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Sample records for adapting stretch receptor

  1. Measures of complexity in neural spike-trains of the slowly adapting stretch receptor organs.

    PubMed

    Jiménez-Montaño, M A; Penagos, H; Hernández Torres, A; Diez-Martínez, O

    2000-01-01

    Discrete sequence analysis methods were applied to study spike-trains generated by the isolated neuron of the slowly adapting stretch receptor organ. Calculation of the algorithmic complexity and block entropies of digitized individual spike-train forms allowed us to distinguish different classes of neural behavior. While some spike-trains exhibited significant structure, others displayed diverse degrees of randomness. The sequences recorded during the stimulated portions of the intermittent and walk-through forms, differed considerably from their randomly shuffled surrogates. Informational and grammar complexity measures (in two, four and eight-letter alphabets), tell us things about the structure of spike-trains that are not obtained with conventional spike analysis. Comparison of the conditional entropies for the digitized signals showed that the method distinguishes between different stimulated conditions. Additionally, comparison of the different stimulated conditions with their corresponding surrogates showed that, both, conditional entropies and complexities were significantly different for the two groups. Although the original and the randomly shuffled sequences had the same distribution and average firing rate, their complexity values were different. The results obtained with both measures of sequence structure were quite consistent.

  2. Mechanics of the trachea and behaviour of its slowly adapting stretch receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Mortola, J P; Sant'Ambrogio, G

    1979-01-01

    1. The trachea is constructed by a series of U-shaped cartilaginous rings supporting a membranous posterior wall. We have studied separately the pressure-volume relationships of the two components. 2. The motion of the membranous posterior wall contributes most to the tracheal volume change caused by any given transmural pressure change; the cartilaginous rings provide a semi-rigid support to the posterior wall and have a far greater compliance with negative than positive transmural pressure. 3. The response of tracheal stretch receptors to transmural pressure can be explained by the mechanical coupling between cartilages and posterior wall. They respond both to positive and negative transmural pressure, they are active at zero transmural pressure and have a point of least activity with small negative transmural pressures. 4. The stress-strain relationship of the posterior wall has been studied in static and dynamic conditions in control situations and after removal of either the tunica fibrosa or the trachealis muscle. Each of these two components contributes to the stiffness of the posterior wall, with the trachealis muscle providing most of its viscosity. 5. The response of tracheal stretch receptors to transverse traction of the posterior membranous wall has been studied in both static and dynamic conditions before and after removal of the tunica fibrosa. The behaviour of these receptors reflects the visco-elastic properties of the trachealis muscle in which they have been localized. PMID:439039

  3. Effects of tetrodotoxin on the slowly adapting stretch receptor neurone of lobster.

    PubMed

    Albuquerque, E X; Grampp, W

    1968-03-01

    1. A study has been made of the effects of tetrodotoxin on the impulse activity, resting membrane potential, input resistance, and the generator potential and its after-hyperpolarization of the slowly adapting stretch receptor neurone of the lobster.2. Tetrodotoxin was able to abolish completely within about 2 min the impulse activity in most cells, when given in a dose of 2 x 10(-8) g/ml., but in all cells, when administered in a dose of 4 x 10(-8) g/ml. After blockage by the toxin in concentrations as high as 4 x 10(-6) g/ml. for periods of up to 30 min the action potential was restored by washing the preparation in physiological solution for 1 hr.3. In a concentration of 4 x 10(-8) g/ml. tetrodotoxin produced within 1-2 min an average increase of 4.8 mV of the resting membrane potential and a simultaneous 47% reduction of the resting input resistance. These effects were reversed by washing the preparation in physiological solution for 1 hr.4. Tetrodotoxin administered in doses as high as 4 x 10(-6) g/ml. for periods of up to 30 min had no effect on the amplitude of the steady phase of the generator potential.5. In a concentration of 4 x 10(-8) g/ml. tetrodotoxin produced within 5 min a 65% reduction of the amplitude of the hyperpolarization following the generator potential. This effect was reversed by washing the preparation in physiological solution for 1 hr.6. The simultaneous increase in resting membrane potential and decrease in membrane resistance is suggested to be due to an elevated potassium permeability besides a reduced sodium conductance. The constancy in height of the generator potential in the presence of a decreased membrane resistance makes necessary the assumption of an augmented generator current. The decrease in amplitude of the hyperpolarization following the generator potential may be the result of an increase in potassium conductance and/or a reduction in acceleration of an electrogenic pump in consequence of a diminished sodium influx

  4. White noise analysis of pace-maker-response interactions and non-linearities in slowly adapting crayfish stretch receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Buño, W; Bustamante, J; Fuentes, J

    1984-01-01

    Input-output relations were investigated in the slowly adapting stretch receptor organ of crayfish using a Gaussian white noise length input with a 0.03-12.5 Hz band width and the resulting action potential output. The noise input was presented to the de-efferented receptor in situ, at three mean elongations and at four different amplitudes. The three mean elongations were set within the normal range in vivo, two at the extremes close to the minimum and maximum physiological lengths and the other in the mid-range. With white noise inputs there is a finite probability that the system will be tested in all possible conditions within the chosen band width because white noise has the advantage that it contains, with a finite probability, all possible stimulus wave forms at random. The analysis indicated similarities between the effects of the input variables, namely white noise amplitude and mean elongation. With low input variables the activity was periodic. With larger inputs, impulse rates were higher and irregular. The average length trajectories leading to a spike (i.e. the average stimulus) were either biphasic with high inputs or multiphasic and periodic with lower input variables. The frequency of periodicity increased with mean elongation. Although for a given length and noise amplitude a variety of individual length trajectories preceded spikes, the final biphasic shortening-lengthening average stimulus sequence before a spike was similar in all cases irrespective of the input variables. The number of possible trajectories decreased with increments in the input variables. The standard deviation of length values for each average stimulus was computed and displayed as a function of time relative to the spike. It was first constant, and decreased gradually to a minimum value at the spike reference. Standard deviation values were lower for higher white noise amplitudes and mean elongation. Simple, short-lasting stimulus wave forms in the white noise were isolated

  5. Antidromic potential spread modulates the receptor responses in the stretch receptor neurons of the crayfish.

    PubMed

    Purali, Nuhan

    2011-12-01

    The effects of antidromic potential spread were investigated in the stretch receptor neurons of the crayfish. Current and potential responses to conductance changes were recorded in the dynamic clamp condition and compared to those obtained by using some conventional clamp methods and a compartmental neuron model. An analogue circuit was used for dynamic calculation of the injected receptor current as a function of the membrane potential and the given conductance change. Alternatively, receptor current responses to a mechanical stimulus were recorded and compared when the cell was voltage clamped to a previously recorded impulse wave form and the resting potential, respectively. Under dynamic clamp, the receptor current had an oscillating waveform which contrasts with the conventional recordings. Frequency, amplitude and sign of the oscillations were dependent on the applied conductance level, reversal potential and electrotonic attenuation. Mean current amplitude and frequency of the evoked impulse responses were smaller under dynamic clamp, especially for large conductance increases. However, firing frequency was larger if plotted against the mean current response. Recorded responses were similar to those calculated in the model. It was not possible to evoke any adaptation in the slowly adapting neuron by using the dynamic clamp. Evoked potential change served as a self limiting response, preventing the depolarization block. However, impulse duration was significantly shorter in the rapidly adapting neuron when the dynamic clamp was used. It was concluded that, in the stretch receptor neurons during a conductance increase, antidromic potential spread modulates the receptor responses and contributes to adaptation.

  6. Stretching

    MedlinePlus

    ... benefits of stretching before working out. Traditional, or "static," stretching may lead to decreased muscle strength and performance. Consider doing dynamic stretches before and static stretching after a workout. Stretching still can be ...

  7. Stretching

    MedlinePlus

    ... activity, dynamic stretching allows for full range of motion of the joints. continue Stretching Stretching used to ... addition, stretching provides increased: flexibility joint range and motion blood flow to muscles Stretching has to be ...

  8. Adaptively Stretched Templates for Normal Type Ia Supernova Light Curves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Strovink, Mark

    2007-12-01

    Individual BVRI light-curve templates have been determined for 22 unusually well-observed literature Type Ia supernovae by the newly developed template builder AQUAA. This tool uses light-curve functions that are smooth, flexible, and free of potential bias from externally derived templates and other prior assumptions. In the B filter, to high accuracy 19 of these light curves may be represented by a single master template that is stretched adaptively along the time axis. The usual parameter describing average linear stretch is supplemented by two new nonlinear parameters that characterize transitions between regions of different time dilation. The distribution of these parameter values is related to the observed diversity of supernova rise times (Strovink, M., ApJ in press, astro-ph/07050726). Major portions of the VRI light curves, including the pre-maximum and peak regions, may be represented by corresponding master templates that similarly are stretched. When the dependence of absolute supernova luminosity on the limited number of stretch parameters is established, the use of Type Ia supernovae as cosmological distance indicators will be simplified and may be sharpened. This work is supported by the Director, Office of Science, of the U.S. Department of Energy under Contract No. DE-AC02-05CH11231.

  9. Entrainment of leech swimming activity by the ventral stretch receptor.

    PubMed

    Yu, Xintian; Friesen, W Otto

    2004-11-01

    Rhythmic animal movements originate in CNS oscillator circuits; however, sensory inputs play an important role in shaping motor output. Our recent studies demonstrated that leeches with severed nerve cords swim with excellent coordination between the two ends, indicating that sensory inputs are sufficient for maintaining intersegmental coordination. In this study, we examined the neuronal substrates that underlie intersegmental coordination via sensory mechanisms. Among the identified sensory neurons in the leech, we found the ventral stretch receptor (VSR) to be the best candidate for our study because of its sensitivity to tension in longitudinal muscle. Our experiments demonstrate that (1) the membrane potential of the VSR is depolarized during swimming and oscillates with an amplitude of 1.5-5.0 mV, (2) rhythmic currents injected into the VSR can entrain ongoing swimming over a large frequency range (0.9-1.8 Hz), and (3) large current pulses injected into the VSR shift the phase of the swimming rhythm. These results suggest that VSRs play an important role in generating and modulating the swim rhythm. We propose that coordinated swimming in leech preparations with severed nerve cords results from mutual entrainment between the two ends of the leech mediated by stretch receptors.

  10. Intracellular ion control in lobster stretch receptor neurone.

    PubMed

    Edman, A; Gestrelius, S; Grampp, W

    1983-07-01

    The control of intracellular ion concentrations by means of passive and active transmembrane ion transports was investigated in the lobster stretch neurone using electrophysiological and pharmacological techniques in combination with recording with ion-sensitive microelectrodes. In resting conditions [Na+]i, [K+]i, and [Cl-]i were, in both slowly and rapidly adapting cells, found to be in the order of 20, 155, and 50 mM, respectively. In the slowly adapting cell impulse firing at stationary frequencies of 7-10 Hz caused an increase in [Na+]i and a decrease in [K+]i of 20-30 mM; [Cl-]i was only little affected, the rise in [Na+]i led to an enhanced Na-K pump activity noticeable as an increase in pump current production. In stationary conditions the quotient between pump current and Na+ influx increments was about 0.3, which is compatible with 3:2 Na-K pumping ratio in the present preparation. From measurements of the pump current activation during stationary firing at maximum tolerable frequencies an estimate was made of the cell's maximum pump current production. The measurements were used in the formulation of a mathematical model of the intracellular ion control in which expressions of active and passive transmembrane ion transports are incorporated into the continuity equation for the ion fluxes involved.

  11. [Receptor adaptation of muscle spindles treated in different ways].

    PubMed

    Zalkind, V I; Rokotova, N A

    1978-11-01

    Comparison of the grades of 60 sensitive muscle spindle terminals on two actions: gradual stretch of the muscle and short intensive tetanization of the muscle nerve, showed that, irrespective of the mode of action, the character of adaptation remains the smae in majority of units. The speed of receptors adaptation depends not on the specific of testing precedures, but, apparently, on the means of connection of the sensitive terminals with different types of intrafusal muscle fibers with different elasticviscous properties. The possible reason for speedy adaptation of muscle receptors of elementary dynamic type, is discussed.

  12. Stretch sensitive reflexes as an adaptive mechanism for maintaining limb stability

    PubMed Central

    Shemmell, Jonathan; Krutky, Matthew A.; Perreault, Eric J.

    2010-01-01

    The often studied stretch reflex is fundamental to the involuntary control of posture and movement. Nevertheless, there remains controversy regarding its functional role. Many studies have demonstrated that stretch reflexes can be modulated in a task appropriate manner. This review focuses on modulation of the long latency stretch reflex, thought to be mediated, at least in part, by supraspinal pathways. For example, this component of the stretch reflex increases in magnitude during interactions with compliant environments, relative to the sensitivity during interactions with rigid environments. This suggests that reflex sensitivity increases to augment limb stability when that stability is not provided by the environment. However, not all results support the stabilizing role of stretch reflexes. Some studies have demonstrated that involuntary responses within the time period corresponding to the long latency reflex can destabilize limb posture. We propose that this debate stems from the fact that multiple perturbation-sensitive pathways can contribute to the long latency stretch reflex and that these pathways have separate functional roles. The presented studies suggest that neural activity occurring within the period normally ascribed to the long latency stretch reflex is highly adaptable to current task demands and possibly should be considered more intelligent than “reflexive.” PMID:20434396

  13. Effects of prolonged lung inflation or deflation on pulmonary stretch receptor discharge in the alligator (Alligator mississippiensis).

    PubMed

    Marschand, Rachel E; Wilson, Jenna L; Burleson, Mark L; Crossley, Dane A; Hedrick, Michael S

    2014-08-15

    The American alligator (Alligator mississippiensis) is a semi-aquatic diving reptile that has a periodic breathing pattern. Previous work identified pulmonary stretch receptors, that are rapidly and slowly adapting, as well as intrapulmonary chemoreceptors (IPC), sensitive to CO2, that modulate breathing patterns in alligators. The purpose of the present study was to quantify the effects of prolonged lung inflation and deflation (simulated dives) on pulmonary stretch receptors (PSR) and/or IPC discharge characteristics. The effects of airway pressure (0-20 cm H2O), hypercapnia (7% CO2), and hypoxia (5% O2) on dynamic and static responses of PSR were studied in juvenile alligators (mean mass=246 g) at 24°C. Alligators were initially anesthetized with isoflurane, cranially pithed, tracheotomized and artificially ventilated. Vagal afferent tonic and phasic activity was recorded with platinum hook electrodes. Receptor activity was a mixture of slowly adapting PSR (SAR) and rapidly adapting PSR (RAR) with varying thresholds and degrees of adaptation, without CO2 sensitivity. Receptor activity before, during and after 1 min periods of lung inflation and deflation was quantified to examine the effect of simulated breath-hold dives. Some PSR showed a change in dynamic response, exhibiting inhibition for several breaths after prolonged lung inflation. Following 1 min deflation, RAR, but not SAR, exhibited a significant potentiation of burst frequency relative to control. For SAR, the post-inflation receptor inhibition was blocked by CO2 and hypoxia; for RAR, the post-inflation inhibition was potentiated by CO2 and blocked by hypoxia. These results suggest that changes in PSR firing following prolonged inflation and deflation may promote post-dive ventilation in alligators. We hypothesize that PSR in alligators may be involved in recovery of breathing patterns and lung volume during pre- and post-diving behavior and apneic periods in diving reptiles.

  14. Hypertensive stretch regulates endothelial exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies through VEGF receptor 2 signaling pathways.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Hu, Zhenqian; Han, Xiaofan; Jiang, Beibei; Zhang, Rongli; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Lu, Yao; Geng, Chenyang; Li, Wei; He, Yulong; Huo, Yingqing; Shibuya, Masabumi; Luo, Jincai

    2013-06-01

    Regulated endothelial exocytosis of Weibel-Palade bodies (WPBs), the first stage in leukocyte trafficking, plays a pivotal role in inflammation and injury. Acute mechanical stretch has been closely associated with vascular inflammation, although the precise mechanism is unknown. Here, we show that hypertensive stretch regulates the exocytosis of WPBs of endothelial cells (ECs) through VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling pathways. Stretch triggers a rapid release (within minutes) of von Willebrand factor and interleukin-8 from WPBs in cultured human ECs, promoting the interaction between leukocytes and ECs through the translocation of P-selectin to the cell membrane. We further show that hypertensive stretch significantly induces P-selectin translocation of intact ECs and enhances leukocyte adhesion both ex vivo and in vivo. Stretch-induced endothelial exocytosis is mediated via a VEGFR2/PLCγ1/calcium pathway. Interestingly, stretch also induces a negative feedback via a VEGFR2/Akt/nitric oxide pathway. Such dual effects are confirmed using pharmacological and genetic approaches in carotid artery segments, as well as in acute hypertensive mouse models. These studies reveal mechanical stretch as a potent agonist for endothelial exocytosis, which is modulated by VEGFR2 signaling. Thus, VEGFR2 signaling pathways may represent novel therapeutic targets in limiting hypertensive stretch-related inflammation.

  15. Adaptation of the dermal collagen structure of human skin and scar tissue in response to stretch: an experimental study.

    PubMed

    Verhaegen, Pauline D; Schouten, Hennie J; Tigchelaar-Gutter, Wikky; van Marle, Jan; van Noorden, Cornelis J; Middelkoop, Esther; van Zuijlen, Paul P

    2012-01-01

    Surgeons are often faced with large defects that are difficult to close. Stretching adjacent skin can facilitate wound closure. In clinical practice, intraoperative stretching is performed in a cyclical or continuous fashion. However, exact mechanisms of tissue adaptation to stretch remain unclear. Therefore, we investigated collagen and elastin orientation and morphology of stretched and nonstretched healthy skin and scars. Tissue samples were stretched, fixed in stretched-out position, and processed for histology. Objective methods were used to quantify the collagen orientation index (COI), bundle thickness, and bundle spacing. Also sections were analyzed for elastin orientation and quantity. Significantly more parallel aligned collagen bundles were found after cyclical (COI = 0.57) and continuous stretch (COI = 0.57) compared with nonstretched skin (COI = 0.40). Similarly, more parallel aligned elastin was found after stretch. Also, significantly thicker collagen bundles and more bundle spacing were found after stretch. For stretched scars, significantly more parallel aligned collagen was found (COI = 0.61) compared with nonstretched scars (COI = 0.49). In conclusion, both elastin and collagen realign in a parallel fashion in response to stretch. For healthy skin, thicker bundles and more space between the bundles were found. Rapid changes in extension, alignment, and collagen morphology appear to be the underlying mechanisms of adaptation to stretching.

  16. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Hosomi, Naohisa; Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke; Deguchi, Kazushi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Griendling, Kathy K.; Nishiyama, Akira

    2011-10-15

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: {yields} Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. {yields} Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. {yields} Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. {yields} Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  17. Egr3-dependent muscle spindle stretch receptor intrafusal muscle fiber differentiation and fusimotor innervation homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Oliveira Fernandes, Michelle; Tourtellotte, Warren G

    2015-04-08

    Muscle stretch proprioceptors (muscle spindles) are required for stretch reflexes and locomotor control. Proprioception abnormalities are observed in many human neuropathies, but the mechanisms involved in establishing and maintaining muscle spindle innervation and function are still poorly understood. During skeletal muscle development, sensory (Ia-afferent) innervation induces contacted myotubes to transform into intrafusal muscle fibers that form the stretch receptor core. The transcriptional regulator Egr3 is induced in Ia-afferent contacted myotubes by Neuregulin1 (Nrg1)/ErbB receptor signaling and it has an essential role in spindle morphogenesis and function. Because Egr3 is widely expressed during development and has a pleiotropic function, whether Egr3 functions primarily in skeletal muscle, Ia-afferent neurons, or in Schwann cells that myelinate Ia-afferent axons remains unresolved. In the present studies, cell-specific ablation of Egr3 in mice showed that it has a skeletal muscle autonomous function in stretch receptor development. Moreover, using genetic tracing, we found that Ia-afferent contacted Egr3-deficient myotubes were induced in normal numbers, but their development was blocked to generate one to two shortened fibers that failed to express some characteristic myosin heavy chain (MyHC) proteins. These "spindle remnants" persisted into adulthood, remained innervated by Ia-afferents, and expressed neurotrophin3 (NT3), which is required for Ia-afferent neuron survival. However, they were not innervated by fusimotor axons and they did not express glial derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF), which is essential for fusimotor neuron survival. These results demonstrate that Egr3 has an essential role in regulating gene expression that promotes normal intrafusal muscle fiber differentiation and fusimotor innervation homeostasis.

  18. Age-dependent Muscle Adaptation after Chronic Stretch-shortening Contractions in Rats.

    PubMed

    Rader, Erik P; Layner, KaylaN; Triscuit, Alyssa M; Chetlin, Robert D; Ensey, James; Baker, Brent A

    2016-01-01

    Age-related differences in contraction-induced adaptation have been well characterized especially for young and old rodent models but much less so at intermediate ages. Therefore, additional research is warranted to determine to what extent alterations in adaptation are due to maturation versus aging per se. The purpose of our study was to evaluate muscles of Fisher 344XBrown Norway rats of various ages following one month of exposure to stretch-shortening contractions (SSCs). With exposure, muscles mass increased by ~10% for 27 and 30 month old rats vs. ~20% for 3 and 6 month old rats (P < 0.05). For 3 month old rats, maximum isometric force and dynamic peak force increased by 22 ± 8% and 27 ± 10%, respectively (P < 0.05). For 6 month old rats, these forces were unaltered by exposure and positive work capacity diminished by 27 ± 2% (P = 0.006). By 30 months of age, age-related deficits in maximum isometric force, peak force, negative work, and positive work were apparent and SSC exposure was ineffective at counteracting such deficits. Recovery from fatigue was also tested and exposure-induced improvements in fatigue recovery were indicated for 6 month old rats and to a lesser extent for 3 month old rats whereas no such effect was observed for older rats. Alterations in fatigue recovery were accompanied by evidence of substantial type IIb to IIx fiber type shifting. These results highlight the exceptional adaptive capacity for strength at a young age, the inclination for adaptation in fatigue recovery at early adulthood, and diminished adaptation for muscle performance in general beginning at late adulthood. Such findings motivate careful investigation to determine appropriate SSC exposures at all stages of life.

  19. Influence of inter-set stretching on strength, flexibility and hormonal adaptations.

    PubMed

    Souza, Antônio Claudio; Bentes, Claudio Melibeu; de Salles, Belmiro Freitas; Reis, Victor Machado; Alves, José Vilaça; Miranda, Humberto; Novaes, Jefferson da Silva

    2013-03-01

    Adequate levels of strength and flexibility are important for the promotion and maintenance of health and functional autonomy as well as safe and effective sports participation. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of 8 weeks of strength training with or without inter-set static stretching on strength, flexibility and hormonal adaptations of trained men. Sixteen trained men were randomly divided into 2 groups: the static stretching group (SSG) and passive interval group (PIG). All participants performed 24 training sessions 3 times a week. The test and retest of 8RM, strength, flexibility, cortisol and growth hormone concentration in pre and post test conditions were also evaluated. To compare the differences between and within groups in pre- and post-training tests, ANOVA with repeated measures was performed (SSGpre x SSGpost; PIGpre x PIGpost; SSGpost x PIGpost). An alpha level of p<0.05 was considered statistically significant for all comparisons. Both groups showed significant increases in strength (SSGpre vs. SSGpost; PIGpre vs. PIGpost) in the same exercises for leg extension (LE) and Low Row (LR). Specifically, in the SSG group, the parameters for LE were (p = 0.0015 and ES = 2.28 - Large), and the parameters for LR were (p = 0.002 and ES = 1.95 - Large). Moreover, in the PIG group, the parameters for LE were (p = 0.009 and ES = 1.95 - Large), and the parameters for LR were (p = 0.0001 and ES = 2.88 - Large). No differences were found between the groups (SSGpost vs. PIGpost). Both groups showed significant increases in flexibility but in different joints (SSGpre vs. SSGpost; PIGpre vs. PIGpost). In the SSG group, only three joints showed significant increases in flexibility: shoulder extension (p = 0.004 and ES = 1.76 - Large), torso flexion (p = 0.002 and ES = 2.36 - Large), and hip flexion (p = 0.001 and ES = 1.79 -Large). In the PIG group, only three joints showed increases in flexibility: horizontal shoulder abduction (p = 0.003 and ES

  20. Mechanical, hormonal, and hypertrophic adaptations to 10 weeks of eccentric and stretch-shortening cycle exercise training in old males.

    PubMed

    Váczi, Márk; Nagy, Szilvia A; Kőszegi, Tamás; Ambrus, Míra; Bogner, Péter; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Tóth, Katalin; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2014-10-01

    The growth promoting effects of eccentric (ECC) contractions are well documented but it is unknown if the rate of stretch per se plays a role in such muscular responses in healthy aging human skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training of the quadriceps muscle with low rate ECC and high rate ECC contractions in the form of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) but at equal total mechanical work would produce rate-specific adaptations in healthy old males age 60-70. Both training programs produced similar improvements in maximal voluntary isometric (6%) and ECC torque (23%) and stretch-shortening cycle function (reduced contraction duration [24%] and enhanced elastic energy storage [12%]) (p<0.05). The rate of torque development increased 30% only after SSC exercise (p<0.05). Resting testosterone and cortisol levels were unchanged but after each program the acute exercise-induced cortisol levels were 12-15% lower (p<0.05). Both programs increased quadriceps size 2.5% (p<0.05). It is concluded that both ECC and SSC exercise training produces favorable adaptations in healthy old males' quadriceps muscle. Although the rate of muscle tension during the SSC vs. ECC contractions was about 4-fold greater, the total mechanical work seems to regulate the hypetrophic, hormonal, and most of the mechanical adaptations. However, SSC exercise was uniquely effective in improving a key deficiency of aging muscle, i.e., its ability to produce force rapidly.

  1. [Endocellular regulation of oxygen consumption in the neurone of isolated crawfish stretch receptor].

    PubMed

    Zaguskin, S L; Zaguskina, L D; Zaguskina, S S

    2007-01-01

    Morphological correlations of functional regulation of oxygen consumption have been investigated in single of isolated crustacean stretch receptor neuron. The increase in oxygen consumption is promoted by: 1) redistribution of mitochondria and increase in cytochrome oxidase (CO) activity in mitochondria near to the plasmatic membrane; 2) coordination of mitochondria aggregation rhythms with pO2 rhythms in external environment of a cell; 3) reduction of the area with high CO and mitochondria activity, and reduction of the way of oxygen diffusion; 4) increase in CO activity gradient from periphery to the center of the neuron body; 5) carry of oxygen by water current under hydration of the neuron body, and cytoplasm dilution under transition of a part of gel in sol; 6) cyclic changes in the neuron body and hillock sizes ratio determining carry of oxygen by water current into the neuron body, oxygen absorption by mitochondria in the neuron body, and transition of the water released from oxygen from the neuron body into hillock and further into the external environment.

  2. Muscle excursion does not correlate with increased serial sarcomere number after muscle adaptation to stretched tendon transfer.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Mitsuhiko; Ward, Samuel R; Fridén, Jan; Lieber, Richard L

    2012-11-01

    Chronic skeletal muscle stretch typically increases serial muscle fiber sarcomere number. Since serial sarcomere number correlates with functional excursion in normal muscle, observed changes in sarcomere number are often extrapolated to their new assumed function. However, this has not been well demonstrated experimentally. Thus, we measured the functional properties of muscles stretched due to tendon transfer surgery. Muscle active and passive length-tension curves were measured 1 week and 4 weeks after surgery, and then each muscle was further examined to determine structural adaptation as well as single fiber and fiber bundle passive mechanical properties. We found a disconnect between the functional and structural muscle properties. Specifically, muscle excursion was significantly lower in the transferred muscle compared to controls, even though serial sarcomere number had increased. Furthermore, maximum tetanic tension was significantly reduced, though the two groups had similar physiological cross sectional areas. Passive tension increased in the transferred muscle, which was deemed to be due to proliferation of extracellular matrix. These data are the first to report that muscle morphological adaptation after chronic stretch does not accurately predict the muscle's functional properties. These data have significant implications for examining muscle physiological properties under surgical interventions.

  3. Investigation on improved infrared image detail enhancement algorithm based on adaptive histogram statistical stretching and gradient filtering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Bangze; Zhu, Youpan; Li, Zemin; Hu, Dechao; Luo, Lin; Zhao, Deli; Huang, Juan

    2014-11-01

    Duo to infrared image with low contrast, big noise and unclear visual effect, target is very difficult to observed and identified. This paper presents an improved infrared image detail enhancement algorithm based on adaptive histogram statistical stretching and gradient filtering (AHSS-GF). Based on the fact that the human eyes are very sensitive to the edges and lines, the author proposed to extract the details and textures by using the gradient filtering. New histogram could be acquired by calculating the sum of original histogram based on fixed window. With the minimum value for cut-off point, author carried on histogram statistical stretching. After the proper weights given to the details and background, the detail-enhanced results could be acquired finally. The results indicate image contrast could be improved and the details and textures could be enhanced effectively as well.

  4. Quantifying the squeezing or stretching of fisheries as they adapt to displacement by marine reserves.

    PubMed

    Chollett, Iliana; Box, Stephen J; Mumby, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    The designation of no-take marine reserves involves social and economic concerns due to the resulting displacement of fishing effort, when fishing rights are removed from those who traditionally fished within an area. Displacement can influence the functioning of the fishery and success of the reserve, yet levels of displacement are seldom quantified after reserve implementation and very rarely before that. We devised a simple analytical framework based on set theory to facilitate reserve placement. Implementation of the framework requires maps of fishing grounds, fishing effort, or catch per unit effort for at least 2 years. The framework quantifies the level of conflict that a reserve designation might cause in the fishing sector due to displacement and the opportunities to offset the conflict through fisher spatial mobility (i.e., ability of fishers to fish elsewhere). We also considered how the outputs of the framework can be used to identify targeted management interventions for each fishery. We applied the method in Honduras, where the largest marine protected area in Central America is being placed, for which spatial data on fishing effort were available for 6 fisheries over 3 years. The proposed closure had a greater negative impact on the shrimp and lobster scuba fisheries, which concentrated respectively 28% and 18% of their effort inside the reserve. These fisheries could not accommodate the displacement within existing fishing grounds. Both would be forced to stretch into new fishing grounds, which are available but are of unknown quality. These stakeholders will likely require compensation to offset costly exploratory fishing or to travel to fishing grounds farther away from port.

  5. Effects of transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1) on the mechanical stretch-induced expression of airway remodeling-associated factors in human bronchial epithelioid cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qian; Li, Minchao

    2017-01-25

    Research has shown that mechanical stress stimulation can cause airway remodeling. We investigate the effects of mechanical stretch on the expression of the airway remodeling-associated factors interleukin-13 (IL-13) and matrix metalloprotein-9 (MMP-9) and signaling pathways in human bronchial epithelioid (16HBE) cells under mechanical stretch. A Flexcell FX-4000 Tension System with a flexible substrate was applied to stretch 16HBE cells at a 15% elongation amplitude and 1Hz frequency, with stretching for 0.5h, 1h, 1.5h and 2h. The experimental group with higher IL-13, MMP-9, and TRPC1 expression and higher Ca(2+) levels was selected for performing intervention experiment. These cells were pretreated with the transient receptor potential canonical 1 (TRPC1) channel antagonist SKF96365 and TRPC1-specific siRNA, and then mechanical stretch was applied. Our results provided evidences that mechanical pressure significantly increased IL-13, MMP-9, and TRPC1 protein and mRNA expression levels and intracellular Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity at 4 time points compared with the control group. The peak IL-13, MMP-9, and TRPC1 expression levels were observed at 0.5h after exposure to mechanical pressure. IL-13 and MMP-9 expression levels and Ca(2+) fluorescence intensity in the stretch+SKF96365 group and in the stretch+TRPC1 siRNA group were significantly lower than those were in the mechanical stretch group. By incubating the cells with the intracellular calcium chelator BAPTA-AM, the expression of IL-13 and MMP9 was significantly decreased, and the expression level of TRPC1 remained unchanged. These observations suggest that mechanical stretch may induce an influx of Ca(2+) and up-regulation of IL-13 and MMP-9 expression in 16HBE cells via activation of TRPC1.

  6. The drop height determines neuromuscular adaptations and changes in jump performance in stretch-shortening cycle training.

    PubMed

    Taube, W; Leukel, C; Lauber, B; Gollhofer, A

    2012-10-01

    There is an ongoing discussion about how to improve jump performance most efficiently with plyometric training. It has been proposed that drop height influences the outcome, although longitudinal studies are missing. Based on cross-sectional drop jump studies showing height-dependent Hoffmann (H)-reflex activities, we hypothesized that the drop height should influence the neuromuscular activity and thus, the training result. Thirty-three subjects participated as a control or in one of two stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) interventions. Subjects either trained for 4 weeks doing drop jumps from 30, 50, and 75 cm drop heights (SSC1) or completed the same amount of jumps exclusively from 30 cm (SSC2). During training and testing (from 30, 50, and 75 cm), subjects were instructed to minimize the duration of ground contact and to maximize their rebound height. Rebound heights were significantly augmented after SSC1, but a trend was only observed after SSC2. In contrast, the duration of ground contact increased after SSC1 but decreased after SSC2. The performance index (rebound height/duration of ground contact) improved similarly after SSC1 (+14%) and SSC2 (+14%). Changes in performance were accompanied by neuromuscular adaptations: for SSC1, activity of the soleus increased toward take-off (between 120 and 170 ms after touchdown), whereas SSC2-trained subjects showed enhanced activity shortly after ground contact (20-70 ms after touch down). The present study demonstrates a strong link among drop height, neuromuscular adaptation, and performance in SSC training. As the improvement in the performance index was no different after SSC1 or SSC2, the decision whether to apply SSC1 or SSC2 should depend on the specific requirements of the sports discipline.

  7. Stretch Marks

    MedlinePlus

    ... like during puberty), that person may get fine lines on the body called stretch marks. Stretch marks happen when the skin is pulled by rapid growth or stretching. Although the skin is usually fairly elastic, when it's overstretched, the normal production of collagen (the major protein that makes up ...

  8. Modular Activating Receptors in Innate and Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Berry, Richard; Call, Matthew E

    2017-03-14

    Triggering of cell-mediated immunity is largely dependent on the recognition of foreign or abnormal molecules by a myriad of cell surface-bound receptors. Many activating immune receptors do not possess any intrinsic signaling capacity but instead form noncovalent complexes with one or more dimeric signaling modules that communicate with a common set of kinases to initiate intracellular information-transfer pathways. This modular architecture, where the ligand binding and signaling functions are detached from one another, is a common theme that is widely employed throughout the innate and adaptive arms of immune systems. The evolutionary advantages of this highly adaptable platform for molecular recognition are visible in the variety of ligand-receptor interactions that can be linked to common signaling pathways, the diversification of receptor modules in response to pathogen challenges, and the amplification of cellular responses through incorporation of multiple signaling motifs. Here we provide an overview of the major classes of modular activating immune receptors and outline the current state of knowledge regarding how these receptors assemble, recognize their ligands, and ultimately trigger intracellular signal transduction pathways that activate immune cell effector functions.

  9. Ion (H+, Ca2+, Co2+) and temperature effects on a hyperpolarization-activated membrane current in the lobster stretch receptor neurone.

    PubMed

    Edman, A; Grampp, W

    1991-02-01

    The effects of some ions (H+, Ca2+, Co2+) and temperature on the Q-channel (a channel which conducts a hyperpolarization-activated membrane current, IQ) was investigated in the slowly adapting lobster stretch receptor neurone. It was found: (1) that increases in pH cause an increase in the maximum channel conductance; (2) that Co2+ (1 mM) and increases in extracellular Ca2+ produce a positive shift of the relationship between the membrane voltage and the steady-state channel activation along the voltage scale; (3) that Co2+ and decreases in extracellular pH cause a decrease in rate of the voltage-dependent step of the channel's gating reaction; (4) that none of the ions has an effect on the rate of the voltage-independent step of the gating reaction; and (5) that Co2+ and K+ do not interfere with each other's actions on the channel's gating reaction and maximum ion conductivity. Increases in temperature from 13 to 23 degrees C were found: (1) to cause an increase in the maximum Q-channel conductance by a factor of 1.7; (2) to have no effect on the voltage dependence of the channel's gating reaction; but (3) to lead to an increase in rate of the gating reaction by a factor of about five for the voltage-dependent, and by a factor of about three for the voltage-independent gating step. The temperature sensitivity of the IQ mechanism proved to be mathematically reproducible by a previously developed, and slightly modified Q-channel model (Edman et al. 1987, Edman & Grampp 1989), and to be of no significance in the control of membrane excitability in a thermally unstable environment.

  10. Slowly Adapting Sensory Units Have More Receptors in Large Airways than in Small Airways in Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Jun; Song, Nana; Guardiola, Juan; Roman, Jesse; Yu, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Sensory units of pulmonary slowly adapting receptors (SARs) are more active in large airways than in small airways. However, there is no explanation for this phenomenon. Although sensory structures in large airways resemble those in small airways, they are bigger and more complex. Possibly, a larger receptor provides greater surface area for depolarization, and thus has a lower activating threshold and/or a higher sensitivity to stretch, leading to more nerve electrical activities. Recently, a single sensory unit has been reported to contain multiple receptors. Therefore, sensory units in large airways may contain more SARs, which may contribute to high activities. To test this hypothesis, we used a double staining technique to identify sensory receptor sizes. We labeled the sensory structure with Na+/K+-ATPase antibodies and the myelin sheath with myelin basic protein (MBP) antibodies. A SAR can be defined as the end formation beyond MBP labeling. Thus, we are able to compare sizes of sensory structures and SARs in large (trachea and bronchi) vs. small (bronchioles <500 μm in diameter) airways in the rabbit. We found that even though the sensory structure was bigger in large airways than in small airways (3340 ± 223 vs. 1168 ± 103 μm2; P < 0.0001), there was no difference in receptor sizes (349 ± 14 vs. 326 ± 16 μm2; > 0.05). However, the sensory structure contains more SARs in large airways than in small airways (9.6 ± 0.6 vs. 3.6 ± 0.3; P < 0.0001). Thus, our data support the hypothesis that greater numbers of SARs in sensory units of large airways may contribute to higher activities. PMID:28018231

  11. Slowly Adapting Sensory Units Have More Receptors in Large Airways than in Small Airways in Rabbits.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Song, Nana; Guardiola, Juan; Roman, Jesse; Yu, Jerry

    2016-01-01

    Sensory units of pulmonary slowly adapting receptors (SARs) are more active in large airways than in small airways. However, there is no explanation for this phenomenon. Although sensory structures in large airways resemble those in small airways, they are bigger and more complex. Possibly, a larger receptor provides greater surface area for depolarization, and thus has a lower activating threshold and/or a higher sensitivity to stretch, leading to more nerve electrical activities. Recently, a single sensory unit has been reported to contain multiple receptors. Therefore, sensory units in large airways may contain more SARs, which may contribute to high activities. To test this hypothesis, we used a double staining technique to identify sensory receptor sizes. We labeled the sensory structure with Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase antibodies and the myelin sheath with myelin basic protein (MBP) antibodies. A SAR can be defined as the end formation beyond MBP labeling. Thus, we are able to compare sizes of sensory structures and SARs in large (trachea and bronchi) vs. small (bronchioles <500 μm in diameter) airways in the rabbit. We found that even though the sensory structure was bigger in large airways than in small airways (3340 ± 223 vs. 1168 ± 103 μm(2); P < 0.0001), there was no difference in receptor sizes (349 ± 14 vs. 326 ± 16 μm(2); > 0.05). However, the sensory structure contains more SARs in large airways than in small airways (9.6 ± 0.6 vs. 3.6 ± 0.3; P < 0.0001). Thus, our data support the hypothesis that greater numbers of SARs in sensory units of large airways may contribute to higher activities.

  12. NMDA receptor mediated phosphorylation of GluR1 subunits contributes to the appearance of calcium-permeable AMPA receptors after mechanical stretch injury

    PubMed Central

    Spaethling, Jennifer; Le, Linda; Meaney, David F

    2016-01-01

    Alterations in neuronal cytosolic calcium is a key mediator of the traumatic brain injury (TBI) pathobiology, but less is known of the role and source of calcium in shaping early changes in synaptic receptors and neural circuits after TBI. In this study, we examined the calcium source and potential phosphorylation events leading to insertion of calcium-permeable AMPARs (CP-AMPARs) after in vitro traumatic brain injury, a receptor subtype that influences neural circuit dynamics for hours to days following injury. We found that both synaptic and NR2B-containing NMDARs contribute significantly to the calcium influx following stretch injury. Moreover, an early and sustained phosphorylation of the S-831 site of the GluR1 subunit appeared after mechanical injury, and this phosphorylation was blocked with the inhibition of either synaptic NMDARs or NR2B-containing NMDARs. In comparison, mechanical injury led to no significant change in the S-845 phosphorylation of the GluR1 subunit. Although no change in S-845 phosphorylation appeared in injured cultures, we observed that inhibition of NR2B-containing NMDARs significantly increased S-845 phosphorylation one hour after injury while blockade of synaptic NMDARs did not change S-845 phosphorylation at any time point following injury. These findings show that a broad class of NMDARs are activated in parallel and that targeting either subpopulation will reverse some of the consequences of mechanical injury, providing distinct paths to treat the effects of mechanical injury on neural circuits after TBI. PMID:22426393

  13. Identification of vagal sensory receptors in the rat lung: are there subtypes of slowly adapting receptors?

    PubMed Central

    Bergren, D R; Peterson, D F

    1993-01-01

    1. We studied the characteristics of pulmonary sensory receptors whose afferent fibres are in the left vagus nerve of opened-chest rats. The activity of these receptors was recorded during mechanical ventilation approximating eupnoea, as well as during deflation, stepwise inflations and constant-pressure inflations of the lungs. Data were also collected from closed-chest rats and analysed separately. 2. Ninety-four per cent of receptors were located in the ipsilateral lung or airways with the remainder in the contralateral lung. 3. Not only were slowly adapting receptors (SARs) the most abundant pulmonary receptors but 21% of them were either exclusively or predominantly active during the deflationary phase of the ventilatory cycle. Deflationary units were found in opened- and closed-chest rats. The average conduction velocity for all fibres innervating SARs averaged 29.7 m s-1. 4. We found rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) to be extremely rare in the rat. Their activity was sparse and irregular. The conduction velocities of fibres innervating RARs averaged 12.3 m s-1. 5. Far more abundant than RARs in the remaining population of pulmonary fibres were C fibres. They were observed to have an average conduction velocity of 2.1 m s-1, base-level activity which was irregular and a high pressure threshold of activation and were stimulated by intravenous capsaicin injection. 6. Notable differences exist between pulmonary receptors in rats and those reported in other species. The variations include the abundant existence of intrapulmonary SARs with exclusively deflationary modulation and the rarity of RARs. We also encountered C fibres which have not previously been described systematically in the rat. PMID:8229824

  14. Olfactory Receptor Subgenomes Linked with Broad Ecological Adaptations in Sauropsida.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Yang, Zhikai; Maldonado, Emanuel; Li, Cai; Zhang, Guojie; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Jarvis, Erich D; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-11-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) govern a prime sensory function. Extant birds have distinct olfactory abilities, but the molecular mechanisms underlining diversification and specialization remain mostly unknown. We explored OR diversity in 48 phylogenetic and ecologically diverse birds and 2 reptiles (alligator and green sea turtle). OR subgenomes showed species- and lineage-specific variation related with ecological requirements. Overall 1,953 OR genes were identified in reptiles and 16,503 in birds. The two reptiles had larger OR gene repertoires (989 and 964 genes, respectively) than birds (182-688 genes). Overall, birds had more pseudogenes (7,855) than intact genes (1,944). The alligator had significantly more functional genes than sea turtle, likely because of distinct foraging habits. We found rapid species-specific expansion and positive selection in OR14 (detects hydrophobic compounds) in birds and in OR51 and OR52 (detect hydrophilic compounds) in sea turtle, suggestive of terrestrial and aquatic adaptations, respectively. Ecological partitioning among birds of prey, water birds, land birds, and vocal learners showed that diverse ecological factors determined olfactory ability and influenced corresponding olfactory-receptor subgenome. OR5/8/9 was expanded in predatory birds and alligator, suggesting adaptive specialization for carnivory. OR families 2/13, 51, and 52 were correlated with aquatic adaptations (water birds), OR families 6 and 10 were more pronounced in vocal-learning birds, whereas most specialized land birds had an expanded OR family 14. Olfactory bulb ratio (OBR) and OR gene repertoire were correlated. Birds that forage for prey (carnivores/piscivores) had relatively complex OBR and OR gene repertoires compared with modern birds, including passerines, perhaps due to highly developed cognitive capacities facilitating foraging innovations.

  15. The influence of chronological age on periods of accelerated adaptation of stretch-shortening cycle performance in pre and postpubescent boys.

    PubMed

    Lloyd, Rhodri S; Oliver, Jon L; Hughes, Michael G; Williams, Craig A

    2011-07-01

    Although it is suggested that periods of naturally occurring accelerated adaptation may exist for various physical parameters, it would appear that no such evidence exists for stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) development. Two hundred and fifty male youths aged 7-17 years were tested for squat (SJ) and countermovement jump (CMJ) height, reactive strength index (RSI), and leg stiffness, with analyses of variance used to establish any significant between-group differences. Additionally, to ascertain the existence of periods of accelerated adaptation, inferences were made about the magnitudes of change between consecutive chronological age groups in relation to the smallest worthwhile change. The largest mean differences (±90% confidence limits) occurred between age groups 10 and 11 (G10-G11) for squat jump (SJ) height (21.61 ± 12.08-31.94%), CMJ height (20.80 ± 11.1-44.1%), and RSI (26.51 ± 11.07-44.10%); and between G12 and G13 for SJ (15.31 ± 7.47-23.73%) and CMJ (16.09 ± 7.50-25.38%) height. Negative mean differences occurred between G11 and G12 for SJ height (-1.32 ± -9.30 to 7.37%), CMJ jump height (-7.68 ± -15.15 to 0.45%) and RSI (-11.48 ± -22.21 to 0.74%); and between G10 and G11 for leg stiffness (-8.87 ± -18.85 to 2.34%). It would appear almost certain that windows of accelerated adaptation may exist for SJ and CMJ height and RSI in male youths; however, leg stiffness results would suggest that fast-SSC function may follow a different developmental trend.

  16. Stretching Fibroblasts Remodels Fibronectin and Alters Cancer Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Mingfang; Brewer, Bryson M.; Yang, Lijie; Franco Coronel, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu

    2015-02-01

    Most investigations of cancer-stroma interactions have focused on biochemical signaling effects, with much less attention being paid to biophysical factors. In this study, we investigated the role of mechanical stimuli on human prostatic fibroblasts using a microfluidic platform that was adapted for our experiments and further developed for both repeatable performance among multiple assays and for compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy. Results show that mechanical stretching of normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) alters the structure of secreted fibronectin. Specifically, unstretched NAFs deposit and assemble fibronectin in a random, mesh-like arrangement, while stretched NAFs produce matrix with a more organized, linearly aligned structure. Moreover, the stretched NAFs exhibited an enhanced capability for directing co-cultured cancer cell migration in a persistent manner. Furthermore, we show that stretching NAFs triggers complex biochemical signaling events through the observation of increased expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). A comparison of these behaviors with those of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) indicates that the observed phenotypes of stretched NAFs are similar to those associated with CAFs, suggesting that mechanical stress is a critical factor in NAF activation and CAF genesis.

  17. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na+, Ca2+ and K+. The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca2+-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  18. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate OFF responses in light-adapted ON bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-Jie; Gao, Fan; Wu, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that photoreceptor synaptic inputs to depolarizing bipolar cells (DBCs or ON bipolar cells) are mediated by mGluR6 receptors and those to hyperpolarizing bipolar cells (HBCs or OFF bipolar cells) are mediated by AMPA/kainate receptors. Here we show that in addition to mGluR6 receptors which mediate the sign-inverting, depolarizing light responses, subpopulations of cone-dominated and rod/cone mixed DBCs use GluR4 AMPA receptors to generate a transient sign-preserving OFF response under light adapted conditions. These AMPA receptors are located at the basal junctions postsynaptic to rods and they are silent under dark-adapted conditions, as tonic glutamate release in darkness desensitizes these receptors. Light adaptation enhances rod-cone coupling and thus allows cone photocurrents with an abrupt OFF depolarization to enter the rods. The abrupt rod depolarization triggers glutamate activation of unoccupied AMPA receptors, resulting in a transient OFF response in DBCs. It has been widely accepted that the DNQX-sensitive, OFF transient responses in retinal amacrine cells and ganglion cells are mediated exclusively by HBCs. Our results suggests that this view needs revision as AMPA receptors in subpopulations of DBCs are likely to significantly contribute to the DNQX-sensitive OFF transient responses in light-adapted third- and higher-order visual neurons. PMID:22842089

  19. Stretching Safely and Effectively

    MedlinePlus

    ... that stretching immediately before an event weakens hamstring strength. Instead of static stretching, try performing a "dynamic ... Acute effects of static vs. ballistic stretching on strength and muscular fatigue of ballet dancers and resistance- ...

  20. Get up and Stretch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crupi, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Daily stretching has many benefits for one's body. It can relieve stress and tension, it increases flexibility and it can help prevent injuries. There are many stretching exercises that a teacher can do with his or her students to help promote daily stretching routines. In this article, the author presents several stretching exercises and some…

  1. Synaptic connections between the hindwing stretch receptor and flight motor neurones in the locust revealed by double cobalt labelling for electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.H.; Altman, J.S.; Tyrer, N.M.

    1985-03-08

    Synaptic interactions between sensory and motor neurones in the locust flight system have been investigated by using intracellular labelling with cobalt and nickel for electron microscopy. Simultaneous axonal filling of two neurones with different concentrations of metal ions produces differential labelling, so that contacts between them in the central nervous system can be recognized. We have investigated the connectivity of the hindwing stretch receptor neurone (SR) with a direct hindwing depressor motor neurone (MN 127) known from physiological experiments to receive monosynaptic input from the SR, and an indirect hindwing depressor motor neurone (MN 112/1), for which no monosynaptic connection with the SR has been reported. We have found no direct synapses between the SR and MN 112/1, although some of their branches lie close together in the neuropile. We have, however, found some evidence for polysynaptic connections between them. There are many synapses of conventional dyadic morphology from both the lateral and mediolateral branches of the SR to MN 127; the medial branch was not examined. Those from the lateral branch contact the motor neurone on branches close to the neuropilar segment, while those from the mediolateral branch contact long, thin distal twigs. We estimate that there are about 600 anatomical synapses between these two neurones. Our results suggest that a large number of widely distributed anatomical synapses constitute the physiological synaptic connection between the SR and MN 127. The dyadic arrangement of these synapses provides an anatomical correlate for the physiologically established divergence of SR outputs onto interneurones and motor neurones.

  2. Mechanism of HSV infection through soluble adapter-mediated virus bridging to the EGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Kenji; Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi; Tahara, Hideaki; Kuwano, Michihiko; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2011-04-25

    Herpes simplex virus entry into cells requires the binding of envelope glycoprotein D (gD) to an entry receptor. Depending on the cell, entry occurs by different mechanisms, including fusion at the cell surface or endocytosis. Here we examined the entry mechanism through a non-HSV receptor mediated by a soluble bi-specific adapter protein composed of recognition elements for gD and the EGF receptor (EGFR). Virus entered into endosomes using either EGF or an EGFR-specific single chain antibody (scFv) for receptor recognition. Infection was less efficient with the EGF adapter which could be attributed to its weaker binding to a viral gD. Infection mediated by the scFv adapter was pH sensitive, indicating that gD-EGFR bridging alone was insufficient for capsid release from endosomes. We also show that the scFv adapter enhanced infection of EGFR-expressing tumor tissue in vivo. Our results indicate that adapters may retarget HSV infection without drastically changing the entry mechanism.

  3. The DRF motif of CXCR6 as chemokine receptor adaptation to adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Koenen, Andrea; Babendreyer, Aaron; Schumacher, Julian; Pasqualon, Tobias; Schwarz, Nicole; Seifert, Anke; Deupi, Xavier

    2017-01-01

    The CXC-chemokine receptor 6 (CXCR6) is a class A GTP-binding protein-coupled receptor (GPCRs) that mediates adhesion of leukocytes by interacting with the transmembrane cell surface-expressed chemokine ligand 16 (CXCL16), and also regulates leukocyte migration by interacting with the soluble shed variant of CXCL16. In contrast to virtually all other chemokine receptors with chemotactic activity, CXCR6 carries a DRF motif instead of the typical DRY motif as a key element in receptor activation and G protein coupling. In this work, modeling analyses revealed that the phenylalanine F3.51 in CXCR6 might have impact on intramolecular interactions including hydrogen bonds by this possibly changing receptor function. Initial investigations with embryonic kidney HEK293 cells and further studies with monocytic THP-1 cells showed that mutation of DRF into DRY does not influence ligand binding, receptor internalization, receptor recycling, and protein kinase B (AKT) signaling. Adhesion was slightly decreased in a time-dependent manner. However, CXCL16-induced calcium signaling and migration were increased. Vice versa, when the DRY motif of the related receptor CX3CR1 was mutated into DRF the migratory response towards CX3CL1 was diminished, indicating that the presence of a DRF motif generally impairs chemotaxis in chemokine receptors. Transmembrane and soluble CXCL16 play divergent roles in homeostasis, inflammation, and cancer, which can be beneficial or detrimental. Therefore, the DRF motif of CXCR6 may display a receptor adaptation allowing adhesion and cell retention by transmembrane CXCL16 but reducing the chemotactic response to soluble CXCL16. This adaptation may avoid permanent or uncontrolled recruitment of inflammatory cells as well as cancer metastasis. PMID:28267793

  4. The Role of Metabotropic Glutamate Receptors and Cortical Adaptation in Habituation of Odor-Guided Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yadon, Carly A.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2005-01-01

    Decreases in behavioral investigation of novel stimuli over time may be mediated by a variety of factors including changes in attention, internal state, and motivation. Sensory cortical adaptation, a decrease in sensory cortical responsiveness over prolonged stimulation, may also play a role. In olfaction, metabotropic glutamate receptors on…

  5. Receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE) regulates sepsis but not the adaptive immune response

    PubMed Central

    Liliensiek, Birgit; Weigand, Markus A.; Bierhaus, Angelika; Nicklas, Werner; Kasper, Michael; Hofer, Stefan; Plachky, Jens; Gröne, Herman-Josef; Kurschus, Florian C.; Schmidt, Ann Marie; Yan, Shi Du; Martin, Eike; Schleicher, Erwin; Stern, David M.; Hämmerling, Günter J.; Nawroth, Peter P.; Arnold, Bernd

    2004-01-01

    While the initiation of the adaptive and innate immune response is well understood, less is known about cellular mechanisms propagating inflammation. The receptor for advanced glycation end products (RAGE), a transmembrane receptor of the immunoglobulin superfamily, leads to perpetuated cell activation. Using novel animal models with defective or tissue-specific RAGE expression, we show that in these animal models RAGE does not play a role in the adaptive immune response. However, deletion of RAGE provides protection from the lethal effects of septic shock caused by cecal ligation and puncture. Such protection is reversed by reconstitution of RAGE in endothelial and hematopoietic cells. These results indicate that the innate immune response is controlled by pattern-recognition receptors not only at the initiating steps but also at the phase of perpetuation. PMID:15173891

  6. Mechanisms of Host Receptor Adaptation by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kailang; Peng, Guiqing; Wilken, Matthew; Geraghty, Robert J.; Li, Fang

    2012-12-10

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) from palm civets has twice evolved the capacity to infect humans by gaining binding affinity for human receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Numerous mutations have been identified in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of different SARS-CoV strains isolated from humans or civets. Why these mutations were naturally selected or how SARS-CoV evolved to adapt to different host receptors has been poorly understood, presenting evolutionary and epidemic conundrums. In this study, we investigated the impact of these mutations on receptor recognition, an important determinant of SARS-CoV infection and pathogenesis. Using a combination of biochemical, functional, and crystallographic approaches, we elucidated the molecular and structural mechanisms of each of these naturally selected RBD mutations. These mutations either strengthen favorable interactions or reduce unfavorable interactions with two virus-binding hot spots on ACE2, and by doing so, they enhance viral interactions with either human (hACE2) or civet (cACE2) ACE2. Therefore, these mutations were viral adaptations to either hACE2 or cACE2. To corroborate the above analysis, we designed and characterized two optimized RBDs. The human-optimized RBD contains all of the hACE2-adapted residues (Phe-442, Phe-472, Asn-479, Asp-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for hACE2 but relative low affinity for cACE2. The civet-optimized RBD contains all of the cACE2-adapted residues (Tyr-442, Pro-472, Arg-479, Gly-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for cACE2 and also substantial affinity for hACE2. These results not only illustrate the detailed mechanisms of host receptor adaptation by SARS-CoV but also provide a molecular and structural basis for tracking future SARS-CoV evolution in animals.

  7. Low power laser irradiation does not affect the generation of signals in a sensory receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeberg, T.; Zhou, J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of low power Helium-Neon (He-Ne) and Gallium-Arsenide (Ga-As) laser on the slowly adapting crustacean stretch receptor was studied. The results showed that low power laser irradiation did not affect the membrane potential of the stretch receptor. These results are discussed in relation to the use of low power laser irradiation on the skin overlaying acupuncture points in treatment of pain syndrome.

  8. Stretched Wire Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Gordon; /SLAC

    2005-09-06

    Stretched wires are beginning to play an important role in the alignment of accelerators and synchrotron light sources. Stretched wires are proposed for the alignment of the 130 meter long LCLS undulator. Wire position technology has reached sub-micron resolution yet analyses of perturbations to wire straightness are hard to find. This paper considers possible deviations of stretched wire from the simple 2-dimensional catenary form.

  9. Receptor-Induced Dilatation in the Systemic and Intrarenal Adaptation to Pregnancy in Rats

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Vanessa M.; Gomes, Thiago S.; Reis, Luciana A.; Ferreira, Alice T.; Razvickas, Clara V.; Schor, Nestor; Boim, Mirian A.

    2009-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is associated with systemic and intrarenal vasodilatation resulting in an increased glomerular filtration rate. This adaptive response occurs in spite of elevated circulating levels of angiotensin II (Ang II). In the present study, we evaluated the potential mechanisms responsible for this adaptation. The reactivity of the mesangial cells (MCs) cultured from 14-day-pregnant rats to Ang II was measured through changes in the intracellular calcium concentration ([Cai]). The expression levels of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), the Ang II-induced vasodilatation receptor AT2, and the relaxin (LGR7) receptor were evaluated in cultured MCs and in the aorta, renal artery and kidney cortex by real time-PCR. The intrarenal distribution of LGR7 was further analyzed by immunohistochemistry. The MCs displayed a relative insensitivity to Ang II, which was paralleled by an impressive increase in the expression level of iNOS, AT2 and LGR7. These results suggest that the MCs also adapt to the pregnancy, thereby contributing to the maintenance of the glomerular surface area even in the presence of high levels of Ang II. The mRNA expression levels of AT2 and LGR7 also increased in the aorta, renal artery and kidney of the pregnant animals, whereas the expression of the AT1 did not significantly change. This further suggests a role of these vasodilatation-induced receptors in the systemic and intrarenal adaptation during pregnancy. LGR7 was localized in the glomeruli and on the apical membrane of the tubular cells, with stronger labeling in the kidneys of pregnant rats. These results suggest a role of iNOS, AT2, and LGR7 in the systemic vasodilatation and intrarenal adaptation to pregnancy and also suggest a pivotal role for relaxin in the tubular function during gestation. PMID:19287481

  10. Ca2+-activated K+ currents regulate odor adaptation by modulating spike encoding of olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed Central

    Kawai, Fusao

    2002-01-01

    The olfactory system is thought to accomplish odor adaptation through the ciliary transduction machinery in olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). However, ORCs that have lost their cilia can exhibit spike frequency accommodation in which the action potential frequency decreases with time despite a steady depolarizing stimulus. This raises the possibility that somatic ionic channels in ORCs might serve for odor adaptation at the level of spike encoding, because spiking responses in ORCs encode the odor information. Here I investigate the adaptational mechanism at the somatic membrane using conventional and dynamic patch-clamp recording techniques, which enable the ciliary mechanism to be bypassed. A conditioning stimulus with an odorant-induced current markedly shifted the response range of action potentials induced by the same test stimulus to higher concentrations of the odorant, indicating odor adaptation. This effect was inhibited by charybdotoxin and iberiotoxin, Ca2+-activated K+ channel blockers, suggesting that somatic Ca2+-activated K+ currents regulate odor adaptation by modulating spike encoding. I conclude that not only the ciliary machinery but also the somatic membrane currents are crucial to odor adaptation. PMID:11916858

  11. Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ 2 Modulates Late-Pregnancy Homeostatic Metabolic Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Vivas, Yurena; Díez-Hochleitner, Monica; Izquierdo-Lahuerta, Adriana; Corrales, Patricia; Horrillo, Daniel; Velasco, Ismael; Martínez-García, Cristina; Campbell, Mark; Sevillano, Julio; Ricote, Mercedes; Ros, Manuel; Ramos, Maria Pilar; Medina-Gomez, Gema

    2016-01-01

    Pregnancy requires adaptation of maternal energy metabolism, including expansion and functional modifications of adipose tissue. Insulin resistance (IR), predominantly during late gestation, is a physiological metabolic adaptation that serves to support the metabolic demands of fetal growth. The molecular mechanisms underlying these adaptations are not fully understood and may contribute to gestational diabetes mellitus. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) controls adipogenesis, glucose and lipid metabolism and insulin sensitivity. The PPARγ2 isoform is mainly expressed in adipocytes and is thus likely to contribute to adipose tissue adaptation during late pregnancy. In the present study, we investigated the contribution of PPARγ2 to the metabolic adaptations occurring during the late phase of pregnancy in the context of IR. Using a model of late pregnancy in PPARγ2 knockout (KO) mice, we found that deletion of PPARγ2 exacerbated IR in association with lower serum adiponectin levels, increased body weight and enhanced lipid accumulation in the liver. Lack of PPARγ2 provoked changes in the distribution of fat mass and preferentially prevented expansion of the perigonadal depot while at the same time exacerbating inflammation. Pregnant PPARγ2KO mice presented adipose tissue depot-dependent decreased expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism. Collectively, these data indicate that PPARγ2 is essential in promoting healthy adipose tissue expansion and immune and metabolic functionality during pregnancy, contributing to the physiological adaptations that lead gestation to term. PMID:27782293

  12. fMRI study of the role of glutamate NMDA receptor in the olfactory adaptation in rats: Insights into cellular and molecular mechanisms of olfactory adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Fuqiang; Wang, Xiaohai; Zariwala, Hatim A; Uslaner, Jason M; Houghton, Andrea K; Evelhoch, Jeffrey L; Hostetler, Eric; Winkelmann, Christopher T; Hines, Catherine D G

    2017-02-03

    Olfactory adaptation, characterized by attenuation of response to repeated odor stimulations or continuous odor exposure, is an intrinsic feature of olfactory processing. Adaptation can be induced by either "synaptic depression" due to depletion of neurotransmitters, or "enhanced inhibition" onto principle neurons by local inhibitory interneurons in olfactory structures. It is not clear which mechanism plays a major role in olfactory adaptation. More importantly, molecular sources of enhanced inhibition have not been identified. In this study, olfactory responses to either repeated 40-s stimulations with interstimulus intervals (ISI) of 140-s or 30-min, or a single prolonged 200-s stimulus were measured by fMRI in different naïve rats. Olfactory adaptations in the olfactory bulb (OB), anterior olfactory nucleus (AON), and piriform cortex (PC) were observed only with repeated 40-s odor stimulations, and no olfactory adaptations were detected during the prolonged 200-s stimulation. Interestingly, in responses to repeated 40-s odor stimulations in the PC, the first odor stimulation induced positive activations, and odor stimulations under adapted condition induced negative activations. The negative activations suggest that "sparse coding" and "global inhibition" are the characteristics of olfactory processing in PC, and the global inhibition manifests only under an adapted condition, not a naïve condition. Further, we found that these adaptations were NMDA receptor dependent; an NMDA receptor antagonist (MK801) blocked the adaptations. Based on the mechanism that glutamate NMDA receptor plays a role in the inhibition onto principle neurons by interneurons, our data suggest that the olfactory adaptations are caused by enhanced inhibition from interneurons. Combined with the necessity of the interruption of odor stimulation to observe the adaptations, the molecular source for the enhanced inhibition is most likely an increased glutamate release from presynaptic

  13. Stretching: Does It Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  14. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  15. Adaptation as a mechanism for gain control in cockroach ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Maria; Tichy, Harald

    2012-02-01

    In many sensory systems adaptation acts as a gain control mechanism that optimizes sensory performance by trading increased sensitivity to low stimulus intensity for decreased sensitivity to high stimulus intensity. Adaptation of insect antennal olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) has been studied for strong odour concentrations, either pulsed or constant. Here, we report that during slowly oscillating changes in the concentration of the odour of lemon oil, the ON and OFF ORNs on the antenna of the cockroach Periplaneta americana adapt to the actual odour concentration and the rate at which concentration changes. When odour concentration oscillates rapidly with brief periods, adaptation improves gain for instantaneous odour concentration and reduces gain for the rate of concentration change. Conversely, when odour concentration oscillates slowly with long periods, adaptation increases gain for the rate of change at the expense of instantaneous concentration. Without this gain control the ON and OFF ORNs would, at brief oscillation periods, soon reach their saturation level and become insensitive to further concentration increments and decrements. At long oscillation periods, on the other hand, the cue would simply be that the discharge begins to change. Because of the high gain for the rate of change, the cockroach will receive creeping changes in odour concentration, even if they persist in one direction. Gain control permits a high degree of precision at small rates when it counts most, without sacrificing the range of detection and without extending the measuring scale.

  16. Cyclic tensile stretch load and oxidized low density lipoprotein synergistically induce lectin-like oxidized ldl receptor-1 in cultured bovine chondrocytes, resulting in decreased cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis.

    PubMed

    Akagi, Masao; Nishimura, Shunji; Yoshida, Kohji; Kakinuma, Takumi; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Munakata, Hiroshi; Hamanishi, Chiaki

    2006-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation is known to be an essential factor in the regulation of cartilage metabolism. We tested the hypothesis that expression of lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1) can be modulated by cyclic tensile stretch load in chondrocytes. Cyclic loading of repeated stretch stress at 10 cycles per minute with 10 kPa of stress for 6 h induced expression of LOX-1 to 2.6 times control in cultured bovine articular chondrocytes, equivalent to the addition of 10 microg/mL oxidized low density lipoprotein (ox-LDL) (2.4 times control). Application of the cyclic load to the chondrocytes along with 10 microg/mL ox-LDL resulted in synergistically increased LOX-1 expression to 6.3 times control. Individual application of cyclic loading and 10 microg/mL ox-LDL significantly suppressed chondrocytes viability (84.6% +/- 3.4% and 80.9% +/- 3.2% of control at 24 h, respectively; n = 3; p < 0.05) and proteoglycan synthesis [81.0% +/- 7.1% and 85.7% +/- 5.2% of control at 24 h, respectively; p < 0.05 when compared with 94.6% +/- 4.6% for native-LDL (n = 3)]. Cyclic loading and 10 microg/mL ox-LDL synergistically affected cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis, which were significantly suppressed to 45.6% +/- 4.9% and 48.7% +/- 6.7% of control at 24 h, respectively (n = 3; p < 0.01 when compared with individual application of cyclic loading or 10 microg/mL ox-LDL). In this study, we demonstrated synergistic effects of cyclic tensile stretch load and ox-LDL on cell viability and proteoglycan synthesis in chondrocytes, which may be mediated through enhanced expression of LOX-1 and which has important implications in the progression of cartilage degeneration in osteoarthritis.

  17. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    PubMed

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils.

  18. [Role of brain 5-HT7 receptors as a functional molecule involved in the development of stress adaptation].

    PubMed

    Tsuji, Minoru; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Miyagawa, Kazuya; Takeda, Hiroshi

    2012-08-01

    A growing body of evidence suggests that the brain serotonin (5-HT) nervous system is an important component related to the etiology as well as the treatment of stress-related psychiatric disorders. Molecular cloning studies have revealed the existence of 14 different genes, each encoding a distinct 5-HT receptor subtype. The 5-HT7 receptor is the most recently identified member of the 5-HT receptor subtypes, and the physiological role of this receptor is still unknown. Recently, either selective agonists or antagonists for 5-HT7 receptors, as well as 5-HT7 receptor knockout mice, have been developed, and these have recently been used as the experimental tools for determining the actual function of 5-HT7 receptors. The first half of the present article introduces the reports that have examined the role of the 5-HT7 receptor on emotional regulation. On the other hand, it has been indicated that the ability to adapt to stress is an important defensive function of a living body, and impairment of this ability may contribute to some stress-related disorders. Thus, the examination of brain mechanisms involved in stress adaptation could help to pave the way for new therapeutic strategies for stress-related psychiatric disorders. The second half of the present article introduces our recent studies focusing on the relationship between brain 5-HT7 receptors and the mechanisms of stress adaptation.

  19. Phylogeny of Toll-Like Receptor Signaling: Adapting the Innate Response

    PubMed Central

    Roach, Jeffrey M.; Racioppi, Luigi; Jones, Corbin D.; Masci, Anna Maria

    2013-01-01

    The Toll-like receptors represent a largely evolutionarily conserved pathogen recognition machinery responsible for recognition of bacterial, fungal, protozoan, and viral pathogen associated microbial patterns and initiation of inflammatory response. Structurally the Toll-like receptors are comprised of an extracellular leucine rich repeat domain and a cytoplasmic Toll/Interleukin 1 receptor domain. Recognition takes place in the extracellular domain where as the cytoplasmic domain triggers a complex signal network required to sustain appropriate immune response. Signal transduction is regulated by the recruitment of different intracellular adaptors. The Toll-like receptors can be grouped depending on the usage of the adaptor, MyD88, into MyD88-dependent and MyD88 independent subsets. Herein, we present a unique phylogenetic analysis of domain regions of these receptors and their cognate signaling adaptor molecules. Although previously unclear from the phylogeny of full length receptors, these analyses indicate a separate evolutionary origin for the MyD88-dependent and MyD88-independent signaling pathway and provide evidence of a common ancestor for the vertebrate and invertebrate orthologs of the adaptor molecule MyD88. Together these observations suggest a very ancient origin of the MyD88-dependent pathway Additionally we show that early duplications gave rise to several adaptor molecule families. In some cases there is also strong pattern of parallel duplication between adaptor molecules and their corresponding TLR. Our results further support the hypothesis that phylogeny of specific domains involved in signaling pathway can shed light on key processes that link innate to adaptive immune response. PMID:23326591

  20. Metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonists selectively enhance responses of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Cahusac, Peter M B; Senok, Solomon S

    2006-03-15

    There is evidence that glutamate may participate as a transmitter at the junction between Merkel cells and the nerve terminals of slowly adapting type I (St I) units. We recorded extracellularly from the deep vibrissal nerve of an isolated rat vibrissa preparation in vitro. Five second trapezoid stimulus ramp deflections of the hair shaft were used to evoke responses. We bath-applied two compounds, which we planned would interfere with glutamatergic transmission. (2S)-2-Amino-2-[(1S,2S)-2-carboxycycloprop-1-yl]-3-(xanth-9-yl) propanoic acid (LY341495) was used at concentrations up to 100 microM to block all known metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors. The racemic mixture (RS)-4-carboxy-3-hydroxyphenylglycine ((RS)-4C3HPG) was used up to 100 microM to block ionotropic and Group I metabotropic glutamate receptors, and as an agonist at Group II mGlu receptors. Unexpectedly, both compounds had rapid onset excitatory effects on mechanically-evoked responses. (RS)-4C3HPG increased responses, with a mean 146% of control (P < 0.05) in a concentration-dependent manner. LY341495 increased responses, with a mean 128% of control (P < 0.05). With (RS)-4C3HPG in particular, it was noted that the static component (the firing during the last 1 s plateau) was preferentially enhanced relative to the dynamic component (firing during the first 0.5 s). Rapid recovery was seen after wash. Slowly adapting type II units, which have no junctional transmission, were completely unaffected by these compounds up to 200 microM. These results suggest that mGlu receptors play a role in Merkel cell-neurite complex mechanotransduction, although other explanations are considered.

  1. Triceps stretch (image)

    MedlinePlus

    ... shoulder. Hold for 10 to 20 seconds, then switch sides. Alternate method: raise your arm over your ... elbow. Hold for 10 to 20 seconds, then switch sides. You should feel either of these stretches ...

  2. Melanocortin 4 receptor mutations contribute to the adaptation of cavefish to nutrient-poor conditions

    PubMed Central

    Aspiras, Ariel C.; Rohner, Nicolas; Martineau, Brian; Borowsky, Richard L.; Tabin, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of morphological evolution, the genetic underpinnings of behavioral and physiological evolution remain largely unknown. Here, we study the metabolic changes that evolved in independently derived populations of the Mexican cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus. A hallmark of cave environments is scarcity of food. Cavefish populations rely almost entirely on sporadic food input from outside of the caves. To survive under these conditions, cavefish have evolved a range of adaptations, including starvation resistance and binge eating when food becomes available. The use of these adaptive strategies differs among independently derived cave populations. Although all cavefish populations tested lose weight more slowly than their surface conspecifics during restricted rations, only a subset of cavefish populations consume more food than their surface counterparts. A candidate gene-based screen led to the identification of coding mutations in conserved residues of the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) gene, contributing to the insatiable appetite found in some populations of cavefish. Intriguingly, one of the mutated residues has been shown to be linked to obesity in humans. We demonstrate that the allele results in both reduced maximal response and reduced basal activity of the receptor in vitro. We further validate in vivo that the mutated allele contributes to elevated appetite, growth, and starvation resistance. The allele appears to be fixed in cave populations in which the overeating phenotype is present. The presence of the same allele in multiple caves appears to be due to selection from standing genetic variation present in surface populations. PMID:26170297

  3. Activation of Toll-like Receptor 4 (TLR4) Attenuates Adaptive Thermogenesis via Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress*

    PubMed Central

    Okla, Meshail; Wang, Wei; Kang, Inhae; Pashaj, Anjeza; Carr, Timothy; Chung, Soonkyu

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive thermogenesis is the cellular process transforming chemical energy into heat in response to cold. A decrease in adaptive thermogenesis is a contributing factor to obesity. However, the molecular mechanisms responsible for the compromised adaptive thermogenesis in obese subjects have not yet been elucidated. In this study we hypothesized that Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation and subsequent inflammatory responses are key regulators to suppress adaptive thermogenesis. To test this hypothesis, C57BL/6 mice were either fed a palmitate-enriched high fat diet or administered with chronic low-dose LPS before cold acclimation. TLR4 stimulation by a high fat diet or LPS were both associated with reduced core body temperature and heat release. Impairment of thermogenic activation was correlated with diminished expression of brown-specific markers and mitochondrial dysfunction in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (sWAT). Defective sWAT browning was concomitant with elevated levels of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and autophagy. Consistently, TLR4 activation by LPS abolished cAMP-induced up-regulation of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) in primary human adipocytes, which was reversed by silencing of C/EBP homologous protein (CHOP). Moreover, the inactivation of ER stress by genetic deletion of CHOP or chemical chaperone conferred a resistance to the LPS-induced suppression of adaptive thermogenesis. Collectively, our data indicate the existence of a novel signaling network that links TLR4 activation, ER stress, and mitochondrial dysfunction, thereby antagonizing thermogenic activation of sWAT. Our results also suggest that TLR4/ER stress axis activation may be a responsible mechanism for obesity-mediated defective brown adipose tissue activation. PMID:26370079

  4. Positive and negative regulation of antigen receptor signaling by the Shc family of protein adapters.

    PubMed

    Finetti, Francesca; Savino, Maria Teresa; Baldari, Cosima T

    2009-11-01

    The Shc adapter family includes four members that are expressed as multiple isoforms and participate in signaling by a variety of cell-surface receptors. The biological relevance of Shc proteins as well as their variegated function, which relies on their highly conserved modular structure, is underscored by the distinct and dramatic phenotypic alterations resulting from deletion of individual Shc isoforms both in the mouse and in two model organisms, Drosophila melanogaster and Caenorhabditis elegans. The p52 isoform of ShcA couples antigen and cytokine receptors to Ras activation in both lymphoid and myeloid cells. However, the recognition of the spectrum of activities of p52ShcA in the immune system has been steadily expanding in recent years to other fundamental processes both at the cell and organism levels. Two other Shc family members, p66ShcA and p52ShcC/Rai, have been identified recently in T and B lymphocytes, where they antagonize survival and attenuate antigen receptor signaling. These developments reveal an unexpected and complex interplay of multiple Shc proteins in lymphocytes.

  5. Nav channel mechanosensitivity: activation and inactivation accelerate reversibly with stretch.

    PubMed

    Morris, Catherine E; Juranka, Peter F

    2007-08-01

    Voltage-gated sodium channels (Nav) are modulated by many bilayer mechanical amphiphiles, but whether, like other voltage-gated channels (Kv, HCN, Cav), they respond to physical bilayer deformations is unknown. We expressed human heart Nav1.5 pore alpha-subunit in oocytes (where, unlike alphaNav1.4, alphaNav1.5 exhibits normal kinetics) and measured small macroscopic currents in cell-attached patches. Pipette pressure was used to reversibly stretch the membrane for comparison of I(Na)(t) before, during, and after stretch. At all voltages, and in a dose-dependent fashion, stretch accelerated the I(Na)(t) time course. The sign of membrane curvature was not relevant. Typical stretch stimuli reversibly accelerated both activation and inactivation by approximately 1.4-fold; normalization of peak I(Na)(t) followed by temporal scaling ( approximately 1.30- to 1.85-fold) resulted in full overlap of the stretch/no-stretch traces. Evidently the rate-limiting outward voltage sensor motion in the Nav1.5 activation path (as in Kv1) accelerated with stretch. Stretch-accelerated inactivation occurred even with activation saturated, so an independently stretch-modulated inactivation transition is also a possibility. Since Nav1.5 channel-stretch modulation was both reliable and reversible, and required stretch stimuli no more intense than what typically activates putative mechanotransducer channels (e.g., stretch-activated TRPC1-based currents), Nav channels join the ranks of putative mechanotransducers. It is noteworthy that at voltages near the activation threshold, moderate stretch increased the peak I(Na) amplitude approximately 1.5-fold. It will be important to determine whether stretch-modulated Nav current contributes to cardiac arrhythmias, to mechanosensory responses in interstitial cells of Cajal, to touch receptor responses, and to neuropathic (i.e., hypermechanosensitive) and/or normal pain reception.

  6. Muscle plasticity and β₂-adrenergic receptors: adaptive responses of β₂-adrenergic receptor expression to muscle hypertrophy and atrophy.

    PubMed

    Sato, Shogo; Shirato, Ken; Tachiyashiki, Kaoru; Imaizumi, Kazuhiko

    2011-01-01

    We discuss the functional roles of β₂-adrenergic receptors in skeletal muscle hypertrophy and atrophy as well as the adaptive responses of β₂-adrenergic receptor expression to anabolic and catabolic conditions. β₂-Adrenergic receptor stimulation using anabolic drugs increases muscle mass by promoting muscle protein synthesis and/or attenuating protein degradation. These effects are prevented by the downregulation of the receptor. Endurance training improves oxidative performance partly by increasing β₂-adrenergic receptor density in exercise-recruited slow-twitch muscles. However, excessive stimulation of β₂-adrenergic receptors negates their beneficial effects. Although the preventive effects of β₂-adrenergic receptor stimulation on atrophy induced by muscle disuse and catabolic hormones or drugs are observed, these catabolic conditions decrease β₂-adrenergic receptor expression in slow-twitch muscles. These findings present evidence against the use of β₂-adrenergic agonists in therapy for muscle wasting and weakness. Thus, β₂-adrenergic receptors in the skeletal muscles play an important physiological role in the regulation of protein and energy balance.

  7. Molecular adaptation and resilience of the insect’s nuclear receptor USP

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    propose a model in which the molecular adaptation of this protein is seen as a process of resilience for the maintenance of the ecdysone receptor functionality. PMID:23039844

  8. Canine distemper virus associated with a lethal outbreak in monkeys can readily adapt to use human receptors.

    PubMed

    Sakai, Kouji; Yoshikawa, Tomoki; Seki, Fumio; Fukushi, Shuetsu; Tahara, Maino; Nagata, Noriyo; Ami, Yasushi; Mizutani, Tetsuya; Kurane, Ichiro; Yamaguchi, Ryoji; Hasegawa, Hideki; Saijo, Masayuki; Komase, Katsuhiro; Morikawa, Shigeru; Takeda, Makoto

    2013-06-01

    A canine distemper virus (CDV) strain, CYN07-dV, associated with a lethal outbreak in monkeys, used human signaling lymphocyte activation molecule as a receptor only poorly but readily adapted to use it following a P541S substitution in the hemagglutinin protein. Since CYN07-dV had an intrinsic ability to use human nectin-4, the adapted virus became able to use both human immune and epithelial cell receptors, as well as monkey and canine ones, suggesting that CDV can potentially infect humans.

  9. APS, an adapter protein with a PH and SH2 domain, is a substrate for the insulin receptor kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Z; Smith, B J; Kotani, K; Wilden, P; Pillay, T S

    1999-01-01

    APS (adapter protein with a PH and SH2 domain) is the newest member of a family of tyrosine kinase adapter proteins including SH2-B and Lnk. We previously identified SH2-B as an insulin-receptor-binding protein and substrate [Kotani, Wilden and Pillay (1998) Biochem J. 335, 103-109]. Here we show that APS interacts with the insulin receptor kinase activation loop through its SH2 domain and insulin stimulates the tyrosine-phosphorylation of APS. Furthermore, the phosphorylation of activation-loop tyrosine residues 1158 and 1162 are required for this interaction. PMID:10417330

  10. Polarized actin structural dynamics in response to cyclic uniaxial stretch

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lawrence; Helmke, Brian P.

    2014-01-01

    Endothelial cell (EC) alignment to directional flow or stretch supports anti-inflammatory functions, but mechanisms controlling polarized structural adaptation in response to physical cues remain unclear. This study aimed to determine whether factors associated with early actin edge ruffling implicated in cell polarization are prerequisite for stress fiber (SF) reorientation in response to cyclic uniaxial stretch. Time-lapse analysis of EGFP-actin in confluent ECs showed that onset of either cyclic uniaxial or equibiaxial stretch caused a non-directional increase in edge ruffling. Edge activity was concentrated in a direction perpendicular to the stretch axis after 60 min, consistent with the direction of SF alignment. Rho-kinase inhibition caused reorientation of both stretch-induced edge ruffling and SF alignment parallel to the stretch axis. Arp2/3 inhibition attenuated stretch-induced cell elongation and disrupted polarized edge dynamics and microtubule organizing center reorientation, but it had no effect on the extent of SF reorientation. Disrupting localization of p21-activated kinase (PAK) did not prevent stretch-induced SF reorientation, suggesting that this Rac effector is not critical in regulating stretch-induced cytoskeletal remodeling. Overall, these results suggest that directional edge ruffling is not a primary mechanism that guides SF reorientation in response to stretch; the two events are coincident but not causal. PMID:25821527

  11. The B-cell antigen receptor integrates adaptive and innate immune signals

    PubMed Central

    Otipoby, Kevin L.; Waisman, Ari; Derudder, Emmanuel; Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Franklin, Andrew; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    B cells respond to antigens by engagement of their B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) and of coreceptors through which signals from helper T cells or pathogen-associated molecular patterns are delivered. We show that the proliferative response of B cells to the latter stimuli is controlled by BCR-dependent activation of phosphoinositidyl 3-kinase (PI-3K) signaling. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β and Foxo1 are two PI-3K-regulated targets that play important roles, but to different extents, depending on the specific mitogen. These results suggest a model for integrating signals from the innate and the adaptive immune systems in the control of the B-cell immune response. PMID:26371314

  12. High altitude simulation, substance P and airway rapidly adapting receptor activity in rabbits.

    PubMed

    Bhagat, R; Yasir, A; Vashisht, A; Kulshreshtha, R; Singh, S B; Ravi, K

    2011-09-15

    To investigate whether there is a change in airway rapidly adapting receptor (RAR) activity during high altitude exposure, rabbits were placed in a high altitude simulation chamber (barometric pressure, 429 mm Hg). With 12 h exposure, when there was pulmonary congestion, an increase in basal RAR activity was observed. With 36 h exposure, when there was alveolar edema, there was a further increase in basal RAR activity. In these backgrounds, there was an increase in the sensitivity of the RARs to substance P (SP). To assess whether there was an increase in lung SP level, neutral endopeptidase activity was determined which showed a decrease in low barometric pressure exposed groups. It is concluded that along with the SP released, pulmonary congestion and edema produced, respectively by different durations of low barometric pressure exposure cause a progressive increase in RAR activity which may account for the respiratory symptoms reported in climbers who are unacclimatized.

  13. Both epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor receptors are dispensable for structural intestinal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Raphael C.; Diaz-Miron, Jose L.; Choi, Pamela M.; Sommovilla, Joshua; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.; Warner, Brad W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intestinal adaptation structurally represents increases in crypt depth and villus height in response to small bowel resection (SBR). Previously, we found that neither epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nor insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) function was individually required for normal adaptation. In this study, we sought to determine the effect of disrupting both EGFR and IGF1R expression on resection-induced adaptation. Methods Intestinal-specific EGFR and IGF1R double knockout mice (EGFR/IGF1R-IKO) (n=6) and wild-type (WT) control mice (n=7) underwent 50% proximal SBR. On postoperative day (POD) 7, structural adaptation was scored by measuring crypt depth and villus height. Rates of crypt cell proliferation, apoptosis, and submucosal capillary density were also compared. Results After 50% SBR, normal adaptation occurred in both WT and EGFR/IGF1R-IKO. Rates of proliferation and apoptosis were no different between the two groups. The angiogenic response was less in the EGFR/IGF1R-IKO compared to WT mice. Conclusion Disrupted expression of EGFR and IGF1R in the intestinal epithelial cells does not affect resection-induced structural adaptation but attenuates angiogenesis after SBR. These findings suggest that villus growth is driven by receptors and pathways that occur outside the epithelial cell component, while angiogenic responses may be influenced by epithelial-endothelial crosstalk. PMID:25818318

  14. Stretch That Budget!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John R.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses ways in which industrial education teachers can stretch their budgets, which include reducing waste to a minimum, keeping an accurate and up-to-date inventory, trading surplus or excess materials with neighboring schools, and planning programs more carefully. Money-saving tips concerned with metals, plastics, woods, and printing are also…

  15. Oxytocin and arginine vasopressin receptor evolution: implications for adaptive novelties in placental mammals

    PubMed Central

    Paré, Pamela; Paixão-Côrtes, Vanessa R.; Tovo-Rodrigues, Luciana; Vargas-Pinilla, Pedro; Viscardi, Lucas Henriques; Salzano, Francisco Mauro; Henkes, Luiz E.; Bortolini, Maria Catira

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Oxytocin receptor (OXTR) and arginine vasopressin receptors (AVPR1a, AVPR1b, and AVPR2) are paralogous genes that emerged through duplication events; along the evolutionary timeline, owing to speciation, numerous orthologues emerged as well. In order to elucidate the evolutionary forces that shaped these four genes in placental mammals and to reveal specific aspects of their protein structures, 35 species were selected. Specifically, we investigated their molecular evolutionary history and intrinsic protein disorder content, and identified the presence of short linear interaction motifs. OXTR seems to be under evolutionary constraint in placental mammals, whereas AVPR1a, AVPR1b, and AVPR2 exhibit higher evolutionary rates, suggesting that they have been under relaxed or experienced positive selection. In addition, we describe here, for the first time, that the OXTR, AVPR1a, AVPR1b, and AVPR2 mammalian orthologues preserve their disorder content, while this condition varies among the paralogues. Finally, our results reveal the presence of short linear interaction motifs, indicating possible functional adaptations related to physiological and/or behavioral taxa-specific traits. PMID:27505307

  16. Computation identifies structural features that govern neuronal firing properties in slowly adapting touch receptors.

    PubMed

    Lesniak, Daine R; Marshall, Kara L; Wellnitz, Scott A; Jenkins, Blair A; Baba, Yoshichika; Rasband, Matthew N; Gerling, Gregory J; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2014-01-01

    Touch is encoded by cutaneous sensory neurons with diverse morphologies and physiological outputs. How neuronal architecture influences response properties is unknown. To elucidate the origin of firing patterns in branched mechanoreceptors, we combined neuroanatomy, electrophysiology and computation to analyze mouse slowly adapting type I (SAI) afferents. These vertebrate touch receptors, which innervate Merkel cells, encode shape and texture. SAI afferents displayed a high degree of variability in touch-evoked firing and peripheral anatomy. The functional consequence of differences in anatomical architecture was tested by constructing network models representing sequential steps of mechanosensory encoding: skin displacement at touch receptors, mechanotransduction and action-potential initiation. A systematic survey of arbor configurations predicted that the arrangement of mechanotransduction sites at heminodes is a key structural feature that accounts in part for an afferent's firing properties. These findings identify an anatomical correlate and plausible mechanism to explain the driver effect first described by Adrian and Zotterman. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01488.001.

  17. Stress or no stress: mineralocorticoid receptors in the forebrain regulate behavioral adaptation.

    PubMed

    ter Horst, J P; van der Mark, M H; Arp, M; Berger, S; de Kloet, E R; Oitzl, M S

    2012-07-01

    Corticosteroid effects on cognitive abilities during behavioral adaptation to stress are mediated by two types of receptors. While the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) is mainly involved in the consolidation of memory, the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) mediates appraisal and initial responses to novelty. Recent findings in humans and mice suggest that under stress, the MR might be involved in the use of different learning strategies. Here, we used male mice lacking the MR in the forebrain (MR(CaMKCre)), which were subjected to 5-10 min acute restraint stress, followed 30 min later by training trials on the circular hole board. Mice had to locate an exit hole using extra- and intra-maze cues. We assessed performance and the use of spatial and stimulus-response strategies. Non-stressed MR(CaMKCre) mice showed delayed learning as compared to control littermates. Prior stress impaired performance in controls, but did not further deteriorate learning in MR(CaMKCre) mice. When stressed, 20-30% of both MR(CaMKCre) and control mice switched from a spatial to a stimulus-response strategy, which rescued performance in MR(CaMKCre) mice. Furthermore, MR(CaMKCre) mice showed increased GR mRNA expression in all CA areas of the hippocampus and an altered basal and stress-induced corticosterone secretion, which supports their role in the modulation of neuroendocrine activity. In conclusion, our data provide evidence for the critical role of MR in the fast formation of spatial memory. In the absence of forebrain MR spatial learning performance was under basal circumstances impaired, while after stress further deterioration of performance was rescued by switching behavior increasingly to a stimulus-response strategy.

  18. Adaptations in AMPA receptor transmission in the nucleus accumbens contributing to incubation of cocaine craving

    PubMed Central

    Loweth, Jessica A.; Tseng, Kuei Y.; Wolf, Marina E.

    2013-01-01

    Cue-induced cocaine craving in rodents intensifies or “incubates” during the first months of withdrawal from long access cocaine self-administration. This incubation phenomenon is relevant to human users who achieve abstinence but exhibit persistent vulnerability to cue-induced relapse. It is well established that incubation of cocaine craving involves complex neuronal circuits. Here we will focus on neuroadaptations in the nucleus accumbens (NAc), a region of convergence for pathways that control cocaine seeking. A key adaptation is a delayed (~3–4 weeks) accumulation of Ca2+-permeable AMPAR receptors (CP-AMPARs) in synapses on medium spiny neurons (MSN) of the NAc. These CP-AMPARs mediate the expression of incubation after prolonged withdrawal, although different mechanisms must be responsible during the first weeks of withdrawal, prior to CP-AMPAR accumulation. The cascade of events leading to CP-AMPAR accumulation is still unclear. However, several candidate mechanisms have been identified. First, mGluR1 has been shown to negatively regulate CP-AMPAR levels in NAc synapses, and it is possible that a withdrawal-dependent decrease in this effect may help explain CP-AMPAR accumulation during incubation. Second, an increase in phosphorylation of GluA1 subunits (at the protein kinase A site) within extrasynaptic homomeric GluA1 receptors (CP-AMPARs) may promote their synaptic insertion and oppose their removal. Finally, elevation of brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) levels in the NAc may contribute to maintenance of incubation after months of withdrawal, although incubation-related increases in BDNF accumulation do not account for CP-AMPAR accumulation. Receptors and pathways that negatively regulate incubation, such as mGluR1, are promising targets for the development of therapeutic strategies to help recovering addicts maintain abstinence. PMID:23727437

  19. Stretching & Flexibility: An Interactive Encyclopedia of Stretching. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This CD-ROM offers 140 different stretches in full-motion video sequences. It focuses on the proper techniques for overall physical fitness, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 23 different sports (e.g., golf, running, soccer, skiing, climbing, football, and baseball). Topics include stretching for sports; stretching awareness and education…

  20. Cortical adrenoceptor expression, function and adaptation under conditions of cannabinoid receptor deletion.

    PubMed

    Reyes, B A S; Carvalho, A F; Szot, P; Kalamarides, D J; Wang, Q; Kirby, L G; Van Bockstaele, E J

    2017-03-21

    A neurochemical target at which cannabinoids interact to have global effects on behavior is brain noradrenergic circuitry. Acute and repeated administration of a cannabinoid receptor synthetic agonist is capable of increasing multiple indices of noradrenergic activity. This includes cannabinoid-induced 1) increases in norepinephrine (NE) release in the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC); 2) desensitization of cortical α2-adrenoceptor-mediated effects; 3) activation of c-Fos in brainstem locus coeruleus (LC) noradrenergic neurons; and 4) increases in anxiety-like behaviors. In the present study, we sought to examine adaptations in adrenoceptor expression and function under conditions of cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1r) deletion using knockout (KO) mice and compare these to wild type (WT) controls. Electrophysiological analysis of α2-adrenoceptor-mediated responses in mPFC slices in WT mice showed a clonidine-induced α2-adrenoceptor-mediated increase in mPFC cell excitability coupled with an increase in input resistance. In contrast, CB1r KO mice showed an α2-adrenoceptor-mediated decrease in mPFC cell excitability. We then examined protein expression levels of α2- and β1-adrenoceptor subtypes in the mPFC as well as TH expression in the locus coeruleus (LC) of mice deficient in CB1r. Both α2- and β1-adrenoceptors exhibited a significant decrease in expression levels in CB1r KO mice when compared to WT in the mPFC, while a significant increase in TH was observed in the LC. To better define whether the same cortical neurons express α2A-adrenoceptor and CB1r in mPFC, we utilized high-resolution immunoelectron microscopy. We localized α2A-adrenoceptors in a knock-in mouse that expressed a hemoagglutinin (HA) tag downstream of the α2A-adrenoceptor promoter. Although the α2A-adrenoceptor was often identified pre-synaptically, we observed co-localization of CB1r with α2-adrenoceptors post-synaptically in the same mPFC neurons. Finally, using receptor binding, we

  1. An LRR/Malectin Receptor-Like Kinase Mediates Resistance to Non-adapted and Adapted Powdery Mildew Fungi in Barley and Wheat

    PubMed Central

    Rajaraman, Jeyaraman; Douchkov, Dimitar; Hensel, Götz; Stefanato, Francesca L.; Gordon, Anna; Ereful, Nelzo; Caldararu, Octav F.; Petrescu, Andrei-Jose; Kumlehn, Jochen; Boyd, Lesley A.; Schweizer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) belonging to the multigene family of receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are the sensing devices of plants for microbe- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns released from microbial organisms. Here we describe Rnr8 (for Required for non-host resistance 8) encoding HvLEMK1, a LRR-malectin domain-containing transmembrane RLK that mediates non-host resistance of barley to the non-adapted wheat powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici. Transgenic barley lines with silenced HvLEMK1 allow entry and colony growth of the non-adapted pathogen, although sporulation was reduced and final colony size did not reach that of the adapted barley powdery mildew fungus B. graminis f.sp. hordei. Transient expression of the barley or wheat LEMK1 genes enhanced resistance in wheat to the adapted wheat powdery mildew fungus while expression of the same genes did not protect barley from attack by the barley powdery mildew fungus. The results suggest that HvLEMK1 is a factor mediating non-host resistance in barley and quantitative host resistance in wheat to the wheat powdery mildew fungus. PMID:28018377

  2. An LRR/Malectin Receptor-Like Kinase Mediates Resistance to Non-adapted and Adapted Powdery Mildew Fungi in Barley and Wheat.

    PubMed

    Rajaraman, Jeyaraman; Douchkov, Dimitar; Hensel, Götz; Stefanato, Francesca L; Gordon, Anna; Ereful, Nelzo; Caldararu, Octav F; Petrescu, Andrei-Jose; Kumlehn, Jochen; Boyd, Lesley A; Schweizer, Patrick

    2016-01-01

    Pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) belonging to the multigene family of receptor-like kinases (RLKs) are the sensing devices of plants for microbe- or pathogen-associated molecular patterns released from microbial organisms. Here we describe Rnr8 (for Required for non-host resistance 8) encoding HvLEMK1, a LRR-malectin domain-containing transmembrane RLK that mediates non-host resistance of barley to the non-adapted wheat powdery mildew fungus Blumeria graminis f.sp. tritici. Transgenic barley lines with silenced HvLEMK1 allow entry and colony growth of the non-adapted pathogen, although sporulation was reduced and final colony size did not reach that of the adapted barley powdery mildew fungus B. graminis f.sp. hordei. Transient expression of the barley or wheat LEMK1 genes enhanced resistance in wheat to the adapted wheat powdery mildew fungus while expression of the same genes did not protect barley from attack by the barley powdery mildew fungus. The results suggest that HvLEMK1 is a factor mediating non-host resistance in barley and quantitative host resistance in wheat to the wheat powdery mildew fungus.

  3. Stretch-Oriented Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Klinedinst, D.; Feuz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Two thermoplastic polyimides - one amorphous, the other crystallizable -- were subjected to isothermal stretching just above their glass transition temperatures. Room-temperature strengths in the stretch direction were greatly improved and, moduli increased up to 3.6-fold. Optimum stretching conditions were determined.

  4. Experimental Adaptation of Wild-Type Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) to the Human Entry Receptor CD150

    PubMed Central

    Bieringer, Maria; Han, Jung Woo; Kendl, Sabine; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Plattet, Philippe; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a close relative of measles virus (MV), is widespread and well known for its broad host range. When the goal of measles eradication may be achieved, and when measles vaccination will be stopped, CDV might eventually cross the species barrier to humans and emerge as a new human pathogen. In order to get an impression how fast such alterations may occur, we characterized required adaptive mutations to the human entry receptors CD150 (SLAM) and nectin-4 as first step to infect human target cells. Recombinant wild-type CDV-A75/17red adapted quickly to growth in human H358 epithelial cells expressing human nectin-4. Sequencing of the viral attachment proteins (hemagglutinin, H, and fusion protein, F) genes revealed that no adaptive alteration was required to utilize human nectin-4. In contrast, the virus replicated only to low titres (102 pfu/ml) in Vero cells expressing human CD150 (Vero-hSLAM). After three passages using these cells virus was adapted to human CD150 and replicated to high titres (105 pfu/ml). Sequence analyses revealed that only one amino acid exchange in the H-protein at position 540 Asp→Gly (D540G) was required for functional adaptation to human CD150. Structural modelling suggests that the adaptive mutation D540G in H reflects the sequence alteration from canine to human CD150 at position 70 and 71 from Pro to Leu (P70L) and Gly to Glu (G71E), and compensates for the gain of a negative charge in the human CD150 molecule. Using this model system our data indicate that only a minimal alteration, in this case one adaptive mutation, is required for adaptation of CDV to the human entry receptors, and help to understand the molecular basis why this adaptive mutation occurs. PMID:23554862

  5. Experimental adaptation of wild-type canine distemper virus (CDV) to the human entry receptor CD150.

    PubMed

    Bieringer, Maria; Han, Jung Woo; Kendl, Sabine; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Plattet, Philippe; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a close relative of measles virus (MV), is widespread and well known for its broad host range. When the goal of measles eradication may be achieved, and when measles vaccination will be stopped, CDV might eventually cross the species barrier to humans and emerge as a new human pathogen. In order to get an impression how fast such alterations may occur, we characterized required adaptive mutations to the human entry receptors CD150 (SLAM) and nectin-4 as first step to infect human target cells. Recombinant wild-type CDV-A75/17(red) adapted quickly to growth in human H358 epithelial cells expressing human nectin-4. Sequencing of the viral attachment proteins (hemagglutinin, H, and fusion protein, F) genes revealed that no adaptive alteration was required to utilize human nectin-4. In contrast, the virus replicated only to low titres (10(2) pfu/ml) in Vero cells expressing human CD150 (Vero-hSLAM). After three passages using these cells virus was adapted to human CD150 and replicated to high titres (10(5) pfu/ml). Sequence analyses revealed that only one amino acid exchange in the H-protein at position 540 Asp→Gly (D540G) was required for functional adaptation to human CD150. Structural modelling suggests that the adaptive mutation D540G in H reflects the sequence alteration from canine to human CD150 at position 70 and 71 from Pro to Leu (P70L) and Gly to Glu (G71E), and compensates for the gain of a negative charge in the human CD150 molecule. Using this model system our data indicate that only a minimal alteration, in this case one adaptive mutation, is required for adaptation of CDV to the human entry receptors, and help to understand the molecular basis why this adaptive mutation occurs.

  6. Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2006-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site] Stretched View Showing 'Victoria'

    This pair of images from the panoramic camera on NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity served as initial confirmation that the two-year-old rover is within sight of 'Victoria Crater,' which it has been approaching for more than a year. Engineers on the rover team were unsure whether Opportunity would make it as far as Victoria, but scientists hoped for the chance to study such a large crater with their roving geologist. Victoria Crater is 800 meters (nearly half a mile) in diameter, about six times wider than 'Endurance Crater,' where Opportunity spent several months in 2004 examining rock layers affected by ancient water.

    When scientists using orbital data calculated that they should be able to detect Victoria's rim in rover images, they scrutinized frames taken in the direction of the crater by the panoramic camera. To positively characterize the subtle horizon profile of the crater and some of the features leading up to it, researchers created a vertically-stretched image (top) from a mosaic of regular frames from the panoramic camera (bottom), taken on Opportunity's 804th Martian day (April 29, 2006).

    The stretched image makes mild nearby dunes look like more threatening peaks, but that is only a result of the exaggerated vertical dimension. This vertical stretch technique was first applied to Viking Lander 2 panoramas by Philip Stooke, of the University of Western Ontario, Canada, to help locate the lander with respect to orbiter images. Vertically stretching the image allows features to be more readily identified by the Mars Exploration Rover science team.

    The bright white dot near the horizon to the right of center (barely visible without labeling or zoom-in) is thought to be a light-toned outcrop on the far wall of the crater, suggesting that the rover can see over the low rim of Victoria. In figure 1, the northeast and southeast rims are labeled

  7. Brain regional differences in CB1 receptor adaptation and regulation of transcription.

    PubMed

    Lazenka, M F; Selley, D E; Sim-Selley, L J

    2013-03-19

    Cannabinoid CB1 receptors (CB1Rs) are expressed throughout the brain and mediate the central effects of cannabinoids, including Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the main psychoactive constituent of marijuana. Repeated THC administration produces tolerance to cannabinoid-mediated effects, although the magnitude of tolerance varies by effect. Consistent with this observation, CB1R desensitization and downregulation, as well as induction of immediate early genes (IEGs), vary by brain region. Zif268 and c-Fos are induced in the forebrain after acute THC administration. Phosphorylation of the cAMP response-element binding protein (CREB) is increased in a region-specific manner after THC administration. Results differ between acute versus repeated THC injection, and suggest that tolerance to IEG activation might develop in some regions. Repeated THC treatment produces CB1R desensitization and downregulation in the brain, although less adaption occurs in the striatum as compared to regions such as the hippocampus. Repeated THC treatment also induces expression of ΔFosB, a very stable isoform of FosB, in the striatum. Transgenic expression of ∆FosB in the striatum enhances the rewarding effects of several drugs, but its role in THC-mediated effects is not known. The inverse regional relationship between CB1R desensitization and ∆FosB induction suggests that these adaptations might inhibit each other, although this possibility has not been investigated. The differential regional expression of individual IEGs by acute or repeated THC administration suggests that regulation of target genes and effects on CB1R signaling will contribute to the behavioral effects of THC.

  8. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  9. Stretching and injury prevention in football: current perspectives.

    PubMed

    Stojanovic, Marko D; Ostojic, Sergej M

    2011-04-01

    Stretching exercises are regularly recommended as a part of football-training sessions and in preparation for competition. There is little sound empirical evidence, however, to substantiate the role of stretching exercises and consequently increased flexibility on injury prevention in football. Furthermore, in the last decade or so, fundamental research has shed some light on the biomechanical adaptation of the muscle-tendon unit following different stretching protocols, improving knowledge about the topic and enabling better understanding of the stretching-injury relationship. The purpose of this review is to examine the literature on the role of stretching and/or increased flexibility on injury prevention in football, with presented results analyzed in the context of the up-to-date basic science research evidence.

  10. The regularity of sustained firing reveals two populations of slowly adapting touch receptors in mouse hairy skin.

    PubMed

    Wellnitz, Scott A; Lesniak, Daine R; Gerling, Gregory J; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2010-06-01

    Touch is initiated by diverse somatosensory afferents that innervate the skin. The ability to manipulate and classify receptor subtypes is prerequisite for elucidating sensory mechanisms. Merkel cell-neurite complexes, which distinguish shapes and textures, are experimentally tractable mammalian touch receptors that mediate slowly adapting type I (SAI) responses. The assessment of SAI function in mutant mice has been hindered because previous studies did not distinguish SAI responses from slowly adapting type II (SAII) responses, which are thought to arise from different end organs, such as Ruffini endings. Thus we sought methods to discriminate these afferent types. We developed an epidermis-up ex vivo skin-nerve chamber to record action potentials from afferents while imaging Merkel cells in intact receptive fields. Using model-based cluster analysis, we found that two types of slowly adapting receptors were readily distinguished based on the regularity of touch-evoked firing patterns. We identified these clusters as SAI (coefficient of variation = 0.78 +/- 0.09) and SAII responses (0.21 +/- 0.09). The identity of SAI afferents was confirmed by recording from transgenic mice with green fluorescent protein-expressing Merkel cells. SAI receptive fields always contained fluorescent Merkel cells (n = 10), whereas SAII receptive fields lacked these cells (n = 5). Consistent with reports from other vertebrates, mouse SAI and SAII responses arise from afferents exhibiting similar conduction velocities, receptive field sizes, mechanical thresholds, and firing rates. These results demonstrate that mice, like other vertebrates, have two classes of slowly adapting light-touch receptors, identify a simple method to distinguish these populations, and extend the utility of skin-nerve recordings for genetic dissection of touch receptor mechanisms.

  11. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  12. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  13. Multispectral images of flowers reveal the adaptive significance of using long-wavelength-sensitive receptors for edge detection in bees.

    PubMed

    Vasas, Vera; Hanley, Daniel; Kevan, Peter G; Chittka, Lars

    2017-03-17

    Many pollinating insects acquire their entire nutrition from visiting flowers, and they must therefore be efficient both at detecting flowers and at recognizing familiar rewarding flower types. A crucial first step in recognition is the identification of edges and the segmentation of the visual field into areas that belong together. Honeybees and bumblebees acquire visual information through three types of photoreceptors; however, they only use a single receptor type-the one sensitive to longer wavelengths-for edge detection and movement detection. Here, we show that these long-wavelength receptors (peak sensitivity at ~544 nm, i.e., green) provide the most consistent signals in response to natural objects. Using our multispectral image database of flowering plants, we found that long-wavelength receptor responses had, depending on the specific scenario, up to four times higher signal-to-noise ratios than the short- and medium-wavelength receptors. The reliability of the long-wavelength receptors emerges from an intricate interaction between flower coloration and the bee's visual system. This finding highlights the adaptive significance of bees using only long-wavelength receptors to locate flowers among leaves, before using information provided by all three receptors to distinguish the rewarding flower species through trichromatic color vision.

  14. FAAH-/- mice display differential tolerance, dependence, and cannabinoid receptor adaptation after delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol and anandamide administration.

    PubMed

    Falenski, Katherine W; Thorpe, Andrew J; Schlosburg, Joel E; Cravatt, Benjamin F; Abdullah, Rehab A; Smith, Tricia H; Selley, Dana E; Lichtman, Aron H; Sim-Selley, Laura J

    2010-07-01

    Repeated administration of Delta(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC), the primary psychoactive constituent of Cannabis sativa, induces profound tolerance that correlates with desensitization and downregulation of CB(1) cannabinoid receptors in the CNS. However, the consequences of repeated administration of the endocannabinoid N-arachidonoyl ethanolamine (anandamide, AEA) on cannabinoid receptor regulation are unclear because of its rapid metabolism by fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH). FAAH(-/-) mice dosed subchronically with equi-active maximally effective doses of AEA or THC displayed greater rightward shifts in THC dose-effect curves for antinociception, catalepsy, and hypothermia than in AEA dose-effect curves. Subchronic THC significantly attenuated agonist-stimulated [(35)S]GTP gamma S binding in brain and spinal cord, and reduced [(3)H]WIN55,212-2 binding in brain. Interestingly, AEA-treated FAAH(-/-) mice showed less CB(1) receptor downregulation and desensitization than THC-treated mice. Experiments examining tolerance and cross-tolerance indicated that the behavioral effects of THC, a low efficacy CB(1) receptor agonist, were more sensitive to receptor loss than those of AEA, a higher efficacy agonist, suggesting that the expression of tolerance was more affected by the intrinsic activity of the ligand at testing than during subchronic treatment. In addition, the CB(1) receptor antagonist, rimonabant, precipitated a markedly reduced magnitude of withdrawal in FAAH(-/-) mice treated subchronically with AEA compared with mice treated repeatedly with THC. The findings that repeated AEA administration produces lesser adaptive changes at the CB(1) receptor and has reduced dependence liability compared with THC suggest that pharmacotherapies targeting endocannabinoid catabolic enzymes are less likely to promote tolerance and dependence than direct acting CB(1) receptor agonists.

  15. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  16. Ca2+ influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Murata, Naohiko; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Takahara, Norihiro; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-10-10

    One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10-30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca(2+)]i transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca(2+)]i. The stretch-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation was attenuated in Ca(2+)-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca(2+)]i by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd(3+), ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca(2+) influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  17. To stretch or not to stretch: the role of stretching in injury prevention and performance.

    PubMed

    McHugh, M P; Cosgrave, C H

    2010-04-01

    Stretching is commonly practiced before sports participation; however, effects on subsequent performance and injury prevention are not well understood. There is an abundance of literature demonstrating that a single bout of stretching acutely impairs muscle strength, with a lesser effect on power. The extent to which these effects are apparent when stretching is combined with other aspects of a pre-participation warm-up, such as practice drills and low intensity dynamic exercises, is not known. With respect to the effect of pre-participation stretching on injury prevention a limited number of studies of varying quality have shown mixed results. A general consensus is that stretching in addition to warm-up does not affect the incidence of overuse injuries. There is evidence that pre-participation stretching reduces the incidence of muscle strains but there is clearly a need for further work. Future prospective randomized studies should use stretching interventions that are effective at decreasing passive resistance to stretch and assess effects on subsequent injury incidence in sports with a high prevalence of muscle strains.

  18. Pulmonary and respiratory tract receptors.

    PubMed

    Widdicombe, J G

    1982-10-01

    Nervous receptors in the lungs and respiratory tract can be grouped into four general categories. 1. Deep, slowly adapting end-organs, which respond to stretch of the airway wall and have large-diameter myelinated fibres; those in the lungs are responsible for the Breuer-Hering reflex. 2. Endings in and under the epithelium which respond to a variety of chemical and mechanical stimuli (i.e. are polymodal), usually with a rapidly adapting discharge, and with small-diameter myelinated fibres; they are responsible for defensive reflexes such as cough and sneeze, and for the reflex actions to inhaled irritants and to some respiratory disease processes. 3. Receptors with nonmyelinated nerve fibres which, being polymodal, are stimulated by tissue damage and oedema and by the mediators released in these conditions; these receptors may be similar in function to 'nociceptors' in other viscera, and set up appropriate reflexes as a reaction to respiratory damage. 4. Specialized receptors such as those for taste and swallowing, and those around joints and in skeletal muscle. Stimulation of any group of receptors may cause reflex changes in breathing (including defensive reflexes), bronchomotor tone, airway mucus secretion, the cardiovascular system (including the vascular bed of the airways), laryngeal calibre, spinal reflexes and sensation. The total pattern of motor responses is unique for each group of receptors, although it is probably unusual for one type of receptor to be stimulated in isolation. The variety of patterns of motor responses must reflect the complexity of brainstem organization of these systems.

  19. Dynamic stretching and golf swing performance.

    PubMed

    Moran, K A; McGrath, T; Marshall, B M; Wallace, E S

    2009-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the effect of dynamic stretching, static stretching and no stretching, as part of a general warm-up, on golf swing performance with a five-iron. Measures of performance were taken 0 min, 5 min, 15 min and 30 min after stretching. Dynamic stretching produced significantly greater club head speeds than both static stretching (Delta=1.9m.s (-1); p=0.000) and no stretching (Delta=1.7 m.s (-1); p=0.000), and greater ball speeds than both static stretching (Delta=3.5m.s (-1); p=0.003) and no stretching (Delta=3.3m.s (-1); p=0.001). Dynamic stretching produced significantly straighter swing-paths than both static stretching (Delta=-0.61 degrees , p=0.000) and no stretching (Delta=-0.72 degrees , p=0.01). Dynamic stretching also produced more central impact points than the static stretch (Delta=0.7 cm, p=0.001). For the club face angle, there was no effect of either stretch or time. For all of the variables measured, there was no significant difference between the static stretch and no stretch conditions. All of the results were unaffected by the time of measurement after stretching. The results indicate that dynamic stretching should be used as part of a general warm-up in golf.

  20. Evidence of genotypic adaptation to the exposure to volcanic risk at the dopamine receptor DRD4 locus

    PubMed Central

    Faurie, Charlotte; Mettling, Clement; Ali Bchir, Mohamed; Hadmoko, Danang Sri; Heitz, Carine; Lestari, Evi Dwi; Raymond, Michel; Willinger, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Humans have colonized and adapted to extremely diverse environments, and the genetic basis of some such adaptations, for example to high altitude, is understood. In some cases, local or regional variation in selection pressure could also cause behavioural adaptations. Numerous genes influence behaviour, such as alleles at the dopamine receptor locus D4 (DRD4), which are associated with attitude toward risk in experimental settings. We demonstrate genetic differentiation for this gene, but not for five unlinked microsatellite loci, between high- and low risk environments around Mount Merapi, an active volcano in Java, Indonesia. Using a behavioural experiment, we further show that people inhabiting the high risk environment are significantly more risk averse. We provide evidence of a genetic basis for this difference, showing that heterozygotes at the DRD4 locus are more risk averse than either homozygotes. In the high risk environment, allele frequencies are equilibrated, generating a high frequency of heterozygotes. Thus it appears that overdominance (i.e. selective advantage of heterozygotes) generates negative frequency dependent selection, favouring the rarer allele at this locus. Our results therefore provide evidence for adaptation to a marginal habitat through the selection of a neurocognitive trait with a genetic basis. PMID:27905471

  1. Evidence of genotypic adaptation to the exposure to volcanic risk at the dopamine receptor DRD4 locus.

    PubMed

    Faurie, Charlotte; Mettling, Clement; Ali Bchir, Mohamed; Hadmoko, Danang Sri; Heitz, Carine; Lestari, Evi Dwi; Raymond, Michel; Willinger, Marc

    2016-12-01

    Humans have colonized and adapted to extremely diverse environments, and the genetic basis of some such adaptations, for example to high altitude, is understood. In some cases, local or regional variation in selection pressure could also cause behavioural adaptations. Numerous genes influence behaviour, such as alleles at the dopamine receptor locus D4 (DRD4), which are associated with attitude toward risk in experimental settings. We demonstrate genetic differentiation for this gene, but not for five unlinked microsatellite loci, between high- and low risk environments around Mount Merapi, an active volcano in Java, Indonesia. Using a behavioural experiment, we further show that people inhabiting the high risk environment are significantly more risk averse. We provide evidence of a genetic basis for this difference, showing that heterozygotes at the DRD4 locus are more risk averse than either homozygotes. In the high risk environment, allele frequencies are equilibrated, generating a high frequency of heterozygotes. Thus it appears that overdominance (i.e. selective advantage of heterozygotes) generates negative frequency dependent selection, favouring the rarer allele at this locus. Our results therefore provide evidence for adaptation to a marginal habitat through the selection of a neurocognitive trait with a genetic basis.

  2. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Naohiko; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Takahara, Norihiro; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  3. Berberine is a dopamine D1- and D2-like receptor antagonist and ameliorates experimentally induced colitis by suppressing innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kawano, Masaaki; Takagi, Rie; Kaneko, Atsushi; Matsushita, Sho

    2015-12-15

    Berberine is an herbal alkaloid with various biological activities, including anti-inflammatory and antidepressant effects. Here, we examined the effects of berberine on dopamine receptors and the ensuing anti-inflammatory responses. Berberine was found to be an antagonist at both dopamine D1- and D2-like receptors and ameliorates the development of experimentally induced colitis in mice. In lipopolysaccharide-stimulated immune cells, berberine treatment modified cytokine levels, consistent with the effects of the dopamine receptor specific antagonists SCH23390 and L750667. Our findings indicate that dopamine receptor antagonists suppress innate and adaptive immune responses, providing a foundation for their use in combatting inflammatory diseases.

  4. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    PubMed Central

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression maneuvers. After pressure equilibration cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics. PMID:25664452

  5. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  6. Strain softening in stretched DNA

    PubMed Central

    Luan, Binquan; Aksimentiev, Aleksei

    2010-01-01

    The microscopic mechanics of DNA stretching was characterized using extensive molecular dynamics simulations. By employing an anisotropic pressure control method, realistic force-extension dependences of effectively infinite DNA molecules were obtained. A coexistence of B- and S-DNA domains was observed during the overstretching transition. The simulations revealed that strain softening may occur in the process of stretching torsionally constrained DNA. The latter observation was qualitatively reconciled with available experimental data using a random-field Ising model. PMID:18851334

  7. Natural Cytotoxicity Receptors: Broader Expression Patterns and Functions in Innate and Adaptive Immune Cells

    PubMed Central

    Hudspeth, Kelly; Silva-Santos, Bruno; Mavilio, Domenico

    2013-01-01

    Natural cytotoxicity receptors (NCRs) have been classically defined as activating receptors delivering potent signals to Natural Killer (NK) cells in order to lyze harmful cells and to produce inflammatory cytokines. Indeed, the elicitation of NK cell effector functions after engagement of NCRs with their ligands on tumor or virus infected cells without the need for prior antigen recognition is one of the main mechanisms that allow a rapid clearance of target cells. The three known NCRs, NKp46, NKp44, and NKp30, comprise a family of germ-line encoded Ig-like trans-membrane (TM) receptors. Until recently, NCRs were thought to be NK cell specific surface molecules, thus making it possible to easily distinguish NK cells from phenotypically similar cell types. Moreover, it has also been found that the surface expression of NKp46 is conserved on NK cells across mammalian species. This discovery allowed for the use of NKp46 as a reliable marker to identify NK cells in different animal models, a comparison that was not possible before due to the lack of a common and comprehensive receptor repertoire between different species. However, several studies over the recent few years indicated that NCR expression is not exclusively confined to NK cells, but is also present on populations of T as well as of NK-like lymphocytes. These insights raised the hypothesis that the induced expression of NCRs on certain T cell subsets is governed by defined mechanisms involving the engagement of the T cell receptor (TCR) and the action of pro-inflammatory cytokines. In turn, the acquisition of NCRs by T cell subsets is also associated with a functional independence of these Ig-like TM receptors from TCR signaling. Here, we review these novel findings with respect to NCR-mediated functions of NK cells and we also discuss the functional consequences of NCR expression on non-NK cells, with a particular focus on the T cell compartment. PMID:23518691

  8. Stretching Skeletal Muscle: Chronic Muscle Lengthening through Sarcomerogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Zöllner, Alexander M.; Abilez, Oscar J.; Böl, Markus; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Skeletal muscle responds to passive overstretch through sarcomerogenesis, the creation and serial deposition of new sarcomere units. Sarcomerogenesis is critical to muscle function: It gradually re-positions the muscle back into its optimal operating regime. Animal models of immobilization, limb lengthening, and tendon transfer have provided significant insight into muscle adaptation in vivo. Yet, to date, there is no mathematical model that allows us to predict how skeletal muscle adapts to mechanical stretch in silico. Here we propose a novel mechanistic model for chronic longitudinal muscle growth in response to passive mechanical stretch. We characterize growth through a single scalar-valued internal variable, the serial sarcomere number. Sarcomerogenesis, the evolution of this variable, is driven by the elastic mechanical stretch. To analyze realistic three-dimensional muscle geometries, we embed our model into a nonlinear finite element framework. In a chronic limb lengthening study with a muscle stretch of 1.14, the model predicts an acute sarcomere lengthening from 3.09m to 3.51m, and a chronic gradual return to the initial sarcomere length within two weeks. Compared to the experiment, the acute model error was 0.00% by design of the model; the chronic model error was 2.13%, which lies within the rage of the experimental standard deviation. Our model explains, from a mechanistic point of view, why gradual multi-step muscle lengthening is less invasive than single-step lengthening. It also explains regional variations in sarcomere length, shorter close to and longer away from the muscle-tendon interface. Once calibrated with a richer data set, our model may help surgeons to prevent muscle overstretch and make informed decisions about optimal stretch increments, stretch timing, and stretch amplitudes. We anticipate our study to open new avenues in orthopedic and reconstructive surgery and enhance treatment for patients with ill proportioned limbs, tendon

  9. Introgression of Neandertal- and Denisovan-like Haplotypes Contributes to Adaptive Variation in Human Toll-like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dannemann, Michael; Andrés, Aida M.; Kelso, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens and the diseases they cause have been among the most important selective forces experienced by humans during their evolutionary history. Although adaptive alleles generally arise by mutation, introgression can also be a valuable source of beneficial alleles. Archaic humans, who lived in Europe and Western Asia for more than 200,000 years, were probably well adapted to this environment and its local pathogens. It is therefore conceivable that modern humans entering Europe and Western Asia who admixed with them obtained a substantial immune advantage from the introgression of archaic alleles. Here we document a cluster of three Toll-like receptors (TLR6-TLR1-TLR10) in modern humans that carries three distinct archaic haplotypes, indicating repeated introgression from archaic humans. Two of these haplotypes are most similar to the Neandertal genome, and the third haplotype is most similar to the Denisovan genome. The Toll-like receptors are key components of innate immunity and provide an important first line of immune defense against bacteria, fungi, and parasites. The unusually high allele frequencies and unexpected levels of population differentiation indicate that there has been local positive selection on multiple haplotypes at this locus. We show that the introgressed alleles have clear functional effects in modern humans; archaic-like alleles underlie differences in the expression of the TLR genes and are associated with reduced microbial resistance and increased allergic disease in large cohorts. This provides strong evidence for recurrent adaptive introgression at the TLR6-TLR1-TLR10 locus, resulting in differences in disease phenotypes in modern humans. PMID:26748514

  10. Introgression of Neandertal- and Denisovan-like Haplotypes Contributes to Adaptive Variation in Human Toll-like Receptors.

    PubMed

    Dannemann, Michael; Andrés, Aida M; Kelso, Janet

    2016-01-07

    Pathogens and the diseases they cause have been among the most important selective forces experienced by humans during their evolutionary history. Although adaptive alleles generally arise by mutation, introgression can also be a valuable source of beneficial alleles. Archaic humans, who lived in Europe and Western Asia for more than 200,000 years, were probably well adapted to this environment and its local pathogens. It is therefore conceivable that modern humans entering Europe and Western Asia who admixed with them obtained a substantial immune advantage from the introgression of archaic alleles. Here we document a cluster of three Toll-like receptors (TLR6-TLR1-TLR10) in modern humans that carries three distinct archaic haplotypes, indicating repeated introgression from archaic humans. Two of these haplotypes are most similar to the Neandertal genome, and the third haplotype is most similar to the Denisovan genome. The Toll-like receptors are key components of innate immunity and provide an important first line of immune defense against bacteria, fungi, and parasites. The unusually high allele frequencies and unexpected levels of population differentiation indicate that there has been local positive selection on multiple haplotypes at this locus. We show that the introgressed alleles have clear functional effects in modern humans; archaic-like alleles underlie differences in the expression of the TLR genes and are associated with increased [corrected] microbial resistance and increased allergic disease in large cohorts. This provides strong evidence for recurrent adaptive introgression at the TLR6-TLR1-TLR10 locus, resulting in differences in disease phenotypes in modern humans.

  11. A highly pleiotropic amino acid polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor contributes to life-history adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Paaby, Annalise B.; Bergland, Alan O.; Behrman, Emily L.; Schmidt, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Finding the specific nucleotides that underlie adaptive variation is a major goal in evolutionary biology, but polygenic traits pose a challenge because the complex genotype–phenotype relationship can obscure the effects of individual alleles. However, natural selection working in large wild populations can shift allele frequencies and indicate functional regions of the genome. Previously, we showed that the two most common alleles of a complex amino acid insertion–deletion polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor show independent, parallel clines in frequency across the North American and Australian continents. Here, we report that the cline is stable over at least a five-year period and that the polymorphism also demonstrates temporal shifts in allele frequency concurrent with seasonal change. We tested the alleles for effects on levels of insulin signaling, fecundity, development time, body size, stress tolerance, and life span. We find that the alleles are associated with predictable differences in these traits, consistent with patterns of Drosophila life-history variation across geography that likely reflect adaptation to the heterogeneous climatic environment. These results implicate insulin signaling as a major mediator of life-history adaptation in Drosophila, and suggest that life-history trade-offs can be explained by extensive pleiotropy at a single locus. PMID:25319083

  12. Reptile Toll-like receptor 5 unveils adaptive evolution of bacterial flagellin recognition

    PubMed Central

    Voogdt, Carlos G. P.; Bouwman, Lieneke I.; Kik, Marja J. L.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are ancient innate immune receptors crucial for immune homeostasis and protection against infection. TLRs are present in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish but have not been functionally characterized in reptiles despite the central position of this animal class in vertebrate evolution. Here we report the cloning, characterization, and function of TLR5 of the reptile Anolis carolinensis (Green Anole lizard). The receptor (acTLR5) displays the typical TLR protein architecture with 22 extracellular leucine rich repeats flanked by a N- and C-terminal leucine rich repeat domain, a membrane-spanning region, and an intracellular TIR domain. The receptor is phylogenetically most similar to TLR5 of birds and most distant to fish TLR5. Transcript analysis revealed acTLR5 expression in multiple lizard tissues. Stimulation of acTLR5 with TLR ligands demonstrated unique responsiveness towards bacterial flagellin in both reptile and human cells. Comparison of acTLR5 and human TLR5 using purified flagellins revealed differential sensitivity to Pseudomonas but not Salmonella flagellin, indicating development of species-specific flagellin recognition during the divergent evolution of mammals and reptiles. Our discovery of reptile TLR5 fills the evolutionary gap regarding TLR conservation across vertebrates and provides novel insights in functional evolution of host-microbe interactions. PMID:26738735

  13. Reptile Toll-like receptor 5 unveils adaptive evolution of bacterial flagellin recognition.

    PubMed

    Voogdt, Carlos G P; Bouwman, Lieneke I; Kik, Marja J L; Wagenaar, Jaap A; van Putten, Jos P M

    2016-01-07

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are ancient innate immune receptors crucial for immune homeostasis and protection against infection. TLRs are present in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish but have not been functionally characterized in reptiles despite the central position of this animal class in vertebrate evolution. Here we report the cloning, characterization, and function of TLR5 of the reptile Anolis carolinensis (Green Anole lizard). The receptor (acTLR5) displays the typical TLR protein architecture with 22 extracellular leucine rich repeats flanked by a N- and C-terminal leucine rich repeat domain, a membrane-spanning region, and an intracellular TIR domain. The receptor is phylogenetically most similar to TLR5 of birds and most distant to fish TLR5. Transcript analysis revealed acTLR5 expression in multiple lizard tissues. Stimulation of acTLR5 with TLR ligands demonstrated unique responsiveness towards bacterial flagellin in both reptile and human cells. Comparison of acTLR5 and human TLR5 using purified flagellins revealed differential sensitivity to Pseudomonas but not Salmonella flagellin, indicating development of species-specific flagellin recognition during the divergent evolution of mammals and reptiles. Our discovery of reptile TLR5 fills the evolutionary gap regarding TLR conservation across vertebrates and provides novel insights in functional evolution of host-microbe interactions.

  14. Failure During Sheared Edge Stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Levy, B. S.; van Tyne, C. J.

    2008-12-01

    Failure during sheared edge stretching of sheet steels is a serious concern, especially in advanced high-strength steel (AHSS) grades. The shearing process produces a shear face and a zone of deformation behind the shear face, which is the shear-affected zone (SAZ). A failure during sheared edge stretching depends on prior deformation in the sheet, the shearing process, and the subsequent strain path in the SAZ during stretching. Data from laboratory hole expansion tests and hole extrusion tests for multiple lots of fourteen grades of steel were analyzed. The forming limit curve (FLC), regression equations, measurement uncertainty calculations, and difference calculations were used in the analyses. From these analyses, an assessment of the primary factors that contribute to the fracture during sheared edge stretching was made. It was found that the forming limit strain with consideration of strain path in the SAZ is a major factor that contributes to the failure of a sheared edge during stretching. Although metallurgical factors are important, they appear to play a somewhat lesser role.

  15. Electrokinetic Stretching of Tethered DNA

    PubMed Central

    Ferree, Sean; Blanch, Harvey W.

    2003-01-01

    During electrophoretic separations of DNA in a sieving medium, DNA molecules stretch from a compact coil into elongated conformations when encountering an obstacle and relax back to a coil upon release from the obstacle. These stretching dynamics are thought to play an important role in the separation mechanism. In this article we describe a silicon microfabricated device to measure the stretching of tethered DNA in electric fields. Upon application of an electric field, electro-osmosis generates bulk fluid flow in the device, and a protocol for eliminating this flow by attaching a polymer brush to all silicon oxide surfaces is shown to be effective. Data on the steady stretching of DNA in constant electric fields is presented. The data corroborate the approximate theory of hydrodynamic equivalence, indicating that DNA is not free-draining in the presence of both electric and nonelectric forces. Finally, these data provide the first quantitative test of a Stigter and Bustamante's detailed theory of electrophoretic stretching of DNA without adjustable parameters. The agreement between theory and experiment is good. PMID:14507716

  16. Evolution of the pregnane X receptor: adaptation to cross-species differences in biliary bile salts

    PubMed Central

    Krasowski, Matthew D.; Yasuda, Kazuto; Hagey, Lee R.; Schuetz, Erin G.

    2008-01-01

    The pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulates the metabolism and elimination of bile salts, steroids, and xenobiotics. The sequence of the PXR ligand-binding domain diverges extensively between different animals suggesting inter-species differences in ligands. Of the endogenous ligands known to activate PXR, biliary bile salts vary the most across vertebrate species, ranging from 27-carbon (C27) bile alcohol sulfates (early fish, amphibians) to C24 bile acids (birds, mammals). Using a luciferase-based reporter assay, human PXR was activated by a wide variety of bile salts. In contrast, zebrafish PXR was activated efficiently only by cyprinol sulfate, the major zebrafish bile salt, but not by recent bile acids. Chicken, mouse, rat, and rabbit PXRs were all activated by species-specific bile acids and by early fish bile alcohol sulfates. In addition, phylogenetic analysis using maximum likelihood demonstrated evidence for non-neutral evolution of the PXR ligand-binding domain. PXR activation by bile salts has expanded from narrow specificity for C27 bile alcohol sulfates (early fish) to a broader specificity for recent bile acids (birds, mammals). PXR specificity for bile salts has thus paralleled the increasing complexity of the bile salt synthetic pathway during vertebrate evolution, an unusual example of ligand-receptor co-evolution in the nuclear hormone receptor superfamily. PMID:15718292

  17. Wrinkled flames and geometrical stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Denet, Bruno; Joulin, Guy

    2011-07-01

    Localized wrinkles of thin premixed flames subject to hydrodynamic instability and geometrical stretch of uniform intensity (S) are studied. A stretch-affected nonlinear and nonlocal equation, derived from an inhomogeneous Michelson-Sivashinsky equation, is used as a starting point, and pole decompositions are used as a tool. Analytical and numerical descriptions of isolated (centered or multicrested) wrinkles with steady shapes (in a frame) and various amplitudes are provided; their number increases rapidly with 1/S>0. A large constant S>0 weakens or suppresses all localized wrinkles (the larger the wrinkles, the easier the suppression), whereas S<0 strengthens them; oscillations of S further restrict their existence domain. Self-similar evolutions of unstable many-crested patterns are obtained. A link between stretch, nonlinearity, and instability with the cutoff size of the wrinkles in turbulent flames is suggested. Open problems are evoked.

  18. Increased expression of estrogen-related receptor β during adaptation of adult cardiomyocytes to sustained hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Kathryn F; Beeson, Gyda C; Beeson, Craig C; McDermott, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related Receptors (ERR) are members of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors that regulate expression of genes required for energy metabolism including mitochondrial biogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation. While ERRα and EPPγ isoforms are known to share a wide array of target genes in the adult myocardium, the function of ERRβ has not been characterized in cardiomyocytes. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of ERRβ in regulating energy metabolism in adult cardiomyocytes in primary culture. Adult feline cardiomyocytes were electrically stimulated to contract in either hypoxia (0.5% O2) or normoxia (21% O2). As compared to baseline values measured in normoxia, ERRβ mRNA levels increased significantly after 8 hours of hypoxia and remained elevated over 24 h. Conversely, ERRβ mRNA decreased to normoxic levels after 4 hours of reoxygenation. Hypoxia increased expression of the α and β isoforms of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Coactivator-1 (PGC-1) mRNA by 6-fold and 3-fold, respectively. Knockdown of ERRβ expression via adenoviral-mediated delivery of ERRβ shRNA blocked hypoxia-induced increases in PGC-1β mRNA, but not PGC-1α mRNA. Loss of ERRβ had no effect on mtDNA content as measured after 24 h of hypoxia. To determine whether loss of ERRβ affected mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption rates (OCR) were measured in contracting versus quiescent cardiomyocytes in normoxia. OCR was significantly lower in contracting cardiomyocytes expressing ERRβ shRNA than scrambled shRNA controls. Maximal OCR also was reduced by ERRβ knockdown. In conclusion: 1) hypoxia increases in ERRβ mRNA expression in contracting cardiomyocytes; 2) ERRβ is required for induction of the PGC-1β isoform in response to hypoxia; 3) ERRβ expression is required to sustain OCR in normoxic conditions. PMID:27335690

  19. TNF-alpha blockade by a dimeric TNF type I receptor molecule selectively inhibits adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Colagiovanni, D B; Suniga, M A; Frazier, J L; Edwards, C K; Fleshner, M; McCay, J A; White, K L; Shopp, G M

    2000-11-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha) is a mediator of severe inflammatory processes, including rheumatoid arthritis. Suppression of TNF with a soluble type I or type II receptor molecule (TNF-RI or TNF-RII) has the potential to decrease cytokine levels and modulate inflammatory diseases in humans. However, it has recently been reported that treatment of mice with a TNF-RI:Fc immunoadhesin protein augmented Gram positive infections and subsequent mortality. To determine if TNF-alpha blockade with soluble TNF-alpha receptors might alter immune system function, assays were assessed in rodents treated with a dimeric form of the p55 TNF-RI, Tumor Necrosis Factor-binding protein (TNFbp). Administration of TNFbp resulted in suppression of primary and secondary IgG antibody responses and cell-mediated immune function. No treatment-related differences were detected in immune-enhancing assays or non-specific immune function parameters. Bacterial host resistance assays with Listeria monocytogenes, Staphylococcus aureus or Escherichia coli showed an increase in tissue colony counts only with L. monocytogenes challenged animals following TNFbp administration. These results suggest that TNFbp has the capacity to inhibit adaptive immune function in experimental animal models. Studies suggest that while reducing TNF-alpha is important in controlling cytokine-dependent disease states, maintenance of a threshold level may be critical for normal immune function.

  20. Brain adaptation to stressful stimuli: a new perspective on potential therapeutic approaches based on BDNF and NMDA receptors.

    PubMed

    Marini, Ann M; Popolo, Margherita; Pan, Hongna; Blondeau, Nicolas; Lipsky, Robert H

    2008-10-01

    A variety of sublethal or stressful stimuli induce a phenomenon in the brain known as tolerance, an adaptive response that protects the brain against the same stress, or against a different stress (cross-tolerance). Understanding the molecular mechanisms of brain preconditioning holds promise in developing innovative therapies to prevent and treat neurodegenerative disorders, particularly ischemic stroke. Many of the detailed steps involved in tolerance and cross-tolerance are unknown. It is also likely that different stressors differentially regulate sets of genes, transcription factors, and signal transduction pathways that depend upon the molecules that are released in response to the stressor, activation of particular receptors, and the surrounding milieu. The focus of this review is to highlight a few examples of stimuli that induce tolerance: 1) cortical spreading depression; 2) 3-nitropropionic acid; and 3) 2-deoxy-D-glucose. We will summarize by discussing one pathway where intracellular mediators may converge to upregulate intrinsic neuronal survival pathways to promote survival by resisting damage. This mechanism, activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptors and its integral relationship with brain-derived neurotrophic factor, may be a critical and general mechanism developed in brain to respond to stressful stimuli.

  1. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors in heart failure: the adaptive arm of the cardiac response to chronic catecholamine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; OʼConnell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2014-04-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the nonfailing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and beta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure.

  2. SH3P7 is a cytoskeleton adapter protein and is coupled to signal transduction from lymphocyte antigen receptors.

    PubMed

    Larbolette, O; Wollscheid, B; Schweikert, J; Nielsen, P J; Wienands, J

    1999-02-01

    Lymphocytes respond to antigen receptor engagement with tyrosine phosphorylation of many cellular proteins, some of which have been identified and functionally characterized. Here we describe SH3P7, a novel substrate protein for Src and Syk family kinases. SH3P7 migrates in sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis as a 55-kDa protein that is preferentially expressed in brain, thymus, and spleen. It contains multiple amino acid sequence motifs, including two consensus tyrosine phosphorylation sites of the YXXP type and one SH3 domain. A region of sequence similarity, which we named SCAD, was found in SH3P7 and three actin-binding proteins. The SCAD region may represent a new type of protein-protein interaction domain that mediates binding to actin. Consistent with this possibility, SH3P7 colocalizes with actin filaments of the cytoskeleton. Altogether, our data implicate SH3P7 as an adapter protein which links antigen receptor signaling to components of the cytoskeleton.

  3. Alpha-1-Adrenergic Receptors in Heart Failure: The Adaptive Arm of the Cardiac Response to Chronic Catecholamine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Brian C.; O'Connell, Timothy D.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the non-failing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and b□eta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain- and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs, to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure. PMID:24145181

  4. The soluble pattern recognition receptor PTX3 links humoral innate and adaptive immune responses by helping marginal zone B cells

    PubMed Central

    Sintes, Jordi; Polentarutti, Nadia; Walland, A. Cooper; Yeiser, John R.; Cunha, Cristina; Lacerda, João F.; Salvatori, Giovanni; Blander, J. Magarian

    2016-01-01

    Pentraxin 3 (PTX3) is a fluid-phase pattern recognition receptor of the humoral innate immune system with ancestral antibody-like properties but unknown antibody-inducing function. In this study, we found binding of PTX3 to splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells, an innate-like subset of antibody-producing lymphocytes strategically positioned at the interface between the circulation and the adaptive immune system. PTX3 was released by a subset of neutrophils that surrounded the splenic MZ and expressed an immune activation–related gene signature distinct from that of circulating neutrophils. Binding of PTX3 promoted homeostatic production of IgM and class-switched IgG antibodies to microbial capsular polysaccharides, which decreased in PTX3-deficient mice and humans. In addition, PTX3 increased IgM and IgG production after infection with blood-borne encapsulated bacteria or immunization with bacterial carbohydrates. This immunogenic effect stemmed from the activation of MZ B cells through a neutrophil-regulated pathway that elicited class switching and plasmablast expansion via a combination of T cell–independent and T cell–dependent signals. Thus, PTX3 may bridge the humoral arms of the innate and adaptive immune systems by serving as an endogenous adjuvant for MZ B cells. This property could be harnessed to develop more effective vaccines against encapsulated pathogens. PMID:27621420

  5. Stretch induced endothelin-1 secretion by adult rat astrocytes involves calcium influx via stretch-activated ion channels (SACs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrow, Lyle W.; Suchyna, Thomas M.; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Endothelin-1 expression by adult rat astrocytes correlates with cell proliferation. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 is inhibited by GsMtx-4, a specific inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+} permeant SACs. {yields} The less specific SAC inhibitor streptomycin also inhibits ET-1 secretion. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 production depends on a calcium influx. {yields} SAC pharmacology may provide a new class of therapeutic agents for CNS pathology. -- Abstract: The expression of endothelins (ETs) and ET-receptors is often upregulated in brain pathology. ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, also inhibits the expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters and is mitogenic for astrocytes, glioma cells, neurons, and brain capillary endothelia. We have previously shown that mechanical stress stimulates ET-1 production by adult rat astrocytes. We now show in adult astrocytes that ET-1 production is driven by calcium influx through stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the ET-1 production correlates with cell proliferation. Mechanical stimulation using biaxial stretch (<20%) of a rubber substrate increased ET-1 secretion, and 4 {mu}M GsMTx-4 (a specific inhibitor of SACs) inhibited secretion by 30%. GsMTx-4 did not alter basal ET-1 levels in the absence of stretch. Decreasing the calcium influx by lowering extracellular calcium also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion without effecting ET-1 secretion in unstretched controls. Furthermore, inhibiting SACs with the less specific inhibitor streptomycin also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion. The data can be explained with a simple model in which ET-1 secretion depends on an internal Ca{sup 2+} threshold. This coupling of mechanical stress to the astrocyte endothelin system through SACs has treatment implications, since all pathology deforms the surrounding parenchyma.

  6. A Purposeful Dynamic Stretching Routine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Craig; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stretching, which involves moving parts of the body and gradually increases range of motion, speed of movement, or both through controlled, sport-specific movements, has become the popular choice of pre-exercise warm-up. This type of warm-up has evolved to encompass several variations, but at its core is the principle theme that preparing…

  7. Iterated Stretching of Viscoelastic Jets

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chang, Hsueh-Chia; Demekhin, Evgeny A.; Kalaidin, Evgeny

    1999-01-01

    We examine, with asymptotic analysis and numerical simulation, the iterated stretching dynamics of FENE and Oldroyd-B jets of initial radius r(sub 0), shear viscosity nu, Weissenberg number We, retardation number S, and capillary number Ca. The usual Rayleigh instability stretches the local uniaxial extensional flow region near a minimum in jet radius into a primary filament of radius [Ca(1 - S)/ We](sup 1/2)r(sub 0) between two beads. The strain-rate within the filament remains constant while its radius (elastic stress) decreases (increases) exponentially in time with a long elastic relaxation time 3We(r(sup 2, sub 0)/nu). Instabilities convected from the bead relieve the tension at the necks during this slow elastic drainage and trigger a filament recoil. Secondary filaments then form at the necks from the resulting stretching. This iterated stretching is predicted to occur successively to generate high-generation filaments of radius r(sub n), (r(sub n)/r(sub 0)) = square root of 2[r(sub n-1)/r(sub 0)](sup 3/2) until finite-extensibility effects set in.

  8. Three Fresh Exposures, Stretched Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been processed using a technique known as a decorrelation stretch to exaggerate the colors. The area in the image includes three holes created inside 'Endurance Crater' by Opportunity's rock abrasion tool between sols 143 and 148 (June 18 and June 23, 2004). Because color variations are so subtle in the pictured area, stretched images are useful for discriminating color differences that can alert scientists to compositional and textural variations. For example, without the exaggeration, no color difference would be discernable among the tailings left behind after the grinding of these holes, but in this stretched image, the tailings around 'London' (top) appear more red than those of the other holes ('Virginia,' middle, and 'Cobble Hill,' bottom). Scientists believe that is because the rock abrasion tool sliced through two 'blueberries,' or spherules (visible on the upper left and upper right sides of the circle). When the blades break up these spherules, composed of mostly gray hematite, the result is a bright red powder. In this image, you can see the rock layers that made the team want to grind holes in each identified layer. The top layer is yellowish red, the middle is yellowish green and the lower layer is green. Another advantage to viewing this stretched image is the clear detail of the distribution of the rock abrasion tool tailings (heading down-slope) and the differences in rock texture. This image was created using the 753-, 535- and 432-nanometer filters.

  9. Chronic escitalopram treatment caused dissociative adaptation in serotonin (5-HT) 2C receptor antagonist-induced effects in REM sleep, wake and theta wave activity.

    PubMed

    Kostyalik, Diána; Kátai, Zita; Vas, Szilvia; Pap, Dorottya; Petschner, Péter; Molnár, Eszter; Gyertyán, István; Kalmár, Lajos; Tóthfalusi, László; Bagdy, Gyorgy

    2014-03-01

    Several multi-target drugs used in treating psychiatric disorders, such as antidepressants (e.g. agomelatine, trazodone, nefazodone, amitriptyline, mirtazapine, mianserin, fluoxetine) or most atypical antipsychotics, have 5-hydroxytryptamine 2C (5-HT2C) receptor-blocking property. Adaptive changes in 5-HT2C receptor-mediated functions are suggested to contribute to therapeutic effects of selective serotonin reuptake inhibitor (SSRI) antidepressants after weeks of treatment, at least in part. Beyond the mediation of anxiety and other functions, 5-HT2C receptors are involved in sleep regulation. Anxiety-related adaptive changes caused by antidepressants have been studied extensively, although sleep- and electroencephalography (EEG)-related functional studies are still lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of chronic SSRI treatment on 5-HT2C receptor antagonist-induced functions in different vigilance stages and on quantitative EEG (Q-EEG) spectra. Rats were treated with a single dose of the selective 5-HT2C receptor antagonist SB-242084 (1 mg/kg, i.p.) or vehicle at the beginning of passive phase following a 20-day-long SSRI (escitalopram; 10 mg/kg/day, osmotic minipump) or VEHICLE pretreatment. Fronto-parietal electroencephalogram, electromyogram and motility were recorded during the first 3 h of passive phase. We found that the chronic escitalopram pretreatment attenuated the SB-242084-caused suppression in rapid eye movement sleep (REMS). On the contrary, the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist-induced elevations in passive wake and theta (5-9 Hz) power density during active wake and REMS were not affected by the SSRI. In conclusion, attenuation in certain, but not all vigilance- and Q-EEG-related functions induced by the 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, suggests dissociation in 5-HT2C receptor adaptation.

  10. Shared usage of the chemokine receptor CXCR4 by primary and laboratory-adapted strains of feline immunodeficiency virus.

    PubMed

    Richardson, J; Pancino, G; Merat, R; Leste-Lasserre, T; Moraillon, A; Schneider-Mergener, J; Alizon, M; Sonigo, P; Heveker, N

    1999-05-01

    Strains of the feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) presently under investigation exhibit distinct patterns of in vitro tropism. In particular, the adaptation of FIV for propagation in Crandell feline kidney (CrFK) cells results in the selection of strains capable of forming syncytia with cell lines of diverse species origin. The infection of CrFK cells by CrFK-adapted strains appears to require the chemokine receptor CXCR4 and is inhibited by its natural ligand, stromal cell-derived factor 1alpha (SDF-1alpha). Here we found that inhibitors of CXCR4-mediated infection by human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1), such as the bicyclam AMD3100 and short peptides derived from the amino-terminal region of SDF-1alpha, also blocked infection of CrFK by FIV. Nevertheless, we observed differences in the ranking order of the peptides as inhibitors of FIV and HIV-1 and showed that such differences are related to the species origin of CXCR4 and not that of the viral envelope. These results suggest that, although the envelope glycoproteins of FIV and HIV-1 are substantially divergent, FIV and HIV-1 interact with CXCR4 in a highly similar manner. We have also addressed the role of CXCR4 in the life cycle of primary isolates of FIV. Various CXCR4 ligands inhibited infection of feline peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) by primary FIV isolates in a concentration-dependent manner. These ligands also blocked the viral transduction of feline PBMC by pseudotyped viral particles when infection was mediated by the envelope glycoprotein of a primary FIV isolate but not by the G protein of vesicular stomatitis virus, indicating that they act at an envelope-mediated step and presumably at viral entry. These findings strongly suggest that primary and CrFK-adapted strains of FIV, despite disparate in vitro tropisms, share usage of CXCR4.

  11. Vascular endothelial cell membranes differentiate between stretch and shear stress through transitions in their lipid phases.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ando, Joji

    2015-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) respond to the hemodynamic forces stretch and shear stress by altering their morphology, functions, and gene expression. However, how they sense and differentiate between these two forces has remained unknown. Here we report that the plasma membrane itself differentiates between stretch and shear stress by undergoing transitions in its lipid phases. Uniaxial stretching and hypotonic swelling increased the lipid order of human pulmonary artery EC plasma membranes, thereby causing a transition from the liquid-disordered phase to the liquid-ordered phase in some areas, along with a decrease in membrane fluidity. In contrast, shear stress decreased the membrane lipid order and increased membrane fluidity. A similar increase in lipid order occurred when the artificial lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles were stretched by hypotonic swelling, indicating that this is a physical phenomenon. The cholesterol content of EC plasma membranes significantly increased in response to stretch but clearly decreased in response to shear stress. Blocking these changes in the membrane lipid order by depleting membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by adding cholesterol resulted in a marked inhibition of the EC response specific to stretch and shear stress, i.e., phosphorylation of PDGF receptors and phosphorylation of VEGF receptors, respectively. These findings indicate that EC plasma membranes differently respond to stretch and shear stress by changing their lipid order, fluidity, and cholesterol content in opposite directions and that these changes in membrane physical properties are involved in the mechanotransduction that activates membrane receptors specific to each force.

  12. Adaptation of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor to sense microbiota-derived indoles

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Troy D.; Murray, Iain A.; Bisson, William H.; Lahoti, Tejas S.; Gowda, Krishne; Amin, Shantu G.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Perdew, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Ligand activation of the aryl hydrocarbon (AHR) has profound effects upon the immunological status of the gastrointestinal tract, establishing and maintaining signaling networks, which facilitate host-microbe homeostasis at the mucosal interface. However, the identity of the ligand(s) responsible for such AHR-mediated activation within the gut remains to be firmly established. Here, we combine in vitro ligand binding, quantitative gene expression, protein-DNA interaction and ligand structure activity analyses together with in silico modeling of the AHR ligand binding domain to identify indole, a microbial tryptophan metabolite, as a human-AHR selective agonist. Human AHR, acting as a host indole receptor may exhibit a unique bimolecular (2:1) binding stoichiometry not observed with typical AHR ligands. Such bimolecular indole-mediated activation of the human AHR within the gastrointestinal tract may provide a foundation for inter-kingdom signaling between the enteric microflora and the immune system to promote commensalism within the gut. PMID:26235394

  13. Positively Charged Residues at the Five-Fold Symmetry Axis of Cell Culture-Adapted Foot-and-Mouth Disease Virus Permit Novel Receptor Interactions

    PubMed Central

    Berryman, Stephen; Clark, Stuart; Kakker, Naresh K.; Silk, Rhiannon; Seago, Julian; Wadsworth, Jemma; Chamberlain, Kyle; Knowles, Nick J.

    2013-01-01

    Field isolates of foot-and-mouth disease virus (FMDV) have a restricted cell tropism which is limited by the need for certain RGD-dependent integrin receptors. In contrast, cell culture-adapted viruses use heparan sulfate (HS) or other unidentified molecules as receptors to initiate infection. Here, we report several novel findings resulting from cell culture adaptation of FMDV. In cell culture, a virus with the capsid of the A/Turkey/2/2006 field isolate gained the ability to infect CHO and HS-deficient CHO cells as a result of a single glutamine (Q)-to-lysine (K) substitution at VP1-110 (VP1-Q110K). Using site-directed mutagenesis, the introduction of lysine at this same site also resulted in an acquired ability to infect CHO cells by type O and Asia-1 FMDV. However, this ability appeared to require a second positively charged residue at VP1-109. CHO cells express two RGD-binding integrins (α5β1 and αvβ5) that, although not used by FMDV, have the potential to be used as receptors; however, viruses with the VP1-Q110K substitution did not use these integrins. In contrast, the VP1-Q110K substitution appeared to result in enhanced interactions with αvβ6, which allowed a virus with KGE in place of the normal RGD integrin-binding motif to use αvβ6 as a receptor. Thus, our results confirmed the existence of nonintegrin, non-HS receptors for FMDV on CHO cells and revealed a novel, non-RGD-dependent use of αvβ6 as a receptor. The introduction of lysine at VP1-110 may allow for cell culture adaptation of FMDV by design, which may prove useful for vaccine manufacture when cell culture adaptation proves intractable. PMID:23740982

  14. Polymer network stretching during electrospinning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Greenfeld, Israel; Arinstein, Arkadii; Fezzaa, Kamel; Rafailovich, Miriam; Zussman, Eyal

    2011-03-01

    Fast X-ray phase contrast imaging is used to observe the flow of a semi-dilute polyethylene oxide solution during electrospinning. Micron-size glass particles mixed in the polymer solution allow viewing of the jet flow field, and reveal a high-gradient flow that has both longitudinal and radial components that grow rapidly along the jet. The resulting hydrodynamic forces cause substantial longitudinal stretching and transversal contraction of the polymer network within the jet, as confirmed by random walk simulation and theoretical modeling. The polymer network therefore concentrates towards the jet center, and its conformation may transform from a free state to a fully-stretched state within a short distance from the jet start. We acknowledge the financial support of the United States - Israel Bi-National Science Foundation (grant 2006061).

  15. Jaw stretch reflexes in children.

    PubMed

    Finan, Donald S; Smith, Anne

    2005-07-01

    The substantial morphological transformations that occur during human development present the nervous system with a considerable challenge in terms of motor control. Variability of skilled motor performance is a hallmark of a developing system. In adults, the jaw stretch reflex contributes to the functional stability of the jaw. We have investigated the response properties of the jaw stretch reflex in two groups of young children and a group of young adults. Response latencies increased with development, and all age groups produced stimulus-magnitude-dependent increases in reflex gain and resulting biting force. Reflex gain was largest for the older children (9-10 years), yet net increases in resulting biting force were comparable across age groups. These data and earlier experiments suggest that oral sensorimotor pathways mature throughout childhood in concert with the continued acquisition of complex motor skills.

  16. Pro-Inflammatory Adaptive Cytokines and Shed Tumor Necrosis Factor Receptors are Elevated Preceding Systemic Lupus Erythematosus Disease Flare

    PubMed Central

    Munroe, Melissa E.; Vista, Evan S.; Guthridge, Joel M.; Thompson, Linda F.; Merrill, Joan T.; James, Judith A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is a multifaceted disease characterized by immune dysregulation and unpredictable disease activity. This study evaluated changes in plasma concentrations of soluble mediators preceding clinically-defined disease flares. Methods Soluble mediators (n=52) were examined, including cytokines, chemokines, and soluble receptors, using validated multiplex bead-based or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays in plasma from European American SLE patients who developed disease flare 6 or 12 weeks after baseline assessment were compared to 28 matched SLE patients without impending flare and 28 matched healthy controls (n=84). For a subset, mediators within samples preceding SLE disease flare and during a clinically stable period from the same individual were compared. Results Compared to clinically stable patients, patients with impending flare had significant (p≤0.01) alterations in 27 soluble mediators at baseline with significantly higher levels of pro-inflammatory mediators, including Th1, Th2, and Th17-type cytokines, several weeks before clinical flare. Baseline levels of regulatory cytokines, including IL-10 and TGF-β, were higher in non-flare SLE patients, while baseline levels of soluble TNFRI, TNFRII, Fas, FasL, and CD40L were significantly greater in pre-flare patients (p≤0.002). A normalized and weighted combined soluble mediator score was significantly higher in pre-flare SLE patients versus those with stable disease (p≤0.0002). Conclusion Pro-inflammatory adaptive cytokines and shed TNF receptors, are elevated prior to disease flare, while regulatory mediators are elevated during periods of stable disease. Alterations in the balance between inflammatory and regulatory mediators may help identify patients at risk of disease flare and help decipher SLE pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:24578190

  17. Cortisol receptor blockade and seawater adaptation in the euryhaline teleost Fundulus heteroclitus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, W.S.; Cozzi, R.R.F.; Pelis, R.M.; McCormick, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    To examine the role of cortisol in seawater osmoregulation in a euryhaline teleost, adult killifish were acclimated to brackish water (10???) and RU486 or vehicle was administered orally in peanut oil daily for five days at low (40 mg.kg-1) or high dose (200 mg.kg-1). Fish were transferred to 1.5 x seawater (45???) or to brackish water (control) and sampled at 24 h and 48 h after transfer, when Cl- secretion is upregulated. At 24 h, opercular membrane Cl- secretion rate, as Isc, was increased only in the high dose RU486 group. Stimulation of membranes by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and cAMP increased Isc in vehicle treated controls but those from RU486-treated animals were unchanged and membranes from brackish water animals showed a decrease in Isc. At 48 h, Isc increased and transepithelial resistance decreased in vehicle and RU486 groups, compared to brackish water controls. Plasma cortisol increased in all groups transferred to high salinity, compared to brackish water controls. RU486 treated animals had higher cortisol levels compared to vehicle controls. Vehicle treated controls had lower cortisol levels than untreated or RU486 treated animals, higher stimulation of Isc, and lower hematocrit at 24 h, beneficial effects attributed to increased caloric intake from the peanut oil vehicle. Chloride cell density was significantly increased in the high dose RU486 group at 48 hours, yet Isc was unchanged, suggesting a decrease in Cl- secretion per cell. Thus cortisol enhances NaCl secretion capacity in chloride cells, likely via glucocorticoid type receptors. ?? 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Voluntary Ethanol Intake Predicts κ-Opioid Receptor Supersensitivity and Regionally Distinct Dopaminergic Adaptations in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Cody A.; Calipari, Erin S.; Cuzon Carlson, Verginia C.; Helms, Christa M.; Lovinger, David M.; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    The dopaminergic projections from the ventral midbrain to the striatum have long been implicated in mediating motivated behaviors and addiction. Previously it was demonstrated that κ-opioid receptor (KOR) signaling in the striatum plays a critical role in the increased reinforcing efficacy of ethanol following ethanol vapor exposure in rodent models. Although rodents have been used extensively to determine the neurochemical consequences of chronic ethanol exposure, establishing high levels of voluntary drinking in these models has proven difficult. Conversely, nonhuman primates exhibit similar intake and pattern to humans in regard to drinking. Here we examine the effects of chronic voluntary ethanol self-administration on dopamine neurotransmission and the ability of KORs to regulate dopamine release in the dorsolateral caudate (DLC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) core. Using voltammetry in brain slices from cynomolgus macaques after 6 months of ad libitum ethanol drinking, we found increased KOR sensitivity in both the DLC and NAc. The magnitude of ethanol intake predicted increases in KOR sensitivity in the NAc core, but not the DLC. Additionally, ethanol drinking increased dopamine release and uptake in the NAc, but decreased both of these measures in the DLC. These data suggest that chronic daily drinking may result in regionally distinct disruptions of striatal outputs. In concert with previous reports showing increased KOR regulation of drinking behaviors induced by ethanol exposure, the strong relationship between KOR activity and voluntary ethanol intake observed here gives further support to the hypothesis that KORs may provide a promising pharmacotherapeutic target in the treatment of alcoholism. PMID:25878269

  19. Leprosy and the Adaptation of Human Toll-Like Receptor 1

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Sunny H.; Gochhait, Sailesh; Malhotra, Dheeraj; Pettersson, Fredrik H.; Teo, Yik Y.; Khor, Chiea C.; Rautanen, Anna; Chapman, Stephen J.; Mills, Tara C.; Srivastava, Amit; Rudko, Aleksey; Freidin, Maxim B.; Puzyrev, Valery P.; Ali, Shafat; Aggarwal, Shweta; Chopra, Rupali; Reddy, Belum S. N.; Garg, Vijay K.; Roy, Suchismita; Meisner, Sarah; Hazra, Sunil K.; Saha, Bibhuti; Floyd, Sian; Keating, Brendan J.; Kim, Cecilia; Fairfax, Benjamin P.; Knight, Julian C.; Hill, Philip C.; Adegbola, Richard A.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Fine, Paul E. M.; Pitchappan, Ramasamy M.; Bamezai, Rameshwar N. K.; Hill, Adrian V. S.; Vannberg, Fredrik O.

    2010-01-01

    Leprosy is an infectious disease caused by the obligate intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium leprae and remains endemic in many parts of the world. Despite several major studies on susceptibility to leprosy, few genomic loci have been replicated independently. We have conducted an association analysis of more than 1,500 individuals from different case-control and family studies, and observed consistent associations between genetic variants in both TLR1 and the HLA-DRB1/DQA1 regions with susceptibility to leprosy (TLR1 I602S, case-control P = 5.7×10−8, OR = 0.31, 95% CI = 0.20–0.48, and HLA-DQA1 rs1071630, case-control P = 4.9×10−14, OR = 0.43, 95% CI = 0.35–0.54). The effect sizes of these associations suggest that TLR1 and HLA-DRB1/DQA1 are major susceptibility genes in susceptibility to leprosy. Further population differentiation analysis shows that the TLR1 locus is extremely differentiated. The protective dysfunctional 602S allele is rare in Africa but expands to become the dominant allele among individuals of European descent. This supports the hypothesis that this locus may be under selection from mycobacteria or other pathogens that are recognized by TLR1 and its co-receptors. These observations provide insight into the long standing host-pathogen relationship between human and mycobacteria and highlight the key role of the TLR pathway in infectious diseases. PMID:20617178

  20. Determinants of Divergent Adaptive Immune Responses after Airway Sensitization with Ligands of Toll-Like Receptor 5 or Toll-Like Receptor 9

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Linda M.; Ji, Ming; Sinha, Meenal; Dong, Matthew B.; Ren, Xin; Wang, Yanli; Lowell, Clifford A.; Ghosh, Sankar; Locksley, Richard M.; DeFranco, Anthony L.

    2016-01-01

    Excessive type 2 helper T cell responses to environmental antigens can cause immunopathology such as asthma and allergy, but how such immune responses are induced remains unclear. We studied this process in the airways by immunizing mice intranasally with the antigen ovalbumin together with either of two Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. We found the TLR5 ligand flagellin promoted a type 2 helper T cell response, whereas, a TLR9 ligand CpG oligodeoxyribonucleotide (ODN) promoted a type 1 helper T cell response. CpG ODN induced mRNA encoding interleukin (IL)-12 p40, whereas, flagellin caused IL-33 secretion and induced mRNAs encoding IL-1 and thymic stromal lymphopoietin (TSLP). By using mice deficient in the TLR and IL-1R signaling molecule, myeloid differentiation primary response 88 (MyD88), in conventional dendritic cells (cDCs) and alveolar macrophages (AMs), and by cell sorting different lung populations after 2 hours of in vivo stimulation, we characterized the cell types that rapidly produced inflammatory cytokines in response to TLR stimulation. CpG ODN was likely recognized by TLR9 on cDCs and AMs, which made mRNA encoding IL-12. IL-12 was necessary for the subsequent innate and adaptive interferon-γ production. In contrast, flagellin stimulated multiple cells of hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic origin, including AMs, DCs, monocytes, and lung epithelial cells. AMs were largely responsible for IL-1α, whereas lung epithelial cells made TSLP. Multiple hematopoietic cells, including AMs, DCs, and monocytes contributed to other cytokines, including IL-1β and TNFα. MyD88-dependent signals, likely through IL-1R and IL-33R, and MyD88-independent signals, likely from TSLP, were necessary in cDCs for promotion of the early IL-4 response by CD4 T cells in the draining lymph node. Thus, the cell types that responded to TLR ligands were a critical determinant of the innate cytokines produced and the character of the resulting adaptive immune response in the

  1. Hard wiring of T cell receptor specificity for the major histocompatibility complex is underpinned by TCR adaptability

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Scott R.; Chen, Zhenjun; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Beddoe, Travis; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Miles, John J.; Khanna, Rajiv; Moss, Denis J.; Liu, Yu Chih; Gras, Stephanie; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Clements, Craig S.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2010-07-07

    {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) are genetically restricted to corecognize peptide antigens bound to self-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules; however, the basis for this MHC specificity remains unclear. Despite the current dogma, evaluation of the TCR-pMHC-I structural database shows that the nongermline-encoded complementarity-determining region (CDR)-3 loops often contact the MHC-I, and the germline-encoded CDR1 and -2 loops frequently participate in peptide-mediated interactions. Nevertheless, different TCRs adopt a roughly conserved docking mode over the pMHC-I, in which three MHC-I residues (65, 69, and 155) are invariably contacted by the TCR in one way or another. Nonetheless, the impact of mutations at these three positions, either individually or together, was not uniformly detrimental to TCR recognition of pHLA-B*0801 or pHLA-B*3508. Moreover, when TCR-pMHC-I recognition was impaired, this could be partially restored by expression of the CD8 coreceptor. The structure of a TCR-pMHC-I complex in which these three (65, 69, and 155) MHC-I positions were all mutated resulted in shifting of the TCR footprint relative to the cognate complex and formation of compensatory interactions. Collectively, our findings reveal the inherent adaptability of the TCR in maintaining peptide recognition while accommodating changes to the central docking site on the pMHC-I.

  2. VEGF receptor-2 Y951 signaling and a role for the adapter molecule TSAd in tumor angiogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Matsumoto, Taro; Bohman, Svante; Dixelius, Johan; Berge, Tone; Dimberg, Anna; Magnusson, Peetra; Wang, Ling; Wikner, Charlotte; Qi, Jian Hua; Wernstedt, Christer; Wu, Jiong; Bruheim, Skjalg; Mugishima, Hideo; Mukhopadhyay, Debrabata; Spurkland, Anne; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2005-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) activation by VEGF-A is essential in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. We have generated a pan-phosphorylation site map of VEGFR-2 and identified one major tyrosine phosphorylation site in the kinase insert (Y951), in addition to two major sites in the C-terminal tail (Y1175 and Y1214). In developing vessels, phosphorylation of Y1175 and Y1214 was detected in all VEGFR-2-expressing endothelial cells, whereas phosphorylation of Y951 was identified in a subset of vessels. Phosphorylated Y951 bound the T-cell-specific adapter (TSAd), which was expressed in tumor vessels. Mutation of Y951 to F and introduction of phosphorylated Y951 peptide or TSAd siRNA into endothelial cells blocked VEGF-A-induced actin stress fibers and migration, but not mitogenesis. Tumor vascularization and growth was reduced in TSAd-deficient mice, indicating a critical role of Y951-TSAd signaling in pathological angiogenesis. PMID:15962004

  3. VEGF receptor-2 Y951 signaling and a role for the adapter molecule TSAd in tumor angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, Taro; Bohman, Svante; Dixelius, Johan; Berge, Tone; Dimberg, Anna; Magnusson, Peetra; Wang, Ling; Wikner, Charlotte; Qi, Jian Hua; Wernstedt, Christer; Wu, Jiong; Bruheim, Skjalg; Mugishima, Hideo; Mukhopadhyay, Debrabata; Spurkland, Anne; Claesson-Welsh, Lena

    2005-07-06

    Vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2) activation by VEGF-A is essential in vasculogenesis and angiogenesis. We have generated a pan-phosphorylation site map of VEGFR-2 and identified one major tyrosine phosphorylation site in the kinase insert (Y951), in addition to two major sites in the C-terminal tail (Y1175 and Y1214). In developing vessels, phosphorylation of Y1175 and Y1214 was detected in all VEGFR-2-expressing endothelial cells, whereas phosphorylation of Y951 was identified in a subset of vessels. Phosphorylated Y951 bound the T-cell-specific adapter (TSAd), which was expressed in tumor vessels. Mutation of Y951 to F and introduction of phosphorylated Y951 peptide or TSAd siRNA into endothelial cells blocked VEGF-A-induced actin stress fibers and migration, but not mitogenesis. Tumor vascularization and growth was reduced in TSAd-deficient mice, indicating a critical role of Y951-TSAd signaling in pathological angiogenesis.

  4. Yawning and Stretching Predict Brain Temperature Changes in Rats: Support for the Thermoregulatory Hypothesis

    PubMed Central

    Shoup-Knox, Melanie L.; Gallup, Andrew C.; Gallup, Gordon G.; McNay, Ewan C.

    2010-01-01

    Recent research suggests that yawning is an adaptive behavior that functions to promote brain thermoregulation among homeotherms. To explore the relationship between brain temperature and yawning we implanted thermocoupled probes in the frontal cortex of rats to measure brain temperature before, during and after yawning. Temperature recordings indicate that yawns and stretches occurred during increases in brain temperature, with brain temperatures being restored to baseline following the execution of each of these behaviors. The circulatory changes that accompany yawning and stretching may explain some of the thermal similarities surrounding these events. These results suggest that yawning and stretching may serve to maintain brain thermal homeostasis. PMID:21031034

  5. Effect of 8-week high-intensity stretching training on biceps femoris architecture.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandro R; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2015-06-01

    Previous studies have reported no changes on muscle architecture (MA) after static stretching interventions; however, authors have argued that stretching duration and intensity may not have been sufficient. A high-intensity stretching intervention targeting the knee flexors with an 8-week duration was conducted to observe the effects on biceps femoris long head (BF) architecture. Participants (n = 5) performed an average of 3.1 assisted-stretching sessions per week, whereas a control group (n = 5) did not perform stretching. The knee extension passive maximal range of motion (ROM), and BF fascicle length (FL), fascicle angle, and muscle thickness were assessed before and after the intervention. A significant increase was observed for FL (+12.3 mm, p = 0.04) and maximal ROM (+14.2°, p = 0.04) for the stretching group after the intervention. No significant changes were observed for the control group in any parameter. An 8-week high-intensity stretching program was observed to efficiently increase the BF FL, as well as the knee extension maximal ROM. Stretching intensity and duration may play an important role on MA adaptation.

  6. Transient effects of stretching exercises on gait parameters of elderly women.

    PubMed

    Rodacki, André L F; Souza, Ricardo M; Ugrinowitsch, Carlos; Cristopoliski, Fabiano; Fowler, Neil E

    2009-04-01

    This study aimed to analyse the effects of a single stretching exercise session on a number of gait parameters in elderly participants in an attempt to determine whether these exercises can influence the risk of fall. Fifteen healthy women living in the community volunteered to participate in the study. A kinematic gait analysis was performed immediately before and after a session of static stretching exercises applied on hip flexor/extensor muscles. Results showed a significant influence of stretching exercises on a number of gait parameters, which have previously been proposed as fall predictors. Participants showed increased gait velocity, greater step length and reduced double support time during stance after performing stretching exercises, suggesting improved stability and mobility. Changes around the pelvis (increased anterior-posterior tilt and rotation range of motion) resulting from the stretching exercises were suggested to influence the gait parameters (velocity, step length and double support time). Therefore, stretching exercises were shown to be a promising strategy to facilitate changes in gait parameters related to the risk of fall. Some other gait variables related to the risk of fall remained unaltered (e.g., toe clearance). The stable pattern of segmental angular velocities was proposed to explain the stability of these unchanged gait variables. The results indicate that stretching exercises, performed on a regular (daily) basis, result in gait adaptations which can be considered as indicative of reduced fall risk. Other studies to determine whether regular stretching routines are an effective strategy to reduce the risk of fall are required.

  7. Cellular localization and adaptive changes of the cardiac delta opioid receptor system in an experimental model of heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Treskatsch, Sascha; Feldheiser, Aarne; Shaqura, Mohammed; Dehe, Lukas; Habazettl, Helmut; Röpke, Torsten K; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Schäfer, Michael; Spies, Claudia D; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2016-02-01

    The role of the cardiac opioid system in congestive heart failure (CHF) is not fully understood. Therefore, this project investigated the cellular localization of delta opioid receptors (DOR) in left ventricle (LV) myocardium and adaptive changes in DOR and its endogenous ligand, the precursor peptide proenkephalin (PENK), during CHF. Following IRB approval, DOR localization was determined by radioligand binding using [H(3)]Naltrindole and by double immunofluorescence confocal analysis in the LV of male Wistar rats. Additionally, 28 days following an infrarenal aortocaval fistula (ACF) the extent of CHF and adaptions in left ventricular DOR and PENK expression were examined by hemodynamic measurements, RT-PCR, and Western blot. DOR specific membrane binding sites were identified in LV myocardium. DOR were colocalized with L-type Ca(2+)-channels (Cav1.2) as well as with intracellular ryanodine receptors (RyR) of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum. Following ACF severe congestive heart failure developed in all rats and was accompanied by up-regulation of DOR and PENK on mRNA as well as receptor proteins representing consecutive adaptations. These findings might suggest that the cardiac delta opioid system possesses the ability to play a regulatory role in the cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis, especially in response to heart failure.

  8. A stretch reflex in extraocular muscles of species purportedly lacking muscle spindles

    PubMed Central

    Dancause, Numa; Taylor, Michael D.; Plautz, Erik J.; Radel, Jeffery D.; Whittaker, Thomas; Nudo, Randolph J.; Feldman, Anatol G.

    2011-01-01

    It is generally assumed that proprioceptive feedback plays a crucial role in limb posture and movement. However, the role of afferent signals from extraocular muscles (EOM) in the control of eye movement has been a matter of continuous debate. These muscles have atypical sensory receptors in several species and it has been proposed that they are not supported by stretch reXexes. We recorded electromyographic activity of EOM during passive rotations of the eye in sedated rats and squirrel monkeys and observed typical stretch reXexes in these muscles. Results suggest that there is a similarity in the reXexive control of limb and eye movement, despite substantial differences in their biomechanics and sensory receptors. Like in some limb skeletal muscles, the stretch reflex in EOM in the investigated species might be mediated by other length-sensitive receptors, rather than muscle spindles. PMID:17216145

  9. Adaptation of avian influenza A (H6N1) virus from avian to human receptor-binding preference

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Fei; Qi, Jianxun; Bi, Yuhai; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Min; Zhang, Baorong; Wang, Ming; Liu, Jinhua; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2015-01-01

    The receptor-binding specificity of influenza A viruses is a major determinant for the host tropism of the virus, which enables interspecies transmission. In 2013, the first human case of infection with avian influenza A (H6N1) virus was reported in Taiwan. To gather evidence concerning the epidemic potential of H6 subtype viruses, we performed comprehensive analysis of receptor-binding properties of Taiwan-isolated H6 HAs from 1972 to 2013. We propose that the receptor-binding properties of Taiwan-isolated H6 HAs have undergone three major stages: initially avian receptor-binding preference, secondarily obtaining human receptor-binding capacity, and recently human receptor-binding preference, which has been confirmed by receptor-binding assessment of three representative virus isolates. Mutagenesis work revealed that E190V and G228S substitutions are important to acquire the human receptor-binding capacity, and the P186L substitution could reduce the binding to avian receptor. Further structural analysis revealed how the P186L substitution in the receptor-binding site of HA determines the receptor-binding preference change. We conclude that the human-infecting H6N1 evolved into a human receptor preference. PMID:25940072

  10. Adaptation of avian influenza A (H6N1) virus from avian to human receptor-binding preference.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Qi, Jianxun; Bi, Yuhai; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Min; Zhang, Baorong; Wang, Ming; Liu, Jinhua; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2015-06-12

    The receptor-binding specificity of influenza A viruses is a major determinant for the host tropism of the virus, which enables interspecies transmission. In 2013, the first human case of infection with avian influenza A (H6N1) virus was reported in Taiwan. To gather evidence concerning the epidemic potential of H6 subtype viruses, we performed comprehensive analysis of receptor-binding properties of Taiwan-isolated H6 HAs from 1972 to 2013. We propose that the receptor-binding properties of Taiwan-isolated H6 HAs have undergone three major stages: initially avian receptor-binding preference, secondarily obtaining human receptor-binding capacity, and recently human receptor-binding preference, which has been confirmed by receptor-binding assessment of three representative virus isolates. Mutagenesis work revealed that E190V and G228S substitutions are important to acquire the human receptor-binding capacity, and the P186L substitution could reduce the binding to avian receptor. Further structural analysis revealed how the P186L substitution in the receptor-binding site of HA determines the receptor-binding preference change. We conclude that the human-infecting H6N1 evolved into a human receptor preference.

  11. Molecular Characterization and Functional Regulation of Melanocortin 2 Receptor (MC2R) in the Sea Bass. A Putative Role in the Adaptation to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Agulleiro, Maria Josep; Sánchez, Elisa; Leal, Esther; Cortés, Raúl; Fernández-Durán, Begoña; Guillot, Raúl; Davis, Perry; Dores, Robert M.; Gallo-Payet, Nicole; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The activation of melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) by ACTH mediates the signaling cascade leading to steroid synthesis in the interrenal tissue (analogous to the adrenal cortex in mammals) of fish. However, little is known about the functional regulation of this receptor in fish. In this work described, we cloned sea bass MC2R from a liver cDNA. SbMC2R requires the melanocortin 2 receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for its functional expression. Dietary cortisol but not long-term stress protocols downregulated interrenal sbMC2R expression. Data suggest the existence of a negative feedback on interrenal sbMC2R expression imposed by local or systemic glucocorticoids. This feedback could be involved in long-term stress adaptation by regulating interrenal sensitivity to ACTH. ACTH-induced MC2R activation stimulates hepatic lipolysis, suggesting that ACTH may mediate stress-induced effects upstream of cortisol release. PMID:23724142

  12. Adaptive increases in expression and vasodilator activity of estrogen receptor subtypes in a blood vessel-specific pattern during pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Mata, Karina M.; Li, Wei; Reslan, Ossama M.; Siddiqui, Waleed T.; Opsasnick, Lauren A.

    2015-01-01

    Normal pregnancy is associated with adaptive hemodynamic, hormonal, and vascular changes, and estrogen (E2) may promote vasodilation during pregnancy; however, the specific E2 receptor (ER) subtype, post-ER signaling mechanism, and vascular bed involved are unclear. We tested whether pregnancy-associated vascular adaptations involve changes in the expression/distribution/activity of distinct ER subtypes in a blood vessel-specific manner. Blood pressure (BP) and plasma E2 were measured in virgin and pregnant (day 19) rats, and the thoracic aorta, carotid artery, mesenteric artery, and renal artery were isolated for measurements of ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [G protein-coupled ER (GPER)] expression and tissue distribution in parallel with relaxation responses to E2 (all ERs) and the specific ER agonist 4,4′,4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-tris-phenol (PPT; ERα), diarylpropionitrile (DPN; ERβ), and G1 (GPER). BP was slightly lower and plasma E2 was higher in pregnant versus virgin rats. Western blots revealed increased ERα and ERβ in the aorta and mesenteric artery and GPER in the aorta of pregnant versus virgin rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increases in ERs were mainly in the intima and media. In phenylephrine-precontracted vessels, E2 and PPT caused relaxation that was greater in the aorta and mesenteric artery but similar in the carotid and renal artery of pregnant versus virgin rats. DPN- and G1-induced relaxation was greater in the mesenteric and renal artery than in the aorta and carotid artery, and aortic relaxation to G1 was greater in pregnant versus virgin rats. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor Nω-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester with or without the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin with or without the EDHF blocker tetraethylammonium or endothelium removal reduced E2, PPT, and G1-induced relaxation in the aorta of pregnant rats, suggesting an endothelium-dependent mechanism, but did not affect E2-, PPT

  13. Adaptive increases in expression and vasodilator activity of estrogen receptor subtypes in a blood vessel-specific pattern during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mata, Karina M; Li, Wei; Reslan, Ossama M; Siddiqui, Waleed T; Opsasnick, Lauren A; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-11-15

    Normal pregnancy is associated with adaptive hemodynamic, hormonal, and vascular changes, and estrogen (E2) may promote vasodilation during pregnancy; however, the specific E2 receptor (ER) subtype, post-ER signaling mechanism, and vascular bed involved are unclear. We tested whether pregnancy-associated vascular adaptations involve changes in the expression/distribution/activity of distinct ER subtypes in a blood vessel-specific manner. Blood pressure (BP) and plasma E2 were measured in virgin and pregnant (day 19) rats, and the thoracic aorta, carotid artery, mesenteric artery, and renal artery were isolated for measurements of ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [G protein-coupled ER (GPER)] expression and tissue distribution in parallel with relaxation responses to E2 (all ERs) and the specific ER agonist 4,4',4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-tris-phenol (PPT; ERα), diarylpropionitrile (DPN; ERβ), and G1 (GPER). BP was slightly lower and plasma E2 was higher in pregnant versus virgin rats. Western blots revealed increased ERα and ERβ in the aorta and mesenteric artery and GPER in the aorta of pregnant versus virgin rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increases in ERs were mainly in the intima and media. In phenylephrine-precontracted vessels, E2 and PPT caused relaxation that was greater in the aorta and mesenteric artery but similar in the carotid and renal artery of pregnant versus virgin rats. DPN- and G1-induced relaxation was greater in the mesenteric and renal artery than in the aorta and carotid artery, and aortic relaxation to G1 was greater in pregnant versus virgin rats. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester with or without the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin with or without the EDHF blocker tetraethylammonium or endothelium removal reduced E2, PPT, and G1-induced relaxation in the aorta of pregnant rats, suggesting an endothelium-dependent mechanism, but did not affect E2-, PPT

  14. Genetic stretching factors in masseter muscle after orthognathic surgery.

    PubMed

    Breuel, Wiebke; Krause, Micaela; Schneider, Matthias; Harzer, Winfried

    2013-09-01

    Up to 30% of patients relapse after orthognathic operations, and one reason might be incomplete neuromuscular adaptation of the masticatory muscles. Displacement of the mandible in sagittal or vertical directions, or both, leads to stretching or compression of these muscles. The aim of this study was to analyse stretching factors in 35 patients with retrognathism or prognathism of the mandible (Classes II and III). Tissue samples were taken from both sides of the masseter muscle (anterior and posterior) both before and 6 months after operation. Developmental myosin heavy chains MYH3 and MYH8, the fast and slow MYH 1, 2, and 7, and cyclo-oxygenase (COX) 2, forkhead transcription factor (FOX)O3a, calcineurin, and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT)1c (stretching and regeneration-specific), were analysed by real time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Correlations of Class II and III with sagittal and vertical cephalometric measurements ANB and ML-NL-angle were examined, and the results showed significant differences in amounts of MYH8 (p<0.05), MYH1 (p<0.05), and FOXO3a (p<0.05) between the 2 groups. Regeneration factor COX2 is more dominant in Class II. Surgically, bite opening (ML/NL angle) correlated with stretching indicators FOXO3a, calcineurin, and NFAT1c only in Class II patients. This means that stretching of the masseter muscle caused by lengthening of the mandible and raising of the bite in Class II patients was more likely to lead to relapse (similar to that in patients with open bite) than in Class III patients. In conclusion, deep bite should be reduced more by incisor intrusion than by skeletal opening. The focus in these patients should be directed towards physiotherapeutic strengthening of the muscles of mastication, and more consideration should be given to change in the vertical dimension.

  15. Convective Flow of Sisko Fluid over a Bidirectional Stretching Surface

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Asif; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation focuses the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the steady three-dimensional Sisko fluid driven by a bidirectional stretching sheet. The modeled partial differential equations are reduced to coupled ordinary differential equations by a suitable transformation. The resulting equations are solved numerically by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta algorithm in combination with Newton's method in the domain [0,∞). The numerical results for the velocity and temperature fields are graphically presented and effects of the relevant parameters are discussed in detail. Moreover, the skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt number for different values of the power-law index and stretching ratio parameter are presented through tabulated data. The numerical results are also verified with the results obtained analytically by the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Additionally, the results are validated with previously published pertinent literature as a limiting case of the problem. PMID:26110873

  16. Convective Flow of Sisko Fluid over a Bidirectional Stretching Surface.

    PubMed

    Munir, Asif; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation focuses the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the steady three-dimensional Sisko fluid driven by a bidirectional stretching sheet. The modeled partial differential equations are reduced to coupled ordinary differential equations by a suitable transformation. The resulting equations are solved numerically by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta algorithm in combination with Newton's method in the domain [0,∞). The numerical results for the velocity and temperature fields are graphically presented and effects of the relevant parameters are discussed in detail. Moreover, the skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt number for different values of the power-law index and stretching ratio parameter are presented through tabulated data. The numerical results are also verified with the results obtained analytically by the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Additionally, the results are validated with previously published pertinent literature as a limiting case of the problem.

  17. Decorrelation Stretch Near Cerberus Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released July 25, 2004 On this image you can see two infrared frames of the same area on Mars. One of the images (in black and white) represents a single wavelength or band of the THEMIS IR instrument, while the other image (in false color) represents 3 different bands. The image with the various colors was created with a technique called Decorrelation Stretch (DCS). In this technique individual bands of the THEMIS IR instrument are stretched to better show compositional variations throughout the whole range. After the bands are stretched they are overlayed on one another and colors are assigned to each band. This makes up the colors in the image.

    As you can see, there is a difference in what is noticable in the single band IR image versus the false-colored one. On the color image the pink/magenta colors usually represent basaltic content, cyan often indicates the presence of water ice clouds, while green can represent dust.

    The bright purple and pink colors associated with the valley are due to basalt. There may be a thin veneer of dust present in the region (it was a dark colored region during the Viking mission in the 1970's) through which the basaltic material pokes out along the edges of the valley and the nearby knobby terrain.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 10.7, Longitude 163 East (197 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  18. Expression of polyalanine stretches induces mitochondrial dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Toriumi, Kazuya; Oma, Yoko; Kino, Yoshihiro; Futai, Eugene; Sasagawa, Noboru; Ishiura, Shoichi

    2008-05-15

    In recent years, several novel types of disorders have been characterized, including what have been termed polyalanine diseases, in which patients have expanded triplet repeats in specific genes, resulting in the translation of aberrantly elongated polyalanine stretches. In this study, we showed that yellow fluorescent protein (YFP)-fused elongated polyalanine stretches localized exclusively to the cytoplasm and formed aggregates. Additionally, the polyalanine stretches themselves were toxic. We sought to identify proteins that bound directly to the polyalanine stretches, as factors that might be involved in triggering cell death. Many mitochondrial proteins were identified as polyalanine-binding proteins. We showed that one of the identified proteins, succinate dehydrogenase subunit A, was decreased in the mitochondria of cells expressing polyalanine stretches; as a result, succinate oxidative activity was decreased. Furthermore, the polyalanine stretches also associated directly with mitochondria. This suggests that polya-lanine stretches might directly induce cell death. Additionally, the mitochondrial membrane potential was reduced in cells expressing polyalanine stretches. We propose a novel mechanism by which polyalanine stretches may cause cytotoxicity through mitochondrial dysfunction. This may be a common mechanism underlying the pathogenesis of all polyalanine diseases.

  19. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    PubMed Central

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations – cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells, measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity. PMID:24875391

  20. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations—cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity.

  1. Kinematics analyses related to stretch-shortening cycle during soccer instep kicking after different acute stretching.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Mohammadkazemi, Reza; Sarafrazi, Soodeh; Riyahi-Malayeri, Shahin; Sotoodeh, Vahid

    2012-11-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static and dynamic stretching within a preexercise warm-up on angular velocity of knee joint, deepest knee flexion (DKF), and duration of eccentric and concentric contractions, which are relative to the stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) during instep kicking in professional soccer players. The kicking motions of dominant legs were captured from 18 Olympic professional male soccer players (height: 180.38 ± 7.34 cm; weight: 69.77 ± 9.73 kg; age: 19.22 ± 1.83 years) using 4 digital video cameras at 50 Hz. There was a significant difference in the DKF after the dynamic stretching (-3.22 ± 3.10°) vs. static stretching (-0.18 ± 3.19°) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.001. Moreover, there was significant difference in eccentric duration after the dynamic stretching (0.006 ± 0.01 seconds) vs. static stretching (-0.003 ± 0.01 seconds) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.015. There was a significant difference in the concentric duration after the dynamic stretching (-0.007 ± 0.01 seconds) vs. static stretching (0.002 ± 0.01 seconds) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.001. There was also a significant difference in knee angular velocity after the dynamic stretching (4.08 ± 3.81 rad·s) vs. static stretching (-5.34 ± 4.40 rad·s) relative to the no-stretching method with p < 0.001. We concluded that dynamic stretching during warm-ups, as compared with static stretching, is probably the most effective way as preparation for the kinematics characteristics of soccer instep kick, which are relative to the SSC.

  2. Non-competitive metabotropic glutamate 1 receptor antagonists block activity of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptor units in the rat sinus hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Cahusac, P M B; Mavulati, S C

    2009-10-20

    Previous studies suggested that Group I metabotropic glutamate (mGlu) receptors play a role in mechanotransduction processes of slowly adapting type I mechanoreceptors. Using an isolated rat sinus hair follicle preparation we tested a range of compounds. Surprisingly, only non-competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonists produced profound and long-lasting depression of mechanically evoked firing. 6-Amino-N-cyclohexyl-N,3-dimethylthiazolo[3,2-alpha]benzimidazole-2-carboxamide hydrochloride (YM-298198) had an IC(50) of 8.7 muM (95% CI 5.7 to 13.2 microM), representing the most potent known blocker of type I mechanoreceptors. The derivative 6-amino-N-cyclohexyl-3-methylthiazolo[3,2-alpha]benzimidazole-2-carboxamide hydrochloride (desmethyl YM-298198) had a comparable potency. Another compound 7-(hydroxyimino)cyclopropa[b]chromen-1a-carboxylate ethyl ester (CPCCOEt) had a similar depressant effect, although it was less potent with an approximate IC(50) of 100 microM. Between three and seven times the concentration of CPCCOEt and YM-298198 respectively was required to produce similar depressions in slowly adapting type II units. No depression, and some weak excitatory effects, were observed using the following ligands: the competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonist alpha-amino-5-carboxy-3-methyl-2-thiopheneacetic acid (3-MATIDA) (300 microM), the phosphoserine phosphatase inhibitor dl-2-amino-3-phosphonopropionic acid (dl-AP3) (2 mM), non-competitive mGlu5 receptor antagonists 3-((2-methyl-1,3-thiazol-4-yl)ethynyl)pyridine; (S)-3,5-DHPG, (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine (MTEP) (10 microM) and 2-methyl-6-(phenylethynyl)pyridine hydrochloride (MPEP) (100 microM), the mGlu1 receptor agonist (S)-3,5-dihydroxyphenylglycine ((S)-3,5-DHPG) (500 microM), and the mGlu5 receptor agonist (RS)-2-chloro-5-hydroxyphenylglycine (CHPG) (1 mM). The results suggest that the non-competitive mGlu1 receptor antagonists are not acting at conventional mGlu1 receptors but at other binding sites, possibly

  3. Modulation of horizontal cell function by GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors in dark- and light-adapted tiger salamander retina.

    PubMed

    Yang, X L; Gao, F; Wu, S M

    1999-01-01

    The physiological function of GABA transporters and GABA receptors in retinal horizontal cells (HCs) under dark-and light-adapted conditions were studied by whole-cell voltage clamp and intracellular recording techniques in retinal slices and whole-mounted isolated retinas of the larval tiger salamander. Puff application of GABA in picrotoxin elicited a NO-711 (a potent GABA transporter blocker)-sensitive inward current that did not exhibit a reversal potential in the physiological range, consistent with the idea that these HCs contain electrogenic GABA transporters. Application of GABA in NO-711 elicited a chloride current in HCs; about half of the current was suppressed by bicuculline or I4AA (a GABA(C) receptor antagonist), and the remaining half was suppressed by bicuculline + I4AA or picrotoxin. In whole-mount retinas, NO-711, bicuculline, I4AA, or picrotoxin hyperpolarized the HCs and enhanced the light responses under dark-adapted conditions, and blocked the time-dependent recovery of HC membrane potential and light responses during background illumination. Based on the parallel conductance model, GABA released in darkness mediates a chloride conductance about three times greater than the leak conductance or the glutamate-gated cation conductance. About half of this chloride conductance is mediated by GABA(A) receptors, and the other half is mediated by GABA(C) receptors. These results suggest that GABA released from HCs through the NO-711-sensitive GABA transporters activates GABA(A) and GABA(C) receptors, resulting in chloride conductance increase which leads to a HC depolarization and reduction of the light response. Additionally, GABA transporters also mediate GABA release in background light that is responsible for the recovery of HC membrane potential and light responses.

  4. Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein is associated with the adapter protein Grb2 and the epidermal growth factor receptor in living cells.

    PubMed Central

    She, H Y; Rockow, S; Tang, J; Nishimura, R; Skolnik, E Y; Chen, M; Margolis, B; Li, W

    1997-01-01

    Src homology domains [i.e., Src homology domain 2 (SH2) and Src homology domain 3 (SH3)] play a critical role in linking receptor tyrosine kinases to downstream signaling networks. A well-defined function of the SH3-SH2-SH3 adapter Grb2 is to link receptor tyrosine kinases, such as the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR), to the p21ras-signaling pathway. Grb2 has also been implicated to play a role in growth factor-regulated actin assembly and receptor endocytosis, although the underlying mechanisms remain unclear. In this study, we show that Grb2 interacts through its SH3 domains with the human Wiskott-Aldrich syndrome protein (WASp), which plays a role in regulation of the actin cytoskeleton. We find that WASp is expressed in a variety of cell types and is exclusively cytoplasmic. Although the N-terminal SH3 domain of Grb2 binds significantly stronger than the C-terminal SH3 domain to WASp, full-length Grb2 shows the strongest binding. Both phosphorylation of WASp and its interaction with Grb2, as well as with another adapter protein Nck, remain constitutive in serum-starved or epidermal growth factor-stimulated cells. WASp coimmunoprecipitates with the activated EGFR after epidermal growth factor stimulation. Purified glutathione S-transferase-full-length-Grb2 fusion protein, but not the individual domains of Grb2, enhances the association of WASp with the EGFR, suggesting that Grb2 mediates the association of WASp with EGFR. This study suggests that Grb2 translocates WASp from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane and the Grb2-WASp complex may play a role in linking receptor tyrosine kinases to the actin cytoskeleton. Images PMID:9307968

  5. An electron microscopic study of primary afferent terminals from slowly adapting type I receptors in the cat.

    PubMed

    Semba, K; Masarachia, P; Malamed, S; Jacquin, M; Harris, S; Yang, G; Egger, M D

    1983-12-20

    Primary afferent fibers transmitting impulses from slowly adapting (SA) Type I receptors in the glabrous skin of the hind paw of the cat were injected intraaxonally in the spinal cord with horseradish peroxidase (HRP). At the light microscopic level, terminal arborizations were observed in the medial dorsal horn extending up to 6 mm rostrocaudally in and near the seventh lumbar segment. Boutonlike swellings labelled with HRP were distributed in clusters in Rexed's laminae III-VI. There was a tendency for the most dorsal clusters from an individual fiber to be located rostrally and for the most ventral clusters to be located caudally. At the electron microscopic level, a combination of morphometric analysis and serial reconstruction revealed the following: (1) All the boutons labelled with HRP contained predominantly clear, round synaptic vesicles, 40-50 nm in diameter. (2) Labelled boutons (n = 75) had cross-sectional longest dimensions of 1.72 +/- 0.53 micron (Mean +/- S.D.), perimeters of 4.95 +/- 1.52 micron, and areas of 1.18 +/- 0.59 micron 2. Their shapes in section varied from rounded to elongated forms. (3) The sizes of labelled boutons decreased significantly and linearly with depth from lamina IV to VI. The shapes of the bouton cross sections also became rounder with depth in the dorsal horn. (4) About 72% of synaptic contacts associated with HRP-filled boutons were with dendritic spines and shafts; most of these synapses were of the asymmetric type. (5) The remainder (28%) of the appositions were synapselike contacts between labelled boutons and unlabelled structures containing flattened or pleomorphic vesicles, and occasional dense-cored vesicles. (6) We observed no unequivocal axosomatic contacts made by labelled boutons. (7) The lengths of synaptic appositions with dendritic spines (0.46 +/- 0.20 micron) or with dendritic shafts (0.51 +/- 0.18 micron) were significantly greater than the synapselike contacts with vesicle-containing unlabelled

  6. Stretching Impacts Inflammation Resolution in Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J; Colas, Romain A; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-07-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 min twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, 2 weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch versus no stretch for 48 h, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue.

  7. Caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qiang; Liu, Jianing; Chen, Shulan; Liu, Jing; Liu, Lijuan; Liu, Guirong; Wang, Fang; Jiang, Wenxin; Zhang, Caixia; Wang, Shuangyu; Yuan, Xiao

    2016-04-01

    It is well recognized that mandibular growth, which is caused by a variety of functional appliances, is considered to be the result of both neuromuscular and skeletal adaptations. Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that apoptosis plays an important role in the adaptation of skeletal muscle function. However, the underlying mechanism of apoptosis that is induced by stretch continues to be incompletely understood. Endoplasmic reticulum stress (ERS), a newly defined signaling pathway, initiates apoptosis. This study seeks to determine if caspase-12 is involved in stretch-induced apoptosis mediated endoplasmic reticulum stress in myoblast and its underlying mechanism. Apoptosis was assessed by Hochest staining, DAPI staining and annexin V binding and PI staining. ER chaperones, such as GRP78, CHOP and caspase-12, were determined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and Western blot. Furthermore, caspase-12 inhibitor was used to value the mechanism of the caspase-12 pathway. Apoptosis of myoblast, which is subjected to cyclic stretch, was observed in a time-dependent manner. We found that GRP78 mRNA and protein were significantly increased and CHOP and caspase-12 were activated in myoblast that was exposed to cyclic stretch. Caspase-12 inhibition reduced stretch-induced apoptosis, and caspase-12 activated caspase-3 to induce apoptosis. We concluded that caspase-12 played an important role in stretch-induced apoptosis that is associated by endoplasmic reticulum stress by activating caspase-3.

  8. THUNDER Piezoelectric Actuators as a Method of Stretch-Tuning an Optical Fiber Grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Fox, Robert L.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Childers, Brooks A.

    2000-01-01

    A method of stretching optical fiber holds interest for measuring strain in smart structures where the physical displacement may be used to tune optical fiber lasers. A small, light weight, low power tunable fiber laser is ideal for demodulating strain in optical fiber Bragg gratings attached to smart structures such as the re-usable launch vehicle that is being developed by NASA. A method is presented for stretching optical fibers using the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators invented at NASA Langley Research Center. THUNDER actuators use a piezoelectric layer bonded to a metal backing to enable the actuators to produce displacements larger than the unbonded piezoelectric material. The shift in reflected optical wavelength resulting from stretching the fiber Bragg grating is presented. Means of adapting THUNDER actuators for stretching optical fibers is discussed, including ferrules, ferrule clamp blocks, and plastic hinges made with stereo lithography.

  9. Mars Under the Microscope (stretched)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured on the 10th day, or sol, of the rover's mission by its microscopic imager, located on the instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This stretched color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover open and closed. The varying hints of orange suggest differences in mineral composition. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  10. Capillary stretching of elastic fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Protiere, Suzie; Stone, Howard A.; Duprat, Camille

    2014-11-01

    Fibrous media consisting of constrained flexible fibers can be found in many engineered systems (membranes in filters, woven textile, matted paper). When such materials interact with a liquid, the presence of liquid/air interfaces induces capillary forces that deform the fibers. To model this interaction we study the behaviour of a finite volume of liquid deposited on two parallel flexible fibers clamped at both ends. A tension along the fibers is imposed and may be varied. We show that the system undergoes various morphological changes as the interfiber distance, the elasticity and the tension of the fibers are varied. For a certain range of parameters, the liquid spreads along the fibers and pulls them together, leading to the ``zipping'' of the fibers. This capillary adhesion can then be enhanced or reduced by changing the tension within the fibers. We will show that balancing stretching and capillary forces allows the prediction of this transition as well as the conditions for which detachment of the fibers occurs. These results may be used to prevent the clogging of fibrous membranes or to optimize the capture of liquids.

  11. The immunomodulatory adapter proteins DAP12 and Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ) regulate development of functional osteoclasts through the Syk tyrosine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Mócsai, Attila; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Van Ziffle, Jessica A. G.; Hu, Yongmei; Burghardt, Andrew; Spusta, Steven C.; Majumdar, Sharmila; Lanier, Lewis L.; Lowell, Clifford A.; Nakamura, Mary C.

    2004-01-01

    Osteoclasts, the only bone-resorbing cells, are central to the pathogenesis of osteoporosis, yet their development and regulation are incompletely understood. Multiple receptors of the immune system use a common signaling paradigm whereby phosphorylated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motifs (ITAMs) within receptor-associated adapter proteins recruit the Syk tyrosine kinase. Here we demonstrate that a similar mechanism is required for development of functional osteoclasts. Mice lacking two ITAM-bearing adapters, DAP12 and the Fc receptor γ-chain (FcRγ), are severely osteopetrotic. DAP12-/-FcRγ-/- bone marrow cells fail to differentiate into multinucleated osteoclasts or resorb bone in vitro and show impaired phosphorylation of the Syk tyrosine kinase. syk-/- progenitors are similarly defective in osteoclast development and bone resorption. Intact SH2-domains of Syk, introduced by retroviral transduction, are required for functional reconstitution of syk-/- osteoclasts, whereas intact ITAM-domains on DAP12 are required for reconstitution of DAP12-/- FcRγ-/- cells. These data indicate that recruitment of Syk to phosphorylated ITAMs is critical for osteoclastogenesis. Although DAP12 appears to be primarily responsible for osteoclast differentiation in cultures directly stimulated with macrophage-colony stimulating factor and receptor activator of NF-κB ligand cytokines, DAP12 and FcRγ have overlapping roles in supporting osteoclast development in osteoblast–osteoclast cocultures, which mirrors their overlapping functions in vivo. These results provide new insight into the biology of osteoclasts and suggest novel therapeutic targets in diseases of bony remodeling. PMID:15073337

  12. Stretching micropatterned cells on a PDMS membrane.

    PubMed

    Carpi, Nicolas; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-22

    Mechanical forces exerted on cells and/or tissues play a major role in numerous processes. We have developed a device to stretch cells plated on a PolyDiMethylSiloxane (PDMS) membrane, compatible with imaging. This technique is reproducible and versatile. The PDMS membrane can be micropatterned in order to confine cells or tissues to a specific geometry. The first step is to print micropatterns onto the PDMS membrane with a deep UV technique. The PDMS membrane is then mounted on a mechanical stretcher. A chamber is bound on top of the membrane with biocompatible grease to allow gliding during the stretch. The cells are seeded and allowed to spread for several hours on the micropatterns. The sample can be stretched and unstretched multiple times with the use of a micrometric screw. It takes less than a minute to apply the stretch to its full extent (around 30%). The technique presented here does not include a motorized device, which is necessary for applying repeated stretch cycles quickly and/or computer controlled stretching, but this can be implemented. Stretching of cells or tissue can be of interest for questions related to cell forces, cell response to mechanical stress or tissue morphogenesis. This video presentation will show how to avoid typical problems that might arise when doing this type of seemingly simple experiment.

  13. [Stretching--do current explanatory models suffice?].

    PubMed

    Freiwald, J; Engelhardt, M; Jäger, M; Gnewuch, A; Reuter, I; Wiemann, K; Starischka, S

    1998-06-01

    The opinion that mobility in the usual performance if the "straight leg raise" test for the evaluation of stretching techniques is subject to solety muscular limitations is critically appraised. With integration of recent results from molecular biological research and our own measurements, we can show that not only mechanical but also neurophysiological factors must be considered in the limitation of mobility. In the majority of the examined patients stretching of the ischiadic nerve seems to be responsible for restrictions in movement. The presented results cast doubt on the currently held assumptions and basic principles of stretching in therapy and sport.

  14. Stretching and injury prevention: an obscure relationship.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, Erik; Mahieu, Nele; Danneels, Lieven; McNair, Peter

    2004-01-01

    It is generally accepted that increasing the flexibility of a muscle-tendon unit promotes better performances and decreases the number of injuries. Stretching exercises are regularly included in warm-up and cooling-down exercises; however, contradictory findings have been reported in the literature. Several authors have suggested that stretching has a beneficial effect on injury prevention. In contrast, clinical evidence suggesting that stretching before exercise does not prevent injuries has also been reported. Apparently, no scientifically based prescription for stretching exercises exists and no conclusive statements can be made about the relationship of stretching and athletic injuries. Stretching recommendations are clouded by misconceptions and conflicting research reports. We believe that part of these contradictions can be explained by considering the type of sports activity in which an individual is participating. Sports involving bouncing and jumping activities with a high intensity of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) [e.g. soccer and football] require a muscle-tendon unit that is compliant enough to store and release the high amount of elastic energy that benefits performance in such sports. If the participants of these sports have an insufficient compliant muscle-tendon unit, the demands in energy absorption and release may rapidly exceed the capacity of the muscle-tendon unit. This may lead to an increased risk for injury of this structure. Consequently, the rationale for injury prevention in these sports is to increase the compliance of the muscle-tendon unit. Recent studies have shown that stretching programmes can significantly influence the viscosity of the tendon and make it significantly more compliant, and when a sport demands SSCs of high intensity, stretching may be important for injury prevention. This conjecture is in agreement with the available scientific clinical evidence from these types of sports activities. In contrast, when the type

  15. Stretching DNA with optical tweezers.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, M D; Yin, H; Landick, R; Gelles, J; Block, S M

    1997-01-01

    Force-extension (F-x) relationships were measured for single molecules of DNA under a variety of buffer conditions, using an optical trapping interferometer modified to incorporate feedback control. One end of a single DNA molecule was fixed to a coverglass surface by means of a stalled RNA polymerase complex. The other end was linked to a microscopic bead, which was captured and held in an optical trap. The DNA was subsequently stretched by moving the coverglass with respect to the trap using a piezo-driven stage, while the position of the bead was recorded at nanometer-scale resolution. An electronic feedback circuit was activated to prevent bead movement beyond a preset clamping point by modulating the light intensity, altering the trap stiffness dynamically. This arrangement permits rapid determination of the F-x relationship for individual DNA molecules as short as -1 micron with unprecedented accuracy, subjected to both low (approximately 0.1 pN) and high (approximately 50 pN) loads: complete data sets are acquired in under a minute. Experimental F-x relationships were fit over much of their range by entropic elasticity theories based on worm-like chain models. Fits yielded a persistence length, Lp, of approximately 47 nm in a buffer containing 10 mM Na1. Multivalent cations, such as Mg2+ or spermidine 3+, reduced Lp to approximately 40 nm. Although multivalent ions shield most of the negative charges on the DNA backbone, they did not further reduce Lp significantly, suggesting that the intrinsic persistence length remains close to 40 nm. An elasticity theory incorporating both enthalpic and entropic contributions to stiffness fit the experimental results extremely well throughout the full range of extensions and returned an elastic modulus of approximately 1100 pN. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 PMID:9138579

  16. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility.

    PubMed

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-02-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups.

  17. Demonstrating the Stretch Reflex: A Mechanical Model.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Batavia, Mitchell; McDonough, Andrew L.

    2000-01-01

    Explains the concept of stretch reflexes to students using a mechanical model. The model provides a dynamic multisensory experience using movement, light, and sound. Describes the construction design. (SAH)

  18. Comparison of two stretching methods and optimization of stretching protocol for the piriformis muscle.

    PubMed

    Gulledge, Brett M; Marcellin-Little, Denis J; Levine, David; Tillman, Larry; Harrysson, Ola L A; Osborne, Jason A; Baxter, Blaise

    2014-02-01

    Piriformis syndrome is an uncommon diagnosis for a non-discogenic form of sciatica whose treatment has traditionally focused on stretching the piriformis muscle (PiM). Conventional stretches include hip flexion, adduction, and external rotation. Using three-dimensional modeling, we quantified the amount of (PiM) elongation resulting from two conventional stretches and we investigated by use of a computational model alternate stretching protocols that would optimize PiM stretching. Seven subjects underwent three CT scans: one supine, one with hip flexion, adduction, then external rotation (ADD stretch), and one with hip flexion, external rotation, then adduction (ExR stretch). Three-dimensional bone models were constructed from the CT scans. PiM elongation during these stretches, femoral neck inclination, femoral head anteversion, and trochanteric anteversion were measured. A computer program was developed to map PiM length over a range of hip joint positions and was validated against the measured scans. ExR and ADD stretches elongated the PiM similarly by approximately 12%. Femoral head and greater trochanter anteversion influenced PiM elongation. Placing the hip joints in 115° of hip flexion, 40° of external rotation and 25° of adduction or 120° of hip flexion, 50° of external rotation and 30° of adduction increased PiM elongation by 30-40% compared to conventional stretches (15.1 and 15.3% increases in PiM muscle length, respectively). ExR and ADD stretches elongate the PiM similarly and therefore may have similar clinical effectiveness. The optimized stretches led to larger increases in PiM length and may be more easily performed by some patients due to increased hip flexion.

  19. Stimulated calcium entry and constitutive RhoA kinase activity cause stretch-induced detrusor contraction.

    PubMed

    Poley, Rainer N; Dosier, Christopher R; Speich, John E; Miner, Amy S; Ratz, Paul H

    2008-12-03

    Urinary bladder wall muscle (i.e., detrusor smooth muscle; DSM) contracts in response to a quick-stretch, but this response is neither fully characterized, nor completely understood at the subcellular level. Strips of rabbit DSM were quick-stretched (5 ms) and held isometric for 10 s to measure the resulting peak quick-stretch contractile response (PQSR). The ability of selective Ca(2+) channel blockers and kinase inhibitors to alter the PQSR was measured, and the phosphorylation levels of myosin light chain (MLC) and myosin phosphatase targeting regulatory subunit (MYPT1) were recorded. DSM responded to a quick-stretch with a biphasic response consisting of an initial contraction peaking at 0.24+/-0.02-fold the maximum KCl-induced contraction (F(o)) by 1.48+/-0.17 s (PQSR) before falling to a weaker tonic (10 s) level (0.12+/-0.03-fold F(o)). The PQSR was dependent on the rate and degree of muscle stretch, displayed a refractory period, and was converted to a sustained response in the presence of muscarinic receptor stimulation. The PQSR was inhibited by nifedipine, 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB), 100 microM gadolinium and Y-27632, but not by atropine, 10 microM gadolinium, LOE-908, cyclopiazonic acid, or GF-109203X. Y-27632 and nifedipine abolished the increase in MLC phosphorylation induced by a quick-stretch. Y-27632, but not nifedipine, inhibited basal MYPT1 phosphorylation, and a quick-stretch failed to increase phosphorylation of this rhoA kinase (ROCK) substrate above the basal level. These data support the hypothesis that constitutive ROCK activity is required for a quick-stretch to activate Ca(2+) entry and cause a myogenic contraction of DSM.

  20. Habituation of visual adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue; Gao, Yi; Lv, Lili; Bao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Our sensory system adjusts its function driven by both shorter-term (e.g. adaptation) and longer-term (e.g. learning) experiences. Most past adaptation literature focuses on short-term adaptation. Only recently researchers have begun to investigate how adaptation changes over a span of days. This question is important, since in real life many environmental changes stretch over multiple days or longer. However, the answer to the question remains largely unclear. Here we addressed this issue by tracking perceptual bias (also known as aftereffect) induced by motion or contrast adaptation across multiple daily adaptation sessions. Aftereffects were measured every day after adaptation, which corresponded to the degree of adaptation on each day. For passively viewed adapters, repeated adaptation attenuated aftereffects. Once adapters were presented with an attentional task, aftereffects could either reduce for easy tasks, or initially show an increase followed by a later decrease for demanding tasks. Quantitative analysis of the decay rates in contrast adaptation showed that repeated exposure of the adapter appeared to be equivalent to adaptation to a weaker stimulus. These results suggest that both attention and a non-attentional habituation-like mechanism jointly determine how adaptation develops across multiple daily sessions. PMID:26739917

  1. Cell culture adaptation mutations in foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A capsid proteins: implications for receptor interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we describe the adaptive changes fixed on the capsid of several foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A strains during propagation in cell monolayers. Viruses passaged extensively in three cell lines (BHK-21, LFBK and IB-RS-2), consistently gained several positively charged amino acids...

  2. Tolerance to LSD and DOB induced shaking behaviour: differential adaptations of frontocortical 5-HT(2A) and glutamate receptor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Buchborn, Tobias; Schröder, Helmut; Dieterich, Daniela C; Grecksch, Gisela; Höllt, Volker

    2015-03-15

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethoxy-bromoamphetamine (DOB), provoke stereotype-like shaking behaviour in rodents, which is hypothesised to engage frontocortical glutamate receptor activation secondary to serotonin2A (5-HT2A) related glutamate release. Challenging this hypothesis, we here investigate whether tolerance to LSD and DOB correlates with frontocortical adaptations of 5-HT2A and/or overall-glutamate binding sites. LSD and DOB (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) induce a ketanserin-sensitive (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30-min pretreatment) increase in shaking behaviour (including head twitches and wet dog shakes), which with repeated application (7× in 4 ds) is undermined by tolerance. Tolerance to DOB, as indexed by DOB-sensitive [(3)H]spiroperidol and DOB induced [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding, is accompanied by a frontocortical decrease in 5-HT2A binding sites and 5-HT2 signalling, respectively; glutamate-sensitive [(3)H]glutamate binding sites, in contrast, remain unchanged. As to LSD, 5-HT2 signalling and 5-HT2A binding, respectively, are not or only marginally affected, yet [(3)H]glutamate binding is significantly decreased. Correlation analysis interrelates tolerance to DOB to the reduced 5-HT2A (r=.80) as well as the unchanged [(3)H]glutamate binding sites (r=.84); tolerance to LSD, as opposed, shares variance with the reduction in [(3)H]glutamate binding sites only (r=.86). Given that DOB and LSD both induce tolerance, one correlating with 5-HT2A, the other with glutamate receptor adaptations, it might be inferred that tolerance can arise at either level. That is, if a hallucinogen (like LSD in our study) fails to induce 5-HT2A (down-)regulation, glutamate receptors (activated postsynaptic to 5-HT2A related glutamate release) might instead adapt and thus prevent further overstimulation of the cortex.

  3. Does motor imagery enhance stretching and flexibility?

    PubMed

    Guillot, Aymeric; Tolleron, Coralie; Collet, Christian

    2010-02-01

    Although several studies have demonstrated that motor imagery can enhance learning processes and improve motor performance, little is known about its effect on stretching and flexibility. The increased active and passive range of motion reported in preliminary research has not been shown to be elicited by motor imagery training alone. We thus compared flexibility scores in 21 synchronized swimmers before and after a 5-week mental practice programme that included five stretching exercises in active and passive conditions. The imagery training programme resulted in selective increased flexibility, independently of the stretching method. Overall, the improvement in flexibility was greater in the imagery group than in the control group for the front split (F(1,18) = 4.9, P = 0.04), the hamstrings (F(1,18) = 5.2, P = 0.035), and the ankle stretching exercises (F(1,18) = 5.6, P = 0.03). There was no difference in shoulders and side-split flexibility (F(1,18) = 0.1, P = 0.73 and F(1,18) = 3.3, P = 0.08 respectively). Finally, there was no correlation between individual imagery ability and improvement in flexibility. Psychological and physiological effects of motor imagery could explain the increase in range of motion, suggesting that imagery enhances joint flexibility during both active and passive stretching.

  4. Movement and stretching imagery during flexibility training.

    PubMed

    Vergeer, Ineke; Roberts, Jenny

    2006-02-01

    The aim of this study was to examine the effect of movement and stretching imagery on increases in flexibility. Thirty volunteers took part in a 4 week flexibility training programme. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups: (1) movement imagery, where participants imagined moving the limb they were stretching; (2) stretching imagery, where participants imagined the physiological processes involved in stretching the muscle; and (3) control, where participants did not engage in mental imagery. Active and passive range of motion around the hip was assessed before and after the programme. Participants provided specific ratings of vividness and comfort throughout the programme. Results showed significant increases in flexibility over time, but no differences between the three groups. A significant relationship was found, however, between improved flexibility and vividness ratings in the movement imagery group. Furthermore, both imagery groups scored significantly higher than the control group on levels of comfort, with the movement imagery group also scoring significantly higher than the stretching imagery group. We conclude that the imagery had stronger psychological than physiological effects, but that there is potential for enhancing physiological effects by maximizing imagery vividness, particularly for movement imagery.

  5. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    PubMed

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia.

  6. CURRENT CONCEPTS IN MUSCLE STRETCHING FOR EXERCISE AND REHABILITATION

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Stretching is a common activity used by athletes, older adults, rehabilitation patients, and anyone participating in a fitness program. While the benefits of stretching are known, controversy remains about the best type of stretching for a particular goal or outcome. The purpose of this clinical commentary is to discuss the current concepts of muscle stretching interventions and summarize the evidence related to stretching as used in both exercise and rehabilitation. PMID:22319684

  7. The role of Toll-like receptors and adaptive immunity in the development of protective or pathological immune response triggered by the Trypanosoma cruzi protozoan.

    PubMed

    Pellegrini, Andrea; Guiñazu, Natalia; Giordanengo, Laura; Cano, Roxana Carolina; Gea, Susana

    2011-12-01

    Trypanosoma cruzi, the causal agent of Chagas disease, is an intracellular protozoan parasite that predominantly invades macrophages and cardiomyocytes, leading to persistent infection. Several members of the Toll-like receptor family are crucial for innate immunity to infection and are involved in maintaining tissue homeostasis. This review focuses on recent experimental findings of the innate and adaptive immune response in controlling the parasite and/or in generating heart and liver tissue injury. We also describe the importance of the host's genetic background in the outcome of the disease and emphasize the importance of studying the response to specific parasite antigens. Understanding the dual participation of the immune response may contribute to the design of new therapies for Chagas disease.

  8. Stretched arc discharge in produced water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y I; Wright, K C; Kim, H S; Cho, D J; Rabinovich, A; Fridman, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost.

  9. Optical Data Compression in Time Stretch Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch imaging offers real-time image acquisition at millions of frames per second and subnanosecond shutter speed, and has enabled detection of rare cancer cells in blood with record throughput and specificity. An unintended consequence of high throughput image acquisition is the massive amount of digital data generated by the instrument. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of real-time optical image compression applied to time stretch imaging. By exploiting the sparsity of the image, we reduce the number of samples and the amount of data generated by the time stretch camera in our proof-of-concept experiments by about three times. Optical data compression addresses the big data predicament in such systems. PMID:25906244

  10. Pharmacological modifications of the stretch-induced effects on ventricular fibrillation in perfused rabbit hearts.

    PubMed

    Chorro, Francisco J; Trapero, Isabel; Such-Miquel, Luis; Pelechano, Francisca; Mainar, Luis; Cánoves, Joaquín; Tormos, Alvaro; Alberola, Antonio; Hove-Madsen, Leif; Cinca, Juan; Such, Luis

    2009-11-01

    Stretch induces modifications in myocardial electrical and mechanical activity. Besides the effects of substances that block the stretch-activated channels, other substances could modulate the effects of stretch through different mechanisms that affect Ca(2+) handling by myocytes. Thirty-six Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts were used to analyze the effects of the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger blocker KB-R7943, propranolol, and the adenosine A(2) receptor antagonist SCH-58261 on the acceleration of ventricular fibrillation (VF) produced by acute myocardial stretching. VF recordings were obtained with two epicardial multiple electrodes before, during, and after local stretching in four experimental series: control (n = 9), KB-R7943 (1 microM, n = 9), propranolol (1 microM, n = 9), and SCH-58261 (1 microM, n = 9). Both the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger blocker KB-R7943 and propranolol induced a significant reduction (P < 0.001 and P < 0.05, respectively) in the dominant frequency increments produced by stretching with respect to the control and SCH-58261 series (control = 49.9%, SCH-58261 = 52.1%, KB-R7943 = 9.5%, and propranolol = 12.5%). The median of the activation intervals, the functional refractory period, and the wavelength of the activation process during VF decreased significantly under stretch in the control and SCH-58261 series, whereas no significant variations were observed in the propranolol and KB-R7943 series, with the exception of a slight but significant decrease in the median of the fibrillation intervals in the KB-R7943 series. KB-R7943 and propranolol induced a significant reduction in the activation maps complexity increment produced by stretch with respect to the control and SCH-58261 series. In conclusion, the electrophysiological effects responsible for stretch-induced VF acceleration in the rabbit heart are reduced by the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger blocker KB-R7943 and by propranolol but not by the adenosine A(2) receptor antagonist SCH-58261.

  11. Overextended sarcomeres regain filament overlap following stretch.

    PubMed

    Panchangam, Appaji; Herzog, Walter

    2012-09-21

    Sarcomere overextension has been widely implicated in stretch-induced muscle injury. Yet, sarcomere overextensions are typically inferred based on indirect evidence obtained in muscle and fibre preparations, where individual sarcomeres cannot be observed during dynamic contractions. Therefore, it remains unclear whether sarcomere overextensions are permanent following injury-inducing stretch-shortening cycles, and thus, if they can explain stretch-induced force loss. We tested the hypothesis that overextended sarcomeres can regain filament overlap in isolated myofibrils from rabbit psoas muscles. Maximally activated myofibrils (n=13) were stretched from an average sarcomere length of 2.6±0.04μm by 0.9μm sarcomere(-1) at a speed of 0.1μm sarcomere(-1)s(-1) and immediately returned to the starting lengths at the same speed (sarcomere strain=34.1±2.3%). Myofibrils were then allowed to contract isometrically at the starting lengths (2.6μm) for ∼30s before relaxing. Force and individual sarcomere lengths were measured continuously. Out of the 182 sarcomeres, 35 sarcomeres were overextended at the peak of stretch, out of which 26 regained filament overlap in the shortening phase while 9 (∼5%) remained overextended. About 35% of the sarcomeres with initial lengths on the descending limb of the force-length relationship and ∼2% of the sarcomeres with shorter initial lengths were overextended. These findings provide first ever direct evidence that overextended sarcomeres can regain filament overlap in the shortening phase following stretch, and that the likelihood of overextension is higher for sarcomeres residing initially on the descending limb.

  12. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  13. Effects of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel agonists and antagonists on slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptors in the rat sinus hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Cahusac, Peter M B

    2009-12-01

    The possible functional role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels was investigated by testing various TRP agonists and antagonists in an isolated rat sinus hair follicle preparation. Extracellular recordings from slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptor units were made. The antagonist capsazepine depressed spontaneous and mechanically evoked activity, with an IC(50) of 82 microM. In one-third of units, capsazepine caused a selective depression of mechanically evoked firing, such that the existing spontaneous firing was interrupted by an absence of activity during the mechanical stimulus. The broad spectrum TRP blocker ruthenium red (30 microM) had inconsistent effects, although in some units a delayed onset (following wash) bursting and paroxysmal firing ensued. The agonist icilin (50-100 microM) had an excitatory effect on spontaneous firing, and (-)-menthol (200 microM) had inconsistent effects. Cinnamaldehyde (1-2 mM) depressed all types of activity equally, mechanically evoked and spontaneous. Camphor (0.5-2 mM) also depressed all types of activity, although it had a preferential effect on spontaneous activity. Capsaicin (1-10 microM) and allyl isothiocyanate (50-100 microM) had no clear effects. These results rule out any role for TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in mechanotransduction processes of slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptors.

  14. Warm-up and stretching in the prevention of muscular injury.

    PubMed

    Woods, Krista; Bishop, Phillip; Jones, Eric

    2007-01-01

    Muscular injury is one of the major problems facing today's athletes, both recreational and professional. Injuries to skeletal muscle represent >30% of the injuries seen in sports medicine clinics. As a result, it is imperative to utilise the most effective means to aid in deterring these injuries. However, there are conflicting opinions regarding methods of reducing muscular injury through warm-up and stretching techniques.Therefore, the purpose of this article is to examine the potential of a warm-up and/or stretching routine in deterring muscular injury during physical activity. The article examines a variety of studies regarding warm-up, stretching and muscular injury. The article also provides a definition of warm-up and stretching to provide clarity on this topic. Many of the differences within previous research were due to conflicting definitions. We also address this issue by examining research on muscular injury and physical adaptations to muscular injury and training. This article provides contradictory evidence to conclusions that have been drawn in previous review articles, which determined that warm-up and/or stretching protocols did not deter injury. The research included here conveys that certain techniques and protocols have shown a positive outcome on deterring injuries. As a result, a warm-up and stretching protocol should be implemented prior to physical activity. The routine should allow the stretching protocol to occur within the 15 minutes immediately prior to the activity in order to receive the most benefit. In addition, current information regarding improvements in flexibility is reviewed.

  15. Climate Simulations with a Variable-Resolution GCM: Stretched Cubed-Sphere High Resolution Atmospheric Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tu, C. Y.; Harris, L.; Lin, S. J.

    2014-12-01

    Variable-resolution GCM with enhanced resolution over the region of interest is an adaptive approach to self-consistent interactions between global and regional phenomena. A stretched cubed-sphere High Resolution Atmosphere Model (HiRAM) is constructed using the Geophysical Fluid Dynamics Laboratory (GFDL) finite-volume dynamical core. The horizontal grid spacing in the stretched cubed-sphere is smoothly transformed from the center of highest-resolution region to the center of coarsest-resolution region. Three 30-yr AMIP type simulations were performed in this study; one C384 uniformed cubed-sphere grid, and two stretched cubed-sphere grid with stretching factor 2.5. Two stretched-grid experiments further set the center of highest-resolution region in Taiwan (C384R2.5TW) and Oklahoma City (C384R2.5OKC), respectively. The horizontal resolution in this C384R2.5 stretched grid ranges from 10km to 65km. Three climate simulations were compared against re-analysis data to understand the effect of horizontal resolution on both the simulated global climate and regional features. The global mean climatology in stretched-grid AMIP simulations shows no unrealistic drift comparing to the uniform-grid simulation and observation. Regional orographic precipitation is better simulated in the high-resolution region. High resolution also shows improvement in typhoon/hurricane simulation. In western Pacific basin, high resolution improves simulated typhoon intensity. For weak and moderate typhoons, there is no strong trend with enhancing resolution. But for strong typhoon, there is high correlation between enhancing resolution with typhoon intensity. By comparing simulations with IBTrACS (International Best Track Archieve for Climate Stewardship) in different basins, HiRAM demonstrates the reduction of simulated typhoon/hurricane numbers with enhancement of horizontal resolution.

  16. Toll-like receptors are critical for clearance of Brucella and play different roles in development of adaptive immunity following aerosol challenge in mice.

    PubMed

    Pei, Jianwu; Ding, Xicheng; Fan, Yaping; Rice-Ficht, Allison; Ficht, Thomas A

    2012-01-01

    Brucella spp. cause undulant fever in humans and brucellosis in variety of other animals. Both innate and adaptive immunity have been shown to be important in controlling Brucella infection. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) represent a group of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) that play critical roles in the host innate immune response, as well as development of adaptive immunity. In the current report, we investigated the role of TLR signaling in the clearance of Brucella and development of adaptive immunity in TLR2(-/-), TLR4(-/-), or MyD88(-/-) mice following aerosol exposure to B. melitensis 16 M. Consistent with previous reports, MyD88 is required for efficient clearance of Brucella from all three organs (lung, spleen, and liver). The results reveal Th2-skewed immune responses in TLR2(-/-) mice late in infection and support a TLR2 requirement for efficient clearance of Brucella from the lungs, but not from the spleen or liver. Similarly, TLR4 is required for efficient clearance of Brucella from the lung, but exhibits a minor contribution to clearance from the spleen and no demonstrable contribution to clearance from the liver. Lymphocyte proliferation assays suggest that the TLRs are not involved in the development of cell-mediated memory response to Brucella antigen. Antibody detection reveals that TLR2 and 4 are required to generate early antigen-specific IgG, but not during the late stages of infection. TLR2 and 4 are only transiently required for IgM production and not at all for IgA production. In contrast, MyD88 is essential for antigen specific IgG production late in infection, but is not required for IgM generation over the course of infection. Surprisingly, despite the prominent role for MyD88 in clearance from all tissues, MyD88-knockout mice express significantly higher levels of serum IgA. These results confirm the important role of MyD88 in controlling infection in the spleen while providing evidence of a prominent contribution to protection in

  17. Cloud Network Helps Stretch IT Dollars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Hilton

    2012-01-01

    No matter how many car washes or bake sales schools host to raise money, adding funds to their coffers is a recurring problem. This perpetual financial difficulty makes expansive technology purchases or changes seem like a pipe dream for school CIOs and has education technologists searching for ways to stretch money. In 2005, state K-12 school…

  18. A computational model of the response of adherent cells to stretch and changes in substrate stiffness.

    PubMed

    Parameswaran, Harikrishnan; Lutchen, Kenneth R; Suki, Béla

    2014-04-01

    Cells in the body exist in a dynamic mechanical environment where they are subject to mechanical stretch as well as changes in composition and stiffness of the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the underlying mechanisms by which cells sense and adapt to their dynamic mechanical environment, in particular to stretch, are not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that emergent phenomena at the level of the actin network arising from active structural rearrangements driven by nonmuscle myosin II molecular motors play a major role in the cellular response to both stretch and changes in ECM stiffness. To test this hypothesis, we introduce a simple network model of actin-myosin interactions that links active self-organization of the actin network to the stiffness of the network and the traction forces generated by the network. We demonstrate that such a network replicates not only the effect of changes in substrate stiffness on cellular traction and stiffness and the dependence of rate of force development by a cell on the stiffness of its substrate, but also explains the physical response of adherent cells to transient and cyclic stretch. Our results provide strong indication that network phenomena governed by the active reorganization of the actin-myosin structure plays an important role in cellular mechanosensing and response to both changes in ECM stiffness and externally applied mechanical stretch.

  19. A comparison of two stretching modalities on lower-limb range of motion measurements in recreational dancers.

    PubMed

    Wyon, Matthew; Felton, Lee; Galloway, Shaun

    2009-10-01

    Most stretching techniques are designed to place a "stress" on the musculoskeletal unit that will increase its resting length and range of motion (ROM). Twenty-four adolescent dancers participated in a 6-week intervention program that compared low-intensity stretching (Microstretching) with moderate-intensity static stretching on active and passive ranges of motion. Microstretching is a new modality that reduces the possibility of the parasympathetic system being activated. Repeated measures analysis indicated changes in ROM over the intervention period (p < 0.05), with the Microstretching group demonstrating greater increases in passive and active ROM than the static stretch group (p < 0.01); there was no noted bilateral differences in ROM. The results from this study agree with past studies that have found that stretching increases the compliance of any given muscle and therefore increases the range of motion. One main finding of the present study was that throughout a 6-week training program very-low-intensity stretching had a greater positive effect on lower-limb ROM than moderate-intensity static stretching. The most interesting aspect of the study was the greater increase in active ROM compared to passive ROM by the Microstretching group. This suggests that adaptation has occurred within the muscle itself to a greater extent than in structures of the hip joint. Practical application for this technique suggests it is beneficial as a postexercise modality that potentially has a restorative component.

  20. Identification of TIFA as an adapter protein that links tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) to interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1) in IL-1 receptor signaling.

    PubMed

    Takatsuna, Hiroshi; Kato, Hiroki; Gohda, Jin; Akiyama, Taishin; Moriya, Ayaka; Okamoto, Yoshinari; Yamagata, Yuriko; Otsuka, Masami; Umezawa, Kazuo; Semba, Kentaro; Inoue, Jun-Ichiro

    2003-04-04

    Tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6) transduces signals from members of the Toll/interleukin-1 (IL-1) receptor family by interacting with IL-1 receptor-associated kinase-1 (IRAK-1) after IRAK-1 is released from the receptor-MyD88 complex upon IL-1 stimulation. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying regulation of the IRAK-1/TRAF6 interaction are largely unknown. We have identified TIFA, a TRAF-interacting protein with a forkhead-associated (FHA) domain. The FHA domain is a motif known to bind directly to phosphothreonine and phosphoserine. In transient transfection assays, TIFA activates NFkappaBeta and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase. However, TIFA carrying a mutation that abolishes TRAF6 binding or mutations in the FHA domain that are known to abolish FHA domain binding to phosphopeptide fails to activate NFkappaBeta and c-Jun amino-terminal kinase. TIFA, when overexpressed, binds both TRAF6 and IRAK-1 and significantly enhances the IRAK-1/TRAF6 interaction. Furthermore, analysis of endogenous proteins indicates that TIFA associates with TRAF6 constitutively, whereas it associates with IRAK-1 in an IL-1 stimulation-dependent manner in vivo. Thus, TIFA is likely to mediate IRAK-1/TRAF6 interaction upon IL-1 stimulation.

  1. MTOR-independent induction of autophagy in trabecular meshwork cells subjected to biaxial stretch.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kristine M; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Liton, Paloma B

    2014-06-01

    The trabecular meshwork (TM) is part of a complex tissue that controls the exit of aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye, and therefore helps maintaining intraocular pressure (IOP). Because of variations in IOP with changing pressure gradients and fluid movement, the TM and its contained cells undergo morphological deformations, resulting in distention and stretching. It is therefore essential for TM cells to continuously detect and respond to these mechanical forces and adapt their physiology to maintain proper cellular function and protect against mechanical injury. Here we demonstrate the activation of autophagy, a pro-survival pathway responsible for the degradation of long-lived proteins and organelles, in TM cells when subjected to biaxial static stretch (20% elongation), as well as in high-pressure perfused eyes (30mmHg). Morphological and biochemical markers for autophagy found in the stretched cells include elevated LC3-II levels, increased autophagic flux, and the presence of autophagic figures in electron micrographs. Furthermore, our results indicate that the stretch-induced autophagy in TM cells occurs in an MTOR- and BAG3-independent manner. We hypothesize that activation of autophagy is part of the physiological response that allows TM cells to cope and adapt to mechanical forces.

  2. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a mega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead, we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. This method was devised for optical mapping of DNA, specifically, DNA denaturation patterns. It may be useful also for other studies, e.g., DNA-protein interactions, specifically, their tension dependence. Generally, wherever long strands of DNA—e.g., native DNA extracted from human cells or bacteria—must be stretched with ease for inspection, this method applies.

  3. Intrapulmonary receptors in the Tegu lizard: I. Sensitivity to CO2.

    PubMed

    Feede, M R; Kuhlmann, W D; Scheid, P

    1977-02-01

    Single unit vagal recordings from intrapulmonary receptors were obtained in decerebrate, paralyzed lizards both during pump ventilation and during unidirectional ventilation on the cannulated, sack-shaped lung. Two types of receptors were identified: (1) CO2-receptors, which increased their discharge frequency as intrapulmonary CO2 concentration decreased but were not sensitive to stretch of the lung. (2) Mechanoreceptors, which rapidly increased discharge frequency when the lung was stretched. These receptors' CO2 sensitivity varied. Lungs of lizards thus appeared to possess both CO2 receptors, which have functional characteristics similar to those in birds, and mechanoreceptors with properties similar to stretch receptors in mammals.

  4. Evolution of an adaptive behavior and its sensory receptors promotes eye regression in blind cavefish: response to Borowsky (2013).

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Masato; O'Quin, Kelly E; Jeffery, William R

    2013-07-11

    Vibration attraction behavior (VAB) is the swimming of fish toward an oscillating object, a behavior that is likely adaptive because it increases foraging efficiency in darkness. VAB is seen in a small proportion of Astyanax surface-dwelling populations (surface fish) but is pronounced in cave-dwelling populations (cavefish). In a recent study, we identified two quantitative trait loci for VAB on Astyanax linkage groups 2 and 17. We also demonstrated that a small population of superficial neuromast sensors located within the eye orbit (EO SN) facilitate VAB, and two quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for EO SN that were congruent with those for VAB. Finally, we showed that both VAB and EO SN are negatively correlated with eye size, and that two (of several) QTL for eye size overlap VAB and EO SN QTLs. From these results, we concluded that the adaptive evolution of VAB and EO SN has contributed to the indirect loss of eyes in cavefish, either as a result of pleiotropy or tight physical linkage of the mutations underlying these traits. In a subsequent commentary, Borowsky argues that there is poor experimental support for our conclusions. Specifically, Borowsky states that: (1) linkage groups (LGs) 2 and 17 harbor QTL for many traits and, therefore, no evidence exists for an exclusive interaction among the overlapping VAB, EO SN and eye size QTL; (2) some of the QTL we identified are too broad (>20 cM) to support the hypothesis of correlated evolution due to pleiotropy or hitchhiking; and (3) VAB is unnecessary to explain the indirect evolution of eye-loss since the negative polarity of numerous eye QTL is consistent with direct selection against eyes. Borowsky further argues that (4) it is difficult to envision an evolutionary scenario whereby VAB and EO SN drive eye loss, since the eyes must first be reduced in order to increase the number of EO SN and, therefore, VAB. In this response, we explain why the evidence of one trait influencing eye reduction

  5. NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW ACROSS CANAL PRISM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW ACROSS CANAL PRISM TO TOWPATH BERM (LATER FILL ENCROACHING LEFT) NEAR CENTER OF THIS STRETCH; VIEW TO SOUTHWEST - Blackstone Canal Worcester-Millbury Segment, Eastern bank of Blackstone River, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  6. Eye regression in blind Astyanax cavefish may facilitate the evolution of an adaptive behavior and its sensory receptors.

    PubMed

    Borowsky, Richard

    2013-07-11

    The forces driving the evolutionary loss or simplification of traits such as vision and pigmentation in cave animals are still debated. Three alternative hypotheses are direct selection against the trait, genetic drift, and indirect selection due to antagonistic pleiotropy. Recent work establishes that Astyanax cavefish exhibit vibration attraction behavior (VAB), a presumed behavioral adaptation to finding food in the dark not exhibited by surface fish. Genetic analysis revealed two regions in the genome with quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both VAB and eye size. These observations were interpreted as genetic evidence that selection for VAB indirectly drove eye regression through antagonistic pleiotropy and, further, that this is a general mechanism to account for regressive evolution. These conclusions are unsupported by the data; the analysis fails to establish pleiotropy and ignores the numerous other QTL that map to, and potentially interact, in the same regions. It is likely that all three forces drive evolutionary change. We will be able to distinguish among them in individual cases only when we have identified the causative alleles and characterized their effects.

  7. Selective overexpression of Toll-like receptor-4 in skeletal muscle impairs metabolic adaptation to high-fat feeding

    PubMed Central

    McMillan, Ryan P.; Wu, Yaru; Voelker, Kevin; Fundaro, Gabrielle; Kavanaugh, John; Stevens, Joseph R.; Shabrokh, Elika; Ali, Mostafa; Harvey, Mordecai; Anderson, Angela S.; Boutagy, Nabil E.; Mynatt, Randall L.; Frisard, Madlyn I.

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) is elevated in skeletal muscle of obese humans, and data from our laboratory have shown that activation of TLR-4 in skeletal muscle via LPS results in decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO). The purpose of this study was to determine whether overexpression of TLR-4 in skeletal muscle alters mitochondrial function and whole body metabolism in the context of a chow and high-fat diet. C57BL/6J mice (males, 6–8 mo of age) with skeletal muscle-specific overexpression of the TLR-4 (mTLR-4) gene were created and used for this study. Isolated mitochondria and whole muscle homogenates from rodent skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius and quadriceps) were investigated. TLR-4 overexpression resulted in a significant reduction in FAO in muscle homogenates; however, mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production did not appear to be affected on a standard chow diet. To determine the role of TLR-4 overexpression in skeletal muscle in response to high-fat feeding, mTLR-4 mice and WT control mice were fed low- and high-fat diets for 16 wk. The high-fat diet significantly decreased FAO in mTLR-4 mice, which was observed in concert with elevated body weight and fat, greater glucose intolerance, and increase in production of ROS and cellular oxidative damage compared with WT littermates. These findings suggest that TLR-4 plays an important role in the metabolic response in skeletal muscle to high-fat feeding. PMID:26084695

  8. Selective overexpression of Toll-like receptor-4 in skeletal muscle impairs metabolic adaptation to high-fat feeding.

    PubMed

    McMillan, Ryan P; Wu, Yaru; Voelker, Kevin; Fundaro, Gabrielle; Kavanaugh, John; Stevens, Joseph R; Shabrokh, Elika; Ali, Mostafa; Harvey, Mordecai; Anderson, Angela S; Boutagy, Nabil E; Mynatt, Randall L; Frisard, Madlyn I; Hulver, Matthew W

    2015-08-01

    Toll-like receptor-4 (TLR-4) is elevated in skeletal muscle of obese humans, and data from our laboratory have shown that activation of TLR-4 in skeletal muscle via LPS results in decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO). The purpose of this study was to determine whether overexpression of TLR-4 in skeletal muscle alters mitochondrial function and whole body metabolism in the context of a chow and high-fat diet. C57BL/6J mice (males, 6-8 mo of age) with skeletal muscle-specific overexpression of the TLR-4 (mTLR-4) gene were created and used for this study. Isolated mitochondria and whole muscle homogenates from rodent skeletal muscle (gastrocnemius and quadriceps) were investigated. TLR-4 overexpression resulted in a significant reduction in FAO in muscle homogenates; however, mitochondrial respiration and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production did not appear to be affected on a standard chow diet. To determine the role of TLR-4 overexpression in skeletal muscle in response to high-fat feeding, mTLR-4 mice and WT control mice were fed low- and high-fat diets for 16 wk. The high-fat diet significantly decreased FAO in mTLR-4 mice, which was observed in concert with elevated body weight and fat, greater glucose intolerance, and increase in production of ROS and cellular oxidative damage compared with WT littermates. These findings suggest that TLR-4 plays an important role in the metabolic response in skeletal muscle to high-fat feeding.

  9. Striatal opioid receptor availability is related to acute and chronic pain perception in arthritis: does opioid adaptation increase resilience to chronic pain?

    PubMed

    Brown, Christopher A; Matthews, Julian; Fairclough, Michael; McMahon, Adam; Barnett, Elizabeth; Al-Kaysi, Ali; El-Deredy, Wael; Jones, Anthony K P

    2015-11-01

    The experience of pain in humans is modulated by endogenous opioids, but it is largely unknown how the opioid system adapts to chronic pain states. Animal models of chronic pain point to upregulation of opioid receptors (OpR) in the brain, with unknown functional significance. We sought evidence for a similar relationship between chronic pain and OpR availability in humans. Using positron emission tomography and the radiotracer (11)C-diprenorphine, patients with arthritis pain (n = 17) and healthy controls (n = 9) underwent whole-brain positron emission tomography scanning to calculate parametric maps of OpR availability. Consistent with the upregulation hypothesis, within the arthritis group, greater OpR availability was found in the striatum (including the caudate) of patients reporting higher levels of recent chronic pain, as well as regions of interest in the descending opioidergic pathway including the anterior cingulate cortex, thalamus, and periaqueductal gray. The functional significance of striatal changes were clarified with respect to acute pain thresholds: data across patients and controls revealed that striatal OpR availability was related to reduced pain perception. These findings are consistent with the view that chronic pain may upregulate OpR availability to dampen pain. Finally, patients with arthritis pain, compared with healthy controls, had overall less OpR availability within the striatum specifically, consistent with the greater endogenous opioid binding that would be expected in chronic pain states. Our observational evidence points to the need for further studies to establish the causal relationship between chronic pain states and OpR adaptation.

  10. Cytokine and cytokine receptor genes of the adaptive immune response are differentially associated with breast cancer risk in American women of African and European ancestry.

    PubMed

    Quan, Lei; Gong, Zhihong; Yao, Song; Bandera, Elisa V; Zirpoli, Gary; Hwang, Helena; Roberts, Michelle; Ciupak, Gregory; Davis, Warren; Sucheston, Lara; Pawlish, Karen; Bovbjerg, Dana H; Jandorf, Lina; Cabasag, Citadel; Coignet, Jean-Gabriel; Ambrosone, Christine B; Hong, Chi-Chen

    2014-03-15

    Disparities in breast cancer biology are evident between American women of African ancestry (AA) and European ancestry (EA) and may be due, in part, to differences in immune function. To assess the potential role of constitutional host immunity on breast carcinogenesis, we tested associations between breast cancer risk and 47 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 26 cytokine-related genes of the adaptive immune system using 650 EA (n = 335 cases) and 864 AA (n = 458 cases) women from the Women's Circle of Health Study (WCHS). With additional participant accrual to the WCHS, promising SNPs from the initial analysis were evaluated in a larger sample size (1,307 EAs and 1,365 AAs). Multivariate logistic regression found SNPs in genes important for T helper type 1 (Th1) immunity (IFNGR2 rs1059293, IL15RA rs2296135, LTA rs1041981), Th2 immunity (IL4R rs1801275), and T regulatory cell-mediated immunosuppression (TGFB1 rs1800469) associated with breast cancer risk, mainly among AAs. The combined effect of these five SNPs was highly significant among AAs (P-trend = 0.0005). When stratified by estrogen receptor (ER) status, LTA rs1041981 was associated with ER-positive breast cancers among EAs and marginally among AAs. Only among AA women, IL15 rs10833 and IL15RA rs2296135 were associated with ER-positive tumors, and IL12RB1 rs375947, IL15 rs10833 and TGFB1 rs1800469 were associated with ER-negative tumors. Our study systematically identified genetic variants in the adaptive immune response pathway associated with breast cancer risk, which appears to differ by ancestry groups, menopausal status and ER status.

  11. Vibrational overtone stretching transitions in sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Michael W. P.

    2006-10-01

    The CH stretching overtone transitions of the nerve agent sarin (O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) are of interest to the standoff detection of chemical warfare agents, as many of these transitions occur near regions where small, efficient, portable diode lasers (originally developed for use in the telecommunications industry) operate. However, the interpretation of experimental vibrational overtone spectra is often difficult, and the computational simulation of overtone transitions in a molecule is challenging. Presented herein are the simulated CH overtone stretching transitions in sarin. Spectral regions are simulated from overtone transition energies and intensities, both of which are calculated within the harmonically coupled anharmonic oscillator (HCAO) model. Data for HCAO calculations are obtained from ab initio calculations, without any recourse to experimental data.

  12. Stretched cell cycle model for proliferating lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Dowling, Mark R.; Kan, Andrey; Heinzel, Susanne; Zhou, Jie H. S.; Marchingo, Julia M.; Wellard, Cameron J.; Markham, John F.; Hodgkin, Philip D.

    2014-01-01

    Stochastic variation in cell cycle time is a consistent feature of otherwise similar cells within a growing population. Classic studies concluded that the bulk of the variation occurs in the G1 phase, and many mathematical models assume a constant time for traversing the S/G2/M phases. By direct observation of transgenic fluorescent fusion proteins that report the onset of S phase, we establish that dividing B and T lymphocytes spend a near-fixed proportion of total division time in S/G2/M phases, and this proportion is correlated between sibling cells. This result is inconsistent with models that assume independent times for consecutive phases. Instead, we propose a stretching model for dividing lymphocytes where all parts of the cell cycle are proportional to total division time. Data fitting based on a stretched cell cycle model can significantly improve estimates of cell cycle parameters drawn from DNA labeling data used to monitor immune cell dynamics. PMID:24733943

  13. Stretching cells and delivering drugs with bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Li, Fenfang; Chon U, Chan; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we'll review our work on impulsive cell stretching using cavitation bubbles and magnetic microbubbles for drug delivery. For sufficient short times cells can sustain a much larger areal strain than the yield strain obtained from quasi-static stretching. Experiments with red blood cells show that even then the rupture of the cell is slow process; it is caused by diffusive swelling rather than mechanical violation of the plasma membrane. In the second part we'll discuss bubbles coated with magnetic and drug loaded particles. These bubbles offer an interesting vector for on demand delivery of drugs using mild ultrasound and magnetic fields. We report on basic experiments in microfluidic channels revealing the release of the agent during bubble oscillations and first in vivo validation with a mouse tumor model. Singapore National Research Foundations Competitive Research Program funding (NRF-CRP9-2011-04).

  14. The role of stretching in tendon injuries.

    PubMed

    Witvrouw, E; Mahieu, N; Roosen, P; McNair, P

    2007-04-01

    The function of tendons can be classified into two categories: tensile force transmission, and storage and release of elastic energy during locomotion. The action of tendons in storing and releasing energy is mainly seen in sports activities with stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs). The more intense the SSC movements are (jumping-like activities), the more frequently tendon problems are observed. High SSC movements impose high loads on tendons. Consequently, tendons that frequently deal with high SSC motion require a high energy-absorbing capacity to store and release this large amount of elastic energy. As the elasticity of tendon structures is a leading factor in the amount of stored energy, prevention and rehabilitation programmes for tendon injuries should focus on increasing this tendon elasticity in athletes performing high SSC movements. Recently, it has been shown that ballistic stretching can significantly increase tendon elasticity. These findings have important clinical implications for treatment and prevention of tendon injuries.

  15. Modeling aftershocks as a stretched exponential relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-11-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Although other expressions have been proposed in recent decades to describe the temporal behavior of aftershocks, the number of model comparisons remains limited. After reviewing the aftershock models published from the late nineteenth century until today, I solely compare the power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential expressions defined in their simplest forms. By applying statistical methods recommended recently in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simple relaxation process, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.

  16. NASA/MSFC Large Stretch Press Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, M. W.; Nealson, W. P.; Jay, G. C.; Buss, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: A. assess and document the advantages/disadvantages of a government agency investment in a large stretch form press on the order of 5000 tons capacity (per jaw); B. develop a procurement specification for the press; and C. provide trade study data that will permit an optimum site location. Tasks were separated into four major elements: cost study, user survey, site selection, and press design/procurement specification.

  17. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  18. Dynamo theory, vorticity generation, and exponential stretching.

    PubMed

    Friedlander, Susan; Vishik, Misha M.

    1991-08-01

    A discussion is given of the analogy between the dynamo equation for the generation of a magnetic field by the motion of an electrically conducting fluid and the equation for the evolution of vorticity of a viscous fluid. In both cases exponential stretching is an important feature of the underlying instability problem. For the "fast" dynamo problem, the existence of exponential stretching (i.e., the positivity of the Lyapunov exponent) somewhere in the flow is a necessary condition when the flow is smooth. An example is presented of a flow with exponential stretching (an Anosov flow) that supports fast dynamo action. A parallel treatment is described for the linearized Navier-Stokes equations for the motion of a viscous fluid. In this problem the analogous necessary condition for "fast vorticity generation" is the existence of some instability in the corresponding Euler (i.e., inviscid) equation. Dynamo theory methods give a second related result, namely a universal geometric estimate from below on the growth rate of a small perturbation in an inviscid fluid. This bound gives an effective sufficient condition for local instability for Eulers equations. In particular, it is proved that a steady flow with a hyperbolic stagnation point is unstable. The growth rate of an infinitesimal perturbation in a metric with derivatives depends on this metric. This dependence is completely described.

  19. Stretch Moduli of Ribonucleotide Embedded Short DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of DNA is essential to comprehending the dynamics of many cellular functions. DNA deformations are involved in many mechanisms when genetic information needs to be stored and used. In addition, recent studies have found that Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) are among the most common non-standard nucleotides present in DNA. The presences of rNMPs in DNA might cause mutation, fragility or genotoxicity of chromosome but how they influence the structure and mechanical properties of DNA remains unclear. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based single molecule spectroscopy, we measure the stretch moduli of double stranded DNAs (dsDNA) with 30 base pairs and 5 equally embedded rNMPs. The dsDNAs are anchored on gold substrate via thiol chemistry, while the AFM tip is used to pick up and stretch the dsDNA from its free end through biotin-streptavidin bonding. Our preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of rNMPs in dsDNA might significantly change its stretch modulus, which might be important in some biological processes.

  20. Sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA

    PubMed Central

    De Bustos, Alfredo; Cuadrado, Angeles; Jouve, Nicolás

    2016-01-01

    Repetitive DNA is widespread in eukaryotic genomes, in some cases making up more than 80% of the total. SSRs are a type of repetitive DNA formed by short motifs repeated in tandem arrays. In some species, SSRs may be organized into long stretches, usually associated with the constitutive heterochromatin. Variation in repeats can alter the expression of genes, and changes in the number of repeats have been linked to certain human diseases. Unfortunately, the molecular characterization of these repeats has been hampered by technical limitations related to cloning and sequencing. Indeed, most sequenced genomes contain gaps owing to repetitive DNA-related assembly difficulties. This paper reports an alternative method for sequencing of long stretches of repetitive DNA based on the combined use of 1) a linear vector to stabilize the cloning process, and 2) the use of exonuclease III for obtaining progressive deletions of SSR-rich fragments. This strategy allowed the sequencing of a fragment containing a stretch of 6.2 kb of continuous SSRs. To demonstrate that this procedure can sequence other kinds of repetitive DNA, it was used to examine a 4.5 kb fragment containing a cluster of 15 repeats of the 5S rRNA gene of barley. PMID:27819354

  1. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Del P.; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Behm, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key points The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. PMID:24149890

  2. Unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity techniques is given. Basic building blocks taken from the field of computational geometry are first described. Various practical mesh generation techniques based on these algorithms are then constructed and illustrated with examples. Issues of adaptive meshing and stretched mesh generation for anisotropic problems are treated in subsequent sections. The presentation is organized in an education manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  3. Contribution of Toll-like receptors to the control of hepatitis B virus infection by initiating antiviral innate responses and promoting specific adaptive immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Zhiyong; Zhang, Ejuan; Yang, Dongliang; Lu, Mengji

    2015-01-01

    It is well accepted that adaptive immunity plays a key role in the control of hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection. In contrast, the contribution of innate immunity has only received attention in recent years. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) sense pathogen-associated molecule patterns and activate antiviral mechanisms, including intracellular antiviral pathways and the production of antiviral effector interferons (IFNs) and pro-inflammatory cytokines. Experimental results from in vitro and in vivo models have demonstrated that TLRs mediate the activation of cellular signaling pathways and the production of antiviral cytokines, resulting in a suppression of HBV replication. However, HBV infection is associated with downregulation of TLR expression on host cells and blockade of the activation of downstream signaling pathways. In primary HBV infection, TLRs may slow down HBV infection, but contribute only indirectly to viral clearance. Importantly, TLRs may modulate HBV-specific T- and B-cell responses in vivo, which are essential for the termination of HBV infection. Thus, TLR agonists are promising candidates to act as immunomodulators for the treatment of chronic HBV infection. Antiviral treatment may recover TLR expression and function in chronic HBV infection and may increase the efficacy of therapeutic approaches based on TLR activation. A combined therapeutic strategy with antiviral treatment and TLR activation could facilitate the restoration of HBV-specific immune responses and thereby, achieve viral clearance in chronically infected HBV patients. PMID:25418467

  4. Stretch-activated cation channel from larval bullfrog skin

    PubMed Central

    Hillyard, Stanley D.; Willumsen, Niels J.; Marrero, Mario B.

    2010-01-01

    Cell-attached patches from isolated epithelial cells from larval bullfrog skin revealed a cation channel that was activated by applying suction (−1 kPa to −4.5 kPa) to the pipette. Activation was characterized by an initial large current spike that rapidly attenuated to a stable value and showed a variable pattern of opening and closing with continuing suction. Current–voltage plots demonstrated linear or inward rectification and single channel conductances of 44–56 pS with NaCl or KCl Ringer's solution as the pipette solution, and a reversal potential (−Vp) of 20–40 mV. The conductance was markedly reduced with N-methyl-D-glucamide (NMDG)-Cl Ringer's solution in the pipette. Neither amiloride nor ATP, which are known to stimulate an apical cation channel in Ussing chamber preparations of larval frog skin, produced channel activation nor did these compounds affect the response to suction. Stretch activation was not affected by varying the pipette concentrations of Ca2+ between 0 mmol l−1 and 4 mmol l−1 or by varying pH between 6.8 and 8.0. However, conductance was reduced with 4 mmol l−1 Ca2+. Western blot analysis of membrane homogenates from larval bullfrog and larval toad skin identified proteins that were immunoreactive with mammalian TRPC1 and TRPC5 (TRPC, canonical transient receptor potential channel) antibodies while homogenates of skin from newly metamorphosed bullfrogs were positive for TRPC1 and TRPC3/6/7 antibodies. The electrophysiological response of larval bullfrog skin resembles that of a stretch-activated cation channel characterized in Xenopus oocytes and proposed to be TRPC1. These results indicate this channel persists in all life stages of anurans and that TRP isoforms may be important for sensory functions of their skin. PMID:20435829

  5. Experimental Characterization of Stretch-Bending Formability of AHSS Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kitting, Daniela; Ofenheimer, Aldo; Pauli, Heinrich; Till, Edwin T.

    2011-05-01

    Deformation conditions of combined stretching and bending are known to enhance material formability compared to forming conditions without bending (e.g. in-plane stretching). These phenomena can be observed for most conventional steel grades but is even more pronounced for Advanced High Strength Steel (AHSS) sheets. Consequently, there is an urgent need in industry to quantify the phenomena of enhanced material formability due to bending effects. In this work new stretch-bend test setups are presented which can be used in addition to the conventional Angular Stretch Bend Test to systematically investigate the influence of various stretch-bending deformation conditions on the formability of AHSS sheets.

  6. Does residual force enhancement increase with increasing stretch magnitudes?

    PubMed

    Hisey, Brandon; Leonard, Tim R; Herzog, Walter

    2009-07-22

    It is generally accepted that force enhancement in skeletal muscles increases with increasing stretch magnitudes. However, this property has not been tested across supra-physiological stretch magnitudes and different muscle lengths, thus it is not known whether this is a generic property of skeletal muscle, or merely a property that holds for small stretch magnitudes within the physiological range. Six cat soleus muscles were actively stretched with magnitudes varying from 3 to 24 mm at three different parts of the force-length relationship to test the hypothesis that force enhancement increases with increasing stretch magnitude, independent of muscle length. Residual force enhancement increased consistently with stretch amplitudes on the descending limb of the force-length relationship up to a threshold value, after which it reached a plateau. Force enhancement did not increase with stretch amplitude on the ascending limb of the force-length relationship. Passive force enhancement was observed for all test conditions, and paralleled the behavior of the residual force enhancement. Force enhancement increased with stretch magnitude when stretching occurred at lengths where there was natural passive force within the muscle. These results suggest that force enhancement does not increase unconditionally with increasing stretch magnitude, as is generally accepted, and that increasing force enhancement with stretch appears to be tightly linked to that part of the force-length relationship where there is naturally occurring passive force.

  7. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-07-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19-21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity.

  8. Effects of JTV-519 on stretch-induced manifestations of mechanoelectric feedback.

    PubMed

    Del Canto, Irene; Such-Miquel, Luis; Brines, Laia; Soler, Carlos; Zarzoso, Manuel; Calvo, Conrado; Parra, Germán; Tormos, Álvaro; Alberola, Antonio; Millet, José; Such, Luis; Chorro, Francisco J

    2016-11-01

    JTV-519 is a 1,4-benzothiazepine derivative with multichannel effects that inhibits Ca(2+) release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum and stabilizes the closed state of the ryanodine receptor, preventing myocardial damage and the induction of arrhythmias during Ca(2+) overload. Mechanical stretch increases cellular Na(+) inflow, activates the reverse mode of the Na(+) /Ca(2+) exchanger, and modifies Ca(2+) handling and myocardial electrophysiology, favoring arrhythmogenesis. This study aims to determine whether JTV-519 modifies the stretch-induced manifestations of mechanoelectric feedback. The ventricular fibrillation (VF) modifications induced by acute stretch were studied in Langendorff-perfused rabbit hearts using epicardial multiple electrodes under control conditions (n=9) or during JTV-519 perfusion: 0.1 μmol/L (n=9) and 1 μmol/L (n=9). Spectral and mapping techniques were used to establish the baseline, stretch and post-stretch VF characteristics. JTV-519 slowed baseline VF and decreased activation complexity. These effects were dose-dependent (baseline VF dominant frequency: control=13.9±2.2 Hz; JTV 0.1 μmol/L=11.1±1.1 Hz, P<.01; JTV 1 μmol/L=6.6±1.1 Hz, P<.0001). The stretch-induced acceleration of VF (control=38.8%) was significantly reduced by JTV-519 0.1 μmol/L (19.8%) and abolished by JTV 1 μmol/L (-1.5%). During stretch, the VF activation complexity index was reduced in both JTV-519 series (control=1.60±0.15; JTV 0.1 μmol/L=1.13±0.3, P<.0001; JTV 1 μmol/L=0.57±0.21, P<.0001), and was independently related to VF dominant frequency (R=.82; P<.0001). The fifth percentile of the VF activation intervals, conduction velocity and wavelength entered the multiple linear regression model using dominant frequency as the dependent variable (R=-.84; P<.0001). In conclusion, JTV-519 slowed and simplified the baseline VF activation patterns and abolished the stretch-induced manifestations of mechanoelectric feedback.

  9. Secondary structure of double-stranded DNA under stretching: Elucidation of the stretched form

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloum, M.; Muller, P.; Beker, A-F.

    2011-03-15

    Almost two decades ago, measurements of force versus extension on isolated double-stranded DNA molecules revealed a force plateau. This unusual stretching phenomenon in DNA suggests that the long molecules may be extended from the usual B form into a new conformation. Different models have been proposed to describe the nature of DNA in its stretched form, S-DNA. Using atomic force microscopy combined with a molecular combing method, we identified the structure of {lambda}-phage DNA for different stretching values. We provide strong evidence for the existence of a first-order transition between B form and S form. Beyond a certain extension of the natural length, DNA molecules adopt a new double-helix conformation characterized by a diameter of 1.2 nm and a helical pitch of18 nm.

  10. Real-time imaging of ATP release induced by mechanical stretch in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Norihiro; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells within the airway walls are continually exposed to mechanical stimuli, and exhibit various functions in response to these mechanical stresses. ATP acts as an extracellular mediator in the airway. Moreover, extracellular ATP is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, it is not known whether ASM cells are cellular sources of ATP secretion in the airway. We therefore investigated whether mechanical stretch induces ATP release from ASM cells. Mechanical stretch was applied to primary human ASM cells cultured on a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Concentrations of ATP in cell culture supernatants measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence were significantly elevated by cyclic stretch (12 and 20% strain). We further visualized the stretch-induced ATP release from the cells in real time using a luminescence imaging system, while acquiring differential interference contrast cell images with infrared optics. Immediately after a single uniaxial stretch for 1 second, strong ATP signals were produced by a certain population of cells and spread to surrounding spaces. The cyclic stretch-induced ATP release was significantly reduced by inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular exocytosis, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide, and bafilomycin. In contrast, the stretch-induced ATP release was not inhibited by a hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone, or blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 by short interfering RNA transfection or ruthenium red. These findings reveal a novel property of ASM cells: mechanically induced ATP release may be a cellular source of ATP in the airway.

  11. Acute effects of dynamic stretching, static stretching, and light aerobic activity on muscular performance in women.

    PubMed

    Curry, Brad S; Chengkalath, Devendra; Crouch, Gordon J; Romance, Michelle; Manns, Patricia J

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three warm-up protocols--static stretching, dynamic stretching, and light aerobic activity--on selected measures of range of motion and power in untrained females and to investigate the sustained effects at 5 and 30 minutes after warm-up. A total of 24 healthy females (ages 23-29 years) attended one familiarization session and three test sessions on nonconsecutive days within 2 weeks. A within-subject design protocol with the testing investigators blinded to the subjects' warm-up was followed. Each session started with 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling followed by pretest baseline measures. Another 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling was completed and followed by one of the three randomly selected warm-up interventions (static stretching, dynamic stretching, or light aerobic activity). The following posttest outcome measures were collected 5 and 30 minutes following the intervention: modified Thomas test, countermovement jump, and isometric time to peak force knee extension measured by dynamometer. Analysis of the data revealed significant time effects on range of motion and countermovement jump changes. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between the warm-up conditions on any of the variables. The variation in responses to warm-up conditions emphasizes the unique nature of individual reactions to different warm-ups; however, there was a tendency for warm-ups with an active component to have beneficial effects. The data suggests dynamic stretching has greater applicability to enhance performance on power outcomes compared to static stretching.

  12. Efficacy of static stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretch on hamstrings length after a single session.

    PubMed

    O'Hora, John; Cartwright, Abigail; Wade, Clive D; Hough, Alan D; Shum, Gary L K

    2011-06-01

    A number of studies have investigated the efficacy of several repetitions of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (PNF) and static stretching (SS). However, there is limited research comparing the effects of a single bout of these stretching maneuvers. The aim of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a single bout of a therapist-applied 30-second SS vs. a single bout of therapist-applied 6-second hamstring (agonist) contract PNF. Forty-five healthy subjects between the ages of 21 and 35 were randomly allocated to 1 of the 2 stretching groups or a control group, in which no stretching was received. The flexibility of the hamstring was determined by a range of passive knee extension, measured using a universal goniometer, with the subject in the supine position and the hip at 90° flexion, before and after intervention. A significant increase in knee extension was found for both intervention groups after a single stretch (SS group = 7.53°, p < 0.01 and PNF group = 11.80°, p < 0.01). Both interventions resulted in a significantly greater increase in knee extension when compared to the control group (p < 0.01). The PNF group demonstrated significantly greater gains in knee extension compared to the SS group (mean difference 4.27°, p < 0.01). It can be concluded that a therapist applied SS or PNF results in a significant increase in hamstring flexibility. A hamstring (agonist) contract PNF is more effective than an SS in a single stretching session. These findings are important to physiotherapists or trainers working in clinical and sporting environments. Where in the past therapists may have spent time conducting multiple repetitions of a PNF and an SS, a single bout of either technique may be considered just as effective. A key component of the study methodology was the exclusion of a warm-up period before stretching. Therefore, the findings of efficacy of a single PNF are of particular relevance in sporting environments and busy clinical

  13. Convective stretching and applications to mantle mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Conjeepurm Subramanian, Natarajan

    In this dissertation I have developed a method to quantify the stretching and orientation of infinitesimal strain ellipsoids in three-dimensional, incompressible, and unsteady flow fields. The method is used to study the mixing properties of various mantle-like flows. Chapter 1 provides a introduction to the dissertation. In Chapter 2, I discuss the mixing properties of a three-dimensional, unsteady flow in which the time dependence and three-dimensionality of the flow can be varied independently. It is found that the time dependance of the flow is a more important control on mixing. In Chapter 3, I discuss the mixing properties in a plate-driven model of mantle convection which generates both toroidal, and poloidal components in the velocity field. It is found that as the toroidal energy in the flow is increased to match the poloidal energy, the mixing becomes more homogeneous. Computing the frequency-size distribution of the stretching experienced by the heterogeneities it is found that the marble cake structure is the most likely structure for the upper mantle. In Chapter 4, I discuss the mixing properties of iso-viscous, steady, thermal convection models at infinite Prandtl number. It is found that the strain rate in these models scales uniformly as Ra-0.55. The strain rate scaling law was used to compute the mixing time in the models. The mixing time for these models was computed as ˜ 410 My for whole mantle convection and ˜ 25 My for layered mantle convection for Ra = 1x108 and ˜ 1.4 By and ˜ 100 My for Ra = 1 x 107. As in the previous chapter, the frequency size distribution corresponding to the stretching values indicates a marble cake structure for the upper mantle. In Chapter 5, I conclude the dissertation.

  14. Uni-Directional Cell Stretching Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L. (Inventor); Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to an apparatus and method for applying various degrees of linear, mechanical loads on mammalian tissues, and in particular, for effecting linear stretching of tissue and simulating changes in hydrostatic pressures encountered during tissue contraction in vivo. The apparatus is useful for the study of mechanical loading in human tissue, and specifically, for permitting the evaluation of the effects of mechanical loading of skeletal or cardiac tissue and of the effects of removal of mechanical loading due to inactivity or the like, and the subsequent reapplication of load to these tissues.

  15. Venus Chasmata: A Lithospheric Stretching Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Solomon, S. C.; Head, J. W.

    1985-01-01

    An outstanding problem for Venus is the characterization of its style of global tectonics, an issue intimately related to the dominant mechanism of lithospheric heat loss. Among the most spectacular and extensive of the major tectonic features on Venus are the chasmata, deep linear valleys generally interpreted to be the products of lithospheric extension and rifting. Systems of chasmata and related features can be traced along several tectonic zones up to 20,000 km in linear extent. A lithospheric stretching model was developed to explain the topographic characteristics of Venus chasmata and to constrain the physical properties of the Venus crust and lithosphere.

  16. Finite stretching of an annular plate.

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Biricikoglu, V.; Kalnins, A.

    1971-01-01

    The problem of the finite stretching of an annular plate which is bonded to a rigid inclusion at its inner edge is considered. The material is assumed to be isotropic and incompressible with a Mooney-type constitutive law. It is shown that the inclusion of the effect of the transverse normal strain leads to a rapid variation in thickness which is confined to a narrow edge zone. The explicit solutions to the boundary layer equations, which govern the behavior of the plate near the edges, are presented.

  17. To Stretch and Search for Better Ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2000-06-01

    There's a lot to do to get each issue of this Journal ready for publication, and there's a lot that can go awry during that process. We the editorial staff do our utmost to make certain that each issue is the best it can possibly be, but, of necessity, a lot of our effort is focused on solving problems, correcting errors, and avoiding pitfalls. It is not surprising that we sometimes lose sight of the bigger picture--all of the things that came out as well as or better than we hoped they would. Therefore it gives us great pleasure when a reader applauds (and thereby rewards) our efforts. One such communication inspired this editorial.

    I have appreciated the extra effort put forward by the staff to make the Journal really come alive. The high quality of the Journal serves as an incentive to chemical educators to stretch and search for better ways to inspire our students.
    I fervently hope that we do encourage you "to stretch and search for better ways", not only to inspire students but in everything you do. Stretching and searching for better ways is what life, science, chemistry, and teaching are all about, and it is a wonderfully stimulating and exciting way to approach anything and everything. Sometimes, though, one's ability to stretch is akin to that of a rubber band exposed too long to sunlight. Change becomes a threat or a burden instead of an opportunity. This often happens in one area but not others, as in the case of someone doing original research but whose lecture notes are yellow with age, or someone who experiments with new teaching approaches but neglects the latest chemical discoveries. Whatever its manifestation, failure to stretch and search for better ways is a great loss, both for the individual directly involved and for others. Fortunately there are many who continually stretch and search, often in conjunction with JCE. For example, some time ago the Chair of the Board of Publication, Jerry Bell, challenged Journal

  18. Acute effect of muscle stretching on the steadiness of sustained submaximal contractions of the plantar flexor muscles.

    PubMed

    Kato, Emika; Vieillevoye, Stéphanie; Balestra, Costantino; Guissard, Nathalie; Duchateau, Jacques

    2011-02-01

    This paper examines the acute effect of a bout of static stretches on torque fluctuation during an isometric torque-matching task that required subjects to sustain isometric contractions as steady as possible with the plantar flexor muscles at four intensities (5, 10, 15, and 20% of maximum) for 20 s. The stretching bout comprised five 60-s passive stretches, separated by 10-s rest. During the torque-matching tasks and muscle stretching, the torque (active and passive) and surface electromyogram (EMG) of the medial gastrocnemius (MG), soleus (Sol), and tibialis anterior (TA) were continuously recorded. Concurrently, changes in muscle architecture (fascicle length and pennation angle) of the MG were monitored by ultrasonography. The results showed that during stretching, passive torque decreased and fascicle length increased gradually. Changes in these two parameters were significantly associated (r(2) = 0.46; P < 0.001). When data from the torque-matching tasks were collapsed across the four torque levels, stretches induced greater torque fluctuation (P < 0.001) and enhanced EMG activity (P < 0.05) in MG and TA muscles with no change in coactivation. Furthermore, stretching maneuvers produced a greater decrease (∼15%; P < 0.001) in fascicle length during the torque-matching tasks and change in torque fluctuation (CV) was positively associated with changes in fascicle length (r(2) = 0.56; P < 0.001), MG and TA EMG activities, and coactivation (r(2) = 0.35, 0.34, and 0.35, respectively; P < 0.001). In conclusion, these observations indicate that repeated stretches can decrease torque steadiness by increasing muscle compliance and EMG activity of muscles around the joint. The relative influence of such adaptations, however, may depend on the torque level during the torque-matching task.

  19. Effects of the Q223R mutation in the hemagglutinin (HA) of egg-adapted pandemic 2009 (H1N1) influenza A virus on virus growth and binding of HA to human- and avian-type cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Suptawiwat, O; Jeamtua, W; Boonarkart, Ch; Kongchanagul, A; Puthawathana, P; Auewarakul, P

    2013-01-01

    The 2009 swine-origin influenza A virus (H1N1) and its initial reassortant vaccine strains did not grow well in embryonated eggs. The glutamine to arginine mutation at the amino acid position 223 (Q223R) of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene is the major mutation previously found in egg-adapted 2009 H1N1 strains and shown to enhance viral growth in embryonated eggs. However, the effect of this mutation on the receptor-binding preference had not been directly demonstrated. In this study, the Q223R mutation was shown to change the viral HA binding preference from the human-type receptor, α2,6-linked sialic acid, to the avian-type receptor, α2,3-linked sialic acid; and to enhance the viral growth in embryonated eggs but not in cell culture.

  20. Levator Ani Muscle Stretch Induced by Simulated Vaginal Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Kuo-Cheng; Mooney, Brian; DeLancey, John O. L.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a three-dimensional computer model to predict levator ani muscle stretch during vaginal birth. METHODS: Serial magnetic resonance images from a healthy nulliparous 34-year-old woman, published anatomic data, and engineering graphics software were used to construct a structural model of the levator ani muscles along with related passive tissues. The model was used to quantify pelvic floor muscle stretch induced during the second stage of labor as a model fetal head progressively engaged and then stretched the iliococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles. RESULTS: The largest tissue strain reached a stretch ratio (tissue length under stretch/original tissue length) of 3.26 in medial pubococcygeus muscle, the shortest, most medial and ventral levator ani muscle. Regions of the ileococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles reached maximal stretch ratios of 2.73, 2.50, and 2.28, respectively. Tissue stretch ratios were proportional to fetal head size: For example, increasing fetal head diameter by 9% increased medial pubococcygeus stretch by the same amount. CONCLUSION: The medial pubococcygeus muscles undergo the largest stretch of any levator ani muscles during vaginal birth. They are therefore at the greatest risk for stretch-related injury. PMID:14704241

  1. Impaired stretch modulation in potentially lethal cardiac sodium channel mutants.

    PubMed

    Banderali, Umberto; Juranka, Peter F; Clark, Robert B; Giles, Wayne R; Morris, Catherine E

    2010-01-01

    The presence of two slowly inactivating mutants of the cardiac sodium channel (hNa(V)1.5), R1623Q and R1626P, associate with sporadic Long-QT3 (LQT3) syndrome, and may contribute to ventricular tachyarrhythmias and/or lethal ventricular disturbances. Cardiac mechanoelectric feedback is considered a factor in such sporadic arrhythmias. Since stretch and shear forces modulate hNa(V)1.5 gating, detailed electrophysiological study of LQT-Na(V)1.5 mutant channel alpha subunit(s) might provide insights. We compared recombinant R1623Q and WT currents in control vs. stretched membrane of cell-attached patches of Xenopus oocytes. Macroscopic current was monitored before, during, and after stretch induced by pipette suction. In either mutant Na(+) channel, peak current at small depolarizations could be more than doubled by stretch. As in WT, R1623Q showed reversible and stretch intensity dependent acceleration of current onset and decay at all voltages, with kinetic coupling between these two processes retained during stretch. These two Na(V)1.5 channel alpha subunits differed in the absolute extent of kinetic acceleration for a given stretch intensity; over a range of intensities, R1623Q inactivation speed increased significantly less than did WT. The LQT3 mutant R1626P also retained its kinetic coupling during stretch. Whereas WT stretch-difference currents (I(Na)(V,t) without stretch minus I(Na)(V,t) with stretch) were mostly inhibitory (equivalent to outward current), they were substantially (R1623Q) or entirely (R1626P) excitatory for the LQT3 mutants. If stretch-modulated Na(V)1.5 current (i.e., brief excitation followed by accelerated current decay) routinely contributes to cardiac mechanoelectric feedback, then during hemodynamic load variations, the abnormal stretch-modulated components of R1623Q and R1626P current could be pro-arrhythmic.

  2. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-12-15

    Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5-7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism.

  3. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  4. Monte Carlo simulation of chromatin stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, Frank; Lankas, Filip; Caudron, Maïwen; Langowski, Jörg

    2006-04-01

    We present Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the stretching of a single 30nm chromatin fiber. The model approximates the DNA by a flexible polymer chain with Debye-Hückel electrostatics and uses a two-angle zigzag model for the geometry of the linker DNA connecting the nucleosomes. The latter are represented by flat disks interacting via an attractive Gay-Berne potential. Our results show that the stiffness of the chromatin fiber strongly depends on the linker DNA length. Furthermore, changing the twisting angle between nucleosomes from 90° to 130° increases the stiffness significantly. An increase in the opening angle from 22° to 34° leads to softer fibers for small linker lengths. We observe that fibers containing a linker histone at each nucleosome are stiffer compared to those without the linker histone. The simulated persistence lengths and elastic moduli agree with experimental data. Finally, we show that the chromatin fiber does not behave as an isotropic elastic rod, but its rigidity depends on the direction of deformation: Chromatin is much more resistant to stretching than to bending.

  5. Stretched Exponential relaxation in pure Se glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Ravindren, S.; Boolchand, P.

    A universal feature of glasses is the stretched exponential relaxation, f (t) = exp[ - t / τ ] β . The model of diffusion of excitations to randomly distributed traps in a glass by Phillips1 yields the stretched exponent β = d[d +2] where d, the effective dimensionality. We have measured the enthalpy of relaxation ΔHnr (tw) at Tg of Se glass in modulated DSC experiments as glasses age at 300K and find β = 0.43(2) for tw in the 0

  6. Stretching DNA by a Constant Field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hori, Yuko

    2005-03-01

    We consider the problem of stretching DNA by a constant field, such as an electric field or a hydrodynamic flow field. We obtain analytical expressions for the elongation of DNA under both weak and strong applied fields, in two and three dimensions. In the weak field limit we consider the effect of self-avoidance, which leads to a 9-fold enhancement of the average end-to-end distance over the result obtained when self-avoidance is ignored in two dimensions, and 3-fold increase in three dimensions. In the strong stretching regime we obtain the exact force-extension relation by mapping the problem to the Schrödinger equation for a simple harmonic oscillator in a time dependent potential. We use our theoretical results to comment on the experiment of Maier et al. ootnotetextB. Maier, U. Seifert, and J. O. Rä'dler, Europhys. Lett., 60, 622 (2002). on DNA adsorbed on a lipid bilayer in the presence of an in-plane electric field. In particular, we find that their estimate for the effective charge density of the DNA molecule, made on the basis of an approximate theory, requires significant corrections in light of our calculations. This work was supported by the NSF through grants DMR-9984471 and DMR-0403997. JK is a Cottrell Scholar of Research Corporation.

  7. Stretch sensors for human body motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Ben; Gisby, Todd; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Sensing motion of the human body is a difficult task. From an engineers' perspective people are soft highly mobile objects that move in and out of complex environments. As well as the technical challenge of sensing, concepts such as comfort, social intrusion, usability, and aesthetics are paramount in determining whether someone will adopt a sensing solution or not. At the same time the demands for human body motion sensing are growing fast. Athletes want feedback on posture and technique, consumers need new ways to interact with augmented reality devices, and healthcare providers wish to track recovery of a patient. Dielectric elastomer stretch sensors are ideal for bridging this gap. They are soft, flexible, and precise. They are low power, lightweight, and can be easily mounted on the body or embedded into clothing. From a commercialisation point of view stretch sensing is easier than actuation or generation - such sensors can be low voltage and integrated with conventional microelectronics. This paper takes a birds-eye view of the use of these sensors to measure human body motion. A holistic description of sensor operation and guidelines for sensor design will be presented to help technologists and developers in the space.

  8. A systematic muscle model covering regions from the fast ramp stretches in the muscle fibres to the relatively slow stretches in the human triceps surae.

    PubMed

    Tamura, Youjiro; Ito, Akira; Cresswell, Andrew G

    2015-01-01

    We have proposed a muscle model which consists of two Maxwell elements and a Voigt element in parallel. The muscle model was applied on the experiment of the force responses by the fast ramp stretch in muscle fibres to determine the mechanical parameters. In the simulation, the Maxwell element with a flexible spring and a long relaxation time seemed to correspond with the force-generating state of the cross-bridges. Next, we tried the muscle model to simulate the relatively slow movement. Experimentally, we have measured torque changes by the stretch responses in the human triceps surae. In the experiments, the derivation of torque by rotation angle showed two peaks P1 and P2. The first peak P1 originated from the elastic properties of engaged cross-bridges, while the second peak P2 was due to stretch reflex signals. The model of a single-joint system simulated well with the experimental results to show a good adaptability of the muscle model.

  9. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study's methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC.

  10. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study’s methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC. PMID:27390425

  11. Early modification of stretch reflex in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bergui, M; Paglia, G; Lopiano, L; Quattrocolo, G; Bergamini, L; Bergamasco, B

    1993-07-01

    We stretched quadriceps femoris in healthy subjects and in patients with a recent diagnosis of PD in order to assess whether modifications of the long-latency component of the stretch reflex is an early event in the course of Parkinson's disease (PD). We found a modified mechanical and electromyographic (EMG) behavior in stretching relaxed muscles of patients while voluntary activation greatly reduced differences between normal and Parkinsonian subjects, suggesting that a lower threshold of the response is an early sign in PD.

  12. Effects of three different stretching techniques on vertical jumping performance.

    PubMed

    Kirmizigil, Berkiye; Ozcaldiran, Bahtiyar; Colakoglu, Muzaffer

    2014-05-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate 3 different flexibility techniques: (a) ballistic stretching (BS), (b) proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching (PNF) + BS, and (c) PNF + static stretching (SS) on vertical jump (VJ) performance and to determine the most appropriate stretching method during warm-up period before explosive force disciplines. One hundred voluntary male athletes participated in this study. All subjects performed aerobic warm-up (5-minute jog) followed by BS (5 seconds for each stretching exercise), PNF + BS (PNF performed followed by 5 seconds of BS), and PNF + SS (PNF performed followed by 30 seconds of SS) treatment protocol, respectively in the same day. Each stretching treatment was applied for 4 sets bilaterally. In all stretching treatments, lumbar extensor, gluteus maximus, and hamstring muscles were stretched with a single stretching exercise. After a 2-minute brief rest period, participants performed 3 trials of VJ test followed by one of the treatment protocols. Vertical jump performance was evaluated by countermovement jump (CMJ). Participants were divided into 3 groups according to their flexibility and prejump performances after warm-up. For each individual group and the whole group, after all treatments, differences in CMJ values were obtained (p ≤ 0.05). Ballistic stretching increased the VJ performance in the groups with low and average flexibility, poor prejumping performance, and also in the whole group (p ≤ 0.05). Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching + BS affected VJ performance in the group of participants with high flexibility (p ≤ 0.05). Proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation + SS decreased VJ performance in groups of participants with high flexibility, moderate, and high prejumping performance and in whole group (p ≤ 0.05). Ballistic stretching method increased VJ height, therefore seems to be more suitable than PNF + SS and PNF + BS before events that rely on explosive power as a part

  13. Warming-up and stretching for improved physical performance and prevention of sports-related injuries.

    PubMed

    Shellock, F G; Prentice, W E

    1985-01-01

    Competitive and recreational athletes typically perform warm-up and stretching activities to prepare for more strenuous exercise. These preliminary activities are used to enhance physical performance and to prevent sports-related injuries. Warm-up techniques are primarily used to increase body temperature and are classified in 3 major categories: (a) passive warm-up - increases temperature by some external means; (b) general warm-up - increases temperature by nonspecific body movements; and (c) specific warm-up - increases temperature using similar body parts that will be used in the subsequent, more strenuous activity. The best of these appears to be specific warm-up because this method provides a rehearsal of the activity or event. The intensity and duration of warm-up must be individualised according to the athlete's physical capabilities and in consideration of environmental factors which may alter the temperature response. The majority of the benefits of warm-up are related to temperature-dependent physiological processes. An elevation in body temperature produces an increase in the dissociation of oxygen from haemoglobin and myoglobin, a lowering of the activation energy rates of metabolic chemical reactions, an increase in muscle blood flow, a reduction in muscle viscosity, an increase in the sensitivity of nerve receptors, and an increase in the speed of nervous impulses. Warm-up also appears to reduce the incidence and likelihood of sports-related musculoskeletal injuries. Improving flexibility through stretching is another important preparatory activity that has been advocated to improve physical performance. Maintaining good flexibility also aids in the prevention of injuries to the musculoskeletal system. Flexibility is defined as the range of motion possible around a specific joint or a series of articulations and is usually classified as either static or dynamic. Static flexibility refers to the degree to which a joint can be passively moved to the

  14. Enhancement of multispectral thermal infrared images - Decorrelation contrast stretching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Decorrelation contrast stretching is an effective method for displaying information from multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images. The technique involves transformation of the data to principle components ('decorrelation'), independent contrast 'stretching' of data from the new 'decorrelated' image bands, and retransformation of the stretched data back to the approximate original axes, based on the inverse of the principle component rotation. The enhancement is robust in that colors of the same scene components are similar in enhanced images of similar scenes, or the same scene imaged at different times. Decorrelation contrast stretching is reviewed in the context of other enhancements applied to TIR images.

  15. Force fluctuations in stretching a tethered polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Anoop; Vemparala, Satyavani; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    The recently proposed fluctuation relation in unfolding forces [Phys. Rev. E1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.84.060101 84, 060101(R) (2011)] is reexamined taking into account the explicit time dependence of the force distribution. The stretching of a tethered Rouse polymer is exactly solved and the ratio of the probabilities of positive to negative forces is shown to be an exponential in force. Extensive steered molecular dynamics simulations of unfolding of deca alanine peptide confirm the form of fluctuation relation proposed earlier, but with explicit correct time dependence of unfolding forces taken into account. From exact calculations and simulations, a linear dependence of the constant in the exponential of the fluctuation relation on average unfolding forces and inverse temperature is proposed.

  16. Constellation Stretch Goals: Review of Industry Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, John

    2006-01-01

    Many good ideas received based on industry experience: a) Shuttle operations; b) Commercial aircraft production; c) NASA's historical way of doing business; d) Military and commercial programs. Aerospace performed preliminary analysis: a) Potential savings; b) Cost of implementation; c) Performance or other impact/penalties; d) Roadblocks; e) Unintended consequences; f) Bottom line. Significant work ahead for a "Stretch Goal"to become a good, documented requirement: 1) As a group, the relative "value" of goals are uneven; 2) Focused analysis on each goal is required: a) Need to ensure that a new requirement produces the desired consequence; b) It is not certain that some goals will not create problems elsewhere. 3) Individual implementation path needs to be studied: a) Best place to insert requirement (what level, which document); b) Appropriate wording for the requirement. Many goals reflect "best practices" based on lessons learned and may have value beyond near-term CxP requirements process.

  17. Stretched Lens Array Photovoltaic Concentrator Technology Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Solar arrays have been and continue to be the mainstay in providing power to nearly all commercial and government spacecraft. Light from the Sun is directly converted into electrical energy using solar cells. One way to reduce the cost of future space power systems is by minimizing the size and number of expensive solar cells by focusing the sunlight onto smaller cells using concentrator optics. The stretched lens array (SLA) is a unique concept that uses arched Fresnel lens concentrators to focus sunlight onto a line of high-efficiency solar cells located directly beneath. The SLA concept is based on the Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET) design that was used on NASA's New Millennium Deep Space 1 mission. The highly successful asteroid/comet rendezvous mission (1998 to 2001) demonstrated the performance and long-term durability of the SCARLET/SLA solar array design and set the foundation for further improvements to optimize its performance.

  18. Aerothermodynamic properties of stretched flames in enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, D. A.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    Flames are stretched by being pulled along their frontal surface by the flow field in which they reside. Their trajectories tend to approach particle paths, acquiring eventually the role of contact boundaries, -interfaces between the burnt and unburnt medium that may broaden solely as a consequence of diffusion. Fundamental properties of flow fields governing such flames are determined here on the basis of the zero Mach number model, providng a rational method of approach to the computational analysis of combustion fields in enclosures where, besides the aerodynamic properties flow, the thermodynamic process of compression must be taken into account. To illustrate its application, the method is used to reveal the mechanism of formation of a tulip-shape flame in a rectangular enclosure under nonturbulent flow conditions.

  19. Buckling and stretching of thin viscous sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Kiely, Doireann; Breward, Chris; Griffiths, Ian; Howell, Peter; Lange, Ulrich

    2016-11-01

    Thin glass sheets are used in smartphone, battery and semiconductor technology, and may be manufactured by producing a relatively thick glass slab and subsequently redrawing it to a required thickness. The resulting sheets commonly possess undesired centerline ripples and thick edges. We present a mathematical model in which a viscous sheet undergoes redraw in the direction of gravity, and show that, in a sufficiently strong gravitational field, buckling is driven by compression in a region near the bottom of the sheet, and limited by viscous resistance to stretching of the sheet. We use asymptotic analysis in the thin-sheet, low-Reynolds-number limit to determine the centerline profile and growth rate of such a viscous sheet.

  20. Griffiths phases and the stretching of criticality in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Paolo; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Hallmarks of criticality, such as power-laws and scale invariance, have been empirically found in cortical-network dynamics and it has been conjectured that operating at criticality entails functional advantages, such as optimal computational capabilities, memory and large dynamical ranges. As critical behaviour requires a high degree of fine tuning to emerge, some type of self-tuning mechanism needs to be invoked. Here we show that, taking into account the complex hierarchical-modular architecture of cortical networks, the singular critical point is replaced by an extended critical-like region that corresponds--in the jargon of statistical mechanics--to a Griffiths phase. Using computational and analytical approaches, we find Griffiths phases in synthetic hierarchical networks and also in empirical brain networks such as the human connectome and that of Caenorhabditis elegans. Stretched critical regions, stemming from structural disorder, yield enhanced functionality in a generic way, facilitating the task of self-organizing, adaptive and evolutionary mechanisms selecting for criticality.

  1. Modeling the impairment of airway smooth muscle force by stretch

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Imposed length changes of only a small percent produce transient reductions in active force in strips of airway smooth muscle (ASM) due to the temporary detachment of bound cross-bridges caused by the relative motion of the actin and myosin fibers. More dramatic and sustained reductions in active force occur following large changes in length. The Huxley two-state model of skeletal muscle originally proposed in 1957 and later adapted to include a four-state description of cross-bridge kinetics has been widely used to model the former phenomenon, but is unable to account for the latter unless modified to include mechanisms by which the contractile machinery in the ASM cell becomes appropriately rearranged. Even so, the Huxley model itself is based on the assumption that the contractile proteins are all aligned precisely in the direction of bulk force generation, which is not true for ASM. The present study derives a coarse-grained version of the Huxley model that is free of inherent assumptions about cross-bridge orientation. This simplified model recapitulates the key features observed in the force-length behavior of activated strips of ASM and, in addition, provides a mechanistically based way of accounting for the sustained force reductions that occur following large stretch. PMID:25571992

  2. Modeling the impairment of airway smooth muscle force by stretch.

    PubMed

    Bates, Jason H T

    2015-03-15

    Imposed length changes of only a small percent produce transient reductions in active force in strips of airway smooth muscle (ASM) due to the temporary detachment of bound cross-bridges caused by the relative motion of the actin and myosin fibers. More dramatic and sustained reductions in active force occur following large changes in length. The Huxley two-state model of skeletal muscle originally proposed in 1957 and later adapted to include a four-state description of cross-bridge kinetics has been widely used to model the former phenomenon, but is unable to account for the latter unless modified to include mechanisms by which the contractile machinery in the ASM cell becomes appropriately rearranged. Even so, the Huxley model itself is based on the assumption that the contractile proteins are all aligned precisely in the direction of bulk force generation, which is not true for ASM. The present study derives a coarse-grained version of the Huxley model that is free of inherent assumptions about cross-bridge orientation. This simplified model recapitulates the key features observed in the force-length behavior of activated strips of ASM and, in addition, provides a mechanistically based way of accounting for the sustained force reductions that occur following large stretch.

  3. Quantifying stretching and rearrangement in epithelial sheet migration.

    PubMed

    Lee, Rachel M; Kelley, Douglas H; Nordstrom, Kerstin N; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Losert, Wolfgang

    2013-02-25

    Although understanding the collective migration of cells, such as that seen in epithelial sheets, is essential for understanding diseases such as metastatic cancer, this motion is not yet as well characterized as individual cell migration. Here we adapt quantitative metrics used to characterize the flow and deformation of soft matter to contrast different types of motion within a migrating sheet of cells. Using a Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) analysis, we find that - in spite of large fluctuations - the flow field of an epithelial cell sheet is not chaotic. Stretching of a sheet of cells (i.e., positive FTLE) is localized at the leading edge of migration and increases when the cells are more highly stimulated. By decomposing the motion of the cells into affine and non-affine components using the metric D(2)min , we quantify local plastic rearrangements and describe the motion of a group of cells in a novel way. We find an increase in plastic rearrangements with increasing cell densities, whereas inanimate systems tend to exhibit less non-affine rearrangements with increasing density.

  4. Understanding the Relative Flexibility of RNA and DNA Duplexes: Stretching and Twist-Stretch Coupling.

    PubMed

    Bao, Lei; Zhang, Xi; Shi, Ya-Zhou; Wu, Yuan-Yan; Tan, Zhi-Jie

    2017-03-28

    The flexibility of double-stranded (ds) RNA and dsDNA is crucial for their biological functions. Recent experiments have shown that the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA can be distinctively different in the aspects of stretching and twist-stretch coupling. Although various studies have been performed to understand the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA, there is still a lack of deep understanding of the distinctive differences in the flexibility of dsRNA and dsDNA helices as pertains to their stretching and twist-stretch coupling. In this work, we have explored the relative flexibility in stretching and twist-stretch coupling between dsRNA and dsDNA by all-atom molecular dynamics simulations. The calculated stretch modulus and twist-stretch coupling are in good accordance with the existing experiments. Our analyses show that the differences in stretching and twist-stretch coupling between dsRNA and dsDNA helices are mainly attributed to their different (A- and B-form) helical structures. Stronger basepair inclination and slide in dsRNA is responsible for the apparently weaker stretching rigidity versus that of dsDNA, and the opposite twist-stretch coupling for dsRNA and dsDNA is also attributed to the stronger basepair inclination in dsRNA than in dsDNA. Our calculated macroscopic elastic parameters and microscopic analyses are tested and validated by different force fields for both dsRNA and dsDNA.

  5. Cyclic Stretch Facilitates Myogenesis in C2C12 Myoblasts and Rescues Thiazolidinedione-Inhibited Myotube Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya-Ju; Chen, Yun-Ju; Huang, Chia-Wei; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Bu-Miin; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Tsai, Yau-Sheng; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Thiazolidinedione (TZD), a specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist, was developed to control blood glucose in diabetes patients. However, several side effects were reported that increased the risk of heart failure. We used C2C12 myoblasts to investigate the role of PPARs and their transcriptional activity during myotube formation. The role of mechanical stretch during myogenesis was also explored by applying cyclic stretch to the differentiating C2C12 myoblasts with 10% strain deformation at 1 Hz. The myogenesis medium (MM), composed of Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium with 2% horse serum, facilitated myotube formation with increased myosin heavy chain and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) protein expression. The PPARγ protein and PPAR response element (PPRE) promoter activity decreased during MM induction. Cyclic stretch further facilitated the myogenesis in MM with increased α-SMA and decreased PPARγ protein expression and inhibited PPRE promoter activity. Adding a PPARγ agonist (TZD) to the MM stopped the myogenesis and restored the PPRE promoter activity, whereas a PPARγ antagonist (GW9662) significantly increased the myotube number and length. During the myogenesis induction, application of cyclic stretch rescued the inhibitory effects of TZD. These results provide novel perspectives for mechanical stretch to interplay and rescue the dysfunction of myogenesis with the involvement of PPARγ and its target drugs. PMID:27047938

  6. Effects of stretching on upper-body muscular performance.

    PubMed

    Torres, Earlando M; Kraemer, William J; Vingren, Jakob L; Volek, Jeff S; Hatfield, Disa L; Spiering, Barry A; Ho, Jen Yu; Fragala, Maren S; Thomas, Gwendolyn A; Anderson, Jeffrey M; Häkkinen, Keijo; Maresh, Carl M

    2008-07-01

    The purpose of this investigation was to examine the influence of upper-body static stretching and dynamic stretching on upper-body muscular performance. Eleven healthy men, who were National Collegiate Athletic Association Division I track and field athletes (age, 19.6 +/- 1.7 years; body mass, 93.7 +/- 13.8 kg; height, 183.6 +/- 4.6 cm; bench press 1 repetition maximum [1RM], 106.2 +/- 23.0 kg), participated in this study. Over 4 sessions, subjects participated in 4 different stretching protocols (i.e., no stretching, static stretching, dynamic stretching, and combined static and dynamic stretching) in a balanced randomized order followed by 4 tests: 30% of 1 RM bench throw, isometric bench press, overhead medicine ball throw, and lateral medicine ball throw. Depending on the exercise, test peak power (Pmax), peak force (Fmax), peak acceleration (Amax), peak velocity (Vmax), and peak displacement (Dmax) were measured. There were no differences among stretch trials for Pmax, Fmax, Amax, Vmax, or Dmax for the bench throw or for Fmax for the isometric bench press. For the overhead medicine ball throw, there were no differences among stretch trials for Vmax or Dmax. For the lateral medicine ball throw, there was no difference in Vmax among stretch trials; however, Dmax was significantly larger (p stretching on upper-body muscular performance in young adult male athletes, regardless of stretch mode, potentially due to the amount of rest used after stretching before the performances. Since throwing performance was largely unaffected by static or dynamic upper-body stretching, athletes competing in the field events could perform upper-body stretching, if enough time were allowed before the performance. However, prior studies on lower-body musculature have demonstrated dramatic negative effects on speed and power. Therefore, it is

  7. Dysregulation of Toll-Like Receptor 7 Compromises Innate and Adaptive T Cell Responses and Host Resistance to an Attenuated West Nile Virus Infection in Old Mice

    PubMed Central

    Xie, Guorui; Luo, Huanle; Pang, Lan; Peng, Bi-hung; Winkelmann, Evandro; McGruder, Brenna; Hesse, Joseph; Whiteman, Melissa; Campbell, Gerald; Milligan, Gregg N.; Cong, Yingzi; Barrett, Alan D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The elderly are known to have enhanced susceptibility to infections and an impaired capacity to respond to vaccination. West Nile virus (WNV), a mosquito-borne flavivirus, has induced severe neurological symptoms, mostly in the elderly population. No vaccines are available for human use. Recent work showed that an attenuated WNV, a nonstructural (NS) 4B-P38G mutant, induced no lethality but strong immune responses in young (6- to 10-week-old) mice. While studying protective efficacy, we found unexpectedly that old (21- to 22-month) mice were susceptible to WNV NS4B-P38G mutant infection but were protected from subsequent lethal wild-type WNV challenge. Compared to responses in young mice, the NS4B-P38G mutant triggered higher inflammatory cytokine and interleukin-10 (IL-10) production, a delayed γδ T cell expansion, and lower antibody and WNV-specific T cell responses in old mice. Toll-like receptor 7 (TLR7) is expressed on multiple types of cells. Impaired TLR7 signaling in old mice led to dendritic cell (DC) antigen-presenting function compromise and a reduced γδ T cell and regulatory T cell (Treg) expansion during NS4B-P38G mutant infection. R848, a TLR7 agonist, decreased host vulnerability in NS4B-P38G-infected old mice by enhancing γδ T cell and Treg expansion and the antigen-presenting capacity of DCs, thereby promoting T cell responses. In summary, our results suggest that dysregulation of TLR7 partially contributes to impaired innate and adaptive T cell responses and an enhanced vulnerability in old mice during WNV NS4B-P38G mutant infection. R848 increases the safety and efficacy during immunization of old mice with the WNV NS4B-P38G mutant. IMPORTANCE The elderly are known to have enhanced susceptibility to infections and an impaired capacity to respond to vaccination. West Nile virus (WNV), an emerging mosquito-borne flavivirus, has induced severe neurological symptoms more frequently in the elderly population. No vaccines are available

  8. Effect of participants' static stretching knowledge or deception on the responses to prolonged stretching.

    PubMed

    Janes, W C Ian; Snow, Brandon B G; Watkins, Caisie E; Noseworthy, Elecia A L; Reid, Jonathan C; Behm, David G

    2016-10-01

    Much of the static stretching (SS) literature reports performance impairments with prolonged SS. However, it has been acknowledged that a limitation of these studies is participants' knowledge or bias. Since many participants have knowledge of the literature, their performance may be subconsciously influenced by expectations. Hence, the objective of this study was to examine the effect of stretching knowledge or deception on subsequent force output following SS. Two groups of male participants who were either aware (BIASED: 14) or unaware (DECEPTION: 14) of the SS literature participated. Unaware participants were misinformed that SS increases force production. Testing involved maximal voluntary isometric contractions (MVC) of the quadriceps and hamstrings at pre-, post-, and 5 min post-intervention (three 30-s passive hamstring stretches to the point of discomfort with 30-s rest intervals) or control. While the DECEPTION group displayed impaired knee flexion force (p = 0.04; 3.6% and 10.4%) following hamstrings SS, there was no significant impairment with the BIASED (-1.1% and +0.9%) group. Both groups exhibited hamstrings F200 (force produced in the first 200 ms) impairments following SS. Whereas BIASED participants exhibited an overall decrease (p < 0.05; 1.8% and 4.2%) in knee extension MVC, DECEPTION participants showed (p = 0.005; 8.8% and 5.1%) force increases. The quadriceps F200 was not significantly affected with the BIASED group but overall there were 4.5% and 8.7% F200 impairments at 1 and 5 min post-intervention (p = 0.05) with the DECEPTION group. Thus while deception resulted in enhanced quadriceps muscle force output, there was no knowledge or deception advantage when stretching the hamstrings.

  9. Role of lateral parabrachial nucleus in the inhibition of water intake produced by right atrial stretch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohman, Lynne E.

    1995-01-01

    Rats with either bilateral electrolytic or sham lesions of the ventrolateral portion of the lateral parabrachial nucleus (VLLPBN) were implanted with latex balloons that lay at the right superior vena cava/atrial junction (RSVC/AJ). Water intake in response to isoproterenol was measured both with and without inflation of the balloon. Water intake of the sham-lesioned rats was significantly depressed by balloon inflation during the first hour of the experiment. In contrast, water intake in the VLLPBN-lesioned rats was unaffected by balloon inflation. These results suggest that the VLLPBN is involved in the processing of afferent input from stretch-activated RSVC/AJ receptors.

  10. Spicing up the sensation of stretch: TRPV1 controls mechanosensitive Piezo channels.

    PubMed

    Altier, Christophe

    2015-02-10

    Piezo proteins--a family of mammalian cation-selective ion channels that respond to mechanical stretch--are molecular mediators of biological processes, including vascular tone, hearing, touch, and pain. In this issue of Science Signaling, Rohacs and colleagues demonstrate that activation of the heat-sensitive transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1), another cation channel, inhibits Piezo channels through a calcium-induced depletion of phosphoinositides. This regulation could contribute to the cellular mechanisms by which the TRPV1 activator capsaicin mitigates mechanical hypersensitivity.

  11. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B.

    2017-01-01

    The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail, and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component. PMID:28298835

  12. The stretch reflex and the contributions of C David Marsden.

    PubMed

    Bhattacharyya, Kalyan B

    2017-01-01

    The stretch reflex or myotatic reflex refers to the contraction of a muscle in response to its passive stretching by increasing its contractility as long as the stretch is within physiological limits. For ages, it was thought that the stretch reflex was of short latency and it was synonymous with the tendon reflex, subserving the same spinal reflex arc. However, disparities in the status of the two reflexes in certain clinical situations led Marsden and his collaborators to carry out a series of experiments that helped to establish that the two reflexes had different pathways. That the two reflexes are dissociated has been proved by the fact that the stretch reflex and the tendon reflex, elicited by stimulation of the same muscle, have different latencies, that of the stretch reflex being considerably longer. They hypothesized that the stretch reflex had a transcortical course before it reached the spinal motor neurons for final firing. Additionally, the phenomenon of stimulus-sensitive cortical myoclonus lent further evidence to the presence of the transcortical loop where the EEG correlate preceded the EMG discharge. This concept has been worked out by later neurologists in great detail, and the general consensus is that indeed, the stretch reflex is endowed with a conspicuous transcortical component.

  13. A Stretching Device for High Resolution Live-Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lawrence; Mathieu, Pattie S.; Helmke, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Several custom-built and commercially available devices are available to investigate cellular responses to substrate strain. However, analysis of structural dynamics by microscopy in living cells during stretch is not readily feasible. We describe a novel stretch device optimized for high-resolution live-cell imaging. The unit assembles onto standard inverted microscopes and applies constant magnitude or cyclic stretch at physiological magnitudes to cultured cells on elastic membranes. Interchangeable modular indenters enable delivery of equibiaxial and uniaxial stretch profiles. Strain analysis performed by tracking fluorescent microspheres adhered onto the substrate demonstrated reproducible application of stretch profiles. In endothelial cells transiently expressing EGFP-vimentin and paxillin-DsRed2 and subjected to constant magnitude equibiaxial stretch, the 2-D strain tensor demonstrated efficient transmission through the extracellular matrix and focal adhesions. Decreased transmission to the intermediate filament network was measured, and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of maximum stretch magnitude revealed discrete sites of strain focusing. Spatial correlation of vimentin and paxillin displacement vectors provided an estimate of the extent of mechanical coupling between the structures. Interestingly, switching the spatial profile of substrate strain reveals that actin-mediated edge ruffling is not desensitized to repeated mechano-stimulation. These initial observations show that the stretch device is compatible with live-cell microscopy and is a novel tool for measuring dynamic structural remodeling under mechanical strain. PMID:20195762

  14. Does Postexercise Static Stretching Alleviate Delayed Muscle Soreness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buroker, Katherine C.; Schwane, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Because many experts recommend stretching after exercise to relieve muscle soreness, 23 subjects performed a 30-minute step test to induce delayed muscle soreness. There was neither temporary relief of pain immediately after stretching nor a reduction in pain during the 3-day postexercise period. (Author/SM)

  15. The history dependence of force production in mammalian skeletal muscle following stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles.

    PubMed

    Herzog, W; Leonard, T R

    2000-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the history dependence of force production during and following stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles in mammalian skeletal muscle. Thirty-three different isometric, stretch, shortening, stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch experiments were preformed in cat soleus (n=8) using previously established methods. Stretch-shortening and shortening-stretch cycles are not commutative with respect to the isometric forces following the length changes. Whereas force depression following shortening is virtually unaffected by previous stretching of the muscle, force enhancement following stretch depends in a dose-dependent manner on the amount of muscle shortening preceding the stretch. The history dependence of isometric force following shortening-stretch cycles can conveniently be modelled using an elastic (compressive and tensile) element that engages at the length of muscle activation. Such an "elastic" mechanism has been proposed by Edman and Tsuchiya (1996) (Edman, K.A. P., Tsuchiya, T., 1996. Strain of passive elements during force enhancement by stretch in frog mucle fibres. Journal of Physiology 490. 1, 191-205) based on experimental observations, and has been implemented theoretically in a rheological model of muscle (Forcinito et al., 1997) (Forcinito, M., Epstein, M., Herzog, W., 1997. Theoretical considerations on myofibril stiffness. Biophysics Journal 72, 1278-1286). The history dependence of isometric force following stretch-shortening cycles appears independent of the stretch preceding the shortening, except perhaps, if stretching occurs at very high speeds (i.e. 6-10 times fibre length per second). The results of this study are hard to reconcile with the two major mechanisms associated with history dependence of force production: sarcomere length non-uniformity (Edman et al., 1993) and stress-induced cross-bridge inhibition (Maréchal and Plaghki, 1979) (Maréchal, G., Plaghki, L., 1979. The deficit of

  16. Bruxism: Is There an Indication for Muscle-Stretching Exercises?

    PubMed

    Gouw, Simone; de Wijer, Anton; Creugers, Nico Hj; Kalaykova, Stanimira I

    Bruxism is a common phenomenon involving repetitive activation of the masticatory muscles. Muscle-stretching exercises are a recommended part of several international guidelines for musculoskeletal disorders and may be effective in management of the jaw muscle activity that gives rise to bruxism. However, most studies of muscle-stretching exercises have mainly focused on their influence on performance (eg, range of motion, coordination, and muscle strength) of the limb or trunk muscles of healthy individuals or individuals with sports-related injuries. Very few have investigated stretching of the human masticatory muscles and none muscle-stretching exercises in the management of (sleep) bruxism. This article reviews the literature on muscle-stretching exercises and their potential role in the management of sleep bruxism or its consequences in the musculoskeletal system.

  17. Flows induced by exponential stretching and shearing plate motions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weidman, Patrick

    2016-11-01

    Boundary-layer solutions for the flow induced by an exponentially stretching surface also sheared in its own plane are given. Prior to this study no similarity solutions have been reported for flows generated by exponentially sheared surfaces concomitant with surface stretching in any form. The method of solution is self-similarity. The results found here are intimately related to those of Magyari and Keller ["Heat and mass transfer in the boundary layers on an exponentially stretching continuous surface," J. Phys. D: Appl. Phys. 32, 577-585 (1999)] who studied the motion and heat transfer induced by an exponentially stretching plate. In addition to two particular cases reported here, a third situation is found where an exponentially stretching surface admits a concomitant arbitrary streamwise shearing motion.

  18. Flow of viscous fluid along a nonlinearly stretching curved surface

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanni, K. M.; Asghar, S.; Jalil, M.; Okechi, N. F.

    This paper focuses on the flow of viscous fluid over a curved surface stretching with nonlinear power-law velocity. The boundary layer equations are transformed into ordinary differential equations using suitable non-dimensional transformations. These equations are solved numerically using shooting and Runge-Kutta (RK) methods. The impact of non-dimensional radius of curvature and power-law indices on the velocity field, the pressure and the skin friction coefficient are investigated. The results deduced for linear stretching are compared with the published work to validate the numerical procedure. The important findings are: (a) Slight variation of the curvature of the stretching sheet increases the velocity and the skin friction coefficient significantly. (b) The nonlinearity of the stretching velocity increases the skin friction. (c) The results for linear stretching and the flat surface are the special cases of this problem.

  19. Experimental Investigation of Process Conditions in Injection Stretch Blow Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomeia, Y.; Menary, G.; Armstrong, C. G.

    2007-04-01

    Various processing parameters influence the final product properties in the stretch blow moulding process. These properties are highly dependent on the balance between the stretching of the polymer and blowing times as well as the level of the pressure inside the bottle. A data acquisition system capable of accurately measuring the process conditions within an industrial environment is discussed. Experimental work has been conducted on an industrial stretch blow moulding machine by means of replacing the original stretch rod with one that contains a force cell and a pressure transducer. Correlation between the stretching force, displacement of the rod and the pressure inside the bottle give a better understanding of the process and should allow a more precise final element simulation of the process to be developed.

  20. Dielectrophoretic Stretching of DNA Tethered to a Fiber Tip

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S.; Li, Jiali

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under AC electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, AC frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the dielectrophoretic force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules. PMID:25741602

  1. Effect of gonadectomy of biochemical indices of striatal dopamine D/sub 1/ and D/sub 2/ receptors, their activity and adaptive response to antipsychotic drug treatment in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrow, T.L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Endogenous gonadal steroids in male and female rats were removed by gonadectomy (Gnx). Striatal D/sub 1/ receptors and their activity were characterized by (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding parameters and D/sub 1/ receptor-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in striatal membranes. Striatal D/sub 2/ receptors and their activity were characterized by (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters in striatal slices and D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activity in striatal membranes. Sub-chronic D/sub 2/ receptor blockade consisted of the administration of the D/sub 2/ specific antagonist sulpiride (20 mg/kg) or vehicle i.p., 2x daily for 21 days followed by a 3 day drug withdrawal period. Gnx of female rats had no affect on striatal D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity nor on the striatal D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activity. Sub-chronic sulpiride treatment produced no adaptive changes in D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in sham-operated or Gnx female rats. Gnx of male rats produced a statistically significant 10% decrease in striatal (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding sites with no change in D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and no change in striatal(/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. Sub-chronic sulpiride treatment of sham-operated male rats produced a desensitization of the striatal D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with no change in the number of (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding sites and no change in (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. Gnx of male rats blocked the development of the striatal D/sub 1/ receptor desensitization response elicited by sub-chronic sulpiride treatment, without affecting striatal (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 or (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. We have demonstrated that sub-chronic D/sub 2/ receptor blockade in sham-operated male rats results in the desensitization of striatal D/sub 1/ receptor activity.

  2. Pre-exercise stretching does not impact upon running economy.

    PubMed

    Hayes, Philip R; Walker, Adrian

    2007-11-01

    Pre-exercise stretching has been widely reported to reduce performance in tasks requiring maximal or near-maximal force or torque. The purpose of this study was to compare the effects of 3 different pre-exercise stretching routines on running economy. Seven competitive male middle and long-distance runners (mean +/- SD) age: 32.5 +/- 7.7 years; height: 175.0 +/- 8.8 cm; mass: 67.8 +/- 8.6 kg; V(.-)O2max: 66.8 +/- 7.0 ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)) volunteered to participate in this study. Each participant completed 4 different pre-exercise conditions: (a) a control condition, (b) static stretching, (c) progressive static stretching, and (d) dynamic stretching. Each stretching routine consisted of 2 x 30-second stretches for each of 5 exercises. Dependent variables measured were sit and reach test before and after each pre-exercise routine, running economy (ml x kg(-1) x km(-1)), and steady-state oxygen uptake (ml x kg(-1) x min(-1)), which were measured during the final 3 minutes of a 10-minute run below lactate threshold. All 3 stretching routines resulted in an increase in the range of movement (p = 0.008). There was no change in either running economy (p = 0.915) or steady-state V(.-)O2 (p = 0.943). The lack of change in running economy was most likely because it was assessed after a period of submaximal running, which may have masked any effects from the stretching protocols. Previously reported reductions in performance have been attributed to reduced motor unit activation, presumably IIX. In this study, these motor units were likely not to have been recruited; this may explain the unimpaired performance. This study suggests that pre-exercise stretching has no impact upon running economy or submaximal exercise oxygen cost.

  3. Single, stretched membrane, structural module experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.L.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes tests done on stretched-membrane heliostats used to reflect solar radiation onto a central receiver. The tests were used to validate prior analysis and mathematical models developed to describe module performance. The modules tested were three meters in diameter and had reflective polymer film laminated to the membrane. The frames were supported at three points equally spaced around the ring. Three modules were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended at the bottom support, two were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended from the upper mounts, and one was rigidly attached with its weight suspended at the bottom mount. By varying the membrane tension we could simulate a uniform wind loading normal to the mirror's surface. A video camera 15+ meters away from the mirror recorded the virtual image of a target grid as reflected by the mirrors' surface. The image was digitized and stored on a microcomputer. Using the law of reflection and analytic geometry, we computed the surface slopes of a sampling of points on the surface. The dominant module response was consistent with prior SERI analyses. The simple analytical model is quite adequate for designing and sizing single-membrane modules if the initial imperfections and their amplification are appropriately controlled. To avoid potential problems resulting from the fundamentally n = 2 deformation phenomena, we advise using either relatively stiffer ring frames or more than three support points.

  4. Stretched Lens Array Squarerigger (SLASR) Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark; McDanal, A.J.; Howell, Joe; Lollar, Louis; Carrington, Connie; Hoppe, David; Piszczor, Michael; Suszuki, Nantel; Eskenazi, Michael; Aiken, Dan; Fulton, Michael; Brandhorst, Henry; Schuller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Since April 2005, our team has been underway on a competitively awarded program sponsored by NASA s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to develop, refine, and mature the unique solar array technology known as Stretched Lens Array SquareRigger (SLASR). SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, including the following: Areal Power Density = 300 W/m2 (2005) - 400 W/m2 (2008 Target) Specific Power = 300 W/kg (2005) - 500 W/kg (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Stowed Power = 80 kW/cu m (2005) - 120 kW/m3 (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Scalable Array Capacity = 100 s of W s to 100 s of kW s Super-Insulated Small Cell Circuit = High-Voltage (300-600 V) Operation at Low Mass Penalty Super-Shielded Small Cell Circuit = Excellent Radiation Hardness at Low Mass Penalty 85% Cell Area Savings = 75% Lower Array Cost per Watt than One-Sun Array Modular, Scalable, & Mass-Producible at MW s per Year Using Existing Processes and Capacities

  5. Global stability of gravitationally stretched capillary jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rubio-Rubio, Mariano; Sevilla, Alejandro; Gordillo, José Manuel

    2013-11-01

    We analyze the global linear stability of capillary jets stretched by gravity both experimentally and theoretically, extending the work by Sauter & Buggisch (J. Fluid Mech. vol. 533, 2005, pp. 237-257). Our results reveal the essential stabilizing role played by the axial curvature of the jet, the latter effect being especially relevant for injectors with a large diameter. The theoretical description, based on the one-dimensional mass and momentum equations retaining the exact expression for the interfacial curvature, accurately predicts the onset of jet self-excited oscillations experimentally observed for wide ranges of liquid viscosity and injector diameter. The marginal self-sustained oscillations observed in the experiments are shown to correspond to the excitation of the leading global mode of the jet. The model developed in the present work shows better agreement with the experimental jetting-dripping transition events than those available in the literature, thus allowing us to conclude that, surprisingly, the size of the steady threads produced at a given distance from the exit can be reduced by increasing the nozzle diameter. The proposed formulation allows to describe the inviscid limit, and experiments are being performed to study this distinguished case. Supported by Spanish MINECO under projects DPI 2011-28356-C03-01 and DPI 2011-28356-C03-02.

  6. Acute effects of muscle stretching on physical performance, range of motion, and injury incidence in healthy active individuals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Behm, David G; Blazevich, Anthony J; Kay, Anthony D; McHugh, Malachy

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been a shift from static stretching (SS) or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching within a warm-up to a greater emphasis on dynamic stretching (DS). The objective of this review was to compare the effects of SS, DS, and PNF on performance, range of motion (ROM), and injury prevention. The data indicated that SS- (-3.7%), DS- (+1.3%), and PNF- (-4.4%) induced performance changes were small to moderate with testing performed immediately after stretching, possibly because of reduced muscle activation after SS and PNF. A dose-response relationship illustrated greater performance deficits with ≥60 s (-4.6%) than with <60 s (-1.1%) SS per muscle group. Conversely, SS demonstrated a moderate (2.2%) performance benefit at longer muscle lengths. Testing was performed on average 3-5 min after stretching, and most studies did not include poststretching dynamic activities; when these activities were included, no clear performance effect was observed. DS produced small-to-moderate performance improvements when completed within minutes of physical activity. SS and PNF stretching had no clear effect on all-cause or overuse injuries; no data are available for DS. All forms of training induced ROM improvements, typically lasting <30 min. Changes may result from acute reductions in muscle and tendon stiffness or from neural adaptations causing an improved stretch tolerance. Considering the small-to-moderate changes immediately after stretching and the study limitations, stretching within a warm-up that includes additional poststretching dynamic activity is recommended for reducing muscle injuries and increasing joint ROM with inconsequential effects on subsequent athletic performance.

  7. Derivation of stretched exponential tap density equations of granular powders.

    PubMed

    Hao, Tian

    2015-04-21

    The tap density of granular powders was found to be better fitted with the stretched exponential law. In our previous work, the stretched exponential tap density equations were derived with the rate process theory and free volume concept, under the assumption that the particle packing rate during the tapping process obeys the stretched Arrhenius equation, which, however, has an empirical origin. In this article, the above assumption is eliminated and attempts are made to obtain the stretched exponential tap density equations from very fundamental bases. In a vertical tapping process, the probability of particles attaining certain energy states is assumed to obey the Boltzmann distribution and particles traveling from one site to another are assumed to follow a very common memoryless random exponential law. The stretched exponential tap density equations are thus derived and all parameters acquire clear physical meanings. The most important parameter, the stretched exponential, is demonstrated to correlate with the interparticle forces: a small value may indicate a strong adhesive or cohesive interaction. Therefore, the stretched exponential could be a better indicator for powder flowability correlated with particle interactions as well.

  8. Cyclical stretch induces structural changes in atrial myocytes.

    PubMed

    De Jong, Anne Margreet; Maass, Alexander H; Oberdorf-Maass, Silke U; De Boer, Rudolf A; Van Gilst, Wiek H; Van Gelder, Isabelle C

    2013-06-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AF) often occurs in the presence of an underlying disease. These underlying diseases cause atrial remodelling, which make the atria more susceptible to AF. Stretch is an important mediator in the remodelling process. The aim of this study was to develop an atrial cell culture model mimicking remodelling due to atrial pressure overload. Neonatal rat atrial cardiomyocytes (NRAM) were cultured and subjected to cyclical stretch on elastic membranes. Stretching with 1 Hz and 15% elongation for 30 min. resulted in increased expression of immediate early genes and phosphorylation of Erk and p38. A 24-hr stretch period resulted in hypertrophy-related changes including increased cell diameter, reinduction of the foetal gene program and cell death. No evidence of apoptosis was observed. Expression of atrial natriuretic peptide, brain natriuretic peptide and growth differentiation factor-15 was increased, and calcineurin signalling was activated. Expression of several potassium channels was decreased, suggesting electrical remodelling. Atrial stretch-induced change in skeletal α-actin expression was inhibited by pravastatin, but not by eplerenone or losartan. Stretch of NRAM results in elevation of stress markers, changes related to hypertrophy and dedifferentiation, electrical remodelling and cell death. This model can contribute to investigating the mechanisms involved in the remodelling process caused by stretch and to the testing of pharmaceutical agents.

  9. Stretch-activated pathways and left ventricular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Force, Thomas; Michael, Ashour; Kilter, Heiko; Haq, Syed

    2002-12-01

    Stretch of cardiomyocytes in vivo occurs in response to a number of stimuli, including pressure or volume overload, but it is most clearly seen following relatively large, acute myocardial infarctions. It is in this setting that stretch is most clearly related to the pathogenesis of heart failure. Stretch of the remote, noninfacted myocardium leads to the activation of a large number of cellular signal transduction pathways, which sets into motion a series of what are designed to be compensatory responses to the increased wall stress on the surviving myocardium. Herein, we will discuss the cellular pathways activated by cell stretch, which appear to trigger the initial steps in the pathogenesis of ventricular dilatation following myocardial infarction. We will discuss what is known of the "stretch sensors," which convert the mechanical stimulus into molecular signals. I will then introduce the specific cellular signaling pathways activated by stretch and discuss the evidence for their involvement in remodeling. Since many of these pathways will be covered in more detail in specific sections to follow, this will serve as an introduction to stretch-activated signaling. Finally, we will briefly examine later phases of the response, including advanced heart failure. The goal is to identify molecular modulators that might serve as targets for pharmacologic or molecular intervention.

  10. No difference in pre- and postexercise stretching on flexibility.

    PubMed

    Beedle, Barry B; Leydig, Summer N; Carnucci, Jennifer M

    2007-08-01

    According to the American College of Sports Medicine (1), there is limited information about when to stretch during an exercise session. The purpose of this study was to determine if the placement of static stretching, either before or after a workout, would affect flexibility in the hip, knee, and ankle. Thirty college-age men (n = 12) and women (n = 18) volunteered to participate. Nine were highly trained, 13 were moderately trained, and 8 were sedentary. Subjects participated in both treatments, which were randomly assigned and were 48-72 hours apart. In one treatment, subjects warmed-up first by walking on a treadmill for 5 minutes at approximately 50% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, and then performed 3 static stretches: quadriceps, hamstrings, and calf muscles. Each stretch was held 3 times, 15 seconds each. Next, flexibility measurements were determined for the hip, hamstrings, and ankle using a goniometer. The other treatment consisted of performing 20 minutes of walking or jogging at a moderate intensity, then the same stretching exercises were performed and the same flexibility measurements were taken. Reliability coefficients ranged from 0.90-0.96. There were no significant differences in any of the flexibility measurements except for hip flexibility, which approached significance (p = 0.06) and therefore favored stretching after the workout. The placement of stretching, before or after a workout, does not make a difference in its effect on flexibility.

  11. Calf stretching in non-weight bearing versus weight bearing.

    PubMed

    Dinh, N V; Freeman, H; Granger, J; Wong, S; Johanson, M

    2011-03-01

    Limited ankle dorsiflexion passive range of motion (DF PROM) has been associated with lower extremity overuse injuries. Therefore, clinicians often prescribe stretching exercises to increase ankle DF PROM. However, there is limited evidence to indicate if any particular gastrocnemius stretching exercise results in greater improvement in DF PROM. The aim of this study was to determine if gastrocnemius stretching in non-weight bearing (NWB) or weight bearing (WB) results in a greater increase of ankle DF PROM. 28 healthy volunteers, aged 18-55 years, who exhibited less than 10 degrees of ankle DF PROM completed the study. Participants were randomized into 2 stretching groups: NWB and WB. Both groups completed a 3-week home gastrocnemius stretching program, consisting of 5 repetitions held for 30 s each, 2 times daily. Participants' ankle DF PROM was measured with a blinded standard goniometer in NWB and WB positions before and after participation in a 3-week home gastrocnemius stretching program. Two 3-way mixed model ANOVAs demonstrated no significant difference in ankle DF PROM between the NWB and WB groups for either the NWB measurement condition (p=0.49) or WB measurement condition (p=0.86). Gastrocnemius stretching exercises performed in NWB or WB were equally effective in increasing ankle DF PROM.

  12. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Perry L; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Re(λ)=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  13. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Reλ=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  14. Isometric Stretch Alters Vascular Reactivity of Mouse Aortic Segments

    PubMed Central

    De Moudt, Sofie; Leloup, Arthur; Van Hove, Cor; De Meyer, Guido; Fransen, Paul

    2017-01-01

    Most vaso-reactive studies in mouse aortic segments are performed in isometric conditions and at an optimal preload, which is the preload corresponding to a maximal contraction by non-receptor or receptor-mediated stimulation. In general, this optimal preload ranges from about 1.2 to 8.0 mN/mm, which according to Laplace's law roughly correlates with transmural pressures of 10–65 mmHg. For physiologic transmural pressures around 100 mmHg, preloads of 15.0 mN/mm should be implemented. The present study aimed to compare vascular reactivity of 2 mm mouse (C57Bl6) aortic segments preloaded at optimal (8.0 mN/mm) vs. (patho) physiological (10.0–32.5 mN/mm) preload. Voltage-dependent contractions of aortic segments, induced by increasing extracellular K+, and contractions by α1-adrenergic stimulation with phenylephrine (PE) were studied at these preloads in the absence and presence of L-NAME to inhibit basal release of NO from endothelial cells (EC). In the absence of basal NO release and with higher than optimal preload, contractions evoked by depolarization or PE were attenuated, whereas in the presence of basal release of NO PE-, but not depolarization-induced contractions were preload-independent. Phasic contractions by PE, as measured in the absence of external Ca2+, were decreased at higher than optimal preload suggestive for a lower contractile SR Ca2+ content at physiological preload. Further, in the presence of external Ca2+, contractions by Ca2+ influx via voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels were preload-independent, whereas non-selective cation channel-mediated contractions were increased. The latter contractions were very sensitive to the basal release of NO, which itself seemed to be preload-independent. Relaxation by endogenous NO (acetylcholine) of aortic segments pre-contracted with PE was preload-independent, whereas relaxation by exogenous NO (diethylamine NONOate) displayed higher sensitivity at high preload. Results indicated that stretching aortic

  15. Optimal Stretching in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion Systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevins, Thomas D.; Kelley, Douglas H.

    2016-10-01

    We investigate growth of the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in chaotic, time-varying flows. In slow flows, reacted regions tend to lie near vortex edges, whereas fast flows restrict reacted regions to vortex cores. We show that reacted regions travel toward vortex centers faster as flow speed increases, but nonreactive scalars do not. For either slow or fast flows, reaction is promoted by the same optimal range of the local advective stretching, but stronger stretching causes reaction blowout and can hinder reaction from spreading. We hypothesize that optimal stretching and blowout occur in many advection-diffusion-reaction systems, perhaps creating ecological niches for phytoplankton in the ocean.

  16. Optimal Stretching in Advection-Reaction-Diffusion Systems.

    PubMed

    Nevins, Thomas D; Kelley, Douglas H

    2016-10-14

    We investigate growth of the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky reaction in chaotic, time-varying flows. In slow flows, reacted regions tend to lie near vortex edges, whereas fast flows restrict reacted regions to vortex cores. We show that reacted regions travel toward vortex centers faster as flow speed increases, but nonreactive scalars do not. For either slow or fast flows, reaction is promoted by the same optimal range of the local advective stretching, but stronger stretching causes reaction blowout and can hinder reaction from spreading. We hypothesize that optimal stretching and blowout occur in many advection-diffusion-reaction systems, perhaps creating ecological niches for phytoplankton in the ocean.

  17. Characterizing the stretch-flangeability of hot rolled multiphase steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, N.; Butcher, C.; Worswick, M.; Gao, J.

    2013-12-16

    Hole expansion tests are commonly used to characterize the edge stretching limit of a material. Traditionally, a conical punch is used to expand a punched hole until a through-thickness crack appears. However, many automotive stretch flanging operations involve in-plane edge stretching that is best captured with a flat punch. In this paper, hole expansion tests were carried out on two different hot-rolled multiphase steels using both flat and conical punches. The fracture mechanisms for both punch types were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  18. Microstructural evolution of PET under stretching and during stretch blow moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Martine; Billon, Noëlle

    2007-04-01

    Strain induced crystallisation of PET designed for stretch blow molding is studied combining well-controlled tensile tests and free blowing on a stretch blow prototype. Microstructure evolution is followed by WAXS and SAXS. Observations on blown parts clearly show that the microstructure can differ along the bottle and from processing conditions to another. Difference can be observed on crystalline orientation, periodic arrangement at the level of lamellae and long period. Range of long period, 8.5 to 13 nm is in agreement with literature. In certain case lamellar organisation disappears. Despite of high level of strain and evidence for strain hardening to occur during blowing no perfect crystalline pattern is observed, except in very thick zones. Interrupted tensile tests followed by quenching demonstrates that strain hardening is not correlated to prefect crystallisation. Microstructure clearly depends on the three parameters: temperature, strain rate and strain. It is concluded that strain hardening is mainly controlled by first stages of crystallisation and that actual crystallisation occurs during a following relaxation step. This later is then highly dependent upon cooling step.

  19. Coupling of CH stretching and bending vibrations in trihalomethanes

    SciTech Connect

    Wong, J.S.; Green, W.H. Jr.; Cheng, C.; Moore, C.B.

    1987-06-01

    The vibrational spectra of HCCl/sub 3/, HCF/sub 3/, HCCl/sub 2/F, and HCClF/sub 2/ have been measured in the vapor from the CH stretching fundamental through to the fifth overtone (i.e., v/sub 1/ = 6, where v/sub 1/ is the number of quanta in the CH stretching mode), using FTIR and photoacoustic spectrometers. Instead of a single strong CH overtone progression, additional strong bands attributable to Fermi-resonant combination tones are prominent in the spectra. The CH stretch is found to be most strongly coupled to the CH bending mode and much less strongly coupled to the heavy atom motions. The resolved band structures are analyzed in the following paper to give quantitative stretch--bend coupling constants for these CH oscillators.

  20. Guidelines for Stretch Flanging Advanced High Strength Steels

    SciTech Connect

    Sriram, S.; Chintamani, J.

    2005-08-05

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are currently being considered for use in closure and structural panels in the automotive industry because of their high potential for affordable weight reduction and improved performance. AHSS such as dual phase steels are currently being used in some vehicle platforms. From a manufacturing perspective, stretch flanging during stamping is an important deformation mode requiring careful consideration of geometry and the die process. This paper presents some geometric and process guidelines for stretch flanging AHSS. Hole expansion experiments were conducted to determine the failure limit for a sheared edge condition. Effects of punching clearance, prestrain and prior strain path on hole expansion were explored in these experiments. In addition, dynamic explicit FE calculations using LS-DYNA were also conducted for a typical stretch flange by varying some key geometric parameters. The experimental and FEA results were then analyzed to yield process and geometric guidelines to enable successful stretch flanging of AHSS.

  1. The weak fundamental NH-stretching transition in amines.

    PubMed

    Schrøder, Sidsel D; Hansen, Anne S; Wallberg, Jens H; Nielsen, Anne R; Du, Lin; Kjaergaard, Henrik G

    2017-02-15

    Absolute intensities of NH-stretching fundamental and overtone transitions of gas phase aniline, methylamine, ethylamine, cyclopropylamine, methylethylamine, diethylamine and pyrrolidine have been measured with long path length conventional absorption spectroscopy. To support the assignments of NH-stretching transitions, transition frequencies and intensities were calculated with the local mode model using ab initio calculated local mode parameters and dipole moment functions obtained at the CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 level of theory. For aniline, the absolute intensities of the NH-stretching transitions show the typical decrease of approximately an order of magnitude for each successive vibrational excitation. For methylamine, ethylamine, cyclopropylamine, methylethylamine, diethylamine and pyrrolidine, the observed absolute intensities of the fundamental NH-stretching transition is weak and of similar strength or even weaker than the corresponding first overtone transition. Characteristic for the amines with a normal fundamental intensity is a conjugated double bond next to the amine group.

  2. Development of Internal Fine Structure in Stretched Rubber Vulcanizates

    SciTech Connect

    M Tosaka; S Toki; J Che; L Rong; B Hsiao

    2011-12-31

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) pattern and tensile stress during relaxation of stretched rubber vulcanizates (synthetic polyisoprene) were measured simultaneously at room temperature and at 0 C. The samples were quickly stretched to the prefixed strain and then allowed to relax for 1 h. In every SAXS pattern, the intensity distribution was elongated along the equator, indicating the formation of structures elongated in the stretching direction. The so-called two-spots pattern corresponding to the long period of stacked lamellar crystals did not appear even when the critical strain to induce crystallization was exceeded. On the other hand, even below the critical strain, additional development of equatorial streaks was detected in the differential SAXS patterns. This result suggests the growth of the density fluctuation elongated in the stretching direction, which is not directly related to strain-induced crystallization.

  3. The weak fundamental NH-stretching transition in amines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schrøder, Sidsel D.; Hansen, Anne S.; Wallberg, Jens H.; Nielsen, Anne R.; Du, Lin; Kjaergaard, Henrik G.

    2017-02-01

    Absolute intensities of NH-stretching fundamental and overtone transitions of gas phase aniline, methylamine, ethylamine, cyclopropylamine, methylethylamine, diethylamine and pyrrolidine have been measured with long path length conventional absorption spectroscopy. To support the assignments of NH-stretching transitions, transition frequencies and intensities were calculated with the local mode model using ab initio calculated local mode parameters and dipole moment functions obtained at the CCSD(T)-F12a/VDZ-F12 level of theory. For aniline, the absolute intensities of the NH-stretching transitions show the typical decrease of approximately an order of magnitude for each successive vibrational excitation. For methylamine, ethylamine, cyclopropylamine, methylethylamine, diethylamine and pyrrolidine, the observed absolute intensities of the fundamental NH-stretching transition is weak and of similar strength or even weaker than the corresponding first overtone transition. Characteristic for the amines with a normal fundamental intensity is a conjugated double bond next to the amine group.

  4. Guidelines for Stretch Flanging Advanced High Strength Steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sriram, S.; Chintamani, J.

    2005-08-01

    Advanced High Strength Steels (AHSS) are currently being considered for use in closure and structural panels in the automotive industry because of their high potential for affordable weight reduction and improved performance. AHSS such as dual phase steels are currently being used in some vehicle platforms. From a manufacturing perspective, stretch flanging during stamping is an important deformation mode requiring careful consideration of geometry and the die process. This paper presents some geometric and process guidelines for stretch flanging AHSS. Hole expansion experiments were conducted to determine the failure limit for a sheared edge condition. Effects of punching clearance, prestrain and prior strain path on hole expansion were explored in these experiments. In addition, dynamic explicit FE calculations using LS-DYNA were also conducted for a typical stretch flange by varying some key geometric parameters. The experimental and FEA results were then analyzed to yield process and geometric guidelines to enable successful stretch flanging of AHSS.

  5. Stiffness Corrections for the Vibration Frequency of a Stretched Wire

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hornung, H. G.; Durie, M. J.

    1977-01-01

    Discusses the need of introducing corrections due to wire stiffness arising from end constraints and wire axis distribution curvature in the measurement of ac electrical frequency by exciting transverse standing waves in a stretched steel wire. (SL)

  6. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PITS CENTER, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  7. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PIT IN BACKGROUND, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  8. Myoelectric silence following unopposed passive stretch in normal man.

    PubMed

    Angel, R W; Waxman, S G; Kocsis, J D

    1980-08-01

    The response to unopposed passive muscle stretch applied during sustained contraction was studied in normal man. When the subject did not resist the stretching force, the initial response was a brief cessation of EMG activity in the elongated muscle. The myoelectric silence was observed repeatedly in muscles of the upper and lower limbs. The response to passive stretch is discussed in relation to the lengthening reaction and the inverse myotatic reflex. The silent period observed under these experimental conditions is unlikely to be caused by Renshaw inhibition, a pause in spindle afferent discharge, or activity of the group II afferent reflex pathway. Possible mechanisms include autogenetic inhibition and a stretch-evoked decrease of fusimotor activity.

  9. Optimal stretching of fluid for enhancing reaction growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nevins, Thomas; Kelley, Douglas

    2016-11-01

    When a biological or chemical scalar grows in flowing fluid, the resulting reacted region is dependent on both the details of the flow, and the reaction kinetics. We simultaneously film reaction state and flow in a laboratory model of reactive mixing in order to examine reactive mixing in physical, time-dependent flows. Using the excitable Belousov-Zhabotinsky (BZ) reaction, we find an optimal stretching range in which the flow enhances reaction, but larger stretching causes reaction blowout. We observe the transition from flow mostly helping to mostly blowout is not associated with the transition to turbulence, and that stretching fields (closely related to finite-time Lyapunov exponents) inside the optimal range appear to have a large effect on reaction growth rate locally. We also present estimates of the optimal stretching for BZ, and hypothesize that it is a feature exclusive to excitable reactions.

  10. A New Tool to Assess the Perception of Stretching Intensity.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Sandro R; Vaz, João R; Gomes, Luis; Silvestre, Rui; Hilário, Edgar; Cordeiro, Nuno; Carnide, Filomena; Pezarat-Correia, Pedro; Mil-Homens, Pedro

    2015-09-01

    This study aimed to develop a valid and reliable scale to assess the perception of stretching intensity below and above the maximal range of motion. Experiments were conducted through a passive leg extension angle-torque assessment to healthy population (n = 90). In the study's first phase, the visual, numerical, and description of the stretching intensity scale (SIS) components were developed. The visual analog scale (VAS) score, absolute magnitude estimation (AME) score, and verbal stretching intensity symptom descriptors were assessed for different stretching intensities. In the second phase, the SIS was tested for validity, reliability, scale production, and estimation properties as well as responsiveness to stretching. In the first phase, a high correlation was found between SIS score and range of motion (ROM), as well as SIS and torque in both submaximal (intraclass correlation coefficient [ICC] = 0.89-0.99, r = 0.88-0.99) and supramaximal (ICC = 0.75-0.86, r = 0.68-0.88) stretching intensities. The AME and VAS scores fitted well in an exponential model for submaximal stretching intensities (y = 14.829e, ICC = 0.97 [0.83-0.99], r = 0.98), and in a linear model for supramaximal stretching intensities (y = 0.7667x - 25.751, ICC = 0.97 [0.89-0.99], r = 0.9594). For the second phase, a high correlation was found between SIS score and ROM (r = 0.70-0.76, ICC = 0.76-0.85), as well as SIS and torque (r = 0.62-0.88, ICC = 0.57-0.85). The interday reliability was high to produce (r = 0.70, ICC = 0.70 [0.50-0.83]) or estimate (r = 0.89, ICC = 0.89 [0.82-0.93]) stretching intensities. The acute stretching effects on ROM and passive torque were detectable using the SIS. It is expected a high application in assessing the stretch intensity using the SIS in future studies and practical interventions.

  11. Image stretching on a curved surface to improve satellite gridding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    A method for substantially reducing gridding errors due to satellite roll, pitch and yaw is given. A gimbal-mounted curved screen, scaled to 1:7,500,000, is used to stretch the satellite image whereby visible landmarks coincide with a projected map outline. The resulting rms position errors averaged 10.7 km as compared with 25.6 and 34.9 km for two samples of satellite imagery upon which image stretching was not performed.

  12. STATIC STRETCHING DOES NOT REDUCE VARIABILITY, JUMP AND SPEED PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Luís Manuel Pinto Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Background Stretching is often part of the warm-up routine prior to athletic participation; however, controversial evidence exists on the effects of stretching on countermovement jump (CMJ) and sprint performance. Additionally, analysis of variability between repeated tasks is useful for monitoring players, to analyze factors that could affect the performance, and to guide clinical decisions for training strategies. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether static stretching (SS) prior to CMJ and 20-meter (20-m) sprint would affect performance, and to investigate whether SS affects an athlete's ability to perform these tasks consistently. Methods Twenty-two trained healthy athletes (23.2 ± 5.0 years) attended, randomly, two testing sessions, separated by 48 hours. At session one, all participants underwent 10 minutes of dynamic running warm-up followed by the experimental tasks (three CMJ and three 20-m sprint), whereas five minutes of stretching was added after the warm-up routine at session two. All participants performed the same experimental tasks in both sessions. The stretching protocol consisted of five stretching exercises for each lower limb. Results The paired-samples t-test revealed no significant differences between the stretching protocol condition and no stretching condition for the 20-m sprint (t(21)=.920; p=.368) and CMJ (t(21)=.709; p=.486). There were no significant differences in trial-by-trial variability on 20-m sprint (t(21)=1.934; p=.067) and CMJ scores (t(21)=.793; p=.437) as result of SS. Conclusion The SS protocol did not modify jumping and running ability in trained healthy athletes. The SS prior to training or competition may not cause detrimental effects to athletic performance. Level of evidence Level III, Nonrandomized controlled trial. PMID:27104057

  13. Stretching of a plane with a lattice of cuts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dahl, Yu. M.

    2016-06-01

    An exact analytical solution of the problem in elasticity theory about stretching of a plane with an infinite lattice of rectilinear cuts has been obtained. The analysis is based on G.V. Kolosov's formulas associating the stress components with two regular functions of a complex variable. The obtained solution revealed the original effects of stretching stress screening and localization of compressive stresses between cuts.

  14. Stretch-induced VEGF expression in the heart.

    PubMed Central

    Li, J; Hampton, T; Morgan, J P; Simons, M

    1997-01-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an endothelial cell mitogen involved in vascular development and angiogenesis. Recently we have observed increased VEGF expression in the normal myocardium after myocardial infarction in a rat heart. This study was designed to explore the mechanism responsible for this increase in VEGF expression. Induction of myocardial stretch in an isolated perfused Langendorff preparation by inflation of an intraventricular balloon to an end-diastolic load of 35 mmHg for 30 min resulted in a nearly sixfold increase in VEGF message level not only in the chamber subjected to stretch (left ventricle) but also in the unstretched right ventricle, thus raising the possibility of a soluble factor mediating stretch- induced induction of VEGF expression. This was further confirmed by demonstrating that coronary venous effluent collected from the stretched heart and used to perfuse isolated hearts in which no balloon was present was able to induce VEGF expression in these normal hearts. Inhibition of TGF-beta activity using a neutralizing antibody, but not antagonists/inhibitors of endothelin and angiotensin II, eliminated stretch-induced increase in VEGF expression. Staurosporine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, also blocked stretch-induced increase of VEGF expression. Measurement of TGF-beta concentration in the perfusate demonstrated increased amounts of the cytokine after myocardial stretch, and addition of TGF-beta protein to the perfusion buffer resulted in increased VEGF expression in control hearts. These results suggest that stretch-induced increase of VEGF expression in the heart is mediated at least in part by TGF-beta. PMID:9202052

  15. On the determination of laminar flame speeds from stretched flames

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, C. K.; Law, C. K.

    1985-01-01

    The effects of stretch on the determination of the laminar flame speed are experimentally studied by using the positively-stretched stagnation flame and negatively-stretched bunsen flame, and by using lean and rich mixtures of methane, propane, butane, and hydrogen with air whose effective Lewis numbers are either greater or less than unity. Results demonstrate that flame speed determination can be influenced by stretch through two factors: (1) Preferential diffusion which tends to increase or decrease the flame temperature and burning rate depending on the effective Lewis number, and (2) Flow divergence which causes the flame speed to assume higher values when evaluated at the upstream boundary of the preheat zone instead of the reaction zone. Recent data on flame speed including the present ones are then examined from the unified viewpoint of flame stretch, leading to satisfactory resolution of the discrepancies between them. The present study also proposes a methodology of determining the laminar flame speeds by using the stagnation flame and linearly extrapolating the data to zero stretch rate.

  16. Stretch activation and nonlinear elasticity of muscle cross-bridges.

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, N; Thornhill, R A

    1996-01-01

    When active insect fibrillar flight muscle is stretched, its ATPase rate increases and it develops "negative viscosity," which allows it to perform oscillatory work. We use a six-state model for the cross-bridge cycle to show that such "stretch activation" may arise naturally as a nonlinear property of a cross-bridge interacting with a single attachment site on a thin filament. Attachment is treated as a thermally activated process in which elastic energy must be supplied to stretch or compress the cross-bridge spring. We find that stretch activation occurs at filament displacements where, before the power stroke, the spring is initially in compression rather than in tension. In that case, pulling the filaments relieves the initial compression and reduces the elastic energy required for attachment. The result is that the attachment rate is enhanced by stretching. The model also displays the "delayed tension" effect observed in length-step experiments. When the muscle is stretched suddenly, the power stroke responds very quickly, but there is a time lag before dissociation at the end of the cycle catches up with the increased attachment rate. This lag is responsible for the delayed tension and hence also for the negative viscosity. PMID:8744318

  17. Pectoral stretching program for women undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Lee, T S; Kilbreath, S L; Refshauge, K M; Pendlebury, S C; Beith, J M; Lee, M J

    2007-05-01

    Surgery and radiotherapy commonly cause adverse musculoskeletal problems, particularly loss of strength and range of motion, in the upper quadrant of breast cancer patients. Few well-designed studies have investigated whether these impairments can be prevented. Stretching is an effective technique for increasing range of motion, hence the aim of this study was to investigate whether a stretching program reduced acute musculoskeletal impairments in patients undergoing radiotherapy for breast cancer. Sixty-four women were recruited prior to commencement of radiotherapy following breast cancer surgery. Participants were randomised to either a control or stretch group. Participants in both groups were reviewed by the physical therapist on a weekly basis for approximately 6 weeks, and were given general information about skin care and lymphedema. The control group received no advice about exercise. The stretch group received instruction on low-load, prolonged pectoral stretches, which were to be performed daily and were checked at weekly visits. Shoulder range of motion, strength, arm circumference, and quality of life measurements were taken prior to, and at completion of radiotherapy, and at 7 months after radiotherapy. There was no difference in any outcome between groups. Breast symptoms increased for both groups during radiotherapy, without loss of strength or range of movement. The incidence of lymphedema during the study was low for both groups and did not differ between groups. The pectoral stretching program did not influence the outcomes measured because the symptoms reported by patients were not a consequence of contracture.

  18. Optimization of dielectrophoretic DNA stretching in microfabricated devices

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyung Eun; Burns, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    We have found that the surface and bulk solution properties in a microfabricated device affect the degree and probability of electrostretching of DNA molecules. Using lambda phage DNA, we found that significantly hydrophilic surfaces between the electrodes decreases the efficiency of stretching. Surfaces treated with higher silane (trimethyl chlorosilane) concentrations performed better presumably due to the decreased non-specific adsorption of DNA on these surfaces compared to their more hydrophilic counterparts. The shape and dimensions of the electrodes also affected the efficiency of stretching. Both lift-off and metal etching methods produced electrodes with random microscopic peaks along the electrode’s edge and were poorly suited for stretching. Annealing the electrodes (450°C for 10 min) removed most of these peaks and allowed for more controlled stretching to be obtained. We also found that thin electrodes (65nm) gave close to a 90% success rate of DNA stretching but stretching with thick electrodes (350nm) produced only a 20% success rate. PMID:16642979

  19. Effect of stretching-induced changes in hydrodynamic screening on coil-stretch hysteresis of unentangled polymer solutions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prabhakar, Ranganathan; Sasmal, Chandi; Nguyen, Duc At; Sridhar, Tam; Prakash, J. Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Extensional rheometry and Brownian dynamics simulations of flexible polymer solutions confirm predictions based on blob concepts that coil-stretch hysteresis in extensional flows increases with concentration, reaching a maximum at the critical overlap concentration c* before progressively vanishing in the semidilute regime. These observations demonstrate that chain stretching strengthens intermolecular hydrodynamic screening in dilute solutions, but weakens it in semidilute solutions. Flow can thus strongly modify the concentration dependence of viscoelastic properties of polymer solutions.

  20. Stretched-State Excitations with the

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Luis Alberto Casimiro

    Neutron time-of-fight spectra were obtained for the ^{14}C(p,n) ^{14}N, ^{18 }O(p,n)^{18}F, and ^{30}Si(p,n) ^{30}P reactions at 135 MeV with the beam-swinger system at the Indiana University Cyclotron Facility. Excitation-energy spectra and the differential cross sections for the observed excitations in these reactions were extracted over the momentum transfer range from 0 to 2.7 fm^{-1}. The primary goal of this work was to obtain the strengths and distributions for the "stretched" states. The identification of these states was based on comparisons of the theoretical differential cross sections, performed in a DWIA formalism, with the experimental cross sections. Isospin assignments were based primarily on comparisons of the measured (p,n) and (e,e^') spectroscopic strengths. Candidate (pid_ {5/2},nu{rm p}_sp {3/2}{-1}), J^ pi = 4 ^- T = 0, 1 and 2, 1 hbaromega states, were identified at E_{x} = 8.5, 13.8, 19.5, and 26.7 MeV in the ^{14}C(p,n) ^{14}N reaction, and the corresponding isovector strengths were extracted. The observed 4^--state excitation energies and the strengths are in good agreement with the analog T = 1 and 2, 4^--states observed in the (e,e^') reaction. Large -basis shell-model calculations were found to predict reasonably well the excitation energies; however, these calculations overpredict the strength by a factor of 2, for the T = 1 and 2 components. In the ^{18}O(p,n) ^{18}F reaction at 135 MeV, (pi d_{5/2},nu {rm d}_sp{5/2}{-1 }) 5^+ T = 0 0hbaromega strength was observed, concentrated in a single state, at E_{x} = 1.1 MeV, with 75% of the extreme-single-particle-model (ESPM) strength, in good agreement with a shell-model calculation. No 6^- 1hbaromega strength was observed in this reaction. Candidate (pi {rm d}_{5/2},nu p _sp{3/2}{-1}) J ^pi = 4^- T = 0, 1 and 2, 1hbaromega states, were identified at E_{x} = 3.9, 9.4, 10.2, 11.4, 12.0, 14.4, 15.3, 17.3, 18.0, 19.7, 21.4, and 23.4 MeV. The observed 4^- T = 2 state excitation energies and

  1. Mechanical stretch triggers rapid epithelial cell division through Piezo1.

    PubMed

    Gudipaty, S A; Lindblom, J; Loftus, P D; Redd, M J; Edes, K; Davey, C F; Krishnegowda, V; Rosenblatt, J

    2017-03-02

    Despite acting as a barrier for the organs they encase, epithelial cells turn over at some of the fastest rates in the body. However, epithelial cell division must be tightly linked to cell death to preserve barrier function and prevent tumour formation. How does the number of dying cells match those dividing to maintain constant numbers? When epithelial cells become too crowded, they activate the stretch-activated channel Piezo1 to trigger extrusion of cells that later die. However, it is unclear how epithelial cell division is controlled to balance cell death at the steady state. Here we show that mammalian epithelial cell division occurs in regions of low cell density where cells are stretched. By experimentally stretching epithelia, we find that mechanical stretch itself rapidly stimulates cell division through activation of the Piezo1 channel. To stimulate cell division, stretch triggers cells that are paused in early G2 phase to activate calcium-dependent phosphorylation of ERK1/2, thereby activating the cyclin B transcription that is necessary to drive cells into mitosis. Although both epithelial cell division and cell extrusion require Piezo1 at the steady state, the type of mechanical force controls the outcome: stretch induces cell division, whereas crowding induces extrusion. How Piezo1-dependent calcium transients activate two opposing processes may depend on where and how Piezo1 is activated, as it accumulates in different subcellular sites with increasing cell density. In sparse epithelial regions in which cells divide, Piezo1 localizes to the plasma membrane and cytoplasm, whereas in dense regions in which cells extrude, it forms large cytoplasmic aggregates. Because Piezo1 senses both mechanical crowding and stretch, it may act as a homeostatic sensor to control epithelial cell numbers, triggering extrusion and apoptosis in crowded regions and cell division in sparse regions.

  2. Modulation of stretch-induced myocyte remodeling and gene expression by nitric oxide: a novel role for lipoma preferred partner in myofibrillogenesis.

    PubMed

    Hooper, Charlotte L; Paudyal, Anju; Dash, Philip R; Boateng, Samuel Y

    2013-05-15

    Prolonged hemodynamic load as a result of hypertension eventually leads to maladaptive cardiac adaptation and heart failure. The signaling pathways that underlie these changes are still poorly understood. The adaptive response to mechanical load is mediated by mechanosensors that convert the mechanical stimuli into a biological response. We examined the effect of cyclic mechanical stretch on myocyte adaptation using neonatal rat ventricular myocytes with 10% (adaptive) or 20% (maladaptive) maximum strain at 1 Hz for 48 h to mimic in vivo mechanical stress. Cells were also treated with and without nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), a general nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibitor to suppress NO production. Maladaptive 20% mechanical stretch led to a significant loss of intact sarcomeres that were rescued by L-NAME (P < 0.05; n ≥ 5 cultures). We hypothesized that the mechanism was through NO-induced alteration of myocyte gene expression. L-NAME upregulated the mechanosensing proteins muscle LIM protein (MLP; by 100%; P < 0.05; n = 5 cultures) and lipoma preferred partner (LPP), a novel cardiac protein (by 80%; P < 0.05; n = 4 cultures). L-NAME also significantly altered the subcellular localization of LPP and MLP in a manner that favored growth and adaptation. These findings suggest that NO participates in stretch-mediated adaptation. The use of isoform selective NOS inhibitors indicated a complex interaction between inducible NOS and neuronal NOS isoforms regulate gene expression. LPP knockdown by small intefering RNA led to formation of α-actinin aggregates and Z bodies showing that myofibrillogenesis was impaired. There was an upregulation of E3 ubiquitin ligase (MUL1) by 75% (P < 0.05; n = 5 cultures). This indicates that NO contributes to stretch-mediated adaptation via the upregulation of proteins associated with mechansensing and myofibrillogenesis, thereby presenting potential therapeutic targets during the progression of heart failure.

  3. Buoyant Low Stretch Diffusion Flames Beneath Cylindrical PMMA Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; Tien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    A unique new way to study low gravity flames in normal gravity has been developed. To study flame structure and extinction characteristics in low stretch environments, a normal gravity low-stretch diffusion flame is generated using a cylindrical PMMA sample of varying large radii. Burning rates, visible flame thickness, visible flame standoff distance, temperature profiles in the solid and gas, and radiative loss from the system were measured. A transition from the blowoff side of the flammability map to the quenching side of the flammability map is observed at approximately 6-7/ sec, as determined by curvefits to the non-monotonic trends in peak temperatures, solid and gas-phase temperature gradients, and non-dimensional standoff distances. A surface energy balance reveals that the fraction of heat transfer from the flame that is lost to in-depth conduction and surface radiation increases with decreasing stretch until quenching extinction is observed. This is primarily due to decreased heat transfer from the flame, while the magnitude of the losses remains the same. A unique local extinction flamelet phenomena and associated pre-extinction oscillations are observed at very low stretch. An ultimate quenching extinction limit is found at low stretch with sufficiently high induced heat losses.

  4. Effects of contract-relax vs static stretching on stretch-induced strength loss and length-tension relationship.

    PubMed

    Balle, S S; Magnusson, S P; McHugh, M P

    2015-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the acute effects of contract-relax stretching (CRS) vs static stretching (SS) on strength loss and the length-tension relationship. We hypothesized that there would be a greater muscle length-specific effect of CRS vs SS. Isometric hamstring strength was measured in 20 healthy people at four knee joint angles (90°, 70°, 50°, 30°) before and after stretching. One leg received SS, the contralateral received CRS. Both stretching techniques resulted in significant strength loss, which was most apparent at short muscle lengths [SS: P = 0.025; stretching × angle P < 0.001; 11.7% at 90° P < 0.01; 5.6% at 70° nonsignificant (ns); 1.3% at 50° ns; -3.7% at 30° ns. CRS: P < 0.001; stretching × angle P < 0.001; 17.7% at 90°, 13.4% at 70°, 11.4% at 50°, all P < 0.01, 4.3% at 30° ns]. The overall stretch-induced strength loss was greater (P = 0.015) after CRS (11.7%) vs SS (3.7%). The muscle length effect on strength loss was not different between CRS and SS (stretching × angle × stretching technique P = 0.43). Contrary to the hypothesis, CRS did not result in a greater shift in the length-tension relationship, and in fact, resulted in greater overall strength loss compared with SS. These results support the use of SS for stretching the hamstrings.

  5. Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-10-01

    ABSTRACT Essentially all spinal cord injured patients receive stretching therapies beginning within the first few weeks post-injury. Despite this fact...that stretching for short periods of time (4-5 weeks ) allows substantial recovery to occur once stretching is stopped, and both acute and chronic...4hours after one stretching session and then on Friday afternoon 3-4hours after the final stretching session of the week (the lowest scores). As seen

  6. Acute effects of different stretching durations on passive torque, mobility, and isometric muscle force.

    PubMed

    Matsuo, Shingo; Suzuki, Shigeyuki; Iwata, Masahiro; Banno, Yasuhiro; Asai, Yuji; Tsuchida, Wakako; Inoue, Takayuki

    2013-12-01

    Static stretching is widely applied in various disciplines. However, the acute effects of different durations of stretching are unclear. Therefore, this study was designed to investigate the acute effects of different stretching durations on muscle function and flexibility, and provide an insight into the optimal duration of static stretching. This randomized crossover trial included 24 healthy students (17 men and 7 women) who stretched their right hamstrings for durations of 20, 60, 180, and 300 seconds in a random order. The following outcomes were assessed using an isokinetic dynamometer as markers of lower-limb function and flexibility: static passive torque (SPT), dynamic passive torque (DPT), stiffness, straight leg raise (SLR), and isometric muscle force. Static passive torque was significantly decreased after all stretching durations (p < 0.05). Static passive torque was significantly lower after 60, 180, and 300 seconds of stretching compared with that after 20-second stretching, and stiffness decreased significantly after 180- and 300-second stretching (p < 0.05). In addition, DPT and stiffness were significantly lower after 300 seconds than after 20-second stretching (p < 0.05), and SLR increased significantly after all stretching durations (p < 0.05). Straight leg raise was higher after 180- and 300-second stretching than after 20-second stretching and higher after 300-second stretching than after 60-second stretching (p < 0.05). Isometric muscle force significantly decreased after all stretching durations (p < 0.05). Therefore, increased duration of stretching is associated with a decrease in SPT but an increase in SLR. Over 180 seconds of stretching was required to decrease DPT and stiffness, but isometric muscle force decreased regardless of the stretching duration. In conclusion, these results indicate that longer durations of stretching are needed to provide better flexibility.

  7. Radial stretch reveals distinct populations of mechanosensitive mammalian somatosensory neurons

    PubMed Central

    Bhattacharya, Martha R. C.; Bautista, Diana M.; Wu, Karin; Haeberle, Henry; Lumpkin, Ellen A.; Julius, David

    2008-01-01

    Primary afferent somatosensory neurons mediate our sense of touch in response to changes in ambient pressure. Molecules that detect and transduce thermal stimuli have been recently identified, but mechanisms underlying mechanosensation, particularly in vertebrate organisms, remain enigmatic. Traditionally, mechanically evoked responses in somatosensory neurons have been assessed one cell at a time by recording membrane currents in response to application of focal pressure, suction, or osmotic challenge. Here, we used radial stretch in combination with live-cell calcium imaging to gain a broad overview of mechanosensitive neuronal subpopulations. We found that different stretch intensities activate distinct subsets of sensory neurons as defined by size, molecular markers, or pharmacological attributes. In all subsets, stretch-evoked responses required extracellular calcium, indicating that mechanical force triggers calcium influx. This approach extends the repertoire of stimulus paradigms that can be used to examine mechanotransduction in mammalian sensory neurons, facilitating future physiological and pharmacological studies. PMID:19060212

  8. Stretching Behavior of Red Blood Cells at High Strain Rates

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mancuso, Jordan; Ristenpart, William

    2016-11-01

    Most work on the mechanical behavior of red blood cells (RBCs) has focused on simple shear flows. Relatively little work has examined RBC deformations in the physiologically important extensional flow that occurs at the entrance to a constriction. In particular, previous work suggests that RBCs rapidly stretch out and then retract upon entering the constriction, but to date no model predicts this behavior for the extremely high strain rates typically experienced there. In this work, we use high speed video to perform systematic measurements of the dynamic stretching behavior of RBCs as they enter a microfluidic constriction. We demonstrate that a simple viscoelastic model captures the observed stretching dynamics, up to strain rates as high as 1000 s-1. The results indicate that the effective elastic modulus of the RBC membrane at these strain rates is an order of magnitude larger than moduli measured by micropipette aspiration or other low strain rate techniques.

  9. Critical dynamics of vesicle stretching transition in elongational flow.

    PubMed

    Kantsler, Vasiliy; Segre, Enrico; Steinberg, Victor

    2008-07-25

    We present results on the stretching of single tubular vesicles in an elongation flow toward dumbbell shapes, and on their relaxation. A critical strain rate epsilonc exists; for strain rates epsilonstretching. Such feature is similar to that found in continuous phase transitions and to the critical effects recently observed for polymer molecules near the coil-stretch transition in elongation flow.

  10. Sketch-n-Stretch: sketching animations using cutouts.

    PubMed

    Sohn, Eisung; Choy, Yoon-Chul

    2012-01-01

    Sketch-n-Stretch lets novices quickly and easily create 2D animations. The system has a seamless two-layer drawing interface that supports cutouts using a whiteboard metaphor. Cutout animations serve as building blocks to help users construct sophisticated animations. While manipulating cutout animations, users can draw and write text to create effects-such as articulated figures, multiple motions, and image objects-that have been difficult with previous sketching approaches. An intuitive timeline interface employs visually integrated motion cues and supports several traditional animation effects. Novices positively evaluated Sketch-n-Stretch's effectiveness in creating object motions, compared to an existing sketching tool. They also used its advanced features to animate complete stories. This video demonstrates the Sketch-n-Stretch tool for making sketch-based animations.

  11. Transcription upregulation via force-induced direct stretching of chromatin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tajik, Arash; Zhang, Yuejin; Wei, Fuxiang; Sun, Jian; Jia, Qiong; Zhou, Wenwen; Singh, Rishi; Khanna, Nimish; Belmont, Andrew S.; Wang, Ning

    2016-12-01

    Mechanical forces play critical roles in the function of living cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of how forces influence nuclear events remain elusive. Here, we show that chromatin deformation as well as force-induced transcription of a green fluorescent protein (GFP)-tagged bacterial-chromosome dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) transgene can be visualized in a living cell by using three-dimensional magnetic twisting cytometry to apply local stresses on the cell surface via an Arg-Gly-Asp-coated magnetic bead. Chromatin stretching depended on loading direction. DHFR transcription upregulation was sensitive to load direction and proportional to the magnitude of chromatin stretching. Disrupting filamentous actin or inhibiting actomyosin contraction abrogated or attenuated force-induced DHFR transcription, whereas activating endogenous contraction upregulated force-induced DHFR transcription. Our findings suggest that local stresses applied to integrins propagate from the tensed actin cytoskeleton to the LINC complex and then through lamina-chromatin interactions to directly stretch chromatin and upregulate transcription.

  12. Effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance.

    PubMed

    Lowery, Ryan P; Joy, Jordan M; Brown, Lee E; Oliveira de Souza, Eduardo; Wistocki, David R; Davis, Gregory S; Naimo, Marshall A; Zito, Gina A; Wilson, Jacob M

    2014-01-01

    It is previously demonstrated that static stretching was associated with a decrease in running economy and distance run during a 30-minute time trial in trained runners. Recently, the detrimental effects of static stretching on economy were found to be limited to the first few minutes of an endurance bout. However, economy remains to be studied for its direct effects on performance during shorter endurance events. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of static stretching on 1-mile uphill run performance, electromyography (EMG), ground contact time (GCT), and flexibility. Ten trained male distance runners aged 24 ± 5 years with an average VO2max of 64.9 ± 6.5 mL·kg-1·min-1 were recruited. Subjects reported to the laboratory on 3 separate days interspersed by 72 hours. On day 1, anthropometrics and V[Combining Dot Above]O2max were determined on a motor-driven treadmill. On days 2 and 3, subjects performed a 5-minute treadmill warm-up and either performed a series of 6 lower-body stretches for three 30-second repetitions or sat still for 10 minutes. Time to complete a 1-mile run under stretching and nonstretching conditions took place in randomized order. For the performance run, subjects were instructed to run as fast as possible at a set incline of 5% until a distance of 1 mile was completed. Flexibility from the sit and reach test, EMG, GCT, and performance, determined by time to complete the 1-mile run, were recorded after each condition. Time to complete the run was significantly less (6:51 ± 0:28 minutes) in the nonstretching condition as compared with the stretching condition (7:04 ± 0:32 minutes). A significant condition-by-time interaction for muscle activation existed, with no change in the nonstretching condition (pre 91.3 ± 11.6 mV to post 92.2 ± 12.9 mV) but increased in the stretching condition (pre 91.0 ± 11.6 mV to post 105.3 ± 12.9 mV). A significant condition-by-time interaction for GCT was also present, with no changes in

  13. Stretching to prevent musculoskeletal injuries. An approach to workplace wellness.

    PubMed

    Gartley, Rosanna M; Prosser, J Lynn

    2011-06-01

    A pre-shift stretching protocol to reduce employee injuries was initiated at a beverage company and a tin mill in the northeastern United States. The primary goal of this study was to determine the effects of a pre-shift stretching program on work-related musculoskeletal injuries. A secondary goal was to evaluate daily participation compliance during the 90-day program. Data on employee injuries during the stretching program were collected and compared to injury events during the same time period 1 year earlier. Comparison to injury events of the total eligible population during the study time frame was also included. Results of this pilot program in terms of injury rate reduction and participant compliance are promising. Study results may be useful for employers considering implementing similar programs and also suggest the need for further study in this area.

  14. Effectiveness of a neck stretching intervention on nurses' primary headaches.

    PubMed

    Lin, Li-Ying; Wang, Ruey-Hsia

    2015-03-01

    This study examined the effects of a neck stretching exercise intervention on nurses' primary headaches. Using a pretest and posttest two-group design, a total of 60 female staff nurses employed by a medical center in Taiwan were selected by convenience sampling. Participants in the experimental group (N=30) practiced neck stretching exercises while experiencing headaches. The participants in the control group (N=30) managed their headaches as usual. A structured questionnaire was used to collect data on headache intensity at baseline, and at 30 minutes and 1 hour after intervention. Decrease in headache intensity of the experimental group was significantly larger than that of the control group. Neck stretching exercises is an effective method for treating primary headaches.

  15. Simple assembly of long nanowires through substrate stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jianjin; Mohieddin Abukhdeir, Nasser; Goldthorpe, Irene A.

    2015-12-01

    Although nanowire (NW) alignment has been previously investigated, minimizing limitations such as process complexity and NW breakage, as well as quantifying the quality of alignment, have not been sufficiently addressed. A simple, low cost, large-area, and versatile alignment method is reported that is applicable for NWs either grown on a substrate or synthesized in solution. Metal and semiconductor NWs with average lengths of up to 16 μm are aligned through the stretching of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films, which compared to other stretching methods results in superior alignment because of the large stretching ratio of PVA. Poly[oxy(methyl-1,2-ethanediyl)] is employed as lubricant to prevent NW breakage. To quantify NW alignment, a simple and effective image processing method is presented. The alignment process results in an order parameter (S) of NW alignment as high as 0.97.

  16. Therapeutic potential of a tumor-specific, MHC-unrestricted T-cell receptor expressed on effector cells of the innate and the adaptive immune system through bone marrow transduction and immune reconstitution

    PubMed Central

    Alajez, Nehad M.; Schmielau, Jan; Alter, Mark D.; Cascio, Michael; Finn, Olivera J.

    2005-01-01

    T-cell receptor (TCR) with unique major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-unrestricted antigen-binding properties was isolated from a human T-cell clone specific for the tumor antigen MUC1. This TCR binds its epitope on the MUC1 protein without the requirement of processing and presentation. A single-chain Vα/Vβ/Cβ (scTCR) was fused to a CD3 zeta (ζ) chain to allow expression on the surface of cells of the innate (granulocytes, macrophages, natural killer [NK] cells) as well as the adaptive (T and B cells) immune system. To test the ability of the cells of the innate immune system to reject a tumor when provided with a tumor antigen-specific TCR, we reconstituted severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice with bone marrow cells transduced with a retroviral vector encoding this receptor and challenged them with a MUC1-positive human tumor. These mice controlled the growth of the tumor significantly better than the control mice. We performed a similar experiment in immunocompetent mice transgenic for human MUC1. Expression of the TCR on large percentages of cells did not result in infiltration or destruction of tissues expressing MUC1. Reconstituted mice controlled the outgrowth of a MUC1-transfected but not the parental control tumor. scTCR expression appears lifelong, suggesting a successful transduction of the self-renewing stem cells. (Blood. 2005;105:4583-4589) PMID:15746083

  17. Evolutionary vignettes of natural killer cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Sambrook, Jennifer G; Beck, Stephan

    2007-10-01

    The discovery of novel immune receptors has led to a recent renaissance of research into the innate immune system, following decades of intense research of the adaptive immune system. Of particular interest has been the discovery of the natural killer (NK) cell receptors which, depending on type, interact with classical or non-classical MHC class I antigens of the adaptive immune system, thus functioning at the interface of innate and adaptive immunity. Here, we review recent progress with respect to two such families of NK receptors, the killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) and the killer cell lectin-like receptors (KLRs), and attempt to trace their evolution across vertebrates.

  18. The acute effects of dynamic and ballistic stretching on vertical jump height, force, and power.

    PubMed

    Jaggers, Jason R; Swank, Ann M; Frost, Karen L; Lee, Chong D

    2008-11-01

    Stretching before performance is a common practice among athletes in hopes of increasing performance and reducing the risk of injury. However, cumulative results indicate a negative impact of static stretching and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) on performance; thus, there is a need for evaluating other stretching strategies for effective warm-up. The purpose of this study was to compare the differences between two sets of ballistic stretching and two sets of a dynamic stretching routine on vertical jump performance. Twenty healthy male and female college students between the ages of 22 and 34 (24.8 +/- 3 years) volunteered to participate in this study. All subjects completed three individual testing sessions on three nonconsecutive days. On each day, the subjects completed one of three treatments (no stretch, ballistic stretch, and dynamic stretch). Intraclass reliability was determined using the data obtained from each subject. A paired samples t-test revealed no significant difference in jump height, force, or power when comparing no stretch with ballistic stretch. A significant difference was found on jump power when comparing no stretch with dynamic stretch, but no significant difference was found for jump height or force. Statistics showed a very high reliability when measuring jump height, force, and power using the Kistler Quattro Jump force plate. It seems that neither dynamic stretching nor ballistic stretching will result in an increase in vertical jump height or force. However, dynamic stretching elicited gains in jump power poststretch.

  19. EMG and peak force responses to PNF stretching and the relationship between stretching-induced force deficits and bilateral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Asim

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of an interaction between stretching induced deficit (SFD) and bilateral deficits (BLD) during maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion under PNF stretch and no-stretch conditions through measurement of EMG and force production. [Subjects and Methods] Ten physically active male Caucasian students (age, 24.1±2.38 years; body mass, 79.48±11.40 kg; height, 174.15±0.8 cm) volunteered to participate in this study. EMG and force measurements of the subjects were recorded during either unilateral or bilateral 3-second maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion (MVC) against a force transducer. The paired sample t-test was used to examine the significance of differences among several conditions. Pearson product-moment correlation was used to evaluate the associations between different parameters. [Results] Stretching-induced deficits correlated with bilateral deficits in both force (r=0.85) and iEMG (r=0.89). PNF stretching caused significant decrements in the bilateral and unilateral conditions for both the right and left sides. [Conclusion] Since both force and iEMG decreases were observed in most measurements; it suggests there is a neural mechanism behinnd both the BLD and the SFD. PMID:25931696

  20. Structure of low-stretch methane nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bai; Ibarreta, Alfonso F.; Sung, Chih-Jen; T'ien, James S.

    2007-04-15

    The present study experimentally and numerically investigates the structure associated with extremely low-stretch ({proportional_to}2 s{sup -1}) gaseous nonpremixed flames. The study of low-stretch flames aims to improve our fundamental understanding of the flame radiation effects on flame response and extinction limits. Low-stretch flames are also relevant to fire safety in reduced-gravity environments and to large buoyant fires, where localized areas of low stretch are attainable. In this work, ultra-low-stretch flames are established in normal gravity by bottom burning of a methane/nitrogen mixture discharged from a porous spherically symmetric burner of large radius of curvature. The large thickness of the resulting nonpremixed flame allows detailed mapping of the flame structure. Several advanced nonintrusive optical diagnostics are used to study the flame structure. Gas phase temperatures are measured by Raman scattering, while the burner surface temperatures are obtained by IR imaging. In addition, OH-PLIF and chemiluminescence imaging techniques are used to help characterize the extent of the flame reaction zone. These experimental results allow direct comparison with a quasi-one-dimensional numerical model including detailed chemistry, thermodynamic/transport properties, and radiation treatment. In addition, the radiative interactions between the flame and porous burner (modeled as a gray surface) are accounted for in the present model. The numerical modeling is demonstrated to be able to simulate the low-stretch flame structure. Using the current model, the extinction limits under different conditions are also examined. The computational results are consistent with experimental observations. (author)

  1. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    PubMed Central

    Sloot, Lizeth H.; van den Noort, Josien C.; van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163–191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  2. The replication of a mouse adapted SARS-CoV in a mouse cell line stably expressing the murine SARS-CoV receptor mACE2 efficiently induces the expression of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Regla-Nava, Jose A; Jimenez-Guardeño, Jose M; Nieto-Torres, Jose L; Gallagher, Thomas M; Enjuanes, Luis; DeDiego, Marta L

    2013-11-01

    Infection of conventional mice with a mouse adapted (MA15) severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) coronavirus (CoV) reproduces many aspects of human SARS such as pathological changes in lung, viremia, neutrophilia, and lethality. However, established mouse cell lines highly susceptible to mouse-adapted SARS-CoV infection are not available. In this work, efficiently transfectable mouse cell lines stably expressing the murine SARS-CoV receptor angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) have been generated. These cells yielded high SARS-CoV-MA15 titers and also served as excellent tools for plaque assays. In addition, in these cell lines, SARS-CoV-MA15 induced the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and IFN-β, mimicking what has been observed in experimental animal models infected with SARS-CoV and SARS patients. These cell lines are valuable tools to perform in vitro studies in a mouse cell system that reflects the species used for in vivo studies of SARS-CoV-MA15 pathogenesis.

  3. Magnetohydrodynamics stagnation point flow towards a stretching vertical sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishak, A.; Nazar, R.; Pop, I.

    2006-03-01

    The analysis of steady two-dimensional stagnation point flow of an incompressible viscous and electrically conducting fluid, subject to a transverse uniform magnetic field, over a vertical stretching sheet is investigated when the sheet is stretched in its own plane with a velocity and a temperature proportional to the distance from the stagnation point. It is shown that the basic partial differential equations reduce to similarity equations. This is followed by a direct numerical solution of the resulting boundary value problem using a very efficient finite-difference method. Discussions are made to trace among them the physically realistic solution. Tables 5, Figs 13, Refs 17.

  4. Stretched Exponential Relaxation of Glasses at Low Temperature.

    PubMed

    Yu, Yingtian; Wang, Mengyi; Zhang, Dawei; Wang, Bu; Sant, Gaurav; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-10-16

    The question of whether glass continues to relax at low temperature is of fundamental and practical interest. Here, we report a novel atomistic simulation method allowing us to directly access the long-term dynamics of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that the potential energy relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay, with a stretching exponent β=3/5, as predicted by Phillips's diffusion-trap model. Interestingly, volume relaxation is also found. However, it is not correlated to the energy relaxation, but it is rather a manifestation of the mixed alkali effect.

  5. Stretched-exponential Doppler spectra in underwater acoustic communication channels.

    PubMed

    van Walree, P A; Jenserud, T; Otnes, R

    2010-11-01

    The theory of underwater sound interacting with the sea surface predicts a Gaussian-spread frequency spectrum in the case of a large Rayleigh parameter. However, recent channel soundings reveal more sharply peaked spectra with heavier tails. The measured Doppler spread increases with the frequency and differs between multipath arrivals. The overall Doppler spectrum of a broadband waveform is the sum of the spectra of all constituent paths and frequencies, and is phenomenologically described by a stretched or compressed exponential. The stretched exponential also fits well to the broadband spectrum of a single propagation path, and narrowband spectra summed over all paths.

  6. Innate Response to Human Cancer Cells with or without IL-2 Receptor Common γ-Chain Function in NOD Background Mice Lacking Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Nishime, Chiyoko; Kawai, Kenji; Yamamoto, Takehiro; Katano, Ikumi; Monnai, Makoto; Goda, Nobuhito; Mizushima, Tomoko; Suemizu, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Masato; Murata, Mitsuru; Suematsu, Makoto; Wakui, Masatoshi

    2015-08-15

    Immunodeficient hosts exhibit high acceptance of xenogeneic or neoplastic cells mainly due to lack of adaptive immunity, although it still remains to be elucidated how innate response affects the engraftment. IL-2R common γ-chain (IL-2Rγc) signaling is required for development of NK cells and a subset of dendritic cells producing IFN-γ. To better understand innate response in the absence of adaptive immunity, we examined amounts of metastatic foci in the livers after intrasplenic transfer of human colon cancer HCT116 cells into NOD/SCID versus NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc (null) (NOG) hosts. The intravital microscopic imaging of livers in the hosts depleted of NK cells and/or macrophages revealed that IL-2Rγc function critically contributes to elimination of cancer cells without the need for NK cells and macrophages. In the absence of IL-2Rγc, macrophages play a role in the defense against tumors despite the NOD Sirpa allele, which allows human CD47 to bind to the encoded signal regulatory protein α to inhibit macrophage phagocytosis of human cells. Analogous experiments using human pancreas cancer MIA PaCa-2 cells provided findings roughly similar to those from the experiments using HCT116 cells except for lack of suppression of metastases by macrophages in NOG hosts. Administration of mouse IFN-γ to NOG hosts appeared to partially compensate lack of IL-2Rγc-dependent elimination of transferred HCT116 cells. These results provide insights into the nature of innate response in the absence of adaptive immunity, aiding in developing tumor xenograft models in experimental oncology.

  7. Eccentric Muscle Contraction and Stretching Evoke Mechanical Hyperalgesia and Modulate CGRP and P2X3 Expression in a Functionally Relevant Manner

    PubMed Central

    Dessem, Dean; Ambalavanar, Ranjinidevi; Evancho, Melena; Moutanni, Aicha; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Bai, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive, movement-based models were used to investigate muscle pain. In rats, the masseter muscle was rapidly stretched or electrically stimulated during forced lengthening to produce eccentric muscle contractions (EC). Both EC and stretching disrupted scattered myofibers and produced intramuscular plasma extravasation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were elevated in the masseter 24h following EC. At 48h, neutrophils increased and ED1 macrophages infiltrated myofibers while ED2 macrophages were abundant at 4d. Mechanical hyperalgesia was evident in the ipsilateral head 4h-4d after a single bout of EC and for 7d following multiple bouts (1 bout/d for 4d). Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA increased in the trigeminal ganglion 24h following EC while immunoreactive CGRP decreased. By 2d, CGRP-muscle afferent numbers equaled naive numbers implying that CGRP is released following EC and replenished within 2d. EC elevated P2X3 mRNA and increased P2X3-muscle afferent neuron number for 12d while electrical stimulation without muscle contraction altered neither CGRP nor P2X3 mRNA levels. Muscle stretching produced hyperalgesia for 2d whereas contraction alone produced no hyperalgesia. Stretching increased CGRP mRNA at 24h but not CGRP-muscle afferent number at 2–12d. In contrast, stretching significantly increased the number of P2X3-muscle afferent neurons for 12d. The sustained, elevated P2X3 expression evoked by EC and stretching may enhance nociceptor responsiveness to ATP released during subsequent myofiber damage. Movement-based actions such as EC and muscle stretching produce unique tissue responses and modulate neuropeptide and nociceptive receptor expression in a manner particularly relevant to repeated muscle damage. PMID:20207080

  8. Mechanosensitive channels in striated muscle and the cardiovascular system: not quite a stretch anymore.

    PubMed

    Stiber, Jonathan A; Seth, Malini; Rosenberg, Paul B

    2009-08-01

    Stretch-activated or mechanosensitive channels transduce mechanical forces into ion fluxes across the cell membrane. These channels have been implicated in several aspects of cardiovascular physiology including regulation of blood pressure, vasoreactivity, and cardiac arrhythmias, as well as the adverse remodeling associated with cardiac hypertrophy and heart failure. This review discusses mechanosensitive channels in skeletal muscle and the cardiovascular system and their role in disease pathogenesis. We describe the regulation of gating of mechanosensitive channels including direct mechanisms and indirect activation by signaling pathways, as well as the influence on activation of these channels by the underlying cytoskeleton and scaffolding proteins. We then focus on the role of transient receptor potential channels, several of which have been implicated as mechanosensitive channels, in the pathogenesis of adverse cardiac remodeling and as potential therapeutic targets in the treatment of heart failure.

  9. Non-destructive quantification of alignment of nanorods embedded in uniaxially stretched polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, Stefan Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Truong, Vo-Van

    2014-03-21

    Among several methods developed for uniaxial alignment of metallic nanorods for optical applications, alignment by film stretching consists in embedding the rods in a transparent thin film of thermoplastic polymer, followed by simultaneous heating and uniaxial stretching of the composite film. As to the quantification of the resulting alignment, it has been limited to statistical calculations based on microscopic examination, which is incomplete, subject to errors due to geometric distortions of the scanning electron microscope images and destructive, since it involves cutting of samples. In contrast, we present in this paper a non-destructive quantification of the average orientation of the rods, based on a probabilistic approach combined with numerical simulations of absorbance spectra and spectrometric characterization of the composite film. Assuming electromagnetically non-interacting rods, we consider the longitudinal absorbance peak of their ensemble to consist of the superposition of their individual spectra that we obtain by numerical simulation using the size and shape adapted dielectric function of the metal and the finite difference time domain method. The accuracy of the solution depends on the number of discretization intervals, the accuracy of the numerical simulations, and the accurate knowledge of the polydispersity of the rods. For the sake of concreteness, we used nanorods to describe the quantification steps but the method is equally valid for any dichroic particles.

  10. Forced convective heat transfer in boundary layer flow of Sisko fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet.

    PubMed

    Munir, Asif; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood

    2014-01-01

    The major focus of this article is to analyze the forced convective heat transfer in a steady boundary layer flow of Sisko fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet. Two cases are studied, namely (i) the sheet with variable temperature (PST case) and (ii) the sheet with variable heat flux (PHF case). The heat transfer aspects are investigated for both integer and non-integer values of the power-law index. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using appropriate similarity variables and solved numerically. The numerical results are obtained by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta method with Broyden's method in the domain[Formula: see text]. The numerical results for the temperature field are found to be strongly dependent upon the power-law index, stretching parameter, wall temperature parameter, material parameter of the Sisko fluid and Prandtl number. In addition, the local Nusselt number versus wall temperature parameter is also graphed and tabulated for different values of pertaining parameters. Further, numerical results are validated by comparison with exact solutions as well as previously published results in the literature.

  11. Bend, stretch, and touch: Locating a finger on an actively deformed transparent sensor array

    PubMed Central

    Sarwar, Mirza Saquib; Dobashi, Yuta; Preston, Claire; Wyss, Justin K. M.; Mirabbasi, Shahriar; Madden, John David Wyndham

    2017-01-01

    The development of bendable, stretchable, and transparent touch sensors is an emerging technological goal in a variety of fields, including electronic skin, wearables, and flexible handheld devices. Although transparent tactile sensors based on metal mesh, carbon nanotubes, and silver nanowires demonstrate operation in bent configurations, we present a technology that extends the operation modes to the sensing of finger proximity including light touch during active bending and even stretching. This is accomplished using stretchable and ionically conductive hydrogel electrodes, which project electric field above the sensor to couple with and sense a finger. The polyacrylamide electrodes are embedded in silicone. These two widely available, low-cost, transparent materials are combined in a three-step manufacturing technique that is amenable to large-area fabrication. The approach is demonstrated using a proof-of-concept 4 × 4 cross-grid sensor array with a 5-mm pitch. The approach of a finger hovering a few centimeters above the array is readily detectable. Light touch produces a localized decrease in capacitance of 15%. The movement of a finger can be followed across the array, and the location of multiple fingers can be detected. Touch is detectable during bending and stretch, an important feature of any wearable device. The capacitive sensor design can be made more or less sensitive to bending by shifting it relative to the neutral axis. Ultimately, the approach is adaptable to the detection of proximity, touch, pressure, and even the conformation of the sensor surface. PMID:28345045

  12. Non-destructive quantification of alignment of nanorods embedded in uniaxially stretched polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoenescu, Stefan; Truong, Vo-Van; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2014-03-01

    Among several methods developed for uniaxial alignment of metallic nanorods for optical applications, alignment by film stretching consists in embedding the rods in a transparent thin film of thermoplastic polymer, followed by simultaneous heating and uniaxial stretching of the composite film. As to the quantification of the resulting alignment, it has been limited to statistical calculations based on microscopic examination, which is incomplete, subject to errors due to geometric distortions of the scanning electron microscope images and destructive, since it involves cutting of samples. In contrast, we present in this paper a non-destructive quantification of the average orientation of the rods, based on a probabilistic approach combined with numerical simulations of absorbance spectra and spectrometric characterization of the composite film. Assuming electromagnetically non-interacting rods, we consider the longitudinal absorbance peak of their ensemble to consist of the superposition of their individual spectra that we obtain by numerical simulation using the size and shape adapted dielectric function of the metal and the finite difference time domain method. The accuracy of the solution depends on the number of discretization intervals, the accuracy of the numerical simulations, and the accurate knowledge of the polydispersity of the rods. For the sake of concreteness, we used nanorods to describe the quantification steps but the method is equally valid for any dichroic particles.

  13. Secreted miR-27a Induced by Cyclic Stretch Modulates the Proliferation of Endothelial Cells in Hypertension via GRK6

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lu; Bao, Han; Wang, Kai-Xuan; Zhang, Ping; Yao, Qing-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Hu; Huang, Kai; Qi, Ying-Xin; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2017-01-01

    Abnormal proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) is important in vascular remodeling during hypertension, but the mechanisms are still unclear. In hypertensive rats caused by abdominal aortic coarctation, the expression of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 (GRK6) in ECs at common carotid artery was repressed in vivo, and EC proliferation was increased. 15% cyclic stretch in vitro, which mimics the pathologically increased stretch in hypertension, repressed EC GRK6 expression via paracrine control by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Furthermore, VSMC-derived microparticles (VSMC-MPs) were detected in the conditioned medium from VSMCs and in artery. VSMC-MPs from cells exposed to 15% cyclic stretch decreased GRK6 expression and increased EC proliferation. miR-27a was detected in VSMC-MPs and was upregulated by 15% cyclic stretch. miR-27a was transferred from VSMCs to ECs via VSMC-MPs and directly targeted on GRK6. Finally, a multi-point injection of antagomiR-27a around carotid artery decreased miR-27a expression in vivo, induced GRK6 expression, and reversed the abnormal EC proliferation. Pathologically elevated cyclic stretch increased the secretion of miR-27a, which was transferred from VSMCs to ECs via the VSMC-MPs, subsequently targeted GRK6, and induced EC proliferation. Locally decreasing miR-27a could be a novel therapeutic approach to attenuate the abnormal EC proliferation in hypertension. PMID:28106155

  14. Secreted miR-27a Induced by Cyclic Stretch Modulates the Proliferation of Endothelial Cells in Hypertension via GRK6.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lu; Bao, Han; Wang, Kai-Xuan; Zhang, Ping; Yao, Qing-Ping; Chen, Xiao-Hu; Huang, Kai; Qi, Ying-Xin; Jiang, Zong-Lai

    2017-01-20

    Abnormal proliferation of endothelial cells (ECs) is important in vascular remodeling during hypertension, but the mechanisms are still unclear. In hypertensive rats caused by abdominal aortic coarctation, the expression of G-protein-coupled receptor kinase 6 (GRK6) in ECs at common carotid artery was repressed in vivo, and EC proliferation was increased. 15% cyclic stretch in vitro, which mimics the pathologically increased stretch in hypertension, repressed EC GRK6 expression via paracrine control by vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Furthermore, VSMC-derived microparticles (VSMC-MPs) were detected in the conditioned medium from VSMCs and in artery. VSMC-MPs from cells exposed to 15% cyclic stretch decreased GRK6 expression and increased EC proliferation. miR-27a was detected in VSMC-MPs and was upregulated by 15% cyclic stretch. miR-27a was transferred from VSMCs to ECs via VSMC-MPs and directly targeted on GRK6. Finally, a multi-point injection of antagomiR-27a around carotid artery decreased miR-27a expression in vivo, induced GRK6 expression, and reversed the abnormal EC proliferation. Pathologically elevated cyclic stretch increased the secretion of miR-27a, which was transferred from VSMCs to ECs via the VSMC-MPs, subsequently targeted GRK6, and induced EC proliferation. Locally decreasing miR-27a could be a novel therapeutic approach to attenuate the abnormal EC proliferation in hypertension.

  15. Effects of Warm-Up Stretching Exercises on Sprint Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makaruk, Hubert; Makaruk, Beata; Kedra, Stanislaw

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To assess direct effects of warm-up consisting of static and dynamic stretching exercises on sprint results attained by students differing in sprint performance. Material and methods: A group of 24 male and 19 female physical education students, including 12 and 9 sprinters, respectively. They performed warm-ups consisting of dynamic…

  16. Mediators of yoga and stretching for chronic low back pain.

    PubMed

    Sherman, Karen J; Wellman, Robert D; Cook, Andrea J; Cherkin, Daniel C; Ceballos, Rachel M

    2013-01-01

    Although yoga is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for its benefits. In a trial comparing yoga to intensive stretching and self-care, we explored whether physical (hours of back exercise/week), cognitive (fear avoidance, body awareness, and self-efficacy), affective (psychological distress, perceived stress, positive states of mind, and sleep), and physiological factors (cortisol, DHEA) mediated the effects of yoga or stretching on back-related dysfunction (Roland-Morris Disability Scale (RDQ)). For yoga, 36% of the effect on 12-week RDQ was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 18% by sleep disturbance, 9% by hours of back exercise, and 61% by the best combination of all possible mediators (6 mediators). For stretching, 23% of the effect was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 14% by days of back exercise, and 50% by the best combination of all possible mediators (7 mediators). In open-ended questions, ≥20% of participants noted the following treatment benefits: learning new exercises (both groups), relaxation, increased awareness, and the benefits of breathing (yoga), benefits of regular practice (stretching). Although both self-efficacy and hours of back exercise were the strongest mediators for each intervention, compared to self-care, qualitative data suggest that they may exert their benefits through partially distinct mechanisms.

  17. SOUTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; CLOSER VIEW OF TRUNCATED NORTHERLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; CLOSER VIEW OF TRUNCATED NORTHERLY END OF TOWPATH BERM (RIGHT) AND CANAL PRISM (LEFT); VIEW TO SOUTH FROM LATER BORROW PIT - Blackstone Canal Worcester-Millbury Segment, Eastern bank of Blackstone River, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  18. NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION, GENERAL VIEW SHOWING TOWPATH BERM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION, GENERAL VIEW SHOWING TOWPATH BERM (CENTER/RIGHT) AND CANAL PRISM (LEFT); VIEW TO SOUTH FROM FOOT OF THE "TOWN-LINE DUMP" - Blackstone Canal Worcester-Millbury Segment, Eastern bank of Blackstone River, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  19. SOUTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW OF TOWPATH BERM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW OF TOWPATH BERM (LEFT) AND CANAL PRISM (CENTER) WITH LATER EMBANKMENT OF U.S. ROUTE 20 RAMP ENCROACHING RIGHT; VIEW TO NORTH - Blackstone Canal Worcester-Millbury Segment, Eastern bank of Blackstone River, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  20. Role of stretch reflex in voluntary movements. [of human foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, G. L.; Agarwal, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The stretch reflex is often described as a spinal servomechanism, a device for assisting in the regulation of muscle length. Observation of the EMG response to mechanical interruption of voluntary movements fails to demonstrate a significant role for spinal reflexes at 40 msec latency. Two functional responses with latencies of 120 msec and 200 msec, implying supraspinal mediation, are observed.

  1. Electrohydrodynamic direct-writing microfiber patterns under stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Gaofeng; Sun, Lingling; Wang, Xiang; Wei, Jin; Xu, Lei; Liu, Yifang; Zheng, Jianyi; Liu, Juan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the rheology and deposition behaviors of electrohydrodynamic direct-write (EDW) jet under stretching tension are studied. The EDW jet is stretched into tightened state by the drag force from moving collector, when moving speed of collector is higher than deposition velocity of jet. The drag force from the moving collector provides an extra force to stretch the charged jet, which promotes the stability and decreases the diameter of direct-written fiber. The whipping and bending motion of jet can be overcome by the drag force, and then, straight orderly fibers are direct-written along the trajectory of collector. The falling jet would be also deviated from the extension line of spinneret by the drag force. As the collector velocity increases from 10 to 1000 mm/s, the average line width of direct-written microfiber decreases from 18.89 to 0.89 µm. The thickness of microfiber ranges from 100 nm to 1.5 µm. The moving collector leads to large deviation of charged jet. The tightened charged jet has good resistance against the interference of charge repulsion force, which helps to direct-write orderly nanofiber. During the EDW process, the mechanical stretching force had provided an excellent function to control the morphology and deposition pattern of micro-/nanofiber.

  2. Mediators of Yoga and Stretching for Chronic Low Back Pain

    PubMed Central

    Sherman, Karen J.; Wellman, Robert D.; Cook, Andrea J.; Cherkin, Daniel C.; Ceballos, Rachel M.

    2013-01-01

    Although yoga is an effective treatment for chronic low back pain, little is known about the mechanisms responsible for its benefits. In a trial comparing yoga to intensive stretching and self-care, we explored whether physical (hours of back exercise/week), cognitive (fear avoidance, body awareness, and self-efficacy), affective (psychological distress, perceived stress, positive states of mind, and sleep), and physiological factors (cortisol, DHEA) mediated the effects of yoga or stretching on back-related dysfunction (Roland-Morris Disability Scale (RDQ)). For yoga, 36% of the effect on 12-week RDQ was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 18% by sleep disturbance, 9% by hours of back exercise, and 61% by the best combination of all possible mediators (6 mediators). For stretching, 23% of the effect was mediated by increased self-efficacy, 14% by days of back exercise, and 50% by the best combination of all possible mediators (7 mediators). In open-ended questions, ≥20% of participants noted the following treatment benefits: learning new exercises (both groups), relaxation, increased awareness, and the benefits of breathing (yoga), benefits of regular practice (stretching). Although both self-efficacy and hours of back exercise were the strongest mediators for each intervention, compared to self-care, qualitative data suggest that they may exert their benefits through partially distinct mechanisms. PMID:23690832

  3. Viscoelastic properties of vascular endothelial cells exposed to uniaxial stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterday, Kathryn; Chew, Thomas; Loury, Phillip; Haga, Jason; Del Alamo, Juan C.; Chien, Shu

    2011-11-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (VECs) line the interior of blood vessels and regulate a variety of functions in the cardiovascular system. It is widely accepted that VECs will remodel themselves in response to mechanical stimuli, but few studies have analyzed the mechanical properties of these cells under stretch. We hypothesize that uniaxial stretch will cause an anisotropic realignment of actin filaments, and a change in the viscoelastic properties of the cell. To test this hypothesis, VECs were grown on a thin, transparent membrane mounted on a microscope. The membrane was stretched, consequently stretching the cells. Time-lapse sequences of the cells were taken every hour with a time resolution of 10 Hz. The random trajectories of intracellular endogenous particles were tracked using in-house algorithms. These trajectories were analyzed using a novel particle tracking microrheology formulation that takes into account the anisotropy of the cytoplasm of VECs. Supported by NSF CBET-1055697 CAREER Award (JCA) and NIH grants BRP HL064382 (SC), 1R01 HL080518 (SC).

  4. Perspective view of the Fifteenth Street facade; this facade stretches ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of the Fifteenth Street facade; this facade stretches almost three city blocks but is partially masked by trees and relieved by four pedimented pavilions. At the time of its construction, this was the largest office building in the world. - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  5. Stretching of DNA confined in nanochannels with charged walls

    PubMed Central

    Manneschi, Chiara; Fanzio, Paola; Angeli, Elena; Repetto, Luca; Valbusa, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    There is currently a growing interest in control of stretching of DNA inside nanoconfined regions due to the possibility to analyze and manipulate single biomolecules for applications such as DNA mapping and barcoding, which are based on stretching the DNA in a linear fashion. In the present work, we couple Finite Element Methods and Monte Carlo simulations in order to study the conformation of DNA molecules confined in nanofluidic channels with neutral and charged walls. We find that the electrostatic forces become more and more important when lowering the ionic strength of the solution. The influence of the nanochannel cross section geometry is also studied by evaluating the DNA elongation in square, rectangular, and triangular channels. We demonstrate that coupling electrostatically interacting walls with a triangular geometry is an efficient way to stretch DNA molecules at the scale of hundreds of nanometers. The paper reports experimental observations of λ-DNA molecules in poly(dimethylsiloxane) nanochannels filled with solutions of different ionic strength. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, confirming the crucial role of the electrostatic repulsion of the constraining walls on the molecule stretching. PMID:25553196

  6. Laser-induced structure formation on stretched polymer foils

    SciTech Connect

    Bityurin, Nikita; Arnold, Nikita; Baeuerle, Dieter; Arenholz, Enno

    2007-04-15

    Noncoherent structures that develop during UV laser ablation of stretched semicrystalline polymer foils are a very general phenomenon. A thermodynamic model based on stress relaxation within the modified layer of the polymer surface describes the main features of the observed phenomena, and, in particular, the dependence of the period of structures on laser wavelength, fluence, and number of laser pulses.

  7. Stretch Forming and Fracture of Strongly Textured Ti Alloy Sheet

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1982-03-01

    where minor changes of the strain or strain rate hardening can dominate the effects of plastic anisotropy which, due to the crystallography of slip in fcc ... bcc metals, are probably relatively small. As a result, interpretations of the existing data which relate stretch forming and plastic anisotropy have

  8. Habituation of lower leg stretch responses in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Bloem, B R; van Vugt, J P; Beckley, D J; Remler, M P; Roos, R A

    1998-02-01

    In young healthy subjects, initially large stretch responses in leg muscles are progressively attenuated following a series of identical postural perturbations. We have studied whether this habituation of stretch responses is impaired in Parkinson's disease. Ten patients and 10 elderly controls received 10 serial 'toe-up' rotational perturbations (amplitude 10 degrees) while standing on a supporting forceplate. We recorded posturally destabilizing medium latency (ML) stretch responses from the medial gastrocnemius muscle. Functional habituation across the first few trials occurred in patients, but not in elderly controls. The rate of habituation was influenced by the size of the response to the first perturbation. This observation explained the absence of habituation in elderly subjects because their responses during the first few trials were much smaller compared to patients. These results suggest that habituation of lower leg stretch responses is unimpaired in Parkinson's disease. The presence of initially large and 'unpracticed' responses may partially explain why Parkinson patients fall in response to unexpected postural disturbances that commonly occur in daily life.

  9. Crystallization of Stretched Polyimides: A Structure-Property Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Dezern, James F.

    2002-01-01

    A simple rotational isomeric state model was used to detect the degree to which polyimide repeat units might align to give an extended crystal. It was found experimentally that the hallmarks of stretch-crystallization were more likely to occur in materials whose molecules could readily give extended, aligned conformations. A proposed screening criterion was 84% accurate in selecting crystallizing molecules.

  10. Unwrapping of DNA-protein complexes under external stretching.

    PubMed

    Sakaue, Takahiro; Löwen, Hartmut

    2004-08-01

    A DNA-protein complex modeled by a semiflexible chain and an attractive spherical core is studied in the situation when an external stretching force is acting on one end monomer of the chain while the other end monomer is kept fixed in space. Without a stretching force, the chain is wrapped around the core. By applying an external stretching force, unwrapping of the complex is induced. We study the statics and dynamics of the unwrapping process by computer simulations and simple phenomenological theory. We find two different scenarios depending on the chain stiffness: For a flexible chain, the extension of the complex scales linearly with the external force applied. The sphere-chain complex is disordered; i.e., there is no clear winding of the chain around the sphere. For a stiff chain, on the other hand, the complex structure is ordered, which is reminiscent of nucleosome. There is a clear winding number, and the unwrapping process under external stretching is discontinuous with jumps of the distance-force curve. This is associated with discrete unwinding processes of the complex. Our predictions are of relevance for experiments, which measure force-extension curves of DNA-protein complexes, such as nucleosome, using optical tweezers.

  11. In-vivo Stretch of Term Human Fetal Membranes

    PubMed Central

    Joyce, EM; Diaz, P; Tamarkin, S; Moore, R; Strohl, A; Stetzer, B; Kumar, D; Sacks, MS; Moore, JJ

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Fetal membranes (FM) usually fail prior to delivery during term labor, but occasionally fail at preterm gestation, precipitating preterm birth. To understand the FM biomechanical properties underlying these events, study of the baseline in-vivo stretch experienced by the FM is required. This study's objective was to utilize high resolution MRI imaging to determine in-vivo FM stretch. Methods Eight pregnant women (38.4±0.4wks) underwent abdominal-pelvic MRI prior to (2.88±0.83d) caesarean delivery. Software was utilized to determine the total FM in-vivo surface area (SA) and that of its components: placental disc and reflected FM. At delivery, the SA of the disc and FM in the relaxed state were measured. In-vivo (stretched) to delivered SA ratios were calculated. FM fragments were then biaxially stretched to determine the force required to re-stretch the FM back to in-vivo SA. Results Total FM SA, in-vivo vs delivered, was 2135.51±108.47 cm2 vs 842.59±35.86 cm2; reflected FM was 1778.42±107.39 cm2 vs 545.41±22.90 cm2, and disc was 357.10±28.08 cm2 vs 297.18±22.14 cm2. The ratio (in-vivo to in-vitro SA) of reflected FM was 3.26±0.11 and disc was 1.22±0.10. Reflected FM re-stretched to in-vivo SA generated a tension of 72.26N/m, corresponding to approximate pressure of 15.4mmHg. FM rupture occurred at 295.08 ± 31.73N/m corresponding to approximate pressure of 34mmHg. Physiological SA was 70% of that at rupture. Discussion FM are significantly distended in-vivo. FM collagen fibers were rapidly recruited once loaded and functioned near the failure state during in-vitro testing, suggesting that, in-vivo, minimal additional (beyond physiological) stretch may facilitate rapid, catastrophic failure. PMID:26907383

  12. The effect of static stretch on elastin degradation in arteries.

    PubMed

    Chow, Ming-Jay; Choi, Myunghwan; Yun, Seok Hyun; Zhang, Yanhang

    2013-01-01

    Previously we have shown that gradual changes in the structure of elastin during an elastase treatment can lead to important transition stages in the mechanical behavior of arteries. However, in vivo arteries are constantly being loaded due to systolic and diastolic pressures and so understanding the effects of loading on the enzymatic degradation of elastin in arteries is important. With biaxial tensile testing, we measured the mechanical behavior of porcine thoracic aortas digested with a mild solution of purified elastase (5 U/mL) in the presence of a static stretch. Arterial mechanical properties and biochemical composition were analyzed to assess the effects of mechanical stretch on elastin degradation. As elastin is being removed, the dimensions of the artery increase by more than 20% in both the longitude and circumference directions. Elastin assays indicate a faster rate of degradation when stretch was present during the digestion. A simple exponential decay fitting confirms the time constant for digestion with stretch (0.11 ± 0.04 h(-1)) is almost twice that of digestion without stretch (0.069 ± 0.028 h(-1)). The transition from J-shaped to S-shaped stress vs. strain behavior in the longitudinal direction generally occurs when elastin content is reduced by about 60%. Multiphoton image analysis confirms the removal/fragmentation of elastin and also shows that the collagen fibers are closely intertwined with the elastin lamellae in the medial layer. After removal of elastin, the collagen fibers are no longer constrained and become disordered. Release of amorphous elastin during the fragmentation of the lamellae layers is observed and provides insights into the process of elastin degradation. Overall this study reveals several interesting microstructural changes in the extracellular matrix that could explain the resulting mechanical behavior of arteries with elastin degradation.

  13. Crimp morphology in relaxed and stretched rat Achilles tendon.

    PubMed

    Franchi, Marco; Fini, Milena; Quaranta, Marilisa; De Pasquale, Viviana; Raspanti, Mario; Giavaresi, Gianluca; Ottani, Vittoria; Ruggeri, Alessandro

    2007-01-01

    Fibrous extracellular matrix of tendon is considered to be an inextensible anatomical structure consisting of type I collagen fibrils arranged in parallel bundles. Under polarized light microscopy the collagen fibre bundles appear crimped with alternating dark and light transverse bands. This study describes the ultrastructure of the collagen fibrils in crimps of both relaxed and in vivo stretched rat Achilles tendon. Under polarized light microscopy crimps of relaxed Achilles tendons appear as isosceles or scalene triangles of different size. Tendon crimps observed via SEM and TEM show the single collagen fibrils that suddenly change their direction containing knots. The fibrils appear partially squeezed in the knots, bent on the same plane like bayonets, or twisted and bent. Moreover some of them lose their D-period, revealing their microfibrillar component. These particular aspects of collagen fibrils inside each tendon crimp have been termed 'fibrillar crimps' and may fulfil the same functional role. When tendon is physiologically stretched in vivo the tendon crimps decrease in number (46.7%) (P<0.01) and appear more flattened with an increase in the crimp top angle (165 degrees in stretched tendons vs. 148 degrees in relaxed tendons, P<0.005). Under SEM and TEM, the 'fibrillar crimps' are still present, never losing their structural identity in straightened collagen fibril bundles of stretched tendons even where tendon crimps are not detectable. These data suggest that the 'fibrillar crimp' may be the true structural component of the tendon crimp acting as a shock absorber during physiological stretching of Achilles tendon.

  14. Precise adaptation in chemotaxis through ``assistance neighborhoods"

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Endres, Robert; Wingreen, Ned

    2006-03-01

    The chemotaxis network in Escherichia coli is remarkable for its sensitivity to small relative changes in the concentrations of multiple chemical signals over a broad range of ambient concentrations. Key to this sensitivity is an adaptation system that relies on methylation and demethylation/deamidation of specific modification sites of the chemoreceptors by the enzymes CheR and CheB, respectively. These enzymes can access 5-7 receptors once tethered to a particular receptor. Based on these ``assistance neighborhoods'', we present a model for precise adaptation of mixed clusters of two-state chemoreceptors. In agreement with experiment the response of adapted cells to addition/removal of attractant scales with the free-energy change at fixed ligand affinity. Our model further predicts two possible limits of precise adaptation: either the response to further addition of attractant stops through saturation of the receptors, or receptors fully methylate before they saturate and therefore stop adapting.

  15. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  16. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor regulates ROMK-like K+ channel activity in the renal cortical collecting duct during high dietary K+ adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi; Zavilowitz, Beth; Ren, Jin; Liu, Wen; Chan, Pokman; Rohatgi, Rajeev; Estilo, Genevieve; Jackson, Edwin K.; Wang, Wen-Hui; Satlin, Lisa M.

    2014-01-01

    The kidney adjusts K+ excretion to match intake in part by regulation of the activity of apical K+ secretory channels, including renal outer medullary K+ (ROMK)-like K+ channels, in the cortical collecting duct (CCD). ANG II inhibits ROMK channels via the ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) during dietary K+ restriction. Because AT1Rs and ANG II type 2 receptors (AT2Rs) generally function in an antagonistic manner, we sought to characterize the regulation of ROMK channels by the AT2R. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that ANG II increased ROMK channel activity in CCDs isolated from high-K+ (HK)-fed but not normal K+ (NK)-fed rats. This response was blocked by PD-123319, an AT2R antagonist, but not by losartan, an AT1R antagonist, and was mimicked by the AT2R agonist CGP-42112. Nitric oxide (NO) synthase is present in CCD cells that express ROMK channels. Blockade of NO synthase with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and free NO with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt completely abolished ANG II-stimulated ROMK channel activity. NO enhances the synthesis of cGMP, which inhibits phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that normally degrade cAMP; cAMP increases ROMK channel activity. Pretreatment of CCDs with IBMX, a broad-spectrum PDE inhibitor, or cilostamide, a PDE3 inhibitor, abolished the stimulatory effect of ANG II on ROMK channels. Furthermore, PKA inhibitor peptide, but not an activator of the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), also prevented the stimulatory effect of ANG II. We conclude that ANG II acts at the AT2R to stimulate ROMK channel activity in CCDs from HK-fed rats, a response opposite to that mediated by the AT1R in dietary K+-restricted animals, via a NO/cGMP pathway linked to a cAMP-PKA pathway. PMID:25100281

  17. Angiotensin II type 2 receptor regulates ROMK-like K⁺ channel activity in the renal cortical collecting duct during high dietary K⁺ adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wei, Yuan; Liao, Yi; Zavilowitz, Beth; Ren, Jin; Liu, Wen; Chan, Pokman; Rohatgi, Rajeev; Estilo, Genevieve; Jackson, Edwin K; Wang, Wen-Hui; Satlin, Lisa M

    2014-10-01

    The kidney adjusts K⁺ excretion to match intake in part by regulation of the activity of apical K⁺ secretory channels, including renal outer medullary K⁺ (ROMK)-like K⁺ channels, in the cortical collecting duct (CCD). ANG II inhibits ROMK channels via the ANG II type 1 receptor (AT1R) during dietary K⁺ restriction. Because AT1Rs and ANG II type 2 receptors (AT2Rs) generally function in an antagonistic manner, we sought to characterize the regulation of ROMK channels by the AT2R. Patch-clamp experiments revealed that ANG II increased ROMK channel activity in CCDs isolated from high-K⁺ (HK)-fed but not normal K⁺ (NK)-fed rats. This response was blocked by PD-123319, an AT2R antagonist, but not by losartan, an AT1R antagonist, and was mimicked by the AT2R agonist CGP-42112. Nitric oxide (NO) synthase is present in CCD cells that express ROMK channels. Blockade of NO synthase with N-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester and free NO with 2-(4-carboxyphenyl)-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxyl-3-oxide potassium salt completely abolished ANG II-stimulated ROMK channel activity. NO enhances the synthesis of cGMP, which inhibits phosphodiesterases (PDEs) that normally degrade cAMP; cAMP increases ROMK channel activity. Pretreatment of CCDs with IBMX, a broad-spectrum PDE inhibitor, or cilostamide, a PDE3 inhibitor, abolished the stimulatory effect of ANG II on ROMK channels. Furthermore, PKA inhibitor peptide, but not an activator of the exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (Epac), also prevented the stimulatory effect of ANG II. We conclude that ANG II acts at the AT2R to stimulate ROMK channel activity in CCDs from HK-fed rats, a response opposite to that mediated by the AT1R in dietary K⁺-restricted animals, via a NO/cGMP pathway linked to a cAMP-PKA pathway.

  18. Effects of Bed Rest on Conduction Velocity of the Triceps Surae Stretch Reflex and Postural Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Esteves, J. T.; Taylor, L. C.; DeDios, Y. E.; Harm, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite rigorous exercise and nutritional management during space missions, astronauts returning from microgravity exhibit neuromuscular deficits and a significant loss in muscle mass in the postural muscles of the lower leg. Similar changes in the postural muscles occur in subjects participating in long-duration bed rest studies. These adaptive muscle changes manifest as a reduction in reflex conduction velocity during head-down bed rest. Because the stretch reflex encompasses both the peripheral (muscle spindle and nerve axon) and central (spinal synapse) components involved in adaptation to calf muscle unloading, it may be used to provide feedback on the general condition of neuromuscular function, and might be used to evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures aimed at preserving muscle mass and function during periods of unloading. Stretch reflexes were measured on 18 control subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 deg head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 degrees at a peak velocity of about 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender. Computerized posturography was also conducted on these same subjects before and after bed rest as part of the standard measures. Peak-to-peak sway was measured during Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) to evaluate changes in the ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Although no gender differences were found, a significant increase in reflex latency and a significant decrease in CV were observed during the bed

  19. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R.; Crone, Wendy C.; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  20. High resolution infrared spectroscopy of the nu 1 (NH stretch) and nu 2 (CH stretch) bands of HCNH +

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altman, Robert S.; Crofton, Mark W.; Oka, Takeshi

    1984-11-01

    The infrared spectrum of the ν1-band (NH stretch) and the ν2-band (CH stretch) of protonated hydrogen cyanide HCNH+ has been observed based on recent theoretical predictions. This is the first observed spectrum of this ion in any wavelength region. From a least-squares analysis of the rovibrational bands, the following spectroscopic constants have been obtained (in cm-1): ν1 (NH stretch) ν2 (CH stretch) ν0 3482.844 1(10) 3187.863 8(4) B1 1.228 633(39) 1.228 494(19) B0 1.236 024(37) 1.236 067(18) D1 1.574(43)×10-6 1.610(22)×10-6 D0 1.596(42)×10-6 1.620(21)×10-6 It is hoped that the rotational constants determined in this paper will lead to the identification of the microwave spectrum of this molecule in interstellar space.

  1. Pea lectin receptor-like kinase functions in salinity adaptation without yield penalty, by alleviating osmotic and ionic stresses and upregulating stress-responsive genes.

    PubMed

    Vaid, Neha; Pandey, Prashant; Srivastava, Vineet Kumar; Tuteja, Narendra

    2015-05-01

    Lectin receptor-like kinases (LecRLKs) are members of RLK family composed of lectin-like extracellular recognition domain, transmembrane domain and cytoplasmic kinase domain. LecRLKs are plasma membrane proteins believed to be involved in signal transduction. However, most of the members of the protein family even in plants have not been functionally well characterized. Herein, we show that Pisum sativum LecRLK (PsLecRLK) localized in plasma membrane systems and/or other regions of the cell and its transcript upregulated under salinity stress. Overexpression of PsLecRLK in transgenic tobacco plants confers salinity stress tolerance by alleviating both the ionic as well the osmotic component of salinity stress. The transgenic plants show better tissue compartmentalization of Na(+) and higher ROS scavenging activity which probably results in lower membrane damage, improved growth and yield maintenance even under salinity stress. Also, expression of several genes involved in cellular homeostasis is perturbed by PsLecRLK overexpression. Alleviation of osmotic and ionic components of salinity stress along with reduced oxidative damage and upregulation of stress-responsive genes in transgenic plants under salinity stress conditions could be possible mechanism facilitating enhanced stress tolerance. This study presents PsLecRLK as a promising candidate for crop improvement and also opens up new avenue to investigate its signalling pathway.

  2. Acute effect of different stretching methods on Illinois agility test in soccer players.

    PubMed

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Sahebozamani, Mansour; Tabrizi, Kourosh G; Yusof, Ashril B

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static, dynamic, and the combination of static and dynamic stretching within a pre-exercise warm-up on the Illinois agility test (IAT) in soccer players. Nineteen professional soccer players (age = 22.5 ± 2.5 years, height = 1.79 ± 0.003 m, body mass = 74.8 ± 10.9 kg) were tested for agility performance using the IAT after different warm-up protocols consisting of static, dynamic, combined stretching, and no stretching. The players were subgrouped into less and more experienced players (5.12 ± 0.83 and 8.18 ± 1.16 years, respectively). There were significant decreases in agility time after no stretching, among no stretching vs. static stretching; after dynamic stretching, among static vs. dynamic stretching; and after dynamic stretching, among dynamic vs. combined stretching during warm-ups for the agility: mean ± SD data were 14.18 ± 0.66 seconds (no stretch), 14.90 ± 0.38 seconds (static), 13.95 ± 0.32 seconds (dynamic), and 14.50 ± 0.35 seconds (combined). There was significant difference between less and more experienced players after no stretching and dynamic stretching. There was significant decrease in agility time following dynamic stretching vs. static stretching in both less and more experienced players. Static stretching does not appear to be detrimental to agility performance when combined with dynamic warm-up for professional soccer players. However, dynamic stretching during the warm-up was most effective as preparation for agility performance. The data from this study suggest that more experienced players demonstrate better agility skills due to years of training and playing soccer.

  3. Post-immobilization eccentric training promotes greater hypertrophic and angiogenic responses than passive stretching in muscles of weanling rats.

    PubMed

    Benedini-Elias, Priscila Cação Oliveira; Morgan, Mariana Calvente; Cornachione, Anabelle Silva; Martinez, Edson Z; Mattiello-Sverzut, Ana Claudia

    2014-04-01

    This study investigated how different types of remobilization after hind limb immobilization, eccentric exercise and passive static stretching, influenced the adaptive responses of muscles with similar function and fascicle size, but differing in their contractile characteristics. Female Wistar weanling rats (21 days old) were divided into 8 groups: immobilized for 10 days, maintaining the ankle in maximum plantar flexion; immobilized and submitted to eccentric training for 10 or 21 days on a declining treadmill for 40min; immobilized and submitted to passive stretching for 10 or 21 days for 40min by maintaining the ankle in maximum dorsiflexion; control of immobilized; and control of 10 or 21 days. The soleus and plantaris muscles were analyzed using fiber distribution, lesser diameter, capillary/fiber ratio, and morphology. Results showed that the immobilization reduced the diameter of all fiber types, caused changes in fiber distribution and decreased the number of transverse capillaries in both muscles. The recovery period of the soleus muscle is longer than that of the plantaris after detraining. Moreover, eccentric training induced greater hypertrophic and angiogenic responses than passive stretching, especially after 21 days of rehabilitation. Both techniques demonstrated positive effects for muscle rehabilitation with the eccentric exercise being more effective.

  4. Impaired recovery of brain muscarinic receptor sites following an adaptive down-regulation induced by repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; De Angelis, S.; Michalek, H. )

    1990-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the recovery rate of brain cholinesterase activity (ChE) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites (mAChRs) following reduction induced by repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were s.c. injected with DFP on alternate days for 2 weeks and killed 48 hr and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after the last treatment. In the hippocampus and striatum, but not in the cerebral cortex, of control rats there as a significant age-related decline of ChE activity and maximal density of 3H-QNB binding sites (Bmax). The repeated administration of DFP during the first week caused a syndrome of cholinergic stimulation both in aged and young rats. The syndrome was more pronounced, in terms of intensity and duration in aged than in young animals resulting in 40 and 12% mortality, respectively; during the second week the syndrome attenuated in the two age-groups. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE at the end of DFP treatment did not differ between young and surviving aged rats. The down-regulation of mACRs was present in the three brain regions of both young and age rats (from 20 to 40%). Factorial analysis of variance showed significant differences for age, recovery rate, and significant interaction between age and recovery rate, both for ChE and mAChRs in young rats the three brain areas.

  5. On the spectrum of a stretched spiral vortex

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pullin, D. I.; Buntine, James D.; Saffman, P. G.

    1994-09-01

    Corrections are found to the k-5/3 spectrum of Lundgren [Phys. Fluids 25, 2193 (1982)] for a stretched spiral vortex model (a is the stretching strain rate and k the scalar wave number) of turbulent fine scales. These take the form of additional terms arising from the early time evolution, when the stretching of vortex lines is small. For the special case when the spiral takes the form of a rolled-up shear layer, it is shown that the composite spectrum is divergent, thus requiring the introduction of a finite early cutoff time τ1 in the time integral for the nonaxisymmetric contribution. The identity νω2 = 2ν∫0∞k2E(k)dk which gives the dissipation is then satisfied self-consistently. Direct numerical calculation of the energy spectrum from the approximate vorticity field for a special choice of spiral structure nevertheless indicates that the one-term k-5/3-spectrum result is asymptotically valid in the inertial range provided aτ1 is O(1) but that the numerically calculated dissipation spectrum appears to lie somewhere between an exp(-B1k2) and an exp(-B2k) form. It is also shown that the stretched, rolled-up shear-layer model predicts asymptotic shell-summed spectra of the energy dissipation and of the square of the vorticity, each asymptotically constant, with no power-law dependence, for k smaller than the Kolmogorov wave number. The corresponding one-dimensional spectra each show -log(k1) behavior for small k1. The extension of the model given by Pullin and Saffman [Phys. Fluids A 5, 126 (1993)] is reformulated by the introduction of a long-time cutoff in the vortex lifetime and an additional requirement that the vortex structures be approximately space filling. This gives a reduction in the number of model free-parameters but introduces a dependence of the calculated Kolmogorov constant and skewness on the ratio of the initial vortex radius to the equivalent Burgers-vortex radius. A scaling for this ratio in terms of the Taylor microscale Reynolds

  6. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  7. A systematic literature review of the relationship between stretching and athletic injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Athletic-related injuries are a major cause for healthcare visits and financial burden for an otherwise healthy population of adults. The purpose of this article was to investigate the effects of stretching on injury prevention and to determine whether current stretching guidelines are beneficial for athletes. A systematic review of the literature was conducted through searching MEDLINE and CINAHL on topics related to stretching and injury prevention. Current belief is that stretching reduces injury incidence and that it should be performed prior to athletic activities. An examination of 11 articles provided inconclusive outcomes regarding the positive effect of stretching on injury prevention. A sport or activity-specific tailored stretch and warm-up program yielded the best outcomes in relation to preventing injuries. Direct negative effects of stretching were not identified; therefore, the application of stretching should be performed on an individual basis.

  8. Fluidization, resolidification, and reorientation of the endothelial cell in response to slow tidal stretches.

    PubMed

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Canovic, Elizabeth Peruski; Iordan, Andreea L; Rajendran, Kavitha; Manomohan, Greeshma; Pirentis, Athanassios P; Smith, Michael L; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Stamenovic, Dimitrije

    2012-08-15

    Mechanical stretch plays an important role in regulating shape and orientation of the vascular endothelial cell. This morphological response to stretch is basic to angiogenesis, neovascularization, and vascular homeostasis, but mechanism remains unclear. To elucidate mechanisms, we used cell mapping rheometry to measure traction forces in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to periodic uniaxial stretches. Onset of periodic stretch of 10% strain amplitude caused a fluidization response typified by attenuation of traction forces almost to zero. As periodic stretch continued, the prompt fluidization response was followed by a slow resolidification response typified by recovery of the traction forces, but now aligned along the axis perpendicular to the imposed stretch. Reorientation of the cell body lagged reorientation of the traction forces, however. Together, these observations demonstrate that cellular reorientation in response to periodic stretch is preceded by traction attenuation by means of cytoskeletal fluidization and subsequent traction recovery transverse to the stretch direction by means of cytoskeletal resolidification.

  9. The SNAP-25 Linker as an Adaptation Toward Fast Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gábor; Milosevic, Ira; Mohrmann, Ralf; Wiederhold, Katrin; Walter, Alexander M.

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of four soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor domains into a complex is essential for membrane fusion. In most cases, the four SNARE-domains are encoded by separate membrane-targeted proteins. However, in the exocytotic pathway, two SNARE-domains are present in one protein, connected by a flexible linker. The significance of this arrangement is unknown. We characterized the role of the linker in SNAP-25, a neuronal SNARE, by using overexpression techniques in synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) null mouse chromaffin cells and fast electrophysiological techniques. We confirm that the palmitoylated linker-cysteines are important for membrane association. A SNAP-25 mutant without cysteines supported exocytosis, but the fusion rate was slowed down and the fusion pore duration prolonged. Using chimeric proteins between SNAP-25 and its ubiquitous homologue SNAP-23, we show that the cysteine-containing part of the linkers is interchangeable. However, a stretch of 10 hydrophobic and charged amino acids in the C-terminal half of the SNAP-25 linker is required for fast exocytosis and in its absence the calcium dependence of exocytosis is shifted toward higher concentrations. The SNAP-25 linker therefore might have evolved as an adaptation toward calcium triggering and a high rate of execution of the fusion process, those features that distinguish exocytosis from other membrane fusion pathways. PMID:18579690

  10. "Stretch Your Body and Your Mind" (Tai Chi as an Adaptive Activity).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crider, Duane A.; Klinger, William

    Tai Chi may be an ideal activity for accommodating a wide variety of individuals with varying interests and physical skills while providing substantial health benefits. Theory suggests that children, adolescents, and healthy adults, as well as senior citizens and people debilitated by illness or injury, may benefit from the practice of Tai Chi…

  11. Development of Stretched wire measurement bench at IDDL, DAVV Indore

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gehlot, Mona; Mishra, G.

    2016-10-01

    A stretched wire magnetic measurement bench is under development at IDDL, DAVV, Indore. In this method a multistrend wire consisting of N turns is stretched inside the undulator to measure the field integrals of the undulators. The wire moved with constant velocity of translation measures the first integral of the undulator field. The cross motion of the wire at the undulator ends measures the second field integral. The measurement accuracy depends on the wire conditions and material properties. In this paper we follow an analytical approach to find the voltage fluctuations due to wire vibrations during the field measurement. It is shown that the voltage fluctuations depend on undulator gap, magnitude of the impulse on the wire. The mass density and the length of the wire also cause sizeable voltage fluctuations. The analytical derived expression is analysed to optimize system parameters for minimum errors during the measurement.

  12. Progressive muscle relaxation, yoga stretching, and ABC relaxation theory.

    PubMed

    Ghoncheh, Shahyad; Smith, Jonathan C

    2004-01-01

    This study compared the psychological effects of progressive muscle relaxation (PMR) and yoga stretching (hatha) exercises. Forty participants were randomly divided into two groups and taught PMR or yoga stretching exercises. Both groups practiced once a week for five weeks and were given the Smith Relaxation States Inventory before and after each session. As hypothesized, practitioners of PMR displayed higher levels of relaxation states (R-States) Physical Relaxation and Disengagement at Week 4 and higher levels of Mental Quiet and Joy as a posttraining aftereffect at Week 5. Contrary to what was hypothesized, groups did not display different levels of R-States Energized or Aware. Results suggest the value of supplementing traditional somatic conceptualizations of relaxation with the psychological approach embodied in ABC relaxation theory. Clinical and research implications are discussed.

  13. Vibrational overtone stretching transitions in trimethyl phosophate and triethyl phosophate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Michael W. P.

    2007-04-01

    The CH stretching overtone transitions of chemical warfare agents are of interest in the area of threat detection, including standoff threat detection, as many of these transitions occur near regions where small, efficient diode lasers operate. Further, detectors which operate in the regions where CH overtone transitions occur (i.e., in the near infrared and visible regions) are usually much more sensitive than detectors which operate in the region where fundamental CH vibrational transitions occur (i.e., in the mid infrared). However, the interpretation of experimental overtone spectra is complex, and the computational simulation of overtone spectra is challenging. Presented herein are the simulated vapour phase CH overtone stretching transitions in the nerve agent simulants trimethyl phosophate and triethyl phosophate. Spectral regions are simulated using the harmonically coupled anharmonic oscillator (HCAO) model. Data for HCAO calculations are obtained from ab initio calculations, without recourse to experimental data.

  14. Quantized Evolution of the Plasmonic Response in a Stretched Nanorod.

    PubMed

    Rossi, Tuomas P; Zugarramurdi, Asier; Puska, Martti J; Nieminen, Risto M

    2015-12-04

    Quantum aspects, such as electron tunneling between closely separated metallic nanoparticles, are crucial for understanding the plasmonic response of nanoscale systems. We explore quantum effects on the response of the conductively coupled metallic nanoparticle dimer. This is realized by stretching a nanorod, which leads to the formation of a narrowing atomic contact between the two nanorod ends. Based on first-principles time-dependent density-functional-theory calculations, we find a discontinuous evolution of the plasmonic response as the nanorod is stretched. This is especially pronounced for the intensity of the main charge-transfer plasmon mode. We show the correlation between the observed discontinuities and the discrete nature of the conduction channels supported by the formed atomic-sized junction.

  15. Rotational stretched exponential relaxation in random trap-barrier model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydiner, Ekrem

    2015-07-01

    The relaxation behavior of complex-disordered systems, such as spin glasses, polymers, colloidal suspensions, structural glasses,and granular media, has not been clarified. Theoretical studies show that relaxation in these systems has a topological origin. In this paper, we focus on the rotational stretched exponential relaxation behavior in complex-disordered systems and introduce a simple phase space model to understand the mechanism of the non-exponential relaxation of these systems. By employing the Monte Carlo simulation method to the model, we obtain the rotational relaxation function as a function of temperature. We show that the relaxation function has a stretched exponential form under the critical temperature while it obeys the Debye law above the critical temperature. Project supported by Istanbul University (Grant Nos. 28432 and 45662).

  16. The Acute Effects of Static Stretching on Speed and Agility Performance Depend on Stretch Duration and Conditioning Level.

    PubMed

    Avloniti, Alexandra; Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Fatouros, Ioannis G; Avloniti, Christina; Protopapa, Maria; Draganidis, Dimitrios; Stampoulis, Theodoros; Leontsini, Diamanda; Mavropalias, George; Gounelas, George; Kambas, Antonios

    2016-10-01

    Avloniti, A, Chatzinikolaou, A, Fatouros, IG, Avloniti, C, Protopapa, M, Draganidis, D, Stampoulis, T, Leontsini, D, Mavropalias, G, Gounelas, G, and Kambas, A. The acute effects of static stretching on speed and agility performance depend on stretch duration and conditioning level. J Strength Cond Res 30(10): 2767-2773, 2016-Although static stretching (SS) is an integral part of physical preparation before training and competition, its usefulness in regards to power performance improvement has been questioned. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of 6 SS durations on speed and agility performance. According to a cross-over design, 34 trained men (age, 20.5 ± 1.4 years; height, 1.81 ± 0.2 m; weight, 77.2 ± 2.6 kg; body fat, 8.2 ± 2.6%) participated in a control session (no stretch) and 6 experimental conditions (10, 15, 20, 30, 40, and 60 seconds) performed in a randomized order. Performance in speed (10 and 20 m) and agility (T-test) was measured after the control and experimental conditions. Static stretching, consisting of stretches for hip extensors, hip adductors, knee extensors, knee flexors, and ankle sole flexors, was performed after light cardiovascular exercise (8 minutes). A 1-way repeated-measures analysis of variance showed that speed was improved only by SS of short duration (15/20 seconds), whereas agility remained unaffected by all SS trials. When participants' speed and agility level was taken into account, it was revealed that only those of moderate performance demonstrated an improved speed (in 15- and 20-second trials) and agility (in 10- and 15-second trials) performance. These results suggest that short-duration SS protocols induce an acute improvement of speed and agility performance, whereas longer-duration SS protocols have neither positive nor negative effect. Furthermore, it seems that individuals of lower speed and agility performance level are more likely to benefit by a short-duration SS protocol.

  17. The effects of strain heating in lithospheric stretching models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, M.; Hodge, D.; Cozzarelli, F.

    1985-01-01

    The deformation by stretching of a continental type lithosphere has been formulated so that the problem can be solved by a continuum mechanical approach. The deformation, stress state, and temperature distribution are constrained to satisfy the physical laws of conservation of mass, energy, momentum, and an experimentally defined rheological response. The conservation of energy equation including a term of strain energy dissipation is given. The continental lithosphere is assumed to have the rheology of an isotropic, incompressible, nonlinear viscous, two layered solid.

  18. Stretching a Curved Surface in a Viscous Fluid

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajid, M.; N., Ali; T., Javed; Z., Abbas

    2010-02-01

    This work is concerned with the viscous flow due to a curved stretching sheet. The similarity solution of the problem is obtained numerically by a shooting method using the Runge-Kutta algorithm. The physical quantities of interest like the fluid velocity and skin friction coefficient are obtained and discussed under the influence of dimensionless curvature. It is evident from the results that dimensionless curvature causes an increase in boundary layer thickness and a decrease in the skin friction coefficient.

  19. Lean and ultralean stretched propane-air counterflow flames

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, Zhongxian; Pitz, Robert W.; Wehrmeyer, Joseph A.

    2006-06-15

    Stretched laminar flame structures for a wide range of C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air mixtures vs hot products are investigated by laser-based diagnostics and numerical simulation. The hot products are produced by a lean H{sub 2}-air premixed flame. The effect of stretch rate and equivalence ratio on four groups of C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air flame structures is studied in detail by Raman scattering measurements and by numerical calculations of the major species concentration and temperature profiles. The equivalence ratio, f, is varied from a near-stoichiometric condition (f=0.86) to the sublean limit (f=0.44) and the stretch rate varies from 90 s{sup -1} to near extinction. For most of these C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air lean mixtures, hot products are needed to maintain the flame. The significant feature of these flames is the relatively low flame temperatures (1200-1800 K). For this temperature range, the predicted C{sub 3}H{sub 8}-air flame structure is sensitive to the specific chemical kinetic mechanism. Two types of flame structures (a lean self-propagating flame and a lean diffusion-controlled flame) are obtained based on the combined effect of stretch and equivalence ratio. Three different mechanisms, the M5 mechanism, the Optimized mechanism, and the San Diego mechanism, are chosen for the numerical simulations. None of the propane chemical mechanisms give good agreement with the data over the entire range of flame conditions. (author)

  20. Revisiting the Galileo Probe results by a stretched atmospheric mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Janssen, Michael A.

    2015-11-01

    The Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in the late 2016. One of its major scientific target is to measure the deep water abundance through its Microwave Radiometer (MWR). Prior to the arrival of Juno, the only observation of the weather layer of Jupiter was the Galileo probe (Niemann et al. 1996; Wong et al. 2004), which returned puzzling results. In contrast to the detected 2 - 5 times enrichment of CH4, NH3 and H2S with respect to the solar values, the amount of water was severely subsolar. Three dimensional modeling (Showman & Dowling 2000) shows that dynamic dry downdrafts could create a huge trough in the material surface, such that air flowing through the hot spots undergoes a temporary increase in pressure by a factor of 2, though it is still too small to explain the Galileo probe results. Inspired by the 3D modeling result, we constructed a stretched atmospheric model to parameterize the alteration of the thermodynamic state of air parcel by dynamics. In our model, an air parcel is initially in its equilibrium condensation state and later has been dynamically stretched to higher pressure modeled by a multiplicative factor S. When S=1, the atmosphere is unaltered by dynamics, representing the equilibrium condensation model. We found that, when S=4, the mixing ratios of H2O, NH3 and H2S match all observations coming from the Galileo probe site. Thus, this stretch parameter provides a continuous representation of dynamic processes from the equilibrium condensation model to the Galileo probe results. We also show that the strength of stretch (S) can be retrieved from Juno/MWR limb darkening observations.

  1. Mechanic and electromechanic effects in biaxially stretched liquid crystal elastomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaz-Calleja, Ricardo; Llovera-Segovia, Pedro; Riande, Evaristo; Quijano López, Alfredo

    2013-02-01

    The effect of combined electromechanic force fields in nematic side chain liquid crystal elastomers will be analyzed. A biaxially stretched plate in the x- and y-directions under an electric field applied in the perpendicular direction to the plate will be considered. A neo-Hookean model is chosen, which implies Gaussian behaviour. Results are obtained for both a soft and semisoft case showing the effect of the electric field on the rotation of the director and the free energy density function.

  2. Can Stretching Prior to Exercise and Sports Improve Performance and Prevent Injury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracko, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Examines data from research on stretching as it relates to enhanced performance and injury prevention so that fitness, exercise, and sports performance professionals can make informed decisions about stretching programs for clients. The paper notes that stretching is a misunderstood component of fitness and sports training. Few studies show…

  3. A Single 30-s Stretch Is Sufficient to Inhibit Maximal Voluntary Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Jason B.; Nelson, Arnold G.; Kokkonen, Joke

    2009-01-01

    While it has been well established that an acute stretching program can inhibit maximal muscle performance, the amount of stretching needed to produce the deleterious response is unknown. Therefore this study examined the dose-response relationship between acute stretching and strength inhibition. Eighteen college students performed a one…

  4. Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-12-1-0587 TITLE: Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch ...Directing Spinal Cord Plasticity: The Impact of Stretch Therapy on Functional Recovery after Spinal Cord Injury. 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-12-1...ABSTRACT Essentially all spinal cord injured patients receive stretching therapies beginning within the first few weeks post-injury. Despite

  5. Acute changes in hamstrings musculo-articular dissipative properties induced by cyclic and static stretching.

    PubMed

    Nordez, A; McNair, P; Casari, P; Cornu, C

    2008-05-01

    This study was designed to measure changes in musculo-articular dissipative properties related to viscosity that were induced by passive cyclic and static stretching. Musculo-articular dissipative properties were assessed by calculating a dissipation coefficient using potential elastic energies stored and restituted during cyclic stretching. Eight subjects performed five passive knee extensions/flexions cycles on a Biodex dynamometer at 5 degrees . s (-1) to 80 % of their maximal range of motion before and after a static stretching protocol. Electromyographic activity from the hamstring muscles was monitored and remained constant during cyclic stretching and after static stretching (p > 0.05). The dissipation coefficient decreased during cyclic stretching (- 28.8 +/- 6.0 %, p < 0.001), while it was slightly increased after static stretching (+ 3.8 +/- 5.0 %, p = 0.037). The findings showed that energy stored and energy restituted decreased during cyclic stretching and after static stretching (p < 0.05). During unloading, passive torque remained constant during cyclic stretching, but was decreased after static stretching. The findings indicate that musculo-articular dissipative properties were primarily affected by a single cycle of motion, and were not influenced by static stretching procedures. The decrease in dissipation coefficient following cyclic motion indicates that the musculo-articular system displays thixotropic behavior.

  6. Direct observation of amyloid nucleation under nanomechanical stretching.

    PubMed

    Varongchayakul, Nitinun; Johnson, Sara; Quabili, Trina; Cappello, Joseph; Ghandehari, Hamidreza; Solares, Santiago De Jesus; Hwang, Wonmuk; Seog, Joonil

    2013-09-24

    Self-assembly of amyloid nanofiber is associated with both functional biological and pathological processes such as those in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite intensive studies, the stochastic nature of the process has made it difficult to elucidate a molecular mechanism for the key amyloid nucleation event. Here we investigated nucleation of the silk-elastin-like peptide (SELP) amyloid using time-lapse lateral force microscopy (LFM). By repeated scanning of a single line on a SELP-coated mica surface, we observed a sudden stepwise height increase. This corresponds to nucleation of an amyloid fiber, which subsequently grew perpendicular to the scanning direction. The lateral force profiles followed either a worm-like chain model or an exponential function, suggesting that the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip stretches a single or multiple SELP molecules along the scanning direction. The probability of nucleation correlated with the maximum stretching force and extension, implying that stretching of SELP molecules is a key molecular event for amyloid nucleation. The mechanically induced nucleation allows for positional and directional control of amyloid assembly in vitro, which we demonstrate by generating single nanofibers at predetermined nucleation sites.

  7. Hyperbolic neighborhoods as organizers of finite-time exponential stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balasuriya, Sanjeeva; Ouellette, Nicholas

    2016-11-01

    Hyperbolic points and their unsteady generalization, hyperbolic trajectories, drive the exponential stretching that is the hallmark of nonlinear and chaotic flow. Typical experimental and observational velocity data is unsteady and available only over a finite time interval, and in such situations hyperbolic trajectories will move around in the flow, and may lose their hyperbolicity at times. Here we introduce a way to determine their region of influence, which we term a hyperbolic neighborhood, which marks fluid elements whose dynamics are instantaneously dominated by the hyperbolic trajectory. We establish, using both theoretical arguments and numerical verification from model and experimental data, that the hyperbolic neighborhoods profoundly impact Lagrangian stretching experienced by fluid elements. In particular, we show that fluid elements traversing a flow experience exponential boosts in stretching while within these time-varying regions, that greater residence time within hyperbolic neighborhoods is directly correlated to larger Finite-Time Lyapunov Exponent (FTLE) values, and that FTLE diagnostics are reliable only when the hyperbolic neighborhoods have a geometrical structure which is regular in a specific sense. Future Fellowship Grant FT130100484 from the Australian Research Council (SB), and a Terman Faculty Fellowship from Stanford University (NO).

  8. Fibril orientation redistribution induced by stretching of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Josefsson, Gabriella; Gamstedt, E. Kristofer; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel

    2015-06-07

    The mechanical performance of materials reinforced by cellulose nanofibrils is highly affected by the orientation of these fibrils. This paper investigates the nanofibril orientation distribution of films of partly oriented cellulose nanofibrils. Stripes of hydrogel films were subjected to different amount of strain and, after drying, examined with X-ray diffraction to obtain the orientation of the nanofibrils in the films, caused by the stretching. The cellulose nanofibrils had initially a random in-plane orientation in the hydrogel films and the strain was applied to the films before the nanofibrils bond tightly together, which occurs during drying. The stretching resulted in a reorientation of the nanofibrils in the films, with monotonically increasing orientation towards the load direction with increasing strain. Estimation of nanofibril reorientation by X-ray diffraction enables quantitative comparison of the stretch-induced orientation ability of different cellulose nanofibril systems. The reorientation of nanofibrils as a consequence of an applied strain is also predicted by a geometrical model of deformation of nanofibril hydrogels. Conversely, in high-strain cold-drawing of wet cellulose nanofibril materials, the enhanced orientation is promoted by slipping of the effectively stiff fibrils.

  9. Study on stretching effect of multiple die forming technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-woo; Kim, Jeong; Kang, Beom-soo

    2013-12-01

    The multiple die forming (MDF) technology is suitable for flexible manufacturing, and it affords several advantages including its applicability to various forming processes such as single-curved surface forming, and double-curved surface forming. In sheet metal forming process, the elastic recovery has become a problem. Therefore, the stretch forming process is applied MDF technology to reduce elastic recovery effect. Numerical simulation is carried out for a saddle-type surface forming using ABAQUS. Every simulation case performs spring-back analysis to find elastic recovery effect after forming simulation. In this simulation, urethane pads are defined based on a hyperelastic material model as a cushion for the smoothness of forming surface. The elastic recovery deformation behavior is also investigated to consider the exact result after the last forming process, and then, the actual experiments are performed to confirm the formability of this forming process. By comparing the simulation and the experimental results, the tendency of the decreased amount of elastic recovery from the application of stretch process is verified. Consequently, it is confirmed that the multiple die stretch forming process has the capability and feasibility of being used to manufacture the curved surfaces of sheet metal.

  10. Stretching Diagnostics and Mixing Properties In The Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legras, B.; Shuckburgh, E.

    The "finite size Lyapunov exponent" and the "effective diffusivity" are two diagnos- tics of mixing which have been recently introduced to investigate atmospheric flows. Both have been used to successfully identify the barriers to transport, for instance at the edge of the stratospheric polar vortex. Here we compare the two diagnostics in detail. The equivalent length has the advantage of arising as a mixing quantification from a rigid theoretical framework, however it has the disadvantage of being an aver- age quantity (the average around a tracer contour). The finite size Lyapunov exponent may be defined at any point in the flow, and quantifies the stretching properties expe- rienced by a fluid parcel both in its past and future evolution. In particular, the lines of maximum stretching at any time delineate the building blocks of the chaotic stirring. However the interpretation of the finite size Lyapunov exponent as a mixing time is less direct and depends on the alignment of tracer contours with the stretching lines.

  11. Chaperones in Polyglutamine Aggregation: Beyond the Q-Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Kuiper, E. F. E.; de Mattos, Eduardo P.; Jardim, Laura B.; Kampinga, Harm H.; Bergink, Steven

    2017-01-01

    Expanded polyglutamine (polyQ) stretches in at least nine unrelated proteins lead to inherited neuronal dysfunction and degeneration. The expansion size in all diseases correlates with age at onset (AO) of disease and with polyQ protein aggregation, indicating that the expanded polyQ stretch is the main driving force for the disease onset. Interestingly, there is marked interpatient variability in expansion thresholds for a given disease. Between different polyQ diseases the repeat length vs. AO also indicates the existence of modulatory effects on aggregation of the upstream and downstream amino acid sequences flanking the Q expansion. This can be either due to intrinsic modulation of aggregation by the flanking regions, or due to differential interaction with other proteins, such as the components of the cellular protein quality control network. Indeed, several lines of evidence suggest that molecular chaperones have impact on the handling of different polyQ proteins. Here, we review factors differentially influencing polyQ aggregation: the Q-stretch itself, modulatory flanking sequences, interaction partners, cleavage of polyQ-containing proteins, and post-translational modifications, with a special focus on the role of molecular chaperones. By discussing typical examples of how these factors influence aggregation, we provide more insight on the variability of AO between different diseases as well as within the same polyQ disorder, on the molecular level. PMID:28386214

  12. Stretch fast dynamo mechanism via conformal mapping in Riemannian manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2007-10-15

    Two new analytical solutions of the self-induction equation in Riemannian manifolds are presented. The first represents a twisted magnetic flux tube or flux rope in plasma astrophysics, where the rotation of the flow implies that the poloidal field is amplified from toroidal field, in the spirit of dynamo theory. The value of the amplification depends on the Frenet torsion of the magnetic axis of the tube. Actually this result illustrates the Zeldovich stretch, twist, and fold method to generate dynamos from straight and untwisted ropes. Based on the fact that this problem was previously handled, using a Riemannian geometry of twisted magnetic flux ropes [Phys Plasmas 13, 022309 (2006)], investigation of a second dynamo solution, conformally related to the Arnold kinematic fast dynamo, is obtained. In this solution, it is shown that the conformal effect on the fast dynamo metric enhances the Zeldovich stretch, and therefore a new dynamo solution is obtained. When a conformal mapping is performed in an Arnold fast dynamo line element, a uniform stretch is obtained in the original line element.

  13. The different muscle-energetics during shortening and stretch.

    PubMed

    Jarosch, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The helical shape of the thin filaments causes their passive counterclockwise rotation during muscle stretch that increases tensile stress and torque at first by unwinding and then by winding up the four anchoring Z-filaments. This means storage of energy in the series elastic Z-filaments and a considerable decrease of the liberated energy of heat and work to (h-w(ap)), where h is the heat energy and w(ap) the stretch energy induced from outside by an apparatus. The steep thin filament helix with an inclination angle of 70° promotes the passive rotation during stretch, but impedes the smooth sliding of shortening by increased friction and production of frictional heat. The frictional heat may be produced by the contact with the myosin cross-bridges: (1) when they passively snap on drilling thin filaments from cleft to cleft over a distance 2 × 2.7 nm = 5.4 nm between the globular actin monomers in one groove, causing stepwise motion; or (2) when they passively cycle from one helical groove to the next (distance 36 nm). The latter causes more heat and may take place on rotating thin filaments without an effective forward drilling ("idle rotation"), e.g., when they produce "unexplained heat" at the beginning of an isometric tetanus. In an Appendix to this paper the different states of muscle are defined. The function of its most important components is described and rotation model and power-stroke model of muscular contraction is compared.

  14. Noise reduction in elastograms using temporal stretching with multicompression averaging.

    PubMed

    Varghese, T; Ophir, J; Céspedes, I

    1996-01-01

    Elastography uses estimates of the time delay (obtained by cross-correlation) to compute strain estimates in tissue due to quasistatic compression. Because the time delay estimates do not generally occur at the sampling intervals, the location of the cross-correlation peak does not give an accurate estimate of the time delay. Sampling errors in the time-delay estimate are reduced using signal interpolation techniques to obtain subsample time-delay estimates. Distortions of the echo signals due to tissue compression introduce correlation artifacts in the elastogram. These artifacts are reduced by a combination of small compressions and temporal stretching of the postcompression signal. Random noise effects in the resulting elastograms are reduced by averaging several elastograms, obtained from successive small compressions (assuming that the errors are uncorrelated). Multicompression averaging with temporal stretching is shown to increase the signal-to-noise ratio in the elastogram by an order of magnitude, without sacrificing sensitivity, resolution or dynamic range. The strain filter concept is extended in this article to theoretically characterize the performance of multicompression averaging with temporal stretching.

  15. Transcription upregulation via force-induced direct stretching of chromatin

    PubMed Central

    Tajik, Arash; Zhang, Yuejin; Wei, Fuxiang; Sun, Jian; Jia, Qiong; Zhou, Wenwen; Singh, Rishi; Khanna, Nimish; Belmont, Andrew S.; Wang, Ning

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical forces play critical roles in the function of living cells. However, the underlying mechanisms of how forces influence nuclear events remain elusive. Here, we show that chromatin deformation as well as force-induced transcription of a green-fluorescent-protein (GFP) tagged bacterial-chromosome dihydrofolate reductase (DHFR) transgene can be visualized in a living cell by using three-dimensional magnetic twisting cytometry to apply local stresses on the cell surface via an Arg-Gly-Asp-coated magnetic bead. Chromatin stretching depended on loading direction. DHFR transcription upregulation was sensitive to load direction and proportional to the magnitude of chromatin stretching. Disrupting filamentous actin or inhibiting actomyosin contraction abrogated or attenuated force-induced DHFR transcription, whereas activating endogenous contraction upregulated force-induced DHFR transcription. Our findings suggest that local stresses applied to integrins propagate from the tensed actin cytoskeleton to the LINC complex and then through lamina-chromatin interactions to directly stretch chromatin and upregulate transcription. PMID:27548707

  16. Chronic flexibility improvement after 12 week of stretching program utilizing the ACSM recommendations: hamstring flexibility.

    PubMed

    Sainz de Baranda, P; Ayala, F

    2010-06-01

    The ACSM flexibility training recommendations emphasize proper stretching of muscles supporting the major joints, but there is a little evidence to support this recommendation in terms of effectiveness, and which stretching parameters (technique and single stretch duration) are more adequate. A randomized controlled clinical trial design was use to investigate whether the ACSM flexibility training recommendation parameters improve hip flexion range of motion. A total of 173 subjects, 122 men (21.3+/-2.5 years; 176.33+/-8.35 cm; 74.42+/-10.80 kg) and 51 women (20.7+/-1.6 years; 163.43+/-6.57 cm; 60.12+/-7.88 kg), classified as recreationally active young adult university students were randomly assigned to 1 of 7 groups: 1 control group (no stretching) or 1 of 6 stretching groups. All stretching groups performed 12 weeks of flexibility training with a consistent stretch daily dose (180 s) and frequency (3 days per week) parameters and different stretch technique (passive or active) and single stretch duration (15, 30, or 45 s). Hip flexion passive range of motion (PROM) was determined through the bilateral straight-leg raise test before, during (at 4 and 8 weeks), and after the program (12 weeks). All stretching groups performed hip flexion PROM after flexibility training. A significant improvement was identified in mean PROM for each stretching group, but no significant differences were found between stretch technique and single stretch duration (p>0.05). The control group's mean PROM decreased (Delta PROM: -0.08 degrees, 95% confidence interval [CI]=-2.3 to 5.3), whereas all stretching groups increased PROM (Delta PROM: 15.14 degrees, 95% CI=10.19 to 23.56) in hip flexion after 12 weeks of stretching (p<0.05). The present study suggests that the current ACSM flexibility training recommendations are effective for improving hip flexion ROM in recreationally active young adults.

  17. The duration of the inhibitory effects with static stretching on quadriceps peak torque production.

    PubMed

    Siatras, Theophanis A; Mittas, Vasilios P; Mameletzi, Dimitra N; Vamvakoudis, Eystratios A

    2008-01-01

    Although several studies have investigated the acute effect of static stretching exercises, the duration of exercises that negatively affects performance has not been ascertained. This study was conducted to determine the acute effect of different static stretching durations on quadriceps isometric and isokinetic peak torque production. The 50 participants were randomly allocated into five equivalent sized groups and were asked to perform a stretching exercise of different duration (no stretch, 10-second stretch, 20-second stretch, 30-second stretch, and 60-second stretch). The knee flexion range of motion and the isometric and concentric isokinetic peak torques of the quadriceps were measured before and after a static stretching exercise in the four experimental groups. The same parameters were examined in the control group (no stretch) without stretching, before and after a 5-minute passive rest. There were no significant differences among groups before the experimentation regarding their physical characteristics and performances (P > 0.05). These results reflect the different groups' homogeneity. Significant knee joint flexibility increases (P < 0.001) and significant isometric and isokinetic peak torque reductions (P < 0.05-0.001) have been shown to occur only after 30 and 60 seconds of quadriceps static stretching. Stretching reduced isometric peak torque by 8.5% and 16.0%, respectively. Concerning isokinetic peak torque after 30 and 60 seconds of stretching, it was reduced by 5.5% vs. 11.6% at 60 degrees/s and by 5.8% vs. 10.0% at 180 degrees/s. We suggest that torque decrements are related to changes of muscle neuromechanical properties. It is recommended that static stretching exercises of a muscle group for more than 30 seconds of duration be avoided before performances requiring maximal strength.

  18. Flightin, a novel myofibrillar protein of Drosophila stretch-activated muscles

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    The indirect flight muscles of Drosophila are adapted for rapid oscillatory movements which depend on properties of the contractile apparatus itself. Flight muscles are stretch activated and the frequency of contraction in these muscles is independent of the rate of nerve impulses. Little is known about the molecular basis of these adaptations. We now report a novel protein that is found only in flight muscles and has, therefore, been named flightin. Although we detect only one gene (in polytene region 76D) for flightin, this protein has several isoforms (relative gel mobilities, 27-30 kD; pIs, 4.6-6.0). These isoforms appear to be created by posttranslational modifications. A subset of these isoforms is absent in newly emerged adults but appears when the adult develops the ability to fly. In intact muscles flightin is associated with the A band of the sarcomere, where evidence suggests it interacts with the myosin filaments. Computer database searches do not reveal extensive similarity to any known protein. However, the NH2-terminal 12 residues show similarity to the NH2- terminal sequence of actin, a region that interacts with myosin. These features suggest a role for flightin in the regulation of contraction, possibly by modulating actin-myosin interaction. PMID:8486738

  19. Ultrafast redistribution of vibrational energy after excitation of NH stretching modes in DNA oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozich, V.; Szyc, Ł.; Nibbering, E. T. J.; Werncke, W.; Elsaesser, T.

    2009-04-01

    Vibrational relaxation after spectrally selective excitation within the NH stretching band of adenine-thymine base pairs in DNA oligomers was studied by subpicosecond infrared-pump/anti-Stokes Raman-probe spectroscopy. The decay of the different NH stretching vibrations populates distinct accepting modes in the NH bending range with a rise time of 0.6 ps that is close to the NH stretching decay times. The population of thymine fingerprint modes after excitation of the adenine antisymmetric NH 2 stretching mode points to an ultrafast excitation transfer to the thymine NH stretching vibration before relaxation. The nonequilibrium fingerprint populations decay on a time scale of several picoseconds.

  20. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  1. On the Fabrication, Characterization and Mechanical Properties of Melt-Stretched Stochastic Honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, Megan

    This thesis presents a new type of polypropylene (PP) cellular material fabricated through a simple melt-stretching process. Stochastic honeycombs have an open cell, random honeycomb structure, with webs oriented perpendicular to built-in skins. This process has the advantage that, for example, PP pellets can be turned into a sandwich panel in one step. It was demonstrated that despite the randomness in the web structure, the out-of-plane compressive strength of stochastic honeycombs was repeatable, and exceeded that of commercial PP foams and was comparable to commercial PP honeycombs. The key material properties required to produce an this architecture were shown to be a high melt strength and a high viscosity, branched polymer. The viscosity was shown to affect the total length of the webs in cross-section and the relative partitioning of material through the skin, transition region and webs. Web thickness was affected by the areal density of the polymer during fabrication. Mechanical testing methods were adapted from ASTM standards for honeycombs, and the fabrication method was advanced from a manual to a machine controlled process. Stochastic honeycombs were shown to buckle elastically, plastically, and fracture after the peak strength. Elastic and plastic buckling were dominant at lower densities, and plastic buckling and fracture at higher densities. A thin-plate buckling model for the strength of stochastic honeycombs was developed and verified experimentally. The crystallinity of the polymer affected the tensile strength and stiffness, having a linear effect on the buckling strength. The architecture was composed of webs bound on both sides and webs bound on one side and free on the other. A greater fraction of bound webs increased the strength of the structure in the buckling model. A fabrication study showed that melt-stretching the polymer at higher strain rates increased the connectivity and fraction of bound webs. Additionally, higher density led to a

  2. Mechanical stretching for tissue engineering: two-dimensional and three-dimensional constructs.

    PubMed

    Riehl, Brandon D; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun; Lim, Jung Yul

    2012-08-01

    Mechanical cell stretching may be an attractive strategy for the tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues. It has been demonstrated that cell growth and differentiation can be guided by cell stretch with minimal help from soluble factors and engineered tissues that are mechanically stretched in bioreactors may have superior organization, functionality, and strength compared with unstretched counterparts. This review explores recent studies on cell stretching in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) setups focusing on the applications of stretch stimulation as a tool for controlling cell orientation, growth, gene expression, lineage commitment, and differentiation and for achieving successful tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues, including cardiac, muscle, vasculature, ligament, tendon, bone, and so on. Custom stretching devices and lab-specific mechanical bioreactors are described with a discussion on capabilities and limitations. While stretch mechanotransduction pathways have been examined using 2D stretch, studying such pathways in physiologically relevant 3D environments may be required to understand how cells direct tissue development under stretch. Cell stretch study using 3D milieus may also help to develop tissue-specific stretch regimens optimized with biochemical feedback, which once developed will provide optimal tissue engineering protocols.

  3. Mechanical Stretching for Tissue Engineering: Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Brandon D.; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical cell stretching may be an attractive strategy for the tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues. It has been demonstrated that cell growth and differentiation can be guided by cell stretch with minimal help from soluble factors and engineered tissues that are mechanically stretched in bioreactors may have superior organization, functionality, and strength compared with unstretched counterparts. This review explores recent studies on cell stretching in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) setups focusing on the applications of stretch stimulation as a tool for controlling cell orientation, growth, gene expression, lineage commitment, and differentiation and for achieving successful tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues, including cardiac, muscle, vasculature, ligament, tendon, bone, and so on. Custom stretching devices and lab-specific mechanical bioreactors are described with a discussion on capabilities and limitations. While stretch mechanotransduction pathways have been examined using 2D stretch, studying such pathways in physiologically relevant 3D environments may be required to understand how cells direct tissue development under stretch. Cell stretch study using 3D milieus may also help to develop tissue-specific stretch regimens optimized with biochemical feedback, which once developed will provide optimal tissue engineering protocols. PMID:22335794

  4. The relevance of stretch intensity and position—a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulos, Nikos; Metsios, George S.; Flouris, Andreas D.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Stretching exercises to increase the range of motion (ROM) of joints have been used by sports coaches and medical professionals for improving performance and rehabilitation. The ability of connective and muscular tissues to change their architecture in response to stretching is important for their proper function, repair, and performance. Given the dearth of relevant data in the literature, this review examined two key elements of stretching: stretch intensity and stretch position; and their significance to ROM, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and inflammation in different populations. A search of three databases, Pub-Med, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Reviews, identified 152 articles, which were subsequently categorized into four groups: athletes (24), clinical (29), elderly (12), and general population (87). The use of different populations facilitated a wider examination of the stretching components and their effects. All 152 articles incorporated information regarding duration, frequency and stretch position, whereas only 79 referred to the intensity of stretching and 22 of these 79 studies were deemed high quality. It appears that the intensity of stretching is relatively under-researched, and the importance of body position and its influence on stretch intensity, is largely unknown. In conclusion, this review has highlighted areas for future research, including stretch intensity and position and their effect on musculo-tendinous tissue, in relation to the sensation of pain, delayed onset muscle soreness, inflammation, as well as muscle health and performance. PMID:26347668

  5. Effect of static stretching on prevention of injuries for military recruits.

    PubMed

    Amako, Masatoshi; Oda, Takaaki; Masuoka, Kazunori; Yokoi, Hiromichi; Campisi, Paolo

    2003-06-01

    This prospective study was designed to evaluate whether static stretching can prevent training-related injuries in Japan Ground Self-Defense Force military recruits. A total of 901 recruits between 1996 and 1998 were divided into two groups. Of which, 518 recruits were assigned to the stretching group and practiced static stretching before and after each physical training session. The control subjects (383 recruits in the nonstretching group) did not stretch statically prior to exercise. The static stretching consisted of 18 exercises. We collected injury data from medical records and assessed the incidence and the location of injury. The total injury rate was almost the same between two groups; however, the incidences of muscle/tendon injury and low back pain were significantly lower in the stretching group (p < 0.05). Static stretching decreased the incidence of muscle-related injuries but did not prevent bone or joint injuries.

  6. Stretching Effects: High-intensity & Moderate-duration vs. Low-intensity & Long-duration.

    PubMed

    Freitas, S R; Vaz, J R; Bruno, P M; Andrade, R; Mil-Homens, P

    2016-03-01

    This study examined whether a high-intensity, moderate-duration bout of stretching would produce the same acute effects as a low-intensity, long-duration bout of stretching. 17 volunteers performed 2 knee-flexor stretching protocols: a high-intensity stretch (i. e., 100% of maximum tolerable passive torque) with a moderate duration (243.5 ± 69.5-s); and a low-intensity stretch (50% of tolerable passive torque) with a long duration (900-s). Passive torque at a given sub-maximal angle, peak passive torque, maximal range of motion (ROM), and muscle activity were assessed before and after each stretching protocol (at intervals of 1, 30 and 60 min). The maximal ROM and tolerable passive torque increased for all time points following the high-intensity stretching (p<0.05), but not after the low-intensity protocol (p>0.05). 1 min post-stretching, the passive torque decreased in both protocols, but to a greater extent in the low-intensity protocol. 30 min post-test, torque returned to baseline for the low-intensity protocol and had increased above the baseline for the high-intensity stretches. The following can be concluded: 1) High-intensity stretching increases the maximal ROM and peak passive torque compared to low-intensity stretching; 2) low-intensity, long-duration stretching is the best way to acutely decrease passive torque; and 3) high-intensity, moderate-duration stretching increases passive torque above the baseline 30 min after stretching.

  7. Lamellar thickness and stretching temperature dependency of cavitation in semicrystalline polymers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yaotao; Jiang, Zhiyong; Fu, Lianlian; Lu, Ying; Men, Yongfeng

    2014-01-01

    Polybutene-1 (PB-1), a typical semicrystalline polymer, in its stable form I shows a peculiar temperature dependent strain-whitening behavior when being stretched at temperatures in between room temperature and melting temperature of the crystallites where the extent of strain-whitening weakens with the increasing of stretching temperature reaching a minima value followed by an increase at higher stretching temperatures. Correspondingly, a stronger strain-hardening phenomenon was observed at higher temperatures. The strain-whitening phenomenon in semicrystalline polymers has its origin of cavitation process during stretching. In this work, the effect of crystalline lamellar thickness and stretching temperature on the cavitation process in PB-1 has been investigated by means of combined synchrotron ultrasmall-angle and wide-angle X-ray scattering techniques. Three modes of cavitation during the stretching process can be identified, namely "no cavitation" for the quenched sample with the thinnest lamellae where only shear yielding occurred, "cavitation with reorientation" for the samples stretched at lower temperatures and samples with thicker lamellae, and "cavitation without reorientation" for samples with thinner lamellae stretched at higher temperatures. The mode "cavitation with reorientation" occurs before yield point where the plate-like cavities start to be generated within the lamellar stacks with normal perpendicular to the stretching direction due to the blocky substructure of the crystalline lamellae and reorient gradually to the stretching direction after strain-hardening. The mode of "cavitation without reorientation" appears after yield point where ellipsoidal shaped cavities are generated in those lamellae stacks with normal parallel to the stretching direction followed by an improvement of their orientation at larger strains. X-ray diffraction results reveal a much improved crystalline orientation for samples with thinner lamellae stretched at higher

  8. Resistance training vs. static stretching: effects on flexibility and strength.

    PubMed

    Morton, Sam K; Whitehead, James R; Brinkert, Ronald H; Caine, Dennis J

    2011-12-01

    Morton, SK, Whitehead, JR, Brinkert, RH, and Caine, DJ. Resistance training vs. static stretching: Effects on flexibility and strength. J Strength Cond Res 25(12): 3391-3398, 2011-The purpose of this study was to determine how full-range resistance training (RT) affected flexibility and strength compared to static stretching (SS) of the same muscle-joint complexes in untrained adults. Volunteers (n = 25) were randomized to an RT or SS training group. A group of inactive volunteers (n = 12) served as a convenience control group (CON). After pretesting hamstring extension, hip flexion and extension, shoulder extension flexibility, and peak torque of quadriceps and hamstring muscles, subjects completed 5-week SS or RT treatments in which the aim was to stretch or to strength train the same muscle-joint complexes over similar movements and ranges. Posttests of flexibility and strength were then conducted. There was no difference in hamstring flexibility, hip flexion, and hip extension improvement between RT and SS, but both were superior to CON values. There were no differences between groups on shoulder extension flexibility. The RT group was superior to the CON in knee extension peak torque, but there were no differences between groups on knee flexion peak torque. The results of this preliminary study suggest that carefully constructed full-range RT regimens can improve flexibility as well as the typical SS regimens employed in conditioning programs. Because of the potential practical significance of these results to strength and conditioning programs, further studies using true experimental designs, larger sample sizes, and longer training durations should be conducted with the aim of confirming or disproving these results.

  9. Ultrafast quantitative time-stretch imaging flow cytometry of phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Queenie T. K.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive quantification of phytoplankton abundance, sizes and other parameters, e.g. biomasses, has been an important, yet daunting task in aquatic sciences and biofuel research. It is primarily because of the lack of effective tool to image and thus accurately profile individual microalgae in a large population. The phytoplankton species are highly diversified and heterogeneous in terms of their sizes and the richness in morphological complexity. This fact makes time-stretch imaging, a new ultrafast real-time optical imaging technology, particularly suitable for ultralarge-scale taxonomic classification of phytoplankton together with quantitative image recognition and analysis. We here demonstrate quantitative imaging flow cytometry of single phytoplankton based on quantitative asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (Q-ATOM) - a new time-stretch imaging modality for label-free quantitative phase imaging without interferometric implementations. Sharing the similar concept of Schlieren imaging, Q-ATOM accesses multiple phase-gradient contrasts of each single phytoplankton, from which the quantitative phase profile is computed. We employ such system to capture, at an imaging line-scan rate of 11.6 MHz, high-resolution images of two phytoplankton populations (scenedesmus and chlamydomonas) in ultrafast microfluidic flow (3 m/s). We further perform quantitative taxonomic screening analysis enabled by this technique. More importantly, the system can also generate quantitative phase images of single phytoplankton. This is especially useful for label-free quantification of biomasses (e.g. lipid droplets) of the particular species of interest - an important task adopted in biofuel applications. Combining machine learning for automated classification, Q-ATOM could be an attractive platform for continuous and real-time ultralarge-scale single-phytoplankton analysis.

  10. Axon Stretch Growth: The Mechanotransduction of Neuronal Growth

    PubMed Central

    Loverde, Joseph R.; Tolentino, Rosa E.; Pfister, Bryan J.

    2011-01-01

    During pre-synaptic embryonic development, neuronal processes traverse short distances to reach their targets via growth cone. Over time, neuronal somata are separated from their axon terminals due to skeletal growth of the enlarging organism (Weiss 1941; Gray, Hukkanen et al. 1992). This mechanotransduction induces a secondary mode of neuronal growth capable of accommodating continual elongation of the axon (Bray 1984; Heidemann and Buxbaum 1994; Heidemann, Lamoureux et al. 1995; Pfister, Iwata et al. 2004). Axon Stretch Growth (ASG) is conceivably a central factor in the maturation of short embryonic processes into the long nerves and white matter tracts characteristic of the adult nervous system. To study ASG in vitro, we engineered bioreactors to apply tension to the short axonal processes of neuronal cultures (Loverde, Ozoka et al. 2011). Here, we detail the methods we use to prepare bioreactors and conduct ASG. First, within each stretching lane of the bioreactor, neurons are plated upon a micro-manipulated towing substrate. Next, neurons regenerate their axonal processes, via growth cone extension, onto a stationary substrate. Finally, stretch growth is performed by towing the plated cell bodies away from the axon terminals adhered to the stationary substrate; recapitulating skeletal growth after growth cone extension. Previous work has shown that ASG of embryonic rat dorsal root ganglia neurons are capable of unprecedented growth rates up to 10mm/day, reaching lengths of up to 10cm; while concurrently resulting in increased axonal diameters (Smith, Wolf et al. 2001; Pfister, Iwata et al. 2004; Pfister, Bonislawski et al. 2006; Pfister, Iwata et al. 2006; Smith 2009). This is in dramatic contrast to regenerative growth cone extension (in absence of mechanical stimuli) where growth rates average 1mm/day with successful regeneration limited to lengths of less than 3cm (Fu and Gordon 1997; Pfister, Gordon et al. 2011). Accordingly, further study of ASG may help

  11. Perturbation Predictability Can Influence the Long-Latency Stretch Response

    PubMed Central

    Forgaard, Christopher J.; Franks, Ian M.; Maslovat, Dana; Chua, Romeo

    2016-01-01

    Perturbations applied to the upper limbs elicit short (M1: 25–50 ms) and long-latency (M2: 50–100 ms) responses in the stretched muscle. M1 is produced by a spinal reflex loop, and M2 receives contribution from multiple spinal and supra-spinal pathways. While M1 is relatively immutable to voluntary intention, the remarkable feature of M2 is that its size can change based on intention or goal of the participant (e.g., increasing when resisting the perturbation and decreasing when asked to let-go or relax following the perturbation). While many studies have examined modulation of M2 between passive and various active conditions, through the use of constant foreperiods (interval between warning signal and a perturbation), it has also been shown that the magnitude of the M2 response in a passive condition can change based on factors such as habituation and anticipation of perturbation delivery. To prevent anticipation of a perturbation, most studies have used variable foreperiods; however, the range of possible foreperiod duration differs between experiments. The present study examined the influence of different variable foreperiods on modulation of the M2 response. Fifteen participants performed active and passive responses to a perturbation that stretched wrist flexors. Each block of trials had either a short (2.5–3.5 seconds; high predictability) or long (2.5–10.5 seconds; low predictability) variable foreperiod. As expected, no differences were found between any conditions for M1, while M2 was larger in the active rather than passive conditions. Interestingly, within the two passive conditions, the long variable foreperiods resulted in greater activity at the end of the M2 response than the trials with short foreperiods. These results suggest that perturbation predictability, even when using a variable foreperiod, can influence circuitry contributing to the long-latency stretch response. PMID:27727293

  12. Elastography Study of Hamstring Behaviors during Passive Stretching

    PubMed Central

    Le Sant, Guillaume; Ates, Filiz; Brasseur, Jean-Louis; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The mechanical properties of hamstring muscles are usually inferred from global passive torque/angle relationships, in combination with adjoining tissues crossing the joint investigated. Shear modulus measurement provides an estimate of changes in muscle-tendon stiffness and passive tension. This study aimed to assess the passive individual behavior of each hamstring muscle in different stretching positions using shear wave elastography. Methods/Results The muscle shear modulus of each hamstring muscle was measured during a standardized slow passive knee extension (PKE, 80% of maximal range of motion) on eighteen healthy male volunteers. Firstly, we assessed the reliability of the measurements. Results were good for semitendinosus (ST, CV: 8.9%-13.4%), semimembranosus (SM, CV: 10.3%-11.2%) and biceps femoris long-head (BF-lh, CV: 8.6%-13.3%), but not for biceps femoris short-head (BF-sh, CV: 20.3%-44.9%). Secondly, we investigated each reliable muscle in three stretch positions: 70°, 90° and 110° of hip flexion. The results showed different values of shear modulus for the same amount of perceived stretch, with the highest measurements in the high-flexed hip situation. Moreover, individual muscles displayed different values, with values increasing or BF-lh, SM and ST, respectively. The inter-subject variability was 35.3% for ST, 27.4% for SM and 30.2% for BF-lh. Conclusion This study showed that the hip needs to be high-flexed to efficiently tension the hamstrings, and reports a higher muscle-tendon stress tolerance at 110° of hip angle. In addition muscles have different passive behaviors, and future works will clarify if it can be linked with rate of injury. PMID:26418862

  13. Adaptation of rat soleus muscles to 4 wk of intermittent strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W. T.; Miller, G. R.; Grimmett, J. G.; Knack, K. K.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of repeated strains on rat soleus muscles was investigated by stretching active muscles 3 times/wk for 4 wk with two different methods of stretching. The adaptation of myofibers and noncontractile tissue was followed by histochemical techniques and computer-assisted image analysis. Muscle hypertrophy was seen in the slow-stretched muscles, which increased in mass by 13% and increased in myofiber cross-sectional area by 30%. In the fast-stretched muscle, mass increased by 10% but myofiber cross-sectional area actually decreased. This decrease in mean fiber area was the result of a population of very small fibers (population A) that coexisted with slightly smaller normal-sized fibers (population B). Fibers in population A did not have the distribution expected from atrophy compared with atrophic fibers from unloaded muscles; they were much smaller. In addition, there was a 44% increase in noncontractile tissue in the fast-stretched muscles. Thus, soleus muscles subjected to repeated strains respond differently to slow and fast stretching. Slow stretching results in typical muscle hypertrophy, whereas fast stretching produces somewhat larger muscles but with a mixture of small and normal-sized myofibers accompanied by a marked proliferation of noncontractile tissue.

  14. Effect of Cytoskeletal Reagents on Stretch Activated Ion Channels

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1992-11-12

    transduction. Biophys J59: 1143-1145, 1991. 23. SACHS, F., W. SIGURDSON, A. RUKNUDIN, AND C. BOWMAN. Single- channel mechanosensitive currents. Science 253: 800... mechanosensitive ion channels . In: Advances in Comparative and Environmental Physiology, v0C, edited by F. Ito. Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1992, p. 55-77. Report of Inventions: None 4 ...EFFECT OF CYTOSKELETAL REAGENTS ON STRETCH ACTIVATED ION CHANNELS b lfli..3-f-I’- o0*’t 6. AUTHOR(S) Dr.-Frederick Sachs DI 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME

  15. An energetic model for macromolecules unfolding in stretching experiments

    PubMed Central

    De Tommasi, D.; Millardi, N.; Puglisi, G.; Saccomandi, G.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple approach, based on the minimization of the total (entropic plus unfolding) energy of a two-state system, to describe the unfolding of multi-domain macromolecules (proteins, silks, polysaccharides, nanopolymers). The model is fully analytical and enlightens the role of the different energetic components regulating the unfolding evolution. As an explicit example, we compare the analytical results with a titin atomic force microscopy stretch-induced unfolding experiment showing the ability of the model to quantitatively reproduce the experimental behaviour. In the thermodynamic limit, the sawtooth force–elongation unfolding curve degenerates to a constant force unfolding plateau. PMID:24047874

  16. Stretched Lens Array (SLA) Photovoltaic Concentrator Hardware Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael; O'Neill, Mark J.; Eskenazi, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, the Stretched Lens Array (SLA) photovoltaic concentrator has evolved, under a NASA contract, from a concept with small component demonstrators to operational array hardware that is ready for space validation testing. A fully-functional four panel SLA solar array has been designed, built and tested. This paper will summarize the focus of the hardware development effort, discuss the results of recent testing conducted under this program and present the expected performance of a full size 7kW array designed to meet the requirements of future space missions.

  17. Stretched exponential survival statistics for microorganisms in radiation field

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Plonka, Andrzej; Bogus, Wlodzimierz

    1999-11-01

    The so-called concave or tailed survival curves are reported both for multi and single species bacterial populations. Taking as an example Bacillus pumilus, frequently encountered in decontamination studies, it is shown that the tailed survival curves are adequately described by stretched (0< α<1) exponential SF=exp[-( D/ D0) α], where SF denotes the fraction of species surviving the irradiation dose D, D0 is the effective dose, and α is the dispersion parameter interpreted phenomenologically in terms of radiation sensivity distribution for single species population under the given experimental conditions.

  18. A Miniature Electrical Pressure Gage Utilizing a Stretched Flat Diagram

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patterson, John L

    1952-01-01

    A variable-air-gap, inductance-type, electrical pressure gage is described that is basically 7/16 inch in diameter and 1/4 inch in thickness. The gage was designed to measure accurately pressures fluctuating at high frequencies and has proved to be a value as a general-purpose electrical gage for aeronautical work where small size and minimum response to acceleration forces are important factors. Design equations and curves are presented which can be used to predict the deflections and fundamental natural frequencies of stretched flat diaphragms.

  19. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  20. Mutation at positively selected positions in the binding site for HLA-C shows that KIR2DL1 is a more refined but less adaptable NK cell receptor than KIR2DL3.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Hugo G; Vago, Luca; Older Aguilar, Anastazia M; Moesta, Achim K; Graef, Thorsten; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Norman, Paul J; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Parham, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Through recognition of HLA class I, killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) modulate NK cell functions in human immunity and reproduction. Although a minority of HLA-A and -B allotypes are KIR ligands, HLA-C allotypes dominate this regulation, because they all carry either the C1 epitope recognized by KIR2DL2/3 or the C2 epitope recognized by KIR2DL1. The C1 epitope and C1-specific KIR evolved first, followed several million years later by the C2 epitope and C2-specific KIR. Strong, varying selection pressure on NK cell functions drove the diversification and divergence of hominid KIR, with six positions in the HLA class I binding site of KIR being targets for positive diversifying selection. Introducing each naturally occurring residue at these positions into KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3 produced 38 point mutants that were tested for binding to 95 HLA- A, -B, and -C allotypes. Modulating specificity for HLA-C is position 44, whereas positions 71 and 131 control cross-reactivity with HLA-A*11:02. Dominating avidity modulation is position 70, with lesser contributions from positions 68 and 182. KIR2DL3 has lower avidity and broader specificity than KIR2DL1. Mutation could increase the avidity and change the specificity of KIR2DL3, whereas KIR2DL1 specificity was resistant to mutation, and its avidity could only be lowered. The contrasting inflexibility of KIR2DL1 and adaptability of KIR2DL3 fit with C2-specific KIR having evolved from C1-specific KIR, and not vice versa. Substitutions restricted to activating KIR all reduced the avidity of KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3, further evidence that activating KIR function often becomes subject to selective attenuation.

  1. A Library of Infectious Hepatitis C Viruses with Engineered Mutations in the E2 Gene Reveals Growth-Adaptive Mutations That Modulate Interactions with Scavenger Receptor Class B Type I.

    PubMed

    Zuiani, Adam; Chen, Kevin; Schwarz, Megan C; White, James P; Luca, Vincent C; Fremont, Daved H; Wang, David; Evans, Matthew J; Diamond, Michael S

    2016-12-01

    While natural hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection results in highly diverse quasispecies of related viruses over time, mutations accumulate more slowly in tissue culture, in part because of the inefficiency of replication in cells. To create a highly diverse population of HCV particles in cell culture and identify novel growth-enhancing mutations, we engineered a library of infectious HCV with all codons represented at most positions in the ectodomain of the E2 gene. We identified many putative growth-adaptive mutations and selected nine highly represented E2 mutants for further study: Q412R, T416R, S449P, T563V, A579R, L619T, V626S, K632T, and L644I. We evaluated these mutants for changes in particle-to-infectious-unit ratio, sensitivity to neutralizing antibody or CD81 large extracellular loop (CD81-LEL) inhibition, entry factor usage, and buoyant density profiles. Q412R, T416R, S449P, T563V, and L619T were neutralized more efficiently by anti-E2 antibodies and T416R, T563V, and L619T by CD81-LEL. Remarkably, all nine variants showed reduced dependence on scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI) for infection. This shift from SR-BI usage did not correlate with a change in the buoyant density profiles of the variants, suggesting an altered E2-SR-BI interaction rather than changes in the virus-associated lipoprotein-E2 interaction. Our results demonstrate that residues influencing SR-BI usage are distributed across E2 and support the development of large-scale mutagenesis studies to identify viral variants with unique functional properties.

  2. Acute Effects of Different Agonist and Antagonist Stretching Arrangements on Static and Dynamic Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, stretching exercises are considered as basic components of warm up aiming to prepare the musculoskeletal system for performance and to prevent injuries. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different agonist and antagonist stretching arrangements within a pre-exercise warm-up on hip static (SROM) and dynamic range of motion (DROM). Materials and Methods: Sixty trained male subjects (Mean ± SD: height, 177.38 ± 6.92 cm; body mass, 68.4 ± 10.22 kg; age, 21.52 ± 1.17 years) volunteered to participate in this study. SROM was measured by V-sit test and DROM captured by a motion analysis system before and after (i) static stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (SFSE), (ii) dynamic stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (DFDE), (iii) static stretching for the hip flexors and dynamic stretching for hip extensors (SFDE), and (iv) dynamic stretching for the hip flexors and static stretching for hip extensors (DFSE). Results: DFSE showed a significantly higher increase in DROM and SROM than the remainder of the stretching protocols (P < 0.05). There were significant differences between DFDE with SFSE and SFDE (P < 0.05) and SFSE showed significant increase as compared to SFDE (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In conclusion, DFSE is probably the best stretching arrangement due to producing more post activation potentiation on agonist muscles and less muscle stiffness in antagonist muscles. PMID:26715975

  3. Morphology and Mechanical Properties of Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate) Stretched Above the Glass Transition Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Lyudmil V.; Viana, Júlio C.

    2007-04-01

    This study presents an experimental investigation into the development of the strain-induced morphology of amorphous poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, stretched above its glass transition temperature. The present work aims at: i) defining the most important processing parameters that govern the structure formation and its significance; ii) characterising the mechanical properties of uniaxial stretched glassy PET, as an approach for industrial stretch-blow moulding techniques; iii) establishing structure-properties relationships. Compression moulded amorphous PET was uniaxial stretched with variations of following stretching parameters: stretching temperature, Tst, stretching velocity, Vst, and stretching ratio, λst, that were varied in two levels according to a L8 Taguchi orthogonal array. The developed morphologies were observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), birefringence and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS). The mechanical behaviour was assessed in tensile testing at 15 mm.min-1 and room temperature. The results were treated by a statistical ANOVA tool. A strong thermal and mechanical coupling is evidenced in the stretching process, significantly influencing the morphology development. The main stretching parameters controlling microstructure formation were defined. The relationships between the microstructure and mechanical properties were established too.

  4. Short bouts of stretching increase myo-D, myostatin and atrogin-1 in rat soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Peviani, Sabrina Messa; Gomes, Anna Raquel Silveira; Moreira, Roberta Fátima Carreira; Moriscot, Anselmo Sigari; Salvini, Tania Fátima

    2007-03-01

    Stretching is widely used in rehabilitation and sports activities to improve joint range-of-motion and flexibility in humans, but the effect of stretching on the gene expression of skeletal muscle is poorly understood. We evaluated the effect of short bouts of passive stretching of rat soleus muscle on myo-D, myostatin, and atrogin-1 gene expressions. Six groups of animals were submitted to a single session of stretching (10 stretches of 1 minute with 30 seconds of rest between them, performed manually) and were evaluated immediately (I), and 8, 24, 48, 72, and 168 hours after the session. To evaluate the effect of repetitive sessions of stretching on the soleus muscle over 1 week, three groups of animals received a single session per day of stretching and the muscle was evaluated immediately after 2, 3, and 7 sessions. The mRNA levels of myo-D, myostatin, and atrogin-1 were determined by real-time polymerase chain reaction. A single session of stretching increased the mRNA levels of myo-D (after 24 h), myostatin (I, and 168 h later), and atrogin-1 (after 48 h). Repeated daily session of stretching over 1 week increased myostatin (after 7 sessions) and atrogin-1 expression (after 2, 3, and 7 sessions). Thus, short bouts of passive stretching are able to increase the gene expression of factors associated with muscle growth (myo-D), negative regulation of muscle mass (myostatin), and atrophy (atrogin-1), indicating muscle remodeling through different pathways.

  5. The effects of dynamic stretching on plantar flexor muscle-tendon tissue properties.

    PubMed

    Samukawa, Mina; Hattori, Masaki; Sugama, Naoko; Takeda, Naoki

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic stretching is commonly used in warm-up routines for athletic activities. Even though several positive effects of dynamic stretching on athletic performance have been reported, the effects on the muscle-tendon unit (MTU) itself are still unclear. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of dynamic stretching on the ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon properties by use of ultrasonography. Twenty healthy male subjects participated in the present study. The subjects were asked to engage in dynamic stretching of plantar flexors for 30 s and to repeat for 5 sets. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM was measured before and after the dynamic stretching. Changes in the displacement of the myotendinous junction (MTJ), pennation angle, and fascicle length were also determined by using ultrasonography. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM increased significantly after the dynamic stretching (p < 0.0001). A significant distal displacement of the MTJ was observed until the second stretching set (p < 0.001) with no significant changes thereafter. Pennation angle, and fascicle length were unaffected by the dynamic stretching. Dynamic stretching was shown to be effective in increasing ankle joint flexibility. Outcomes that could have indicated changes in muscle tissue (such as the pennation angle and fascicle length) were unaltered. However, a significant displacement of the MTJ was found, indicating some change in the tendon tissues. Therefore, dynamic stretching of the plantar flexors was considered an effective means of lengthening the tendon tissues.

  6. Effects of contraction intensity on muscle fascicle and stretch reflex behavior in the human triceps surae.

    PubMed

    Cronin, Neil J; Peltonen, Jussi; Ishikawa, Masaki; Komi, Paavo V; Avela, Janne; Sinkjaer, Thomas; Voigt, Michael

    2008-07-01

    The aims of this study were to examine changes in the distribution of a stretch to the muscle fascicles with changes in contraction intensity in the human triceps surae and to relate fascicle stretch responses to short-latency stretch reflex behavior. Thirteen healthy subjects were seated in an ankle ergometer, and dorsiflexion stretches (8 degrees ; 250 degrees /s) were applied to the triceps surae at different moment levels (0-100% of maximal voluntary contraction). Surface EMG was recorded in the medial gastrocnemius, soleus, and tibialis anterior muscles, and ultrasound was used to measure medial gastrocnemius and soleus fascicle lengths. At low forces, reflex amplitudes increased despite a lack of change or even a decrease in fascicle stretch velocities. At high forces, lower fascicle stretch velocities coincided with smaller stretch reflexes. The results revealed a decline in fascicle stretch velocity of over 50% between passive conditions and maximal force levels in the major muscles of the triceps surae. This is likely to be an important factor related to the decline in stretch reflex amplitudes at high forces. Because short-latency stretch reflexes contribute to force production and stiffness regulation of human muscle fibers, a reduction in afferent feedback from muscle spindles could decrease the efficacy of human movements involving the triceps surae, particularly where high force production is required.

  7. Tactile spatial acuity is reduced by skin stretch at the human wrist.

    PubMed

    Cody, Frederick W J; Idrees, Raheel; Spilioti, Diamantina X; Poliakoff, Ellen

    2010-10-22

    The skin is an elastic organ that is continuously distorted as our limbs move. The hypothesis that the precision of human tactile localisation is reduced when the skin is stretched, with concurrent expansion of receptive fields (RFs) was tested. Locognosic acuity over the dorsal wrist area was quantified during application of background stretch by (a) Wrist-Bend (skin stretch combined with non-cutaneous proprioceptor activation) and (b) Skin-Pull (skin stretch alone). Participants identified the perceived direction (distal or proximal) of brief test stimuli, applied along a 7-point linear array, relative to a central reference locus. Performance was significantly reduced during the large amplitude compared to the small amplitude of tonic skin stretch, but there was no effect of stretch mode (Wrist-Bend, Skin-Pull), nor was the effect of stretch amplitude modulated by the mode of stretch. Locognosic acuity was poorer than baseline accuracy for the large amplitude skin stretches, for both application modes, but did not differ significantly from baseline for either of the small amplitude stretches. We interpret these observations as corroborating the long-held assumption that tactile localisation is primarily dependent upon the RF dimensions, and associated innervation densities, of regional touch units. The finding that performance was reduced to a similar extent under Skin-Pull and Wrist-Bend conditions suggests that non-cutaneous proprioceptors had rather little tonic modulatory effect.

  8. Timing and magnitude of systolic stretch affect myofilament activation and mechanical work

    PubMed Central

    Tangney, Jared R.; Campbell, Stuart G.; McCulloch, Andrew D.

    2014-01-01

    Dyssynchronous activation of the heart leads to abnormal regional systolic stretch. In vivo studies have suggested that the timing of systolic stretch can affect regional tension and external work development. In the present study, we measured the direct effects of systolic stretch timing on the magnitude of tension and external work development in isolated murine right ventricular papillary muscles. A servomotor was used to impose precisely timed stretches relative to electrical activation while a force transducer measured force output and strain was monitored using a charge-couple device camera and topical markers. Stretches taking place during peak intracellular Ca2+ statistically increased peak tension up to 270%, whereas external work due to stretches in this interval reached values of 500 J/m. An experimental analysis showed that time-varying elastance overestimated peak tension by 100% for stretches occurring after peak isometric tension. The addition of the force-velocity relation explained some effects of stretches occurring before the peak of the Ca2+ transient but had no effect in later stretches. An estimate of transient deactivation was measured by performing quick stretches to dissociate cross-bridges. The timing of transient deactivation explained the remaining differences between the model and experiment. These results suggest that stretch near the start of cardiac tension development substantially increases twitch tension and mechanical work production, whereas late stretches decrease external work. While the increased work can mostly be explained by the time-varying elastance of cardiac muscle, the decreased work in muscles stretched after the peak of the Ca2+ transient is largely due to myofilament deactivation. PMID:24878774

  9. Analysis of a Stretched Derivative Aircraft with Open Rotor Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Hendricks, Eric S.; Haller, William J.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Research into advanced, high-speed civil turboprops received significant attention during the 1970s and 1980s when fuel efficiency was the driving focus of U.S. aeronautical research. But when fuel prices declined sharply there was no longer sufficient motivation to continue maturing the technology. Recent volatility in fuel prices and increasing concern for aviation's environmental impact, however, have renewed interest in unducted, open rotor propulsion and revived research by NASA and a number of engine manufacturers. Recently, NASA and General Electric have teamed to conduct several investigations into the performance and noise of an advanced, single-aisle transport with open rotor propulsion. The results of these initial studies indicate open rotor engines have the potential to provide significant reduction in fuel consumption compared to aircraft using turbofan engines with equivalent core technology. In addition, noise analysis of the concept indicates that an open rotor aircraft in the single-aisle transport class would be able to meet current noise regulations with margin. The behavior of derivative open rotor transports is of interest. Heavier, "stretched" derivative aircraft tend to be noisier than their lighter relatives. Of particular importance to the business case for the concept is how the noise margin changes relative to regulatory limits within a family of similar open rotor aircraft. The subject of this report is a performance and noise assessment of a notional, heavier, stretched derivative airplane equipped with throttle-push variants of NASA's initial open rotor engine design.

  10. First Measurements and Results With a Stretched Wire Test Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Franz

    2010-12-13

    The LINAC Coherent Light Source [LCLS] is a free electron laser, designed to produce high brilliant X-ray beams using Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission [SASE]. Due to the physics of SASE, the electron beam has to be held very precisely on the same trajectory as the X-ray light beam generated by the undulator magnets. To optimize the SASE output, trajectory deviations between both beams have to be minimized to a few micrometers along the entire undulator section and held stable over the time period between beam-based-alignment processes. Consequently, extremely high position stability of all magnets in the undulator section is required to operate the LCLS successfully. The knowledge of any magnet movement exceeding few micrometers during periods of several weeks is essential for efficient X-ray generation. A well known principle of monitoring transverse component positions along beam lines is the application of stretched wires, associated with suitable wire position sensors and electronics. The particular challenge at LCLS is the required wire system performance in conjunction with the length of the undulator section and the large number of monitors. Verification of system stability and resolution under real conditions is the primary goal of this test setup. A stretched wire test setup has been implemented to gain experience for the final design of a wire system, which will meet the position monitoring requirements in the LCLS undulator section. The report briefly introduces the system's architecture and describes first measurements and results.

  11. Stretching of Single Polymer Chains Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C.; van der Vegte, E. W.; van Swieten, E.; Robillard, G. T.; Hadziioannou, G.

    1998-03-01

    A variety of macroscopic phenomenon involve "nanoscale" polymer deformation including rubber elasticity, shear yielding, strain hardening, stress relaxation, fracture, and flow. With the advent of new and improved experimental techniques, such as the atomic force microscope (AFM), the probing of physical properties of polymers has reached finer and finer scales. The development of mixed self-assembling monolayer techniques and the chemical functionalization of AFM probe tips has allowed for mechanical experiments on single polymer chains of molecular dimensions. In our experiments, mixed monolayers are prepared in which end-functionalized, flexible polymer chains of thiol-terminated poly(methacrylic acid) are covalently bonded, isolated, and randomly distributed on gold substrates. The coils are then imaged, tethered to a gold-coated AFM tip, and stretched between the tip and the substrate in a conventional force / distance experiment. An increase in the attractive force due to entropic, elastic resistance to stretching, as well as fracture of the polymer chain is observed. The effect of chain stiffness, topological constraints, strain rate, mechanical hysteresis, and stress relaxation were investigated. Force modulation techniques were also employed in order to image the viscoelastic character of the polymer chains. Parallel work includes similar studies of biological systems such as wheat gluten proteins and polypeptides.

  12. OH-stretch vibrational spectroscopy of hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide.

    PubMed

    Fry, Juliane L; Matthews, Jamie; Lane, Joseph R; Roehl, Coleen M; Sinha, Amitabha; Kjaergaard, Henrik G; Wennberg, Paul O

    2006-06-08

    We report measurement and analysis of the photodissociation spectrum of hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide (HOCH(2)OOH) and its partially deuterated analogue, HOCD(2)OOH, in the OH-stretching region. Spectra are obtained by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy in the 1nu(OH) and 2nu(OH) regions, and by laser induced fluorescence detection of the OH fragment produced from dissociation of HOCH(2)OOH initiated by excitation of the 4nu(OH) and 5nu(OH) overtone regions (action spectroscopy). A one-dimensional local-mode model of each OH chromophore is used with ab initio calculated OH-stretching potential energy and dipole moment curves at the coupled-cluster level of theory. Major features in the observed absorption and photodissociation spectra are explained by our local-mode model. In the 4nu(OH) region, explanation of the photodissocation spectrum requires a nonuniform quantum yield, which is estimated by assuming statistical energy distribution in the excited state. Based on the estimated dissociation threshold, overtone photodissociation is not expected to significantly influence the atmospheric lifetime of hydroxymethyl hydroperoxide.

  13. The acoustic emissions of cavitation bubbles in stretched vortices.

    PubMed

    Chang, Natasha A; Ceccio, Steven L

    2011-11-01

    Pairs of unequal strength, counter-rotating vortices were produced in order to examine the inception, dynamics, and acoustic emission of cavitation bubbles in rapidly stretching vortices. The acoustic signatures of these cavitation bubbles were characterized during their inception, growth, and collapse. Growing and collapsing bubbles often produced a sharp, broadband, pop sound. The spectrum of these bubbles, and the peak resonant frequency can generally be related to quiescent flow bubble dynamics and corresponding resonant frequencies. However, some elongated cavitation bubbles produced a short tonal burst, or chirp, with frequencies on the order of a few kilohertz. Theses frequencies are too low to be related to resonant frequencies of a bubble in a quiescent flow. Instead, the frequency content of the acoustic signal during bubble inception and growth is related to the volumetric oscillations of the bubble while it interacted with vortical flow that surrounds the bubble (i.e., the resonant frequency of the vortex-bubble system). A relationship was determined between the observed peak frequency of the oscillations, the highly stretched vortex properties, and the water nuclei content. It was found that different cavitation spectra could relate to different flow and fluid properties and therefore would not scale in the same manner.

  14. The southwestern Nansen Basin: Crustal stretching and sea floor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglar, Kai; Ehrhardt, Axel; Damm, Volkmar; Heyde, Ingo; Schreckenberger, Bernd; Barckhausen, Udo

    2014-05-01

    New geophysical data were collected in August/September 2013 north of Svalbard in the zone from the North Barents shelf towards the oceanic Nansen Basin. We acquired 1056 km of multi-channel seismic data, 2658 km of magnetic data and more than 5000 km of gravity, bathymetric and sediment echosounder data. In the east of the working area, the transition from the Yermak Plateau to the Nansen Basin is characterized by block faulting and well developed syn-rift basins. A large crustal block located about 80 km east of the Yermak Plateau and 120 km north of the slope of the Barents shelf indicates extensive rifting and east-west directed crustal stretching and the absence of oceanic crust in that area. A different picture is found north of Kvitoya Island, in the western part of the working area. There, the slope of the Barents shelf is very steep and a distinct continent-ocean-boundary seems to be located directly at the foot of the slope where we interpret oceanic crust characterized by irregular topography based on the multi-channel seismic data. This will be tested by an analysis of the gravity and magnetic data which is currently work in progress. The combination of east-west-directed continental stretching east of the Yermak Plateau and adjacent oceanic crust to the west points to an opening of the southwesternmost part of the Nansen Basin prior to the spreading of the Gakkel Ridge, possibly related to the opening of the Amerasian Basin.

  15. The carpal stretch test at the rheumatoid wrist.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Hiroyuki; Beppu, Moroe; Matsusita, Kazuhiko; Arai, Takeshi; Yoshida, Noriyuki

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the radiographic changes of the carpus for rheumatoid wrists in patients who underwent the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure by examining the clinical results and comparing pre- and postoperative radiographic measurements. We studied 43 wrists in 37 patients who showed vertical laxity in the radiocarpal and midcarpal joint on preoperative carpal stretch test. Pain was improved in all patients and the forearm rotation angles of the wrist were significantly improved after the operation. The carpal collapse ratio was significantly reduced after the operation. The carpal collapse reduction rate was significantly greater in the group with than that in the group without midcarpal joint vertical laxity on the carpal stretch test. Although the Sauvé-Kapandji procedure was not sufficiently effective in preventing carpal collapse, it did have a protective effect against ulnar carpal shift. The results of our study showed that vertical laxity of the midcarpal joint was the risk factor of the carpal collapse after Sauvé-Kapandji procedure.

  16. Tweed Relaxation: a new multigrid smoother for stretched structured grids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bewley, Thomas; Mashayekhi, Alireza

    2012-11-01

    In DNS/LES of the NSE using a fractional step method, one must accurately solve a Poisson equation for the pressure update at each timestep. This step often represents a significant fraction of the overall computational burden and, when Fourier methods are unavailable, geometric multigrid methods are a preferred choice. When working on an unstretched Cartesian grid, the red-black Gauss-Seidel method is the most efficient multigrid smoother available. When working on a Cartesian grid that is stretched in 1 coordinate direction to provide grid clustering near a wall, zebra relaxation, on sets of lines perpendicular to the wall, is most efficient. When working on a structured grid that is stretched in 2 or 3 coordinate directions, however, one is forced to alternate the directions that the zebra relaxation is applied in order to pass information quickly across all regions of grid clustering. A new relaxation method is introduced which is shown to significantly outperform such alternating direction line smoothers. This new method is implicit along sets of lines that branch and form 90° corners, like the stripes at the shoulder of a tweed shirt, to stay everywhere perpendicular to the nearest wall, thus passing information quickly across all regions of grid clustering.

  17. Nonlinear effects of stretch on the flame front propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Halter, F.; Tahtouh, T.; Mounaim-Rousselle, C.

    2010-10-15

    In all experimental configurations, the flames are affected by stretch (curvature and/or strain rate). To obtain the unstretched flame speed, independent of the experimental configuration, the measured flame speed needs to be corrected. Usually, a linear relationship linking the flame speed to stretch is used. However, this linear relation is the result of several assumptions, which may be incorrected. The present study aims at evaluating the error in the laminar burning speed evaluation induced by using the traditional linear methodology. Experiments were performed in a closed vessel at atmospheric pressure for two different mixtures: methane/air and iso-octane/air. The initial temperatures were respectively 300 K and 400 K for methane and iso-octane. Both methodologies (linear and nonlinear) are applied and results in terms of laminar speed and burned gas Markstein length are compared. Methane and iso-octane were chosen because they present opposite evolutions in their Markstein length when the equivalence ratio is increased. The error induced by the linear methodology is evaluated, taking the nonlinear methodology as the reference. It is observed that the use of the linear methodology starts to induce substantial errors after an equivalence ratio of 1.1 for methane/air mixtures and before an equivalence ratio of 1 for iso-octane/air mixtures. One solution to increase the accuracy of the linear methodology for these critical cases consists in reducing the number of points used in the linear methodology by increasing the initial flame radius used. (author)

  18. Electro-optical property of extremely stretched skinned muscle fibers.

    PubMed Central

    Umazume, Y; Fujime, S

    1975-01-01

    Skinned fibers of frog semitendinosus muscle could easily be stretched up to 8 mum or more in sarcomere length. Such extremely stretched fibers gave quite sharp optical diffraction patterns. The intensities of all observable diffraction lines were found to increase on application of electric field (10 similar to 100 V/cm) parallel to the fiber axis, provided that there was no overlap between thin and thick filaments. By use of a polarizing microscope, it was concluded that I-bands were mainly responsible for this intensity increase. By application of square pulses, the time course of the intensity increase and decay was followed. The analysis based on a simple model suggests: (a) Each thin filament has a permanent dipole movement and the movement directs from Z-bands to the free end of the thin filament. (b) The flexural rigidity of thin filaments is estimated to be similar to 3 with 10-17 dyn with cm-2. The present fibers will provide various applications in physiochemical studies of in vivo thin and thick filaments. Images FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 FIGURE 10 PMID:1078630

  19. Hacking the code of amyloid formation: the amyloid stretch hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Pastor, M Teresa; Esteras-Chopo, Alexandra; Serrano, Luis

    2007-01-01

    Many research efforts in the last years have been directed towards understanding the factors determining protein misfolding and amyloid formation. Protein stability and amino acid composition have been identified as the two major factors in vitro. The research of our group has been focused on understanding the relationship between amino acid sequence and amyloid formation. Our approach has been the design of simple model systems that reproduce the biophysical properties of natural amyloids. An amyloid sequence pattern was extracted that can be used to detect amyloidogenic hexapeptide stretches in proteins. We have added evidence supporting that these amyloidogenic stretches can trigger amyloid formation by nonamyloidogenic proteins. Some experimental results in other amyloid proteins will be analyzed under the conclusions obtained in these studies. Our conclusions together with evidences from other groups suggest that amyloid formation is the result of the interplay between a decrease of protein stability, and the presence of highly amyloidogenic regions in proteins. As many of these results have been obtained in vitro, the challenge for the next years will be to demonstrate their validity in in vivo systems.

  20. Effect of Biaxial Stretching at Temperatures and Strain Histories Comparable to Injection Stretch Blow Moulding on Tensile Modulus for Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. W.; Menary, G. H.; Harkin-Jones, E. M. A.; Armstrong, C. G.; Martin, P. J.

    2007-04-01

    This study is particularly relevant to the injection stretch blow moulding (ISBM) process where PET material is typically biaxially stretched to form bottles for the water and carbonated soft drinks industry. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of biaxial stretching on the mechanical properties of Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) using a custom built biaxial testing machine. An initially amorphous PET sample was prepared via injection moulding to form a square sample (76mm × 76mm) suitable for stretching on the machine. This sample was then subjected to a series of biaxial tests (simultaneous and sequential) within a temperature range between 85°C and 110 °C, strain rates in the range of 1s-1 to 32s-1 and stretch ratios in the range of 1.5 to 3. Specimens were subsequently cut from the biaxial stretched sheets and used to measure the tensile modulus. Results showed that there is almost no effect found for strain rate and temperature on modulus development whilst stretch ratio and mode of deformation played the most important role on modulus development on PET under biaxial deformation.

  1. On the increase in rate of heat production caused by stretch in frog's skeletal muscle

    PubMed Central

    Clinch, N. F.

    1968-01-01

    1. The increase in rate of heat production caused by stretch in the unstimulated frog's sartorius (stretch response) has been measured using a conventional thermopile technique. 2. The rate of heat production was found constant between l0 (the distance in vivo between the tendons when the legs were in a straight line) and 1·2 l0, and rose rapidly above this length to reach 3-5 times the basal rate at 1·3 l0. Stretching to greater lengths appeared to damage the muscles. 3. The stretch response is increased by several substances which increase the duration of the active state. 4. Unlike the rate of heat production at l0, the stretch response is increased by procaine; while the presence of CO2 greatly reduces it. 5. Evidence is presented supporting the hypothesis that the stretch response is associated with the appearance of tension in the sarcolemma. ImagesFig. 2 PMID:5652883

  2. Effect of Lower Extremity Stretching Exercises on Balance in Geriatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Ravi Shankar; Alahmari, Khalid A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective The purpose of this study was to find “Effect of lower extremity stretching exercises on balance in the geriatric population. Method 60 subjects (30 male and 30 female) participated in the study. The subjects underwent 10 weeks of lower limb stretching exercise program. Pre and post 10 weeks stretching exercise program, the subjects were assessed for balance, using single limb stance time in seconds and berg balance score. These outcome measures were analyzed. Results Pre and post lower extremity stretching on balance was analyzed using paired t test. Of 60 subjects 50 subjects completed the stretching exercise program. Paired sample t test analysis showed a significant improvement in single limb stance time (eyes open and eyes closed) (p<0.001) and berg balance score (p<0.001). Conclusion Lower extremity stretching exercises enhances balance in the geriatric population and thereby reduction in the number of falls. PMID:27610062

  3. The Effects of Hamstring Stretching on Leg Rotation during Knee Extension.

    PubMed

    Kimura, Atsushi

    2013-06-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of hamstring stretching on leg rotation during active knee extension. [Subjects] Subjects were 100 bilateral legs of 50 healthy women without articular disease. [Methods] Hamstring hardness, leg rotation and muscle activities of the knee extensors during active knee extension were measured before and after hamstring stretching. [Results] Hamstring hardness was significantly decreased after hamstring stretching. The leg rotation angle, variation in leg rotation angle, variation in leg external rotation angle, and muscle activities of the vastus lateralis and rectus femoris were significantly increased after hamstring stretching. A moderate positive correlation was found between variation in leg rotation and variation in muscle hardness in hamstring. [Conclusion] Leg rotation during active knee extension was increased by hamstring stretching. Hamstring stretching would be effective as a pretreatment for restoring proper leg rotation when knee extension is conducted as a therapeutic exercise.

  4. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  5. Comparing the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Steven L; Kim, Eonho; Seo, Dong-Il; Bemben, Michael G

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men. Twenty-one men were randomly assigned to vibration-stretching (VS; n = 8), vibration only (VO; n = 6), or stretching only (SO; n = 7) groups that trained 3 times per week for 3 weeks. All 3 groups performed 9 total sets of 30-second stretches. The VS group performed four 30-second upper-body vibration exercises and five 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. The VO group performed nine 30-second upper-body vibration exercises. The SO group performed nine 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. Shoulder flexion (SF), shoulder extension (SE), and shoulder transverse extension (STE) were assessed by a Leighton Flexometer and back scratch tests bilaterally (BSR, BSL) were measured via tape measure. A 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) evaluated groups at baseline and a 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA evaluated the interventions over time. At baseline, there were no group differences in age, height, or weight. There was a significant (p < 0.01) time main effect for each flexibility outcome variable (SF: +6.1%, +3.9%, +3.4%; SE: +8.9%, +13.5%, +26.9%; STE: +12.8%, +8.7%, +24.3%; BSR: +4.4 cm, +3.4 cm, +3.1 cm; BSL: +3.6 cm, +2.3 cm, +6.1 cm) for SO, VO, and VS, respectively. Shoulder extension was the only variable that showed a significant (p < 0.05) interaction effect for group by time. In conclusion, vibration training, alone or combined with stretching, is a viable alternative to a standard stretching routine when attempting to increase shoulder flexibility. Adding vibration training to a flexibility regimen may improve the likelihood of regularly performing flexibility sessions because of increased variety.

  6. Mechanical Stretch-Induced Activation of ROS/RNS Signaling in Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Christopher W.; Prosser, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Mechanical activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) occurs in striated muscle and affects Ca2+ signaling and contractile function. ROS/RNS signaling is tightly controlled, spatially compartmentalized, and source specific. Recent Advances: Here, we review the evidence that within the contracting myocyte, the trans-membrane protein NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) is the primary source of ROS generated during contraction. We also review a newly characterized signaling cascade in cardiac and skeletal muscle in which the microtubule network acts as a mechanotransduction element that activates Nox2-dependent ROS generation during mechanical stretch, a pathway termed X-ROS signaling. Critical Issues: In the heart, X-ROS acts locally and affects the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors) and tunes Ca2+ signaling during physiological behavior, but excessive X-ROS can promote Ca2+-dependent arrhythmias in pathology. In skeletal muscle, X-ROS sensitizes Ca2+-permeable sarcolemmal “transient receptor potential” channels, a pathway that is critical for sustaining SR load during repetitive contractions, but when in excess, it is maladaptive in diseases such as Duchenne Musclar dystrophy. Future Directions: New advances in ROS/RNS detection as well as molecular manipulation of signaling pathways will provide critical new mechanistic insights into the details of X-ROS signaling. These efforts will undoubtedly reveal new avenues for therapeutic intervention in the numerous diseases of striated muscle in which altered mechanoactivation of ROS/RNS production has been identified. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 929–936. PMID:23971496

  7. The effects of passive stretching plus vibration on strength and activation of the plantar flexors.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jonathan D; Herda, Trent J; Trevino, Michael A; Mosier, Eric M

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the effects of passive stretching only (PS+CON) and passive stretching with the addition of continuous vibration (VIB) during post-passive stretching tests (PS+VIB) on peak torque (PT), percent voluntary inactivation (%VI), single stimulus twitch torque (TTSINGLE), and doublet stimuli twitch torque (TTDOUBLET) of the plantar flexors at a short (20° plantar flexion (PF)) and long muscle length (15° dorsiflexion (DF)). Fourteen healthy men (age = 22 ± 3 years) performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions at PF and DF, and passive range of motion (PROM) assessments before and after 8 × 30-s passive stretches without (PS+CON) or with VIB (PS+VIB) administered continuously throughout post-passive stretching tests. The passive properties of the muscle tendon unit were assessed pre- and post-passive stretching via PROM, passive torque (PASSTQ), and musculotendinous stiffness (MTS) measurements. PT, TTSINGLE, and TTDOUBLET decreased, whereas, %VI increased following passive stretching at PF and DF (P < 0.05) with no significant differences between PS+CON and PS+VIB. PASSTQ and MTS decreased while PROM increased post-passive stretching during both trials (P < 0.05). The stretching-induced force/torque deficit and increases in %VI were evident following passive stretching at short and long muscle lengths. Although not statistically significant, effect size calculations suggested large and moderate differences in the absolute changes in PT (Cohen's d = 1.14) and %VI (Cohen's d = 0.54) from pre- to post-passive stretching between treatments, with PS+VIB having greater decreases of PT and higher %VI than PS+CON. The decrement in PT following passive stretching may be primarily neural in origin.

  8. Lewis lung carcinoma regulation of mechanical stretch-induced protein synthesis in cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Carson, James A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stretch can activate muscle and myotube protein synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. While it has been established that tumor-derived cachectic factors can induce myotube wasting, the effect of this catabolic environment on myotube mechanical signaling has not been determined. We investigated whether media containing cachectic factors derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) can regulate the stretch induction of myotube protein synthesis. C2C12 myotubes preincubated in control or LLC-derived media were chronically stretched. Protein synthesis regulation by anabolic and catabolic signaling was then examined. In the control condition, stretch increased mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis. The LLC treatment decreased basal mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis and attenuated the stretch induction of protein synthesis. LLC media increased STAT3 and AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in myotubes, independent of stretch. Both stretch and LLC independently increased ERK1/2, p38, and NF-κB phosphorylation. In LLC-treated myotubes, the inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 rescued the stretch induction of protein synthesis. Interestingly, either leukemia inhibitory factor or glycoprotein 130 antibody administration caused further inhibition of mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis in stretched myotubes. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibition increased basal mTORC1 signaling activity and protein synthesis in LLC-treated myotubes, but did not restore the stretch induction of protein synthesis. These results demonstrate that LLC-derived cachectic factors can dissociate stretch-induced signaling from protein synthesis through ERK1/2 and p38 signaling, and that glycoprotein 130 signaling is associated with the basal stretch response in myotubes.

  9. Acute decrease in the stiffness of resting muscle belly due to static stretching.

    PubMed

    Taniguchi, K; Shinohara, M; Nozaki, S; Katayose, M

    2015-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to examine the acute effect of static stretching exercise on the resting stiffness of gastrocnemius muscle belly. Ten healthy young adults performed standing wall stretching in dorsiflexion for 1 min at a time and repeated five times. Before and after stretching, the shear modulus was measured in medial and lateral heads of the resting gastrocnemius muscle with ultrasound shear-wave elastography. After the stretching, dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) of the ankle joint increased (P < 0.01) by 3.9° and returned in 20 min. Immediately after stretching, shear modulus decreased (P < 0.01) by 14%, compared with before stretching across muscle heads. The decrease in shear modulus returned in 20 min after stretching. In the comparison group of 10 additional subjects, the standing intervention without stretching had no influence on these measures. There was a negative correlation between dorsiflexion ROM and shear modulus in either head before and after stretching. The results demonstrate the transient decreases in the stiffness of the resting gastrocnemius muscle belly and indicate that joint flexibility is greater in individuals with lower resting stiffness of the muscle belly.

  10. Effects of hamstring stretching on passive muscle stiffness vary between hip flexion and knee extension maneuvers.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, N; Hirata, K; Kanehisa, H

    2017-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine whether the effects of hamstring stretching on the passive stiffness of each of the long head of the biceps femoris (BFl), semitendinosus (ST), and semimembranosus (SM) vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In 12 male subjects, before and after five sets of 90 s static stretching, passive lengthening measurements where knee or hip joint was passively rotated to the maximal range of motion (ROM) were performed. During the passive lengthening, shear modulus of each muscle was measured by ultrasound shear wave elastography. Both stretching maneuvers significantly increased maximal ROM and decreased passive torque at a given joint angle. Passive knee extension stretching maneuver significantly reduced shear modulus at a given knee joint angle in all of BFl, ST, and SM. In contrast, the stretching effect by passive hip flexion maneuver was significant only in ST and SM. The present findings indicate that the effects of hamstring stretching on individual passive muscles' stiffness vary between passive knee extension and hip flexion stretching maneuvers. In terms of reducing the muscle stiffness of BFl, stretching of the hamstring should be performed by passive knee extension rather than hip flexion.

  11. Stretching-induced nanostructures on shape memory polyurethane films and their regulation to osteoblasts morphology.

    PubMed

    Xing, Juan; Ma, Yufei; Lin, Manping; Wang, Yuanliang; Pan, Haobo; Ruan, Changshun; Luo, Yanfeng

    2016-10-01

    Programming such as stretching, compression and bending is indispensible to endow polyurethanes with shape memory effects. Despite extensive investigations on the contributions of programming processes to the shape memory effects of polyurethane, less attention has been paid to the nanostructures of shape memory polyurethanes surface during the programming process. Here we found that stretching could induce the reassembly of hard domains and thereby change the nanostructures on the film surfaces with dependence on the stretching ratios (0%, 50%, 100%, and 200%). In as-cast polyurethane films, hard segments sequentially assembled into nano-scale hard domains, round or fibrillar islands, and fibrillar apophyses. Upon stretching, the islands packed along the stretching axis to form reoriented fibrillar apophyses along the stretching direction. Stretching only changed the chemical patterns on polyurethane films without significantly altering surface roughness, with the primary composition of fibrillar apophyses being hydrophilic hard domains. Further analysis of osteoblasts morphology revealed that the focal adhesion formation and osteoblasts orientation were in accordance with the chemical patterns of the underlying stretched films, which corroborates the vital roles of stretching-induced nanostructures in regulating osteoblasts morphology. These novel findings suggest that programming might hold great potential for patterning polyurethane surfaces so as to direct cellular behavior. In addition, this work lays groundwork for guiding the programming of shape memory polyurethanes to produce appropriate nanostructures for predetermined medical applications.

  12. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong-Chul; Lee, Sung-Wan; Yeo, Yun-Ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed.

  13. Mechanical stretch inhibits mesenchymal stem cell adipogenic differentiation through TGFβ1/Smad2 signaling.

    PubMed

    Li, Runguang; Liang, Liang; Dou, Yonggang; Huang, Zeping; Mo, Huiting; Wang, Yaning; Yu, Bin

    2015-10-15

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are the common precursors of several functionally disparate cell lineages. A plethora of chemical and physical stimuli contribute to lineage decisions and guidance, including mechanical stretch concomitant with physical movement. Here, we examined how stretch regulates MSC differentiation into adipocytes and the intracellular signaling pathways involved. MSCs were cultured under adipogenic conditions and divided into a control and an experimental group. Cultures in the experimental group were subjected to a sinusoidal stretch regimen delivered via flexible culture bottoms (5% magnitude, 10 times per min, 6h/day, 3 or 5 days). Expression levels of the adipocyte markers PPARγ-2, adiponectin, and C/EBPα were measured as indices of differentiation. Compared to controls, MSCs exposed to mechanical stretch exhibited downregulated PPARγ-2, adiponectin, and C/EBPα mRNA expression. Alternatively, stretch upregulated phosphorylation of Smad2. This stretch-induced increase in Smad2 phosphorylation was suppressed by pretreatment with the TGFβ1/Smad2 pathway antagonist SB-431542. Pretreatment with the TGFβ1/Smad2 signaling agonist TGFβ1 facilitated the inhibitory effect of stretch on the expression levels of PPARγ-2, adiponectin, and C/EBPα proteins, while pretreatment with SB-431542 reversed the inhibitory effects of subsequent stretch on the expression levels of these markers. These results strongly suggest that the anti-adipogenic effects of mechanical stretch on MSCs are mediated, at least in part, by activation of the TGFβ1/Smad2 signaling pathway.

  14. Mechanical Stretch on Human Skin Equivalents Increases the Epidermal Thickness and Develops the Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Tokuyama, Eijiro; Nagai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Ken; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Naruse, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    All previous reports concerning the effect of stretch on cultured skin cells dealt with experiments on epidermal keratinocytes or dermal fibroblasts alone. The aim of the present study was to develop a system that allows application of stretch stimuli to human skin equivalents (HSEs), prepared by coculturing of these two types of cells. In addition, this study aimed to analyze the effect of a stretch on keratinization of the epidermis and on the basement membrane. HSEs were prepared in a gutter-like structure created with a porous silicone sheet in a silicone chamber. After 5-day stimulation with stretching, HSEs were analyzed histologically and immunohistologically. Stretch-stimulated HSEs had a thicker epidermal layer and expressed significantly greater levels of laminin 5 and collagen IV/VII in the basal layer compared with HSEs not subjected to stretch stimulation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the structure of the basement membrane was more developed in HSEs subjected to stretching. Our model may be relevant for extrapolating the effect of a stretch on the skin in a state similar to an in vivo system. This experimental system may be useful for analysis of the effects of stretch stimuli on skin properties and wound healing and is also expected to be applicable to an in vitro model of a hypertrophic scar in the future. PMID:26528823

  15. Mechanical Stretch on Human Skin Equivalents Increases the Epidermal Thickness and Develops the Basement Membrane.

    PubMed

    Tokuyama, Eijiro; Nagai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Ken; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Naruse, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    All previous reports