Science.gov

Sample records for adaptation syndrome sas

  1. Adaptation and Validation of the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a Sample of Male Drug Users.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Medina, Pablo; Sierra, Juan Carlos

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to adapt and validate the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) in a sample of male drug users. A sample of 326 male drug users and 322 non-clinical males was selected by cluster sampling and convenience sampling, respectively. Results showed that the scale had good psychometric properties and adequate internal consistency reliability (Initiation = .66, Refusal = .74 and STD-P = .79). An evaluation of the invariance showed strong factor equivalence between both samples. A high and moderate effect of Differential Item Functioning was only found in items 1 and 14 (∆R 2 Nagelkerke = .076 and .037, respectively). We strongly recommend not using item 1 if the goal is to compare the scores of both groups, otherwise the comparison will be biased. Correlations obtained between the CSFQ-14 and the safe sex ratio and the SAS subscales were significant (CI = 95%) and indicated good concurrent validity. Scores of male drug users were similar to those of non-clinical males. Therefore, the adaptation of the SAS to drug users provides enough guarantees for reliable and valid use in both clinical practice and research, although care should be taken with item 1. PMID:25896498

  2. [Perioperative management of an obese patient complicated with sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) undergoing awake craniotomy].

    PubMed

    Komayama, Noriaki; Kamata, Kotoe; Maruyama, Takashi; Nitta, Masayuki; Muragaki, Yoshihiro; Ozaki, Makoto

    2014-10-01

    Both obesity (BMI over 30) and SAS are risks for Supper airway maintenance. We report an obese patient (BMI 33.5) with SAS who underwent awake craniotomy. Weight reduction was instructed 1 month before the operation, and the patient lost enough weight to use intraoperative MRI. Under general anesthesia, surgical pads containing 2% lidocaine with adrenaline were inserted into the nasal cavities. The patient's airway S was secured by i-gel® until dura was opened. A nasal airway was then inserted to confirm the upper airway patency and anesthetics were terminated The patient regained consciousness and started respiration. The i-gel® was removed. The nasal airway was changed to an RAE tracheal tube ; the tube was fixed above the vocal cords under bronchofiberscopic observation. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) via RAE tube was started. Neither coughing nor epistaxis was observed.The RAE tube prevented glossoptosis and did not disturb speech mapping. Emergent endotracheal intubation was easily managed because the tube was close to the glottis. The RAE tube was removed and nasal CP AP was applied overnight Carefully prepared CP AP support via nasal RAE tube was practical in keeping upper airway patency for an obese patient complicated with SAS undergoing awake craniotomy. PMID:25693340

  3. Cerebral blood flow - Comparison of ground-based and spaceflight data and correlation with space adaptation syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bagian, James P.; Hackett, Peter

    1991-01-01

    The relationship between the cerebral blood flow velocity and the space adaptation syndrome (SAS), which includes symptoms of motion sickness, stuffy head, and/or headaches, was investigated by measuring (using a transcranial Doppler device) differences between the preflight and the inflight cerebral blood flow velocity in crew members who were motion sick and in those who were not sick during a flight aboard KC-135. It was found that the cerebral artery bloodflow inflight did not differ significantly from that recorded preflight, nor did the severity of SAS symptoms correlate directly with the cerebral blood flow.

  4. SIMCA T 1.0: A SAS Computer Program for Simulating Computer Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raiche, Gilles; Blais, Jean-Guy

    2006-01-01

    Monte Carlo methodologies are frequently applied to study the sampling distribution of the estimated proficiency level in adaptive testing. These methods eliminate real situational constraints. However, these Monte Carlo methodologies are not currently supported by the available software programs, and when these programs are available, their…

  5. Physiologic adaptation to space - Space adaptation syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vanderploeg, J. M.

    1985-01-01

    The adaptive changes of the neurovestibular system to microgravity, which result in space motion sickness (SMS), are studied. A list of symptoms, which range from vomiting to drowsiness, is provided. The two patterns of symptom development, rapid and gradual, and the duration of the symptoms are described. The concept of sensory conflict and rearrangements to explain SMS is being investigated.

  6. Modeling Family Adaptation to Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Raspa, Melissa; Bailey, Donald, Jr.; Bann, Carla; Bishop, Ellen

    2014-01-01

    Using data from a survey of 1,099 families who have a child with Fragile X syndrome, we examined adaptation across 7 dimensions of family life: parenting knowledge, social support, social life, financial impact, well-being, quality of life, and overall impact. Results illustrate that although families report a high quality of life, they struggle…

  7. The SAS-3 programmable telemetry system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, M. R.

    1975-01-01

    Basic concept, system design and operation principles of the telemetry system developed for the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3) are analyzed. The concept of programmable format selected for the SAS-3 represents an optical combination of the fixed format system of SAS-1 and SAS-2, and the adaptive format concept. The programmable telemetry system permits a very wide range of changes in the data sampling order by a ground control station, depending on the experimental requirements, so that the maximal amount of useful data can be returned from orbit. The programmable system also allows the data format to differ from one spacecraft to another without changing hardware. Attention is given to the command requirements and redundancy of the SAS-3 telemetry system.

  8. Adaptive Behavior in Children with Fragile X Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hatton, Deborah D.; Wheeler, Anne C.; Skinner, Martie L.; Bailey, Donald B.; Sullivan, Kelly M.; Roberts, Jane E.; Mirrett, Penny; Clark, Renee D.

    2003-01-01

    Adaptive behavior was measured over time in 70 children, ages 1 to 12 years, with fragile X syndrome. With a mean of 4.4 assessments per child, adaptive behavior skills increased steadily and gradually over time. Children with less autistic behavior and higher percentages of the fragile X mental retardation gene protein showed better performance…

  9. Intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome: A case report.

    PubMed

    Palla, Viktoria-Varvara; Karaolanis, Georgios; Pentazos, Panagiotis; Ladopoulos, Alexios; Papageorgiou, Evaggelos

    2015-06-01

    Short bowel syndrome is a clinical entity that includes loss of energy, fluid, electrolytes or micronutrient balance because of inadequate functional intestinal length. This case report demonstrates the case of a woman who compensated for short bowel syndrome through intestinal adaptation, which is a complex process worthy of further investigation for the avoidance of dependence on total parenteral nutrition and of intestinal transplantation in such patients. PMID:26206429

  10. SAS Attitude Support System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Snyder, J. L.; Meyers, G. F.

    1972-01-01

    A unique ground control system was designed and implemented to support and meet the stringent mission requirements of the SAS-1. The important features of the system are described with emphasis on the software used to control the orientation of the spacecraft. A summary of the system's operation during the SAS-1 mission is given along with a discussion of the performance of the software subsystems relative to the mission requirements.

  11. Space adaptation syndrome experiments (8-IML-1)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watt, D.

    1992-01-01

    A set of seven experiments will study adaptation of the human nervous system to weightlessness. Particular emphasis will be placed on the vestibular and proprioceptive systems. The experiments are as follows: the sled/H-reflex; rotation/vestibulo-ocular reflex; the visual stimulator experiment; proprioception (relaxed) experiment; proprioception (active) experiment; proprioception (illusion) experiment; and tactile acuity.

  12. Reprint Control Using SAS.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Layman, Mary F.; Groninger, N. Paige

    1984-01-01

    Discusses an online bibliographic control program written using the Statistical Analysis System (SAS) and its use at the Denver Wildlife Research Center to organize and provide access to reprints of publications. The program listing, sample input and output, and programs for searching by one and two keywords are appended. (EJS)

  13. Space adaptation syndrome: Incidence and operational implications for the space transportation system program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Homick, J. L.; Reschke, M. F.; Vanderploeg, J. M.

    1984-01-01

    Better methods for the prediction, prevention, and treatment of the space adaptation syndome (SAS) were developed. A systematic, long range program of operationally oriented data collection on all individuals flying space shuttle missions was initiated. Preflight activities include the use of a motion experience questionnaire, laboratory tests of susceptibility to motion sickness induced by Coriolis stimuli and determinations of antimotion sickness drug efficacy and side effects. During flight, each crewmember is required to provide a daily report of symptom status, use of medications, and other vestibular related sensations. Additional data are obtained postflight. During the first nine shuttle missions, the reported incidence of SAS has been48%. Self-induced head motions and unusual visual orientation attitudes appear to be the principal triggering stimuli. Antimotion sickness medication, was of limited therapeutic value. Complete recovery from symptoms occurred by mission day three or four. Also of relevance is the lack of a statistically significant correlation between the ground based Coriolis test and SAS. The episodes of SAS have resulted in no impact to shuttle mission objectives and, no significant impact to mission timelines.

  14. The Development of Adaptive Skills in Young People with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Duijn, G.; Dijkxhoorn, Y.; Scholte, E. M.; Van Berckelaer-Onnes, I. A.

    2010-01-01

    Background: To help children with Down syndrome reach optimum levels of adaptive behaviour, caretakers need to know how and to what extent children with Down syndrome acquire adaptive skills. Method: The adaptive levels of motor, daily living, communicative and social behavioural skills were determined in a group of 984 Dutch children with Down…

  15. Possibilistic context identification for SAS imagery

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Du, Xiaoxiao; Zare, Alina; Cobb, J. T.

    2015-05-01

    This paper proposes a possibilistic context identification approach for synthetic aperture sonar (SAS) imagery. SAS seabed imagery can display a variety of textures that can be used to identify seabed types such as sea grass, sand ripple and hard-packed sand, etc. Target objects in SAS imagery often have varying characteristics and features due to changing environmental context. Therefore, methods that can identify the seabed environment can be used to assist in target classification and detection in an environmentally adaptive or context-dependent approach. In this paper, a possibilistic context identification approach is used to identify the seabed contexts. Alternative methods, such as crisp, fuzzy or probabilistic methods, would force one type of context on every sample in the imagery, ignoring the possibility that the test imagery may include an environmental context that has not yet appeared in the training process. The proposed possibilistic approach has an advantage in that it can both identify known contexts as well as identify when an unknown context has been encountered. Experiments are conducted on a collection of SAS imagery that display a variety of environmental features.

  16. Effects of Age on the Adaptive Behavior of Institutionalized and Noninstitutionalized Individuals with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Silverstein, A. B.; And Others

    1988-01-01

    Evidence of an association between Alzheimer disease and Down syndrome led to three studies on the effects of age on the adaptive behavior of over 400 Down syndrome individuals. One study found a decline in motor development competence among older (over 60 years) Down syndrome individuals when compared with other mentally retarded persons.…

  17. Adaptive Skills, Behavior Problems, and Parenting Stress in Mothers of Boys with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sarimski, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    The relationship of temperament, atypical behaviors, and adaptive behavior of young boys with Fragile X syndrome on mothers' parenting stress was analyzed. Twenty-six boys with Fragile X syndrome (30-88 months of age) participated. The overall development of the participants was significantly delayed with a specific profile of adaptive behaviors…

  18. Development of Adaptive Behavior in Adolescents and Young Adults with Autism and Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loveland, Katherine A.; Kelley, Michelle L.

    1988-01-01

    Sixteen individuals with autism and sixteen with Down's Syndrome, aged 10-29, were matched for verbal mental age. The groups' scores did not differ on the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales. However, the adaptive skills of Down's Syndrome individuals kept pace with mental age, while the skills of autistic subjects did not change. (Author/JDD)

  19. Risk, resources and state-dependent adaptive behavioural syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Luttbeg, Barney; Sih, Andrew

    2010-01-01

    Many animals exhibit behavioural syndromes—consistent individual differences in behaviour across two or more contexts or situations. Here, we present adaptive, state-dependent mathematical models for analysing issues about behavioural syndromes. We find that asset protection (where individuals with more ‘assets’ tend be more cautious) and starvation avoidance, two state-dependent mechanisms, can explain short-term behavioural consistency, but not long-term stable behavioural types (BTs). These negative-feedback mechanisms tend to produce convergence in state and behaviour over time. In contrast, a positive-feedback mechanism, state-dependent safety (where individuals with higher energy reserves, size, condition or vigour are better at coping with predators), can explain stable differences in personality over the long term. The relative importance of negative- and positive-feedback mechanisms in governing behavioural consistency depends on environmental conditions (predation risk and resource availability). Behavioural syndromes emerge more readily in conditions of intermediate ecological favourability (e.g. medium risk and medium resources, or high risk and resources, or low risk and resources). Under these conditions, individuals with higher initial state maintain a tendency to be bolder than individuals that start with low initial state; i.e. later BT is determined by state during an early ‘developmental window’. In contrast, when conditions are highly favourable (low risk, high resources) or highly unfavourable (high risk, low resources), individuals converge to be all relatively bold or all relatively cautious, respectively. In those circumstances, initial differences in BT are not maintained over the long term, and there is no early developmental window where initial state governs later BT. The exact range of ecological conditions favouring behavioural syndromes depends also on the strength of state-dependent safety. PMID:21078650

  20. Adaptive Behavior and Problem Behavior in Young Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hahn, Laura J.; Fidler, Deborah J.; Hepburn, Susan L.

    2014-01-01

    The present study compares the adaptive behavior profile of 18 young children with Williams syndrome (WS) and a developmentally matched group of 19 children with developmental disabilities and examines the relationship between adaptive behavior and problem behaviors in WS. Parents completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales--Interview…

  1. Adaptive and Maladaptive Behavior in Children with Smith-Magenis Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martin, Staci C.; Wolters, Pamela L.; Smith, Ann C. M.

    2006-01-01

    Children with Smith-Magenis Syndrome (SMS) exhibit deficits in adaptive behavior but systematic studies using objective measures are lacking. This descriptive study assessed adaptive functioning in 19 children with SMS using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS). Maladaptive behavior was examined through parent questionnaires and the…

  2. Adaptive functioning in Williams syndrome and its relation to demographic variables and family environment.

    PubMed

    Brawn, Gabrielle; Porter, Melanie

    2014-12-01

    This study assessed adaptive functioning in children and adults with Williams syndrome. The aims were to: (1) profile adaptive functioning; (2) investigate the relationship between adaptive functions and gender, CA, and IQ; (3) investigate the relationship between levels of adaptive functioning and family environment characteristics. In line with predictions: (1) there was extensive variability in adaptive functions; (2) neither gender nor IQ were significantly related to adaptive skills, but Communication skills and Interpersonal Relationship skills failed to make appropriate gains relative to same aged peers and (3) adaptive functioning was significantly related to family environment. Practical and clinical implications are discussed. PMID:25310713

  3. Placental transfer of antidepressant medications: implications for postnatal adaptation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ewing, Grace; Tatarchuk, Yekaterina; Appleby, Dina; Schwartz, Nadav; Kim, Deborah

    2015-04-01

    Seven to thirteen percent of women are either prescribed or taking (depending on the study) an antidepressant during pregnancy. Because antidepressants freely cross into the intrauterine environment, we aim to summarize the current findings on placental transfer of antidepressants. Although generally low risk, antidepressants have been associated with postnatal adaptation syndrome (PNAS). Specifically, we explore whether the antidepressants most closely associated with PNAS (paroxetine, fluoxetine, venlafaxine) cross the placenta to a greater extent than other antidepressants. We review research on antidepressants in the context of placental anatomy, placental transport mechanisms, placental metabolism, pharmacokinetics, as well as non-placental maternal and fetal factors. This provides insight into the complexity involved in understanding how placental transfer of antidepressants may relate to adverse perinatal outcomes. Ultimately, from this data there is no pattern in which PNAS is related to placental transfer of antidepressant medications. In general, there is large interindividual variability for each type of antidepressant. To make the most clinically informed decisions about the use of antidepressants in pregnancy, studies that link maternal, placental and fetal genetic polymorphisms, placental transfer rates and infant outcomes are needed. PMID:25711391

  4. SAS-1 Is a C2 Domain Protein Critical for Centriole Integrity in C. elegans

    PubMed Central

    Delattre, Marie; Balestra, Fernando R.; Blanchoud, Simon; Finger, Susanne; Knott, Graham; Müller-Reichert, Thomas; Gönczy, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles important for the formation of cilia, flagella and centrosomes. Despite progress in understanding the underlying assembly mechanisms, how centriole integrity is ensured is incompletely understood, including in sperm cells, where such integrity is particularly critical. We identified C. elegans sas-1 in a genetic screen as a locus required for bipolar spindle assembly in the early embryo. Our analysis reveals that sperm-derived sas-1 mutant centrioles lose their integrity shortly after fertilization, and that a related defect occurs when maternal sas-1 function is lacking. We establish that sas-1 encodes a C2 domain containing protein that localizes to centrioles in C. elegans, and which can bind and stabilize microtubules when expressed in human cells. Moreover, we uncover that SAS-1 is related to C2CD3, a protein required for complete centriole formation in human cells and affected in a type of oral-facial-digital (OFD) syndrome. PMID:25412110

  5. [Effect of vitamin sufficiency on adaptation syndrome in growing rats].

    PubMed

    Sidorova, Iu S; Beketova, N A; Vrzhesinskaia, O A; Kodentsova, V M; Kosheleva, O V; Zorin, S N; Selifanov, A V; Mazo, V K

    2014-01-01

    The influence of vitamin supply of growing male -Wistar rats (n=21) with an initial body weight 53,5±0,9 g on their resistance to a single distress induced by the electric shock has been investigated. Control rats within 21 days received a complete semisynthetic diet,providingadequate amounts of vitamins. Combined vitamin deficiency in experimental rats was caused by 5-fold decrease of vitamin mixture amount in the feed and the total vitamin E exclusion from the mixture. On the 21st day, one day before the end of the experiment, both groups of rats were subjected to stress impact (electrocutaneous irritation on paws, 0,4 mA for 8 sec) and then animals were placed in metabolic cages to collect urine. By the end of the experiment, the animals with the combined vitamin deficiency lag behind in growth. Vitamin B2, A, B1 and E liver content decreased in experimental rats by 1,6, 2,3, 4,4 and 15 fold accordingly. Retinol plasma concentration was significantly reduced by 18%, α-tocopherol level - by 5 fold, urinary excretionof riboflavin and 4-pyridoxic acid (vitamin B6 metabolite) was significantly reduced by 6,5 and 2,46 times accordingly. MDA blood plasma concentration and the urinary ratio of oxidized and not oxidized form of 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxy-guanosine did not differ in both groups of rats. Urinary excretion of stress biomarker corticosterone in rats with combined vitamin deficit was 2,5-fold higher than in control rats. Thus, reducing of vitamins supply resulted in an increase of urine corticosterone in stressed rats, that characterized the intensity of general adaptation syndrome. This fact shows the importance of optimal sufficiency with vitamins in nonspecific (general) resistance to stress. PMID:25816622

  6. Leisure Activities in Prader-Wlli Syndrome: Implications for Health, Cognition and Adaptive Functioning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykens, Elisabeth M.

    2014-01-01

    Although hyperphagia and compulsivity in Prader-Willi syndrome (PWS) are well described, recreation and adaptive skills are relatively unexplored. Parents of 123 participants with PWS (4--48 years) completed measures of their child's adaptive, recreation, and problem behaviors. Offspring received cognitive testing. Watching TV was the most…

  7. Profiles and Development of Adaptive Behavior in Children with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dykens, Elisabeth; Hodapp, Robert; Evans, David

    2006-01-01

    The profiles and developmental trajectories of adaptive behavior were cross-sectionally examined in 80 children with Down syndrome ages 1 to 11.5 years using the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales. Profile findings indicated a significant weakness in communication relative to daily living and socialization skills. Within communication itself,…

  8. MANAGING LARGE DATABASES USING SAS AND ORACLE

    EPA Science Inventory

    This aper iscusses the rinciple f atabase anagement hrough the use of SAS/ASSIST to develop SAS/ACCESS code to interface with ORACLE. t examines how EPA in beginning to use the SAS interface to ORACLE to invoke interactive and batch processing for data entry, editing, updating, a...

  9. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As w...

  10. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying the data. They can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). ...

  11. SAS FORMATS: USES AND ABUSES

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS formats are a very powerful tool. They allow you to display the data in a more readable manner without modifying it. Formats can also be used to group data into categories for use in various procedures like PROC FREQ, PROC TTEST, and PROC MEANS (as a class variable). As ...

  12. People with Usher Syndrome, Type II: Issues and Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Miner, I. D.

    1997-01-01

    Describes the experiences of individuals with Usher Syndrome, discusses the lack of appropriate services and the failure of professionals to provide sufficient information on the condition, and stresses the importance of access to information and the acquisition of new skills before the visual impairment becomes severe. (Author/CR)

  13. Application of syndrome based Turbo decoding with adaptive computational complexity in LTE downlink

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Geldmacher, J.; Hueske, K.; Kosakowski, M.; Götze, J.

    2012-09-01

    This paper describes the application of an adaptive complexity decoder for the Long Term Evolution (LTE) downlink Turbo code. The proposed decoding approach is based on the block syndrome decoding principle and enables adaptive reduction of decoding effort depending on current SNR and iteration number with negligible influence on decoding performance. Numerical results in context of LTE downlink using typical mobile channels are used to demonstrate the efficiency of the approach.

  14. Cognitive, Linguistic and Adaptive Functioning in Williams Syndrome: Trajectories from Early to Middle Adulthood

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howlin, Patricia; Elison, Sarah; Udwin, Orlee; Stinton, Christopher

    2010-01-01

    Background: Little is known about trajectories of cognitive functioning as individuals with Williams syndrome (WS) move though adulthood. Method: The present study investigated cognitive, linguistic and adaptive functioning in adults with WS aged 19-55 years, using both cross-sectional and longitudinal approaches. Results: Data from the…

  15. Neurocognitive, adaptive, and behavioral functioning of individuals with Costello syndrome: a review.

    PubMed

    Axelrad, Marni E; Schwartz, David D; Katzenstein, Jennifer M; Hopkins, Elizabeth; Gripp, Karen W

    2011-05-15

    Costello syndrome is a rare rasopathy resulting from germline mutations of the proto-oncogene HRAS. Its phenotype includes severe failure-to-thrive, cardiac abnormalities, a predisposition to benign and malignant tumors, hypotonia, and developmental delay. Costello syndrome is associated with cognitive impairment, including intellectual functioning generally in the mild to moderate range of disability, commensurate adaptive functioning, and increased anxiety. Relative strengths have been found for nonverbal fluid reasoning (FR). Gender effects have been reported, with females showing better adaptive functioning across domains. Developmentally, nonverbal skills plateau in late childhood/early adolescence, whereas the rate of vocabulary acquisition may increase in adolescence into early adulthood. Here we review the literature assessing cognitive, adaptive, and behavioral functioning in Costello syndrome, and we provide data from an ongoing longitudinal study. Severity of cognitive impairment may depend upon the specific HRAS mutation, as three individuals with the p.G13C change showed average nonverbal FR skills and borderline-to-low average overall nonverbal IQ. Further, separation anxiety is more common in Costello syndrome than in the general population, affecting 39% of this cohort, and males are more often overly anxious than females. Interrelations between anxiety and cognitive and adaptive functioning were found, pointing to functional difficulties as a likely source of stress and anxiety. Taking into account data from animal models, cognitive and behavioral changes likely originate from abnormal differentiation of neuronal precursor cells, which result in structural and functional brain differences. PMID:21495179

  16. Adaptive Behavior and Cognitive Function of Adults with Down Syndrome: Modeling Change with Age.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hawkins, Barbara A.; Eklund, Susan J.; James, David R.; Foose, Alice K.

    2003-01-01

    Fifty-eight adults with Down syndrome were assessed longitudinally over 10 years for the purpose of modeling aging-related change in cognitive function and adaptive behavior. Findings provide further evidence of changes in performance with age and include selected effects for participants who completed the study and those lost to follow-up.…

  17. Adaptive Behavior of 4- through 8-Year-Old Children with Williams Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Mervis, Carolyn B.; Klein-Tasman, Bonita P.; Mastin, Michelle E.

    2001-01-01

    This study assessed the behavior of 41 4-through 8-year-olds with Williams syndrome. As expected, socialization and communication were relative strengths, whereas daily living skills and motor skills were relative weaknesses. Within socialization, interpersonal skills were stronger than play/leisure or coping skills. Adaptive behavior was not…

  18. Behavior and Adaptive Functioning in Adolescents with Down Syndrome: Specifying Targets for Intervention

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jacola, Lisa M.; Hickey, Francis; Howe, Steven R.; Esbensen, Anna; Shear, Paula K.

    2014-01-01

    Adolescents with Down syndrome can demonstrate increased behavior problems as compared with typical peers. Few studies have explored whether behavior impacts adaptive functioning. Caregiver report from the Behavioral Assessment System for Children, 2nd Edition (BASC-2; Reynolds & Kamphaus, 2004) and the Child Behavioral Checklist (CBCL;…

  19. Family Influences on Adaptive Development in Young Children with Down Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hauser-Cram, Penny; And Others

    1999-01-01

    Investigated the extent to which family environment predicted differences in trajectories of adaptive development in young children with Down syndrome. Found that growth in communication, daily living skills, and socialization domains were predicted by family cohesion and mother/child interaction beyond that predicted by maternal education. Bailey…

  20. Cognitive and Adaptive Functioning in 28 Girls with Rett Syndrome. Brief Report.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Perry, Adrienne; And Others

    1991-01-01

    This study of 28 girls (ages 2-19) with Rett Syndrome found profound handicaps in the intellectual and adaptive areas, according to standardized tests. Subjects seemed capable of learning some self-help skills at a basic level. The Cattell Mental Age was significantly negatively correlated with chronological age. (JDD)

  1. Space adaptation syndrome: multiple etiological factors and individual differences

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lackner, J. R.; DiZio, P.

    1991-01-01

    Space motion sickness is a significant operational concern in the American and Soviet space programs. Nearly 70% of all astronauts and cosmonauts are affected to some degree during their first several days of flight. It is now beginning to appear that space motion sickness like terrestrial motion sickness is the consequence of multiple etiological factors. As we come to understand basic mechanisms of spatial orientation and sensory-motor adaptation we can begin to predict etiological factors in different motion environments. Individuals vary greatly in the extent to which they are susceptible to these different factors. However, individuals seem to be relatively self-consistent in terms of their rates of adaptation to provocative stimulation and their retention of adaptation. Attempts to relate susceptibility to motion sickness during the microgravity phases of parabolic flight maneuvers to vestibular function under 1G and 0G test conditions are described.

  2. Comparative assessment of SAS and DES turbulence modeling for massively separated flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Weilin; Yan, Chao; Liu, Hongkang; Luo, Dahai

    2016-02-01

    Numerical studies of the flow past a circular cylinder at Reynolds number 1.4× 105 and NACA0021 airfoil at the angle of attack 60° have been carried out by scale-adaptive simulation (SAS) and detached eddy simulation (DES), in comparison with the existing experimental data. The new version of the model developed by Egorov and Menter is assessed, and advantages and disadvantages of the SAS simulation are analyzed in detail to provide guidance for industrial application in the future. Moreover, the mechanism of the scale-adaptive characteristics in separated regions is discussed, which is obscure in previous analyses. It is concluded that: the mean flow properties satisfactorily agree with the experimental results for the SAS simulation, although the prediction of the second order turbulent statistics in the near wake region is just reasonable. The SAS model can produce a larger magnitude of the turbulent kinetic energy in the recirculation bubble, and, consequently, a smaller recirculation region and a more rapid recovery of the mean velocity outside the recirculation region than the DES approach with the same grid resolution. The vortex shedding is slightly less irregular with the SAS model than with the DES approach, probably due to the higher dissipation of the SAS simulation under the condition of the coarse mesh.

  3. A Non-Traditional Model of the Metabolic Syndrome: The Adaptive Significance of Insulin Resistance in Fasting-Adapted Seals

    PubMed Central

    Houser, Dorian S.; Champagne, Cory D.; Crocker, Daniel E.

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance in modern society is perceived as a pathological consequence of excess energy consumption and reduced physical activity. Its presence in relation to the development of cardiovascular risk factors has been termed the metabolic syndrome, which produces increased mortality and morbidity and which is rapidly increasing in human populations. Ironically, insulin resistance likely evolved to assist animals during food shortages by increasing the availability of endogenous lipid for catabolism while protecting protein from use in gluconeogenesis and eventual oxidation. Some species that incorporate fasting as a predictable component of their life history demonstrate physiological traits similar to the metabolic syndrome during prolonged fasts. One such species is the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), which fasts from food and water for periods of up to 4 months. During this time, ∼90% of the seals metabolic demands are met through fat oxidation and circulating non-esterified fatty acids are high (0.7–3.2 mM). All life history stages of elephant seal studied to date demonstrate insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycemia as well as variations in hormones and adipocytokines that reflect the metabolic syndrome to some degree. Elephant seals demonstrate some intriguing adaptations with the potential for medical advancement; for example, ketosis is negligible despite significant and prolonged fatty acid oxidation and investigation of this feature might provide insight into the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The parallels to the metabolic syndrome are likely reflected to varying degrees in other marine mammals, most of which evolved on diets high in lipid and protein content but essentially devoid of carbohydrate. Utilization of these natural models of insulin resistance may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome in humans and better assist the development of preventative measures and therapies

  4. A non-traditional model of the metabolic syndrome: the adaptive significance of insulin resistance in fasting-adapted seals.

    PubMed

    Houser, Dorian S; Champagne, Cory D; Crocker, Daniel E

    2013-01-01

    Insulin resistance in modern society is perceived as a pathological consequence of excess energy consumption and reduced physical activity. Its presence in relation to the development of cardiovascular risk factors has been termed the metabolic syndrome, which produces increased mortality and morbidity and which is rapidly increasing in human populations. Ironically, insulin resistance likely evolved to assist animals during food shortages by increasing the availability of endogenous lipid for catabolism while protecting protein from use in gluconeogenesis and eventual oxidation. Some species that incorporate fasting as a predictable component of their life history demonstrate physiological traits similar to the metabolic syndrome during prolonged fasts. One such species is the northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris), which fasts from food and water for periods of up to 4 months. During this time, ∼90% of the seals metabolic demands are met through fat oxidation and circulating non-esterified fatty acids are high (0.7-3.2 mM). All life history stages of elephant seal studied to date demonstrate insulin resistance and fasting hyperglycemia as well as variations in hormones and adipocytokines that reflect the metabolic syndrome to some degree. Elephant seals demonstrate some intriguing adaptations with the potential for medical advancement; for example, ketosis is negligible despite significant and prolonged fatty acid oxidation and investigation of this feature might provide insight into the treatment of diabetic ketoacidosis. The parallels to the metabolic syndrome are likely reflected to varying degrees in other marine mammals, most of which evolved on diets high in lipid and protein content but essentially devoid of carbohydrate. Utilization of these natural models of insulin resistance may further our understanding of the pathophysiology of the metabolic syndrome in humans and better assist the development of preventative measures and therapies

  5. A SAS IML Macro for Loglinear Smoothing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moses, Tim; von Davier, Alina

    2011-01-01

    Polynomial loglinear models for one-, two-, and higher-way contingency tables have important applications to measurement and assessment. They are essentially regarded as a smoothing technique, which is commonly referred to as loglinear smoothing. A SAS IML (SAS Institute, 2002a) macro was created to implement loglinear smoothing according to…

  6. The SAS-3 delayed command system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, E. J.

    1975-01-01

    To meet the requirements arising from the increased complexity of the power, attitude control and telemetry systems, a full redundant high-performance control section with delayed command capability was designed for the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3). The relay command system of SAS-3 is characterized by 56 bystate relay commands, with capability for handling up to 64 commands in future versions. The 'short' data command service of SAS-1 and SAS-2 consisting of shifting 24-bit words to two users was expanded to five users and augmented with a 'long load' data command service (up to 4080 bits) used to program the telemetry system and the delayed command subsystem. The inclusion of a delayed command service ensures a program of up to 30 relay or short data commands to be loaded for execution at designated times. The design and system operation of the SAS-3 command section are analyzed, with special attention given to the delayed command subsystem.

  7. [Formula: see text]Intellectual and adaptive functioning in Sturge-Weber Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kavanaugh, Brian; Sreenivasan, Aditya; Bachur, Catherine; Papazoglou, Aimilia; Comi, Anne; Zabel, T Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The present study examined the intellectual and adaptive functioning in a sample of children and young adults with Sturge-Weber Syndrome (SWS). A total of 80 research participants from a SWS study database underwent full neurological evaluation as part of their participation or concurrent medical care. Twenty-nine of the participants received neuropsychological evaluations. Analyses indicated no significant demographic or neurological differences between those who did and did not receive neuropsychological evaluations. Overall, the neuropsychological evaluation sample displayed significantly lower functioning relative to published normative data across domains of intellectual and adaptive functioning. Thirty-two percent of the sample displayed impaired performance (standard score ≤ 75) in intellectual functioning and 58% displayed impaired performance in adaptive functioning. Hemiparesis status independently predicted overall adaptive functioning while seizure frequency independently predicted overall intellectual functioning. Younger participants displayed significantly higher (more intact) ratings in adaptive functioning compared to older participants, specifically in overall adaptive functioning, motor skills, and community living skills. A composite measure of neurological status (SWS-NRS) incorporating seizure and hemiparesis status effectively distinguished between individuals with impaired or nonimpaired adaptive and intellectual functioning and showed promise as a screening method for identifying individuals with more involved intellectual and/or adaptive needs. PMID:25952468

  8. Do Children With Fragile X Syndrome Show Declines or Plateaus in Adaptive Behavior?

    PubMed

    Hahn, Laura J; Brady, Nancy C; Warren, Steven F; Fleming, Kandace K

    2015-09-01

    This study explores if children with fragile X syndrome (FXS) show advances, declines, or plateaus in adaptive behavior over time and the relationship of nonverbal cognitive abilities and autistic behavior on these trajectories. Parents of 55 children with FXS completed the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales ( Sparrow, Balla, & Cicchetti, 1984 ; Sparrow, Cicchetti, & Balla, 2005 ) between 3 and 6 times from 2 to 10 years of age. Using raw scores, results indicate that about half of the sample showed advances in adaptive behavior, whereas the other half showed declines, indicating a regression in skills. Children who were more cognitively advanced and had less autistic behaviors had higher trajectories. Understanding the developmental course of adaptive behavior in FXS has implications for educational planning and intervention, especially for those children showing declines. PMID:26322389

  9. The SAS-D nutation control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taylor, J. M.

    1972-01-01

    A control law is developed for the SAS-D nutation control system. Nutation is removed in a sub-optimal manner with respect to fuel consumed, but attitude errors are minimized. The research performed consist of an investigation of nutation theory and nutation due to energy dissipation, nutation detection analysis, nutation control analysis, and error analysis. The resulting nutation control system uses an accelerometer or rate gyro to sense the nutation angle theta which varies sinusoidally at the nutation frequency omega. The sensed nutation angle is compared with a threshold theta sub tau. If the sensed nutation is greater, a thrust pulse of duration equal to the period of one spin cycle is initiated. Since the threshold theta sub tau is set equal to the amount of nutation that can be removed by one thrust pulse of duration equal to one spin cycle, the spacecraft nutation is reduced to near zero. Error analysis indicates that the nutation sensed, the threshold, the amount of nutation that can be removed during one thrust pulse, and the time duration of one thrust pulse are all sensitive to the spacecraft spin frequency imparted by the Delta rocket. Thus, the nutation control system was designed to be adaptive to the possible variations in imparted spin frequency.

  10. Neuropsychological, behavioral, and adaptive functioning of Swiss children with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruof, Helge; Hammer, Juerg; Tillmann, Bettina; Ghelfi, Daniela; Weber, Peter

    2008-11-01

    This study collected data about developmental problems in a cohort of children with congenital central hypoventilation syndrome. In 2003, in Switzerland, 11 children with this disease were registered. Nine of them gave their informed consent to participate in the study and were examined. Clinical assessments were conducted, including examinations of neuropsychological, behavioral, and adaptive functions using Kaufman-Assessment Battery for Children, Child Behavior Checklist, and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales. The mean age (+/- standard deviation) was 7.5 +/- 2.5 years. The cognitive tests showed problems in working memory functions with a near-to-normal full-range intelligence quotient (87.4 +/- 23.3). The children showed normal values (t-values < 67) on problem scales of behavior, although 5 of the 9 children showed elevated values on the attention and on the social interaction problem scales. Adaptive function problems were identified in communication and daily living skills. PMID:18984833

  11. MANAGING LARGE DATABASES WITH CUSTOMIZED SAS WINDOWS

    EPA Science Inventory

    This paper discusses the principles of database management through customized windows using SAS/AF, particularly PROC BUILD, to invoke interactive and batch processing of data entry, editing, updating, automatic report generation, and custom report generation functions, including...

  12. A Description of Adaptive and Maladaptive Behaviour in Children and Adolescents with Cri-du-Chat Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Teixeira, M. C. T. V.; Emerich, D. R.; Orsati, F. T.; Rimerio, R. C.; Gatto, K. R.; Chappaz, I. O.; Kim, C. A.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Psychological tests can be useful to record adaptive and maladaptive behaviours of children with intellectual disability. The objective of this study was to describe the adaptive and maladaptive behaviour of children and adolescents with Cri-du-chat syndrome. Methods: The sample consisted of 10 children and adolescents with Cri-du-chat…

  13. Causes of Age-Related Decline in Adaptive Behavior of Adults with Down Syndrome: Differential Diagnoses of Dementia.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V. P.; Chung, Man Cheung

    1996-01-01

    A study was conducted of 201 adults with Down's syndrome to investigate the differential causes of decline in adaptive behavior. Results indicated that aging, dementia, and severity of mental retardation were significant factors, while absence of a medical illness predicted a higher level of adaptive behavior. (CR)

  14. Psychiatric syndromes comorbid with mental retardation: differences in cognitive and adaptive skills.

    PubMed

    Di Nuovo, Santo F; Buono, Serafino

    2007-11-01

    The study concerns the specific cognitive and adaptive skills of persons dually diagnosed with mental retardation (MR) and comorbid pathologies, as schizophrenia, personality and mood disorders, pervasive developmental disorders, epilepsy and ADHD. The sample was composed of 182 subjects, diagnosed as mild or moderate MR level, age range from 6 years 8 months to 50 years 2 months, mean age 17.1 (standard deviation 7.9). All the subjects were inpatients in a specialized structure for the diagnosis and the treatment of MR. The instruments of the study were Wechsler Intelligence Scale (WAIS-R or WISC-R according to the chronological age of subjects) and Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS). Results confirm that comorbidity is a factor differentiating among mentally retarded subjects. Both verbal processes requiring memory retrieval and visuo-spatial processes are involved as differentiating features. ADHD strongly increases the impairment of cognitive skills, while behavioral disorders are less damaging in MR performance. In adult samples, the differentiating role of comorbid syndromes in MR individuals is reduced for cognitive skills, and limited to some basic verbal abilities, more impaired in mood disorder, less in schizophrenic disorder. The areas of adaptation and socialization, motor and daily living skills, are impaired more in generalized development disturbances than in comorbid schizophrenic and personality and mood disorders. An accurate psychological assessment of dual diagnoses is useful in detecting the specific underlying processes differentiating the comorbid syndromes, and in planning an appropriate rehabilitative treatment. PMID:16697412

  15. Beneficial Effects of Long-Term Growth Hormone Treatment on Adaptive Functioning in Infants With Prader-Willi Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lo, Sin T; Festen, Dederieke A M; Tummers-de Lind van Wijngaarden, Roderick F A; Collin, Philippe J L; Hokken-Koelega, Anita C S

    2015-07-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of growth hormone treatment on adaptive functioning in children with Prader-Willi syndrome. Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scale (VABS) was assessed during a randomized controlled trial (RCT) and after 7 years of growth hormone treatment. In the RCT, 75 children (42 infants and 33 prepubertal children) with Prader-Willi syndrome were included. Subsequently, 53 children were treated with long-term growth hormone. Our study demonstrates a marked delay in adaptive functioning in infants and children with Prader-Willi syndrome, which was associated with older age and lower intelligence. Results of the repeated measurements show that the earlier growth hormone treatment was started during infancy, the better the adaptive skills were on the long-term. PMID:26161469

  16. [Registration study on analysis of adaptation syndromes and medication characteristics of tanreqing injection].

    PubMed

    Xie, Peng-Yang; Xie, Yan-Ming; Wang, Lian-Xin; Chang, Yan-Peng; You, Li; Zhang, Xiao-Li

    2014-09-01

    Tanreqing injection is suitable for early pneumonia, acute bronchitis, acute exacerbations of chronic, and upper respiratory tract infection which are classified with phlegm-heat obstructing lung syndrome of traditional Chinese medicine. To understand the clinical adaptation syndromes and medication characteristics of the post-market Tanreqing injection, the research team of the paper monitored the patients who are used with Tanreqing injection from September 2012 to October 2013 in four leader hospitals based on the method--prospective, multi-center, large sample, registration-type hospital centralized monitoring,and analyzes the general information, diagnostic information and medication characteristics of patients, in order to produce evidence for clinical practice and medication decisions and to establish the foundation of rational drug use. PMID:25532398

  17. Chiari malformation and central sleep apnea syndrome: efficacy of treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation*

    PubMed Central

    do Vale, Jorge Marques; Silva, Eloísa; Pereira, Isabel Gil; Marques, Catarina; Sanchez-Serrano, Amparo; Torres, António Simões

    2014-01-01

    The Chiari malformation type I (CM-I) has been associated with sleep-disordered breathing, especially central sleep apnea syndrome. We report the case of a 44-year-old female with CM-I who was referred to our sleep laboratory for suspected sleep apnea. The patient had undergone decompressive surgery 3 years prior. An arterial blood gas analysis showed hypercapnia. Polysomnography showed a respiratory disturbance index of 108 events/h, and all were central apnea events. Treatment with adaptive servo-ventilation was initiated, and central apnea was resolved. This report demonstrates the efficacy of servo-ventilation in the treatment of central sleep apnea syndrome associated with alveolar hypoventilation in a CM-I patient with a history of decompressive surgery. PMID:25410846

  18. SAS doctors career progression survey 2013.

    PubMed

    Oroz, Carlos; Sands, Lorna R; Lee, John

    2016-03-01

    We conducted a national survey of Staff, Associate Specialists and Specialty (SAS) doctors working in sexual health clinics in the UK in 2013 in order to explore their career progression. The aim of the survey was to assess SAS doctors' experience in passing through the thresholds and to gather information about the adherence by SAS doctors and employers to the terms and conditions of service laid out by the new 2008 contract. Out of 185 responders, whom the authors estimate comprise 34% of the total workforce, 159 were on the new contract. Of those, most SAS doctors were women (84%), the majority (67%) worked less than nine programmed activities per week; only a few had intentions to join the consultant grade (15%), and a considerable minority (26%) were older than 54 years of age and likely to retire in the next ten years. The survey showed that most participating SAS doctors had undergone appraisal in the previous 15 months (90%), most had a job planning discussion (83%) with their employer and most had some allocated time for supporting professional activities (86%). However, a significant minority had no appraisal (10%), no job planning discussion (17%) and had no allocated supporting professional activities (14%), which allows time for career development in the specialty. Most SAS doctors, who had the opportunity, had progressed through the thresholds automatically (88%); some experienced difficulties in passing (8%) and only a few did not pass (4%). SAS doctors must ensure that they work together with their employer in order to improve adherence to the terms and conditions of service of the contract, which allow for career progression and benefit both the individual doctors and ultimately service provision. PMID:25834092

  19. Adaptive Behavior and Development of Infants and Toddlers with Williams Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kirchner, Rebecca M; Martens, Marilee A; Andridge, Rebecca R

    2016-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that causes deficits in adaptive behavior, difficulties eating and sleeping, cognitive delays, and delayed development. Although researchers have conducted characterizations of children and adults with WS, less is known about young children with this disorder. This study characterizes the developmental and adaptive behavior features of 16 infants and toddlers with WS aged 3 months - 5 years. Data for this project was obtained from 2007 to 2014, and includes parent report data and standardized developmental testing. Thirty-one percent (31.3%) of parents reported that their infant/toddler with WS had sleeping problems and 58.3% reported feeding difficulties. Levels of adaptive behavior were in the Mildly Delayed range as measured by the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Second Edition. Self-care skills such as feeding or dressing oneself were significantly weaker than skills needed to function in the community, such as recognizing his/her home or throwing away trash. The difficulty with self-care skills is hypothesized to be related to the reported difficulties with eating and sleeping. Motor skills were significantly lower than both cognitive and language skills on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition. The current study highlights the need for early intervention in these young children across all areas of development, particularly in self-care skills. PMID:27199832

  20. Adaptive Behavior and Development of Infants and Toddlers with Williams Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kirchner, Rebecca M.; Martens, Marilee A.; Andridge, Rebecca R.

    2016-01-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder that causes deficits in adaptive behavior, difficulties eating and sleeping, cognitive delays, and delayed development. Although researchers have conducted characterizations of children and adults with WS, less is known about young children with this disorder. This study characterizes the developmental and adaptive behavior features of 16 infants and toddlers with WS aged 3 months – 5 years. Data for this project was obtained from 2007 to 2014, and includes parent report data and standardized developmental testing. Thirty-one percent (31.3%) of parents reported that their infant/toddler with WS had sleeping problems and 58.3% reported feeding difficulties. Levels of adaptive behavior were in the Mildly Delayed range as measured by the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System, Second Edition. Self-care skills such as feeding or dressing oneself were significantly weaker than skills needed to function in the community, such as recognizing his/her home or throwing away trash. The difficulty with self-care skills is hypothesized to be related to the reported difficulties with eating and sleeping. Motor skills were significantly lower than both cognitive and language skills on the Bayley Scales of Infant and Toddler Development, Third Edition. The current study highlights the need for early intervention in these young children across all areas of development, particularly in self-care skills. PMID:27199832

  1. The SAS-3 X-ray observatory

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mayer, W. F.

    1975-01-01

    The experiment section of the Small Astronomy Satellite-3 (SAS-3) launched in May 1975 is an X-ray observatory intended to determine the location of bright X-ray sources to an accuracy of 15 arc-seconds; to study a selected set of sources over a wide energy range, from 0.1 to 55 keV, while performing very specific measurements of the spectra and time variability of known X-ray sources; and to monitor the sky continuously for X-ray novae, flares, and unexpected phenomena. The improvements in SAS-3 spacecraft include a clock accurate to 1 part in 10 billion, rotatable solar panels, a programmable data format, and improved nutation damper, a delayed command system, improved magnetic trim and azimuth control systems. These improvements enable SAS-3 to perform three-axis stabilized observations of any point on the celestial sphere at any time of the year. The description of the experiment section and the SAS-3 operation is followed by a synopsis of scientific results obtained from the observations of X-ray sources, such as Vela X-1 (supposed to be an accreting neutron star), a transient source of hard X-ray (less than 36 min in duration) detected by SAS-3, the Crab Nebula pulsar, the Perseus cluster of galaxies, and the Vela supernova remnant.

  2. Adapting Phonological Awareness Interventions for Children With Down Syndrome Based on the Behavioral Phenotype: A Promising Approach?

    PubMed

    Lemons, Christopher J; King, Seth A; Davidson, Kimberly A; Puranik, Cynthia S; Fulmer, Deborah; Mrachko, Alicia A; Partanen, Jane; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Fidler, Deborah J

    2015-08-01

    Many children with Down syndrome demonstrate deficits in phonological awareness, a prerequisite to learning to read in an alphabetic language. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adapting a commercially available phonological awareness program to better align with characteristics associated with the behavioral phenotype of Down syndrome would increase children's learning of phonological awareness, letter sounds, and words. Five children with Down syndrome, ages 6 to 8 years, participated in a multiple baseline across participants single case design experiment in which response to an adapted phonological awareness intervention was compared with response to the nonadapted program. Results indicate a functional relation between the adapted program and phonological awareness. Suggestions for future research and implications for practice are provided. PMID:26214557

  3. Ground-Based Research on Vestibular Adaptation to G-Level Transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Groen, Eric L.; Nooij, Suzanne A. E.; Bos, Jelte E.

    2008-06-01

    At TNO research is ongoing on neuro-vestibular adaptation to altered G-levels. It is well-known that during the first days in weightlessness 50-80% of all astronauts suffer from the Space Adaptation Syndrome (SAS), which involves space motion sickness, spatial disorientation and motion illusions. After return on Earth the problems re-appear, but now also accompanied by postural imbalance. Standard tests for motion sickness, typically applied in astronaut selection programs, do not correlate with SAS at all. TNO developed a method which effectively simulates SAS on Earth, by exposing astronauts to a hypergravity stimulus of 3G in a human centrifuge for one hour. So far we tested the susceptibility for SIC in 12 astronauts and cosmonauts who also rated their susceptibility for SAS in actual spaceflight. The correlation is 100%, suggesting a common mechanism for any G-level transition, whether it is from 1G to 0G or from 3G to 1G. This paper describes the current status of this research.

  4. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results, 1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma-ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitude 310 and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315 deg, 330 deg, 345 deg, 0 deg, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with such galactic features and components as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  5. Mechanisms of Host Receptor Adaptation by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kailang; Peng, Guiqing; Wilken, Matthew; Geraghty, Robert J.; Li, Fang

    2012-12-10

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) from palm civets has twice evolved the capacity to infect humans by gaining binding affinity for human receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Numerous mutations have been identified in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of different SARS-CoV strains isolated from humans or civets. Why these mutations were naturally selected or how SARS-CoV evolved to adapt to different host receptors has been poorly understood, presenting evolutionary and epidemic conundrums. In this study, we investigated the impact of these mutations on receptor recognition, an important determinant of SARS-CoV infection and pathogenesis. Using a combination of biochemical, functional, and crystallographic approaches, we elucidated the molecular and structural mechanisms of each of these naturally selected RBD mutations. These mutations either strengthen favorable interactions or reduce unfavorable interactions with two virus-binding hot spots on ACE2, and by doing so, they enhance viral interactions with either human (hACE2) or civet (cACE2) ACE2. Therefore, these mutations were viral adaptations to either hACE2 or cACE2. To corroborate the above analysis, we designed and characterized two optimized RBDs. The human-optimized RBD contains all of the hACE2-adapted residues (Phe-442, Phe-472, Asn-479, Asp-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for hACE2 but relative low affinity for cACE2. The civet-optimized RBD contains all of the cACE2-adapted residues (Tyr-442, Pro-472, Arg-479, Gly-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for cACE2 and also substantial affinity for hACE2. These results not only illustrate the detailed mechanisms of host receptor adaptation by SARS-CoV but also provide a molecular and structural basis for tracking future SARS-CoV evolution in animals.

  6. Age-related changes of adaptive and neuropsychological features in persons with Down Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ghezzo, Alessandro; Salvioli, Stefano; Solimando, Maria Caterina; Palmieri, Alice; Chiostergi, Chiara; Scurti, Maria; Lomartire, Laura; Bedetti, Federica; Cocchi, Guido; Follo, Daniela; Pipitone, Emanuela; Rovatti, Paolo; Zamberletti, Jessica; Gomiero, Tiziano; Castellani, Gastone; Franceschi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is characterised by premature aging and an accelerated decline of cognitive functions in the vast majority of cases. As the life expectancy of DS persons is rapidly increasing, this decline is becoming a dramatic health problem. The aim of this study was to thoroughly evaluate a group of 67 non-demented persons with DS of different ages (11 to 66 years), from a neuropsychological, neuropsychiatric and psychomotor point of view in order to evaluate in a cross-sectional study the age-related adaptive and neuropsychological features, and to possibly identify early signs predictive of cognitive decline. The main finding of this study is that both neuropsychological functions and adaptive skills are lower in adult DS persons over 40 years old, compared to younger ones. In particular, language and short memory skills, frontal lobe functions, visuo-spatial abilities and adaptive behaviour appear to be the more affected domains. A growing deficit in verbal comprehension, along with social isolation, loss of interest and greater fatigue in daily tasks, are the main features found in older, non demented DS persons evaluated in our study. It is proposed that these signs can be alarm bells for incipient dementia, and that neuro-cognitive rehabilitation and psycho-pharmacological interventions must start as soon as the fourth decade (or even earlier) in DS persons, i.e. at an age where interventions can have the greatest efficacy. PMID:25419980

  7. Age-Related Changes of Adaptive and Neuropsychological Features in Persons with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzo, Alessandro; Salvioli, Stefano; Solimando, Maria Caterina; Palmieri, Alice; Chiostergi, Chiara; Scurti, Maria; Lomartire, Laura; Bedetti, Federica; Cocchi, Guido; Follo, Daniela; Pipitone, Emanuela; Rovatti, Paolo; Zamberletti, Jessica; Gomiero, Tiziano; Castellani, Gastone; Franceschi, Claudio

    2014-01-01

    Down Syndrome (DS) is characterised by premature aging and an accelerated decline of cognitive functions in the vast majority of cases. As the life expectancy of DS persons is rapidly increasing, this decline is becoming a dramatic health problem. The aim of this study was to thoroughly evaluate a group of 67 non-demented persons with DS of different ages (11 to 66 years), from a neuropsychological, neuropsychiatric and psychomotor point of view in order to evaluate in a cross-sectional study the age-related adaptive and neuropsychological features, and to possibly identify early signs predictive of cognitive decline. The main finding of this study is that both neuropsychological functions and adaptive skills are lower in adult DS persons over 40 years old, compared to younger ones. In particular, language and short memory skills, frontal lobe functions, visuo-spatial abilities and adaptive behaviour appear to be the more affected domains. A growing deficit in verbal comprehension, along with social isolation, loss of interest and greater fatigue in daily tasks, are the main features found in older, non demented DS persons evaluated in our study. It is proposed that these signs can be alarm bells for incipient dementia, and that neuro-cognitive rehabilitation and psycho-pharmacological interventions must start as soon as the fourth decade (or even earlier) in DS persons, i.e. at an age where interventions can have the greatest efficacy. PMID:25419980

  8. Cognitive and adaptive evaluation of 21 consecutive patients with Dravet syndrome.

    PubMed

    Villeneuve, Nathalie; Laguitton, Virginie; Viellard, Marine; Lépine, Anne; Chabrol, Brigitte; Dravet, Charlotte; Milh, Mathieu

    2014-02-01

    In order to assess the cognitive and adaptive profiles of school-aged patients with Dravet syndrome (DS), we proposed to evaluate the intelligence and adaptive scores in twenty-one 6- to 10-year-old patients with DS followed in our institution between 1997 and 2013. Fourteen patients were tested using the Wechsler Intelligence Scale for Children (WISC) and the Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales (VABS); 6 patients could not be tested with the WISC and were tested with the VABS only, and one was tested with the WISC only. Data regarding the epilepsy were retrospectively collected. Statistical analysis (Spearman rank order and Pearson correlation coefficient) was used to correlate early epilepsy characteristics with the cognitive and adaptive scores. Sodium channel, neuronal alpha-subunit type 1 (SCN1A) was mutated in 19 out of 21 patients. After the age of 6years, none of the DS patients had a normal intelligence quotient (IQ) using WISC (age at the testing period: mean=100±5; median=105months; mean total IQ=47±3; n=15). Only five patients had a verbal and/or a non verbal IQ of more than 60 (points). Their cognitive profile was characterized by an attention deficit, an inability to inhibit impulsive responses, perseverative responses and deficit in planning function. Administering the Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales in the same period, we showed that socialization skills were significantly higher than communication and autonomy skills (age at the testing period: mean=100±4; median=100months; n=20). We did not find any significant correlation between the IQ or developmental quotient assessed between 6 and 10years of age and the quantitative and qualitative parameters of epilepsy during the first two years of life in this small group of patients. Despite an overall moderate cognitive deficit in this group of patients, the Vineland Adaptive Behavioral Scales described an adaptive/behavioral profile with low communication and autonomy capacities, whereas the

  9. A Note on Multigroup Comparisons Using SAS PROC CALIS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones-Farmer, L. Allison; Pitts, Jennifer P.; Rainer, R. Kelly

    2008-01-01

    Although SAS PROC CALIS is not designed to perform multigroup comparisons, it is believed that SAS can be "tricked" into doing so for groups of equal size. At present, there are no comprehensive examples of the steps involved in performing a multigroup comparison in SAS. The purpose of this article is to illustrate these steps. We demonstrate…

  10. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus replication and quasispecies evolution in pigs that lack adaptive immunity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Nanhua; Dekkers, Jack C M; Ewen, Catherine L; Rowland, Raymond R R

    2015-01-01

    The replication of porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) was studied in a line of pigs possessing a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID). Real-time RT-PCR revealed a unique course of infection for the SCID group. During the course of infection, viremia was initially significantly lower than normal littermates, but by 21 days was significantly elevated. Deep sequencing of the viral structural genes at days 11 and 21 identified seven amino acid substitutions in both normal and SCID pigs. The most significant change was a W99R substitution in GP2, which was present in the inoculum at a frequency of 35%, but eventually disappeared from all pigs regardless of immune status. Therefore, amino acid substitutions that appear during acute infection are likely the result of the adaptation of the virus to replication in pigs and not immune selection. PMID:25451069

  11. Adapting SugarWatch to Manage Metabolic Syndrome in a Partial Hospitalization Program: A Feasibility Study

    PubMed Central

    Clute, Rose

    2015-01-01

    A successful worksite diabetes prevention program, SugarWatch,was adapted for a seriously mentally ill patient population in a partial hospitalization program in Hawai‘i. A feasibility study was implemented using an intervention with 3 components:SugarWatch curriculum, structured physical activity,and Create a Plate lunch. Twenty participants completed the three month intervention. Only systolic blood pressure showed statistically significant improvement. However, trends in improvement were also seen with diastolic blood pressure and total cholesterol. Despite minimal improvement in physiological measures, the project changed practice in the setting to align with the 2004 American Diabetes Association and American Psychiatric Association Guidelines for the prevention of metabolic syndrome and better management of patients taking second generation antipsychotic medications. PMID:25821649

  12. The Adaptive Behaviour Dementia Questionnaire (ABDQ): Screening Questionnaire for Dementia in Alzheimer's Disease in Adults with Down Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V.; Farooq, A.; Holder, R.

    2004-01-01

    The diagnosis of dementia in Alzheimer's disease remains at times problematic in adults with intellectual disability. The analysis of 5-year consecutive data developed a researched-based clinical screening tool for dementia in Alzheimer's disease in adults with Down syndrome. The Adaptive Behaviour Dementia Questionnaire (ABDQ) is a 15-item…

  13. Adapting Phonological Awareness Interventions for Children with Down Syndrome Based on the Behavioral Phenotype: A Promising Approach?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lemons, Christopher J.; King, Seth A.; Davidson, Kimberly A.; Puranik, Cynthia S.; Fulmer, Deborah; Mrachko, Alicia A.; Partanen, Jane; Al Otaiba, Stephanie; Fidler, Deborah J.

    2015-01-01

    Many children with Down syndrome demonstrate deficits in phonological awareness, a prerequisite to learning to read in an alphabetic language. The purpose of this study was to determine whether adapting a commercially available phonological awareness program to better align with characteristics associated with the behavioral phenotype of Down…

  14. Staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome: superantigen-mediated enhancement of endotoxin shock and adaptive immune suppression.

    PubMed

    Kulhankova, Katarina; King, Jessica; Salgado-Pabón, Wilmara

    2014-08-01

    Infectious diseases caused by Staphylococcus aureus present a significant clinical and public health problem. S. aureus causes some of the most severe hospital-associated and community-acquired illnesses. Specifically, it is the leading cause of infective endocarditis and osteomyelitis, and the second leading cause of sepsis in the USA. While pathogenesis of S. aureus infections is at the center of current research, many questions remain about the mechanisms underlying staphylococcal toxic shock syndrome (TSS) and associated adaptive immune suppression. Both conditions are mediated by staphylococcal superantigens (SAgs)-secreted staphylococcal toxins that are major S. aureus virulence factors. Toxic shock syndrome toxin-1 (TSST-1) is the SAg responsible for almost all menstrual TSS cases in the USA. TSST-1, staphylococcal enterotoxin B and C are also responsible for most cases of non-menstrual TSS. While SAgs mediate all of the hallmark features of TSS, such as fever, rash, hypotension, and multi-organ dysfunction, they are also capable of enhancing the toxic effects of endogenous endotoxin. This interaction appears to be critical in mediating the severity of TSS and related mortality. In addition, interaction between SAgs and the host immune system has been recognized to result in a unique form of adaptive immune suppression, contributing to poor outcomes of S. aureus infections. Utilizing rabbit models of S. aureus infective endocarditis, pneumonia and sepsis, and molecular genetics techniques, we aim to elucidate the mechanisms of SAg and endotoxin synergism in the pathogenesis of TSS, and examine the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying SAg-mediated immune dysfunction. PMID:24816557

  15. The Association of Intelligence, Visual-Motor Functioning, and Personality Characteristics With Adaptive Behavior in Individuals With Williams Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Fu, Trista J; Lincoln, Alan J; Bellugi, Ursula; Searcy, Yvonne M

    2015-07-01

    Williams syndrome (WS) is associated with deficits in adaptive behavior and an uneven adaptive profile. This study investigated the association of intelligence, visual-motor functioning, and personality characteristics with the adaptive behavior in individuals with WS. One hundred individuals with WS and 25 individuals with developmental disabilities of other etiologies were included in this study. This study found that IQ and visual-motor functioning significantly predicted adaptive behavior in individuals of WS. Visual-motor functioning especially predicted the most amount of unique variance in overall adaptive behavior and contributed to the variance above and beyond that of IQ. Present study highlights the need for interventions that address visual-motor and motor functioning in individuals with WS. PMID:26161466

  16. Localization of Tubular Adaptation to Renal Sodium Loss in Gitelman Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Nau, Valérie; Kolb, Isabelle; Vargas-Poussou, Rosa; Hannedouche, Thierry; Moulin, Bruno

    2012-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Gitelman syndrome (GS) is a salt-wasting tubulopathy that results from the inactivation of the human thiazide–sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter located in the distal convoluted tubule. Tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss has been described and localized in the distal tubule in experimental models of GS but not in humans with GS. Design, setting, participants, & measurements The tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss is described. Osmole-free water clearance and endogenous lithium clearance with furosemide infusion are used to compare 7 patients with genetically confirmed GS and 13 control participants. Results Neither endogenous lithium clearance nor osmole-free water clearance disclosed enhanced proximal fluid reabsorption in patients with GS. These patients displayed significantly lower osmole-free water clearance factored by inulin clearance (7.1±1.9 versus 10.1±2.2; P<0.01) and significantly lower fractional sodium reabsorption in the diluting nephron (73.2%±7.1% versus 86.1%±4.7%; P<0.005), consistent with the inactivation of the thiazide-sensitive sodium chloride cotransporter. The furosemide-induced reduction rate of fractional sodium reabsorption in the diluting segment was higher in patients with GS (75.6%±6.1% versus 69.9%±3.2%; P<0.039), suggesting that sodium reabsorption would be enhanced in the cortical part of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle in patients with GS. Conclusions These findings suggest that tubular adaptation to renal sodium loss in GS would be devoted to the cortical part of the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle in humans. PMID:22241817

  17. Adaptation to transient postural perturbations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Andres, Robert O.

    1992-01-01

    This research was first proposed in May, 1986, to focus on some of the problems encountered in the analysis of postural responses gathered from crewmembers. The ultimate driving force behind this line of research was the desire to treat, predict, or explain 'Space Adaptation Syndrome' (SAS) and hence circumvent any adverse effects of space motion sickness on crewmember performance. The aim of this project was to develop an easily implemented analysis of the transient responses to platform translation that can be elicited with a protocol designed to force sensorimotor reorganization, utilizing statistically reliable criterion measures. This report will present: (1) a summary of the activity that took place in each of the three funded years of the project; (2) discussion of experimental results and their implications for future research; and (3) a list of presentations and publications resulting from this project.

  18. The SAS-3 power and thermal systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sullivan, R. M.; Hogrefe, A. F.; Brenza, P. T.

    1975-01-01

    Solar array configurations of the SAS-3 are described: a configuration with two sets of coplanar panels in the horizontal and two others in the vertical position, and two other configurations with either four horizontal or four vertical sets of panels. The nickel-cadmium battery of the power subsystem is described in detail, with emphasis on voltage limits and charge-discharge characteristics. The characteristic of 'solar-only' operation in the case of damage to the battery is discussed. The thermal subsystem of SAS-3 is considered, with discussions of thermal design criteria and the thermal environment. Temperature is controlled by using internal thermal louvers that regulate the rate at which the heat load from electronic equipment is transmitted to the outer surface for dumping to space.

  19. [Sleep apnea syndrome and obesity].

    PubMed

    Laaban, J P

    2002-04-01

    Obesity is a main risk factor for sleep apnea syndrome (SAS). The prevalence of SAS is especially high in massive obesity and in visceral obesity. The mechanisms of obstructive apneas in obesity are poorly known, but an increase in upper airway collapsibility probably plays an important role. Several cardiorespiratory complications of SAS, especially systemic arterial hypertension, diurnal alveolar hypoventilation and pulmonary arterial hypertension, are more frequent and more severe in obese patients. An important weight loss resulting from surgical treatment of obesity is often associated with a dramatic decrease in apnea-hypopnea index in patients with massive obesity. In patients with moderate obesity, dietary weight loss is associated with varying degrees of improvement in SAS. Pharyngoplasty and anterior mandibular positioning devices have a low success rate in patients with massive obesity. Nasal continuous positive airway pressure is often the only effective treatment in obese SAS patients. PMID:12082447

  20. Children with Williams syndrome: Developmental trajectories for intellectual abilities, vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior.

    PubMed

    Mervis, Carolyn B; Pitts, C Holley

    2015-06-01

    To examine longitudinal trajectories of intellectual abilities, single-word vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior for 76 children with Williams syndrome (WS) aged 4-15 years, we compared their standard scores (SSs) at two time points approximately 3 years apart on the same standardized measures. At the group level, mean SS declined significantly for 8 of the 12 measures and showed a slight (nonsignificant) increase or decrease for 4 measures. However, for most measures significant changes in SS were found for only a small proportion of the children, with some children evidencing significant declines and a smaller proportion evidencing significant increases. Significant SS changes were most common for adaptive behavior. For all measures, the mean magnitude of SS change was smaller for older children (>7.5 years at Time 1) than for younger children (<7.5 years at Time 1). Furthermore, correlations between Time 1 and Time 2 SSs were larger for the older cohort than for the younger cohort, indicating that SS stability was greater for older children than for younger children. Although mean SSs declined for most measures, indicating that children with WS as a group were not making the expected amount of progress relative to their general population peers who earned the same SS at Time 1, there was little evidence either of regression (loss of skills) or stagnation (failure to increase raw scores). The relations of these results to those of previous smaller-sample longitudinal studies of children with WS and the implications of the findings are considered. PMID:25989316

  1. Unexpected Role for Adaptive αβTH17 Cells in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome1

    PubMed Central

    Li, John T.; Melton, Andrew C.; Su, George; Hamm, David E.; LaFemina, Michael; Howard, James; Fang, Xiaohui; Bhat, Sudarshan; Huynh, Kieu-My; O’Kane, Cecilia M.; Ingram, Rebecca J.; Muir, Roshell R.; McAuley, Daniel F.; Matthay, Michael A.; Sheppard, Dean

    2015-01-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating disorder characterized by increased alveolar permeability with no effective treatment beyond supportive care. Current mechanisms underlying ARDS focus on alveolar endothelial and epithelial injury caused by products of innate immune cells and platelets. However, the role of adaptive immune cells in ARDS remains largely unknown. Here we report that expansion of antigen-specific αβT helper 17 (αβTH17) cells contribute to ARDS by local secretion of IL-17A, which in turn directly increases alveolar epithelial permeability. Mice with a highly restrictive defect in antigen-specific αβTH17 cells were protected from experimental ARDS induced by a single dose of endotracheal lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Loss of IL-17 receptor C or antibody blockade of IL-17A was similarly protective, further suggesting that IL-17A released by these cells was responsible for this effect. LPS induced a rapid and specific clonal expansion of αβTH17 cells in the lung, as determined by deep sequencing of the hypervariable CD3RβVJ region of the T cell receptor. Our findings could be relevant to ARDS in humans, since we found significant elevation of IL-17A in bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid from patients with ARDS and recombinant IL-17A directly increased permeability across cultured human alveolar epithelial monolayers. These results reveal a previously unexpected role for adaptive immune responses that increase alveolar permeability in ARDS and suggest that αβTH17 cells and IL-17A could be novel therapeutic targets for this currently untreatable disease. PMID:26002979

  2. Children with Williams Syndrome: Developmental Trajectories for Intellectual Abilities, Vocabulary Abilities, and Adaptive Behavior

    PubMed Central

    Mervis, Carolyn B.; Pitts, C. Holley

    2016-01-01

    To examine longitudinal trajectories of intellectual abilities, single-word vocabulary abilities, and adaptive behavior for 76 children with Williams syndrome (WS) aged 4 – 15 years, we compared their standard scores (SSs) at two time points approximately 3 years apart on the same standardized measures. At the group level, mean SS declined significantly for 8 of the 12 measures and showed a slight (nonsignificant) increase or decrease for 4 measures. However, for most measures significant changes in SS were found for only a small proportion of the children, with some children evidencing significant declines and a smaller proportion evidencing significant increases. Significant SS changes were most common for adaptive behavior. For all measures, the mean magnitude of SS change was smaller for older children (> 7.5 years at Time 1) than for younger children (< 7.5 years at Time 1). Furthermore, correlations between Time 1 and Time 2 SSs were larger for the older cohort than for the younger cohort, indicating that SS stability was greater for older children than for younger children. Although mean SSs declined for most measures, indicating that children with WS as a group were not making the expected amount of progress relative to their general population peers who earned the same SS at Time 1, there was little evidence either of regression (loss of skills) or stagnation (failure to increase raw scores). The relations of these results to those of previous smaller-sample longitudinal studies of children with WS and the implications of the findings are considered. PMID:25989316

  3. Unexpected Role for Adaptive αβTh17 Cells in Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Li, John T; Melton, Andrew C; Su, George; Hamm, David E; LaFemina, Michael; Howard, James; Fang, Xiaohui; Bhat, Sudarshan; Huynh, Kieu-My; O'Kane, Cecilia M; Ingram, Rebecca J; Muir, Roshell R; McAuley, Daniel F; Matthay, Michael A; Sheppard, Dean

    2015-07-01

    Acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS) is a devastating disorder characterized by increased alveolar permeability with no effective treatment beyond supportive care. Current mechanisms underlying ARDS focus on alveolar endothelial and epithelial injury caused by products of innate immune cells and platelets. However, the role of adaptive immune cells in ARDS remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that expansion of Ag-specific αβTh17 cells contributes to ARDS by local secretion of IL-17A, which in turn directly increases alveolar epithelial permeability. Mice with a highly restrictive defect in Ag-specific αβTh17 cells were protected from experimental ARDS induced by a single dose of endotracheal LPS. Loss of IL-17 receptor C or Ab blockade of IL-17A was similarly protective, further suggesting that IL-17A released by these cells was responsible for this effect. LPS induced a rapid and specific clonal expansion of αβTh17 cells in the lung, as determined by deep sequencing of the hypervariable CD3RβVJ region of the TCR. Our findings could be relevant to ARDS in humans, because we found significant elevation of IL-17A in bronchoalveolar lavage fluid from patients with ARDS, and rIL-17A directly increased permeability across cultured human alveolar epithelial monolayers. These results reveal a previously unexpected role for adaptive immune responses that increase alveolar permeability in ARDS and suggest that αβTh17 cells and IL-17A could be novel therapeutic targets for this currently untreatable disease. PMID:26002979

  4. A programmable sampling format telemetry system. [for SAS-C

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peterson, M. R.

    1973-01-01

    This paper describes the programmable sampling format telemetry system to be used by the near-earth Small Astronomy Satellite-C (SAS-C) and possible future SAS missions. The concept of the programmable sampling format is introduced and the features of the system are illustrated by an example. The SAS-C telemetry system is described at the block diagram level and redundancy of the system is discussed briefly.

  5. Eco-evo-devo of the lemur syndrome: did adaptive behavioral plasticity get canalized in a large primate radiation?

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Background Comprehensive explanations of behavioral adaptations rarely invoke all levels famously admonished by Niko Tinbergen. The role of developmental processes and plasticity, in particular, has often been neglected. In this paper, we combine ecological, physiological and developmental perspectives in developing a hypothesis to account for the evolution of ‘the lemur syndrome’, a combination of reduced sexual dimorphism, even adult sex ratios, female dominance and mild genital masculinization characterizing group-living species in two families of Malagasy primates. Results We review the different components of the lemur syndrome and compare it with similar adaptations reported for other mammals. We find support for the assertion that the lemur syndrome represents a unique set of integrated behavioral, demographic and morphological traits. We combine existing hypotheses about underlying adaptive function and proximate causation by adding a potential developmental mechanism linking maternal stress and filial masculinization, and outline an evolutionary scenario for its canalization. Conclusions We propose a new hypothesis linking ecological, physiological, developmental and evolutionary processes to adumbrate a comprehensive explanation for the evolution of the lemur syndrome, whose assumptions and predictions can guide diverse future research on lemurs. This hypothesis should also encourage students of other behavioral phenomena to consider the potential role of developmental plasticity in evolutionary innovation. PMID:26816515

  6. The SAS-3 attitude control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mobley, F. F.; Konigsberg, R.; Fountain, G. H.

    1975-01-01

    SAS-3 uses a reaction wheel to provide torque to control the spin rate. If the wheel speed becomes too great or too small, it must be restored to its nominal rate by momentum dumping which is done by magnetic torquing against the earth's magnetic field by the satellite's magnetic coils. A small rate-integrating gyro is used to sense the spin rate so that closed loop control of the spin rate can be achieved. These various systems are described in detail including the reaction wheel system, the gyro system, along with control modes (spin rate control and the star lock mode).

  7. The role of hope in adaptation to uncertainty: The experience of caregivers of children with Down syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Truitt, Megan; Biesecker, Barbara; Capone, George; Bailey, Thomas; Erby, Lori

    2012-01-01

    Objective The goal of this study was to investigate the relationships between perceived uncertainty, hope, and adaptation in caregivers of children with Down syndrome (DS). Methods A total of 546 caregivers were recruited from local and national DS groups and from a DS clinic list. A cross-sectional survey examined caregivers’ levels of perceived uncertainty, hope, and adaptation. The hope that caregivers had for their child was also measured. Results Uncertainty, hope and adaptation were all significantly correlated, with uncertainty and hope independently predicting caregiver adaptation. Caregivers’ motivation to reach goals for their child was higher than their ability to think of ways to meet those goals, and their lessened ability to think of ways to reach goals was significantly related to decreased adaptation levels. Conclusion Findings from this study suggest that having hope in the face of uncertainty is important in adaptation but that caregivers struggle with having hope related to thinking of ways to reach goals for their child. Practice implications The results of this study indicate that perceived uncertainty and hope may be important targets for improving psychological well-being. Interventions that assist caregivers in setting and attaining appropriate goals may be of particular interest. PMID:21937189

  8. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  9. INTERFACING SAS TO ORACLE IN THE UNIX ENVIRONMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    SAS is an EPA standard data and statistical analysis software package while ORACLE is EPA's standard data base management system software package. RACLE has the advantage over SAS in data retrieval and storage capabilities but has limited data and statistical analysis capability....

  10. Modifications to SAS4 to provide cask dose rate profiles

    SciTech Connect

    Napolitano, D.G.; Sweezy, J.E.; Henkel, C.S.

    1997-12-01

    SAS4 of the SCALE code system has been used extensively by NAC International (NAC) to perform storage and transport cask shielding analyses. SAS4 utilizes a one-dimensional XSDRNPM adjoint calculation of the cask to generate biasing parameters for a three-dimensional MORSE-SGC Monte Carlo model of the cask geometry. This technique is very efficient in getting particles to tally at the cask exterior surfaces. However, SAS4/MORSE-SGC is limited to the use of point detectors (next-event estimators) and large surface detectors (surface-crossing estimators). Modifications to SAS4 were made to allow a more flexible use of the surface detectors. This modification allows multiple nonoverlapping surface detectors on each surface and allows each surface detector to be broken into subdetectors. The use of subdetectors enables the user to obtain detailed surface dose rate profiles. Tallies can now be performed on all surfaces of the cask and at user-specified distances from the cask surface. The subdetectors provide an alternative to point detectors and excessive computational time. The NAC version of SAS4 is called SAS4A. A comparison of CPU time and dose rates is made between SAS4 point detectors and SAS4A surface subdetection on the NLI {1/2} transport cask.

  11. SAS-6 coiled-coil structure and interaction with SAS-5 suggest a regulatory mechanism in C. elegans centriole assembly

    PubMed Central

    Qiao, Renping; Cabral, Gabriela; Lettman, Molly M; Dammermann, Alexander; Dong, Gang

    2012-01-01

    The centriole is a conserved microtubule-based organelle essential for both centrosome formation and cilium biogenesis. Five conserved proteins for centriole duplication have been identified. Two of them, SAS-5 and SAS-6, physically interact with each other and are codependent for their targeting to procentrioles. However, it remains unclear how these two proteins interact at the molecular level. Here, we demonstrate that the short SAS-5 C-terminal domain (residues 390–404) specifically binds to a narrow central region (residues 275–288) of the SAS-6 coiled coil. This was supported by the crystal structure of the SAS-6 coiled-coil domain (CCD), which, together with mutagenesis studies, indicated that the association is mediated by synergistic hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions. The crystal structure also shows a periodic charge pattern along the SAS-6 CCD, which gives rise to an anti-parallel tetramer. Overall, our findings establish the molecular basis of the specific interaction between SAS-5 and SAS-6, and suggest that both proteins individually adopt an oligomeric conformation that is disrupted upon the formation of the hetero-complex to facilitate the correct assembly of the nine-fold symmetric centriole. PMID:23064147

  12. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  13. The Mexican Sistema de Alerta Sismica (SAS) Experience

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Espinosa-Aranda, J.; Rodriguez, F.

    2003-12-01

    The Mexico City's SAS is an Early Warning System developed in accordance with recommendations of foreign and national seismology experts, after the disaster generated in 1985 by the M8.1 Michoacan earthquake. The SAS aim is to help mitigate future seismic disasters in Mexico City (MC), mainly if the big forecast "Guerrero Earthquake" hits. In 1991 the SAS started its service in an experimental basis for evaluating its performance both with a group of basic education students in public schools, and with the emergency stop function for the Mexico City Metropolitan Subway System (METRO of MC); after this The Federal District Government (FDG) opened the SAS as a public service in August, 1993, shortly after the SAS warned, with more than 60 seconds of anticipation, the incoming effect of May 13, 1993, M5.8, and M6 double earthquake originated more than 300 Km from MC between Guerrero and Oaxaca, on the coast. That year, an initial technical flaw generated one false alert signal; the cause was readily corrected. The SAS has 12 seismic sensor stations covering a stripe close to 400 X 100 Km on the Guerrero's coast, between Papanoa and Punta Maldonado, that send information through a dedicated radio relay system to the SAS Central Control in MC., using the valuable support of some TELMEX field installations. Until August, 2003, the SAS sensor system has detected more than 1550 earthquakes in the 2.55 magnitude events, which are the ones felt in MC. The SAS has generated 57 warning signals with an average of 60 sec in advance to earthquake effects: 46 of restricted use for M<6, and 11 of public use for M>6 events. Public warnings have the automatic broadcast support of many commercial radio AM/FM and TV stations in Mexico City and Toluca valleys. The FDG controls the SAS signal service that includes the more frequent events (from M>5 up), asking the user to develop procedures and practice useful actions to mitigate seismic

  14. Long-lasting, dense scotoma under light-adapted conditions in patient with multiple evanescent white dot syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kuniyoshi, Kazuki; Sakuramoto, Hiroyuki; Sugioka, Koji; Matsumoto, Chota; Kusaka, Shunji; Shimomura, Yoshikazu

    2016-08-01

    To report the light- and dark-adapted perimetric findings in a patient with multiple evanescent white dot syndrome (MEWDS). The patient was a 25-year-old Japanese woman who underwent comprehensive ophthalmological examinations including measurements of the visual acuity, dilated ophthalmoscopy, Goldmann kinetic perimetry, electroretinography (ERG), indocyanine green fundus angiography (ICGA), and optical coherence tomography (OCT). Kinetic perimetry was performed under light- and dark-adapted conditions. The patient was diagnosed with MEWDS by the fundus and visual field findings, and the ICGA abnormalities. Light-adapted perimetry showed an enlargement of the blind spot; however, the size of the blind spot was normalized with dark-adaptation. Amplitude of cone ERG was more reduced than that of rod ERG in the affected eye. The OCT images showed multiple disruptions of the ellipsoid and interdigitation zones. These abnormalities were still present 9 months after the onset although the fundus appeared normal. These findings indicate a persistent cone-dominated dysfunction in a patient with MEWDS. PMID:26678272

  15. Adult zebrafish intestine resection: a novel model of short bowel syndrome, adaptation, and intestinal stem cell regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Schall, K. A.; Holoyda, K. A.; Grant, C. N.; Levin, D. E.; Torres, E. R.; Maxwell, A.; Pollack, H. A.; Moats, R. A.; Frey, M. R.; Darehzereshki, A.; Al Alam, D.; Lien, C.

    2015-01-01

    Loss of significant intestinal length from congenital anomaly or disease may lead to short bowel syndrome (SBS); intestinal failure may be partially offset by a gain in epithelial surface area, termed adaptation. Current in vivo models of SBS are costly and technically challenging. Operative times and survival rates have slowed extension to transgenic models. We created a new reproducible in vivo model of SBS in zebrafish, a tractable vertebrate model, to facilitate investigation of the mechanisms of intestinal adaptation. Proximal intestinal diversion at segment 1 (S1, equivalent to jejunum) was performed in adult male zebrafish. SBS fish emptied distal intestinal contents via stoma as in the human disease. After 2 wk, S1 was dilated compared with controls and villus ridges had increased complexity, contributing to greater villus epithelial perimeter. The number of intervillus pockets, the intestinal stem cell zone of the zebrafish increased and contained a higher number of bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU)-labeled cells after 2 wk of SBS. Egf receptor and a subset of its ligands, also drivers of adaptation, were upregulated in SBS fish. Igf has been reported as a driver of intestinal adaptation in other animal models, and SBS fish exposed to a pharmacological inhibitor of the Igf receptor failed to demonstrate signs of intestinal adaptation, such as increased inner epithelial perimeter and BrdU incorporation. We describe a technically feasible model of human SBS in the zebrafish, a faster and less expensive tool to investigate intestinal stem cell plasticity as well as the mechanisms that drive intestinal adaptation. PMID:26089336

  16. Acute effects of the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, on intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome.

    PubMed

    Thymann, Thomas; Stoll, Barbara; Mecklenburg, Lars; Burrin, Douglas G; Vegge, Andreas; Qvist, Niels; Eriksen, Thomas; Jeppesen, Palle B; Sangild, Per T

    2014-06-01

    Neonatal short bowel syndrome following massive gut resection is associated with malabsorption of nutrients. The intestinotrophic factor glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) improves gut function in adult patients with short bowel syndrome, but its effect in pediatric patients remains unknown. Our objective was to test the efficacy of the long-acting synthetic human GLP-2 analogue, teduglutide (ALX-0600), in a neonatal piglet jejunostomy model. Two-day-old pigs were subjected to resection of 50% of the small intestine (distal part), and the remnant intestine was exteriorized on the abdominal wall as a jejunostomy. All pigs were given total parenteral nutrition for 7 days and a single daily injection of the following doses of teduglutide: 0.01 (n = 6), 0.02 (n = 6), 0.1 (n = 5), or 0.2 mg · kg · day (n = 6), and compared with placebo (n = 9). Body weight increment was similar for all 4 teduglutide groups but higher than placebo (P < 0.05). There was a dose-dependent increase in weight per length of the remnant intestine (P < 0.01) and fractional protein synthesis rate in the intestine was increased in the 0.2 mg · kg · day group versus placebo (P < 0.001); however, functional and structural endpoints including activity of digestive enzymes, absorption of enteral nutrients, and immunohistochemistry (Ki67, villin, FABP2, ChgA, and GLP-2R) were not affected by the treatment. Teduglutide induces trophicity on the remnant intestine but has limited acute effects on functional endpoints. Significant effects of teduglutide on gut function may require a longer adaptation period and/or a more frequent administration of the peptide. In perspective, GLP-2 or its analogues may be relevant to improve intestinal adaptation in pediatric patients with short bowel syndrome. PMID:24399211

  17. Usual Dietary Intakes: SAS Macros for the NCI Method

    Cancer.gov

    SAS macros are currently available to facilitate modeling of a single dietary component, whether consumed daily or episodically; ratios of two dietary components that are consumed nearly every day; multiple dietary components, whether consumed daily or episodically.

  18. A SAS macro for residual deviance of ordinal regression analysis.

    PubMed

    Wan, J Y; Wang, W; Bromberg, J

    1994-12-01

    In this paper, a SAS macro is described for calculating the likelihood of the 'saturated' model in the analysis of ordinal regression. The outcome variable is multinomial on an ordinal scale, while the explanatory variables can be nominal or ordinal. Several ordinal regression models may be fitted to the data. One method of testing for the goodness of fit of these regression models is by comparing the residual deviance with the chi 2 distribution. In SAS, PROC LOGISTIC may be used to fit this type of data with proportional odds model. Unfortunately, the residual deviance is not available from the output. Our SAS macro will supplement the SAS output so that the residual deviance test may be carried out. The data from an ongoing HIV study is used as an illustration. PMID:7736732

  19. Breast Cancer Risk Assessment SAS Macro (Gail Model)

    Cancer.gov

    A SAS macro (commonly referred to as the Gail Model) that projects absolute risk of invasive breast cancer according to NCI’s Breast Cancer Risk Assessment Tool (BCRAT) algorithm for specified race/ethnic groups and age intervals.

  20. Klinefelter syndrome has increased brain responses to auditory stimuli and motor output, but not to visual stimuli or Stroop adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Skakkebæk, Anne; Bojesen, Anders; Fedder, Jens; Laurberg, Peter; Østergaard, John R.; Hertz, Jens Michael; Pedersen, Anders Degn; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) (KS) is a genetic syndrome characterized by the presence of an extra X chromosome and low level of testosterone, resulting in a number of neurocognitive abnormalities, yet little is known about brain function. This study investigated the fMRI-BOLD response from KS relative to a group of Controls to basic motor, perceptual, executive and adaptation tasks. Participants (N: KS = 49; Controls = 49) responded to whether the words “GREEN” or “RED” were displayed in green or red (incongruent versus congruent colors). One of the colors was presented three times as often as the other, making it possible to study both congruency and adaptation effects independently. Auditory stimuli saying “GREEN” or “RED” had the same distribution, making it possible to study effects of perceptual modality as well as Frequency effects across modalities. We found that KS had an increased response to motor output in primary motor cortex and an increased response to auditory stimuli in auditory cortices, but no difference in primary visual cortices. KS displayed a diminished response to written visual stimuli in secondary visual regions near the Visual Word Form Area, consistent with the widespread dyslexia in the group. No neural differences were found in inhibitory control (Stroop) or in adaptation to differences in stimulus frequencies. Across groups we found a strong positive correlation between age and BOLD response in the brain's motor network with no difference between groups. No effects of testosterone level or brain volume were found. In sum, the present findings suggest that auditory and motor systems in KS are selectively affected, perhaps as a compensatory strategy, and that this is not a systemic effect as it is not seen in the visual system. PMID:26958463

  1. Klinefelter syndrome has increased brain responses to auditory stimuli and motor output, but not to visual stimuli or Stroop adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wallentin, Mikkel; Skakkebæk, Anne; Bojesen, Anders; Fedder, Jens; Laurberg, Peter; Østergaard, John R; Hertz, Jens Michael; Pedersen, Anders Degn; Gravholt, Claus Højbjerg

    2016-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome (47, XXY) (KS) is a genetic syndrome characterized by the presence of an extra X chromosome and low level of testosterone, resulting in a number of neurocognitive abnormalities, yet little is known about brain function. This study investigated the fMRI-BOLD response from KS relative to a group of Controls to basic motor, perceptual, executive and adaptation tasks. Participants (N: KS = 49; Controls = 49) responded to whether the words "GREEN" or "RED" were displayed in green or red (incongruent versus congruent colors). One of the colors was presented three times as often as the other, making it possible to study both congruency and adaptation effects independently. Auditory stimuli saying "GREEN" or "RED" had the same distribution, making it possible to study effects of perceptual modality as well as Frequency effects across modalities. We found that KS had an increased response to motor output in primary motor cortex and an increased response to auditory stimuli in auditory cortices, but no difference in primary visual cortices. KS displayed a diminished response to written visual stimuli in secondary visual regions near the Visual Word Form Area, consistent with the widespread dyslexia in the group. No neural differences were found in inhibitory control (Stroop) or in adaptation to differences in stimulus frequencies. Across groups we found a strong positive correlation between age and BOLD response in the brain's motor network with no difference between groups. No effects of testosterone level or brain volume were found. In sum, the present findings suggest that auditory and motor systems in KS are selectively affected, perhaps as a compensatory strategy, and that this is not a systemic effect as it is not seen in the visual system. PMID:26958463

  2. An Integrated Literature Review on the Adaptive Behavior of Individuals with Asperger Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hyo Jung; Park, Hye Ran

    2007-01-01

    The diagnostic definition of Asperger syndrome (AS) is surrounded by debate and controversy, because it does not address many of the broader characteristics of individuals with AS. For example, neither the "Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders," 4th edition, nor the "International Classification of Diseases," 10th revision,…

  3. Early Learning and Adaptive Behaviour in Toddlers with Down Syndrome: Evidence for an Emerging Behavioural Phenotype?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Deborah; Hepburn, Susan; Rogers, Sally

    2006-01-01

    Background: Though the Down syndrome behavioural phenotype has been described as involving relative strengths in visuo-spatial processing and sociability, and relative weaknesses in verbal skills and motor planning, the early emergence of this phenotypic pattern of strengths and weaknesses has not yet been fully explored. Method: In this study, we…

  4. Adaptive Behaviour in Angelman Syndrome: Its Profile and Relationship to Age

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gasca, C. Brun; Obiols, J. E.; Bonillo, A.; Artigas, J.; Lorente, I.; Gabau, E.; Guitart, M.; Turk, J.

    2010-01-01

    Background: Angelman syndrome (AS) is a neurodevelopmental disorder usually caused by an anomaly in the maternally inherited chromosome 15. The main features are severe intellectual disability, speech impairment, ataxia, epilepsy, sleep disorder and a behavioural phenotype that reportedly includes happy disposition, attraction to/fascination with…

  5. Autistic Features, Personality, and Adaptive Behavior in Males with the Fragile X Syndrome and No Autism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kerby, Dave S.; Dawson, Brenda L.

    1994-01-01

    Nine adult males with mental retardation resulting from Fragile X syndrome were compared to males with mental retardation of other etiology. Fragile X males showed a distinct psychological profile with more autistic features, more schizoid features, and more schizotypal features. These males were also more shy, more socially withdrawn, less…

  6. Evidence for the adaptive evolution of ORF5 gene of Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus isolated in China.

    PubMed

    Xu, Z; Chang, X; Xiao, S; Chen, H; Zhou, R

    2010-01-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) ORF5 gene encoding an envelope glycoprotein involved in humoral immunity is the most variable protein-coding gene of PRRSV. The present study aimed to identify potential selective pressures acting on the ORF5 gene of PRRSV isolates of North American type prevalent in China. The non-synonymous to synonymous rate ratio ω (dN/dS) was employed as a measure of selective pressure at the codon level. An overall ω of 0.45 indicated negative (purifying) selection as the major driving force operating on the ORF5 gene during adaptation of the virus to swine. Determination of ω values for individual amino acids sites revealed 8 positively selected sites, most of them situated in the N-terminal ectodomain, indicating their potential role in the binding of virus to the cellular receptors. Further, 75 negatively selected sites were identified in the rest of molecule, probably as a result of functional or immunological constraints. Determination of potential N-glycosylation sites revealed 7 sites, four of which coincided with the positively selected ones. These results indicated that a specific adaptive evolution has operated on the ORF5 gene of Chinese PRRSV isolates. It is hoped that the disclosed adaptive sites might help identify a candidate antigenic epitope for the use in vaccine against this serious swine disease. PMID:21175251

  7. Administration of a DPP-IV Inhibitor Enhances the Intestinal Adaptation in a Mouse Model of Short Bowel Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Okawada, Manabu; Holst, Jens J.; Teitelbaum, Daniel H.

    2011-01-01

    Background Glucagon-like peptide-2(GLP-2) induces small intestine mucosal epithelial cell (EC) proliferation; and may have benefit for patients suffering from short bowel syndrome (SBS). However, GLP-2 is rapidly inactivated in vivo by dipeptidyl peptidase IV (DPPIV). Therefore, we hypothesized that selectively inhibiting DPPIV would prolong the circulating life of GLP-2 and lead to increased intestinal adaptation after development of SBS. Methods 8-week old C57BL/6J mice underwent a 50% proximal small bowel resection and were treated with either sitagliptin, a DPPIV-inhibitor (DPPIV-I), starting 1 day before surgery versus placebo. DPPIV-I efficacy was assessed 3 days after resection, including intestinal morphology, EC apoptosis and EC proliferation. Adaptive mechanisms were assessed with quantitative real-time PCR, and plasma bioactive GLP-2 was measured by radioimmunoassay. RESULT Body weight loss and peripheral blood glucose levels did not change compared to SBS controls. DPPIV-I treatment led to significant increases in villus height and crypt depth. DPPIV-I treatment did not significantly change EC apoptosis rates, but significantly increased crypt EC proliferation versus placebo-SBS controls. DPPIV-I treatment markedly increased mRNA expression of β-catenin and c-myc in ileal mucosa. Plasma GLP-2 levels significantly increased(~40.9%) in DPPIV-I-SBS mice. Conclusions DPPIV- I treatment increased SBS adaptation, and may potentially be useful for SBS patients. PMID:21719060

  8. Adaptive-filtering of trisomy 21: risk of Down syndrome depends on family size and age of previous child

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Neuhäuser, Markus; Krackow, Sven

    2007-02-01

    The neonatal incidence rate of Down syndrome (DS) is well-known to accelerate strongly with maternal age. This non-linearity renders mere accumulation of defects at recombination during prolonged first meiotic prophase implausible as an explanation for DS rate increase with maternal age, but might be anticipated from chromosomal drive (CD) for trisomy 21. Alternatively, as there is selection against genetically disadvantaged embryos, the screening system that eliminates embryos with trisomy 21 might decay with maternal age. In this paper, we provide the first evidence for relaxed filtering stringency (RFS) to represent an adaptive maternal response that could explain accelerating DS rates with maternal age. Using historical data, we show that the proportion of aberrant live births decrease with increased family size in older mothers, that inter-birth intervals are longer before affected neonates than before normal ones, and that primiparae exhibit elevated levels of DS incidence at higher age. These findings are predicted by adaptive RFS but cannot be explained by the currently available alternative non-adaptive hypotheses, including CD. The identification of the relaxation control mechanism and therapeutic restoration of a stringent screen may have considerable medical implications.

  9. Effect of thyroid stimulating hormone on adaptive behaviour in Down's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Bhaumik, S; Collacott, R A; Garrick, P; Mitchell, C

    1991-12-01

    Patients with Down's syndrome are particularly vulnerable to the development of both hypothyroidism and Alzheimer's disease. Both hypothyroidism and Alzheimer's disease may be associated with elevated serum concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone. In a group of institutionalized Down's syndrome patients with normal thyroid function, global scores of ability were higher than in a group of patients with elevated thyroid stimulating hormone levels in the presence of normal T3 and T4. The actual concentrations of thyroid stimulating hormone were shown to be significantly and inversely correlated with scores of global abilities. If these findings are reproducible, the authors believe that thyroid stimulating hormone estimation may provide confirmatory evidence of clinical dementia in this group of mentally handicapped individuals. PMID:1839315

  10. Stress, Locus of Control, and Family Cohesion and Adaptability in Parents of Children with Down, Williams, Fragile X, and Prader-Willi Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lanfranchi, Silvia; Vianello, Renzo

    2012-01-01

    The present study analyzes differences in parental stress in families of children with Down, Williams, Fragile X, and Prader-Willi syndromes, exploring factors that influence parental stress, such as child's characteristics, parental locus of control, and family cohesion and adaptability. Differences between mothers and fathers are also…

  11. Group Training in Interpersonal Problem-Solving Skills for Workplace Adaptation of Adolescents and Adults with Asperger Syndrome: A Preliminary Study

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bonete, Saray; Calero, María Dolores; Fernández-Parra, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Adults with Asperger syndrome show persistent difficulties in social situations which psychosocial treatments may address. Despite the multiple studies focusing on social skills interventions, only some have focused specifically on problem-solving skills and have not targeted workplace adaptation training in the adult population. This study…

  12. The presence of alpha interferon at the time of infection alters the innate and adaptive immune responses to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most devastating and costly diseases to the swine industry world-wide. Overall, the adaptive immune response to PRRS virus (PRRSV) is weak and results in delayed elimination of virus from the host and inferior vaccine protection. PRR...

  13. Longitudinal Changes in Adaptive Behavior in Adults with Down Syndrome: Interim Findings from a Longitudinal Study.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Prasher, V. P.; Chung, Man Cheung; Haque, M. S.

    1998-01-01

    A study examined underlying factors for age-related decline in adaptive behavior in 128 adults with trisomy 21 over a three-year period. Presence of dementia was the only determining factor, although the difference in trend over time as compared to subjects without dementia was not significant. (Author/CR)

  14. Overcoming the "Walmart Syndrome": Adapting Problem-Based Management Education in East Asia

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallinger, Philip; Lu, Jiafang

    2012-01-01

    This paper explores design issues to be considered in adapting the problem-based learning (PBL) for use in the context of East Asian higher education and tests its instructional effectiveness in a Master of Management degree program at a graduate school of business (GSB) in Thailand. The research analyzes course evaluation data obtained from…

  15. Leisure activities in Prader-Wlli syndrome: Implications for health, cognition and adaptive functioning

    PubMed Central

    Dykens, Elisabeth M

    2012-01-01

    To this day, I can recite the Sara Sparrow definition of adaptive behavior. To this day, I recall Sara sitting on the other side of a one-way mirror observing me, an inexperienced clinical psychology intern, administer the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales to the mother of a child with learning disabilities. Talk about nervous-- the world’s expert on adaptive behavior held my very internship and career success in her hands! Even though I stumbled through it, Sara reassured me that I did great…all I needed was more practice. So, thousands of Vineland’s later, I was launched. Both my first and my latest publications in the disability field used assessment tools that I learned from Sara—primarily the Vineland, but also several cognitive tests. Beyond these tools, I cherish key insights from Sara that have stayed with me over the long haul. First and foremost, Sara taught me how to be a real psychologist, how to carefully observe and assess people with standardized tools and with my own eyes and ears. Second, she instilled a practical skill that I still am working on—always be on time even if others are late! Third, Sara imbued a sense of fun and adventure into our training and she continued to be a source of inspiration and fun in the years after I left Yale. For us data-driven types, the process of research and discovery is inherently fun—it is a total blast. Yet Sara modeled that fun and enjoyment need to come in other ways that are more balanced or well-rounded—that are, in a word, adaptive. It seems a fitting tribute to Sara to submit a paper that related her treasured Vineland Scales to how people with developmental disabilities have fun. Thank you, Sara. PMID:22484792

  16. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 1: Diffuse emission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Continuing analysis of the data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray experiment has produced an improved picture of the sky at photon energies above 35 MeV. On a large scale, the diffuse emission from the galactic plane is the dominant feature observed by SAS-2. This galactic plane emission is most intense between galactic longitudes 310 deg and 45 deg, corresponding to a region within 7 kpc of the galactic center. Within the high-intensity region, SAS-2 observes peaks around galactic longitudes 315, 330, 345, 0, and 35 deg. These peaks appear to be correlated with galactic features and components such as molecular hydrogen, atomic hydrogen, magnetic fields, cosmic-ray concentrations, and photon fields.

  17. Development and Validation of a Smartphone Addiction Scale (SAS)

    PubMed Central

    Kwon, Min; Lee, Joon-Yeop; Won, Wang-Youn; Park, Jae-Woo; Min, Jung-Ah; Hahn, Changtae; Gu, Xinyu; Choi, Ji-Hye; Kim, Dai-Jin

    2013-01-01

    Objective The aim of this study was to develop a self-diagnostic scale that could distinguish smartphone addicts based on the Korean self-diagnostic program for Internet addiction (K-scale) and the smartphone's own features. In addition, the reliability and validity of the smartphone addiction scale (SAS) was demonstrated. Methods A total of 197 participants were selected from Nov. 2011 to Jan. 2012 to accomplish a set of questionnaires, including SAS, K-scale, modified Kimberly Young Internet addiction test (Y-scale), visual analogue scale (VAS), and substance dependence and abuse diagnosis of DSM-IV. There were 64 males and 133 females, with ages ranging from 18 to 53 years (M = 26.06; SD = 5.96). Factor analysis, internal-consistency test, t-test, ANOVA, and correlation analysis were conducted to verify the reliability and validity of SAS. Results Based on the factor analysis results, the subscale “disturbance of reality testing” was removed, and six factors were left. The internal consistency and concurrent validity of SAS were verified (Cronbach's alpha = 0.967). SAS and its subscales were significantly correlated with K-scale and Y-scale. The VAS of each factor also showed a significant correlation with each subscale. In addition, differences were found in the job (p<0.05), education (p<0.05), and self-reported smartphone addiction scores (p<0.001) in SAS. Conclusions This study developed the first scale of the smartphone addiction aspect of the diagnostic manual. This scale was proven to be relatively reliable and valid. PMID:23468893

  18. Observations of A0620-00 by SAS-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bradt, H.; Matilsky, T.

    1976-01-01

    The transient X-ray source A0620-00 was observed by the SAS-3 group with the SAS-3 X-ray observatory. At maximum X-ray luminosity limits of 2% were placed on periodic variations from 0.2 ms - 2,000 sec. A precise position was obtained with the rotating modulation collimator. This led directly to radio and optical identification by groups at the NRAO, Arecibo, and McGraw Hill Observatories. The low energy (0.15-0.9 keV) system was pointed at the source, and a spectrum was derived. Hardness ratios are presented, as well as detailed light curves.

  19. Want independent validation and assurance? Ask for a SAS-70.

    PubMed

    Boutin, Christopher C

    2008-08-01

    The AICPA's Statement on Auditing Standards No.70, Service Organizations addresses CPA audits of service providers conducted to verify that a provider has adequate controls over its operations. Hospitals should request a SAS-70, the report produced by such an audit, from all of their third-party service providers. SAS-70s can be issued for a specific date or for a six-month period, and they typically consist of three sections: a CPA opinion, a description of controls, and information about the design of the controls. PMID:18709869

  20. Usual Dietary Intakes: SAS Macros for Fitting Multivariate Measurement Error Models & Estimating Multivariate Usual Intake Distributions

    Cancer.gov

    The following SAS macros can be used to create a multivariate usual intake distribution for multiple dietary components that are consumed nearly every day or episodically. A SAS macro for performing balanced repeated replication (BRR) variance estimation is also included.

  1. Transfer of perceptual-motor training and the space adaptation syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, R. S.; Berbaum, K. S.; Williams, M. C.; Brannan, J.; Welch, R. B.

    1987-01-01

    Perceptual cue conflict may be the basis for the symptoms which are experienced by space travelers in microgravity conditions. Recovery has been suggested to take place after perceptual modification or reinterpretation. To elucidate this process, 10 subjects who repeatedly experienced a visual/vestibular conflict over trials and days, were tested in a similar but not identical perceptual situation (pseudo-Coriolis) to determine whether any savings in perceptual adaptation had occurred as compared to an unpracticed control group (N = 40). The practiced subjects experienced lessening dizziness and ataxia within and over sessions.

  2. Mutational hierarchies in myelodysplastic syndromes dynamically adapt and evolve upon therapy response and failure.

    PubMed

    Mossner, Maximilian; Jann, Johann-Christoph; Wittig, Janina; Nolte, Florian; Fey, Stephanie; Nowak, Verena; Obländer, Julia; Pressler, Jovita; Palme, Iris; Xanthopoulos, Christina; Boch, Tobias; Metzgeroth, Georgia; Röhl, Henning; Witt, Stephanie H; Dukal, Helene; Klein, Corinna; Schmitt, Steffen; Gelß, Patrick; Platzbecker, Uwe; Balaian, Ekaterina; Fabarius, Alice; Blum, Helmut; Schulze, Torsten J; Meggendorfer, Manja; Haferlach, Claudia; Trumpp, Andreas; Hofmann, Wolf-Karsten; Medyouf, Hind; Nowak, Daniel

    2016-09-01

    Clonal evolution is believed to be a main driver for progression of various types of cancer and implicated in facilitating resistance to drugs. However, the hierarchical organization of malignant clones in the hematopoiesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and its impact on response to drug therapy remain poorly understood. Using high-throughput sequencing of patient and xenografted cells, we evaluated the intratumoral heterogeneity (n= 54) and reconstructed mutational trajectories (n = 39) in patients suffering from MDS (n = 52) and chronic myelomonocytic leukemia-1 (n = 2). We identified linear and also branching evolution paths and confirmed on a patient-specific level that somatic mutations in epigenetic regulators and RNA splicing genes frequently constitute isolated disease-initiating events. Using high-throughput exome- and/or deep-sequencing, we analyzed 103 chronologically acquired samples from 22 patients covering a cumulative observation time of 75 years MDS disease progression. Our data revealed highly dynamic shaping of complex oligoclonal architectures, specifically upon treatment with lenalidomide and other drugs. Despite initial clinical response to treatment, patients' marrow persistently remained clonal with rapid outgrowth of founder-, sub-, or even fully independent clones, indicating an increased dynamic rate of clonal turnover. The emergence and disappearance of specific clones frequently correlated with changes of clinical parameters, highlighting their distinct and far-reaching functional properties. Intriguingly, increasingly complex mutational trajectories are frequently accompanied by clinical progression during the course of disease. These data substantiate a need for regular broad molecular monitoring to guide clinical treatment decisions in MDS. PMID:27268087

  3. Data reduction and analysis of SAS-1 data. [bibliographies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Giacconi, R.

    1979-01-01

    An abstracted bibliography of 59 articles addressing the analysis of X-ray observations from the UHURU X-Ray Observatory (SAS-1) is presented. Investigations of galactic and extragalactic X-ray sources, X-ray binaries, and transient and burst phenomena are highlighted.

  4. A SAS Interface for Bayesian Analysis with WinBUGS

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zhang, Zhiyong; McArdle, John J.; Wang, Lijuan; Hamagami, Fumiaki

    2008-01-01

    Bayesian methods are becoming very popular despite some practical difficulties in implementation. To assist in the practical application of Bayesian methods, we show how to implement Bayesian analysis with WinBUGS as part of a standard set of SAS routines. This implementation procedure is first illustrated by fitting a multiple regression model…

  5. 49 CFR 229.311 - Review of SAs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Review of SAs. 229.311 Section 229.311 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics § 229.311 Review...

  6. 49 CFR 229.311 - Review of SAs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Review of SAs. 229.311 Section 229.311 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics § 229.311 Review...

  7. 49 CFR 229.311 - Review of SAs.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Review of SAs. 229.311 Section 229.311 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) FEDERAL RAILROAD ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION RAILROAD LOCOMOTIVE SAFETY STANDARDS Locomotive Electronics § 229.311 Review...

  8. Using SAS PROC MCMC for Item Response Theory Models

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ames, Allison J.; Samonte, Kelli

    2015-01-01

    Interest in using Bayesian methods for estimating item response theory models has grown at a remarkable rate in recent years. This attentiveness to Bayesian estimation has also inspired a growth in available software such as WinBUGS, R packages, BMIRT, MPLUS, and SAS PROC MCMC. This article intends to provide an accessible overview of Bayesian…

  9. SAS Partial Least Squares (PLS) for Discriminant Analysis

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    The objective of this work was to implement discriminant analysis using SAS partial least squares (PLS) regression for analysis of spectral data. This was done in combination with previous efforts which implemented data pre-treatments including scatter correction, derivatives, mean centering, and v...

  10. Characterization of homologous and heterologous adaptive immune responses in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Ivan; Gimeno, Mariona; Darwich, Laila; Navarro, Nuria; Kuzemtseva, Liudmila; López, Sergio; Galindo, Ivan; Segalés, Joaquim; Martín, Margarita; Pujols, Joan; Mateu, Enric

    2012-01-01

    The present study characterized the homologous and heterologous immune response in type-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. Two experiments were conducted: in experiment 1, eight pigs were inoculated with PRRSV strain 3262 and 84 days post-inoculation (dpi) they were challenged with either strain 3262 or strain 3267 and followed for the next 14 days (98 dpi). In experiment 2, eight pigs were inoculated with strain 3267 and challenged at 84 dpi as above. Clinical course, viremia, humoral response (neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, NA) and virus-specific IFN-γ responses (ELISPOT) were evaluated all throughout the study. Serum levels of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and TGF-β were determined (ELISA) after the second challenge. In experiment 1 primo-inoculation with strain 3262 induced viremia of ≤ 28 days, low titres of homologous NA but strong IFN-γ responses. In contrast, strain 3267 induced longer viremias (up to 56 days), higher NA titres (≤ 6 log2) and lower IFN-γ responses. Inoculation with 3267 produced higher serum IL-8 levels. After the re-challenge at 84 dpi, pigs in experiment 1 developed mostly a one week viremia regardless of the strain used. In experiment 2, neither the homologous nor the heterologous challenge resulted in detectable viremia although PRRSV was present in tonsils of some animals. Homologous re-inoculation with 3267 produced elevated TGF-β levels in serum for 7-14 days but this did not occur with the heterologous re-inoculation. In conclusion, inoculation with different PRRSV strains result in different virological and immunological outcomes and in different degrees of homologous and heterologous protection. PMID:22515169

  11. Innate and adaptive immunity against Porcine Reproductive and Respiratory Syndrome Virus.

    PubMed

    Loving, Crystal L; Osorio, Fernando A; Murtaugh, Michael P; Zuckermann, Federico A

    2015-09-15

    Many highly effective vaccines have been produced against viruses whose virulent infection elicits strong and durable protective immunity. In these cases, characterization of immune effector mechanisms and identification of protective epitopes/immunogens has been informative for the development of successful vaccine programs. Diseases in which the immune system does not rapidly clear the acute infection and/or convalescent immunity does not provide highly effective protection against secondary challenge pose a major hurdle for clinicians and scientists. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) falls primarily into this category, though not entirely. PRRSV causes a prolonged infection, though the host eventually clears the virus. Neutralizing antibodies can provide passive protection when present prior to challenge, though infection can be controlled in the absence of detectable neutralizing antibodies. In addition, primed pigs (through natural exposure or vaccination with a modified-live vaccine) show some protection against secondary challenge. While peripheral PRRSV-specific T cell responses have been examined, their direct contribution to antibody-mediated immunity and viral clearance have not been fully elucidated. The innate immune response following PRRSV infection, particularly the antiviral type I interferon response, is meager, but when provided exogenously, IFN-α enhances PRRSV immunity and viral control. Overall, the quality of immunity induced by natural PRRSV infection is not ideal for informing vaccine development programs. The epitopes necessary for protection may be identified through natural exposure or modified-live vaccines and subsequently applied to vaccine delivery platforms to accelerate induction of protective immunity following vaccination. Collectively, further work to identify protective B and T cell epitopes and mechanisms by which PRRSV eludes innate immunity will enhance our ability to develop more effective methods

  12. Blood Pressure and Hemodynamic Adaptations after a Training Program in Young Individuals with Down Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Seron, Bruna Barboza; Goessler, Karla Fabiana; Modesto, Everaldo Lambert; Almeida, Eloise Werle; Greguol, Márcia

    2015-01-01

    Background Cardiovascular diseases affect people worldwide. Individuals with Down Syndrome (DS) have an up to sixteen-time greater risk of mortality from cardiovascular diseases. Objective To evaluate the effects of aerobic and resistance exercises on blood pressure and hemodynamic variables of young individuals with DS. Methods A total of 29 young individuals with DS participated in the study. They were divided into two groups: aerobic training (AT) (n = 14), and resistance training (TR) (n = 15). Their mean age was 15.7 ± 2.82 years. The training program lasted 12 weeks, and had a frequency of three times a week for AT and twice a week for RT. AT was performed in treadmill/ bicycle ergometer, at an intensity between 50%-70% of the HR reserve. RT comprised nine exercises with three sets of 12 repetition-maximum. Systolic blood pressure (SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean blood pressure (MBP) and hemodynamic variables were assessed beat-to-beat using the Finometer device before/after the training program. Descriptive analysis, the Shapiro-Wilk test to check the normality of data, and the two-way ANOVA for repeated measures were used to compare pre- and post-training variables. The Pearson’s correlation coefficient was calculated to correlate hemodynamic variables. The SPSS version 18.0 was used with the significance level set at p < 0.05. Results After twelve weeks of aerobic and/or resistance training, significant reductions in variables SBP, DBP and MBP were observed. Conclusion This study suggests a chronic hypotensive effect of moderate aerobic and resistance exercises on young individuals with DS. PMID:26131704

  13. Characterization of homologous and heterologous adaptive immune responses in porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The present study characterized the homologous and heterologous immune response in type-I porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection. Two experiments were conducted: in experiment 1, eight pigs were inoculated with PRRSV strain 3262 and 84 days post-inoculation (dpi) they were challenged with either strain 3262 or strain 3267 and followed for the next 14 days (98 dpi). In experiment 2, eight pigs were inoculated with strain 3267 and challenged at 84 dpi as above. Clinical course, viremia, humoral response (neutralizing and non-neutralizing antibodies, NA) and virus-specific IFN-γ responses (ELISPOT) were evaluated all throughout the study. Serum levels of IL-1, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α and TGF-β were determined (ELISA) after the second challenge. In experiment 1 primo-inoculation with strain 3262 induced viremia of ≤ 28 days, low titres of homologous NA but strong IFN-γ responses. In contrast, strain 3267 induced longer viremias (up to 56 days), higher NA titres (≤ 6 log2) and lower IFN-γ responses. Inoculation with 3267 produced higher serum IL-8 levels. After the re-challenge at 84 dpi, pigs in experiment 1 developed mostly a one week viremia regardless of the strain used. In experiment 2, neither the homologous nor the heterologous challenge resulted in detectable viremia although PRRSV was present in tonsils of some animals. Homologous re-inoculation with 3267 produced elevated TGF-β levels in serum for 7–14 days but this did not occur with the heterologous re-inoculation. In conclusion, inoculation with different PRRSV strains result in different virological and immunological outcomes and in different degrees of homologous and heterologous protection. PMID:22515169

  14. Spacelab 3 flight experiment No. 3AFT23: Autogenic-feedback training as a preventive method for space adaptation syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cowings, Patricia S.; Toscano, William B.; Kamiya, Joe; Miller, Neal E.; Sharp, Joseph C.

    1988-01-01

    Space adaptation syndrome is a motion sickness-like disorder which affects up to 50 percent of all people exposed to microgravity in space. This experiment tested a physiological conditioning procedure (Autogenic-Feedback Training, AFT) as an alternative to pharmacological management. Four astronauts participated as subjects in this experiment. Crewmembers A and B served as treatment subjects. Both received preflight training for control of heart rate, respiration rate, peripheral blood volume, and skin conductance. Crewmembers C and D served as controls (i.e., did not receive training). Crewmember A showed reliable control of his own physiological responses, and a significant increase in motion sickness tolerance after training. Crewmember B, however, demonstrated much less control and only a moderate increase in motion sickness tolerance was observed after training. The inflight symptom reports and physiological data recordings revealed that Crewmember A did not experience any severe symptom episodes during the mission, while Crewmember B reported one severe symptom episode. Both control group subjects, C and D (who took antimotion sickness medication), reported multiple symptom episodes on mission day 0. Both inflight data and crew reports indicate that AFT may be an effective countermeasure. Additional data must be obtained inflight (a total of eight treatment and eight control subjects) before final evaluation of this treatment can be made.

  15. SAS- Semantic Annotation Service for Geoscience resources on the web

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Elag, M.; Kumar, P.; Marini, L.; Li, R.; Jiang, P.

    2015-12-01

    There is a growing need for increased integration across the data and model resources that are disseminated on the web to advance their reuse across different earth science applications. Meaningful reuse of resources requires semantic metadata to realize the semantic web vision for allowing pragmatic linkage and integration among resources. Semantic metadata associates standard metadata with resources to turn them into semantically-enabled resources on the web. However, the lack of a common standardized metadata framework as well as the uncoordinated use of metadata fields across different geo-information systems, has led to a situation in which standards and related Standard Names abound. To address this need, we have designed SAS to provide a bridge between the core ontologies required to annotate resources and information systems in order to enable queries and analysis over annotation from a single environment (web). SAS is one of the services that are provided by the Geosematnic framework, which is a decentralized semantic framework to support the integration between models and data and allow semantically heterogeneous to interact with minimum human intervention. Here we present the design of SAS and demonstrate its application for annotating data and models. First we describe how predicates and their attributes are extracted from standards and ingested in the knowledge-base of the Geosemantic framework. Then we illustrate the application of SAS in annotating data managed by SEAD and annotating simulation models that have web interface. SAS is a step in a broader approach to raise the quality of geoscience data and models that are published on the web and allow users to better search, access, and use of the existing resources based on standard vocabularies that are encoded and published using semantic technologies.

  16. Cultural adaptation: translatability assessment and linguistic validation of the patient-reported outcome instrument for irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea

    PubMed Central

    Delgado-Herrera, Leticia; Lasch, Kathryn; Popielnicki, Ana; Nishida, Akito; Arbuckle, Rob; Banderas, Benjamin; Zentner, Susan; Gagainis, Ingrid; Zeiher, Bernhardt

    2016-01-01

    Background and objective Following a 2009 US Food and Drug Administration guidance, a new patient-reported outcome (PRO) instrument was developed to support end points in multinational clinical trials assessing irritable bowel syndrome with diarrhea (IBS-D) symptom severity. Our objective was to assess the translatability of the IBS-D PRO instrument into ten languages, and subsequently perform a cultural adaptation/linguistic validation of the questionnaire into Japanese and US Spanish. Materials and methods Translatability assessments of the US English version of the IBS-D PRO were performed by experienced PRO translators who were native speakers of each target language and currently residing in target-language countries. Languages were Chinese (People’s Republic of China), Dutch (the Netherlands), French (Belgium), German (Germany), Japanese (Japan), Polish (Poland), Portuguese (Brazil), Russian (Russia), Spanish (Mexico), and Spanish (US). The project team assessed the instrument to identify potential linguistic and/or cultural adaptation issues. After the issues identified were resolved, the instrument was translated into Spanish (US) and Japanese through a process of two forward translations, one reconciled translation, and one backward translation. The project team reviewed the translated versions before the instruments were evaluated by cognitive debriefing interviews with samples of five Spanish (US) and five Japanese IBS-D patients. Results Linguistic and cultural adaptation concerns identified during the translatability assessment required minor revisions, mainly the presentation of dates/times and word structure. During the cognitive debriefing interviews, two of five Spanish respondents misunderstood the term “bowel movement” to mean only diarrhea in the Spanish version. Consequently, the term was changed from “movimiento intestinal” to “evacuaciones”. None of the Japanese respondents identified issues with the Japanese version. Conclusion

  17. The SAS Education Value-Added Assessment System (SAS[R] EVAAS[R]) in the Houston Independent School District (HISD): Intended and Unintended Consequences

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Amrein-Beardsley, Audrey; Collins, Clarin

    2012-01-01

    The SAS Educational Value-Added Assessment System (SAS[R] EVAAS[R]) is the most widely used value-added system in the country. It is also self-proclaimed as "the most robust and reliable" system available, with its greatest benefit to help educators improve their teaching practices. This study critically examined the effects of SAS[R] EVAAS[R] as…

  18. The Caenorhabditis elegans protein SAS-5 forms large oligomeric assemblies critical for centriole formation

    PubMed Central

    Rogala, Kacper B; Dynes, Nicola J; Hatzopoulos, Georgios N; Yan, Jun; Pong, Sheng Kai; Robinson, Carol V; Deane, Charlotte M; Gönczy, Pierre; Vakonakis, Ioannis

    2015-01-01

    Centrioles are microtubule-based organelles crucial for cell division, sensing and motility. In Caenorhabditis elegans, the onset of centriole formation requires notably the proteins SAS-5 and SAS-6, which have functional equivalents across eukaryotic evolution. Whereas the molecular architecture of SAS-6 and its role in initiating centriole formation are well understood, the mechanisms by which SAS-5 and its relatives function is unclear. Here, we combine biophysical and structural analysis to uncover the architecture of SAS-5 and examine its functional implications in vivo. Our work reveals that two distinct self-associating domains are necessary to form higher-order oligomers of SAS-5: a trimeric coiled coil and a novel globular dimeric Implico domain. Disruption of either domain leads to centriole duplication failure in worm embryos, indicating that large SAS-5 assemblies are necessary for function in vivo. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07410.001 PMID:26023830

  19. Adaptive and Maladaptive Correlates of Repetitive Behavior and Restricted Interests in Persons with Down Syndrome and Developmentally-Matched Typical Children: A Two-Year Longitudinal Sequential Design

    PubMed Central

    Evans, David W.; Kleinpeter, F. Lee; Slane, Mylissa M.; Boomer, K. B.

    2014-01-01

    We examined the course of repetitive behavior and restricted interests (RBRI) in children with and without Down syndrome (DS) over a two-year time period. Forty-two typically-developing children and 43 persons with DS represented two mental age (MA) levels: “younger” 2–4 years; “older” 5–11 years. For typically developing younger children some aspects of RBRI increased from Time 1 to Time 2. In older children, these aspects remained stable or decreased over the two-year period. For participants with DS, RBRI remained stable or increased over time. Time 1 RBRI predicted Time 2 adaptive behavior (measured by the Vineland Scales) in typically developing children, whereas for participants with DS, Time 1 RBRI predicted poor adaptive outcome (Child Behavior Checklist) at Time 2. The results add to the body of literature examining the adaptive and maladaptive nature of repetitive behavior. PMID:24710387

  20. Increased pathogenicity of European porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus is associated with enhanced adaptive responses and viral clearance.

    PubMed

    Morgan, S B; Graham, S P; Salguero, F J; Sánchez Cordón, P J; Mokhtar, H; Rebel, J M J; Weesendorp, E; Bodman-Smith, K B; Steinbach, F; Frossard, J P

    2013-04-12

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most economically important diseases of swine worldwide. Since its first emergence in 1987 the PRRS virus (PRRSV) has become particularly divergent with highly pathogenic strains appearing in both Europe and Asia. However, the underlying mechanisms of PRRSV pathogenesis are still unclear. This study sets out to determine the differences in pathogenesis between subtype 1 and 3 strains of European PRRSV (PRRSV-I), and compare the immune responses mounted against these strains. Piglets were infected with 3 strains of PRRSV-I: Lelystad virus, 215-06 a British field strain and SU1-bel from Belarus. Post-mortem examinations were performed at 3 and 7 days post-infection (dpi), and half of the remaining animals in each group were inoculated with an Aujeszky's disease (ADV) vaccine to investigate possible immune suppression resulting from PRRSV infection. The subtype 3 SU1-bel strain displayed greater clinical signs and lung gross pathology scores compared with the subtype 1 strains. This difference did not appear to be caused by higher virus replication, as viraemia and viral load in broncho-alveolar lavage fluid (BALF) were lower in the SU1-bel group. Infection with SU1-bel induced an enhanced adaptive immune response with greater interferon (IFN)-γ responses and an earlier PRRSV-specific antibody response. Infection with PRRSV did not affect the response to vaccination against ADV. Our results indicate that the increased clinical and pathological effect of the SU1-bel strain is more likely to be caused by an enhanced inflammatory immune response rather than higher levels of virus replication. PMID:23313323

  1. Functional adaptation of tendon and skeletal muscle to resistance training in three patients with genetically verified classic Ehlers Danlos Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Møller, Mathias Bech; Kjær, Michael; Svensson, René Brüggebusch; Andersen, Jesper Lovind; Magnusson, Stig Peter; Nielsen, Rie Harboe

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: tendon and skeletal muscle function adapts to physical training of resistive nature, but it is unknown to what extent persons with genetically altered connective tissue – who have a higher than normal tendon extensibility – will obtain any effect upon their tendon and muscle when undergoing muscle strength training. We investigated patients with classical Ehlers Danlos Syndrome (EDS) (collagen type V defect) who display articular hypermobility, skin extensibility and tissue fragility. Methods: subjects underwent strength training 3 times a week for 4 months and were tested before and after intervention in regards to muscle strength, tendon mechanical properties, and muscle function. Results: three subjects completed the scheduled 48 sessions and had no major adverse events. Mean isometric leg extension force and leg extensor power both increased by 8 and 11% respectively (358 to 397 N, and 117 to 123 W). The tendon stiffness was tested and an average increase in response to physical training, from 1795 to 2519 N/mm was found. On average, the training loads both in upper and lower body exercises increased by around 30% over the training period. When testing balance, the average sway-area of the participants decreased by 26% (0.144 to 0.108 m2). On the subscale of CIS20 the participants lowered their average subjective fatigue score from 33 to 25. Conclusion: in this small pilot study, heavy resistance training was both feasible and effective in classic Ehlers Danlos patients, and the results indicated that both tendon and skeletal muscle properties can be improved also in this patient group when they are subjected to resistance training. PMID:25489549

  2. Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS) for women: development and validation.

    PubMed

    Morokoff, P J; Quina, K; Harlow, L L; Whitmire, L; Grimley, D M; Gibson, P R; Burkholder, G J

    1997-10-01

    Four studies were conducted to develop and validate the Sexual Assertiveness Scale (SAS), a measure of sexual assertiveness in women that consists of factors measuring initiation, refusal, and pregnancy-sexually transmitted disease prevention assertiveness. A total of 1,613 women from both university and community populations were studied. Confirmatory factor analyses demonstrated that the 3 factors remained stable across samples of university and community women. A structural model was tested in 2 samples, indicating that sexual experience, anticipated negative partner response, and self-efficacy are consistent predictors of sexual assertiveness. Sexual assertiveness was found to be somewhat related to relationship satisfaction, power, and length. The community sample was retested after 6 months and 1 year to establish test-retest reliability. The SAS provides a reliable instrument for assessing and understanding women's sexual assertiveness. PMID:9325594

  3. Genome sequencing and annotation of Proteus sp. SAS71

    PubMed Central

    Selim, Samy; Hassan, Sherif; Hagagy, Nashwa

    2015-01-01

    We report draft genome sequence of Proteus sp. strain SAS71, isolated from water spring in Aljouf region, Saudi Arabia. The draft genome size is 3,037,704 bp with a G + C content of 39.3% and contains 6 rRNA sequence (single copies of 5S, 16S & 23S rRNA). The genome sequence can be accessed at DDBJ/EMBL/GenBank under the accession no. LDIU00000000. PMID:26697338

  4. Quality assurance management plan (QAPP) special analytical support (SAS)

    SciTech Connect

    LOCKREM, L.L.

    1999-05-20

    It is the policy of Special Analytical Support (SAS) that the analytical aspects of all environmental data generated and processed in the laboratory, subject to the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), U.S. Department of Energy or other project specific requirements, be of known and acceptable quality. It is the intention of this QAPP to establish and assure that an effective quality controlled management system is maintained in order to meet the quality requirements of the intended use(s) of the data.

  5. Pharmacological management of SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Olivieri, Ignazio; Padula, Angela; Palazzi, Carlo

    2006-10-01

    The SAPHO (synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis) syndrome (SaS) includes different skeletal manifestations such as recurrent multifocal osteomyelitis, osteitis and arthritis, which are frequently associated with different forms of skin pustulosis (palmoplantar pustulosis, pustular psoriasis and severe acne). This syndrome is strictly related to the spondyloarthopathies (particularly to psoriatic arthritis) and many SaS cases fulfil the classification criteria for the spondyloarthopathies. Because SaS is an uncommon disease, current knowledge regarding its therapy is based on limited experiences gained by treating mainly small groups of patients. As a consequence, its treatment is still empiric. Several drugs (including NSAIDs, corticosteroids, sulfasalazine, methotrexate, ciclosporin, leflunomide, calcitonin and so on) have been administered and obtained conflicting results. The use of antibiotics, due to the isolation of Propionibacterium acnes from the bone biopsies of several subjects with SaS, has not represented a turning point in therapy, although some patients are responsive to this treatment. Initial reports concerning the administration of bisphosphonates (pamidronate and zoledronic acid) and of an anti-TNF-alpha agent (infliximab) are very promising for the future. In any case, larger, multi-centre, controlled, double-blind studies are required to emerge from the present pioneering phase. PMID:16989598

  6. Acute effects of the glucagon-like peptide 2 analogue, teduglutide, on intestinal adaptation in short bowel syndrome

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Neonatal short bowel syndrome following massive gut resection is associated with malabsorption of nutrients. The intestinotrophic factor glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) improves gut function in adult patients with short bowel syndrome, but its effect in pediatric patients remains unknown. Our object...

  7. Group training in interpersonal problem-solving skills for workplace adaptation of adolescents and adults with Asperger syndrome: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Bonete, Saray; Calero, María Dolores; Fernández-Parra, Antonio

    2015-05-01

    Adults with Asperger syndrome show persistent difficulties in social situations which psychosocial treatments may address. Despite the multiple studies focusing on social skills interventions, only some have focused specifically on problem-solving skills and have not targeted workplace adaptation training in the adult population. This study describes preliminary data from a group format manual-based intervention, the Interpersonal Problem-Solving for Workplace Adaptation Programme, aimed at improving the cognitive and metacognitive process of social problem-solving skills focusing on typical social situations in the workplace based on mediation as the main strategy. A total of 50 adults with Asperger syndrome received the programme and were compared with a control group of typical development. The feasibility and effectiveness of the treatment were explored. Participants were assessed at pre-treatment and post-treatment on a task of social problem-solving skills and two secondary measures of socialisation and work profile using self- and caregiver-report. Using a variety of methods, the results showed that scores were significantly higher at post-treatment in the social problem-solving task and socialisation skills based on reports by parents. Differences in comparison to the control group had decreased after treatment. The treatment was acceptable to families and subject adherence was high. The Interpersonal Problem-Solving for Workplace Adaptation Programme appears to be a feasible training programme. PMID:24569569

  8. Observations of low energy gamma-ray bursts with SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Oegelman, H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1975-01-01

    The present paper reports on the low-energy gamma-ray bursts observed by the plastic scintillator anticoincidence dome of the Small Astronomy Satellite-2 (SAS-2) gamma-ray telescope. SAS-2 detected two events observed by other satellites and discovered one which was subsequently confirmed by other satellite observations. Two events seen by other satellites were not detected by SAS-2, probably due to earth occultation. The event detection threshold for SAS-2 was almost two orders of magnitude lower than that of the Vela satellites.

  9. Extension of the sasCIF format and its applications for data processing and deposition

    PubMed Central

    Kachala, Michael; Westbrook, John; Svergun, Dmitri

    2016-01-01

    Recent advances in small-angle scattering (SAS) experimental facilities and data analysis methods have prompted a dramatic increase in the number of users and of projects conducted, causing an upsurge in the number of objects studied, experimental data available and structural models generated. To organize the data and models and make them accessible to the community, the Task Forces on SAS and hybrid methods for the International Union of Crystallography and the Worldwide Protein Data Bank envisage developing a federated approach to SAS data and model archiving. Within the framework of this approach, the existing databases may exchange information and provide independent but synchronized entries to users. At present, ways of exchanging information between the various SAS databases are not established, leading to possible duplication and incompatibility of entries, and limiting the opportunities for data-driven research for SAS users. In this work, a solution is developed to resolve these issues and provide a universal exchange format for the community, based on the use of the widely adopted crystallographic information framework (CIF). The previous version of the sasCIF format, implemented as an extension of the core CIF dictionary, has been available since 2000 to facilitate SAS data exchange between laboratories. The sasCIF format has now been extended to describe comprehensively the necessary experimental information, results and models, including relevant metadata for SAS data analysis and for deposition into a database. Processing tools for these files (sasCIFtools) have been developed, and these are available both as standalone open-source programs and integrated into the SAS Biological Data Bank, allowing the export and import of data entries as sasCIF files. Software modules to save the relevant information directly from beamline data-processing pipelines in sasCIF format are also developed. This update of sasCIF and the relevant tools are an important

  10. Single mutations in sasA enable a simpler ΔcikA gene network architecture with equivalent circadian properties

    PubMed Central

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K.; Boyd, Joseph S.; Katsuki, Takeo; Golden, Susan S.; Greenspan, Ralph J.

    2014-01-01

    The circadian input kinase of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (CikA) is important both for synchronizing circadian rhythms with external environmental cycles and for transferring temporal information between the oscillator and the global transcriptional regulator RpaA (regulator of phycobilisome-associated A). KOs of cikA result in one of the most severely altered but still rhythmic circadian phenotypes observed. We chemically mutagenized a cikA-null S. elongatus strain and screened for second-site suppressor mutations that could restore normal circadian rhythms. We identified two independent mutations in the Synechococcus adaptive sensor A (sasA) gene that produce nearly WT rhythms of gene expression, likely because they compensate for the loss of CikA on the temporal phosphorylation of RpaA. Additionally, these mutations restore the ability to reset the clock after a short dark pulse through an output-independent pathway, suggesting that SasA can influence entrainment through direct interactions with KaiC, a property previously unattributed to it. These experiments question the evolutionary advantage of integrating CikA into the cyanobacterial clock, challenge the conventional construct of separable input and output pathways, and show how easily the cell can adapt to restore phenotype in a severely compromised genetic network. PMID:25385627

  11. Single mutations in sasA enable a simpler ΔcikA gene network architecture with equivalent circadian properties.

    PubMed

    Shultzaberger, Ryan K; Boyd, Joseph S; Katsuki, Takeo; Golden, Susan S; Greenspan, Ralph J

    2014-11-25

    The circadian input kinase of the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus PCC 7942 (CikA) is important both for synchronizing circadian rhythms with external environmental cycles and for transferring temporal information between the oscillator and the global transcriptional regulator RpaA (regulator of phycobilisome-associated A). KOs of cikA result in one of the most severely altered but still rhythmic circadian phenotypes observed. We chemically mutagenized a cikA-null S. elongatus strain and screened for second-site suppressor mutations that could restore normal circadian rhythms. We identified two independent mutations in the Synechococcus adaptive sensor A (sasA) gene that produce nearly WT rhythms of gene expression, likely because they compensate for the loss of CikA on the temporal phosphorylation of RpaA. Additionally, these mutations restore the ability to reset the clock after a short dark pulse through an output-independent pathway, suggesting that SasA can influence entrainment through direct interactions with KaiC, a property previously unattributed to it. These experiments question the evolutionary advantage of integrating CikA into the cyanobacterial clock, challenge the conventional construct of separable input and output pathways, and show how easily the cell can adapt to restore phenotype in a severely compromised genetic network. PMID:25385627

  12. SAS 3 survey of the soft X-ray background

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Clark, G. W.

    1984-01-01

    The results of a survey of the soft X-ray sky in the C band (0.10-0.28keV) are reported. The observations were carried out using two independent flow proportional counters on board the SAS 3 X-ray satellite which had a total angular resolution of 2.9 deg FWHM, and a total exposure of 2.2 x 10 to the 4th per sq cm s sr. It is found that C band counting rates were generally inversely correlated with the column density of the neutral hydrogen on all angular scales down to the lowest angular resolution of the detectors. In the region 90-180 deg l and 0-10 deg b, the relation between C-band rates and the column densities of neutral hydrogen was fitted with a residual rms deviation of less than 13 percent by a two-component numerical model of the X-ray background. For the apparent attenuation column density a value of 2.7 x 10 to the 20th per sq cm was obtained. On the basis of a computer simulation of the SAS 3 data, it is shown that the observed clumping of interstellar matter was consistent with the magnitude of spatial fluctuations in the C-band map. When the background rates were subtracted from the survey map, the subsequent map showed foreground emission and absorption features with improved sensitivity and clarity. A series of computer-generated maps incorporating the SAS 3 data is given in an appendix.

  13. Workmanship vibration test of the SAS-B spacecraft

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Demas, L. J.

    1974-01-01

    The occurrence of a technical problem made it necessary to remove the transmitter from the SAS-B spacecraft. The transmitter was repaired and reinstalled in the spacecraft. After this operation it was necessary to test the mechanical properties of the reassembled spacecraft in a vibration test to be conducted near the spacecraft launching place on the San Marco Range in the Indian Ocean. A vibration system was, therefore, sent to San Marco. The design of the vibration system is discussed, giving attention also to alternative solutions for conducting the required tests.

  14. [Influence of enzymatic hydrolyzate of mussel meat on growth and some indicators of general adaptation syndrome in rats].

    PubMed

    Sidorova, Iu S; Seliaskin, K E; Zorin, S N; Abramova, L S; Mazo, V K

    2014-01-01

    78 ng/ml), treated with EMM, compared to stressed animals of group 2 that received a casein diet (834 ± 167 ng/ml). It has been shown that consumption of EMM with a high content of short and medium peptides has an impact on effectiveness of body weight gain of growing laboratory animals, and restrict the increase of corticosterone level in rats blood, which is typical for general adaptation syndrome. PMID:25549471

  15. Recent high energy gamma-ray results from SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.; Ogelman, H. B.; Ozel, M. E.; Tumer, T.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Recent developments in gamma-ray astronomy due to the results from SAS-2 have focused on two areas. First, the emission from the plane of the Galaxy is the dominant feature in the gamma-ray sky. The galactic latitude and longitude distributions are consistent with the concept that the high-energy radiation originates from cosmic rays interacting with interstellar matter, and the measurements support a galactic origin for cosmic rays. Second, searches of the SAS-2 data for emission from localized sources have shown three strong discrete gamma-ray sources: the Crab nebula and PSR 0531 + 21, the Vela supernova remnant and PSR 0833-45, and a source near galactic coordinates 193 deg longitude, +3 deg latitude, which does not appear to be associated with other known celestial objects. Evidence has also been found for pulsed gamma-ray emission from two other radio pulsars, PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46. A localized source near longitudes 76-80 deg may be associated with the X-ray source Cyg X-3.

  16. Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents (SAS-A): Measuring Social Anxiety among Finnish Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ranta, Klaus; Junttila, Niina; Laakkonen, Eero; Uhmavaara, Anni; La Greca, Annette M.; Niemi, Paivi M.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate symptoms of social anxiety and the psychometric properties of the "Social Anxiety Scale for Adolescents" (SAS-A) among Finnish adolescents, 13-16 years of age. Study 1 (n = 867) examined the distribution of SAS-A scores according to gender and age, and the internal consistency and factor structure of the…

  17. Mechanisms of HsSAS-6 assembly promoting centriole formation in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Keller, Debora; Orpinell, Meritxell; Olivier, Nicolas; Wachsmuth, Malte; Mahen, Robert; Wyss, Romain; Hachet, Virginie; Ellenberg, Jan; Manley, Suliana; Gönczy, Pierre

    2014-01-01

    SAS-6 proteins are thought to impart the ninefold symmetry of centrioles, but the mechanisms by which their assembly occurs within cells remain elusive. In this paper, we provide evidence that the N-terminal, coiled-coil, and C-terminal domains of HsSAS-6 are each required for procentriole formation in human cells. Moreover, the coiled coil is necessary and sufficient to mediate HsSAS-6 centrosomal targeting. High-resolution imaging reveals that GFP-tagged HsSAS-6 variants localize in a torus around the base of the parental centriole before S phase, perhaps indicative of an initial loading platform. Moreover, fluorescence recovery after photobleaching analysis demonstrates that HsSAS-6 is immobilized progressively at centrosomes during cell cycle progression. Using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy and three-dimensional stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, we uncover that HsSAS-6 is present in the cytoplasm primarily as a homodimer and that its oligomerization into a ninefold symmetrical ring occurs at centrioles. Together, our findings lead us to propose a mechanism whereby HsSAS-6 homodimers are targeted to centrosomes where the local environment and high concentration of HsSAS-6 promote oligomerization, thus initiating procentriole formation. PMID:24590172

  18. Using SAS/IntrNet for Evaluating Web-Based Courses.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yu, Chong-ho; Jannasch-Pennell, Angel; Digangi, Sam; Wasson, Barnaby

    1998-01-01

    Describes the use of SAS/IntrNet, a Web service rather than a Web server, to evaluate and enhance university level Web-based courses. IntrNet provides the ability to create both static and dynamic Web pages, using Web publishing tools to convert SAS output to hypertext markup language for the creation of static Web pages. (Author/LRW)

  19. From the "Springfield Development Program" to the "21st Century School Administrator Skills (SAS) Program."

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bradshaw, Lynn; Buckner, Kermit

    This paper discusses the use of simulations in the professional development of school leaders. It compares two National Association of Secondary School Principal (NASSP) programs: the "Springfield Development Program" and the "21st Century School Administrator Skills Program" (SAS) and identifies the characteristics of SAS that are aligned with…

  20. Evolving experience with prevention and treatment of splenic artery syndrome after orthotopic liver transplantation.

    PubMed

    Mogl, Martina T; Nüssler, Natascha C; Presser, Sabine J; Podrabsky, Petr; Denecke, Timm; Grieser, Christian; Neuhaus, Peter; Guckelberger, Olaf

    2010-08-01

    Impaired hepatic arterial perfusion after orthotopic liver transplantation (OLT) may lead to ischemic biliary tract lesions and graft-loss. Hampered hepatic arterial blood flow is observed in patients with hypersplenism, often described as arterial steal syndrome (ASS). However, arterial and portal perfusions are directly linked via the hepatic arterial buffer response (HABR). Recently, the term 'splenic artery syndrome' (SAS) was coined to describe the effect of portal hyperperfusion leading to diminished hepatic arterial blood flow. We retrospectively analyzed 650 transplantations in 585 patients. According to preoperative imaging, 78 patients underwent prophylactic intraoperative ligation of the splenic artery. In case of postoperative SAS, coil-embolization of the splenic artery was performed. After exclusion of 14 2nd and 3rd retransplantations and 83 procedures with arterial interposition grafts, SAS was diagnosed in 28 of 553 transplantations (5.1%). Twenty-six patients were treated with coil-embolization, leading to improved liver function, but requiring postinterventional splenectomy in two patients. Additionally, two patients with SAS underwent splenectomy or retransplantation without preceding embolization. Prophylactic ligation could not prevent SAS entirely (n = 2), but resulted in a significantly lower rate of complications than postoperative coil-embolization. We recommend prophylactic ligation of the splenic artery for patients at risk of developing SAS. Post-transplant coil-embolization of the splenic artery corrected hemodynamic changes of SAS, but was associated with a significant morbidity. PMID:20180930

  1. [Standardization of the Greek version of Zung's Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS)].

    PubMed

    Samakouri, M; Bouhos, G; Kadoglou, M; Giantzelidou, A; Tsolaki, K; Livaditis, M

    2012-01-01

    Self-rating Anxiety Scale (SAS), introduced by Zung, has been widely used in research and in clinical practice for the detection of anxiety. The present study aims at standardizing the Greek version of SAS. SAS consists of 20 items rated on a 1-4 likert type scale. The total SAS score may vary from 20 (no anxiety at all) to 80 (severe anxiety). Two hundred and fifty four participants (114 male and 140 female), psychiatric patients, physically ill and general population individuals, aged 45.40±11.35 years, completed the following: (a) a demographic characteristics' questionnaire, (b) the SAS Greek version, (c) the Spielberg's Modified Greek State-Trait Anxiety Scale (STAI-Gr.-X) and (d) the Zung Depression Rating Scale (ZDRS). Seventy six participants answered the SAS twice within a 12th-day median period of time. The following parameters were calculated: (a) internal consistency of the SAS in terms of Cronbach's α co-efficient, (b) its test-retest reliability in terms of the Intraclass Correlation Coefficient (ICC) and (c) its concurrent and convergent validities through its score's Spearman's rho correlations with both the state and trait subscales of STAI-Gr X and the ZDRS. In addition, in order to evaluate SAS' discriminant validity, the scale's scores of the three groups of participants (psychiatric patients, physically ill and general population individuals) were compared among each other, in terms of Kruskall Wallis and Mann Whitney U tests. SAS Cronbach's alpha equals 0.897 while ICC regarding its test-retest reliability equals 0.913. Spearman's rho concerning validity: (a) when SAS is compared to STAI-Gr.-X (state), equals it 0.767, (b) when SAS is compared to STAI-Gr. X (trait), it equals 0.802 and (c) when SAS is compared to ZDRS, it equals 0.835. The mentally ill scored significantly higher in SAS compared to both the healthy and the general population. In conclusion, the SAS Greek version presents very satisfactory psychometric properties regarding

  2. Genomic structure of SAS, a member of the transmembrane 4 superfamily amplified in human sarcomas

    SciTech Connect

    Jankowski, S.A.; De Jong, P.; Meltzer, P.S.

    1995-01-20

    SAS is a recently identified member of the transmembrane 4 superfamily (TM4SF) that is frequently amplified in human sarcomas. To further its characterization and to confirm its classification, the genomic structure of the SAS gene was determined. The SAS gene covers approximately 3.2 kb of DNA. It contains six exons within its translated region, three of which are highly conserved in the TM4SF. 5{prime} to the translation start site are two putative transcription start sites, two CCAAT consensus sequences, and potential binding sites for both Sp1 and ATF transcription factors. Comparison of SAS organization to human ME491, CD9, and CD53 and murine CD53 and TAPA-1 confirms that SAS is a member of this family of genes and is consistent with the theory that these genes arose through duplication and divergent evolution. 44 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. SAS-2 observations of gamma rays from the galactic plane

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.

    1973-01-01

    The SAS-2 gamma ray experiment has made measurements on the high energy gamma rays coming from the galactic center region. The gamma radiation in this region is very much more intense than in the anticenter region, in agreement with the observations made with the OSO-3 experiment of Kraushaar et al. (1973); and exhibits a narrow distribution along the plane which is nearly uniform in intensity from 330 deg to 30 deg. The energy spectrum in the range from 35 MeV to 210 MeV is quite flat, consistent with a cosmic ray-interstellar matter interaction pion-decay spectrum, or a mixture of this spectrum and a spectrum formed by Compton radiation from cosmic ray electrons. The intensity of the radiation in the anticenter direction is consistent with that expected from the cosmic ray-interstellar matter interaction origin, namely 0.000.002 photons.

  4. SAS-2 galactic gamma ray results. 2. Localized sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1976-01-01

    Gamma-ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR1818-04 and PSR1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma-ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Since the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma-ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma-ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. Using distance estimates it is found that PSR1818-04 has a gamma-ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, while the luminosities of PSR1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. This survey of SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations has also yielded upper limits to gamma-ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars.

  5. Centriolar CPAP/SAS-4 Imparts Slow Processive Microtubule Growth.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Ashwani; Aher, Amol; Dynes, Nicola J; Frey, Daniel; Katrukha, Eugene A; Jaussi, Rolf; Grigoriev, Ilya; Croisier, Marie; Kammerer, Richard A; Akhmanova, Anna; Gönczy, Pierre; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-05-23

    Centrioles are fundamental and evolutionarily conserved microtubule-based organelles whose assembly is characterized by microtubule growth rates that are orders of magnitude slower than those of cytoplasmic microtubules. Several centriolar proteins can interact with tubulin or microtubules, but how they ensure the exceptionally slow growth of centriolar microtubules has remained mysterious. Here, we bring together crystallographic, biophysical, and reconstitution assays to demonstrate that the human centriolar protein CPAP (SAS-4 in worms and flies) binds and "caps" microtubule plus ends by associating with a site of β-tubulin engaged in longitudinal tubulin-tubulin interactions. Strikingly, we uncover that CPAP activity dampens microtubule growth and stabilizes microtubules by inhibiting catastrophes and promoting rescues. We further establish that the capping function of CPAP is important to limit growth of centriolar microtubules in cells. Our results suggest that CPAP acts as a molecular lid that ensures slow assembly of centriolar microtubules and, thereby, contributes to organelle length control. PMID:27219064

  6. Different Effects of Startling Acoustic Stimuli (SAS) on TMS-Induced Responses at Rest and during Sustained Voluntary Contraction.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Li, Shengai; Zhou, Ping; Li, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a habituated startling acoustic stimulus (SAS) can cause a transient suppression of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during light muscle contraction. However, it is still unknown whether this phenomenon persists when at rest or during a sustained voluntary contraction task. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a conditioning SAS has different effects. TMS was delivered to the hot spot for the left biceps on 11 subjects at rest both with and without a conditioning SAS. Of the 11subjects, 9 also had TMS delivered during isometric flexion of the left elbow, also with and without a conditioning SAS. TMS-induced MEPs, TMS-induced force, and silent periods were used to determine the effect of conditioning SAS. Consistent with previous findings, TMS-induced MEPs were smaller with a conditioning SAS (0.49 ± 0.37 mV) as compared without the SAS (0.69 ± 0.52 mV) at rest. However, a conditioning SAS during the voluntary contraction tasks resulted in a significant shortening of the MEP silent period (187.22 ± 22.99 ms with SAS vs. 200.56 ± 29.71 ms without SAS) without any changes in the amplitude of the MEP (1.37 ± 0.9 mV with SAS V.S. 1.32 ± 0.92 mV without SAS) or the TMS-induced force (3.11 ± 2.03 N-m with SAS V.S. 3.62 ± 1.33 N-m without SAS). Our results provide novel evidence that a conditioning SAS has different effects on the excitability of the motor cortex when at rest or during sustained voluntary contractions. PMID:27547181

  7. Different Effects of Startling Acoustic Stimuli (SAS) on TMS-Induced Responses at Rest and during Sustained Voluntary Contraction

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yen-Ting; Li, Shengai; Zhou, Ping; Li, Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that a habituated startling acoustic stimulus (SAS) can cause a transient suppression of motor evoked potentials (MEPs) induced by transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) during light muscle contraction. However, it is still unknown whether this phenomenon persists when at rest or during a sustained voluntary contraction task. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine whether a conditioning SAS has different effects. TMS was delivered to the hot spot for the left biceps on 11 subjects at rest both with and without a conditioning SAS. Of the 11subjects, 9 also had TMS delivered during isometric flexion of the left elbow, also with and without a conditioning SAS. TMS-induced MEPs, TMS-induced force, and silent periods were used to determine the effect of conditioning SAS. Consistent with previous findings, TMS-induced MEPs were smaller with a conditioning SAS (0.49 ± 0.37 mV) as compared without the SAS (0.69 ± 0.52 mV) at rest. However, a conditioning SAS during the voluntary contraction tasks resulted in a significant shortening of the MEP silent period (187.22 ± 22.99 ms with SAS vs. 200.56 ± 29.71 ms without SAS) without any changes in the amplitude of the MEP (1.37 ± 0.9 mV with SAS V.S. 1.32 ± 0.92 mV without SAS) or the TMS-induced force (3.11 ± 2.03 N-m with SAS V.S. 3.62 ± 1.33 N-m without SAS). Our results provide novel evidence that a conditioning SAS has different effects on the excitability of the motor cortex when at rest or during sustained voluntary contractions. PMID:27547181

  8. Analyzing product test data in a relational database using SAS software

    SciTech Connect

    Orman, J.L.

    1991-01-01

    SAS software is being used to analyze product test data stored in an INGRES relational database. The database has been implemented at Allied-Signal in Kansas City on a Digital Equipment Corporation (DEC) VAX computer. The INGRES application development has been a joint project between Sandia National Laboratories and Allied-Signal. Application screens have been developed so that the user can query the database for selected data. Fourth generation language procedures are used to retrieve all data requested. FORTRAN and VAX/VMS DCL (DIGITAL Control Language) procedures are invoked from the application to create SAS data sets and dynamically build SAS programs that are executed to build custom reports or graphically display the retrieved test data along with control and specification limits. A retrieval screen has also been developed which invokes SAS software to calculate the mean and standard deviation of the retrieved data. These parameters are passed back into the application for display and may then be used as an aid in setting new control limits for future test runs. Screens have been developed to provide an interface for the user to select from a library of SAS programs, edit the selected program, and run the program with a user-defined SAS data set as input. This paper will give a brief description of the application screens and provide details of how information is passed between the application and SAS programs.

  9. You need this done by when '': Increasing your efficiency with the SAS reg sign system

    SciTech Connect

    DeHaan, M.S.

    1992-01-01

    The SAS Institute publication -- SAS Programming Tips: A Guide to Efficient SAS Processing defines efficiency as obtaining more results from fewer computer or human resources.'' While this publication contains many very useful tips, it seems to concentrate mostly on computer efficiency. This paper will focus on ways of increasing your efficiency in developing, writing, and debugging SAS programs, i.e. increasing human efficiency. In my job as a consulting statistician, my programs are usually one-run programs. That is, I develop and test a program, then I run them once to get the results I need, and the program is typically never used again. Even for multiple run jobs, the greatest expense by far is the time used to develop a program, and any CPU/hardware expense'' is relatively insignificant. I believe that this is true for most SAS system users and that not enough attention has been given to this aspect of cost''. While most of these tips and techniques were developed under the PC platform, nearly all are applicable and useful under all SAS supported platforms. Some of the tips the experienced SAS programmer may already be familiar with, but many should be new and useful to both novice and veteran users.

  10. ``You need this done by when?``: Increasing your efficiency with the SAS{reg_sign} system

    SciTech Connect

    DeHaan, M.S.

    1992-08-01

    The SAS Institute publication -- SAS Programming Tips: A Guide to Efficient SAS Processing defines efficiency as ``obtaining more results from fewer computer or human resources.`` While this publication contains many very useful tips, it seems to concentrate mostly on computer efficiency. This paper will focus on ways of increasing your efficiency in developing, writing, and debugging SAS programs, i.e. increasing human efficiency. In my job as a consulting statistician, my programs are usually one-run programs. That is, I develop and test a program, then I run them once to get the results I need, and the program is typically never used again. Even for multiple run jobs, the greatest expense by far is the time used to develop a program, and any CPU/hardware ``expense`` is relatively insignificant. I believe that this is true for most SAS system users and that not enough attention has been given to this aspect of ``cost``. While most of these tips and techniques were developed under the PC platform, nearly all are applicable and useful under all SAS supported platforms. Some of the tips the experienced SAS programmer may already be familiar with, but many should be new and useful to both novice and veteran users.

  11. Variants at multiple loci implicated in both innate and adaptive immune responses are associated with Sjögren’s syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lessard, Christopher J.; Li, He; Adrianto, Indra; Ice, John A.; Rasmussen, Astrid; Grundahl, Kiely M.; Kelly, Jennifer A.; Dozmorov, Mikhail G.; Miceli-Richard, Corinne; Bowman, Simon; Lester, Sue; Eriksson, Per; Eloranta, Maija-Leena; Brun, Johan G.; Gøransson, Lasse G.; Harboe, Erna; Guthridge, Joel M.; Kaufman, Kenneth M.; Kvarnström, Marika; Jazebi, Helmi; Graham, Deborah S. Cunninghame; Grandits, Martha E.; Nazmul-Hossain, Abu N. M.; Patel, Ketan; Adler, Adam J.; Maier-Moore, Jacen S.; Farris, A. Darise; Brennan, Michael T.; Lessard, James A.; Chodosh, James; Gopalakrishnan, Rajaram; Hefner, Kimberly S.; Houston, Glen D.; Huang, Andrew J.W.; Hughes, Pamela J.; Lewis, David M.; Radfar, Lida; Rohrer, Michael D.; Stone, Donald U.; Wren, Jonathan D.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Gaffney, Patrick M.; James, Judith A.; Omdal, Roald; Wahren-Herlenius, Marie; Illei, Gabor G.; Witte, Torsten; Jonsson, Roland; Rischmueller, Maureen; Rönnblom, Lars; Nordmark, Gunnel; Ng, Wan-Fai; Mariette, Xavier; Anaya, Juan-Manuel; Rhodus, Nelson L.; Segal, Barbara M.; Scofield, R. Hal; Montgomery, Courtney G.; Harley, John B.; Sivils, Kathy L. Moser

    2013-01-01

    Sjögren’s syndrome is a common autoimmune disease (~0.7% of European Americans) typically presenting as keratoconjunctivitis sicca and xerostomia. In addition to strong association within the HLA region at 6p21 (Pmeta=7.65×10−114), we establish associations with IRF5-TNPO3 (Pmeta=2.73×10−19), STAT4 (Pmeta=6.80×10−15), IL12A (Pmeta =1.17×10−10), FAM167A-BLK (Pmeta=4.97×10−10), DDX6-CXCR5 (Pmeta=1.10×10−8), and TNIP1 (Pmeta=3.30×10−8). Suggestive associations with Pmeta<5×10−5 were observed with 29 regions including TNFAIP3, PTTG1, PRDM1, DGKQ, FCGR2A, IRAK1BP1, ITSN2, and PHIP amongst others. These results highlight the importance of genes involved in both innate and adaptive immunity in Sjögren’s syndrome. PMID:24097067

  12. SIMPOLYCAT: An SAS Program for Conducting CAT Simulation Based on Polytomous IRT Models

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Ssu-Kuang; Cook, Karon F.

    2009-01-01

    A real-data simulation of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) is an important step in real life CAT applications. Such a simulation allows CAT developers to evaluate important features of the CAT system such as item selection and stopping rules before live testing. SIMPOLYCAT, an SAS macro program, was created by the authors to conduct real-data CAT simulation based on polytomous item response theory (IRT) models. In SIMPOLYCAT, item responses can be input from an external file or generated internally based on item parameters provided by users. The program allows users to choose among methods of setting initial θ, approaches to item selection, trait estimators, CAT stopping criteria, polytomous IRT models, and other CAT parameters. In addition, CAT simulation results can be saved easily and used for further study. The purpose of this article is to introduce SIMPOLYCAT, briefly describe the program algorithm and parameters, and provide examples of CAT simulations using generated and real data. Visual comparisons of the results obtained from the CAT simulations are presented. PMID:19363190

  13. Semantic Verbal Fluency Pattern, Dementia Rating Scores and Adaptive Behavior Correlate With Plasma Aβ42 Concentrations in Down Syndrome Young Adults

    PubMed Central

    Hoyo, Laura Del; Xicota, Laura; Sánchez-Benavides, Gonzalo; Cuenca-Royo, Aida; de Sola, Susana; Langohr, Klaus; Fagundo, Ana B.; Farré, Magí; Dierssen, Mara; de la Torre, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is an intellectual disability (ID) disorder in which language and specifically, verbal fluency are strongly impaired domains; nearly all adults show neuropathology of Alzheimer’s disease (AD), including amyloid deposition by their fifth decade of life. In the general population, verbal fluency deficits are considered a strong AD predictor being the semantic verbal fluency task (SVFT) a useful tool for enhancing early diagnostic. However, there is a lack of information about the association between the semantic verbal fluency pattern (SVFP) and the biological amyloidosis markers in DS. In the current study, we used the SVFT in young adults with DS to characterize their SVFP, assessing total generated words, clustering, and switching. We then explored its association with early indicators of dementia, adaptive behavior and amyloidosis biomarkers, using the Dementia Questionnaire for Persons with Intellectual Disability (DMR), the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition (ABAS-II), and plasma levels of Aβ peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42), as a potent biomarker of AD. In DS, worse performance in SVFT and poorer communication skills were associated with higher plasma Aβ42 concentrations, a higher DMR score and impaired communication skills (ABAS–II). The total word production and switching ability in SVFT were good indicators of plasma Aβ42 concentration. In conclusion, we propose the SVFT as a good screening test for early detection of dementia and amyloidosis in young adults with DS. PMID:26635555

  14. Semantic Verbal Fluency Pattern, Dementia Rating Scores and Adaptive Behavior Correlate With Plasma Aβ42 Concentrations in Down Syndrome Young Adults.

    PubMed

    Hoyo, Laura Del; Xicota, Laura; Sánchez-Benavides, Gonzalo; Cuenca-Royo, Aida; de Sola, Susana; Langohr, Klaus; Fagundo, Ana B; Farré, Magí; Dierssen, Mara; de la Torre, Rafael

    2015-01-01

    Down syndrome (DS) is an intellectual disability (ID) disorder in which language and specifically, verbal fluency are strongly impaired domains; nearly all adults show neuropathology of Alzheimer's disease (AD), including amyloid deposition by their fifth decade of life. In the general population, verbal fluency deficits are considered a strong AD predictor being the semantic verbal fluency task (SVFT) a useful tool for enhancing early diagnostic. However, there is a lack of information about the association between the semantic verbal fluency pattern (SVFP) and the biological amyloidosis markers in DS. In the current study, we used the SVFT in young adults with DS to characterize their SVFP, assessing total generated words, clustering, and switching. We then explored its association with early indicators of dementia, adaptive behavior and amyloidosis biomarkers, using the Dementia Questionnaire for Persons with Intellectual Disability (DMR), the Adaptive Behavior Assessment System-Second Edition (ABAS-II), and plasma levels of Aβ peptides (Aβ40 and Aβ42), as a potent biomarker of AD. In DS, worse performance in SVFT and poorer communication skills were associated with higher plasma Aβ42 concentrations, a higher DMR score and impaired communication skills (ABAS-II). The total word production and switching ability in SVFT were good indicators of plasma Aβ42 concentration. In conclusion, we propose the SVFT as a good screening test for early detection of dementia and amyloidosis in young adults with DS. PMID:26635555

  15. Pathogenicity and genetic characteristics associated with cell adaptation of a virulent porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus nsp2 DEL strain CA-2.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seung-Chul; Choi, Hwan-Won; Nam, Eeuri; Noh, Yun-Hee; Lee, Sunhee; Lee, Yoo Jin; Park, Gun-Seok; Shin, Jae-Ho; Yoon, In-Joong; Kang, Shien-Young; Lee, Changhee

    2016-04-15

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) is the most common and world-widespread viral pathogen of swine. We previously reported genomic sequences and pathogenicity of type 2 Korean PRRSV strains belonging to the virulent lineage 1 family, which contain remarkable amino acid deletions in nonstructural protein 2 (nsp2 DEL) compared to VR-2332. Here, a virulent type 2 Korean PRRSV nsp2 DEL strain, CA-2, was serially propagated in MARC-145 cells for up to 100 passages (CA-2-P100). As the passage number increased, the phenotypic characteristics of cell-adapted CA-2 strains were altered, in terms of higher viral titers and larger plaque sizes compared to the parental virus. Pro-inflammatory cytokine genes, including TNF-α, IL-8, MCP-1, and MCP-2, were found to be significantly down-regulated in PAM cells with the CA-2-P100 strain compared to its parental nsp2 DEL virus. Animal inoculation studies demonstrated that the virulence of CA-2-P100 was reduced significantly, with showing normal weight gain, body temperatures, and lung lesions comparable to the control group. Furthermore, high-passage CA-2-P100 showed declined and transient viremia kinetics, as well as delayed and low PRRSV-specific antibody responses in infected pigs. In addition, we determined whole genome sequences of low to high-passage derivatives of CA-2. The nsp2 DEL pattern was conserved for 100 passages, whereas no other deletions or insertions arose during the cell adaptation process. However, CA-2-P100 possessed 54 random nucleotide substitutions that resulted in 27 amino acid changes distributed throughout the genome, suggesting that these genetic drifts provide a possible molecular basis correlated with the cell-adapted features in vitro and the attenuated phenotype in vivo. Taken together, our data indicate that the cell-attenuated CA-2-P100 strain is a promising candidate for developing a safe and effective live PRRSV vaccine. PMID:27016772

  16. The presence of alpha interferon at the time of infection alters the innate and adaptive immune responses to porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus.

    PubMed

    Brockmeier, Susan L; Loving, Crystal L; Nelson, Eric A; Miller, Laura C; Nicholson, Tracy L; Register, Karen B; Grubman, Marvin J; Brough, Douglas E; Kehrli, Marcus E

    2012-04-01

    Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome (PRRS) is one of the most devastating and costly diseases to the swine industry worldwide. Overall, the adaptive immune response to PRRS virus (PRRSV) is weak, which results in delayed elimination of virus from the host and inferior vaccine protection. PRRSV has been shown to induce a meager alpha interferon (IFN-α) response, and we hypothesized that elevated IFN-α levels early in infection would shorten the induction time and increase elements of the adaptive immune response. To test this, we measured both antibody and cell-mediated immunity in pigs after the administration of a nonreplicating human adenovirus type 5 vector expressing porcine IFN-α (Ad5-pIFN-α) at the time of PRRSV infection and compared the results to those for pigs infected with PRRSV alone. Viremia was delayed, and there was a decrease in viral load in the sera of pigs administered the Ad5-pIFN-α. Although seroconversion was slightly delayed in pigs receiving Ad5-pIFN-α, probably due to the early reduction in viral replication, little difference in the overall or neutralizing antibody response was seen. However, there was an increase in the number of virus-specific IFN-γ-secreting cells detected in the pigs receiving Ad5-pIFN-α, as well as an altered cytokine profile in the lung at 14 days postinfection, indicating that the presence of IFN-α at the time of infection can alter innate and adaptive immune responses to PRRSV. PMID:22301694

  17. IASGA: A SAS MACRO Program for Interrater Agreement Studies of Qualitative Data via a Generalizability Approach.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Li, Mao-Neng Fred; Lautenschlager, Gary J.

    1999-01-01

    Describes a Statistical Analysis System (SAS) MACRO for computing various indices of interrater agreement, including a new generalizability coefficient, for categorical data in a single-facet, crossed design. (Author/SLD)

  18. Multifractal spectra of laser Doppler flowmetry signals in healthy and sleep apnea syndrome subjects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buard, Benjamin; Trzepizur, Wojciech; Mahe, Guillaume; Chapeau-Blondeau, François; Rousseau, David; Gagnadoux, Frédéric; Abraham, Pierre; Humeau, Anne

    2009-07-01

    Laser Doppler flowmetry (LDF) signals give a peripheral view of the cardiovascular system. To better understand the possible modifications brought by sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) in LDF signals, we herein propose to analyze the complexity of such signals in obstructive SAS subjects, and to compare the results with those obtained in healthy subjects. SAS is a pathology that leads to a drop in the parasympathetic tone associated with an increase in the sympathetic tone in awakens SAS patients. Nine men with obstructive SAS and nine healthy men participated awaken in our study and LDF signals were recorded in the forearm. In our work, complexity of LDF signals is analyzed through the computation and analysis of their multifractal spectra. The multifractal spectra are estimated by first estimating the discrete partition function of the signals, then by determining their Renyi exponents with a linear regression, and finally by computing their Legendre transform. The results show that, at rest, obstructive SAS has no or little impact on the multifractal spectra of LDF signals recorded in the forearm. This study shows that the physiological modifications brought by obstructive SAS do not modify the complexity of LDF signals when recorded in the forearm.

  19. A note on the estimation of the multinomial logistic model with correlated responses in SAS.

    PubMed

    Kuss, Oliver; McLerran, Dale

    2007-09-01

    We show how multinomial logistic models with correlated responses can be estimated within SAS software. To achieve this, random effects and marginal models are introduced and the respective SAS code is given. An example data set on physicians' recommendations and preferences in traumatic brain injury rehabilitation is used for illustration. The main motivation for this work are two recent papers that recommend estimating multinomial logistic models with correlated responses by using a Poisson likelihood which is statistically correct but computationally inefficient. PMID:17686544

  20. SAS 2 observation of pulsed high-energy gamma radiation from Geminga

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mattox, J. R.; Bertsch, D. L.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Following the detection of pulsed X-rays and gamma rays from Geminga, the 1972-1973 SAS 2 data which first revealed this source have been reanalyzed. The 237 ms periodicity is visible in those observations. The phase of the SAS 2 periodicity is consistent with that of COS B suggesting that the gamma-ray data allow an accounting for every revolution of the Geminga pulsar between 1972 and 1982.

  1. Data Transfer Software-SAS MetaData Server & Phoenix Integration Model Center

    2010-04-15

    This software is a plug-in that interfaces between the Phoenix Integration's Model Center and the Base SAS 9.2 applications. The end use of the plug-in is to link input and output data that resides in SAS tables or MS SQL to and from "legacy" software programs without recoding. The potential end users are users who need to run legacy code and want data stored in a SQL database.

  2. The small tellurium-based compound SAS suppresses inflammation in human retinal pigment epithelium

    PubMed Central

    Livnat, Tami; Halpert, Gilad; Jawad, Shayma; Nisgav, Yael; Azar-Avivi, Shirley; Liu, Baoying; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Weinberger, Dov; Sredni, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Pathological angiogenesis and chronic inflammation greatly contribute to the development of choroidal neovascularization (CNV) in chorioretinal diseases involving abnormal contact between retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) and endothelial cells (ECs), associated with Bruch’s membrane rupture. We explored the ability of the small organotellurium compound octa-O-bis-(R,R)-tartarate ditellurane (SAS) to mitigate inflammatory processes in human RPE cells. Methods Cell adhesion assays and analyses of gene and protein expression were used to examine the effect of SAS on ARPE-19 cells or primary human RPE cells that were grown alone or in an RPE-EC co-culture. Results Adhesion assays showed that SAS inhibited αv integrins expressed on RPE cells. Co-cultures of RPE cells with ECs significantly reduced the gene expression of PEDF, as compared to RPE cells cultured alone. Both SAS and the anti-αvβ3 antibody LM609 significantly enhanced the production of PEDF at both mRNA and protein levels in RPE cells. RPE cells co-cultured with EC exhibited increased gene expression of CXCL5, COX1, MMP2, IGF1, and IL8, all of which are involved in both angiogenesis and inflammation. The enhanced expression of these genes was greatly suppressed by SAS, but interestingly, remained unaffected by LM609. Zymography assay showed that SAS reduced the level of MMP-2 activity in RPE cells. We also found that SAS significantly suppressed IL-1β-induced IL-6 expression and secretion from RPE cells by reducing the protein levels of phospho-IkappaBalpha (pIκBα). Conclusions Our results suggest that SAS is a promising anti-inflammatory agent in RPE cells, and may be an effective therapeutic approach for controlling chorioretinal diseases. PMID:27293373

  3. SAS-6 engineering reveals interdependence between cartwheel and microtubules in determining centriole architecture.

    PubMed

    Hilbert, Manuel; Noga, Akira; Frey, Daniel; Hamel, Virginie; Guichard, Paul; Kraatz, Sebastian H W; Pfreundschuh, Moritz; Hosner, Sarah; Flückiger, Isabelle; Jaussi, Rolf; Wieser, Mara M; Thieltges, Katherine M; Deupi, Xavier; Müller, Daniel J; Kammerer, Richard A; Gönczy, Pierre; Hirono, Masafumi; Steinmetz, Michel O

    2016-04-01

    Centrioles are critical for the formation of centrosomes, cilia and flagella in eukaryotes. They are thought to assemble around a nine-fold symmetric cartwheel structure established by SAS-6 proteins. Here, we have engineered Chlamydomonas reinhardtii SAS-6-based oligomers with symmetries ranging from five- to ten-fold. Expression of a SAS-6 mutant that forms six-fold symmetric cartwheel structures in vitro resulted in cartwheels and centrioles with eight- or nine-fold symmetries in vivo. In combination with Bld10 mutants that weaken cartwheel-microtubule interactions, this SAS-6 mutant produced six- to eight-fold symmetric cartwheels. Concurrently, the microtubule wall maintained eight- and nine-fold symmetries. Expressing SAS-6 with analogous mutations in human cells resulted in nine-fold symmetric centrioles that exhibited impaired length and organization. Together, our data suggest that the self-assembly properties of SAS-6 instruct cartwheel symmetry, and lead us to propose a model in which the cartwheel and the microtubule wall assemble in an interdependent manner to establish the native architecture of centrioles. PMID:26999736

  4. SAS-2 galactic gamma-ray results. 2: Localized sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Oegelman, H.; Oezel, M. E.; Tuemer, T.

    1977-01-01

    Gamma ray emission was detected from the radio pulsars PSR 1818-04 and PSR 1747-46, in addition to the previously reported gamma ray emission from the Crab and Vela pulsars. Because the Crab pulsar is the only one observed in the optical and X-ray bands, these gamma ray observations suggest a uniquely gamma ray phenomenon occurring in a fraction of the radio pulsars. PSR 1818-04 has a gamma ray luminosity comparable to that of the Crab pulsar, whereas the luminosities of PSR 1747-46 and the Vela pulsar are approximately an order of magnitude lower. SAS-2 data for pulsar correlations yielded upper limits to gamma ray luminosity for 71 other radio pulsars. For five of the closest pulsars, upper limits for gamma ray luminosity are found to be at least three orders of magnitude lower than that of the Crab pulsar. Gamma ray enhancement near the Milky Way satellite galaxy and the galactic plane in the Cygnus region is also discussed.

  5. Circinus X-1 - X-ray observations with SAS 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dower, R. G.; Bradt, H. V.; Morgan, E. H.

    1982-01-01

    Eight observations of Cir X-1 with SAS 3, each lasting 1-6 days, have yielded a variety of new phenomena, viz., a luminous state of steady emission, rapid large-intensity dips, an extremely rapid X-ray transition, and bright flares. Through searches for periodic X-ray pulsations were carried out on data trains of duration up to 6 days; upper limits for pulsations with periods greater than 250 microsec range down to 0.3%. Aperiodic variability with characteristic times of 0.4-1.0 sec was observed but is not well characterized by a simple shot noise model. No millisecond bursts were observed during 40,000 sec in three separate observations. Spectral parameters derived before and after several X-ray transitions indicate that the transitions are not due to absorption of X-rays by intervening gas. Models previously proposed for the Cir X-1 system do not easily provide explanations for all the complex phenomena reported herein.

  6. Reexamination of the SAS 2 Cygnus X-3 data

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Lamb, R. C.

    1987-01-01

    Recent observations of Cygnus X-3 have shown marked variability of the radiation on short time scales. In particular, the bursts lasting on the order of 10 minutes, seen in both the infrared and very high energy (greater than 10 to the 11th eV) gamma-ray regions, and the time-variations on many scales at high energies, have stimulated a reanalysis of the March 6 to 13, 1973 SAS 2 high-energy gamma-ray data. Although a clear periodicity in the E greater 35 MeV gamma radiation is observed at the 4.79 hr period seen in X-rays, there is no evidence for major variations of the radiation from one day to the next, and no statistically significant evidence for bursts on the 10-minute time scale seen in the infrared or very high energy ranges. If the excess observed had been predominantly in the form of ten minute bursts even at a rate as high as two/day, a clearly significant set of bursts would have been seen.

  7. SAS molecular tests Salmonella detection kit. Performance tested method 021202.

    PubMed

    Bapanpally, Chandra; Montier, Laura; Khan, Shah; Kasra, Akif; Brunelle, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    The SAS Molecular tests Salmonella Detection method, a Loop-mediated Isothermal Amplification method, performed as well as or better than the U.S. Department of Agriculture-Food Safety Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference methods for ground beef, beef trim, ground turkey, chicken carcass rinses, bagged mixed lettuce, and fresh spinach. The ground beef (30% fat, 25 g test portion), poultry matrixes and leafy greens were validated in a 6-7 h enrichment, and ground beef (30% fat, 375 g composite test portion) and beef trim (375 g composite test portion) were validated in a 16-20 h enrichment. The method performance for meat and leafy green matrixes was shown to be acceptable under conditions of co-enrichment with Escherichia coli 0157. Thus, after a short 6-7 h co-enrichment step, ground beef, beef trim, lettuce, and spinach can be tested for both Salmonella and E. coli O157. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing revealed no false negatives and no false positives among the 100 Salmonella serovars and 30 non-Salmonella species examined. The method was shown to be robust when enrichment time, DNA extract hold time, and DNA volume were varied. PMID:25051629

  8. Cognitive rehabilitation in a child with Joubert Syndrome: Developmental trends and adaptive changes in a single case report.

    PubMed

    Gagliardi, Chiara; Brenna, Viola; Romaniello, Romina; Arrigoni, Filippo; Tavano, Alessandro; Romani, Marta; Valente, Enza Maria; Borgatti, Renato

    2015-12-01

    We report the clinical and rehabilitative follow up of M, a female child carrying a compound heterozygous pathogenic mutations in the TCTN1 gene and affected by Joubert Syndrome (JS). JS is a congenital cerebellar ataxia characterized by "the molar tooth sign" on axial MRI, a pathognomonic neuroradiological malformation involving the cerebellum and brainstem. JS presents with high phenotypic/cognitive variability, and little is known about cognitive rehabilitation programs. We describe the therapeutic settings, intensive rehabilitation targets and outcome indexes in M's cognitive development. Using a single case evidence-based approach, we attempt to distinguish the effectiveness of the intervention from the overall developmental trend. We assume that an adequate amount of focused, goal directed treatment in a relative short period of time can be at least as effective as one provided in longer time, and much less interfering with the child's everyday life. We conclude by discussing specific issues in cognitive development and rehabilitation in JS and, more broadly, in cerebellar malformations. PMID:26489806

  9. Adaptations for marine habitat and the effect of Triassic and Jurassic predator pressure on development of decompression syndrome in ichthyosaurs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rothschild, B. M.; Xiaoting, Z.; Martin, L. D.

    2012-06-01

    Decompression syndrome (caisson disease or the "the bends") resulting in avascular necrosis has been documented in mosasaurs, sauropterygians, ichthyosaurs, and turtles from the Middle Jurassic to Late Cretaceous, but it was unclear that this disease occurred as far back as the Triassic. We have examined a large Triassic sample of ichthyosaurs and compared it with an equally large post-Triassic sample. Avascular necrosis was observed in over 15 % of Late Middle Jurassic to Cretaceous ichthyosaurs with the highest occurrence (18 %) in the Early Cretaceous, but was rare or absent in geologically older specimens. Triassic reptiles that dive were either physiologically protected, or rapid changes of their position in the water column rare and insignificant enough to prevent being recorded in the skeleton. Emergency surfacing due to a threat from an underwater predator may be the most important cause of avascular necrosis for air-breathing divers, with relative frequency of such events documented in the skeleton. Diving in the Triassic appears to have been a "leisurely" behavior until the evolution of large predators in the Late Jurassic that forced sudden depth alterations contributed to a higher occurrence of bends.

  10. [Features of brain mechanisms of regulation of the level of wakefulness, organization of cognitive functions and adaptive reactions in children with attention deficit with hyperactivity syndrome and healthy children].

    PubMed

    Iliukhina, V A; Krivoshchapova, M N; Manzhosova, G V

    2011-01-01

    In work results of research of features of infringement superslow cortical-truncal, limbic-reticular and upsegmentary mechanisms of regulation of a level of wakefulness at children of 6-7 years with a syndrome of deficiency of attention and hyperactivity and healthy children, pupils of 1 class of a comprehensive school with different type of psychological adaptation are generalized. At use system-integrativity psychophysiology the approach features are established: a) organization emotional-motivational and cognitive spheres; b) psychophysiology mechanisms of formation of adaptive reactions at tactile interaction about earlier unknown alive object--a dolphin at the surveyed contingent of healthy and ill children. PMID:21542315

  11. Asperger syndrome and "non-verbal learning problems" in a longitudinal perspective: neuropsychological and social adaptive outcome in early adult life.

    PubMed

    Hagberg, Bibbi S; Nydén, Agneta; Cederlund, Mats; Gillberg, Christopher

    2013-12-15

    Co-existence of Asperger syndrome (AS) and non-verbal learning disability (NLD) has been proposed based on the observation that people with AS tend to have significantly higher verbal than performance IQ (VIQ > PIQ by ≥ 15 points), one of the core features of NLD. In the present study we examined neuropsychological and social adaptive profiles with "non-verbal learning problems" associated with NLD in a group of individuals with AS followed from childhood into early adult life. The group was divided into three subgroups: (i) persistent NLD (P-NLD), i.e. NLD (VIQ > PIQ) both in childhood and early adulthood occasions, (ii) childhood NLD (CO-NLD), i.e. NLD (VIQ > PIQ) only at original diagnosis, or (iii) No NLD (VIQ > PIQ) ever (NO-NLD). All three subgroups were followed prospectively from childhood into adolescence and young adult life. One in four to one in five of the whole group of males with AS had P-NLD. The P-NLD subgroup had poorer neuropsychological outcome in early adult life than did those with CO-NLD and those with NO-NLD. There were no unequivocal markers in early childhood that predicted subgroup status in early adult life, but early motor delay and a history of early speech-language problems tended to be associated with P-NLD. PMID:23871410

  12. Determination and occurrence of secondary alkane sulfonates (SAS) in aquatic environments.

    PubMed

    Baena-Nogueras, Rosa María; González-Mazo, Eduardo; Lara-Martín, Pablo A

    2013-05-01

    A new methodology has been developed for the determination of secondary alkane sulfonates (SAS), an anionic surfactant, in environmental matrices. Sediment and sludge samples were extracted using pressurized liquid extraction and sonication, whereas wastewater and surface water samples were processed using solid-phase extraction. Extraction recoveries were acceptable for both aqueous (78-120%) and solid samples (83-100%). Determination of SAS was carried out by high or ultra performance liquid chromatography - mass spectrometry using ion trap and time-of-flight detectors. The methodology was applied to samples from Guadalete River (SW Spain), where SAS concentrations below 1 μg L(-1) were measured in surface water, and from 72 to 9737 μg kg(-1) in sediments. Differential partitioning was observed for SAS homologues as those having a longer hydrocarbon chain which preferentially sorbed onto particulate matter. A preliminary environmental risk assessment also showed that SAS measured levels were not harmful to the aquatic community in the sampling area. PMID:23421983

  13. SAS-Pro: Simultaneous Residue Assignment and Structure Superposition for Protein Structure Alignment

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Shweta B.; Sahinidis, Nikolaos V.

    2012-01-01

    Protein structure alignment is the problem of determining an assignment between the amino-acid residues of two given proteins in a way that maximizes a measure of similarity between the two superimposed protein structures. By identifying geometric similarities, structure alignment algorithms provide critical insights into protein functional similarities. Existing structure alignment tools adopt a two-stage approach to structure alignment by decoupling and iterating between the assignment evaluation and structure superposition problems. We introduce a novel approach, SAS-Pro, which addresses the assignment evaluation and structure superposition simultaneously by formulating the alignment problem as a single bilevel optimization problem. The new formulation does not require the sequentiality constraints, thus generalizing the scope of the alignment methodology to include non-sequential protein alignments. We employ derivative-free optimization methodologies for searching for the global optimum of the highly nonlinear and non-differentiable RMSD function encountered in the proposed model. Alignments obtained with SAS-Pro have better RMSD values and larger lengths than those obtained from other alignment tools. For non-sequential alignment problems, SAS-Pro leads to alignments with high degree of similarity with known reference alignments. The source code of SAS-Pro is available for download at http://eudoxus.cheme.cmu.edu/saspro/SAS-Pro.html. PMID:22662161

  14. SAS applications for Tai's stability analysis and AMMI model in genotype x environmental interaction (GEI) effects.

    PubMed

    Thillainathan, M; Fernandez, G C

    2001-01-01

    A user-friendly graphical data analysis to perform stability analysis of genotype x environmental interactions, using Tai's stability model and additive main effects and multiplicative interaction (AMMI) biplots, are presented here. This practical approach integrates statistical and graphical analysis tools available in SAS systems and provides user-friendly applications to perform complete stability analyses without writing SAS program statements or using pull-down menu interfaces by running the SAS macros in the background. By using this macro approach, the agronomists and plant breeders can effectively perform stability analysis and spend more time in data exploration, interpretation of graphs, and output, rather than debugging their program errors. The necessary MACRO-CALL files can be downloaded from the author's home page at http://www.ag.unr.edu/gf. The nature and the distinctive features of the graphics produced by these applications are illustrated by using published data. PMID:11535655

  15. A menu system featuring SAS/QC for monitoring alpha detector performance

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-01-01

    Statistical Process Control (SPC) can be described as a systematic method for improving the quality of production processes by analyzing, quantifying, and classifying the variation of processes with the goal of controlling and reducing the variation. It is often difficult to successfully implement and benefit from SPC in a production environment due to problems such as untimely feedback of critical process changes, seemingly unmanageable amounts of data, and lack of training in SPC methodology. The implementation of user-friendly menu systems created using SAS software can be effective in eliminating these problems. This paper addresses a real-life SPC application encountered at the Rocky Flats Nuclear Weapons Plant that was solved using SAS/AF and SAS/QC software under the VMS operating system. Presented is a description of the application, a discussion of the development stages involved with the project, and an overview of additional applications developed for the user. 2 refs., 8 figs.

  16. Burnout syndrome among dental students: a short version of the "Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire" adapted for students (BCSQ-12-SS)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Burnout has been traditionally defined in relation to the dimensions of "exhaustion", "cynicism", and "inefficiency". More recently, the Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire (BCSQ-12) further established three different subtypes of burnout: the "frenetic" subtype (related to "overload"), the "under-challenged" subtype (related to "lack of development"), and the "worn-out" subtype (related to "neglect"). However, to date, these definitions have not been applied to students. The aims of this research were (1) to adapt a Spanish version of the BCSQ-12 for use with students, (2) to test its factorial validity, internal consistency, convergent and discriminant validity, and (3) to assess potential socio-demographic and occupational risk factors associated with the development of the subtypes. Method We used a cross-sectional design on a sample of dental students (n = 314) from Santiago and Huesca universities (Spain). Participants completed the Burnout Clinical Subtype Questionnaire Student Survey (BCSQ-12-SS), the Maslach Burnout Inventory Student Survey (MBI-SS), and a series of socio-demographic and occupational questions formulated for the specific purpose of this study. Data were subjected to exploratory factor analysis (EFA) using the principal component method with varimax orthogonal rotation. To assess the relations with the criterion, we calculated the Pearson correlation coefficient (r), multiple correlation coefficient (Ry.123), and the coefficient of determination (R2y.123). To assess the association between the subtypes and the socio-demographic variables, we examined the adjusted odds ratio (OR) obtained from multivariate logistic regression models. Results Factorial analyses supported the theoretical proposition of the BCSQ-12-SS, with α-values exceeding 0.80 for all dimensions. The "overload-exhaustion" relation was r = 0.59 (p < 0.001), "lack of development"-"cynicism", r = 0.49 (p < 0.001), "neglect"-"inefficiency", r = 0.47 (p < 0

  17. Mycobiome of the Bat White Nose Syndrome Affected Caves and Mines Reveals Diversity of Fungi and Local Adaptation by the Fungal Pathogen Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans

    PubMed Central

    Rajkumar, Sunanda S.; Li, Xiaojiang; Okoniewski, Joseph C.; Hicks, Alan C.; Davis, April D.; Broussard, Kelly; LaDeau, Shannon L.; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    Current investigations of bat White Nose Syndrome (WNS) and the causative fungus Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans (Pd) are intensely focused on the reasons for the appearance of the disease in the Northeast and its rapid spread in the US and Canada. Urgent steps are still needed for the mitigation or control of Pd to save bats. We hypothesized that a focus on fungal community would advance the understanding of ecology and ecosystem processes that are crucial in the disease transmission cycle. This study was conducted in 2010–2011 in New York and Vermont using 90 samples from four mines and two caves situated within the epicenter of WNS. We used culture-dependent (CD) and culture-independent (CI) methods to catalogue all fungi (‘mycobiome’). CD methods included fungal isolations followed by phenotypic and molecular identifications. CI methods included amplification of DNA extracted from environmental samples with universal fungal primers followed by cloning and sequencing. CD methods yielded 675 fungal isolates and CI method yielded 594 fungal environmental nucleic acid sequences (FENAS). The core mycobiome of WNS comprised of 136 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) recovered in culture and 248 OTUs recovered in clone libraries. The fungal community was diverse across the sites, although a subgroup of dominant cosmopolitan fungi was present. The frequent recovery of Pd (18% of samples positive by culture) even in the presence of dominant, cosmopolitan fungal genera suggests some level of local adaptation in WNS-afflicted habitats, while the extensive distribution of Pd (48% of samples positive by real-time PCR) suggests an active reservoir of the pathogen at these sites. These findings underscore the need for integrated disease control measures that target both bats and Pd in the hibernacula for the control of WNS. PMID:25264864

  18. Mycobiome of the bat white nose syndrome affected caves and mines reveals diversity of fungi and local adaptation by the fungal pathogen Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Tao; Victor, Tanya R; Rajkumar, Sunanda S; Li, Xiaojiang; Okoniewski, Joseph C; Hicks, Alan C; Davis, April D; Broussard, Kelly; LaDeau, Shannon L; Chaturvedi, Sudha; Chaturvedi, Vishnu

    2014-01-01

    Current investigations of bat White Nose Syndrome (WNS) and the causative fungus Pseudogymnoascus (Geomyces) destructans (Pd) are intensely focused on the reasons for the appearance of the disease in the Northeast and its rapid spread in the US and Canada. Urgent steps are still needed for the mitigation or control of Pd to save bats. We hypothesized that a focus on fungal community would advance the understanding of ecology and ecosystem processes that are crucial in the disease transmission cycle. This study was conducted in 2010-2011 in New York and Vermont using 90 samples from four mines and two caves situated within the epicenter of WNS. We used culture-dependent (CD) and culture-independent (CI) methods to catalogue all fungi ('mycobiome'). CD methods included fungal isolations followed by phenotypic and molecular identifications. CI methods included amplification of DNA extracted from environmental samples with universal fungal primers followed by cloning and sequencing. CD methods yielded 675 fungal isolates and CI method yielded 594 fungal environmental nucleic acid sequences (FENAS). The core mycobiome of WNS comprised of 136 operational taxonomic units (OTUs) recovered in culture and 248 OTUs recovered in clone libraries. The fungal community was diverse across the sites, although a subgroup of dominant cosmopolitan fungi was present. The frequent recovery of Pd (18% of samples positive by culture) even in the presence of dominant, cosmopolitan fungal genera suggests some level of local adaptation in WNS-afflicted habitats, while the extensive distribution of Pd (48% of samples positive by real-time PCR) suggests an active reservoir of the pathogen at these sites. These findings underscore the need for integrated disease control measures that target both bats and Pd in the hibernacula for the control of WNS. PMID:25264864

  19. An implementation of SAS{reg_sign} in an environmental information system

    SciTech Connect

    James, T.; Zygmunt, B.C.

    1994-12-31

    This paper describes a software environmental database information system that uses SAS to process data and ORACLE{reg_sign} as the relational database management system (RDBMS). The hardware includes a network of UNIX-based servers and workstations. The relational database consists of large tables containing envionmental measurement data, as well as other smaller tables with reference, metadata and internal administrative information. The data come in a variety of formats and must be converted to conform to the system`s standards. SAS/ACCESS{sub {reg_sign}} and PROC SQL are used extensively in the data processing.

  20. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT-A AND A ENVIRONMENTAL SEALS, INC., SEAL ASSIST SYSTEM (SAS) PHASE II REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Environmental Technology Verification report discusses the technology and performance of Seal Assist System (SAS) for natural gas reciprocating compressor rod packing manufactured by A&A Environmental Seals, Inc. The SAS uses a secondary containment gland to collect natural g...

  1. Membrane associated cancer-oocyte neoantigen SAS1B/ovastacin is a candidate immunotherapeutic target for uterine tumors

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Eusebio S.; D'Souza, Ryan S.; Needham, Marisa A.; Herr, Austin K.; Jazaeri, Amir A.; Li, Hui; Stoler, Mark H.; Anderson-Knapp, Kiley L.; Thomas, Theodore; Mandal, Arabinda; Gougeon, Alain; Flickinger, Charles J.; Bruns, David E.; Pollok, Brian A.; Herr, John C.

    2015-01-01

    The metalloproteinase SAS1B [ovastacin, ASTL, astacin-like] was immunolocalized on the oolemma of ovulated human oocytes and in normal ovaries within the pool of growing oocytes where SAS1B protein was restricted to follicular stages spanning the primary-secondary follicle transition through ovulation. Gene-specific PCR and immunohistochemical studies revealed ASTL messages and SAS1B protein in both endometrioid [74%] and malignant mixed Mullerian tumors (MMMT) [87%] of the uterus. A MMMT-derived cell line, SNU539, expressed cell surface SAS1B that, after binding polyclonal antibodies, internalized into EEA1/LAMP1-positive early and late endosomes. Treatment of SNU539 cells with anti-SAS1B polyclonal antibodies caused growth arrest in the presence of active complement. A saporin-immunotoxin directed to SAS1B induced growth arrest and cell death. The oocyte restricted expression pattern of SAS1B among adult organs, cell-surface accessibility, internalization into the endocytic pathway, and tumor cell growth arrest induced by antibody-toxin conjugates suggest therapeutic approaches that would selectively target tumors while limiting adverse drug effects in healthy cells. The SAS1B metalloproteinase is proposed as a prototype cancer-oocyte tumor surface neoantigen for development of targeted immunotherapeutics with limited on-target/off tumor effects predicted to be restricted to the population of growing oocytes. PMID:26327203

  2. Houston, We Have a Problem: Teachers Find No Value in the SAS Education Value-Added Assessment System (EVAAS®)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Clarin

    2014-01-01

    This study examined the SAS Education Value-Added Assessment System (EVAAS®) in practice, as perceived and experienced by teachers in the Southwest School District (SSD). To evaluate teacher effectiveness, SSD is using SAS EVAAS® for high-stakes consequences more than any other district or state in the country. A mixed-method design including a…

  3. Student Alienation Syndrome: A Paradigm for Understanding the Relation between School Trauma and School Violence

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hyman, Irwin; Cohen, Ian; Mahon, Matthew

    2003-01-01

    In the school setting, children too often are victimized by peers, educators, and other school staff. The frequent and often unrecognized abuse in the school may cause pervasive emotional, social, and academic problems in children. This paper posits a theoretical construct, Student Alienation Syndrome (SAS), which may result from Posttraumatic…

  4. Social Approach and Autistic Behavior in Children with Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roberts, Jane E.; Weisenfeld, Leigh Anne H.; Hatton, Deborah D.; Heath, Morgan; Kaufmann, Walter E.

    2007-01-01

    Social avoidance is a core phenotypic characteristic of fragile X syndrome (FXS) that has critical cognitive and social consequences. However, no study has examined modulation of multiple social avoidant behaviors in children with FXS. In the current study, we introduce the "Social Approach Scale" (SAS), an observation scale that includes physical…

  5. Measuring Statistics Anxiety: Cross-Country Validity of the Statistical Anxiety Scale (SAS)

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chiesi, Francesca; Primi, Caterina; Carmona, Jose

    2011-01-01

    The aim of the research was to test the psychometric properties of the Italian version of the Vigil-Colet et al.'s Statistical Anxiety Scale (SAS), taking into account evidences based on (a) internal structure (factorial structure and cross-country invariance) and (b) relationships to other variables (the statistics anxiety's nomological network).…

  6. A new SAS program for behavioral analysis of Electrical Penetration Graph (EPG) data

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A new program is introduced that uses SAS software to duplicate output of descriptive statistics from the Sarria Excel workbook for EPG waveform analysis. Not only are publishable means and standard errors or deviations output, the user also is guided through four relatively simple sub-programs for ...

  7. SAS MACRO LANGUAGE PROGRAM FOR PARTIAL LEAST SQUARES REGRESSION OF SPECTRAL DATA

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A computer program was written in the SAS language for the purpose of examining the effect of spectral pretreatments on partial least squares regression of near-infrared (or similarly structured) data. The program operates in an unattended batch mode, in which the user may specify a number of commo...

  8. Preliminary results on SAS-2 observations of greater than 30 MeV gamma radiation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.

    1963-01-01

    A description is given of the SAS-2 detector and its measurements of gamma ray sources greater than 30 MeV. Results indicate that gamma rays come from discrete energetic sources, the galactic plane, and diffuse presumably extragalactic regions not associated with the galactic plane.

  9. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar. II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1977-01-01

    Analysis of additional data from SAS-2 experiment and improvements in the orbit-attitude data and analysis procedures have produced revised values for the flux from the Vela gamma-ray source. The pulsar phase plot shows two peaks, neither of which is in phase with the single radio pulse.

  10. Galactic plane gamma radiation. [SAS-2 and COS-b observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Ogelman, H. B.; Tuner, T.; Ozel, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    Analysis of the complete data from SAS-2 accentuates the fact that the distribution of galactic gamma radiation has several similarities to that of other large-scale tracers of galactic structure. The gamma radiation shows no statistically significant variation with direction, and the spectrum seen along the plane is the same as that derived for the galactic component of the gamma radiation at high latitude. This uniformity of the energy spectrum, the smooth decrease in intensity as a function of galactic latitude, and the absence of any galactic gamma ray sources at high latitudes argue in favor of a diffuse origin for most of the galactic gamma radiation, rather than a collection of localized sources. All the localized sources identified in the SAS 2 data are associated with known compact objects on the basis of observed periodicities, except gamma195+5 Excluding those SAS 2 sources observed by COS-B and two other excesses (CG 312-1 and CG333+0) visible in the SAS 2 data associated with tangential directions of spiral arms, thera are eight remaining new sources in the COS-B catalog.

  11. PS3-21: Extracting Utilization Data from Clarity into VDW Using Oracle and SAS

    PubMed Central

    Chimmula, Srivardhan

    2013-01-01

    Background/Aims The purpose of the presentation is to demonstrate how we use SAS and Oracle to load VDW_Utilization, VDW_DX, and VDW_PX tables from Clarity at the Kaiser Permanente Northern California (KPNC) Division of Research (DOR) site. Methods DOR uses the best of Oracle PL/ SQL and SAS capabilities in building Extract Transform and Load (ETL) processes. These processes extract patient encounter, diagnosis, and procedure data from Teradata-based Clarity. The data is then transformed to fit HMORN’s VDW definitions of the table. This data is then loaded into the Oracle-based VDW table on DOR’s research database and then finally a copy of the table is also created as a SAS dataset. Results DOR builds robust and efficient ETL processes that refresh VDW Utilization table on a monthly basis processing millions of records/observations. The ETL processes have the capability to identify daily changes in Clarity and update the VDW tables on a daily basis. Conclusions KPNC DOR combines the best of both Oracle and SAS worlds to build ETL processes that load the data into VDW Utilization tables efficiently.

  12. Implementation of Surface Detector Option in SCALE SAS4 Shielding Module

    SciTech Connect

    Broadhead, B.L.; Emmett, M.B.; Tang, J.S.

    1999-11-17

    The Shielding Analysis Sequence No. 4 (SAS4) in the Standardized Cask Analysis and Licensing Evaluation System (SCALE) is designed to aid the novice user in the preparation of detailed three-dimensional models and radiation protection studies of transportation or storage packages containing spent fuel from a nuclear reactor facility. The underlying methodology in these analyses is the Monte Carlo particle-tracking approach as incorporated into the MORSE-SGC computer code. The use of these basic procedures is enhanced via the automatic generation of the biasing parameters in the SAS4 sequence, which dramatically increases the calculational efficiency of most standard shielding problems. Until recently the primary mechanism for dose estimates in SAS4 was the use of point detectors, which were effective for single-dose locations, but inefficient for quantification of dose-rate profiles. This paper describes the implementation of a new surface detector option for SAS4 with automatic discretization of the detector surface into multiple segments or subdetectors. Results from several sample problems are given and discussed.

  13. A fine structure genomic map of the region of 12q13 containing SAS and CDK4

    SciTech Connect

    Linder, C.Y.; Elkahloun, A.G.; Su, Y.A.

    1994-09-01

    We have recently adapted a method, originally described by Rackwitz, to the rapid restriction mapping of multiple cosmid DNA samples. Linearization of the cosmids at the lambda cohesive site using lambda terminase is followed by partial digestion with selected restriction enzymes and hybridization to oligonucleotides specific for the right or left hand termini. Partial digestions are performed in a microtiter plate thus allowing up to 12 cosmid clones to be digested with one restriction enzyme. We have applied this rapid restriction mapping method to cosmids derived from a region of chromosome 12q13 that has recently been shown to be amplified in a variety of cancers including malignant fibrous histiocytoma, fibrosarcoma, liposarcoma, osteosarcoma and brain tumors. A small segment of this amplification unit containing three genes, SAS (a membrane protein), CDK4 (a cyclin dependent kinase) and OS-9 (a recently described cDNA) has been analyzed with the system described above. This fine structure genomic map will be useful for completing the expression map of this region as well as characterizing its pattern of amplification in tumor specimens.

  14. SAS1B Protein [Ovastacin] Shows Temporal and Spatial Restriction to Oocytes in Several Eutherian Orders and Initiates Translation at the Primary to Secondary Follicle Transition

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Eusebio S; Hlavin, Callie; Macnamara, Ellen; Ishola-Gbenla, Khadijat; Doerwaldt, Christa; Chamberlain, Catherine; Klotz, Kenneth; Herr, Austin K.; Khole, Aalok; Chertihin, Olga; Curnow, Eliza; Feldman, Sandford H; Mandal, Arabinda; Shetty, Jagathpala; Flickinger, Charles; Herr, John C

    2014-01-01

    Background Sperm Acrosomal SLLP1 Binding (SAS1B) protein (ovastacin) is an oolemmal binding partner for the intra-acrosomal sperm protein SLLP1. Results Immunohistochemical localization revealed that SAS1B translation is restricted among adult tissues to the ovary and oocytes, SAS1B appearing first in follicles at the primary-secondary transition. Quiescent oocytes within primordial follicles and primary follicles did not stain for SAS1B. Examination of neonatal rat ovaries revealed SAS1B expression first as faint signals in postnatal day 3 oocytes, with SAS1B protein staining intensifying with oocyte growth. Irrespective of animal age or estrus stage, SAS1B was seen only in oocytes of follicles that initiated a second granulosa cell layer. The precise temporal and spatial onset of SAS1B expression was conserved in adult ovaries in 7 eutherian species, including non-human primates. Immunoelectron micrographs localized SAS1B within cortical granules in MII oocytes. A population of SAS1B localized on the oolemma predominantly in the microvillar region anti-podal to the nucleus in ovulated MII rat oocytes and on the oolemma in macaque GV oocytes. Conclusions The restricted expression of SAS1B protein in growing oocytes, absence in the ovarian reserve, and localization on the oolemma suggest this zinc metalloprotease deserves consideration as a candidate target for reversible female contraceptive strategies. PMID:24038607

  15. Development of sleep apnea syndrome screening algorithm by using heart rate variability analysis and support vector machine.

    PubMed

    Nakayama, Chikao; Fujiwara, Koichi; Matsuo, Masahiro; Kano, Manabu; Kadotani, Hiroshi

    2015-08-01

    Although sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) is a common sleep disorder, most patients with sleep apnea are undiagnosed and untreated because it is difficult for patients themselves to notice SAS in daily living. Polysomnography (PSG) is a gold standard test for sleep disorder diagnosis, however PSG cannot be performed in many hospitals. This fact motivates us to develop an SAS screening system that can be used easily at home. The autonomic nervous function of a patient changes during apnea. Since changes in the autonomic nervous function affect fluctuation of the R-R interval (RRI) of an electrocardiogram (ECG), called heart rate variability (HRV), SAS can be detected through monitoring HRV. The present work proposes a new HRV-based SAS screening algorithm by utilizing support vector machine (SVM), which is a well-known pattern recognition method. In the proposed algorithm, various HRV features are derived from RRI data in both apnea and normal respiration periods of patients and healthy people, and an apnea/normal respiration (A/N) discriminant model is built from the derived HRV features by SVM. The result of applying the proposed SAS screening algorithm to clinical data demonstrates that it can discriminate patients with sleep apnea and healthy people appropriately. The sensitivity and the specificity of the proposed algorithm were 100% and 86%, respectively. PMID:26738189

  16. Association between Plaque Score of the Carotid Artery and the Severity of Sleep Apnea Syndrome in Patients with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Hasegawa, Daisuke; Tanaka, Akihito; Inaguma, Daijo; Ito, Eri; Kamegai, Naoki; Kato, Akiko; Mizutani, Minami; Shimogushi, Hiroya; Shinjo, Hibiki; Otsuka, Yasuhiro; Takeda, Asami

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) has been associated with hypertension, cardiovascular disease and death. Patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) have higher rates of SAS, atherosclerotic complications and death than do patients without CKD. Although the relationship between SAS and atherosclerosis is well known, few papers have described this relationship in humans, especially in CKD patients. Patients and Methods This was a cross-sectional study of 110 clinically stable, non-dialysis patients with CKD who attended a CKD educational program from April 2014 to September 2015. The diagnosis of SAS and its severity were assessed using a type 3 portable monitor. Other atherosclerosis-related data were obtained from the patients' medical records in order to determine the factors associated with the severity of SAS. Results 95 men and 15 women with a mean age of 71.4 ± 9.9 years were included in the study. The patients' mean body mass index was 24.0 ± 3.9, their mean blood pressure 134.3 ± 21.2/73.6 ± 13.4 mm Hg and their mean estimated glomerular filtration rate 19.8 ± 9.5 ml/min/1.7 m2. Adjusted plaque score was a significant predictor of severe SAS (odds ratio = 1.13, p = 0.0182). Mixed plaque was significantly associated with severe SAS (correlation ratio = 0.48, p < 0.0001). Conclusions Many patients with CKD also have SAS. Our findings demonstrate the relationship between plaque score and the severity of SAS. PMID:26989401

  17. SATB2-associated syndrome presenting with Rett-like phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Lee, J S; Yoo, Y; Lim, B C; Kim, K J; Choi, M; Chae, J-H

    2016-06-01

    The SATB2-associated syndrome (SAS) was proposed recently, after the SATB2 gene was initially discovered to be associated with isolated cleft palate. This syndrome is characterized by intellectual disability with delayed speech development, facial dysmorphism, cleft or high-arched palate, and dentition problems. Here, we describe two novel SATB2 sequence variants in two unrelated patients presenting with Rett-like phenotypes. We performed trio-based whole-exome sequencing in a 17-month-old girl presenting with severe retardation and Rett-like phenotypes, which revealed a de novo missense variant in SATB2 (p.Glu396Gln). Moreover, targeted sequencing of the SATB2 gene was performed in a 2-year-old girl with severe psychomotor retardation, facial hypotonia, and cleft palate who also exhibited some features of Rett syndrome. A nonsense variant in SATB2 was identified in this patient (p.Arg459*). This study expanded the clinical and genetic spectrum of SAS. SATB2 variants should be considered in cases with psychomotor retardation alone or in any cases with Rett-like phenotypes, regardless of the typical features of SAS such as cleft palate. PMID:26596517

  18. Usual Dietary Intakes: SAS Macros for Estimating Ratios of Two Dietary Components that are Consumed Nearly Every Day

    Cancer.gov

    The following SAS macros can be used to create a bivariate distribution of usual intake of two dietary components that are consumed nearly every day and to calculate percentiles of the population distribution of the ratio of usual intakes.

  19. Repositioning the substrate activity screening (SAS) approach as a fragment-based method for identification of weak binders.

    PubMed

    Gladysz, Rafaela; Cleenewerck, Matthias; Joossens, Jurgen; Lambeir, Anne-Marie; Augustyns, Koen; Van der Veken, Pieter

    2014-10-13

    Fragment-based drug discovery (FBDD) has evolved into an established approach for "hit" identification. Typically, most applications of FBDD depend on specialised cost- and time-intensive biophysical techniques. The substrate activity screening (SAS) approach has been proposed as a relatively cheap and straightforward alternative for identification of fragments for enzyme inhibitors. We have investigated SAS for the discovery of inhibitors of oncology target urokinase (uPA). Although our results support the key hypotheses of SAS, we also encountered a number of unreported limitations. In response, we propose an efficient modified methodology: "MSAS" (modified substrate activity screening). MSAS circumvents the limitations of SAS and broadens its scope by providing additional fragments and more coherent SAR data. As well as presenting and validating MSAS, this study expands existing SAR knowledge for the S1 pocket of uPA and reports new reversible and irreversible uPA inhibitor scaffolds. PMID:25154878

  20. Patterns of Growth in Adaptive Social Abilities among Children with Autism Spectrum Disorders

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Anderson, Deborah K.; Oti, Rosalind S.; Lord, Catherine; Welch, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    Adaptive social skills were assessed longitudinally at approximately ages 2, 3, 5, 9, and 13 years in a sample of 192 children with a clinical diagnosis of autism (n = 93), PDD-NOS (n = 51), or nonspectrum developmental disabilities (n = 46) at age 2. Growth curve analyses with SAS proc mixed were used to analyze social trajectories over time.…

  1. SAS-2 observations of celestial diffuse gamma radiation above 30 MeV

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.

    1974-01-01

    The small astronomy satellite, SAS-2, used a 32-deck magnetic core digitized spark chamber to study gamma rays with energies above 30 MeV. Data for four regions of the sky away from the galactic plane were analyzed. These regions show a finite, diffuse flux of gamma rays with a steep energy spectrum, and the flux is uniform over all the regions. Represented by a power law, the differential energy spectrum shows an index of 2.5 + or - 0.4. The steep SAS-2 spectrum and the lower energy data are reasonably consistent with a neutral pion gamma-ray spectrum which was red-shifted (such as that proposed by some cosmological theories). It is concluded that the diffuse celestial gamma ray spectrum observed presents the possibility of cosmological studies and possible evidence for a residual cosmic ray density, and supports the galactic superclusters of matter and antimatter remaining from baryon-symmetric big bang.

  2. Map self-validation: improved criteria to resolve the SIR or SAS phase ambiguity.

    PubMed

    Langs, D A; Blessing, R H; Guo, D

    2001-09-01

    A procedure was recently described that used the correlation coefficient (CC) agreement between the observed /F(h)/ and their associated unbiased 'omit map' extrapolated values /X(h)/ from an initial trial map as the basis for resolving the SIR or SAS phase ambiguity. It is noted here that a significant improvement in selectivity can be obtained if this agreement is expressed in terms of the complex-valued F(h) and X(h). A new scheme is outlined to exploit the weighted average of the two SIR or SAS phase choices. This procedure requires six FFTs per phase compared with three for the older method that randomly selected either of the two permitted phase choices from the Argand diagram as starting values. Trial calculations are encouraging for applications as low as 4 A resolution. PMID:11526342

  3. Using SAS PROC TCALIS for multigroup structural equation modelling with mean structures.

    PubMed

    Gu, Fei; Wu, Wei

    2011-11-01

    Multigroup structural equation modelling (SEM) is a technique frequently used to evaluate measurement invariance in social and behavioural science research. Before version 9.2, SAS was incapable of handling multigroup SEM. However, this limitation is resolved in PROC TCALIS in SAS 9.2. For the purpose of illustration, this paper provides a step-by-step guide to programming the tests of measurement invariance and partial invariance using PROC TCALIS for multigroup SEM with mean structures. Fit indices and parameter estimates are validated, thus providing an alternative tool for researchers conducting both applied and simulated studies. Other new features (e.g., different types of modelling languages and estimation methods) and limitations (e.g., ordered-categorical SEM and multilevel SEM) of the TCALIS procedure are also briefly discussed. PMID:21973099

  4. PREFACE Proceedings of the XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen; Terrill, Nicholas

    2010-10-01

    The XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009, was held in Oxford UK, 13-18 September 2009, and was jointly organised under the auspices of the International Union of Crystallography Commission on SAS by a team from the Diamond Light Source and the ISIS Pulsed Neutron Source - their first such joint venture - with help from the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council. It was the first time that this long running and successful series of conferences on the application, science and technology of small-angle scattering techniques had been staged in the UK. The UK has a proud heritage in small-angle scattering: as home to one of the world's first SANS instruments (at AERE Harwell), as the site of the world's first 2nd generation X-ray Synchrotron (the SRS at Daresbury with its suite of SAXS beamlines), and latterly as the location of the world's most successful pulsed source SANS instrument. Indeed, 2009 also marked the 25th Anniversary of neutron operations at ISIS and the opening of a Second Target Station. Whilst the SRS ceased operations in 2008, its mantle has been inherited by the Diamond synchrotron. Many delegates took the opportunity to visit both Diamond and ISIS during a conference excursion. Despite the prevailing global economic downturn, we were delighted that 434 delegates from 32 different countries were able to attend SAS-2009; two-thirds were drawn from the UK, Germany, Japan, the USA and France, but there were also sizeable contingents from Australia, Korea, Taiwan and South America. In many ways this geographical spread reflects the present and emerging distribution, respectively, of 3rd generation X-ray synchrotrons and high-flux neutron sources, although the scope of the conference was not solely limited to these probes. Financial support from the IUCr enabled us to grant bursaries to attend SAS-2009 to 12 delegates from emerging countries (Algeria, Argentina, Brazil, India, Nepal, Romania, Russia and the Ukraine). The

  5. Observation of celestial high energy gamma rays from SAS-II

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    The Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)-II, launched on Nov. 15, 1973, carried into orbit a 32-deck magnetic-core digitized-spark-chamber gamma-ray telescope to study celestial gamma radiation in the energy range above 30 MeV. As of May 21, 1973, SAS-II had viewed approximately half the sky, including the galactic center region, the galactic anti-center, and several regions off the galactic plane, and about one-third of the data from eight weeks of viewing has been analyzed. A finite diffuse flux for regions with galactic latitudes greater than 20 deg has been detected with a very steep energy spectrum. Combining this result with low-energy gamma-ray data yields a picture suggesting a cosmological origin for this radiation.

  6. Aerosol Optical Depth Value-Added Product for the SAS-He Instrument

    SciTech Connect

    Ermold, B; Flynn, CJ; Barnard, J

    2013-11-27

    The Shortwave Array Spectroradiometer – Hemispheric (SAS-He) is a ground-based, shadowband instrument that measures the direct and diffuse solar irradiance. In this regard, the instrument is similar to the Multi-Filter Rotating Shadowband Radiometer (MFRSR) – an instrument that has been in the ARM suite of instruments for more than 15 years. However, the two instruments differ significantly in wavelength resolution and range. In particular, the MFRSR only observes the spectrum in six discrete wavelength channels of about 10 nm width from 415 to 940 nm. The SAS-He, in contrast, incorporates two fiber-coupled grating spectrometers: a Si CCD spectrometer with over 2000 pixels covering the range from 325-1040 nm with ~ 2.5 nm resolution ,and an InGaAs array spectrometer with 256 pixels covering the wavelength range from 960-1700 nm with ~ 6 nm resolution.

  7. Design and implementation of reliability evaluation of SAS hard disk based on RAID card

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Shaohua; Han, Sen

    2015-10-01

    Because of the huge advantage of RAID technology in storage, it has been widely used. However, the question associated with this technology is that the hard disk based on the RAID card can not be queried by Operating System. Therefore how to read the self-information and log data of hard disk has been a problem, while this data is necessary for reliability test of hard disk. In traditional way, this information can be read just suitable for SATA hard disk, but not for SAS hard disk. In this paper, we provide a method by using LSI RAID card's Application Program Interface, communicating with RAID card and analyzing the feedback data to solve the problem. Then we will get the necessary information to assess the SAS hard disk.

  8. Code portability and data management considerations in the SAS3D LMFBR accident-analysis code

    SciTech Connect

    Dunn, F.E.

    1981-01-01

    The SAS3D code was produced from a predecessor in order to reduce or eliminate interrelated problems in the areas of code portability, the large size of the code, inflexibility in the use of memory and the size of cases that can be run, code maintenance, and running speed. Many conventional solutions, such as variable dimensioning, disk storage, virtual memory, and existing code-maintenance utilities were not feasible or did not help in this case. A new data management scheme was developed, coding standards and procedures were adopted, special machine-dependent routines were written, and a portable source code processing code was written. The resulting code is quite portable, quite flexible in the use of memory and the size of cases that can be run, much easier to maintain, and faster running. SAS3D is still a large, long running code that only runs well if sufficient main memory is available.

  9. System definition phase and acquisition phase project plan for Small Astronomy Satellite SAS-D

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1971-01-01

    The objective of the SAS-D project is to conduct spectral distribution studies of celestial ultraviolet sources using an Explorer-class spacecraft launched by a Delta vehicle into a geosynchronous orbit in the last half of 1975. The telescope system is intended for use by guest astronomers for a major portion of the total observing time. The concept of the overall system, designed to resemble functionally the operation of a ground-based observatory, should maximize the usefulness of the instrument to the astronomical community by limiting the amount of special instruction needed to use the spaceborne telescope. The SAS-D mission will obtain information on what stars, nebulae, and galaxies are and how they develop.

  10. Recent results of X-ray observations from OSO-7 and SAS-3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, G. W.

    1978-01-01

    Recent observations bearing on the nature of compact X-ray sources obtained from the MIT instruments aboard OSO-7 and SAS-3 are discussed. Results on the X-ray sky survey, new ultralow-energy X-ray sources, X-ray sources in globular clusters, slow X-ray pulsars, and variability and position of compact X-ray sources in Cen A are discussed. Descriptions of the satellite-borne X-ray instruments are provided.

  11. Hybrid measurement chains for the SAS-C spacecraft. [advantages over analog signal processing circuits

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goeke, R. F.

    1975-01-01

    Spacecraft electronic systems usually demand tight packaging. It was this consideration which initially forced us to consider hybrid circuits for the analog signal processing circuits in the Small Astronomy Satellite-C (SAS-C) scientific payload. We gradually discovered that increased reliability, low power consumption, and reduced program costs all followed. This paper will attempt to share our laboratory's first experience with hybrid circuits and indicate those areas which we found to be important.

  12. SAS-3 observations of an X-ray flare from Cygnus X-1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Canizares, C. R.; Bradt, H.; Buff, J.; Laufer, B.

    1976-01-01

    Preliminary results are presented for the SAS-3 observation of an X-ray flare from Cygnus X-1. The 1.5 to 6 keV intensity rose by a factor of four and exhibited variability on several time scales from seconds to hours. The 6 to 15 keV intensity showed less activity. The event is similar to that observed by ANS and Ariel 5, but lasted less than two weeks.

  13. Catalog of SAS-2 gamma-ray observations (Fichtel, et al. 1990)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Warren, Wayne H., Jr.

    1990-01-01

    The machine-readable version of the catalog, as it is currently being distributed from the Astronomical Data Center, is described. The SAS-2 gamma ray catalog contains fluxes measured with the high energy gamma ray telescope flown aboard the second NASA Small Astronomy Satellite. The objects measured include various types of galaxies, quasi-stellar, and BL Lacertae objects, and pulsars. The catalog contains separate files for galaxies, pulsars, other objects, notes, and references.

  14. Characterizing Flexible and Instrinsically Unstructured Biological Macromolecules by SAS using the Porod-Debye Law

    PubMed Central

    Rambo, Robert P.; Tainer, John A.

    2011-01-01

    Unstructured proteins, RNA or DNA components provide functionally important flexibility that is key to many macromolecular assemblies throughout cell biology. As objective, quantitative experimental measures of flexibility and disorder in solution are limited, small angle scattering (SAS), and in particular small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), provides a critical technology to assess macromolecular flexibility as well as shape and assembly. Here, we consider the Porod-Debye law as a powerful tool for detecting biopolymer flexibility in SAS experiments. We show that the Porod-Debye region fundamentally describes the nature of the scattering intensity decay, which captures information needed for distinguishing between folded and flexible particles. Particularly for comparative SAS experiments, application of the law, as described here, can distinguish between discrete conformational changes and localized flexibility relevant to molecular recognition and interaction networks. This approach aids insightful analyses of fully and partly flexible macromolecules that is more robust and conclusive than traditional Kratky analyses. Furthermore, we demonstrate for prototypic SAXS data that the ability to calculate particle density by the Porod-Debye criteria, as shown here, provides an objective quality assurance parameter that may prove of general use for SAXS modeling and validation. PMID:21509745

  15. The standardized functional support sectional for the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, M. R.

    1974-01-01

    The standardized functional support section for the improved Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS) spacecraft, which can be used virtually without change for a wide variety of experimental packages and missions, is described. This functional support section makes the spacecraft remarkably flexible for a small satellite. Able to point its thrust axis to any direction in space, it can also spin or slow its outer body rotation to zero for star- or earth-locked pointing of side-viewing experiments. It features a reprogrammable telemetry system, a delayed command system, and an improved control system. Experiments can be built independently and attached to the SAS spacecraft just prior to final acceptance testing and launch. The spacecraft subsystems are described in detail. Included are a summary of the spacecraft characteristics, special design considerations, project reliability requirements, and environmental test conditions. It is intended that this new functional support section afford virtual off-the-shelf availability of the SAS spacecraft to independently built experiments, thus providing quick response time and minimum cost in meeting a wide variety of experimenter needs.

  16. Embedding SAS approach into conjugate gradient algorithms for asymmetric 3D elasticity problems

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Hsin-Chu; Warsi, N.A.; Sameh, A.

    1996-12-31

    In this paper, we present two strategies to embed the SAS (symmetric-and-antisymmetric) scheme into conjugate gradient (CG) algorithms to make solving 3D elasticity problems, with or without global reflexive symmetry, more efficient. The SAS approach is physically a domain decomposition scheme that takes advantage of reflexive symmetry of discretized physical problems, and algebraically a matrix transformation method that exploits special reflexivity properties of the matrix resulting from discretization. In addition to offering large-grain parallelism, which is valuable in a multiprocessing environment, the SAS scheme also has the potential for reducing arithmetic operations in the numerical solution of a reasonably wide class of scientific and engineering problems. This approach can be applied directly to problems that have global reflexive symmetry, yielding smaller and independent subproblems to solve, or indirectly to problems with partial symmetry, resulting in loosely coupled subproblems. The decomposition is achieved by separating the reflexive subspace from the antireflexive one, possessed by a special class of matrices A, A {element_of} C{sup n x n} that satisfy the relation A = PAP where P is a reflection matrix (symmetric signed permutation matrix).

  17. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome, your small intestine cannot absorb nutrients from foods. Causes of malabsorption syndromes include Celiac disease Lactose intolerance Short bowel syndrome. This happens after surgery to ...

  18. Porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) subverts normal development of adaptive immunity by proliferation of germline-encoded B cells with hydrophobic HCDR3

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Isolator piglets infected with porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) develop severe hypergammaglobulinemia, lymph node adenopathy and autoimmune disease. The expanded B cell clones in this disease are unusual in bearing hydrophobic HCDR3 regions and these are disseminated to mo...

  19. PREFACE Proceedings of the XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen; Terrill, Nicholas

    2010-10-01

    The XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009, was held in Oxford UK, 13-18 September 2009, and was jointly organised under the auspices of the International Union of Crystallography Commission on SAS by a team from the Diamond Light Source and the ISIS Pulsed Neutron Source - their first such joint venture - with help from the UK Science and Technology Facilities Council. It was the first time that this long running and successful series of conferences on the application, science and technology of small-angle scattering techniques had been staged in the UK. The UK has a proud heritage in small-angle scattering: as home to one of the world's first SANS instruments (at AERE Harwell), as the site of the world's first 2nd generation X-ray Synchrotron (the SRS at Daresbury with its suite of SAXS beamlines), and latterly as the location of the world's most successful pulsed source SANS instrument. Indeed, 2009 also marked the 25th Anniversary of neutron operations at ISIS and the opening of a Second Target Station. Whilst the SRS ceased operations in 2008, its mantle has been inherited by the Diamond synchrotron. Many delegates took the opportunity to visit both Diamond and ISIS during a conference excursion. Despite the prevailing global economic downturn, we were delighted that 434 delegates from 32 different countries were able to attend SAS-2009; two-thirds were drawn from the UK, Germany, Japan, the USA and France, but there were also sizeable contingents from Australia, Korea, Taiwan and South America. In many ways this geographical spread reflects the present and emerging distribution, respectively, of 3rd generation X-ray synchrotrons and high-flux neutron sources, although the scope of the conference was not solely limited to these probes. Financial support from the IUCr enabled us to grant bursaries to attend SAS-2009 to 12 delegates from emerging countries (Algeria, Argentina, Brazil, India, Nepal, Romania, Russia and the Ukraine). The

  20. Isaac's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome (also known as neuromyotonia, Isaacs-Mertens syndrome, continuous muscle fiber activity syndrome, and quantal squander syndrome) is a rare neuromuscular disorder caused by hyperexcitability and continuous firing of ... which include progressive muscle stiffness, continuously contracting ...

  1. The value of esophagectomy surgical apgar score (eSAS) in predicting the risk of major morbidity after open esophagectomy

    PubMed Central

    Xing, Xue-Zhong; Wang, Hai-Jun; Qu, Shi-Ning; Huang, Chu-Lin; Zhang, Hao; Wang, Hao; Yang, Quan-Hui

    2016-01-01

    Background Recently, surgical apgar score (SAS) has been reported to be strongly associated with major morbidity after major abdominal surgery. The aim of this study was to assess the value of esophagectomy SAS (eSAS) in predicting the risk of major morbidity after open esophagectomy in a high volume cancer center. Methods The data of all patients who admitted to intensive care unit (ICU) after open esophagectomy at Cancer Hospital of Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences & Peking Union Medical College from September 2008 through August 2010 was retrospectively collected and reviewed. Preoperative and perioperative variables were recorded and compared. The eSAS was calculated as the sum of the points of EBL, lowest MAP and lowest HR for each patient. Patients were divided into high-risk (below the cutoff) and low-risk (above the cutoff) eSAS groups according to the cutoff score with optimal accuracy of eSAS for major morbidity. Univariable and multivariable regression analysis were used to define risk factors of the occurrence of major morbidity. Results Of 189 patients, 110 patients developed major morbidities (58.2%) and 30-day operative mortality was 5.8% (11/189). There were 156 high risk patients (eSAS ≤7) and 33 low risk (eSAS >7) patients. Univariable analysis demonstrated that forced expiratory volume in one second of predicted (FEV1%) ≤78% (44% vs. 61%, P=0.024), McKeown approach (22.7% vs. 7.6%, P=0.011), duration of operation longer than 230 minutes, intraoperative estimated blood loss (347±263 vs. 500±510 mL, P=0.015) and eSAS ≤7 (62.2% vs. 90.0%, P=0.001) were predictive of major morbidity. Multivariable analysis demonstrated that FEV1% ≤78% (OR, 2.493; 95% CI, 1.279–4.858, P=0.007) and eSAS ≤7 (OR, 2.810; 95% CI, 1.105–7.144; P=0.030) were independent predictors of major morbidity after esophagectomy. Compared with patients who had eSAS >7, patients who had eSAS ≤7 had longer hospital length of stay (25.39±14.36 vs. 32.22±22.66 days

  2. SAS6-like protein in Plasmodium indicates that conoid-associated apical complex proteins persist in invasive stages within the mosquito vector

    PubMed Central

    Wall, Richard J.; Roques, Magali; Katris, Nicholas J.; Koreny, Ludek; Stanway, Rebecca R.; Brady, Declan; Waller, Ross F.; Tewari, Rita

    2016-01-01

    The SAS6-like (SAS6L) protein, a truncated paralogue of the ubiquitous basal body/centriole protein SAS6, has been characterised recently as a flagellum protein in trypanosomatids, but associated with the conoid in apicomplexan Toxoplasma. The conoid has been suggested to derive from flagella parts, but is thought to have been lost from some apicomplexans including the malaria-causing genus Plasmodium. Presence of SAS6L in Plasmodium, therefore, suggested a possible role in flagella assembly in male gametes, the only flagellated stage. Here, we have studied the expression and role of SAS6L throughout the Plasmodium life cycle using the rodent malaria model P. berghei. Contrary to a hypothesised role in flagella, SAS6L was absent during gamete flagellum formation. Instead, SAS6L was restricted to the apical complex in ookinetes and sporozoites, the extracellular invasive stages that develop within the mosquito vector. In these stages SAS6L forms an apical ring, as we show is also the case in Toxoplasma tachyzoites. The SAS6L ring was not apparent in blood-stage invasive merozoites, indicating that the apical complex is differentiated between the different invasive forms. Overall this study indicates that a conoid-associated apical complex protein and ring structure is persistent in Plasmodium in a stage-specific manner. PMID:27339728

  3. Considerations for Serving Adolescents with Usher's Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fillman, Robyn D.; And Others

    1989-01-01

    Usher's syndrome is described, with emphasis on the visual symptomatology characteristic of retinitis pigmentosa. Also discussed are the services needed by individuals with Usher's Syndrome, the syndrome's psychosocial aspects, ways to prevent self-defeating behavior, orientation and mobility, and classroom adaptations. (JDD)

  4. The homo-oligomerisation of both Sas-6 and Ana2 is required for efficient centriole assembly in flies

    PubMed Central

    Cottee, Matthew A; Muschalik, Nadine; Johnson, Steven; Leveson, Joanna; Raff, Jordan W; Lea, Susan M

    2015-01-01

    Sas-6 and Ana2/STIL proteins are required for centriole duplication and the homo-oligomerisation properties of Sas-6 help establish the ninefold symmetry of the central cartwheel that initiates centriole assembly. Ana2/STIL proteins are poorly conserved, but they all contain a predicted Central Coiled-Coil Domain (CCCD). Here we show that the Drosophila Ana2 CCCD forms a tetramer, and we solve its structure to 0.8 Å, revealing that it adopts an unusual parallel-coil topology. We also solve the structure of the Drosophila Sas-6 N-terminal domain to 2.9 Å revealing that it forms higher-order oligomers through canonical interactions. Point mutations that perturb Sas-6 or Ana2 homo-oligomerisation in vitro strongly perturb centriole assembly in vivo. Thus, efficient centriole duplication in flies requires the homo-oligomerisation of both Sas-6 and Ana2, and the Ana2 CCCD tetramer structure provides important information on how these proteins might cooperate to form a cartwheel structure. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07236.001 PMID:26002084

  5. SAS molecular tests Escherichia coli O157 detection kit. Performance tested method 031203.

    PubMed

    Bapanpally, Chandra; Montier, Laura; Khan, Shah; Kasra, Akif; Brunelle, Sharon L

    2014-01-01

    The SAS Molecular tests Escherichia coli O157 Detection method, a loop-mediated isothermal amplification method, performed as well as or better than the U.S. Department of Agriculture, Food Safety Inspection Service Microbiology Laboratory Guidebook and the U.S. Food and Drug Administration Bacteriological Analytical Manual reference methods for ground beef, beef trim, bagged mixed lettuce, and fresh spinach. Ground beef (30% fat, 25 g test portion) was validated for 7-8 h enrichment, leafy greens were validated in a 6-7 h enrichment, and ground beef (30% fat, 375 g composite test portion) and beef trim (375 g composite test portion) were validated in a 16-20 h enrichment. The method performance for meat and leafy green matrixes was also shown to be acceptable under conditions of co-enrichment with Salmonella. Thus, after a short co-enrichment step, ground beef, beef trim, lettuce, and spinach can be tested for both Salmonella and E. coli O157. The SAS Molecular tests Salmonella Detection Kit was validated using the same test portions as for the SAS Molecular tests E. coli O157 Detection Kit and those results are presented in a separate report. Inclusivity and exclusivity testing revealed no false negatives and no false positives among the 50 E. coli 0157 strains, including H7 and non-motile strains, and 30 non-E. coli O157 strains examined. Finally, the method was shown to be robust when variations to DNA extract hold time and DNA volume were varied. The method comparison and robustness data suggest a full 7 h enrichment time should be used for 25 g ground beef test portions. PMID:25051628

  6. SAS-2 observations of high energy gamma rays from discrete sources

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kniffen, D. A.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Lamb, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.

    1977-01-01

    The SAS-2 identified six localized high energy (greater than 35 MeV) gamma ray sources. Four of these are the radio pulsars, PSR 0531+21, PSR 0833-45, PSR 1818-04, and PSR 1717-46 discovered in a search of 75 radio pulsars. The fact that only one of these is observed in X-rays, and the significant differences in pulse profiles in the gamma ray and radio observations, leads to the speculation that different mechanisms are involved.

  7. Interactions between SAS-C spacecraft nutations and spin control system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tossman, B. E.; Thayer, D. L.

    1974-01-01

    The SAS-C spacecraft is stabilized by a momentum biased reaction wheel and passive nutation damper. A closed-loop low-speed spacecraft spin rate control system is included which uses a single-axis gyro and a variable speed range on the reaction wheel. Dynamic instability can result from interactions among the gyro, damper, and spacecraft dynamic unbalance. This instability may be aggravated by gyro angular misalignment, gyro error signals, and spacecraft nutations. Analytic eigenvector, and digital computer analyses of the coupled systems are presented. Mechanisms for instability are described as well as the effects that gyro error signal, tilt, and spacecraft dynamic unbalance produce on control system performance.

  8. Past and future corollaries of theories on causes of metabolic syndrome and obesity related co-morbidities part 2: a composite unifying theory review of human-specific co-adaptations to brain energy consumption.

    PubMed

    McGill, Anne-Thea

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic syndrome (MetS) predicts type II diabetes mellitus (TIIDM), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer, and their rates have escalated over the last few decades. Obesity related co-morbidities also overlap the concept of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, understanding of the syndrome's underlying causes may have been misapprehended. The current paper follows on from a theory review by McGill, A-T in Archives of Public Health, 72: 30. This accompanying paper utilises research on human evolution and new biochemistry to theorise on why MetS and obesity arise and how they affect the population. The basis of this composite unifying theory is that the proportionately large, energy-demanding human brain may have driven co-adaptive mechanisms to provide, or conserve, energy for the brain. A 'dual system' is proposed. 1) The enlarged, complex cortico-limbic-striatal system increases dietary energy by developing strong neural self-reward/motivation pathways for the acquisition of energy dense food, and (2) the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) cellular protection system amplifies antioxidant, antitoxicant and repair activity by employing plant chemicals. In humans who consume a nutritious diet, the NRF2 system has become highly energy efficient. Other relevant human-specific co-adaptations are explored. In order to 'test' this composite unifying theory it is important to show that the hypothesis and sub-theories pertain throughout the whole of human evolution and history up till the current era. Corollaries of the composite unifying theory of MetS are examined with respect to past under-nutrition and malnutrition since agriculture began 10,000 years ago. The effects of man-made pollutants on degenerative change are examined. Projections are then made from current to future patterns on the state of 'insufficient micronutrient and/or unbalanced high energy malnutrition with central obesity and metabolic dysregulation' or 'malnubesity'. Forecasts

  9. Proteomic analysis of cellular response induced by boron neutron capture reaction in human squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Akira; Itoh, Tasuku; Imamichi, Shoji; Kikuhara, Sota; Fujimori, Hiroaki; Hirai, Takahisa; Saito, Soichiro; Sakurai, Yoshinori; Tanaka, Hiroki; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Suzuki, Minoru; Murakami, Yasufumi; Baiseitov, Diaz; Berikkhanova, Kulzhan; Zhumadilov, Zhaxybay; Imahori, Yoshio; Itami, Jun; Ono, Koji; Masunaga, Shinichiro; Masutani, Mitsuko

    2015-12-01

    To understand the mechanism of cell death induced by boron neutron capture reaction (BNCR), we performed proteome analyses of human squamous tumor SAS cells after BNCR. Cells were irradiated with thermal neutron beam at KUR after incubation under boronophenylalanine (BPA)(+) and BPA(-) conditions. BNCR mainly induced typical apoptosis in SAS cells 24h post-irradiation. Proteomic analysis in SAS cells suggested that proteins functioning in endoplasmic reticulum, DNA repair, and RNA processing showed dynamic changes at early phase after BNCR and could be involved in the regulation of cellular response to BNCR. We found that the BNCR induces fragments of endoplasmic reticulum-localized lymphoid-restricted protein (LRMP). The fragmentation of LRMP was also observed in the rat tumor graft model 20 hours after BNCT treatment carried out at the National Nuclear Center of the Republic of Kazakhstan. These data suggest that dynamic changes of LRMP could be involved during cellular response to BNCR. PMID:26302661

  10. Causes of metabolic syndrome and obesity-related co-morbidities Part 1: A composite unifying theory review of human-specific co-adaptations to brain energy consumption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    One line summary Metabolic syndrome and obesity-related co-morbidities are largely explained by co-adaptations to the energy use of the large human brain in the cortico-limbic-striatal and NRF2 systems. The medical, research and general community is unable to effect significantly decreased rates of central obesity and related type II diabetes mellitus (TIIDM), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. All conditions seem to be linked by the concept of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the underlying causes are not known. MetS markers may have been mistaken for causes, thus many treatments are destined to be suboptimal. The current paper aims to critique current paradigms, give explanations for their persistence, and to return to first principles in an attempt to determine and clarify likely causes of MetS and obesity related comorbidities. A wide literature has been mined, study concepts analysed and the basics of human evolution and new biochemistry reviewed. A plausible, multifaceted composite unifying theory is formulated. The basis of the theory is that the proportionately large, energy-demanding human brain may have driven co-adaptive mechanisms to provide, or conserve, energy for the brain. A ‘dual system’ is proposed. 1) The enlarged, complex cortico-limbic-striatal system increases dietary energy by developing strong neural self-reward/motivation pathways for the acquisition of energy dense food, and (2) the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) cellular protection system amplifies antioxidant, antitoxicant and repair activity by employing plant chemicals, becoming highly energy efficient in humans. The still-evolving, complex human cortico-limbic-striatal system generates strong behavioural drives for energy dense food procurement, including motivating agricultural technologies and social system development. Addiction to such foods, leading to neglect of nutritious but less appetizing ‘common or garden’ food, appears to have occurred

  11. Staphylococcus aureus SasA Is Responsible for Binding to the Salivary Agglutinin gp340, Derived from Human Saliva

    PubMed Central

    Kukita, Kenji; Kawada-Matsuo, Miki; Oho, Takahiko; Nagatomo, Mami; Oogai, Yuichi; Hashimoto, Masahito; Suda, Yasuo; Tanaka, Takuo

    2013-01-01

    Staphylococcus aureus is a major human pathogen that can colonize the nasal cavity, skin, intestine, and oral cavity as a commensal bacterium. gp340, also known as DMBT1 (deleted in malignant brain tumors 1), is associated with epithelial differentiation and innate immunity. In the oral cavity, gp340 induces salivary aggregation with several oral bacteria and promotes bacterial adhesion to tissues such as the teeth and mucosa. S. aureus is often isolated from the oral cavity, but the mechanism underlying its persistence in the oral cavity remains unclear. In this study, we investigated the interaction between S. aureus and gp340 and found that S. aureus interacts with saliva- and gp340-coated resin. We then identified the S. aureus factor(s) responsible for binding to gp340. The cell surface protein SasA, which is rich in basic amino acids (BR domain) at the N terminus, was responsible for binding to gp340. Inactivation of the sasA gene resulted in a significant decrease in S. aureus binding to gp340-coated resin. Also, recombinant SasA protein (rSasA) showed binding affinity to gp340, which was inhibited by the addition of N-acetylneuraminic acid. Surface plasmon resonance analysis showed that rSasA significantly bound to the NeuAcα(2-3)Galβ(1-4)GlcNAc structure. These results indicate that SasA is responsible for binding to gp340 via the N-acetylneuraminic acid moiety. PMID:23439307

  12. Efficiency prediction for a low head bulb turbine with SAS SST and zonal LES turbulence models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jošt, D.; Škerlavaj, A.

    2014-03-01

    A comparison between results of numerical simulations and measurements for a 3-blade bulb turbine is presented in order to determine an appropriate numerical setup for accurate and reliable simulations of flow in low head turbines. Numerical analysis was done for three angles of runner blades at two values of head. For the smallest blade angle the efficiency was quite accurately predicted, but for the optimal and maximal blade angles steady state analysis entirely failed to predict the efficiency due to underestimated torque on the shaft and incorrect results in the draft tube. Transient simulation with SST did not give satisfactory results, but with SAS and zonal LES models the prediction of efficiency was significantly improved. From the results obtained by SAS and zonal LES the interdependence between turbulence models, vortex structures in the flow, values of eddy viscosity and flow energy losses in the draft tube can be seen. Also the effect of using the bounded central differential scheme instead of the high resolution scheme was evident. To test the effect of grid density, simulations were performed on four grids. While a difference between results obtained on the basic grid and on the fine grid was small, the results obtained on the coarse grids were not satisfactory.

  13. Final SAS-2 gamma ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Analysis of SAS-2 high energy Gamma ray data from the direction of the galactic anticenter shows that this region is characterized by: a diffuse emission from the galactic plane which has a maximum along b=0 deg and an enhancement toward negative latitudes associated with Gould's Belt, a strong point source in the direction of the Crab nebula, and a second intense localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg. Gamma ray emission from the Crab source is dominated by a pulsed flux from PSR 0531+21. The total flux above 100MeV is 3.7 + or - 0.8 million/sq cm s. The source near 195 deg, + 5 deg has a flux above 100 MeV of 4.3 + or - 0.9 million/sq cm s. Its spectrum appears flatter than that of the Crab. The diffuse galactic plane emission at negative lattitudes shows a general correlation with the local matter distribution associated with Gould's Belt. The calculated Gamma ray intensity agrees well with the SAS-2 observations.

  14. Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwarte, Andrea R.

    2008-01-01

    This article provides an overview of current research on Fragile X Syndrome, and how that knowledge can be used to guide successful intervention. The genetic etiology of Fragile X is reviewed and the physical, cognitive, adaptive, behavioral, and emotional phenotypes of children with the disorder are described, highlighting the differences in…

  15. A Comparison of Three Programming Models for Adaptive Applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shan, Hong-Zhang; Singh, Jaswinder Pal; Oliker, Leonid; Biswa, Rupak; Kwak, Dochan (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    We study the performance and programming effort for two major classes of adaptive applications under three leading parallel programming models. We find that all three models can achieve scalable performance on the state-of-the-art multiprocessor machines. The basic parallel algorithms needed for different programming models to deliver their best performance are similar, but the implementations differ greatly, far beyond the fact of using explicit messages versus implicit loads/stores. Compared with MPI and SHMEM, CC-SAS (cache-coherent shared address space) provides substantial ease of programming at the conceptual and program orchestration level, which often leads to the performance gain. However it may also suffer from the poor spatial locality of physically distributed shared data on large number of processors. Our CC-SAS implementation of the PARMETIS partitioner itself runs faster than in the other two programming models, and generates more balanced result for our application.

  16. ARP: Automatic rapid processing for the generation of problem dependent SAS2H/ORIGEN-s cross section libraries

    SciTech Connect

    Leal, L.C.; Hermann, O.W.; Bowman, S.M.; Parks, C.V.

    1998-04-01

    In this report, a methodology is described which serves as an alternative to the SAS2H path of the SCALE system to generate cross sections for point-depletion calculations with the ORIGEN-S code. ARP, Automatic Rapid Processing, is an algorithm that allows the generation of cross-section libraries suitable to the ORIGEN-S code by interpolation over pregenerated SAS2H libraries. The interpolations are carried out on the following variables: burnup, enrichment, and water density. The adequacy of the methodology is evaluated by comparing measured and computed spent fuel isotopic compositions for PWR and BWR systems.

  17. Analysis of the TREAT loss-of-flow tests L6 and L7 using SAS3D

    SciTech Connect

    Morris, E.E.; Simms, R.; Gruber, E.E.

    1985-01-01

    The TREAT loss-of-flow tests L6 and L7 have been analyzed using the SAS3D accident analysis code. The impetus for the analysis was the need for experimentally supported fuel motion modeling in whole core accident studies performed in support of licensing of the Clinch River Breeder Reactor Project. The input prescription chosen for the SAS3D/SLUMPY fuel motion model gave reasonable agreement with the test results. Tests L6 and L7, each conducted with a cluster of three fuel pins, were planned to simulate key events in the loss-of-flow accident scenario for the Clinch River homogeneous reactor.

  18. Phase-dependent generation and transmission of time information by the KaiABC circadian clock oscillator through SasA-KaiC interaction in cyanobacteria.

    PubMed

    Valencia S, J; Bitou, Kyouhei; Ishii, Kentaro; Murakami, Reiko; Morishita, Megumi; Onai, Kiyoshi; Furukawa, Yukio; Imada, Katsumi; Namba, Keiichi; Ishiura, Masahiro

    2012-05-01

    Circadian clocks allow organisms to predict environmental changes of the day/night cycle. In the cyanobacterial circadian clock machinery, the phosphorylation level and ATPase activity of the clock protein KaiC oscillate with a period of approximately 24 h. The time information is transmitted from KaiC to the histidine kinase SasA through the SasA autophosphorylation-enhancing activity of KaiC, ultimately resulting in genome-wide transcription cycles. Here, we showed that SasA derived from the thermophilic cyanobacterium Thermosynechococcus elongatus BP-1 has the domain structure of an orthodox histidine kinase and that its C-terminal domain, which contains a phosphorylation site at His160, is responsible for the autophosphorylation activity and the temperature- and phosphorylation state-dependent trimerization / hexamerization activity of SasA. SasA and KaiC associate through their N-terminal domains with an affinity that depends on their phosphorylation states. Furthermore, the SasA autophosphorylation-enhancing activity of KaiC requires the C-terminal ATPase catalytic site and depends on its phosphorylation state. We show that the phosphotransfer activity of SasA is essential for the generation of normal circadian gene expression in cyanobacterial cells. Numerical simulations suggest that circadian time information (free phosphorylated SasA) is released mainly by unphosphorylated KaiC during the late subjective night. PMID:22512339

  19. ENVIRONMENTAL TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT, PERFORMANCE TEST RESULTS FOR THE A AND A ENVIRONMENTAL SEALS' SEAL ASSIST SYSTEM (SAS), PHASE I--TECHNOLOGY VERIFICATION REPORT

    EPA Science Inventory

    The report presents results of tests determining the efficacy of A&A Environmental Seals, Inc's Seal Assist System (SAS) in preventing natural gas compressor station's compressor rod packing leaks from escaping into the atmosphere. The SAS consists of an Emission Containment Glan...

  20. Effect of telemetric monitoring in the first 30 days of continuous positive airway pressure adaptation for obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome - a controlled pilot study.

    PubMed

    Frasnelli, Matthias; Baty, Florent; Niedermann, Jolanda; Brutsche, Martin H; Schoch, Otto D

    2016-06-01

    Obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (OSAS) is characterised by repetitive collapse of the upper airway during sleep. Continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) applied via a mask is the standard treatment for OSAS. CPAP adherence is crucial in therapy to prevent the deleterious consequences of OSAS. We hypothesised that a combination of supervision by telemetry together with targeted telephone support in the first month of CPAP would increase CPAP adherence and treatment success. A total of 113 OSAS patients followed by telemetry-triggered interventions used the device for 5.3 h/night on 28/30 nights, significantly more than the 110 OSAS patients in the control group with 4.6 h/night and 27/30 nights. Telemetry-triggered interventions have a significant impact on adherence rate in early CPAP treatment. These results can be reached with an acceptable additional effort. PMID:26253747

  1. Dravet Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... NINDS Dravet Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Severe Myoclonic Epilepsy of Infancy (SMEI) Table of Contents (click to ... Dravet Syndrome? Dravet syndrome, also called severe myoclonic epilepsy of infancy (SMEI), is a severe form of ...

  2. Williams syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Williams-Beuren syndrome ... Williams syndrome is a rare condition caused by missing a copy of several genes. Parents may not have ... history of the condition. However, a person with Williams syndrome has a 50% chance of passing the disorder ...

  3. Brown Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Does Brown syndrome cause eye problems besides abnormal eye movements? Some children with Brown syndrome have poor binocular ... In the congenital form of Brown syndrome, the eye movement problem is usually constant and unlikely to resolve ...

  4. Fahr's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Fahr's Syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Familial Idiopathic Basal Ganglia ... is being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Fahr's Syndrome? Fahr's Syndrome is a rare, genetically dominant, ...

  5. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing disease Cushing syndrome due to adrenal tumor Diabetes Ectopic Cushing syndrome Exogenous Cushing syndrome Kidney stones Pituitary tumor Rheumatoid arthritis Tumor Update Date 10/28/2015 Updated by: ...

  6. The SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Safety Analysis Code System

    SciTech Connect

    2012-01-31

    SAS4A/SASSYS-1 is a software simulation tool used to perform deterministic safety analysis of anticipated events as well as design basis and beyond design basis accidents for advanced nuclear reactors. This software can be used to assess the safety of a prescribed reactor design, but it cannot be used to configure a design to meet targeted performance objectives. Detailed, mechanistic models of steady-state and transient thermal,hydraulic, kinetic, and mechanical phenomena are employed to describe the response of the reactor core, the reactor primary and secondary coolant loops, the reactor control and protection systems and the balance-of-plant to accidents caused by changes in coolantflow, oss of heat rejection, or reactivity insertion. The consequences of single and double-fault accidents can be modeled, including fuel and coolant heating, fuel and cladding mechanical behavior, core reactivity feedbacks, coolant loop performance including natural circulation, and decay heat removal. Analyses are typically terminated upon demonstration of reactor and plant shutdown to permanently coolable conditions or upon violation of design basis margins. The objective of the analysis is to quantify accident consequences as measured by the transient behavior of system performance parameters, such as fuel and cladding temperatures, reactivity, and cladding strain. Originally developed for analysis of sodium cooled reactors with oxide fuel clad by stainless steel, the models In SAS4A/SASSYS-1 were subsequently extended and specialized to metallic fuel clad with advanced alloys and to several other coolant options including lead and LBE. METHOD OF SOLUTION: Each subassembly in the reactor core is represented with single or multiple-pin models. One channel represents one or more fuel pins and many channels are employed for a whole-core representation. Heat transfer in each pin is modeled with a two-dimensional (r/z) heat conduction equation. Single and two-phase coolant thermal

  7. The SAS4A/SASSYS-1 Safety Analysis Code System

    2012-01-31

    SAS4A/SASSYS-1 is a software simulation tool used to perform deterministic safety analysis of anticipated events as well as design basis and beyond design basis accidents for advanced nuclear reactors. This software can be used to assess the safety of a prescribed reactor design, but it cannot be used to configure a design to meet targeted performance objectives. Detailed, mechanistic models of steady-state and transient thermal,hydraulic, kinetic, and mechanical phenomena are employed to describe the responsemore » of the reactor core, the reactor primary and secondary coolant loops, the reactor control and protection systems and the balance-of-plant to accidents caused by changes in coolantflow, oss of heat rejection, or reactivity insertion. The consequences of single and double-fault accidents can be modeled, including fuel and coolant heating, fuel and cladding mechanical behavior, core reactivity feedbacks, coolant loop performance including natural circulation, and decay heat removal. Analyses are typically terminated upon demonstration of reactor and plant shutdown to permanently coolable conditions or upon violation of design basis margins. The objective of the analysis is to quantify accident consequences as measured by the transient behavior of system performance parameters, such as fuel and cladding temperatures, reactivity, and cladding strain. Originally developed for analysis of sodium cooled reactors with oxide fuel clad by stainless steel, the models In SAS4A/SASSYS-1 were subsequently extended and specialized to metallic fuel clad with advanced alloys and to several other coolant options including lead and LBE. METHOD OF SOLUTION: Each subassembly in the reactor core is represented with single or multiple-pin models. One channel represents one or more fuel pins and many channels are employed for a whole-core representation. Heat transfer in each pin is modeled with a two-dimensional (r/z) heat conduction equation. Single and two-phase coolant

  8. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein A (SasA) Protect Against Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis and Peritonitis in Mice.

    PubMed

    Yang, Yilong; Qian, Mengying; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Shuling; Li, Bing; Yu, Rui; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Changming; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) imposes an increasing impact on public health. Due to multi-antibiotics resistance in MRSA strains, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics such as effective monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MRSA infections. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein A (SasA), a large surface-located protein (~240 kDa), is one of MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) and a potential target for immunotherapeutic approaches against S. aureus infections. In the present study, we analyzed the sequence of SasA with bioinformatics tools and generated a protective monoclonal antibody (2H7) targeting the conserved domain of SasA. 2H7 was shown to recognize wild-type S. aureus and promote opsonophagocytic killing of S. aureus. In both sepsis and peritoneal infection models, prophylactic administration of 2H7 improved the survival of BALB/c mice challenged by S. aureus strain USA300 and ST239 (prevalent MRSA clones in North America and Asian countries, respectively) and enhanced bacterial clearance in kidneys. Additionally, 2H7 prophylaxis prevented the formation of intraperitoneal abscess in a murine model of peritoneal infection and therapeutic administration of 2H7 showed protective efficacy in a murine sepsis model. Our results presented here provide supporting evidences that an anti-SasA mAb might be a potential component in an antibody-based immunotherapeutic treatment of MRSA infections. PMID:26926145

  9. SAS Code for Calculating Intraclass Correlation Coefficients and Effect Size Benchmarks for Site-Randomized Education Experiments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brandon, Paul R.; Harrison, George M.; Lawton, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    When evaluators plan site-randomized experiments, they must conduct the appropriate statistical power analyses. These analyses are most likely to be valid when they are based on data from the jurisdictions in which the studies are to be conducted. In this method note, we provide software code, in the form of a SAS macro, for producing statistical…

  10. Monoclonal Antibody Targeting Staphylococcus aureus Surface Protein A (SasA) Protect Against Staphylococcus aureus Sepsis and Peritonitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yilong; Qian, Mengying; Yi, Shaoqiong; Liu, Shuling; Li, Bing; Yu, Rui; Guo, Qiang; Zhang, Xiaopeng; Yu, Changming; Li, Jianmin; Xu, Junjie; Chen, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Epidemic methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) imposes an increasing impact on public health. Due to multi-antibiotics resistance in MRSA strains, there is an urgent need to develop novel therapeutics such as effective monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against MRSA infections. Staphylococcus aureus surface protein A (SasA), a large surface-located protein (~240 kDa), is one of MSCRAMMs (microbial surface components recognizing adhesive matrix molecules) and a potential target for immunotherapeutic approaches against S. aureus infections. In the present study, we analyzed the sequence of SasA with bioinformatics tools and generated a protective monoclonal antibody (2H7) targeting the conserved domain of SasA. 2H7 was shown to recognize wild-type S. aureus and promote opsonophagocytic killing of S. aureus. In both sepsis and peritoneal infection models, prophylactic administration of 2H7 improved the survival of BALB/c mice challenged by S. aureus strain USA300 and ST239 (prevalent MRSA clones in North America and Asian countries, respectively) and enhanced bacterial clearance in kidneys. Additionally, 2H7 prophylaxis prevented the formation of intraperitoneal abscess in a murine model of peritoneal infection and therapeutic administration of 2H7 showed protective efficacy in a murine sepsis model. Our results presented here provide supporting evidences that an anti-SasA mAb might be a potential component in an antibody-based immunotherapeutic treatment of MRSA infections. PMID:26926145

  11. A randomised trial of adaptive pacing therapy, cognitive behaviour therapy, graded exercise, and specialist medical care for chronic fatigue syndrome (PACE): statistical analysis plan

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The publication of protocols by medical journals is increasingly becoming an accepted means for promoting good quality research and maximising transparency. Recently, Finfer and Bellomo have suggested the publication of statistical analysis plans (SAPs).The aim of this paper is to make public and to report in detail the planned analyses that were approved by the Trial Steering Committee in May 2010 for the principal papers of the PACE (Pacing, graded Activity, and Cognitive behaviour therapy: a randomised Evaluation) trial, a treatment trial for chronic fatigue syndrome. It illustrates planned analyses of a complex intervention trial that allows for the impact of clustering by care providers, where multiple care-providers are present for each patient in some but not all arms of the trial. Results The trial design, objectives and data collection are reported. Considerations relating to blinding, samples, adherence to the protocol, stratification, centre and other clustering effects, missing data, multiplicity and compliance are described. Descriptive, interim and final analyses of the primary and secondary outcomes are then outlined. Conclusions This SAP maximises transparency, providing a record of all planned analyses, and it may be a resource for those who are developing SAPs, acting as an illustrative example for teaching and methodological research. It is not the sum of the statistical analysis sections of the principal papers, being completed well before individual papers were drafted. Trial registration ISRCTN54285094 assigned 22 May 2003; First participant was randomised on 18 March 2005. PMID:24225069

  12. The dental X-ray file of crew members in the Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS).

    PubMed

    Keiser-Nielsen, S; Johanson, G; Solheim, T

    1981-11-01

    In 1977, the Scandinavian Airlines System (SAS) established a dental X-ray file of all crew members. Its aim was to have immediately available an adequate set of physical antemortem data useful for identification in case of a fatal crash. Recently, an investigation into the quality and suitability of this material was carried out. The radiographs of 100 Danish, 100 Norwegian, and 100 Swedish pilots were picked at random and evaluated for formal deficiences, technical deficiencies, treatment pattern as useful for identification purposes, and the presence of pathology. The major results of the investigation were that a number of formal and technical deficiencies were disclosed, that the treatment pattern would seem adequate for identification purposes, and that a number of pathological findings were made, several of which had to be considered possible safety risks in the form of barodontalgia. PMID:7305798

  13. An aid to generating figures for the American Journal of Epidemiology using SAS/GRAPH.

    PubMed

    McArdle, Patrick F

    2015-11-01

    Data visualization is an important tool that epidemiologists use to communicate with others in the field. The American Journal of Epidemiology recently acknowledged the importance of data visualization by inaugurating an award for the "Figure of the Year." Yet, creating figures that adhere to the standards of the Journal is a challenge. The purpose of the present article was to provide helpful hints for creating figures in SAS/GRAPH that meet the requirements of the Journal. It stresses 3 techniques: properly sizing figures overall, sizing text within a figure, and creating acceptable file formats. This information will prove useful to authors who create data-driven figures intended to be published in the Journal. PMID:26476284

  14. A search for X-ray pulsations from the galactic center. [SAS-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cordova, F. A.; Garmire, G. P.; Lewin, W. H. G.

    1978-01-01

    Data from the SAS-3 satellite were used in a search for X-ray pulsations from the direction of the galactic center. No periodic X-ray behavior was detected in the frequency interval 0.6 Hz to 0.0006 Hz and energy range 2.5 - 35 keV. For periods less than 60 sec, the upper limit to the amplitude of any pulsation in the 2.5 - 10 keV band is approximately .0017 cts/sq cm/s. This corresponds to a pulsed fraction of approximately 1.3 percent of the total GCX flux. Somewhat higher limits apply for longer periods and for energies greater than 10 keV.

  15. JMFit: A SAS Macro for Joint Models of Longitudinal and Survival Data

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Danjie; Chen, Ming-Hui; Ibrahim, Joseph G.; Boye, Mark E.; Shen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Joint models for longitudinal and survival data now have a long history of being used in clinical trials or other studies in which the goal is to assess a treatment effect while accounting for a longitudinal biomarker such as patient-reported outcomes or immune responses. Although software has been developed for fitting the joint model, no software packages are currently available for simultaneously fitting the joint model and assessing the fit of the longitudinal component and the survival component of the model separately as well as the contribution of the longitudinal data to the fit of the survival model. To fulfill this need, we develop a SAS macro, called JMFit. JMFit implements a variety of popular joint models and provides several model assessment measures including the decomposition of AIC and BIC as well as ΔAIC and ΔBIC recently developed in Zhang et al. (2014). Examples with real and simulated data are provided to illustrate the use of JMFit.

  16. Qualification of the GASGUARD® SAS GGT Arsine Sub-Atmospheric Gas Delivery System for Ion Implantation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dunn, James P.; Rolland, James L.; Grim, James S.; Machado, Reinaldo M.; Hartz, Christopher L.

    2006-11-01

    A beta level evaluation of the GASGUARD® SAS GGT Arsine ion implant dopant supply developed by Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. was conducted by Atmel Corporation. The evaluation included characterization of the normalized wafer yield, mass spectra, ionization efficiency, flow rate, beam current, extraction of usable material and cylinder lifetime. This new and novel sub-atmospheric dopant gas delivery system utilizes a unique electrochemical process, which can generate, on demand, high flows of arsine at a constant 400 torr pressure while limiting net inventory of arsine to only 1 gram. This paper illustrates how Atmel Corporation evaluated and released this new arsine dopant delivery system for commercial production and verified high delivery capacity, resulting in reduced gas costs and increased cylinder life compared to the traditional adsorbent based technology.

  17. GéoSAS: A modular and interoperable Open Source Spatial Data Infrastructure for research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bera, R.; Squividant, H.; Le Henaff, G.; Pichelin, P.; Ruiz, L.; Launay, J.; Vanhouteghem, J.; Aurousseau, P.; Cudennec, C.

    2015-05-01

    To-date, the commonest way to deal with geographical information and processes still appears to consume local resources, i.e. locally stored data processed on a local desktop or server. The maturity and subsequent growing use of OGC standards to exchange data on the World Wide Web, enhanced in Europe by the INSPIRE Directive, is bound to change the way people (and among them research scientists, especially in environmental sciences) make use of, and manage, spatial data. A clever use of OGC standards can help scientists to better store, share and use data, in particular for modelling. We propose a framework for online processing by making an intensive use of OGC standards. We illustrate it using the Spatial Data Infrastructure (SDI) GéoSAS which is the SDI set up for researchers' needs in our department. It is based on the existing open source, modular and interoperable Spatial Data Architecture geOrchestra.

  18. A warning concerning the estimation of multinomial logistic models with correlated responses in SAS.

    PubMed

    de Rooij, Mark; Worku, Hailemichael M

    2012-08-01

    Kuss and McLerran in a paper in this journal provide SAS code for the estimation of multinomial logistic models for correlated data. Their motivation derived from two papers that recommended to estimate such models using a Poisson likelihood, which is according to Kuss and McLerran "statistically correct but computationally inefficient". Kuss and McLerran propose several estimating methods. Some of these are based on the fact that the multinomial model is a multivariate binary model. Subsequently a procedure proposed by Wright is exploited to fit the models. In this paper we will show that the new computation methods, based on the approach by Wright, are statistically incorrect because they do not take into account that for multinomial data a multivariate link function is needed. An alternative estimation strategy is proposed using the clustered bootstrap. PMID:22398107

  19. SAS-2 gamma-ray observations of PSR 1747-46. [radio pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.; Lamb, R. C.

    1976-01-01

    Evidence is reported for the observation of gamma-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 1747-46 by the gamma-ray telescope aboard SAS 2. The evidence is based on the presence of both an approximately 3-sigma enhancement of gamma rays at the pulsar's location and an approximately 4-sigma peak in the phase plot of 79 gamma-ray events whose phase was calculated from the pulsar's known period. The gamma-ray pulsation is found to appear at a phase lag of about 0.16 from that predicted by the radio observations. The pulsed gamma-ray fluxes above 35 MeV and 100 MeV are estimated, and it is shown that the gamma-ray pulse width is similar to the radio pulse width. It is concluded that PSR 1747-46 is a most likely candidate for pulsed gamma-ray emission.

  20. Observations of Hercules X-1 with SAS-3 during 1975 July

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joss, P. C.; Li, F. K.; Wang, Y.-M.; Hearn, D. R.

    1977-01-01

    X-ray pulsations from Her X-1 with energies between 0.1 and 30 keV were observed for four days with the SAS-3 satellite, during the 1975 July-August ON state of the source. The existence of a strong flux between 0.1 and 0.4 keV, with pulsations that are out of phase with those above 1 keV, is confirmed. A pulsed flux in the 19-30 keV band was discovered. The average fractional rate of change in pulse period between 1972 and 1975 was about 3 x 10 to the -6th/yr, and the absolute value of the average fractional rate of change in orbital period during the same interval was not greater than 5 x 10 to the -7th/yr

  1. SAS-2 observations of the high energy gamma radiation from the Vela region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-B high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg smaller than 12 smaller than 290 deg show a statistically significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy larger than 100 MeV. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from the supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, than on the order of 3 x 10 to the 50th power ergs would have been released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  2. Tabulated data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray telescope

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.; Ogelman, H. B.; Tuner, T.; Ozel, M. E.

    1978-01-01

    The second small astronomy satellite (SAS-2) carried a high energy gamma ray telescope into an equitorial orbit with a 2 D inclination, an apogee of 610 km, and a perigee of 440 km. The energy threshold of the instrument was about 30 MeV, the energy of the gamma rays could be measured up to about 200 MeV, and the integral intensity above 200 MeV could also be measured. Summary tables of the gamma ray data are presented in two energy bands, 35-100 MeV and 100 MeV. The sky was divided into 144 solid angle elements, and, in each solid angle element for which data exist, the number of gamma rays observed is given and also the exposure factor. Information is provided to permit conversion of these data into approximate intensities.

  3. SAS-2 high-energy gamma-ray observations of the Vela pulsar

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Ogelman, H. B.

    1975-01-01

    The Second Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-2) high-energy (in excess of 35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope has detected pulsed gamma-ray emission at the radio period from PSR 0833-45, the Vela pulsar, as well as an unpulsed flux from the Vela region. The pulsed emission consists of two peaks following the single radio peak by about 13 ms and 48 ms. The luminosity of the pulsed emission above 100 MeV from Vela is about 0.1 that of the pulsar NP 0532 in the Crab nebula, whereas the pulsed emission from Vela at optical wavelengths is less than 0.0002 that from the Crab. The relatively high intensity of the pulsed gamma-ray emission, and the double peak structure, compared with the single pulse in the radio emission, suggest that the high-energy gamma-ray pulsar emission may be produced under different conditions from those at lower energies.

  4. SAS-2 observations of gamma rays from the galactic plane. [noting longitude and latitude observation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Preliminary data are given for the SAS-2 high energy galactic gamma ray observation. These data include both latitude and longitude distributions. The longitude distribution shows a high density region. The latitude distributions toward the center and the anti-center are markedly different, the former showing a two-component structure of half-widths of approximately 3 and 6 deg. The energy spectrum in the range 35 to 200 MeV is hard, consistent with cosmic ray interactions with interstellar matter, including neutral pions decay and emission from energetic electron interactions. The data is consistent with an interpretation in terms of the confinement of the cosmic rays in the spiral arms.

  5. Spacecraft control section for the improved Small Astronomy Satellite /SAS-C/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Townsend, J. R.

    1973-01-01

    The upgraded spacecraft control section for the Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS-C) incorporates a remarkable amount of flexibility for a small satellite. Able to point its thrust axis to any direction in space, it can also spin or slow its outer body rotation to zero for star-locked pointing of side viewing experiments. A programmable telemetry system and delayed command system enhance the inherent capability of a spacecraft designed to be used for a variety of experiments, each of which can be built independently and attached just prior to final acceptance testing and launch. The design of this new spacecraft, whose first launch is scheduled for 1975, is provided in sufficient detail to permit the reader to ascertain its suitability for specific experiments.

  6. Final SAS-2 gamma-ray results on sources in the galactic anticenter region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.

    1977-01-01

    Final results are presented for SAS-2 observations of high-energy gamma-rays from the galactic anticenter region. Three main gamma-ray features are shown to characterize this region: a localized source associated with the Crab Nebula and its pulsar, another localized source near galactic coordinates 195 deg, +5 deg, and a general enhancement of the diffuse background 10 to 15 deg south of the galactic plane, which is associated with the Gould Belt. For the Crab, it is found that the radiation is mostly pulsed, the pulsed fraction increases with energy, and the intensity of the radiation in the main and interpulse peaks is approximately the same. The other localized source, provisionally designated as gamma 195+5, is found to have a harder spectrum than the Crab but no obvious radio counterpart; emission from an external galaxy is ruled out.

  7. Celestial diffuse gamma-ray emission observed by SAS-2 and its interpretation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.; Thompson, D. J.; Gelman, H.; Ozel, M.; Tumer, T.

    1977-01-01

    A clearly established diffuse celestial gamma-ray component was seen by SAS-2 above 35 MeV, after examining several regions of the sky at different latitudes, including the north celestial pole. For energies above 100 MeV the gamma ray results are consistent with an equation of the form I(b)=C1+C2/sin b with the second term being dominant, suggesting that the radiation above 100 MeV comes largely from the local regions of the galactic disk. Between 35 and 100 MeV, a similar equation is also a reasonable representation of the data, but here the two terms are comparable, with the first, or isotropic term, actually being the larger one. In addition to indicating that the diffuse radiation is partially galactic, these results imply a steepness for the energy spectrum of the diffuse isotropic component which places significant constraints on possible theoretical models of this radiation.

  8. A search of the SAS-2 data for pulsed gamma-ray emission from radio pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogelman, H. B.; Fichtel, C. E.

    1976-01-01

    Data from the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray experiment were examined for pulsed emission from each of 75 radio pulsars which were viewed by the instrument and which have sufficiently well defined period and period derivative information from radio observations to allow for gamma ray periodicity searches. When gamma ray arrival times were converted to pulsar phase using the radio reference timing information, two pulsars, PSR 1747-46 and PSR 1818-04, showed positive effects, each with a probability less than 0.0001 of being a random fluctuation in the data for that pulsar. These are in addition to PSR 0531+21 and PSR 0833-45, previously reported. The results of this study suggest that gamma-ray astronomy has reached the detection threshold for gamma ray pulsars and that work in the near future should give important information on the nature of pulsars.

  9. Radiation hazards to synchronous satellites: The IUE (SAS-D) mission

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stassinopoulos, E. G.

    1973-01-01

    The ambient trapped particle fluxes incident on the IUE (SAS-D) satellite were studied. Several synchronous elliptical and circular flight paths were evaluated and the effect of inclination, eccentricity, and parking longitude on vehicle encountered intensities was investigated. Temporal variations in the electron environment were considered and partially accounted for. Magnetic field calculations were performed with a current field model extrapolated to a later epoch with linear time terms. Orbital flux integrations were performed with the latest proton and electron environment models using new improved computational methods. The results are presented in graphical and tabular form; they are analyzed, explained, and discussed. Estimates of energetic solar proton fluxes are given for a one year mission at selected integral energies ranging from 10 to 100 MeV, calculated for a year of maximum solar activity during the next solar cycle.

  10. XMM-Newton Data Analysis with SAS Software Over GRID Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ceballos, M. T.; Campos, I.; Orviz, P.; Tapiador, D.; Álvarez, R.; Ibarra, A.; Gabriel, C.; Rodón, J. R.

    The processing of data obtained by the XMM-Newton observatory of the European Space Agency (ESA) is done using the SAS (Software Analysis System) tools provided by the ESA XMM Science Operations Centre (SOC). In order to be operative, these tools must be downloaded from the official SOC web pages and then installed (eventually upgraded) and run locally in the computer used by the data analyser. This process can be in some cases cumbersome for some users and local resources. In this presentation, we summarise the initiative developed from the SOC at the European Space Astronomy Centre (ESAC) in collaboration with the Instituto de Física de Cantabria (IFCA CSIC-UC), to run these tools in a GRID environment, and thus taking advantage of the resources distribution and the possibility of remote use of the analysis tools.

  11. Integrative Biological Chemistry Program Includes The Use Of Informatics Tools, GIS And SAS Software Applications

    PubMed Central

    D’Souza, Malcolm J.; Kashmar, Richard J.; Hurst, Kent; Fiedler, Frank; Gross, Catherine E.; Deol, Jasbir K.; Wilson, Alora

    2015-01-01

    Wesley College is a private, primarily undergraduate minority-serving institution located in the historic district of Dover, Delaware (DE). The College recently revised its baccalaureate biological chemistry program requirements to include a one-semester Physical Chemistry for the Life Sciences course and project-based experiential learning courses using instrumentation, data-collection, data-storage, statistical-modeling analysis, visualization, and computational techniques. In this revised curriculum, students begin with a traditional set of biology, chemistry, physics, and mathematics major core-requirements, a geographic information systems (GIS) course, a choice of an instrumental analysis course or a statistical analysis systems (SAS) programming course, and then, students can add major-electives that further add depth and value to their future post-graduate specialty areas. Open-sourced georeferenced census, health and health disparity data were coupled with GIS and SAS tools, in a public health surveillance system project, based on US county zip-codes, to develop use-cases for chronic adult obesity where income, poverty status, health insurance coverage, education, and age were categorical variables. Across the 48 contiguous states, obesity rates are found to be directly proportional to high poverty and inversely proportional to median income and educational achievement. For the State of Delaware, age and educational attainment were found to be limiting obesity risk-factors in its adult population. Furthermore, the 2004–2010 obesity trends showed that for two of the less densely populated Delaware counties; Sussex and Kent, the rates of adult obesity were found to be progressing at much higher proportions when compared to the national average. PMID:26191337

  12. Risk assessment of coal production: an information system user's manual. [SAS (Statistical Analysis System) format

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, A.P.; Birchfield, T.E.; Fore, C.S.

    1982-10-01

    A specialized information system comprising all US domestic coal mine and processing plant injuries as reported to the Mine Safety and Health Administration of the US Department of Labor for the years 1975 through 1980 has been developed at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) for online and batch users. The data are stored in two principal datasets: (1) annual summaries of accidental injuries and fatalities in both surface and underground bituminous and anthracite mines, as well as information on injuries suffered by workers employed in coal-processing (blending, crushing, etc.) facilities; and (2) annual summaries of employment (person-hours, number of individuals) and production (tons) of each domestic mine or processing facility for which the US Department of Labor has granted an operating permit. There are currently more than 232 000 records available online to interested users. Data are recorded for the following variables: county, state, date of injury, sex of victim, age at time of accident, degree of injury, occupation title at time of injury, activity during injury, location of accident, type of coal, type of mine, type of mining machine, type of accident, source and nature of injury, part of body injured, total mine experience, experience at current mine and job title held at time of injury, and number of days away from work or number of days restricted or charged due to the injury. As these values are organized by FIPS (Federal Information Processing Standards) county code for each reporting facility, compilations may be made on a subregional or substate basis. The datasets have been established in SAS (Statistical Analysis System) format and are readily manipulated by SAS routines available at ORNL. Several appendices are included in the manual to provide the user with a detailed description of all the codes available for data retrieval. Sample retrieval sessions are also incorporated.

  13. Analyses of Weapons-Grade MOX VVER-1000 Neutronics Benchmarks: Pin-Cell Calculations with SCALE/SAS2H

    SciTech Connect

    Ellis, R.J.

    2001-01-11

    A series of unit pin-cell benchmark problems have been analyzed related to irradiation of mixed oxide fuel in VVER-1000s (water-water energetic reactors). One-dimensional, discrete-ordinates eigenvalue calculations of these benchmarks were performed at ORNL using the SAS2H control sequence module of the SCALE-4.3 computational code system, as part of the Fissile Materials Disposition Program (FMDP) of the US DOE. Calculations were also performed using the SCALE module CSAS to confirm the results. The 238 neutron energy group SCALE nuclear data library 238GROUPNDF5 (based on ENDF/B-V) was used for all calculations. The VVER-1000 pin-cell benchmark cases modeled with SAS2H included zero-burnup calculations for eight fuel material variants (from LEU UO{sub 2} to weapons-grade MOX) at five different reactor states, and three fuel depletion cases up to high burnup. Results of the SAS2H analyses of the VVER-1000 neutronics benchmarks are presented in this report. Good general agreement was obtained between the SAS2H results, the ORNL results using HELIOS-1.4 with ENDF/B-VI nuclear data, and the results from several Russian benchmark studies using the codes TVS-M, MCU-RFFI/A, and WIMS-ABBN. This SAS2H benchmark study is useful for the verification of HELIOS calculations, the HELIOS code being the principal computational tool at ORNL for physics studies of assembly design for weapons-grade plutonium disposition in Russian reactors.

  14. [Alport's syndrome (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Huismans, H

    1978-05-01

    A case report is given of a 22-years old student (whose brother had Alport's syndrome) with recurrent central corneal swelling and paracentral erosions of the cornea of both eyes. Further signs of beginning Alport's syndrome in this case are disturbance of re-adaptation after dazzling (Mesoptometer) and paracentral scotomata in the visual fields. Remarkable was the small diameter of the disc in both eyes (1.37 mm). Local therapy was Scopolamin-eye-drops, Actihaemyl- and especially Cystein-Gel (2.4%). PMID:672101

  15. Evidence for the binary nature of A0535+26. [SAS-3 observation of transient X ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rappaport, S.; Bradt, H.; Clark, G. W.; Jernigan, J. G.; Joss, P. C.

    1976-01-01

    The transient X-ray source A0535+26 was observed extensively with the SAS-3 satellite on two occasions. Sufficient timing data on the 104-s periodicity were obtained to indicate that the pulse period was changing during both of the observations. The possibility that these period changes are intrinsic to the compact star (e.g., due to accretion torques) cannot be completely excluded. However, it is demonstrated that all of the SAS-3 timing data can be explained by orbital motion of the X-ray star about a companion. Constraints are then placed on the orbital elements of the system. The results indicate a model for this source that consists of a neutron star in a long-period orbit (period of at least 17 days) about an OB star with a variable stellar wind.

  16. Cdk1 Phosphorylates Drosophila Sas-4 to Recruit Polo to Daughter Centrioles and Convert Them to Centrosomes.

    PubMed

    Novak, Zsofia A; Wainman, Alan; Gartenmann, Lisa; Raff, Jordan W

    2016-06-20

    Centrosomes and cilia are organized by a centriole pair comprising an older mother and a younger daughter. Centriole numbers are tightly regulated, and daughter centrioles (which assemble in S phase) cannot themselves duplicate or organize centrosomes until they have passed through mitosis. It is unclear how this mitotic "centriole conversion" is regulated, but it requires Plk1/Polo kinase. Here we show that in flies, Cdk1 phosphorylates the conserved centriole protein Sas-4 during mitosis. This creates a Polo-docking site that helps recruit Polo to daughter centrioles and is required for the subsequent recruitment of Asterless (Asl), a protein essential for centriole duplication and mitotic centrosome assembly. Point mutations in Sas-4 that prevent Cdk1 phosphorylation or Polo docking do not block centriole disengagement during mitosis, but block efficient centriole conversion and lead to embryonic lethality. These observations can explain why daughter centrioles have to pass through mitosis before they can duplicate and organize a centrosome. PMID:27326932

  17. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  18. Causes of metabolic syndrome and obesity-related co-morbidities Part 1: A composite unifying theory review of human-specific co-adaptations to brain energy consumption.

    PubMed

    McGill, Anne-Thea

    2014-01-01

    The medical, research and general community is unable to effect significantly decreased rates of central obesity and related type II diabetes mellitus (TIIDM), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer. All conditions seem to be linked by the concept of the metabolic syndrome (MetS), but the underlying causes are not known. MetS markers may have been mistaken for causes, thus many treatments are destined to be suboptimal. The current paper aims to critique current paradigms, give explanations for their persistence, and to return to first principles in an attempt to determine and clarify likely causes of MetS and obesity related comorbidities. A wide literature has been mined, study concepts analysed and the basics of human evolution and new biochemistry reviewed. A plausible, multifaceted composite unifying theory is formulated. The basis of the theory is that the proportionately large, energy-demanding human brain may have driven co-adaptive mechanisms to provide, or conserve, energy for the brain. A 'dual system' is proposed. 1) The enlarged, complex cortico-limbic-striatal system increases dietary energy by developing strong neural self-reward/motivation pathways for the acquisition of energy dense food, and (2) the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) cellular protection system amplifies antioxidant, antitoxicant and repair activity by employing plant chemicals, becoming highly energy efficient in humans. The still-evolving, complex human cortico-limbic-striatal system generates strong behavioural drives for energy dense food procurement, including motivating agricultural technologies and social system development. Addiction to such foods, leading to neglect of nutritious but less appetizing 'common or garden' food, appears to have occurred. Insufficient consumption of food micronutrients prevents optimal human NRF2 function. Inefficient oxidation of excess energy forces central and non-adipose cells to store excess toxic lipid. Oxidative stress and

  19. Past and future corollaries of theories on causes of metabolic syndrome and obesity related co-morbidities part 2: a composite unifying theory review of human-specific co-adaptations to brain energy consumption

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Forward A composite unifying theory on causes of obesity related-MetS has been formulated and published in an accompanying article (1). In the current article, the historical and recent past, present and future corollaries of this theory are discussed. By presenting this composite theory and corollaries, it is hoped that human evolution and physiology will be viewed and studied from a new vantage point. The politics of management of ecological farming and nutrition will change, a profound reconfiguration of scientific theory generation and advancement in a ‘high-tech’ world can be made, and pathways for solutions recognised. Metabolic syndrome (MetS) predicts type II diabetes mellitus (TIIDM), cardiovascular disease (CVD) and cancer, and their rates have escalated over the last few decades. Obesity related co-morbidities also overlap the concept of the metabolic syndrome (MetS). However, understanding of the syndrome’s underlying causes may have been misapprehended. The current paper follows on from a theory review by McGill, A-T in Archives of Public Health, 72: 30. This accompanying paper utilises research on human evolution and new biochemistry to theorise on why MetS and obesity arise and how they affect the population. The basis of this composite unifying theory is that the proportionately large, energy-demanding human brain may have driven co-adaptive mechanisms to provide, or conserve, energy for the brain. A ‘dual system’ is proposed. 1) The enlarged, complex cortico-limbic-striatal system increases dietary energy by developing strong neural self-reward/motivation pathways for the acquisition of energy dense food, and (2) the nuclear factor-erythroid 2-related factor 2 (NRF2) cellular protection system amplifies antioxidant, antitoxicant and repair activity by employing plant chemicals. In humans who consume a nutritious diet, the NRF2 system has become highly energy efficient. Other relevant human-specific co-adaptations are explored. In order to

  20. Pseudoaminopterin syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kraoua, Lilia; Capri, Yline; Perrin, Laurence; Benmansour, Abdelmajjid; Verloes, Alain

    2012-09-01

    Pseudoaminopterin syndrome or aminopterin syndrome-like sine aminopterin (ASSA syndrome--OMIM 600325] is a rare autosomal recessive syndrome defined by characteristic dysmorphic features, skeletal defects, limb anomalies, cryptorchidism, and growth retardation. The syndrome owes its name to the fact that patients resemble the children exposed to aminopterin or to methotrexate, two dihydrofolate reductase inhibitors used for chemotherapy, or as an abortificient in early pregnancy. Ten patients have been described with pseudoaminopterin syndrome. Their phenotype is variable, and differs from the phenotype resulting from folic acid deprivation, leading to the notion that the pathogenesis may be more complex than simple vitamin deficiency. We report on an Algerian patient with pseudoaminopterin syndrome, review the previously reported cases and confirm that pseudoaminopterin syndrome does not result from a detectable contiguous gene imbalance as high resolution CGH array was normal in this child. PMID:22811276

  1. Usher Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Usher syndrome is an inherited disease that causes serious hearing loss and retinitis pigmentosa, an eye disorder ... hearing and vision. There are three types of Usher syndrome: People with type I are deaf from ...

  2. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... to have children and who have a family history of Morquio syndrome. Counseling is also recommended for families who have a child with Morquio syndrome to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available.

  3. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001549.htm Asperger syndrome To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form ...

  4. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis References Joseph RL, Alleva JT, Hudgins TH. Piriformis syndrome. In: Frontera: Essentials of Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation . 3rd ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2014:chap ...

  5. Pendred Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thyroid gland. Pendred syndrome also can affect the vestibular system, which controls balance. Some people with Pendred syndrome will show vestibular weakness when their balance is tested. However, the ...

  6. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Turner syndrome is a genetic disorder that affects a girl's development. The cause is a missing or ... t work properly. Other physical features typical of Turner syndrome are Short, "webbed" neck with folds of ...

  7. Premenstrual syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome. Cochrane Database Syst Rev. 2009;2:CD001396. Lentz GM. Primary and secondary dysmenorrhea, premenstrual syndrome, and premenstrual dysphoric disorder: etiology, diagnosis, management. In: Lentz GM, Lobo RA, Gershenson DM, Katz VL, eds. ...

  8. Cushing syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing syndrome is called exogenous Cushing syndrome . Prednisone, dexamethasone, and prednisolone are examples of this type of ... Blood cortisol levels Blood sugar Saliva cortisol levels Dexamethasone suppression test 24-hour urine for cortisol and ...

  9. Cushing's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Cushing's syndrome, also called hypercortisolism , is a rare endocrine disorder caused by chronic exposure of the body's tissues ... removing the tumor while minimizing the chance of endocrine deficiency or long-term ... for Cushing's Syndrome Clinical Trials ...

  10. Hurler syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hurler syndrome is a rare disease of metabolism in which a person cannot break down long chains of sugar molecules called glycosaminoglycans (formerly called mucopolysaccharides). Hurler syndrome belongs to a group of diseases called mucopolysaccharidosis, ...

  11. Bloom's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ... Glycogen Storage Disease, Type 1A Joubert Syndrome Maple Syrup Urine Disease and DLD Mucolipidosis IV (MLIV) Nemaline ...

  12. Angelman Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... causes developmental delay and neurological problems. The physician Harry Angelman first delineated the syndrome in 1965, when ... 202-534-3731 Prader-Willi Syndrome Association 8588 Potter Park Drive Suite 500 Sarasota, FL 34238 national@ ...

  13. Asperger syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Asperger syndrome is often considered a high functioning form of autism. It can lead to difficulty interacting socially, repeat behaviors, and clumsiness. Asperger syndrome is a part of the larger developmental disorder ...

  14. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Rett syndrome is a rare genetic disease that causes developmental and nervous system problems, mostly in girls. It's related to autism spectrum disorder. Babies with Rett syndrome seem to grow and develop normally at first. ...

  15. Mechanisms of intestinal adaptation.

    PubMed

    Rubin, Deborah C; Levin, Marc S

    2016-04-01

    Following loss of functional small bowel surface area due to surgical resection for therapy of Crohn's disease, ischemia, trauma or other disorders, the remnant gut undergoes a morphometric and functional compensatory adaptive response which has been best characterized in preclinical models. Increased crypt cell proliferation results in increased villus height, crypt depth and villus hyperplasia, accompanied by increased nutrient, fluid and electrolyte absorption. Clinical observations suggest that functional adaptation occurs in humans. In the immediate postoperative period, patients with substantial small bowel resection have massive fluid and electrolyte loss with reduced nutrient absorption. For many patients, the adaptive response permits partial or complete weaning from parenteral nutrition (PN), within two years following resection. However, others have life-long PN dependence. An understanding of the molecular mechanisms that regulate the gut adaptive response is critical for developing novel therapies for short bowel syndrome. Herein we present a summary of key studies that seek to elucidate the mechanisms that regulate post-resection adaptation, focusing on stem and crypt cell proliferation, epithelial differentiation, apoptosis, enterocyte function and the role of growth factors and the enteric nervous system. PMID:27086888

  16. Cucurbitacin E as Inducer of Cell Death and Apoptosis in Human Oral Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cell Line SAS

    PubMed Central

    Hung, Chao-Ming; Chang, Chi-Chang; Lin, Chen-Wei; Ko, Shun-Yao; Hsu, Yi-Chiang

    2013-01-01

    Human oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) is a common form of malignant cancer, for which radiotherapy or chemotherapy are the main treatment methods. Cucurbitacin E (CuE) is a natural compound previously shown to be an antifeedant as well as a potent chemopreventive agent against several types of cancer. The present study investigates anti-proliferation (using MTT assay, CuE demonstrated cytotoxic activity against SAS cell with IC50 values at 3.69 μM) and induced apoptosis of human oral squamous cell carcinoma SAS cells after 24 h treatment with CuE. Mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) and caspase activity were studied and our results indicate that CuE inhibits cell proliferation as well as the activation of apoptois in SAS cells. Both effects increased in proportion to the dosage of CuE and apoptosis was induced via mitochondria- and caspase-dependent pathways. CuE can induce cell death by a mechanism that is not dependent on apoptosis induction, and thus represents a promising anticancer agent for prevention and treatment of OSCC. PMID:23965977

  17. Identifying sleep apnea syndrome using heart rate and breathing effort variation analysis based on ballistocardiography.

    PubMed

    Weichao Zhao; Hongbo Ni; Xingshe Zhou; Yalong Song; Tianben Wang

    2015-08-01

    Sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) is regarded as one of the most common sleep-related breathing disorders, which can severely affect sleep quality. Since SAS is usually accompanied with the cyclical heart rate variation (HRV), many studies have been conducted on heart rate (HR) to identify it at an earlier stage. While most related work mainly based on clinical devices or signals (e.g., polysomnography (PSG), electrocardiography (ECG)), in this paper we focus on the ballistocardiographic (BCG) signal which is obtained in a non-invasive way. Moreover, as the precision and reliability of BCG signal are not so good as PSG or ECG, we propose a fine-grained feature extraction and analysis approach in SAS recognition. Our analysis takes both the basic HRV features and the breathing effort variation into consideration during different sleep stages rather than the whole night. The breathing effort refers to the mechanical interaction between respiration and BCG signal when SAS events occur, which is independent from autonomous nervous system (ANS) modulations. Specifically, a novel method named STC-Min is presented to extract the breathing effort variation feature. The basic HRV features depict the ANS modulations on HR and Sample Entropy and Detrended Fluctuation Analysis are applied for the evaluations. All the extracted features along with personal factors are fed into the knowledge-based support vector machine (KSVM) classification model, and the prior knowledge is based on dataset distribution and domain knowledge. Experimental results on 42 subjects in 3 nights validate the effectiveness of the methods and features in identifying SAS (90.46% precision rate and 88.89% recall rate). PMID:26737303

  18. Celestial diffuse gamma radiation above 30 MeV observed by SAS-2

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Hartman, R. C.

    1973-01-01

    The Small Astronomy Satellite (SAS)-2, launched on November 15, 1972, carried into orbit a 32-deck magnetic-core digitized spark chamber gamma ray telescope to study celestial gamma radiation in the energy range above 30 MeV. In the study of several regions with b sub 2 15 deg, a finite, diffuse flux of gamma rays with a steep energy spectrum in the energy region from 35 to 200 MeV is observed. Representing the energy spectrum by a power law of the form dJ/dE = AE to - alpha power over this energy range, alpha is found along with the integral flux above 100 MeV. Combining this result with existing low energy gamma ray data yields an energy spectrum which is not a simple power law in energy, as in the X-ray region, but which demonstrates first an increase and then a decrease in slope, consistent within uncertainties with that predicted by cosmological theories, including the continuous production of high energy gamma rays primarily from neutral pi mesons throughout the history of the universe.

  19. Diffuse gamma radiation. [intensity, energy spectrum and spatial distribution from SAS 2 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fichtel, C. E.; Simpson, G. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1978-01-01

    Results are reported for an investigation of the intensity, energy spectrum, and spatial distribution of the diffuse gamma radiation detected by SAS 2 away from the galactic plane in the energy range above 35 MeV. The gamma-ray data are compared with relevant data obtained at other wavelengths, including 21-cm emission, radio continuum radiation, and the limited UV and radio information on local molecular hydrogen. It is found that there are two quite distinct components to the diffuse radiation, one of which shows a good correlation with the galactic matter distribution and continuum radiation, while the other has a much steeper energy spectrum and appears to be isotropic at least on a coarse scale. The galactic component is interpreted in terms of its implications for both local and more distant regions of the Galaxy. The apparently isotropic radiation is discussed partly with regard to the constraints placed on possible models by the steep energy spectrum, the observed intensity, and an upper limit on the anisotropy.

  20. Observations of the giant radio lobes region of Centaurus A with SAS 3

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, F. J.; Clark, G. W.

    1981-01-01

    Observations of the X-ray flux from the extended radio lobes of the galaxy Centaurus A obtained with the SAS 3 observatory are reported. The 15 x 15 deg region that includes the lobes was mapped by superposing data from raster scans with the horizontal tubular collimator detectors, which have a 1.7 deg FWHM circular field of view. Data obtained is consistent with the presence of superposed emission from the point sources NGC 5128 and MX 1312-42, a previously unreported source detected by the Einstein Observatory IPC. Fluxes of 4.63 + or - 0.14 x 10 to the -10th and 4.6 + or - 0.6 x 10 to the -11th ergs/sq cm per sec were measured for NGC 5128 and MX 1312-42, respectively, with best fit power law spectra of indices 0.83 + or - 0.04 and 0.62 + or - 0.10 and hydrogen column densities of 1.23 + or - 0.10 x 10 to the 23rd and 9.7 + or - 15.0 x 10 to the 21st atoms/sq cm. Results imply an upper limit of 2.9 x 10 to the 11th for the X-ray emission from the extended radio lobes of Cen A between 2 and 10 keV, which indicates a lower limit to the magnetic field in the lobes of 1.6 x 10 to the -6th gauss.

  1. SAS-2 observations of the galactic gamma radiation from the Vela region

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    Data from a scan of the galactic plane by the SAS-2 high energy gamma ray experiment in the region 250 deg l2 290 deg show a statistically-significant excess over the general radiation from the galactic plane for gamma radiation of energy 100 MeV in the region 260 deg l2 270 deg and -7.5 deg b2 0 deg. If the enhanced gamma radiation results from interactions of cosmic rays with galactic matter, as the energy spectrum suggests, it seems reasonable to associate the enhancement with large scale galactic features, such as spiral arm segments in that direction, or with the region surrounding the Vela supernova remnant, with which PSR 0833-45 is associated. If the excess is attributed to cosmic rays released from this supernova interacting with the interstellar matter in that region, then on the order of 3.10 to the 50th power ergs would be released by that supernova in the form of cosmic rays.

  2. SAS 3 observations of two X-ray transient events with precursors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hoffman, J. A.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Doty, J.; Jernigan, J. G.; Haney, M.; Richardson, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    SAS 3 has observed two unusual fast transient X-ray events from different sources, one lasting about 150 s and one, approximately 1500 s. Both events were preceded by precursor pulses which lasted a few seconds and which rose and fell in less than 0.4 s. The precursors were separated from the 'main' events by several seconds, during which no X-rays were detected. There are similarities between the two main events and X-ray bursts in both their temporal and spectral evolution. The spectra of the main events started out much softer than the spectra of the precursors, became harder as they approached maximum intensity, and softened as they decayed. In the 1500-s event, X-rays with energies greater than 10 keV were delayed by about 80 s compared with 1.5-6-keV X-rays. A blackbody fit to the spectral data of the main event of approximately 1500-s duration gives a maximum temperature of 29 million K and a radius for the emitting region of at least about 9 km (at a distance of 10 kpc); this is similar to the temperature and sizes found for several X-ray burst sources.

  3. A search of the SAS-2 data for pulsed gamma-ray emission from radio pulsars

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ogelman, H.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Thompson, D. J.

    1976-01-01

    Data from the SAS-2 high-energy (above 35 MeV) gamma-ray experiment have been examined for pulsed emission from each of 75 radio pulsars which were viewed by the instrument and which have sufficiently well-defined period and period-derivative information from radio observations to allow for gamma-ray periodicity searches. When gamma-ray arrival times were converted to pulsar phase using the radio reference timing information, two pulsars, PSR 1747-46 and PSR 1818-04, showed positive effects, each with a probability of less than 1 part in 10,000 of being a random fluctuation in the data for that pulsar. These are in addition to PSR 0531+21 and PSR 0833-45, previously reported. The results of this study suggest that gamma-ray astronomy has reached the detection threshold for gamma-ray pulsars and that work in the near future should give important new information on the nature of pulsars.

  4. Further analysis of SAS 3 observations of the rapid burster /MXB 1730-335/

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Marshall, H. L.; Hoffman, J. A.; Doty, J.; Lewin, W. H. G.; Ulmer, M. P.

    1979-01-01

    SAS 3 observations of the rapid burster MXB 1730-335 are analyzed with specific reference to the rapidly repetitive type II bursts and also the type I bursts. It is found that: (1) there are two stable patterns in the recurrence of the rapidly repetitive type II bursts, designated modes I and II; (2) the range of type II burst energies is a factor of about 100 for mode I and a factor of about 10 for mode II; (3) type II burst spectra are best fitted by a blackbody of constant temperature (of the order of 18 million K), constant column density, and decreasing intensity; and (4) type I bursts are best fitted by a blackbody spectrum with decreasing temperature (approximately 24 million K during the first few seconds and 16 million K about 10 sec later). The spectral fits for both types of burst are shown to yield sizes for the emission region comparable to the radius of a neutron star. A model for the rapid burster is suggested.

  5. SAS-2 gamma-ray observations of PSR 1747-46

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Kniffen, D. A.; Lamb, R. C.; Oegelman, H. B.

    1976-01-01

    Observations with the SAS-2 high energy ( 35 MeV) gamma-ray telescope show evidence of gamma-ray emission from the radio pulsar PSR 1747-46. When the arrival times of gamma-rays from the region of the pulsar were converted to pulsar phases using the radio period and period derivative, a single peak was found in the phase plot, with a Poisson probability of occurring by chance of .00008. Independently, the time-averaged data for the PSR 1747-46 region show an enhancement over the surrounding region of the sky at the same galactic latitude, with a Poisson probability of chance occurrence of less than .008. The probability that these results are chance is the product of these two probabilities times the number of radio pulsars examined (73). This overall probability is sufficiently small (.00005) to suggest an identification of a new gamma-ray pulsar. In the gamma-ray pulsar plot, the peak falls 0.16 + or - 0.03 period after the radio pulsar peak. This phase shift is, within uncertainties, the same as that observed between the single radio peak and the first of the two gamma-ray peaks seen in the phase plot for PSR-0833-45 (the Vela pulsar).

  6. Sulfuric acid speleogenesis (SAS) close to the water table: Examples from southern France, Austria, and Sicily

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Waele, Jo; Audra, Philippe; Madonia, Giuliana; Vattano, Marco; Plan, Lukas; D'Angeli, Ilenia M.; Bigot, Jean-Yves; Anoux, Catherine; Nobécourt, Jean-Claude

    2016-01-01

    Caves formed by rising sulfuric waters have been described from all over the world in a wide variety of climate settings, from arid regions to mid-latitude and alpine areas. H2S is generally formed at depth by reduction of sulfates in the presence of hydrocarbons and is transported in solution through the deep aquifers. In tectonically disturbed areas major fractures eventually allow these H2S-bearing fluids to rise to the surface where oxidation processes can become active producing sulfuric acid. This extremely strong acid reacts with the carbonate bedrock creating caves, some of which are among the largest and most spectacular in the world. Production of sulfuric acid mostly occurs at or close to the water table but also in subaerial conditions in moisture films and droplets in the cave environment. These caves are generated at or immediately above the water table, where condensation-corrosion processes are dominant, creating a set of characteristic meso- and micromorphologies. Due to their close connection to the base level, these caves can also precisely record past hydrological and geomorphological settings. Certain authigenic cave minerals, produced during the sulfuric acid speleogenesis (SAS) phase, allow determination of the exact timing of speleogenesis. This paper deals with the morphological, geochemical and mineralogical description of four very typical sulfuric acid water table caves in Europe: the Grotte du Chat in the southern French Alps, the Acqua Fitusa Cave in Sicily (Italy), and the Bad Deutsch Altenburg and Kraushöhle caves in Austria.

  7. Integrating SAS and GIS software to improve habitat-use estimates from radiotelemetry data

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Kenow, K.P.; Wright, R.G.; Samuel, M.D.; Rasmussen, P.W.

    2001-01-01

    Radiotelemetry has been used commonly to remotely determine habitat use by a variety of wildlife species. However, habitat misclassification can occur because the true location of a radiomarked animal can only be estimated. Analytical methods that provide improved estimates of habitat use from radiotelemetry location data using a subsampling approach have been proposed previously. We developed software, based on these methods, to conduct improved habitat-use analyses. A Statistical Analysis System (SAS)-executable file generates a random subsample of points from the error distribution of an estimated animal location and formats the output into ARC/INFO-compatible coordinate and attribute files. An associated ARC/INFO Arc Macro Language (AML) creates a coverage of the random points, determines the habitat type at each random point from an existing habitat coverage, sums the number of subsample points by habitat type for each location, and outputs tile results in ASCII format. The proportion and precision of habitat types used is calculated from the subsample of points generated for each radiotelemetry location. We illustrate the method and software by analysis of radiotelemetry data for a female wild turkey (Meleagris gallopavo).

  8. Long-term effects of CPAP on daytime functioning in patients with sleep apnoea syndrome.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, A; Mayoralas, L R; Barbé, F; Pericás, J; Agusti, A G

    2000-04-01

    Daytime sleepiness, impaired cognitive performance and dysphoric mood are often present in patients with obstructive sleep apnoea syndrome (SAS). This prospective controlled study evaluates the effects of treatment with continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) during 1 yr on daytime functioning in a large group of patients with SAS. The authors studied 80 patients (mean+/-sem 49+/-1 yrs) with SAS with a mean apnoea-hypopnoea index of 60+/-2 h-1, and 80 healthy control subjects matched for sex and age (46+/-1 yrs.). Measurements were obtained at the beginning of the study and 12+/-1 months later, and included: daytime sleepiness (Epworth scale), depression and anxiety (Beck tests), vigilance (Steer-Clear) and reaction time (Psychometer Vigilance Test 192). Drug, coffee and alcohol intake, as well as the sleep schedule, were also recorded. Results showed that, before treatment, patients were more somnolent (p<0.001), anxious (p<0.01) and depressed (p<0.001) than control subjects. Also, they had a longer reaction time (p<0.05) and poorer vigilance (p<0.01). The use of CPAP improved significantly the levels of somnolence (p<0.0001) and vigilance (p<0.01), but failed to modify anxiety and depression. Reaction time changes were minor. Variables with a potential confounding effect did not change during the study. These results provide firm evidence to substantiate the use of continuous positive airway pressure in patients with sleep apnoea syndrome. PMID:10780758

  9. Dumping Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Disease Organizations​​ (PDF, 341 KB)​​​​​ Alternate Language URL Dumping Syndrome Page Content On this page: What is ... Nutrition Points to Remember Clinical Trials What is dumping syndrome? Dumping syndrome occurs when food, especially sugar, ...

  10. Velocardiofacial Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gothelf, Doron; Frisch, Amos; Michaelovsky, Elena; Weizman, Abraham; Shprintzen, Robert J.

    2009-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome (VCFS), also known as DiGeorge, conotruncal anomaly face, and Cayler syndromes, is caused by a microdeletion in the long arm of Chromosome 22. We review the history of the syndrome from the first clinical reports almost half a century ago to the current intriguing molecular findings associating genes from the…

  11. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Down syndrome is a genetic condition in which a person has 47 chromosomes instead of the usual 46. ... In most cases, Down syndrome occurs when there is an extra copy of chromosome 21. This form of Down syndrome is called trisomy 21. ...

  12. Promoting intestinal adaptation by nutrition and medication.

    PubMed

    Neelis, E G; Olieman, J F; Hulst, J M; de Koning, B A E; Wijnen, R M H; Rings, E H H M

    2016-04-01

    The ultimate goal in the treatment of short bowel syndrome is to wean patients off parenteral nutrition, by promoting intestinal adaptation. Intestinal adaptation is the natural compensatory process that occurs after small bowel resection. Stimulating the remaining bowel with enteral nutrition can enhance this process. Additionally, medication can be used to either reduce factors that complicate the adaptation process or to stimulate intestinal adaptation, such as antisecretory drugs and several growth factors. The aim of this review was to provide an overview of the best nutritional strategies and medication that best promote intestinal adaptation. PMID:27086889

  13. Oculocerebral hypopigmentation syndrome (Cross syndrome).

    PubMed

    Ozkan, H; Unsal, E; Köse, G

    1991-01-01

    A typical case of Cross syndrome with hypopigmentation, mental and psychomotor retardation, spasticity, bilateral optic atrophy and dental defects in a three-year-old boy is presented. The clinical features of this rare syndrome are discussed. PMID:1814043

  14. Mexican Seismic Alert System's SAS-I algorithm review considering strong earthquakes felt in Mexico City since 1985

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuellar Martinez, A.; Espinosa Aranda, J.; Suarez, G.; Ibarrola Alvarez, G.; Ramos Perez, S.; Camarillo Barranco, L.

    2013-05-01

    The Seismic Alert System of Mexico (SASMEX) uses three algorithms for alert activation that involve the distance between the seismic sensing field station (FS) and the city to be alerted; and the forecast for earthquake early warning activation in the cities integrated to the system, for example in Mexico City, the earthquakes occurred with the highest accelerations, were originated in the Pacific Ocean coast, whose distance this seismic region and the city, favors the use of algorithm called Algorithm SAS-I. This algorithm, without significant changes since its beginning in 1991, employs the data that generate one or more FS during P wave detection until S wave detection plus a period equal to the time employed to detect these phases; that is the double S-P time, called 2*(S-P). In this interval, the algorithm performs an integration process of quadratic samples from FS which uses a triaxial accelerometer to get two parameters: amplitude and growth rate measured until 2*(S-P) time. The parameters in SAS-I are used in a Magnitude classifier model, which was made from Guerrero Coast earthquakes time series, with reference to Mb magnitude mainly. This algorithm activates a Public or Preventive Alert if the model predicts whether Strong or Moderate earthquake. The SAS-I algorithm has been operating for over 23 years in the subduction zone of the Pacific Coast of Mexico, initially in Guerrero and followed by Oaxaca; and since March 2012 in the seismic region of Pacific covering the coasts among Jalisco, Colima, Michoacan, Guerrero and Oaxaca, where this algorithm has issued 16 Public Alert and 62 Preventive Alerts to the Mexico City where its soil conditions increase damages by earthquake such as the occurred in September 1985. This work shows the review of the SAS-I algorithm and possible alerts that it could generate from major earthquakes recordings detected by FS or seismometers near the earthquakes, coming from Pacific Ocean Coast whose have been felt in Mexico

  15. [An algorithm based on ECG signal for sleep apnea syndrome detection].

    PubMed

    Yu, Xiaomin; Tu, Yuewen; Huang, Chao; Ye, Shuming; Chen, Hang

    2013-10-01

    The diagnosis of sleep apnea syndrome (SAS) has a significant importance in clinic for preventing diseases of hypertention, coronary heart disease, arrhythmia and cerebrovascular disorder, etc. This study presents a novel method for SAS detection based on single-channel electrocardiogram (ECG) signal. The method preprocessed ECG and detected QRS waves to get RR signal and ECG-derived respiratory (EDR) signal. Then 40 time- and spectral-domain features were extracted to normalize the signals. After that support vector machine (SVM) was used to classify the signals as "apnea" or "normal". Finally, the performance of the method was evaluated by the MIT-BIH Apnea-ECG database, and an accuracy of 95% in train sets and an accuracy of 88% in test sets were achieved. PMID:24459959

  16. Intestinal mucosal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Drozdowski, Laurie; Thomson, Alan BR

    2006-01-01

    Intestinal failure is a condition characterized by malnutrition and/or dehydration as a result of the inadequate digestion and absorption of nutrients. The most common cause of intestinal failure is short bowel syndrome, which occurs when the functional gut mass is reduced below the level necessary for adequate nutrient and water absorption. This condition may be congenital, or may be acquired as a result of a massive resection of the small bowel. Following resection, the intestine is capable of adaptation in response to enteral nutrients as well as other trophic stimuli. Identifying factors that may enhance the process of intestinal adaptation is an exciting area of research with important potential clinical applications. PMID:16937429

  17. Reducing Incapacitating Symptoms during Space Flight: is Postural Deficiency Syndrome an Applicable Model?

    PubMed Central

    Souvestre, P A; Landrock, C K; Blaber, A P

    2008-01-01

    Severe and prolonged unmitigated SAS and SMS related symptoms have been thoroughly described in Astronauts during adaptation periods for orbital flight and post orbital flight. It has recently been shown that there is a strong correlation between these symptoms most often suffered by astronauts to that of the symptoms of patients suffering from Postural Deficiency Syndrome (PDS) on Earth that have been successfully assessed, diagnosed and treated. International peer-reviewed literature identifies PDS as a trauma induced medical condition which originates from central neural dysregulation of sensory-motor and cognitive controls; these dysfunctions can be accurately identified, measured, and monitored via a specific ocular-vestibular-postural monitoring system along with relevant clinical data. This higher level of understanding is necessary in order to reach the next stage of success for humans living and working in Space. Central sensory-motor and cognitive controls dysfunction underlie symptoms that can adversely impact and reflect alteration of eye-hand coordination, fine tuned dexterity, body positioning in space, space projection and trajectory control, perception of environment/obstacles, orientation in space and time, sensory motor and cognitive aspects of decision making, sensory-motor/cognitive error proneness. All of these factors are necessary for Astronaut's mission capabilities, while both carrying out operations in Space and performing the tasks required during and after re-entry. The objective of this paper is to elucidate how PDS related medical conditions are currently assessed, identified and monitored, and how these methodologies and technologies translate into a potential for better understanding of astronauts' potential incapacitation during space flight operations. PMID:19048092

  18. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  19. Sub-Milli Arcsecond Resolution Observations of the Optical Solar Limb with RHESSI/SAS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fivian, Martin D.; Hudson, Hugh; Krucker, Sam

    2015-04-01

    The Solar Aspect System (SAS) of the RHESSI satellite measures the optical solar limb with a cadence typically set at 100 samples/s. RHESSI has observed the Sun continuously since its launch in early 2002, and we have acquired a unique data set ranging over more than a full 11-year solar cycle and consisting of about 4x10^10 single data points. The optics has a point spread of about 4.5 arcsec FWHM imaging the red continuum onto three linear CCD sensors with a pixel resolution of 1.7 arcsec. However, careful study of systematics, masking of contaminated data, and accumulation of data over appropriate time intervals has led to measurements with sub-milli arcsec accuracy. Analyzing data for an initial period in 2004, these measurements have led to the most accurate oblateness measurement to date, 8.01+-0.14 milli arcsec (Fivian et al., 2008), a value consistent with models predicting an oblateness from surface rotation. An excess oblateness term can be attributed to magnetic elements possibly located in the enhanced network. We also study photometric properties of our data. Previous observations of latitude-dependent brightness variations at the limb had suggested the presence of a polar temperature excess as large as 1.5 K. The RHESSI observations, made with a rotating telescope in space, have great advantages in the rejection of systematic errors in the very precise photometry required for such an observation. Our measurements of latitude-dependent brightness variations at the limb lead to a quadrupolar term (a pole-to-equator temperature variation) of the order of 0.1 K, an order of magnitude smaller than previously reported. We present the analysis of these unique data, an overview of some results and we report on our progress as we apply our developed analysis method to the whole 13 years of data.

  20. RHESSI/SAS Observations of the Optical Solar Limb Over a Full Solar Cycle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fivian, M. D.; Hudson, H. S.

    2014-12-01

    The Solar Aspect System (SAS) of the RHESSI satellite measures the optical solar limb in the red continuum with a cadence typically set at 16 samples/s in each of three linear CCD sensors. RHESSI has observed the Sun continuously since its launch in early 2002, and we have acquired a unique data set ranging over a full 11-year solar cycle and consisting of about 3x10^10 single data points. Analyzing data for an initial period in 2004, these measurements have led to the most accurate oblateness measurement to date, 8.01+-0.14 milli arcsec (Fivian et al., 2008), a value consistent with models predicting an oblateness from surface rotation. An excess oblateness term can be attributed to magnetic elements possibly located in the enhanced network. We have started to also study photometric properties of our data. Previous observations of latitude-dependent brightness variations at the limb had suggested the presence of a polar temperature excess as large as 1.5 K. The RHESSI observations, made with a rotating telescope in space, have great advantages in the rejection of systematic errors in the very precise photometry required for such an observation. Our new measurements of latitude-dependent brightness variations at the limb lead to a quadrupolar term (a pole-to-equator temperature variation) of the order of 0.1 K, an order of magnitude smaller than previously reported. We present the analysis of these unique data, an overview of some results and we report on our progress as we apply our developed analysis method to the whole 12 years of data.

  1. RHESSI/SAS Observations of the Optical Solar Limb Over More Than 14 Years

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fivian, Martin; Hudson, Hugh S.; Krucker, Sam

    2016-05-01

    The Solar Aspect System (SAS) of the RHESSI satellite measures the optical solar limb with a cadence typically set at 100 samples/s.RHESSI has observed the Sun continuously since its launch in early 2002, and we have acquired a unique data set ranging over more than a full 11-year solar cycle and consisting of about 4x10^10 single data points.The optics has a point spread of about 4.5 arcsec FWHM imaging the red continuum onto three linear CCD sensors with a pixel resolution of 1.7 arcsec.However, careful study of systematics, masking of contaminated data, and accumulation of data over appropriate time intervals has led to measurementswith sub-milli arcsec accuracy.Analyzing data for an initial period in 2004, these measurements have led to the most accurate oblateness measurement to date, 8.01+-0.14 milli arcsec (Fivian et al., 2008), a value consistent with models predicting an oblateness from surface rotation.An excess oblateness term can be attributed to magnetic elements possibly located in the enhanced network.We also study photometric properties of our data. Previous observations of latitude-dependent brightness variations at the limb had suggested the presence of a polar temperature excess as large as 1.5 K.The RHESSI observations, made with a rotating telescope in space, have great advantages in the rejection of systematic errors in the very precise photometry required for such an observation.Our measurements of latitude-dependent brightness variations at the limb lead to a quadrupolar term (a pole-to-equator temperature variation) of the order of 0.1 K, an order of magnitude smaller than previously reported.We present the analysis of these unique data, an overview of some results and we report on our progress as we apply our developed analysis method to the whole 14 years of data.

  2. Comprehensive analysis of interacting proteins and genome-wide location studies of the Sas3-dependent NuA3 histone acetyltransferase complex

    PubMed Central

    Vicente-Muñoz, Sara; Romero, Paco; Magraner-Pardo, Lorena; Martinez-Jimenez, Celia P.; Tordera, Vicente; Pamblanco, Mercè

    2014-01-01

    Histone acetylation affects several aspects of gene regulation, from chromatin remodelling to gene expression, by modulating the interplay between chromatin and key transcriptional regulators. The exact molecular mechanism underlying acetylation patterns and crosstalk with other epigenetic modifications requires further investigation. In budding yeast, these epigenetic markers are produced partly by histone acetyltransferase enzymes, which act as multi-protein complexes. The Sas3-dependent NuA3 complex has received less attention than other histone acetyltransferases (HAT), such as Gcn5-dependent complexes. Here, we report our analysis of Sas3p-interacting proteins using tandem affinity purification (TAP), coupled with mass spectrometry. This analysis revealed Pdp3p, a recently described component of NuA3, to be one of the most abundant Sas3p-interacting proteins. The PDP3 gene, was TAP-tagged and protein complex purification confirmed that Pdp3p co-purified with the NuA3 protein complex, histones, and several transcription-related and chromatin remodelling proteins. Our results also revealed that the protein complexes associated with Sas3p presented HAT activity even in the absence of Gcn5p and vice versa. We also provide evidence that Sas3p cannot substitute Gcn5p in acetylation of lysine 9 in histone H3 in vivo. Genome-wide occupancy of Sas3p using ChIP-on-chip tiled microarrays showed that Sas3p was located preferentially within the 5′-half of the coding regions of target genes, indicating its probable involvement in the transcriptional elongation process. Hence, this work further characterises the function and regulation of the NuA3 complex by identifying novel post-translational modifications in Pdp3p, additional Pdp3p-co-purifying chromatin regulatory proteins involved in chromatin-modifying complex dynamics and gene regulation, and a subset of genes whose transcriptional elongation is controlled by this complex. PMID:25473596

  3. Prediction of the space adaptation syndrome

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Homick, J. L.; Ryan, P.; Moseley, E. C.

    1984-01-01

    The univariate and multivariate relationships of provocative measures used to produce motion sickness symptoms were described. Normative subjects were used to develop and cross-validate sets of linear equations that optimally predict motion sickness in parabolic flights. The possibility of reducing the number of measurements required for prediction was assessed. After describing the variables verbally and statistically for 159 subjects, a factor analysis of 27 variables was completed to improve understanding of the relationships between variables and to reduce the number of measures for prediction purposes. The results of this analysis show that none of variables are significantly related to the responses to parabolic flights. A set of variables was selected to predict responses to KC-135 flights. A series of discriminant analyses were completed. Results indicate that low, moderate, or severe susceptibility could be correctly predicted 64 percent and 53 percent of the time on original and cross-validation samples, respectively. Both the factor analysis and the discriminant analysis provided no basis for reducing the number of tests.

  4. Overgrowth Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Edmondson, Andrew C; Kalish, Jennifer M

    2015-09-01

    Numerous multiple malformation syndromes associated with pathologic overgrowth have been described and, for many, their molecular bases elucidated. This review describes the characteristic features of these overgrowth syndromes, as well as the current understanding of their molecular bases, intellectual outcomes, and cancer predispositions. We review syndromes such as Sotos, Malan, Marshall-Smith, Weaver, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel, Perlman, Bannayan-Riley-Ruvalcaba, PI3K-related, Proteus, Beckwith-Wiedemann, fibrous dysplasia, Klippel-Trenaunay-Weber, and Maffucci. PMID:27617124

  5. Lutembacher's syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Sandhya S.; Sakaria, Amit K.; Mahajan, Sanket K.; Shah, Kuldeep B.

    2012-01-01

    The definition of Lutembacher's syndrome has undergone many changes. It refers to combination of congenital Atrial Septal Defect with acquired mitral stenosis. Lutembacher's syndrome is a very rare disease and in the past, it has been either overdiagnosed or misdiagnosed. Here, we will discuss a case of a pregnant lady who developed breathlessness during her third trimester of pregnancy and on detailed examination and investigation, she was found to be having Lutembacher's syndrome. PMID:22629045

  6. Sanfilippo syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for families who have a child with Sanfilippo syndrome, to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available. Alternative Names MPS III References Pyeritz ...

  7. Sheehan syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Postpartum hypopituitarism; Postpartum pituitary insufficiency; Hypopituitarism Syndrome ... Malee MP. Pituitary and adrenal disorders in pregnancy. In: Gabbe ... Problem Pregnancies . 6th ed. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Mosby; ...

  8. A missense mutation in the PISA domain of HsSAS-6 causes autosomal recessive primary microcephaly in a large consanguineous Pakistani family.

    PubMed

    Khan, Muzammil A; Rupp, Verena M; Orpinell, Meritxell; Hussain, Muhammad S; Altmüller, Janine; Steinmetz, Michel O; Enzinger, Christian; Thiele, Holger; Höhne, Wolfgang; Nürnberg, Gudrun; Baig, Shahid M; Ansar, Muhammad; Nürnberg, Peter; Vincent, John B; Speicher, Michael R; Gönczy, Pierre; Windpassinger, Christian

    2014-11-15

    Asymmetric cell division is essential for normal human brain development. Mutations in several genes encoding centrosomal proteins that participate in accurate cell division have been reported to cause autosomal recessive primary microcephaly (MCPH). By homozygosity mapping including three affected individuals from a consanguineous MCPH family from Pakistan, we delineated a critical region of 18.53 Mb on Chromosome 1p21.3-1p13.1. This region contains the gene encoding HsSAS-6, a centrosomal protein primordial for seeding the formation of new centrioles during the cell cycle. Both next-generation and Sanger sequencing revealed a homozygous c.185T>C missense mutation in the HsSAS-6 gene, resulting in a p.Ile62Thr substitution within a highly conserved region of the PISA domain of HsSAS-6. This variant is neither present in any single-nucleotide polymorphism or exome sequencing databases nor in a Pakistani control cohort. Experiments in tissue culture cells revealed that the Ile62Thr mutant of HsSAS-6 is substantially less efficient than the wild-type protein in sustaining centriole formation. Together, our findings demonstrate a dramatic impact of the mutation p.Ile62Thr on HsSAS-6 function and add this component to the list of genes mutated in primary microcephaly. PMID:24951542

  9. Airborne measurements of black carbon aerosol over the Southeastern U.S. during the Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Markovic, M. Z.; Perring, A. E.; Schwarz, J. P.; Fahey, D. W.; Gao, R.; Watts, L.; Holloway, J.; Graus, M.; Warneke, C.; De Gouw, J. A.; Veres, P. R.; Roberts, J. M.; Middlebrook, A. M.; Welti, A.; Liao, J.

    2013-12-01

    The Southeast Atmosphere Study (SAS) field campaign was a large-scale, collaborative project, which took place in the Southeastern U.S. in June and July of 2013. The goal of the campaign was to investigate the impacts of biogenic and anthropogenic gases and aerosols on the formation of haze and anomalous climate cooling in the region. During SAS, a NOAA Single Particle Soot Photometer (SP2) instrument was utilized onboard NOAA WP-3D research aircraft for measurements of black carbon (BC) aerosol mass and microphysical properties. BC aerosol is emitted into the atmosphere from biomass burning (BB) and incomplete combustion of fossil and biofuel. Hence, BC sources are strongly linked to anthropogenic activity. BC aerosol is currently the second largest anthropogenic climate forcing agent after CO2(g), and its climate impacts, which depend on vertical burden and internal mixing, are not fully understood. In the Southeast, BC aerosol is expected to provide surface area for the condensation of semi-volatile products of VOC oxidation and subsequent formation of secondary organic aerosol (SOA). Hence, BC is expected to impact the haze formation and regional climate. In this work we present an overview of BC measurements during Southeast Nexus (SENEX) study, the NOAA contribution to SAS. Geographical variations in mass mixing ratios, mass size distributions, and mixing state of BC over the Southeast U.S. are discussed. Relationships of BC with carbon monoxide (CO), acetonitrile (ACN) and other trace gases are used to investigate the impacts of urban, BB, natural gas development, and power plant emissions on the distribution and properties of BC aerosol in the region. Among studied urban centers, St. Louis and Atlanta were determined to be the largest source regions of BC. A clear weekend effect in BC mass mixing ratios and microphysical properties was observed in the metropolitan Atlanta region. Compared to BB and urban centers, power plants and natural gas developments

  10. Search for an X-ray identification of a strong gamma-ray source. [sas-3 observations

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lamb, R. C.

    1979-01-01

    X-rays from Cygnus X-3 were observed during early 1978 with the detectors of the SAS-3 satellite. These observations in conjunction with earlier UHURU and ANS data indicate that the 4.8 hr period of Cygnus X-3 is increasing at the rate of P/P = (5/1 plus or minus 1.3) x 10 to the minus 6 power/1 yr. The sign and magnitude for this change are incompatible with a rotation model for the period and are in reasonable agreement with model predictions for orbital changes associated with mass loss and transfer in a binary system.

  11. Recent results from observations of 4U1700-37 using SAS-3. [X-ray source

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Matilsky, T.

    1978-01-01

    SAS-3 observations of a complete orbital cycle (approximately 3.5 d) of the X-ray source 4U1700-37 are presented. A persistent, approximately sinusoidal modulation of approximately 60% amplitude is present in the data at 97 m. Satellite orbital effects are ruled out by using other detectors pointed away from the source but sampled at the same time. The effect of such a long rotation period (if indeed the period is rotational) on current ideas involving accretion torques and stellar wind is discussed.

  12. Observations of discrete gamma ray sources with SAS-2. [compact sources centered on Crab nebula and Vela X supernova remnant

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thompson, D. J.; Fichtel, C. E.; Hartman, R. C.; Kniffen, D. A.; Bignami, G. F.

    1974-01-01

    Compact gamma ray sources centered on the Crab nebula and the Vela X supernova remnant are considered. An excess in the galactic radiation was observed in both regions. Data indicate that a large fraction of this flux is pulsed. The excess from the Vela region could reflect either a large-scale galactic feature, such as a superposition of spiral arm segments, or it could be associated with the Vela supernova remnant. Low-energy gamma ray bursts were observed in the SAS-2 anticoincidence shielding.

  13. High energy galactic gamma radiation from cosmic rays concentrated in spiral arms. [using SAS-B satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bignami, G. F.; Fichtel, C. E.; Thompson, D. J.; Kniffen, D. A.

    1974-01-01

    A model for the emission of high energy ( 100 MeV) gamma rays from the galactic disk was developed and compared to recent SAS-2 observations. In the calculation, it is assumed that (1) the high energy galactic gamma rays result primarily from the interaction of cosmic rays with galactic matter; (2) on the basis of theoretical and experimental arguments the cosmic ray density is proportional to the matter density on the scale of galactic arms; and (3) the matter in the galaxy, atomic and molecular, is distributed in a spiral pattern consistent with density wave theory and the experimental data on the matter distribution.

  14. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Connective tissue helps support all parts of your body. It also helps control how your body grows and develops. Marfan syndrome most often affects ... A mutation, or change, in the gene that controls how the body makes fibrillin causes Marfan syndrome. Fibrillin is a ...

  15. Tourette Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Look, Kathy

    Tourette Syndrome has a history of being misdiagnosed or undiagnosed due to its unusual and complex symptoms. This paper describes: the symptoms of Tourette Syndrome; its etiology; age of onset; therapeutic methods, such as drug therapy, psychotherapy, diet control, and hypnosis; educational implications; and employment prospects. Several…

  16. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... thin, and loose jointed. Most people with Marfan syndrome have heart and blood vessel problems, such as a weakness in the aorta or heart valves that leak. They may also have problems with ... diagnose Marfan syndrome. Your doctor may use your medical history, family ...

  17. Turner syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at birth is often smaller than average. A child with Turner syndrome is much shorter than children who are the ... Growth hormone may help a child with Turner syndrome grow taller. ... started when the girl is 12 or 13 years old. These help trigger ...

  18. [Pregnancy and antiphospholipid syndrome].

    PubMed

    Costedoat-Chalumeau, N; Guettrot-Imbert, G; Leguern, V; Leroux, G; Le Thi Huong, D; Wechsler, B; Morel, N; Vauthier-Brouzes, D; Dommergues, M; Cornet, A; Aumaître, O; Pourrat, O; Piette, J-C; Nizard, J

    2012-04-01

    Antiphospholipid syndrome (APS) is associated with a risk of obstetrical complications, affecting both the mother and the fetus. Obstetrical APS is defined by a history of three consecutive spontaneous miscarriages before 10 weeks of gestation (WG), an intra-uterine fetal death after 10 WG, or a premature birth before 34 WG because of severe pre-eclampsia, eclampsia or placental adverse outcomes (intrauterine growth retardation, oligohydramnios). Pregnancy in women with a diagnosis of obstetric APS is at increased risk for placental abruption, HELLP (Hemolysis, Elevated Liver enzymes, Low Platelet count) syndrome and thrombosis that may be part of a catastrophic antiphospholipid syndrome (CAPS). A previous thrombosis and the presence of a lupus anticoagulant are risk factors for pregnancy failure. A multidisciplinary approach, associating the internist, the anesthesiologist and the obstetrician, is recommended for these high-risk pregnancies. Preconception counseling is proposed to identify pregnancy contraindications, and to define and adapt the treatment prior and during the upcoming pregnancy. Heparin and low-dose aspirin are the main treatments. The choice between therapeutic or prophylactic doses of heparin will depend on the patient's medical history. The anticoagulant therapeutic window for delivery should be as narrow as possible and adapted to maternal thrombotic risk. There is a persistent maternal risk in the postpartum period (thrombosis, HELLP syndrome, CAPS) justifying an antithrombotic coverage during this period. We suggest a monthly clinical and biological monitoring which can be more frequent towards the end of pregnancy. The persistence of notches at the Doppler-ultrasound evaluation seems to be the best predictor for a higher risk of placental vascular complications. Treatment optimization and multidisciplinary antenatal care improve the prognosis of pregnancies in women with obstetric APS, leading to a favorable outcome most of the time. PMID

  19. Onboard photo: Japanese Payload Specialist Dr. Mamoru Mohri at work in Spacelab-J module

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    Space Shuttle Endeavour (STS-47) onboard photo of Japanese Payload Specialist Dr. Mamoru Mohri participating in Comparative Measurement of Visual Stability in Earth Cosmic Space experiment to learn more about Space Adaptation Syndrome (SAS).

  20. Combined SAXS/EM Based Models of the S. elongatus Post-Translational Circadian Oscillator and its Interactions with the Output His-Kinase SasA

    SciTech Connect

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R.; Rossi, Gian; Weigand, Steven; Mori, Tetsuya; Johnson, Carl H.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Egli, Martin

    2012-03-15

    The circadian clock in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is composed of a post-translational oscillator (PTO) that can be reconstituted in vitro from three different proteins in the presence of ATP and a transcription-translation feedback loop (TTFL). The homo-hexameric KaiC kinase, phosphatase and ATPase alternates between hypo- and hyper-phosphorylated states over the 24-h cycle, with KaiA enhancing phosphorylation, and KaiB antagonizing KaiA and promoting KaiC subunit exchange. SasA is a His kinase that relays output signals from the PTO formed by the three Kai proteins to the TTFL. Although the crystal structures for all three Kai proteins are known, atomic resolution structures of Kai and Kai/SasA protein complexes have remained elusive. Here, we present models of the KaiAC and KaiBC complexes derived from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), which are consistent with previous EM based models. We also present a combined SAXS/EM model of the KaiC/SasA complex, which has two N-terminal SasA sensory domains occupying positions on the C-terminal KaiC ring reminiscent of the orientations adopted by KaiB dimers. Using EM we demonstrate that KaiB and SasA compete for similar binding sites on KaiC. We also propose an EM based model of the ternary KaiABC complex that is consistent with the sequestering of KaiA by KaiB on KaiC during the PTO dephosphorylation phase. This work provides the first 3D-catalogue of protein-protein interactions in the KaiABC PTO and the output pathway mediated by SasA.

  1. Combined SAXS/EM based models of the S. elongatus post-translational circadian oscillator and its interactions with the output His-kinase SasA.

    PubMed

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R; Rossi, Gian; Weigand, Steven; Mori, Tetsuya; Johnson, Carl H; Stewart, Phoebe L; Egli, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clock in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is composed of a post-translational oscillator (PTO) that can be reconstituted in vitro from three different proteins in the presence of ATP and a transcription-translation feedback loop (TTFL). The homo-hexameric KaiC kinase, phosphatase and ATPase alternates between hypo- and hyper-phosphorylated states over the 24-h cycle, with KaiA enhancing phosphorylation, and KaiB antagonizing KaiA and promoting KaiC subunit exchange. SasA is a His kinase that relays output signals from the PTO formed by the three Kai proteins to the TTFL. Although the crystal structures for all three Kai proteins are known, atomic resolution structures of Kai and Kai/SasA protein complexes have remained elusive. Here, we present models of the KaiAC and KaiBC complexes derived from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), which are consistent with previous EM based models. We also present a combined SAXS/EM model of the KaiC/SasA complex, which has two N-terminal SasA sensory domains occupying positions on the C-terminal KaiC ring reminiscent of the orientations adopted by KaiB dimers. Using EM we demonstrate that KaiB and SasA compete for similar binding sites on KaiC. We also propose an EM based model of the ternary KaiABC complex that is consistent with the sequestering of KaiA by KaiB on KaiC during the PTO dephosphorylation phase. This work provides the first 3D-catalogue of protein-protein interactions in the KaiABC PTO and the output pathway mediated by SasA. PMID:21887298

  2. Combined SAXS/EM Based Models of the S. elongatus Post-Translational Circadian Oscillator and its Interactions with the Output His-Kinase SasA

    PubMed Central

    Pattanayek, Rekha; Williams, Dewight R.; Rossi, Gian; Weigand, Steven; Mori, Tetsuya; Johnson, Carl H.; Stewart, Phoebe L.; Egli, Martin

    2011-01-01

    The circadian clock in the cyanobacterium Synechococcus elongatus is composed of a post-translational oscillator (PTO) that can be reconstituted in vitro from three different proteins in the presence of ATP and a transcription-translation feedback loop (TTFL). The homo-hexameric KaiC kinase, phosphatase and ATPase alternates between hypo- and hyper-phosphorylated states over the 24-h cycle, with KaiA enhancing phosphorylation, and KaiB antagonizing KaiA and promoting KaiC subunit exchange. SasA is a His kinase that relays output signals from the PTO formed by the three Kai proteins to the TTFL. Although the crystal structures for all three Kai proteins are known, atomic resolution structures of Kai and Kai/SasA protein complexes have remained elusive. Here, we present models of the KaiAC and KaiBC complexes derived from solution small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), which are consistent with previous EM based models. We also present a combined SAXS/EM model of the KaiC/SasA complex, which has two N-terminal SasA sensory domains occupying positions on the C-terminal KaiC ring reminiscent of the orientations adopted by KaiB dimers. Using EM we demonstrate that KaiB and SasA compete for similar binding sites on KaiC. We also propose an EM based model of the ternary KaiABC complex that is consistent with the sequestering of KaiA by KaiB on KaiC during the PTO dephosphorylation phase. This work provides the first 3D-catalogue of protein-protein interactions in the KaiABC PTO and the output pathway mediated by SasA. PMID:21887298

  3. CVD silicon carbide monofilament reinforced SrO-Al2O3-2SiO2 (SAS) glass-ceramic composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bansal, Narottam P.

    1995-01-01

    Unidirectional CVD SiC fiber-reinforced SrO.Al2O3.2SiO2 (SAS) glass-ceramic matrix composites have been fabricated by hot pressing at various combinations of temperature, pressure and time. Both carbon-rich surface coated SCS-6 and uncoated SCS-0 fibers were used as reinforcements. Almost fully dense composites have been obtained. Monoclinic celsian, SrAl2Si2O8, was the only crystalline phase observed in the matrix from x-ray diffraction. During three point flexure testing of composites, a test span to thickness ratio of approximately 25 or greater was necessary to avoid sample delamination. Strong and tough SCS-6/SAS composites having a first matrix crack stress of approximately 300 MPa and an ultimate bend strength of approximately 825 MPa were fabricated. No chemical reaction between the SCS-6 fibers and the SAS matrix was observed after high temperature processing. The uncoated SCS-0 fiber-reinforced SAS composites showed only limited improvement in strength over SAS monolithic. The SCS-0/SAS composite having a fiber volume fraction of 0.24 and hot pressed at 1400 deg C exhibited a first matrix cracking stress of approximately 231 +/- 20 MPa and ultimate strength of 265 +/- 17 MPa. From fiber push-out tests, the fiber/matrix interfacial debonding strength (tau(sub debond)) and frictional sliding stress (tau(sub friction)) in the SCS-6/SAS system were evaluated to be approximately 6.7 +/- 2.3 MPa and 4.3 +/- 0.6 MPa, respectively, indicating a weak interface. However, for the SCS-0/SAS composite, much higher values of approximately 17.5 +/- 2.7 MPa for tau(sub debond) and 11.3 +/- 1.6 MPa for tau(sub friction) respectively, were observed; some of the fibers were so strongly bonded to the matrix that they could not be pushed out. Examination of fracture surfaces revealed limited short pull-out length of SCS-0 fibers. The applicability of various micromechanical models for predicting the values of first matrix cracking stress and ultimate strength of these

  4. CVD silicon carbide monofilament reinforced SrO-Al2O3-2SiO2 (SAS) glass-ceramic composites

    SciTech Connect

    Bansal, N.P.

    1995-08-01

    Unidirectional CVD SiC fiber-reinforced SrO.Al2O3.2SiO2 (SAS) glass-ceramic matrix composites have been fabricated by hot pressing at various combinations of temperature, pressure and time. Both carbon-rich surface coated SCS-6 and uncoated SCS-0 fibers were used as reinforcements. Almost fully dense composites have been obtained. Monoclinic celsian, SrAl2Si2O8, was the only crystalline phase observed in the matrix from x-ray diffraction. During three point flexure testing of composites, a test span to thickness ratio of approximately 25 or greater was necessary to avoid sample delamination. Strong and tough SCS-6/SAS composites having a first matrix crack stress of approximately 300 MPa and an ultimate bend strength of approximately 825 MPa were fabricated. No chemical reaction between the SCS-6 fibers and the SAS matrix was observed after high temperature processing. The uncoated SCS-0 fiber-reinforced SAS composites showed only limited improvement in strength over SAS monolithic. The SCS-0/SAS composite having a fiber volume fraction of 0.24 and hot pressed at 1400 deg C exhibited a first matrix cracking stress of approximately 231 +/- 20 MPa and ultimate strength of 265 +/- 17 MPa. From fiber push-out tests, the fiber/matrix interfacial debonding strength (tau(sub debond)) and frictional sliding stress (tau(sub friction)) in the SCS-6/SAS system were evaluated to be approximately 6.7 +/- 2.3 MPa and 4.3 +/- 0.6 MPa, respectively, indicating a weak interface. However, for the SCS-0/SAS composite, much higher values of approximately 17.5 +/- 2.7 MPa for tau(sub debond) and 11.3 +/- 1.6 MPa for tau(sub friction) respectively, were observed; some of the fibers were so strongly bonded to the matrix that they could not be pushed out. Examination of fracture surfaces revealed limited short pull-out length of SCS-0 fibers.

  5. Craniofacial Syndrome Descriptions

    MedlinePlus

    ... with this syndrome do not have a smile). Miller syndrome Miller Syndrome is very rare condition characterized by downward ... dysplasia • Hemangioma • Hemifacial Microsomia / Goldenhar syndrome • Microtia/Atresia • Miller syndrome • Moebius syndrome • Nager syndrome • Pierre Robin Sequence • ...

  6. Kounis syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ntuli, P M; Makambwa, E

    2015-10-01

    Kounis syndrome is characterised by a group of symptoms that manifest as unstable vasospastic or non-vasospastic angina secondary to a hypersensitivity reaction. It was first described by Kounis and Zavras in 1991 as the concurrence of an allergic response with an anaphylactoid or anaphylactic reaction and coronary artery spasm or even myocardial infarction. Since then, this condition has evolved to include a number of mast cell activation disorders associated with acute coronary syndrome. There are many triggering factors, including reactions to multiple medications, exposure to radiological contrast media, poison ivy, bee stings, shellfish and coronary stents. In addition to coronary arterial involvement, Kounis syndrome comprises other arterial systems with similar physiologies, such as mesenteric and cerebral circulation resulting in ischaemia/infarction of the vital organs. The incidence of this condition is difficult to establish owing to the number of potential instigating factors and its relatively infrequent documentation in the literature.We report the case of an HIV-negative 39-year-old man with no coronary risk factors or family history of premature coronary artery disease, who developed Kounis syndrome after the administration of fluoroquinolone for dysuria. However, to the best of our knowledge,no data on the incidence and prevalence of Kounis syndrome in South Africa have ever been reported in the literature. The recent understanding of Kounis syndrome has led to the condition being classified into three syndrome variants. PMID:26636160

  7. Neurocutaneous syndromes.

    PubMed

    Klar, Nitasha; Cohen, Bernard; Lin, Doris D M

    2016-01-01

    Neurocutaneous syndromes (or phakomatoses) are a diverse group of congenital disorders that encompass abnormalities of neuroectodermal and, sometimes, mesodermal development, hence commonly involving the skin, eye, and central nervous system. These are often inherited conditions and typically present in early childhood or adolescence. Some of the abnormalities and clinical symptoms may, however, be progressive, and there is an increased risk of neoplastic formation in many of the syndromes. As a group, neurocutaneous syndromes are characterized by distinctive cutaneous stigmata and neurologic symptomology, the latter often representing the most devastating and debilitating features of these diseases. Many of these syndromes are markedly heterogeneous in nature as they affect many organ systems. Given the incurable nature of these conditions and the broad spectrum of pathologies they comprise, treatments vary on a case-by-case basis and tend to be palliative rather than curative. With the advances in molecular genetics, however, greater understanding of biologic functions of the gene products and the correlative phenotypic expression is being attained, and this knowledge may guide future therapeutic developments. This chapter focuses on the cutaneous and neurologic pathology with emphasis on neuroimaging of selective neurocutaneous syndromes, including tuberous sclerosis, Sturge-Weber syndrome, Klippel-Trenaunay syndrome, ataxia-telangiectasia, and incontinentia pigmenti. PMID:27432683

  8. Hubris syndrome.

    PubMed

    Owen, David

    2008-08-01

    Hubris syndrome is associated with power, more likely to manifest itself the longer the person exercises power and the greater the power they exercise. A syndrome not to be applied to anyone with existing mental illness or brain damage. Usually symptoms abate when the person no longer exercises power. It is less likely to develop in people who retain a personal modesty, remain open to criticism, have a degree of cynicism or well developed sense of humour. Four heads of government in the last 100 years are singled out as having developed hubris syndrome: David Lloyd George, Margaret Thatcher, George W Bush and Tony Blair. PMID:18724614

  9. LEOPARD Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Sudip Kumar; Majumdar, Biswajit; Rudra, Olympia; Chakraborty, Sougat

    2015-10-01

    LEOPARD syndrome (LS) is an autosomal dominantly inherited or sporadic disorder of variable penetrance and expressivity. The acronym LEOPARD stands for its cardinal clinical features including Lentigines, Electrocardiographic conduction abnormalities, Ocular hypertelorism, Pulmonary stenosis, Abnormalities of genitalia, Retardation of growth, and Deafness. We present herein a patient with LEOPARD syndrome and distinctive features. It was noteworthy that our patient presented with the concern of generalized lentiginosis and subsequent evaluation revealed that the patient had LEOPARD syndrome. In this report we would like to highlight the importance of detailed clinical examination and appropriate imaging in patients with multiple lentigines. PMID:26632807

  10. [Aarskog's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Hromádková, L; Frána, L

    1991-05-01

    The authors described the rare Aarskog syndrome in a 6-year-old boy, associated with left-sided Brown's syndrome. Another 4-year-old boy came from an affected family where the brother suffered also from Aarskog's syndrome and in the mother some microsymptoms were detected. The authors recommend that patients who on examination of a refraction defect or strabism display uncommon features in the face or other parts of the body should be always subjected to a general examination incl. genetic examination. PMID:1913912

  11. [DRESS syndrome].

    PubMed

    Adamcová, Monika; Šturdík, Igor; Koller, Tomáš; Payer, Juraj

    2016-04-01

    DRESS syndrome (Drug Rash with Eosinophilia and Systemic Symptoms) is severe drug-induced allergic-type reaction which occurs few days to weeks after taking a drug in a predisposed patient. Organ damage, eosinophilia and skin rash are typical at presentation. Corticotherapy is often necessary in severe cases. In this report we describe a case of 56-year old female with fever, elevated liver tests and skin rash. DRESS syndrome was diagnosed and allopurinol was indentified as a causative drug. Due to possible fatal outcome, DRESS syndrome should be considered in a differential diagnosis of all patients presenting with similar signs and symptoms. PMID:27250614

  12. Velocardiofacial syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Pike, A. C.; Super, M.

    1997-01-01

    Velocardiofacial syndrome is a syndrome of multiple anomalies that include cleft palate, cardiac defects, learning difficulties, speech disorder and characteristic facial features. It has an estimated incidence of 1 in 5000. The majority of cases have a microdeletion of chromosome 22q11.2. The phenotype of this condition shows considerable variation, not all the principal features are present in each case. Identification of the syndrome can be difficult as many of the anomalies are minor and present in the general population. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 PMID:9497944

  13. Adaptive Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop and demonstrate innovative adaptive seal technologies that can lead to dramatic improvements in engine performance, life, range, and emissions, and enhance operability for next generation gas turbine engines. This work is concentrated on the development of self-adaptive clearance control systems for gas turbine engines. Researchers have targeted the high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip seal location for following reasons: Current active clearance control (ACC) systems (e.g., thermal case-cooling schemes) cannot respond to blade tip clearance changes due to mechanical, thermal, and aerodynamic loads. As such they are prone to wear due to the required tight running clearances during operation. Blade tip seal wear (increased clearances) reduces engine efficiency, performance, and service life. Adaptive sealing technology research has inherent impact on all envisioned 21st century propulsion systems (e.g. distributed vectored, hybrid and electric drive propulsion concepts).

  14. Alport syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... rarest type. Males and females have equally severe disease. Symptoms KIDNEYS With all types of Alport syndrome the kidneys are affected. The tiny blood vessels in the glomeruli of the kidneys are damaged. ...

  15. Nephrotic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Safety Doctors & Hospitals Q&A Recipes En Español Teachers - Looking for Health Lessons? Visit KidsHealth in the ... of certain legal and illegal drugs, or morbid obesity can lead to nephrotic syndrome. Symptoms Some kids ...

  16. Klinefelter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... proportions (long legs, short trunk, shoulder equal to hip size) Abnormally large breasts ( gynecomastia ) Infertility Sexual problems Less than normal amount of pubic, armpit, and facial hair Small, firm testicles Tall height Exams and Tests Klinefelter syndrome may first be ...

  17. [Sneddon syndrome].

    PubMed

    Berchtold, B; Hunziker, T; Zala, L; Braathen, L R

    1991-05-01

    A 44-year-old female with Sneddon's syndrome, i.e. generalized racemose livedo and recurrent cerebrovascular disease, is presented. Significant levels of IgG anticardiolipin antibodies were found in her serum. PMID:1874623

  18. Proteus Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Our Blog Newsletter Home About Us The PSF Provides Board of Directors Medical Advisory Board International Affiliates Proteus Syndrome Diagnostic Criteria & FAQs Medical Research Glossary Donate Cash Donation Life Insurance Gift ...

  19. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... cause of metabolic syndrome. The cause might be insulin resistance. Insulin is a hormone your body produces to help ... into energy for your body. If you are insulin resistant, too much sugar builds up in your ...

  20. Wallenberg's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Some people with Wallenberg’s syndrome report that the world seems to be tilted in an unsettling way, which makes it difficult to keep their balance when they walk. Is there any treatment? Treatment ...

  1. Scheie syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... for families who have a child with Scheie syndrome, to help them understand the condition and possible treatments. Prenatal testing is available. Alternative Names Mucopolysaccharidosis type I S; MPS ...

  2. Apert syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... by ridging along sutures (craniosynostosis) Frequent ear infections Fusion or severe webbing of the 2nd, 3rd, and ... midface Skeletal (limb) abnormalities Short height Webbing or fusion of the toes Several other syndromes can lead ...

  3. Alport Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... medicines (medications to control high blood pressure) Diuretics (water pills) Limit sodium (salt) in your diet If you are approaching kidney disease because of Alport syndrome, a ... NY Register Now 2016 Orangeburg Kidney Walk Thu, ...

  4. Duane Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... the eye muscles. In Duane syndrome, the sixth cranial nerve that controls the lateral rectus muscle (the muscle ... abnormal innervation of a branch from the third cranial nerve, which normally controls the medial rectus muscle (the ...

  5. Behcet's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Behcet's syndrome is a disease that involves vasculitis, which is inflammation of the blood vessels. It causes problems in many parts of the body. The ... National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases

  6. Marfan Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Marfan syndrome is a disorder that affects connective tissue. Connective tissues are proteins that support skin, bones, blood vessels, and other organs. One of these proteins is fibrillin. A problem with the ...

  7. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... used to determine effective treatment strategies. NIH Patient Recruitment for Paraneoplastic Syndromes Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical Center Throughout the U.S. and Worldwide NINDS Clinical Trials Organizations Column1 Column2 American Autoimmune Related Diseases Association 22100 ...

  8. Paraneoplastic Syndromes

    PubMed Central

    Stolinsky, David C.

    1980-01-01

    Neoplasms can produce a variety of remote effects on the host; these are referred to as paraneoplastic syndromes. The syndromes may affect any of the systems of the body, may precede or follow the diagnosis of the underlying neoplasm, and may or may not parallel the course of the neoplasm in severity. The diagnosis of and therapy for these syndromes can be challenging to a physician, but successful therapy may bring about worthwhile relief for the patient. In addition, the syndromes and the substances that cause them are sometimes useful in diagnosing and in following the course of certain neoplasms. Perhaps of greater importance, study of these remote effects of neoplasia may shed light on the nature of the neoplastic process itself. PMID:6990627

  9. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hunter syndrome is a disease in which long chains of sugar molecules (glycosaminoglycans, formerly called mucopolysaccharides ) are ... of the enzyme iduronate sulfatase. Without this enzyme, chains of sugar molecules build up in various body ...

  10. Malabsorption Syndromes

    MedlinePlus

    ... They often include chronic diarrhea, abnormal stools, weight loss, and gas. Your doctor may use lab, imaging, or other tests to make a diagnosis. Treatment of malabsorption syndromes depends on the cause.

  11. Compartment syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... caused by repetitive activities, such as running. The pressure in a compartment only increases during that activity. Compartment syndrome is most common in the lower leg and forearm. It can also occur in the hand, foot, thigh, and upper arm.

  12. Sotos Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Sotos Syndrome Information ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  13. Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... or problems with their heart, stomach or eyes. Intelligence ranges from low normal to very retarded (slow ... a baby who has Down syndrome will be. Intelligence ranges from low normal to very retarded (slow ...

  14. Compartment syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Jobe MT. Compartment syndromes and Volkmann contracture. In: Canale ST, Beaty JH, eds. Campbell's Operative Orthopaedics . 12th ed. ... and Shoulder Service, UCSF Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, San Francisco, CA. Also reviewed by David Zieve, MD, MHA, ...

  15. Turner Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... turnersyndrome. html • Eunice Kennedy Shriver National Institutes of Child Health & Human Development (NIH): www. nichd. nih. gov/ health/ topics/ Turner_ Syndrome. cfm • Mayo Clinic: www. mayoclinic. com/ health/ turner- ...

  16. Reifenstein syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... with the gene will be affected. Every female child has a 50% chance of carrying the gene. Family history is important in determining risk factors. The syndrome is estimated to affect 1 in 99,000 people.

  17. [DIDMOAD syndrome].

    PubMed

    Alicanoğlu, R; Canbakan, B; Yildiz, N; Arikan, E; Kundur, H; Bahtiyar, K; Sayali, E

    1994-01-01

    The DIDMOAD or so called Wolfram syndrome is a hereditary disease with autosomal-recessive transmission showing 4 main features: diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus, nervus opticus atrophia and deafness. Beside this it shows multiple organ involvement. Our 38-year old male patient, showing all above mentioned features except deafness had urinary tract involvement and neurological symptoms. EEG, cerebral MRI, tests with evoked potentials and HLA-typing were performed to discuss the aetiopathogenetic background in our patient. Almost all symptoms of the Wolfram syndrome can be mixed up with complications of diabetes mellitus, which is usually the first symptom of the Wolfram syndrome. Because of this, wrong diagnosis is not rare. Hence in differential diagnosis in any diabetes mellitus type I patient, the possibility of the Wolfram syndrome should be discussed. PMID:8023526

  18. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... make ribosomal proteins) This condition is similar to Diamond-Blackfan anemia, and the 2 conditions should not ... chromosome 19 is found in some people with Diamond-Blackfan anemia. The anemia in Aase syndrome is ...

  19. Piriformis syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... sciatica; Hip socket neuropathy; Pelvic outlet syndrome; Low back pain - piriformis ... or numbness in the buttock and along the back of the leg Difficulty sitting Pain from sitting that grows worse as you continue ...

  20. Menkes syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Menkes syndrome, cells in the body can absorb copper, but they are unable to release it. It ... makes it hard for the body to distribute copper in food from the intestines into the bloodstream ...

  1. Waardenburg syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... conditions passed down through families. The syndrome involves deafness and pale skin, hair, and eye color. ... Symptoms may include: Cleft lip (rare) Constipation Deafness (more ... that don't match ( heterochromia ) Pale color skin, hair, and ...

  2. Aase syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Aase-Smith syndrome; Hypoplastic anemia - triphalangeal thumbs, Aase-Smith type ... Jones KL, Jones MC, Del Campo M, eds. Smith's Recognizable Patterns of Human Malformation . 7th ed. Philadelphia, ...

  3. HELLP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... out of 1,000 pregnancies. In women with preeclampsia or eclampsia , the condition develops in 10 to ... have high blood pressure and are diagnosed with preeclampsia before they develop HELLP syndrome. In some cases, ...

  4. Hunter syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Genetic counseling is recommended for couples who want to have children and who have a family history of Hunter syndrome. Prenatal testing is available. Carrier testing for female relatives of affected males is available at a few centers.

  5. Down syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... their limitations, they may also feel frustration and anger. Many different medical conditions are seen in people ... syndrome and their families deal with the frustration, anger, and compulsive behavior that often occur. Parents and ...

  6. Sanfilippo syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome belongs to a group of diseases called mucopolysaccharidoses (MPS). Specifically, it is known as MPS III. ... PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2015:chap 260. Spranger J. Mucopolysaccharidoses. In: Kliegman RM, Behrman RE, Jenson HB, Stanton ...

  7. [Heptopulmonary syndrome].

    PubMed

    Cuadrado, Antonio; Díaz, Ainhoa; Iruzubieta, Paula; Salcines, José Ramón; Crespo, Javier

    2015-01-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome is characterized by the presence of liver disease, pulmonary vascular dilatations, and arterial hypoxemia. It is usually associated with cirrhosis of any origin, but has been described in other liver diseases, both acute and chronic, and not always associated with portal hypertension. The gold standard method to detect pulmonary vascular dilations is contrast enhancement echocardiography with saline and is essential for the diagnosis of hepatopulmonary syndrome. These dilatations reflect changes in the pulmonary microvasculature (vasodilatation, intravascular monocyte accumulation, and angiogenesis) and induce a ventilation/perfusion mismatch, or even true intrapulmonary shunts, which eventually trigger hypoxemia. This syndrome worsens patients' prognosis and impairs their quality of life and may lead to the need for liver transplantation, which is the only effective and definitive treatment. In this article, we review the etiological, pathophysiological, clinical and therapeutic features of this syndrome. PMID:25840463

  8. Joubert Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Funding Information Research Programs Training & Career Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Joubert Syndrome Information ... News From NINDS | Find People | Training | Research | Enhancing Diversity Careers@NINDS | FOIA | Accessibility Policy | Contact Us | Privacy ...

  9. Beals Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... have many of the skeletal (bone) and aortic enlargement problems as people with Marfan syndrome, and treatments ... appearance to the top of the ear Aortic enlargement and/or mitral valve regurgitation (occasionally) People with ...

  10. Klinefelter Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Text Search" box. Then click "Submit Query". Organizations Organizations Listen Nonprofit support and advocacy groups bring together ... endorsement by GARD. Suggest an organization to add. Organizations Supporting this Disease American Association for Klinefelter Syndrome ...

  11. [Netherton syndrome].

    PubMed

    Serra-Guillén, Carlos; Torrelo, Antonio; Drake, Marta; Armesto, Susana; Fernández-Llaca, Héctor; Zambrano, Antonio

    2006-06-01

    Netherton syndrome is a rare disease inherited as an autosomal recessive trait due to mutations in the SPINK5 gene. It is characterized by the triad of ichthyosiform dermatosis, alterations of the hair shaft and immunological disorders. We present the case of a 12-year-old girl with the triad of ichthyosis linearis circumflexa, trichorrhexis invaginata and atopic dermatitis, characteristic of Netherton syndrome. PMID:16956571

  12. Noonan syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Amy E; Allanson, Judith E; Tartaglia, Marco; Gelb, Bruce D

    2014-01-01

    Noonan syndrome is a genetic multisystem disorder characterised by distinctive facial features, developmental delay, learning difficulties, short stature, congenital heart disease, renal anomalies, lymphatic malformations, and bleeding difficulties. Mutations that cause Noonan syndrome alter genes encoding proteins with roles in the RAS–MAPK pathway, leading to pathway dysregulation. Management guidelines have been developed. Several clinically relevant genotype–phenotype correlations aid risk assessment and patient management. Increased understanding of the pathophysiology of the disease could help development of pharmacogenetic treatments. PMID:23312968

  13. Alagille syndrome.

    PubMed Central

    Krantz, I D; Piccoli, D A; Spinner, N B

    1997-01-01

    Alagille syndrome (OMIM 118450) is an autosomal dominant disorder associated with abnormalities of the liver, heart, eye, skeleton, and a characteristic facial appearance. Also referred to as the Alagille-Watson syndrome, syndromic bile duct paucity, and arteriohepatic dysplasia, it is a significant cause of neonatal jaundice and cholestasis in older children. In the fully expressed syndrome, affected subjects have intrahepatic bile duct paucity and cholestasis, in conjunction with cardiac malformations (most frequently peripheral pulmonary stenosis), ophthalmological abnormalities (typically of the anterior chamber with posterior embryotoxon being the most common), skeletal anomalies (most commonly butterfly vertebrae), and characteristic facial appearance. Inheritance is autosomal dominant, but expressivity is highly variable. Sibs and parents of probands are often found to have mild expression of the presumptive disease gene, with abnormalities of only one or two systems. The frequency of new mutations appears relatively high, estimated at between 15 and 50%. The disease gene has been mapped to chromosome 20 band p12 based on multiple patients described with cytogenetic or molecular rearrangements of this region. However, the frequency of detectable deletions of 20p12 is low (less than 7%). Progress has been made in the molecular definition of an Alagille syndrome critical region within the short arm of chromosome 20. We will review the clinical, genetic, cytogenetic, and molecular findings in this syndrome. Images PMID:9039994

  14. Cri du chat syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... syndrome who wish to become pregnant may consider genetic counseling. Alternative Names Chromosome 5p deletion syndrome; 5p minus syndrome; Cat cry syndrome References Bacino CA, Lee B. Cytogenetics. ...

  15. Holmes-Adie Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Holmes-Adie syndrome Information Page Synonym(s): Adie's Syndrome, Adie's ... research is being done? Clinical Trials What is Holmes-Adie syndrome ? Holmes-Adie syndrome (HAS) is a ...

  16. Anesthesia & Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... occur in individuals with Down syndrome than their peers without Down syndrome. An awareness of these more ... of the eyes, ears, and joints - just like peers without Down syndrome. What About Down Syndrome Is ...

  17. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Job syndrome; Hyper IgE syndrome ... Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is also called Job syndrome. It is named after the biblical character Job whose faithfulness was tested by an affliction with draining skin sores and pustules . ...

  18. Androgen insensitivity syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... at the tip Reifenstein syndrome (also known as Gilbert-Dreyfus syndrome or Lubs syndrome) Infertile male syndrome ... F, Leveno KJ, Bloom SL, et al., eds. Williams Obstetrics . 23rd ed. New York, NY: McGraw-Hill, ...

  19. Sexuality and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ... Down Syndrome? Down Syndrome Facts Myths & Truths Preferred Language Guide Q&A for Kids Resources New & Expectant ...

  20. Tics and Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    MENU Return to Web version Tics and Tourette Syndrome Overview What is Tourette syndrome? Tourette syndrome is a type of tic disorder. Children who have Tourette syndrome will repeat both movements and ...

  1. Down Syndrome (For Kids)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Got Homework? Here's Help White House Lunch Recipes Down Syndrome KidsHealth > For Kids > Down Syndrome Print A A ... skills. continue Do a Lot of People Have Down Syndrome? Down syndrome is not contagious , so you can' ...

  2. The SCF-FBXW5 E3-ubiquitin ligase is regulated by PLK4 and targets HsSAS-6 to control centrosome duplication.

    PubMed

    Puklowski, Anja; Homsi, Yahya; Keller, Debora; May, Martin; Chauhan, Sangeeta; Kossatz, Uta; Grünwald, Viktor; Kubicka, Stefan; Pich, Andreas; Manns, Michael P; Hoffmann, Ingrid; Gönczy, Pierre; Malek, Nisar P

    2011-08-01

    Deregulated centrosome duplication can result in genetic instability and contribute to tumorigenesis. Here, we show that centrosome duplication is regulated by the activity of an E3-ubiquitin ligase that employs the F-box protein FBXW5 (ref. 3) as its targeting subunit. Depletion of endogenous FBXW5 or overexpression of an F-box-deleted mutant version results in centrosome overduplication and formation of multipolar spindles. We identify the centriolar protein HsSAS-6 (refs 4,5) as a critical substrate of the SCF-FBXW5 complex. FBXW5 binds HsSAS-6 and promotes its ubiquitylation in vivo. The activity of SCF-FBXW5 is in turn negatively regulated by Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), which phosphorylates FBXW5 at Ser 151 to suppress its ability to ubiquitylate HsSAS-6. FBXW5 is a cell-cycle-regulated protein with expression levels peaking at the G1/S transition. We show that FBXW5 levels are controlled by the anaphase-promoting (APC/C) complex, which targets FBXW5 for degradation during mitosis and G1, thereby helping to reset the centrosome duplication machinery. In summary, we show that a cell-cycle-regulated SCF complex is regulated by the kinase PLK4, and that this in turn restricts centrosome re-duplication through degradation of the centriolar protein HsSAS-6. PMID:21725316

  3. SAS2H input for computing core activities of 4.5, 5.0, and 5.5 weight % {sup 235}U fuel for Sequoyah Nuclear Plant

    SciTech Connect

    Hermann, O.W.

    1994-08-01

    Sequoyah Nuclear Plant core activities at initial fuel enrichments of 4.5, 5.0, and 5.5 wt% {sup 235}U, required in nuclear safety evaluations, were computed by the SAS2H analysis sequence and the ORIGEN-S code within the SCALE-4.2 code system.

  4. An SAS Macro for Implementing the Modified Bollen-Stine Bootstrap for Missing Data: Implementing the Bootstrap Using Existing Structural Equation Modeling Software

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enders, Craig K.

    2005-01-01

    The Bollen-Stine bootstrap can be used to correct for standard error and fit statistic bias that occurs in structural equation modeling (SEM) applications due to nonnormal data. The purpose of this article is to demonstrate the use of a custom SAS macro program that can be used to implement the Bollen-Stine bootstrap with existing SEM software.…

  5. Adapting Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wedman, John; Wedman, Judy

    1985-01-01

    The "Animals" program found on the Apple II and IIe system master disk can be adapted for use in the mathematics classroom. Instructions for making the necessary changes and suggestions for using it in lessons related to geometric shapes are provided. (JN)

  6. Adaptive Thresholds

    SciTech Connect

    Bremer, P. -T.

    2014-08-26

    ADAPT is a topological analysis code that allow to compute local threshold, in particular relevance based thresholds for features defined in scalar fields. The initial target application is vortex detection but the software is more generally applicable to all threshold based feature definitions.

  7. Adaptive homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Davies, Kelvin J A

    2016-06-01

    Homeostasis is a central pillar of modern Physiology. The term homeostasis was invented by Walter Bradford Cannon in an attempt to extend and codify the principle of 'milieu intérieur,' or a constant interior bodily environment, that had previously been postulated by Claude Bernard. Clearly, 'milieu intérieur' and homeostasis have served us well for over a century. Nevertheless, research on signal transduction systems that regulate gene expression, or that cause biochemical alterations to existing enzymes, in response to external and internal stimuli, makes it clear that biological systems are continuously making short-term adaptations both to set-points, and to the range of 'normal' capacity. These transient adaptations typically occur in response to relatively mild changes in conditions, to programs of exercise training, or to sub-toxic, non-damaging levels of chemical agents; thus, the terms hormesis, heterostasis, and allostasis are not accurate descriptors. Therefore, an operational adjustment to our understanding of homeostasis suggests that the modified term, Adaptive Homeostasis, may be useful especially in studies of stress, toxicology, disease, and aging. Adaptive Homeostasis may be defined as follows: 'The transient expansion or contraction of the homeostatic range in response to exposure to sub-toxic, non-damaging, signaling molecules or events, or the removal or cessation of such molecules or events.' PMID:27112802

  8. Factors related to sleep apnea syndrome in sleep clinic patients.

    PubMed

    Dealberto, M J; Ferber, C; Garma, L; Lemoine, P; Alpérovitch, A

    1994-06-01

    We examined 129 patients recruited from two sleep clinics to study the sleep apnea syndrome (SAS), defined by the apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) > or = 10. Information was registered from a self-administered questionnaire, basal physical measurements, and polysomnography. In 68 subjects recorded for two consecutive nights, a high correlation was found between first- and second-night AHIs (r = 0.89). Habitual loud snoring and breathing arrests during sleep were associated with AHI > or = 10. A model including these two variables, sex, age, and body mass index was created in order to predict AHI > or = 10 and with which it was possible to successfully classify almost three of four patients. Among subjective sleep questionnaire items, only daytime sleepiness was related to drops of transcutaneous oxygen tension. These discrepancies in the observed relationship between sleep parameters and subjective sleep items reduce the questionnaire value in epidemiologic settings where it aimed to detect SAS, as defined solely by the AHI value. PMID:8205872

  9. Obstructive Sleep Apnea Syndrome in a Railroad Controller Worker.

    PubMed

    Raşcu, Agripina; Moise, Laura; Naghi, Eugenia; Handra, Claudia; Oţelea, Marina; Raşcu, Alexandra; Lăcătuşu, Lavinia

    2015-01-01

    Sleep Apnea Syndrome (SAS) constitutes a healthcare issue of major importance at international level with a prevalence of 5% in the active population. Consequentially to the induced co-morbidities, the mortality reaches as high as 39% at eight years time lapse from the initial diagnostic. Seldom undiagnosed, the severity spectrum of SAS, in the absence of therapy, only continues to amplify. Here below, we are presenting the case of a 49 years old patient, railroad controller worker, non-smoker and occasionally alcohol user, who was hospitalized in our Clinic for Occupational Medicine. During last year, the patient was accusing excessive daytime somnolence, breath arrests during sleep, intense snoring, morning headaches, morning oral dryness, pin point chest pain, nocturia (4-5 nocturnal urination), concentration difficulties and an overall reduced work capacity. The presumptive diagnostic of Obstructive Sleep Apnea is being considered based on the correlation between the clinical presentation and the Epworth, Stanford and Berlin questionnaire results. The key diagnostic element was the polygraph recording over an 8 hours sleep period. Positive Diagnosis: Obstructive Sleep Apnea severe form. Management and recommendations: (1) Behavioral therapy (weight loss) and (2) CPAP (Continuous Positive Airway Pressure) therapy which was instituted immediately after the positive diagnosis was made. As a consequence, the respiratory symptoms, the frequent episodes of daytime snoozing and the concentration difficulties at work place diminished considerably. PMID:26076566

  10. The Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP)

    PubMed Central

    Melley, Alison H.; Oltmanns, Thomas F.; Turkheimer, Eric

    2015-01-01

    The authors investigated the test-retest reliability and predictive validity of the diagnostic scales from the Schedule for Nonadaptive and Adaptive Personality (SNAP). Participants were identified from a sample of 240 undergraduates who completed the SNAP and the Social Adjustment Scale (SAS-SR) at Time 1. The authors selected 50 people who met criteria for a personality disorder (PD) based on the SNAP and 50 who did not qualify for a diagnosis. Eighty-three of these people completed the SNAP and the SAS-SR for a second time approximately 9 months after initial screening. SNAP PD scales were relatively stable over time. Test-retest correlation coefficients ranged from .58 to .81. Scores on diagnostic scales for paranoid, schizoid, and schizotypal PD were inversely related to self-reported levels of adjustment for social roles concerned with work as a student, leisure activities, and relationships with family. The results provide some evidence for the validity of the SNAP. PMID:12066833

  11. Melatonin in Chronic Pain Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Danilov, Andrei; Kurganova, Julia

    2016-06-01

    Melatonin is a neurohormone secreted by epiphysis and extrapineal structures. It performs several functions including chronobiotic, antioxidant, oncostatic, immune modulating, normothermal, and anxiolytic functions. Melatonin affects the cardiovascular system and gastrointestinal tract, participates in reproduction and metabolism, and body mass regulation. Moreover, recent studies have demonstrated melatonin efficacy in relation to pain syndromes. The present paper reviews the studies on melatonin use in fibromyalgia, headaches, irritable bowel syndrome, chronic back pain, and rheumatoid arthritis. The paper discusses the possible mechanisms of melatonin analgesic properties. On one hand, circadian rhythms normalization results in sleep improvement, which is inevitably disordered in chronic pain syndromes, and activation of melatonin adaptive capabilities. On the other hand, there is evidence of melatonin-independent analgesic effect involving melatonin receptors and several neurotransmitter systems. PMID:26984272

  12. Analysis of the Phenix end-of-life natural convection test with SAS4A/SASSYS-1

    SciTech Connect

    Thomas, J. W.; Fanning, T. H.; Dunn, F. E.; Sofu, T.

    2012-07-01

    From a reduced power and flow condition, the 2009 Phenix Natural Convection Test mimics a protected loss-of-heat sink event. The measured transient response of the Phenix reactor to such an event provides an important data set for validating safety analysis codes. A model of the Phenix reactor and primary coolant system was developed using the reactor safety analysis code system SAS4A/SASSYS-1. While the overall global response of the reactor was predicted reasonably well, there were some non-negligible discrepancies in the temperature predictions during the transient and work continues to improve the model. Some modeling issues have been identified, and will be addressed as improvements to the model continue. (authors)

  13. First results of MWC SAS3 electromagnetic wave experiment on board of the Chibis-M satellite

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klimov, Stanislav; Ferencz, Csaba; Bodnár, László; Szegedi, Péter; Steinbach, Péter; Gotlib, Vladimir; Novikov, Denis; Belyayev, Serhiy; Marusenkov, Andrey; Ferencz, Orsolya; Korepanov, Valery; Lichtenberger, János; Hamar, Dániel

    2014-11-01

    The main goals of the Chibis-M mission are the testing of a new micro-satellite technology, the study of new physical processes related to lightning activity and the verification of possible monitoring techniques of Space Weather phenomena. In frames of the Chibis-M mission an electromagnetic wave complex MWC is installed on board of the satellite composed of electromagnetic sensors and SAS3 measuring unit. The obtained data show that the scientific instrumentation operates properly and produces interesting information. Here we present the first results of the first year of operation of the MWC in the ELF-VLF bands in different operation modes. An important conclusion is that basing on the experience of the first year it is possible to realize an effective and reliable Space Weather monitoring system using micro-satellites and simultaneously operating ground support equipments.

  14. SAS and SPSS macros to calculate standardized Cronbach's alpha using the upper bound of the phi coefficient for dichotomous items.

    PubMed

    Sun, Wei; Chou, Chih-Ping; Stacy, Alan W; Ma, Huiyan; Unger, Jennifer; Gallaher, Peggy

    2007-02-01

    Cronbach's a is widely used in social science research to estimate the internal consistency of reliability of a measurement scale. However, when items are not strictly parallel, the Cronbach's a coefficient provides a lower-bound estimate of true reliability, and this estimate may be further biased downward when items are dichotomous. The estimation of standardized Cronbach's a for a scale with dichotomous items can be improved by using the upper bound of coefficient phi. SAS and SPSS macros have been developed in this article to obtain standardized Cronbach's a via this method. The simulation analysis showed that Cronbach's a from upper-bound phi might be appropriate for estimating the real reliability when standardized Cronbach's a is problematic. PMID:17552473

  15. [Application of SAS macro to evaluated multiplicative and additive interaction in logistic and Cox regression in clinical practices].

    PubMed

    Nie, Z Q; Ou, Y Q; Zhuang, J; Qu, Y J; Mai, J Z; Chen, J M; Liu, X Q

    2016-05-10

    Conditional logistic regression analysis and unconditional logistic regression analysis are commonly used in case control study, but Cox proportional hazard model is often used in survival data analysis. Most literature only refer to main effect model, however, generalized linear model differs from general linear model, and the interaction was composed of multiplicative interaction and additive interaction. The former is only statistical significant, but the latter has biological significance. In this paper, macros was written by using SAS 9.4 and the contrast ratio, attributable proportion due to interaction and synergy index were calculated while calculating the items of logistic and Cox regression interactions, and the confidence intervals of Wald, delta and profile likelihood were used to evaluate additive interaction for the reference in big data analysis in clinical epidemiology and in analysis of genetic multiplicative and additive interactions. PMID:27188374

  16. Psychosocial Aspects of the Sudden Infant Death Syndrome ("Cot Death").

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bluglass, Kerry

    1981-01-01

    Reviews literature on reactions of parents and siblings to Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS). The prospects for prolonged, adverse reactions are considered, and professional concerns regarding abnormal adaptation are noted. (Author/DB)

  17. Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters

    MedlinePlus

    ... Pressure Tools & Resources Stroke More Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters Updated:Jul 24,2014 Metabolic syndrome may be ... Syndrome • Home • About Metabolic Syndrome • Why Metabolic Syndrome Matters • Your Risk for Metabolic Syndrome • Symptoms & Diagnosis • Prevention & ...

  18. The Spectral Analysis of X-Ray Binaries from the XMM-Newton Space Craft Data using SAS Software

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baki, P.; Mito, C. O.

    2009-10-01

    A spectral data analysis on a luminous object of sky-coordinates 12h52m24.28s-29d115'02.3'12.6arcsec using Science Analysis Software (SAS) is presented. The analysis, based on data acquired by the Reflection Grating Spectrometer (RGS) camera aboard the XMM-Newton Space satellite, shows that the primary constituents of the X-ray source are Fe (Iron) and O (oxygen). This suggests that the source may be a magnetized plasma in a binary system and as this magnetic field accelerates the cooling of a star, one may speculate that this may be a compact star in its last stages of a thermonuclear fusion process. Nous présentons une analyse du spectre d'une source a rayons X située -- en coordonnées sidérales - à 12h52m24.28s - 29d115'02.312.6 arcsec. Science Analysis Software (SAS) est le programme informatique utilisé pour l'analyse des données. Cette analyse est basée sur les données provenant du spectromètre à haute résolution (RGS) à bord du satellite spatiale XMM-Newton. Nous montrons que ladite source est principalement constituée de Fer (Fe) et d'oxygene (O). Ce résultat suggère que la source pourrait être un plasma magnétisé au sein d'un système binaire. Et du fait que ce champ magnétique accélère le refroidissement de l'étoile, nous supposons que cette étoile pourrait ètre un objet compact en phase terminale d'un processus de fusion thermonucléaire.

  19. Battlefield Utility of Antipersonnel Landmines and Proposed Alternatives (Analysis in Support of the NATO SAS-023 APM Study)

    SciTech Connect

    Crandley, J F; Greenwalt, R J; Magnoli, D E; Randazzo, A S

    2002-02-05

    This study consists of work done in support of the U.S. delegation to the NATO SAS-023 Antipersonnel Landmine Study Group, supplemented by additional work done for the U.S. Office of the Secretary of Defense Antipersonnel Landmine Alternative Concept Exploration Program (Track III). It explores the battlefield utility of current antipersonnel landmines (APL) in both pure and mixed APL/antitank minefields and evaluates the value of military suggested non-materiel alternatives. The historical record is full of examples where the presence (or absence) of antipersonnel landmines made a critical difference in battle. The current generation of military thinkers and writers lack any significant combat experience employing either mixed or antipersonnel minefields, which leaves a critical gap in available expert advice for policy and decision-makers. Because of this lack of experienced-based professional military knowledge, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory analyzed the employment of antipersonnel landmines in tactical mixed minefields and in protective antipersonnel minefields. The scientific method was employed where hypotheses were generated from the tactics and doctrine of the antipersonnel landmine era and tested in a simulation laboratory. A high-resolution, U.S. Joint Forces Command combat simulation model (the Joint Conflict and Tactical Simulation--JCATS) was used as the laboratory instrument. A realistic European scenario was obtained from a multi-national USAREUR exercise and was approved by the SAS-023 panel members. Additional scenarios were provided by U.S. CINC conferences and were based on Southwest Asia and Northeast Asia. Weapons data was obtained from the U.S. family of Joint Munitions Effectiveness Manuals. The U.S. Army Materiel Systems Analysis Agency conducted a limited verification and validation assessment of JCATS for purposes of this study.

  20. Antiphospholipid syndrome.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Irastorza, Guillermo; Crowther, Mark; Branch, Ware; Khamashta, Munther A

    2010-10-30

    The antiphospholipid syndrome causes venous, arterial, and small-vessel thrombosis; pregnancy loss; and preterm delivery for patients with severe pre-eclampsia or placental insufficiency. Other clinical manifestations are cardiac valvular disease, renal thrombotic microangiopathy, thrombocytopenia, haemolytic anaemia, and cognitive impairment. Antiphospholipid antibodies promote activation of endothelial cells, monocytes, and platelets; and overproduction of tissue factor and thromboxane A2. Complement activation might have a central pathogenetic role. Of the different antiphospholipid antibodies, lupus anticoagulant is the strongest predictor of features related to antiphospholipid syndrome. Therapy of thrombosis is based on long-term oral anticoagulation and patients with arterial events should be treated aggressively. Primary thromboprophylaxis is recommended in patients with systemic lupus erythematosus and probably in purely obstetric antiphospholipid syndrome. Obstetric care is based on combined medical-obstetric high-risk management and treatment with aspirin and heparin. Hydroxychloroquine is a potential additional treatment for this syndrome. Possible future therapies for non-pregnant patients with antiphospholipid syndrome are statins, rituximab, and new anticoagulant drugs. PMID:20822807

  1. Preexcitation Syndromes.

    PubMed

    Bhatia, Atul; Sra, Jasbir; Akhtar, Masood

    2016-03-01

    The classic electrocardiogram in Wolff-Parkinson-White (WPW) syndrome is characterized by a short PR interval and prolonged QRS duration in the presence of sinus rhythm with initial slurring. The clinical syndrome associated with above electrocardiogram finding and the history of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia is referred to as Wolff-Parkinson-White syndrome. Various eponyms describing accessory or anomalous conduction pathways in addition to the normal pathway are collectively referred to as preexcitation syndromes. The latter form and associated eponyms are frequently used in literature despite controversy and disagreements over their actual anatomical existence and electrophysiological significance. This communication highlights inherent deficiencies in the knowledge that has existed since the use of such eponyms began. With the advent of curative ablation, initially surgical, and then catheter based, the knowledge gaps have been mostly filled with better delineation of the anatomic and electrophysiological properties of anomalous atrioventricular pathways. It seems reasonable, therefore, to revisit the clinical and electrophysiologic role of preexcitation syndromes in current practice. PMID:26897561

  2. Connector adapter

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hacker, Scott C. (Inventor); Dean, Richard J. (Inventor); Burge, Scott W. (Inventor); Dartez, Toby W. (Inventor)

    2007-01-01

    An adapter for installing a connector to a terminal post, wherein the connector is attached to a cable, is presented. In an embodiment, the adapter is comprised of an elongated collet member having a longitudinal axis comprised of a first collet member end, a second collet member end, an outer collet member surface, and an inner collet member surface. The inner collet member surface at the first collet member end is used to engage the connector. The outer collet member surface at the first collet member end is tapered for a predetermined first length at a predetermined taper angle. The collet includes a longitudinal slot that extends along the longitudinal axis initiating at the first collet member end for a predetermined second length. The first collet member end is formed of a predetermined number of sections segregated by a predetermined number of channels and the longitudinal slot.

  3. Emotional Responsivity in Young Children with Williams Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Debbie J.; Hepburn, Susan L.; Most, David E.; Philofsky, Amy; Rogers, Sally J.

    2007-01-01

    The hypothesis that young children with Williams syndrome show higher rates of emotional responsivity relative to other children with developmental disabilities was explored. Performance of 23 young children with Williams syndrome and 30 MA-matched children with developmental disabilities of nonspecific etiologies was compared on an adaptation of…

  4. Attentional Set-Shifting in Fragile X Syndrome

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van der Molen, M. J. W.; Van der Molen, M. W.; Ridderinkhof, K. R.; Hamel, B. C. J.; Curfs, L. M. G.; Ramakers, G. J. A.

    2012-01-01

    The ability to flexibly adapt to the changing demands of the environment is often reported as a core deficit in fragile X syndrome (FXS). However, the cognitive processes that determine this attentional set-shifting deficit remain elusive. The present study investigated attentional set-shifting ability in fragile X syndrome males with the…

  5. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, Bobby L.; Aeby, Ian

    1982-01-01

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data having variable frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  6. Adaptive sampler

    DOEpatents

    Watson, B.L.; Aeby, I.

    1980-08-26

    An adaptive data compression device for compressing data is described. The device has a frequency content, including a plurality of digital filters for analyzing the content of the data over a plurality of frequency regions, a memory, and a control logic circuit for generating a variable rate memory clock corresponding to the analyzed frequency content of the data in the frequency region and for clocking the data into the memory in response to the variable rate memory clock.

  7. Adaptive antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barton, P.

    1987-04-01

    The basic principles of adaptive antennas are outlined in terms of the Wiener-Hopf expression for maximizing signal to noise ratio in an arbitrary noise environment; the analogy with generalized matched filter theory provides a useful aid to understanding. For many applications, there is insufficient information to achieve the above solution and thus non-optimum constrained null steering algorithms are also described, together with a summary of methods for preventing wanted signals being nulled by the adaptive system. The three generic approaches to adaptive weight control are discussed; correlation steepest descent, weight perturbation and direct solutions based on sample matrix conversion. The tradeoffs between hardware complexity and performance in terms of null depth and convergence rate are outlined. The sidelobe cancellor technique is described. Performance variation with jammer power and angular distribution is summarized and the key performance limitations identified. The configuration and performance characteristics of both multiple beam and phase scan array antennas are covered, with a brief discussion of performance factors.

  8. Expansion of syndromic vaccine preventable disease surveillance to include bacterial meningitis and Japanese encephalitis: Evaluation of adapting polio and measles laboratory networks in Bangladesh, China and India, 2007–2008

    PubMed Central

    Cavallaro, Kathleen F.; Sandhu, Hardeep S.; Hyde, Terri B.; Johnson, Barbara W.; Fischer, Marc; Mayer, Leonard W.; Clark, Thomas A.; Pallansch, Mark A.; Yin, Zundong; Zuo, Shuyan; Hadler, Stephen C.; Diorditsa, Serguey; Hasan, A.S.M. Mainul; Bose, Anindya S.; Dietz, Vance

    2016-01-01

    Background Surveillance for acute flaccid paralysis with laboratory confirmation has been a key strategy in the global polio eradication initiative, and the laboratory platform established for polio testing has been expanded in many countries to include surveillance for cases of febrile rash illness to identify measles and rubella cases. Vaccine-preventable disease surveillance is essential to detect outbreaks, define disease burden, guide vaccination strategies and assess immunization impact. Vaccines now exist to prevent Japanese encephalitis (JE) and some etiologies of bacterial meningitis. Methods We evaluated the feasibility of expanding polio–measles surveillance and laboratory networks to detect bacterial meningitis and JE, using surveillance for acute meningitis-encephalitis syndrome in Bangladesh and China and acute encephalitis syndrome in India. We developed nine syndromic surveillance performance indicators based on international surveillance guidelines and calculated scores using supervisory visit reports, annual reports, and case-based surveillance data. Results Scores, variable by country and targeted disease, were highest for the presence of national guidelines, sustainability, training, availability of JE laboratory resources, and effectiveness of using polio–measles networks for JE surveillance. Scores for effectiveness of building on polio–measles networks for bacterial meningitis surveillance and specimen referral were the lowest, because of differences in specimens and techniques. Conclusions Polio–measles surveillance and laboratory networks provided useful infrastructure for establishing syndromic surveillance and building capacity for JE diagnosis, but were less applicable for bacterial meningitis. Laboratory-supported surveillance for vaccine-preventable bacterial diseases will require substantial technical and financial support to enhance local diagnostic capacity. PMID:25597940

  9. Lemierre's syndrome.

    PubMed

    Eilbert, Wesley; Singla, Nitin

    2013-01-01

    Lemierre's syndrome is a condition characterized by thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and bacteremia caused by primarily anaerobic organisms, following a recent oropharyngeal infection. This has been an uncommon illness in the era of antibiotic therapy, though it has been reported with increasing frequency in the past 15 years. Lemierre's syndrome should be suspected in young healthy patients with prolonged symptoms of pharyngitis followed by symptoms of septicemia or pneumonia, or an atypical lateral neck pain. Diagnosis is often confirmed by identification of thrombophlebitis of the internal jugular vein and growth of anaerobic bacteria on blood culture. Treatment involves prolonged antibiotic therapy occasionally combined with anticoagulation. We review the literature and a case of a child with Lemierre's syndrome. PMID:24152679

  10. Compartment syndromes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mubarak, S. J.; Pedowitz, R. A.; Hargens, A. R.

    1989-01-01

    The compartment syndrome is defined as a condition in which high pressure within a closed fascial space (muscle compartment) reduces capillary blood perfusion below the level necessary for tissue viability'. This condition occurs in acute and chronic (exertional) forms, and may be secondary to a variety of causes. The end-result of an extended period of elevated intramuscular pressure may be the development of irreversible tissue injury and Volkmann's contracture. The goal of treatment of the compartment syndrome is the reduction of intracompartmental pressure thus facilitating reperfusion of ischaemic tissue and this goal may be achieved by decompressive fasciotomy. Controversy exists regarding the critical pressure-time thresholds for surgical decompression and the optimal diagnostic methods of measuring intracompartmental pressures. This paper will update and review some current knowledge regarding the pathophysiology, aetiology, diagnosis, and treatment of the acute compartment syndrome.

  11. [Kallmann syndrome].

    PubMed

    Mokosch, A; Bernecker, C; Willenberg, H S; Neumann, N J

    2011-10-01

    The Kallmann syndrome is a very rare congenital association of gonadotropin-releasing hormone deficiency and hyposmia or anosmia. Clinically it is characterized by low serum concentrations of testosterone and inadequate low levels of luteinizing hormone and follicle-stimulating hormone as well as incomplete sexual maturation, lack of secondary sexual features (facial and body hair growth, deepening of the voice), micropenis and sometimes even cryptorchidism. The reduced or absent sense of smell is typical for the Kallmann syndrome and distinguishes this syndrome from other causes of hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Additional findings may include synkinesia, hearing loss, unilateral renal aplasia, brachy- or syndactyly, agenesis of corpus callosum, cleft palate and dental agenesis. A 19-year-old man presented to our male infertility clinic with delayed sexual maturation, eunuchoid habitus, micropenis, cryptorchidism, erectile dysfunction and absence of ejaculation, anemia and osteoporosis as well as low serum concentrations of luteinizing hormone, follicle-stimulating hormone and testosterone in combination with hyposmia. PMID:21918848

  12. SAPHO syndrome.

    PubMed

    Cotten, A; Flipo, R M; Mentre, A; Delaporte, E; Duquesnoy, B; Chastanet, P

    1995-09-01

    Palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne are sometimes associated with peculiar aseptic skeletal conditions, but such skeletal lesions can be found without skin lesions. The term SAPHO syndrome has been coined for this cluster of manifestations. (The acronym SAPHO refers to synovitis, acne, palmoplantar pustulosis, hyperostosis, and osteitis.) The most common site of the disease is the upper anterior chest wall, characterized by predominantly osteosclerotic lesions, hyperostosis, and arthritis of the adjacent joints. Osteosclerosis of the vertebral bodies, hyperostosis, and erosions of the vertebral plates can be encountered. Unilateral sacroiliitis is frequently observed. Long bone involvement consists of osteosclerosis or osteolysis with periosteal new bone formation. Peripheral arthritis can be present but is rarely associated with joint destruction. The pathogenesis of this syndrome remains unknown, but a link with seronegative spondyloarthropathies is probable. Radiologists should be aware of this unusual syndrome to avoid misdiagnosis (eg, tumor, infection), unnecessary surgery, and antibiotic therapy. PMID:7501856

  13. Adaptive decoding of convolutional codes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hueske, K.; Geldmacher, J.; Götze, J.

    2007-06-01

    Convolutional codes, which are frequently used as error correction codes in digital transmission systems, are generally decoded using the Viterbi Decoder. On the one hand the Viterbi Decoder is an optimum maximum likelihood decoder, i.e. the most probable transmitted code sequence is obtained. On the other hand the mathematical complexity of the algorithm only depends on the used code, not on the number of transmission errors. To reduce the complexity of the decoding process for good transmission conditions, an alternative syndrome based decoder is presented. The reduction of complexity is realized by two different approaches, the syndrome zero sequence deactivation and the path metric equalization. The two approaches enable an easy adaptation of the decoding complexity for different transmission conditions, which results in a trade-off between decoding complexity and error correction performance.

  14. Flammer syndrome

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    The new term Flammer syndrome describes a phenotype characterized by the presence of primary vascular dysregulation together with a cluster of symptoms and signs that may occur in healthy people as well as people with disease. Typically, the blood vessels of the subjects with Flammer syndrome react differently to a number of stimuli, such as cold and physical or emotional stress. Nearly all organs, particularly the eye, can be involved. Although the syndrome has some advantages, such as protection against the development of atherosclerosis, Flammer syndrome also contributes to certain diseases, such as normal tension glaucoma. The syndrome occurs more often in women than in men, in slender people than in obese subjects, in people with indoor rather than outdoor jobs, and in academics than in blue collar workers. Affected subjects tend to have cold extremities, low blood pressure, prolonged sleep onset time, shifted circadian rhythm, reduced feeling of thirst, altered drug sensitivity, and increased general sensitivity, including pain sensitivity. The plasma level of endothelin-1 is slightly increased, and the gene expression in lymphocytes is changed. In the eye, the retinal vessels are stiffer and their spatial variability larger; the autoregulation of ocular blood flow is decreased. Glaucoma patients with Flammer syndrome have an increased frequency of the following: optic disc hemorrhages, activated retinal astrocytes, elevated retinal venous pressure, optic nerve compartmentalization, fluctuating diffuse visual field defects, and elevated oxidative stress. Further research should lead to a more concise definition, a precise diagnosis, and tools for recognizing people at risk. This may ultimately lead to more efficient and more personalized treatment. PMID:25075228

  15. [Eisenmenger syndrome].

    PubMed

    Jensen, Annette Schophuus; Iversen, Kasper; Vejlstrup, Niels G; Hansen, Peter Bo; Søndergaard, Lars

    2009-04-01

    Congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunt can induce proliferation, vasoconstriction and thrombosis in the pulmonary vascular bed. Eventually, the patient may develop Eisenmenger syndrome defined as pulmonary arterial hypertension caused by high pulmonary vascular resistance with right-to-left shunt and cyanosis. Patients with Eisenmenger syndrome suffer a high risk of complications in connection with acute medical conditions, extra-cardiac surgery and pregnancy. This article describes the precautions that should be taken to reduce morbidity and mortality in these patients. PMID:19416617

  16. EDITORIAL Proceedings of the XIV International Conference on Small-Angle Scattering, SAS-2009

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ungar, Goran; Heenan, Richard

    2010-10-01

    particles based on the radial pair distance distribution function. The model takes account of different types of disorder, i.e. of both 1st ('thermal') and 2nd ('paracrystalline') kind, as well as finite size, stacking and orientational disorder. In paper 012014 Salvino Ciccariello works out the 3D correlation function of plane objects, specifically a triangle of a general shape. This paves the way to analysing morphologies that can be approximated by cylinders of different cross-sections. Papers 012051 (Polte et al.) and 012047 (Bras et al.) report the use of SAS in combination with X-ray spectroscopy. Ristic et al. describe a real-time study of crystal nucleation induced by ultrasound (012049), while Marianne Imperor-Clerc et al. present an investigation of lyotropic liquid crystals under shear (012052). In the Polymers section Geoff Mitchell describes modelling of SANS data on electrospun fibres (012042), while Cabral et al. describes a study of nanoparticle aggregation in bulk and thin polymer films (012046). Work on phospholipid membranes was reported by Spinozzi et al. and by Onai et al. in papers 012019 and 012018, respectively. The latter deals with the effect of osmotic pressure on model 'lipid rafts', these being considered as having an important role in the function of the mammalian cell membrane. Readers interested in biological systems will find a number of other interesting papers describing the use of either SAXS or SANS in the Biological Systems and Membranes section. A number of descriptions of recent designs of SAXS (synchrotron) and SANS beamlines, as well as detector developments can be found in the section on Beamlines and Instrumentation. Goran Ungar, Editor-in-Chief Richard Heenan, Deputy Editor-in-Chief

  17. A comparison of three programming models for adaptive applications on the Origin2000

    SciTech Connect

    Shan, Hongzhang; Singh, Jaswinder Pal; Oliker, Leonid; Biswas, Rupak

    2001-05-30

    Adaptive applications have computational workloads and communication patterns which change unpredictably at runtime, requiring dynamic load balancing to achieve scalable performance on parallel machines. Efficient parallel implementations of such adaptive applications is therefore a challenging task. In this paper, we compare the performance of and the programming effort required for two major classes of adaptive applications under three leading parallel programming models on an SGI Origin2000 system, a machine which supports all three models efficiently. Results indicate that the three models deliver comparable performance; however, the implementations differ significantly beyond merely using explicit messages versus implicit loads/stores even though the basic parallel algorithms are similar. Compared with the message-passing (using MPI) and SHMEM programming models, the cache-coherent shared address space (CC-SAS) model provides substantial ease of programming at both the conceptual and program orchestration levels, often accompanied by performance gains. However, CC-SAS currently has portability limitations and may suffer from poor spatial locality of physically distributed shared data on large numbers of processors.

  18. From Uhuru at CfA to SAS-3 at MIT: Looking for X-Ray Binaries in all the Right Places

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cominsky, Lynn R.

    2013-01-01

    My career in X-ray astronomy started almost accidentally, when in 1975 I was hired fresh out of college as a “data aide” for the Uhuru satellite, in Riccardo Giacconi’s group at the Harvard-Smithsonian Center for Astrophysics. Working first for Mel Ulmer, and later for Bill Forman and Christine Jones, I learned the fundamentals of data analysis, and helped produce the Fourth Uhuru catalog of X-ray sources (Forman et al. 1978), as well as studying transient X-ray sources (Cominsky et al. 1978). Christine was the first woman scientist I had ever met, and with her encouragement, I applied to graduate school to continue on in X-ray astronomy. Lured down the street to MIT by the chance to work on SAS-3, I eagerly learned how to operate the satellite from a control room in the Center for Space Research. The SAS-3 group was led by Prof. George Clark, and it was my good luck that he was around during the holiday break in January 1978 when everyone else in the group was at an AAS meeting in Hawaii. A source I recognized from my Uhuru work, 4U0115+63, had reappeared, and I knew that it was likely to be a pulsar. With the help of George and Project Scientist Bill Mayer, I managed to send the commands to stop SAS-3 and point at the source. The 3.6 second pulsations were so strong that they could be seen in the raw data! This discovery made the New York Times, as 4U0115+63 was the first transient x-ray source shown to be in a binary system (Cominsky et al. 1978, Rappaport et al. 1978). Another personal SAS-3 highlight included working on Prof. Walter Lewin’s “World-wide Burst Watch” - coordinated multi-wavelength observations of x-ray burst sources which led to the discoveries of slightly delayed but coincident optical bursts (Grindlay et al. 1978, McClintock et al. 1979). Although live operations of SAS-3 ended when it re-entered on April 9, 1979, many years of additional data analysis remained. And later, as a continuation of work I began in my Ph.D. Thesis on X

  19. Rett Syndrome.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Culbert, Linda A.

    This pamphlet reviews the historical process involved in initially recognizing Rett Syndrome as a specific disorder in girls. Its etiology is unknown, but studies have considered factors as hyperammonemia, a two-step mutation, a fragile X chromosome, metabolic disorder, environmental causation, dopamine deficiency, and an inactive X chromosome.…

  20. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... If you already have metabolic syndrome, making these healthy lifestyle choices can help reduce your risk of heart disease and other health problems. If lifestyle changes alone can’t control your ... to help. Maintain a healthy weight Your doctor can measure your body mass ...

  1. Reye's Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... diagnosis and medical treatment of RS. NIH Patient Recruitment for Reye's Syndrome Clinical Trials At NIH Clinical ... Drug Administration (FDA) U.S. Department of Health and Human Services 5600 Fishers Lane, CDER-HFD-240 Rockville, MD ... Privacy Statement NIH...Turning Discovery Into Health ®

  2. Metabolic Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... from Nemours for Parents for Kids for Teens Teens Home Body Mind Sexual Health Food & Fitness Diseases & Conditions Infections Q&A School & Jobs Drugs & Alcohol Staying Safe Recipes En Español Making a Change – Your Personal Plan Hot ... > Metabolic Syndrome Print A A A Text Size ...

  3. Dubowitz syndrome.

    PubMed

    Wilhelm, O L; Méhes, K

    1986-01-01

    Four children including two siblings with Dubowitz syndrome are presented. All four were preterm or small-for-dates. On the basis of their symptoms, it is suggested that infantile eczema is not an essential sign of the disorder, whereas the high frequency of hernia, strabism and upward slant of the palpebral fissures is underestimated in the literature. PMID:3730185

  4. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... is also possible that many genes with smaller effects and environmental factors may play a role in the development ... Publication No. 12-2163 Back to Tourette Syndrome Information Page See a list ... by: Office of Communications and Public Liaison National Institute of Neurological Disorders ...

  5. HELLP syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... get worse and be harmful to both the mother and child. Your health care provider may induce labor by ... treatment, a small number of women die. The death rate among babies born to mothers with HELLP syndrome depends on birth weight and ...

  6. Rett Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... binding protein 2 (MeCP2), which is needed for brain development and acts as one of the many biochemical ... the following criteria do not have Rett syndrome: brain injury secondary to ... abnormal psychomotor development in the first 6 months of life. Is ...

  7. Tourette Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... organizations can help kids learn how to explain tics to others. How Should I Act Around Someone Who Has It? Kids who have Tourette syndrome want to be treated like everybody else. They can do regular stuff, just like other kids. In fact, Tim Howard grew up to be a soccer star. ...

  8. [Refeeding syndrome].

    PubMed

    Ševela, Stanislav; Novák, František; Kazda, Antonín; Brodská, Helena

    2016-01-01

    Despite being known more than 60 years, refeeding syndrome (RS) still bears many uncertainties. For example, its definition is not clear and definite, and the attitude to it varies from the complete neglect to over-prevention.The term "refeeding syndrome" refers to electrolyte and metabolic changes occurring in malnourished patients after the readministration of nutrition. These changes concern especially to phosphates and ions. Potassium, magnesium, naturism and fluids balance are involved. The changes lead to cell energetic metabolism and electric potential disturbances, with related clinical symptoms.Fully developed refeeding syndrome is quite rare; nevertheless it can be fatal for the patient. However, even its development can lead to many complications increasing the patient's morbidity and the length of stay in the hospital. Yet the refeeding syndrome is more or less predictable and if kept in mind also preventable.The aim of this article is to get the reader to know more about this metabolic phenomenon and possible attitudes towards it. PMID:27088791

  9. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Heldmann, F; Kiltz, U; Baraliakos, X; Braun, J

    2014-10-01

    The SAPHO syndrome, an acronym for synovitis, acne, pustulosis, hyperostosis and osteitis, is a rare disease which affects bones, joints and the skin. The main osteoarticular features are hyperostosis and osteitis. Osteoarticular symptoms predominantly occur on the anterior chest wall but the spine and the peripheral skeleton can also be involved. The most important skin affections are palmoplantar pustulosis and severe acne. The etiology of this syndrome remains unclear but infectious, immunological and genetic factors are involved. The diagnostic features of SAPHO syndrome are clinical and radiological. The most important diagnostic procedure is Tc-99 m bone scintigraphy but conventional x-rays as well as computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can also contribute to the final diagnosis. Bone histology and positron emission tomography CT (PET-CT) may help to differentiate SAPHO syndrome from malignancies and infectious osteomyelitis. Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are the cornerstone of treatment. The results obtained using antibiotics and disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (DMARDs), such as sulfasalazine and methotrexate are inconsistent. Bisphosphonates and anti-tumor necrosis factor (anti-TNF) drugs have shown promising results in small studies but further research is still necessary. PMID:25260820

  10. Morquio syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Hearing test Slit-lamp eye exam Skin fibroblast culture X-rays of the long bones, ribs, and spine People with Morquio syndrome should have MRI of the lower skull and upper neck to determine if their upper vertebrae are underdeveloped.

  11. Sotos syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Baujat, Geneviève; Cormier-Daire, Valérie

    2007-01-01

    Sotos syndrome is an overgrowth condition characterized by cardinal features including excessive growth during childhood, macrocephaly, distinctive facial gestalt and various degrees of learning difficulty, and associated with variable minor features. The exact prevalence remains unknown but hundreds of cases have been reported. The diagnosis is usually suspected after birth because of excessive height and occipitofrontal circumference (OFC), advanced bone age, neonatal complications including hypotonia and feeding difficulties, and facial gestalt. Other inconstant clinical abnormalities include scoliosis, cardiac and genitourinary anomalies, seizures and brisk deep tendon reflexes. Variable delays in cognitive and motor development are also observed. The syndrome may also be associated with an increased risk of tumors. Mutations and deletions of the NSD1 gene (located at chromosome 5q35 and coding for a histone methyltransferase implicated in transcriptional regulation) are responsible for more than 75% of cases. FISH analysis, MLPA or multiplex quantitative PCR allow the detection of total/partial NSD1 deletions, and direct sequencing allows detection of NSD1 mutations. The large majority of NSD1 abnormalities occur de novo and there are very few familial cases. Although most cases are sporadic, several reports of autosomal dominant inheritance have been described. Germline mosaicism has never been reported and the recurrence risk for normal parents is very low (<1%). The main differential diagnoses are Weaver syndrome, Beckwith-Wiedeman syndrome, Fragile X syndrome, Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome and 22qter deletion syndrome. Management is multidisciplinary. During the neonatal period, therapies are mostly symptomatic, including phototherapy in case of jaundice, treatment of the feeding difficulties and gastroesophageal reflux, and detection and treatment of hypoglycemia. General pediatric follow-up is important during the first years of life to allow detection

  12. The Source for Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richard, Gail J.; Hoge, Debra Reichert

    Designed for practicing speech-language pathologists, this book discusses different syndrome disabilities, pertinent speech-language characteristics, and goals and strategies to begin intervention efforts at a preschool level. Chapters address: (1) Angelman syndrome; (2) Asperger syndrome; (3) Down syndrome; (4) fetal alcohol syndrome; (5) fetal…

  13. Joint observations of 4U1223-62 by the SAS-3 satellite and Columbia University proportional counter experiment on NASA rocket 26.054 UH

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Novick, R.; Wolff, R. S.

    1978-01-01

    The pulsating X-ray binary 4U1223-62 and Vela X-1 were observed by Aerobee rocket-borne proportional counters. Valid X-ray events were telemetered and analyzed for possible flaring, quasiperiodic, and periodic pulsations, and for other nonstatistical behavior in the source. Both fast Fourier transform and autocorrelation programs were used. For several hours four days before and after the rocket flight, the SAS-3 satellite scanned the galactic plane in order to identify X-ray sources in the vicinity of 4U1223-62 and their intensities, and to provide positional accuracy of 0.25 for sources with intensity greater than 10% of the target. Observations of the source near the main peak of its pulsating period as defined by SAS-3 are discussed. There is no evidence of a spectral feature although twice as many photons were received as than from Vela X-1.

  14. [SAPHO syndrome].

    PubMed

    Chamot, A M; Kahn, M F

    1994-01-01

    The occurrence of musculoskeletal manifestations (including synovitis, chest wall arthroosteitis and multifocal osteomyelitis) in association with severe acne, palmoplantar pustulosis and perhaps with some presentations of psoriasis, have been described by many authors in the past 30 years. These different multifaceted descriptions have been designated by a variety of terms. More recently, a possible link between these conditions and spondarthritides has also been underlined by a slightly increased prevalence of HLA B27 and occasional occurrences of sacroiliitis, chronic inflammatory bowel disease and possibly psoriasis. An acronym, the SAPHO syndrome (which stands for Synovitis, Acne, Pustulosis Hyperostosis and Osteitis) is proposed for this group of diseases because of the similarity of musculoskeletal manifestations in patients with severe acne and pustulosis. The clinical, epidemiological, pathophysiological, immunogenetic and diagnostic aspects, as well as the management of this syndrome are reviewed. PMID:7975935

  15. Paraneoplastic syndromes

    SciTech Connect

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Paraneoplastic syndromes (PNS) comprise a diverse group of disorders that are associated with cancer but unrelated to the size, location, metastases, or physiologic activities of the mature tissue of origin. They are remote effects of tumors that may appear as signs, symptoms, or syndromes which can mimic other disease conditions encountered in veterinary medicine. Recognition of PNS is valuable for several reasons: the observed abnormalities may represent tumor cell markers and facilitate early diagnosis of the tumor; they may allow assessment of premalignant states; they may aid in the search metastases; they may help quantify and monitor response to therapy; and, they may provide insight into the study of malignant transformation and oncogene expression. This review will concentrate on the pathophysiology, diagnosis, and treatment of some of the common PNS encountered in veterinary medicine.

  16. Fluency Disorders in Genetic Syndromes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Van Borsel, John; Tetnowski, John A.

    2007-01-01

    The characteristics of various genetic syndromes have included "stuttering" as a primary symptom associated with that syndrome. Specifically, Down syndrome, fragile X syndrome, Prader-Willi syndrome, Tourette syndrome, Neurofibromatosis type I, and Turner syndrome all list "stuttering" as a characteristic of that syndrome. An extensive review of…

  17. Brachycephalic Syndrome.

    PubMed

    Dupré, Gilles; Heidenreich, Dorothee

    2016-07-01

    Animals presenting with brachycephalic syndrome suffer from multilevel obstruction of the airways as well as secondary structural collapse. Stenotic nares, aberrant turbinates, nasopharyngeal collapse, soft palate elongation and hyperplasia, laryngeal collapse, and left bronchus collapse are being described as the most common associated anomalies. Rhinoplasty and palatoplasty as well as newer surgical techniques and postoperative care strategies have resulted in significant improvement of the prognosis even in middle-aged dogs. PMID:27012936

  18. Small-angle scattering computed tomography (SAS-CT) using a Talbot-Lau interferometer and a rotating anode x-ray tube: theory and experiments

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guang-Hong; Bevins, Nicholas; Zambelli, Joseph; Qi, Zhihua

    2013-01-01

    X-ray differential phase contrast imaging methods, including projection imaging and the corresponding computed tomography (CT), have been implemented using a Talbot interferometer and either a synchrotron beam line or a low brilliance x-ray source generated by a stationary-anode x-ray tube. From small-angle scattering events which occur as an x-ray propagates through a medium, a signal intensity loss can be recorded and analyzed for an understanding of the micro-structures in an image object. This has been demonstrated using a Talbot-Lau interferometer and a stationary-anode x-ray tube. In this paper, theoretical principles and an experimental implementation of the corresponding CT imaging method are presented. First, a line integral is derived from analyzing the cross section of the small-angle scattering events. This method is referred to as small-angle scattering computed tomography (SAS-CT). Next, a Talbot-Lau interferometer and a rotating-anode x-ray tube were used to implement SAS-CT. A physical phantom and human breast tissue sample were used to demonstrate the reconstructed SAS-CT image volumes. PMID:20588425

  19. Brugada Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    ANTZELEVITCH, CHARLES

    2007-01-01

    First introduced as a new clinical entity in 1992, the Brugada syndrome is associated with a relatively high risk of sudden death in young adults, and occasionally in children and infants. Recent years have witnessed a striking proliferation of papers dealing with the clinical and basic aspects of the disease. Characterized by a coved-type ST-segment elevation in the right precordial leads of the electrocardiogram (ECG), the Brugada syndrome has a genetic basis that thus far has been linked only to mutations in SCN5A, the gene that encodes the α-subunit of the sodium channel. The Brugada ECG is often concealed, but can be unmasked or modulated by a number of drugs and pathophysiological states including sodium channel blockers, a febrile state, vagotonic agents, tricyclic antidepressants, as well as cocaine and propranolol intoxication. Average age at the time of initial diagnosis or sudden death is 40 ± 22, with the youngest patient diagnosed at 2 days of age and the oldest at 84 years. This review provides an overview of the clinical, genetic, molecular, and cellular aspects of the Brugada syndrome, incorporating the results of two recent consensus conferences. Controversies with regard to risk stratification and newly proposed pharmacologic strategies are discussed. PMID:17038146

  20. Roberts syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Baoshan; Lu, Shuai; Gerton, Jennifer L

    2014-01-01

    All living organisms must go through cycles of replicating their genetic information and then dividing the copies between two new cells. This cyclical process, in cells from bacteria and human alike, requires a protein complex known as cohesin. Cohesin is a structural maintenance of chromosomes (SMC) complex. While bacteria have one form of this complex, yeast have several SMC complexes, and humans have at least a dozen cohesin complexes alone. Therefore the ancient structure and function of SMC complexes has been both conserved and specialized over the course of evolution. These complexes play roles in replication, repair, organization, and segregation of the genome. Mutations in the genes that encode cohesin and its regulatory factors are associated with developmental disorders such as Roberts syndrome, Cornelia de Lange syndrome, and cancer. In this review, we focus on how acetylation of cohesin contributes to its function. In Roberts syndrome, the lack of cohesin acetylation contributes to nucleolar defects and translational inhibition. An understanding of basic SMC complex function will be essential to unraveling the molecular etiology of human diseases associated with defective SMC function. PMID:25054091

  1. Acrodysostosis syndromes.

    PubMed

    Silve, C; Le-Stunff, C; Motte, E; Gunes, Y; Linglart, A; Clauser, E

    2012-01-01

    Acrodysostosis (ADO) refers to a heterogeneous group of rare skeletal dysplasia that share characteristic features including severe brachydactyly, facial dysostosis and nasal hypoplasia. The literature describing acrodysostosis cases has been confusing because some reported patients may have had other phenotypically related diseases presenting with Albright Hereditary Osteodystrophy (AHO) such as pseudohypoparathyroidism type 1a (PHP1a) or pseudopseudohypoparathyroidism (PPHP). A question has been whether patients display or not abnormal mineral metabolism associated with resistance to PTH and/or resistance to other hormones that bind G-protein coupled receptors (GPCR) linked to Gsα, as observed in PHP1a. The recent identification in patients affected with acrodysostosis of defects in two genes, PRKAR1A and PDE4D, both important players in the GPCR-Gsα-cAMP-PKA signaling, has helped clarify some issues regarding the heterogeneity of acrodysostosis, in particular the presence of hormonal resistance. Two different genetic and phenotypic syndromes are now identified, both with a similar bone dysplasia: ADOHR, due to PRKAR1A defects, and ADOP4 (our denomination), due to PDE4D defects. The existence of GPCR-hormone resistance is typical of the ADOHR syndrome. We review here the PRKAR1A and PDE4D gene defects and phenotypes identified in acrodysostosis syndromes, and discuss them in view of phenotypically related diseases caused by defects in the same signaling pathway. PMID:24363928

  2. Down Syndrome: Eye Problems

    MedlinePlus

    ... life expectancy. Do children with Down syndrome have eye problems? Individuals with Down syndrome are at increased ... When should children with Down syndrome receive an eye exam? The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends that ...

  3. Reye syndrome - resources

    MedlinePlus

    Resources - Reye syndrome ... The following organizations are good resources for information on Reye Syndrome : National Reye's Syndrome Foundation, Inc. -- www.reyessyndrome.org National Institute of Neurologic Disorders and Stroke -- www. ...

  4. Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is a rare, inherited disease. It causes problems with the skin, sinuses, lungs, bones, and teeth. ... Hyperimmunoglobulin E syndrome is also called Job syndrome. It is named after the biblical character Job whose faithfulness was ...

  5. National Down Syndrome Society

    MedlinePlus

    donate Entire Site Down Syndrome Resources Ways to Give #DSWORKS™ Buddy Walk® Advocacy About NDSS The National Advocate for People with Down Syndrome Since 1979 National Down Syndrome Society 8 E ...

  6. Genetic obesity syndromes.

    PubMed

    Goldstone, Anthony P; Beales, Philip L

    2008-01-01

    There are numerous reports of multi-system genetic disorders with obesity. Many have a characteristic presentation and several, an overlapping phenotype indicating the likelihood of a shared common underlying mechanism or pathway. By understanding the genetic causes and functional perturbations of such syndromes we stand to gain tremendous insight into obesogenic pathways. In this review we focus particularly on Bardet-Biedl syndrome, whose molecular genetics and cell biology has been elucidated recently, and Prader-Willi syndrome, the commonest obesity syndrome due to loss of imprinted genes on 15q11-13. We also discuss highlights of other genetic obesity syndromes including Alstrom syndrome, Cohen syndrome, Albright's hereditary osteodystrophy (pseudohypoparathyroidism), Carpenter syndrome, MOMO syndrome, Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome, cases with deletions of 6q16, 1p36, 2q37 and 9q34, maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 14, fragile X syndrome and Börjeson-Forssman-Lehman syndrome. PMID:18230893

  7. Fetal Alcohol Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Conditions Frequently Asked Questions Español Condiciones Chinese Conditions Fetal Alcohol Syndrome Read in Chinese What is Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS)? Fetal Alcohol Syndrome (FAS) describes changes in ...

  8. Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What is Tethered Spinal Cord Syndrome? Tethered spinal cord syndrome is a neurological ...

  9. Heart and Down Syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Associated Conditions » The Heart & Down Syndrome The Heart & Down Syndrome Abnormalities of the cardiovascular system are common in ... the Most Common Heart Defects in Children With Down Syndrome? The most common defects are Atrioventricular Septal Defect ( ...

  10. What is Down Syndrome?

    MedlinePlus

    ... NICHD Research Information Clinical Trials Resources and Publications Down Syndrome: Condition Information Skip sharing on social media links Share this: Page Content What is Down syndrome? Down syndrome describes a set of cognitive and ...

  11. Do you know this syndrome? Noonan syndrome.

    PubMed

    Kondo, Rogerio Nabor; Martins, Ligia Márcia Mario; Lopes, Vivian Cristina Holanda; Bittar, Rodrigo Antonio; Araújo, Fernanda Mendes

    2013-01-01

    Noonan Syndrome is one of the most common genetic syndromes and also an important differential diagnosis in children presenting with syndromic facies similar to Turner's syndrome phenotype. This syndrome is characterized by facial dysmorphism, congenital heart defects, short stature and also a wide phenotypic variation. This article discusses the case of a 10 year-old patient with Noonan syndrome that presented typical facies, cardiac defects (pulmonary dilatation and mitral regurgitation), dental malocclusion, micrognatism, short stature and a certain degree of learning disability. PMID:24068150

  12. Intestinal adaptation after massive intestinal resection

    PubMed Central

    Weale, A; Edwards, A; Bailey, M; Lear, P

    2005-01-01

    Patients with short bowel syndrome require long term parenteral nutrition support. However, after massive intestinal resection the intestine undergoes adaptation and nutritional autonomy may be obtained. Given that the complications of parenteral nutrition may be life threatening or result in treatment failure and the need for intestinal transplantation, a more attractive option is to wean patients off nutrition support by optimising the adaptive process. The article examines the evidence that after extensive small bowel resection adaptation occurs in humans and focuses on the factors that influence adaptation and the strategies that have been used to optimise this process. The review is based on an English language Medline search with secondary references obtained from key articles. There is evidence that adaptation occurs in humans. Adaptation is a complex process that results in response to nutrient and non-nutrient stimuli. Successful and reproducible strategies to improve adaptation remain elusive despite an abundance of experimental data. Nevertheless given the low patient survival and quality of life associated with other treatments for irreversible intestinal failure it is imperative that clinical research continues into the optimisation of the adaptation. PMID:15749794

  13. Inherited ichthyosis: Syndromic forms.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Kozo

    2016-03-01

    Among diseases that cause ichthyosis as one of the symptoms, there are some diseases that induce abnormalities in organs other than the skin. Of these, diseases with characteristic signs are regarded as syndromes. Although these syndromes are very rare, Netherton syndrome, Sjögren-Larsson syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, Dorfman-Chanarin syndrome, ichthyosis follicularis, atrichia and photophobia (IFAP) syndrome, and Refsum syndrome have been described in texts as representative ones. It is important to know the molecular genetics and pathomechanisms in order to establish an effective therapy and beneficial genetic counseling including a prenatal diagnosis. PMID:26945533

  14. Acute nephritic syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    Glomerulonephritis - acute; Acute glomerulonephritis; Nephritis syndrome - acute ... Acute nephritic syndrome is often caused by an immune response triggered by an infection or other disease. Common causes ...

  15. Quercetin inhibits migration and invasion of SAS human oral cancer cells through inhibition of NF-κB and matrix metalloproteinase-2/-9 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Lai, Wan-Wen; Hsu, Shu-Chun; Chueh, Fu-Shih; Chen, Ya-Yin; Yang, Jai-Sing; Lin, Jing-Pin; Lien, Jin-Cherng; Tsai, Chung-Hung; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2013-05-01

    Quercetin, a principal flavanoid compound in onions, has been shown to possess a wide spectrum of pharmacological properties, including anticancer activities. Our earlier study showed that quercetin induced cytotoxic effects on SAS human oral cancer cells. In this study, we found that quercetin significantly reduced wound closure of SAS cells in culture plates after 12- and 24-h treatments. Results indicated that quercetin inhibited the expression and activity of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9, as measured by western blotting and gelatin zymography. The results from western blotting also showed that quercetin reduced the protein levels of MMP-2, -7, -9 and -10, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) p65, inductible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA), phosphatidylinositide-3 kinases (PI3K), nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor, alpha (IKBα), IKB-α/β, phosphorylated nuclear factor of kappa light polypeptide gene enhancer in B-cells inhibitor kinase, alpha/beta (p-IKKα/β), focal adhesion kinase (FAK), son of sevenless homolog-1 (SOS1), growth factor receptor-bound protein-2 (GRB2), mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase-3 (MEKK3), MEKK7, extracellular-signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), p-ERK1/2, c-Jun N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2), p38, p-p38, Jun proto-oncogene (c-JUN) and p-c-JUN but it did not affect Ras homolog gene family, member A (RhoA), Protein kinase C (PKC) and rat sarcoma viral oncogene homolog (RAS) in SAS cells. Confocal laser microscopy also showed that quercetin promoted the expressions of RhoA and Rho-associated, coiled-coil containing protein kinase-1 (ROCK1), but inhibited the expression of NF-κB p65 in SAS cells. It is concluded from these data that inhibition of migration and invasion of SAS cells by quercetin is associated with the down

  16. What Do Parents Want?: An Analysis of Education-Related Comments Made by Parents of Children with Different Genetic Syndromes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fidler, Deborah J.; Lawson, John E.; Hodapp, Robert M.

    2003-01-01

    An analysis of educational desires found parents of children with Down syndrome (n=39) wanted changes in speech therapy and reading services, parents of children with Prader-Willi syndrome (n=25) wanted increases in adaptive physical education services, and parents of children with Williams syndrome (n=26) wanted increases in music services and…

  17. Morvan Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Maskery, Mark; Chhetri, Suresh K.; Dayanandan, Rejith; Gall, Claire

    2016-01-01

    A 74-year-old gentleman was admitted to the regional neurosciences center with encephalopathy, myokymia, and dysautonomia. Chest imaging had previously identified an incidental mass in the anterior mediastinum, consistent with a primary thymic tumor. Antivoltage-gated potassium channel (anti-VGKC) antibodies were positive (titer 1273 pmol/L) and he was hypokalemic. Electromyogram and nerve conduction studies were in keeping with peripheral nerve hyperexcitability syndrome, and an electroencephalogram was consistent with encephalopathy. A diagnosis of Morvan syndrome was made, for which he was initially treated with high-dose steroids, followed by a 5-day course of intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIG) therapy. He also underwent thymectomy, followed by a postexcision flare of his symptoms requiring intensive care management. Further steroids, plasmapheresis, and IVIG achieved stabilization of his clinical condition, enabling transfer for inpatient neurorehabilitation. He was commenced on azathioprine and a prolonged oral steroid taper. A subsequent presumed incipient relapse responded well to further IVIG treatment. This case report documents a thymoma-associated presentation of anti-VGKC-positive Morvan syndrome supplemented by patient and carer narrative and video, both of which provide valuable further insights into this rare disorder. There are a limited number of publications surrounding this rare condition available in the English literature. This, combined with the heterogenous presentation, association with underlying malignancy, response to treatment, and prognosis, provides a diagnostic challenge. However, the association with anti-VGKC antibody-associated complexes and 2 recent case series have provided some scope for both accurate diagnosis and management. PMID:26740856

  18. Mazabraud syndrome

    PubMed Central

    John, Anulekha Mary; Behera, Kishore Kumar; Mathai, Thomas; Parmar, Harshad; Paul, Thomas V.

    2013-01-01

    A 25 year old lady presented with pain and swelling of left thigh. On examination she was found to have tenderness of left femur with a separate soft tissue swelling within the thigh muscle. Further evaluation revealed expansile bony lesion on X-ray of left tibia and multiple hot spots on bone scan suggestive of fibrous dysplasia. The soft tissue swelling on excision and histopathological examination was found to be intramuscular myxoma. The combination of the above two, called Mazabraud syndrome is being reported. PMID:23961498

  19. [Ascher's syndrome].

    PubMed

    Halling, F; Sandrock, D; Merten, H A; Hönig, J F

    1991-01-01

    Ascher's syndrome is composed of the triad blepharochalasis, double lip and goitre. In many of the cases reported in the literature this typical constellation of symptoms is not complete; particularly the struma is not mandatorily involved. A 58-year-old patient with this rare disease who exhibited blepharochalasis and double upper and lower lip is presented. Additionally, subclinical hypothyroidism and alopecia areata totalis were found. In differential diagnosis other causes of double lips or enlargement of the lips must be considered. PMID:1817784

  20. [Piriformis syndrome].

    PubMed

    Erauso, Thomas; Pégorie, Anne; Gaveau, Yves-Marie; Tardy, Dominique

    2010-09-20

    Sciatic pain is often misleading and establishing the link with a local muscular cause can be difficult and lead to errors, especially when faced with a young sportsman, with typical discogenic pain. Simple, specific and reproducible tests enable a better identification and treatment of a muscular cause or canal syndrome. Physiotherapy, or local infiltrations are generally very efficient, and sufficient. Surgery may be considered only in a very limited number of cases, lack of response to the first line treatment and then only if it is the absolute diagnosis, diagnosis which must remain a diagnosis of exception, more so of exclusion. PMID:21033479