Science.gov

Sample records for adaptable io system

  1. Petascale IO Using The Adaptable IO System

    SciTech Connect

    Lofstead, J.; Klasky, Scott A; Abbasi, H.

    2009-01-01

    ADIOS, the adaptable IO system, has demonstrated excellent scalability to 29,000 cores. With the introduction of the XT5 upgrades to Jaguar, new optimizations are required to successfully reach 140,000+ cores. This paper explains the techniques employed and shows the performance levels attained.

  2. Adaptable Metadata Rich IO Methods for Portable High Performance IO

    SciTech Connect

    Lofstead, J.; Zheng, Fang; Klasky, Scott A; Schwan, Karsten

    2009-01-01

    Since IO performance on HPC machines strongly depends on machine characteristics and configuration, it is important to carefully tune IO libraries and make good use of appropriate library APIs. For instance, on current petascale machines, independent IO tends to outperform collective IO, in part due to bottlenecks at the metadata server. The problem is exacerbated by scaling issues, since each IO library scales differently on each machine, and typically, operates efficiently to different levels of scaling on different machines. With scientific codes being run on a variety of HPC resources, efficient code execution requires us to address three important issues: (1) end users should be able to select the most efficient IO methods for their codes, with minimal effort in terms of code updates or alterations; (2) such performance-driven choices should not prevent data from being stored in the desired file formats, since those are crucial for later data analysis; and (3) it is important to have efficient ways of identifying and selecting certain data for analysis, to help end users cope with the flood of data produced by high end codes. This paper employs ADIOS, the ADaptable IO System, as an IO API to address (1)-(3) above. Concerning (1), ADIOS makes it possible to independently select the IO methods being used by each grouping of data in an application, so that end users can use those IO methods that exhibit best performance based on both IO patterns and the underlying hardware. In this paper, we also use this facility of ADIOS to experimentally evaluate on petascale machines alternative methods for high performance IO. Specific examples studied include methods that use strong file consistency vs. delayed parallel data consistency, as that provided by MPI-IO or POSIX IO. Concerning (2), to avoid linking IO methods to specific file formats and attain high IO performance, ADIOS introduces an efficient intermediate file format, termed BP, which can be converted, at small

  3. Managing variability in the IO performance of petascale storage systems.

    SciTech Connect

    Wolf, Matthew; Zheng, Fang; Klasky, Scott; Schwan, Karsten; Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald Fredrick, II; Liu, Qing; Kordenbrock, Todd

    2010-11-01

    Significant challenges exist for achieving peak or even consistent levels of performance when using IO systems at scale. They stem from sharing IO system resources across the processes of single large-scale applications and/or multiple simultaneous programs causing internal and external interference, which in turn, causes substantial reductions in IO performance. This paper presents interference effects measurements for two different file systems at multiple supercomputing sites. These measurements motivate developing a 'managed' IO approach using adaptive algorithms varying the IO system workload based on current levels and use areas. An implementation of these methods deployed for the shared, general scratch storage system on Oak Ridge National Laboratory machines achieves higher overall performance and less variability in both a typical usage environment and with artificially introduced levels of 'noise'. The latter serving to clearly delineate and illustrate potential problems arising from shared system usage and the advantages derived from actively managing it.

  4. Toward realistic and practical ideal observer (IO) estimation for the optimization of medical imaging systems.

    PubMed

    He, Xin; Caffo, Brian S; Frey, Eric C

    2008-10-01

    The ideal observer (IO) employs complete knowledge of the available data statistics and sets an upper limit on observer performance on a binary classification task. However, the IO test statistic cannot be calculated analytically, except for cases where object statistics are extremely simple. Kupinski have developed a Markov chain Monte Carlo (MCMC) based technique to compute the IO test statistic for, in principle, arbitrarily complex objects and imaging systems. In this work, we applied MCMC to estimate the IO test statistic in the context of myocardial perfusion SPECT (MPS). We modeled the imaging system using an analytic SPECT projector with attenuation, distant-dependent detector-response modeling and Poisson noise statistics. The object is a family of parameterized torso phantoms with variable geometric and organ uptake parameters. To accelerate the imaging simulation process and thus enable the MCMC IO estimation, we used discretized anatomic parameters and continuous uptake parameters in defining the objects. The imaging process simulation was modeled by precomputing projections for each organ for a finite number of discretely-parameterized anatomic parameters and taking linear combinations of the organ projections based on continuous sampling of the organ uptake parameters. The proposed method greatly reduces the computational burden and allows MCMC IO estimation for a realistic MPS imaging simulation. We validated the proposed IO estimation technique by estimating IO test statistics for a large number of input objects. The properties of the first- and second-order statistics of the IO test statistics estimated using the MCMC IO estimation technique agreed well with theoretical predictions. Further, as expected, the IO had better performance, as measured by the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve, than the Hotelling observer. This method is developed for SPECT imaging. However, it can be adapted to any linear imaging system.

  5. 3D Boltzmann Simulation of the Io's Plasma Environment with Adaptive Mesh and Particle Refinement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lipatov, A. S.; Combi, M. R.

    2002-12-01

    The global dynamics of the ionized and neutral components in the environment of Io plays an important role in the interaction of Jupiter's corotating magnetospheric plasma with Io [Combi et al., 2002; 1998; Kabin et al., 2001]. The stationary simulation of this problem was done in the MHD [Combi et al., 1998; Linker et al, 1998; Kabin et al., 2001] and the electrodynamic [Saur et al., 1999] approaches. In this report, we develop a method of kinetic ion-neutral simulation, which is based on a multiscale adaptive mesh, particle and algorithm refinement. This method employs the fluid description for electrons whereas for ions the drift-kinetic and particle approaches are used. This method takes into account charge-exchange and photoionization processes. The first results of such simulation of the dynamics of ions in the Io's environment are discussed in this report. ~ M R Combi et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103, 9071, 1998. M R Combi, T I Gombosi, K Kabin, Atmospheres in the Solar System: Comparative\\ Aeronomy. Geophys. Monograph Series, 130, 151, 2002. K Kabin et al., Planetary and Space Sci., 49, 337, 2001. J A Linker et al., J. Geophys. Res., 103(E9), 19867, 1998. J Saur et al., J. Geophys. Res., 104, 25105, 1999.

  6. Using IoT Device Technology in Spacecraft Checkout Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plummer, Chris

    2015-09-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) has become a common theme in both the technical and popular press in recent years because many of the enabling technologies that are required to make IoT a reality have now matured. Those technologies are revolutionising the way industrial systems and products are developed because they offer significant advantages over older technologies. This paper looks at how IoT device technology can be used in spacecraft checkout systems to achieve smaller, more capable, and more scalable solutions than are currently available. It covers the use of IoT device technology for classical spacecraft test systems as well as for hardware-in-the-loop simulation systems used to support spacecraft checkout.

  7. Scalable I/O Systems via Node-Local Storage: Approaching 1 TB/sec File I/O

    SciTech Connect

    Bronevetsky, G; Moody, A

    2009-08-18

    In the race to PetaFLOP-speed supercomputing systems, the increase in computational capability has been accompanied by corresponding increases in CPU count, total RAM, and storage capacity. However, a proportional increase in storage bandwidth has lagged behind. In order to improve system reliability and to reduce maintenance effort for modern large-scale systems, system designers have opted to remove node-local storage from the compute nodes. Today's multi-TeraFLOP supercomputers are typically attached to parallel file systems that provide only tens of GBs/s of I/O bandwidth. As a result, such machines have access to much less than 1GB/s of I/O bandwidth per TeraFLOP of compute power, which is below the generally accepted limit required for a well-balanced system. In a many ways, the current I/O bottleneck limits the capabilities of modern supercomputers, specifically in terms of limiting their working sets and restricting fault tolerance techniques, which become critical on systems consisting of tens of thousands of components. This paper resolves the dilemma between high performance and high reliability by presenting an alternative system design which makes use of node-local storage to improve aggregate system I/O bandwidth. In this work, we focus on the checkpointing use-case and present an experimental evaluation of the Scalable Checkpoint/Restart (SCR) library, a new adaptive checkpointing library that uses node-local storage to significantly improve the checkpointing performance of large-scale supercomputers. Experiments show that SCR achieves unprecedented write speeds, reaching a measured 700GB/s of aggregate bandwidth on 8,752 processors and an estimated 1TB/s for a similarly structured machine of 12,500 processors. This corresponds to a speedup of over 70x compared to the bandwidth provided by the 10GB/s parallel file system the cluster uses. Further, SCR can adapt to an environment in which there is wide variation in performance or capacity among the

  8. Standing Alfven wave current system at Io: Voyager 1 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acuna, M. H.; Neubauer, F. M.; Ness, N. F.

    1980-01-01

    The enigmatic control of the occurrence frequency of Jupiter's decametric emissions by the satellite Io is explained theoretically on the basis of its strong electrodynamic interaction with the corotating Jovian magnetosphere leading to field aligned currents connecting Io with the Jovian ionosphere. Direct measurements of the perturbation magnetic fields due to this current system were obtained by the magnetic field experiment on Voyager 1 on 5 March 1979 when it passed within 20,500 km south of Io. An interpretation in the framework of Alfven waves radiated by Io leads to current estimates of 2.8 million amps. A mass density of 7400 to 13600 proton mass units per Cu cm is derived which compares very favorably with independent observations of the torus composition characterized by 7-9 proton mass units per electron for a local electron density of 1050 to 1500 per cu cm. The power dissipated in the current system may be important for heating the Io heavy ion torus, inner magnetosphere, Jovian ionosphere, and possibly the ionosphere or even the interior of Io.

  9. D0 Cryogenic System Superconducting Solenoid Platform I/O

    SciTech Connect

    Markley, D.; /Fermilab

    1997-10-09

    The Dzero detector is scheduled for a major upgrade between 1996 and 1999. This note describes the specifications and configuration of the physical Input/Output devices and instrumentation of the 2 Tesla Superconducting Solenoid. The Solenoid and the VLPC cryostats both reside on the detector platform and are cooled by the Dzero Helium Refrigerator. The cryogenic process control s for these two components will be an extension of the TI565 programmable logic controller system used for other Dzero cryogenic controls. Two Input/Output Bases will be installed on the Dzero detector platform near the cryo corner. These I/O bases will handle all the sensor input and process control output devices from the Solenoid and VLPC cryostats. Having the I/O bases installed on the detector platform makes the connecting cabl ing to the platform much easier . All the instruments are wired directly to the I/O base. The bases have only one communications network cabl e that must be routed off the platform to the South side of the Dzero building.

  10. booc.io: An Education System with Hierarchical Concept Maps and Dynamic Non-linear Learning Plans.

    PubMed

    Schwab, Michail; Strobelt, Hendrik; Tompkin, James; Fredericks, Colin; Huff, Connor; Higgins, Dana; Strezhnev, Anton; Komisarchik, Mayya; King, Gary; Pfister, Hanspeter

    2017-01-01

    Information hierarchies are difficult to express when real-world space or time constraints force traversing the hierarchy in linear presentations, such as in educational books and classroom courses. We present booc.io, which allows linear and non-linear presentation and navigation of educational concepts and material. To support a breadth of material for each concept, booc.io is Web based, which allows adding material such as lecture slides, book chapters, videos, and LTIs. A visual interface assists the creation of the needed hierarchical structures. The goals of our system were formed in expert interviews, and we explain how our design meets these goals. We adapt a real-world course into booc.io, and perform introductory qualitative evaluation with students.

  11. Active Storage with Analytics Capabilities and I/O Runtime System for Petascale Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, Alok

    2015-03-18

    Computational scientists must understand results from experimental, observational and computational simulation generated data to gain insights and perform knowledge discovery. As systems approach the petascale range, problems that were unimaginable a few years ago are within reach. With the increasing volume and complexity of data produced by ultra-scale simulations and high-throughput experiments, understanding the science is largely hampered by the lack of comprehensive I/O, storage, acceleration of data manipulation, analysis, and mining tools. Scientists require techniques, tools and infrastructure to facilitate better understanding of their data, in particular the ability to effectively perform complex data analysis, statistical analysis and knowledge discovery. The goal of this work is to enable more effective analysis of scientific datasets through the integration of enhancements in the I/O stack, from active storage support at the file system layer to MPI-IO and high-level I/O library layers. We propose to provide software components to accelerate data analytics, mining, I/O, and knowledge discovery for large-scale scientific applications, thereby increasing productivity of both scientists and the systems. Our approaches include 1) design the interfaces in high-level I/O libraries, such as parallel netCDF, for applications to activate data mining operations at the lower I/O layers; 2) Enhance MPI-IO runtime systems to incorporate the functionality developed as a part of the runtime system design; 3) Develop parallel data mining programs as part of runtime library for server-side file system in PVFS file system; and 4) Prototype an active storage cluster, which will utilize multicore CPUs, GPUs, and FPGAs to carry out the data mining workload.

  12. VisIO: enabling interactive visualization of ultra-scale, time-series data via high-bandwidth distributed I/O systems

    SciTech Connect

    Mitchell, Christopher J; Ahrens, James P; Wang, Jun

    2010-10-15

    Petascale simulations compute at resolutions ranging into billions of cells and write terabytes of data for visualization and analysis. Interactive visuaUzation of this time series is a desired step before starting a new run. The I/O subsystem and associated network often are a significant impediment to interactive visualization of time-varying data; as they are not configured or provisioned to provide necessary I/O read rates. In this paper, we propose a new I/O library for visualization applications: VisIO. Visualization applications commonly use N-to-N reads within their parallel enabled readers which provides an incentive for a shared-nothing approach to I/O, similar to other data-intensive approaches such as Hadoop. However, unlike other data-intensive applications, visualization requires: (1) interactive performance for large data volumes, (2) compatibility with MPI and POSIX file system semantics for compatibility with existing infrastructure, and (3) use of existing file formats and their stipulated data partitioning rules. VisIO, provides a mechanism for using a non-POSIX distributed file system to provide linear scaling of 110 bandwidth. In addition, we introduce a novel scheduling algorithm that helps to co-locate visualization processes on nodes with the requested data. Testing using VisIO integrated into Para View was conducted using the Hadoop Distributed File System (HDFS) on TACC's Longhorn cluster. A representative dataset, VPIC, across 128 nodes showed a 64.4% read performance improvement compared to the provided Lustre installation. Also tested, was a dataset representing a global ocean salinity simulation that showed a 51.4% improvement in read performance over Lustre when using our VisIO system. VisIO, provides powerful high-performance I/O services to visualization applications, allowing for interactive performance with ultra-scale, time-series data.

  13. Making resonance a common case: a high-performance implementation of collective I/O on parallel file systems

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Marion Kei; Zhang, Xuechen; Jiang, Song

    2009-01-01

    Collective I/O is a widely used technique to improve I/O performance in parallel computing. It can be implemented as a client-based or server-based scheme. The client-based implementation is more widely adopted in MPI-IO software such as ROMIO because of its independence from the storage system configuration and its greater portability. However, existing implementations of client-side collective I/O do not take into account the actual pattern offile striping over multiple I/O nodes in the storage system. This can cause a significant number of requests for non-sequential data at I/O nodes, substantially degrading I/O performance. Investigating the surprisingly high I/O throughput achieved when there is an accidental match between a particular request pattern and the data striping pattern on the I/O nodes, we reveal the resonance phenomenon as the cause. Exploiting readily available information on data striping from the metadata server in popular file systems such as PVFS2 and Lustre, we design a new collective I/O implementation technique, resonant I/O, that makes resonance a common case. Resonant I/O rearranges requests from multiple MPI processes to transform non-sequential data accesses on I/O nodes into sequential accesses, significantly improving I/O performance without compromising the independence ofa client-based implementation. We have implemented our design in ROMIO. Our experimental results show that the scheme can increase I/O throughput for some commonly used parallel I/O benchmarks such as mpi-io-test and ior-mpi-io over the existing implementation of ROMIO by up to 157%, with no scenario demonstrating significantly decreased performance.

  14. Eye on Io.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Scott M.

    1985-01-01

    "Io," one of four satellites of Jupiter, orbits its mother planet in roughly the same plane as Earth orbits the sun. Guidelines for collecting data about Io using a reflecting telescope, 35mm camera, and adapter are presented. A computer program used in studying Io's maximum distance from Jupiter is available. (DH)

  15. TTEO (Things Talk to Each Other): Programming Smart Spaces Based on IoT Systems

    PubMed Central

    Yun, Jaeseok; Ahn, Il-Yeup; Choi, Sung-Chan; Kim, Jaeho

    2016-01-01

    The Internet of Things allows things in the world to be connected to each other and enables them to automate daily tasks without human intervention, eventually building smart spaces. This article demonstrates a prototype service based on the Internet of Things, TTEO (Things Talk to Each Other). We present the full details on the system architecture and the software platforms for IoT servers and devices, called Mobius and &Cube, respectively, complying with the globally-applicable IoT standards, oneM2M, a unique identification scheme for a huge number of IoT devices, and service scenarios with an intuitive smartphone app. We hope that our approach will help developers and lead users for IoT devices and application services to establish an emerging IoT ecosystem, just like the ecosystem for smartphones and mobile applications. PMID:27043578

  16. TTEO (Things Talk to Each Other): Programming Smart Spaces Based on IoT Systems.

    PubMed

    Yun, Jaeseok; Ahn, Il-Yeup; Choi, Sung-Chan; Kim, Jaeho

    2016-04-01

    The Internet of Things allows things in the world to be connected to each other and enables them to automate daily tasks without human intervention, eventually building smart spaces. This article demonstrates a prototype service based on the Internet of Things, TTEO (Things Talk to Each Other). We present the full details on the system architecture and the software platforms for IoT servers and devices, called Mobius and &Cube, respectively, complying with the globally-applicable IoT standards, oneM2M, a unique identification scheme for a huge number of IoT devices, and service scenarios with an intuitive smartphone app. We hope that our approach will help developers and lead users for IoT devices and application services to establish an emerging IoT ecosystem, just like the ecosystem for smartphones and mobile applications.

  17. I/O Parallelization for the Goddard Earth Observing System Data Assimilation System (GEOS DAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lucchesi, R.; Sawyer, W.; Takacs, L. L.; Lyster, P.; Zero, J.

    1999-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Data Assimilation Office (DAO) at the Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed the GEOS DAS, a data assimilation system that provides production support for NASA missions and will support NASA's Earth Observing System (EOS) in the coming years. The DAO's support of the EOS project along with the requirement of producing long-term reanalysis datasets with an unvarying system levy a large I/O burden on the future system. The DAO has been involved in prototyping parallel implementations of the GEOS DAS for a number of years and is now converting the production version from shared-memory parallelism to distributed-memory parallelism using the portable Message-Passing Interface (MPI). If the MPI-based GEOS DAS is to meet these production requirements, we must make I/O from the parallel system efficient. We have designed a scheme that allows efficient I/O processing while retaining portability, reducing the need for post-processing, and producing data formats that are required by our users, both internal and external. The first phase of the GEOS DAS Parallel I/O System (GPIOS) will expand upon the common method of gathering global data to a Single PE for output. Instead of using a PE also tasked with primary computation, a number of PEs will be dedicated to I/O and its related tasks. This allows the data transformations and formatting required prior to output to take place asynchronously with respect to the GEOS DAS assimilation cycle, improving performance and generating output data sets in a format convenient for our users. I/O PEs can be added as needed to handle larger data volumes or to meet user file specifications. We will show I/O performance results from a prototype MPI GCM integrated with GPIOS. Phase two of GPIOS development will examine ways of integrating new software technologies to further improve performance and build scalability into the system. The maturing of MPI-IO implementations and

  18. Nonlinear standing Alfven wave current system at Io: Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Neubauer, F.M.

    1980-03-01

    We present a nonlinear analytical model of the Alfven current tubes continuing the currents through Io (or rather its ionosphere) generated by the unipolar inductor effect due to Io's motion relative to the magnetospheric plasma. We thereby extend the linear work by Drell et al. (1965) to the fully nonlinear, sub-Alfvenic situation also including flow which is not perpendicular to the background magnetic field. The following principal results have been obtained: (1) The portion of the currents feeding Io is aligned with the Alfven characteristics at an angle theta/sub A/ is the Alfven Mach number. (2) The Alfven tubes act like an external conductance ..sigma../sub A/=1/(..mu../sub 0/V/sub A/(1+M/sub A//sup 2/+2M/sub A/ sin theta)/sup 1/2/ where V/sub A/ is the Alfven wave propagation. Hence the Jovian ionospheric conductivity is not necessary for current closure. (3) In addition, the Alfven tubes may be reflected from either the torus boundary or the Jovian ionosphere. The efficiency of the resulting interaction with these boundaries varies with Io position. The interaction is particularly strong at extreme magnetic latitudes, thereby suggesting a mechanism for the Io control of decametric emissions. (4) The reflected Alfven waves may heat both the torus plasma and the Jovian ionosphere as well as produce increased diffusion of high-energy particles in the torus. (5) From the point of view of the electrodynamic interaction, Io is unique among the Jovian satellites for several reasons: these include its ionosphere arising from ionized volcanic gases, a high external Alfvenic conductance ..sigma../sub A/, and a high corotational voltage in addition to the interaction phenomenon with a boundary. (6) We find that Amalthea is probably strongly coupled to Jupiter's ionosphere while the outer Galilean satellites may occasionally experience super-Alfvenic conditions.

  19. Parallel File System I/O Performance Testing On LANL Clusters

    SciTech Connect

    Wiens, Isaac Christian; Green, Jennifer Kathleen

    2016-08-18

    These are slides from a presentation on parallel file system I/O performance testing on LANL clusters. I/O is a known bottleneck for HPC applications. Performance optimization of I/O is often required. This summer project entailed integrating IOR under Pavilion and automating the results analysis. The slides cover the following topics: scope of the work, tools utilized, IOR-Pavilion test workflow, build script, IOR parameters, how parameters are passed to IOR, *run_ior: functionality, Python IOR-Output Parser, Splunk data format, Splunk dashboard and features, and future work.

  20. A Selective Group Authentication Scheme for IoT-Based Medical Information System.

    PubMed

    Park, YoHan; Park, YoungHo

    2017-04-01

    The technology of IoT combined with medical systems is expected to support advanced medical services. However, unsolved security problems, such as misuse of medical devices, illegal access to the medical server and so on, make IoT-based medical systems not be applied widely. In addition, users have a high burden of computation to access Things for the explosive growth of IoT devices. Because medical information is critical and important, but users have a restricted computing power, IoT-based medical systems are required to provide secure and efficient authentication for users. In this paper, we propose a selective group authentication scheme using Shamir's threshold technique. The property of selectivity gives the right of choice to users to form a group which consists of things users select and access. And users can get an access authority for those Things at a time. Thus, our scheme provides an efficient user authentication for multiple Things and conditional access authority for safe IoT-based medical information system. To the best of our knowledge, our proposed scheme is the first in which selectivity is combined with group authentication in IoT environments.

  1. Volcanic features of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Carr, M.H.; Masursky, H.; Strom, R.G.; Terrile, R.J.

    1979-01-01

    Volcanic activity is apparently higher on Io than on any other body in the Solar System. Its volcanic landforms can be compared with features on Earth to indicate the type of volcanism present on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  2. Adaptation of adaptive optics systems.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Yu; Zhao, Dazun; Li, Chen

    1997-10-01

    In the paper, a concept of an adaptation of adaptive optical system (AAOS) is proposed. The AAOS has certain real time optimization ability against the variation of the brightness of detected objects m, atmospheric coherence length rO and atmospheric time constant τ by means of changing subaperture number and diameter, dynamic range, and system's temporal response. The necessity of AAOS using a Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor and some technical approaches are discussed. Scheme and simulation of an AAOS with variable subaperture ability by use of both hardware and software are presented as an example of the system.

  3. Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) proof-of-concept system functional design I/O network system services

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1985-01-01

    The function design of the Input/Output (I/O) services for the Advanced Information Processing System (AIPS) proof of concept system is described. The data flow diagrams, which show the functional processes in I/O services and the data that flows among them, are contained. A complete list of the data identified on the data flow diagrams and in the process descriptions are provided.

  4. IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment for a smart space management system.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hoan-Suk; Rhee, Woo-Seop

    2014-11-20

    The existing Internet environment has been extended to the Internet of Things (IoT) as an emerging new paradigm. The IoT connects various physical entities. These entities have communication capability and deploy the observed information to various service areas such as building management, energy-saving systems, surveillance services, and smart homes. These services are designed and developed by professional service providers. Moreover, users' needs have become more complicated and personalized with the spread of user-participation services such as social media and blogging. Therefore, some active users want to create their own services to satisfy their needs, but the existing IoT service-creation environment is difficult for the non-technical user because it requires a programming capability to create a service. To solve this problem, we propose the IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment to provide an easy way to create IoT services. Also, the proposed environment deploys the defined service to another user. Through the personalization and customization of the defined service, the value and dissemination of the service is increased. This environment also provides the ontology-based context-information processing that produces and describes the context information for the IoT-based user-driven service.

  5. IoT-Based User-Driven Service Modeling Environment for a Smart Space Management System

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Hoan-Suk; Rhee, Woo-Seop

    2014-01-01

    The existing Internet environment has been extended to the Internet of Things (IoT) as an emerging new paradigm. The IoT connects various physical entities. These entities have communication capability and deploy the observed information to various service areas such as building management, energy-saving systems, surveillance services, and smart homes. These services are designed and developed by professional service providers. Moreover, users' needs have become more complicated and personalized with the spread of user-participation services such as social media and blogging. Therefore, some active users want to create their own services to satisfy their needs, but the existing IoT service-creation environment is difficult for the non-technical user because it requires a programming capability to create a service. To solve this problem, we propose the IoT-based user-driven service modeling environment to provide an easy way to create IoT services. Also, the proposed environment deploys the defined service to another user. Through the personalization and customization of the defined service, the value and dissemination of the service is increased. This environment also provides the ontology-based context-information processing that produces and describes the context information for the IoT-based user-driven service. PMID:25420153

  6. Performance and dependability of RapidIO-based systems for real-time space applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bueno, David R.

    Emerging space applications such as Space-Based Radar (SBR) require networks with higher throughput and lower latency than the bus-based interconnects traditionally used in spacecraft payload processing systems. The RapidIO embedded systems interconnect is one network that seeks to help meet the needs of future embedded applications by offering a switched topology with low latency and throughputs in the multi-gigabits per second range. In this research, we use modeling and simulation to study the tradeoffs associated with employing RapidIO in real-time embedded space systems with high processing and network demands. The first phase of this research presents a network-centric study on the use of RapidIO for SBR Ground Moving Target Indicator (GMTI) and Synthetic Aperture Radar (SAR) applications. These results provide insight into the optimal partitioning of the SBR algorithms for the RapidIO network, as well as a sensitivity analysis of the algorithms to various network parameters such as clock rate and flow-control type. In the second phase of this work, we propose several novel fault-tolerant architectures for RapidIO-based space systems and quantitatively evaluate these architectures through a unique combination of analytical metrics and simulation studies. The results from this phase show several promising architectures in terms of achieving a balance between performance, fault-tolerance, size, power, and cost. In the third and final phase of this research, we extend the previous two phases into a set of detailed case studies with an expanded model set that is augmented with actual RapidIO testbed hardware results. These case studies lead to key insight into interactions and architectural tradeoffs between RapidIO, reconfigurable processing elements, and a shared local memory interface in a realistic embedded architecture.

  7. IOrchestrator: improving the performance of multi-node I/O systems via inter-server coordination

    SciTech Connect

    Davis, Marion Kei; Zhang, Xuechen; Jiang, Song

    2010-01-01

    A cluster of I/O nodes and a parallel file system are often used to provide high-throughput I/O service to a parallel compute cluster. To exploit I/O parallelism parallel file systems stripe file data across the I/O nodes. While this practice is effective in serving asynchronous requests, it may break individual program's spatial locality, which can seriously degrade I/O performance when the I/O nodes concurrently serve synchronous requests from multiple I/O-intensive programs. In this paper we propose a scheme, Orchestrator, to improve the I/O performance of multi-I/O-node systems by orchestrating I/O services among programs when such inter-I/O-node coordination is dynamically determined to be cost effective. We have implemented IOrchestrator in the PVFS2 parallel file system. Our experiments with representative parallel benchmarks show that IOrchestrator can significantly improve I/O performance - by up to a factor of 2.5 - delivered by a cluster of I/O nodes servicing concurrently-running parallel programs. Notably, we have not observed any scenarios in which the use of IOrchestrator causes significant performance degradation.

  8. Understanding I/O workload characteristics of a Peta-scale storage system

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngjae; Gunasekaran, Raghul

    2015-01-01

    Understanding workload characteristics is critical for optimizing and improving the performance of current systems and software, and architecting new storage systems based on observed workload patterns. In this paper, we characterize the I/O workloads of scientific applications of one of the world s fastest high performance computing (HPC) storage cluster, Spider, at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF). OLCF flagship petascale simulation platform, Titan, and other large HPC clusters, in total over 250 thousands compute cores, depend on Spider for their I/O needs. We characterize the system utilization, the demands of reads and writes, idle time, storage space utilization, and the distribution of read requests to write requests for the Peta-scale Storage Systems. From this study, we develop synthesized workloads, and we show that the read and write I/O bandwidth usage as well as the inter-arrival time of requests can be modeled as a Pareto distribution. We also study the I/O load imbalance problems using I/O performance data collected from the Spider storage system.

  9. Server-side Log Data Analytics for I/O Workload Characterization and Coordination on Large Shared Storage Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Y.; Gunasekaran, Raghul; Ma, Xiaosong; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2016-01-01

    Inter-application I/O contention and performance interference have been recognized as severe problems. In this work, we demonstrate, through measurement from Titan (world s No. 3 supercomputer), that high I/O variance co-exists with the fact that individual storage units remain under-utilized for the majority of the time. This motivates us to propose AID, a system that performs automatic application I/O characterization and I/O-aware job scheduling. AID analyzes existing I/O traffic and batch job history logs, without any prior knowledge on applications or user/developer involvement. It identifies the small set of I/O-intensive candidates among all applications running on a supercomputer and subsequently mines their I/O patterns, using more detailed per-I/O-node traffic logs. Based on such auto- extracted information, AID provides online I/O-aware scheduling recommendations to steer I/O-intensive applications away from heavy ongoing I/O activities. We evaluate AID on Titan, using both real applications (with extracted I/O patterns validated by contacting users) and our own pseudo-applications. Our results confirm that AID is able to (1) identify I/O-intensive applications and their detailed I/O characteristics, and (2) significantly reduce these applications I/O performance degradation/variance by jointly evaluating out- standing applications I/O pattern and real-time system l/O load.

  10. IoT-based smart garbage system for efficient food waste management.

    PubMed

    Hong, Insung; Park, Sunghoi; Lee, Beomseok; Lee, Jaekeun; Jeong, Daebeom; Park, Sehyun

    2014-01-01

    Owing to a paradigm shift toward Internet of Things (IoT), researches into IoT services have been conducted in a wide range of fields. As a major application field of IoT, waste management has become one such issue. The absence of efficient waste management has caused serious environmental problems and cost issues. Therefore, in this paper, an IoT-based smart garbage system (SGS) is proposed to reduce the amount of food waste. In an SGS, battery-based smart garbage bins (SGBs) exchange information with each other using wireless mesh networks, and a router and server collect and analyze the information for service provisioning. Furthermore, the SGS includes various IoT techniques considering user convenience and increases the battery lifetime through two types of energy-efficient operations of the SGBs: stand-alone operation and cooperation-based operation. The proposed SGS had been operated as a pilot project in Gangnam district, Seoul, Republic of Korea, for a one-year period. The experiment showed that the average amount of food waste could be reduced by 33%.

  11. IoT-Based Smart Garbage System for Efficient Food Waste Management

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jaekeun

    2014-01-01

    Owing to a paradigm shift toward Internet of Things (IoT), researches into IoT services have been conducted in a wide range of fields. As a major application field of IoT, waste management has become one such issue. The absence of efficient waste management has caused serious environmental problems and cost issues. Therefore, in this paper, an IoT-based smart garbage system (SGS) is proposed to reduce the amount of food waste. In an SGS, battery-based smart garbage bins (SGBs) exchange information with each other using wireless mesh networks, and a router and server collect and analyze the information for service provisioning. Furthermore, the SGS includes various IoT techniques considering user convenience and increases the battery lifetime through two types of energy-efficient operations of the SGBs: stand-alone operation and cooperation-based operation. The proposed SGS had been operated as a pilot project in Gangnam district, Seoul, Republic of Korea, for a one-year period. The experiment showed that the average amount of food waste could be reduced by 33%. PMID:25258730

  12. Time variability of Io's volcanic activity from near-IR adaptive optics observations on 100 nights in 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kleer, Katherine; de Pater, Imke

    2016-12-01

    Jupiter's moon Io is a dynamic target, exhibiting extreme and time-variable volcanic activity powered by tidal forcing from Jupiter. We have conducted a campaign of high-cadence observations of Io with the goal of characterizing its volcanic activity. Between Aug 2013 and the end of 2015, we imaged Io on 100 nights in the near-infrared with adaptive optics on the Keck and Gemini N telescopes, which resolve emission from individual volcanic hot spots. During our program, we made over 400 detections of 48 distinct hot spots, some of which were detected 30+ times. We use these observations to derive a timeline of global volcanic activity on Io, which exhibits wide variability from month to month. The timelines of thermal activity at individual volcanic centers have geophysical implications, and will permit future characterization by others. We evaluate hot spot detection limits and give a simple parameterization of the minimum detectable intensity as a function of emission angle, which can be applied to other analyses. We detected three outburst eruptions in August 2013, but no other outburst-scale events were observed in the subsequent ∼90 observations. Either the cluster of events in August 2013 was a rare occurrence, or there is a mechanism causing large events to occur closely-spaced in time. We also detected large eruptions (though not of outburst scale) within days of one another at Kurdalagon Patera and Sethlaus/Gabija Paterae in 2015. As was also seen in the Galileo dataset, the hot spots we detected can be separated into two categories based on their thermal emission: those that are persistently active for 1 year or more at moderate intensity, and those that are only briefly active, are time-variable, and often reach large intensities. A small number of hot spots in the latter category appear and subside in a matter of days, reaching particularly high intensities; although these are not bright enough to qualify as outbursts, their thermal signatures follow

  13. A Novel Secure IoT-Based Smart Home Automation System Using a Wireless Sensor Network

    PubMed Central

    Pirbhulal, Sandeep; Zhang, Heye; E Alahi, Md Eshrat; Ghayvat, Hemant; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) provide noteworthy benefits over traditional approaches for several applications, including smart homes, healthcare, environmental monitoring, and homeland security. WSNs are integrated with the Internet Protocol (IP) to develop the Internet of Things (IoT) for connecting everyday life objects to the internet. Hence, major challenges of WSNs include: (i) how to efficiently utilize small size and low-power nodes to implement security during data transmission among several sensor nodes; (ii) how to resolve security issues associated with the harsh and complex environmental conditions during data transmission over a long coverage range. In this study, a secure IoT-based smart home automation system was developed. To facilitate energy-efficient data encryption, a method namely Triangle Based Security Algorithm (TBSA) based on efficient key generation mechanism was proposed. The proposed TBSA in integration of the low power Wi-Fi were included in WSNs with the Internet to develop a novel IoT-based smart home which could provide secure data transmission among several associated sensor nodes in the network over a long converge range. The developed IoT based system has outstanding performance by fulfilling all the necessary security requirements. The experimental results showed that the proposed TBSA algorithm consumed less energy in comparison with some existing methods. PMID:28042831

  14. A Novel Secure IoT-Based Smart Home Automation System Using a Wireless Sensor Network.

    PubMed

    Pirbhulal, Sandeep; Zhang, Heye; E Alahi, Md Eshrat; Ghayvat, Hemant; Mukhopadhyay, Subhas Chandra; Zhang, Yuan-Ting; Wu, Wanqing

    2016-12-30

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) provide noteworthy benefits over traditional approaches for several applications, including smart homes, healthcare, environmental monitoring, and homeland security. WSNs are integrated with the Internet Protocol (IP) to develop the Internet of Things (IoT) for connecting everyday life objects to the internet. Hence, major challenges of WSNs include: (i) how to efficiently utilize small size and low-power nodes to implement security during data transmission among several sensor nodes; (ii) how to resolve security issues associated with the harsh and complex environmental conditions during data transmission over a long coverage range. In this study, a secure IoT-based smart home automation system was developed. To facilitate energy-efficient data encryption, a method namely Triangle Based Security Algorithm (TBSA) based on efficient key generation mechanism was proposed. The proposed TBSA in integration of the low power Wi-Fi were included in WSNs with the Internet to develop a novel IoT-based smart home which could provide secure data transmission among several associated sensor nodes in the network over a long converge range. The developed IoT based system has outstanding performance by fulfilling all the necessary security requirements. The experimental results showed that the proposed TBSA algorithm consumed less energy in comparison with some existing methods.

  15. LLNL's Parallel I/O Testing Tools and Techniques for ASC Parallel File Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Loewe, W E; Hedges, R M; McLarty, T T; Morrone, C J

    2004-04-08

    Livermore Computing is an early and aggressive adopter of parallel file systems including, for example, GPFS from IBM and Lustre for our present Linux systems. As such, we have acquired more than our share of battle scars from encountering bugs in 'bleeding edge' file systems that we have pressed into production to serve our customers' massive I/O requirements. A major role of the Scalable I/O Project is to detect errors before our end users do. In order to do this, we have developed highly parallel test codes to stress and probe potentially weak areas of file system behavior. This paper describes those test programs and how we make use of them.

  16. On the Origin of System III Asymmetries in the Io Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, N. M.; Delamere, P. A.

    2006-01-01

    The Io plasma torus exhibits several intriguing asymmetries which offer insights to the processes that transport mass and energy through the system. While these asymmetries are increasingly well described observationally, most still lack physical explanations. One important asymmetry is fixed in the coordinate system corotating with Jupiter's magnetic field. Space-based and ground-based observations have shown that torus ions are hotter and more highly ionized around System III 20 deg. Our simulations show that this type of torus asymmetry can be caused by enhanced pickup of fresh ions from Io's neutral clouds near these longitudes. The enhancement is caused primarily by the tilt and offset of the torus relative to the neutral clouds. We will report on the model parameters required to match the observed asymmetries, and offer predictions which will allow a test of this hypothesis.

  17. An IoT-cloud Based Wearable ECG Monitoring System for Smart Healthcare.

    PubMed

    Yang, Zhe; Zhou, Qihao; Lei, Lei; Zheng, Kan; Xiang, Wei

    2016-12-01

    Public healthcare has been paid an increasing attention given the exponential growth human population and medical expenses. It is well known that an effective health monitoring system can detect abnormalities of health conditions in time and make diagnoses according to the gleaned data. As a vital approach to diagnose heart diseases, ECG monitoring is widely studied and applied. However, nearly all existing portable ECG monitoring systems cannot work without a mobile application, which is responsible for data collection and display. In this paper, we propose a new method for ECG monitoring based on Internet-of-Things (IoT) techniques. ECG data are gathered using a wearable monitoring node and are transmitted directly to the IoT cloud using Wi-Fi. Both the HTTP and MQTT protocols are employed in the IoT cloud in order to provide visual and timely ECG data to users. Nearly all smart terminals with a web browser can acquire ECG data conveniently, which has greatly alleviated the cross-platform issue. Experiments are carried out on healthy volunteers in order to verify the reliability of the entire system. Experimental results reveal that the proposed system is reliable in collecting and displaying real-time ECG data, which can aid in the primary diagnosis of certain heart diseases.

  18. Spatial distribution of Io's volcanic activity from near-IR adaptive optics observations on 100 nights in 2013-2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kleer, Katherine; de Pater, Imke

    2016-12-01

    The extreme and time-variable volcanic activity on Jupiter's moon Io is the result of periodic tidal forcing. The spatial distribution of Io's surface heat flux provides an important constraint on models for tidal heat dissipation, yielding information on interior properties and on the depth at which the tidal heat is primarily dissipated. We analyze the spatial distribution of 48 hot spots based on more than 400 total hot spot detections in adaptive optics images taken on 100 nights in 2013-2015 (data presented in de Kleer and de Pater [2016] Time variability of Io's volcanic activity from near-IR adaptive optics 13 observations on 100 nights in 2013-2015). We present full surface maps of Io at multiple near-infrared wavelengths for three epochs during this time period, and show that the longitudinal distribution of hot spots has not changed significantly since the Galileo mission. We find that hot spots that are persistently active at moderate intensities tend to occur at different latitudes/longitudes than those that exhibit sudden brightening events characterized by high peak intensities and subsequent decay phases. While persistent hot spots are located primarily between ± 30°N, hot spots exhibiting bright eruption events occur primarily between 40° and 65° in both the northern and southern hemispheres. In addition, while persistent hot spots occur preferentially on the leading hemisphere, all bright eruptions were detected on the trailing hemisphere, despite the comparable longitudinal coverage of our observations to both hemispheres. A subset of the bright hot spots which are not intense enough to qualify as outburst eruptions resemble outbursts in terms of temporal evolution and spatial distribution, and may be outbursts whose peak emission went unobserved, or else scaled-down versions of the same phenomenon. A statistical analysis finds that large eruptions are more spatially clustered and occur at higher latitudes than 95% of simulated datasets that

  19. A Generic System-Level Framework for Self-Serve Health Monitoring System through Internet of Things (IoT).

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Mobyen Uddin; Björkman, Mats; Lindén, Maria

    2015-01-01

    Sensor data are traveling from sensors to a remote server, data is analyzed remotely in a distributed manner, and health status of a user is presented in real-time. This paper presents a generic system-level framework for a self-served health monitoring system through the Internet of Things (IoT) to facilities an efficient sensor data management.

  20. Virtualized MME Design for IoT Support in 5G Systems.

    PubMed

    Andres-Maldonado, Pilar; Ameigeiras, Pablo; Prados-Garzon, Jonathan; Ramos-Munoz, Juan Jose; Lopez-Soler, Juan Manuel

    2016-08-22

    Cellular systems are recently being considered an option to provide support to the Internet of Things (IoT). To enable this support, the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) has introduced new procedures specifically targeted for cellular IoT. With one of these procedures, the transmissions of small and infrequent data packets from/to the devices are encapsulated in signaling messages and sent through the control plane. However, these transmissions from/to a massive number of devices may imply a major increase of the processing load on the control plane entities of the network and in particular on the Mobility Management Entity (MME). In this paper, we propose two designs of an MME based on Network Function Virtualization (NFV) that aim at facilitating the IoT support. The first proposed design partially separates the processing resources dedicated to each traffic class. The second design includes traffic shaping to control the traffic of each class. We consider three classes: Mobile Broadband (MBB), low latency Machine to Machine communications (lM2M) and delay-tolerant M2M communications. Our proposals enable reducing the processing resources and, therefore, the cost. Additionally, results show that the proposed designs lessen the impact between classes, so they ease the compliance of the delay requirements of MBB and lM2M communications.

  1. Complex IoT Systems as Enablers for Smart Homes in a Smart City Vision.

    PubMed

    Lynggaard, Per; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2016-11-02

    The world is entering a new era, where Internet-of-Things (IoT), smart homes, and smart cities will play an important role in meeting the so-called big challenges. In the near future, it is foreseen that the majority of the world's population will live their lives in smart homes and in smart cities. To deal with these challenges, to support a sustainable urban development, and to improve the quality of life for citizens, a multi-disciplinary approach is needed. It seems evident, however, that a new, advanced Information and Communications Technology ICT infrastructure is a key feature to realize the "smart" vision. This paper proposes a specific solution in the form of a hierarchical layered ICT based infrastructure that handles ICT issues related to the "big challenges" and seamlessly integrates IoT, smart homes, and smart city structures into one coherent unit. To exemplify benefits of this infrastructure, a complex IoT system has been deployed, simulated and elaborated. This simulation deals with wastewater energy harvesting from smart buildings located in a smart city context. From the simulations, it has been found that the proposed infrastructure is able to harvest between 50% and 75% of the wastewater energy in a smart residential building. By letting the smart city infrastructure coordinate and control the harvest time and duration, it is possible to achieve considerable energy savings in the smart homes, and it is possible to reduce the peak-load for district heating plants.

  2. Virtualized MME Design for IoT Support in 5G Systems

    PubMed Central

    Andres-Maldonado, Pilar; Ameigeiras, Pablo; Prados-Garzon, Jonathan; Ramos-Munoz, Juan Jose; Lopez-Soler, Juan Manuel

    2016-01-01

    Cellular systems are recently being considered an option to provide support to the Internet of Things (IoT). To enable this support, the 3rd Generation Partnership Project (3GPP) has introduced new procedures specifically targeted for cellular IoT. With one of these procedures, the transmissions of small and infrequent data packets from/to the devices are encapsulated in signaling messages and sent through the control plane. However, these transmissions from/to a massive number of devices may imply a major increase of the processing load on the control plane entities of the network and in particular on the Mobility Management Entity (MME). In this paper, we propose two designs of an MME based on Network Function Virtualization (NFV) that aim at facilitating the IoT support. The first proposed design partially separates the processing resources dedicated to each traffic class. The second design includes traffic shaping to control the traffic of each class. We consider three classes: Mobile Broadband (MBB), low latency Machine to Machine communications (lM2M) and delay-tolerant M2M communications. Our proposals enable reducing the processing resources and, therefore, the cost. Additionally, results show that the proposed designs lessen the impact between classes, so they ease the compliance of the delay requirements of MBB and lM2M communications. PMID:27556468

  3. Io volcanism

    SciTech Connect

    Carr, M.H.

    1985-01-01

    Io is the most volcanically active body in the Solar System. The Voyage spacecraft observed nine active eruption plumes in 1979, and detected numerous thermal anomalies. Loki the most active volcanic region has been emitting 1.5 x 10/sup 13/ W over the last few years. Many of the volcanic features have been interpreted as the result of sulfur volcanism because 1) the spectral reflectance of the surface resembles sulfur, 2) SO/sub 2/ has been positively identified, 3) the satellite leaves a trail of sulfur atoms in its wake; and 4) many of the hot spots have surfaces temperatures less than 400/sup 0/K, compatible with low-temperature melts. The evidence for sulfur has led to suggestions of sulfur lava flows hundreds of kilometers long, and sulfur lava lakes as large as Lake Erie. The observations are, however, equally compatible with basaltic volcanism. Modeling of the cooling of basaltic lava flows indicates that regions of basaltic volcanism on Io should have temperatures similar to those detected by the Voyager spacecraft. High eruption rates are required. High rates of fumarolic activity accompanying the eruptions and expulsion of volatiles by the plumes give the surface its sulfur-like spectral reflectance.

  4. US-CERT Control System Center Input/Output (I/O) Conceputal Design

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    2005-02-01

    This document was prepared for the US-CERT Control Systems Center of the National Cyber Security Division (NCSD) of the Department of Homeland Security (DHS). DHS has been tasked under the Homeland Security Act of 2002 to coordinate the overall national effort to enhance the protection of the national critical infrastructure. Homeland Security Presidential Directive HSPD-7 directs the federal departments to identify and prioritize critical infrastructure and protect it from terrorist attack. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security was prepared by the NCSD to address the control system security component addressed in the National Strategy to Secure Cyberspace and the National Strategy for the Physical Protection of Critical Infrastructures and Key Assets. The US-CERT National Strategy for Control Systems Security identified five high-level strategic goals for improving cyber security of control systems; the I/O upgrade described in this document supports these goals. The vulnerability assessment Test Bed, located in the Information Operations Research Center (IORC) facility at Idaho National Laboratory (INL), consists of a cyber test facility integrated with multiple test beds that simulate the nation's critical infrastructure. The fundamental mission of the Test Bed is to provide industry owner/operators, system vendors, and multi-agency partners of the INL National Security Division a platform for vulnerability assessments of control systems. The Input/Output (I/O) upgrade to the Test Bed (see Work Package 3.1 of the FY-05 Annual Work Plan) will provide for the expansion of assessment capabilities within the IORC facility. It will also provide capabilities to connect test beds within the Test Range and other Laboratory resources. This will allow real time I/O data input and communication channels for full replications of control systems (Process Control Systems [PCS], Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition Systems [SCADA], and components

  5. Driver Adaptive Warning Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1998-03-01

    this threshold, an alarm is triggered. Since TLC based systems can have user defined thresholds, a warning can be given as early as desired. However, the...Driver Adaptive Warning Systems Thesis Proposal Parag H. Batavia CMU-RI-TR-98-07 The Robotics Institute Carnegie Mellon University Pittsburgh...control number. 1. REPORT DATE MAR 1998 2. REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-1998 to 00-00-1998 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Driver Adaptive Warning

  6. Scientific Data Services -- A High-Performance I/O System with Array Semantics

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kesheng; Byna, Surendra; Rotem, Doron; Shoshani, Arie

    2011-09-21

    As high-performance computing approaches exascale, the existing I/O system design is having trouble keeping pace in both performance and scalability. We propose to address this challenge by adopting database principles and techniques in parallel I/O systems. First, we propose to adopt an array data model because many scientific applications represent their data in arrays. This strategy follows a cardinal principle from database research, which separates the logical view from the physical layout of data. This high-level data model gives the underlying implementation more freedom to optimize the physical layout and to choose the most effective way of accessing the data. For example, knowing that a set of write operations is working on a single multi-dimensional array makes it possible to keep the subarrays in a log structure during the write operations and reassemble them later into another physical layout as resources permit. While maintaining the high-level view, the storage system could compress the user data to reduce the physical storage requirement, collocate data records that are frequently used together, or replicate data to increase availability and fault-tolerance. Additionally, the system could generate secondary data structures such as database indexes and summary statistics. We expect the proposed Scientific Data Services approach to create a “live” storage system that dynamically adjusts to user demands and evolves with the massively parallel storage hardware.

  7. Real-Time Performance of a Self-Powered Environmental IoT Sensor Network System

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Fan; Rüdiger, Christoph; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2017-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) play an increasingly important role in monitoring applications in many areas. With the emergence of the Internet-of-Things (IoT), many more low-power sensors will need to be deployed in various environments to collect and monitor data about environmental factors in real time. Providing power supply to these sensor nodes becomes a critical challenge for realizations of IoT applications as sensor nodes are normally battery-powered and have a limited lifetime. This paper proposes a wireless sensor network that is powered by solar energy harvesting. The sensor network monitors the environmental data with low-power sensor electronics and forms a network using multiple XBee wireless modules. A detailed performance analysis of the network system under solar energy harvesting has been presented. The sensor network system and the proposed energy-harvesting techniques are configured to achieve a continuous energy source for the sensor network. The proposed energy-harvesting system has been successfully designed to enable an energy solution in order to keep sensor nodes active and reliable for a whole day. The paper also outlines some of our experiences in real-time implementation of a sensor network system with energy harvesting. PMID:28157148

  8. System III variations in apparent distance of Io plasma torus from Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dessler, A. J.; Sandel, B. R.

    1992-01-01

    System III variations in apparent distance of the Io plasma torus from Jupiter are examined on the basis of data obtained from UVS scans across Jupiter's satellite system. The displacement of the dawn and dusk ansae are found to be unexpectedly complex. The displacements are unequal and both ansae are in motion with the motion of the approaching ansa being the lesser of the two. The radial motions, as measured from either the center of Jupiter or the offset-tilted dipole, are of unequal magnitude and have the System III periodicity. It is concluded that the cross-tail electric field that causes these torus motions is concentrated on the dusk ansa, varied with the System III period, and shows magnetic-anomaly phase control. It is found that the dawn-dust asymmetry in brightness is not explained simply by the cross-tail electric field. It is concluded that there is a heating mechanism that causes the dusk side of the Io plasma torus to be brighter than the dawn side.

  9. Real-Time Performance of a Self-Powered Environmental IoT Sensor Network System.

    PubMed

    Wu, Fan; Rüdiger, Christoph; Yuce, Mehmet Rasit

    2017-02-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) play an increasingly important role in monitoring applications in many areas. With the emergence of the Internet-of-Things (IoT), many more lowpower sensors will need to be deployed in various environments to collect and monitor data about environmental factors in real time. Providing power supply to these sensor nodes becomes a critical challenge for realizations of IoT applications as sensor nodes are normally battery-powered and have a limited lifetime. This paper proposes a wireless sensor network that is powered by solar energy harvesting. The sensor network monitors the environmental data with low-power sensor electronics and forms a network using multiple XBee wireless modules. A detailed performance analysis of the network system under solar energy harvesting has been presented. The sensor network system and the proposed energy-harvesting techniques are configured to achieve a continuous energy source for the sensor network. The proposed energy-harvesting system has been successfully designed to enable an energy solution in order to keep sensor nodes active and reliable for a whole day. The paper also outlines some of our experiences in real-time implementation of a sensor network system with energy harvesting.

  10. NEEDS - Information Adaptive System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kelly, W. L.; Benz, H. F.; Meredith, B. D.

    1980-01-01

    The Information Adaptive System (IAS) is an element of the NASA End-to-End Data System (NEEDS) Phase II and is focused toward onboard image processing. The IAS is a data preprocessing system which is closely coupled to the sensor system. Some of the functions planned for the IAS include sensor response nonuniformity correction, geometric correction, data set selection, data formatting, packetization, and adaptive system control. The inclusion of these sensor data preprocessing functions onboard the spacecraft will significantly improve the extraction of information from the sensor data in a timely and cost effective manner, and provide the opportunity to design sensor systems which can be reconfigured in near real-time for optimum performance. The purpose of this paper is to present the preliminary design of the IAS and the plans for its development.

  11. Complex IoT Systems as Enablers for Smart Homes in a Smart City Vision

    PubMed Central

    Lynggaard, Per; Skouby, Knud Erik

    2016-01-01

    The world is entering a new era, where Internet-of-Things (IoT), smart homes, and smart cities will play an important role in meeting the so-called big challenges. In the near future, it is foreseen that the majority of the world’s population will live their lives in smart homes and in smart cities. To deal with these challenges, to support a sustainable urban development, and to improve the quality of life for citizens, a multi-disciplinary approach is needed. It seems evident, however, that a new, advanced Information and Communications Technology ICT infrastructure is a key feature to realize the “smart” vision. This paper proposes a specific solution in the form of a hierarchical layered ICT based infrastructure that handles ICT issues related to the “big challenges” and seamlessly integrates IoT, smart homes, and smart city structures into one coherent unit. To exemplify benefits of this infrastructure, a complex IoT system has been deployed, simulated and elaborated. This simulation deals with wastewater energy harvesting from smart buildings located in a smart city context. From the simulations, it has been found that the proposed infrastructure is able to harvest between 50% and 75% of the wastewater energy in a smart residential building. By letting the smart city infrastructure coordinate and control the harvest time and duration, it is possible to achieve considerable energy savings in the smart homes, and it is possible to reduce the peak-load for district heating plants. PMID:27827851

  12. SYNAISTHISI: an IoT-powered smart visitor management and cognitive recommendations system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thanos, Giorgos Konstandinos; Karafylli, Christina; Karafylli, Maria; Zacharakis, Dimitris; Papadimitriou, Apostolis; Dimitros, Kostantinos; Kanellopoulou, Konstantina; Kyriazanos, Dimitris M.; Thomopoulos, Stelios C. A.

    2016-05-01

    Location-based and navigation services are really needed to help visitors and audience of big events, complex buildings, shopping malls, airports and large companies. However, the lack of GPS and proper mapping indoors usually renders location-based applications and services useless or simply not applicable in such environments. SYNAISTHISI introduces a mobile application for smartphones which offers navigation capabilities outside and inside buildings and through multiple floor levels. The application comes together with a suite of helpful services, including personalized recommendations, visit/event management and a helpful search functionality in order to navigate to a specific location, event or person. As the user finds his way towards his destination, NFC-enabled checkpoints and bluetooth beacons assist him, while offering re-routing, check-in/out capabilities and useful information about ongoing meetings and nearby events. The application is supported by a back-end GIS system which can provide a broad and clear view to event organizers, campus managers and field personnel for purposes of event logistics, safety and security. SYNAISTHISI system comes with plenty competitive advantages including (a) Seamless Navigation as users move between outdoor and indoor areas and different floor levels by using innovative routing algorithms, (b) connection to and powered by IoT platform, for localization and real-time information feedback, (c) dynamic personalized recommendations based on user profile, location and real-time information provided by the IoT platform and (d) Indoor localization without the need for expensive infrastructure and installations.

  13. Dust escape from Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, Alberto

    2004-08-01

    The Dust ballerina skirt is a set of well defined streams composed of nanometric sized dust particles that escape from the Jovian system and may be accelerated up to >=200 km/s. The source of this dust is Jupiter's moon Io, the most volcanically active body in the Solar system. The escape of dust grains from Jupiter requires first the escape of these grains from Io. This work is basically devoted to explain this escape given that the driving of dust particles to great heights and later injection into the ionosphere of Io may give the particles an equilibrium potential that allow the magnetic field to accelerate them away from Io. The grain sizes obtained through this study match very well to the values required for the particles to escape from the Jovian system.

  14. Improving Operational System Performance of Internet of Things (IoT) in Indonesia Telecomunication Company

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dachyar, M.; Risky, S. A.

    2014-06-01

    Telecommunications company have to improve their business performance despite of the increase customers every year. In Indonesia, the telecommunication company have provided best services, improving operational systems by designing a framework for operational systems of the Internet of Things (IoT) other name of Machine to Machine (M2M). This study was conducted with expert opinion which further processed by the Analytic Hierarchy Process (AHP) to obtain important factor for organizations operational systems, and the Interpretive Structural Modeling (ISM) to determine factors of organization which found drives the biggest power. This study resulted, the greatest weight of SLA & KPI handling problems. The M2M current dashboard and current M2M connectivity have power to affect other factors and has important function for M2M operations roomates system which can be effectively carried out.

  15. Io Volcano Observer (IVO)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, A. S.; Keszthelyi, L.; Spencer, J.; Thomas, N.; Johnson, T.; Christensen, P.; Wurz, P.; Glassmeier, K. H.; Shinohara, C.; Girard, T.

    2009-04-01

    In early FY2008, NASA solicited study concepts for Discovery/Scout-class missions that would be enabled by use of 2 Advanced Stirling Radioisotope Generators (ASRGs). We proposed an Io Volcano Observer (IVO) study concept, because the ASRGs enable pointing flexibility and a high data rate from a low-cost mission in Jupiter orbit. Io presents a rich array of inter-connected orbital, geophysical, atmospheric, and plasma phenomena and is the only place in the Solar System (including Earth) where we can watch very large-scale silicate volcanic processes in action. Io is the best place to study tidal heating, which greatly expands the habitable zones of planetary systems. The coupled orbital-tidal evolution of Io and Europa is key to understanding the histories of both worlds. IVO utilizes an elliptical orbit inclined > 45° to Jupiter's orbital plane with repeated fast flybys of Io. Io will have nearly constant illumination at each flyby, which facilitates monitoring of changes over time. The view of Io on approach and departure will be nearly polar, enabling unique measurement and monitoring of polar heat flow (key to tidal heating models), equatorial plumes, and magnetospheric interactions. We expect to collect and return 20 Gbits per flyby via 34-m DSN stations, >1000 times the Io data return of Galileo. The minimal payload we considered included (1) a narrow-angle camera, (2) a thermal mapper, (3) an ion and neutral mass spectrometer, and (4) a pair of fluxgate magnetometers. The camera will acquire global km-scale monitoring and sampling down to 10 m/pixel or better. One key objective is to acquire nearly simultaneous (<0.1 s) multispectral measurements to determine the peak lava temperatures, which in turn constrains the temperature and rheology of Io's mantle and whether or not the heat flow is in equilibrium with tidal heating. The thermal mapper will be similar to THEMIS on Mars Odyssey, but with bandpasses designed to monitor volcanic activity, measure heat

  16. A Network Coverage Information-Based Sensor Registry System for IoT Environments

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hyunjun; Jeong, Dongwon; Lee, Sukhoon; On, Byung-Won; Baik, Doo-Kwon

    2016-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is expected to provide better services through the interaction of physical objects via the Internet. However, its limitations cause an interoperability problem when the sensed data are exchanged between the sensor nodes in wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which constitute the core infrastructure of the IoT. To address this problem, a Sensor Registry System (SRS) is used. By using a SRS, the information of the heterogeneous sensed data remains pure. If users move along a road, their mobile devices predict their next positions and obtain the sensed data for that position from the SRS. If the WSNs in the location in which the users move are unstable, the sensed data will be lost. Consider a situation where the user passes through dangerous areas. If the user’s mobile device cannot receive information, they cannot be warned about the dangerous situation. To avoid this, two novel SRSs that use network coverage information have been proposed: one uses OpenSignal and the other uses the probabilistic distribution of the users accessing SRS. The empirical study showed that the proposed method can seamlessly provide services related to sensing data under any abnormal circumstance. PMID:27463717

  17. A Network Coverage Information-Based Sensor Registry System for IoT Environments.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyunjun; Jeong, Dongwon; Lee, Sukhoon; On, Byung-Won; Baik, Doo-Kwon

    2016-07-25

    The Internet of Things (IoT) is expected to provide better services through the interaction of physical objects via the Internet. However, its limitations cause an interoperability problem when the sensed data are exchanged between the sensor nodes in wireless sensor networks (WSNs), which constitute the core infrastructure of the IoT. To address this problem, a Sensor Registry System (SRS) is used. By using a SRS, the information of the heterogeneous sensed data remains pure. If users move along a road, their mobile devices predict their next positions and obtain the sensed data for that position from the SRS. If the WSNs in the location in which the users move are unstable, the sensed data will be lost. Consider a situation where the user passes through dangerous areas. If the user's mobile device cannot receive information, they cannot be warned about the dangerous situation. To avoid this, two novel SRSs that use network coverage information have been proposed: one uses OpenSignal and the other uses the probabilistic distribution of the users accessing SRS. The empirical study showed that the proposed method can seamlessly provide services related to sensing data under any abnormal circumstance.

  18. Io Volcano Observer (IVO): Budget travel to the outer Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Alfred; Turtle, Elizabeth; Hibbard, Kenneth; Reynolds, Edward; Adams, Elena

    2014-01-01

    The IVO mission would make multiple close encounters with Io while orbiting Jupiter in an inclined elliptical orbit. The payload includes narrow-angle and wide-angle cameras (NAC and WAC), dual fluxgate magnetometers (FGM), a thermal mapper (ThM), dual ion and neutral mass spectrometers (INMS), and dual plasma ion analyzers (PIA). The mission is designed to answer key outstanding questions about Io, especially the nature of the intense active volcanism and internal processes that drive the volcanism. IVO can collect and return 20 Gb of compressed science data per Io encounter, 100 times the total Io data return from the 8yr Galileo tour.

  19. Microstructure and particulate properties of the surfaces of Io and Ganymede - Comparison with other solar system bodies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pang, K. D.; Lumme, K.; Bowell, E.

    The phase curves of Io and Ganymede between 0 and 40 deg solar phase angle have been compiled from Voyager photopolarimeter and ground-based observations. Modeling the data with the Lumme-Bowell theory made it possible to determine improved estimates of the surface texture and particulate properties. Accurate V-band zero-phase geometric albedos, phase integrals, and Bond albedos are also obtained. The properties of the particles on Io's surface appear to be different from those of other solar system objects whose surfaces are totally controlled by impact cratering processes. Sulfur and SO2 frost, previously identified by spectral analysis, seem to exist in a physical form not commonly found on earth. The agglomeration of volcanic ash into aggregates on Io's surface is postulated.

  20. Adaptive CT scanning system

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, Stephen E.

    2016-11-22

    Apparatus, systems, and methods that provide an X-ray interrogation system having a plurality of stationary X-ray point sources arranged to substantially encircle an area or space to be interrogated. A plurality of stationary detectors are arranged to substantially encircle the area or space to be interrogated, A controller is adapted to control the stationary X-ray point sources to emit X-rays one at a time, and to control the stationary detectors to detect the X-rays emitted by the stationary X-ray point sources.

  1. OPAL: An Open-Source MPI-IO Library over Cray XT

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Weikuan; Vetter, Jeffrey S; Canon, Richard Shane

    2007-01-01

    Parallel IO over Cray XT is supported by a vendor-supplied MPI-IO package. This package contains a proprietary ADIO implementation built on top of the sysio library. While it is reasonable to maintain a stable code base for application scientists' convenience, it is also very important to the system developers and researchers to analyze and assess the effectiveness of parallel IO software, and accordingly, tune and optimize the MPI-IO implementation. A proprietary parallel IO code base relinquishes such flexibilities. On the other hand, a generic UFS-based MPI-IO implementation is typically used on many Linux-based platforms. We have developed an open-source MPI-IO package over Lustre, referred to as OPAL (OPportunistic and Adaptive MPI-IO Library over Lustre). OPAL provides a single source-code base for MPI-IO over Lustre on Cray XT and Linux platforms. Compared to Cray implementation, OPAL provides a number of good features, including arbitrary specification of striping patterns and Lustre-stripe aligned file domain partitioning. This paper presents the performance comparisons between OPAL and Cray's proprietary implementation. Our evaluation demonstrates that OPAL achieves the performance comparable to the Cray implementation. We also exemplify the benefits of an open source package in revealing the underpinning of the parallel IO performance.

  2. An open, parallel I/O computer as the platform for high-performance, high-capacity mass storage systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Abineri, Adrian; Chen, Y. P.

    1992-01-01

    APTEC Computer Systems is a Portland, Oregon based manufacturer of I/O computers. APTEC's work in the context of high density storage media is on programs requiring real-time data capture with low latency processing and storage requirements. An example of APTEC's work in this area is the Loral/Space Telescope-Data Archival and Distribution System. This is an existing Loral AeroSys designed system, which utilizes an APTEC I/O computer. The key attributes of a system architecture that is suitable for this environment are as follows: (1) data acquisition alternatives; (2) a wide range of supported mass storage devices; (3) data processing options; (4) data availability through standard network connections; and (5) an overall system architecture (hardware and software designed for high bandwidth and low latency). APTEC's approach is outlined in this document.

  3. Ignition and Combustion Characteristics of Nanoscale Al/AgIO3: A Potential Energetic Biocidal System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    reaction of Al/AgIO3 thermites for potential use in biocidal applications . Rapid-heating wire experiments were performed to measure the ignition...OF: This work investigates the ignition and reaction of Al/AgIO3 thermites for potential use in biocidal applications . Rapid-heating wire experiments...were performed to measure the ignition temperature and investigate the thermal decomposition of the oxidizer using a T-Jump/TOF Mass Spectrometer

  4. Current parallel I/O limitations to scalable data analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Mascarenhas, Ajith Arthur; Pebay, Philippe Pierre

    2011-07-01

    This report describes the limitations to parallel scalability which we have encountered when applying our otherwise optimally scalable parallel statistical analysis tool kit to large data sets distributed across the parallel file system of the current premier DOE computational facility. This report describes our study to evaluate the effect of parallel I/O on the overall scalability of a parallel data analysis pipeline using our scalable parallel statistics tool kit [PTBM11]. In this goal, we tested it using the Jaguar-pf DOE/ORNL peta-scale platform on a large combustion simulation data under a variety of process counts and domain decompositions scenarios. In this report we have recalled the foundations of the parallel statistical analysis tool kit which we have designed and implemented, with the specific double intent of reproducing typical data analysis workflows, and achieving optimal design for scalable parallel implementations. We have briefly reviewed those earlier results and publications which allow us to conclude that we have achieved both goals. However, in this report we have further established that, when used in conjuction with a state-of-the-art parallel I/O system, as can be found on the premier DOE peta-scale platform, the scaling properties of the overall analysis pipeline comprising parallel data access routines degrade rapidly. This finding is problematic and must be addressed if peta-scale data analysis is to be made scalable, or even possible. In order to attempt to address these parallel I/O limitations, we will investigate the use the Adaptable IO System (ADIOS) [LZL+10] to improve I/O performance, while maintaining flexibility for a variety of IO options, such MPI IO, POSIX IO. This system is developed at ORNL and other collaborating institutions, and is being tested extensively on Jaguar-pf. Simulation code being developed on these systems will also use ADIOS to output the data thereby making it easier for other systems, such as ours, to

  5. Satellite Atmosphere and Io Torus Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Nicholas

    2004-01-01

    NASA's Planetary Astronomy Program has supported a vigorous three-year program of groundbased observations and detailed analysis of the Jupiter/Io system. Our work focused on Io's escaping atmosphere and the plasma torus that it creates.

  6. Development of IoT-based Urban Sinkhole and Road Collapse Monitoring System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, B.; Bang, E.; Lee, H. J.; Jeong, S. W.; Ryu, D.; Kim, S. W.; Kim, B. K.; Yum, B. W.; Lee, I. H.

    2015-12-01

    The consortium of Korean government-funded research institutes is developing IoT- (Internet of things) based underground safety monitoring and alerting system to manage risks arisen from land subsidence and road collapses in metropolitan areas in South Korea. The system consists of four major functional units: subsurface monitoring sensors sending data directly through the internet, centralized servers capable of collecting and processing big data, computational modules providing physical and statistical models for predicting high-risk areas, and geologic information service platforms visualizing underground safety maps for the public. The target urban area will be regionally covered by multi-sensors monitoring soil and groundwater conditions, and by high resolution satellite InSAR images filtering vertical land movements in a centimeter scale. Integrity of buried water supply and sewer lines are also monitored for the possibility of underground cavity formation. Once high-risk area is predicted, more tangible surveying methods such as ground penetrating radar (GPR) and resistivity survey can be applied for locating the cavities. Additionally, laboratory and field experiments are performed to understand overall road collapsing mechanism from the initial cavity creation to its progressive development depending on soil types, degree of compaction, and groundwater condition. Acquired results will update existing fully-coupled hydromechanical models for more accurate prediction of the collapsing-vulnerable area. Preliminary laboratory experiments show that the upward propagation of subsurface cavity is closely related to the soil properties, such as sand-clay ratios and moisture contents, and groundwater dynamics.

  7. Adaptive control of linearizable systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sastry, S. Shankar; Isidori, Alberto

    1989-01-01

    Initial results are reported regarding the adaptive control of minimum-phase nonlinear systems which are exactly input-output linearizable by state feedback. Parameter adaptation is used as a technique to make robust the exact cancellation of nonlinear terms, which is called for in the linearization technique. The application of the adaptive technique to control of robot manipulators is discussed. Only the continuous-time case is considered; extensions to the discrete-time and sampled-data cases are not obvious.

  8. Geologic map of Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Williams, David A.; Keszthelyi, Laszlo P.; Crown, David A.; Yff, Jessica A.; Jaeger, Windy L.; Schenk, Paul M.; Geissler, Paul E.; Becker, Tammy L.

    2011-01-01

    Io, discovered by Galileo Galilei on January 7–13, 1610, is the innermost of the four Galilean satellites of the planet Jupiter (Galilei, 1610). It is the most volcanically active object in the Solar System, as recognized by observations from six National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) spacecraft: Voyager 1 (March 1979), Voyager 2 (July 1979), Hubble Space Telescope (1990–present), Galileo (1996–2001), Cassini (December 2000), and New Horizons (February 2007). The lack of impact craters on Io in any spacecraft images at any resolution attests to the high resurfacing rate (1 cm/yr) and the dominant role of active volcanism in shaping its surface. High-temperature hot spots detected by the Galileo Solid-State Imager (SSI), Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS), and Photopolarimeter-Radiometer (PPR) usually correlate with darkest materials on the surface, suggesting active volcanism. The Voyager flybys obtained complete coverage of Io's subjovian hemisphere at 500 m/pixel to 2 km/pixel, and most of the rest of the satellite at 5–20 km/pixel. Repeated Galileo flybys obtained complementary coverage of Io's antijovian hemisphere at 5 m/pixel to 1.4 km/pixel. Thus, the Voyager and Galileo data sets were merged to enable the characterization of the whole surface of the satellite at a consistent resolution. The United States Geological Survey (USGS) produced a set of four global mosaics of Io in visible wavelengths at a spatial resolution of 1 km/pixel, released in February 2006, which we have used as base maps for this new global geologic map. Much has been learned about Io's volcanism, tectonics, degradation, and interior since the Voyager flybys, primarily during and following the Galileo Mission at Jupiter (December 1995–September 2003), and the results have been summarized in books published after the end of the Galileo Mission. Our mapping incorporates this new understanding to assist in map unit definition and to provide a global synthesis

  9. Lava Lakes on Io?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopes, R. M. C.; Kamp, L. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Howell, R.; Mouginis-Mark, P.; Kargel, J. S.; Radebaugh, J.; Turtle, E. P.; Perry, J.; Williams, D. A.; Carlson, R. W.; Doute, S.; Galileo NIMS Team

    2003-05-01

    At least 152 active volcanic centers have been identified on Jupiter's moon Io [Lopes et al., 2003, submitted to Icarus]. Eruptions at these centers include lava flows (``Promethean" type eruptions), explosive ``Pillanian" eruptions [Keszthelyi et al., 2001, JGR 106, 33,025-52] and volcanism confined within patera walls (``Lokian", Lopes et al., 2003). Understanding the Lokian eruption mechanism is particularly important because paterae are the most ubiquitous volcanic constructs on Io's surface [Radebaugh et al. 2001, JGR, 106, 33,005-33,020] and patera volcanism is the most common eruption type on Io. We use observations from Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) and compare them with images from Galileo's Solid State Imaging system (SSI) to map the distribution of thermal emission at several Ionian paterae. This allows us to examine how thermal emission correlates with visible features, and to investigate how thermal emission varies with time. Galileo's close fly-bys of Io from 1999 to 2001 allowed NIMS to observe the volcanoes at relatively high spatial resolution (1-30 km pixel). At these scales, observations of the several paterae reveal that the greatest thermal emission occurs at the edges. This can be explained as the crust of a lava lake breaking up against the base of the patera (caldera) walls, similar to what has been observed at lava lakes on Earth. Comparison with terrestrial analogs shows that several Ionian active paterae, such as Loki, Tupan, and Emakong, have thermal properties consistent with relatively inactive lava lakes on Earth. We discuss these results and their implications for eruption styles and resurfacing on Io. This work was supported in part by NASA's Planetary Geology and Geophysics Program.

  10. Adaptive protection algorithm and system

    DOEpatents

    Hedrick, Paul [Pittsburgh, PA; Toms, Helen L [Irwin, PA; Miller, Roger M [Mars, PA

    2009-04-28

    An adaptive protection algorithm and system for protecting electrical distribution systems traces the flow of power through a distribution system, assigns a value (or rank) to each circuit breaker in the system and then determines the appropriate trip set points based on the assigned rank.

  11. Enhancing I/O Throughput via Efficient Routing and Placement for Large-scale Parallel File Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Dillow, David A; Shipman, Galen M; Oral, H Sarp; Zhang, Zhe; Kim, Youngjae

    2011-01-01

    As storage systems get larger to meet the demands of petascale systems, careful planning must be applied to avoid congestion points and extract the maximum performance. In addition, the large data sets generated by such systems makes it desirable for all compute resources to have common access to this data without needing to copy it to each machine. This paper describes a method of placing I/O close to the storage nodes to minimize contention on Cray s SeaStar2+ network, and extends it to a routed Lustre configuration to gain the same benefits when running against a center-wide file system. Our experiments using half of the resources of Spider the center-wide file system at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility show that I/O write bandwidth can be improved by up to 45% (from 71.9 to 104 GB/s) for a direct-attached configuration and by 137% (47.6 GB/s to 115 GB/s) for a routed configuration. We demonstrated up to 20.7% reduction in run-time for production scientific applications. With the full Spider system, we demonstrated over 240 GB/s of aggregate bandwidth using our techniques.

  12. The Io Plasma Torus: Motivation for Abandoning the "Active Sector" Concept in Favor of System IV Modulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morgenthaler, J. P.; Oliversen, R. J.; Marconi, M.; Woodward, R. C., Jr.

    2014-12-01

    We use an extensive spectroscopic dataset of 1000 observations of Io in [OI] 6300A, presented by Oliversen et al. (2001), narrow-band images of the torus in [SII] 6731A, and HST/STIS EUV observations of Io and its environs to confirm that the Io [OI] flux is an excellent proxy for the electron density in the Io plasma to torus (IPT). Furthermore, we find: (1) A careful statistical analysis of short-term variations in this dataset (20 min to 1 hour), previously suspected to be from flux tube interchange (Oliversen et al. 2001, Morgenthaler et al. 2012) are, in fact, consistent with the expected statistical variation of the parent population of observations. (2) The semi-empirical IPT model developed by W. Smyth (Oliversen et al. 2001; Smyth, Peterson, & Marconi 2011) fits the overall trends in the data reasonably well, with notable exceptions. (3) There may be a link between what was previously known the "active sector" at system III longitudes of 170 ~ 230 degrees and the modulation in IPT plasma density caused by the beating between system III and system IV, predicted by Hess et al. (2011). Conclusion: a simple modification to the W. Smyth semi-empirical torus model to incorporate a system IV-controlled density enhancement, rather than a fixed "active sector" in system III, should enable the model to "lock in" more readily to our extensive set of [OI] 6300A observations recorded between 1990 and 2008. This will provide detailed information about the flow of mass and energy in the IPT during the Galileo, Ulysses, Cassini, and New Horizons missions. Additional observations are planned during NASA's upcoming Juno mission. This work was supported by NASA Planetary Research Program RTOP 344-32-40 to GSFC and grants NAGW-3319 and NAG5-6787 to the University of Wisconsin--Madison, STIS contract NAS5-30131 to the University of Wisconsin--Madison and NASA Outer Planets Research Program grant NNX11AM43G to PSI.

  13. Adaptive security systems -- Combining expert systems with adaptive technologies

    SciTech Connect

    Argo, P.; Loveland, R.; Anderson, K.

    1997-09-01

    The Adaptive Multisensor Integrated Security System (AMISS) uses a variety of computational intelligence techniques to reason from raw sensor data through an array of processing layers to arrive at an assessment for alarm/alert conditions based on human behavior within a secure facility. In this paper, the authors give an overview of the system and briefly describe some of the major components of the system. This system is currently under development and testing in a realistic facility setting.

  14. Future Io Exploration for 2013-2022 and Beyond: A White Paper submitted for the 2011 Planetary Science Decadal Survey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, D. A.; Radebaugh, J.; Lopes, R. M.; de Pater, I.; Schneider, N. M.; Marchis, F.; Moses, J. I.; Davies, A. G.; Perry, J.; Kargel, J. S.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Paranicas, C.; McEwen, A. S.; Jessup, K.; Goldstein, D.; Bunte, M. K.; Rathbun, J. A.; McGrath, M. A.

    2009-12-01

    Jupiter's satellite Io is the most geologically dynamic solid body in the Solar System. Io undergoes severe tidal heating, induced by the orbital eccentricity forced by Jupiter and the 4:2:1 Laplace resonance between Io, Europa, and Ganymede. Io's high global heat flow (>2 W m-2, compared to the 0.06 W m-2 average for Earth) presages an extremely rich array of geophysical, geological, geochemical, and atmospheric phenomena operating at a scale not currently seen active anywhere else in our Solar System. Thus we are not restricted, as on other planetary bodies, to reconstructing processes from their long-dead remains. Io also is the main source of neutral gas, plasma, and dust to the Jovian magnetosphere. And importantly, Io is the best place in the Solar System to study the effects of tidal heating. Testing models of tidal heating on Io has implications for many satellites in our own Solar System, and to the possibility of expanded habitability zones in extrasolar systems. Io's history is directly linked to the evolution of the one of most promising sites for extraterrestrial life, Europa. By studying the time-variable orbital and thermal evolution of Io, we also gain a better understanding of time-variable tidal heating of Europa, with obvious implications for the sustainability of its putative subsurface ocean and history of habitability. An Io-dedicated mission that operates in the 2013-2022 timeframe could identify key parameters involved in Europa’s orbital-thermal evolution, which can be further investigated by the NASA-ESA Europa-Jupiter System Mission's (EJSM) orbiters when they enter the Jovian system in 2025. This presentation will review the science objectives and proposed mission concepts for future exploration of Io in the next decade and beyond. We recommend specific mission concepts and instruments be implemented during the next Decadal Survey period. These include: 1) a Jupiter-orbiting spacecraft (Io Observer) of either Discovery-class or New

  15. Adaptive ophthalmologic system

    DOEpatents

    Olivier, Scot S.; Thompson, Charles A.; Bauman, Brian J.; Jones, Steve M.; Gavel, Don T.; Awwal, Abdul A.; Eisenbies, Stephen K.; Haney, Steven J.

    2007-03-27

    A system for improving vision that can diagnose monochromatic aberrations within a subject's eyes, apply the wavefront correction, and then enable the patient to view the results of the correction. The system utilizes a laser for producing a beam of light; a corrector; a wavefront sensor; a testing unit; an optic device for directing the beam of light to the corrector, to the retina, from the retina to the wavefront sensor, and to the testing unit; and a computer operatively connected to the wavefront sensor and the corrector.

  16. Adaptive Production Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1974-12-01

    Melton, A. W., and Marton. E. (Eds.). Coding Processes in Human Memory, Washington, DC , Winston and Sons, 1972. Newell. A. Production systems...STM (1 A ’) (ACTION (USED) (DEP (NEXT B))) (B ?) (LOC A) (A ?) (B ?) ( SEPIc ’ fiAB) 16 TRUE IN PS STM (NEXT A) (1 A?) (ACTION (USED) (DEP (NEXT B

  17. Adaptive Instructional Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    planning stage, which used the infbrmation obtained from the Phase I research to develop a plan for utilizing the tecnolog in the proposed system. 1.4...categories of physical stimuli are perceptual, intake, time, and mobility . 01ly one of these factors, perceptual, cam be taken into account in the simulator

  18. [Health: an adaptive complex system].

    PubMed

    Toro-Palacio, Luis Fernando; Ochoa-Jaramillo, Francisco Luis

    2012-02-01

    This article points out the enormous gap that exists between complex thinking of an intellectual nature currently present in our environment, and complex experimental thinking that has facilitated the scientific and technological advances that have radically changed the world. The article suggests that life, human beings, global society, and all that constitutes health be considered as adaptive complex systems. This idea, in turn, prioritizes the adoption of a different approach that seeks to expand understanding. When this rationale is recognized, the principal characteristics and emerging properties of health as an adaptive complex system are sustained, following a care and services delivery model. Finally, some pertinent questions from this perspective are put forward in terms of research, and a series of appraisals are expressed that will hopefully serve to help us understand all that we have become as individuals and as a species. The article proposes that the delivery of health care services be regarded as an adaptive complex system.

  19. Remote Adaptive Communication System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2001-10-25

    manage several different devices using the software tool A. Client/Server Architecture The architecture we are proposing is based on the Client...communication". International Telemedicine. Julio 1999. Pp 4. [17] F. Fernández, L. Roa, "Communication System Based on a New Open Architecture...Toledo, " Fundamentos de Neurología para educadores". IDEO. Sevilla 1994. [21] P. Coad, E. Yourdon, "Object Oriented Analysis". Yourdon Press

  20. Changes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    A: A global map of Jupiter's moon Io derived from eight images taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) on the New Horizons spacecraft, as it passed Jupiter on its way to Pluto in late February 2007. Details as small as 12 kilometers (7 miles) are visible. The map shows the comprehensive picture of Io's volcanism obtained by New Horizons. Yellow ovals denote areas with new, faded or shifted plume deposits since the last images taken by the Galileo spacecraft in 2001. Green circles denote areas where probable new lava flows have occurred. Cyan diamonds indicate locations of active volcanic plumes, and orange hexagons are volcanic hot spots detected by the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) instrument. For plumes and hot spots, symbol size indicates the approximate relative size and brightness of the features.

    B-F: Comparison of New Horizons (NH) and earlier images of major surface changes discovered by New Horizons at Io's volcanoes Masubi (45 degrees S, 57 degrees West) and North Lerna (55 degrees S, 290 degrees W). The scale bars are 200 kilometers long, and a is the solar phase angle. At Masubi, old lava flows seen by Voyager and Galileo (B) have been obscured at low phase angles (C) by deposits from two active plumes associated with a new 240-kilometer (150-mile) long dark lava flow, which is the longest lava flow known to have been erupted in the solar system since the discovery of Io volcanism in 1979. At North Lerna, a recent eruption has generated a 130-km long lava flow (F), as well as an active plume that has produced a concentric pattern of deposits.

  1. File concepts for parallel I/O

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crockett, Thomas W.

    1989-01-01

    The subject of input/output (I/O) was often neglected in the design of parallel computer systems, although for many problems I/O rates will limit the speedup attainable. The I/O problem is addressed by considering the role of files in parallel systems. The notion of parallel files is introduced. Parallel files provide for concurrent access by multiple processes, and utilize parallelism in the I/O system to improve performance. Parallel files can also be used conventionally by sequential programs. A set of standard parallel file organizations is proposed, organizations are suggested, using multiple storage devices. Problem areas are also identified and discussed.

  2. Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yost, Bruce D.; Hines, John W.; Agasid, Elwood F.; Buckley, Steven J.

    2010-01-01

    The utility of small spacecraft based on the University cubesat standard is becoming evident as more and more agencies and organizations are launching or planning to include nanosatellites in their mission portfolios. Cubesats are typically launched as secondary spacecraft in enclosed, containerized deployers such as the CalPoly Poly Picosat Orbital Deployer (P-POD) system. The P-POD allows for ease of integration and significantly reduces the risk exposure to the primary spacecraft and mission. NASA/ARC and the Operationally Responsive Space office are collaborating to develop a Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS), which can accommodate multiple cubesat or cubesat-derived spacecraft on a single launch vehicle. NLAS is composed of the adapter structure, P-POD or similar spacecraft dispensers, and a sequencer/deployer system. This paper describes the NLAS system and it s future capabilities, and also provides status on the system s development and potential first use in space.

  3. Real-time Medical Emergency Response System: Exploiting IoT and Big Data for Public Health.

    PubMed

    Rathore, M Mazhar; Ahmad, Awais; Paul, Anand; Wan, Jiafu; Zhang, Daqiang

    2016-12-01

    Healthy people are important for any nation's development. Use of the Internet of Things (IoT)-based body area networks (BANs) is increasing for continuous monitoring and medical healthcare in order to perform real-time actions in case of emergencies. However, in the case of monitoring the health of all citizens or people in a country, the millions of sensors attached to human bodies generate massive volume of heterogeneous data, called "Big Data." Processing Big Data and performing real-time actions in critical situations is a challenging task. Therefore, in order to address such issues, we propose a Real-time Medical Emergency Response System that involves IoT-based medical sensors deployed on the human body. Moreover, the proposed system consists of the data analysis building, called "Intelligent Building," depicted by the proposed layered architecture and implementation model, and it is responsible for analysis and decision-making. The data collected from millions of body-attached sensors is forwarded to Intelligent Building for processing and for performing necessary actions using various units such as collection, Hadoop Processing (HPU), and analysis and decision. The feasibility and efficiency of the proposed system are evaluated by implementing the system on Hadoop using an UBUNTU 14.04 LTS coreTMi5 machine. Various medical sensory datasets and real-time network traffic are considered for evaluating the efficiency of the system. The results show that the proposed system has the capability of efficiently processing WBAN sensory data from millions of users in order to perform real-time responses in case of emergencies.

  4. Erosional scarps on Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    McCauley, J.F.; Smith, B.A.; Soderblom, L.A.

    1979-01-01

    Irregular or fretted scarps on Io are similar to those found on Earth and Mars. A sapping mechanism involving liquid SO2 is proposed to explain these complexly eroded terrains on Io. ?? 1979 Nature Publishing Group.

  5. Architecture for Adaptive Intelligent Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayes-Roth, Barbara

    1993-01-01

    We identify a class of niches to be occupied by 'adaptive intelligent systems (AISs)'. In contrast with niches occupied by typical AI agents, AIS niches present situations that vary dynamically along several key dimensions: different combinations of required tasks, different configurations of available resources, contextual conditions ranging from benign to stressful, and different performance criteria. We present a small class hierarchy of AIS niches that exhibit these dimensions of variability and describe a particular AIS niche, ICU (intensive care unit) patient monitoring, which we use for illustration throughout the paper. We have designed and implemented an agent architecture that supports all of different kinds of adaptation by exploiting a single underlying theoretical concept: An agent dynamically constructs explicit control plans to guide its choices among situation-triggered behaviors. We illustrate the architecture and its support for adaptation with examples from Guardian, an experimental agent for ICU monitoring.

  6. The Limits to Adaptation; A Systems Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Limits to Adaptation: A Systems Approach. The ability to adapt to climate change is delineated by capacity thresholds, after which climate damages begin to overwhelm the adaptation response. Such thresholds depend upon physical properties (natural processes and engineering...

  7. io-watchdog

    SciTech Connect

    Grondona, Mark A.

    2007-08-22

    The IO watchdog is a facility for monitoring user applications and parallel jobs for hangs which typically have a side-effect of ceasing all IO in an application (i.e.one that writes something to a log or data file during each cycle of computation.) The watchdog attempts to monitor all IO generated from an application and triggers a set of user-defined actions when IO has stopped for a configurable timeout period.

  8. IOS and ECS line coupling calculation for the CO-He system - Influence on the vibration-rotation band shapes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boissoles, J.; Boulet, C.; Robert, D.; Green, S.

    1987-01-01

    Line coupling coefficients resulting from rotational excitation of CO perturbed by He are computed within the infinite order sudden approximation (IOSA) and within the energy corrected sudden approximation (ECSA). The influence of this line coupling on the 1-0 CO-He vibration-rotation band shape is then computed for the case of weakly overlapping lines in the 292-78 K temperature range. The IOS and ECS results differ only at 78 K by a weak amount at high frequencies. Comparison with an additive superposition of Lorentzian lines shows strong modifications in the troughs between the lines. These calculated modifications are in excellent quantitative agreement with recent experimental data for all the temperatures considered. The applicability of previous approaches to CO-He system, based on either the strong collision model or exponential energy gap law, is also discussed.

  9. Making Intelligent Systems Adaptive. (Revision)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1988-10-01

    eventually produce solutions. BY contrast, human beinge and other intelligent animls continuously adapt to the demands and opportunities presented by a...such as monitoring critically ill medical patients or controlling a manufacturing process. Following the model set by human intelligence, we define...signs probabilistically, using a belief network, as well as from first principles, using explicit models of system structure and function. Concurrent

  10. Flyby of Io with Repeat Encounters (FIRE): Designing a New Frontiers mission to study the most volcanic body in the solar system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Padovan, S.; Cable, M. L.; Cumbers, J.; Gentry, D.; Harrison, T. N.; Naidu, S.; Parker, C. W.; Potter, R.; Reimuller, J.; Shkolyar, S.; Suer, T. K.; Szalay, J.; Trammell, H. J.; Walker, C. C.; Whitten, J.

    2012-12-01

    FIRE (Flyby of Io with Repeat Encounters) is a mission designed by the authors, in conjunction with the Jet Propulsion Lab's TeamX, while attending NASA's Planetary Science Summer School in June 2012. The target of FIRE is Io,the innermost of Jupiter's Galilean moons and the most geologically active body in the Solar System. Io represents a laboratory with which to improve our understanding of volcanic processes and their relation to outgassing and atmosphere formation. These are believed to be pivotal events in the early phases of terrestrial planets' evolution. The mission is designed to directly address the science objectives laid out in the 2009 New Frontiers Announcement of Opportunity. FIRE will be an ASRG powered spacecraft flying on an ATLAS V rocket. The nominal mission includes ten close (altitude above the surface < 100 km) flybys of Io while the spacecraft is on a Jupiter-bound orbit. The instrument package includes (1) a visual and NIR camera (VOLCANO), an instrument devoted to the characterization of the composition and morphology of the surface, and of hot spots' thermal emission; (2) a magnetic instrumentation sub-package (MAGMA) which, combining magnetic field, plasma and charged particle measurements, will test the presence of the putative magma ocean at Io and will provide important clues on the moon's interior structure; (3) a dust analyzer (CALDERA), to determine the composition of the material which is continuously ejected from Io, thus directly identifying silicates and other species and improving our understanding of the volcanic activity and related outgassing processes; and (4) a radio science experiment (FLARE) which takes advantage of a gimbaled, two-band high gain antenna to measure both the static and the time-variable components of the gravity field of Io, thus informing on the radial distribution and physical state of the matter in the interior of the moon. FIRE, with its potential science return, would give an invaluable

  11. Chandra Observations of Io and the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, Ronald F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H., Jr.; Grodent, D. C.; Crary, F. J.; Metzger, A. E.; Hurley, K. C.; Ford, P.; Feigelson, E.; Garmire, G.; Whitaker, Ann (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Chandra observed the Jovian system for approximately 1 day with ACIS-S in Nov, 1999, and approximately 10 hours with HRC-I in Dec, 2000. Among the many results of great interest to planetary scientists are the detection of x-ray emission from the Io Plasma Torus (IPT) and, very faintly, associated with the Jovian moon Io itself. The IPT is an almost self-generating donut of S and O ions in Io's orbit that ultimately derive from volcanoes on the surface. While EUV and visible emissions from the IPT are relatively well understood to result from low charge state transitions of S and O and from electron impact, the x-ray emissions are too energetic to be explained this way and seem to require the presence of higher charge states of S and O. We present current ideas as to origins of these x-ray emissions.

  12. Certification Considerations for Adaptive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bhattacharyya, Siddhartha; Cofer, Darren; Musliner, David J.; Mueller, Joseph; Engstrom, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Advanced capabilities planned for the next generation of aircraft, including those that will operate within the Next Generation Air Transportation System (NextGen), will necessarily include complex new algorithms and non-traditional software elements. These aircraft will likely incorporate adaptive control algorithms that will provide enhanced safety, autonomy, and robustness during adverse conditions. Unmanned aircraft will operate alongside manned aircraft in the National Airspace (NAS), with intelligent software performing the high-level decision-making functions normally performed by human pilots. Even human-piloted aircraft will necessarily include more autonomy. However, there are serious barriers to the deployment of new capabilities, especially for those based upon software including adaptive control (AC) and artificial intelligence (AI) algorithms. Current civil aviation certification processes are based on the idea that the correct behavior of a system must be completely specified and verified prior to operation. This report by Rockwell Collins and SIFT documents our comprehensive study of the state of the art in intelligent and adaptive algorithms for the civil aviation domain, categorizing the approaches used and identifying gaps and challenges associated with certification of each approach.

  13. Volcanism on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard

    2014-03-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Io, 1610 to 1995: Galileo to Galileo: 1. Io, 1610-1979; 2. Between Voyager and Galileo: 1979-95; 3. Galileo at Io; Part II. Planetary Volcanism: Evolution and Composition: 4. Io and Earth: formation, evolution, and interior structure; 5. Magmas and volatiles; Part III. Observing and Modeling Volcanic Activity: 6. Observations: thermal remote sensing of volcanic activity; 7. Models of effusive eruption processes; 8. Thermal evolution of volcanic eruptions; Part IV. Galileo at Io: the Volcanic Bestiary: 9. The view from Galileo; 10. The lava lake at Pele; 11. Pillan and Tvashtar: lava fountains and flows; 12. Prometheus and Amirani: Effusive activity and insulated flows; 13. Loki Patera: Io's powerhouse; 14. Other volcanoes and eruptions; Part V. Volcanism on Io: The Global View: 15. Geomorphology: paterae, shields, flows and mountains; 16. Volcanic plumes; 17. Hot spots; Part VI. Io after Galileo: 18. Volcanism on Io: a post-Galileo view; 19. The future of Io observations; Appendix 1; Appendix 2; References; Index.

  14. Volcanism on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard

    2007-08-01

    Preface; Introduction; Part I. Io, 1610 to 1995: Galileo to Galileo: 1. Io, 1610-1979; 2. Between Voyager and Galileo: 1979-1995; 3. Galileo at Io; Part II. Planetary Volcanism: Evolution and Composition: 4. Io and Earth: formation, evolution, and interior structure; 5. Magmas and volatiles; Part III. Observing and Modeling Volcanic Activity: 6. Observations: thermal remote sensing of volcanic activity; 7. Models of effusive eruption processes; 8. Thermal evolution of volcanic eruptions; Part IV. Galileo at Io: the Volcanic Bestiary: 9. The view from Galileo; 10. The lava lake at Pele; 11. Pillan and Tvashtar: lava fountains and flows; 12. Prometheus and Amirani: Effusive activity and insulated flows; 13. Loki Patera: Io's powerhouse; 14. Other volcanoes and eruptions; Part V. Volcanism on Io: The Global View: 15. Geomorphology: paterae, shields, flows and mountains; 16. Volcanic plumes; 17. Hot spots; Part VI. Io after Galileo: 18. Volcanism on Io: a post-Galileo view; 19. The future of Io observations; Appendix 1; Appendix 2; References; Index.

  15. Adaptive Behaviour Assessment System: Indigenous Australian Adaptation Model (ABAS: IAAM)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    du Plessis, Santie

    2015-01-01

    The study objectives were to develop, trial and evaluate a cross-cultural adaptation of the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition Teacher Form (ABAS-II TF) ages 5-21 for use with Indigenous Australian students ages 5-14. This study introduced a multiphase mixed-method design with semi-structured and informal interviews, school…

  16. The ERIS adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Fedrigo, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Soenke, Christian; Brast, Roland; Conzelmann, Ralf; Delabre, Bernard; Duchateau, Michel; Frank, Christoph; Klein, Barbara; Amico, Paola; Hubin, Norbert; Esposito, Simone; Antichi, Jacopo; Carbonaro, Luca; Puglisi, Alfio; Quirós-Pacheco, Fernando; Riccardi, Armando; Xompero, Marco

    2014-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the new Adaptive Optics based instrument for ESO's VLT aiming at replacing NACO and SINFONI to form a single compact facility with AO fed imaging and integral field unit spectroscopic scientific channels. ERIS completes the instrument suite at the VLT adaptive telescope. In particular it is equipped with a versatile AO system that delivers up to 95% Strehl correction in K band for science observations up to 5 micron It comprises high order NGS and LGS correction enabling the observation from exoplanets to distant galaxies with a large sky coverage thanks to the coupling of the LGS WFS with the high sensitivity of its visible WFS and the capability to observe in dust embedded environment thanks to its IR low order WFS. ERIS will be installed at the Cassegrain focus of the VLT unit hosting the Adaptive Optics Facility (AOF). The wavefront correction is provided by the AOF deformable secondary mirror while the Laser Guide Star is provided by one of the four launch units of the 4 Laser Guide Star Facility for the AOF. The overall layout of the ERIS AO system is extremely compact and highly optimized: the SPIFFI spectrograph is fed directly by the Cassegrain focus and both the NIX's (IR imager) and SPIFFI's entrance windows work as visible/infrared dichroics. In this paper we describe the concept of the ERIS AO system in detail, starting from the requirements and going through the estimated performance, the opto-mechanical design and the Real-Time Computer design.

  17. ERIS adaptive optics system design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchetti, Enrico; Le Louarn, Miska; Soenke, Christian; Fedrigo, Enrico; Madec, Pierre-Yves; Hubin, Norbert

    2012-07-01

    The Enhanced Resolution Imager and Spectrograph (ERIS) is the next-generation instrument planned for the Very Large Telescope (VLT) and the Adaptive Optics facility (AOF). It is an AO assisted instrument that will make use of the Deformable Secondary Mirror and the new Laser Guide Star Facility (4LGSF), and it is planned for the Cassegrain focus of the telescope UT4. The project is currently in its Phase A awaiting for approval to continue to the next phases. The Adaptive Optics system of ERIS will include two wavefront sensors (WFS) to maximize the coverage of the proposed sciences cases. The first is a high order 40x40 Pyramid WFS (PWFS) for on axis Natural Guide Star (NGS) observations. The second is a high order 40x40 Shack-Hartmann WFS for single Laser Guide Stars (LGS) observations. The PWFS, with appropriate sub-aperture binning, will serve also as low order NGS WFS in support to the LGS mode with a field of view patrolling capability of 2 arcmin diameter. Both WFSs will be equipped with the very low read-out noise CCD220 based camera developed for the AOF. The real-time reconstruction and control is provided by a SPARTA real-time platform adapted to support both WFS modes. In this paper we will present the ERIS AO system in all its main aspects: opto-mechanical design, real-time computer design, control and calibrations strategy. Particular emphasis will be given to the system performance obtained via dedicated numerical simulations.

  18. Distributed I/O Control System Implementation for the 1238 Optical Witness Sample Thermoelectric Quartz Crystal Microbalance Thermal Vacuum Bakeout Chamber

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Buchanan, Randy K.

    2002-01-01

    The 1238 Thermal Vacuum Bakeout Chamber is used to test materials to determine if they meet space program contamination requirements. The system was previously manual in its operation, in that there was no supervisory control system and therefore, no means for automated operation. Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) requested that its operation be automated. The subsequent process implemented involved a hybrid scenario that included existing hardware, a distributed input and output (I/O) system and a graphical user interface (GUI).

  19. Adaptable state based control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rasmussen, Robert D. (Inventor); Dvorak, Daniel L. (Inventor); Gostelow, Kim P. (Inventor); Starbird, Thomas W. (Inventor); Gat, Erann (Inventor); Chien, Steve Ankuo (Inventor); Keller, Robert M. (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    An autonomous controller, comprised of a state knowledge manager, a control executor, hardware proxies and a statistical estimator collaborates with a goal elaborator, with which it shares common models of the behavior of the system and the controller. The elaborator uses the common models to generate from temporally indeterminate sets of goals, executable goals to be executed by the controller. The controller may be updated to operate in a different system or environment than that for which it was originally designed by the replacement of shared statistical models and by the instantiation of a new set of state variable objects derived from a state variable class. The adaptation of the controller does not require substantial modification of the goal elaborator for its application to the new system or environment.

  20. Io's Kanehekili Hemisphere

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color composite of Io, acquired by Galileo during its ninth orbit (C9) of Jupiter, shows the hemisphere of Io which is centered at longitude 52 degrees. The dark feature just to the lower right of the center of the disk is called Kanehekili. Named after an Hawaiian thunder god, Kanehekili contains two persistent high temperature hot spots and a 'new' active volcanic plume. NASA's Voyager spacecraft returned images of nine active plumes during its 1979 flyby of this dynamic satellite. To date, Galileo's plume monitoring observations have shown continued activity at four of those nine plume locations as well as new activity at six other locations.

    North is to the top of the picture which combines images acquired using violet, green, and near-infrared (756 micrometers) filters. The resolution is 21 kilometers per picture element. The images were taken on June 27, 1997 at a range of 1,033,000 kilometers by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  1. IO Rotation Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    During its 1979 flyby, Voyager 2 observed Io only from a distance. However, the volcanic activity discovered by Voyager 1 months earlier was readily visible. This sequence of nine color images was collected using the Blue, Green and Orange filters from about 1.2 million kilometers. A 2.5 hour period is covered during which Io rotates 7 degrees.

    Rotating into view over the limb of Io are the plumes of the volcanoes Amirani (top) and Maui (lower). These plumes are very distinct against the black sky because they are being illuminated from behind. Notice that as Io rotates, the proportion of Io which is sunlit decreases greatly. This changing phase angle is because Io is moving between the spacecraft and the Sun.

    This time-lapse movie was produced at JPL by the Image Processing Laboratory in 1985.

  2. Advanced I/O for large-scale scientific applications.

    SciTech Connect

    Klasky, Scott; Schwan, Karsten; Oldfield, Ron A.; Lofstead, Gerald F., II

    2010-01-01

    As scientific simulations scale to use petascale machines and beyond, the data volumes generated pose a dual problem. First, with increasing machine sizes, the careful tuning of IO routines becomes more and more important to keep the time spent in IO acceptable. It is not uncommon, for instance, to have 20% of an application's runtime spent performing IO in a 'tuned' system. Careful management of the IO routines can move that to 5% or even less in some cases. Second, the data volumes are so large, on the order of 10s to 100s of TB, that trying to discover the scientifically valid contributions requires assistance at runtime to both organize and annotate the data. Waiting for offline processing is not feasible due both to the impact on the IO system and the time required. To reduce this load and improve the ability of scientists to use the large amounts of data being produced, new techniques for data management are required. First, there is a need for techniques for efficient movement of data from the compute space to storage. These techniques should understand the underlying system infrastructure and adapt to changing system conditions. Technologies include aggregation networks, data staging nodes for a closer parity to the IO subsystem, and autonomic IO routines that can detect system bottlenecks and choose different approaches, such as splitting the output into multiple targets, staggering output processes. Such methods must be end-to-end, meaning that even with properly managed asynchronous techniques, it is still essential to properly manage the later synchronous interaction with the storage system to maintain acceptable performance. Second, for the data being generated, annotations and other metadata must be incorporated to help the scientist understand output data for the simulation run as a whole, to select data and data features without concern for what files or other storage technologies were employed. All of these features should be attained while

  3. Improving Parallel I/O Performance with Data Layout Awareness

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Yong; Sun, Xian-He; Thakur, Dr. Rajeev; Song, Huaiming; Jin, Hui

    2010-01-01

    Parallel applications can benefit greatly from massive computational capability, but their performance suffers from large latency of I/O accesses. The poor I/O performance has been attributed as a critical cause of the low sustained performance of parallel computing systems. In this study, we propose a data layout-aware optimization strategy to promote a better integration of the parallel I/O middleware and parallel file systems, two major components of the current parallel I/O systems, and to improve the data access performance. We explore the layout-aware optimization in both independent I/O and collective I/O, two primary forms of I/O in parallel applications. We illustrate that the layout-aware I/O optimization could improve the performance of current parallel I/O strategy effectively. The experimental results verify that the proposed strategy could improve parallel I/O performance by nearly 40% on average. The proposed layout-aware parallel I/O has a promising potential in improving the I/O performance of parallel systems.

  4. A 'Plumefall' on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    New Horizons took this image of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io with its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 15:15 Universal Time on February 28, 2007, nearly 10 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. The image is centered at Io coordinates 5 degrees south, 92 degrees west, and the spacecraft was 2.4 million kilometers (1.5 million miles) from Io. Io's diameter is 3,640 kilometers (2,262 miles).

    Io's dayside was deliberately overexposed in this image to bring out details on the nightside and in any volcanic plumes that might be present. Io cooperated by producing an enormous plume, 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, from the volcano Tvashtar. Near Io's north pole, Tvashtar was active throughout New Horizons' Jupiter encounter.

    In this image, volcanic debris from the plume, illuminated by the setting sun, rains down onto Io's nightside. Hot, glowing lava at the source of the plume is the bright point of light on the sunlit side of the terminator (the line separating day and night). Elsewhere along the terminator, mountains catch the setting sun. The nightside of Io is lit up by light reflected from Jupiter.

  5. Geodesic IO Library

    SciTech Connect

    2011-03-15

    GIO is an application programmer interface (API) or library for high performance IO that is designed for climate models that operate on a geodesic grid. GIO uses a combination of configuration files and API calls to define the mapping of internal model data to output variables in standard climate data formats. The mapping from model data to model output includes method of data slicing, aggregation, and linearization using a morton ordering approach. The data is then persisted through a standard interface that can be implemented using several different high level parallel libraries. Both Parallel NetCDF and NetCDF4 interfaces are provided. GIO is designed to run on supercomputing systems or multi-processor clusters with parallel file systems.

  6. Adaptive diagnosis of the bilinear mechanical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gelman, L.; Gorpinich, S.; Thompson, C.

    2009-07-01

    A generic adaptive approach is proposed for diagnosis of the bilinear mechanical systems. The approach adapts the free oscillation method for bilinearity diagnosis of mechanical systems. The expediency of the adaptation is proved for a recognition feature, the decrement of the free oscillations. The developed adaptation consists of variation of the adaptive likelihood ratio of the decrement with variation of the resonance frequency of the bilinear system. It is shown that in the cases of the frequency-independent and the frequency-dependent internal damping, the adaptation is expedient. To investigate effectiveness of the adaptation in these cases, a numerical simulation was carried out. The simulation results show that use of the adaptation increases the total probability of the correct diagnosis of system bilinearity.

  7. An MPA-IO interface to HPSS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Terry; Mark, Richard; Martin, Jeanne; May, John; Pierce, Elsie; Stanberry, Linda

    1996-01-01

    This paper describes an implementation of the proposed MPI-IO (Message Passing Interface - Input/Output) standard for parallel I/O. Our system uses third-party transfer to move data over an external network between the processors where it is used and the I/O devices where it resides. Data travels directly from source to destination, without the need for shuffling it among processors or funneling it through a central node. Our distributed server model lets multiple compute nodes share the burden of coordinating data transfers. The system is built on the High Performance Storage System (HPSS), and a prototype version runs on a Meiko CS-2 parallel computer.

  8. Two Decades (almost) of Keck Observations of Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Pater, I.; Davies, A. G.; de Kleer, K.

    2015-12-01

    We have regularly observed Io with the 10-m Keck Telescope since 1998, initially using the speckle imaging technique, and switching to Adaptive Optics techniques when this became available in 2001. In this talk we will discuss several eruptions that we witnessed, and present 20-30 year timelines of thermal emission from Pele, Pillan, Janus Patera, Kanehekili Fluctus, and Loki Patera, updating timelines in recent publications [1, 2] with additional Keck adaptive optics data obtained between 2002 and 2015. These new timelines are the most comprehensive plots ever produced of the volcanic thermal emission variability for these or any other locations on Io, utilizing data from multiple ground- and space-based assets. Our continuing multi-decadal observing program forms the basis for charting the variability of Io's volcanic activity, of great importance for understanding the evolution of the Galilean satellite system, and with the expectation of new missions to the jovian system in the next decade. Acknowledgements: This research is in part supported by NSF grant AST-1313485 to UC Berkeley. AGD is supported by a grant from the NASA OPR Program. References: [1] Davies et al. (2012) Icarus, 221, 466-470. [2] Rathbun and Spencer (2010) Icarus, 209, 625-630.

  9. Local electron heating in the Io plasma torus associated with Io from HISAKI satellite observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, Fuminori; Kagitani, Masato; Yoshioka, Kazuo; Kimura, Tomoki; Murakami, Go; Yamazaki, Atsushi; Nozawa, Hiromasa; Kasaba, Yasumasa; Sakanoi, Takeshi; Uemizu, Kazunori; Yoshikawa, Ichiro

    2015-12-01

    Io-correlated brightness change in the Io plasma torus (IPT) was discovered by the Voyager spacecraft, showing evidence of local electron heating around Io. However, its detailed properties and the cause of electron heating are still open issues. The extreme ultraviolet spectrograph on board the HISAKI satellite continuously observed the IPT from the end of December 2013 to the middle of January 2014. The variation in the IPT brightness showed that clear periodicity associated with Io's orbital period (42 h) and that the bright region was located downstream of Io. The amplitude of the periodic variation was larger at short wavelengths than at long wavelengths. From spectral analyses, we found that Io-correlated brightening is caused by the increase in the hot electron population in the region downstream of Io. We also found that the brightness depends on the system III longitude and found primary and secondary peaks in the longitude ranges of 100-130° and 250-340°, respectively. Io's orbit crosses the center of the IPT around these longitudes. This longitude dependence suggests that the electron heating process is related to the plasma density around Io. The total radiated power from the IPT in January 2014 was estimated to be 1.4 TW in the wavelength range from 60 to 145 nm. The Io-correlated component produced 10% of this total radiated power. The interaction between Io and the IPT continuously produces a large amount of energy around Io, and 140 GW of that energy is immediately converted to hot electron production in the IPT.

  10. Local electron heating in the Io plasma torus associated with Io: the HISAKI observation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, F.; Yoshioka, K.; Kimura, T.; Murakami, G.; Kagitani, M.; Yamazaki, A.; Kasaba, Y.; Sakanoi, T.; Yoshikawa, I.; Nozawa, H.

    2014-12-01

    Io-correlated brightness change in Io plasma torus (IPT) has been discovered by Voyager and show an evidence of local electron heating around Io. However, the amount of observation data is still limited to investigate its detail properties. In addition, the clear Io-correlated change has not been detected by EUVE and Cassini observations. Cause of the Io-correlated effect is still open issue. The HISAKI satellite was launched on Sep. 14, 2013 and started observation of IPT and Jovian aurora for more than two months since the end of Dec. 2013. EUV spectrograph onboard the HISAKI satellite covers wavelength range from 55 to 145 nm, a wide slit which had a field of view of 400 x 140 arc-second was chosen to measure radial distribution and time variation of IPT. Observation of IPT with HISAKI showed clear Io-correlated brightness change since the Voyager observation. The amplitude of the periodic variation associated with Io's orbital period was found. It also showed long-term variation during the HISAKI's observation period. Through the observation period, the amplitude was larger in the short wavelength than in long wavelength. The wavelength dependence suggests significant electron heating and/or hot electron production. The Io phase dependence shows that bright region is located just downstream of Io. These are evidence of local electron heating around/downstream of Io and consistent with the Voyager result. The brightness also depends on system-III longitude and has local maximum around 120 and 300 degrees. Based on an empirical model of IPT, electron density at Io also shows maxima around the same longitudes. This suggests that the electron heating process is related with plasma density at Io. Candidate mechanisms which are responsible for the electron heating will be discussed.

  11. Topography of Io (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The images used to create this color composite of Io were acquired by Galileo during its ninth orbit (C9) of Jupiter and are part of a sequence of images designed to map the topography or relief on Io and to monitor changes in the surface color due to volcanic activity. Obtaining images at low illumination angles is like taking a picture from a high altitude around sunrise or sunset. Such lighting conditions emphasize the topography of the volcanic satellite. Several mountains up to a few miles high can be seen in this view, especially near the upper right. Some of these mountains appear to be tilted crustal blocks. Most of the dark spots correspond to active volcanic centers.

    North is to the top of the picture which merges images obtained with the clear, red, green, and violet filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. . The resolution is 8.3 kilometers per picture element. The image was taken on June 27, 1997 at a range of 817,000 kilometers by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  12. Io Eclipse Montage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    New Horizons took this montage of images of Jupiter's volcanic moon Io, glowing in the dark of Jupiter's shadow, as the Pluto-bound spacecraft sped through the Jupiter system on Feb. 27, 2007.

    (A): In this picture from the Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), dark blotches and straight lines are artifacts. The brightest spots (including the volcanoes Pele [P] and East Girru [EG]) are incandescent lava from active volcanoes. The more diffuse glows, and the many faint spots, are from gas in the plumes and atmosphere, glowing due to bombardment by plasma in Jupiter's magnetosphere, in a display similar to the Earth's aurorae. (B): The same image with a latitude/longitude grid, showing that the cluster of faint spots is centered near longitude 0 degrees, the point on Io that faces Jupiter. The image also shows the locations of the plumes seen in sunlit images (indicated by red diamonds), which glow with auroral emission in eclipse. (C): Simulated sunlit view of Io with the same geometry, based on sunlit LORRI images. (D): A combination of the sunlit image (in cyan) and the eclipse image (in red), showing that all point-like glows in the eclipse image arise from dark volcanoes in the eclipse image. (E): This infrared image, at a wavelength of 2.3 microns, obtained by New Horizons Linear Etalon Spectral Imaging Array (LEISA) an hour after the LORRI image, showing thermal emission from active volcanoes. Elongation of the hot spots is an artifact. (F): Combined visible albedo (cyan) and LEISA thermal emission (red) image, showing the sources of the volcanic emission. That most of the faint point-like glows near longitude zero, seen in visible light in images A, B, and D, do not appear in the infrared view of volcanic heat radiation, is one reason scientists believe that these glows are due to auroral emission, not heat radiation.

    This image appears in the Oct. 12, 2007, issue of Science magazine, in a paper by John Spencer, et al.

  13. Is Echo a complex adaptive system?

    PubMed

    Smith, R M; Bedau, M A

    2000-01-01

    We evaluate whether John Holland's Echo model exemplifies his theory of complex adaptive systems. After reviewing Holland's theory of complex adaptive systems and describing his Escho model, we describe and explain the characteristic evolutionary behavior observed in a series of Echo model runs. We conclude that Echo lacks the diversity of hierarchically organized aggregates that typify complex adaptive systems, and we explore possible explanations for this failure.

  14. Geologic Landforms on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Shown here is one of the highest-resolution images of Io (Latitude: -60 to +20 degrees, Longitude: 150 to 230 degrees) acquired by the Galileo spacecraft, revealing a great variety of landforms. There are rugged mountains several miles high, layered materials forming plateaus, and many irregular depressions called volcanic calderas. Similar landforms were seen near Io's south pole by the Voyager spacecraft, but Galileo has revealed that such landforms are ubiquitous. Several of the dark, flow-like features correspond to hot spots, and may be active lava flows. There are no landforms resembling impact craters, as the volcanism covers the surface with new deposits much more rapidly than the flux of comets and asteroids can create large impact craters.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the left. The image covers an area 2000 kilometers wide and the smallest features that can be discerned are 2.5 kilometers in size. This image was taken on November 6th, 1996, at a range of 245,719 kilometers by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on the Galileo Spacecraft.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the Galileo mission home page on the World Wide Web at http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  15. Io's Sodium Cloud (Clear Filter)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of Jupiter's moon Io and its surrounding sky is shown in false color. It was taken at 5 hours 30 minutes Universal Time on Nov. 9, 1996 by the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft, using a clear filter whose wavelength range was approximately 400 to 1100 nanometers. This picture differs in two main ways from the green-yellow filter image of the same scene which was released yesterday.

    First, the sky around Io is brighter, partly because the wider wavelength range of the clear filter lets in more scattered light from Io's illuminated crescent and from Prometheus' sunlit plume. Nonetheless, the overall sky brightness in this frame is comparable to that seen through the green-yellow filter, indicating that even here much of the diffuse sky emission is coming from the wavelength range of the green-yellow filter (i.e., from Io's Sodium Cloud).

    The second major difference is that a quite large roundish spot has appeared in Io's southern hemisphere. This spot -- which has been colored red -- corresponds to thermal emission from the volcano Pele. The green-yellow filter image bears a much smaller trace of this emission because the clear filter is far more sensitive to those relatively long wavelengths where thermal emission is strongest.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  16. Road to Io

    SciTech Connect

    Chang, T.

    1989-01-01

    The potential study of Io by the Galileo mission is discussed. The mission, which is scheduled for launch from the Space Shuttle in 1989, is expected to fly 20 to 100 times closer to the Galilean moons of Jupiter than the Voyager missions. Topics which the mission hopes to address include volcanism, tidal forces and continental drift on Io, and the torus of charged particles that accompanies Io on its orbit of Jupiter. The Venus-earth-earth gravity assist route of the mission and the NIR mapping spectrometer aboard Galileo are considered.

  17. IO SUBSYSTEM 1 BETA

    SciTech Connect

    Sjaardema, Greg

    2002-08-21

    "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" uses standard object-oriented principles to minimize dependencies between the underlying input or output database format and the client code (i.e., Sierra) using the io subsystem. The interface and priciples are simolar to the Facade pattern described in the "Design Patterns" book by Gamma, et.al. The software uses data authentication algorithms to ensure data input/output is consistent with model being defined. "IO Subsystem Ver. 1.0 Beta" is a database independent input/output library for finite element analysis, preprocessing, post processing, and translation programs.

  18. Virtual Prototyping and Performance Analysis of RapidIO-Based System Architectures for Space-Based Radar

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-11-02

    RapidIO uses Low-Voltage Differential Signaling ( LVDS ) to minimize power usage at high clock speeds, and therefore is appropriate for use in HPEC...point, packet-switched interconnect Peak single-link throughput ranging from 2 to 64 Gb/s Focus on 16-bit parallel LVDS RIO implementation for satellite

  19. ANALOG I/O MODULE TEST SYSTEM BASED ON EPICS CA PROTOCOL AND ACTIVEX CA INTERFACE

    SciTech Connect

    YENG,YHOFF,L.

    2003-10-13

    Analog input (ADC) and output (DAC) modules play a substantial role in device level control of accelerator and large experiment physics control system. In order to get the best performance some features of analog modules including linearity, accuracy, crosstalk, thermal drift and so on have to be evaluated during the preliminary design phase. Gain and offset error calibration and thermal drift compensation (if needed) may have to be done in the implementation phase as well. A natural technique for performing these tasks is to interface the analog VO modules and GPIB interface programmable test instruments with a computer, which can complete measurements or calibration automatically. A difficulty is that drivers of analog modules and test instruments usually work on totally different platforms (vxworks VS Windows). Developing new test routines and drivers for testing instruments under VxWorks (or any other RTOS) platform is not a good solution because such systems have relatively poor user interface and developing such software requires substantial effort. EPICS CA protocol and ActiveX CA interface provide another choice, a PC and LabVIEW based test system. Analog 110 module can be interfaced from LabVIEW test routines via ActiveX CA interface. Test instruments can be controlled via LabVIEW drivers, most of which are provided by instrument vendors or by National Instruments. Labview also provides extensive data analysis and process functions. Using these functions, users can generate powerful test routines very easily. Several applications built for Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) Beam Loss Monitor (BLM) system are described in this paper.

  20. Monitoring Citrus Soil Moisture and Nutrients Using an IoT Based System

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xueyan; Zhang, Jianwu; Li, Lin; Zhang, Yuzhu; Yang, Guocai

    2017-01-01

    Chongqing mountain citrus orchard is one of the main origins of Chinese citrus. Its planting terrain is complex and soil parent material is diverse. Currently, the citrus fertilization, irrigation and other management processes still have great blindness. They usually use the same pattern and the same formula rather than considering the orchard terrain features, soil differences, species characteristics and the state of tree growth. With the help of the ZigBee technology, artificial intelligence and decision support technology, this paper has developed the research on the application technology of agricultural Internet of Things for real-time monitoring of citrus soil moisture and nutrients as well as the research on the integration of fertilization and irrigation decision support system. Some achievements were obtained including single-point multi-layer citrus soil temperature and humidity detection wireless sensor nodes and citrus precision fertilization and irrigation management decision support system. They were applied in citrus base in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. The results showed that the system could help the grower to scientifically fertilize or irrigate, improve the precision operation level of citrus production, reduce the labor cost and reduce the pollution caused by chemical fertilizer. PMID:28241488

  1. Monitoring Citrus Soil Moisture and Nutrients Using an IoT Based System.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xueyan; Zhang, Jianwu; Li, Lin; Zhang, Yuzhu; Yang, Guocai

    2017-02-23

    Chongqing mountain citrus orchard is one of the main origins of Chinese citrus. Its planting terrain is complex and soil parent material is diverse. Currently, the citrus fertilization, irrigation and other management processes still have great blindness. They usually use the same pattern and the same formula rather than considering the orchard terrain features, soil differences, species characteristics and the state of tree growth. With the help of the ZigBee technology, artificial intelligence and decision support technology, this paper has developed the research on the application technology of agricultural Internet of Things for real-time monitoring of citrus soil moisture and nutrients as well as the research on the integration of fertilization and irrigation decision support system. Some achievements were obtained including single-point multi-layer citrus soil temperature and humidity detection wireless sensor nodes and citrus precision fertilization and irrigation management decision support system. They were applied in citrus base in the Three Gorges Reservoir Area. The results showed that the system could help the grower to scientifically fertilize or irrigate, improve the precision operation level of citrus production, reduce the labor cost and reduce the pollution caused by chemical fertilizer.

  2. Software Technology for Adaptable Reliable Systems (STARS) Joint Task Force Report.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1983-03-15

    34 NCASIFE 4 * ~~SIN 6162 -0618 -ŝ SCCUOUT? LASS8FlCAT@IO0 THIS PASShII . 0 am * SOFTWARE TECHNOLOGY FOR ADAPTABLE, RELIABLE SYSTEMS (STARS) JOINT TASK...Following the workshop, the Task Force concentrated on producing the final set of documents (see Section 4 ! 0 for a complete list). Revisions were...Lafayette, LA. 7(504’ Jack C. Wileden Univ. of Mass. 115 Pelham Road Amherst, MA. 01002 9 4 ° /, * -.. r*• 4 0 DOCUMENTS PRODUCED The following documents are

  3. Modeling Power Systems as Complex Adaptive Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Chassin, David P.; Malard, Joel M.; Posse, Christian; Gangopadhyaya, Asim; Lu, Ning; Katipamula, Srinivas; Mallow, J V.

    2004-12-30

    Physical analogs have shown considerable promise for understanding the behavior of complex adaptive systems, including macroeconomics, biological systems, social networks, and electric power markets. Many of today's most challenging technical and policy questions can be reduced to a distributed economic control problem. Indeed, economically based control of large-scale systems is founded on the conjecture that the price-based regulation (e.g., auctions, markets) results in an optimal allocation of resources and emergent optimal system control. This report explores the state-of-the-art physical analogs for understanding the behavior of some econophysical systems and deriving stable and robust control strategies for using them. We review and discuss applications of some analytic methods based on a thermodynamic metaphor, according to which the interplay between system entropy and conservation laws gives rise to intuitive and governing global properties of complex systems that cannot be otherwise understood. We apply these methods to the question of how power markets can be expected to behave under a variety of conditions.

  4. Method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth, low noise mechanical I/O for computer systems

    DOEpatents

    Rosenberg, Louis B.

    1998-01-01

    A method and apparatus for providing high bandwidth and low noise mechanical input and output for computer systems. A gimbal mechanism provides two revolute degrees of freedom to an object about two axes of rotation. A linear axis member is coupled to the gimbal mechanism at the intersection of the two axes of rotation. The linear axis member is capable of being translated along a third axis to provide a third degree of freedom. The user object is coupled to the linear axis member and is thus translatable along the third axis so that the object can be moved along all three degrees of freedom. Transducers associated with the provided degrees of freedom include sensors and actuators and provide an electromechanical interface between the object and a digital processing system. Capstan drive mechanisms transmit forces between the transducers and the object. The linear axis member can also be rotated about its lengthwise axis to provide a fourth degree of freedom, and, optionally, a floating gimbal mechanism is coupled to the linear axis member to provide fifth and sixth degrees of freedom to an object. Transducer sensors are associated with the fourth, fifth, and sixth degrees of freedom. The interface is well suited for simulations of medical procedures and simulations in which an object such as a stylus or a joystick is moved and manipulated by the user.

  5. Autonomous Organization-Based Adaptive Information Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-01-01

    intentional Multi - agent System (MAS) approach [10]. While these approaches are functional AIS systems, they lack the ability to reorganize and adapt...extended a multi - agent system with a self- reorganizing architecture to create an autonomous, adaptive information system. Design Our organization-based...goals. An advantage of a multi - agent system using the organization theoretic model is its extensibility. The practical, numerical limits to the

  6. Io's Sodium Cloud (Green-yellow Filter)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This image of Jupiter's moon Io and its surrounding sky is shown in false color. North is at the top, and east is to the right. Most of Io's visible surface is in shadow, though one can see part of a white crescent on its western side. This crescent is being illuminated mostly by 'Jupitershine' (i.e. sunlight reflected off Jupiter).

    The striking burst of white light near Io's eastern equatorial edge is sunlight being scattered by the plume of the volcano Prometheus. Prometheus lies just beyond the visible edge of the moon on Io's far side. Its plume extends about 100 kilometers above the surface, and is being hit by sunlight just a little east of Io's eastern edge.

    Scattered light from Prometheus' plume and Io's lit crescent also contribute to the diffuse yellowish emission which appears throughout much of the sky. However, much of this emission comes from Io's Sodium Cloud: sodium atoms within Io's extensive material halo are scattering sunlight at the yellow wavelength of about 589 nanometers.

    This image was taken at 5 hours 30 minutes Universal Time on Nov. 9, 1996 through the green-yellow filter of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Galileo was then in Jupiter's shadow, and located about 2.3 million kilometers (about 32 Jovian radii) from both Jupiter and Io.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA, manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington D.C. This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web Galileo mission home page at: http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov.

  7. Computerized Adaptive Mastery Tests as Expert Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frick, Theodore W.

    1992-01-01

    Discussion of expert systems and computerized adaptive tests describes two versions of EXSPRT, a new approach that combines uncertain inference in expert systems with sequential probability ratio test (SPRT) stopping rules. Results of two studies comparing EXSPRT to adaptive mastery testing based on item response theory and SPRT approaches are…

  8. Io and Ganymede

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) took this 4-millisecond exposure of Jupiter and two of its moons at 01:41:04 UTC on January 17, 2007. The spacecraft was 68.5 million kilometers (42.5 million miles) from Jupiter, closing in on the giant planet at 41,500 miles (66,790 kilometers) per hour. The volcanic moon Io is the closest planet to the right of Jupiter; the icy moon Ganymede is to Io's right. The shadows of each satellite are visible atop Jupiter's clouds; Ganymede's shadow is draped over Jupiter's northwestern limb.

    Ganymede's average orbit distance from Jupiter is about 1.07 million kilometers (620,000 miles); Io's is 422,000 kilometers (262,000 miles). Both Io and Ganymede are larger than Earth's moon; Ganymede is larger than the planet Mercury.

  9. Io's 'Sounding Signal'

    NASA Video Gallery

    This animation show the internal structure of Jupiter's moon Io as revealed by data from NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The low-density crust about 30 to 50 kilometers (20 to 30 miles) thick is shown i...

  10. Interior of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Cutaway view of the possible internal structure of Io The surface of the satellite is a mosaic of images obtained in 1979 by NASA's Voyager spacecraft The interior characteristics are inferred from gravity field and magnetic field measurements by NASA's Galileo spacecraft. Io's radius is 1821 km, similar to the 1738 km radius of our Moon; Io has a metallic (iron, nickel) core (shown in gray) drawn to the correct relative size. The core is surrounded by a rock shell (shown in brown). Io's rock or silicate shell extends to the surface.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  11. Satellite Atmosphere and Io Torus Observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schneider, Nicholas M.

    2000-01-01

    Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system, and it is embedded deep within the strongest magnetosphere of any planet. This combination of circumstances leads to a host of scientifically compelling phenomena, including (1) an atmosphere out of proportion with such a small object, (2) a correspondingly large atmospheric escape rate, (3) a ring of dense plasma locked in a feedback loop with the atmosphere, and (4) a host of Io-induced emissions from radio bursts to UV auroral spots on Jupiter. This proposal seeks to continue our investigation into the physics connecting these phenomena, with emphasis on Io's atmosphere and plasma torus. The physical processes are clearly of interest for Io, and also other places in the solar system where they are important but not readily observable.

  12. Io in Eclipse

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This unusual image shows Io glowing in the darkness of Jupiter's shadow. It is a combination of eight images taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) between 14:25 and 14:55 Universal Time on February 27, 2007, about 15 hours before the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. North is at the top of the image.

    Io's surface is invisible in the darkness, but the image reveals glowing hot lava, auroral displays in Io's tenuous atmosphere and volcanic plumes across the moon. The three bright points of light on the right side of Io are incandescent lava at active volcanoes - Pele and Reiden (south of the equator), and a previously unknown volcano near 22 degrees north, 233 degrees west near the edge of the disk at the 2 o'clock position.

    An auroral glow, produced as intense radiation from Jupiter's magnetosphere bombards Io's atmosphere, outlines the edge of the moon's disk. The glow is patchy because the atmosphere itself is patchy, being denser over active volcanoes. In addition to the near-surface glow, there is a remarkable auroral glow suspended 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the edge of the disk at the 2 o'clock position; perhaps this glowing gas was ejected from the new volcano below it. Another glowing gas plume, above a fainter point of light, is visible just inside Io's disk near the 6 o'clock position; this plume is above another new volcanic eruption discovered by New Horizons.

    On the left side of the disk, near Io's equator, a cluster of faint dots of light is centered near the point on Io that always faces Jupiter. This is the region where electrical currents connect Io to Jupiter's magnetosphere. It is likely that electrical connections to individual volcanoes are causing the glows seen here, though the details are mysterious.

    Total exposure time for this image was 16 seconds. The range to Io was 2.8 million kilometers (1.7 million miles), and the image is centered at Io coordinates 7 degrees south

  13. Operator adaptation to changes in system reliability under adaptable automation.

    PubMed

    Chavaillaz, Alain; Sauer, Juergen

    2016-11-25

    This experiment examined how operators coped with a change in system reliability between training and testing. Forty participants were trained for 3 h on a complex process control simulation modelling six levels of automation (LOA). In training, participants either experienced a high- (100%) or low-reliability system (50%). The impact of training experience on operator behaviour was examined during a 2.5 h testing session, in which participants either experienced a high- (100%) or low-reliability system (60%). The results showed that most operators did not often switch between LOA. Most chose an LOA that relieved them of most tasks but maintained their decision authority. Training experience did not have a strong impact on the outcome measures (e.g. performance, complacency). Low system reliability led to decreased performance and self-confidence. Furthermore, complacency was observed under high system reliability. Overall, the findings suggest benefits of adaptable automation because it accommodates different operator preferences for LOA. Practitioner Summary: The present research shows that operators can adapt to changes in system reliability between training and testing sessions. Furthermore, it provides evidence that each operator has his/her preferred automation level. Since this preference varies strongly between operators, adaptable automation seems to be suitable to accommodate these large differences.

  14. The Limits to Adaptation: A Systems Approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Felgenhauer, T. N.

    2013-12-01

    The ability to adapt to climate change is delineated by capacity thresholds, after which climate damages begin to overwhelm the adaptation response. Such thresholds depend upon physical properties (natural processes and engineering parameters), resource constraints (expressed through market prices), and societal preferences (from prices as well as cultural norms). Exceedance of adaptation capacity will require substitution either with other pre-existing policy responses or with new adaptation responses that have yet to be developed and tested. Previous modeling research shows that capacity limited adaptation will play a policy-significant role in future climate change decision-making. The aim of this study is to describe different types of adaptation response and climate damage systems and postulate how these systems might behave when the limits to adaptation are reached. The hypothesis is that this behavior will be governed by the characteristics and level of the adaptation limit, the shape of the damage curve in that specific damage area, and the availability of alternative adaptation responses once the threshold is passed, whether it is more of the old technology, a new response type, or a transformation of the climate damage and response system itself.

  15. Io in Eclipse 2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This image of Io eclipsed by Jupiter's shadow is a combination of several images taken by the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) between 09:35 and 09:41 Universal Time on February 27, 2007, about 28 hours after the spacecraft's closest approach to Jupiter. North is at the top of the image.

    In the darkness, only glowing hot lava, auroral displays in Io's tenuous atmosphere and the moon's volcanic plumes are visible. The brightest points of light in the image are the glow of incandescent lava at several active volcanoes. The three brightest volcanoes south of the equator are, from left to right, Pele, Reiden and Marduk. North of the equator, near the disk center, a previously unknown volcano near 22 degrees north, 233 degrees west glows brightly. (The dark streak to its right is an artifact.)

    The edge of Io's disk is outlined by the auroral glow produced as intense radiation from Jupiter's magnetosphere bombards the atmosphere. The glow is patchy because the atmosphere itself is patchy, being denser over active volcanoes. At the 1 o'clock position the giant glowing plume from the Tvashtar volcano rises 330 kilometers (200 miles) above the edge of the disk, and several smaller plumes are also visible as diffuse glows scattered across the disk. Bright glows at the edge of Io on the left and right sides of the disk mark regions where electrical currents connect Io to Jupiter's magnetosphere.

    New Horizons was 2.8 million kilometers (1.7 million miles) from Io when this picture was taken, and the image is centered at Io coordinates 2 degrees south, 238 degrees west. The image has been heavily processed to remove scattered light from Jupiter, but some artifacts remain, including a horizontal seam where two sets of frames were pieced together. Total exposure time for this image was 56 seconds.

  16. The geology of Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schaber, G. G.

    A preliminary geologic map of 34.8 percent of the surface of Io has been compiled using best-resolution Voyager 1 images. Nine volcanic units are identified, including materials of mountains, plains, flows, cones, and crater vents, in addition to six types of structural features. Photogeologic evidence indicates a dominantly silicate composition for the mountain material. Sulfur flows of diverse viscosity and sulfur-silicate mixtures may compose the extensive plans. Pit-crater and shield-crater vent-wall scarps reach heights of over two km, and layered-plains boundary scarps have estimated heights of 150 to 1700 m, indicating a material with considerable strength. A cumulative size-frequency distribution plot for 170 volcanic craters with diameters over 14 km is similar to the curves for impact craters on other bodies in the solar system, attesting to a similar nonrandom distribution of crater diameters and a surplus of small craters. A total of 151 lineaments and grabens forming two nearly orthogonal sets is recognized.

  17. Io in Front of Jupiter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    Jupiter's four largest satellites, including Io, the golden ornament in front of Jupiter in this image from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, have fascinated Earthlings ever since Galileo Galilei discovered them in 1610 in one of his first astronomical uses of the telescope.

    Images from Cassini that will be released over the next several days capture each of the four Galilean satellites in their orbits around the giant planet.

    This true-color composite frame, made from narrow angle images taken on Dec. 12, 2000, captures Io and its shadow in transit against the disk of Jupiter. The distance of the spacecraft from Jupiter was 19.5 million kilometers (12.1 million miles). The image scale is 117 kilometers (73 miles) per pixel.

    The entire body of Io, about the size of Earth's Moon, is periodically flexed as it speeds around Jupiter and feels, as a result of its non-circular orbit, the periodically changing gravitational pull of the planet. The heat arising in Io's interior from this continual flexure makes it the most volcanically active body in the solar system, with more than 100 active volcanoes. The white and reddish colors on its surface are due to the presence of different sulfurous materials. The black areas are silicate rocks.

    Cassini is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the Cassini mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  18. Adaptation in CRISPR-Cas Systems.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Samuel H; Richter, Hagen; Charpentier, Emmanuelle; Qimron, Udi

    2016-03-17

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR) and CRISPR-associated (Cas) proteins constitute an adaptive immune system in prokaryotes. The system preserves memories of prior infections by integrating short segments of foreign DNA, termed spacers, into the CRISPR array in a process termed adaptation. During the past 3 years, significant progress has been made on the genetic requirements and molecular mechanisms of adaptation. Here we review these recent advances, with a focus on the experimental approaches that have been developed, the insights they generated, and a proposed mechanism for self- versus non-self-discrimination during the process of spacer selection. We further describe the regulation of adaptation and the protein players involved in this fascinating process that allows bacteria and archaea to harbor adaptive immunity.

  19. Io Eclipse Observations: Does Loki Dominate Io's Infrared Flux?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rathbun, J. A.; Spencer, J. R.

    2008-03-01

    Observations of Io's thermal infrared emission made from NASA's IRTF will be presented. We will determine whether Loki dominates Io's infrared flux and attempt to separate Loki's flux in order to compare it to a quantitative model of its eruption.

  20. Runtime System for I/O Staging in Support of In-Situ Processing of Extreme Scale Data

    SciTech Connect

    Schwan, Karsten

    2013-11-01

    Our research in this project focused on creating and evaluating an I/O infrastructure and tools for extreme-scale applications and machines so that scientists can reduce their time to discovery at small cost in machine resources and consequent power consumption. We wanted to provide tools that are highly scalable, portable, and easy-to-use, so that scientists can gain control of their science, and concentrate on producing important scientific discovery in their own domain. Accelerating the rate of insight and scientific productivity, therefore, demands new solutions to managing the avalanche of data expected at extreme scale.

  1. Adaptive, full-spectrum solar energy system

    DOEpatents

    Muhs, Jeffrey D.; Earl, Dennis D.

    2003-08-05

    An adaptive full spectrum solar energy system having at least one hybrid solar concentrator, at least one hybrid luminaire, at least one hybrid photobioreactor, and a light distribution system operably connected to each hybrid solar concentrator, each hybrid luminaire, and each hybrid photobioreactor. A lighting control system operates each component.

  2. Small scale adaptive optics experiment systems engineering

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Boykin, William H.

    1993-01-01

    Assessment of the current technology relating to the laser power beaming system which in full scale is called the Beam Transmission Optical System (BTOS). Evaluation of system integration efforts are being conducted by the various government agencies and industry. Concepts are being developed for prototypes of adaptive optics for a BTOS.

  3. Adaptive Dialogue Systems for Assistive Living Environments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Papangelis, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    Adaptive Dialogue Systems (ADS) are intelligent systems, able to interact with users via multiple modalities, such as speech, gestures, facial expressions and others. Such systems are able to make conversation with their users, usually on a specific, narrow topic. Assistive Living Environments are environments where the users are by definition not…

  4. Strong tidal dissipation in Io and Jupiter from astrometric observations.

    PubMed

    Lainey, Valéry; Arlot, Jean-Eudes; Karatekin, Ozgür; Van Hoolst, Tim

    2009-06-18

    Io is the volcanically most active body in the Solar System and has a large surface heat flux. The geological activity is thought to be the result of tides raised by Jupiter, but it is not known whether the current tidal heat production is sufficiently high to generate the observed surface heat flow. Io's tidal heat comes from the orbital energy of the Io-Jupiter system (resulting in orbital acceleration), whereas dissipation of energy in Jupiter causes Io's orbital motion to decelerate. Here we report a determination of the tidal dissipation in Io and Jupiter through its effect on the orbital motions of the Galilean moons. Our results show that the rate of internal energy dissipation in Io (k(2)/Q = 0.015 +/- 0.003, where k(2) is the Love number and Q is the quality factor) is in good agreement with the observed surface heat flow, and suggest that Io is close to thermal equilibrium. Dissipation in Jupiter (k(2)/Q = (1.102 +/- 0.203) x 10(-5)) is close to the upper bound of its average value expected from the long-term evolution of the system, and dissipation in extrasolar planets may be higher than presently assumed. The measured secular accelerations indicate that Io is evolving inwards, towards Jupiter, and that the three innermost Galilean moons (Io, Europa and Ganymede) are evolving out of the exact Laplace resonance.

  5. Io Surface Changes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This montage compares similar sides of Io photographed by the Galileo spacecraft in October 1999 (left) and the New Horizons spacecraft on February 27, 2007. The New Horizons image was taken with its Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) from a range of 2.7 million kilometers (1.7 million miles).

    Most features on Io have changed little in the seven-plus years between these images, despite continued intense volcanic activity. The largest visible feature is the dark oval composed of deposits from the Pele volcano, nearly 1,200 kilometers (750 miles) across its longest dimension. At high northern latitudes, the volcano Dazhbog is prominent as a dark spot in the New Horizons image, near the edge of the disk at the 11 o'clock position. This volcano is much less conspicuous in the Galileo image. This darkening happened after this 1999 Galileo image but before Galileo took its last images of Io in 2001.

    A more recent change, discovered by New Horizons, can be seen in the southern hemisphere (circled). A new volcanic eruption near 55 degrees south, 290 degrees west has created a roughly circular deposit nearly 500 kilometers (300 miles) in diameter that was not seen by Galileo. Other New Horizons images show that the plume that created this deposit is still active.

    The New Horizons image is centered at Io coordinates 8 degrees south, 269 degrees west.

  6. A Software Product Line Process to Develop Agents for the IoT.

    PubMed

    Ayala, Inmaculada; Amor, Mercedes; Fuentes, Lidia; Troya, José M

    2015-07-01

    One of the most important challenges of this decade is the Internet of Things (IoT), which aims to enable things to be connected anytime, anyplace, with anything and anyone, ideally using any path/network and any service. IoT systems are usually composed of heterogeneous and interconnected lightweight devices that support applications that are subject to change in their external environment and in the functioning of these devices. The management of the variability of these changes, autonomously, is a challenge in the development of these systems. Agents are a good option for developing self-managed IoT systems due to their distributed nature, context-awareness and self-adaptation. Our goal is to enhance the development of IoT applications using agents and software product lines (SPL). Specifically, we propose to use Self-StarMASMAS, multi-agent system) agents and to define an SPL process using the Common Variability Language. In this contribution, we propose an SPL process for Self-StarMAS, paying particular attention to agents embedded in sensor motes.

  7. A Software Product Line Process to Develop Agents for the IoT

    PubMed Central

    Ayala, Inmaculada; Amor, Mercedes; Fuentes, Lidia; Troya, José M.

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important challenges of this decade is the Internet of Things (IoT), which aims to enable things to be connected anytime, anyplace, with anything and anyone, ideally using any path/network and any service. IoT systems are usually composed of heterogeneous and interconnected lightweight devices that support applications that are subject to change in their external environment and in the functioning of these devices. The management of the variability of these changes, autonomously, is a challenge in the development of these systems. Agents are a good option for developing self-managed IoT systems due to their distributed nature, context-awareness and self-adaptation. Our goal is to enhance the development of IoT applications using agents and software product lines (SPL). Specifically, we propose to use Self-StarMASMAS, multi-agent system) agents and to define an SPL process using the Common Variability Language. In this contribution, we propose an SPL process for Self-StarMAS, paying particular attention to agents embedded in sensor motes. PMID:26140350

  8. Effective File I/O Bandwidth Benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    Rabenseifner, R.; Koniges, A.E.

    2000-02-15

    The effective I/O bandwidth benchmark (b{_}eff{_}io) covers two goals: (1) to achieve a characteristic average number for the I/O bandwidth achievable with parallel MPI-I/O applications, and (2) to get detailed information about several access patterns and buffer lengths. The benchmark examines ''first write'', ''rewrite'' and ''read'' access, strided (individual and shared pointers) and segmented collective patterns on one file per application and non-collective access to one file per process. The number of parallel accessing processes is also varied and well-formed I/O is compared with non-well formed. On systems, meeting the rule that the total memory can be written to disk in 10 minutes, the benchmark should not need more than 15 minutes for a first pass of all patterns. The benchmark is designed analogously to the effective bandwidth benchmark for message passing (b{_}eff) that characterizes the message passing capabilities of a system in a few minutes. First results of the b{_}eff{_}io benchmark are given for IBM SP and Cray T3E systems and compared with existing benchmarks based on parallel Posix-I/O.

  9. An Eruption on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The first images returned to Earth by New Horizons during its close encounter with Jupiter feature the Galilean moon Io, snapped with the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 0840 UTC on February 26, while the moon was 2.5 million miles (4 million kilometers) from the spacecraft.

    Io is intensely heated by its tidal interaction with Jupiter and is thus extremely volcanically active. That activity is evident in these images, which reveal an enormous dust plume, more than 150 miles high, erupting from the volcano Tvashtar. The plume appears as an umbrella-shaped feature of the edge of Io's disk in the 11 o'clock position in the right image, which is a long-exposure (20-millisecond) frame designed specifically to look for plumes like this. The bright spots at 2 o'clock are high mountains catching the setting sun; beyond them the night side of Io can be seen, faintly illuminated by light reflected from Jupiter itself.

    The left image is a shorter exposure -- 3 milliseconds -- designed to look at surface features. In this frame, the Tvashtar volcano shows as a dark spot, also at 11 o'clock, surrounded by a large dark ring, where an area larger than Texas has been covered by fallout from the giant eruption.

    This is the clearest view yet of a plume from Tvashtar, one of Io's most active volcanoes. Ground-based telescopes and the Galileo Jupiter orbiter first spotted volcanic heat radiation from Tvashtar in November 1999, and the Cassini spacecraft saw a large plume when it flew past Jupiter in December 2000. The Keck telescope in Hawaii picked up renewed heat radiation from Tvashtar in spring 2006, and just two weeks ago the Hubble Space Telescope saw the Tvashtar plume in ultraviolet images designed to support the New Horizons flyby.

    Most of those images will be stored onboard the spacecraft for downlink to Earth in March and April.

  10. Global shape estimates and GIS cartography of Io and Enceladus using new control point network

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nadezhdina, I.; Patraty, V.; Shishkina, L.; Zhukov, D.; Zubarev, A.; Karachevtseva, I.; Oberst, J.

    2012-04-01

    We have analyzed a total of 53 Galileo and Voyager images of Io and 54 Cassini images of Enceladus to derive new geodetic control point networks for the two satellites. In order to derive the network for Io we used a subset of 66 images from those used in previous control point network studies [1, 2]. Additionally we have carried out new point measurements. We used recently reconstructed Galileo spacecraft trajectory data, supplied by the spacecraft navigation team of JPL. A total of 1956 tie point measurements for Io and 4392 ones for Enceladus have been carried out, which were processed by performing photogrammetric bundle block adjustments. Measurements and block adjustments were performed by means of the «PHOTOMOD» software [3] which was especially adapted for this study to accommodate global networks of small bodies, such as Io and Enceladus. As a result, two catalogs with the Cartesian three-dimensional coordinates of 197 and 351 control points were obtained for Io and Enceladus, respectively. The control points for Io have a mean overall accuracy of 4985.7 m (RMS). The individual accuracy of the control points for Enceladus differ substantially over the surface (the range is from 0.1 to 36.0 km) because images lack coverage and resolutions. We also determine best-fit spheres, spheroids, and tri-axial ellipsoids. The centers of the models were found to be shifted from the coordinate system origin attesting to possible errors in the ephemeris of Io. Conclusion and Future work: A comparison of our results for Io with the most recent control point network analysis [2] has revealed that we managed to derive the same accuracy of the control points using a smaller number of images and measurements (This study: 1956 measurements, DLR study: 4392). This probably attests to the fact that the now available new navigation data are internally more consistent. At present an analysis of the data is in progress. We report that control point measurements and global network

  11. The Jupiter-Io connection - An Alfven engine in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Belcher, John W.

    1987-01-01

    Much has been learned about the electromagnetic interaction between Jupiter and its satellite Io from in situ observations. Io, in its motion through the Io plasma torus at Jupiter, continuously generates an Alfven wing that carries two billion kilowatts of power into the jovian ionosphere. Concurrently, Io is acted upon by a J x B force tending to propel it out of the jovian system. The energy source for these processes is the rotation of Jupiter. This unusual planet-satellite coupling serves as an archetype for the interaction of a large moving conductor with a magnetized plasma, a problem of general space and astrophysical interest.

  12. The Jupiter-Io connection - an Alfven engine in space

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belcher, J. W.

    1987-10-01

    Much has been learned about the electromagnetic interaction between Jupiter and its satellite Io from in situ observations. Io, in its motion through the Io plasma torus at Jupiter, continuously generates an Alfven wing that carries two billion kilowatts of power into the jovian ionosphere. Concurrently, Io is acted upon by a J x B force tending to propel it out of the jovian system. The energy source for these processes is the rotation of Jupiter. This unusual planet-satellite coupling serves as an archetype for the interaction of a large moving conductor with a magnetized plasma, a problem of general space and astrophysical interest.

  13. Adaptive Control for Microgravity Vibration Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Bong-Jun; Calise, Anthony J.; Craig, James I.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    Most active vibration isolation systems that try to a provide quiescent acceleration environment for space science experiments have utilized linear design methods. In this paper, we address adaptive control augmentation of an existing classical controller that employs a high-gain acceleration feedback together with a low-gain position feedback to center the isolated platform. The control design feature includes parametric and dynamic uncertainties because the hardware of the isolation system is built as a payload-level isolator, and the acceleration Sensor exhibits a significant bias. A neural network is incorporated to adaptively compensate for the system uncertainties, and a high-pass filter is introduced to mitigate the effect of the measurement bias. Simulations show that the adaptive control improves the performance of the existing acceleration controller and keep the level of the isolated platform deviation to that of the existing control system.

  14. Operational Results of an Adaptive SDI System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sage, C. R.; Fitzwater, D. R.

    The Ames Laboratory SDI system requires a minimum of human intervention. The adaptability of the system provides two major contributions to information dissemination. (1) The user benefits proportionately from the amount of effort he expends in setting up his profile and the diligence in sending back responses. (2) The document input has only to…

  15. The adaptive control system of acetylene generator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kovaliuk, D. O.; Kovaliuk, Oleg; Burlibay, Aron; Gromaszek, Konrad

    2015-12-01

    The method of acetylene production in acetylene generator was analyzed. It was found that impossible to provide the desired process characteristics by the PID-controller. The adaptive control system of acetylene generator was developed. The proposed system combines the classic controller and fuzzy subsystem for controller parameters tuning.

  16. Multiprocessor Adaptive Control Of A Dynamic System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Juang, Jer-Nan; Hyland, David C.

    1995-01-01

    Architecture for fully autonomous digital electronic control system developed for use in identification and adaptive control of dynamic system. Architecture modular and hierarchical. Combines relatively simple, standardized processing units into complex parallel-processing subsystems. Although architecture based on neural-network concept, processing units themselves not neural networks; processing units implemented by programming of currently available microprocessors.

  17. RNA viruses as complex adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Elena, Santiago F; Sanjuán, Rafael

    2005-07-01

    RNA viruses have high mutation rates and so their populations exist as dynamic and complex mutant distributions. It has been consistently observed that when challenged with a new environment, viral populations adapt following hyperbolic-like kinetics: adaptation is initially very rapid, but then slows down as fitness reaches an asymptotic value. These adaptive dynamics have been explained in terms of populations moving towards the top of peaks on rugged fitness landscapes. Fitness fluctuations of varying magnitude are observed during adaptation. Often the presence of fluctuations in the evolution of physical systems indicates some form of self-organization, or where many components of the system are simultaneously involved. Here we analyze data from several in vitro evolution experiments carried out with vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) looking for the signature of criticality and scaling. Long-range fitness correlations have been detected during the adaptive process. We also found that the magnitude of fitness fluctuations, far from being trivial, conform to a Weibull probability distribution function, suggesting that viral adaptation belongs to a broad category of phenomena previously documented in other fields and related with emergence.

  18. Adaptation in the auditory system: an overview.

    PubMed

    Pérez-González, David; Malmierca, Manuel S

    2014-01-01

    The early stages of the auditory system need to preserve the timing information of sounds in order to extract the basic features of acoustic stimuli. At the same time, different processes of neuronal adaptation occur at several levels to further process the auditory information. For instance, auditory nerve fiber responses already experience adaptation of their firing rates, a type of response that can be found in many other auditory nuclei and may be useful for emphasizing the onset of the stimuli. However, it is at higher levels in the auditory hierarchy where more sophisticated types of neuronal processing take place. For example, stimulus-specific adaptation, where neurons show adaptation to frequent, repetitive stimuli, but maintain their responsiveness to stimuli with different physical characteristics, thus representing a distinct kind of processing that may play a role in change and deviance detection. In the auditory cortex, adaptation takes more elaborate forms, and contributes to the processing of complex sequences, auditory scene analysis and attention. Here we review the multiple types of adaptation that occur in the auditory system, which are part of the pool of resources that the neurons employ to process the auditory scene, and are critical to a proper understanding of the neuronal mechanisms that govern auditory perception.

  19. Managing adaptively for multifunctionality in agricultural systems.

    PubMed

    Hodbod, Jennifer; Barreteau, Olivier; Allen, Craig; Magda, Danièle

    2016-12-01

    The critical importance of agricultural systems for food security and as a dominant global landcover requires management that considers the full dimensions of system functions at appropriate scales, i.e. multifunctionality. We propose that adaptive management is the most suitable management approach for such goals, given its ability to reduce uncertainty over time and support multiple objectives within a system, for multiple actors. As such, adaptive management may be the most appropriate method for sustainably intensifying production whilst increasing the quantity and quality of ecosystem services. However, the current assessment of performance of agricultural systems doesn't reward ecosystem service provision. Therefore, we present an overview of the ecosystem functions agricultural systems should and could provide, coupled with a revised definition for assessing the performance of agricultural systems from a multifunctional perspective that, when all satisfied, would create adaptive agricultural systems that can increase production whilst ensuring food security and the quantity and quality of ecosystem services. The outcome of this high level of performance is the capacity to respond to multiple shocks without collapse, equity and triple bottom line sustainability. Through the assessment of case studies, we find that alternatives to industrialized agricultural systems incorporate more functional goals, but that there are mixed findings as to whether these goals translate into positive measurable outcomes. We suggest that an adaptive management perspective would support the implementation of a systematic analysis of the social, ecological and economic trade-offs occurring within such systems, particularly between ecosystem services and functions, in order to provide suitable and comparable assessments. We also identify indicators to monitor performance at multiple scales in agricultural systems which can be used within an adaptive management framework to increase

  20. The ERIS adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riccardi, A.; Esposito, S.; Agapito, G.; Antichi, J.; Biliotti, V.; Blain, C.; Briguglio, R.; Busoni, L.; Carbonaro, L.; Di Rico, G.; Giordano, C.; Pinna, E.; Puglisi, A.; Spanò, P.; Xompero, M.; Baruffolo, A.; Kasper, M.; Egner, S.; Suàrez Valles, M.; Soenke, C.; Downing, M.; Reyes, J.

    2016-07-01

    ERIS is the new AO instrument for VLT-UT4 led by a Consortium of Max-Planck Institut fuer Extraterrestrische Physik, UK-ATC, ETH-Zurich, ESO and INAF. The ERIS AO system provides NGS mode to deliver high contrast correction and LGS mode to extend high Strehl performance to large sky coverage. The AO module includes NGS and LGS wavefront sensors and, with VLT-AOF Deformable Secondary Mirror and Laser Facility, will provide AO correction to the high resolution imager NIX (1-5um) and the IFU spectrograph SPIFFIER (1-2.5um). In this paper we present the preliminary design of the ERIS AO system and the estimated correction performance.

  1. Io Through Different 'Eyes'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This montage demonstrates New Horizons' ability to observe the same target in complementary ways using its diverse suite of instruments. Previously released views taken at visible and slightly longer infrared wavelengths with the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), New Horizons' high-resolution black-and-white camera, and the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC), its color camera, are here compared with a nearly simultaneous view from the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA), which observes its targets in more than 200 separate wavelengths of infrared light. This color LEISA view of Io (bottom right) combines three wavelength ranges, centered at 1.80, 2.04, and 2.31 micrometers.

    The LORRI image (left) shows fine details on Io's sunlit crescent and in the partially sunlit plume from the Tvashtar volcano, and reveals the bright nighttime glow of the hot lavas at the source of the Tvashtar plume. The MVIC image (top right) shows the contrasting colors of the red lava and blue plume at Tvashtar, and the sulfur and sulfur dioxide deposits on Io's sunlit surface. The LEISA image shows that the glow of the Tvashtar volcano is even more intense at infrared wavelengths and reveals the infrared glow of at least 10 fainter volcanic hot spots on the moon's nightside. The brightest of these, Amirani/Maui, which is visible to the lower right of Tvashtar, is less than 4% as bright as Tvashtar. All of these are long-lived hot spots that have been observed previously by the Galileo orbiter. Further analysis of the LEISA data will provide information on the volcanoes' temperatures, and data on the sunlit crescent of Io will reveal details of Io's surface composition.

    The LORRI, MVIC and LEISA images were taken March 1, 2007, at 00:35, 00:25 and 00:31 Universal Time, respectively, from a range of 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles). The images are centered at Io coordinates 4 degrees south, 164 degrees west.

  2. Io in Eclipse, Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    Glowing spots of hot lava and ethereal auroral emissions are highlighted against blackness in this sequence of 48 frames from NASA's Cassini spacecraft, which show Jupiter's moon Io in the darkness of the giant planet's shadow.

    The sequence was recorded over a two-hour interval that spanned nearly an entire eclipse on Jan. 1, 2001. Although no sunlight shines on the moon during an eclipse, two types of glows can be seen. The bright points of light are the glows of hot lava from active volcanoes. The brightest is the volcano Pele, which appears to be erupting steadily despite its great intensity. To the right of Pele and slightly above it is a pair of bright spots associated with the volcano Pillan, the source of a major eruption in 1997. NASA's Galileo spacecraft and Hubble Space Telescope saw that 1997 eruption of Pillan dwarf the energy output from neighboring Pele, but Pillan's eruption has waned over the past 30 months to the pair of small hot spots seen here. Another volcano, seen below and to the right of Pele, varies on a time scale of days. This sequence of images illustrates the great variations in intensity and longevity of Io's volcanic eruptions.

    The second type of glow seen on Io during eclipse is a set of faint, diffuse emissions due to atmospheric auroras. Similar to the aurora borealis and aurora australis on Earth, Io's auroras are caused by the collisions of charged particles with gases in Io's tenuous atmosphere. A faint ring encircles the moon, while brighter glows are concentrated near the moon's equator. These equatorial glows are seen here gradually shifting clockwise in location as the eclipse progresses, due to the changing orientation of Jupiter's magnetic field. This is a new result which confirms that these visible auroras, like their counterparts seen at ultraviolet wavelengths, are caused by electrical currents that flow between Io and Jupiter.

    The original images were taken through a clear filter of Cassini's narrow

  3. Adaptive System Modeling for Spacecraft Simulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Justin

    2011-01-01

    This invention introduces a methodology and associated software tools for automatically learning spacecraft system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques were used to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). Evaluation on historical ISS telemetry data shows that adaptive system modeling reduces simulation error anywhere from 50 to 90 percent over existing approaches. The purpose of the methodology is to outline how someone can create accurate system models from sensor (telemetry) data. The purpose of the software is to support the methodology. The software provides analysis tools to design the adaptive models. The software also provides the algorithms to initially build system models and continuously update them from the latest streaming sensor data. The main strengths are as follows: Creates accurate spacecraft system models without in-depth system knowledge or any assumptions about system behavior. Automatically updates/calibrates system models using the latest streaming sensor data. Creates device specific models that capture the exact behavior of devices of the same type. Adapts to evolving systems. Can reduce computational complexity (faster simulations).

  4. Resolving Volcanism on Io with Aperture Mask Interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGruder, Chima; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Greenbaum, Alexandra

    2016-01-01

    James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) is due to launch in October 2018. However, much preparatory work is needed to ensure JWST's effective use once it is launched. One major issue is to ensure that data taken by JWST can be properly analyzed. This summer, I worked on developing methods for data analysis of simulated images of Io, Jupiter's closest moon. These images will come from JWST's instrument, the Near InfraRed Imager and Slitless Spectrograph (NIRISS). Io is the most volcanically active body in the solar system, shining brightly in the infrared during its volcanic outbursts. Currently, we observe Io with ground based telescopes, but because of atmospheric turbulence we can't resolve volcanism on Io. This is why using JWST to observe Io's volcanos would be extremely beneficial. The most relevant parameters are the position of volcanic eruptions, the flux of those eruptions, and the surface brightness of Io itself. Simultaneously, finding both the positional parameters of Io's volcanoes and the flux parameters of Io's volcanoes was inefficient. Instead, I found it best to acquire the positions of the volcanoes first, then fixing these positions to fit for the flux of the volcanoes and the brightness of Io. In addition, I found that with just an assumption of Poisson noise affecting the image, the correct fluxes and brightness could be measured within 3% error. The remaining work includes fine tuning our forward modeling procedures to reduce the error on measured parameters and accounting for other types of noise in the simulation.

  5. Evolving Systems and Adaptive Key Component Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, Susan A.; Balas, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    We propose a new framework called Evolving Systems to describe the self-assembly, or autonomous assembly, of actively controlled dynamical subsystems into an Evolved System with a higher purpose. An introduction to Evolving Systems and exploration of the essential topics of the control and stability properties of Evolving Systems is provided. This chapter defines a framework for Evolving Systems, develops theory and control solutions for fundamental characteristics of Evolving Systems, and provides illustrative examples of Evolving Systems and their control with adaptive key component controllers.

  6. An Optimizing Compiler for Petascale I/O on Leadership Class Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Choudhary, Alok; Kandemir, Mahmut

    2015-03-18

    In high-performance computing systems, parallel I/O architectures usually have very complex hierarchies with multiple layers that collectively constitute an I/O stack, including high-level I/O libraries such as PnetCDF and HDF5, I/O middleware such as MPI-IO, and parallel file systems such as PVFS and Lustre. Our project explored automated instrumentation and compiler support for I/O intensive applications. Our project made significant progress towards understanding the complex I/O hierarchies of high-performance storage systems (including storage caches, HDDs, and SSDs), and designing and implementing state-of-the-art compiler/runtime system technology that targets I/O intensive HPC applications that target leadership class machine. This final report summarizes the major achievements of the project and also points out promising future directions.

  7. Adaptive fuzzy system for 3-D vision

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mitra, Sunanda

    1993-01-01

    An adaptive fuzzy system using the concept of the Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART) type neural network architecture and incorporating fuzzy c-means (FCM) system equations for reclassification of cluster centers was developed. The Adaptive Fuzzy Leader Clustering (AFLC) architecture is a hybrid neural-fuzzy system which learns on-line in a stable and efficient manner. The system uses a control structure similar to that found in the Adaptive Resonance Theory (ART-1) network to identify the cluster centers initially. The initial classification of an input takes place in a two stage process; a simple competitive stage and a distance metric comparison stage. The cluster prototypes are then incrementally updated by relocating the centroid positions from Fuzzy c-Means (FCM) system equations for the centroids and the membership values. The operational characteristics of AFLC and the critical parameters involved in its operation are discussed. The performance of the AFLC algorithm is presented through application of the algorithm to the Anderson Iris data, and laser-luminescent fingerprint image data. The AFLC algorithm successfully classifies features extracted from real data, discrete or continuous, indicating the potential strength of this new clustering algorithm in analyzing complex data sets. The hybrid neuro-fuzzy AFLC algorithm will enhance analysis of a number of difficult recognition and control problems involved with Tethered Satellite Systems and on-orbit space shuttle attitude controller.

  8. Modeling Ultraviolet Emissions Near Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Linker, Jon A.

    2000-01-01

    In this report, we describe work awarded to Science Applications International Corporation, for the period 6/l/99 to 5/31/00. During this time period, we have investigated the interaction of Io, Jupiter's innermost Galilean satellite, with the Io plasma torus, and the role this interaction plays in producing ultraviolet (UV) emissions from neutral oxygen and sulfur. Io, the innermost of Jupiter's Galilean satellites, plays a unique role in the jovian magnetosphere. Neutral material that escapes from Io is ionized to form the lo torus, a dense, heavy-ion plasma that corotates with Jupiter and interacts with Io. Io supplies not only the torus, but is a major source of plasma for the entire magnetosphere. Ionization and charge-exchange of neutrals near lo strongly influences the plasma interaction, and Io's neutral atmosphere plays an important role in the generation of currents that couple Io to Jupiter. There have been no in situ measurements of the neutral density near Io, but remote observations of neutrals near lo have been performed for many years. Recent observations from the Hubble Space Telescope (HST) have shown detailed structure in UV emissions from neutral species near Io. Electron-impact of the neutrals by the Io torus plasma is the primary mechanism responsible for exciting these emissions. Previously, we have modeled the Io plasma environment using three-dimensional magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) simulations, and we have shown that the interaction between Io and the plasma torus plays an important role in producing the morphology of the observed emissions. In the past year, we have extended these studies to use both UV observations and Galileo particle and field measurements to investigate the Io interaction.

  9. Adaptive synchronization and anticipatory dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Ying-Jen; Chen, Chun-Chung; Lai, Pik-Yin; Chan, C. K.

    2015-09-01

    Many biological systems can sense periodical variations in a stimulus input and produce well-timed, anticipatory responses after the input is removed. Such systems show memory effects for retaining timing information in the stimulus and cannot be understood from traditional synchronization consideration of passive oscillatory systems. To understand this anticipatory phenomena, we consider oscillators built from excitable systems with the addition of an adaptive dynamics. With such systems, well-timed post-stimulus responses similar to those from experiments can be obtained. Furthermore, a well-known model of working memory is shown to possess similar anticipatory dynamics when the adaptive mechanism is identified with synaptic facilitation. The last finding suggests that this type of oscillator can be common in neuronal systems with plasticity.

  10. Robust adaptive control of HVDC systems

    SciTech Connect

    Reeve, J.; Sultan, M. )

    1994-07-01

    The transient performance of an HVDC power system is highly dependent on the parameters of the current/voltage regulators of the converter controls. In order to better accommodate changes in system structure or dc operating conditions, this paper introduces a new adaptive control strategy. The advantages of automatic tuning for continuous fine tuning are combined with predetermined gain scheduling in order to achieve robustness for large disturbances. Examples are provided for a digitally simulated back-to-back dc system.

  11. An adaptive learning control system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekel, R.; Nachmias, S.

    1976-01-01

    A learning control system is developed which blends the gain scheduling and adaptive control into a single learning system that has the advantages of both. An important feature of the developed learning control system is its capability to adjust the gain schedule in a prescribed manner to account for changing aircraft operating characteristics. Furthermore, if tests performed by the criteria of the learning system preclude any possible change in the gain schedule, then the overall system becomes an ordinary gain scheduling system. Examples are discussed.

  12. Final Report - Regulatory Considerations for Adaptive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilkinson, Chris; Lynch, Jonathan; Bharadwaj, Raj

    2013-01-01

    This report documents the findings of a preliminary research study into new approaches to the software design assurance of adaptive systems. We suggest a methodology to overcome the software validation and verification difficulties posed by the underlying assumption of non-adaptive software in the requirementsbased- testing verification methods in RTCA/DO-178B and C. An analysis of the relevant RTCA/DO-178B and C objectives is presented showing the reasons for the difficulties that arise in showing satisfaction of the objectives and suggested additional means by which they could be satisfied. We suggest that the software design assurance problem for adaptive systems is principally one of developing correct and complete high level requirements and system level constraints that define the necessary system functional and safety properties to assure the safe use of adaptive systems. We show how analytical techniques such as model based design, mathematical modeling and formal or formal-like methods can be used to both validate the high level functional and safety requirements, establish necessary constraints and provide the verification evidence for the satisfaction of requirements and constraints that supplements conventional testing. Finally the report identifies the follow-on research topics needed to implement this methodology.

  13. Science Rationale for the Io Volcano Observer (IVO) Mission Concept

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McEwen, Alfred; Turtle, Elizabeth

    2012-07-01

    The Io Volcano Observer (IVO) mission can explore the rich array of interconnected orbital, geophysical, atmospheric, and plasma phenomena surrounding the most volcanically active world in the Solar System. Io is the only place in the Solar System (including Earth) where we can watch very large-scale silicate volcanic processes in action, and it provides unique insight into high-temperature and high effusion-rate volcanic processes that were important in the early histories of the terrestrial planets. Io is also the best target at which to study tidal heating, which greatly expands the habitable zones of planetary systems. Moreover, the coupled orbital-tidal evolution is key to understanding the thermal histories of Europa and Ganymede. Io is always inside the intense radiation belt of Jupiter, so a radiation-mitigation strategy has been developed. An inclined orbit that passes Io at high velocity (˜19 km/s) near its perijove point keeps the total ionizing dose to ˜10 krad (behind 2.5 mm or 100 mils Al) per encounter. Nevertheless, the dose rate is high near Io so some science instruments have special design considerations to minimize noise. The IVO spacecraft must be agile enough (rapid turning and settling) for high-stability targeted observations during close encounters. The inclined orbit provides nearly pole-to-pole flybys of Io, which enables some of the highest-priority Io science such as understanding the polar heat flow and electrical conductivity of Io's mantle (which may contain a magma ocean). Key science instruments include narrow- and wide-angle cameras, magnetometers, a thermal mapper, neutral mass spectrometers, and plasma ion analyzers. NASA's 2011 Decadal Survey for planetary science identified an Io mission similar to IVO as one of seven options for the next two New Frontiers mission opportunities. The Galileo (GLL) mission and payload were designed prior to the Voyager 1 flyby and discovery of Io's active volcanism, so they were not designed

  14. User Modeling in Adaptive Hypermedia Educational Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martins, Antonio Constantino; Faria, Luiz; Vaz de Carvalho, Carlos; Carrapatoso, Eurico

    2008-01-01

    This document is a survey in the research area of User Modeling (UM) for the specific field of Adaptive Learning. The aims of this document are: To define what it is a User Model; To present existing and well known User Models; To analyze the existent standards related with UM; To compare existing systems. In the scientific area of User Modeling…

  15. Adaptive Control of Nonlinear and Stochastic Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1991-01-14

    Hernmndez-Lerma and S.I. Marcus, Nonparametric adaptive control of dis- crete time partially observable stochastic systems, Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications 137... Journal of Mathematical Analysis and Applications 137 (1989), 485-514. [19] A. Arapostathis and S.I. Marcus, Analysis of an identification algorithm

  16. Adaptive control system for gas producing wells

    SciTech Connect

    Fedor, Pashchenko; Sergey, Gulyaev; Alexander, Pashchenko

    2015-03-10

    Optimal adaptive automatic control system for gas producing wells cluster is proposed intended for solving the problem of stabilization of the output gas pressure in the cluster at conditions of changing gas flow rate and changing parameters of the wells themselves, providing the maximum high resource of hardware elements of automation.

  17. An adaptive strategy for controlling chaotic system.

    PubMed

    Cao, Yi-Jia; Hang, Hong-Xian

    2003-01-01

    This paper presents an adaptive strategy for controlling chaotic systems. By employing the phase space reconstruction technique in nonlinear dynamical systems theory, the proposed strategy transforms the nonlinear system into canonical form, and employs a nonlinear observer to estimate the uncertainties and disturbances of the nonlinear system, and then establishes a state-error-like feedback law. The developed control scheme allows chaos control in spite of modeling errors and parametric variations. The effectiveness of the proposed approach has been demonstrated through its applications to two well-known chaotic systems: Duffing oscillator and Rössler chaos.

  18. A brief parallel I/O tutorial.

    SciTech Connect

    Ward, H. Lee

    2010-03-01

    This document provides common best practices for the efficient utilization of parallel file systems for analysts and application developers. A multi-program, parallel supercomputer is able to provide effective compute power by aggregating a host of lower-power processors using a network. The idea, in general, is that one either constructs the application to distribute parts to the different nodes and processors available and then collects the result (a parallel application), or one launches a large number of small jobs, each doing similar work on different subsets (a campaign). The I/O system on these machines is usually implemented as a tightly-coupled, parallel application itself. It is providing the concept of a 'file' to the host applications. The 'file' is an addressable store of bytes and that address space is global in nature. In essence, it is providing a global address space. Beyond the simple reality that the I/O system is normally composed of a small, less capable, collection of hardware, that concept of a global address space will cause problems if not very carefully utilized. How much of a problem and the ways in which those problems manifest will be different, but that it is problem prone has been well established. Worse, the file system is a shared resource on the machine - a system service. What an application does when it uses the file system impacts all users. It is not the case that some portion of the available resource is reserved. Instead, the I/O system responds to requests by scheduling and queuing based on instantaneous demand. Using the system well contributes to the overall throughput on the machine. From a solely self-centered perspective, using it well reduces the time that the application or campaign is subject to impact by others. The developer's goal should be to accomplish I/O in a way that minimizes interaction with the I/O system, maximizes the amount of data moved per call, and provides the I/O system the most information about

  19. Adaptable Transponder for Multiple Telemetry Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sims, William Herbert, III (Inventor); Varnavas, Kosta A. (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    The present invention is a stackable telemetry circuit board for use in telemetry systems for satellites and other purposes. The present invention incorporates previously-qualified interchangeable circuit boards, or "decks," that perform functions such as power, signal receiving and transmission, and processing. Each deck is adapted to serve a range of telemetry applications. This provides flexibility in the construction of the stackable telemetry circuit board and significantly reduces the cost and time necessary to develop a telemetry system.

  20. Adaptive P300 based control system

    PubMed Central

    Jin, Jing; Allison, Brendan Z.; Sellers, Eric W.; Brunner, Clemens; Horki, Petar; Wang, Xingyu; Neuper, Christa

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive P300 brain-computer interface (BCI) using a 12 × 7 matrix explored new paradigms to improve bit rate and accuracy. During online use, the system adaptively selects the number of flashes to average. Five different flash patterns were tested. The 19-flash paradigm represents the typical row/column presentation (i.e., 12 columns and 7 rows). The 9- and 14-flash A & B paradigms present all items of the 12 × 7 matrix three times using either nine or 14 flashes (instead of 19), decreasing the amount of time to present stimuli. Compared to 9-flash A, 9-flash B decreased the likelihood that neighboring items would flash when the target was not flashing, thereby reducing interference from items adjacent to targets. 14-flash A also reduced adjacent item interference and 14-flash B additionally eliminated successive (double) flashes of the same item. Results showed that accuracy and bit rate of the adaptive system were higher than the non-adaptive system. In addition, 9- and 14-flash B produced significantly higher performance than their respective A conditions. The results also show the trend that the 14-flash B paradigm was better than the 19-flash pattern for naïve users. PMID:21474877

  1. On Approach: Jupiter and Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on the image for movie of On Approach: Jupiter and Io

    This sequence of images was taken on Jan. 8, 2007, with the New Horizons Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), while the spacecraft was about 81 million kilometers (about 50 million miles) from Jupiter. Jupiter's volcanic moon Io is to the right; the planet's Great Red Spot is also visible. The image was one of 11 taken during the Jan. 8 approach sequence, which signaled the opening of the New Horizons Jupiter encounter.

    Even in these early approach images, Jupiter shows different face than what previous visiting spacecraft -- such as Voyager 1, Galileo and Cassini -- have seen. Regions around the equator and in the southern tropical latitudes seem remarkably calm, even in the typically turbulent 'wake' behind the Great Red Spot.

    The New Horizons science team will scrutinize these major meteorological features -- including the unexpectedly calm regions -- to understand the diverse variety of dynamical processes on the solar system's largest planet. These include the newly formed Little Red Spot, the Great Red Spot and a variety of zonal features.

  2. Mountains and Plateaus on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These two views of Io were acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft during its seventh orbit (G7) of Jupiter. The images were designed to view large features on Io at low sun angles when the lighting conditions emphasize the topography or relief of the volcanic satellite. Sun angles are low near the terminator which is the day-night boundary near the left side of the images. These images reveal that the topography is very flat near the active volcanic centers such as Loki Patera (the large dark horseshoe-shaped feature near the terminator in the left-hand image) and that a variety of mountains and plateaus exist elsewhere.

    North is to the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers per picture element (6.1 for the left hand image and 5.7 for the right). The images were taken on April 4th, 1997 at a ranges of 600,000 kilometers (left image) and 563,000 kilometers (right image) by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  3. Remote I/O : fast access to distant storage.

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, I.; Kohr, D., Jr.; Krishnaiyer, R.; Mogill, J.

    1997-12-17

    As high-speed networks make it easier to use distributed resources, it becomes increasingly common that applications and their data are not colocated. Users have traditionally addressed this problem by manually staging data to and from remote computers. We argue instead for a new remote I/O paradigm in which programs use familiar parallel I/O interfaces to access remote file systems. In addition to simplifying remote execution, remote I/O can improve performance relative to staging by overlapping computation and data transfer or by reducing communication requirements. However, remote I/O also introduces new technical challenges in the areas of portability, performance, and integration with distributed computing systems. We propose techniques designed to address these challenges and describe a remote I/O library called RIO that we have developed to evaluate the effectiveness of these techniques. RIO addresses issues of portability by adopting the quasi-standard MPI-IO interface and by defining a RIO device and RIO server within the ADIO abstract I/O device architecture. It addresses performance issues by providing traditional I/O optimizations such as asynchronous operations and through implementation techniques such as buffering and message forwarding to off load communication overheads. RIO uses the Nexus communication library to obtain access to configuration and security mechanisms provided by the Globus wide area computing tool kit. Microbenchmarks and application experiments demonstrate that our techniques achieve acceptable performance in most situations and can improve turnaround time relative to staging.

  4. Adaptive functional systems: learning with chaos.

    PubMed

    Komarov, M A; Osipov, G V; Burtsev, M S

    2010-12-01

    We propose a new model of adaptive behavior that combines a winnerless competition principle and chaos to learn new functional systems. The model consists of a complex network of nonlinear dynamical elements producing sequences of goal-directed actions. Each element describes dynamics and activity of the functional system which is supposed to be a distributed set of interacting physiological elements such as nerve or muscle that cooperates to obtain certain goal at the level of the whole organism. During "normal" behavior, the dynamics of the system follows heteroclinic channels, but in the novel situation chaotic search is activated and a new channel leading to the target state is gradually created simulating the process of learning. The model was tested in single and multigoal environments and had demonstrated a good potential for generation of new adaptations.

  5. Jupiter-Io Montage

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This is a montage of New Horizons images of Jupiter and its volcanic moon Io, taken during the spacecraft's Jupiter flyby in early 2007. The Jupiter image is an infrared color composite taken by the spacecraft's near-infrared imaging spectrometer, the Linear Etalon Imaging Spectral Array (LEISA) at 1:40 UT on Feb. 28, 2007. The infrared wavelengths used (red: 1.59 um, green: 1.94 um, blue: 1.85 um) highlight variations in the altitude of the Jovian cloud tops, with blue denoting high-altitude clouds and hazes, and red indicating deeper clouds. The prominent bluish-white oval is the Great Red Spot. The observation was made at a solar phase angle of 75 degrees but has been projected onto a crescent to remove distortion caused by Jupiter's rotation during the scan. The Io image, taken at 00:25 UT on March 1st 2007, is an approximately true-color composite taken by the panchromatic Long-Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI), with color information provided by the 0.5 um ('blue') and 0.9 um ('methane') channels of the Multispectral Visible Imaging Camera (MVIC). The image shows a major eruption in progress on Io's night side, at the northern volcano Tvashtar. Incandescent lava glows red beneath a 330-kilometer high volcanic plume, whose uppermost portions are illuminated by sunlight. The plume appears blue due to scattering of light by small particles in the plume

    This montage appears on the cover of the Oct. 12, 2007, issue of Science magazine.

  6. Digital cartography of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, Alfred S.; Duck, B.; Edwards, Kathleen

    1991-01-01

    A high resolution controlled mosaic of the hemisphere of Io centered on longitude 310 degrees is produced. Digital cartographic techniques were employed. Approximately 80 Voyager 1 clear and blue filter frames were utilized. This mosaic was merged with low-resolution color images. This dataset is compared to the geologic map of this region. Passage of the Voyager spacecraft through the Io plasma torus during acquisition of the highest resolution images exposed the vidicon detectors to ionized radiation, resulting in dark-current buildup on the vidicon. Because the vidicon is scanned from top to bottom, more charge accumulated toward the bottom of the frames, and the additive error increases from top to bottom as a ramp function. This ramp function was removed by using a model. Photometric normalizations were applied using the Minnaert function. An attempt to use Hapke's photometric function revealed that this function does not adequately describe Io's limb darkening at emission angles greater than 80 degrees. In contrast, the Minnaert function accurately describes the limb darkening up to emission angles of about 89 degrees. The improved set of discrete camera angles derived from this effort will be used in conjunction with the space telemetry pointing history file (the IPPS file), corrected on 4 or 12 second intervals to derive a revised time history for the pointing of the Infrared Interferometric Spectrometer (IRIS). For IRIS observations acquired between camera shutterings, the IPPS file can be corrected by linear interpolation, provided that the spacecraft motions were continuous. Image areas corresponding to the fields of view of IRIS spectra acquired between camera shutterings will be extracted from the mosaic to place the IRIS observations and hotspot models into geologic context.

  7. Adaptive Embedded Digital System for Plasma Diagnostics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González, Angel; Rodríguez, Othoniel; Mangual, Osvaldo; Ponce, Eduardo; Vélez, Xavier

    2014-05-01

    An Adaptive Embedded Digital System to perform plasma diagnostics using electrostatic probes was developed at the Plasma Engineering Laboratory at Polytechnic University of Puerto Rico. The system will replace the existing instrumentation at the Laboratory, using reconfigurable hardware to minimize the equipment and software needed to perform diagnostics. The adaptability of the design resides on the possibility of replacing the computational algorithm on the fly, allowing to use the same hardware for different probes. The system was prototyped using Very High Speed Integrated Circuits Hardware Description Language (VHDL) into an Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) board. The design of the Embedded Digital System includes a Zero Phase Digital Filter, a Derivative Unit, and a Computational Unit designed using the VHDL-2008 Support Library. The prototype is able to compute the Plasma Electron Temperature and Density from a Single Langmuir probe. The system was tested using real data previously acquired from a single Langmuir probe. The plasma parameters obtained from the embedded system were compared with results computed using matlab yielding excellent matching. The new embedded system operates on 4096 samples versus 500 on the previous system, and completes its computations in 26 milliseconds compared with about 15 seconds on the previous system.

  8. Prometheus: Io's wandering plume.

    PubMed

    Kieffer, S W; Lopes-Gautier, R; McEwen, A; Smythe, W; Keszthelyi, L; Carlson, R

    2000-05-19

    Unlike any volcanic behavior ever observed on Earth, the plume from Prometheus on Io has wandered 75 to 95 kilometers west over the last 20 years since it was first discovered by Voyager and more recently observed by Galileo. Despite the source motion, the geometric and optical properties of the plume have remained constant. We propose that this can be explained by vaporization of a sulfur dioxide and/or sulfur "snowfield" over which a lava flow is moving. Eruption of a boundary-layer slurry through a rootless conduit with sonic conditions at the intake of the melted snow can account for the constancy of plume properties.

  9. The effective I/O bandwidth benchmark (b{_}eff{_}io)

    SciTech Connect

    Koniges, A E; Rabehseifner, R

    2000-02-17

    The effective I/O bandwidth benchmark (b{_}eff{_}io) covers two goals: (1) to achieve a characteristic average number for the I/O bandwidth achievable with parallel MPI-I/O applications, and (2) to get detailed information about several access patterns and buffer lengths. The benchmark examines ''first write'', ''rewrite'' and ''read'' access, strided (individual and shared pointers) and segmented collective patterns on one file per application and non-collective access to one file per process. The number of parallel accessing processes is also varied and wellformed I/O is compared with non-wellformed. On systems, meeting the rule that the total memory can be written to disk in 10 minutes, the benchmark should not need more than 15 minutes for a first pass of all patterns. The benchmark is designed analogously to the effective bandwidth benchmark for message passing (b{_}eff) that characterizes the message passing capabilities of a system in a few minutes. First results of the b{_}elf{_}io benchmark are given for IBM SP and Cray T3E systems and compared with existing benchmarks based on parallel Posix-I/O.

  10. Adaptive Optics Imaging of Solar System Objects

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Roddier, Francois; Owen, Toby

    1997-01-01

    Most solar system objects have never been observed at wavelengths longer than the R band with an angular resolution better than 1 sec. The Hubble Space Telescope itself has only recently been equipped to observe in the infrared. However, because of its small diameter, the angular resolution is lower than that one can now achieved from the ground with adaptive optics, and time allocated to planetary science is limited. We have been using adaptive optics (AO) on a 4-m class telescope to obtain 0.1 sec resolution images solar system objects at far red and near infrared wavelengths (0.7-2.5 micron) which best discriminate their spectral signatures. Our efforts has been put into areas of research for which high angular resolution is essential, such as the mapping of Titan and of large asteroids, the dynamics and composition of Neptune stratospheric clouds, the infrared photometry of Pluto, Charon, and close satellites previously undetected from the ground.

  11. Demonstration of portable solar adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Deqing; Dong, Bing

    2012-10-01

    Solar-adaptive optics (AO) are more challenging than night-time AO, in some aspects. A portable solar adaptive optics (PSAO) system featuring compact physical size, low cost, and good performance has been proposed and developed. PSAO can serve as a visiting instrument for any existing ground-based solar telescope to improve solar image quality by replacing just a few optical components. High-level programming language, LabVIEW, is used to develop the wavefront sensing and control software, and general purpose computers are used to drive the whole system. During October 2011, the feasibility and good performance of PSAO was demonstrated with the 61-cm solar telescope at San Fernando Observatory. The image contrast and resolution are noticeably improved after AO correction.

  12. Adaptive control design for hysteretic smart systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Xiang; Smith, Ralph C.

    2009-03-01

    Ferroelectric and ferromagnetic actuators are being considered for a range of industrial, aerospace, aeronautic and biomedical applications due to their unique transduction capabilities. However, they also exhibit hysteretic and nonlinear behavior that must be accommodated in models and control designs. If uncompensated, these effects can yield reduced system performance and, in the worst case, can produce unpredictable behavior of the control system. One technique for control design is to approximately linearize the actuator dynamics using an adaptive inverse compensator that is also able to accommodate model uncertainties and error introduced by the inverse algorithm. This paper describes the design of an adaptive inverse control technique based on the homogenized energy model for hysteresis. The resulting inverse filter is incorporated in an L1 control theory to provide a robust control algorithm capable of providing high speed, high accuracy tracking in the presence of actuator hysteresis and nonlinearities. Properties of the control design are illustrated through numerical examples.

  13. Cyberspace: The Ultimate Complex Adaptive System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-04-05

    capable of a transaction with a given agent; tags also facilitate the formation of aggregates , or meta-agents. Meta-agents help distrib- ute and... Mbps or Gbps through communications links Path Roads, Rails, Flight Path, Sea- lanes Links, Connections Terrain Hills, Valleys, Urban Canyons... aggregate of many factors, both local and global. Unfit agents are more likely to instigate schema change. What is a Complex Adaptive System? This

  14. Adaptable radiation monitoring system and method

    DOEpatents

    Archer, Daniel E.; Beauchamp, Brock R.; Mauger, G. Joseph; Nelson, Karl E.; Mercer, Michael B.; Pletcher, David C.; Riot, Vincent J.; Schek, James L.; Knapp, David A.

    2006-06-20

    A portable radioactive-material detection system capable of detecting radioactive sources moving at high speeds. The system has at least one radiation detector capable of detecting gamma-radiation and coupled to an MCA capable of collecting spectral data in very small time bins of less than about 150 msec. A computer processor is connected to the MCA for determining from the spectral data if a triggering event has occurred. Spectral data is stored on a data storage device, and a power source supplies power to the detection system. Various configurations of the detection system may be adaptably arranged for various radiation detection scenarios. In a preferred embodiment, the computer processor operates as a server which receives spectral data from other networked detection systems, and communicates the collected data to a central data reporting system.

  15. Gaia as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed Central

    Lenton, Timothy M; van Oijen, Marcel

    2002-01-01

    We define the Gaia system of life and its environment on Earth, review the status of the Gaia theory, introduce potentially relevant concepts from complexity theory, then try to apply them to Gaia. We consider whether Gaia is a complex adaptive system (CAS) in terms of its behaviour and suggest that the system is self-organizing but does not reside in a critical state. Gaia has supported abundant life for most of the last 3.8 Gyr. Large perturbations have occasionally suppressed life but the system has always recovered without losing the capacity for large-scale free energy capture and recycling of essential elements. To illustrate how complexity theory can help us understand the emergence of planetary-scale order, we present a simple cellular automata (CA) model of the imaginary planet Daisyworld. This exhibits emergent self-regulation as a consequence of feedback coupling between life and its environment. Local spatial interaction, which was absent from the original model, can destabilize the system by generating bifurcation regimes. Variation and natural selection tend to remove this instability. With mutation in the model system, it exhibits self-organizing adaptive behaviour in its response to forcing. We close by suggesting how artificial life ('Alife') techniques may enable more comprehensive feasibility tests of Gaia. PMID:12079529

  16. Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems (CASOS) engineering environment.

    SciTech Connect

    Detry, Richard Joseph; Linebarger, John Michael; Finley, Patrick D.; Maffitt, S. Louise; Glass, Robert John, Jr.; Beyeler, Walter Eugene; Ames, Arlo Leroy

    2012-02-01

    Complex Adaptive Systems of Systems, or CASoS, are vastly complex physical-socio-technical systems which we must understand to design a secure future for the nation. The Phoenix initiative implements CASoS Engineering principles combining the bottom up Complex Systems and Complex Adaptive Systems view with the top down Systems Engineering and System-of-Systems view. CASoS Engineering theory and practice must be conducted together to develop a discipline that is grounded in reality, extends our understanding of how CASoS behave and allows us to better control the outcomes. The pull of applications (real world problems) is critical to this effort, as is the articulation of a CASoS Engineering Framework that grounds an engineering approach in the theory of complex adaptive systems of systems. Successful application of the CASoS Engineering Framework requires modeling, simulation and analysis (MS and A) capabilities and the cultivation of a CASoS Engineering Community of Practice through knowledge sharing and facilitation. The CASoS Engineering Environment, itself a complex adaptive system of systems, constitutes the two platforms that provide these capabilities.

  17. Social networks as embedded complex adaptive systems.

    PubMed

    Benham-Hutchins, Marge; Clancy, Thomas R

    2010-09-01

    As systems evolve over time, their natural tendency is to become increasingly more complex. Studies in the field of complex systems have generated new perspectives on management in social organizations such as hospitals. Much of this research appears as a natural extension of the cross-disciplinary field of systems theory. This is the 15th in a series of articles applying complex systems science to the traditional management concepts of planning, organizing, directing, coordinating, and controlling. In this article, the authors discuss healthcare social networks as a hierarchy of embedded complex adaptive systems. The authors further examine the use of social network analysis tools as a means to understand complex communication patterns and reduce medical errors.

  18. A Novel Location-Centric IoT-Cloud Based On-Street Car Parking Violation Management System in Smart Cities.

    PubMed

    Dinh, Thanh; Kim, Younghan

    2016-06-02

    Nowadays, in big cities, parking management is a critical issue from both the driver's side and the city government's side. From the driver's side, how to find an available parking lot in a city is a considerable concern. As a result, smart parking systems recently have received great interest, both in academia and industry. From the city government's side, how to manage and distribute such a limited public parking resource efficiently to give every visitor a fair chance of finding an on-street parking lot is also a considerable concern. However, existing studies of smart parking management focus only on assisting the driver's side to find available parking spaces. This study aims to raise a new perspective on such smart parking management and to propose a novel location-centric IoT-cloud-based parking violation management system. The system is designed to assist authoritative officers in finding parking violations easily and recommends the least cost path for officers so that officers can achieve their highest productivity in finding parking violations and issuing parking tickets. Experimental results show that the system not only improves the productivity of officers in finding parking violations and issuing tickets, but also helps reduce the traveling cost of officers and to reduce the average violation period of violating cars considerably.

  19. A Novel Location-Centric IoT-Cloud Based On-Street Car Parking Violation Management System in Smart Cities

    PubMed Central

    Dinh, Thanh; Kim, Younghan

    2016-01-01

    Nowadays, in big cities, parking management is a critical issue from both the driver’s side and the city government’s side. From the driver’s side, how to find an available parking lot in a city is a considerable concern. As a result, smart parking systems recently have received great interest, both in academia and industry. From the city government’s side, how to manage and distribute such a limited public parking resource efficiently to give every visitor a fair chance of finding an on-street parking lot is also a considerable concern. However, existing studies of smart parking management focus only on assisting the driver’s side to find available parking spaces. This study aims to raise a new perspective on such smart parking management and to propose a novel location-centric IoT-cloud-based parking violation management system. The system is designed to assist authoritative officers in finding parking violations easily and recommends the least cost path for officers so that officers can achieve their highest productivity in finding parking violations and issuing parking tickets. Experimental results show that the system not only improves the productivity of officers in finding parking violations and issuing tickets, but also helps reduce the traveling cost of officers and to reduce the average violation period of violating cars considerably. PMID:27271620

  20. Energy Efficient IoT Data Collection in Smart Cities Exploiting D2D Communications

    PubMed Central

    Orsino, Antonino; Araniti, Giuseppe; Militano, Leonardo; Alonso-Zarate, Jesus; Molinaro, Antonella; Iera, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Fifth Generation (5G) wireless systems are expected to connect an avalanche of “smart” objects disseminated from the largest “Smart City” to the smallest “Smart Home”. In this vision, Long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A) is deemed to play a fundamental role in the Internet of Things (IoT) arena providing a large coherent infrastructure and a wide wireless connectivity to the devices. However, since LTE-A was originally designed to support high data rates and large data size, novel solutions are required to enable an efficient use of radio resources to convey small data packets typically exchanged by IoT applications in “smart” environments. On the other hand, the typically high energy consumption required by cellular communications is a serious obstacle to large scale IoT deployments under cellular connectivity as in the case of Smart City scenarios. Network-assisted Device-to-Device (D2D) communications are considered as a viable solution to reduce the energy consumption for the devices. The particular approach presented in this paper consists in appointing one of the IoT smart devices as a collector of all data from a cluster of objects using D2D links, thus acting as an aggregator toward the eNodeB. By smartly adapting the Modulation and Coding Scheme (MCS) on the communication links, we will show it is possible to maximize the radio resource utilization as a function of the total amount of data to be sent. A further benefit that we will highlight is the possibility to reduce the transmission power when a more robust MCS is adopted. A comprehensive performance evaluation in a wide set of scenarios will testify the achievable gains in terms of energy efficiency and resource utilization in the envisaged D2D-based IoT data collection. PMID:27338385

  1. Energy Efficient IoT Data Collection in Smart Cities Exploiting D2D Communications.

    PubMed

    Orsino, Antonino; Araniti, Giuseppe; Militano, Leonardo; Alonso-Zarate, Jesus; Molinaro, Antonella; Iera, Antonio

    2016-06-08

    Fifth Generation (5G) wireless systems are expected to connect an avalanche of "smart" objects disseminated from the largest "Smart City" to the smallest "Smart Home". In this vision, Long Term Evolution-Advanced (LTE-A) is deemed to play a fundamental role in the Internet of Things (IoT) arena providing a large coherent infrastructure and a wide wireless connectivity to the devices. However, since LTE-A was originally designed to support high data rates and large data size, novel solutions are required to enable an efficient use of radio resources to convey small data packets typically exchanged by IoT applications in "smart" environments. On the other hand, the typically high energy consumption required by cellular communications is a serious obstacle to large scale IoT deployments under cellular connectivity as in the case of Smart City scenarios. Network-assisted Device-to-Device (D2D) communications are considered as a viable solution to reduce the energy consumption for the devices. The particular approach presented in this paper consists in appointing one of the IoT smart devices as a collector of all data from a cluster of objects using D2D links, thus acting as an aggregator toward the eNodeB. By smartly adapting the Modulation and Coding Scheme (MCS) on the communication links, we will show it is possible to maximize the radio resource utilization as a function of the total amount of data to be sent. A further benefit that we will highlight is the possibility to reduce the transmission power when a more robust MCS is adopted. A comprehensive performance evaluation in a wide set of scenarios will testify the achievable gains in terms of energy efficiency and resource utilization in the envisaged D2D-based IoT data collection.

  2. Progress with the lick adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D T; Olivier, S S; Bauman, B; Max, C E; Macintosh, B

    2000-03-01

    Progress and results of observations with the Lick Observatory Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System are presented. This system is optimized for diffraction-limited imaging in the near infrared, 1-2 micron wavelength bands. We describe our development efforts in a number of component areas including, a redesign of the optical bench layout, the commissioning of a new infrared science camera, and improvements to the software and user interface. There is also an ongoing effort to characterize the system performance with both natural and laser guide stars and to fold this data into a refined system model. Such a model can be used to help plan future observations, for example, predicting the point-spread function as a function of seeing and guide star magnitude.

  3. Progress with the Lick adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gavel, Donald T.; Olivier, Scot S.; Bauman, Brian J.; Max, Claire E.; Macintosh, Bruce A.

    2000-07-01

    Progress and results of observations with the Lick Observatory Laser Guide Star Adaptive Optics System are presented. This system is optimized for diffraction-limited imaging in the near infrared, 1 - 2 micron wavelength bands. We describe our development efforts in a number of component areas including, a redesign of the optical bench layout, the commissioning of a new infrared science camera, and improvements to the software and user interface. There is also an ongoing effort to characterize the system performance with both natural and laser guide stars and to fold this data into a refined system model. Such a model can be used to help plan future observations, for example, predicting the point-spread function as a function of seeing and guide star magnitude.

  4. The adaptive safety analysis and monitoring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, Haiying; Allanach, Jeffrey; Singh, Satnam; Pattipati, Krishna R.; Willett, Peter

    2004-09-01

    The Adaptive Safety Analysis and Monitoring (ASAM) system is a hybrid model-based software tool for assisting intelligence analysts to identify terrorist threats, to predict possible evolution of the terrorist activities, and to suggest strategies for countering terrorism. The ASAM system provides a distributed processing structure for gathering, sharing, understanding, and using information to assess and predict terrorist network states. In combination with counter-terrorist network models, it can also suggest feasible actions to inhibit potential terrorist threats. In this paper, we will introduce the architecture of the ASAM system, and discuss the hybrid modeling approach embedded in it, viz., Hidden Markov Models (HMMs) to detect and provide soft evidence on the states of terrorist network nodes based on partial and imperfect observations, and Bayesian networks (BNs) to integrate soft evidence from multiple HMMs. The functionality of the ASAM system is illustrated by way of application to the Indian Airlines Hijacking, as modeled from open sources.

  5. Adaptable data management for systems biology investigations

    PubMed Central

    Boyle, John; Rovira, Hector; Cavnor, Chris; Burdick, David; Killcoyne, Sarah; Shmulevich, Ilya

    2009-01-01

    Background Within research each experiment is different, the focus changes and the data is generated from a continually evolving barrage of technologies. There is a continual introduction of new techniques whose usage ranges from in-house protocols through to high-throughput instrumentation. To support these requirements data management systems are needed that can be rapidly built and readily adapted for new usage. Results The adaptable data management system discussed is designed to support the seamless mining and analysis of biological experiment data that is commonly used in systems biology (e.g. ChIP-chip, gene expression, proteomics, imaging, flow cytometry). We use different content graphs to represent different views upon the data. These views are designed for different roles: equipment specific views are used to gather instrumentation information; data processing oriented views are provided to enable the rapid development of analysis applications; and research project specific views are used to organize information for individual research experiments. This management system allows for both the rapid introduction of new types of information and the evolution of the knowledge it represents. Conclusion Data management is an important aspect of any research enterprise. It is the foundation on which most applications are built, and must be easily extended to serve new functionality for new scientific areas. We have found that adopting a three-tier architecture for data management, built around distributed standardized content repositories, allows us to rapidly develop new applications to support a diverse user community. PMID:19265554

  6. Pele Plume Deposit on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The varied effects of Ionian volcanism can be seen in this false color infrared composite image of Io's trailing hemisphere. Low resolution color data from Galileo's first orbit (June, 1996) have been combined with a higher resolution clear filter picture taken on the third orbit (November, 1996) of the spacecraft around Jupiter.

    A diffuse ring of bright red material encircles Pele, the site of an ongoing, high velocity volcanic eruption. Pele's plume is nearly invisible, except in back-lit photographs, but its deposits indicate energetic ejection of sulfurous materials out to distances more than 600 kilometers from the central vent. Another bright red deposit lies adjacent to Marduk, also a currently active ediface. High temperature hot spots have been detected at both these locations, due to the eruption of molten material in lava flows or lava lakes. Bright red deposits on Io darken and disappear within years or decades of deposition, so the presence of bright red materials marks the sites of recent volcanism.

    This composite was created from data obtained by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The region imaged is centered on 15 degrees South, 224 degrees West, and is almost 2400 kilometers across. The finest details that can be discerned in this picture are about 3 kilometers across. North is towards the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the west.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  7. An Intelligent Tutoring System Approach to Adaptive Instructional Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    gr prototypes (scripts) (Schank, 1977). Many software systems have been developed that employ these representations. Many instructional theories and...specific performance or skill-acquisition. However, there are many theories about the number and type of these general abilities. Researchers...Computer Generated Forces and Behavioral Representations. 7.1.2 Role of MAMID in an Adaptive Instructional System Motivation Currently, the student

  8. Adaptive system for eye-fundus imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Larichev, A V; Ivanov, P V; Iroshnikov, N G; Shmalgauzen, V I; Otten, L J

    2002-10-31

    A compact adaptive system capable of imaging a human-eye retina with a spatial resolution as high as 6 {mu}m and a field of view of 15{sup 0} is developed. It is shown that a modal bimorph corrector with nonlocalised response functions provides the efficient suppression of dynamic aberrations of a human eye. The residual root-mean-square error in correction of aberrations of a real eye with nonparalysed accommodation lies in the range of 0.1 - 0.15 {mu}m.

  9. Geophysical implications of Io limb profile data

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nimmo, F.; Thomas, P. C.

    2013-12-01

    Limb profiles can be used both to determine a body's long-wavelength shape, and to infer its averaged elastic thickness [1]. Here we apply previously-developed techniques [1] to analyze Galileo limb profiles for Io [2], for comparison with control-point network analysis [3]. We determine Io's long-wavelength topography at spherical harmonic degrees 3 and 4. The amplitude of the topography is +/- 0.5 km, small compared to the degree-2 (tidal and rotational) shape. The l=4 components contain 4 times more power than l=3, consistent with tidal heating playing a role in producing topography [e.g. 4]. However, the topographic pattern is anti-symmetric about the equator, which is not expected from tidal models. Nor does the topography correlate with the global pattern of volcanoes and mountains [5]. The variation in limb profile roughness with wavelength can be used to infer an elastic thickness [1,6]. In the case of Io, despite local mountains, overall the topography is quite smooth. The highest-resolution limb profiles suggest an elastic thickness of about 50 km, higher than that of other outer solar system satellites [1]. This value is consistent with previous estimates based on the existence of mountains [7] and expectations of a thick, cold lid resulting from Io's heat loss being dominated by erupting melt [8]. [1] Nimmo et al. JGR 2011 [2] Thomas et al. Icarus 1998 [3] Oberst and Schuster JGR 2004 [4] Ross et al. Icarus 1990 [5] Kirchoff et al. EPSL 2011 [6] Araki et al. Science 2009 [7] Carr et al. Icarus 1998 [8] O'Reilly and Davies GRL 1981 Io long-wavelength topography, obtained from limb profile data and expanded from l=m=3 to l=m=4. Contour interval 0.1 km.

  10. NASA Facts: Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chartres, James; Cappuccio, Gelsomina

    2013-01-01

    The Nanosatellite Launch Adapter System (NLAS) was developed to increase access to space while simplifying the integration process of miniature satellites, called nanosats or cubesats, onto launch vehicles. A standard cubesat measures about 4inches (10 cm) long, 4 inches wide,and 4 inches high, and is called a one-unit (1U) cubesat. A single NLAS provides the capability to deploy 24U of cubesats. The system is designed to accommodate satellites measuring 1U, 1.5U, 2U, 3U and 6U sizes for deployment into orbit. The NLAS may be configured for use on different launch vehicles. The system also enables flight demonstrations of new technologies in the space environment.

  11. Alice Views Jupiter and Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This graphic illustrates the pointing and shows the data from one of many observations made by the New Horizons Alice ultraviolet spectrometer (UVS) instrument during the Pluto-bound spacecraft's recent encounter with Jupiter. The red lines in the graphic show the scale, orientation, and position of the combined 'box and slot' field of view of the Alice UVS during this observation.

    The positions of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, the torus of ionized gas from Io, and Jupiter are shown relative to the Alice field of view. Like a prism, the spectrometer separates light from these targets into its constituent wavelengths.

    Io's volcanoes produce an extremely tenuous atmosphere made up primarily of sulfur dioxide gas, which, in the harsh plasma environment at Io, breaks down into its component sulfur and oxygen atoms. Alice observed the auroral glow from these atoms in Io's atmosphere and their ionized counterparts in the Io torus.

    Io's dayside is deliberately overexposed to bring out faint details in the plumes and on the moon's night side. The continuing eruption of the volcano Tvashtar, at the 1 o'clock position, produces an enormous plume roughly 330 kilometers (200 miles) high, which is illuminated both by sunlight and 'Jupiter light.'

  12. Adaptive Decision Aiding in Computer-Assisted Instruction: Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopf-Weichel, Rosemarie; And Others

    This report describes results of the first year of a three-year program to develop and evaluate a new Adaptive Computerized Training System (ACTS) for electronics maintenance training. (ACTS incorporates an adaptive computer program that learns the student's diagnostic and decision value structure, compares it to that of an expert, and adapts the…

  13. The Adaptive Immune System of Haloferax volcanii.

    PubMed

    Maier, Lisa-Katharina; Dyall-Smith, Mike; Marchfelder, Anita

    2015-02-16

    To fight off invading genetic elements, prokaryotes have developed an elaborate defence system that is both adaptable and heritable-the CRISPR-Cas system (CRISPR is short for: clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats and Cas: CRISPR associated). Comprised of proteins and multiple small RNAs, this prokaryotic defence system is present in 90% of archaeal and 40% of bacterial species, and enables foreign intruders to be eliminated in a sequence-specific manner. There are three major types (I-III) and at least 14 subtypes of this system, with only some of the subtypes having been analysed in detail, and many aspects of the defence reaction remaining to be elucidated. Few archaeal examples have so far been analysed. Here we summarize the characteristics of the CRISPR-Cas system of Haloferax volcanii, an extremely halophilic archaeon originally isolated from the Dead Sea. It carries a single CRISPR-Cas system of type I-B, with a Cascade like complex composed of Cas proteins Cas5, Cas6b and Cas7. Cas6b is essential for CRISPR RNA (crRNA) maturation but is otherwise not required for the defence reaction. A systematic search revealed that six protospacer adjacent motif (PAM) sequences are recognised by the Haloferax defence system. For successful invader recognition, a non-contiguous seed sequence of 10 base-pairs between the crRNA and the invader is required.

  14. Adaptable formations utilizing heterogeneous unmanned systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Laura E.; Garcia, Richard; Fields, MaryAnne; Valavanis, Kimon

    2009-05-01

    This paper addresses the problem of controlling and coordinating heterogeneous unmanned systems required to move as a group while maintaining formation. We propose a strategy to coordinate groups of unmanned ground vehicles (UGVs) with one or more unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs). UAVs can be utilized in one of two ways: (1) as alpha robots to guide the UGVs; and (2) as beta robots to surround the UGVs and adapt accordingly. In the first approach, the UAV guides a swarm of UGVs controlling their overall formation. In the second approach, the UGVs guide the UAVs controlling their formation. The unmanned systems are brought into a formation utilizing artificial potential fields generated from normal and sigmoid functions. These functions control the overall swarm geometry. Nonlinear limiting functions are defined to provide tighter swarm control by modifying and adjusting a set of control variables forcing the swarm to behave according to set constraints. Formations derived are subsets of elliptical curves but can be generalized to any curvilinear shape. Both approaches are demonstrated in simulation and experimentally. To demonstrate the second approach in simulation, a swarm of forty UAVs is utilized in a convoy protection mission. As a convoy of UGVs travels, UAVs dynamically and intelligently adapt their formation in order to protect the convoy of vehicles as it moves. Experimental results are presented to demonstrate the approach using a fully autonomous group of three UGVs and a single UAV helicopter for coordination.

  15. Adaptive cyber-attack modeling system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonsalves, Paul G.; Dougherty, Edward T.

    2006-05-01

    The pervasiveness of software and networked information systems is evident across a broad spectrum of business and government sectors. Such reliance provides an ample opportunity not only for the nefarious exploits of lone wolf computer hackers, but for more systematic software attacks from organized entities. Much effort and focus has been placed on preventing and ameliorating network and OS attacks, a concomitant emphasis is required to address protection of mission critical software. Typical software protection technique and methodology evaluation and verification and validation (V&V) involves the use of a team of subject matter experts (SMEs) to mimic potential attackers or hackers. This manpower intensive, time-consuming, and potentially cost-prohibitive approach is not amenable to performing the necessary multiple non-subjective analyses required to support quantifying software protection levels. To facilitate the evaluation and V&V of software protection solutions, we have designed and developed a prototype adaptive cyber attack modeling system. Our approach integrates an off-line mechanism for rapid construction of Bayesian belief network (BN) attack models with an on-line model instantiation, adaptation and knowledge acquisition scheme. Off-line model construction is supported via a knowledge elicitation approach for identifying key domain requirements and a process for translating these requirements into a library of BN-based cyber-attack models. On-line attack modeling and knowledge acquisition is supported via BN evidence propagation and model parameter learning.

  16. Congestion based mechanism for route discovery in a V2I-V2V system applying smart devices and IoT.

    PubMed

    Parrado, Natalia; Donoso, Yezid

    2015-03-31

    The Internet of Things is a new paradigm in which objects in a specific context can be integrated into traditional communication networks to actively participate in solving a determined problem. The Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) technologies are specific cases of IoT and key enablers for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). V2V and V2I have been widely used to solve different problems associated with transportation in cities, in which the most important is traffic congestion. A high percentage of congestion is usually presented by the inappropriate use of resources in vehicular infrastructure. In addition, the integration of traffic congestion in decision making for vehicular traffic is a challenge due to its high dynamic behavior. In this paper, an optimization model over the load balancing in the congestion percentage of the streets is formulated. Later, we explore a fully congestion-oriented route discovery mechanism and we make a proposal on the communication infrastructure that should support it based on V2I and V2V communication. The mechanism is also compared with a modified Dijkstra's approach that reacts at congestion states. Finally, we compare the results of the efficiency of the vehicle's trip with the efficiency in the use of the capacity of the vehicular network.

  17. Congestion Based Mechanism for Route Discovery in a V2I-V2V System Applying Smart Devices and IoT

    PubMed Central

    Parrado, Natalia; Donoso, Yezid

    2015-01-01

    The Internet of Things is a new paradigm in which objects in a specific context can be integrated into traditional communication networks to actively participate in solving a determined problem. The Vehicle-to-Vehicle (V2V) and Vehicle-to-Infrastructure (V2I) technologies are specific cases of IoT and key enablers for Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS). V2V and V2I have been widely used to solve different problems associated with transportation in cities, in which the most important is traffic congestion. A high percentage of congestion is usually presented by the inappropriate use of resources in vehicular infrastructure. In addition, the integration of traffic congestion in decision making for vehicular traffic is a challenge due to its high dynamic behavior. In this paper, an optimization model over the load balancing in the congestion percentage of the streets is formulated. Later, we explore a fully congestion-oriented route discovery mechanism and we make a proposal on the communication infrastructure that should support it based on V2I and V2V communication. The mechanism is also compared with a modified Dijkstra’s approach that reacts at congestion states. Finally, we compare the results of the efficiency of the vehicle’s trip with the efficiency in the use of the capacity of the vehicular network. PMID:25835185

  18. Adaptive automatic balancing of magnetic bearing systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jong-Sun

    Rotating machinery including magnetic bearings are usually persistently excited by the rotation related disturbances such as mass unbalance; hence there exists a residual vibration in the steady state response even if the closed loop system is asymptotically stable. In order to control the periodic disturbances, a disturbance accommodating controller (DAC) is designed based on the disturbance estimator and applied to the forced balancing of magnetic bearing system. The control objective is to minimize the synchronous component of shaft displacement or control current. In order to account for the variation of the disturbance model due to the shaft of operating speed, an adaptive disturbance accommodating control scheme is developed based on a certain optimality criterion. The continuous time design discretized to implement the controller in the digital computer and the merits and demerits are studied numerically. It is shown that the proposed method is efficient in reducing rotor unbalance and automatic balancing.

  19. Contrarian behavior in a complex adaptive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liang, Y.; An, K. N.; Yang, G.; Huang, J. P.

    2013-01-01

    Contrarian behavior is a kind of self-organization in complex adaptive systems (CASs). Here we report the existence of a transition point in a model resource-allocation CAS with contrarian behavior by using human experiments, computer simulations, and theoretical analysis. The resource ratio and system predictability serve as the tuning parameter and order parameter, respectively. The transition point helps to reveal the positive or negative role of contrarian behavior. This finding is in contrast to the common belief that contrarian behavior always has a positive role in resource allocation, say, stabilizing resource allocation by shrinking the redundancy or the lack of resources. It is further shown that resource allocation can be optimized at the transition point by adding an appropriate size of contrarians. This work is also expected to be of value to some other fields ranging from management and social science to ecology and evolution.

  20. Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Masek, Jeffrey G.

    2006-01-01

    The Landsat Ecosystem Disturbance Adaptive Processing System (LEDAPS) project is creating a record of forest disturbance and regrowth for North America from the Landsat satellite record, in support of the carbon modeling activities. LEDAPS relies on the decadal Landsat GeoCover data set supplemented by dense image time series for selected locations. Imagery is first atmospherically corrected to surface reflectance, and then change detection algorithms are used to extract disturbance area, type, and frequency. Reuse of the MODIS Land processing system (MODAPS) architecture allows rapid throughput of over 2200 MSS, TM, and ETM+ scenes. Initial ("Beta") surface reflectance products are currently available for testing, and initial continental disturbance products will be available by the middle of 2006.

  1. Contrarian behavior in a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Liang, Y; An, K N; Yang, G; Huang, J P

    2013-01-01

    Contrarian behavior is a kind of self-organization in complex adaptive systems (CASs). Here we report the existence of a transition point in a model resource-allocation CAS with contrarian behavior by using human experiments, computer simulations, and theoretical analysis. The resource ratio and system predictability serve as the tuning parameter and order parameter, respectively. The transition point helps to reveal the positive or negative role of contrarian behavior. This finding is in contrast to the common belief that contrarian behavior always has a positive role in resource allocation, say, stabilizing resource allocation by shrinking the redundancy or the lack of resources. It is further shown that resource allocation can be optimized at the transition point by adding an appropriate size of contrarians. This work is also expected to be of value to some other fields ranging from management and social science to ecology and evolution.

  2. Extending I/O through High Performance Data Services

    SciTech Connect

    Abbasi, H.; Lofstead, J.; Zheng, Fang; Klasky, Scott A; Schwan, Karsten

    2009-08-01

    The complexity of HPC systems has increased the burden on the developer as applications scale to hundreds of thousands of processing cores. Moreover, additional efforts are required to achieve acceptable I/O performance, where it is important how I/O is performed, which resources are used, and where I/O functionality is deployed. Specifically, by scheduling I/O data movement and by effectively placing operators affecting data volumes or information about the data, tremendous gains can be achieved both in the performance of simulation output and in the usability of output data. Previous studies have shown the value of using asynchronous I/O, of employing a staging area, and of performing select operations on data before it is written to disk. Leveraging such insights, this paper develops and experiments with higher level I/O abstractions, termed 'data services', that manage output data from 'source to sink': where/when it is captured, transported towards storage, and filtered or manipulated by service functions to improve its information content. Useful services include data reduction, data indexing, and those that manage how I/O is performed, i.e., the control aspects of data movement. Our data services implementation distinguishes control aspects - the control plane - from data movement - the data plane, so that both may be changed separably. This results in runtime flexibility not only in which services to employ, but also in where to deploy them and how they use I/O resources. The outcome is consistently high levels of I/O performance at large scale, without requiring application change.

  3. Relationship between Jovian Hectometric Attenuation Lanes And Io Volcanic Activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Menietti, J. D.; Gurnett, D. A.; Spencer, J. R.; Stansberry, J. A.

    2001-01-01

    Within the Galileo plasma wave instrument data a narrow (in frequency) attenuation band is seen in the hectometric (HOM) emission that varies in frequency with system III longitude. This attenuation lane is believed to be the result of near-grazing incidence or coherent scattering of radio emission near the outer edge of the Io torus, i.e., when the ray path is nearly tangent to an L shell containing the Io flux tube. Such a process should, therefore, be enhanced when the Io volcanic activity is increased and the Io flux tube has enhanced density. We have performed a systematic study of the existing Galileo radio emission data in an effort to determine the phenomenology and frequency of occurrence of the attenuation lanes and the association, if any, with published volcanic activity of Io. Our results indicate that the attenuation lanes are present almost all of the time but are enhanced on occasion. The best examples of attenuation lanes occur when Galileo is within approximately 65 R(sub J) of Jupiter and thus are probably more apparent because of the increased signal-to-noise ratio of the radio receivers. The lack of continuous monitoring of Io activity and the lack of known activity on the anti-Earthward side of Io are problematic and make detailed correlation with radio emission very difficult at this time. Nevertheless, if the data are displayed for periods when the spacecraft is within 65 R(sub J) (i.e., for each perijove pass), then the highest-contrast lanes occur on most passes when the Io volcanic activity is also high for that pass. These results support our current understanding of attenuation lane formation and suggest that future efforts can be made to better understand the interaction of HOM emission with the Io flux tube.

  4. EDONIO: Extended distributed object network I/O library

    SciTech Connect

    D`Azevedo, E.F.; Romine, C.H.

    1995-03-01

    This report describes EDONIO (Extended Distributed Object Network I/O), an enhanced version of DONIO (Distributed Object Network I/O Library) optimized for the Intel Paragon Systems using the new M-ASYNC access mode. DONIO provided fast file I/O capabilities in the Intel iPSC/860 and Paragon distributed memory parallel environments by caching a copy of the entire file in memory distributed across all processors. EDONIO is more memory efficient by caching only a subset of the disk file at a time. DONIO was restricted by the high memory requirements and use of 32-bit integer indexing to handle files no larger than 2 Gigabytes. EDONIO overcomes this barrier by using the extended integer library routines provided by Intel`s NX operating system. For certain applications, EDONIO may show a ten-fold improvement in performance over the native NX I/O routines.

  5. Jupiter's moon Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    This picture shows a special color reconstruction of one of the erupting volcanos on Io discovered by Voyager 1 during its encounter with Jupiter on the 4th and 5th of March. The picture was taken March 4 about 5:00 p.m. from a range of about half a million kilometers showing an eruption region on the horizon. This method of color analysis allows scientists to combine data from four pictures, taken in ultraviolet, blue, green and orange light. In this picture one can see the strong change in color of the erupting plume. The region that is brighter in ultraviolet light (blue in this image) is much more extensive than the denser, bright yellow region near the center of the eruption. Scientists will use data of this type to study the amount of gas and dust in the eruption and the size of dust particles. Preliminary analysis suggests that the bright ultraviolet part of the cloud may be due to scattered light from very fine particles (the same effect which makes smoke appear bluish).

  6. Flipping Adapters for Space Launch System

    NASA Video Gallery

    The structural test article adapter is flipped at Marshall testing facility Building 4705. The turnover is an important step in finishing the machining work on the adapter, which will undergo tests...

  7. The Limits to Adaptation: A Systems Approach

    EPA Science Inventory

    The ability to adapt to climate change is delineated by capacity thresholds, after which climate damages begin to overwhelm the adaptation response. Such thresholds depend upon physical properties (natural processes and engineering parameters), resource constraints (expressed th...

  8. Intercellular Communication in the Adaptive Immune System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Arup

    2004-03-01

    Higher organisms, like humans, have an adaptive immune system that can respond to pathogens that have not been encountered before. T lymphocytes (T cells) are the orchestrators of the adaptive immune response. They interact with cells, called antigen presenting cells (APC), that display molecular signatures of pathogens. Recently, video microscopy experiments have revealed that when T cells detect antigen on APC surfaces, a spatially patterned supramolecular assembly of different types of molecules forms in the junction between cell membranes. This recognition motif is implicated in information transfer between APC and T cells, and so, is labeled the immunological synapse. The observation of synapse formation sparked two broad questions: How does the synapse form? Why does the synapse form? I will describe progress made in answering these fundamental questions in biology by synergistic use of statistical mechanical theory/computation, chemical engineering principles, and genetic and biochemical experiments. The talk will also touch upon mechanisms that may underlie the extreme sensitivity with which T cells discriminate between self and non-self.

  9. Io's volcanic influence on the Io plasma torus: HISAKI observation in 2015

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsuchiya, F.; Yoshioka, K.; Kimura, T.; Murakami, G.; Yoneda, M.; Koga, R.; Kagitani, M.; Sakanoi, T.; Kasaba, Y.; Yamazaki, A.; Yoshikawa, I.

    2015-12-01

    The satellite Io which has many active volcanos supplies volcanic gases to the Jovian magnetosphere with typical rate of 1 ton/sec and has been known be a primary source of plasmas in the magnetosphere. Change in the volcanic activity on Io should cause change of the supply rate and could affect structure of the magnetosphere and dynamics occurs in it. However, responses of the magnetosphere to the volcanic activity is still not fully understood; one of the reasons is lack of continuous and long term observations of Io' volcanic gas extended around Io, plasmas in the Io torus, and activity of the magnetosphere. The extreme ultraviolet (EUV) spectroscope, EXCEED, onboard the HISAKI satellite has capability to measure ion and atomic emission lines in EUV range (55-145nm) and is dedicated to observing solar system planets. The satellite has been successfully launched on Sep. 2013 and 2nd campaign of Io plasma torus and Jovian northern EUV aurora observation has been done from the end of Nov. 2014 to middle of May 2015. On middle of Jan. 2015, HISAKI detected gradual increase in intensity of S+ emission lines and decrease of S3+ ones in the plasma torus. The S+ intensity showed a maximum around the end of Feb. and S++ and S3+ intensities also showed maxima subsequently. Simultaneous ground based observation of the sodium nebula showed increase of the emission intensity from the middle of Jan. to the beginning of Mar. These observations suggest that the volcanic activity began at the middle of Jan. and increase neutral atom and ion densities in the Io torus. The intensities of S+ and S2+ ions returned to the pre-increase level by the middle of May 2015. S3+ had still been in the decay phase at the end of the observation. Change in radial structure of the plasma torus was also found during the volcanic event. The intensity of S+ ion began to increase around the orbit of Io (6 Jovian radii). The brightened region propagated outward and reached at 8.5 Jovian radii from

  10. Polar Heat Flow on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.; Davies, A. G.; Blaney, D. L.

    2003-01-01

    Recently, Galileo spacecraft data have revealed Io's polar regions to be much warmer than previously expected. This unexpected development came from Photo-Polarimeter Radiometer (PPR) data which show that the minimum night temperatures are in the range of 90-95 K virtually everywhere on Io. The minimum night temperatures show no dependence upon latitude and, when away from the sunset terminator, they show no dependence upon time of night. This is indeed bizarre behavior for surface units which generally had been assumed to be passive with respect to Io's pervasive volcanism. Night temperatures of 90-95 K at high, polar latitudes are particularly hard to explain. Even assuming infinite thermal inertia, at these latitudes there is insufficient sunlight to support these warm night temperatures. Thus, through the process of elimination of other possibilities, we come to the conclusion that these surfaces are volcanically heated. Taking previously passive units and turning them into new sources of heat flow is a radical departure from previous thermophysical model paradigms. However, the geological interpretation is straight forward. We are simply seeing the effect of old, cool lava flows which cover most of the surface of Io but yet have some heat to radiate. Under these new constraints, we have taken on the challenge of formulating a physical model which quantitatively reproduces all of the observations of Io's thermal emission. In the following we introduce a new parametric model which suffices to identify a previously unrecognized polar component of Io's heat flow.

  11. Simulation of DKIST solar adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marino, Jose; Carlisle, Elizabeth; Schmidt, Dirk

    2016-07-01

    Solar adaptive optics (AO) simulations are a valuable tool to guide the design and optimization process of current and future solar AO and multi-conjugate AO (MCAO) systems. Solar AO and MCAO systems rely on extended object cross-correlating Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensors to measure the wavefront. Accurate solar AO simulations require computationally intensive operations, which have until recently presented a prohibitive computational cost. We present an update on the status of a solar AO and MCAO simulation tool being developed at the National Solar Observatory. The simulation tool is a multi-threaded application written in the C++ language that takes advantage of current large multi-core CPU computer systems and fast ethernet connections to provide accurate full simulation of solar AO and MCAO systems. It interfaces with KAOS, a state of the art solar AO control software developed by the Kiepenheuer-Institut fuer Sonnenphysik, that provides reliable AO control. We report on the latest results produced by the solar AO simulation tool.

  12. Multiclient Identification System Using Adaptive Probabilistic Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Chin-Teng; Siana, Linda; Shou, Yu-Wen; Yang, Chien-Ting

    2010-12-01

    This paper aims at integrating detection and identification of human faces in a more practical and real-time face recognition system. The proposed face detection system is based on the cascade Adaboost method to improve the precision and robustness toward unstable surrounding lightings. Our Adaboost method innovates to adjust the environmental lighting conditions by histogram lighting normalization and to accurately locate the face regions by a region-based-clustering process as well. We also address on the problem of multi-scale faces in this paper by using 12 different scales of searching windows and 5 different orientations for each client in pursuit of the multi-view independent face identification. There are majorly two methodological parts in our face identification system, including PCA (principal component analysis) facial feature extraction and adaptive probabilistic model (APM). The structure of our implemented APM with a weighted combination of simple probabilistic functions constructs the likelihood functions by the probabilistic constraint in the similarity measures. In addition, our proposed method can online add a new client and update the information of registered clients due to the constructed APM. The experimental results eventually show the superior performance of our proposed system for both offline and real-time online testing.

  13. Herd behavior in a complex adaptive system

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Li; Yang, Guang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Yu; Huang, J. P.; Ohashi, Hirotada; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2011-01-01

    In order to survive, self-serving agents in various kinds of complex adaptive systems (CASs) must compete against others for sharing limited resources with biased or unbiased distribution by conducting strategic behaviors. This competition can globally result in the balance of resource allocation. As a result, most of the agents and species can survive well. However, it is a common belief that the formation of a herd in a CAS will cause excess volatility, which can ruin the balance of resource allocation in the CAS. Here this belief is challenged with the results obtained from a modeled resource-allocation system. Based on this system, we designed and conducted a series of computer-aided human experiments including herd behavior. We also performed agent-based simulations and theoretical analyses, in order to confirm the experimental observations and reveal the underlying mechanism. We report that, as long as the ratio of the two resources for allocation is biased enough, the formation of a typically sized herd can help the system to reach the balanced state. This resource ratio also serves as the critical point for a class of phase transition identified herein, which can be used to discover the role change of herd behavior, from a ruinous one to a helpful one. This work is also of value to some fields, ranging from management and social science, to ecology and evolution, and to physics. PMID:21876133

  14. Herd behavior in a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li; Yang, Guang; Wang, Wei; Chen, Yu; Huang, J P; Ohashi, Hirotada; Stanley, H Eugene

    2011-09-13

    In order to survive, self-serving agents in various kinds of complex adaptive systems (CASs) must compete against others for sharing limited resources with biased or unbiased distribution by conducting strategic behaviors. This competition can globally result in the balance of resource allocation. As a result, most of the agents and species can survive well. However, it is a common belief that the formation of a herd in a CAS will cause excess volatility, which can ruin the balance of resource allocation in the CAS. Here this belief is challenged with the results obtained from a modeled resource-allocation system. Based on this system, we designed and conducted a series of computer-aided human experiments including herd behavior. We also performed agent-based simulations and theoretical analyses, in order to confirm the experimental observations and reveal the underlying mechanism. We report that, as long as the ratio of the two resources for allocation is biased enough, the formation of a typically sized herd can help the system to reach the balanced state. This resource ratio also serves as the critical point for a class of phase transition identified herein, which can be used to discover the role change of herd behavior, from a ruinous one to a helpful one. This work is also of value to some fields, ranging from management and social science, to ecology and evolution, and to physics.

  15. Adaptive model training system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, Randall L; Palnitkar, Rahul M; Lee, Vo

    2014-04-15

    An adaptive model training system and method for filtering asset operating data values acquired from a monitored asset for selectively choosing asset operating data values that meet at least one predefined criterion of good data quality while rejecting asset operating data values that fail to meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality; and recalibrating a previously trained or calibrated model having a learned scope of normal operation of the asset by utilizing the asset operating data values that meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality for adjusting the learned scope of normal operation of the asset for defining a recalibrated model having the adjusted learned scope of normal operation of the asset.

  16. Adaptive model training system and method

    DOEpatents

    Bickford, Randall L; Palnitkar, Rahul M

    2014-11-18

    An adaptive model training system and method for filtering asset operating data values acquired from a monitored asset for selectively choosing asset operating data values that meet at least one predefined criterion of good data quality while rejecting asset operating data values that fail to meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality; and recalibrating a previously trained or calibrated model having a learned scope of normal operation of the asset by utilizing the asset operating data values that meet at least the one predefined criterion of good data quality for adjusting the learned scope of normal operation of the asset for defining a recalibrated model having the adjusted learned scope of normal operation of the asset.

  17. Intelligent Optical Systems Using Adaptive Optics

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Until recently, the phrase adaptive optics generally conjured images of large deformable mirrors being integrated into telescopes to compensate for atmospheric turbulence. However, the development of smaller, cheaper devices has sparked interest for other aerospace and commercial applications. Variable focal length lenses, liquid crystal spatial light modulators, tunable filters, phase compensators, polarization compensation, and deformable mirrors are becoming increasingly useful for other imaging applications including guidance navigation and control (GNC), coronagraphs, foveated imaging, situational awareness, autonomous rendezvous and docking, non-mechanical zoom, phase diversity, and enhanced multi-spectral imaging. The active components presented here allow flexibility in the optical design, increasing performance. In addition, the intelligent optical systems presented offer advantages in size and weight and radiation tolerance.

  18. Simulating Astronomical Adaptive Optics Systems Using Yao

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rigaut, François; Van Dam, Marcos

    2013-12-01

    Adaptive Optics systems are at the heart of the coming Extremely Large Telescopes generation. Given the importance, complexity and required advances of these systems, being able to simulate them faithfully is key to their success, and thus to the success of the ELTs. The type of systems envisioned to be built for the ELTs cover most of the AO breeds, from NGS AO to multiple guide star Ground Layer, Laser Tomography and Multi-Conjugate AO systems, with typically a few thousand actuators. This represents a large step up from the current generation of AO systems, and accordingly a challenge for existing AO simulation packages. This is especially true as, in the past years, computer power has not been following Moore's law in its most common understanding; CPU clocks are hovering at about 3GHz. Although the use of super computers is a possible solution to run these simulations, being able to use smaller machines has obvious advantages: cost, access, environmental issues. By using optimised code in an already proven AO simulation platform, we were able to run complex ELT AO simulations on very modest machines, including laptops. The platform is YAO. In this paper, we describe YAO, its architecture, its capabilities, the ELT-specific challenges and optimisations, and finally its performance. As an example, execution speed ranges from 5 iterations per second for a 6 LGS 60x60 subapertures Shack-Hartmann Wavefront sensor Laser Tomography AO system (including full physical image formation and detector characteristics) up to over 30 iterations/s for a single NGS AO system.

  19. Topography and Volcanoes on Io (color)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    The images used to create this enhanced color composite of Io were acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft during its seventh orbit (G7) of Jupiter. Low sun angles near the terminator (day-night boundary near the left side of the image) offer lighting conditions which emphasize the topography or relief on the volcanic satellite. The topography appears very flat near the active volcanic centers such as Loki Patera (the large dark horse-shoe shaped feature near the terminator) while a variety of mountains and plateaus exist elsewhere. The big reddish-orange ring in the lower right is formed by material deposited from the eruption of Pele, Io's largest volcanic plume.

    North is to the top of this picture which merges images obtained with the clear, red, green, and violet filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The resolution is 6.1 kilometers per picture element. The images were taken on April 4th, 1997 at a range of 600,000 kilometers.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    Concurrent results from Galileo's exploration of Io appear in the October 15th, 1997 issue of Geophysical Research Letters. The papers are: Temperature and Area Constraints of the South Volund Volcano on Io from the NIMS and SSI Instruments during the Galileo G1 Orbit, by A.G. Davies, A.S. McEwen, R. Lopes-Gautier, L. Keszthelyi, R.W. Carlson and W.D. Smythe. High-temperature hot spots on Io as seen by the Galileo Solid-State Imaging (SSI) experiment, by A. McEwen, D. Simonelli, D. Senske, K. Klassen, L. Keszthelyi, T. Johnson, P. Geissler, M. Carr, and M. Belton. Io: Galileo evidence for major variations in regolith properties, by D. Simonelli, J. Veverka, and A. McEwen.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home

  20. Cassini observations of Io's visible aurorae

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Geissler, P.; McEwen, A.; Porco, C.; Strobel, D.; Saur, J.; Ajello, J.; West, R.

    2004-01-01

    More than 500 images of Io in eclipse were acquired by the Cassini spacecraft in late 2000 and early 2001 as it passed through the jovian system en route to Saturn (Porco et al., 2003, Science 299, 1541-1547). Io's bright equatorial glows were detected in Cassini's near-ultraviolet filters, supporting the interpretation that the visible emissions are predominantly due to molecular SO2. Detailed comparisons of laboratory SO2 spectra with the Cassini observations indicate that a mixture of gases contribute to the equatorial emissions. Potassium is suggested by new detections of the equatorial glows at near-infrared wavelengths from 730 to 800 nm. Neutral atomic oxygen and sodium are required to explain the brightness of the glows at visible wavelengths. The molecule S2 is postulated to emit most of the glow intensity in the wavelength interval from 390 to 500 nm. The locations of the visible emissions vary in response to the changing orientation of the external magnetic field, tracking the tangent points of the jovian magnetic field lines. Limb glows distinct from the equatorial emissions were observed at visible to near-infrared wavelengths from 500 to 850 nm, indicating that atomic O, Na, and K are distributed across Io's surface. Stratification of the atmosphere is demonstrated by differences in the altitudes of emissions at various wavelengths: SO2 emissions are confined to a region close to Io's surface, whereas neutral oxygen emissions are seen at altitudes that reach up to 900 km, or half the radius of the satellite. Pre-egress brightening demonstrates that light scattered into Jupiter's shadow by gases or aerosols in the giant planet's upper atmosphere contaminates images of Io taken within 13 minutes of entry into or emergence from Jupiter's umbra. Although partial atmospheric collapse is suggested by the longer timescale for post-ingress dimming than pre-egress brightening, Io's atmosphere must be substantially supported by volcanism to retain auroral

  1. Adaptive Systems in Education: A Review and Conceptual Unification

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, Chunyu; Scott, Bernard

    2017-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to review the use of adaptive systems in education. It is intended to be a useful introduction for the non-specialist reader. Design/methodology/approach: A distinction is made between intelligent tutoring systems (ITSs) and adaptive hypermedia systems (AHSs). The two kinds of system are defined, compared and…

  2. Crafting a Usable Microkernel, Processor, and I/O System with Strict and Provable Information Flow Security

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-01-01

    flow properties of embedded systems. Once the de- sign has been debugged using conventional tools, our abstraction and augmentation tools create a new de...www.lynuxworks.com/solutions/milaero/arinc-653. php . [2] Common criteria for information technology security evaluation. http

  3. Active Volcanic Plumes on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This color image, acquired during Galileo's ninth orbit around Jupiter, shows two volcanic plumes on Io. One plume was captured on the bright limb or edge of the moon (see inset at upper right), erupting over a caldera (volcanic depression) named Pillan Patera after a South American god of thunder, fire and volcanoes. The plume seen by Galileo is 140 kilometers (86 miles) high and was also detected by the Hubble Space Telescope. The Galileo spacecraft will pass almost directly over Pillan Patera in 1999 at a range of only 600 kilometers (373 miles).

    The second plume, seen near the terminator (boundary between day and night), is called Prometheus after the Greek fire god (see inset at lower right). The shadow of the 75-kilometer (45- mile) high airborne plume can be seen extending to the right of the eruption vent. The vent is near the center of the bright and dark rings. Plumes on Io have a blue color, so the plume shadow is reddish. The Prometheus plume can be seen in every Galileo image with the appropriate geometry, as well as every such Voyager image acquired in 1979. It is possible that this plume has been continuously active for more than 18 years. In contrast, a plume has never been seen at Pillan Patera prior to the recent Galileo and Hubble Space Telescope images.

    North is toward the top of the picture. The resolution is about 6 kilometers (3.7 miles) per picture element. This composite uses images taken with the green, violet and near infrared filters of the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The images were obtained on June 28, 1997, at a range of more than 600,000 kilometers (372,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page

  4. Arizona-sized Io Eruption

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These images of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, show the results of a dramatic event that occurred on the fiery satellite during a five-month period. The changes, captured by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft, occurred between the time Galileo acquired the left frame, during its seventh orbit of Jupiter, and the right frame, during its tenth orbit. A new dark spot, 400 kilometers (249 miles) in diameter, which is roughly the size of Arizona, surrounds a volcanic center named Pillan Patera. Galileo imaged a 120 kilometer (75 mile) high plume erupting from this location during its ninth orbit. Pele, which produced the larger plume deposit southwest of Pillan, also appears different than it did during the seventh orbit, perhaps due to interaction between the two large plumes. Pillan's plume deposits appear dark at all wavelengths. This color differs from the very red color associated with Pele, but is similar to the deposits of Babbar Patera, the dark feature southwest of Pele. Some apparent differences between the images are not caused by changes on Io's surface, but rather are due to differences in illumination, emission and phase angles. This is particularly apparent at Babbar Patera.

    North is to the top of the images. The left frame was acquired on April 4th, 1997, while the right frame was taken on Sept. 19th, 1997. The images were obtained at ranges of 563,000 kilometers (350,000 miles) for the left image, and 505,600 kilometers (314,165 miles) for the right.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo.

  5. Pianola: A script-based I/O benchmark

    SciTech Connect

    May, J

    2008-09-18

    Script-based I/O benchmarks record the I/O behavior of applications by using an instrumentation library to trace I/O events and their timing. A replay engine can then reproduce these events from the script in the absence of the original application. This type of benchmark reproduces real-world I/O workloads without the need to distribute, build, or run complex applications. However, faithfully recreating the I/O behavior of the original application requires careful design in both the instrumentation library and the replay engine. This paper presents the Pianola script-based benchmarking system, which includes an accurate and unobtrusive instrumentation system and a simple-to-use replay engine, along with some additional utility programs to manage the creation and replay of scripts. We show that for some sample applications, Pianola reproduces the qualitative features of the I/O behavior. Moreover, the overall replay time and the cumulative read and write times are usually within 10% of the values measured for the original applications.

  6. Io: Mountains and crustal extension

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heath, M. J.

    1985-01-01

    It is argued that there is good reason to conclude that mountains on Io, like those on Earth, are subject to growth and decay. The decay of mountains will be assisted by the ability of SO sub 2 to rot silicate rock and by explosive escape of sub-surface SO sub 2 from aquifers (Haemus Mons is seen to be covered by bright material, presumably fallout from a SO sub 2 rich plume which had been active on the mountain flanks). On the west side of the massif at 10 degrees S, 270 degrees W a rugged surface consists of long ridges running perpendicular to the downslope direction, suggesting tectonic denudation with crustal blocks sliding down the mountain flank. Tectonic denudation may be assisted, as in the case of the Bearpaw Mountains, Montana by overloading mountain flanks with volcanic products. The surfaces of some massifs exhibit a well developed, enigmatic corrugated terrain, consisting of complex ridge systems. Ridges may bifurcate, anastomose to form closed depressions and form concentric loops. Taken together, observations of morphology, heat flux, surface deposits and styles of volcanism may point to the existence of lithosphere domains with distinct compositions and tectonic regimes.

  7. Indirect CO2 Emission Implications of Energy System Pathways: Linking IO and TIMES Models for the UK.

    PubMed

    Daly, Hannah E; Scott, Kate; Strachan, Neil; Barrett, John

    2015-09-01

    Radical changes to current national energy systems-including energy efficiency and the decarbonization of electricity-will be required in order to meet challenging carbon emission reduction commitments. Technology explicit energy system optimization models (ESOMs) are widely used to define and assess such low-carbon pathways, but these models only account for the emissions associated with energy combustion and either do not account for or do not correctly allocate emissions arising from infrastructure, manufacturing, construction and transport associated with energy technologies and fuels. This paper addresses this shortcoming, through a hybrid approach that estimates the upstream CO2 emissions across current and future energy technologies for the UK using a multiregional environmentally extended input-output model, and explicitly models the direct and indirect CO2 emissions of energy supply and infrastructure technologies within a national ESOM (the UK TIMES model). Results indicate the large significance of nondomestic indirect emissions, particularly coming from fossil fuel imports, and finds that the marginal abatement cost of mitigating all emissions associated with UK energy supply is roughly double that of mitigating only direct emissions in 2050.

  8. Integration of the immune system: a complex adaptive supersystem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Crisman, Mark V.

    2001-10-01

    Immunity to pathogenic organisms is a complex process involving interacting factors within the immune system including circulating cells, tissues and soluble chemical mediators. Both the efficiency and adaptive responses of the immune system in a dynamic, often hostile, environment are essential for maintaining our health and homeostasis. This paper will present a brief review of one of nature's most elegant, complex adaptive systems.

  9. Implementation of an Adaptive Learning System Using a Bayesian Network

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yasuda, Keiji; Kawashima, Hiroyuki; Hata, Yoko; Kimura, Hiroaki

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive learning system is proposed that incorporates a Bayesian network to efficiently gauge learners' understanding at the course-unit level. Also, learners receive content that is adapted to their measured level of understanding. The system works on an iPad via the Edmodo platform. A field experiment using the system in an elementary school…

  10. Eclipse Images of Io (3 views)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These three images of Io in eclipse (top) show volcanic hot spots and airglow associated with volcanic plumes and Io's atmosphere. They were acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft during three separate orbits of Jupiter when the moon was in Jupiter's shadow. Brightnesses are color-coded from red which displays the highest intensity to dark blue which displays zero intensity (no light).

    Below them are the corresponding views of Io in reflected sunlight, reprojected from a global mosaic of images obtained during Galileo's first and second orbits of Jupiter. These lit views help to identify the locations of the hot spots seen in the eclipse images. The grid marks are at 15 degree intervals of latitude and longitude. North is to the top.

    In the eclipse images (top) small red ovals and perhaps some small green areas are due to thermal emission from volcanic hot spots with temperatures hotter than about 700 kelvin (about 1000 degrees Fahrenheit). Diffuse greenish areas seen near the limb or edge of the moon are probably the result of auroral and/or airglow emissions of neutral species of oxygen or sulfur in volcanic plumes and in Io's patchy atmosphere.

    All images were acquired by the solid state imaging (CCD) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft. The top left image was obtained during the spacecraft's fourth orbit (E4) on December 17, 1996, the top middle image during the sixth orbit (E6) on February 21, 1997, and the top right image during the first orbit (G1) on June 29th, 1996. The relatively long exposures used to obtain these eclipse images lead to some smearing of the picture elements which reduces the actual resolution. Unsmeared they would have resolutions of 17.6, 9.1, and 10.5 kilometers per picture element respectively (left to right).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech

  11. Isoplanatism in a multiconjugate adaptive optics system.

    PubMed

    Tokovinin, A; Le Louarn, M; Sarazin, M

    2000-10-01

    Turbulence correction in a large field of view by use of an adaptive optics imaging system with several deformable mirrors (DM's) conjugated to various heights is considered. The residual phase variance is computed for an optimized linear algorithm in which a correction of each turbulent layer is achieved by applying a combination of suitably smoothed and scaled input phase screens to all DM's. Finite turbulence outer scale and finite spatial resolution of the DM's are taken into account. A general expression for the isoplanatic angle thetaM of a system with M mirrors is derived in the limiting case of infinitely large apertures and Kolmogorov turbulence. Like Fried's isoplanatic angle theta0,thetaM is a function only of the turbulence vertical profile, is scalable with wavelength, and is independent of the telescope diameter. Use of angle thetaM permits the gain in the field of view due to the increased number of DM's to be quantified and their optimal conjugate heights to be found. Calculations with real turbulence profiles show that with three DM's a gain of 7-10x is possible, giving the typical and best isoplanatic field-of-view radii of 16 and 30 arcseconds, respectively, at lambda = 0.5 microm. It is shown that in the actual systems the isoplanatic field will be somewhat larger than thetaM owing to the combined effects of finite aperture diameter, finite outer scale, and optimized wave-front spatial filtering. However, this additional gain is not dramatic; it is less than 1.5x for large-aperture telescopes.

  12. Volcanogenic Sulfur on Earth and Io: Composition and Spectroscopy

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kargel, J.S.; Delmelle, P.; Nash, D.B.

    1999-01-01

    any natural sulfur containing significant Na beyond that attributable to silicate inclusions. In sum, the unique physical-chemical properties of S-rich systems and the strong affinity of certain elements for S may have broad implications for the appearance, spectroscopic interpretation, and geologic processes of Io. Identification of impurities in sulfur may be helpful in tracing the geochemical evolution of surface deposits on Io. Perhaps foretelling of new areas of investigation, Cl has recently been reported in the Io torus (M. Kueppers and N. M. Schneider 1999, Eos Trans.80, 5207), suggesting the presence on Io of either salts, such as halite, or sulfur chlorides. Further evidence of minor iogenic impurities should be sought in Io's neutral cloud and plasma torus as well as in further scrutiny of Io's reflectance spectra. ?? 1999 Academic Press.

  13. TRIO: Burst Buffer Based I/O Orchestration

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Teng; Oral, H Sarp; Pritchard, Michael; Wang, Bin; Yu, Weikuan

    2015-01-01

    The growing computing power on leadership HPC systems is often accompanied by ever-escalating failure rates. Checkpointing is a common defensive mechanism used by scientific applications for failure recovery. However, directly writing the large and bursty checkpointing dataset to parallel filesystem can incur significant I/O contention on storage servers. Such contention in turn degrades the raw bandwidth utilization of storage servers and prolongs the average job I/O time of concurrent applications. Recently burst buffer has been proposed as an intermediate layer to absorb the bursty I/O traffic from compute nodes to storage backend. But an I/O orchestration mechanism is still desired to efficiently move checkpointing data from bursty buffers to storage backend. In this paper, we propose a burst buffer based I/O orchestration framework, named TRIO, to intercept and reshape the bursty writes for better sequential write traffic to storage severs. Meanwhile, TRIO coordinates the flushing orders among concurrent burst buffers to alleviate the contention on storage server bandwidth. Our experimental results reveal that TRIO can deliver 30.5% higher bandwidth and reduce the average job I/O time by 37% on average for data-intensive applications in various checkpointing scenarios.

  14. Network and adaptive system of systems modeling and analysis.

    SciTech Connect

    Lawton, Craig R.; Campbell, James E. Dr.; Anderson, Dennis James; Eddy, John P.

    2007-05-01

    This report documents the results of an LDRD program entitled ''Network and Adaptive System of Systems Modeling and Analysis'' that was conducted during FY 2005 and FY 2006. The purpose of this study was to determine and implement ways to incorporate network communications modeling into existing System of Systems (SoS) modeling capabilities. Current SoS modeling, particularly for the Future Combat Systems (FCS) program, is conducted under the assumption that communication between the various systems is always possible and occurs instantaneously. A more realistic representation of these communications allows for better, more accurate simulation results. The current approach to meeting this objective has been to use existing capabilities to model network hardware reliability and adding capabilities to use that information to model the impact on the sustainment supply chain and operational availability.

  15. Valuation of design adaptability in aerospace systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fernandez Martin, Ismael

    As more information is brought into early stages of the design, more pressure is put on engineers to produce a reliable, high quality, and financially sustainable product. Unfortunately, requirements established at the beginning of a new project by customers, and the environment that surrounds them, continue to change in some unpredictable ways. The risk of designing a system that may become obsolete during early stages of production is currently tackled by the use of robust design simulation, a method that allows to simultaneously explore a plethora of design alternatives and requirements with the intention of accounting for uncertain factors in the future. Whereas this design technique has proven to be quite an improvement in design methods, under certain conditions, it fails to account for the change of uncertainty over time and the intrinsic value embedded in the system when certain design features are activated. This thesis introduces the concepts of adaptability and real options to manage risk foreseen in the face of uncertainty at early design stages. The method described herein allows decision-makers to foresee the financial impact of their decisions at the design level, as well as the final exposure to risk. In this thesis, cash flow models, traditionally used to obtain the forecast of a project's value over the years, were replaced with surrogate models that are capable of showing fluctuations on value every few days. This allowed a better implementation of real options valuation, optimization, and strategy selection. Through the option analysis model, an optimization exercise allows the user to obtain the best implementation strategy in the face of uncertainty as well as the overall value of the design feature. Here implementation strategy refers to the decision to include a new design feature in the system, after the design has been finalized, but before the end of its production life. The ability to do this in a cost efficient manner after the system

  16. Io's volcanism influences Jupiter's magnetosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balcerak, Ernie

    2012-02-01

    Volcanic emissions from Jupiter's moon Io supply plasma to the planet's magnetosphere and lead to its main auroral emissions. New observations show that the main auroral oval expanded and outer emissions brightened in spring 2007. Some studies have suggested that magnetospheric changes such as these could be caused by changes in the incoming solar wind. Bonfond et al. present several lines of evidence—including images from the Hubble Space Telescope and observations of a volcanic plume on Io from the New Horizons probe along with measurements of increased emissions from Jupiter's sodium cloud—that indicate that Io's volcanism controls changes in Jupiter's magnetosphere. (Geophysical Research Letters, doi:10.1029/2011GL050253, 2012)

  17. Io and Europa Meet Again

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    This beautiful image of the crescents of volcanic Io and more sedate Europa is a combination of two New Horizons images taken March 2, 2007, about two days after New Horizons made its closest approach to Jupiter. A lower-resolution color image snapped by the Multispectral Visual Imaging Camera (MVIC) at 10:34 universal time (UT) has been merged with a higher-resolution black-and-white image taken by the Long Range Reconnaissance Imager (LORRI) at 10:23 UT. The composite image shows the relative positions of Io and Europa, which were moving past each other during the image sequence, as they were at the time the LORRI image was taken.

    This image was taken from a range of 4.6 million kilometers (2.8 million miles) from Io and 3.8 million kilometers (2.4 million miles) from Europa. Although the moons appear close together in this view, a gulf of 790,000 kilometers (490,000 miles) separates them. Io's night side is lit up by light reflected from Jupiter, which is off the frame to the right. Europa's night side is dark, in contrast to Io, because this side of Europa faces away from Jupiter.

    Here Io steals the show with its beautiful display of volcanic activity. Three volcanic plumes are visible. Most conspicuous is the enormous 300-kilometer (190-mile) high plume from the Tvashtar volcano at the 11 o'clock position on Io's disk. Two much smaller plumes are also visible: that from the volcano Prometheus, at the 9 o'clock position on the edge of Io's disk, and from the volcano Amirani, seen between Prometheus and Tvashtar along Io's terminator (the line dividing day and night). The Tvashtar plume appears blue because of the scattering of light by tiny dust particles ejected by the volcanoes, similar to the blue appearance of smoke. In addition, the contrasting red glow of hot lava can be seen at the source of the Tvashtar plume.

    The images are centered at 1 degree North, 60 degrees West on Io, and 0 degrees North, 149 degrees West on Europa. The color

  18. Updated modeling of Io and non-Io Radio Auroral Emissions of Jupiter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Louis, C.; Lamy, L.; Zarka, P.; Cecconi, B.; Hess, S.

    2015-10-01

    The radio auroral emissions produced by the Jupiter's magnetosphere between a few kHz and 40MHz, the most intense of our Solar System, are known since half a century, but they still drive many questions, and their deepened study is one of the main aim of the JUNO missions (arrival in July 2016). Jovian auroral radio emissions are thought to be produced through the Cyclotron Maser Instability (CMI), from non-maxwellian weakly relativistic electrons gyrating along high-latitude magnetic fields lines (Zarka, 1998). These emissions divide in different spectral components, driven or not by the moon Io. The origin and the relationship between kilometric, hectometric and decametric non-Io emissions in particular remains poorly understood. To investigate these emissions, we simulated numerical dynamic spectra with the most recent version of the ExPRES code - Exoplanetary and Planetary Radio Emission Simulator, available at http://maser.obspm.fr - already used to successfully model Io decametric and Saturn's kilometric arcshaped emissions (Hess et al., 2008, Lamy et al., 2008) and predict exoplanetary radio emissions (Hess et al., 2011). Such simulations bring direct constraints on the locus of active magnetic field lines and on the nature of CMI-unstable electrons (Hess et al., submitted). We validated the new theoretical calculation of the beaming angle used by ExPRES, which now includes refraction at the source. We then built updated simulations of Io and non-Io emissions which were compared to the radio observations acquired by the Cassini spacecraft (Jupiter flyby in 2000) and the Nançay decameter array (routines observations of Jupiter).

  19. Cascaded Effects of Spatial Adaptation in the Early Visual System

    PubMed Central

    Dhruv, Neel T.; Carandini, Matteo

    2014-01-01

    Summary Virtually all stages of the visual system exhibit adaptation: neurons adjust their responses based on the recent stimulus history. While some of these adjustments occur at specific stages, others may be inherited from earlier stages. How do adaptation effects cascade along the visual system? We measured spatially selective adaptation at two successive stages in the mouse visual system: visual thalamus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1). This form of adaptation affected both stages but in drastically different ways: in LGN it only changed response gain, while in V1 it also shifted spatial tuning away from the adaptor. These effects, however, are reconciled by a simple model whereby V1 neurons summate LGN inputs with a fixed, unadaptable weighting profile. These results indicate that adaptation effects cascade through the visual system, that this cascading can shape selectivity, and that the rules of integration from one stage to the next are not themselves adaptable. PMID:24507190

  20. Cascaded effects of spatial adaptation in the early visual system.

    PubMed

    Dhruv, Neel T; Carandini, Matteo

    2014-02-05

    Virtually all stages of the visual system exhibit adaptation: neurons adjust their responses based on the recent stimulus history. While some of these adjustments occur at specific stages, others may be inherited from earlier stages. How do adaptation effects cascade along the visual system? We measured spatially selective adaptation at two successive stages in the mouse visual system: visual thalamus (LGN) and primary visual cortex (V1). This form of adaptation affected both stages but in drastically different ways: in LGN it only changed response gain, while in V1 it also shifted spatial tuning away from the adaptor. These effects, however, are reconciled by a simple model whereby V1 neurons summate LGN inputs with a fixed, unadaptable weighting profile. These results indicate that adaptation effects cascade through the visual system, that this cascading can shape selectivity, and that the rules of integration from one stage to the next are not themselves adaptable.

  1. Taming parallel I/O complexity with auto-tuning

    DOE PAGES

    Behzad, Babak; Luu, Huong Vu Thanh; Huchette, Joseph; ...

    2013-11-17

    We present an auto-tuning system for optimizing I/O performance of HDF5 applications and demonstrate its value across platforms, applications, and at scale. The system uses a genetic algorithm to search a large space of tunable parameters and to identify effective settings at all layers of the parallel I/O stack. The parameter settings are applied transparently by the auto-tuning system via dynamically intercepted HDF5 calls. To validate our auto-tuning system, we applied it to three I/O benchmarks (VPIC, VORPAL, and GCRM) that replicate the I/O activity of their respective applications. We tested the system with different weak-scaling configurations (128, 2048, andmore » 4096 CPU cores) that generate 30 GB to 1 TB of data, and executed these configurations on diverse HPC platforms (Cray XE6, IBM BG/P, and Dell Cluster). In all cases, the auto-tuning framework identified tunable parameters that substantially improved write performance over default system settings. In conclusion, we consistently demonstrate I/O write speedups between 2x and 100x for test configurations.« less

  2. Taming parallel I/O complexity with auto-tuning

    SciTech Connect

    Behzad, Babak; Luu, Huong Vu Thanh; Huchette, Joseph; Byna, Surendra; Prabhat, -; Aydt, Ruth; Koziol, Quincey; Snir, Marc

    2013-11-17

    We present an auto-tuning system for optimizing I/O performance of HDF5 applications and demonstrate its value across platforms, applications, and at scale. The system uses a genetic algorithm to search a large space of tunable parameters and to identify effective settings at all layers of the parallel I/O stack. The parameter settings are applied transparently by the auto-tuning system via dynamically intercepted HDF5 calls. To validate our auto-tuning system, we applied it to three I/O benchmarks (VPIC, VORPAL, and GCRM) that replicate the I/O activity of their respective applications. We tested the system with different weak-scaling configurations (128, 2048, and 4096 CPU cores) that generate 30 GB to 1 TB of data, and executed these configurations on diverse HPC platforms (Cray XE6, IBM BG/P, and Dell Cluster). In all cases, the auto-tuning framework identified tunable parameters that substantially improved write performance over default system settings. In conclusion, we consistently demonstrate I/O write speedups between 2x and 100x for test configurations.

  3. Radio occultations of the Io plasma torus by Juno are feasible

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Phipps, Phillip H.; Withers, Paul

    2017-02-01

    The flow of material from Io's volcanoes into the Io plasma torus, out into the magnetosphere, and along field lines into Jupiter's upper atmosphere is not adequately understood. The lack of observations of spatial and temporal variations in the Io plasma torus impedes attempts to understand the system as a whole. Here we propose that radio occultations of the Io plasma torus by the Juno spacecraft can measure plasma densities in the Io plasma torus. We find that the line-of-sight column density of plasma in each of the three regions of the Io plasma torus (cold torus, ribbon, and warm torus) can be measured with uncertainties of 10%. We also find that scale heights describing the spatial variation in plasma density in each of these three regions can be measured with similar uncertainties. Such observations will be sufficiently accurate to support system-scale studies of the flow of plasma through the magnetosphere of Jupiter.

  4. I/O characterization of a portable astrophysics application on the IBM SP and Intel Paragon

    SciTech Connect

    Thakur, R.; Lusk, E.; Gropp, W.

    1996-05-01

    Many large-scale applications on parallel machines are bottlenecked by the I/O performance rather than the CPU or communication performance of the system. To improve the I/O performance, it is first necessary for system designers to understand the I/O requirements of various applications. This paper presents results of a study of the I/O characteristics and performance of a real, large- scale, portable, parallel application in astrophysics, on two different parallel machines--the IBM SP and the Intel Paragon. We instrumented the source code to record all I/O activity and analyzed the resulting trace files. Results show that, for this application, the I/O consists of fairly large writes, and writing data to files is faster on the Paragon, whereas opening and closing files are faster on the SP.

  5. Central nervous system adaptation to exercise training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaminski, Lois Anne

    Exercise training causes physiological changes in skeletal muscle that results in enhanced performance in humans and animals. Despite numerous studies on exercise effects on skeletal muscle, relatively little is known about adaptive changes in the central nervous system. This study investigated whether spinal pathways that mediate locomotor activity undergo functional adaptation after 28 days of exercise training. Ventral horn spinal cord expression of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), a trophic factor at the neuromuscular junction, choline acetyltransferase (Chat), the synthetic enzyme for acetylcholine, vesicular acetylcholine transporter (Vacht), a transporter of ACh into synaptic vesicles and calcineurin (CaN), a protein phosphatase that phosphorylates ion channels and exocytosis machinery were measured to determine if changes in expression occurred in response to physical activity. Expression of these proteins was determined by western blot and immunohistochemistry (IHC). Comparisons between sedentary controls and animals that underwent either endurance training or resistance training were made. Control rats received no exercise other than normal cage activity. Endurance-trained rats were exercised 6 days/wk at 31m/min on a treadmill (8% incline) for 100 minutes. Resistance-trained rats supported their weight plus an additional load (70--80% body weight) on a 60° incline (3 x 3 min, 5 days/wk). CGRP expression was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). CGRP expression in the spinal dorsal and ventral horn of exercise-trained animals was not significantly different than controls. Chat expression measured by Western blot and IHC was not significantly different between runners and controls but expression in resistance-trained animals assayed by IHC was significantly less than controls and runners. Vacht and CaN immunoreactivity in motor neurons of endurance-trained rats was significantly elevated relative to control and resistance-trained animals. Ventral

  6. Aircraft as adaptive nonlinear system which must be in the adaptational maximum zone for safety

    SciTech Connect

    Ignative, M.; Simatos, N.; Sivasundaram, S.

    1994-12-31

    Safety is a main problem in aircraft. We are considering this problem from the point of view related to existence of the adaptational maximum in complex developing systems. Safety space of aircraft parameters are determined. This space is transformed to different regimes of flight, when one engine malfunctions etc., are considered. Also it is shown that maximum safety is in adaptational maximum zone.

  7. CRISPR adaptation in Escherichia coli subtypeI-E system.

    PubMed

    Kiro, Ruth; Goren, Moran G; Yosef, Ido; Qimron, Udi

    2013-12-01

    The CRISPRs (clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats) and their associated Cas (CRISPR-associated) proteins are a prokaryotic adaptive defence system against foreign nucleic acids. The CRISPR array comprises short repeats flanking short segments, called 'spacers', which are derived from foreign nucleic acids. The process of spacer insertion into the CRISPR array is termed 'adaptation'. Adaptation allows the system to rapidly evolve against emerging threats. In the present article, we review the most recent studies on the adaptation process, and focus primarily on the subtype I-E CRISPR-Cas system of Escherichia coli.

  8. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  9. Subsidence of topography on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Webb, Erik K.; Stevenson, David J.

    1987-01-01

    The underlying roots of Io's topographic features are softened and eroded by contact with the hot mantle, resulting in a subsidence which is analogous to the progress of a butter pat on a frying pan. This process would be offset by crustal thickening due to continuing volcanism if the rate for this phenomenon were more than the observed 1 cm/year or less. Because the crustal thinning would occur at about 50 cm/year if the material underneath were a pure magma ocean, Io cannot have a global magna ocean, and interior viscosities greater than about 10 to the 10th P are implied.

  10. Modeling Vapor and Heat Transport on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Allen, D. R.; Howell, R. R.

    2012-12-01

    Loki patera, a large, active volcanic depression on Jupiter's innermost Galilean moon Io, shows evidence of sulfur transport and exhibits temperatures that are consistently lower than many other volcanoes on Io. Galileo images of Loki reveal red sulfur deposits exterior to the patera that extend approximately 40 km from the patera's edge. Voyager images show light deposits, colloquially known as sulfur bergs, scattered across the patera floor that range from 3.5 km to 5 km in diameter. In addition, temperature profiles running north to south across the patera vary by only a few degrees and are difficult to explain with current thermal models, which don't include the role of volatiles such as sulfur. We are investigating the role sulfur plays in producing the features seen in images of Loki and in modifying the temperatures at Loki. We used the atmospheric models of Ingersoll (1989) and Moreno et al. (1991) for SO2 transport on Io as a starting point for our own sulfur transport models. We also compared the length scales of deposition predicted by our models and Moreno's models to the morphology and features seen in Galileo and Voyager images. In one case, Ingersoll modeled the sublimation of SO2 from a hot, higher pressure side which moves in one dimension and is deposited on a cold, lower pressure side. Using this case as a starting point, we adapted it for temperatures and pressures appropriate for S8 transport. We also converted his equations to consider the radial expansion of S8 from a point source, which we compared to the models of Moreno et al. (1991). We solved the hot side-cold side Ingersoll adapted model both analytically and numerically and obtained horizontal length scales of sulfur deposition consistent with the red deposits. We scaled the horizontal lengths of SO2 deposition predicted by Moreno's numerical models for S8 and obtained sulfur deposition lengths consistent with the light deposits. In contrast, our radial expansion model gave horizontal

  11. Kinetics and mechanism of the IO + IO reaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sander, S. P.

    1986-01-01

    The flash photolysis-absorption technique has been used to measure the rate constant for the reaction IO + IO over the temperature range 250-373 K and pressure range 20-700 torr of N2. The rate constant for the overall reaction was found to be independent of pressure and equal to 1.73 x 10 to the -12th exp (1020 + or - 200)/T cu cm/molecule s. Branching ratios for the reaction channels forming 2I + O2, I2 + O2, and I2O2, were found to be pressure dependent, with the I2 channel accounting for less than 5 percent of the total reaction over the observed pressure range. A stable reaction product was observed between 230 and 300 nm which was formed on a long time scale compared to IO disappearance. The rate constant for the reaction I + O3 + yields to IO + O2 was measured at 298 K and found to be (9.5 + or - 1.5) x 10 to the -13th cu cm/molecule s.

  12. Nonequilibrium Enhances Adaptation Efficiency of Stochastic Biochemical Systems

    PubMed Central

    Jia, Chen; Qian, Minping

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation is a crucial biological function possessed by many sensory systems. Early work has shown that some influential equilibrium models can achieve accurate adaptation. However, recent studies indicate that there are close relationships between adaptation and nonequilibrium. In this paper, we provide an explanation of these two seemingly contradictory results based on Markov models with relatively simple networks. We show that as the nonequilibrium driving becomes stronger, the system under consideration will undergo a phase transition along a fixed direction: from non-adaptation to simple adaptation then to oscillatory adaptation, while the transition in the opposite direction is forbidden. This indicates that although adaptation may be observed in equilibrium systems, it tends to occur in systems far away from equilibrium. In addition, we find that nonequilibrium will improve the performance of adaptation by enhancing the adaptation efficiency. All these results provide a deeper insight into the connection between adaptation and nonequilibrium. Finally, we use a more complicated network model of bacterial chemotaxis to validate the main results of this paper. PMID:27195482

  13. Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Williams, Rube B.

    2004-02-01

    Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

  14. Restricted Complexity Framework for Nonlinear Adaptive Control in Complex Systems

    SciTech Connect

    Williams, Rube B.

    2004-02-04

    Control law adaptation that includes implicit or explicit adaptive state estimation, can be a fundamental underpinning for the success of intelligent control in complex systems, particularly during subsystem failures, where vital system states and parameters can be impractical or impossible to measure directly. A practical algorithm is proposed for adaptive state filtering and control in nonlinear dynamic systems when the state equations are unknown or are too complex to model analytically. The state equations and inverse plant model are approximated by using neural networks. A framework for a neural network based nonlinear dynamic inversion control law is proposed, as an extrapolation of prior developed restricted complexity methodology used to formulate the adaptive state filter. Examples of adaptive filter performance are presented for an SSME simulation with high pressure turbine failure to support extrapolations to adaptive control problems.

  15. Concept Based Approach for Adaptive Personalized Course Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salahli, Mehmet Ali; Özdemir, Muzaffer; Yasar, Cumali

    2013-01-01

    One of the most important factors for improving the personalization aspects of learning systems is to enable adaptive properties to them. The aim of the adaptive personalized learning system is to offer the most appropriate learning path and learning materials to learners by taking into account their profiles. In this paper, a new approach to…

  16. Adaptive tracking control for a class of uncertain chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Feng-Xiang; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Wei-Dong

    2007-09-01

    The paper is concerned with adaptive tracking problem for a class of chaotic system with time-varying uncertainty, but bounded by norm polynomial. Based on adaptive technique, it proposes a novel controller to asymptotically track the arbitrary desired bounded trajectory. Simulation on the Rossler chaotic system is performed and the result verifies the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  17. Development of Adaptive Kanji Learning System for Mobile Phone

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mengmeng; Ogata, Hiroaki; Hou, Bin; Hashimoto, Satoshi; Liu, Yuqin; Uosaki, Noriko; Yano, Yoneo

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an adaptive learning system based on mobile phone email to support the study of Japanese Kanji. In this study, the main emphasis is on using the adaptive learning to resolve one common problem of the mobile-based email or SMS language learning systems. To achieve this goal, the authors main efforts focus on three aspects:…

  18. Adaptive Hypermedia Educational System Based on XML Technologies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baek, Yeongtae; Wang, Changjong; Lee, Sehoon

    This paper proposes an adaptive hypermedia educational system using XML technologies, such as XML, XSL, XSLT, and XLink. Adaptive systems are capable of altering the presentation of the content of the hypermedia on the basis of a dynamic understanding of the individual user. The user profile can be collected in a user model, while the knowledge…

  19. Management Strategies for Complex Adaptive Systems: Sensemaking, Learning, and Improvisation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McDaniel, Reuben R., Jr.

    2007-01-01

    Misspecification of the nature of organizations may be a major reason for difficulty in achieving performance improvement. Organizations are often viewed as machine-like, but complexity science suggests that organizations should be viewed as complex adaptive systems. I identify the characteristics of complex adaptive systems and give examples of…

  20. SCORPIO: A Scalable Two-Phase Parallel I/O Library With Application To A Large Scale Subsurface Simulator

    SciTech Connect

    Sreepathi, Sarat; Sripathi, Vamsi; Mills, Richard T; Hammond, Glenn; Mahinthakumar, Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Inefficient parallel I/O is known to be a major bottleneck among scientific applications employed on supercomputers as the number of processor cores grows into the thousands. Our prior experience indicated that parallel I/O libraries such as HDF5 that rely on MPI-IO do not scale well beyond 10K processor cores, especially on parallel file systems (like Lustre) with single point of resource contention. Our previous optimization efforts for a massively parallel multi-phase and multi-component subsurface simulator (PFLOTRAN) led to a two-phase I/O approach at the application level where a set of designated processes participate in the I/O process by splitting the I/O operation into a communication phase and a disk I/O phase. The designated I/O processes are created by splitting the MPI global communicator into multiple sub-communicators. The root process in each sub-communicator is responsible for performing the I/O operations for the entire group and then distributing the data to rest of the group. This approach resulted in over 25X speedup in HDF I/O read performance and 3X speedup in write performance for PFLOTRAN at over 100K processor cores on the ORNL Jaguar supercomputer. This research describes the design and development of a general purpose parallel I/O library, SCORPIO (SCalable block-ORiented Parallel I/O) that incorporates our optimized two-phase I/O approach. The library provides a simplified higher level abstraction to the user, sitting atop existing parallel I/O libraries (such as HDF5) and implements optimized I/O access patterns that can scale on larger number of processors. Performance results with standard benchmark problems and PFLOTRAN indicate that our library is able to maintain the same speedups as before with the added flexibility of being applicable to a wider range of I/O intensive applications.

  1. Connecting Io's volcanic activity to the Io plasma torus: comparison of Galileo/NIMS volcanic and ground-based torus observations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Magalhaes, F. P.; Lopes, R. M. C.; Rathbun, J. A.; Gonzalez, W. D.; Morgenthaler, J. P.; Echer, E.; Echer, M. P. D. S.

    2015-12-01

    Io, the innermost of the Jupiter's four Galilean moons, is a remarkable object in the Solar System, due to its intense and energetic volcanic activity. The volcanic sulfur and oxygen in Io's tenuous atmosphere escapes forming an extended neutral cloud around Io and Jupiter. Subsequently, by ionization and pickup ions, a ring of charged particles encircling Jupiter is created, forming the Io plasma torus. Considering this scenario, it is reasonable to expect that the Io plasma torus should be affected by changes in Io's volcanism. Interactions between Io and the Jovian environment is unique and yet not very well understood. Here we present two sets of observations. One from the Galileo Near-Infrared Imaging Spectrograph (NIMS) instrument, which obtained spectral image cubes between 0.7 and 5.2 microns. The other dataset is from ground-based observations of the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines from the Io plasma torus, obtained at McMath-Pierce Solar Telescope, at Kitt Peak. Our dataset from the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines cover more years than the one from the NIMS data. The years presented in this work for a comparative study are from 1998 through 2001. Using the NIMS instrument we were able to identify which volcanoes were active and measure their level of activity. From the [SII] 6731 Å emission lines we were able to trace the densest part of the torus and also the brightness of both ansa. By comparing the results from the Galileo instrument and the ground-based observations, we are exploring how the Io plasma torus responds to large eruptions from Io. We aim with this study to help improve our understanding of this complex coupled system, Jupiter-Io.

  2. Sinusoidal error perturbation reveals multiple coordinate systems for sensorymotor adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Todd E.; Landy, Michael S.

    2016-01-01

    A coordinate system is composed of an encoding, defining the dimensions of the space, and an origin. We examine the coordinate encoding used to update motor plans during sensory-motor adaptation to center-out reaches. Adaptation is induced using a novel paradigm in which feedback of reach endpoints is perturbed following a sinewave pattern over trials; the perturbed dimensions of the feedback were the axes of a Cartesian coordinate system in one session and a polar coordinate system in another session. For center-out reaches to randomly chosen target locations, reach errors observed at one target will require different corrections at other targets within Cartesian- and polar-coded systems. The sinewave adaptation technique allowed us to simultaneously adapt both dimensions of each coordinate system (x-y, or reach gain and angle), and identify the contributions of each perturbed dimension by adapting each at a distinct temporal frequency. The efficiency of this technique further allowed us to employ perturbations that were a fraction the size normally used, which avoids confounding automatic adaptive processes with deliberate adjustments made in response to obvious experimental manipulations. Subjects independently corrected errors in each coordinate in both sessions, suggesting that the nervous system encodes both a Cartesian- and polar-coordinate-based internal representation for motor adaptation. The gains and phase lags of the adaptive responses are not readily explained by current theories of sensory-motor adaptation. Motor adaptation is fundamental to the neural control of movement, affording an automatic process to maintain a consistent relationship between motor plans and movement outcomes. That is, adaptation is described as updating an internal mapping between desired motor outcome and motor output (Sanger, 2004; Shadmehr, Smith, & Krakauer, 2010), not a deliberate corrective action. Here, using a method that relies on extremely small perturbations that

  3. I/O performance measurement on Cray-1 and CDC 7600 computers

    SciTech Connect

    Bucher, I.Y.; Hayes, A.H.

    1980-01-01

    Disk I/O transfer rates and overhead CPU times were measured as functions of buffer size and number of logically independent I/O channels for several operating systems and 16 I/O routines on the Cray-1 and CDC 7600 computers. By parameterizing the codes for a variable number of channels, buffer sizes, and words transmitted, the effect of these variables is observed for buffered, nonbuffered, and random-access I/O transmissions. To measure CPU-overlapped performance, I/O was performed concurrently with a pretimed compute loop. Rates, sector overhead, and CPU transmission speeds were calculated upon completion of I/O. Effects of memory blocking due to vector operations were observed. Methods and results are presented. 4 figures, 1 table.

  4. Calibrated Methodology for Assessing Adaptation Costs for Urban Drainage Systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Changes in precipitation patterns associated with climate change may pose significant challenges for storm water management systems across much of the U.S. In particular, adapting these systems to more intense rainfall events will require significant investment. The assessment ...

  5. Recursive architecture for large-scale adaptive system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hanahara, Kazuyuki; Sugiyama, Yoshihiko

    1994-09-01

    'Large scale' is one of major trends in the research and development of recent engineering, especially in the field of aerospace structural system. This term expresses the large scale of an artifact in general, however, it also implies the large number of the components which make up the artifact in usual. Considering a large scale system which is especially used in remote space or deep-sea, such a system should be adaptive as well as robust by itself, because its control as well as maintenance by human operators are not easy due to the remoteness. An approach to realizing this large scale, adaptive and robust system is to build the system as an assemblage of components which are respectively adaptive by themselves. In this case, the robustness of the system can be achieved by using a large number of such components and suitable adaptation as well as maintenance strategies. Such a system gathers many research's interest and their studies such as decentralized motion control, configurating algorithm and characteristics of structural elements are reported. In this article, a recursive architecture concept is developed and discussed towards the realization of large scale system which consists of a number of uniform adaptive components. We propose an adaptation strategy based on the architecture and its implementation by means of hierarchically connected processing units. The robustness and the restoration from degeneration of the processing unit are also discussed. Two- and three-dimensional adaptive truss structures are conceptually designed based on the recursive architecture.

  6. A Proof-of-Concept for Semantically Interoperable Federation of IoT Experimentation Facilities

    PubMed Central

    Lanza, Jorge; Sanchez, Luis; Gomez, David; Elsaleh, Tarek; Steinke, Ronald; Cirillo, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is unanimously identified as one of the main pillars of future smart scenarios. The potential of IoT technologies and deployments has been already demonstrated in a number of different application areas, including transport, energy, safety and healthcare. However, despite the growing number of IoT deployments, the majority of IoT applications tend to be self-contained, thereby forming application silos. A lightweight data centric integration and combination of these silos presents several challenges that still need to be addressed. Indeed, the ability to combine and synthesize data streams and services from diverse IoT platforms and testbeds, holds the promise to increase the potentiality of smart applications in terms of size, scope and targeted business context. In this article, a proof-of-concept implementation that federates two different IoT experimentation facilities by means of semantic-based technologies will be described. The specification and design of the implemented system and information models will be described together with the practical details of the developments carried out and its integration with the existing IoT platforms supporting the aforementioned testbeds. Overall, the system described in this paper demonstrates that it is possible to open new horizons in the development of IoT applications and experiments at a global scale, that transcend the (silo) boundaries of individual deployments, based on the semantic interconnection and interoperability of diverse IoT platforms and testbeds. PMID:27367695

  7. A Proof-of-Concept for Semantically Interoperable Federation of IoT Experimentation Facilities.

    PubMed

    Lanza, Jorge; Sanchez, Luis; Gomez, David; Elsaleh, Tarek; Steinke, Ronald; Cirillo, Flavio

    2016-06-29

    The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is unanimously identified as one of the main pillars of future smart scenarios. The potential of IoT technologies and deployments has been already demonstrated in a number of different application areas, including transport, energy, safety and healthcare. However, despite the growing number of IoT deployments, the majority of IoT applications tend to be self-contained, thereby forming application silos. A lightweight data centric integration and combination of these silos presents several challenges that still need to be addressed. Indeed, the ability to combine and synthesize data streams and services from diverse IoT platforms and testbeds, holds the promise to increase the potentiality of smart applications in terms of size, scope and targeted business context. In this article, a proof-of-concept implementation that federates two different IoT experimentation facilities by means of semantic-based technologies will be described. The specification and design of the implemented system and information models will be described together with the practical details of the developments carried out and its integration with the existing IoT platforms supporting the aforementioned testbeds. Overall, the system described in this paper demonstrates that it is possible to open new horizons in the development of IoT applications and experiments at a global scale, that transcend the (silo) boundaries of individual deployments, based on the semantic interconnection and interoperability of diverse IoT platforms and testbeds.

  8. Systems and Methods for Derivative-Free Adaptive Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yucelen, Tansel (Inventor); Kim, Kilsoo (Inventor); Calise, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An adaptive control system is disclosed. The control system can control uncertain dynamic systems. The control system can employ one or more derivative-free adaptive control architectures. The control system can further employ one or more derivative-free weight update laws. The derivative-free weight update laws can comprise a time-varying estimate of an ideal vector of weights. The control system of the present invention can therefore quickly stabilize systems that undergo sudden changes in dynamics, caused by, for example, sudden changes in weight. Embodiments of the present invention can also provide a less complex control system than existing adaptive control systems. The control system can control aircraft and other dynamic systems, such as, for example, those with non-minimum phase dynamics.

  9. Adaptive Learning Systems: Beyond Teaching Machines

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kara, Nuri; Sevim, Nese

    2013-01-01

    Since 1950s, teaching machines have changed a lot. Today, we have different ideas about how people learn, what instructor should do to help students during their learning process. We have adaptive learning technologies that can create much more student oriented learning environments. The purpose of this article is to present these changes and its…

  10. Hormesis and adaptive cellular control systems

    EPA Science Inventory

    Hormetic dose response occurs for many endpoints associated with exposures of biological organisms to environmental stressors. Cell-based U- or inverted U-shaped responses may derive from common processes involved in activation of adaptive responses required to protect cells from...

  11. A Guide to Computer Adaptive Testing Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davey, Tim

    2011-01-01

    Some brand names are used generically to describe an entire class of products that perform the same function. "Kleenex," "Xerox," "Thermos," and "Band-Aid" are good examples. The term "computerized adaptive testing" (CAT) is similar in that it is often applied uniformly across a diverse family of testing methods. Although the various members of…

  12. Deconvolution of IRTF Observations of Jupiter's Moon Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wernher, Hannah; Rathbun, Julie A.; Spencer, John R.

    2016-10-01

    Io is a active volcanic world with a heat output more than 40 times that of earth. While spacecraft have been used to study Io's volcanoes, their high level of variability requires Earth-based observations to reveal their eruptions in the absence of spacecraft data. Our nearly 20 years of observations from the NASA InfraRed Telescope Facility (IRTF) have been used to monitor volcanic eruptions on Io. Our observations allow us not only to better understand the eruption properties of Ionian volcanoes, but also how the volcanic eruptions affect the rest of the Jovian system, such as the Io plasma torus, sodium clouds, Jovian magnetosphere, and aurorae. While our Jupiter occultation lightcurves of an eclipsed Io have been the focus of this program, due to their ability to determine volcano brightnesses and 1D locations, those observations only allow us to measure volcanic eruptions on the sub-Jovian hemisphere. We also observe Io in reflected sunlight so that we can observe other longitudes on Io. But, brighter eruptions are required for us to be able to distinguish them above the reflected sunlight. We are able to increase the spatial resolution of these images of in order to detect and locate fainter hotspots. We have employed shift-and-add techniques using multiple short exposures to detect eruptions in the past (Rathbun and Spencer, 2010). We will report on the use of publically available deconvolution algorithms to further improve spatial resolution and hot spot detectability, using images of a standard star as our PSF, including experiments with performing the deconvolution both before and after shift and add. We will present results of observations from 2007 and 2013.

  13. Mountain building on Io driven by deep faulting

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bland, Michael T.; McKinnon, William B.

    2016-06-01

    Jupiter's volcanic moon Io possesses some of the highest relief in the Solar System: massive, isolated mountain blocks that tower up to 17 km above the surrounding plains. These mountains are likely to result from pervasive compressive stresses induced by subsidence of the surface beneath the near-continual emplacement of volcanic material. The stress state that results from subsidence and warming of Io's lithosphere has been investigated in detail; however, the mechanism of orogenesis itself and its effect on regional tectonism and volcanism has not been firmly established. Here we present viscoelastic-plastic finite element simulations demonstrating that Io's mountains form along deep-seated thrust faults that initiate at the base of the lithosphere and propagate upward. We show that faulting fundamentally alters the stress state of Io's lithosphere by relieving the large volcanism-induced subsidence stresses. Notably, in the upper portion of the lithosphere, stresses become tensile (near-zero differential stress). A number of processes are therefore altered post-faulting, including magma transport through the lithosphere, interactions with tidal stresses and potentially the localization of mountain formation by thermoelastic stresses. We conclude that Io's mountains form by a unique orogenic mechanism, compared with tectonic processes operating elsewhere in the Solar System.

  14. The Development and Evaluation of a Computerized Adaptive Testing System.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    de-la-Torre, Roberto; Vispoel, Walter P.

    The development and preliminary evaluation of the Computerized Adaptive Testing System (CATSYS), a new testing package for IBM-compatible microcomputers, are described. CATSYS can be used to administer and score operational adaptive tests or to conduct on-line computer simulation studies. The package incorporates several innovative features,…

  15. [Adaptation potential of cardio-respiratory system in dust diseases].

    PubMed

    Serebryakov, P V; Nenenko, O I; Fedina, I N; Rakhimzyanov, A R

    2016-01-01

    The article covers results of cardio-respiratory system evaluation in workers exposed to dust, on basis of adaptation potential evaluation via calculation of functional changes index and 6 minutes' walk test with continuous assessment of blood oxygenation and heart rate. Adaptation disorders are supported by results of external respiration assessment and echo-cardiography.

  16. Adaptive management of social-ecological systems: the path forward

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Allen, Craig R.

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive management remains at the forefront of environmental management nearly 40 years after its original conception, largely because we have yet to develop other methodologies that offer the same promise. Despite the criticisms of adaptive management and the numerous failed attempts to implement it, adaptive management has yet to be replaced with a better alternative. The concept persists because it is simple, allows action despite uncertainty, and fosters learning. Moving forward, adaptive management of social-ecological systems provides policymakers, managers and scientists a powerful tool for managing for resilience in the face of uncertainty.

  17. I/O routing in a multidimensional torus network

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Dong; Eisley, Noel A.; Heidelberger, Philip

    2017-02-07

    A method, system and computer program product are disclosed for routing data packet in a computing system comprising a multidimensional torus compute node network including a multitude of compute nodes, and an I/O node network including a plurality of I/O nodes. In one embodiment, the method comprises assigning to each of the data packets a destination address identifying one of the compute nodes; providing each of the data packets with a toio value; routing the data packets through the compute node network to the destination addresses of the data packets; and when each of the data packets reaches the destination address assigned to said each data packet, routing said each data packet to one of the I/O nodes if the toio value of said each data packet is a specified value. In one embodiment, each of the data packets is also provided with an ioreturn value used to route the data packets through the compute node network.

  18. Cyberspace: The Ultimate Complex Adaptive System

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-04-09

    a transaction with a given agent; tags also facilitate the formation of aggregates , or meta-agents. Meta-agents help distrib- ute and decentralize...Cyber Environments Attribute Physical Environment Cyber Environment Location Latitude, Longitude IP-Address Speed Air and ground in mph Mbps or Gbps...or more capable in terms of its requisite variety (in can adapt to a wider range of conditions). The fitness of the agent is a complex aggregate

  19. Adaptive Control of Nonlinear Flexible Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-18

    disturbances. The following example illustrates the need for a robust state-feedback law and the sensi- tivity of the exact - linearization based control law... exact linearization , one can bring an input-output approach to a particular case of certainty- equivalence based adaptive control design. We now...are available for this model, exact linearization can be performed. Let C(s) be the compensator that is being used so far in the previous three

  20. Chronic infection and the origin of adaptive immune system.

    PubMed

    Usharauli, David

    2010-08-01

    It has been speculated that the rise of the adaptive immune system in jawed vertebrates some 400 million years ago gave them a superior protection to detect and defend against pathogens that became more elusive and/or virulent to the host that had only innate immune system. First, this line of thought implies that adaptive immune system was a new, more sophisticated layer of host defense that operated independently of the innate immune system. Second, the natural consequence of this scenario would be that pathogens would have exercised so strong an evolutionary pressure that eventually no host could have afforded not to have an adaptive immune system. Neither of these arguments is supported by the facts. First, new experimental evidence has firmly established that operation of adaptive immune system is critically dependent on the ability of the innate immune system to detect invader-pathogens and second, the absolute majority of animal kingdom survives just fine with only an innate immune system. Thus, these data raise the dilemma: If innate immune system was sufficient to detect and protect against pathogens, why then did adaptive immune system develop in the first place? In contrast to the innate immune system, the adaptive immune system has one important advantage, precision. By precision I mean the ability of the defense system to detect and remove the target, for example, infected cells, without causing unwanted bystander damage of surrounding tissue. While the target precision per se is not important for short-term immune response, it becomes a critical factor when the immune response is long-lasting, as during chronic infection. In this paper I would like to propose new, "toxic index" hypothesis where I argue that the need to reduce the collateral damage to the tissue during chronic infection(s) was the evolutionary pressure that led to the development of the adaptive immune system.

  1. Jovian dust streams: A monitor of Io's volcanic plume activity

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kruger, H.; Geissler, P.; Horanyi, M.; Graps, A.L.; Kempf, S.; Srama, R.; Moragas-Klostermeyer, G.; Moissl, R.; Johnson, T.V.; Grun, E.

    2003-01-01

    Streams of high speed dust particles originate from Jupiter's moon Io. After release from Io, the particles collect electric charges in the Io plasma torus, gain energy from the co-rotating electric field of Jupiter's magnetosphere, and leave the Jovian system into interplanetary space with escape speeds over 200 km s-1. The Galileo spacecraft has continuously monitored the dust streams during 34 revolutions about Jupiter between 1996 and 2002. The observed dust fluxes exhibit large orbit-to-orbit variability due to systematic and stochastic changes. After removal of the systematic variations, the total dust emission rate of Io has been calculated. It varies between 10-3 and 10 kg s-1, and is typically in the range of 0.1 to 1 kg s-1. We compare the dust emission rate with other markers of volcanic activity on Io like large-area surface changes caused by volcanic deposits and sightings of volcanic plumes. Copyright 2003 by the American Geophysical Union.

  2. Self-consistent MPI-IO performance requirements and expectations.

    SciTech Connect

    Gropp, W. D.; Kimpe, D.; Ross, R.; Thakur, R.; Traff, J. L.; Mathematics and Computer Science; Univ. of Illinois; Katholieke Univ. Leuven; NEC Laboratories Europe

    2008-01-01

    We recently introduced the idea of self-consistent performance requirements for MPI communication. Such requirements provide a means to ensure consistent behavior of an MPI library, thereby ensuring a degree of performance portability by making it unnecessary for a user to perform implementation-dependent optimizations by hand. For the collective operations in particular, a large number of such rules could sensibly be formulated, without making hidden assumptions about the underlying communication system or otherwise constraining the MPI implementation. In this paper, we extend this idea to the realm of parallel I/O (MPI-IO), where the issues are far more subtle. In particular, it is not always possible to specify performance requirements without making assumptions about the implementation or without a priori knowledge of the I/O access pattern. For such cases, we introduce the notion of performance expectations, which specify the desired behavior for good implementations of MPI-IO. I/O performance requirements as well as expectations could be automatically checked by an appropriate benchmarking tool.

  3. Magma ascent pathways associated with large mountains on Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGovern, Patrick J.; Kirchoff, Michelle R.; White, Oliver L.; Schenk, Paul M.

    2016-07-01

    While Jupiter's moon Io is the most volcanically active body in the Solar System, the largest mountains seen on Io are created by tectonic forces rather than volcanic construction. Pervasive compression, primarily brought about by subsidence induced by sustained volcanic resurfacing, creates the mountains, but at the same time inhibits magma ascent in vertical conduits (dikes). We superpose stress solutions for subsidence, along with thermal stress, (both from the "crustal conveyor belt" process of resurfacing) in Io's lithosphere with stresses from Io mountain-sized loads (in a shallow spherical shell solution) in order to evaluate magma ascent pathways. We use stress orientation (least compressive stress horizontal) and stress gradient (compression decreasing upwards) criteria to identify ascent pathways through the lithosphere. There are several configurations for which viable ascent paths transit nearly the entire lithosphere, arriving at the base of the mountain, where magma can be transported through thrust faults or perhaps thermally eroded flank sections. The latter is consistent with observations of some Io paterae in close contact with mountains.

  4. RASCAL: A Rudimentary Adaptive System for Computer-Aided Learning.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stewart, John Christopher

    Both the background of computer-assisted instruction (CAI) systems in general and the requirements of a computer-aided learning system which would be a reasonable assistant to a teacher are discussed. RASCAL (Rudimentary Adaptive System for Computer-Aided Learning) is a first attempt at defining a CAI system which would individualize the learning…

  5. A Hybrid Data Compression Scheme for Power Reduction in Wireless Sensors for IoT.

    PubMed

    Deepu, Chacko John; Heng, Chun-Huat; Lian, Yong

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a novel data compression and transmission scheme for power reduction in Internet-of-Things (IoT) enabled wireless sensors. In the proposed scheme, data is compressed with both lossy and lossless techniques, so as to enable hybrid transmission mode, support adaptive data rate selection and save power in wireless transmission. Applying the method to electrocardiogram (ECG), the data is first compressed using a lossy compression technique with a high compression ratio (CR). The residual error between the original data and the decompressed lossy data is preserved using entropy coding, enabling a lossless restoration of the original data when required. Average CR of 2.1 × and 7.8 × were achieved for lossless and lossy compression respectively with MIT/BIH database. The power reduction is demonstrated using a Bluetooth transceiver and is found to be reduced to 18% for lossy and 53% for lossless transmission respectively. Options for hybrid transmission mode, adaptive rate selection and system level power reduction make the proposed scheme attractive for IoT wireless sensors in healthcare applications.

  6. Io Glowing in the Dark

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Volcanic hot spots and auroral emissions glow on the darkside of Jupiter's moon Io in the image at left. The image was taken by the camera onboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on 29 June, 1996 UT while Io was in Jupiter's shadow. It is the best and highest-resolution image ever acquired of hot spots or auroral features on Io. The mosaic at right of 1979 Voyager images is shown with an identical scale and projection to identify the locations of the hot spots seen in the Galileo image. The grid marks are at 30 degree intervals of latitude and longitude. North is to the top.

    In the nighttime Galileo image, small red ovals and perhaps some small green areas are from volcanic hot spots with temperatures of more than about 700 kelvin (about 1000 degrees Fahrenheit). Greenish areas seen near the limb, or edge of the moon, are probably the result of auroral or airglow emissions of neutral oxygen or sulfur atoms in volcanic plumes and in Io's patchy atmosphere. The image was taken from a range of 1,035,000 kilometers (about 643,000 miles).

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  7. Magnetism and Raman spectroscopy of the dimeric lanthanide iodates Ln(IO3)3 (Ln Gd, Er) and magnetism of Yb(IO3)3.

    SciTech Connect

    Sykora, Richard E.; Khalifah, Peter; Assefa, Zerihun; Albrecht-Schmitt, Thomas E.; Haire, Richard G.

    2008-01-01

    Colorless single crystals of Gd(IO3)3 or pale pink single crystals of Er(IO3)3 have been formed from the reaction of Gd metal with H5IO6 or Er metal with H5IO6 under hydrothermal reaction conditions at 180 1C. The structures of both materials adopt the Bi(IO3)3 structure type. Crystallographic data are (MoKa, l 0.71073 A ): Gd(IO3)3, monoclinic, space group P21/n, a 8.7615(3) A , b 5.9081(2) A , c 15.1232(6) A , b 96.980(1)1, V 777.03(5) Z 4, R(F) 1.68% for 119 parameters with 1930 re ections with I42s(I); Er(IO3)3, monoclinic, space group P21/n, a 8.6885(7) A , b 5.9538(5) A , c 14.9664(12) A , b 97.054(1)1, V 768.4(1) Z 4, R(F) 2.26% for 119 parameters with 1894 re ections with I42s(I). In addition to structural studies, Gd(IO3)3, Er(IO3)3, and the isostructural Yb(IO3)3 were also characterized by Raman spectroscopy and magnetic property measurements. The results of the Raman studies indicated that the vibrational pro les are adequately sensitive to distinguish between the structures of the iodates reported here and other lanthanide iodate systems. The magnetic measurements indicate that only in Gd(IO3)3 did the 3+ lanthanide ion exhibit its full 7.9 mB Hund s rule moment; Er3+ and Yb3+ exhibited ground state moments and gap energy scales of 8.3 mB/70 K and 3.8 mB/160 K, respectively. Er(IO3)3 exhibited extremely weak ferromagnetic correlations (+0.4 K), while the magnetic ions in Gd(IO3)3 and Yb(IO3)3 were fully non-interacting within the resolution of our measurements ("'0.2 K).

  8. Design of a digital adaptive control system for reentry vehicles.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Picon-Jimenez, J. L.; Montgomery, R. C.; Grigsby, L. L.

    1972-01-01

    The flying qualities of atmospheric reentry vehicles experience considerable variations due to the wide changes in flight conditions characteristic of reentry trajectories. A digital adaptive control system has been designed to modify the vehicle's dynamic characteristics and to provide desired flying qualities for all flight conditions. This adaptive control system consists of a finite-memory identifier which determines the vehicle's unknown parameters, and a gain computer which calculates feedback gains to satisfy flying quality requirements.

  9. Global adaptive control for uncertain nonaffine nonlinear hysteretic systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yong-Hua; Huang, Liangpei; Xiao, Dongming; Guo, Yong

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, the global output tracking is investigated for a class of uncertain nonlinear hysteretic systems with nonaffine structures. By combining the solution properties of the hysteresis model with the novel backstepping approach, a robust adaptive control algorithm is developed without constructing a hysteresis inverse. The proposed control scheme is further modified to tackle the bounded disturbances by adaptively estimating their bounds. It is rigorously proven that the designed adaptive controllers can guarantee global stability of the closed-loop system. Two numerical examples are provided to show the effectiveness of the proposed control schemes.

  10. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented.

  11. Adaptive Mesh Refinement and Adaptive Time Integration for Electrical Wave Propagation on the Purkinje System

    PubMed Central

    Ying, Wenjun; Henriquez, Craig S.

    2015-01-01

    A both space and time adaptive algorithm is presented for simulating electrical wave propagation in the Purkinje system of the heart. The equations governing the distribution of electric potential over the system are solved in time with the method of lines. At each timestep, by an operator splitting technique, the space-dependent but linear diffusion part and the nonlinear but space-independent reactions part in the partial differential equations are integrated separately with implicit schemes, which have better stability and allow larger timesteps than explicit ones. The linear diffusion equation on each edge of the system is spatially discretized with the continuous piecewise linear finite element method. The adaptive algorithm can automatically recognize when and where the electrical wave starts to leave or enter the computational domain due to external current/voltage stimulation, self-excitation, or local change of membrane properties. Numerical examples demonstrating efficiency and accuracy of the adaptive algorithm are presented. PMID:26581455

  12. Optimizing Input/Output Using Adaptive File System Policies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Madhyastha, Tara M.; Elford, Christopher L.; Reed, Daniel A.

    1996-01-01

    Parallel input/output characterization studies and experiments with flexible resource management algorithms indicate that adaptivity is crucial to file system performance. In this paper we propose an automatic technique for selecting and refining file system policies based on application access patterns and execution environment. An automatic classification framework allows the file system to select appropriate caching and pre-fetching policies, while performance sensors provide feedback used to tune policy parameters for specific system environments. To illustrate the potential performance improvements possible using adaptive file system policies, we present results from experiments involving classification-based and performance-based steering.

  13. Io Science Opportunities with JIMO: Observing in the Infrared

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smythe, W. D.; Lopes, R.; Spencer, J. R.

    2003-01-01

    The Jupiter Icy Moons Orbiter presents an opportunity to greatly improve our understanding of the most dynamic body in the solar system. Io is the best place to study tidal heating of the Galilean moons, provides unique insights into Earth history and is a unique laboratory for basic planetary physics. Many important questions about Io remain after Galileo that cannot be addressed from Earth or Earth orbit, but could be answered by limited observing time from JIMO with the appropriate instrumentation. Here we outline the requirements in the infrared.

  14. An Optimizing Compiler for Petascale I/O on Leadership-Class Architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Kandemir, Mahmut Taylan; Choudary, Alok; Thakur, Rajeev

    2014-03-01

    In high-performance computing (HPC), parallel I/O architectures usually have very complex hierarchies with multiple layers that collectively constitute an I/O stack, including high-level I/O libraries such as PnetCDF and HDF5, I/O middleware such as MPI-IO, and parallel file systems such as PVFS and Lustre. Our DOE project explored automated instrumentation and compiler support for I/O intensive applications. Our project made significant progress towards understanding the complex I/O hierarchies of high-performance storage systems (including storage caches, HDDs, and SSDs), and designing and implementing state-of-the-art compiler/runtime system technology that targets I/O intensive HPC applications that target leadership class machine. This final report summarizes the major achievements of the project and also points out promising future directions Two new sections in this report compared to the previous report are IOGenie and SSD/NVM-specific optimizations.

  15. Adaptive integral robust control and application to electromechanical servo systems.

    PubMed

    Deng, Wenxiang; Yao, Jianyong

    2017-03-01

    This paper proposes a continuous adaptive integral robust control with robust integral of the sign of the error (RISE) feedback for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems, in which the RISE feedback gain is adapted online to ensure the robustness against disturbances without the prior bound knowledge of the additive disturbances. In addition, an adaptive compensation integrated with the proposed adaptive RISE feedback term is also constructed to further reduce design conservatism when the system also exists parametric uncertainties. Lyapunov analysis reveals the proposed controllers could guarantee the tracking errors are asymptotically converging to zero with continuous control efforts. To illustrate the high performance nature of the developed controllers, numerical simulations are provided. At the end, an application case of an actual electromechanical servo system driven by motor is also studied, with some specific design consideration, and comparative experimental results are obtained to verify the effectiveness of the proposed controllers.

  16. An adaptive tracking observer for failure-detection systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sidar, M.

    1982-01-01

    The design problem of adaptive observers applied to linear, constant and variable parameters, multi-input, multi-output systems, is considered. It is shown that, in order to keep the observer's (or Kalman filter) false-alarm rate (FAR) under a certain specified value, it is necessary to have an acceptable proper matching between the observer (or KF) model and the system parameters. An adaptive observer algorithm is introduced in order to maintain desired system-observer model matching, despite initial mismatching and/or system parameter variations. Only a properly designed adaptive observer is able to detect abrupt changes in the system (actuator, sensor failures, etc.) with adequate reliability and FAR. Conditions for convergence for the adaptive process were obtained, leading to a simple adaptive law (algorithm) with the possibility of an a priori choice of fixed adaptive gains. Simulation results show good tracking performance with small observer output errors and accurate and fast parameter identification, in both deterministic and stochastic cases.

  17. Adaptive Neural Network Based Control of Noncanonical Nonlinear Systems.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yanjun; Tao, Gang; Chen, Mou

    2016-09-01

    This paper presents a new study on the adaptive neural network-based control of a class of noncanonical nonlinear systems with large parametric uncertainties. Unlike commonly studied canonical form nonlinear systems whose neural network approximation system models have explicit relative degree structures, which can directly be used to derive parameterized controllers for adaptation, noncanonical form nonlinear systems usually do not have explicit relative degrees, and thus their approximation system models are also in noncanonical forms. It is well-known that the adaptive control of noncanonical form nonlinear systems involves the parameterization of system dynamics. As demonstrated in this paper, it is also the case for noncanonical neural network approximation system models. Effective control of such systems is an open research problem, especially in the presence of uncertain parameters. This paper shows that it is necessary to reparameterize such neural network system models for adaptive control design, and that such reparameterization can be realized using a relative degree formulation, a concept yet to be studied for general neural network system models. This paper then derives the parameterized controllers that guarantee closed-loop stability and asymptotic output tracking for noncanonical form neural network system models. An illustrative example is presented with the simulation results to demonstrate the control design procedure, and to verify the effectiveness of such a new design method.

  18. Spectrophotometric studies of the Io Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brown, R. A.; Pilcher, C. B.; Strobel, D. F.

    1983-01-01

    A toroidal volume near Io's orbit is made luminous by multiple optical and ultraviolet line emissions excited by resonant scattering of sunlight and by electron collisions. These emitting atoms and ions have been lost from Io. The spectrophotometric measurements of these emissions and their physical interpretation are considered. It is now known that the flow of material from Io dominates the particle and energy budgets of the Jovian magnetosphere. The observed emitting species in the Io torus are examined, and the atomic clouds are discussed, taking into account morphology and kinematics, atomic cloud supply rates, ion-atom collisions, and charge-exchange collisions. Observations and studies concerning the plasma torus are reported, giving attention to the forbidden lines, the extreme ultraviolet lines, and aspects of ion temperature and spatial distribution. Two types of radial transport in the Io torus include the ballistic motion of neutrals escaping from Io and the cross-L transport of ions.

  19. Spatially resolved observations of the forbidden SO aΔ→XΣ rovibronic transition on Io during an eclipse and a volcanic eruption at Ra Patera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Laver, Conor; Marchis, Franck; Roe, Henry G.; Macintosh, Bruce A.

    2007-11-01

    We report observations of Io that were conducted on UT 12 November 2002 with the NIRSPEC spectrometer, coupled to the adaptive optics system, on the 10-m Keck II telescope. We detected a bright eruption in the Ra Patera area, with a color (H-K' band) temperature of 1031±110 K over an effective area of 1.5±0.2 km. The eruption was associated with a hot plume, which revealed itself through SO emission at a rate of (9±3)×10 photonss, about 10-15% of Io's total SO flux at the time. The rotational temperature was 700±150 K. No significant SO emission was received from Io's northern hemisphere (north of Ra Patera/Loki); roughly 50% of the total SO emission came from the equatorial region (including Ra Patera, Janus and Loki), and ˜40% came from the south. The rotational temperatures typically measured between 600 and 1000 K. The emissions are most likely produced by SO molecules ejected out of volcanic vents in the excited aΔ state. Our narrow band images that span the SO emission band suggest that a source near Io's south pole, Nemea, may be a source of some of the southern SO emissions.

  20. Identification and Characterization of a Novel Issatchenkia orientalis GPI-Anchored Protein, IoGas1, Required for Resistance to Low pH and Salt Stress

    PubMed Central

    Matsushika, Akinori; Negi, Kanako; Suzuki, Toshihiro; Goshima, Tetsuya; Hoshino, Tamotsu

    2016-01-01

    The use of yeasts tolerant to acid (low pH) and salt stress is of industrial importance for several bioproduction processes. To identify new candidate genes having potential roles in low-pH tolerance, we screened an expression genomic DNA library of a multiple-stress-tolerant yeast, Issatchenkia orientalis (Pichia kudriavzevii), for clones that allowed Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells to grow under highly acidic conditions (pH 2.0). A genomic DNA clone containing two putative open reading frames was obtained, of which the putative protein-coding gene comprising 1629 bp was retransformed into the host. This transformant grew significantly at pH 2.0, and at pH 2.5 in the presence of 7.5% Na2SO4. The predicted amino acid sequence of this new gene, named I. orientalis GAS1 (IoGAS1), was 60% identical to the S. cerevisiae Gas1 protein, a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein essential for maintaining cell wall integrity, and 58–59% identical to Candida albicans Phr1 and Phr2, pH-responsive proteins implicated in cell wall assembly and virulence. Northern hybridization analyses indicated that, as for the C. albicans homologs, IoGAS1 expression was pH-dependent, with expression increasing with decreasing pH (from 4.0 to 2.0) of the medium. These results suggest that IoGAS1 represents a novel pH-regulated system required for the adaptation of I. orientalis to environments of diverse pH. Heterologous expression of IoGAS1 complemented the growth and morphological defects of a S. cerevisiae gas1Δ mutant, demonstrating that IoGAS1 and the corresponding S. cerevisiae gene play similar roles in cell wall biosynthesis. Site-directed mutagenesis experiments revealed that two conserved glutamate residues (E161 and E262) in the IoGas1 protein play a crucial role in yeast morphogenesis and tolerance to low pH and salt stress. Furthermore, overexpression of IoGAS1 in S. cerevisiae remarkably improved the ethanol fermentation ability at pH 2.5, and at pH 2.0 in the presence of

  1. Adaptive Fuzzy Systems in Computational Intelligence

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berenji, Hamid R.

    1996-01-01

    In recent years, the interest in computational intelligence techniques, which currently includes neural networks, fuzzy systems, and evolutionary programming, has grown significantly and a number of their applications have been developed in the government and industry. In future, an essential element in these systems will be fuzzy systems that can learn from experience by using neural network in refining their performances. The GARIC architecture, introduced earlier, is an example of a fuzzy reinforcement learning system which has been applied in several control domains such as cart-pole balancing, simulation of to Space Shuttle orbital operations, and tether control. A number of examples from GARIC's applications in these domains will be demonstrated.

  2. Io Degassing from sub- and anti-Jupiter Regions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Shown here are color-coded images of Io in eclipse (top). The images were acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft during its tenth orbit around Jupiter. The corresponding views of Io in reflected light are shown at the bottom. The white lines delimit Io's equator and longitudes of 0 (left) and 180 degrees (right). Io always keeps the same hemisphere (longitude 0) facing Jupiter, just as the nearside of the Moon always faces Earth. Furthermore, Io is not a perfect sphere; it is elongated along the axis which is radial to Jupiter (the 'a' axis). The solid-body tides on Io have the greatest amplitude (about 50 meters) where the a axis intersects the surface, at the sub-Jupiter point (latitude 0, longitude 0) and at the anti-Jupiter point (latitude 0, longitude 180 degrees).

    From these eclipse images we see evidence for enhanced concentrations of volcanic gases (dominantly SO2) at the sub- and anti-Jupiter regions. This enhanced degassing may be due directly to the tides or may be due to enhanced heat flow at depth below these regions.

    North is to the top of the picture. The eclipse resolutions are 13.2 (left) and 63 (right) kilometers per picture element. The images were taken on September 18, 1997 (left) and October 5, 1997 (right) by the Solid State Imaging (SSI) system on NASA's Galileo spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/ galileo.

  3. Adaptive controller for a needle free jet-injector system.

    PubMed

    Modak, Ashin; Hogan, N Catherine; Hunter, Ian W

    2015-01-01

    A nonlinear, sliding mode adaptive controller was created for a needle-free jet injection system. The controller was based on a simplified lumped-sum parameter model of the jet-injection mechanics. The adaptive control scheme was compared to a currently-used Feed-forward+PID controller in both ejection of water into air, and injection of dye into ex-vivo porcine tissue. The adaptive controller was more successful in trajectory tracking and was more robust to the biological variations caused by a tissue load.

  4. State of the art in adaptive control of robotic systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tosunoglu, Sabri; Tesar, Delbert

    1988-01-01

    An up-to-date assessment of adaptive control technology as applied to robotics is presented. Although the field is relatively new and does not yet represent a mature discipline, considerable attention for the design of sophisticated robot controllers has occured. In this presentation, adaptive control methods are divided into model reference adaptive systems and self-tuning regulators, with further definition of various approaches given in each class. The similarity and distinct features of the designed controllers are delineated and tabulated to enhance comparative review.

  5. Adaptive control of Hammerstein-Wiener nonlinear systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Bi; Hong, Hyokchan; Mao, Zhizhong

    2016-07-01

    The Hammerstein-Wiener model is a block-oriented model, having a linear dynamic block sandwiched by two static nonlinear blocks. This note develops an adaptive controller for a special form of Hammerstein-Wiener nonlinear systems which are parameterized by the key-term separation principle. The adaptive control law and recursive parameter estimation are updated by the use of internal variable estimations. By modeling the errors due to the estimation of internal variables, we establish convergence and stability properties. Theoretical results show that parameter estimation convergence and closed-loop system stability can be guaranteed under sufficient condition. From a qualitative analysis of the sufficient condition, we introduce an adaptive weighted factor to improve the performance of the adaptive controller. Numerical examples are given to confirm the results in this paper.

  6. Parameter testing for lattice filter based adaptive modal control systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundararajan, N.; Williams, J. P.; Montgomery, R. C.

    1983-01-01

    For Large Space Structures (LSS), an adaptive control system is highly desirable. The present investigation is concerned with an 'indirect' adaptive control scheme wherein the system order, mode shapes, and modal amplitudes are estimated on-line using an identification scheme based on recursive, least-squares, lattice filters. Using the identified model parameters, a modal control law based on a pole-placement scheme with the objective of vibration suppression is employed. A method is presented for closed loop adaptive control of a flexible free-free beam. The adaptive control scheme consists of a two stage identification scheme working in series and a modal pole placement control scheme. The main conclusion from the current study is that the identified parameters cannot be directly used for controller design purposes.

  7. Determination of the supersaturation in the LiIO 3-HIO 3-H 2O system using a refractive index value at near saturation concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lyutov, Lyudmil G.

    2009-09-01

    The exact determination of supersaturation is essential for the studies of crystal growth processes in solutions. Due to peculiarities in the solubility of LiIO 3, the refractive index of the solution is chosen as a measure of the supersaturation instead of undercooling. The experimental setup is based on a refractometer and a special setup to create supersaturation in the cuvette by means of successive evaporation of small amounts of solvent. The refractive index is measured at different solution concentrations and pH and the data are correlated as dependences of concentration and pH on the refractive index. The accuracy of the method and the adequacy of the model are discussed.

  8. The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control. [adaptive control of flexible spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, C. R., Jr.; Lawrence, D. A.

    1981-01-01

    The reduced order model problem in distributed parameter systems adaptive identification and control is investigated. A comprehensive examination of real-time centralized adaptive control options for flexible spacecraft is provided.

  9. Communication system with adaptive noise suppression

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kozel, David (Inventor); Devault, James A. (Inventor); Birr, Richard B. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    A signal-to-noise ratio dependent adaptive spectral subtraction process eliminates noise from noise-corrupted speech signals. The process first pre-emphasizes the frequency components of the input sound signal which contain the consonant information in human speech. Next, a signal-to-noise ratio is determined and a spectral subtraction proportion adjusted appropriately. After spectral subtraction, low amplitude signals can be squelched. A single microphone is used to obtain both the noise-corrupted speech and the average noise estimate. This is done by determining if the frame of data being sampled is a voiced or unvoiced frame. During unvoiced frames an estimate of the noise is obtained. A running average of the noise is used to approximate the expected value of the noise. Spectral subtraction may be performed on a composite noise-corrupted signal, or upon individual sub-bands of the noise-corrupted signal. Pre-averaging of the input signal's magnitude spectrum over multiple time frames may be performed to reduce musical noise.

  10. The Bilingual as an Adaptive System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, David W.

    2002-01-01

    Dijkstra and van Heuven lucidly summarize the important research generated by the BIA model and provide an excellent case for the BIA+ model with its critical separation of the identification system from the task/decision system. A keynote article necessarily offers a selective exposition of the authors' thinking and so my remarks are an…

  11. Adaptive sliding mode control for a class of chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farid, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Zalam, B.

    2015-03-01

    Chaos control here means to design a controller that is able to mitigating or eliminating the chaos behavior of nonlinear systems that experiencing such phenomenon. In this paper, an Adaptive Sliding Mode Controller (ASMC) is presented based on Lyapunov stability theory. The well known Chua's circuit is chosen to be our case study in this paper. The study shows the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive sliding mode controller.

  12. Adaptive sliding mode control for a class of chaotic systems

    SciTech Connect

    Farid, R.; Ibrahim, A.; Zalam, B.

    2015-03-30

    Chaos control here means to design a controller that is able to mitigating or eliminating the chaos behavior of nonlinear systems that experiencing such phenomenon. In this paper, an Adaptive Sliding Mode Controller (ASMC) is presented based on Lyapunov stability theory. The well known Chua's circuit is chosen to be our case study in this paper. The study shows the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive sliding mode controller.

  13. Trilinos I/O Support (Trios)

    DOE PAGES

    Oldfield, Ron A.; Sjaardema, Gregory D.; Lofstead II, Gerald F.; ...

    2012-01-01

    Trilinos I/O Support (Trios) is a new capability area in Trilinos that serves two important roles: (1) it provides and supports I/O libraries used by in-production scientific codes; (2) it provides a research vehicle for the evaluation and distribution of new techniques to improve I/O on advanced platforms. This paper provides a brief overview of the production-grade I/O libraries in Trios as well as some of the ongoing research efforts that contribute to the experimental libraries in Trios.

  14. Distributed adaptive simulation through standards-based integration of simulators and adaptive learning systems.

    PubMed

    Bergeron, Bryan; Cline, Andrew; Shipley, Jaime

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a distributed, standards-based architecture that enables simulation and simulator designers to leverage adaptive learning systems. Our approach, which incorporates an electronic competency record, open source LMS, and open source microcontroller hardware, is a low-cost, pragmatic option to integrating simulators with traditional courseware.

  15. MACAO-VLTI adaptive optics systems performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arsenault, Robin; Donaldson, Rob; Dupuy, Christophe; Fedrigo, Enrico; Hubin, Norbert N.; Ivanescu, Liviu; Kasper, Markus E.; Oberti, Sylvain; Paufique, Jerome; Rossi, Silvio; Silber, Armin; Delabre, Bernhard; Lizon, Jean-Louis; Gigan, Pierre

    2004-10-01

    In April and August "03 two MACAO-VLTI curvature AO systems were installed on the VLT telescopes unit 2 and 3 in Paranal (Chile). These are 60 element systems using a 150mm bimorph deformable mirror and 60 APD"s as WFS detectors. Valuable integration & commissioning experience has been gained during these 2 missions. Several tests have been performed in order to evaluate system performance on the sky. The systems have proven to be extremely robust, performing in a stable fashion in extreme seeing condition (seeing up to 3"). Strehl ratio of 0.65 and residual tilt smaller than 10 mas have been obtained on the sky in 0.8" seeing condition. Weak guide source performance is also excellent with a strehl of 0.26 on a V~16 magnitude star. Several functionalities have been successfully tested including: chopping, off-axis guiding, atmospheric refraction compensation etc. The AO system can be used in a totally automatic fashion with a small overhead: the AO loop can be closed on the target less than 60 sec after star acquisition by the telescope. It includes reading the seeing value given by the site monitor, evaluate the guide star magnitude (cycling through neutral density filters) setting the close-loop AO parameters (system gain and vibrating membrane mirror stroke) including calculation of the command-matrix. The last 2 systems will be installed in August "04 and in the course of 2005.

  16. Screening systems adapt to changing conditions

    SciTech Connect

    Fiscor, S.

    2009-08-15

    Prep plants are installing larger screening systems and synthetic media is meeting those challenges. The largest manufacturer of synthetic screen media is Polydeck located in Spartanburg, South Carolina. The company's primary product lines include modular polyurethane and rubber screen panels and the frame systems to support the media. The modular approach overcomes a wear problem in one area of the deck common on Banana screens and facilitates maintenance. A rubber formation used in 1- x 2-pt screen panels called the Flexi design is softer and allows more vibration than standard urethane panels. The Maxi screen panel design combined with the PipeTop II frame makes the system highly versatile. 1 photo.

  17. An adaptive learning control system for aircraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mekel, R.; Nachmias, S.

    1978-01-01

    A learning control system and its utilization as a flight control system for F-8 Digital Fly-By-Wire (DFBW) research aircraft is studied. The system has the ability to adjust a gain schedule to account for changing plant characteristics and to improve its performance and the plant's performance in the course of its own operation. Three subsystems are detailed: (1) the information acquisition subsystem which identifies the plant's parameters at a given operating condition; (2) the learning algorithm subsystem which relates the identified parameters to predetermined analytical expressions describing the behavior of the parameters over a range of operating conditions; and (3) the memory and control process subsystem which consists of the collection of updated coefficients (memory) and the derived control laws. Simulation experiments indicate that the learning control system is effective in compensating for parameter variations caused by changes in flight conditions.

  18. Adaptive Multilevel Middleware for Object Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-12-01

    evaluation activities; and introduced and supported a commonly accessible testbed facility to organize and significantly improve multi-technology developer ( TD ...Technology Developers ( TDs ), BBN took on the responsibility of setting up and maintaining an ARMS project within the University of Utah’s Emulab’ system...SYSTEMS The use of the Emulab was a great success, with the majority of the TDs using it at one point or another, and a number using it on a regular basis

  19. An Adaptive Speed Control System for Micro Electro Discharge Machining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yeo, S. H.; Aligiri, E.; Tan, P. C.; Zarepour, H.

    2009-11-01

    The integration of the state-of-the-art monitoring and adaptive control technologies can substantially improve the performance of EDM process. This paper reports the development of an adaptive speed control system for micro EDM which demands a higher level of accuracy. Monitoring of the machining state is conducted during the machining process so that the conditions are analysed continuously. Various schemes for the machining state are used for decision making. For instance, upon recognition of abnormal discharges, the developed adaptive speed control system would adjust the electrode feeding speed in an attempt to correct the machining state. Experimental verification shows that the proposed system can improve the machining time by more than 50%. In addition, a more accurate machined feature can be produced as compared to traditional EDM servo control systems.

  20. HIDEC F-15 adaptive engine control system flight test results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smolka, James W.

    1987-01-01

    NASA-Ames' Highly Integrated Digital Electronic Control (HIDEC) flight test program aims to develop fully integrated airframe, propulsion, and flight control systems. The HIDEC F-15 adaptive engine control system flight test program has demonstrated that significant performance improvements are obtainable through the retention of stall-free engine operation throughout the aircraft flight and maneuver envelopes. The greatest thrust increase was projected for the medium-to-high altitude flight regime at subsonic speed which is of such importance to air combat. Adaptive engine control systems such as the HIDEC F-15's can be used to upgrade the performance of existing aircraft without resort to expensive reengining programs.

  1. Adaptive synchronization of Rossler and Chen chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Zhi; Han, Chong-Zhao

    2002-07-01

    A novel adaptive synchronization method is proposed for two identical Rossler and Chen systems with uncertain parameters. Based on Lyapunov stability theory, we derive an adaptive controller without the knowledge of the system parameters, which can make the states of two identical Rossler and Chen systems globally asymptotically synchronized. Especially, when some unknown uncertain parameters are positive, we can make the controller more simple and, besides, the controller is independent of those positive uncertain parameters. All results are proved using a well-known Lyapunov stability theorem. Numerical simulations are given to validate the proposed synchronization approach.

  2. Fast calibration of high-order adaptive optics systems.

    PubMed

    Kasper, Markus; Fedrigo, Enrico; Looze, Douglas P; Bonnet, Henri; Ivanescu, Liviu; Oberti, Sylvain

    2004-06-01

    We present a new method of calibrating adaptive optics systems that greatly reduces the required calibration time or, equivalently, improves the signal-to-noise ratio. The method uses an optimized actuation scheme with Hadamard patterns and does not scale with the number of actuators for a given noise level in the wavefront sensor channels. It is therefore highly desirable for high-order systems and/or adaptive secondary systems on a telescope without a Gregorian focal plane. In the latter case, the measurement noise is increased by the effects of the turbulent atmosphere when one is calibrating on a natural guide star.

  3. Using IOR to analyze the I/O Performance for HPC Platforms

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Hongzhang; Shalf, John

    2007-06-08

    The HPC community is preparing to deploy petaflop-scale computing platforms that may include hundreds of thousands to millions of computational cores over the next 3 years. Such explosive growth in concurrency creates daunting challenges for the design and implementation of the I/O system. In this work, we first analyzed the I/O practices and requirements of current HPC applications and used them as criteria to select a subset of microbenchmarks that reflect the workload requirements. Our analysis led to selection of IOR, an I/O benchmark developed by LLNL for the ASCI Purple procurement, as our tool to study the I/O performance on two HPC platforms. We selected parameterizations for IOR that match the requirements of key I/O intensive applications to assess its fidelity in reproducing their performance characteristics.

  4. ADAPTIVE FULL-SPECTRUM SOLOR ENERGY SYSTEMS

    SciTech Connect

    Byard D. Wood

    2004-04-01

    This RD&D project is a three year team effort to develop a hybrid solar lighting (HSL) system that transports solar light from a paraboloidal dish concentrator to a luminaire via a large core polymer fiber optic. The luminaire can be a device to distribute sunlight into a space for the production of algae or it can be a device that is a combination of solar lighting and electric lighting. A benchmark prototype system has been developed to evaluate the HSL system. Sunlight is collected using a one-meter paraboloidal concentrator dish with two-axis tracking. A secondary mirror consisting of eight planar-segmented mirrors directs the visible part of the spectrum to eight fibers (receiver) and subsequently to eight luminaires. This results in about 8,200 lumens incident at each fiber tip. Each fiber can illuminate about 16.7 m{sup 2} (180 ft{sup 2}) of office space. The IR spectrum is directed to a thermophotovoltaic (TPV) array to produce electricity. During this reporting period, the project team made advancements in the design of the second generation (Alpha) system. For the Alpha system, the eight individual 12 mm fibers have been replaced with a centralized bundle of 3 mm fibers. The TRNSYS Full-Spectrum Solar Energy System model has been updated and new components have been added. The TPV array and nonimaging device have been tested and progress has been made in the fiber transmission models. A test plan was developed for both the high-lumen tests and the study to determine the non-energy benefits of daylighting. The photobioreactor team also made major advancements in the testing of model scale and bench top lab-scale systems.

  5. A Model of Internal Communication in Adaptive Communication Systems.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Williams, M. Lee

    A study identified and categorized different types of internal communication systems and developed an applied model of internal communication in adaptive organizational systems. Twenty-one large organizations were selected for their varied missions and diverse approaches to managing internal communication. Individual face-to-face or telephone…

  6. Identification of Infinite Dimensional Systems via Adaptive Wavelet Neural Networks

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-01-01

    We consider identification of distributed systems via adaptive wavelet neural networks (AWNNs). We take advantage of the multiresolution property of...wavelet systems and the computational structure of neural networks to approximate the unknown plant successively. A systematic approach is developed

  7. Integrating Learning Styles into Adaptive E-Learning System

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Truong, Huong May

    2015-01-01

    This paper provides an overview and update on my PhD research project which focuses on integrating learning styles into adaptive e-learning system. The project, firstly, aims to develop a system to classify students' learning styles through their online learning behaviour. This will be followed by a study on the complex relationship between…

  8. Adaptive and Optimal Control of Stochastic Dynamical Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-09-14

    control and stochastic differential games . Stochastic linear-quadratic, continuous time, stochastic control problems are solved for systems with noise...control problems for systems with arbitrary correlated n 15. SUBJECT TERMS Adaptive control, optimal control, stochastic differential games 16. SECURITY...explicit results have been obtained for problems of stochastic control and stochastic differential games . Stochastic linear- quadratic, continuous time

  9. Understanding leukemic hematopoiesis as a complex adaptive system

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    Normal and abnormal hematopoiesis is working as a complex adaptive system. From this perspective, the development and the behavior of hematopoietic cell lineages appear as a balance between normal and abnormal hematopoiesis in the setting of a functioning or malfunctioning microenvironment under the control of the immune system and the influence of hereditary and environmental events. PMID:26516407

  10. Understanding leukemic hematopoiesis as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Xavier

    2015-10-26

    Normal and abnormal hematopoiesis is working as a complex adaptive system. From this perspective, the development and the behavior of hematopoietic cell lineages appear as a balance between normal and abnormal hematopoiesis in the setting of a functioning or malfunctioning microenvironment under the control of the immune system and the influence of hereditary and environmental events.

  11. Multiple-User Adaptive-Array Communication System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zohar, S.

    1985-01-01

    Weights for K-beam system computed K/6 times faster. In single-frequency adaptive-array communication system in whick K mobile users communicate with central station equipped with n-antenna array. Each K signal recoverable by taking specific weighted sum of n complex antenna voltages.

  12. Network adaptable information systems for safeguard applications

    SciTech Connect

    Rodriguez, C.; Burczyk, L.; Chare, P.; Wagner, H.

    1996-09-01

    While containment and surveillance systems designed for nuclear safeguards have greatly improved through advances in computer, sensor, and microprocessor technologies, the authors recognize the need to continue the advancement of these systems to provide more standardized solutions for safeguards applications of the future. The benefits to be gained from the use of standardized technologies are becoming evident as safeguard activities are increasing world-wide while funding of these activities is becoming more limited. The EURATOM Safeguards Directorate and Los Alamos National Laboratory are developing and testing advanced monitoring technologies coupled with the most efficient solutions for the safeguards applications of the future.

  13. Framework for Adaptable Operating and Runtime Systems: Final Project Report

    SciTech Connect

    Patrick G. Bridges

    2012-02-01

    In this grant, we examined a wide range of techniques for constructing high-performance con gurable system software for HPC systems and its application to DOE-relevant problems. Overall, research and development on this project focused in three specifc areas: (1) software frameworks for constructing and deploying con gurable system software, (2) applcation of these frameworks to HPC-oriented adaptable networking software, (3) performance analysis of HPC system software to understand opportunities for performance optimization.

  14. Method and system for environmentally adaptive fault tolerant computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copenhaver, Jason L. (Inventor); Jeremy, Ramos (Inventor); Wolfe, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Brenner, Dean (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for adapting fault tolerant computing. The method includes the steps of measuring an environmental condition representative of an environment. An on-board processing system's sensitivity to the measured environmental condition is measured. It is determined whether to reconfigure a fault tolerance of the on-board processing system based in part on the measured environmental condition. The fault tolerance of the on-board processing system may be reconfigured based in part on the measured environmental condition.

  15. Lessons from Adaptive Level One Accelerator (ALOA) System Implementation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patel, Umesh D.; Brambora, Clifford; Ghuman, Parminder; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Adaptive Level One Accelerator (ALOA) system was developed as part of the Earth Science Data and Information System (ESDIS) project. The reconfigurable computing technologies were investigated for Level 1 satellite telemetry data processing to achieve computing acceleration and cost reduction for the next-generation Level 1 data processing systems. The MODIS instrument calibration algorithm was implemented using reconfigurable a computer. The system development process and the lessons learned throughout the design cycle are summarized in this paper.

  16. Climate change: Cropping system changes and adaptations

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Climate change impacts the life of every person; however, there is little comprehensive understanding of the direct and indirect effects of climate change on agriculture. Since our food, feed, fiber, and fruit is derived from agricultural systems, understanding the effects of changing temperature, p...

  17. Adaptive Device Context Based Mobile Learning Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pu, Haitao; Lin, Jinjiao; Song, Yanwei; Liu, Fasheng

    2011-01-01

    Mobile learning is e-learning delivered through mobile computing devices, which represents the next stage of computer-aided, multi-media based learning. Therefore, mobile learning is transforming the way of traditional education. However, as most current e-learning systems and their contents are not suitable for mobile devices, an approach for…

  18. Robust Adaptive Control of Multivariable Nonlinear Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-28

    Systems: Challenge Problem Integration and NASA s Integrated Resilient Aircraft Control . We also revealed some similarities with the disturbance ... observer (DOB) controllers and identified the main features in the difference between them. The key feature of this difference is that the estimation loop

  19. The Moon System Adapted for Musical Notation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jackson, Michael

    1987-01-01

    A means is presented for using William Moon's embossed symbols to represent musical notation for blind individuals, as an alternative to braille notation. The proposed system includes pitch symbols, octave indicators, duration symbols, accidentals, key signatures, rests, stress symbols, ornaments, and other symbols. (Author/JDD)

  20. Adaptive control with an expert system based supervisory level. Thesis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, Gerald A.

    1991-01-01

    Adaptive control is presently one of the methods available which may be used to control plants with poorly modelled dynamics or time varying dynamics. Although many variations of adaptive controllers exist, a common characteristic of all adaptive control schemes, is that input/output measurements from the plant are used to adjust a control law in an on-line fashion. Ideally the adjustment mechanism of the adaptive controller is able to learn enough about the dynamics of the plant from input/output measurements to effectively control the plant. In practice, problems such as measurement noise, controller saturation, and incorrect model order, to name a few, may prevent proper adjustment of the controller and poor performance or instability result. In this work we set out to avoid the inadequacies of procedurally implemented safety nets, by introducing a two level control scheme in which an expert system based 'supervisor' at the upper level provides all the safety net functions for an adaptive controller at the lower level. The expert system is based on a shell called IPEX, (Interactive Process EXpert), that we developed specifically for the diagnosis and treatment of dynamic systems. Some of the more important functions that the IPEX system provides are: (1) temporal reasoning; (2) planning of diagnostic activities; and (3) interactive diagnosis. Also, because knowledge and control logic are separate, the incorporation of new diagnostic and treatment knowledge is relatively simple. We note that the flexibility available in the system to express diagnostic and treatment knowledge, allows much greater functionality than could ever be reasonably expected from procedural implementations of safety nets. The remainder of this chapter is divided into three sections. In section 1.1 we give a detailed review of the literature in the area of supervisory systems for adaptive controllers. In particular, we describe the evolution of safety nets from simple ad hoc techniques, up

  1. Effects of adaptive task allocation on monitoring of automated systems.

    PubMed

    Parasuraman, R; Mouloua, M; Molloy, R

    1996-12-01

    The effects of adaptive task allocation on monitoring for automation failure during multitask flight simulation were examined. Participants monitored an automated engine status task while simultaneously performing tracking and fuel management tasks over three 30-min sessions. Two methods of adaptive task allocation, both involving temporary return of the automated engine status task to the human operator ("human control"), were examined as a possible countermeasure to monitoring inefficiency. For the model-based adaptive group, the engine status task was allocated to all participants in the middle of the second session for 10 min, following which it was again returned to automation control. The same occurred for the performance-based adaptive group, but only if an individual participant's monitoring performance up to that point did not meet a specified criterion. For the nonadaptive control groups, the engine status task remained automated throughout the experiment. All groups had low probabilities of detection of automation failures for the first 40 min spent with automation. However, following the 10-min intervening period of human control, both adaptive groups detected significantly more automation failures during the subsequent blocks under automation control. The results show that adaptive task allocation can enhance monitoring of automated systems. Both model-based and performance-based allocation improved monitoring of automation. Implications for the design of automated systems are discussed.

  2. Adaptive Management of Computing and Network Resources for Spacecraft Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pfarr, Barbara; Welch, Lonnie R.; Detter, Ryan; Tjaden, Brett; Huh, Eui-Nam; Szczur, Martha R. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    It is likely that NASA's future spacecraft systems will consist of distributed processes which will handle dynamically varying workloads in response to perceived scientific events, the spacecraft environment, spacecraft anomalies and user commands. Since all situations and possible uses of sensors cannot be anticipated during pre-deployment phases, an approach for dynamically adapting the allocation of distributed computational and communication resources is needed. To address this, we are evolving the DeSiDeRaTa adaptive resource management approach to enable reconfigurable ground and space information systems. The DeSiDeRaTa approach embodies a set of middleware mechanisms for adapting resource allocations, and a framework for reasoning about the real-time performance of distributed application systems. The framework and middleware will be extended to accommodate (1) the dynamic aspects of intra-constellation network topologies, and (2) the complete real-time path from the instrument to the user. We are developing a ground-based testbed that will enable NASA to perform early evaluation of adaptive resource management techniques without the expense of first deploying them in space. The benefits of the proposed effort are numerous, including the ability to use sensors in new ways not anticipated at design time; the production of information technology that ties the sensor web together; the accommodation of greater numbers of missions with fewer resources; and the opportunity to leverage the DeSiDeRaTa project's expertise, infrastructure and models for adaptive resource management for distributed real-time systems.

  3. Adaptation in the innate immune system and heterologous innate immunity.

    PubMed

    Martin, Stefan F

    2014-11-01

    The innate immune system recognizes deviation from homeostasis caused by infectious or non-infectious assaults. The threshold for its activation seems to be established by a calibration process that includes sensing of microbial molecular patterns from commensal bacteria and of endogenous signals. It is becoming increasingly clear that adaptive features, a hallmark of the adaptive immune system, can also be identified in the innate immune system. Such adaptations can result in the manifestation of a primed state of immune and tissue cells with a decreased activation threshold. This keeps the system poised to react quickly. Moreover, the fact that the innate immune system recognizes a wide variety of danger signals via pattern recognition receptors that often activate the same signaling pathways allows for heterologous innate immune stimulation. This implies that, for example, the innate immune response to an infection can be modified by co-infections or other innate stimuli. This "design feature" of the innate immune system has many implications for our understanding of individual susceptibility to diseases or responsiveness to therapies and vaccinations. In this article, adaptive features of the innate immune system as well as heterologous innate immunity and their implications are discussed.

  4. An Approach to V&V of Embedded Adaptive Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Yan; Yerramalla, Sampath; Fuller, Edgar; Cukic, Bojan; Gururajan, Srikaruth

    2004-01-01

    Rigorous Verification and Validation (V&V) techniques are essential for high assurance systems. Lately, the performance of some of these systems is enhanced by embedded adaptive components in order to cope with environmental changes. Although the ability of adapting is appealing, it actually poses a problem in terms of V&V. Since uncertainties induced by environmental changes have a significant impact on system behavior, the applicability of conventional V&V techniques is limited. In safety-critical applications such as flight control system, the mechanisms of change must be observed, diagnosed, accommodated and well understood prior to deployment. In this paper, we propose a non-conventional V&V approach suitable for online adaptive systems. We apply our approach to an intelligent flight control system that employs a particular type of Neural Networks (NN) as the adaptive learning paradigm. Presented methodology consists of a novelty detection technique and online stability monitoring tools. The novelty detection technique is based on Support Vector Data Description that detects novel (abnormal) data patterns. The Online Stability Monitoring tools based on Lyapunov's Stability Theory detect unstable learning behavior in neural networks. Cases studies based on a high fidelity simulator of NASA's Intelligent Flight Control System demonstrate a successful application of the presented V&V methodology. ,

  5. Adaptive carrier recovery systems for digital data communications receivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cupo, Robert L.; Gitlin, Richard D.

    1989-12-01

    Adaptive or predictive carrier recovery systems, which are essential in high-performance quadrature-amplitude-modulated (QAM) data communications systems to correct for phase jitter and frequency offset, are considered. Analytical and experimental results are presented for two structures that implement a predictive carrier recovery system. These systems, which adapt their structure to match the spectral properties of the impairments, avoid the conflict between a wide bandwidth (to track fast jitter) and a narrow bandwidth (to minimize output noise) inherent in most carrier recovery loops. Such a system increases the likelihood that very bandwidth-efficient modems (e.g., 7 bits/s/Hz for 19.2 kbits/s voiceband modem applications) can provide reliable transmission in the presence of severe phase jitter and frequency offset. In particular, the predictive carrier recovery systems can track sinusoidal jitter present at more than one frequency as well as generalized time-varying phase jitter processes. Both finite-impulse-response and infinite-impulse-response (IIR) adaptive phase tracking systems are considered. Prior limitations on adaptive IIR filters are overcome by designing a structure that is guaranteed to be stable and to possess only a global minimum as the filter coefficients converge to their desired values.

  6. Adaptive optics at Lick Observatory: System architecture and operations

    SciTech Connect

    Brase, J.M.; An, J.; Avicola, K.

    1994-03-01

    We will describe an adaptive optics system developed for the 1 meter Nickel and 3 meter Shane telescopes at Lick Observatory. Observing wavelengths will be in the visible for the 1 meter telescope and in the near IR on the 3 meter. The adaptive optics system design is based on a 69 actuator continuous surface deformable mirror and a Hartmann wavefront sensor equipped with an intensified CCD framing camera. The system has been tested at the Cassegrain focus of the 1 meter telescope where the subaperture size is 12.5 cm. The wavefront control calculations are performed on a four processor single board computer controlled by a Unix-based system. We will describe the optical system and give details of the wavefront control system design. We will present predictions of the system performance and initial test results.

  7. Adaptive optics at Lick Observatory: system architecture and operations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brase, James M.; An, Jong; Avicola, Kenneth; Bissinger, Horst D.; Friedman, Herbert W.; Gavel, Donald T.; Johnston, Brooks; Max, Claire E.; Olivier, Scot S.; Presta, Robert W.; Rapp, David A.; Salmon, J. Thaddeus; Waltjen, Kenneth E.; Fisher, William A.

    1994-05-01

    We will describe an adaptive optics system developed for the 1 meter Nickel and 3 meter Shane telescopes at Lick Observatory. Observing wavelengths will be in the visible for the 1 meter telescope and in the near IR on the 3 meter. The adaptive optics system design is based on a 69 actuator continuous surface deformable mirror and a Hartmann wavefront sensor equipped with an intensified CCD framing camera. The system has been tested at the Cassegrain focus of the 1 meter telescope where the subaperture size is 12.5 cm. The wavefront control calculations are performed on a four processor single board computer controlled by a Unix-based system. We will describe the optical system and give details of the wavefront control system design. We will present predictions of the system performance and initial test results.

  8. SDR implementation of the receiver of adaptive communication system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skarzynski, Jacek; Darmetko, Marcin; Kozlowski, Sebastian; Kurek, Krzysztof

    2016-04-01

    The paper presents software implementation of a receiver forming a part of an adaptive communication system. The system is intended for communication with a satellite placed in a low Earth orbit (LEO). The ability of adaptation is believed to increase the total amount of data transmitted from the satellite to the ground station. Depending on the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the received signal, adaptive transmission is realized using different transmission modes, i.e., different modulation schemes (BPSK, QPSK, 8-PSK, and 16-APSK) and different convolutional code rates (1/2, 2/3, 3/4, 5/6, and 7/8). The receiver consists of a software-defined radio (SDR) module (National Instruments USRP-2920) and a multithread reception software running on Windows operating system. In order to increase the speed of signal processing, the software takes advantage of single instruction multiple data instructions supported by x86 processor architecture.

  9. Laser Adaptive System for Measurement of Molecule Mass and Concentration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Romashko, R. V.; Kulchin, Y. N.; Efimov, T. A.; Sergeev, A. A.; Nepomnyashiy, A. V.

    A Laser adaptive microweighting system for measurement of molecules mass based on the principles of adaptive holog aphic interferometry is proposed and experimentally tested in task of gas concentration measurement. A sensitive element of the system is a microcantilever coated by a layer of chitosan, which can adsorb different molecules. Changes in gas concentration re ult in change in mass of molecules adsorbed in chitosan, and, as sequence, result in change in natural frequency of cantilever oscillations, which are measured by an adaptive holographic interferometer. The operation of the system has been experimentally demonstrated in measurement of water vapor concentration. The detected change in concentration of H2O molecules amounted to 125 ppm.

  10. Adaptive synchronization of two chaotic systems with stochastic unknown parameters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salarieh, Hassan; Alasty, Aria

    2009-02-01

    Using the Lyapunov stability theory an adaptive control is proposed for chaos synchronization between two different systems which have stochastically time varying unknown coefficients. The stochastic variations of the coefficients about their unknown mean values are modeled through white Gaussian noise produced by the Weiner process. It is shown that using the proposed adaptive control the mean square of synchronization error converges to an arbitrarily small bound around zero. To demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed technique, it is applied to the Lorenz-Chen and the Chen-Rossler dynamical systems, as some case studies. Simulation results indicate that the proposed adaptive controller has a high performance in synchronization of chaotic systems in noisy environment.

  11. An adaptive brain actuated system for augmenting rehabilitation

    PubMed Central

    Roset, Scott A.; Gant, Katie; Prasad, Abhishek; Sanchez, Justin C.

    2014-01-01

    For people living with paralysis, restoration of hand function remains the top priority because it leads to independence and improvement in quality of life. In approaches to restore hand and arm function, a goal is to better engage voluntary control and counteract maladaptive brain reorganization that results from non-use. Standard rehabilitation augmented with developments from the study of brain-computer interfaces could provide a combined therapy approach for motor cortex rehabilitation and to alleviate motor impairments. In this paper, an adaptive brain-computer interface system intended for application to control a functional electrical stimulation (FES) device is developed as an experimental test bed for augmenting rehabilitation with a brain-computer interface. The system's performance is improved throughout rehabilitation by passive user feedback and reinforcement learning. By continuously adapting to the user's brain activity, similar adaptive systems could be used to support clinical brain-computer interface neurorehabilitation over multiple days. PMID:25565945

  12. Software Technology for Adaptable, Reliable Systems (STARS)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1990-11-02

    through the use of a single intermediate language. However, certain evolutionary paths, i.e., translators and funtional interfaces, must be established...Systems Ada compiler beginning in December 1984 and was presented at an Arcadia consortium meeting held in December 1984. Iris concepts and a grammar ...Page 11 2 November 1990 STARS-RC-01430/001/00 o An LALR parser generator and an Ada grammar , used to produce the parse phase of the Ada-to-DIANA

  13. ADAPTIVE CLEARANCE CONTROL SYSTEMS FOR TURBINE ENGINES

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Blackwell, Keith M.

    2004-01-01

    The Controls and Dynamics Technology Branch at NASA Glenn Research Center primarily deals in developing controls, dynamic models, and health management technologies for air and space propulsion systems. During the summer of 2004 I was granted the privilege of working alongside professionals who were developing an active clearance control system for commercial jet engines. Clearance, the gap between the turbine blade tip and the encompassing shroud, increases as a result of wear mechanisms and rubbing of the turbine blades on shroud. Increases in clearance cause larger specific fuel consumption (SFC) and loss of efficient air flow. This occurs because, as clearances increase, the engine must run hotter and bum more fuel to achieve the same thrust. In order to maintain efficiency, reduce fuel bum, and reduce exhaust gas temperature (EGT), the clearance must be accurately controlled to gap sizes no greater than a few hundredths of an inch. To address this problem, NASA Glenn researchers have developed a basic control system with actuators and sensors on each section of the shroud. Instead of having a large uniform metal casing, there would be sections of the shroud with individual sensors attached internally that would move slightly to reform and maintain clearance. The proposed method would ultimately save the airline industry millions of dollars.

  14. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  15. Implementation of a Multichannel Serial Data Streaming Algorithm using the Xilinx Serial RapidIO Solution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Doxley, Charles A.

    2016-01-01

    In the current world of applications that use reconfigurable technology implemented on field programmable gate arrays (FPGAs), there is a need for flexible architectures that can grow as the systems evolve. A project has limited resources and a fixed set of requirements that development efforts are tasked to meet. Designers must develop robust solutions that practically meet the current customer demands and also have the ability to grow for future performance. This paper describes the development of a high speed serial data streaming algorithm that allows for transmission of multiple data channels over a single serial link. The technique has the ability to change to meet new applications developed for future design considerations. This approach uses the Xilinx Serial RapidIO LOGICORE Solution to implement a flexible infrastructure to meet the current project requirements with the ability to adapt future system designs.

  16. Situational adapting system supporting team situation awareness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helldin, Tove; Erlandsson, Tina; Niklasson, Lars; Falkman, Göran

    2010-10-01

    Military fighter pilots have to make suitable decisions fast in an environment where continuously increasing flows of information from sensors, team members and databases are provided. Not only do the huge amounts of data aggravate the pilots' decision making process: time-pressure, presence of uncertain data and high workload are factors that can worsen the performance of pilot decision making. In this paper, initial ideas of how to support the pilots accomplishing their tasks are presented. Results from interviews with two fighter pilots are described as well as a discussion about how these results can guide the design of a military fighter pilot decision support system, with focus on team cooperation.

  17. Real-time control system for adaptive resonator

    SciTech Connect

    Flath, L; An, J; Brase, J; Hurd, R; Kartz, M; Sawvel, R; Silva, D

    2000-07-24

    Sustained operation of high average power solid-state lasers currently requires an adaptive resonator to produce the optimal beam quality. We describe the architecture of a real-time adaptive control system for correcting intra-cavity aberrations in a heat capacity laser. Image data collected from a wavefront sensor are processed and used to control phase with a high-spatial-resolution deformable mirror. Our controller takes advantage of recent developments in low-cost, high-performance processor technology. A desktop-based computational engine and object-oriented software architecture replaces the high-cost rack-mount embedded computers of previous systems.

  18. Design of suboptimal adaptive filter for stochastic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Jun Il; Shin, Vladimir

    2005-12-01

    In this paper, the problem of estimating the system state in for linear discrete-time systems with uncertainties is considered. In [1], [2], we have proposed the fusion formula (FF) for an arbitrary number of correlated and uncorrelated estimates. The FF is applied to detection and filtering problem. The new suboptimal adaptive filter with parallel structure is herein proposed. In consequence of parallel structure of the proposed filter, parallel computers can be used for their design. A lower computational complexity and lower memory demand are achieved with the proposed filter than in the optimal adaptive Lainiotis-Kalman filter. Example demonstrates the accuracy of the new filter.

  19. Evolution of innate and adaptive immune systems in jawless vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Kasamatsu, Jun

    2013-01-01

    Because jawless vertebrates are the most primitive vertebrates, they have been studied to gain understanding of the evolutionary processes that gave rise to the innate and adaptive immune systems in vertebrates. Jawless vertebrates have developed lymphocyte-like cells that morphologically resemble the T and B cells of jawed vertebrates, but they express variable lymphocyte receptors (VLRs) instead of the T and B cell receptors that specifically recognize antigens in jawed vertebrates. These VLRs act as antigen receptors, diversity being generated in their antigen-binding sites by assembly of highly diverse leucine-rich repeat modules. Therefore, jawless vertebrates have developed adaptive immune systems based on the VLRs. Although pattern recognition receptors, including Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and Rig-like receptors (RLRs), and their adaptor genes are conserved in jawless vertebrates, some transcription factor and inflammatory cytokine genes in the TLR and RLR pathways are not present. However, like jawed vertebrates, the initiation of adaptive immune responses in jawless vertebrates appears to require prior activation of the innate immune system. These observations imply that the innate immune systems of jawless vertebrates have a unique molecular basis that is distinct from that of jawed vertebrates. Altogether, although the molecular details of the innate and adaptive immune systems differ between jawless and jawed vertebrates, jawless vertebrates have developed versions of these immune systems that are similar to those of jawed vertebrates.

  20. Adaptive Modeling of the International Space Station Electrical Power System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Justin Ray

    2007-01-01

    Software simulations provide NASA engineers the ability to experiment with spacecraft systems in a computer-imitated environment. Engineers currently develop software models that encapsulate spacecraft system behavior. These models can be inaccurate due to invalid assumptions, erroneous operation, or system evolution. Increasing accuracy requires manual calibration and domain-specific knowledge. This thesis presents a method for automatically learning system models without any assumptions regarding system behavior. Data stream mining techniques are applied to learn models for critical portions of the International Space Station (ISS) Electrical Power System (EPS). We also explore a knowledge fusion approach that uses traditional engineered EPS models to supplement the learned models. We observed that these engineered EPS models provide useful background knowledge to reduce predictive error spikes when confronted with making predictions in situations that are quite different from the training scenarios used when learning the model. Evaluations using ISS sensor data and existing EPS models demonstrate the success of the adaptive approach. Our experimental results show that adaptive modeling provides reductions in model error anywhere from 80% to 96% over these existing models. Final discussions include impending use of adaptive modeling technology for ISS mission operations and the need for adaptive modeling in future NASA lunar and Martian exploration.

  1. Adaptive mass expulsion attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rodden, John J. (Inventor); Stevens, Homer D. (Inventor); Carrou, Stephane (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    An attitude control system and method operative with a thruster controls the attitude of a vehicle carrying the thruster, wherein the thruster has a valve enabling the formation of pulses of expelled gas from a source of compressed gas. Data of the attitude of the vehicle is gathered, wherein the vehicle is located within a force field tending to orient the vehicle in a first attitude different from a desired attitude. The attitude data is evaluated to determine a pattern of values of attitude of the vehicle in response to the gas pulses of the thruster and in response to the force field. The system and the method maintain the attitude within a predetermined band of values of attitude which includes the desired attitude. Computation circuitry establishes an optimal duration of each of the gas pulses based on the pattern of values of attitude, the optimal duration providing for a minimal number of opening and closure operations of the valve. The thruster is operated to provide gas pulses having the optimal duration.

  2. Adaptive data acquisition multiplexing system and method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinderson, Richard L. (Inventor); Salazar, George A. (Inventor); Haddick, Clyde M., Jr. (Inventor); Spahn, Caroll J. (Inventor); Venkatesh, Chikkabelarangala N. (Inventor)

    1990-01-01

    A reconfigurable telemetry multiplexer is described which includes a monitor-terminal and a plurality of remote terminals. The remote terminals each include signal conditioning for a plurality of sensors for measuring parameters which are converted by an analog to digital converter. CPU's in the remote terminals store instructions for prompting system configuration and reconfiguration commands. The measurements, instructions, and the terminal's present configuration and status data are transmitted to the monitor-terminal and displayed. In response to menu-driven prompts generated and displayed at the monitor-terminal, data generation request commands, status and health commands, and the like are input at the monitor-terminal and transmitted to the remote terminals. The CPU in each remote terminal receives the various commands, stores them in electrically alterable memory, and reacts in accordance with the commands to reconfigure a plurality of aspects of the system. The CPU in each terminal also generates parameter measurements, status and health signals, and transmits these signals of the respective terminals to the monitor-terminal for low data rate operator viewing and to higher rate external transmission/monitor equipment. Reconfiguration may be in real time during the general period of parameter measurement acquisition, and may include alteration of the gain, automatic gain rescaling, bias, and or sampling rates associated with one or more of the parameter measurements made by the remote terminals.

  3. Volcanic Degassing of Hydrogen Compounds on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zolotov, M. Yu.; Fegley, B., Jr.

    2000-01-01

    Thermodynamic calculations show that hydrogen, recently detected in Io's ionosphere by the Galileo spacecraft, can degas from high-temperature silicate magmas on Io in the form of H2O, H2S, HS, NaOH, H2, KOH, and HCl in order of decreasing abundance.

  4. New Results on Io's Color and Composition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Geissler, P.; McEwen, A. S.; Phillips, C.; Keszthelyi, L.; Turtle, E.; Milazzo, M.; Lopes-Gautier, R.; Simonelli, D.; Williams, D.

    2000-01-01

    Galileo's recent high-resolution imaging provides new insights into the nature of Io's colorful surface, shedding light on the composition and origin of pyroclastic deposits and suggesting that Io's mysterious green spots are due to coating or alteration of silicate lavas.

  5. 3- to 13-micron spectra of Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Noll, Keith S.; Hammel, H. B.; Young, Leslie; Joiner, Joanna; Hackwell, J.; Lynch, D. K.; Russell, R.

    1993-01-01

    The Broadband Array Spectrograph System with the NASA Infrared Telescope Facility was used to obtain 3- to 13-micron spectra of Io on June 14-16, 1991. The extinction correction and its error for each standard star (Alpha Boo, Alpha Lyr, and Mu UMa) were found individually by performing an unweighted linear fit of instrumental magnitude as a function of airmass. The model results indicate two significant trends: (1) modest differences between the two hemispheres at lower background temperatures and (2) a tendency to higher temperatures, smaller areas, and less power from the warm component at higher background temperatures with an increased contrast between the two hemispheres. The increased flux from 8 to 13 microns is due primarily to a greater area on the Loki (trailing) hemisphere for the warm component, although temperature also plays a role.

  6. Quantitative adaptation analytics for assessing dynamic systems of systems: LDRD Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Gauthier, John H.; Miner, Nadine E.; Wilson, Michael L.; Le, Hai D.; Kao, Gio K.; Melander, Darryl J.; Longsine, Dennis Earl; Vander Meer, Jr., Robert C.

    2015-01-01

    Our society is increasingly reliant on systems and interoperating collections of systems, known as systems of systems (SoS). These SoS are often subject to changing missions (e.g., nation- building, arms-control treaties), threats (e.g., asymmetric warfare, terrorism), natural environments (e.g., climate, weather, natural disasters) and budgets. How well can SoS adapt to these types of dynamic conditions? This report details the results of a three year Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project aimed at developing metrics and methodologies for quantifying the adaptability of systems and SoS. Work products include: derivation of a set of adaptability metrics, a method for combining the metrics into a system of systems adaptability index (SoSAI) used to compare adaptability of SoS designs, development of a prototype dynamic SoS (proto-dSoS) simulation environment which provides the ability to investigate the validity of the adaptability metric set, and two test cases that evaluate the usefulness of a subset of the adaptability metrics and SoSAI for distinguishing good from poor adaptability in a SoS. Intellectual property results include three patents pending: A Method For Quantifying Relative System Adaptability, Method for Evaluating System Performance, and A Method for Determining Systems Re-Tasking.

  7. Development of adaptive control applied to chaotic systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rhode, Martin Andreas

    1997-12-01

    Continuous-time derivative control and adaptive map-based recursive feedback control techniques are used to control chaos in a variety of systems and in situations that are of practical interest. The theoretical part of the research includes the review of fundamental concept of control theory in the context of its applications to deterministic chaotic systems, the development of a new adaptive algorithm to identify the linear system properties necessary for control, and the extension of the recursive proportional feedback control technique, RPF, to high dimensional systems. Chaos control was applied to models of a thermal pulsed combustor, electro-chemical dissolution and the hyperchaotic Rossler system. Important implications for combustion engineering were suggested by successful control of the model of the thermal pulsed combustor. The system was automatically tracked while maintaining control into regions of parameter and state space where no stable attractors exist. In a simulation of the electrochemical dissolution system, application of derivative control to stabilize a steady state, and adaptive RPF to stabilize a period one orbit, was demonstrated. The high dimensional adaptive control algorithm was applied in a simulation using the Rossler hyperchaotic system, where a period-two orbit with two unstable directions was stabilized and tracked over a wide range of a system parameter. In the experimental part, the electrochemical system was studied in parameter space, by scanning the applied potential and the frequency of the rotating copper disk. The automated control algorithm is demonstrated to be effective when applied to stabilize a period-one orbit in the experiment. We show the necessity of small random perturbations applied to the system in order to both learn the dynamics and control the system at the same time. The simultaneous learning and control capability is shown to be an important part of the active feedback control.

  8. Decision-making in healthcare as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Kuziemsky, Craig

    2016-01-01

    Healthcare transformation requires a change in how the business of healthcare is done. Traditional decision-making approaches based on stable and predictable systems are inappropriate in healthcare because of the complex nature of healthcare delivery. This article reviews challenges to using traditional decision-making approaches in healthcare and how insight from Complex Adaptive Systems (CAS) could support healthcare management. The article also provides a system model to guide decision-making in healthcare as a CAS.

  9. Automatic Identification of Application I/O Signatures from Noisy Server-Side Traces

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Yang; Gunasekaran, Raghul; Ma, Xiaosong; Vazhkudai, Sudharshan S

    2014-01-01

    Competing workloads on a shared storage system cause I/O resource contention and application performance vagaries. This problem is already evident in today s HPC storage systems and is likely to become acute at exascale. We need more interaction between application I/O requirements and system software tools to help alleviate the I/O bottleneck, moving towards I/O-aware job scheduling. However, this requires rich techniques to capture application I/O characteristics, which remain evasive in production systems. Traditionally, I/O characteristics have been obtained using client-side tracing tools, with drawbacks such as non-trivial instrumentation/development costs, large trace traffic, and inconsistent adoption. We present a novel approach, I/O Signature Identifier (IOSI), to characterize the I/O behavior of data-intensive applications. IOSI extracts signatures from noisy, zero-overhead server-side I/O throughput logs that are already collected on today s supercomputers, without interfering with the compiling/execution of applications. We evaluated IOSI using the Spider storage system at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, the S3D turbulence application (running on 18,000 Titan nodes), and benchmark-based pseudo-applications. Through our ex- periments we confirmed that IOSI effectively extracts an application s I/O signature despite significant server-side noise. Compared to client-side tracing tools, IOSI is transparent, interface-agnostic, and incurs no overhead. Compared to alternative data alignment techniques (e.g., dynamic time warping), it offers higher signature accuracy and shorter processing time.

  10. Io: Heat flow from dark volcanic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, Glenn J.; Davies, Ashley Gerard; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2009-11-01

    Dark flow fields on the jovian satellite Io are evidence of current or recent volcanic activity. We have examined the darkest volcanic fields and quantified their thermal emission in order to assess their contribution to Io's total heat flow. Loki Patera, the largest single source of heat flow on Io, is a convenient point of reference. We find that dark volcanic fields are more common in the hemisphere opposite Loki Patera and this large scale concentration is manifested as a maximum in the longitudinal distribution (near ˜200 °W), consistent with USGS global geologic mapping results. In spite of their relatively cool temperatures, dark volcanic fields contribute almost as much to Io's heat flow as Loki Patera itself because of their larger areal extent. As a group, dark volcanic fields provide an asymmetric component of ˜5% of Io's global heat flow or ˜5 × 10 12 W.

  11. Self-characterization of linear and nonlinear adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hampton, Peter J.; Conan, Rodolphe; Keskin, Onur; Bradley, Colin; Agathoklis, Pan

    2008-01-01

    We present methods used to determine the linear or nonlinear static response and the linear dynamic response of an adaptive optics (AO) system. This AO system consists of a nonlinear microelectromechanical systems deformable mirror (DM), a linear tip-tilt mirror (TTM), a control computer, and a Shack-Hartmann wavefront sensor. The system is modeled using a single-input-single-output structure to determine the one-dimensional transfer function of the dynamic response of the chain of system hardware. An AO system has been shown to be able to characterize its own response without additional instrumentation. Experimentally determined models are given for a TTM and a DM.

  12. [Caffeine and adaptive changes in the circulatory system during pregnancy].

    PubMed

    Cendrowska-Pinkosz, Monika; Dworzański, Wojciech; Krauze, Magdalena; Burdan, Franciszek

    2017-01-23

    Adaptive physiological changes that occur in pregnant women can fluctuate with the intake of substances with proven, adverse biological effect on the body. Due to the fact that caffeine is one of the most chronically used xenobiotics, the impact of consuming caffeine on adaptive processes in the circulatory system of a pregnant women required a research. Many researchers emphasise its negative effect on the circulatory system of the mother and her offspring. However, in spite of years of observation, there is no clear answer to what extent dose or in what period of time the caffeine modulates the adaptive processes during pregnancy. Because of the potential risk the supply of caffeine during pregnancy should be subjected to considerable restrictions.

  13. A dual-modal retinal imaging system with adaptive optics

    PubMed Central

    Meadway, Alexander; Girkin, Christopher A.; Zhang, Yuhua

    2013-01-01

    An adaptive optics scanning laser ophthalmoscope (AO-SLO) is adapted to provide optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. The AO-SLO function is unchanged. The system uses the same light source, scanning optics, and adaptive optics in both imaging modes. The result is a dual-modal system that can acquire retinal images in both en face and cross-section planes at the single cell level. A new spectral shaping method is developed to reduce the large sidelobes in the coherence profile of the OCT imaging when a non-ideal source is used with a minimal introduction of noise. The technique uses a combination of two existing digital techniques. The thickness and position of the traditionally named inner segment/outer segment junction are measured from individual photoreceptors. In-vivo images of healthy and diseased human retinas are demonstrated. PMID:24514529

  14. Adapting ISA system warnings to enhance user acceptance.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Felipe; Liang, Yingzhen; Aparicio, Francisco

    2012-09-01

    Inappropriate speed is a major cause of traffic accidents. Different measures have been considered to control traffic speed, and intelligent speed adaptation (ISA) systems are one of the alternatives. These systems know the speed limits and try to improve compliance with them. This paper deals with an informative ISA system that provides the driver with an advance warning before reaching a road section with singular characteristics that require a lower safe speed than the current speed. In spite of the extensive tests performed using ISA systems, few works show how warnings can be adapted to the driver. This paper describes a method to adapt warning parameters (safe speed on curves, zone of influence of a singular stretch, deceleration process and reaction time) to normal driving behavior. The method is based on a set of tests with and without the ISA system. This adjustment, as well as the analysis of driver acceptance before and after the adaptation and changes in driver behavior (changes in speed and path) resulting from the tested ISA regarding a driver's normal driving style, is shown in this paper. The main conclusion is that acceptance by drivers increased significantly after redefining the warning parameters, but the effect of speed homogenization was not reduced.

  15. Periodic Bursts of Jovian Non-Io Decametric Radio Emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H O.; Farrell, W. M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have Recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period approx. = 1:5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300 deg. and 60 deg. (via 360 deg.). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every approx. 25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  16. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission.

    PubMed

    Panchenko, M; Rucker, H O; Farrell, W M

    2013-03-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period [Formula: see text] longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every [Formula: see text] days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  17. Cassini-VIMS at Jupiter: Solar occultation measurements using Io

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Formisano, V.; D'Aversa, E.; Bellucci, G.; Baines, K.H.; Bibring, J.-P.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Capaccioni, F.; Cerroni, P.; Clark, R.N.; Coradini, A.; Cruikshank, D.P.; Drossart, P.; Jaumann, R.; Langevin, Y.; Matson, D.L.; McCord, T.B.; Mennella, V.; Nelson, R.M.; Nicholson, P.D.; Sicardy, B.; Sotin, C.; Chamberlain, M.C.; Hansen, G.; Hibbits, K.; Showalter, M.; Filacchione, G.

    2003-01-01

    We report unusual and somewhat unexpected observations of the jovian satellite Io, showing strong methane absorption bands. These observations were made by the Cassini VIMS experiment during the Jupiter flyby of December/January 2000/2001. The explanation is straightforward: Entering or exiting from Jupiter's shadow during an eclipse, Io is illuminated by solar light which has transited the atmosphere of Jupiter. This light, therefore becomes imprinted with the spectral signature of Jupiter's upper atmosphere, which includes strong atmospheric methane absorption bands. Intercepting solar light refracted by the jovian atmosphere, Io essentially becomes a "miffor" for solar occultation events of Jupiter. The thickness of the layer where refracted solar light is observed is so large (more than 3000 km at Io's orbit), that we can foresee a nearly continuous multi-year period of similar events at Saturn, utilizing the large and bright ring system. During Cassini's 4-year nominal mission, this probing tecnique should reveal information of Saturn's atmosphere over a large range of southern latitudes and times. ?? 2003 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission

    PubMed Central

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H.O.; Farrell, W.M.

    2013-01-01

    During the years 2000–2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period ≈1.5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every ∼25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind. PMID:23585696

  19. Periodic bursts of Jovian non-Io decametric radio emission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Panchenko, M.; Rucker, H. O.; Farrell, W. M.

    2013-03-01

    During the years 2000-2011 the radio instruments onboard Cassini, Wind and STEREO spacecraft have recorded a large amount of the Jovian decametric radio emission (DAM). In this paper we report on the analysis of the new type of Jovian periodic radio bursts recently revealed in the decametric frequency range. These bursts, which are non-Io component of DAM, are characterized by a strong periodic reoccurrence over several Jovian days with a period ≈1.5% longer than the rotation rate of the planet's magnetosphere (System III). The bursts are typically observed between 4 and 12 MHz and their occurrence probability has been found to be significantly higher in the sector of Jovian Central Meridian Longitude between 300° and 60° (via 360°). The stereoscopic multispacecraft observations have shown that the radio sources of the periodic bursts radiate in a non-axisymmetric hollow cone-like pattern and sub-corotate with Jupiter remaining active during several planet's rotations. The occurrence of the periodic non-Io DAM bursts is strongly correlated with pulses of the solar wind ram pressure at Jupiter. Moreover the periodic bursts exhibit a tendency to occur in groups every ∼25 days. The polarization measurements have shown that the periodic bursts are right hand polarized radio emission associated with the Northern magnetic hemisphere of Jupiter. We suggest that periodic non-Io DAM bursts may be connected with the interchange instability in Io plasma torus triggered by the solar wind.

  20. Active Volcanic Eruptions on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    Six views of the volcanic plume named Prometheus, as seen against Io's disk and near the bright limb (edge) of the satellite by the SSI camera on the Galileo spacecraft during its second (G2) orbit of Jupiter. North is to the top of each frame. To the south-southeast of Prometheus is another bright spot that appears to be an active plume erupting from a feature named Culann Patera. Prometheus was active 17 years ago during both Voyager flybys, but no activity was detected by Voyager at Culann. Both of these plumes were seen to glow in the dark in an eclipse image acquired by the imaging camera during Galileo's first (G1) orbit, and hot spots at these locations were detected by Galileo's Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer.

    The plumes are thought to be driven by heating sulfur dioxide in Io's subsurface into an expanding fluid or 'geyser'. The long-lived nature of these eruptions requires that a substantial supply of sulfur dioxide must be available in Io's subsurface, similar to groundwater. Sulfur dioxide gas condenses into small particles of 'snow' in the expanding plume, and the small particles scatter light and appear bright at short wavelengths. The images shown here were acquired through the shortest-wavelength filter (violet) of the Galileo camera. Prometheus is about 300 km wide and 75 km high and Culann is about 150 km wide and less than 50 km high. The images were acquired on September 4, 1996 at a range of 2,000,000 km (20 km/pixel resolution). Prometheus is named after the Greek fire god and Culann is named after the Celtic smith god.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the Galileo mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC. JPL is an operating division of California Institute of Technology (Caltech).

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the

  1. Efficiency Evaluation of Cray XT Parallel IO Stack

    SciTech Connect

    Yu, Weikuan; Oral, H Sarp; Vetter, Jeffrey S; Barrett, Richard F

    2007-01-01

    PetaScale computing platforms need to be coupled with efficient IO subsystems that can deliver commensurate IO throughput to scientific applications. In order to gain insights into the deliverable IO efficiency on the Cray XT platform at ORNL, this paper presents an in-depth efficiency evaluation of its parallel IO software stack. Our evaluation covers the performance of a variety of parallel IO interfaces, including POSIX IO, MPI-IO, and HDF5. Moreover, we describe several tuning parameters for these interfaces and present their effectiveness in enhancing the IO efficiency.

  2. Control of adaptive immunity by the innate immune system

    PubMed Central

    Iwasaki, Akiko; Medzhitov, Ruslan

    2015-01-01

    Microbial infections are recognized by the innate immune system both to elicit immediate defense and to generate long-lasting adaptive immunity. To detect and respond to vastly different groups of pathogens, the innate immune system uses several recognition systems that rely on sensing common structural and functional features associated with different classes of microorganisms. These recognition systems determine microbial location, viability, replication and pathogenicity. Detection of these features by recognition pathways of the innate immune system is translated into different classes of effector responses though specialized populations of dendritic cells. Multiple mechanisms for the induction of immune responses are variations on a common design principle wherein the cells that sense infections produce one set of cytokines to induce lymphocytes to produce another set of cytokines, which in turn activate effector responses. Here we discuss these emerging principles of innate control of adaptive immunity. PMID:25789684

  3. Discovery of Soft X-Ray Emission from Io, Europa and the Io Plasma Torus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Elsner, R. F.; Gladstone, G. R.; Waite, J. H.; Crary, F. J.; Howell, R. R.; Johnson, R. E.; Ford, P. G.; Metzger, A. E.; Hurley, K. C.; Feigelson, E. D.; Six, N. Frank (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    The Chandra X-ray Observatory observed the Jovian system for about 24 hours on 25-26 Nov 1999 with the Advanced CCD Imaging Spectrometer (ACIS), in support of the Galileo flyby of Io, and for about 10 hours on 18 Dec 2000 with the imaging array of the High Resolution Camera (HRC-I), in support of the Cassini flyby of Jupiter. Analysis of these data have revealed soft (0.25--2 keV) x-ray emission from the moons Io and Europa, probably Ganymede, and from the Io Plasma Torus (IPT). Bombardment by energetic (greater than 10 keV) H, O, and S ions from the region of the IPT seems the likely source of the x-ray emission from the Galilean moons. According to our estimates, fluorescent x-ray emission excited by solar x-rays is about an order of magnitude too weak even during flares from the active Sun to account for the observed x-ray flux from the IPT. Charge-exchange processes, previously invoked to explain Jupiter's x-ray aurora and cometary x-ray emission, and ion stripping by dust grains both fall by orders of magnitude. On the other hand, we calculate that bremsstrahlung emission of soft X-rays from non-thermal electrons in the few hundred to few thousand eV range accounts for roughly one third of the observed x-ray flux from the IPT. Extension of the far ultraviolet (FUV) IPT spectrum likely also contributes.

  4. Classrooms as Complex Adaptive Systems: A Relational Model

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burns, Anne; Knox, John S.

    2011-01-01

    In this article, we describe and model the language classroom as a complex adaptive system (see Logan & Schumann, 2005). We argue that linear, categorical descriptions of classroom processes and interactions do not sufficiently explain the complex nature of classrooms, and cannot account for how classroom change occurs (or does not occur), over…

  5. Aptitudes and Symbol Systems in Adaptive Classroom Teaching.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snow, Richard E.

    1997-01-01

    Education at its best is an "aptitude development program" that promotes development of learning abilities and effective personal styles needed for future learning in school and throughout life. Much of this development involves adapting and expanding the symbol systems used in teaching and learning to convey essential meanings. Adaptive…

  6. Adaptive mechanism-based congestion control for networked systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Zhi; Zhang, Yun; Chen, C. L. Philip

    2013-03-01

    In order to assure the communication quality in network systems with heavy traffic and limited bandwidth, a new ATRED (adaptive thresholds random early detection) congestion control algorithm is proposed for the congestion avoidance and resource management of network systems. Different to the traditional AQM (active queue management) algorithms, the control parameters of ATRED are not configured statically, but dynamically adjusted by the adaptive mechanism. By integrating with the adaptive strategy, ATRED alleviates the tuning difficulty of RED (random early detection) and shows a better control on the queue management, and achieve a more robust performance than RED under varying network conditions. Furthermore, a dynamic transmission control protocol-AQM control system using ATRED controller is introduced for the systematic analysis. It is proved that the stability of the network system can be guaranteed when the adaptive mechanism is finely designed. Simulation studies show the proposed ATRED algorithm achieves a good performance in varying network environments, which is superior to the RED and Gentle-RED algorithm, and providing more reliable service under varying network conditions.

  7. Adaptive comanagement for building resilience in social-ecological systems.

    PubMed

    Olsson, Per; Folke, Carl; Berkes, Fikret

    2004-07-01

    Ecosystems are complex adaptive systems that require flexible governance with the ability to respond to environmental feedback. We present, through examples from Sweden and Canada, the development of adaptive comanagement systems, showing how local groups self-organize, learn, and actively adapt to and shape change with social networks that connect institutions and organizations across levels and scales and that facilitate information flows. The development took place through a sequence of responses to environmental events that widened the scope of local management from a particular issue or resource to a broad set of issues related to ecosystem processes across scales and from individual actors, to group of actors to multiple-actor processes. The results suggest that the institutional and organizational landscapes should be approached as carefully as the ecological in order to clarify features that contribute to the resilience of social-ecological systems. These include the following: vision, leadership, and trust; enabling legislation that creates social space for ecosystem management; funds for responding to environmental change and for remedial action; capacity for monitoring and responding to environmental feedback; information flow through social networks; the combination of various sources of information and knowledge; and sense-making and arenas of collaborative learning for ecosystem management. We propose that the self-organizing process of adaptive comanagement development, facilitated by rules and incentives of higher levels, has the potential to expand desirable stability domains of a region and make social-ecological systems more robust to change.

  8. Complex Adaptive Systems as Metaphors for Organizational Management

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Palmberg, Klara

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to explore the concept of complex adaptive systems (CAS) from the perspective of managing organizations, to describe and explore the management principles in a case study of an organization with unconventional ways of management and to present a tentative model for managing organizations as CAS--system…

  9. Enhancing Adaptive Filtering Approaches for Land Data Assimilation Systems

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Recent work has presented the initial application of adaptive filtering techniques to land surface data assimilation systems. Such techniques are motivated by our current lack of knowledge concerning the structure of large-scale error in either land surface modeling output or remotely-sensed estima...

  10. The New Trends in Adaptive Educational Hypermedia Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Somyürek, Sibel

    2015-01-01

    This paper aims to give a general review of existing literature on adaptive educational hypermedia systems and to reveal technological trends and approaches within these studies. Fifty-six studies conducted between 2002 and 2012 were examined, to identify prominent themes and approaches. According to the content analysis, the new technological…

  11. Modeling Students' Memory for Application in Adaptive Educational Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelánek, Radek

    2015-01-01

    Human memory has been thoroughly studied and modeled in psychology, but mainly in laboratory setting under simplified conditions. For application in practical adaptive educational systems we need simple and robust models which can cope with aspects like varied prior knowledge or multiple-choice questions. We discuss and evaluate several models of…

  12. The Transfer of Abstract Principles Governing Complex Adaptive Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goldstone, Robert L.; Sakamoto, Yasuaki

    2003-01-01

    Four experiments explored participants' understanding of the abstract principles governing computer simulations of complex adaptive systems. Experiments 1, 2, and 3 showed better transfer of abstract principles across simulations that were relatively dissimilar, and that this effect was due to participants who performed relatively poorly on the…

  13. Adaptive control system having hedge unit and related apparatus and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric Norman (Inventor); Calise, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    2003-01-01

    The invention includes an adaptive control system used to control a plant. The adaptive control system includes a hedge unit that receives at least one control signal and a plant state signal. The hedge unit generates a hedge signal based on the control signal, the plant state signal, and a hedge model including a first model having one or more characteristics to which the adaptive control system is not to adapt, and a second model not having the characteristic(s) to which the adaptive control system is not to adapt. The hedge signal is used in the adaptive control system to remove the effect of the characteristic from a signal supplied to an adaptation law unit of the adaptive control system so that the adaptive control system does not adapt to the characteristic in controlling the plant.

  14. Adaptive control system having hedge unit and related apparatus and methods

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Eric Norman (Inventor); Calise, Anthony J. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    The invention includes an adaptive control system used to control a plant. The adaptive control system includes a hedge unit that receives at least one control signal and a plant state signal. The hedge unit generates a hedge signal based on the control signal, the plant state signal, and a hedge model including a first model having one or more characteristics to which the adaptive control system is not to adapt, and a second model not having the characteristic(s) to which the adaptive control system is not to adapt. The hedge signal is used in the adaptive control system to remove the effect of the characteristic from a signal supplied to an adaptation law unit of the adaptive control system so that the adaptive control system does not adapt to the characteristic in controlling the plant.

  15. Geologic Landforms on Io (Area 2)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Shown here is one of the topographic mapping images of Jupiter's moon Io (Latitude: +5 to +48 degrees, Longitude: 120 to 185 degrees) acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft, revealing a great variety of landforms. There are rugged mountains several miles high, layered materials forming plateaus, and many irregular depressions called volcanic calderas. There are also dark lava flows and bright deposits of SO2 frost or other sulfurous materials, which have no discernable topographic relief at this scale. Several of the dark, flow-like features correspond to hot spots, and may be active lava flows. There are no landforms resembling impact craters, as the volcanism covers the surface with new deposits much more rapidly than the flux of comets and asteroids can create large impact craters.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the left. The bright region beyond Io's limb (upper right corner) is Jupiter's atmosphere. The image covers an area about 2080 kilometers wide and the smallest features that can be discerned are 2.6 kilometers in size. This image was taken on November 6th, 1996, at a range of 258,100 kilometers by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on the Galileo Spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  16. Geologic Landforms on Io (Area 4)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Shown here is one of the topographic mapping images of Jupiter's moon Io (Latitude: -60 to 20 degrees, Longitude: 180 to 270 degrees) acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft, revealing a great variety of landforms. There are rugged mountains several miles high, layered materials forming plateaus, and many irregular depressions called volcanic calderas. There are also dark lava flows and bright deposits of SO2 frost or other sulfurous materials, which have no discernable topographic relief at this scale. Several of the dark, flow-like features correspond to hot spots, and may be active lava flows. There are no landforms resembling impact craters, as the volcanism covers the surface with new deposits much more rapidly than the flux of comets and asteroids can create large impact craters. The large oval on the left-hand side is the fallout deposit from Pele, the largest volcanic eruption plume on Io, over 200 miles high when active.

    North is to the top of the picture and the sun illuminates the surface from the left. The image covers an area about 2390 kilometers wide and the smallest features that can be discerned are 3.0 kilometers in size. This image was taken on November 6th, 1996, at a range of 294,000 kilometers by the Solid State Imaging (CCD) system on the Galileo Spacecraft.

    The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  17. Global View of Io in various colors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    These full disk views of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io, use images which were acquired by NASA's Galileo spacecraft when Io, the spacecraft, and the sun were nearly all aligned (near zero degrees phase angle). This angle best shows color variations on the surface. The left frame is an enhanced color view combining images obtained with the near-infrared, green, and violet filters of Galileo's Solid State Imaging (CCD) system. The white areas are rich in sulfur dioxide frost. Yellow, brown, and red areas are rich in other sulfurous materials. The upper right frame combines the green, near-infrared, and one micrometer filters. The added information from the infrared part of the spectrum will help scientists characterize the type of volcanism that paints this active world. The lower right frame is a color ratio composite, in which ratios of different color combinations are displayed as red, green, and blue to reveal subtle color variations. North is to the top and the smallest features which can be discerned are 6 kilometers in size. These images were taken on December 18, 1996 at a range of 580,000 kilometers.

    Launched in October 1989, Galileo entered orbit around Jupiter on December 7, 1995. The spacecraft's mission is to conduct detailed studies of the giant planet, its largest moons and the Jovian magnetic environment. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, CA manages the mission for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, DC.

    This image and other images and data received from Galileo are posted on the World Wide Web, on the Galileo mission home page at URL http://galileo.jpl.nasa.gov. Background information and educational context for the images can be found at URL http://www.jpl.nasa.gov/galileo/sepo

  18. Infrared Spectral Signatures For Io's Dark Spots

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Granahan, J. C.; Sweet, J.; Fanale, F. P.; Carlson, R. W.; Smythe, W. D.; Galileo NIMS Team; Galileo SSI Team

    2000-10-01

    A variety of indicators for silicate volcanism on Io have been observed by the Galileo spacecraft. These include high temperature volcanism ([1] McEwen et al., 2000 and [2] Lopes-Gautier et al., 2000) of up to 1700 K, a 0.9 micrometer absorption present in many dark (and relatively recent) lava flows ([3] Geissler et al., 1999), and large scale releif in f the form of mountains ([4] Turtle et al., 2000). The 0.9 micrometer feature can be interpreted as absorption feature due to pyroxene. This detection was accomplished via the Galileo SSI (Solid State Imager) camera system which utilizes a set of up to 8 discrete filters to sample the wavelength range from 0.4-1.0 micrometers. Orthopyroxene has an absorption feature around 2.0 micrometers. Our study seeks to analyze the infrared signatures that correlate to this 0.9 micrometer feature. The Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) collects data from 0.7-5.2 micrometers with up to 408 bands during the nominal mission and with 12 bands during the current mission. Initial results indicate that these dark features appear to have lower concentrations of sulfur dioxide than surrounding surfaces and do not directly correlate to the 1.2 micrometer absorption feature found by NIMS on Io. Although not detected in our initial NIMS spectral survey, we are modeling spectral mixtures to determine the maximum amount of orthopyroxene that can be present in the NIMS observations. [1 & 2] EOS, Trans, Vol. 81, No. 19, Supplement, S288, [3] Icarus, 140, 265, [4] EOS, Trans, Vol. 81, No. 19, Supplement, S289.

  19. Guiding Climate Change Adaptation Within Vulnerable Natural Resource Management Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bardsley, Douglas K.; Sweeney, Susan M.

    2010-05-01

    Climate change has the potential to compromise the sustainability of natural resources in Mediterranean climatic systems, such that short-term reactive responses will increasingly be insufficient to ensure effective management. There is a simultaneous need for both the clear articulation of the vulnerabilities of specific management systems to climate risk, and the development of appropriate short- and long-term strategic planning responses that anticipate environmental change or allow for sustainable adaptive management in response to trends in resource condition. Governments are developing climate change adaptation policy frameworks, but without the recognition of the importance of responding strategically, regional stakeholders will struggle to manage future climate risk. In a partnership between the South Australian Government, the Adelaide and Mt Lofty Ranges Natural Resource Management Board and the regional community, a range of available research approaches to support regional climate change adaptation decision-making, were applied and critically examined, including: scenario modelling; applied and participatory Geographical Information Systems modelling; environmental risk analysis; and participatory action learning. As managers apply ideas for adaptation within their own biophysical and socio-cultural contexts, there would be both successes and failures, but a learning orientation to societal change will enable improvements over time. A base-line target for regional responses to climate change is the ownership of the issue by stakeholders, which leads to an acceptance that effective actions to adapt are now both possible and vitally important. Beyond such baseline knowledge, the research suggests that there is a range of tools from the social and physical sciences available to guide adaptation decision-making.

  20. Adaptive multibeam concepts for traffic management satellite systems.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bisaga, J. J.; Blank, H. A.; Klein, S. A.

    1973-01-01

    The analysis of the performance of the various implementations of the simultaneous system in the Atlantic and Pacific Oceans has demonstrated that the use of adaptive system concepts in satellite traffic management systems can greatly improve the performance capabilities of these systems as compared to the corresponding performance capabilities of conventional nonadaptive satellite communications systems. It is considered that the techniques developed and analyzed represent a significant technological advance, and that the performance improvement achieved will generally outweigh the increased cost and implementation factors.

  1. Profiling and Improving I/O Performance of a Large-Scale Climate Scientific Application

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Zhuo; Wang, Bin; Wang, Teng; Tian, Yuan; Xu, Cong; Wang, Yandong; Yu, Weikuan; Cruz, Carlos A.; Zhou, Shujia; Clune, Tom; Klasky, Scott

    2013-01-01

    Exascale computing systems are soon to emerge, which will pose great challenges on the huge gap between computing and I/O performance. Many large-scale scientific applications play an important role in our daily life. The huge amounts of data generated by such applications require highly parallel and efficient I/O management policies. In this paper, we adopt a mission-critical scientific application, GEOS-5, as a case to profile and analyze the communication and I/O issues that are preventing applications from fully utilizing the underlying parallel storage systems. Through in-detail architectural and experimental characterization, we observe that current legacy I/O schemes incur significant network communication overheads and are unable to fully parallelize the data access, thus degrading applications' I/O performance and scalability. To address these inefficiencies, we redesign its I/O framework along with a set of parallel I/O techniques to achieve high scalability and performance. Evaluation results on the NASA discover cluster show that our optimization of GEOS-5 with ADIOS has led to significant performance improvements compared to the original GEOS-5 implementation.

  2. Integrated modeling of the GMT laser tomography adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Piatrou, Piotr

    2014-08-01

    Laser Tomography Adaptive Optics (LTAO) is one of adaptive optics systems planned for the Giant Magellan Telescope (GMT). End-to-end simulation tools that are able to cope with the complexity and computational burden of the AO systems to be installed on the extremely large telescopes such as GMT prove to be an integral part of the GMT LTAO system development endeavors. SL95, the Fortran 95 Simulation Library, is one of the software tools successfully used for the LTAO system end-to-end simulations. The goal of SL95 project is to provide a complete set of generic, richly parameterized mathematical models for key elements of the segmented telescope wavefront control systems including both active and adaptive optics as well as the models for atmospheric turbulence, extended light sources like Laser Guide Stars (LGS), light propagation engines and closed-loop controllers. The library is implemented as a hierarchical collection of classes capable of mutual interaction, which allows one to assemble complex wavefront control system configurations with multiple interacting control channels. In this paper we demonstrate the SL95 capabilities by building an integrated end-to-end model of the GMT LTAO system with 7 control channels: LGS tomography with Adaptive Secondary and on-instrument deformable mirrors, tip-tilt and vibration control, LGS stabilization, LGS focus control, truth sensor-based dynamic noncommon path aberration rejection, pupil position control, SLODAR-like embedded turbulence profiler. The rich parameterization of the SL95 classes allows to build detailed error budgets propagating through the system multiple errors and perturbations such as turbulence-, telescope-, telescope misalignment-, segment phasing error-, non-common path-induced aberrations, sensor noises, deformable mirror-to-sensor mis-registration, vibration, temporal errors, etc. We will present a short description of the SL95 architecture, as well as the sample GMT LTAO system simulation

  3. Flexible Ubiquitous Learning Management System Adapted to Learning Context

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeong, Ji-Seong; Kim, Mihye; Park, Chan; Yoo, Jae-Soo; Yoo, Kwan-Hee

    This paper proposes a u-learning management system (ULMS) appropriate to the ubiquitous learning environment, with emphasis on the significance of context awareness and adaptation in learning. The proposed system supports the basic functions of an e-learning management system and incorporates a number of tools and additional features to provide a more customized learning service. The proposed system automatically corresponds to various forms of user terminal without modifying the existing system. The functions, formats, and course learning activities of the system are dynamically and adaptively constructed at runtime according to user terminals, course types, pedagogical goals as well as student characteristics and learning context. A prototype for university use has been implemented to demonstrate and evaluate the proposed approach. We regard the proposed ULMS as an ideal u-learning system because it can not only lead students into continuous and mobile 'anytime, anywhere' learning using any kind of terminal, but can also foster enhanced self-directed learning through the establishment of an adaptive learning environment.

  4. Adaptive Optics System Design and Operation at Lick Observatory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Olivier, S. S.; Max, C. E.; Avicola, K.; Bissinger, H. D.; Brase, J. M.; Friedman, H. W.; Gavel, D. T.; Salmon, J. T.; Waltjen, K. E.

    1993-12-01

    An adaptive optics system developed for the 40 inch Nickel and 120 inch Shane telescopes at Lick Observatory is described. The adaptive optics system design is based on a 69 actuator continuous-surface deformable mirror and a Hartmann wavefront sensor equipped with a commercial intensified CCD fast-framing camera. The system has been tested at the Cassegrain focus of the 40 inch Nickel telescope where the subaperture diameter is 12 cm. The subaperture slope and mirror control calculations are performed on a four processor single board computer controlled by a Unix workstation. This configuration is capable of up to 1 KHz frame rates. The optical configuration of the system and its interface to the telescope is described. Details of the control system design, operation, and user interface are given. Initial test results emphasizing control system operations of this adaptive optics system using natural reference stars on the 40 inch Nickel telescope are presented. The initial test results are compared to predictions from analyses and simulations. Work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract W-7405-Eng-48.

  5. Adaptive backstepping slide mode control of pneumatic position servo system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Haipeng; Fan, Juntao

    2016-09-01

    With the price decreasing of the pneumatic proportional valve and the high performance micro controller, the simple structure and high tracking performance pneumatic servo system demonstrates more application potential in many fields. However, most existing control methods with high tracking performance need to know the model information and to use pressure sensor. This limits the application of the pneumatic servo system. An adaptive backstepping slide mode control method is proposed for pneumatic position servo system. The proposed method designs adaptive slide mode controller using backstepping design technique. The controller parameter adaptive law is derived from Lyapunov analysis to guarantee the stability of the system. A theorem is testified to show that the state of closed-loop system is uniformly bounded, and the closed-loop system is stable. The advantages of the proposed method include that system dynamic model parameters are not required for the controller design, uncertain parameters bounds are not need, and the bulk and expensive pressure sensor is not needed as well. Experimental results show that the designed controller can achieve better tracking performance, as compared with some existing methods.

  6. Generating Shifting Workloads to Benchmark Adaptability in Relational Database Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rabl, Tilmann; Lang, Andreas; Hackl, Thomas; Sick, Bernhard; Kosch, Harald

    A large body of research concerns the adaptability of database systems. Many commercial systems already contain autonomic processes that adapt configurations as well as data structures and data organization. Yet there is virtually no possibility for a just measurement of the quality of such optimizations. While standard benchmarks have been developed that simulate real-world database applications very precisely, none of them considers variations in workloads produced by human factors. Today’s benchmarks test the performance of database systems by measuring peak performance on homogeneous request streams. Nevertheless, in systems with user interaction access patterns are constantly shifting. We present a benchmark that simulates a web information system with interaction of large user groups. It is based on the analysis of a real online eLearning management system with 15,000 users. The benchmark considers the temporal dependency of user interaction. Main focus is to measure the adaptability of a database management system according to shifting workloads. We will give details on our design approach that uses sophisticated pattern analysis and data mining techniques.

  7. The Integration of DCS I/O to an Existing PLC

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sadhukhan, Debashis; Mihevic, John

    2013-01-01

    At the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC), Existing Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) I/O was replaced with Distributed Control System (DCS) I/O, while keeping the existing PLC sequence Logic. The reason for integration of the PLC logic and DCS I/O, along with the evaluation of the resulting system is the subject of this paper. The pros and cons of the old system and new upgrade are described, including operator workstation screen update times. Detail of the physical layout and the communication between the PLC, the DCS I/O and the operator workstations are illustrated. The complex characteristics of a central process control system and the plan to remove the PLC processors in future upgrades is also discussed.

  8. Volcanism on Io: The Galileo NIMS Io Thermal Emission Database (NITED)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, A. G.; Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Johnson, T. V.

    2011-12-01

    In order to determine the magnitude of thermal emission from Io's volcanoes and variability with time at local, regional and global scales, we have calculated the 4.7 or 5 μm radiant flux for every hot spot in every Galileo Near Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) observation obtained during the Galileo mission between June 1996 and October 2001. The resulting database contains over 1000 measurements of radiant flux, corrected for emission angle, range to target, and, where necessary, incident sunlight. Io's volcanoes produce the most voluminous and most powerful eruptions in the Solar System [1] and NIMS was the ideal instrument for measuring thermal emission from these volcanoes (see [1, 2]). NIMS covered the infrared from 0.7 to 5.2 μm, so measurement of hot spot thermal emission at ~5 μm was possible even in daytime observations. As part of a campaign to quantify magnitude and variability of volcanic thermal emission [1, 3-5] we examined the entire NIMS dataset (196 observations). The resulting NIMS Io Thermal Emission Database (NITED) allows the charting of 5-μm thermal emission at individual volcanoes, identifying individual eruption episodes, and enabling the comparison of activity at different hot spots [e.g., 6] and different regions of Io. Some ionian hot spots were detected only once or twice by NIMS (e.g., Ah Peku Patera, seen during I32), but most were detected many times (e.g., Culann, Tupan and Zamama, [6]). For example, the database contains over 40 observations of Loki Patera (some at high emission angle, and two partial observations). There are 55 observations of Pele. The 27 nighttime observations of Pele show a remarkably steady 5-μm radiant flux of 35 ± 12 GW/μm. There are 34 observations of Pillan, which erupted violently in 1997. Although in many observations low spatial resolution makes it difficult to separate hot spot pairs such as Susanoo Patera and Mulungu Patera; Tawhaki Patera and Hi'iaka Patera; and Janus Patera and Kanehekili

  9. Adaptive conventional power system stabilizer based on artificial neural network

    SciTech Connect

    Kothari, M.L.; Segal, R.; Ghodki, B.K.

    1995-12-31

    This paper deals with an artificial neural network (ANN) based adaptive conventional power system stabilizer (PSS). The ANN comprises an input layer, a hidden layer and an output layer. The input vector to the ANN comprises real power (P) and reactive power (Q), while the output vector comprises optimum PSS parameters. A systematic approach for generating training set covering wide range of operating conditions, is presented. The ANN has been trained using back-propagation training algorithm. Investigations reveal that the dynamic performance of ANN based adaptive conventional PSS is quite insensitive to wide variations in loading conditions.

  10. Design optimization of system level adaptive optical performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michels, Gregory J.; Genberg, Victor L.; Doyle, Keith B.; Bisson, Gary R.

    2005-09-01

    By linking predictive methods from multiple engineering disciplines, engineers are able to compute more meaningful predictions of a product's performance. By coupling mechanical and optical predictive techniques mechanical design can be performed to optimize optical performance. This paper demonstrates how mechanical design optimization using system level optical performance can be used in the development of the design of a high precision adaptive optical telescope. While mechanical design parameters are treated as the design variables, the objective function is taken to be the adaptively corrected optical imaging performance of an orbiting two-mirror telescope.

  11. Linear adaptive control of a single-tether system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Greene, M. E.; Carter, J. T.; Walls, J. L.

    1992-01-01

    A control law for a single-tether orbiting satellite system based on a reduced order linear adaptive control technique is presented. The main advantages of this technique are its design simplicity and the facts that specific system parameters and model linearization are not required when designing the controller. Two controllers are developed: one which uses only tension in the tether as control actuation and one which uses both tension and in-plane thrusters as control actuation. Both a sixth-order nonlinear and an 11th-order bead model of a tethered satellite system are used for simulation purposes, demonstrating the ability of the controller to manage an uncertain system. Retrieval and stationkeeping results using these nonlinear models and the linear adaptive controller demonstrate the feasibility of the method. The robustness of the controller with respect to parameter uncertainties is also demonstrated by changing the nonlinear model and parameters within the model without redesigning the controller.

  12. Variable Neural Adaptive Robust Control: A Switched System Approach

    SciTech Connect

    Lian, Jianming; Hu, Jianghai; Zak, Stanislaw H.

    2015-05-01

    Variable neural adaptive robust control strategies are proposed for the output tracking control of a class of multi-input multi-output uncertain systems. The controllers incorporate a variable-structure radial basis function (RBF) network as the self-organizing approximator for unknown system dynamics. The variable-structure RBF network solves the problem of structure determination associated with fixed-structure RBF networks. It can determine the network structure on-line dynamically by adding or removing radial basis functions according to the tracking performance. The structure variation is taken into account in the stability analysis of the closed-loop system using a switched system approach with the aid of the piecewise quadratic Lyapunov function. The performance of the proposed variable neural adaptive robust controllers is illustrated with simulations.

  13. An Approach to Automated Fusion System Design and Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Fritze, Alexander; Mönks, Uwe; Holst, Christoph-Alexander; Lohweg, Volker

    2017-01-01

    Industrial applications are in transition towards modular and flexible architectures that are capable of self-configuration and -optimisation. This is due to the demand of mass customisation and the increasing complexity of industrial systems. The conversion to modular systems is related to challenges in all disciplines. Consequently, diverse tasks such as information processing, extensive networking, or system monitoring using sensor and information fusion systems need to be reconsidered. The focus of this contribution is on distributed sensor and information fusion systems for system monitoring, which must reflect the increasing flexibility of fusion systems. This contribution thus proposes an approach, which relies on a network of self-descriptive intelligent sensor nodes, for the automatic design and update of sensor and information fusion systems. This article encompasses the fusion system configuration and adaptation as well as communication aspects. Manual interaction with the flexibly changing system is reduced to a minimum. PMID:28300762

  14. Io's Atmosphere Silhouetted in Transit by Jupiter Lyman-alpha

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Retherford, Kurt

    2014-10-01

    Io's active volcanos both directly establish local gas plumes and indirectly establish a more global sublimation atmosphere, through plume deposited sulfur dioxide frost patches. Despite decades of study and recent observational advances the very basic question about the relative role of each of these sources is unresolved. The correlation between volcanic activity variability and Io's dramatic influence on numerous time-variable phenomenon in the Jupiter system cannot be causally linked until this answer is in hand. Our experienced team has developed a novel approach to use STIS in a new way to obtain global radial profiles of SO2 scale height distributions above both plume and sublimation dominated regions. We exploit the bright Lyman-alpha dayglow of Jupiter as a background illumination source together with the strongly absorptive nature of SO2 at 121.6 nm to image Io's atmosphere in silhouette with unprecedented detail during transit events. Our program provides the following key information for SO2: 1) First high-altitude (>400 km) radial measurements of tangential column densities and scale heights; 2) First clear measurement of sublimation densities at polar locations; 3) Volcanic densities for large and mid-sized plumes (possibly new ones); 4) Globally distributed limb profiles allowing strong distinctions between plume and sublimation dominated locations; 5) Repeated imaging on a few day and a few week timescales for improved plume variability constraints; and 6) Lyman-alpha reflectance imaging at Io central lon. ~180 deg, filling a gap in previous coverage. These new information are critical to breaking through an impasse in our understanding of Io's atmosphere.

  15. Guidance and Actuation Systems for an Adaptive-Suspension Vehicle

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-03-14

    FORM 1. REPORT NUMBER 2. GOVT ACCESSION NO. 3 . RECIPIENT’S CATALOG NUMBER G8186-685-84 ’D Ji 4. TITLE (and Subtitle) S. TYPE OF REPORT & PERIOD COVERED...Adaptive-Suspension Vehicle ..... ........ 2 2.2.2 The Terrain-Sensing System ...... .......... 3 2.3 Guidance System Algorithms... 3 2.3.1 Overview ............. ................... 3 2.3.2 Elevation Map Algorithms ...... ........... 3 2.3.3 Vehicle Guidance Algorithms

  16. System integration of pattern recognition, adaptive aided, upper limb prostheses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lyman, J.; Freedy, A.; Solomonow, M.

    1975-01-01

    The requirements for successful integration of a computer aided control system for multi degree of freedom artificial arms are discussed. Specifications are established for a system which shares control between a human amputee and an automatic control subsystem. The approach integrates the following subsystems: (1) myoelectric pattern recognition, (2) adaptive computer aiding; (3) local reflex control; (4) prosthetic sensory feedback; and (5) externally energized arm with the functions of prehension, wrist rotation, elbow extension and flexion and humeral rotation.

  17. An information adaptive system study report and development plan

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ataras, W. S.; Eng, K.; Morone, J. J.; Beaudet, P. R.; Chin, R.

    1980-01-01

    The purpose of the information adaptive system (IAS) study was to determine how some selected Earth resource applications may be processed onboard a spacecraft and to provide a detailed preliminary IAS design for these applications. Detailed investigations of a number of applications were conducted with regard to IAS and three were selected for further analysis. Areas of future research and development include algorithmic specifications, system design specifications, and IAS recommended time lines.

  18. Modeling of Complex Adaptive Systems in Air Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    control of C3 in an increasingly complex military environment. Control theory is a multidisciplinary science associated with dynamic systems and, while...AFRL-IF-RS-TR-2006-282 In- House Final Technical Report September 2006 MODELING OF COMPLEX ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS IN AIR OPERATIONS...NOTICE AND SIGNATURE PAGE Using Government drawings, specifications, or other data included in this document for any purpose other than Government

  19. On Development of an Adaptive Tutoring System for Calculus Learning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yokota, Hisashi

    2010-06-01

    One-on-one tutoring is known to be an effective model for learning calculus. Therefore, implementing one-on-one tutoring system into calculus learning software is a natural thing to do. The purpose of this article is to describe how to diagnose a students' knowledge structure about calculus without asking many questions and to show how an adaptive tutoring system is implemented into our calculus learning software JCALC.

  20. Selective adaptation to "oddball" sounds by the human auditory system.

    PubMed

    Simpson, Andrew J R; Harper, Nicol S; Reiss, Joshua D; McAlpine, David

    2014-01-29

    Adaptation to both common and rare sounds has been independently reported in neurophysiological studies using probabilistic stimulus paradigms in small mammals. However, the apparent sensitivity of the mammalian auditory system to the statistics of incoming sound has not yet been generalized to task-related human auditory perception. Here, we show that human listeners selectively adapt to novel sounds within scenes unfolding over minutes. Listeners' performance in an auditory discrimination task remains steady for the most common elements within the scene but, after the first minute, performance improves for distinct and rare (oddball) sound elements, at the expense of rare sounds that are relatively less distinct. Our data provide the first evidence of enhanced coding of oddball sounds in a human auditory discrimination task and suggest the existence of an adaptive mechanism that tracks the long-term statistics of sounds and deploys coding resources accordingly.

  1. Autonomous navigation system using a fuzzy adaptive nonlinear H∞ filter.

    PubMed

    Outamazirt, Fariz; Li, Fu; Yan, Lin; Nemra, Abdelkrim

    2014-09-19

    Although nonlinear H∞ (NH∞) filters offer good performance without requiring assumptions concerning the characteristics of process and/or measurement noises, they still require additional tuning parameters that remain fixed and that need to be determined through trial and error. To address issues associated with NH∞ filters, a new SINS/GPS sensor fusion scheme known as the Fuzzy Adaptive Nonlinear H∞ (FANH∞) filter is proposed for the Unmanned Aerial Vehicle (UAV) localization problem. Based on a real-time Fuzzy Inference System (FIS), the FANH∞ filter continually adjusts the higher order of the Taylor development thorough adaptive bounds  and adaptive disturbance attenuation , which significantly increases the UAV localization performance. The results obtained using the FANH∞ navigation filter are compared to the NH∞ navigation filter results and are validated using a 3D UAV flight scenario. The comparison proves the efficiency and robustness of the UAV localization process using the FANH∞ filter.

  2. Evolutionary adaptation of phenotypic plasticity in a synthetic microbial system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tans, Sander

    2010-03-01

    While phenotypic plasticity -the capability to respond to the environment- is vital to organisms, tests of its adaptation have remained indecisive because constraints and selection in variable environments are unknown and entangled. We show that one can determine the phenotype-fitness landscape that specifies selection on plasticity, by uncoupling the environmental cue and stress in a genetically engineered microbial system. Evolutionary trajectories revealed genetic constraints in a regulatory protein, which imposed cross-environment trade-offs that favored specialization. However, depending on the synchronicity and amplitude of the applied cue and stress variations, adaptation could break constraints, resolve trade-offs, and evolve optimal phenotypes that exhibit qualitatively altered (inverse) responses to the cue. Our results provide a first step to explain the adaptive origins of complex behavior in heterogeneous environments.

  3. Hot-spot tectonics on Io

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcewen, A. S.

    1985-01-01

    The thesis is that extensional tectonics and low-angle detachment faults probably occur on Io in association with the hot spots. These processes may occur on a much shorter timescale on Ion than on Earth, so that Io could be a natural laboratory for the study of thermotectonics. Furthermore, studies of heat and detachment in crustal extension on Earth and the other terresrial planets (especially Venus and Mars) may provide analogs to processes on Io. The geology of Io is dominated by volcanism and hot spots, most likely the result of tidal heating. Hot spots cover 1 to 2% of Io's surface, radiating at temperatures typically from 200 to 400 K, and occasionally up to 700K. Heat loss from the largest hot spots on Io, such as Loki Patera, is about 300 times the heat loss from Yellowstone, so a tremendous quantity of energy is available for volcanic and tectonic work. Active volcanism on Io results in a resurfacing rate as high as 10 cm per year, yet many structural features are apparent on the surface. Therefore, the tectonics must be highly active.

  4. Escape mechanisms of dust in Io

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Flandes, A.

    The injection of material into the jovian magnetosphere through Io's volcanic activity makes possible the formation of structures such as the plasma torus and the dust ballerina skirt. Io's high temperature volcanism produces spectacular plumes, but even the tallest plumes, as those of Pelen Patera, will not produce enough energy to defeat the gravitational attraction of Io. The fact is that dust escapes from Io, which implies that a second mechanism is acting on the grains. Grains brought to the top of the highest plumes by the volcanic forces are still under Io's gravitational pull, but need only a minimum charge (~10-1 4 C) so that the Lorentz force due to the Jovian magnetic field equilibrates this attraction. In the volcanic vents, the escape velocity of the ejected material and its own density produces enough collisions to create charges. On top of the highest plumes (~500km) charged grains are exposed to the plasma torus that co-rotates rigidly with Jupiter and, due to the relative velocity among Io and the torus, the grains will be dragged away from Io. As it is well known, these dust grains will also be dragged away from Jupiter.

  5. Astronomical coronagraphy with high-order adaptive optics systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, James P.; Graham, James R.; Kalas, Paul; Oppenheimer, Ben R.; Sivaramakrishnan, Anand; Makidon, Russell B.; Macintosh, Bruce A.; Max, Claire E.; Baudoz, Pierre; Kuhn, Jeff R.; Potter, Dan

    2001-12-01

    Space surveillance systems have recently been developed that exploit high order adaptive optics systems to take diffraction limited images in visible light on 4 meter class telescopes. Most astronomical targets are faint, thus driving astronomical AO systems towards larger subapertures, and thus longer observing wavelengths for diffraction limited imaging at moderate Strehl ratio. There is, however, a particular niche that can be exploited by turning these visible light space surveillance systems to astronomical use at infrared wavelengths. At the longer wavelengths, the Strehl ratio rises dramatically, thus placing more light into the diffracted Airy pattern compared to the atmospheric halo. A Lyot coronagraph can be used to suppress the diffracted light from an on axis star, and observe faint companions and debris disks around nearby, bright stars. These very high contrast objects can only be observed with much higher order adaptive optics systems than are presently available to the astronomical community. We describe simulations of high order adaptive optics coronagraphs, and outline a project to deploy an astronomical coronagraph at the Air Force AEOS facility at the Maui Space Surveillance System.

  6. People at the centre of complex adaptive health systems reform.

    PubMed

    Sturmberg, Joachim P; O'Halloran, Diana M; Martin, Carmel M

    2010-10-18

    Health systems are increasingly recognised to be complex adaptive systems (CASs), functionally characterised by their continuing and dynamic adaptation in response to core system drivers, or attractors. The core driver for our health system (and for the health reform strategies intended to achieve it) should clearly be the improvement of people's health - the personal experience of health, regardless of organic abnormalities; we contend that a patient-centred health system requires flexible localised decision making and resource use. The prevailing trend is to use disease protocols, financial management strategies and centralised control of siloed programs to manage our health system. This strategy is suggested to be fatally flawed, as: people's health and health experience as core system drivers are inevitably pre-empted by centralised and standardised strategies; the context specificity of personal experience and the capacity of local systems are overlooked; and in line with CAS patterns and characteristics, these strategies will lead to "unintended" consequences on all parts of the system. In Australia, there is still the time and opportunity for health system redesign that truly places people and their health at the core of the system.

  7. Homeostatic regulation of memory systems and adaptive decisions.

    PubMed

    Mizumori, Sheri J Y; Jo, Yong Sang

    2013-11-01

    While it is clear that many brain areas process mnemonic information, understanding how their interactions result in continuously adaptive behaviors has been a challenge. A homeostatic-regulated prediction model of memory is presented that considers the existence of a single memory system that is based on a multilevel coordinated and integrated network (from cells to neural systems) that determines the extent to which events and outcomes occur as predicted. The "multiple memory systems of the brain" have in common output that signals errors in the prediction of events and/or their outcomes, although these signals differ in terms of what the error signal represents (e.g., hippocampus: context prediction errors vs. midbrain/striatum: reward prediction errors). The prefrontal cortex likely plays a pivotal role in the coordination of prediction analysis within and across prediction brain areas. By virtue of its widespread control and influence, and intrinsic working memory mechanisms. Thus, the prefrontal cortex supports the flexible processing needed to generate adaptive behaviors and predict future outcomes. It is proposed that prefrontal cortex continually and automatically produces adaptive responses according to homeostatic regulatory principles: prefrontal cortex may serve as a controller that is intrinsically driven to maintain in prediction areas an experience-dependent firing rate set point that ensures adaptive temporally and spatially resolved neural responses to future prediction errors. This same drive by prefrontal cortex may also restore set point firing rates after deviations (i.e. prediction errors) are detected. In this way, prefrontal cortex contributes to reducing uncertainty in prediction systems. An emergent outcome of this homeostatic view may be the flexible and adaptive control that prefrontal cortex is known to implement (i.e. working memory) in the most challenging of situations. Compromise to any of the prediction circuits should result in

  8. Homeostatic Regulation of Memory Systems and Adaptive Decisions

    PubMed Central

    Mizumori, Sheri JY; Jo, Yong Sang

    2013-01-01

    While it is clear that many brain areas process mnemonic information, understanding how their interactions result in continuously adaptive behaviors has been a challenge. A homeostatic-regulated prediction model of memory is presented that considers the existence of a single memory system that is based on a multilevel coordinated and integrated network (from cells to neural systems) that determines the extent to which events and outcomes occur as predicted. The “multiple memory systems of the brain” have in common output that signals errors in the prediction of events and/or their outcomes, although these signals differ in terms of what the error signal represents (e.g., hippocampus: context prediction errors vs. midbrain/striatum: reward prediction errors). The prefrontal cortex likely plays a pivotal role in the coordination of prediction analysis within and across prediction brain areas. By virtue of its widespread control and influence, and intrinsic working memory mechanisms. Thus, the prefrontal cortex supports the flexible processing needed to generate adaptive behaviors and predict future outcomes. It is proposed that prefrontal cortex continually and automatically produces adaptive responses according to homeostatic regulatory principles: prefrontal cortex may serve as a controller that is intrinsically driven to maintain in prediction areas an experience-dependent firing rate set point that ensures adaptive temporally and spatially resolved neural responses to future prediction errors. This same drive by prefrontal cortex may also restore set point firing rates after deviations (i.e. prediction errors) are detected. In this way, prefrontal cortex contributes to reducing uncertainty in prediction systems. An emergent outcome of this homeostatic view may be the flexible and adaptive control that prefrontal cortex is known to implement (i.e. working memory) in the most challenging of situations. Compromise to any of the prediction circuits should result

  9. Adaptive feed array compensation system for reflector antenna surface distortion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Acosta, Roberto J.; Zaman, A.

    1989-01-01

    The feasibility of a closed loop adaptive feed array system for compensating reflector surface deformations has been investigated. The performance characteristics (gain, sidelobe level, pointing, etc.) of large communication antenna systems degrade as the reflector surface distorts mainly due to thermal effects from a varying solar flux. The compensating systems described in this report can be used to maintain the design performance characteristics independent of thermal effects on the reflector surface. The proposed compensating system employs the concept of conjugate field matching to adjust the feed array complex excitation coefficients.

  10. Contingency support using adaptive telemetry extractor and expert system technologies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bryant, Thomas; Cruse, Bryant; Wende, Charles

    1987-01-01

    The 'telemetry analysis logic for operations support' prototype system constitutes an expert system that is charged with contingency planning for the NASA Hubble Space Telescope (HST); this system has demonstrated the feasibility of using an adaptive telemetry extractor/reformatter that is integrated with an expert system. A test case generated by a simulator has demonstrated the reduction of the time required for analysis of a complex series of failures to a few minutes, from the hour usually required. The HST's telemetry extractor will be able to read real-time engineering telemetry streams and disk-based data. Telemetry format changes will be handled almost instantaneously.

  11. A Comparison of a Brain-Based Adaptive System and a Manual Adaptable System for Invoking Automation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bailey, Nathan R.; Scerbo, Mark W.; Freeman, Frederick G.; Mikulka, Peter J.; Scott, Lorissa A.

    2004-01-01

    Two experiments are presented that examine alternative methods for invoking automation. In each experiment, participants were asked to perform simultaneously a monitoring task and a resource management task as well as a tracking task that changed between automatic and manual modes. The monitoring task required participants to detect failures of an automated system to correct aberrant conditions under either high or low system reliability. Performance on each task was assessed as well as situation awareness and subjective workload. In the first experiment, half of the participants worked with a brain-based system that used their EEG signals to switch the tracking task between automatic and manual modes. The remaining participants were yoked to participants from the adaptive condition and received the same schedule of mode switches, but their EEG had no effect on the automation. Within each group, half of the participants were assigned to either the low or high reliability monitoring task. In addition, within each combination of automation invocation and system reliability, participants were separated into high and low complacency potential groups. The results revealed no significant effects of automation invocation on the performance measures; however, the high complacency individuals demonstrated better situation awareness when working with the adaptive automation system. The second experiment was the same as the first with one important exception. Automation was invoked manually. Thus, half of the participants pressed a button to invoke automation for 10 s. The remaining participants were yoked to participants from the adaptable condition and received the same schedule of mode switches, but they had no control over the automation. The results showed that participants who could invoke automation performed more poorly on the resource management task and reported higher levels of subjective workload. Further, those who invoked automation more frequently performed

  12. Robust adaptive dynamic programming and feedback stabilization of nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the robust optimal control design for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems from a perspective of robust adaptive dynamic programming (RADP). The objective is to fill up a gap in the past literature of adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) where dynamic uncertainties or unmodeled dynamics are not addressed. A key strategy is to integrate tools from modern nonlinear control theory, such as the robust redesign and the backstepping techniques as well as the nonlinear small-gain theorem, with the theory of ADP. The proposed RADP methodology can be viewed as an extension of ADP to uncertain nonlinear systems. Practical learning algorithms are developed in this paper, and have been applied to the controller design problems for a jet engine and a one-machine power system.

  13. Embedded intelligent adaptive PI controller for an electromechanical system.

    PubMed

    El-Nagar, Ahmad M

    2016-09-01

    In this study, an intelligent adaptive controller approach using the interval type-2 fuzzy neural network (IT2FNN) is presented. The proposed controller consists of a lower level proportional - integral (PI) controller, which is the main controller and an upper level IT2FNN which tuning on-line the parameters of a PI controller. The proposed adaptive PI controller based on IT2FNN (API-IT2FNN) is implemented practically using the Arduino DUE kit for controlling the speed of a nonlinear DC motor-generator system. The parameters of the IT2FNN are tuned on-line using back-propagation algorithm. The Lyapunov theorem is used to derive the stability and convergence of the IT2FNN. The obtained experimental results, which are compared with other controllers, demonstrate that the proposed API-IT2FNN is able to improve the system response over a wide range of system uncertainties.

  14. Coronagraphy with the AEOS High Order Adaptive Optics System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lloyd, J. P.; Graham, J. R.; Kalas, P.; Oppenheimer, B. R.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Makidon, R. B.; Macintosh, B. A.; Max, C. E.; Baudoz, P.; Kuhn, J. R.; Potter, D.

    2001-05-01

    Adaptive Optics has recently become a widely used technique to acquire sensitive, diffraction limited images in the near infrared with large ground based telescopes. Most astronomical targets are faint; driving astronomical AO systems towards large subapertures; resulting in a compromise between guide star brightness, observing wavelength, resolution and Strehl ratio. Space surveilance systems have recently been developed that exploit high order adaptive optics systems to take diffraction limited images in visible light on 4 meter class telescopes on bright (V<8) targets. There is, however, a particular niche that can be exploited by turning these visible light space surveillance systems to astronomical use at infrared wavelengths. At the longer wavelengths, the strehl ratio rises dramatically, thus placing more light into the diffracted Airy pattern at the expense of the atmospheric halo. A coronagraph can be used to suppress the diffracted light, and observe faint companions and debris disks around nearby, bright stars. Observations of these very high contrast objects benefit greatly from much higher order adaptive optics systems than are presently available to the astronomical commnunity. The National Science Foundation and Air Force Office of Scientific Research is sponsoring a program to conduct astronomical observations at the AEOS facility. We are presently developing an astronomical coronagraph to be deployed at the Air Force AEOS facility. We describe the coronagraph, and discuss the advantages and limitations of ground based high order AO for high contrast imaging.

  15. Soft systems thinking and social learning for adaptive management.

    PubMed

    Cundill, G; Cumming, G S; Biggs, D; Fabricius, C

    2012-02-01

    The success of adaptive management in conservation has been questioned and the objective-based management paradigm on which it is based has been heavily criticized. Soft systems thinking and social-learning theory expose errors in the assumption that complex systems can be dispassionately managed by objective observers and highlight the fact that conservation is a social process in which objectives are contested and learning is context dependent. We used these insights to rethink adaptive management in a way that focuses on the social processes involved in management and decision making. Our approach to adaptive management is based on the following assumptions: action toward a common goal is an emergent property of complex social relationships; the introduction of new knowledge, alternative values, and new ways of understanding the world can become a stimulating force for learning, creativity, and change; learning is contextual and is fundamentally about practice; and defining the goal to be addressed is continuous and in principle never ends. We believe five key activities are crucial to defining the goal that is to be addressed in an adaptive-management context and to determining the objectives that are desirable and feasible to the participants: situate the problem in its social and ecological context; raise awareness about alternative views of a problem and encourage enquiry and deconstruction of frames of reference; undertake collaborative actions; and reflect on learning.

  16. Algebraic and adaptive learning in neural control systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferrari, Silvia

    A systematic approach is developed for designing adaptive and reconfigurable nonlinear control systems that are applicable to plants modeled by ordinary differential equations. The nonlinear controller comprising a network of neural networks is taught using a two-phase learning procedure realized through novel techniques for initialization, on-line training, and adaptive critic design. A critical observation is that the gradients of the functions defined by the neural networks must equal corresponding linear gain matrices at chosen operating points. On-line training is based on a dual heuristic adaptive critic architecture that improves control for large, coupled motions by accounting for actual plant dynamics and nonlinear effects. An action network computes the optimal control law; a critic network predicts the derivative of the cost-to-go with respect to the state. Both networks are algebraically initialized based on prior knowledge of satisfactory pointwise linear controllers and continue to adapt on line during full-scale simulations of the plant. On-line training takes place sequentially over discrete periods of time and involves several numerical procedures. A backpropagating algorithm called Resilient Backpropagation is modified and successfully implemented to meet these objectives, without excessive computational expense. This adaptive controller is as conservative as the linear designs and as effective as a global nonlinear controller. The method is successfully implemented for the full-envelope control of a six-degree-of-freedom aircraft simulation. The results show that the on-line adaptation brings about improved performance with respect to the initialization phase during aircraft maneuvers that involve large-angle and coupled dynamics, and parameter variations.

  17. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system.

    PubMed

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K

    2015-01-01

    A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea.

  18. Adaptive control of artificial pancreas systems - a review.

    PubMed

    Turksoy, Kamuran; Cinar, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Artificial pancreas (AP) systems offer an important improvement in regulating blood glucose concentration for patients with type 1 diabetes, compared to current approaches. AP consists of sensors, control algorithms and an insulin pump. Different AP control algorithms such as proportional-integral-derivative, model-predictive control, adaptive control, and fuzzy logic control have been investigated in simulation and clinical studies in the past three decades. The variability over time and complexity of the dynamics of blood glucose concentration, unsteady disturbances such as meals, time-varying delays on measurements and insulin infusion, and noisy data from sensors create a challenging system to AP. Adaptive control is a powerful control technique that can deal with such challenges. In this paper, a review of adaptive control techniques for blood glucose regulation with an AP system is presented. The investigations and advances in technology produced impressive results, but there is still a need for a reliable AP system that is both commercially viable and appealing to patients with type 1 diabetes.

  19. Risk-return relationship in a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Song, Kunyu; An, Kenan; Yang, Guang; Huang, Jiping

    2012-01-01

    For survival and development, autonomous agents in complex adaptive systems involving the human society must compete against or collaborate with others for sharing limited resources or wealth, by using different methods. One method is to invest, in order to obtain payoffs with risk. It is a common belief that investments with a positive risk-return relationship (namely, high risk high return and vice versa) are dominant over those with a negative risk-return relationship (i.e., high risk low return and vice versa) in the human society; the belief has a notable impact on daily investing activities of investors. Here we investigate the risk-return relationship in a model complex adaptive system, in order to study the effect of both market efficiency and closeness that exist in the human society and play an important role in helping to establish traditional finance/economics theories. We conduct a series of computer-aided human experiments, and also perform agent-based simulations and theoretical analysis to confirm the experimental observations and reveal the underlying mechanism. We report that investments with a negative risk-return relationship have dominance over those with a positive risk-return relationship instead in such a complex adaptive systems. We formulate the dynamical process for the system's evolution, which helps to discover the different role of identical and heterogeneous preferences. This work might be valuable not only to complexity science, but also to finance and economics, to management and social science, and to physics.

  20. Digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging system

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Changgeng; Kim, Myung K.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. A digital adaptive optics line-scanning confocal imaging (DAOLCI) system is proposed by applying digital holographic adaptive optics to a digital form of line-scanning confocal imaging system. In DAOLCI, each line scan is recorded by a digital hologram, which allows access to the complex optical field from one slice of the sample through digital holography. This complex optical field contains both the information of one slice of the sample and the optical aberration of the system, thus allowing us to compensate for the effect of the optical aberration, which can be sensed by a complex guide star hologram. After numerical aberration compensation, the corrected optical fields of a sequence of line scans are stitched into the final corrected confocal image. In DAOLCI, a numerical slit is applied to realize the confocality at the sensor end. The width of this slit can be adjusted to control the image contrast and speckle noise for scattering samples. DAOLCI dispenses with the hardware pieces, such as Shack–Hartmann wavefront sensor and deformable mirror, and the closed-loop feedbacks adopted in the conventional adaptive optics confocal imaging system, thus reducing the optomechanical complexity and cost. Numerical simulations and proof-of-principle experiments are presented that demonstrate the feasibility of this idea. PMID:26140334

  1. MPI-IO: A Parallel File I/O Interface for MPI Version 0.3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Corbett, Peter; Feitelson, Dror; Hsu, Yarsun; Prost, Jean-Pierre; Snir, Marc; Fineberg, Sam; Nitzberg, Bill; Traversat, Bernard; Wong, Parkson

    1995-01-01

    Thanks to MPI [9], writing portable message passing parallel programs is almost a reality. One of the remaining problems is file I/0. Although parallel file systems support similar interfaces, the lack of a standard makes developing a truly portable program impossible. Further, the closest thing to a standard, the UNIX file interface, is ill-suited to parallel computing. Working together, IBM Research and NASA Ames have drafted MPI-I0, a proposal to address the portable parallel I/0 problem. In a nutshell, this proposal is based on the idea that I/0 can be modeled as message passing: writing to a file is like sending a message, and reading from a file is like receiving a message. MPI-IO intends to leverage the relatively wide acceptance of the MPI interface in order to create a similar I/0 interface. The above approach can be materialized in different ways. The current proposal represents the result of extensive discussions (and arguments), but is by no means finished. Many changes can be expected as additional participants join the effort to define an interface for portable I/0. This document is organized as follows. The remainder of this section includes a discussion of some issues that have shaped the style of the interface. Section 2 presents an overview of MPI-IO as it is currently defined. It specifies what the interface currently supports and states what would need to be added to the current proposal to make the interface more complete and robust. The next seven sections contain the interface definition itself. Section 3 presents definitions and conventions. Section 4 contains functions for file control, most notably open. Section 5 includes functions for independent I/O, both blocking and nonblocking. Section 6 includes functions for collective I/O, both blocking and nonblocking. Section 7 presents functions to support system-maintained file pointers, and shared file pointers. Section 8 presents constructors that can be used to define useful filetypes (the

  2. Performance predictions for the Keck telescope adaptive optics system

    SciTech Connect

    Gavel, D.T.; Olivier, S.S.

    1995-08-07

    The second Keck ten meter telescope (Keck-11) is slated to have an infrared-optimized adaptive optics system in the 1997--1998 time frame. This system will provide diffraction-limited images in the 1--3 micron region and the ability to use a diffraction-limited spectroscopy slit. The AO system is currently in the preliminary design phase and considerable analysis has been performed in order to predict its performance under various seeing conditions. In particular we have investigated the point-spread function, energy through a spectroscopy slit, crowded field contrast, object limiting magnitude, field of view, and sky coverage with natural and laser guide stars.

  3. Design of high temperature adaptability cassegrain collimation system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Zhibin; Song, Yan; Liu, Xianhong; Xiao, Wenjian

    2014-12-01

    Collimation system is an indispensable part of the photoelectric detection equipment. Aimed at meeting the demand of field on-line detection for photoelectric system, the system must have higher requirements for its volume, quality and the anti-interference ability of all sorts of complex weather conditions. In order to solve this problem, this paper designed a kind of high temperature adaptability reflex cassegrain collimation system. First the technical indexes of the system was put forward according to the requirements of practical application, then the initial structure parameters was calculated by gaussian optical computing and optimized processing through Zemax. The simulation results showed that the MTF of the system was close to the diffraction limit, which had a good image quality. The system structure tube adopted hard steel material; the primary mirror and secondary mirror used low expansion coefficient of microcrystalline glass, which effectively reduced the deformation due to temperature difference and remained little change in quality and volume at the same time. The experiment results in high and low temperature environments also showed that the collimation system could keep within 30 "beam divergence angle, which proved to have good temperature adaptability, so that it can be used in the field of complex bad conditions.

  4. Io: Heat Flow from Dark Volcanic Fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Veeder, G. J.; Matson, D. L.; Davies, A. G.; Johnson, T. V.

    2008-03-01

    We focus on the heat flow contribution from dark volcanic fields on Io. These are concentrated in the anti-Loki hemisphere. We use the areas and estimated effective temperatures of dark flucti to derive their total power.

  5. High-Performance I/O: HDF5 for Lattice QCD

    SciTech Connect

    Kurth, Thorsten; Pochinsky, Andrew; Sarje, Abhinav; Syritsyn, Sergey; Walker-Loud, Andre

    2015-01-01

    Practitioners of lattice QCD/QFT have been some of the primary pioneer users of the state-of-the-art high-performance-computing systems, and contribute towards the stress tests of such new machines as soon as they become available. As with all aspects of high-performance-computing, I/O is becoming an increasingly specialized component of these systems. In order to take advantage of the latest available high-performance I/O infrastructure, to ensure reliability and backwards compatibility of data files, and to help unify the data structures used in lattice codes, we have incorporated parallel HDF5 I/O into the SciDAC supported USQCD software stack. Here we present the design and implementation of this I/O framework. Our HDF5 implementation outperforms optimized QIO at the 10-20% level and leaves room for further improvement by utilizing appropriate dataset chunking.

  6. Quantifying Adaptive Evolution in the Drosophila Immune System

    PubMed Central

    Obbard, Darren J.; Welch, John J.; Kim, Kang-Wook; Jiggins, Francis M.

    2009-01-01

    It is estimated that a large proportion of amino acid substitutions in Drosophila have been fixed by natural selection, and as organisms are faced with an ever-changing array of pathogens and parasites to which they must adapt, we have investigated the role of parasite-mediated selection as a likely cause. To quantify the effect, and to identify which genes and pathways are most likely to be involved in the host–parasite arms race, we have re-sequenced population samples of 136 immunity and 287 position-matched non-immunity genes in two species of Drosophila. Using these data, and a new extension of the McDonald-Kreitman approach, we estimate that natural selection fixes advantageous amino acid changes in immunity genes at nearly double the rate of other genes. We find the rate of adaptive evolution in immunity genes is also more variable than other genes, with a small subset of immune genes evolving under intense selection. These genes, which are likely to represent hotspots of host–parasite coevolution, tend to share similar functions or belong to the same pathways, such as the antiviral RNAi pathway and the IMD signalling pathway. These patterns appear to be general features of immune system evolution in both species, as rates of adaptive evolution are correlated between the D. melanogaster and D. simulans lineages. In summary, our data provide quantitative estimates of the elevated rate of adaptive evolution in immune system genes relative to the rest of the genome, and they suggest that adaptation to parasites is an important force driving molecular evolution. PMID:19851448

  7. Low Temperature Shape Memory Alloys for Adaptive, Autonomous Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Williams, Martha; Benafan, Othmane; Fesmire, James

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this joint activity between Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Glenn Research Center (GRC) is to develop and evaluate the applicability of 2-way SMAs in proof-of-concept, low-temperature adaptive autonomous systems. As part of this low technology readiness (TRL) activity, we will develop and train low-temperature novel, 2-way shape memory alloys (SMAs) with actuation temperatures ranging from 0 C to 150 C. These experimental alloys will also be preliminary tested to evaluate their performance parameters and transformation (actuation) temperatures in low- temperature or cryogenic adaptive proof-of-concept systems. The challenge will be in the development, design, and training of the alloys for 2-way actuation at those temperatures.

  8. CRISPR-Cas systems: Prokaryotes upgrade to adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Barrangou, Rodolphe; Marraffini, Luciano A

    2014-04-24

    Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR), and associated proteins (Cas) comprise the CRISPR-Cas system, which confers adaptive immunity against exogenic elements in many bacteria and most archaea. CRISPR-mediated immunization occurs through the uptake of DNA from invasive genetic elements such as plasmids and viruses, followed by its integration into CRISPR loci. These loci are subsequently transcribed and processed into small interfering RNAs that guide nucleases for specific cleavage of complementary sequences. Conceptually, CRISPR-Cas shares functional features with the mammalian adaptive immune system, while also exhibiting characteristics of Lamarckian evolution. Because immune markers spliced from exogenous agents are integrated iteratively in CRISPR loci, they constitute a genetic record of vaccination events and reflect environmental conditions and changes over time. Cas endonucleases, which can be reprogrammed by small guide RNAs have shown unprecedented potential and flexibility for genome editing and can be repurposed for numerous DNA targeting applications including transcriptional control.

  9. Global Geologic Mapping of Io: Preliminary Results

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, David A.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Crown, D. A.; Geissler, P. E.; Schenk, P. M.; Yff, Jessica; Jaeger, W. L.; Rathbun, J. A.

    2008-01-01

    A new global geologic map of Jupiter's volcanic moon, Io is being prepared, with the focus being on completion of a draft map by July 2008. Here initial results of the mapping are reported: a preliminary distribution of material units in terms of areas and a visual representation. Additionally, the mapping hopes to address some of the problems in Io geology. Thus far it has been discovered that Io's surface is dominated by plains material, thought to consist of Io's silicate crust covered by pyroclastic deposits and lava flows of silicate and sulfur-bearing composition. Many plains areas contain flow fields that cannot be mapped separately due to a lack of resolution or modification by alteration processes. Discrete lava flows and flow fields are the next most abundant unit, with bright (sulfur?) flows in greater abundance than dark (silicate?) flows. The source of most of Io's heat flow, the paterae, are the least abundant unit in terms of areal extent.Upon completion of the draft map for peer review, it will be used to investigate several specific questions about the geological evolution of Io that previously could not be well addressed, including: comparison of the areas versus the heights of Ionian mountains to assess their stability and evolution; correlation and comparison of Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer and Photopolarimeter-Radiometer hot spot locations with the mapped location of dark versus bright lava flows and patera floors to assess any variations in the types of sources for Io's active volcanism; and the creation of a global inventory of the areal coverage of dark and bright laval flows to assess the relative importance of sulfur versus silicate volcanism in resurfacing Io, and to assess whether there are regional concentrations of either style of volcanism that may have implications on interior processes.

  10. Map of Io's volcanic heat flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Ashley Gerard; Veeder, Glenn J.; Matson, Dennis L.; Johnson, Torrence V.

    2015-12-01

    We present a map of Io's volcanic heat flow. Io's high heat flow is a result of intense tidal heating, which generates widespread volcanic activity. The surface expression of ongoing volcanic activity constrains the location and magnitude of tidal dissipation within Io. Tidal heating models place heating either at relatively shallow (aesthenosphere) levels, or deep in the mantle. It was thought that actual tidal heating could be approximated using a combination of these end-member models. Io's volcanic heat flow has now been mapped in sufficient detail to compare with the models. Our maps show that the distribution of heat flow is not matched by current models of deep nor shallow tidal heating, nor by any combination of these two models. We find relatively low heat flow at sub-jovian (0°W) and anti-jovian (180°W) longitudes, at odds with the pure aesthenospheric heating model. Furthermore, there are large swaths of Io's surface where there is poor correlation between the number of hot spots in an area and the power emitted. We have previously accounted for ≈54% of Io's observed heat flow. We now show that Io's anomalously warm poles, possibly the result of heat flow from deep-mantle heating, would yield the ;missing; energy (48 TW) if the polar surfaces are at temperatures of ∼90 K to ∼95 K and cover latitudes above ∼43° to ∼48° respectively. This possibility implies a ratio of deep to shallow heating of about 1:1. However, explaining regional variations in surface volcanic activity requires more detailed modeling of the location and magnitude of the internal tidal dissipation and the consequences of mantle convection and advection within Io. Future model predictions can be compared to our heat flow map.

  11. Understanding Io's Interior Structure from Electromagnetic Induction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khurana, K. K.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Jia, X.

    2015-12-01

    Io has long been suspected of a molten interior based on theoretical models of tidal dissipation in its interior. Extremely high temperature lava erupting on Io's surface would be consistent with an internal magma ocean but the highest reported eruption temperatures are questionable. Currently, the only direct evidence of a subsurface magma ocean in Io is the electromagnetic induction response observed by Galileo (Khurana et al. 2011, Science, 332, 1186). Using Jupiter's rotating magnetic field as a sounding signal, Khurana et al. (2011) provided evidence of a strong dipolar induction signature in Galileo's magnetometer data from four different flybys. They further showed that the signal is consistent with electromagnetic induction from large amounts of rock-melts in the asthenosphere of Io. Modeling showed that the induction response from a completely solid mantle model is inadequate to explain the magnetometer observations. However, a layer of asthenosphere >50 km in thickness with a melt fraction ≥20% is adequate to accurately match the observed magnetic field. Here we summarize our current knowledge of Io's interior from Galileo's induction measurements, and then outline a scheme to further infer properties of Io's interior, especially its internal temperature profile, by marrying the principles of thermodynamics with those of electromagnetism. In particular, we obtain guidance on stable mineral phases and their physical properties (such as density, melt state and electrical conductivity) from thermodynamic principles, whereas guidance on how the resulting internal conductivity profile affects the magnetic environment around Io is obtained from electromagnetic theory. We also explore how induction measurements can be obtained at multiple frequencies from a future mission and be used to constrain both the location and the thickness of the magma ocean. Finally, we explore the consequences of the global magma ocean on Io's physical properties such as the current

  12. A System Approach to Adaptive Multi-Modal Sensor Designs

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-02-01

    Email: rhody@cis.rit.edu Program Managers: Dr. Douglas Cochran <douglas.cochran@afosr.af.mil> Dr. Kitt C. Reinhardt <kitt.reinhardt...DEPARTMENT OF COMPUTER SCIENCE CONVENT AVE & 138TH ST SCHOOL OF ENGINEERING NEW YORK, NY 10031 Approved for public release...FA9550-08-1-0199 A System Approach to Adaptive Multi-Modal Sensor Designs 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  13. RAINBOW: Architecture-Based Adaptation of Complex Systems

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-04-01

    architectural level. The second problem is to translate architectural repairs into actual system changes. To do this we write a simple table-driven...bandwidth, regardless of the adaptation. Similarly, it is possible to use general probe technology to ameliorate the task of writing probes for particular...it is possible to use existing technologies like ProbeMeister [21] to generate the actual probes, without writing any additional code. 2.3

  14. Adaptive and neuroadaptive control for nonnegative and compartmental dynamical systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volyanskyy, Kostyantyn Y.

    Neural networks have been extensively used for adaptive system identification as well as adaptive and neuroadaptive control of highly uncertain systems. The goal of adaptive and neuroadaptive control is to achieve system performance without excessive reliance on system models. To improve robustness and the speed of adaptation of adaptive and neuroadaptive controllers several controller architectures have been proposed in the literature. In this dissertation, we develop a new neuroadaptive control architecture for nonlinear uncertain dynamical systems. The proposed framework involves a novel controller architecture with additional terms in the update laws that are constructed using a moving window of the integrated system uncertainty. These terms can be used to identify the ideal system weights of the neural network as well as effectively suppress system uncertainty. Linear and nonlinear parameterizations of the system uncertainty are considered and state and output feedback neuroadaptive controllers are developed. Furthermore, we extend the developed framework to discrete-time dynamical systems. To illustrate the efficacy of the proposed approach we apply our results to an aircraft model with wing rock dynamics, a spacecraft model with unknown moment of inertia, and an unmanned combat aerial vehicle undergoing actuator failures, and compare our results with standard neuroadaptive control methods. Nonnegative systems are essential in capturing the behavior of a wide range of dynamical systems involving dynamic states whose values are nonnegative. A sub-class of nonnegative dynamical systems are compartmental systems. These systems are derived from mass and energy balance considerations and are comprised of homogeneous interconnected microscopic subsystems or compartments which exchange variable quantities of material via intercompartmental flow laws. In this dissertation, we develop direct adaptive and neuroadaptive control framework for stabilization, disturbance

  15. Adaptation with disturbance attenuation in nonlinear control systems

    SciTech Connect

    Basar, T.

    1997-12-31

    We present an optimization-based adaptive controller design for nonlinear systems exhibiting parametric as well as functional uncertainty. The approach involves the formulation of an appropriate cost functional that places positive weight on deviations from the achievement of desired objectives (such as tracking of a reference trajectory while the system exhibits good transient performance) and negative weight on the energy of the uncertainty. This cost functional also translates into a disturbance attenuation inequality which quantifies the effect of the presence of uncertainty on the desired objective, which in turn yields an interpretation for the optimizing control as one that optimally attenuates the disturbance, viewed as the collection of unknown parameters and unknown signals entering the system dynamics. In addition to this disturbance attenuation property, the controllers obtained also feature adaptation in the sense that they help with identification of the unknown parameters, even though this has not been set as the primary goal of the design. In spite of this adaptation/identification role, the controllers obtained are not of certainty-equivalent type, which means that the identification and the control phases of the design are not decoupled.

  16. A role of the adaptive immune system in glucose homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Bronsart, Laura L; Contag, Christopher H

    2016-01-01

    Objective The immune system, including the adaptive immune response, has recently been recognized as having a significant role in diet-induced insulin resistance. In this study, we aimed to determine if the adaptive immune system also functions in maintaining physiological glucose homeostasis in the absence of diet-induced disease. Research design and methods SCID mice and immunocompetent control animals were phenotypically assessed for variations in metabolic parameters and cytokine profiles. Additionally, the glucose tolerance of SCID and immunocompetent control animals was assessed following introduction of a high-fat diet. Results SCID mice on a normal chow diet were significantly insulin resistant relative to control animals despite having less fat mass. This was associated with a significant increase in the innate immunity-stimulating cytokines granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP1), and MCP3. Additionally, the SCID mouse phenotype was exacerbated in response to a high-fat diet as evidenced by the further significant progression of glucose intolerance. Conclusions These results support the notion that the adaptive immune system plays a fundamental biological role in glucose homeostasis, and that the absence of functional B and T cells results in disruption in the concentrations of various cytokines associated with macrophage proliferation and recruitment. Additionally, the absence of functional B and T cells is not protective against diet-induced pathology. PMID:27026807

  17. The plasma membrane transport systems and adaptation to salinity.

    PubMed

    Mansour, Mohamed Magdy F

    2014-11-15

    Salt stress represents one of the environmental challenges that drastically affect plant growth and yield. Evidence suggests that glycophytes and halophytes have a salt tolerance mechanisms working at the cellular level, and the plasma membrane (PM) is believed to be one facet of the cellular mechanisms. The responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in contrasting species/cultivars were discussed. The review provides a comprehensive overview of the recent advances describing the crucial roles that the PM transport systems have in plant adaptation to salt. Several lines of evidence were presented to demonstrate the correlation between the PM transport proteins and adaptation of plants to high salinity. How alterations in these transport systems of the PM allow plants to cope with the salt stress was also addressed. Although inconsistencies exist in some of the information related to the responses of the PM transport proteins to salinity in different species/cultivars, their key roles in adaptation of plants to high salinity is obvious and evident, and cannot be precluded. Despite the promising results, detailed investigations at the cellular/molecular level are needed in some issues of the PM transport systems in response to salinity to further evaluate their implication in salt tolerance.

  18. Adaptive and Rational Anticipations in Risk Management Systems and Economy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubois, Daniel M.; Holmberg, Stig C.

    2010-11-01

    The global financial crisis of year 2009 is explained as a result of uncoordinated risk management decisions in business firms and economic organisations. The underlying reason for this can be found in the current financial system. As the financial market has lost much of its direct coupling to the concrete economy it provides misleading information to economic decision makers at all levels. Hence, the financial system has moved from a state of moderate and slow cyclical fluctuations into a state of fast and chaotic ones. Those misleading decisions can further be described, but not explained, by help of adaptive and rational expectations from macroeconomic theory. In this context, AE, the Adaptive Expectations are related to weak passive Exo-anticipation, and RE, the Rational expectations can be related to a strong, active and design oriented anticipation. The shortcomings of conventional cures, which builds on a reactive paradigm, have already been demonstrated in economic literature and are here further underlined by help of Ashby's "Law of Requisite Variety", Weaver's distinction between systems of "Disorganized Complexity" and those of "Organized Complexity", and Klir's "Reconstructability Analysis". Anticipatory decision-making is hence here proposed as a replacement to current expectation based and passive risk management. An anticipatory model of the business cycle is presented for supporting that proposition. The model, which is an extension of the Kaldor-Kalecki model, includes both retardation and anticipation. While cybernetics with the feedback process in control system deals with an explicit goal or purpose given to a system, the anticipatory system discussed here deals with a behaviour for which the future state of the system is built by the system itself, without explicit goal. A system with weak anticipation is based on a predictive model of the system, while a system with strong anticipation builds its own future by itself. Numerical simulations on

  19. An adaptive neuro-control system of synchronous generator for power system stabilization

    SciTech Connect

    Kobayashi, Takenori; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    1996-09-01

    This paper proposes a nonlinear adaptive generator control system using neural networks, called an adaptive neuro-control system (ANCS). This system generates supplementary control signals to conventional controllers and works adaptively in response to changes in operating conditions and network configuration. Through digital time simulations for a one-machine infinite bus test power system, the control performance of the ANCS and advanced controllers such as a linear optimal regulator and a self-tuning regulator is evaluated from the viewpoint of stability enhancement. As a result, the proposed ANCS using neural networks with nonlinear characteristics improves system damping more effectively and more adaptively than the other two controllers designed for the linearized model of the power system.

  20. Layout-Aware I/O Scheduling for Terabits Data Movement

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Youngjae; Atchley, Scott; Vallee, Geoffroy R; Shipman, Galen M

    2013-01-01

    Many science facilities, such as the Department of Energy s Leadership Computing Facilities and experimental facilities including the Spallation Neutron Source, Stanford Linear Accelerator Center, and Advanced Photon Source, produce massive amounts of experimental and simulation data. These data are often shared among the facilities and with collaborating institutions. Moving large datasets over the wide- area network (WAN) is a major problem inhibiting collaboration. Next- generation, terabit-networks will help alleviate the problem, however, the parallel storage systems on the end-system hosts at these institutions can become a bottleneck for terabit data movement. The parallel storage system (PFS) is shared by simulation systems, experimental systems, analysis and visualization clusters, in addition to wide-area data movers. These competing uses often induce temporary, but significant, I/O load imbalances on the storage system, which impact the performance of all the users. The problem is a serious concern because some resources are more expensive (e.g. super computers) or have time-critical deadlines (e.g. experimental data from a light source), but parallel file systems handle all requests fairly even if some storage servers are under heavy load. This paper investigates the problem of competing workloads accessing the parallel file system and how the performance of wide-area data movement can be improved in these environments. First, we study the I/O load imbalance problems using actual I/O performance data collected from the Spider storage system at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility. Second, we present I/O optimization solutions with layout-awareness on end-system hosts for bulk data movement. With our evaluation, we show that our I/O optimization techniques can avoid the I/O congested disk groups, improving storage I/O times on parallel storage systems for terabit data movement.

  1. IO &Amalthea: Examples of acting wave processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kochemasov, G.

    Io and Amalthea and their "warm" yielding surfaces seem to be specially suitable for a demonstration of warping action of standing inertia-gravity waves sculpturing planetary surfaces and shaping bodies. "Orbits make structures". This fundamental finding seriously changing our understanding of origin of shapes and tectonic building of celestial bodies was demonstrated on many occasions. As examples were taken small and larger planets (solid and gaseous), Sun, small and large satellites, asteroids and comets (the recently acquired Borrelli's pictures are particularly revealing!).One circumstance which is universal and extremely important is the fact that all celestial bodies move in several orbits. In this respect satellites are of great interest because only in our Galaxy they have 3 orbits: around planets, Sun and the galactic center. All orbits induce their structures. The galactic orbit common to all bodies of the Solar system makes them through a wave modulation tectonically dichotomic (a trace of the fundamental wave). This fundamental wave as the lower side frequency appears in any body. The higher side frequencies also appear in any body and are in the ranges of microwaves and radiowaves depending on bodies dimensions and orbital frequencies [1]. In Io's case the galactic frequency 1/~200 000 000 y. modulates the circumsolar fr. 1/12 y. and the circumjovian fr. 1/1.769 days making oscillations with wavelengths 68 cm and 0.276 mm. For smaller and faster Amalthea these wavelengths are shorter: 4.88 cm and 0.0056 mm. Such a "microwave stove" heating, affecting the whole volume of a body, might be partially responsible for extraheat issued by these satellites. Yielding Amalthea's body is probably the best example in the Solar system clearly demonstrating its diamond - like shape produced by an interference of wave 2 warpings superimposed on the global convexo-concave shape (wave 1 feature). Not enough sharp images of its surface show however regularly crossing

  2. Adaptive Mesh Refinement in Curvilinear Body-Fitted Grid Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinthorsson, Erlendur; Modiano, David; Colella, Phillip

    1995-01-01

    To be truly compatible with structured grids, an AMR algorithm should employ a block structure for the refined grids to allow flow solvers to take advantage of the strengths of unstructured grid systems, such as efficient solution algorithms for implicit discretizations and multigrid schemes. One such algorithm, the AMR algorithm of Berger and Colella, has been applied to and adapted for use with body-fitted structured grid systems. Results are presented for a transonic flow over a NACA0012 airfoil (AGARD-03 test case) and a reflection of a shock over a double wedge.

  3. An experimental study of a hybrid adaptive control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lizewski, E. F.; Monopoli, R. V.

    1974-01-01

    A Liapunov type model reference adaptive control system with five adjustable gains is implemented using a PDP-11 digital computer and an EAI 380 analog computer. The plant controlled is a laboratory type dc servo system. It is made to follow closely a second order linear model. The experimental results demonstrate the feasibility of implementing this rather complex design using only a minicomputer and a reasonable number of operational amplifiers. Also, it points out that satisfactory performance can be achieved even when certain assumptions necessary for the theory are not satisfied.

  4. ISAARE: Information System for Adaptive, Assistive, and Recreational Equipment: Volume I: Existence; Volume II, Communication; Volume V, Adaptation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Melichar, Joseph F.

    Described as part of the Information System for Adaptive, Assistive and Recreational Equipment are equipment items for physically handicapped pupils in the functional areas of existence, equipment and adaptation. Reviewed in the existence section are such items as assistive food containers and container stabilizers, feeder accessories, bowel and…

  5. Experiment of space laser communication based on adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhun; Ai, Yong; Chen, Jin; Chen, Erhu; Wu, Yunyun

    2011-11-01

    The adaptive optics(AO) technology is adopted in the demo experiment of indoor space laser communication system. In transmit terminal, 650nm beacon and 1550nm signal beam with OOK modulation propagate through atmosphere turbulence simulator which simulate the laser's propagation in real atmosphere conditions. The AO system corrects real time wave-front information. In received terminal, signal intensity is collected and the bit error rate(BER) is recorded. Experiment data is obtained in different status of the AO system. Combined with signal beam wave-front reconstructed and image quality of far-field laser spot, results show that the received average power of communication system increases when using the AO system to correct low-order aberration. Also it rejects signal fading and makes the BER lower.

  6. Experiment of space laser communication based on adaptive optics system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiong, Zhun; Ai, Yong; Chen, Jin; Chen, Erhu; Wu, Yunyun

    2012-02-01

    The adaptive optics(AO) technology is adopted in the demo experiment of indoor space laser communication system. In transmit terminal, 650nm beacon and 1550nm signal beam with OOK modulation propagate through atmosphere turbulence simulator which simulate the laser's propagation in real atmosphere conditions. The AO system corrects real time wave-front information. In received terminal, signal intensity is collected and the bit error rate(BER) is recorded. Experiment data is obtained in different status of the AO system. Combined with signal beam wave-front reconstructed and image quality of far-field laser spot, results show that the received average power of communication system increases when using the AO system to correct low-order aberration. Also it rejects signal fading and makes the BER lower.

  7. [Incorporation and adaptation of the postmodern belief system].

    PubMed

    Garzón Pérez, Adela

    2012-01-01

    Every society develops a particular system of beliefs that summarizes its vision of socio-political organization, culture and interpersonal relationships. Each of these three basic dimensions has different forms, depending on the spatial and temporal context of societies. The belief system of the service societies is characterized by a democratic vision of social and political organization, rejection of radical social changes and high levels of interpersonal trust. This paper empirically examines the incorporation and adaptation of the postmodern belief system in a sample of university students. The participants belong to a country that is slowly integrating into the service societies. We used a scale of postmodernity to analyze the incorporation of the postmodern belief system. The results indicate that there is a peculiar combination of the three basic dimensions of the postmodern belief system, where the postmodern conceptions of culture and social relationships have lower acceptance.

  8. Relationships Between Paterae, Mountains, and Hotspots on Io from a Global Database

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radebaugh, J.; Jaeger, W. L.; Keszthelyi, L. P.; Turtle, E. P.; Milazzo, M. P.; Perry, J.; McEwen, A. S.; Lopes, R.; Davies, A. G.; Geissler, P.

    2004-01-01

    Now that the Galileo spacecraft s tour of the Jupiter system is over, we seek to integrate all available datasets in the hopes of understanding Io as completely as possible. We have compiled information about the morphologies and locations of paterae (volcano-tectonic depressions), mountains, and hotspots on Io in a single database. It is our hope that an analysis of the spatial and temporal relationships between these features will provide more indications of the nature of the crust of Io and the mechanisms leading to these features formation. Since Io s tidal heat escapes through its crust, more knowledge about the crust will lead to an understanding of internal processes, such as magma generation and delivery to the surface, and magnitude and orientation of internal stresses.

  9. Distributed service-based approach for sensor data fusion in IoT environments.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez-Valenzuela, Sandra; Holgado-Terriza, Juan A; Gutiérrez-Guerrero, José M; Muros-Cobos, Jesús L

    2014-10-15

    The Internet of Things (IoT) enables the communication among smart objects promoting the pervasive presence around us of a variety of things or objects that are able to interact and cooperate jointly to reach common goals. IoT objects can obtain data from their context, such as the home, office, industry or body. These data can be combined to obtain new and more complex information applying data fusion processes. However, to apply data fusion algorithms in IoT environments, the full system must deal with distributed nodes, decentralized communication and support scalability and nodes dynamicity, among others restrictions. In this paper, a novel method to manage data acquisition and fusion based on a distributed service composition model is presented, improving the data treatment in IoT pervasive environments.

  10. Distributed Service-Based Approach for Sensor Data Fusion in IoT Environments

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Valenzuela, Sandra; Holgado-Terriza, Juan A.; Gutiérrez-Guerrero, José M.; Muros-Cobos, Jesús L.

    2014-01-01

    The Internet of Things (IoT) enables the communication among smart objects promoting the pervasive presence around us of a variety of things or objects that are able to interact and cooperate jointly to reach common goals. IoT objects can obtain data from their context, such as the home, office, industry or body. These data can be combined to obtain new and more complex information applying data fusion processes. However, to apply data fusion algorithms in IoT environments, the full system must deal with distributed nodes, decentralized communication and support scalability and nodes dynamicity, among others restrictions. In this paper, a novel method to manage data acquisition and fusion based on a distributed service composition model is presented, improving the data treatment in IoT pervasive environments. PMID:25320907

  11. Adaptive-passive vibration control systems for industrial applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayer, D.; Pfeiffer, T.; Vrbata, J.; Melz, T.

    2015-04-01

    Tuned vibration absorbers have become common for passive vibration reduction in many industrial applications. Lightly damped absorbers (also called neutralizers) can be used to suppress narrowband disturbances by tuning them to the excitation frequency. If the resonance is adapted in-operation, the performance of those devices can be significantly enhanced, or inertial mass can be decreased. However, the integration of actuators, sensors and control electronics into the system raises new design challenges. In this work, the development of adaptive-passive systems for vibration reduction at an industrial scale is presented. As an example, vibration reduction of a ship engine was studied in a full scale test. Simulations were used to study the feasibility and evaluate the system concept at an early stage. Several ways to adjust the resonance of the neutralizer were evaluated, including piezoelectric actuation and common mechatronic drives. Prototypes were implemented and tested. Since vibration absorbers suffer from high dynamic loads, reliability tests were used to assess the long-term behavior under operational conditions and to improve the components. It was proved that the adaptive systems are capable to withstand the mechanical loads in an industrial application. Also a control strategy had to be implemented in order to track the excitation frequency. The most mature concepts were integrated into the full scale test. An imbalance exciter was used to simulate the engine vibrations at a realistic level experimentally. The neutralizers were tested at varying excitation frequencies to evaluate the tracking capabilities of the control system. It was proved that a significant vibration reduction is possible.

  12. An IoT Reader for Wireless Passive Electromagnetic Sensors.

    PubMed

    Galindo-Romera, Gabriel; Carnerero-Cano, Javier; Martínez-Martínez, José Juan; Herraiz-Martínez, Francisco Javier

    2017-03-28

    In the last years, many passive electromagnetic sensors have been reported. Some of these sensors are used for measuring harmful substances. Moreover, the response of these sensors is usually obtained with laboratory equipment. This approach highly increases the total cost and complexity of the sensing system. In this work, a novel low-cost and portable Internet-of-Things (IoT) reader for passive wireless electromagnetic sensors is proposed. The reader is used to interrogate the sensors within a short-range wireless link avoiding the direct contact with the substances under test. The IoT functionalities of the reader allows remote sensing from computers and handheld devices. For that purpose, the proposed design is based on four functional layers: the radiating layer, the RF interface, the IoT mini-computer and the power unit. In this paper a demonstrator of the proposed reader is designed and manufactured. The demonstrator shows, through the remote measurement of different substances, that the proposed system can estimate the dielectric permittivity. It has been demonstrated that a linear approximation with a small error can be extracted from the reader measurements. It is remarkable that the proposed reader can be used with other type of electromagnetic sensors, which transduce the magnitude variations in the frequency domain.

  13. Fuzzy Adaptive Cubature Kalman Filter for Integrated Navigation Systems.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chien-Hao; Lin, Sheng-Fuu; Jwo, Dah-Jing

    2016-07-26

    This paper presents a sensor fusion method based on the combination of cubature Kalman filter (CKF) and fuzzy logic adaptive system (FLAS) for the integrated navigation systems, such as the GPS/INS (Global Positioning System/inertial navigation system) integration. The third-degree spherical-radial cubature rule applied in the CKF has been employed to avoid the numerically instability in the system model. In processing navigation integration, the performance of nonlinear filter based estimation of the position and velocity states may severely degrade caused by modeling errors due to dynamics uncertainties of the vehicle. In order to resolve the shortcoming for selecting the process noise covariance through personal experience or numerical simulation, a scheme called the fuzzy adaptive cubature Kalman filter (FACKF) is presented by introducing the FLAS to adjust the weighting factor of the process noise covariance matrix. The FLAS is incorporated into the CKF framework as a mechanism for timely implementing the tuning of process noise covariance matrix based on the information of degree of divergence (DOD) parameter. The proposed FACKF algorithm shows promising accuracy improvement as compared to the extended Kalman filter (EKF), unscented Kalman filter (UKF), and CKF approaches.

  14. Fuzzy Adaptive Cubature Kalman Filter for Integrated Navigation Systems

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chien-Hao; Lin, Sheng-Fuu; Jwo, Dah-Jing

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a sensor fusion method based on the combination of cubature Kalman filter (CKF) and fuzzy logic adaptive system (FLAS) for the integrated navigation systems, such as the GPS/INS (Global Positioning System/inertial navigation system) integration. The third-degree spherical-radial cubature rule applied in the CKF has been employed to avoid the numerically instability in the system model. In processing navigation integration, the performance of nonlinear filter based estimation of the position and velocity states may severely degrade caused by modeling errors due to dynamics uncertainties of the vehicle. In order to resolve the shortcoming for selecting the process noise covariance through personal experience or numerical simulation, a scheme called the fuzzy adaptive cubature Kalman filter (FACKF) is presented by introducing the FLAS to adjust the weighting factor of the process noise covariance matrix. The FLAS is incorporated into the CKF framework as a mechanism for timely implementing the tuning of process noise covariance matrix based on the information of degree of divergence (DOD) parameter. The proposed FACKF algorithm shows promising accuracy improvement as compared to the extended Kalman filter (EKF), unscented Kalman filter (UKF), and CKF approaches. PMID:27472336

  15. Adaptive mechanical properties of topologically interlocking material systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khandelwal, S.; Siegmund, T.; Cipra, R. J.; Bolton, J. S.

    2015-04-01

    Topologically interlocked material systems are two-dimensional granular crystals created as ordered and adhesion-less assemblies of unit elements of the shape of platonic solids. The assembly resists transverse forces due to the interlocking geometric arrangement of the unit elements. Topologically interlocked material systems yet require an external constraint to provide resistance under the action of external load. Past work considered fixed and passive constraints only. The objective of the present study is to consider active and adaptive external constraints with the goal to achieve variable stiffness and energy absorption characteristics of the topologically interlocked material system through an active control of the in-plane constraint conditions. Experiments and corresponding model analysis are used to demonstrate control of system stiffness over a wide range, including negative stiffness, and energy absorption characteristics. The adaptive characteristics of the topologically interlocked material system are shown to solve conflicting requirements of simultaneously providing energy absorption while keeping loads controlled. Potential applications can be envisioned in smart structure enhanced response characteristics as desired in shock absorption, protective packaging and catching mechanisms.

  16. The PDZ domain as a complex adaptive system.

    PubMed

    Kurakin, Alexei; Swistowski, Andrzej; Wu, Susan C; Bredesen, Dale E

    2007-09-26

    Specific protein associations define the wiring of protein interaction networks and thus control the organization and functioning of the cell as a whole. Peptide recognition by PDZ and other protein interaction domains represents one of the best-studied classes of specific protein associations. However, a mechanistic understanding of the relationship between selectivity and promiscuity commonly observed in the interactions mediated by peptide recognition modules as well as its functional meaning remain elusive. To address these questions in a comprehensive manner, two large populations of artificial and natural peptide ligands of six archetypal PDZ domains from the synaptic proteins PSD95 and SAP97 were generated by target-assisted iterative screening (TAIS) of combinatorial peptide libraries and by synthesis of proteomic fragments, correspondingly. A comparative statistical analysis of affinity-ranked artificial and natural ligands yielded a comprehensive picture of known and novel PDZ ligand specificity determinants, revealing a hitherto unappreciated combination of specificity and adaptive plasticity inherent to PDZ domain recognition. We propose a reconceptualization of the PDZ domain in terms of a complex adaptive system representing a flexible compromise between the rigid order of exquisite specificity and the chaos of unselective promiscuity, which has evolved to mediate two mutually contradictory properties required of such higher order sub-cellular organizations as synapses, cell junctions, and others--organizational structure and organizational plasticity/adaptability. The generalization of this reconceptualization in regard to other protein interaction modules and specific protein associations is consistent with the image of the cell as a complex adaptive macromolecular system as opposed to clockwork.

  17. Synthesis, crystal structure and optical properties of two new layered cadmium iodates: Cd(IO{sub 3})X (X=Cl, OH)

    SciTech Connect

    Yang, Bing-Ping Mao, Jiang-Gao

    2014-11-15

    Systematic explorations of new compounds in the cadmium iodate system by hydrothermal reactions led to two layered iodates, namely, Cd(IO{sub 3})X (X=Cl, OH). Cd(IO{sub 3})Cl crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Cmca (No. 64) whereas Cd(IO{sub 3})(OH) crystallizes in the orthorhombic space group Pnma (No. 62). Cd(IO{sub 3})Cl displays a unique double layered structure composed of {sup 1}{sub ∞}[Cd−O{sub 3}Cl]{sub n} chains. Cadmium octahedrons form a 1D chain along the a-axis through edge sharing, and such chains are further interconnected via IO{sub 3} groups to form a special double layer on (020) plane. Cd(IO{sub 3})(OH) also exhibits a layered structure that is composed of cadmium cations, IO{sub 3} groups and hydroxyl ions. Within a layer, chains of CdO{sub 6} edge-shared octahedra are observed along the b-axis. And these chains are connected by IO{sub 3} groups into a layer parallel to the bc plane. Spectroscopic characterizations, elemental analysis, and thermogravimetric analysis for the reported two compounds are also presented. - Graphical abstract: Two new layered cadmium iodates Cd(IO{sub 3})X (X=Cl, OH) are reported. Cd(IO{sub 3})Cl features a unique double layered structure whereas Cd(IO{sub 3})(OH) displays an ordinary layered structure. - Highlights: • Two new layered cadmium iodates Cd(IO{sub 3})X (X=Cl, OH) are reported. • Cd(IO{sub 3})Cl features a unique double layered structure. • Cd(IO{sub 3})(OH) displays an ordinary layered structure. • The spectroscopic and thermal properties have been studied in detail.

  18. AP-IO: asynchronous pipeline I/O for hiding periodic output cost in CFD simulation.

    PubMed

    Xiaoguang, Ren; Xinhai, Xu

    2014-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation often needs to periodically output intermediate results to files in the form of snapshots for visualization or restart, which seriously impacts the performance. In this paper, we present asynchronous pipeline I/O (AP-IO) optimization scheme for the periodically snapshot output on the basis of asynchronous I/O and CFD application characteristics. In AP-IO, dedicated background I/O processes or threads are in charge of handling the file write in pipeline mode, therefore the write overhead can be hidden with more calculation than classic asynchronous I/O. We design the framework of AP-IO and implement it in OpenFOAM, providing CFD users with a user-friendly interface. Experimental results on the Tianhe-2 supercomputer demonstrate that AP-IO can achieve a good optimization effect for the periodical snapshot output in CFD application, and the effect is especially better for massively parallel CFD simulations, which can reduce the total execution time up to about 40%.

  19. Agent Technology, Complex Adaptive Systems, and Autonomic Systems: Their Relationships

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Truszkowski, Walt; Rash, James; Rouff, Chistopher; Hincheny, Mike

    2004-01-01

    To reduce the cost of future spaceflight missions and to perform new science, NASA has been investigating autonomous ground and space flight systems. These goals of cost reduction have been further complicated by nanosatellites for future science data-gathering which will have large communications delays and at times be out of contact with ground control for extended periods of time. This paper describes two prototype agent-based systems, the Lights-out Ground Operations System (LOGOS) and the Agent Concept Testbed (ACT), and their autonomic properties that were developed at NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) to demonstrate autonomous operations of future space flight missions. The paper discusses the architecture of the two agent-based systems, operational scenarios of both, and the two systems autonomic properties.

  20. Classification of Volcanic Eruptions on Io and Earth Using Low-Resolution Remote Sensing Data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davies, A. G.; Keszthelyi, L. P.

    2005-01-01

    Two bodies in the Solar System exhibit high-temperature active volcanism: Earth and Io. While there are important differences in the eruptions on Earth and Io, in low-spatial-resolution data (corresponding to the bulk of available and foreseeable data of Io), similar styles of effusive and explosive volcanism yield similar thermal flux densities. For example, a square metre of an active pahoehoe flow on Io looks very similar to a square metre of an active pahoehoe flow on Earth. If, from observed thermal emission as a function of wavelength and change in thermal emission with time, the eruption style of an ionian volcano can be constrained, estimates of volumetric fluxes can be made and compared with terrestrial volcanoes using techniques derived for analysing terrestrial remotely-sensed data. In this way we find that ionian volcanoes fundamentally differ from their terrestrial counterparts only in areal extent, with Io volcanoes covering larger areas, with higher volumetric flux. Io outbursts eruptions have enormous implied volumetric fluxes, and may scale with terrestrial flood basalt eruptions. Even with the low-spatial resolution data available it is possible to sometimes constrain and classify eruption style both on Io and Earth from the integrated thermal emission spectrum. Plotting 2 and 5 m fluxes reveals the evolution of individual eruptions of different styles, as well as the relative intensity of eruptions, allowing comparison to be made from individual eruptions on both planets. Analyses like this can be used for interpretation of low-resolution data until the next mission to the jovian system. For a number of Io volcanoes (including Pele, Prometheus, Amirani, Zamama, Culann, Tohil and Tvashtar) we do have high/moderate resolution imagery to aid determination of eruption mode from analyses based only on low spatial-resolution data.