evolving age and convergence rate of the incoming oceanic plate, so the effect of time-evolving subduction parameters on transient partial melting of oceanic crust can be evaluated. Our model calculations revealed that adakites and boninites in the Izu-Bonin and Aleutian subduction zones resulted from transient partial melting of oceanic crust. However, the steady-state subduction model using current subduction parameters did not produce any partial melting of oceanic crust in the aforementioned subduction zones, indicating that time-evolving subduction parameters are crucial for modeling transient eruption of adakites and boninites. Our model calculations confirm that other geological processes such as forearc extension, back-arc opening, mantle plumes and ridge subduction are required for partial melting of the oceanic crust in the Mariana, Northeast Japan, Tonga, and southeastern Java-Sunda subduction zones.

  3. Two-types of Early Cretaceous adakitic porphyries from the Luxi terrane, eastern North China Block: Melting of subducted Paleo-Pacific slab and delaminated newly underplated lower crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Hao; Xu, Zhaowen; Lu, Xiancai; Fu, Bin; Lu, Jianjun; Yang, Xiaonan; Zhao, Zengxia

    2016-01-01

    The origin and tectonic setting of Early Cretaceous adakitic rocks from the Luxi terrane in the eastern North China Block (NCB) remain debated. To resolve this issue, we determined whole-rock geochemistry, zircon U-Pb ages, and in situ Hf-O isotopes of the Mengyin and Liujing adakitic porphyries from the Luxi terrane. Zircon U-Pb dating results reveal that both the Mengyin and Liujing plutons were emplaced during the Early Cretaceous, with weighted mean 206Pb/238U ages of 130 ± 1 Ma (2σ) and 131 ± 2 Ma (2σ), respectively. In addition, abundant Neoarchean-Paleoproterozoic inherited zircon cores are identified in the Mengyin adakitic porphyry with 207Pb/206Pb ages ranging from 2.53 to 2.42 Ga. Rocks of both plutons are silicic (SiO2 = 65.4-70.2 wt.%), metaluminous, and alkaline in composition, comprising mainly quartz syenite porphyries. Samples from both plutons are enriched in large ion lithophile elements (LILEs) (e.g., Rb, Sr, and Ba), and light rare earth elements (LREEs), depleted in high field strength elements (HFSEs) (e.g., Nb, Ta, and Ti), and heavy rare earth elements (HREEs), and have either positive or no Eu anomalies. In addition, both adakitic porphyries have high Mg# values (51-64), high Sr and La contents, low Y and Yb contents, and high Sr/Y (Mengyin = 149-264; Liujing = 58-110) and (La/Yb)N (Mengyin = 32.4-45.3; Liujing = 43.8-53.1) ratios, similar to adakitic rocks worldwide. The Mengyin adakitic porphyry has higher whole-rock εNd(t) values (-5.8 to - 4.1), more radiogenic Pb [(206Pb/204Pb)i = 18.35-18.39, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.55-15.56, (208Pb/204Pb)i = 38.20-38.23], higher zircon rim εHf(t) values (+ 3.3 to + 8.8) and δ18O values (+ 6.5‰ to + 7.9‰), and lower (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios (0.7049-0.7050) than the Liujing adakitic porphyry [εNd(t) = - 12.4 to - 12.2, (206Pb/204Pb)i = 17.63-17.72, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.56-15.58, (208Pb/204Pb)i = 37.76-37.94, εHf(t) = - 14.8 to - 11.2, δ18O = + 5.9‰ to + 7.1‰, (87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7090-0.7091]. The

  4. Repeated magmatism at 34 Ma and 23-20 Ma producing high magnesian adakitic andesites and transitional basalts on southern Okushiri Island, NE Japan arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Makoto; Shuto, Kenji; Nohara-Imanaka, Rikako; Takazawa, Eiichi; Osanai, Yasuhito; Nakano, Nobuhiko

    2014-09-01

    The southern part of Okushiri Island in the present-day back-arc margin of the NE Japan arc is one of the rare convergent plate boundaries where similar magma types (high-magnesian adakitic andesite (HMAA) and high-TiO2 basalt (HTB)) have been erupted concurrently at more than one time. Oligocene HMAA can be divided into two types: HMAA-I is characterized by high Sr/Y and low Y, and HMAA-II by relatively low Sr/Y and high Y. HMAA-I is primitive in terms of MgO (8.5 wt.%), Mg# (67), Ni (232 ppm) and Cr (613 ppm) contents, and the most Mg-rich olivine phenocrysts plot within the mantle olivine array in terms of Fo and NiO. The similar Cr versus Ni relations of types I and II HMAA indicate some interaction of slab-derived adakitic melts with mantle peridotite, whereas Ni contents are higher than those of most boninites derived by partial melting of mantle peridotite at a given Cr content. Types I and II HMAA have more enriched Sr and Nd isotopic compositions than N-MORB. The petrography and geochemistry of these rocks, combined with published results on the genesis of high-magnesian andesite (HMA) indicate that types I and II HMAA could be produced by interaction of slab (N-MORB and sediment)-derived adakitic melts with mantle peridotite. The comagmatism of HMAA and HTB is ascribed to the following model. A cool, less hydrous, adakite magma (spherical diapir) would rise from the subducting slab (Pacific Plate) and become more hydrous as a result of its interaction with overlying hydrous peridotite. This hydrated adakitic diapir further ascends and is heated on entering the overlying mantle wedge. Subsequently, the temperature and H2O gradients in the ascending adakitic diapir and surrounding mantle peridotite would have been established. The HTB magma segregated from the surrounding mantle peridotite region (high temperature and low H2O content) at a depth of 60 km or more, whereas the adakitic diapir (low temperature and high H2O content) continued to rise, with its

  5. Nd-isotope systematics of ˜2.7 Ga adakites, magnesian andesites, and arc basalts, Superior Province: evidence for shallow crustal recycling at Archean subduction zones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Polat, Ali; Kerrich, Robert

    2002-09-01

    An association of adakite, magnesian andesite (MA), and Nb-enriched basalt (NEB) volcanic flows, which erupted within 'normal' intra-oceanic arc tholeiitic to calc-alkaline basalts, has recently been documented in ˜2.7 Ga Wawa greenstone belts. Large, positive initial ɛNd values (+1.95 to +2.45) of the adakites signify that their basaltic precursors, with a short crustal residence, were derived from a long-term depleted mantle source. It is likely that the adakites represent the melts of subducted late Archean oceanic crust. Initial ɛNd values in the MA (+0.14 to +1.68), Nb-enriched basalts and andesites (NEBA) (+1.11 to +2.05), and 'normal' intra-oceanic arc tholeiitic to calc-alkaline basalts and andesites (+1.44 to +2.44) overlap with, but extend to lower values than, the adakites. Large, tightly clustered ɛNd values of the adakites, together with Th/Ce and Ce/Yb systematics of the arc basalts that rule out sediment melting, place the enriched source in the sub-arc mantle. Accordingly, isotopic data for the MA, NEBA, and 'normal' arc basalts can be explained by melting of an isotopically heterogeneous sub-arc mantle that had been variably enriched by recycling of continental material into the shallow mantle in late Archean subduction zones up to 200 Ma prior to the 2.7 Ga arc. If the late Archean Wawa adakites, MA, and basalts were generated by similar geodynamic processes as their counterparts in Cenozoic arcs, involving subduction of young and/or hot ocean lithosphere, then it is likely that late Archean oceanic crust, and arc crust, were also created and destroyed by modern plate tectonic-like geodynamic processes. This study suggests that crustal recycling through subduction zone processes played an important role for the generation of heterogeneity in the Archean upper mantle. In addition, the results of this study indicate that the Nd-isotope compositions of Archean arc- and plume-derived volcanic rocks are not very distinct, whereas Phanerozoic plumes

  6. Decoupling of whole-rock Nd-Hf and zircon Hf-O isotopic compositions of a 284 Ma mafic-ultramafic intrusion in the Beishan Terrane, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Ben-Xun; Qin, Ke-Zhang; Lu, Ying-Huai; Sun, He; Sakyi, Patrick Asamoah

    2015-10-01

    Abundant Permian mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the Beishan Terrane, NW China, are parts of the Tarim large igneous province. Among these intrusions, Luodong intrusion is composed of dunite, wehrlite and gabbro. These rocks have whole-rock Sr-Nd-Hf and zircon Hf-O isotope compositions that display significant decoupling. The decoupling of these generally well-correlated systems demonstrates contrasting evolving trends. Systematic compositional and mineralogical controls on decoupling have been investigated. Wehrlites and gabbros show MORB-like trace element patterns with negligible crustal contamination. They have high initial 143Nd/144Nd [ɛNd(t) = +6.6 to +11.2] and 176Hf/177Hf [ɛHf(t) = +12.2 to +16.9] and low initial 87Sr/86Sr [(87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.702949-0.704098] ratios and plot within the MORB field, indicating that their parental magmas were derived from a depleted mantle source. The enrichment features are present in the zircon crystals separated from the gabbro. These homogeneously unzoned zircon crystals have high U concentrations, low Th/U ratios and a U-Pb age of 284.0 ± 2.3 Ma. They are therefore interpreted as having formed rapidly in a highly fractionated/evolved magma. Their ɛHf(t) and δ18O values range from -9.3 to -6.7 and +10.25 ‰ to +11.42 ‰, respectively. The decoupling is linked with crustal contamination by ancient crust (probably Proterozoic schist in the Beishan Terrane) that occurred during zircon crystallization. However, the contamination signature in the whole-rock composition was soon overprinted by magma mixing process. The inference is evidenced by zoning textures preserved in plagioclase, clinopyroxene, spinel and particularly olivine, and the presence of coeval diabase dykes cutting through the intrusion. The isotope decoupling observed in this mantle-plume-related mafic-ultramafic intrusion supports the idea that Nd-Hf decoupling and Lu/Hf and Sm/Nd parent/daughter variations exist only on a small hand-size scale in a

  7. U-Pb zircon dating, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions of mafic intrusive rocks in the Motuo, SE Tibet constrain on their petrogenesis and tectonic implication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pan, Fa-Bin; Zhang, Hong-Fei; Xu, Wang-Chun; Guo, Liang; Luo, Bi-Ji; Wang, Shuai

    2016-02-01

    Mafic intrusive rocks are widely exposed in the Motuo tectono-magmatic belt, southeast Lhasa terrane. LA-ICP-MS U-Pb zircon dating shows that they have magma crystallization ages of 69 and ca. 50 Ma. These mafic intrusive rocks are characterized by variable SiO2 (44.60-57.60 wt.%), high Al2O3 (17.19-20.86 wt.%), and low MgO (1.85-5.38 wt.%) with Mg# of 31-55. Their chemical composition is comparable with low-MgO high-Al basalts to basaltic andesites. They are enriched in LILEs (Rb, Ba, K) and LREE and depleted in HFSEs (Nb, Ta, Zr, Hf, Ti), with weakly evolved Sr-Nd-Hf compositions (whole-rock (87Sr/86Sr)0 = 0.7064 to 0.7086, εNd(t) = - 3.41 to + 1.22, and zircon εHf(t) = - 3.8 to + 6.4). The mafic rocks were derived from partial melting of metasomatized lithospheric mantle. Geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data show that they were insignificantly modified during magma emplacement. We provide a different secular evolution of the lithospheric mantle beneath the eastern part relative to the central part of the southern Lhasa terrane. Sr-Nd isotopic composition of the Motuo Late Cretaceous-Eocene mafic rocks argues that they were derived from partial melting of a relatively homogeneous and depleted lithospheric mantle. We propose that the Late Cretaceous delamination resulted in the replacement of ancient lithospheric mantle by the juvenile homogeneous lithospheric mantle in the eastern Lhasa terrane. The foundered ancient materials may subsequently re-fertilize the lithospheric mantle not only in the eastern Lhasa terrane but also in the surrounding areas.

  8. Petrogenesis and economic potential of the Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic intrusion in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt, NW China: Constraints from olivine chemistry, U-Pb age and Hf isotopes of zircons, and whole-rock Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Tao; Qian, Zhuang-Zhi; Li, Chusi; Xia, Ming-Zhe; Yang, Su-Hong

    2013-12-01

    The Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic intrusion is located in the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt in northern Xinjiang where many early-Permian mafic-ultramafic intrusions host important Ni-Cu sulfide deposits. In this paper we report zircon U-Pb age, olivine chemistry and integrated whole-rock chemical and isotopic compositions for the Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic intrusion. This intrusion is composed of lherzolites and gabbroic rocks. The U-Pb age of zircon from a large olivine gabbro sample from the intrusion is 283.1 ± 1.5 Ma, which indicates that the Erhongwa intrusion is contemporaneous with the early-Permian sulfide ore-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the central Tianshan region. Olivine from the Erhongwa intrusion contains up to 89.5 mol% Fo and 3000 ppm Ni, which are the highest among all known early-Permian mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the region. The occurrence of small sulfide inclusions in the most primitive olivine and significant Ni depletion in more fractionated olivine in the Erhongwa intrusion indicate that sulfide segregation took place during olivine fractional crystallization. The Erhongwa intrusive rocks are characterized by light REE enrichment relative to heavy REE, negative Nb anomalies, positive εNd (t = 283 Ma) values from + 6.3 to + 7.7, low initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios from 0.7034 to 0.7036, initial 206Pb/204Pb ratios from 17.8 to 17.9 and zircon εHf values from 8.0 to 15.5. The Erhongwa mafic-ultramafic rocks and coeval A-type granites in the region have similar isotopic compositions but the former have lower Th/Nb ratios than the latter. These similarities and differences are consistent with the interpretation that the Erhongwa magma formed by the mixing of a mafic magma derived from a depleted mantle with a granitic melt derived from a juvenile arc crust. It is deduced that sulfide saturation in the Erhongwa magmatic system was related to the magma mixing event at depth. More significant sulfide mineralization may

  9. Geochronological and geochemical implications of Early to Middle Jurassic continental adakitic arc magmatism in the Korean Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Sung Won; Kwon, Sanghoon; Ko, Kyoungtae; Yi, Keewook; Cho, Deung-Lyong; Kee, Weon-Seo; Kim, Bok Chul

    2015-06-01

    Sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) zircon U-Pb ages and whole-rock chemical compositions of Early to Middle Jurassic plutons from the central to southern Korean Peninsula are reported to investigate the effect of paleo-Pacific plate subduction preserved along the continental margin. Twenty-one plutonic rocks from the Yeongnam massif (i.e., Sunchang and Namwon plutons), the Okcheon belt (Jeongup, Boeun, and Mungyeong plutons), the northeast (Gangreung pluton), and the Gyeonggi massif (Gonam, Anheung, and Ganghwa plutons) have age ranges from ca. 189-186 Ma to 177 Ma, 177-166 Ma, and 177-173 Ma, respectively. Most plutonic rocks have chemical compositions similar to adakites, showing high SiO2 (45.62-74.96 wt.%), low MgO (0.01-2.84 wt.%), high Na2O (2.65-4.83 wt.%), high Sr/Y and La/Yb, low Y and Yb, as well as low HFSEs (Nb and Ta), but initial Sr ratios (0.7048-0.7262), K2O (0.50-5.88 wt.%), and K2O/Na2O (0.34-2.1) were unlikely to have been formed by melting of either a thickened and/or delaminated lower continental crust, or an altered oceanic crust. These suggest that the "adakitic" plutonic rocks in this region resulted from partial melting of an enriched mantle source metasomatized by dewatering from a delaminated flat-slab. The spatial distributions of this continental adakitic plutonic belt, based on the present study, together with previously reported geochronological results, indicate that magmatic pulses gradually migrated toward the continent across the Korean Peninsula as a result of slab shallowing caused by periodic slab buckling. The similar geochronological and geochemical characteristics, petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the plutonic belt spanning the Korean Peninsula, Japan, eastern China, and eastern Russia indicate a possible link to an active subduction system that existed during the Early to Middle Jurassic, although the products of the plate subduction might differ in different locations along the East Asian continental

  10. Juxtaposition of adakite, boninite, high-TiO 2 and low-TiO 2 basalts in the Devonian southern Altay, Xinjiang, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Niu, Hecai; Sato, Hiroaki; Zhang, Haixiang; Ito, Jun'ichi; Yu, Xueyuan; Nagao, Takashi; Terada, Kentaro; Zhang, Qi

    2006-12-01

    We present petrographic and geochemical data on representative samples of the Devonian adakite, boninite, low-TiO 2 and high-TiO 2 basalts and associated rocks in the southern Altay areas, Xinjiang, NW China. These volcanic rocks mostly occur as tectonic blocks within suture zones between the Siberian and Junggar plates. Adakite occurs in the Suoerkuduke area ca. 40 km south of Fuyun, and actually represents a poorly-sorted massive volcaniclastic deposit, mostly consisting of a suite of hornblende andesite to pyroxene andesite. The geochemical features of the adakite suggest its generation by melting of subducted oceanic crust. Boninite occurs in the Saerbulake area ca. 20 km southwest of Fuyun, as pillowed lava or pillowed breccia. It is associated with high-TiO 2 basalt/gabbro and low-TiO 2 basalt. The boninites are metamorphosed, but contain relict clinopyroxene with Mg# (=100*Mg/(Mg+Fe)) of 90-92, and Cr 2O 3 contents of 0.5-0.7 wt% and chromian spinel with Cr/(Cr+Al) ratio of 0.84. The bulk rock compositions of the boninites are characterized by low and U-shaped REE with variable La/Yb ratios. They are classified as high-Ca boninite. The Cr-rich cpx phenocryst and Chromian spinel suggests that the boninites were formed by melting of mildly refractory mantle peridotite fluxed by a slab-derived fluid component under normal mantle potential temperature conditions. Basaltic rocks occur as massive flows, pillowed lavas, tuff breccia, lapilli tuff and blocks in tectonic mélanges. Together with gabbros, the basaltic rocks are classified into high-TiO 2 (>1.7 wt%) and low-TiO 2 (<1.5 wt%) types. They show variable trace element compositions, from MORB-type through transitional back-arc basin basalt to arc tholeiite, or within plate alkalic basalt. A notable feature of the Devonian formations in the southern Altay is the juxtaposition of volcanic rocks of various origins even within a limited area; i.e. the adakite and the boninites are associated with high-TiO 2 and

  11. Early Silurian (~ 440 Ma) adakitic, andesitic and Nb-enriched basaltic lavas in the southern Altay Range, Northern Xinjiang (western China): Slab melting and implications for crustal growth in the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Xiao-Ming; Zhang, Hai-Xiang; Wang, Qiang; Ma, Lin; Yang, Yue-Heng

    2014-10-01

    As an important part of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), the Altay Range contains large-scale Paleozoic magmatic rocks. However, owing to the lack of precise age constraints, the tectonic setting and petrogenesis of the magmatic rocks in this area have been controversial, which has led to the debate on Phanerozoic crustal growth mechanisms and accretionary orogenic processes in the CAOB. Herein, we report geochronological and geochemical data of the Suoerkuduke adakitic, andesitic and Nb-enriched basaltic (NEB) lavas in the southern margin of the southern Altay Range. LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb analyses for five adakitic, andesitic and NEB samples indicate that they were coevally generated in the Early Silurian (~ 440 Ma). The adakites and basaltic andesites are geochemically characterized by high Na2O/K2O, Sr/Y, Al2O3, Sr, εNd(t) and zircon εHf(t) values and relatively low (87Sr/86Sr)i ratios. The NEBs are sodium-rich and have higher TiO2, P2O5, Zr, Nb, and Nb/U values than those of typical arc basalts. They also have positive εNd(t) values and positive and variable zircon εHf(t) values. We suggest that the Suoerkuduke adakites were derived by a partial melting of the subducted oceanic crust with minor overlying sediments, and the continuous compositional variations between adakites and basaltic andesites confirm that the interaction between slab melts and mantle peridotite played an important role in the formation of basaltic andesites. The associated NEBs were possibly generated by a partial melting of mantle wedge peridotites metasomatized by slab-derived adakitic melts and minor fluids. In combination with the occurrence of voluminous Silurian-Devonian granitoids, coeval ophiolite mélanges, and a series of intra-arc basins, a slab window model triggered by slab tearing is proposed to account for the formation of the Suoerkuduke adakite-basaltic andesite-NEB suites. The upwelling of the asthenospheric mantle through the slab window probably caused

  12. Magma mixing origin for the post-collisional adakitic monzogranite of the Triassic Yangba pluton, Northwestern margin of the South China block: geochemistry, Sr-Nd isotopic, zircon U-Pb dating and Hf isotopic evidences

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Jiang-Feng; Lai, Shao-Cong; Diwu, Chun-Rong; Ju, Yin-Juan; Li, Yong-Fei

    2010-03-01

    Petrogenesis of high Mg# adakitic rocks in intracontinental settings is still a matter of debate. This paper reports major and trace element, whole-rock Sr-Nd isotope, zircon U-Pb and Hf isotope data for a suite of adakitic monzogranite and its mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) at Yangba in the northwestern margin of the South China Block. These geochemical data suggest that magma mixing between felsic adakitic magma derived from thickened lower continental crust and mafic magma derived from subcontinental lithospheric mantle (SCLM) may account for the origin of high Mg# adakitic rocks in the intracontinental setting. The host monzogranite and MMEs from the Yangba pluton have zircon U-Pb ages of 207 ± 2 and 208 ± 2 Ma, respectively. The MMEs show igneous textures and contain abundant acicular apatite that suggests quenching process. Their trace element and evolved Sr-Nd isotopic compositions [(87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.707069-0.707138, and ɛNd( t) = -6.5] indicate an origin from SCLM. Some zircon grains from the MMEs have positive ɛHf( t) values of 2.3-8.2 with single-stage Hf model ages of 531-764 Ma. Thus, the MMEs would be derived from partial melts of the Neoproterozoic SCLM that formed during rift magmatism in response to breakup of supercontinent Rodinia, and experience subsequent fractional crystallization and magma mixing process. The host monzogranite exhibits typical geochemical characteristics of adakite, i.e., high La/Yb and Sr/Y ratios, low contents of Y (9.5-14.5 ppm) and Yb, no significant Eu anomalies (Eu/Eu* = 0.81-0.90), suggesting that garnet was stable in their source during partial melting. Its evolved Sr-Nd isotopic compositions [(87Sr/86Sr)i = 0.7041-0.7061, and ɛNd( t) = -3.1 to -4.3] and high contents of K2O (3.22-3.84%) and Th (13.7-19.0 ppm) clearly indicate an origin from the continental crust. In addition, its high Mg# (51-55), Cr and Ni contents may result from mixing with the SCLM-derived mafic magma. Most of the zircon grains from the

  13. Effect of ultramafic intrusions and associated mineralized rocks on the aqueous geochemistry of the Tangle Lakes Area, Alaska: Chapter C in Studies by the U.S. Geological Survey in Alaska, 2011

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wang, Bronwen; Gough, Larry P.; Wanty, Richard B.; Lee, Gregory K.; Vohden, James; O’Neill, J. Michael; Kerin, L. Jack

    2013-01-01

    Stream water was collected at 30 sites within the Tangle Lakes area of the Delta mineral belt in Alaska. Sampling focused on streams near the ultramafic rocks of the Fish Lake intrusive complex south of Eureka Creek and the Tangle Complex area east of Fourteen Mile Lake, as well as on those within the deformed metasedimentary, metavolcanic, and intrusive rocks of the Specimen Creek drainage and drainages east of Eureka Glacier. Major, minor, and trace elements were analyzed in aqueous samples for this reconnaissance aqueous geochemistry effort. The lithologic differences within the study area are reflected in the major-ion chemistry of the water. The dominant major cation in streams draining mafic and ultramafic rocks is Mg2+; abundant Mg and low Ca in these streams reflect the abundance of Mg-rich minerals in these intrusions. Nickel and Cu are detected in 84 percent and 87 percent of the filtered samples, respectively. Nickel and Cu concentrations ranged from Ni <0.4 to 10.1 micrograms per liter (mg/L), with a median of 4.2 mg/L, and Cu <0.5 to 27 mg/L, with a median of 1.2 mg/L. Trace-element concentrations in water are generally low relative to U.S. Environmental Protection Agency freshwater aquatic-life criteria; however, Cu concentrations exceed the hardness-based criteria for both chronic and acute exposure at some sites. The entire rare earth element (REE) suite is found in samples from the Specimen Creek sites MH5, MH4, and MH6 and, with the exception of Tb and Tm, at site MH14. These samples were all collected within drainages containing or downstream from Tertiary gabbro, diabase, and metagabbro (Trgb) exposures. Chondrite and source rock fractionation profiles for the aqueous samples were light rare earth element depleted, with negative Ce and Eu anomalies, indicating fractionation of the REE during weathering. Fractionation patterns indicate that the REE are primarily in the dissolved, as opposed to colloidal, phase.

  14. Carboniferous magmatism in the Evora Massif (southwest Portugal, Ossa-Morena Zone): from typical arc calc-alkaline to adakitic-like magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lima, Selma M.; Neiva, Ana M. R.; Ramos, Joao M. F.

    2014-05-01

    The Evora Massif is one of the subdivisions of western Ossa-Morena Zone. It is a dome-like structure mainly composed of Ediacaran, Cambrian and Ordovician country rocks, affected by medium- and high-grade metamorphism coeval with the emplacement of several mafic to felsic intrusive bodies. The last magmatic event recorded in this area (Carboniferous) consists of calc-alkaline volcanism and voluminous plutonism (mainly composed by tonalites, gabbros, diorites and late-orogenic granodiorites and granites) [1]. Detailed chemical and isotopic studies from Evora Massif plutons were performed in the last few years. Whole-rock chemical and isotopic data suggest that the Hospitais tonalite (HT), Alto de Sao Bento area (ASB) and Reguengos de Monsaraz pluton (RM) resulted from fractional crystallization of mantle-derived magmas followed by mixing with variable proportions of crustal melts [2-4]. U-Pb ID-TIMS data indicate an age of 337-335 for the RM [4]. The Pavia pluton is a multiphase granitic body constructed incrementally by the episodic emplacement of several batches of magma (at 328 Ma, ca. 324 Ma and 319-317 Ma) [5]. The main granitic phases range from tonalite to two-mica granite that contain rare surmicaceous and fine-grained enclaves, and granitic and amphibolitic xenoliths. On the other hand, they are cut by abundant rhyodacite porphyries, microgranites (s.l.) and pegmatite dikes, predominantly oriented NE-SW and NW-SE. Although each phase seems to represent a distinct batch of magma, whole-rock Sr-Nd isotopic data suggest a similar and fairly homogenous source for all the constituent phases. Initial 87Sr/86Sr varies between 0.70428 and 0.7058 and ɛ Ndt ranges from -3.4 to +0.4, pointing towards a mantle or juvenile crust origin. A higher variation is observed in whole-rock δ18O (5.6-9.6 o), consistent with assimilation of crust. The PP was interpreted as the result of assimilation-fractional crystallization of a basaltic magma. Substantial differences between

  15. Important role of magma mixing in generating the Mesozoic monzodioritic-granodioritic intrusions related to Cu mineralization, Tongling, East China: Evidence from petrological and in situ Sr-Hf isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, C. J.; Chen, B.; Li, Z.; Wang, Z. Q.

    2016-04-01

    The Mesozoic ore-bearing high-Mg monzodioritic-granodioritic rocks in the Tongling mining district (East China) have been described as having adakitic affinities, and their origin has been attributed to partial melting of delaminated eclogite at depth in the mantle, followed by interaction of the resultant granitic magma with mantle peridotite. Here we present petrological data and in situ Sr isotopic data for zoned plagioclase that are inconsistent with the eclogite-derived model and instead propose a model that involves magma mixing of siliceous crustal melts and basaltic magma that was derived from metasomatized mantle in a back-arc extensional regime. The principal geochemical signatures of these Mesozoic rocks include a high-K calc-alkaline affinity, high values of Mg#, high Sr-Ba abundances, high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, εNd(t) = - 13.1 to - 9.0, and ISr = 0.70707-0.70824. The magma mixing model is supported by (1) the common existence of mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) and the disequilibrium textures of plagioclase and amphibole, (2) the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of embayed high-Ca cores of plagioclase that are distinctly lower than in the euhedral low-Ca overgrowth rims, (3) the negative correlations between whole-rock Nd and Sr isotopic ratios, and (4) the significant differences in the values of εHf(t) (- 9.5 to - 26) within different zircons from the same intrusion.

  16. Sr-Nd isotope geology and tectonomagmatic setting of the Dehsalm intrusives (Lut Block, Eastern Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmandzadeh, Reza; Francisco Santos, Jose; Ribeiro, Sara

    2013-04-01

    The Dehsalm porphyritic shallow intrusives belong to the Lut Block volcanic-plutonic belt (central eastern Iran). Previous research on alteration, mineralization and hydrothermal fluids indicates that a Cu-Mo porphyry type mineralization system is related with these intrusives (Arjmandzadeh et al., 2012). The rocks studied in this work range in composition from gabbro-diorite to granite, with dominance of monzonites and quartz monzonites, and have geochemical features of high-K calc alkaline to shoshonitic volcanic arc suites. The trends of major element oxides on Harker diagrams, together with textural evidence, point to the crystal fractionation of clinopyroxene, Ca - plagioclase, hornblende, apatite and oxide minerals. Primitive mantle - normalized trace element spider diagrams display strong enrichment in LILE, such as Rb, Ba and Cs, and depletions in some high field strength elements (HFSE), such as Nb, Ti, Y and HREE. Chondrite-normalized plots show significant LREE enrichments, high LaN/YbN (21.5 to 31.0) and the lack of Eu anomaly. Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios of Dehsalm intrusives are respectively 31.6-72.2 and 21.5-33.5, which reveals that, despite their K-rich composition, these rocks also have some adakitic affinity. A Rb-Sr whole rock-feldspar-biotite age of 33.4±1 Ma was obtained in a quartz monzonite sample; this date may be interpreted as close to the intrusion age, considering that the chosen sample is almost unaltered and should have suffered fast cooling. The obtained age coincides, within error, with a previous geochronological result in a similar rock from the Chah-Shaljami area (Arjmandzadeh et al., 2011), further northwest along the eastern border of the Lut Block. 87Sr/86Sr(33Ma) and ɛNd(33Ma) values range from 0.70481 to 0.70508 and from +1.5 to +2.5, respectively, which fits into a supra-subduction mantle wedge source for the parental melts and indicates that crustal contribution for magma diversification was not relevant. Sr and Nd isotope

  17. Petrogenesis of Cretaceous mafic intrusive rocks in the Fosdick Mountains, Marie Byrd Land, West Antarctica: melting of metasomatized sub-continental arc mantle along the active plate margin of Gondwana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, S.; Brown, M.; Korhonen, F. J.; Mcfadden, R. R.; Siddoway, C. S.

    2013-12-01

    A diorite pluton and widely distributed mafic dykes occur in the Fosdick migmatite-granite complex, which is interpreted to represent middle-to-lower crustal rocks of the paleo-Pacific active continental margin of Gondwana. The mafic dykes exhibit a variety of relationships with host rocks in the field ranging from undeformed dykes with sharp contacts with host gneisses to dismembered dykes with comingled textures and numerous back-veins of leucosome intruded from host migmatitic gneisses suggestive of significant interaction with crustal rocks. U-Pb ages for magmatic zircon in these rocks yields Cretaceous crystallization ages ranging from ca. 113 Ma to ca. 98 Ma for the mafic dykes and ca. 100 Ma for the diorite pluton. These mafic intrusive rocks, which contain abundant hydrous minerals, are medium- to high-K-series calc-alkaline rocks with basic-intermediate compositions (47-59 wt % SiO2 for mafic dykes and 52-56 wt % SiO2 for the diorite pluton). They have trace element patterns characterized by LILE enrichments and negative Nb anomalies indicating an origin from a hydrous mantle source metasomatized by slab-derived components. The samples without evidence of interaction with crustal rocks, which are likely to better reflect the mantle source composition, have positive ɛSr(100Ma) values (+8.1 to +14.5) and negative to slightly positive ɛNd(100Ma) values (-1.6 to +2.5) consistent with derivation from an enriched mantle source. These samples may be divided into two groups either characterized by higher LILE/HFSE ratios, less radiogenic ɛSr(100Ma) values and more radiogenic ɛNd(100Ma) values, or characterized by relatively lower LILE/ HFSE ratios, more radiogenic ɛSr(100Ma) values and less radiogenic ɛNd(100Ma) values suggesting differences in the mantle source. The results of this study are consistent with melting of a variably metasomatized sub-arc mantle source during a transition from a wrench to a transtensional tectonic setting, but are inconsistent

  18. Petrogenesis of the Kuangshancun and Hongshan intrusive complexes from the Handan-Xingtai district: Implications for iron mineralization associated with Mesozoic magmatism in the North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, Yi; Xiao, Long; Zhan, Qiongyao; Wu, Jianxun; Zhu, Dan; Huang, Wan; Bai, Ming; Zhang, Yanhai

    2015-12-01

    The Handan-Xingtai district in eastern China exposes numerous late Mesozoic intrusions. Among these, the Kuangshancun intrusive complex is one of the major ore-related intrusions whereas the Hongshan complex is barren, although both intrusions display similar geochemical characteristics. The Kuangshancun complex consists of diorite and monzonite, with zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb age of 133.7 ± 1 Ma. The Hongshan complex mainly consists of syenite and shows zircon U-Pb age of 134.5 ± 1 Ma. The mineral chemistry of plagioclase from both complexes reveals normal zoning, consistent with the fractional crystallization process. Rocks of the Kuangshancun complex show SiO2 in the range of 58.92-63.84 wt.%, Na2O of 4.63-8.81 wt.%, and Al2O3 of 16.14-18.18 wt.%, together high Sr/Y (14-54) and high LaN/YbN (8.30-16.18) ratios. They show enrichment in LREE and depletion in HREE and HFSE, with no remarkable Eu anomalies, similar to the features of adakites. The whole rock initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios range from 0.706661 to 0.706722 and εNd (t = 134 Ma) between -15.26 and -15.12, which are consistent with zircon 176Hf/177Hf ratios of 0.281940-0.282059 and εHf (t) values of -27.0 to -22.7. Samples of the Hongshan complex show SiO2 in the range of 56.57-68.16 wt.%, high Sr/Y (19-112) and high LaN/YbN (11.39-16.82) ratios. The zircon εHf (t) values are in the range of -15.9 to -12.8 and εNd (t = 134 Ma) is between -9.82 and -8.62. The Kuangshancun complex was derived through partial melting of an enriched lithospheric mantle contaminated by lower continental crust components. The Hongshan complex was also derived from the EM I-like mantle source. However, the calculated zircon Ce4+/Ce3+ and Eu/Eu∗ ratios indicate that the source magma of the Kuangshancun complex were characterized by higher oxygen fugacity as compared to that the Hongshan complex. The high oxidation states and high water contents are considered as possible key factors that led to the iron mineralization in the

  19. Early Jurassic high-K calc-alkaline and shoshonitic rocks from the Tongshi intrusive complex, eastern North China Craton: Implication for crust-mantle interaction and post-collisional magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lan, Ting-Guang; Fan, Hong-Rui; Santosh, M.; Hu, Fang-Fang; Yang, Kui-Feng; Yang, Yue-Heng; Liu, Yongsheng

    2012-05-01

    The Tongshi intrusive complex, located within the western Shandong Province (Luxi Block) in the eastern North China Craton, comprises high-K calc-alkaline series (fine-grained quartz monzonite and porphyritic quartz monzonite) and shoshonitic series (coarse- to fine-grained porphyritic syenites). Here we report comprehensive data on petrology, geochemistry, Sr-Nd-Pb isotopes and zircon U-Pb and Hf isotopic compositions from the intrusive complex. LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb ages show that this complex was emplaced at 180.1-184.7 Ma. The fine-grained quartz monzonite and porphyritic quartz monzonite have similar major and trace elements features, implying a similar petrogenetic history. Coupled with the widespread Neoarchean inherited zircons in these rocks, the high SiO2 and Na2O as well as the low MgO contents and low Pb isotopic ratios ((206Pb/204Pb)i = 15.850-16.881, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 14.932-15.261, (208Pb/204Pb)i = 35.564-36.562) of the quartz monzonites suggest an origin from ancient tonalite-trondhjemite-granodiorite (TTG) crust. However, their higher Nd and Hf isotopic ratios (ɛNd (t) = - 11.7 to - 7.0, ɛHf (t) = - 25.0 to - 10.3) as compared to the basement rocks indicate input of enriched lithospheric mantle-derived materials. The coarse- to fine-grained porphyritic syenites were derived from similar sources as inferred from their comparable major and trace elements contents as well as the Nd, Hf and Pb isotopic compositions. The Neoarchean inherited zircons and depletion of Nb, Ta, P and Ti in these rocks indicate the involvement of ancient crust. However, the high Nd and Hf isotopic ratios (ɛNd (t) = - 0.8 to 1.5, ɛHf (t) = - 4.4 to 4.8) coupled with high Pb isotopic compositions ((206Pb/204Pb)i = 18.082-19.560, (207Pb/204Pb)i = 15.510-15.730, (208Pb/204Pb)i = 37.748-39.498) suggest that the porphyritic syenites were mainly derived from an asthenospheric mantle. Based on the geochemical and isotopic features, a magmatic process similar to MASH (melting

  20. Elemental and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic constraints on the origin of Late Jurassic adakitic granodiorite in central Fujian province, southeast China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Guo-Chang; Jiang, Yao-Hui; Liu, Zheng; Ni, Chun-Yu; Qing, Long; Zhang, Qiao

    2015-08-01

    This paper presents the first detailed SHRIMP or LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating, major and trace element geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic data of an adakitic pluton (Tangquan pluton) and an I-type granitic pluton (Xiadao pluton) in central Fujian. SHRIMP and LA-ICP-MS zircon U-Pb dating indicates that the Tangquan and Xiadao plutons were emplaced in the Late Jurassic (~160 Ma) and Early Cretaceous (~143 Ma), respectively. The Tangquan pluton is mainly composed of high-K calc-alkaline granodiorite. The rocks show adakitic affinities, characterized by high Sr and low Y and Yb contents, with high Sr/Y ratios, and by high Mg#. They have initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.7084-0.7087, ɛNd (T) of -8.8 to -9.0 and ɛHf (T) (in-situ zircon) of -11.2. Detailed elemental and isotopic data suggest that the Tangquan adakitic granodiorite was formed by partial melting of Paleoproterozoic metamorphic basement at a depth of ~40 km ( P ~12.5 kbar) plus additional input from coeval basaltic magma. The Xiadao pluton consists of monzogranite, syenogranite and alkali-feldspar granite. These granites are high-K calc-alkaline and belong to I-type. They have relatively low Sr and high Y and Yb contents and show similar Mg# to pure crustal melts. The Xiadao granites have slightly higher initial 87Sr/86Sr (0.7095-0.7102) and lower ɛNd (T) (-9.0 to -9.4) and ɛHf (T) (-14.4; in-situ zircon) than the Tangquan granitoids. Detailed elemental and isotopic data suggest that the Xiadao I-type granites were formed by partial melting of Paleoproterozoic metamorphic basement at a depth of ~30 km ( P ~10 kbar).

  1. Timing, petrogenesis and tectonic setting of the Late Paleozoic gabbro-granodiorite-granite intrusions in the Shalazhashan of northern Alxa: Constraints on the southernmost boundary of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shi, Xingjun; Wang, Tao; Zhang, Lei; Castro, Antonio; Xiao, XuChang; Tong, Ying; Zhang, Jianjun; Guo, Lei; Yang, Qidi

    2014-11-01

    The Late Paleozoic tectonic setting and location of the southernmost boundary of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB) with respect to the Alxa Block or Alxa-North China Craton (ANCC) are debated. This paper presents new geochronological, petrological, geochemical and zircon Hf isotopic data of the Late Paleozoic intrusions from the Shalazhashan in northern Alxa and discusses the tectonic setting and boundary between the CAOB and ANCC. Using zircon U-Pb dating, intrusions can be broadly grouped as Late Carboniferous granodiorites (~ 301 Ma), Middle Permian gabbros (~ 264 Ma) and granites (~ 266 Ma) and Late Permian granodiorites, monzogranites and quartz monzodiorites (254-250 Ma). The Late Carboniferous granodiorites are slightly peraluminous and calcic. The remarkably high zircon Hf isotopes (εHf(t) = + 6-+ 10) and characteristics of high silica adakites suggest that these granodiorites were mainly derived from "hot" basaltic slab-melts of the subducted oceanic crust. The Middle Permian gabbros exhibited typical cumulate textures and were derived from the partial melting of depleted mantle. The Middle Permian granites are slightly peraluminous with high-K calc-alkaline and low εHf(t) values from - 0.9 to + 2.9. These granites were most likely derived from juvenile materials mixed with old crustal materials. The Late Permian granodiorites, monzogranites and quartz monzodiorites are characterized as metaluminous to slightly peraluminous, with variable Peacock alkali-lime index values from calc-alkalic to alkali-calcic. These rocks were mainly derived from juvenile crustal materials, as evidenced by their high εHf(t) values (+ 3.3 to + 8.9). The juvenile sources of the above intrusions in the Shalazhashan are similar to those of the granitoids from the CAOB but distinct from the granitoids within the Alxa Block. These findings suggest that the Shalazhashan Zone belongs to the CAOB rather than the Alxa Block and that its boundary with the Alxa block can be

  2. Petrogenesis of Early-Middle Jurassic intrusive rocks in northern Liaoning and central Jilin provinces, northeast China: Implications for the extent of spatial-temporal overprinting of the Mongol-Okhotsk and Paleo-Pacific tectonic regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-Hong; Wang, Feng; Xu, Wen-Liang; Cao, Hua-Hua; Pei, Fu-Ping

    2016-07-01

    The Mesozoic tectonic evolution of NE China was controlled mainly by the Mongol-Okhotsk and Paleo-Pacific tectonic regimes. However, the extent of the spatial and temporal overprinting of these two regimes is poorly understood. Here, we report new zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating and geochemical analyses of Jurassic intrusive rocks in northern Liaoning and central Jilin provinces, northeast China, to discuss their petrogenesis and outline the extent of spatial and temporal overprinting of these two tectonic regimes. Dating results indicate that Jurassic magmatism occurred in two stages during the Early (ca. 175 Ma) and Middle Jurassic (170-163 Ma). These rocks represent two-stage typical bimodal igneous rock associations composed mainly of olivine gabbro, gabbro, and gneissic granitoids. The Early and Middle Jurassic gabbros have low rare earth element (REE) abundances, positive Eu anomalies, depletion in high field strength elements (HFSEs), and positive εHf(t) values (+ 4.0 to + 10.3, except for one value of - 17.8), suggesting that the primary magma was derived from partial melting of depleted lithospheric mantle metasomatized by subducted-slab-derived fluids. The Early Jurassic monzogranite exhibit high REE abundances (195-201 ppm), weak negative Eu anomalies (δEu = 0.63-0.64), and negative εHf(t) values (- 11.9 to - 8.2), suggesting a primary magma that was derived from partial melting of lower continental crust of the NCC. The Middle Jurassic granodiorites are enriched in light REEs (LREEs) and large ion lithophile elements (LILEs), and are depleted in heavy REEs (HREEs) and HFSEs, as well as high Sr/Y (29-132) and (La/Yb)N (15-44) ratios. In addition, the Middle Jurassic granitoids near or within the NCC exhibit negative εHf(t) values (- 18.9 to + 0.2), whereas those within the Xing'an-Mongolia Orogenic Belt (XMOB) have generally positive εHf(t) values (- 0.6 to + 6.4), suggesting their origin from partial melting of thickened ancient NCC and newly accreted

  3. Hydrothermal alteration and Cu–Ni–PGE mobilization in the charnockitic rocks of the footwall of the South Kawishiwi intrusion, Duluth Complex, USA

    PubMed Central

    Benkó, Zsolt; Mogessie, Aberra; Molnár, Ferenc; Krenn, Kurt; Poulson, Simon R.; Hauck, Steven; Severson, Mark; Arehart, Greg B.

    2015-01-01

    In the Neoarchean (~ 2.7 Ga) contact metamorphosed charnockitic footwall of the Mesoproterosoic (1.1 Ga) South Kawishiwi intrusion of the Duluth Complex, the primary metamorphic mineral assemblage and Cu–Ni–PGE sulfide mineralization is overprinted by an actinolite + chlorite + cummingtonite + prehnite + pumpellyite + quartz + calcite hydrothermal mineral assemblage along 2–3 cm thick veins. In calcite, hosted by the hydrothermal alteration zones and in a single recrystallized quartz porphyroblast, four different fluid inclusion assemblages are documented; the composition of these fluid inclusions provide p–T conditions of the fluid flow, and helps to define the origin of the fluids and evaluate their role in the remobilization and reprecipitation of the primary metamorphic sulfide assemblage. Pure CO2 fluid inclusions were found as early inclusions in recrystallized quartz porphyroblast. These inclusions may have been trapped during the recrystallization of the quartz during the contact metamorphism of the footwall charnockite in the footwall of the SKI. The estimated trapping pressure (1.6–2.0 kbar) and temperature (810–920 °C) conditions correspond to estimates based on felsic veins in the basal zones of the South Kawishiwi intrusion. Fluid inclusion assemblages with CO2–H2O–NaCl and CH4–N2–H2O–NaCl compositions found in this study along healed microfractures in the recrystallized quartz porphyroblast establish the heterogeneous state of the fluids during entrapment. The estimated trapping pressure and temperature conditions (240–650 bar and 120–150 °C for CO2–H2O–NaCl inclusions and 315–360 bar and 145–165 °C for CH4–N2–H2O–NaCl inclusions) are significantly lower than the p–T conditions (> 700 °C and 1.6–2 kbar) during the contact metamorphism, indicating that this fluid flow might not be related to the cooling of the Duluth Complex and its contact aureole. The presence of chalcopyrite

  4. Slab melting in the Aleutians: implications of an ion probe study of clinopyroxene in primitive adakite and basalt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yogodzinski, G. M.; Kelemen, P. B.

    1998-05-01

    An ion probe study of trace elements in Mg-rich clinopyroxene phenocrysts in primitive Aleutian lavas provides constraints on the genesis of Aleutian adakites, and possible insights into the source of common Aleutian magmas. Clinopyroxene (cpx) phenocrysts in the primitive adakites have high Sr and Nd/Yb compared to cpx in Aleutian basalts. In the adakites, Sr and Nd/Yb are highest for high Mg# cpx, and these concentrations decrease toward lower Mg# compositions. These trends are the opposite of those seen in basalt cpx which generally show increasing incompatible trace element contents with decreasing Mg#, and are unlike antithetic compatible-incompatible trace element trends produced by chemical or kinetic effects of crystal growth. Petrographic observations and major and trace element zonation in cpx phenocrysts indicate that primitive Aleutian adakites are in part the product of mixing between primitive and relatively evolved magmas. The adakite trace element signature (high Sr, Nd/Yb) is clearly associated with the primitive mixing end-member. This observation supports the idea that adakites are derived by equilibration of slab melts with mantle olivine, and appears to rule out an origin by melting in the lower crust. Adakites are relatively rare in the Aleutians, but arc-wide correlations between Sr and La/Yb indicates that an adakite-type slab melt component may be present in the magmatic source throughout the arc.

  5. Sr-Nd-Hf isotopes of the intrusive rocks in the Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolite, southern Tibet: Constraints on its formation setting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Liang-Liang; Liu, Chuan-Zhou; Wu, Fu-Yuan; Zhang, Chang; Ji, Wei-Qiang; Wang, Jian-Gang

    2016-08-01

    The Cretaceous Xigaze ophiolite is best exposed at the central part of the Yarlung-Zangbo Suture Zone, Tibet Plateau. It consists of a thick section of mantle peridotites, but a relatively thin mafic sequence. This study presents geochronological and geochemical data for intrusive dykes (both mafic and felsic) and basalts to revisit the formation setting of the Xigaze ophiolite. The rodingites are characterized by high CaO and low Na2O contents relative to mafic dykes and show big variations in trace element compositions. Both gabbros and diabases have similar geochemical compositions, with MgO contents of 6.42-11.48 wt% and Mg# of 0.56-0.71. They display REE patterns similar to N-MORB and are variably enriched in large ion lithophile elements. Basalts have fractionated compositions and display LREE-depleted patterns very similar to N-MORB. They do not show obvious enrichment in LILE and depletion in high-field-strength elements, but a negative Nb anomaly is present. The studied plagiogranites have compositions of trondhjemite to tonalite, with high Na2O and low K2O contents. They have low TiO2 contents less than 1 wt%, consistent with melts formed by anatexis of gabbros rather than by differentiation of basalts. Zircons from seven samples, including three rodingites, three plagiogranites, and one gabbro, have been dated and yielded U-Pb ages of 124.6 ~ 130.5 Ma, indicating the Xigaze ophiolite was formed during the Early Cretaceous. They have mantle-like δ18O values of + 4.92 ~ + 5.26‰ and very positive εHf(t) values of + 16 ~ + 13.3. Ages of the rodingites and less altered gabbros indicate that serpentinization was occurred at ~ 125 Ma. Occurrence of both gabbroic and diabase dykes within the serpentinites suggests that the mantle lithosphere of the Xigaze ophiolite was rapidly exhumed. Both mafic and felsic dykes have slightly more radiogenic 87Sr/86Sr ratios relative to MORB, but depleted Hf-Nd isotpe compositions. They have a limited range of ε

  6. Sr-Nd isotope geochemistry and tectonomagmatic setting of the Dehsalm Cu-Mo porphyry mineralizing intrusives from Lut Block, eastern Iran

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arjmandzadeh, R.; Santos, J. F.

    2014-01-01

    The Dehsalm Cu-Mo-bearing porphyritic granitoids belong to the Lut Block volcanic-plutonic belt (central eastern Iran). These rocks range in composition from gabbro-diorite to granite, with dominance of monzonites and quartz monzonites, and have geochemical features of high-K calc-alkaline to shoshonitic volcanic arc suites. Primitive mantle-normalized trace element spider diagrams display strong enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements such as Rb, Ba and Cs and depletions in some high-field strength elements, e.g., Nb, Ti, Y and HREE. Chondrite-normalized plots display significant LREE enrichments, high LaN/YbN and a lack of Eu anomaly. High Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios of Dehsalm intrusives reveal that, despite their K-rich composition, these granitoids show some resemblances with adakitic rocks. A Rb-Sr whole rock-feldspar-biotite age of 33 ± 1 Ma was obtained in a quartz monzonite sample and coincides, within error, with a previous geochronological result in Chah-Shaljami granitoids, further northwest within the Lut Block. (87Sr/86Sr)i and ɛNdi isotopic ratios range from 0.70481 to 0.70508 and from +1.5 to +2.5, respectively, which fits into a supra-subduction mantle wedge source for the parental melts and indicates that crustal contribution for magma diversification was of limited importance. Sr and Nd isotopic compositions together with major and trace element geochemistry point to an origin of the parental magmas by melting of a metasomatized mantle source, with phlogopite breakdown playing a significant role in the geochemical fingerprints of the parental magmas; small amounts of residual garnet in the mantle source also help to explain some trace element patterns. Geochemical features of Dehsalm porphyries and its association with Cu-Mo mineralization agree with a mature continental arc setting related to the convergence of Afghan and Lut plates during Oligocene.

  7. Zircon U-Pb age, Hf isotope and geochemistry of Carboniferous intrusions from the Langshan area, Inner Mongolia: Petrogenesis and tectonic implications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Min; Zhang, Da; Xiong, Guangqiang; Zhao, Hongtao; Di, Yongjun; Wang, Zhong; Zhou, Zhiguang

    2016-04-01

    Late Paleozoic was a critical period for the tectonic evolution of the northern margin of the Alxa-North China craton, but the evolutionary history is not well constrained. The Carboniferous intrusions in the Langshan area in the western part of the northern margin of the Alxa-North China craton are mainly composed of tonalite, quartz diorite, olivine gabbro and pyroxene peridotite. Zircon LA-ICP-MS U-Pb dating indicates that the Langshan Carboniferous intrusions were emplaced at ca. 338-324 Ma. The quartz diorites are characterized by high amounts of compatible trace elements (Cr, Ni and V) and high Mg# values, which may suggest a significant mantle source. The positive Pb and negative Nb-Ta-Ti anomalies, the variable εHf(t) (-6.9 to 2.0) values and the old Hf model ages (1218-1783 Ma) imply some involvement of ancient continental materials in its petrogenesis. The tonalite has relatively high Sr/Y ratios, low Mg#, Yb and Y contents, features of adakite-like rocks, negative εHf(t) values (-9.8 to -0.1) and older Hf model ages (1344-1953 Ma), which suggest significant involvement of ancient crust materials and mantle-derived basaltic component in its petrogenesis. The high Mg# values, high Cr and Ni contents, and low Zr and Hf contents of the mafic-ultramafic rocks show evidence of a mantle source, and the relatively low zircon εHf(t) values (-5.9 to 3.2) might point to an enriched mantle. The trace element characteristics indicate the influence of subducted sediments and slab-derived fluids. In the tectonic discrimination diagrams, all the rocks plot in subduction-related environment, such as volcanic arc and continental arc. Considering the regional geology, we suggest that the Carboniferous intrusions in the Langshan area were likely emplaced during the late stage of the southward subduction of the Paleo-Asian Ocean plate, which formed a continental arc along the northern margin of the Alxa-North China craton.

  8. Geochemical characteristics of the Shujiadian Cu deposit related intrusion in Tongling: Petrogenesis and implications for the formation of porphyry Cu systems in the Middle-Lower Yangtze River Valley metallogenic belt, eastern China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shiwei; Zhou, Taofa; Yuan, Feng; Fan, Yu; Cooke, David R.; Zhang, Lejun; Fu, Bin; White, Noel C.

    2016-05-01

    Porphyry Cu deposits can form in intracontinental or post-collision settings; however, both the genesis of fertile magmas and the mechanism of metal enrichment remain controversial. The Shujiadian porphyry Cu deposit is located in the Tongling area of the Middle-Lower Yangtze River Valley metallogenic belt. It is hosted by the Shujiadian complex, which mainly consists of quartz diorite porphyry (143.7 ± 1.7 Ma) and pyroxene diorite (139.8 ± 1.6 Ma). They both belong to the calc-alkaline series, with enrichment in large-ion lithophile elements (LILE) and light rare earth elements (LREE), depletion in high field-strength elements (HFSE) and heavy rare earth elements (HREE), and slightly negative Eu anomalies. Both quartz diorite porphyry and pyroxene diorite have geochemical affinities with adakite, and their low MgO (1.5-3.7 wt%), and Ni (3.7-6.9 ppm), Cr (2.0-44 ppm), and Th/Ce contents (0.06-0.11) indicate that the intrusive rocks have some characteristics of adakite-like rocks derived from thickened lower crust and melts from metabasaltic rocks and eclogites. Plagioclases from the quartz diorite porphyry are andesine (An value = 31.8-40.5) and from the pyroxene diorite are felsic albite and oligoclase with large-scale zones and variable An value (An value = 8.9-18.3), Fe and Sr contents, which indicate that mixing of mafic and felsic magma may have occurred in the shallow magma chamber. Compared to the barren quartz diorite porphyry, relatively lower SiO2 contents (49.5-55.2 wt.%), higher εNd(t) values (- 7.4 to - 6.9), εHf(t) values (- 11.0 to - 9.1) compositions, Ti-in-zircon temperatures (714-785 °C), and variations of HREE contents of the mineralization-related pyroxene diorite suggest mixing with high-temperature mafic magma. Calculated Ce4 +/Ce3 + values of pyroxene diorite plot between the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO) and magnetite-hematite buffer (MH), and barren quartz diorite porphyry samples plot below the Ni-NiO buffer (NNO). Geochemical features of

  9. Age and geochemistry of host rocks of the Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, central Panama: Implications for the Paleogene evolution of the Panamanian magmatic arc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baker, Michael J.; Hollings, Peter; Thompson, Jennifer A.; Thompson, Jay M.; Burge, Colin

    2016-04-01

    The Cobre Panama porphyry Cu-Au deposit, located in the Petaquilla district of central Panama, is hosted by a sequence of medium- to high-K calc-alkaline volcanic and sub-volcanic rocks. New crystallisation ages obtained from a granodiorite Petaquilla batholith and associated mineralised diorite to granodiorite porphyry stocks and dikes at Cobre Panama indicate that the batholith was emplaced as a multi-phase intrusion, over a period of ~ 4 million years from 32.20 ± 0.76 Ma to 28.26 ± 0.61 Ma, while the porphyritic rocks were emplaced over a ~ 2 million year period from 28.96 ± 0.62 Ma to 27.48 ± 0.68 Ma. Both the volcanic to sub-volcanic host rocks and intrusive rocks of the Cobre Panama deposit evolved via fractional crystallisation processes, as demonstrated by the major elements (e.g. Al2O3, Fe2O3, TiO2 and MgO) displaying negative trends with increasing SiO2. The Petaquilla intrusive rocks, including the diorite-granodiorite porphyries and granodiorite batholith, are geochemically evolved and appear to have formed from more hydrous magmas than the preceding host volcanic rocks, as evidenced by the presence of hornblende phenocrysts, higher degrees of large-ion lithophile element (LILE) and light rare earth element (LREE) enrichment and heavy rare earth element (HREE) depletion, and higher Sr/Y and La/Yb values. However, the degree of LREE enrichment, HREE depletion and La/Yb values are insufficient for the intrusive rocks to be considered as adakites. Collectively, the volcanic and intrusive rocks have LILE, REE and mobile trace element concentrations similar to enriched Miocene-age Cordilleran arc magmatism found throughout central and western Panama. Both the Petaquilla and Cordilleran arc magmatic suites are geochemically more evolved than the late Cretaceous to Eocene Chagres-Bayano arc magmas from northeastern Panama, as they display higher degrees of LILE and LREE enrichment. The geochemical similarities between the Petaquilla and Cordilleran arc

  10. Zircon Recycling in Arc Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, J.; Barth, A.; Matzel, J.; Wooden, J.; Burgess, S.

    2008-12-01

    Recycling of zircon has been well established in arc intrusions and arc volcanoes, but a better understanding of where and how zircons are recycled can help illuminate how arc magma systems are constructed. To that end, we are conducting age, trace element (including Ti-in-zircon temperatures; TzrnTi) and isotopic studies of zircons from the Late Cretaceous (95-85 Ma) Tuolumne Intrusive Suite (TIS) in the Sierra Nevada Batholith (CA). Within the TIS zircons inherited from ancient basement sources and/or distinctly older host rocks are uncommon, but recycled zircon antecrysts from earlier periods of TIS-related magmatism are common and conspicuous in the inner and two most voluminous units of the TIS, the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak Granodiorites. All TIS units have low bulk Zr ([Zr]<150 ppm) and thus low calculated zircon saturation temperatures (Tzrnsat). Within the Half Dome and Cathedral Peak, TzrnTi values are predominantly at or below average Tzrnsat, and there is no apparent correlation between age and TzrnTi. At temperatures appropriate for granodiorite/tonalite melt generation (at or above biotite dehydration; >825°C), [Zr] in the TIS is a factor of 2 to 3 lower than saturation values. Low [Zr] in TIS rocks might be attributed to a very limited supply of zircon in the source, by disequilibrium melting and rapid melt extraction [1], by melting reactions involving formation of other phases that can incorporate appreciable Zr [2], or by removal of zircon at an earlier stage of magma evolution. Based on a preliminary compilation of literature data, low [Zr] is common to Late Cretaceous N.A. Cordilleran granodioritic/tonalitic intrusions (typically <200 ppm and frequently 100-150 ppm for individual large intrusions or intrusive suites). We infer from this that [Zr] in anatectic melts is probably not limited by zircon supply and is primarily controlled by melting parameters. Comparison of the data from TIS with one of these intrusions, the smaller but otherwise

  11. Discovery of Miocene adakitic dacite from the Eastern Pontides Belt (NE Turkey) and a revised geodynamic model for the late Cenozoic evolution of the Eastern Mediterranean region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eyuboglu, Yener; Santosh, M.; Yi, Keewook; Bektaş, Osman; Kwon, Sanghoon

    2012-08-01

    The Cenozoic magmatic record within the ca. 500 km long eastern Pontides orogen, located within the Alpine metallogenic belt, is critical to evaluate the tectonic history and geodynamic evolution of the eastern Mediterranean region. In this paper we report for the first time late Miocene adakitic rocks from the southeastern part of the eastern Pontides belt and present results from geochemical and Sr-Nd isotopic studies as well as zircon U-Pb geochronology. The Tavdagi dacite that we investigate in this study is exposed as round or ellipsoidal shaped bodies, sills, and dikes in the southeastern part of the belt. Zircons in the dacite show euhedral crystal morphology with oscillatory zoning and high Th/U values (up to 1.69) typical of magmatic origin. Zircon LA-ICPMS analysis yielded a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 7.86 ± 0.15 Ma. SHRIMP analyses of zircons with typical magmatic zoning from another sample yielded a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 8.79 ± 0.19 Ma. Both ages are identical and constrain the timing of dacitic magmatism as late Miocene. The Miocene Tavdagi dacite shows adakitic affinity with high SiO2 (68.95-71.41 wt.%), Al2O3 (14.88-16.02 wt.%), Na2O (3.27-4.12 wt.%), Sr (331.4-462.1 ppm), Sr/Y (85-103.7), LaN/YbN (34.3-50.9) and low Y (3.2-5 ppm) values. Their initial 143Nd/144Nd (0.512723-0.512736) and 87Sr/86Sr (0.70484-0.70494) ratios are, respectively, lower and higher than those of normal oceanic crust. The geological, geochemical and isotopic data suggest that the adakitic magmatism was generated by partial melting of the mafic lower crust in the southeastern part of the eastern Pontide belt during the late Miocene. Based on the results presented in this study and a synthesis of the geological and tectonic information on the region, we propose that the entire northern edge of the eastern Pontides-Lesser Caucasus-Elbruz magmatic arc was an active continental margin during the Cenozoic. We identify a migration of the Cenozoic magmatism towards

  12. Interior intrusion detection systems

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, J.R.; Matter, J.C. ); Dry, B. )

    1991-10-01

    The purpose of this NUREG is to present technical information that should be useful to NRC licensees in designing interior intrusion detection systems. Interior intrusion sensors are discussed according to their primary application: boundary-penetration detection, volumetric detection, and point protection. Information necessary for implementation of an effective interior intrusion detection system is presented, including principles of operation, performance characteristics and guidelines for design, procurement, installation, testing, and maintenance. A glossary of sensor data terms is included. 36 figs., 6 tabs.

  13. Brine and Gas Flow Patterns Between Excavated Areas and Disturbed Rock Zone in the 1996 Performance Assessment for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant for a Single Drilling Intrusion that Penetrates Repository and Castile Brine Reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    ECONOMY,KATHLEEN M.; HELTON,JON CRAIG; VAUGHN,PALMER

    1999-10-01

    The Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP), which is located in southeastern New Mexico, is being developed for the geologic disposal of transuranic (TRU) waste by the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE). Waste disposal will take place in panels excavated in a bedded salt formation approximately 2000 ft (610 m) below the land surface. The BRAGFLO computer program which solves a system of nonlinear partial differential equations for two-phase flow, was used to investigate brine and gas flow patterns in the vicinity of the repository for the 1996 WIPP performance assessment (PA). The present study examines the implications of modeling assumptions used in conjunction with BRAGFLO in the 1996 WIPP PA that affect brine and gas flow patterns involving two waste regions in the repository (i.e., a single waste panel and the remaining nine waste panels), a disturbed rock zone (DRZ) that lies just above and below these two regions, and a borehole that penetrates the single waste panel and a brine pocket below this panel. The two waste regions are separated by a panel closure. The following insights were obtained from this study. First, the impediment to flow between the two waste regions provided by the panel closure model is reduced due to the permeable and areally extensive nature of the DRZ adopted in the 1996 WIPP PA, which results in the DRZ becoming an effective pathway for gas and brine movement around the panel closures and thus between the two waste regions. Brine and gas flow between the two waste regions via the DRZ causes pressures between the two to equilibrate rapidly, with the result that processes in the intruded waste panel are not isolated from the rest of the repository. Second, the connection between intruded and unintruded waste panels provided by the DRZ increases the time required for repository pressures to equilibrate with the overlying and/or underlying units subsequent to a drilling intrusion. Third, the large and areally extensive DRZ void volumes is a

  14. Sediment-enriched adakitic magmas from the Daisen volcanic field, Southwest Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feineman, Maureen; Moriguti, Takuya; Yokoyama, Tetsuya; Terui, Sakiko; Nakamura, Eizo

    2013-08-01

    The Quaternary Southwest Japan Arc is a product of subduction of the hot, young Philippine Sea Plate beneath the Eurasian Continental Plate. The magmas erupted from the Southwest Japan Arc belong to a category of magmas commonly referred to as "adakites" or "adakitic magmas". These magmas show trace element evidence for interaction with garnet at depth, and may be associated with partial melting of subducted altered oceanic crust. Also found throughout the southern Sea of Japan region are alkali basalts with little apparent connection to the subduction zone. We have determined major element, trace element, and Sr, Nd, Pb, and U-Th isotopic compositions for a bimodal suite of lavas erupted at the Daisen volcanic field in the Southwest Japan Arc. These magmas consist of mildly alkaline basalts and a calcalkaline intermediate suite, separated by a ˜10 wt.% silica gap. The intermediate magmas show trace element and isotopic evidence for interaction with garnet, consistent with partial melting of the hot, young (˜20 Ma) Philippine Sea Plate. The Daisen intermediate magmas are distinct from other adakitic magmas in their radiogenic isotopic characteristics, consistent with a significant contribution (˜25%) from subducted Nankai Trough sediments. Our data suggest that the basalts erupted at the Daisen volcanic field are not parental to the intermediate magmas, and contain a small contribution of EM1-like mantle common in Sea of Japan alkali basalts but not apparent in the Daisen intermediate magmas.

  15. A Review on Forearc Ophiolite Obduction, Adakite-Like Generation, and Slab Window Development at the Chile Triple Junction Area: Uniformitarian Framework for Spreading-Ridge Subduction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bourgois, Jacques; Lagabrielle, Yves; Martin, Hervé; Dyment, Jérôme; Frutos, Jose; Cisternas, Maria Eugenia

    2016-05-01

    This paper aggregates the main basic data acquired along the Chile Triple Junction (CTJ) area (45°-48°S), where an active spreading center is presently subducting beneath the Andean continental margin. Updated sea-floor kinematics associated with a comprehensive review of geologic, geochemical, and geophysical data provide new constraints on the geodynamics of this puzzling area. We discuss: (1) the emplacement mode for the Pleistocene Taitao Ridge and the Pliocene Taitao Peninsula ophiolite bodies. (2) The occurrence of these ophiolitic complexes in association with five adakite-like plutonic and volcanic centers of similar ages at the same restricted locations. (3) The inferences from the co-occurrence of these sub-coeval rocks originating from the same subducting oceanic lithosphere evolving through drastically different temperature-pressure (P-T) path: low-grade greenschist facies overprint and amphibolite-eclogite transition, respectively. (4) The evidences that document ridge-jump events and associated microplate individualization during subduction of the SCR1 and SCR-1 segments: the Chonos and Cabo Elena microplates, respectively. The ridge-jump process associated with the occurrence of several closely spaced transform faults entering subduction is controlling slab fragmentation, ophiolite emplacement, and adakite-like production and location in the CTJ area. Kinematic inconsistencies in the development of the Patagonia slab window document an 11- km westward jump for the SCR-1 spreading segment at ~6.5-to-6.8 Ma. The SCR-1 spreading center is relocated beneath the North Patagonia Icefield (NPI). We argue that the deep-seated difference in the dynamically sustained origin of the high reliefs of the North and South Patagonia Icefield (NPI and SPI) is asthenospheric convection and slab melting, respectively. The Chile Triple Junction area provides the basic constraints to define the basic signatures for spreading-ridge subduction beneath an Andean

  16. Petrogenesis and geodynamic setting of Early Cretaceous mafic-ultramafic intrusions, South China: A case study from the Gan-Hang tectonic belt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qi, Youqiang; Hu, Ruizhong; Liu, Shen; Coulson, Ian M.; Qi, Huawen; Tian, Jianji; Zhu, Jingjing

    2016-08-01

    A study using whole-rock major-trace elements and Sr-Nd isotopes as well as zircon U-Pb dating has been carried out on Early Cretaceous mafic-ultramafic intrusions from the Gan-Hang tectonic belt (GHTB), South China, to understand the origin of mantle sources and the sequential evolution of the underlying Late Mesozoic lithospheric mantle of this area. The study focused on two intrusions, one at Quzhou and the other at Longyou (see Fig. 1). They are primarily composed of mafic-ultramafic rocks with wide range of chemical compositions. The Quzhou mafic rocks have relatively narrow ranges of SiO2 (48.94-51.79 wt%), MgO (6.07-7.21 wt%), Fe2O3 (10.48-11.56 wt%), CaO (8.20-8.81 wt%), and Mg# (51.7-56.5) with relatively low K2O (0.56-0.67 wt%) and Na2O (3.09-3.42 wt%). By contrast, the ultramafic rocks from Longyou have distinct lower SiO2 (41.50-45.11 wt%) and higher MgO (9.05-9.90 wt%), Fe2O3 (12.14-12.62 wt%), CaO (8.64-10.67 wt%), and Mg# (59.5-61.1) with relatively higher K2O (1.32-1.75 wt%) and Na2O (4.53-5.08 wt%). They are characterized by Ocean Island Basalts (OIB)-type trace element distribution patterns, with a significant enrichment of light rare earth elements (LREE), large ion lithophile elements (LILE, i.e., Rb, Ba, K, and Sr) and high field strength elements (HFSE, i.e., Nb, Ta), and slight depletion of Th, U, Ti, and Y. The intrusions exhibit relatively depleted Sr-Nd isotope compositions, with (87Sr/86Sr)i range of 0.7035 to 0.7055 (143Nd/144Nd)i of 0.51264 to 0.51281 and εNd(t) values of + 3.0 to + 6.6. Zircon U-Pb dating of Longyou and Quzhou intrusions yields consistent magma emplacement ages of 129.0 ± 3.9 to 126.2 ± 2.4 Ma, respectively. The dating results are consistent with the peak of extension in Early Cretacerous throughout the Gan-Hang tectonic belt. Their magmas were principally derived from near-solidus partial melting of pyroxenites with different content of silica, and the pyroxenites were resulted from a juvenile SCLM peridotite

  17. Igneous intrusions in coal-bearing sequences

    SciTech Connect

    Gurevich, A.B.; Shishlov, S.B.

    1987-08-01

    Intrusions of various compositions, sizes, and shapes have been observed in 115 out of 620 coal basins or deposits on all the continents. They are mainly subvolcanic and hypabyssal, with depths of emplacement estimated as ranging from a few hundred meters to 6 km, but usually 3-4 km. Compositionally, 42% are basic, 31% intermediate, 23% acid, and 4% ultrabasic. Mafic (and related) rock types include dolerites, trachydolerites, gabbro-dolerites, gabbro-monzonites, monzonites, diabases, gabbrodiabases, and less often gabbros and basalts (subvolcanic bodies). These mafic intrusions occur in coal formations of various ages from Carboniferous through Neogene, but predominate in Paleozoic (47%) and Cenozoic beds (45%). They also occur in coal formations of all genetic types, apart from those on ancient stable platforms, where there are no signs of intrusive activity. The mafic intrusions are almost everywhere associated with comagmatic lavas and tuffs (mainly in the younger strata), and the coal beds themselves are to some extent enriched in pyroclastic material, particularly in the upper horizons. This paper gives a worldwide review of igneous intrusions in coal beds. 24 references.

  18. Deformation Structures associated with the emplacement of high level intrusions: A study of Trachyte Mesa Intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P. I. R.; McCaffrey, K. J. W.; Jarvis, I.; Murphy, P.; Davidson, J. P.

    2012-04-01

    Most studies of sill and laccolith complexes have focused on the internal architecture and thermal effects of these intrusions, while few have looked in detail at host rock deformation structures associated with their emplacement. Various sill and laccolith emplacement mechanisms have been proposed (e.g. radial growth/ bulldozing, and two-stage growth), each with their own distinct deformation style. Compressional structures likely dominate during radial growth (bulldozing) emplacement, while extensional structures are more likely to form during two-stage growth emplacement. In this study we focus on deformation structures (faults, deformation bands and joints) associated with emplacement of Tertiary sills and laccolith intrusions in the Henry Mountains, Utah. Trachyte Mesa, the most distal satellite intrusion to the Mt. Hilliers intrusive centre, is an elongate (NE-SW) laccolith concordant with the Entrada sandstone it intrudes. The intrusion is comprised of multiple, stacked intrusive sheets. Two structural transects across the northwest lateral margin have identified distinct structural domains within the host rock that reflect both temporal and kinematic variations in deformation. Three deformation phases are identified, interpreted to be pre-, syn- and late-emplacement structures. A background set of deformation bands (phase 1), trending oblique to the intrusion margin, is apparent across the entire area. A second set of deformation bands (phase 2) overprint the early phase. These are characterised by conjugate deformation bands that parallel the intrusion margin, and increase in intensity and spacing towards the intrusion. Within this same zone a series of calcite filled normal faults, striking parallel and perpendicular to the intrusion margin, are apparent. Due to their spatial, kinematic and overprinting relationships we interpret these to be linked to the emplacement of the intrusive body. Overprinting all other structures, are two sets of tensile joints

  19. Bro Intrusion Detection System

    SciTech Connect

    Paxson, Vern; Campbell, Scott; leres, Craig; Lee, Jason

    2006-01-25

    Bro is a Unix-based Network Intrusion Detection System (IDS). Bro monitors network traffic and detects intrusion attempts based on the traffic characteristics and content. Bro detects intrusions by comparing network traffic against rules describing events that are deemed troublesome. These rules might describe activities (e.g., certain hosts connecting to certain services), what activities are worth alerting (e.g., attempts to a given number of different hosts constitutes a "scan"), or signatures describing known attacks or access to known vulnerabilities. If Bro detects something of interest, it can be instructed to either issue a log entry or initiate the execution of an operating system command. Bro targets high-speed (Gbps), high-volume intrusion detection. By judiciously leveraging packet filtering techniques, Bro is able to achieve the performance necessary to do so while running on commercially available PC hardware, and thus can serve as a cost effective means of monitoring a site’s Internet connection.

  20. Computer Intrusions and Attacks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Falk, Howard

    1999-01-01

    Examines some frequently encountered unsolicited computer intrusions, including computer viruses, worms, Java applications, trojan horses or vandals, e-mail spamming, hoaxes, and cookies. Also discusses virus-protection software, both for networks and for individual users. (LRW)

  1. Trace element behavior and P-T-t evolution during partial melting of exhumed eclogite in the North Qaidam UHPM belt (NW China): Implications for adakite genesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guibin; Niu, Yaoling; Song, Shuguang; Zhang, Lifei; Tian, Zuolin; Christy, Andrew G.; Han, Lei

    2015-06-01

    We have studied trace element behavior and timing of decompression melting of UHP rocks during exhumation recorded in the magmatic products, i.e., the melt phase (leucosomes), cumulate (garnetite) and residue (amphibolitized eclogite) from a single outcrop in the south Dulan area, North Qaidam UHPM belt, NW China. Two distinct episodes of partial melting are recognized. First, Grt-free tonalitic-trondhjemitic leucosome melts with higher silica crystallized at 424.0 ± 2.7 Ma. Garnets grew in the leucosome melt but fractionated out to form garnetite cumulates along with Ti-rich phases (rutile and titanite), strengthening the adakitic signature of the leucosome. Later Grt-bearing leucosome melts with an age of 412.4 ± 2.9 Ma cross-cut boudins and layers of amphibolitized eclogite. Geochemical investigation of bulk-rocks and in situ minerals verifies the genetic relationship between the amphibolitized eclogite and the tonalitic-trondhjemitic melts. Zircons from the amphibolitized eclogite have older (> 700 Ma) protolith ages, with subsequent eclogite-facies metamorphism, retrograde granulite-facies overprinting and partial melting. Phase modeling and Zr-in-rutile thermometry calculations in combination with zircon geochronology reveal the evolution P-T-t path for the exhumation and the partial melting of the deeply subducted continental crust at the North Qaidam subduction zone in the Early Paleozoic.

  2. Adakitic volcanism in the eastern Aleutian arc: Petrology and geochemistry of Hayes volcano, Cook Inlet, Alaska

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McHugh, K.; Hart, W. K.; Coombs, M. L.

    2012-12-01

    Located in south-central Alaska, 135 km northwest of Anchorage, Hayes volcano is responsible for the most widespread tephra fall deposit in the regional Holocene record (~3,500 BP). Hayes is bounded to the west by the Cook Inlet volcanoes (CIV; Mt. Spurr, Redoubt, Iliamna, and Augustine) and separated from the nearest volcanism to the east, Mount Drum of the Wrangell Volcanic Field (WVF), by a 400 km-wide volcanic gap. We report initial results of the first systematic geochemical and petrologic study of Hayes volcano. Hayes eruptive products are calc-alkaline dacites and rhyolites that have anomalous characteristics within the region. Major and trace element analyses reveal that the Hayes rhyolites are more silicic (~74 wt. % SiO2) than compositions observed in other CIV, and its dacitic products possess the distinctive geochemical signatures of adakitic magmas. Key aspects of the Hayes dacite geochemistry include: 16.03 - 17.54 wt. % Al2O3, 0.97 - 2.25 wt. % MgO, Sr/Y = 60 - 78, Yb = 0.9 - 1.2 ppm, Ba/La = 31 - 79. Such signatures are consistent with melting of a metamorphosed basaltic source that leaves behind a residue of garnet ± amphibole ± pyroxene via processes such as melting of a subducting oceanic slab or underplated mafic lower crust, rather than flux melting of the mantle wedge by dehydration of the down-going slab. Additionally, Hayes tephras display a distinctive mineralogy of biotite with amphibole in greater abundance than pyroxene, a characteristic not observed at other CIV. Furthermore, Hayes rhyolites and dacites exhibit little isotopic heterogeneity (87Sr/86Sr = 0.70384 - 0.70395, 206Pb/204Pb = 18.866 - 18.889) suggesting these lavas originate from the same source. Hayes volcano is approximately situated above the western margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane and where the dip of the Pacific slab beneath Cook Inlet shallows northward. Due to its position along the margin of the subducting Yakutat terrane, it is plausible that Hayes magmas

  3. Mineralogical and geochemical constraints on contribution of magma mixing and fractional crystallization to high-Mg adakite-like diorites in eastern Dabie orogen, East China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Chao; Ma, Changqian; Holtz, Francois; Koepke, Jürgen; Wolff, Paul Eric; Berndt, Jasper

    2013-07-01

    The Liujiawa pluton which is located near the eastern boundary of the Dabie orogen is composed of multiple lithologic units including mainly gabbronorites, diorites, granodiorites and hornblende gabbros. Gabbronorites and hornblende gabbros occur as enclaves in dioritic hosts which show gradual contact with granodiorites. Zircon U-Pb dating indicates that gabbronorites and diorites formed coevally at ~ 128 Ma, but they have distinct zircon Hf isotopes with εHf(t) of - 26 to - 23 (gabbronorite) and of - 32 to - 27 (diorite) respectively. Petrographic observations and rock-forming mineral compositions clearly show mixing between mafic and felsic magma end-members, which might have formed the homogeneous whole-rock Sr-Nd isotopes with εNd(t) of - 17 to - 25 and initial 87Sr/86Sr of 0.707 to 0.709. As revealed by zircon Hf isotopes, F concentrations in amphibole and biotite and thermodynamic modeling of crystallization, the gabbronorites represent enriched lithospheric mantle-derived magmas which evolved by fractional crystallization of orthopyroxene, clinopyroxene, magnetite and/or amphibole, whereas the granodiorites may be derived from the Dabie Archean basement. Mineralogical and geochemical data as well as major and trace element modeling show that the origin of diorites, previously interpreted as high-Mg adakites, can be explained by magma mixing between the crust-derived granodioritic magmas and the differentiation products of mantle-derived gabbronoritic magmas. As a result, the high-Mg adakite-like geochemistry of the diorites is a consequence of magma differentiation at a crustal depth, involving fractional crystallization and magma mixing, rather than an intrinsic feature of primitive melts. The mantle upwelling in the adjacent central Middle-Lower Yangtze River metallogenic (MLYR) belt during Late Jurassic-Early Cretaceous belt might have acted as a precursor and triggered the partial melting of lithospheric mantle beneath the eastern Dabie orogen and the

  4. Origin of Mesoarchaean arc-related rocks with boninite/komatiite affinities from southern West Greenland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szilas, Kristoffer; Næraa, Tomas; Scherstén, Anders; Stendal, Henrik; Frei, Robert; van Hinsberg, Vincent J.; Kokfelt, Thomas F.; Rosing, Minik T.

    2012-07-01

    -silica adakite (slab-melt) into the mantle source region. Accordingly, we propose that the mafic and ultramafic rocks were derived from a similar type of mantle source, but that the ultramafic rocks were derived from a previously depleted mantle source that was refertilised by slab melts in a subduction zone setting. The high MgO contents of the ultramafic rocks could thus reflect a second stage of partial melting of a refractory mantle in a process similar to that which is suggested for the formation of modern boninites. We propose that the mafic-ultramafic sequence represents an island arc that evolved initially as a juvenile complex (c. 3000 Ma). However, inherited zircon grains in aplites and Hf isotope data recorded by the second intrusive TTG phase (c. 2850-2870 Ma), show that mixing with older pre-existing crust occurred during this event. Because the regional crust is dominated by TTGs of this younger age, our data suggests that it likely formed by accretion and melting of arcs of different ages and/or contamination of juvenile arcs by pre-existing continental crust rather than entirely by juvenile arc differentiation or melting. Our data thus supports melting of thickened mafic crust in an accretionary setting, rather than direct slab melting, as a mechanism for Archaean crust formation.

  5. Genesis of adakite-like lavas of Licancabur volcano (Chile—Bolivia, Central Andes)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Figueroa, Oscar; Déruelle, Bernard; Demaiffe, Daniel

    2009-04-01

    The Licancabur volcano is located on the Bolivia—Chile Altiplano (Central Andes). The lavas are andesites and dacites. Numerous mineralogic features attest that magma mixing occurred. Andesites have concave (spoon-shaped) REE patterns whereas dacites have steep slopes. A spectacular crossover of patterns occurs with increasing SiO 2. Most geochemical discrimination criteria of adakites are satisfied by Licancabur dacites, except their high Sr-isotope compositions (> 0.7075). For the genesis of the Licancabur adakite-like lavas, a four-step model is proposed: (1) partial melting (5 to 10 wt %) of a subducted altered oceanic crust; (2) hybridation (< 10 wt %) of the magmas with melts derived from the overlying lithospheric mantle; (3) contamination (≈ 1 wt %) of these hybrid magmas by TTG-type granodiorites of the Archean lower continental crust (with present-day Sr-isotope ratios ≈ 0.820); (4) evolution and differentiation by crystal fractionation (< 6 wt %) and magma mixing at upper crustal levels.

  6. Important role of magma mixing in generating the Mesozoic monzodioritic-granodioritic intrusions related to Cu mineralization, Tongling, East China: evidence from petrological and in situ Sr-Hf isotopic data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Bin; Chen, ChangJian

    2016-04-01

    The Mesozoic ore-bearing high-Mg monzodioritic-granodioritic rocks in the Tongling mining district (East China) have been described as having adakitic affinities, and their origin has been attributed to partial melting of delaminated eclogite at depth in the mantle, followed by interaction of the resultant granitic magma with mantle peridotite. Here we present petrological data and in situ Sr isotopic data for zoned plagioclase that are inconsistent with the eclogite-derived model, and instead propose a model that involves magma mixing of siliceous crustal melts and basaltic magma that was derived from metasomatized mantle by subduction zone fluids in an extensional regime. The principal geochemical signatures of these Mesozoic rocks include a hydrous and high-K calc-alkaline affinity, high values of Mg#, high Sr abundances, high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios, ɛNd(t)=-13.1 to -9.0, and ISr=0.70707-0.70824. The magma mixing model is supported by (1) the common existence of mafic microgranular enclaves (MMEs) and the disequilibrium textures of plagioclase and hornblende, (2) the increase in Ti and Al(IV) from hornblende cores to rims, and the overgrowths of high-Ca pyroxene around hornblende grains as well, indicative of episode of heating and rejuvenation of the magma chamber as a result of recharge of mafic magma, (3) the 87Sr/86Sr ratios of embayed high-Ca cores of plagioclase that are distinctly lower than in the euhedral low-Ca overgrowth rims, (4) negative correlations between whole-rock Nd and Sr isotopic ratios, and (5) the significant differences in the values of ɛHf(t) (-9.5 to -26) within different zircons from the same intrusion. We propose that underplating of hydrous basaltic magma from the metasomatized lithospheric mantle in the lower crust resulted in partial melting of the lower crustal rocks (Precambrian TTG gneisses and amphibolite/granulite) under water-saturated conditions, during which plagioclase decomposed, leaving hornblende-rich restites and

  7. Mafic mantle sources indicated by the olivine-spinifex basalt-ferropicrite lavas in the accreted Permian oceanic LIP fragments and Miocene low-Ni basalt and adakite lavas in central Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishiwatari, A.; Ichiyama, Y.; Yamazaki, R.; Katsuragi, T.; Tsuchihashi, H.

    2008-12-01

    Melting of mafic (eclogitic) rocks in the peridotite mantle diapir may be important to generate a large quantity of magma in a short period of time as required for the LIP basaltic magmatism (e.g. Takahashi et al. 1998; EPSL, 162, 63-). Ferropicritic rocks also occur in some LIPs, and Ichiyama et al. (2006; Lithos, 89, 47-) propose a non-peridotitic, Ti- and Fe-rich eclogitic source (recycled oceanic ferrogabbro?) entrained in the peridotitic LIP mantle plume for the origin of ferropicritic rocks, that occur with olivine-spinifex basalt (Ichiyama et al., 2007; Island Arc, 16, 493-) in a Permian LIP fragment that was captured in the Jurassic Tamba accretionary complex in central Japan. Although Ti-poor ferrokomatiitic magma might form through high- degree melting of a primitive chondritic mantle (25wt% MgO and 25wt% Fe+FeO), Ti- and HFSE-rich ferropicritic and meimechitic magmas can not form in this way. On the other hand, Miocene volcanic rocks distributed along the Japan Sea coast of central Japan also represent a product of large-scale arc magmatism that happened coeval to the spreading of the Japan Sea floor. The chemical and isotopic signatures of the magmas are consistent with the secular change of tectonic setting from continental arc (22- 20 Ma) to island arc (15-11 Ma) (Shuto et al. 2006; Lithos, 86, 1-). Some adakites have already been found from these Miocene volcanic rocks by Shuto"fs group, and mafic rock melting in either subducting slab or lower arc crust has been proposed. We have recently found a wide distribution of low-Ni basalt from Fukui City. The low-Ni basalt contains olivine phenocrysts which are one order of magnitude poorer in Ni (less than 0.02 wt% NiO at Fo87) than those in normal basalt (more than 0.2 wt% NiO at Fo87). The rock is also poor in bulk-rock Ni, rich in K and Ti, and may have formed from an olivine-free pyroxenitic source. Close association of adakite and low-Ni basalt with normal tholeiitic basalt, calc-alkaline andesite

  8. Intrusive prospective imagery, posttraumatic intrusions and anxiety in schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Malcolm, Charlotte P; Picchioni, Marco M; Ellett, Lyn

    2015-12-30

    Trauma exposure and intrusive thoughts are commonly reported in both schizophrenia and posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Information processing accounts suggest that intrusions occur in the two conditions as a result of insufficient state and/or trait contextual processing in long-term memory. Most research has focused on intrusions about past events, while growing evidence suggests that intrusions about prospective imagined events warrants further investigation. Prospective intrusive imagery has yet to be examined in psychotic disorders but could provide crucial information regarding the aetiology and maintenance of psychotic symptoms. The current study examines the role of prospective intrusive imagery, posttraumatic intrusions and anxiety in schizophrenia. Fifty-seven participants (30 patients and 27 healthy controls) completed measures of trauma, PTSD, anxiety, general non-affective use of imagery, and intrusive prospective imagery. Patients reported significantly more intrusive prospective imagery relative to control participants but, importantly, not greater use of general non-affective imagery. Intrusive prospective imagery was associated with posttraumatic intrusions and anxiety in schizophrenia. The findings are consistent with information processing models of intrusions and psychosis, and provide novel insights for theoretical accounts, clinical formulation and therapeutic targets for psychotic symptoms in schizophrenia. PMID:26619917

  9. Bro Intrusion Detection System

    2006-01-25

    Bro is a Unix-based Network Intrusion Detection System (IDS). Bro monitors network traffic and detects intrusion attempts based on the traffic characteristics and content. Bro detects intrusions by comparing network traffic against rules describing events that are deemed troublesome. These rules might describe activities (e.g., certain hosts connecting to certain services), what activities are worth alerting (e.g., attempts to a given number of different hosts constitutes a "scan"), or signatures describing known attacks or accessmore » to known vulnerabilities. If Bro detects something of interest, it can be instructed to either issue a log entry or initiate the execution of an operating system command. Bro targets high-speed (Gbps), high-volume intrusion detection. By judiciously leveraging packet filtering techniques, Bro is able to achieve the performance necessary to do so while running on commercially available PC hardware, and thus can serve as a cost effective means of monitoring a site’s Internet connection.« less

  10. Magma mixing in a zoned alkalic intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Price, J.G.; Henry, C.D.; Barker, D.S.; Rubin, J.N.

    1985-01-01

    The Marble Canyon stock is unique among the alkalic intrusions of the Trans-Pecos magmatic province in being zoned from a critically silica-undersaturated rim of alkali gabbro (AG) to a silica-oversaturated core of quartz syenite (QS). Hybrid rocks of intermediate chemical and mineralogical compositions occur between the rim and core. Nepheline-syenite dikes occur only within the AG. Silica-rich dikes of quartz trachyte, pegmatite, and aplite cut the AG, QS, and hybrid rocks. Thermodynamic calculations of silica activity in the magmas illustrate the presence of two trends with decreasing temperature: a silica-poor trend from AG to nepheline syenite and a silica-rich trend from hybrid rocks to QS. Least-square modeling of rock and mineral compositions suggests 1) the nepheline syenites were derived by crystal-liquid fractionation from nearly solidified AG at the rim of the stock, 2) AG magma farther from the rim mixed with a small proportion of granitic magma, and 3) the mixture then differentiated to produce the hybrid rocks and QS. Zirconium dioxide inclusions in plagioclase crystals of the hybrid rocks and QS indicate that the AG magma contained some crystals before it mixed with the granitic magma. Two origins for the granitic magma are possible: 1) a late-stage differentiate of a mantle-derived hypersthene-normative magma and 2) melting of crustal material by the AG magma. Recognition of magma mixing might not have been possible if the AG had been hypersthene-normative.

  11. Slab melting, adakite differentiation and emplacement in a fossile subduction channel: the late Paleocene Sabzevar magmatism (NE Iran)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossetti, Federico; Nasrabady, Mohsen; Gerdes, Axel; Moniè, Patrick; Theye, Thomas; Lucci, Federico; Vignaroli, Gianluca

    2014-05-01

    This study describes the structural setting, petrogenesis, and geochronology of a suite of acidic magmatic rocks that are intruded in the metamorphic core of the Tertiary ophiolitic suture zone of the Sabzevar Range, NE central Iran. This ophiolitic complex consists of a ductile-to-brittle, S/SE-verging orogenic domain, where a frontal nonmetamorphic and an inner metamorphic sector can be identified in the field. The metamorphic domain consists of a major ophiolitic tectonic mélange, where variably sized, foliated metabasic rocks (blueschists, greenschists, and amphibolites) occur dispersed as centimetre- to kilometre-size blocks into a highly sheared serpentinite matrix. The granitoids occur as leucocratic tabular bodies, with variably developed contact metamorphic zones that are typically gradational in the field and concordant with the regional country rock foliation. The field relations with the host rocks and the internal (magmatic to solid state) fabrics in the Sabzevar granitoids document a syntectonic magma emplacement scenario, based on: (1) concordance of pluton shapes and internal structures with regional structures (S-L fabrics); (2) the existence of a continuum of magmatic through solid-state noncoaxial flow consistent with the regional sense of shear (top-to-the-SSE); and (3) occurrence of foliated wall-rock xenoliths, incorporated by flowing magma into the marginal sectors of the intrusive bodies. These points, together with the evidence that magma preferentially migrated along flats, attest that the Sabzevar granitoids intruded into rocks that were actively deforming during compressional shearing. In the TAS diagram, the granitoid compositions define a medium-K calc-alkaline suite, spanning from basaltic andesite to the dacite and rhyolite fields. They show characteristic low MgO (0.15-0.60 wt%) and Ni (

  12. Magma mingling in the panozero sanukitoid intrusion, baltic shield

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rollinson, H.

    2003-04-01

    The 2.7 Ga Panozero pluton is a composite intrusion comprising magmas of sanukitoid affinity, intrusive into the ca. 2.75 Ga Segozero greenstone belt in western Karelia in the Baltic Shield. The intrusion is predominantly a monzonite, is elliptical in form (9 x 6 km) and is undeformed. Along the eastern margin of the intrusion a wide variety of cogenetic magmas have been mapped ranging in composition from biotite-hornblendites, through monzo-gabbro and monzonite to quartz-monzonite. The contact relationships between the different phases of the intrusion are complex and imply magma mingling and incomplete mixing between magma types. The monzogabbros show a gradational relationship with the monzodiorites, but occur as inclusions within, and contain inclusions of, the monzonite implying two coexisting melts. Similar relationships exist between the monzonite and quartz monzonite and in places there is a gneissose banding of the darker phase within the lighter phase. The quartz-syenite is intrusive into all earlier phases, although the latest phase is hornblendite. This is present as net veining in gabbro and as irregular veins, dykes and as irregularly shaped xenoliths in monzonite, quartz monzonite and syenite. The irregular form and deformed state of the hornblendite inclusions within the earlier magmas implies that the hornblendite was emplaced whilst the host magma was hot. Also developed along the eastern margin of the intrusion are breccia pipes. These are found in the monzodiorites, monzonites and in quartz monzonites. They contain elliptical fragments up to 20 cm long of hornblendite, tremolitite, epidotised amphibolite and in the monzodiorite euhedral feldspars with felsic reaction rims. The matrix of the breccias is often very similar to the composition of their host rock. Many of the fragments are thought to be derived from the adjacent greenstone belt. However, metabasaltic rocks are not recorded from this part of the greenstone belt and so may be derived

  13. Short-term and localized plume-slab interaction explains the genesis of Abukuma adakite in Northeastern Japan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Changyeol; Lim, Chungwan

    2014-06-01

    The pulse-like adakite eruption in Mt. Abukuma, northeastern Japan at ∼16 Ma has been considered peculiar because the subducting Pacific slab was too old to have been melted. Recent studies suggested that the injection of hot asthenospheric mantle as a temporal temperature anomaly into the corner of the mantle wedge was responsible for partial melting of the subducting slab, producing adakitic magma. However, the pulse-like and localized eruption of the Abukuma adakite poses a problem to the above model because rollback of the Pacific plate for ∼10 Myr should have resulted in injection of the hot asthenospheric mantle into the corner of the mantle wedge along northeastern Japan, Sikhote-Alin, and Sakhalin. In addition, no quantitative examination of the interaction between the hot asthenospheric mantle and cold subducting Pacific plate has been performed. In this study, we used a series of two-dimensional kinematic-dynamic numerical subduction models to evaluate slab melting by the injection of a short-term temperature anomaly into the mantle wedge. Our model calculations show that injection of the short-term temperature anomaly into the corner of the mantle wedge resulted in slab melting at ∼17 Ma, but that the duration of injection should be <5 Myr to comply with the pulse-like eruption of the Abukuma adakite at ∼16 Ma. The localization of the Abukuma adakite, which excludes other areas of northeastern Japan, as well as Sikhote-Alin and Sakhalin, implies that the short-term temperature anomaly existed as a blob, which may have resulted from the penetration of the mantle plume through a neck in the subducting Pacific plate. The rising hot blob of the mantle plume from the slab neck was entrained to the corner flow of the mantle wedge and arrived at the slab surface at ∼17 Ma. The pulse-like and localized Abukuma adakite was thus the consequence of short-term and localized plume-slab interaction in the Abukuma region.

  14. Lithologic mapping of mafic intrusions in East Greenland using Landsat Thematic Mapper data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Naslund, H. Richard; Birnie, R. W.; Parr, J. T.

    1989-01-01

    The East Greenland Tertiary Igneous Province contains a variety of intrusive and extrusive rock types. The Skaergaard complex is the most well known of the intrusive centers. Landsat thematic mapping (TM) was used in conjunction with field spectrometer data to map these mafic intrusions. These intrusions are of interest as possible precious metal ore deposits. They are spectrally distinct from the surrounding Precambrian gneisses. However, subpixel contamination by snow, oxide surface coatings, lichen cover and severe topography limit the discrimination of lithologic units within the gabbro. Imagery of the Skaergaard and surrounding vicinity, and image processing and enhancement techniques are presented. Student theses and other publications resulting from this work are also listed.

  15. Lamprophyre dike intrusion and the age of the Alpine fault, New Zealand

    SciTech Connect

    Cooper, A.F.; Barreiro, B.A.; Kimbrough, D.L.; Mattinson, J.M.

    1987-10-01

    The orientations of intrusive rocks from a carbonatitic lamprophyre dike swarm and the history of emplacement relative to country-rock schist structures are compatible with intrusion into tension fractures and Riedel shears formed during initiation of the dextral wrench system of the Alpine fault. New U-Pb and Rb-Sr dates indicate a late Oligocene-early Miocene time of intrusion which, in turn, suggests a mid-Tertiary history for propagation of the Alpine fault plate boundary through South Island, New Zealand.

  16. Petrology of the igneous rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mccallum, I. S.

    1987-01-01

    Papers published during the 1983-1986 period on the petrology and geochemistry of igneous rocks are discussed, with emphasis on tectonic environment. Consideration is given to oceanic rocks, subdivided into divergent margin suites (mid-ocean ridge basalts, ridge-related seamounts, and back-arc basin basalts) and intraplate suites (oceanic island basalts and nonridge seamounts), and to igneous rocks formed at convergent margins (island arc and continental arc suites), subdivided into volcanic associations and plutonic associations. Other rock groups discussed include continental flood basalts, layered mafic intrusions, continental alkalic associations, komatiites, ophiolites, ash-flow tuffs, anorthosites, and mantle xenoliths.

  17. The vernon supersuite: Mesoproterozoic A-type granitoid rocks in the New Jersey highlands

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Volkert, R.A.; Drake, A.A., Jr.

    1998-01-01

    Abundant Mesoproterozoic A-type granitoid rocks of two intrusive suites underlie approximately 50 percent of the New Jersey Highlands. These rocks, the Byram Intrusive and Lake Hopatcong Intrusive Suites, consist of granite, alaskite, quartz monzonite, monzonite, and minor pegmatite. Byram and Lake Hopatcong rocks, although different mineralogically, are similar geochemically and contain overlapping abundances of most major and trace elements. Petrographic relationships, geochronology, field relationships, and geochemical similarities support a comagmatic origin for both suites. They constitute the here named Vernon Supersuite.

  18. Origin of primitive andesites by melt-rock reaction in the sub-arc mantle (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rapp, R. P.

    2009-12-01

    The genetic relationship between primitive granitoids, including high-Mg andesites (HMAs) and bajaites, and primary granitoids, or "pristine" adakites, has been vigorously debated since Defant and Drummond (1991; henceforth D&D) first applied the term "adakite" to refer to Cenozoic arc magmas (andesites and dacites) "associated with young subducting lithosphere", with low Y and Yb, low high-field strength elements (HFSEs), high Sr, and high Sr/Y and (La/Yb)N ratios "relative to island arc andesite-dacite-rhyolite". These characteristics were attributed to an origin for adakites by partial melting of basaltic crust within the subducting slab (hence "slab melts"). That such a process can produce melts with the characteristics described by D&D has since been largely confirmed by dehydration melting experiments on hydrous metabasalt at ~1-4 GPa. Attention was also drawn to the geochemical similarities between "adakites" and large-ion lithophile element (LILE)-enriched, high-field strength element (HFSE) depleted magnesian andesites (HMAs) from Adak Island in the western Aleutians, first described by Kay (1978), implying a genetic relationship between primary granitoid (adakites) formed by partial melting of basaltic ocean crust in the subducting slab, transformed to garnet-amphibolite or eclogite, and primitive magnesian andesites (HMAs) with high Mg-numbers (Mg# = molar Mg/(Mg+Fe)x100) and high concentrations of Ni and Cr. What then is the true origin of these enigmatic arc magmas, with both crustal and mantle, derivative and primitive, geochemical signatures? Kay (1978) suggested a "hybrid" model, in which "hydrous melting of eclogite (slab melting) results in a small volume of dacitic melt ("pristine adakite"), which rises into the hotter overlying peridotite wedge and equilibrates with olivine and orthopyroxene, reacting with olivine until it becomes andesitic". In this paper, I will discuss the results of melt-rock reaction experiments modelling this peridotite

  19. Acoustic emission intrusion detector

    DOEpatents

    Carver, Donald W.; Whittaker, Jerry W.

    1980-01-01

    An intrusion detector is provided for detecting a forcible entry into a secured structure while minimizing false alarms. The detector uses a piezoelectric crystal transducer to sense acoustic emissions. The transducer output is amplified by a selectable gain amplifier to control the sensitivity. The rectified output of the amplifier is applied to a Schmitt trigger circuit having a preselected threshold level to provide amplitude discrimination. Timing circuitry is provided which is activated by successive pulses from the Schmitt trigger which lie within a selected time frame for frequency discrimination. Detected signals having proper amplitude and frequency trigger an alarm within the first complete cycle time of a detected acoustical disturbance signal.

  20. Hybrid network intrusion detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tahmoush, David

    2014-05-01

    We report on a machine learning classifier that can be used to discover the patterns hidden within large networking data flows. It utilizes an existing intrusion detection system (IDS) as an oracle to learn a faster, less resource intensive normalcy classifier as a front-end to a hybrid network IDS. This system has the capability to recognize new attacks that are similar to known attack signatures. It is also more highly scalable and distributable than the signature-based IDS. The new hybrid design also allows distributed updates and retraining of the normalcy classifier to stay up-to-date with current threats.

  1. Petrochemistry of igneous rocks of the California-Vetas mining district, Santander, Colombia: Implications for northern Andean tectonics and porphyry Cu (-Mo, Au) metallogeny

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bissig, Thomas; Mantilla Figueroa, Luis Carlos; Hart, Craig J. R.

    2014-07-01

    Porphyry Mo and Cu mineralization in the California-Vetas mining district is contemporaneous with 10.9 to 8.4 Ma granodiorite porphyry stocks and overprinted by Au-Ag mineralization of epithermal affinity. Mineralization is hosted by Grenvillian aged paragneisses (Bucaramanga Gneiss of the Santander Massif) and late Triassic to early Jurassic granitic rocks. All intrusive rocks are high-K calc-alkaline. Late Triassic to early Jurassic rocks include peraluminous granites with more than 70 wt.% SiO2 as well as metaluminous diorites, tonalites and granodiorites with SiO2 between 54.9 and 60.4 wt.%. Late Miocene rocks are weakly peraluminous granodiorite porphyries with SiO2 between 61 and 67 wt.% SiO2. Late Miocene rocks share some characteristics with adakite-like rocks which are widely associated with porphyry and epithermal style mineralization elsewhere in the Andes. They have high Ba (930 to 1500 ppm) and high Ba/La (28 to 50), high Sr (850 to 1100 ppm) and Sr/Y (48-78) and depleted middle rare earth elements (MREE) compared to the Mesozoic granites, which have 400 to 700 ppm Ba (Ba/La 14 to 25) and 80 to 150 ppm Sr (Sr/Y 2.5 to 14), and Mesozoic diorites and tonalites, which have ~ 900 to 1200 ppm Ba (Ba/La 20 to 32) and ~ 610 to 750 ppm Sr (Sr/Y 22 to 25). Miocene granodiorite porphyries, in contrast to Mesozoic intrusive rocks have only weak negative Eu anomalies. The Miocene rocks have 87Sr/86Sr ratios of 0.7052 to 0.7067 and εNd of - 1.9 to - 5.4 and are significantly more isotopically primitive than all other rocks in the study area including the Mesozoic diorites to tonalites (87Sr/86Sr = 0.7082 and 0.7092; εNd = - 6.7 and - 7.2), granites (87Sr/86Sr = 0.730 (n = 2); εNd = - 8.2 and - 8.3) and Bucaramanga Gneiss (0.718 to 0.743; εNd = - 10.8 to - 14.1). Lead isotope data are broadly consistent with the Sr and Nd isotope data and the Miocene porphyries have the lowest 207Pb/204Pb ratios but overlap with the Mesozoic diorites to tonalites in their 206Pb

  2. Paleocene arc-continent collision in southeastern Papua New Guinea was followed in the Neogene by 50 km of extension on low-angle faults, emplacement of intrusive rocks, uplift and tilting and erosion to reveal the PUB ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, H. L.; Jonda, L.

    2012-12-01

    The geology of the Owen Stanley Range in southeastern Papua New Guinea was mapped at reconnaissance scale in 1960-1980. The range comprises a core of mostly felsic greenschist-facies metamorphics (Kagi Metamorphics) that is structurally overlain on the northeast side by a fault-bounded partial carapace of mafic partly-blueschist-facies metamorphics (Emo Metamorphics). Metamorphism was by arc-continent collision in the Paleocene (cooling age 58.3 Ma). Subsequently there has been 50 km or more of NE-SW extension of the crust allowing emergence and uplift of the metamorphic rocks and tilting and erosion of the arc to reveal the PUB ophiolite. In 2010-2011 we reviewed the existing field and petrologic data and more recent satellite imagery, and followed up with several days of reconnaissance mapping. We were particularly interested to find and explanation for the interruption of the Owen Stanley Range at 148.4E to 148.8 E. Our preliminary conclusions include (a) there is evidence of a second metamorphic event (a second collision perhaps) in the Eocene; (b) it is likely that the range developed as a series of sub-horizontal thrust sheets; and (c) the thrust sheets were reactivated in the Late Miocene-to-Quaternary as extensional duplexes. Extension was accompanied by emplacement of diorite-granodiorite and K-rich hypabyssal rocks some of which are localised along the former leading edge (the SW front) of the Emo metamorphic carapace.

  3. Thermal aureoles of igneous intrusions: some possible indications of hydrothermal convective cooling

    SciTech Connect

    Parmentier, E.M.; Schedl, A.

    1981-01-01

    The size and shape of metamorphic aureoles is investigated as a possible indicator of hydrothermal convective cooling of epizonal igneous intrusions. A simple family of numerical models illustrates the effect of convective cooling on maximum temperatures attained in the country rock surrounding an intrusion. Boundary layer approximations have also been applied to describe convection of vaporizing groundwater near the contact of an intrusion early in its cooling history. Maximum temperature isotherms are taken to reflect the width and shape of thermal aureoles defined by preserved mineral assemblages as appears to be reasonable based on several well-studied conductively cooled intrusions. The thermal aureoles of intrusions for which oxygen and hydrogen isotope data indicate convective groundwater circulation have been examined on the basis of the simple numerical and boundary layer models. The shape of the low temperature alteration aureole of the well-mapped El Salvador porphyry copper deposit suggests convective cooling of a permeable intrusion. The width of the low temperature (greenschist) aureole of the Mull intrusive complex can be explained by convective cooling of permeable intrusive rock. The narrow high temperature (amphibolite) aureole of the Cuillin gabbro on Skye can be explained by strong convective cooling; but the low temperature (greenschist) aureole is wide enough to be consistent with conductive cooling, thus suggesting decreasing permeabilities during the cooling history. This is consistent with oxygen isotope sampling and other geologic observations.

  4. Syn-collision Hairhan layered intrusion, Lakes Zone, Western Mongolia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vishnevskiy, A. V.; Izokh, A. E.; Kalugin, V. M.; Gertner, I. F.

    2012-04-01

    In the structure of the Lakes Zone of Western Mongolia, which is reconstructed as the Early Cambrian island arc (Lakes island arc terrane), there are several groups of contiguous space gabbroic intrusions, merged in Hirgisnuur complex. The largest (70 km2) is Hairhan intrusion, located in the central part of the Lake Zone in the Bumbat-Hairhan ridge. The structure of the intrusion disturbed by later tectonic movements and the subsequent formation of Cambrian granitoids Tohtoginshil complex. The structures of the body are two groups of rocks: layered series and marginal facies, fragmentary spread to the periphery of intrusion. Gabbronorites of marginal facies have intrusive contacts with the sedimentary rocks of Early Cambrian age Burgastay formation. The marginal facies, apparent thickness which is 1.5 km, is composed primarily of non-olivine gabbronorites in which there is trachytoid and sometimes bedding. Layered series composes the central part of the Hairhan intrusion, the direction of layering has a northwest strike, coaxial with the long axis of the intrusion. The lower part of the layered series consists mainly troctolites with minor olivine gabbroids. The upper part of the layered series consists mainly of olivine gabbro, troctolite occur here less frequently also observed small schlieren anorthosites. Of particular interest is the horizon taxitic gabbro and being above it - the horizon orbicular gabbro at the top of the layered series. The rocks are widely manifested magmatic disruptive and plastic deformation - both macro and micro levels. They are expressed in the collapse of layering of elements in small folds of varying amplitude (typically to a few tens centimeters), often passing into areas and zones taxitic disruption. The greatest number of these structural elements characteristic of the upper part of the layered series, including the orbicular gabbro and troctolites taxitic horizons. These features indicate intensive tectonic processes that

  5. The petrogenesis of late Neoproterozoic mafic dyke-like intrusion in south Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Azer, M. K.; Abu El-Ela, F. F.; Ren, M.

    2012-08-01

    New field, petrographical and geochemical studies are presented here for the late Neoproterozoic Rimm intrusion (˜15 km long) exposed in the southern Sinai Peninsula, Egypt in the northernmost Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS). Field relations indicate that the Rimm intrusion is younger than the surrounding metamorphic rocks and calc-alkaline syn-tectonic granodiorite and it was not affected by regional metamorphism. The anorogenic peralkaline granite of Gebel Serbal crosscuts the Rimm intrusion. The Rimm intrusion is made up of several consanguineous rock types with gradational contacts. It is composed chiefly of pyroxene-hornblende gabbro, hornblende gabbro and minor quartz diorite. The chemical composition of the mafic minerals indicated that the studied rocks derived from calc-alkaline mafic magma. Geochemically, the studied rocks are characterized by enrichment in LILE relative to HFSE and LREE relative to HREE [(Ce/Yb)N = 4.50-6.36]. Quartz diorite display slightly concave HREE pattern and slightly negative Eu-anomaly [(Eu/Eu*)n = 0.91] which may be the result of fractionation of amphibole and plagioclase from the source melt, respectively. The Rimm intrusion evolved from mafic mantle magma into different type rocks by fractional crystallization with minor crustal contamination. The initial magma corresponds to pyroxene-hornblende gabbro and the crystallization of hornblende was caused by slight H2O increase in magma after crystallization of near-liquidus clinopyroxene and Ca-rich plagioclase. Amphiboles geobarometer indicate that the gabbroic rocks of the Rimm intrusion crystallized at pressures between 4.8 and 6.4 Kb, while quartz diorite crystallized at 1.3-2.1 Kb. Crystallization temperatures range between 800 and 926 °C for the gabbros and between 667 and 784 °C for the quartz diorite. The Rimm intrusion represents a post-orogenic phase formed during the crustal thinning and extension of the Arabian-Nubian Shield.

  6. Episodic intrusion, internal differentiation, and hydrothermal alteration of the miocene tatoosh intrusive suite south of Mount Rainier, Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, E.A.; Bacon, C.R.; John, D.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Mazdab, F.K.

    2011-01-01

    The Miocene Tatoosh intrusive suite south of Mount Rainier is composed of three broadly granodioritic plutons that are manifestations of ancestral Cascades arc magmatism. Tatoosh intrusive suite plutons have individually diagnostic characteristics, including texture, mineralogy, and geochemistry, and apparently lack internal contacts. New ion-microprobe U-Pb zircon ages indicate crystallization of the Stevens pluton ca. 19.2 Ma, Reflection-Pyramid pluton ca. 18.5 Ma, and Nisqually pluton ca. 17.5 Ma. The Stevens pluton includes rare, statistically distinct ca. 20.1 Ma zircon antecrysts. Wide-ranging zircon rare earth element (REE), Hf, U, and Th concentrations suggest late crystallization from variably evolved residual liquids. Zircon Eu/Eu*-Hf covariation is distinct for each of the Reflection-Pyramid, Nisqually, and Stevens plutons. Although most Tatoosh intrusive suite rocks have been affected by weak hydrothermal alteration, and sparse mineralized veins cut some of these rocks, significant base or precious metal mineralization is absent. At the time of shallow emplacement, each of these magma bodies was largely homogeneous in bulk composition and petrographic features, but, prior to final solidification, each of the Tatoosh intrusive suite plutons developed internal compositional variation. Geochemical and petrographic trends within each pluton are most consistent with differential loss of residual melt, possibly represented by late aplite dikes or erupted as rhyolite, from crystal-rich magma. Crystal-rich magma that formed each pluton evidently accumulated in reservoirs below the present level of exposure and then intruded to a shallow depth. Assembled by episodic intrusion, the Tatoosh intrusive suite may be representative of midsized composite plutonic complexes beneath arc volcanoes. ?? 2011 Geological Society of America.

  7. Health-related intrusive thoughts.

    PubMed

    Freeston, M H; Gagnon, F; Ladouceur, R; Thibodeau, N; Letarte, H; Rhéaume, J

    1994-04-01

    Two studies address the prevalence, concomitants, and appraisal of health-related intrusive thoughts. Eighty-three percent of adults (N = 658) in waiting rooms of two general hospitals reported at least one intrusive thought during the preceding month and 75.0% of patients and 55.5% of people accompanying them reported a health-related intrusive thought in the same period. The intrusions were associated with anxious and depressive symptoms. Health related intrusive thoughts were reported by 61% of a sample of university students (N = 608) and were the most frequent intrusive thought among 19.9% of the students. First, triggering stimuli reported by the subjects were significant predictors of thought frequency, worry, removal difficulty, and effort used in removing the thought. Second, appraisals of high probability were significant predictors of high frequency, worry, and especially difficulty in removing the thought. Finally, perceived responsibility and disapproval of the thought were also significant predictors of thought frequency, worry, removal difficulty, effort used in removing the thought, and guilt. These data support the position that cognitive appraisal of intrusive thoughts is closely linked to the subjective experience of the thought: more extreme appraisals were associated with more troublesome thoughts. The clinical implications of these studies are discussed in terms of current models of hypochondriasis and health anxiety. PMID:8027960

  8. The role of intrusions in the formation of Irish-type mineralisation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCusker, Jim; Reed, Christopher

    2013-08-01

    The Stonepark Prospect is located in County Limerick, south-central Ireland. Multiple zones of Zn-Pb mineralisation have been identified at Stonepark and these are approximately 5 km west of the Pallas Green Prospect. At Stonepark, the sulphide bodies are hosted within the Waulsortian Limestone and closely resemble other Irish-type deposits. The mineralisation is composed of pyrite-marcasite, sphalerite and galena with gangue Fe-dolomite and calcite cements. A key difference at Stonepark is the presence of Chadian-aged volcanic rocks (Knockroe Volcanics) that intrude into and overlie the Waulsortian Limestone. Subsequent hydrothermal brecciation of the Waulsortian Limestone and Knockroe intrusions resulted in the formation of tabular polymict breccia bodies containing mixed carbonate and clasts of intrusive rocks. These have then been overprinted by massive sulphide mineralisation. Further syn-mineralisation brecciation has overprinted the earlier breccias. Drilling has demonstrated a spatial relationship between the volume of intrusive rocks (dykes and polymict breccias) and Zn-Pb mineralisation. This association suggests that the intrusive rocks provided a mechanism for the introduction of the mineralising fluids into the breccia bodies. This is significant as to date no large controlling fault has been identified, as is seen at other Irish-type deposits. Further work is required to understand the alteration process of the intrusive rocks and how this may relate to the mineralising process.

  9. Geologic and geophysical investigations of Climax stock intrusive, Nevada

    SciTech Connect

    1983-12-31

    This document contains three parts of a survey of Climax stock intrusive, Nevada by the US Geological Survey. The first contains the results of a conventional survey of the site and an investigation of rock composition. The second contains the results of a gravity survey and the third contains the results of a magnetic aerial survey. Each of the three documents contains a separate abstract.

  10. Water-saturated magmas in the Panama Canal region: a precursor to adakite-like magma generation?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rooney, Tyrone O.; Franceschi, Pastora; Hall, Chris M.

    2011-03-01

    Amphibole, while uncommon as a phenocryst in arc lavas, is increasingly recognized as a key constituent in the petrogenesis of arc magmas. Fractional crystallization of water-saturated arc magmas in the lower crust can yield substantial volumes of amphibole cumulates that, depending on the pressure of crystallization, may also contain garnet. Fractionation of this higher pressure assemblage has been invoked as a possible mechanism in the production of magmas that contain an adakitic signature. This study examines newly dated Late-Oligocene (25.37 ± 0.13 Ma) hypabyssal amphibole-rich andesites from Cerro Patacon in the Panama Canal region. These andesites contain nodules of amphibole cumulates that are ~4-6 cm in diameter and are almost entirely composed of 5-10-mm amphibole crystals (dominantly ferri-tschermakite). Geochemical variations, optical and chemical zoning of the Cerro Patacon amphiboles are consistent with their evolution in a crystal mush environment that had at least one recharge event prior to entrainment in the host andesite. Amphiboles hosted within the cumulate nodules differ from those hosted in the Cerro Patacon andesite and contain consistently higher values of Ti. We suggest these nodules represent the early stages of fractionation from a water-saturated magma. Cerro Patacon andesites have REE concentrations that plot at the most depleted end of Central American Arc magmas and exhibit a distinctive depletion in the middle REE. These geochemical and petrographic observations strongly support significant amphibole fractionation during formation of the Cerro Patacon andesite, consistent with the petrographic evidence. Fractionation of water-saturated magmas is a mechanism by which adakitic compositions may be produced, and the Cerro Patacon andesites do exhibit adakite-like geochemical characteristics (e.g., elevated Sr/Y; 28-34). However, the relatively elevated concentrations of Y and HREE indicate garnet was not stable in the fractionating

  11. Fracturing of doleritic intrusions and associated contact zones: Implications for fluid flow in volcanic basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Senger, Kim; Buckley, Simon J.; Chevallier, Luc; Fagereng, Åke; Galland, Olivier; Kurz, Tobias H.; Ogata, Kei; Planke, Sverre; Tveranger, Jan

    2015-02-01

    Igneous intrusions act as both carriers and barriers to subsurface fluid flow and are therefore expected to significantly influence the distribution and migration of groundwater and hydrocarbons in volcanic basins. Given the low matrix permeability of igneous rocks, the effective permeability in- and around intrusions is intimately linked to the characteristics of their associated fracture networks. Natural fracturing is caused by numerous processes including magma cooling, thermal contraction, magma emplacement and mechanical disturbance of the host rock. Fracturing may be locally enhanced along intrusion-host rock interfaces, at dyke-sill junctions, or at the base of curving sills, thereby potentially enhancing permeability associated with these features. In order to improve our understanding of fractures associated with intrusive bodies emplaced in sedimentary host rocks, we have investigated a series of outcrops from the Karoo Basin of the Eastern Cape province of South Africa, where the siliciclastic Burgersdorp Formation has been intruded by various intrusions (thin dykes, mid-sized sheet intrusions and thick sills) belonging to the Karoo dolerite. We present a quantified analysis of fracturing in- and around these igneous intrusions based on five outcrops at three individual study sites, utilizing a combination of field data, high-resolution lidar virtual outcrop models and image processing. Our results show a significant difference between the three sites in terms of fracture orientation. The observed differences can be attributed to contrasting intrusion geometries, outcrop geometry (for lidar data) and tectonic setting. Two main fracture sets were identified in the dolerite at two of the sites, oriented parallel and perpendicular to the contact respectively. Fracture spacing was consistent between the three sites, and exhibits a higher degree of variation in the dolerites compared to the host rock. At one of the study sites, fracture frequency in the

  12. An analogue study of intrusions.

    PubMed

    Laposa, Judith M; Alden, Lynn E

    2006-07-01

    According to cognitive theorists, intrusive trauma memories have their origin in how information during the event is processed. Two studies investigated functional cognitive strategies during medical crises that might protect against intrusions. In Study 1, interviews with health-care professionals were used to identify cognitive strategies judged to be effective in controlling emotions and dealing with medical crises. Study 2 systematically manipulated the use of those strategies in a trauma analogue film paradigm. Experimental participants reported fewer intrusions, and less fear and avoidance of film-related stimuli during the subsequent week than controls. The manipulation did not affect anxiety during the film or memory disorganization. Implications for cognitive theories of intrusion development are discussed. PMID:16125135

  13. Mineral-Scale and Regional Isotopic Heterogeneity within the Kiglapait Intrusion and Other Mafic Intrusions of the ca. 1.3 Ga Nain Plutonic Suite, Labrador

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weis, D.; Morse, S. A.; Scoates, J. S.

    2004-05-01

    For years, stratigraphic variations in the radiogenic isotopic compositions of whole rocks from layered intrusions have been used to document compositional changes (e.g., magma recharge, mixing, contamination) associated with the filling, crystallization, and cooling of crustal magma chambers. However, recent studies are revealing pronounced isotopic disequilibrium or heterogeneity between minerals from many major layered intrusions, including Pb isotopes in coexisting plagioclase and sulfide from the Bushveld (Mathez & Waight, 2003, GCA) and the Stillwater (McCallum et al, 1999, CMP), Sr and Nd isotopes in whole rock, plagioclase, and clinopyroxene from the Skaergaard (McBirney & Creaser, 2003, JP), and Sr isotopes in single plagioclase crystals from the Rum layered intrusion (Tepley & Davidson, 2003, CMP). Except for the Stillwater intrusion, these isotopic variations are not related to low-temperature secondary alteration. Instead, slow cooling (105-106 years) of these large bodies from near-liquidus to subsolidus temperatures appears to allow for complex geochemical evolution of partially molten systems. Proterozoic anorthosite plutonic suites are especially attractive targets for investigating the significance and extent of isotopic differences between crystals, whole rocks, and different intrusions given their typically protracted emplacement histories, range of magma compositions, and slow cooling at mid-crustal depths. To this list of intrusions that record mineral-mineral isotopic disequilibrium, we can add the large 1308 Ma troctolitic Kiglapait layered intrusion in the Nain Plutonic Suite, Labrador. Plagioclase separates and whole rocks show significant differences in both measured and initial Pb isotopic compositions. Bulk mafics and separated minerals (apatite, magnetite, augite and olivine) give internal Pb-Pb and U-Pb isochron ages consistent with the crystallization age. Measured 206Pb/204Pb is highest in apatite (30-73), indicating that apatite is

  14. Gas intrusion into SPR caverns

    SciTech Connect

    Hinkebein, T.E.; Bauer, S.J.; Ehgartner, B.L.; Linn, J.K.; Neal, J.T.; Todd, J.L.; Kuhlman, P.S.; Gniady, C.T.; Giles, H.N.

    1995-12-01

    The conditions and occurrence of gas in crude oil stored in Strategic Petroleum Reserve, SPR, caverns is characterized in this report. Many caverns in the SPR show that gas has intruded into the oil from the surrounding salt dome. Historical evidence and the analyses presented here suggest that gas will continue to intrude into many SPR caverns in the future. In considering why only some caverns contain gas, it is concluded that the naturally occurring spatial variability in salt permeability can explain the range of gas content measured in SPR caverns. Further, it is not possible to make a one-to-one correlation between specific geologic phenomena and the occurrence of gas in salt caverns. However, gas is concluded to be petrogenic in origin. Consequently, attempts have been made to associate the occurrence of gas with salt inhomogeneities including anomalies and other structural features. Two scenarios for actual gas intrusion into caverns were investigated for consistency with existing information. These scenarios are gas release during leaching and gas permeation through salt. Of these mechanisms, the greater consistency comes from the belief that gas permeates to caverns through the salt. A review of historical operating data for five Bryan Mound caverns loosely supports the hypothesis that higher operating pressures reduce gas intrusion into caverns. This conclusion supports a permeability intrusion mechanism. Further, it provides justification for operating the caverns near maximum operating pressure to minimize gas intrusion. Historical gas intrusion rates and estimates of future gas intrusion are given for all caverns.

  15. Modal Composition and Age of Intrusions in North-Central and Northeast Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.; Crafford, A. Elizabeth Jones

    2007-01-01

    Introduction Data presented in this report characterize igneous intrusions of north-central and northeast Nevada and were compiled as part of the Metallogeny of the Great Basin project conducted by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) between 2001 and 2007. The compilation pertains to the area bounded by lats 38.5 and 42 N., long 118.5 W., and the Nevada-Utah border (fig. 1). The area contains numerous large plutons and smaller stocks but also contains equally numerous smaller, shallowly emplaced intrusions, including dikes, sills, and endogenous dome complexes. Igneous intrusions (hereafter, intrusions) of multiple ages are major constituents of the geologic framework of north-central and northeast Nevada (Stewart and Carlson, 1978). Mesozoic and Cenozoic intrusions are particularly numerous and considered to be related to subduction along the west edge of the North American plate during this time. Henry and Ressel (2000) and Ressel and others (2000) have highlighted the association between magmatism and ore deposits along the Carlin trend. Similarly, Theodore (2000) has demonstrated the association between intrusions and ore deposits in the Battle Mountain area. Decades of geologic investigations in north-central and northeast Nevada (hereafter, the study area) demonstrate that most hydrothermal ore deposits are spatially, and probably temporally and genetically, associated with intrusions. Because of these associations, studies of many individual intrusions have been conducted, including those by a large number of Master's and Doctoral thesis students (particularly University of Nevada at Reno students and associated faculty), economic geologists working on behalf of exploration and mining companies, and USGS earth scientists. Although the volume of study area intrusions is large and many are associated with ore deposits, no synthesis of available data that characterize these rocks has been assembled. Compilations that have been produced for intrusions in Nevada

  16. Paleomagnetic record of a geomagnetic field reversal from late miocene mafic intrusions, southern nevada.

    PubMed

    Ratcliff, C D; Geissman, J W; Perry, F V; Crowe, B M; Zeitler, P K

    1994-10-21

    Late Miocene (about 8.65 million years ago) mafic intrusions and lava flows along with remagnetized host rocks from Paiute Ridge, southern Nevada, provide a high-quality paleomagnetic record of a geomagnetic field reversal. These rocks yield thermoremanent magnetizations with declinations of 227 degrees to 310 degrees and inclinations of -7 degrees to 49 degrees , defining a reasonably continuous virtual geomagnetic pole path over west-central Pacific longitudes. Conductive cooling estimates for the intrusions suggest that this field transition, and mafic magmatism, lasted only a few hundred years. Because this record comes principally from intrusive rocks, rather than sediments or lavas, it is important in demonstrating the longitudinal confinement of the geomagnetic field during a reversal. PMID:17816684

  17. Digital mapping of accommodating structures and deformation associated with the emplacement of high level magmatic intrusions, Henry Mountains, Utah

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, P. I.; McCaffrey, K. J.; Holdsworth, R. E.; Davidson, J. P.; Murphy, P. J.; Jarvis, I.

    2012-12-01

    High-level sill and laccolith complexes form an important part of volcanic plumbing systems in which magma is emplaced as a series of sub-horizontal tabular sheet-like intrusions. Few studies of these intrusion types have looked in detail at the host rock, emplacement-related deformation structures, and how the additional volume of rock is accommodated within the crust, i.e. the 'space problem'. The aim of this study is to develop an understanding of the stages of emplacement (style of emplacement versus style of host rock deformation) and the internal textural evolution of Tertiary sills and laccoliths in the Henry Mountains, whilst also attempting to resolve the 'space problem'. Conventional field mapping, outcrop studies and detailed data collection of deformation structures has been combined with digital mapping using FieldMove™ and terrestrial laser scanning (TLS) in order to enable 3D modelling of the intrusive bodies and emplacement-related host rock deformation. Kinematic and geometrical studies of emplacement-related structures in the host rocks are supplemented by micro-scale textural and geochemical studies of deformed host rocks, plagioclase feldspar and amphibole phenocryst populations within the intrusions, and the intrusion-host rock contact zone. Fabric studies recognise micro-structural fabrics (associated with accommodating structures) from magmatic fabrics (associated with magma flow). Crystal size distribution (CSD) studies help constrain the crystal:molten rock ratio and mechanical properties of the intruding magma, in addition to helping identify individual magma pulses. Fieldwork to date has focused on two satellite intrusions to Mt. Hilliers: Trachyte Mesa (the most distal intrusion; simple geometries); and Maiden Creek (closer to Mt. Hilliers; more complex geometries) both of which are emplaced into the Jurassic Entrada Formation sandstone. Preliminary results highlight the importance of faults, fractures, deformation bands and newly

  18. Deformation structures associated with the Trachyte Mesa intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah: Implications for sill and laccolith emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Penelope I. R.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.; Wilson, Robert W.; Jarvis, Ian; Holdsworth, Robert E.

    2016-06-01

    Deformation structures in the wall rocks of igneous intrusions emplaced at shallow crustal depths preserve an important record of how space was created for magma in the host rocks. Trachyte Mesa, a small Oligocene age intrusion in the Henry Mountains, Utah, is composed of a series of stacked tabular, sheet-like intrusions emplaced at 3-3.5 km depth into sandstone-dominated sedimentary sequences of late Palaeozoic-Mesozoic age. New structural analysis of the spatial distribution, geometry, kinematics and relative timings of deformation structures in the host rocks of the intrusion has enabled the recognition of distinct pre-, syn-, and late-stage-emplacement deformation phases. Our observations suggest a two-stage growth mechanism for individual sheets where radial growth of a thin sheet was followed by vertical inflation. Dip-slip faults formed during vertical inflation; they are restricted to the tips of individual sheets due to strain localisation, with magma preferentially exploiting these faults, initiating sill (sheet) climbing. The order in which sheets are stacked impacts on the intrusion geometry and associated deformation of wall rocks. Our results offer new insights into the incremental intrusion geometries of shallow-level magmatic bodies and the potential impact of their emplacement on surrounding host rocks.

  19. Deformation structures associated with the Trachyte Mesa intrusion, Henry Mountains, Utah: Implications for sill and laccolith emplacement mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilson, Penelope I. R.; McCaffrey, Ken J. W.; Wilson, Robert W.; Jarvis, Ian; Holdsworth, Robert E.

    2016-06-01

    Deformation structures in the wall rocks of igneous intrusions emplaced at shallow crustal depths preserve an important record of how space was created for magma in the host rocks. Trachyte Mesa, a small Oligocene age intrusion in the Henry Mountains, Utah, is composed of a series of stacked tabular, sheet-like intrusions emplaced at 3-3.5 km depth into sandstone-dominated sedimentary sequences of late Palaeozoic-Mesozoic age. New structural analysis of the spatial distribution, geometry, kinematics and relative timings of deformation structures in the host rocks of the intrusion has enabled the recognition of distinct pre-, syn-, and late-stage-emplacement deformation phases. Our observations suggest a two-stage growth mechanism for individual sheets where radial growth of a thin sheet was followed by vertical inflation. Dip-slip faults formed during vertical inflation; they are restricted to the tips of individual sheets due to strain localisation, with magma preferentially exploiting these faults, initiating sill (sheet) climbing. The order in which sheets are stacked impacts on the intrusion geometry and associated deformation of wall rocks. Our results offer new insights into the incremental intrusion geometries of shallow-level magmatic bodies and the potential impact of their emplacement on surrounding host rocks.

  20. From intrusive to oscillating thoughts.

    PubMed

    Peirce, Anne Griswold

    2007-10-01

    This paper focused on the possibility that intrusive thoughts (ITs) are a form of an evolutionary, adaptive, and complex strategy to prepare for and resolve stressful life events through schema formation. Intrusive thoughts have been studied in relation to individual conditions, such as traumatic stress disorder and obsessive-compulsive disorder. They have also been documented in the average person experiencing everyday stress. In many descriptions of thought intrusion, it is accompanied by thought suppression. Several theories have been put forth to describe ITs, although none provides a satisfactory explanation as to whether ITs are a normal process, a normal process gone astray, or a sign of pathology. There is also no consistent view of the role that thought suppression plays in the process. I propose that thought intrusion and thought suppression may be better understood by examining them together as a complex and adaptive mechanism capable of escalating in times of need. The ability of a biological mechanism to scale up in times of need is one hallmark of a complex and adaptive system. Other hallmarks of complexity, including self-similarity across scales, sensitivity to initial conditions, presence of feedback loops, and system oscillation, are also discussed in this article. Finally, I propose that thought intrusion and thought suppression are better described together as an oscillatory cycle. PMID:17904485

  1. Talking Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Dale; Corley, Brenda

    1987-01-01

    Discusses some of the ways that rocks can be used to enhance children's creativity and their interest in science. Suggests the creation of a dramatic production involving rocks. Includes basic information on sedimentary, igneous, and metamorphic rocks. (TW)

  2. Adakitic-like volcanism in Southern Mexico and subduction of the Tehuantepec Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manea, M.; Manea, V. C.

    2007-05-01

    The origin of El Chichón volcano is poorly understood, and our attempt in this study is to demonstrate that Tehuantepec Ridge, a major tectonic discontinuity on the Cocos plate, plays a key role in the slab dehydration budget and therefore in partial melting of the mantle beneath El Chichón. Using marine magnetic anomalies we show that the upper mantle beneath TR undergo partial serpentinization, a 5-7 km thick serpentinized root extending along TR and below the oceanic crust. Another key aspect of the magnetic anomaly over southern México is a long-wavelength (~150 km) high amplitude (~500 nT) magnetic anomaly located between the trench and the coast. Using a 2D joint magnetic-gravity forward model, constrained by the subduction P-T structure, slab geometry and seismicity, we find a highly magnetic and low-density source located at 40-130 km depth. We interpret this result as a serpentinized mantle wedge by fluids expelled from the subducting Cocos plate beneath southern Mexico. Such a deep hydrated mantle requires a low temperature wedge (T<600° C) because serpentine is stable below this temperature and also the magnetic properties are preserved for temperature less than the Currie point for magnetite (~580° C). This result explains the lack of volcanism in southern México where the slab depth is ~ 100 km. Using phase diagrams for sediments, basalt and peridotite, and the subduction P-T structure beneath El Chichón we find that sediments and basalt dehydrate ~ 50% at depths corresponding with the location of serpentinized mantle wedge, whereas the serpentinized root beneath TR strongly dehydrates (60-80%) at higher depths (170-180 km) comparable with the slab depth beneath El Chichón. We conclude that this strong deserpentinization pulse of mantle lithosphere beneath TR at great depths triggers arc melting, explaining the unusual location and probably the adakitic signature of El Chichón.

  3. Laboratory Experiments for Seawater Intrusion into Freshwater Aquifer with Heterogeneity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, K.; Karasaki, K.; Takasu, T.

    2007-12-01

    It is important for safety assessment of high-level radioactive waste geologic disposal to understand groundwater flow in deep underground accurately. Especially, groundwater flow in the coastal area is considered to be quite complex that involves density and hydraulic gradient driven flow of freshwater and seawater. In order to understand the behavior of seawater intrusion into freshwater in deep underground, we constructed a laboratory equipment, 'Mini-MACRO' (MAss transport Characterization in host ROck). Mini-MACRO consists of three parts: a sandbox (0.5m x 0.25m x 0.1m) and a reservoir tank on each side containing saltwater simulating seawater and freshwater, respectively. Seawater intrusion experiments are conducted using glass beads (sub- millimeter in diameter) and colored saltwater in the sandbox with a transparent face plate to allow visual observation. We created several cases of experimental conditions to observe the seawater intrusion behavior into two-layered stratum against various hydraulic gradients and densities of saltwater resembling the so-called Henry Problem. We confirmed that the results using this equipment match numerical results under simple heterogeneous condition. These results contribute to the better understanding of seawater intrusion behavior and to increasing confidence in modeling methodology of groundwater flow and mass transport in deep underground through comparison with numerical analysis. We believe that it is crucial for the safety assessment of geologic disposal to integrate this knowledge.

  4. A conduit-related genesis of the Lengshuiqing intrusive assemblage (Sichuan, SW China)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Munteanu, Marian; Wilson, Allan H.; Yao, Yong; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Chunnett, Gordon; Luo, Yaonan; Mafurutu, Leonard; Phadagi, Rofhiwa

    2010-01-01

    Lengshuiqing is part of the late Proterozoic igneous province from the western margin of the Yangtze craton. The Lengshuiqing area comprises five ultramafic-mafic intrusions, emplaced in the late Proterozoic Yanbian Group. The intrusions from Lengshuiqing contain cumulate ultramafic zones (peridotite + olivine pyroxenite), with cumulus olivine and Cr-spinel, and intercumulus pyroxenes, hornblende, phlogopite and plagioclase. Ni-Cu ore (pyrrhotite + pentlandite + chalcopyrite) is hosted in the ultramafic zones. Olivine-free diorite-quartz diorite ± gabbro and granite zones commonly occur above the ultramafic rocks. The genesis of the intrusions (conduit-related accumulation or differentiation from stagnant magma) was investigated. The amount of sulphides in the intrusions from Lengshuiqing is one order of magnitude bigger than the sulphides that can be dissolved by a volume of mafic magma similar with the volume of the intrusions. Most intrusions from Lengshuiqing have bulk composition (peridotite ± diorite ± granite) more magnesian (MgO = 21-22%; Mg# > 78) than the deduced composition of their parental magma (MgO = 9-11%; Mg# = 64-67). This indicates the accumulation of sulphide and mafic silicates from a volume of magma much bigger than the volume of the intrusions, which can be explained by the fractionation from magma ascending through the intrusions to shallower depths. A continuous supply and vent of magma is consistent with the lack of chilled margins, the melting of the wall rocks and the generation of high-temperature mineral assemblages (K-feldspar, diopside, and sillimanite) in the Yanbian Group. The intrusions from Lengshuiqing are seen as microchambers on conduits draining olivine-, Cr-spinel-, and sulphide-bearing mafic magma from a larger staging chamber.

  5. Constraints on the formation of geochemically variable plagiogranite intrusions in the Troodos Ophiolite, Cyprus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freund, Sarah; Haase, Karsten M.; Keith, Manuel; Beier, Christoph; Garbe-Schönberg, Dieter

    2014-02-01

    The geochemistry and petrology of tonalitic to trondhjemitic samples ( n = 85) from eight different plagiogranite intrusions at the gabbro/sheeted dyke transition of the Troodos Ophiolite were studied in order to determine their petrogenetic relationship to the mafic plutonic section and the lava pile. The plagiogranitic rocks have higher SiO2 contents than the majority of the glasses of the Troodos lava pile, but lie on a continuation of the chemical trends defined by the extrusive rocks, indicating that the shallow intrusions generally represent crystallised magmas. We define three different groups of plagiogranites in the Troodos Ophiolite based on different incompatible element contents and ratios. The first and most common plagiogranite group has geochemical similarities to the tholeiitic lavas forming the lavas and sheeted dyke complex in the Troodos crust, implying that these magmas formed at a spreading axis. The second plagiogranite group occurs in one intrusion that is chemically related to late-stage and off-axis boninitic lavas and dykes. One intrusion next to the Arakapas fault zone consists of incompatible element-enriched plagiogranites which are unrelated to any known mafic crustal rocks. The similarities of incompatible element ratios between plagiogranites, lavas and mafic plutonic rocks, the continuous chemical trends defined by plagiogranites and mafic rocks, as well as incompatible element modelling results, all suggest that shallow fractional crystallisation is the dominant process responsible for formation of the felsic magmas.

  6. 1420 Ma diabasic intrusives from the Mesoproterozoic Singhora Group, Chhattisgarh Supergroup, India: Implications towards non-plume intrusive activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Priyabrata; Das, Kaushik; Chakraborty, Partha Pratim; Balakrishnan, S.

    2011-04-01

    Besides offering significant clues towards tracking the geochemical evolution of the mantle and architectural reconstruction of different `supercontinent', geochronological and geochemical appraisal of igneous inputs are also important to bracket the depositional time frame of any lithopackage, particularly, the unfossiliferous sedimentary successions. The present study deals with diabasic intrusive within Mesoproterozoic Saraipalli Formation, which is an argillaceous constituent present at the basal part of nearly 400 m thick four-tiered unmetamorphosed but deformed sedimentary succession of Singhora Group, Chhattisgarh Supergroup, central India. The SE-NW trending intrusive comprises mainly of plagioclase and augite together with minor orthopyroxene, biotite and opaque minerals. Though some plagioclase laths are partially sericitized, the ophitic-to-subophitic texture of the rock is well preserved. Major and trace element geochemical data indicate that this intrusive is basalt-to-basaltic andesite in character and of subalkaline basalt affinity. Multi-element plot shows overall LILE-enrichment and enrichment of Pb and slight depletion of Nb and P, coupled with moderate La/Nb and Th/Nb ratios. Zr, Y and Nb ternary diagrams plot in the fields of within plate basalt. Selected HFSE ratios indicate a non-plume source with crustal assimilation/sediment mixing. Sm-Nd and Rb-Sr isotope data show that the intrusive has Srinitial and Ndinitial of 0.709377-0.706672 and 0.510919-0.510815, respectively. Positive ɛ t Nd [ t = 1420 Ma] values (+0.3 to + 2.3) indicate depleted isotopic nature of their protolith. The calculated T DM age is 1.7-1.9 Ga. The mineral-whole rock isochron data (Sm-Nd systematics) of the intrusive implies an emplacement age of ca. 1420 Ma. Considering synchronous terrain boundary shear zone development in Bastar craton on the southeastern part of the Singhora basin, mafic magmatism in Eastern Ghats and large-scale basic intrusion in Sausar mobile belt

  7. Fusion of arkosic sand by intrusive andesite

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bailey, Roy A.

    1954-01-01

    An andesite dike in the Valles Mountains of northern New Mexico has intruded and partly fused arkosic sediments for a distance of 50 feet from its contacts. The dike is semi-circular in form, has a maximum width of about 100 feet, and is about 500 feet long. Small associated arcuate dikes are arranged in spiral fashion around the main dike, suggesting that they were intruded along shear fractures similar to those described by Burbank (1941). The fused rocks surrounding the andesite dike are of three general types: 1) partly fused arkosic sand, 2) fused clay, and 3) hybrid rocks. The fused arkosic sand consists of relict detrital grains of quartz, orthoclose, and plagioclase, imbedded in colorless glass containing microlites of tridymite, cordierite, and magnetite. The relict quartz grains are corroded and embayed by glass; the orthoclase is sanidinized and partly fused; and the plagioclase is inverted to the high temperature form and is partly fused. The fused clay, which was originally a mixture of montmorillonite and hydromica, consists primarily of cordierite but also contains needle-like crystals of sillimanite (?) or mullite (?). The hybrid rocks originated in part by intermixing of fused arkosic sediments and andesitic liquid and in part by diffusion of mafic constituents through the fused sediments. They are rich in cordierite and magnetite and also contain hypersthene, augite, and plagioclase. The composition of pigeonite in the andesite indicates that the temperature of the andesite at the time of intrusion probably did not exceed 1200?C. Samples of arkosic sand were fused in the presence of water in a Morey bomb at 1050?C. Stability relations of certain minerals in the fused sand suggest that fusion may have taken place at a lower temperature, however, and the fluxing action of volatiles from the andesite are thought to have made this possible.

  8. A mantle- and a lower crust-derived bimodal suite in the Yusufeli (Artvin) area, NE Turkey: trace element and REE evidence for subduction-related rift origin of Early Jurassic Demirkent intrusive complex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dokuz, Abdurrahman; Tanyolu, Erkan; Genç, Salim

    2006-06-01

    The Yusufeli area, in the Eastern Black Sea Region of Turkey, contains a crystalline complex that intruded into the Carboniferous metamorphic basement and is composed of two intrusive bodies: a gabbro-diorite and a tonalite-trondhjemite. The mafic body (45 57 wt% SiO2) displays a broad lithological spectrum ranging from plagioclase-cumulate to quartz diorite. Primitive varieties of the body have Mg-number, MgO and Cr contents that are close to those expected for partial melts from mantle peridotite. Data are consistent with the magma generation in an underlying mantle wedge that was depleted in Zr, Nb and Ti, and enriched in large ion lithophile elements (K, Rb, Ba, Th). However, high Al2O3, CaO and generally low Ni (<65 ppm) contents are not in agreement with the unfractionated mantle-derived primitive magmas and require some Al2O3- and CaO-poor mafic phases, in particular, olivine and orthopyroxene. Absence of orthopyroxene in crystallization sequence, uralitization, and a common appearance of clinopyroxene surrounded by hornblende imply an anhydrous phase fractionated from highly hydrous (5 6%) parent. Geochemical modelling suggests derivation by 15 20% melting of a depleted-lherzolitic mantle. The tonalite-trondhjemite body (58 76 wt% SiO2) ranges in composition from quartz diorite to granodiorite with a low-K calc-alkaline trend. Although LILE- and LREE- enriched characteristics of the primitive samples imply a metasomatic sub-arc mantle for their source region, low MgO, Ni and Cr concentrations rule out direct derivation from the mantle wedge. Also, lack of negative Eu anomalies suggests an unfractionated magma and precludes a differentiation from the diorites of mafic body, which show negative Eu anomalies. Their Na enrichments relative to Ca and K are similar to those of Archean tonalites, trondhjemites and granodiorites and Cenozoic adakites. However, they exhibit important geochemical differences from them, including low-Al (<15 wt%) contents

  9. Did Upper Cretaceous Intrusions reactivate Pre-Cretaceous structures at the South Atlantic passive continental margin of Brazil?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glasmacher, Ulrich Anton; De Souza Silva, Jaqueline; Hackspacher, Peter Christian; Doranti-Tiritan, Carolina

    2014-05-01

    "Passive" continental margins especially of the South Atlantic Ocean are perfect locations to quantify exhumation, rock uplift, and surface uplift rates, model the long-term landscape evolution and provide information on the influence of mantle processes on a longer time scale. Furthermore, these passive margin allow to study the influence of large intrusions on the reactivation of Pre-Intrusion structures. In Southern Brazil, the Poços de Caldas intrusion (83 Ma) took place in Neoproterozoic para-metamorphic rocks of amphibolite facies, which are deformed and metamorphosed during the Central Brazilian Orogeny (630 Ma - 510 Ma). The compressional deformation caused major N-S trending transform faults, and related perpendicular structures. In the Serra da Mantiqueira and Serra do Mar to the East, these N-S trending transform structures are reactivated at about 120 Ma. Together with the surrounding Precambrian metamorphic rocks the Poços de Caldas Intrusion forms the Poços de Caldas Plateau reaching elevatiosn between 900 m.a.s.l. and 1300 m.a.s.l. The intrusion covers an area of 800 km². The presentation will provide data and discuss the influence of the large intrusion on Pre-Intrusion structures within the surrounding metamorphic basement.

  10. Data Mining for Intrusion Detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Singhal, Anoop; Jajodia, Sushil

    Data Mining Techniques have been successfully applied in many different fields including marketing, manufacturing, fraud detection and network management. Over the past years there is a lot of interest in security technologies such as intrusion detection, cryptography, authentication and firewalls. This chapter discusses the application of Data Mining techniques to computer security. Conclusions are drawn and directions for future research are suggested.

  11. Saucer-shaped Clastic Intrusions and Associated Injectites in the Westerm San Joaquin Valley

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hurst, A.; Vigorito, M.; Vetel, W.; Cartwright, J.

    2007-12-01

    Clastic sills, including saucer-shaped intrusions, are the most volumetrically significant clastic intrusions in the Panoche Giant Injectite Complex (PGIC). Injection occurred in the Lower Paleocene during a period of inversion caused by the convergence of the Pacific and North American plates. Almost 400 km2 of exposure reveals the relationships between clastic intrusions, their parent beds and seafloor sand extrusions (extrudites). Sand was injected into partially-consolidated deepwater mudstones of late Cretaceous and early Paleocene age in a single event but with many pulses that produced cross-cutting intrusions. More than 40 km3 of sand is estimated to have injected within the area of outcrop. The total thickness of strata cut by injections (from deepest known Lower Cretaceous parent bed to extrudite) is in excess of 1.2 km. Saucer-shaped intrusions are composite features that comprise sills, low-angle dikes and dike swarms, arranged as low-angle conical or saucer-shaped injected units that exhibit a semi-elliptical to horse-shoe geometry in plan view and are V- or U-shaped in cross section. Saucer-shaped intrusions are 500 to 1.5km wide and in some cases cut through more than 250 m of stratigraphic section. The lowest parts of the saucer-shaped intrusions consists of multiply-stacked, low-angle dikes up to 80m thick that cut the stratigraphy at angles between 5-10º and locally exhibit stepped or transgressive geometry. The low-angle dykes are 8 to 20 m wide and laterally continuous over distances of a few to several hundreds of metres. Steeper segments (up to 30 deg) emanate laterally from the periphery of the lowest units and cut through the host-rock for a few up to several tens of metres, pinching-out laterally over distances of several tens to a few hundreds of metres. At their margins the saucer-shaped intrusions are bounded by steep (50-70 deg), narrow dikes (generally <1 m wide); such dikes are unlikely to be imaged on seismic data. The central areas

  12. Petrogenesis of the Ni-Cu-PGE sulfide-bearing Tamarack Intrusive Complex, Midcontinent Rift System, Minnesota

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taranovic, Valentina; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi; Rossell, Dean

    2015-01-01

    The Tamarack Intrusive Complex (TIC, 1105.6 ± 1.2 Ma) in NE Minnesota, was emplaced during the early stages of the development of the Midcontinent Rift System (MRS, "Early Stage": 1110-1106 Ma). Country rocks of the TIC are those of the Paleoproterozoic Thomson Formation, part of the Animikie Group including sulfide-bearing metasedimentary black shale. The magmatic system is composed of at least two principal mafic-ultramafic intrusive sequences: the sulfide-barren Bowl Intrusion in the south and the "dike" area intrusions in the north which host Ni-Cu-Platinum Group Elements (PGE) mineralization with up to 2.33% Ni, 1.24% Cu, 0.34 g/t Pt, 0.23 g/t Pd and 0.18 g/t Au. Two distinct intrusive units in the "dike" area are the CGO (coarse-grained olivine-bearing) Intrusion, a sub-vertical dike-like body, and the overlying sub-horizontal FGO (fine-grained olivine-bearing) Intrusion. Both intrusions comprise peridotite, feldspathic peridotite, feldspathic pyroxenite, melatroctolite and melagabbro. Massive sulfides are volumetrically minor and mainly occur as lenses emplaced into the country rocks associated with both intrusions. Semi-massive (net-textured) sulfides are distributed at the core of the CGO Intrusion, surrounded by a halo of the disseminated sulfides. Disseminated sulfides also occur in lenses along the base of the FGO Intrusion. Olivine compositions in the CGO Intrusion are between Fo89 and Fo82 and in the FGO Intrusion from Fo84 to Fo82. TIC intrusions have more primitive olivine compositions than that of olivine in the sheet-like intrusions in the Duluth Complex (below Fo70), as well as olivine from the smaller, conduit-related, Eagle and East Eagle Intrusions in Northern Michigan (Fo86 to Fo75). The FeO/MgO ratios of the CGO and FGO Intrusion parental magmas, inferred from olivine compositions, are similar to those of picritic basalts erupted during the early stages of the MRS formation. Trace element ratios differ slightly from other intrusions in the

  13. Composite synvolcanic intrusions associated with Precambrian VMS-related hydrothermal systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galley, Alan G.

    2003-06-01

    Large subvolcanic intrusions are recognized within most Precambrian VMS camps. Of these, 80% are quartz diorite-tonalite-trondhjemite composite intrusions. The VMS camps spatially associated with composite intrusions account for >90% of the aggregate sulfide tonnage of all the Precambrian, intrusion-related VMS camps. These low-alumina, low-K, and high-Na composite intrusions contain early phases of quartz diorite and tonalite, followed by more voluminous trondhjemite. They have a high proportion of high silica (>74% SiO2) trondhjemite which is compositionally similar to the VMS-hosting rhyolites within the volcanic host-rock successions. The quartz-diorite and possibly tonalite phases follow tholeiitic fractionation trends whereas the trondhjemites fall within the composition field for primitive crustal melts. These transitional M-I-type primitive intrusive suites are associated with extensional regimes within oceanic-arc environments. Subvolcanic composite intrusions related to the Archean Sturgeon Lake and Noranda, and Paleoproterozoic Snow Lake VMS camps range in volume from 300 to 1,000 km3. Three have a sill morphology with strike lengths between 15 and 22 km and an average thickness between 1,500 and 2,000 m. The fourth has a gross stock-like shape. The VMS deposits are principally restricted to the volcanic strata above the strike length of the intrusions, as are areally extensive, thin exhalite units. The composite intrusions contain numerous internal phases which are commonly clustered within certain parts of the composite intrusion. These clusters underlie eruptive centers surrounded by areas of hydrothermal alteration and which contain most of the VMS deposits. Early quartz-diorite and tonalite phases appear to have intruded in rapid succession. Evidence includes gradational contacts, magma mixing and disequilibrium textures. They appear to have been emplaced as sill-dike swarms. These early phases are present as pendants and xenoliths within later

  14. Pre-Elsonian mafic magmatism in the Nain Igneous Complex, Labrador: the bridges layered intrusion

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Ashwal, L.D.; Wiebe, R.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Whitehouse, M.J.; Snyder, Diane

    1992-01-01

    Decades of work on the pristine, unmetamorphosed, and well exposed anorthositic, mafic and granitic rocks of the Nain igneous complex, Labrador, have led to the conclusion that all plutonic rocks in that area were emplaced in a short time intercal at about 1300 ?? 10 Ma). We report here new isotopic data for mafic intrusive rocks that appear to have crystallized several hundred Ma earlier than the bulk of the plutonic activity in the Nain complex. The Bridges layered intrusion (BLI) is a small (15-20 km2) lens of layered mafic rocks about 1.5 km thick, surrounded and intruded by anorthositic, leuconoritic and leucotroctolitic plutons in the middle of the coastal section of the Nain igneous complex. BLI shows very well developed magmatic structures, including channel scours, slump structures, and ubiquitous modally graded layering. Most rocks, however, show granular textures indicative of recrystallization, presumably caused by emplacement of younger anorthositic rocks. BLI contains cumulate rocks with slightly more primitive mineral compositions (An60-83, Fo66-71) than those of other mafic intrusions in the Nain igneous complex, including Kiglapait. SmNd isotopic data for 7 BLI whole-rocks ranging in composition between olivine melagabbro and olivine leucogabbro yield an age of 1667 ?? 75 Ma, which we interpret as the time of primary crystallization. The internal isotopic systematics of the BLI have been reset, probably by intrusion of adjacent anorthositic plutons. A SmNd mineral isochron (plag, whole-rock, mafics) for a BLI olivine melagabbro gives an age of 1283 ?? 22 Ma, equivalent within error of a mineral array (plag, whole-rock, opx, cpx) for an adjacent, igneous-textured, leuconorite vein (1266 ?? 152 Ma). The initial Nd ratio for BLI corresponds to ??{lunate}Nd = -3.18 ?? 0.44. Other whole-rock samples, however, some with vein-like alteration (Chlorite, serpentine, amphiboles), show ??{lunate}Nd values as low as -9.1, suggesting variable contamination by

  15. Aeromagnetic and radio echo ice-sounding measurements over the Dufek intrusion, Antarctica.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Behrendt, John C.; Drewry, D.J.; Jankowski, E.; Grim, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    Comparisons of the magnetic and subglacial topographic profiles illustrate the usefulness of this combination of methods in studying bedrock geology beneath ice-covered areas. Rocks are exposed in only 3% of the inferred area of the intrusion.-from Authors

  16. Evaluation of Intrusion Detection Systems

    PubMed Central

    Ulvila, Jacob W.; Gaffney, John E.

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents a comprehensive method for evaluating intrusion detection systems (IDSs). It integrates and extends ROC (receiver operating characteristic) and cost analysis methods to provide an expected cost metric. Results are given for determining the optimal operation of an IDS based on this expected cost metric. Results are given for the operation of a single IDS and for a combination of two IDSs. The method is illustrated for: 1) determining the best operating point for a single and double IDS based on the costs of mistakes and the hostility of the operating environment as represented in the prior probability of intrusion and 2) evaluating single and double IDSs on the basis of expected cost. A method is also described for representing a compound IDS as an equivalent single IDS. Results are presented from the point of view of a system administrator, but they apply equally to designers of IDSs.

  17. Fast detection of network intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xinjia; Walker, Ernest

    2011-06-01

    In this paper, we propose new network intrusion detection techniques which promptly detect malicious attacks and thus lower the resulting damage. Moreover, our approach rigorously control the probability of falsely implicating benign remote hosts as malicious. Such technique is especially suitable for detecting DoS attackers and port-scan attackers routinely perform random "portscans" of IP addresses to find vulnerable servers to compromise. Our method performs significantly faster and also more accurate than other current solutions.

  18. Pyasino-Vologochan intrusion: Geological structure and platinum-copper-nickel ores (Norilsk Region)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sluzhenikin, S. F.; Krivolutskaya, N. A.

    2015-09-01

    Rocks enriched in olivine, such as olivine and picritic gabbro-dolerite and troctolite are abundant in the Pyasino-Vologochan intrusion. In contrast to Norilsk type ore-bearing massifs, ultramafic rocks of the intrusion are dominated by troctolite. Picritic gabbro-dolerite and troctolite are located between olivine and olivine-bearing gabbro-dolerite. These rocks are related by gradual transitions. The rocks are enriched in olivine, but depleted in magnesium relative to the Norilsk type ore-bearing massifs. The intrusion is also distinguished by low chromium content in the rocks. Most disseminated Pt-Cu-Ni ores are confined to troctolite and picritic gabbro-dolerite, and to a lesser extent, to contact and olivine gabbro-dolerite. The ore is mainly observed as low-sulfur assemblages of sulfides with troilite, Fe-rich hexagonal pyrrhotite, Fe-rich chalcopyrite, talnakhite, Fe-rich pentlandite, and cubanite. The total content of platinum group elements (PGE) in the ore (ppm) is as follows: from 0.45-3.47 to 7.8; gold, from 0.05-0.24 to 0.49; and silver, from 0.53-4.50 to 8.30. Disseminated ores of the Pyasino-Vologochan intrusion contain the following Pt and Pd minerals: sobolevskite, Te-sobolevskite, Te-insizwaite, maslovite, paolovite, zvyagintsevite, atokite, niggliite, mertieite II, guanglinite, and Pd2(As,Sb), Pd2(Sn,As), Pd3Sb, (Pd,Ni)2As minerals. The similarities and differences between the Pyasino-Vologochan intrusion and Norilsk type ore-bearing massifs are discussed in this paper.

  19. Rock Art

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Henn, Cynthia A.

    2004-01-01

    There are many interpretations for the symbols that are seen in rock art, but no decoding key has ever been discovered. This article describes one classroom's experiences with a lesson on rock art--making their rock art and developing their own personal symbols. This lesson allowed for creativity, while giving an opportunity for integration…

  20. Rock Finding

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rommel-Esham, Katie; Constable, Susan D.

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the authors discuss a literature-based activity that helps students discover the importance of making detailed observations. In an inspiring children's classic book, "Everybody Needs a Rock" by Byrd Baylor (1974), the author invites readers to go "rock finding," laying out 10 rules for finding a "perfect" rock. In this way, the…

  1. Collecting Rocks.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barker, Rachel M.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science topics, the booklet provides those interested in rock collecting with a nontechnical introduction to the subject. Following a section examining the nature and formation of igneous, sedimentary, and metamorphic rocks, the booklet gives suggestions for starting a rock collection and using…

  2. Crustal extension from exposed sheet intrusions: review and method proposal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marinoni, Laura B.

    2001-06-01

    Sheet intrusions are probably the most widespread magmatic features on Earth. They create a space for themselves by dilating the host rock. The exposed sheet intrusions allow an estimate of a minimum value of the extension to which the crustal layers and the volcanic edifices are subject. The correct evaluation of the contribution of sheet intrusions to the crustal extension is of great importance in various geologic settings. The current methods used to evaluate the extension due to exposed sheet intrusions are reviewed in this paper. The effect of the dip of sheet intrusions on the evaluation of horizontal crustal extension is analysed. If the dip effect is neglected and the intrusions are (sub)vertical, the error due to the dip effect in the extension evaluation is small; if the intrusions are shallow dipping, the error may be great and varies as a function of the dyke dip. For dykes with dip range 45-65°, the error due to neglecting the dip effect is ˜30 to ˜15%. Increasing discrepancies of more than 25% are produced on the computed dilation when the intrusions progressively dip less than 50°. A simple method, based on structural field measurements of exposed sheet intrusions and on trigonometric considerations, is presented as an improvement of pre-existing methods to estimate the horizontal component of the crustal extension. Using this method, field data of 1154 dykes from different geodynamic contexts are analysed. The horizontal component of extension is computed using dyke data from the Tertiary massifs of Lanzarote and Tenerife, and from the active stratovolcanoes of Monte Somma-Vesuvius and Etna. Since the analysed dykes are steeply dipping, the cumulative difference between the extension computed neglecting and taking into account the dip effect remains less than 10% for all the data sets. The percentage difference is nearly constant and cumulatively higher for Monte Somma, where the mean dip of the intrusions is smaller. In Lanzarote, 237 dykes

  3. Experimental modelling of thin-skinned shortening around magmatic intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Merle, Olivier; Vendeville, Bruno

    1995-03-01

    Magmatic intrusions can trigger thin-skinned compression of the adjacent sedimentary cover by three processes: (a) gravity gliding away from the topographic dome resulting from the ascending magma; (b) fluid push from the rear resulting from forceful intrusion then lateral spreading of the magma; and (c) increased loading by volcanic accumulation. The applicability of the first two mechanisms, gravity gliding and fluid push, was tested using dynamically scaled experiments. Model results help to elucidate the kinematics and structural evolution of thrusts and folds formed by such processes and determine which geological parameters control the deformation style. The results show that the presence of a weak layer within the sedimentary overburden is essential to form thrust and fold belts around the intrusion. Experiments suggest that although gravity gliding can dominate the early stages of deformation, most of the deformation is caused by lateral spreading of the fluid magma pushing the adjacent sedimentary rocks. Models also suggest that true laccoliths can form only if the sedimentary section comprises a basal low-viscosity stratum. Comparison with natural examples allows the evaluation of the applicability of experimental results.

  4. Platinum-group element geochemistry of zoned ultramafic intrusive suites, Klamath Mountains, California and Oregon.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Gray, F.; Page, N.J.; Carlson, C.A.; Wilson, S.A.; Carlson, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    Analyses for platinum-group elements of the varied rock suites of three Alaskan-type ultramafic to mafic multi-intrusive bodies are reported. Ir and Ru are less than analytical sensitivities of 100 and 20 ppb; Rh is less than or near 1 ppb. Average Pd assays vary among the rocks within intrusive complexes and between the three complexes (6.3, 13.7, 36.4 ppb); average Pt assays vary little among the same samples (27.9, 60.9, 34.0 ppb). Statistically adjusted Pt/(Pt + Pd) ratios increase in each suite from gabbro through clinopyroxenite to olivine-rich rocks, possibly owing to Pd fractionation.-G.J.N.

  5. Fracture mode analysis and related surface deformation during dyke intrusion: Results from 2D experimental modelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Abdelmalak, M.; Mourgues, R.; Bureau, D.

    2012-04-01

    The analysis of surface deformation in response to approaching intrusion is important for assessing volcanic hazards. In this paper, we present results from 2D scaled models of magma intrusion, in which we discuss the propagation mode and related surface deformation during dyke growth. Our experiments consist in the injection of analogue magma (Golden syrup) into cohesive fine-grained silica powder, simulating the brittle upper crust. Using an optical image correlation technique (Particle Imaging Velocimetry), we were able to follow the surface deformation, the displacements within the country rock and to calculate strains induced by the magma emplacement. We identified two kinds of intrusion morphologies resulting from different interactions between the dyke and plastic deformations occurring in the country rock near the surface. In both morphologies, the dyke is vertical at depth. Our analysis demonstrates that both hydraulic tensile opening and shear-related propagation operate during this first stage of vertical growth. At the same time, the surface lifted up and formed a smooth symmetrical dome. Both types of morphologies differ in the upper part. During a second stage of evolution, the first type of intrusion inclined at a dip between 45 to 65°. This inclination is not caused by shear deformations and is attributed to stress rotation near the tip. Closer to the surface, the growth of the inclined sheet creates shear bands which conduct the fluid toward the surface. The surface uplift becomes asymmetric. The second type of intrusion does not rotate at depth and continues its vertical propagation by catching vertical tensile cracks. The intrusion of magma in these cracks creates horizontal stresses which are responsible for the closure of fractures and the formation of reverse faults. At the surface the dome remains symmetrical. For both intrusions, the surface uplift accelerates during the second stage and it is strongly influenced by the presence or the

  6. Stratigraphic and geophysical evidence for a Tertiary intrusion near Beaufort, S. C

    SciTech Connect

    McCartan, L.; Gettings, M.E.

    1985-01-01

    A mafic intrusion about 10 km in diameter at 1.5 km depth is indicated by strong positive gravity and magnetic anomalies and a closed structural high is overlying upper Eocene limestone near Beaufort, S.C. Sediments of Oligocene age northeast of Beaufort and of Miocene age to the west and southwest indicate that the Beaufort high divided the Southeast Georgia Embayment into two sub-basins by late Oligocene time. The stratigraphic relations and elevated geothermal gradients suggest an age of 20-30 Ma for the intrusion. Maintenance of the Beaufort high through time despite several marine incursions implies continued uplift, probably due to effects of the intrusion and Tertiary compressional warping. Intrusions with similar geophysical signatures are commonest in the southeast but are also present elsewhere along the Atlantic continental margin. Seismic profiles across the anomalies at the Clubhouse Crossroads deep corehole, 60 km north of Beaufort, show a flat Jurassic reflector, so the intrusive rocks there are Jurassic or older. However, 175 km northeast of Beaufort, a seismic line crossing one of the offshore anomalies shows an intrusion doming up Cenozoic sediments. Substantiation of a Tertiary age for the Beaufort pluton would significantly change the current models of the Tertiary tectonic history of the Southeast Georgia Embayment.

  7. Laboratory Experiment of Saltwater Intrusion into Freshwater Aquifer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maekawa, K.; Karasaki, K.; Takasu, T.

    2006-12-01

    It is important for safety assessment of high-level radioactive waste geologic disposal to understand groundwater flow in deep underground accurately. Especially groundwater flow in the coastal area considered to be quite complex that involves density and hydraulic gradient driven flow of freshwater and saltwater. Furthermore, bentonite, which is one of the favored artificial barrier materials, may not swell very well in saltwater as it does in freshwater, and therefore may not provide a reliable seal if salinity is high enough. In order to understand the behavior of saltwater intrusion into freshwater in deep underground, we constructed a laboratory equipment "Mini-MACRO" named after the original large scale MACRO (MAss transport Characterization in host ROck) and aimed to increase a precision and efficiency of experiment. Mini-MACRO equipment consists of three parts: a sandbox (0.5m x 0.25m x 0.1m) and each reservoir tank for saltwater and freshwater. Saltwater intrusion experiments are conducted using glass beads (sub-millimeter in diameter) and colored saltwater in the sandbox with a transparent face plate to allow visual observation. In the present paper we summarize the concept of the equipment design and the results of the experiment that we created several cases of experimental conditions to observe the saltwater intrusion behavior against various hydraulic gradients and densities of saltwater. This equipment contributes to the better understanding of saltwater intrusion behavior and to increasing confidence in modeling methodology of groundwater flow and mass transport in deep underground through comparison with numerical analysis. We believe that it is crucial for the safety assessment of geologic disposal to integrate this knowledge.

  8. The Genesis of the Abukuma Adakites, Northeast Japan Resulting From the Interaction Between Hot Asthenospheric Mantle and Subducting Slab: A Numerical Model Study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, C.; Lim, C.

    2013-12-01

    The geochemistry of the transient Miocene adakites (~16 Ma) in the Abukuma Mountains, Northeast Japan shows that the adakites were generated by the partial melting of the subducted oceanic crust. However, the very old age of the converging oceanic plate which cannot yield high slab temperatures enough for the partial melting poses a problem for the genesis of the adakites. Other possible geneses such as the partial melting of the lower crust, flat subduction and/or transient cold plume are not relevant to the genesis of the adakites. Instead, it is thought that the injection of the upwelling hot asthenospheric mantle to the mantle wedge caused by the East Sea (Japan Sea) opening heats the cold subducting slab hotter enough for the partial melting of the oceanic crust. Although the hypothesis is promising, quantitative evaluation of the interaction between the cold Pacific slab and hot asthenospheric mantle has not been carried out. Thus, we conducted a series of 2-dimensional kinematic-dynamic subduction model experiments to evaluate the thermal structures of the subducting slab, essential for the partial melting of the oceanic crust. Since time-dependence is crucial for the transient adakites, the time-evolving convergence rate and slab age of the incoming Pacific plate for the last 65 Ma constrained from a recent plate reconstruction model are implemented in the numerical models with the transient hot asthenospheric mantle. The convergence rate and slab age are implemented along the oceanward wall boundary and updated each time step. The mantle potential temperature of 1350 °C and the mantle adiabat of 0.35 °C/km are used. The transient injection of the hot asthenospheric mantle to the mantle wedge is implemented as a function of depth- and time-dependent normal temperature distribution along the arcward wall boundary and updated each time step. The peak temperature of the hot asthenospheric mantle is assumed as 1550 °C at 100 km depth and the standard

  9. Effect of permeability on cooling of a magmatic intrusion in a geothermal reservoir

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, K.H.

    1980-01-11

    Numerical modeling of the transient cooling of a magmatic intrusion is described in a geothermal reservoir that results from conduction and convection, considering the effects of overlying cap rock and differing horizontal and vertical permeabilities of the reservoir. These results are compared with data from Salton Sea Geothermal Field (SSGF). Multiple layers of convection cells are observed when horizontal permeability is much larger than vertical permeability. The sharp drop-off of surface heat flow experimentally observed at SSGF is consistent with the numerical results. The age of the intrusive body at SSGF is estimated to be between 6000 and 20,000 years.

  10. An international perspective on Facebook intrusion.

    PubMed

    Błachnio, Agata; Przepiorka, Aneta; Benvenuti, Martina; Cannata, Davide; Ciobanu, Adela Magdalena; Senol-Durak, Emre; Durak, Mithat; Giannakos, Michail N; Mazzoni, Elvis; Pappas, Ilias O; Popa, Camelia; Seidman, Gwendolyn; Yu, Shu; Wu, Anise M S; Ben-Ezra, Menachem

    2016-08-30

    Facebook has become one of the most popular social networking websites in the world. The main aim of the study was to present an international comparison of Facebook intrusion and Internet penetration while examining possible gender differences. The study consisted of 2589 participants from eight countries: China, Greece, Israel, Italy, Poland, Romania, Turkey, USA. Facebook intrusion and Internet penetration were taken into consideration. In this study the relationship between Facebook intrusion and Internet penetration was demonstrated. Facebook intrusion was slightly negatively related to Internet penetration in each country. PMID:27347649

  11. 'Earhart' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image taken by NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity shows a rock informally named 'Earhart' on the lower slopes of 'Endurance Crater.' The rock was named after the pilot Amelia Earhart. Like 'Escher' and other rocks dotting the bottom of Endurance, scientists believe fractures in Earhart could have been formed by one of several processes. They may have been caused by the impact that created Endurance Crater, or they might have arisen when water leftover from the rock's formation dried up. A third possibility is that much later, after the rock was formed, and after the crater was created, the rock became wet once again, then dried up and developed cracks. Rover team members do not have plans to investigate Earhart in detail because it is located across potentially hazardous sandy terrain. This image was taken on sol 219 (Sept. 4) by the rover's panoramic camera, using its 750-, 530- and 430-nanometer filters.

  12. Science Rocks!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prestwich, Dorothy; Sumrall, Joseph; Chessin, Debby A.

    2010-01-01

    It all began one Monday morning. Raymond could not wait to come to large group. In his hand, he held a chunk of white granite he had found. "Look at my beautiful rock!" he cried. The rock was passed around and examined by each student. "I wonder how rocks are made?" wondered one student. "Where do they come from?" asked another. At this moment, a…

  13. Linking magnetic fabric and cumulate texture in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O Driscoll, B.; Stevenson, C.; Magee, C.

    2013-12-01

    Research on the magnetic fabrics of igneous rocks, pioneered by Balsley and Buddington[1] and Khan[2], has greatly contributed to our understanding of magma dynamics in lava flows, sheet intrusions and plutons over the past five decades. However, considerably few magnetic fabric studies have focused on layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions, particularly ';lopolithic' intrusions, despite the fact that such rocks may preserve a large range of small-scale kinematic structures potentially related to important magma chamber processes. This may be partly due to the fact that mafic-ultramafic cumulates commonly exhibit visible planar fabrics (mineral lamination), as well as compositional layering, in contrast to the frequent absence of such features in granite bodies or fine-grained mafic lava flows. Indeed, debates in the 1970s and 1980s on the development of layering and mineral fabrics in mafic-ultramafic intrusions, focused around the crystal settling versus in situ crystallisation paradigms, are classic in the subject of igneous petrology. Central to these debates is the notion that a wide range of magma chamber processes occur in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions that are not frequently considered to occur in their relatively viscous granitic counterparts; in essence, the latter have historically been viewed as much more likely to ';freeze-in' a primary magma flow fabric whilst mafic-ultramafic intrusions are subjected to a more protracted solidification history. This wide array of potential initial sources for layering and mineral fabrics in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions, together with the possible modification of textures at the postcumulus stage, demands a cautious application of any fabric analysis and presents a problem well-suited to interrogation by the AMS technique. The purpose of this contribution is to provide specific context on the application of AMS to elucidating the formation of cumulates in layered mafic-ultramafic intrusions. Examples of AMS

  14. Non-intrusive speed sensor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wyett, L.

    1986-01-01

    In Phase I of the Non-Intrusive Speed Sensor program, a computerized literature search was performed to identify candidate technologies for remote, non-intrusive speed sensing applications in Space Shuttle Main Engine (SSME) turbopumps. The three most promising technologies were subjected to experimental evaluation to quantify their performance characteristics under the harsh environmental requirements within the turbopumps. Although the infrared and microwave approaches demonstrated excellent cavitation immunity in laboratory tests, the variable-source magnetic speed sensor emerged as the most viable approach. Preliminary design of this speed sensor encountered no technical obstacles and resulted in viable and feasible speed nut, sensor housing, and sensor coil designs. Phase II of this program developed the variable-source magnetic speed sensor through the detailed design task and guided the design into breadboard fabrication. The speed sensor and its integral speed nut were evaluated at both unit and system level testing. The final room-temperature and cryogenic spin testing of the hardware demonstrated that the sensor was capable of generating sufficient output signal to enable remote speed sensing from 1500 to 40000 rpm over a speed nut/sensor separation of 3.5 inches.

  15. Intrusive Images in Psychological Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Brewin, Chris R.; Gregory, James D.; Lipton, Michelle; Burgess, Neil

    2010-01-01

    Involuntary images and visual memories are prominent in many types of psychopathology. Patients with posttraumatic stress disorder, other anxiety disorders, depression, eating disorders, and psychosis frequently report repeated visual intrusions corresponding to a small number of real or imaginary events, usually extremely vivid, detailed, and with highly distressing content. Both memory and imagery appear to rely on common networks involving medial prefrontal regions, posterior regions in the medial and lateral parietal cortices, the lateral temporal cortex, and the medial temporal lobe. Evidence from cognitive psychology and neuroscience implies distinct neural bases to abstract, flexible, contextualized representations (C-reps) and to inflexible, sensory-bound representations (S-reps). We revise our previous dual representation theory of posttraumatic stress disorder to place it within a neural systems model of healthy memory and imagery. The revised model is used to explain how the different types of distressing visual intrusions associated with clinical disorders arise, in terms of the need for correct interaction between the neural systems supporting S-reps and C-reps via visuospatial working memory. Finally, we discuss the treatment implications of the new model and relate it to existing forms of psychological therapy. PMID:20063969

  16. Rock flows

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matveyev, S. N.

    1986-01-01

    Rock flows are defined as forms of spontaneous mass movements, commonly found in mountainous countries, which have been studied very little. The article considers formations known as rock rivers, rock flows, boulder flows, boulder stria, gravel flows, rock seas, and rubble seas. It describes their genesis as seen from their morphological characteristics and presents a classification of these forms. This classification is based on the difference in the genesis of the rubbly matter and characterizes these forms of mass movement according to their source, drainage, and deposit areas.

  17. Intrusive images and intrusive thoughts as different phenomena: two experimental studies.

    PubMed

    Hagenaars, Muriel A; Brewin, Chris R; van Minnen, Agnes; Holmes, Emily A; Hoogduin, Kees A L

    2010-01-01

    According to the dual representation theory of PTSD, intrusive trauma images and intrusive verbal thoughts are produced by separate memory systems. In a previous article it was shown that after watching an aversive film, participants in non-movement conditions reported more intrusive images than participants in a free-to-move control condition (Hagenaars, Van Minnen, Holmes, Brewin, & Hoogduin, 2008). The present study investigates whether the experimental conditions of the Hagenaars et al. study had a different effect on intrusive thoughts than on intrusive images. Experiment 2 further investigated the image-thoughts distinction by manipulating stimulus valence (trauma film versus neutral film) and assessing the subsequent development of intrusive images and thoughts. In addition, both experiments studied the impact of peri-traumatic emotions on subsequent intrusive images and thoughts frequency across conditions. Results showed that experimental manipulations (non-movement and trauma film) caused higher levels of intrusive images relative to control conditions (free movement and neutral film) but they did not affect intrusive thoughts. Peri-traumatic anxiety and horror were associated with subsequent higher levels of intrusive images, but not intrusive thoughts. Correlations were inconclusive for anger and sadness. The results suggest intrusive images and thoughts can be manipulated independently and as such can be considered different phenomena. PMID:20391178

  18. Origin of postcollisional intrusions in NW Anatolia, Turkey: Implications for magma chamber processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aysal, Namık

    2013-04-01

    Post-collisional magmatic activities of NW Anatolia are represented by a series of granitic intrusions and volcanic successions in the Biga Peninsula, NW Turkey. These plutonic rocks have distinct textures, chemical compositions and Sr-Nd isotope characteristics. They consist of coarse grained, equigranular and/or hypidiomorphic textured granite, gronodiorite, monzogranite, quartz-monzonite, pyroxene-monzonite and leucocratic alkali feldspar granites. These intrusions are composed of quartz, K-feldspar, plagioclase, hornblende, pyroxene and biotite. However, leucocratic facies rocks contain tourmaline with minor amount of mafic minerals. Accessory phases are represented by zircon, apatite, monozite, magnetite, sphene and rarely allanite. ASI values of the plutonic rocks vary between 0.7 and 1.24. These intrusive rocks are therefore classified as metaluminous-peraluminous with I-type affinity. K2O contents show that the intrusive rock samples show calc-alkaline, high K-calc-alkaline and shoshonitic character. Initial 87Sr/86Sr(t) (0.69980-0.70835), 143Nd/144Nd(t) (0.51238-0.51247) isotope ratios and negative ɛNd(t) (-4.4 - -2.6) values imply that these intrusive rocks could have been derived from enriched mantle sources. N-MORB normalized spidergrams of NW Anatolian plutonic rocks display enrichments in large ion lithophile elements (LILE), light rare earth elements (LREE) and depletion in high field strength elements (HFSE) indicating hydrous melting of a mantle wedge in a subduction zone and/or enrichment of the mantle source with an inherited subduction component from an ancient arc magmatism. Chondrite-normalized Rare Earth Element spidergrams are indicative of the importance of plagioclase and amphibole fractionation. On tectonic discrimination diagrams, all granite samples fall into the volcanic arc granite, syn and post-collisional granite fields. The geochemical data also indicate that a number of magma chamber processes involving magma mixing, fractional

  19. Potassium-argon and lead-alpha ages of plutonic rocks, Bokan Mountain area, Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Lanphere, M.A.; MacKevett, E.M., Jr.; Stern, T.W.

    1964-01-01

    Most of the granitic rocks in the Bokan Mountain area, southeastern Alaska, are early Paleozoic (probably Ordovician) judged by potassium-argon and lead-alpha age measurements. The Bokan Mountain Granite, the youngest intrusive unit in the area, belongs to a Mesozoic plutonic episode. These age measurements are the first direct evidence for the emplacement of early Paleozoic granitic intrusive rocks close to the Pacific margin of North America.

  20. Potassium-Argon and Lead-Alpha Ages of Plutonic Rocks, Bokan Mountain Area, Alaska.

    PubMed

    Lanphere, M A; Mackevett, E M; Stern, T W

    1964-08-14

    Most of the granitic rocks in the Bokan Mountain area, southeastern Alaska, are early Paleozoic (probably Ordovician) judged by potassium-argon and lead-alpha age measurements. The Bokan Mountain Granite, the youngest intrusive unit in the area, belongs to a Mesozoic plutonic episode. These age measurements are the first direct evidence for the emplacement of early Paleozoic granitic intrusive rocks close to the Pacific margin of North America. PMID:17754670

  1. Multiple sources for the origin of Late Jurassic Linglong adakitic granite in the Shandong Peninsula, eastern China: Zircon U-Pb geochronological, geochemical and Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic evidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Liang; Jiang, Shao-Yong; Dai, Bao-Zhang; Jiang, Yao-Hui; Hou, Ming-Lan; Pu, Wei; Xu, Bin

    2013-03-01

    The Linglong granite is one of the most important Mesozoic plutons in the Shandong Peninsula, eastern China, and its petrogenesis has long been controversial, particularly with regard to the nature of source region and geodynamic setting. Our new precise zircon U-Pb dating results reveal that the Linglong granite was emplaced in the Late Jurassic (157-160 Ma). In addition, abundant inherited zircons are identified in the granite with four groups of age peaked at ~ 208, ~ 750, ~ 1800 and ~ 2450 Ma. Geochemical studies indicate that the Linglong granite is weakly peraluminous I-type granite, and is characterized by high SiO2, Sr and La, but low MgO, Y and Yb contents, strongly fractionated REE pattern and high Sr/Y and La/Yb ratios. It also exhibits high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7097 to 0.7125), low ɛNd(t) (- 17.7 to - 20.3) and variable zircon ɛHf(t) (- 22.2 to - 8.7) values. Calculation of the zircon saturation temperature (TZr) reveals that the magma temperatures are 760 ± 20 °C, and the lowest TZr value of 740 °C may be close to initial magma temperature of this inheritance-rich rock. Interpretation of the elemental and isotopic data suggests that the Linglong granite has some affinities with the adakite, and was most likely derived from partial melting of thickened lower crust without any significant contribution of mantle components. The presence of a large number of inherited zircons and variable Sr-Nd-Hf isotopic compositions reveal that the Linglong granite probably has multiple sources consisting of the lower crust of both South China Block and North China Block, as well as the collision-related alkaline rocks and UHP metamorphic rocks. The continental arc-rifting related to the Izanagi plate subduction was the most likely geodynamic force for formation of the Jurassic Linglong adakatic granite in the Shandong Peninsula.

  2. The Eagle and East Eagle sulfide ore-bearing mafic-ultramafic intrusions in the Midcontinent Rift System, upper Michigan: Geochronology and petrologic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ding, Xin; Li, Chusi; Ripley, Edward M.; Rossell, Dean; Kamo, Sandra

    2010-03-01

    The Eagle and East Eagle intrusions are small, subvertical dike-like mafic-ultramafic bodies that cut Proterozoic sedimentary strata in the Baraga Basin in northern Michigan. The Eagle intrusion hosts a newly discovered magmatic Ni-Cu-PGE deposit. The nearby East Eagle intrusion also contains sulfide mineralization, but the extent of this mineralization has yet to be determined by further drilling. Both intrusions contain olivine-bearing rocks such as feldspathic peridotite, melatroctolite, and olivine melagabbro. Sulfide accumulations range from disseminated at both Eagle and East Eagle to semimassive and massive at Eagle. U-Pb baddeleyite dating gives a crystallization age of 1107.2 ± 5.7 Ma for the Eagle intrusion, coeval with eruption of picritic basalts at the base of the volcanic succession in the Midcontinent Rift System (MRS). The Fo contents of olivine cores in the Eagle and East Eagle intrusions vary between 75 and 85 mol %, higher than those of olivine in larger layered intrusions in the MRS such as the Duluth Complex. The FeO/MgO ratios and Al2O3 contents of the parental magmas for the Eagle and East Eagle intrusions inferred from olivine and spinel compositions are similar to those of picritic basalts in the base of the MRS volcanic succession. These petrochemical data suggest that the Eagle and East Eagle intrusions are the intrusive equivalents of high-MgO basalts that erupted in the early stages of continental magmatism associated with the development of the rift. Variations in mineral compositions and incompatible trace element ratios suggest that at least three major pulses of magmas were involved in the formation of low-sulfide rocks in the Eagle intrusion. Lower Fo contents of olivine associated with semimassive sulfides as compared to that of olivine in low-sulfide rocks suggest that the magma associated with the semimassive sulfide was more fractionated than the parental magmas of the low-sulfide rocks in the Eagle intrusion. Accumulation of

  3. Emotional and Behavioral Reaction to Intrusive Thoughts

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Lisa-Marie; May, Jon; Andrade, Jackie; Kavanagh, David

    2010-01-01

    A self-report measure of the emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusive thoughts was developed. The article presents data that confirm the stability, reliability, and validity of the new seven-item measure. Emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusions emerged as separate factors on the Emotional and Behavioral Reactions to Intrusions…

  4. Legal Vs. Psychological Aspects of Intrusiveness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Binder, Virginia L.

    Court decisions stressing the rights of mental patients have necessitated a radical revision in the management of behavioral treatment programs. The client's rights to the least intrusive procedures to achieve treatment goals have become important in case law. Factors which identify intrusiveness include: (1) the extent to which the "new mental…

  5. Vapour Intrusion into Buildings - A Literature Review

    EPA Science Inventory

    This chapter provides a review of recent research on vapour intrusion of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into buildings. The chapter builds on a report from Tillman and Weaver (2005) which reviewed the literature on vapour intrusion through 2005. Firstly, the term ‘vapour intru...

  6. 'Tetl' Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image, taken by the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Spirit during the rover's trek through the 'Columbia Hills' at 'Gusev Crater,' shows the horizontally layered rock dubbed 'Tetl.' Scientists hope to investigate this rock in more detail, aiming to determine whether the rock's layering is volcanic or sedimentary in origin. If for some reason this particular rock is not favorably positioned for grinding and examination by the toolbox of instruments on the rover's robotic arm, Spirit will be within short reach of another similar rock, dubbed 'Coba.' Spirit took this image on its 264th martian day, or sol (Sept. 29, 2004). This is a false-color composite image generated from the panoramic camera's 750-, 530-, and 430-nanometer filters.

  7. Magnetic Fabrics in the Bjerkreim Sokndal Layered Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biedermann, Andrea R.; Jackson, Mike; McEnroe, Suzanne A.; Michels, Alexander

    2016-04-01

    The Bjerkreim Sokndal (BKSK) layered intrusion in Southern Norway covers 230 km2 and was emplaced 930 Ma ago by several pulses of jotunitic magma. It forms a syncline with strong foliation on the limbs. The rocks consist of plagioclase-pyroxene cumulates, and contain two magnetic minerals, magnetite and hemo-ilmenite. Earlier studies suggest that the remanent magnetization in the rocks is carried by lamellar hemo-ilmenite. Hemo-ilmenite displays a strong anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and therefore we are interested in the magnetic fabrics of the rocks from the BKSK intrusion. Magnetic fabrics have been characterized for 60 sites, with a main focus on the so-called MCU IVe' unit, which generates a strong negative aeromagnetic anomaly. In order to define the carriers of the magnetic fabrics, anisotropy of anhysteretic remanent magnetization (AARM), anisotropy of isothermal remanent magnetization (AIRM) and anisotropy of thermal remanent magnetization (ATRM) were measured in addition to low-field anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility (LF-AMS). AIRM and ATRM were partially demagnetized in an attempt to isolate the magnetic fabrics due to high-coercivity hemo-ilmenite. Initial results show a strong AARM which is coaxial to the LF-AMS. Partially demagnetized AIRM and ATRM are not significant. This indicates a strong contribution of a low-coercivity phase such as magnetite. The high-coercivity hemo-ilmenite anisotropy could not be isolated in samples that contain both magnetite and hemo-ilmenite. Samples that are free of magnetite show a strong LF-AMS, but anisotropy of remanent magnetization is in general not significant. This suggests that higher fields would be needed to isolate the hemo-ilmenite fabric. Mineral fabric data will be used to determine whether the magnetite anisotropy is influenced by the orientation of hemo-ilmenite lamellae.

  8. Intrusion detection using secure signatures

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Trent Darnel; Haile, Jedediah

    2014-09-30

    A method and device for intrusion detection using secure signatures comprising capturing network data. A search hash value, value employing at least one one-way function, is generated from the captured network data using a first hash function. The presence of a search hash value match in a secure signature table comprising search hash values and an encrypted rule is determined. After determining a search hash value match, a decryption key is generated from the captured network data using a second hash function, a hash function different form the first hash function. One or more of the encrypted rules of the secure signatures table having a hash value equal to the generated search hash value are then decrypted using the generated decryption key. The one or more decrypted secure signature rules are then processed for a match and one or more user notifications are deployed if a match is identified.

  9. Emotional and behavioral reaction to intrusive thoughts.

    PubMed

    Berry, Lisa-Marie; May, Jon; Andrade, Jackie; Kavanagh, David

    2010-03-01

    A self-report measure of the emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusive thoughts was developed. The article presents data that confirm the stability, reliability, and validity of the new seven-item measure. Emotional and behavioral reactions to intrusions emerged as separate factors on the Emotional and Behavioral Reactions to Intrusions Questionnaire (EBRIQ), a finding confirmed by an independent stress study. Test-retest reliability over 30 to 70 days was good. Expected relationships with other constructs were significant. Stronger negative responses to intrusions were associated with lower mindfulness scores and higher ratings of experiential avoidance, thought suppression, and intensity and frequency of craving. The EBRIQ will help explore differences in reactions to intrusive thoughts in clinical and nonclinical populations, and across different emotional and behavioral states. It will also be useful in assessing the effects of therapeutic approaches such as mindfulness. PMID:19797324

  10. Prediction of sea water intrusion for mining activity in close precincts of sea shore.

    PubMed

    Singh, Awanindra Pratap; Gupta, Prem Kumar; Khandelwal, Manoj

    2013-01-01

    The mining lease area of Surka [District Bhavnagar, Gujarat (India)] is located within 6-12 km horizontal distance of sea shore of Gulf of Cambay. Whenever, there will be onset of lignite extraction, there will be always a threat of sea water intrusion into the mining lease area due to its close proximity to seashore. This article describes the prediction of sea water intrusion into the lease area of whole mining block using Ghyben-Herzberg relation between fresh and saline water, Remote Sensing, Ground Truth verification, Electrical Resistivity Survey and groundwater table monitored during the year 2004. As per the Ghyben-Herzberg relation, results show that there will not be sea water intrusion. If there is excess pumping of water then also the basement rock below the lignite seam will put hindrance to any possible upconing of saline water interface. PMID:24083098

  11. Intrusion-aware alert validation algorithm for cooperative distributed intrusion detection schemes of wireless sensor networks.

    PubMed

    Shaikh, Riaz Ahmed; Jameel, Hassan; d'Auriol, Brian J; Lee, Heejo; Lee, Sungyoung; Song, Young-Jae

    2009-01-01

    Existing anomaly and intrusion detection schemes of wireless sensor networks have mainly focused on the detection of intrusions. Once the intrusion is detected, an alerts or claims will be generated. However, any unidentified malicious nodes in the network could send faulty anomaly and intrusion claims about the legitimate nodes to the other nodes. Verifying the validity of such claims is a critical and challenging issue that is not considered in the existing cooperative-based distributed anomaly and intrusion detection schemes of wireless sensor networks. In this paper, we propose a validation algorithm that addresses this problem. This algorithm utilizes the concept of intrusion-aware reliability that helps to provide adequate reliability at a modest communication cost. In this paper, we also provide a security resiliency analysis of the proposed intrusion-aware alert validation algorithm. PMID:22454568

  12. The Torres del Paine intrusion as a model for a shallow magma chamber

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baumgartner, Lukas; Bodner, Robert; Leuthold, Julien; Muntener, Othmar; Putlitz, Benita; Vennemann, Torsten

    2014-05-01

    The shallow magmatic Torres del Paine Intrusive Complex (TPIC) belongs to a series of sub-volcanic and plutonic igneous bodies in Southern Chile and Argentina. This trench-parallel belt is located in a transitional position between the Patagonia Batholith in the West, and the alkaline Cenozoic plateau lavas in the East. While volumetrically small amounts of magmatism started around 28 my ago in the Torres del Paine area, and a second period occurred between 17-16 Ma, it peaked with the TPIC 12.59-12.43 Ma ago. The spectacular cliffs of the Torres del Paine National park provide a unique opportunity to study the evolution of a very shallow magma chamber and the interaction with its host rocks. Intrusion depth can be estimated based on contact metamorphic assemblages and granite solidus thermobarometry to 750±250 bars, corresponding to an intrusion depth of ca. 3km, ca. 500m above the base of the intrusion. Hornblende thermobarometry in mafic rocks agrees well with these estimates (Leuthold et al., 2014). The TPIC is composed of a granitic laccolith emplaced over 90ka (Michel et al., 2008) in 3 major, several 100m thick sheets, forming an overall thickness of nearly 2 km. Contacts are sharp between sheets, with the oldest sheet on the top and the youngest on the bottom (Michel et al., 2008). The granitic laccolith is under-plated by a ca. 400m thick mafic laccolith, built up over ca. 50ka (Leuthold et al. 2012), constructed from the bottom up. Granitic and mafic sheets are themselves composed of multiple metric to decametric pulses, mostly with ductile contacts between them, resulting in outcrop patterns resembling braided stream sediments. The contact of the TPIC with the Cretaceous flysch sediments document intrusion mechanism. Pre-existing sub-horizontal fold axes are rotated in the roof of the TPIC, clearly demonstrating ballooning of the roof; no ballooning was observed in the footwall of the intrusion. Extension during ballooning of the roof is indicated by

  13. Art Rocks with Rock Art!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bickett, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    This article discusses rock art which was the very first "art." Rock art, such as the images created on the stone surfaces of the caves of Lascaux and Altimira, is the true origin of the canvas, paintbrush, and painting media. For there, within caverns deep in the earth, the first artists mixed animal fat, urine, and saliva with powdered minerals…

  14. Testing models of dike intrusion during rifting episodes: The role of heating in triggering earthquakes in Afar

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kulpinski, K.; Cote, D. M.; Ebinger, C. J.; Keir, D.; Ayele, A.

    2009-12-01

    In September 2005, a major rifting episode occurred in the western Afar depression. Following the initial intrusion of an approximately 60 km-long, up to 8m-wide dike, seismic stations were deployed to the surrounding region. Since the 2005 deployment, discrete magma intrusions have been observed propagating along the rift axis as migrating swarms of moderate magnitude earthquakes that occur over times of vertical and horizontal deformation imaged in satellite radar interferometry. Between these discrete diking events, however, persistent, moderate magnitude (mb > 2 -4) earthquakes occur singly and in swarms along the length of the 2005 dike intrusion zone. More intense zones of seismicity correspond to areas of greater strain in the 2005 and subsequent dikes. Is the persistent along-axis seismicity indicative of ongoing, small volume dike intrusions at depth, tectonic faulting in response to the original dike intrusion, or is it caused by thermal stresses of dike solidification and cooling? Differentiating between mechanisms provides insights into rock failure and magma intrusion processes. A simple one-dimensional dike model is presented as an instantaneous, purely thermal (i.e. neglecting volumetric changes due to fluid emplacement) intrusion that cools by conduction to the surrounding host rock. The associated thermal stresses with a large volume intrusion (~0.05km3 or greater) are on the order of tens of MPa for several months. We compare seismogenic layer thickness variations with yield stress envelopes at the dike wall at a range of times after dike emplacement. The yield stress for the depth of the earthquakes is of the same order or less, meaning the thermal stresses are large enough to contribute to causing the mb 2-4 earthquakes observed in the region. This is evidence that earthquakes not only correspond to the rock breaking in front of the dike, but also mark the dike's path by the generation of thermally induced earthquakes in the wallrock. A second

  15. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    27 January 2006 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows some of the light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in northern Terby Crater. Terby is located along the north edge of Hellas Planitia. The sedimentary rocks might have been deposited in a greater, Hellas-filling sea -- or not. Today, the rocks are partly covered by dark-toned sediment and debris.

    Location near: 27.2oS, 285.3oW Image width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Summer

  16. Self-report may underestimate trauma intrusions.

    PubMed

    Takarangi, Melanie K T; Strange, Deryn; Lindsay, D Stephen

    2014-07-01

    Research examining maladaptive responses to trauma routinely relies on spontaneous self-report to index intrusive thoughts, which assumes people accurately recognize and report their intrusive thoughts. However, "mind-wandering" research reveals people are not always meta-aware of their thought content: they often fail to notice shifts in their attention. In two experiments, we exposed subjects to trauma films, then instructed them to report intrusive thoughts during an unrelated reading task. Intermittently, we asked whether they were thinking about the trauma. As expected, subjects often spontaneously reported intrusive thoughts. However, they were also "caught" engaging in unreported trauma-oriented thoughts. The presence and frequency of intermittent probes did not influence self-caught intrusions. Both self-caught and probe-caught intrusions were related to an existing tendency toward intrusive cognition, film-related distress, and thought suppression attempts. Our data suggest people may lack meta-awareness of trauma-related thoughts, which has implications for theory, research and treatment relating to trauma-related psychopathology. PMID:24993526

  17. The role of estrogen in intrusive memories.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jessica; Chervonsky, Liza; Felmingham, Kim L; Bryant, Richard A

    2013-11-01

    Intrusive memories are highly vivid, emotional and involuntary recollections which cause significant distress across psychological disorders including posttraumatic disorder (PTSD). Recent evidence has potentially extended our understanding of the development of intrusive memories by identifying biological factors which significantly impact on memories for emotionally arousing stimuli. This study investigated the role of stress on the development of intrusions for negative and neutral images, and indexed the potential contributions of sex (estrogen and progesterone) and stress (noradrenaline and cortisol) hormones. Whilst viewing the images, half the participants underwent a cold pressor stress (CPS) procedure to induce stress while the control participants immersed their hands in warm water. Saliva samples were collected to index estrogen, progesterone and noradrenergic and cortisol response. Participants (55 university students, 26 men, 29 women) viewed a series of negatively arousing and neutral images. Participants completed recall and intrusions measures 2 days later. Negative images resulted in greater recall and more intrusions than neutral images. In the cold water condition females recalled fewer neutral memories than males. Cortisol increase predicted decreased recall of negative memories in males, and estrogen predicted increased intrusions of negative images in women. These findings are consistent with evidence that circulating levels of ovarian hormones influence memory for emotionally arousing events, and provides the first evidence of the influence of sex hormones on intrusive memories. These results provide one possible explanation for the higher incidence of anxiety disorders in women. PMID:23891994

  18. Rock Garden

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This false color composite image of the Rock Garden shows the rocks 'Shark' and 'Half Dome' at upper left and middle, respectively. Between these two large rocks is a smaller rock (about 0.20 m wide, 0.10 m high, and 6.33 m from the Lander) that was observed close-up with the Sojourner rover (see PIA00989).

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech). The Imager for Mars Pathfinder (IMP) was developed by the University of Arizona Lunar and Planetary Laboratory under contract to JPL. Peter Smith is the Principal Investigator.

  19. Dynamics of tectonic nappes: Thrusting versus intrusion or dynamic pressure versus lithostatic pressure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markus Schmalholz, Stefan; Podladchikov, Yuri; Medvedev, Sergei

    2014-05-01

    Despite extensive research, the dynamics of tectonic nappes exhibiting high and ultra-high pressure ((U)HP) rocks is still debated. We classify existing models for nappe formation into two types, and refer to them as thrust and intrusion model. Thrust models approximate the orogen as wedge with a rigid buttress behind and a subducting lithospheric slab beneath. The dominant process of nappe formation is thrusting (brittle and/or ductile) that generates a dominant top-to-the-foreland shear sense. Rocks remain within crustal depth (<~60 km). Uplift and exhumation of (U)HP rocks is explained by underplating accompanied by isostatic uplift, extension in higher levels of the wedge and erosion. Thrust models can explain the imbricate nappe stacking and first-order structural observations in the Western Alps. However, in the last decades (U)HP rocks were found in nappes, and it is usually assumed that metamorphic pressure is a good indicator of maximum burial. This assumption represents a fundamental problem for the thrust model, namely to account for the large burial depth of (U)HP rocks indicating depths >100 km. Nappe formation at such mantle depths cannot be explained by the thrust model. In intrusion models (U)HP rocks are subducted to mantle depths and return to crustal depths by buoyancy driven or tectonically forced flow. Nappes are formed during the return flow with an opposite shear sense at the bottom and top of the nappe. Intrusion models could reproduce the first-order patterns of P-T-time paths of the Western Alps. However, there are problems with intrusion models. First, the intrusion scenario requires a major extensional shear zone in the hanging wall of the exhuming (U)HP unit. However, for most (U)HP units of the Western Alps the earliest coherent structures recorded along the upper boundary are top-to-the-foreland shear zones (consistent with thrust models). Second, dynamic intrusion models are usually unable to generate an imbricate nappe stack. The

  20. Enhanced rock discrimination using Landsat-5 Thematic Mapper (TM) data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blodget, H. W.; Andre, C. G.; Marcell, R. F.

    1985-01-01

    The application of TM data to rock discrimination is discussed. Sixteen specific terrains derived from geologic maps are examined on TM images of the Arabian shield obtained on Apr. 14, 1984; visual enhancement procedures are applied to the images. The rock types observed in the test site are described; the major sedimentary formations in the test area are laterite and sandstone. The data reveal that the layered rocks in the outcrop consist of a variety of metamorphosed volcanics, metamorphosed sediments, and amphibolite, and the intrusive complex is composed of several classes of mafic and acidic rocks.

  1. Geophysical Survey and Detailed Geologic Mapping of an Eroded Stratovolcano's Central Intrusive Complex, Summer Coon, Co.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harp, A.

    2015-12-01

    Eroded volcanoes expose plumbing systems that provide important information on intrusive geometries, magma propagation directions, and the effects of host rock types and heterogeneities. Summer Coon Volcano, CO, is an Oligocene stratovolcano where erosion has removed much of the original edifice, revealing the intrusive stocks of the central intrusive complex (CIC). Surrounding the CIC are hundreds of radial dikes ranging from basaltic to rhyolitic in composition. Published geologic maps indicate most radial dikes do not connect to the intrusive stocks, supporting published theories that most did not emanate from the central intrusions. However, much of the area surrounding the CIC is covered by alluvium, suggesting that the lack of connection might be an artifact of exposure. We completed a ground magnetic survey and detailed geological mapping to determine if the dikes continue beneath the alluvium and into the intrusive stocks. Linear magnetic anomalies indicate four NW-SE trending rhyodacite dikes continue beneath the alluvium for up to 250 m, and mapping indicates that at least two of the rhyodacite dikes do extend into the CIC. Shorter linear anomalies are attributed to seven NW-SE trending basaltic dikes ~100-500-m-long which are sparsely exposed in the alluvium. Mapping shows that three rhyodacite dikes extend into the CIC and to within 200 m of their possible source, an 800-m-wide granodiorite stock. Additionally, three rhyolitic dikes extend to within several meters of a 200×500-m-wide tuff breccia zone of similar composition, likely their source. In summary, magnetic data and detailed mapping indicate that radial dikes do extend into the central intrusive complex in contrast to some model predictions.

  2. Quantification of the Intrusion Process at Kïlauea Volcano, Hawai'I

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wright, T. L.; Marsh, B. D.

    2014-12-01

    Knowing the time between initial intrusion and later eruption of a given volume of differentiated magma is key to evaluating the connections among magma transport and emplacement, solidification and differentiation, and melt extraction and eruption. Cooling rates for two Kïlauea lava lakes as well as known parent composition and residence times for intrusions that resulted in fractionated lavas later erupted on the East Rift Zone in 1955 (34 years) and 1977 (22 years) allow intrusion dimensions to be calculated. We model intrusions beneath Kïlauea's East Rift Zone near their point of separation from the magma transport path at ~ 5 km depth using Jaeger's (1957) method calibrated against Alae and Makaopuhi lava lakes with wallrock temperatures above the curie point at 450-550°C. Minimum thicknesses of 50-70 meters are found for intrusions that fed the two fractionated lavas, as well as for long-lived magma bodies identified from geodetic monitoring during many East Rift eruptions. These intrusions began as dikes, but probably became sills or laccolithic bodies that remained near the transport path. Short-lived intrusions also arrested near the magma transport path, but that retain a dike geometry, are hypothesized to serve as a trigger for the small but discrete increments of seaward movement on Kïlauea's south flank that characterize slow-slip earthquakes. Two additional thoughts arise from the quantitative modeling of magma cooling. First, long-term heating of the wallrock surrounding the horizontal East Rift Zone transport path slows the rate of cooling within the conduit, possibly contributing to the longevity of the East Rift eruption that began in 1983. Second, the combined effects of heating of the wall rock and ever-increasing magma supply rate from the mantle may have forced breakdown and widening of the vertical transport conduit, which could explain the 5-15-km deep long-period earthquake swarms beneath Kīlauea's summit between 1987 and 1992.

  3. Advanced technologies for perimeter intrusion detection sensors

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, J.D.

    1995-03-01

    The development of integrated circuit fabrication techniques and the resulting devices have contributed more to the advancement of exterior intrusion detectors and alarm assessment devices than any other technology. The availability of this technology has led to the improvements in and further development of smaller more powerful computers, microprocessors, solid state memories, solid state cameras, thermal imagers, low-power lasers, and shorter pulse width and higher frequency electronic circuitry. This paper presents information on planning a perimeter intrusion detection system, identifies the site characteristics that affect its performance, and describes improvements to perimeter intrusion detection sensors and assessment devices that have been achieved by using integrated circuit technology.

  4. Evaluation of geologic materials to limit biological intrusion into low-level radioactive waste disposal sites

    SciTech Connect

    Hakonson, T.E.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes the results of a three-year research program to evaluate the performance of selected soil and rock trench cap designs in limiting biological intrusion into simulated waste. The report is divided into three sections including a discussion of background material on biological interactions with waste site trench caps, a presentation of experimental data from field studies conducted at several scales, and a final section on the interpretation and limitations of the data including implications for the user.

  5. Episodic Eruptive and Filling Dynamics as Recorded in Phenocryst Distribution Profiles in Volcanic and Intrusive Domains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charrier, A.; Marsh, B. D.

    2013-12-01

    The sorting and capture of phenocryst populations in certain magmatic bodies leaves a record of episodic magmatic system filling dynamics that is analogous to volcanic eruptive events. While it is reasonable to assume certain similarities between volcanic and shallow-level intrusive events, learning to identify and read these phenocryst records helps to build a necessary body of evidence to more robustly investigate the scope of these similarities. Phenocryst distribution profiles from the intrusive shallow-level Ferrar Dolerites sill complex of Antarctica are here investigated and compared to distribution profiles from volcanic systems. Features common to filling dynamics seen in both the intrusive and volcanic records are established by coupling theories of particle settling in viscous flows with those of conductive cooling and solidification front advancement. There is clear evidence for episodic activity for both types of systems in their respective phenocryst records, which in the case of some of the volcanic events was also verified by direct observation. Remobilization, transport, and capture of phenocryst populations in magmatic bodies are fundamental processes that also drive crystal fractionation and thus the evolution and diversity of igneous rocks. The chemical diversity of igneous rocks has been long known and studied, but it is necessary to also study and understand the physical processes that drive such chemical evolution. The relation between phenocryst abundance and chemical diversity in these rock suites is easily and clearly demonstrated, but learning to read these phenocryst records and relate them to magma transport dynamics gives a broader understanding of the processes which are the underlying cause of such diversity in all igneous rocks, whether intrusive or volcanic.

  6. Occurrence of seawater intrusion overshoot

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgan, Leanne K.; Bakker, Mark; Werner, Adrian D.

    2015-04-01

    A number of numerical modeling studies of transient sea level rise (SLR) and seawater intrusion (SI) in flux-controlled aquifer systems have reported an overshoot phenomenon, whereby the freshwater-saltwater interface temporarily extends further inland than the eventual steady state position. Recently, physical sand-tank modeling has shown overshoot to be a physical process. In this paper, we have carried out numerical modeling of SLR-SI to demonstrate that overshoot can occur at the field scale within unconfined aquifers. This result is contrary to previous conclusions drawn from a restricted number of cases. In addition, we show that SI overshoot is plausible under scenarios of gradual sea level rise that are consistent with conditions predicted by the Intergovernmental Panel for Climate Change. Overshoot was found to be largest in flux-controlled unconfined aquifers characterized by low freshwater flux, high specific yield, and large inland extent. These conditions result in longer timeframes for the aquifer to reach new steady state conditions following SLR, and the extended period prior to reequilibration of the groundwater flow field produces more extensive overshoot.

  7. AIDE - Advanced Intrusion Detection Environment

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, Cathy L.

    2013-04-28

    Would you like to know when someone has dropped an undesirable executable binary on our system? What about something less malicious such as a software installation by a user? What about the user who decides to install a newer version of mod_perl or PHP on your web server without letting you know beforehand? Or even something as simple as when an undocumented config file change is made by another member of the admin group? Do you even want to know about all the changes that happen on a daily basis on your server? The purpose of an intrusion detection system (IDS) is to detect unauthorized, possibly malicious activity. The purpose of a host-based IDS, or file integrity checker, is check for unauthorized changes to key system files, binaries, libraries, and directories on the system. AIDE is an Open Source file and directory integrity checker. AIDE will let you know when a file or directory has been added, deleted, modified. It is included with the Red Hat Enterprise 6. It is available for other Linux distros. This is a case study describing the process of configuring AIDE on an out of the box RHEL6 installation. Its goal is to illustrate the thinking and the process by which a useful AIDE configuration is built.

  8. The age and origin of felsic intrusions of the Thetford Mines ophiolite, Quebec.

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Clague, D.A.; Frankel, C.S.; Eaby, J.S.

    1985-01-01

    This ophiolite was obducted in the early Ordovician during the closing of the proto-Atlantic. The tectonized peridotite of the lower unit of the ophiolite is intruded by felsic dykes and pods, including isolated lenses of massive rodingite, small bodies of strongly deformed diorite, and younger, less deformed monzonite. These intrusions are found only near the base of the ophiolite, and are considered to have been emplaced before the ophiolite reached its present position. The young group of intrusions consists of biotite-muscovite quartz monzonite and leuco-quartz monzonite. Analysed samples have high K2O, high (K2O X 100)/Na2O + K2O) ratios, and high initial Sr ratios, indicating that the magma source was continental and that these felsic rocks formed by partial melting of continental sediments. Whole-rock and mineral isochron ages suggest that the felsic intrusions are approx 456 + or - 4 m.y. old and that they were metamorphosed approx 418 + or - 7 m.y. ago. The detachment of the ophiolite occurred approx 491 + or - 3 m.y. ago. The felsic dykes were intruded approx 35 m.y. later, during the Taconic orogeny. The lengthy time between detachment and final nappe emplacement recorded by the felsic dykes may be a requirement for formation of abundant asbestiform chrysotile. Whole-rock analyses (16) and Rb, Sr and 87Sr/86Sr data from the Colline de Granite, King Mts., Vimy Ridge and Black Lake samples are presented.-P.Br.

  9. Oxygen- and strontium-isotopic studies of the skye intrusive complex, northwest Scotland

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, B.M.

    1981-01-01

    This dissertation is comprised of three parts, each of which addresses some aspect of the meteoric-hydrothermal fluid/rock interaction which affected the rocks within and near the Skye intrusive complex. Part 1 was undertaken to determine the scale and magnitude of hydrothermal Sr contamination in the Coire Uaigneich Granophyre (CUG). Sr- and O-isotopic and electron microprobe results show that Sr was mobile in the low-/sup 18/O meteoric-hydrothermal fluids, that Sr-exchange between these fluids and the CUG was limited to thin (less than or equal to 1 cm) zones of bleached and albitized granophyre adjacent to fractures, and that the scale of O-exchange was much larger. Part 2 focuses on the stable isotopic and mineralogical compositions of the Beinn an Dubhaich Granite and its Durness Limestone host rocks. Part 3 is an attempt to discriminate between magmatic and subsolidus /sup 18/O depletions in porphyritic felsitic dikes from two widely separated regions of the intrusive complex. Eastern Red Hills felsites, collected approximately 9 km from the exposed margin of the Cuillins intrusion, probably crystallized from O-isotopically normal magmas. Empirical and experimental data on the kinetics of volume diffusion of oxygen in feldspar minerals and quartz (in the presence of H/sub 2/O) suggest that the /sup 18/O depletion in quartz and feldspar from the SPF may be attributed to very high-temperature (>600/sup 0/C) subsolidus exchange with circulating low-/sup 18/O fluids.

  10. Autonomous Rule Creation for Intrusion Detection

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Vollmer; Jim Alves-Foss; Milos Manic

    2011-04-01

    Many computational intelligence techniques for anomaly based network intrusion detection can be found in literature. Translating a newly discovered intrusion recognition criteria into a distributable rule can be a human intensive effort. This paper explores a multi-modal genetic algorithm solution for autonomous rule creation. This algorithm focuses on the process of creating rules once an intrusion has been identified, rather than the evolution of rules to provide a solution for intrusion detection. The algorithm was demonstrated on anomalous ICMP network packets (input) and Snort rules (output of the algorithm). Output rules were sorted according to a fitness value and any duplicates were removed. The experimental results on ten test cases demonstrated a 100 percent rule alert rate. Out of 33,804 test packets 3 produced false positives. Each test case produced a minimum of three rule variations that could be used as candidates for a production system.

  11. Online Intrusion Alert Aggregation Through Mobile

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kumar, S. Magesh; Mohan, K.; Kadirvelu, G.; Muruganandam, S.

    2012-08-01

    Online Intrusion Alert Aggregation with Generative Data Stream Modeling is a generative modeling approach using probabilistic methods. Assuming that attack instances can be regarded as random processes ìproducingî alerts, we aim at modeling these processes using approximative maximum likelihood parameterestimation techniques. Thus, the beginning as well as the completion of attack instances can be detected. In the proposed scheme of Online Intrusion Alert Aggregation, we extend our idea of sending Intrusion alerts to the mobile. This makes the process easier and comfortable. Online Intrusion Alert Aggregation with Generative Data Stream Modeling does not degrade system performance as individual layers are independent and are trained with only a small number of features, thereby, resulting in an efficient system

  12. Adapting safety requirements analysis to intrusion detection

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lutz, R.

    2001-01-01

    Several requirements analysis techniques widely used in safety-critical systems are being adapted to support the analysis of secure systems. Perhaps the most relevant system safety techique for Intrusion Detection Systems is hazard analysis.

  13. A General Model for Shallow Magmatic Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thorey, C.; Michaut, C.

    2015-12-01

    Shallow magmatic intrusions make room for themselves by upward bending of the elastic overburden. Previous studies have shown that the bending of the overlying layer first controls the dynamics. Then, when the radius reaches a few times the flexural wavelength of the overburden, it transitions to a gravity current regime. This model predicts the appropriate geometry for both terrestrial laccoliths and large mafic sills. However, it underestimates the absolute dimensions of these magmatic intrusions; in particular, it requires abnormally high viscosity to reconcile both observations and predictions. To get some insights into the effective flow viscosity, we develop a model that account for the cooling of such elastic-plated gravity currents. We show that the coupling between the temperature field and the flow itself leads to the formation of a highly viscous region at the tip that slows down the spreading in both regimes. The intrusions are predicted to be thicker and their dimensions, especially in the bending regime, are now consistent with observations. By introducing the potentially complex structure of the overburden, we also show that the topography largely contributes to constrain the final intrusion morphology. For instance, in the case of an intrusion centered below a circular depression, the model predicts that the lithostatic increase at the crater rim prevents the magma from spreading laterally and enhances the thickening of the intrusion. This model has already proven successful in reproducing the deformations observed on potential intrusion centered below lunar impact craters. Caldera complexes often exhibit ground deformations that might be associated to the formation of shallow magmatic intrusions. InSAR imaging and GPS measurements now provide efficient tools to monitor these deformations. We conclude this study by examining the ability of the model to reproduce the deformation observed in several caldera complexes.

  14. [Intrusive care and the nursing approach].

    PubMed

    Bécu, Anays Vaplet; Viltart, Valérie

    2015-04-01

    All caregivers who listen to patients will hear them tell their experience of the intrusive nature of care, whether it be basic, technical, educational or relational. The relational approach implemented by nurses enables them to identify organisational and behavioural methods which favour the establishment of a climate of trust. It helps them appropriate this interdisciplinary approach to caregiving, limiting as much as possible the intrusion felt by the patient during their hospital stay. PMID:26043629

  15. 10 CFR 63.322 - Human intrusion scenario.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Human intrusion scenario. 63.322 Section 63.322 Energy... REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Postclosure Public Health and Environmental Standards Human Intrusion Standard § 63.322 Human intrusion scenario. For the purposes of the analysis of human intrusion, DOE...

  16. 10 CFR 63.322 - Human intrusion scenario.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Human intrusion scenario. 63.322 Section 63.322 Energy... REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Postclosure Public Health and Environmental Standards Human Intrusion Standard § 63.322 Human intrusion scenario. For the purposes of the analysis of human intrusion, DOE...

  17. 10 CFR 63.322 - Human intrusion scenario.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Human intrusion scenario. 63.322 Section 63.322 Energy... REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Postclosure Public Health and Environmental Standards Human Intrusion Standard § 63.322 Human intrusion scenario. For the purposes of the analysis of human intrusion, DOE...

  18. 10 CFR 63.322 - Human intrusion scenario.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Human intrusion scenario. 63.322 Section 63.322 Energy... REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Postclosure Public Health and Environmental Standards Human Intrusion Standard § 63.322 Human intrusion scenario. For the purposes of the analysis of human intrusion, DOE...

  19. 10 CFR 63.322 - Human intrusion scenario.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 10 Energy 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Human intrusion scenario. 63.322 Section 63.322 Energy... REPOSITORY AT YUCCA MOUNTAIN, NEVADA Postclosure Public Health and Environmental Standards Human Intrusion Standard § 63.322 Human intrusion scenario. For the purposes of the analysis of human intrusion, DOE...

  20. A system for distributed intrusion detection

    SciTech Connect

    Snapp, S.R.; Brentano, J.; Dias, G.V.; Goan, T.L.; Heberlein, L.T.; Ho, Che-Lin; Levitt, K.N.; Mukherjee, B. . Div. of Computer Science); Grance, T. ); Mansur, D.L.; Pon, K.L. ); Smaha, S.E. )

    1991-01-01

    The study of providing security in computer networks is a rapidly growing area of interest because the network is the medium over which most attacks or intrusions on computer systems are launched. One approach to solving this problem is the intrusion-detection concept, whose basic premise is that not only abandoning the existing and huge infrastructure of possibly-insecure computer and network systems is impossible, but also replacing them by totally-secure systems may not be feasible or cost effective. Previous work on intrusion-detection systems were performed on stand-alone hosts and on a broadcast local area network (LAN) environment. The focus of our present research is to extend our network intrusion-detection concept from the LAN environment to arbitarily wider areas with the network topology being arbitrary as well. The generalized distributed environment is heterogeneous, i.e., the network nodes can be hosts or servers from different vendors, or some of them could be LAN managers, like our previous work, a network security monitor (NSM), as well. The proposed architecture for this distributed intrusion-detection system consists of the following components: a host manager in each host; a LAN manager for monitoring each LAN in the system; and a central manager which is placed at a single secure location and which receives reports from various host and LAN managers to process these reports, correlate them, and detect intrusions. 11 refs., 2 figs.

  1. Complexity on a small scale: Emplacement dynamics and evolution of the Doros layered mafic intrusion, Namibia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Owen-Smith, Trishya; Ashwal, Lewis

    2014-05-01

    The Doros Complex in Namibia is a relatively small (~8 km x 4 km), shallow-level layered mafic intrusion that forms part of the ~132 Ma Paraná-Etendeka Large Igneous Province. It consists of a ~500 m-thick preserved sequence of roughly concordant, sill-like gabbro layers dipping in towards the centre of the intrusion, cut by syenitic (bostonite) dykes. The fundamental mineralogy is essentially the same throughout the main package (plagioclase + calcic clinopyroxene + oxy-exsolved Fe-Ti oxides ± olivine), and hence the layering is defined by variations in the modal proportions of these minerals, and in the mineral and rock textures. A detailed petrographic, whole-rock and mineral major and trace element, and Sr-, Nd- and Pb-isotopic study, combined with major element modelling, has shown that the stratigraphic order of appearance of cumulus minerals and overall trends in rock compositions are consistent with fractional crystallisation and accumulation from an uncontaminated basaltic parental magma. However, these data also reveal considerable complexity and stratigraphic trends in mineralogy, chemistry and physical properties incongruent with a simple progressive differentiation path. Based on a comprehensive set of field, petrographic, geochemical and geophysical evidence, we put forward a compelling argument in favour of an origin for the Doros intrusion by multiple, closely-spaced influxes of crystal-bearing magmas (magma mushes), rather than from the post-emplacement differentiation of a single batch of crystal-free melt. This evidence includes intrusive layer relations, textural evidence for primocrysts, disequilibrium features, and stratigraphic reversals in mineral and whole-rock chemistry and magnetic properties. At least seven distinct major injections of magma have been identified in the stratigraphy, as well as several smaller pulses. These findings represent a departure from the traditional single-pulse liquid magma model for the formation of such

  2. Pyroclastic Rocks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahood, Gail A.

    Most of the advances in volcanology during the past 20 years have concerned the recognition, interpretation, and mode of emplacement of pyroclastic rocks. The literature on pyroclastic rocks is widely scattered, in part because the field draws from sedimentology, igneous petrology, physics, and fluid mechanics, and there have been few review papers on the topic. Fisher and Schmincke have done the discipline of volcanology and all field-oriented geologists a great service in assembling material from a wide range of sources in this comprehensive treatment of pyroclastic rocks. With its introduction to the petrology of magmas involved in explosive eruptions in chapter 2 and a complete treatment of magma rheology and the behavior of dissolved and exsolving magmatic volatiles in chapter 3, they lay sufficient groundwork that anyone with a rudimentary knowledge of geology can understand the book.

  3. Geometry of Caldera Superfaults and Emplacement of Their Associated Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hildyard, R.; Kokelaar, P.

    2006-12-01

    Caldera collapse generally involves large-scale fault movements, in some cases involving an annular structure (ring-fault) but commonly involving several intersecting fault strands. Fault displacements are typically hundreds of meters in hours or days. The geometry of caldera faults has often been depicted as inward dipping and bounding a coherent crustal block, but such `key-stone'-like geometry does not facilitate subsidence unless associated with overall extension. Recent modelling, experimentation and comparison with natural analogs show that bounding faults typically dip outwards. Reappraisal of the deeply dissected Glencoe Volcano in Scotland has shown that the archetypal bounding `ring-fault' and associated intrusions, which define an ellipse 14x8 km, comprise near vertical, outward-dipping structures that have accommodated ~700 m of subsidence. Along certain sections, pseudotachylyte occurs at the margins of voluminous (1-2000 m wide) fault intrusions of rhyolite, monzonite, diorite, tonalite and granite. The pseudotachylyte and rhyolite show various mingling relationships indicating a fluid and particulate-state interaction during emplacement. The inner contacts, against the subsided country rocks, are planar while the outer contacts are highly irregular, both on a large scale (100's m) and a small scale (10 cm -1 m). In one section, a fault strand cuts a hydrothermal system recorded by veins of quartz, epidote, pyrite and sericite. We infer that both friction melts and magmas were transformed explosively to froth or spray where they encountered rapid decompression along dilatant sections of the active superfaults. The friction melts were driven upwards, plastering separate fault surfaces, and were rapidly followed by fragmented rhyolite magma and then fluid magma that formed fault intrusions. The irregular outer contacts of the fault intrusions are interpreted as recording instantaneous explosive disruption of pressurized hydrothermal systems that were

  4. Cenozoic rocks of the Santa Rita Mountains, southeast of Tucson, Arizona

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Drewes, Harald

    1972-01-01

    the interpretations of the geologic record of the rocks themselves. The rocks of the greatest potential economic interest are the Greaterville intrusives of the Helvetia and Greaterville mining districts and the quartz vein swarm of the Tyndall and Wrightson mining districts.

  5. Contact relations and petrography of the Solarya intrusive complex (NW Turkey)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nur Güraslan, Işıl; Ünal, Alp; Altunkaynak, Şafak

    2016-04-01

    Solarya pluton is a N-S trending intrusive body exposed in the North of the Balikesir city in NW Anatolia. It is Early Miocene in age and intruded into the Nilüfer and Hodul unit of Karakaya complex representing Triassic metamorphic and non-metamorphic basement of Sakarya Continent. Solarya plutonic complex consists of three granitic rock members: Porphyritic granodiorite with K-feldspar (orthoclase) megacrystals, microgranite-microgranodiorite and haplogranite. Coarse grained porphyritic granodiorite is common in northern part of the pluton while the southern part of the pluton is formed from microgranite-microgranodiorite. Haplogranite was emplaced between the pluton and the metamorphic country rocks and surrounds the pluton as a thin light coloured outer zone along northern half of the border. Haplogranitic envelope zone display graphic and granophyric textures. Main plutonic body also contains mafic enclaves and syn-plutonic mafic dykes. Along the southern border, the fine grained chilled margin of Solarya pluton gradually passes into the hypabyssal and volcanic rocks. At the western border of the pluton, a young fault separates the pluton from non-metamorphic Hodul Unit of Karakaya complex. Along the northern and eastern margin, Solarya pluton intruded into metamorphic rocks of Nilüfer Unit which consist mainly of marbles, metapelites and metabasites. Solarya intrusive complex developed contact metamorphism in a narrow zone (150-200 m) around its eastern margin between the marbles which reaches to hornblende-hornfels facies conditions. The grain sizes of the marbles grow towards the margin of the pluton. Contact metamorphic rocks surrounding the intrusive body are common with granoblastic texture and display calcite + plagioclase + tremolite + diopside + garnet ± quartz mineral paragenesis dominantly. This mineral paragenesis suggest that the contact metamorphic aureole has developed under 500-550 C° and 2-3 kbar temperature and pressure conditions, which

  6. Oxygen isotope geochemistry of The Geysers reservoir rocks, California

    SciTech Connect

    Gunderson, Richard P.; Moore, Joseph N.

    1994-01-20

    Whole-rock oxygen isotopic compositions of Late Mesozoic graywacke, the dominant host rock at The Geysers, record evidence of a large liquid-dominated hydrothermal system that extended beyond the limits of the present steam reservoir. The graywackes show vertical and lateral isotopic variations that resulted from gradients in temperature, permeability, and fluid composition during this early liquid-dominated system. All of these effects are interpreted to have resulted from the emplacement of the granitic "felsite" intrusion 1-2 million years ago. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the graywacke are strongly zoned around a northwest-southeast trending low located near the center of and similar in shape to the present steam system. Vertical isotopic gradients show a close relationship to the felsite intrusion. The {delta}{sup 18}O values of the graywacke decrease from approximately 15 per mil near the surface to 4-7 per mil 300 to 600 m above the intrusive contact. The {delta}{sup 18}O values then increase downward to 8-10 per mil at the felsite contact, thereafter remaining nearly constant within the intrusion itself. The large downward decrease in {delta}{sup 18}O values are interpreted to be controlled by variations in temperature during the intrusive event, ranging from 150{degree}C near the surface to about 425{degree}C near the intrusive contact. The upswing in {delta}{sup 18}O values near the intrusive contact appears to have been caused by lower rock permeability and/or heavier fluid isotopic composition there. Lateral variations in the isotopic distributions suggests that the effects of temperature were further modified by variations in rock permeability and/or fluid-isotopic composition. Time-integrated water:rock ratios are thought to have been highest within the central isotopic low where the greatest isotopic depletions are observed. We suggest that this region of the field was an area of high permeability within the main upflow zone of the liquid

  7. Classic Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Beem, Edgar Allen

    2004-01-01

    While "early college" programs designed for high-school-age students are beginning to proliferate nationwide, a small New England school has been successfully educating teens for nearly four decades. In this article, the author features Simon's Rock, a small liberal arts college located in the Great Barrington, Massachusetts, that has been…

  8. Paying attention to saccadic intrusions.

    PubMed

    Gowen, E; Abadi, R V; Poliakoff, E

    2005-12-01

    Fixation to a target in primary gaze is invariably interrupted by physiological conjugate saccadic intrusions (SI). These small idiosyncratic eye movements (usually <1 degrees in amplitude) take the form of an initial horizontal fast eye movement away from the desired eye position, followed after a variable duration by a return saccade or drift. As the aetiology of SI is still unclear, it was the aim of this study to investigate whether SI are related to exogenous or endogenous attentional processes. This was achieved by varying (a) the "bottom-up" target viewing conditions (target presence, servo control of the target, target background, target size) and (b) the 'top-down' attentional state (instruction change--'look' or 'hold eyes steady' and passive fixation versus active--'respond to change' fixation) in 13 subjects (the number of participants in each task varied between 7 and 11). We also manipulated the orientation of pure exogenous attention through a cue-target task, during which subjects were required to respond to a target, preceded by a non-informative cue by either pressing a button or making a saccade towards the target. SI amplitude, duration, frequency and direction were measured. SI amplitude was found to be significantly higher when the target was absent and SI frequency significantly lower during open loop conditions. Target size and background influenced SI behaviour in an idiosyncratic manner, although there was a trend for subjects to exhibit lower SI frequencies and amplitudes when a patterned background was present and larger SI amplitudes with larger target sizes. SI frequency decreased during the "hold eyes steady" passive command as well as during active fixation but SI direction was not influenced by the exogenous cue-target task. These results suggest that SI are related to endogenous rather than exogenous attention mechanisms. Our experiments lead us to propose that SI represent shifts in endogenous attention that reflect a baseline

  9. Isotopic variation in the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite, central Sierra Nevada, California

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kistler, R.W.; Chappell, B.W.; Peck, D.L.; Bateman, P.C.

    1986-01-01

    Granitoid rocks of the compositionally zoned Late Cretaceous Toulumne Intrusive Suite in the central Sierra Nevada, California, have initial87Sr/86Sr values (Sri) and143Nd/144Nd values (Ndi) that vary from 0.7057 to 0.7067 and from 0.51239 to 0.51211 respectively. The observed variation of both Sri and Ndi and of chemical composition in rocks of the suite cannot be due to crystal fractionation of magma solely under closed system conditons. The largest variation in chemistry, Ndi, and Sri is present in the outer-most equigranular units of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite. Sri varies positively with SiO2, Na2O, K2O, and Rb concentrations, and negatively with Ndi, Al2O3, Fe2O3, MgO, FeO, CaO, MnO, P2O5, TiO2, and Sr concentrations. This covariation of Sri, Ndi and chemistry can be modeled by a process of simple mixing of basaltic and granitic magmas having weight percent SiO2 of 48.0 and 73.3 respectively. Isotopic characteristic of the mafic magma are Sri=0.7047, Ndi=0.51269 and ??18O=6.0, and of the felsic magma are Sri=0.7068, Ndi=0.51212 and ??18O=8.9. The rocks sampled contain from 50 to 80% of the felsic component. An aplite in the outer equigranular unit of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite apparently was derived by fractional crystallization of plagioclase and hornblende from magma with granudiorite composition that was a product of mixing of the magmas described above. Siliceous magmas derived from the lower crust, having a maximum of 15 percent mantle-derived mafic component, are represented by the inner prophyritic units of the Tuolumne Intrusive Suite. ?? 1986 Springer-Verlag.

  10. 916 Ma Pole for southwestern Baltica: palaeomagnetism of the Bjerkreim-Sokndal layered intrusion, Rogaland Igneous Complex, southern Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, Laurie L.; McEnroe, Suzanne A.

    2015-10-01

    The Rogaland Igneous Complex (RIC) in southern Norway intruded into post-Sveconorwegian granulite facies crust ˜930 Ma. It includes three massif anorthosites, several small leuconorite bodies and the ˜7 km thick norite-quartz mangerite layered Bjerkreim-Sokndal (BKS) intrusion. The intrusion consists of five rhythmic megaunits created by repeated magma influxes topped by a transition zone and more evolved mangerites and quartz mangerites. Over 70 palaeomagnetic sites have been collected in the BKS, sampling all the megacyclic subunits and overlying mangerites. Remanence within the BKS is held in hemo-ilmenite-only rocks (lower parts of the megacyclic units), mixed hemo-ilmenite and magnetite rocks (upper parts of the lower megacyclic units) and magnetite only rocks in the upper highest megacyclic unit and overlying mangerites. Due to the different oxides present magnetic susceptibility varies over four orders of magnitude with a bimodal distribution (mean susceptibility of 6.4 × 10-3 SI for hemo-ilmenite rocks, and 8.7 × 10-2 SI for magnetite rocks). NRM values do not show a strong bimodal distribution as many of the rocks lacking magnetite have hemo-ilmenite with strong lamellar magnetism; average NRM for the entire suite is 8.83 A m-1. All sites within the cyclic part of the intrusion have stable remanence and produce well-clustered site means. Samples from the upper mangerite rocks, dominated by MD magnetite, are commonly unstable and not all sites provide acceptable data. Mean directions for 66 sites spanning the entire intrusion are I = -73.5°, D = 303.4°, with α95 = 3.7° and k = 24. The resulting pole position is at 35.9°S and 217.9°E, with a palaeolatitude for this part of Baltica of -59.4°. Examination of the magnetic mineralogy combined with geochronology for RIC rocks and cooling rates for the region yields an age of magnetization of 916 Ma. Metamorphic country rocks yield similar directions at least 10 km from the contact, confirming the

  11. Age, field, and petrological relationships of the Hyde School Gneiss, Adirondack lowlands, New York: Criteria for an intrusive igneous origin

    SciTech Connect

    McLelland, J. ); Perham, A. ); Chiarenzelli, J.

    1992-01-01

    Alaskitic and tonalitic rocks constituting Hyde School Gneiss (HSG) occur in 14 domical bodies in the Adirondack lowlands. Recent models have interpreted these bodies as metamorphosed rhyolitic and dacitic ash-flow deposits forming the basal member of a regional stratigraphic package. In contrast, this paper presents criteria and evidence for an intrusive origin for HSG. Field evidence includes intrusion breccias and complex crosscutting relationships involving mafic layers resembling synplutonic dikes. Petrologic constraints supporting an intrusive origin include: (1) the common occurrence of quartz-mesoperthite hypersolvus assemblages; (2) magmatic features in tonalitic, trondhjemitic, and alaskitic facies, (3) local occurrences of orthopyroxene in all facies of HSG; and (4) the development of marginal garnet-sillimanite gneiss with corundum-spinel-garnet-sillimanite assemblages yielding paleotemperatures of 780-810C and interpreted as restite remaining after anatexis of country rock metapelite by intrusions of hypersolvus granitoids. U-Pb zircon ages reported here suggest that the majority of the HSG was intruded at ca. 1230 Ma, contemporaneous with high-grade metamorphic activity in the Adirondacks and elsewhere in the SW sector of the Grenville Province. Geochronological evidence from a leucogranitic rock crosscutting metasediments on Wellesley Island suggest that these metasediments are older than 1416 {plus minus} 5 Ma.

  12. Petrogenesis of the Late Triassic volcanic rocks in the Southern Yidun arc, SW China: Constraints from the geochronology, geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Pb-Hf isotopes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leng, Cheng-Biao; Huang, Qiu-Yue; Zhang, Xing-Chun; Wang, Shou-Xu; Zhong, Hong; Hu, Rui-Zhong; Bi, Xian-Wu; Zhu, Jing-Jing; Wang, Xin-Song

    2014-03-01

    Studies on zircon ages, petrology, major and trace element geochemistry, and Sr-Nd-Hf-Pb isotopic geochemistry of intermediate volcanic rocks from the Southern Yidun arc, Sanjiang-Tethyan Orogenic Belt, SW China have been undertaken in this paper. They are used to discuss the petrogenesis of these rocks and to constrain the tectonic setting and evolution of the Yidun arc. These intermediate volcanic rocks were erupted at ca. 220 Ma (U-Pb zircon ages). Trachyandesite is the dominant lithology among these volcanic rocks, and is mainly composed of hornblende and plagioclase, with minor clinopyroxene and biotite. A hornblende geobarometer suggests that the stagnation of magma in the lower crust, where plagioclase crystallization was suppressed while hornblende crystallized, giving rise to high Sr/Y ratios that are one of the distinguishing features of adakites, after the primary magma originated from the lithospheric mantle wedge. Steeply right-inclined Rare Earth Element (REE) pattern combined with high La/Yb ratios suggests adakitic affinity of these volcanic rocks, implying that slab-melt from the subducting oceanic crust is a necessary component in the primary magma. Besides, trace element geochemistry and isotopic geochemistry also indicate that partial melting of pelagic sediments in the subduction zone and noticeable contamination with the lower crust were involved in the evolution of parental magma of these volcanic rocks. Based on previous work on the Northern Yidun arc and this study, we propose that the subduction was initiated in the Northern Yidun arc and extended to the southern part and that the Northern Yidun arc is an island arc while the Southern Yidun arc represents a continental arc, probably caused by the existence of the Zhongza Massif, that was invoked to be derived from Yangtze Block, as a possible basement of the Southern Yidun arc.

  13. Gravity-driven intrusions in stratified fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maurer, Benjamin Dudley

    All natural fluids stratify. Stable stratifications, in which isobars and isopycnals are parallel, are capable of supporting internal wave motion. Unstable stratification, in which density and pressure gradients are not aligned, results in gravity-driven flow. Gravity currents are a subset of these flows in which horizontal density gradients sharpen and propagate horizontally, transporting mass, momentum, and energy. If the density of the gravity current is within the density extrema of the stably stratified ambient fluid, it propagates as an intrusion at an intermediate height. Through laboratory experiments and numerical simulations, this dissertation explores the influence of stratification on the dynamics of gravity-driven intrusions. Intrusions require stable stratification in the ambient fluid, which is capable of transporting momentum and energy away from the current in the form of internal waves. We investigate the constant velocity propagation of well-mixed intrusions propagating into a linearly stratified ambient fluid. Varying the level of neutral buoyancy, we quantify the corresponding variation in structure, momentum, and energy of the upstream wave field. Adjacent stable stratifications of differing vertical density structure necessarily entail horizontal density gradients. These gradients determine the hydrostatic pressure differences driving the ensuing gravity current. We examine the mid-depth, constant velocity propagation of one linearly stratified fluid into another more strongly linearly stratified fluid. Working from the available potential energy of the system and measurements of the intrusion thickness, we develop an energy model to describe the speed of the intrusion in terms of the ratio of the two buoyancy frequencies. Distinct from adjacent linear stratifications, adjacent discrete stratifications may create flow consisting of interleaving intrusions. Single intrusions into a two-layer ambient fluid are well understood. Limiting our

  14. Influence of the temperature dependence of thermal parameters of heat conduction models on the reconstruction of thermal history of igneous-intrusion-bearing basins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Dayong; Lu, Xiancai; Song, Yongchen; Shao, Rong; Qi, Tian

    2010-10-01

    Heat conduction models are important tools for reconstructing the thermal history of sedimentary basins affected by magmatic intrusions. Accurate thermal properties of the intrusion and its wall rocks are crucial for accurate predictions of thermal history. Although data on the thermal properties of rocks used in the models are not yet sufficient, we theoretically evaluated the influence of their temperature dependence on the reconstruction of the thermal history of wall rocks of a cooling intrusive sheet. In this study, due to their relatively adequate thermophysical data over wide temperature ranges, diabase, limestone, and Berea sandstone are assumed as the intrusion and the wall rocks in a heat conduction model. A linear interpolation algorithm is used to fit the temperature dependence of their thermal conductivity and specific heat based on experimental data. Simulations indicate that (a) the temperature dependence of these thermal properties can improve the estimation of the contact temperature ( Tc), (b) the deviation of Tc from a temperature-independent-coefficient heat conduction model can be as large as 102 °C for limestone and 61 °C for Berea sandstone, and (c) this is also the maximum deviation in the peak-temperature profile of wall rocks. However, its effect on the peak-temperature profile of wall rocks which is above 20 °C only occurs in a very narrow zone that is less than a half width of the intrusion away from the contact or a domain with the peak temperature above 500 °C. Furthermore, the temperature dependence can also significantly change the thermal-evolution history of wall rocks, lowering the cooling rate of magma intrusion and hence influencing the prediction of vitrinite reflectance ( Ro) based on the EASY%Ro model. Until a magma intrusion almost completely cools down, the maximum deviation in the predicted Ro profile of wall rocks from the temperature-independent-parameter heat conduction model can attain 0.47% for Berea sandstone at

  15. Characteristics of illness intrusions in a non-clinical sample.

    PubMed

    Langlois, Frédéric; Ladouceur, Robert; Patrick, Gosselin; Freeston, Mark H

    2004-06-01

    This study examines whether illness intrusions can be distinguished from obsessional intrusions and worries. It also assesses the relationship between strategies, thought characteristics, and appraisal of illness intrusions. Two hundred and forty-three non-clinical participants identified an obsessive intrusive thought, a worry, and an illness intrusion. They evaluated each thought using items from the Cognitive Intrusions Questionnaire. The comparisons of intrusions showed that illness intrusions share characteristics of worries and obsessional intrusions, but also have their own characteristics. Illness intrusions seem to be particularly egosyntonic. The relationships between the strategies used to counter illness intrusions and their appraisal were also tested. Results support the idea that there are specific links between the evaluation of cognitive intrusions and the way they are processed. It demonstrated that escape/avoidance strategies are associated with the egodystonic nature of the thought and that problem-focused strategies are associated with the thought's basis in reality. Illness intrusions may be conceptualised as either obsessions or worries. This study demonstrated that the category of an intrusive thought might not be as important as the way it is processed. It seems more important to consider appraisal of the disturbing thought and the way in which the person subsequently reacts and behaves. PMID:15081884

  16. Poohbear Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image, taken by Sojourner's front right camera, was taken when the rover was next to Poohbear (rock at left) and Piglet (not seen) as it looked out toward Mermaid Dune. The textures differ from the foreground soil containing a sorted mix of small rocks, fines and clods, from the area a bit ahead of the rover where the surface is covered with a bright drift material. Soil experiments where the rover wheels dug in the soil revealed that the cloudy material exists underneath the drift.

    Mars Pathfinder is the second in NASA's Discovery program of low-cost spacecraft with highly focused science goals. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, developed and manages the Mars Pathfinder mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C. JPL is a division of the California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

  17. Meridiani Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    16 September 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows the complex surfaces of some of the light- and intermediate-toned sedimentary rock exposed by erosion in eastern Sinus Meridiani. Similar rocks occur at the Mars Exploration Rover, Opportunity, site, but they are largely covered by windblown sand and granules. The dark feature with a rayed pattern is the product of a meteor impact.

    Location near: 0.8oN, 355.2oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  18. Terby's Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    25 August 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows light-toned, layered, sedimentary rock outcrops in the crater, Terby. The crater is located on the north rim of Hellas Basin. If one could visit the rocks in Terby, one might learn from them whether they formed in a body of water. It is possible, for example, that Terby was a bay in a larger, Hellas-wide sea.

    Location near: 27.9oS, 285.7oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: upper left Season: Southern Winter

  19. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    14 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows a portion of the famous 'White Rock' feature in Pollack Crater in the Sinus Sabaeus region of Mars. The light-toned rock is not really white, but its light tone caught the eye of Mars geologists as far back as 1972, when it was first spotted in images acquired by Mariner 9. The light-toned materials are probably the remains of a suite of layered sediments that once spread completely across the interior of Pollack Crater. Dark materials in this image include sand dunes and large ripples.

    Location near: 8.1oS, 335.1oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Southern Summer

  20. White Rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2002-01-01

    (Released 19 April 2002) The Science 'White Rock' is the unofficial name for this unusual landform which was first observed during the Mariner 9 mission in the early 1970's. As later analysis of additional data sets would show, White Rock is neither white nor dense rock. Its apparent brightness arises from the fact that the material surrounding it is so dark. Images from the Mars Global Surveyor MOC camera revealed dark sand dunes surrounding White Rock and on the floor of the troughs within it. Some of these dunes are just apparent in the THEMIS image. Although there was speculation that the material composing White Rock could be salts from an ancient dry lakebed, spectral data from the MGS TES instrument did not support this claim. Instead, the White Rock deposit may be the erosional remnant of a previously more continuous occurrence of air fall sediments, either volcanic ash or windblown dust. The THEMIS image offers new evidence for the idea that the original deposit covered a larger area. Approximately 10 kilometers to the southeast of the main deposit are some tiny knobs of similarly bright material preserved on the floor of a small crater. Given that the eolian erosion of the main White Rock deposit has produced isolated knobs at its edges, it is reasonable to suspect that the more distant outliers are the remnants of a once continuous deposit that stretched at least to this location. The fact that so little remains of the larger deposit suggests that the material is very easily eroded and simply blows away. The Story Fingers of hard, white rock seem to jut out like icy daggers across a moody Martian surface, but appearances can be deceiving. These bright, jagged features are neither white, nor icy, nor even hard and rocky! So what are they, and why are they so different from the surrounding terrain? Scientists know that you can't always trust what your eyes see alone. You have to use other kinds of science instruments to measure things that our eyes can

  1. Petrology of the Upper Border Series of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salmonsen, L.; Tegner, C.; Jakobsen, J. K.

    2009-12-01

    The Upper Border Series crystallized downwards from the roof of the Skaergaard magma chamber. It met with the Layered Series that crystallized upwards from the floor in the Sandwich Horizon that contains the last and most evolved rocks of the intrusion. Previous investigations of the Upper Border Series (Naslund, 1984) have shown that the compositional trends of plagioclase, olivine and pyroxene largely mirror those of the Layered Series. At the same time it was argued that the crystallization sequence in Upper Border Series differed from the Layered Series in that apatite precipitated before magnetite that, in turn, appeared before Ca-rich pyroxene. From the existing data the magma from which the Upper Border Series crystallized was inferred to be enriched in SiO2, K2O, P2O5 and H2O relative to the magma in the lower parts of the intrusion. This has lead to the conception that the Upper Border Series crystallized from a chemically different magma. Here we present new petrography, mineralogy and bulk compositions for samples collected in three profiles through the Upper Border Series (Kilen, Hammerpas and Brødretoppen transects). Although euhedral apatite is present throughout most of the Upper Border Series, we interpret a marked increase in modal apatite late in the crystallization sequence as marking its first appearance on the liquidus at the crystallization front. The plagioclase An% at this level in the Upper Border Series is ˜40 and is identical with plagioclase An% at the level of apatite-in in the Layered Series. Similarly, we find that the plagioclase An% at the onset of FeTi-oxide and sulphide precipitation in the Upper Border Series (52 and 47, respectively) and Layered Series are alike. Finally, we interpret abundant augite in Upper Border Series rocks before magnetite-in as a cumulus phase. We therefore conclude that the crystallization sequences of the two series are identical. The new bulk rock data reveal that the Upper Border Series and the

  2. Debris avalanche triggered by sill intrusions in basaltic volcanoes (Piton des Neiges, La Réunion Island)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berthod, C.; Famin, V.; Bascou, J.; Michon, L.; Ildefonse, B.

    2014-12-01

    Debris avalanches derived from the flanks of volcanic islands are among the largest on Earth. Debris avalanches are rare, catastrophic destabilizations that still keep geologists debating about the mechanisms that initiate them and make them travel huge runout distances. To shed light on the trigger of such destabilizations, we studied the inland scar of a debris avalanche deposit cropping out at Piton des Neiges, a dormant and eroded basaltic volcano of La Réunion Island. The avalanche deposit rests on a pile of 50-70 sill intrusions with a shallow northward dip, i.e. toward the sea. We measured the anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility in a transect across the uppermost sill of the pile in contact with the avalanche deposit. This transect reveals a strongly asymmetric magnetic fabric, consistent with a north-directed shear movement of the upper intrusion wall. This suggests that the upper sill induced a co-intrusive shear displacement of the volcano flank toward the sea. The upper sill margin in contact with the avalanche is striated, showing that this intrusion is older than the avalanche. Striae indicate a northward direction of avalanche runout. The upper sill margin also displays a magmatic lineation consistent with a magma flow in the intrusion toward the north. There is thus a striking kinematic consistency between the directions of intrusion propagation and avalanche runout, both oriented toward the sea. From the above results, we propose that repeated sill intrusions, such as observed on Piton des Neiges, increase the instability of a volcanic edifice. Each injection induces an incremental slip of the overlying rock mass, which may eventually end up into a landslide. Sill intrusions associated with seaward displacements of volcano flank, such as inferred for the April 2007 eruption of Piton de la Fournaise (also in La Réunion), should therefore be considered as a potential trigger of debris avalanches.

  3. Geology of crystalline rocks of northern Fiordland: details of the granulite facies Western Fiordland Orthogneiss and associated rock units

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Bradshaw, J.Y.

    1990-01-01

    A c. 700 km2 area of northern Fiordland (South Island, New Zealand) is described in which Early Cretaceous high-pressure metamorphic rocks and virtually unmetamorphosed plutonic rocks occur. The dominant rocks are orthogneisses developed from synmetamorphic basic-intermediate intrusive complexes, the youngest and most widespread of which is the Early Cretaceous Western Fiordland Orthogneiss (WFO). The latter has undergone granulite facies metamorphism and occurs throughout much of western Fiordland. WFO was emplaced synkinematically in a subduction-related magmatic arc. A collisional event during or immediately following magma emplacement resulted in crustal thickening equivalent to onloading of a 20 km thick section over rocks already buried at mid-crustal depths. This event was responsible for peak load pressures of c. 12-13 kbar. The steeply dipping Surprise Creek Fault juxtaposes high-pressure metamorphic rocks of western and central Fiordland against virtually unmetamorphosed gabbroic rocks of the Early Cretaceous Darran Complex. -from Author

  4. Detecting the thermal aureole of a magmatic intrusion in immature to mature sediments: a case study in the East Greenland Basin (73°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aubourg, Charles; Techer, Isabelle; Geoffroy, Laurent; Clauer, Norbert; Baudin, François

    2014-01-01

    The Cretaceous and Triassic argillaceous rocks from the passive margin of Greenland have been investigated in order to detect the thermal aureole of magmatic intrusions, ranging from metric dyke to kilometric syenite pluton. Rock-Eval data (Tmax generally <468 °C), vitrinite reflectance data (R0 < 0.9 per cent) and illite cristallinity data (ICI > 0.3), all indicate a maximum of 5 km burial for the argillaceous rocks whatever the distance to an intrusion. The K-Ar dating of the clays <2 μm fraction suggests that illites are mostly detrital, except near magmatic intrusions where younger ages are recorded. To get more information about the extent of the thermal aureole, rock magnetism data were determined. At distance away from the thermal aureole of the syenite intrusion, Triassic argillaceous rocks reveal a standard magnetic assemblage compatible with their burial (R0 ˜ 0.4 per cent). It is constituted essentially by neoformed stoichiometric magnetite (Fe3O4). In contrast, within the thermal aureole of the magmatic intrusions, the Cretaceous argillaceous rocks contain micron-sized pyrrhotite (Fe7S8), firmly identified through the recognition of Besnus transition at 35 K. The thermal demagnetization of natural remanence carried by this pyrrhotite shows a diagnostic `square shouldered' pattern, indicating a narrow grain size distribution of pyrrhotite. The extension of this diagnostic pyrrhotite maps a ˜10-km-thick aureole around the syenitic pluton. Away from this aureole, the magnetic assemblage is diagnostic of those found in argillaceous rocks where organic matter is mature.

  5. Lead-alpha age determinations of granitic rocks from Alaska

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Matzko, John J.; Jaffe, H.W.; Waring, C.L.

    1957-01-01

    Lead-alpha activity age determinations were made on zircon from seven granitic rocks of central and southeastern Alaska. The results of the age determinations indicate two periods of igneous intrusion, one about 95 million years ago, during the Cretaceous period, and another about 53 million years ago, during the early part of the Tertiary. The individual ages determined on zircon from 2 rocks from southeastern Alaska and 1 from east-central Alaska gave results of 90, 100, and 96 million years; those determined on 4 rocks from central Alaska gave results of 47, 56, 58, and 51 million years.

  6. Origin of the Lyme Dome and implications for the timing of multiple Alleghanian deformational and intrusive events in southern Connecticut

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Walsh, G.J.; Aleinikoff, J.N.; Wintsch, R.P.

    2007-01-01

    Geologic mapping, structural analysis, and geochronology in the area of the Lyme dome, southern Connecticut provides constraints on the origin of the rocks in the core of the dome, the absolute timing of the principal deformational and thermal events attributed to Alleghanian orogenesis, and the processes that generated the dome. Detrital zircon geochronology in combination with ages on intrusive rocks brackets the deposition of quartzite in the core of the dome sometime between ca. 925 and 620 Ma. Granite and granodiorite intruded the Neoproteorozic metasedimentary rocks in the core of the dome at ca. 620 to 610 Ma. Four major early Permian events associated with the Alleghanian orogeny affected the rocks in the Lyme dome area. Syn-tectonic migmatization and widespread penetrative deformation (D1, ca. 300 - 290 Ma) included emplacement of alaskite at 290 ?? 4 Ma during regional foliation development and aluminosilicate-orthoclase metamorphic conditions. Rocks of the Avalon terrane may have wedged between Gander cover rocks and Gander basement in the core of the Lyme during D1. Limited structural evidence for diapiric uplift of the Lyme dome indicates that diapirism started late in D1 and was completed by D2 (ca. 290 - 280 Ma) when horizontal WNW contractional stresses dominated over vertical stresses. Second sillimanite metamorphism continued and syn-tectonic D2 granite pegmatite (288 ?? 4 Ma) and the Joshua Rock Granite Gniess (284 ?? 3 Ma) intruded at this time. North-northwest extension during D3 (ca. 280 - 275 Ma) led to granitic pegmatite intrusion along S3 cleavage planes and in extensional zones in boudin necks during hydraulic failure and decompression melting. Intrusion of a Westerly Granite dike at 275 ?? 4 Ma suggests that D3 extension was active, and perhaps concluding, by ca. 275 Ma. Late randomly oriented but gently dipping pegmatite dikes record a final stage of intrusion during D4 (ca. 275 - 260 Ma), and a switch from NNW extension to vertical

  7. Magmatic intrusions in the lunar crust

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michaut, C.; Thorey, C.

    2015-10-01

    The lunar highlands are very old, with ages covering a timespan between 4.5 to 4.2 Gyr, and probably formed by flotation of light plagioclase minerals on top of the lunar magma ocean. The lunar crust provides thus an invaluable evidence of the geological and magmatic processes occurring in the first times of the terrestrial planets history. According to the last estimates from the GRAIL mission, the lunar primary crust is particularly light and relatively thick [1] This low-density crust acted as a barrier for the dense primary mantle melts. This is particularly evident in the fact that subsequent mare basalts erupted primarily within large impact basin: at least part of the crust must have been removed for the magma to reach the surface. However, the trajectory of the magma from the mantle to the surface is unknown. Using a model of magma emplacement below an elastic overlying layer with a flexural wavelength Λ, we characterize the surface deformations induced by the presence of shallow magmatic intrusions. We demonstrate that, depending on its size, the intrusion can show two different shapes: a bell shape when its radius is smaller than 4 times Λ or a flat top with small bended edges if its radius is larger than 4 times Λ[2]. These characteristic shapes for the intrusion result in characteristic deformations at the surface that also depend on the topography of the layer overlying the intrusion [3].Using this model we provide evidence of the presence of intrusions within the crust of the Moon as surface deformations in the form of low-slope lunar domes and floor-fractured craters. All these geological features have morphologies consistent with models of magma spreading at depth and deforming an overlying elastic layer. Further more,at floor-fractured craters, the deformation is contained within the crater interior, suggesting that the overpressure at the origin of magma ascent and intrusion was less than the pressure due to the weight of the crust removed by

  8. Computationally Efficient Neural Network Intrusion Security Awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Todd Vollmer; Milos Manic

    2009-08-01

    An enhanced version of an algorithm to provide anomaly based intrusion detection alerts for cyber security state awareness is detailed. A unique aspect is the training of an error back-propagation neural network with intrusion detection rule features to provide a recognition basis. Network packet details are subsequently provided to the trained network to produce a classification. This leverages rule knowledge sets to produce classifications for anomaly based systems. Several test cases executed on ICMP protocol revealed a 60% identification rate of true positives. This rate matched the previous work, but 70% less memory was used and the run time was reduced to less than 1 second from 37 seconds.

  9. Convective, intrusive geothermal plays: what about tectonics?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Santilano, A.; Manzella, A.; Gianelli, G.; Donato, A.; Gola, G.; Nardini, I.; Trumpy, E.; Botteghi, S.

    2015-09-01

    We revised the concept of convective, intrusive geothermal plays, considering that the tectonic setting is not, in our opinion, a discriminant parameter suitable for a classification. We analysed and compared four case studies: (i) Larderello (Italy), (ii) Mt Amiata (Italy), (iii) The Geysers (USA) and (iv) Kizildere (Turkey). The tectonic settings of these geothermal systems are different and a matter of debate, so it is hard to use this parameter, and the results of classification are ambiguous. We suggest a classification based on the age and nature of the heat source and the related hydrothermal circulation. Finally we propose to distinguish the convective geothermal plays as volcanic, young intrusive and amagmatic.

  10. Magma rheology variation in sheet intrusions (Invited)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magee, C.; O'Driscoll, B.; Petronis, M. S.; Stevenson, C.

    2013-12-01

    The rheology of magma fundamentally controls igneous intrusion style as well as the explosivity and type of volcanic eruptions. Importantly, the dynamic interplay between the viscosity of magma and other processes active during intrusion (e.g., crystallisation, magma mixing, assimilation of crystal mushes and/or xenolith entrainment) will likely bear an influence on the temporal variation of magma rheology. Constraining the timing of rheological changes during magma transit therefore plays an important role in understanding the nuances of volcanic systems. However, the rheological evolution of actively emplacing igneous intrusions cannot be directly studied. While significant advances have been made via experimental modelling and analysis of lava flows, how these findings relate to intruding magma remains unclear. This has led to an increasing number of studies that analyse various characteristics of fully crystallised intrusions in an attempt to ';back-out' the rheological conditions governing emplacement. For example, it has long been known that crystallinity affects the rheology and, consequently, the velocity of intruding magma. This means that quantitative textural analysis of crystal populations (e.g., crystal size distribution; CSD) used to elucidate crystallinity at different stages of emplacement can provide insights into magma rheology. Similarly, methods that measure flow-related fabrics (e.g., anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility; AMS) can be used to discern velocity profiles, a potential proxy for the magma rheology. To illustrate these ideas, we present an integrated AMS and petrological study of several sheet intrusions located within the Ardnamurchan Central Complex, NW Scotland. We focus on the entrainment and transport dynamics of gabbroic inclusions that were infiltrated by the host magma upon entrainment. Importantly, groundmass magnetic fabrics within and external to these inclusions are coaxial. This implies that a deviatoric stress was

  11. SW U. S. diabase province: A 1. 1-Ga intrusion event of middle Grenville and middle Keweenawan age

    SciTech Connect

    Conway, C.M.; Elston, D.P. ); Wrucke, C.T. )

    1993-02-01

    Diabase in the southwestern US intrudes Middle Proterozoic stratified rocks as sills and Early and Middle Proterozoic crystalline rocks as subhorizontal sheets and subvertical dikes. It is discontinuous in a broad belt extending from western Texas to southeastern California. The best known intrusions are sills in Middle Proterozoic strata in Death Valley, Grand Canyon, and central Arizona. Sparse to rare dikes in some of these strata trend mostly north but range from north-northeast to west-northwest. Diabase dikes widespread in crystalline rocks in western Arizona and adjacent parts of southeastern California strike from north to west-northwest, but are predominantly northwesterly. Dikes and sheets are also present in crystalline rocks in the southern Pinaleno Mountains, southeastern Arizona, where dikes strike west-northwest. The northwest trend of the diabase province and prevalent northwesterly trend of dikes in crystalline rocks suggest that intrusion was controlled by an approximately horizontal least compressive stress field roughly parallel to the Grenville Front. Radiometric ages of Arizona and California diabase indicate emplacement at [approximately]1,100 Ma. Paleomagnetic poles from diabase sills and enclosing stratified rocks in Arizona correlate with poles reported from middle and early-late Keweenawan rocks of Lake Superior. Emplacement of the diabase coincides with: (1) the middle Keweenawan eruptive and intrusive episode of the Midcontinent Rift System; (2) a major episode of (middle) Grenville thrusting and deformation documented in the Van Horn area; and (3) a time of abrupt reversal in North American apparent polar wander. These interrelated manifestations presumably arose in response to a major episode of plate interaction and collision between North American and a plate that encroached from the southeast.

  12. Complete Analytical Data for Samples of Jurassic Igneous Rocks in the Bald Mountain Mining District, Nevada

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    du Bray, Edward A.

    2009-01-01

    This report presents all petrographic, major oxide, and trace element data for a set of 109 samples collected during an investigation of Jurassic igneous rocks in the Bald Mountain mining district, Nevada. Igneous rocks in the district include the Bald Mountain stock, quartz-feldspar porphyry dikes, basaltic andesite dikes, aplite sills, and rare lamprophyre dikes. These rocks, although variably altered near intrusion-related mineral deposits, are fresh in many parts of the district. Igneous rocks in the district are hosted by Paleozoic sedimentary rocks.

  13. Zircon U-Pb age, Lu-Hf isotope, mineral chemistry and geochemistry of Sundamalai peralkaline pluton from the Salem Block, southern India: Implications for Cryogenian adakite-like magmatism in an aborted-rift

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renjith, M. L.; Santosh, M.; Li, Tang; Satyanarayanan, M.; Korakoppa, M. M.; Tsunogae, T.; Subba Rao, D. V.; Kesav Krishna, A.; Nirmal Charan, S.

    2016-01-01

    The Sundamalai peralkaline pluton is one among the Cryogenian alkaline plutons occurring in the Dharmapuri Rift Zone (DRZ) of the Salem Block in the Southern Granulite Terrane (SGT) of India. Here we present zircon U-Pb age and Lu-Hf isotopic composition, mineral chemistry and geochemistry of the pluton to explore the petrogenesis and geodynamic implications. Systematic modal variation of orthoclase, Na-plagioclase, Ca-amphibole (ferro-edenite and hastingsite) and quartz developed quartz-monzonite and granite litho units in the Sundamalai pluton. Thermometry based on amphibole-plagioclase pair suggests that the pluton was emplaced and solidified at around 4.6 kbar pressure with crystallization of the major phases between 748 and 661 °C. Estimated saturation temperature of zircon (712-698 °C) is also well within this range. However, apatite saturation occurred at higher temperatures between 835 and 870 °C, in contrast with monazite saturation (718-613 °C) that continued up to the late stage of crystallization. Estimated oxygen fugacity values (log fO2: -14 to -17) indicate high oxidation state for the magma that stabilized titanite and magnetite. The magmatic zircons from Sundamalai pluton yielded a weighted mean 206Pb/238U age of 832.6 ± 3.2 Ma. Geochemically, the Sundamalai rocks are high-K to shoshonitic, persodic (Na2O/K2O ratio > 1), silica-saturated (SiO2:65-72 wt.%), and peralkaline in composition (aluminum saturation index, ASI < 1; Alkalinity index, AI < 0). The initial magma was mildly metaluminous which evolved to strongly peralkaline as result of fractional crystallization (plagioclase effect) controlled differentiation between quartz-monzonite and granite. Both rock types have high content of Na2O (5.1-6.3 wt.%), Ba (350-2589 ppm) and Sr (264-1036 ppm); low content of Y (8.7-17 ppm) and Yb (0.96-1.69 ppm); elevated ratios of La/Yb (11-46) and Sr/Y (46-69) and are depleted in Ti, with a positive Sr anomaly suggesting an adakite-like composition and

  14. Sulfur Isotopic Composition and Behavior in Granitoid Intrusions, southwestern New Brunswick, Canada

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, X.; Lentz, D. R.

    2004-05-01

    Bulk sulfur isotopic composition and sulfur content were determined for 12 granitoid intrusions (48 samples) associated with various types of mineralization (e.g., Au, Sb-W-Mo-Au, W-Sn-In-Zn-Pb-Cu) and the pertinent wallrocks (7 samples), in southwestern New Brunswick, Canada. This data together with data from field relations, magnetic susceptibility, sulfide mineralogy, petrology, and geochemistry, were used to characterize these intrusions. Two distinct groups can be established, although both show some features of I-type grantiods: (1) a Late Devonian granitic series (GS) including the Mount Pleasant, True Hill, Beech Hill, Pleasant Ridge, Kedron, Sorrel Ridge granites, and (2) a Late Silurian to Early Devonian granodioritic to monzogranitic series (GMS) including the Magaguadavic, Bocabec, Utopia, Tower Hill, Evandale, and Lake George intrusions. The former occur along the northwestern flank of the Saint George Batholith as satellite plutons, and the later form parts of this batholith and the Pokiok Batholith to the north. The GS rocks show the attributes of evolved I-type with some A-type features, whereas the GMS rocks are either reduced I-type (ilmenite-series), or normal I-type (magnetite-series). Strong assimilation and contamination by local metasedimentary rocks lead to the Tower Hill granite resembling S-type, e.g., the presence of muscovite and garnet. The GS type rocks have δ 34S values between -7.1 and +13 per mil with bulk-S content ranging from 33 to 3434 ppm. The GMS type rocks have relatively narrower variation in δ 34S values (-4.4 to +7.3 per mil), but with larger ranges of bulk-S content (45 to 11100 ppm). The granite samples with S contents much higher than its solubility in felsic melts are interpreted to be affected either by local metasedimentary rocks or by late stage hydrothermal alteration. The metasedimentary rocks contain variable S contents (707 to 14000 ppm) with δ 34S values of -10.6 to 0.1 per mil. In terms of mass balance, a

  15. Sedimentary Rocks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    6 November 2005 This Mars Global Surveyor (MGS) Mars Orbiter Camera (MOC) image shows outcrops of sedimentary rocks in a crater located just north of the Sinus Meridiani region. Perhaps the crater was once the site of a martian lake.

    Location near: 2.9oN, 359.0oW Image width: width: 3 km (1.9 mi) Illumination from: lower left Season: Northern Autumn

  16. Paleomagnetism of the Miocene intrusive suite of Kidd Creek: Timing of deformation in the Cascade arc, southern Washington

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hagstrum, J.T.; Swanson, D.A.; Snee, L.W.

    1998-01-01

    Paleomagnetic study of the intrusive suite of Kidd Creek in the southern Washington Cascades (23 sites in dikes and sills) was undertaken to help determine if these rocks are comagmatic and whether they postdate regional folding of the volcanic arc. Fission track and 40Ar-39Ar age determinations indicate an age of ???12.7 Ma (middle Miocene) for these rocks. The similarity of normal-polarity characteristic directions for most samples corroborate the available geochemical data indicating that these rocks are most likely comagmatic. Reversed-polarity directions for samples from four sites, however, show that emplacement of Kidd Creek intrusions spanned at least one reversal of the geomagnetic field. The paleomagnetic directions for the dikes and sills fail a fold test at the 99% confidence level indicating that the Kidd Creek rocks postdate regional folding. The mean in situ direction also indicates that the Kidd Creek and older rocks have been rotated 22?? ?? 6?? clockwise about a vertical or near-vertical axis from the expected Miocene direction. Compression and regional folding of the Cascade arc in southern Washington therefore had ended by ???12 Ma prior to the onset of deformation resulting in rotation of these rocks.

  17. Thermal Inertia of Rocks and Rock Populations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golombek, M. P.; Jakosky, B. M.; Mellon, M. T.

    2001-01-01

    The effective thermal inertia of rock populations on Mars and Earth is derived from a model of effective inertia versus rock diameter. Results allow a parameterization of the effective rock inertia versus rock abundance and bulk and fine component inertia. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  18. SALT WATER INTRUSION IN THE UNITED STATES

    EPA Science Inventory

    Salt water intrusion, from one or more sources outlined in this report, has resulted in degradation of subsurface fresh water aquifers in 43 States. Numerous case histories delineating current problems exist, providing adequate documentation of the seriousness of salt water intru...

  19. Daytime intrusive thoughts and subjective insomnia symptoms.

    PubMed

    Baker, Louise D; Baldwin, David S; Garner, Matthew

    2015-10-30

    Insomnia is increasingly recognised as a 24h complaint that is associated with an increased risk of mood and anxiety disorders. However, the effects of insomnia symptoms on maladaptive daytime patterns of thinking are poorly understood. We examined the relationship between subjective insomnia symptoms, attentional control and negative thought intrusions during daytime in a large sample of undergraduates experiencing poor sleep. A total of 109 participants completed self-report measures of sleep quality, current sleepiness, anxiety and attentional control. A behavioural measure of intrusive thought required participants to control their attention during two focus periods separated by a 5min period of self-referential worry. Thought intrusions were sampled throughout the pre- and post-worry periods. Perceived insomnia severity was associated with the reduced ability to focus attention and uniquely associated with increased negative thought intrusions in the pre-worry period. These results support suggestions that acute episodes of poor sleep can dysregulate key networks involved in attentional control and emotion regulation, and that promote negative cognitive activity. PMID:26279126

  20. ON-LINE CALCULATOR: VAPOR INTRUSION MODELING

    EPA Science Inventory

    Migration of volatile chemicals from the subsurface into overlying buildings is called vapor intrusion (VI). Volatile organic chemicals in contaminated soils or groundwater can emit vapors, which may migrate through subsurface soils and may enter the indoor air of overlying build...

  1. Intrusive [r] and Optimal Epenthetic Consonants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Uffmann, Christian

    2007-01-01

    This paper argues against the view of intrusive [r] as a synchronically arbitrary insertion process. Instead, it is seen as a phonologically natural process, which can be modelled within the framework of Optimality Theory (OT). Insertion of [r] in phonologically restricted environments is a consequence of a more general theory of consonant…

  2. Chemical Observations of a Polar Vortex Intrusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schoeberl, M. R.; Kawa, S. R.; Douglass, A. R.; McGee, T. J.; Browell, E.; Waters, J.; Livesey, N.; Read, W.; Froidevaux, L.

    2006-01-01

    An intrusion of vortex edge air in D the interior of the Arctic polar vortex was observed on the January 31,2005 flight of the NASA DC-8 aircraft. This intrusion was identified as anomalously high values of ozone by the AROTAL and DIAL lidars. Our analysis shows that this intrusion formed when a blocking feature near Iceland collapsed, allowing edge air to sweep into the vortex interior. along the DC-8 flight track also shows the intrusion in both ozone and HNO3. Polar Stratospheric Clouds (PSCs) were observed by the DIAL lidar on the DC-8. The spatial variability of the PSCs can be explained using MLS HNO3 and H2O observations and meteorological analysis temperatures. We also estimate vortex denitrification using the relationship between N2O and HNO3. Reverse domain fill back trajectory calculations are used to focus on the features in the MLS data. The trajectory results improve the agreement between lidar measured ozone and MLS ozone and also improve the agreement between the HNO3 measurements PSC locations. The back trajectory calculations allow us to compute the local denitrification rate and reduction of HCl within the filament. We estimate a denitrification rate of about lO%/day after exposure to below PSC formation temperature. Analysis of Aura MLS observations made

  3. An Adaptive Database Intrusion Detection System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barrios, Rita M.

    2011-01-01

    Intrusion detection is difficult to accomplish when attempting to employ current methodologies when considering the database and the authorized entity. It is a common understanding that current methodologies focus on the network architecture rather than the database, which is not an adequate solution when considering the insider threat. Recent…

  4. Intrusion of Soil Water through Pipe Cracks

    EPA Science Inventory

    This report describes a series of experiments conducted at U.S. EPA’s Test and Evaluation Facility in 2013-2014 to study the intrusion of contaminated soil water into a pipe crack during simulated backflow events. A test rig was used consisting of a 3’ x 3’ x 3’ acrylic soil bo...

  5. Assessment of the long-term risks of inadvertent human intrusion

    SciTech Connect

    Wuschke, D.M. )

    1993-01-01

    Canada has conducted an extensive research program on the safe disposal of nuclear fuel wastes. The program has focused on the concept of disposal of spent fuel in durable containers in an engineered facility, or vault, 500 to 1000 m deep in intrusive igneous rock in the Canadian Shield. An essential goal of this program has been to develop and demonstrate a methodology to evaluate the performance of the facility against safety criteria established by Canada's regulatory agency, the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB). These criteria are expressed in terms of risk, where risk is defined as the sum over all significant scenarios of the product of the probability of the scenario, the magnitude of the resultant dose, and the probability of a health effect per unit dose. This paper describes the methodology developed to assess the long-term risk from inadvertent human intrusion into such a facility and the results of its application to a conceptual design of such a facility.

  6. 3D Seismic Studies of Igneous Intrusions, Taranaki Basin, off-shore west New Zealand

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harbor, R. L.; Chrisitiansen, E. H.; Keach, R. W.

    2008-12-01

    Several off-shore volcano-plutonic complexes are imaged in a detailed 3D seismic survey acquired by Pogo New Zealand/Plains Exploration. The new data provide insight into the sizes, shapes, and wall rock deformation associated with the emplacement of plutons. The seismic survey, conducted in 2005, covers 1700 km2 and was processed with modern techniques used in hydrocarbon exploration. The images and structures have to be interpreted with care because of distortions caused by "velocity pull ups" created by the large seismic wave velocity contrast between sediment and igneous rock. The magmatic rocks may be part of the Mohakatino Volcanic Centre (15 to 1.5 Ma) that intrudes and partially fills the Taranaki graben, which began to form in the Cretaceous. Imaged plutons range from less than 1 to as much as 12 km across. The intrusions are steep-sided and do not resemble sills, but their bases are poorly resolved. The top of the largest complex is sharply delineated and marked by multiple apophyses as much as 2 km across and hundreds of meters high. Deformation along the sides of the intrusion is dominated by of a faulted rim anticline, with apparent dips of 45° or higher. Dips decrease rapidly away from the intrusion but doming extends several hundred meters from the margins. A series of high-angle faults fan out from the margin of the pluton and cut the folded strata along the margin. These faults terminate against the margins of the intrusion, extend as much as 1 pluton diameter away from the margin, and then merge with "regional" faults that are part of the Taranaki graben. Offset along these radiating faults is on the order of a few hundred meters. Strata on the top of the complex are thinned but are deformed into a faulted dome with an amplitude of about 1 km. Steep, dip-slip faults form a semi-radial pattern in the roof rocks but are strongly controlled by the regional stress field as many of the faults are sub-parallel to those that form the graben. The longest

  7. Calcic myrmekite in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffries, C.M.; Dymek, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    Myrmekite is a common feature of granitic plutonic rocks and quartzo-feldspathic gneisses, but it is rarely reported in anorthositic and gabbroic rocks. The authors have identified myrmekitic intergrowths of quartz and calcic plagioclase in a variety of plagioclase-rich cumulate rocks, including samples from a number of massif anorthosites and layered igneous intrusions. It appears that calcic myrmekite has been frequently overlooked, and is a common accessory feature in these rock types. Chemical and textural characteristics of myrmekite in the St-Urbain massif anorthosite (Quebec) and the Bushveld Igneous Complex (South Africa) have several features in common, but this myrmekite appears to be fundamentally different from that described by most previous investigators. Whereas myrmekite typically consists of a vermicular intergrowth of sodic plagioclase and quartz that occurs adjacent to alkali feldspar, the intergrowths in these rocks contain highly calcic plagioclase and lack the intervening alkali feldspar. In addition, the plagioclase in the myrmekite is more calcic than that in the surrounding rock. The boundary between the myrmekite and the host material is generally extremely sharp, although reverse zoning of host plagioclase may obscure the contact in some cases. The textural and chemical evidence is consistent with a replacement origin for these intergrowths; the proportion of quartz in the myrmekite is in close agreement with the predicted amount of silica that is generated by the theoretical replacement reaction. It appears that water played a key role in the replacement process.

  8. BTSC VAPOR INSTRUSION PRIMER "VAPOR INTRUSION CONSIDERATION FOR REDEVELOPMENT"

    EPA Science Inventory

    This primer is designed for brownfields stakeholders concerned about vapor intrusion, including property owners, real estate developers, and contractors performing environmental site investigations. It provides an overview of the vapor intrusion issue and how it can impact the ap...

  9. Magnetic interpretation by the Monte Carlo method with application to the intrusion of the Crimea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gryshchuk, Pavlo

    2014-05-01

    The study involves the application of geophysical methods for geological mapping. Magnetic and radiometric measurements were used to delineate the intrusive bodies in Bakhchysarai region of the Crimea. Proton magnetometers used to measure the total magnetic field in the area and variation station. Scintillation radiometer used to determine the radiation dose. Due to susceptimeter measured the magnetic susceptibility of rocks. It deal with the fact that in this area of research the rock mass appears on the surface. Anomalous values of the magnetic intensity were obtained as the difference between the observed measurements and values on variation station. Through geophysical data were given maps of the anomalous magnetic field, radiation dose, and magnetic susceptibility. Geology of area consisted from magmatic rocks and overlying sedimentary rocks. The main task of research was to study the geometry and the magnetization vector of igneous rocks. Intrusive body composed of diabase and had an average magnetic susceptibility, weak dose rate and negative magnetic field. Sedimentary rocks were represented by clays. They had a low value of the magnetic susceptibility and the average dose rate. Map of magnetic susceptibility gave information about the values and distribution of magnetized bodies close to the surface. These data were used to control and elaboration the data of the magnetic properties for magnetic modelling. Magnetic anomaly map shows the distribution of magnetization in depth. Interpretation profile was located perpendicular to the strike of the intrusive body. Modelling was performed for profile of the magnetic field. Used the approach for filling by rectangular blocks of geological media. The fitting implemented for value magnetization and its vector for ever block. Fitting was carried out using the Monte Carlo method in layers from the bottom to top. After passing through all the blocks were fixed magnetic parameters of the block with the best

  10. Rock Driller

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, Thomas M.

    2001-01-01

    The next series of planetary exploration missions require a method of extracting rock and soil core samples. Therefore a prototype ultrasonic core driller (UTCD) was developed to meet the constraints of Small Bodies Exploration and Mars Sample Return Missions. The constraints in the design are size, weight, power, and axial loading. The ultrasonic transducer requires a relatively low axial load, which is one of the reasons this technology was chosen. The ultrasonic generator breadboard section can be contained within the 5x5x3 limits and weighs less than two pounds. Based on results attained the objectives for the first phase were achieved. A number of transducer probes were made and tested. One version only drills, and the other will actually provide a small core from a rock. Because of a more efficient transducer/probe, it will run at very low power (less than 5 Watts) and still drill/core. The prototype generator was built to allow for variation of all the performance-effecting elements of the transducer/probe/end effector, i.e., pulse, duty cycle, frequency, etc. The heart of the circuitry is what will be converted to a surface mounted board for the next phase, after all the parameters have been optimized and the microprocessor feedback can be installed.

  11. Melilitolite intrusion and pelite digestion by high temperature kamafugitic magma at Colle Fabbri, Spoleto, Italy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoppa, Francesco; Sharygin, Victor V.

    2009-10-01

    A subvolcanic body in Colle Fabbri (Umbria, Central Italy) intrudes sedimentary rocks and the overlaying extrusive breccia. The intrusive rock is melilitolite with essential leucite, kalsilite, and wollastonite plus accessory Ti-garnet, Ti-Al-Fe 3+-clinopyroxene, magnetite, perovskite, rankinite, Si-bearing apatite, Fe-Ni sulphides, and carbonate/zeolite. Bulk chemistry of melilitolite indicates a strong SiO 2-undersaturation, extremely high CaO composition, and strong initial potassic character. Sr and Nd isotopic ratios support a link with the source of kamafugites and carbonatites found in the same region. The igneous contact rock contains variable amounts of quenched clinopyroxene, anorthite, sanidine ± wollastonite, plus spinel and glass. Extremely high temperature melilitolite magma digested pelite country-rock, thus leading to a unique mineral composition. The homogenisation temperatures of mineral inclusions in contact rock demonstrate that crystallisation occurred well above 1230 °C. A large thermal aureole formed in a local clinker-like breccia, characterised by the association of felsic glass + indialite + tridymite ± Ti-magnetite, confirms high-temperature emplacement. Metasomatic/thermometamorphic phenomena favoured zone-specific mineralisation of hydrated Ca-silicates, hydrated complex sulphates and zeolites in breccias and encasing rocks.

  12. Insight into Vent Opening Probability in Volcanic Calderas in the Light of a Sill Intrusion Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giudicepietro, Flora; Macedonio, G.; D'Auria, L.; Martini, M.

    2016-05-01

    The aim of this paper is to discuss a novel approach to provide insights on the probability of vent opening in calderas, using a dynamic model of sill intrusion. The evolution of the stress field is the main factor that controls the vent opening processes in volcanic calderas. On the basis of previous studies, we think that the intrusion of sills is one of the most common mechanism governing caldera unrest. Therefore, we have investigated the spatial and temporal evolution of the stress field due to the emplacement of a sill at shallow depth to provide insight on vent opening probability. We carried out several numerical experiments by using a physical model, to assess the role of the magma properties (viscosity), host rock characteristics (Young's modulus and thickness), and dynamics of the intrusion process (mass flow rate) in controlling the stress field. Our experiments highlight that high magma viscosity produces larger stress values, while low magma viscosity leads to lower stresses and favors the radial spreading of the sill. Also high-rock Young's modulus gives high stress intensity, whereas low values of Young's modulus produce a dramatic reduction of the stress associated with the intrusive process. The maximum intensity of tensile stress is concentrated at the front of the sill and propagates radially with it, over time. In our simulations, we find that maximum values of tensile stress occur in ring-shaped areas with radius ranging between 350 m and 2500 m from the injection point, depending on the model parameters. The probability of vent opening is higher in these areas.

  13. Multiple magma evolution and ore-forming processes of the Hongge layered intrusion, SW China: Insights from Sr-Nd isotopes, trace elements and platinum-group elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Mingyang; Tao, Yan; Song, Xieyan; Li, Yubang; Xiong, Feng

    2015-12-01

    The Hongge layered intrusion (259 Ma), which is located in the inner zone of the Emeishan large igneous province (ELIP), is one of the most typical Fe-Ti-V ore deposits in the Pan-Xi area. Mafic-ultramafic layered intrusions of the ELIP have attracted a lot of attention lately because these intrusions host world class Fe-Ti-V oxide deposits plus interesting Cu-Ni-(PGE) mineralization which may have economic potential. This paper, reports new whole-rock major and trace element compositions, PGE abundances and Sr-Nd isotopic data for selected cumulate rocks and basalts. We use these data to investigate the nature of parental magmas and the controls on its evolution from the source mantle en route to the surface involving the Hongge ore-bearing intrusion. Two abrupt changes in Mt/Ilm and trace element ratios such as Ba/Th with depths in the Hongge layered intrusion indicate that this intrusion formed by at least two pluses of relatively primitive magma. The whole rock Sr-Nd isotopic data of basaltic and intrusive rocks plot in the region of Emeishan low-Ti basalts and the compositions of residual liquid (at ∼1260 °C and 1155 °C) calculated by MELTS are similar to our actual high-Ti (BFQ-2) and low-Ti (BC-1) basltic samples, indicate they are co-magmatic rather than derivation from a distinct source. Total PGE abundances in the Hongge samples are extremely low, ranging from 0.5 to 10 ppb. Sulfide-bearing rocks in the Hongge intrusion and the nearby coeval Banfangqing and Baicao basalts have similar mantle-like Pd/Pt ratios (2-6) and extremely high Cu/Pd ratios (3 × 104 to 4 × 105), indicating that sulfide segregation took place at depth prior to emplacement at Hongge and eruption in this region. Sulfide saturation in the Hongge magma may have resulted from such crustal contamination event. Crystallization of silicate minerals under the anhydrous magma, magma hydration plus Fe-Ti enrichments in the parental magma are three critical factors for the formation of Fe

  14. 40Ar/39Ar dates from alkaline intrusions of the northern Crazy Mountains, south-central Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harlan, S. S.

    2005-05-01

    The Crazy Mountains basin of south-central Montana is a complex foreland basin that formed during the interaction of thin-skinned, decollement-style folds of the Montana thrust belt and the basement-involved folds and thrust faults of the Rocky Mountain foreland province. Near the depositional center of the basin, synorogenic strata of the Paleocene Fort Union Formation have been intruded and locally thermally metamorphosed by strongly alkaline to subalkaline Tertiary intrusive rocks. The subalkaline rocks are found mostly in the southern Crazy Mountains and form stocks (Big Timber stock, Loco Mountain stock), radiating dikes and sills. With the exception of the Ibex Mountain sill (?), the alkaline rocks are restricted to the northern Crazy Mountains. New 40Ar/39Ar dates are reported from the strongly alkaline rocks, including the Comb Creek stock and dike swarm, the Ibex Mountain sill(?), and sills from the Robinson anticline intrusive complex. The alkaline rocks of the Robinson anticline intrusive complex are exposed in the easternmost folds of the Cordilleran fold and thrust belt, but despite their arcuate and apparently folded map geometry they have been shown to post-date folding. Hornblende from a trachyte sill in the Robinson anticline intrusive complex yielded a relatively simple age spectrum with a weighted mean of 50.61 ± 0.14 Ma (2σ), which probably records the age of sill emplacement. Nepheline syenite and mafic nepheline syenites of the Comb Creek stock and a dike from its radial dike swarm, two sills from the Robinson antlicline intrusive complex, and the Ibex Mountains sill(?) gave biotite plateau dates ranging from 50.03 to 50.22 Ma, with 2σ errors of ± 0.11 to 0.19 Ma. Because these dates are from fairly small, hypabyssal intrusions, they must have cooled quickly and thus these dates closely approximate the emplacement age of the intrusions. These data indicate that the strongly alkaline intrusions were emplaced during a fairly restricted

  15. Paleomagnetism of Middle Proterozoic mafic intrusions and Upper Proterozoic (Nankoweap) red beds from the Lower Grand Canyon Supergroup, Arizona

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weil, Arlo B.; Geissman, John W.; Heizler, Matt; Van der Voo, Rob

    2003-11-01

    Paleomagnetic data from lavas and dikes of the Unkar igneous suite (16 sites) and sedimentary rocks of the Nankoweap Formation (7 sites), Grand Canyon Supergroup (GCSG), Arizona, provide two primary paleomagnetic poles for Laurentia for the latest Middle Proterozoic (ca. 1090 Ma) at 32°N, 185°E (dp=6.8°, dm=9.3°) and early Late Proterozoic (ca. 850-900 Ma) at 10°S, 163°E (dp=3.5°, dm=7.0°). A new 40Ar/ 39Ar age determination from an Unkar dike gives an interpreted intrusion age of about 1090 Ma, similar to previously reported geochronologic data for the Cardenas Basalts and associated intrusions. The paleomagnetic data show no evidence of any younger, middle Late Proterozoic tectonothermal event such as has been revealed in previous geochronologic studies of the Unkar igneous suite. The pole position for the Unkar Group Cardenas Basalts and related intrusions is in good agreement with other ca. 1100 Ma paleomagnetic poles from the Keweenawan midcontinent rift deposits and other SW Laurentia diabase intrusions. The close agreement in age and position of the Unkar intrusion (UI) pole with poles derived from rift related rocks from elsewhere in Laurentia indicates that mafic magmatism was essentially synchronous and widespread throughout Laurentia at ca. 1100 Ma, suggesting a large-scale continental magmatic event. The pole position for the Nankoweap Formation, which plots south of the Unkar mafic rocks, is consistent with a younger age of deposition, at about 900 to 850 Ma, than had previously been proposed. Consequently, the inferred ˜200 Ma difference in age between the Cardenas Basalts and overlying Nankoweap Formation provides evidence for a third major unconformity within the Grand Canyon sequence.

  16. Sheared sheet intrusions as mechanism for lateral flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes: Applications to Réunion Island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayol, V.; Catry, T.; Michon, L.; Chaput, M.; Famin, V.; Bodart, O.; Froger, J.-L.; Romagnoli, C.

    2014-10-01

    Field work carried out on the Piton des Neiges volcano (Réunion Island) suggests that the injection of magma along detachments could trigger flank failure by conjugate opening and shear displacement. We use 3-D numerical models to compare the ability of purely opened sheet intrusions, sheared sheet intrusions, and normal faults to induce flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes. We assume that shear stress change on fractures results from stress anisotropy of the host rock under gravity. Exploring a large range of stress anisotropies, fracture dips, and fracture depth over length ratios, we determine that the amount of shear displacement is independent of the proximity to the ground surface. Sheared sheet intrusions are the most efficient slip medium on volcanoes. Consequently, the largest flank displacement is induced by the longest, deepest sheared intrusion dipping closest to 45° in a host rock with the highest stress anisotropy. Using our model in a forward way, we provide shear and normal displacements for buried fractures. Applying the model to a pile of sills at the Piton des Neiges volcano, we determine that the mean shear displacement caused by each intrusion was 3.7 m, leading to a total of a 180-260 m of lateral displacement for the 50 m high pile of sills. Using our model in an inverse way, we formulate a decision tree to determine some fracture characteristics and the host rock stress anisotropy from ratios of maximum surface displacements. This procedure provides a priori models, which can be used to bound the parameter space before it is explored through a formal inversion. Applying the decision tree to the 1.4 m coeruptive flank displacement recorded at Piton de la Fournaise in 2007, we find that it probably originated from a shallow eastward dipping subhorizontal normal fault.

  17. Constraints on the magmatic evolution of the oceanic crust from plagiogranite intrusions in the Oman ophiolite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haase, Karsten M.; Freund, Sarah; Beier, Christoph; Koepke, Jürgen; Erdmann, Martin; Hauff, Folkmar

    2016-05-01

    We present major and trace element as well as Sr, Nd, and Hf isotope data on a suite of 87 plutonic rock samples from 27 felsic crustal intrusions in seven blocks of the Oman ophiolite. The rock compositions of the sample suite including associated more mafic rocks range from 48 to 79 wt% SiO2, i.e. from gabbros to tonalites. The samples are grouped into a Ti-rich and relatively light rare earth element (LREE)-enriched P1 group [(Ce/Yb) N > 0.7] resembling the early V1 lavas, and a Ti-poor and LREE-depleted P2 group [(Ce/Yb) N < 0.7] resembling the late-stage V2 lavas. Based on the geochemical differences and in agreement with previous structural and petrographic models, we define phase 1 (P1) and phase 2 (P2) plutonic rocks. Felsic magmas in both groups formed by extensive fractional crystallization of olivine, clinopyroxene, plagioclase, apatite, and Ti-magnetite from mafic melts. The incompatible element compositions of P1 rocks overlap with those from mid-ocean ridges but have higher Ba/Nb and Th/Nb trending towards the P2 rock compositions and indicating an influence of a subducting slab. The P2 rocks formed from a more depleted mantle source but show a more pronounced slab signature. These rocks also occur in the southern blocks (with the exception of the Tayin block) of the Oman ophiolite implying that the entire ophiolite formed above a subducting slab. Initial Nd and Hf isotope compositions suggest an Indian-MORB-type mantle source for the Oman ophiolite magmas. Isotope compositions and high Th/Nb in some P2 rocks indicate mixing of a melt from subducted sediment into this mantle.

  18. Intrusive Memories in Perpetrators of Violent Crime: Emotions and Cognitions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Evans, Ceri; Ehlers, Anke; Mezey, Gillian; Clark, David M.

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated factors that may determine whether perpetrators of violent crime develop intrusive memories of their offense. Of 105 young offenders who were convicted of killing or seriously harming others, 46% reported distressing intrusive memories, and 6% had posttraumatic stress disorder. Intrusions were associated with lower…

  19. Comparative petrogenesis of anorthositic and troctolitic series rocks of the Duluth Complex, Minnesota

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, J.D. Jr.; Weiblen, P.W.

    1985-01-01

    Results of new mapping in the NW part of the Middle Proterozoic Duluth Complex in NE Minnesota reinforces the view that the Complex consists dominantly of two major lithostratigraphic units: an Anorthositic Series (AS) and a Troctolitic Series (TS) dominated by troctolite and olivine gabbro. Consistent intrusive and inclusive relationships confirm that AS rocks are older than TS. Interpretations of field, petrographic, and petrochemical data imply that the petrogenesis of the two rock series differed in at least four significant ways: 1) While parent magmas to both rock series could have been derived from high-Al olivine tholeiite primary magmas by fractional crystallization of Pl+Ol+Cpx+Sp in lower to intermediate crustal (40-15 km) chambers, AS parent magmas were generally more evolved than TS magmas upon their introduction into the Duluth Complex. 2) As magmas were intruded as plagioclase crystal muses (less than or equal to50% crystals), whereas later TS intrusions contained rare or minor intratelluric plagioclase and olivine. Periodic intrusions of viscous AS mushes probably caused much of the structural complexity ubiquitous to these rocks. 3) Although parent magmas to both rock series were saturated in plagioclase upon intrusion, AS magmas were less often saturated in olivine than were TS magmas. 4) TS rocks record fractional crystallization within Duluth Complex chambers; however, the extent and pattern of differentiation often reflects repeated replenishment of more primitive magmas.

  20. Magmatic Cu-Ni sulfide mineralization of the Huangshannan mafic-untramafic intrusion, Eastern Tianshan, China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Yun; Xue, Chunji; Zhao, Xiaobo; Yang, YongQiang; Ke, Junjun

    2015-06-01

    The Huangshannan Ni-Cu (-PGE) sulfide deposit, a new discovery from geological prospecting in Eastern Tianshan, is in a belt of magmatic Ni-Cu (-PGE) sulfide deposits along the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt. The host intrusion of the Huangshannan deposit is composed of a layered ultramafic sequence and a massive gabbro-diorite unit. The major sulfide orebodies occur mainly within websterite and lherzolite in the layered ultramafic sequence. In-situ zircon U-Pb dating analyses yielded a crystallization age of 282.5 ± 1.4 Ma, similar to the ages of the Permian Tarim mantle plume. Samples from the Huangshannan intrusion are characterized by nearly flat rare earth elements patterns, negative Zr, Ti and Nb anomalies, arc-like Th/Yb and Nb/Yb ratios, and significantly lower rare earth element and immobile trace element contents than the Tarim basalts. These characteristics suggest that the Huangshannan intrusion was not generated from the Tarim mantle plume. The primary magma for the Huangshannan intrusion and its associated sulfide mineralization were formed from different pulses of picritic magma with different degrees of crustal contamination. The first pulse underwent an initial removal of 0.016% sulfide in the deep magma chamber. The evolved magma reached sulfide saturation again in the shallow magma chamber and formed sulfide ores in lherzolite. The second pulse of magma reached a level of 0.022% sulfide segregation at staging chamber before ascending up to the shallow magma chamber. In the shallow conduit system, this sulfide-unsaturated magma mixed with the first pulse of magma and with contamination from the country rocks, leading to the formation of sulfide ores in websterite. The third magma pulse from the deep chamber formed the unmineralized massive gabbro-diorite unit of the Huangshannan intrusion.

  1. Evaluation of Seawater Intrusion Potential into a Coastal Underground Oil Storage Cavern in Korea

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, E.; Lim, J.; Moon, H.; Lee, K.

    2010-12-01

    Underground oil storage caverns have been operated in Korea since 1990s, and the facility at Yeosu, south coast of Korea, is one of the largest underground oil storage facilities in Korea. Hydrologic and water quality monitoring of the facility has been performed to find out whether the facility maintains secure containment condition and long-term stability. Recently, seawater intrusion into the base of the storage cavern was suspected based on the long-term monitoring of water levels and chemical analyses of seepage water pumped out from cavern bottom. The sudden decrease of water pressure during the construction of storage tunnel seems to cause the inland movement of saline water. In this study, numerical analysis was performed to estimate the potential of seawater intrusion into underground oil storage cavern using a three dimensional groundwater simulation model, FEFLOW (Diersch, 2005). The geometry of the cavern and water curtain was represented by using the implemented functions. The groundwater flow field and seawater intrusion in response to construction activity was also estimated. The simulation results were validated by comparing EC and salinity of seepage water monitoring data. Sensitivity analyses on hydraulic conductivity and water pressure from the water curtain or injection well were also conducted. Relatively high groundwater level was observed at this site due to the low hydraulic conductivity of base rock and high altitude of the mountains. Therefore, the amount of intruded seawater does not seem to be significant. However, apparent decrease of water level was observed along the main fracture zone and seawater could be intruded along these paths. Simulation results show that the seawater intrusion to the cavern is mainly controlled by the fracture zone, which would be the main channel of groundwater movement. The injection of fresh water to the injection wells along the coast may retard the intrusion of seawater.

  2. Geochemical reconnaissance for uranium occurrences in the Notch Peak intrusive area, House Range, Millard County, Utah

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Cadigan, R.A.; Robinson, Keith

    1982-01-01

    Samples collected from the contact metamorphic zone of the Notch Peak intrusive area, House Range, Millard County, Utah, indicate the occurrence of low-grade uranium and thorium ore. Maximum abundances in the altered mineralized rocks in the contact zone are 450 ppm uranium and 480 ppm thorium. Interpretation of factor analysis of the spectrochemical and delayed neutron analytical data suggests the presence of five geological factors which account for 82 percent of element covariance of 34 elements in 61 samples. The factors are identified as (1) limestone source rock reactions; (2) monzonite source rock reactions; (3) hydrothermal element group 1; (4) rare earth group; and (5) hydrothermal element group 2. The last factor effects the distribution of, primarily, beryllium, uranium, copper, molybdenum, tungsten, niobium, and secondarily, thorium, tin, and zinc; it is identified as the prime mineralization factor. The Notch Peak intrusive area has been a tungsten producing area since before the 1940's and the location of small-scale gold placer operations. This reconnaissance study was a 'follow-up' of uranium anomaly data which were developed during the U.S. Dept. of Energy National Uranium Resource Evaluation (NURE) program in 1978-80.

  3. High-precision temporal constraints on intrusive magmatism of the Siberian Traps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burgess, Seth; Bowring, Sam; Pavlov, Volodia E.; Veselovsky, Roman V.

    2014-05-01

    The broad temporal coincidence between large igneous province magmatism and some of the most severe biotic/environmental crises in Earth history has led many to infer a causal connection between the two. Notable examples include the end-Permian mass extinction and eruption/emplacement of the Siberian Traps large igneous province (LIP) and the end-Triassic mass extinction and the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province. In models proposing a causal connection between LIP magmatism and the environmental changes that lead to mass extinction, gases and particulates injected into the atmosphere are thought to cause abrupt changes in climate and ocean chemistry sufficient to drive mass extinction of marine and terrestrial biota. Magmatism has been proposed to cause voluminous volatile release via contact metamorphism of the sedimentary rocks. In the case of the Siberian Traps LIP, the compositions of sedimentary rocks (carbonates, evaporates, organic-rich shales) that host sills and dikes are ideal for greenhouse gas generation. When coupled with the enormous volume of Siberian LIP intrusive rocks, there is the potential for volatile generation on a scale necessary to drive environmental changes and mass extinction. This model must be tested by comparing the timing of intrusive magmatism with that of the mass extinction. Coupled high-precision geochronology and astrochronology have constrained the timing of biotic crisis and associated environmental perturbations from the deca-millennial to sub-millennial timescale, suggesting that the biotic crisis was abrupt, occurring over < 100 ka. Published geochronology on sills and dikes from the LIP are sparse and lack the necessary precision to resolve the relative timing of the two events outside of age uncertainty. We present new high-precision U-Pb zircon geochronology on seventeen gabbroic sills from throughout the magmatic province. This includes samples from the mineralized and differentiated intrusions in the Noril'sk region

  4. How to build a mid-crustal intrusive suite: geologic mapping, U-Pb geo-/thermochronology, and thermal modeling of the Bergell Intrusion, Central Alps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Samperton, K. M.; Schoene, B.; Annen, C.

    2015-12-01

    Insights into the characteristic rates and processes of crustal magmatic systems can best be made through the integration of observational, analytical and modeling perspectives. We present such an approach in reconstructing the emplacement, differentiation and cooling history of the Bergell Intrusion (N Italy/SE Switzerland), a normally-zoned pluton preserving a ~10 km mid-crustal transect. U-Pb zircon, titanite and allanite geo-/thermochronology of Bergell granitoids provide key empirical constraints for informing numerical simulations of pulse-wise, incremental assembly. Protracted zircon crystallization histories, representing the time between magma zircon saturation and cooling to the solidus, provide a direct petrologic link to forward models of magma emplacement, both of which can be used to derive quantitative magmatic cooling rates for the middle crust. Titanite and allanite dates provide additional constraints on the timing of solidification. Geochronology and modeling are performed in the context of detailed field and structural observations, including those previously interpreted as evidence of upward, pluton-scale melt migration via floor convergence/roof ballooning. Combined Bergell data and modeling demonstrate that pulsed assembly can lead to the formation of substantial melt reservoirs in the middle crust: this finding is largely in contrast to similar models of shallow crustal plutons, highlighting the importance of factors such as ambient country rock temperature in affecting melt residence timescales. This work emphasizes the importance of implementing joint data/modeling studies to intrusive rocks across the full range of spatial scales, emplacement levels and tectonic settings observed on Earth.

  5. The petrology of the layered gabbro intrusion, eastern gabbro, Coldwell alkaline complex, Northwestern Ontario, Canada: evidence for multiple phases of intrusion in a ring dyke

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shaw, Cliff S. J.

    1997-07-01

    The Coldwell alkaline complex is a large (> 350 km 2) gabbro and syenite intrusion on the north shore of Lake Superior. It was emplaced at 1108 Ma during early magmatic activity associated with the formation of the Mid-Continent Rift of North America. The eastern gabbro forms a partial ring dyke on the outer margin of the complex and consists of at least three discrete intrusions. The largest of these is the layered gabbro that comprises a 300 m thick fine- to medium-grained basal unit overlain by up to 1100 m of variably massive to layered gabbroic cumulates which vary from olivine gabbro to anorthosite. Several xenoliths of Archaean metamorphic rocks that range in size from 10's to 100's of meters are present in the central part of the intrusion. Within discrete horizons in the layered gabbro are many centimeter- to meter-scale, gabbroic xenoliths. The main cumulus minerals, in order of crystallization, are plagioclase, olivine and clinopyroxene ± Fe-Ti oxides. Biotite and Fe-Ti-oxide are the dominant intercumulus phases. Orthopyroxene occurs not as a cumulus phase but as peritectic overgrowths on cumulus olivine. A detailed petrographic and mineral chemical study of samples from two stratigraphically controlled traverses through the layered gabbro indicates that the stratigraphy cannot be correlated along the 33 km strike of the ring dyke. Mineral compositions show both normal and reversed fractionation trends. These patterns are interpreted to record at least three separate intrusions of magma into restricted dilatant zones within the ring dyke possibly associated with ongoing caldera collapse. Calculations of parental melt composition using mineral — melt equilibria show that even the most primitive gabbros crystallized from an evolved magma with mg# of 0.42-0.49. The presence of orthopyroxene overgrowths on cumulus olivine suggests rising silica activity in the melt during crystallization and implies a subalkaline parentage for the layered gabbro.

  6. Decimeter Scale Ultra-Fine Fault Rocks (Possible Pseudotachylites) in an Ancient Subduction Thrust Zone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rowe, C. D.; Moore, J. C.; Meneghini, F.; McKiernan, A. W.

    2004-12-01

    Large bodies of ultrafine fault rock (possible pseudotachylite or frictional melt) occur within cataclastic thrust zones in the Ghost Rocks Formation, Kodiak Accretionary Complex, Alaska. The Paleocene Ghost Rocks Formation includes map-scale mélange belts formed by flattening and shearing of seafloor sediments and volcanic rocks at about 250 degrees C and 325 MPa (~13 km depth) during subduction between 65-60Ma. Ten to 15-meter thick cataclastite zones crosscut the mélange fabric at a low angle, representing a stage of increasingly localized shear during subduction thrusting. Ultrafine fault rocks occur as thick (10-25cm) continuous planar beds along the boundaries of cataclastites, or in discontinuous accumulation bodies within cataclastite zones. The boundaries of the ultrafine fault rocks are intrusive, sharp but irregular and deform the cataclastite host fabric. Single pulse intrusions of the ultrafine fault rock range up to 0.5m in intrusive dimension and form complex morphologies resembling both upward and downward directed flame structures and dike-sill complexes, as well as sheath folds and disharmonic flow banding and folding. These field characteristics indicate fluidization and perhaps frictional melting of the ultrafine fault rocks. Ultrafine fault rock bodies can be traced laterally for meters to tens of meters at individual outcrops and occur for about 2 km along strike. Preliminary SEM analysis reveals that the primary matrix material is physically and chemically homogenous down to few-micron scale, consistent with the field identification of pseudotachylite. Thin sections show rounded remnant quartz aggregates, typical of pseudotachylytes. Although some thin sections show suggest melting others may represent ultracataclastite. Some ultrafine fault rock material is rebrecciated and cataclastized to a fine scale, indicating reactivation of previous fault rock generation surfaces. These ultrafine fault rock zones represent the most highly deformed

  7. Magnetic anomalies in Bahia Esperanza: A window of magmatic arc intrusions and glacier erosion over the northeastern Antarctic Peninsula

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Galindo-Zaldívar, Jesús; Ruiz-Constán, Ana; Pedrera, Antonio; Ghidella, Marta; Montes, Manuel; Nozal, Francisco; Rodríguez-Fernandez, Luis Roberto

    2013-02-01

    Bahia Esperanza, constituting the NE tip of the Antarctic Peninsula, is made up of Paleozoic clastic sedimentary rocks overlain by a Jurassic volcano-sedimentary series and intruded by Cretaceous gabbros and diorites. The area is located along the southern part of the Pacific Margin magnetic anomaly belt. Field magnetic researches during February 2010 contribute to determining the deep geometry of the intermediate and basic intrusive rocks. Moreover, the new field data help constrain the regional Pacific Margin Anomaly, characterized up to now only by aeromagnetic and marine data. Field magnetic susceptibility measurements of intrusive intermediate and basic rocks, responsible for magnetic anomalies, ranges from 0.5 × 10- 3 SI in diorites to values between 0.75 × 10- 3 SI and 1.3 × 10- 3 SI in gabbros. In addition, a significant remanent magnetism should also have contributed to the anomalies. The regional magnetic anomaly is characterized by a westward increase from 100 nT up to 750 nT, associated with large intrusive diorite bodies. They probably underlie most of the western slopes of Mount Flora. Gabbros in the Nobby Nunatak determine local residual rough anomalies that extend northwards and westwards, pointing to the irregular geometry of the top of the basic rocks bodies below the Pirámide Peak Glacier. However, the southern and eastern boundaries with the Buenos Aires Glacier are sharp related to deep glacier incision. As a result of the glacier dynamics, magnetic anomalies are also detected north of the Nobby Nunatak due to the extension of the anomalous body and the presence of gabbro blocks in the moraines. The Bahia Esperanza region is a key area where onshore field geological and magnetic research allows us to constrain the shape of the crustal igneous intrusions and the basement glacier geometry, providing accurate data that complete regional aeromagnetic research.

  8. Mapping faults and intrusions onshore Disko Island by use of Vibroseismic data, shallow marine seismic data and electromagnetic observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Clausen, Ole R.; Nørmark, Egon; Gulbrandsen, Pelle; Sabra, Henrik

    2014-05-01

    The west Greenland margin is characterized by sedimentary basins containing high density of intrusions (dikes and sills) originating from the Cenozoic breakup and separation of Greenland and North American. The magmatic rocks have lately attracted interest due to observations of hydrocarbons associated to the intrusions but here due to the ore potential associated to the same intrusions. In 2000 a marine seismic campaign by GEUS in the coastal areas of West Greenland showed that it is possible to identify magmatic intrusions in the sedimentary succession as well as map normal faults, and that the intrusions are heterogeneous distributed and probably related to the normal faults. The presence of normal faults is known from the regional onshore geological mapping campaigns performed by GEUS. However, the marine seismic data indicate a much more complicated structural pattern than presented in the onshore maps, which is a well-known phenomenon (Marcussen et al., 2002). In 2012 and 2013 seismic data were acquired onshore on the northern coast of Disko as part of a research project funded by Avannaa Resources . The objective was initially to test whether it is possible to acquire data of a quality enabling the observation and mapping of intrusions in the subsurface. Later it was followed by a more extensive survey where it was attempted to map the depth to and geometry of the intrusions. The relatively dense seismic grid onshore -compared to the marine seismic data offshore west Greenland- enable the identification and more important the mapping of several intrusions. They show some of the same characteristics as intrusions observed at e.q. the Norwegian margin of the North Atlantic (Hansen et al., 2004). The preliminary results which integrate both marine and onshore seismic data revise the structural understanding of the area and indicate a close relation between the intrusions and the rift related normal faults. The results are consistent with remote sensing methods

  9. Process characteristics of worry and obsessive intrusive thoughts.

    PubMed

    Clark, D A; Claybourn, M

    1997-12-01

    One hundred and twenty-five university students were administered a battery of self-report measures to assess worry disposition and content, frequency of obsessive intrusive thoughts, and 10 conceptually derived appraisal dimensions of worry and obsessional intrusions. Process ratings indicated that the worrisome thoughts were considered more disturbing than the ego-dystonic intrusive thoughts. Worry was also distinguished by a focus on the possible consequences of negative events, whereas concern about the personal meaning of the thought was a unique process dimension for obsessive intrusive thoughts. Both content and process variables are important in differentiating worry and obsessive-like intrusive thoughts in a nonclinical population. PMID:9465447

  10. Research on IPv6 intrusion detection system Snort-based

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shen, Zihao; Wang, Hui

    2010-07-01

    This paper introduces the common intrusion detection technologies, discusses the work flow of Snort intrusion detection system, and analyzes IPv6 data packet encapsulation and protocol decoding technology. We propose the expanding Snort architecture to support IPv6 intrusion detection in accordance with CIDF standard combined with protocol analysis technology and pattern matching technology, and present its composition. The research indicates that the expanding Snort system can effectively detect various intrusion attacks; it is high in detection efficiency and detection accuracy and reduces false alarm and omission report, which effectively solves the problem of IPv6 intrusion detection.

  11. Extreme high field strength element (HFSE) depletion and near-chondritic Nb/Ta ratios in Central Andean adakite-like lavas (~ 28°S, ~ 68°W)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goss, A. R.; Kay, S. M.

    2009-03-01

    The eruption of andesites with steep REE patterns and high Sr concentrations (adakite-like) in the northernmost Chilean flatslab region of the Central Andes spatially and temporally corresponds with the appearance of a marked HFSE (high field strength element) depletion in these lavas (La/Ta up to 95). Known as the Dos Hermanos and Pircas Negras andesites, these lavas erupted at the beginning (˜ 8 Ma), during (7-3 Ma), and immediately following (3-2 Ma) a period of tectonic instability characterized by eastward migration of the frontal volcanic arc. ICP-MS analyses of the HFSE reveal a range of chondritic (20-18) to subchondritic (18-11) Nb/Ta ratios in these lavas. Evident temporal trace element trends support a change from a rutile-bearing to an amphibole-bearing eclogitic residual assemblage in equilibrium with the mafic precursor magmas of these andesites. This change in residual mineralogy is contemporaneous with the onset of frontal arc migration in the region. Potential eclogitic sources for the Dos Hermanos and Pircas Negras adakitic andesites include mafic Andean lower crust and an additional flux of forearc crust transported to the sub-arc mantle via subduction erosion during the height of arc migration and Pircas Negras magmatism. Batch melting models of rutile- or amphibole-bearing eclogitic arc basalt in tandem with magma mixing calculations generate the observed adakitic signatures and near-chondritic Nb/Ta ratios of these Central Andean andesites.

  12. Petrogenesis of postcollisional magmatism at Scheelite Dome, Yukon, Canada: Evidence for a lithospheric mantle source for magmas associated with intrusion-related gold systems

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Mair, John L.; Farmer, G. Lang; Groves, David I.; Hart, Craig J.R.; Goldfarb, Richard J.

    2011-01-01

    The type examples for the class of deposits termed intrusion-related gold systems occur in the Tombstone-Tungsten belt of Alaska and Yukon, on the eastern side of the Tintina gold province. In this part of the northern Cordillera, extensive mid-Cretaceous postcollisional plutonism took place following the accretion of exotic terranes to the continental margin. The most cratonward of the resulting plutonic belts comprises small isolated intrusive centers, with compositionally diverse, dominantly potassic rocks, as exemplified at Scheelite Dome, located in central Yukon. Similar to other spatially and temporally related intrusive centers, the Scheelite Dome intrusions are genetically associated with intrusion-related gold deposits. Intrusions have exceptional variability, ranging from volumetrically dominant clinopyroxene-bearing monzogranites, to calc-alkaline minettes and spessartites, with an intervening range of intermediate to felsic stocks and dikes, including leucominettes, quartz monzonites, quartz monzodiorites, and granodiorites. All rock types are potassic, are strongly enriched in LILEs and LREEs, and feature high LILE/HFSE ratios. Clinopyroxene is common to all rock types and ranges from salite in felsic rocks to high Mg augite and Cr-rich diopside in lamprophyres. Less common, calcic amphibole ranges from actinolitic hornblende to pargasite. The rocks have strongly radiogenic Sr (initial 87Sr/86Sr from 0.711-0.714) and Pb isotope ratios (206Pb/204Pb from 19.2-19.7), and negative initial εNd values (-8.06 to -11.26). Whole-rock major and trace element, radiogenic isotope, and mineralogical data suggest that the felsic to intermediate rocks were derived from mafic potassic magmas sourced from the lithospheric mantle via fractional crystallization and minor assimilation of metasedimentary crust. Mainly unmodified minettes and spessartites represent the most primitive and final phases emplaced. Metasomatic enrichments in the underlying lithospheric mantle

  13. The differentiation of the Skaergaard Intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hunter, R. H.; Sparks, R. S. J.

    1987-04-01

    Previous interpretations of the Skaergaard Intrusion suggested that differentiation involved extreme iron-enrichment but no silica-enrichment until a very late stage. This model is difficult to reconcile with petrological and geochemical evidence, with the behaviour of tholeiitic volcanic suites and with phase equilibria. We propose that the Skaergaard magma evolved on a trend of pronounced silica-enrichment after cumulus magnetite appeared at the top of the Lower Zone. At that stage, the magma was of ferrobasaltic composition with close to 50% SiO2. The Middle and Upper Zones of the intrusion dominantly represent crystal accumulation during differentiation from ferrobasalt through iron-rich basaltic andesite and icelandite to rhyolite, a fractionation sequence common in tholeiitic volcanic provinces. This interpretation requires re-appraisal of the physical processes responsible for the differentiation. In particular, residual liquids became lower in density with fractionation and would have caused the Skaergaard magma chamber to have become compositionally zoned.

  14. Non-intrusive refrigerant charge indicator

    DOEpatents

    Mei, Viung C.; Chen, Fang C.; Kweller, Esher

    2005-03-22

    A non-intrusive refrigerant charge level indicator includes a structure for measuring at least one temperature at an outside surface of a two-phase refrigerant line section. The measured temperature can be used to determine the refrigerant charge status of an HVAC system, and can be converted to a pressure of the refrigerant in the line section and compared to a recommended pressure range to determine whether the system is under-charged, properly charged or over-charged. A non-intrusive method for assessing the refrigerant charge level in a system containing a refrigerant fluid includes the step of measuring a temperature at least one outside surface of a two-phase region of a refrigerant containing refrigerant line, wherein the temperature measured can be converted to a refrigerant pressure within the line section.

  15. Distributed fiber optic moisture intrusion sensing system

    DOEpatents

    Weiss, Jonathan D.

    2003-06-24

    Method and system for monitoring and identifying moisture intrusion in soil such as is contained in landfills housing radioactive and/or hazardous waste. The invention utilizes the principle that moist or wet soil has a higher thermal conductance than dry soil. The invention employs optical time delay reflectometry in connection with a distributed temperature sensing system together with heating means in order to identify discrete areas within a volume of soil wherein temperature is lower. According to the invention an optical element and, optionally, a heating element may be included in a cable or other similar structure and arranged in a serpentine fashion within a volume of soil to achieve efficient temperature detection across a large area or three dimensional volume of soil. Remediation, moisture countermeasures, or other responsive action may then be coordinated based on the assumption that cooler regions within a soil volume may signal moisture intrusion where those regions are located.

  16. Mineralogical, petrological, and geochemical studies of the Limahe mafic-ultramatic intrusion and associated Ni-Cu sulfide ores, SW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tao, Yan; Li, Chusi; Song, Xie-Yan; Ripley, Edward M.

    2008-11-01

    The Limahe Ni-Cu sulfide deposit is hosted by a small mafic-ultramafic intrusion (800 × 200 × 300 m) that is temporally associated with the voluminous Permian flood basalts in SW China. The objective of this study is to better understand the origin of the deposit in the context of regional magmatism which is important for the ongoing mineral exploration in the region. The Limahe intrusion is a multiphase intrusion with an ultramafic unit at the base and a mafic unit at the top. The two rock units have intrusive contacts and exhibit similar mantle-normalized trace element patterns and Sr-Nd isotopic compositions but significantly different cumulus mineralogy and major element compositions. The similarities suggest that they are related to a common parental liquid, whereas the differences point to magma differentiation by olivine crystallization at depth. Sulfide mineralization is restricted to the ultramafic unit. The abundances of sulfides in the ultramafic unit generally increase towards the basal contacts with sedimentary footwall. The δ 34S values of sulfide minerals from the Limahe deposit are elevated, ranging from +2.4 to +5.4‰. These values suggest the involvement of external S with elevated δ 34S values. The mantle-normalized platinum-group element (PGE) patterns of bulk sulfide ores are similar to those of picrites associated with flood basalts in the region. The abundances of PGE in the sulfide ores, however, are significantly lower than that of sulfide liquid expected to segregate from undepleted picrite magma. Cr-spinel and olivine are present in the Limahe ultramafic rocks as well as in the picrites. Mantle-normalized trace element patterns of the Limahe intrusion generally resemble those of the picrites. However, negative Nb-Ta anomalies, common features of contamination with the lower or middle crust, are present in the intrusion but absent in the picrites. Sr-Nd isotopes suggest that the Limahe intrusion experienced higher degrees of

  17. Non-intrusive appliance monitor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hart, George W.; Kern, Jr., Edward C.; Schweppe, Fred C.

    1989-08-15

    A non-intrusive monitor of energy consumption of residential appliances is described in which sensors, coupled to the power circuits entering a residence, supply analog voltage and current signals which are converted to digital format and processed to detect changes in certain residential load parameters, i.e., admittance. Cluster analysis techniques are employed to group change measurements into certain categories, and logic is applied to identify individual appliances and the energy consumed by each.

  18. Detection techniques for non-intrusive testing

    SciTech Connect

    Humphrey, D.L.

    1997-02-01

    Non-intrusive testing using nuclear techniques began with neutron activation. Other industrial applications gradually developed over the years. Explosives, hidden by terrorists, and the sophisticated concealment of contraband by smugglers have motivated the development of new technology for rapid real-time inspection systems. The basic nuclear techniques that have been proposed are reviewed. The applicable detectors are compared. {copyright} {ital 1997 American Institute of Physics.}

  19. Non-intrusive appliance monitor apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Hart, G.W.; Kern, E.C. Jr.; Schweppe, F.C.

    1989-08-15

    A non-intrusive monitor of energy consumption of residential appliances is described in which sensors, coupled to the power circuits entering a residence, supply analog voltage and current signals which are converted to digital format and processed to detect changes in certain residential load parameters, i.e., admittance. Cluster analysis techniques are employed to group change measurements into certain categories, and logic is applied to identify individual appliances and the energy consumed by each. 9 figs.

  20. Intrusion detection using pattern recognition methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jiang, Nan; Yu, Li

    2007-09-01

    Today, cyber attacks such as worms, scanning, active attackers are pervasive in Internet. A number of security approaches are proposed to address this problem, among which the intrusion detection system (IDS) appears to be one of the major and most effective solutions for defending against malicious users. Essentially, intrusion detection problem can be generalized as a classification problem, whose goal is to distinguish normal behaviors and anomalies. There are many well-known pattern recognition algorithms for classification purpose. In this paper we describe the details of applying pattern recognition methods to the intrusion detection research field. Experimenting on the KDDCUP 99 data set, we first use information gain metric to reduce the dimensionality of the original feature space. Two supervised methods, the support vector machine as well as the multi-layer neural network have been tested and the results display high detection rate and low false alarm rate, which is promising for real world applications. In addition, three unsupervised methods, Single-Linkage, K-Means, and CLIQUE, are also implemented and evaluated in the paper. The low computational complexity reveals their application in initial data reduction process.

  1. Intrusion detection using rough set classification.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lian-hua; Zhang, Guan-hua; Zhang, Jie; Bai, Ying-cai

    2004-09-01

    Recently machine learning-based intrusion detection approaches have been subjected to extensive researches because they can detect both misuse and anomaly. In this paper, rough set classification (RSC), a modern learning algorithm, is used to rank the features extracted for detecting intrusions and generate intrusion detection models. Feature ranking is a very critical step when building the model. RSC performs feature ranking before generating rules, and converts the feature ranking to minimal hitting set problem addressed by using genetic algorithm (GA). This is done in classical approaches using Support Vector Machine (SVM) by executing many iterations, each of which removes one useless feature. Compared with those methods, our method can avoid many iterations. In addition, a hybrid genetic algorithm is proposed to increase the convergence speed and decrease the training time of RSC. The models generated by RSC take the form of "IF-THEN" rules, which have the advantage of explication. Tests and comparison of RSC with SVM on DARPA benchmark data showed that for Probe and DoS attacks both RSC and SVM yielded highly accurate results (greater than 99% accuracy on testing set). PMID:15323002

  2. A Rock Encyclopedia That Includes Rock Samples.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Laznicka, Peter

    1981-01-01

    Described is a rock encyclopedia combining rock sample sets and encyclopedic word and picture entries which can be used as a realistic information resource for independent study or as a part of a course. (JT)

  3. Role of asthenosphere and lithosphere in the genesis of the Early Permian Huangshan mafic-ultramafic intrusion in the Northern Tianshan, NW China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deng, Yu-Feng; Song, Xie-Yan; Hollings, Pete; Zhou, Taofa; Yuan, Feng; Chen, Lie-Meng; Zhang, Dayu

    2015-06-01

    The Huangshan mafic-ultramafic intrusion hosts a large Ni-Cu sulfide deposit and is situated in the Northern Tianshan at the southern margin of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB). The Early Permian intrusion consists of lherzolite, websterite, gabbronorite, gabbro and diorite. The Huangshan deposit contains ~ 80.4 Mt of ore grading 0.54 wt.% Ni and 0.3 wt.% Cu and is the second largest magmatic sulfide deposit in Northern Xinjiang, China. The Huangshan intrusive rocks are enriched in large ion lithophile elements and depleted in high field strength elements relative to N-MORB, with low Nb/U (1.53-5.27) and high Ba/Nb (1.68-121) ratios, indicating that the primary magma was derived from partial melting of a metasomatized mantle source. The mafic-ultramafic rocks in the Northern Tianshan are characterized by lower Ca contents (< 1000 ppm) in olivine, more depleted Nb and Ta, lower Nb/U ratios, and higher εΝd(t) than those of the Tarim mafic-ultramafic intrusive rocks and ocean island basalts (OIB). The range of εΝd(t) values of the mafic-ultramafic rocks in the Northern Tianshan over time suggests a greater role for upwelling asthenospheric mantle in the younger rocks. This implies that they were produced by interactions between metasomatized lithospheric mantle and depleted asthenospheric melts rather than a mantle plume. The linear distribution of Permian mafic-ultramafic intrusions along the Kangguer fault in the Northern Tianshan suggests that slab breakoff played a key role in the genesis of the mantle-derived magma in a syn-collisional setting.

  4. Fracture fillings and intrusive pyroclasts, Inyo Domes, California

    SciTech Connect

    Heiken, G.; Wohletz, K.; Eichelberger, J.

    1988-05-10

    Fractures containing juvenile magmatic pyroclasts were encountered during drilling into a 600-year-old feeder dike beneath the Inyo Domes chain, California. The Inyo Domes consist of a north-south trending, 10-km-long chain of domes, rhyolitic tuff rings, and phreatic craters. Boreholes were cored through the 51-m-diameter conduit of Obsidian Dome, the largest of the Inyo Domes, and through an unvented portion of the intrusion (dike) 1 km to the south. Pyroclast-bearing fractures were intersected in both holes: (1) 7- to 40-cm-thick fractures in welded basaltic scoria and quartz monzonite country rock are adjacent to the conduit at depths of 400--411 m and 492--533 m; they contain gray, clastic deposits, which show truncated cross bedding and convolute bedding; (2) adjacent to the dike, massive fracture fillings occur at depths of 289--302 m (129 m east of the dike) and 366--384 m (95--87 m east of the dike).

  5. Lower-crustal intrusion on the North Atlantic continental margin.

    PubMed

    White, R S; Smith, L K; Roberts, A W; Christie, P A F; Kusznir, N J; Roberts, A M; Healy, D; Spitzer, R; Chappell, A; Eccles, J D; Fletcher, R; Hurst, N; Lunnon, Z; Parkin, C J; Tymms, V J

    2008-03-27

    When continents break apart, the rifting is sometimes accompanied by the production of large volumes of molten rock. The total melt volume, however, is uncertain, because only part of it has erupted at the surface. Furthermore, the cause of the magmatism is still disputed-specifically, whether or not it is due to increased mantle temperatures. We recorded deep-penetration normal-incidence and wide-angle seismic profiles across the Faroe and Hatton Bank volcanic margins in the northeast Atlantic. Here we show that near the Faroe Islands, for every 1 km along strike, 360-400 km(3) of basalt is extruded, while 540-600 km(3) is intruded into the continent-ocean transition. We find that lower-crustal intrusions are focused mainly into a narrow zone approximately 50 km wide on the transition, although extruded basalts flow more than 100 km from the rift. Seismic profiles show that the melt is intruded into the lower crust as sills, which cross-cut the continental fabric, rather than as an 'underplate' of 100 per cent melt, as has often been assumed. Evidence from the measured seismic velocities and from igneous thicknesses are consistent with the dominant control on melt production being increased mantle temperatures, with no requirement for either significant active small-scale mantle convection under the rift or the presence of fertile mantle at the time of continental break-up, as has previously been suggested for the North Atlantic Ocean. PMID:18368115

  6. Segment linkage in Afar via magma intrusion: the birth of a transform fault?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aronovitz, A. C.; Ebinger, C. J.; Campbell, E.; Keir, D. B.; Ayele, A.; Mitra, G.

    2007-12-01

    Both continental and oceanic rifts are segmented along their length, but the relation between transfer faults and transform faults linking segments remains unclear. How and when do transform faults initiate to link rift segments? Does magma intrusion achieve some of the strain transfer between segments? A temporary seismic array in the volcanically and seismically active Afar rift of Ethiopia provides insights into these two fundamental questions. We analyze the spatial and temporal patterns of earthquakes, and compare these to patterns in high-resolution satellite imagery and space geodetic data from the ongoing seismo-volcanic episode that began in 2005. We integrate these results to understand how stresses are transferred between ridge segments and how this possibly relates to the initiation of transform faults. Earthquake swarms from October 2005 to March 2006 form narrow bands coinciding with NW-SE striking fault zones linking the active Erta' Ale and Tat `Ale magmatic rift segments, and the Dabbahu and Alayta magmatic segments. Step over distances are ~15 km and ~20 km respectively. The time and spatial distribution of these seismic events as well as the correlation of events with magmatic centers suggests that earthquakes are triggered by magma intrusion. These patterns offer insight to magma accommodation along faults and between rift segments, suggesting magma intrusion facilitates transform fault initiation. We compare and contrast active structures during the 2005- 2006 episode with segment linkage patterns preserved in the rock record to understand transform evolution.

  7. Broad accommodation of rift-related extension recorded by dyke intrusion in Saudi Arabia

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Pallister, J.S.; McCausland, W.A.; Jonsson, Sigurjon; Lu, Zhiming; Zahran, H.M.; El, Hadidy S.; Aburukbah, A.; Stewart, I.C.F.; Lundgren, P.R.; White, R.A.; Moufti, M.R.H.

    2010-01-01

    The extensive harrat lava province of Arabia formed during the past 30 million years in response to Red Sea rifting and mantle upwelling. The area was regarded as seismically quiet, but between April and June 2009 a swarm of more than 30,000 earthquakes struck one of the lava fields in the province, Harrat Lunayyir, northwest Saudi Arabia. Concerned that larger damaging earthquakes might occur, the Saudi Arabian government evacuated 40,000 people from the region. Here we use geologic, geodetic and seismic data to show that the earthquake swarm resulted from magmatic dyke intrusion. We document a surface fault rupture that is 8 km long with 91 cm of offset. Surface deformation is best modelled by the shallow intrusion of a north-west trending dyke that is about 10 km long. Seismic waves generated during the earthquakes exhibit overlapping very low- and high-frequency components. We interpret the low frequencies to represent intrusion of magma and the high frequencies to represent fracturing of the crystalline basement rocks. Rather than extension being accommodated entirely by the central Red Sea rift axis, we suggest that the broad deformation observed in Harrat Lunayyir indicates that rift margins can remain as active sites of extension throughout rifting. Our analyses allowed us to forecast the likelihood of a future eruption or large earthquake in the region and informed the decisions made by the Saudi Arabian government to return the evacuees.

  8. River Valley pluton, Ontario - A late-Archean/early-Proterozoic anorthositic intrusion in the Grenville Province

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ashwal, Lewis D.; Wooden, Joseph L.

    1989-01-01

    This paper presents Nd, Sr, and Pb isotopic data indicating a late-Archean/early-Proterozoic age for the River Valley anorthositic pluton of the southwestern Grenville Province of Sudbury, Ontario. Pb-Pb isotopic data on 10 whole-rock samples ranging in composition from anorthosite to gabbro yield an age of 2560 + or - 155 Ma. The River Valley pluton is thus the oldest anorthositic intrusive yet recognized within the Grenville Province. The Sm-Nd isotopic system records an age of 2377 + or - 68 Ma. High Pb-208/Pb-204 of deformed samples relative to igneous-textured rocks implies Th introduction and/or U loss during metamorphism in the River Valley area. Rb-Sr data from igneous-textured and deformed samples and from mineral separates give an age of 2185 + or - 105 Ma, indicating substantial disturbance of the Rb-Sr isotopic system.

  9. Episodic growth of a Late Cretaceous and Paleogene intrusive complex of pegmatitic leucogranite, Ruby Mountains core complex, Nevada, USA

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Howard, K.A.; Wooden, J.L.; Barnes, C.G.; Premo, W.R.; Snoke, A.W.; Lee, S.-Y.

    2011-01-01

    Gneissic pegmatitic leucogranite forms a dominant component (>600 km3) of the midcrustal infrastructure of the Ruby Mountains-East Humboldt Range core complex (Nevada, USA), and was assembled and modified episodically into a batholithic volume by myriad small intrusions from ca. 92 to 29 Ma. This injection complex consists of deformed sheets and other bodies emplaced syntectonically into a stratigraphic framework of marble, calc-silicate rocks, quartzite, schist, and other granitoids. Bodies of pegmatitic granite coalesce around host-rock remnants, which preserve relict or ghost stratigraphy, thrusts, and fold nappes. Intrusion inflated but did not disrupt the host-rock structure. The pegmatitic granite increases proportionally downward from structurally high positions to the bottoms of 1-km-deep canyons where it constitutes 95%-100% of the rock. Zircon and monazite dated by U-Pb (sensitive high-resolution ion microprobe, SHRIMP) for this rock type cluster diffusely at ages near 92, 82(?), 69, 38, and 29 Ma, and indicate successive or rejuvenated igneous crystallization multiple times over long periods of the Late Cretaceous and the Paleogene. Initial partial melting of unexposed pelites may have generated granite forerunners, which were remobilized several times in partial melting events. Sources for the pegmatitic granite differed isotopically from sources of similar-aged interleaved equigranular granites. Dominant Late Cretaceous and fewer Paleogene ages recorded from some pegmatitic granite samples, and Paleogene-only ages from the two structurally deepest samples, together with varying zircon trace element contents, suggest several disparate ages of final emplacement or remobilization of various small bodies. Folded sills that merge with dikes that cut the same folds suggest that there may have been in situ partial remobilization. The pegmatitic granite intrusions represent prolonged and recurrent generation, assembly, and partial melting modification of a

  10. Workshop on Pristine Highlands Rocks and the early History of the Moon

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Longhi, J. (Editor); Ryder, G. (Editor)

    1983-01-01

    Oxide composition of the Moon, evidence for an initially totally molten Moon, geophysical contraints on lunar composition, random sampling of a layered intrusion, lunar highland rocks, early evolution of the Moon, mineralogy and petrology of the pristine rocks, relationship of the pristine nonmore rocks to the highlands soils and breccias, ferroan anorthositic norite, early lunar igneous history, compositional variation in ferroan anosthosites, a lunar magma ocean, deposits of lunar pristine rocks, lunar and planetary compositions and early fractionation in the solar nebula, Moon composition models, petrogenesis in a Moon with a chondritic refractory lithophile pattern, a terrestrial analog of lunar ilmenite bearing camulates, and the lunar magma ocean are summarized.

  11. Mafic dykes intrusive into Pre-Cambrian rocks of the São Luís cratonic fragment and Gurupi Belt (Parnaíba Province), north-northeastern Brazil: Geochemistry, Sr-Nd-Pb-O isotopes, 40Ar/39Ar geochronology, and relationships to CAMP magmatism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein, Evandro L.; Angélica, Rômulo S.; Harris, Chris; Jourdan, Fred; Babinski, Marly

    2013-07-01

    Dykes of diabase and microgabbro intruded into Pre-Cambrian rocks of the São Luís cratonic fragment and Gurupi Belt, which are tectonic and erosive windows of the Parnaíba Basin in north-northeastern Brazil. Ar-Ar ages were determined, and major, trace element, and Nd-Sr-Pb-O isotopic compositions of these dykes were measured to provide insights into their age, and into the nature of their mantle sources and petrogenetic processes. The data have also been used to compare the chemical and isotopic signatures of the dykes with those of the Central Atlantic Magmatic Province (CAMP). Four chemical groups of mafic dykes have been identified. These comprise two subtypes of high-Ti rocks (i) HTi-1 (TiO2 < 2.3 wt.%; SiO2 > 47 wt.%), (ii) HTi-2 (TiO2 > 2.7 wt.%; SiO2 > 47 wt.%), in addition to (iii) evolved high-Ti (TiO2 > 4 wt.%; SiO2 of ~ 46 wt.%) and (iv) low-Si (TiO2 > 2.2 wt.%; SiO2 < 45 wt.%) rocks. 40Ar/39Ar geochronology of plagioclase returned ages of 201 ± 4 Ma and 193 ± 10 Ma for the HTi-2 subtype, and of 201 ± 2 Ma and 207 ± 9 Ma for the evolved high-Ti group. The HTi-1 and low-Si groups presented highly disturbed age spectra, and did not allow the definition of their emplacement ages. The Argon data indicate an age > 200 Ma for the low-Si group and are dubious with respect to the age of theHTi-1 subtype, if coeval with (i.e., ~ 200 Ma), or older than, the HTi-2 and evolved high-Ti types. All groups present δ18O values of pyroxene that are compatible with uncontaminated mantle-derived magmas. The HTi-1 subtype (average 143Nd/144Nd200 = 0.512644; 87Sr/86Sr200 = 0.7035; 206Pb/204Pb of 17.86) shows the less enriched and less fractionated (more primitive) trace element distribution of all groups. The HTi-2 subtype shows enriched trace element pattern and depleted Nd-Sr signature (143Nd/144Nd200 = 0.512610; 87Sr/86Sr200 = 0.7037) and average 206Pb/204Pb ratios of 17.23. The evolved high-Ti chemical group shows average ratios of 143Nd/144Nd200 = 0.512558, 87Sr

  12. Geophysical Exploration of Disseminated and Stockwork deposits associated with plutonic intrusive: A Case study in the eastern flank of the western Cordillera, Colombia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hernandez, O.; Alexander, G. C.; Pintor, I. M.

    2011-12-01

    Disseminated deposit exploration in the tropics suffers from difficult geological mapping due to thick vegetation, lack of rock outcrop, and extensive but variable saprolitic weathering. Geophysical exploration of these deposits normally includes magnetic, induced polarization and gamma ray spectrometry surveys. The largest RTP Total field magnetic anomaly highs are usually associated with the diorite porphyry intrusive bodies. Normally, diorites are less magnetic than the basaltic rocks. Therefore, where the magnetic anomaly highs are related to the intrusions they can be explained by the intensive mineralization of basic metals including magnetite that are associated with the porphyry intrusions. Regularly, the magnetic anomaly gradients help to delineate local discontinuities that can be interpreted as local faults and joints that can be mineralized. The gamma ray spectrometry is useful to determine the anomalous concentration of Potassium, Uranium and Thorium that can be interpreted in terms of alteration halos and linear discontinuities. The statistical analysis of the data also can determine the intermediate intrusive / extrusive nature of the porphyry intrusions. The use of gamma ray spectrometry helps to determine the concentration of elemental potassium, regardless of the associated potassium mineral species, enabling alteration mapping in a geological setting related to volcanic-associated massive sulphide base metals and gold. The induced polarization survey is useful in outlining sulphide distribution in porphyry deposits related to chargeability anomaly highs. The preliminary results of the geophysical exploration program of the eastern flank of the Western Cordillera in the Andes Mountains of Colombia are discussed.

  13. An origin of marginal reversal of the Fongen-Hyllingen layered intrusion by prolonged magma emplacement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Egorova, V.; Latypov, R.

    2012-04-01

    The ~100 m thick marginal zone of the Fongen-Hyllingen Intrusion (FHI) consists of nonlayered, highly iron-enriched ferrodiorites that are overlain by a ~6 km thick layered sequence of gabbroic to dioritic rocks of the Layered Series. From the base upwards the marginal zone become more primitive as exemplified by a significant increase in whole-rock MgO, Mg-number, and normative An. The reverse trends are also evident from an upward increase in An-content of plagioclase (from ~30 to ~43 at.%) and Mg-number of amphibole (from ~9 to ~23 at.%) and clinopyroxene (from ~23 to ~37 at.%). The marginal zone is abruptly terminated at the contact with the overlying Layered Series as is evident from a step-like increase in Mg-number of mafic minerals and An-content of plagioclase, as well as a sharp increase in whole-rock MgO and Mg-number in overlying olivine gabbronorites of the Layered Series. Based on these features the marginal zone of the FHI can be interpreted as an aborted marginal reversal. Reverse trends in whole-rock and mineral compositions, as well as a sharp break in these parameters are indicative of its formation in an open system with the involvement of the prolonged emplacement of magma that became increasingly more primitive. Such development of the marginal reversal was interrupted by the emplacement of a major influx of more primitive magma that produced the Layered Series. The open system evolution of a basaltic magma chamber may represent a general mechanism for the origin of marginal reversals in mafic sills and layered intrusions.

  14. Uranium and other element analyses of igneous rocks of Arkansas

    SciTech Connect

    Steele, K.F.

    1982-05-01

    Seventy-six samples of igneous rocks representing a variety of rock types and locations in Arkansas were analyzed by neutron activation analysis for the elements U, Th, Na, Al, Sc, Ti, V, Mn, Fe, La, Ce, Sm, Eu, Dy, Yb, Lu, and Hf. Samples were collected from the major igneous intrusions at Granite Mountain, Bauxite, Magnet Cove, Potash Sulfur Springs, and Murfreesboro, representing various syenites, lamprophyres, carbonatite, kimberlite, and periodotite. To make the data available for public use without further delay, this report is being issued without the normal technical and copy editing.

  15. A mathematical model for 2D heat transfer dynamics in fluid systems with localized sink of magmatic fluid into local fractured zones above the top of crystallizing intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharapov, V. N.; Cherepanov, A. N.; Popov, V. N.; Bykova, V. G.

    2012-11-01

    A model describing two-dimensional (2D) dynamics of heat transfer in the fluid systems with a localized sink of a magmatic fluid into local fractured zones above the roof of crystallizing crustal intrusions is suggested. Numerical modeling of the migration of the phase boundaries in 2D intrusive chambers under retrograde boiling of magma with relatively high initial water content in the melt shows that, depending on the character of heat dissipation from a magmatic fluid into the host rock, two types of fluid magmatic systems can arise. (1) At high heat losses, the zoning of fluidogenic ore formation is determined by the changes in temperature of the rocks within the contact aureole of the intrusive bodies. These temperature variations are controlled by the migration of the phase boundaries in the cooling melt towards the center of the magmatic bodies from their contacts. (2) In the case of a localized sink of the magmatic fluid in different parts of the top of the intrusive chambers, a specific characteristic scenario of cooling of the magmatic bodies is probably implemented. In 2D systems with a heat transfer coefficient α k < 5 × 104 W/m2 K, an area with quasi-stationary phase boundaries develops close to the region of fluid drainage through the fractured zone in the intrusion. Therefore, as the phase boundaries contract to the sink zone of a fluid, specific thermal tubes arise, whose characteristics depend on the width of the fluid-conductive zone and the heat losses into the side rocks. (3) The time required for the intrusion to solidify varies depending on the particular position of the fluid conductor above the top of the magmatic body.

  16. The Managua Graben and Las Sierras-Masaya volcanic complex (Nicaragua); pull-apart localization by an intrusive complex: results from analogue modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Girard, Guillaume; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin

    2005-06-01

    There is a well-documented association between pull-apart basins in strike-slip zones and large volcanic caldera complexes. Las Sierras-Masaya volcanic complex, Nicaragua, is a large basaltic lava and ignimbrite shield with nested calderas. The widest caldera is partly underlain by a large and dense intrusive complex, evidenced by a positive gravity anomaly. The Las Sierras Caldera, relating to this cumulate complex, is less than 30,000 years old and is probably still hot and ductile. The inner Masaya Caldera hosts an active magmatic system. The volcanic complex is in a dextral transtensional tectonic context of the Nicaraguan Depression. The highly active Managua Graben is on the northern part of the volcano. We speculate that the graben and volcano are linked tectonically, with the graben initiating in response of a regional stress field modified around the dense, ductile intrusive complex. Previous field work and reappraisal of structures with digital elevation model morphological analysis show that the volcano is surrounded by a rhombic fault pattern that may form a nascent pull-apart basin. We have done scaled analogue models to test the effect of intrusion density and rheology anomalies on strike-slip fault geometries. The models show that intrusion density variations alone do not significantly change fault patterns. In contrast, ductile rocks (silicone in the models as analogue for hot mafic intrusive rocks) markedly alter strike-slip fault patterns. In transtension the presence of a ductile intrusion causes the formation of a pull-apart, while in pure strike-slip or transpression, uplift and thrusting is generated. Pull-apart and uplift structures are rhomb-shaped even when the ductile inclusion is circular. We conclude that a pull-apart is developing at Las Sierras-Masaya volcanic complex in response to the transtensive regional deformation regime and the dense, ductile intrusive complex. We suggest that the volcano and graben are one dynamic system and

  17. Ring complexes and related rocks in Africa

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vail, J. R.

    Over 625 igneous complexes throughout Africa and Arabia have been selected and classified on the basis of petrographic association and chronology into six broad age groups forming 29 provinces. The groups range from Mid-Proterozoic to Tertiary and include gabbro, granite, syenite, foid syenite and carbonatite plutonic rocks, the majority in the form of ring-dykes, cone-sheets, plugs, circular intrusions, and their associated extrusive phases. Pan-African late or post-orogenic complexes (720-490 Ma) are common in the Arabian-Nubian and Tuareg shields of north Africa originating from subduction zone derived magmatism. Anorogenic complexes in Egypt, NE and central Sudan, Niger, Nigeria, Cameroon, Zaïre-Burundi, Malawi, Mozambique, Zimbabwe, Namibia and Angola span 550 to 50 Ma and are dominantly alkali granites and foid syenites. Many groups occur as en-echelon bands within linear arrays, and show migrating centres of intrusion in variable directions. In W. Africa there was a progressive shift of emplacement southwards during early Ordovician to Mid-Cretaceous times. Distribution patterns suggest thatdeep seated features, such as shear zones associated with lithospheric plate movements,controlled melting, and the resultant location of the complexes. Economic mineralization is not widespread in the rocks of the African ring complexes and is mainly restricted to small deposits of Sn, W, F, U and Nb.

  18. Bald Mountain gold mining district, Nevada: A Jurassic reduced intrusion-related gold system

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Nutt, C.J.; Hofstra, A.H.

    2007-01-01

    The Bald Mountain mining district has produced about 2 million ounces (Moz) of An. Geologic mapping, field relationships, geochemical data, petrographic observations, fluid inclusion characteristics, and Pb, S, O, and H isotope data indicate that An mineralization was associated with a reduced Jurassic intrusion. Gold deposits are localized within and surrounding a Jurassic (159 Ma) quartz monzonite porphyry pluton and dike complex that intrudes Cambrian to Mississippian carbonate and clastic rocks. The pluton, associated dikes, and An mineralization were controlled by a crustal-scale northwest-trending structure named the Bida trend. Gold deposits are localized by fracture networks in the pluton and the contact metamorphic aureole, dike margins, high-angle faults, and certain strata or shale-limestone contacts in sedimentary rocks. Gold mineralization was accompanied by silicification and phyllic alteration, ??argillic alteration at shallow levels. Although An is typically present throughout, the system exhibits a classic concentric geochemical zonation pattern with Mo, W, Bi, and Cu near the center, Ag, Pb, and Zn at intermediate distances, and As and Sb peripheral to the intrusion. Near the center of the system, micron-sized native An occurs with base metal sulfides and sulfosalts. In peripheral deposits and in later stages of mineralization, Au is typically submicron in size and resides in pyrite or arsenopyrite. Electron microprobe and laser ablation ICP-MS analyses show that arsenopyrite, pyrite, and Bi sulfide minerals contain 10s to 1,000s of ppm Au. Ore-forming fluids were aqueous and carbonic at deep levels and episodically hypersaline at shallow levels due to boiling. The isotopic compositions of H and O in quartz and sericite and S and Pb in sulfides are indicative of magmatic ore fluids with sedimentary sulfur. Together, the evidence suggests that Au was introduced by reduced S-bearing magmatic fluids derived from a reduced intrusion. The reduced

  19. Periodontal changes following molar intrusion with miniscrews

    PubMed Central

    Bayani, Shahin; Heravi, Farzin; Radvar, Mehrdad; Anbiaee, Najmeh; Madani, Azam Sadat

    2015-01-01

    Background: With the introduction of skeletal anchorage system, recently it is possible to successfully intrude molar teeth. On the other hand, there have been concerns about periodontal changes associated with intrusion and there are few studies on this topic, especially for posterior teeth. Materials and Methods: Ten female patients were enrolled in this study. Maxillary molar intrusion was achieved by inserting two miniscrews and a 17 × 25 titanium molybdenum alloy spring. Crestal height changes were evaluated at three intervals including: Baseline (T0), end of active treatment (T1) and 6 months after retention (T2). Other variables including probing depth, gingival recession, attachment level and bleeding on probing were evaluated by clinical measurements in the three above mentioned intervals. One-sample Kolmogrov-Smirnov test ascertained the normality of the data. For all patients, the changes in tooth position and crestal height were evaluated using one-sample t-test. (P < 0.05) Results: Supra-erupted molars were successfully intruded a mean of 2.1 ± 0.9 mm during active treatment (T0-T1). A mean bone resorption of 0.9 ± 0.9 mm in mesial crest and 1 ± 0.8 mm in distal crest had occurred in total treatment (T0-T2). A mean of 0.6 ± 1.4 mm bone was deposited on mesial crest during the retention period (T1-T2) following tooth relapse. On average, 0.8 ± 0.4 mm attachment gain was obtained. Gingival margin coronalized a mean of 0.8 ± 0.6 mm throughout the entire treatment. Probing depth showed no significant change during treatment. Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, these results suggest that not only periodontal status was not negatively affected by intrusion, but also there were signs of periodontal improvement including attachment gain and shortening of clinical crown height. PMID:26288629

  20. Corticostriatal circuitry in regulating diseases characterized by intrusive thinking.

    PubMed

    Kalivas, Benjamin C; Kalivas, Peter W

    2016-03-01

    Intrusive thinking triggers clinical symptoms in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Using drug addiction as an exemplar disorder sustained in part by intrusive thinking, we explore studies demonstrating that impairments in corticostriatal circuitry strongly contribute to intrusive thinking. Neuroimaging studies have long implicated this projection in cue-induced craving to use drugs, and preclinical models show that marked changes are produced at corticostriatal synapses in the nucleus accumbens during a relapse episode. We delineate an accumbens microcircuit that mediates cue-induced drug seeking becoming an intrusive event. This microcircuit harbors many potential therapeutic targets. We focus on preclinical and clinical studies, showing that administering N-acetylcysteine restores uptake of synaptic glutamate by astroglial glutamate transporters and thereby inhibits intrusive thinking. We posit that because intrusive thinking is a shared endophenotype in many disorders, N-acetylcysteine has positive effects in clinical trials for a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction, gambling, trichotillomania, and depression. PMID:27069381

  1. Corticostriatal circuitry in regulating diseases characterized by intrusive thinking

    PubMed Central

    Kalivas, Benjamin C.; Kalivas, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    Intrusive thinking triggers clinical symptoms in many neuropsychiatric disorders. Using drug addiction as an exemplar disorder sustained in part by intrusive thinking, we explore studies demonstrating that impairments in corticostriatal circuitry strongly contribute to intrusive thinking. Neuroimaging studies have long implicated this projection in cue-induced craving to use drugs, and preclinical models show that marked changes are produced at corticostriatal synapses in the nucleus accumbens during a relapse episode. We delineate an accumbens microcircuit that mediates cue-induced drug seeking becoming an intrusive event. This microcircuit harbors many potential therapeutic targets. We focus on preclinical and clinical studies, showing that administering N-acetylcysteine restores uptake of synaptic glutamate by astroglial glutamate transporters and thereby inhibits intrusive thinking. We posit that because intrusive thinking is a shared endophenotype in many disorders, N-acetylcysteine has positive effects in clinical trials for a variety of neuropsychiatric disorders, including drug addiction, gambling, trichotillomania, and depression. PMID:27069381

  2. 900 Ma Pole from the Bjerkreim-Sokndal Layered Intrusion, Rogaland Igneous Complex, Norway: Where Was Baltica in the Early Neoproterozoic?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, L. L.; McEnroe, S. A.

    2014-12-01

    The southern Norwegian Rogaland Igneous Complex (RIC) intruded into post-Sveconorwegian granulite facies crust between 930 and 920 Ma. It includes three massif anorthosites, several small leuconorite bodies and the ~7km thick norite-quartz mangerite layered Bjerkreim-Sokndal (BKS) intrusion. The intrusion consists of five rhythmic mega-units created by repeated magma influxes capped by a transition zone and a thick sequence of more evolved mangerites and quartz mangerites. Over 70 paleomagnetic sites have been collected in the BKS, sampling all the mega-cyclic subunits and overlying mangerites. Remanence within the BKS is held in hemo-ilmenite-only rocks (lower parts of the mega-cyclic units), mixed hemo-ilmenite and magnetite rocks (upper parts of the lower mega-cyclic units) and magnetite only rocks in the upper highest mega-cyclic unit and overlying mangerites. Due to the different oxides present magnetic susceptibility varies over four orders of magnitude with a bimodal distribution (mean susceptibility of 6.4 x 10-3 SI for hemo-ilmenite rocks, and 8.9 x 10-2 SI for magnetite rocks). NRM values do not show a strong bimodal distribution as many of the rocks lacking magnetite have hemo-ilmenite with strong lamellar magnetism; average NRM for the entire suite is 8.83 A/m. All sites within the cyclic part of the intrusion have stable remanence and produce well-clustered site means. Samples from the upper mangerite rocks, dominated by MD magnetite, are often unstable and not all sites provide acceptable data. Mean directions for 66 sites spanning the entire intrusion are I = -73.7°, D = 303.7°, with α95 = 3.6° and k = 24. The resulting pole position is at 36.1°S and 217.5°E, with a paleolatitude for this part of Baltica of 59.7°S. Examination of the magnetic mineralogy combined with geochronology for RIC rocks yields an age of magnetization of ~900 Ma. Metamorphic country rocks yield similar directions at least 10 km from the contact, confirming the presence

  3. Edifice and substrata deformation induced by intrusive complexes and gravitational loading in the Mull volcano (Scotland)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mathieu, Lucie; Vries, Benjamin Van Wyk De

    2009-12-01

    It is likely that the structure of a volcanic edifice can be significantly modified by deformation caused by large, shallow intrusions. Such deformation may interact with that caused by volcano loading. We explore such intrusion-related and loading-related deformation with field evidence and analogue models. To do this we have chosen the eroded Palaeogene Mull volcano (Scotland) that had a major edifice, has well exposed intrusions and significant deformation. There are thin Mesozoic sedimentary rocks forming ductile layers below the volcano, but their thickness is insufficient to allow the gravitational spreading of the volcanic edifice, especially when considering that a thick lava pile covers them. Thus intrusive push may have been the driving force for deformation. The Mull activity migrated toward the northwest, forming three successive intrusive complexes (Centres 1, 2 and 3). Our detailed fieldwork reveals that deformation due to these was accommodated on three levels; along thrust planes in lava sequences, along a décollement located in a thin clay-rich sediment succession and in basement schists. A relative chronology has been established between different groups of structures using dyke and sill cross-cutting relationships. Centre 1 is surrounded by a fold and thrust belt leading to radial expansion. In contrast, Centre 2 and 3 are connected to thrusts located to the south and east, bounded by strike-slip faults, leading to expansion to the southeast. The migration of centres and the directed sliding of the edifice may be related to the presence to the southeast of low-resistance Dalradian basement that failed significantly during growth of Centres 2 and 3. To study the observed relationships we have carried out scaled analogue models. Models are made with fine powder intruded by a viscous magma analogue. The models show an intimate relationship between intrusion growth, uplift of the volcano and subsequent flank sliding. The structures produced can be

  4. Field relation, geochemistry and origin of the Xinglonggou volcanic rocks in Beipiao area, Liaoning Province (China): Reappraisal on the foundering of lower continental crust of North China Craton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yang; Cheng, Su-Hua

    2012-03-01

    Our large scale geological mapping in the Beipiao area, western Liaoning Province, the North China Craton, shows that the exposed "Xinglonggou Formation" is not a monoclinal stratum, but a suit of strongly deformed volcanic rocks intruded by some small plugs. Consequently, two rock groups are categorized for the "Xinglonggou Formation" in the Beipiao area, according to their field relation, petrography, and geochemical characteristics. The group 1 rocks are blackish and fresh, and cut across the deformed group 2 volcanic rocks. Meanwhile, the group 1 rocks exhibit characteristics of higher magnesium number (Mg# ⩾ 60), calcium content (CaO > 5 wt.%), and Sr/Y ratio (>60), but lower potassium (K2O < 2 wt.%) and Rb contents (<40 ppm). Among these rocks, most of them have higher Cs but lower Li content. Geochemically, the group 1 rocks belong to high-SiO2 adakite (HSA). On the contrary, the group 2 is composed of intermediate and acid volcanic rocks, which are brownish or greenish and strongly folded. Compared with the group 1 rocks, they have higher potassium (K2O > 2 wt.%) and Rb contents, but lower Mg# (<60) and calcium content (most samples CaO < 5 wt.%); meanwhile, they have lower Sr/Y ratios (in general <60), and lower Cs but higher Li contents. According to their near zero ɛNd(t) value and radiogenic Pb isotopic compositions, as well as the enrichment of U and Th relative to LREE, neither the group 1 or the group 2 rocks result from the partial melting of the lower crust of North China Craton. The group 1 HSAs are generated by melting of the subducted oceanic crust of the Paleo-Pacific plate; otherwise, the group 2 rocks are derivatives of the magma originated from a slab-derived melt metasomatised mantle.

  5. Rollerjaw Rock Crusher

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peters, Gregory; Brown, Kyle; Fuerstenau, Stephen

    2009-01-01

    The rollerjaw rock crusher melds the concepts of jaw crushing and roll crushing long employed in the mining and rock-crushing industries. Rollerjaw rock crushers have been proposed for inclusion in geological exploration missions on Mars, where they would be used to pulverize rock samples into powders in the tens of micrometer particle size range required for analysis by scientific instruments.

  6. [Defining and questioning intrusion in care situations].

    PubMed

    Malaquin-Pavan, Evelyne

    2015-04-01

    Most care procedures require the patient to give personal information and to reveal their body in order to enable a clinical examination or a care procedure to be carried out, which can leave them feeling embarrassed. Considering as a team what causes the feeling of intrusion in a care procedure enables nursing strategies to be adopted which can help the patient overcome their modesty and feel secure, becoming a partner in a care procedure for which they understand the clinical need and underlying intentionality. Testimonies. PMID:26043628

  7. The architecture of a network level intrusion detection system

    SciTech Connect

    Heady, R.; Luger, G.; Maccabe, A.; Servilla, M.

    1990-08-15

    This paper presents the preliminary architecture of a network level intrusion detection system. The proposed system will monitor base level information in network packets (source, destination, packet size, and time), learning the normal patterns and announcing anomalies as they occur. The goal of this research is to determine the applicability of current intrusion detection technology to the detection of network level intrusions. In particular, the authors are investigating the possibility of using this technology to detect and react to worm programs.

  8. Clinical Evaluation of Efficacy of CIA and CNA Intrusion Arches

    PubMed Central

    Vora, Sambhav; Pandey, Vinisha

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Excessive overbite is one of the most common problems that confront the orthodontist. Deep bite can be due to infraocclusion of posterior teeth, supraocclusion of anterior teeth or a combination of the two. Correction of same can be carried out by extrusion of molars, intrusion of incisors or by a combination of both respectively. Various intrusion arches are recommended for correcting deep bite by true intrusion of anterior teeth, Utility arches, Segmental arch, Connecticut Intrusion Arch (CIA) and Connecticut New Arch (CNA). The purpose of this study was to evaluate clinical efficacy of CIA and CNA intrusion arches. Materials and Methods Tracings recorded from pre and post-treatment lateral cephalograms of 25 patients treated by CIA (Group I) and another 25 patients treated by CNA (Group II) intrusion arches in deep bite cases after four months of treatment were analysed and findings were recorded. Statistical Analysis Paired t-test was used to compare pre and post-treatment changes within Groups I and II and unpaired t-test was used to compare treatment changes between Group I and Group II. A P-value of < 0.05 was set for statistical significance. Results Findings of this study demonstrate that an average of 1mm of intrusion takes place with CIA intrusion arch and 1.3mm with CNA intrusion arch in a period of 4 months. Both intrusion arches do not affect the position of molar in vertical or anteroposterior plane. Interpretation & Conclusion Both CIA and CNA intrusion arches are effective in bringing about intrusion of lower incisors. PMID:26501008

  9. Stabilization of volcanic flanks by dike intrusion: An example from Kilauea

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Delaney, P.T.; Denlinger, R.P.

    1999-01-01

    Dike propagation and dilation increases the compression of adjacent rocks. On volcanoes, especially oceanic shields, dikes are accordingly thought to be structurally destabilizing. As compression is incremented, volcanic flanks are driven outward or downslope and thus increase their susceptibility to destructive earthquakes and giant landslides. We show, however, that the 2-m-thick dike emplaced along the east rift zone of Kilauea in 1983 actually stabilized that volcano's flank. Specifically, production of flank earthquakes dropped more than twofold after 1983 as maximum downslope motion slowed to 6 cm ?? year-1 from approximately 40 cm ?? year-1 during 1980-1982. As much as 65 cm of deflationary subsidence above Kilauea's summit and upper rift zones accompanied the dike intrusion. According to recent estimates, this deflation corresponds to a reduction in magma-reservoir pressure of approximately 4 MPa, probably about as much as the driving pressure of the 1983 dike. The volume of the dike, approximately 0.10-0.15 km3, is orders of magnitude less than the estimated 200- to 250-km3 volume of Kilauea's reservoir of magma and nearby hot, mushy rock. Thus, deflation of that reservoir reduces the compressional load on the flank over a much larger area than intrusion of the dike adds to it, particularly at the dominant depth of seismicity, 8-9 km. A Coulomb block model for flank motion during intervals between major earthquakes requires the low-angle fault beneath Kilauea's flank to exhibit slip weakening, conducive to earthquake instability. Accordingly, the triggering mechanism of destructive earthquakes, several of which have struck Hawaii during the past 150 years, need not require stresses accumulated by dike intrusions.

  10. Automatic identification of responses from porphyry intrusive systems within magnetic data using image analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Holden, Eun-Jung; Fu, Shih Ching; Kovesi, Peter; Dentith, Michael; Bourne, Barry; Hope, Matthew

    2011-08-01

    Direct targeting of mineral deposits using magnetic data may be facilitated by hydrothermal alteration associated with the mineralising event if the alteration changes the magnetic properties of the host rock. Hydrothermal alteration associated with porphyry-style mineralisation typically comprises concentric near-circular alteration zones surrounding a roughly circular central intrusion. The intrusion itself and the proximal alteration zone are usually associated with positive magnetic anomalies whilst the outer alteration zones are much less magnetic. Because the country rocks are usually magnetic, this pattern of alteration produces a central magnetic 'high' surrounded by an annular magnetic 'low'. This paper presents an automatic image analysis system for gridded data that provides an efficient, accurate and non-subjective way to seek the magnetic response of an idealised porphyry mineralising system within magnetic datasets. The method finds circular anomalies that are associated with the central intrusion and inner alteration zone of the porphyry system using a circular feature detection method called the radial symmetry transform. Next, their boundaries are traced using deformable splines that are drawn to the locations of maximum contrast between the amplitudes of the central 'high' and surrounding area of lower magnetisation. Experiments were conducted on magnetic data from Reko Diq, Pakistan; a region known to contain numerous occurrences of porphyry-style mineralisation. The predicted locations of porphyry systems closely match the locations of the known deposits in this region. This system is suitable as an initial screening tool for large geophysical datasets, therefore reducing the time and cost imposed by manual data inspection in the exploration process. The same principles can be applied to the search for circular magnetic responses with different amplitude characteristics.

  11. Diabetes Intrusiveness and Wellness among Elders: A Test of the Illness Intrusiveness Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DeCoster, Vaughn A.; Killian, Tim; Roessler, Richard T.

    2013-01-01

    Using data collected from 147 predominately African American senior citizens in Arkansas, this research examined the Illness Intrusiveness Model (Devins, 1991; Devins & Seland, 1987; Devins & Shnek, 2000) to explain variations in wellness specifically related to participants' adaptation to diabetes. The theoretical model hypothesized…

  12. Relationships between volcano gravitational spreading and magma intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delcamp, Audray; van Wyk de Vries, Benjamin; James, Mike R.; Gailler, L. S.; Lebas, E.

    2012-04-01

    Volcano spreading, with its characteristic sector grabens, is caused by outward flow of weak substrata due to gravitational loading. This process is now known to affect many present-day edifices. A volcano intrusive complex can form an important component of an edifice and may induce deformation while it develops. Such intrusions are clearly observed in ancient eroded volcanoes, like the Scottish Palaeocene centres, or in geophysical studies such as in La Réunion, or inferred from large calderas, such as in Hawaii, the Canaries or Galapagos volcanoes. Volcano gravitational spreading and intrusive complex emplacement may act simultaneously within an edifice. We explore the coupling and interactions between these two processes. We use scaled analogue models, where an intrusive complex made of Golden syrup is emplaced within a granular model volcano based on a substratum of a ductile silicone layer overlain by a brittle granular layer. We model specifically the large intrusive complex growth and do not model small-scale and short-lived events, such as dyke intrusion, that develop above the intrusive complex. The models show that the intrusive complex develops in continual competition between upward bulging and lateral gravity spreading. The brittle substratum strongly controls the deformation style, the intrusion shape and also controls the balance between intrusive complex spreading and ductile layer-related gravitational spreading. In the models, intrusive complex emplacement and spreading produce similar structures to those formed during volcano gravitational spreading alone (i.e. grabens, folds, en échelon fractures). Therefore, simple analysis of fault geometry and fault kinetic indicators is not sufficient to distinguish gravitational from intrusive complex spreading, except when the intrusive complex is eccentric from the volcano centre. However, the displacement fields obtained for (1) a solely gravitational spreading volcano and for (2) a gravitational

  13. Reassessment of the volume of the Las Aguilas mafic-ultramafic intrusives, San Luis, Argentina, based on an alternative geophysical model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Claudia, Zaffarana; Silvana, Geuna; Stella, Poma; Alberto, Patiño Douce

    2011-10-01

    In the Sierra de San Luis, Central Argentina, a belt of small and discontinuous lenses of mafic-ultramafic rocks intrude a polydeformed basement and are thought to be the cause of a local increase of the metamorphic grade from amphibolite to granulite facies conditions. This assumption was especially based on forward modelling of a huge gravity anomaly centered over the Sierra de San Luis, which lead some workers to think that a vast volume of mafic-ultramafic rocks lay in shallow levels. Here, we propose an alternative model to explain this anomaly, in which the mafic-ultramafic intrusion is not the ultimate source. Therefore, there is no need to propose a bigger size than that observed in outcrops for the mafic-ultramafic bodies. The thermal effect of the emplacement of mafic-ultramafic sills and dikes on the host rocks was estimated applying a simple analytical solution (error function) for heating of a semi-infinite half space (the country rocks) in contact with a hotter sheet of finite thickness (the mafic-ultramafic intrusion). Results indicate that the effect of the intrusion of these hot mafic magmas is local, because beyond a few hundred meters from the contact zone temperatures never exceed 600 °C, and a few km from the intrusion they barely increase 50 °C relative to the initial temperature. These results, together with the preservation of primary igneous characteristics (such as rhythmic layering) being overprinted by metamorphic textural changes, indicate that the intrusion occurred before regional deformation. It is suggested that the thermal anomaly in the Pringles Metamorphic Complex could have been mainly caused by factors inherent to their geodynamic setting.

  14. Late Neoproterozoic post-collisional mafic magmatism in the Arabian-Nubian Shield: A case study from Wadi El-Mahash gabbroic intrusion in southeast Sinai, Egypt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khalil, A. E. S.; Obeid, M. A.; Azer, M. K.

    2015-05-01

    Late Neoproterozoic gabbroic intrusion of Wadi El-Mahash lays in the northwestern sector of the Arabian-Nubian Shield (ANS) which is exposed in the Sinai Peninsula, Egypt. It occurs as small undeformed mafic body intruding metamorphic rocks and truncated by alkali granites. Field relations, mineralogical characteristics and chemical data indicate that Wadi El-Mahash mafic intrusion is unmetamorphosed. The intrusion consists of medium- to coarse-grained gabbroic rocks. The medium-grained one (hornblende gabbro) formed nearly simultaneous with, or slightly later than, the coarse-grained rock (pyroxene-hornblende gabbro). Geochemically, the gabbroic samples are characterized by enrichment in LILE relative to HFSE and LREE relative to HREE [(La/Yb)n = 4.52-6.35]. They show geochemical signature similar to other post-collisional gabbroic intrusions of south Sinai. The subduction-related geochemical characteristic of the gabbroic intrusion of Wadi El-Mahash can be explained by partial melting of a relatively enriched lithospheric mantle source following a previous subduction process in the ANS. The gabbroic rocks crystallized at pressures between 6.2 and 6.5 kbar (∼15-20 km depth) with crystallization temperature ranging from 750 to 970 °C. Lithospheric delamination model is suggested for the mafic magma of Wadi El-Mahash since delamination of lithospheric mantle allowed asthenosphere to rise rapidly causing partial melting and generating gabbroic melts. The produced melts then infiltrated the base of the crust to induce the post-collisional magmatism in south Sinai.

  15. Kontay intrusion (Polar Siberia)- an example of strong magmatic differentiation in the single magmatic body

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, Victor

    2016-04-01

    Kontay intrusion is located in the north-west part of Maimecha-Kotuy province, (part of Siberian Large Igneous Province) in the northern part of the Siberian Platform. Intrusion is fully overlaid and practically not studied before. Geophysical data evident that intrusion has form of laccolite with diameter ˜7.5 km and thickness ˜ 2.5 km [1]. Initially lower part of intrusion was described as "gabbro-anortozite and anortositic gabbro" and higher part - as "leucocratic granophyric anortosites" [2]. Complex mineralo-petrological-geochemical study allow to divide intrusion section on three zones: Lower zone (below 1100 m) - layered sequence of leucocratic and melanocratic of biotite- and ortopyroxene-bearing gabbro, with minor alkaline feldspar, Middle zone (1100-700m) - biotite- and K-feldspar bearing gabbro and monzonotes, interstitial space often contain micrographical structures. Biotite corroded clinopyroxene and form interstitial crystals and Upper zone (700-214 m) - petrographically monotone porthyric quartz-monzonites and granosyenites with rare phenocrysts of plagioclase, magnetite, clinopyroxene and biotite. The main secondary minerals are albite, amphibole (edenite-feroedenite), secondary biotite, chlorite, and F,Al-bearing titanite. Rocks of the all parts fall in the same trends on the binary petrochemical diagrams, they belong to the High-K calc-alkaline seria. They are clearly more alkaline then intrusions of Norilsk district and less alkaline then alkaline-ultramafic intrusions of Maymecha-Kotuy province. Volcanic rocks of Norilsk and Maymecha-Kotuy area was subdivided for four geochemical types, mainly by the Ti-content, Th/U, Gd/Yb and Sm/Yb ratio: Low-Ti-1 (predominated), Low-Ti-2 (well -developed in Norilsk region), Moderate-Ti (developed only in the lower part of volcanic formation in Norilsk region), High-Ti (rare in Norilsk region, but widely spread in Mailecha-Kotuy area) [3]. Kontay intrusion rocks belong to Moderate-Ti group. The closest

  16. Diabasic intrusion and lavas, segregation veins, and magma differentiation at Kahoolawe volcano, Hawaii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fodor, R. V.; Bauer, G. R.

    2014-04-01

    A mafic sill-like intrusion, ~5 × 30 m, exposed along the eastern shoreline of Kahoolawe Island, Hawaii, represents tholeiitic magma emplaced as diabase among caldera-filling lavas. It differentiated from ~7.8 wt.% MgO to yield low-MgO (2.9 wt.%) vesicular segregation veins. We examined the intrusion for whole-rock and mineral compositions for comparison to Kahoolawe caldera-fill lavas (some also diabasic), to the Uwekahuna laccolith (Kilauea), and to gabbros, diabases, and segregations and oozes of other tholeiitic shield volcanoes (e.g., Mauna Loa and Kilauea lava lakes). We also evaluate this extreme differentiation in terms of MELTS modeling, using parameters appropriate for Hawaiian crystallization environments. Kahoolawe intrusion diabase samples have major and trace element abundances and plagioclase, pyroxene, and olivine compositions in agreement with those in gabbros and diabases of other volcanoes. However, the intrusion samples are at the low-MgO end of the large MgO range formed by the collective comparative samples, as many of those have between 8 and 20 wt.% MgO. The intrusion's segregation vein has SiO2 53.4 wt.%, TiO2 3.2 wt.%, FeO 13.5 wt.%, Zr 350 ppm, and La 16 ppm. It plots in compositional fields formed by other Hawaiian segregations and oozes that have MgO <5 wt.%—fields that show large variances, such as factor of ~2 differences for incompatible element abundances accompanying SiO2 from ~49 to 59 wt.%. Our MELTS modeling assesses the Kahoolawe intrusion as differentiating from ~8 wt.% MgO parent magma beginning along oxygen buffers equivalent to FMQ and FMQ-2, having magmatic H2O of 0.15 and 0.7 wt.% (plus traces of CO2 and S), and under 100 and 500 bars pressure. Within these parameters, MELTS calculates that <3 wt.% MgO occurs at ~1,086 to 1,060 °C after ~48 to 63 % crystallization, whereby the lesser crystallization percentages and lower temperatures equate to higher magmatic H2O, leading to high SiO2, ~56-58 wt.%. To contrast

  17. Geochemical and isotopic studies of the Lady of the Lake Intrusion and associated tobacco root Batholith: Constraints on the genetic relation between Cretaceous mafic and silicic magmatism in Southwestern Montana

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sarkar, Arindam; Brophy, James G.; Ripley, Edward M.; Li, Chusi; Kamo, Sandra L.

    2009-12-01

    Small volumes of alkalic mafic intrusions are spatially associated with Cretaceous to Early Tertiary granodioritic to granitic intrusions in the batholithic province of southwestern Montana. The mafic rocks generally occur near the contacts of the Boulder, Pioneer, and Tobacco Root Batholiths with country rocks, but their genetic relation with the batholiths is uncertain. The Lady of the Lake Intrusion is a small layered body composed of melagabbro and gabbro that occurs along the south-central margin of the Tobacco Root Batholith near its contact with Archean country rocks. A diorite unit, spatially distinct from the granodiorite/quartz monzonite of the Batholith intrudes the gabbroic rocks of the Lady of the Lake Intrusion. Zircon crystals from the melagabbro and diorite units give U-Pb ages that are very similar to that of the Tobacco Root Batholith at 74.88 ± 0.17 Ma and 76.24 ± 0.08 Ma, respectively. Mineral chemistry, whole rock major and trace element compositions, and oxygen and sulfur isotope ratios have been utilized to evaluate the genetic relation between the Lady of the Lake Intrusion, the diorite, and the Tobacco Root Batholith. No significant variation in the composition of clinopyroxene is observed in different rock units of the Lady of the Lake Intrusion. Minor olivine with Fo 64 in the melagabbro unit is interpreted to represent early crystallization in the base of the intrusion. Whole rock major and trace element compositions, as well as results from modeling using the MELTS program, are consistent with the premise that the diorite was produced by fractional crystallization of the same magma that was parental to the gabbros of the Lady of the Lake Intrusion. Both whole rock chemistry and oxygen isotopes support the interpretation that the parental magma was an uncontaminated mantle-derived basaltic magma. In contrast, trace element and oxygen isotopes indicate that the quartz monzonitic and granodioritic rocks of the Tobacco Root Batholith and

  18. Derivation of S and Pb in phanerozoic intrusion-related metal deposits from neoproterozoic sedimentary pyrite, Great Basin, United States

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Vikre, P.G.; Poulson, S.R.; Koenig, A.E.

    2011-01-01

    The thick (???8 km), regionally extensive section of Neoproterozoic siliciclastic strata (terrigenous detrital succession, TDS) in the central and eastern Great Basin contains sedimentary pyrite characterized by mostly high d34S values (-11.6 to 40.8%, <70% exceed 10%; 51 analyses) derived from reduction of seawater sulfate, and by markedly radiogenic Pb isotopes ( 207Pb/204Pb <19.2; 15 analyses) acquired from clastic detritus eroded from Precambrian cratonal rocks to the east-southeast. In the overlying Paleozoic section, Pb-Zn-Cu-Ag-Au deposits associated with Jurassic, Cretaceous, and Tertiary granitic intrusions (intrusion-related metal deposits) contain galena and other sulfide minerals with S and Pb isotope compositions similar to those of TDS sedimentary pyrite, consistent with derivation of deposit S and Pb from TDS pyrite. Minor element abundances in TDS pyrite (e.g., Pb, Zn, Cu, Ag, and Au) compared to sedimentary and hydrothermal pyrite elsewhere are not noticeably elevated, implying that enrichment in source minerals is not a precondition for intrusion-related metal deposits. Three mechanisms for transferring components of TDS sedimentary pyrite to intrusion-related metal deposits are qualitatively evaluated. One mechanism involves (1) decomposition of TDS pyrite in thermal aureoles of intruding magmas, and (2) aqueous transport and precipitation in thermal or fluid mixing gradients of isotopically heavy S, radiogenic Pb, and possibly other sedimentary pyrite and detrital mineral components, as sulfide minerals in intrusion-related metal deposits. A second mechanism invokes mixing and S isotope exchange in thermal aureoles of Pb and S exsolved from magma and derived from decomposition of sedimentary pyrite. A third mechanism entails melting of TDS strata or assimilation of TDS strata by crustal or mantle magmas. TDS-derived or assimilated magmas ascend, decompress, and exsolve a mixture of TDS volatiles, including isotopically heavy S and radiogenic Pb

  19. From Intrusion Detection to Self Protection

    SciTech Connect

    Frincke, Deb; Wespi, Andreas; Zamboni, Diego

    2007-04-11

    Modern computer systems have become so complex and interdependent that the traditional model of system defense, utilizing layers and including an intrusion detection system that provides alerts to a human who responds to them, is becoming unfeasible. Effective human-guided real-time responses are no longer a reasonable expectation for large scale systems--this is particularly troublesome because a failure to respond correctly and rapidly can have disastrous consequences. In an ideal world, our systems would automatically detect and respond to threats of all kinds, including but not limited to automated attacks, human-guided attacks, and the constant onslaught of unsolicited email (spam). Traditionally, these threats have been dealt with by separate communities--the anti-virus community, the intrusion-detection/firewall community, and the anti-spam community. Today however, we see an increasing need for integrating different technologies toward achieving a common goal. In this special issue, we surveyed the research community with the intent of identifying novel, multidisciplinary and integrated approaches to system defense that contribute towards development of true self-protecting and self-healing systems. The result is reflected in the articles we selected.

  20. Characterizing and Improving Distributed Intrusion Detection Systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Hurd, Steven A.; Proebstel, Elliot P.

    2007-11-01

    Due to ever-increasing quantities of information traversing networks, network administrators are developing greater reliance upon statistically sampled packet information as the source for their intrusion detection systems (IDS). Our research is aimed at understanding IDS performance when statistical packet sampling is used. Using the Snort IDS and a variety of data sets, we compared IDS results when an entire data set is used to the results when a statistically sampled subset of the data set is used. Generally speaking, IDS performance with statistically sampled information was shown to drop considerably even under fairly high sampling rates (such as 1:5). Characterizing and Improving Distributed Intrusion Detection Systems4AcknowledgementsThe authors wish to extend our gratitude to Matt Bishop and Chen-Nee Chuah of UC Davis for their guidance and support on this work. Our thanks are also extended to Jianning Mai of UC Davis and Tao Ye of Sprint Advanced Technology Labs for their generous assistance.We would also like to acknowledge our dataset sources, CRAWDAD and CAIDA, without which this work would not have been possible. Support for OC48 data collection is provided by DARPA, NSF, DHS, Cisco and CAIDA members.

  1. Platinum mineralization in the Kapalagulu Intrusion, western Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmij, Harry R.; Cabri, Louis J.

    2016-03-01

    Low-grade copper and nickel mineralization was found near the eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika at Kungwe Bay in the early part of the twentieth century. The mineralization occurs in harzburgite at the base of a layered gabbro complex known as the Kapalagulu Intrusion, emplaced between the Paleoproterozoic Ubendian basement and overlying Neoproterozoic Itiaso Group metasediments. Several mining and exploration companies continued the geophysical and drilling exploration for base metals throughout the last century culminating in the discovery of high-grade platinum-group element (PGE) mineralization associated with chromitite and sulfide-bearing harzburgite within the southeastern extension of the Kapalagulu Intrusion (known as the Lubalisi Zone) that is covered by a layer of nickel-rich laterite regolith. The poorly layered southeastern harzburgite forms part of the >1500 m-thick Lower Ultramafic Sequence and resembles a dike-like body that flares upwards into a succession of well-layered gabbroic rocks of the Upper Mafic Sequence. No PGE mineralization has been found in the layered gabbro; all the mineralization is associated with the chromite- and sulfide-rich harzburgite of the Lower Ultramafic Sequence and the laterite regolith overlying the mineralized harzburgite. The Lubalisi Zone harzburgite is underlain by basal dunite and overlain by an interval of layered harzburgite and troctolite and this ultramafic sequence is folded into a syncline that plunges towards the northwest that has been modified by major dolerite-filled faults orientated subparallel to the fold axial surface. Extensive deep drilling in the Lubalisi Zone of the Kapalagulu Intrusion shows that the folded harzburgite can be subdivided into a lower feldspathic harzburgite, a harzburgite containing chromitite seams and intervals of sulfide and chromite mineralization known as the Main Chromite Sulfide Succession (MCSS), an overlying sulfide-rich harzburgite, and an upper feldspathic harzburgite

  2. Platinum mineralization in the Kapalagulu Intrusion, western Tanzania

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilhelmij, Harry R.; Cabri, Louis J.

    2016-03-01

    Low-grade copper and nickel mineralization was found near the eastern shore of Lake Tanganyika at Kungwe Bay in the early part of the twentieth century. The mineralization occurs in harzburgite at the base of a layered gabbro complex known as the Kapalagulu Intrusion, emplaced between the Paleoproterozoic Ubendian basement and overlying Neoproterozoic Itiaso Group metasediments. Several mining and exploration companies continued the geophysical and drilling exploration for base metals throughout the last century culminating in the discovery of high-grade platinum-group element (PGE) mineralization associated with chromitite and sulfide-bearing harzburgite within the southeastern extension of the Kapalagulu Intrusion (known as the Lubalisi Zone) that is covered by a layer of nickel-rich laterite regolith. The poorly layered southeastern harzburgite forms part of the >1500 m-thick Lower Ultramafic Sequence and resembles a dike-like body that flares upwards into a succession of well-layered gabbroic rocks of the Upper Mafic Sequence. No PGE mineralization has been found in the layered gabbro; all the mineralization is associated with the chromite- and sulfide-rich harzburgite of the Lower Ultramafic Sequence and the laterite regolith overlying the mineralized harzburgite. The Lubalisi Zone harzburgite is underlain by basal dunite and overlain by an interval of layered harzburgite and troctolite and this ultramafic sequence is folded into a syncline that plunges towards the northwest that has been modified by major dolerite-filled faults orientated subparallel to the fold axial surface. Extensive deep drilling in the Lubalisi Zone of the Kapalagulu Intrusion shows that the folded harzburgite can be subdivided into a lower feldspathic harzburgite, a harzburgite containing chromitite seams and intervals of sulfide and chromite mineralization known as the Main Chromite Sulfide Succession (MCSS), an overlying sulfide-rich harzburgite, and an upper feldspathic harzburgite

  3. SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology and thermal modeling of multilayer granitoid intrusions. Implications for the building and thermal evolution of the Central System batholith, Iberian Massif, Spain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Díaz Alvarado, Juan; Fernández, Carlos; Castro, Antonio; Moreno-Ventas, Ignacio

    2013-08-01

    This work shows the results of a U-Pb SHRIMP zircon geochronological study of the central part of the Gredos massif (Spanish Central System batholith). The studied batholith is composed of several granodiorite and monzogranite tabular bodies, around 1 km thick each, intruded into partially molten pelitic metasediments. Granodiorites and monzogranites, belonging to three distinct intrusive bodies, and samples of anatectic leucogranites have been selected for SHRIMP U-Pb zircon geochronology. Distinct age groups, separated by up to 20 Ma, have been distinguished in each sample. Important age differences have also been determined among the most representative age groups of the three analyzed granitoid bodies: 312.6 ± 2.8 Ma for the Circo de Gredos Bt-granodiorites (floor intrusive layer), 306.9 ± 1.5 Ma for the Barbellido-Plataforma granitoids (top intrusive layer) and 303.5 ± 2.8 Ma for Las Pozas Crd-monzogranites (middle intrusive layer). These age differences are interpreted in terms of sequential emplacement of the three intrusive bodies, contemporary with the Late Paleozoic D3 deformation phase. The anatectic leucogranites are coeval to slightly younger than the adjacent intrusive granodiorites and monzogranites (305.4 ± 1.6 Ma for Refugio del Rey leucogranites and 303 ± 2 Ma for migmatitic hornfelses). It is suggested that these anatectic magmas were generated in response to the thermal effects of granodiorite intrusions. Thermal modeling with COMSOL Multiphysics® reveals that sequential emplacement was able to keep the thermal conditions of the batholith around the temperature of zircon crystallization in granitic melts (around 750 °C) for several million of years, favoring the partial melting of host rocks and the existence of large magma chambers composed of crystal mush prone to be rejuvenated after new intrusions.

  4. Geomechanical rock properties of a basaltic volcano

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaefer, Lauren; Kendrick, Jackie; Lavallée, Yan; Oommen, Thomas; Chigna, Gustavo

    2015-06-01

    In volcanic regions, reliable estimates of mechanical properties for specific volcanic events such as cyclic inflation-deflation cycles by magmatic intrusions, thermal stressing, and high temperatures are crucial for building accurate models of volcanic phenomena. This study focuses on the challenge of characterizing volcanic materials for the numerical analyses of such events. To do this, we evaluated the physical (porosity, permeability) and mechanical (strength) properties of basaltic rocks at Pacaya Volcano (Guatemala) through a variety of laboratory experiments, including: room temperature, high temperature (935 °C), and cyclically-loaded uniaxial compressive strength tests on as-collected and thermally-treated rock samples. Knowledge of the material response to such varied stressing conditions is necessary to analyze potential hazards at Pacaya, whose persistent activity has led to 13 evacuations of towns near the volcano since 1987. The rocks show a non-linear relationship between permeability and porosity, which relates to the importance of the crack network connecting the vesicles in these rocks. Here we show that strength not only decreases with porosity and permeability, but also with prolonged stressing (i.e., at lower strain rates) and upon cooling. Complimentary tests in which cyclic episodes of thermal or load stressing showed no systematic weakening of the material on the scale of our experiments. Most importantly, we show the extremely heterogeneous nature of volcanic edifices that arise from differences in porosity and permeability of the local lithologies, the limited lateral extent of lava flows, and the scars of previous collapse events. Input of these process-specific rock behaviors into slope stability and deformation models can change the resultant hazard analysis. We anticipate that an increased parameterization of rock properties will improve mitigation power.

  5. Ortigalita Peak gabbro, Franciscan complex: U-Pb dates of intrusion and high-pressure low-temperature metamorphism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mattinson, James M.; Echeverria, Lina M.

    1980-12-01

    Paleontological and isotopic age data from the Franciscan complex in the Ortigalita Peak quadrangle, Diablo Range, California, provide new insight into the tectonic evolution of at least part of the Franciscan complex. Graywacke, shale, pillowed greenstone, and chert in the quadrangle were deposited in Late Jurassic (Tithonian) time, about 135 to 150 m.y. ago, on the basis of radiolaria. These rocks then were incorporated in an accretionary wedge prior to the intrusion of gabbroic magma 95 m.y. ago (U-Pb dating on zircons). Subduction (metamorphism of gabbro and surrounding sedimentary rocks to blueschist grade) closely followed intrusion at about 92 m.y. ago (U-Pb dating on metamorphic titanite and “plagioclase” = albite + pumpellyite ± quartz). The brief interval between intrusion and subduction confirms the idea that the gabbro was intruded into the accretionary wedge, essentially at the site of plate convergence. The much longer interval (about 40 to 55 m.y.) between deposition and subduction reveals that the Franciscan had a long presubduction history and provides a time frame within which more speculative concepts such as extensive northward translation of the Franciscan must be constrained.

  6. Periodicity of Kı¯lauea's Dike Intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montgomery-Brown, E. K.; Miklius, A.

    2015-12-01

    Magmatic intrusions commonly occur in the rift zones of Kı¯lauea Volcano. Individual dike intrusions observed by geodetic methods are usually 5 to 10 km long, and can occur repeatedly in the same region. Five such intrusions in Kı¯lauea's East Rift Zone, with inferred locations downrift of the bend where the NNW trending upper ERZ turns to the ENE trending ERZ, have occurred since the start of the ongoing ERZ eruption in 1983. The intrusions occur on one of two segments that correlate with seismic segments (Wright and Klein, USGS PP1806, 2014): Makaopuhi (1993 and 2007) and Nāpau (1983, 1997, and 2011). During each intrusion, the amount of dike opening was between 2 and 3 meters. Intrusions into the UERZ tend to be much smaller (~10 cm of dike opening) and occur more frequently. The time between ERZ intrusions for same-segment pairs are: 14.07 (1983-1997), 14.09 (1997-2011), and 13.95 (1993-2007) years, with the Nāpau segment becoming active about 3.5 years after the Makaopuhi segment in each case. The amount of modeled dike opening during each of these events roughly corresponds to the amount of seaward south flank motion and deep rift opening accumulated in the time between events, as was noted by Owen et al. (GRL, 2000) for the 1983 and 1997 intrusions. The recurrence interval of ~14 years appears to be unaffected by the magma surge of 2003-2007 (Poland et al., Nature, 2012), suggesting that flank motion, rather than magma supply, could be a controlling factor in the periodicity of intrusions. The long duration of the seismic catalog and the coincidence of repeated dike intrusions with the seismic segments suggest that on the timescale of decades, Kı¯lauea's East Rift Zone segments are persistent rather than ephemeral features related to single intrusion events.

  7. Molar Intrusion in Open-bite Adults Using Zygomatic Miniplates.

    PubMed

    Marzouk, Eiman S; Abdallah, Essam Mohamed; El-Kenany, Walid A

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the skeletal, dental and soft tissue changes that arise after intrusion of the maxillary molars using zygomatic miniplates in adult skeletal anterior open bite patients. In addition to measuring the amount and rate of molar intrusion; with special emphasis on changes in the axial inclination of the intruded molars. The study group was composed of 13 anterior open bite patients (mean age 18 years, 8 months ± 2 years, 2 months) with posterior dentoalveolar excess. Mini-plates were placed in the zygomatic buttress bilaterally. The upper arch was segmentally leveled and a double Trans-Palatal Arch (TPA) was bonded. Closed NiTi coil spring was placed bilaterally between the book of the mini-plate just mesial and distal to the first molar buccal tube applying intrusive force of 450 gper side. Lateral and posteroanterior cephalograms were taken before intrusion (T1: post upper segmental leveling) and after intrusion (T2). Comparison between means before and after the intrusion was done using Wilcoxon Signed Ranks test (WSRT). Mandibular autorotation followed the molar intrusion, SNB and SN-Pog angles significantly increased while the ANB, MP-SN angle and N-S-Gn angle significantly decreased. The mean amount of accomplished molar intrusion was 3.1mm ± 0.74mm, with a rate of 0.36mm per month ± 0.08mm per month and a bite closure of 6.55mm ± 1.83mm. There was no significant buccal tip in the right and left molars upon intrusion. Conclusion: Miniplates zygomatic anchorage can be used effectively for skeletal open bite correction through posterior dento-alveolar intrusion. Intrusion of the posterior teeth with skeletal anchorage induced counterclockwise rotation of the mandible and, as a consequence, corrected the anteroposterior intermaxillary relationship with a dramatic improvement in the facial soft tissue convexity. PMID:26349291

  8. Deformation-driven differentiation during in-situ crystallization of the Iguilid mafic intrusion (West African craton)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berger, Julien; Diot, Hervé; Lo, Khalidou

    2015-04-01

    The 2.7 Ga Iguilid mafic body is a small (9x2 km) magmatic intrusion with preserved igneous textures and not affected by metamorphism and deformation. It intrudes the metamorphic Archean basement of the Amsaga domain in the West African craton in Mauritania. The dominant lithology is a gabbronorite with subordinate gabbros and norites. We investigated 45 oriented samples for fabric analysis, anisotropy of magnetic susceptibility and geochemical analyses to explore the link between chemical differentiation and emplacement of the plutonic body. According to the limited variations in modal proportions and in major element compositions within the intrusion, the Iguilid pluton crystallized via an in-situ mechanism where solidification fronts progressively thickens from the rim to the core of the cooling intrusion and where the trace-element composition is controlled by the amount of interstitial liquid (containing most incompatible trace-elements) preserved between cumulus minerals before total solidification. An in-situ crystallization process alone normally does not produce chemical differentiation but the mafic cumulates at Iguilid have been deformed during their crystallization (i.e. when melt was still present). The vertical foliations and the randomly oriented lineations argue for horizontal flattening as the main deformation mechanism. We estimated the amount of trapped interstitial liquid preserved between the network of cumulate minerals with geochemical modelling in 12 samples and found that it is negatively correlated to the anisotropy degree determined by fabric analysis. The rocks located close to the margins of the intrusion were not deformed, probably because the degree of crystallization and, hence, the viscosity of the mush was too high. The most deformed rocks with the lowest trapped interstitial liquid content are found in the center of the intrusion where the crystal mushes were rich enough in melt to record significant strain. Deformation leaded to

  9. Prior-List Intrusions in Serial Recall Are Positional

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Osth, Adam F.; Dennis, Simon

    2015-01-01

    Henson (1996) provided a number of demonstrations of error patterns in serial recall that contradict chaining models. One such error pattern concerned when participants make intrusions from prior lists: Rather than originating from random positions in the prior list, intrusions tend to be recalled in the same position as their position in the…

  10. SAMPLING-BASED APPROACH TO INVESTIGATING VAPOR INTRUSION

    EPA Science Inventory

    Vapor intrusion is defined as the migration of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) into occupied buildings from contaminated soil or ground water. EPA recently developed guidance to facilitate assessment of vapor intrusion at sites regulated by RCRA and CERCLA. The EPA guidance e...

  11. Identification and Control of Pollution from Salt Water Intrusion.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC. Office of Water Programs.

    This document contains informational guidelines for identifying and evaluating the nature and extent of pollution from salt water intrusion. The intent of these guidelines is to provide a basic framework for assessing salt water intrusion problems and their relationship to the total hydrologic system, and to provide assistance in developing…

  12. Intrusive and Withdrawn Depressed Mothers and Their Infants

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Field, Tiffany; Hernandez-Reif, Maria; Diego, Miguel

    2006-01-01

    This review of the literature on two different interaction styles of depressed mothers, intrusive and withdrawn, shows that withdrawn versus intrusive mothers typically have an EEG pattern that is associated with negative affect (i.e., greater relative right frontal EEG activation) as well as lower levels of the activating neurotransmitter,…

  13. Young women's experiences of intrusive behavior in 12 countries.

    PubMed

    Sheridan, Lorraine; Scott, Adrian J; Roberts, Karl

    2016-01-01

    The present study provides international comparisons of young women's (N = 1,734) self-reported experiences of intrusive activities enacted by men. Undergraduate psychology students from 12 countries (Armenia, Australia, England, Egypt, Finland, India, Indonesia, Italy, Japan, Portugal, Scotland, and Trinidad) indicated which of 47 intrusive activities they had personally experienced. Intrusive behavior was not uncommon overall, although large differences were apparent between countries when women's personal experiences of specific intrusive activities were compared. Correlations were carried out between self-reported intrusive experiences, the Gender Empowerment Measure (GEM), and Hofstede's dimensions of national cultures. The primary associations were between women's experiences of intrusive behavior and the level of power they are afforded within the 12 countries. Women from countries with higher GEM scores reported experiencing more intrusive activities relating to courtship and requests for sex, while the experiences of women from countries with lower GEM scores related more to monitoring and ownership. Intrusive activities, many of them constituent of harassment and stalking, would appear to be widespread and universal, and their incidence and particular form reflect national level gender inequalities. PMID:26299620

  14. Chineysky Layered Intrusion with unique V and PGE-Cu ores (Siberia, Russia)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gongalskiy, Bronislav; Krivolutskaya, Nadezda

    2010-05-01

    South of the Siberian platform is an extraordinary metallogenic province. Many giant deposits of different genetic types are concentrated here: Udokan (Cu), Chiney (Ti-Fe-V, Pd-Cu), Katugin (Ta, Nb), Sulumat (Fe) etc. It is his considered this massif is the largest component of the Proterozoic volcanic-plutonic system of the Kodar-Udokan district. Chineisky massif located among Cu-rich sedimentary rocks is represented by interlayering horizons of gabbronorite and titanomagnetite gabbro in its lower zone and gabbro and anorthosite in the upper zone.The intrusive rocks were proved to be genetically interrelated and show certain similar geochemical features: they have elevated TiO2 concentrations and have similar trace element patterns and (La/Sm)N and (Gd/Yb)N ratios (1.5-2.3 and 1.87-2.06, respectively). The Chineisky massif is thought to have been formed by the successive emplacement of genetically similar basic magmas, which produced four rock groups with fine and coarse layering and cyclicity of variable rank (micro-rhythms, rhythms, units, and series). The results of cluster analysis indicate that the rocks can be classified into 13 petrochemical types. The phase and chemical characteristics of the parental melts of these compositions were simulated with the use of the COMAGMAT-3.5 computer model, which was also applied to evaluate the composition of the most primitive initial magma of the whole Chineisky massif. Our results indicate that the primitive magma was heterogeneous (olivine + plagioclase titanomagnetite + melt) at a temperature of approximately 1130 C. The initial melt had a ferrobasaltic composition and was close to saturation with magnetite at ~NNO 0.5 The basic and ultrabasic rocks of the Luktur pluton are supposed to be the Mg-rich fraction of the parental melt. Gravimetric and magnetic geophysical data show that ultrabasic and basic rocks occur at shallow depths at the Chiney pluton and around it. These facts show the existence of huge magmatic

  15. Permeability evolution as a result of fluid-rock interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Astakhov, Dmitriy Konstantinovich

    2000-10-01

    Fluid-rock interaction plays a critical role in the evolution of rock permeability. Among the most important engineering applications are flow of hydrocarbons in petroleum reservoirs, thermal energy extraction, water supply exploration, and toxic and radioactive waste management. Important natural examples include multiple dikes and sheeted intrusions, natural hydraulic fracturing, water circulation in the oceanic crust, and ore deposits formation. In this thesis, new effects associated with stress and temperature dependent permeability of fractured rock were studied. The conducted asymptotic and numerical analysis supported by field and laboratory observations resulted in better understanding of these phenomena and useful recommendations for science and engineering. In particular, the evolution of permeability as a result of the fluid-rock interaction was considered for hydraulic fracturing, fluid flow through jointed layered rocks, and water circulation in seafloor hydrothermal systems. It was shown that in all three cases fluid-rock interaction plays a critical role and must be taken into account by accurately computing changes of fracture apertures. It was also shown that elastic interaction between the segments significantly affects multisegmented hydraulic fracture dimensions and driving pressure and can alter the permeability of jointed layered rocks by orders of magnitude. Fracture closure due to thermal stresses can dramatically reduce water flow through the oceanic crust changing the regime of heat transfer near mid-oceanic ridges and the temperature of the water discharging from the hydrothermal vents. Fracture closure by internal fluid pressure---an effect never previously reported---was found in the study of parallel, closely located fractures. Asymptotic formula that is simple but accurate for all possible parameter ranges was suggested for the permeability of parallel joint sets. These findings may have a significant impact on hydraulic fracture

  16. Thermochronology and Cooling Histories of Intrusive Suites: Implications for Incremental Pluton Assembly

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davis, J.; Coleman, D.; Heizler, M.

    2007-12-01

    Debate persists about the timescales and mechanisms of pluton emplacement and batholith formation. An understanding of whether plutons accumulate as large masses of magma or as an incremental series of pulses, in which the active magma body is small relative to the final pluton, is important for understanding the relationship between volcanoes and plutons. If volcanic eruptions < 1000 km3 are the most common size and large ignimbrites are rare, it follows that most plutons should record accumulations of small volumes of melt that were emplaced over long time intervals (millions to tens of millions of years) and therefore preserve predictable, protracted thermal histories. Modeling predicts observable differences in thermal histories of plutons and their aureoles that can be tested through thermochronology. Application of multiple chronometers (zircon and titanite U-Pb TIMS; hornblende, biotite, and K-feldspar 40Ar/39Ar; zircon and titanite (U-Th)/He) combined with K-feldspar multiple diffusion domain (MDD) modeling were used to determine the thermal history and to calibrate thermal models of two eastern California, Sierra Nevada batholith intrusive suites; the dike-like John Muir Intrusive Suite (JMIS) and the laccolithic Mt. Whitney Intrusive Suite (MWIS), and their wall rocks. Preliminary results of (U-Th)/He zircon data from the JMIS and its wall rock (the Tinemaha granodiorite) show a tight cluster of dates ranging from 75.6 to 70.4 Ma. The JMIS is thought to be mesozonal (8 to 11 km) and these data are interpreted as resulting from exhumation and additional 40Ar/39Ar data are required to determine if the thermal history reflects incremental intrusions. In contrast to the JMIS, preliminary (U-Th)/He zircon data from the MWIS and its wall rock (the Bullfrog pluton) show a wide range in dates ranging from 91.4 to 74.6 Ma that are interpreted to reflect reheating events. Amphibole 40Ar/39Ar inverse isochron dates, K- feldspar age spectra, and (U-Th)/He zircon data

  17. Groundwater intrusion into leaky sewer systems.

    PubMed

    Wittenberg, H; Aksoy, H

    2010-01-01

    Vast volumes of groundwater are drained by urban sewer systems. This unwanted flow component intrudes into sewer systems through leaky joints or connected house drains. However, unlike urban storm drainage, it has a high seasonal variation corresponding to groundwater storage and long slow recessions similar to baseflow in rivers also fed by shallow groundwater exfiltrating into the surface waters. By applying the nonlinear reservoir algorithm as used for baseflow separation from total flow in a river, groundwater flow is separated from daily measured influents to treatment plants in Lower Saxony and Baden-Württemberg, Germany and in the Terkos Lake watershed near Istanbul, Turkey. While waste water flows vary only moderately within a year, separated intruded groundwater flows show recessions and seasonal variations correlated to baseflow in neighbouring rivers. It is possible to conclude that recession characteristics of treatment plant influents allow quantification and prediction of groundwater intrusion into sewer systems. PMID:20595758

  18. Stress, intrusive imagery, and chronic distress.

    PubMed

    Baum, A

    1990-01-01

    Discusses the nature of stress in the context of problems with its definition and sources of confusion regarding its usefulness and specificity. Stress can be defined as a negative emotional experience accompanied by predictable biochemical, physiological, and behavioral changes that are directed toward adaptation either by manipulating the situation to alter the stressor or by accommodating its effects. Chronic stress is more complex than most definitions suggest and is clearly not limited to situations in which stressors persist for long periods of time. Responses may habituate before a stressor disappears or may persist long beyond the physical presence of the stressor. This latter case, in which chronic stress and associated biobehavioral changes outlast their original cause, is considered in light of research at Three Mile Island and among Vietnam veterans. The role of intrusive images of the stressor or uncontrollable thoughts about it in maintaining stress is explored. PMID:2286178

  19. Coastal Marsh Monitoring for Persistent Saltwater Intrusion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hall, Callie M.

    2008-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews NASA's work on the project that supports the Gulf of Mexico Alliance (GOMA) Governors Action Plan to monitor the coastal wetlands for saltwater intrusion. The action items that relate to the task are: (1) Obtain information on projected relative sea level rise, subsidence, and storm vulnerability to help prioritize conservation projects, including restoration, enhancement, and acquisition, and (2) Develop and apply ecosystem models to forecast the habitat structure and succession following hurricane disturbance and changes in ecological functions and services that impact vital socio-economic aspects of coastal systems. The objectives of the program are to provide resource managers with remote sensing products that support ecosystem forecasting models requiring salinity and inundation data. Specifically, the proposed work supports the habitat-switching modules in the Coastal Louisiana Ecosystem Assessment and Restoration (CLEAR) model, which provides scientific evaluation for restoration management.

  20. Application of resistivity and GPR techniques for the characterization of the coastal litho-stratigraphy and aquifer vulnerability due to seawater intrusion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maury, Shrikant; Balaji, S.

    2015-11-01

    The objective of this study is to identify geological properties and structural settings, allowing salt-water intrusion to the aquifers in oceanic originated rock formations of the South Andaman Island. To evaluate the impact of seawater in groundwater aquifer, several geophysical surveys using ground penetrating radar (GPR) and resistivity sounding were performed through the most significant sites, located near coastal areas, tidal channels and agriculture land. High-resolution GPR images were obtained and combined with resistivity sounding, which allows to identify the mixing/transition zone of fresh and saline groundwater and also successfully delineated the structural geometry and litho-stratigraphic details of aquifers. We show that the sedimentary formations are highly susceptible to seawater intrusion than the mantle originated ophiolites. Further, potential impacts from seawater intrusion are higher along the west coast than the east coast because of macro-pore tendency of soils allows seawater filtration.

  1. Isotope-geochemical Nd-Sr evidence of Palaeoproterozoic plume magmatism in Fennoscandia and mantle-crust interaction on stages of layered intrusions formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Serov, Pavel; Bayanova, Tamara; Kunakkuzin, Evgeniy; Steshenko, Ekaterina

    2016-04-01

    Palaeoproterozoic Fennoscandian layered intrusions belong to the pyroxenite-gabbronorite-anorthosite formation and spread on a vast area within the Baltic Shield. Based on isotope U-Pb, Sm-Nd, Rb-Sr and Re-Os data the duration of this formation can be to 100-130 Ma (2.53-2.40 Ga) [Serov et. al., 2008; Bayanova et. al., 2009]. We have studied rocks of layered PGE-bearing Fedorovo-Pansky, Monchetundra, Burakovsky, Olanga group intrusions and Penikat intrusion. According to recent and new complex Nd-Sr-REE data magma source of the vast majority of these intrusions was a mantle reservoir with unusual characteristics: negative values of ɛNd (from 0 to -4) and ISr = 0.702-0.706, flat spectra of REE (value of (La/Yb)N ~ 1.0-5.8) with positive Eu-anomalies [Bayanova et. al., 2009; Bayanova et. al., 2014]. However, the distribution of REE for ore-bearing gabbronorite intrusions Penikat (Sm-Nd age is 2426 ± 38 Ma [Ekimova et. al., 2011]) has a negative Eu-anomalies. This may be due to the formation of plagioclase and its removal from the magma chamber. One of the aims of isotope geochemical investigations is to establish the contribution of mantle components in the formation of layered intrusions rocks and the degrees of contamination of the magma source by crustal material. To calculate the proportion of mantle component model binary mixture was used [Jahn et. al., 2000]. As the mantle components we used data for CHUR: ɛNd = 0, [Nd] = 1.324 [Palm, O'Neil, 2003] and for crustal components were used host-rocks Nd-data. The proportion of mantle component for the studied intrusions was 77-99%. Also, data were obtained for the Monchetundra dike complex and amphibolized gabbro, for which the proportion of mantle material was 20-40%. For these rocks a significant crustal contamination is most likely. This process resulted in low values of ɛNd, a direct relationship between ɛNd and Nd concentration, and significant differences between the U-Pb and Sm-Nd model ages. A

  2. Emplacement of sandstone intrusions during contractional tectonics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palladino, Giuseppe; Grippa, Antonio; Bureau, Denis; Alsop, G. Ian; Hurst, Andrew

    2016-08-01

    Sandstone injections are created by the forceful emplacement of remobilized sand in response to increases in overpressure. However, the contribution provided by horizontal compressive stress to the build-up in overpressure, and the resulting emplacement of sand injection complexes, is still to be substantiated by robust field observations. An opportunity to address this issue occurs in Central California where a large volume of sandstone intrusions record regionally-persistent supra-lithostatic pore-pressure. Detailed fieldwork allows sandstone-filled thrusts to be recognized and, for the first time, permits us to demonstrate that some sandstone intrusions are linked to contractional deformation affecting the western border of the Great Valley Basin. Fluidized sand was extensively injected along thrust surfaces, and also fills local dilatant cavities linked to thrusting. The main aims of this paper are to provide detailed descriptions of the newly recognized syn-tectonic injections, and describe detailed cross-cutting relationships with earlier sandstone injection complexes in the study area. Finally, an evolutionary model consisting of three phases of sand injection is provided. In this model, sand injection is linked to contractional tectonic episodes affecting the western side of the Great Valley Basin during the Early-Middle Cenozoic. This study demonstrates that sand injections, driven by fluid overpressure, may inject along thrusts and folds and thereby overcome stresses associated with regional contractional deformation. It is shown that different generations of sand injection can develop in the same area under the control of different stress regimes, linked to the evolving mountain chain.

  3. Geochemistry and geochronology of Paleozoic intrusions in the Nalati (Narati) area in western Tianshan, Xinjiang, China: Implications for Paleozoic tectonic evolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Xue-Yi; Wang, Hong-Liang; Li, Ping; Chen, Jun-Lu; Ma, Zhong-Ping; Zhu, Tao; Wang, Ning; Dong, Yun-Peng

    2013-08-01

    The Nalati (Narati) area in the Chinese western Tianshan is characterized by abundant Paleozoic intrusions, including granites, diorites and gabbros. They are not only indicators of the interaction between crust and mantle, but also useful clues for tracing the tectonic history of the Tianshan Orogen. Most Early Paleozoic granitoids (biotite monzonitic granites and muscovite granites) of this study are from the Yili Block. The biotite monzonitic granites (mixed-source-derived I-type granites) have a zircon U-Pb age of 497.0 ± 5.9 Ma, indicating the time of the subduction of the Terskey Oceanic crust in the Late Cambrian. The 427.2 ± 5.7 Ma Zircon U-Pb age of the S-type muscovite granites let us interpret that these granites may have been formed during the crust thickening process after the collision between the Yili Block and the Nalati Block. In western Tianshan the Late Paleozoic biotite granites, muscovite granites, quartz diorites, biotite monzonitic granites, granodiorites and alkali granites have respectively a LA-ICPMS zircon U-Pb age of 371.8 ± 6 Ma, 357.2 ± 7.5 Ma, 313.9 ± 2.5 Ma and 296.9 ± 2.4 Ma. The biotite granites display I-type geochemical features and are considered to have been derived from a lower continental crust source. The muscovite granites have a pronounced S-type affinity and are considered to have been formed by the partial melting of thickened continental crust after the collision between the Central Tianshan Belt and the South Tianshan Belt. The quartz-diorites are adakite-like and have an I-type affinity, which are considered to have been formed by partial melting of a delaminated lower crust in a post-orogenic extension setting. The granodiorites also show some typical geochemical features of adakite. Their formation is considered to be related to the lower crustal delamination and the ascending of asthenosphere after the collision event. The alkali granites show an A-type granite affinity. They may have been formed in a within

  4. Mafic intrusions triggering eruptions in Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sigmarsson, O.

    2012-04-01

    The last two eruptions in Iceland, Eyjafjallajökull 2010 and Grímsvötn 2011, were both provoked by an intrusion of more mafic magma into pre-existing magmatic system. Injection into the latter volcano, which is located in the main rift-zone of the island, above the presumed centre of the mantle plume and is the most active volcano of Iceland, has been gradual since the last eruption in 2004. In contrast, at Eyjafjallajökull volcano, one of the least active volcano in Iceland and located at the southern part of a propagating rift-zone where extensional tectonics are poorly developed, mafic magma intrusion occurred over less than a year. Beneath Eyjafjallajökull, a silicic intrusion at approximately 6 km depth was recharged with mantle derived alkali basalt that was injected into residual rhyolite from the penultimate eruption in the years 1821-23. The resulting magma mingIing process was highly complex, but careful sampling of tephra during the entire eruption allows the dynamics of the mingling process to be unravelled. Short-lived disequilibria between the gaseous nuclide 210Po and the much less volatile nuclide 210Pb, suggest that basalt accumulated beneath the silicic intrusion over approximately 100 days, or from early January 2010 until the onset of the explosive summit eruption on 14 April. Due to the degassing, crystal fractionation modified the composition of the injected mafic magma producing evolved Fe-and Ti-rich basalt, similar in composition to that of the nearby Katla volcano. This evolved basalt was intruded into the liquid part of the silicic intrusion only a few hours before the onset of the explosive summit eruption. The short time between intrusion and eruption led to the production of very heterogeneous (of basaltic, intermediate and silicic composition) and fine-grained tephra during the first days of explosive eruption. The fine grained tephra resulted from combined effects of magma fragmentation due to degassing of stiff magma rich in

  5. New paradigm for layered paleoproterozoic PGE intrusions of the Fennoscandian Shield: duration and multistage magmatic activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mitrofanov, Felix; Bayanova, Tamara; Serov, Pavel

    2014-05-01

    Layered mafic-ultramafic paleoproterozoic PGE intrusions are widespread in the N-E part of Fennoscandian Shield and belongs to two belt: North (Kola) and South (Finland and Karelia). Precise isotope-geochemical data using U-Pb (on zircon and baddeleyite) and Sm-Nd (rock-forming and sulfides minerals), systematic reflect long magmatic activity (with 2.53, 2.50, 2.45, 2.40 pulses) and duration of mantle event from 2.53 to 2.40 Ga. The Kola belt barren phases were dated in Fedorovo-Pansky massifs with 2.53 Ga for orthopyroxenites and olivine gabbro based on U-Pb (on zircon) and Sm-Nd (rock-forming minerals) data. Main PGE-bearing phases of gabbronorite (Mt. Generalskaya) norite (Monchepluton) and gabbronorite (Fedorovo-Pansky) massif have yielded 2.50 Ga on U-Pb and Sm-Nd dating. The second PGE-bearing phases with 2.45 Ga belong to anorthosite of Mt. Generalskaya, Fedorovo-Pansky and Monchetundra massifs. The same ages have layered PGE-bearing intrusions of Finland - Koitelainen, Penikat et. set. and Oulanga group in Karelia (Bayanova et al., 2009). The final mafic magmatic activity connected with dykes of Imandra lopolith with 2.40 Ga. Isotope geochemical ɛNd - ISr indicators for layered intrusions (more than 70 analyses) reflect enriched mantle EM-1 type reservoir with ISr values from 0.703-0.704. Isotope 3He/4He data for accessory minerals (ilmenite, magnetite et. set.) have significant lower and upper mantle contribution. The model Sm-Nd ages of protolith lies in 3.2-2.9 Ga and primary magma source as fertile according to (Arndt, 2010). The geological and isotope-geochemistry data for layered paleoproterozoic PGE-intrusions permit considered Fennoscandian Shield with Superior and Wyoming as a big magmatic LIP, which related with breakup of oldest Kenorland Sypercontitent. We thank to G. Wasserburg for 205 Pb artificial spike, J. Ludden for 91500 and Temora standards, F. Corfu, V. Todt and U. Poller for assistance in the establishing of the U-Pb method for single

  6. Structural control on the shape of intrusions in the Koktokay ore district, Chinese Altai, north western China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tian, Ye; Qin, Ke Zhang; Zhou, Qi Feng; Paterson, Greig

    2016-02-01

    The Koktokay pegmatite-type rare-metal-bearing ore district in the Altai orogen is famous for both its large scale and its diversity of rare metals. However, the emplacement mechanisms of the ore-bearing pegmatite intrusions in the Koktokay ore district are still unclear. Based on field observations, the emplacement of the ore-bearing pegmatite intrusions falls into two types. The first type is typical of the formation of dykes and sills, whereby they intruded into fan shaped, moderate dipping, joints within plutonic rocks. The second type involves the formation of a punched laccolith that was fed by a pegmatite sill. Magmatic stoping is the main mechanism of the laccolith emplacement. The peripheral faults played an important role in helping the emplacement of the laccolith. The trend of dykes and sills indicate two potential prospecting areas, which are located in the western and northern regions of the Koktokay ore district.

  7. Theory of wing rock

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, C.-H.; Lan, C. E.

    1985-01-01

    Wing rock is one type of lateral-directional instabilities at high angles of attack. To predict wing rock characteristics and to design airplanes to avoid wing rock, parameters affecting wing rock characteristics must be known. A new nonlinear aerodynamic model is developed to investigate the main aerodynamic nonlinearities causing wing rock. In the present theory, the Beecham-Titchener asymptotic method is used to derive expressions for the limit-cycle amplitude and frequency of wing rock from nonlinear flight dynamics equations. The resulting expressions are capable of explaining the existence of wing rock for all types of aircraft. Wing rock is developed by negative or weakly positive roll damping, and sustained by nonlinear aerodynamic roll damping. Good agreement between theoretical and experimental results is obtained.

  8. Rocks in Our Pockets

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Plummer, Donna; Kuhlman, Wilma

    2005-01-01

    To introduce students to rocks and their characteristics, teacher can begin rock units with the activities described in this article. Students need the ability to make simple observations using their senses and simple tools.

  9. The Rock Cycle

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Singh, Raman J.; Bushee, Jonathan

    1977-01-01

    Presents a rock cycle diagram suitable for use at the secondary or introductory college levels which separates rocks formed on and below the surface, includes organic materials, and separates products from processes. (SL)

  10. Rocks and Minerals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Naturescope, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Provides background information on rocks and minerals, including the unique characteristics of each. Teaching activities on rock-hunting and identification, mineral configurations, mystery minerals, and growing crystals are provided. Reproducible worksheets are included for two of the activities. (TW)

  11. Controlling factors on earthquake swarms associated with magmatic intrusions; constraints from Iceland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, R.; Sigmundsson, F.; Einarsson, P.; Brandsdottir, B.; Arnadottir, T.

    2005-12-01

    Intrusion of magma into the Earth's crust is frequently associated with seismic activity, often occurring as distinct earthquake swarms. Understanding the nature of these swarms is important for evaluating crisis situations in volcanic areas. However, there often seem to be little correlation between the amount of seismic energy release, the spatial extent of the volume of rock affected by the stress perturbations, and the volume of magma on the move, which complicates the immediate risk evaluation. A number of factors may influence the evolution of a magmatically induced seismic swarm and the resulting seismic energy release. A number of factors need to be evaluated in each individual case. These are, in random order: the crustal thickness, presence/absence of a crustal magma chamber, geothermal gradient, magmatic flow rate/stressing rate, intrusion volume, depth of intrusion, tectonic setting of the intruded area, regional stresses and tectonic history. Based on three case studies, where seismic swarm activities have been confirmed through deformation measurements to be related to magmatic movements, we attempt to evaluate the relative importance of the assumed controlling factors. All case examples are located within Iceland, but in different tectonic settings. 1. The Hengill triple junction, situated where two extensional plate boundaries join a transform zone. The area experienced a period of unusually persistent earthquake activity from 1994 to 1999, contemporaneously with ground uplift at a rate of 1-2 cm/yr. The uplift was modeled as a response to magma injection at about 7 km depth. 2. The Eyjafjallajokull volcano, situated in a volcanic flank zone where extensional fractures are only poorly developed. Two minor seismic swarms, in 1994 and 1999; were associated with a cumulative surface uplift of more than 35 cm. The two uplift events were modeled as sill intrusions at depths of 4.5 to 6.5 km. 3. The Krafla rift segment, forming part of an extensional

  12. Principles of rock deformation

    SciTech Connect

    Nicolas, A.

    1987-01-01

    This text focuses on the recent achievements in the analysis of rock deformation. It gives an analytical presentation of the essential structures in terms of kinetic and dynamic interpretation. The physical properties underlying the interpretation of rock structures are exposed in simple terms. Emphasized in the book are: the role of fluids in rock fracturing; the kinematic analysis of magnetic flow structures; the application of crystalline plasticity to the kinematic and dynamic analysis of the large deformation imprinted in many metamorphic rocks.

  13. Sheared sheet intrusions as a mechanism for lateral flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes: Applications to Réunion Island volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cayol, V.; Catry, T.; Michon, L.; Chaput, M.; Famin, V.; Bodart, O.; Froger, J. L.; Romagnoli, C.

    2014-12-01

    Field work carried out on the Piton des Neiges volcano (Réunion Island) suggests that the injection of magma along detachments could trigger flank failure by conjugate opening and shear displacement [Famin and Michon, 2010]. We use 3D numerical models to compare the ability of purely opened sheet intrusions, sheared sheet intrusions, and normal faults to induce flank displacement on basaltic volcanoes (Figure). We assume that shear stress change on fractures which are not normal to a principal stress results from stress anisotropy of the host rock under gravity. Exploring a large range of stress anisotropies, fracture dips, and fracture depth over length ratios, we determine that the amount of shear displacement is independent of the proximity to the ground surface. Sheared sheet intrusions are the most efficient slip medium on volcanoes. Using our model in a forward way, we provide shear and normal displacements for buried fractures. Applying the model to a pile of sills at the Piton des Neiges volcano, we determine that the mean shear displacement caused by each intrusion was 3.7 m, leading to a total of a 180-260 m of lateral displacement for the 50 m high pile of sills. Using our model in an inverse way, we formulate a decision tree to determine some fracture characteristics and the host rock stress anisotropy from ratios of maximum surface displacements. This procedure provides a priori models, thus limits to the parameter space which can be further explored through a formal inversion. Applying this procedure to the 1.4 m co-eruptive flank displacement recorded at Piton de la Fournaise in 2007, we find that it probably originated from a shallow eastward-dipping sub-horizontal normal fault.

  14. My Pet Rock

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lark, Adam; Kramp, Robyne; Nurnberger-Haag, Julie

    2008-01-01

    Many teachers and students have experienced the classic pet rock experiment in conjunction with a geology unit. A teacher has students bring in a "pet" rock found outside of school, and the students run geologic tests on the rock. The tests include determining relative hardness using Mohs scale, checking for magnetization, and assessing luster.…

  15. 68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    68. LITTLE ROCK AND PALMDALE IRRIGATION DISTRICT, LITTLE ROCK DAM: STRESS SHEET, SHEET 4; MAY, 1918. Littlerock Water District files. - Little Rock Creek Dam, Little Rock Creek, Littlerock, Los Angeles County, CA

  16. Passive kimberlite intrusion into actively dilating dyke-fracture arrays: evidence from fibrous calcite veins and extensional fracture cleavage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Basson, I. J.; Viola, G.

    2004-09-01

    Calcite veins are invariably associated with en-echelon kimberlite dyke-fracture arrays. A detailed microstructural study of veining indicates four vein types. Type I stretched or ataxial veins are defined by high aspect ratio calcite fibers that are crystallographically continuous with calcite of the kimberlite matrix wall rock, by elongated phenocrystic phlogopite with sharp crystal terminations centered on contacts between adjacent calcite fibers and by phenocrystic phlogopite that grows or extends across these veins. Type I vein mineralogy indicates syn-dilational crystallization of vein minerals in local tensional areas within the kimberlite. Vein Types II (stretched to syntaxial elongate-blocky) and III (antitaxial) indicate late crystallization vein mineral growth during subsequent or repeated dilation. Calcite fibers in Type I to Type III veins are orthogonal to the contacts of their host dykes regardless of the orientation of vein margins. Type IV calcite veins, with blocky or mosaic/polycrystalline textures, are attributed to minor post-intrusion extension, which was potentially accompanied by repeated kimberlite intrusion within a given dyke array. Syn-crystallization/syn-intrusion Type I veins and an ubiquitous dyke-parallel fracture cleavage, in a zone up to 4 m on either side of dyke contacts, suggest that en-echelon kimberlite dyke-fracture arrays occupied the approximate center of zones of active dilation within the brittle carapace of the upper crust. Type II and III veins indicate that extension or dilation continued, independently of an occupying kimberlite fluid phase, after initial intrusion. Arrested mobile hydrofracturing, under low differential stress within the upper brittle or seismic carapace of the continental crust, followed by repeated dilation of the dyke-fracture system, is proposed as a mechanism for producing the features observed in this study. The conditions constrained in this study indicate passive dyke intrusion into dilating

  17. Geochemistry and U-Pb zircon ages of plutonic rocks from the Algodões granite-greenstone terrane, Troia Massif, northern Borborema Province, Brazil: Implications for Paleoproterozoic subduction-accretion processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Costa, Felipe Grandjean da; Palheta, Edney Smith de Moraes; Rodrigues, Joseneusa Brilhante; Gomes, Iaponira Paiva; Vasconcelos, Antonio Maurilio

    2015-04-01

    The Algodões metavolcano-sedimentary sequence is located at the northern margin of the Archean/Paleoproterozoic Troia Massif, northern Borborema Province (NE Brazil). It represents a well-preserved Paleoproterozoic greenstone-like sequence affected by two major plutonic events. The early plutonism, represented by the Cipó orthogneisses, mainly comprises biotite-bearing metatonalites, which share similar geochemical signatures with Archean tonalite-trondjhemite-granodiorite (TTG). For these rocks, we report U-Pb (LA-ICPMS) zircon ages of 2189 ± 14 Ma and 2180 ± 15 Ma. A subsequent plutonic magmatism occurred at ˜2150-2130 Ma and is mainly represented by hornblende-bearing dioritic to tonalitic orthogneisses of the Madalena Suite and São José da Macaoca Complex. Geochemical data indicate that these dioritic/tonalitic orthogneisses have adakitic characteristics and strongly suggest mantle-related magmas. A (sensu stricto) granite plutonism (Serra da Palha orthogneisses) also intruded the Algodões sequence and yielded U-Pb (LA-ICPMS) zircon age of 2150 ± 16 Ma. These granitic orthogneisses show high-K content, A-type characteristics and probably derived from partial melting of a crustal (tonalitic) source. We suggest that the early ˜2190-2160 Ma TTG plutons probably developed in intra-oceanic arc setting, whereas the following ˜2150-2130 Ma adakitic plutons and A-type granitic magmatism developed in response to arc-continent collision.

  18. Magmatism and tectonic evolution of the Chinese Altai, NW China: insights from the Paleozoic mafic and felsic intrusions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cai, Keda; Sun, Min; Xiao, Wenjiao; Yuan, Chao; Zhao, Guochun; Long, Xiaoping

    2013-04-01

    The Chinese Altai, as a key segment of the Central Asian Orogenic Belt (CAOB), is dominated by variably deformed and metamorphosed sedimentary rocks, volcanic rocks and plutonic rocks. The plutonic rocks include extensive granites and relatively subordinate mafic intrusions. For instance, mafic dykes in the northwestern region (Habahe area) have an emplacement age of 375.5±4.8Ma and include gabbroic and doleritic dykes. The gabbroic dykes have chondrite-normalized REE patterns similar to N-MORB (La/YbN=0.86~1.1), together with their high ɛNd(t) values (+7.6~+8.1), indicating deriviation from a N-MORB-type depleted asthenospheric mantle. While the doleritic dykes resemble E-MORB (La/YbN= 1.12~2.28) with relatively low ɛNd(t) values (+3.4-+5.4) and high initial 87Sr/86Sr ratios (0.7057-0.7060), suggesting derivation from a mantle wedge metasomatized by slab-derived fluids and/or melts. In contrast, mafic intrusions in the southeastern region (Keketuohai area) occur as a zoned intrusion with an emplacement age of 409±5 Ma, consisting of dunite, olivine gabbro, hornblende gabbro and pyroxene diorite. Their ɛNd(t) values (0 to +2.7) suggest that the parental magma was produced by partial melting of the lithospheric mantle under a high geothermal regime. Zircon U-Pb ages demonstrate that voluminous granitoids were continuously emplaced over more than 30 % area of the Chinese Altai during the period from 447 Ma to 368 Ma with a climax at ca. 400 Ma. Positive ɛHf(t) values (0 to +9) of normal magmatic zircons suggest that the granitoid magmas were derived from juvenile sources. The extensive magmatism at ca. 400 Ma significantly changed the Hf isotopic composition of the magma source by substantial input of juvenile material in a relatively short period. Four representative large S-type granitic intrusions were emplaced from 419 to 393 Ma, consistent with a period of intensive magmatic activities. The S-type granitic magmas were generated by dehydration melting of

  19. Tertiary alkaline Roztoky Intrusive Complex, České středohoří Mts., Czech Republic: petrogenetic characteristics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skála, Roman; Ulrych, Jaromír; Ackerman, Lukáš; Jelínek, Emil; Dostál, Jaroslav; Hegner, Ernst; Řanda, Zdeněk

    2014-07-01

    The České středohoří Mts. is the dominant volcanic center of the Ohře (Eger) rift zone. It hosts the Roztoky Intrusive Complex (RIC), which is made up of a caldera vent and intrusions of 33-28-Ma-old hypabyssal bodies of essexite-monzodiorite-sodalite syenite series accompanied by a radially oriented 30-25-Ma-old dike swarm comprising about 1,000 dikes. The hypabyssal rocks are mildly alkaline mostly foid-bearing types of mafic to intermediate compositions. The dike swarm consists of chemically mildly alkaline and rare strongly alkaline rocks (tinguaites). The geochemical signatures of the mildly alkaline hypabyssal and associated dike rocks of the RIC are consistent with HIMU mantle sources and contributions from lithospheric mantle. The compositional variations of essexite and monzodiorite can be best explained by fractional crystallization of parent magma without significant contributions of crustal material. On the other hand, the composition of monzosyenite, leuco-monzodiorite and sodalite syenite reflects fractional crystallization coupled with variable degrees of crustal assimilation. It is suggested that the parent magmas in the Ohře rift were produced by an adiabatic decompression melting of ambient upper mantle in response to lithospheric extension associated with the Alpine Orogeny.

  20. Welded tuff porosity characterization using mercury intrusion, nitrogen and ethylene glycol monoethyl ether sorption and epifluorescence microscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Reddy, M.M.; Claassen, H.C.; Rutherford, D.W.; Chiou, C.T.

    1994-01-01

    Porosity of welded tuff from Snowshoe Mountain, Colorado, was characterized by mercury intrusion porosimetry (MIP), nitrogen sorption porosimetry, ethylene glycol monoethyl ether (EGME) gas phase sorption and epifluorescence optical microscopy. Crushed tuff of two particle-size fractions (1-0.3 mm and less than 0.212 mm), sawed sections of whole rock and crushed tuff that had been reacted with 0.1 N hydrochloric acid were examined. Average MIP pore diameter values were in the range of 0.01-0.02??m. Intrusion volume was greatest for tuff reacted with 0.1 N hydrochloric acid and least for sawed tuff. Cut rock had the smallest porosity (4.72%) and crushed tuff reacted in hydrochloric acid had the largest porosity (6.56%). Mean pore diameters from nitrogen sorption measurements were 0.0075-0.0187 ??m. Nitrogen adsorption pore volumes (from 0.005 to 0.013 cm3/g) and porosity values (from 1.34 to 3.21%) were less than the corresponding values obtained by MIP. More than half of the total tuff pore volume was associated with pore diameters < 0.05??m. Vapor sorption of EGME demonstrated that tuff pores contain a clay-like material. Epifluorescence microscopy indicated that connected porosity is heterogeneously distributed within the tuff matix; mineral grains had little porosity. Tuff porosity may have important consequences for contaminant disposal in this host rock. ?? 1994.

  1. The Experience of Intrusions Scale: a preliminary examination.

    PubMed

    Salters-Pedneault, Kristalyn; Vine, Vera; Mills, Mary Alice; Park, Crystal; Litz, Brett T

    2009-01-01

    Intrusive thoughts (i.e., unwelcome, distressing, involuntary thoughts) are prevalent in a variety of clinical conditions and are increasingly a focus of translational research. The goal of this study was to develop and preliminarily examine a brief self-report measure designed to assess clinically relevant aspects of the experience of intrusive thoughts related to a particular target. The Experience of Intrusions Scale (EIS) is a five-item measure that assesses the frequency, unpredictability, and unwantedness of intrusive thoughts, as well as the interference and distress caused by the intrusions, each on a five-point Likert-type scale. Five times over a four-] period, female undergraduates (N=160) completed the EIS in response to intrusive thoughts regarding a film clip depicting a sexual assault. On the first and last days, participants completed the EIS five minutes after watching the clip. In between film clip viewings, participants completed the EIS once per day. The EIS demonstrated good internal consistency, good to excellent test-retest reliability using both immediate post-stimulus and 24-hour time intervals, and convergent validity with two existing measures of intrusive phenomena: the White Bear Suppression Inventory (Wegner & Zanakos, 1994) and the Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Checklist-Civilian Version (Weathers, Litz, Herman, Huska, & Keane, 1993). PMID:18937103

  2. Working memory capacity and suppression of intrusive thoughts.

    PubMed

    Brewin, Chris R; Smart, Laura

    2005-03-01

    We sought to show that individual differences in working memory capacity are related to the ability to intentionally suppress personally relevant intrusive thoughts, and that this effect cannot be explained by differences in negative mood. Sixty participants identified their most frequent intrusive thought and then completed a thought suppression task. Better performance on a measure of working memory capacity (OSPAN) was related to having fewer intrusions in the suppression condition but was unrelated to number of intrusions in the expression condition, suggesting a specific association with attempts to inhibit unwanted thoughts. In contrast, a more negative mood was related to having more intrusions in both conditions, suggestive of a more general influence on the accessibility of unwanted thoughts. Working memory capacity was not associated with negative mood or with the frequency of intrusive thoughts reported in everyday life. The findings extend previous results to the domain of personally relevant intrusive thoughts and support the idea that individual differences in the cognitive abilities supporting inhibitory mechanisms are relevant to clinical conditions such as obsessive-compulsive disorder and posttraumatic stress disorder. PMID:15687010

  3. The role of stress during memory reactivation on intrusive memories.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Jessica; Garber, Benjamin; Bryant, Richard A

    2015-09-01

    Intrusive memories are unwanted recollections that maintain distress in psychological disorders. Increasing evidence suggests that memories that are reactivated through retrieval become temporarily vulnerable to environmental or pharmacological manipulation, including changes in levels of circulating stress hormones. This study investigated the influence of stress during memory reactivation of an emotionally arousing trauma film on subsequent intrusive memories. Three groups of participants (N=63) viewed a trauma film depicting a serious car accident at baseline. Two days later (Time 2), one group received a reactivation induction following a socially evaluated cold pressor test (SECPT; Stress/Reactivation condition), whilst the second group reactivated the memory after a control procedure (Reactivation condition). A third group underwent the SECPT but was not asked to reactivate memory of the trauma film (Stress condition). Two days later (Time 3), all participants received a surprise cued memory recall test and intrusions questionnaire which they completed online. Results showed that those in the Stress/Reactivation group had higher intrusions scores than the other two groups, suggesting that acute stress promotes intrusive memories only when the memory trace is reactivated shortly afterwards. Increased cortisol predicted enhanced intrusive experiences in the Stress/Reactivation condition but not in the other conditions. This pattern of results suggests that acute stress during the reactivation of emotional material impacts on involuntary emotional memories. These findings suggest a possible explanation for the mechanism underlying the maintenance of intrusive memories in clinical disorders. PMID:25911248

  4. A novel interacting multiple model based network intrusion detection scheme

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Ruichi; Venkatasubramanian, Vijay; Leung, Henry

    2006-04-01

    In today's information age, information and network security are of primary importance to any organization. Network intrusion is a serious threat to security of computers and data networks. In internet protocol (IP) based network, intrusions originate in different kinds of packets/messages contained in the open system interconnection (OSI) layer 3 or higher layers. Network intrusion detection and prevention systems observe the layer 3 packets (or layer 4 to 7 messages) to screen for intrusions and security threats. Signature based methods use a pre-existing database that document intrusion patterns as perceived in the layer 3 to 7 protocol traffics and match the incoming traffic for potential intrusion attacks. Alternately, network traffic data can be modeled and any huge anomaly from the established traffic pattern can be detected as network intrusion. The latter method, also known as anomaly based detection is gaining popularity for its versatility in learning new patterns and discovering new attacks. It is apparent that for a reliable performance, an accurate