Science.gov

Sample records for adaptation program wrap

  1. WRAP program evaluation

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrey, S. and Associates, Newton, MA )

    1990-01-01

    The Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,'' or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities' low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, the WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This evaluation of the WRAP program is designed to: (1) Review the continuing relevance of the demand-side management option screening methodology for determining program configuration for services delivery, including rural populations; (2) locate and analyze recent additions to the energy conservation literature, data and information that bear on design of the WRAP program; and (3) through interviews assess participant impressions of the collaborative process used to plan, develop and implement the WRAP process.

  2. Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Bonnie B.; Lundien, Barbara; Kaufman, Jeffrey; Kreczko, Adam; Ferrey, Steven; Morgan, Stephen

    1991-12-01

    The Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,'' or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities' low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, the WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents appendices with surveys, participant list, and computers program to examine and predict potential energy savings.

  3. Water Resource Adaptation Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Water Resource Adaptation Program (WRAP) contributes to the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency’s (U.S. EPA) efforts to provide water resource managers and decision makers with the tools needed to adapt water resources to demographic and economic development, and future clim...

  4. Session: Program Review X Wrap-Up

    SciTech Connect

    1992-01-01

    This wrap-up session at the Geothermal Energy Program Review X: Geothermal Energy and the Utility Market consisted of Closing Remarks by Roland R. Kessler and six NGA Industry Critique Panel presentations: ''Summary of Comments on DOE-Industry Cooperation by Geothermal Industry Panel'' by James B. Koenig, GeothermEx, Inc.; ''NGA Industry Critique of the Exploration Component'' by Joe L. Iovenitti, Weiss Associates; ''Critique of Drilling Research'' by Jerry Hamblin, UNOCAL Geothermal; ''Critique Panel Comments on Reservoir Engineering, DOE Geothermal Technology Development'' by Dennis Kaspereit, California Energy Company, Inc.; ''DOE Geothermal Program Review - Critique on Production'' by Douglas B. Jung, Two-Phase Engineering and Research; ''Comments on the DOE Hydrothermal Energy Conversion R&D Program'' by David L. Mendive, Geothermal Development Associates.

  5. Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Jacobson, Bonnie B.; Lundien, Barbara; Kaufman, Jeffrey; Kreczko, Adam

    1991-12-01

    The Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,'' or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities' low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, the WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents appendices with energy savings, consumption and socio-economic data for low income population in both urban and rural areas.

  6. Process evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP Program). [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The ``Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,`` or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities` low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, and WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents the findings of a process evaluation and WRAP customer survey conducted by the Technical Development Corporation (TDC). TDC`s work is one part of a multi-part evaluation project being conducted under the management of ICF Resources, Inc.

  7. Process evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP Program)

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1990-10-01

    The Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,'' or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities' low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, and WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents the findings of a process evaluation and WRAP customer survey conducted by the Technical Development Corporation (TDC). TDC's work is one part of a multi-part evaluation project being conducted under the management of ICF Resources, Inc.

  8. Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The Connecticut low income weatherization program was developed in response to a 1987 rate docket order from the Connecticut Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) to Connecticut Light Power Co., an operating subsidiary of Northeast Utilities (NU). (Throughout this report, NU is referred to as the operator of the program.) This program, known as the Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership, or WRAP, was configured utilizing input from a collaborative group of interested parties to the docket. It was agreed that this program would be put forth by the electric utility, but would not ignore oil and gas savings (thus, it was to be fuel- blind''). The allocated cost of conservation services for each fuel source, however, should be cost effective. It was to be offered to those utility customers at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty levels, and provide a wide array of energy saving measures directed toward heating, water heating and lighting. It was felt by the collaborative group that this program would raise the level of expenditures per participant for weatherization services provided by the state, and by linking to and revising the auditing process for weatherization, would lower the audit unit cost. The program plans ranged from the offering of low-cost heating, water heating and infiltration measures, increased insulation levels, carpentry and plumbing services, to furnace or burner replacement. The program was configured to allow for very comprehensive weatherization and heating system servicing.

  9. An interactive wire-wrap board layout program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schlutsmeyer, A.

    1987-01-01

    An interactive computer-graphics-based tool for specifying the placement of electronic parts on a wire-wrap circuit board is presented. Input is a data file (currently produced by a commercial logic design system) which describes the parts used and their interconnections. Output includes printed reports describing the parts and wire paths, parts counts, placement lists, board drawing, and a tape to send to the wire-wrap vendor. The program should reduce the engineer's layout time by a factor of 3 to 5 as compared to manual methods.

  10. Overview: Western Regional applications Program (WRAP) status

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, S. M.

    1981-01-01

    Interactions with all 14 of the states in the Western Region over the past three years are reviewed from NASA's perspective. Outreach and training programs using the M mobile analysis and training extension van, the University Program, classes at the Ames Center, demonstration tests with state agencies, and surveying the needs of local governments are highlighted. Planned activities, the continuance of ASVT's, and the impact of the budget cuts on NASA'S technology program are also considered.

  11. Adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filter for noise removal in wrapped phase patterns.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guixiong; Chen, Dongxue; Peng, Yanhua; Zeng, Qilin

    2016-08-01

    In order to avoid the detrimental effects of excessive noise in the phase fringe patterns of a laser digital interferometer over the accuracy of phase unwrapping and the successful detection of mechanical fatigue defects, an effective method of adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filtering is introduced based on the characteristics of the energy spectrum of localized wrapped phase patterns. Not only can this method automatically set the cutoff frequency, but it can also effectively filter out noise while preserving the image edge information. Compared with the sine and cosine transform filtering and the multidirectional frequency domain filtering, the experimental results demonstrate that the image filtered by our method has the fewest number of residues and is the closest to the noise-free image, compared to the two aforementioned methods, demonstrating the effectiveness of this adaptive multidirectional frequency domain filter. PMID:27505376

  12. Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program. Volume 3, Appendices D, E, F, and G: [Final Report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The ``Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,`` or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities` low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, the WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents appendices with surveys, participant list, and computers program to examine and predict potential energy savings.

  13. Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program. Volume 2, Appendices A, B, and C: [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The ``Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,`` or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities` low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, the WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This report presents appendices with energy savings, consumption and socio-economic data for low income population in both urban and rural areas.

  14. Program evaluation: Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership (WRAP) Program. Volume 1, Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-12-01

    The Connecticut low income weatherization program was developed in response to a 1987 rate docket order from the Connecticut Department of Public Utility Control (DPUC) to Connecticut Light & Power Co., an operating subsidiary of Northeast Utilities (NU). (Throughout this report, NU is referred to as the operator of the program.) This program, known as the Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership, or WRAP, was configured utilizing input from a collaborative group of interested parties to the docket. It was agreed that this program would be put forth by the electric utility, but would not ignore oil and gas savings (thus, it was to be ``fuel- blind``). The allocated cost of conservation services for each fuel source, however, should be cost effective. It was to be offered to those utility customers at or below 200 percent of the federal poverty levels, and provide a wide array of energy saving measures directed toward heating, water heating and lighting. It was felt by the collaborative group that this program would raise the level of expenditures per participant for weatherization services provided by the state, and by linking to and revising the auditing process for weatherization, would lower the audit unit cost. The program plans ranged from the offering of low-cost heating, water heating and infiltration measures, increased insulation levels, carpentry and plumbing services, to furnace or burner replacement. The program was configured to allow for very comprehensive weatherization and heating system servicing.

  15. WRAP program evaluation. Task 10, Evaluation of the low-income screening methodology; Task 11, Evaluation of the low-income program collaborative planning approach: [Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Ferrey, S.

    1990-12-31

    The ``Weatherization Residential Assistance Partnership,`` or WRAP program, is a fuel-blind conservation program designed to assist Northeast Utilities` low-income customers to use energy safely and efficiently. Innovative with respect to its collaborative approach and its focus on utilizing and strengthening the existing low-income weatherization service delivery network, the WRAP program offers an interesting model to other utilities which traditionally have relied on for-profit energy service contractors and highly centralized program implementation structures. This evaluation of the WRAP program is designed to: (1) Review the continuing relevance of the demand-side management option screening methodology for determining program configuration for services delivery, including rural populations; (2) locate and analyze recent additions to the energy conservation literature, data and information that bear on design of the WRAP program; and (3) through interviews assess participant impressions of the collaborative process used to plan, develop and implement the WRAP process.

  16. The Experience of Trauma Recovery: A Qualitative Study of Participants in the Women Recovering from Abuse Program (WRAP)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Alyson; Fourt, Anne; Langmuir, Judith I.; Dalton, E. Jane; Classen, Catherine C.

    2007-01-01

    The efficacy of intensive group treatment programs for child maltreatment has been established. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand how women with a history of child maltreatment experienced the Women Recovering from Abuse Program (WRAP), an existing intensive group treatment program. Seven women were interviewed following their…

  17. The experience of trauma recovery: a qualitative study of participants in the Women Recovering from Abuse Program (WRAP).

    PubMed

    Parker, Alyson; Fourt, Anne; Langmuir, Judith I; Dalton, E Jane; Classen, Catherine C

    2007-01-01

    The efficacy of intensive group treatment programs for child maltreatment has been established. The aim of this qualitative study was to understand how women with a history of child maltreatment experienced the Women Recovering from Abuse Program (WRAP), an existing intensive group treatment program. Seven women were interviewed following their participation in WRAP. Three themes emerged: Breaking Trauma-Based Patterns, Doing Therapy, and The Healing Journey as a Continuous Process. These findings deepen our understanding about how participants view the recovery process. Theoretical and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:17895232

  18. Adaptive use of bubble wrap for storing liquid samples and performing analytical assays.

    PubMed

    Bwambok, David K; Christodouleas, Dionysios C; Morin, Stephen A; Lange, Heiko; Phillips, Scott T; Whitesides, George M

    2014-08-01

    This paper demonstrates that the gas-filled compartments in the packing material commonly called "bubble wrap" can be repurposed in resource-limited regions as containers to store liquid samples, and to perform bioanalyses. The bubbles of bubble wrap are easily filled by injecting the samples into them using a syringe with a needle or a pipet tip, and then sealing the hole with nail hardener. The bubbles are transparent in the visible range of the spectrum, and can be used as "cuvettes" for absorbance and fluorescence measurements. The interiors of these bubbles are sterile and allow storage of samples without the need for expensive sterilization equipment. The bubbles are also permeable to gases, and can be used to culture and store micro-organisms. By incorporating carbon electrodes, these bubbles can be used as electrochemical cells. This paper demonstrates the capabilities of the bubbles by culturing E. coli, growing C. elegans, measuring glucose and hemoglobin spectrophotometrically, and measuring ferrocyanide electrochemically, all within the bubbles. PMID:24983331

  19. Cultural Adaptation in Outdoor Programming

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fabrizio, Sheila M.; Neill, James

    2005-01-01

    Outdoor programs often intentionally provide a different culture and the challenge of working out how to adapt. Failure to adapt, however, can cause symptoms of culture shock, including homesickness, negative personal behavior, and interpersonal conflict. This article links cross-cultural and outdoor programming literature and provides case…

  20. Unfolding wrapped phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Treviño-Palacios, Carlos Gerardo

    2015-11-01

    Phase unwrapping is the final step in phase extraction methods, which consists of recovering the correct phase from the wrapped phase by removing 2π discontinuities. The difference between the correct phase and the wrapped phase is the phase wrapping map. A new method for phase unwrapping is presented by identifying the phase wrapping map as a sequence of binary valued intermediate wrapping maps and iteratively removing them producing the correct phase by phase-wrapped unfolding. A path-following algorithm is presented to exemplify the phase wrapped unfolding method.

  1. Chemistry Wrap Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lloyd, Jeremy M.; Pristera, Jeffrey M.; Wheeler, Steven E.

    2000-01-01

    Describes an activity for high school students on household plastic wraps to introduce polymer science. Tests wraps for added plasticizers and stress and strain properties. Suggests focus points for student evaluation. (YDS)

  2. SLA's Conference Wrap-Up.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shepherd, Susan J., Comp.

    1987-01-01

    Encapsulates a wrap-up session on technical programs presented at the Special Libraries Association's June 1987 conference, including presentations in the areas of information technology, management, education, and international issues. Ethics, value, leadership, international issues, image, and risk are identified as major themes of the…

  3. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/sq m, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/sq m). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  4. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/m2, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/m2). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  5. Adaptive Management Implementation: Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program Trinity River Restoration Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Wittler, R.; McBain, S.; Stalnaker, C.

    2003-01-01

    Two adaptive management programs, the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (GCDAMP) and the Trinity River Restoration Program (TRRP) are examined. In both cases, the focus is on managing the aquatic and riparian systems downstream of a large dam and water supply project. The status of the two programs, lessons learned by the program managers and the Adaptive Environmental Assessment and Management (AEAM) evolution of the TRRP are discussed. The Trinity River illustrates some of the scientific uncertainities that a program faces and the ways the program evolves from concept through implementation.

  6. An Adaptive Superintendent Induction Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Jim; Donlevy, Kent; Hanna, Paulette; Gereluk, Dianne; Patterson, Peggy; Rhyason, Kath

    2014-01-01

    This study examined a recently established induction program for new superintendents in the Canadian province of Alberta over a three-year period. In keeping with principles of design-based research data were collected from a variety of sources from the 26 new superintendents and their 25 mentors to assess and adjust programming through three…

  7. Wrapping with a splash

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Deepak; Paulsen, Joseph; Russell, Thomas; Menon, Narayanan

    Ultrathin sheets have been used to encapsulate drops of one fluid in another. When the sheet is thin enough that bending energies are much smaller than interfacial energies, experiment and theory show that optimal wrappings are achieved without any special sheet design. Here we study wrappings generated by the impact of an oil droplet onto an ultrathin (30-200 nm) polystyrene film floating on water. Depending on the energy of impact, a large deformation of the air-water interface is followed by formation of an oil phase wrapped around by the polymer film, submerged in the water. Even though the energetic cost of bending of the polymer film is very small, we find that successful wrapping requires an impact energy much larger than the energy difference between the initial and final configurations. We explore the dynamics of the fluid and the sheet in this process with a view to devising an efficient method to create optimal wrappings.

  8. Improvements to the adaptive maneuvering logic program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgin, George H.

    1986-01-01

    The Adaptive Maneuvering Logic (AML) computer program simulates close-in, one-on-one air-to-air combat between two fighter aircraft. Three important improvements are described. First, the previously available versions of AML were examined for their suitability as a baseline program. The selected program was then revised to eliminate some programming bugs which were uncovered over the years. A listing of this baseline program is included. Second, the equations governing the motion of the aircraft were completely revised. This resulted in a model with substantially higher fidelity than the original equations of motion provided. It also completely eliminated the over-the-top problem, which occurred in the older versions when the AML-driven aircraft attempted a vertical or near vertical loop. Third, the requirements for a versatile generic, yet realistic, aircraft model were studied and implemented in the program. The report contains detailed tables which make the generic aircraft to be either a modern, high performance aircraft, an older high performance aircraft, or a previous generation jet fighter.

  9. Plaster-Wrap Dragons

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vance, Shelly

    2012-01-01

    In this article, the author describes how her students constructed a three-dimensional sculpture of a dragon using plaster wrap and other materials. The dragons were formed from modest means--using only a toilet-paper tube, newsprint, tape and wire.

  10. Non-Traditional Wraps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Owens, Buffy

    2009-01-01

    This article presents a recipe for non-traditional wraps. In this article, the author describes how adults and children can help with the recipe and the skills involved with this recipe. The bigger role that children can play in the making of the item the more they are apt to try new things and appreciate the texture and taste.

  11. Parallel Programming Strategies for Irregular Adaptive Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biswas, Rupak; Biegel, Bryan (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Achieving scalable performance for dynamic irregular applications is eminently challenging. Traditional message-passing approaches have been making steady progress towards this goal; however, they suffer from complex implementation requirements. The use of a global address space greatly simplifies the programming task, but can degrade the performance for such computations. In this work, we examine two typical irregular adaptive applications, Dynamic Remeshing and N-Body, under competing programming methodologies and across various parallel architectures. The Dynamic Remeshing application simulates flow over an airfoil, and refines localized regions of the underlying unstructured mesh. The N-Body experiment models two neighboring Plummer galaxies that are about to undergo a merger. Both problems demonstrate dramatic changes in processor workloads and interprocessor communication with time; thus, dynamic load balancing is a required component.

  12. Wrapped branes as qubits.

    PubMed

    Borsten, L; Dahanayake, D; Duff, M J; Ebrahim, H; Rubens, W

    2008-06-27

    Recent work has established a correspondence between the tripartite entanglement measure of three qubits and the macroscopic entropy of the four-dimensional 8-charge STU black hole of supergravity. Here we consider the configurations of intersecting D3-branes, whose wrapping around the six compact dimensions T6 provides the microscopic string-theoretic interpretation of the charges, and associate the three-qubit basis vectors |ABC>, (A, B, C=0 or 1) with the corresponding 8 wrapping cycles. In particular, we relate a well-known fact of quantum information theory, that the most general real three-qubit state can be parameterized by four real numbers and an angle, to a well-known fact of string theory, that the most general STU black hole can be described by four D3-branes intersecting at an angle. PMID:18643650

  13. Inflation from wrapped branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Becker, Melanie; Leblond, Louis; Shandera, Sarah

    2007-12-01

    We show that the use of higher dimensional wrapped branes can significantly extend the inflaton field range compared to brane inflation models which use D3-branes. We construct a simple inflationary model in terms of 5-branes wrapping a 2-cycle and traveling towards the tip of the Klebanov-Strassler throat. Inflation ends when the branes reach the tip of the cone and self-annihilate. Assuming a quadratic potential for the brane it is possible to match the cosmic microwave background data in the Dirac-Born-Infeld regime, but we argue that the backreaction of the brane is important and cannot be neglected. This scenario predicts a strong non-Gaussian signal and possibly detectable gravitational waves.

  14. Adaptive Assessment of Student's Knowledge in Programming Courses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chatzopoulou, D. I.; Economides, A. A.

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents Programming Adaptive Testing (PAT), a Web-based adaptive testing system for assessing students' programming knowledge. PAT was used in two high school programming classes by 73 students. The question bank of PAT is composed of 443 questions. A question is classified in one out of three difficulty levels. In PAT, the levels of…

  15. The CHARA Array Adaptive Optics Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ten Brummelaar, Theo; Che, Xiao; McAlister, Harold A.; Ireland, Michael; Monnier, John D.; Mourard, Denis; Ridgway, Stephen T.; sturmann, judit; Sturmann, Laszlo; Turner, Nils H.; Tuthill, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The CHARA array is an optical/near infrared interferometer consisting of six 1-meter diameter telescopes the longest baseline of which is 331 meters. With sub-millisecond angular resolution, the CHARA array is able to spatially resolve nearby stellar systems to reveal the detailed structures. To improve the sensitivity and scientific throughput, the CHARA array was funded by NSF-ATI in 2011, and by NSF-MRI in 2015, for an upgrade of adaptive optics (AO) systems to all six telescopes. The initial grant covers Phase I of the adaptive optics system, which includes an on-telescope Wavefront Sensor and non-common-path (NCP) error correction. The WFS use a fairly standard Shack-Hartman design and will initially close the tip tilt servo and log wavefront errors for use in data reduction and calibration. The second grant provides the funding for deformable mirrors for each telescope which will be used closed loop to remove atmospheric aberrations from the beams. There are then over twenty reflections after the WFS at the telescopes that bring the light several hundred meters into the beam combining laboratory. Some of these, including the delay line and beam reducing optics, are powered elements, and some of them, in particular the delay lines and telescope Coude optics, are continually moving. This means that the NCP problems in an interferometer are much greater than those found in more standard telescope systems. A second, slow AO system is required in the laboratory to correct for these NCP errors. We will breifly describe the AO system, and it's current status, as well as discuss the new science enabled by the system with a focus on our YSO program.

  16. Conservation program participation and adaptive rangeland decision-making

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    This paper analyzes rancher participation in conservation programs in the context of a social-ecological framework for adaptive rangeland management. We argue that conservation programs are best understood as one of many strategies of adaptively managing rangelands in ways that sustain livelihoods a...

  17. Microcomputer Network for Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT): Program Listing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quan, Baldwin; And Others

    This program listing is a supplement to the Microcomputer Network for Computerized Adaptive Testing (CAT). The driver textfile program allows access to major subprograms of the CAT project. The test administration textfile program gives examinees a prescribed set of subtests. The parameter management textfile program establishes a file containing…

  18. "Wrapping Up" Your Construction Insurance.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ferraro, Mark

    1998-01-01

    School facility managers are beginning to use a special insurance-management technique called wrap-up. The project owner purchases a bulk construction insurance policy consisting of general liability, excess liability, workers' compensation, and builders' risk insurance. Wrap-ups ensure competitive pricing, safety incentives, lower claims costs,…

  19. Selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs in health care systems.

    PubMed

    Zullig, Leah L; Bosworth, Hayden B

    2015-01-01

    Practitioners and researchers often design behavioral programs that are effective for a specific population or problem. Despite their success in a controlled setting, relatively few programs are scaled up and implemented in health care systems. Planning for scale-up is a critical, yet often overlooked, element in the process of program design. Equally as important is understanding how to select a program that has already been developed, and adapt and implement the program to meet specific organizational goals. This adaptation and implementation requires attention to organizational goals, available resources, and program cost. We assert that translational behavioral medicine necessitates expanding successful programs beyond a stand-alone research study. This paper describes key factors to consider when selecting, adapting, and sustaining programs for scale-up in large health care systems and applies the Knowledge to Action (KTA) Framework to a case study, illustrating knowledge creation and an action cycle of implementation and evaluation activities. PMID:25931825

  20. Locked-wrap fuel rod

    DOEpatents

    Kaplan, Samuel; Chertock, Alan J.; Punches, James R.

    1977-01-01

    A method for spacing fast reactor fuel rods using a wire wrapper improved by orienting the wire-wrapped fuel rods in a unique manner which introduces desirable performance characteristics not attainable by previous wire-wrapped designs. Use of this method in a liquid metal fast breeder reactor results in: (a) improved mechanical performance, (b) improved rod-to-rod contact, (c) reduced steel volume, and (d) improved thermal-hydraulic performance. The method produces a "locked wrap" design which tends to lock the rods together at each of the wire cluster locations.

  1. Lessons Learned from the Everglades Collaborative Adaptive Management Program

    EPA Science Inventory

    Recent technical papers explore whether adaptive management (AM) is useful for environmental management and restoration efforts and discuss the many challenges to overcome for successful implementation, especially for large-scale restoration programs (McLain and Lee 1996; Levine ...

  2. Everglades Collaborative Adaptive Management Program Progress

    EPA Science Inventory

    When the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan (CERP) was authorized in 2000, adaptive management (AM) was recognized as a necessary tool to address uncertainty in achieving the broad goals and objectives for restoring a highly managed system. The Everglades covers18,000 squ...

  3. Adapting Scheduling Programs for Educational Specifications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Thomas E.

    1984-01-01

    Planners of a new Arizona school used the district's existing computerized master scheduling program to identify instructional spaces needed. Total classroom needs by subject were translated into total square footage requirements. (MLF)

  4. Offset wrap rib antenna concept development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, A. A., Jr.

    1981-01-01

    A program to demonstrate large diameter offset reflector technology readiness through the development of ground testable, flight representative full size hardware also aims to provide a basis of data to allow confirmation of cost, performance, and size growth projections for the offset wrap ribe antenna design. An overview of the antenna system is presented and the operational deployment sequence examined. The ability to manufacture multiple segment ribs is assured and tooling for rib manufacture was redesigned to reduce cost. The selected mast design permits adequate stiffness and minimum stowed volume. Reflector and mast concerns and the program plan are summarized.

  5. Teaching Adaptability of Object-Oriented Programming Language Curriculum

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhu, Xiao-dong

    2012-01-01

    The evolution of object-oriented programming languages includes update of their own versions, update of development environments, and reform of new languages upon old languages. In this paper, the evolution analysis of object-oriented programming languages is presented in term of the characters and development. The notion of adaptive teaching upon…

  6. Adaptive Programming Improves Outcomes in Drug Court: An Experimental Trial

    PubMed Central

    Marlowe, Douglas B.; Festinger, David S.; Dugosh, Karen L.; Benasutti, Kathleen M.; Fox, Gloria; Croft, Jason R.

    2011-01-01

    Prior studies in Drug Courts reported improved outcomes when participants were matched to schedules of judicial status hearings based on their criminological risk level. The current experiment determined whether incremental efficacy could be gained by periodically adjusting the schedule of status hearings and clinical case-management sessions in response to participants’ ensuing performance in the program. The adjustments were made pursuant to a priori criteria specified in an adaptive algorithm. Results confirmed that participants in the full adaptive condition (n = 62) were more than twice as likely as those assigned to baseline-matching only (n = 63) to be drug-abstinent during the first 18 weeks of the program; however, graduation rates and the average time to case resolution were not significantly different. The positive effects of the adaptive program appear to have stemmed from holding noncompliant participants more accountable for meeting their attendance obligations in the program. Directions for future research and practice implications are discussed. PMID:22923854

  7. Taking a Broad Approach to Public Health Program Adaptation: Adapting a Family-Based Diabetes Education Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Reinschmidt, Kerstin M.; Teufel-Shone, Nicolette I.; Bradford, Gail; Drummond, Rebecca L.; Torres, Emma; Redondo, Floribella; Elenes, Jo Jean; Sanders, Alicia; Gastelum, Sylvia; Moore-Monroy, Martha; Barajas, Salvador; Fernandez, Lourdes; Alvidrez, Rosy; de Zapien, Jill Guernsey; Staten, Lisa K.

    2010-01-01

    Diabetes health disparities among Hispanic populations have been countered with federally funded health promotion and disease prevention programs. Dissemination has focused on program adaptation to local cultural contexts for greater acceptability and sustainability. Taking a broader approach and drawing on our experience in Mexican American…

  8. Enhancing Functional Performance using Sensorimotor Adaptability Training Programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Mulavara, A. P.; Peters, B. T.; Brady, R.; Audas, C.; Ruttley, T. M.; Cohen, H. S.

    2009-01-01

    During the acute phase of adaptation to novel gravitational environments, sensorimotor disturbances have the potential to disrupt the ability of astronauts to perform functional tasks. The goal of this project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program designed to facilitate recovery of functional capabilities when astronauts transition to different gravitational environments. The project conducted a series of studies that investigated the efficacy of treadmill training combined with a variety of sensory challenges designed to increase adaptability including alterations in visual flow, body loading, and support surface stability.

  9. Adaptive sampling program support for expedited site characterization

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, R.

    1993-10-01

    Expedited site characterizations offer substantial savings in time and money when assessing hazardous waste sites. Key to some of these savings is the ability to adapt a sampling program to the ``real-time`` data generated by an expedited site characterization. This paper presents a two-prong approach to supporting adaptive sampling programs: a specialized object-oriented database/geographical information system for data fusion, management and display; and combined Bayesian/geostatistical methods for contamination extent estimation and sample location selection.

  10. Adaptable Constrained Genetic Programming: Extensions and Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Janikow, Cezary Z.

    2005-01-01

    An evolutionary algorithm applies evolution-based principles to problem solving. To solve a problem, the user defines the space of potential solutions, the representation space. Sample solutions are encoded in a chromosome-like structure. The algorithm maintains a population of such samples, which undergo simulated evolution by means of mutation, crossover, and survival of the fittest principles. Genetic Programming (GP) uses tree-like chromosomes, providing very rich representation suitable for many problems of interest. GP has been successfully applied to a number of practical problems such as learning Boolean functions and designing hardware circuits. To apply GP to a problem, the user needs to define the actual representation space, by defining the atomic functions and terminals labeling the actual trees. The sufficiency principle requires that the label set be sufficient to build the desired solution trees. The closure principle allows the labels to mix in any arity-consistent manner. To satisfy both principles, the user is often forced to provide a large label set, with ad hoc interpretations or penalties to deal with undesired local contexts. This unfortunately enlarges the actual representation space, and thus usually slows down the search. In the past few years, three different methodologies have been proposed to allow the user to alleviate the closure principle by providing means to define, and to process, constraints on mixing the labels in the trees. Last summer we proposed a new methodology to further alleviate the problem by discovering local heuristics for building quality solution trees. A pilot system was implemented last summer and tested throughout the year. This summer we have implemented a new revision, and produced a User's Manual so that the pilot system can be made available to other practitioners and researchers. We have also designed, and partly implemented, a larger system capable of dealing with much more powerful heuristics.

  11. Wire-Wrap Chatter Detector

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fisch, G. Z.; Borden, T. J.

    1982-01-01

    Monitoring circuit responds to changes in resistance as little as 0.1 ohm. Has been used to detect defective wire-wrap connections during thermal and vibration tests. Defect is indicated to operator by light-emitting diode and by increase in count on a two-digit display.

  12. Climate Change Impacts on Water Resources and Water Supply Security through Adaptation

    EPA Science Inventory

    This presentation is to describe the water resources adaptation program (WRAP) at the U.S.EPA National Risk Management Research Laboratory, and to highlight initial research results on hydroclimatic periodicity and changes and on adaptation measures including sustainable water in...

  13. A Comparison of Three Programming Models for Adaptive Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shan, Hong-Zhang; Singh, Jaswinder Pal; Oliker, Leonid; Biswa, Rupak; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We study the performance and programming effort for two major classes of adaptive applications under three leading parallel programming models. We find that all three models can achieve scalable performance on the state-of-the-art multiprocessor machines. The basic parallel algorithms needed for different programming models to deliver their best performance are similar, but the implementations differ greatly, far beyond the fact of using explicit messages versus implicit loads/stores. Compared with MPI and SHMEM, CC-SAS (cache-coherent shared address space) provides substantial ease of programming at the conceptual and program orchestration level, which often leads to the performance gain. However it may also suffer from the poor spatial locality of physically distributed shared data on large number of processors. Our CC-SAS implementation of the PARMETIS partitioner itself runs faster than in the other two programming models, and generates more balanced result for our application.

  14. 21 CFR 880.6850 - Sterilization wrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Sterilization wrap. 880.6850 Section 880.6850 Food... § 880.6850 Sterilization wrap. (a) Identification. A sterilization wrap (pack, sterilization wrapper... sterilized by a health care provider. It is intended to allow sterilization of the enclosed medical...

  15. 21 CFR 880.6850 - Sterilization wrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Sterilization wrap. 880.6850 Section 880.6850 Food... § 880.6850 Sterilization wrap. (a) Identification. A sterilization wrap (pack, sterilization wrapper... sterilized by a health care provider. It is intended to allow sterilization of the enclosed medical...

  16. 21 CFR 880.6850 - Sterilization wrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Sterilization wrap. 880.6850 Section 880.6850 Food... § 880.6850 Sterilization wrap. (a) Identification. A sterilization wrap (pack, sterilization wrapper... sterilized by a health care provider. It is intended to allow sterilization of the enclosed medical...

  17. 21 CFR 880.6850 - Sterilization wrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Sterilization wrap. 880.6850 Section 880.6850 Food... § 880.6850 Sterilization wrap. (a) Identification. A sterilization wrap (pack, sterilization wrapper... sterilized by a health care provider. It is intended to allow sterilization of the enclosed medical...

  18. 21 CFR 880.6850 - Sterilization wrap.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Sterilization wrap. 880.6850 Section 880.6850 Food... § 880.6850 Sterilization wrap. (a) Identification. A sterilization wrap (pack, sterilization wrapper... sterilized by a health care provider. It is intended to allow sterilization of the enclosed medical...

  19. WRAP-RIB antenna technology development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Freeland, R. E.; Garcia, N. F.; Iwamoto, H.

    1985-01-01

    The wrap-rib deployable antenna concept development is based on a combination of hardware development and testing along with extensive supporting analysis. The proof-of-concept hardware models are large in size so they will address the same basic problems associated with the design fabrication, assembly and test as the full-scale systems which were selected to be 100 meters at the beginning of the program. The hardware evaluation program consists of functional performance tests, design verification tests and analytical model verification tests. Functional testing consists of kinematic deployment, mesh management and verification of mechanical packaging efficiencies. Design verification consists of rib contour precision measurement, rib cross-section variation evaluation, rib materials characterizations and manufacturing imperfections assessment. Analytical model verification and refinement include mesh stiffness measurement, rib static and dynamic testing, mass measurement, and rib cross-section characterization. This concept was considered for a number of potential applications that include mobile communications, VLBI, and aircraft surveillance. In fact, baseline system configurations were developed by JPL, using the appropriate wrap-rib antenna, for all three classes of applications.

  20. Roping and wrapping carbon nanotubes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ausman, Kevin D.; O'Connell, Michael J.; Boul, Peter; Ericson, Lars M.; Casavant, Michael J.; Walters, Deron A.; Huffman, Chad; Saini, Rajesh; Wang, Yuhuang; Haroz, Erik; Billups, Edward W.; Smalley, Richard E.

    2001-11-01

    Single-walled carbon nanotubes can be dispersed into solvents by ultrasonication to the point that primarily individual tubes, cut to a few hundred nanometers in length, are present. However, when such dispersions are filtered to a thick mat, or paper, only tangles of uniform, seemingly endless ropes are observed. The factors contributing to this "roping" phenomenon, akin to aggregation or crystallization, will be discussed. We have developed methods for generating "super-ropes" more than twenty times the diameter of those formed by filtration, involving the extraction of nanotube material from an oleum dispersion. Nanotubes have been solubilized in water, largely individually, by non-covalently wrapping them with linear polymers. The general thermodynamic drive for this wrapping involves the polymer disrupting both the hydrophobic interface with water and the smooth tube-tube interaction in aggregates. The nanotubes can be recovered from their polymeric wrapping by changing their solvent system. This solubilization process opens the door to solution chemistry on pristine nanotubes, as well as their introduction into biologically relevant systems.

  1. Robust adaptive dynamic programming and feedback stabilization of nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2014-05-01

    This paper studies the robust optimal control design for a class of uncertain nonlinear systems from a perspective of robust adaptive dynamic programming (RADP). The objective is to fill up a gap in the past literature of adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) where dynamic uncertainties or unmodeled dynamics are not addressed. A key strategy is to integrate tools from modern nonlinear control theory, such as the robust redesign and the backstepping techniques as well as the nonlinear small-gain theorem, with the theory of ADP. The proposed RADP methodology can be viewed as an extension of ADP to uncertain nonlinear systems. Practical learning algorithms are developed in this paper, and have been applied to the controller design problems for a jet engine and a one-machine power system. PMID:24808035

  2. Adaptive dynamic programming for auto-resilient video streaming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Juan; Li, Xingmei; Wang, Wei; Wu, Guoping

    2007-11-01

    Wireless video transmission encounters higher error rate than in wired network, which introduces distortion into the error-sensitive compressed data, reducing the quality of the playback video. Therefore, to ensure the end-to-end quality, wireless video needs a transmission system including both efficient source coding scheme and transmission technology against the influence of the channel error. This paper tackles a dynamic programming algorithm for robust video streaming over error-prone channels. An auto-resilient multiple-description coding with optimized transmission strategy has been proposed. Further study is done on the computational complexity of rate-distortion optimized video streaming and a dynamic programming algorithm is considered. Experiment results show that video streaming with adaptive dynamic programming gains better playback video quality at the receiver when transmitted through error-prone mobile channel.

  3. Adaptation and Learning of Agents in Market Oriented Programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishinishi, Masayuki; Namatame, Akira; Kita, Hajime

    Market Oriented Programming (MOP) proposed by Wellman is a decentralized control method using auction machanism inspired by the market economy. It is applied to many problems such as network and computation resource allocation. Conventional MOP models are formulated based on the concept of ‘competitive market’ of economics which assumes that the market consists of sufficiently many and small agents. However, in realistic applications of MOP, number of agents is limited and their interdependency is not negligible. In this paper, MOP for interdependent agents is discussed. An oligopoly market model for MOP is introduced, and adaptation process of interdependent agents and its stability are discussed. Further, it is also demonstrated that selfish learning of adaptation coefficiency by each agent achieves stability of market through computer simulation.

  4. Open Groups: Adaptations in Implementing a Parent Training Program

    PubMed Central

    Brock, Donna-Jean P.; Marek, Lydia I.; Matteo-Kerney, Cheryl; Bagby, Tammy

    2013-01-01

    Background: Programs that focus on positive parenting have been shown to improve parental attitudes, knowledge, and behaviors, and increase parent and child bonding. These programs are typically conducted in a closed group for­mat. However, when individual or community needs are more immediate, programmers sometimes opt for an open group format. To determine the effectiveness of this adaptation to an open group format, the present study compared both groups on parental out­comes. Methods: Both closed and open group formats were offered and implemented between January 2009 and December 2012. Participants for both formats were recruited through similar means and the format placement for each family was determined by the immediacy of the need for an intervention, the time lapse until a new cycle would begin, and scheduling flexibility. Chi-Square analyses were conducted to determine demographic differences between the two groups and gain scores were calculated from the pre- and post-test AAPI-2 scales within a mixed MANOVA to determine group format effectiveness. Results: Though open groups contained higher risk families; parental outcome improvements were significant for both groups. All participants, regardless of group membership, demonstrated the same statistically significant improvements following completion of the program. Conclusion: Findings provide support for adapting group formats when necessary to fit community and individual needs. PMID:24688972

  5. Vibration of thin, tensioned, helically wrapped plates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez, Ernesto; Müftü, Sinan

    2011-02-01

    Free vibration analysis of a thin tensioned plate, wrapped around a cylindrical guide in a helical manner is presented. The system is a model of a thin, flexible web wrapped around a turn-bar. The equation of motion of the wrapped plate is derived by using the energy method and with the Kirchhoff-Love assumptions. The weak form of the equation of motion was obtained by the finite element method and the eigenvalue problem was solved numerically. The effects of parameters such as plate tension, guide radius, longitudinal and helical wrap angles, plate width, and the lengths of the non-wrapped segments were investigated. Eigenmodes with same mode numbers were observed in symmetric and anti-symmetric fashion about the center of the plate, for symmetrically wrapped plates. It was shown that the plate/shell boundary of the wrapped plate effectively acts like a support. For non-helically wrapped plates the free edges cause a frequency clustering of the lateral modes about the dominant longitudinal mode. The frequency clustering diminishes when helical wrap is introduced.

  6. Robust adaptive dynamic programming with an application to power systems.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2013-07-01

    This brief presents a novel framework of robust adaptive dynamic programming (robust-ADP) aimed at computing globally stabilizing and suboptimal control policies in the presence of dynamic uncertainties. A key strategy is to integrate ADP theory with techniques in modern nonlinear control with a unique objective of filling up a gap in the past literature of ADP without taking into account dynamic uncertainties. Neither the system dynamics nor the system order are required to be precisely known. As an illustrative example, the computational algorithm is applied to the controller design of a two-machine power system. PMID:24808528

  7. Effect of delayed wrapping and wrapping source on digestibility and intake of alfalfa silage in sheep

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Delays often occur between baling and wrapping during production of baled silage that increases exposure time of the forage to oxygen. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of two different wrapping sources and time intervals between baling and wrapping on intake and digestibility of al...

  8. CSER-98-002: Criticality analysis for the storage of special nuclear material sources and standards in the WRAP facility

    SciTech Connect

    GOLDBERG, H.J.

    1999-05-18

    The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility will store uranium and transuranic (TRU) sources and standards for certification that WRAP meets the requirements of the Quality Assurance Program Plan (QAPP) for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). In addition, WRAP must meet internal requirements for testing and validation of measuring instruments for nondestructive assay (NDA). In order to be certified for WIPP, WRAP will participate in the NDA Performance Demonstration Program (PDP). This program is a blind test of the NDA capabilities for TRU waste. It is intended to ensure that the NDA capabilities of this facility satisfy the requirements of the quality assurance program plan for the WIPP. The PDP standards have been provided by the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) for this program. These standards will be used in the WRAP facility.

  9. It's a Wrap! A Study of Installations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buck, Susan

    2002-01-01

    Describes an art project for junior and senior high school students called the wrapped chair project where students wrapped chairs using torn sheets in the style of artists, Christo Javacheff and Jeanne-Claude de-Guillebon. Explains that students created thumbnail sketches and drew their finished drawing in either charcoal or chalk. (CMK)

  10. ONT High Gain Initiative WRAP (Wide Area Rapid Acoustic Prediction) computational performance section

    SciTech Connect

    McGraw, J.R.; Hedstrom, G.; De Groot, T.

    1990-10-02

    LLNL received a contract during March 1990 to perform three tasks for ONT. This letter report covers Task I which concerned a supercomputing effort in a program termed the High Gain Initiative, which is an anti-submarine (ASW) project that requires substantial computational and signal processing expertise. The core of the computational aspects at the present time is a code called WRAP (Wide Area Rapid Acoustic Prediction). LLNL's objective was to study the WRAP model and determine the feasibility and limits of its optimization. At the present time, the WRAP code runs on a single processor VAX computer.

  11. Probabilistic dual heuristic programming-based adaptive critic

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Herzallah, Randa

    2010-02-01

    Adaptive critic (AC) methods have common roots as generalisations of dynamic programming for neural reinforcement learning approaches. Since they approximate the dynamic programming solutions, they are potentially suitable for learning in noisy, non-linear and non-stationary environments. In this study, a novel probabilistic dual heuristic programming (DHP)-based AC controller is proposed. Distinct to current approaches, the proposed probabilistic (DHP) AC method takes uncertainties of forward model and inverse controller into consideration. Therefore, it is suitable for deterministic and stochastic control problems characterised by functional uncertainty. Theoretical development of the proposed method is validated by analytically evaluating the correct value of the cost function which satisfies the Bellman equation in a linear quadratic control problem. The target value of the probabilistic critic network is then calculated and shown to be equal to the analytically derived correct value. Full derivation of the Riccati solution for this non-standard stochastic linear quadratic control problem is also provided. Moreover, the performance of the proposed probabilistic controller is demonstrated on linear and non-linear control examples.

  12. Adaptive strategies in designing the simultaneous global drug development program.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Zhilong; Chen, Gang; Huang, Qin

    2016-01-01

    Many methods have been proposed to account for the potential impact of ethnic/regional factors when extrapolating results from multiregional clinical trials (MRCTs) to targeted ethnic (TE) patients, i.e., "bridging." Most of them either focused on TE patients in the MRCT (i.e., internal bridging) or a separate local clinical trial (LCT) (i.e., external bridging). Huang et al. (2012) integrated both bridging concepts in their method for the Simultaneous Global Drug Development Program (SGDDP) which designs both the MRCT and the LCT prospectively and combines patients in both trials by ethnic origin, i.e., TE vs. non-TE (NTE). The weighted Z test was used to combine information from TE and NTE patients to test with statistical rigor whether a new treatment is effective in the TE population. Practically, the MRCT is often completed before the LCT. Thus to increase the power for the SGDDP and/or obtain more informative data in TE patients, we may use the final results from the MRCT to re-evaluate initial assumptions (e.g., effect sizes, variances, weight), and modify the LCT accordingly. We discuss various adaptive strategies for the LCT such as sample size reassessment, population enrichment, endpoint change, and dose adjustment. As an example, we extend a popular adaptive design method to re-estimate the sample size for the LCT, and illustrate it for a normally distributed endpoint. PMID:26098138

  13. Adaptive dynamic programming as a theory of sensorimotor control.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Yu; Jiang, Zhong-Ping

    2014-08-01

    Many characteristics of sensorimotor control can be explained by models based on optimization and optimal control theories. However, most of the previous models assume that the central nervous system has access to the precise knowledge of the sensorimotor system and its interacting environment. This viewpoint is difficult to be justified theoretically and has not been convincingly validated by experiments. To address this problem, this paper presents a new computational mechanism for sensorimotor control from a perspective of adaptive dynamic programming (ADP), which shares some features of reinforcement learning. The ADP-based model for sensorimotor control suggests that a command signal for the human movement is derived directly from the real-time sensory data, without the need to identify the system dynamics. An iterative learning scheme based on the proposed ADP theory is developed, along with rigorous convergence analysis. Interestingly, the computational model as advocated here is able to reproduce the motor learning behavior observed in experiments where a divergent force field or velocity-dependent force field was present. In addition, this modeling strategy provides a clear way to perform stability analysis of the overall system. Hence, we conjecture that human sensorimotor systems use an ADP-type mechanism to control movements and to achieve successful adaptation to uncertainties present in the environment. PMID:24962078

  14. KVP meter errors induced by plastic wrap

    SciTech Connect

    Jefferies, D.; Morris, J.W.; White, V.P. )

    1991-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine whether erroneous kVp meter readings, induced by plastic wrap, affected the actual kVp (output) of a dental X-ray machine. To evaluate the effect of plastic wrap on dental X-ray machine kVp meters, a radiation output device was used to measure output in mR/ma.s. An intraoral dental X-ray unit (S.S. White Model {number sign}90W) was used to make the exposures. First, the kVp meter was not covered with plastic wrap and output readings were recorded at various kVp settings with the milliamperage and time held constant. Secondly, the same kVp settings were selected before the plastic wrap was placed. Milliamperage and time were again held to the same constant. The X-ray console was then covered with plastic wrap prior to measuring the output for each kVp. The wrap possessed a static charge. This charge induced erroneous kVp meter readings. Out-put readings at the various induced kVp settings were then recorded. A kVp of 50 with no wrap present resulted in the same output as a kVp of 50 induced to read 40 or 60 kVp by the presence of wrap. Similar results were obtained at other kVp settings. This indicates that the plastic wrap influences only the kVp meter needle and not the actual kilovoltage of the X-ray machine. Dental X-ray machine operators should select kVp meter readings prior to placing plastic wrap and should not adjust initial settings if the meter is deflected later by the presence of wrap. The use of such a procedure will result in proper exposures, fewer retakes, and less patient radiation. If plastic wrap leads to consistent exposure errors, clinicians may wish to use a 0.5% sodium hypochlorite disinfectant as an alternative to the barrier technique.

  15. Wrap-rib antenna concept development overview

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, A. A., Jr.; Garcia, N. F.

    1983-01-01

    The wrap rib antenna design of a parabolic reflector large space antenna is discussed. Cost estimates, design/mission compatibility, deployment sequence, ground based tests, and fabrication are discussed.

  16. Evidence-Based Programming within Cooperative Extension: How Can We Maintain Program Fidelity While Adapting to Meet Local Needs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Olson, Jonathan R.; Welsh, Janet A.; Perkins, Daniel F.

    2015-01-01

    In this article, we describe how the recent movement towards evidence-based programming has impacted Extension. We review how the emphasis on implementing such programs with strict fidelity to an underlying program model may be at odds with Extension's strong history of adapting programming to meet the unique needs of children, youth, families,…

  17. Adaptive Management for Decision Making at the Program and Project Levels of the Missouri River Recovery Program

    SciTech Connect

    Thom, Ronald M.; Anderson, Michael G.; Tyre, Drew; Fleming, Craig A.

    2009-02-28

    The paper, “Adaptive Management: Background for Stakeholders in the Missouri River Recovery Program,” introduced the concept of adaptive management (AM), its principles and how they relate to one-another, how AM is applied, and challenges for its implementation. This companion paper describes how the AM principles were applied to specific management actions within the Missouri River Recovery Program to facilitate understanding, decision-making, and stakeholder engagement. For context, we begin with a brief synopsis of the Missouri River Recovery Program (MRRP) and the strategy for implementing adaptive management (AM) within the program; we finish with an example of AM in action within Phase I of the MRPP.

  18. Cultural Adaptation of the Strengthening Families Program 10-14 to Italian Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ortega, Enrique; Giannotta, Fabrizia; Latina, Delia; Ciairano, Silvia

    2012-01-01

    Background: The family context has proven to be a useful target in which to apply prevention efforts aimed at child and adolescent health risk behaviors. There are currently a variety of cultural adaptation models that serve to guide the international adaptation of intervention programs. Objective: The cultural adaptation process and program…

  19. Adaptive Competency Acquisition: Why LPN-to-ADN Career Mobility Education Programs Work.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Coyle-Rogers, Patricia G.

    Adaptive competencies are the skills required to effectively complete a particular task and are the congruencies (balance) between personal skills and task demands. The differences between the adaptive competency acquisition of students in licensed practical nurse (LPN) programs and associate degree nurse (ADN) programs were examined in a…

  20. Project ADAPT: Report Number 1: Description and Review of the MIT Orientation Program: [And Appendix].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Massachusetts Inst. of Tech., Cambridge. Dept. of Urban Studies and Planning.

    The report of Project ADAPT (Aerospace and Defense Adaptation to Public Technology), describes the design, execution, and forthcoming evaluation of the program. The program's objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of redeploying surplus technical manpower into public service at State and local levels of government. The development of the…

  1. Aquifer Storage and Recovery as a Viable Climate Change Adaptation Technique: Sustainable Development under the Current Regulatory Framework

    EPA Science Inventory

    A holistic investigation of aquifer storage and recovery (ASR) technique and application in the U.S. is being conducted as a part of the USEPA Water Resources Adaptation Program (WRAP). The research focus is to evaluate the potential of ASR application as a practical climate chan...

  2. Thin sheets achieve optimal wrapping of liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulsen, Joseph; Démery, Vincent; Davidovitch, Benny; Santangelo, Christian; Russell, Thomas; Menon, Narayanan

    2015-03-01

    A liquid drop can wrap itself in a sheet using capillary forces [Py et al., PRL 98, 2007]. However, the efficiency of ``capillary origami'' at covering the surface of a drop is hampered by the mechanical cost of bending the sheet. Thinner sheets deform more readily by forming small-scale wrinkles and stress-focussing patterns, but it is unclear how coverage efficiency competes with mechanical cost as thickness is decreased, and what wrapping shapes will emerge. We place a thin (~ 100 nm) polymer film on a drop whose volume is gradually decreased so that the sheet covers an increasing fraction of its surface. The sheet exhibits a complex sequence of axisymmetric and polygonal partially- and fully- wrapped shapes. Remarkably, the progression appears independent of mechanical properties. The gross shape, which neglects small-scale features, is correctly predicted by a simple geometric approach wherein the exposed area is minimized. Thus, simply using a thin enough sheet results in maximal coverage.

  3. Technical Assessment: WRAP 1 HVAC Passive Shutdown

    SciTech Connect

    Ball, D.E.; Nash, C.R.; Stroup, J.L.

    1993-08-12

    As the result of careful interpretation of DOE Order 6430.lA and other DOE Orders, the HVAC system for WRAP 1 has been greatly simplified. The HVAC system is now designed to safely shut down to Passive State if power fails for any reason. The fans cease functioning, allowing the Zone 1 and Zone 2 HVAC Confinement Systems to breathe with respect to atmospheric pressure changes. Simplifying the HVAC system avoided overdesign. Construction costs were reduced by eliminating unnecessary equipment. This report summarizes work that was done to define the criteria, physical concepts, and operational experiences that lead to the passive shutdown design for WRAP 1 confinement HVAC systems.

  4. Fabrication of FFTF fuel pin wire wrap

    SciTech Connect

    Epperson, E.M.

    1980-06-01

    Lateral spacing between FFTF fuel pins is required to provide a passageway for the sodium coolant to flow over each pin to remove heat generated by the fission process. This spacing is provided by wrapping each fuel pin with type 316 stainless steel wire. This wire has a 1.435mm (0.0565 in.) to 1.448mm (0.0570 in.) diameter, contains 17 +- 2% cold work and was fabricated and tested to exacting RDT Standards. About 500 kg (1100 lbs) or 39 Km (24 miles) of fuel pin wrap wire is used in each core loading. Fabrication procedures and quality assurance tests are described.

  5. STAR adaptation of QR algorithm. [program for solving over-determined systems of linear equations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shah, S. N.

    1981-01-01

    The QR algorithm used on a serial computer and executed on the Control Data Corporation 6000 Computer was adapted to execute efficiently on the Control Data STAR-100 computer. How the scalar program was adapted for the STAR-100 and why these adaptations yielded an efficient STAR program is described. Program listings of the old scalar version and the vectorized SL/1 version are presented in the appendices. Execution times for the two versions applied to the same system of linear equations, are compared.

  6. Implementing an Adaptive Physical Education Program for Educable Mentally Retarded Children, Kindergarten through Third Grade.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keller, Mimi

    An adaptive physical education program was implemented for two special classes of educable mentally retarded children, grades K-3 in California. Children from a regular kindergarten class also participated in the program. The program operated for 5 months, with children receiving motor skills training 40 minutes per day, 4 days per week. Analysis…

  7. Adapting a Multifaceted U.S. HIV Prevention Education Program for Girls in Ghana

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fiscian, Vivian Sarpomaa; Obeng, E. Kwame; Goldstein, Karen; Shea, Judy A.; Turner, Barbara J.

    2009-01-01

    We adapted a U.S. HIV prevention program to address knowledge gaps and cultural pressures that increase the risk of infection in adolescent Ghanaian girls. The theory-based nine-module HIV prevention program combines didactics and games, an interactive computer program about sugar daddies, and tie-and-dye training to demonstrate an economic…

  8. Adapting Physical Education: A Guide for Individualizing Physical Education Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buckanavage, Robert, Ed.; And Others

    Guidelines are presented for organizing programs and modifying activities in physical education programs for children with a wide range of physical and emotional disabilities. The guidelines should result in a program that allows students to work to their maximum potential within the framework of regular physical education classes. In planning the…

  9. Computer simulation program is adaptable to industrial processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Schultz, F. E.

    1966-01-01

    The Reaction kinetics ablation program /REKAP/, developed to simulate ablation of various materials, provides mathematical formulations for computer programs which can simulate certain industrial processes. The programs are based on the use of nonsymmetrical difference equations that are employed to solve complex partial differential equation systems.

  10. Adaption of a corrector module to the IMP dynamics program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1972-01-01

    The corrector module of the RAEIOS program and the IMP dynamics computer program were combined to achieve a date-fitting capability with the more general spacecraft dynamics models of the IMP program. The IMP dynamics program presents models of spacecraft dynamics for satellites with long, flexible booms. The properties of the corrector are discussed and a description is presented of the performance criteria and search logic for parameter estimation. A description is also given of the modifications made to add the corrector to the IMP program. This includes subroutine descriptions, common definitions, definition of input, and a description of output.

  11. Chirality control in oligothiophene through chiral wrapping.

    PubMed

    Sanji, Takanobu; Kato, Nobu; Tanaka, Masato

    2006-01-19

    [structure: see text] Mixing oligothiophenes and polysaccharides, such as amylose and schizophyllan, affords novel inclusion complexes, in which oligothiophene guests adopt twisted conformation in the chiral channel created by left- or right-handed helical wrapping with the polysaccharide host polymers, leading to optical activity. PMID:16408883

  12. Designing monitoring programs in an adaptive management context for regional multiple species conservation plans

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Atkinson, A.J.; Trenham, P.C.; Fisher, R.N.; Hathaway, S.A.; Johnson, B.S.; Torres, S.G.; Moore, Y.C.

    2004-01-01

    critical management uncertainties; and 3) implementing long-term monitoring and adaptive management. Ultimately, the success of regional conservation planning depends on the ability of monitoring programs to confront the challenges of adaptively managing and monitoring complex ecosystems and diverse arrays of sensitive species.

  13. A Theory of Secondary Teachers' Adaptations When Implementing a Reading Intervention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leko, Melinda M.; Roberts, Carly A.; Pek, Yvonne

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the causes and consequences of secondary teachers' adaptations when implementing a research-based reading intervention program. Interview, observation, and artifact data were collected on five middle school intervention teachers, leading to a grounded theory composed of the core component, reconciliation through adaptation, and…

  14. An Extension Education Program to Help Local Governments with Flood Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gary, Gretchen; Allred, Shorna; LoGiudice, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Education is an important tool to increase the capacity of local government officials for community flood adaptation. To address flood adaptation and post-flood stream management in municipalities, Cornell Cooperative Extension and collaborators developed an educational program to increase municipal officials' knowledge about how to work…

  15. The GANA Program: A Tailoring Approach to Adapting Parent Child Interaction Therapy for Mexican Americans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McCabe, Kristen M.; Yeh, May; Garland, Ann F.; Lau, Anna S.; Chavez, Gloria

    2005-01-01

    The current manuscript describes the process of developing the GANA program, a version of PCIT that has been culturally adapted for Mexican American families. The adaptation process involved combining information from 1) clinical literature on Mexican American families, 2) empirical literature on barriers to treatment access and effectiveness, and…

  16. Computer Adaptive Testing for Small Scale Programs and Instructional Systems

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rudner, Lawrence M.; Guo, Fanmin

    2011-01-01

    This study investigates measurement decision theory (MDT) as an underlying model for computer adaptive testing when the goal is to classify examinees into one of a finite number of groups. The first analysis compares MDT with a popular item response theory model and finds little difference in terms of the percentage of correct classifications. The…

  17. University of Rhode Island Adapted Aquatics Program Manual.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scraba, Paula J.; Bloomquist, Lorraine E.

    An overview is presented of the aquatics course, adapted for persons with disabilities, at the University of Rhode Island. A description of the course includes information on course requirements, objectives, content and learning activities, assignments, modules used in the course, and a course syllabus. A description of the course organization and…

  18. Development, adaptation, and implementation of a cardiovascular health program for Alaska native women.

    PubMed

    Stefanich, Charlotte A; Witmer, Julie M; Young, Bonnie D; Benson, LouAnn E; Penn, Cheryl A; Ammerman, Alice S; Garcia, Beverly A; Jilcott, Stephanie B; Etzel, Ruth A

    2005-10-01

    Southcentral Foundation's Traditions of the Heart program is an innovative cardiovascular disease prevention program for women designed to build on the strengths of the Alaska Native culture as a way to support and encourage positive lifestyle behaviors that focus on healthy eating, active living, stress management, and tobacco cessation. After conducting assessments of existing intervention programs and formative data collection, we adapted two existing programs, Native Nutrition Circles and A New Leaf... Choices for Healthy Living, to develop the Traditions of the Heart program. We implemented and evaluated a pilot intervention study to determine the program's acceptance among Alaska Native women. We used the evaluation results to further refine our study protocol. This article describes the adaptation of these programs to the cultural needs and strengths of Alaska Native women and the results of the formative evaluation used to improve the program design. The complete pilot study outcomes will be published separately. PMID:16210690

  19. 7 CFR 58.411 - Rindless cheese wrapping area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Rindless cheese wrapping area. 58.411 Section 58.411....411 Rindless cheese wrapping area. For rindless cheese a suitable space shall be provided for proper wrapping and boxing of the cheese. The area shall be free from dust, condensation, mold or other...

  20. 7 CFR 58.411 - Rindless cheese wrapping area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rindless cheese wrapping area. 58.411 Section 58.411....411 Rindless cheese wrapping area. For rindless cheese a suitable space shall be provided for proper wrapping and boxing of the cheese. The area shall be free from dust, condensation, mold or other...

  1. 7 CFR 58.411 - Rindless cheese wrapping area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Rindless cheese wrapping area. 58.411 Section 58.411....411 Rindless cheese wrapping area. For rindless cheese a suitable space shall be provided for proper wrapping and boxing of the cheese. The area shall be free from dust, condensation, mold or other...

  2. 7 CFR 58.411 - Rindless cheese wrapping area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Rindless cheese wrapping area. 58.411 Section 58.411....411 Rindless cheese wrapping area. For rindless cheese a suitable space shall be provided for proper wrapping and boxing of the cheese. The area shall be free from dust, condensation, mold or other...

  3. 7 CFR 58.411 - Rindless cheese wrapping area.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Rindless cheese wrapping area. 58.411 Section 58.411....411 Rindless cheese wrapping area. For rindless cheese a suitable space shall be provided for proper wrapping and boxing of the cheese. The area shall be free from dust, condensation, mold or other...

  4. Modeling for deformable mirrors and the adaptive optics optimization program

    SciTech Connect

    Henesian, M.A.; Haney, S.W.; Trenholme, J.B.; Thomas, M.

    1997-03-18

    We discuss aspects of adaptive optics optimization for large fusion laser systems such as the 192-arm National Ignition Facility (NIF) at LLNL. By way of example, we considered the discrete actuator deformable mirror and Hartmann sensor system used on the Beamlet laser. Beamlet is a single-aperture prototype of the 11-0-5 slab amplifier design for NIF, and so we expect similar optical distortion levels and deformable mirror correction requirements. We are now in the process of developing a numerically efficient object oriented C++ language implementation of our adaptive optics and wavefront sensor code, but this code is not yet operational. Results are based instead on the prototype algorithms, coded-up in an interpreted array processing computer language.

  5. Promising Practices, and Program Adaptations & Successes. Annual Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dianda, Marcella; Flaherty, John

    Through its Metropolitan Educational Trends and Research Outcomes (METRO) Center, the Southwest Regional Laboratory (SWRL) helps school districts implement research-based programs for educationally disadvantaged students. The most prominent of these is Success for All, a nationally recognized school restructuring program. In 1992, SWRL made a…

  6. [Development of an adapted leisure education program for persons with dementia].

    PubMed

    Carbonneau, Hélène; Caron, Chantal D; Desrosiers, Johanne

    2009-06-01

    Leisure represents a positive way to keep relationships satisfactory between caregivers and a person with dementia. Adapted leisure education is a promising approach to assist the family to discover new ways to share good times with their relatives. This study aimed to develop an adapted leisure education program. It included an evaluation of the caregivers' needs, the program content development, and a pilot study to experiment with the content of the program. Three focus groups of dementia caregivers (n = 19) were conducted to investigate caregivers needs. Based on content analysis of these focus groups and a literature review, the content of the program was developed. The pilot study (n = 4) included a quasi-experimental trial and an implementation evaluation. This study led to the development of an adapted leisure education program that puts caregiver support in a new perspective, focusing on positive aspects rather than the burden of caregiving. PMID:19860971

  7. Improve Problem Solving Skills through Adapting Programming Tools

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shaykhian, Linda H.; Shaykhian, Gholam Ali

    2007-01-01

    There are numerous ways for engineers and students to become better problem-solvers. The use of command line and visual programming tools can help to model a problem and formulate a solution through visualization. The analysis of problem attributes and constraints provide insight into the scope and complexity of the problem. The visualization aspect of the problem-solving approach tends to make students and engineers more systematic in their thought process and help them catch errors before proceeding too far in the wrong direction. The problem-solver identifies and defines important terms, variables, rules, and procedures required for solving a problem. Every step required to construct the problem solution can be defined in program commands that produce intermediate output. This paper advocates improved problem solving skills through using a programming tool. MatLab created by MathWorks, is an interactive numerical computing environment and programming language. It is a matrix-based system that easily lends itself to matrix manipulation, and plotting of functions and data. MatLab can be used as an interactive command line or a sequence of commands that can be saved in a file as a script or named functions. Prior programming experience is not required to use MatLab commands. The GNU Octave, part of the GNU project, a free computer program for performing numerical computations, is comparable to MatLab. MatLab visual and command programming are presented here.

  8. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  9. Understanding barriers to implementation of an adaptive land management program.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Susan K; Morris, Julie K; Sanders, J Scott; Wiley, Eugene N; Brooks, Michael; Bennetts, Robert E; Percival, H Franklin; Marynowski, Susan

    2006-10-01

    The Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission manages over 650,000 ha, including 26 wildlife management and environmental areas. To improve management, they developed an objective-based vegetation management (OBVM) process that focuses on desired conditions of plant communities through an adaptive management framework. Our goals were to understand potential barriers to implementing OBVM and to recommend strategies to overcome barriers. A literature review identified 47 potential barriers in six categories to implementation of adaptive and ecosystem management: logistical, communication, attitudinal, institutional, conceptual, and educational. We explored these barriers through a bureau-wide survey of 90 staff involved in OBVM and personal interviews with area managers, scientists, and administrators. The survey incorporated an organizational culture assessment instrument to gauge how institutional factors might influence OBVM implementation. The survey response rate was 69%. Logistics and communications were the greatest barriers to implementing OBVM. Respondents perceived that the agency had inadequate resources for implementing OBVM and provided inadequate information. About one-third of the respondents believed OBVM would decrease their job flexibility and perceived greater institutional barriers to the approach. The 43% of respondents who believed they would have more responsibility under OBVM also had greater attitudinal barriers. A similar percentage of respondents reported OBVM would not give enough priority to wildlife. Staff believed that current agency culture was hierarchical but preferred a culture that would provide more flexibility for adaptive management and would foster learning from land management activities. In light of the barriers to OBVM, we recommend the following: (1) mitigation of logistical barriers by addressing real and perceived constraints of staff, funds, and other resources in a participatory manner; (2) mitigation of

  10. The process of adapting a universal dating abuse prevention program to adolescents exposed to domestic violence.

    PubMed

    Foshee, Vangie A; Dixon, Kimberly S; Ennett, Susan T; Moracco, Kathryn E; Bowling, J Michael; Chang, Ling-Yin; Moss, Jennifer L

    2015-07-01

    Adolescents exposed to domestic violence are at increased risk of dating abuse, yet no evaluated dating abuse prevention programs have been designed specifically for this high-risk population. This article describes the process of adapting Families for Safe Dates (FSD), an evidenced-based universal dating abuse prevention program, to this high-risk population, including conducting 12 focus groups and 107 interviews with the target audience. FSD includes six booklets of dating abuse prevention information, and activities for parents and adolescents to do together at home. We adapted FSD for mothers who were victims of domestic violence, but who no longer lived with the abuser, to do with their adolescents who had been exposed to the violence. Through the adaptation process, we learned that families liked the program structure and valued being offered the program and that some of our initial assumptions about this population were incorrect. We identified practices and beliefs of mother victims and attributes of these adolescents that might increase their risk of dating abuse that we had not previously considered. In addition, we learned that some of the content of the original program generated negative family interactions for some. The findings demonstrate the utility of using a careful process to adapt evidence-based interventions (EBIs) to cultural sub-groups, particularly the importance of obtaining feedback on the program from the target audience. Others can follow this process to adapt EBIs to groups other than the ones for which the original EBI was designed. PMID:25287405

  11. SIMCA T 1.0: A SAS Computer Program for Simulating Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiche, Gilles; Blais, Jean-Guy

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo methodologies are frequently applied to study the sampling distribution of the estimated proficiency level in adaptive testing. These methods eliminate real situational constraints. However, these Monte Carlo methodologies are not currently supported by the available software programs, and when these programs are available, their…

  12. Perceived Control and Adaptive Coping: Programs for Adolescent Students Who Have Learning Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Firth, Nola; Frydenberg, Erica; Greaves, Daryl

    2008-01-01

    This study explored the effect of a coping program and a teacher feedback intervention on perceived control and adaptive coping for 98 adolescent students who had specific learning disabilities. The coping program was modified to build personal control and to address the needs of students who have specific learning disabilities. The teacher…

  13. Kinetics of particle wrapping by a vesicle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mirigian, Stephen; Muthukumar, Murugappan

    2013-07-01

    We present theoretical results on kinetics for the passive wrapping of a single, rigid particle by a flexible membrane. Using a simple geometric ansatz for the shape of the membrane/particle complex we first compute free energy profiles as a function of the particle size, attraction strength between the particle and vesicle, and material properties of the vesicle—bending stiffness and stretching modulus. The free energy profiles thus computed are taken as input to a stochastic model of the wrapping process, described by a Fokker-Planck equation. We compute average uptake rates of the particle into the vesicle. We find that the rate of particle uptake falls to zero outside of a thermodynamically allowed range of particle sizes. Within the thermodynamically allowed range of particle size, the rate of uptake is variable and we compute the optimal particle size and maximal uptake rate as a function of the attraction strength, the vesicle size, and vesicle material properties.

  14. Moduli stabilization and inflation using wrapped branes

    SciTech Connect

    Easson, Damien A.; Trodden, Mark

    2005-07-15

    We demonstrate that a gas of wrapped branes in the early Universe can help resolve the cosmological Dine-Seiberg/Brustein-Steinhardt overshoot problem in the context of moduli stabilization with steep potentials in string theory. Starting from this mechanism, we propose a cosmological model with a natural setting in the context of an early phase dominated by brane and string gases. The Universe inflates at early times due to the presence of a wrapped two brane (domain wall) gas and all moduli are stabilized. A natural graceful exit from the inflationary regime is achieved. However, the basic model suffers from a generalized domain wall/reheating problem and cannot generate a scale invariant spectrum of fluctuations without additional physics. Several suggestions are presented to address these issues.

  15. Input parameters to codes which analyze LMFBR wire-wrapped bundles

    SciTech Connect

    Hawley, J.T.; Chan, Y.N.; Todreas, N.E.

    1980-12-01

    This report provides a current summary of recommended values of key input parameters required by ENERGY code analysis of LMFBR wire wrapped bundles. This data is based on the interpretation of experimental results from the MIT and other available laboratory programs.

  16. Wrapped multilayer insulation design and testing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dye, S. A.; Tyler, P. N.; Mills, G. L.; Kopelove, A. B.

    2014-11-01

    New vehicles need improved cryogenic propellant storage and transfer capabilities for long duration missions. Multilayer insulation (MLI) for cryogenic propellant feedlines is much less effective than MLI tank insulation, with heat leak into spiral wrapped MLI on pipes 3-10 times higher than conventional tank MLI. Better insulation for cryogenic feed lines is an important enabling technology that could help NASA reach cryogenic propellant storage and transfer requirements. Improved insulation for Ground Support Equipment could reduce cryogen losses during launch vehicle loading. Wrapped-MLI (WMLI) is a high performance multilayer insulation using innovative discrete spacer technology specifically designed for cryogenic transfer lines and Vacuum Jacketed Pipe (VJP) to reduce heat flux. The poor performance of traditional MLI wrapped on feed lines is due in part to compression of the MLI layers, with increased interlayer contact and heat conduction. WMLI uses discrete spacers that maintain precise layer spacing, with a unique design to reduce heat leak. A Triple Orthogonal Disk spacer was engineered to minimize contact area/length ratio and reduce solid heat conduction for use in concentric MLI configurations. A new insulation, WMLI, was developed and tested. Novel polymer spacers were designed, analyzed and fabricated; different installation techniques were examined; and rapid prototype nested shell components to speed installation on real world piping were designed and tested. Prototypes were installed on tubing set test fixtures and heat flux measured via calorimetry. WMLI offered superior performance to traditional MLI installed on cryogenic pipe, with 2.2 W/m2 heat flux compared to 26.6 W/m2 for traditional spiral wrapped MLI (5 layers, 77-295 K). WMLI as inner insulation in VJP can offer heat leaks as low as 0.09 W/m, compared to industry standard products with 0.31 W/m. WMLI could enable improved spacecraft cryogenic feedlines and industrial hot/cold transfer

  17. Wrapped Wire Detects Rupture Of Pressure Vessel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hunt, James B.

    1990-01-01

    Simple, inexpensive technique helps protect against damage caused by continuing operation of equipment after rupture or burnout of pressure vessel. Wire wrapped over area on outside of vessel where breakthrough most likely. If wall breaks or burns, so does wire. Current passing through wire ceases, triggering cutoff mechanism stopping flow in vessel to prevent further damage. Applied in other situations in which pipes or vessels fail due to overpressure, overheating, or corrosion.

  18. Adapting Foreign Language Programs to New Educational Designs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Stephen L.

    John Dewey High School, the first experimental non-graded school in New York City, is described in this article in terms of its educational philosophy and administrative procedures. With modular scheduling, five area resource centers, and innovative student evaluation procedures integrated into the program, the school views the concept of…

  19. Adapting the Behavior Education Program for Preschool Settings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Steed, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Behavior Education Program (BEP) is the most researched targeted intervention that is used in schoolwide positive behavior intervention and supports (PBIS). It is a daily check-in and check-out system in which students receive extra attention for positive social behavior throughout their school day. This extra attention is intended to prevent…

  20. Slim-hole casing program adapted to horizontal well

    SciTech Connect

    Foster, L. )

    1993-09-06

    A type of slim-hole well design reduced the cost of drilling a horizontal well in the southern North Sea. The basic slim-hole drilling and casing program was similar to that used in conventional directional wells in the field, but with slight modifications for drilling with logging-while-drilling (LWD) tools and running production liners. Nearly 2,600 ft were successfully drilled at over 80[degree] inclination in ARCO British Ltd.'s Pickerill A6 well, the first time in the southern North Sea that a horizontal well was drilled through the reservoir without first casting off the overlying evaporite sequence. The paper describes the well design, the pilot hole plan, the evaluation program for directional drilling, a horizontal sidetrack plan, its evaluation and drilling, hole conditions, liners, well completion, and results.

  1. Ph.D. and Ed.D. Program Adaptations for College Teachers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dressel, Paul L.; Guiste, Evelyn B.

    The extent to which the Ph.D. and/or Ed.D. programs have been adapted to assist in preparing students for college teaching was surveyed. Of 309 universities, 122 responded, and of these, 72 had no adaptations. However, 50 universities indicated the availability, in at least one discipline or field, of modifications in the Ph.D. and/or Ed.D.…

  2. Sequential multiple assignment randomized trial (SMART) with adaptive randomization for quality improvement in depression treatment program.

    PubMed

    Cheung, Ying Kuen; Chakraborty, Bibhas; Davidson, Karina W

    2015-06-01

    Implementation study is an important tool for deploying state-of-the-art treatments from clinical efficacy studies into a treatment program, with the dual goals of learning about effectiveness of the treatments and improving the quality of care for patients enrolled into the program. In this article, we deal with the design of a treatment program of dynamic treatment regimens (DTRs) for patients with depression post-acute coronary syndrome. We introduce a novel adaptive randomization scheme for a sequential multiple assignment randomized trial of DTRs. Our approach adapts the randomization probabilities to favor treatment sequences having comparatively superior Q-functions used in Q-learning. The proposed approach addresses three main concerns of an implementation study: it allows incorporation of historical data or opinions, it includes randomization for learning purposes, and it aims to improve care via adaptation throughout the program. We demonstrate how to apply our method to design a depression treatment program using data from a previous study. By simulation, we illustrate that the inputs from historical data are important for the program performance measured by the expected outcomes of the enrollees, but also show that the adaptive randomization scheme is able to compensate poorly specified historical inputs by improving patient outcomes within a reasonable horizon. The simulation results also confirm that the proposed design allows efficient learning of the treatments by alleviating the curse of dimensionality. PMID:25354029

  3. Recursive dynamic programming for adaptive sequence and structure alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Thiele, R.; Zimmer, R.; Lengauer, T.

    1995-12-31

    We propose a new alignment procedure that is capable of aligning protein sequences and structures in a unified manner. Recursive dynamic programming (RDP) is a hierarchical method which, on each level of the hierarchy, identifies locally optimal solutions and assembles them into partial alignments of sequences and/or structures. In contrast to classical dynamic programming, RDP can also handle alignment problems that use objective functions not obeying the principle of prefix optimality, e.g. scoring schemes derived from energy potentials of mean force. For such alignment problems, RDP aims at computing solutions that are near-optimal with respect to the involved cost function and biologically meaningful at the same time. Towards this goal, RDP maintains a dynamic balance between different factors governing alignment fitness such as evolutionary relationships and structural preferences. As in the RDP method gaps are not scored explicitly, the problematic assignment of gap cost parameters is circumvented. In order to evaluate the RDP approach we analyse whether known and accepted multiple alignments based on structural information can be reproduced with the RDP method.

  4. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  5. Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) for Nondestructive Assay of Transuranic (TRU) Waste at the WRAP Facility

    SciTech Connect

    WILLS, C.E.

    2000-02-24

    The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility, located on the Hanford Site in southeast Washington, is a key link in the certification of Hanford's transuranic (TRU) waste for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste characterization is one of the vital functions performed at WRAP, and nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of TRU waste containers is one of two required methods used for waste characterization (Reference 1). Various programs exist to ensure the validity of waste characterization data; all of these cite the need for clearly defined knowledge of uncertainty, associated with any measurements taken. All measurements have an inherent uncertainty associated with them. The combined effect of all uncertainties associated with a measurement is referred to as the Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU). The NDA measurement uncertainties can be numerous and complex. In addition to system-induced measurement uncertainty, other factors contribute to the TMU, each associated with a particular measurement. The NDA measurements at WRAP are based on processes (radioactive decay and induced fission) which are statistical in nature. As a result, the proper statistical summation of the various uncertainty components is essential. This report examines the contributing factors to NDA measurement uncertainty at WRAP. The significance of each factor on the TMU is analyzed, and a final method is given for determining the TMU for NDA measurements at WRAP. As more data becomes available, and WRAP gains in operational experience, this report will be reviewed semi-annually and updated as necessary. This report also includes the data flow paths for the analytical process in the radiometric determinations.

  6. China's small town urbanization program: criticism and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Tan, K C

    1993-02-01

    "China's 12,000 designated towns and more than 40,000 rural market towns have experienced a major transformation since the institution of rural reforms in the late 1970s. Rural industrialization based on the concept of 'leaving the soil but not the village, entering the factory but not the town' has contributed to the revitalization of many small towns. But this rural urbanization has also brought about a number of problems in the countryside, leading many to propose the adoption of the concept of 'leaving the soil and the village' as another basis of China's small town urbanization. This essay attempts to examine this transformation, particularly the recent criticism and adjustment made to the small town urbanization program." PMID:12318388

  7. Program on Promoting Climate Change Adaptation Technologies Bridging Policy Making and Science Research in Taiwan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiang, Y.; Chiang, W.; Sui, C.; Tung, C.; Ho, H.; Li, M.; Chan, S.; Climate Change Adaptation Technologies Program, National Science Council, Taiwan

    2010-12-01

    Climate changes adaptation needs innovative technological revolution on demand for transdisciplinary studies in various temporal and spatial scales. In our proposed program, a systematic and scientific framework will be developed to promote innovative adaptation technologies with respect to providing decision making information for government sectors, enhancing applicability of scientific research output, strengthening national research capabilities, and integrating both academic and non-academic resources. The objectives of this program are to identify key issues, required technologies, and scientific knowledge for climate change adaptations, and to build a transdisciplinary platform bridging science-supported technologies required by government sectors and demand-oriented scientific research conducted by academic communities. The approach proposed herein will be practiced in vulnerable regions, such as urban, rural, mountain, river basin, and coastal areas, which are particularly sensitive to climate change. The first phase of 3-year (2011~2013) work is to deploy framework and strategies of climate change impact assessment and adaptation measures between related government sectors and researchers from academic communities. The proposed framework involves three principle research groups, namely Environmental System, Vulnerability Assessment, and Risk Management and Adaptation Technology. The goal of the first group, Environmental System, is to combine climate change projections with enhanced scientific and environmental monitoring technologies for better adaptations to future scenarios in different social, economic, and environmental sectors to support adaptation measures planning and to reduce uncertainties on assessing vulnerability. The goal of the second group, Vulnerability Assessment, is to identify interfaces and information structures of climate change vulnerably issues and to develop protocol, models, and indices for vulnerability assessment. The goal of

  8. Wrap spring clutch syringe ram and frit mixer

    DOEpatents

    Simpson, Frank B.

    2006-07-25

    A wrap spring clutch syringe ram pushes at least one syringe with virtually instantaneous starting and stopping, and with constant motion at a defined velocity during the intervening push. The wrap spring clutch syringe ram includes an electric motor, a computer, a flywheel, a wrap spring clutch, a precision lead screw, a slide platform, and syringe reservoirs, a mixing chamber, and a reaction incubation tube. The electric motor drives a flywheel and the wrap spring clutch couples the precision lead screw to the flywheel when a computer enables a solenoid of the wrap spring clutch. The precision lead screw drives a precision slide which causes syringes to supply a portion of solution into the mixing chamber and the incubation tube. The wrap spring clutch syringe ram is designed to enable the quantitative study of solution phase chemical and biochemical reactions, particularly those reactions that occur on the subsecond time scale.

  9. Study of wrap-rib antenna design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wade, W. D.; Sinha, A.; Singh, R.

    1979-01-01

    The results of a parametric design study conducted to develop the significant characteristics and technology limitations of space deployable antenna systems with aperture sizes ranging from 50 up to 300 m and F/D ratios between 0.5 and 3.0 are presented. Wrap/rib type reflectors of both the prime and offset fed geometry and associated feed support structures were considered. The significant constraints investigated as limitations on achievable aperture were inherent manufacturability, orbit dynamic and thermal stability, antenna weight, and antenna stowed volume. A data base, resulting in the defined maximum achievable aperture size as a function of diameter, frequency and estimated cost, was formed.

  10. A review of diabetes prevention program translations: use of cultural adaptation and implementation research.

    PubMed

    Tabak, Rachel G; Sinclair, Kàimi A; Baumann, Ana A; Racette, Susan B; Sebert Kuhlmann, Anne; Johnson-Jennings, Michelle D; Brownson, Ross C

    2015-12-01

    The Diabetes Prevention Program (DPP) has been shown to prevent type 2 diabetes through lifestyle modification. The purpose of this study was to describe the literature on DPP translation, synthesizing studies using cultural adaptation and implementation research. A systematic search was conducted. Original studies evaluating DPP implementation and/or cultural adaptation were included. Data about cultural adaptation, implementation outcomes, and translation strategies was abstracted. A total of 44 were included, of which 15 reported cultural adaptations and 38 explored implementation. Many studies shortened the program length and reported a group format. The most commonly reported cultural adaptation (13 of 15) was with content. At the individual level, the most frequently assessed implementation outcome (n = 30) was adoption. Feasibility was most common (n = 32) at the organization level. The DPP is being tested in a variety of settings and populations, using numerous translational strategies and cultural adaptations. Implementation research that identifies, evaluates, and reports efforts to translate the DPP into practice is crucial. PMID:26622913

  11. Development of a Programming Adapter for a Classified-Data Processor Device

    SciTech Connect

    PEREA,DOMINIC A.

    2000-08-09

    This summer, the author was tasked with the development of a design and prototype for a Programming Adapter (PA). This device must interface to a specialized cluster of computers at a US Air Force programming station. The PA is a command/response system capable of recognizing commands from a host Programming Computer (PC) generating a response to these commands according to design requirements. The PA must also route classified serial data between a programming station and any target devices on the PA without compromising the data. In this manner, classified data can pass through the adapter, but when data transfer is complete, the PA can be handled as an unclassified piece of hardware.

  12. MPH program adaptability in a competitive marketplace: the case for continued assessment.

    PubMed

    Caron, Rosemary M; Tutko, Holly

    2010-06-01

    In the last several years, the number of Master of Public Health (MPH) programs has increased rapidly in the US. As such, MPH programs, particularly smaller-sized ones, need to critically examine how their programs are meeting the needs and preferences of local public health practitioners. To assist in this necessity, the University of New Hampshire conducted a comprehensive educational assessment of its effectiveness as a smaller-sized, accredited MPH program. The aim of the assessment was to review the MPH program from the perspective of all stakeholders and then to agree on changes that would contribute to the fulfillment of the program's mission, as well as improve program quality and reach. The program's stakeholders examined the following components: policy development and implementation; target audience; marketing strategies; marketplace position; delivery model; curriculum design; and continuing education. Though assessment activities explored a wide array of program attributes, target audience, curriculum design, and delivery strategy presented significant challenges and opportunities for our smaller MPH Program to remain competitive. The effort put forth into conducting an in-depth assessment of the core components of our program also allowed for a comparison to the increasing number of MPH programs developing regionally. Since public health practice is changing and the education of public health practitioners must be adaptable, we propose that a routine assessment of an institution's MPH program could not only meet this need but also assist with keeping smaller, unbranded MPH programs competitive in a burgeoning marketplace. PMID:20127157

  13. The tug-of-war: fidelity versus adaptation throughout the health promotion program life cycle.

    PubMed

    Bopp, Melissa; Saunders, Ruth P; Lattimore, Diana

    2013-06-01

    Researchers across multiple fields have described the iterative and nonlinear phases of the translational research process from program development to dissemination. This process can be conceptualized within a "program life cycle" framework that includes overlapping and nonlinear phases: development, adoption, implementation, maintenance, sustainability or termination, and dissemination or diffusion, characterized by tensions between fidelity to the original plan and adaptation for the setting and population. In this article, we describe the life cycle (phases) for research-based health promotion programs, the key influences at each phase, and the issues related to the tug-of-war between fidelity and adaptation throughout the process using a fictionalized case study based on our previous research. This article suggests the importance of reconceptualizing intervention design, involving stakeholders, and monitoring fidelity and adaptation throughout all phases to maintain implementation fidelity and completeness. Intervention fidelity should be based on causal mechanisms to ensure effectiveness, while allowing for appropriate adaption to ensure maximum implementation and sustainability. Recommendations for future interventions include considering the determinants of implementation including contextual factors at each phase, the roles of stakeholders, and the importance of developing a rigorous, adaptive, and flexible definition of implementation fidelity and completeness. PMID:23526141

  14. Program of Adaptation Assistance in Foster Families and Particular Features of Its Implementation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zakirova, Venera G.; Gaysina, Guzel I.; Zhumabaeva, Asia

    2015-01-01

    Relevance of the problem stated in the article, conditioned by the fact that the successful adaptation of orphans in a foster family requires specialized knowledge and skills, as well as the need of professional support. Therefore, this article aims at substantiation of the effectiveness of the developed pilot program psycho-pedagogical support of…

  15. An Adapted Dialogic Reading Program for Turkish Kindergarteners from Low Socio-Economic Backgrounds

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ergül, Cevriye; Akoglu, Gözde; Sarica, Ayse D.; Karaman, Gökçe; Tufan, Mümin; Bahap-Kudret, Zeynep; Zülfikar, Deniz

    2016-01-01

    The study aimed to examine the effectiveness of the Adapted Dialogic Reading Program (ADR) on the language and early literacy skills of Turkish kindergarteners from low socio-economic (SES) backgrounds. The effectiveness of ADR was investigated across six different treatment conditions including classroom and home based implementations in various…

  16. Establishing Adaptive Sports Programs for Youth with Moderate to Severe Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ryan, Joseph B.; Katsiyannis, Antonis; Cadorette, Deborah; Hodge, Janie; Markham, Michelle

    2014-01-01

    Children with disabilities are at increased risk of health risk factors including obesity, often because of low levels of physical activity and limited participation in sports. However, organized adaptive sports programs are increasingly available for individuals with disabilities. This article provides recommendations for establishing successful…

  17. 76 FR 584 - Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program Work Group (AMWG)

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-01-05

    ... Bureau of Reclamation Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program Work Group (AMWG) AGENCY: Bureau of... Management Work Group (AMWG), a technical work group (TWG), a Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center... addition, there will be updates from the Charter Ad Hoc Group and a follow up report on the work done...

  18. Adapting to Changing Expectations: Post-Graduate Students' Experience of an E-Learning Tax Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engelbrecht, Elmarie

    2005-01-01

    In response to the impact of information and communication technology on traditional business and commerce practices, and the empowerment of individuals by the growth of information available on the Internet, educators are challenged to adapt the curricula and delivery modes of educational programs for knowledge workers, such as tax accountants.…

  19. ADAPTING THE FFA TO A CHANGING PROGRAM OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE. RESEARCH SERIES IN AGRICULTURAL EDUCATION.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    KANTER, EARL F.; BENDER, RALPH E.

    THE PURPOSE OF THIS NATIONAL STUDY WAS TO SUGGEST WAYS OF ADAPTING THE FUTURE FARMERS OF AMERICA (FFA) TO A CHANGING PROGRAM OF VOCATIONAL AGRICULTURE THROUGH IDENTIFYING NEW PURPOSES OF THE FFA AND EVALUATING SELECTED OPERATIONAL GUIDELINES AND NATIONAL AND STATE FFA ACTIVITIES. MEMBERS OF THE UNITED STATES OFFICE OF EDUCATION, HEAD STATE…

  20. Effects of a Culturally Adapted Social-Emotional Learning Intervention Program on Students' Mental Health

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cramer, Kristine M.; Castro-Olivo, Sara

    2016-01-01

    Student self-reports of resiliency and social-emotional internalizing problems were examined to determine intervention effects of a culturally adapted social and emotional learning (SEL) program. Data were analyzed from 20 culturally and linguistically diverse high school students who participated in a school-based 12-lesson SEL intervention and…

  1. The Constructivist Resume: Promoting the Career Adaptability of Graduate Students in Counseling Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Scholl, Mark B.; Cascone, Jason

    2010-01-01

    The authors present the constructivist resume, an original approach developed to promote professional identity development and career adaptability (i.e., concern, curiosity, confidence, and control) in students completing graduate-level counselor training programs. The authors discuss underlying theories, including Super's (1990; Super, Savickas,…

  2. Cultural Adaptation of the Focus on Kids Program for College Students in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita; Wang, Bo; Mao, Rong; Zhang, Hongshia; Qu, Minfeng; Sun, Zhifeng; Wang, Jing

    2008-01-01

    This pilot study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of cultural adaptation of a social cognitive theory-based HIV risk reduction program delivered among college students in China. Three hundred eighty students from four universities in Nanjing, China, were assigned by classroom to either an intervention group receiving the culturally adapted…

  3. Role of angiotensin II in renal wrap hypertension.

    PubMed

    Denton, K M; Anderson, W P

    1985-01-01

    The role of angiotensin II in the development of renal wrap hypertension was studied in rabbits that underwent either bilateral renal cellophane wrap or sham operation. In half the rabbits, angiotensin II production was blocked by continuous administration of enalapril. Four weeks after renal wrapping, mean arterial pressure had risen by 48 +/- 5 mm Hg in untreated rabbits, but by only 25 +/- 4 mm Hg in enalapril-treated rabbits (p less than 0.01). Similar differences were also measured 6 weeks after wrapping. In untreated rabbits, plasma renin activity had increased fourfold 4 and 6 weeks after renal wrapping. There were no significant changes in blood pressure or plasma renin activity following sham operation. Compared with that in sham-operated rabbits, renal blood flow was reduced by 60% in the untreated rabbits 4 weeks after wrapping but by only 30% in the enalapril-treated wrapped rabbits (p less than 0.05). Renal vascular resistances were 5.5 +/- 1.7 mm Hg . ml-1 . min-1 and 1.2 +/- 0.1 mm Hg . min . ml-1 in the untreated wrapped and sham-operated rabbits respectively and 1.9 +/- 0.4 mm Hg . min . ml-1 and 0.8 +/- 1 mm Hg . min . ml-1 in the enalapril-treated wrapped and sham-operated rabbits. Renal wrapping did not alter filtration fraction in untreated rabbits, but markedly reduced it in enalapril-treated rabbits. These results suggest that angiotensin II had two major effects in rabbits after bilateral renal wrapping: it contributed substantially to the increase in blood pressure and caused renal vasoconstriction, primarily at a postglomerular site. PMID:3000937

  4. A comparison of three programming models for adaptive applications on the Origin2000

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Hongzhang; Singh, Jaswinder Pal; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    2001-05-30

    Adaptive applications have computational workloads and communication patterns which change unpredictably at runtime, requiring dynamic load balancing to achieve scalable performance on parallel machines. Efficient parallel implementations of such adaptive applications is therefore a challenging task. In this paper, we compare the performance of and the programming effort required for two major classes of adaptive applications under three leading parallel programming models on an SGI Origin2000 system, a machine which supports all three models efficiently. Results indicate that the three models deliver comparable performance; however, the implementations differ significantly beyond merely using explicit messages versus implicit loads/stores even though the basic parallel algorithms are similar. Compared with the message-passing (using MPI) and SHMEM programming models, the cache-coherent shared address space (CC-SAS) model provides substantial ease of programming at both the conceptual and program orchestration levels, often accompanied by performance gains. However, CC-SAS currently has portability limitations and may suffer from poor spatial locality of physically distributed shared data on large numbers of processors.

  5. Test application of Bayesian Programming: Adaptive water quality management under uncertainty

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrison, Kenneth W.

    2007-03-01

    A new method, Bayesian Programming (BP), developed by Harrison [Harrison KW. Multi-stage decision-making under uncertainty and stochasticity: Bayesian Programming. Adv Water Resour, submitted for publication] is tested on a case study involving optimal adaptive management of a river basin. The case study considers anew the process of permitting pulp mills on the Athabasca River in Alberta, Canada. The problem has characteristics common to many environmental management problems. There is uncertainty in the water quality response to pollutant loadings that will not be completely resolved with monitoring and the resolution of this uncertainty is impeded by the stochastic behavior of the water quality system. A two-stage adaptive management process is optimized with BP. Based on monitoring data collected after implementation of the first-stage decision, the uncertainties are updated prior to the second decision stage using Bayesian analysis. The worth of this two-stage adaptive management approach to this problem and the worth of monitoring are evaluated. Conclusions are drawn on the general practicality of BP for adaptive management. Potential strategies are outlined for extending the BP approach to secure further benefits of adaptive management.

  6. Fuzzy physical programming for Space Manoeuvre Vehicles trajectory optimization based on hp-adaptive pseudospectral method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chai, Runqi; Savvaris, Al; Tsourdos, Antonios

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, a fuzzy physical programming (FPP) method has been introduced for solving multi-objective Space Manoeuvre Vehicles (SMV) skip trajectory optimization problem based on hp-adaptive pseudospectral methods. The dynamic model of SMV is elaborated and then, by employing hp-adaptive pseudospectral methods, the problem has been transformed to nonlinear programming (NLP) problem. According to the mission requirements, the solutions were calculated for each single-objective scenario. To get a compromised solution for each target, the fuzzy physical programming (FPP) model is proposed. The preference function is established with considering the fuzzy factor of the system such that a proper compromised trajectory can be acquired. In addition, the NSGA-II is tested to obtain the Pareto-optimal solution set and verify the Pareto optimality of the FPP solution. Simulation results indicate that the proposed method is effective and feasible in terms of dealing with the multi-objective skip trajectory optimization for the SMV.

  7. Adapting high-level language programs for parallel processing using data flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Standley, Hilda M.

    1988-01-01

    EASY-FLOW, a very high-level data flow language, is introduced for the purpose of adapting programs written in a conventional high-level language to a parallel environment. The level of parallelism provided is of the large-grained variety in which parallel activities take place between subprograms or processes. A program written in EASY-FLOW is a set of subprogram calls as units, structured by iteration, branching, and distribution constructs. A data flow graph may be deduced from an EASY-FLOW program.

  8. An adaptive structure data acquisition system using a graphical-based programming language

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baroth, Edmund C.; Clark, Douglas J.; Losey, Robert W.

    1992-01-01

    An example of the implementation of data fusion using a PC and a graphical programming language is discussed. A schematic of the data acquisition system and user interface panel for an adaptive structure test are presented. The computer programs (a series of icons 'wired' together) are also discussed. The way in which using graphical-based programming software to control a data acquisition system can simplify analysis of data, promote multidisciplinary interaction, and provide users a more visual key to understanding their data are shown.

  9. Surprise and opportunity for learning in Grand Canyon: the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Melis, Theodore S.; Walters, Carl; Korman, Josh

    2015-01-01

    With a focus on resources of the Colorado River ecosystem below Glen Canyon Dam, the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program has included a variety of experimental policy tests, ranging from manipulation of water releases from the dam to removal of non-native fish within Grand Canyon National Park. None of these field-scale experiments has yet produced unambiguous results in terms of management prescriptions. But there has been adaptive learning, mostly from unanticipated or surprising resource responses relative to predictions from ecosystem modeling. Surprise learning opportunities may often be viewed with dismay by some stakeholders who might not be clear about the purpose of science and modeling in adaptive management. However, the experimental results from the Glen Canyon Dam program actually represent scientific successes in terms of revealing new opportunities for developing better river management policies. A new long-term experimental management planning process for Glen Canyon Dam operations, started in 2011 by the U.S. Department of the Interior, provides an opportunity to refocus management objectives, identify and evaluate key uncertainties about the influence of dam releases, and refine monitoring for learning over the next several decades. Adaptive learning since 1995 is critical input to this long-term planning effort. Embracing uncertainty and surprise outcomes revealed by monitoring and ecosystem modeling will likely continue the advancement of resource objectives below the dam, and may also promote efficient learning in other complex programs.

  10. Shuttle/Centaur G-prime composite adapters damage tolerance/repair test program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sollars, Teresa A.

    1987-01-01

    The Space Shuttle/Centaur Composite Adapters Damage Tolerance/Repair Test program had as its goals the determination of probable and potentially critical defects or damages on the adapters' strength and stability, as well as the adequacy of repairs on significantly damaged areas and the generation of NDT data for the upgrading of acceptance criteria. Such rational accept/reject criteria and repair methods reduce both engineering liason costs and any unnecessary parts-scrapping. Successful 'damage tolerant' design ensures that degradations of strength and stability due to undetected defects or damage will not be catastrophic.

  11. 9 CFR 327.9 - Burlap wrapping for foreign meat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. 327... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION IMPORTED PRODUCTS § 327.9 Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. Burlap shall not...

  12. 9 CFR 327.9 - Burlap wrapping for foreign meat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. 327... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION IMPORTED PRODUCTS § 327.9 Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. Burlap shall not...

  13. 9 CFR 327.9 - Burlap wrapping for foreign meat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. 327... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION IMPORTED PRODUCTS § 327.9 Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. Burlap shall not...

  14. 9 CFR 327.9 - Burlap wrapping for foreign meat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. 327... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION IMPORTED PRODUCTS § 327.9 Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. Burlap shall not...

  15. 9 CFR 327.9 - Burlap wrapping for foreign meat.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 9 Animals and Animal Products 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. 327... AGRICULTURE AGENCY ORGANIZATION AND TERMINOLOGY; MANDATORY MEAT AND POULTRY PRODUCTS INSPECTION AND VOLUNTARY INSPECTION AND CERTIFICATION IMPORTED PRODUCTS § 327.9 Burlap wrapping for foreign meat. Burlap shall not...

  16. 7 CFR 58.426 - Rindless cheese wrapping equipment.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 3 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Rindless cheese wrapping equipment. 58.426 Section 58... Service 1 Equipment and Utensils § 58.426 Rindless cheese wrapping equipment. The equipment used to heat seal the wrapper applied to rindless cheese shall have square interior corners, reasonably...

  17. CNS myelin wrapping is driven by actin disassembly.

    PubMed

    Zuchero, J Bradley; Fu, Meng-Meng; Sloan, Steven A; Ibrahim, Adiljan; Olson, Andrew; Zaremba, Anita; Dugas, Jason C; Wienbar, Sophia; Caprariello, Andrew V; Kantor, Christopher; Leonoudakis, Dmitri; Leonoudakus, Dmitri; Lariosa-Willingham, Karen; Kronenberg, Golo; Gertz, Karen; Soderling, Scott H; Miller, Robert H; Barres, Ben A

    2015-07-27

    Myelin is essential in vertebrates for the rapid propagation of action potentials, but the molecular mechanisms driving its formation remain largely unknown. Here we show that the initial stage of process extension and axon ensheathment by oligodendrocytes requires dynamic actin filament assembly by the Arp2/3 complex. Unexpectedly, subsequent myelin wrapping coincides with the upregulation of actin disassembly proteins and rapid disassembly of the oligodendrocyte actin cytoskeleton and does not require Arp2/3. Inducing loss of actin filaments drives oligodendrocyte membrane spreading and myelin wrapping in vivo, and the actin disassembly factor gelsolin is required for normal wrapping. We show that myelin basic protein, a protein essential for CNS myelin wrapping whose role has been unclear, is required for actin disassembly, and its loss phenocopies loss of actin disassembly proteins. Together, these findings provide insight into the molecular mechanism of myelin wrapping and identify it as an actin-independent form of mammalian cell motility. PMID:26166300

  18. Adapting the Community of Inquiry Survey for an Online Graduate Program: Implications for Online Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumar, Swapna; Ritzhaupt, Albert D.

    2014-01-01

    A cohort-based online professional doctorate program that consisted of both online coursework and research activities was designed using Garrison et al's community of inquiry (CoI) framework. The evaluation of the program proved a challenge because all existing CoI assessment methods in the past have dealt with online courses, not with online…

  19. On-line replacement of program modules using AdaPT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldrop, Raymond S.; Volz, Richard A.; Smith, Gary W.; Holzbacher-Valero, A. A.; Goldsack, Stephen J.

    1992-01-01

    One purpose of our research is the investigation of the effectiveness and expressiveness of AdaPT(1), a set of language extensions to Ada 83, for distributed systems. As a part of that effort, we are now investigating the subject of replacing, e.g., upgrading, software modules while the software system remains in operation. The AdaPT language extension provide a good basis for this investigation for several reasons: (1) they include the concept of specific, self-contained program modules which can be manipulated; (2) support for program configuration is included in the language; and (3) although the discussion will be in terms of the AdaPT language, the AdaPT to Ada 83 conversion methodology being developed as another part of this project will provide a basis for the application of our findings to Ada 83 systems. The purpose of this investigation is to explore the basic mechanisms to the replacement process. Thus, while replacement in the presence of real-time deadlines, heterogeneous systems, and unreliable networks is certainly a topic of interest, we will first gain an understanding of the basic processes in the absence of such concerns. The extension of the replacement process to more complex situations can be made later. This report will establish an overview of the on-line upgrade problem, and present a taxonomy of the various aspects of the replacement process.

  20. Use of Culturally Focused Theoretical Frameworks for Adapting Diabetes Prevention Programs: A Qualitative Review

    PubMed Central

    Johnson-Jennings, Michelle; Baumann, Ana A.; Proctor, Enola

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Diabetes disproportionately affects underserved racial/ethnic groups in the United States. Diabetes prevention interventions positively influence health; however, further evaluation is necessary to determine what role culture plays in effective programming. We report on the status of research that examines cultural adaptations of diabetes prevention programs. Methods We conducted database searches in March and April 2014. We included studies that were conducted in the United States and that focused on diabetes prevention among African Americans, American Indians/Alaska Natives, Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders, and Latinos. Results A total of 58 studies were identified for review; 29 were excluded from evaluation. Few adaptations referenced or followed recommendations for cultural adaptation nor did they justify the content modifications by providing a rationale or evidence. Cultural elements unique to racial/ethnic populations were not assessed. Conclusion Future cultural adaptations should use recommended processes to ensure that culture’s role in diabetes prevention–related behavioral changes contributes to research. PMID:25950567

  1. Architecture-Adaptive Computing Environment: A Tool for Teaching Parallel Programming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dorband, John E.; Aburdene, Maurice F.

    2002-01-01

    Recently, networked and cluster computation have become very popular. This paper is an introduction to a new C based parallel language for architecture-adaptive programming, aCe C. The primary purpose of aCe (Architecture-adaptive Computing Environment) is to encourage programmers to implement applications on parallel architectures by providing them the assurance that future architectures will be able to run their applications with a minimum of modification. A secondary purpose is to encourage computer architects to develop new types of architectures by providing an easily implemented software development environment and a library of test applications. This new language should be an ideal tool to teach parallel programming. In this paper, we will focus on some fundamental features of aCe C.

  2. Translation, cultural adaptation and field-testing of the Thinking Healthy Program for Vietnam

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Depression and anxiety are prevalent among women in low- and lower-middle income countries who are pregnant or have recently given birth. There is promising evidence that culturally-adapted, evidence-informed, perinatal psycho-educational programs implemented in local communities are effective in reducing mental health problems. The Thinking Healthy Program (THP) has proved effective in Pakistan. The aims were to adapt the THP for rural Vietnam; establish the program’s comprehensibility, acceptability and salience for universal use, and investigate whether administration to small groups of women might be of equivalent effectiveness to administration in home visits to individual women. Methods The THP Handbook and Calendar were made available in English by the program developers and translated into Vietnamese. Cultural adaptation and field-testing were undertaken using WHO guidance. Field-testing of the four sessions of THP Module One was undertaken in weekly sessions with a small group in a rural commune and evaluated using baseline, process and endline surveys. Results The adapted Vietnamese version of the Thinking Healthy Program (THP-V) was found to be understandable, meaningful and relevant to pregnant women, and commune health centre and Women’s Union representatives in a rural district. It was delivered effectively by trained local facilitators. Role-play, brainstorming and small-group discussions to find shared solutions to common problems were appraised as helpful learning opportunities. Conclusions The THP-V is safe and comprehensible, acceptable and salient to pregnant women without mental health problems in rural Vietnam. Delivery in facilitated small groups provided valued opportunities for role-play rehearsal and shared problem solving. Local observers found the content and approach highly relevant to local needs and endorsed the approach as a mental health promotion strategy with potential for integration into local universal maternal

  3. Multilevel adaptive solution procedure for material nonlinear problems in visual programming environment

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, D.; Ghanem, R.

    1994-12-31

    Multigrid solution technique to solve a material nonlinear problem in a visual programming environment using the finite element method is discussed. The nonlinear equation of equilibrium is linearized to incremental form using Newton-Rapson technique, then multigrid solution technique is used to solve linear equations at each Newton-Rapson step. In the process, adaptive mesh refinement, which is based on the bisection of a pair of triangles, is used to form grid hierarchy for multigrid iteration. The solution process is implemented in a visual programming environment with distributed computing capability, which enables more intuitive understanding of solution process, and more effective use of resources.

  4. The Assessment, Development, Assurance Pharmacist's Tool (ADAPT) for Ensuring Quality Implementation of Health Promotion Programs

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Catherine R.; DiPietro, Natalie A.

    2012-01-01

    Objective. To develop and validate the Assessment, Development, Assurance Pharmacist's Tool (ADAPT), an instrument for pharmacists and student pharmacists to use in developing and implementing health promotion programs. Methods. The 36-item ADAPT instrument was developed using the framework of public health's 3 core functions (assessment, policy development, and assurance) and 10 essential services. The tool's content and usage was assessed and conducted through peer-review and initial validity testing processes. Results. Over 20 faculty members, preceptors, and student pharmacists at 5 institutions involved in planning and implementing health promotion initiatives reviewed the instrument and conducted validity testing. The instrument took approximately 15 minutes to complete and the findings resulted in changes and improvements to elements of the programs evaluated. Conclusion. The ADAPT instrument fills a need to more effectively plan, develop, implement, and evaluate pharmacist-directed public health programs that are evidence-based, high-quality, and compliant with laws and regulations and facilitates documentation of pharmacists’ contributions to public health. PMID:22412211

  5. Developmental Cascade Effects of the New Beginnings Program on Adolescent Adaptation Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Bonds, Darya D.; Wolchik, Sharlene A.; Winslow, Emily; Tein, Jenn-Yun; Sandler, Irwin N.; Millsap, Roger E.

    2010-01-01

    Using data from a 6-year longitudinal follow-up sample of 240 youth who participated in a randomized experimental trial of a preventive intervention for divorced families with children ages 9–12, the current study tested alternative cascading pathways by which the intervention decreased symptoms of internalizing disorders, symptoms of externalizing disorders, substance use, and risky sexual behavior, and increased self-esteem and academic performance in mid-to late-adolescence (15–19 years old). It was hypothesized that the impact of the program on adolescent adaptation outcomes would be explained by progressive associations between program-induced changes in parenting and youth adaptation outcomes. The results supported a cascading model of program effects in which the program was related to increased mother-child relationship quality, which was related to subsequent decreases in child internalizing problems, which then was related to subsequent increases in self-esteem and decreases in symptoms of internalizing disorders in adolescence. The results also were consistent with a model in which the program was related to increased maternal effective discipline, which was related to subsequent decreases in child externalizing problems, which then was related to subsequent decreases in symptoms of externalizing disorders, less substance use and better academic performance in adolescence. There were no significant differences in the model based on level of baseline risk or adolescent gender. These results provide support for a cascading pathways model of child and adolescent development. PMID:20883581

  6. Outcomes of a type 2 diabetes education program adapted to the cultural contexts of Saudi women

    PubMed Central

    Al-Bannay, Hana R.; Jongbloed, Lyn E.; Jarus, Tal; Alabdulwahab, Sami S.; Khoja, Tawfik A.; Dean, Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To explore the outcomes of a pilot intervention of a type 2 diabetes (T2D) education program, based on international standards, and adapted to the cultural and religious contexts of Saudi women. Methods: This study is an experiment of a pilot intervention carried out between August 2011 and January 2012 at the primary health clinics in Dammam. Women at risk of or diagnosed with T2D (N=35 including dropouts) were assigned to one of 2 groups; an intervention group participated in a pilot intervention of T2D education program, based on international standards and tailored to their cultural and religious contexts; and a usual care group received the usual care for diabetes in Saudi Arabia. Outcomes included blood glucose, body composition, 6-minute walk distance, life satisfaction, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge. The intervention group participated in a focus group of their program experience. Data analysis was based on mixed methods. Results: Based on 95% confidence interval comparisons, improvements were noted in blood sugar, 6-minute walk distance, quality of life, and diabetes knowledge in participants of the intervention group. They also reported improvements in lifestyle-related health behaviors after the education program. Conclusion: Saudi women may benefit from a T2D education program based on international standards and adapted to their cultural and religious contexts. PMID:26108595

  7. An adaptive maneuvering logic computer program for the simulation of one-to-one air-to-air combat. Volume 2: Program description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgin, G. H.; Owens, A. J.

    1975-01-01

    A detailed description is presented of the computer programs in order to provide an understanding of the mathematical and geometrical relationships as implemented in the programs. The individual sbbroutines and their underlying mathematical relationships are described, and the required input data and the output provided by the program are explained. The relationship of the adaptive maneuvering logic program with the program to drive the differential maneuvering simulator is discussed.

  8. The Effectiveness of Adapted Versions of an Evidence-Based Prevention Program in Reducing Alcohol Use among Alternative School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hopson, Laura M.; Holleran Steiker, Lori K.

    2010-01-01

    Although there is a strong evidence base for effective substance abuse prevention programs for youths, there is a need to facilitate the implementation and evaluation of these programs in real-world settings. This study evaluates the effectiveness of adapted versions of an evidence-based prevention program, keepin' it REAL (kiR), with alternative…

  9. FLEXWAL: A computer program for predicting the wall modifications for two-dimensional, solid, adaptive-wall tunnels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Everhart, J. L.

    1983-01-01

    A program called FLEXWAL for calculating wall modifications for solid, adaptive-wall wind tunnels is presented. The method used is the iterative technique of NASA TP-2081 and is applicable to subsonic and transonic test conditions. The program usage, program listing, and a sample case are given.

  10. Fast and intuitive programming of adaptive laser cutting of lace enabled by machine vision

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vaamonde, Iago; Souto-López, Álvaro; García-Díaz, Antón

    2015-07-01

    A machine vision system has been developed, validated, and integrated in a commercial laser robot cell. It permits an offline graphical programming of laser cutting of lace. The user interface allows loading CAD designs and aligning them with images of lace pieces. Different thread widths are discriminated to generate proper cutting program templates. During online operation, the system aligns CAD models of pieces and lace images, pre-checks quality of lace cuts and adapts laser parameters to thread widths. For pieces detected with the required quality, the program template is adjusted by transforming the coordinates of every trajectory point. A low-cost lace feeding system was also developed for demonstration of full process automation.

  11. Matrix theory on ALE spaces and wrapped membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berenstein, David; Corrado, Richard

    1998-09-01

    We study the properties of wrapped membranes in matrix theory on ALE spaces. We show that the only BPS bound states of wrapped membranes that can form are roots of the A- D- E group. We determine a bound on the energy of a bound state and find the correct dependence on the blow-up parameters and longitudinal momentum expected from M-theory. For the An-1 series, we construct explicit classical solutions for the wrapped membrane bound states. These states have a very rich structure and have a natural interpretation in terms of non-commutative geometry. In the A1 case, we examine the spectrum of excitations around the wrapped membrane solution and provide an explicit calculation of their energies. The results agree exactly with supergravity calculations.

  12. Thermal stress analysis of wrapped pipes in steady temperature state

    SciTech Connect

    Kawaguchi, Kouji; Sawa, Toshiyuki

    1995-11-01

    Thermal stress distributions of wrapped pipes subjected to heat loading are analyzed using an axisymmetrical theory of elasticity. The wrapped pipes consist of two finite hollow pipes of dissimilar material. In the numerical calculations, the effects of the thermal expansion coefficient and Young`s modulus on the interface thermal stress distributions are investigated. The residual thermal stress distributions are examined in the case of alumina-metal wrapped pipes. Experiments on the strains were conducted. It is found that the interface thermal stresses increase with an increase of the ratios of the thermal expansion coefficient and of Young`s modulus between the inner and the outer pipes. Moreover, it is demonstrated that the residual thermal stress in the case of alumina-metal wrapped pipes decreases as Young`s modulus of the outer pipe decreases and the thermal expansion coefficient of the outer pipe increases. The analytical results show good agreement with the experiments.

  13. Periosteum-wrapped alloplasts for reconstructive head and neck surgery.

    PubMed

    Har-El, G; Nash, M; Torno, R B; Goldsher, M; Krespi, Y P

    1992-01-01

    Methylmethacrylate is widely used by orthopaedic and neurosurgeons for bone reconstruction. However, there is not much information about the interaction between methylmethacrylate and soft tissues. A prospective canine study was designed to examine the morphologic and histologic aspects of the use of methylmethacrylate with soft tissues. A previous study has shown that by wrapping the prosthesis with dense connective tissue, such as periosteum, better results can be achieved in tracheal reconstruction. Ten wrapped and 10 unwrapped pieces of methylmethacrylate were implanted in dogs, and were removed at intervals of 2, 4, 8, 11 and 16 weeks. Gross morphologic and histologic examination showed better incorporation of the wrapped implants into the surrounding soft tissues with less inflammation when compared to the unwrapped pieces. We suggest that connective tissue wrapped methylmethacrylate alloplasts are better tolerated by surrounding soft tissues and may lead to improved reconstructive results. PMID:1562844

  14. Sociocultural Adaptation of U.S. Education Abroad Students in Greece: The Effects of Program Duration and Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Antonakopoulou, Efi

    2013-01-01

    There is no evidence in the literature for direct comparison of the sociocultural adaptation brought by the participation of U.S. students in education abroad programs of different lengths. This study attempts to address this gap by comparing the sociocultural adaptation of education abroad students that results from their participation in both…

  15. Adaptive properties of living beings: proposal for a generic mechanism. (Self-programming machines III).

    PubMed

    Moulin, Jean-Paul

    2006-03-01

    Living systems are capable to have appropriate responses to unpredictable environment. This kind of self-organization seems to operate as a self-programming machine, i.e. an organization able to modify itself. Until now the models of self-organization of living beings proposed are functions solutions of differential systems or transition functions of automata. These functions are fixed and these models are therefore unable to modify their organization. On the other hand, computer science propose a lot of models having the properties of adaptive systems of living beings, but all these models depend on the comparison between a goal and the results and ingenious choices of parameters by programmers, whereas there are no programmer's intention nor choice in the living systems. From two best known examples of adaptive systems of living beings, nervous system and immune system that have in common that the external signals modify the rewriting of their organization and therefore work as self-organizing machines, we devised machines with a finite set of inputs, based upon a recurrence, are able to rewrite their organization (Self-programming machines or m(sp)) whenever external conditions vary and have striking properties of adaptation. M(sp) have similar properties whatever the operation defining the recurrence maybe. These results bring us to make the following statement: adaptive properties of living systems can be explained by their ability to rewrite their organization whenever external conditions vary under the only assumption that the rewriting mechanism be a deterministic constant recurrence in a finite state set. PMID:16545754

  16. On-line upgrade of program modules using AdaPT

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Waldrop, Raymond S.; Volz, Richard A.; Smith, Gary W.; Goldsack, Stephen J.; Holzbach-Valero, A. A.

    1993-01-01

    One purpose of our research is the investigation of the effectiveness and expressiveness of AdaPT, a set of language extensions to Ada 83, for distributed systems. As a part of that effort, we are now investigating the subject of replacing, e.g. upgrading, software modules while the software system remains in operation. The AdaPT language extensions provide a good basis for this investigation for several reasons: they include the concept of specific, self-contained program modules which can be manipulated; support for program configuration is included in the language; and although the discussion will be in terms of the AdaPT language, the AdaPT to Ada 83 conversion methodology being developed as another part of this project will provide a basis for the application of our findings to Ada 83 and Ada 9X systems. The purpose of this investigation is to explore the basic mechanisms of the replacement process. With this purpose in mind, we will avoid including issues whose presence would obscure these basic mechanisms by introducing additional, unrelated concerns. Thus, while replacement in the presence of real-time deadlines, heterogeneous systems, and unreliable networks is certainly a topic of interest, we will first gain an understanding of the basic processes in the absence of such concerns. The extension of the replacement process to more complex situations can be made later. A previous report established an overview of the module replacement problem, a taxonomy of the various aspects of the replacement process, and a solution to one case in the replacement taxonomy. This report provides solutions to additional cases in the replacement process taxonomy: replacement of partitions with state and replacement of nodes. The solutions presented here establish the basic principles for module replacement. Extension of these solutions to other more complicated cases in the replacement taxonomy is direct, though requiring substantial work beyond the available funding.

  17. Referral hospitals in the Democratic Republic of Congo as complex adaptive systems: similar program, different dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Karemere, Hermès; Ribesse, Nathalie; Kahindo, Jean-Bosco; Macq, Jean

    2015-01-01

    Introduction In many African countries, first referral hospitals received little attention from development agencies until recently. We report the evolution of two of them in an unstable region like Eastern Democratic Republic of Congo when receiving the support from development aid program. Specifically, we aimed at studying how actors’ network and institutional framework evolved over time and what could matter the most when looking at their performance in such an environment. Methods We performed two cases studies between 2006 and 2010. We used multiple sources of data: reports to document events; health information system for hospital services production, and “key-informants” interviews to interpret the relation between interventions and services production. Our analysis was inspired from complex adaptive system theory. It started from the analysis of events implementation, to explore interaction process between the main agents in each hospital, and the consequence it could have on hospital health services production. This led to the development of new theoretical propositions. Results Two events implemented in the frame of the development aid program were identified by most of the key-informants interviewed as having the greatest impact on hospital performance: the development of a hospital plan and the performance based financing. They resulted in contrasting interaction process between the main agents between the two hospitals. Two groups of services production were reviewed: consultation at outpatient department and admissions, and surgery. The evolution of both groups of services production were different between both hospitals. Conclusion By studying two first referral hospitals through the lens of a Complex Adaptive System, their performance in a context of development aid takes a different meaning. Success is not only measured through increased hospital production but through meaningful process of hospital agents’” network adaptation. Expected

  18. Grants for adaptive sports programs for disabled veterans and disabled members of the Armed Forces. Final rule.

    PubMed

    2015-05-01

    This final rule amends Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations to establish a new program to provide grants to eligible entities to provide adaptive sports activities to disabled veterans and disabled members of the Armed Forces. This rulemaking is necessary to implement a change in the law that authorizes VA to make grants to entities other than the United States Olympic Committee for adaptive sports programs. It establishes procedures for evaluating grant applications under this grant program, and otherwise administering the grant program. This rule implements section 5 of the VA Expiring Authorities Extension Act of 2013. PMID:25985479

  19. Grants for adaptive sports programs for disabled veterans and disabled members of the Armed Forces. Interim final rule.

    PubMed

    2014-07-01

    This interim final rule amends Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) regulations to establish a new program to provide grants to eligible entities to provide adaptive sports activities to disabled veterans and disabled members of the Armed Forces. This rulemaking is necessary to implement a change in the law that authorizes VA to make grants to entities other than the United States Olympic Committee for adaptive sports programs. It establishes procedures for evaluating grant applications under this grant program, and otherwise administering the grant program. This rule implements section 5 of the VA Expiring Authorities Extension Act of 2013. PMID:25016618

  20. Repair of peripheral nerve with vein wrapping*

    PubMed Central

    LEUZZI, S.; ARMENIO, A.; LEONE, L.; DE SANTIS, V.; DI TURI, A.; ANNOSCIA, P.; BUFANO, L.; PASCONE, M.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The post–traumatic neuro-anastomosis must be protected from the surrounding environment. This barrier must be biologically inert, biodegradable, not compressing but protecting the nerve. Formation of painful neuroma is one of the major issues with neuro-anastomosis; currently there is no consensus on post-repair neuroma prevention. Aim of this study is to evaluate the efficacy of neuroanastomosis performed with venous sheath to reduce painful neuromas formation, improve the electrical conductivity of the repaired nerve, and reduce the discrepancies of the sectioned nerve stumps. Patients and methods From a trauma population of 320 patients treated in a single centre between January 2008 and December 2011, twenty-six patients were identified as having an injury to at least one of the peripheral nerves of the arm and enrolled in the study. Patients were divided into two groups. In the group A (16 patients) the end-to-end nerve suture was wrapped in a vein sheath and compared with the group B (10 patients) in which a simple end-to-end neurorrhaphy was performed. The venous segment used to cover the nerve micro-suture was harvested from the superficial veins of the forearm. The parameters analyzed were: functional recovery of motor nerves, sensitivity and pain. Results Average follow-up was 14 months (range: 12–24 months). The group A showed a more rapid motor and sensory recovery and a reduction of the painful symptoms compared to the control group (B). Conclusions The Authors demonstrated that, in their experience, the venous sheath provides a valid solution to avoid the dispersion of the nerve fibres, to prevent adherent scars and painful neuromas formation. Moreover it can compensate the different size of two nerve stumps, allowing, thereby, a more rapid functional and sensitive recovery without expensive devices. PMID:24841688

  1. Non-covalent polymer wrapping of carbon nanotubes and the role of wrapped polymers as functional dispersants

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fujigaya, Tsuyohiko; Nakashima, Naotoshi

    2015-04-01

    Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have been recognized as a promising material in a wide range of applications from biotechnology to energy-related devices. However, the poor solubility in aqueous and organic solvents hindered the applications of CNTs. As studies have progressed, the methodology for CNT dispersion was established. In this methodology, the key issue is to covalently or non-covalently functionalize the surfaces of the CNTs with a dispersant. Among the various types of dispersions, polymer wrapping through non-covalent interactions is attractive in terms of the stability and homogeneity of the functionalization. Recently, by taking advantage of their stability, the wrapped-polymers have been utilized to support and/or reinforce the unique functionality of the CNTs, leading to the development of high-performance devices. In this review, various polymer wrapping approaches, together with the applications of the polymer-wrapped CNTs, are summarized.

  2. The Glen Canyon Dam adaptive management program: progress and immediate challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hamill, John F.; Melis, Theodore S.

    2012-01-01

    Adaptive management emerged as an important resource management strategy for major river systems in the United States (US) in the early 1990s. The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program (‘the Program’) was formally established in 1997 to fulfill a statutory requirement in the 1992 Grand Canyon Protection Act (GCPA). The GCPA aimed to improve natural resource conditions in the Colorado River corridor in the Glen Canyon National Recreation Area and Grand Canyon National Park, Arizona that were affected by the Glen Canyon dam. The Program achieves this by using science and a variety of stakeholder perspectives to inform decisions about dam operations. Since the Program started the ecosystem is now much better understood and several biological and physical improvements have been achieved. These improvements include: (i) an estimated 50% increase in the adult population of endangered humpback chub (Gila cypha) between 2001 and 2008, following previous decline; (ii) a 90% decrease in non-native rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss), which are known to compete with and prey on native fish, as a result of removal experiments; and (iii) the widespread reappearance of sandbars in response to an experimental high-flow release of dam water in March 2008.Although substantial progress has been made, the Program faces several immediate challenges. These include: (i) defining specific, measurable objectives and desired future conditions for important natural, cultural and recreational attributes to inform science and management decisions; (ii) implementing structural and operational changes to improve collaboration among stakeholders; (iii) establishing a long-term experimental programme and management plan; and (iv) securing long-term funding for monitoring programmes to assess ecosystem and other responses to management actions. Addressing these challenges and building on recent progress will require strong and consistent leadership from the US Department of the Interior

  3. The Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program: An experiment in science-based resource management

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    kaplinski, m

    2001-12-01

    In 1996, Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management (GCDAMP) program was established to provide input on Glen Canyon Dam operations and their affect on the Colorado Ecosystem in Grand Canyon. The GCDAMP is a bold experiment in federal resource management that features a governing partnership with all relevant stakeholders sitting at the same table. It is a complicated, difficult process where stakeholder-derived management actions must balance resource protection with water and power delivery compacts, the Endangered Species Act, the National Historical Preservation Act, the Grand Canyon Protection Act, National Park Service Policy, and other stakeholder concerns. The program consists of four entities: the Adaptive Management Workgroup (AMWG), the Technical Workgroup (TWG), the Grand Canyon Monitoring and Research Center (GCMRC), and independent review panels. The AMWG and TWG are federal advisory committees that consists of federal and state resource managers, Native American tribes, power, environmental and recreation interests. The AMWG is develops, evaluates and recommends alternative dam operations to the Secretary. The TWG translates AMWG policy and goals into management objectives and information needs, provides questions that serve as the basis for long-term monitoring and research activities, interprets research results from the GCMRC, and prepares reports as required for the AMWG. The GCMRC is an independent science center that is responsible for all GCDAMP monitoring and research activities. The GCMRC utilizes proposal requests with external peer review and an in-house staff that directs and synthesizes monitoring and research results. The GCMRC meets regularly with the TWG and AMWG and provides scientific information on the consequences of GCDAMP actions. Independent review panels consist of external peer review panels that provide reviews of scientific activities and the program in general, technical advice to the GCMRC, TWG and AMWG, and play a critical

  4. Calculation of the exchange ratio for the Adaptive Maneuvering Logic program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Neuman, F.; Erzberger, H.

    1985-01-01

    Improvements were made to the Adaptive Maneuvering Logic (AML) computer program, a computer-generated, air-to-air combat opponent. The primary improvement was incorporating a measure of performance, the exchange ratio, defined as the statistical measure of number of enemy kills divided by number of friendly losses. This measure was used to test a new modification of the AML's combat tactics. When the new version of the AML competed against the old version, the new version won with an exchange ratio of 1.4.

  5. iAPBS: a programming interface to Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS).

    PubMed

    Konecny, Robert; Baker, Nathan A; McCammon, J Andrew

    2012-07-26

    The Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS) is a state-of-the-art suite for performing Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations on biomolecules. The iAPBS package provides a modular programmatic interface to the APBS library of electrostatic calculation routines. The iAPBS interface library can be linked with a FORTRAN or C/C++ program thus making all of the APBS functionality available from within the application. Several application modules for popular molecular dynamics simulation packages - Amber, NAMD and CHARMM are distributed with iAPBS allowing users of these packages to perform implicit solvent electrostatic calculations with APBS. PMID:22905037

  6. iAPBS: a programming interface to Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver

    SciTech Connect

    Konecny, Robert; Baker, Nathan A.; McCammon, J. A.

    2012-07-26

    The Adaptive Poisson-Boltzmann Solver (APBS) is a state-of-the-art suite for performing Poisson-Boltzmann electrostatic calculations on biomolecules. The iAPBS package provides a modular programmatic interface to the APBS library of electrostatic calculation routines. The iAPBS interface library can be linked with a Fortran or C/C++ program thus making all of the APBS functionality available from within the application. Several application modules for popular molecular dynamics simulation packages -- Amber, NAMD and CHARMM are distributed with iAPBS allowing users of these packages to perform implicit solvent electrostatic calculations with APBS.

  7. The New Weather Radar for America's Space Program in Florida: A Temperature Profile Adaptive Scan Strategy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carey, L. D.; Petersen, W. A.; Deierling, W.; Roeder, W. P.

    2009-01-01

    A new weather radar is being acquired for use in support of America s space program at Cape Canaveral Air Force Station, NASA Kennedy Space Center, and Patrick AFB on the east coast of central Florida. This new radar replaces the modified WSR-74C at Patrick AFB that has been in use since 1984. The new radar is a Radtec TDR 43-250, which has Doppler and dual polarization capability. A new fixed scan strategy was designed to best support the space program. The fixed scan strategy represents a complex compromise between many competing factors and relies on climatological heights of various temperatures that are important for improved lightning forecasting and evaluation of Lightning Launch Commit Criteria (LCC), which are the weather rules to avoid lightning strikes to in-flight rockets. The 0 C to -20 C layer is vital since most generation of electric charge occurs within it and so it is critical in evaluating Lightning LCC and in forecasting lightning. These are two of the most important duties of 45 WS. While the fixed scan strategy that covers most of the climatological variation of the 0 C to -20 C levels with high resolution ensures that these critical temperatures are well covered most of the time, it also means that on any particular day the radar is spending precious time scanning at angles covering less important heights. The goal of this project is to develop a user-friendly, Interactive Data Language (IDL) computer program that will automatically generate optimized radar scan strategies that adapt to user input of the temperature profile and other important parameters. By using only the required scan angles output by the temperature profile adaptive scan strategy program, faster update times for volume scans and/or collection of more samples per gate for better data quality is possible, while maintaining high resolution at the critical temperature levels. The temperature profile adaptive technique will also take into account earth curvature and refraction

  8. Adaptation of a Cervical Cancer Education Program for African Americans in the Faith-Based Community, Atlanta, Georgia, 2012

    PubMed Central

    Escoffery, Cam; Wilkerson, Corinthia; Bell, Rashida; Flowers, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    Background From 1999 through 2009, African American women in the United States had the second highest incidence rates of cervical cancer and were more likely to die from cervical cancer than women of other races. Con Amor Aprendemos (CAA) is an intervention created to educate the Latino community to reduce their risk for cervical cancer and diseases related to human papilloma virus (HPV). CAA was adapted to With Love We Learn (WLWL) to prevent cervical cancer and HPV in African American communities. Community Context Health ministries of 2 churches in the Atlanta area partnered with the Spirit Foundation Inc to adapt CAA to WLWL by tailoring the curriculum to the African American faith-based community. Methods The National Cancer Institute’s Research to Reality (R2R) mentorship program pair collaborated with program staff on an adaptation summary form, a tool to document and assist with adapting the program curriculum with fidelity. Trainers, faith leaders, and participants adapted the program in 4 phases: 1) review of the CAA curriculum, 2) a focus group discussion to determine changes for the WLWL curriculum, 3) train-the-trainer sessions on program delivery, and 4) a pilot intervention and follow-up focus group to evaluate the new curriculum. Outcomes The CAA/WLWL curriculum was adapted and piloted in a faith-based setting. Adaptations to the CAA program included pictures, games, statistics on cervical cancer, dialogues, and delivery of curriculum. Interpretation Community engagement in the adaptation of WLWL through various methods was critical to tailoring an evidence-based program to a new population and setting. PMID:24762531

  9. Adaptation of an Alcohol and HIV School-Based Prevention Program for Teens

    PubMed Central

    Springer, Carolyn; Leu, Cheng-Shiun; Ghosh, Shivnath; Sharma, Sunil Kumar; Rapkin, Bruce

    2010-01-01

    Given the current status of HIV infection in youth in India, developing and implementing HIV education and prevention interventions is critical. The goal for School-based Teenage Education Program (STEP) was to demonstrate that a HIV/AIDS and alcohol abuse educational program built with specific cultural, linguistic, and community-specific characteristics could be effective. Utilizing the Train-the-Trainer model, the instructors (17–21 years) were trained to present the 10 session manualized program to primarily rural and tribal youth aged 13–16 years in 23 schools (N = 1,421) in the northern state of Himachal Pradesh in India. The intervention had a greater impact on girls; girls evidenced greater communication skills and a trend towards greater self efficacy and reduced risk taking behavior. The STEP has been successfully adapted by the community organizations that were involved in coordinating the program at the local level. Their intention to continue STEP beyond extra funding shows that utilizing the local community in designing, implementing and evaluating programs promotes ownership and sustainability. PMID:20589528

  10. Technical assessment of compliance with workplace air sampling requirements at WRAP

    SciTech Connect

    HACKWORTH, M.F.

    1999-06-02

    The purpose of this Technical Assessment is to satisfy HSRCM-1, ''Hanford Site Radiological Control Manual'' Article 551.4 for a documented study of facility Workplace Air Monitoring (WAM) programs. HSRCM-1 is the primary guidance for radiological control at Waste Management Federal Services of Hanford, Inc. (WMH). The HSRCM-1 complies with Title 10. Part 835 of the Code of Federal Regulations (10CFR835). This document provides an evaluation of the compliance of the Waste Receiving and Processing facility (WRAP) WAM program to the criteria standards, requirements, and documents compliance with the requirements where appropriate. Where necessary, it also indicates changes needed to bring specific locations into compliance.

  11. Adaptive optimal control of highly dissipative nonlinear spatially distributed processes with neuro-dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Luo, Biao; Wu, Huai-Ning; Li, Han-Xiong

    2015-04-01

    Highly dissipative nonlinear partial differential equations (PDEs) are widely employed to describe the system dynamics of industrial spatially distributed processes (SDPs). In this paper, we consider the optimal control problem of the general highly dissipative SDPs, and propose an adaptive optimal control approach based on neuro-dynamic programming (NDP). Initially, Karhunen-Loève decomposition is employed to compute empirical eigenfunctions (EEFs) of the SDP based on the method of snapshots. These EEFs together with singular perturbation technique are then used to obtain a finite-dimensional slow subsystem of ordinary differential equations that accurately describes the dominant dynamics of the PDE system. Subsequently, the optimal control problem is reformulated on the basis of the slow subsystem, which is further converted to solve a Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation. HJB equation is a nonlinear PDE that has proven to be impossible to solve analytically. Thus, an adaptive optimal control method is developed via NDP that solves the HJB equation online using neural network (NN) for approximating the value function; and an online NN weight tuning law is proposed without requiring an initial stabilizing control policy. Moreover, by involving the NN estimation error, we prove that the original closed-loop PDE system with the adaptive optimal control policy is semiglobally uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, the developed method is tested on a nonlinear diffusion-convection-reaction process and applied to a temperature cooling fin of high-speed aerospace vehicle, and the achieved results show its effectiveness. PMID:25794375

  12. Molecular views of damaged DNA: Adaptation of the Program DUPLEX to parallel architectures

    SciTech Connect

    Hingerty, B.E.; Crawford, O.H.; Broyde, S.; Wagner, R.A.

    1994-09-01

    The nucleic acids molecular mechanics program DUPLEX has been designed with useful features for surveying the potential energy surface of polynucleotides, especially ones that are modified by polycyclic aromatic carcinogens. The program features helpful strategies for addressing the multiple minimum problem: (1) the reduced variable domain of torsion angle space; (2) search strategies that emphasize large scale searches for smaller subunits, followed by building to larger units by a variety of strategies; (3) the use of penalty functions to aid the minimizer in locating selected structural types in first stage minimizations; penalty functions are released in terminal minimizations to yield final unrestrained minimum energy conformations. Predictive capability is illustrated by DNA modified by activated benzo[a]pyrenes. The first stage of adaptation to parallel computers is described.

  13. Adapting SugarWatch to Manage Metabolic Syndrome in a Partial Hospitalization Program: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Clute, Rose

    2015-01-01

    A successful worksite diabetes prevention program, SugarWatch,was adapted for a seriously mentally ill patient population in a partial hospitalization program in Hawai‘i. A feasibility study was implemented using an intervention with 3 components:SugarWatch curriculum, structured physical activity,and Create a Plate lunch. Twenty participants completed the three month intervention. Only systolic blood pressure showed statistically significant improvement. However, trends in improvement were also seen with diastolic blood pressure and total cholesterol. Despite minimal improvement in physiological measures, the project changed practice in the setting to align with the 2004 American Diabetes Association and American Psychiatric Association Guidelines for the prevention of metabolic syndrome and better management of patients taking second generation antipsychotic medications. PMID:25821649

  14. Effects of mesh density and flow conditioning in simulating 7-pin wire wrapped fuel pins.

    SciTech Connect

    Smith, J. G.; Babin, B. R.; Pointer, W. D.; Fischer, P. F.

    2008-01-01

    In response to the goals outlined by the U.S. Department of Energy's Global Nuclear Energy Partnership program, Argonne National Laboratory has initiated an effort to create an integrated multi-physics multi-resolution thermal hydraulic simulation tool package for the evaluation of nuclear power plant design and safety. As part of this effort, the applicability of a variety of thermal hydraulic analysis methods for the prediction of heat transfer and fluid dynamics in the wire-wrapped fuel-rod bundles found in a fast reactor core is being evaluated. The work described herein provides an initial assessment of the capabilities of the general purpose commercial computational fluid dynamics code Star-CD for the prediction of fluid dynamic characteristics in a wire wrapped fast reactor fuel assembly. A 7-pin wire wrapped fuel rod assembly based on the dimensions of fuel elements in the concept Advanced Burner Test Reactor [1] was simulated for different mesh densities and domain configurations. A model considering a single axial span of the wire wrapped fuel assembly was initially used to assess mesh resolution effects. The influence of the inflow/outflow boundary conditions on the predicted flow fields in the single-span model were then investigated through comparisons with the central span region of models which included 3 and 5 spans. The change in grid refinement had minimal impact on the inter-channel exchange within the assembly resulting in roughly a 5 percent maximum difference. The central span of the 3-span and 5-span cases exhibits much higher velocities than the single span case,, with the largest deviation (15 to 20 percent) occurring furthest away from the wire spacer grids in the higher velocity regions. However, the differences between predicted flow fields in the 3-span and 5-span models are minimal.

  15. Cultural adaptation of the Focus on Kids program for college students in China.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiaoming; Stanton, Bonita; Wang, Bo; Mao, Rong; Zhang, Hongshia; Qu, Minfeng; Sun, Zhifeng; Wang, Jing

    2008-02-01

    This pilot study was designed to evaluate the efficacy of cultural adaptation of a social cognitive theory-based HIV risk reduction program delivered among college students in China. Three hundred eighty students from four universities in Nanjing, China, were assigned by classroom to either an intervention group receiving the culturally adapted HIV risk reduction curriculum or a control group. Data were collected at baseline and 6 months postintervention. Outcome measures included HIV-related knowledge and perceptions, intention of risk behaviors, and self-reported risk behaviors. The participation in the intervention was significantly associated with increased HIV-related knowledge (including knowledge of condom use) and protective perceptions (e.g., self-efficacy), and associated with decreased intention of engaging in sexual intercourse in the next 6 months. There was no intervention effect on sexual behaviors because of the relatively low rates of sexual activities. The results suggest that a social cognitive theory based HIV risk reduction program for young adults can be effective in changing HIV-related perceptions and intentions in China. PMID:18312063

  16. Development of a School Adaptation Program for Elementary School Students with Hearing Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Shin-Jeong; Kwon, Myung Soon

    2015-01-01

    Background and Objectives Although new technology of assistive listening device leads many hard of hearing children to be mainstreamed in public school programs, many clinicians and teachers still wonder whether the children are able to understand all instruction, access educational materials, and have social skills in the school. The purpose of this study is to develop a school adaptation program (SAP) for the hearing-impaired children who attend public elementary school. Subjects and Methods The theoretical framework of the SAP was a system model including microsystem, mesosystem, and macrosystem merged with Keller's ARCS theory. Results The SAP consisted of 10 sessions based on five categories (i.e., school life, activity in the class, relationship with friends, relationship with teacher, and school environments). For preliminary validity testing, the developed SAP was reviewed by sixteen elementary school teachers, using the evaluation questionnaire. The results of evaluation showed high average 3.60 (±0.52) points out of 4 while proving a reliable and valid school-based program. Conclusions The SAP indicated that it may serve as a practical and substantive program for hearing-impaired children in the public school in order to help them achieve better academic support and social integrations. PMID:26185788

  17. Advantages and limitations of the spatially adaptive program SAPRO in clinical perimetry.

    PubMed

    Fankhauser, F; Funkhouser, A; Kwasniewska, S

    1986-05-01

    The SAPRO program devised for the OCTOPUS 201 automated perimeter, consists of a number of program components. It is designed to be used on the Octopus 201 computer. In its measurement mode, it employs an algorithm which achieves high speed and efficiency. This is made possible by a threshold bracketing strategy which is simpler than the normal OCTOPUS bracketing. Moreover, three grids with test location distributions of increasing resolution are superimposed in succession on the whole or on part of the visual field to be analyzed. Out of the distribution of test locations, only those which fulfill a number of criteria are actually utilized. These criteria must be given and are adaptable to any given clinical problem. As a result, despite the high spatial resolution achieved, only a fraction of the test locations are utilized using SAPRO as compared with a program using a fixed pattern of test locations. The algorithm is thus able to imitate human intelligence, which tends to concentrate stimuli at places which appear to be relevant for the solution of a problem. The results of program SAPRO are disturbed by short- and long-term fluctuations. Their validity is limited, in a manner similar to that encountered in any other threshold determination procedure. A number of printout modes is available which are oriented towards an optimal understanding of the information contained in various examinations. These principles will be illustrated by one case of inactive disseminated chorioretinitis. PMID:3755124

  18. Effectiveness of a Culturally Adapted Strengthening Families Program 12-16-Years for High-Risk Irish Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kumpfer, Karol L.; Xie, Jing; O'Driscoll, Robert

    2012-01-01

    Background: Evidence-based programs (EBPs) targeting effective family skills are the most cost effective for improving adolescent behavioural health. Cochrane Reviews have found the "Strengthening Families Program" (SFP) to be the most effective substance abuse prevention intervention. Standardized cultural adaptation processes resulted in…

  19. Teaching the Fluctuation Test "In Silico" by Using Mutate: A Program to Distinguish between the Adaptive and Spontaneous Mutation Hypotheses

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Carvajal-Rodriguez, Antonio

    2012-01-01

    Mutate is a program developed for teaching purposes to impart a virtual laboratory class for undergraduate students of Genetics in Biology. The program emulates the so-called fluctuation test whose aim is to distinguish between spontaneous and adaptive mutation hypotheses in bacteria. The plan is to train students in certain key multidisciplinary…

  20. An Evaluation of Levels of Adaptation Used in the Teaching of Foreign University Degree Programs in China

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willis, Mike

    2004-01-01

    Many universities now deliver courses and programs in overseas markets such as China. Often these programs are delivered by foreign academics who teach in these overseas locations. This style and format of educational delivery raises the issue of the degree to which subject material and teaching styles need to be adapted to meet the needs of…

  1. National Summary of Aquatic Education Materials Developed by, or Adapted for Use with, State and Territorial Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Iowa State Dept. of Natural Resources, Des Moines.

    This document summarizes materials on aquatic education used by state programs. Emphasis is on materials developed by, or adapted for use with, programs in various states and territories. The 234 entries are categorized as activity books, brochures, newsletters, posters, videos, and other materials. Major subjects include fishing, boating and…

  2. Bubble wrap for optical trapping and cell culturing

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, Craig; McGloin, David

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate that the bubbles of bubble wrap make ideal trapping chambers for integration with low-cost optical manipulation. The interior of the bubbles is sterile and gas permeable, allowing for the bubbles to be used to store and culture cells, while the flat side of the bubble wrap is of sufficient optical quality to allow for optical trapping inside the bubbles. Through the use of a 100 W bulb to cure hanging droplets of PDMS, a low-cost optical trapping system was constructed. Effector T cells were cultured in bubble wrap for 8 days and then trapped with the PDMS droplet based optical manipulation. These techniques further demonstrate the opportunities for biophysical analysis afforded through repurposing common materials in resource-limited settings. PMID:26504627

  3. Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming for Adapting to the Change of Stock Prices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yan; Mabu, Shingo; Shimada, Kaoru; Hirasawa, Kotaro

    The key in stock trading model is to take the right actions for trading at the right time, primarily based on the accurate forecast of future stock trends. Since an effective trading with given information of stock prices needs an intelligent strategy for the decision making, we applied Genetic Network Programming (GNP) to creating a stock trading model. In this paper, we propose a new method called Real Time Updating Genetic Network Programming (RTU-GNP) for adapting to the change of stock prices. There are three important points in this paper: First, the RTU-GNP method makes a stock trading decision considering both the recommendable information of technical indices and the candlestick charts according to the real time stock prices. Second, we combine RTU-GNP with a Sarsa learning algorithm to create the programs efficiently. Also, sub-nodes are introduced in each judgment and processing node to determine appropriate actions (buying/selling) and to select appropriate stock price information depending on the situation. Third, a Real Time Updating system has been firstly introduced in our paper considering the change of the trend of stock prices. The experimental results on the Japanese stock market show that the trading model with the proposed RTU-GNP method outperforms other models without real time updating. We also compared the experimental results using the proposed method with Buy&Hold method to confirm its effectiveness, and it is clarified that the proposed trading model can obtain much higher profits than Buy&Hold method.

  4. Wrapping transition and wrapping-mediated interactions for discrete binding along an elastic filament: An exact solution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dean, David S.; Hammant, Thomas C.; Horgan, Ronald R.; Naji, Ali; Podgornik, Rudolf

    2012-10-01

    The wrapping equilibria of one and two adsorbing cylinders are studied along a semi-flexible filament (polymer) due to the interplay between elastic rigidity and short-range adhesive energy between the cylinder and the filament. We show that statistical mechanics of the system can be solved exactly using a path integral formalism which gives access to the full effect of thermal fluctuations, going thus beyond the usual Gaussian approximations which take into account only the contributions from the minimal energy configuration and small fluctuations about this minimal energy solution. We obtain the free energy of the wrapping-unwrapping transition of the filament around the cylinders as well as the effective interaction between two wrapped cylinders due to thermal fluctuations of the elastic filament. A change of entropy due to wrapping of the filament around the adsorbing cylinders as they move closer together is identified as an additional source of interactions between them. Such entropic wrapping effects should be distinguished from the usual entropic configuration effects in semi-flexible polymers. Our results may be relevant to the problem of adsorption of oriented nano-rods on semi-flexible polymers.

  5. An adaptive compromise programming method for multi-objective path optimization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Rongrong; Leung, Yee; Lin, Hui; Huang, Bo

    2013-04-01

    Network routing problems generally involve multiple objectives which may conflict one another. An effective way to solve such problems is to generate a set of Pareto-optimal solutions that is small enough to be handled by a decision maker and large enough to give an overview of all possible trade-offs among the conflicting objectives. To accomplish this, the present paper proposes an adaptive method based on compromise programming to assist decision makers in identifying Pareto-optimal paths, particularly for non-convex problems. This method can provide an unbiased approximation of the Pareto-optimal alternatives by adaptively changing the origin and direction of search in the objective space via the dynamic updating of the largest unexplored region till an appropriately structured Pareto front is captured. To demonstrate the efficacy of the proposed methodology, a case study is carried out for the transportation of dangerous goods in the road network of Hong Kong with the support of geographic information system. The experimental results confirm the effectiveness of the approach.

  6. Finite-approximation-error-based discrete-time iterative adaptive dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Wei, Qinglai; Wang, Fei-Yue; Liu, Derong; Yang, Xiong

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, a new iterative adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) algorithm is developed to solve optimal control problems for infinite horizon discrete-time nonlinear systems with finite approximation errors. First, a new generalized value iteration algorithm of ADP is developed to make the iterative performance index function converge to the solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. The generalized value iteration algorithm permits an arbitrary positive semi-definite function to initialize it, which overcomes the disadvantage of traditional value iteration algorithms. When the iterative control law and iterative performance index function in each iteration cannot accurately be obtained, for the first time a new "design method of the convergence criteria" for the finite-approximation-error-based generalized value iteration algorithm is established. A suitable approximation error can be designed adaptively to make the iterative performance index function converge to a finite neighborhood of the optimal performance index function. Neural networks are used to implement the iterative ADP algorithm. Finally, two simulation examples are given to illustrate the performance of the developed method. PMID:25265640

  7. Error bounds of adaptive dynamic programming algorithms for solving undiscounted optimal control problems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Li, Hongliang; Wang, Ding

    2015-06-01

    In this paper, we establish error bounds of adaptive dynamic programming algorithms for solving undiscounted infinite-horizon optimal control problems of discrete-time deterministic nonlinear systems. We consider approximation errors in the update equations of both value function and control policy. We utilize a new assumption instead of the contraction assumption in discounted optimal control problems. We establish the error bounds for approximate value iteration based on a new error condition. Furthermore, we also establish the error bounds for approximate policy iteration and approximate optimistic policy iteration algorithms. It is shown that the iterative approximate value function can converge to a finite neighborhood of the optimal value function under some conditions. To implement the developed algorithms, critic and action neural networks are used to approximate the value function and control policy, respectively. Finally, a simulation example is given to demonstrate the effectiveness of the developed algorithms. PMID:25751878

  8. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  9. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  10. Neural-network-observer-based optimal control for unknown nonlinear systems using adaptive dynamic programming

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Derong; Huang, Yuzhu; Wang, Ding; Wei, Qinglai

    2013-09-01

    In this paper, an observer-based optimal control scheme is developed for unknown nonlinear systems using adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) algorithm. First, a neural-network (NN) observer is designed to estimate system states. Then, based on the observed states, a neuro-controller is constructed via ADP method to obtain the optimal control. In this design, two NN structures are used: a three-layer NN is used to construct the observer which can be applied to systems with higher degrees of nonlinearity and without a priori knowledge of system dynamics, and a critic NN is employed to approximate the value function. The optimal control law is computed using the critic NN and the observer NN. Uniform ultimate boundedness of the closed-loop system is guaranteed. The actor, critic, and observer structures are all implemented in real-time, continuously and simultaneously. Finally, simulation results are presented to demonstrate the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  11. Optimal control for unknown discrete-time nonlinear Markov jump systems using adaptive dynamic programming.

    PubMed

    Zhong, Xiangnan; He, Haibo; Zhang, Huaguang; Wang, Zhanshan

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we develop and analyze an optimal control method for a class of discrete-time nonlinear Markov jump systems (MJSs) with unknown system dynamics. Specifically, an identifier is established for the unknown systems to approximate system states, and an optimal control approach for nonlinear MJSs is developed to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation based on the adaptive dynamic programming technique. We also develop detailed stability analysis of the control approach, including the convergence of the performance index function for nonlinear MJSs and the existence of the corresponding admissible control. Neural network techniques are used to approximate the proposed performance index function and the control law. To demonstrate the effectiveness of our approach, three simulation studies, one linear case, one nonlinear case, and one single link robot arm case, are used to validate the performance of the proposed optimal control method. PMID:25420238

  12. A newly developed wrapping method for scintillator detectors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stuhl, L.; Krasznahorkay, A.; Csatlós, M.; Algora, A.; Gulyás, J.; Kalinka, G.; Kertész, Zs I.; Timár, J.

    2016-01-01

    A neutron spectrometer, the European Low-Energy Neutron Spectrometer (ELENS), has been constructed to study exotic nuclei in inverse kinematics experiments. The spectrometer consisting of scintillator bars can be used in the neutron energy range of 100 keV to 10 MeV. To increase the light collection efficiency a special wrapping method was developed for each bars of ELENS. By using the specially heat treated reflector foil 15-20% better light collection is available. The development of wrapping process, the results of the test experiments are also presented.

  13. “When Will Your Program Be Available in Spanish?” Adapting an Early Parenting Intervention for Latino Families

    PubMed Central

    Dumas, Jean E.; Arriaga, Ximena; Begle, Angela Moreland; Longoria, Zayra

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the Spanish adaptation of PACE—Parenting Our Children to Excellence. Successfully offered in preschools and daycare centers since 2002, PACE is a research-based preventive intervention to support families in their parenting task through discussions and activities that address practical childrearing issues and promote child coping-competence. Developed in response to community calls, the new program is known as CANNE –Criando a Nuestros Niños hacia el Éxito. The paper makes the processes linking original and adapted versions explicit by accounting for the conceptual and practical decisions that were made as CANNE was being developed. We begin by summarizing the challenges of adapting and translating a behavioral intervention, and by describing the coping-competence model that informs both versions of the program. We turn then to a detailed account of the adaptation itself and of its results. Specifically, we describe: (a) the consultation process at the origin of this adaptation, (b) the adaptation of the manual and the steps taken to establish the extent to which the English and Spanish versions correspond (adaptation fidelity), and (c) the translation of the manual and the cross-language comparison of measures to demonstrate that they yield comparable data when administered in English and Spanish. PMID:20607140

  14. Offset wrap rib antenna concept development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woods, A. A., Jr.; Garcia, N. F.

    1982-01-01

    The demonstration of 50 to 150 m, STS compatible, offset antenna technology readiness is reported. Fabrication of a ground and flight testable partial 55 m reflector section and feed support structure is discussed. Reduction to practice through ground test verification is presently contained in the program. Key objectives for the program include the design of a compatible feed support structure and the fabrication and testing of critical components.

  15. A weight-loss intervention program designed for Mexican-American women: Cultural adaptations and results

    PubMed Central

    Lindberg, Nangel M.; Stevens, Victor J.; Vega-López, Sonia; Kauffman, Tia; Calderón, Mariana Rosales; Cervantes, María Antonieta

    2013-01-01

    Background This study assessed the feasibility of a culturally-appropriate weight-loss intervention targeting obese Spanish-speaking Mexican women. Methods This 12-month weight-loss program was based on behavioral interventions previously used successfully with English-speaking participants. Cultural adaptations included: female interventionists, minimal written materials, emphasis on group activities, focus on Mexican traditions and beliefs, and skill-building approach to food measurement. All sessions were conducted in Spanish. The study had few exclusionary criteria, which allowed participation of women with a wide range of literacy levels. Results Recruitment exceeded expectations, with 47 participants enrolling in the program. Not counting participants who became pregnant during the study, attendance at 6 and 12 months was 62% and 50% respectively. Mean weight loss at 6 and 12 months was 5.3 kg and 7.2 kg, respectively, with a mean reduction in BMI of 4.0 kg/m2 and 5.5 kg/m2 from baseline to 6 and 12 months, respectively. Discussion This pilot study shows that it is feasible to develop and implement culturally-appropriate behavioral lifestyle interventions for obesity treatment in Mexican-American women. PMID:22460538

  16. Adapting Stanford’s Chronic Disease Self-Management Program to Hawaii’s Multicultural Population

    PubMed Central

    Tomioka, Michiyo; Braun, Kathryn L.; Compton, Merlita; Tanoue, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Stanford’s Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been proven to increase patients’ ability to manage distress. We describe how we replicated CDSMP in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) communities. Design and Methods: We used the “track changes” tool to deconstruct CDSMP into its various components (e.g., recruitment and staffing) and the “adaptation traffic light” to identify allowable modifications to the original program. We monitored local leaders’ fidelity of delivery of CDSMP and tracked participants’ attendance, satisfaction, and 6-month outcomes. Results: Between July 2007 and February 2010, 584 completed a CDSMP workshop. Baseline and 6-month data were available for 422 (72%), including 53 Caucasians, 177 Asians, and 194 Pacific Islanders. All 3 groups realized significant decreases in social and role activity limitations and significant increases in communication with physicians. Asians and Pacific Islanders also realized significant increases in self-rated health and time spent engaging in stretching/strengthening exercise. Asians also reported significant reductions in health distress and self-reported physician visits and increases in time spent in aerobic exercise, ability to cope with symptoms, and self-efficacy. Implications: Our experience suggests that CDSMP can be modified for increased cultural appropriateness for API communities while maintaining the key components responsible for behavior change. PMID:21719630

  17. Adaptive Evolutionary Programming Incorporating Neural Network for Transient Stability Constrained Optimal Power Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tangpatiphan, Kritsana; Yokoyama, Akihiko

    This paper presents an adaptive evolutionary programming incorporating neural network for solving transient stability constrained optimal power flow (TSCOPF). The proposed AEP method is an evolutionary programming (EP)-based algorithm, which adjusts its population size automatically during an optimization process. The artificial neural network, which classifies the AEP individual based on its stability degrees, is embedded into the search template to reduce the computational load caused by transient stability constraints. The fuel cost minimization is selected as the objective function of TSCOPF. The proposed method is tested on the IEEE 30-bus system with two types of the fuel cost functions, i.e. the conventional quadratic function and the quadratic function superimposed by sine component to model the cost curves without and with valve-point loading effect respectively. The numerical examples show that AEP is more effective than conventional EP in terms of computational speed, and when the neural network is incorporated into AEP, it can significantly reduce the computational time of TSCOPF. A study of the architecture of the neural network is also conducted and discussed. In addition, the effectiveness of the proposed method for solving TSCOPF with the consideration of multiple contingencies is manifested.

  18. Diffusion of school-based prevention programs in two urban districts: adaptations, rationales, and suggestions for change.

    PubMed

    Ozer, Emily J; Wanis, Maggie G; Bazell, Nickie

    2010-03-01

    The diffusion of school-based preventive interventions involves the balancing of high-fidelity implementation of empirically-supported programs with flexibility to permit local stakeholders to target the specific needs of their youth. There has been little systematic research that directly seeks to integrate research- and community-driven approaches to diffusion. The present study provides a primarily qualitative investigation of the initial roll-out of two empirically-supported substance and violence prevention programs in two urban school districts that serve a high proportion of low-income, ethnic minority youth. The predominant ethnic group in most of our study schools was Asian American, followed by smaller numbers of Latinos, African Americans, and European Americans. We examined the adaptations made by experienced health teachers as they implemented the programs, the elicitation of suggested adaptations to the curricula from student and teacher stakeholders, and the evaluation of the consistency of these suggested adaptations with the core components of the programs. Data sources include extensive classroom observations of curricula delivery and interviews with students, teachers, and program developers. All health teachers made adaptations, primarily with respect to instructional format, integration of real-life experiences into the curriculum, and supplementation with additional resources; pedagogical and class management issues were cited as the rationale for these changes. Students and teachers were equally likely to propose adaptations that met with the program developers' approval with respect to program theory and implementation logistics. Tensions between teaching practice and prevention science-as well as implications for future research and practice in school-based prevention-are considered. PMID:19697133

  19. Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Hazards Assessment

    SciTech Connect

    CAMPBELL, L.R.

    1999-09-29

    This document establishes the technical basis in support of Emergency Planning activities for the WRAP Module 1 Facility on the Hanford Site. Through this document, the technical basis for the development of facility specific Emergency Action Levels and Emergency Planning Zone is demonstrated.

  20. 15. DETAIL OF HEATSEALING DEVICE USED TO SEAL PLASTIC WRAPPING ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    15. DETAIL OF HEAT-SEALING DEVICE USED TO SEAL PLASTIC WRAPPING APPLIED TO CLEANED FAIRING ASSEMBLY. DEVICE LOCATED ON THE NORTH WALL OF CLEAN ROOM (102) NEAR DOOR TO ASSEMBLY ROOM (101). - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Vehicle Support Building, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  1. Operational readiness review phase-1 final report for WRAP-1

    SciTech Connect

    Bowen, W., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-12-27

    This report documents the Operational Readiness Review for WRAP-1 Phase-1 operations. The report includes all criteria, lines of inquiry with resulting Findings and Observations. The review included assessing operational capability of the organization and the computer controlled process and facility systems.

  2. Method of making solar cell with wrap-around electrode

    SciTech Connect

    Amick, J.A.

    1982-12-07

    A solar cell is provided which has a front electrode which wraps around the edge of the cell and onto a portion of the back of the cell. A second electrode is also provided on the back of the cell thereby permitting all electrical connections to be made on one side of the cell. A method for making such a cell also is disclosed.

  3. Modeling Nanoparticle Wrapping or Translocation in Bilayer Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Curtis, Emily M.; Bahrami, Amir H.; Weikl, Thomas R.; Hall, Carol K.

    2015-01-01

    The spontaneous wrapping of nanoparticles by membranes is of increasing interest as nanoparticles become more prevalent in consumer products and hence more likely to enter the human body. We introduce a simulations-based tool that can be used to visualize the molecular level interaction between nanoparticles and bilayer membranes. By combining LIME, an intermediate resolution, implicit solvent model for phospholipids, with discontinuous molecular dynamics (DMD), we are able to simulate the wrapping or embedding of nanoparticles by 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine (DPPC) bilayer membranes. Simulations of hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters from 10Å to 250Å show that hydrophilic nanoparticles with diameters greater than 20Å become wrapped while the nanoparticle with a diameter of 10Å does not . Instead this smaller particle became embedded in the bilayer surface where it could interact with the hydrophilic head groups of the lipid molecules. We also investigate the interaction between a DPPC bilayer and hydrophobic nanoparticles with diameters 10Å to 40Å. These nanoparticles do not undergo the wrapping process; instead they directly penetrate the membrane and embed themselves within the inner hydrophobic core of the bilayers. PMID:26260123

  4. DMS test summary report for the WRAP facility

    SciTech Connect

    Weidert, J.R.

    1997-11-04

    This report documents the functional and integration testing process performed to verify functionality of the Release 1.1, Release 2.0, Release 3.0 and Release 3.1 software for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP) Data Management Systems (DMS) Release 2.

  5. ROOM TEMPERATURE BULK SYNTHESIS OF SILVER NANOCABLES WRAPPED WITH POLYPYRROLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    Wet chemical synthesis of silver cables wrapped with polypyrrole is reported in aqueous media without use of any surfactant/capping agent and/or template. The method employs direct polymerization of pyrrole of an aqueous solution with AgNO3 as an oxidizing agent. The four probe c...

  6. Which uncertainty? Using expert elicitation and expected value of information to design an adaptive program

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Runge, Michael C.; Converse, Sarah J.; Lyons, James E.

    2011-01-01

    Natural resource management is plagued with uncertainty of many kinds, but not all uncertainties are equally important to resolve. The promise of adaptive management is that learning in the short-term will improve management in the long-term; that promise is best kept if the focus of learning is on those uncertainties that most impede achievement of management objectives. In this context, an existing tool of decision analysis, the expected value of perfect information (EVPI), is particularly valuable in identifying the most important uncertainties. Expert elicitation can be used to develop preliminary predictions of management response under a series of hypotheses, as well as prior weights for those hypotheses, and the EVPI can be used to determine how much management could improve if uncertainty was resolved. These methods were applied to management of whooping cranes (Grus americana), an endangered migratory bird that is being reintroduced in several places in North America. The Eastern Migratory Population of whooping cranes had exhibited almost no successful reproduction through 2009. Several dozen hypotheses can be advanced to explain this failure, and many of them lead to very different management responses. An expert panel articulated the hypotheses, provided prior weights for them, developed potential management strategies, and made predictions about the response of the population to each strategy under each hypothesis. Multi-criteria decision analysis identified a preferred strategy in the face of uncertainty, and analysis of the expected value of information identified how informative each strategy could be. These results provide the foundation for design of an adaptive management program.

  7. Science, Uncertainty, and Adaptive Management in Large River Restoration Programs: Trinity River example

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McBain, S.

    2002-12-01

    Following construction of Trinity and Lewiston dams on the upper Trinity River in 1964, dam induced changes to streamflows and sediment regime had severely simplified channel morphology and aquatic habitat downstream of the dams. This habitat change, combined with blocked access to over 100 miles of salmon and steelhead habitat upstream of the dams, caused salmon and steelhead populations to quickly plummet. An instream flow study was initiated in 1984 to address the flow needs to restore the fishery, and this study relied on the Physical Habitat Simulation (PHABSIM) Model to quantify instream flow needs. In 1992, geomorphic and riparian studies were integrated into the instream flow study, with the overall study completed in 1999 (USFWS 1999). This 13-year process continued through three presidential administrations, several agency managers, and many turnovers of the agency technical staff responsible for conducting the study. This process culminated in 1996-1998 when a group of scientists were convened to integrate all the studies and data to produce the final instream flow study document. This 13-year, non-linear process, resulted in many uncertainties that could not be resolved in the short amount of time allowed for completing the instream flow study document. Shortly after completion of the instream flow study document, the Secretary of Interior issued a Record of Decision to implement the recommendations contained in the instream flow study document. The uncertainties encountered as the instream flow study report was prepared were highlighted in the report, and the Record of Decision initiated an Adaptive Environmental Assessment and Management program to address these existing uncertainties and improve future river management. There have been many lessons learned going through this process, and the presentation will summarize: 1)The progression of science used to develop the instream flow study report; 2)How the scientists preparing the report addressed

  8. Towards Motivation-Based Adaptation of Difficulty in E-Learning Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Endler, Anke; Rey, Gunter Daniel; Butz, Martin V.

    2012-01-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate if an e-learning environment may use measurements of the user's current motivation to adapt the level of task difficulty for more effective learning. In the reported study, motivation-based adaptation was applied randomly to collect a wide range of data for different adaptations in a variety of…

  9. Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) for Nondestructive Assay of Transuranic (TRU) Waste at the WRAP Facility

    SciTech Connect

    WILLS, C.E.

    2000-01-06

    This report examines the contributing factors to NDA measurement uncertainty at WRAP The significance of each factor on the TMU is analyzed and a final method is given for determining the TMU for NDA measurements at WRAP. As more data becomes available and WRAP gains in operational experience this report will be reviewed semi annually and updated as necessary.

  10. The Effect of an Adapted Swimming Program on the Performance of an Individual with Kyphosis-Scoliosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dimitrios, Voutsas; Dimitrios, Kokaridas

    2004-01-01

    The purpose of this action research study was to examine the effect of an adapted swimming program in terms of improving the performance and behaviour of an individual with kyphosis-scoliosis, with the use of an individualised education approach. The sample consisted of an adult woman with kyphosis-scoliosis. The pre-swimming phase included a…

  11. Community Adaptation of Youth Accessing Residential Programs or a Home-Based Alternative: Contact with the Law and Delinquent Activities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cameron, Gary; Frensch, Karen; Preyde, Michele; Quosai, Trudy Smit

    2011-01-01

    This article presents the findings from a longitudinal investigation of the prevalence of negative contact with the law for a sample of youth 12-18 months after graduating from residential and intensive children's mental health programming. Results of this study suggest serious community adaptation difficulties face many youth graduating from…

  12. Community Adaptation of Youth Accessing Residential Programs or a Home-Based Alternative: School Attendance and Academic Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frensch, Karen; Cameron, Gary; Preyde, Michele

    2009-01-01

    Caregivers of 210 youth receiving residential treatment (RT) or intensive family services (IFS) in Ontario were interviewed about the long term community adaptation of youth after leaving these programs. School attendance and academic functioning data at admission, discharge, and 12-18 months post-discharge were analyzed to explore predictors of…

  13. Multidimensional Computerized Adaptive Scholastic Aptitude Test Program Used for Grade 9 Students under Different Reviewing Test Conditions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Khunkrai, Naruemon; Sawangboon, Tatsirin; Ketchatturat, Jatuphum

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this research is to study the accurate prediction of comparing test information and evaluation result by multidimensional computerized adaptive scholastic aptitude test program used for grade 9 students under different reviewing test conditions. Grade 9 students of the Secondary Educational Service Area Office in the North-east of…

  14. Cardio Respiratory Adaptations with Long Term Personalized Exercise Program in a T12 Spinal Cord Injured Person

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vasiliadis, Angelo; Christoulas, Kosmas; Evaggelinou, Christina; Vrabas, Ioannis

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the physiological adaptations in cardio respiratory endurance with a personalized exercise program with arm-cranking exercise in a paraplegic person (incomplete T12 spinal cord injury). A 32 year-old man with spinal cord injury (T12) participated in the present study performing 30 minutes arm cranking…

  15. Promoting Social-Emotional Learning in Adolescent Latino ELLs: A Study of the Culturally Adapted "Strong Teens" Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Castro-Olivo, Sara M.

    2014-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of the culturally adapted "Jóvenes Fuertes" ("Strong Teens") Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) program on the social-emotional outcomes of Latino English language learners (ELLs). A quasi-experimental design with random assignment by classrooms was used to assess the intervention's…

  16. Helping General Physical Educators and Adapted Physical Educators Address the Office of Civil Rights Dear Colleague Guidance Letter: Part III--Practitioners and Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Poulin, David; Martinez, David; Aenchbacher, Amy; Aiello, Rocco; Doyle, Mike; Hilgenbrinck, Linda; Busse, Sean; Cappuccio, Jim

    2013-01-01

    In Part III of the feature, physical educators and adapted physical educators offer current best practices as models of implementation for readers. Contributions included are: (1) Answer to the Dear Colleague Letter from the Anchorage School District's Adapted Sport Program (David Poulin); (2) Georgia's Adapted Physical Educators…

  17. Implementing watershed investment programs to restore fire-adapted forests for watershed services

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Springer, A. E.

    2013-12-01

    Payments for ecosystems services and watershed investment programs have created new solutions for restoring upland fire-adapted forests to support downstream surface-water and groundwater uses. Water from upland forests supports not only a significant percentage of the public water supplies in the U.S., but also extensive riparian, aquatic, and groundwater dependent ecosystems. Many rare, endemic, threatened, and endangered species are supported by the surface-water and groundwater generated from the forested uplands. In the Ponderosa pine forests of the Southwestern U.S., post Euro-American settlement forest management practices, coupled with climate change, has significantly impacted watershed functionality by increasing vegetation cover and associated evapotranspiration and decreasing runoff and groundwater recharge. A large Collaborative Forest Landscape Restoration Program project known as the Four Forests Restoration Initiative is developing landscape scale processes to make the forests connected to these watersheds more resilient. However, there are challenges in financing the initial forest treatments and subsequent maintenance treatments while garnering supportive public opinion to forest thinning projects. A solution called the Flagstaff Watershed Protection Project is utilizing City tax dollars collected through a public bond to finance forest treatments. Exit polling from the bond election documented the reasons for the 73 % affirmative vote on the bond measure. These forest treatments have included in their actions restoration of associated ephemeral stream channels and spring ecosystems, but resources still need to be identified for these actions. A statewide strategy for developing additional forest restoration resources outside of the federal financing is being explored by state and local business and governmental leaders. Coordination, synthesis, and modeling supported by a NSF Water Sustainability and Climate project has been instrumental in

  18. Parenting in 2 Worlds: pilot results from a culturally adapted parenting program for urban American Indians.

    PubMed

    Kulis, Stephen; Ayers, Stephanie L; Baker, Tahnee

    2015-02-01

    This study reports the implementation and feasibility of a culturally adapted parenting curriculum, Parenting in 2 Worlds (P2W), which we designed specifically for urban American Indian families by means of community-based participatory research and then pilot tested in three Arizona cities. Data come from matched pre- and post-test surveys completed in 2012 by 75 American Indian parents of adolescents aged 10-17 who participated in the pilot version of P2W. P2W is a 10-workshop program administered twice a week for 5 weeks by trained American Indian community facilitators. Parents completed pre-test surveys during Workshop 1 and post-test surveys 5 weeks later during Workshop 10. Paired t tests assessed changes in parenting outcomes, cultural identity, and child anti-social behavior. Changes from pre- to post-test demonstrated statistically significant improvements in several parenting outcomes (discipline, involvement, self-agency, and supervision), a strengthened sense of ethnic and cultural identity and Native spirituality, and a decrease in the child's anti-social behavior. These results, which show significant preliminary improvements in parenting skills and family functioning, suggest the feasibility of implementing a culturally grounded parenting intervention for urban American Indian parents. PMID:25367804

  19. Parenting in 2 Worlds: Pilot Results from a Culturally Adapted Parenting Program for Urban American Indians

    PubMed Central

    Kulis, Stephen; Ayers, Stephanie L.; Baker, Tahnee

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the implementation and feasibility of a culturally adapted parenting curriculum, Parenting in 2 Worlds (P2W), which we designed specifically for urban American Indian families by means of community-based participatory research and then pilot tested in three Arizona cities. Data come from matched pre- and post-test surveys completed in 2012 by 75 American Indian parents of adolescents aged 10–17 who participated in the pilot version of P2W. P2W is a 10-workshop program administered twice a week for five weeks by trained American Indian community facilitators. Parents completed pretest surveys during Workshop 1 and post-test surveys five weeks later during Workshop 10. Paired t tests assessed changes in parenting outcomes, cultural identity, and child anti-social behavior. Changes from pre- to post-test demonstrated statistically significant improvements in several parenting outcomes (discipline, involvement, self-agency, and supervision), a strengthened sense of ethnic and cultural identity and Native spirituality, and a decrease in the child’s anti-social behavior. These results, which show significant if preliminary improvements in parenting skills and family functioning, suggest the feasibility of implementing a culturally grounded parenting intervention for urban American Indian parents. PMID:25367804

  20. Policy iteration adaptive dynamic programming algorithm for discrete-time nonlinear systems.

    PubMed

    Liu, Derong; Wei, Qinglai

    2014-03-01

    This paper is concerned with a new discrete-time policy iteration adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) method for solving the infinite horizon optimal control problem of nonlinear systems. The idea is to use an iterative ADP technique to obtain the iterative control law, which optimizes the iterative performance index function. The main contribution of this paper is to analyze the convergence and stability properties of policy iteration method for discrete-time nonlinear systems for the first time. It shows that the iterative performance index function is nonincreasingly convergent to the optimal solution of the Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman equation. It is also proven that any of the iterative control laws can stabilize the nonlinear systems. Neural networks are used to approximate the performance index function and compute the optimal control law, respectively, for facilitating the implementation of the iterative ADP algorithm, where the convergence of the weight matrices is analyzed. Finally, the numerical results and analysis are presented to illustrate the performance of the developed method. PMID:24807455

  1. Adapting and evaluating a social cognitive remediation program for schizophrenia in Arabic.

    PubMed

    Gohar, Sherif M; Hamdi, Emad; El Ray, Lamis A; Horan, William P; Green, Michael F

    2013-08-01

    Although growing evidence supports the efficacy of social cognitive training interventions for schizophrenia, nearly all studies to date have been conducted in Westernized countries. In the current study, we translated and adapted an existing social cognitive skills training (SCST) program into Arabic and conducted a preliminary efficacy evaluation in schizophrenia outpatients in Egypt. Twenty-two patients were randomized to 16 sessions of group-based SCST and 20 were randomized to a format- and time-matched illness management training control condition. Pre- and post-intervention assessments included a primary social cognition outcome measure that assessed four branches of emotional intelligence and a battery of neurocognitive tests. The SCST group demonstrated significant treatment effects on total emotional intelligence scores (F=24.31, p<.001), as well as the sub-areas of Identifying Emotions (F=11.77, p<.001) and Managing Emotions (F=23.27, p<.001), compared with those in the control condition. There were no treatment benefits for neurocognition for either condition, and both interventions were well-tolerated by patients. These initial results demonstrate the feasibility of implementing social cognitive interventions in different cultural settings with relatively minor modifications. The findings are encouraging regarding further efforts to maximize the benefits of social cognitive interventions internationally. PMID:23756297

  2. Space adaptation syndrome: Incidence and operational implications for the space transportation system program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.; Reschke, M. F.; Vanderploeg, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Better methods for the prediction, prevention, and treatment of the space adaptation syndome (SAS) were developed. A systematic, long range program of operationally oriented data collection on all individuals flying space shuttle missions was initiated. Preflight activities include the use of a motion experience questionnaire, laboratory tests of susceptibility to motion sickness induced by Coriolis stimuli and determinations of antimotion sickness drug efficacy and side effects. During flight, each crewmember is required to provide a daily report of symptom status, use of medications, and other vestibular related sensations. Additional data are obtained postflight. During the first nine shuttle missions, the reported incidence of SAS has been48%. Self-induced head motions and unusual visual orientation attitudes appear to be the principal triggering stimuli. Antimotion sickness medication, was of limited therapeutic value. Complete recovery from symptoms occurred by mission day three or four. Also of relevance is the lack of a statistically significant correlation between the ground based Coriolis test and SAS. The episodes of SAS have resulted in no impact to shuttle mission objectives and, no significant impact to mission timelines.

  3. Fair Energy Scheduling for Vehicle-to-Grid Networks Using Adaptive Dynamic Programming.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shengli; Zhong, Weifeng; Xie, Kan; Yu, Rong; Zhang, Yan

    2016-08-01

    Research on the smart grid is being given enormous supports worldwide due to its great significance in solving environmental and energy crises. Electric vehicles (EVs), which are powered by clean energy, are adopted increasingly year by year. It is predictable that the huge charge load caused by high EV penetration will have a considerable impact on the reliability of the smart grid. Therefore, fair energy scheduling for EV charge and discharge is proposed in this paper. By using the vehicle-to-grid technology, the scheduler controls the electricity loads of EVs considering fairness in the residential distribution network. We propose contribution-based fairness, in which EVs with high contributions have high priorities to obtain charge energy. The contribution value is defined by both the charge/discharge energy and the timing of the action. EVs can achieve higher contribution values when discharging during the load peak hours. However, charging during this time will decrease the contribution values seriously. We formulate the fair energy scheduling problem as an infinite-horizon Markov decision process. The methodology of adaptive dynamic programming is employed to maximize the long-term fairness by processing online network training. The numerical results illustrate that the proposed EV energy scheduling is able to mitigate and flatten the peak load in the distribution network. Furthermore, contribution-based fairness achieves a fast recovery of EV batteries that have deeply discharged and guarantee fairness in the full charge time of all EVs. PMID:26930694

  4. Building a conceptual framework to culturally adapt health promotion and prevention programs at the deep structural level.

    PubMed

    Wang-Schweig, Meme; Kviz, Frederick J; Altfeld, Susan J; Miller, Arlene M; Miller, Brenda A

    2014-07-01

    The debate on the effectiveness and merit for the amount of time, effort, and resources to culturally adapt health promotion and prevention programs continues. This may be due, in large part, to the lack of theory in commonly used methods to match programmatic content and delivery to the culture of a population, particularly at the deep structural level. This paper asserts that prior to the cultural adaptation of prevention programs, it is necessary to first develop a conceptual framework. We propose a multiphase approach to address key challenges in the science of cultural adaptation by first identifying and exploring relevant cultural factors that may affect the targeted health-related behavior prior to proceeding through steps of a stage model. The first phase involves developing an underlying conceptual framework that integrates cultural factors to ground this process. The second phase employs the different steps of a stage model. For Phase I of our approach, we offer four key steps and use our research study as an example of how these steps were applied to build a framework for the cultural adaptation of a family-based intervention to prevent adolescent alcohol use, Guiding Good Choices (GGC), to Chinese American families. We then provide a summary of the preliminary evidence from a few key relationships that were tested among our sample with the greater purpose of discussing how these findings might be used to culturally adapt GGC. PMID:24396122

  5. Effects of an adapted physical activity program in a group of elderly subjects with flexed posture: clinical and instrumental assessment

    PubMed Central

    Benedetti, Maria Grazia; Berti, Lisa; Presti, Chiara; Frizziero, Antonio; Giannini, Sandro

    2008-01-01

    Background Flexed posture commonly increases with age and is related to musculoskeletal impairment and reduced physical performance. The purpose of this clinical study was to systematically compare the effects of a physical activity program that specifically address the flexed posture that marks a certain percentage of elderly individuals with a non specific exercise program for 3 months. Methods Participants were randomly divided into two groups: one followed an Adapted Physical Activity program for flexed posture and the other one completed a non-specific physical activity protocol for the elderly. A multidimensional clinical assessment was performed at baseline and at 3 months including anthropometric data, clinical profile, measures of musculoskeletal impairment and disability. The instrumental assessment of posture was realized using a stereophotogrammetric system and a specific biomechanical model designed to describe the reciprocal position of the body segments on the sagittal plane in a upright posture. Results The Adapted Physical Activity program determined a significant improvement in several key parameters of the multidimensional assessment in comparison to the non-specific protocol: decreased occiput-to-wall distance, greater lower limb range of motion, better flexibility of pectoralis, hamstrings and hip flexor muscles, increased spine extensor muscles strength. Stereophotogrammetric analysis confirmed a reduced protrusion of the head and revealed a reduction in compensative postural adaptations to flexed posture characterized by knee flexion and ankle dorsiflexion in the participants of the specific program. Conclusion The Adapted Physical Activity program for flexed posture significantly improved postural alignment and musculoskeletal impairment of the elderly. The stereophotogrammetric evaluation of posture was useful to measure the global postural alignment and especially to analyse the possible compensatory strategies at lower limbs in flexed

  6. Adaptation of an Evidence-Based Colorectal Cancer Screening Program Using the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research

    PubMed Central

    Esplin, Andrea; Baldwin, Laura-Mae

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Federally Qualified Health Centers (FQHCs) provide primary care to low-income and uninsured patients in the United States. FQHCs are required to report annual measurements and provide evidence of improvement for quality measures; effective methods to improve quality in FQHCs are needed. Systems of Support (SOS) is a proactive, mail-based, colorectal cancer screening program that was developed and tested in an integrated health care system. The objective of this study was to adapt SOS for use in an FQHC system, guided by the Consolidated Framework for Implementation Research (CFIR). Methods We conducted qualitative semi-structured interviews in 2014 with organizational leadership, medical staff, and nursing staff to identify facilitators of and barriers to implementation of SOS in an FQHC system. The interview guide was based on the CFIR framework. Interview transcripts were analyzed using Template Analysis. We adapted SOS and planned implementation strategies to address identified barriers. Results Facilitators of implementation of SOS were previous quality improvement experience and engagement of clinic and administrative leadership. Barriers to implementation were a more diverse patient population, a decentralized administrative structure, and communication challenges throughout the organization. Program adaptations focused on patient instructions and educational materials as well as elimination of follow-up phone calls. Implementation strategies included early and frequent engagement with organizational leadership and a smaller pilot program before organization-wide implementation. Conclusions Use of CFIR identified facilitators of and barriers to implementation of the evidence-based colorectal cancer screening program. Program adaptations and implementation strategies based on this study may generalize to other FQHC systems that are considering implementation of a proactive, mail-based colorectal cancer screening program. PMID:26632954

  7. Surprise and Opportunity for Learning in Grand Canyon: the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melis, T. S.; Walters, C. J.; Korman, J.

    2013-12-01

    With a focus on resources of the Colorado River ecosystem downstream of Glen Canyon Dam in Glen Canyon National Recreation Area (GCNRA) and Grand Canyon National Park (GCNP) of northern Arizona, the Glen Canyon Dam Adaptive Management Program has evaluated experimental flow and nonflow policy tests since 1990. Flow experiments have consisted of a variety of water releases from the dam within pre-existing annual downstream delivery agreements. The daily experimental dam operation, termed the Modified Low Fluctuating Flow (MLFF), implemented in 1996 to increase daily low flows and decrease daily peaks were intended to limit daily flow range to conserve tributary sand inputs and improve navigation among other objectives, including hydropower energy. Other flow tests have included controlled floods with some larger releases bypassing the dam's hydropower plant to rebuild and maintain eroded sandbars in GCNP. Experimental daily hydropeaking tests beyond MLFF have also been evaluated for managing the exotic recreational rainbow trout fishery in the dam's GCNRA tailwater. Experimental nonflow policies, such as physical removal of exotic fish below the tailwater, and experimental translocation of endangered native humpback chub from spawning habitats in the Little Colorado River (the largest natal origin site for chub in the basin) to other tributaries within GCNP have also been monitored. None of these large-scale field experiments has yet produced unambiguous results in terms of management prescriptions, owing to inadequate monitoring programs and confounding of treatment effects with effects of ongoing natural changes; most notably, a persistent warming of the river resulting from reduced storage in the dam's reservoir after 2003. But there have been several surprising results relative to predictions from models developed to identify monitoring needs and evaluate experimental design options at the start of the adaptive ecosystem assessment and management program in 1997

  8. Effects of an adapted physical activity program on psychophysical health in elderly women

    PubMed Central

    Battaglia, Giuseppe; Bellafiore, Marianna; Alesi, Marianna; Paoli, Antonio; Bianco, Antonino; Palma, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Background Several studies have shown the positive effects of adapted physical activity (APA) on physical and mental health (MH) during the lifetime. The aim of this study was to assess the effectiveness of a specific APA intervention program in the improvement of the health-related quality of life (QOL) and functional condition of spine in elderly women. Methods Thirty women were recruited from a senior center and randomly assigned to two groups: control group (CG; age: 69.69±7.94 years, height: 1.57±0.06 m, weight: 68.42±8.18 kg, body mass index [BMI]: 27.88±2.81) and trained group (TG; age: 68.35±6.04 years, height: 1.55±0.05 m, weight: 64.78±10.16 kg, BMI: 26.98±3.07). The APA program was conducted for 8 weeks, with two training sessions/week. CG did not perform any physical activity during the study. Spinal angles were evaluated by SpinalMouse® (Idiag, Volkerswill, Switzerland); health-related QOL was evaluated by SF-36 Health Survey, which assesses physical component summary (PCS-36), mental component summary (MCS-36), and eight subscales: physical functioning, role-physical, bodily pain, general health perception, role-emotional, social functioning, vitality, and MH. All measures were recorded before and after the experimental period. Results In TG, compared to CG, the two-way analysis of variance with repeated measures with Bonferroni post hoc test showed a relevant improvement in lumbar spinal angle (°) and in SF-36 outcomes after the intervention period. We showed a significant increase in physical functioning, bodily pain, and MH subscales and in PCS-36 and MCS-36 scores in TG compared to CG. In particular, from baseline to posttest, we found that in TG, the PCS-36 and MCS-36 scores increased by 13.20% and 11.64%, respectively. Conclusion We believe that an 8-week APA intervention program is able to improve psychophysical heath in elderly people. During the aging process, a dynamic lifestyle, including regular physical activity, is a crucial

  9. Increasing Adaptive Responses and Reducing Finger Mouthing in an Adolescent with Multiple Disabilities: Evaluation of an Upgraded Microswitch-Cluster Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Cingolani, Eleonora; D'Oro, Lega F.

    2008-01-01

    We evaluated an upgraded version of a microswitch-cluster program used for promoting adaptive foot and head responses and reducing finger mouthing with a boy with multiple disabilities. The boy had been exposed to an early version of the program, which ensured that positive stimulation followed only adaptive responses occurring free from finger…

  10. A Microswitch-Cluster Program to Foster Adaptive Responses and Head Control in Students with Multiple Disabilities: Replication and Validation Assessment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Gatti, Michela; Manfredi, Francesco; Megna, Gianfranco; La Martire, Maria L.; Tota, Alessia; Smaldone, Angela; Groeneweg, Jop

    2008-01-01

    A program relying on microswitch clusters (i.e., combinations of microswitches) and preferred stimuli was recently developed to foster adaptive responses and head control in persons with multiple disabilities. In the last version of this program, preferred stimuli (a) are scheduled for adaptive responses occurring in combination with head control…

  11. Partial wrapping and spontaneous endocytosis of spherical nanoparticles by tensionless lipid membranes.

    PubMed

    Spangler, Eric J; Upreti, Sudhir; Laradji, Mohamed

    2016-01-28

    Computer simulations of an implicit-solvent particle-based model are performed to investigate the interactions between small spherical nanoparticles and tensionless lipid bilayers. We found that nanoparticles are either unbound, wrapped by the bilayer, or endocytosed. The degree of wrapping increases with increasing the adhesion strength. The transition adhesion strength between the unbound and partially wrapped states decreases as the nanoparticle diameter is increased. We also observed that the transition adhesion strength between the wrapped states and endocytosis state decreases with increasing the nanoparticle diameter. The partial wrapping of the nanoparticles by the tensionless bilayer is explained by an elastic theory which accounts for the fact that the interaction between the nanoparticle and the bilayer extends beyond the contact region. The theory predicts that for small nanoparticles, the wrapping angle increases continuously with increasing the adhesion strength. However, for relatively large nanoparticles, the wrapping angle exhibits a discontinuity between weakly and strongly wrapped states. The size of the gap in the wrapping angle between the weakly wrapped and strongly wrapped states increases with decreasing the range of nanoparticle-bilayer interaction. PMID:26827231

  12. Partial wrapping and spontaneous endocytosis of spherical nanoparticles by tensionless lipid membranes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangler, Eric J.; Upreti, Sudhir; Laradji, Mohamed

    2016-01-01

    Computer simulations of an implicit-solvent particle-based model are performed to investigate the interactions between small spherical nanoparticles and tensionless lipid bilayers. We found that nanoparticles are either unbound, wrapped by the bilayer, or endocytosed. The degree of wrapping increases with increasing the adhesion strength. The transition adhesion strength between the unbound and partially wrapped states decreases as the nanoparticle diameter is increased. We also observed that the transition adhesion strength between the wrapped states and endocytosis state decreases with increasing the nanoparticle diameter. The partial wrapping of the nanoparticles by the tensionless bilayer is explained by an elastic theory which accounts for the fact that the interaction between the nanoparticle and the bilayer extends beyond the contact region. The theory predicts that for small nanoparticles, the wrapping angle increases continuously with increasing the adhesion strength. However, for relatively large nanoparticles, the wrapping angle exhibits a discontinuity between weakly and strongly wrapped states. The size of the gap in the wrapping angle between the weakly wrapped and strongly wrapped states increases with decreasing the range of nanoparticle-bilayer interaction.

  13. Polyvinyl chloride meat-wrapping film study. Final report

    SciTech Connect

    Vandervort, R.

    1988-01-01

    As a result of worker complaints in the Baltimore, Maryland area, potential health hazards associated with the use of polyvinyl-chloride film for wrapping meat were reviewed. Fumes generated during the meat-wrapping process were causing concern among the workers as they experienced respiratory irritation and distress. It appeared that only some of the meat wrappers experienced difficulty, only some of the rolls of film-produced irritations in the affected workers, and affected workers had prior histories of respiratory difficulties. Fumes were generated during hot-wire film cutting. The amount of fume generated depended significantly on the care taken during the operation. If the dispensing machines were improperly adjusted, large amounts of fumes could be obtained during the cutting process. The author concludes that the amounts of these chemicals released during this operation does not constitute a health hazard to the employees. It may be necessary, however, to remove persons with prior respiratory irritation from this particular job location.

  14. WRAP Module 1 data management system (DMS) software design description (SDD)

    SciTech Connect

    Talmage, P.A.

    1995-03-17

    The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS) System Design Description (SDD) describes the logical and physical architecture of the system. The WRAP 1 DMS SDD formally partitions the elements of the system described in the WRAP 1 DMS Software requirements specification into design objects and describes the key properties and relationships among the design objects and interfaces with external systems such as the WRAP Plant Control System (PCS). The WRAP 1 DMS SDD can be thought of as a detailed blueprint for implementation activities. The design descriptions contained within this document will describe, in detail, the software products that will be developed to assist the Project W-026, Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1, in their management functions. The WRAP 1 DMS is required to collect, store, and report data related to certification, tracking, packaging, repackaging, processing, and shipment of waste processed or stored at the WRAP 1 facility.

  15. CEL Working procedures for WRAP 2A formulation development test

    SciTech Connect

    Duchsherer, M.J.

    1994-08-02

    The WRAP 2A facility will encapsulate retrieved, stored, and newly generated contact-handled mixed low level waste (MLLW) into 55-500 gal cementitous forms. Standardized test procedures will be required to facilitate this process. Cementitous specimens will be prepared from simulated drum wastes and will be tested in the Chemical Engineering Laboratory using the laboratory operating/working procedures encorporated into this document.

  16. External aortic wrap for repair of type 1 endoleak☆

    PubMed Central

    Dean, Anastasia; Yap, Swee Leong; Bhamidipaty, Venu; Pond, Franklin

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Type 1 endoleak is a rare complication after endovascular abdominal aortic aneurysm repair (EVAR) with a reported frequency up to 2.88%. It is a major risk factor for aneurysmal enlargement and rupture. PRESENTATION OF CASE We present a case of a 68 year old gentleman who was found to have a proximal type 1 endoleak with loss of graft wall apposition on routine surveillance imaging post-EVAR. An initial attempt at endovascular repair was unsuccessful. Given the patient's multiple medical co-morbidities, which precluded the possibility of conventional graft explantation and open repair, we performed a novel surgical technique which did not require aortic cross-clamping. A double-layered Dacron wrap was secured around the infra-renal aorta with Prolene sutures, effectively hoisting the posterior bulge to allow wall to graft apposition and excluding the endoleak. Post-operative CT angiogram showed resolution of the endoleak and a stable sac size. DISCUSSION Several anatomical factors need to be considered when this technique is proposed including aortic neck angulation, position of lumbar arteries and peri-aortic venous anatomy. While an external wrap technique has been investigated sporadically for vascular aneurysms, to our knowledge there is only one similar case in the literature. CONCLUSION Provided certain anatomical features are present, an external aortic wrap is a useful and successful option to manage type 1 endoleak in high-risk patients who are unsuitable for aortic clamping. PMID:25217878

  17. Universal critical wrapping probabilities in the canonical ensemble

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Hao; Deng, Youjin

    2015-09-01

    Universal dimensionless quantities, such as Binder ratios and wrapping probabilities, play an important role in the study of critical phenomena. We study the finite-size scaling behavior of the wrapping probability for the Potts model in the random-cluster representation, under the constraint that the total number of occupied bonds is fixed, so that the canonical ensemble applies. We derive that, in the limit L → ∞, the critical values of the wrapping probability are different from those of the unconstrained model, i.e. the model in the grand-canonical ensemble, but still universal, for systems with 2yt - d > 0 where yt = 1 / ν is the thermal renormalization exponent and d is the spatial dimension. Similar modifications apply to other dimensionless quantities, such as Binder ratios. For systems with 2yt - d ≤ 0, these quantities share same critical universal values in the two ensembles. It is also derived that new finite-size corrections are induced. These findings apply more generally to systems in the canonical ensemble, e.g. the dilute Potts model with a fixed total number of vacancies. Finally, we formulate an efficient cluster-type algorithm for the canonical ensemble, and confirm these predictions by extensive simulations.

  18. Cross-cultural adaptation and evaluation of a home-based program for alcohol use prevention among urban youth: the "Slick Tracy Home Team Program".

    PubMed

    Komro, Kelli A; Perry, Cheryl L; Veblen-Mortenson, Sara; Farbakhsh, Kian; Kugler, Kari C; Alfano, Karen A; Dudovitz, Bonnie S; Williams, Carolyn L; Jones-Webb, Rhonda

    2006-03-01

    The current study describes the extensive cross-cultural adaptation of a brief home-based alcohol prevention program for racially and ethnically diverse sixth grade students and their families, using a randomized controlled trial design involving 60 public schools in the city of Chicago (N = 3,623 students). The adapted program achieved high participation levels (73%) overall, as well as in single parent families, non-English homes, and low-income students, among other at risk groups. Lower levels of factors associated with the onset of alcohol use (i.e., normative expectations and outcome expectations) were achieved in the intervention group compared to the control group. However, no differences were observed for several other protective factors or alcohol use. PMID:16502143

  19. Design and Evaluation of the User-Adapted Program Scheduling system based on Bayesian Network and Constraint Satisfaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Iwasaki, Hirotoshi; Sega, Shinichiro; Hiraishi, Hironori; Mizoguchi, Fumio

    In recent years, lots of music content can be stored in mobile computing devices, such as a portable digital music player and a car navigation system. Moreover, various information content like news or traffic information can be acquired always anywhere by a cellular communication and a wireless LAN. However, usability issues arise from the simple interfaces of mobile computing devices. Moreover, retrieving and selecting such content poses safety issues, especially while driving. Thus, it is important for the mobile system to recommend content automatically adapted to user's preference and situation. In this paper, we present the user-adapted program scheduling that generates sequences of content (Program) suiting user's preference and situation based on the Bayesian network and the Constraint Satisfaction Problem (CSP) technique. We also describe the design and evaluation of its realization system, the Personal Program Producer (P3). First, preference such as a genre ratio of content in a program is learned as a Bayesian network model using simple operations such as a skip behavior. A model including each content tends to become large-scale. In order to make it small, we present the model separation method that carries out losslessly compression of the model. Using the model, probabilistic distributions of preference to generate constraints are inferred. Finally satisfying the constraints, a program is produced. This kind of CSP has an issue of which the number of variables is not fixedness. In order to make it variable, we propose a method using metavariables. To evaluate the above methods, we applied them to P3 on a car navigation system. User evaluations helped us clarify that the P3 can produce the program that a user prefers and adapt it to the user.

  20. Water Reserves Program. An adaptation strategy to balance water in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez Perez, M.; Barrios, E.; Salinas-Rodriguez, S.; Wickel, B.; Villon, R. A.

    2013-05-01

    -allocation takes place. The strategy is to identify and protect basins with an availability of water that is close to their natural flow regime and that also have a high conservation value (based on prior national conservation priority definitions such as protected areas, and biodiversity conservation gap analyses) in order to implement legal restrictions on water resource development. With such protection, these systems will be best positioned to adjust and respond to water shortages, and regime shifts. To date, 189 basins around the country were identified as potential water reserves. The next step will be the nomination of these water reserves to be integrated in the National Water Reserves Program. This program forms the core of the official Mexican government adaptation strategy towards climate prepared water management, which recognizes that water reserves are the buffer society needs to face uncertainty, and reduce water scarcity risk. The development of activities that alter the natural flow regime such as dams and levees are closely examined, and would potentially be restricted.

  1. Water Reserves Program. An adaptation strategy to prevent imbalance of water in nature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salinas-Rodriguez, S. A.; López Pérez, M.; Barrios Ordóñez, J.; Wickel, B.; Villón Bracamonte, R. A.

    2013-12-01

    allocated, and where the flow regime is then protected before over-allocation takes place. The strategy has been to identify and protect basins with an availability of water that is close to their natural flow regime and that also have a high conservation value (based on prior national conservation priority definitions such as protected areas, and biodiversity conservation gap analyses) in order to implement legal restrictions on water resource development. With such protection, these systems will be best positioned to adjust and respond to water shortages, and regime shifts. To date, 189 basins around the country were identified as potential water reserves. The next step will be the nomination of these water reserves to be integrated in the National Water Reserves Program. This program forms the core of the official Mexican government adaptation strategy towards climate prepared water management, which recognizes that water reserves are the buffer society needs to face uncertainty, imbalance of the man-made, global changes, and thus to reduce water scarcity risk. The development of activities that alter the natural flow regime such as dams and levees are closely examined, and would potentially be restricted.

  2. Promoting social-emotional learning in adolescent Latino ELLs: a study of the culturally adapted Strong Teens program.

    PubMed

    Castro-Olivo, Sara M

    2014-12-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of the culturally adapted Jóvenes Fuertes (Strong Teens) Social-Emotional Learning (SEL) program on the social-emotional outcomes of Latino English language learners (ELLs). A quasi-experimental design with random assignment by classrooms was used to assess the intervention's effects on students' knowledge of SEL and resiliency. A sample of 102 Spanish-dominant Latino ELLs enrolled in middle or high school participated in this study. The results indicated significant intervention effects on SEL knowledge and social-emotional resiliency. The findings are discussed in terms of their implications for preventive, culturally responsive SEL programs in school settings. PMID:24708282

  3. WRAP Module 1 sampling strategy and waste characterization alternatives study

    SciTech Connect

    Bergeson, C.L.

    1994-09-30

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1 Facility is designed to examine, process, certify, and ship drums and boxes of solid wastes that have a surface dose equivalent of less than 200 mrem/h. These wastes will include low-level and transuranic wastes that are retrievably stored in the 200 Area burial grounds and facilities in addition to newly generated wastes. Certification of retrievably stored wastes processing in WRAP 1 is required to meet the waste acceptance criteria for onsite treatment and disposal of low-level waste and mixed low-level waste and the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant Waste Acceptance Criteria for the disposal of TRU waste. In addition, these wastes will need to be certified for packaging in TRUPACT-II shipping containers. Characterization of the retrievably stored waste is needed to support the certification process. Characterization data will be obtained from historical records, process knowledge, nondestructive examination nondestructive assay, visual inspection of the waste, head-gas sampling, and analysis of samples taken from the waste containers. Sample characterization refers to the method or methods that are used to test waste samples for specific analytes. The focus of this study is the sample characterization needed to accurately identify the hazardous and radioactive constituents present in the retrieved wastes that will be processed in WRAP 1. In addition, some sampling and characterization will be required to support NDA calculations and to provide an over-check for the characterization of newly generated wastes. This study results in the baseline definition of WRAP 1 sampling and analysis requirements and identifies alternative methods to meet these requirements in an efficient and economical manner.

  4. Calibrations, torsion classes, and wrapped M-branes

    SciTech Connect

    Fayyazuddin, Ansar; Husain, Tasneem Zehra

    2006-05-15

    The present work has two goals. The first is to complete the classification of geometries in terms of torsion classes of M-branes wrapping cycles of a Calabi-Yau manifold. The second goal is to give insight into the physical meaning of the torsion class constraints. We accomplish both tasks by defining new energy minimizing calibrations in M-brane backgrounds. When fluxes are turned on, it is these calibrations that are relevant, rather than those which had previously been defined in the context of purely geometric backgrounds.

  5. Germanium wrap-around photodetectors on Silicon photonics.

    PubMed

    Going, Ryan; Seok, Tae Joon; Loo, Jodi; Hsu, Kyle; Wu, Ming C

    2015-05-01

    We present a novel waveguide coupling scheme where a germanium diode grown via rapid melt growth is wrapped around a silicon waveguide. A 4 fF PIN photodiode is demonstrated with 0.95 A/W responsivity at 1550 nm, 6 nA dark current, and nearly 9 GHz bandwidth. Devices with shorter intrinsic region exhibit higher bandwidth (30 GHz) and slightly lower responsivity (0.7 A/W). An NPN phototransistor is also demonstrated using the same design with 14 GHz f(T). PMID:25969287

  6. Wrapping interactions at strong coupling: The giant magnon

    SciTech Connect

    Janik, Romuald A.; Lukowski, Tomasz

    2007-12-15

    We derive generalized Luescher formulas for finite size corrections in a theory with a general dispersion relation. For the AdS{sub 5}xS{sup 5} superstring these formulas encode leading wrapping interaction effects. We apply the generalized {mu}-term formula to calculate finite size corrections to the dispersion relation of the giant magnon at strong coupling. The result exactly agrees with the classical string computation of Arutyunov, Frolov, and Zamaklar. The agreement involved a Borel resummation of all even loop orders of the BES/BHL dressing factor thus providing a strong consistency check for the choice of the dressing factor.

  7. Evaluating an Adaptive and Interactive mHealth Smoking Cessation and Medication Adherence Program: A Randomized Pilot Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Anderson, Melissa L; Bradley, Katharine; An, Lawrence C; Catz, Sheryl L

    2016-01-01

    Background Mobile health (mHealth) interventions hold great promise for helping smokers quit since these programs can have wide reach and facilitate access to comprehensive, interactive, and adaptive treatment content. However, the feasibility, acceptability, and effectiveness of these programs remain largely untested. Objective To assess feasibility and acceptability of the My Mobile Advice Program (MyMAP) smoking cessation program and estimate its effects on smoking cessation and medication adherence to inform future research planning. Methods Sixty-six smokers ready to quit were recruited from a large regional health care system and randomized to one of two mHealth programs: (1) standard self-help including psychoeducational materials and guidance how to quit smoking or (2) an adaptive and interactive program consisting of the same standard mHealth self-help content as controls received plus a) real-time, adaptively tailored advice for managing nicotine withdrawal symptoms and medication side-effects and b) asynchronous secure messaging with a cessation counselor. Participants in both arms were also prescribed a 12-week course of varenicline. Follow-up assessments were conducted at 2 weeks post-target quit date (TQD), 3 months post-TQD, and 5 months post-TQD. Indices of program feasibility and acceptability included acceptability ratings, utilization metrics including use of each MyMAP program component (self-help content, secure messaging, and adaptively tailored advice), and open-ended feedback from participants. Smoking abstinence and medication adherence were also assessed to estimate effects on these treatment outcomes. Results Utilization data indicated the MyMAP program was actively used, with higher mean program log-ins by experimental than control participants (10.6 vs 2.7, P<.001). The majority of experimental respondents thought the MyMAP program could help other people quit smoking (22/24, 92%) and consistently take their stop-smoking medication (17

  8. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    PubMed Central

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence—favorably evaluated in the West—for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The adaptation process was theory-driven and covered several key issues of cultural adaptation. We considered the importance of interpersonal relationships and family in China and cultural notions of health. Using an evidence-based treatment protocol originally designed for Western HIV-positive patients, we developed an 11-step Chinese Life-Steps program with an additional culture-specific intervention option. We describe in detail how the cultural elements were incorporated into the intervention and put into practice at each stage. Clinical considerations are also outlined and followed by two case examples that are provided to illustrate our application of the intervention. Finally, we discuss practical and research issues and limitations emerging from our field experiments in a HIV clinic in Beijing. The intervention was tailored to address both universal and culturally specific barriers to adherence and is readily applicable to generalized clinical settings. This evidence-based intervention provides a case example of the process of adapting behavioral interventions to culturally diverse communities with limited resources. PMID:23667305

  9. Adapting Computer Programming Self-Efficacy Scale and Engineering Students' Self-Efficacy Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Korkmaz, Özgen; Altun, Halis

    2014-01-01

    Students might have different type and different level of perceptions: Positive or negative perceptions on programming; a perception on benefit of programming, perceptions related to difficulties of programming process etc. The perception of student on their own competence is defined as self-efficacy. Based on the discussions reported in…

  10. Estimation of an Examinee's Ability in the Web-Based Computerized Adaptive Testing Program IRT-CAT

    PubMed Central

    Park, Jung-Ho; Park, In-Yong

    2006-01-01

    We developed a program to estimate an examinee s ability in order to provide freely available access to a web-based computerized adaptive testing (CAT) program. We used PHP and Java Script as the program languages, PostgresSQL as the database management system on an Apache web server and Linux as the operating system. A system which allows for user input and searching within inputted items and creates tests was constructed. We performed an ability estimation on each test based on a Rasch model and 2- or 3-parametric logistic models. Our system provides an algorithm for a web-based CAT, replacing previous personal computer-based ones, and makes it possible to estimate an examinee's ability immediately at the end of test. PMID:19223996

  11. Effect of the Adapted NASA Mission X International Child Fitness Program on Young Children and their Parents in South Korea

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Min, Jungwon; Kim, Gilsook; Lim, Hyunjung; Carvajal, Nubia A.; Lloyd, Charles W.; Wang, Youfa; Reeves, Katherine

    2015-01-01

    Obesity has become a global epidemic. Childhood obesity is global public health concern including in South Korea where 16.2% of boys and 9.9% of girls are overweight or obese in 2011. Effective and sustainable intervention programs are needed for prevention of childhood obesity. Obesity prevention programs for young children may have a greater intervention effect than in older children. The NASA Mission X: Train Like an Astronaut (MX) program was developed to promote children's exercise and healthy eating by tapping into their excitement for training like an astronaut. This study aimed to examine the feasibility and effectiveness of the adapted NASA MX intervention in promoting PA in young children and in improving parents' related perspectives.

  12. Effects of a Military Parenting Program on Parental Distress and Suicidal Ideation: After Deployment Adaptive Parenting Tools.

    PubMed

    Gewirtz, Abigail H; DeGarmo, David S; Zamir, Osnat

    2016-04-01

    Few studies have examined whether parenting prevention programs might mitigate risk for suicidality in parents, yet parent suicidality is a strong risk factor for offspring suicidality. We report results from a randomized controlled trial of a parenting program for deployed National Guard and Reserve families with a school-aged child. Intent-to-treat analyses showed that random assignment to the parenting program (ADAPT) was associated with improved parenting locus of control (LOC). Improved parenting LOC was concurrently associated with strengthened emotion regulation which predicted reductions in psychological distress and suicidal ideation at 12 months postbaseline. Results are discussed in the context of ongoing efforts to reduce suicide rates in military populations. PMID:27094107

  13. User's guide for the PWR LOCA analysis capability of the WRAP-EM system

    SciTech Connect

    Beranek, F; Gregory, M V

    1980-02-01

    The Water Reactor Analysis Package (WRAP) has been expanded to provide the capability to analyze loss-of-coolant accidents (LOCAs) in both pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and boiling water reactors (BWRs) by using evaluation models (EMs). The input specifications for modules in the WRAP-EM system are presented in this document along with the JOSHUA input templates. This document, along with the WRAP user's guide, provides a step-by-step procedure for setting up a PWR data base for the WRAP-EM system. 12 refs.

  14. Phase wrapping of epicyclic perturbations in the Wobbly Galaxy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de la Vega, Alexander; Quillen, Alice C.; Carlin, Jeffrey L.; Chakrabarti, Sukanya; D'Onghia, Elena

    2015-11-01

    We use test-particle integrations to show that epicyclic motions excited by a pericentre passage of a dwarf galaxy could account for bulk vertical velocity streaming motions recently observed in the Galactic stellar disc near the Sun. We use fixed potential test-particle integrations to isolate the role of phase wrapping of epicyclic perturbations from bending and breathing waves or modes, which require self-gravity to oscillate. Perturbations from a fairly massive Sagittarius dwarf galaxy, Md ˜ 2.5 × 1010 M⊙, are required to account for the size of the observed streaming motions from its orbital pericentre approximately a Gyr ago. A previous passage of the dwarf through the Galactic disc approximately 2.2 Gyr ago (with a then more massive dwarf galaxy) is less effective. If phase wrapping of epicyclic perturbations is responsible for stellar streaming motions in the Galactic disc, then there should be variations in velocity gradients on scales of a few kpc in the vicinity of the Sun.

  15. A clinical evaluation of bleaching using whitening wraps and strips.

    PubMed

    Matis, Bruce A; Cochran, Michael; Wang, Ge; Franco, Miguel; Eckert, George J; Carlotti, Ronald J; Bryan, Christopher

    2005-01-01

    This study evaluated the degree of color change of teeth and the sensitivities of teeth and gums in an in vivo study. Ranir Whitening Wraps (WW2) and Crest Whitestrips Premium (WP2) were used twice a day and Ranir Whitening Wraps (WW1) were used once a day. Color evaluations occurred at baseline, after five and seven-day use of bleaching agent and 14 days post-bleaching. Color change was evaluated objectively and subjectively. Sensitivity evaluations were also accomplished. Seventy-six of the 78 subjects enrolled completed the study. All three products significantly lightened teeth. WW2 lightened more than WP2 and WW1 in L*, a*, b*, E and shade guide value. WP2 lightened more than WW1 in a*, b*, E and shade guide value. There was no difference in tooth sensitivity, but WW1 and WP2 caused less gingival sensitivity than WW2. The mean age of smokers was seven years younger than nonsmokers who qualified. PMID:16268392

  16. Phase-wrapping ambiguity in along-track interferometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Deming, Ross; Ilin, Roman; Best, Matthew

    2013-05-01

    In a previous SPIE paper we described several variations of along-track interferometry (ATI), which can be used for moving target detection and geo-location in clutter. ATI produces a phase map in range/Doppler coordinates by combining radar data from several receive channels separated fore-and-aft (along-track) on the sensor platform. In principle, the radial velocity of a moving target can be estimated from the ATI phase of the pixels in the target signature footprint. Once the radial velocity is known, the target azimuth follows directly. Unfortunately, the ATI phase is wrapped, i.e., it repeats in the interval [-π, π], and therefore the mapping from ATI phase to target azimuth is non-unique. In fact, depending on the radar system parameters, each detected target can map to several equally-likely azimuth values. In the present paper we discuss a signal processing method for resolving the phase wrapping ambiguity, in which the radar bandwidth is split into a high and low sub-band in software, and an ATI phase map is generated for each. By subtracting these two phase maps we can generate a coarse, but unambiguous, radial velocity estimate. This coarse estimate is then combined with the fine, but ambiguous estimate to pinpoint the target radial velocity, and therefore its azimuth. Since the coarse estimate is quite sensitive to noise, a rudimentary tracker is used to help smooth out the phase errors. The method is demonstrated on Gotcha 2006 Challenge data.

  17. Observation of Molecular Diffusion in Polyelectrolyte-Wrapped SERS Nanoprobes

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The popularity of nanotechnology-based sensing technologies has rapidly expanded within the past decade. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) is one such technique capable of chemically specific and highly sensitive measurements. The careful preparation of SERS-active nanoprobes is immensely vital for biological applications where nanoprobes are exposed to harsh ionic and protein rich microenvironments. Encapsulation of optical reporter molecules via layer-by-layer (LbL) polyelectrolyte wrapping is an emerging technique that also permits facile modification of surface chemistry and charge. LbL wrapping can be performed within a few hours and does not require the use of organic solvents or hazardous silanes. Nonetheless, the stability of its products requires further characterization and analysis. In this study, Raman-active methylene blue molecules were electrostatically encapsulated within alternating layers of cationic and anionic polyelectrolytes surrounding gold nanospheres. We observed molecular diffusion of methylene blue through polyelectrolyte layers by monitoring the change in SERS intensity over a period of more than 5 weeks. To minimize diffusion and improve the long-term storage stability of our nanoprobes, two additional nanoprobe preparation techniques were performed: thiol coating and cross-linking of the outer polyelectrolyte layer. In both cases, molecular diffusion is significantly diminished. PMID:24998291

  18. Mitigation and adaptation within a climate change policy portfolio: A research program

    EPA Science Inventory

    It is now recognized that optimal global climate policy is a portfolio of the two key responses for reducing the risks of climate change: mitigation and adaptation. Significant differences between the two responses have inhibited understanding of how to appropriately view these...

  19. Learning to Be a Community: Schools Need Adaptable Models to Create Successful Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ermeling, Bradley A.; Gallimore, Ronald

    2013-01-01

    Making schools learning places for teachers as well as students is a timeless and appealing vision. The growing number of professional learning communities is a hopeful sign that profound change is on the way. This is the challenge learning communities face: Schools and districts need implementation models flexible enough to adapt to local…

  20. Principle of Partial Participation and Individualized Adaptations in Educational Programs for Severely Handicapped Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baumgart, Diane; And Others

    1982-01-01

    The article defines the principle of partial participation and individualized adaptations (which asserts that severely handicapped students can acquire skills to enable them to function, a least in part, in a variety of school and non school activities) and describes their use to generate functional school and nonschool curricula. (Author/CL)

  1. Effect of Short-Term Study Abroad Programs on Students' Cultural Adaptability

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mapp, Susan C.

    2012-01-01

    The number of U.S. students studying abroad has been growing, particularly those participating in short-term trips. However, literature on the effect of these short-term trips is lacking. The purpose of this study was to assess quantitatively the effect on bachelor students' cross-cultural adaptability using a pre-post design. Significant changes…

  2. Adaptive Technology that Provides Access to Computers. DO-IT Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Washington Univ., Seattle.

    This brochure describes the different types of barriers individuals with mobility impairments, blindness, low vision, hearing impairments, and specific learning disabilities face in providing computer input, interpreting output, and reading documentation. The adaptive hardware and software that has been developed to provide functional alternatives…

  3. Firestar-"D": Computerized Adaptive Testing Simulation Program for Dichotomous Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Choi, Seung W.; Podrabsky, Tracy; McKinney, Natalie

    2012-01-01

    Computerized adaptive testing (CAT) enables efficient and flexible measurement of latent constructs. The majority of educational and cognitive measurement constructs are based on dichotomous item response theory (IRT) models. An integral part of developing various components of a CAT system is conducting simulations using both known and empirical…

  4. Project ADAPT: A Program to Assess Depression and Provide Proactive Treatment in Rural Areas

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Luptak, Marilyn; Kaas, Merrie J.; Artz, Margaret; McCarthy, Teresa

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: We describe and evaluate a project designed to pilot test an evidence-based clinical intervention for assessing and treating depression in older adults in rural primary care clinics. Project ADAPT--Assuring Depression Assessment and Proactive Treatment--utilized existing primary care resources to overcome barriers to sustainability…

  5. "When Will Your Program Be Available in Spanish?" Adapting an Early Parenting Intervention for Latino Families

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dumas, Jean E.; Arriaga, Ximena; Begle, Angela Moreland; Longoria, Zayra

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the Spanish adaptation of PACE--"Parenting Our Children to Excellence." Successfully offered in preschools and daycare centers since 2002, PACE is a research-based preventive intervention to support families in their parenting task through discussions and activities that address practical childrearing issues and promote child…

  6. Content Analysis Schedule for Bilingual Education Programs: Adaptations of Bilingual Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hess, Richard T.

    This content analysis schedule for Adaptations of Bilingual Education of Orange, California, presents information on the history, funding, and scope of the project. Included are sociolinguistic process variables such as the native and dominant languages of students and their interaction. Information is provided on staff selection and the…

  7. The Adaptation of Short Stories into Screenplays: A Language Arts Program for the Gifted.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Paulis, Chris

    1984-01-01

    A summer English class for gifted fifth- through eighth-grade students was designed to allow students to interact with literature by adapting short-stories into plays that the students then produced, performed, and filmed. During the prewriting phase, students discussed qualities most essential to a story or film, and compared a short story with…

  8. Mexican American women's perspectives on a culturally adapted cognitive-behavioral therapy guided self-help program for binge eating.

    PubMed

    Shea, Munyi; Cachelin, Fary M; Gutierrez, Guadalupe; Wang, Sherry; Phimphasone, Phoutdavone

    2016-02-01

    The prevalence of bulimia nervosa (BN) and binge eating disorder (BED) among Latinas is comparable to those of the general population; however, few interventions and treatment trial research have focused on this group. Cognitive-behavioral therapy (CBT) is the treatment of choice for binge eating related disorders. CBT-based guided self-help (CBTgsh)-a low-cost minimal intervention-has also been shown effective in improving binge eating related symptom, but the effectiveness of the CBTgsh among ethnic minority women is not well understood. Cultural adaptation of evidence-based treatments can be an important step for promoting treatment accessibility and engagement among underserved groups. This qualitative study was part of a larger investigation that examined the feasibility and efficacy of a culturally adapted CBTgsh program among Mexican American women with binge eating disorders. Posttreatment focus groups were conducted with 12 Mexican American women with BN or BED who participated in the intervention. Data were analyzed with the grounded theory methodology (Corbin & Strauss, 2008). Three themes emerged from the data: (a) eating behavior and body ideals are socially and culturally constructed, (b) multifaceted support system is crucial to Mexican American women's treatment engagement and success, and (c) the culturally adapted CBTgsh program is feasible and relevant to Mexican American women's experience, but it can be strengthened with increased family and peer involvement. The findings provide suggestions for further adaptation and refinement of the CBTgsh, and implications for future research as well as early intervention for disordered eating in organized care settings. PMID:26462112

  9. Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive Behavior Therapy Guided Self-Help Program for Mexican American Women With Binge Eating Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Shea, Munyi; Cachelin, Fary; Uribe, Luz; Striegel, Ruth H.; Thompson, Douglas; Wilson, G. Terence

    2013-01-01

    Data on the compatibility of evidence-based treatment in ethnic minority groups are limited. This study utilized focus group interviews to elicit Mexican American women’s (N = 12) feedback on a cognitive behavior therapy guided self-help program for binge eating disorders. Findings revealed 6 themes to be considered during the cultural adaptation process and highlighted the importance of balancing the fidelity and cultural relevance of evidence-based treatment when disseminating it across diverse racial/ethnic groups. PMID:23645969

  10. Introduction of new technologies and decision making processes: a framework to adapt a Local Health Technology Decision Support Program for other local settings

    PubMed Central

    Poulin, Paule; Austen, Lea; Scott, Catherine M; Poulin, Michelle; Gall, Nadine; Seidel, Judy; Lafrenière, René

    2013-01-01

    Purpose Introducing new health technologies, including medical devices, into a local setting in a safe, effective, and transparent manner is a complex process, involving many disciplines and players within an organization. Decision making should be systematic, consistent, and transparent. It should involve translating and integrating scientific evidence, such as health technology assessment (HTA) reports, with context-sensitive evidence to develop recommendations on whether and under what conditions a new technology will be introduced. However, the development of a program to support such decision making can require considerable time and resources. An alternative is to adapt a preexisting program to the new setting. Materials and methods We describe a framework for adapting the Local HTA Decision Support Program, originally developed by the Department of Surgery and Surgical Services (Calgary, AB, Canada), for use by other departments. The framework consists of six steps: 1) development of a program review and adaptation manual, 2) education and readiness assessment of interested departments, 3) evaluation of the program by individual departments, 4) joint evaluation via retreats, 5) synthesis of feedback and program revision, and 6) evaluation of the adaptation process. Results Nine departments revised the Local HTA Decision Support Program and expressed strong satisfaction with the adaptation process. Key elements for success were identified. Conclusion Adaptation of a preexisting program may reduce duplication of effort, save resources, raise the health care providers’ awareness of HTA, and foster constructive stakeholder engagement, which enhances the legitimacy of evidence-informed recommendations for introducing new health technologies. We encourage others to use this framework for program adaptation and to report their experiences. PMID:24273415

  11. Modification and Adaptation of the Program Evaluation Standards in Saudi Arabia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alyami, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    The Joint Committee on Standards for Educational Evaluation's Program Evaluation Standards is probably the most recognized and applied set of evaluation standards globally. The most recent edition of The Program Evaluation Standards includes five categories and 30 standards. The five categories are Utility, Feasibility, Propriety, Accuracy,…

  12. Geriatric Education across 94 Million Acres: Adapting Conference Programming in a Rural State

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Murphy-Southwick, Colleen; McBride, Melen

    2006-01-01

    Montana, a predominantly rural state, with a unique blend of geography and history, low population density, and cultural diversity represents the challenges for program development and implementation across remote areas. The paper discusses two statewide multidisciplinary geriatric education programs for health professionals offered by the…

  13. DEVELOPING AND EDUCATIONAL PROGRAM ADAPTED TO THE NEEDS OF THE CULTURALLY DIFFERENT.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    HIGGINS, GORDON H.; AND OTHERS

    AS PART OF THE GREAT CITIES PROGRAM FOR SCHOOL IMPROVEMENT, THE BUFFALO PROJECT WAS DESIGNED TO ATTACK THE SOCIAL INERTIA, LOW DEGREE OF INTEREST, ACHIEVEMENT AND PROGRESS, AND UNINSPIRED MOTIVATIONAL PATTERNS CHARACTERISTIC OF CHILDREN FROM A COMMUNITY LOW ON THE SOCIOECONOMIC SCALE. THIS WAS SOUGHT THROUGH AN ENRICHED SCHOOL PROGRAM OF TEACHING,…

  14. School Nurse Achievement Program II: Curriculum Adaptation for Expanded and Accelerated Dissemination. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smith, Ann N.; Burgess, Heidi

    The final report of a 3-year project to improve the delivery of inservice training for school nurses through the development of computer assisted instructional programs and videotapes concerning handicapped children is presented. The School Nurse Achievement Program (SNAP) is an on-going national inservice training course. The evaluation project…

  15. Swim Free. A 10 Day Program of Aquatic Exercises Adapted from Life in the Waterworld.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Eberhardt, Lorraine; Sanborn, Laura

    The completely waterproof book contains instructions for an alternative form of swimming exercises based on the movements of 19 water creatures. The exercises can be used by groups or individuals to enhance training programs, to serve as part of a structured synchronized swimming program, or to supplement recreational activities. The book provides…

  16. Antioxidant systems in supporting environmental and programmed adaptations to low temperatures.

    PubMed

    Blagojević, Dusko P

    2007-01-01

    Hetero and endothermic adaptive responses arising as a result of natural responses to environmental cues include antioxidant systems that support adaptations to environmental low temperatures in the broadest sense. These temperatures induce phase changes in energy production and consequently changes in the concentration of reactive oxygen species (ROS). The latter may lead to oxidative stress and the impairment of cellular homeostasis and antioxidant defence systems (ADS) scavenge the ROS so generated. In endotherms the ADS responds to oxidative pressure during acute cold stress conditions, this response is tissue specific and does not extend to prevent other oxidative damage. The early acute phase of cold exposure is accompanied by a significant depletion in redox equivalents. Under such conditions it is questionable if ADS has the capacity to neutralize elevated levels of ROS since there is also an increased energy demand and enhanced ATP consumption. Prolonged exposure to cold leads to ADS adaptation. Hibernators and freeze-tolerant species elevate their ADS before hibernation or freezing in order to prepare for and cope with re-awakening. The involvement of ROS and the role of the ADS in organisms subjected to low temperatures are features intercalated into physiological mechanisms of homestasis. The exact mechanisms for ADS regulation have not been fully defined and are the subject of many ongoing intriguing scientific investigations. PMID:17898903

  17. Histopathologic findings in autogenous saphenous vein graft wrapping for recurrent tarsal tunnel syndrome: a case report.

    PubMed

    Campbell, J T; Schon, L C; Burkhardt, L D

    1998-11-01

    Autogenous saphenous vein graft wrapping of the tibial nerve has been described as an effective treatment option for failed tarsal tunnel decompression. Various theories have been proposed to explain how this method works, with little histologic evidence to date. A pathologic investigation of a sectioned nerve that had been previously wrapped provides some insight into these proposals. PMID:9840207

  18. TRUNK SPROUTING AND GROWTH OF CITRUS AS AFFECTED BY NAA, ALUMINUM FOIL, AND PLASTIC TRUNK WRAPS

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In spring 1999, a commercial NAA (1-naphthaleneacetic acid) preparation for trunk sprout inhibition was compared to a corrugated plastic trunk wrap, aluminum foil wrap, bimonthly hand-removal of sprouts, use of NAA preparation plus bimonthly hand-removal when sprouts appeared, and a non-treated cont...

  19. Technical safety requirements (TSR) for waste receiving and processing (WRAP) facility

    SciTech Connect

    Weidert, J.R.

    1997-11-18

    The scope of this TSR document is based on the WRAP Final Safety Analysis Report (HNF-SD-W026-SAR-002) and supporting documents. The administrative controls set forth in this TSR document are derived from the WRAP Final Safety Analysis Report.

  20. 7 CFR 27.22 - Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton. 27.22... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.22 Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton. The original sets of samples of the...

  1. 7 CFR 27.22 - Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton. 27.22... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.22 Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton. The original sets of samples of the...

  2. 7 CFR 27.22 - Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton. 27.22... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.22 Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton. The original sets of samples of the...

  3. 7 CFR 27.22 - Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton. 27.22... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.22 Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton. The original sets of samples of the...

  4. 7 CFR 27.22 - Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton. 27.22... CONTAINER REGULATIONS COTTON CLASSIFICATION UNDER COTTON FUTURES LEGISLATION Regulations Inspection and Samples § 27.22 Wrapping and marking of samples of cotton. The original sets of samples of the...

  5. The Noval Properties and Construction of Multi-scale Matrix-valued Bivariate Wavelet wraps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Hai-mo

    In this paper, we introduce matrix-valued multi-resolution structure and matrix-valued bivariate wavelet wraps. A constructive method of semi-orthogonal matrix-valued bivari-ate wavelet wraps is presented. Their properties have been characterized by using time-frequency analysis method, unitary extension principle and operator theory. The direct decom-position relation is obtained.

  6. MFRP project: plastic-wrap preserved mature orchardgrass round-baled hay up to 34% moisture

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Effects of harvest moisture and bale wrapping on forage quality and mold formation in orchardgrass hay intended for equine feeding have not been investigated. The objectives of this study were to determine the effects of initial bale moisture and plastic wrapping on temperature, forage quality, and ...

  7. Social Science at the Center for Adaptive Optics: Synergistic Systems of Program Evaluation, Applied Research, Educational Assessment, and Pedagogy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goza, B. K.; Hunter, L.; Shaw, J. M.; Metevier, A. J.; Raschke, L.; Espinoza, E.; Geaney, E. R.; Reyes, G.; Rothman, D. L.

    2010-12-01

    This paper describes the interaction of four elements of social science as they have evolved in concert with the Center for Adaptive Optics Professional Development Program (CfAO PDP). We hope these examples persuade early-career scientists and engineers to include social science activities as they develop grant proposals and carry out their research. To frame our discussion we use a metaphor from astronomy. At the University of California Santa Cruz (UCSC), the CfAO PDP and the Educational Partnership Center (EPC) are two young stars in the process of forming a solar system. Together, they are surrounded by a disk of gas and dust made up of program evaluation, applied research, educational assessment, and pedagogy. An idea from the 2001 PDP intensive workshops program evaluation developed into the Assessing Scientific Inquiry and Leadership Skills (AScILS) applied research project. In iterative cycles, AScILS researchers participated in subsequent PDP intensive workshops, teaching social science while piloting AScILS measurement strategies. Subsequent "orbits" of the PDP program evaluation gathered ideas from the applied research and pedagogy. The denser regions of this disk of social science are in the process of forming new protoplanets as tools for research and teaching are developed. These tools include problem-solving exercises or simulations of adaptive optics explanations and scientific reasoning; rubrics to evaluate the scientific reasoning simulation responses, knowledge regarding inclusive science education, and student explanations of science/engineering inquiry investigations; and a scientific reasoning curriculum. Another applied research project is forming with the design of a study regarding how to assess engineering explanations. To illustrate the mutual shaping of the cross-disciplinary, intergenerational group of educational researchers and their projects, the paper ends with a description of the professional trajectories of some of the

  8. Model-free optimal controller design for continuous-time nonlinear systems by adaptive dynamic programming based on a precompensator.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jilie; Zhang, Huaguang; Liu, Zhenwei; Wang, Yingchun

    2015-07-01

    In this paper, we consider the problem of developing a controller for continuous-time nonlinear systems where the equations governing the system are unknown. Using the measurements, two new online schemes are presented for synthesizing a controller without building or assuming a model for the system, by two new implementation schemes based on adaptive dynamic programming (ADP). To circumvent the requirement of the prior knowledge for systems, a precompensator is introduced to construct an augmented system. The corresponding Hamilton-Jacobi-Bellman (HJB) equation is solved by adaptive dynamic programming, which consists of the least-squared technique, neural network approximator and policy iteration (PI) algorithm. The main idea of our method is to sample the information of state, state derivative and input to update the weighs of neural network by least-squared technique. The update process is implemented in the framework of PI. In this paper, two new implementation schemes are presented. Finally, several examples are given to illustrate the effectiveness of our schemes. PMID:25704057

  9. WRAP low level waste (LLW) glovebox acceptance test report

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1998-02-17

    In June 28, 1997, the Low Level Waste (LLW) glovebox was tested using glovebox acceptance test procedure 13031A-85. The primary focus of the glovebox acceptance test was to examine control system interlocks, display menus, alarms, and operator messages. Limited mechanical testing involving the drum ports, hoists, drum lifter, compacted drum lifter, drum tipper, transfer car, conveyors, lidder/delidder device and the supercompactor were also conducted. As of November 24, 1997, 2 of the 131 test exceptions that affect the LLW glovebox remain open. These items will be tracked and closed via the WRAP Master Test Exception Database. As part of Test Exception resolution/closure the responsible individual closing the Test Exception performs a retest of the affected item(s) to ensure the identified deficiency is corrected, and, or to test items not previously available to support testing. Test Exceptions are provided as appendices to this report.

  10. Twist-three at five loops, Bethe ansatz and wrapping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beccaria, Matteo; Forini, Valentina; Łukowski, Tomasz; Zieme, Stefan

    2009-03-01

    We present a formula for the five-loop anomalous dimension of Script N = 4 SYM twist-three operators in the fraktur sfraktur l(2) sector. We obtain its asymptotic part from the Bethe Ansatz and finite volume corrections from the generalized Lüscher formalism, considering scattering processes of spin chain magnons with virtual particles that travel along the cylinder. The complete result respects the expected large spin scaling properties and passes non-trivial tests including reciprocity constraints. We analyze the pole structure and find agreement with a conjectured resummation formula. In analogy with the twist-two anomalous dimension at four-loops wrapping effects are of order (log2M/M2) for large values of the spin.

  11. /N=2 gauge theories from wrapped five-branes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bigazzi, F.; Cotrone, A. L.; Zaffaroni, A.

    2001-11-01

    We present string duals of four-dimensional N=2 pure SU(N) SYM theory. The theory is obtained as the low energy limit of D5-branes wrapped on non-trivial two-cycles. Using seven-dimensional gauged supergravity and uplifting the result to ten dimensions, we obtain solutions corresponding to various points of the N=2 moduli space. The more symmetric solution may correspond to a point with rotationally invariant classical vevs. By turning on seven-dimensional scalar fields, we find a solution corresponding to a linear distribution of vevs. Both solutions are conveniently studied with a D5-probe, which also confirms many of the standard expectations for N=2 solutions.

  12. Shear Strength Prediction of RC Beams Wrapped with Frp

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Suyan; Zhou, Yingwu; Li, Hongnan

    During past decades, substantial studies on the external bonding of fiber reinforced polymer (FRP) strips to deficient reinforced concrete (RC) beams have been carried out for the well-known superior properties of the FRP. Several shear prediction models have been established by using the effective strain of the FRP or introducing an ultimate stress discount coefficient. And the latest design concept is the use of stress distribution factor. In this paper, an equivalent effective strain model of the FRP is presented, which contains the concepts of maximum strain, stress distribution factor and critical shear crack angle influences. To develop a simple and accurate approach for such equivalent effective strain, major influenced factors are investigated and analyzed by the statistical independent hypothetic tests on a database of 128 RC beams wrapped by the FRP. Finally, a simple and rational shear design proposal is given, which is more accurate than the existing models using the above database.

  13. Wrapping process for fabrication of A-15 superconducting composite wires

    DOEpatents

    Suenaga, M.; Klamut, C.J.; Luhman, T.S.

    1980-08-15

    A method for fabricating superconducting wires wherein a billet of copper containing filaments of niobium or vanadium is rolled to form a strip which is wrapped about a tin-alloy core to form a composite. The alloy is a tin-copper alloy for niobium filaments and a gallium-copper alloy for vanadium filaments. The composite is then drawn down to a desired wire size and heat treated. During the heat treatment process, the tin in the bronze reacts with the niobium to form the superconductor niobium tin. In the case where vanadium is used, the gallium in the gallium bronze reacts with the vanadium to form the superconductor vanadium gallium. This new process eliminates the costly annealing steps, external tin plating and drilling of bronze ingots required in a number of prior art processes.

  14. A spatial algorithm to reduce phase wraps from two dimensional signals in fringe projection profilometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arevalillo-Herráez, Miguel; Gdeisat, Munther; Lilley, Francis; Burton, David R.

    2016-07-01

    In this paper, we present a novel algorithm to reduce the number of phase wraps in two dimensional signals in fringe projection profilometry. The technique operates in the spatial domain, and achieves a significant computational saving with regard to existing methods based on frequency shifting. The method works by estimating the modes of the first differences distribution in each axial direction. These are used to generate a tilted plane, which is subtracted from the entire phase map. Finally, the result is re-wrapped to obtain a phase map with fewer wraps. The method may be able to completely eliminate the phase wraps in many cases, or can achieve a significant phase wrap reduction that helps the subsequent unwrapping of the signal. The algorithm has been exhaustively tested across a large number of real and simulated signals, showing similar results compared to approaches operating in the frequency domain, but at significantly lower running times.

  15. Comparison of three different prehospital wrapping methods for preventing hypothermia - a crossover study in humans

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Accidental hypothermia increases mortality and morbidity in trauma patients. Various methods for insulating and wrapping hypothermic patients are used worldwide. The aim of this study was to compare the thermal insulating effects and comfort of bubble wrap, ambulance blankets / quilts, and Hibler's method, a low-cost method combining a plastic outer layer with an insulating layer. Methods Eight volunteers were dressed in moistened clothing, exposed to a cold and windy environment then wrapped using one of the three different insulation methods in random order on three different days. They were rested quietly on their back for 60 minutes in a cold climatic chamber. Skin temperature, rectal temperature, oxygen consumption were measured, and metabolic heat production was calculated. A questionnaire was used for a subjective evaluation of comfort, thermal sensation, and shivering. Results Skin temperature was significantly higher 15 minutes after wrapping using Hibler's method compared with wrapping with ambulance blankets / quilts or bubble wrap. There were no differences in core temperature between the three insulating methods. The subjects reported more shivering, they felt colder, were more uncomfortable, and had an increased heat production when using bubble wrap compared with the other two methods. Hibler's method was the volunteers preferred method for preventing hypothermia. Bubble wrap was the least effective insulating method, and seemed to require significantly higher heat production to compensate for increased heat loss. Conclusions This study demonstrated that a combination of vapour tight layer and an additional dry insulating layer (Hibler's method) is the most efficient wrapping method to prevent heat loss, as shown by increased skin temperatures, lower metabolic rate and better thermal comfort. This should then be the method of choice when wrapping a wet patient at risk of developing hypothermia in prehospital environments. PMID:21699720

  16. Samoan Body and Soul: Adapting an Evidence-Based Obesity and Cancer Prevention Program

    PubMed Central

    Cassel, Kevin D.; Braun, Kathryn; Ka’opua, Lana; Soa, Fuamaila; Nigg, Claudio

    2015-01-01

    Obesity-associated chronic diseases persist in Samoan populations in the United States. Samoans and African Americans share cultural similarities such as church affiliation, perceptions of weight and body size, and obesity-related health risks. Adapting an effective energy balance intervention originally designed for African Americans—Body and Soul— might be useful in reducing obesity among U.S. Samoans. To determine potential attractiveness and adaptations, we used aspects of grounded theory to analyze key-informant and focus group interviews with 31 purposively selected Samoans in Hawaii. We incorporated participatory features into the research with Samoan community members conducting parts of the study. From interview narratives, we identified relevant themes from Samoan culture, such as fa’aSamoa or the Samoan way, and specific energy balance activities to include in an obesity and cancer prevention intervention for U.S.-dwelling Samoans. Our findings describe methods to address health disparities by incorporating culturally appropriate health concepts into existing evidence-based interventions. PMID:25212854

  17. Results from the Active for Life process evaluation: program delivery fidelity and adaptations.

    PubMed

    Griffin, Sarah F; Wilcox, Sara; Ory, Marcia G; Lattimore, Diana; Leviton, Laura; Castro, Cynthia; Carpenter, Ruth Ann; Rheaume, Carol

    2010-04-01

    Active for Life((R)) (AFL) was a large (n = 8159) translational initiative to increase physical activity (PA) in midlife and older adults. Translational research calls for a shift in emphasis from just understanding what works (efficacy) to also understanding how it works in more 'real world' settings. This article describes the process evaluation design and findings, discuss how these findings were used to better understand the translational process and provide a set of process evaluation recommendations with community-based translational research. AFL community organizations across the United States implemented one of two evidence-based PA programs (Active Living Every Day-The Cooper Institute; Human Kinetics Inc. or Active Choices-Stanford University). Both programs were based on the transtheoretical model and social cognitive theory. Overall, the process evaluation revealed high-dose delivery and implementation fidelity by quite varied community organizations serving diverse adult populations. Findings reveal most variation occurred for program elements requiring more participant engagement. Additionally, the results show how a collaborative process allowed the organizations to 'fit' the programs to their specific participant base while maintaining fidelity to essential program elements. PMID:19325031

  18. Neuromuscular adaptations after a rehabilitation program in patients with chronic low back pain: case series (uncontrolled longitudinal study)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background To investigate the impact of a short-term multimodal rehabilitation program for patients with low back pain (LBP) on trunk muscle reflex responses and feedforward activation induced by postural perturbations. Methods Case series (uncontrolled longitudinal study). Thirty chronic patients with LBP (21 women and 19 men, mean age 42.6 ± 8.6 years, mean weight 73 ± 14 kg, mean height 174 ± 10 cm) were included. The intervention consisted in a 5-day program including therapeutic education sessions (360 min), supervised abdominal and back muscle strength exercises (240 min), general aerobic training (150 min), stretching (150 min), postural education (150 min) and aqua therapy (150 min). Feedforward activation level and reflex amplitude determined by surface electromyographic activity triggered by postural perturbations were recorded from abdominal and paraspinal muscles in unexpected and expected conditions. Subjects were tested before, just after and again one month after the rehabilitation program. Results No main intervention effect was found on feedforward activation levels and reflex amplitudes underlining the absence of changes in the way patients with LBP reacted across perturbation conditions. However, we observed a shift in the behavioral strategy between conditions, in fact feedforward activation (similar in both conditions before the program) decreased in the unexpected condition after the program, whereas reflex amplitudes became similar in both conditions. Conclusions The results suggest that a short-term rehabilitation program modifies trunk behavioral strategies during postural perturbations. These results can be useful to clinicians for explaining to patients how to adapt to daily life activities before and after rehabilitation. PMID:24063646

  19. Adaptation of a program for nonlinear finite element analysis to the CDC STAR 100 computer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pifko, A. B.; Ogilvie, P. L.

    1978-01-01

    The conversion of a nonlinear finite element program to the CDC STAR 100 pipeline computer is discussed. The program called DYCAST was developed for the crash simulation of structures. Initial results with the STAR 100 computer indicated that significant gains in computation time are possible for operations on gloval arrays. However, for element level computations that do not lend themselves easily to long vector processing, the STAR 100 was slower than comparable scalar computers. On this basis it is concluded that in order for pipeline computers to impact the economic feasibility of large nonlinear analyses it is absolutely essential that algorithms be devised to improve the efficiency of element level computations.

  20. Runtime and Programming Support for Memory Adaptation in Scientific Applications via Local Disk and Remote Memory

    SciTech Connect

    Mills, Richard T; Yue, Chuan; Andreas, Stathopoulos; Nikolopoulos, Dimitrios S

    2007-01-01

    The ever increasing memory demands of many scientific applications and the complexity of today's shared computational resources still require the occasional use of virtual memory, network memory, or even out-of-core implementations, with well known drawbacks in performance and usability. In Mills et al. (Adapting to memory pressure from within scientific applications on multiprogrammed COWS. In: International Parallel and Distributed Processing Symposium, IPDPS, Santa Fe, NM, 2004), we introduced a basic framework for a runtime, user-level library, MMlib, in which DRAM is treated as a dynamic size cache for large memory objects residing on local disk. Application developers can specify and access these objects through MMlib, enabling their application to execute optimally under variable memory availability, using as much DRAM as fluctuating memory levels will allow. In this paper, we first extend our earlier MMlib prototype from a proof of concept to a usable, robust, and flexible library. We present a general framework that enables fully customizable memory malleability in a wide variety of scientific applications. We provide several necessary enhancements to the environment sensing capabilities of MMlib, and introduce a remote memory capability, based on MPI communication of cached memory blocks between 'compute nodes' and designated memory servers. The increasing speed of interconnection networks makes a remote memory approach attractive, especially at the large granularity present in large scientific applications. We show experimental results from three important scientific applications that require the general MMlib framework. The memory-adaptive versions perform nearly optimally under constant memory pressure and execute harmoniously with other applications competing for memory, without thrashing the memory system. Under constant memory pressure, we observe execution time improvements of factors between three and

  1. Fostering Integrative Thinking: Adapting the Executive Education Model to the MBA Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Latham, Gary; Latham, Soosan D.; Whyte, Glen

    2004-01-01

    Many full-time MBA programs limit their effectiveness by clinging to functionalism. At best, they have made incremental changes to meet the market demand for MBA graduates. These changes, in most cases, have failed to integrate the various functional facets of complex business challenges. For insights into how to do so, many business schools need…

  2. Adapting a Community-Based Physical Activity Promotion Program for Rural, Diverse Youth

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Colquitt, Gavin; Walker, Ashley; Alfonso, Moya

    2014-01-01

    With school-aged youth spending less time in physical education, school-community-university partnerships offer potential to promote physical activity among school-aged youth. The VERB™ Summer Scorecard (VSS) program was designed in Lexington, Kentucky, to promote physical activity among "tweens" (8- to 13-year-olds). VSS since has been…

  3. Program Adaptations for Students in Four Selected Sports: Badminton, Golf, Archery, and Tennis.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cowart, Jim

    1982-01-01

    The booklet reviews ways in which students with crutches may be helped to successfully participate in four specific sports. General guidelines for modifying programs for this group include the importance of thorough assessment, attention to details of the game play, and consideration of equipment and supply alterations. Each of the four sports is…

  4. Adaptation and Re-Use of Spacecraft Power System Models for the Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hojnicki, Jeffrey S.; Kerslake, Thomas W.; Ayres, Mark; Han, Augustina H.; Adamson, Adrian M.

    2008-01-01

    NASA's Constellation Program is embarking on a new era of space exploration, returning to the Moon and beyond. The Constellation architecture will consist of a number of new spacecraft elements, including the Orion crew exploration vehicle, the Altair lunar lander, and the Ares family of launch vehicles. Each of these new spacecraft elements will need an electric power system, and those power systems will need to be designed to fulfill unique mission objectives and to survive the unique environments encountered on a lunar exploration mission. As with any new spacecraft power system development, preliminary design work will rely heavily on analysis to select the proper power technologies, size the power system components, and predict the system performance throughout the required mission profile. Constellation projects have the advantage of leveraging power system modeling developments from other recent programs such as the International Space Station (ISS) and the Mars Exploration Program. These programs have developed mature power system modeling tools, which can be quickly modified to meet the unique needs of Constellation, and thus provide a rapid capability for detailed power system modeling that otherwise would not exist.

  5. Adapting Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program to Hawaii's Multicultural Population

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomioka, Michiyo; Braun, Kathryn L.; Compton, Merlita; Tanoue, Leslie

    2012-01-01

    Purpose of the Study: Stanford's Chronic Disease Self-Management Program (CDSMP) has been proven to increase patients' ability to manage distress. We describe how we replicated CDSMP in Asian and Pacific Islander (API) communities. Design and Methods: We used the "track changes" tool to deconstruct CDSMP into its various components (e.g.,…

  6. Cross-Cultural Competency Adaptability of Dental Hygiene Educators in Entry Level Dental Hygiene Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Engeswick, Lynnette Marie

    2011-01-01

    This study was conducted to discover the extent dental hygiene educators in 25 entry-level dental hygiene programs from the Upper Midwest demonstrate Emotional Resilience, Flexibility and Openness, Perceptual Acuity, and Personal Autonomy as they relate to their level of education and multicultural experiences. An additional purpose was to examine…

  7. Mathematical description and program documentation for CLASSY, an adaptive maximum likelihood clustering method

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lennington, R. K.; Rassbach, M. E.

    1979-01-01

    Discussed in this report is the clustering algorithm CLASSY, including detailed descriptions of its general structure and mathematical background and of the various major subroutines. The report provides a development of the logic and equations used with specific reference to program variables. Some comments on timing and proposed optimization techniques are included.

  8. Providing Physical Activity for Students with Intellectual Disabilities: The Motivate, Adapt, and Play Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis, Kathy; Hodson, Patricia; Zhang, Guili; Boswell, Boni; Decker, Jim

    2010-01-01

    Research has shown that regular physical activity helps to prevent major health problems, such as heart disease, obesity, and diabetes. However, little research has been conducted on classroom-based physical activity programs for students with disabilities. In North Carolina, the Healthy Active Children Policy was implemented in 2006, requiring…

  9. Effectiveness of an Activity Tracker- and Internet-Based Adaptive Walking Program for Adults: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Poirier, Josée; Bennett, Wendy L; Jerome, Gerald J; Shah, Nina G; Lazo, Mariana; Yeh, Hsin-Chieh; Clark, Jeanne M

    2016-01-01

    Background The benefits of physical activity are well documented, but scalable programs to promote activity are needed. Interventions that assign tailored and dynamically adjusting goals could effect significant increases in physical activity but have not yet been implemented at scale. Objective Our aim was to examine the effectiveness of an open access, Internet-based walking program that assigns daily step goals tailored to each participant. Methods A two-arm, pragmatic randomized controlled trial compared the intervention to no treatment. Participants were recruited from a workplace setting and randomized to a no-treatment control (n=133) or to treatment (n=132). Treatment participants received a free wireless activity tracker and enrolled in the walking program, Walkadoo. Assessments were fully automated: activity tracker recorded primary outcomes (steps) without intervention by the participant or investigators. The two arms were compared on change in steps per day from baseline to follow-up (after 6 weeks of treatment) using a two-tailed independent samples t test. Results Participants (N=265) were 66.0% (175/265) female with an average age of 39.9 years. Over half of the participants (142/265, 53.6%) were sedentary (<5000 steps/day) and 44.9% (119/265) were low to somewhat active (5000-9999 steps/day). The intervention group significantly increased their steps by 970 steps/day over control (P<.001), with treatment effects observed in sedentary (P=.04) and low-to-somewhat active (P=.004) participants alike. Conclusions The program is effective in increasing daily steps. Participants benefited from the program regardless of their initial activity level. A tailored, adaptive approach using wireless activity trackers is realistically implementable and scalable. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT02229409, https://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT02229409 (Archived by WebCite at http://www.webcitation.org/6eiWCvBYe) PMID:26860434

  10. Coping Power Adapted as Universal Prevention Program: Mid Term Effects on Children's Behavioral Difficulties and Academic Grades.

    PubMed

    Muratori, Pietro; Bertacchi, Iacopo; Giuli, Consuelo; Nocentini, Annalaura; Ruglioni, Laura; Lochman, John E

    2016-08-01

    Aggressive behaviors in schools have the potential to cause serious harm to students' emotional and social well-being and to limit their ability to achieve their full academic potential. Prevention programs developed to reduce children's aggressive behaviors in school settings can provide interventions at a universal or targeted level. The main aim of our randomized control study was to examine the efficacy of Coping Power, adapted as a universal prevention program, in reducing children's behavioral problems and improving school grades. Nine classes participated (184 students, mean age 91 months) from two elementary state schools in Tuscany, Italy. Study findings showed a significant reduction in behavioral problems and an improvement in school grades for the intervention classes relative to the control classes. This study suggests the Coping Power program can be delivered in school settings at both universal and targeted prevention levels, and that in this multi-tiered prevention model, teachers, educators and school psychologists can learn a set of intervention skills which can be delivered with flexibility, thus reducing some of the complexity and costs of schools using multiple interventions. PMID:27129573

  11. Structural Integrity Testing Method for PRSEUS Rod-Wrap Stringer Design

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, John T.; Grenoble, Ray W.; Pickell, Robert D.

    2012-01-01

    NASA Langley Research Center and The Boeing Company are developing an innovative composite structural concept, called PRSEUS, for the flat center section of a future environmentally friendly hybrid wing body (HWB) aircraft. The PRSEUS (Pultruded Rod Stitched Efficient Unitized Structure) concept uses dry textile preforms for the skins, frames, and stiffener webs. The highly loaded stiffeners are made from precured unidirectional carbon/epoxy rods and dry fiber preforms. The rods are wrapped with the dry fiber preforms and a resin infusion process is used to form the rod-wrap stiffeners. The structural integrity of the rod-wrap interface is critical for maintaining the panel s high strength and bending rigidity. No standard testing method exists for testing the strength of the rod-wrap bondline. Recently, Boeing proposed a rod push-out testing method and conducted some preliminary tests using this method. This paper details an analytical study of the rod-wrap bondline. The rod-wrap interface is modeled as a cohesive zone for studying the initiation and growth of interfacial debonding during push-out testing. Based on the correlations of analysis results and Boeing s test data, the adequacy of the rod-wrap testing method is evaluated, and potential approaches for improvement of the test method are proposed.

  12. Skylab medical experiments program. [for in-flight human physiological adaptive processes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hessberg, R. R.

    1973-01-01

    With the completion of the historic Apollo Program, the significant medical findings will be reviewed and the medical results summarized. The medical objectives of Skylab will be presented. The medical experiments which will be conducted and their relationship to the Apollo medical findings and Skylab objectives will be discussed. The interrelationship of the Skylab medical experiments will be described and the anticipated information to be obtained will be postulated.

  13. Incorporating Climate Change Predictions into Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategies (WRAPS) in the Upper Mississippi River Basin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burke, M. P.; Foreman, C. S.

    2014-12-01

    Development of the Watershed Restoration and Protection Strategies (WRAPS) for the Pine and Leech Lake River Watersheds is underway in Minnesota. Project partners participating in this effort include the Minnesota Pollution Control Agency (MPCA), Crow Wing Soil and Water Conservation District (SWCD), Cass County, and other local partners. These watersheds are located in the Northern Lakes and Forest ecoregion of Minnesota and drain to the Upper Mississippi River. To support the Pine and Leech Lake River WRAPS, watershed-scale hydrologic and water-quality models were developed with Hydrological Simulation Program-FORTRAN (HSPF). The HSPF model applications simulate hydrology (discharge, stage), as well as a number of water quality constituents (sediment, temperature, organic and inorganic nitrogen, total ammonia, organic and inorganic phosphorus, dissolved oxygen and biochemical oxygen demand, and algae) continuously for the period 1995-2009 and provide predictions at points of interest within the watersheds, such as observation gages, management boundaries, compliance points, and impaired water body endpoints. The model applications were used to evaluate phosphorus loads to surface waters under resource management scenarios, which were based on water quality threats that were identified at stakeholder meetings. Simulations of land use changes including conversion of forests to agriculture, shoreline development, and full build-out of cities show a watershed-wide phosphorus increases of up to 80%. The retention of 1.1 inches of runoff from impervious surfaces was not enough to mitigate the projected phosphorus load increases. Changes in precipitation projected by climate change models led to a 20% increase in annual watershed phosphorus loads. The scenario results will inform the implementation strategies selected for the WRAPS.

  14. Phase discrepancy induced from least squares wavefront reconstruction of wrapped phase measurements with high noise or large localized wavefront gradients

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steinbock, Michael J.; Hyde, Milo W.

    2012-10-01

    Adaptive optics is used in applications such as laser communication, remote sensing, and laser weapon systems to estimate and correct for atmospheric distortions of propagated light in real-time. Within an adaptive optics system, a reconstruction process interprets the raw wavefront sensor measurements and calculates an estimate for the unwrapped phase function to be sent through a control law and applied to a wavefront correction device. This research is focused on adaptive optics using a self-referencing interferometer wavefront sensor, which directly measures the wrapped wavefront phase. Therefore, its measurements must be reconstructed for use on a continuous facesheet deformable mirror. In testing and evaluating a novel class of branch-point- tolerant wavefront reconstructors based on the post-processing congruence operation technique, an increase in Strehl ratio compared to a traditional least squares reconstructor was noted even in non-scintillated fields. To investigate this further, this paper uses wave-optics simulations to eliminate many of the variables from a hardware adaptive optics system, so as to focus on the reconstruction techniques alone. The simulation results along with a discussion of the physical reasoning for this phenomenon are provided. For any applications using a self-referencing interferometer wavefront sensor with low signal levels or high localized wavefront gradients, understanding this phenomena is critical when applying a traditional least squares wavefront reconstructor.

  15. Adaptive dynamic programming for finite-horizon optimal control of discrete-time nonlinear systems with ε-error bound.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei-Yue; Jin, Ning; Liu, Derong; Wei, Qinglai

    2011-01-01

    In this paper, we study the finite-horizon optimal control problem for discrete-time nonlinear systems using the adaptive dynamic programming (ADP) approach. The idea is to use an iterative ADP algorithm to obtain the optimal control law which makes the performance index function close to the greatest lower bound of all performance indices within an ε-error bound. The optimal number of control steps can also be obtained by the proposed ADP algorithms. A convergence analysis of the proposed ADP algorithms in terms of performance index function and control policy is made. In order to facilitate the implementation of the iterative ADP algorithms, neural networks are used for approximating the performance index function, computing the optimal control policy, and modeling the nonlinear system. Finally, two simulation examples are employed to illustrate the applicability of the proposed method. PMID:20876014

  16. [Mindfulness based cognitive therapy (MBCT) in patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder--an adaptation of the original program].

    PubMed

    Külz, Anne Katrin; Rose, Nina

    2014-01-01

    Mindfulness-based cognitive Therapy (MBCT) has shown to be effective in the relapse prevention and treatment of several psychiatric disorders. However, MBCT has not yet been applied in OCD (Obsessive-compulsive Disorder). This article proposes an adaptation of the eight-session group program for patients with residual symptoms after cognitive behavioural treatment (CBT) with exposure. It has proven feasible and was considered helpful by patients within the framework of a pilot study 1. Apart from an overview of the modified manual, OCD-specific elements are presented in detail and illustrated on the base of work sheets. The manual indicates that MBCT could be a useful supplement to CBT and is well applicable to the therapeutic needs of patients with OCD. PMID:23959536

  17. The Regional Integrated Sciences and Assessments (RISA) Program, Climate Services, and Meeting the National Climate Change Adaptation Challenge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Overpeck, J. T.; Udall, B.; Miles, E.; Dow, K.; Anderson, C.; Cayan, D.; Dettinger, M.; Hartmann, H.; Jones, J.; Mote, P.; Ray, A.; Shafer, M.; White, D.

    2008-12-01

    The NOAA-led RISA Program has grown steadily to nine regions and a focus that includes both natural climate variability and human-driven climate change. The RISAs are, at their core, university-based and heavily invested in partnerships, particularly with stakeholders, NOAA, and other federal agencies. RISA research, assessment and partnerships have led to new operational climate services within NOAA and other agencies, and have become important foundations in the development of local, state and regional climate change adaptation initiatives. The RISA experience indicates that a national climate service is needed, and must include: (1) services prioritized based on stakeholder needs; (2) sustained, ongoing regional interactions with users, (3) a commitment to improve climate literacy; (4) support for assessment as an ongoing, iterative process; (5) full recognition that stakeholder decisions are seldom made using climate information alone; (6) strong interagency partnership; (7) national implementation and regional in focus; (8) capability spanning local, state, tribal, regional, national and international space scales, and weeks to millennia time scales; and (9) institutional design and scientific support flexible enough to assure the effort is nimble enough to respond to rapidly-changing stakeholder needs. The RISA experience also highlights the central role that universities must play in national climate change adaptation programs. Universities have a tradition of trusted regional stakeholder partnerships, as well as the interdisciplinary expertise - including social science, ecosystem science, law, and economics - required to meet stakeholder climate-related needs; project workforce can also shift rapidly in universities. Universities have a proven ability to build and sustain interagency partnerships. Universities excel in most forms of education and training. And universities often have proven entrepreneurship, technology transfer and private sector

  18. Gamma radiation, cold and four different wrappings to preserve ginger rhizomes, Zingiber officinallis Roscoe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Queirol, Marco Antonio P.; Neto, João Tessarioli; Arthur, Valter; Wiendl, Frederico M.; Villavicencio, Anna Lucia C. H.

    2002-03-01

    After irradiating with a single dose of 50 Gy, ginger rhizomes were dipped into paraffin for coating, wrapped in a plastic film of low-density polyethylene, on perforated or non-perforated polivinyl chloride film, and compared with non-wrapping and non-irradiation as the controls. After treatments the rhizomes were maintained refrigerated at 13°C and 80% relative humidity. As a main result it could be observed that dipping into paraffin and wrapping with plastics resulted in smaller weight loss of the rhizomes.

  19. Individual and Public-Program Adaptation: Coping with Heat Waves in Five Cities in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Alberini, Anna; Gans, Will; Alhassan, Mustapha

    2011-01-01

    Heat Alert and Response Systems (HARS) are currently undergoing testing and implementation in Canada. These programs seek to reduce the adverse health effects of heat waves on human health by issuing weather forecasts and warnings, informing individuals about possible protections from excessive heat, and providing such protections to vulnerable subpopulations and individuals at risk. For these programs to be designed effectively, it is important to know how individuals perceive the heat, what their experience with heat-related illness is, how they protect themselves from excessive heat, and how they acquire information about such protections. In September 2010, we conducted a survey of households in 5 cities in Canada to study these issues. At the time of the survey, these cities had not implemented heat outreach and response systems. The study results indicate that individuals’ recollections of recent heat wave events were generally accurate. About 21% of the sample reported feeling unwell during the most recent heat spell, but these illnesses were generally minor. Only in 25 cases out of 243, these illnesses were confirmed or diagnosed by a health care professional. The rate at which our respondents reported heat-related illnesses was higher among those with cardiovascular and respiratory illnesses, was higher among younger respondents and bore no relationship with the availability of air conditioning at home. Most of the respondents indicated that they would not dismiss themselves as “not at risk” and that they would cope with excessive heat by staying in air conditioned environments and keeping well hydrated. Despite the absence of heat outreach and education programs in their city, our respondents at least a rough idea of how to take care of themselves. The presence of air conditioning and knowledge of cooling centers is location-specific, which provides opportunities for targeting HARS interventions. PMID:22408596

  20. The development and evaluation of an adaptable computer aided instruction(CAI) program for acquiring problem solving skills in biochemistry on the WWW: The "BioChem Thinker".

    PubMed Central

    Hershkovitz, B.

    1997-01-01

    BioChem Thinker is a CAI program that was developed to enhance problem solving skills and ability to integrate knowledge in biochemistry for medical and dental students. The program runs on a WWW browser. BioChem Thinker is adaptable, it enables the teacher to create a new problem solving assignment, or edit existing assignments without in-depth knowledge of computer programming. This provides teachers with greater independence and flexibility so as to be able to adapt the program to their own course requirements. The program was implemented and evaluated in the 3rd year biochemistry course of The Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School. The tool used to develop Biochem Thinker can be utilized to develop similar CAI in other biomedical areas. PMID:9357717

  1. Strategic Program for Biodiversity and Water Resource Management and Climate Change Adaptation in Pakistan

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sher, Hassan; Aldosari, Ali

    2014-05-01

    and temporal distribution of water resources on annual and inter-annual basis in the country. To address the impact of climate change on ago-biodiversity and water resources, the present study was initiated with the aim to increase awareness to adapt to changing water resources situation due to climate change. Secondly to build climate change resilience into Pakistan agriculture system and also to enhance the understanding of climate change issues by farmers, and policy makers to enable them to make informed decision. Our assessment revealed a gap in our knowledge on the climate change vulnerability of mountain agro-biodiversity and institutional setups, as well as lack of policy imperatives to address the issues. Therefore, the 2014 generally assembly of EGU will provide a forum for our further understanding of the relevant scienti?c and geopolitical issues. This forum will not only establish a social network for future collaborative research but will also enable us to devise better strategies for both biodiversity and water-resource management and climate change adaptation.

  2. Engaging Communities to Understand and Adapt to Environmental Changes with The GLOBE Program

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wegner, K.; Malmberg, J. S.; Murphy, T.; Mauriello, H.

    2015-12-01

    During the past twenty years, The GLOBE Program (www.globe.gov) has connected scientists, K-12 students, teachers, and other stakeholders to "co-create" scientific understanding of their local, regional, and global environment in more than 110 countries. Through the support and collaboration of federal agencies- NASA, NSF, and NOAA- the community-driven GLOBE database has more than 130 million Earth science measurements (atmosphere, biosphere, hydrosphere, and pedosphere) that align with the USGCRP's indicators of climate change, such as air and surface temperature (Indicator: Global Surface Temperature), land cover (Indicators: 1) Forest Cover; 2) Grassland, Shrubland, and Pasture Cover), and plant phenology (Indicator: Start of Spring). GLOBE contributes to climate literacy while encouraging community members of all ages to enrich their scientific understanding, define issues of local relevance, and engage in broader action, such as regional and global science campaigns. In this session, we will present case studies of how GLOBE data has been used to inspire "homegrown" research campaigns such as the GLOBE Surface Temperature Campaign and European Aerosols Campaign, as well as solution-based action in response to environmental changes, including the development of a mosquito protocol in Thailand and across Africa and a toad service project in the Czech Republic. We will also discuss some of the initiatives we have led as a program in order to promote and share local and regional community-led efforts with our worldwide GLOBE community, as well as some of the challenges and opportunities presented by supporting climate research.

  3. Magnetic profile of a graphene wrapped ferromagnetic surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Charlton, Timothy; Love, David; Aboljadayel, Razan; Weatherup, R.; Monteiro, , P.; Ionescu, Adrian; Barnes, C. H. W.

    Graphene has one of the highest electron mobilities at room temperature, making it ideal for next generation electronic devices. However, due to its small spin-orbit coupling it is not possible to manipulate spins directly in a pristine graphene monolayer. This may be overcome by proximity to a ferromagnet. Recent theoretical and experimental publications indicate that on a Ni surface the graphene band structure is spin split. The authors used XMCD to measure the magnetic moment induced on the π- electrons in graphene due to the proximity effect with Ni, obtaining a value between 0.05-0.10 μB per C atom. We have produced a uniform graphene layer grown by a CVD process directly a Ni coated substrate (the catalyst). By varying key growth parameters (temperature & pressure) the interaction between graphene and the catalyst can be tuned to provide strong epitaxial alignment between graphene and Ni or a more weakly oriented rotated alignment. We will present results showing a magnetic enhancement at the ferromagnet - C interface extracted from recent polarized neutron reflectivity measurement on both epitaxial and rotated graphene wrapped ferromagnetic surfaces.

  4. Practical considerations for coil-wrapped Distributed Temperature Sensing setups

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solcerova, Anna; van Emmerik, Tim; Hilgersom, Koen; van de Giesen, Nick

    2015-04-01

    Fiber-optic Distributed Temperature Sensing (DTS) has been applied widely in hydrological and meteorological systems. For example, DTS has been used to measure streamflow, groundwater, soil moisture and temperature, air temperature, and lake energy fluxes. Many of these applications require a spatial monitoring resolution smaller than the minimum resolution of the DTS device. Therefore, measuring with these resolutions requires a custom made setup. To obtain both high temporal and high spatial resolution temperature measurements, fiber-optic cable is often wrapped around, and glued to, a coil, for example a PVC conduit. For these setups, it is often assumed that the construction characteristics (e.g., the coil material, shape, diameter) do not influence the DTS temperature measurements significantly. This study compares DTS datasets obtained during four measurement campaigns. The datasets were acquired using different setups, allowing to investigate the influence of the construction characteristics on the monitoring results. This comparative study suggests that the construction material, shape, diameter, and way of attachment can have a significant influence on the results. We present a qualitative and quantitative approximation of errors introduced through the selection of the construction, e.g., choice of coil material, influence of solar radiation, coil diameter, and cable attachment method. Our aim is to provide insight in factors that influence DTS measurements, which designers of future DTS measurements setups can take into account. Moreover, we present a number of solutions to minimize these errors for improved temperature retrieval using DTS.

  5. The Application of Adaptive Sampling and Analysis Program (ASAP) Techniques to NORM Sites

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, Robert; Smith, Karen P.; Quinn, John

    1999-10-29

    The results from the Michigan demonstration establish that this type of approach can be very effective for NORM sites. The advantages include (1) greatly reduced per sample analytical costs; (2) a reduced reliance on soil sampling and ex situ gamma spectroscopy analyses; (3) the ability to combine characterization with remediation activities in one fieldwork cycle; (4) improved documentation; and (5) ultimately better remediation, as measured by greater precision in delineating soils that are not in compliance with requirements from soils that are in compliance. In addition, the demonstration showed that the use of real-time technologies, such as the RadInSoil, can facilitate the implementation of a Multi-Agency Radiation Survey and Site Investigation Manual (MARSSIM)-based final status survey program

  6. Blood Pressure and Hemodynamic Adaptations after a Training Program in Young Individuals with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Seron, Bruna Barboza; Goessler, Karla Fabiana; Modesto, Everaldo Lambert; Almeida, Eloise Werle; Greguol, Márcia

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases affect people worldwide. Individuals with Down Syndrome (DS) have an up to sixteen-time greater risk of mortality from cardiovascular diseases. Objective To evaluate the effects of aerobic and resistance exercises on blood pressure and hemodynamic variables of young individuals with DS. Methods A total of 29 young individuals with DS participated in the study. They were divided into two groups: aerobic training (AT) (n = 14), and resistance training (TR) (n = 15). Their mean age was 15.7 ± 2.82 years. The training program lasted 12 weeks, and had a frequency of three times a week for AT and twice a week for RT. AT was performed in treadmill/ bicycle ergometer, at an intensity between 50%-70% of the HR reserve. RT comprised nine exercises with three sets of 12 repetition-maximum. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean blood pressure (MBP) and hemodynamic variables were assessed beat-to-beat using the Finometer device before/after the training program. Descriptive analysis, the Shapiro-Wilk test to check the normality of data, and the two-way ANOVA for repeated measures were used to compare pre- and post-training variables. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient was calculated to correlate hemodynamic variables. The SPSS version 18.0 was used with the significance level set at p < 0.05. Results After twelve weeks of aerobic and/or resistance training, significant reductions in variables SBP, DBP and MBP were observed. Conclusion This study suggests a chronic hypotensive effect of moderate aerobic and resistance exercises on young individuals with DS. PMID:26131704

  7. Characteristics of Youth Presenting to a Canadian Youth Concurrent Disorders Program: Clinical Complexity, Trauma, Adaptive Functioning and Treatment Priorities

    PubMed Central

    Catchpole, Rosalind E. H.; Brownlie, E. B.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: This study describes clinical characteristics of youth presenting for service at a Canadian youth concurrent mental health and substance use disorders (SUD) program. Method: Participants were 100 adolescents and emerging adults (aged 14–25) who attended a Canadian concurrent mental health and substance use disorders outpatient program. SUDs were assigned using the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV. Self-reported mental health symptoms, trauma exposure and adaptive functioning were also assessed. Results: Eighty-three percent of participants scored over the clinical cut-off on at least one mental health scale and 33% reported at least one suicide attempt. Sixty-six percent met criteria for a current SUD; 96% met lifetime criteria. Exposure to adverse events was nearly universal (94%). Almost half of female (46%) and almost a third of male (31%) participants endorsed symptoms consistent with posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD). Youth reported impairment and need for support in multiple domains of functioning, including school, peer, family and mental health. Substance use was least likely to be identified as a treatment priority. Conclusions: High rates of adverse events and PTSD highlight the need for trauma-informed care when providing services to this vulnerable population. Functional impairment in domains related to developmental transitions and tasks underscores the need for a developmental lens and integrated treatment that goes beyond mental health and SUD symptoms and addresses developmentally relevant domains during this transitional age. PMID:27274746

  8. Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Final Safety Analysis Report (FSAR)

    SciTech Connect

    TOMASZEWSKI, T.A.

    2000-04-25

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP), 2336W Building, on the Hanford Site is designed to receive, confirm, repackage, certify, treat, store, and ship contact-handled transuranic and low-level radioactive waste from past and present U.S. Department of Energy activities. The WRAP facility is comprised of three buildings: 2336W, the main processing facility (also referred to generically as WRAP); 2740W, an administrative support building; and 2620W, a maintenance support building. The support buildings are subject to the normal hazards associated with industrial buildings (no radiological materials are handled) and are not part of this analysis except as they are impacted by operations in the processing building, 2336W. WRAP is designed to provide safer, more efficient methods of handling the waste than currently exist on the Hanford Site and contributes to the achievement of as low as reasonably achievable goals for Hanford Site waste management.

  9. An alternate solution for the treatment of ascending aortic aneurysms: the wrapping technique

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background The aortic Dacron wrapping technique is a surgical technique used under certain circumstances in cases of ascending aorta dilatation. Herein, we are presenting our experience on the method performed on multimorbid patients who denied major aortic surgery. Methods We included in our series 7 patients (5 male-2 female) with mild to moderate ascending aortic dilatation, who were operated with the wrapping technique. One patient was submitted to biological aortic valve replacement during the same procedure. The number of conventionally operated patients during the same period (2 years) was 21. Results Mortality during the 18-months follow-up control was 0%. One patient had to be operated with biological aortic valve replacement 18 months after the initial wrapping operation, although the diameter of her ascending aorta remained stable. Conclusions The Dacron wrapping technique is a method that can alternatively be used in multimorbid patients with mild to moderate ascending aortic dilatation without dissecting elements and has generally good results. PMID:21047398

  10. A 'compare and contrast' exercise: wrapping versus personalised external aortic root support (PEARS).

    PubMed

    Treasure, Tom

    2016-01-01

    Wrapping of the aorta and personalised external aortic root support (PEARS) both have the purpose of preventing further expansion of the ascending aorta in order to reduce the risk of aortic dissection and to spare the patient the disastrous consequences of aortic rupture. For the first time, Plonek and colleagues have reported systematically the CT appearances of a series of cases of wrapping. They illustrate the important finding that there are residual spaces between the aorta and the wrap. PEARS by contrast is intimately in contact with the aorta due to its personalised design and is fully incorporated due it construction from a porous mesh. A limitation of PEARS is that it is, of its nature, a planned and elective operation while wrapping can be undertaken during an emergency operation and can be used without prior planning as an intraoperative decision. PMID:27406033

  11. Wrapped Interferograms Enhanced By MuLSAR Method: Applications And Comparison To Other Methods

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinel-Puyssegur, Beatrice; Karnoukian, Marc; Granin, Raphael; Lasserre, Cecile; Doin, Marie-Pierre

    2013-12-01

    SAR interferometry (InSAR) is a powerful technique to monitor surface displacements. However, InSAR suffers from numerous noise sources such as temporal and geometric decorrelation of images. In this study, we apply the MuLSAR method [1] to produce robust denoised wrapped phase time series from the combination of wrapped interferograms, using the redundancy of interferograms. It is particularly efficient in high temporal decorrelation areas. Our method has been applied to ENVISAT time series suffering from diverse temporal decorrelation in three regions: the Himalaya, the Levantine Fault in Lebanon and Western Pakistan. The interferograms are efficiently enhanced for every time series. First, we show that a criterion called colinearity is more efficient than the coherence to quantify wrapped phase quality. The performance of MuLSAR method is demonstrated as it enhances post-processing steps (DEM residual compensation, unwrapping). It is finally compared to another method of wrapped time series enhancement, SqueeSAR [2].

  12. Adapting FAO-56 Spreadsheet Program to estimate olive orchard transpiration fluxes under soil water stress condition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rallo, G.; Provenzano, G.; Manzano-Juárez, J.

    2012-04-01

    In the Mediterranean environment, where the period of crops growth does not coincide with the rainy season, the crop is subject to water stress periods that may be amplified with improper irrigation management. Agro-hydrological models can be considered an economic and simple tool to optimize irrigation water use, mainly when water represents a limiting factor for crop production. In the last two decades, agro-hydrological physically based models have been developed to simulate mass and energy exchange processes in the soil-plant-atmosphere system (Feddes et al., 1978; Bastiaanssen et al., 2007). Unfortunately these models, although very reliable, as a consequence of the high number of required variables and the complex computational analysis, cannot often be used. Therefore, simplified agro-hydrological models may represent an useful and simple tool for practical irrigation scheduling. The main objective of the work is to assess, for an olive orchard, the suitability of FAO-56 spreadsheet agro-hydrological model to estimate a long time series of field transpiration, soil water content and crop water stress dynamic. A modification of the spreadsheet is suggested in order to adapt the simulations to a crop tolerant to water stress. In particular, by implementing a new crop water stress function, actual transpiration fluxes and an ecophysiological stress indicator, i. e. the relative transpiration, are computed in order to evaluate a plant-based irrigation scheduling parameter. Validation of the proposed amendment is carried out by means of measured sap fluxes, measured on different plants and up-scaled to plot level. Spatial and temporal variability of soil water contents in the plot was measured, at several depths, using the Diviner 2000 capacitance probe (Sentek Environmental Technologies, 2000) and TDR-100 (Campbell scientific, Inc.) system. The detailed measurements of soil water content, allowed to explore the high spatial variability of soil water content due

  13. Programmed cell death and adaptation: two different types of abiotic stress response in a unicellular chlorophyte.

    PubMed

    Zuppini, Anna; Gerotto, Caterina; Baldan, Barbara

    2010-06-01

    Eukaryotic microalgae are highly suitable biological indicators of environmental changes because they are exposed to extreme seasonal fluctuations. The biochemical and molecular targets and regulators of key proteins involved in the stress response in microalgae have yet to be elucidated. This study presents morphological and biochemical evidence of programmed cell death (PCD) in a low temperature strain of Chlorella saccharophila induced by exposure to NaCl stress. Morphological characteristics of PCD, including cell shrinkage, detachment of the plasma membrane from the cell wall, nuclear condensation and DNA fragmentation, were observed. Additionally, a significant production of H(2)O(2) and increase in caspase 3-like activity were detected. We demonstrated that singly applied environmental stresses such as warming or salt stress trigger a pathway of PCD. Intriguingly, the prior application of salt stress seems to reduce heat shock-induced cell death significantly, suggesting a combined effect which activates a defense mechanism in algal cells. These results suggest that C. saccharophila can undergo PCD under stress conditions, and that this PCD shares several features with metazoan PCD. Moreover, the simultaneous exposure of this unicellular chlorophyte to different abiotic stresses results in a tolerance mechanism. PMID:20457671

  14. Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Weight Scale Analysis Fairbanks Weight Scale Evaluation Results

    SciTech Connect

    JOHNSON, M.D.

    2000-03-13

    Fairbanks Weight Scales are used at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility to determine the weight of waste drums as they are received, processed, and shipped. Due to recent problems, discovered during calibration, the WRAP Engineering Department has completed this document which outlines both the investigation of the infeed conveyor scale failure in September of 1999 and recommendations for calibration procedure modifications designed to correct deficiencies in the current procedures.

  15. Persons with multiple disabilities increase adaptive responding and control inadequate posture or behavior through programs based on microswitch-cluster technology.

    PubMed

    Lancioni, Giulio E; Singh, Nirbhay N; O'Reilly, Mark F; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Boccasini, Adele; La Martire, Maria L; D'Amico, Fiora; Sasanelli, Giovanni

    2013-10-01

    Study I used typical microswitch-cluster programs to promote adaptive responding (i.e., object manipulation) and reduce inappropriate head or head-trunk forward leaning with a boy and a woman with multiple disabilities. Optic, tilt, and vibration microswitches were used to record their adaptive responses while optic and tilt microswitches monitored their posture. The study included an ABB(1)AB(1) sequence, in which A represented baseline phases, B represented an intervention phase in which adaptive responses were always followed by preferred stimulation, and B(1) represented intervention phases in which the adaptive responses led to preferred stimulation only if the inappropriate posture was absent. Study II assessed a non-typical, new microswitch-cluster program to promote two adaptive responses (i.e., mouth cleaning to reduce drooling effects and object assembling) with a man with multiple disabilities. Initially, the man received preferred stimulation for each cleaning response. Then, he received stimulation only if mouth cleaning was preceded by object assembling. The results of Study I showed that both participants had large increases in adaptive responding and a drastic reduction in inappropriate posture during the B(1) phases and a 2-week post-intervention check. The results of Study II showed that the man learned to control drooling effects through mouth cleaning and used object assembling to extend constructive engagement and interspace cleaning responses functionally. The practical implications of the findings are discussed. PMID:23920024

  16. Silk wrapping of nuptial gifts as visual signal for female attraction in a crepuscular spider

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trillo, Mariana C.; Melo-González, Valentina; Albo, Maria J.

    2014-02-01

    An extensive diversity of nuptial gifts is known in invertebrates, but prey wrapped in silk is a unique type of gift present in few insects and spiders. Females from spider species prefer males offering a gift accepting more and longer matings than when males offered no gift. Silk wrapping of the gift is not essential to obtain a mating, but appears to increase the chance of a mating evidencing a particularly intriguing function of this trait. Consequently, as other secondary sexual traits, silk wrapping may be an important trait under sexual selection, if it is used by females as a signal providing information on male quality. We aimed to understand whether the white color of wrapped gifts is used as visual signal during courtship in the spider Paratrechalea ornata. We studied if a patch of white paint on the males' chelicerae is attractive to females by exposing females to males: with their chelicerae painted white; without paint; and with the sternum painted white (paint control). Females contacted males with white chelicerae more often and those males obtained higher mating success than other males. Thereafter, we explored whether silk wrapping is a condition-dependent trait and drives female visual attraction. We exposed good and poor condition males, carrying a prey, to the female silk. Males in poor condition added less silk to the prey than males in good condition, indicating that gift wrapping is an indicator of male quality and may be used by females to acquire information of the potential mate.

  17. DESIGN OF WIRE-WRAPPED ROD BUNDLE MATCHED INDEX-OF-REFRACTION EXPERIMENTS

    SciTech Connect

    Hugh McIlroy; Hongbin Zhang; Kurt Hamman

    2008-05-01

    Experiments will be conducted in the Idaho National Laboratory (INL) Matched Index-of-Refraction (MIR) Flow Facility [1] to characterize the three-dimensional velocity and turbulence fields in a wire-wrapped rod bundle typically employed in liquid-metal cooled fast reactors and to provide benchmark data for computer code validation. Sodium cooled fast reactors are under consideration for use in the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP) program. The experiment model will be constructed of quartz components and the working fluid will be mineral oil. Accurate temperature control (to within 0.05 oC) matches the index-of-refraction of mineral oil with that of quartz and renders the model transparent to the wavelength of laser light employed for optical measurements. The model will be a scaled 7-pin rod bundle enclosed in a hexagonal canister. Flow field measurements will be obtained with a LaVision 3-D particle image velocimeter (PIV) and complimented by near-wall velocity measurements obtained from a 2-D laser Doppler velocimeter (LDV). These measurements will be used as benchmark data for computational fluid dynamics (CFD) validation. The rod bundle model dimensions will be scaled up from the typical dimensions of a fast reactor fuel assembly to provide the maximum Reynolds number achievable in the MIR flow loop. A range of flows from laminar to fully-turbulent will be available with a maximum Reynolds number, based on bundle hydraulic diameter, of approximately 22,000. The fuel pins will be simulated by 85 mm diameter quartz tubes (closed on the inlet ends) and the wire-wrap will be simulated by 25 mm diameter quartz rods. The canister walls will be constructed from quartz plates. The model will be approximately 2.13 m in length. Bundle pressure losses will also be measured and the data recorded for code comparisons. The experiment design and preliminary CFD calculations, which will be used to provide qualitative hydrodynamic

  18. Structural mechanics of DNA wrapping in the nucleosome.

    PubMed

    Battistini, Federica; Hunter, Christopher A; Gardiner, Eleanor J; Packer, Martin J

    2010-02-19

    were obtained by applying a constant bending moment. When a single bending moment was applied to the entire sequence, the local details of the calculated structure did not match the experiment. However, when local 10-step bending moments were applied separately, the calculated structure showed excellent agreement with experiment. This implies that the protein applies variable bending forces along the DNA to maintain the superhelical path required for nucleosome wrapping. In particular, the 50 degrees kinks are constraints imposed by the protein rather than a feature of the 1kx5 DNA sequence. The kinks coincide with a relatively flexible region of the sequence, and this is probably a prerequisite for high-affinity nucleosome binding, but the bending strain energy is significantly higher at these points than for the rest of the sequence. In the most rigid regions of the sequence, a higher strain energy is also required to achieve the standard 30 degrees curvature per helical turn. We conclude that matching of the DNA sequence to the local roll periodicity required to achieve bending, together with the increased flexibility required at the kinks, determines the sequence selectivity of DNA wrapping in the nucleosome. PMID:19932116

  19. The New Digital [St]age: Barriers to the Adoption and Adaptation of New Technologies to Deliver Extension Programming and How to Address Them

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Seger, Jamie

    2011-01-01

    With the rise of social media and the need for statewide program cohesiveness, The Ohio State University Extension has the opportunity to position itself as a catalyst for technology adoption and adaptation nationwide. Unfortunately, many barriers exist to the successful use and implementation of technology, including an organizational structure…

  20. Adaptation of the ALLP-II Spanish Self-Instructional Program (F. Rand Morton, University of Michigan) to Class Sessions. Final Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stevens, Thomas C.; Diaz-Carnot, Raul

    An experimental adaptation of the second phase of an autoinstructional Spanish program was conducted at Culver-Stockton College in Missouri during the academic year 1965-66. This report suggests that despite the inconclusive nature of the evidence drawn from the experiment, the relatively high level of student efficiency in vocalization, auditory…

  1. Persons with Multiple Disabilities Exercise Adaptive Response Schemes with the Help of Technology-Based Programs: Three Single-Case Studies

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Oliva, Doretta; Campodonico, Francesca; Lang, Russell

    2012-01-01

    The present three single-case studies assessed the effectiveness of technology-based programs to help three persons with multiple disabilities exercise adaptive response schemes independently. The response schemes included (a) left and right head movements for a man who kept his head increasingly static on his wheelchair's headrest (Study I), (b)…

  2. Neuroendocrine transcriptional programs adapt dynamically to the supply and demand for neuropeptides as revealed in NSF mutant zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Kurrasch, Deborah M; Nevin, Linda M; Wong, Jinny S; Baier, Herwig; Ingraham, Holly A

    2009-01-01

    Background Regulated secretion of specialized neuropeptides in the vertebrate neuroendocrine system is critical for ensuring physiological homeostasis. Expression of these cell-specific peptide markers in the differentiating hypothalamus commences prior to birth, often predating the physiological demand for secreted neuropeptides. The conserved function and spatial expression of hypothalamic peptides in vertebrates prompted us to search for critical neuroendocrine genes in newly hatched zebrafish larvae. Results We screened mutant 5 days post-fertilization zebrafish larvae that fail to undergo visually mediated background adaptation for disruption in hypothalamic pomc expression. To our surprise, the ATPase N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor (nsf) was identified as an essential gene for maintenance of neuroendocrine transcriptional programs during the embryo-to-larva transition. Despite normal hypothalamic development in nsfst53 mutants, neuropeptidergic cells exhibited a dramatic loss of cell-specific markers by 5 days post-fertilization that is accompanied by elevated intracellular neuropeptide protein. Consistent with the role of NSF in vesicle-membrane fusion events and intracellular trafficking, cytoplasmic endoplasmic reticulum-like membranes accumulate in nsf-/- hypothalamic neurons similar to that observed for SEC18 (nsf ortholog) yeast mutants. Our data support a model in which unspent neuropeptide cargo feedbacks to extinguish transcription in neuropeptidergic cells just as they become functionally required. In support of this model we found that gnrh3 transcripts remained unchanged in pre-migratory, non-functional gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) neurons in nsf-/- zebrafish. Furthermore, oxytocin-like (oxtl, intp) transcripts, which are found in osmoreceptive neurons and persist in mutant zebrafish, drop precipitously after mutant zebrafish are acutely challenged with high salt. Conclusion Our analyses of nsf mutant zebrafish reveal an unexpected

  3. Adapting Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedman, John; Wedman, Judy

    1985-01-01

    The "Animals" program found on the Apple II and IIe system master disk can be adapted for use in the mathematics classroom. Instructions for making the necessary changes and suggestions for using it in lessons related to geometric shapes are provided. (JN)

  4. QoS Differential Scheduling in Cognitive-Radio-Based Smart Grid Networks: An Adaptive Dynamic Programming Approach.

    PubMed

    Yu, Rong; Zhong, Weifeng; Xie, Shengli; Zhang, Yan; Zhang, Yun

    2016-02-01

    As the next-generation power grid, smart grid will be integrated with a variety of novel communication technologies to support the explosive data traffic and the diverse requirements of quality of service (QoS). Cognitive radio (CR), which has the favorable ability to improve the spectrum utilization, provides an efficient and reliable solution for smart grid communications networks. In this paper, we study the QoS differential scheduling problem in the CR-based smart grid communications networks. The scheduler is responsible for managing the spectrum resources and arranging the data transmissions of smart grid users (SGUs). To guarantee the differential QoS, the SGUs are assigned to have different priorities according to their roles and their current situations in the smart grid. Based on the QoS-aware priority policy, the scheduler adjusts the channels allocation to minimize the transmission delay of SGUs. The entire transmission scheduling problem is formulated as a semi-Markov decision process and solved by the methodology of adaptive dynamic programming. A heuristic dynamic programming (HDP) architecture is established for the scheduling problem. By the online network training, the HDP can learn from the activities of primary users and SGUs, and adjust the scheduling decision to achieve the purpose of transmission delay minimization. Simulation results illustrate that the proposed priority policy ensures the low transmission delay of high priority SGUs. In addition, the emergency data transmission delay is also reduced to a significantly low level, guaranteeing the differential QoS in smart grid. PMID:25910254

  5. Mixed waste solidification testing on polymer and cement-based waste forms in support of Hanford`s WRAP 2A facility

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A. Jr.; Weingardt, K.M.

    1993-10-01

    A testing program has been conducted by the Westinghouse Hanford Company to confirm the baseline waste form selection for use in Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 2A. WRAP Module 2A will provide treatment required to properly dispose of containerized contact-handled, mixed low-level waste at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Solidification/stabilization has been chosen as the appropriate treatment for this waste. This work is intended to test cement-based, thermosetting polymer, and thermoplastic polymer solidification media to substantiate the technology approach for WRAP Module 2A. Screening tests were performed using the major chemical constituent of each waste type to measure the gross compatibility with the immobilization media and to determine formulations for more detailed testing. Surrogate materials representing each of the eight waste types were prepared in the laboratory. These surrogates were then solidified with the selected immobilization media and subjected to a battery of standard performance tests. Detailed discussion of the laboratory work and results are contained in this report.

  6. Mixed waste solidification testing on thermosetting polymer and cement based waste forms in support of Hanford`s WRAP Module 2A Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Burbank, D.A.; Weingardt, K.M.

    1993-03-01

    A testing program has been conducted by the Westinghouse Hanford Company to confirm the baseline waste form selection for use in Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 2A. WRAP Module 2A will provide treatment required to properly dispose of containerized contact-handled, mixed low-level waste at the US Department of Energy Hanford Site in south-central Washington State. Solidification/stabilization has been chosen as the appropriate treatment for this waste. This work is intended to test cement-based and thermosetting polymer solidification media to confirm the baseline technologies selected for WRAP Module 2A. Screening tests were performed using the major chemical constituent of each waste type to measure the gross compatibility with the immobilization media and to determine formulations for more detailed testing. Surrogate wastes representing each of the eight waste types were prepared for testing. Surrogates for polymer testing were sent to a vendor commissioned for that portion of the test work. Surrogates for the grout testing were used in the Westinghouse Hanford Company laboratory responsible for the grout performance testing. Detailed discussion of the laboratory work and results are contained in this report.

  7. Integer-linear-programing optimization in scalable video multicast with adaptive modulation and coding in wireless networks.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dongyul; Lee, Chaewoo

    2014-01-01

    The advancement in wideband wireless network supports real time services such as IPTV and live video streaming. However, because of the sharing nature of the wireless medium, efficient resource allocation has been studied to achieve a high level of acceptability and proliferation of wireless multimedia. Scalable video coding (SVC) with adaptive modulation and coding (AMC) provides an excellent solution for wireless video streaming. By assigning different modulation and coding schemes (MCSs) to video layers, SVC can provide good video quality to users in good channel conditions and also basic video quality to users in bad channel conditions. For optimal resource allocation, a key issue in applying SVC in the wireless multicast service is how to assign MCSs and the time resources to each SVC layer in the heterogeneous channel condition. We formulate this problem with integer linear programming (ILP) and provide numerical results to show the performance under 802.16 m environment. The result shows that our methodology enhances the overall system throughput compared to an existing algorithm. PMID:25276862

  8. Integer-Linear-Programing Optimization in Scalable Video Multicast with Adaptive Modulation and Coding in Wireless Networks

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Chaewoo

    2014-01-01

    The advancement in wideband wireless network supports real time services such as IPTV and live video streaming. However, because of the sharing nature of the wireless medium, efficient resource allocation has been studied to achieve a high level of acceptability and proliferation of wireless multimedia. Scalable video coding (SVC) with adaptive modulation and coding (AMC) provides an excellent solution for wireless video streaming. By assigning different modulation and coding schemes (MCSs) to video layers, SVC can provide good video quality to users in good channel conditions and also basic video quality to users in bad channel conditions. For optimal resource allocation, a key issue in applying SVC in the wireless multicast service is how to assign MCSs and the time resources to each SVC layer in the heterogeneous channel condition. We formulate this problem with integer linear programming (ILP) and provide numerical results to show the performance under 802.16 m environment. The result shows that our methodology enhances the overall system throughput compared to an existing algorithm. PMID:25276862

  9. Community-Based Adaptive Physical Activity Program for Chronic Stroke: Feasibility, Safety, and Efficacy of the Empoli Model

    PubMed Central

    Stuart, Mary; Benvenuti, Francesco; Macko, Richard; Taviani, Antonio; Segenni, Lucianna; Mayer, Federico; Sorkin, John D.; Stanhope, Steven J.; Macellari, Velio; Weinrich, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Objective To determine whether Adaptive Physical Activity (APA-stroke), a community-based exercise program for participants with hemiparetic stroke, improves function in the community. Methods Nonrandomized controlled study in Tuscany, Italy, of participants with mild to moderate hemiparesis at least 9 months after stroke. Forty-nine participants in a geographic health authority (Empoli) were offered APA-stroke (40 completed the study). Forty-four control participants in neighboring health authorities (Florence and Pisa) received usual care (38 completed the study). The APA intervention was a community-based progressive group exercise regimen that included walking, strength, and balance training for 1 hour, thrice a week, in local gyms, supervised by gym instructors. No serious adverse clinical events occurred during the exercise intervention. Outcome measures included the following: 6-month change in gait velocity (6-Minute Timed Walk), Short Physical Performance Battery (SPPB), Berg Balance Scale, Stroke Impact Scale (SIS), Barthel Index, Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression, and Index of Caregivers Strain. Results After 6 months, the intervention group improved whereas controls declined in gait velocity, balance, SPPB, and SIS social participation domains. These between-group comparisons were statistically significant at P < .00015. Individuals with depressive symptoms at baseline improved whereas controls were unchanged (P < .003). Oral glucose tolerance tests were performed on a subset of participants in the intervention group. For these individuals, insulin secretion declined 29% after 6 months (P = .01). Conclusion APA-stroke appears to be safe, feasible, and efficacious in a community setting. PMID:19318465

  10. Determination of volatile organic compounds (VOCs) from wrapping films and wrapped PDO Italian cheeses by using HS-SPME and GC/MS.

    PubMed

    Panseri, Sara; Chiesa, Luca Maria; Zecconi, Alfonso; Soncini, Gabriella; De Noni, Ivano

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays food wrapping assures attractive presentation and simplifies self-service shopping. Polyvinylchloride (PVC)- and polyethylene (PE)-based cling-films are widely used worldwide for wrapping cheeses. For this purpose, films used in retail possess suitable technical properties such as clinginess and unrolling capacity, that are achieved by using specific plasticizers during their manufacturing process. In the present study, the main VOCs of three cling-films (either PVC-based or PE-based) for retail use were characterized by means of Solid-Phase Micro-Extraction and GC/MS. In addition, the effects of cling film type and contact time on the migration of VOCs from the films to four different PDO Italian cheeses during cold storage under light or dark were also investigated. Among the VOCs isolated from cling-films, PVC released 2-ethylhexanol and triacetin. These compounds can likely be considered as a "non-intentionally added substance". These same compounds were also detected in cheeses wrapped in PVC films with the highest concentration found after 20 days storage. The PE cling-film was shown to possess a simpler VOC profile, lacking some molecules peculiar to PVC films. The same conclusions can be drawn for cheeses wrapped in the PE cling-film. Other VOCs found in wrapped cheeses were likely to have been released either by direct transfer from the materials used for the manufacture of cling-films or from contamination of the films. Overall, HS-SPME is shown to be a rapid and solvent free technique to screen the VOCs profile of cling-films, and to detect VOCs migration from cling-films to cheese under real retail storage conditions. PMID:24968328

  11. Broken Optical Symmetry in DNA-SWNT Hybrids: Spectroscopic Signaling of the Helical Wrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotkin, Slava V.

    2009-03-01

    Functionalizing single-stranded DNA on a single-wall carbon nanotube (SWNT) has allowed isolating individual tubes, making them soluble, and separating SWNTs according to their chirality. Such strong technological impact motivated our study of the optical properties of the DNA-SWNT hybrids, commonly used now for the solution-based fabrication and experiments. The helicity of the DNA wrap may interfere with the intrinsic Hamiltonian of the SWNT and result in bandstructure modulation. Our modeling predicts a symmetry lowering in the hybrid due to the Coulomb potential of the regular helical wrap of the ionized backbone of the ssDNA, followed by the qualitative changes in the cross- or circularly polarized SWNT absorption spectrum (with no or little change in the parallel polarization). In particular, we predict the appearance of a new peak in the cross-polarized absorption of the ssDNA-SWNT at a frequency lower than that of all allowed transitions in the bare tube. Such effect can be used for optical identification of the wrap at sufficient ssDNA coverage. Wrap signaling happens also via another optical effect, a strong circular dichroism even in the complex with an achiral SWNT, and even at the frequencies where ss-DNA has no absorption features at all. Symmetry of the wrap is central to determine such a circular dichroism of the hybrid. Having in mind that the exact geometry of a DNA wrap for an arbitrary tube is not precisely known yet, we put forward a general model capable of tracking optical effects, varying the parameters of the wrap and/or tube diameter. For various ssDNA backbone helical angles and for various tubes we predict different absorption spectra, though a general qualitative feature of the helical symmetry breaking, the appearance of new van Hove singularities and circular dichroism, must be present.

  12. An adaptive maneuvering logic computer program for the simulation of one-on-one air-to-air combat. Volume 1: General description

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burgin, G. H.; Fogel, L. J.; Phelps, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    A technique for computer simulation of air combat is described. Volume 1 decribes the computer program and its development in general terms. Two versions of the program exist. Both incorporate a logic for selecting and executing air combat maneuvers with performance models of specific fighter aircraft. In the batch processing version the flight paths of two aircraft engaged in interactive aerial combat and controlled by the same logic are computed. The realtime version permits human pilots to fly air-to-air combat against the adaptive maneuvering logic (AML) in Langley Differential Maneuvering Simulator (DMS). Volume 2 consists of a detailed description of the computer programs.

  13. Pregnancy, programming and preeclampsia: gap junctions at the nexus of pregnancy-induced adaptation of endothelial function and endothelial adaptive failure in PE.

    PubMed

    Bird, I M; Boeldt, D S; Krupp, J; Grummer, M A; Yi, F X; Magness, R R

    2013-09-01

    The challenge of pregnancy to the mother requires that her own metabolic and endocrine needs be met while also taking on the literally growing demands of the unborn child. While all of the mother's organs require continued support, the uterus and now added placenta must also develop substantially. One critical area of adaptation is thus the ability to provide added blood flow over and above that already serving the preexisting maternal organs. Previous reviews have covered in detail how this is achieved from an endocrine or indeed vascular physiology standpoint and we will not repeat that here. Suffice it to say in addition to new vessel growth, there is also the need to achieve reduced vascular resistance through maintenance of endothelial vasodilation, particularly through NO and PGI2 production in response to multiple agonists and their associated cell signaling systems. In this review, we continue our focus on pregnancy adaptive changes at the level of cell signaling, with a particular emphasis now on the developing story of the critical role of gap junctions. Remapping of cell signaling itself beyond changes in individual hormones and respective receptors brings about global changes in cell function, and recent studies have revealed that such post-receptor changes in cell signaling are equally if not more important in the process of pregnancy adaptation of endothelial function than the upregulated expression of vasodilator synthetic pathways themselves. The principle significance, however, of reviewing this aspect of pregnancy adaptation of endothelial cell function is that these same gap junction proteins that mediate pregnancy-adapted changes in vasodilatory signaling function may also be the focal point of failure in diseased pregnancy, and clues as to how and why are given by comparing studies of Cx43 functional suppression at wound sites with studies of preeclamptic pregnancy. If preeclamptic pregnancy is indeed a pregnancy misconstrued by the body in

  14. Quality changes of 'Sanguinello' oranges wrapped with different plastic films under simulated marketing conditions.

    PubMed

    D'Aquino, S; Malinconico, M; Avella, M; Di Lorenzo, M L; Mura; Palma, A

    2013-01-01

    Chemical and eating quality of citrus fruit changes slowly after harvest, and quality alteration is mainly due to shrinkage, loss of firmness, excessive weight loss and decay rather than a reduction of nutritional value and taste features. Film wrapping may be a suitable means to reduce transpiration and preserve market quality provided film permeability to gases does not lead to: 1) a reduction of in-package O2 partial pressure at a point that would induce anaerobic respiration; 2) an increase of CO2 concentration to toxic levels. This experiment was carried out to study quality changes of 'Sanguinello' oranges treated or not treated with 500 mg/L imazalil (IMZ) and wrapped with continuous, macro- or micro-perforated polyolefinic films. Wrapped and no-wrapped fruit were stored at 20 degrees C and 60% RH for 20 or 30 days. In-package gas composition of the macro-perforated film showed no significant difference compared to air composition, while in-package partial pressure of CO2 and O2 ranged between 4 (continuous film) and 9.8 kPa (micro-perforated films), and 14.8 (continuous film) and 5 kPa (micro-perforated films), respectively. After 30 days of storage weight loss in fruit wrapped with the macro-perforated film was (4.3%) slightly lowerthan un-packed fruit (5%), while in all other packages weight loss never exceeded 0.7%.Quality changes were quite stable over storage in all treatments, although slight but significantly lower levels of total soluble solids and ascorbic acid were detected in micro-perforated films with the lowest degree of perforation. However, the sensory analysis denoted a remarkable decrease of firmness in un-wrapped or wrapped fruit with macro-perforated film, while a moderate build-up of off-flavour, which reduced the eating quality, developed in micro-perforated films. Decay ranged between 6 and 12% in not treated fruit, with the lowest incidence detected in un-wrapped fruit, whereas differences among the different films were not

  15. Lipid-Mediated Targeting with Membrane-Wrapped Nanoparticles in the Presence of Corona Formation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Fangda; Reiser, Michael; Yu, Xinwei; Gummuluru, Suryaram; Wetzler, Lee; Reinhard, Björn M

    2016-01-26

    Membrane-wrapped nanoparticles represent a versatile platform for utilizing specific lipid-receptor interactions, such as siallyllactose-mediated binding of the ganglioside GM3 to Siglec1 (CD169), for targeting purposes. The membrane wrap around the nanoparticles not only serves as a matrix to incorporate GM3 as targeting moiety for antigen-presenting cells but also offers unique opportunities for constructing a biomimetic surface from lipids with potentially protein-repellent properties. We characterize nonspecific protein adsorption (corona formation) to membrane-wrapped nanoparticles with core diameters of approximately 35 and 80 nm and its effect on the GM3-mediated targeting efficacy as a function of surface charge through combined in vitro and in vivo studies. The stability and fate of the membrane wrap around the nanoparticles in a simulated biological fluid and after uptake in CD169-expressing antigen-presenting cells is experimentally tested. Finally, we demonstrate in hock immunization studies in mice that GM3-decorated membrane-wrapped nanoparticles achieve a selective enrichment in the peripheral regions of popliteal lymph nodes that contain high concentrations of CD169-expressing antigen-presenting cells. PMID:26720275

  16. Unilateral Versus Bilateral Wrap Crural Fixation in Laparoscopic Nissen Fundoplication for Children

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction: Gastroesophageal reflux (GERD) is common in neurologically impaired (NI) children. Fundoplication and gastrostomy have previously been indicated in NI children with GERD who have not responded to medical treatment. The most common reason for fundoplication failure is intrathoracic migration of the wrap. Objective: The aim of the study is to measure the effect of wrap fixation on the final outcome of laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in NI children. Patients and Methods: A retrospective file review was conducted for all NI children who underwent laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication in 2 tertiary pediatric surgery centers in the United Arab Emirates from February 15, 2006 to February 15, 2013. Redo fundoplication patients were excluded from the study. Patients were divided into 2 groups: group 1 in which the fundoplication wrap was fixed to the right crus only, and group 2 in which the wrap was fixed to the right and left crus simultaneously. Results: The study population included 68 patients; there were 47 male and 21 female children. Mean age at time of surgery was 8.2 years. Recurrent GERD at 1 year postoperatively was 26% versus 7% in group 1 and group 2, respectively, by upper contrast study. Redo surgery was required in 21% versus 3% in group 1 and group 2, respectively. Conclusions: Bilateral fixation of the wrap to diaphragmatic crura significantly reduced recurrent GERD, in laparoscopic Nissen fundoplication for neurologically impaired children, with no increased risk of morbidities. Future prospective studies should be conducted with larger patient populations and longer follow-up periods. PMID:25516705

  17. Constructive Developmental Theory and Programming across Cultures: An Examination of the Development and Experiences of Adult Burmese Participants in a High Quality Adaptive Capacity Development Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindsley, Robert Bugden

    2011-01-01

    A recent movement in international development has seen the expansion of capacity development activities to include adaptive approaches to education. Adaptive approaches are distinct from traditional approaches to education as they seek not only to provide new knowledge, but to cultivate more complex and flexible qualities of mind. Borrowed from…

  18. Volume-equated high- and low-repetition daily undulating programming strategies produce similar hypertrophy and strength adaptations.

    PubMed

    Klemp, Alex; Dolan, Chad; Quiles, Justin M; Blanco, Rocky; Zoeller, Robert F; Graves, B Sue; Zourdos, Michael C

    2016-07-01

    The overarching aim of this study was to compare volume-equated high-repetition daily undulating periodization (DUPHR) versus a low-repetition daily undulating periodization (DUPLR) program for muscle performance. Sixteen college-aged (23 ± 3 years) resistance-trained males were counterbalanced into 2 groups: (i) DUPHR (n = 8), with a weekly training order of 12 repetitions (Day 1), 10 repetitions (Day 2), and 8 repetitions (Day 3); and (ii) DUPLR (n = 8), with a weekly training order of 6 repetitions (Day 1), 4 repetitions (Day 2), and 2 repetitions (Day 3). Both groups trained 3 times/week for 8 weeks on nonconsecutive days, with pre- and post-training testing during weeks 1 and 8. Participants performed only squat and bench press exercises each session. Changes in one-repetition maximum (1RM) strength, muscle thickness (MT), and muscular endurance (ME) were assessed. Both groups significantly increased 1RM strength for both squat and bench press (p < 0.01), and no group differences existed (p > 0.05). Similarly, both groups experienced significant increases in chest, lateral quadriceps distal, and anterior quadriceps MT (p < 0.05), but no change was present in either group for lateral quadriceps mid MT (p < 0.05). No group differences were discovered for changes in MT (p > 0.05). ME did not significantly change in the squat or bench press for either group (p > 0.05); however, for squat ME, a moderate effect size was observed for DUPHR (0.57) versus a trivial effect size for DUPLR (0.17). Our findings suggest that in previously trained males, training volume is a significant contributor to strength and hypertrophy adaptations, which occur independently of specific repetition ranges. PMID:27218448

  19. Programmed death ligand 1 as an indicator of pre-existing adaptive immune responses in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Xie, Qian-Kun; Zhao, Yu-Jie; Pan, Tao; Lyu, Ning; Mu, Lu-Wen; Li, Shao-Long; Shi, Mu-De; Zhang, Zhen-Feng; Zhou, Peng-Hui; Zhao, Ming

    2016-07-01

    It is well known that the aberrant expression of programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) on tumor cells impairs antitumor immunity. To date, in hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), the relationship between PD-L1 expression and host-tumor immunity is not well defined. Here, the expression levels of PD-L1 and CD8(+) T cell infiltration were analyzed by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) specimens from 167 HCC patients undergoing resection. A significant positive association was found between PD-L1 expression and the presence of CD8(+) T cell (p < 0.0001). Moreover, constitutive PD-L1 protein expression was not detected by western blot in HepG2, Hep3B, and 7402 HCC cancer cell lines; but co-cultured these cell lines with INFγ, a cytokine produced by activated CD8(+) T cells, remarkably upregulated PD-L1 expression. In fresh frozen HCC specimens, INFγ was found to be significantly correlated with PD-L1 and CD8(+) gene expression, as evaluated by quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). These findings indicate that increased PD-L1 level may represent an adaptive immune resistance mechanism exerted by tumor cells in response to endogenous antitumor activity. Both increased intratumoral PD-L1 and CD8(+) were significantly associated with superior DFS (CD8(+): p = 0.03; PD-L1: p = 0.023) and OS (CD8(+): p = 0.001 and PD-L1: p = 0.059), but PD-L1 expression was not independently prognostic. In conclusions, PD-L1 upregulation is mainly induced by activated CD8(+) cytotoxic T cells pre-existing in HCC milieu rather than be constitutively expressed by the tumor cells, and it is a favorable prognostic factor for HCC. PMID:27622038

  20. Estimation of soil cation exchange capacity using Genetic Expression Programming (GEP) and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Emamgolizadeh, S.; Bateni, S. M.; Shahsavani, D.; Ashrafi, T.; Ghorbani, H.

    2015-10-01

    The soil cation exchange capacity (CEC) is one of the main soil chemical properties, which is required in various fields such as environmental and agricultural engineering as well as soil science. In situ measurement of CEC is time consuming and costly. Hence, numerous studies have used traditional regression-based techniques to estimate CEC from more easily measurable soil parameters (e.g., soil texture, organic matter (OM), and pH). However, these models may not be able to adequately capture the complex and highly nonlinear relationship between CEC and its influential soil variables. In this study, Genetic Expression Programming (GEP) and Multivariate Adaptive Regression Splines (MARS) were employed to estimate CEC from more readily measurable soil physical and chemical variables (e.g., OM, clay, and pH) by developing functional relations. The GEP- and MARS-based functional relations were tested at two field sites in Iran. Results showed that GEP and MARS can provide reliable estimates of CEC. Also, it was found that the MARS model (with root-mean-square-error (RMSE) of 0.318 Cmol+ kg-1 and correlation coefficient (R2) of 0.864) generated slightly better results than the GEP model (with RMSE of 0.270 Cmol+ kg-1 and R2 of 0.807). The performance of GEP and MARS models was compared with two existing approaches, namely artificial neural network (ANN) and multiple linear regression (MLR). The comparison indicated that MARS and GEP outperformed the MLP model, but they did not perform as good as ANN. Finally, a sensitivity analysis was conducted to determine the most and the least influential variables affecting CEC. It was found that OM and pH have the most and least significant effect on CEC, respectively.

  1. A Profile of the Introduction to Adapted Physical Education Course within Undergraduate Physical Education Teacher Education Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piletic, Cindy K.; Davis, Ron

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the profile, content, delivery mechanism, and application of teaching standards, National Association of Sport and Physical Education (NASPE) and Adapted Physical Education National Standards (APENS), within the Introduction to Adapted Physical Education (APE) course for college/university PETE preparation…

  2. Harnessing Protocolized Adaptation in Dissemination: Successful Implementation and Sustainment of the Veterans Affairs Coordinated-Transitional Care Program in a Non-Veterans Affairs Hospital.

    PubMed

    Kind, Amy J H; Brenny-Fitzpatrick, Maria; Leahy-Gross, Kris; Mirr, Jacquelyn; Chapman, Elizabeth; Frey, Brooke; Houlahan, Beth

    2016-02-01

    The Department of Veterans Affairs (VA) Coordinated-Transitional Care (C-TraC) program is a low-cost transitional care program that uses hospital-based nurse case managers, inpatient team integration, and in-depth posthospital telephone contacts to support high-risk patients and their caregivers as they transition from hospital to community. The low-cost, primarily telephone-based C-TraC program reduced 30-day rehospitalizations by one-third, leading to significant cost savings at one VA hospital. Non-VA hospitals have expressed interest in launching C-TraC, but non-VA hospitals differ in important ways from VA hospitals, particularly in terms of context, culture, and resources. The objective of this project was to adapt C-TraC to the specific context of one non-VA setting using a modified Replicating Effective Programs (REP) implementation theory model and to test the feasibility of this protocolized implementation approach. The modified REP model uses a mentored phased-based implementation with intensive preimplementation activities and harnesses key local stakeholders to adapt processes and goals to local context. Using this protocolized implementation approach, an adapted C-TraC protocol was created and launched at the non-VA hospital in July 2013. In its first 16 months, C-TraC successfully enrolled 1,247 individuals with 3.2 full-time nurse case managers, achieving good fidelity for core protocol steps. C-TraC participants experienced a 30-day rehospitalization rate of 10.8%, compared with 16.6% for a contemporary comparison group of similar individuals for whom C-TraC was not available (n = 1,307) (P < .001). The new C-TraC program continues in operation. Use of a modified REP model to guide protocolized adaptation to local context resulted in a C-TraC program that was feasible and sustained in a real-world non-VA setting. A modified REP implementation framework may be an appropriate foundational step for other clinical programs seeking to harness

  3. Short-term effects on substance use of the keepin' it real pilot prevention program: linguistically adapted for youth in Jalisco, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Marsiglia, Flavio F; Booth, Jaime M; Ayers, Stephanie L; Nuño-Gutierrez, Bertha L; Kulis, Stephen; Hoffman, Steven

    2014-10-01

    This article presents the short-term effects of a pilot study of keepin'it REAL (Manténte REAL) conducted in central Mexico by a binational team of investigators. This middle school-based model program for preventing substance use was adapted for Mexico linguistically but not culturally. Two Guadalajara public middle schools were recruited and randomly assigned to either implement the prevention program or serve as a control site. The program was implemented in the treatment site by the students' regular teachers, who were trained by the research team. Seventh graders in ten classrooms in the treatment and control schools (N = 432) completed a pretest and posttest survey in Spanish similar to the survey utilized in the original efficacy trial of keepin'it REAL in the US. T-tests and OLS regressions were conducted to determine the effects of the intervention on substance use outcomes. Differences between treatment and control groups in frequency of use of alcohol and tobacco, the two substances of choice in this sample, were significant and in the desired direction. Differences in amount of use were also in the preferred direction but were not significant for alcohol and only marginally significant for tobacco. When the sample was split by gender, statistically significant treatment effects remained for females but were not observed among males. Effects of the linguistically adapted version of keepin'it REAL appears to be driven by the change in female use; however, the difference in male and female outcomes was not statistically significant. Implications for cultural adaptation and prevention in Mexico are discussed from a communication competency perspective. The promising results of the pilot study suggest that the linguistic adaptation was effective, but that a comprehensive cultural adaptation of keepin'it REAL in partnership with Mexican investigators and communities may be warranted. PMID:23877541

  4. Short-term effects on substance use of the keepin' it REAL pilot prevention program: Linguistically adapted for youth in Jalisco, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Marsiglia, Flavio F.; Booth, Jaime M.; Ayers, Stephanie L.; Nuño-Gutierrez, Bertha L.; Kulis, Stephen; Hoffman, Steven

    2013-01-01

    This article presents the short-term effects of a pilot study of keepin' it REAL(Manténte REAL) conducted in central Mexico by a bi-national team of investigators. This middle school-based model program for preventing substance use was adapted for Mexico linguistically but not culturally. Two Guadalajara public middle schools were recruited and randomly assigned to either implement the prevention program or serve as a control site. The program was implemented in the treatment site by the students' regular teachers, who were trained by the research team. Seventh graders in ten classrooms in the treatment and control schools (N = 432) completed a pretest and post-test survey in Spanish similar to the survey utilized in the original efficacy trial of keepin' it REAL in the US. T-tests and OLS regressions were conducted to determine the effects of the intervention on substance use outcomes. Differences between treatment and control groups in frequency of use of alcohol and tobacco, the two substances of choice in this sample, were significant and in the desired direction. Differences in amount of use were also in the preferred direction but were not significant for alcohol and only marginally significant for tobacco. When the sample was split by gender, statistically significant treatment effects remained for females but were not observed among males. Effects of the linguistically adapted version of keepin' it REAL appears to be driven by the change in female use, however the difference in male and female outcomes was not statistically significant. Implications for cultural adaptation and prevention in Mexico are discussed from a communication competency perspective. The promising results of the pilot study suggest that the linguistic adaptation was effective but that a comprehensive cultural adaptation of keepin' it REAL in partnership with Mexican investigators and communities may be warranted. PMID:23877541

  5. Brownian dynamics simulation of the nucleosome chirality - the wrapping direction of DNA on the histone octamer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng-Ye

    2005-03-01

    In eukaryote nucleosome, DNA wraps around a histone octamer in a left-handed way. We study the process of chirality formation of nucleosome with Brownian dynamics simulation. We model the histone octamer with a quantitatively adjustable chirality: left-handed, right-handed or non-chiral, and simulate the dynamical wrapping process of a DNA molecule on it. We find that the chirality of a nucleosome formed is strongly dependent on that of the histone octamer, and different chiralities of the histone octamer induce its different rotation directions in the wrapping process of DNA. In addition, a very weak chirality of the histone octamer is quite enough for sustaining the correct chirality of the nucleosome formed. We also show that the chirality of a nucleosome may be broken at elevated temperature.

  6. Evaluation model calculations with the water reactor analysis package (WRAP-EM)

    SciTech Connect

    Gregory, M.V.; Beranek, F.

    1982-01-01

    The Water Reactor Analysis Package-Evaluation Model (WRAP-EM) is a modular system of computer codes designed to provide the safety analyst with the capability of performing complete loss-of-coolant calculations for both pressurized- and boiling-water reactor systems. The system provides a licensing-type calculation capability and thus contains most of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission-Approved EM options, as described in the Code of Federal Regulations, Title 10, Part 50, Appendix K. All phases of an accident (blowdown, refill, and reflood) are modeled. The WRAP consists of modified versions of five preexisting codes (RELAP4/MOD5, GAPCON, FRAP, MOXY, and NORCOOL), the necessary interfaces to permit automatic transition from one code to the next during the transient calculations, plus a host of user-convenience features to aid the analyst faced with a multitude of EM calculations. The WRAP has been verified against both calculated and experimental results.

  7. Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility Public Address System Review Findings

    SciTech Connect

    HUMPHRYS, K.L.

    1999-11-03

    Public address system operation at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility was reviewed. The review was based on an Operational Readiness Review finding that public address performance was not adequate in parts of the WRAP facility. Several improvements were made to the WRAP Public Address (PA) system to correct the deficiencies noted. Speaker gain and position was optimized. A speech processor was installed to boost intelligibility in high noise areas. Additional speakers were added to improve coverage in the work areas. The results of this evaluation indicate that further PA system enhancements are not warranted. Additional speakers cannot compensate for the high background sound and high reverberation levels found in the work areas. Recommendations to improve PA system intelligibility include minor speaker adjustments, enhanced PA announcement techniques, and the use of sound reduction and abatement techniques where economically feasible.

  8. Tie them up tight: wrapping by Philoponella vicina spiders breaks, compresses and sometimes kills their prey

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eberhard, William G.; Barrantes, Gilbert; Weng, Ju-Lin

    2006-05-01

    We show that uloborid spiders, which lack the poison glands typical of nearly all other spiders, employ thousands of wrapping movements with their hind legs and up to hundreds of meters of silk line to make a shroud that applies substantial compressive force to their prey. Shrouds sometimes break the prey’s legs, buckle its compound eyes inward, or kill it outright. The compressive force apparently results from the summation of small tensions on sticky lines as they are applied to the prey package. Behavioral details indicate that wrapping is designed to compact prey; in turn, compaction probably functions to facilitate these spiders’ unusual method of feeding. This is the first demonstration that prey wrapping by spiders compacts and physically damages their prey, rather than simply restraining them.

  9. DNA Bending and Wrapping around RNA Polymerase: a “Revolutionary” Model Describing Transcriptional Mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    Coulombe, Benoit; Burton, Zachary F.

    1999-01-01

    A model is proposed in which bending and wrapping of DNA around RNA polymerase causes untwisting of the DNA helix at the RNA polymerase catalytic center to stimulate strand separation prior to initiation. During elongation, DNA bending through the RNA polymerase active site is proposed to lower the energetic barrier to the advance of the transcription bubble. Recent experiments with mammalian RNA polymerase II along with accumulating evidence from studies of Escherichia coli RNA polymerase indicate the importance of DNA bending and wrapping in transcriptional mechanisms. The DNA-wrapping model describes specific roles for general RNA polymerase II transcription factors (TATA-binding protein [TBP], TFIIB, TFIIF, TFIIE, and TFIIH), provides a plausible explanation for preinitiation complex isomerization, suggests mechanisms underlying the synergy between transcriptional activators, and suggests an unforseen role for TBP-associating factors in transcription. PMID:10357858

  10. Supersonic aerodynamic characteristics of a series of wrap-around-fin missile configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fournier, R. H.

    1977-01-01

    A parametric study of wrap-around-fin missile configurations was conducted at Mach numbers from 1.60 to 2.86 in the Langley Unitary Plan wind tunnel. The fin configurations investigated included variations in chord length, leading edge sweep, thickness ratio, and leading edge shape. The investigation also included a smooth and a stepped-down afterbody required for flush retraction of the wrap-around-fin configuration. The investigation indicated no unusual longitudinal characteristics; however, all the wrap-around-fin configurations tested indicated erratic lateral behavior, particularly in the form of induced roll at zero angle of attack and irregular variations of roll with angle of attack and Mach number. The magnitude of rolling moment at an angle of attack of 0 deg is estimated to represent approximately 0.25 deg or less roll control deflection. The stepped-down afterbody has a marked effect on reducing the induced roll.

  11. QA Objectives for Nondestructive Assay at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    CANTALOUB, M.G.; WILLS, C.E.

    2000-03-24

    The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility, located on the Hanford Site in southeast Washington, is a key link in the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste characterization is one of the vital functions performed at WRAP, and nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of TRU waste containers is one of two required methods used for waste characterization. The Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, DOEMPP-069 (WIPP-WAC) delineates the quality assurance objectives which have been established for NDA measurement systems. Sites must demonstrate that the quality assurance objectives can be achieved for each radioassay system over the applicable ranges of measurement. This report summarizes the validation of the WRAP NDA systems against the radioassay quality assurance objectives or QAOs. A brief description of the each test and significant conclusions are included. Variables that may have affected test outcomes and system response are also addressed.

  12. QA Objectives for Nondestructive Assay at the Waste Receiving & Processing (WRAP) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    CANTALOUB, M.G.

    2000-08-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) facility, located on the Word Site in southeast Washington, is a key link in the certification of transuranic (TRU) waste for shipment to the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant (WIPP). Waste characterization is one of the vital functions performed at WRAP, and nondestructive assay (NDA) measurements of TRU waste containers is one of two required methods used for waste characterization. The Waste Acceptance Criteria for the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant, DOE/WIPP-069 (WIPP-WAC) delineates the quality assurance objectives which have been established for NDA measurement systems. Sites must demonstrate that the quality assurance objectives can be achieved for each radioassay system over the applicable ranges of measurement. This report summarizes the validation of the WRAP NDA systems against the radioassay quality assurance objectives or QAOs. A brief description of the each test and significant conclusions are included. Variables that may have affected test outcomes and system response are also addressed.

  13. Wearing knee wraps affects mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise.

    PubMed

    Lake, Jason P; Carden, Patrick J C; Shorter, Kath A

    2012-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of wearing knee wraps on mechanical output and performance characteristics of back squat exercise. Ten resistance trained men (back squat 1 repetition maximum [1RM]: 160.5 ± 18.4 kg) performed 6 single back squats with 80% 1RM, 3 wearing knee wraps, 3 without. Mechanical output was obtained from ground reaction force, performance characteristics from digitized motion footage obtained from a single high-speed digital camera. Wearing knee wraps led to a 39% reduction (0.09 compared with 0.11 m, p = 0.037) in horizontal barbell displacement that continued during the lifting phase. Lowering phase vertical impulse remained within 1% across conditions; however, the lowering phase was performed 45% faster (1.13 compared with 1.57 seconds). This demonstrated that vertical force applied to the center of mass during the lowering phase was considerably larger and was likely a consequence of the generation and storage of elastic energy within the knee wrap. Subsequent vertical impulse applied to the center of mass was 10% greater (192 compared with 169 N·s, p = 0.018). Mechanical work involved in vertically displacing the center of mass was performed 20% faster and was reflected by a 10% increase in peak power (2,121 compared with 1,841 W, p = 0.019). The elastic properties of knee wraps increased mechanical output but altered back squat technique in a way that is likely to alter the musculature targeted by the exercise and possibly compromise the integrity of the knee joint. Knee wraps should not be worn during the strength and condition process, and perceived weakness in the knee joint should be assessed and treated. PMID:22995993

  14. Wrapping of nanoparticles by the cell membrane: the role of interactions between the nanoparticles.

    PubMed

    Tang, Huayuan; Ye, Hongfei; Zhang, Hongwu; Zheng, Yonggang

    2015-11-28

    A fundamental understanding of the interactions between nanoparticles (NPs) and the cell membrane is essential to improve the performance of the NP-based biomedical applications and assess the potential toxicity of NPs. Despite the great progress in understanding the interaction between individual NP and the membrane, little is known about the interaction between multiple NPs and the membrane. In this work, we investigate the wrapping of two parallel elongated NPs by the membrane, taking the NP-NP electrostatic interaction and van der Waals (vdW) interaction into consideration. Three types of NPs, namely the rigid NPs with circular and elliptic cross-sections and the deformable NPs, are systematically investigated. The results show that the electrostatic interaction would enhance the tendency of the independent wrapping and inhibit the rotation of the elongated and equally charged NPs with elliptic cross-sections. Under the vdW interaction, the competition of the NP-NP adhesion and the membrane elastic energies with the NP-membrane adhesion energy leads the NPs to be wrapped cooperatively or independently. For the system with elongated NPs with elliptic cross-sections, the NPs are more likely to be wrapped independently as the shapes become more anisotropic and the NPs would rotate to contact each other with the flat sides in the cooperative wrapping configuration. Moreover, the soft NPs are more likely to be wrapped cooperatively compared with the stiff NPs. These results may provide guidelines to control the internalization pathway of NPs and improve the efficiency of NP-based drug delivery systems. PMID:26381589

  15. "Yondering" IYA: How the Astronomical Society of the Pacific is Adapting its International Year of Astronomy Programs for the Long Haul

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manning, J. G.

    2011-09-01

    The International Year of Astronomy in 2009, the 400th anniversary of the year Galileo peeped at the heavens with his new telescope, is history. But 2010 is the 400th anniversary of the year he published, and we are now into "Beyond IYA" territory, as things developed for or during IYA are adapted for longer-term use as legacy products and programs. The Astronomical Society of the Pacific (ASP) is continuing three of its IYA efforts in this regard. This article describes how the ASP's IYA Discovery Guides (online packages of theme- and object-based educational materials), Cosmic Clearinghouse (a website with a wide variety of links to good educational materials), and Galileo Teacher Training Program (a teacher workshop using Galileo's iconic observations to teach the process of science) are being adapted for ongoing availability "over yonder," well beyond the horizon of IYA.

  16. Transparently wrap-gated semiconductor nanowire arrays for studies of gate-controlled photoluminescence

    SciTech Connect

    Nylund, Gustav; Storm, Kristian; Torstensson, Henrik; Wallentin, Jesper; Borgström, Magnus T.; Hessman, Dan; Samuelson, Lars

    2013-12-04

    We present a technique to measure gate-controlled photoluminescence (PL) on arrays of semiconductor nanowire (NW) capacitors using a transparent film of Indium-Tin-Oxide (ITO) wrapping around the nanowires as the gate electrode. By tuning the wrap-gate voltage, it is possible to increase the PL peak intensity of an array of undoped InP NWs by more than an order of magnitude. The fine structure of the PL spectrum reveals three subpeaks whose relative peak intensities change with gate voltage. We interpret this as gate-controlled state-filling of luminescing quantum dot segments formed by zincblende stacking faults in the mainly wurtzite NW crystal structure.

  17. Composite wrap approved for U.S. gas-pipeline repairs

    SciTech Connect

    True, W.R.

    1995-10-09

    The US agency that oversees pipeline safety has taken the unusual step of waiving certain natural-gas pipeline maintenance regulations and permitted a group of gas-pipeline operators to perform repairs with a patented composite wrap formerly used only on liquids lines. The waivers ar subject to conditions and to future performance evaluations. The wrap is made of polyester resin reinforced by glass filament. On installation, it is tightly wound and adhesively bonded to damaged pipe. The paper describes the 2 waivers, the development of this new technology, savings, and training required by the Dept. of Transportation.

  18. Amphiphilic tribranched scaffolds with polyaromatic panels that wrap perylene stacks displaying unusual emissions.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Akira; Akita, Munetaka; Yoshizawa, Michito

    2016-08-21

    A rigid tribranched scaffold with three anthracene panels was synthesized using a stereocontrolled 1,3,5-triphenylbenzene core. Grinding a mixture of the rigid scaffold and perylene leads to the quantitative formation of a spherical assembly containing stacked perylene molecules in water. The wrapped perylenes exhibit unusual Y-type excimer-like emission (λmax = ∼500 nm) at room temperature. In contrast, an analogous assembly from a flexible tribranched scaffold and perylene shows E-type emission (λmax = ∼610 nm) from the wrapped perylenes under the same conditions. PMID:27444246

  19. Laserjet Control Program

    1992-07-02

    LC is a single program designed to serve as a Laser Jet printer controller. Options include specifying paper size, print orientation, number of lines per inch, top and bottom margins, end-of-line wrap, symbol set, typeface, style (upright or italic), stroke weight, proportional or fixed spaced font, and point size (height of character whose size can be scaled.

  20. Study of Post-Cracking Torsional Behaviour of High-Strength Reinforced Concrete Beams with a Ferrocement Wrap

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behera, Gopal Charan; Rao, Tippabhotla Durga Gunneswara; Kameswara, Chittem Butchi

    2014-09-01

    The post-cracking behaviour of structures subjected to torsion can be well predicted by Hsu's softened truss model. The softened truss model is applicable to structures having symmetry in their material properties on all four sides. Wrapping on three faces is a common phenomenon when the top face is provided with a flange or slab. Such a wrapping on three faces of a beam is referred to as a "U" wrap. "U" wraps are better wrapping strategies for distressed structures, as their top face is not accessible for many structures. The material property of an unwrapped face differs from the rest of wrapped faces. For the effective use of wrapping, the unwrapped face needs to be provided with a material having a higher resistance to tension and shear. For this, high-strength concrete in the core is a better option. Here, an attempt is made to predict the torsional capacity of "U" wrapped high-strength concrete beams having an asymmetry in the material using a softened truss model with suitable modifications of the material properties. Efficient algorithms are proposed for the solution of simultaneous equations. The predictions are found to be in good agreement with the experimental test results

  1. The scaffold protein WRAP53β orchestrates the ubiquitin response critical for DNA double-strand break repair

    PubMed Central

    Henriksson, Sofia; Rassoolzadeh, Hanif; Hedström, Elisabeth; Coucoravas, Christos; Julner, Alexander; Goldstein, Michael; Imreh, Gabriela; Zhivotovsky, Boris; Kastan, Michael B.; Helleday, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The WD40 domain-containing protein WRAP53β (WD40 encoding RNA antisense to p53; also referred to as WDR79/TCAB1) controls trafficking of splicing factors and the telomerase enzyme to Cajal bodies, and its functional loss has been linked to carcinogenesis, premature aging, and neurodegeneration. Here, we identify WRAP53β as an essential regulator of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. WRAP53β rapidly localizes to DSBs in an ATM-, H2AX-, and MDC1-dependent manner. We show that WRAP53β targets the E3 ligase RNF8 to DNA lesions by facilitating the interaction between RNF8 and its upstream partner, MDC1, in response to DNA damage. Simultaneous binding of MDC1 and RNF8 to the highly conserved WD40 scaffold domain of WRAP53β facilitates their interaction and accumulation of RNF8 at DSBs. In this manner, WRAP53β controls proper ubiquitylation at DNA damage sites and the downstream assembly of 53BP1, BRCA1, and RAD51. Furthermore, we reveal that knockdown of WRAP53β impairs DSB repair by both homologous recombination (HR) and nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), causes accumulation of spontaneous DNA breaks, and delays recovery from radiation-induced cell cycle arrest. Our findings establish WRAP53β as a novel regulator of DSB repair by providing a scaffold for DNA repair factors. PMID:25512560

  2. The effect of harvest moisture and bale wrapping on forage quality, temperature, and mold in orchardgrass hay

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The effects of harvest moisture and bale wrapping on forage quality and mold formation in orchardgrass hay intended for equine feeding have not been investigated. The objectives of this study were to assess the effects of initial bale moisture and wrapping on temperature, forage quality, and mold fo...

  3. Intragenic homogenization and multiple copies of prey-wrapping silk genes in Argiope garden spiders

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Spider silks are spectacular examples of phenotypic diversity arising from adaptive molecular evolution. An individual spider can produce an array of specialized silks, with the majority of constituent silk proteins encoded by members of the spidroin gene family. Spidroins are dominated by tandem repeats flanked by short, non-repetitive N- and C-terminal coding regions. The remarkable mechanical properties of spider silks have been largely attributed to the repeat sequences. However, the molecular evolutionary processes acting on spidroin terminal and repetitive regions remain unclear due to a paucity of complete gene sequences and sampling of genetic variation among individuals. To better understand spider silk evolution, we characterize a complete aciniform spidroin gene from an Argiope orb-weaving spider and survey aciniform gene fragments from congeneric individuals. Results We present the complete aciniform spidroin (AcSp1) gene from the silver garden spider Argiope argentata (Aar_AcSp1), and document multiple AcSp1 loci in individual genomes of A. argentata and the congeneric A. trifasciata and A. aurantia. We find that Aar_AcSp1 repeats have >98% pairwise nucleotide identity. By comparing AcSp1 repeat amino acid sequences between Argiope species and with other genera, we identify regions of conservation over vast amounts of evolutionary time. Through a PCR survey of individual A. argentata, A. trifasciata, and A. aurantia genomes, we ascertain that AcSp1 repeats show limited variation between species whereas terminal regions are more divergent. We also find that average dN/dS across codons in the N-terminal, repetitive, and C-terminal encoding regions indicate purifying selection that is strongest in the N-terminal region. Conclusions Using the complete A. argentata AcSp1 gene and spidroin genetic variation between individuals, this study clarifies some of the molecular evolutionary processes underlying the spectacular mechanical attributes of

  4. Decoration of multi-walled carbon nanotubes by polymer wrapping and its application in MWCNT/polyethylene composites

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    We dispersed the non-covalent functionalization of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (CNTs) with a polymer dispersant and obtained a powder of polymer-wrapped CNTs. The UV–vis absorption spectrum was used to investigate the optimal weight ratio of the CNTs and polymer dispersant. The powder of polymer-wrapped CNTs had improved the drawbacks of CNTs of being lightweight and difficult to process, and it can re-disperse in a solvent. Then, we blended the polymer-wrapped CNTs and polyethylene (PE) by melt-mixing and produced a conductive masterbatch and CNT/PE composites. The polymer-wrapped CNTs showed lower surface resistivity in composites than the raw CNTs. The scanning electron microscopy images also showed that the polymer-wrapped CNTs can disperse well in composites than the raw CNTs. PMID:22559082

  5. Wrapping tissues with a pre-established cage-like layer composed of living cells.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Shinji; Inagaki, Hitomi; Inamoto, Kazuya; Taya, Masahito

    2012-10-01

    We report a method for wrapping tissues with a pre-established cage-like layer composed of living cells. We encapsulated multicellular aggregates of human hepatoma HepG2 cells as a model of tissues such as pancreatic islets and hepatocyte spheroids in alginate-based hydrogel microcapsules and subsequently coated the microcapsule surface with a gelatin derivative through a horseradish peroxidase-catalyzed reaction. Human aorta endothelial (HAE) cells grew on the surface and formed a cell layer within 24 h of incubating the microcapsules in a medium containing the cells. Subsequent degradation of the hydrogel microcapsule using a non-proteolytic enzyme, alginate lyase, resulted in a cage-like structure of HAE cells formed around the microcapsule. The HAE cell layer shrank without fragmenting and wrapped the inner spherical tissue. This method was also effective for wrapping multiple cellular aggregates within a single cage of HAE cells. In addition, it was possible to wrap tissue grown from individual cells in spherical cavities within the microcapsules. PMID:22770525

  6. Is a fully wrapped SSB–DNA complex essential for Escherichia coli survival?

    PubMed Central

    Waldman, Vincent M.; Weiland, Elizabeth; Kozlov, Alexander G.; Lohman, Timothy M.

    2016-01-01

    Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) is an essential homotetramer that binds ssDNA and recruits multiple proteins to their sites of action during genomic maintenance. Each SSB subunit contains an N-terminal globular oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold (OB-fold) and an intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain. SSB binds ssDNA in multiple modes in vitro, including the fully wrapped (SSB)65 and (SSB)56 modes, in which ssDNA contacts all four OB-folds, and the highly cooperative (SSB)35 mode, in which ssDNA contacts an average of only two OB-folds. These modes can both be populated under physiological conditions. While these different modes might be used for different functions, this has been difficult to assess. Here we used a dimeric SSB construct with two covalently linked OB-folds to disable ssDNA binding in two of the four OB-folds thus preventing formation of fully wrapped DNA complexes in vitro, although they retain a wild-type-like, salt-dependent shift in cooperative binding to ssDNA. These variants complement wild-type SSB in vivo indicating that a fully wrapped mode is not essential for function. These results do not preclude a normal function for a fully wrapped mode, but do indicate that E. coli tolerates some flexibility with regards to its SSB binding modes. PMID:27084941

  7. Identifying the phase discontinuities in the wrapped phase maps by a classification framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Ashfaq; Lu, Yanting

    2016-03-01

    Identifying phase discontinuity locations is a necessary and complex step in the phase unwrapping process, and it becomes more challenging when dealing with noisy wrapped phase maps that are produced through shearography or other speckle-based interferometry methods. Recently, the task of identifying phase discontinuities has been formulated into a two-class classification problem, where the phase discontinuities are identified by a complex neural network trained on plenty of image patches taken from wrapped phase maps. A simple but efficient classification framework is proposed for the phase discontinuities identification task. Six features are first designed to describe the characteristics of discontinuous and continuous pixels. Then, the naive Bayes classifier, working on these features, is employed as the classifier of our framework. Finally, a thinning procedure is performed on the classification results to get the one-pixel-width discontinuity location map which can be used for further phase unwrapping. The experiments on simulated wrapped phase maps are performed to validate the performance of the proposed approach. The experimental results show that the proposed approach can identify phase discontinuities in the wrapped phase maps well and has more robust performances when the signal-to-noise ratios of the phase maps are low.

  8. Global optimization method for combined spherical-cylindrical wrapping in musculoskeletal upper limb modelling.

    PubMed

    Audenaert, A; Audenaert, E

    2008-10-01

    In musculoskeletal modelling, many muscles cannot be represented as straight lines from origin to insertion because the bony and musculotendinous morphology of neighboring structures causes them to wrap. The majority of these passive structures can be adequately described as simple geometric shapes such as spheres and cylinders. Techniques for describing smooth muscle paths around multiple obstacles have been developed for modelling use. Until now obstacle-set methods have combined the path of single structures. This does not analytically define the shortest smooth path around multiple objects. When a sphere is included in a multiple-object wrapping algorithm, muscle paths around that sphere are restricted to a bundle of planes containing the sphere center. This assumed restriction can compromise the iterative process for finding the true shortest muscle path that satisfies all restrictions of a smooth path. This can cause model instability. The new method involves the determination of the shortest smooth muscle path in a spherical and cylindrical wrapping algorithm. A typical example is musculoskeletal modelling of the upper limb, where the muscle fibers have to wrap over this combination of obstacles. PMID:18606476

  9. WRAP Module 1 data management system (DMS) software design description (SDD)

    SciTech Connect

    Weidert, J.R.

    1996-05-13

    Revision 2 of the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 Data Management System (DMS) Preliminary Software Design Description (PSDD) provides a high-level design description of the system. The WRAP 1 DMS is required to collect, store, and report data related to certification, tracking, packaging, repackaging, processing, and shipment of waste processed or stored at the WRAP 1 facility. The WRAP 1 DMS SDD is used as the primary medium for communication software design information. This release provides design descriptions for the following process modules produced under Phase 1 of the development effort: Receiving Drum or Box Containers Process Routing and Picklists; Waste Inventory by Location and/or Container Relationships; LLW Process Glovebox Facility Radiologic Material Inventory Check (partial); Shipping (partial production); Drum or Box NDE Operations; and Drum or Box NDA Operations Data Review (partial production). In addition, design descriptions are included for the following process modules scheduled for development under Phases 2 and 3: Activity Comment; LLW RWM Glovebox Sample Management; TRU Process Glovebox; TRU RWM Glovebox; and TRUPACT Processing. Detailed design descriptions for Reports and Facility Metrics have also been provided for in Revision 2 of this document.

  10. Radiologic and Endoscopic Characteristics of Laparoscopic Antireflux Wrap: Correlation With Outcome

    PubMed Central

    Braghetto, Italo; Korn, Owen; Csendes, Attila; Valladares, Héctor; Davanzo, Cristóbal; Debandi, Aníbal

    2012-01-01

    After antireflux surgery for gastroesophageal reflux disease, 10% to 15% of patients may have unsuccessful results as a result of abnormal restoration of the esophagogastric junction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the postoperative endoscopic and radiologic characteristics of the antireflux barrier and their correlation with the postoperative results. After surgery, endoscopic and radiologic features of the antireflux wrap were evaluated in 120 consecutive patients. Jobe's classification of the postoperative valve was used for the definition of a “normal” or “defective” wrap. Patients were evaluated 3 to 5 years later in order to determine the clinical and objective failed fundoplication. A “normal” antireflux wrap was associated with successful results in 81.7% of the patients. On the contrary, defective radiologic or endoscopic antireflux wrap was observed in 19% of cases. Among these patients, hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter was observed in 50% to 65% of patients, abnormal 24-hour pH monitoring in 91%, and recurrent postoperative erosive esophagitis in 50% of patients, respectively (P < 0.001). “Defective” antireflux fundoplication is associated with recurrent reflux symptoms, presence of endoscopic esophagitis, hypotensive lower esophageal sphincter, and abnormal acid reflux. PMID:23113845

  11. Hedonic evaluation of cooked chicken wrapped with apple and tomato films formulated with cinnamaldehyde and carvacol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible films and coatings can be used as carriers of plant essential oils and their active antibacterial components to protect food against bacterial pathogens and spoilage, while potentially enhancing sensory properties of the wrapped foods. To demonstrate this possibility, this study evaluated th...

  12. Energy Planning for Indian Nations within the WRAP: A Field Guide

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Acker, Thomas L.; Jones, Chian; Smith, Dean Howard

    2006-01-01

    Energy in the form of electricity is a hot topic among tribes within the Western Regional Air Partnership (WRAP). For too many people, energy is too expensive, not reliable, or even nonexistent. For many tribal members, up to 20 or 30 percent of income is spent on energy, which is unbelievably high compared to nontribal people in the same area.…

  13. Effects of wrapping time delays on fermentation characteristics of baled alfalfa silages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baled silage is an attractive forage conservation approach for small and mid-sized dairy or beef producers, partly because it limits the risks associated with baling dry hay during wet or unstable weather conditions. Our objectives were to test the effects of delayed wrapping on silage fermentation,...

  14. Graphene wrapped multiwalled carbon nanotubes dispersed nanofluids for heat transfer applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jyothirmayee Aravind, S. S.; Ramaprabhu, S.

    2012-12-01

    A two step method is employed for the preparation of graphene wrapped multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) dispersed nanofluids. Graphene wrapped MWNT composite is prepared by simple chemical vapor deposition technique and further purified prior to the synthesis of nanofluids. The functionalization of MWNT with the poly electrolyte, graphene drives out the need for surfactants or long term harsh chemical treatments as in the case of pristine carbon materials based nanofluids. The enhancement in thermal transport properties of surfactant free graphene wrapped MWNT composite in de-ionized (DI) water and ethylene glycol (EG) base fluids than that of pristine carbon nanomaterial based nanofluids indicates the potential usage of the hybrid composite based nanofluids in heat transfer applications. An enhancement in thermal conductivity of 11.3% and 13.7% has been attained with 0.04% volume fraction of hybrid composite based DI water and EG nanofluids at 25 °C. The nanocomposite possesses extreme stability in a variety of aqueous solvents without any surfactant. Electrical conductivity of the nanofluids analyzed as a function of volume fraction of nanoparticles and temperature shows a positive effect. Further, the analysis of forced convective heat transfer coefficients of the nanofluids flowing through a stain less steel tube shows significant enhancement in heat transfer, attributed to good aspect ratio of graphene wrapped MWNT and synergistic effect of high thermally conducting graphene and MWNT.

  15. Esthetic Craniofacial Bony and Skull Base Reconstruction Using Flap Wrapping Technique.

    PubMed

    Yano, Tomoyuki; Suesada, Nobuko; Usami, Satoshi

    2016-07-01

    For a safe and esthetic skull base reconstruction combined with repair of craniofacial bone defects, the authors introduce the flap wrapping technique in this study. This technique consists of skull base reconstruction using the vastus lateralis muscle of an anterolateral thigh (ALT) free flap, and structural craniofacial bony reconstruction using an autologous calvarial bone graft. The key to this technique is that all of the grafted autologous bone is wrapped with the vascularized fascia of the ALT free flap to protect the grafted bone from infection and exposure. Two anterior skull base tumors combined with craniofacial bony defects were included in this study. The subjects were a man and a woman, aged 18 and 64. Both patients had preoperative proton beam therapy. First, the skull base defect was filled with vastus lateralis muscle, and then structural reconstruction was performed with an autologous bone graft and a fabricated inner layer of calvarial bone, and then the grafted bone was completely wrapped in the vascularized fascia of the ALT free flap. By applying this technique, there was no intracranial infection or grafted bone exposure in these 2 patients postoperatively, even though both patients had preoperative proton beam therapy. Additionally, the vascularized fascia wrapped bone graft could provide a natural contour and prevent collapse of the craniofacial region, and this gives patients a better facial appearance even though they have had skull base surgery. PMID:27300454

  16. Crisis phenomena in boiling on submerged wire mesh-wrapped wall

    SciTech Connect

    Tolubinskiy, V.I.; Antonenko, V.A.; Ivanenko, G.V. )

    1989-07-01

    Experimental data on relationships governing the boiling crisis on heating walls wrapped in a single layer of wire mesh are presented. The effect of this thin screen on the critical heat flux is primarily due to the changes it introduces in the boiling process, namely, the breakoff diameter and the breakoff frequency of the vapor bubbles.

  17. Hedonic evaluation of cooked chicken wrapped with apple and tomato films formulated with cinnamaldehvde and carvacrol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Edible films and coatings can be used as carriers of plant essential oils and their active antibacterial components to protect food against bacterial pathogens and spoilage, while potentially enhancing sensory properties of the wrapped foods. To demonstrate this possibility, this study evaluated the...

  18. Effects of wrapping time delays on the nutritive value of baled alfalfa silages

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Baled silages are an attractive forage conservation option, especially for small and mid-sized beef and dairy producers. Our objectives were to test the effects of delayed wrapping on the nutritive value of baled alfalfa silages on a pre- and post-storage basis. A secondary objective was to evaluate...

  19. It's a Wrap: Writing, Reading, and Art Projects for Developmental College Students.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hartman, Kathleen A.; Stewart, Thomas C.

    2001-01-01

    Describes the visual arts as a means of helping remedial reading and writing students to "see" the process of writing. Discusses the use of clay sculpting to demonstrate free-writing techniques, Venn-mobiles to demonstrate compare/contrast techniques, and wraps (felt "tortillas" and fillings) to demonstrate summary writing. (Contains 10…

  20. Supercoiled DNA wraps around the bacteriophage phi 29 head-tail connector.

    PubMed Central

    Turnquist, S; Simon, M; Egelman, E; Anderson, D

    1992-01-01

    Supercoiled pBR322 DNA wraps around the outside of the isolated Bacillus subtilis bacteriophage phi 29 head-tail connector, the crux of the DNA packaging machine of the viral precursor capsid or prohead. The contour length of the supercoiled DNA, determined by EM, decreased by approximately 180 base pairs for each connector bound. Mass and radial density determinations by scanning transmission EM showed that the increased mass of the connector-DNA complex relative to the connector alone was equivalent to approximately 170 base pairs of DNA and was located around the outside of the connector. Topoisomerase I treatment of the complexes followed by deproteinization suggested that supercoils were restrained by the connectors. Connectors bound linear and open-circular plasmid DNAs inefficiently but were not wrapped by these DNAs. The wrapping of supercoiled DNA around the isolated phi 29 connector is hypothesized to reflect the initiation phase of the normal process of DNA packaging. Packaging substrates would be supercoiled, wrapped by the connector, linearized, and translocated by rotation of the connector relative to the viral capsid with the aid of ATP hydrolysis. Images PMID:1438237

  1. QA Objectives for Nondestructive Assay at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    WILLS, C.E.

    2000-01-27

    This report summarizes the validation of the WRAP NDA systems against the various QAOs. A brief description of each test and any significant conclusions is included. Variables which may have affected test outcomes are examined. This report will be reviewed semi-annually and updated as necessary.

  2. QA objectives for nondestructive assay at the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility

    SciTech Connect

    WILLS, C.E.

    1999-07-12

    This report summarizes the validation of the WRAP NDA systems against the various QAOs. A brief description of each test and any significant conclusions is included. Variables which may have affected test outcomes are examined. This report will be reviewed semi-annually and updated as necessary.

  3. Optical Sensing using Fiber Bragg Gratings for Monitoring Structural Damage in Composite Over-Wrapped Vessels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Grant, Joseph

    2005-01-01

    Composite Over-Wrap Vessels are widely used in the aerospace community. They are made of thin-walled bottles that are over wrapped with high strength fibers embedded in a matrix material. There is a strong drive to reduce the weight of space borne vehicles and thus pushes designers to adopt COPVs that are over wrapped with graphite fibers embedded in its epoxy matrix. Unfortunately, this same fiber-matrix configuration is more susceptible to impact damage than others and to make matters worse; there is a regime where impacts that damage the over wrap leave no visible scar on the COPV surface. In this paper FBG sensors are presented as a means of monitoring and detecting these types of damage. The FBG sensors are surface mounted to the COPVs and optically interrogated to explore the structural properties of these composite pressure vessels. These gratings optically inscribed into the core of a single mode fiber are used as a tool to monitor the stress strain relation in the composite matrix. The response of these fiber-optic sensors is investigated by pressurizing the cylinder up to its burst pressure of around 4500 psi. A Fiber Optic Demodulation System built by Blue Road Research, is used for interrogation of the Bragg gratings.

  4. Is a fully wrapped SSB-DNA complex essential for Escherichia coli survival?

    PubMed

    Waldman, Vincent M; Weiland, Elizabeth; Kozlov, Alexander G; Lohman, Timothy M

    2016-05-19

    Escherichia coli single-stranded DNA binding protein (SSB) is an essential homotetramer that binds ssDNA and recruits multiple proteins to their sites of action during genomic maintenance. Each SSB subunit contains an N-terminal globular oligonucleotide/oligosaccharide binding fold (OB-fold) and an intrinsically disordered C-terminal domain. SSB binds ssDNA in multiple modes in vitro, including the fully wrapped (SSB)65 and (SSB)56 modes, in which ssDNA contacts all four OB-folds, and the highly cooperative (SSB)35 mode, in which ssDNA contacts an average of only two OB-folds. These modes can both be populated under physiological conditions. While these different modes might be used for different functions, this has been difficult to assess. Here we used a dimeric SSB construct with two covalently linked OB-folds to disable ssDNA binding in two of the four OB-folds thus preventing formation of fully wrapped DNA complexes in vitro, although they retain a wild-type-like, salt-dependent shift in cooperative binding to ssDNA. These variants complement wild-type SSB in vivo indicating that a fully wrapped mode is not essential for function. These results do not preclude a normal function for a fully wrapped mode, but do indicate that E. coli tolerates some flexibility with regards to its SSB binding modes. PMID:27084941

  5. Tightly wrapped semiconductor-axon microtubes for probing hybrid networks: Modeling the capacitive coupling strength

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diedrich, Daniel; Blick, Robert H.

    2015-02-01

    We present finite-element simulations modeling the electromagnetic interaction between axons and semiconductor microtubes. These tubes are tightly wrapped around the axons, enabling highly efficient capacitive coupling. The calculations reveal that the capacitive coupling strength is in the pA regime.

  6. Is Head-Wrap Necessary? Mandarin Possessive Objects in GPSG and HPSG.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huang, Chu-Ren

    The paper explores the significance of a contrast between generalized phrase structure grammar (GPSG), a context-free grammar with a well structured theory of features, and head-driven phrase structure grammar (HPSG), a mechanism for increasing the power of GPSG by introducing head-wrapping and lexical rules, using examples from Mandarin Chinese.…

  7. Design guidelines for adapting scientific research articles: An example from an introductory level, interdisciplinary program on soft matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Langbeheim, Elon; Safran, Samuel A.; Yerushalmi, Edit

    2013-01-01

    We present design guidelines for using Adapted Primary Literature (APL) as part of current interdisciplinary topics to introductory physics students. APL is a text genre that allows students to comprehend a scientific article, while maintaining the core features of the communication among scientists, thus representing an authentic scientific discourse. We describe the adaptation of a research paper by Nobel Laureate Paul Flory on phase equilibrium in polymer-solvent mixtures that was presented to high school students in a project-based unit on soft matter. The adaptation followed two design strategies: a) Making explicit the interplay between the theory and experiment. b) Re-structuring the text to map the theory onto the students' prior knowledge. Specifically, we map the theory of polymer-solvent systems onto a model for binary mixtures of small molecules of equal size that was already studied in class.

  8. The application of muscle wrapping to voxel-based finite element models of skeletal structures.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jia; Shi, Junfen; Fitton, Laura C; Phillips, Roger; O'Higgins, Paul; Fagan, Michael J

    2012-01-01

    Finite elements analysis (FEA) is now used routinely to interpret skeletal form in terms of function in both medical and biological applications. To produce accurate predictions from FEA models, it is essential that the loading due to muscle action is applied in a physiologically reasonable manner. However, it is common for muscle forces to be represented as simple force vectors applied at a few nodes on the model's surface. It is certainly rare for any wrapping of the muscles to be considered, and yet wrapping not only alters the directions of muscle forces but also applies an additional compressive load from the muscle belly directly to the underlying bone surface. This paper presents a method of applying muscle wrapping to high-resolution voxel-based finite element (FE) models. Such voxel-based models have a number of advantages over standard (geometry-based) FE models, but the increased resolution with which the load can be distributed over a model's surface is particularly advantageous, reflecting more closely how muscle fibre attachments are distributed. In this paper, the development, application and validation of a muscle wrapping method is illustrated using a simple cylinder. The algorithm: (1) calculates the shortest path over the surface of a bone given the points of origin and ultimate attachment of the muscle fibres; (2) fits a Non-Uniform Rational B-Spline (NURBS) curve from the shortest path and calculates its tangent, normal vectors and curvatures so that normal and tangential components of the muscle force can be calculated and applied along the fibre; and (3) automatically distributes the loads between adjacent fibres to cover the bone surface with a fully distributed muscle force, as is observed in vivo. Finally, we present a practical application of this approach to the wrapping of the temporalis muscle around the cranium of a macaque skull. PMID:21308392

  9. Adaptive homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-06-01

    Homeostasis is a central pillar of modern Physiology. The term homeostasis was invented by Walter Bradford Cannon in an attempt to extend and codify the principle of 'milieu intérieur,' or a constant interior bodily environment, that had previously been postulated by Claude Bernard. Clearly, 'milieu intérieur' and homeostasis have served us well for over a century. Nevertheless, research on signal transduction systems that regulate gene expression, or that cause biochemical alterations to existing enzymes, in response to external and internal stimuli, makes it clear that biological systems are continuously making short-term adaptations both to set-points, and to the range of 'normal' capacity. These transient adaptations typically occur in response to relatively mild changes in conditions, to programs of exercise training, or to sub-toxic, non-damaging levels of chemical agents; thus, the terms hormesis, heterostasis, and allostasis are not accurate descriptors. Therefore, an operational adjustment to our understanding of homeostasis suggests that the modified term, Adaptive Homeostasis, may be useful especially in studies of stress, toxicology, disease, and aging. Adaptive Homeostasis may be defined as follows: 'The transient expansion or contraction of the homeostatic range in response to exposure to sub-toxic, non-damaging, signaling molecules or events, or the removal or cessation of such molecules or events.' PMID:27112802

  10. Spun-wrapped aligned nanofiber (SWAN) lithography for fabrication of micro/nano-structures on 3D objects.

    PubMed

    Ye, Zhou; Nain, Amrinder S; Behkam, Bahareh

    2016-07-01

    Fabrication of micro/nano-structures on irregularly shaped substrates and three-dimensional (3D) objects is of significant interest in diverse technological fields. However, it remains a formidable challenge thwarted by limited adaptability of the state-of-the-art nanolithography techniques for nanofabrication on non-planar surfaces. In this work, we introduce Spun-Wrapped Aligned Nanofiber (SWAN) lithography, a versatile, scalable, and cost-effective technique for fabrication of multiscale (nano to microscale) structures on 3D objects without restriction on substrate material and geometry. SWAN lithography combines precise deposition of polymeric nanofiber masks, in aligned single or multilayer configurations, with well-controlled solvent vapor treatment and etching processes to enable high throughput (>10(-7) m(2) s(-1)) and large-area fabrication of sub-50 nm to several micron features with high pattern fidelity. Using this technique, we demonstrate whole-surface nanopatterning of bulk and thin film surfaces of cubes, cylinders, and hyperbola-shaped objects that would be difficult, if not impossible to achieve with existing methods. We demonstrate that the fabricated feature size (b) scales with the fiber mask diameter (D) as b(1.5)∝D. This scaling law is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions using the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts (JKR) contact theory, thus providing a rational design framework for fabrication of systems and devices that require precisely designed multiscale features. PMID:27283144

  11. Two Boys with Multiple Disabilities Increasing Adaptive Responding and Curbing Dystonic/Spastic Behavior via a Microswitch-Based Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Didden, Robert; Oliva, Doretta

    2009-01-01

    A recent study has shown that microswitch clusters (i.e., combinations of microswitches) and contingent stimulation could be used to increase adaptive responding and reduce dystonic/spastic behavior in two children with multiple disabilities [Lancioni, G. E., Singh, N. N., Oliva, D., Scalini, L., & Groeneweg, J. (2003). Microswitch clusters to…

  12. Promoting Positive Interactions in the Classroom: Adapting Parent-Child Interaction Therapy as a Universal Prevention Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gershenson, Rachel A.; Lyon, Aaron R.; Budd, Karen S.

    2010-01-01

    The adaptation of Parent-Child Interaction Therapy (PCIT), an empirically-supported dyadic parent training intervention, to a preschool setting may provide an opportunity to enhance the well-being of both teachers and children by improving the teacher-child relationship and supplying teachers with effective tools for behavior management. The…

  13. Development and Adaptation of an Employment-Integration Program for People Who Are Visually Impaired in Quebec, Canada

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wittich, Walter; Watanabe, Donald H.; Scully, Lizabeth; Bergevin , Martin

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: In the Province of Quebec, Canada, it is estimated that only about one-third of working-age adults with visual impairments are part of the workforce, despite ongoing efforts of rehabilitation and government agencies to integrate these individuals. The present article describes the development and adaptation of a pre-employment…

  14. The Chinese Life-Steps Program: A Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive-Behavioral Intervention to Enhance HIV Medication Adherence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shiu, Cheng-Shi; Chen, Wei-Ti; Simoni, Jane; Fredriksen-Goldsen, Karen; Zhang, Fujie; Zhou, Hongxin

    2013-01-01

    China is considered to be the new frontier of the global AIDS pandemic. Although effective treatment for HIV is becoming widely available in China, adherence to treatment remains a challenge. This study aimed to adapt an intervention promoting HIV-medication adherence--favorably evaluated in the West--for Chinese HIV-positive patients. The…

  15. Adaptation of a Cancer Clinical Trials Education Program for African American and Latina/o Community Members

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pelto, Debra J.; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Njoku, Ogo; Rodriguez, Maria Carina; Villagra, Cristina; Malcarne, Vanessa L.; Riley, Natasha E.; Behar, Alma I.; Jandorf, Lina

    2016-01-01

    The pilot study reported in this article culturally and linguistically adapted an educational intervention to promote cancer clinical trials (CCTs) participation among Latinas/os and African Americans. The single-session slide presentation with embedded videos, originally developed through a campus-community partnership in Southern California, was…

  16. Two Children with Multiple Disabilities Increase Adaptive Object Manipulation and Reduce Inappropriate Behavior via a Technology-Assisted Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lancioni, Giulio E.; O'Reilly, Mark F.; Singh, Nirbhay N.; Sigafoos, Jeff; Didden, Robert; Oliva, Doretta; Campodonico, Francesca

    2010-01-01

    Persons with severe to profound multiple disabilities, such as intellectual, visual, and motor disabilities, may be characterized by low levels of adaptive engagement with the environment. They may also display forms of inappropriate, stereotypical behavior (like hand mouthing, that is, putting their fingers into or over their mouths) or…

  17. A New Framework and Practice Center for Adapting, Translating, and Scaling Evidence-Based Health/Wellness Programs for People With Disabilities.

    PubMed

    Rimmer, James H; Vanderbom, Kerri A; Graham, Ian D

    2016-04-01

    Supporting the transition of people with newly acquired and existing disability from rehabilitation into community-based health/wellness programs, services, and venues requires rehabilitation professionals to build evidence by capturing successful strategies at the local level, finding innovative ways to translate successful practices to other communities, and ultimately to upgrade and maintain their applicability and currency for future scale-up. This article describes a knowledge-to-practice framework housed in a national resource and practice center that will support therapists and other rehabilitation professionals in building and maintaining a database of successful health/wellness guidelines, recommendations, and adaptations to promote community health inclusion for people with disabilities. A framework was developed in the National Center on Health, Physical Activity and Disability (NCHPAD) to systematically build and advance the evidence base of health/wellness programs, practices, and services applicable to people with disabilities. N-KATS (NCHPAD Knowledge Adaptation, Translation, and Scale-up) has 4 sequencing strategies: strategy 1-new evidence- and practice-based knowledge is collected and adapted for the local context (ie, community); strategy 2-customized resources are effectively disseminated to key stakeholders including rehabilitation professionals with appropriate training tools; strategy 3-NCHPAD staff serve as facilitators assisting key stakeholders in implementing recommendations; strategy 4-successful elements of practice (eg, guideline, recommendation, adaptation) are archived and scaled to other rehabilitation providers. The N-KATS framework supports the role of rehabilitation professionals as knowledge brokers, facilitators, and users in a collaborative, dynamic structure that will grow and be sustained over time through the NCHPAD.Video abstract available for additional insights from the authors (see Video, Supplemental Digital Content 1

  18. Innoversity in knowledge-for-action and adaptation to climate change: the first steps of an ‘evidence-based climatic health’ transfrontier training program

    PubMed Central

    Lapaige, Véronique; Essiembre, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear to the international scientific community that climate change is real and has important consequences for human health. To meet these new challenges, the World Health Organization recommends reinforcing the adaptive capacity of health systems. One of the possible avenues in this respect is to promote awareness and knowledge translation in climatic health, at both the local and global scales. Within such perspective, two major themes have emerged in the field of public health research: 1) the development of advanced training adapted to ‘global environment’ change and to the specific needs of various groups of actors (doctors, nurses, public health practitioners, health care managers, public service managers, local communities, etc) and 2) the development of strategies for implementing research results and applying various types of evidence to the management of public health issues affected by climate change. Progress on these two fronts will depend on maximum innovation in transdisciplinary and transsectoral collaborations. The general purpose of this article is to present the program of a new research and learning chair designed for this double set of developmental objectives – a chair that emphasizes ‘innoversity’ (the dynamic relationship between innovation and diversity) and ‘transfrontier ecolearning for adaptive actions’. The Écoapprentissages, santé mentale et climat collaborative research chair (University of Montreal and Quebec National Public Health Institute) based in Montreal is a center for ‘transdisciplinary research’ on the transfrontier knowledge-for-action that can aid adaptation of the public health sector, the public mental health sector, and the public service sector to climate change, as well as a center for complex collaborations on evidence-based climatic health ‘training’. This program-focused article comprises two main sections. The first section presents the ‘general’ and

  19. Innoversity in knowledge-for-action and adaptation to climate change: the first steps of an 'evidence-based climatic health' transfrontier training program.

    PubMed

    Lapaige, Véronique; Essiembre, Hélène

    2010-01-01

    It has become increasingly clear to the international scientific community that climate change is real and has important consequences for human health. To meet these new challenges, the World Health Organization recommends reinforcing the adaptive capacity of health systems. One of the possible avenues in this respect is to promote awareness and knowledge translation in climatic health, at both the local and global scales. Within such perspective, two major themes have emerged in the field of public health research: 1) the development of advanced training adapted to 'global environment' change and to the specific needs of various groups of actors (doctors, nurses, public health practitioners, health care managers, public service managers, local communities, etc) and 2) the development of strategies for implementing research results and applying various types of evidence to the management of public health issues affected by climate change. Progress on these two fronts will depend on maximum innovation in transdisciplinary and transsectoral collaborations. The general purpose of this article is to present the program of a new research and learning chair designed for this double set of developmental objectives - a chair that emphasizes 'innoversity' (the dynamic relationship between innovation and diversity) and 'transfrontier ecolearning for adaptive actions'. The Écoapprentissages, santé mentale et climat collaborative research chair (University of Montreal and Quebec National Public Health Institute) based in Montreal is a center for 'transdisciplinary research' on the transfrontier knowledge-for-action that can aid adaptation of the public health sector, the public mental health sector, and the public service sector to climate change, as well as a center for complex collaborations on evidence-based climatic health 'training'. This program-focused article comprises two main sections. The first section presents the 'general' and 'specific contexts' in which the

  20. Expanding clinical medical training opportunities at the University of Nairobi: adapting a regional medical education model from the WWAMI program at the University of Washington.

    PubMed

    Child, Mara J; Kiarie, James N; Allen, Suzanne M; Nduati, Ruth; Wasserheit, Judith N; Kibore, Minnie W; John-Stewart, Grace; Njiri, Francis J; O'Malley, Gabrielle; Kinuthia, Raphael; Norris, Tom E; Farquhar, Carey

    2014-08-01

    A major medical education need in Sub-Saharan Africa includes expanding clinical training opportunities to develop health professionals. Medical education expansion is a complicated process that requires significant investment of financial and human resources, but it can also provide opportunities for innovative approaches and partnerships. In 2010, the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief launched the Medical Education Partnership Initiative to invest in medical education and health system strengthening in Africa. Building on a 30-year collaborative clinical and research training partnership, the University of Nairobi in Kenya developed a pilot regional medical education program modeled on the WWAMI (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) medical education program at the University of Washington in the United States. The University of Nairobi adapted key elements of the WWAMI model to expand clinical training opportunities without requiring major capital construction of new buildings or campuses. The pilot program provides short-term clinical training opportunities for undergraduate students and recruits and trains clinical faculty at 14 decentralized training sites. The adaptation of a model from the Northwestern United States to address medical education needs in Kenya is a successful transfer of knowledge and practices that can be scaled up and replicated across Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25072575

  1. Expanding Clinical Medical Training Opportunities at the University of Nairobi: Adapting a Regional Medical Education Model from the WWAMI Program at the University of Washington

    PubMed Central

    Child, Mara J.; Kiarie, James N.; Allen, Suzanne M.; Nduati, Ruth; Wasserheit, Judith N.; Kibore, Minnie W.; John-Stewart, Grace; Njiri, Francis J.; O'Malley, Gabrielle; Kinuthia, Raphael; Norris, Tom E.; Farquhar, Carey

    2014-01-01

    A major medical education need in Sub-Saharan Africa includes expanding clinical training opportunities to develop health professionals. Medical education expansion is a complicated process that requires significant investment of financial and human resources, but it can also provide opportunities for innovative approaches and partnerships. In 2010, the U.S. President's Emergency Plan for AIDS Relief (PEPFAR) launched the Medical Education Partnership Initiative to invest in medical education and health system strengthening in Africa. Building on a 30-year collaborative clinical and research training partnership, the University of Nairobi in Kenya developed a pilot regional medical education program modeled on the WWAMI (Washington, Wyoming, Alaska, Montana, and Idaho) medical education program at the University of Washington in the United States. The University of Nairobi adapted key elements of the WWAMI model to expand clinical training opportunities without requiring major capital construction of new buildings or campuses. The pilot program provides short-term clinical training opportunities for undergraduate students and recruits and trains clinical faculty at 14 decentralized training sites. The adaptation of a model from the Northwestern United States to address medical education needs in Kenya is a successful transfer of knowledge and practices that can be scaled up and replicated across Sub-Saharan Africa. PMID:25072575

  2. Individual shrink wrapping extends the storage life and maintains the antioxidants of mango (cvs. 'Alphonso' and 'Banganapalli') stored at 8 °C.

    PubMed

    Rao, D V Sudhakar; Shivashankara, K S

    2015-07-01

    Freshly-harvested mature green mangoes (cvs. 'Alphonso' and 'Banganapalli') were individually shrink wrapped using two semi-permeable Cryovac films® (D-955 and LD-935) and a locally available LDPE film. The shrink wrapped and non-wrapped fruit were stored at 8 °C for 5 weeks and transferred to ambient conditions for subsequent ripening, to study the feasibility of alleviation of chilling injury (CI) and to determine shrink wrapping effect on fruit quality. Shrink wrapped mangoes of 'Banganapalli' and 'Alphonso' cultivars packed in D-955 (15 μm thickness) film could be stored for 5 weeks at 8 °C in fresh and unripe green condition. After storage, these cultivars respectively lost only 0.5 and 1.4 % mass in case of shrink wrapping as compared to 5.8 and 6.9 % loss in non-wrapped fruit. After removal from low temperature and unwrapping, shrink wrapped mangoes showed normal respiratory behaviour with production of CO2 and ethylene peaks (climacteric peaks) during ripening, whereas non-wrapped fruit did not show any respiratory peaks. Shrink wrapped mangoes ripened normally within a week at ambient temperature (24-32 °C and 60-70 % RH) with good surface yellow colour (reflected by hue and chroma values), edible softness, retention of nutritional quality and acceptable organoleptic quality. These quality parameters were better in fruit wrapped with D-955 film compared to LD-935 and LDPE films. Total carotenoids in terms of β-carotene content were significantly higher in shrink wrapped fruit when compared to non-wrapped fruit. Among different shrink films, total antioxidant capacity and DPPH radical scavenging abilities were higher in LD-935 wrapped fruit in case of 'Alphonso' cultivar whereas these were on par in LD-935 and D-955 film wrapped fruit in case of 'Banganapalli' cultivar. PMID:26139900

  3. How Can We Adapt the Positive Experiences of School-to-Work Programs, Especially Work-Based Learning, to JTPA Programs?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Churchill, Andrew

    Several decades of studies evaluating youth employment programs funded through the nation's second-chance system have demonstrated the shortcomings of programs that concentrate on work experience alone and try to reverse years of inadequate education, discrimination, and alienation in a few weeks or months. The School-to-Work Opportunities Act…

  4. Adapting Extension Food Safety Programming for Vegetable Growers to Accommodate Differences in Ethnicity, Farming Scale, and Other Individual Factors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kline, Terence R.; Kneen, Harold; Barrett, Eric; Kleinschmidt, Andy; Doohan, Doug

    2012-01-01

    Differences in vegetable production methods utilized by American growers create distinct challenges for Extension personnel providing food safety training to producer groups. A program employing computers and projectors will not be accepted by an Amish group that does not accept modern technology. We have developed an outreach program that covers…

  5. Family Literacy Funding Reductions and Work-First Welfare Policies: Adaptations and Consequences in Family Literacy Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prins, Esther; Gungor, Ramazan

    2011-01-01

    This article examines the consequences of two concurrent policy changes for family literacy programs in Pennsylvania: (1) the transition from federal (Even Start) to state funding and (2) the elimination of adult education as a work activity for welfare recipients over 22 years of age. Using qualitative data from 10 family literacy programs, the…

  6. Effects of various field coccidiosis control programs on host innate and adaptive immunity in commercial broiler chickens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Coccidiosis control programs such as vaccines or in-feed anticoccidials are commonly practiced in poultry industry to improve growth performance and health of commercial broiler chickens. In this study, we assessed the effects of various coccidiosis control programs (e.g., in ovo vaccination, synth...

  7. Policy Directions Addressing the Public Health Impact of Climate Change in South Korea: The Climate-change Health Adaptation and Mitigation Program.

    PubMed

    Shin, Yong Seung; Ha, Jongsik

    2012-01-01

    Climate change, caused by global warming, is increasingly recognized as a major threat to mankind's survival. Climate change concurrently has both direct and modifying influences on environmental, social, and public health systems undermining human health as a whole. Environmental health policy-makers need to make use of political and technological alternatives to address these ramifying effects. The objective of this paper is to review public health policy in Korea, as well as internationally, particularly as it relates to climate change health adaptation and mitigation programs (such as C-CHAMP of Korea), in order to assess and elicit directions for a robust environmental health policy that is adaptive to the health impacts of climate change. In Korea, comprehensive measures to prevent or mitigate overall health effects are limited, and the diffusion of responsibility among various government departments makes consistency in policy execution very difficult. This paper proposes integration, synergy, and utilization as the three core principles of policy direction for the assessment and adaptation to the health impacts of climate change. For specific action plans, we suggest policy making based on scientifically integrated health impact assessments and the prioritization of environmental factors in climate change; the development of practical and technological tools that support policy decisions by making their political implementation more efficient; and customized policy development that deals with the vulnerability of local communities. PMID:23256088

  8. An Initial Evaluation of a Culturally-Adapted Social Problem Solving and Relational Aggression Prevention Program for Urban African American Relationally Aggressive Girls

    PubMed Central

    Leff, Stephen S.; Gullan, Rebecca Lakin; Paskewich, Brooke S.; Abdul-Kabir, Saburah; Jawad, Abbas F.; Grossman, Michael; Munro, Melissa A.; Power, Thomas J.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research demonstrating that relational aggression is associated with peer relationship difficulties, internalizing and externalizing behaviors, social processing deficits, and possibly later mental health disorders among girls has emphasized the need to address the unique expression of aggression amongst females. Despite these findings, almost all aggression interventions have been directed towards physically aggressive boys. In the current manuscript, authors describe the acceptability and initial effectiveness of a culturally-adapted social problem solving/social skills intervention for inner-city third to fifth grade urban, African American, relationally aggressive girls called the Friend to Friend Program. The authors partnered with youth, teachers, parents, and playground supervisors to design the program, and the current study presents preliminary data suggesting that the intervention is viewed as highly acceptable by participating girls and teachers. Further, the intervention appears to have promise for decreasing at-risk girls’ levels of relationally and physically aggressive behaviors, hostile attributions, and loneliness. PMID:19830622

  9. Modeling, mesh generation and adaptive numerical methods for partial differential equations: IMA summer program. Final report, April 1, 1993--March 31, 1994

    SciTech Connect

    Friedman, A.; Miller, W. Jr.

    1993-12-31

    The program was divided into segments: (Week 1) geometric modeling and mesh generation (Weeks 2 and 3) error estimation and adaptive strategies. Participants in the program came from a wide variety of disciplines dealing with remarkably analogous problems in this area. Ideas were exchanged and interdisciplinary collaboration was initiated in informal contexts as well as in the talks and question periods. In the talks, a number of algorithms were described along with specific applications to problems of great current interest in various scientific and engineering disciplines. In this emerging field, participants developed criteria for evaluation of algorithms and established guidelines for selection of algorithms appropriate to any specific problem. Special features of a problem may include curved surfaces, complicated boundaries, evolving interfaces (such as occur in coating flows), and/or criticality of error estimation.

  10. Reduced graphene oxide and Ag wrapped TiO2 photocatalyst for enhanced visible light photocatalysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leong, Kah Hon; Sim, Lan Ching; Bahnemann, Detlef; Jang, Min; Ibrahim, Shaliza; Saravanan, Pichiah

    2015-10-01

    A well-organised reduced graphene oxide (RGO) and silver (Ag) wrapped TiO2 nano-hybrid was successfully achieved through a facile and easy route. The inherent characteristics of the synthesized RGO-Ag/TiO2 were revealed through crystalline phase, morphology, chemical composition, Raman scattering, UV-visible absorption, and photoluminescence analyses. The adopted synthesis route significantly controlled the uniform formation of silver nanoparticles and contributed for the absorption of light in the visible spectrum through localized surface plasmon resonance effects. The wrapped RGO nanosheets triggered the electron mobility and promoted visible light shift towards red spectrum. The accomplishment of synergised effect of RGO and Ag well degraded Bisphenol A under visible light irradiation with a removal efficiency of 61.9%.

  11. Cobalt oxide nanosheets wrapped onto nickel foam for non-enzymatic detection of glucose.

    PubMed

    Meng, Shangjun; Wu, Meiyan; Wang, Qian; Dai, Ziyang; Si, Weili; Huang, Wei; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-08-26

    Ultra-sensitive and highly selective detection of glucose is essential for the clinical diagnosis of diabetes. In this paper, an ultra-sensitive glucose sensor was successfully fabricated based on cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanosheets directly grown on nickel foam through a simple hydrothermal method. Characterizations indicated that the Co3O4 nanosheets are completely and uniformly wrapped onto the surface of nickel foam to form a three-dimensional heterostructure. The resulting self-standing electrochemical electrode presents a high performance for the non-enzymatic detection of glucose, including short response time (<10 s), ultra-sensitivity (12.97 mA mM(-1) cm(-2)), excellent selectivity and low detection limit (0.058 μM, S/N = 3). These results indicate that Co3O4 nanosheets wrapped onto nickel foam are a low-cost, practical, and high performance electrochemical electrode for bio sensing. PMID:27407035

  12. Convex optimization-based windowed Fourier filtering with multiple windows for wrapped-phase denoising.

    PubMed

    Yatabe, Kohei; Oikawa, Yasuhiro

    2016-06-10

    The windowed Fourier filtering (WFF), defined as a thresholding operation in the windowed Fourier transform (WFT) domain, is a successful method for denoising a phase map and analyzing a fringe pattern. However, it has some shortcomings, such as extremely high redundancy, which results in high computational cost, and difficulty in selecting an appropriate window size. In this paper, an extension of WFF for denoising a wrapped-phase map is proposed. It is formulated as a convex optimization problem using Gabor frames instead of WFT. Two Gabor frames with differently sized windows are used simultaneously so that the above-mentioned issues are resolved. In addition, a differential operator is combined with a Gabor frame in order to preserve discontinuity of the underlying phase map better. Some numerical experiments demonstrate that the proposed method is able to reconstruct a wrapped-phase map, even for a severely contaminated situation. PMID:27409020

  13. Cobalt oxide nanosheets wrapped onto nickel foam for non-enzymatic detection of glucose

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Shangjun; Wu, Meiyan; Wang, Qian; Dai, Ziyang; Si, Weili; Huang, Wei; Dong, Xiaochen

    2016-08-01

    Ultra-sensitive and highly selective detection of glucose is essential for the clinical diagnosis of diabetes. In this paper, an ultra-sensitive glucose sensor was successfully fabricated based on cobalt oxide (Co3O4) nanosheets directly grown on nickel foam through a simple hydrothermal method. Characterizations indicated that the Co3O4 nanosheets are completely and uniformly wrapped onto the surface of nickel foam to form a three-dimensional heterostructure. The resulting self-standing electrochemical electrode presents a high performance for the non-enzymatic detection of glucose, including short response time (<10 s), ultra-sensitivity (12.97 mA mM‑1 cm‑2), excellent selectivity and low detection limit (0.058 μM, S/N = 3). These results indicate that Co3O4 nanosheets wrapped onto nickel foam are a low-cost, practical, and high performance electrochemical electrode for bio sensing.

  14. Control characteristics for wrap-around fins on cruise missiles configurations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawyer, W. C.; Monta, W. J.; Carter, W. V.; Alexander, W. K.

    1981-01-01

    This paper presents selected results of a panel loads study conducted as part of the final phase of an extensive investigation of an air-breathing missile concept employing wrap-around aerodynamic surfaces. Typical results for M = 2.36 are presented for the fin load results, plus a brief review of basic results of the previously reported tests. Vapor screen results are also discussed. The present results indicate that the fin load characteristics are nearly identical for planar and curved fins having the same projected planform and would permit the use of planar-surface predictions for supersonic speeds in the preliminary design stages of missiles employing wrap-around curved fins.

  15. Effects of sequence on DNA wrapping around histones

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, Vanessa

    2011-03-01

    A central question in biophysics is whether the sequence of a DNA strand affects its mechanical properties. In epigenetics, these are thought to influence nucleosome positioning and gene expression. Theoretical and experimental attempts to answer this question have been hindered by an inability to directly resolve DNA structure and dynamics at the base-pair level. In our previous studies we used a detailed model of DNA to measure the effects of sequence on the stability of naked DNA under bending. Sequence was shown to influence DNA's ability to form kinks, which arise when certain motifs slide past others to form non-native contacts. Here, we have now included histone-DNA interactions to see if the results obtained for naked DNA are transferable to the problem of nucleosome positioning. Different DNA sequences interacting with the histone protein complex are studied, and their equilibrium and mechanical properties are compared among themselves and with the naked case. NLM training grant to the Computation and Informatics in Biology and Medicine Training Program (NLM T15LM007359).

  16. Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands- on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kenna, T. C.; Pfirman, S.; Mailloux, B. J.; Martin, S.; Kelsey, R.; Bower, P.

    2008-12-01

    Adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program to create an Authentic, Hands-on, Field based Curriculum in Environmental Science at Barnard College T. C. Kenna, S. Pfirman, B. J. Mailloux, M. Stute, R. Kelsey, and P. Bower By adapting a successful inquiry-based immersion program (SEA semester) to the typical college format of classes, we are improving the technical and quantitative skills of undergraduate women and minorities in environmental science and improving their critical thinking and problem-solving by exposing our students to open-ended real-world environmental issues. Our approach uses the Hudson River Estuary as a natural laboratory. In a series of hands-on inquiry-based activities, students use advanced equipment to collect data and samples. Each class session introduces new analytical and data analysis techniques. All classes have the connecting theme of the river. Working with real data is open-ended. Our major findings as indicated by surveys as well as journaling throughout the semester are that the field- based experience significantly contributed to student learning and engagement. Journaling responses indicated that nearly all students discussed the importance and excitement of an authentic research experience. Some students were frustrated with data irregularities, uncertainty in methods and data, and the general challenge of a curriculum with inherent ambiguity. The majority were satisfied with the aims of the course to provide an integrative experience. All students demonstrated transfer of learned skills. This project has had a significant impact on our undergraduate female students: several students have pursued senior thesis projects stemming from grant activities, stating that the field activities were the highlight of their semester. Some students love the experience and want more. Others decide that they want to pursue a different career. All learn how science is conducted and have a better foundation to understand concepts such

  17. Pump thrombosis—A riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    This manuscript reviews the state of the art regarding the subject of pump thrombosis (PT). The historical context of PT and the clinical data are described, the etiologic factors are elucidated, preventive strategies are explored, diagnostic modalities are reviewed, and management principles are defined. There clearly remains much work to be done towards solving this riddle wrapped in a mystery inside an enigma, but promising foundations are being established. PMID:25452905

  18. Batching alternatives for Phase I retrieval wastes to be processed in WRAP Module 1

    SciTech Connect

    Mayancsik, B.A.

    1994-10-13

    During the next two decades, the transuranic (TRU) waste now stored in the 200 Area burial trenches and storage buildings is to be retrieved, processed in the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Module 1 facility, and shipped to a final disposal facility. The purpose of this document is to identify the criteria that can be used to batch suspect TRU waste, currently in retrievable storage, for processing through the WRAP Module 1 facility. These criteria are then used to generate a batch plan for Phase 1 Retrieval operations, which will retrieve the waste located in Trench 4C-04 of the 200 West Area burial ground. The reasons for batching wastes for processing in WRAP Module 1 include reducing the exposure of workers and the environment to hazardous material and ionizing radiation; maximizing the efficiency of the retrieval, processing, and disposal processes by reducing costs, time, and space throughout the process; reducing analytical sampling and analysis; and reducing the amount of cleanup and decontamination between process runs. The criteria selected for batching the drums of retrieved waste entering WRAP Module 1 are based on the available records for the wastes sent to storage as well as knowledge of the processes that generated these wastes. The batching criteria identified in this document include the following: waste generator; type of process used to generate or package the waste; physical waste form; content of hazardous/dangerous chemicals in the waste; radiochemical type and quantity of waste; drum weight; and special waste types. These criteria were applied to the waste drums currently stored in Trench 4C-04. At least one batching scheme is shown for each of the criteria listed above.

  19. Radioactive Air Emmission Notice of Construction (NOC) for the Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP)

    SciTech Connect

    MENARD, N.M.

    2000-12-01

    This document serves as a notice of construction (NOC) pursuant to the requirements of Washington Administrative Code (WAC) 246-247-060, and as a request for approval to modify pursuant to 40 Code of Federal Regulations (CFR) 61.07 for the Waste Receiving and Processing (WRAP) Facility. The rewrite of this NOC incorporates all the approved revisions (Sections 5.0, 6.0, 8.0, and 9.0), a revised potential to emit (PTE) based on the revised maximally exposed individual (MEI) (Sections 8.0, 10.0, 11.0, 12.0, 13.0, 14.0, and 15.0), the results of a study on fugitive emissions (Sections 6.0, 10.0, and 15.0), and reflects the current operating conditions at the WRAP Facility (Section 5.0). This NOC replaces DOE/RL-93-15 and DOE/RL-93-16 in their entirety. The primary function of the WRAP Facility is to examine, assay, characterize, treat, verify, and repackage radioactive material and mixed waste. There are two sources of emissions from the WRAP Facility: stack emissions and fugitive emissions. The stack emissions have an unabated total effective dose equivalent (TEDE) estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 1.13 E+02 millirem per year. The abated TEDE for the stack emissions is estimated at 5.63 E-02 millirem per year to the MEI. The fugitive emissions have an unabated TEDE estimate to the hypothetical offsite MEI of 5.87 E-04. There is no abatement for the fugitive emissions.

  20. First adaptation of coping power program as a classroom-based prevention intervention on aggressive behaviors among elementary school children.

    PubMed

    Muratori, Pietro; Bertacchi, Iacopo; Giuli, Consuelo; Lombardi, Lavinia; Bonetti, Silvia; Nocentini, Annalaura; Manfredi, Azzurra; Polidori, Lisa; Ruglioni, Laura; Milone, Annarita; Lochman, John E

    2015-04-01

    Children with high levels of aggressive behavior create a major management problem in school settings and interfere with the learning environment of their classmates. We report results from a group-randomized trial of a program aimed at preventing aggressive behaviors. The purpose of the current study, therefore, was to determine the extent to which an indicated prevention program, Coping Power Program, is capable of reducing behavioral problems and improving pro-social behavior when delivered as a universal classroom-based prevention intervention. Nine classes (five first grade and four second grade) were randomly assigned to intervention or control conditions. Findings showed a significant reduction in overall problematic behaviors and in inattention-hyperactivity problems for the intervention classes compared to the control classes. Students who received Coping Power Program intervention also showed more pro-social behaviors at postintervention. The implications of these findings for the implementation of strategies aimed at preventing aggressive behavior in school settings are discussed. PMID:24942813

  1. An adapted mindfulness-based stress reduction program for elders in a continuing care retirement community: quantitative and qualitative results from a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    PubMed

    Moss, Aleezé S; Reibel, Diane K; Greeson, Jeffrey M; Thapar, Anjali; Bubb, Rebecca; Salmon, Jacqueline; Newberg, Andrew B

    2015-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to test the feasibility and effectiveness of an adapted 8-week Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction (MBSR) program for elders in a continuing care community. This mixed-methods study used both quantitative and qualitative measures. A randomized waitlist control design was used for the quantitative aspect of the study. Thirty-nine elderly were randomized to MBSR (n = 20) or a waitlist control group (n = 19), mean age was 82 years. Both groups completed pre-post measures of health-related quality of life, acceptance and psychological flexibility, facets of mindfulness, self-compassion, and psychological distress. A subset of MBSR participants completed qualitative interviews. MBSR participants showed significantly greater improvement in acceptance and psychological flexibility and in role limitations due to physical health. In the qualitative interviews, MBSR participants reported increased awareness, less judgment, and greater self-compassion. Study results demonstrate the feasibility and potential effectiveness of an adapted MBSR program in promoting mind-body health for elders. PMID:25492049

  2. Cross-cultural adaptation and validation of the self-reporting questionnaire among HIV+ individuals in a rural ART program in southern Uganda

    PubMed Central

    Nakimuli-Mpungu, Etheldreda; Mojtabai, Ramin; Alexandre, Pierre K; Katabira, Elly; Musisi, Seggane; Nachega, Jean B; Bass, Judith K

    2012-01-01

    Background HIV treatment programs are in need of brief, valid instruments to identify common mental disorders such as depression. Aim To translate and culturally adapt the Self-Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) for use in Uganda and to investigate its psychometric properties in this setting. Methods Following an initial translation of the SRQ-20 from English to Luganda, key informant interviews and focus-group discussions were used to produce a culturally adapted version of the instrument. The adapted SRQ-20 was administered to 200 HIV-positive individuals in a rural antiretroviral therapy program in southern Uganda. All study participants were also evaluated by a psychiatric clinical officer with the Mini International Neuropsychiatric Interview (MINI). Receiver-operating-characteristic analysis was used to examine the sensitivity and specificity of the SRQ-20 compared to the clinical diagnosis generated by the MINI. Results The prevalence estimates of any depressive disorder and current depression were 24% (n = 48) and 12% (n = 24), respectively. The SRQ-20 scores discriminated well between subjects with and without current depression based on the MINI, with an area under the curve of 0.92, as well as between subjects with and without any current or past depressive disorder, with an area under the curve of 0.75. A score of 6 or more had 84% sensitivity and 93% specificity for current depression, and 75% sensitivity and 90% specificity for any depressive disorder. Conclusion The SRQ-20 appears to be a reliable and valid screening measure for depression among rural HIV-positive individuals in southern Uganda. The use of this screening instrument can potentially improve detection and management of depression in this setting. PMID:22570575

  3. Adaptation of a Cancer Clinical Trials Education Program for African American and Latina/o Community Members.

    PubMed

    Pelto, Debra J; Sadler, Georgia Robins; Njoku, Ogo; Rodriguez, Maria Carina; Villagra, Cristina; Malcarne, Vanessa L; Riley, Natasha E; Behar, Alma I; Jandorf, Lina

    2016-08-01

    The pilot study reported in this article culturally and linguistically adapted an educational intervention to promote cancer clinical trials (CCTs) participation among Latinas/os and African Americans. The single-session slide presentation with embedded videos, originally developed through a campus-community partnership in Southern California, was chosen for adaptation because it was perceived to fit the CORRECT model of innovation (credible, observable, relevant, relatively advantageous, easy to understand, compatible, and testable) and because of the potential to customize any components not identified as core, allowing them to be revised for cultural and linguistic alignment in New York City. Most of the 143 community participants (76.2%) were female; most (54.6%) were older than 59 years. More than half (78.3%) preferred to speak English or were bilingual in English and Spanish. A large proportion (41.3%) had not completed high school. Knowledge and perceived benefits and barriers regarding CCT showed small, though statistically significant, increases. There were no statistically significant group differences for changes in mean knowledge, perceived benefits, or perceived barriers when examined by ethnicity, education level, language, or other included sociodemographic variables. However, a small, but statistically significant difference in perceived barriers was observed when examined by country of origin, with the foreign born score worsening 0.08 points (SD = 0.47, p = .007) on the 5-point Likert-type scale administered posteducation compared to preeducation. Participants' open-ended comments demonstrated the acceptability of the topic and intervention. This adaptation resulted in an intervention with the potential to educate African American and Latina/o general community members in a new geographic region about the purpose, methods, and benefits of CCTs. PMID:26493870

  4. A Wrapping Method for Inserting Titanium Micro-Mesh Implants in the Reconstruction of Blowout Fractures

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Tae Joon; Yang, Won Yong; Kang, Sang Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Titanium micro-mesh implants are widely used in orbital wall reconstructions because they have several advantageous characteristics. However, the rough and irregular marginal spurs of the cut edges of the titanium mesh sheet impede the efficacious and minimally traumatic insertion of the implant, because these spurs may catch or hook the orbital soft tissue, skin, or conjunctiva during the insertion procedure. In order to prevent this problem, we developed an easy method of inserting a titanium micro-mesh, in which it is wrapped with the aseptic transparent plastic film that is used to pack surgical instruments or is attached to one side of the inner suture package. Fifty-four patients underwent orbital wall reconstruction using a transconjunctival or transcutaneous approach. The wrapped implant was easily inserted without catching or injuring the orbital soft tissue, skin, or conjunctiva. In most cases, the implant was inserted in one attempt. Postoperative computed tomographic scans showed excellent placement of the titanium micro-mesh and adequate anatomic reconstruction of the orbital walls. This wrapping insertion method may be useful for making the insertion of titanium micro-mesh implants in the reconstruction of orbital wall fractures easier and less traumatic. PMID:26848451

  5. A Wrapping Method for Inserting Titanium Micro-Mesh Implants in the Reconstruction of Blowout Fractures.

    PubMed

    Choi, Tae Joon; Burm, Jin Sik; Yang, Won Yong; Kang, Sang Yoon

    2016-01-01

    Titanium micro-mesh implants are widely used in orbital wall reconstructions because they have several advantageous characteristics. However, the rough and irregular marginal spurs of the cut edges of the titanium mesh sheet impede the efficacious and minimally traumatic insertion of the implant, because these spurs may catch or hook the orbital soft tissue, skin, or conjunctiva during the insertion procedure. In order to prevent this problem, we developed an easy method of inserting a titanium micro-mesh, in which it is wrapped with the aseptic transparent plastic film that is used to pack surgical instruments or is attached to one side of the inner suture package. Fifty-four patients underwent orbital wall reconstruction using a transconjunctival or transcutaneous approach. The wrapped implant was easily inserted without catching or injuring the orbital soft tissue, skin, or conjunctiva. In most cases, the implant was inserted in one attempt. Postoperative computed tomographic scans showed excellent placement of the titanium micro-mesh and adequate anatomic reconstruction of the orbital walls. This wrapping insertion method may be useful for making the insertion of titanium micro-mesh implants in the reconstruction of orbital wall fractures easier and less traumatic. PMID:26848451

  6. Electronic structure of single-walled carbon nanotubes inside helical DNA wraps

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Snyder, Stacy; Rotkin, Slava

    2007-03-01

    Single stranded DNA can helically wrap a single-walled carbon nanotube (SWNT) leading to changes in electronic structure, which is the subject of our study. Other charged polymers may produce band gap modulation similar to that observed for DNA-SWNT complexes. For these hybrids we assume a regular helical wrap, the potential of which breaks the symmetry of the pristine SWNT. Band structure changes are modeled quantum mechanically using the tight binding method together with self-consistent electrostatics. Gap modulation and band structure symmetry-lowering effects may result in variation of the optical spectra, especially for (slightly forbidden) transverse optical transitions. The effect of environmental screening of charges is investigated. Self-consistent electrostatic calculations yield cohesion energy between a charged, regular wrap and a SWNT of the order of tenths of eV per DNA base [1]. [1] Snyder, S. E., and Rotkin, S. V., Polarization Component of Cohesion Energy in Single-Wall Carbon Nanotube-DNA Complexes, JETP Letters 84, 348 (2006).

  7. Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) for Nondestructive Assay of Transuranic (TRU) Waste at the WRAP Facility

    SciTech Connect

    CANTALOUB, M.G.

    2000-05-22

    At the WRAP facility, there are two identical imaging passive/active neutron (IPAN) assay systems and two identical gamma energy assay (GEA) systems. Currently, only the GEA systems are used to characterize waste, therefore, only the GEA systems are addressed in this document. This document contains the limiting factors relating to the waste drum analysis for shipments destined for WIPP. The TMU document provides the uncertainty basis in the NDA analysis of waste containers at the WRAP facility. The defined limitations for the current analysis scheme are as follows: The WRAP waste stream debris is from the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant's process lines, primarily combustible materials. Plutonium analysis range is from the minimum detectable concentration (MDC), Reference 6, to 160 grams (8). The GEA system calibration density ranges from 0.013 g/cc to 1.6 g/cc. PDP Plutonium drum densities were evaluated from 0.065 g/cc to 0.305 gkc. PDP Plutonium source weights ranged from 0.030 g to 3 18 g, in both empty and combustibles matrix drums. The GEA system design density correction macroscopic absorption cross section table (MAC) is Lucite, a material representative of combustible waste. Drums with material not fitting the debris waste criteria are targeted for additional calculations, reviews, and potential re-analysis using a calibration suited for the waste type.

  8. Total Measurement Uncertainty (TMU) for Nondestructive Assay of Transuranic (TRU) Waste at the WRAP Facility

    SciTech Connect

    CANTALOUB, M.G.

    2000-10-20

    At the WRAP facility, there are two identical imaging passive/active neutron (IPAN) assay systems and two identical gamma energy assay (GEA) systems. Currently, only the GEA systems are used to characterize waste, therefore, only the GEA systems are addressed in this document. This document contains the limiting factors relating to the waste drum analysis for shipments destined for WIPP. The TMU document provides the uncertainty basis in the NDA analysis of waste containers at the WRAP facility. The defined limitations for the current analysis scheme are as follows: (1) The WRAP waste stream debris is from the Hanford Plutonium Finishing Plant's process lines, primarily combustible materials. (2) Plutonium analysis range is from the minimum detectable concentration (MDC), Reference 6, to 200 grams (g). (3) The GEA system calibration density ranges from 0.013 g/cc to 1.6 g/cc. (4) PDP Plutonium drum densities were evaluated from 0.065 g/cc to 0.305 g/cc. (5) PDP Plutonium source weights ranged from 0.030 g to 318 g, in both empty and combustibles matrix drums. (6) The GEA system design density correction mass absorption coefficient table (MAC) is Lucite, a material representative of combustible waste. (7) Drums with material not fitting the debris waste criteria are targeted for additional calculations, reviews, and potential re-analysis using a calibration suited for the waste type.

  9. Probabilistic seismic performance assessment of lap-spliced RC columns retrofitted by steel wrapping jackets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Eunsoo; Youn, Heejung; Cho, Baik-Soon

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the seismic fragility curves of two reinforced concrete (RC) columns that were lap-spliced at the bottom and retrofitted with steel wrapping jackets were generated. Their seismic performance was probabilistically assessed in comparison to that of lap-spliced or continuous reinforcement RC columns. This study used two types of steel wrapping jackets, a full jacket and a split jacket. Analytical models of the four types of columns were developed based on the experimental results of the columns using OpenSEES, which is effective in conducting nonlinear time history analyses. A suite of ten artificial ground motions, modified from recorded ground motions, was used to perform nonlinear time history analyses of the analytical models with scaling of the peak ground acceleration from 0.1 g to 1.0 g in increments of 0.1 g. The steel wrapping jackets did not increase the medians for yield (slight damage state) of the lap-spiced column and did not exceed the corresponding median of the continuous reinforcement column. However, the two steel jackets increased the medians for failure by 1.872 and 2.017 times, respectively, and exceeded the corresponding median of the continuous reinforcement column by 11.8% and 20.5%, respectively.

  10. DOE final report, phase one startup, Waste Receiving and Processing Facility (WRAP)

    SciTech Connect

    Jasen, W.G.

    1998-01-07

    This document is to validate that the WRAP facility is physically ready to start up phase 1, and that the managers and operators are prepared to safely manage and operate the facility when all pre-start findings have been satisfactorily corrected. The DOE Readiness Assessment (RA) team spent a week on-site at Waste Receiving and Processing Module 1 (WRAP-1) to validate the readiness for phase 1 start up of facility. The Contractor and DOE staff were exceptionally cooperative and contributed significantly to the overall success of the RA. The procedures and Conduct of Operations areas had significant discrepancies, many of which should have been found by the contractor review team. In addition the findings of the contractor review team should have led the WRAP-1 management team to correcting the root causes of the findings prior to the DOE RA team review. The findings and observations include many issues that the team believes should have been found by the contractor review and corrective actions taken. A significantly improved Operational Readiness Review (ORR) process and corrective actions of root causes must be fully implemented by the contractor prior to the performance of the contractor ORR for phase 2 operations. The pre-start findings as a result of this independent DOE Readiness Assessment are presented.

  11. Bagless transfer technology applications in Hanford`s WRAP-1 Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Leist, K.J.

    1994-08-01

    The Waste Receiving and Processing Facility, under construction at in south-central Washington State. The facility is scheduled to begin operation in 1996. Designed as a joint venture by Raytheon Engineers and Constructors and British Nuclear Fuels, Ltd. (BNFL), its mission is to annually receive more than 6,800 55-gallon drums of both newly generated and retrieved contact-handled solid waste and prepare them for certification and disposal. While 3,800 drums will require only waste acceptance criteria certification using the WRAP-1 NDA/NDE functions, 3,000 drums also will need to be repackaged. The WRAP-1 Facility will use two separate glovebox lines to annually repackage more than 1,500 drums each of transuranic (TRU) and low-level waste (LLW) to meet current disposal guidelines. When complete, WRAP-1 will be the first facility of its kind to perform these tasks on a production scale. Completing this challenging task is made possible by using large-container (drum) bagless transfer technology and state-of-the-art glovebox design.

  12. Waste reduction assistance program (WRAP) on-site consultation audit report: Heavy equipment maintenance shop

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-06-29

    The report is a waste audit study of a heavy equipment maintenance shop in Alaska. Process descriptions, waste types and quantities, waste and materials management methods, and waste reduction alternatives are discussed. Waste reduction methods already used at the facility include filtering of oils and solvents, burning of used oils and solvents for heat recovery, and recycling of batteries. The report recommends further measures the facility could take including use of a solvent still, improved materials management, and performing waste reduction audits regularly. Appendices include a summary of state regulations, a fact sheet on lead-acid battery storage, and a list of vendors and services.

  13. Adapting a Database of Text Messages to a Mobile-Based Weight Loss Program: The Case of the Middle East

    PubMed Central

    Behih, Nawal; Shahzad, Maahd; Anggraini, Aysha

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has become a worldwide epidemic. Qatar, a rapidly developing country in the Middle East, has seen a sharp increase in the prevalence of obesity. The increase can be attributed to several reasons, including sedentary lifestyles imposed by a harsh climate and the introduction of Western fast food. Mobile technologies have been used and studied as a technology to support individuals' weight loss. The authors have developed a mobile application that implements three strategies drawn from proven theories of behavioral change. The application is localized to the cultural context of its proposed users. The objective of this paper is to present a method through which we adapted the messaging content of a weight loss application to the context of its users while retaining an effective degree of automation. The adaptation addressed body image, eating and physical exercise habits, and regional/cultural needs. The paper discusses how surveying potential users can be used to build a profile of a target population, find common patterns, and then develop a database of text messages. The text messages are automated and sent to the users at specific times of day, as suggested by the survey results. PMID:24511311

  14. Strain Measurement during Stress Rupture of Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessel with Fiber Bragg Gratings Sensors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-01-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings were used to measure strain fields during Stress Rupture (SSM) test of Kevlar Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPV). The sensors were embedded under the over-wrapped attached to the liner released from the Kevlar and attached to the Kevlar released from the liner. Additional sensors (foil gages and fiber bragg gratings) were surface mounted on the COPY liner.

  15. Strain measurement during stress rupture of composite over-wrapped pressure vessel with fiber Bragg gratings sensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banks, Curtis E.; Grant, Joseph; Russell, Sam; Arnett, Shawn

    2008-03-01

    Fiber optic Bragg gratings were used to measure strain fields during Stress Rupture (SSM) test of Kevlar Composite Over-Wrapped Pressure Vessels (COPVs). The sensors were embedded under the over-wrapped attached to the liner released from the Kevlar and attached to the Kevlar released from the liner. Additional sensors (foil gages and fiber bragg gratings) were surface mounted on the COPV liner.

  16. Adaptive Sampling Proxy Application

    2012-10-22

    ASPA is an implementation of an adaptive sampling algorithm [1-3], which is used to reduce the computational expense of computer simulations that couple disparate physical scales. The purpose of ASPA is to encapsulate the algorithms required for adaptive sampling independently from any specific application, so that alternative algorithms and programming models for exascale computers can be investigated more easily.

  17. Benefits of size dimorphism and copulatory silk wrapping in the sexually cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Alissa G; Hebets, Eileen A

    2016-02-01

    In sexually cannibalistic animals, male fitness is influenced not only by successful mate acquisition and egg fertilization, but also by avoiding being eaten. In the cannibalistic nursery web spider, Pisaurina mira, the legs of mature males are longer in relation to their body size than those of females, and males use these legs to aid in wrapping a female's legs with silk prior to and during copulation. We hypothesized that elongated male legs and silk wrapping provide benefits to males, in part through a reduced likelihood of sexual cannibalism. To test this, we paired females of random size with males from one of two treatment groups-those capable of silk wrapping versus those incapable of silk wrapping. We found that males with relatively longer legs and larger body size were more likely to mate and were less likely to be cannibalized prior to copulation. Regardless of relative size, males capable of silk wrapping were less likely to be cannibalized during or following copulation and had more opportunities for sperm transfer (i.e. pedipalpal insertions). Our results suggest that male size and copulatory silk wrapping are sexually selected traits benefiting male reproductive success. PMID:26911340

  18. Single molecule analysis of DNA wrapping and looping by a circular 14mer wheel of the bacteriophage 186 CI repressor.

    PubMed

    Wang, Haowei; Dodd, Ian B; Dunlap, David D; Shearwin, Keith E; Finzi, Laura

    2013-06-01

    The lytic-lysogenic decision in bacteriophage 186 is governed by the 186 CI repressor protein in a unique way. The 186 CI is proposed to form a wheel-like oligomer that can mediate either wrapped or looped nucleoprotein complexes to provide the cooperative and competitive interactions needed for regulation. Although consistent with structural, biochemical and gene expression data, many aspects of this model are based on inference. Here, we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) to reveal the various predicted wrapped and looped species, and new ones, for CI regulation of lytic and lysogenic transcription. Automated AFM analysis showed CI particles of the predicted dimensions on the DNA, with CI multimerization favoured by DNA binding. Measurement of the length of the wrapped DNA segments indicated that CI may move on the DNA, wrapping or releasing DNA on either side of the wheel. Tethered particle motion experiments were consistent with wrapping and looping of DNA by CI in solution, where in contrast to λ repressor, the looped species were exceptionally stable. The CI regulatory system provides an intriguing comparison with that of nucleosomes, which share the ability to wrap and release similar sized segments of DNA. PMID:23620280

  19. 'Supramolecular wrapping chemistry' by helix-forming polysaccharides: a powerful strategy for generating diverse polymeric nano-architectures.

    PubMed

    Numata, Munenori; Shinkai, Seiji

    2011-02-21

    We have exploited novel supramolecular wrapping techniques by helix-forming polysaccharides, β-1,3-glucans, which have strong tendency to form regular helical structures on versatile nanomaterials in an induced-fit manner. This approach is totally different from that using the conventional interpolymer interactions seen in both natural and synthetic polymeric architectures, and therefore has potential to create novel polymeric architectures with diverse and unexpected functionalities. The wrapping by β-1,3-glucans enforces the entrapped guest polymer to adopt helical or twisted conformations through the convergent interpolymer interactions. On the contrary, the wrapping by chemically modified semi-artificial β-1,3-glucans can bestow the divergent self-assembling abilities on the entrapped guest polymer to create hierarchical polymeric architectures, where the polymer/β-1,3-glucan composite acts as a huge one-dimensional building block. Based on the established wrapping strategy, we have further extended the wrapping techniques toward the creation of three-dimensional polymeric architectures, in which the polymer/β-1,3-glucan composite behaves as a sort of amphiphilic block copolymers. The present wrapping system would open several paths to accelerate the development of the polymeric supramolecular assembly systems, giving the strong stimuli to the frontier of polysaccharide-based functional chemistry. PMID:21246150

  20. Adaptation and optimization of a line-by-line radiative transfer program for the STAR-100 (STARSMART)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rarig, P. L.

    1980-01-01

    A program to calculate upwelling infrared radiation was modified to operate efficiently on the STAR-100. The modified software processes specific test cases significantly faster than the initial STAR-100 code. For example, a midlatitude summer atmospheric model is executed in less than 2% of the time originally required on the STAR-100. Furthermore, the optimized program performs extra operations to save the calculated absorption coefficients. Some of the advantages and pitfalls of virtual memory and vector processing are discussed along with strategies used to avoid loss of accuracy and computing power. Results from the vectorized code, in terms of speed, cost, and relative error with respect to serial code solutions are encouraging.

  1. Cross-cultural adaptation of an adolescent HIV prevention program: social validation of social contexts and behavior among Botswana adolescents.

    PubMed

    St Lawrence, Janet S; Seloilwe, Esther; Magowe, Mabel; Dithole, Kefalotse; Kgosikwena, Billy; Kokoro, Elija; Lesaane, Dipuo

    2013-08-01

    An evidence-based HIV prevention intervention was adapted for Botswana youth with qualitative interviews, input from an adolescent panel, and social validation. Qualitative interviews were conducted with 40 boys and girls ages 13-19. An adolescent panel then drafted scenarios reflecting social situations described in the interviews that posed risk for HIV. A social validation sample (N = 65) then indicated the prevalence and difficulty of each situation. Youth described informational needs, pressures to use alcohol and drugs, peer pressure for unprotected sex, and intergenerational sex initiations as risk-priming situations. From 17% to 57% of the social validation sample had personally experienced the situations drafted by the adolescent panel. There were no differences in the ratings of boys versus girls, but youth over age 16 more often reported that they had experienced these risky situations. The results were embedded into the intervention. Major changes to the intervention resulted from this three-phase process. PMID:23837806

  2. The Balthazar Scales of Adaptive Behavior. Measures of Program Development for the Severely and Profoundly Mentally Retarded. Section 1. Skills of Functional Independence. Part Three: Program Scoring Form.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Balthazar, Earl E.

    The scoring form for functional independence skills for the mentally retarded includes a section for recording subjects' demographic characteristics as well as tests used, date administered, and raw score. Other sections provide for a brief description of the program being used, an item scoring sheet for the Eating Scales (dependent feeding,…

  3. Cultural Adaptation of a Cognitive Behavior Therapy Guided Self-Help Program for Mexican American Women with Binge Eating Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shea, Munyi; Cachelin, Fary; Uribe, Luz; Striegel, Ruth H.; Thompson, Douglas; Wilson, G. Terence

    2012-01-01

    Data on the compatibility of evidence-based treatment in ethnic minority groups are limited. This study utilized focus group interviews to elicit Mexican American women's (N = 12) feedback on a cognitive behavior therapy guided self-help program for binge eating disorders. Findings revealed 6 themes to be considered during the cultural adaptation…

  4. Project A.D.A.P.T.: Approaches for Developing Active Participation in State Mandated Training Programs for Child Caregivers.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Davis-Dike, Janice

    To increase the participation of child caregivers in mandated inservice training provided at a metropolitan adult/vocational center, changes were made in the curriculum and classroom environment and the research literature was reviewed for ways of activating adult learners. Several specific program innovations were implemented, including the…

  5. Does It "Want" or "Was It Programmed to..."? Kindergarten Children's Explanations of an Autonomous Robot's Adaptive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Levy, Sharona T.; Mioduser, David

    2008-01-01

    This study investigates young children's perspectives in explaining a self-regulating mobile robot, as they learn to program its behaviors from rules. We explore their descriptions of a robot in action to determine the nature of their explanatory frameworks: psychological or technological. We have also studied the role of an adult's intervention…

  6. The Effect of Adapting Instructional Design to Individual Learning Style Pathways on Learning Outcome in a Combat Pilot Training Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Malachowski, James A.

    2012-01-01

    This study used a convenience sample military officers from the U.S. Air Force, Navy, and Marine Corps enrolled in an undergraduate pilot training course but awaiting the start of their program. All participants were 4-year college graduates with a median age of 23. Of the 114 participants, 87% were male and 13% were female. Participants were…

  7. Architecture as a Metaphor for Development of Culturally Adapted Minority Education Programs. Final Report of the Regional Study Award Project.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Klein, Thomas W.

    The use of metaphor offers considerable promise within scientific disciplines for encouraging creative thinking, drawing attention to important concepts or principles in a discipline, and developing new methodologies. Ferguson's description of architectural practice as a metaphor for the development of social programs is used to demonstrate these…

  8. Reply to discussion of, "Adapting Existing Models to Examine Effects of Agricultural Conservation Programs on Stream Habitat Quality"

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Annual expenditures by the federal government in the US for agricultural conservation increased about 80% with passage of the 2002 Farm Bill. However, environmental benefits of these programs have not been quantified. A national project is underway to estimate the effect of conservation practices on...

  9. Economic benefits of using adaptive predictive models of reproductive toxicity in the context of a tiered testing program

    EPA Science Inventory

    A predictive model of reproductive toxicity, as observed in rat multigeneration reproductive (MGR) studies, was previously developed using high throughput screening (HTS) data from 36 in vitro assays mapped to 8 genes or gene-sets from Phase I of USEPA ToxCast research program, t...

  10. Spun-wrapped aligned nanofiber (SWAN) lithography for fabrication of micro/nano-structures on 3D objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ye, Zhou; Nain, Amrinder S.; Behkam, Bahareh

    2016-06-01

    Fabrication of micro/nano-structures on irregularly shaped substrates and three-dimensional (3D) objects is of significant interest in diverse technological fields. However, it remains a formidable challenge thwarted by limited adaptability of the state-of-the-art nanolithography techniques for nanofabrication on non-planar surfaces. In this work, we introduce Spun-Wrapped Aligned Nanofiber (SWAN) lithography, a versatile, scalable, and cost-effective technique for fabrication of multiscale (nano to microscale) structures on 3D objects without restriction on substrate material and geometry. SWAN lithography combines precise deposition of polymeric nanofiber masks, in aligned single or multilayer configurations, with well-controlled solvent vapor treatment and etching processes to enable high throughput (>10-7 m2 s-1) and large-area fabrication of sub-50 nm to several micron features with high pattern fidelity. Using this technique, we demonstrate whole-surface nanopatterning of bulk and thin film surfaces of cubes, cylinders, and hyperbola-shaped objects that would be difficult, if not impossible to achieve with existing methods. We demonstrate that the fabricated feature size (b) scales with the fiber mask diameter (D) as b1.5 ~ D. This scaling law is in excellent agreement with theoretical predictions using the Johnson, Kendall, and Roberts (JKR) contact theory, thus providing a rational design framework for fabrication of systems and devices that require precisely designed multiscale features.Fabrication of micro/nano-structures on irregularly shaped substrates and three-dimensional (3D) objects is of significant interest in diverse technological fields. However, it remains a formidable challenge thwarted by limited adaptability of the state-of-the-art nanolithography techniques for nanofabrication on non-planar surfaces. In this work, we introduce Spun-Wrapped Aligned Nanofiber (SWAN) lithography, a versatile, scalable, and cost-effective technique for

  11. Interactive cutting path analysis programs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiner, J. M.; Williams, D. S.; Colley, S. R.

    1975-01-01

    The operation of numerically controlled machine tools is interactively simulated. Four programs were developed to graphically display the cutting paths for a Monarch lathe, Cintimatic mill, Strippit sheet metal punch, and the wiring path for a Standard wire wrap machine. These programs are run on a IMLAC PDS-ID graphic display system under the DOS-3 disk operating system. The cutting path analysis programs accept input via both paper tape and disk file.

  12. Adaptation of a Culturally Relevant Nutrition and Physical Activity Program for Low-Income, Mexican-Origin Parents With Young Children

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Judith; Horowitz, Marcel; Lamp, Catherine; Johns, Margaret; Espinoza, Dorina; Byrnes, Michele; Gomez, Mayra Muñoz; Aguilera, Alberto; de la Torre, Adela

    2015-01-01

    Latino children experience higher rates of obesity than do non-Latino white children. Family-centered nutrition interventions can slow the rate of weight gain in this population. Niños Sanos, Familia Sana (Healthy Children, Healthy Family) is a 5-year, community-based, participatory research study that targets rural Mexican-origin farmworker families with children aged 2 to 8 years in California’s Central Valley. Adaptation of a culturally relevant obesity prevention program involved qualitative research to tailor key obesity prevention messages, pilot testing and implementation of key messages and activities at family nights, and continual modification to incorporate culturally innovative elements. Of the 238 families enrolled, 53% (125) attended the recommended minimum of 5 (of 10 possible) classes during the first year. A university and community partnership can guide development of a culturally tailored obesity prevention program that is suitable for reaching a high-risk Mexican-origin audience through cooperative extension and other public health programs. PMID:25974142

  13. New LANL Group M-7 two-stage gun: Double-diaphragm and wrap-around gas breech

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Martinez, A.R.

    1992-10-01

    A new two-stage gun is being installed in a high explosive testing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the purpose of subjecting insensitive high explosives to controlled projectile impacts so that shock-to-detonation transition can be studied in detail. This gun has been patterned after guns designed by Alois Stilp at Ernst Mach Institut (EMI) in Freiburg and Wintersweiler, Germany. Several changes were made to adapt the design to our needs. The gun has a 100-mm diameter pump tube and 33-mm and 50-mm diameter launch tubes; both pump and launch tubes are 7.6 m long. We plan to use only helium as the reservoir gas. Large hydraulic clamps hold the gun together in three places during a shot; these are located on both sides of the transition section and at the breech. These clamps make gun conversions to different setups relatively simple, i.e., the two-stage gun can be converted into a single-stage gun. A gas breech has been designed which can be operated in either wrap-around or double-diaphragm mode with a maximum operating pressure of 15,000 psi. Two-stage gun calculations indicate that in the gas breech configuration, projectile velocities up to 4 km/s can be obtained using helium in both the breech and the reservoir. The gun has been fabricated and is being installed at the present time. Testing is expected to begin in early 1993 if the startup difficulties do not become excessive.

  14. New LANL Group M-7 two-stage gun: Double-diaphragm and wrap-around gas breech

    SciTech Connect

    Sheffield, S.A.; Martinez, A.R.

    1992-01-01

    A new two-stage gun is being installed in a high explosive testing facility at Los Alamos National Laboratory for the purpose of subjecting insensitive high explosives to controlled projectile impacts so that shock-to-detonation transition can be studied in detail. This gun has been patterned after guns designed by Alois Stilp at Ernst Mach Institut (EMI) in Freiburg and Wintersweiler, Germany. Several changes were made to adapt the design to our needs. The gun has a 100-mm diameter pump tube and 33-mm and 50-mm diameter launch tubes; both pump and launch tubes are 7.6 m long. We plan to use only helium as the reservoir gas. Large hydraulic clamps hold the gun together in three places during a shot; these are located on both sides of the transition section and at the breech. These clamps make gun conversions to different setups relatively simple, i.e., the two-stage gun can be converted into a single-stage gun. A gas breech has been designed which can be operated in either wrap-around or double-diaphragm mode with a maximum operating pressure of 15,000 psi. Two-stage gun calculations indicate that in the gas breech configuration, projectile velocities up to 4 km/s can be obtained using helium in both the breech and the reservoir. The gun has been fabricated and is being installed at the present time. Testing is expected to begin in early 1993 if the startup difficulties do not become excessive.

  15. Using intervention mapping to develop and adapt a secondary stroke prevention program in Veterans Health Administration medical centers

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Secondary stroke prevention is championed by the stroke guidelines; however, it is rarely systematically delivered. We sought to develop a locally tailored, evidence-based secondary stroke prevention program. The purpose of this paper was to apply intervention mapping (IM) to develop our locally tailored stroke prevention program and implementation plan. We completed a needs assessment and the five Steps of IM. The needs assessment included semi-structured interviews of 45 providers; 26 in Indianapolis and 19 in Houston. We queried frontline clinical providers of stroke care using structured interviews on the following topics: current provider practices in secondary stroke risk factor management; barriers and needs to support risk factor management; and suggestions on how to enhance secondary stroke risk factor management throughout the continuum of care. We then describe how we incorporated each of the five Steps of IM to develop locally tailored programs at two sites that will be evaluated through surveys for patient outcomes, and medical records chart abstraction for processes of care. PMID:21159171

  16. Adaptive Structures Flight Experiments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Martin, Maurice

    1992-01-01

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  17. Adaptive structures flight experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, Maurice

    The topics are presented in viewgraph form and include the following: adaptive structures flight experiments; enhanced resolution using active vibration suppression; Advanced Controls Technology Experiment (ACTEX); ACTEX program status; ACTEX-2; ACTEX-2 program status; modular control patch; STRV-1b Cryocooler Vibration Suppression Experiment; STRV-1b program status; Precision Optical Bench Experiment (PROBE); Clementine Spacecraft Configuration; TECHSAT all-composite spacecraft; Inexpensive Structures and Materials Flight Experiment (INFLEX); and INFLEX program status.

  18. Electromagnetic wrap

    DOEpatents

    Tremblay, Paul L [Idaho Falls, ID; Scott, Jill R [Idaho Falls, ID

    2010-09-28

    A device and method for altering the line reactance of a transmission line having a transmission line, a first floating conductor and a grounding (shielding) conductor. The first floating conductor is positioned between and electrically insulated from the transmission line and the grounding conductor. A source and a load are connected at opposite ends of the transmission line.

  19. Camembert-type cheese ripening dynamics are changed by the properties of wrapping films.

    PubMed

    Picque, D; Leclercq-Perlat, M N; Guillemin, H; Perret, B; Cattenoz, T; Provost, J J; Corrieu, G

    2010-12-01

    Four gas-permeable wrapping films exhibiting different degrees of water permeability (ranging from 1.6 to 500 g/m(2) per d) were tested to study their effect on soft-mold (Camembert-type) cheese-ripening dynamics compared with unwrapped cheeses. Twenty-three-day trials were performed in 2 laboratory-size (18L) respiratory-ripening cells under controlled temperature (6 ± 0.5°C), relative humidity (75 ± 2%), and carbon dioxide content (0.5 to 1%). The films allowed for a high degree of respiratory activity; no limitation in gas permeability was observed. The wide range of water permeability of the films led to considerable differences in cheese water loss (from 0.5 to 12% on d 23, compared with 15% for unwrapped cheeses), which appeared to be a key factor in controlling cheese-ripening progress. A new relationship between 2 important cheese-ripening descriptors (increase of the cheese core pH and increase of the cheese's creamy underrind thickness) was shown in relation to the water permeability of the wrapping film. High water losses (more than 10 to 12% on d 23) also were observed for unwrapped cheeses, leading to Camembert cheeses that were too dry and poorly ripened. On the other hand, low water losses (from 0.5 to 1% on d 23) led to over-ripening in the cheese underrind, which became runny as a result. Finally, water losses from around 3 to 6% on d 23 led to good ripening dynamics and the best cheese quality. This level of water loss appeared to be ideal in terms of cheese-wrapping film design. PMID:21094731

  20. Physical exercise affects the epigenetic programming of rat brain and modulates the adaptive response evoked by repeated restraint stress.

    PubMed

    Kashimoto, R K; Toffoli, L V; Manfredo, M H F; Volpini, V L; Martins-Pinge, M C; Pelosi, G G; Gomes, M V

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics has recently been linked to molecular adaptive responses evoked by physical exercise and stress. Herein we evaluated the effects of physical exercise on global DNA methylation and expression of the Dnmt1 gene in the rat brain and also verified its potential to modulate responses evoked by repeated restraint stress (RRS). Wistar rats were classified into the following experimental groups: (1) physically active (EX): animals submitted to swimming during postnatal days 53-78 (PND); (2) stress (ST): animals submitted to RRS during 75-79PND; (3) exercise-stress (EX-ST): animals submitted to swimming during 53-78PND and to RRS during 75-79PND, and (4) control (CTL): animals that were not submitted to intervention. Samples from the hippocampus, cortex and hypothalamus were obtained at 79PND. The global DNA methylation profile was assessed using an ELISA-based method and the expression of Dnmt1 was evaluated by real-time PCR. Significantly increased methylation was observed in the hypothalamus of animals from the EX group in comparison to CTL. Comparative analysis involving the EX-ST and ST groups revealed increased global DNA methylation in the hippocampus, cortex, and hypothalamus of EX-ST, indicating the potential of physical exercise in modulating the responses evoked by RRS. Furthermore, decreased expression of the Dnmt1 gene was observed in the hippocampus and hypothalamus of animals from the EX-ST group. In summary, our data indicate that physical exercise affects DNA methylation of the hypothalamus and might modulate epigenetic responses evoked by RRS in the hippocampus, cortex, and hypothalamus. PMID:26342282