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Sample records for adapter insulator ring

  1. Gas insulated transmission line having tapered particle trapping ring

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.

    1982-01-01

    A gas-insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner conductor, insulating supports and an insulating gas. A particle-trapping ring is secured to each insulating support, and it is comprised of a central portion and two tapered end portions. The ends of the particle trapping ring have a smaller diameter than the central portion of the ring, so as to enable the use of the particle trapping ring in a curved transmission line.

  2. Keck Adaptive Optics Images of Uranus and Its Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Gibbard, S. G.; Macintosh, B. A.; Roe, H. G.; Gavel, D. T.; Max, C. E.

    2002-12-01

    We present adaptive optic images of Uranus obtained with the 10-m W. M. Keck II telescope in June 2000, at wavelengths between 1 and 2.4 μm. The angular resolution of the images is ˜0.06-0.09″. We identified eight small cloud features on Uranus's disk, four of which were in the northern hemisphere. The latter features are ˜1000-2000 km in extent and located in the upper troposphere, above the methane cloud, at pressures between 0.5 and 1 bar. Our data have been combined with HST data by Hammel et al. (2001, Icarus153, 229-235); the combination of Keck and HST data allowed derivation of an accurate wind velocity profile. Our images further show Uranus's entire ring system: the asymmetric ɛ ring, as well as the three groups of inner rings (outward from Uranus): the rings 6+5+4, α+β, and the η+γ+δ rings. We derived the equivalent I/ F width and ring particle reflectivity for each group of rings. Typical particle albedos are ˜0.04-0.05, in good agreement with HST data at 0.9 μm.

  3. Keck Adaptive Optics Imaging of Uranus and its Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Roe, H.; Macintosh, B.; Gibbard, S.; Max, C.; Gavel, D.

    2000-10-01

    We observed Uranus with the recently commissioned AO/NIRSPEC system (Adaptive Optics system with the Near-Infrared echelle Spectrograph) on the 10-m W.M. Keck telescope, UT June 17 and 18, 2000. NIRSPEC allows one to take images and spectra simultaneously. Here we will discuss the images at wavelengths between 1 and 2.4 micron. Due to the location of the rings' pericenter, the rings were much brighter in the north than the south, which resulted in excellent ring images. Inside of the ɛ ring at least three more (individually slightly resolved) rings are visible: from the outside inwards these are: 1) combined δ ,γ ,η rings, 2) combined β ,α rings, and 3) combined 4,5,6 rings. On the planet itself we detected at least 8 different cloud features, five of which were in the northern hemisphere. Two features could be tracked over a 40-60 degree longitude range, and yield wind velocities of 175 +/- 35 m/s at a latitude of +30o, and of 120 +/- 40 m/s at +40o latitude. The highest latitude reached by HST NICMOS was +27o, where a velocity of 20 m/s was measured (Karkoschka, 1998). Has the wind speed changed? Or is there a very steep gradient in the profile? Our data suggest the wind profile to be similar to that derived for Neptune, though at reduced velocities. This research was supported in part by the STC Program of the National Science Foundation under Agreement No. AST-9876783, and in part under the auspices of the US Department of Energy at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, Univ. of Calif. under contract No. W-7405-Eng-48.

  4. High Power Accelerator and Magnetically Insulated Ion Diode for Ion Ring Studies.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jones, Stephen Edward

    Ion ring generation for Cornell University's Megavolt Ion Coil Experiment (MICE) requires a suitable pulsed power accelerator to drive a high-power magnetically insulated ion diode. The diode then emits an intense ion-beam which forms an ion ring by using a cusped magnetic field. The goal of this thesis is to provide the necessary beam to form the ion-ring, and the present work consists of two parts: (1) the design, construction, testing, and operation of the pulsed power accelerator; and (2) the design, construction, testing, operation, and physics studies of a magnetically insulated diode for ion ring generation. For the required pulsed-power driver, we use a modified 2-MV, 100 kJ Marx generator, connected to a new 2-Omega-200-nsec pulse-forming line. For the diode, we use a novel applied-B, extraction diode with anode-side as well as cathode-side coils. This coil arrangement forms an easily variable pseudo-separatrix within the gap allowing flexibility for diode studies and optimization. Diode investigations reveal the efficacy of such a pseudo-separatrix located in the gap near the flashboard, in terms of anode turn-on and ion beam current. Further results (1) support the hypothesis that leakage electrons to the flashboard are instrumental for anode turn-on, (2) indicate that the gap electron-population has two different electron sources, and (3) discuss the possible long development time scale for diode development. Extensive computer simulations have also been conducted on the accelerator and diode, and results are compared with experiment. A driving constraint throughout this work is affordability on a university budget; also, unfortunately, some of the experiments had to be cut short due to funding cuts.

  5. The insulator protein Suppressor of Hairy wing is required for proper ring canal development during oogenesis in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Shih-Jui; Plata, Maria P; Ernest, Ben; Asgarifar, Saghi; Labrador, Mariano

    2015-07-01

    Chromatin insulators orchestrate gene transcription during embryo development and cell differentiation by stabilizing interactions between distant genomic sites. Mutations in genes encoding insulator proteins are generally lethal, making in vivo functional analyses of insulator proteins difficult. In Drosophila, however, mutations in the gene encoding the Suppressor of Hairy wing insulator protein [Su(Hw)] are viable and female sterile, providing an opportunity to study insulator function during oocyte development. Whereas previous reports suggest that the function of Su(Hw) in oogenesis is independent of its insulator activity, many aspects of the role of Su(Hw) in Drosophila oogenesis remain unexplored. Here we show that mutations in su(Hw) result in smaller ring canal lumens and smaller outer ring diameters, which likely obstruct molecular and vesicle passage from nurse cells to the oocyte. Fluorescence microscopy reveals that lack of Su(Hw) leads to excess accumulation of Kelch (Kel) and Filament-actin (F-actin) proteins in the ring canal structures of developing egg chambers. Furthermore, we found that misexpression of the Src oncogene at 64B (Src64B) may cause ring canal development defects as microarray analysis and real-time RT-PCR revealed there is a three fold decrease in Src64B expression in su(Hw) mutant ovaries. Restoration of Src64B expression in su(Hw) mutant female germ cells rescued the ring phenotype but did not restore fertility. We conclude that loss of su(Hw) affects expression of many oogenesis related genes and down-regulates Src64B, resulting in ring canal defects potentially contributing to obstruction of molecular flow and an eventual failure of egg chamber organization.

  6. Topological insulator behavior of WS2 monolayer with square-octagon ring structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kumar, Ashok; Pandey, Ravindra; Ahluwalia, P. K.; Tankeshwar, K.

    2016-05-01

    We report electronic behavior of an allotrope of monolayer WS2 with a square octagon ring structure, refereed to as (so-WS2) within state-of-the-art density functional theory (DFT) calculations. The WS2 monolayer shows semi-metallic characteristics with Dirac-cone like features around D. Unlike p-orbital's Dirac-cone in graphene, the Dirac-cone in the so-WS2 monolayer originates from the d-electrons of the W atom in the lattice. Most interestingly, the spin-orbit interaction associated with d-electrons induce a finite band-gap that results into the metal-semiconductor transition and topological insulator-like behavior in the so-WS2 monolayer. These characteristics suggest the so-WS2 monolayer to be a promising candidate for the next-generation electronic and spintronics devices.

  7. Air-mode photonic crystal ring resonator on silicon-on-insulator

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Ge; Zhang, Yong; Zhang, He; Wang, Yi; Huang, Qingzhong; Xia, Jinsong

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we propose and demonstrate an air-mode photonic crystal ring resonator (PhCRR) on silicon-on-insulator platform. Air mode is utilized to confine the optical field into photonic crystal (PhC) air holes, which is confirmed by the three-dimensional finite-difference time-domain simulation. PhCRR structure is employed to enhance the light-matter interaction through combining the whispering-gallery mode resonance of ring resonator with the slow-light effect in PhC waveguide. In the simulated and measured transmission spectra of air-mode PhCRR, nonuniform free spectral ranges are observed near the Brillouin zone edge of PhC, indicating the presence of the slow-light effect. A maximum group index of 27.3 and a highest quality factor of 14600 are experimentally obtained near the band edge. Benefiting from the strong optical confinement in the PhC holes and enhanced light-matter interaction in the resonator, the demonstrated air-mode PhCRR is expected to have potential applications in refractive index sensing, on-chip light emitting and nonlinear optics by integration with functional materials. PMID:26818430

  8. Insulation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rhea, Dennis

    This instructional unit is one of 10 developed by students on various energy-related areas that deals specifically with insulation. Its objective is for the student to be able to determine insulation needs of new or existing structures, select type to use, use installation techniques, calculate costs, and apply safety factors. Some topics covered…

  9. Adaptive microwave impedance memory effect in a ferromagnetic insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Hanju; Friedman, Barry; Lee, Kiejin

    2016-12-01

    Adaptive electronics, which are often referred to as memristive systems as they often rely on a memristor (memory resistor), are an emerging technology inspired by adaptive biological systems. Dissipative systems may provide a proper platform to implement an adaptive system due to its inherent adaptive property that parameters describing the system are optimized to maximize the entropy production for a given environment. Here, we report that a non-volatile and reversible adaptive microwave impedance memory device can be realized through the adaptive property of the dissipative structure of the driven ferromagnetic system. Like the memristive device, the microwave impedance of the device is modulated as a function of excitation microwave passing through the device. This kind of new device may not only helpful to implement adaptive information processing technologies, but also may be useful to investigate and understand the underlying mechanism of spontaneous formation of complex and ordered structures.

  10. Adaptive microwave impedance memory effect in a ferromagnetic insulator.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hanju; Friedman, Barry; Lee, Kiejin

    2016-12-14

    Adaptive electronics, which are often referred to as memristive systems as they often rely on a memristor (memory resistor), are an emerging technology inspired by adaptive biological systems. Dissipative systems may provide a proper platform to implement an adaptive system due to its inherent adaptive property that parameters describing the system are optimized to maximize the entropy production for a given environment. Here, we report that a non-volatile and reversible adaptive microwave impedance memory device can be realized through the adaptive property of the dissipative structure of the driven ferromagnetic system. Like the memristive device, the microwave impedance of the device is modulated as a function of excitation microwave passing through the device. This kind of new device may not only helpful to implement adaptive information processing technologies, but also may be useful to investigate and understand the underlying mechanism of spontaneous formation of complex and ordered structures.

  11. Persistent Hall voltages across thin planar charged quantum rings on the surface of a three-dimensional topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Durganandini, P.

    2016-03-01

    We study theoretically, the electromagnetic response due to localized charge current distributions above a topological insulator (coated with a thin ferromagnetic layer) using the electromagnetic SL(2,Z) duality symmetry. We show that the localized current induces an electric field which depends on the current —this is a manifestation of the topological magnetoelectric (TME) effect. We also show that if the charge carriers have spin, then they acquire Aharanov-Casher phases which depend on the current. As an application, we consider thin planar charged quantum rings with persistent currents on the surface of a TI and show that the TME manifests itself as persistent Hall voltages across the charged ring. If the spin is also taken into account, then persistent spin Hall voltages develop across the ring.

  12. Narrow line-width single-longitudinal-mode fiber laser using silicon-on-insulator based micro-ring-resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Yang; Hsu, Yung; Hsu, Chin-Wei; Yang, Ling-Gang; Chow, Chi-Wai; Yeh, Chien-Hung; Lai, Yin-Chieh; Tsang, Hon-Ki

    2016-02-01

    In this work, we propose and demonstrate a stable single-longitudinal-mode (SLM) fiber laser with narrow line-width by using an integrated silicon-on-insulator micro-ring resonator (SOI MRR) and two subsidiary fiber rings for the first time, to the best of our knowledge. The laser is tunable over the wavelength range from 1546 to 1570 nm, with only step tuning of 2 nm steps. A maximum 49 dB side mode suppression ratio (SMSR) can be achieved. The compact SOI MRR provides a large free-spectral-range (FSR), while the subsidiary rings provide Vernier effect producing a single lasing mode. The FSR of the SOI MRR can be very large and controllable (since it is easy to fabricate small SOI MRR when compared with making small fiber-rings) using the complementary-metal-oxide-semiconductor (CMOS) compactable SOI fabrication processes. In our proposed laser, the measured single sideband (SSB) spectrum shows that the densely spaced longitudinal modes can be significantly suppressed to achieve SLM. The laser linewidth is only 3.5 kHz measured by using the self-heterodyne method. 30 min stability evaluation in terms of lasing wavelength and optical power is performed; showing the optical wavelength and power are both very stable, with fluctuations of only 0.02 nm and 0.8 dB, respectively.

  13. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOEpatents

    Vanacek, D.L.; Pike, C.D.

    1982-07-13

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly having a tubular insulator extending between the ground plane ring and the high voltage ring. The insulator is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring to the high voltage ring, producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall of the insulator to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly.

  14. Speed tracking and synchronization of multiple motors using ring coupling control and adaptive sliding mode control.

    PubMed

    Li, Le-Bao; Sun, Ling-Ling; Zhang, Sheng-Zhou; Yang, Qing-Quan

    2015-09-01

    A new control approach for speed tracking and synchronization of multiple motors is developed, by incorporating an adaptive sliding mode control (ASMC) technique into a ring coupling synchronization control structure. This control approach can stabilize speed tracking of each motor and synchronize its motion with other motors' motion so that speed tracking errors and synchronization errors converge to zero. Moreover, an adaptive law is exploited to estimate the unknown bound of uncertainty, which is obtained in the sense of Lyapunov stability theorem to minimize the control effort and attenuate chattering. Performance comparisons with parallel control, relative coupling control and conventional PI control are investigated on a four-motor synchronization control system. Extensive simulation results show the effectiveness of the proposed control scheme.

  15. High voltage variable diameter insulator

    DOEpatents

    Vanecek, David L.; Pike, Chester D.

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage feedthrough assembly (10) having a tubular insulator (15) extending between the ground plane ring (16) and the high voltage ring (30). The insulator (15) is made of Pyrex and decreases in diameter from the ground plane ring (16) to the high voltage ring (30), producing equipotential lines almost perpendicular to the wall (27) of the insulator (15) to optimize the voltage-holding capability of the feedthrough assembly (10).

  16. Adaptive ultrasonic sensor using a fiber ring laser with tandem fiber Bragg gratings.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tongqing; Hu, Lingling; Han, Ming

    2014-08-01

    We propose and demonstrate an intensity-demodulated fiber-optic ultrasonic sensor system that can be self-adaptive to large quasi-static background strain perturbations. The sensor system is based on a fiber ring laser (FRL) whose laser cavity includes a pair of fiber Bragg gratings (FBGs). Self-adaptive ultrasonic detection is achieved by a tandem design where the two FBGs are engineered to have differential spectral responses to ultrasonic waves and are installed side-by-side at the same location on a structure. As a result, ultrasonic waves lead to relative spectral shifts of the FBGs and modulations to the cold-cavity loss of the FRL. Ultrasonic waves can then be detected directly from the laser intensity variations in response to the cold-cavity loss modulation. The sensor system is insensitive to quasi-static background strains because they lead to identical responses of the tandem FBGs. Based on the principle, a FRL sensor system was demonstrated and tested for adaptive ultrasonic detection when large static strains as well as dynamic sinusoidal vibrations were applied to the sensor.

  17. Orbital disc insulator for SF.sub.6 gas-insulated bus

    DOEpatents

    Bacvarov, Dosio C.; Gomarac, Nicholas G.

    1977-01-01

    An insulator for supporting a high voltage conductor within a gas-filled grounded housing consists of radially spaced insulation rings fitted to the exterior of the bus and the interior of the grounded housing respectively, and the spaced rings are connected by trefoil type rings which are integrally formed with the spaced insulation rings.

  18. Electrode Placement for Active Tuning of Silicon-on-Insulator (SOI) Ring Resonator Structure Clad in Nematic Liquid Crystals

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-08-01

    their electromagnetic spectrum and find applications in optical switching, filtering, buffering , lasers, and biosensors. Photonic resonances are... coupler ring resonators [1–3]. Combining dielectric resonators with nematic liquid crystals (LC) enables easily tunable devices where the tuning is

  19. The Effect of Casting Ring Liner Length and Prewetting on the Marginal Adaptation and Dimensional Accuracy of Full Crown Castings

    PubMed Central

    Haralur, Satheesh B.; Hamdi, Osama A.; Al-Shahrani, Abdulaziz A.; Alhasaniah, Sultan

    2017-01-01

    Aim: To evaluate the effect of varying cellulose casting ring liner length and its prewetting on the marginal adaptation and dimensional accuracy of full veneer metal castings. Materials and Methods: The master die was milled in stainless steel to fabricate the wax pattern. Sixty wax patterns were fabricated with a uniform thickness of 1.5 mm at an occlusal surface and 1 mm axial surface, cervical width at 13.5 mm, and 10 mm cuspal height. The samples were divided into six groups (n = 10). Groups I and II samples had the full-length cellulose prewet and dry ring liner, respectively. The groups III and IV had 2 mm short prewet and dry cellulose ring liner, respectively, whereas groups V and VI were invested in 6 mm short ring liner. The wax patterns were immediately invested in phosphate bonded investment, and casting procedure was completed with nickel-chrome alloy. The castings were cleaned and mean score of measurements at four reference points for marginal adaption, casting height, and cervical width was calculated. The marginal adaption was calculated with Imaje J software, whereas the casting height and cervical width was determined using a digital scale. The data was subjected to one-way analysis of varaince and Tukey post hoc statistical analysis with Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 20 software. Results: The group II had the best marginal adaption with a gap of 63.786 μm followed by group I (65.185 μm), group IV (87.740 μm), and group III (101.455 μm). A large marginal gap was observed in group V at 188.871 μm. Cuspal height was more accurate with group V (10.428 mm), group VI (10.421 mm), and group II (10.488 mm). The cervical width was approximately similar in group I, group III, and group V. Statistically significant difference was observed in Tukey post hoc analysis between group V and group VI with all the other groups with regards to marginal adaptation. Conclusion: The dry cellulose ring liners provided better marginal

  20. GaInAsP/silicon-on-insulator hybrid laser with ring-resonator-type reflector fabricated by N2 plasma-activated bonding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yusuke; Suzuki, Junichi; Inoue, Satoshi; Tanvir Hasan, Shovon Muhammad; Kuno, Yuki; Itoh, Kazuto; Amemiya, Tomohiro; Nishiyama, Nobuhiko; Arai, Shigehisa

    2016-08-01

    III-V/Si hybrid integration with direct bonding is an attractive method of realizing an electrophotonic convergence router with a small size and a low power consumption. Plasma-activated bonding (PAB) is an effective approach for reducing thermal stress during the bonding process because PAB achieves a high bonding strength with low-temperature annealing. This time, the fabrication of a GaInAsP/silicon-on-insulator (SOI) hybrid laser with Si ring-resonator-type reflectors was demonstrated by N2 PAB. By measuring the lasing spectra, we confirmed the reflective characteristics resulting from the cascaded Si ring resonators. We also investigated kink characteristics, which occur around the threshold current, of the current-light output (I-L) characteristics, and successfully approximated the kink characteristics by considering saturable absorption occurring at the III-V/Si taper tip. The taper structure was investigated in terms of a passive device as well as an active device, and a structure for eliminating saturable absorption was proposed.

  1. Proposal of Prediction Methods for Compression Set of EP-Rubber O-Rings for Gas Insulated Switchgear

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matsuda, Akihiro; Inamine, Morikatsu; Teramoto, Tokuo; Mizutani, Yoshinobu; Goshima, Hisashi; Shinkai, Hiroyuki

    In this paper, a numerical analysis of thermo-mechanical viscoelastic material was investigated to predict the compression set of EP-rubber O-rings for substation facilities. Relaxation times for viscous characteristics of this model were calculated by the Arrhenius equation and temperature of rubber. Furthermore, biaxial loading tests by loading test machine and the stress-relaxation tests in the thermal chamber were conducted to evaluate the mechanical and thermal characteristics and effect of temperature on the stress relaxation to confirm the applicability of the simulation code. From the simulated results, the developed code shows enough accuracy to predict the stress reduction of natural rubber parts under the long-term compression.

  2. Adaptive center determination for effective suppression of ring artifacts in tomography images

    SciTech Connect

    Jha, D. Sørensen, H. O. Dobberschütz, S.; Stipp, S. L. S.; Feidenhans'l, R.

    2014-10-06

    Ring artifacts on tomogram slices hinder image interpretation. They are caused by minor variation in the response from individual elements in a two dimensional (2D) X-ray detector. Polar space decreases the suppression complexity by transforming the rings on the tomogram slice to linear stripes. However, it requires that the center of rings lie at the origin of polar transformation. If this is not the case, all methods employing polar space become ineffective. We developed a method based on Gaussian localization of the ring center in Hough parameter space to assign the origin for the polar transformation. Thus, obtained linear stripes can be effectively suppressed by already existing methods. This effectively suppresses ring artifacts in the data from a variety of experimental setups, sample types and also handles tomograms that are previously cropped. This approach functions automatically, avoids the need for assumptions and preserves fine details, all critical for synchrotron based nanometer resolution tomography.

  3. Rings in the extreme: PCNA interactions and adaptations in the archaea.

    PubMed

    Winter, Jody A; Bunting, Karen A

    2012-01-01

    Biochemical and structural analysis of archaeal proteins has enabled us to gain great insight into many eukaryotic processes, simultaneously offering fascinating glimpses into the adaptation and evolution of proteins at the extremes of life. The archaeal PCNAs, central to DNA replication and repair, are no exception. Characterisation of the proteins alone, and in complex with both peptides and protein binding partners, has demonstrated the diversity and subtlety in the regulatory role of these sliding clamps. Equally, studies have provided valuable detailed insight into the adaptation of protein interactions and mechanisms that are necessary for life in extreme environments.

  4. Active noise control using noise source having adaptive resonant frequency tuning through variable ring loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pla, Frederic G. (Inventor); Rajiyah, Harindra (Inventor); Renshaw, Anthony A. (Inventor); Hedeen, Robert A. (Inventor)

    1995-01-01

    A noise source for an aircraft engine active noise cancellation system in which the resonant frequency of noise radiating structure is tuned to permit noise cancellation over a wide range of frequencies. The resonant frequency of the noise radiating structure is tuned by a plurality of drivers arranged to contact the noise radiating structure. Excitation of the drivers causes expansion or contraction of the drivers, thereby varying the edge loading applied to the noise radiating structure. The drivers are actuated by a controller which receives input of a feedback signal proportional to displacement of the noise radiating element and a signal corresponding to the blade passage frequency of the engine's fan. In response, the controller determines a control signal which is sent to the drivers, causing them to expand or contract. The noise radiating structure may be either the outer shroud of the engine or a ring mounted flush with an inner wall of the shroud or disposed in the interior of the shroud.

  5. Variable diameter CO2 laser ring-cutting system adapted to a zoom microscope for applications on polymer tapes.

    PubMed

    Förster, Erik; Bohnert, Patrick; Kraus, Matthias; Kilper, Roland; Müller, Ute; Buchmann, Martin; Brunner, Robert

    2016-11-20

    This paper presents the conception and implementation of a variable diameter ring-cutting system for a CO2 laser with a working wavelength of 10.6 μm. The laser-cutting system is adapted to an observation zoom microscope for combined use and is applicable for the extraction of small circular areas from polymer films, such as forensic adhesive tapes in a single shot. As an important characteristic for our application, the variable diameter ring-cutting system provides telecentricity in the target area. Ring diameters are continuously tunable between 500 μm and 2 mm. A minimum width of less than 20 μm was found for the ring profile edge. The basic characteristics of the system, including telecentricity, were experimentally evaluated and demonstrated by cutting experiments on different polymer tapes and further exemplary samples.

  6. Application of composite insulators to transmission lines

    SciTech Connect

    Cherney, E.A.; Brown, R.L.; Karady, G.; Nicholls, J.L.; Orbeck, T.; Pargamin, L.

    1983-05-01

    The paper provides guidelines for the application of composite insulators to transmission lines. These guidelines are based on utility field experiences, results of research laboratory tests and manufacturers' recommendations. Discussed are interchangeability with porcelain and glass insulators, application in contaminated environments, material ageing, insulator icing, the use of grease, resistance to vandalism, temperature extremes, and the need for grading rings. Clarification is provided on the mechanical rating of composite insulators because there is not yet general agreement by various industry groups.

  7. Insulator for laser housing

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, D.B.

    1992-12-29

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member. 3 figs.

  8. Insulator for laser housing

    DOEpatents

    Duncan, David B.

    1992-01-01

    The present invention provides a heat-resistant electrical insulator adapted for joining laser housing portions, which insulator comprises: an annulus; a channel in the annulus traversing the circumference and length of the housing; at least two ports, each communicating with the channel and an outer surface of the housing; and an attachment for securely attaching each end of the annulus to a laser housing member.

  9. The Polar Insulation Investigation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Urban-Rich, Juanita

    2006-01-01

    In this article, the author developed an activity called "The Polar Insulation Investigation." This activity builds on students' natural interest in "things polar" and introduces them to animal adaptations in a unique way. The aim of the exploration is to determine the role of animal coverings (e.g., blubber, fur, and feathers) and to see which is…

  10. Cellulose Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1980-01-01

    Fire retardant cellulose insulation is produced by shredding old newspapers and treating them with a combination of chemicals. Insulating material is blown into walls and attics to form a fiber layer which blocks the flow of air. All-Weather Insulation's founders asked NASA/UK-TAP to help. They wanted to know what chemicals added to newspaper would produce an insulating material capable of meeting federal specifications. TAP researched the query and furnished extensive information. The information contributed to successful development of the product and helped launch a small business enterprise which is now growing rapidly.

  11. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    SciTech Connect

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-15

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  12. Note: O-ring stack system for electron gun alignment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, In-Yong; Cho, Boklae; Han, Cheolsu; Shin, Seungmin; Lee, Dongjun; Ahn, Sang Jung

    2015-01-01

    We present a reliable method for aligning an electron gun which consists of an electron source and lenses by controlling a stack of rubber O-rings in a vacuum condition. The beam direction angle is precisely tilted along two axes by adjusting the height difference of a stack of O-rings. In addition, the source position is shifted in each of three orthogonal directions. We show that the tilting angle and linear shift along the x and y axes as obtained from ten stacked O-rings are ±2.55° and ±2 mm, respectively. This study can easily be adapted to charged particle gun alignment and adjustments of the flange position in a vacuum, ensuring that its results can be useful with regard to electrical insulation between flanges with slight modifications.

  13. Exploring the size adaptability of the B ring binding zone of the colchicine site of tubulin with para-nitrogen substituted isocombretastatins.

    PubMed

    Jiménez, Carmen; Ellahioui, Younes; Álvarez, Raquel; Aramburu, Laura; Riesco, Alejandra; González, Myriam; Vicente, Alba; Dahdouh, Abdelaziz; Ibn Mansour, Ahmed; Jiménez, Carlos; Martín, Diego; Sarmiento, Rogelio G; Medarde, Manuel; Caballero, Esther; Peláez, Rafael

    2015-07-15

    We have synthesized and assayed dimethylaminophenyl, pyrrolidin-1-ylphenyl and carbazole containing phenstatins and isocombretastatins as analogues of the highly potent indoleisocombretastatins with extended or reduced ring sizes. This is an attempt to explore beyond the structural constraints of the X-ray crystal structures the zone of the colchicine site where the tropolone ring of colchicine binds to tubulin (zone 1). The isocombretastatins display up to 30 fold increased water solubility when compared with combretastatin A-4, potent inhibition of tubulin polymerization, and nanomolar cytotoxicities against several human cancer cell lines irrespective of the size of the B ring. On the other hand, substitutions ortho to the nitrogen cause an important reduction in potency. We have also shown that representative compounds inhibit autophagy. These results show that zone 1 can adapt to systems of different size as far as they stay in a common plane, but does not tolerate substituents protruding above or below it. These results can help in the understanding of the binding modes of structures with similar systems and in the design of new colchicine site ligands.

  14. Highly adaptive RF excitation scheme based on conformal resonant CRLH metamaterial ring antennas for 7-Tesla traveling-wave magnetic resonance imaging.

    PubMed

    Erni, Daniel; Liebig, Thorsten; Rennings, Andreas; Koster, Norbert H L; Fröhlich, Jürg

    2011-01-01

    We propose an adaptive RF antenna system for the excitation (and manipulation) of the fundamental circular waveguide mode (TE(11)) in the context of high-field (7T) traveling-wave magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). The system consists of composite right-/left-handed (CRLH) meta-material ring antennas that fully conforms to the inner surface of the MRI bore. The specific use of CRLH metamaterials is motivated by its inherent dispersion engineering capabilities, which is needed when designing resonant ring structures for virtually any predefined diameter operating at the given Larmor frequency (i.e. 298 MHz). Each functional group of the RF antenna system consists of a pair of subsequently spaced and correspondingly fed CRLH ring antennas, allowing for the unidirectional excitation of propagating, circularly polarized B(1) mode fields. The same functional group is also capable to simultaneously mold an incoming, counter-propagating mode. Given these functionalities we are proposing now a compound scheme (i.e. periodically arranged multiple antenna pairs)--termed as "MetaBore"--that is apt to provide a tailored RF power distribution as well as full wave reflection compensation virtually at any desired location along the bore.

  15. Environmental study of miniature slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Radnik, J. L.

    1967-01-01

    Investigation studied the long term operation of miniature slip ring assembles in high vacuum of space and included the influence of ring, brush, and insulator materials on electrical noise and mechanical wear. Results show that soft metal vapor plating and niobium diselenide miniature slip rings are beneficial.

  16. Detail of insulator array at first line structure showing historic ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Detail of insulator array at first line structure showing historic porcelain suspension insulators in strings of eight, porcelain jumper support insulators in strings of six, arch rings and ball weights - Morony Hydroelectric Facility, Morony-to-Rainbow 100 kV Transmission Line, West bank of the Missouri River, Great Falls, Cascade County, MT

  17. Automotive Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Under a Space Act Agreement between Boeing North America and BSR Products, Space Shuttle Thermal Protection System (TPS) materials are now used to insulate race cars. BSR has created special TPS blanket insulation kits for use on autos that take part in NASCAR events, and other race cars through its nationwide catalog distribution system. Temperatures inside a race car's cockpit can soar to a sweltering 140 to 160 degrees, with the extreme heat coming through the engine firewall, transmission tunnel, and floor. It is common for NASCAR drivers to endure blisters and burns due to the excessive heat. Tests on a car insulated with the TPS material showed a temperature drop of some 50 degrees in the driver's cockpit. BSR-TPS Products, Inc. now manufactures insulation kits for distribution to race car teams around the world.

  18. Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Commercially known as Solimide, Temptronics, Inc.'s thermal insulation has application in such vehicles as aircraft, spacecraft and surface transportation systems (i.e. rapid transit cars, trains, buses, and ships) as acoustical treatment for door, wall, and ceiling panels, as a means of reducing vibrations, and as thermal insulation (also useful in industrial equipment). Product originated from research conducted by Johnson Space Center on advanced flame-resistant materials for minimizing fire hazard in the Shuttle and other flight vehicles.

  19. Development of a triclosan scaffold which allows for adaptations on both the A- and B-ring for transport peptides

    PubMed Central

    Muench, Stephen P.; Stec, Jozef; Zhou, Ying; Afanador, Gustavo A.; McPhillie, Martin J.; Hickman, Mark; Lee, Patty J.; Leed, Susan E.; Auschwitz, Jennifer M.; Prigge, Sean T.; Rice, David W.; McLeod, Rima

    2013-01-01

    The enoyl acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR) enzyme is harboured within the apicoplast of apicomplexan parasites providing a significant challenge for drug delivery, which may be overcome through the addition of transductive peptides, which facilitates crossing the apicoplast membranes. The binding site of triclosan, a potent ENR inhibitor, is occluded from the solvent making the attachment of these linkers challenging. Herein, we have produced 3 new triclosan analogues with bulky A- and B-ring motifs, which protrude into the solvent allowing for the future attachment of molecular transporters for delivery. PMID:23664871

  20. Development of a triclosan scaffold which allows for adaptations on both the A- and B-ring for transport peptides.

    PubMed

    Muench, Stephen P; Stec, Jozef; Zhou, Ying; Afanador, Gustavo A; McPhillie, Martin J; Hickman, Mark R; Lee, Patty J; Leed, Susan E; Auschwitz, Jennifer M; Prigge, Sean T; Rice, David W; McLeod, Rima

    2013-06-15

    The enoyl acyl-carrier protein reductase (ENR) enzyme is harbored within the apicoplast of apicomplexan parasites providing a significant challenge for drug delivery, which may be overcome through the addition of transductive peptides, which facilitates crossing the apicoplast membranes. The binding site of triclosan, a potent ENR inhibitor, is occluded from the solvent making the attachment of these linkers challenging. Herein, we have produced 3 new triclosan analogs with bulky A- and B-ring motifs, which protrude into the solvent allowing for the future attachment of molecular transporters for delivery.

  1. Electrical hand tools and techniques: A compilation. [utilization of space technology for tools and adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1974-01-01

    Space technology utilization for developing tools, adapters, and fixtures and procedures for assembling, installing, and servicing electrical components and equipment are discussed. Some of the items considered are: (1) pivotal screwdriver, (2) termination locator tool for shielded cables, (3) solder application tools, (4) insulation and shield removing tool, and (5) torque wrench adapter for cable connector engaging ring. Diagrams of the various tools and devices are provided.

  2. Design and Simulation of an Anode Stalk Support Insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, L; Houck, T; Westenskow, G

    2005-05-16

    An anode stalk support insulator in a magnetically insulated transmission line was designed and modeled. One of the important design criteria is that within space constraints, the electric field along the insulator surface has to be minimized in order to prevent a surface flashover. In order to further reduce the field on the insulator surface, metal rings between insulator layers were also specially shaped. To facilitate the design process, electric field simulations were performed to determine the maximum field stress on the insulator surfaces and the transmission line chamber.

  3. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    The Apollo and subsequent spacecraft have had highly effective radiation barriers; made of aluminized polymer film, they bar or let in heat to maintain consistent temperatures inside. Tech 2000, formerly Quantum International Corporation used the NASA technology in its insulating materials, Super "Q" Radiant Barrier, for home, industry and mobile applications. The insulation combines industrial aluminum foil overlaid around a core of another material, usually propylene or mylar. The outer layer reflects up to 97 percent of heat; the central layer creates a thermal break in the structure and thus allows low radiant energy emission. The Quantum Cool Wall, used in cars and trucks, takes up little space while providing superior insulation, thus reducing spoilage and costs. The panels can also dampen sound and engine, exhaust and solar heat.

  4. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  5. Insulation Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1984-01-01

    Manufactured by Hitco Materials Division of Armco, Inc. a ceramic fiber insulation material known as Refrasil has been used extensively as a heat-absorbing ablative reinforcement for such space systems as rocket motor nozzles, combustion chambers, and re-entry shields. Refrasil fibers are highly porous and do not melt or vaporize until fibers exceed 3,100 degrees Fahrenheit. Due to these and other properties, Refrasil has found utility in a number of industrial high temperature applications where glass, asbestos and other materials fail. Hitco used this insulation to assist Richardson Co., Inc. in the manufacturing of hard rubber and plastic molded battery cases.

  6. Insulation Material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Apex Mills Corporation's superinsulators are used by makers of cold weather apparel, parkas, jackets, boots and outdoor gear such as sleeping bags. Their attraction in such applications is that radiant barrier insulation offers excellent warmth retention at minimal weight and bulk.

  7. Radiation Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1987-01-01

    Radiation insulation technology from Apollo and subsequent spacecraft was used to develop superinsulators, used by makers of cold weather apparel, to make parkas, jackets, boots and outdoor gear such as sleeping bags. The radiant barrier technology offers warmth retention at minimal weight and bulk.

  8. Window insulator

    SciTech Connect

    Nesbitt, W. A.

    1985-10-01

    An insulator for mounting to a window. A pair of plastic layers including a plurality of partitions positioned therebetween form air pockets between the layers. A plurality of suction cups and suction grooves arranged in rows on one outer surface of the sheet removably secure the sheet to a window. The sheet includes a circumferentially extending recessed portion receiving the window frame.

  9. Microsphere insulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allen, Mark S. (Inventor); Willen, Gary S. (Inventor); Mohling, Robert A. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    A new insulation system is provided that contains microspheres. This insulation system can be used to provide insulated panels and clamshells, and to insulate annular spaces around objects used to transfer, store, or transport cryogens and other temperature-sensitive materials. This insulation system provides better performance with reduced maintenance than current insulation systems.

  10. A decrease in heat insulation of the black-clawed brush-furred rat (Lophuromys melanonyx, Petter) during adaptation to high altitudes.

    PubMed

    Ivlev, Y F; Lavrenchenko, L A

    2016-01-01

    The results of the body-surface infrared thermography of rodents of the genus Lophuromys suggest that heat insulation of the black-clawed brush-furred rat L. melanonyx, a large specialized species of the AfroAlpine zone, is worse than that of the related smaller species, the golden-footed (L. chrysopus) and shorttailed (L. brevicaudus) brush-furred rats, that inhabit tropical forest and Erica shrub, respectively. A decrease in heat insulation of the alpine species may facilitate the use of solar radiation for supporting heat balance of these diurnal animals.

  11. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  12. The liquid metal slip ring experiment for the communications technology satellite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lovell, R. R.

    1972-01-01

    The experiment is designed to demonstrate liquid metal slip ring (LMSR) performance in a space environment. An evaluation was made of the features of the LMSR where improvement in performance over conventional slip rings was expected. The primary measurements to be made in the experiment will allow a determination of the slip ring electrical resistance, between ring insulation and ring cleanliness.

  13. SEALED INSULATOR BUSHING

    DOEpatents

    Carmichael, H.

    1952-11-11

    The manufacture of electrode insulators that are mechanically strong, shock-proof, vacuum tight, and are capable of withstanding gas pressures of many atmospheres under intense neutron bombardment, such as may be needed in an ionization chamber, is described. The ansulator comprises a bolt within a quartz tube, surrounded by a bushing held in place by two quartz rings, and tightened to a pressure of 1,000 pounds per square inch by a nut and washer. Quartz is the superior material to meet these conditions, however, to withstand this pressure the quartz must be fire polished, lapped to form smooth and parallel surfaces, and again fire polished to form an extremely smooth and fracture resistant mating surface.

  14. Saturn's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cuzzi, J. N.

    2014-12-01

    The rings are changing before our eyes; structure varies on all timescales and unexpected things have been discovered. Many questions have been answered, but some answers remain elusive (see Cuzzi et al 2010 for a review). Here we highlight the major ring science progress over the mission to date, and describe new observations planned for Cassini's final three years. Ring Composition and particle sizes: The rings are nearly all water ice with no other ices - so why are they reddish? The C Ring and Cassini Division are "dirtier" than the more massive B and A Rings, as shown by near-IR and, recently, microwave observations. Particle sizes, from stellar and radio occultations, vary from place to place. Ring structure, micro and macro: numerous spiral density waves and ubiquitous "self-gravity wakes" reveal processes which fostered planet formation in the solar system and elsewhere. However, big puzzles remain regarding the main ring divisions, the C Ring plateau structures, and the B Ring irregular structure. Moonlets, inside and out, seen and unseen: Two gaps contain sizeable moonlets, but more gaps seem to contain none; even smaller embedded "propeller" objects wander, systematically or randomly, through the A ring. Rubble pile ringmoons just outside the rings may escaped from the rings, and the recently discovered "Peggy" may be trying this as we watch. Impact bombardment of the rings: Comet fragments set the rings to rippling on century-timescales, and boulders crash through hourly; meanwhile, the constant hail of infalling Kuiper belt material has a lower mass flux than previously thought. Origin and Age of the Rings: The ring mass and bombardment play key roles. The ring mass is well known everywhere but in the B Ring (where most of it is). New models suggest how tidal breakup of evolving moons may have formed massive ancient rings, of which the current ring is just a shadow. During its last three years, the Cassini tour profile will allow entirely new

  15. Design Criteria for the Z Vacuum Insulator Stack

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-06-01

    spacings predicted to be safe against breakdown or loss. This paper deals with the design of the insulator stack against vacuum surface flashover and...peak stress, and A (cm2) is the surface area, is widely used to predict the flashover of 45- deg. vacuum insulator surfaces . As is discussed in Ref. 6...signals is also possible by electron emission from the 45- degree surface of the insulator or from any gradient ring. Complete flashover of a stack

  16. Helmet latching and attaching ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chase, E. W.; Viikinsalo, S. J. (Inventor)

    1970-01-01

    A neck ring releasably secured to a pressurized garment carries an open-ended ring normally in the engagement position fitted into an annular groove and adapted to fit into a complementary annular groove formed in a helmet. Camming means formed on the inner surface at the end of the helmet engages the open-ended ring to retract the same and allow for one motion donning even when the garment is pressurized. A projection on the end of the split ring is engageable to physically retract the split ring.

  17. Tank Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    For NASA's Apollo program, McDonnell Douglas Astronautics Company, Huntington Beach, California, developed and built the S-IVB, uppermost stage of the three-stage Saturn V moonbooster. An important part of the development task was fabrication of a tank to contain liquid hydrogen fuel for the stage's rocket engine. The liquid hydrogen had to be contained at the supercold temperature of 423 degrees below zero Fahrenheit. The tank had to be perfectly insulated to keep engine or solar heat from reaching the fuel; if the hydrogen were permitted to warm up, it would have boiled off, or converted to gaseous form, reducing the amount of fuel available to the engine. McDonnell Douglas' answer was a supereffective insulation called 3D, which consisted of a one-inch thickness of polyurethane foam reinforced in three dimensions with fiberglass threads. Over a 13-year development and construction period, the company built 30 tanks and never experienced a failure. Now, after years of additional development, an advanced version of 3D is finding application as part of a containment system for transporting Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG) by ship.

  18. Vascular ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... with aberrant subclavian and left ligamentum ateriosus; Congenital heart defect - vascular ring; Birth defect heart - vascular ring ... accounts for less than 1% of all congenital heart problems. The condition occurs as often in males ...

  19. Neptune's rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1999-01-01

    This 591-second exposure of the rings of Neptune were taken with the clear filter by the Voyager 2 wide-angle camera. The two main rings are clearly visible and appear complete over the region imaged. Also visible in this image is the inner faint ring and the faint band which extends smoothly from the ring roughly halfway between the two bright rings. Both of these newly discovered rings are broad and much fainter than the two narrow rings. The bright glare is due to over-exposure of the crescent on Neptune. Numerous bright stars are evident in the background. Both bright rings have material throughout their entire orbit, and are therefore continuous. The Voyager Mission is conducted by JPL for NASA's Office of Space Science and Applications.

  20. Ground Movement in SSRL Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Sunikumar, Nikita; /UCLA /SLAC

    2011-08-25

    Users of the Stanford Synchrotron Radiation Lightsource (SSRL) are being affected by diurnal motion of the synchrotron's storage ring, which undergoes structural changes due to outdoor temperature fluctuations. In order to minimize the effects of diurnal temperature fluctuations, especially on the vertical motion of the ring floor, scientists at SSRL tried three approaches: painting the storage ring white, covering the asphalt in the middle of the ring with highly reflective Mylar and installing Mylar on a portion of the ring roof and walls. Vertical motion in the storage ring is measured by a Hydrostatic Leveling System (HLS), which calculates the relative height of water in a pipe that extends around the ring. The 24-hr amplitude of the floor motion was determined using spectral analysis of HLS data, and the ratio of this amplitude before and after each experiment was used to quantitatively determine the efficacy of each approach. The results of this analysis showed that the Mylar did not have any significant effect on floor motion, although the whitewash project did yield a reduction in overall HLS variation of 15 percent. However, further analysis showed that the reduction can largely be attributed to a few local changes rather than an overall reduction in floor motion around the ring. Future work will consist of identifying and selectively insulating these local regions in order to find the driving force behind diurnal floor motion in the storage ring.

  1. Insulators for high voltages

    SciTech Connect

    Looms, J.S.T.

    1987-01-01

    This book describes electrical insulators for high voltage applications. Topics considered include the insulating materials, the manufacture of wet process porcelain, the manufacture of tempered glass, the glass-fibre core, the polymeric housing, the common problem - terminating an insulator, mechanical constraints, the physics of pollution flashover, the physics of contamination, testing of insulators, conclusions from testing, remedies for flashover, insulators for special cases, interference and noise, and the insulator of the future.

  2. Silicon-on-Insulator Nanowire Based Optical Waveguide Biosensors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Mingyu; Liu, Yong; Chen, Yangqing; He, Jian-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Optical waveguide biosensors based on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) nanowire have been developed for label free molecular detection. This paper reviews our work on the design, fabrication and measurement of SOI nanowire based high-sensitivity biosensors employing Vernier effect. Biosensing experiments using cascaded double-ring sensor and Mach-Zehnder- ring sensor integrated with microfluidic channels are demonstrated

  3. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed wh provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation.

  4. Multiple density layered insulator

    DOEpatents

    Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-06

    A multiple density layered insulator for use with a laser is disclosed which provides at least two different insulation materials for a laser discharge tube, where the two insulation materials have different thermoconductivities. The multiple layer insulation materials provide for improved thermoconductivity capability for improved laser operation. 4 figs.

  5. Calcium silicate insulation structure

    DOEpatents

    Kollie, Thomas G.; Lauf, Robert J.

    1995-01-01

    An insulative structure including a powder-filled evacuated casing utilizes a quantity of finely divided synthetic calcium silicate having a relatively high surface area. The resultant structure-provides superior thermal insulating characteristics over a broad temperature range and is particularly well-suited as a panel for a refrigerator or freezer or the insulative barrier for a cooler or a insulated bottle.

  6. Sound Insulation in Buildings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gösele, K.; Schröder, E.

    Sound insulation between the different rooms inside a building or to the outside is a very complex problem. First, the airborne sound insulation of ceilings, walls, doors and windows is important. Second, a sufficient structure-borne sound insulation, also called impact sound insulation, for the ceilings, has to be provided especially. Finally, the service equipment should be sufficiently quiet.

  7. Engineering design of the Z magnetically-insulated transmission lines and insulator stack

    SciTech Connect

    Ives, H.C.; Van De Valde, D.M.; Long, F.W.; Smith, J.W.

    1997-08-01

    A 3.3 m diameter cylindrical insulator stack and a set of 3 m diameter conical magnetically insulated transmission lines (MITLs) were built for the Z accelerator. The 1.7 m tall insulator stack operates at {approx}20 MA and 2.5-3.5 MV, and was instrumented with 12 current and 24 voltage monitors. The insulator stack was concentrically and azimuthally aligned within 1.5 mm. The stack, containing 22 crosslinked polystyrene insulators and 18 grading rings, was designed to provide vertical stability for the MITLs and to resist radial buckling. 2-D and 3-D static finite element analyses (FEA) were used in designing the MITLs to limit gravity deflections to less than .25 mm. 2-D FEA dynamic analyses were done to predict motion and to help design features to restrict damage. Each MITL is divided into four concentric zones which fasten together in a way which facilitates fabrication, limits the extent of possible damage and allows for future changes at minimal cost. The tapered MITLs are supported by feedthrough rings in the insulator stack so that the gaps at small radius are adjustable from 0 to 22 mm. The MITL anodes were instrumented with 24 current monitors and have 48 additional diagnostic locations available. The MITLs were fabricated from 304L stainless steel except the outer anode sections, which were made from 6061-T6 aluminum alloy. Procedures were developed for fabrication of the large and small diameter MITL cones, as well as for the feedthrough rings and grading rings of the stack. The power-flow surfaces were successfully machined to within {+-}.25 mm of the specified contours. A large, multi-trolley MITL handling system was designed to allow for removal, cleaning and replacement of the MITLs for each shot, at a shot rate of 1.5 shots/day. Additional equipment allows for cleaning of the insulators.

  8. Vortex rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Leonard, Anthony

    1992-01-01

    The vortex-ring problem in fluid mechanics is examined generally in terms of formation, the steady state, the duration of the rings, and vortex interactions. The formation is studied by examining the generation of laminar and turbulent vortex rings and their resulting structures with attention given to the three stages of laminar ring development. Inviscid dynamics is addressed to show how core dynamics affects overall ring motion, and laminar vortex structures are described in two dimensions. Viscous and inviscid structures are related in terms of 'leapfrogging', head-on collisions, and collisions with a no-slip wall. Linear instability theory is shown to successfully describe observational data, although late stages in the breakdown are not completely understood. This study of vortex rings has important implications for key aerodynamic issues including sound generation, transport and mixing, and vortex interactions.

  9. Adaptation of the pseudo-metal-oxide-semiconductor field effect transistor technique to ultrathin silicon-on-insulator wafers characterization: Improved set-up, measurement procedure, parameter extraction, and modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Van Den Daele, W.; Malaquin, C.; Baumel, N.; Kononchuk, O.; Cristoloveanu, S.

    2013-10-01

    This paper revisits and adapts of the pseudo-MOSFET (Ψ-MOSFET) characterization technique for advanced fully depleted silicon on insulator (FDSOI) wafers. We review the current challenges for standard Ψ-MOSFET set-up on ultra-thin body (12 nm) over ultra-thin buried oxide (25 nm BOX) and propose a novel set-up enabling the technique on FDSOI structures. This novel configuration embeds 4 probes with large tip radius (100-200 μm) and low pressure to avoid oxide damage. Compared with previous 4-point probe measurements, we introduce a simplified and faster methodology together with an adapted Y-function. The models for parameters extraction are revisited and calibrated through systematic measurements of SOI wafers with variable film thickness. We propose an in-depth analysis of the FDSOI structure through comparison of experimental data, TCAD (Technology Computed Aided Design) simulations, and analytical modeling. TCAD simulations are used to unify previously reported thickness-dependent analytical models by analyzing the BOX/substrate potential and the electrical field in ultrathin films. Our updated analytical models are used to explain the results and to extract correct electrical parameters such as low-field electron and hole mobility, subthreshold slope, and film/BOX interface traps density.

  10. Ball-joint grounding ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Aperlo, P. J. A.; Buck, P. A.; Weldon, V. A.

    1981-01-01

    In ball and socket joint where electrical insulator such as polytetrafluoroethylene is used as line to minimize friction, good electrical contact across joint may be needed for lightning protection or to prevent static-charge build-up. Electrical contact is maintained by ring of spring-loaded fingers mounted in socket. It may be useful in industry for cranes, trailers, and other applications requiring ball and socket joint.

  11. Planetary Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuzzi, Jeffrey N.

    1994-01-01

    Just over two decades ago, Jim Pollack made a critical contribution to our understanding of planetary ring particle properties, and resolved a major apparent paradox between radar reflection and radio emission observations. At the time, particle properties were about all there were to study about planetary rings, and the fundamental questions were, why is Saturn the only planet with rings, how big are the particles, and what are they made of? Since then, we have received an avalanche of observations of planetary ring systems, both from spacecraft and from Earth. Meanwhile, we have seen steady progress in our understanding of the myriad ways in which gravity, fluid and statistical mechanics, and electromagnetism can combine to shape the distribution of the submicron-to-several-meter size particles which comprise ring systems into the complex webs of structure that we now know them to display. Insights gained from studies of these giant dynamical analogs have carried over into improved understanding of the formation of the planets themselves from particle disks, a subject very close to Jim's heart. The now-complete reconnaissance of the gas giant planets by spacecraft has revealed that ring systems are invariably found in association with families of regular satellites, and there is ark emerging perspective that they are not only physically but causally linked. There is also mounting evidence that many features or aspects of all planetary ring systems, if not the ring systems themselves, are considerably younger than the solar system

  12. Insulated Foamy Viral Vectors.

    PubMed

    Browning, Diana L; Collins, Casey P; Hocum, Jonah D; Leap, David J; Rae, Dustin T; Trobridge, Grant D

    2016-03-01

    Retroviral vector-mediated gene therapy is promising, but genotoxicity has limited its use in the clinic. Genotoxicity is highly dependent on the retroviral vector used, and foamy viral (FV) vectors appear relatively safe. However, internal promoters may still potentially activate nearby genes. We developed insulated FV vectors, using four previously described insulators: a version of the well-studied chicken hypersensitivity site 4 insulator (650cHS4), two synthetic CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF)-based insulators, and an insulator based on the CCAAT box-binding transcription factor/nuclear factor I (7xCTF/NF1). We directly compared these insulators for enhancer-blocking activity, effect on FV vector titer, and fidelity of transfer to both proviral long terminal repeats. The synthetic CTCF-based insulators had the strongest insulating activity, but reduced titers significantly. The 7xCTF/NF1 insulator did not reduce titers but had weak insulating activity. The 650cHS4-insulated FV vector was identified as the overall most promising vector. Uninsulated and 650cHS4-insulated FV vectors were both significantly less genotoxic than gammaretroviral vectors. Integration sites were evaluated in cord blood CD34(+) cells and the 650cHS4-insulated FV vector had fewer hotspots compared with an uninsulated FV vector. These data suggest that insulated FV vectors are promising for hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy.

  13. Home Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1994-01-01

    Under the Guaranteed Watt Savers (GWS) system, plans for a new home are computer analyzed for anticipated heat loss and gain. Specifications are specifically designed for each structure and a Smart- House Radiant Barrier is installed. Designed to reflect away 95% of the Sun's radiant energy, the radiant barrier is an adaptation of an aluminum shield used on Apollo spacecraft. On completion of a home, technicians using a machine, check for air tightness, by creating a vacuum in the house and computer calculations that measure the amount of air exchanged. A guarantee that only the specified number kilowatt hours will be used is then provided.

  14. Hybrid particle traps and conditioning procedure for gas insulated transmission lines

    DOEpatents

    Dale, Steinar J.; Cookson, Alan H.

    1982-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line includes an outer sheath, an inner condor within the outer sheath, insulating supports supporting the inner conductor within the outer sheath, and an insulating gas electrically insulating the inner conductor from the outer sheath. An apertured particle trapping ring is disposed within the outer sheath, and the trapping ring has a pair of dielectric members secured at each longitudinal end thereof, with the dielectric members extending outwardly from the trapping ring along an arc. A support sheet having an adhesive coating thereon is secured to the trapping ring and disposed on the outer sheath within the low field region formed between the trapping ring and the outer sheath. A conditioning method used to condition the transmission line prior to activation in service comprises applying an AC voltage to the inner conductor in a plurality of voltage-time steps, with the voltage-time steps increasing in voltage magnitude while decreasing in time duration.

  15. Reuseable lightweight modular multi-layer insulation for space shuttle

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burr, K. F.

    1973-01-01

    The adaptation of the Self Evacuating Multilayer Insulation System to the space shuttle orbiter liquid hydrogen tanks was investigated. Small scale material screening tests and subscale panel tests demonstrated the potential of the insulation to withstand the anticipated 100 flight cycles. The composition of the material and the process for producing the finished insulation are described. Results of the various tests to determine the durability of the material are presented.

  16. Insulated Fiber Brush.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    An insulated-strand fiber brush is provided for a DC motor /generator. The brush is comprised of a plurality of fiber segments which are insulated from one another near the contact surface of a rotor bar. In one embodiment, insulating spacers are fixed to a brush assembly and wear with the fibers, and in another embodiment insulation is provided by a separate shell. (Author)

  17. Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, S. D.; Fesmire, J. E.; Wikstrom, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    The results of a comparative study of cryogenic insulation systems performed are presented. The key aspects of thermal insulation relative to cryogenic system design, testing, manufacturing, and maintenance are discussed. An overview of insulation development from an energy conservation perspective is given. Conventional insulation materials for cryogenic applications provide three levels of thermal conductivity. Actual thermal performance of standard multilayer insulation (MLI) is several times less than laboratory performance and often 10 times worse than ideal performance. The cost-effectiveness of the insulation system depends on thermal performance; flexibility and durability; ease of use in handling, installation, and maintenance; and overall cost including operations, maintenance, and life cycle. Results of comprehensive testing of both conventional and novel materials such as aerogel composites using cryostat boil-off methods are given. The development of efficient, robust cryogenic insulation systems that operate at a soft vacuum level is the primary focus of this paper.

  18. Ghostly Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Click on image for poster version

    This image shows a ghostly ring extending seven light-years across around the corpse of a massive star. The collapsed star, called a magnetar, is located at the exact center of this image. NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope imaged the mysterious ring around magnetar SGR 1900+14 in infrared light. The magnetar itself is not visible in this image, as it has not been detected at infrared wavelengths (it has been seen in X-ray light).

    Magnetars are formed when a massive giant star ends its life in a supernova explosion, leaving behind a super dense neutron star with an incredibly strong magnetic field. The ring seen by Spitzer could not have formed during the original explosion, as any material as close to the star as the ring would have been disrupted by the supernova shock wave. Scientists suspect that the ring my actually be the edges of a bubble that was hollowed out by an explosive burst from the magnetar in 1998. The very bright region near the center of the image is a cluster of young stars, which may be illuminating the inner edge of the bubble, making it look like a ring in projection.

    This composite image was taken using all three of Spitzer's science instruments. The blue color represents 8-micron infrared light taken by the infrared array camera, green is 16-micron light from the infrared spectograph, and red is 24-micron radiation from the multiband imaging photometer.

  19. Luminescent Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    This view shows the unlit face of Saturn's rings, visible via scattered and transmitted light. In these views, dark regions represent gaps and areas of higher particle densities, while brighter regions are filled with less dense concentrations of ring particles.

    The dim right side of the image contains nearly the entire C ring. The brighter region in the middle is the inner B ring, while the darkest part represents the dense outer B Ring. The Cassini Division and the innermost part of the A ring are at the upper-left.

    Saturn's shadow carves a dark triangle out of the lower right corner of this image.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft wide-angle camera on June 8, 2005, at a distance of approximately 433,000 kilometers (269,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 22 kilometers (14 miles) per pixel.

    The Cassini-Huygens mission is a cooperative project of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. The Jet Propulsion Laboratory, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages the mission for NASA's Science Mission Directorate, Washington, D.C. The Cassini orbiter and its two onboard cameras were designed, developed and assembled at JPL. The imaging operations center is based at the Space Science Institute in Boulder, Colo.

    For more information about the Cassini-Huygens mission visit http://saturn.jpl.nasa.gov . The Cassini imaging team homepage is at http://ciclops.org .

  20. Cave Rings

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-13

    hypothesis, that cave rings are formed in the same manner as coffee rings[3], that is, due to the enhanced deposition at the edges of sessile drops ...Literature The ‘splash ring’ conjecture is described in [5]. It is claimed that 45◦ is the most probable angle for secondary drops to be ejected at, and that...ring’ is the deposit formed when a sessile drop of a solution containing dissolved particles, such as coffee or salt, dries. This was investigated by

  1. Horizon detection and higher dimensional black rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Coley, A. A.; McNutt, D. D.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we study the stationary horizons of the rotating black ring and the supersymmetric black ring spacetimes in five dimensions. In the case of the rotating black ring we use Weyl aligned null directions to algebraically classify the Weyl tensor, and utilize an adapted Cartan algorithm in order to produce Cartan invariants. For the supersymmetric black ring we employ the discriminant approach and repeat the adapted Cartan algorithm. For both of these metrics we are able to construct Cartan invariants that detect the horizon alone, and which are easier to compute and analyse than scalar polynomial curvature invariants.

  2. Design validation of the PBFA-Z vacuum insulator stack

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, R.W.; Long, F.; Martin, T.H.

    1997-07-01

    Sandia has developed PBFA-Z, a 20-MA driver for z-pinch experiments by replacing the water lines, insulator stack. and MITLs on PBFA II with hardware of a new design. The PBFA-Z accelerator was designed to deliver 20 MA to a 15-mg z-pinch load in 100 ns. The accelerator was modeled using circuit codes to determine the time-dependent voltage and current waveforms at the input and output of the water lines, the insulator stack, and the MITLs. The design of the vacuum insulator stack was dictated by the drive voltage, the electric field stress and grading requirements, the water line and MITL interface requirements, and the machine operations and maintenance requirements. The insulator stack consists of four separate modules, each of a different design because of different voltage drive and hardware interface requirements. The shape of the components in each module, i.e., grading rings, insulator rings, flux excluders, anode and cathode conductors, and the design of the water line and MITL interfaces, were optimized by using the electrostatic analysis codes, ELECTRO and JASON. The time-dependent performance of the insulator stacks was evaluated using IVORY, a 2-D PIC code. This paper will describe the insulator stack design, present the results of the ELECTRO and IVORY analyses, and show the results of the stack measurements.

  3. Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Finckenor, M. M.; Dooling, D.

    1999-01-01

    Multilayer Insulation Material Guidelines provides data on multilayer insulation materials used by previous spacecraft such as Spacelab and the Long-Duration Exposure Facility and outlines other concerns. The data presented in the document are presented for information only. They can be used as guidelines for multilayer insulation design for future spacecraft provided the thermal requirements of each new design and the environmental effects on these materials are taken into account.

  4. Alternator insulation evaluation tests

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Penn, W. B.; Schaefer, R. F.; Balke, R. L.

    1972-01-01

    Tests were conducted to predict the remaining electrical insulation life of a 60 KW homopolar inductor alternator following completion of NASA turbo-alternator endurance tests for SNAP-8 space electrical power systems application. The insulation quality was established for two alternators following completion of these tests. A step-temperature aging test procedure was developed for insulation life prediction and applied to one of the two alternators. Armature winding insulation life of over 80,000 hours for an average winding temperature of 248 degrees C was predicted using the developed procedure.

  5. Anderson Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, James Jun; Zhou, Tong; Gu, Z. C.; Law, K. T.

    When a magnetic field is applied to a quantum spin Hall insulator (QSHI) without inversion symmetry, the edge states become gapful due to the breaking of time reversal symmetry (TRS) and the QSHI becomes a trivial spin Hall insulator (SHI) whose Chern number is N = 0 . In this work we show that disorder can drive such a SHI to a Chern insulator (CI) with N = 1 which supports a gapless chiral edge state. This CI exists in a finite range of disorder strength. Interestingly, the edge state is protected by the bulk mobility gap instead of an energy gap. For this reason, the new phase is called an Anderson Chern insulator (ACI).

  6. Loose-fill insulations

    SciTech Connect

    1995-05-01

    Whether you are increasing the insulation levels in your current home or selecting insulation for a new home, choosing the right insulation material can be challenging. Fibrous loose-fill insulations such as cellulose, fiberglass, and rock wool are options you may wish to consider. This publication will introduce you to these materials--what they are, how they are applied, how they compare with each other, and other considerations regarding their use--so that you can decide whether loose fills are right for your home.

  7. Composite Flexible Blanket Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Pitts, William C. (Inventor); Goldstein, Howard E. (Inventor); Sawko, Paul M. (Inventor)

    1991-01-01

    Composite flexible multilayer insulation systems (MLI) were evaluated for thermal performance and compared with the currently used fibrous silica (baseline) insulation system. The systems described are multilayer insulations consisting of alternating layers of metal foil and scrim ceramic cloth or vacuum metallized polymeric films quilted together using ceramic thread. A silicon carbide thread for use in the quilting and the method of making it are also described. These systems are useful in providing lightweight insulation for a variety of uses, particularly on the surface of aerospace vehicles subject to very high temperatures during flight.

  8. Gas insulated transmission line with insulators having field controlling recesses

    DOEpatents

    Cookson, Alan H.; Pederson, Bjorn O.

    1984-01-01

    A gas insulated transmission line having a novel insulator for supporting an inner conductor concentrically within an outer sheath. The insulator has a recess contiguous with the periphery of one of the outer and inner conductors. The recess is disposed to a depth equal to an optimum gap for the dielectric insulating fluid used for the high voltage insulation or alternately disposed to a large depth so as to reduce the field at the critical conductor/insulator interface.

  9. Kayser-Fleischer Rings

    MedlinePlus

    ... to know about Wilson Disease Kayser-Fleischer Rings Definition Kayser-Fleischer Ring: Clinical sign. Brownish-yellow ring ... Diet & Nutrition Kayser-Fleischer Rings Wilson Disease FAQs Definitions Transplantation For Patients & Families Resources Membership Events Centers ...

  10. Thermal insulation blanket material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pusch, R. H.

    1982-01-01

    A study was conducted to provide a tailorable advanced blanket insulation based on a woven design having an integrally woven core structure. A highly pure quartz yarn was selected for weaving and the cells formed were filled with a microquartz felt insulation.

  11. Thermal insulation blanket material

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pusch, R. H.

    1982-06-01

    A study was conducted to provide a tailorable advanced blanket insulation based on a woven design having an integrally woven core structure. A highly pure quartz yarn was selected for weaving and the cells formed were filled with a microquartz felt insulation.

  12. Insulation Fact Sheet.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Conservation and Renewable Energy Inquiry and Referral Service (DOE), Silver Spring, MD.

    Heating and cooling account for 50-70% of the energy consumed in the average American home. Heating water accounts for another 20%. A poorly insulated home loses much of this energy, causing drafty rooms and high energy bills. This fact sheet discusses how to determine if your home needs more insulation, the additional thermal resistance (called…

  13. Mineral Wool Insulation Binders

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kowatsch, Stefan

    Mineral wool is considered the best known insulation type among the wide variety of insulation materials. There are three types of mineral wool, and these consist of glass, stone (rock), and slag wool. The overall manufacturing processes, along with features such as specifications and characteristics for each of these types, as well as the role of the binder within the process are described.

  14. Mott-insulator dynamics

    SciTech Connect

    Lundh, Emil

    2011-09-15

    The hydrodynamics of a lattice Bose gas in a time-dependent external potential is studied in a mean-field approximation. The conditions under which a Mott insulating region can melt, and the local density can adjust to the new potential, are determined. In the case of a suddenly switched potential, it is found that the Mott insulator stays insulating and the density will not adjust if the switch is too abrupt. This comes about because too rapid currents result in Bloch oscillation-type current reversals. For a stirrer moved through a Mott insulating cloud, it is seen that only if the stirrer starts in a superfluid region and the velocity is comparable to the time scale set by the tunneling will the Mott insulator be affected.

  15. Dynamics insulation systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, W. E. W.; Hepler, W. A.; Yuan, S. W. K.; Frederking, T. H. K.

    1985-01-01

    Advanced dynamic insulation systems were analyzed from a thermodynamic point of view. A particular performance measure is proposed in order to characterize various insulations in a unique manner. This measure is related to a base quantity, the refrigeration power ratio. The latter is the minimum refrigeration power, for a particular dynamic insulation limit, to the actual reliquefaction power associated with cryoliquid boiloff. This ratio serves as reference quantity which is approximately constant for a specific ductless insulation at a chosen normal boiling point. Each real container with support structure, vent tube, and other transverse components requires a larger refrigeration power. The ratio of the actual experimental power to the theoretical value of the support-less system is a suitable measure of the entire insulation performance as far as parasitic heat leakage is concerned. The present characterization is illustrated using simple thermodynamic system examples including experiments with liquid nitrogen. Numerical values are presented and a comparison with liquid helium is given.

  16. Breakdown of organic insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuddihy, E. F.

    1983-01-01

    Solar cells and their associated electrical interconnects and leads were encapsulated in transparent elastomeric materials. Their purpose in a photovoltaic module, one of the most important for these elastomeric encapsulation materials, is to function as electrical insulation. This includes internal insulation between adjacent solar cells, between other encapsulated electrical parts, and between the total internal electrical circuitry and external metal frames, grounded areas, and module surfaces. Catastrophic electrical breakdown of the encapsulant insulation materials or electrical current through these materials or module edges to external locations can lead to module failure and can create hazards to humans. Electrical insulation stability, advanced elastomeric encapsulation materials are developed which are intended to be intrinsically free of in-situ ionic impurities, have ultralow water absorption, be weather-stable (UV, oxygen), and have high mechanical flexibility. Efforts to develop a method of assessing the life potential of organic insulation materials in photovoltaic modules are described.

  17. Measurement of corrosion under insulation and effectiveness of protective coatings

    SciTech Connect

    Abayarathna, D.; Ashbaugh, W.G.; Kane, R.D.; McGowan, N. Heimann, B.

    1997-08-01

    A laboratory cell set-up was designed and constructed for the simulation of corrosion under insulation (CUI) on a pipe section at elevated temperature. The CUI cell consisted of six carbon steel ring specimens separated by insulation spacers and held together by blind flanged pipe sections on both ends. Thermal insulation which was placed around the testing section provided the annular space to retain the test environment. The ring specimens were used as test electrodes in two separate electrochemical cells. One cell was used as the control while the other was used to test applied protective coatings. Corrosion measurements were made using both electrochemical polarization resistance and mass loss data under isothermal and cyclic wet/dry test conditions. The test cell was used to (1) successfully simulate CUI in the laboratory, (2) evaluate the corrosivity and different modes of corrosion observed with CUI and (3) evaluate proprietary coatings for minimizing CUI under simulated CUI conditions.

  18. Ringing wormholes

    SciTech Connect

    Konoplya, R.A.; Molina, C.

    2005-06-15

    We investigate the response of traversable wormholes to external perturbations through finding their characteristic frequencies and time-domain profiles. The considered solution describes traversable wormholes between the branes in the two brane Randall-Sundrum model and was previously found within Einstein gravity with a conformally coupled scalar field. The evolution of perturbations of a wormhole is similar to that of a black hole and represents damped oscillations (ringing) at intermediately late times, which are suppressed by power-law tails (proportional to t{sup -2} for monopole perturbations) at asymptotically late times.

  19. Cooper Pair Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Valles, James

    One of the recent advances in the field of the Superconductor to Insulator Transition (SIT) has been the discovery and characterization of the Cooper Pair Insulator phase. This bosonic insulator, which consists of localized Cooper pairs, exhibits activated transport and a giant magneto-resistance peak. These features differ markedly from the weakly localized transport that emerges as pairs break at a ``fermionic'' SIT. I will describe how our experiments on films nano-patterned with a nearly triangular array of holes have enabled us to 1) distinguish bosonic insulators from fermionic insulators, 2) show that Cooper pairs, rather than quasi-particles dominate the transport in the Cooper Pair insulator phase, 3) demonstrate that very weak, sub nano-meter thickness inhomogeneities control whether a bosonic or fermionic insulator forms at an SIT and 4) reveal that Cooper pairs disintegrate rather than becoming more tightly bound deep in the localized phase. We have also developed a method, using a magnetic field, to tune flux disorder reversibly in these films. I will present our latest results on the influence of magnetic flux disorder and random gauge fields on phenomena near bosonic SITs. This work was performed in collaboration with M. D. Stewart, Jr., Hung Q. Nguyen, Shawna M. Hollen, Jimmy Joy, Xue Zhang, Gustavo Fernandez, Jeffrey Shainline and Jimmy Xu. It was supported by NSF Grants DMR 1307290 and DMR-0907357.

  20. On-grade insulated panel floor system

    SciTech Connect

    Bjornson, D.; Briscoe, J.; Brown, G.Z.; Fremouw, S.; Kline, J.; Northcutt, D.

    1999-07-01

    The on-grade insulated panel floor system combines floor and foundation to reduce cost, increase energy and structural performance, and provide easy dismantling and recycling upon demolition. The system uses one-sided structural insulated panels (SIPs with one layer of OSB attached to foam insulation), a compacted gravel bed, and engineered lumber for the perimeter beam. Tests show that an on-grade panel floor system of 20 ft by 36 ft (6.1 by 11.0 m) is $895 less expensive and has a 55% better insulating value than an insulated concrete slab, exceeds deflection and flatness criteria for wood and concrete slab floors and supports structural loads in excess of those in residential construction. The flexible nature of the foam and wood may also improve the standing comfort of the floor compared to a concrete slab floor. In addition, the panel and engineered wood components increase the recyclability of the floor. The system is easily adaptable to use over an existing concrete floor.

  1. Cryogenic insulation development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leonhard, K. E.

    1972-01-01

    Multilayer insulations for long term cryogenic storage are described. The development effort resulted in an insulation concept using lightweight radiation shields, separated by low conductive Dacron fiber tufts. The insulation is usually referred to as Superfloc. The fiber tufts are arranged in a triangular pattern and stand about .040 in. above the radiation shield base. Thermal and structural evaluation of Superfloc indicated that this material is a strong candidate for the development of high performance thermal protection systems because of its high strength, purge gas evacuation capability during boost, its density control and easy application to a tank.

  2. Internal insulation system development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gille, J. P.

    1973-01-01

    The development of an internal insulation system for cryogenic liquids is described. The insulation system is based on a gas layer concept in which capillary or surface tension effects are used to maintain a stable gas layer within a cellular core structure between the tank wall and the contained cryogen. In this work, a 1.8 meter diameter tank was insulated and tested with liquid hydrogen. Ability to withstand cycling of the aluminum tank wall to 450 K was a design and test condition.

  3. Microsphere Insulation Panels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mohling, R.; Allen, M.; Baumgartner, R.

    2006-01-01

    Microsphere insulation panels (MIPs) have been developed as lightweight, longlasting replacements for the foam and vacuum-jacketed systems heretofore used for thermally insulating cryogenic vessels and transfer ducts. The microsphere core material of a typical MIP consists of hollow glass bubbles, which have a combination of advantageous mechanical, chemical, and thermal-insulation properties heretofore available only separately in different materials. In particular, a core filling of glass microspheres has high crush strength and low density, is noncombustible, and performs well in soft vacuum.

  4. Insulation fact sheet

    SciTech Connect

    1997-08-01

    Electricity bills, oil bills, gas bills - all homeowners pay for one or more of these utilities, and wish they paid less. Often many of us do not really know how to control or reduce our utility bills. We resign ourselves to high bills because we think that is the price we have to pay for a comfortable home. We encourage our children to turn off the lights and appliances, but may not recognize the benefits of insulating the attic. This publication provides facts relative to home insulation. It discusses where to insulate, what products to use, the decision making process, installation options, and sources of additional information.

  5. Building Insulation Materials Compilation.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1979-09-01

    this material in use. Extruded polystyrene shows a permeability to water vapor of 0.6 perm-in when tested by ASTM- C355 -64 and a volumetric water...ASTM- C355 , and water absorption less than 2% by weight by ASTM-C272. Polystyrene foam insulating boards and sheathing are used in residential...Insulations C520 Test for Density of Granular Loose Fill Insulations C1622 Test for Apparent Density of Rigid Cellular Plastics C355 Test for Water Vapor

  6. Investigations of the electrical breakdown properties of insulator materials used in high voltage vacuum diodes

    SciTech Connect

    Shurter, R.P.; Carlson, R.L.; Melton, J.G.

    1993-08-01

    The Injector for the proposed Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrodynamic Testing (DARHT) Facility at Los Alamos utilizes a monolithic insulator deployed in a radial configuration. The 1.83-m-diam {times} 25.4-cm-thick insulator with embedded grading rings separates the output oil transmission line from the vacuum vessel that contains the re-entrant anode and cathode assemblies. Although much work has been done by the pulse power community in studying surface flash-over of insulating materials used in both axial and radial configurations, dendrite growth at the roots of grading rings embedded in materials suitable for very large insulators is less well characterized. Degradation of several acrylic insulators has been observed in the form of dendrites growing at the roots of the grading rings for large numbers (100`s) of pulses on the prototype DARHT Injector and other machines using similar radial geometries. In a few cases, these dendrites have led to catastrophic bulk breakdown of the acrylic between two grading rings making the insulator a costly loss. Insulating materials under investigation are acrylic (Lucite), epoxy (Furane), and cross-linked polystyrene (Rexolite); each of these materials has its own particular mechanical and electrical merits. All of these materials have been cast and machined into the required large size for the Injector. Test methods and the results of investigations into the breakdown strength of various interface geometries and the susceptibility of these materials to dendrite growth are reported.

  7. Experimental demonstration of anomalous Floquet topological insulator for sound.

    PubMed

    Peng, Yu-Gui; Qin, Cheng-Zhi; Zhao, De-Gang; Shen, Ya-Xi; Xu, Xiang-Yuan; Bao, Ming; Jia, Han; Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2016-11-11

    Time-reversal invariant topological insulator is widely recognized as one of the fundamental discoveries in condensed matter physics, for which the most fascinating hallmark is perhaps a spin-based topological protection, the absence of scattering of conduction electrons with certain spins on matter surface. Recently, it has created a paradigm shift for topological insulators, from electronics to photonics, phononics and mechanics as well, bringing about not only involved new physics but also potential applications in robust wave transport. Despite the growing interests in topologically protected acoustic wave transport, T-invariant acoustic topological insulator has not yet been achieved. Here we report experimental demonstration of anomalous Floquet topological insulator for sound: a strongly coupled metamaterial ring lattice that supports one-way propagation of pseudo-spin-dependent edge states under T-symmetry. We also demonstrate the formation of pseudo-spin-dependent interface states due to lattice dislocations and investigate the properties of pass band and band gap states.

  8. Experimental demonstration of anomalous Floquet topological insulator for sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peng, Yu-Gui; Qin, Cheng-Zhi; Zhao, De-Gang; Shen, Ya-Xi; Xu, Xiang-Yuan; Bao, Ming; Jia, Han; Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2016-11-01

    Time-reversal invariant topological insulator is widely recognized as one of the fundamental discoveries in condensed matter physics, for which the most fascinating hallmark is perhaps a spin-based topological protection, the absence of scattering of conduction electrons with certain spins on matter surface. Recently, it has created a paradigm shift for topological insulators, from electronics to photonics, phononics and mechanics as well, bringing about not only involved new physics but also potential applications in robust wave transport. Despite the growing interests in topologically protected acoustic wave transport, T-invariant acoustic topological insulator has not yet been achieved. Here we report experimental demonstration of anomalous Floquet topological insulator for sound: a strongly coupled metamaterial ring lattice that supports one-way propagation of pseudo-spin-dependent edge states under T-symmetry. We also demonstrate the formation of pseudo-spin-dependent interface states due to lattice dislocations and investigate the properties of pass band and band gap states.

  9. Linear particle accelerator with seal structure between electrodes and insulators

    DOEpatents

    Broadhurst, John H.

    1989-01-01

    An electrostatic linear accelerator includes an electrode stack comprised of primary electrodes formed or Kovar and supported by annular glass insulators having the same thermal expansion rate as the electrodes. Each glass insulator is provided with a pair of fused-in Kovar ring inserts which are bonded to the electrodes. Each electrode is designed to define a concavo-convex particle trap so that secondary charged particles generated within the accelerated beam area cannot reach the inner surface of an insulator. Each insulator has a generated inner surface profile which is so configured that the electrical field at this surface contains no significant tangential component. A spark gap trigger assembly is provided, which energizes spark gaps protecting the electrodes affected by over voltage to prevent excessive energy dissipation in the electrode stack.

  10. Cooper Pairs in Insulators?!

    ScienceCinema

    James Valles

    2016-07-12

    Nearly 50 years elapsed between the discovery of superconductivity and the emergence of the microscopic theory describing this zero resistance state. The explanation required a novel phase of matter in which conduction electrons joined in weakly bound pairs and condensed with other pairs into a single quantum state. Surprisingly, this Cooper pair formation has also been invoked to account for recently uncovered high-resistance or insulating phases of matter. To address this possibility, we have used nanotechnology to create an insulating system that we can probe directly for Cooper pairs. I will present the evidence that Cooper pairs exist and dominate the electrical transport in these insulators and I will discuss how these findings provide new insight into superconductor to insulator quantum phase transitions. 

  11. Composite flexible blanket insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kourtides, Demetrius A. (Inventor); Lowe, David M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    An improved composite flexible blanket insulation is presented comprising top silicon carbide having an interlock design, wherein the reflective shield is composed of single or double aluminized polyimide and wherein the polyimide film has a honeycomb pattern.

  12. Topological insulators: Engineered heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hesjedal, Thorsten; Chen, Yulin

    2017-01-01

    The combination of topological properties and magnetic order can lead to new quantum states and exotic physical phenomena. In particular, the coupling between topological insulators and antiferromagnets enables magnetic and electronic structural engineering.

  13. Measurement of insulation layers using DTS system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hruby, David; Kajnar, Tomas; Koudelka, Petr; Latal, Jan; Hurta, Jan; Kepak, Stanislav; Jaros, Jakub; Vasinek, Vladimir

    2015-01-01

    Fiber optic distributed temperature sensing systems (DTS) are based on the principle of reflectometer and allow us to measure the temperature along the optical fiber. Optical fiber in these systems is used as a temperature sensor which can measure up to thousands of points simultaneously. DTS sensors use nonlinear phenomenon known as Raman scattering for temperature measurement. The advantages of this system include immunity to electromagnetic radiation, low cost of optical fiber, the possibility of measurement to a distance of 10 km and safe use in flammable or corrosive environments. The small size of optical fiber allows using in applications where the dimensions of the other sensors were problematic. A typical example of the DTS application is the fire detection in tunnels and buildings at risk, detection of water leaks on dikes and dams or monitoring of temperature in mine shafts. This article deals with the measurement of temperature transmission over various insulation layers using the DTS system. One of the problems of temperature transmission is that most of the sensors cannot measure the entire temperature profile but only allows a point measurement. This problem is solved by DTS systems with optical fibers. Optical fiber, due to its small size, can be applied among various insulation layers that were formed by rock wool. Three sensory layers formed by rings of multimode optical tightbuffered fiber with 50/125 micron core/cladding dimension were applied. The layers were linked together allowing a direct comparison of measured temperature. Rows of rings were placed on the margins and one was in the middle. Individual rings were linked together into the horizontal lines. Thus we were able to cover the whole surface of the insulation layers. Measurement was carried out in a closed air-conditioned room for 37 hours. Graphs with the progress of temperature at time and place were compiled from the measured data.

  14. Improved Sprayable Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, W. F.; Sharpe, M. H.; Lester, C. N.; Echols, Sherman; Simpson, W. G.; Lambert, J. D.; Norton, W. F.; Mclemore, J. P.; Patel, A. K.; Patel, S. V.; Shockney, C. H.; Adams, G. R.; Kelly, M. R.; White, W. T.

    1992-01-01

    MSA-2 and MSA-2A, two similar improved versions of Marshall sprayable ablator, insulating material developed at Marshall Space Flight Center to replace both sheets of cork and MSA-1. Suitable for use on large vehicles and structures exposed to fire or other sources of heat by design or accident. Ablative insulation turns into strong char when exposed to high temperature; highly desireable property in original spacecraft application and possibly in some terrestrial applications.

  15. Vacuum foil insulation system

    DOEpatents

    Hanson, John P.; Sabolcik, Rudolph E.; Svedberg, Robert C.

    1976-11-16

    In a multifoil thermal insulation package having a plurality of concentric cylindrical cups, means are provided for reducing heat loss from the penetration region which extends through the cups. At least one cup includes an integral skirt extending from one end of the cup to intersection with the penetration means. Assembly of the insulation package with the skirted cup is facilitated by splitting the cup to allow it to be opened up and fitted around the other cups during assembly.

  16. Surface flashover of insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, H.C.

    1988-08-31

    This paper reviews surface flashover (i.e., voltage breakdown along the surfaces of insulators), primarily in vacuum, although some comments are made about surface/flashover in high pressure gases. Theories and models relating to surface flashover are discussed, along with pertinent experimental results. Also, some suggestions are made regarding how to choose the material, geometry, and processing when selecting an insulator for a particular application.

  17. Calculating IP Tuning Knobs for the PEP II High Energy Ring using Singular Value Decomposition, Response Matrices and an Adapted Moore Penrose Method

    SciTech Connect

    Wittmer, W.; /SLAC

    2007-11-07

    The PEP II lattices are unique in their detector solenoid field compensation scheme by utilizing a set of skew quadrupoles in the IR region and the adjacent arcs left and right of the IP. Additionally, the design orbit through this region is nonzero. This combined with the strong local coupling wave makes it very difficult to calculate IP tuning knobs which are orthogonal and closed. The usual approach results either in non-closure, not being orthogonal or the change in magnet strength being too big. To find a solution, the set of tuning quads had to be extended which resulted having more degrees of freedom than constraints. To find the optimal set of quadrupoles which creates a linear, orthogonal and closed knob and simultaneously minimizing the changes in magnet strength, the method using Singular Value Decomposition, Response Matrices and an Adapted Moore Penrose method had to be extended. The results of these simulations are discussed below and the results of first implementation in the machine are shown.

  18. Perioperative thermal insulation.

    PubMed

    Bräuer, Anselm; Perl, Thorsten; English, Michael J M; Quintel, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Perioperative hypothermia remains a common problem during anesthesia and surgery. Unfortunately, the implementation of new minimally invasive surgical procedures has not lead to a reduction of this problem. Heat losses from the skin can be reduced by thermal insulation to avoid perioperative hypothermia. However, only a small amount of information is available regarding the physical properties of insulating materials used in the Operating Room (OR). Therefore, several materials using validated manikins were tested. Heat loss from the surface of the manikin can be described as:"Q = h . DeltaT . A" where Q = heat flux, h = heat exchange coefficient, DeltaT = temperature gradient between the environment and surface, and A = covered area. Heat flux per unit area and surface temperature were measured with calibrated heat flux transducers. Environmental temperature was measured using a thermoanemometer. The temperature gradient between the surface and environment (DeltaT) was varied and "h" was determined by linear regression analysis as the slope of "DeltaT" versus heat flux per unit area. The reciprocal of the heat exchange coefficient defines the insulation. The insulation values of the materials varied between 0.01 Clo (plastic bag) to 2.79 Clo (2 layers of a hospital duvet). Given the range of insulating materials available for outdoor activities, significant improvement in insulation of patients in the OR is both possible and desirable.

  19. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/m2, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/m2). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  20. Wrapped Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott A.

    2015-01-01

    New NASA vehicles, such as Earth Departure Stage (EDS), Orion, landers, and orbiting fuel depots, need improved cryogenic propellant transfer and storage for long-duration missions. Current cryogen feed line multilayer insulation (MLI) performance is 10 times worse per area than tank MLI insulation. During each launch, cryogenic piping loses approximately 150,000 gallons (equivalent to $300,000) in boil-off during transfer, chill down, and ground hold. Quest Product Development Corp., teaming with Ball Aerospace, developed an innovative advanced insulation system, Wrapped MLI (wMLI), to provide improved thermal insulation for cryogenic feed lines. wMLI is high-performance multilayer insulation designed for cryogenic piping. It uses Quest's innovative discrete-spacer technology to control layer spacing/ density and reduce heat leak. The Phase I project successfully designed, built, and tested a wMLI prototype with a measured heat leak 3.6X lower than spiral-wrapped conventional MLI widely used for piping insulation. A wMLI prototype had a heat leak of 7.3 W/sq m, or 27 percent of the heat leak of conventional MLI (26.7 W/sq m). The Phase II project is further developing wMLI technology with custom, molded polymer spacers and advancing the product toward commercialization via a rigorous testing program, including developing advanced vacuuminsulated pipe for ground support equipment.

  1. Kinetics of ring formation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ben-Naim, E.; Krapivsky, P. L.

    2011-06-01

    We study reversible polymerization of rings. In this stochastic process, two monomers bond and, as a consequence, two disjoint rings may merge into a compound ring or a single ring may split into two fragment rings. This aggregation-fragmentation process exhibits a percolation transition with a finite-ring phase in which all rings have microscopic length and a giant-ring phase where macroscopic rings account for a finite fraction of the entire mass. Interestingly, while the total mass of the giant rings is a deterministic quantity, their total number and their sizes are stochastic quantities. The size distribution of the macroscopic rings is universal, although the span of this distribution increases with time. Moreover, the average number of giant rings scales logarithmically with system size. We introduce a card-shuffling algorithm for efficient simulation of the ring formation process and we present numerical verification of the theoretical predictions.

  2. Ringing phenomenon of the fiber ring resonator.

    PubMed

    Ying, Diqing; Ma, Huilian; Jin, Zhonghe

    2007-08-01

    A resonator fiber-optic gyro (R-FOG) is a high-accuracy inertial rotation sensor based on the Sagnac effect. A fiber ring resonator is the core sensing element in the R-FOG. When the frequency of the fiber ring resonator input laser is swept linearly with time, ringing of the output resonance curve is observed. The output field of the fiber ring resonator is derived from the superposition of the light transmitted through the directional coupler directly and the multiple light components circulated in the fiber ring resonator when the frequency of the laser is swept. The amplitude and phase of the output field are analyzed, and it is found that the difference in time for different light components in the fiber ring resonator to reach a point of destructive interference causes the ringing phenomenon. Finally the ringing phenomenon is observed in experiments, and the experimental results agree with the theoretical analysis well.

  3. Asymmetric dipolar ring

    DOEpatents

    Prosandeev, Sergey A.; Ponomareva, Inna V.; Kornev, Igor A.; Bellaiche, Laurent M.

    2010-11-16

    A device having a dipolar ring surrounding an interior region that is disposed asymmetrically on the ring. The dipolar ring generates a toroidal moment switchable between at least two stable states by a homogeneous field applied to the dipolar ring in the plane of the ring. The ring may be made of ferroelectric or magnetic material. In the former case, the homogeneous field is an electric field and in the latter case, the homogeneous field is a magnetic field.

  4. Ring Image Analyzer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Strekalov, Dmitry V.

    2012-01-01

    Ring Image Analyzer software analyzes images to recognize elliptical patterns. It determines the ellipse parameters (axes ratio, centroid coordinate, tilt angle). The program attempts to recognize elliptical fringes (e.g., Newton Rings) on a photograph and determine their centroid position, the short-to-long-axis ratio, and the angle of rotation of the long axis relative to the horizontal direction on the photograph. These capabilities are important in interferometric imaging and control of surfaces. In particular, this program has been developed and applied for determining the rim shape of precision-machined optical whispering gallery mode resonators. The program relies on a unique image recognition algorithm aimed at recognizing elliptical shapes, but can be easily adapted to other geometric shapes. It is robust against non-elliptical details of the image and against noise. Interferometric analysis of precision-machined surfaces remains an important technological instrument in hardware development and quality analysis. This software automates and increases the accuracy of this technique. The software has been developed for the needs of an R&TD-funded project and has become an important asset for the future research proposal to NASA as well as other agencies.

  5. Insulation bonding test system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beggs, J. M.; Johnston, G. D.; Coleman, A. D.; Portwood, J. N.; Saunders, J. M.; Redmon, J. W.; Porter, A. C. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    A method and a system for testing the bonding of foam insulation attached to metal is described. The system involves the use of an impacter which has a calibrated load cell mounted on a plunger and a hammer head mounted on the end of the plunger. When the impacter strikes the insulation at a point to be tested, the load cell measures the force of the impact and the precise time interval during which the hammer head is in contact with the insulation. This information is transmitted as an electrical signal to a load cell amplifier where the signal is conditioned and then transmitted to a fast Fourier transform (FFT) analyzer. The FFT analyzer produces energy spectral density curves which are displayed on a video screen. The termination frequency of the energy spectral density curve may be compared with a predetermined empirical scale to determine whether a igh quality bond, good bond, or debond is present at the point of impact.

  6. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, S.E.; Arasteh, D.K.; Hartmann, J.L.

    1988-04-05

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas. 2 figs.

  7. Thermal insulated glazing unit

    DOEpatents

    Selkowitz, Stephen E.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Hartmann, John L.

    1991-01-01

    An improved insulated glazing unit is provided which can attain about R5 to about R10 thermal performance at the center of the glass while having dimensions about the same as those of a conventional double glazed insulated glazing unit. An outer glazing and inner glazing are sealed to a spacer to form a gas impermeable space. One or more rigid, non-structural glazings are attached to the inside of the spacer to divide the space between the inner and outer glazings to provide insulating gaps between glazings of from about 0.20 inches to about 0.40 inches. One or more glazing surfaces facing each thermal gap are coated with a low emissivity coating. Finally, the thermal gaps are filled with a low conductance gas such as krypton gas.

  8. Reusable Surface Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    Advanced Flexible Reusable Surface Insulation, developed by Ames Research Center, protects the Space Shuttle from the searing heat that engulfs it on reentry into the Earth's atmosphere. Initially integrated into the Space Shuttle by Rockwell International, production was transferred to Hi-Temp Insulation Inc. in 1974. Over the years, Hi-Temp has created many new technologies to meet the requirements of the Space Shuttle program. This expertise is also used commercially, including insulation blankets to cover aircrafts parts, fire barrier material to protect aircraft engine cowlings and aircraft rescue fire fighter suits. A Fire Protection Division has also been established, offering the first suit designed exclusively by and for aircraft rescue fire fighters. Hi-Temp is a supplier to the Los Angeles City Fire Department as well as other major U.S. civil and military fire departments.

  9. Saturn's Spectacular Ring System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lissauer, Jack J.; DeVincenzi, Donald (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Saturn's beautiful rings have fascinated astronomers since they were first observed by Galileo in 1610. The main rings consist of solid particles mostly in the 1 cm - 10 m range, composed primarily of water ice. The ring disk is exceptionally thin - the typical local thickness of the bright rings is tens of meters, whereas the diameter of the main rings is 250,000 km! The main rings exhibit substantial radial variations "ringlets", many of which are actively maintained via gravitational perturbations from Saturn's moons. Exterior to the main rings lie tenuous dust rings, which have little mass but occupy a very large volume of space. This seminar will emphasize the physics of ring-moon interactions, recent advances in our understanding of various aspects of the rings obtained from observations taken during 1995 when the rings appeared edge-on to the Earth and then to the Sun, and observations in subsequent years from HST.

  10. Which Ringed Planet...!?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-12-01

    and the disk of Uranus therefore appears unsually dark. At the same time, the icy material in the rings reflects the sunlight and appears comparatively bright. Uranus is unique among the planets of the solar system in having a tilted rotation axis that is close to the main solar system plane in which most planets move (the "Ecliptic"). At the time of the Voyager-2 encounter (1986), the southern pole was oriented toward the Earth. Now, sixteen years later (corresponding to about one-fifth of Uranus' 84-year period of revolution), we observe the Uranian ring system at an angle that is comparable to the one under which we see Saturn when its ring system is most "open". The moons ESO PR Photo 31b/02 ESO PR Photo 31b/02 [Preview - JPEG: 400 x 526 pix - 76k] [Full-Res - JPEG: 1460 x 1919 pix - 1.1M] Caption : PR Photo 31b/02 provides identifications of the Uranian moons present in PR Photo 31a/02 . The unidentified, round object to the left is a background star. The image scale in indicated by the bar. Seven of the moons of Uranus have been identified in PR Photo 31b/02 [1]. Of these, Titania and Oberon are the brightest (visual magnitude about 14). They were first seen in 1787 by the discoverer of Uranus, William Herschel (1738-1822), working at Bath in England. Ariel and Umbriel were found in 1851 by William Lassell (1799-1880) at Liverpool in the same country. Miranda was discovered in 1948 by Gerard Kuiper (1905-1973) at the 5-m Palomar telescope in California (USA). The much smaller and fainter Puck and Portia (visual magnitude about 21 and barely visible in the photo) were first found in 1985-86 by Stephen P. Synnott of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (USA), during a study of Voyager-2 photos obtained soon before this NASA spacecraft flew by Uranus in January 1986. Other VLT images If you now want to see a fine VLT photo of Saturn, please look at PR Photo 04a/02 , obtained in late 2001. It was made with the NAOS-CONICA (NACO) Adaptive Optics facility and is therefore

  11. Notes on topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaufmann, Ralph M.; Li, Dan; Wehefritz-Kaufmann, Birgit

    2016-11-01

    This paper is a survey of the ℤ2-valued invariant of topological insulators used in condensed matter physics. The ℤ-valued topological invariant, which was originally called the TKNN invariant in physics, has now been fully understood as the first Chern number. The ℤ2 invariant is more mysterious; we will explain its equivalent descriptions from different points of view and provide the relations between them. These invariants provide the classification of topological insulators with different symmetries in which K-theory plays an important role. Moreover, we establish that both invariants are realizations of index theorems which can also be understood in terms of condensed matter physics.

  12. Thermal insulation protection means

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dotts, R. L.; Smith, J. A.; Strouhal, G. (Inventor)

    1979-01-01

    A system for providing thermal insulation for portions of a spacecraft which do not exceed 900 F during ascent or reentry relative to the earth's atmosphere is described. The thermal insulation is formed of relatively large flexible sheets of needled Nomex felt having a flexible waterproof coating. The thickness of the felt is sized to protect against projected temperatures and is attached to the structure by a resin adhesive. Vent holes in the sheets allow ventilation while maintaining waterproofing. The system is heat treated to provide thermal stability.

  13. Slide-Ring Materials Using Cyclodextrin.

    PubMed

    Ito, Kohzo

    2017-01-01

    We have recently synthesized slide-ring materials using cyclodextrin by cross-linking polyrotaxanes, a typical supramolecule. The slide-ring materials have polymer chains with bulky end groups topologically interlocked by figure-of-eight shaped junctions. This indicates that the cross-links can pass through the polymer chains similar to pulleys to relax the tension of the backbone polymer chains. The slide-ring materials also differ from conventional polymers in that the entropy of rings affects the elasticity. As a result, the slide-ring materials show quite small Young's modulus not proportional to the cross-linking density. This concept can be applied to a wide variety of polymeric materials as well as gels. In particular, the slide-ring materials show remarkable scratch-proof properties for coating materials for automobiles, cell phones, mobile computers, and so on. Further current applications include vibration-proof insulation materials for sound speakers, highly abrasive polishing media, dielectric actuators, and so on.

  14. Stirling engine piston ring

    DOEpatents

    Howarth, Roy B.

    1983-01-01

    A piston ring design for a Stirling engine wherein the contact pressure between the piston and the cylinder is maintained at a uniform level, independent of engine conditions through a balancing of the pressure exerted upon the ring's surface and thereby allowing the contact pressure on the ring to be predetermined through the use of a preloaded expander ring.

  15. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... Loss Surgery? A Week of Healthy Breakfasts Shyness Birth Control Ring KidsHealth > For Teens > Birth Control Ring Print A A A What's in this ... español Anillo vaginal anticonceptivo What Is It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring ...

  16. Self-Healing Wire Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parrish, Clyde F. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A self-healing system for an insulation material initiates a self-repair process by rupturing a plurality of microcapsules disposed on the insulation material. When the plurality of microcapsules are ruptured, reactants within the plurality of microcapsules react to form a replacement polymer in a break of the insulation material. This self-healing system has the ability to repair multiple breaks in a length of insulation material without exhausting the repair properties of the material.

  17. New Dust Belts of Uranus: One Ring, Two Ring, Red Ring, Blue Ring

    SciTech Connect

    de Pater, I; Hammel, H B; Gibbard, S G; Showalter, M R

    2006-02-02

    We compare near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with HST results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced via impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where non-gravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of sub-micron sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring.

  18. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-04-30

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprises high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

  19. Peg supported thermal insulation panel

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    A thermal insulation panel which is lightweight, load bearing, accommodates thermal stress, and has excellent high temperature insulation capability comprising high performance insulation between thin metal walls supported by high density, high strength glass pegs made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  20. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R

    2006-08-16

    Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators are vacuum insulating structures composed of thin, alternating layers of dielectric and metal. They are currently being developed for application to high-current accelerators and related pulsed power systems. This paper describes some of the High-Gradient Insulator research currently being conducted at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

  1. Composite rod insulators for ac power lines; Electrical performance of various designs at a coastal testing station

    SciTech Connect

    Houlgate, R.G.; Swift, D.A. )

    1990-10-01

    The electrical performance of thirty-six composite insulators - of four commercial types for each AC system level of 34.5 kV, 230 kV and 500 kV - has been determined at the CEGB insulator testing station, Brighton, England. The weathershed materials were epoxy-resin, ethylene propylene rubber and silicone rubber; half of the 230 kV insulators had no stress rings. Surface leakage current was recorded for surge levels of 25 mA, 150 mA and 500 mA; a special technique was developed to obtain the flashover statistics of the 500 kV insulators, thereby enabling performance of the composite insulator to be quantified relative to that of a string of cap and pin porcelain insulators of anti-fog design, the deterioration of the insulators was observed by making regular visual inspections. The practical consequences of the findings and the causes of the degradation are discussed.

  2. Elastomer Unistructure Insulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-06-01

    Faulkerson, J. Braucht, and R. Behymer . References 1. R. 0. Godwin, W. F. Hagen, J. F. Holzrichter, W. W. Simmons, and J. B. Trenholme, "Livermore...enhanced triggered gas switches, Proc Conference Energy Storage, Compression, and Switching, p. 463, (November 5-7, 1974 ) Switch Insulator- · Figure 1

  3. Insulated ECG electrodes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Portnoy, W. M.; David, R. M.

    1973-01-01

    Insulated, capacitively coupled electrode does not require electrolyte paste for attachment. Other features of electrode include wide range of nontoxic material that may be employed for dielectric because of sputtering technique used. Also, electrode size is reduced because there is no need for external compensating networks with FET operational amplifier.

  4. Erosion of polyurethane insulation.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kraus, S.

    1973-01-01

    Detailed description of the test program in which erosion of the spray foam insulation used in the S-II stage of the Saturn-V Apollo launch vehicle was investigated. The behavior of the spray foam was investigated at the elevated temperature and static pressure appropriate to the S-II stage environment, but in the absence of the aerodynamic shear stress.

  5. Preassembly Of Insulating Tiles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Izu, Y. D.; Yoshioka, E. N.; Rosario, T.

    1988-01-01

    Concept for preassembling high-temperature insulating tiles speeds and simplifies installation and repair and reduces damage from handling. Preassembly concept facilitates placement of tiles on gently contoured surfaces as well as on flat ones. Tiles bonded to nylon mesh with room-temperature-vulcanizing silicon rubber. Spacing between tiles is 0.03 in. Applications include boilers, kilns, and furnaces.

  6. Improved insulation material

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1976-01-01

    Multilayer material consisting of embossed, silver-coated Mylar, nylon net, and silk net is useful for thermal-protection systems and cryogenic containers. Embossing serves two purposes: helps separate radiation barriers and controls radiant energy diffusion. Insulation requires no maintenance after installation.

  7. THERMAL INSULATION SYSTEMS

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Augustynowicz, Stanislaw D. (Inventor); Fesmire, James E. (Inventor)

    2005-01-01

    Thermal insulation systems and with methods of their production. The thermal insulation systems incorporate at least one reflection layer and at least one spacer layer in an alternating pattern. Each spacer layer includes a fill layer and a carrier layer. The fill layer may be separate from the carrier layer, or it may be a part of the carrier layer, i.e., mechanically injected into the carrier layer or chemically formed in the carrier layer. Fill layers contain a powder having a high surface area and low bulk density. Movement of powder within a fill layer is restricted by electrostatic effects with the reflection layer combined with the presence of a carrier layer, or by containing the powder in the carrier layer. The powder in the spacer layer may be compressed from its bulk density. The thermal insulation systems may further contain an outer casing. Thermal insulation systems may further include strips and seams to form a matrix of sections. Such sections serve to limit loss of powder from a fill layer to a single section and reduce heat losses along the reflection layer.

  8. Alaska Pipeline Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    Crude oil moving through the 800-mile Trans-Alaska Pipeline must be kept at a relatively high temperature, about 180 degrees Fahrenheit, to maintain the fluidity of the oil. In Arctic weather, that demands highly effective insulation. General Electric Co.'s Space Division, Valley Forge, Pennsylvania, provided it with a spinoff product called Therm-O-Trol. Shown being installed on the pipeline, Therm-O-Trol is a metal-bonded polyurethane foam especially formulated for Arctic insulation. A second GE spinoff product, Therm-O-Case, solved a related problem involved in bringing hot crude oil from 2,000-foot-deep wells to the surface without transferring oil heat to the surrounding permafrost soil; heat transfer could melt the frozen terrain and cause dislocations that might destroy expensive well casings. Therm-O-Case is a double-walled oil well casing with multi-layered insulation which provides an effective barrier to heat transfer. Therm-O-Trol and Therm-O-Case are members of a family of insulating products which stemmed from technology developed by GE Space Division in heat transferlthermal control work on Gemini, Apollo and other NASA programs.

  9. Transcription Independent Insulation at TFIIIC-Dependent Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Valenzuela, Lourdes; Dhillon, Namrita; Kamakaka, Rohinton T.

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin insulators separate active from repressed chromatin domains. In yeast the RNA pol III transcription machinery bound to tRNA genes function with histone acetylases and chromatin remodelers to restrict the spread of heterochromatin. Our results collectively demonstrate that binding of TFIIIC is necessary for insulation but binding of TFIIIB along with TFIIIC likely improves the probability of complex formation at an insulator. Insulation by this transcription factor occurs in the absence of RNA polymerase III or polymerase II but requires specific histone acetylases and chromatin remodelers. This analysis identifies a minimal set of factors required for insulation. PMID:19596900

  10. Integrated Multilayer Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dye, Scott

    2009-01-01

    Integrated multilayer insulation (IMLI) is being developed as an improved alternative to conventional multilayer insulation (MLI), which is more than 50 years old. A typical conventional MLI blanket comprises between 10 and 120 metallized polymer films separated by polyester nets. MLI is the best thermal- insulation material for use in a vacuum, and is the insulation material of choice for spacecraft and cryogenic systems. However, conventional MLI has several disadvantages: It is difficult or impossible to maintain the desired value of gap distance between the film layers (and consequently, it is difficult or impossible to ensure consistent performance), and fabrication and installation are labor-intensive and difficult. The development of IMLI is intended to overcome these disadvantages to some extent and to offer some additional advantages over conventional MLI. The main difference between IMLI and conventional MLI lies in the method of maintaining the gaps between the film layers. In IMLI, the film layers are separated by what its developers call a micro-molded discrete matrix, which can be loosely characterized as consisting of arrays of highly engineered, small, lightweight, polymer (typically, thermoplastic) frames attached to, and placed between, the film layers. The term "micro-molded" refers to both the smallness of the frames and the fact that they are fabricated in a process that forms precise small features, described below, that are essential to attainment of the desired properties. The term "discrete" refers to the nature of the matrix as consisting of separate frames, in contradistinction to a unitary frame spanning entire volume of an insulation blanket.

  11. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, Phillip A.; Anderson, Andrew T.; Alger, Terry W.

    1994-01-01

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dialectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections.

  12. Insulative laser shell coupler

    DOEpatents

    Arnold, P.A.; Anderson, A.T.; Alger, T.W.

    1994-09-20

    A segmented coaxial laser shell assembly having at least two water jacket sections, two pairs of interconnection half rings, a dielectric break ring, and a pair of threaded ring sections is disclosed. Each water jacket section with an inner tubular section that defines an inner laser cavity with water paths adjacent to at least a portion of the exterior of the inner tubular section, and mating faces at the end of the water jacket section through which the inner laser cavity opens and which defines at least one water port therethrough in communication with the water jackets. The water paths also define in their external surface a circumferential notch set back from and in close proximity to the mating face. The dielectric break ring has selected thickness and is placed between, and in coaxial alignment with, the mating faces of two of the adjacent water jacket sections. The break ring also defines an inner laser cavity of the same size and shape as the inner laser cavity of the water jacket sections and at least one water passage through the break ring to communicate with at least one water port through the mating faces of the water jacket sections. 4 figs.

  13. Multilayer High-Gradient Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Anaya, R M; Blackfield, D; Chen, Y -; Falabella, S; Hawkins, S; Holmes, C; Paul, A C; Sampayan, S; Sanders, D M; Watson, J A; Caporaso, G J; Krogh, M

    2006-11-15

    High voltage systems operated in vacuum require insulating materials to maintain spacing between conductors held at different potentials, and may be used to maintain a nonconductive vacuum boundary. Traditional vacuum insulators generally consist of a single material, but insulating structures composed of alternating layers of dielectric and metal can also be built. These ''High-Gradient Insulators'' have been experimentally shown to withstand higher voltage gradients than comparable conventional insulators. As a result, they have application to a wide range of high-voltage vacuum systems where compact size is important. This paper describes ongoing research on these structures, as well as the current theoretical understanding driving this work.

  14. Stacked insulator induction accelerator gaps

    SciTech Connect

    Houck, T.I.; Westenskow, G.A.; Kim, J.S.; Eylon, S.; Henestroza, E.; Yu, S.S.; Vanecek, D.

    1997-05-01

    Stacked insulators, with alternating layers of insulating material and conducting film, have been shown to support high surface electrical field stresses. We have investigated the application of the stacked insulator technology to the design of induction accelerator modules for the Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator program. The rf properties of the accelerating gaps using stacked insulators, particularly the impedance at frequencies above the beam pipe cutoff frequency, are investigated. Low impedance is critical for Relativistic-Klystron Two-Beam Accelerator applications where a high current, bunched beam is trsnsported through many accelerating gaps. An induction accelerator module designs using a stacked insulator is presented.

  15. Temporal ringdown of silicon-on-insulator racetrack resonators.

    PubMed

    Karle, T J; Raineri, F; Roppo, V; Bordas, F; Monnier, P; Ali, S; Sivan, I; Raj, R

    2013-07-01

    Ring-down temporal measurements of silicon-on-insulator wire racetrack resonators are performed with 150 fs input pulses using a parametric process in a nonlinear crystal to gate and amplify the weak output pulses. We measure the cavity round trip time and the quality factor of these all-pass filters and find excellent agreement with continuous wave spectroscopic measurements as well as with an analytic model built using numerical solutions for the fully vectorial waveguide modes.

  16. Website malfunction: a case report highlighting the danger of using electrical insulating tape for buddy strapping.

    PubMed

    Devitt, Brian Meldan; Baker, Joseph F; Fitzgerald, Eilis; McCarthy, Conor

    2010-05-06

    A case of injury to the third web space of the right hand of a rugby player, as a result of buddy strapping with electrical insulating tape of the little and ring finger, is presented. A deep laceration of the web space and distal palmar fascia resulted, necessitating wound exploration and repair. This case highlights the danger of using electrical insulating tape as a means to buddy strap fingers.

  17. Jupiter's Main Ring/Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (28.5 miles) per picture element (pixel) along Jupiter's rings. Because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow, peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2.3 million kilometers (1.4 million miles) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced when sunlight is scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts - - a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, outside the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the figure's far left side. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow. Some radial structure is barely visible across the ring's ansa (top image). A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings. This vertically extended 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces pushing the smallest grains out of the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. To accentuate faint features in the bottom image of the ring halo, different brightnesses are shown through color. Brightest features are white or yellow and the

  18. Spin Seebeck insulator.

    PubMed

    Uchida, K; Xiao, J; Adachi, H; Ohe, J; Takahashi, S; Ieda, J; Ota, T; Kajiwara, Y; Umezawa, H; Kawai, H; Bauer, G E W; Maekawa, S; Saitoh, E

    2010-11-01

    Thermoelectric generation is an essential function in future energy-saving technologies. However, it has so far been an exclusive feature of electric conductors, a situation which limits its application; conduction electrons are often problematic in the thermal design of devices. Here we report electric voltage generation from heat flowing in an insulator. We reveal that, despite the absence of conduction electrons, the magnetic insulator LaY(2)Fe(5)O(12) can convert a heat flow into a spin voltage. Attached Pt films can then transform this spin voltage into an electric voltage as a result of the inverse spin Hall effect. The experimental results require us to introduce a thermally activated interface spin exchange between LaY(2)Fe(5)O(12) and Pt. Our findings extend the range of potential materials for thermoelectric applications and provide a crucial piece of information for understanding the physics of the spin Seebeck effect.

  19. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1993-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  20. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially "point" or "line" contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form "line" contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively "point" contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  1. Compact vacuum insulation embodiments

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-04-28

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point' or line' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included. 26 figs.

  2. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1993-01-05

    An ultra-thin compact vacuum insulation panel is comprised of two hard, but bendable metal wall sheets closely spaced apart from each other and welded around the edges to enclose a vacuum chamber. Glass or ceramic spacers hold the wall sheets apart. The spacers can be discrete spherical beads or monolithic sheets of glass or ceramic webs with nodules protruding therefrom to form essentially point'' or line'' contacts with the metal wall sheets. In the case of monolithic spacers that form line'' contacts, two such spacers with the line contacts running perpendicular to each other form effectively point'' contacts at the intersections. Corrugations accommodate bending and expansion, tubular insulated pipes and conduits, and preferred applications are also included.

  3. Floquet Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grushin, Adolfo G.; Gómez-León, Álvaro; Neupert, Titus

    2014-04-01

    We show theoretically that periodically driven systems with short range Hubbard interactions offer a feasible platform to experimentally realize fractional Chern insulator states. We exemplify the procedure for both the driven honeycomb and the square lattice, where we derive the effective steady state band structure of the driven system by using the Floquet theory and subsequently study the interacting system with exact numerical diagonalization. The fractional Chern insulator state equivalent to the 1/3 Laughlin state appears at 7/12 total filling (1/6 filling of the upper band). The state also features spontaneous ferromagnetism and is thus an example of the spontaneous breaking of a continuous symmetry along with a topological phase transition. We discuss light-driven graphene and shaken optical lattices as possible experimental systems that can realize such a state.

  4. Installing fiber insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, D. S.; Warren, A. D. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A method for installing fragile, high temperature insulation batting in an elongated cavity or in a resilient wire sleeve to form a resilient seal. The batting is preformed to rough dimensions and wrapped in a plastic film, the film being of a material which is fugitive at a high temperature. The film is heat sealed and trimmed to form a snugly fit skin which overlaps at least at one end to permit attachment of a pull cord. The film absorbs the tensile force of pulling the film enclosed batting through the cavity or wire mesh sleeve and is subsequently driven off by high temperature baking, leaving only the insulation in the cavity or wire mesh sleeve.

  5. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, B.T.; Arasteh, D.K.; Selkowitz, S.E.

    1993-12-14

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation. 18 figures.

  6. Gas filled panel insulation

    DOEpatents

    Griffith, Brent T.; Arasteh, Dariush K.; Selkowitz, Stephen E.

    1993-01-01

    A structural or flexible highly insulative panel which may be translucent, is formed from multi-layer polymeric material in the form of an envelope surrounding a baffle. The baffle is designed so as to minimize heat transfer across the panel, by using material which forms substantially closed spaces to suppress convection of the low conductivity gas fill. At least a portion of the baffle carries a low emissivity surface for suppression of infrared radiation.

  7. Improved DC Gun Insulator

    SciTech Connect

    M.L. Neubauer, K.B. Beard, R. Sah, C. Hernandez-Garcia, G. Neil

    2009-05-01

    Many user facilities such as synchrotron light sources and free electron lasers require accelerating structures that support electric fields of 10-100 MV/m, especially at the start of the accelerator chain where ceramic insulators are used for very high gradient DC guns. These insulators are difficult to manufacture, require long commissioning times, and have poor reliability, in part because energetic electrons bury themselves in the ceramic, creating a buildup of charge and causing eventual puncture. A novel ceramic manufacturing process is proposed. It will incorporate bulk resistivity in the region where it is needed to bleed off accumulated charge caused by highly energetic electrons. This process will be optimized to provide an appropriate gradient in bulk resistivity from the vacuum side to the air side of the HV standoff ceramic cylinder. A computer model will be used to determine the optimum cylinder dimensions and required resistivity gradient for an example RF gun application. A ceramic material example with resistivity gradient appropriate for use as a DC gun insulator will be fabricated by glazing using doping compounds and tested.

  8. Weyl Mott Insulator

    PubMed Central

    Morimoto, Takahiro; Nagaosa, Naoto

    2016-01-01

    Relativistic Weyl fermion (WF) often appears in the band structure of three dimensional magnetic materials and acts as a source or sink of the Berry curvature, i.e., the (anti-)monopole. It has been believed that the WFs are stable due to their topological indices except when two Weyl fermions of opposite chiralities annihilate pairwise. Here, we theoretically show for a model including the electron-electron interaction that the Mott gap opens for each WF without violating the topological stability, leading to a topological Mott insulator dubbed Weyl Mott insulator (WMI). This WMI is characterized by several novel features such as (i) energy gaps in the angle-resolved photo-emission spectroscopy (ARPES) and the optical conductivity, (ii) the nonvanishing Hall conductance, and (iii) the Fermi arc on the surface with the penetration depth diverging as approaching to the momentum at which the Weyl point is projected. Experimental detection of the WMI by distinguishing from conventional Mott insulators is discussed with possible relevance to pyrochlore iridates. PMID:26822023

  9. Insulator - Insulator Contact Charging as a Function of Pressure

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.; Mucciolo, E. R.; Calle, C. I.

    2006-01-01

    Metal - metal and metal - insulator contact or triboelectric charging are well known phenomena with good theoretical understanding of the charge exchange mechanism. However, insulator - insulator charging is not as well understood. Theoretical and experimental research has been performed that shows that the surface charge on an insulator after triboelectric charging with another insulator is rapidly dissipated with lowered atmospheric pressure. This pressure discharge is consistent with surface ions being evaporated off the surface once their vapor pressure is attained. A two-phase equilibrium model based on an ideal gas of singly charged ions in equilibrium with a submonolayer adsorbed film was developed to describe the pressure dependence of the surface charge on an insulator. The resulting charge density equation is an electrostatic version of the Langmuir isotherm.

  10. New dust belts of Uranus: one ring, two ring, red ring, blue ring.

    PubMed

    de Pater, Imke; Hammel, Heidi B; Gibbard, Seran G; Showalter, Mark R

    2006-04-07

    We compared near-infrared observations of the recently discovered outer rings of Uranus with Hubble Space Telescope results. We find that the inner ring, R/2003 U 2, is red, whereas the outer ring, R/2003 U 1, is very blue. Blue is an unusual color for rings; Saturn's enigmatic E ring is the only other known example. By analogy to the E ring, R/2003 U 1 is probably produced by impacts into the embedded moon Mab, which apparently orbits at a location where nongravitational perturbations favor the survival and spreading of submicron-sized dust. R/2003 U 2 more closely resembles Saturn's G ring, which is red, a typical color for dusty rings.

  11. Fiber Ring Optical Gyroscope (FROG)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1979-01-01

    The design, construction, and testing of a one meter diameter fiber ring optical gyro, using 1.57 kilometers of single mode fiber, are described. The various noise components: electronic, thermal, mechanical, and optical, were evaluated. Both dc and ac methods were used. An attempt was made to measure the Earth rotation rate; however, the results were questionable because of the optical and electronic noise present. It was concluded that fiber ring optical gyroscopes using all discrete components have many serious problems that can only be overcome by discarding the discrete approach and adapting an all integrated optic technique that has the laser source, modulator, detector, beamsplitters, and bias element on a single chip.

  12. Möbius molecules and fragile Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muechler, Lukas; Maciejko, Joseph; Neupert, Titus; Car, Roberto

    2014-12-01

    Motivated by the concept of Möbius aromatics in organic chemistry, we extend the recently introduced concept of fragile Mott insulators (FMI) to ring-shaped molecules with repulsive Hubbard interactions threaded by a half-quantum of magnetic flux (h c /2 e ) . In this context, an FMI is the insulating ground state of a finite-size molecule that cannot be adiabatically connected to a single Slater determinant, i.e., to a band insulator, provided that time-reversal and lattice translation symmetries are preserved. Based on exact numerical diagonalization for finite Hubbard interaction strength U and existing Bethe-ansatz studies of the one-dimensional Hubbard model in the large-U limit, we establish a duality between Hubbard molecules with 4 n and 4 n +2 sites, with n integer. A molecule with 4 n sites is an FMI in the absence of flux but becomes a band insulator in the presence of a half-quantum of flux, while a molecule with 4 n +2 sites is a band insulator in the absence of flux but becomes an FMI in the presence of a half-quantum of flux. Including next-nearest-neighbor hoppings gives rise to new FMI states that belong to multidimensional irreducible representations of the molecular point group, giving rise to a rich phase diagram.

  13. Möbius molecules and fragile Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muechler, Lukas; Maciejko, Joseph; Neupert, Titus; Car, Roberto

    2015-03-01

    Motivated by the concept of Möbius aromatics in organic chemistry, we extend the recently introduced concept of fragile Mott insulators (FMI) to ring-shaped molecules with repulsive Hubbard interactions threaded by a half-quantum of magnetic flux (hc / 2 e). In this context, a FMI is the insulating ground state of a finite-size molecule that cannot be adiabatically connected to a single Slater determinant, i.e., to a band insulator, provided that time-reversal and lattice translation symmetries are preserved. Based on exact numerical diagonalization for finite Hubbard interaction strength U and existing Bethe-ansatz studies of the one-dimensional Hubbard model in the large- U limit, we establish a duality between Hubbard molecules with 4 n and 4 n + 2 sites, with n integer. A molecule with 4 n sites is an FMI in the absence of flux but becomes a band insulator in the presence of a half-quantum of flux, while a molecule with 4 n + 2 sites is a band insulator in the absence of flux but becomes an FMI in the presence of a half-quantum of flux. Including next-nearest-neighbor-hoppings gives rise to new FMI states that belong to multidimensional irreducible representations of the molecular point group, giving rise to a rich phase diagram. Reference: arXiv:1409.6732

  14. Saturn's F-Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This narrow-angle camera image of Saturn's F Ring was taken through the Clear filter while at a distance of 6.9 million km from Saturn on 8 November 1980. The brightness variations of this tightly-constrained ring shown here indicate that the ring is less uniform in makeup than the larger rings. JPL managed the Voyager Project for NASA's Office of Space Science

  15. On certain Hecke rings

    PubMed Central

    Evens, Sam; Bressler, Paul

    1987-01-01

    We examine rings that embed into the smash product of the group algebra of the Weyl group with the field of meromorphic functions on the Cartan subalgebra and are generated by elements that satisfy braid relations. We prove that every such ring is isomorphic to either the Hecke algebra, the nil Hecke ring, or the group algebra of the Weyl group. PMID:16593804

  16. The Jumping Ring Experiment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Baylie, M.; Ford, P. J.; Mathlin, G. P.; Palmer, C.

    2009-01-01

    The jumping ring experiment has become central to liquid nitrogen shows given as part of the outreach and open day activities carried out within the University of Bath. The basic principles of the experiment are described as well as the effect of changing the geometry of the rings and their metallurgical state. In general, aluminium rings are…

  17. Rings Around Uranus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Maran, Stephen P.

    1977-01-01

    Events leading up to the discovery of the rings of Uranus are described. The methods used and the logic behind the methods are explained. Data collected to prove the existence of the rings are outlined and theories concerning the presence of planetary rings are presented. (AJ)

  18. Soft normed rings.

    PubMed

    Uluçay, Vakkas; Şahin, Mehmet; Olgun, Necati

    2016-01-01

    Molodtsov introduced the concept of soft sets, which can be seen as a new mathematical tool for dealing with uncertainty. In this paper, we initiate the study of soft normed rings by soft set theory. The notions of soft normed rings, soft normed ideals, soft complete normed rings are introduced and also several related properties and examples are given.

  19. Repetitively pulsed vacuum insulator flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Ginn, J.W.; Buttram, M.T.

    1987-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine the flashover strength of various vacuum insulators under conditions of repetitive pulsing. The pulse duration was 30 ns, and the thickness of a typical insulator sample was 1.8 cm. Data were taken for 45 insulators from five different materials. An insulator was subjected to an extended series of pulses at a given repetition rate and field. If flashover was not detected, the field level was increased and the sequence repeated. At rates up to 50 pulses per second, there was no apparent dependence of flashover field on rate. In addition, some ''single shot'' data were taken, including various modifications of the geometries and surface textures of the insulators. Only two to the modifications increased the flashover strength significantly over that of a 45 sample: (1) annealing some plastics (roughly a 35% increase), and (2) extending the insulator to cover the surfaces of both electrodes (an increase of nearly a factor of two).

  20. Topological crystalline insulator SnTe nanoribbons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahal, Bishnu R.; Dulal, Rajendra P.; Pegg, Ian L.; Philip, John

    2017-03-01

    Topological crystalline insulators are systems in which a band inversion that is protected by crystalline mirror symmetry gives rise to nontrivial topological surface states. SnTe is a topological crystalline insulator. It exhibits p-type conductivity due to Sn vacancies and Te antisites, which leads to high carrier density in the bulk. Thus growth of high quality SnTe is a prerequisite for understanding the topological crystalline insulating behavior. We have grown SnTe nanoribbons using a solution method. The width of the SnTe ribbons varies from 500 nm to 2 μm. They exhibit rock salt crystal structure with a lattice parameter of 6.32 Å. The solution method that we have adapted uses low temperature, so the Sn vacancies can be controlled. The solution grown SnTe nanoribbons exhibit strong semiconducting behavior with an activation energy of 240 meV. This activation energy matches with the calculated band gap for SnTe with a lattice parameter of 6.32 Å, which is higher than that reported for bulk SnTe. The higher activation energy makes the thermal excitation of bulk charges very difficult on the surface. As a result, the topological surfaces will be free from the disturbance caused by the thermal excitations

  1. Solid Rocket Motor Insulation Testing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-07-13

    3μ Kevlar Pulp Kevlar Fibers Bulk Phase, 1/4” long SEM 11 Distribution A: Public Release. Distribution unlimited Carbon Nanofibers • Many Types...Distribution unlimited Carbon Nanofibers Nanomaterials for Insulation Case Insulation Goal: 50% Lower Erosion of Insulation (44% weight reduction...used fiber is the Chrysotile fiber (pliable and nonfriable) 10 Distribution A: Public Release. Distribution unlimited Other Fibers Kevlar Fibers 3μ

  2. PPO foam - Liquid hydrogen insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yates, G. B.

    1975-01-01

    An extensive fabrication and test program is described which has demonstrated the integrity of PPO (polyphenylene oxide) foam as an internal insulation. PPO is shown to be capable of withstanding multiple reuses on such cryogenic-fueled launch vehicles as the Space Shuttle. The major advantages of this internal insulation is the absence of a pressure load on the insulation, reduced handling damage, and minimization of cyclic thermal stresses by a 'warm' bond line.

  3. Solid rocket motor internal insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Twichell, S. E. (Editor); Keller, R. B., Jr.

    1976-01-01

    Internal insulation in a solid rocket motor is defined as a layer of heat barrier material placed between the internal surface of the case propellant. The primary purpose is to prevent the case from reaching temperatures that endanger its structural integrity. Secondary functions of the insulation are listed and guidelines for avoiding critical problems in the development of internal insulation for rocket motors are presented.

  4. High Gradient Multilayer Insulator Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S E; Caporaso, G J; Nunnally, W C; Sanders, D M; Watson, J A; Krogh, M L; Anderson, H U

    2004-06-03

    We are investigating a novel insulator concept that involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods less than 1 mm. These structures perform 1.5 to 4 times better than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We survey our ongoing studies investigating the performance under long pulse electron beam, short pulse, and full reversing conditions.

  5. Magnetic insulation for plasma propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gonzalez, Dora E.

    1990-01-01

    The design parameters of effective magnetic insulation for plasma engines are discussed. An experimental model used to demonstrate the process of plasma acceleration and magnetic insulation is considered which consists of a copper strap that is wound around a glass tube and connected to a capacitor. In order to adequately model the magnetic insulation mechanisms, a computer algorithm is developed. Plasma engines, with their efficient utilization of the propellant mass, are expected to provide the next-generation advanced propulsion systems.

  6. Insulating Cryogenic Pipes With Frost

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stephenson, J. G.; Bova, J. A.

    1985-01-01

    Crystallized water vapor fills voids in pipe insulation. Small, carefully controlled amount of water vapor introduced into dry nitrogen gas before it enters aft fuselage. Vapor freezes on pipes, filling cracks in insulation. Ice prevents gaseous nitrogen from condensing on pipes and dripping on structure, in addition to helping to insulate all parts. Industrial applications include large refrigeration plants or facilities that use cryogenic liquids.

  7. Electrical Conductivity in Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Anil Kumar

    2003-03-01

    ABSTRACT In insulating solid(Plastic Sheet)of 0.73mm thickness, the conduction process was ohmic at low D.C. electric feilds, but the feild strength increased the conductivity became feild dependent at high feilds and it exhibited some conductivity and the variation in conduction current was none-ohmic.The mechanism of electron transfer between two metallic electrodes separated by insulating material has received considerable attention. The electron transfer current was studied on 0.73mm plastic sheet and(I-V),(log I-log V),(log J-E^1/2)and (log o- 1/T) relations have been studied and the value of slope,electronic dielectric constant and activation energy for nature of conduction mechanism and process have been determined.The electrical conductivity measurements were carried out at room temperature (32.5 celcius)under high D.C. electric feilds of the order of 10^6 volt/meter.The sample of insulator(plastic sheet) was sandwiched between the aluminium electrodes of designed experimental cell,The effect of very high varying feilds at 32.5 celcius temperature,the electrical conduction has been proposed on the data obtained.The non-ohmic behavior in the sample seemed to start at an electric feild 3x10^6 volt/meter.In this case on data obtained it was concluded that "SCHOTTKY EMISSION MECHANISM" has been proposed. The activation energy was calculated by plotting(log o-1/T)characterstics at running temperature and it was found 0.325ev which is less than 1.0,It confirms predominance of Electronic Conduction. I=current in ampere V=volt T=temperature O=conductivity

  8. Saturn's largest ring.

    PubMed

    Verbiscer, Anne J; Skrutskie, Michael F; Hamilton, Douglas P

    2009-10-22

    Most planetary rings in the Solar System lie within a few radii of their host body, because at these distances gravitational accelerations inhibit satellite formation. The best known exceptions are Jupiter's gossamer rings and Saturn's E ring, broad sheets of dust that extend outward until they fade from view at five to ten planetary radii. Source satellites continuously supply the dust, which is subsequently lost in collisions or by radial transport. Here we report that Saturn has an enormous ring associated with its outer moon Phoebe, extending from at least 128R(S) to 207R(S) (Saturn's radius R(S) is 60,330 km). The ring's vertical thickness of 40R(S) matches the range of vertical motion of Phoebe along its orbit. Dynamical considerations argue that these ring particles span the Saturnian system from the main rings to the edges of interplanetary space. The ring's normal optical depth of approximately 2 x 10(-8) is comparable to that of Jupiter's faintest gossamer ring, although its particle number density is several hundred times smaller. Repeated impacts on Phoebe, from both interplanetary and circumplanetary particle populations, probably keep the ring populated with material. Ring particles smaller than centimetres in size slowly migrate inward and many of them ultimately strike the dark leading face of Iapetus.

  9. On the solar dust ring(s)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mukai, T.

    Based on a mechanism to form the solar dust ring, it is proved that the observed peak in infrared F-corona cannot be explained by silicate type grains alone. Preliminary analysis on the recent infrared data of the F-corona by Maihara et al. (1984) has suggested that the ring particles have different physical properties compared with the dust grains, which produce the background F-corona.

  10. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.; Potter, Thomas F.

    1992-01-01

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases therebetween are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and variious laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels.

  11. Compact vacuum insulation

    DOEpatents

    Benson, D.K.; Potter, T.F.

    1992-10-27

    Improved compact insulation panel is provided which is comprised of two adjacent metal sheets spaced close together with a plurality of spherical, or other discretely shaped, glass or ceramic beads optimally positioned between the sheets to provide support and maintain the spacing between the metal sheets when the gases there between are evacuated to form a vacuum. These spherical glass beads provide the maximum support while minimizing thermal conductance. In its preferred embodiment; these two metal sheets are textured with ribs or concave protrusions in conjunction with the glass beads to maximize the structural integrity of the panels while increasing the spacing between beads, thereby reducing the number of beads and the number of thermal conduction paths. Glass or porcelain-enameled liners in combination with the glass spacers and metal sidewalls effectively decrease thermal conductivity, and various laminates, including wood, porcelain-enameled metal, and others effectively increase the strength and insulation capabilities of the panels. Also, a metal web is provided to hold the spacers in place, and strategic grooves are shown to accommodate expansion and contraction or shaping of the panels. 35 figs.

  12. Electrical wire insulation and electromagnetic coil

    DOEpatents

    Bich, George J.; Gupta, Tapan K.

    1984-01-01

    An electromagnetic coil for high temperature and high radiation application in which glass is used to insulate the electrical wire. A process for applying the insulation to the wire is disclosed which results in improved insulation properties.

  13. Dust and Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddiqui, Muddassir

    ABSTRACT Space is not empty it has comic radiations (CMBR), dust etc. Cosmic dust is that type of dust which is composed of particles in space which vary from few molecules to 0.1micro metres in size. This type of dust is made up of heavier atoms born in the heart of stars and supernova. Mainly it contains dust grains and when these dust grains starts compacting then it turns to dense clouds, planetary ring dust and circumstellar dust. Dust grains are mainly silicate particles. Dust plays a major role in our solar system, for example in zodiacal light, Saturn's B ring spokes, planetary rings at Jovian planets and comets. Observations and measurements of cosmic dust in different regions of universe provide an important insight into the Universe's recycling processes. Astronomers consider dust in its most recycled state. Cosmic dust have radiative properties by which they can be detected. Cosmic dusts are classified as intergalactic dusts, interstellar dusts and planetary rings. A planetary ring is a ring of cosmic dust and other small particles orbiting around a planet in flat disc shape. All of the Jovian planets in our solar system have rings. But the most notable one is the Saturn's ring which is the brightest one. In March 2008 a report suggested that the Saturn's moon Rhea may have its own tenuous ring system. The ring swirling around Saturn consists of chunks of ice and dust. Most rings were thought to be unstable and to dissipate over course of tens or hundreds of millions of years but it now appears that Saturn's rings might be older than that. The dust particles in the ring collide with each other and are subjected to forces other than gravity of its own planet. Such collisions and extra forces tend to spread out the rings. Pluto is not known to have any ring system but some Astronomers believe that New Horizons probe might find a ring system when it visits in 2015.It is also predicted that Phobos, a moon of Mars will break up and form into a planetary ring

  14. Washing Off Polyurethane Foam Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burley, Richard K.; Fogel, Irving

    1990-01-01

    Jet of hot water removes material quickly and safely. Simple, environmentally sound technique found to remove polyurethane foam insulation from metal parts. Developed for (but not limited to) use during rebuilding of fuel system of Space Shuttle main engine, during which insulation must be removed for penetrant inspection of metal parts.

  15. Plastic Materials for Insulating Applications.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wang, S. F.; Grossman, S. J.

    1987-01-01

    Discusses the production and use of polymer materials as thermal insulators. Lists several materials that provide varying degrees of insulation. Describes the production of polymer foam and focuses on the major applications of polystyrene foam, polyurethane foam, and polyisocyanurate foam. (TW)

  16. Smaller insulators handle higher voltage

    SciTech Connect

    Wilt, G.

    1997-10-01

    Researcher at Lawrence Livermore have designed the Ultra High Gradient Insulator, a device that can reliably withstand electrical voltages four times greater than before. The Ultra-HGI is designed with alternating layers which divide voltages so finely that the chances of failure are small, and when they do occur, they are confined to a very small portion of the insulator.

  17. Tailorable Advanced Blanket Insulation (TABI)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sawko, Paul M.; Goldstein, Howard E.

    1987-01-01

    Single layer and multilayer insulating blankets for high-temperature service fabricated without sewing. TABI woven fabric made of aluminoborosilicate. Triangular-cross-section flutes of core filled with silica batting. Flexible blanket formed into curved shapes, providing high-temperature and high-heat-flux insulation.

  18. The birth of topological insulators.

    PubMed

    Moore, Joel E

    2010-03-11

    Certain insulators have exotic metallic states on their surfaces. These states are formed by topological effects that also render the electrons travelling on such surfaces insensitive to scattering by impurities. Such topological insulators may provide new routes to generating novel phases and particles, possibly finding uses in technological applications in spintronics and quantum computing.

  19. DEGRADATION OF MAGNET EPOXY AT NSLS X-RAY RING.

    SciTech Connect

    HU,J.P.; ZHONG,Z.; HAAS,E.; HULBERT,S.; HUBBARD,R.

    2004-05-24

    Epoxy resin degradation was analyzed for NSLS X-ring magnets after two decades of 2.58-2.8 GeV continuous electron-beam operation, based on results obtained from thermoluminescent dosimeters irradiated along the NSLS ring and epoxy samples irradiated at the beamline target location. A Monte Carlo-based particle transport code, MCNP, was utilized to verify the dose from synchrotron radiation distributed along the axial- and transverse-direction in a ring model, which simulates the geometry of a ring quadrupole magnet and its central vacuum chamber downstream of the bending-magnet photon ports. The actual life expectancy of thoroughly vacuum baked-and-cured epoxy resin was estimated from radiation tests on similar polymeric materials using a radiation source developed for electrical insulation and mechanical structure studies.

  20. Hybrid Multifoil Aerogel Thermal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sakamoto, Jeffrey; Paik, Jong-Ah; Jones, Steven; Nesmith, Bill

    2008-01-01

    This innovation blends the merits of multifoil insulation (MFI) with aerogel-based insulation to develop a highly versatile, ultra-low thermally conductive material called hybrid multifoil aerogel thermal insulation (HyMATI). The density of the opacified aerogel is 240 mg/cm3 and has thermal conductivity in the 20 mW/mK range in high vacuum and 25 mW/mK in 1 atmosphere of gas (such as argon) up to 800 C. It is stable up to 1,000 C. This is equal to commercially available high-temperature thermal insulation. The thermal conductivity of the aerogel is 36 percent lower compared to several commercially available insulations when tested in 1 atmosphere of argon gas up to 800 C.

  1. Two classes of Mott insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Dung-Hai; Kivelson, Steven A.

    2003-01-01

    There are two classes of Mott insulators in nature, distinguished by their responses to weak doping. With increasing chemical potential, type I Mott insulators undergo a first order phase transition from the undoped to the doped phase. In the presence of long-range Coulomb interactions, this leads to an inhomogeneous state exhibiting “micro-phase separation.” In contrast, in type II Mott insulators charges go in continuously above a critical chemical potential. We show that if the insulating state has a broken symmetry, this increases the likelihood that it will be type I. There exists a close analogy between these two types of Mott insulators and the familiar type I and type II superconductors.

  2. Topological Insulators from Electronic Superstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugita, Yusuke; Motome, Yukitoshi

    2016-07-01

    The possibility of realizing topological insulators by the spontaneous formation of electronic superstructures is theoretically investigated in a minimal two-orbital model including both the spin-orbit coupling and electron correlations on a triangular lattice. Using the mean-field approximation, we show that the model exhibits several different types of charge-ordered insulators, where the charge disproportionation forms a honeycomb or kagome superstructure. We find that the charge-ordered insulators in the presence of strong spin-orbit coupling can be topological insulators showing quantized spin Hall conductivity. Their band gap is dependent on electron correlations as well as the spin-orbit coupling, and even vanishes while showing the massless Dirac dispersion at the transition to a trivial charge-ordered insulator. Our results suggest a new route to realize and control topological states of quantum matter by the interplay between the spin-orbit coupling and electron correlations.

  3. Impacting device for testing insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Redmon, J. W. (Inventor)

    1984-01-01

    An electro-mechanical impacting device for testing the bonding of foam insulation to metal is descirbed. The device lightly impacts foam insulation attached to metal to determine whether the insulation is properly bonded to the metal and to determine the quality of the bond. A force measuring device, preferably a load cell mounted on the impacting device, measures the force of the impact and the duration of the time the hammer head is actually in contact with the insulation. The impactor is designed in the form of a handgun having a driving spring which can propel a plunger forward to cause a hammer head to impact the insulation. The device utilizes a trigger mechanism which provides precise adjustements, allowing fireproof operation.

  4. Technology Solutions Case Study: Insulating Concrete Forms

    SciTech Connect

    none,

    2012-10-01

    This Pacific Northwest National Laboratory project investigated insulating concrete forms—rigid foam, hollow walls that are filled with concrete for highly insulated, hurricane-resistant construction.

  5. Slowing of Vortex Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, Russell; Bolster, Diogo; Hershberger, Robert

    2008-11-01

    We have investigated the slowing of vortex rings in water which are created with very thin cores. We find that these rings propagate with no measurable change in diameter or core size. The drag appears to be the result of viscous forces on the core. A simple model for this drag describes experimental data in terms of a drag coefficient, which depends only on Reynolds number. Barenghi's group at Newcastle found that the translational velocity of a ring in an inviscid fluid perturbed by Kelvin waves decreases with increasing amplitude of Kelvin waves. This suggests that the velocity of vortex rings in a viscous fluid may well depend on the amplitude of Kelvin waves at the time of formation. Rings with substantial amplitude of Kelvin waves will be expected to move more slowly than rings with little or no Kelvin wave amplitude. We present experimental data confirming this suggestion.

  6. Radioactive gold ring dermatitis

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, R.A.; Aldrich, J.E. )

    1990-08-01

    A superficial squamous cell carcinoma developed in a woman who wore a radioactive gold ring for more than 30 years. Only part of the ring was radioactive. Radiation dose measurements indicated that the dose to basal skin layer was 2.4 Gy (240 rad) per week. If it is assumed that the woman continually wore her wedding ring for 37 years since purchase, she would have received a maximum dose of approximately 4600 Gy.

  7. Design and analysis of the PBFA-Z vacuum insulator stack

    SciTech Connect

    Shoup, R.W. |; Long, F.; Martin, T.H.

    1996-06-01

    Sandia is developing PBFA-Z, a 20-MA driver for z-pinch experiments by replacing the water lines, insulator stack, and MITLs on PBFA II with new hardware. The design of the vacuum insulator stack was dictated by the drive voltage, the electric field stress and grading requirements, the water line and MITL interface requirements, and the machine operations and maintenance requirements. The insulator stack will consist of four separate modules, each of a different design because of different voltage drive and hardware interface requirements. The shape of the components in each module, i.e., grading rings, insulator rings, flux excluders, anode and cathode conductors, and the design of the water line and MITL interfaces, were optimized by using the electrostatic analysis codes, ELECTRO and JASON. The time dependent performance of the insulator stack was evaluated using IVORY, a 2-D PIC code. This paper will describe the insulator stack design and present the results of the ELECTRO and IVORY analyses.

  8. Saturn's E ring revisited

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feibelman, W. A.; Klinglesmith, D. A.

    1980-07-01

    Images of the E ring of Saturn obtained by the image processing of photographs of the 1966 edge-on presentation of the planet's ring plane are presented. Two methods of image enhancement were used: scanning with an image quantizer operated in the derivative mode to enhance contrast and computerized subtraction of a circularly symmetric image of the overexposed Saturn disk. Further photographic and CCD observation confirming the existence of the ring extending to twice the diameter of the A ring, which was not detected by the Pioneer 11 imaging photopolarimeter, is indicated.

  9. Jupiter's Ring Halo

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    A mosaic of four images taken through the clear filter (610 nanometers) of the solid state imaging (CCD) system aboard NASA's Galileo spacecraft on November 8, 1996, at a resolution of approximately 46 kilometers (km) per picture element (pixel) along the rings; however, because the spacecraft was only about 0.5 degrees above the ring plane, the image is highly foreshortened in the vertical direction. The images were obtained when Galileo was in Jupiter's shadow peering back toward the Sun; the ring was approximately 2,300,000 kilometers (km) away. The arc on the far right of the image is produced by sunlight scattered by small particles comprising Jupiter's upper atmospheric haze. The ring also efficiently scatters light, indicating that much of its brightness is due to particles that are microns or less in diameter. Such small particles are believed to have human-scale lifetimes, i.e., very brief compared to the solar system's age.

    Jupiter's ring system is composed of three parts -- a flat main ring, a lenticular halo interior to the main ring, and the gossamer ring, which lies exterior to the main ring. The near and far arms of Jupiter's main ring extend horizontally across the mosaic, joining together at the ring's ansa, on the far left side of the figure. The near arm of the ring appears to be abruptly truncated close to the planet, at the point where it passes into Jupiter's shadow.

    A faint mist of particles can be seen above and below the main rings; this vertically extended, toroidal 'halo' is unusual in planetary rings, and is probably caused by electromagnetic forces which can push small grains out of the ring plane. Halo material is present across this entire image, implying that it reaches more than 27,000 km above the ring plane. Because of shadowing, the halo is not visible close to Jupiter in the lower right part of the mosaic. In order to accentuate faint features in the image, different brightnesses are shown through color, with the brightest

  10. Metallization of electronic insulators

    DOEpatents

    Gottesfeld, Shimshon; Uribe, Francisco A.

    1994-01-01

    An electroplated element is formed to include an insulating substrate, a conducting polymer polymerized in situ on the substrate, and a metal layer deposited on the conducting polymer. In one application a circuit board is formed by polymerizing pyrrole on an epoxy-fiberglass substrate in a single step process and then electrodepositing a metal over the resulting polypyrrole polymer. No chemical deposition of the metal is required prior to electroplating and the resulting layer of substrate-polymer-metal has excellent adhesion characteristics. The metal deposition is surprisingly smooth and uniform over the relatively high resistance film of polypyrrole. A continuous manufacturing process is obtained by filtering the solution between successive substrates to remove polymer formed in the solution, by maintaining the solution oxidizing potential within selected limits, and by adding a strong oxidant, such as KMnO.sub.4 at periodic intervals to maintain a low sheet resistivity in the resulting conducting polymer film.

  11. Quantum Mechanics in Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Aeppli, G.

    2009-08-20

    Atomic physics is undergoing a large revival because of the possibility of trapping and cooling ions and atoms both for individual quantum control as well as collective quantum states, such as Bose-Einstein condensates. The present lectures start from the 'atomic' physics of isolated atoms in semiconductors and insulators and proceed to coupling them together to yield magnets undergoing quantum phase transitions as well as displaying novel quantum states with no classical analogs. The lectures are based on: G.-Y. Xu et al., Science 317, 1049-1052 (2007); G. Aeppli, P. Warburton, C. Renner, BT Technology Journal, 24, 163-169 (2006); H. M. Ronnow et al., Science 308, 392-395 (2005) and N. Q. Vinh et al., PNAS 105, 10649-10653 (2008).

  12. Lightweight Ceramic Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wheeler, W. H.; Creedon, J. F.

    1986-01-01

    Fiber burnout process yields low densities. Low density attained by process of sacrificial burnout. Graphite or carbon fibers mixed into slurry of silica, alumina, and boron-compound fibers in amounts ranging from 25 to 75 percent of total fiber content by weight. Mixture formed into blocks and dried. Blocks placed in kiln and heated to 1,600 degrees F(870 degrees C) for several hours. Graphite or carbon fibers slowly oxidize away, leaving voids and reducing block density. Finally, blocks heated to 2,350 degrees F (1,290 degrees C) for 90 minutes to bond remaining ceramic fibers together. Developed for use on Space Shuttle and other spacecraft, rigid insulation machined to requisite shape and bonded in place.

  13. Multiple layer insulation cover

    DOEpatents

    Farrell, James J.; Donohoe, Anthony J.

    1981-11-03

    A multiple layer insulation cover for preventing heat loss in, for example, a greenhouse, is disclosed. The cover is comprised of spaced layers of thin foil covered fabric separated from each other by air spaces. The spacing is accomplished by the inflation of spaced air bladders which are integrally formed in the cover and to which the layers of the cover are secured. The bladders are inflated after the cover has been deployed in its intended use to separate the layers of the foil material. The sizes of the material layers are selected to compensate for sagging across the width of the cover so that the desired spacing is uniformly maintained when the cover has been deployed. The bladders are deflated as the cover is stored thereby expediting the storage process and reducing the amount of storage space required.

  14. Boron nitride insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Jr., Chester S.; Cavin, O. Burl; McCulloch, Reginald W.; Clark, David L.

    1978-01-01

    High temperature BN-insulated heaters for use as fuel pin simulators in reactor thermal hydraulic test facility studies comprise a cylindrical housing and a concentric heating element disposed within the housing and spaced apart from the housing to define an annular region therebetween. The annular region contains BN for providing electrical resistance and thermal conductivity between the housing and the heating element. The fabrication method of this invention comprises the steps of cold pressing BN powder at a pressure of 20 to 80,000 psig and a dwell time of at least 0.1-3 seconds to provide hollow cylindrical preforms of suitable dimensions for insertion into the annular region, the BN powder having a tap density of about 0.6-1.1 g/cm.sup.3 and an orientation ratio of at least about 100/3.5. The preforms are inserted into the annular region and crushed in place.

  15. Insulated face brick

    SciTech Connect

    Cromrich, J.; Cromrich, L.B.

    1990-10-16

    This patent describes a method for forming insulated brick intended solely for use in building walls and having superior insulation qualities and lighter weight consonant with the load bearing capabilities of building bricks and the appearance of facing brick. It comprises dry mixing two parts of vermiculite and one part of brick clay, thereby forming a dry mixture having a vermiculite to clay ratio of approximately two-to-one by volume; adding water to the dry mixture and mixing, so that a substantially dry admixture having expanded vermiculite and brick clay is formed; forming a facing layer solely from brick clay; molding and compressing the substantially dry admixture, so as to form a generally rectangular main body layer having parallel top and bottom faces, a pair of parallel side faces and a pair of parallel end faces, respectively, the top and bottom faces being substantially larger in area than the respective side faces, and the side faces being substantially larger in area than the respective end faces, the body layer further having at least one bore formed therein, the bore running from the top face to the bottom face perpendicularly thereto and substantially parallel to the side surfaces thereof, the bore being substantially centrally disposed and wherein the facing layer is disposed on one of the side surfaces of the body portion; curing the molded admixture having the facing layer disposed thereon; whereby a cured brick is formed; and firing the cured brick and the facing layer disposed thereon, whereby an integral brick is formed having top and bottom faces of the brick which are entirely devoid of facing layers, wherein the brick has the desired load bearing capability substantially between its top and bottom faces, whereby the outer facing layer only provides the desired appearance and weather resistance, and further whereby the weight of the brick is substantially reduced.

  16. Modified spiral wound retaining ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawson, A. G. (Inventor)

    1980-01-01

    A spiral wound retaining ring with angled ends is described. The ring is crimped at the same angle as the ring ends to maintain a constant thickness dimension. The angling of the ends of the ring and crimp allow the ends to be positioned closer together while maintaining enough clearance to enable insertion and removal of the ring. By reducing the separation distance between the ends a stronger ring results since the double layer area of the ring is maximized.

  17. Seasonal acclimatization determined by non-invasive measurements of coat insulation.

    PubMed

    Langman, Vaughan A; Langman, Sarah L; Ellifrit, Nancy

    2015-01-01

    Seasonal acclimatization in terrestrial mammals in the Northern Hemisphere involves changes in coat insulation. It is more economical to provide increased insulation than increased heat production for protection against the cold. This study was done to test a technique for the non-invasive measurement of mammal coat insulation and to measure coat insulation over several seasons on captive exotics. The working hypothesis was that species that have no coat or have a coat that does not change seasonally do not acclimatize seasonally. Three surface temperature readings were measured from the torso area. The insulation was calculated using measured metabolic rates and body temperature when possible. The African elephants, giraffe and okapi did not acclimatize with average maximum insulation values of 0.256°Cm(2)  W(-1) . The Amur tigers and mountain goats acclimatized to seasonal ambient conditions by increasing the insulation values of the hair coats in the cold with an average maximum insulation values of 0.811°Cm(2)  W(-1) . The cold adapted species are more than three times more insulated in the cold than the equatorial species. The husbandry implications of exotics that have no ability to acclimatize to Northern Hemisphere seasonal ambient changes are profound. Giraffe, African elephants, and okapi when exposed to cold conditions with ambient air temperatures below 21°C will use body energy reserves to maintain a heat balance and will require housing that provides ambient conditions of 21°C.

  18. Experimental demonstration of anomalous Floquet topological insulator for sound

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Yu-Gui; Qin, Cheng-Zhi; Zhao, De-Gang; Shen, Ya-Xi; Xu, Xiang-Yuan; Bao, Ming; Jia, Han; Zhu, Xue-Feng

    2016-01-01

    Time-reversal invariant topological insulator is widely recognized as one of the fundamental discoveries in condensed matter physics, for which the most fascinating hallmark is perhaps a spin-based topological protection, the absence of scattering of conduction electrons with certain spins on matter surface. Recently, it has created a paradigm shift for topological insulators, from electronics to photonics, phononics and mechanics as well, bringing about not only involved new physics but also potential applications in robust wave transport. Despite the growing interests in topologically protected acoustic wave transport, T-invariant acoustic topological insulator has not yet been achieved. Here we report experimental demonstration of anomalous Floquet topological insulator for sound: a strongly coupled metamaterial ring lattice that supports one-way propagation of pseudo-spin-dependent edge states under T-symmetry. We also demonstrate the formation of pseudo-spin-dependent interface states due to lattice dislocations and investigate the properties of pass band and band gap states. PMID:27834375

  19. Wedding ring shaped excitation coil

    DOEpatents

    MacLennan, Donald A.; Tsai, Peter

    2001-01-01

    A high frequency inductively coupled electrodeless lamp includes an excitation coil with an effective electrical length which is less than one half wavelength of a driving frequency applied thereto, preferably much less. The driving frequency may be greater than 100 MHz and is preferably as high as 915 MHz. Preferably, the excitation coil is configured as a non-helical, semi-cylindrical conductive surface having less than one turn, in the general shape of a wedding ring. At high frequencies, the current in the coil forms two loops which are spaced apart and parallel to each other. Configured appropriately, the coil approximates a Helmholtz configuration. The lamp preferably utilizes an bulb encased in a reflective ceramic cup with a pre-formed aperture defined therethrough. The ceramic cup may include structural features to aid in alignment and/or a flanged face to aid in thermal management. The lamp head is preferably an integrated lamp head comprising a metal matrix composite surrounding an insulating ceramic with the excitation integrally formed on the ceramic. A novel solid-state oscillator preferably provides RF power to the lamp. The oscillator is a single active element device capable of providing over 70 watts of power at over 70% efficiency.

  20. Superconductivity-related insulating behavior.

    PubMed

    Sambandamurthy, G; Engel, L W; Johansson, A; Shahar, D

    2004-03-12

    We present the results of an experimental study of superconducting, disordered, thin films of amorphous indium oxide. These films can be driven from the superconducting phase to a reentrant insulating state by the application of a perpendicular magnetic field (B). We find that the high-B insulator exhibits activated transport with a characteristic temperature, TI. TI has a maximum value (TpI) that is close to the superconducting transition temperature (Tc) at B=0, suggesting a possible relation between the conduction mechanisms in the superconducting and insulating phases. Tp(I) and Tc display opposite dependences on the disorder strength.

  1. Contactless Magnetic Slip Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kumagai, Hiroyuki (Inventor); Deardon, Joe D. (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A contactless magnetic slip ring is disclosed having a primary coil and a secondary coil. The primary and secondary coils are preferably magnetically coupled together, in a highly reliable efficient manner, by a magnetic layered core. One of the secondary and primary coils is rotatable and the contactless magnetic slip ring provides a substantially constant output.

  2. Illustration of Saturn's Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2001-01-01

    This illustration shows a close-up of Saturn's rings. These rings are thought to have formed from material that was unable to form into a Moon because of tidal forces from Saturn, or from a Moon that was broken up by Saturn's tidal forces.

  3. Birth Control Ring

    MedlinePlus

    ... It? The birth control ring is a soft, flexible, doughnut-shaped ring about 2 inches (5 centimeters) in diameter. It is inserted into the vagina, where it slowly releases hormones — the chemicals the body makes to control organ function — through the vaginal wall into the ...

  4. Steroidal contraceptive vaginal rings.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, N N

    2003-06-01

    The development of steroid-releasing vaginal rings over the past three decades is reviewed to illustrate the role of this device as an effective hormonal contraceptive for women. Vaginal rings are made of polysiloxane rubber or ethylene-vinyl-acetate copolymer with an outer diameter of 54-60 mm and a cross-sectional diameter of 4-9.5 mm and contain progestogen only or a combination of progestogen and oestrogen. The soft flexible combined ring is inserted in the vagina for three weeks and removed for seven days to allow withdrawal bleeding. Progesterone/progestogen-only rings are kept in for varying periods and replaced without a ring-free period. Rings are in various stages of research and development but a few, such as NuvaRing, have reached the market in some countries. Women find this method easy to use, effective, well tolerated and acceptable with no serious side-effects. Though the contraceptive efficacy of these vaginal rings is high, acceptability is yet to be established.

  5. Smoke Ring Physics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-11-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampère's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features.

  6. The Fermilab recycler ring

    SciTech Connect

    Martin Hu

    2001-07-24

    The Fermilab Recycler is a permanent magnet storage ring for the accumulation of antiprotons from the Antiproton Source, and the recovery and cooling of the antiprotons remaining at the end of a Tevatron store. It is an integral part of the Fermilab III luminosity upgrade. The following paper describes the design features, operational and commissioning status of the Recycler Ring.

  7. Smoke Ring Physics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huggins, Elisha

    2011-01-01

    The behavior of smoke rings, tornados, and quantized vortex rings in superfluid helium has many features in common. These features can be described by the same mathematics we use when introducing Ampere's law in an introductory physics course. We discuss these common features. (Contains 7 figures.)

  8. EBT ring physics

    SciTech Connect

    Uckan, N.A.

    1980-04-01

    This workshop attempted to evaluate the status of the current experimental and theoretical understanding of hot electron ring properties. The dominant physical processes that influence ring formation, scaling, and their optimal behavior are also studied. Separate abstracts were prepared for each of the 27 included papers. (MOW)

  9. Telemetry carrier ring and support

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wakeman, Thomas G. (Inventor)

    1992-01-01

    A telemetry carrier ring for use in a gas turbine engine includes an annular support ring connected to the engine and an annular carrier ring coupled to the support ring, each ring exhibiting different growth characteristics in response to thermal and mechanical loading. The carrier ring is coupled to the support ring by a plurality of circumferentially spaced web members which are relatively thin in an engine radial direction to provide a predetermined degree of radial flexibility. the web members have a circumferential width and straight axial line of action selected to transfer torque and thrust between the support ring and the carrier ring without substantial deflection. The use of the web members with radial flexibility provides compensation between the support ring and the carrier ring since the carrier ring grows at a different rate than the supporting ring.

  10. Jupiter's Gossamer Rings Explained.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamilton, D. P.

    2003-05-01

    Over the past several years, Galileo measurements and groundbased imaging have drastically improved our knowledge of Jupiter's faint ring system. We now recognize that the ring consists of four components: a main ring 7000km wide, whose inner edge blossoms into a vertically-extended halo, and a pair of more tenuous Gossamer rings, one associated with each of the small moons Thebe and Amalthea. When viewed edge on, the Gossamer rings appear as diaphanous disks whose thicknesses agree with the vertical excursions of the inclined satellites from the equatorial plane. In addition, the brightness of each Gossamer ring drops off sharply outside the satellite orbits. These correlations allowed Burns etal (1999, Science, 284, 1146) to argue convincingly that the satellites act as sources of the dusty ring material. In addition, since most material is seen inside the orbits of the source satellites, an inwardly-acting dissipative force such as Poynting-Robertson drag is implicated. The most serious problem with this simple and elegant picture is that it is unable to explain the existence of a faint swath of material that extends half a jovian radius outward from Thebe. A key constraint is that this material has the same thickness as the rest of the Thebe ring. In this work, we identify the mechanism responsible for the outward extension: it is a shadow resonance, first investigated by Horanyi and Burns (1991, JGR, 96, 19283). When a dust grain enters Jupiter's shadow, photoelectric processes shut down and the grain's electric charge becomes more negative. The electromagnetic forces associated with the varying charge cause periodic oscillations in the orbital eccentricity and semimajor axis as the orbital pericenter precesses. This results in a ring which spreads both inward and outward of its source satellite while preserving its vertical thickness - just as is observed for the Thebe ring. Predictions of the model are: i) gaps of micron-sized material interior to Thebe and

  11. Ring chromosome 4.

    PubMed Central

    McDermott, A; Voyce, M A; Romain, D

    1977-01-01

    A mentally and physically retarded boy with a 46,XY,ring (4) (p16q35) chromosome complement is described. Chromosome banding showed that the amount of chromosome material deleted from the ring chromosome 4 was minimal, apparently no more than the telomeres. Chromosomal aberrations appear to be restricted to the production of double-sized dicentric rings, and aneuploidy. The mosiacism resulting from the behavioural peculiarities of ring chromosomes is described as dynamic mosaicism. It is suggested that the clinical features associated with this ring chromosome are more likely to be the result of the effects of a diploid/monosomy 4/polysomy 4 mosaicism than to the deficiency of the telomeric regions of the chromosome. Images PMID:881718

  12. Jupiter's Rings: Sharpest View

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2007-01-01

    The New Horizons spacecraft took the best images of Jupiter's charcoal-black rings as it approached and then looked back at Jupiter. The top image was taken on approach, showing three well-defined lanes of gravel- to boulder-sized material composing the bulk of the rings, as well as lesser amounts of material between the rings. New Horizons snapped the lower image after it had passed Jupiter on February 28, 2007, and looked back in a direction toward the sun. The image is sharply focused, though it appears fuzzy due to the cloud of dust-sized particles enveloping the rings. The dust is brightly illuminated in the same way the dust on a dirty windshield lights up when you drive toward a 'low' sun. The narrow rings are confined in their orbits by small 'shepherding' moons.

  13. Metal-Insulator-Semiconductor Photodetectors

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Chu-Hsuan; Liu, Chee Wee

    2010-01-01

    The major radiation of the Sun can be roughly divided into three regions: ultraviolet, visible, and infrared light. Detection in these three regions is important to human beings. The metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetector, with a simpler process than the pn-junction photodetector and a lower dark current than the MSM photodetector, has been developed for light detection in these three regions. Ideal UV photodetectors with high UV-to-visible rejection ratio could be demonstrated with III–V metal-insulator-semiconductor UV photodetectors. The visible-light detection and near-infrared optical communications have been implemented with Si and Ge metal-insulator-semiconductor photodetectors. For mid- and long-wavelength infrared detection, metal-insulator-semiconductor SiGe/Si quantum dot infrared photodetectors have been developed, and the detection spectrum covers atmospheric transmission windows. PMID:22163382

  14. Light-weight ceramic insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2002-01-01

    Ultra-high temperature, light-weight, ceramic insulation such as ceramic tile is obtained by pyrolyzing a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of at least one organo dialkoxy silane and at least one tetralkoxy silane in an acid or base liquid medium. The reaction mixture of the tetra- and dialkoxy silanes may contain also an effective amount of a mono- or trialkoxy silane to obtain the siloxane gel. The siloxane gel is dried at ambient pressures to form a siloxane ceramic precursor without significant shrinkage. The siloxane ceramic precursor is subsequently pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the black ceramic insulation comprising atoms of silicon, carbon and oxygen. The ceramic insulation, can be characterized as a porous, uniform ceramic tile resistant to oxidation at temperatures ranging as high as 1700.degree. C. and is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft and other high-temperature insulation applications.

  15. Measure Guideline: Basement Insulation Basics

    SciTech Connect

    Aldrich, R.; Mantha, P.; Puttagunta, S.

    2012-10-01

    This guideline is intended to describe good practices for insulating basements in new and existing homes, and is intended to be a practical resources for building contractors, designers, and also to homeowners.

  16. Evaluation of thermal insulation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wilbers, O. J.; Conti, J. C.; Mcgee, J. V.; Mcpherson, J. I.

    1973-01-01

    Data was obtained on silicone-bonded fiberglass, isocyanurate foam, and two dozen other insulators. Materials were selected to withstand heat sterilization, outer space, and the Martian atmosphere. Significant environmental parameters were vibration, landing shock, and launch venting.

  17. Of Rings and Volcanoes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    2002-01-01

    Office National d'Etudes et de Recherches Aérospatiales (ONERA) , Laboratoire d'Astrophysique de Grenoble (LAOG) and the DESPA and DASGAL laboratories of the Observatoire de Paris in France, in collaboration with ESO. The CONICA infra-red camera was built, under an ESO contract, by the Max-Planck-Institut für Astronomie (MPIA) (Heidelberg) and the Max-Planck Institut für Extraterrestrische Physik (MPE) (Garching) in Germany, in collaboration with ESO. Saturn - Lord of the rings ESO PR Photo 04a/02 ESO PR Photo 04a/02 [Preview - JPEG: 460 x 400 pix - 54k] [Normal - JPEG: 1034 x 800 pix - 200k] Caption : PR Photo 04a/02 shows the giant planet Saturn, as observed with the VLT NAOS-CONICA Adaptive Optics instrument on December 8, 2001; the distance was 1209 million km. It is a composite of exposures in two near-infrared wavebands (H and K) and displays well the intricate, banded structure of the planetary atmosphere and the rings. Note also the dark spot at the south pole at the bottom of the image. One of the moons, Tethys, is visible as a small point of light below the planet. It was used to guide the telescope and to perform the adaptive optics "refocussing" for this observation. More details in the text. Technical information about this photo is available below. This NAOS/CONICA image of Saturn ( PR Photo 04a/02 ), the second-largest planet in the solar system, was obtained at a time when Saturn was close to summer solstice in the southern hemisphere. At this moment, the tilt of the rings was about as large as it can be, allowing the best possible view of the planet's South Pole. That area was on Saturn's night side in 1982 and could therefore not be photographed during the Voyager encounter. The dark spot close to the South Pole is a remarkable structure that measures approximately 300 km across. It was only recently observed in visible light from the ground with a telescope at the Pic du Midi Observatory in the Pyrenees (France) - this is the first infrared image to

  18. The Enceladus Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] The Enceladus Ring (labeled)

    This excellent view of the faint E ring -- a ring feature now known to be created by Enceladus -- also shows two of Saturn's small moons that orbit within the ring, among a field of stars in the background.

    The E ring extends from three to eight Saturn radii -- about 180,000 kilometers (118,000 miles) to 482,000 kilometers (300,000 miles). Its full extent is not visible in this view.

    Calypso (22 kilometers, or 14 miles across) and Helene (32 kilometers, or 20 miles across) orbit within the E ring's expanse. Helene skirts the outer parts of the E ring, but here it is projected in front of a region deeper within the ring.

    Calypso and Helene are trojan satellites, or moons that orbit 60 degrees in front or behind a larger moon. Calypso is a Tethys trojan and Helene is a trojan of Dione.

    An interesting feature of note in this image is the double-banded appearance of the E-ring, which is created because the ring is somewhat fainter in the ringplane than it is 500-1,000 kilometers (300-600 miles) above and below the ringplane. This appearance implies that the particles in this part of the ring have nonzero inclinations (a similar affect is seen in Jupiter's gossamer ring). An object with a nonzero inclination does not orbit exactly at Saturn's ringplane. Instead, its orbit takes it above and below the ringplane. Scientists are not entirely sure why the particles should have such inclinations, but they are fairly certain that the reason involves Enceladus.

    One possible explanation is that all the E ring particles come from the plume of icy material that is shooting due south out of the moon's pole. This means all of the particles are created with a certain velocity out of the ringplane, and then they orbit above and below that plane.

    Another possible explanation is that Enceladus produces particles with a range of speeds, but the moon gravitationally

  19. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOEpatents

    Forsyth, Eric B.; Muller, Albert C.

    1984-01-01

    A high voltage oil-impregnated electrical cable with fully polymer taped insulation operable to 765 kV. Biaxially oriented, specially processed, polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene tape with an embossed pattern is wound in multiple layers over a conductive core with a permeable screen around the insulation. Conventional oil which closely matches the dielectric constant of the tape is used, and the cable can be impregnated after field installation because of its excellent impregnation characteristics.

  20. Cryogenic foam insulation: Abstracted publications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williamson, F. R.

    1977-01-01

    A group of documents were chosen and abstracted which contain information on the properties of foam materials and on the use of foams as thermal insulation at cryogenic temperatures. The properties include thermal properties, mechanical properties, and compatibility properties with oxygen and other cryogenic fluids. Uses of foams include applications as thermal insulation for spacecraft propellant tanks, and for liquefied natural gas storage tanks and pipelines.

  1. Lung function in insulation workers.

    PubMed Central

    Clausen, J; Netterstrøm, B; Wolff, C

    1993-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of working with modern insulation materials (rock and glass wool), the members of the Copenhagen Union of Insulation Workers were invited to participate in a study based on a health examination that included lung function tests. Three hundred and forty men (74%) agreed to participate, and 166 bus drivers served as the control group. Age distribution, height, and smoking habits were similar in the two groups. Forced vital capacity (FVC) and forced expiratory volume in one second (FEV1) were used as tests for lung function. There were no differences in FVC between the study and control groups, but the insulation workers had significantly lower values of FEV1 (mean 2.51) compared with the controls (mean 3.4 1), independent of smoking habits. Six years before the present study, 114 of the insulation workers participated in a similar study, and eight years after the initial study, the lung function of 59 of the bus drivers was tested. The decline in FVC in insulation workers who smoked was significantly higher (7.7 cl/year) than in bus drivers who smoked (3.1 cl/year); the decline in FEV1 was significantly higher in insulation workers independent of smoking habits (17.0 cl/year v 2.9 cl/year). Self assessed former exposure to asbestos was not associated with lung function in insulation workers. The study concludes that working with modern insulation materials is associated with increased risk of developing obstructive lung disease. PMID:8457492

  2. Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, Paul A.; Malecha, Richard F.; Chilenskas, Albert A.

    1994-01-01

    A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communcation with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket.

  3. Multilayer high performance insulation materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stuckey, J. M.

    1971-01-01

    A number of tests are required to evaluate both multilayer high performance insulation samples and the materials that comprise them. Some of the techniques and tests being employed for these evaluations and some of the results obtained from thermal conductivity tests, outgassing studies, effect of pressure on layer density tests, hypervelocity impact tests, and a multilayer high performance insulation ambient storage program at the Kennedy Space Center are presented.

  4. MAS Bulletin. Microtherm Thermal Insulation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1989-03-03

    EUROPEAN OFFICE Box 39, FPO New York 0951P .0700 Phone (AV)235.ൕjLomm) 409-4131 MASB 16-89 11 1 E, March 1989 MICROTHERM THERMAL INSULAT 00T...Background. Microtherm insulation is being marketed by Figure 1 illustrates the relative differenbeibetween Microtherm Micropore Insulation, Ltd., of Wirral...tivity properties. Figure 2 displays thermal conductivity compari- facturer has introduced a new product - Microtherm MPS, a sons between Microtherm MPS

  5. Variable pressure thermal insulating jacket

    DOEpatents

    Nelson, P.A.; Malecha, R.F.; Chilenskas, A.A.

    1994-09-20

    A device for controlled insulation of a thermal device is disclosed. The device includes a thermal jacket with a closed volume able to be evacuated to form an insulating jacket around the thermal source. A getter material is in communication with the closed volume of the thermal jacket. The getter material can absorb and desorb a control gas to control gas pressure in the volume of the thermal jacket to control thermal conductivity in the thermal jacket. 10 figs.

  6. Magnetically insulated opening switch research

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McGeoch, M. W.; Kraft, R.

    1987-01-01

    We examine the feasibility of an opening switch concept based on magnetic insulation in a coaxial thermionic diode. It is found that the impedance ratio between closed and open states of the diode is marginal for efficient energy transfer via this type of switch. The open, or insulated state of the diode is characterized by current leakage across the magnetic field which is associated with the presence of plasma waves.

  7. Advances in cryogenic foam insulations.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lemons, C. R.; Salmassy, O. K.; Watts, C. R.

    1971-01-01

    Description of a discretely oriented thread-reinforced polyurethane foam thermal insulation system for liquid hydrogen fuel tanks. The 3-D foam and glass liner composite is designed to be adhesively bonded to the inside surface of the tank wall and to be in direct contact with liquid hydrogen. All elements of this insulation composite are capable of sustaining the loads and environmental conditions imposed by testing under simulated Space Shuttle vehicle requirements at temperatures between -423 and +350 F.

  8. Advanced silicon on insulator technology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Godbey, D.; Hughes, H.; Kub, F.

    1991-01-01

    Undoped, thin-layer silicon-on-insulator was fabricated using wafer bonding and selective etching techniques employing a molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) grown Si0.7Ge0.3 layer as an etch stop. Defect free, undoped 200-350 nm silicon layers over silicon dioxide are routinely fabricated using this procedure. A new selective silicon-germanium etch was developed that significantly improves the ease of fabrication of the bond and etch back silicon insulator (BESOI) material.

  9. Model Fractional Chern Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behrmann, Jörg; Liu, Zhao; Bergholtz, Emil J.

    2016-05-01

    We devise local lattice models whose ground states are model fractional Chern insulators—Abelian and non-Abelian topologically ordered states characterized by exact ground state degeneracies at any finite size and infinite entanglement gaps. Most saliently, we construct exact parent Hamiltonians for two distinct families of bosonic lattice generalizations of the Zk parafermion quantum Hall states: (i) color-entangled fractional Chern insulators at band filling fractions ν =k /(C +1 ) and (ii) nematic states at ν =k /2 , where C is the Chern number of the lowest band. In spite of a fluctuating Berry curvature, our construction is partially frustration free: the ground states reside entirely within the lowest band and exactly minimize a local (k +1 ) body repulsion term by term. In addition to providing the first known models hosting intriguing states such as higher Chern number generalizations of the Fibonacci anyon quantum Hall states, the remarkable stability and finite-size properties make our models particularly well suited for the study of novel phenomena involving, e.g., twist defects and proximity induced superconductivity, as well as being a guide for designing experiments.

  10. High Voltage Insulation Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scherb, V.; Rogalla, K.; Gollor, M.

    2008-09-01

    In preparation of new Electronic Power Conditioners (EPC's) for Travelling Wave Tub Amplifiers (TWTA's) on telecom satellites a study for the development of new high voltage insulation technology is performed. The initiative is mandatory to allow compact designs and to enable higher operating voltages. In a first task a market analysis was performed, comparing different materials with respect to their properties and processes. A hierarchy of selection criteria was established and finally five material candidates (4 Epoxy resins and 1 Polyurethane resin) were selected to be further investigated in the test program. Samples for the test program were designed to represent core elements of an EPC, the high voltage transformer and Printed Circuit Boards of the high voltage section. All five materials were assessed in the practical work flow of the potting process and electrical, mechanical, thermal and lifetime testing was performed. Although the lifetime tests results were overlayed by a larges scatter, finally two candidates have been identified for use in a subsequent qualification program. This activity forms part of element 5 of the ESA ARTES Programme.

  11. Method and means of directing an ion beam onto an insulating surface for ion implantation or sputtering

    DOEpatents

    Gruen, Dieter M.; Krauss, Alan R.; Siskind, Barry

    1981-01-01

    A beam of ions is directed under control onto an insulating surface by supplying simultaneously a stream of electrons directed at the same surface in a quantity sufficient to neutralize the overall electric charge of the ion beam and result in a net zero current flow to the insulating surface. The ion beam is adapted particularly both to the implantation of ions in a uniform areal disposition over the insulating surface and to the sputtering of atoms or molecules of the insulator onto a substrate.

  12. Keck Observations of Dusty Rings in our Solar System

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke

    2007-08-01

    All four giant planets are surrounded by ring systems, which typically consist of a combination of large and small bodies, as well as fine dust. With the 10-m W.M. Keck telescope on Mauna Kea (Hawaii) we have focused on observing the dusty rings of these planets. In this review I will summarize our data sets. I will focus on our most recent results with regard to Jupiter and Uranus, both observed during ring plane crossings. Jupiter's ring system was observed in December 2002 and January 2003 at 2.2 micron, where we used both the facility near-infrared camera NIRC with a pixel size of 0.151" (˜500 km at Jupiter), and the adaptive optics camera NIRC2, with a pixelsize of 0.04" and 0.01". The images were "onion-peeled" to provide radial scans of the rings. We will compare results of the main ring with Galileo data, and comment on similarities and differences with respect to the location of parent material in the ring. The radial structure of the gossamer rings is very different than expected based upon the Burns et al (1999) formation scenarios. The rings are not sheets of material, but narrow rings located just interior to the orbits of Amalthea and Thebe. The Amalthea ring shows a structure analagous to the main ring. Its inner boundary is near the location of synchronous orbit. Radial variations in the Thebe ring suggest "sculpting" by Lorentz resonances. We will present images of Uranus "hot of the press"; we are scheduled to observe in July and August when the rings are edge-on.

  13. Earth: A Ringed Planet?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hancock, L. O.; Povenmire, H.

    2010-12-01

    Among the most beautiful findings of the Space Age have been the discoveries of planetary rings. Not only Saturn but also Jupiter, Uranus and Neptune have rings; Saturn’s ring system has structures newly discovered; even Saturn's moon Rhea itself has a ring. All these are apparently supplied by material from the planetary moons (Rhea's ring by Rhea itself). The question naturally arises, why should the Earth not have a ring, and on the other hand, if it does, why has it not been observed? No rings have yet been observed in the inner solar system, but after all, rings in the inner solar system might simply tend to be fainter and more transient than those of the outer solar system: the inner solar system is more affected by the solar wind, and the Sun’s perturbing gravitational influence is greater. J.A. O’Keefe first suggested (1980) that Earth might have a ring system of its own. An Earth ring could account for some climate events. O’Keefe remarked that formation or thickening of a ring system in Earth’s equatorial plane could drive glaciation by deepening the chill of the winter hemisphere. (It is very well established that volcanic dust is an effective agent for the extinction of sunlight; this factor can be overwhelmingly apparent in eclipse observations.) O’Keefe died in 2000 and the speculation was not pursued, but the idea of an Earth ring has a prima facie reasonableness that calls for its renewed consideration. The program of this note is to hypothesize that, as O’Keefe proposed: (a) an Earth ring system exists; (b) it affects Earth's weather and climate; (c) the tektite strewn fields comprise filaments of the ring fallen to Earth's surface on various occasions of disturbance by comets or asteroids. On this basis, and drawing on the world's weather records, together with the Twentieth Century Reanalysis by NCEP/CIRES covering the period 1870-2010 and the geology of the tektite strewn fields, we herein propose the hypothesized Earth ring

  14. Seal ring installation tool

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Haselmaier, L. Haynes (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    A seal ring tool that allows an installer to position a primary seal ring between hub ends of pipe flanges that are being assembled together. The tool includes a pivoting handle member and extension arms attached to the pivoting handle member. The ends of the arms have side indentation type longitudinal grooves angled toward one another for holding the primary seal ring in place between the hubs of respective pipes that are to be attached together. The arms of the tool can also have flat sides that can be used to abut against an optional second larger seal that is supported within a groove in one of the hub ends so that the second hub end can then be moved against the other side of the primary seal ring. Once the seal ring is positioned between the pipe hubs, the pipe hubs can be moved about the seal ring due to the flat sides of the arms of the tool. The tool eliminates the chances of damaging and contaminating seal rings being installed within pipe hubs that are being attached to one another.

  15. Electrical control of spin in topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chang, Kai

    2012-02-01

    by changing the gate voltage. It provides us a new way to control surface magnetism electrically. The gap opened by doped magnetic ions can lead to a short-range Bloembergen-Rowland interaction. The competition among the Heisenberg, Ising, and DM terms leads to rich spin configurations and an anomalous Hall effect on different lattices [4]. There are many proposals for quantum computation scheme are based on the spin in semiconductor quantum dots. Topological insulator quantum dots display a very different behavior with that of conventional semiconductor quantum dots [5]. In sharp contrast to conventional semiconductor quantum dots, the quantum states in the gap of the HgTe QD are fully spin-polarized and show ring-like density distributions near the boundary of the QD and optically dark. The persistent charge currents and magnetic moments, i.e., the Aharonov-Bohm effect, can be observed in such a QD structure. This feature offers us a practical way to detect these exotic ring-like edge states by using the SQUID technique. [0pt]Refs: [1] W. Yang, Kai Chang, and S. C. Zhang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 056602 (2008); J. Li and Kai Chang, Appl. Phys. Lett. 95, 222110 (2009). [2] L. B. Zhang, Kai Chang, X. C. Xie, H. Buhmann and L. W. Molenkamp, New J. Phys. 12, 083058 (2010). [3] L. B. Zhang, F. Cheng, F. Zhai and Kai Chang, Phys. Rev. B 83 081402(R) (2011); Z. H. Wu, F. Zhai, F. M. Peeters, H. Q. Xu and Kai Chang, Phys, Rev. Lett. 106, 176802 (2011). [4] J. J. Zhu, D. X. Yao, S. C. Zhang, and Kai Chang, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 097201 (2011). [5] Kai Chang, and Wen-Kai Lou, Phys. Rev. Lett. 106, 206802 (2011).

  16. Investigation of high-performance insulation application problems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fredrickson, G. O.

    1973-01-01

    The design, fabrication, and performance of a practical, flightworthy, multilayer insulation (MLI) system for a Modular Nuclear Vehicle (MNV) LH2 propellant tank is presented. An MLI system is now available. It may be applied to the MNV or any other space vehicle requiring MLI for thermal control. This design concept was adapted for an MLI installation that covered and was successfully flown on the Skylab forward dome.

  17. Dynamics of the Uranian Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dermott, S. F.

    1984-01-01

    Some of the problems of the shepherding satellite model of Goldreich ant tremaine are discussed. The following topics are studied: (1) optical depths of the all the observed narrow rings; (2) satellite and ring separation timescales; (3) ring edge sharpness; (4) shock formation in narrow rings; (5) the existence of small satellites near the Uranian rings; and (6) the apse and node alignments of the eccentric and inclined rings.

  18. Heavy ion storage rings

    SciTech Connect

    Schuch, R.

    1987-01-01

    A brief overview of synchrotron storage rings for heavy ions, which are presently under construction in different accelerator laboratories is given. Ions ranging from protons up to uranium ions at MeV/nucleon energies will be injected into these rings using multiturn injection from the accelerators available or being built in these laboratories. After injection, it is planned to cool the phase space distribution of the ions by merging them with cold electron beams or laser beams, or by using stochastic cooling. Some atomic physics experiments planned for these rings are presented.

  19. Alternative parallel ring protocols

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mukkamala, R.; Foudriat, E. C.; Maly, Kurt J.; Kale, V.

    1990-01-01

    Communication protocols are know to influence the utilization and performance of communication network. The effect of two token ring protocols on a gigabit network with multiple ring structure is investigated. In the first protocol, a mode sends at most one message on receiving a token. In the second protocol, a mode sends all the waiting messages when a token is received. The behavior of these protocols is shown to be highly dependent on the number of rings as well as the load in the network.

  20. Supernumerary small ring chromosome.

    PubMed Central

    Kaffe, S; Kim, H J; Hsu, L Y; Brill, C B; Hirschhorn, K

    1977-01-01

    A supernumerary small ring chromosome was found in 30% of cultured peripheral leucocytes and 50% of skin fibroblasts in a 6-year-old boy with mild mental retardation and midline cleft palate. The extra chromosome appeared to carry a densely staining region on Giemsa banding. The banding patterns of the remaining 46 chromosomes were normal. C banding indicated that the ring chromosome contained mainly centromeric constitutive heterochromatin. Chromosome analysis of both parents showed normal karyotypes by both conventional and banding techniques; thus the origin of the ring chromosome could not be determined. Images PMID:604496

  1. Theodolite Ring Lights

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Clark, David

    2006-01-01

    Theodolite ring lights have been invented to ease a difficulty encountered in the well-established optical-metrology practice of using highly reflective spherical tooling balls as position references. A theodolite ring light produces a more easily visible reflection and eliminates the need for an autocollimating device. A theodolite ring light is a very bright light source that is well centered on the optical axis of the instrument. It can be fabricated, easily and inexpensively, for use on a theodolite or telescope of any diameter.

  2. Drapery assembly including insulated drapery liner

    DOEpatents

    Cukierski, Gwendolyn

    1983-01-01

    A drapery assembly is disclosed for covering a framed wall opening, the assembly including drapery panels hung on a horizontal traverse rod, the rod having a pair of master slides and means for displacing the master slides between open and closed positions. A pair of insulating liner panels are positioned behind the drapery, the remote side edges of the liner panels being connected with the side portions of the opening frame, and the adjacent side edges of the liner panels being connected with a pair of vertically arranged center support members adapted for sliding movement longitudinally of a horizontal track member secured to the upper horizontal portion of the opening frame. Pivotally arranged brackets connect the center support members with the master slides of the traverse rod whereby movement of the master slides to effect opening and closing of the drapery panels effects simultaneous opening and closing of the liner panels.

  3. Pressure Dependence of Insulator-Insulator Contact Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael D.

    2005-01-01

    The mechanism of insulator-insulator triboelectric (contact) charging is being studied by the Electrostatics and Surface Physics Laboratory at KSC. The hypothesis that surface ion exchange is the primary mechanism is being tested experimentally. A two-phase model based on a small partial pressure of singly charged ions in an ambient ideal gas in equilibrium with a submonolayer adsorbed film will provide predictions about charging as a function Of ion mass, pressure, temperature, and surface adsorption energy. Interactions between ions will be considered in terms of coulombic and screened potential energies. This work is yielding better understanding of the triboelectrification of insulators, which is an important problem in. space exploration technology. The work is also relevant to important industrial processes such as xerography and the application of paints and coatings. Determining a better understanding of the fundamental mechanism of insulator-insulator triboelectrification will hopefully lead to better means of eliminating or at least mitigating its hazards and enhancing its useful applications.

  4. Saturn's dynamic D ring

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hedman, M.M.; Burns, J.A.; Showalter, M.R.; Porco, C.C.; Nicholson, P.D.; Bosh, A.S.; Tiscareno, M.S.; Brown, R.H.; Buratti, B.J.; Baines, K.H.; Clark, R.

    2007-01-01

    The Cassini spacecraft has provided the first clear images of the D ring since the Voyager missions. These observations show that the structure of the D ring has undergone significant changes over the last 25 years. The brightest of the three ringlets seen in the Voyager images (named D72), has transformed from a narrow, <40-km wide ringlet to a much broader and more diffuse 250-km wide feature. In addition, its center of light has shifted inwards by over 200 km relative to other features in the D ring. Cassini also finds that the locations of other narrow features in the D ring and the structure of the diffuse material in the D ring differ from those measured by Voyager. Furthermore, Cassini has detected additional ringlets and structures in the D ring that were not observed by Voyager. These include a sheet of material just interior to the inner edge of the C ring that is only observable at phase angles below about 60??. New photometric and spectroscopic data from the ISS (Imaging Science Subsystem) and VIMS (Visual and Infrared Mapping Spectrometer) instruments onboard Cassini show the D ring contains a variety of different particle populations with typical particle sizes ranging from 1 to 100 microns. High-resolution images reveal fine-scale structures in the D ring that appear to be variable in time and/or longitude. Particularly interesting is a remarkably regular, periodic structure with a wavelength of ??? 30 ?? km extending between orbital radii of 73,200 and 74,000 km. A similar structure was previously observed in 1995 during the occultation of the star GSC5249-01240, at which time it had a wavelength of ??? 60 ?? km. We interpret this structure as a periodic vertical corrugation in the D ring produced by differential nodal regression of an initially inclined ring. We speculate that this structure may have formed in response to an impact with a comet or meteoroid in early 1984. ?? 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Ultrasonic Newton's rings

    SciTech Connect

    Hsu, D.K. ); Dayal, V. )

    1992-03-09

    Interference fringes due to bondline thickness variation were observed in ultrasonic scans of the reflected echo amplitude from the bondline of adhesively joined aluminum skins. To demonstrate that full-field interference patterns are observable in point-by-point ultrasonic scans, an optical setup for Newton's rings was scanned ultrasonically in a water immersion tank. The ultrasonic scan showed distinct Newton's rings whose radii were in excellent agreement with the prediction.

  6. Flashover tests of artificially iced insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Charneski, M.D.; Gaibrois, G.L.; Whitney, B.F.

    1982-08-01

    Test apparatus and procedures were developed to test energized, non-contaminated, 120 kV system insulators under simulated freezing rain conditions. The flashover performances were compared between non-ceramic composite transmission line insulators and standard porcelain 5 3/4 x 10 inch suspension insulators. Standard and long leak Multicone porcelain insulators were also compared in the icing tests to standard porcelain station post insulators. Icing tests at several voltage stresses provided the full flashover range of the insulators from the minimum or zero flashovers in ten trials up to the maximum or 10 flashovers in 10 trials. Using the desired insulator voltage stress flashover curve for specific insulator types and the voltage stress applied to the insulator, the comparative probability of flashover due to ice storms on the system can be evaluated for 120 kV, 230 kV and 345 kV systems.

  7. Bending the Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    Saturn's rings appear strangely warped in this view of the rings seen through the upper Saturn atmosphere.

    The atmosphere acts like a lens in refracting (bending) the light reflected from the rings. As the rings pass behind the overexposed limb (edge) of Saturn as seen from Cassini, the ring structure appears to curve downward due to the bending of the light as it passes through the upper atmosphere.

    This image was obtained using a near-infrared filter. The filter samples a wavelength where methane gas does not absorb light, thus making the far-off rings visible through the upper atmosphere.

    By comparing this image to similar ones taken using filters where methane gas does absorb, scientists can estimate the vertical profile of haze and the abundance of methane in Saturn's high atmosphere.

    The image was taken in visible light with the Cassini spacecraft narrow-angle camera on April 14, 2005, through a filter sensitive to wavelengths of infrared light centered at 938 nanometers and at a distance of approximately 197,000 kilometers (123,000 miles) from Saturn. The image scale is 820 meters (2,680 feet) per pixel.

  8. Insulating phases of vanadium dioxide are Mott-Hubbard insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huffman, T. J.; Hendriks, C.; Walter, E. J.; Yoon, Joonseok; Ju, Honglyoul; Smith, R.; Carr, G. L.; Krakauer, H.; Qazilbash, M. M.

    2017-02-01

    We present comprehensive broadband optical spectroscopy data on two insulating phases of vanadium dioxide (V O2 ): monoclinic M2 and triclinic. The main result of our work is that the energy gap and the electronic structure are essentially unaltered by the first-order structural phase transition between the M2 and triclinic phases. Moreover, the optical interband features in the M2 and triclinic phases are remarkably similar to those observed in the well-studied monoclinic M1 insulating phase of V O2 . As the energy gap is insensitive to the different lattice structures of the three insulating phases, we rule out vanadium-vanadium pairing (the Peierls component) as the dominant contributor to the opening of the gap. Rather, the energy gap arises primarily from intra-atomic Coulomb correlations.

  9. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2014-04-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings [5, 8]. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~ 100m in size) have been identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images [10, 7, 9, 11]. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring [6, 2]. In this paper we present our new results about by now classical A ring propellers and more enigmatic B ring population. Due to the presence of self-gravity wakes the analysis of propeller brightness in ISS images always bears some ambiguity [7, 9] and consequently the exact morphology of propellers is not a settled issue. In 2008 we obtained a fortunate Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) occultation of the largest A ring propeller Bleriot. Utilizing Cassini ISS images we obtain Bleriot orbit and demonstrate that UVIS Persei Rev42 occultation did cut across Bleriot about 100km downstream from the center. The occultation itself shows a prominent partial gap and higher density outer flanking wakes, while their orientation is consistent with a downstream cut. While in the UVIS occultation the partial gap is more prominent than the flanking wakes, the features mostly seen in Bleriot images are actually flanking wakes. One of the most interesting aspects of the A ring propellers are their wanderings, or longitudinal deviations from a pure circular orbit [11]. We numerically investigated the possibility of simple moon

  10. Positron Annihilation in Insulating Materials

    SciTech Connect

    Asoka-Kumar, P; Sterne, PA

    2002-10-18

    We describe positron results from a wide range of insulating materials. We have completed positron experiments on a range of zeolite-y samples, KDP crystals, alkali halides and laser damaged SiO{sub 2}. Present theoretical understanding of positron behavior in insulators is incomplete and our combined theoretical and experimental approach is aimed at developing a predictive understanding of positrons and positronium annihilation characteristics in insulators. Results from alkali halides and alkaline-earth halides show that positrons annihilate with only the halide ions, with no apparent contribution from the alkali or alkaline-earth cations. This contradicts the results of our existing theory for metals, which predicts roughly equal annihilation contributions from cation and anion. We also present result obtained using Munich positron microprobe on laser damaged SiO{sub 2} samples.

  11. Thermal shock resistance ceramic insulator

    DOEpatents

    Morgan, Chester S.; Johnson, William R.

    1980-01-01

    Thermal shock resistant cermet insulators containing 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase. The insulators are prepared by a process comprising the steps of (a) providing a first solid phase mixture of a ceramic powder and a metal precursor; (b) heating the first solid phase mixture above the minimum decomposition temperature of the metal precursor for no longer than 30 minutes and to a temperature sufficiently above the decomposition temperature to cause the selective decomposition of the metal precursor to the metal to provide a second solid phase mixture comprising particles of ceramic having discrete metal particles adhering to their surfaces, said metal particles having a mean diameter no more than 1/2 the mean diameter of the ceramic particles, and (c) densifying the second solid phase mixture to provide a cermet insulator having 0.1-20 volume % metal present as a dispersed phase.

  12. Floquet topological insulators for sound

    PubMed Central

    Fleury, Romain; Khanikaev, Alexander B; Alù, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    The unique conduction properties of condensed matter systems with topological order have recently inspired a quest for the similar effects in classical wave phenomena. Acoustic topological insulators, in particular, hold the promise to revolutionize our ability to control sound, allowing for large isolation in the bulk and broadband one-way transport along their edges, with topological immunity against structural defects and disorder. So far, these fascinating properties have been obtained relying on moving media, which may introduce noise and absorption losses, hindering the practical potential of topological acoustics. Here we overcome these limitations by modulating in time the acoustic properties of a lattice of resonators, introducing the concept of acoustic Floquet topological insulators. We show that acoustic waves provide a fertile ground to apply the anomalous physics of Floquet topological insulators, and demonstrate their relevance for a wide range of acoustic applications, including broadband acoustic isolation and topologically protected, nonreciprocal acoustic emitters. PMID:27312175

  13. Process for making ceramic insulation

    DOEpatents

    Akash, Akash; Balakrishnan, G. Nair

    2009-12-08

    A method is provided for producing insulation materials and insulation for high temperature applications using novel castable and powder-based ceramics. The ceramic components produced using the proposed process offers (i) a fine porosity (from nano-to micro scale); (ii) a superior strength-to-weight ratio; and (iii) flexibility in designing multilayered features offering multifunctionality which will increase the service lifetime of insulation and refractory components used in the solid oxide fuel cell, direct carbon fuel cell, furnace, metal melting, glass, chemical, paper/pulp, automobile, industrial heating, coal, and power generation industries. Further, the ceramic components made using this method may have net-shape and/or net-size advantages with minimum post machining requirements.

  14. Floquet topological insulators for sound

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fleury, Romain; Khanikaev, Alexander B.; Alù, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    The unique conduction properties of condensed matter systems with topological order have recently inspired a quest for the similar effects in classical wave phenomena. Acoustic topological insulators, in particular, hold the promise to revolutionize our ability to control sound, allowing for large isolation in the bulk and broadband one-way transport along their edges, with topological immunity against structural defects and disorder. So far, these fascinating properties have been obtained relying on moving media, which may introduce noise and absorption losses, hindering the practical potential of topological acoustics. Here we overcome these limitations by modulating in time the acoustic properties of a lattice of resonators, introducing the concept of acoustic Floquet topological insulators. We show that acoustic waves provide a fertile ground to apply the anomalous physics of Floquet topological insulators, and demonstrate their relevance for a wide range of acoustic applications, including broadband acoustic isolation and topologically protected, nonreciprocal acoustic emitters.

  15. Railgun experiments with Lexan insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Witherspoon, F. Douglas; Burton, Rodney L.; Goldstein, Shyke A.

    1989-06-01

    A series of railgun experiments has been performed using Lexan insulators in both round and square bores, and with closed-breech and open-breech/injected configurations. Measured armature lengths have been roughly constant at 5-10 cm in a 1-cm bore for all Lexan insulator shots, indicating that the ablated Lexan is not swept up. Projectiles have been observed to reach peak velocity of 5.65 km/s with clean armature structures; i.e., no separated secondary arc or restrike. However, in most cases a secondary arc does occur with Lexan and limits the achievable velocity. Occasionally, stationary secondary arcs have also been observed for a particularly leaky gun assembly. The effect of insulator ablation on performance is discussed, indicating that Lexan may be useful at up to 8-10 km/s for well-sealed railguns.

  16. Magnetic inhibition of insulator flashover

    SciTech Connect

    VanDevender, J.P.; McDaniel, D.H.; Neau, E.L.; Mattis, R.E.; Bergeron, K.D.

    1982-06-01

    Electrical breakdown across a vacuum/plastic interface in the presence of applied or self-generated magnetic fields, B< or =3.5 T, was investigated. The E x B drift of charged particles near the interface in these experiments was away from the insulator surface. The self-magnetic field effects on a plastic vacuum insulator flashover were examined with inductive loads, particle beam loads, and imploding plasma loads. Average breakdown electric fields of up to 38 MV/m were observed. Power densities of 100 TW/m/sup 2/ were passed through acrylic-vacuum interfaces. The flashover electric fields were improved over the B = 0 fields from previous experiments by factors of 7.1, 5.0, and 1.8 for the -45/sup 0/, 0/sup 0/, and +45/sup 0/ insulators, respectively.

  17. Multi-stage FE simulation of hot ring rolling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Geijselaers, H. J. M.; van den Boogaard, A. H.

    2013-05-01

    As a unique and important member of the metal forming family, ring rolling provides a cost effective process route to manufacture seamless rings. Applications of ring rolling cover a wide range of products in aerospace, automotive and civil engineering industries [1]. Above the recrystallization temperature of the material, hot ring rolling begins with the upsetting of the billet cut from raw stock. Next a punch pierces the hot upset billet to form a hole through the billet. This billet, referred to as preform, is then rolled by the ring rolling mill. For an accurate simulation of hot ring rolling, it is crucial to include the deformations, stresses and strains from the upsetting and piercing process as initial conditions for the rolling stage. In this work, multi-stage FE simulations of hot ring rolling process were performed by mapping the local deformation state of the workpiece from one step to the next one. The simulations of upsetting and piercing stages were carried out by 2D axisymmetric models using adaptive remeshing and element erosion. The workpiece for the ring rolling stage was subsequently obtained after performing a 2D to 3D mapping. The commercial FE package LS-DYNA was used for the study and user defined subroutines were implemented to complete the control algorithm. The simulation results were analyzed and also compared with those from the single-stage FE model of hot ring rolling.

  18. Ring correlations in random networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sadjadi, Mahdi; Thorpe, M. F.

    2016-12-01

    We examine the correlations between rings in random network glasses in two dimensions as a function of their separation. Initially, we use the topological separation (measured by the number of intervening rings), but this leads to pseudo-long-range correlations due to a lack of topological charge neutrality in the shells surrounding a central ring. This effect is associated with the noncircular nature of the shells. It is, therefore, necessary to use the geometrical distance between ring centers. Hence we find a generalization of the Aboav-Weaire law out to larger distances, with the correlations between rings decaying away when two rings are more than about three rings apart.

  19. Low-power microelectromechanically tunable silicon photonic ring resonator add-drop filter.

    PubMed

    Errando-Herranz, Carlos; Niklaus, Frank; Stemme, Göran; Gylfason, Kristinn B

    2015-08-01

    We experimentally demonstrate a microelectromechanically (MEMS) tunable photonic ring resonator add-drop filter, fabricated in a simple silicon-on-insulator (SOI) based process. The device uses electrostatic parallel plate actuation to perturb the evanescent field of a silicon waveguide, and achieves a 530 pm resonance wavelength tuning, i.e., more than a fourfold improvement compared to previous MEMS tunable ring resonator add-drop filters. Moreover, our device has a static power consumption below 100 nW, and a tuning rate of -62  pm/V, i.e., the highest reported rate for electrostatic tuning of ring resonator add-drop filters.

  20. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Amiri, Farhang

    2016-02-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant differences from the AC case. In particular, the ring does not fly off the core but rises a short distance and then falls back. If the ring jumps high enough, the rising and the falling motion of the ring does not follow simple vertical motion of a projectile. This indicates that there are additional forces on the ring in each part of its motion. Four possible stages of the motion of the ring with DC are identified, which result from the ring current changing directions during the jump in response to a changing magnetic flux through the moving ring.

  1. Propellers in Saturn's rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sremcevic, M.; Stewart, G. R.; Albers, N.; Esposito, L. W.

    2013-12-01

    Theoretical studies and simulations have demonstrated the effects caused by objects embedded in planetary rings. Even if the objects are too small to be directly observed, each creates a much larger gravitational imprint on the surrounding ring material. These strongly depend on the mass of the object and range from "S" like propeller-shaped structures for about 100m-sized icy bodies to the opening of circumferential gaps as in the case of the embedded moons Pan and Daphnis and their corresponding Encke and Keeler Gaps. Since the beginning of the Cassini mission many of these smaller objects (~<500m in size) have been indirectly identified in Saturn's A ring through their propeller signature in the images. Furthermore, recent Cassini observations indicate the possible existence of objects embedded even in Saturn's B and C ring. In this paper we present evidence for the existence of propellers in Saturn's B ring by combining data from Cassini Ultraviolet Imaging Spectrograph (UVIS) and Imaging Science Subsystem (ISS) experiments. We show evidence that B ring seems to harbor two distinct populations of propellers: "big" propellers covering tens of degrees in azimuth situated in the densest part of B ring, and "small" propellers in less dense inner B ring that are similar in size and shape to known A ring propellers. The population of "big" propellers is exemplified with a single object which is observed for 5 years of Cassini data. The object is seen as a very elongated bright stripe (40 degrees wide) in unlit Cassini images, and dark stripe in lit geometries. In total we report observing the feature in images at 18 different epochs between 2005 and 2010. In UVIS occultations we observe this feature as an optical depth depletion in 14 out of 93 occultation cuts at corrotating longitudes compatible with imaging data. Combining the available Cassini data we infer that the object is a partial gap located at r=112,921km embedded in the high optical depth region of the B

  2. Aerogels Insulate Against Extreme Temperatures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2010-01-01

    In 1992, NASA started to pursue the development of aerogel for cryogenic insulation. Kennedy Space Center awarded Small Business Innovation Research (SBIR) contracts to Aspen Systems Inc., of Marlborough, Massachusetts, that resulted in a new manufacturing process and a new flexible, durable, easy-to-use form of aerogel. Aspen Systems formed Aspen Aerogels Inc., in Northborough, Massachusetts, to market the product, and by 2009, the company had become the leading provider of aerogel in the United States, producing nearly 20 million square feet per year. With an array of commercial applications, the NASA-derived aerogel has most recently been applied to protect and insulate people s hands and feet.

  3. High temperature insulation barrier composite

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Onstott, Joseph W. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    A composite material suitable for providing insulation for the nozzle structure of the Space Shuttle and other similar surfaces is disclosed. The composite layer is comprised of an outer skin layer of nickel chromium and an interleaved inner region comprising a top layer of nickel chromium foil which acts as a primary convective shield. There are at least two layers of alumina batting adjacent to the layers of silicon carbide fabric. An additional layer of nickel chromium foil is used as a secondary convective shield. The composite is particularly advantageous for use as nozzle insulation because of its ability to withstand high reentry temperatures, its flexibility, oxidation resistance, low conductivity, and light weight.

  4. Inversion-symmetric topological insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hughes, Taylor L.; Prodan, Emil; Bernevig, B. Andrei

    2011-06-01

    We analyze translationally invariant insulators with inversion symmetry that fall outside the current established classification of topological insulators. These insulators exhibit no edge or surface modes in the energy spectrum and hence they are not edge metals when the Fermi level is in the bulk gap. However, they do exhibit protected modes in the entanglement spectrum localized on the cut between two entangled regions. Their entanglement entropy cannot be made to vanish adiabatically, and hence the insulators can be called topological. There is a direct connection between the inversion eigenvalues of the Hamiltonian band structure and the midgap states in the entanglement spectrum. The classification of protected entanglement levels is given by an integer N, which is the difference between the negative inversion eigenvalues at inversion symmetric points in the Brillouin zone, taken in sets of 2. When the Hamiltonian describes a Chern insulator or a nontrivial time-reversal invariant topological insulator, the entirety of the entanglement spectrum exhibits spectral flow. If the Chern number is zero for the former, or time reversal is broken in the latter, the entanglement spectrum does not have spectral flow, but, depending on the inversion eigenvalues, can still exhibit protected midgap bands similar to impurity bands in normal semiconductors. Although spectral flow is broken (implying the absence of real edge or surface modes in the original Hamiltonian), the midgap entanglement bands cannot be adiabatically removed, and the insulator is “topological.” We analyze the linear response of these insulators and provide proofs and examples of when the inversion eigenvalues determine a nontrivial charge polarization, a quantum Hall effect, an anisotropic three-dimensional (3D) quantum Hall effect, or a magnetoelectric polarization. In one dimension, we establish a link between the product of the inversion eigenvalues of all occupied bands at all inversion

  5. Piston Ring Pressure Distribution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kuhn, M.

    1943-01-01

    The discovery and introduction of the internal combustion engine has resulted in a very rapid development in machines utilizing the action of a piston. Design has been limited by the internal components of the engine, which has been subjected to ever increasing thermal and mechanical stresses, Of these internal engine components, the piston and piston rings are of particular importance and the momentary position of engine development is not seldom dependent upon the development of both of the components, The piston ring is a well-known component and has been used in its present shape in the steam engine of the last century, Corresponding to its importance, the piston ring has been a rich field for creative activity and it is noteworthy that in spite of this the ring has maintained its shape through the many years. From the many and complicated designs which have been suggested as a packing between piston and cylinder wall hardly one suggestion has remained which does not resemble the original design of cast iron rectangular ring.

  6. Stacked Corrugated Horn Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sosnowski, John B.

    2010-01-01

    This Brief describes a method of machining and assembly when the depth of corrugations far exceeds the width and conventional machining is not practical. The horn is divided into easily machined, individual rings with shoulders to control the depth. In this specific instance, each of the corrugations is identical in profile, and only differs in diameter and outer profile. The horn is segmented into rings that are cut with an interference fit (zero clearance with all machining errors biased toward contact). The interference faces can be cut with a reverse taper to increase the holding strength of the joint. The taper is a compromise between the interference fit and the clearance of the two faces during assembly. Each internal ring is dipped in liquid nitrogen, then nested in the previous, larger ring. The ring is rotated in the nest until the temperature of the two parts equalizes and the pieces lock together. The resulting assay is stable, strong, and has an internal finish that cannot be achieved through other methods.

  7. Partial Model of Insulator/Insulator Contact Charging

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hogue, Michael; Calle, C. I.; Buhler, C. R.; Mucciolo, E. R.

    2005-01-01

    Two papers present a two-phase equilibrium model that partly explains insulator/ insulator contact charging. In this model, a vapor of ions within a gas is in equilibrium with a submonolayer of ions of the same species that have been adsorbed on the surface of an insulator. The surface is modeled as having localized states, each with a certain energy of adsorption for an ion. In an earlier version of the model described in the first paper, the ions do not interact with each other. Using the grand canonical ensemble, the chemical potentials of both vapor and absorbed phases are derived and equated to determine the vapor pressure. If a charge is assigned to the vapor particles (in particular, if single ionization is assumed), then the surface charge density associated with adsorbed ions can be calculated as a function of pressure. In a later version of the model presented in the second paper, the submodel of the vapor phase is extended to include electrostatic interactions between vapor ions and adsorbed ones as well as the screening effect, at a given distance from the surface, of ions closer to the surface. Theoretical values of this model closely match preliminary experimental data on the discharge of insulators as a function of pressure.

  8. Experimental Realizations of Magnetic Topological Insulator and Topological Crystalline Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Suyang

    2013-03-01

    Over the past few years the experimental research on three-dimensional topological insulators have emerged as one of the most rapidly developing fields in condensed matter physics. In this talk, we report on two new developments in the field: The first part is on the dynamic interplay between ferromagnetism and the Z2 topological insulator state (leading to a magnetic topological insulator). We present our spin-resolved photoemission and magnetic dichroic experiments on MBE grown films where a hedgehog-like spin texture is revealed on the magnetically ordered surface of Mn-Bi2Se3 revealing a Berry's phase gradient in energy-momentum space of the crystal. A chemically/electrically tunable Berry's phase switch is further demonstrated via the tuning of the spin groundstate in Mn-Bi2Se3 revealed in our data (Nature Physics 8, 616 (2012)). The second part of this talk describes our experimental observation of a new topological phase of matter, namely a topological crystalline insulator where space group symmetries replace the role of time-reversal symmetry in an otherwise Z2 topological insulator predicted in theory. We experimentally investigate the possibility of a mirror symmetry protected topological phase transition in the Pb1-xSnxTe alloy system, which has long been known to contain an even number of band inversions based on band theory. Our experimental results show that at a composition below the theoretically predicted band inversion, the system is fully gapped, whereas in the band-inverted regime, the surface exhibits even number of spin-polarized Dirac cone states revealing mirror-protected topological order (Nature Communications 3, 1192 (2012)) distinct from that observed in Z2 topological insulators. We discuss future experimental possibilities opened up by these new developments in topological insulators research. This work is in collaboration with M. Neupane, C. Liu, N. Alidoust, I. Belopolski, D. Qian, D.M. Zhang, A. Richardella, A. Marcinkova, Q

  9. Rings in the solar system

    SciTech Connect

    Pollack, J.B.; Cuzzi, J.N.

    1981-11-01

    Saturn, Jupiter, and Uranus have rings with different structure and composition. The rings consist of tiny masses in independent orbits. Photographs and data obtained by the Voyager project have aided in the understanding of Saturn's rings. Spokes have been found in B ring and boards, knots, and twist in F ring. Particles on the order of a micrometer in size are believed to occur in F, B, and A rings. The dominant component is water ice. The rings of Uranus are narrow and separated by broad empty regions. The technique used to study them has been stellar occulation. Nothing is known of particle size. The dominant component is believed to be silicates rich in compounds that absorb sunlight. Jupiter's rings consist of 3 main parts: a bright ring, a diffuse disk, and a halo. Use of Pioneer 10 data and other techniques have indicated particle sizes on the order of several micrometers and some at least a centimeter in diameter. The architecture of the ring system results from the interplay of a number of forces. These include gravitational forces due to moons outside the rings and moonlets embedded in them, electromagnetic forces due to the planet's rotating magnetic field, and even the gentle forces exerted by the dilute gaseous medium in which the rings rotate. Each of these forces is discussed. Several alternative explanations of how the rings arose are considered. The primary difference in these hypotheses is the account of the relationship between the ring particles of today and the primordial ring material. (SC)

  10. Fiber Reinforced Composites for Insulation and Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Broughton, Roy M., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    The work involves two areas: Composites, optimum fiber placement with initial construction of a pressure vessel, and the general subject of insulation, a continual concern in harsh thermal environments. Insulation

  11. Insulation board and process of making

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, Jeffert J.; Owens, William J.

    1985-01-01

    Insulation board capable of bearing a load without significant loss of insulating capacity due to compression, produced by a method wherein the board is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure.

  12. New insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Slenski, George

    1994-01-01

    Outlined in this presentation is the background to insulation constructions for aerospace wiring applications, the Air Force wiring policy, the purpose and contract requirements of new insulation constructions, the test plan, and the test results.

  13. Physics of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorkavyi, N.

    2007-08-01

    It is difficult to enumerate all the surprises presented by the planetary rings. The Saturnian rings are stratified into thousands of ringlets and the Uranian rings are compressed into narrow streams, which for some reason or other differ from circular orbits like the wheel of an old bicycle. The edge of the rings is jagged and the rings themselves are pegged down under the gravitational pressure of the satellites, bending like a ship's wake. There are spiral waves, elliptical rings, strange interlacing of narrow ringlets, and to cap it all one has observed in the Neptunian ring system three dense, bright arcs - like bunches of sausages on a transparent string. For celestial mechanics this is a spectacle as unnatural as a bear's tooth in the necklace of the English queen. In the dynamics of planetary rings the physics of collective interaction was supplemented by taking collisions between particles into account. One was led to study a kinetic equation with a rather complex collision integral - because the collisions are inelastic - which later on made it possible, both by using the Chapman-Enskog method and by using the solution of the kinetic equation for a plasma in a magnetic field, to reduce it to a closed set of (hydrodynamical) moment equations [1]. The hydrodynamical instabilities lead to the growth of short-wavelength waves and large-scale structures of the Saturnian rings [1]. We have shown that the formation of the existing dense Uranian rings is connected with the capture of positively drifting ring particles in inner Lindblad resonances which arrest this drift [1]. After the formation of dense rings at the positions of satellite resonances the collective interaction between resonant particles is amplified and the rings can leave the resonance and drift away from the planet and the parent resonance. We can expect in the C ring an appreciable positive ballistic particle drift caused by the erosion of the B ring by micrometeorites. It is therefore natural

  14. Deployable Fresnel Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kennedy, Timothy F.; Fink, Patrick W.; Chu, Andrew W.; Lin, Gregory Y.

    2014-01-01

    Deployable Fresnel rings (DFRs) significantly enhance the realizable gain of an antenna. This innovation is intended to be used in combination with another antenna element, as the DFR itself acts as a focusing or microwave lens element for a primary antenna. This method is completely passive, and is also completely wireless in that it requires neither a cable, nor a connector from the antenna port of the primary antenna to the DFR. The technology improves upon the previous NASA technology called a Tri-Sector Deployable Array Antenna in at least three critical aspects. In contrast to the previous technology, this innovation requires no connector, cable, or other physical interface to the primary communication radio or sensor device. The achievable improvement in terms of antenna gain is significantly higher than has been achieved with the previous technology. Also, where previous embodiments of the Tri-Sector antenna have been constructed with combinations of conventional (e.g., printed circuit board) and conductive fabric materials, this innovation is realized using only conductive and non-conductive fabric (i.e., "e-textile") materials, with the possible exception of a spring-like deployment ring. Conceptually, a DFR operates by canceling the out-of-phase radiation at a plane by insertion of a conducting ring or rings of a specific size and distance from the source antenna, defined by Fresnel zones. Design of DFRs follow similar procedures to those outlined for conventional Fresnel zone rings. Gain enhancement using a single ring is verified experimentally and through computational simulation. The experimental test setup involves a microstrip patch antenna that is directly behind a single-ring DFR and is radiating towards a second microstrip patch antenna. The first patch antenna and DFR are shown. At 2.42 GHz, the DFR improves the transmit antenna gain by 8.6 dB, as shown in Figure 2, relative to the wireless link without the DFR. A figure illustrates the

  15. Rings dominate western Gulf

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vidal L., Francisco V.; Vidal L., Victor M. V.; Molero, José María Pérez

    Surface and deep circulation of the central and western Gulf of Mexico is controlled by interactions of rings of water pinched from the gulf's Loop Current. The discovery was made by Mexican oceanographers who are preparing a full-color, 8-volume oceanographic atlas of the gulf.Anticyclonic warm-core rings pinch off the Loop Current at a rate of about one to two per year, the scientists of the Grupo de Estudios Oceanográficos of the Instituto de Investigaciones Eléctricas (GEO-IIE) found. The rings migrate west until they collide with the continental shelf break of the western gulf, almost always between 22° and 23°N latitude. On their westward travel they transfer angular momentum and vorticity to the surrounding water, generating cyclonic circulations and vortex pairs that completely dominate the entire surface and deep circulation of the central and western gulf.

  16. Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-06-01

    The surface of an insulator under vacuum and under electrical charge will flashover when illuminated by a critical dose of ultra-violet (UV...fluence (energy per unit area) required to induce surface flashover of vacuum insulators for some candid insulator materials: High Density... Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination1 J. B. Javedani, T.L. Houck, D.A. Lahowe, G.E. Vogtlin and D.A. Goerz Lawrence Livermore

  17. 16 CFR 460.18 - Insulation ads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... INSULATION § 460.18 Insulation ads. (a) If your ad gives an R-value, you must give the type of insulation and... your ad gives a price, you must give the type of insulation, the R-value at a specific thickness, the... you give the price per square foot, you do not have to give the coverage area. (c) If your ad...

  18. 16 CFR 460.18 - Insulation ads.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... INSULATION § 460.18 Insulation ads. (a) If your ad gives an R-value, you must give the type of insulation and... your ad gives a price, you must give the type of insulation, the R-value at a specific thickness, the... you give the price per square foot, you do not have to give the coverage area. (c) If your ad...

  19. Forming Refractory Insulation On Copper Wire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Setlock, J.; Roberts, G.

    1995-01-01

    Alternative insulating process forms flexible coat of uncured refractory insulating material on copper wire. Coated wire formed into coil or other complex shape. Wire-coating apparatus forms "green" coat on copper wire. After wire coiled, heating converts "green" coat to refractory electrical insulator. When cured to final brittle form, insulating material withstands temperatures above melting temperature of wire. Process used to make coils for motors, solenoids, and other electrical devices to be operated at high temperatures.

  20. Ring laser gyroscope anode

    SciTech Connect

    Ljung, B.H.

    1981-03-17

    An anode for a ring laser gyroscope which provides improved current stability in the glow discharge path is disclosed. The anode of this invention permits operation at lower currents thereby allowing a reduction of heat dissipation in the ring laser gyroscope. The anode of one embodiment of this invention is characterized by a thumbtack appearance with a spherical end where the normal sharp end of the thumbtack would be located. The stem of the anode extends from the outside of the gyroscope structure to the interior of the structure such that the spherical end is substantially adjacent to the laser beam.

  1. GUARD RING SEMICONDUCTOR JUNCTION

    DOEpatents

    Goulding, F.S.; Hansen, W.L.

    1963-12-01

    A semiconductor diode having a very low noise characteristic when used under reverse bias is described. Surface leakage currents, which in conventional diodes greatly contribute to noise, are prevented from mixing with the desired signal currents. A p-n junction is formed with a thin layer of heavily doped semiconductor material disposed on a lightly doped, physically thick base material. An annular groove cuts through the thin layer and into the base for a short distance, dividing the thin layer into a peripheral guard ring that encircles the central region. Noise signal currents are shunted through the guard ring, leaving the central region free from such currents. (AEC)

  2. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, J.P.; Craft, D.C.

    1994-09-20

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity is disclosed. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction. 21 figs.

  3. Unidirectional ring lasers

    DOEpatents

    Hohimer, John P.; Craft, David C.

    1994-01-01

    Unidirectional ring lasers formed by integrating nonreciprocal optical elements into the resonant ring cavity. These optical elements either attenuate light traveling in a nonpreferred direction or amplify light traveling in a preferred direction. In one preferred embodiment the resonant cavity takes the form of a circle with an S-shaped crossover waveguide connected to two points on the interior of the cavity such that light traveling in a nonpreferred direction is diverted from the cavity into the crossover waveguide and reinjected out of the other end of the crossover waveguide into the cavity as light traveling in the preferred direction.

  4. Saturn's Rings, the Yarkovsky Effects, and the Ring of Fire

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rubincam, David Parry

    2004-01-01

    The dimensions of Saturn's A and B rings may be determined by the seasonal Yarkovsky effect and the Yarkovsky-Schach effect; the two effects confine the rings between approximately 1.68 and approximately 2.23 Saturn radii, in reasonable agreement with the observed values of 1.525 and 2.267. The C ring may be sparsely populated because its particles are transients on their way to Saturn; the infall may create a luminous Ring of Fire around Saturn's equator. The ring system may be young: in the past heat flow from Saturn's interior much above its present value would not permit rings to exist.

  5. 46 CFR 153.240 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insulation. 153.240 Section 153.240 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 153.240 Insulation. Cargo containment system insulation made necessary by the requirements of this...

  6. 46 CFR 153.240 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Insulation. 153.240 Section 153.240 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 153.240 Insulation. Cargo containment system insulation made necessary by the requirements of this...

  7. 49 CFR 179.201-11 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Insulation. 179.201-11 Section 179.201-11 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...-Pressure Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-111AW and 115AW) § 179.201-11 Insulation. (a) Insulation shall be...

  8. 46 CFR 153.240 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Insulation. 153.240 Section 153.240 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 153.240 Insulation. Cargo containment system insulation made necessary by the requirements of this...

  9. 46 CFR 153.240 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Insulation. 153.240 Section 153.240 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 153.240 Insulation. Cargo containment system insulation made necessary by the requirements of this...

  10. 46 CFR 153.240 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 5 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Insulation. 153.240 Section 153.240 Shipping COAST GUARD..., LIQUEFIED GAS, OR COMPRESSED GAS HAZARDOUS MATERIALS Design and Equipment Cargo Containment Systems § 153.240 Insulation. Cargo containment system insulation made necessary by the requirements of this...

  11. Analyzing Gases From Decomposing Electrical Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Moffett, Gary; Shelley, Timothy J.; Morelli, John J.

    1995-01-01

    Test fixture holds insulated wire and traps gases emitted by heating of wire. Used with gas chromatograph and/or mass spectrometer, to analyze gases emitted by insulation on wire when wire heated with controlled current in controlled atmosphere to simulate pyrolysis, combustion, and arc tracking. Small, inexpensive, easily maintained, and relatively nonreactive to organic compounds produced during breakdown of insulation.

  12. Advanced solid propellant motor insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Smith, P. L.; Russ, R. F.

    1972-01-01

    An advanced lightweight insulation system suitable for use in long duration, low pressure planetary orbiter-type motor applications was developed. Experiments included the screening of various filler and binder materials with optimization studies combining the best of each. Small scale test motor data were used to judge the degree of success.

  13. Thermal Insulation from Hardwood Residues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sable, I.; Grinfelds, U.; Vikele, L.; Rozenberga, L.; Zeps, M.; Luguza, S.

    2015-11-01

    Adequate heat is one of the prerequisites for human wellbeing; therefore, building insulation is required in places where the outside temperature is not suitable for living. The climate change, with its rising temperatures and longer dry periods, promotes enlargement of the regions with conditions more convenient for hardwood species than for softwood species. Birch (Betula pendula) is the most common hardwood species in Latvia. The aim of this work was to obtain birch fibres from wood residues of plywood production and to form low-density thermal insulation boards. Board formation and production was done in the presence of water; natural binder, fire retardant and fungicide were added in different concentrations. Board properties such as density, transportability or resistance to particulate loss, thermal conductivity and reaction to fire were investigated. This study included thermal insulation boards with the density of 102-120 kg/m3; a strong correlation between density and the binder amount was found. Transportability also improved with the addition of a binder, and 0.1-0.5% of the binder was the most appropriate amount for this purpose. The measured thermal conductivity was in the range of 0.040-0.043 W/(m·K). Fire resistance increased with adding the fire retardant. We concluded that birch fibres are applicable for thermal insulation board production, and it is possible to diversify board properties, changing the amount of different additives.

  14. Vacuum-insulated catalytic converter

    DOEpatents

    Benson, David K.

    2001-01-01

    A catalytic converter has an inner canister that contains catalyst-coated substrates and an outer canister that encloses an annular, variable vacuum insulation chamber surrounding the inner canister. An annular tank containing phase-change material for heat storage and release is positioned in the variable vacuum insulation chamber a distance spaced part from the inner canister. A reversible hydrogen getter in the variable vacuum insulation chamber, preferably on a surface of the heat storage tank, releases hydrogen into the variable vacuum insulation chamber to conduct heat when the phase-change material is hot and absorbs the hydrogen to limit heat transfer to radiation when the phase-change material is cool. A porous zeolite trap in the inner canister absorbs and retains hydrocarbons from the exhaust gases when the catalyst-coated substrates and zeolite trap are cold and releases the hydrocarbons for reaction on the catalyst-coated substrate when the zeolite trap and catalyst-coated substrate get hot.

  15. On effective holographic Mott insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baggioli, Matteo; Pujolàs, Oriol

    2016-12-01

    We present a class of holographic models that behave effectively as prototypes of Mott insulators — materials where electron-electron interactions dominate transport phenomena. The main ingredient in the gravity dual is that the gauge-field dynamics contains self-interactions by way of a particular type of non-linear electrodynamics. The electrical response in these models exhibits typical features of Mott-like states: i) the low-temperature DC conductivity is unboundedly low; ii) metal-insulator transitions appear by varying various parameters; iii) for large enough self-interaction strength, the conductivity can even decrease with increasing doping (density of carriers) — which appears as a sharp manifestation of `traffic-jam'-like behaviour; iv) the insulating state becomes very unstable towards superconductivity at large enough doping. We exhibit some of the properties of the resulting insulator-superconductor transition, which is sensitive to the momentum dissipation rate in a specific way. These models imply a clear and generic correlation between Mott behaviour and significant effects in the nonlinear electrical response. We compute the nonlinear current-voltage curve in our model and find that indeed at large voltage the conductivity is largely reduced.

  16. Magnetically Insulated Opening Switch Research.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1987-01-01

    this research is to investigate the validity of the magneti- cally insulated opening switch concept proposed by Eninger (Ref. 5, Appendix 1). The...1973). 3. Y. Carmel, and J. Nation, Phys, Rev. Lett. 31, 286 (1973). 4. T.J. Orzechowski, and G. Bekefi, Phys. Fluids 19, 43 (1976). U 5. 3. Eninger

  17. A band-pass plasmonic filter with dual-square ring resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duan, Gaoyan; Lang, Peilin; Wang, Lulu; Yu, Li; Xiao, Jinghua

    2014-09-01

    In this paper, we show the simulation of a plasmonic band-pass filter which consists of two surface plasmon polaritons (SPPs) waveguides and a resonator in metal-insulator-metal (MIM) structure. The resonator is formed by two square rings and a patch between them. The patch is a tiny rectangle cavity in order to transfer the SPPs from one ring to the other. The finite element method (FEM) method is employed in simulation. The results show that the dual-ring resonator performs better than a single ring does. The 3 dB bandwidth near the peak wavelength λ = 1054 nm is merely 31.7 nm. The resonant wavelength can be shifted by changing the side length of the square ring. This narrow band-pass filter is easy to fabricate and has potential applications in future integrated optical circuits.

  18. Polyimide Foams Offer Superior Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2012-01-01

    At Langley Research Center, Erik Weiser and his colleagues in the Advanced Materials and Processing Branch were working with a new substance for fabricating composites for use in supersonic aircraft. The team, however, was experiencing some frustration. Every time they tried to create a solid composite from the polyimide (an advanced polymer) material, it bubbled and foamed. It seemed like the team had reached a dead end in their research - until they had another idea. "We said, This isn t going to work for composites, but maybe we could make a foam out of it," Weiser says. "That was kind of our eureka moment, to see if we could go in a whole other direction. And it worked." Weiser and his colleagues invented a new kind of polyimide foam insulation they named TEEK. The innovation displayed a host of advantages over existing insulation options. Compared to other commercial foams, Weiser explains, polyimide foams perform well across a broad range of temperatures, noting that the NASA TEEK foams provide effective structural insulation up to 600 F and down to cryogenic temperatures. The foam does not burn or off-gas toxic fumes, and even at -423 F - the temperature of liquid hydrogen - the material stays flexible. The inventors could produce the TEEK foam at a range of densities, from 0.5 pounds per cubic foot up to 20 pounds per cubic foot, making the foam ideal for a range of applications, including as insulation for reusable launch vehicles and for cryogenic tanks and lines. They also developed a unique, friable balloon format for manufacturing the foam, producing it as hollow microspheres that allowed the foam to be molded and then cured into any desired shape - perfect for insulating pipes of different sizes and configurations. The team s originally unplanned invention won an "R&D 100" award, and a later form of the foam, called LaRC FPF-44 (Spinoff 2009), was named "NASA Invention of the Year" in 2007.

  19. Silicon-on-insulator sensors using integrated resonance-enhanced defect-mediated photodetectors.

    PubMed

    Fard, Sahba Talebi; Murray, Kyle; Caverley, Michael; Donzella, Valentina; Flueckiger, Jonas; Grist, Samantha M; Huante-Ceron, Edgar; Schmidt, Shon A; Kwok, Ezra; Jaeger, Nicolas A F; Knights, Andrew P; Chrostowski, Lukas

    2014-11-17

    A resonance-enhanced, defect-mediated, ring resonator photodetector has been implemented as a single unit biosensor on a silicon-on-insulator platform, providing a cost effective means of integrating ring resonator sensors with photodetectors for lab-on-chip applications. This method overcomes the challenge of integrating hybrid photodetectors on the chip. The demonstrated responsivity of the photodetector-sensor was 90 mA/W. Devices were characterized using refractive index modified solutions and showed sensitivities of 30 nm/RIU.

  20. Automatic extraction of insulators from 3D LiDAR data of an electrical substation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arastounia, M.; Lichti, D. D.

    2013-10-01

    A considerable percentage of power outages are caused by animals that come into contact with conductive elements of electrical substations. These can be prevented by insulating conductive electrical objects, for which a 3D as-built plan of the substation is crucial. This research aims to create such a 3D as-built plan using terrestrial LiDAR data while in this paper the aim is to extract insulators, which are key objects in electrical substations. This paper proposes a segmentation method based on a new approach of finding the principle direction of points' distribution. This is done by forming and analysing the distribution matrix whose elements are the range of points in 9 different directions in 3D space. Comparison of the computational performance of our method with PCA (principal component analysis) shows that our approach is 25% faster since it utilizes zero-order moments while PCA computes the first- and second-order moments, which is more time-consuming. A knowledge-based approach has been developed to automatically recognize points on insulators. The method utilizes known insulator properties such as diameter and the number and the spacing of their rings. The results achieved indicate that 24 out of 27 insulators could be recognized while the 3 un-recognized ones were highly occluded. Check point analysis was performed by manually cropping all points on insulators. The results of check point analysis show that the accuracy, precision and recall of insulator recognition are 98%, 86% and 81%, respectively. It is concluded that automatic object extraction from electrical substations using only LiDAR data is not only possible but also promising. Moreover, our developed approach to determine the directional distribution of points is computationally more efficient for segmentation of objects in electrical substations compared to PCA. Finally our knowledge-based method is promising to recognize points on electrical objects as it was successfully applied for

  1. Ring Flame Stabilizer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1996-01-01

    The Ring Flame Stabilizer has been developed in conjunction with Lewis Research Center. This device can lower pollutant emissions (which contribute to smog and air pollution) from natural-gas appliances such as furnaces and water heaters by 90 percent while improving energy efficiency by 2 percent.

  2. Ring of Stellar Death

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This false-color image from NASA's Spitzer Space Telescope shows a dying star (center) surrounded by a cloud of glowing gas and dust. Thanks to Spitzer's dust-piercing infrared eyes, the new image also highlights a never-before-seen feature -- a giant ring of material (red) slightly offset from the cloud's core. This clumpy ring consists of material that was expelled from the aging star.

    The star and its cloud halo constitute a 'planetary nebula' called NGC 246. When a star like our own Sun begins to run out of fuel, its core shrinks and heats up, boiling off the star's outer layers. Leftover material shoots outward, expanding in shells around the star. This ejected material is then bombarded with ultraviolet light from the central star's fiery surface, producing huge, glowing clouds -- planetary nebulas -- that look like giant jellyfish in space.

    In this image, the expelled gases appear green, and the ring of expelled material appears red. Astronomers believe the ring is likely made of hydrogen molecules that were ejected from the star in the form of atoms, then cooled to make hydrogen pairs. The new data will help explain how planetary nebulas take shape, and how they nourish future generations of stars.

    This image composite was taken on Dec. 6, 2003, by Spitzer's infrared array camera, and is composed of images obtained at four wavelengths: 3.6 microns (blue), 4.5 microns (green), 5.8 microns (orange) and 8 microns (red).

  3. Exotic damping ring lattices

    SciTech Connect

    Palmer, R.B.

    1987-05-01

    This paper looks at, and compares three types of damping ring lattices: conventional, wiggler lattice with finite ..cap alpha.., wiggler lattice with ..cap alpha.. = 0, and observes the attainable equilibrium emittances for the three cases assuming a constraint on the attainable longitudinal impedance of 0.2 ohms. The emittance obtained are roughly in the ratio 4:2:1 for these cases.

  4. Ring laser scatterometer

    DOEpatents

    Ackermann, Mark; Diels, Jean-Claude

    2005-06-28

    A scatterometer utilizes the dead zone resulting from lockup caused by scatter from a sample located in the optical path of a ring laser at a location where counter-rotating pulses cross. The frequency of one pulse relative to the other is varied across the lockup dead zone.

  5. Reading, Writing, and Rings!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aschbacher, Pamela; Li, Erika; Hammon, Art

    2008-01-01

    "Reading, Writing, and Rings!" was created by a team of elementary teachers, literacy experts, and scientists in order to integrate science and literacy. These free units bring students inside NASA's Cassini-Huygens mission to Saturn. The authors--a science teacher and education outreach specialist and two evaluators of educational programs--have…

  6. Making Molecular Borromean Rings

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pentecost, Cari D.; Tangchaivang, Nichol; Cantrill, Stuart J.; Chichak, Kelly S.; Peters, Andrea J.; Stoddart, Fraser J.

    2007-01-01

    A procedure that requires seven 4-hour blocks of time to allow undergraduate students to prepare the molecular Borromean rings (BRs) on a gram-scale in 90% yield is described. The experiment would serve as a nice capstone project to culminate any comprehensive organic laboratory course and expose students to fundamental concepts, symmetry point…

  7. Thermal Testing and Analysis of an Efficient High-Temperature Multi-Screen Internal Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weiland, Stefan; Handrick, Karin; Daryabeigi, Kamran

    2007-01-01

    Conventional multi-layer insulations exhibit excellent insulation performance but they are limited to the temperature range to which their components reflective foils and spacer materials are compatible. For high temperature applications, the internal multi-screen insulation IMI has been developed that utilizes unique ceramic material technology to produce reflective screens with high temperature stability. For analytical insulation sizing a parametric material model is developed that includes the main contributors for heat flow which are radiation and conduction. The adaptation of model-parameters based on effective steady-state thermal conductivity measurements performed at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) allows for extrapolation to arbitrary stack configurations and temperature ranges beyond the ones that were covered in the conductivity measurements. Experimental validation of the parametric material model was performed during the thermal qualification test of the X-38 Chin-panel, where test results and predictions showed a good agreement.

  8. Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, Paul R.; Shapira, Hanna B.

    1981-01-01

    Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

  9. Reflective insulating blinds for windows and the like

    DOEpatents

    Barnes, P.R.; Shapira, H.B.

    1979-12-07

    Energy-conserving window blinds are provided. The blinds are fabricated from coupled and adjustable slats, each slat having an insulation layer and a reflective surface to face outwardly when the blinds are closed. A range of desired light and air transmission may be selected with the reflective surfaces of the slats adapted to direct sunlight upward toward the ceiling when the blinds are open. When the blinds are closed, the insulation of the slats reduces the heat loss or gain produced by the windows. If desired, the reflective surfaces of the slats may be concave. The edges of the slats are designed to seal against adjacent slats when the blinds are closed to ensure minimum air flow between slats.

  10. Ring Bubbles of Dolphins

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shariff, Karim; Marten, Ken; Psarakos, Suchi; White, Don J.; Merriam, Marshal (Technical Monitor)

    1996-01-01

    The article discusses how dolphins create and play with three types of air-filled vortices. The underlying physics is discussed. Photographs and sketches illustrating the dolphin's actions and physics are presented. The dolphins engage in this behavior on their own initiative without food reward. These behaviors are done repeatedly and with singleminded effort. The first type is the ejection of bubbles which, after some practice on the part of the dolphin, turn into toroidal vortex ring bubbles by the mechanism of baroclinic torque. These bubbles grow in radius and become thinner as they rise vertically to the surface. One dolphin would blow two in succession and guide them to fuse into one. Physicists call this a vortex reconnection. In the second type, the dolphins first create an invisible vortex ring in the water by swimming on their side and waving their tail fin (also called flukes) vigorously. This vortex ring travels horizontally in the water. The dolphin then turns around, finds the vortex and injects a stream of air into it from its blowhole. The air "fills-out" the core of the vortex ring. Often, the dolphin would knock-off a smaller ring bubble from the larger ring (this also involves vortex reconnection) and steer the smaller ring around the tank. One other dolphin employed a few other techniques for planting air into the fluke vortex. One technique included standing vertically in the water with tail-up, head-down and tail piercing the free surface. As the fluke is waved to create the vortex ring, air is entrained from above the surface. Another technique was gulping air in the mouth, diving down, releasing air bubbles from the mouth and curling them into a ring when they rose to the level of the fluke. In the third type, demonstrated by only one dolphin, the longitudinal vortex created by the dorsal fin on the back is used to produce 10-15 foot long helical bubbles. In one technique she swims in a curved path. This creates a dorsal fin vortex since

  11. Rings from Close Encounters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kohler, Susanna

    2016-09-01

    Weve recently discovered narrow sets of rings around two minor planets orbiting in our solar system. How did these rings form? A new study shows that they could be a result of close encounters between the minor planets and giants like Jupiter or Neptune.Unexpected Ring SystemsPositions of the centaurs in our solar system (green). Giant planets (red), Jupiter trojans (grey), scattered disk objects (tan) and Kuiper belt objects (blue) are also shown. [WilyD]Centaurs are minor planets in our solar system that orbit between Jupiter and Neptune. These bodies of which there are roughly 44,000 with diameters larger than 1 km have dynamically unstable orbits that cross paths with those of one or more giant planets.Recent occultation observations of two centaurs, 10199 Chariklo and 2060 Chiron, revealed that these bodies both host narrow ring systems. Besides our four giant planets, Chariklo and Chiron are the only other bodies in the solar system known to have rings. But how did these rings form?Scientists have proposed several models, implicating collisions, disruption of a primordial satellite, or dusty outgassing. But a team of scientists led by Ryuki Hyodo (Paris Institute of Earth Physics, Kobe University) has recently proposed an alternative scenario: what if the rings were formed from partial disruption of the centaur itself, after it crossed just a little too close to a giant planet?Tidal Forces from a GiantHyodo and collaborators first used past studies of centaur orbits to estimate that roughly 10% of centaurs experience close encounters (passing within a distance of ~2x the planetary radius) with a giant planet during their million-year lifetime. The team then performed a series of simulations of close encounters between a giant planet and a differentiated centaur a body in which the rocky material has sunk to form a dense silicate core, surrounded by an icy mantle.Some snapshots of simulation outcomes (click for a closer look!) for different initial states of

  12. Vacuum Packaging of MEMS With Multiple Internal Seal Rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hayworth, Ken; Yee, Karl; Shcheglov, Kirill; Bae, Youngsam; Wiberg, Dean; Peay, Chris; Challoner, Anthony

    2008-01-01

    A proposed method of design and fabrication of vacuum-packaged microelectromechanical systems (MEMS) and of individual microelectromechanical devices involves the use of multiple internal seal rings (MISRs) in conjunction with vias (through holes plated with metal for electrical contacts). The proposed method is compatible with mass production in a wafer-level fabrication process, in which the dozens of MEMS or individual microelectromechanical devices on a typical wafer are simultaneously vacuum packaged by bonding a capping wafer before the devices are singulated (cut apart by use of a dicing saw). In addition to being compatible with mass production, the proposed method would eliminate the need for some complex and expensive production steps and would yield more reliable vacuum seals. Conventionally, each MEMS or individual microelectromechanical device is fabricated as one of many identical units on a device wafer. Vacuum packaging is accomplished by bonding the device wafer to a capping wafer with metal seal rings (one ring surrounding each unit) that have been formed on the capping wafer. The electrical leads of each unit are laid out on what would otherwise be a flat surface of the device wafer, against which the seal ring is to be pressed for sealing. The resulting pattern of metal lines and their insulating oxide coverings presents a very rough and uneven surface, upon which it is difficult to pattern the sealing metal. Consequently, the seal is prone to leakage unless additional costly and complex planarization steps are performed before patterning the seal ring and bonding the wafers.

  13. From a normal insulator to a topological insulator in plumbene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Xiang-Long; Huang, Li; Wu, Jiansheng

    2017-03-01

    Plumbene, similar to silicene, has a buckled honeycomb structure with a large band gap (˜400 meV). All previous studies have shown that it is a normal insulator. Here, we perform first-principles calculations and employ a sixteen-band tight-binding model with nearest-neighbor and next-nearest-neighbor hopping terms to investigate electronic structures and topological properties of the plumbene monolayer. We find that it can become a topological insulator with a large bulk gap (˜200 meV) through electron doping, and the nontrivial state is very robust with respect to external strain. Plumbene can be an ideal candidate for realizing the quantum spin Hall effect at room temperature. By investigating effects of external electric and magnetic fields on electronic structures and transport properties of plumbene, we present two rich phase diagrams with and without electron doping and propose a theoretical design for a four-state spin-valley filter.

  14. Chromatin insulators: lessons from the fly

    PubMed Central

    Gurudatta, B. V.

    2009-01-01

    Chromatin insulators are DNA–protein complexes with broad functions in nuclear biology. Drosophila has at least five different types of insulators; recent results suggest that these different insulators share some components that may allow them to function through common mechanisms. Data from genome-wide localization studies of insulator proteins indicate a possible functional specialization, with different insulators playing distinct roles in nuclear biology. Cells have developed mechanisms to control insulator activity by recruiting specialized proteins or by covalent modification of core components. Current results suggest that insulators set up cell-specific blueprints of nuclear organization that may contribute to the establishment of different patterns of gene expression during cell differentiation and development. PMID:19752045

  15. A ceramic radial insulation structure for a relativistic electron beam vacuum diode.

    PubMed

    Xun, Tao; Yang, Hanwu; Zhang, Jiande; Liu, Zhenxiang; Wang, Yong; Zhao, Yansong

    2008-06-01

    For one kind of a high current diode composed of a small disk-type alumina ceramic insulator water/vacuum interface, the insulation structure was designed and experimentally investigated. According to the theories of vacuum flashover and the rules for radial insulators, a "cone-column" anode outline and the cathode shielding rings were adopted. The electrostatic field along the insulator surface was obtained by finite element analysis simulating. By adjusting the outline of the anode and reshaping the shielding rings, the electric fields were well distributed and the field around the cathode triple junction was effectively controlled. Area weighted statistical method was applied to estimate the surface breakdown field. In addition, the operating process of an accelerator based on a spiral pulse forming line (PFL) was simulated through the PSPICE software to get the waveform of charging and diode voltage. The high voltage test was carried out on a water dielectric spiral PFL accelerator with long pulse duration, and results show that the diode can work stably in 420 kV, 200 ns conditions. The experimental results agree with the theoretical and simulated results.

  16. Inorganic glass ceramic slip rings

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Glossbrenner, E. W.; Cole, S. R.

    1972-01-01

    Prototypes of slip rings have been fabricated from ceramic glass, a material which is highly resistant to deterioration due to high temperature. Slip ring assemblies were not structurally damaged by mechanical tests and performed statisfactorily for 200 hours.

  17. Approximating metal-insulator transitions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Danieli, Carlo; Rayanov, Kristian; Pavlov, Boris; Martin, Gaven; Flach, Sergej

    2015-12-01

    We consider quantum wave propagation in one-dimensional quasiperiodic lattices. We propose an iterative construction of quasiperiodic potentials from sequences of potentials with increasing spatial period. At each finite iteration step, the eigenstates reflect the properties of the limiting quasiperiodic potential properties up to a controlled maximum system size. We then observe approximate Metal-Insulator Transitions (MIT) at the finite iteration steps. We also report evidence on mobility edges, which are at variance to the celebrated Aubry-André model. The dynamics near the MIT shows a critical slowing down of the ballistic group velocity in the metallic phase, similar to the divergence of the localization length in the insulating phase.

  18. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-06

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  19. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Wayne Y.

    1987-01-01

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800.degree. C.), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m.degree. C.), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800.degree. C., a diameter within the range of 20-200 .mu.m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2-4 .mu.m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  20. High temperature structural insulating material

    DOEpatents

    Chen, W.Y.

    1984-07-27

    A high temperature structural insulating material useful as a liner for cylinders of high temperature engines through the favorable combination of high service temperature (above about 800/sup 0/C), low thermal conductivity (below about 0.2 W/m/sup 0/C), and high compressive strength (above about 250 psi). The insulating material is produced by selecting hollow ceramic beads with a softening temperature above about 800/sup 0/C, a diameter within the range of 20-200 ..mu..m, and a wall thickness in the range of about 2 to 4 ..mu..m; compacting the beads and a compatible silicate binder composition under pressure and sintering conditions to provide the desired structural form with the structure having a closed-cell, compact array of bonded beads.

  1. Insulation assembly for electric machine

    DOEpatents

    Rhoads, Frederick W.; Titmuss, David F.; Parish, Harold; Campbell, John D.

    2013-10-15

    An insulation assembly is provided that includes a generally annularly-shaped main body and at least two spaced-apart fingers extending radially inwards from the main body. The spaced-apart fingers define a gap between the fingers. A slot liner may be inserted within the gap. The main body may include a plurality of circumferentially distributed segments. Each one of the plurality of segments may be operatively connected to another of the plurality of segments to form the continuous main body. The slot liner may be formed as a single extruded piece defining a plurality of cavities. A plurality of conductors (extendable from the stator assembly) may be axially inserted within a respective one of the plurality of cavities. The insulation assembly electrically isolates the conductors in the electric motor from the stator stack and from other conductors.

  2. SUPPORTING AND HEAT INSULATING MEANS

    DOEpatents

    Birmingham, B.W.; Brown, H.; Scott, R.B.; Vander-arend, P.C.

    1959-01-27

    A method is described for simultaneously supporting inner and outer members spaced from each other and heat insulating them from each other comprising an inner and outer member together defining an annular cavity. Each member carries a shoulder projecting towards the other member. A stack of annular metal plates in the cavity is held between the shoulder of the outer member and the shoulder of the inner member. The edges of the metal plate forming the stack are exposed to the cavity and to evacuation conditions which may exist within thc cavity. The stack of metal plates acts to both support one of the members with respect to the other and as a heat insulator.

  3. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, Larry D.; Ballard, William P.; Clark, M. Collins; Marder, Barry M.

    1988-01-01

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields arfe produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap.

  4. Magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator

    DOEpatents

    Bacon, L.D.; Ballard, W.P.; Clark, M.C.; Marder, B.M.

    1987-05-19

    A magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator employs self-generated magnetic fields to generate microwave energy. An anode of the oscillator includes slow-wave structures which are formed of a plurality of thin conductive vanes defining cavities therebetween, and a gap is formed between the anode and a cathode of the oscillator. In response to a pulsed voltage applied to the anode and cathode, self-generated magnetic fields are produced in a cross-field orientation with respect to the orientation of the electric field between the anode and the cathode. The cross-field magnetic fields insulate the flow of electrons in the gap and confine the flow of electrons within the gap. 11 figs.

  5. RINGED ACCRETION DISKS: EQUILIBRIUM CONFIGURATIONS

    SciTech Connect

    Pugliese, D.; Stuchlík, Z. E-mail: zdenek.stuchlik@physics.cz

    2015-12-15

    We investigate a model of a ringed accretion disk, made up by several rings rotating around a supermassive Kerr black hole attractor. Each toroid of the ringed disk is governed by the general relativity hydrodynamic Boyer condition of equilibrium configurations of rotating perfect fluids. Properties of the tori can then be determined by an appropriately defined effective potential reflecting the background Kerr geometry and the centrifugal effects. The ringed disks could be created in various regimes during the evolution of matter configurations around supermassive black holes. Therefore, both corotating and counterrotating rings have to be considered as being a constituent of the ringed disk. We provide constraints on the model parameters for the existence and stability of various ringed configurations and discuss occurrence of accretion onto the Kerr black hole and possible launching of jets from the ringed disk. We demonstrate that various ringed disks can be characterized by a maximum number of rings. We present also a perturbation analysis based on evolution of the oscillating components of the ringed disk. The dynamics of the unstable phases of the ringed disk evolution seems to be promising in relation to high-energy phenomena demonstrated in active galactic nuclei.

  6. Ring closure in actin polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Supurna; Chattopadhyay, Sebanti

    2017-03-01

    We present an analysis for the ring closure probability of semiflexible polymers within the pure bend Worm Like Chain (WLC) model. The ring closure probability predicted from our analysis can be tested against fluorescent actin cyclization experiments. We also discuss the effect of ring closure on bend angle fluctuations in actin polymers.

  7. DC-Powered Jumping Ring

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jeffery, Rondo N.; Farhang, Amiri

    2016-01-01

    The classroom jumping ring demonstration is nearly always performed using alternating current (AC), in which the ring jumps or flies off the extended iron core when the switch is closed. The ring jumps higher when cooled with liquid nitrogen (LN2). We have performed experiments using DC to power the solenoid and find similarities and significant…

  8. Uranus: the rings are black.

    PubMed

    Sinton, W M

    1977-11-04

    An upper limit of 0.05 is established for the geometric albedo of the newly discovered rings of Uranus. In view of this very low albedo, the particles of the rings cannot be ice-covered as are those of rings A and B of Saturn.

  9. Subnanosecond Breakdown of Insulating Media

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-29

    50so O0 PRESSURE Itorr] Fig. 6. Breakdown voltage for argon and air with 100 kV pulser amplitude Breakdown voltages for surface flashover differ from the...developments in the field of high speed/high power electromagnetics applica- tions, such as Ultrawideband (UWB) radar, plasma limiters, and fast general...voltages for short pulses is of relevance for many switching and insulation tasks, for both volume breakdown in differ- ent media as well as for surface

  10. Materials for foam type insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hill, W. E.

    1971-01-01

    An internal foam fabrication is one of the concepts being considered for cryogenic insulation on the hydrogen tanks of the shuttle vehicle. The three-dimensional polyurethane used on the S-4 B tanks failed to meet the higher temperature requirements of the shuttle vehicle, however, and other foams under consideration include polyisocyanurates, polyphenylene oxides, polyimides, and polybenzimidazoles. Improved adhesive systems for attaching the foams to the interior tank wall are under study.

  11. Flexible pile thermal barrier insulator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, G. E.; Fell, D. M.; Tesinsky, J. S. (Inventor)

    1978-01-01

    A flexible pile thermal barrier insulator included a plurality of upstanding pile yarns. A generally planar backing section supported the upstanding pile yarns. The backing section included a plurality of filler yarns forming a mesh in a first direction. A plurality of warp yarns were looped around said filler yarns and pile yarns in the backing section and formed a mesh in a second direction. A binder prevented separation of the yarns in the backing section.

  12. Satellite Rings Movie

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2000-01-01

    This brief movie clip (of which the release image is a still frame), taken by NASA's Cassini spacecraft as it approached Jupiter, shows the motions, over a 16 hour-period, of two satellites embedded in Jupiter's ring. The moon Adrastea is the fainter of the two, and Metis the brighter. Images such as these will be used to refine the orbits of the two bodies.

    The movie was made from images taken during a 40-hour sequence of the Jovian ring on December 11, 2000.

    Cassini is a cooperative mission of NASA, the European Space Agency and the Italian Space Agency. JPL, a division of the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena, manages Cassini for NASA's Office of Space Science, Washington, D.C.

  13. Saturn Ring Observer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Spilker, T. R.

    2001-01-01

    Answering fundamental questions about ring particle characteristics, and individual and group behavior, appears to require close-proximity (a few km) observations. Saturn's magnificent example of a ring system offers a full range of particle sizes, densities, and behaviors for study, so it is a natural choice for such detailed investigation. Missions implementing these observations require post-approach Delta(V) of approximately 10 km/s or more, so past mission concepts called upon Nuclear Electric Propulsion. The concept described here reduces the propulsive Delta(V) requirement to as little as 3.5 km/s, difficult but not impossible for high-performance chemical propulsion systems. Additional information is contained in the original extended abstract.

  14. Strained Ring Energetic Binders

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-08-27

    polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ). PHBV was not found to have the mechanical instability problems of PBV, but was still thermally unstable (Tonset - 660C, Tmax - 1090C...DISCUSSION 4 Polybenzvalene (PBV) 4 Polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ) 6 Chain-Transfer Studies 11 CONCLUSIONS 15 EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES 16 .F 4E 19 APPENDICES A...strained ring polymers similar to PBV are known. The investigation of one of these polymers, polyhomobenzvalene ( PHBV ), is also described in this report

  15. Topological Insulators at Room Temperature

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Haijun; Liu, Chao-Xing; Qi, Xiao-Liang; Dai, Xi; Fang, Zhong; Zhang, Shou-Cheng; /Stanford U., Phys. Dept.

    2010-03-25

    Topological insulators are new states of quantum matter with surface states protected by the time-reversal symmetry. In this work, we perform first-principle electronic structure calculations for Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}Te{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} crystals. Our calculations predict that Sb{sub 2}Te{sub 3}, Bi{sub 2}T e{sub 3} and Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} are topological insulators, while Sb{sub 2}Se{sub 3} is not. In particular, Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} has a topologically non-trivial energy gap of 0.3eV , suitable for room temperature applications. We present a simple and unified continuum model which captures the salient topological features of this class of materials. These topological insulators have robust surface states consisting of a single Dirac cone at the {Lambda} point.

  16. Supplemental multilayer insulation research facility

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dempsey, P. J.; Stochl, R. J.

    1995-07-01

    The Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF) provides a small scale test bed for conducting cryogenic experiments in a vacuum environment. The facility vacuum system is capable of simulating a Space Shuttle launch pressure profile as well as providing a steady space vacuum environment of 1.3 x 10(exp -4) Newton/sq meter (1 x 10(exp -6) torr). Warm side boundary temperatures can be maintained constant between 111 K (200 R) and 361 K (650 R) using a temperature controlled shroud. The shroud can also simulate a typical lunar day-night temperature profile. The test hardware consists of a cryogenic calorimeter supported by the lid of the vacuum chamber. A 0.45 cu meter (120 gallon) vacuum jacketed storage/supply tank is available for conditioning the cryogen prior to use in the calorimeter. The facility was initially designed to evaluate the thermal performance of insulation systems for long-term storage in space. The facility has recently been used to evaluate the performance of various new insulation systems for LH2 and LN2 ground storage dewars.

  17. Supplemental multilayer insulation research facility

    SciTech Connect

    Dempsey, P.J.; Stochl, R.J.

    1996-12-31

    The Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF) provides a small scale test bed for conducting cryogenic experiments in a vacuum environment. The facility vacuum system is capable of simulating a Space Shuttle launch pressure profile as well as providing a steady space vacuum environment of 1.3{times}10{sup -4} N/m{sup 2}(1 x 10{sup -6} torr). Warm side boundary temperatures can be maintained constant between 111 K(200 R) and 361 K(650 R) using a temperature controlled shroud. The shroud can also simulate a typical lunar day-night temperature profile. The test hardware consists of a cryogenic calorimeter supported by the lid of the vacuum chamber. A 0.45 m{sup 3} (120 gal) vacuum jacketed storage/supply tank is available for conditioning the cryogen prior to use in the calorimeter. The facility was initially designed to evaluate the thermal performance of insulation systems for long-term storage in space. The facility has recently been used to evaluate the performance of various new insulation systems for LH{sub 2} and LN{sub 2} ground storage dewars.

  18. Supplemental multilayer insulation research facility

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dempsey, P. J.; Stochl, R. J.

    1995-01-01

    The Supplemental Multilayer Insulation Research Facility (SMIRF) provides a small scale test bed for conducting cryogenic experiments in a vacuum environment. The facility vacuum system is capable of simulating a Space Shuttle launch pressure profile as well as providing a steady space vacuum environment of 1.3 x 10(exp -4) Newton/sq meter (1 x 10(exp -6) torr). Warm side boundary temperatures can be maintained constant between 111 K (200 R) and 361 K (650 R) using a temperature controlled shroud. The shroud can also simulate a typical lunar day-night temperature profile. The test hardware consists of a cryogenic calorimeter supported by the lid of the vacuum chamber. A 0.45 cu meter (120 gallon) vacuum jacketed storage/supply tank is available for conditioning the cryogen prior to use in the calorimeter. The facility was initially designed to evaluate the thermal performance of insulation systems for long-term storage in space. The facility has recently been used to evaluate the performance of various new insulation systems for LH2 and LN2 ground storage dewars.

  19. The method for detecting diffusion ring diameter in Hemagglutinin measuring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jing, Wenbo; Liu, Xue; Duan, Jin; Wang, Xiao-man

    2014-11-01

    The diffuser ring diameter measurement is the most critical in hemagglutinin Measuring. The traditional methods, such as a vernier caliper or high-definition scanned images are subjective and low for the measurement data reliability. Propose high-resolution diffusion ring image for drop-resolution processing, adaptive Canny operator and local detection method to extract complete and clear diffusion ring boundaries, and finally make use of polynomial interpolation algorithm to make diffusion ring outer boundary pixel coordinates achieve sub-pixel accuracy and the least-squares fitting circle algorithm to calculate the precise center of the circle and the diameter of the diffuser ring. Experimental results show that the method detection time is only 63.61ms, which is a faster speed; diffuser ring diameter estimation error can achieve 0.55 pixel, high stability in experimental data. This method is adapted to the various types of influenza vaccine hemagglutinin content measurements, and has important value in the influenza vaccine quality detection.

  20. Precooler Ring Vacuum System

    SciTech Connect

    Moenich, J.

    1980-10-02

    The precooler vacuum system, as proposed by FNAL, is based on a suitable modification of the existing Electron Cooling Ring System. Because of the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets, distributed ion pumping, as exists in the Electron Cooling Ring, is not applicable. Instead, the proposed pumping will be done with commercial appendage ion pumps mounted approximately every two meters around the circumference of the ring. The loss of effective pumping speed and non-uniformity of system pressure with appendage pumps may not be major considerations but the large number required does effect experimental and analytical equipment placement considerations. There is a distributed pumping technique available which: (1) is not affected by the magnetic cycle of the bending magnets; (2) will provide a minimum of four times the hydrogen pumping speed of the proposed appendage ion pumps; (3) will require no power during pumping after the strip is activated; (4) will provide the heat source for bakeout; (5) is easily replaceable; and (6) can be purchased, installed, and operated at a generous economic advantage over the presently proposed ion pumped system. The pumping technique referred to is non-evaporable gettering with ST101 Zr/Al pumping strip. A technical description of this pumping strip is given on Data Sheet 1 and 2 attached to this report.

  1. Saturn's ``Gossamer'' Ring: The F Ring's Inner Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Showalter, M. R.; Burns, J. A.; Hamilton, D. P.

    1998-09-01

    Recent Galileo and Earth-based images have revealed for the first time that Jupiter's ``gossamer'' ring is actually composed of two rings, one bounded at the outer edge by Amalthea and the other bounded by Thebe. Dynamical models suggest that these rings are composed of dust grains ejected off the surfaces of the two moons, which then evolve inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. A very faint sheet of material filling the region between Saturn's A and F Rings reported by Burns et al. (BAAS 15, 1013--1014, 1983) may be a dynamically analogous system, in which dust escapes from the F Ring and evolves inward to the A Ring. Unlike Jupiter's gossamer rings, however, the inner sheet of Saturn's F Ring has been well observed from a large range of phase angles and visual wavelengths by Voyager. Voyager images reveal that this faint ring shows a tenfold increase in brightness between phase angles of 125(deg) and 165(deg) , indicating that it is composed of fine dust microns in size. Preliminary estimates of the normal optical depth fall in the range 1--2*E(-4) , depending on the dust size distribution assumed. Initial spectrophotometry reveals that the ring is neutral in color. The ring is uniform in brightness over the entire region between the two rings, with no evidence for internal structure associated with Prometheus and Atlas, suggesting that neither of these embedded moons acts as either a source or a sink. We will refine the aforementioned measurements and develop photometric models to better constrain the properties of the dust in this ring. This will enable us to relate the dust population to that in the F Ring proper, and to better explore the dynamical processes at work.

  2. Resilient seal ring assembly with spring means applying force to wedge member. [cryogenic applications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Myers, W. N.; Hein, L. A. (Inventor)

    1983-01-01

    A ring seal adapted for installation in an annular recess between a housing and a rotating or reciprocating shaft is described. The seal consists of a resilient ring cup member having a ring wedge member inserted in the center recess of the cup member to wedge the opposing lips of the cup member outwardly into a sealing relationship. A spring maintains the force against the wedge member.

  3. Near-infrared spectra of the uranian ring system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Kleer, Katherine; de Pater, Imke; Ádámkovics, Máté; Hammel, Heidi

    2013-09-01

    We present the first high-resolution near-infrared (1.18-2.38 μm) spectrum of the rings of Uranus, as observed with adaptive optics on the W.M. Keck II telescope in August 2010. We derive ring equivalent widths, as well as ring and particle reflectivities for the ɛ ring and ringlet groups based on H- and K-band data. We find the rings to be gray, indicating that they are dominated by large particles rather than dust, and we find no evidence for water ice. We present a reflectivity spectrum for the ɛ ring alone, which we also find to be consistent with a flat spectrum. We derive H-band ring particle reflectivities of 0.022 ± 0.010, 0.051 ± 0.009 0.042 ± 0.012, and 0.043 ± 0.001 and K-band ring particle reflectivities of 0.016 ± 0.010, 0.034 ± 0.012, 0.047 ± 0.008 and 0.041 ± 0.002 for the 456, αβ, ηγδ, and ɛ ring groups. Previous observations have found ring particle reflectivities in the 0.033-0.044 range (de Pater, I., Gibbard, S., Macintosh, B.A., Roe, H.G. [2002]. Icarus 160, 359-374; Gibbard, S.G., de Pater, I., Hammel, H.B. [2005]. Icarus 174, 253-262), and are generally consistent with our results.

  4. Mass of Saturn's A ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horn, L. J.; Russell, C. T.

    1993-01-01

    The mass of Saturn's A ring is reestimated using the behavior of spiral density waves embedded in the ring. The Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) observed the star delta-Scorpii as it was occulted by Saturn's rings during the Voyager 2 flyby of Saturn in 1981 producing a radial profile of the rings. We examined forty spiral density waves in the Voyager PPS data of the A ring including 10 weaker waves that have not been previously analyzed by means of an autoregressive power spectral technique called Burg. The strengths of this new method for ring studies are that weaker, less extended waves are easily detected and characterized. This method is also the first one which does not require precise knowledge of the resonance location and phase of the wave in order to calculate the surface mass density. Uncertainties of up to 3 km are present in the currently available radial scales for Saturn's rings.

  5. A season in Saturn's rings: Cycling, recycling and ring history

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Esposito, L. W.; Meinke, B. K.; Albers, N.; Sremcevic, M.

    2012-04-01

    Cassini experiments have watched Saturn's ring system evolve before our eyes. Images and occultations show changes and transient events. The rings are a dynamic and complex geophysical system, incompletely modeled as a single-phase fluid. Key Cassini observations: High resolution images show straw, propellers, embedded moonlets, and F ring objects. Multiple UVIS, RSS and VIMS occutlations indicate multimodal ringlet and edge structure, including free and forced modes along with stochastic perturbations that are most likely caused by nearby mass concentrations. Vertical excursions are evident at ring edges and in other perturbed regions. The rings are occasionally hit by meteorites that leave a signature that may last centuries; meteoritic dust pollutes the rings. Temperature, reflectance and transmission spectra are influenced by the dynamical state of the ring particles. Saturn's Equinox 2009: Oblique lighting exposed vertical structure and embedded objects. The rings were the coldest ever. Images inspired new occultation and spectral analysis that show abundant structure in the perturbed regions. The rings are more variable and complex than we had expected prior to this seasonal viewing geometry. Sub-kilometer structure in power spectral analysis: Wavelet analysis shows features in the strongest density waves and at the shepherded outer edge of the B ring. Edges are variable as shown by multiple occultations and occultations of double stars. F ring kittens: 25 features seen in the first 102 occultations show a weak correlation with Prometheus location. We interpret these features as temporary aggregations. Simulation results indicate that accretion must be enhanced to match the kittens' size distribution. Images show that Prometheus triggers the formation of transient objects. Propellers and ghosts: Occulations and images provide evidence for small moonlets in the A, B and C rings. These indicate accretion occurs inside the classical Roche limit. Implications

  6. Music, Myth, and Education: The Case of "The Lord of the Rings" Film Trilogy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jorgensen, Estelle R.

    2010-01-01

    In probing the interrelationship of myth, meaning, and education, the author offers a case in point, notably, Peter Jackson's film adaptations and Howard Shore's musical scores for J. R. R. Tolkien's "The Lord of the Rings trilogy"--"The Fellowship of the Ring," "The Two Towers," and "The Return of the King." Intersecting literature, film, and…

  7. New Views of Jupiter's Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burns, J. A.

    1998-09-01

    Jupiter's rings are the archetype of ethereal planetary rings (very-low optical-depth bands containing micron-sized "dust"). As a result of much improved observations by Galileo (Ockert-Bell* -- most citations are et al. and Icarus in press* or this meeting) and Keck (de Pater*), we now understand the nature of such rings. The ring has three components: a 104 km-thick toroidal halo (1.4-1.7 RJ; normal optical depth t = 10-6), a thin main ring (1.7-1.8 RJ; t = 10-6), and a pair of exterior gossamer rings (1.8-3.5RJ; t = 10-7). The main ring has patchy ( 20-30 percent) brightness. The ring is reddish and its particles satisfy a -2.5 differential power-law size distribution. Because particle lifetimes are brief, the rings must be continually regenerated, by collisions into parent bodies, which may be unseen or may be the known small ring-moons (Thomas*, Simonelli). The gossamer ring seems to be collisional ejecta derived from the ring-moons Amalthea and Thebe, and evolving inward by Poynting-Robertson drag (Burns). The particles drift through many electromagnetic resonances, clustering around synchronous orbit, which produce jumps in the particles' inclinations (Hamilton). The main ring is probably debris from Adrastea and Metis, which orbit in the equatorial plane. The halo particles are driven vertically by electromagnetic forces, which may be resonant (Schaffer & Burns) or not (Horanyi & Cravens). When halo orbits become highly distorted, particles are lost into Jupiter. Similar faint rings may be attendant to all small, close-in satellites (Showalter).

  8. ASRM case insulation design and development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bell, Matthew S.; Tam, William F. S.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes the achievements made on the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case insulation design and development program. The ASRM case insulation system described herein protects the metal case and joints from direct radiation and hot gas impingement. Critical failure of solid rocket systems is often traceable to failure of the insulation design. The wide ranging accomplishments included the development of a nonasbestos insulation material for ASRM that replaced the existing Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) asbestos-filled nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) along with a performance gain of 300 pounds, and improved reliability of all the insulation joint designs, i.e., segmented case joint, case-to-nozzle and case-to-igniter joint. The insulation process development program included the internal stripwinding process. This process advancement allowed Aerojet to match to exceed the capability of other propulsion companies.

  9. Hydrogen storage in insulated pressure vessels

    SciTech Connect

    Aceves, S.M.; Garcia-Villazana, O.

    1998-08-01

    Insulated pressure vessels are cryogenic-capable pressure vessels that can be fueled with liquid hydrogen (LH{sub 2}) or ambient-temperature compressed hydrogen (CH{sub 2}). Insulated pressure vessels offer the advantages of liquid hydrogen tanks (low weight and volume), with reduced disadvantages (lower energy requirement for hydrogen liquefaction and reduced evaporative losses). This paper shows an evaluation of the applicability of the insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles. The paper shows an evaluation of evaporative losses and insulation requirements and a description of the current analysis and experimental plans for testing insulated pressure vessels. The results show significant advantages to the use of insulated pressure vessels for light-duty vehicles.

  10. High pressure electrical insulated feed thru connector

    DOEpatents

    Oeschger, Joseph E.; Berkeland, James E.

    1979-11-13

    A feed-thru type hermetic electrical connector including at least one connector pin feeding through an insulator block within the metallic body of the connector shell. A compression stop arrangement coaxially disposed about the insulator body is brazed to the shell, and the shoulder on the insulator block bears against this top in a compression mode, the high pressure or internal connector being at the opposite end of the shell. Seals between the pin and an internal bore at the high pressure end of the insulator block and between the insulator block and the metallic shell at the high pressure end are hermetically brazed in place, the first of these also functioning to transfer the axial compressive load without permitting appreciable shear action between the pin and insulator block.

  11. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, B. S.; Hsu, Y.-T.; Zeng, B.; Hatnean, M. Ciomaga; Harrison, N.; Zhu, Z.; Hartstein, M.; Kiourlappou, M.; Srivastava, A.; Johannes, M. D.; Murphy, T. P.; Park, J.-H.; Balicas, L.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Balakrishnan, G.; Sebastian, Suchitra E.

    2015-07-01

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. The quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior.

  12. ASRM case insulation design and development

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bell, Matthew S.; Tam, William F. S.

    1992-10-01

    This paper describes the achievements made on the Advanced Solid Rocket Motor (ASRM) case insulation design and development program. The ASRM case insulation system described herein protects the metal case and joints from direct radiation and hot gas impingement. Critical failure of solid rocket systems is often traceable to failure of the insulation design. The wide ranging accomplishments included the development of a nonasbestos insulation material for ASRM that replaced the existing Redesigned Solid Rocket Motor (RSRM) asbestos-filled nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) along with a performance gain of 300 pounds, and improved reliability of all the insulation joint designs, i.e., segmented case joint, case-to-nozzle and case-to-igniter joint. The insulation process development program included the internal stripwinding process. This process advancement allowed Aerojet to match to exceed the capability of other propulsion companies.

  13. Unconventional Fermi surface in an insulating state

    SciTech Connect

    Harrison, Neil; Tan, B. S.; Hsu, Y. -T.; Zeng, B.; Hatnean, M. Ciomaga; Zhu, Z.; Hartstein, M.; Kiourlappou, M.; Srivastava, A.; Johannes, M. D.; Murphy, T. P.; Park, J. -H.; Balicas, L.; Lonzarich, G. G.; Balakrishnan, G.; Sebastian, Suchitra E.

    2015-07-17

    Insulators occur in more than one guise; a recent finding was a class of topological insulators, which host a conducting surface juxtaposed with an insulating bulk. Here, we report the observation of an unusual insulating state with an electrically insulating bulk that simultaneously yields bulk quantum oscillations with characteristics of an unconventional Fermi liquid. We present quantum oscillation measurements of magnetic torque in high-purity single crystals of the Kondo insulator SmB6, which reveal quantum oscillation frequencies characteristic of a large three-dimensional conduction electron Fermi surface similar to the metallic rare earth hexaborides such as PrB6 and LaB6. As a result, the quantum oscillation amplitude strongly increases at low temperatures, appearing strikingly at variance with conventional metallic behavior.

  14. Silicon-on-insulator integrated optic transceivers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Morris, Robin J.

    1997-04-01

    Silicon-on-insulator offers the chance to produce integrated optical `circuits' with properties which are appropriate even for demanding applications. Developments in SOI waveguide technology have been combined with the well- developed micro-engineering properties of silicon for use in fields such as telecommunication and sensors. An integrated optical transceiver is selected as an example with which to describe the features of the technology. The design will be used to illustrate the benefits brought by the use of SOI waveguide elements. These functional `building blocks' include alignment features, integrated mode-matching waveguide tapers, tap-off couplers and low back-reflection interfaces. Further possible integrated elements are described, including WDMs, as relevant to optical transceiver technology. The economic and technical drivers and difficulties surrounding the convergence of electrical, CMOS-like and optical SOI technologies are also considered. There is a spreading acceptance that low-cost motherboard technology is needed, to realize volume production of optical transceivers. A range of materials solutions have been reported. The relative merits of SOI technology are discussed. Motherboard techniques provide a platform for precise optical alignment between components. The SOI approach can deliver self-aligned waveguide and hybridization features--such as fiber attach or laser diode connections--and includes the ability to adapt to laser diode and optical fiber near-field characteristics.

  15. DC Characterization of High Gradient Multilayer Insulators

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-06-01

    electric field for surface flashover is not directly proportional to the insulator length i.e. doubling the length of a simple, bulk (single material...or composite) insulator does not double the voltage where surface flashover occurs. Literature suggests the most likely mechanism of flashover in... surface flashover or other fault. As a result, we did not observe damage to the electrodes or the sample insulators following a flashover . For

  16. Floating insulated conductors for heating subsurface formations

    DOEpatents

    Burns, David; Goodwin, Charles R.

    2014-07-29

    A heating system for a subsurface formation includes a conduit located in a first opening in the subsurface formation. Three electrical conductors are located in the conduit. A return conductor is located inside the conduit. The return conductor is electrically coupled to the ends of the electrical conductors distal from the surface of the formation. Insulation is located inside the conduit. The insulation electrically insulates the three electrical conductors, the return conductor, and the conduit from each other.

  17. DC CHARACTERIZATION OF HIGH GRADIENT MULTILAYER INSULATORS

    SciTech Connect

    Watson, J A; Caporaso, G J; Sampayan, S E; Sanders, D M; Krogh, M L

    2005-05-26

    We have developed a novel insulator concept that involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods less than 1 mm. We have demonstrated that these structures perform 2 to 5 times better than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We present new testing results showing exceptional behavior at DC, with gradients in excess of 110kV/cm in vacuum.

  18. Ignitability of some insulation and building materials

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hilado, C. J.; Murphy, R. M.

    1978-01-01

    A variety of insulation and building materials were evaluated for ignitability, using a screening test method developed at the University of San Francisco. Ignitability tended to be greater with the more efficient insulation materials because the insulating qualities resulted in a more rapid rise in temperature at the exposed surface. The use of a noncombustible facing material is recommended to provide protection from surface ignition.

  19. Gas insulated substation equipment for industrial applications

    SciTech Connect

    Kenedy, J.J.

    1984-11-01

    Until recently the only available method for construction of high voltage systems was to use exposed air insulated equipment supported on porcelain columns. The past decade has witnessed the introduction and wide acceptance of compressed gas insulated equipment as a viable alternative to the conventional substation system. The characteristics of gas insulated substations (GIS) and their application for industrial use at service voltages at 69 kV and above are discussed.

  20. Historical Review of VLF Insulator Tests.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1981-07-01

    construction contractor, Woerfel Corporation , on the other hand. The controversy concerned the accept- ability of the guy strain insulators in terms of meeting...specification, 21-75-0043, resulted in Contract N62477-75- C-0043 to Decca Austin Insulator Corporation of Branson, Ontario; after a design conference in...Appendix F: NELC Specification: Insulator Assembly, Electrical, VLF Antenna Base (ELEX-I-157) 7. Appendix G: Megatek Corporation Final Report: Testing

  1. Aerogels Insulate Missions and Consumer Products

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2008-01-01

    Aspen Aerogels, of Northborough, Massachusetts, worked with NASA through an SBIR contract with Kennedy Space Center to develop a robust, flexible form of aerogel for cryogenic insulation for space shuttle launch applications. The company has since used the same manufacturing process developed under the SBIR award to expand its product offerings into the more commercial realms, making the naturally fragile aerogel available for the first time as a standard insulation that can be handled and installed just like standard insulation.

  2. Protection against telomeric position effects by the chicken cHS4 β-globin insulator

    PubMed Central

    Rincón-Arano, Héctor; Furlan-Magaril, Mayra; Recillas-Targa, Félix

    2007-01-01

    Epigenetic silencing of genes relocated near telomeres, termed telomeric position effect, has been extensively studied in yeast and more recently in vertebrates. However, protection of a transgene against telomeric position effects by chromatin insulators has not yet been addressed. In this work we investigated the capacity of the chicken β-globin insulator cHS4 to shield a transgene against silencing by telomeric heterochromatin. Using telomeric repeats, we targeted transgene integration into telomeres of the chicken cell line HD3. When the chicken cHS4 insulator is incorporated to the transgene, we observe a sustained gene expression of single-copy integrants that can be maintained for >100 days of continuous culture. However, uninsulated single-copy clones showed an accelerated gene expression extinction profile. Unexpectedly, telomeric silencing was not reversed with trichostatin A or nicotidamine. In contrast, significant reactivation was obtained with 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine, consistent with the subtelomeric DNA methylation status. Strikingly, insulated transgenes integrated into telomeric regions were enriched in histone methylation, such as H3K4me2 and H3K79me2, but not in histone acetylation. Furthermore, the cHS4 insulator counteracts telomeric position effects in an upstream stimulatory factor-independent manner. Our results suggest that this insulator has the capacity to adapt to different chromatin propagation signals in distinct insertional epigenome environments. PMID:17715059

  3. Tree Rings: Timekeepers of the Past.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Phipps, R. L.; McGowan, J.

    One of a series of general interest publications on science issues, this booklet describes the uses of tree rings in historical and biological recordkeeping. Separate sections cover the following topics: dating of tree rings, dating with tree rings, tree ring formation, tree ring identification, sample collections, tree ring cross dating, tree…

  4. 16 CFR 460.2 - What is home insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... INSULATION § 460.2 What is home insulation. Insulation is any material mainly used to slow down heat flow. It... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false What is home insulation. 460.2 Section 460.2..., semirigid, flexible, or loose-fill form. Home insulation is for use in old or new homes,...

  5. 16 CFR 460.2 - What is home insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... INSULATION § 460.2 What is home insulation. Insulation is any material mainly used to slow down heat flow. It... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false What is home insulation. 460.2 Section 460.2..., semirigid, flexible, or loose-fill form. Home insulation is for use in old or new homes,...

  6. 16 CFR 460.2 - What is home insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... INSULATION § 460.2 What is home insulation. Insulation is any material mainly used to slow down heat flow. It... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false What is home insulation. 460.2 Section 460.2..., semirigid, flexible, or loose-fill form. Home insulation is for use in old or new homes,...

  7. Ring currents in azulene

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paxton, A. T.; Todorov, T. N.; Elena, A. M.

    2009-11-01

    We propose a self consistent polarisable ion tight binding theory for the study of push-pull processes in aromatic molecules. We find that the method quantitatively reproduces ab initio calculations of dipole moments and polarisability. We apply the scheme in a simulation which solves the time dependent Schrödinger equation to follow the relaxation of azulene from the second excited to the ground states. We observe rather spectacular oscillating ring currents which we explain in terms of interference between the HOMO and LUMO states.

  8. Systems and Methods for Providing Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Golden, Johnny L. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    Systems and methods provide a multi-layer insulation (MLI) that includes a plurality of sealed metalized volumes in a stacked arrangement, wherein the plurality of sealed metalized volumes encapsulate a gas therein, with the gas having one of a thermal insulating property, an acoustic insulating property, or a combination insulating property thereof. The MLI also includes at least one spacer between adjacent sealed metalized volumes of the plurality of sealed metalized volumes and a protective cover surrounding the plurality of sealed metalized volumes.

  9. Inspecting Pipe Radiographically Through Asbestos Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gianettino, David P.

    1994-01-01

    Welds between sections of insulated steampipe located and inspected radiographically. Unless need to repair defective weld, one avoids cost, time, and hazard of removing asbestos insulation. Enables inspectors to locate and evaluate nondestructively any weld in pipe system, without shutting down steam. Hidden weld joints first located by use of low-power fluoroscope, moved along pipe while technician observes fluoroscopic image. Low-energy x rays from fluoroscope penetrate insulation but not pipe. Weld bead appears in silhouette on fluoroscope screen. Technician then accurately marks weld sites on insulation for later inspection.

  10. Transmission in graphene-topological insulator heterostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    De Beule, C.; Zarenia, M.; Partoens, B.

    2017-03-01

    We investigate scattering of the topological surface state of a three-dimensional time-reversal invariant topological insulator when graphene is deposited on the topological-insulator surface. Specifically, we consider the (111) surface of a Bi2Se3 -like topological insulator. We present a low-energy model for the graphene-topological insulator heterostructure and we calculate the transmission probability at zigzag and armchair edges of the deposited graphene, and the conductance through graphene nanoribbon barriers, and show that its features can be understood from antiresonances in the transmission probability.

  11. Multilayer ultra high gradient insulator technology

    SciTech Connect

    Sampayan, S.E.; Vitello, P.A.; Krogh, M.L.; Elizondo, J.M.

    1998-03-27

    We are investigating a novel insulator concept which involves the use of alternating layers of conductors and insulators with periods less than 1 mm. These structures perform many times better (about 1.5 to 4 times higher breakdown electric field) than conventional insulators in long pulse, short pulse, and alternating polarity applications. We present our ongoing studies investigating the degradation of the breakdown electric field resulting from surface roughness, the effect of gas pressure, and the performance of the insulator structure under bi-polar stress. Further, we present our initial modeling studies.

  12. Wave structure in planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horn, Linda Joyce

    1992-01-01

    Planetary rings contain a wealth of wavelike structure that is driven by gravitational resonance interactions with nearby satellites. Wave behavior is a powerful tool for estimating physical ring parameters that are key to our understanding of ring origin and evolution. A new technique, utilizing the Burg autoregressive power spectral algorithm, was developed for probing the physical characteristics of rings and for detecting waves that are not otherwise visible. Data from the Voyager photopolarimeter (PPS) stellar occultations by the rings of Saturn, Uranus, and Neptune and the Voyager radio science (RSS) occultation by Saturn's rings were used. Local surface mass density estimates are obtained from the dispersion of 40 spiral density waves in Saturn's A ring, including 10 weaker waves not previously analyzed. Surface mass densities vary from 20 to 60 gm sq cm. Increasing optical depth is not correlated with increasing surface mass density, especially after the Keeler gap, suggesting that ring particle size and composition are not uniform throughout the A ring. Saturn's A ring mass is reestimated using the surface mass densities and is 5.2 +/- 1.3 x 1021 gm. The wakes of Saturn's satellite Pan are not short timescale phenomena because the effects of Pan's gravitational perturbations persist for more than one Pan encounter. Four additional Pan wakes were discovered at longitudes greater than 360 deg. Collective effects such as collisions modify the wake dispersion more extensively at greater longitudes. Pan is the dominant mass in the Encke gap. A spiral density wave was detected inside the Uranian delta ring. Upper and lower bounds were estimated for the surface mass density of the delta ring 5 less than or equal to sigma less than or equal to 10 gm/sq cm, the viscosity 10 less than or equal to nu less than or equal to 40 sq cm/sec, and the local ring height 7 less than or equal to h less than or equal to 20 m. These values are comparable to the corresponding

  13. Thermal Insulation Strips Conserve Energy

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2009-01-01

    Launching the space shuttle involves an interesting paradox: While the temperatures inside the shuttle s main engines climb higher than 6,000 F hot enough to boil iron for fuel, the engines use liquid hydrogen, the second coldest liquid on Earth after liquid helium. Maintained below 20 K (-423 F), the liquid hydrogen is contained in the shuttle s rust-colored external tank. The external tank also contains liquid oxygen (kept below a somewhat less chilly 90 K or -297 F) that combines with the hydrogen to create an explosive mixture that along with the shuttle s two, powdered aluminum-fueled solid rocket boosters allows the shuttle to escape Earth s gravity. The cryogenic temperatures of the main engines liquid fuel can cause ice, frost, or liquefied air to build up on the external tank and other parts of the numerous launch fueling systems, posing a possible debris risk when the ice breaks off during launch and causing difficulties in the transfer and control of these cryogenic liquid propellants. Keeping the fuel at the necessary ultra-cold temperatures while minimizing ice buildup and other safety hazards, as well as reducing the operational maintenance costs, has required NASA to explore innovative ways for providing superior thermal insulation systems. To address the challenge, the Agency turned to an insulating technology so effective that, even though it is mostly air, a thin sheet can prevent a blowtorch from igniting a match. Aerogels were invented in 1931 and demonstrate properties that make them the most extraordinary insulating materials known; a 1-inch-thick piece of aerogel provides the same insulation as layering 15 panes of glass with air pockets in between. Derived from silica, aluminum oxide, or carbon gels using a supercritical drying process - resulting in a composition of almost 99-percent air - aerogels are the world s lightest solid (among 15 other titles they hold in the Guinness World Records), can float indefinitely on water if treated to be

  14. Development of Pixelated Linear Avalanche Integration Detector Using Silicon on Insulator Technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koyama, Akihiro; Shimazoe, Kenji; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Hamasaki, Ryutaro; Orita, Tadashi; Onuki, Yoshiyuki; Otani, Wataru; Takeshita, Tohru; Kurachi, Ikuo; Miyoshi, Toshinobu; Nakamura, Isamu; Arai, Yasuo

    In various X-ray imaging applications such as single photon counting X-ray CT, micrometer scale spatial resolution and high detection efficiency possibility using structured porous scintillator took great interests. In order to achieve precise energy- and timing information measurements, high sensitive separately readable photo detector needs to be coupled to porous crystal. Therefore, we fabricated test element group (TEG) of micro sized linear avalanche integration detector (Plaid) on a silicon on insulator (SOI) wafer and inspected performance of each device. Measurements results showed guard ring structure achieved avalanche gain of magnitude from 10 to 1000 with lower gain saturation effect than non-guard ring structure. We concluded guard ring structure is desirable to achieve stable gain performance toward various optical powers and efficient to use for scintillation light read out.

  15. Electrical Conduction in Thin Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinha, Anil Kumar, , Dr.

    2003-10-01

    ABSTRACT: The study of Conduction mechanism in Insulator(Mica)of thickness from 20-80 microns has been carried out.The effect of varying electrical fields upto 50 MV/m at room temperature were studied.A sample of thickness 80 microns exibits non-linear behavior at fields beyond 24 MV/m. Other sample of thickness 50 microns,40 microns and 20 microns exibit linear behavior at low fields.On increasing the field furthur a sharp rise in current is obersved. Eventually at fields beyond 20 MV/m,the current does not continue to rise sharply and the rate of increase slow down very much.The log J-log V characterstics were obtained for various samples.For a sample of thickness of 20 microns,there are three distinct regions were found, having different slopes.The slope the second region indicates a square law dependence.The studies with these Mica films indicated different conduction processes at different field strenght.At field,ranging from(10-20)MV/m, the current was found to be SPACE-CHARGE LIMITED,due to shallow trapping of electrons.Beyond this field,however,at room temperature,the current did not show as sharp a rise as it should in case of an insulator caontaining shallow traps.This behavior has been attributed to the electron- phonon interactions.At higher temperature the current increased with fields as in the case of an insulator contaning shallow traps.A SPACE-CHARGE LIMITED CONDUCTION MECHANISM due to shallow traping of electrons has been suggested.This has been undertaken in view of growing interest and application of integrated circuitry.

  16. The Charging of Planetary Rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graps, Amara L.; Horanyi, M.; Havnes, O.; Gruen, E.

    2008-09-01

    Planetary rings have an undeniable aesthetic appeal, resulting in media icons of ringed planets as descriptive of the planetary sciences field as a whole. Such far-reaching symbolism might not be misplaced, however, because planetary rings represent a fundamental class of planetary structure that invites interdisciplinary investigations from specialists in dust, gravitational, plasma, collisional, and radiative transfer physics, due to: its sub-micron to meters-sized particles, its immersion in the planet's magnetic field, its embedded moonlets and its close proximity to the ringed planet's ionosphere and innermost moons. As such, planetary rings are a metaphoric bridge through a wide range of planetary physical processes. Processes to charge ring particles have different relative dynamical effects, dependent upon the rings' particle sizes, and the ring's plasma, magnetic and gravitational environments. This presentation will review what is known about the charging parameters and processes of planetary rings, in particular the sum of the individual currents from the time-varying charge dQ/dt, of the planetary ring particle. The individual currents depend on the environmental plasma conditions: number density, flow speed, temperature, and mass for the currents: electron and ion capture from the plasma, ion currents to a moving grain, photoelectron emission, secondary electron emission, thermionic effects, with stochastic charging influencing all of the above. Since rings are an ensemble of particles, ("cloud" Ring), we will define an ensemble, and consider the above currents, including those for the smallest ring particles, the dust particles, to arrive at a table giving charge potential and other relevant parameters.

  17. Fully synthetic taped insulation cables

    DOEpatents

    Forsyth, E.B.; Muller, A.C.

    1983-07-15

    The present invention is a cable which, although constructed from inexpensive polyolefin tapes and using typical impregnating oils, furnishes high voltage capability up to 765 kV, and has such excellent dielectric characteristics and heat transfer properties that it is capable of operation at capacities equal to or higher than presently available cables at a given voltage. This is accomplished by using polyethylene, polybutene or polypropylene insulating tape which has been specially processed to attain properties which are not generally found in these materials, but are required for their use in impregnated electrical cables. Chief among these properties is compatibility with impregnating oil.

  18. Superconducting interfaces between insulating oxides.

    PubMed

    Reyren, N; Thiel, S; Caviglia, A D; Kourkoutis, L Fitting; Hammerl, G; Richter, C; Schneider, C W; Kopp, T; Rüetschi, A-S; Jaccard, D; Gabay, M; Muller, D A; Triscone, J-M; Mannhart, J

    2007-08-31

    At interfaces between complex oxides, electronic systems with unusual electronic properties can be generated. We report on superconductivity in the electron gas formed at the interface between two insulating dielectric perovskite oxides, LaAlO3 and SrTiO3. The behavior of the electron gas is that of a two-dimensional superconductor, confined to a thin sheet at the interface. The superconducting transition temperature of congruent with 200 millikelvin provides a strict upper limit to the thickness of the superconducting layer of congruent with 10 nanometers.

  19. Insulating panels with rice husk

    SciTech Connect

    Salas, J.; Veras, J.

    1986-01-01

    This study includes the quantitative results of tests caried out on 7.5 x 15.0 cm cylindrical test pieces and fullsized panels with a cement and rice husk, produced by using means belonging to the so-called ''appropriate technologies''. These results are summarized and analyzed with a view to providing a possible alternative for substituting other insulating materials, which are generally imported, in developing countries. The technical results presented point towards a promising future for the task undertaken, within the context of a research project on ''materials, technologies and prototypes for very low-cost housing'' which, in a - multinational capacity, is being developed at the Instituto E. Torroja.

  20. Electrically insulating and sealing frame

    DOEpatents

    Guthrie, Robin J.

    1983-11-08

    A combination gas seal and electrical insulator having a closed frame shape interconnects a fuel cell stack and a reactant gas plenum of a fuel cell generator. The frame can be of rectangular shape including at least one slidable spline connection in each side to permit expansion or contraction consistent with that of the walls of the gas plenum and fuel cell stack. The slidable spline connections in the frame sides minimizes lateral movement between the frame side members and sealing material interposed between the frame and the fuel cell stack or between the frame and the reactant gas plenum.

  1. Processing of insulators and semiconductors

    DOEpatents

    Quick, Nathaniel R.; Joshi, Pooran C.; Duty, Chad Edward; Jellison, Jr., Gerald Earle; Angelini, Joseph Attilio

    2015-06-16

    A method is disclosed for processing an insulator material or a semiconductor material. The method includes pulsing a plasma lamp onto the material to diffuse a doping substance into the material, to activate the doping substance in the material or to metallize a large area region of the material. The method may further include pulsing a laser onto a selected region of the material to diffuse a doping substance into the material, to activate the doping substance in the material or to metallize a selected region of the material.

  2. Spin currents and magnon dynamics in insulating magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakata, Kouki; Simon, Pascal; Loss, Daniel

    2017-03-01

    Nambu–Goldstone theorem provides gapless modes to both relativistic and nonrelativistic systems. The Nambu–Goldstone bosons in insulating magnets are called magnons or spin-waves and play a key role in magnetization transport. We review here our past works on magnetization transport in insulating magnets and also add new insights, with a particular focus on magnon transport. We summarize in detail the magnon counterparts of electron transport, such as the Wiedemann–Franz law, the Onsager reciprocal relation between the Seebeck and Peltier coefficients, the Hall effects, the superconducting state, the Josephson effects, and the persistent quantized current in a ring to list a few. Focusing on the electromagnetism of moving magnons, i.e. magnetic dipoles, we theoretically propose a way to directly measure magnon currents. As a consequence of the Mermin–Wagner–Hohenberg theorem, spin transport is drastically altered in one-dimensional antiferromagnetic (AF) spin-1/2 chains; where the Néel order is destroyed by quantum fluctuations and a quasiparticle magnon-like picture breaks down. Instead, the low-energy collective excitations of the AF spin chain are described by a Tomonaga–Luttinger liquid (TLL) which provides the spin transport properties in such antiferromagnets some universal features at low enough temperature. Finally, we enumerate open issues and provide a platform to discuss the future directions of magnonics.

  3. Buoyant Norbury's vortex rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Blyth, Mark; Rodriguez-Rodriguez, Javier; Salman, Hayder

    2014-11-01

    Norbury's vortices are a one-parameter family of axisymmetric vortex rings that are exact solutions to the Euler equations. Due to their relative simplicity, they are extensively used to model the behavior of real vortex rings found in experiments and in Nature. In this work, we extend the original formulation of the problem to include buoyancy effects for the case where the fluid that lies within the vortex has a different density to that of the ambient. In this modified formulation, buoyancy effects enter the problem through the baroclinic term of the vorticity equation. This permits an efficient numerical solution of the governing equation of motion in terms of a vortex contour method that tracks the evolution of the boundary of the vortex. Finally, we compare our numerical results with the theoretical analysis of the short-time evolution of a buoyant vortex. Funded by the Spanish Ministry of Economy and Competitiveness through grant DPI2011-28356-C03-02 and by the London Mathematical Society.

  4. Storage ring injection

    SciTech Connect

    Burke, R.J.

    1980-01-01

    Some basic issues involved in injecting the beam into storage rings with the principal parameters of those studied at the workshop have been considered. The main conclusion is that straightforward adjustments of the storage ring parameters makes injection easy. The largest number of injected turns is fourteen, and the phase space dilution allowance seems adequate to ensure very small beam loss during injection. The adjustments also result in lower bending magnet fields, and high field superconducting magnets (e.g., 5 Tesla) are not necessary. The design changes do not necessarily affect the Keil-Schnell criterion for stability of the longitudinal microwave instability, although that criterion appears to be irrelevant. Because the beams are expected to be unstable, but with slow growth rates, the vacuum chamber impedances required to give equal risetimes for the various designs are compared for systems posing various degrees of difficulty for injection. Finally, the impact of the parameters on cost is noted, and a system is considered that cuts the length of the linac in half by using doubly charged ions.

  5. Ring current and radiation belts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, D. J.

    1987-01-01

    Studies performed during 1983-1986 on the ring current, the injection boundary model, and the radiation belts are discussed. The results of these studies yielded the first observations on the composition and charge state of the ring current throughout the ring-current energy range, and strong observational support for an injection-boundary model accounting for the origins of radiation-belt particles, the ring current, and substorm particles observed at R less than about 7 earth radii. In addition, the results have demonstrated that the detection of energetic neutral atoms generated by charge-exchange interactions between the ring current and the hydrogen geocorona can provide global images of the earth's ring current and its spatial and temporal evolution.

  6. Reversible Rings with Involutions and Some Minimalities

    PubMed Central

    Fakieh, W. M.; Nauman, S. K.

    2013-01-01

    In continuation of the recent developments on extended reversibilities on rings, we initiate here a study on reversible rings with involutions, or, in short, ∗-reversible rings. These rings are symmetric, reversible, reflexive, and semicommutative. In this note we will study some properties and examples of ∗-reversible rings. It is proved here that the polynomial rings of ∗-reversible rings may not be ∗-reversible. A criterion for rings which cannot adhere to any involution is developed and it is observed that a minimal noninvolutary ring is of order 4 and that a minimal noncommutative ∗-reversible ring is of order 16. PMID:24489510

  7. Keck observations of the 2002 2003 jovian ring plane crossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    de Pater, Imke; Showalter, Mark R.; Macintosh, Bruce

    2008-05-01

    We present new observations of Jupiter's ring system at a wavelength of 2.2 μm obtained with the 10-m W.M. Keck telescopes on three nights during a ring plane crossing: UT 19 December 2002, and 22 and 26 January 2003. We used conventional imaging, plus adaptive optics on the last night. Here we present detailed radial profiles of the main ring, halo and gossamer rings, and interpret the data together with information extracted from radio observations of Jupiter's synchrotron radiation. The main ring is confined to a 800-km-wide annulus between 128,200 and 129,000 km, with a ˜5000 km extension on the inside. The normal optical depth is 8×10, 15% of which is provided by bodies with radii a≳5 cm. These bodies are as red as Metis. Half the optical depth, τ≈4×10, is attributed to micron-sized dust, and the remaining τ≈3×10 to grains tens to hundreds of μm in size. The inward extension consists of micron-sized ( a≲10 μm) dust, which probably migrates inward under Poynting-Robertson drag. The inner limit of this extension falls near the 3:2 Lorentz resonance (at orbital radius r=122,400 km), and coincides with the outer limit of the halo. The gossamer rings appear to be radially confined, rather than broad sheets of material. The Amalthea ring is triangularly shaped, with a steep outer dropoff over ˜5000 km, extending a few 1000 km beyond the orbit of Amalthea, and a more gradual inner dropoff over 15,000-20,000 km. The inner edge is near the location of the synchronous orbit. The optical depth in the Amalthea ring is ˜5×10, up to 20% of which is comprised of macroscopic material. The optical depth in the Thebe ring is a factor of 3 smaller.

  8. RADIATION MONITOR CONTAINING TWO CONCENTRIC IONIZATION CHAMBERS AND MEANS FOR INSULATING THE SEPARATE CHAMBERS

    DOEpatents

    Braestrup, C.B.; Mooney, R.T.

    1964-01-21

    This invention relates to a portable radiation monitor containing two concentric ionization chambers which permit the use of standard charging and reading devices. It is particularly adapted as a personnel x-ray dosimeter and to this end comprises a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an inner energy dependent chamber, a small thin walled, cylindrical conductor forming an outer energy independent chamber, and polymeric insulation means which insulates said chambers from each other and holds the chambers together with exposed connections in a simple, trouble-free, and compact assembly substantially without variation in directional response. (AEC)

  9. Interfacing Topological Insulators with Ferromagnetism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Richardella, Anthony

    In topological insulators, the surface states arise from strong spin-orbit coupling while the degeneracy of the Dirac point is protected by time reversal symmetry. Introducing magnetism in proximity to the surface states breaks this symmetry, destroying the non-trivial Berry phase at the Dirac point and leads to a hedgehog spin texture near the newly opened magnetic gap. This symmetry broken phase leads to a host of unusual physics, such as the quantum anomalous Hall (QAH) effect. In this talk, we discuss the growth by molecular beam epitaxy and characterization of such magnetically interfaced and magnetically doped topological insulators. Such materials often suffer from structural defects and interfacial layers, as well as from degradation during device fabrication. In particular, it is shown that Cr doped (Bi1-x,Sbx)2Te3 can exhibit perfect Hall quantization at low temperatures despite these defects. However, the magnetic ordering of this material was found to be quite unusual, displaying a super-paramagnetic like character, perhaps reflecting this disorder. Such observations highlight the surprising behavior of such broken symmetry phases in topological materials. This work was performed in collaboration with A. Kandala, M. Liu, W. Wang, N.P. Ong, C.-X. Liu, and N. Samarth, in addition to the authors of the references cited. This work was supported by funding from ARO/MURI, DARPA and ONR.

  10. Sialons as high temperature insulators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Phillips, W. M.; Kuo, Y. S.

    1978-01-01

    Sialons were evaluated for application as high temperature electrical insulators in contact with molybdenum and tungsten components in hard vacuum applications. Both D.C. and variable frequency A.C. resistivity data indicate the sialons to have electrical resistivity similar to common oxide in the 1000 C or higher range. Metallographic evaluations indicate good bonding of the type 15R ALN polytype to molybdenum and tungsten. The beta prime or modified silicon nitride phase was unacceptable in terms of vacuum stability. Additives effect on electrical resistivity. Similar resistivity decreases were produced by additions of molybdenum or tungsten to form cermets. The use of hot pressing at 1800 C with ALN, Al2 O3 and Si3N4 starting powders produced a better product than did a combination of SiO2 and AIN staring powders. It was indicated that sialons will be suitable insulators in the 1600K range in contact with molybdenum or tungsten if they are produced as a pure ceramic and subsequently bonded to the metal components at temperatures in the 1600K range.

  11. Corona processing of insulating oil

    SciTech Connect

    Rohwein, G.J.

    1996-07-01

    It is well known that sustained corona discharge in insulating oil lowers its dielectric strength and simultaneously reduces its corona resistance. Therefore, for operating stresses in the corona regime, activity typically increases with time and, if allowed to continue, eventually leads to breakdown of the oil and failure of the component or system. It is, therefore, common practice to periodically replace oil in devices such as large power transformers and switch gear before breakdown occurs. Sealed components such as capacitors are typically replaced. Recent experiments have demonstrated that the dielectric properties of corona weakened oil can not only be restored, but actually improved by a simple regeneration process. These experiments were carried out on high voltage pulse transformer windings which were operated at high rep rates until partial discharges formed. Reprocessing the oil after each operating cycle resulted in successively longer operational periods before partial discharges appeared. In a separate experiment, a process was developed to precondition transformer oil to raise its corona inception voltage before using it to insulate a high voltage component, thus giving it a longer initial service life for a given operating stress or permitting higher stress operation for limited operating times.

  12. The RING Finger E3 Ligase SpRing is a Positive Regulator of Salt Stress Signaling in Salt-Tolerant Wild Tomato Species.

    PubMed

    Qi, Shilian; Lin, Qingfang; Zhu, Huishan; Gao, Fenghua; Zhang, Wenhao; Hua, Xuejun

    2016-03-01

    Protein ubiquitination in plants plays critical roles in many biological processes, including adaptation to abiotic stresses. Previously, RING finger E3 ligase has been characterized during salt stress response in several plant species, but little is known about its function in tomato. Here, we report that SpRing, a stress-inducible gene, is involved in salt stress signaling in wild tomato species Solanum pimpinellifolium 'PI365967'. In vitro ubiquitination assay revealed that SpRing is an E3 ubiquitin ligase and the RING finger conserved region is required for its activity. SpRing is expressed in all tissues of wild tomato and up-regulated by salt, drought and osmotic stresses, but repressed by low temperature. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) fusion analysis showed that SpRing is localized at the endoplasmic reticulum. Silencing of SpRing through a virus-induced gene silencing approach led to increased sensitivity to salt stress in wild tomato. Overexpression of SpRing in Arabidopsis thaliana resulted in enhanced salt tolerance during seed germination and early seedling development. The expression levels of certain key stress-related genes are altered both in SpRing-overexpressing Arabidopsis plants and virus-induced gene silenced tomato seedlings. Taken together, our results indicate that SpRing is involved in salt stress and functions as a positive regulator of salt tolerance.

  13. Low-cost exterior insulation process and structure

    DOEpatents

    Vohra, A.

    1999-03-02

    A low-cost exterior insulation process of stacking bags of insulating material against a wall and covering them with wire mesh and stucco provides a durable structure with good insulating value. 2 figs.

  14. Formation of lunar basin rings

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Hodges, C.A.; Wilhelms, D.E.

    1978-01-01

    The origin of the multiple concentric rings that characterize lunar impact basins, and the probable depth and diameter of the transient crater have been widely debated. As an alternative to prevailing "megaterrace" hypotheses, we propose that the outer scarps or mountain rings that delineate the topographic rims of basins-the Cordilleran at Orientale, the Apennine at Imbrium, and the Altai at Nectaris-define the transient cavities, enlarged relatively little by slumping, and thus are analogous to the rim crests of craters like Copernicus; inner rings are uplifted rims of craters nested within the transient cavity. The magnitude of slumping that occurs on all scarps is insufficient to produce major inner rings from the outer. These conclusions are based largely on the observed gradational sequence in lunar central uplifts:. from simple peaks through somewhat annular clusters of peaks, peak and ring combinations and double ring basins, culminating in multiring structures that may also include peaks. In contrast, belts of slump terraces are not gradational with inner rings. Terrestrial analogs suggest two possible mechanisms for producing rings. In some cases, peaks may expand into rings as material is ejected from their cores, as apparently occurred at Gosses Bluff, Australia. A second process, differential excavation of lithologically diverse layers, has produced nested experimental craters and is, we suspect, instrumental in the formation of terrestrial ringed impact craters. Peak expansion could produce double-ring structures in homogeneous materials, but differential excavation is probably required to produce multiring and peak-in-ring configurations in large lunar impact structures. Our interpretation of the representative lunar multiring basin Orientale is consistent with formation of three rings in three layers detected seismically in part of the Moon-the Cordillera (basin-bounding) ring in the upper crust, the composite Montes Rook ring in the underlying

  15. Fingering inside the coffee ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weon, Byung Mook; Je, Jung Ho

    2013-01-01

    Colloidal droplets including micro- and nanoparticles generally leave a ringlike stain, called the “coffee ring,” after evaporation. We show that fingering emerges during evaporation inside the coffee ring, resulting from a bidispersed colloidal mixture of micro- and nanoparticles. Microscopic observations suggest that finger formation is driven by competition between the coffee-ring and Marangoni effects, especially when the inward Marangoni flow is overwhelmed by the outward coffee-ring flow. This finding could help to understand the variety of the final deposition patterns of colloidal droplets.

  16. Split ring containment attachment device

    DOEpatents

    Sammel, Alfred G.

    1996-01-01

    A containment attachment device 10 for operatively connecting a glovebag 200 to plastic sheeting 100 covering hazardous material. The device 10 includes an inner split ring member 20 connected on one end 22 to a middle ring member 30 wherein the free end 21 of the split ring member 20 is inserted through a slit 101 in the plastic sheeting 100 to captively engage a generally circular portion of the plastic sheeting 100. A collar potion 41 having an outer ring portion 42 is provided with fastening means 51 for securing the device 10 together wherein the glovebag 200 is operatively connected to the collar portion 41.

  17. Saturn's Rings Edge-on

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    In one of nature's most dramatic examples of 'now-you see-them, now-you-don't', NASA's Hubble Space Telescope captured Saturn on May 22, 1995 as the planet's magnificent ring system turned edge-on. This ring-plane crossing occurs approximately every 15 years when the Earth passes through Saturn's ring plane.

    For comparison, the top picture was taken by Hubble on December 1, 1994 and shows the rings in a more familiar configuration for Earth observers.

    The bottom picture was taken shortly before the ring plane crossing. The rings do not disappear completely because the edge of the rings reflects sunlight. The dark band across the middle of Saturn is the shadow of the rings cast on the planet (the Sun is almost 3 degrees above the ring plane.) The bright stripe directly above the ring shadow is caused by sunlight reflected off the rings onto Saturn's atmosphere. Two of Saturn's icy moons are visible as tiny starlike objects in or near the ring plane. They are, from left to right, Tethys (slightly above the ring plane) and Dione.

    This observation will be used to determine the time of ring-plane crossing and the thickness of the main rings and to search for as yet undiscovered satellites. Knowledge of the exact time of ring-plane crossing will lead to an improved determination of the rate at which Saturn 'wobbles' about its axis (polar precession).

    Both pictures were taken with Hubble's Wide Field Planetary Camera 2. The top image was taken in visible light. Saturn's disk appears different in the bottom image because a narrowband filter (which only lets through light that is not absorbed by methane gas in Saturn's atmosphere) was used to reduce the bright glare of the planet. Though Saturn is approximately 900 million miles away, Hubble can see details as small as 450 miles across.

    The Wide Field/Planetary Camera 2 was developed by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and managed by the Goddard Spaced Flight Center for NASA's Office of Space Science

  18. Cotton-Fiber-Filled Rubber Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, Floyd A.

    1987-01-01

    Carbonization of fibers at high temperatures improves strength and erosion resistance. Cotton linters tested as replacement for asbestos filler currently used in rubber insulation in solid rocket motors. Cotton-filled rubber insulation has industrial uses; in some kinds of chemical- or metal-processing equipment, hoses, and protective clothing.

  19. Advanced Space Suit Insulation Feasibility Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Trevino, Luis A.; Orndoff, Evelyne S.

    2000-01-01

    For planetary applications, the space suit insulation has unique requirements because it must perform in a dynamic mode to protect humans in the harsh dust, pressure and temperature environments. Since the presence of a gaseous planetary atmosphere adds significant thermal conductance to the suit insulation, the current multi-layer flexible insulation designed for vacuum applications is not suitable in reduced pressure planetary environments such as that of Mars. Therefore a feasibility study has been conducted at NASA to identify the most promising insulation concepts that can be developed to provide an acceptable suit insulation. Insulation concepts surveyed include foams, microspheres, microfibers, and vacuum jackets. The feasibility study includes a literature survey of potential concepts, an evaluation of test results for initial insulation concepts, and a development philosophy to be pursued as a result of the initial testing and conceptual surveys. The recommended focus is on microfibers due to the versatility of fiber structure configurations, the wide choice of fiber materials available, the maturity of the fiber processing industry, and past experience with fibers in insulation applications

  20. Reflecting layers reduce weight of insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cole, J. D.; Schlessinger, E. D.; Rockoff, H. J.

    1981-01-01

    Metalized films placed between layers of fibrous material maintain equivalent thermal conductivity while cutting blanket density in half. Tests indicate that insulation with 1 lb/cu ft density with goldized films has thermal conductivity equal to 2 lb/cu ft of conventional insulation. Concept reduces weight in commercial aircraft and increases cargo space.

  1. Internal capillary insulation for cryogenic tanks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mcgrew, J. L.

    1972-01-01

    Capillary-type insulation was devised for installation on inside of liquid methane fuel tanks for future aircraft. Insulation consists of honeycomb core of fiberglass cloth impregnated with polyimide resin which is bonded onto metal tank wall using polyimide adhesive. Capillary holes in each honeycomb cell admit methane which provides static pressure in cell.

  2. Development of extruded polymer insulated superconducting cable

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kosaki, M.; Nagao, M.; Mizuno, Y.; Shimizu, N.; Horii, K.

    A superconducting power cable which has a structure similar to the conventional extruded polyethylene cable is proposed. The main features of the design are to exploit the excellent electrical properties of polymers at cryogenic temperatures and to separate the helium coolant from the electrical insulation. However, the most hazardous problem of this insulation system is cracking of the extruded polymer insulation during cooling. In order to examine the feasibility of the above proposal, a superconducting cable of rated voltage 20 kV and rated current 2 kA was manufactured, being suitable for the university laboratory tests. Extruded polyethylene or ethylene propylene rubber was adopted as electrical insulation. Current transmission tests up to 2.5 kA were performed with extruded polyethylene insulated superconducting cable though the insulation cracked during cooling. Voltage application tests were carried out with fair success at the liquid helium temperature with extruded ethylene propylene rubber insulated cable. This ia a breakthrough in terms of the electrical insulation design of cryogenic cables.

  3. Insulation board and process of making

    DOEpatents

    Nowobilski, J.J.; Owens, W.J.

    1985-08-27

    Insulation board is described which is capable of bearing a load without significant loss of insulating capacity due to compression, produced by a method wherein the board is made in compliance with specified conditions of time, temperature and pressure. 2 figs.

  4. Uniform insulation applied-B ion diode

    DOEpatents

    Seidel, David B.; Slutz, Stephen A.

    1988-01-01

    An applied-B field extraction ion diode has uniform insulation over an anode surface for increased efficiency. When the uniform insulation is accomplished with anode coils, and a charge-exchange foil is properly placed, the ions may be focused at a point on the z axis.

  5. Insulator (Heat and Frost). Occupational Analyses Series.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McRory, Aline; Ally, Mohamed

    This analysis covers tasks performed by an insulator, an occupational title some provinces and territories of Canada have also identified as heat and frost insulator. A guide to analysis discusses development, structure, and validation method; scope of the occupation; trends; and safety. To facilitate understanding the nature of the occupation,…

  6. Engineered Ceramic Insulators for High Field Magnets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rice, J. A.

    2006-03-01

    High field magnet coils made from brittle A15 superconductors need to be rigidly contained by their support structure but yet be electrically insulated from it. Current insulators (end shoes, pole pieces, spacers, mandrels, etc.) are often made from coated metallic shapes that satisfy the mechanical and thermal requirements but are electrically unreliable. The insulating coating on the metal core too often chips or flakes, causing electrical shorts. Any replacement insulator materials must manage the thermal expansion mismatch to control the stress within the coil enabling the achievement of ultimate magnet performance. A novel ceramic insulator has been developed that eliminates the potential for shorting while maintaining high structural integrity and thermal performance. The insulator composition can be engineered to provide a thermal expansion that matches the coil expansion, minimizing detrimental stress on the superconductor. These ceramic insulators are capable of surviving high temperature heat treatments and are radiation resistant. The material can withstand high mechanical loads generated during magnet operation. These more robust insulators will lower the magnet production costs, which will help enable future devices to be constructed within budgetary restrictions.

  7. Topological insulators: A romance with many dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manoharan, Hari C.

    2010-07-01

    Electric charges on the boundaries of certain insulators are programmed by topology to keep moving forward when they encounter an obstacle, rather than scattering backwards and increasing the resistance of the system. This is just one reason why topological insulators are one of the hottest topics in physics right now.

  8. 49 CFR 179.300-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Insulation. 179.300-4 Section 179.300-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-4 Insulation. (a) Tanks shall not...

  9. 49 CFR 179.220-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... space between the inner container and the outer shell must contain an approved insulation material. ... 49 Transportation 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Insulation. 179.220-4 Section 179.220-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  10. 49 CFR 179.220-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... inner container and the outer shell must contain an approved insulation material. ... 49 Transportation 3 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Insulation. 179.220-4 Section 179.220-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  11. 49 CFR 179.220-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... inner container and the outer shell must contain an approved insulation material. ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Insulation. 179.220-4 Section 179.220-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  12. 49 CFR 179.300-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Insulation. 179.300-4 Section 179.300-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-4 Insulation. (a) Tanks shall not...

  13. 49 CFR 179.220-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... inner container and the outer shell must contain an approved insulation material. ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Insulation. 179.220-4 Section 179.220-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS...

  14. 49 CFR 179.300-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Insulation. 179.300-4 Section 179.300-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-4 Insulation. (a) Tanks shall not...

  15. 49 CFR 179.300-4 - Insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 49 Transportation 3 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Insulation. 179.300-4 Section 179.300-4 Transportation Other Regulations Relating to Transportation (Continued) PIPELINE AND HAZARDOUS MATERIALS SAFETY...-Unit Tank Car Tanks (Classes DOT-106A and 110AW) § 179.300-4 Insulation. (a) Tanks shall not...

  16. Method of thermally insulating a wellbore

    SciTech Connect

    Mckinzie, H.L.

    1981-07-07

    A method is claimed for thermally insulating the borehole of a well in a thermal process for oil recovery by providing in the annular space between the casing and the well tubing a flowable, solid material having thermal insulating properties, such as vermiculite or perlite. Removal of the material is by fluidization thereof.

  17. Flex-gear power transmission system for transmitting EMF between Sun and ring gears

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vranish, John M. (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    A plurality of flexible cylindrical members, termed flex-gears and having gear tooth type perimeters are located in an annular space between two concentric rotating gear members, one an inner gear member and the other an outer ring gear member, both of which have mutually facing toothed surfaces which engage the flex-gears. The flex-gears rotate and orbit around the annular space as planetary gears when the inner and outer gear members rotate with respect to one another. Pairs of these elements located in two mutually parallel planes and separated by insulators provide two electrical conductor paths across which an electrical signal source, AC or DC, can be connected and coupled to an electrical device. Alternatively, one set of elements including outer gears segmented into mutually insulated semicircles and inner gears segmented into mutually insulated quadrants can be used.

  18. Triple-glazed insulating unit with improved edge insulation

    DOEpatents

    Goodwin, George B.; Buchanan, Michael J.

    2016-06-07

    An insulating unit includes a first spacer frame between first and second sheets, e.g. glass sheets, and a second spacer frame between the second sheet and a third sheet. A first surface of the first spacer frame is adhered to inner surface of the first sheet, and an opposite second surface of the first spacer frame is adhered to a first surface of the second sheet, by a moisture impervious adhesive layer. A first outer surface of the second spacer frame is adhered to a second surface of the second sheet, and an opposite second outer surface of the second spacer frame is adhered to an inner surface of the third sheet, by the adhesive layer. The first spacer frame and the second spacer frame have an offset of greater than zero.

  19. Black ring deconstruction

    SciTech Connect

    Gimon, Eric; Gimon, Eric G.; Levi, Thomas S.

    2007-06-22

    We present a sample microstate for a black ring in four and five dimensional language. The microstate consists of a black string microstate with an additional D6-brane. We show that with an appropriate choice of parameters the piece involving the black string microstate falls down a long AdS throat, whose M-theory lift is AdS_3 x S2. We wrap a spinning dipole M2-brane on the S2 in the probe approximation. In IIA, this corresponds to a dielectric D2-brane carrying only D0-charge. We conjecture this is the firstapproximation to a cloud of D0-branes blowing up due to their non-abelian degrees of freedom and the Myers effect.

  20. Ring around the colloid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cavallaro, Marcello, Jr.; Gharbi, Mohamed A.; Beller, Daniel A.; Čopar, Simon; Shi, Zheng; Kamien, Randall D.; Yang, Shu; Baumgart, Tobias; Stebe, Kathleen J.

    In this work, we show that Janus washers, genus-one colloids with hybrid anchoring conditions, form topologically required defects in nematic liquid crystals. Experiments under crossed polarizers reveal the defect structure to be a rigid disclination loop confined within the colloid, with an accompanying defect in the liquid crystal. When confined to a homeotropic cell, the resulting colloid-defect ring pair tilts relative to the far field director, in contrast to the behavior of toroidal colloids with purely homeotropic anchoring. We show that this tilting behavior can be reversibly suppressed by the introduction of a spherical colloid into the center of the toroid, creating a new kind of multi-shape colloidal assemblage.

  1. Insulator Surface Flashover Due to UV Illumination

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Lahowe, D A; Vogtlin, G E; Goerz, D A

    2009-07-27

    The surface of an insulator under vacuum and under electrical charge will flashover when illuminated by a critical dose of ultra-violet (UV) radiation - depending on the insulator size and material, insulator cone angle, the applied voltage and insulator shot-history. A testbed comprised of an excimer laser (KrF, 248 nm, {approx}16 MW, 30 ns FWHM,), a vacuum chamber, and a negative polarity dc high voltage power supply ({le} -60 kV) were assembled to test 1.0 cm thick angled insulators for surface-flashover. Several candidate insulator materials, e.g. High Density Polyethylene (HDPE), Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex, of varying cone angles were tested against UV illumination. Commercial energy meters were used to measure the UV fluence of the pulsed laser beam. In-house designed and fabricated capacitive probes (D-dots, >12 GHz bandwidth) were embedded in the anode electrode underneath the insulator to determine the time of UV arrival and time of flashover. Of the tested insulators, the +45 degree Rexolite insulator showed more resistance to UV for surface flashover; at UV fluence level of less than 13 mJ/cm{sup 2}, it was not possible to induce a flashover for up to -60 kV of DC potential across the insulator's surface. The probes also permitted the electrical charge on the insulator before and after flashover to be inferred. Photon to electron conversion efficiency for the surface of Rexolite insulator was determined from charge-balance equation. In order to understand the physical mechanism leading to flashover, we further experimented with the +45 degree Rexolite insulator by masking portions of the UV beam to illuminate only a section of the insulator surface; (1) the half nearest the cathode and subsequently, (2) the half nearest the anode. The critical UV fluence and time to flashover were measured and the results in each case were then compared with the base case of full-beam illumination. It was discovered that the time for the

  2. Novel Cryogenic Insulation Materials: Aerogel Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    White, Susan

    2001-01-01

    New insulation materials are being developed to economically and reliably insulate future reusable spacecraft cryogenic tanks over a planned lifecycle of extreme thermal challenges. These insulation materials must prevent heat loss as well as moisture and oxygen condensation on the cryogenic tanks during extended groundhold, must withstand spacecraft launch conditions, and must protect a partly full or empty reusable cryogenic tank from significant reentry heating. To perform over such an extreme temperature range, novel composites were developed from aerogels and high-temperature matrix material such as Space Shuttle tile. These materials were fabricated and tested for use both as cryogenic insulation and as high-temperature insulation. The test results given in this paper were generated during spacecraft re-entry heating simulation tests using cryogenic cooling.

  3. ITER CENTRAL SOLENOID COIL INSULATION QUALIFICATION

    SciTech Connect

    Martovetsky, N N; Mann, T L; Miller, J R; Freudenberg, K D; Reed, R P; Walsh, R P; McColskey, J D; Evans, D

    2009-06-11

    An insulation system for ITER Central Solenoid must have sufficiently high electrical and structural strength. Design efforts to bring stresses in the turn and layer insulation within allowables failed. It turned out to be impossible to eliminate high local tensile stresses in the winding pack. When high local stresses can not be designed out, the qualification procedure requires verification of the acceptable structural and electrical strength by testing. We built two 4 x 4 arrays of the conductor jacket with two options of the CS insulation and subjected the arrays to 1.2 million compressive cycles at 60 MPa and at 76 K. Such conditions simulated stresses in the CS insulation. We performed voltage withstand tests and after end of cycling we measured the breakdown voltages between in the arrays. After that we dissectioned the arrays and studied micro cracks in the insulation. We report details of the specimens preparation, test procedures and test results.

  4. The Saturn Ring Observer: In situ studies of planetary rings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicholson, P. D.; Tiscareno, M. S.; Spilker, L. J.

    2010-12-01

    As part of the Planetary Science Decadal Survey recently undertaken by the NRC's Space Studies Board for the National Academy of Sciences, studies were commissioned for a number of potential missions to outer planet targets. One of these studies examined the technological feasibility of a mission to carry out in situ studies of Saturn's rings, from a spacecraft placed in a circular orbit above the ring plane: the Saturn Ring Observer. The technical findings and background are discussed in a companion poster by T. R. Spilker et al. Here we outline the science goals of such a mission. Most of the fundamental interactions in planetary rings occur on spatial scales that are unresolved by flyby or orbiter spacecraft. Typical particle sizes in the rings of Saturn are in the 1 cm - 10 m range, and average interparticle spacings are a few meters. Indirect evidence indicates that the vertical thickness of the rings is as little as 5 - 10 m, which implies a velocity dispersion of only a few mm/sec. Theories of ring structure and evolution depend on the unknown characteristics of interparticle collisions and on the size distribution of the ring particles. The SRO could provide direct measurements of both the coefficient of restitution -- by monitoring individual collisions -- and the particles’ velocity dispersion. High-resolution observations of individual ring particles should also permit estimates of their spin states. Numerical simulations of Saturn’s rings incorporating both collisions and self-gravity predict that the ring particles are not uniformly distributed, but are instead clustered into elongated structures referred to as “self-gravity wakes”, which are continually created and destroyed on an orbital timescale. Theory indicates that the average separation between wakes in the A ring is of order 30-100 m. Direct imaging of self-gravity wakes, including their formation and subsequent dissolution, would provide critical validation of these models. Other

  5. Sclerotic Rings in Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae): Structures and Taxonomic Diversity

    PubMed Central

    Yamashita, Momo; Konishi, Takuya; Sato, Tamaki

    2015-01-01

    Mosasaurs (Squamata: Mosasauridae) were a highly diverse, globally distributed group of aquatic lizards in the Late Cretaceous (98–66 million years ago) that exhibited a high degree of adaptation to life in water. To date, despite their rich fossil record, the anatomy of complete mosasaur sclerotic rings, embedded in the sclera of the eyeball, has not been thoroughly investigated. We here describe and compare sclerotic rings of four mosasaur genera, Tylosaurus, Platecarpus, Clidastes, and Mosasaurus, for the first time. Two specimens of Tylosaurus and Platecarpus share an exact scleral ossicle arrangement, excepting the missing portion in the specimen of Platecarpus. Furthermore, the exact arrangement and the total count of 14 ossicles per ring are shared between Tylosaurus and numerous living terrestrial lizard taxa, pertaining to both Iguania and Scleroglossa. In contrast, two species of Mosasaurus share the identical count of 12 ossicles and the arrangement with each other, while no living lizard taxa share exactly the same arrangement. Such a mosaic distribution of these traits both among squamates globally and among obligatorily aquatic mosasaurs specifically suggests that neither the ossicle count nor their arrangement played major roles in the aquatic adaptation in mosasaur eyes. All the mosasaur sclerotic rings examined consistently exhibit aperture eccentricity and the scleral ossicles with gently convex outer side. Hitherto unknown to any squamate taxa, one specimen of Platecarpus unexpectedly shows a raised, concentric band of roughened surface on the inner surface of the sclerotic ring. It is possible that one or both of these latter features may have related to adaptation towards aquatic vision in mosasaurs, but further quantitative study of extant reptilian clades containing both terrestrial and aquatic taxa is critical and necessary in order to understand possible adaptive significances of such osteological features. PMID:25692667

  6. The KACST Heavy-Ion Electrostatic Storage Ring

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Almuqhim, A. A.; Alshammari, S. M.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Papash, A. I.; Welsch, C. P.

    2011-10-01

    A novel Electrostatic Storage Ring (ESR) for beams at energies up to 30keV/q is now being constructed at the National Centre for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP), King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). The ring is designed to be the core of a highly flexible experimental platform that will combine a large package of complementary beam techniques for atomic and molecular physics and related fields. The lattice design had to cover the different experimental techniques that the ring will be equipped with, such as e.g. Electron-Ion, Laser-Ion, Ion-Ion or Ion-Neutral beams, in both crossed and merged-beam configurations. The development of such an ESR is realized in a staged approach, in which a simple and early-run adaptation of the ring is built first, and then this basic version is upgraded to a higher symmetry of the ultimate version of the ring. Here, we report a general overview of this technical development with a focus on the layout of the first built stage of the ring.

  7. The KACST Heavy-Ion Electrostatic Storage Ring

    SciTech Connect

    Almuqhim, A. A.; Alshammari, S. M.; El Ghazaly, M. O. A.; Papash, A. I.; Welsch, C. P.

    2011-10-27

    A novel Electrostatic Storage Ring (ESR) for beams at energies up to 30keV/q is now being constructed at the National Centre for Mathematics and Physics (NCMP), King Abdul-Aziz City for Science and Technology (KACST). The ring is designed to be the core of a highly flexible experimental platform that will combine a large package of complementary beam techniques for atomic and molecular physics and related fields. The lattice design had to cover the different experimental techniques that the ring will be equipped with, such as e.g. Electron-Ion, Laser-Ion, Ion-Ion or Ion-Neutral beams, in both crossed and merged-beam configurations. The development of such an ESR is realized in a staged approach, in which a simple and early-run adaptation of the ring is built first, and then this basic version is upgraded to a higher symmetry of the ultimate version of the ring. Here, we report a general overview of this technical development with a focus on the layout of the first built stage of the ring.

  8. Fibre ring cavity semiconductor laser

    SciTech Connect

    Duraev, V P; Medvedev, S V

    2013-10-31

    This paper presents a study of semiconductor lasers having a polarisation maintaining fibre ring cavity. We examine the operating principle and report main characteristics of a semiconductor ring laser, in particular in single- and multiple-frequency regimes, and discuss its application areas. (lasers)

  9. Contraceptive vaginal rings: a review.

    PubMed

    Brache, Vivian; Faundes, Anibal

    2010-11-01

    Development efforts on contraceptive vaginal rings were initiated over 40 years ago based on two principles: the capacity of the vaginal epithelium to absorb steroids and the capacity of elastomers to release these hormones at a nearly constant rate. Numerous models of contraceptive vaginal rings (CVRs) have been studied, but only two have reached the market: NuvaRing, a combined ring that releases etonogestrel (ENG) and ethinylestradiol (EE), and Progering, a progesterone-releasing ring for use in lactating women. The main advantages of CVRs are their effectiveness (similar to or slightly better than the pill), ease of use without the need of remembering a daily routine, user's ability to control initiation and discontinuation, nearly constant release rate allowing for lower doses, greater bioavailability and good cycle control with the combined ring. The main disadvantages are related to the mode of delivery; CVRs may cause vaginal discharge and complaints, ring expulsion is not uncommon, the ring may be felt during coitus and vaginal insertion may be unpleasant for some women. The studies reviewed in this article provide evidence that CVRs are safe, effective and highly acceptable to women. There is no doubt that CVRs offer a new, effective contraceptive option to women, expanding their available choices of hormonal contraception.

  10. Ring Infiltrate in Staphylococcal Keratitis

    PubMed Central

    Wallang, Batriti S.; Sharma, Savitri; Sahu, Srikant K.; Mittal, Ruchi

    2013-01-01

    Smear and culture tests of corneal scrapings from a patient with a ring infiltrate confirmed significant growth of a Staphylococcus species resistant to fluoroquinolones. Because of nonresponse to medical management, the patient underwent therapeutic penetrating keratoplasty. Staphylococcal infection of the cornea may appear as a ring-like infiltrate that is recalcitrant to medical management. PMID:23100354

  11. Biomechanics of Corneal Ring Implants

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the biomechanics of corneal ring implants by providing a related mathematical theory and biomechanical model for the treatment of myopia and keratoconus. Methods: The spherical dome model considers the inhomogeneity of the tunica of the eye, dimensions of the cornea, lamellar structure of the corneal stroma, and asphericity of the cornea. It is used in this study for calculating a strengthening factor sf for the characterization of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs. The strengthening factor is a measure of the amount of strengthening of the cornea induced by the implant. Results: For ring segments and incomplete rings, sf = 1.0, which indicates that these implants are not able to strengthen the cornea. The intracorneal continuous complete ring (MyoRing) has a strengthening factor of up to sf = 3.2. The MyoRing is, therefore, able to strengthen the cornea significantly. Conclusions: The result of the presented biomechanical analysis of different ring-shaped corneal implant designs can explain the different postoperative clinical results of different implant types in myopia and keratoconus. PMID:26312619

  12. Reversible Seeding in Storage Rings

    SciTech Connect

    Ratner, Daniel; Chao, Alex; /SLAC

    2011-12-14

    We propose to generate steady-state microbunching in a storage ring with a reversible seeding scheme. High gain harmonic generation (HGHG) and echo-enabled harmonic generation (EEHG) are two promising methods for microbunching linac electron beams. Because both schemes increase the energy spread of the seeded beam, they cannot drive a coherent radiator turn-by-turn in a storage ring. However, reversing the seeding process following the radiator minimizes the impact on the electron beam and may allow coherent radiation at or near the storage ring repetition rate. In this paper we describe the general idea and outline a proof-of-principle experiment. Electron storage rings can drive high average power light sources, and free-electron lasers (FELs) are now producing coherent light sources of unprecedented peak brightness While there is active research towards high repetition rate FELs (for example, using energy recovery linacs), at present there are still no convenient accelerator-based sources of high repetition rate, coherent radiation. As an alternative avenue, we recently proposed to establish steady-state microbunching (SSMB) in a storage ring. By maintaining steady-state coherent microbunching at one point in the storage ring, the beam generates coherent radiation at or close to the repetition rate of the storage ring. In this paper, we propose a method of generating a microbunched beam in a storage ring by using reversible versions of linac seeding schemes.

  13. How Jupiter's Ring Was Discovered.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Elliot, James; Kerr, Richard

    1985-01-01

    "Rings" (by astronomer James Elliot and science writer Richard Kerr) is a nontechnical book about the discovery and exploration of ring systems from the time of Galileo to the era of the Voyager spacecraft. One of this book's chapters is presented. (JN)

  14. Rings Full of Waves (zoom)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This image shows a close-up view of a density wave in Saturn's A ring. It was taken by the narrow angle camera on the Cassini spacecraft after successful entry into Saturn's orbit. The view shows the dark, or unlit, side of the rings.

  15. Cooling a Band Insulator with a Metal: Fermionic Superfluid in a Dimerized Holographic Lattice

    PubMed Central

    Haldar, Arijit; Shenoy, Vijay B.

    2014-01-01

    A cold atomic realization of a quantum correlated state of many fermions on a lattice, eg. superfluid, has eluded experimental realization due to the entropy problem. Here we propose a route to realize such a state using holographic lattice and confining potentials. The potentials are designed to produces a band insulating state (low heat capacity) at the trap center, and a metallic state (high heat capacity) at the periphery. The metal “cools” the central band insulator by extracting out the excess entropy. The central band insulator can be turned into a superfluid by tuning an attractive interaction between the fermions. Crucially, the holographic lattice allows the emergent superfluid to have a high transition temperature – even twice that of the effective trap temperature. The scheme provides a promising route to a laboratory realization of a fermionic lattice superfluid, even while being adaptable to simulate other many body states. PMID:25324029

  16. Cooling a Band Insulator with a Metal: Fermionic Superfluid in a Dimerized Holographic Lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haldar, Arijit; Shenoy, Vijay B.

    A cold atomic realization of a quantum correlated state of many fermions on a lattice, eg. superfluid, has eluded experimental realization due to the entropy problem. Here we propose a route to realize such a state using holographic lattice and confining potentials. The potentials are designed to produces a band insulating state (low heat capacity) at the trap center, and a metallic state (high heat capacity) at the periphery. The metal ``cools'' the central band insulator by extracting out the excess entropy. The central band insulator can be turned into a superfluid by tuning an attractive interaction between the fermions. Crucially, the holographic lattice allows the emergent superfluid to have a high transition temperature - even twice that of the effective trap temperature. The scheme provides a promising route to a laboratory realization of a fermionic lattice superfluid, even while being adaptable to simulate other many body states. Reference: Scientific Reports 4, 6665 (2014). Work supported by CSIR, DST and DAE.

  17. Simulating the Smallest Ring World of Chariklo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Michikoshi, Shugo; Kokubo, Eiichiro

    2017-03-01

    A ring system consisting of two dense narrow rings has been discovered around Centaur Chariklo. The existence of these rings around a small object poses various questions about their origin, stability, and lifetime. In order to understand the nature of Chariklo’s rings, we perform global N-body simulations of the self-gravitating collisional particle rings for the first time. We find that Chariklo should be denser than the ring material in order to avoid the rapid diffusion of the rings. If Chariklo is denser than the ring material, fine spiral structures called self-gravity wakes occur in the inner ring. These wakes accelerate the viscous spreading of the ring significantly and typically occur on timescales of about 100 {years} for m-sized ring particles, which is considerably shorter than the timescales suggested in previous studies. The existence of these narrow rings implies smaller ring particles or the existence of shepherding satellites.

  18. Reconfigurable Microwave Photonic Topological Insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goryachev, Maxim; Tobar, Michael E.

    2016-12-01

    Using full 3D finite-element simulation and underlining Hamiltonian models, we demonstrate reconfigurable photonic analogues of topological insulators on a regular lattice of tunable posts in a reentrant 3D lumped element-type system. The tunability allows a dynamical in situ change of media chirality and other properties via the alteration of the same parameter for all posts, and as a result, great flexibility in the choice of bulk-edge configurations. Additionally, one-way photon transport without an external magnetic field is demonstrated. The ideas are illustrated by using both full finite-element simulation as well as simplified harmonic oscillator models. Dynamical reconfigurability of the proposed systems paves the way to a class of systems that can be employed for random access, topological signal processing, and sensing.

  19. Automatic insulation resistance testing apparatus

    DOEpatents

    Wyant, Francis J.; Nowlen, Steven P.; Luker, Spencer M.

    2005-06-14

    An apparatus and method for automatic measurement of insulation resistances of a multi-conductor cable. In one embodiment of the invention, the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, a plurality of input relay controlled contacts, a plurality of output relay controlled contacts, a relay controller and a computer. In another embodiment of the invention the apparatus comprises a power supply source, an input measuring means, an output measuring means, an input switching unit, an output switching unit and a control unit/data logger. Embodiments of the apparatus of the invention may also incorporate cable fire testing means. The apparatus and methods of the present invention use either voltage or current for input and output measured variables.

  20. Topological Insulator and Thermoelectric Effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Yong

    The recent discovery of topological insulator (TI) offers new opportunities for the development of thermoelectricity, because many TIs (like Bi2Te3) are excellent thermoelectric materials. In this talk, I will first introduce our theoretical predictions of anomalous Seebeck effect and strong size effect in TI [PRL 112, 226801 (2014)]. Then I will report our recent proof experiments, which find in TI thin films that (i) the hole-type Seebeck effect and the electron-type Hall effect coexist in the same TI sample for all the measured temperatures (up to 300 K), and (ii) the thermoelectric properties depend sensitively on the film thickness. The unconventional phenomena are revealed to be closely related to the topological nature of the material. These findings may inspire new ideas for designing TI-based high-efficiency thermoelectric devices.

  1. Disorder induced Floquet Topological Insulators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhattacharjee, Paraj; Lindner, Netanel; Rechtsman, Mikael; Refael, Gil

    2014-03-01

    We investigate the possibility of realizing a disorder induced topological state in two dimensional periodically driven systems. This phenomenon is akin to the topological Anderson insulator (TAI) in equilibrium systems. We focus on graphene band structures, where in the presence of the driving electromagnetic field, but in the absence of disorder, the system starts off in a trivial state due to the presence of a sublattice potential. We show that by adding on-site disorder a topological state is induced in this system. We numerically compute the average Bott index (the analog of the Chern number for disordered systems) to show that starting from a trivial phase, topological behavior can be observed at finite disorder strength. In the topological phase, we detect chiral edge states by a numerical time evolution of wavepackets at the edge of the system. We propose an experimental set-up in photonic lattices to observe this phenomenon.

  2. Quantum Capacitance in Topological Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Xiu, Faxian; Meyer, Nicholas; Kou, Xufeng; He, Liang; Lang, Murong; Wang, Yong; Yu, Xinxin; Fedorov, Alexei V.; Zou, Jin; Wang, Kang L.

    2012-01-01

    Topological insulators show unique properties resulting from massless, Dirac-like surface states that are protected by time-reversal symmetry. Theory predicts that the surface states exhibit a quantum spin Hall effect with counter-propagating electrons carrying opposite spins in the absence of an external magnetic field. However, to date, the revelation of these states through conventional transport measurements remains a significant challenge owing to the predominance of bulk carriers. Here, we report on an experimental observation of Shubnikov-de Haas oscillations in quantum capacitance measurements, which originate from topological helical states. Unlike the traditional transport approach, the quantum capacitance measurements are remarkably alleviated from bulk interference at high excitation frequencies, thus enabling a distinction between the surface and bulk. We also demonstrate easy access to the surface states at relatively high temperatures up to 60 K. Our approach may eventually facilitate an exciting exploration of exotic topological properties at room temperature. PMID:22993694

  3. Topological Insulator Nanowires and Nanoribbons

    SciTech Connect

    Kong, D.S.

    2010-06-02

    Recent theoretical calculations and photoemission spectroscopy measurements on the bulk Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} material show that it is a three-dimensional topological insulator possessing conductive surface states with nondegenerate spins, attractive for dissipationless electronics and spintronics applications. Nanoscale topological insulator materials have a large surface-to-volume ratio that can manifest the conductive surface states and are promising candidates for devices. Here we report the synthesis and characterization of high quality single crystalline Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanomaterials with a variety of morphologies. The synthesis of Bi{sub 2}Se{sub 3} nanowires and nanoribbons employs Au-catalyzed vapor-liquid-solid (VLS) mechanism. Nanowires, which exhibit rough surfaces, are formed by stacking nanoplatelets along the axial direction of the wires. Nanoribbons are grown along [11-20] direction with a rectangular crosssection and have diverse morphologies, including quasi-one-dimensional, sheetlike, zigzag and sawtooth shapes. Scanning tunneling microscopy (STM) studies on nanoribbons show atomically smooth surfaces with {approx}1 nm step edges, indicating single Se-Bi-Se-Bi-Se quintuple layers. STM measurements reveal a honeycomb atomic lattice, suggesting that the STM tip couples not only to the top Se atomic layer, but also to the Bi atomic layer underneath, which opens up the possibility to investigate the contribution of different atomic orbitals to the topological surface states. Transport measurements of a single nanoribbon device (four terminal resistance and Hall resistance) show great promise for nanoribbons as candidates to study topological surface states.

  4. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  5. Development of High Performance Composite Foam Insulation with Vacuum Insulation Cores

    SciTech Connect

    Biswas, Kaushik; Desjarlais, Andre Omer; SmithPhD, Douglas; LettsPhD, John; YaoPhD, Jennifer

    2016-01-01

    Development of a high performance thermal insulation (thermal resistance or R-value per inch of R-12 hr-ft2- F/Btu-in or greater), with twice the thermal resistance of state-of-the-art commercial insulation materials ( R6/inch for foam insulation), promises a transformational impact in the area of building insulation. In 2010, in the US, the building envelope-related primary energy consumption was 15.6 quads, of which 5.75 quads were due to opaque wall and roof sections; the total US consumption (building, industrial and transportation) was 98 quads. In other words, the wall and roof contribution was almost 6% of the entire US primary energy consumption. Building energy modeling analyses have shown that adding insulation to increase the R-value of the external walls of residential buildings by R10-20 (hr-ft2- F/Btu) can yield savings of 38-50% in wall-generated heating and cooling loads. Adding R20 will require substantial thicknesses of current commercial insulation materials, often requiring significant (and sometimes cost-prohibitive) alterations to existing buildings. This article describes the development of a next-generation composite insulation with a target thermal resistance of R25 for a 2 inch thick board (R12/inch or higher). The composite insulation will contain vacuum insulation cores, which are nominally R35-40/inch, encapsulated in polyisocyanurate foam. A recently-developed variant of vacuum insulation, called modified atmosphere insulation (MAI), was used in this research. Some background information on the thermal performance and distinguishing features of MAI has been provided. Technical details of the composite insulation development and manufacturing as well as laboratory evaluation of prototype insulation boards are presented.

  6. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schirber, T.; Mosiman, G.; Ojczyk, C.

    2014-09-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4 inches wide by 4 feet to 5 feet deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  7. Slab edge insulating form system and methods

    DOEpatents

    Lee, Brain E.; Barsun, Stephan K.; Bourne, Richard C.; Hoeschele, Marc A.; Springer, David A.

    2009-10-06

    A method of forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising constructing a foundation frame, the frame comprising an insulating form having an opening, inserting a pocket former into the opening; placing concrete inside the foundation frame; and removing the pocket former after the placed concrete has set, wherein the concrete forms a pocket in the placed concrete that is accessible through the opening. The method may further comprise sealing the opening by placing a sealing plug or sealing material in the opening. A system for forming an insulated concrete foundation is provided comprising a plurality of interconnected insulating forms, the insulating forms having a rigid outer member protecting and encasing an insulating material, and at least one gripping lip extending outwardly from the outer member to provide a pest barrier. At least one insulating form has an opening into which a removable pocket former is inserted. The system may also provide a tension anchor positioned in the pocket former and a tendon connected to the tension anchor.

  8. Moisture performance analysis of EPS frost insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Ojanen, T.; Kokko, E.

    1997-11-01

    A horizontal layer of expanded polystyrene foam (EPS) is widely used as a frost insulation of building foundations in the Nordic countries. The performance properties of the insulation depend strongly on the moisture level of the material. Experimental methods are needed to produce samples for testing the material properties in realistic moisture conditions. The objective was to analyze the moisture loads and the wetting mechanisms of horizontal EPS frost insulation. Typical wetting tests, water immersion and diffusive water vapor absorption tests, were studied and the results were compared with the data from site investigations. Usually these tests give higher moisture contents of EPS than what are detected in drained frost insulation applications. Also the effect of different parameters, like the immersion depth and temperature gradient were studied. Special attention was paid to study the effect of diffusion on the wetting process. Numerical simulation showed that under real working conditions the long period diffusive moisture absorption in EPS frost insulation remained lower than 1% Vol. Moisture performance was determined experimentally as a function of the distance between the insulation and the free water level in the ground. The main moisture loads and the principles for good moisture performance of frost insulation are presented.

  9. Excavationless Exterior Foundation Insulation Field Study

    SciTech Connect

    Schirber, T.; Mosiman, G.; Ojczyk, C.

    2014-10-01

    Building science research supports installing exterior (soil side) foundation insulation as the optimal method to enhance the hygrothermal performance of new homes. With exterior foundation insulation, water management strategies are maximized while insulating the basement space and ensuring a more even temperature at the foundation wall. However, such an approach can be very costly and disruptive when applied to an existing home, requiring deep excavation around the entire house. The NorthernSTAR Building America Partnership team implemented an innovative, minimally invasive foundation insulation upgrade technique on an existing home. The approach consisted of using hydrovac excavation technology combined with a liquid insulating foam. The team was able to excavate a continuous 4" wide by 4' to 5' deep trench around the entire house, 128 linear feet, except for one small part under the stoop that was obstructed with concrete debris. The combination pressure washer and vacuum extraction technology also enabled the elimination of large trenches and soil stockpiles normally produced by backhoe excavation. The resulting trench was filled with liquid insulating foam, which also served as a water-control layer of the assembly. The insulation was brought above grade using a liquid foam/rigid foam hybrid system and terminated at the top of the rim joist. Cost savings over the traditional excavation process ranged from 23% to 50%. The excavationless process could result in even greater savings since replacement of building structures, exterior features, utility meters, and landscaping would be minimal or non-existent in an excavationless process.

  10. Proximity induced superconductivity in the 3D topological insulator HgTe probed with scanning SQUID microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sochnikov, Ilya; Kirtley, John R.; Moler, Kathryn A.; Maier, Luis; Bruene, Christoph; Buhmann, Hartmut; Molenkamp, Laurens W.

    2014-03-01

    Inducing superconductivity on the surface of a 3D topological insulator is important for novel broken symmetry phases. However, it is difficult to assess the existence of the surface superconductivity with a single experimental technique. We have used a scanning SQUID microscope to characterize the magnetic properties of hybrid structures made of the 3D topological insulator HgTe and superconducting Nb. The magnetic response of superconducting rings with exotic Josephson junctions reveals the current-phase relation, while measurements of bilayer HgTe/Nb disks reveal the total superfluid density of the hybrid structure. We analyze the degree of skew in the current-phase relation to determine the relative contribution of surface states, and discuss other contributions to the current-phase relation. This work sets an agenda for discussion of the prospects for detection of new broken symmetry phases in 3D topological insulators.

  11. Ultra-Violet Induced Insulator Flashover

    SciTech Connect

    Javedani, J B; Houck, T L; Kelly, B T; Lahowe, D A; Shirk, M D; Goerz, D A

    2008-05-21

    Insulators are critical components in high-energy, pulsed power systems. It is known that the vacuum surface of the insulator will flashover when illuminated by ultraviolet (UV) radiation depending on the insulator material, insulator cone angle, applied voltage and insulator shot-history. A testbed comprised of an excimer laser (KrF, 248 nm, {approx} 2 MW/cm{sup 2}, 30 ns FWHM,), a vacuum chamber (low 1.0E-6 torr), and dc high voltage power supply (<60 kV) was assembled for insulator testing to measure the UV dose during a flashover event. Five in-house developed and calibrated fast D-Dot probes (>12 GHz, bandwidth) were embedded in the anode electrode underneath the insulator to determine the time of flashover with respect to UV arrival. A commercial energy meter were used to measure the UV fluence for each pulse. Four insulator materials High Density Polyethylene, Rexolite{reg_sign} 1400, Macor{trademark} and Mycalex with side-angles of 0, {+-}30, and {+-}45 degrees, 1.0 cm thick samples, were tested with a maximum UV fluence of 75 mJ/cm{sup 2} and at varying electrode charge (10 kV to 60 kV). This information clarified/corrected earlier published studies. A new phenomenon was observed related to the UV power level on flashover that as the UV pulse intensity was increased, the UV fluence on the insulator prior to flashover was also increased. This effect would bias the data towards higher minimum flashover fluence.

  12. Ring Buffered Network Bus

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1997-01-01

    This report describes the research effort to demonstrate the integration of a data sharing technology, Ring Buffered Network Bus, in development by Dryden Flight Research Center, with an engine simulation application, the Java Gas Turbine Simulator, in development at the University of Toledo under a grant from the Glenn Research Center. The objective of this task was to examine the application of the RBNB technologies as a key component in the data sharing, health monitoring and system wide modeling elements of the NASA Aviation Safety Program (AVSP) [Golding, 1997]. System-wide monitoring and modeling of aircraft and air safety systems will require access to all data sources which are relative factors when monitoring or modeling the national airspace such as radar, weather, aircraft performance, engine performance, schedule and planning, airport configuration, flight operations, etc. The data sharing portion of the overall AVSP program is responsible for providing the hardware and software architecture to access and distribute data, including real-time flight operations data, among all of the AVSP elements. The integration of an engine code capable of numerically "flying" through recorded flight paths and weather data using a software tool that allows for distributed access of data to this engine code demonstrates initial steps toward building a system capable of monitoring and modeling the National Airspace.

  13. Urea formaldehyde foam: a dangerous insulation

    SciTech Connect

    Keough, C.

    1980-12-01

    Insulating a home with urea formaldehyde foam can lead to severe health problems due to poisoning from formaldehyde gas. Respiratory problems, allergies, memory loss, and mental problems can result from exposure to foam insulation fumes. Research is now under way at the Chemical Industry Inst., Univ. of Washington, and other institutions to learn more about the health effects of formaldehyde foam and to develop possible remedies to these problems. Several states are either banning or controlling the use of this type of home insulation.

  14. Floquet Topological Insulators in Uranium Compounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pi, Shu-Ting; Savrasov, Sergey

    2014-03-01

    A major issue regarding the Uranium based nuclear fuels is to conduct the heat from the core area to its outer area. Unfortunately, those materials are notorious for their extremely low thermal conductivity due to the phonon-dominated-heat-transport properties in insulating states. Although metallic Uranium compounds are helpful in increasing the thermal conductivity, their low melting point still make those efforts in vain. In this report, we will figure out potential Uranium based Floquet topological insulators where the insulating bulk states accompanied with metallic surface states is achieved by applying periodic electrical fields which makes the coexistence of both benefits possible.

  15. Refractory Oxidative-Resistant Ceramic Carbon Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leiser, Daniel B. (Inventor); Hsu, Ming-Ta S. (Inventor); Chen, Timothy S. (Inventor)

    2001-01-01

    High-temperature, lightweight, ceramic carbon insulation is prepared by coating or impregnating a porous carbon substrate with a siloxane gel derived from the reaction of an organodialkoxy silane and an organotrialkoxy silane in an acid or base medium in the presence of the carbon substrate. The siloxane gel is subsequently dried on the carbon substrate to form a ceramic carbon precursor. The carbon precursor is pyrolyzed, in an inert atmosphere, to form the ceramic insulation containing carbon, silicon, and oxygen. The carbon insulation is characterized as a porous, fibrous, carbon ceramic tile which is particularly useful as lightweight tiles for spacecraft.

  16. Silicon on insulator self-aligned transistors

    DOEpatents

    McCarthy, Anthony M.

    2003-11-18

    A method for fabricating thin-film single-crystal silicon-on-insulator (SOI) self-aligned transistors. Standard processing of silicon substrates is used to fabricate the transistors. Physical spaces, between the source and gate, and the drain and gate, introduced by etching the polysilicon gate material, are used to provide connecting implants (bridges) which allow the transistor to perform normally. After completion of the silicon substrate processing, the silicon wafer is bonded to an insulator (glass) substrate, and the silicon substrate is removed leaving the transistors on the insulator (glass) substrate. Transistors fabricated by this method may be utilized, for example, in flat panel displays, etc.

  17. Insulation failure assessment under random energization overvoltages

    SciTech Connect

    Mahdy, A.M.; Anis, H.I.; El-Morshedy, A.

    1996-03-01

    This paper offers a new simple approach to the evaluation of the risk of failure of external insulation in view of their known probabilistic nature. This is applied to EHV transmission systems subjected to energization overvoltages. The randomness, both in the applied stresses and insulation`s withstand characteristics are numerically simulated and then integrated to assess the risk of failure. Overvoltage control methods are accounted for, such as the use of pre-insertion breaker resistors, series capacitive compensation, and the installation of shunt reactors.

  18. Measure Guideline: Hybrid Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-05-01

    This measure guideline provides recommendations for designs and variations for retrofit hybrid assemblies in improving interior foundation insulation and water management of basements. Variations include closed cell spray foam (ccSPF) with membrane waterproofing or air gap membrane drainage layers, rigid board foam insulation at flat walls (cast concrete or CMU block), a 'partial drainage' detail making use of the bulk water drainage that occurs through the field of a rubble stone wall, and non-drained spray foam assemblies (including slab insulation).

  19. Measure Guideline. Hybrid Foundation Insulation Retrofits

    SciTech Connect

    Ueno, K.; Lstiburek, J.

    2012-05-01

    This measure guideline provides recommendations for designs and variations for retrofit hybrid assemblies in improving interior foundation insulation and water management of basements. Variations include closed cell spray foam (ccSPF) with membrane waterproofing or air gap membrane drainage layers, rigid board foam insulation at flat walls (cast concrete or CMU block), a “partial drainage” detail making use of the bulk water drainage that occurs through the field of a rubble stone wall, and non-drained spray foam assemblies (including slab insulation).

  20. Double layered tailorable advanced blanket insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falstrup, D.

    1983-01-01

    An advanced flexible reusable surface insulation material for future space shuttle flights was investigated. A conventional fly shuttle loom with special modifications to weave an integral double layer triangular core fabric from quartz yarn was used. Two types of insulating material were inserted into the cells of the fabric, and a procedure to accomplish this was developed. The program is follow up of a program in which single layer rectangular cell core fabrics are woven and a single type of insulating material was inserted into the cells.

  1. Electrical Strength of Multilayer Vacuum Insulators

    SciTech Connect

    Harris, J R; Kendig, M; Poole, B; Sanders, D M; Caporaso, G J

    2008-07-01

    The electrical strength of vacuum insulators is a key constraint in the design of particle accelerators and pulsed power systems. Vacuum insulating structures assembled from alternating layers of metal and dielectric can result in improved performance compared to conventional insulators, but previous attempts to optimize their design have yielded seemingly inconsistent results. Here, we present two models for the electrical strength of these structures, one assuming failure by vacuum arcing between adjacent metal layers and the other assuming failure by vacuum surface flashover. These models predict scaling laws which are in agreement with the experimental data currently available.

  2. High-Tech, Low-Temp Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1998-01-01

    Under an SBIR (Small Business Innovative Research) contract with Ames, S.D. Miller & Associates developed new manufacturing methods for multi-layer metal spacecraft insulation that could significantly reduce launch weight and launch costs. The new honeycomb structure is more efficient than fibers for insulation. Honeycombs can be made from metals for high temperature uses, even plastic insulation from recycled milk bottles. Under development are blankets made from recycled milk bottles which will be field tested by the Red Cross and ambulance companies. Currently available are honeycomb mittens based on the same technology.

  3. Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Greenly, John, B.

    2005-07-31

    This Final Technical Report presents the results of the program, Ion Rings for Magnetic Fusion, which was carried out under Department of Energy funding during the period August, 1993 to January, 2005. The central objective of the program was to study the properties of field-reversed configurations formed by ion rings. In order to reach this objective, our experimental program, called the Field-reversed Ion Ring Experiment, FIREX, undertook to develop an efficient, economical technology for the production of field-reversed ion rings. A field-reversed configuration (FRC) in which the azimuthal (field-reversing) current is carried by ions with gyro-radius comparable to the magnetic separatrix radius is called a field-reversed ion ring. A background plasma is required for charge neutralization of the ring, and this plasma will be confined within the ring's closed magnetic flux. Ion rings have long been of interest as the basis of compact magnetic fusion reactors, as the basis for a high-power accelerator for an inertial fusion driver, and for other applications of high power ion beams or plasmas of high energy density. Specifically, the FIREX program was intended to address the longstanding question of the contribution of large-orbit ions to the observed stability of experimental FRCs to the MHD tilt mode. Typical experimental FRCs with s {approx} 2-4, where s is the ratio of separatrix radius to ion gyro-radius, have been stable to tilting, but desired values for a fusion reactor, s > 20, should be unstable. The FIREX ring would consist of a plasma with large s for the background ions, but with s {approx} 1 for the ring ions. By varying the proportions of these two populations, the minimum proportion of large-orbit ions necessary for stability could be determined. The incorporation of large-orbit ions, perhaps by neutral-beam injection, into an FRC has been advanced for the purpose of stabilizing, heating, controlling angular momentum, and aiding the formation of a

  4. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 20 syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions ring chromosome 20 syndrome ring chromosome 20 syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ring chromosome 20 syndrome is a condition that affects the ...

  5. Genetics Home Reference: ring chromosome 14 syndrome

    MedlinePlus

    ... Home Health Conditions ring chromosome 14 syndrome ring chromosome 14 syndrome Enable Javascript to view the expand/ ... Download PDF Open All Close All Description Ring chromosome 14 syndrome is a condition characterized by seizures ...

  6. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  7. SIMULATION STUDY AND INITIAL TEST OF THESNS RING RF SYSTEM

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yan; Ma, Hengjie; Holmes, Jeffrey A; Champion, Mark; Chu, Paul; Cousineau, Sarah M; Hardek, Thomas W; Plum, Michael A; Danilov, Viatcheslav; Piller, Chip

    2008-01-01

    The rfsimulator code was developed for the study of the Spallation Neutron Source (SNS) dual-harmonic ring RF control. It uses time-domain solvers to compute beam-cavity interactions and FFT methods to simulate the time responses of the linear RF system. The important elements of the system considered in the model include beam loading, dynamic cavity detuning, circuit bandwidth, loop delay, proportional-integral controller for feedback and adaptive feed forward, stochastic noise, width-in-turn loop parameter change, beam current fluctuation, and bunch leakage. As the beam power increases, beam loss in the ring goes up and thus precise control of the bunching RF phase and amplitude is required to limit beam loss. The code will help in the development of a functional RF control and in achieving the goal of minimizing beam loss in the accumulator ring.

  8. Electromagnetic Nondestructive Evaluation of Wire Insulation and Models of Insulation Material Properties

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bowler, Nicola; Kessler, Michael R.; Li, Li; Hondred, Peter R.; Chen, Tianming

    2012-01-01

    Polymers have been widely used as wiring electrical insulation materials in space/air-craft. The dielectric properties of insulation polymers can change over time, however, due to various aging processes such as exposure to heat, humidity and mechanical stress. Therefore, the study of polymers used in electrical insulation of wiring is important to the aerospace industry due to potential loss of life and aircraft in the event of an electrical fire caused by breakdown of wiring insulation. Part of this research is focused on studying the mechanisms of various environmental aging process of the polymers used in electrical wiring insulation and the ways in which their dielectric properties change as the material is subject to the aging processes. The other part of the project is to determine the feasibility of a new capacitive nondestructive testing method to indicate degradation in the wiring insulation, by measuring its permittivity.

  9. Researches on the Piston Ring

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ehihara, Keikiti

    1944-01-01

    In internal combustion engines, steam engines, air compressors, and so forth, the piston ring plays an important role. Especially, the recent development of Diesel engines which require a high compression pressure for their working, makes, nowadays, the packing action of the piston ring far more important than ever. Though a number of papers have been published in regard to researches on the problem of the piston ring, none has yet dealt with an exact measurement of pressure exerted on the cylinder wall at any given point of the ring. The only paper that can be traced on this subject so far is Mr. Nakagawa's report on the determination of the relative distribution of pressure on the cylinder wall, but the measuring method adopted therein appears to need further consideration. No exact idea has yet been obtained as to how the obturation of gas between the piston and cylinder, the frictional resistance of the piston, and the wear of the cylinder wall are affected by the intensity and the distribution of the radial pressure of the piston ring. Consequently, the author has endeavored, by employing an apparatus of his own invention, to get an exact determination of the pressure distribution of the piston ring. By means of a newly devised ring tester, to which piezoelectricity of quartz was applied, the distribution of the radial pressure of many sample rings on the market was accurately determined. Since many famous piston rings show very irregular pressure distribution, the author investigated and achieved a manufacturing process of the piston ring which will exert uniform pressure on the cylinder wall. Temperature effects on the configuration and on the mean spring power have also been studied. Further, the tests were performed to ascertain how the gas tightness of the piston ring may be affected by the number or spring power. The researches as to the frictional resistance between the piston ring and the cylinder wall were carried out, too. The procedure of study, and

  10. Reflex ring laser amplifier system

    DOEpatents

    Summers, Mark A.

    1985-01-01

    A laser pulse is injected into an unstable ring resonator-amplifier structure. Inside this resonator the laser pulse is amplified, spatially filtered and magnified. The laser pulse is recirculated in the resonator, being amplified, filtered and magnified on each pass. The magnification is chosen so that the beam passes through the amplifier in concentric non-overlapping regions similar to a single pass MOPA. After a number of passes around the ring resonator the laser pulse is spatially large enough to exit the ring resonator system by passing around an output mirror.

  11. 16 CFR 460.2 - What is home insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false What is home insulation. 460.2 Section 460.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.2 What is home insulation. Insulation is any material mainly used to slow down heat flow....

  12. Introduction to Insulation. Introduction to Construction Series. Instructor Edition.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Associated General Contractors of America, Washington, DC.

    This module on introductory insulation is one of a series of modules designed to teach basic skills necessary for entry-level employment in this field. The instructor's guide contains three instructional units that cover the following topics: (1) insulation materials; (2) insulation tools; and (3) insulation layout and basic skills. Each…

  13. 16 CFR 460.2 - What is home insulation.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 16 Commercial Practices 1 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false What is home insulation. 460.2 Section 460.2 Commercial Practices FEDERAL TRADE COMMISSION TRADE REGULATION RULES LABELING AND ADVERTISING OF HOME INSULATION § 460.2 What is home insulation. Insulation is any material mainly used to slow down heat flow....

  14. KSI's Cross Insulated Core Transformer Technology

    SciTech Connect

    Uhmeyer, Uwe

    2009-08-04

    Cross Insulated Core Transformer (CCT) technology improves on Insulated Core Transformer (ICT) implementations. ICT systems are widely used in very high voltage, high power, power supply systems. In an ICT transformer ferrite core sections are insulated from their neighboring ferrite cores. Flux leakage is present at each of these insulated gaps. The flux loss is raised to the power of stages in the ICT design causing output voltage efficiency to taper off with increasing stages. KSI's CCT technology utilizes a patented technique to compensate the flux loss at each stage of an ICT system. Design equations to calculate the flux compensation capacitor value are presented. CCT provides corona free operation of the HV stack. KSI's CCT based High Voltage power supply systems offer high efficiency operation, high frequency switching, low stored energy and smaller size over comparable ICT systems.

  15. Feasibility of Integrated Insulation in Rammed Earth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stone, C.; Balintova, M.; Holub, M.

    2015-11-01

    Building Codes in Europe stipulate strict thermal performance criteria which any traditional rammed earth recipe cannot meet. This does not infer that the material itself is inferior; it has many other face saving attributes such as low embodied energy, high workability, sound insulation, fire resistance, aesthetics, high diffusivity and thermal accumulation properties. Integrated insulation is experimented with, to try achieve a 0.22 [W/(m2.K)] overall coefficient of heat transfer for walls required by 2015 Slovak standards, without using external insulation or using technologically complex interstitial insulation. This has the added aesthetic benefit of leaving the earth wall exposed to the external environment. Results evaluate the feasibility of this traditional approach.

  16. MAR-SI, Martin Surface Insulation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Plank, P. P.; Feldman, A.; Miiller, W. C.; Creedon, J. F.; Toth, J. M., Jr.

    1973-01-01

    The development of an alumina/silicate based composite material for space shuttle reusable surface insulation is reported. Physical property determinations, environmental testing, design analysis, and projected costs for a thermal protection system are outlined.

  17. Sizable band gap in organometallic topological insulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Derakhshan, V.; Ketabi, S. A.

    2017-01-01

    Based on first principle calculation when Ceperley-Alder and Perdew-Burke-Ernzerh type exchange-correlation energy functional were adopted to LSDA and GGA calculation, electronic properties of organometallic honeycomb lattice as a two-dimensional topological insulator was calculated. In the presence of spin-orbit interaction bulk band gap of organometallic lattice with heavy metals such as Au, Hg, Pt and Tl atoms were investigated. Our results show that the organometallic topological insulator which is made of Mercury atom shows the wide bulk band gap of about ∼120 meV. Moreover, by fitting the conduction and valence bands to the band-structure which are produced by Density Functional Theory, spin-orbit interaction parameters were extracted. Based on calculated parameters, gapless edge states within bulk insulating gap are indeed found for finite width strip of two-dimensional organometallic topological insulators.

  18. Thermal Performance Testing of Cryogenic Insulation Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fesmire, James E.; Augustynowicz, Stan D.; Scholtens, Brekke E.

    2007-01-01

    Efficient methods for characterizing thermal performance of materials under cryogenic and vacuum conditions have been developed. These methods provide thermal conductivity data on materials under actual-use conditions and are complementary to established methods. The actual-use environment of full temperature difference in combination with vacuum-pressure is essential for understanding insulation system performance. Test articles include solids, foams, powders, layered blankets, composite panels, and other materials. Test methodology and apparatus design for several insulation test cryostats are discussed. The measurement principle is liquid nitrogen boil-off calorimetry. Heat flux capability ranges from approximately 0.5 to 500 watts per square meter; corresponding apparent thermal conductivity values range from below 0.01 up to about 60 mW/m- K. Example data for different insulation materials are also presented. Upon further standardization work, these patented insulation test cryostats can be available to industry for a wide range of practical applications.

  19. Ion flooding to precharge insulating materials

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, D.; Steadman, P.; Bounds, J.; Whitley, C.; Rawool-Sullivan, M.

    1996-10-01

    This is the final report of a one-year, Laboratory-Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project at the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). The collection of ions created by alpha particles in air is a powerful technique for detecting the presence of alpha-emitting radioactive contamination. These ions have a relatively long lifetime (greater than 5 seconds) in air so the ions can travel much longer distances than the alpha particles themselves. However, such ion detection is difficult when the object being surveyed is an insulating material. An insulating object does not release ions generated until the surface of the object has completely discharged. Thus, there are significant response-time problems with contamination on insulating objects. This project sought to investigate the technique of {open_quotes}flooding{close_quotes} the suspect object with ions prior to the actual contamination detection measurement. Our preliminary conclusion is that such flooding will enhance detection speed on insulating objects.

  20. Internally insulated thermal storage system development program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, O. L.

    1980-01-01

    A cost effective thermal storage system for a solar central receiver power system using molten salt stored in internally insulated carbon steel tanks is described. Factors discussed include: testing of internal insulation materials in molten salt; preliminary design of storage tanks, including insulation and liner installation; optimization of the storage configuration; and definition of a subsystem research experiment to demonstrate the system. A thermal analytical model and analysis of a thermocline tank was performed. Data from a present thermocline test tank was compared to gain confidence in the analytical approach. A computer analysis of the various storage system parameters (insulation thickness, number of tanks, tank geometry, etc.,) showed that (1) the most cost-effective configuration was a small number of large cylindrical tanks, and (2) the optimum is set by the mechanical constraints of the system, such as soil bearing strength and tank hoop stress, not by the economics.