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Sample records for adapting stretch receptor

  1. Mechanics of the trachea and behaviour of its slowly adapting stretch receptors.

    PubMed Central

    Mortola, J P; Sant'Ambrogio, G

    1979-01-01

    1. The trachea is constructed by a series of U-shaped cartilaginous rings supporting a membranous posterior wall. We have studied separately the pressure-volume relationships of the two components. 2. The motion of the membranous posterior wall contributes most to the tracheal volume change caused by any given transmural pressure change; the cartilaginous rings provide a semi-rigid support to the posterior wall and have a far greater compliance with negative than positive transmural pressure. 3. The response of tracheal stretch receptors to transmural pressure can be explained by the mechanical coupling between cartilages and posterior wall. They respond both to positive and negative transmural pressure, they are active at zero transmural pressure and have a point of least activity with small negative transmural pressures. 4. The stress-strain relationship of the posterior wall has been studied in static and dynamic conditions in control situations and after removal of either the tunica fibrosa or the trachealis muscle. Each of these two components contributes to the stiffness of the posterior wall, with the trachealis muscle providing most of its viscosity. 5. The response of tracheal stretch receptors to transverse traction of the posterior membranous wall has been studied in both static and dynamic conditions before and after removal of the tunica fibrosa. The behaviour of these receptors reflects the visco-elastic properties of the trachealis muscle in which they have been localized. PMID:439039

  2. Location of stretch receptors in the trachea and bronchi of the dog.

    PubMed Central

    Bartlett, D; Jeffery, P; Sant'ambrogio, G; Wise, J C

    1976-01-01

    1. Using single fibre vagal afferent recording techniques, we have investigated the longitudinal and circumferential location of slowly adapting stretch receptors in a functionally isolated, in situ segment of the trachea in dogs. 2. We have also studied the depth of these receptors within the airway wall and their response to reflex and drug induced contraction of the airway smooth muscle. 3. Thirty-four per cent of the receptors studied were in the extrathoracic trachea; calculations indicate that about 17-1% of all airway stretch receptors lie outside the thorax. 4. All the receptors were located in the membranous posterior wall of the trachea, and those tested responded more to transverse than to longitudinal stretching of the wall. 5. Receptors in the extrathoracic trachea continued to function after the regional mucosa had been widely resected; subsequent removal of histolocially proven smooth muscle tissue caused the abrupt cessation of receptor discharge. 6. Contraction of airway smooth muscle brought about an increase in receptor discharge frequency. 7. Similar results were found for a smaller number of stretch receptors located in the mainstem and lobar bronchi. 8. These findings procided evidence that stretch receptors are anatomically located within the smooth muscle layer of the airways and are functionally aranged in series with the muscle fibres. PMID:957165

  3. TRP Channels in Insect Stretch Receptors as Insecticide Targets.

    PubMed

    Nesterov, Alexandre; Spalthoff, Christian; Kandasamy, Ramani; Katana, Radoslav; Rankl, Nancy B; Andrés, Marta; Jähde, Philipp; Dorsch, John A; Stam, Lynn F; Braun, Franz-Josef; Warren, Ben; Salgado, Vincent L; Göpfert, Martin C

    2015-05-01

    Defining the molecular targets of insecticides is crucial for assessing their selectivity and potential impact on environment and health. Two commercial insecticides are now shown to target a transient receptor potential (TRP) ion channel complex that is unique to insect stretch receptor cells. Pymetrozine and pyrifluquinazon disturbed Drosophila coordination and hearing by acting on chordotonal stretch receptor neurons. This action required the two TRPs Nanchung (Nan) and Inactive (Iav), which co-occur exclusively within these cells. Nan and Iav together sufficed to confer cellular insecticide responses in vivo and in vitro, and the two insecticides were identified as specific agonists of Nan-Iav complexes that, by promoting cellular calcium influx, silence the stretch receptor cells. This establishes TRPs as insecticide targets and defines specific agonists of insect TRPs. It also shows that TRPs can render insecticides cell-type selective and puts forward TRP targets to reduce side effects on non-target species. PMID:25950634

  4. Crayfish stretch receptor: an investigation with voltage-clamp and ion-sensitive electrodes.

    PubMed Central

    Brown, H M; Ottoson, D; Rydqvist, B

    1978-01-01

    1. The membrane characteristics of the slowly adapting stretch receptor from the crayfish, Astacus fluviatilis, were examined with electrophysiological techniques consisting of membrane potential recording, voltage clamp and ion-sensitive microelectrodes. 2. The passive membrane current (Ip) following step changes of the membrane potential to levels above 0 mV required more than a minute to decay to a steady-state level. 3. The stretch-induced current (SIC, where SIC = Itotal--Ipassive) was not fully developed until the Ip had decayed to a steady state. 4. With Ip at the steady state and the stretch-induced current at the O-current potential, a slow stretch-induced inward current was isolated. The latter reaches a maximum after 1 sec of stretch and declines even more slowly after stretch. The I-V relation of the slow current had a negative slope and reversed sign near the resting potential. It is suggested that this current is due to a Cl- conductance change. 5. The stretch-induced current, consisting of a rapid transient phase and a steady component can be isolated from the slow stretch-induced current at a holding potential corresponding to the resting potential. 6. The SIC-Em relation is non-linear and reverses sign at about +15 mV. 7. In a given cell, the reversal potential of the stretch-induced potential change obtained with current clamp coincided with the 0-current potential of the stretch-induced current obtained by voltage clamp. The average value from twenty-six cells was +13 +/- 6.5 mV; cell to cell variability seemed to be correlated with dendrite length. 8. Tris (mol. wt. 121) or arginine (mol. wt. 174) susbstituted for Na+ reduces but does not abolish the stretch-induced current. 9. The permeability ratios of Tris:Na and arginine:Na were estimated from changes in the 0-current potential as these cations replaced Na+ in the external medium. The PTris:PNa was somewhat higher (0.31) than the Parginine:PNa ratio (0.25). 10. Changes in the external Ca2

  5. Origin of primary sensory neurons innervating the buccal stretch receptor.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, T; Onozuka, M; Nagasaki, S; Watanabe, K; Ozono, S

    1999-01-01

    The primary sensory neurons innervating mechanoreceptors in oro-facial regions have their cell bodies in either the trigeminal ganglion or the mesencephalic nucleus of the trigeminal nerve. The buccal stretch receptor (BSR), a type of mechanoreceptor in the jaw of rodents, has recently been recognized as signaling the position of the mandible. The location of the primary afferent neurons innervating this receptor is unknown. To investigate the cell bodies of the BSR afferent neurons in rats, we applied wheat germ agglutinin-horseradish peroxidase (WGA-HRP) to the proximal stump of the severed nerve branch of the buccal nerve that supplied the BSR. HRP-labeled cell bodies were observed in the posterolateral portion of the ipsilateral trigeminal ganglion. None was found in the contralateral trigeminal ganglion or in the brainstem. All labeled cell bodies were oval or round and closely resembled pseudo-unipolar neurons. The mean diameter of the labeled somata ranged between 25.5 and 52.5 microm, with small (< or = 30 microm), medium (from 31 to 40 microm), and large somata (> or = 41 microm) accounting for 8.8%, 54.9%, and 36.3%, respectively. Among the myelinated nerve fibers in the branch in which WGA-HRP was applied, 78.5% terminated in the BSR and had larger fiber diameters than the rest, indicating that most of the medium and large HRP-labeled cell bodies were BSR afferents. From these results and the ontogenetic origin of this receptor, it is suggested that the BSR differentiated from the mechanoreceptors in the oral mucosa or the fascia of masticatory muscles. PMID:10065945

  6. Morphological and physiological development of anterior thoracic stretch receptors in two isopods, Armadillidium vulgare and Ligia exotica.

    PubMed

    Iwasaki, Masazumi; Ohata, Ayako; Niida, Akiyoshi

    2007-07-01

    Abdominal muscle receptor organs (MROs) monitor the position and movement of abdomen in crustaceans. Thoracic segments of decapods are fused and immovable. It is speculated that MROs had retrograded simple shape, N-cells that lost receptor muscles, a receptor cell and accessory nerves. We focused on the effect of segmental movement in respect to thoracic N-cells and MROs in isopods that have movable thoracic segments. Armadillidium vulgare rolled up its body segments. Ligia exotica swam by quick movement of the posterior thoracic segments. Both isopods possessed N-cells and MROs in the thorax. N-cells were a simple structure, but N-cells from the second and third thoracic segments of A. vulgare had a muscle strand. MROs(T3-T4) (from the third and fourth thoracic segments) of A. vulgare had two receptor muscles. MROs(T3-T4) of L. exotica had one long receptor muscle. N-cells of both species and MROs of A. vulgare showed slowly adapting stretch-activated discharges. MROs of L. exotica showed both slowly and rapidly adapting discharges. The stretch-activated responses of N-cells and MROs inhibited each other. N-cells or MROs in the thorax of isopods are not related to the segmental structure. The morphology and physiology of N-cells and MROs are specialized to species-specific behaviors. PMID:17473927

  7. Release of ATP and glutamate in the nucleus tractus solitarii mediate pulmonary stretch receptor (Breuer–Hering) reflex pathway

    PubMed Central

    Gourine, Alexander V; Dale, Nicholas; Korsak, Alla; Llaudet, Enrique; Tian, Faming; Huckstepp, Robert; Spyer, K Michael

    2008-01-01

    The Breuer–Hering inflation reflex is initiated by activation of the slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptor afferents (SARs), which monosynaptically activate second-order relay neurones in the dorsal medullary nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS). Here we demonstrate that during lung inflation SARs release both ATP and glutamate from their central terminals to activate these NTS neurones. In anaesthetized and artificially ventilated rats, ATP- and glutamate-selective microelectrode biosensors placed in the NTS detected rhythmic release of both transmitters phase-locked to lung inflation. This release of ATP and glutamate was independent of the centrally generated respiratory rhythm and could be reversibly abolished during the blockade of the afferent transmission in the vagus nerve by topical application of local anaesthetic. Microionophoretic application of ATP increased the activity of all tested NTS second-order relay neurones which receive monosynaptic inputs from the SARs. Unilateral microinjection of ATP into the NTS site where pulmonary stretch receptor afferents terminate produced central apnoea, mimicking the effect of lung inflation. Application of P2 and glutamate receptor antagonists (pyridoxal-5′-phosphate-6-azophenyl-2′,4′-disulphonic acid, suramin and kynurenic acid) significantly decreased baseline lung inflation-induced firing of the second-order relay neurones. These data demonstrate that ATP and glutamate are released in the NTS from the central terminals of the lung stretch receptor afferents, activate the second-order relay neurones and hence mediate the key respiratory reflex — the Breuer—Hering inflation reflex. PMID:18617567

  8. Regulation of dihydropyridine receptor gene expression in mouse skeletal muscles by stretch and disuse.

    PubMed

    Radzyukevich, Tatiana L; Heiny, Judith A

    2004-11-01

    This study examined dihydropyridine receptor (DHPR) gene expression in mouse skeletal muscles during physiological adaptations to disuse. Disuse was produced by three in vivo models-denervation, tenotomy, and immobilization-and DHPR alpha1s mRNA was measured by quantitative Northern blot. After 14-day simultaneous denervation of the soleus (Sol), tibialis anterior (TA), extensor digitorum longus (EDL), and gastrocnemius (Gastr) muscles by sciatic nerve section, DHPR mRNA increased preferentially in the Sol and TA (+1.6-fold), whereas it increased in the EDL (+1.6-fold) and TA (+1.8-fold) after selective denervation of these muscles by peroneal nerve section. It declined in all muscles (-1.3- to -2.6-fold) after 14-day tenotomy, which preserves nerve input but removes mechanical tension. Atrophy was comparable in denervated and tenotomized muscles. These results suggest that factor(s) in addition to inactivity per se, muscle phenotype, or associated atrophy can regulate DHPR gene expression. To test the contribution of passive tension to this regulation, we subjected the same muscles to disuse by limb immobilization in a maximally dorsiflexed position. DHPR alpha1s mRNA increased in the stretched muscles (Sol, +2.3-fold; Gastr, +1.5-fold) and decreased in the shortened muscles (TA, -1.4-fold; EDL, -1.3-fold). The effect of stretch was confirmed in vitro. DHPR protein did not change significantly after 4-day immobilization, suggesting that additional levels of regulation may exist. These results demonstrate that DHPR alpha1s gene expression is regulated as an integral part of the adaptive response of skeletal muscles to disuse in both slow- and fast-twitch muscles and identify passive tension as an important signal for its regulation in vivo. PMID:15294855

  9. A C. elegans stretch receptor neuron revealed by a mechanosensitive TRP channel homologue.

    PubMed

    Li, Wei; Feng, Zhaoyang; Sternberg, Paul W; Xu, X Z Shawn

    2006-03-30

    The nematode Caenorhabditis elegans is commonly used as a genetic model organism for dissecting integration of the sensory and motor systems. Despite extensive genetic and behavioural analyses that have led to the identification of many genes and neural circuits involved in regulating C. elegans locomotion behaviour, it remains unclear whether and how somatosensory feedback modulates motor output during locomotion. In particular, no stretch receptors have been identified in C. elegans, raising the issue of whether stretch-receptor-mediated proprioception is used by C. elegans to regulate its locomotion behaviour. Here we have characterized TRP-4, the C. elegans homologue of the mechanosensitive TRPN channel. We show that trp-4 mutant worms bend their body abnormally, exhibiting a body posture distinct from that of wild-type worms during locomotion, suggesting that TRP-4 is involved in stretch-receptor-mediated proprioception. We show that TRP-4 acts in a single neuron, DVA, to mediate its function in proprioception, and that the activity of DVA can be stimulated by body stretch. DVA both positively and negatively modulates locomotion, providing a unique mechanism whereby a single neuron can fine-tune motor activity. Thus, DVA represents a stretch receptor neuron that regulates sensory-motor integration during C. elegans locomotion. PMID:16572173

  10. Range of motion, neuromechanical, and architectural adaptations to plantar flexor stretch training in humans.

    PubMed

    Blazevich, A J; Cannavan, D; Waugh, C M; Miller, S C; Thorlund, J B; Aagaard, P; Kay, A D

    2014-09-01

    The neuromuscular adaptations in response to muscle stretch training have not been clearly described. In the present study, changes in muscle (at fascicular and whole muscle levels) and tendon mechanics, muscle activity, and spinal motoneuron excitability were examined during standardized plantar flexor stretches after 3 wk of twice daily stretch training (4 × 30 s). No changes were observed in a nonexercising control group (n = 9), however stretch training elicited a 19.9% increase in dorsiflexion range of motion (ROM) and a 28% increase in passive joint moment at end ROM (n = 12). Only a trend toward a decrease in passive plantar flexor moment during stretch (-9.9%; P = 0.15) was observed, and no changes in electromyographic amplitudes during ROM or at end ROM were detected. Decreases in H(max):M(max) (tibial nerve stimulation) were observed at plantar flexed (gastrocnemius medialis and soleus) and neutral (soleus only) joint angles, but not with the ankle dorsiflexed. Muscle and fascicle strain increased (12 vs. 23%) along with a decrease in muscle stiffness (-18%) during stretch to a constant target joint angle. Muscle length at end ROM increased (13%) without a change in fascicle length, fascicle rotation, tendon elongation, or tendon stiffness following training. A lack of change in maximum voluntary contraction moment and rate of force development at any joint angle was taken to indicate a lack of change in series compliance of the muscle-tendon unit. Thus, increases in end ROM were underpinned by increases in maximum tolerable passive joint moment (stretch tolerance) and both muscle and fascicle elongation rather than changes in volitional muscle activation or motoneuron pool excitability. PMID:24947023

  11. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Gang; Hitomi, Hirofumi; Hosomi, Naohisa; Lei, Bai; Nakano, Daisuke; Deguchi, Kazushi; Mori, Hirohito; Masaki, Tsutomu; Ma, Hong; Griendling, Kathy K.; Nishiyama, Akira

    2011-10-15

    Insulin resistance and hypertension have been implicated in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular disease; however, little is known about the roles of insulin and mechanical force in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) remodeling. We investigated the contribution of mechanical stretch to insulin-induced VSMC proliferation. Thymidine incorporation was stimulated by insulin in stretched VSMCs, but not in un-stretched VSMCs. Insulin increased 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation in both stretched and un-stretched VSMCs. Mechanical stretch augmented insulin-induced extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and Akt phosphorylation. Inhibitors of epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor tyrosine kinase and Src attenuated insulin-induced ERK and Akt phosphorylation, as well as thymidine incorporation, whereas 2-deoxy-glucose incorporation was not affected by these inhibitors. Moreover, stretch augmented insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 receptor expression, although it did not alter the expression of insulin receptor and insulin receptor substrate-1. Insulin-induced ERK and Akt activation, and thymidine incorporation were inhibited by siRNA for the IGF-1 receptor. Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via upregulation of IGF-1 receptor, and downstream Src/EGF receptor-mediated ERK and Akt activation. Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor expression was also augmented in hypertensive rats. These results provide a basis for clarifying the molecular mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertensive patients with hyperinsulinemia. -- Highlights: {yields} Mechanical stretch augments insulin-induced VSMC proliferation via IGF-1 receptor. {yields} Src/EGFR-mediated ERK and Akt phosphorylation are augmented in stretched VSMCs. {yields} Similar to in vitro experiment, IGF-1 receptor is increased in hypertensive rats. {yields} Results provide possible mechanisms of vascular remodeling in hypertension with DM.

  12. Aortic Valve Cyclic Stretch Causes Increased Remodeling Activity and Enhanced Serotonin Receptor Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Balachandran, Kartik; Bakay, Marina A.; Connolly, Jeanne M.; Zhang, Xuemei; Yoganathan, Ajit P.; Levy, Robert J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Increased serotonin(5HT) receptor(5HTR) signaling has been associated with cardiac valvulopathy. Prior cell culture studies of 5HTR signaling in heart valve interstitial cells have provided mechanistic insights concerning only static conditions. We investigated the hypothesis that aortic valve biomechanics participate in the regulation of both 5HTR expression and inter-related extracellular matrix remodeling events. Methods The effects of cyclic-stretch on aortic valve 5HTR, expression, signaling and extracellular matrix remodeling were investigated using a tensile stretch bioreactor in studies which also compared the effects of adding 5HT and/or the 5HT-transporter inhibitor, Fluoxetine. Results Cyclic-stretch alone increased both proliferation and collagen in porcine aortic valve cusp samples. However, with cyclic-stretch, unlike static conditions, 5HT plus Fluoxetine caused the greatest increase in proliferation (p<0.0001), and also caused significant increases in collagen(p<0.0001) and glycosaminoglycans (p<0.0001). DNA microarray data demonstrated upregulation of 5HTR2A and 5HTR2B (>4.5 fold) for cyclic-stretch versus static (p<0.001), while expression of the 5HT transporter was not changed significantly. Extracellular matrix genes (eg. Collagen Types I,II,III, and proteoglycans) were also upregulated by cyclic-stretch. Conclusions Porcine aortic valve cusp samples subjected to cyclic stretch upregulate 5HTR2A and 2B, and also initiate remodeling activity characterized by increased proliferation and collagen production. Importantly, enhanced 5HTR responsiveness, due to increased 5HTR2A and 2B expression, results in a significantly greater response in remodeling endpoints (proliferation, collagen and GAG production) to 5HT in the presence of 5HT transporter blockade. PMID:21718840

  13. Liposome reconstitution and modulation of recombinant N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor channels by membrane stretch

    PubMed Central

    Kloda, Anna; Lua, Linda; Hall, Rhonda; Adams, David J.; Martinac, Boris

    2007-01-01

    In this study, the heteromeric N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) receptor channels composed of NR1a and NR2A subunits were expressed, purified, reconstituted into liposomes, and characterized by using the patch clamp technique. The protein exhibited the expected electrophysiological profile of activation by glutamate and glycine and internal Mg2+ blockade. We demonstrated that the mechanical energy transmitted to membrane-bound NMDA receptor channels can be exerted directly by tension developed in the lipid bilayer. Membrane stretch and application of arachidonic acid potentiated currents through NMDA receptor channels in the presence of intracellular Mg2+. The correlation of membrane tension induced by either mechanical or chemical stimuli with the physiological Mg2+ block of the channel suggests that the synaptic transmission can be altered if NMDA receptor complexes experience local changes in bilayer thickness caused by dynamic targeting to lipid microdomains, electrocompression, or chemical modification of the cell membranes. The ability to study gating properties of NMDA receptor channels in artificial bilayers should prove useful in further study of structure–function relationships and facilitate discoveries of new therapeutic agents for treatment of glutamate-mediated excitotoxicity or analgesic therapies. PMID:17242368

  14. Training-specific adaptations of H- and stretch reflexes in human soleus muscle.

    PubMed

    Gruber, M; Taube, W; Gollhofer, A; Beck, S; Amtage, F; Schubert, M

    2007-01-01

    The authors investigated the effect of physical exercise on reflex excitability in a controlled intervention study. Healthy participants (N = 21) performed 4 weeks of either power training (ballistic strength training) or balance training (sensorimotor training [SMT]). Both training regimens enhanced balance control and rate of force development, whereas reductions in peak-to-peak amplitudes of stretch reflexes and in the ratio of the maximum Hoffman reflex to the maximum efferent motor response (Hmax:Mmax) measured at rest were limited to SMT. The differences in reflex excitability between the training regimens indicated different underlying neural mechanisms of adaptation. The reduced reflex excitability following SMT was most likely induced by supraspinal influence. The authors discuss an overall increase in presynaptic inhibition of Ia afferent fibers as a possible mechanism. PMID:17251172

  15. Activation of Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Receptor 2 Mediates Endothelial Permeability Caused by Cyclic Stretch.

    PubMed

    Tian, Yufeng; Gawlak, Grzegorz; O'Donnell, James J; Birukova, Anna A; Birukov, Konstantin G

    2016-05-01

    High tidal volume mechanical ventilation and the resultant excessive mechanical forces experienced by lung vascular endothelium are known to lead to increased vascular endothelial leak, but the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. One reported mechanotransduction pathway of increased endothelial cell (EC) permeability caused by high magnitude cyclic stretch (18% CS) involves CS-induced activation of the focal adhesion associated signalosome, which triggers Rho GTPase signaling. This study identified an alternative pathway of CS-induced EC permeability. We show here that high magnitude cyclic stretch (18% CS) rapidly activates VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2) signaling by dissociating VEGFR2 from VE-cadherin at the cell junctions. This results in VEGFR2 activation, Src-dependent VE-cadherin tyrosine phosphorylation, and internalization leading to increased endothelial permeability. This process is also accompanied by CS-induced phosphorylation and internalization of PECAM1. Importantly, CS-induced endothelial barrier disruption was attenuated by VEGFR2 inhibition. 18% CS-induced EC permeability was linked to dissociation of cell junction scaffold afadin from the adherens junctions. Forced expression of recombinant afadin in pulmonary endothelium attenuated CS-induced VEGFR2 and VE-cadherin phosphorylation, preserved adherens junction integrity and VEGFR2·VE-cadherin complex, and suppressed CS-induced EC permeability. This study shows for the first time a mechanism whereby VEGFR2 activation mediates EC permeability induced by pathologically relevant cyclic stretch. In this mechanism, CS induces dissociation of the VE-cadherin·VEGFR2 complex localized at the adherens juctions, causing activation of VEGFR2, VEGFR2-mediated Src-dependent phosphorylation of VE-cadherin, disassembly of adherens junctions, and EC barrier failure. PMID:26884340

  16. Influence of Inter-Set Stretching on Strength, Flexibility and Hormonal Adaptations

    PubMed Central

    Souza, Antônio Claudio; Bentes, Claudio Melibeu; de Salles, Belmiro Freitas; Reis, Victor Machado; Alves, José Vilaça; Miranda, Humberto; Novaes, Jefferson da Silva

    2013-01-01

    Adequate levels of strength and flexibility are important for the promotion and maintenance of health and functional autonomy as well as safe and effective sports participation. The aim of the present study was to analyze the effects of 8 weeks of strength training with or without inter-set static stretching on strength, flexibility and hormonal adaptations of trained men. Sixteen trained men were randomly divided into 2 groups: the static stretching group (SSG) and passive interval group (PIG). All participants performed 24 training sessions 3 times a week. The test and retest of 8RM, strength, flexibility, cortisol and growth hormone concentration in pre and post test conditions were also evaluated. To compare the differences between and within groups in pre- and post-training tests, ANOVA with repeated measures was performed (SSGpre x SSGpost; PIGpre x PIGpost; SSGpost x PIGpost). An alpha level of p<0.05 was considered statistically significant for all comparisons. Both groups showed significant increases in strength (SSGpre vs. SSGpost; PIGpre vs. PIGpost) in the same exercises for leg extension (LE) and Low Row (LR). Specifically, in the SSG group, the parameters for LE were (p = 0.0015 and ES = 2.28 - Large), and the parameters for LR were (p = 0.002 and ES = 1.95 - Large). Moreover, in the PIG group, the parameters for LE were (p = 0.009 and ES = 1.95 - Large), and the parameters for LR were (p = 0.0001 and ES = 2.88 - Large). No differences were found between the groups (SSGpost vs. PIGpost). Both groups showed significant increases in flexibility but in different joints (SSGpre vs. SSGpost; PIGpre vs. PIGpost). In the SSG group, only three joints showed significant increases in flexibility: shoulder extension (p = 0.004 and ES = 1.76 - Large), torso flexion (p = 0.002 and ES = 2.36 - Large), and hip flexion (p = 0.001 and ES = 1.79 -Large). In the PIG group, only three joints showed increases in flexibility: horizontal shoulder abduction (p = 0.003 and ES

  17. An analysis of receptor potential and tension of isolated cat muscle spindles in response to sinusoidal stretch.

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, C C; Wilkinson, R S

    1980-01-01

    In isolated cat muscle spindles the receptor potential responses of primary and secondary endings as well as tension responses to sinusoidal length changes in the steady state have been analysed. 1. At a given stimulus frequency, receptor potential per unit length change (receptor potential gain) in both primary and secondary endings is constant when displacement is less than about 10 micrometer. With larger stretches, receptor potential gain decreases approximately as a power function of displacement, the gain of primary endings decreasing more rapidly with increasing displacement than that of secondary endings. Tension per unit length change (tension gain) shows a similar constant range above which it also decreases as a power function of displacement. 2. In spite of the large reduction in gain at high displacement amplitudes, response wave forms remained essentially sinusoidal. The gain reduction results principally from a displacement-dependent non-linearity which has a rapid onset and slow decay. 3. Receptor potential and tension responses to small amplitude sinusoidal stretch depend, in a parallel manner, on the initial length of the preparation. 4. Both receptor potential and tension responses are highly dependent on frequency of sinusoidal stretch. In primary endings receptor potential gain increased as a power function of frequency over the range 0 . 01 to about 40 Hz, above which frequency the gain decreased; phase advance remained relatively constant up to 10 Hz then decreased to become a phase lag at higher frequency. In secondary endings receptor potential gain remained fairly constant between 0 . 01 and 1 Hz then rose as a power function of frequency but less steeply than in primary endings. 3. The possible mechanisms underlying these findings are discussed. PMID:6447781

  18. Mechanical, hormonal, and hypertrophic adaptations to 10 weeks of eccentric and stretch-shortening cycle exercise training in old males.

    PubMed

    Váczi, Márk; Nagy, Szilvia A; Kőszegi, Tamás; Ambrus, Míra; Bogner, Péter; Perlaki, Gábor; Orsi, Gergely; Tóth, Katalin; Hortobágyi, Tibor

    2014-10-01

    The growth promoting effects of eccentric (ECC) contractions are well documented but it is unknown if the rate of stretch per se plays a role in such muscular responses in healthy aging human skeletal muscle. We tested the hypothesis that exercise training of the quadriceps muscle with low rate ECC and high rate ECC contractions in the form of stretch-shortening cycles (SSCs) but at equal total mechanical work would produce rate-specific adaptations in healthy old males age 60-70. Both training programs produced similar improvements in maximal voluntary isometric (6%) and ECC torque (23%) and stretch-shortening cycle function (reduced contraction duration [24%] and enhanced elastic energy storage [12%]) (p<0.05). The rate of torque development increased 30% only after SSC exercise (p<0.05). Resting testosterone and cortisol levels were unchanged but after each program the acute exercise-induced cortisol levels were 12-15% lower (p<0.05). Both programs increased quadriceps size 2.5% (p<0.05). It is concluded that both ECC and SSC exercise training produces favorable adaptations in healthy old males' quadriceps muscle. Although the rate of muscle tension during the SSC vs. ECC contractions was about 4-fold greater, the total mechanical work seems to regulate the hypetrophic, hormonal, and most of the mechanical adaptations. However, SSC exercise was uniquely effective in improving a key deficiency of aging muscle, i.e., its ability to produce force rapidly. PMID:25064038

  19. Cytoplasmic Localization and the Choice of Ligand Determine Aggregate Formation by Androgen Receptor with Amplified Polyglutamine Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Matthias; Martin, Elke; Schneikert, Jean; Krug, Harald F.; Cato, Andrew C.B.

    2000-01-01

    Polyglutamine tract expansion in androgen receptor is a recognized cause of spinal and bulbar muscular atrophy (SBMA), an X-linked motor neuronopathy. Similar mutations have been identified in proteins associated with other neurodegenerative diseases. Recent studies have shown that amplified polyglutamine repeat stretches form cellular aggregates that may be markers for these neurodegenerative diseases. Here we describe conditions that lead to aggregate formation by androgen receptor with polyglutamine stretch amplification. In transfection experiments, the mutant, compared with the wild-type receptor, was delayed in its cytoplasmic–nuclear translocation and formed large cytoplasmic aggregates in the presence of androgen. The cytoplasmic environment appears crucial for this aggregation, since retention of both the wild-type and mutant receptors in this cellular compartment by the deletion of their nuclear localization signals resulted in massive aggregation. Conversely, rapid nuclear transport of both receptors brought about by deletion of their ligand binding domains did not result in aggregate formation. However, androgen antagonists that altered the conformation of the ligand binding domain and promoted varying rates of cytoplasmic–nuclear translocation all inhibited aggregate formation. This demonstrates that in addition to the cytoplasmic localization, a distinct contribution of the ligand binding domain of the receptor is necessary for the aggregation. The finding that antiandrogens inhibit aggregate formation may provide the basis for in vivo determination of the role of these structures in SBMA. PMID:10769019

  20. Quantifying the squeezing or stretching of fisheries as they adapt to displacement by marine reserves.

    PubMed

    Chollett, Iliana; Box, Stephen J; Mumby, Peter J

    2016-02-01

    The designation of no-take marine reserves involves social and economic concerns due to the resulting displacement of fishing effort, when fishing rights are removed from those who traditionally fished within an area. Displacement can influence the functioning of the fishery and success of the reserve, yet levels of displacement are seldom quantified after reserve implementation and very rarely before that. We devised a simple analytical framework based on set theory to facilitate reserve placement. Implementation of the framework requires maps of fishing grounds, fishing effort, or catch per unit effort for at least 2 years. The framework quantifies the level of conflict that a reserve designation might cause in the fishing sector due to displacement and the opportunities to offset the conflict through fisher spatial mobility (i.e., ability of fishers to fish elsewhere). We also considered how the outputs of the framework can be used to identify targeted management interventions for each fishery. We applied the method in Honduras, where the largest marine protected area in Central America is being placed, for which spatial data on fishing effort were available for 6 fisheries over 3 years. The proposed closure had a greater negative impact on the shrimp and lobster scuba fisheries, which concentrated respectively 28% and 18% of their effort inside the reserve. These fisheries could not accommodate the displacement within existing fishing grounds. Both would be forced to stretch into new fishing grounds, which are available but are of unknown quality. These stakeholders will likely require compensation to offset costly exploratory fishing or to travel to fishing grounds farther away from port. PMID:26096358

  1. Direct detection of cellular adaptation to local cyclic stretching at the single cell level by atomic force microscopy.

    PubMed

    Watanabe-Nakayama, Takahiro; Machida, Shin-ichi; Harada, Ichiro; Sekiguchi, Hiroshi; Afrin, Rehana; Ikai, Atsushi

    2011-02-01

    The cellular response to external mechanical forces has important effects on numerous biological phenomena. The sequences of molecular events that underlie the observed changes in cellular properties have yet to be elucidated in detail. Here we have detected the responses of a cultured cell against locally applied cyclic stretching and compressive forces, after creating an artificial focal adhesion under a glass bead attached to the cantilever of an atomic force microscope. The cell tension initially increased in response to the tensile stress and then decreased within ∼1 min as a result of viscoelastic properties of the cell. This relaxation was followed by a gradual increase in tension extending over several minutes. The slow recovery of tension ceased after several cycles of force application. This tension-recovering activity was inhibited when cells were treated with cytochalasin D, an inhibitor of actin polymerization, or with (-)-blebbistatin, an inhibitor of myosin II ATPase activity, suggesting that the activity was driven by actin-myosin interaction. To our knowledge, this is the first quantitative analysis of cellular mechanical properties during the process of adaptation to locally applied cyclic external force. PMID:21281570

  2. The Effect of an Oxytocin Receptor Antagonist (Retosiban, GSK221149A) on the Response of Human Myometrial Explants to Prolonged Mechanical Stretch.

    PubMed

    Moraitis, Alexandros A; Cordeaux, Yolande; Charnock-Jones, D Stephen; Smith, Gordon C S

    2015-10-01

    Multiple pregnancy is a major cause of spontaneous preterm birth, which is related to uterine overdistention. The objective of this study was to determine whether an oxytocin receptor antagonist, retosiban (GSK221149A), inhibited the procontractile effect of stretch on human myometrium. Myometrial biopsies were obtained at term planned cesarean delivery (n = 12). Each biopsy specimen was dissected into 8 strips that were exposed in pairs to low or high stretch (0.6 or 2.4 g) in the presence of retosiban (1 μM) or vehicle (dimethylsulfoxide) for 24 hours. Subsequently, we analyzed the contractile responses to KCl and oxytocin in the absence of retosiban. We found that incubation under high stretch in vehicle alone increased the response of myometrial explants to both KCl (P = .007) and oxytocin (P = .01). However, there was no statistically significant effect of stretch when explants were incubated with retosiban (P = .3 and .2, respectively). Incubation with retosiban in low stretch had no statistically significant effect on the response to either KCl or oxytocin (P = .8 and >.9, respectively). Incubation with retosiban in high stretch resulted in a statistically significant reduction (median fold change, interquartile range, P) in the response to both KCl (0.74, 0.60-1.03, P = .046) and oxytocin (0.71, 0.53-0.91, P = .008). The greater the effect of stretch on explants from a given patient, the greater was the inhibitory effect of retosiban (r = -0.65, P = .02 for KCl and r= -0.73, P = .007 for oxytocin). These results suggest that retosiban prevented stretch-induced stimulation of human myometrial contractility. Retosiban treatment is a potential approach for preventing preterm birth in multiple pregnancy. PMID:26207346

  3. Aryl Hydrocarbon Receptor Control of Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor that belongs to the family of basic helix-loop-helix transcription factors. Although the AhR was initially recognized as the receptor mediating the pathologic effects of dioxins and other pollutants, the activation of AhR by endogenous and environmental factors has important physiologic effects, including the regulation of the immune response. Thus, the AhR provides a molecular pathway through which environmental factors modulate the immune response in health and disease. In this review, we discuss the role of AhR in the regulation of the immune response, the source and chemical nature of AhR ligands, factors controlling production and degradation of AhR ligands, and the potential to target the AhR for therapeutic immunomodulation. PMID:23908379

  4. Differential adapter recruitment by TLR2 co-receptors.

    PubMed

    Piao, Wenji; Ru, Lisa W; Toshchakov, Vladimir Y

    2016-07-01

    TLR2 heterodimers with TLR1 or TLR6 recognize distinct pathogen-associated molecules such as tri- and di-acylated lipopeptides. The activated TLR2 heterodimers recruit Toll-IL-1R domain- (TIR-) containing adapter proteins, TIRAP and MyD88, through the receptor TIR domains. Molecular recognition mechanisms responsible for agonist-driven, TIR domain-mediated receptor-adapter interactions as well as the structure of resultant signaling complexes remain unknown. We previously reported that the cell-permeable peptide derived from helix D of TLR2 TIR (2R9) specifically binds TIRAP in vitro and in cells and thereby inhibits TIRAP-dependent TLR signaling. This study demonstrates that cell-permeable peptides from D helix of TLR1 or TLR6, peptides 1R9 and 6R9 respectively, inhibit signaling mediated by cognate TLR2 co-receptors. Interestingly, 1R9 and 6R9 bind different TLR2 adapters, as they selectively bind MyD88 and TIRAP TIR, respectively. Both peptides block the agonist-induced co-immunoprecipitation (co-IP) of TLR2 with TIRAP or MyD88, but not TLR2 co-IP with co-receptors. Our data suggest that D helices of TLR1 and TLR6 TIR domains are adapter recruitment sites in both co-receptors; yet the sites recruit different adapters. The D helix in TLR1 is the MyD88 docking site, whereas in TLR6 this site recruits TIRAP. PMID:27150837

  5. Acute inhalation of ozone stimulates bronchial C-fibers and rapidly adapting receptors in dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Coleridge, J.C.G.; Coleridge, H.M.; Schelegle, E.S.; Green, J.F. Univ. of California, San Francisco )

    1993-05-01

    To identify the afferents responsible for initiating the vagally mediated respiratory changes evoked by acute exposure to ozone, the authors recorded vagal impulses in anesthetized, open-chest, artificially ventilated dogs and examined the pulmonary afferent response to ozone (2--3 ppM in air) delivered to the lower trachea for 20--60 min. Bronchial C-fibers (BrCs) were the lung afferents most susceptible to ozone, the activity of 10 of 11 BrCs increasing from 0.2 [+-] 0.2 to 4.6 [+-] 1.3 impulses/s within 1--7 min of ozone exposure. Ten of 15 rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) were stimulated by ozone, their activity increasing from 1.5 [+-] 0.4 to 4.7 [+-] 0.7 impulses/s. Stimulation of RARs (but not of BrCs) appeared secondary to the ozone-induced reduction of lung compliance because it was abolished by hyperinflation of the lungs. Ozone had little effect on pulmonary C-fibers or slowly adapting pulmonary stretch receptors. The authors' results suggest that both BrCs and RARs contribute to the tachypnea and bronchoconstriction evoked by acute exposure to ozone when vagal conduction is intact and that BrCs alone are responsible for the vagally mediated tachypnea that survives vagal cooling to 7[degrees]C. 23 refs., 5 figs.

  6. Identification of vagal sensory receptors in the rat lung: are there subtypes of slowly adapting receptors?

    PubMed Central

    Bergren, D R; Peterson, D F

    1993-01-01

    1. We studied the characteristics of pulmonary sensory receptors whose afferent fibres are in the left vagus nerve of opened-chest rats. The activity of these receptors was recorded during mechanical ventilation approximating eupnoea, as well as during deflation, stepwise inflations and constant-pressure inflations of the lungs. Data were also collected from closed-chest rats and analysed separately. 2. Ninety-four per cent of receptors were located in the ipsilateral lung or airways with the remainder in the contralateral lung. 3. Not only were slowly adapting receptors (SARs) the most abundant pulmonary receptors but 21% of them were either exclusively or predominantly active during the deflationary phase of the ventilatory cycle. Deflationary units were found in opened- and closed-chest rats. The average conduction velocity for all fibres innervating SARs averaged 29.7 m s-1. 4. We found rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) to be extremely rare in the rat. Their activity was sparse and irregular. The conduction velocities of fibres innervating RARs averaged 12.3 m s-1. 5. Far more abundant than RARs in the remaining population of pulmonary fibres were C fibres. They were observed to have an average conduction velocity of 2.1 m s-1, base-level activity which was irregular and a high pressure threshold of activation and were stimulated by intravenous capsaicin injection. 6. Notable differences exist between pulmonary receptors in rats and those reported in other species. The variations include the abundant existence of intrapulmonary SARs with exclusively deflationary modulation and the rarity of RARs. We also encountered C fibres which have not previously been described systematically in the rat. PMID:8229824

  7. Evidence for adaptation of porcine Toll-like receptors.

    PubMed

    Darfour-Oduro, Kwame A; Megens, Hendrik-Jan; Roca, Alfred; Groenen, Martien A M; Schook, Lawrence B

    2016-03-01

    Naturally endemic infectious diseases provide selective pressures for pig populations. Toll-like receptors (TLRs) represent the first line of immune defense against pathogens and are likely to play a crucial adaptive role for pig populations. This study was done to determine whether wild and domestic pig populations representing diverse global environments demonstrate local TLR adaptation. The genomic sequence encoding the ectodomain, responsible for interacting with pathogen ligands of bacterial (TLR1, TLR2 and TLR6) and viral (TLR3, TLR7 and TLR8) receptors, was obtained. Mitochondrial D-loop region sequences were obtained and a phylogenetic analysis using these sequences revealed a clear separation of animals into Asian (n = 27) and European (n = 40) clades. The TLR sequences were then analyzed for population-specific positive selection signatures within wild boars and domesticated pig populations derived from Asian and European clades. Using within-population and between-population tests for positive selection, a TLR2-derived variant 376A (126Thr), estimated to have arisen in 163,000 years ago with a frequency of 83.33% within European wild boars, 98.00% within domestic pig breeds of European origin, 40.00% within Asian wild boars, and 11.36% within Asian domestic pigs, was identified to be under positive selection in pigs of European origin. The variant is located within the N terminal domain of the TLR2 protein 3D crystal structure and could affect ligand binding. This study suggests the TLR2 gene contributing to responses to bacterial pathogens has been crucial in adaptation of pigs to pathogens. PMID:26701185

  8. Olfactory Receptor Subgenomes Linked with Broad Ecological Adaptations in Sauropsida.

    PubMed

    Khan, Imran; Yang, Zhikai; Maldonado, Emanuel; Li, Cai; Zhang, Guojie; Gilbert, M Thomas P; Jarvis, Erich D; O'Brien, Stephen J; Johnson, Warren E; Antunes, Agostinho

    2015-11-01

    Olfactory receptors (ORs) govern a prime sensory function. Extant birds have distinct olfactory abilities, but the molecular mechanisms underlining diversification and specialization remain mostly unknown. We explored OR diversity in 48 phylogenetic and ecologically diverse birds and 2 reptiles (alligator and green sea turtle). OR subgenomes showed species- and lineage-specific variation related with ecological requirements. Overall 1,953 OR genes were identified in reptiles and 16,503 in birds. The two reptiles had larger OR gene repertoires (989 and 964 genes, respectively) than birds (182-688 genes). Overall, birds had more pseudogenes (7,855) than intact genes (1,944). The alligator had significantly more functional genes than sea turtle, likely because of distinct foraging habits. We found rapid species-specific expansion and positive selection in OR14 (detects hydrophobic compounds) in birds and in OR51 and OR52 (detect hydrophilic compounds) in sea turtle, suggestive of terrestrial and aquatic adaptations, respectively. Ecological partitioning among birds of prey, water birds, land birds, and vocal learners showed that diverse ecological factors determined olfactory ability and influenced corresponding olfactory-receptor subgenome. OR5/8/9 was expanded in predatory birds and alligator, suggesting adaptive specialization for carnivory. OR families 2/13, 51, and 52 were correlated with aquatic adaptations (water birds), OR families 6 and 10 were more pronounced in vocal-learning birds, whereas most specialized land birds had an expanded OR family 14. Olfactory bulb ratio (OBR) and OR gene repertoire were correlated. Birds that forage for prey (carnivores/piscivores) had relatively complex OBR and OR gene repertoires compared with modern birds, including passerines, perhaps due to highly developed cognitive capacities facilitating foraging innovations. PMID:26219582

  9. Stretch Marks

    MedlinePlus

    ... changes that can go with bodybuilding. People who use steroid-containing skin creams or ointments (such as hydrocortisone) for more than a few weeks may also get stretch marks. So might people who have to ... surgeon. These doctors may use one of many types of treatments — from actual ...

  10. Reduced Mechanical Stretch Induces Enhanced Endothelin B Receptor-Mediated Contractility via Activation of Focal Adhesion Kinase and Extracellular Regulated Kinase 1/2 in Cerebral Arteries from Rat.

    PubMed

    Spray, Stine; Rasmussen, Marianne N P; Skovsted, Gry F; Warfvinge, Karin; Sheykhzade, Majid; Edvinsson, Lars

    2016-07-01

    Cerebral ischaemia results in enhanced endothelin B (ETB ) receptor-mediated contraction and receptor protein expression in the affected cerebrovascular smooth muscle cells (SMC). Organ culture of cerebral arteries is a method to induce similar alterations in ETB receptor expression. We suggest that rapid and sustained reduction in wall tension/stretch is a possible trigger mechanism for this vascular remodelling. Isolated rat middle cerebral artery (MCA) segments were incubated in a wire myograph with or without mechanical stretch, prior to assessment of their contractile response to the selective ETB receptor agonist sarafotoxin 6c. The involvement of extracellular regulated kinase (ERK) 1/2 and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) was studied by their specific inhibitors U0126 and PF-228, respectively. Compared with their stretched counterparts, unstretched MCA segments showed a significantly increased ETB receptor-mediated contractile response after 12 hr of incubation, which was attenuated by either U0126 or PF-228. The functionally increased ETB -mediated contractility could be attributed to two different mechanisms: (i) a difference in ETB receptor localization from primarily endothelial expression to SMC expression and (ii) an increased calcium sensitivity of the SMCs due to an increased expression of the calcium channel transient receptor potential canonical 1. Collectively, our results present a possible mechanism linking lack of vessel wall stretch/tension to changes in ETB receptor-mediated contractility via triggering of an early mechanosensitive signalling pathway involving ERK1/2 and FAK signalling. A mechanism likely to be an initiating factor for the increased ETB receptor-mediated contractility found after cerebral ischaemia. PMID:26781487

  11. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats.

    PubMed

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo Del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-09-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na(+), Ca(2+) and K(+). The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of N (ω)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca(2+)-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  12. Role of the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 receptor and stretch-activated ion channels in nitric oxide release from endothelial cells of the aorta and heart in rats

    PubMed Central

    Torres-Narváez, Juan Carlos; Mondragón, Leonardo del Valle; Varela López, Elvira; Pérez-Torres, Israel; Díaz Juárez, Julieta Anabell; Suárez, Jorge; Hernández, Gustavo Pastelín

    2012-01-01

    Shear stress stimulates nitric oxide (NO) release in endothelial cells. Stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the transient receptor potential vanilloid type 1 (TRPV1) receptor respond to mechanical stimulus and are permeable to Na+, Ca2+ and K+. The influence of SACs and the TRPV1 receptor on NO release on the heart and on the vascular reactivity of the thoracic aorta (TA) was studied. Experiments were performed in isolated perfused heart, cultured endothelial cells and TA rings from Wistar rats. Capsaicin (10 μM, 30 μM) was used as a NO release stimulator, capsazepine (6 μM, 10 μM) was used as a capsaicin antagonist and gadolinium (3 μM, 5 μM) was used as an inhibitor of SACs. NO was measured by the Kelm and Tenorio methods. Left ventricular pressure was recorded and coronary vascular resistance was calculated. Capsaicin increased NO release in the heart by 58% (395±8 pmol/mL to 627±23 pmol/mL). Capsazepine and gadolinium inhibited NO release by 74% and 82%, respectively. This tendency was similar in all experimental models. Capsaicin attenuated the effects of norepinephrine (10 M to 7 M) on TA and had no effect in the presence of Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester. Therefore, the authors conclude that SACs and the TRPV1 receptor are both present in the coronary endothelium and that both participate in Ca2+-dependent NO release. PMID:23620694

  13. Stretching Fibroblasts Remodels Fibronectin and Alters Cancer Cell Migration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ao, Mingfang; Brewer, Bryson M.; Yang, Lijie; Franco Coronel, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu

    2015-02-01

    Most investigations of cancer-stroma interactions have focused on biochemical signaling effects, with much less attention being paid to biophysical factors. In this study, we investigated the role of mechanical stimuli on human prostatic fibroblasts using a microfluidic platform that was adapted for our experiments and further developed for both repeatable performance among multiple assays and for compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy. Results show that mechanical stretching of normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) alters the structure of secreted fibronectin. Specifically, unstretched NAFs deposit and assemble fibronectin in a random, mesh-like arrangement, while stretched NAFs produce matrix with a more organized, linearly aligned structure. Moreover, the stretched NAFs exhibited an enhanced capability for directing co-cultured cancer cell migration in a persistent manner. Furthermore, we show that stretching NAFs triggers complex biochemical signaling events through the observation of increased expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). A comparison of these behaviors with those of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) indicates that the observed phenotypes of stretched NAFs are similar to those associated with CAFs, suggesting that mechanical stress is a critical factor in NAF activation and CAF genesis.

  14. Stretching Fibroblasts Remodels Fibronectin and Alters Cancer Cell Migration

    PubMed Central

    Ao, Mingfang; Brewer, Bryson M.; Yang, Lijie; Franco Coronel, Omar E.; Hayward, Simon W.; Webb, Donna J.; Li, Deyu

    2015-01-01

    Most investigations of cancer-stroma interactions have focused on biochemical signaling effects, with much less attention being paid to biophysical factors. In this study, we investigated the role of mechanical stimuli on human prostatic fibroblasts using a microfluidic platform that was adapted for our experiments and further developed for both repeatable performance among multiple assays and for compatibility with high-resolution confocal microscopy. Results show that mechanical stretching of normal tissue-associated fibroblasts (NAFs) alters the structure of secreted fibronectin. Specifically, unstretched NAFs deposit and assemble fibronectin in a random, mesh-like arrangement, while stretched NAFs produce matrix with a more organized, linearly aligned structure. Moreover, the stretched NAFs exhibited an enhanced capability for directing co-cultured cancer cell migration in a persistent manner. Furthermore, we show that stretching NAFs triggers complex biochemical signaling events through the observation of increased expression of platelet derived growth factor receptor α (PDGFRα). A comparison of these behaviors with those of cancer-associated fibroblasts (CAFs) indicates that the observed phenotypes of stretched NAFs are similar to those associated with CAFs, suggesting that mechanical stress is a critical factor in NAF activation and CAF genesis. PMID:25660754

  15. Ionotropic glutamate receptors mediate OFF responses in light-adapted ON bipolar cells

    PubMed Central

    Pang, Ji-Jie; Gao, Fan; Wu, Samuel M.

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that photoreceptor synaptic inputs to depolarizing bipolar cells (DBCs or ON bipolar cells) are mediated by mGluR6 receptors and those to hyperpolarizing bipolar cells (HBCs or OFF bipolar cells) are mediated by AMPA/kainate receptors. Here we show that in addition to mGluR6 receptors which mediate the sign-inverting, depolarizing light responses, subpopulations of cone-dominated and rod/cone mixed DBCs use GluR4 AMPA receptors to generate a transient sign-preserving OFF response under light adapted conditions. These AMPA receptors are located at the basal junctions postsynaptic to rods and they are silent under dark-adapted conditions, as tonic glutamate release in darkness desensitizes these receptors. Light adaptation enhances rod-cone coupling and thus allows cone photocurrents with an abrupt OFF depolarization to enter the rods. The abrupt rod depolarization triggers glutamate activation of unoccupied AMPA receptors, resulting in a transient OFF response in DBCs. It has been widely accepted that the DNQX-sensitive, OFF transient responses in retinal amacrine cells and ganglion cells are mediated exclusively by HBCs. Our results suggests that this view needs revision as AMPA receptors in subpopulations of DBCs are likely to significantly contribute to the DNQX-sensitive OFF transient responses in light-adapted third- and higher-order visual neurons. PMID:22842089

  16. Identification of a stretch of six divergent amino acids on the alpha5 helix of Galpha16 as a major determinant of the promiscuity and efficiency of receptor coupling.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, Maurice K C; Chan, Jasmine H P; Wong, Cecilia S S; Wong, Yung H

    2004-01-01

    A broad repertory of G-protein-coupled receptors shows effective coupling with the haematopoietic G16 protein. In the present study, individual residues along the C-terminal alpha5 helix of Galpha16 were examined for their contributions in defining receptor-coupling specificity. Residues that are relatively conserved within, but diverse between, the subfamilies of cloned Galpha subunits were mutated into the corresponding Galpha(z) residues. Six G(i)-linked receptors with different coupling efficiencies to Galpha16 were examined for their ability to utilize the various Galpha16 mutants to mediate agonist-induced inositol phosphate accumulation and Ca2+ mobilization. Co-operative enhancements of receptor coupling were observed with chimaeras harbouring multiple mutations at Glu350, Lys357 and Leu364 of Galpha16. Mutation of Leu364 into isoleucine appeared to be more efficient in enhancing receptor recognition compared with mutations at the other two sites. Mutation of a stretch of six consecutive residues (362-367) lying towards the end of the alpha5 helix was found to broaden significantly the receptor-coupling profile of Galpha16, and the effect was mediated partly through interactions with the beta2-beta3 loop. These results suggested that a stretch of six distinctive residues at the alpha5 helix of Galpha16 is particularly important, whereas other discrete residues spreading along the alpha5 helix function co-operatively for determining the specificity of receptor recognition. PMID:15005654

  17. Involvement of dopamine D2 receptors in the effect of cocaine on sexual behaviour and stretching-yawning of male rats.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, F; Giuliani, D

    1997-06-01

    The effect of cocaine (7.5, 15 and 30 mg/kg) administered in acute or subchronic mode, on the mating behaviour of sexually active male rats varied in a dose- and mode-dependent manner. Regardless of mode of treatment, 30 mg/kg markedly impaired the rats copulatory ability and impairment continued for a week after suspension of subchronic treatment. An acute dose of 15 mg/kg reduced intromission frequency, while in subchronic mode it also reduced ejaculation latency. Mount frequency was increased by 7.5 and 15 mg/kg, but only on first injection. In the case of sexually-naive male rats, acute administration of cocaine (3-30 mg/kg) stimulated penile erections at 7.5 mg/kg and motor hyperactivity at all doses. (-) Eticlopride (0.025 and 0.05 mg/kg), a DA D2 antagonist, counteracted cocaine-induced motor hyperactivity but not penile erection, which it enhanced. (-) Eticlopride at the same doses also antagonized cocaine potentiation of lisuride (0.2 mg/kg)-induced behavioural effects. When male rats treated with subchronic cocaine (15 mg/kg) were injected with the DA D2 agonist SND 919 (0.1 mg/kg), they displayed a more marked stretching-yawning behaviour than control animals receiving SND 919 at the same dose. The involvement of DA D2 receptors in cocaine-induced effects is suggested. PMID:9225304

  18. Cross-adaptation to odor stimulation of olfactory receptor cells in the box turtle, Terrapene carolina.

    PubMed

    Tonosaki, K

    1993-01-01

    Electrical recording from small twigs of olfactory nerve and electro-olfactogram (EOG) from olfactory epithelium in a turtle shows that olfactory receptors in the nose are responsive to various odors. I have used the effects of cross-adaptation to odor stimulation on the olfactory receptors to investigate the stimulus-specific components of these responses and to provide information about the responsiveness of cells. The results of the cross-adaptation experiments strongly support the hypothesis that different categories of receptor cells exist in the olfactory epithelium. PMID:8386588

  19. Synaptic connections between the hindwing stretch receptor and flight motor neurones in the locust revealed by double cobalt labelling for electron microscopy

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, B.H.; Altman, J.S.; Tyrer, N.M.

    1985-03-08

    Synaptic interactions between sensory and motor neurones in the locust flight system have been investigated by using intracellular labelling with cobalt and nickel for electron microscopy. Simultaneous axonal filling of two neurones with different concentrations of metal ions produces differential labelling, so that contacts between them in the central nervous system can be recognized. We have investigated the connectivity of the hindwing stretch receptor neurone (SR) with a direct hindwing depressor motor neurone (MN 127) known from physiological experiments to receive monosynaptic input from the SR, and an indirect hindwing depressor motor neurone (MN 112/1), for which no monosynaptic connection with the SR has been reported. We have found no direct synapses between the SR and MN 112/1, although some of their branches lie close together in the neuropile. We have, however, found some evidence for polysynaptic connections between them. There are many synapses of conventional dyadic morphology from both the lateral and mediolateral branches of the SR to MN 127; the medial branch was not examined. Those from the lateral branch contact the motor neurone on branches close to the neuropilar segment, while those from the mediolateral branch contact long, thin distal twigs. We estimate that there are about 600 anatomical synapses between these two neurones. Our results suggest that a large number of widely distributed anatomical synapses constitute the physiological synaptic connection between the SR and MN 127. The dyadic arrangement of these synapses provides an anatomical correlate for the physiologically established divergence of SR outputs onto interneurones and motor neurones.

  20. Behavioural evidence that different neurochemical mechanisms underly stretching-yawning and penile erection induced in male rats by SND 919, a new selective D2 dopamine receptor agonist.

    PubMed

    Ferrari, F; Pelloni, F; Giuliani, D

    1993-01-01

    The behavioural effects induced in male Wistar rats by SND 919, a new drug reputed to have selective agonistic activity at D2 dopamine (DA) receptors, were studied. The following aspects of behaviour were considered: motor activity, stretching-yawning (SY), penile erection (PE) and stereotyped behaviour (SB). Intraperitoneal injection (IP) of the drug (0.01-20 mg/kg) induced an SY syndrome in the form of a bell-shaped dose-response curve, the effect being maximal at the dose of 0.1 mg/kg and disappearing completely at 10 mg/kg. SND 919 also potently elicited PE; this latter effect, however, was not coincident with SY induction, being maximal at 1 mg/kg and persisting at 10 and 20 mg/kg. SND 919-induced SY was potently antagonized by pretreatment not only with the D2 antagonist, L-sulpiride (20 mg/kg), but also with the alpha 2 antagonist, yohimbine (1, 3 mg/kg), and the more selective alpha 2 antagonist, idazoxan (1, 2 and 5 mg/kg). While sulpiride also decreased SND 919-induced PE, idazoxan at all doses and yohimbine at 1 mg/kg did not affect this behaviour. Inhibition of motor activity was induced by the D2 agonist at low doses (0.05, 0.1 mg/kg), while at high doses (1, 10 and 20 mg/kg), it was actually replaced by a form of SB characterized by downward sniffing and licking. When, for comparison, the D2 agonist, RU 24213 (0.1-20 mg/kg IP), was tested for PE, SY, motor activity and SB, it displayed a behavioural pattern very similar to that obtained with SND 919. Idazoxan (2 mg/kg), administered before RU 24213 (10 mg/kg), significantly antagonized the drug-induced SY, but not PE.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:7855178

  1. Mechanical-Stretch of C2C12 Myoblasts Inhibits Expression of Toll-Like Receptor 3 (TLR3) and of Autoantigens Associated with Inflammatory Myopathies

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinghui; Adriouch, Sahil; Liao, Hua

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies in patients suffering from inflammatory autoimmune myopathies suggested that moderate exercise training improves or at least stabilizes muscle strength and function without inducing disease flares. However, the precise mechanisms involved in this beneficial effect have not been extensively studied. Here we used a model of in vitro stretched C2C12 myoblasts to investigate whether mechanical stretch could influence myoblast proliferation or the expression of proinflammatory genes. Our results demonstrated that cyclic mechanical stretch stimulated C2C12 cell cycling and early up-regulation of the molecules related to mechanical-stretch pathway in muscle (calmodulin, nNOS, MMP-2, HGF and c-Met). Unexpectedly, mechanical stretch also reduced the expression of TLR3 and of proteins known to represent autoantigens in inflammatory autoimmune myopathies (Mi-2, HRS, DNA-PKcs, U1-70). Interestingly, stimulation or inhibition of calmodulin, NOS, HGF or c-Met molecules in vitro affected the expression of autoantigens and TLR3 proteins confirming their role in the inhibition of autoantigens and TLR3 during mechanical stretch. Overall, this study demonstrates for the first time that mechanical stretch could be beneficial by reducing expression of muscle autoantigens and of pro-inflammatory TLR3 and may provide new insight to understand how resistance training can reduce the symptoms associated with myositis. PMID:24224022

  2. Get up and Stretch

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crupi, Jeffrey

    2004-01-01

    Daily stretching has many benefits for one's body. It can relieve stress and tension, it increases flexibility and it can help prevent injuries. There are many stretching exercises that a teacher can do with his or her students to help promote daily stretching routines. In this article, the author presents several stretching exercises and some…

  3. Mechanism of HSV infection through soluble adapter-mediated virus bridging to the EGF receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Nakano, Kenji; Kobayashi, Masatoshi; Nakamura, Kei-ichiro; Nakanishi, Takeshi; Asano, Ryutaro; Kumagai, Izumi; Tahara, Hideaki; Kuwano, Michihiko; Cohen, Justus B.; Glorioso, Joseph C.

    2011-04-25

    Herpes simplex virus entry into cells requires the binding of envelope glycoprotein D (gD) to an entry receptor. Depending on the cell, entry occurs by different mechanisms, including fusion at the cell surface or endocytosis. Here we examined the entry mechanism through a non-HSV receptor mediated by a soluble bi-specific adapter protein composed of recognition elements for gD and the EGF receptor (EGFR). Virus entered into endosomes using either EGF or an EGFR-specific single chain antibody (scFv) for receptor recognition. Infection was less efficient with the EGF adapter which could be attributed to its weaker binding to a viral gD. Infection mediated by the scFv adapter was pH sensitive, indicating that gD-EGFR bridging alone was insufficient for capsid release from endosomes. We also show that the scFv adapter enhanced infection of EGFR-expressing tumor tissue in vivo. Our results indicate that adapters may retarget HSV infection without drastically changing the entry mechanism.

  4. Adaptation of the receptors of the cosmonauts during of space missions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Prisniakov, Volodymyr

    Perception and analysis of information characterizing outside environment and the inner state of the man's own systems define the efficiency of the astronauts to a great extent. This information is being perceived by a system of various receptors: visual, oral, tactile, gustatory, olfactory etc. The sensitivity of these receptors depend upon a number of factors. Usually the study of the receptors aimed at finding out the relations between their sensitivity through the time which defined the so-called adaptation process. The developed by authors the theory of the adaptation process enables to predict behaviour of individuals not only on the Earth, but also in conditions of space flight. Key parameters of the theory is time constant of information processing in memory and the amount of information retained by memory after sufficiently long period of time. Values of these sizes are received as a result of processing the numerous literary data. In paper the dependences of these sizes on overloads and microgravitation that enables to predict adaptation of all analyzers of cosmonauts during space flight are determined: light and darkness adaptation with consideration of the effect of the duration of pre-adaptation lighting, of the period of long adaptation to a certain colours, of the effect of brightness of preexposition lighting, of brightness of different colours, of the size of test objects, of the angular distance of the test object from the fixed point, of the areas of the test object, of the effect of adaptation to light on the subsequent darkness adaptation. Adaptation to gustatory stimuli, to tactile sensations for olfactory sensations are dealt too. The received results enable to take into account changes of sensitivity of analyzers of cosmonauts in flight and them to correct in case of need.

  5. Mechanisms of Host Receptor Adaptation by Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Wu, Kailang; Peng, Guiqing; Wilken, Matthew; Geraghty, Robert J.; Li, Fang

    2012-12-10

    The severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) from palm civets has twice evolved the capacity to infect humans by gaining binding affinity for human receptor angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2). Numerous mutations have been identified in the receptor-binding domain (RBD) of different SARS-CoV strains isolated from humans or civets. Why these mutations were naturally selected or how SARS-CoV evolved to adapt to different host receptors has been poorly understood, presenting evolutionary and epidemic conundrums. In this study, we investigated the impact of these mutations on receptor recognition, an important determinant of SARS-CoV infection and pathogenesis. Using a combination of biochemical, functional, and crystallographic approaches, we elucidated the molecular and structural mechanisms of each of these naturally selected RBD mutations. These mutations either strengthen favorable interactions or reduce unfavorable interactions with two virus-binding hot spots on ACE2, and by doing so, they enhance viral interactions with either human (hACE2) or civet (cACE2) ACE2. Therefore, these mutations were viral adaptations to either hACE2 or cACE2. To corroborate the above analysis, we designed and characterized two optimized RBDs. The human-optimized RBD contains all of the hACE2-adapted residues (Phe-442, Phe-472, Asn-479, Asp-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for hACE2 but relative low affinity for cACE2. The civet-optimized RBD contains all of the cACE2-adapted residues (Tyr-442, Pro-472, Arg-479, Gly-480, and Thr-487) and possesses exceptionally high affinity for cACE2 and also substantial affinity for hACE2. These results not only illustrate the detailed mechanisms of host receptor adaptation by SARS-CoV but also provide a molecular and structural basis for tracking future SARS-CoV evolution in animals.

  6. Low power laser irradiation does not affect the generation of signals in a sensory receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Lundeberg, T.; Zhou, J.

    1989-01-01

    The effect of low power Helium-Neon (He-Ne) and Gallium-Arsenide (Ga-As) laser on the slowly adapting crustacean stretch receptor was studied. The results showed that low power laser irradiation did not affect the membrane potential of the stretch receptor. These results are discussed in relation to the use of low power laser irradiation on the skin overlaying acupuncture points in treatment of pain syndrome.

  7. Lung inflation inhibits rapidly adapting receptor relay neurons in the rat.

    PubMed

    Ezure, K; Tanaka, I

    2000-06-01

    Pulmonary slowly adapting receptors (SARs) and rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) are important components of various respiratory reflexes. In anesthetized, paralyzed and artificially ventilated rats, we found an inhibitory linkage from the former to the latter system at the level of their second-order relay neurons (P cells and RAR cells, respectively). Lung inflation which activates RARs as well as SARs suppressed RAR cell activity evoked by electrical stimulation of the vagus nerve. Intracellular recordings from RAR cells showed IPSPs locked to electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral and contralateral vagus nerves at an intensity just above the threshold for P cell activation. Activation of P cells with glutamate suppressed RAR cell firing. Since P cells project to the area of RAR cells, taken together, these results strongly suggest that P cells synaptically inhibit RAR cells. PMID:10852230

  8. Involvement of the V2 Vasopressin Receptor in Adaptation to Limited Water Supply

    PubMed Central

    Böselt, Iris; Römpler, Holger; Hermsdorf, Thomas; Thor, Doreen; Busch, Wibke; Schulz, Angela; Schöneberg, Torsten

    2009-01-01

    Mammals adapted to a great variety of habitats with different accessibility to water. In addition to changes in kidney morphology, e.g. the length of the loops of Henle, several hormone systems are involved in adaptation to limited water supply, among them the renal-neurohypophysial vasopressin/vasopressin receptor system. Comparison of over 80 mammalian V2 vasopressin receptor (V2R) orthologs revealed high structural and functional conservation of this key component involved in renal water reabsorption. Although many mammalian species have unlimited access to water there is no evidence for complete loss of V2R function indicating an essential role of V2R activity for survival even of those species. In contrast, several marsupial V2R orthologs show a significant increase in basal receptor activity. An increased vasopressin-independent V2R activity can be interpreted as a shift in the set point of the renal-neurohypophysial hormone circuit to realize sufficient water reabsorption already at low hormone levels. As found in other desert mammals arid-adapted marsupials show high urine osmolalities. The gain of basal V2R function in several marsupials may contribute to the increased urine concentration abilities and, therefore, provide an advantage to maintain water and electrolyte homeostasis under limited water supply conditions. PMID:19440390

  9. Calcium-stores mediate adaptation in axon terminals of Olfactory Receptor Neurons in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background In vertebrates and invertebrates, sensory neurons adapt to variable ambient conditions, such as the duration or repetition of a stimulus, a physiological mechanism considered as a simple form of non-associative learning and neuronal plasticity. Although various signaling pathways, as cAMP, cGMP, and the inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate receptor (InsP3R) play a role in adaptation, their precise mechanisms of action at the cellular level remain incompletely understood. Recently, in Drosophila, we reported that odor-induced Ca2+-response in axon terminals of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) is related to odor duration. In particular, a relatively long odor stimulus (such as 5 s) triggers the induction of a second component involving intracellular Ca2+-stores. Results We used a recently developed in-vivo bioluminescence imaging approach to quantify the odor-induced Ca2+-activity in the axon terminals of ORNs. Using either a genetic approach to target specific RNAs, or a pharmacological approach, we show that the second component, relying on the intracellular Ca2+-stores, is responsible for the adaptation to repetitive stimuli. In the antennal lobes (a region analogous to the vertebrate olfactory bulb) ORNs make synaptic contacts with second-order neurons, the projection neurons (PNs). These synapses are modulated by GABA, through either GABAergic local interneurons (LNs) and/or some GABAergic PNs. Application of GABAergic receptor antagonists, both GABAA or GABAB, abolishes the adaptation, while RNAi targeting the GABABR (a metabotropic receptor) within the ORNs, blocks the Ca2+-store dependent component, and consequently disrupts the adaptation. These results indicate that GABA exerts a feedback control. Finally, at the behavioral level, using an olfactory test, genetically impairing the GABABR or its signaling pathway specifically in the ORNs disrupts olfactory adapted behavior. Conclusion Taken together, our results indicate that a relatively long lasting

  10. Stretched Wire Mechanics

    SciTech Connect

    Bowden, Gordon; /SLAC

    2005-09-06

    Stretched wires are beginning to play an important role in the alignment of accelerators and synchrotron light sources. Stretched wires are proposed for the alignment of the 130 meter long LCLS undulator. Wire position technology has reached sub-micron resolution yet analyses of perturbations to wire straightness are hard to find. This paper considers possible deviations of stretched wire from the simple 2-dimensional catenary form.

  11. Ca2+-activated K+ currents regulate odor adaptation by modulating spike encoding of olfactory receptor cells.

    PubMed

    Kawai, Fusao

    2002-04-01

    The olfactory system is thought to accomplish odor adaptation through the ciliary transduction machinery in olfactory receptor cells (ORCs). However, ORCs that have lost their cilia can exhibit spike frequency accommodation in which the action potential frequency decreases with time despite a steady depolarizing stimulus. This raises the possibility that somatic ionic channels in ORCs might serve for odor adaptation at the level of spike encoding, because spiking responses in ORCs encode the odor information. Here I investigate the adaptational mechanism at the somatic membrane using conventional and dynamic patch-clamp recording techniques, which enable the ciliary mechanism to be bypassed. A conditioning stimulus with an odorant-induced current markedly shifted the response range of action potentials induced by the same test stimulus to higher concentrations of the odorant, indicating odor adaptation. This effect was inhibited by charybdotoxin and iberiotoxin, Ca2+-activated K+ channel blockers, suggesting that somatic Ca2+-activated K+ currents regulate odor adaptation by modulating spike encoding. I conclude that not only the ciliary machinery but also the somatic membrane currents are crucial to odor adaptation. PMID:11916858

  12. Stretching: Does It Help?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vardiman, Phillip; Carrand, David; Gallagher, Philip M.

    2010-01-01

    Stretching prior to activity is universally accepted as an important way to improve performance and help prevent injury. Likewise, limited flexibility has been shown to decrease functional ability and predispose a person to injuries. Although this is commonly accepted, appropriate stretching for children and adolescents involved with sports and…

  13. Stretch Band Exercise Program

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Skirka, Nicholas; Hume, Donald

    2007-01-01

    This article discusses how to use stretch bands for improving total body fitness and quality of life. A stretch band exercise program offers a versatile and inexpensive option to motivate participants to exercise. The authors suggest practical exercises that can be used in physical education to improve or maintain muscular strength and endurance,…

  14. Transient Receptor Potential C4/5 Like Channel Is Involved in Stretch-Induced Spontaneous Uterine Contraction of Pregnant Rat

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Seungsoo; Kim, Young-Hwan; Joeng, Ji-Hyun

    2014-01-01

    Spontaneous myometrial contraction (SMC) in pregnant uterus is greatly related with gestational age and growing in frequency and amplitude toward the end of gestation to initiate labor. But, an accurate mechanism has not been elucidated. In human and rat uterus, all TRPCs except TRPC2 are expressed in pregnant myometrium and among them, TRPC4 are predominant throughout gestation, suggesting a possible role in regulation of SMC. Therefore, we investigated whether the TRP channel may be involved SMC evoked by mechanical stretch in pregnant myometrial strips of rat using isometric tension measurement and patch-clamp technique. In the present results, hypoosmotic cell swelling activated a potent outward rectifying current in G protein-dependent manner in rat pregnant myocyte. The current was significantly potentiated by 1µM lanthanides (a potent TRPC4/5 stimulator) and suppressed by 10µM 2-APB (TRPC4-7 inhibitor). In addition, in isometric tension experiment, SMC which was evoked by passive stretch was greatly potentiated by lanthanide (1µM) and suppressed by 2-APB (10µM), suggesting a possible involvement of TRPC4/5 channel in regulation of SMC in pregnant myometrium. These results provide a possible cellular mechanism for regulation of SMC during pregnancy and provide basic information for developing a new agent for treatment of premature labor. PMID:25598665

  15. Adaptation as a mechanism for gain control in cockroach ON and OFF olfactory receptor neurons.

    PubMed

    Burgstaller, Maria; Tichy, Harald

    2012-02-01

    In many sensory systems adaptation acts as a gain control mechanism that optimizes sensory performance by trading increased sensitivity to low stimulus intensity for decreased sensitivity to high stimulus intensity. Adaptation of insect antennal olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) has been studied for strong odour concentrations, either pulsed or constant. Here, we report that during slowly oscillating changes in the concentration of the odour of lemon oil, the ON and OFF ORNs on the antenna of the cockroach Periplaneta americana adapt to the actual odour concentration and the rate at which concentration changes. When odour concentration oscillates rapidly with brief periods, adaptation improves gain for instantaneous odour concentration and reduces gain for the rate of concentration change. Conversely, when odour concentration oscillates slowly with long periods, adaptation increases gain for the rate of change at the expense of instantaneous concentration. Without this gain control the ON and OFF ORNs would, at brief oscillation periods, soon reach their saturation level and become insensitive to further concentration increments and decrements. At long oscillation periods, on the other hand, the cue would simply be that the discharge begins to change. Because of the high gain for the rate of change, the cockroach will receive creeping changes in odour concentration, even if they persist in one direction. Gain control permits a high degree of precision at small rates when it counts most, without sacrificing the range of detection and without extending the measuring scale. PMID:22304687

  16. Adaptation in sound localization: from GABA(B) receptor-mediated synaptic modulation to perception.

    PubMed

    Stange, Annette; Myoga, Michael H; Lingner, Andrea; Ford, Marc C; Alexandrova, Olga; Felmy, Felix; Pecka, Michael; Siveke, Ida; Grothe, Benedikt

    2013-12-01

    Across all sensory modalities, the effect of context-dependent neural adaptation can be observed at every level, from receptors to perception. Nonetheless, it has long been assumed that the processing of interaural time differences, which is the primary cue for sound localization, is nonadaptive, as its outputs are mapped directly onto a hard-wired representation of space. Here we present evidence derived from in vitro and in vivo experiments in gerbils indicating that the coincidence-detector neurons in the medial superior olive modulate their sensitivity to interaural time differences through a rapid, GABA(B) receptor-mediated feedback mechanism. We show that this mechanism provides a gain control in the form of output normalization, which influences the neuronal population code of auditory space. Furthermore, psychophysical tests showed that the paradigm used to evoke neuronal GABA(B) receptor-mediated adaptation causes the perceptual shift in sound localization in humans that was expected on the basis of our physiological results in gerbils. PMID:24141311

  17. The role of metabotropic glutamate receptors and cortical adaptation in habituation of odor-guided behavior

    PubMed Central

    Yadon, Carly A.; Wilson, Donald A.

    2005-01-01

    Decreases in behavioral investigation of novel stimuli over time may be mediated by a variety of factors including changes in attention, internal state, and motivation. Sensory cortical adaptation, a decrease in sensory cortical responsiveness over prolonged stimulation, may also play a role. In olfaction, metabotropic glutamate receptors on cortical afferent pre-synaptic terminals have been shown to underlie both cortical sensory adaptation and habituation of odor-evoked reflexes. The present experiment examined whether blockade of sensory cortical adaptation through bilateral infusion of the group III metabotropic glutamate receptor antagonist cyclopropyl-4-phosphonophenylglycine (CPPG) into the anterior piriform cortex could reduce habituation of a more complex odor-driven behavior such as investigation of a scented object or a conspecific. The results demonstrate that time spent investigating a scented jar, or a conspecific, decreases over the course of a continuous 10 minute trial. Acute infusion of CPPG bilaterally into the anterior piriform cortex significantly enhanced the time spent investigating the scented jar compared to investigation time in control rats, without affecting overall behavioral activity levels. Infusions into the brain outside of the piriform cortex were without effect. CPPG infusion into the piriform cortex also produced an enhancement of time spent investigating a conspecific, although this effect was not significant. PMID:16322361

  18. Adaptive responses of androgen receptor signaling in castration-resistant prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Prostate Cancer (PCa) is an important age-related disease being the most common cancer malignancy and the second leading cause of cancer mortality in men in Western countries. Initially, PCa progression is androgen receptor (AR)- and androgen-dependent. Eventually advanced PCa reaches the stage of Castration-Resistant Prostate Cancer (CRPC), but remains dependent on AR, which indicates the importance of AR activity also for CRPC. Here, we discuss various pathways that influence the AR activity in CRPC, which indicates an adaptation of the AR signaling in PCa to overcome the treatment of PCa. The adaptation pathways include interferences of the normal regulation of the AR protein level, the expression of AR variants, the crosstalk of the AR with cytokine tyrosine kinases, the Src-Akt-, the MAPK-signaling pathways and AR corepressors. Furthermore, we summarize the current treatment options with regard to the underlying molecular basis of the common adaptation processes of AR signaling that may arise after the treatment with AR antagonists, androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) as well as for CRPC, and point towards novel therapeutic strategies. The understanding of individualized adaptation processes in PCa will lead to individualized treatment options in the future. PMID:26325261

  19. Melanocortin 4 receptor mutations contribute to the adaptation of cavefish to nutrient-poor conditions.

    PubMed

    Aspiras, Ariel C; Rohner, Nicolas; Martineau, Brian; Borowsky, Richard L; Tabin, Clifford J

    2015-08-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of morphological evolution, the genetic underpinnings of behavioral and physiological evolution remain largely unknown. Here, we study the metabolic changes that evolved in independently derived populations of the Mexican cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus. A hallmark of cave environments is scarcity of food. Cavefish populations rely almost entirely on sporadic food input from outside of the caves. To survive under these conditions, cavefish have evolved a range of adaptations, including starvation resistance and binge eating when food becomes available. The use of these adaptive strategies differs among independently derived cave populations. Although all cavefish populations tested lose weight more slowly than their surface conspecifics during restricted rations, only a subset of cavefish populations consume more food than their surface counterparts. A candidate gene-based screen led to the identification of coding mutations in conserved residues of the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) gene, contributing to the insatiable appetite found in some populations of cavefish. Intriguingly, one of the mutated residues has been shown to be linked to obesity in humans. We demonstrate that the allele results in both reduced maximal response and reduced basal activity of the receptor in vitro. We further validate in vivo that the mutated allele contributes to elevated appetite, growth, and starvation resistance. The allele appears to be fixed in cave populations in which the overeating phenotype is present. The presence of the same allele in multiple caves appears to be due to selection from standing genetic variation present in surface populations. PMID:26170297

  20. Melanocortin 4 receptor mutations contribute to the adaptation of cavefish to nutrient-poor conditions

    PubMed Central

    Aspiras, Ariel C.; Rohner, Nicolas; Martineau, Brian; Borowsky, Richard L.; Tabin, Clifford J.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the understanding of morphological evolution, the genetic underpinnings of behavioral and physiological evolution remain largely unknown. Here, we study the metabolic changes that evolved in independently derived populations of the Mexican cavefish, Astyanax mexicanus. A hallmark of cave environments is scarcity of food. Cavefish populations rely almost entirely on sporadic food input from outside of the caves. To survive under these conditions, cavefish have evolved a range of adaptations, including starvation resistance and binge eating when food becomes available. The use of these adaptive strategies differs among independently derived cave populations. Although all cavefish populations tested lose weight more slowly than their surface conspecifics during restricted rations, only a subset of cavefish populations consume more food than their surface counterparts. A candidate gene-based screen led to the identification of coding mutations in conserved residues of the melanocortin 4 receptor (MC4R) gene, contributing to the insatiable appetite found in some populations of cavefish. Intriguingly, one of the mutated residues has been shown to be linked to obesity in humans. We demonstrate that the allele results in both reduced maximal response and reduced basal activity of the receptor in vitro. We further validate in vivo that the mutated allele contributes to elevated appetite, growth, and starvation resistance. The allele appears to be fixed in cave populations in which the overeating phenotype is present. The presence of the same allele in multiple caves appears to be due to selection from standing genetic variation present in surface populations. PMID:26170297

  1. Implicit learning and generalization of stretch response modulation in humans.

    PubMed

    Turpin, Nicolas A; Levin, Mindy F; Feldman, Anatol G

    2016-06-01

    Adaptation of neural responses to repeated muscle stretching likely represents implicit learning to minimize muscle resistance to perturbations. To test this hypothesis, the forearm was placed on a horizontal manipulandum. Elbow flexors or extensors compensated an external load and were stretched by 20° or 70° rotations. Participants were instructed not to intervene by intentionally modifying the muscle resistance elicited by stretching. In addition to phasic stretch reflexes (SRs), muscle stretching was associated with inhibitory periods (IPs) in the ongoing muscle activity starting at minimal latencies of ∼35 ms. The SR amplitude decreased dramatically across 5-12 trials and was not restored after a resting period of 3-5 min, despite the increase in stretch amplitude from 20° to 70°, but IPs remained present. When SRs were suppressed, stretching of originally nonstretched, antagonist muscles initiated after the rest period showed immediate SR suppression while IPs remained present in the first and subsequent trials. Adaptation to muscle stretching thus includes features characteristic of implicit learning such as memory consolidation and generalization. Adaptation may be achieved by central shifts in the threshold positions at which muscles begin to be activated. Shifts are thought to be prepared in advance and triggered with stretch onset. Threshold position resetting provides a comprehensive explanation of the results in the broader context of the control of posture, movement, and motor learning in the healthy and damaged nervous system. PMID:27052586

  2. Molecular adaptation and resilience of the insect’s nuclear receptor USP

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    propose a model in which the molecular adaptation of this protein is seen as a process of resilience for the maintenance of the ecdysone receptor functionality. PMID:23039844

  3. The B-cell antigen receptor integrates adaptive and innate immune signals

    PubMed Central

    Otipoby, Kevin L.; Waisman, Ari; Derudder, Emmanuel; Srinivasan, Lakshmi; Franklin, Andrew; Rajewsky, Klaus

    2015-01-01

    B cells respond to antigens by engagement of their B-cell antigen receptor (BCR) and of coreceptors through which signals from helper T cells or pathogen-associated molecular patterns are delivered. We show that the proliferative response of B cells to the latter stimuli is controlled by BCR-dependent activation of phosphoinositidyl 3-kinase (PI-3K) signaling. Glycogen synthase kinase 3β and Foxo1 are two PI-3K-regulated targets that play important roles, but to different extents, depending on the specific mitogen. These results suggest a model for integrating signals from the innate and the adaptive immune systems in the control of the B-cell immune response. PMID:26371314

  4. Both epidermal growth factor and insulin-like growth factor receptors are dispensable for structural intestinal adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Raphael C.; Diaz-Miron, Jose L.; Choi, Pamela M.; Sommovilla, Joshua; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.; Warner, Brad W.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose Intestinal adaptation structurally represents increases in crypt depth and villus height in response to small bowel resection (SBR). Previously, we found that neither epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) nor insulin-like growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R) function was individually required for normal adaptation. In this study, we sought to determine the effect of disrupting both EGFR and IGF1R expression on resection-induced adaptation. Methods Intestinal-specific EGFR and IGF1R double knockout mice (EGFR/IGF1R-IKO) (n=6) and wild-type (WT) control mice (n=7) underwent 50% proximal SBR. On postoperative day (POD) 7, structural adaptation was scored by measuring crypt depth and villus height. Rates of crypt cell proliferation, apoptosis, and submucosal capillary density were also compared. Results After 50% SBR, normal adaptation occurred in both WT and EGFR/IGF1R-IKO. Rates of proliferation and apoptosis were no different between the two groups. The angiogenic response was less in the EGFR/IGF1R-IKO compared to WT mice. Conclusion Disrupted expression of EGFR and IGF1R in the intestinal epithelial cells does not affect resection-induced structural adaptation but attenuates angiogenesis after SBR. These findings suggest that villus growth is driven by receptors and pathways that occur outside the epithelial cell component, while angiogenic responses may be influenced by epithelial-endothelial crosstalk. PMID:25818318

  5. Evidence for adaptive evolution of olfactory receptor genes in 9 bird species.

    PubMed

    Steiger, Silke S; Fidler, Andrew E; Mueller, Jakob C; Kempenaers, Bart

    2010-01-01

    It has been suggested that positive selection, in particular selection favoring a change in the protein sequence, plays a role in the evolution of olfactory receptor (OR) gene repertoires in fish and mammals. ORs are 7-transmembrane domain (TM) proteins, members of the G-protein-coupled receptor superfamily in vertebrate genomes, and responsible for odorant binding and discrimination. OR gene repertoires in birds are surprisingly large and diverse, suggesting that birds have a keen olfactory sense. The aim of this study is to investigate signatures of positive selection in an expanded OR clade (group-gamma-c) that seems to be a characteristic of avian genomes. Using maximum-likelihood methods that estimate the d(N)/d(S) ratios and account for the effects of recombination, we show here that there is evidence for positive selection in group-gamma-c partial OR coding sequences of 9 bird species that are likely to have different olfactory abilities: the blue tit (Cyanistes caeruleus), the black coucal (Centropus grillii), the brown kiwi (Apteryx australis), the canary (Serinus canaria), the galah (Eolophus roseicapillus), the kakapo (Strigops habroptilus), the mallard (Anas platyrhynchos), the red jungle fowl (Gallus gallus), and the snow petrel (Pagodroma nivea). Positively selected codons were predominantly located in TMs, which in other vertebrates are involved in odorant binding. Our data suggest that 1) at least some avian OR genes have been subjected to adaptive evolution, 2) the extent of such adaptive evolution differs between bird species, and 3) positive selective pressures may have been stronger on the group-gamma-c OR genes of species that have well-developed olfactory abilities. PMID:19965911

  6. Computation identifies structural features that govern neuronal firing properties in slowly adapting touch receptors

    PubMed Central

    Lesniak, Daine R; Marshall, Kara L; Wellnitz, Scott A; Jenkins, Blair A; Baba, Yoshichika; Rasband, Matthew N; Gerling, Gregory J; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2014-01-01

    Touch is encoded by cutaneous sensory neurons with diverse morphologies and physiological outputs. How neuronal architecture influences response properties is unknown. To elucidate the origin of firing patterns in branched mechanoreceptors, we combined neuroanatomy, electrophysiology and computation to analyze mouse slowly adapting type I (SAI) afferents. These vertebrate touch receptors, which innervate Merkel cells, encode shape and texture. SAI afferents displayed a high degree of variability in touch-evoked firing and peripheral anatomy. The functional consequence of differences in anatomical architecture was tested by constructing network models representing sequential steps of mechanosensory encoding: skin displacement at touch receptors, mechanotransduction and action-potential initiation. A systematic survey of arbor configurations predicted that the arrangement of mechanotransduction sites at heminodes is a key structural feature that accounts in part for an afferent’s firing properties. These findings identify an anatomical correlate and plausible mechanism to explain the driver effect first described by Adrian and Zotterman. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01488.001 PMID:24448409

  7. A [3]rotaxane with two porphyrinic plates acting as an adaptable receptor.

    PubMed

    Frey, Julien; Tock, Christian; Collin, Jean-Paul; Heitz, Valérie; Sauvage, Jean-Pierre

    2008-04-01

    Following a multistep procedure, the copper(I)-templated strategy allowed preparation of a multifunctional [3]rotaxane. The dumbbell consists of a central two-bidentate chelate unit and two terminal stoppers. The two rings threaded on the rotaxane axis consist each of a 1,10-phenanthroline-incorporating macrocycle, rigidly connected to an appended zinc-complexed porphyrin. The copper(I) template can be removed, affording a free rotaxane whose two rings can glide freely along the axis and spin around it. The dumbbell being very long (approximately 85 A in its extended conformation from one stopper to the other), the porphyrin-porphyrin distance can be varied over a wide range. The two porphyrinic plates constitute the key elements of a receptor able to complex various guests between the plates. The ability of the threaded rings to move freely makes the host perfectly adjustable, allowing capture of geometrically very different guests. The copper(I)-complexed rotaxane also acts as an efficient receptor, although its adaptability is obviously more limited than that of its free rotaxane counterpart. PMID:18338892

  8. Computation identifies structural features that govern neuronal firing properties in slowly adapting touch receptors.

    PubMed

    Lesniak, Daine R; Marshall, Kara L; Wellnitz, Scott A; Jenkins, Blair A; Baba, Yoshichika; Rasband, Matthew N; Gerling, Gregory J; Lumpkin, Ellen A

    2014-01-01

    Touch is encoded by cutaneous sensory neurons with diverse morphologies and physiological outputs. How neuronal architecture influences response properties is unknown. To elucidate the origin of firing patterns in branched mechanoreceptors, we combined neuroanatomy, electrophysiology and computation to analyze mouse slowly adapting type I (SAI) afferents. These vertebrate touch receptors, which innervate Merkel cells, encode shape and texture. SAI afferents displayed a high degree of variability in touch-evoked firing and peripheral anatomy. The functional consequence of differences in anatomical architecture was tested by constructing network models representing sequential steps of mechanosensory encoding: skin displacement at touch receptors, mechanotransduction and action-potential initiation. A systematic survey of arbor configurations predicted that the arrangement of mechanotransduction sites at heminodes is a key structural feature that accounts in part for an afferent's firing properties. These findings identify an anatomical correlate and plausible mechanism to explain the driver effect first described by Adrian and Zotterman. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.01488.001. PMID:24448409

  9. Groin stretch (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Stand with your legs wide apart. Shift your weight to one side, bending your knee somewhat. Do not let your knee bend beyond your ankle; in other words, you should be able to look down and still see your toes. You should feel the stretch in your opposite ...

  10. Stretching to Understand Proteins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2007-03-01

    Mechanical stretching of single proteins has been studied experimentally for about 50 proteins yielding a variety of force patterns and values of the peak forces. We have performed a theoretical survey of 7749 proteins of known native structure and map out the landscape of possible dynamical behaviors unders stretching at constant speed. The model used is constructed based on the native geometry. It is solved by methods of molecular dynamics and validated by comparing the theoretical predictions to experimental results. We characterize the distribution of peak forces and on correlations with the system size and with the structure classification as characterized by the CATH scheme. We identify proteins with the biggest forces and show that they belong to few topology classes. We determine which protein segments act as mechanical clamps and show that, in most cases, they correspond to long stretches of parallel beta-strands, but other mechanisms are also possible. We then consider stretching by fluid flows. We show that unfolding induced by a uniform flow shows a richer behavior than that in the force clamp. The dynamics of unfolding is found to depend strongly on the selection of the amino acid, usually one of the termini, which is anchored. These features offer potentially wider diagnostic tools to investigate structure of proteins compared to experiments based on the atomic force microscopy.

  11. Stretch That Budget!

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walker, John R.

    1976-01-01

    Discusses ways in which industrial education teachers can stretch their budgets, which include reducing waste to a minimum, keeping an accurate and up-to-date inventory, trading surplus or excess materials with neighboring schools, and planning programs more carefully. Money-saving tips concerned with metals, plastics, woods, and printing are also…

  12. Stretching & Flexibility: An Interactive Encyclopedia of Stretching. [CD-ROM].

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    2002

    This CD-ROM offers 140 different stretches in full-motion video sequences. It focuses on the proper techniques for overall physical fitness, injury prevention and rehabilitation, and 23 different sports (e.g., golf, running, soccer, skiing, climbing, football, and baseball). Topics include stretching for sports; stretching awareness and education…

  13. Stretched Inertial Jets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ghabache, Elisabeth; Antkowiak, Arnaud; Seon, Thomas; Villermaux, Emmanuel

    2015-11-01

    Liquid jets often arise as short-lived bursting liquid flows. Cavitation or impact-driven jets, bursting champagne bubbles, shaped-charge jets, ballistospores or drop-on-demand inkjet printing are a few examples where liquid jets are suddenly released. The trademark of all these discharge jets is the property of being stretched, due to the quenching injection. the present theoretical and experimental investigation, the structure of the jet flow field will be unraveled experimentally for a few emblematic occurrences of discharge jets. Though the injection markedly depends on each flow configuration, the jet velocity field will be shown to be systematically and rapidly attracted to the universal stretching flow z/t. The emergence of this inertial attractor actually only relies on simple kinematic ingredients, and as such is fairly generic. The universality of the jet velocity structure will be discussed.

  14. Experimental Adaptation of Wild-Type Canine Distemper Virus (CDV) to the Human Entry Receptor CD150

    PubMed Central

    Bieringer, Maria; Han, Jung Woo; Kendl, Sabine; Khosravi, Mojtaba; Plattet, Philippe; Schneider-Schaulies, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    Canine distemper virus (CDV), a close relative of measles virus (MV), is widespread and well known for its broad host range. When the goal of measles eradication may be achieved, and when measles vaccination will be stopped, CDV might eventually cross the species barrier to humans and emerge as a new human pathogen. In order to get an impression how fast such alterations may occur, we characterized required adaptive mutations to the human entry receptors CD150 (SLAM) and nectin-4 as first step to infect human target cells. Recombinant wild-type CDV-A75/17red adapted quickly to growth in human H358 epithelial cells expressing human nectin-4. Sequencing of the viral attachment proteins (hemagglutinin, H, and fusion protein, F) genes revealed that no adaptive alteration was required to utilize human nectin-4. In contrast, the virus replicated only to low titres (102 pfu/ml) in Vero cells expressing human CD150 (Vero-hSLAM). After three passages using these cells virus was adapted to human CD150 and replicated to high titres (105 pfu/ml). Sequence analyses revealed that only one amino acid exchange in the H-protein at position 540 Asp→Gly (D540G) was required for functional adaptation to human CD150. Structural modelling suggests that the adaptive mutation D540G in H reflects the sequence alteration from canine to human CD150 at position 70 and 71 from Pro to Leu (P70L) and Gly to Glu (G71E), and compensates for the gain of a negative charge in the human CD150 molecule. Using this model system our data indicate that only a minimal alteration, in this case one adaptive mutation, is required for adaptation of CDV to the human entry receptors, and help to understand the molecular basis why this adaptive mutation occurs. PMID:23554862

  15. Stretch-Oriented Polyimide Films

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Klinedinst, D.; Feuz, L.

    2000-01-01

    Two thermoplastic polyimides - one amorphous, the other crystallizable -- were subjected to isothermal stretching just above their glass transition temperatures. Room-temperature strengths in the stretch direction were greatly improved and, moduli increased up to 3.6-fold. Optimum stretching conditions were determined.

  16. Receptor and viral determinants of SARS-coronavirus adaptation to human ACE2

    PubMed Central

    Li, Wenhui; Zhang, Chengsheng; Sui, Jianhua; Kuhn, Jens H; Moore, Michael J; Luo, Shiwen; Wong, Swee-Kee; Huang, I-Chueh; Xu, Keming; Vasilieva, Natalya; Murakami, Akikazu; He, Yaqing; Marasco, Wayne A; Guan, Yi; Choe, Hyeryun; Farzan, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Human angiotensin-converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) is a functional receptor for SARS coronavirus (SARS-CoV). Here we identify the SARS-CoV spike (S)-protein-binding site on ACE2. We also compare S proteins of SARS-CoV isolated during the 2002–2003 SARS outbreak and during the much less severe 2003–2004 outbreak, and from palm civets, a possible source of SARS-CoV found in humans. All three S proteins bound to and utilized palm-civet ACE2 efficiently, but the latter two S proteins utilized human ACE2 markedly less efficiently than did the S protein obtained during the earlier human outbreak. The lower affinity of these S proteins could be complemented by altering specific residues within the S-protein-binding site of human ACE2 to those of civet ACE2, or by altering S-protein residues 479 and 487 to residues conserved during the 2002–2003 outbreak. Collectively, these data describe molecular interactions important to the adaptation of SARS-CoV to human cells, and provide insight into the severity of the 2002–2003 SARS epidemic. PMID:15791205

  17. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, L.M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elestic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  18. Tensioning device for a stretched membrane collector

    DOEpatents

    Murphy, Lawrence M.

    1984-01-01

    Disclosed is a solar concentrating collector comprising an elastic membrane member for concentrating sunlight, a frame for holding the membrane member in plane and in tension, and a tensioning means for varying the tension of the membrane member. The tensioning means is disposed at the frame and is adapted to releasably attach the membrane member thereto. The tensioning means is also adapted to uniformly and symmetrically subject the membrane member to stretching forces such that membrane stresses produced thereby are distributed uniformly over a thickness of the membrane member and reciprocal twisting moments are substantially prevented from acting about said frame.

  19. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  20. Stretching Cells with Light

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guck, Jochen

    2003-03-01

    Trapped in a two-beam laser trap, any dielectric object experiences surface stresses induced by the laser light that lead to a "stretching" of the object. This can be explained with simple ray optics as well as with a modified Mie theory approach. Based on this phenomenon we have developed an optical tool to probe the viscoelastic properties of individual cells - an optical stretcher. The cell's deformation at a known induced stress reveals the mechanical properties of the cell and the underlying cytoskeleton. Thus, the optical stretcher can be used for contact-free microrheology on individual cells. Step-stress experiments on mouse fibroblasts reveal two main time regimes. At stress duration times shorter than a minute cells behave like a passive viscoelastic fluid. The frequency dependence of the complex shear modulus and the terminal relaxation time are consistent with a weakly entangled, transiently crosslinked actin gel, while contributions from other cytoskeletal filaments can be largely ruled out. At stretching times longer than a minute cells show an active response evidenced by a continued elongation after stretch. Malignantly transformed fibroblasts are less elastic and less viscous. Experiments on various other cell types with the optical stretcher confirm very generally that the viscoelastic response of cells changes during the progression of cancer and other diseases, which are accompanied by cytoskeletal changes, and the normal differentiation of cells. This suggests using optical deformability as a novel inherent cell marker. Instead of having to "look" for changes, light can now directly be used to "feel" for altered cells. Incorporated into a microfluidic device this can be done at rates that could eventually rival flow cytometers rendering the optical stretcher an ideal device for cytological diagnosis of disease and the screening and sorting of heterogeneous cell populations.

  1. The Role of 5-HT1A Receptors in Long-Term Adaptation of Newborn Rats to Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mikhailenko, V A; Butkevich, I P

    2016-08-01

    We studied the effects of neonatal hypoxia on adaptive behavior of rats during prepubertal and pubertal periods in the control and after repeated injections of 5-HT1A receptor agonist buspirone. Hypoxia enhanced the inflammatory nociceptive response and exacerbated the depressive-like behavior. Repeated injections of buspirone starting from the neonatal period produced a long-term normalizing effect on the inflammatory nociceptive response and psychoemotional behavior disturbed by hypoxia. The protective effect of buspirone can result from strengthening of the adaptive potencies of the serotoninergic system via activation of 5-HT1A receptors that up-regulate secretion of trophic factor S100β under conditions of serotonin deficiency typical of rats exposed to neonatal hypoxia. Buspirone promotes recovery of the afferent and efferent connections of the raphe nuclei with the prefrontal cortex and spinal cord involved in integration of the anti-nociceptive and psychoemotional systems. PMID:27591870

  2. Stretching cells with DEAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Akbari, S.; Rosset, S.; Shea, H. R.

    2012-04-01

    Biological cells regulate their biochemical behavior in response to mechanical stress present in their organism. Most of the available cell cultures designed to study the effect of mechanical stimuli on cells are cm2 area, far too large to monitor single cell response or have a very low throughput. We have developed two sets of high throughput single cell stretcher devices based on dielectric elastomer microactuators to stretch groups of individual cells with various strain levels in a single experiment. The first device consists of an array of 100 μm x 200 μm actuators on a non-stretched PDMS membrane bonded to a Pyrex chip, showing up to 4.7% strain at the electric field of 96 V/μm. The second device contains an array of 100 μm x 100 μm actuators on a 160% uniaxially prestretched PDMS membrane suspended over a frame. 37% strain is recorded at the nominal electric field of 114 V/μm. The performance of these devices as a cell stretcher is assessed by comparing their static and dynamic behavior.

  3. Stimulation of pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors by inhaled wood smoke in rats.

    PubMed

    Lai, C J; Kou, Y R

    1998-04-15

    1. The stimulation of pulmonary rapidly adapting receptors (RARs) by wood smoke was investigated. Impulses from seventy RARs were recorded in fifty-nine anaesthetized, open-chest and artificially ventilated rats; responses to delivery of 6 ml of wood smoke into the lungs were studied in sixty-one receptors whereas responses to histamine (10 or 100 microg kg-1, i.v.) were studied in the other nine. 2. Delivery of wood smoke stimulated fifty-two of the sixty-one RARs studied. When stimulated, an intense burst of discharge was evoked within 1 or 2 s of smoke delivery. This increased activity quickly peaked in 1-3 s (Delta = 15.8 +/- 1.6 impulses s-1; n = 61; mean +/- s.e.m.), then declined and yet remained at a level higher than the baseline activity. The mean duration of the stimulation was 25.1 +/- 2.7 s. In contrast, smoke delivery did not affect tracheal pressure. 3. Peak responses of RARs to wood smoke were partially reduced by removal of smoke particulates and were largely attenuated by pretreatment with dimethylthiourea (DMTU, a hydroxyl radical scavenger), indomethacin (Indo, a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor), or both DMTU and Indo (DMTU + Indo). Conversely, the peak responses of RARs were not significantly affected by pretreatment with isoprenaline (a bronchodilator) or vehicle for these chemicals. Additionally, pretreatment with DMTU, Indo, or DMTU + Indo did not significantly alter the RAR sensitivity to mechanical stimulation (constant-pressure lung inflation; 20 cmH2O). 4. Of the nine RARs tested, six were stimulated by histamine and their sensitivity to this chemical irritant was not altered by pretreatment with DMTU + Indo. 5. The results suggest that both the particulates and gas phases are responsible for, and both the hydroxyl radical and cyclo-oxygenase products are involved in, the stimulation of RARs by wood smoke. Furthermore, changes in lung mechanics following smoke delivery are not the cause of this afferent stimulation. PMID:9508820

  4. Molecular evolution of the odorant and gustatory receptor genes in lepidopteran insects: implications for their adaptation and speciation.

    PubMed

    Engsontia, Patamarerk; Sangket, Unitsa; Chotigeat, Wilaiwan; Satasook, Chutamas

    2014-08-01

    Lepidoptera (comprised of butterflies and moths) is one of the largest groups of insects, including more than 160,000 described species. Chemoreception plays important roles in the adaptation of these species to a wide range of niches, e.g., plant hosts, egg-laying sites, and mates. This study investigated the molecular evolution of the lepidopteran odorant (Or) and gustatory receptor (Gr) genes using recently identified genes from Bombyx mori, Danaus plexippus, Heliconius melpomene, Plutella xylostella, Heliothis virescens, Manduca sexta, Cydia pomonella, and Spodoptera littoralis. A limited number of cases of large lineage-specific gene expansion are observed (except in the P. xylostella lineage), possibly due to selection against tandem gene duplication. There has been strong purifying selection during the evolution of both lepidopteran odorant and gustatory genes, as shown by the low ω values estimated through CodeML analysis, ranging from 0.0093 to 0.3926. However, purifying selection has been relaxed on some amino acid sites in these receptors, leading to sequence divergence, which is a precursor of positive selection on these sequences. Signatures of positive selection were detected only in a few loci from the lineage-specific analysis. Estimation of gene gains and losses suggests that the common ancestor of the Lepidoptera had fewer Or genes compared to extant species and an even more reduced number of Gr genes, particularly within the bitter receptor clade. Multiple gene gains and a few gene losses occurred during the evolution of Lepidoptera. Gene family expansion may be associated with the adaptation of lepidopteran species to plant hosts, especially after angiosperm radiation. Phylogenetic analysis of the moth sex pheromone receptor genes suggested that chromosomal translocations have occurred several times. New sex pheromone receptors have arisen through tandem gene duplication. Positive selection was detected at some amino acid sites predicted to be

  5. Galectins as self/non-self recognition receptors in innate and adaptive immunity: an unresolved paradox

    PubMed Central

    Vasta, Gerardo R.; Ahmed, Hafiz; Nita-Lazar, Mihai; Banerjee, Aditi; Pasek, Marta; Shridhar, Surekha; Guha, Prasun; Fernández-Robledo, José A.

    2012-01-01

    Galectins are characterized by their binding affinity for β-galactosides, a unique binding site sequence motif, and wide taxonomic distribution and structural conservation in vertebrates, invertebrates, protista, and fungi. Since their initial description, galectins were considered to bind endogenous (“self”) glycans and mediate developmental processes and cancer. In the past few years, however, numerous studies have described the diverse effects of galectins on cells involved in both innate and adaptive immune responses, and the mechanistic aspects of their regulatory roles in immune homeostasis. More recently, however, evidence has accumulated to suggest that galectins also bind exogenous (“non-self”) glycans on the surface of potentially pathogenic microbes, parasites, and fungi, suggesting that galectins can function as pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) in innate immunity. Thus, a perplexing paradox arises by the fact that galectins also recognize lactosamine-containing glycans on the host cell surface during developmental processes and regulation of immune responses. According to the currently accepted model for non-self recognition, PRRs recognize pathogens via highly conserved microbial surface molecules of wide distribution such as LPS or peptidoglycan (pathogen-associated molecular patterns; PAMPs), which are absent in the host. Hence, this would not apply to galectins, which apparently bind similar self/non-self molecular patterns on host and microbial cells. This paradox underscores first, an oversimplification in the use of the PRR/PAMP terminology. Second, and most importantly, it reveals significant gaps in our knowledge about the diversity of the host galectin repertoire, and the subcellular targeting, localization, and secretion. Furthermore, our knowledge about the structural and biophysical aspects of their interactions with the host and microbial carbohydrate moieties is fragmentary, and warrants further investigation. PMID:22811679

  6. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  7. Ca2+ influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Murata, Naohiko; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Takahara, Norihiro; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-10-10

    One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10-30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca(2+)]i transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca(2+)]i. The stretch-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation was attenuated in Ca(2+)-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca(2+)]i by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd(3+), ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca(2+)]i elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca(2+) influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP. PMID:25256743

  8. BSDB: the biomolecule stretching database

    PubMed Central

    Sikora, Mateusz; Sułkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartłomiej S.; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    We describe the Biomolecule Stretching Data Base that has been recently set up at http://www.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. It provides information about mechanostability of proteins. Its core is based on simulations of stretching of 17 134 proteins within a structure-based model. The primary information is about the heights of the maximal force peaks, the force–displacement patterns, and the sequencing of the contact-rupturing events. We also summarize the possible types of the mechanical clamps, i.e. the motifs which are responsible for a protein's resistance to stretching. PMID:20929872

  9. BSDB: the biomolecule stretching database.

    PubMed

    Sikora, Mateusz; Sulkowska, Joanna I; Witkowski, Bartlomiej S; Cieplak, Marek

    2011-01-01

    We describe the Biomolecule Stretching Data Base that has been recently set up at http://www.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. It provides information about mechanostability of proteins. Its core is based on simulations of stretching of 17 134 proteins within a structure-based model. The primary information is about the heights of the maximal force peaks, the force-displacement patterns, and the sequencing of the contact-rupturing events. We also summarize the possible types of the mechanical clamps, i.e. the motifs which are responsible for a protein's resistance to stretching. PMID:20929872

  10. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics.

  11. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching.

    PubMed

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-03-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells' cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here, we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression manoeuvres. After pressure equilibration, cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics. PMID:25664452

  12. Hydraulic fracture during epithelial stretching

    PubMed Central

    Casares, Laura; Vincent, Romaric; Zalvidea, Dobryna; Campillo, Noelia; Navajas, Daniel; Arroyo, Marino; Trepat, Xavier

    2015-01-01

    The origin of fracture in epithelial cell sheets subject to stretch is commonly attributed to excess tension in the cells’ cytoskeleton, in the plasma membrane, or in cell-cell contacts. Here we demonstrate that for a variety of synthetic and physiological hydrogel substrates the formation of epithelial cracks is caused by tissue stretching independently of epithelial tension. We show that the origin of the cracks is hydraulic; they result from a transient pressure build-up in the substrate during stretch and compression maneuvers. After pressure equilibration cracks heal readily through actomyosin-dependent mechanisms. The observed phenomenology is captured by the theory of poroelasticity, which predicts the size and healing dynamics of epithelial cracks as a function of the stiffness, geometry and composition of the hydrogel substrate. Our findings demonstrate that epithelial integrity is determined in a tension-independent manner by the coupling between tissue stretching and matrix hydraulics. PMID:25664452

  13. Ca{sup 2+} influx and ATP release mediated by mechanical stretch in human lung fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Murata, Naohiko; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Takahara, Norihiro; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-10-10

    Highlights: • Uniaxial stretching activates Ca{sup 2+} signaling in human lung fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced intracellular Ca{sup 2+} elevation is mainly via Ca{sup 2+} influx. • Mechanical strain enhances ATP release from fibroblasts. • Stretch-induced Ca{sup 2+} influx is not mediated by released ATP or actin cytoskeleton. - Abstract: One cause of progressive pulmonary fibrosis is dysregulated wound healing after lung inflammation or damage in patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis and severe acute respiratory distress syndrome. The mechanical forces are considered to regulate pulmonary fibrosis via activation of lung fibroblasts. In this study, the effects of mechanical stretch on the intracellular Ca{sup 2+} concentration ([Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}) and ATP release were investigated in primary human lung fibroblasts. Uniaxial stretch (10–30% in strain) was applied to fibroblasts cultured in a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Following stretching and subsequent unloading, [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} transiently increased in a strain-dependent manner. Hypotonic stress, which causes plasma membrane stretching, also transiently increased the [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i}. The stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was attenuated in Ca{sup 2+}-free solution. In contrast, the increase of [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} by a 20% stretch was not inhibited by the inhibitor of stretch-activated channels GsMTx-4, Gd{sup 3+}, ruthenium red, or cytochalasin D. Cyclic stretching induced significant ATP releases from fibroblasts. However, the stretch-induced [Ca{sup 2+}]{sub i} elevation was not inhibited by ATP diphosphohydrolase apyrase or a purinergic receptor antagonist suramin. Taken together, mechanical stretch induces Ca{sup 2+} influx independently of conventional stretch-sensitive ion channels, the actin cytoskeleton, and released ATP.

  14. Introgression of Neandertal- and Denisovan-like Haplotypes Contributes to Adaptive Variation in Human Toll-like Receptors.

    PubMed

    Dannemann, Michael; Andrés, Aida M; Kelso, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens and the diseases they cause have been among the most important selective forces experienced by humans during their evolutionary history. Although adaptive alleles generally arise by mutation, introgression can also be a valuable source of beneficial alleles. Archaic humans, who lived in Europe and Western Asia for more than 200,000 years, were probably well adapted to this environment and its local pathogens. It is therefore conceivable that modern humans entering Europe and Western Asia who admixed with them obtained a substantial immune advantage from the introgression of archaic alleles. Here we document a cluster of three Toll-like receptors (TLR6-TLR1-TLR10) in modern humans that carries three distinct archaic haplotypes, indicating repeated introgression from archaic humans. Two of these haplotypes are most similar to the Neandertal genome, and the third haplotype is most similar to the Denisovan genome. The Toll-like receptors are key components of innate immunity and provide an important first line of immune defense against bacteria, fungi, and parasites. The unusually high allele frequencies and unexpected levels of population differentiation indicate that there has been local positive selection on multiple haplotypes at this locus. We show that the introgressed alleles have clear functional effects in modern humans; archaic-like alleles underlie differences in the expression of the TLR genes and are associated with increased [corrected] microbial resistance and increased allergic disease in large cohorts. This provides strong evidence for recurrent adaptive introgression at the TLR6-TLR1-TLR10 locus, resulting in differences in disease phenotypes in modern humans. PMID:26748514

  15. Introgression of Neandertal- and Denisovan-like Haplotypes Contributes to Adaptive Variation in Human Toll-like Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Dannemann, Michael; Andrés, Aida M.; Kelso, Janet

    2016-01-01

    Pathogens and the diseases they cause have been among the most important selective forces experienced by humans during their evolutionary history. Although adaptive alleles generally arise by mutation, introgression can also be a valuable source of beneficial alleles. Archaic humans, who lived in Europe and Western Asia for more than 200,000 years, were probably well adapted to this environment and its local pathogens. It is therefore conceivable that modern humans entering Europe and Western Asia who admixed with them obtained a substantial immune advantage from the introgression of archaic alleles. Here we document a cluster of three Toll-like receptors (TLR6-TLR1-TLR10) in modern humans that carries three distinct archaic haplotypes, indicating repeated introgression from archaic humans. Two of these haplotypes are most similar to the Neandertal genome, and the third haplotype is most similar to the Denisovan genome. The Toll-like receptors are key components of innate immunity and provide an important first line of immune defense against bacteria, fungi, and parasites. The unusually high allele frequencies and unexpected levels of population differentiation indicate that there has been local positive selection on multiple haplotypes at this locus. We show that the introgressed alleles have clear functional effects in modern humans; archaic-like alleles underlie differences in the expression of the TLR genes and are associated with reduced microbial resistance and increased allergic disease in large cohorts. This provides strong evidence for recurrent adaptive introgression at the TLR6-TLR1-TLR10 locus, resulting in differences in disease phenotypes in modern humans. PMID:26748514

  16. Reptile Toll-like receptor 5 unveils adaptive evolution of bacterial flagellin recognition.

    PubMed

    Voogdt, Carlos G P; Bouwman, Lieneke I; Kik, Marja J L; Wagenaar, Jaap A; van Putten, Jos P M

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are ancient innate immune receptors crucial for immune homeostasis and protection against infection. TLRs are present in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish but have not been functionally characterized in reptiles despite the central position of this animal class in vertebrate evolution. Here we report the cloning, characterization, and function of TLR5 of the reptile Anolis carolinensis (Green Anole lizard). The receptor (acTLR5) displays the typical TLR protein architecture with 22 extracellular leucine rich repeats flanked by a N- and C-terminal leucine rich repeat domain, a membrane-spanning region, and an intracellular TIR domain. The receptor is phylogenetically most similar to TLR5 of birds and most distant to fish TLR5. Transcript analysis revealed acTLR5 expression in multiple lizard tissues. Stimulation of acTLR5 with TLR ligands demonstrated unique responsiveness towards bacterial flagellin in both reptile and human cells. Comparison of acTLR5 and human TLR5 using purified flagellins revealed differential sensitivity to Pseudomonas but not Salmonella flagellin, indicating development of species-specific flagellin recognition during the divergent evolution of mammals and reptiles. Our discovery of reptile TLR5 fills the evolutionary gap regarding TLR conservation across vertebrates and provides novel insights in functional evolution of host-microbe interactions. PMID:26738735

  17. Reptile Toll-like receptor 5 unveils adaptive evolution of bacterial flagellin recognition

    PubMed Central

    Voogdt, Carlos G. P.; Bouwman, Lieneke I.; Kik, Marja J. L.; Wagenaar, Jaap A.; van Putten, Jos P. M.

    2016-01-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are ancient innate immune receptors crucial for immune homeostasis and protection against infection. TLRs are present in mammals, birds, amphibians and fish but have not been functionally characterized in reptiles despite the central position of this animal class in vertebrate evolution. Here we report the cloning, characterization, and function of TLR5 of the reptile Anolis carolinensis (Green Anole lizard). The receptor (acTLR5) displays the typical TLR protein architecture with 22 extracellular leucine rich repeats flanked by a N- and C-terminal leucine rich repeat domain, a membrane-spanning region, and an intracellular TIR domain. The receptor is phylogenetically most similar to TLR5 of birds and most distant to fish TLR5. Transcript analysis revealed acTLR5 expression in multiple lizard tissues. Stimulation of acTLR5 with TLR ligands demonstrated unique responsiveness towards bacterial flagellin in both reptile and human cells. Comparison of acTLR5 and human TLR5 using purified flagellins revealed differential sensitivity to Pseudomonas but not Salmonella flagellin, indicating development of species-specific flagellin recognition during the divergent evolution of mammals and reptiles. Our discovery of reptile TLR5 fills the evolutionary gap regarding TLR conservation across vertebrates and provides novel insights in functional evolution of host-microbe interactions. PMID:26738735

  18. A highly pleiotropic amino acid polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor contributes to life-history adaptation.

    PubMed

    Paaby, Annalise B; Bergland, Alan O; Behrman, Emily L; Schmidt, Paul S

    2014-12-01

    Finding the specific nucleotides that underlie adaptive variation is a major goal in evolutionary biology, but polygenic traits pose a challenge because the complex genotype-phenotype relationship can obscure the effects of individual alleles. However, natural selection working in large wild populations can shift allele frequencies and indicate functional regions of the genome. Previously, we showed that the two most common alleles of a complex amino acid insertion-deletion polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor show independent, parallel clines in frequency across the North American and Australian continents. Here, we report that the cline is stable over at least a five-year period and that the polymorphism also demonstrates temporal shifts in allele frequency concurrent with seasonal change. We tested the alleles for effects on levels of insulin signaling, fecundity, development time, body size, stress tolerance, and life span. We find that the alleles are associated with predictable differences in these traits, consistent with patterns of Drosophila life-history variation across geography that likely reflect adaptation to the heterogeneous climatic environment. These results implicate insulin signaling as a major mediator of life-history adaptation in Drosophila, and suggest that life-history trade-offs can be explained by extensive pleiotropy at a single locus. PMID:25319083

  19. Incretin Receptor Null Mice Reveal Key Role of GLP-1 but Not GIP in Pancreatic Beta Cell Adaptation to Pregnancy

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, R. Charlotte; Vasu, Srividya; Thorens, Bernard; Drucker, Daniel J.; Flatt, Peter R.

    2014-01-01

    Islet adaptations to pregnancy were explored in C57BL6/J mice lacking functional receptors for glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) and gastric inhibitory polypeptide (GIP). Pregnant wild type mice and GIPRKO mice exhibited marked increases in islet and beta cell area, numbers of medium/large sized islets, with positive effects on Ki67/Tunel ratio favouring beta cell growth and enhanced pancreatic insulin content. Alpha cell area and glucagon content were unchanged but prohormone convertases PC2 and PC1/3 together with significant amounts of GLP-1 and GIP were detected in alpha cells. Knockout of GLP-1R abolished these islet adaptations and paradoxically decreased pancreatic insulin, GLP-1 and GIP. This was associated with abolition of normal pregnancy-induced increases in plasma GIP, L-cell numbers, and intestinal GIP and GLP-1 stores. These data indicate that GLP-1 but not GIP is a key mediator of beta cell mass expansion and related adaptations in pregnancy, triggered in part by generation of intra-islet GLP-1. PMID:24927416

  20. Human stretch reflex pathways reexamined

    PubMed Central

    Yavuz, Ş. Utku; Mrachacz-Kersting, Natalie; Sebik, Oğuz; Berna Ünver, M.; Farina, Dario

    2013-01-01

    Reflex responses of tibialis anterior motor units to stretch stimuli were investigated in human subjects. Three types of stretch stimuli were applied (tap-like, ramp-and-hold, and half-sine stretch). Stimulus-induced responses in single motor units were analyzed using the classical technique, which involved building average surface electromyogram (SEMG) and peristimulus time histograms (PSTH) from the discharge times of motor units and peristimulus frequencygrams (PSF) from the instantaneous discharge rates of single motor units. With the use of SEMG and PSTH, the tap-like stretch stimulus induced five separate reflex responses, on average. With the same single motor unit data, the PSF technique indicated that the tap stimulus induced only three reflex responses. Similar to the finding using the tap-like stretch stimuli, ramp-and-hold stimuli induced several peaks and troughs in the SEMG and PSTH. The PSF analyses displayed genuine increases in discharge rates underlying the peaks but not underlying the troughs. Half-sine stretch stimuli induced a long-lasting excitation followed by a long-lasting silent period in SEMG and PSTH. The increase in the discharge rate, however, lasted for the entire duration of the stimulus and continued during the silent period. The results are discussed in the light of the fact that the discharge rate of a motoneuron has a strong positive linear association with the effective synaptic current it receives and hence represents changes in the membrane potential more directly and accurately than the other indirect measures. This study suggests that the neuronal pathway of the human stretch reflex does not include inhibitory pathways. PMID:24225537

  1. Effects of egg-adaptation on receptor-binding and antigenic properties of recent influenza A (H3N2) vaccine viruses.

    PubMed

    Parker, Lauren; Wharton, Stephen A; Martin, Stephen R; Cross, Karen; Lin, Yipu; Liu, Yan; Feizi, Ten; Daniels, Rodney S; McCauley, John W

    2016-06-01

    Influenza A virus (subtype H3N2) causes seasonal human influenza and is included as a component of influenza vaccines. The majority of vaccine viruses are isolated and propagated in eggs, which commonly results in amino acid substitutions in the haemagglutinin (HA) glycoprotein. These substitutions can affect virus receptor-binding and alter virus antigenicity, thereby, obfuscating the choice of egg-propagated viruses for development into candidate vaccine viruses. To evaluate the effects of egg-adaptive substitutions seen in H3N2 vaccine viruses on sialic acid receptor-binding, we carried out quantitative measurement of virus receptor-binding using surface biolayer interferometry with haemagglutination inhibition (HI) assays to correlate changes in receptor avidity with antigenic properties. Included in these studies was a panel of H3N2 viruses generated by reverse genetics containing substitutions seen in recent egg-propagated vaccine viruses and corresponding cell culture-propagated wild-type viruses. These assays provide a quantitative approach to investigating the importance of individual amino acid substitutions in influenza receptor-binding. Results show that viruses with egg-adaptive HA substitutions R156Q, S219Y, and I226N, have increased binding avidity to α2,3-linked receptor-analogues and decreased binding avidity to α2,6-linked receptor-analogues. No measurable binding was detected for the viruses with amino acid substitution combination 156Q+219Y and receptor-binding increased in viruses where egg-adaptation mutations were introduced into cell culture-propagated virus. Substitutions at positions 156 and 190 appeared to be primarily responsible for low reactivity in HI assays with post-infection ferret antisera raised against 2012-2013 season H3N2 viruses. Egg-adaptive substitutions at position 186 caused substantial differences in binding avidity with an insignificant effect on antigenicity. PMID:26974849

  2. Soleus stretch reflex during cycling.

    PubMed

    Grey, M J; Pierce, C W; Milner, T E; Sinkjaer, T

    2001-01-01

    The modulation and strength of the human soleus short latency stretch reflex was investigated by mechanically perturbing the ankle during an unconstrained pedaling task. Eight subjects pedaled at 60 rpm against a preload of 10 Nm. A torque pulse was applied to the crank at various positions during the crank cycle, producing ankle dorsiflexion perturbations of similar trajectory. The stretch reflex was greatest during the power phase of the crank cycle and was decreased to the level of background EMG during recovery. Matched perturbations were induced under static conditions at the same crank angle and background soleus EMG as recorded during the power phase of active pedaling. The magnitude of the stretch reflex was not statistically different from that during the static condition throughout the power phase of the movement. The results of this study indicate that the stretch reflex is not depressed during active cycling as has been shown with the H-reflex. This lack of depression may reflect a decreased susceptibility of the stretch reflex to inhibition, possibly originating from presynaptic mechanisms. PMID:11232549

  3. APJ acts as a dual receptor in cardiac hypertrophy.

    PubMed

    Scimia, Maria Cecilia; Hurtado, Cecilia; Ray, Saugata; Metzler, Scott; Wei, Ke; Wang, Jianming; Woods, Chris E; Purcell, Nicole H; Catalucci, Daniele; Akasaka, Takeshi; Bueno, Orlando F; Vlasuk, George P; Kaliman, Perla; Bodmer, Rolf; Smith, Layton H; Ashley, Euan; Mercola, Mark; Brown, Joan Heller; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2012-08-16

    Cardiac hypertrophy is initiated as an adaptive response to sustained overload but progresses pathologically as heart failure ensues. Here we report that genetic loss of APJ, a G-protein-coupled receptor, confers resistance to chronic pressure overload by markedly reducing myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure. In contrast, mice lacking apelin (the endogenous APJ ligand) remain sensitive, suggesting an apelin-independent function of APJ. Freshly isolated APJ-null cardiomyocytes exhibit an attenuated response to stretch, indicating that APJ is a mechanosensor. Activation of APJ by stretch increases cardiomyocyte cell size and induces molecular markers of hypertrophy. Whereas apelin stimulates APJ to activate Gαi and elicits a protective response, stretch signals in an APJ-dependent, G-protein-independent fashion to induce hypertrophy. Stretch-mediated hypertrophy is prevented by knockdown of β-arrestins or by pharmacological doses of apelin acting through Gαi. Taken together, our data indicate that APJ is a bifunctional receptor for both mechanical stretch and the endogenous peptide apelin. By sensing the balance between these stimuli, APJ occupies a pivotal point linking sustained overload to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PMID:22810587

  4. Cyclic stretch-induced stress fiber dynamics - Dependence on strain rate, Rho-kinase and MLCK

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Chin-Fu; Haase, Candice; Deguchi, Shinji; Kaunas, Roland

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Cyclic stretch induces stress fiber disassembly, reassembly and fusion perpendicular to the direction of stretch. {yields} Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced at low stretch frequency. {yields} Stretch caused actin fiber formation parallel to stretch in distinct locations in cells treated with Rho-kinase and MLCK inhibitors. -- Abstract: Stress fiber realignment is an important adaptive response to cyclic stretch for nonmuscle cells, but the mechanism by which such reorganization occurs is not known. By analyzing stress fiber dynamics using live cell microscopy, we revealed that stress fiber reorientation perpendicular to the direction of cyclic uniaxial stretching at 1 Hz did not involve disassembly of the stress fiber distal ends located at focal adhesion sites. Instead, these distal ends were often used to assemble new stress fibers oriented progressively further away from the direction of stretch. Stress fiber disassembly and reorientation were not induced when the frequency of stretch was decreased to 0.01 Hz, however. Treatment with the Rho-kinase inhibitor (Y27632) reduced stress fibers to thin fibers located in the cell periphery which bundled together to form thick fibers oriented parallel to the direction of stretching at 1 Hz. In contrast, these thin fibers remained diffuse in cells subjected to stretch at 0.01 Hz. Cyclic stretch at 1 Hz also induced actin fiber formation parallel to the direction of stretch in cells treated with the myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) inhibitor ML-7, but these fibers were located centrally rather than peripherally. These results shed new light on the mechanism by which stress fibers reorient in response to cyclic stretch in different regions of the actin cytoskeleton.

  5. Increased expression of estrogen-related receptor β during adaptation of adult cardiomyocytes to sustained hypoxia

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, Kathryn F; Beeson, Gyda C; Beeson, Craig C; McDermott, Paul J

    2016-01-01

    Estrogen-related Receptors (ERR) are members of the steroid hormone receptor superfamily of transcription factors that regulate expression of genes required for energy metabolism including mitochondrial biogenesis, fatty acid oxidation and oxidative phosphorylation. While ERRα and EPPγ isoforms are known to share a wide array of target genes in the adult myocardium, the function of ERRβ has not been characterized in cardiomyocytes. The purpose of this study was to determine the role of ERRβ in regulating energy metabolism in adult cardiomyocytes in primary culture. Adult feline cardiomyocytes were electrically stimulated to contract in either hypoxia (0.5% O2) or normoxia (21% O2). As compared to baseline values measured in normoxia, ERRβ mRNA levels increased significantly after 8 hours of hypoxia and remained elevated over 24 h. Conversely, ERRβ mRNA decreased to normoxic levels after 4 hours of reoxygenation. Hypoxia increased expression of the α and β isoforms of Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor γ Coactivator-1 (PGC-1) mRNA by 6-fold and 3-fold, respectively. Knockdown of ERRβ expression via adenoviral-mediated delivery of ERRβ shRNA blocked hypoxia-induced increases in PGC-1β mRNA, but not PGC-1α mRNA. Loss of ERRβ had no effect on mtDNA content as measured after 24 h of hypoxia. To determine whether loss of ERRβ affected mitochondrial function, oxygen consumption rates (OCR) were measured in contracting versus quiescent cardiomyocytes in normoxia. OCR was significantly lower in contracting cardiomyocytes expressing ERRβ shRNA than scrambled shRNA controls. Maximal OCR also was reduced by ERRβ knockdown. In conclusion: 1) hypoxia increases in ERRβ mRNA expression in contracting cardiomyocytes; 2) ERRβ is required for induction of the PGC-1β isoform in response to hypoxia; 3) ERRβ expression is required to sustain OCR in normoxic conditions. PMID:27335690

  6. Alpha-1-Adrenergic Receptors in Heart Failure: The Adaptive Arm of the Cardiac Response to Chronic Catecholamine Stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Jensen, Brian C.; O'Connell, Timothy D.; Simpson, Paul C.

    2013-01-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors are G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the non-failing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and b□eta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain- and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs, to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure. PMID:24145181

  7. Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors in heart failure: the adaptive arm of the cardiac response to chronic catecholamine stimulation.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Brian C; OʼConnell, Timothy D; Simpson, Paul C

    2014-04-01

    Alpha-1-adrenergic receptors (ARs) are G protein-coupled receptors activated by catecholamines. The alpha-1A and alpha-1B subtypes are expressed in mouse and human myocardium, whereas the alpha-1D protein is found only in coronary arteries. There are far fewer alpha-1-ARs than beta-ARs in the nonfailing heart, but their abundance is maintained or increased in the setting of heart failure, which is characterized by pronounced chronic elevation of catecholamines and beta-AR dysfunction. Decades of evidence from gain and loss-of-function studies in isolated cardiac myocytes and numerous animal models demonstrate important adaptive functions for cardiac alpha-1-ARs to include physiological hypertrophy, positive inotropy, ischemic preconditioning, and protection from cell death. Clinical trial data indicate that blocking alpha-1-ARs is associated with incident heart failure in patients with hypertension. Collectively, these findings suggest that alpha-1-AR activation might mitigate the well-recognized toxic effects of beta-ARs in the hyperadrenergic setting of chronic heart failure. Thus, exogenous cardioselective activation of alpha-1-ARs might represent a novel and viable approach to the treatment of heart failure. PMID:24145181

  8. Adaptability and selectivity of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR) pan agonists revealed from crystal structures

    SciTech Connect

    Oyama, Takuji; Toyota, Kenji; Waku, Tsuyoshi; Hirakawa, Yuko; Nagasawa, Naoko; Kasuga, Jun-ichi; Hashimoto, Yuichi; Miyachi, Hiroyuki; Morikawa, Kosuke

    2009-08-01

    The structures of the ligand-binding domains (LBDs) of human peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARα, PPARγ and PPARδ) in complexes with a pan agonist, an α/δ dual agonist and a PPARδ-specific agonist were determined. The results explain how each ligand is recognized by the PPAR LBDs at an atomic level. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs) belong to the nuclear hormone receptor family, which is defined as transcriptional factors that are activated by the binding of ligands to their ligand-binding domains (LBDs). Although the three PPAR subtypes display different tissue distribution patterns and distinct pharmacological profiles, they all are essentially related to fatty-acid and glucose metabolism. Since the PPARs share similar three-dimensional structures within the LBDs, synthetic ligands which simultaneously activate two or all of the PPARs could be potent candidates in terms of drugs for the treatment of abnormal metabolic homeostasis. The structures of several PPAR LBDs were determined in complex with synthetic ligands, derivatives of 3-(4-alkoxyphenyl)propanoic acid, which exhibit unique agonistic activities. The PPARα and PPARγ LBDs were complexed with the same pan agonist, TIPP-703, which activates all three PPARs and their crystal structures were determined. The two LBD–ligand complex structures revealed how the pan agonist is adapted to the similar, but significantly different, ligand-binding pockets of the PPARs. The structures of the PPARδ LBD in complex with an α/δ-selective ligand, TIPP-401, and with a related δ-specific ligand, TIPP-204, were also determined. The comparison between the two PPARδ complexes revealed how each ligand exhibits either a ‘dual selective’ or ‘single specific’ binding mode.

  9. A Purposeful Dynamic Stretching Routine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leon, Craig; Oh, Hyun-Ju; Rana, Sharon

    2012-01-01

    Dynamic stretching, which involves moving parts of the body and gradually increases range of motion, speed of movement, or both through controlled, sport-specific movements, has become the popular choice of pre-exercise warm-up. This type of warm-up has evolved to encompass several variations, but at its core is the principle theme that preparing…

  10. Three Fresh Exposures, Stretched Color

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This panoramic camera image from NASA's Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity has been processed using a technique known as a decorrelation stretch to exaggerate the colors. The area in the image includes three holes created inside 'Endurance Crater' by Opportunity's rock abrasion tool between sols 143 and 148 (June 18 and June 23, 2004). Because color variations are so subtle in the pictured area, stretched images are useful for discriminating color differences that can alert scientists to compositional and textural variations. For example, without the exaggeration, no color difference would be discernable among the tailings left behind after the grinding of these holes, but in this stretched image, the tailings around 'London' (top) appear more red than those of the other holes ('Virginia,' middle, and 'Cobble Hill,' bottom). Scientists believe that is because the rock abrasion tool sliced through two 'blueberries,' or spherules (visible on the upper left and upper right sides of the circle). When the blades break up these spherules, composed of mostly gray hematite, the result is a bright red powder. In this image, you can see the rock layers that made the team want to grind holes in each identified layer. The top layer is yellowish red, the middle is yellowish green and the lower layer is green. Another advantage to viewing this stretched image is the clear detail of the distribution of the rock abrasion tool tailings (heading down-slope) and the differences in rock texture. This image was created using the 753-, 535- and 432-nanometer filters.

  11. Design of Warped Stretch Transform.

    PubMed

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Chen, Claire Lifan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch dispersive Fourier transform enables real-time spectroscopy at the repetition rate of million scans per second. High-speed real-time instruments ranging from analog-to-digital converters to cameras and single-shot rare-phenomena capture equipment with record performance have been empowered by it. Its warped stretch variant, realized with nonlinear group delay dispersion, offers variable-rate spectral domain sampling, as well as the ability to engineer the time-bandwidth product of the signal's envelope to match that of the data acquisition systems. To be able to reconstruct the signal with low loss, the spectrotemporal distribution of the signal spectrum needs to be sparse. Here, for the first time, we show how to design the kernel of the transform and specifically, the nonlinear group delay profile dictated by the signal sparsity. Such a kernel leads to smart stretching with nonuniform spectral resolution, having direct utility in improvement of data acquisition rate, real-time data compression, and enhancement of ultrafast data capture accuracy. We also discuss the application of warped stretch transform in spectrotemporal analysis of continuous-time signals. PMID:26602458

  12. Design of Warped Stretch Transform

    PubMed Central

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Chen, Claire Lifan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch dispersive Fourier transform enables real-time spectroscopy at the repetition rate of million scans per second. High-speed real-time instruments ranging from analog-to-digital converters to cameras and single-shot rare-phenomena capture equipment with record performance have been empowered by it. Its warped stretch variant, realized with nonlinear group delay dispersion, offers variable-rate spectral domain sampling, as well as the ability to engineer the time-bandwidth product of the signal’s envelope to match that of the data acquisition systems. To be able to reconstruct the signal with low loss, the spectrotemporal distribution of the signal spectrum needs to be sparse. Here, for the first time, we show how to design the kernel of the transform and specifically, the nonlinear group delay profile dictated by the signal sparsity. Such a kernel leads to smart stretching with nonuniform spectral resolution, having direct utility in improvement of data acquisition rate, real-time data compression, and enhancement of ultrafast data capture accuracy. We also discuss the application of warped stretch transform in spectrotemporal analysis of continuous-time signals. PMID:26602458

  13. Design of Warped Stretch Transform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahjoubfar, Ata; Chen, Claire Lifan; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-11-01

    Time stretch dispersive Fourier transform enables real-time spectroscopy at the repetition rate of million scans per second. High-speed real-time instruments ranging from analog-to-digital converters to cameras and single-shot rare-phenomena capture equipment with record performance have been empowered by it. Its warped stretch variant, realized with nonlinear group delay dispersion, offers variable-rate spectral domain sampling, as well as the ability to engineer the time-bandwidth product of the signal’s envelope to match that of the data acquisition systems. To be able to reconstruct the signal with low loss, the spectrotemporal distribution of the signal spectrum needs to be sparse. Here, for the first time, we show how to design the kernel of the transform and specifically, the nonlinear group delay profile dictated by the signal sparsity. Such a kernel leads to smart stretching with nonuniform spectral resolution, having direct utility in improvement of data acquisition rate, real-time data compression, and enhancement of ultrafast data capture accuracy. We also discuss the application of warped stretch transform in spectrotemporal analysis of continuous-time signals.

  14. Early Adaptation and Acquired Resistance to CDK4/6 Inhibition in Estrogen Receptor-Positive Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Abreu, Maria Teresa; Palafox, Marta; Asghar, Uzma; Rivas, Martín A; Cutts, Rosalind J; Garcia-Murillas, Isaac; Pearson, Alex; Guzman, Marta; Rodriguez, Olga; Grueso, Judit; Bellet, Meritxell; Cortés, Javier; Elliott, Richard; Pancholi, Sunil; Baselga, José; Dowsett, Mitch; Martin, Lesley-Ann; Turner, Nicholas C; Serra, Violeta

    2016-04-15

    Small-molecule inhibitors of the CDK4/6 cell-cycle kinases have shown clinical efficacy in estrogen receptor (ER)-positive metastatic breast cancer, although their cytostatic effects are limited by primary and acquired resistance. Here we report that ER-positive breast cancer cells can adapt quickly to CDK4/6 inhibition and evade cytostasis, in part, via noncanonical cyclin D1-CDK2-mediated S-phase entry. This adaptation was prevented by cotreatment with hormone therapies or PI3K inhibitors, which reduced the levels of cyclin D1 (CCND1) and other G1-S cyclins, abolished pRb phosphorylation, and inhibited activation of S-phase transcriptional programs. Combined targeting of both CDK4/6 and PI3K triggered cancer cell apoptosis in vitro and in patient-derived tumor xenograft (PDX) models, resulting in tumor regression and improved disease control. Furthermore, a triple combination of endocrine therapy, CDK4/6, and PI3K inhibition was more effective than paired combinations, provoking rapid tumor regressions in a PDX model. Mechanistic investigations showed that acquired resistance to CDK4/6 inhibition resulted from bypass of cyclin D1-CDK4/6 dependency through selection of CCNE1 amplification or RB1 loss. Notably, although PI3K inhibitors could prevent resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors, they failed to resensitize cells once resistance had been acquired. However, we found that cells acquiring resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors due to CCNE1 amplification could be resensitized by targeting CDK2. Overall, our results illustrate convergent mechanisms of early adaptation and acquired resistance to CDK4/6 inhibitors that enable alternate means of S-phase entry, highlighting strategies to prevent the acquisition of therapeutic resistance to these agents. Cancer Res; 76(8); 2301-13. ©2016 AACR. PMID:27020857

  15. Stretch induced endothelin-1 secretion by adult rat astrocytes involves calcium influx via stretch-activated ion channels (SACs)

    SciTech Connect

    Ostrow, Lyle W.; Suchyna, Thomas M.; Sachs, Frederick

    2011-06-24

    Highlights: {yields} Endothelin-1 expression by adult rat astrocytes correlates with cell proliferation. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 is inhibited by GsMtx-4, a specific inhibitor of Ca{sup 2+} permeant SACs. {yields} The less specific SAC inhibitor streptomycin also inhibits ET-1 secretion. {yields} Stretch-induced ET-1 production depends on a calcium influx. {yields} SAC pharmacology may provide a new class of therapeutic agents for CNS pathology. -- Abstract: The expression of endothelins (ETs) and ET-receptors is often upregulated in brain pathology. ET-1, a potent vasoconstrictor, also inhibits the expression of astrocyte glutamate transporters and is mitogenic for astrocytes, glioma cells, neurons, and brain capillary endothelia. We have previously shown that mechanical stress stimulates ET-1 production by adult rat astrocytes. We now show in adult astrocytes that ET-1 production is driven by calcium influx through stretch-activated ion channels (SACs) and the ET-1 production correlates with cell proliferation. Mechanical stimulation using biaxial stretch (<20%) of a rubber substrate increased ET-1 secretion, and 4 {mu}M GsMTx-4 (a specific inhibitor of SACs) inhibited secretion by 30%. GsMTx-4 did not alter basal ET-1 levels in the absence of stretch. Decreasing the calcium influx by lowering extracellular calcium also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion without effecting ET-1 secretion in unstretched controls. Furthermore, inhibiting SACs with the less specific inhibitor streptomycin also inhibited stretch-induced ET-1 secretion. The data can be explained with a simple model in which ET-1 secretion depends on an internal Ca{sup 2+} threshold. This coupling of mechanical stress to the astrocyte endothelin system through SACs has treatment implications, since all pathology deforms the surrounding parenchyma.

  16. The Adaptation of the Moth Pheromone Receptor Neuron to its Natural Stimulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kostal, Lubomir; Lansky, Petr; Rospars, Jean-Pierre

    2008-07-01

    We analyze the first phase of information transduction in the model of the olfactory receptor neuron of the male moth Antheraea polyphemus. We predict such stimulus characteristics that enable the system to perform optimally, i.e., to transfer as much information as possible. Few a priori constraints on the nature of stimulus and stimulus-to-signal transduction are assumed. The results are given in terms of stimulus distributions and intermittency factors which makes direct comparison with experimental data possible. Optimal stimulus is approximatelly described by exponential or log-normal probability density function which is in agreement with experiment and the predicted intermittency factors fall within the lowest range of observed values. The results are discussed with respect to electroantennogram measurements and behavioral observations.

  17. Adaptation of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor to sense microbiota-derived indoles

    PubMed Central

    Hubbard, Troy D.; Murray, Iain A.; Bisson, William H.; Lahoti, Tejas S.; Gowda, Krishne; Amin, Shantu G.; Patterson, Andrew D.; Perdew, Gary H.

    2015-01-01

    Ligand activation of the aryl hydrocarbon (AHR) has profound effects upon the immunological status of the gastrointestinal tract, establishing and maintaining signaling networks, which facilitate host-microbe homeostasis at the mucosal interface. However, the identity of the ligand(s) responsible for such AHR-mediated activation within the gut remains to be firmly established. Here, we combine in vitro ligand binding, quantitative gene expression, protein-DNA interaction and ligand structure activity analyses together with in silico modeling of the AHR ligand binding domain to identify indole, a microbial tryptophan metabolite, as a human-AHR selective agonist. Human AHR, acting as a host indole receptor may exhibit a unique bimolecular (2:1) binding stoichiometry not observed with typical AHR ligands. Such bimolecular indole-mediated activation of the human AHR within the gastrointestinal tract may provide a foundation for inter-kingdom signaling between the enteric microflora and the immune system to promote commensalism within the gut. PMID:26235394

  18. Prolonged activation of human islet cannabinoid receptors in vitro induces adaptation but not dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Vilches-Flores, Alonso; Franklin, Zara; Hauge-Evans, Astrid C.; Liu, Bo; Huang, Guo C.; Choudhary, Pratik; Jones, Peter M.; Persaud, Shanta J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Although in vivo studies have implicated endocannabinoids in metabolic dysfunction, little is known about direct, chronic activation of the endocannabinoid system (ECS) in human islets. Therefore, this study investigated the effects of prolonged exposure to cannabinoid agonists on human islet gene expression and function. Methods Human islets were maintained for 2 and 5 days in the absence or presence of CB1r (ACEA) or CB2r (JWH015) agonists. Gene expression was quantified by RT-PCR, hormone levels by radioimmunoassay and apoptosis by caspase activities. Results Human islets express an ECS, with mRNAs encoding the biosynthetic and degrading enzymes NAPE-PLD, FAAH and MAGL being considerably more abundant than DAGLα, an enzyme involved in 2-AG synthesis, or CB1 and CB2 receptor mRNAs. Prolonged activation of CB1r and CB2r altered expression of mRNAs encoding ECS components, but did not have major effects on islet hormone secretion. JWH015 enhanced insulin and glucagon content at 2 days, but had no effect after 5 days. Treatment with ACEA or JWH015 for up to 5 days did not have marked effects on islet viability, as assessed by morphology and caspase activities. Conclusions Maintenance of human islets for up to 5 days in the presence of CB1 and CB2 receptor agonists causes modifications in ECS element gene expression, but does not have any major impact on islet function or viability. General Significance These data suggest that the metabolic dysfunction associated with over-activation of the ECS in obesity and diabetes in humans is unlikely to be secondary to impaired islet function. PMID:27114924

  19. High progesterone receptor concentration in a variant of the ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cell line adapted to growth in oestrogen free conditions.

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, H. W.; Martin, J.; Lynch, M.

    1990-01-01

    Culture of ZR-75-1 human breast cancer cells for 5 days in the absence of oestrogens (phenol red-free medium supplemented with dextran coated charcoal stripped 5% fetal calf serum) resulted in a slowing of growth rate and loss of progesterone receptors. Oestradiol at 10(-9) M markedly stimulated growth and progesterone receptor synthesis over a 5-day period. While medroxyprogesterone acetate (10(-10) to 10(-6) M) inhibited growth of ZR-75-1 cells growing in complete medium, in the short-term absence of oestrogens low concentrations were growth stimulatory. Cells deprived of oestrogens for 5 days retained sensitivity to growth inhibition by 4-hydroxy tamoxifen. ZR-75-1 cells were also adapted to growth in the absence of oestrogens over a 5-month period. These cells (ZR-PR-LT) failed to express binding sites characteristic of the type 1 oestrogen receptor but progesterone receptor expression was at a level normally associated with oestrogen induction. Adapted cells were growth inhibited by oestradiol, 4-hydroxy tamoxifen and medroxyprogesterone acetate, but despite elevated progesterone receptor expression the progestin was only marginally more inhibitory than in the parent line. Our data indicate a poor quantitative relationship between response to progestins in vitro and progesterone receptor concentration and support previous findings that acquisition of an oestrogen independent phenotype does not necessarily result in resistance to anti-oestrogens. PMID:2139575

  20. Mechanical stretch regulates TRPC expression and calcium entry in human myometrial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dalrymple, A; Mahn, K; Poston, L; Songu-Mize, E; Tribe, R M

    2007-03-01

    Stretch is known to stimulate myometrial hyperplasia and hypertrophy in early pregnancy and uterine contraction at term. We propose that transduction of the stretch signal involves alteration of intracellular calcium signalling, including changes in transient receptor potential canonical (TRPC) isoform expression. The aim of the present study was to investigate the effect of prolonged mechanical (tonic) stretch in vitro on human myometrial smooth muscle cell calcium signalling and TRPC expression. Cells were cultured from myometrial biopsies, obtained from women undergoing elective Caesarean section at term, grown on Flexiplates and subjected to 25% tonic mechanical stretch for 1, 4 and 14 h. Time-matched control cells were not stretched. Mechanical stretch (14 h) increased basal calcium entry and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA)-induced calcium/Mn(2+) entry (P < 0.05) in Fura-2 loaded cells. The calcium selectivity of CPA-thapsigarin induced inward currents, measured by patch clamp electrophysiology, was also increased in stretched cells compared with control cells (P < 0.05). Real time PCR and Western blot data demonstrated that TRPC3 and TRPC4 mRNA and TRPC3 protein expression were increased by stretch (P < 0.05), respectively. These data support the hypothesis that uterine stretch modulates uterine growth and contractility in pregnancy via alterations in calcium signalling. PMID:17208928

  1. Stretching dynamics of semiflexible polymers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Obermayer, B.; Hallatschek, O.; Frey, E.; Kroy, K.

    2007-08-01

    We analyze the nonequilibrium dynamics of single inextensible semiflexible biopolymers as stretching forces are applied at the ends. Based on different (contradicting) heuristic arguments, various scaling laws have been proposed for the propagation speed of the backbone tension which is induced in response to stretching. Here, we employ a newly developed unified theory to systematically substantiate, restrict, and extend these approaches. Introducing the practically relevant scenario of a chain equilibrated under some prestretching force fpre that is suddenly exposed to a different external force fext at the ends, we give a concise physical explanation of the underlying relaxation processes by means of an intuitive blob picture. We discuss the corresponding intermediate asymptotics, derive results for experimentally relevant observables, and support our conclusions by numerical solutions of the coarse-grained equations of motion for the tension.

  2. Stretching short DNAs in electrolytes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jizeng; Fan, Xiaojun; Gao, Huajian

    2006-03-01

    This paper is aimed at a combined theoretical and numerical study of the force-extension relation of a short DNA molecule stretched in an electrolyte. A theoretical formula based on a recent discrete wormlike chain (WLC) model of Kierfeld et al. (Eur Phys. J. E, Vol. 14, pp.17-34, 2004) and the classical OSF mean-field theory on electrostatic stiffening of a charged polymer is numerically verified by a set of Brownian dynamics simulations based on a generalized bead-rod (GBR) model incorporating long-ranged electrostatic interactions via the Debye-Hueckel potential (DH). The analysis indicates that the stretching of a short DNA can be well described as a WLC with a constant effective persistent length. This contrasts the behavior of long DNA chains that are known to exhibit variable persistent lengths depending on the ion concentration levels and force magnitudes. PMID:16711068

  3. Stretching

    MedlinePlus

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  4. BSDB: the Biomolecule Stretching Database

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek; Sikora, Mateusz; Sulkowska, Joanna I.; Witkowski, Bartlomiej

    2011-03-01

    Despite more than a decade of experiments on single biomolecule manipulation, mechanical properties of only several scores of proteins have been measured. A characteristic scale of the force of resistance to stretching, Fmax , has been found to range between ~ 10 and 480 pN. The Biomolecule Stretching Data Base (BSDB) described here provides information about expected values of Fmax for, currently, 17 134 proteins. The values and other characteristics of the unfolding proces, including the nature of identified mechanical clamps, are available at www://info.ifpan.edu.pl/BSDB/. They have been obtained through simulations within a structure-based model which correlates satisfactorily with the available experimental data on stretching. BSDB also lists experimental data and results of the existing all-atom simulations. The database offers a Protein-Data-Bank-wide guide to mechano-stability of proteins. Its description is provided by a forthcoming Nucleic Acids Research paper. Supported by EC FUNMOL project FP7-NMP-2007-SMALL-1, and European Regional Development Fund: Innovative Economy (POIG.01.01.02-00-008/08).

  5. Cortisol receptor blockade and seawater adaptation in the euryhaline teleost Fundulus heteroclitus

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Marshall, W.S.; Cozzi, R.R.F.; Pelis, R.M.; McCormick, S.D.

    2005-01-01

    To examine the role of cortisol in seawater osmoregulation in a euryhaline teleost, adult killifish were acclimated to brackish water (10???) and RU486 or vehicle was administered orally in peanut oil daily for five days at low (40 mg.kg-1) or high dose (200 mg.kg-1). Fish were transferred to 1.5 x seawater (45???) or to brackish water (control) and sampled at 24 h and 48 h after transfer, when Cl- secretion is upregulated. At 24 h, opercular membrane Cl- secretion rate, as Isc, was increased only in the high dose RU486 group. Stimulation of membranes by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and cAMP increased Isc in vehicle treated controls but those from RU486-treated animals were unchanged and membranes from brackish water animals showed a decrease in Isc. At 48 h, Isc increased and transepithelial resistance decreased in vehicle and RU486 groups, compared to brackish water controls. Plasma cortisol increased in all groups transferred to high salinity, compared to brackish water controls. RU486 treated animals had higher cortisol levels compared to vehicle controls. Vehicle treated controls had lower cortisol levels than untreated or RU486 treated animals, higher stimulation of Isc, and lower hematocrit at 24 h, beneficial effects attributed to increased caloric intake from the peanut oil vehicle. Chloride cell density was significantly increased in the high dose RU486 group at 48 hours, yet Isc was unchanged, suggesting a decrease in Cl- secretion per cell. Thus cortisol enhances NaCl secretion capacity in chloride cells, likely via glucocorticoid type receptors. ?? 2005 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  6. Cortisol receptor blockade and seawater adaptation in the euryhaline teleost Fundulus heteroclitus.

    PubMed

    Marshall, W S; Cozzi, R R F; Pelis, R M; McCormick, S D

    2005-02-01

    To examine the role of cortisol in seawater osmoregulation in a euryhaline teleost, adult killifish were acclimated to brackish water (10 per thousand) and RU486 or vehicle was administered orally in peanut oil daily for five days at low (40 mg.kg(-1)) or high dose (200 mg.kg(-1)). Fish were transferred to 1.5 x seawater (45 per thousand) or to brackish water (control) and sampled at 24 h and 48 h after transfer, when Cl- secretion is upregulated. At 24 h, opercular membrane Cl- secretion rate, as Isc, was increased only in the high dose RU486 group. Stimulation of membranes by 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine and cAMP increased Isc in vehicle treated controls but those from RU486-treated animals were unchanged and membranes from brackish water animals showed a decrease in Isc. At 48 h, Isc increased and transepithelial resistance decreased in vehicle and RU486 groups, compared to brackish water controls. Plasma cortisol increased in all groups transferred to high salinity, compared to brackish water controls. RU486 treated animals had higher cortisol levels compared to vehicle controls. Vehicle treated controls had lower cortisol levels than untreated or RU486 treated animals, higher stimulation of Isc, and lower hematocrit at 24 h, beneficial effects attributed to increased caloric intake from the peanut oil vehicle. Chloride cell density was significantly increased in the high dose RU486 group at 48 hours, yet Isc was unchanged, suggesting a decrease in Cl- secretion per cell. Thus cortisol enhances NaCl secretion capacity in chloride cells, likely via glucocorticoid type receptors. PMID:15662660

  7. Nuclear hormone receptors as mediators of metabolic adaptability following reproductive perturbations.

    PubMed

    Ratnappan, Ramesh; Ward, Jordan D; Yamamoto, Keith R; Ghazi, Arjumand

    2016-01-01

    Previously, we identified a group of nuclear hormone receptors (NHRs) that promote longevity in the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans following germline-stem cell (GSC) loss. This group included NHR-49, the worm protein that performs functions similar to vertebrate PPARα, a key regulator of lipid metabolism. We showed that NHR-49/PPARα enhances mitochondrial β-oxidation and fatty acid desaturation upon germline removal, and through the coordinated enhancement of these processes allows the animal to retain lipid homeostasis and undergo lifespan extension. NHR-49/PPARα expression is elevated in GSC-ablated animals, in part, by DAF-16/FOXO3A and TCER-1/TCERG1, two other conserved, pro-longevity transcriptional regulators that are essential for germline-less longevity. In exploring the roles of the other pro-longevity NHRs, we discovered that one of them, NHR-71/HNF4, physically interacted with NHR-49/PPARα. NHR-71/HNF4 did not have a broad impact on the expression of β-oxidation and desaturation targets of NHR-49/PPARα. But, both NHR-49/PPARα and NHR-71/HNF4 were essential for the increased expression of DAF-16/FOXO3A- and TCER-1/TCERG1-downstream target genes. In addition, nhr-49 inactivation caused a striking membrane localization of KRI-1, the only known common upstream regulator of DAF-16/FOXO3A and TCER-1/TCERG1, suggesting that it may operate in a positive feedback loop to potentiate the activity of this pathway. These data underscore how selective interactions between NHRs that function as nodes in metabolic networks, confer functional specificity in response to different physiological stimuli. PMID:27073739

  8. Voluntary Ethanol Intake Predicts κ-Opioid Receptor Supersensitivity and Regionally Distinct Dopaminergic Adaptations in Macaques

    PubMed Central

    Siciliano, Cody A.; Calipari, Erin S.; Cuzon Carlson, Verginia C.; Helms, Christa M.; Lovinger, David M.; Grant, Kathleen A.

    2015-01-01

    The dopaminergic projections from the ventral midbrain to the striatum have long been implicated in mediating motivated behaviors and addiction. Previously it was demonstrated that κ-opioid receptor (KOR) signaling in the striatum plays a critical role in the increased reinforcing efficacy of ethanol following ethanol vapor exposure in rodent models. Although rodents have been used extensively to determine the neurochemical consequences of chronic ethanol exposure, establishing high levels of voluntary drinking in these models has proven difficult. Conversely, nonhuman primates exhibit similar intake and pattern to humans in regard to drinking. Here we examine the effects of chronic voluntary ethanol self-administration on dopamine neurotransmission and the ability of KORs to regulate dopamine release in the dorsolateral caudate (DLC) and nucleus accumbens (NAc) core. Using voltammetry in brain slices from cynomolgus macaques after 6 months of ad libitum ethanol drinking, we found increased KOR sensitivity in both the DLC and NAc. The magnitude of ethanol intake predicted increases in KOR sensitivity in the NAc core, but not the DLC. Additionally, ethanol drinking increased dopamine release and uptake in the NAc, but decreased both of these measures in the DLC. These data suggest that chronic daily drinking may result in regionally distinct disruptions of striatal outputs. In concert with previous reports showing increased KOR regulation of drinking behaviors induced by ethanol exposure, the strong relationship between KOR activity and voluntary ethanol intake observed here gives further support to the hypothesis that KORs may provide a promising pharmacotherapeutic target in the treatment of alcoholism. PMID:25878269

  9. Differential effects of interleukin-17 receptor signaling on innate and adaptive immunity during central nervous system bacterial infection.

    PubMed

    Vidlak, Debbie; Kielian, Tammy

    2012-01-01

    Although IL-17A (commonly referred to as IL-17) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of central nervous system (CNS) autoimmune disease, its role during CNS bacterial infections remains unclear. To evaluate the broader impact of IL-17 family members in the context of CNS infection, we utilized IL-17 receptor (IL-17R) knockout (KO) mice that lack the ability to respond to IL-17, IL-17F and IL-17E (IL-25). In this article, we demonstrate that IL-17R signaling regulates bacterial clearance as well as natural killer T (NKT) cell and gamma-delta (γδ) T cell infiltrates during Staphylococcus aureus-induced brain abscess formation. Specifically, when compared with wild-type (WT) animals, IL-17R KO mice exhibited elevated bacterial burdens at days 7 and 14 following S. aureus infection. Additionally, IL-17R KO animals displayed elevated neutrophil chemokine production, revealing the ability to compensate for the lack of IL-17R activity. Despite these differences, innate immune cell recruitment into brain abscesses was similar in IL-17R KO and WT mice, whereas IL-17R signaling exerted a greater influence on adaptive immune cell recruitment. In particular, γδ T cell influx was increased in IL-17R KO mice at day 7 post-infection. In addition, NK1.1high infiltrates were absent in brain abscesses of IL-17R KO animals and, surprisingly, were rarely detected in the livers of uninfected IL-17R KO mice. Although IL-17 is a key regulator of neutrophils in other infection models, our data implicate an important role for IL-17R signaling in regulating adaptive immunity during CNS bacterial infection. PMID:22704602

  10. Human Cytomegalovirus variant peptides adapt by decreasing their total coordination upon binding to a T cell receptor

    PubMed Central

    Antipas, Georgios S.E.; Germenis, Anastasios E.

    2015-01-01

    The tertiary structure of the native Cytomegalovirus peptide (NLV) presented by HLA-A2 and bound to the RA14 T cell receptor was used as a reference for the calculation of atomic coordination differences of both the NLV as well as of a number of singly substituted NLV variants in the absence of TCR. Among the pMHC complexes, the native peptide was found to exhibit the highest total coordination difference in respect to the reference structure, suggesting that it experienced the widest structural adaptation upon recognition by the TCR. In addition, the peptide on the isolated NLV-MHC complex was over-coordinated as compared to the rest of the variants. Moreover, the trend was found to account for a set of measured dissociation constants and critical concentrations for target-cell lysis for all variants in complexation with RA14: functionally, all variant peptides were established to be either weak agonists or null peptides, while, at the same time, our current study established that they were also under-coordinated in respect to NLV. It could, thus, be argued that the most ‘efficient’ structural adaptation upon pMHC recognition by the TCR requires of the peptide to undergo the widest under-coordination possible. The main structural characteristic which differentiated the NLV in respect to the variants was a the presence of 16 oxygen atoms (waters) in the former׳s second coordination shell which accounted for over-coordination of roughly 100% and 30% in the O–O and C–O partials respectively. In fact, in the absence of second shell oxygens, the NLV peptide was decidedly under-coordinated in respect to all of the variants, as also suggested by the C–C partial. PMID:26958591

  11. Biaxially Stretched Polycarbonate Film For Capacitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yen, Shaio-Ping S.; Lowry, Lynn E.; Bankston, Clyde P.

    1992-01-01

    Report describes experiments on effects of biaxial stretching on crystal structures, dielectric properties, and sellected thermal and mechanical properties of biaxially stretched polycarbonate films. Highest stretch ratios produce highest degree of crystallinity, with single crystalline phase and distribution of crystallites more nearly isotropic than uniaxially oriented film. Electrical properties at high temperatures improved.

  12. Dose-Related Differences in the Regional Pattern of Cannabinoid Receptor Adaptation and in Vivo Tolerance Development to Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol

    PubMed Central

    McKinney, Diana L.; Cassidy, Michael P.; Collier, Lauren M.; Martin, Billy R.; Wiley, Jenny L.; Selley, Dana E.; Sim-Selley, Laura J.

    2009-01-01

    Chronic treatment with Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) produces tolerance to cannabinoid-mediated behaviors and region-specific adaptation of brain cannabinoid receptors. However, the relationship between receptor adaptation and tolerance is not well understood, and the dose-response relationship of THC-induced cannabinoid receptor adaptation is unknown. This study assessed cannabinoid receptor function in the brain and cannabinoid-mediated behaviors after chronic treatment with different dosing regimens of THC. Mice were treated twice per day for 6.5 days with the following: vehicle, 10 mg/kg THC, or escalating doses of 10 to 20 to 30 or 10 to 30 to 60 mg/kg THC. Tolerance to cannabinoid-mediated locomotor inhibition, ring immobility, antinociception, and hypothermia was produced by both ramping THC-dose paradigms. Administration of 10 mg/kg THC produced less tolerance development, the magnitude of which depended upon the particular behavior. Decreases in cannabinoid-mediated G-protein activation, which varied with treatment dose and region, were observed in autoradiographic and membrane guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate ([35S]GTPγS)-binding assays in brains from THC-treated mice. Agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding was reduced in the hippocampus, cingulate cortex, periaqueductal gray, and cerebellum after all treatments. Decreased agonist-stimulated [35S]GTPγS binding in the caudate-putamen, nucleus accumbens, and preoptic area occurred only after administration of 10 to 30 to 60 mg/kg THC, and no change was found in the globus pallidus or entopeduncular nucleus after any treatment. Changes in the CB1 receptor Bmax values also varied by region, with hippocampus and cerebellum showing reductions after all treatments and striatum/globus pallidus showing effects only at higher dosing regimens. These results reveal that tolerance and CB1 receptor adaptation exhibit similar dose-dependent development, and they are consistent with previous studies

  13. Stress and glucocorticoid receptor-dependent mechanisms in long-term memory: from adaptive responses to psychopathologies

    PubMed Central

    Finsterwald, Charles; Alberini, Cristina M.

    2013-01-01

    A proper response against stressors is critical for survival. In mammals, the stress response is primarily mediated by secretion of glucocorticoids via the hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenocortical (HPA) axis and release of catecholamines through adrenergic neurotransmission. Activation of these pathways results in a quick physical response to the stress and, in adaptive conditions, mediates long-term changes in the brain that lead to the formation of long-term memories of the experience. These long-term memories are an essential adaptive mechanism that allows an animal to effectively face similar demands again. Indeed, a moderate stress level has a strong positive effect on memory and cognition, as a single arousing or moderately stressful event can be remembered for up to a lifetime. Conversely, exposure to extreme, traumatic, or chronic stress can have the opposite effect and cause memory loss, cognitive impairments, and stress-related psychopathologies such as anxiety disorders, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While more effort has been devoted to the understanding of the effects of the negative effects of chronic stress, much less has been done thus far on the identification of the mechanisms engaged in the brain when stress promotes long-term memory formation. Understanding these mechanisms will provide critical information for use in ameliorating memory processes in both normal and pathological conditions. Here, we will review the role of glucocorticoids and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in memory formation and modulation. Furthermore, we will discuss recent findings on the molecular cascade of events underlying the effect of GR activation in adaptive levels of stress that leads to strong, long-lasting memories. Our recent data indicate that the positive effects of GR activation on memory consolidation critically engage the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pathway. We propose and will discuss the hypothesis that stress promotes the

  14. Stress and glucocorticoid receptor-dependent mechanisms in long-term memory: from adaptive responses to psychopathologies.

    PubMed

    Finsterwald, Charles; Alberini, Cristina M

    2014-07-01

    A proper response against stressors is critical for survival. In mammals, the stress response is primarily mediated by secretion of glucocorticoids via the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) axis and release of catecholamines through adrenergic neurotransmission. Activation of these pathways results in a quick physical response to the stress and, in adaptive conditions, mediates long-term changes in the brain that lead to the formation of long-term memories of the experience. These long-term memories are an essential adaptive mechanism that allows an animal to effectively face similar demands again. Indeed, a moderate stress level has a strong positive effect on memory and cognition, as a single arousing or moderately stressful event can be remembered for up to a lifetime. Conversely, exposure to extreme, traumatic, or chronic stress can have the opposite effect and cause memory loss, cognitive impairments, and stress-related psychopathologies such as anxiety disorders, depression and post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD). While more effort has been devoted to the understanding of the negative effects of chronic stress, much less has been done thus far on the identification of the mechanisms engaged in the brain when stress promotes long-term memory formation. Understanding these mechanisms will provide critical information for use in ameliorating memory processes in both normal and pathological conditions. Here, we will review the role of glucocorticoids and glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) in memory formation and modulation. Furthermore, we will discuss recent findings on the molecular cascade of events underlying the effect of GR activation in adaptive levels of stress that leads to strong, long-lasting memories. Our recent data indicate that the positive effects of GR activation on memory consolidation critically engage the brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) pathway. We propose and will discuss the hypothesis that stress promotes the formation of

  15. Highly Dynamic Exon Shuffling in Candidate Pathogen Receptors … What if Brown Algae Were Capable of Adaptive Immunity?

    PubMed Central

    Zambounis, Antonios; Elias, Marek; Sterck, Lieven; Maumus, Florian; Gachon, Claire M.M.

    2012-01-01

    Pathogen recognition is the first step of immune reactions. In animals and plants, direct or indirect pathogen recognition is often mediated by a wealth of fast-evolving receptors, many of which contain ligand-binding and signal transduction domains, such as leucine-rich or tetratricopeptide repeat (LRR/TPR) and NB-ARC domains, respectively. In order to identify candidates potentially involved in algal defense, we mined the genome of the brown alga Ectocarpus siliculosus for homologues of these genes and assessed the evolutionary pressures acting upon them. We thus annotated all Ectocarpus LRR-containing genes, in particular an original group of LRR-containing GTPases of the ROCO family, and 24 NB-ARC–TPR proteins. They exhibit high birth and death rates, while a diversifying selection is acting on their LRR (respectively TPR) domain, probably affecting the ligand-binding specificities. Remarkably, each repeat is encoded by an exon, and the intense exon shuffling underpins the variability of LRR and TPR domains. We conclude that the Ectocarpus ROCO and NB-ARC–TPR families are excellent candidates for being involved in recognition/transduction events linked to immunity. We further hypothesize that brown algae may generate their immune repertoire via controlled somatic recombination, so far only known from the vertebrate adaptive immune systems. PMID:22144640

  16. Hard wiring of T cell receptor specificity for the major histocompatibility complex is underpinned by TCR adaptability

    SciTech Connect

    Burrows, Scott R.; Chen, Zhenjun; Archbold, Julia K.; Tynan, Fleur E.; Beddoe, Travis; Kjer-Nielsen, Lars; Miles, John J.; Khanna, Rajiv; Moss, Denis J.; Liu, Yu Chih; Gras, Stephanie; Kostenko, Lyudmila; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Clements, Craig S.; Brooks, Andrew G.; Purcell, Anthony W.; McCluskey, James; Rossjohn, Jamie

    2010-07-07

    {alpha}{beta} T cell receptors (TCRs) are genetically restricted to corecognize peptide antigens bound to self-major histocompatibility complex (pMHC) molecules; however, the basis for this MHC specificity remains unclear. Despite the current dogma, evaluation of the TCR-pMHC-I structural database shows that the nongermline-encoded complementarity-determining region (CDR)-3 loops often contact the MHC-I, and the germline-encoded CDR1 and -2 loops frequently participate in peptide-mediated interactions. Nevertheless, different TCRs adopt a roughly conserved docking mode over the pMHC-I, in which three MHC-I residues (65, 69, and 155) are invariably contacted by the TCR in one way or another. Nonetheless, the impact of mutations at these three positions, either individually or together, was not uniformly detrimental to TCR recognition of pHLA-B*0801 or pHLA-B*3508. Moreover, when TCR-pMHC-I recognition was impaired, this could be partially restored by expression of the CD8 coreceptor. The structure of a TCR-pMHC-I complex in which these three (65, 69, and 155) MHC-I positions were all mutated resulted in shifting of the TCR footprint relative to the cognate complex and formation of compensatory interactions. Collectively, our findings reveal the inherent adaptability of the TCR in maintaining peptide recognition while accommodating changes to the central docking site on the pMHC-I.

  17. APJ ACTS AS A DUAL RECEPTOR IN CARDIAC HYPERTROPHY

    PubMed Central

    Scimia, Maria Cecilia; Hurtado, Cecilia; Ray, Saugata; Metzler, Scott; Wei, Ke; Wang, Jianming; Woods, Chris E.; Purcell, Nicole H.; Catalucci, Daniele; Akasaka, Takashi; Bueno, Orlando F.; Vlasuk, George P.; Kaliman, Perla; Bodmer, Rolf; Smith, Layton H.; Ashley, Euan; Mercola, Mark; Brown, Joan Heller; Ruiz-Lozano, Pilar

    2012-01-01

    Cardiac hypertrophy is initiated as an adaptive response to sustained overload but progresses pathologically as heart failure ensues1. Here we report that genetic loss of APJ confers resistance to chronic pressure overload by dramatically reducing myocardial hypertrophy and heart failure. In contrast, mice lacking apelin (the endogenous APJ ligand) remain sensitive, suggesting an apelin independent function of APJ. Freshly isolated APJ-null cardiomyocytes exhibit an attenuated response to stretch, indicating that APJ is a mechano-sensor. Activation of APJ by stretch increases cardiomyocyte cell size and induces molecular markers of hypertrophy. Whereas apelin stimulates APJ to activate Gαi and elicits a protective response, stretch signals in an APJ-dependent G-protein-independent fashion to induce hypertrophy. Stretch-mediated hypertrophy is prevented by knockdown of β-arrestins or by pharmacological doses of apelin acting through Gαi. Taken together, our data indicate that APJ is a bifunctional receptor for both mechanical stretch and for the endogenous peptide apelin. By sensing the balance between these stimuli, APJ occupies a pivotal point linking sustained overload to cardiomyocyte hypertrophy. PMID:22810587

  18. Nitric oxide mediates stretch-induced Ca2+ oscillation in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Ji; Zhai, Kui; Chen, Yingxiao; Zhang, Xu; Miao, Lin; Wei, Bin; Ji, Guangju

    2016-06-15

    The stretching of smooth muscle tissue modulates contraction through augmentation of Ca(2+) transients, but the mechanism underlying stretch-induced Ca(2+) transients is still unknown. We found that mechanical stretching and maintenance of mouse urinary bladder smooth muscle strips and single myocytes at 30% and 18% beyond the initial length, respectively, resulted in Ca(2+) oscillations. Experiments indicated that mechanical stretching remarkably increased the production of nitric oxide (NO) as well as the amplitude and duration of muscle contraction. Stretch-induced Ca(2+) oscillations and contractility increases were completely abolished by the NO inhibitor L-NAME or eNOS (also known as NOS3) gene inactivation. Moreover, exposure of eNOS-knockout myocytes to exogenous NO donor induced Ca(2+) oscillations. The stretch-induced Ca(2+) oscillations were greatly inhibited by the selective inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor (IP3R) inhibitor xestospongin C and partially inhibited by ryanodine. Moreover, the stretch-induced Ca(2+) oscillations were also suppressed by the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitor LY294002, but not by the soluble guanylyl cyclase (sGC) inhibitor ODQ. These results suggest that stretching myocyte and maintenance at a certain length results in Ca(2+) oscillations that are NO dependent , and sGC and cGMP independent, and results from the activation of PI3K in smooth muscle. PMID:27189081

  19. Adaptation of avian influenza A (H6N1) virus from avian to human receptor-binding preference.

    PubMed

    Wang, Fei; Qi, Jianxun; Bi, Yuhai; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Min; Zhang, Baorong; Wang, Ming; Liu, Jinhua; Yan, Jinghua; Shi, Yi; Gao, George F

    2015-06-12

    The receptor-binding specificity of influenza A viruses is a major determinant for the host tropism of the virus, which enables interspecies transmission. In 2013, the first human case of infection with avian influenza A (H6N1) virus was reported in Taiwan. To gather evidence concerning the epidemic potential of H6 subtype viruses, we performed comprehensive analysis of receptor-binding properties of Taiwan-isolated H6 HAs from 1972 to 2013. We propose that the receptor-binding properties of Taiwan-isolated H6 HAs have undergone three major stages: initially avian receptor-binding preference, secondarily obtaining human receptor-binding capacity, and recently human receptor-binding preference, which has been confirmed by receptor-binding assessment of three representative virus isolates. Mutagenesis work revealed that E190V and G228S substitutions are important to acquire the human receptor-binding capacity, and the P186L substitution could reduce the binding to avian receptor. Further structural analysis revealed how the P186L substitution in the receptor-binding site of HA determines the receptor-binding preference change. We conclude that the human-infecting H6N1 evolved into a human receptor preference. PMID:25940072

  20. Cellular localization and adaptive changes of the cardiac delta opioid receptor system in an experimental model of heart failure in rats.

    PubMed

    Treskatsch, Sascha; Feldheiser, Aarne; Shaqura, Mohammed; Dehe, Lukas; Habazettl, Helmut; Röpke, Torsten K; Shakibaei, Mehdi; Schäfer, Michael; Spies, Claudia D; Mousa, Shaaban A

    2016-02-01

    The role of the cardiac opioid system in congestive heart failure (CHF) is not fully understood. Therefore, this project investigated the cellular localization of delta opioid receptors (DOR) in left ventricle (LV) myocardium and adaptive changes in DOR and its endogenous ligand, the precursor peptide proenkephalin (PENK), during CHF. Following IRB approval, DOR localization was determined by radioligand binding using [H(3)]Naltrindole and by double immunofluorescence confocal analysis in the LV of male Wistar rats. Additionally, 28 days following an infrarenal aortocaval fistula (ACF) the extent of CHF and adaptions in left ventricular DOR and PENK expression were examined by hemodynamic measurements, RT-PCR, and Western blot. DOR specific membrane binding sites were identified in LV myocardium. DOR were colocalized with L-type Ca(2+)-channels (Cav1.2) as well as with intracellular ryanodine receptors (RyR) of the sarcoplasmatic reticulum. Following ACF severe congestive heart failure developed in all rats and was accompanied by up-regulation of DOR and PENK on mRNA as well as receptor proteins representing consecutive adaptations. These findings might suggest that the cardiac delta opioid system possesses the ability to play a regulatory role in the cardiomyocyte calcium homeostasis, especially in response to heart failure. PMID:25552382

  1. Molecular Characterization and Functional Regulation of Melanocortin 2 Receptor (MC2R) in the Sea Bass. A Putative Role in the Adaptation to Stress

    PubMed Central

    Agulleiro, Maria Josep; Sánchez, Elisa; Leal, Esther; Cortés, Raúl; Fernández-Durán, Begoña; Guillot, Raúl; Davis, Perry; Dores, Robert M.; Gallo-Payet, Nicole; Cerdá-Reverter, José Miguel

    2013-01-01

    The activation of melanocortin 2 receptor (MC2R) by ACTH mediates the signaling cascade leading to steroid synthesis in the interrenal tissue (analogous to the adrenal cortex in mammals) of fish. However, little is known about the functional regulation of this receptor in fish. In this work described, we cloned sea bass MC2R from a liver cDNA. SbMC2R requires the melanocortin 2 receptor accessory protein (MRAP) for its functional expression. Dietary cortisol but not long-term stress protocols downregulated interrenal sbMC2R expression. Data suggest the existence of a negative feedback on interrenal sbMC2R expression imposed by local or systemic glucocorticoids. This feedback could be involved in long-term stress adaptation by regulating interrenal sensitivity to ACTH. ACTH-induced MC2R activation stimulates hepatic lipolysis, suggesting that ACTH may mediate stress-induced effects upstream of cortisol release. PMID:23724142

  2. Detachment of stretched viscoelastic fibrils

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Glassmaker, N. J.; Hui, C. Y.; Yamaguchi, T.; Creton, C.

    2008-03-01

    New experimental results are presented about the final stage of failure of soft viscoelastic adhesives. A microscopic view of the detachment of the adhesive shows that after cavity growth and expansion, well adhered soft adhesives form a network of fibrils connected to expanded contacting feet which fail via a sliding mechanism, sensitive to interfacial shear stresses rather than by a fracture mechanism as sometimes suggested in earlier work. A mechanical model of this stretching and sliding failure phenomenon is presented which treats the fibril as a nonlinear elastic or viscoelastic rod and the foot as an elastic layer subject to a friction force proportional to the local displacement rate. The force on the stretched rod drives the sliding of the foot against the substrate. The main experimental parameter controlling the failure strain and stress during the sliding process is identified by the model as the normalized probe pull speed, which also depends on the magnitude of the friction and PSA modulus. In addition, the material properties, viscoelasticity and finite extensibility of the polymer chains, are shown to have an important effect on both the details of the sliding process and the ultimate failure strain and stress. Appendix B is only available in electronic form at 10.1140/epje/i2007-10287-y and are accessible for authorised users.

  3. Prenatal exposure to cocaine produces unique developmental and long-term adaptive changes in dopamine D1 receptor activity and subcellular distribution.

    PubMed

    Stanwood, Gregg D; Levitt, Pat

    2007-01-01

    Low-dose intravenous cocaine administration to pregnant rabbits causes permanent structural alterations in dopamine-rich cerebral cortical areas, substantially reduced dopamine D1 receptor coupling to G(s)-protein, and deficits in cognitive function. The developmental influences of reduced D1-G(s) coupling and the underlying cellular basis are unknown. Using primary neuronal cultures derived from the medial frontal cortex and striatum of in utero saline- and cocaine-exposed embryos, spontaneous neurite outgrowth of in utero-exposed cortical neurons was greater than in control neurons. In contrast, striatal neurons exposed to cocaine in utero exhibited an entirely opposite adaptive response, with diminished spontaneous neurite outgrowth compared with saline-exposed controls. Control neurons isolated from the two structures also exhibited opposite regulatory responses to the D1 receptor agonist SKF38393 (1-phenyl-2,3,4-5-tetrahydro-(1H)-3-benzazepine-7,8-diol hydrochloride), inhibiting outgrowth in cortical cultures and stimulating outgrowth in striatal cultures. The agonist was ineffective in modulating neurite outgrowth of neurons from either structure isolated from cocaine-exposed fetuses, reflecting the reduced D1-Gs coupling. Total D1 receptor number was indistinguishable in neurons from the cocaine- and saline-exposed animals, but cell imaging and receptor binding of differentially isolated membranes showed that the lack of responsiveness was because of greatly reduced cell-surface localization of D1 receptors. These data suggest that prenatal exposure to cocaine causes a novel, long-lasting adaptive response in the subcellular distribution of D1 receptors, resulting in alterations in signaling capacity that have developmental and behavioral consequences. PMID:17202482

  4. Adaptive increases in expression and vasodilator activity of estrogen receptor subtypes in a blood vessel-specific pattern during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Mata, Karina M; Li, Wei; Reslan, Ossama M; Siddiqui, Waleed T; Opsasnick, Lauren A; Khalil, Raouf A

    2015-11-15

    Normal pregnancy is associated with adaptive hemodynamic, hormonal, and vascular changes, and estrogen (E2) may promote vasodilation during pregnancy; however, the specific E2 receptor (ER) subtype, post-ER signaling mechanism, and vascular bed involved are unclear. We tested whether pregnancy-associated vascular adaptations involve changes in the expression/distribution/activity of distinct ER subtypes in a blood vessel-specific manner. Blood pressure (BP) and plasma E2 were measured in virgin and pregnant (day 19) rats, and the thoracic aorta, carotid artery, mesenteric artery, and renal artery were isolated for measurements of ERα, ERβ, and G protein-coupled receptor 30 [G protein-coupled ER (GPER)] expression and tissue distribution in parallel with relaxation responses to E2 (all ERs) and the specific ER agonist 4,4',4″-(4-propyl-[1H]-pyrazole-1,3,5-triyl)-tris-phenol (PPT; ERα), diarylpropionitrile (DPN; ERβ), and G1 (GPER). BP was slightly lower and plasma E2 was higher in pregnant versus virgin rats. Western blots revealed increased ERα and ERβ in the aorta and mesenteric artery and GPER in the aorta of pregnant versus virgin rats. Immunohistochemistry revealed that the increases in ERs were mainly in the intima and media. In phenylephrine-precontracted vessels, E2 and PPT caused relaxation that was greater in the aorta and mesenteric artery but similar in the carotid and renal artery of pregnant versus virgin rats. DPN- and G1-induced relaxation was greater in the mesenteric and renal artery than in the aorta and carotid artery, and aortic relaxation to G1 was greater in pregnant versus virgin rats. The nitric oxide synthase inhibitor N(ω)-nitro-l-arginine methyl ester with or without the cyclooxygenase inhibitor indomethacin with or without the EDHF blocker tetraethylammonium or endothelium removal reduced E2, PPT, and G1-induced relaxation in the aorta of pregnant rats, suggesting an endothelium-dependent mechanism, but did not affect E2-, PPT

  5. Association between the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene and autism: relationship to Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales and cognition.

    PubMed

    Lerer, E; Levi, S; Salomon, S; Darvasi, A; Yirmiya, N; Ebstein, R P

    2008-10-01

    Evidence both from animal and human studies suggests that common polymorphisms in the oxytocin receptor (OXTR) gene are likely candidates to confer risk for autism spectrum disorders (ASD). In lower mammals, oxytocin is important in a wide range of social behaviors, and recent human studies have shown that administration of oxytocin modulates behavior in both clinical and non-clinical groups. Additionally, two linkage studies and two recent association investigations also underscore a possible role for the OXTR gene in predisposing to ASD. We undertook a comprehensive study of all 18 tagged SNPs across the entire OXTR gene region identified using HapMap data and the Haploview algorithm. Altogether 152 subjects diagnosed with ASDs (that is, DSM IV autistic disorder or pervasive developmental disorder--NOS) from 133 families were genotyped (parents and affected siblings). Both individual SNPs and haplotypes were tested for association using family-based association tests as provided in the UNPHASED set of programs. Significant association with single SNPs and haplotypes (global P-values <0.05, following permutation test adjustment) were observed with ASD. Association was also observed with IQ and the Vineland Adaptive Behavior Scales (VABS). In particular, a five-locus haplotype block (rs237897-rs13316193-rs237889-rs2254298-rs2268494) was significantly associated with ASD (nominal global P=0.000019; adjusted global P=0.009) and a single haplotype (carried by 7% of the population) within that block showed highly significant association (P=0.00005). This is the third association study, in a third ethnic group, showing that SNPs and haplotypes in the OXTR gene confer risk for ASD. The current investigation also shows association with IQ and total VABS scores (as well as the communication, daily living skills and socialization subdomains), suggesting that this gene shapes both cognition and daily living skills that may cross diagnostic boundaries. PMID:17893705

  6. RIG-I-like receptors evolved adaptively in mammals, with parallel evolution at LGP2 and RIG-I.

    PubMed

    Cagliani, Rachele; Forni, Diego; Tresoldi, Claudia; Pozzoli, Uberto; Filippi, Giulia; Rainone, Veronica; De Gioia, Luca; Clerici, Mario; Sironi, Manuela

    2014-03-20

    RIG-I-like receptors (RLRs) are nucleic acid sensors that activate antiviral innate immune response. These molecules recognize diverse non-self RNA substrates and are antagonized by several viral inhibitors. We performed an evolutionary analysis of RLR genes (RIG-I, MDA5, and LGP2) in mammals. Results indicated that purifying selection had a dominant role in driving the evolution of RLRs. However, application of maximum-likelihood analyses identified several positions that evolved adaptively. Positively selected sites are located in all domains of MDA5 and RIG-I, whereas in LGP2 they are confined to the helicase domain. In both MDA5 and RIG-I, the linkers separating the caspase activation and recruitment domain and the helicase domain represented preferential targets of positive selection. Independent selective events in RIG-I and LGP2 targeted the corresponding site (Asp421 and Asp179, respectively) within a protruding α-helix that grips the V-shaped structure formed by the pincer. Most of the positively selected sites in MDA5 are in regions unique to this RLR, including a characteristic insertion within the helicase domain. Additional selected sites are located at the contact interface between MDA5 monomers, in spatial proximity to a positively selected human polymorphism (Arg843His) and immediately external to the parainfluenza virus 5 V protein binding region. Structural analyses suggested that the positively selected His834 residue is involved in parainfluenza virus 5 V protein binding. Data herein suggest that RLRs have been engaged in host-virus genetic conflict leading to diversifying selection and indicate parallel evolution at the same site in RIG-I and LGP2, a position likely to be of central importance in antiviral responses. PMID:24211720

  7. Integration of signal pathways for stretch-dependent growth and differentiation in vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Albinsson, Sebastian; Hellstrand, Per

    2007-08-01

    The vascular smooth muscle phenotype is regulated by environmental factors, such as mechanical forces, that exert effects on signaling to differentiation and growth. We used the mouse portal vein in organ culture to investigate stretch-dependent activation of Akt, ERK, and focal adhesion kinase (FAK), which have been suggested to be involved in the regulation of stretch-dependent protein synthesis. The role of actin polymerization in these signaling events was examined using the actin-stabilizing agent jasplakinolide. Stretch caused a biphasic activation of FAK at 5-15 min and 24-72 h, which may reflect first a direct phosphorylation of preexisting focal adhesions followed by a rearrangement of focal adhesions to accommodate for the increased mechanical load. Phosphorylation of ERK was increased by acute stretch but then decreased, and Akt did not have a distinct peak in stretch-induced phosphorylation. Inhibition of ERK, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase, or mammalian target of rapamycin reduced global but not contractile protein synthesis with maintained stretch sensitivity. Stabilization of actin filaments with jasplakinolide, in unstretched portal veins, resulted in increased ERK phosphorylation and global protein synthesis as well as the synthesis of contractile proteins. In contrast, stretch during culture with jasplakinolide did not affect FAK phosphorylation or contractility. Therefore, remodeling of smooth muscle cells to adapt to stretch requires a dynamic cytoskeleton. PMID:17507430

  8. Insulin-like growth factor 2 and its enterocyte receptor are not required for adaptation in response to massive small bowel resection

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Raphael C.; Choi, Pamela M.; Guo, Jun; Erwin, Christopher R.; Warner, Brad W.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose Enhanced structural features of resection-induced intestinal adaptation have been demonstrated following the administration of multiple different growth factors and peptides. Among these, the insulin-like growth factor (IGF) system has been considered to be significant. In this study, we employ mutant mouse strains to directly test the contribution of IGF2 and its enterocyte receptor (IGF1R) toward the adaptation response to massive small bowel resection (SBR). Methods IGF2-knockout (IGF2-KO) (n=8) and intestine specific IGF1R-knockout mice (IGF1R-IKO) (n=9) and their wild type (WT) littermates (n=5, n=7, respectively) underwent 50% proximal SBR. At post-operative day 7, structural adaptation was measured as crypt depth and villus height. Rates of enterocyte proliferation and apoptosis were also recorded. Results The successful deletion of IGF2 and IGF1R expression in the enterocytes was confirmed by RT-PCR and Western blot, respectively. Normal adaptation occurred in both IGF2-KO and IGF1R-IKO mice after 50% SBR. Post-operative rates of proliferation and apoptosis in both IGF2-KO and IGF1R-IKO mice were no different than their respective controls. Conclusion IGF2 and functional IGF1R signaling in enterocytes are both dispensable for resection-induced adaptation responses. The mechanism for IGF-stimulation of intestinal adaptation may involve other ligands or cellular compartments within the intestine. PMID:24888844

  9. Decorrelation Stretch Near Cerberus Fossae

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    [figure removed for brevity, see original site]

    Released July 25, 2004 On this image you can see two infrared frames of the same area on Mars. One of the images (in black and white) represents a single wavelength or band of the THEMIS IR instrument, while the other image (in false color) represents 3 different bands. The image with the various colors was created with a technique called Decorrelation Stretch (DCS). In this technique individual bands of the THEMIS IR instrument are stretched to better show compositional variations throughout the whole range. After the bands are stretched they are overlayed on one another and colors are assigned to each band. This makes up the colors in the image.

    As you can see, there is a difference in what is noticable in the single band IR image versus the false-colored one. On the color image the pink/magenta colors usually represent basaltic content, cyan often indicates the presence of water ice clouds, while green can represent dust.

    The bright purple and pink colors associated with the valley are due to basalt. There may be a thin veneer of dust present in the region (it was a dark colored region during the Viking mission in the 1970's) through which the basaltic material pokes out along the edges of the valley and the nearby knobby terrain.

    Image information: IR instrument. Latitude 10.7, Longitude 163 East (197 West). 100 meter/pixel resolution.

    Note: this THEMIS visual image has not been radiometrically nor geometrically calibrated for this preliminary release. An empirical correction has been performed to remove instrumental effects. A linear shift has been applied in the cross-track and down-track direction to approximate spacecraft and planetary motion. Fully calibrated and geometrically projected images will be released through the Planetary Data System in accordance with Project policies at a later time.

    NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory manages the 2001 Mars Odyssey mission for NASA

  10. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching.

    PubMed

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations--cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell's passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity. PMID:24875391

  11. Cell reorientation under cyclic stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Livne, Ariel; Bouchbinder, Eran; Geiger, Benjamin

    2014-05-01

    Mechanical cues from the extracellular microenvironment play a central role in regulating the structure, function and fate of living cells. Nevertheless, the precise nature of the mechanisms and processes underlying this crucial cellular mechanosensitivity remains a fundamental open problem. Here we provide a novel framework for addressing cellular sensitivity and response to external forces by experimentally and theoretically studying one of its most striking manifestations—cell reorientation to a uniform angle in response to cyclic stretching of the underlying substrate. We first show that existing approaches are incompatible with our extensive measurements of cell reorientation. We then propose a fundamentally new theory that shows that dissipative relaxation of the cell’s passively-stored, two-dimensional, elastic energy to its minimum actively drives the reorientation process. Our theory is in excellent quantitative agreement with the complete temporal reorientation dynamics of individual cells measured over a wide range of experimental conditions, thus elucidating a basic aspect of mechanosensitivity.

  12. Ionic effects on spindle adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Husmark, I.; Ottoson, D.

    1971-01-01

    1. Effects of changes in ionic environment on the receptor potential were studied in isolated frog spindle. Particular attention was focused on the action of potassium removal on the early adaptive decline of the response. 2. Removal of potassium caused a reduction and final disappearance of the dynamic overshoot of the receptor potential. The static phase of the response was also reduced although to less extent. The repolarization phase of the response following release of phasic or maintained stretch was greatly prolonged. 3. Increased potassium concentration caused a reduction of the response, but did not change its general time course. The amount of reduction was related to the potassium concentration. 4. Removal of sodium caused a marked diminution of the response, the static phase being in general more affected than the dynamic phase. 5. It is suggested that the effects of potassium removal are caused by a delay in sodium inactivation and a partial depolarization of the endings. It is concluded that the greater part of the early adaptation of the spindle proper may be attributed to ionic mechanisms in the transducer membrane. PMID:4256546

  13. Convective Flow of Sisko Fluid over a Bidirectional Stretching Surface.

    PubMed

    Munir, Asif; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation focuses the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the steady three-dimensional Sisko fluid driven by a bidirectional stretching sheet. The modeled partial differential equations are reduced to coupled ordinary differential equations by a suitable transformation. The resulting equations are solved numerically by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta algorithm in combination with Newton's method in the domain [0,∞). The numerical results for the velocity and temperature fields are graphically presented and effects of the relevant parameters are discussed in detail. Moreover, the skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt number for different values of the power-law index and stretching ratio parameter are presented through tabulated data. The numerical results are also verified with the results obtained analytically by the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Additionally, the results are validated with previously published pertinent literature as a limiting case of the problem. PMID:26110873

  14. Convective Flow of Sisko Fluid over a Bidirectional Stretching Surface

    PubMed Central

    Munir, Asif; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood

    2015-01-01

    The present investigation focuses the flow and heat transfer characteristics of the steady three-dimensional Sisko fluid driven by a bidirectional stretching sheet. The modeled partial differential equations are reduced to coupled ordinary differential equations by a suitable transformation. The resulting equations are solved numerically by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta algorithm in combination with Newton's method in the domain [0,∞). The numerical results for the velocity and temperature fields are graphically presented and effects of the relevant parameters are discussed in detail. Moreover, the skin-friction coefficient and local Nusselt number for different values of the power-law index and stretching ratio parameter are presented through tabulated data. The numerical results are also verified with the results obtained analytically by the homotopy analysis method (HAM). Additionally, the results are validated with previously published pertinent literature as a limiting case of the problem. PMID:26110873

  15. c-Src regulates clathrin adapter protein 2 interaction with beta-arrestin and the angiotensin II type 1 receptor during clathrin- mediated internalization.

    PubMed

    Fessart, Delphine; Simaan, May; Laporte, Stéphane A

    2005-02-01

    Beta-arrestins are multifunctional adapters involved in the internalization and signaling of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs). They target receptors to clathrin-coated pits (CCPs) through binding with clathrin and clathrin adapter 2 (AP-2) complex. They also act as transducers of signaling by recruiting c-Src kinase to certain GPCRs. Here we sought to determine whether c-Src regulates the recruitment of AP-2 to beta-arrestin and the angiotensin II (Ang II) type 1 receptor (AT1R) during internalization. We show that the agonist stimulation of native AT1R in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) induces the formation of an endogenous complex containing c-Src, beta-arrestins and AP-2. In vitro studies using coimmunoprecipitation experiments and a yeast three-hybrid assay reveal that c-Src stabilizes the agonist-independent association between beta-arrestin2 and the beta-subunit of AP-2 independently of the kinase activity of c-Src. However, although c-Src expression promoted the rapid dissociation of AP-2 from both beta-arrestin and AT1R after receptor stimulation, a kinase-inactive mutant of c-Src failed to induce the dissociation of AP-2 from the agonist-occupied receptor. Thus, the consequence of c-Src in regulating the dissociation of AP-2 from the receptor was also examined on the internalization of AT1R by depleting c-Src in human embryonic kidney (HEK) 293 cells using a small interfering RNA strategy. Experiments in c-Src depleted cells reveal that AT1R remained mostly colocalized with AP-2 at the plasma membrane after Ang II stimulation, consistent with the observed delay in receptor internalization. Moreover, coimmunoprecipitation experiments in c-Src depleted HEK 293 cells and VSMCs showed an increased association of AP-2 to the agonist-occupied AT1R and beta-arrestin, respectively. Together, our results support a role for c-Src in regulating the dissociation of AP-2 from agonist-occupied AT1R and beta-arrestin during the clathrin-mediated internalization

  16. Adaptations in the mesoaccumbens dopamine system resulting from repeated administration of dopamine D1 and D2 receptor-selective agonists: relevance to cocaine sensitization.

    PubMed

    Henry, D J; Hu, X T; White, F J

    1998-11-01

    The mesoaccumbens dopamine (DA) system is intricately involved in sensitization to the locomotor stimulant effects of cocaine. Among the adaptations implicated in cocaine sensitization are transient subsensitivity of impulse-regulating DA D2 autoreceptors on ventral tegmental area (VTA) DA neurons leading to hyperactivity of the mesoaccumbens DA pathway, and persistently enhanced DA D1 receptor responses of nucleus accumbens (NAc) neurons. We have tested the hypothesis that both of these adaptations are necessary to produce cocaine sensitization. We injected rats twice daily for 2 weeks with the selective DA D1 class receptor agonist SKF 38393, the DA D2 class receptor agonist quinpirole, or both. We then used single-cell recording procedures to determine possible alterations in VTA DA autoreceptor sensitivity and NAc D1 receptor sensitivity at three withdrawal times: 1 day, 1 week and 1 month. We also tested whether these treatments produced cross-sensitization to cocaine at each withdrawal time. Repeated quinpirole treatment produced a reduction in VTA autoreceptor sensitivity and cross-sensitization to cocaine, but these effects lasted for less than 1 week. Repeated SKF 38393 treatment produced enhanced NAc D1 responses which lasted for 1 week and cross-sensitization to cocaine which was only evident after 1 week of withdrawal. Repeated treatment with the combination of the two agonists transiently down-regulated autoreceptor sensitivity, enhanced and prolonged D1 receptor supersensitivity (lasting 1 month), and produced enduring cross-sensitization to cocaine. These results suggest that neuroadaptations within both the VTA and NAc may be necessary for the induction of enduring cocaine sensitization. PMID:9860115

  17. Reinforcement for Stretch Formed Sheet Metal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lea, J. B.; Baxter, C. R.

    1983-01-01

    Tearing of aluminum sheet metal durinng stretch forming prevented by flame spraying layer of aluminum on edges held in stretch-forming machine. Technique improves grip of machine on metal and reinforced sheet better able to with stand concentration of force in vicinity of grips.

  18. Stretching Impacts Inflammation Resolution in Connective Tissue.

    PubMed

    Berrueta, Lisbeth; Muskaj, Igla; Olenich, Sara; Butler, Taylor; Badger, Gary J; Colas, Romain A; Spite, Matthew; Serhan, Charles N; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-07-01

    Acute inflammation is accompanied from its outset by the release of specialized pro-resolving mediators (SPMs), including resolvins, that orchestrate the resolution of local inflammation. We showed earlier that, in rats with subcutaneous inflammation of the back induced by carrageenan, stretching for 10 min twice daily reduced inflammation and improved pain, 2 weeks after carrageenan injection. In this study, we hypothesized that stretching of connective tissue activates local pro-resolving mechanisms within the tissue in the acute phase of inflammation. In rats injected with carrageenan and randomized to stretch versus no stretch for 48 h, stretching reduced inflammatory lesion thickness and neutrophil count, and increased resolvin (RvD1) concentrations within lesions. Furthermore, subcutaneous resolvin injection mimicked the effect of stretching. In ex vivo experiments, stretching of connective tissue reduced the migration of neutrophils and increased tissue RvD1 concentration. These results demonstrate a direct mechanical impact of stretching on inflammation-regulation mechanisms within connective tissue. PMID:26588184

  19. Strategy as stretch and leverage.

    PubMed

    Hamel, G; Prahalad, C K

    1993-01-01

    Global competition is not just product versus product or company versus company. It is mind-set versus mind-set. Driven to understand the dynamics of competition, we have learned a lot about what makes one company more successful than another. But to find the root of competitiveness--to understand why some companies create new forms of competitive advantage while others watch and follow--we must look at strategic mind-sets. For many managers, "being strategic" means pursuing opportunities that fit the company's resources. This approach is not wrong, Gary Hamel and C.K. Prahalad contend, but it obscures an approach in which "stretch" supplements fit and being strategic means creating a chasm between ambition and resources. Toyota, CNN, British Airways, Sony, and others all displaced competitors with stronger reputations and deeper pockets. Their secret? In each case, the winner had greater ambition than its well-endowed rivals. Winners also find less resource-intensive ways of achieving their ambitious goals. This is where leverage complements the strategic allocation of resources. Managers at competitive companies can get a bigger bang for their buck in five basic ways: by concentrating resources around strategic goals; by accumulating resources more efficiently; by complementing one kind of resource with another; by conserving resources whenever they can; and by recovering resources from the market-place as quickly as possible. As recent competitive battles have demonstrated, abundant resources can't guarantee continued industry leadership.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:10124635

  20. Mars Under the Microscope (stretched)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2004-01-01

    This magnified look at the martian soil near the Mars Exploration Rover Opportunity's landing site, Meridiani Planum, shows coarse grains sprinkled over a fine layer of sand. The image was captured on the 10th day, or sol, of the rover's mission by its microscopic imager, located on the instrument deployment device, or 'arm.' Scientists are intrigued by the spherical rocks, which can be formed by a variety of geologic processes, including cooling of molten lava droplets and accretion of concentric layers of material around a particle or 'seed.'

    The examined patch of soil is 3 centimeters (1.2 inches) across. The circular grain in the lower left corner is approximately 3 millimeters (.12 inches) across, or about the size of a sunflower seed.

    This stretched color composite was obtained by merging images acquired with the orange-tinted dust cover open and closed. The varying hints of orange suggest differences in mineral composition. The blue tint at the lower right corner is a tag used by scientists to indicate that the dust cover is closed.

  1. Vascular endothelial cell membranes differentiate between stretch and shear stress through transitions in their lipid phases.

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Kimiko; Ando, Joji

    2015-10-01

    Vascular endothelial cells (ECs) respond to the hemodynamic forces stretch and shear stress by altering their morphology, functions, and gene expression. However, how they sense and differentiate between these two forces has remained unknown. Here we report that the plasma membrane itself differentiates between stretch and shear stress by undergoing transitions in its lipid phases. Uniaxial stretching and hypotonic swelling increased the lipid order of human pulmonary artery EC plasma membranes, thereby causing a transition from the liquid-disordered phase to the liquid-ordered phase in some areas, along with a decrease in membrane fluidity. In contrast, shear stress decreased the membrane lipid order and increased membrane fluidity. A similar increase in lipid order occurred when the artificial lipid bilayer membranes of giant unilamellar vesicles were stretched by hypotonic swelling, indicating that this is a physical phenomenon. The cholesterol content of EC plasma membranes significantly increased in response to stretch but clearly decreased in response to shear stress. Blocking these changes in the membrane lipid order by depleting membrane cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin or by adding cholesterol resulted in a marked inhibition of the EC response specific to stretch and shear stress, i.e., phosphorylation of PDGF receptors and phosphorylation of VEGF receptors, respectively. These findings indicate that EC plasma membranes differently respond to stretch and shear stress by changing their lipid order, fluidity, and cholesterol content in opposite directions and that these changes in membrane physical properties are involved in the mechanotransduction that activates membrane receptors specific to each force. PMID:26297225

  2. THUNDER Piezoelectric Actuators as a Method of Stretch-Tuning an Optical Fiber Grating

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Fox, Robert L.; Froggatt, Mark E.; Childers, Brooks A.

    2000-01-01

    A method of stretching optical fiber holds interest for measuring strain in smart structures where the physical displacement may be used to tune optical fiber lasers. A small, light weight, low power tunable fiber laser is ideal for demodulating strain in optical fiber Bragg gratings attached to smart structures such as the re-usable launch vehicle that is being developed by NASA. A method is presented for stretching optical fibers using the THUNDER piezoelectric actuators invented at NASA Langley Research Center. THUNDER actuators use a piezoelectric layer bonded to a metal backing to enable the actuators to produce displacements larger than the unbonded piezoelectric material. The shift in reflected optical wavelength resulting from stretching the fiber Bragg grating is presented. Means of adapting THUNDER actuators for stretching optical fibers is discussed, including ferrules, ferrule clamp blocks, and plastic hinges made with stereo lithography.

  3. Glucocorticoid receptor haploinsufficiency causes hypertension and attenuates hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis and blood pressure adaptions to high-fat diet.

    PubMed

    Michailidou, Z; Carter, R N; Marshall, E; Sutherland, H G; Brownstein, D G; Owen, E; Cockett, K; Kelly, V; Ramage, L; Al-Dujaili, E A S; Ross, M; Maraki, I; Newton, K; Holmes, M C; Seckl, J R; Morton, N M; Kenyon, C J; Chapman, K E

    2008-11-01

    Glucocorticoid hormones are critical to respond and adapt to stress. Genetic variations in the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) gene alter hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity and associate with hypertension and susceptibility to metabolic disease. Here we test the hypothesis that reduced GR density alters blood pressure and glucose and lipid homeostasis and limits adaption to obesogenic diet. Heterozygous GR(betageo/+) mice were generated from embryonic stem (ES) cells with a gene trap integration of a beta-galactosidase-neomycin phosphotransferase (betageo) cassette into the GR gene creating a transcriptionally inactive GR fusion protein. Although GR(betageo/+) mice have 50% less functional GR, they have normal lipid and glucose homeostasis due to compensatory HPA axis activation but are hypertensive due to activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS). When challenged with a high-fat diet, weight gain, adiposity, and glucose intolerance were similarly increased in control and GR(betageo/+) mice, suggesting preserved control of intermediary metabolism and energy balance. However, whereas a high-fat diet caused HPA activation and increased blood pressure in control mice, these adaptions were attenuated or abolished in GR(betageo/+) mice. Thus, reduced GR density balanced by HPA activation leaves glucocorticoid functions unaffected but mineralocorticoid functions increased, causing hypertension. Importantly, reduced GR limits HPA and blood pressure adaptions to obesogenic diet. PMID:18697839

  4. Stretch induced hyperexcitability of mice callosal pathway

    PubMed Central

    Fan, Anthony; Stebbings, Kevin A.; Llano, Daniel A.; Saif, Taher

    2015-01-01

    Memory and learning are thought to result from changes in synaptic strength. Previous studies on synaptic physiology in brain slices have traditionally been focused on biochemical processes. Here, we demonstrate with experiments on mouse brain slices that central nervous system plasticity is also sensitive to mechanical stretch. This is important, given the host of clinical conditions involving changes in mechanical tension on the brain, and the normal role that mechanical tension plays in brain development. A novel platform is developed to investigate neural responses to mechanical stretching. Flavoprotein autofluoresence (FA) imaging was employed for measuring neural activity. We observed that synaptic excitability substantially increases after a small (2.5%) stretch was held for 10 min and released. The increase is accumulative, i.e., multiple stretch cycles further increase the excitability. We also developed analytical tools to quantify the spatial spread and response strength. Results show that the spatial spread is less stable in slices undergoing the stretch-unstretch cycle. FA amplitude and activation rate decrease as excitability increases in stretch cases but not in electrically enhanced cases. These results collectively demonstrate that a small stretch in physiological range can modulate neural activities significantly, suggesting that mechanical events can be employed as a novel tool for the modulation of neural plasticity. PMID:26300729

  5. Stretch due to Penile Prosthesis Reservoir Migration

    PubMed Central

    Baten, E.; Vandewalle, T.; van Renterghem, K.

    2016-01-01

    A 43-year old patient presented to the emergency department with stretch, due to impossible deflation of the penile prosthesis, 4 years after successful implant. A CT-scan showed migration of the reservoir to the left rectus abdominis muscle. Refilling of the reservoir was inhibited by muscular compression, causing stretch. Removal and replacement of the reservoir was performed, after which the prosthesis was well-functioning again. Migration of the penile prosthesis reservoir is extremely rare but can cause several complications, such as stretch. PMID:26793592

  6. Springback prediction and optimization of variable stretch force trajectory in three-dimensional stretch bending process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teng, Fei; Zhang, Wanxi; Liang, Jicai; Gao, Song

    2015-11-01

    Most of the existing studies use constant force to reduce springback while researching stretch force. However, variable stretch force can reduce springback more efficiently. The current research on springback prediction in stretch bending forming mainly focuses on artificial neural networks combined with the finite element simulation. There is a lack of springback prediction by support vector regression (SVR). In this paper, SVR is applied to predict springback in the three-dimensional stretch bending forming process, and variable stretch force trajectory is optimized. Six parameters of variable stretch force trajectory are chosen as the input parameters of the SVR model. Sixty experiments generated by design of experiments (DOE) are carried out to train and test the SVR model. The experimental results confirm that the accuracy of the SVR model is higher than that of artificial neural networks. Based on this model, an optimization algorithm of variable stretch force trajectory using particle swarm optimization (PSO) is proposed. The springback amount is used as the objective function. Changes of local thickness are applied as the criterion of forming constraints. The objection and constraints are formulated by response surface models. The precision of response surface models is examined. Six different stretch force trajectories are employed to certify springback reduction in the optimum stretch force trajectory, which can efficiently reduce springback. This research proposes a new method of springback prediction using SVR and optimizes variable stretch force trajectory to reduce springback.

  7. Effect of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching on hamstring muscle flexibility

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Hashim; Iqbal, Amir; Anwer, Shahnawaz; Alghadir, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of present study was to compare the effectiveness of modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility. [Subjects and Methods] Forty-five male subjects with hamstring tightness were included in this study. The subjects were randomly placed into three groups: the modified hold-relax stretching, static stretching and control groups. The modified hold-relax stretching group performed 7 seconds of isometric contraction and then relaxed for 5 seconds, and this was repeated five times daily for five consecutive days. The static stretching group received 10 minutes of static stretching with the help of a pulley and weight system for five consecutive days. The control group received only moist heat for 20 minutes for five consecutive days. A baseline reading of passive knee extension (PKE) was taken prior to the intervention; rest measurements were taken immediate post intervention on day 1, day 3, day 5, and after a 1 week follow-up, i.e., at the 12th day. [Results] On comparing the baseline readings of passive knee extension (PKE), there was no difference noted between the three groups. On comparing the posttest readings on day 5 between the 3 groups, a significant difference was noted. However, post hoc analysis revealed an insignificant difference between the modified hold-relax stretching and static stretching groups. There was a significant difference between the static stretching and control groups and between the modified hold-relax stretching and control groups. [Conclusion] The results of this study indicate that both the modified hold-relax stretching technique and static stretching are equally effective, as there was no significant difference in improving the hamstring muscle flexibility between the two groups. PMID:25729210

  8. Stretch reflex oscillations and essential tremor.

    PubMed Central

    Elble, R J; Higgins, C; Moody, C J

    1987-01-01

    Using a computer-controlled torque motor and manipulandum, 50 ms torque pulses and 70 second trains of binary pseudorandom torque disturbances were applied to the wrists of 10 adult controls and 22 patients with essential tremor in order to study the interaction between mechanically-induced stretch-reflex oscillations and essential tremor. These two oscillations were separated by applying inertial and spring loads to the wrist. There was no evidence of increased or unstable stretch-reflex activity in the essential tremor patients, and stretch-reflex latencies did not correlate with the frequency of essential tremor. Essential tremor and mechanically-induced stretch-reflex oscillations are separate phenomena capable of complex interaction. PMID:3612149

  9. Investing in a Large Stretch Press

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, M.; Nealson, W.; Jay, G.; Buss, W.

    1986-01-01

    Press for forming large aluminum parts from plates provides substantial economies. Study assessed advantages and disadvantages of investing in large stretch-forming press, and also developed procurement specification for press.

  10. Design of a new membrane stretching device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yiran

    Cell stretching device has been applied into the lab use for many years to help researchers study about the behavior of cells during the stretching process. Because the cell responses to the different mechanical stimuli, especially in the case of disease, the cell stretching device is a necessary tool to study the cell behavior in a controlled environment. However existing devices have limitations, such as too big to fit the culture chamber, unable to be observed during the stretching process and too expensive to fabricate. In this thesis, a new cell stretcher is designed to resolve these limitations. Many typical cell stretching devices only work under simple conditions. For instance they can only apply the strain on the cell in uniaxial or equibiaxial directions. On the other hand the environment of cells' survival is varying. Many new cell stretchers have been developed, which have the same property that cells can be stretched via the radical deformation of the elastomeric membrane. The aim of this new design is to create a cell stretching device that fits in general lab conditions. This device is designed to fit on a microscope to observe, as well as in the incubator. In addition, two small step motors are used to control the strain, adjust the frequency, and maintain the stability precisely. Problems such as the culture media leakage and the membrane breakage are solved by the usage of multiple materials for both the cell stretcher and the membrane. Based on the experimental results, this device can satisfy the requirements of target users with a reduced manufacturing cost. In the future, an auto-focus tracking function will be developed to allow real time observation of the cells' behavior.

  11. Tolerance to LSD and DOB induced shaking behaviour: differential adaptations of frontocortical 5-HT(2A) and glutamate receptor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Buchborn, Tobias; Schröder, Helmut; Dieterich, Daniela C; Grecksch, Gisela; Höllt, Volker

    2015-03-15

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethoxy-bromoamphetamine (DOB), provoke stereotype-like shaking behaviour in rodents, which is hypothesised to engage frontocortical glutamate receptor activation secondary to serotonin2A (5-HT2A) related glutamate release. Challenging this hypothesis, we here investigate whether tolerance to LSD and DOB correlates with frontocortical adaptations of 5-HT2A and/or overall-glutamate binding sites. LSD and DOB (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) induce a ketanserin-sensitive (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30-min pretreatment) increase in shaking behaviour (including head twitches and wet dog shakes), which with repeated application (7× in 4 ds) is undermined by tolerance. Tolerance to DOB, as indexed by DOB-sensitive [(3)H]spiroperidol and DOB induced [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding, is accompanied by a frontocortical decrease in 5-HT2A binding sites and 5-HT2 signalling, respectively; glutamate-sensitive [(3)H]glutamate binding sites, in contrast, remain unchanged. As to LSD, 5-HT2 signalling and 5-HT2A binding, respectively, are not or only marginally affected, yet [(3)H]glutamate binding is significantly decreased. Correlation analysis interrelates tolerance to DOB to the reduced 5-HT2A (r=.80) as well as the unchanged [(3)H]glutamate binding sites (r=.84); tolerance to LSD, as opposed, shares variance with the reduction in [(3)H]glutamate binding sites only (r=.86). Given that DOB and LSD both induce tolerance, one correlating with 5-HT2A, the other with glutamate receptor adaptations, it might be inferred that tolerance can arise at either level. That is, if a hallucinogen (like LSD in our study) fails to induce 5-HT2A (down-)regulation, glutamate receptors (activated postsynaptic to 5-HT2A related glutamate release) might instead adapt and thus prevent further overstimulation of the cortex. PMID:25513973

  12. Cell culture adaptation mutations in foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A capsid proteins: implications for receptor interactions

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In this study we describe the adaptive changes fixed on the capsid of several foot-and-mouth disease virus serotype A strains during propagation in cell monolayers. Viruses passaged extensively in three cell lines (BHK-21, LFBK and IB-RS-2), consistently gained several positively charged amino acids...

  13. Type I Interferon Receptor Deficiency in Dendritic Cells Facilitates Systemic Murine Norovirus Persistence Despite Enhanced Adaptive Immunity

    PubMed Central

    Nice, Timothy J.; Osborne, Lisa C.; Tomov, Vesselin T.; Artis, David; Wherry, E. John; Virgin, Herbert W.

    2016-01-01

    In order for a virus to persist, there must be a balance between viral replication and immune clearance. It is commonly believed that adaptive immunity drives clearance of viral infections and, thus, dysfunction or viral evasion of adaptive immunity is required for a virus to persist. Type I interferons (IFNs) play pleiotropic roles in the antiviral response, including through innate control of viral replication. Murine norovirus (MNoV) replicates in dendritic cells (DCs) and type I IFN signaling in DCs is important for early control of MNoV replication. We show here that the non-persistent MNoV strain CW3 persists systemically when CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. Persistence in this setting is associated with increased early viral titers, maintenance of DC numbers, increased expression of DC activation markers and an increase in CD8 T cell and antibody responses. Furthermore, CD8 T cell function is maintained during the persistent phase of infection and adaptive immune cells from persistently infected mice are functional when transferred to Rag1-/- recipients. Finally, increased early replication and persistence are also observed in mixed bone marrow chimeras where only half of the CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. These findings demonstrate that increased early viral replication due to a cell-intrinsic innate immune deficiency is sufficient for persistence and a functional adaptive immune response is not sufficient for viral clearance. PMID:27327515

  14. Type I Interferon Receptor Deficiency in Dendritic Cells Facilitates Systemic Murine Norovirus Persistence Despite Enhanced Adaptive Immunity.

    PubMed

    Nice, Timothy J; Osborne, Lisa C; Tomov, Vesselin T; Artis, David; Wherry, E John; Virgin, Herbert W

    2016-06-01

    In order for a virus to persist, there must be a balance between viral replication and immune clearance. It is commonly believed that adaptive immunity drives clearance of viral infections and, thus, dysfunction or viral evasion of adaptive immunity is required for a virus to persist. Type I interferons (IFNs) play pleiotropic roles in the antiviral response, including through innate control of viral replication. Murine norovirus (MNoV) replicates in dendritic cells (DCs) and type I IFN signaling in DCs is important for early control of MNoV replication. We show here that the non-persistent MNoV strain CW3 persists systemically when CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. Persistence in this setting is associated with increased early viral titers, maintenance of DC numbers, increased expression of DC activation markers and an increase in CD8 T cell and antibody responses. Furthermore, CD8 T cell function is maintained during the persistent phase of infection and adaptive immune cells from persistently infected mice are functional when transferred to Rag1-/- recipients. Finally, increased early replication and persistence are also observed in mixed bone marrow chimeras where only half of the CD11c positive DCs are unable to respond to type I IFN. These findings demonstrate that increased early viral replication due to a cell-intrinsic innate immune deficiency is sufficient for persistence and a functional adaptive immune response is not sufficient for viral clearance. PMID:27327515

  15. Habituation of visual adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue; Gao, Yi; Lv, Lili; Bao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Our sensory system adjusts its function driven by both shorter-term (e.g. adaptation) and longer-term (e.g. learning) experiences. Most past adaptation literature focuses on short-term adaptation. Only recently researchers have begun to investigate how adaptation changes over a span of days. This question is important, since in real life many environmental changes stretch over multiple days or longer. However, the answer to the question remains largely unclear. Here we addressed this issue by tracking perceptual bias (also known as aftereffect) induced by motion or contrast adaptation across multiple daily adaptation sessions. Aftereffects were measured every day after adaptation, which corresponded to the degree of adaptation on each day. For passively viewed adapters, repeated adaptation attenuated aftereffects. Once adapters were presented with an attentional task, aftereffects could either reduce for easy tasks, or initially show an increase followed by a later decrease for demanding tasks. Quantitative analysis of the decay rates in contrast adaptation showed that repeated exposure of the adapter appeared to be equivalent to adaptation to a weaker stimulus. These results suggest that both attention and a non-attentional habituation-like mechanism jointly determine how adaptation develops across multiple daily sessions. PMID:26739917

  16. Habituation of visual adaptation.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xue; Gao, Yi; Lv, Lili; Bao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Our sensory system adjusts its function driven by both shorter-term (e.g. adaptation) and longer-term (e.g. learning) experiences. Most past adaptation literature focuses on short-term adaptation. Only recently researchers have begun to investigate how adaptation changes over a span of days. This question is important, since in real life many environmental changes stretch over multiple days or longer. However, the answer to the question remains largely unclear. Here we addressed this issue by tracking perceptual bias (also known as aftereffect) induced by motion or contrast adaptation across multiple daily adaptation sessions. Aftereffects were measured every day after adaptation, which corresponded to the degree of adaptation on each day. For passively viewed adapters, repeated adaptation attenuated aftereffects. Once adapters were presented with an attentional task, aftereffects could either reduce for easy tasks, or initially show an increase followed by a later decrease for demanding tasks. Quantitative analysis of the decay rates in contrast adaptation showed that repeated exposure of the adapter appeared to be equivalent to adaptation to a weaker stimulus. These results suggest that both attention and a non-attentional habituation-like mechanism jointly determine how adaptation develops across multiple daily sessions. PMID:26739917

  17. What Protects Certain Nerves from Stretch Injury?

    PubMed

    Schraut, Nicholas B; Walton, Sharon; Bou Monsef, Jad; Shott, Susan; Serici, Anthony; Soulii, Lioubov; Amirouche, Farid; Gonzalez, Mark H; Kerns, James M

    2016-01-01

    The human tibial nerves is less prone to injury following joint arthroplasty compared with the peroneal nerves. Besides the anatomical distribution, other features may confer protection from stretch injury. We therefore examined the size, shape and connective tissue distribution for the two nerves. The tibial and peroneal nerves from each side of nine fresh human cadavers we reharvested mid-thigh. Proximal segments manually stretched 20%-25% were fixed in aldehyde, while the adjacent distal segments were fixed in their natural length. Paraffin sections stained by Masson's trichrome method for connective tissue were examined by light microscopy. Tibial nerves had 2X more fascicles compared with the peroneal, but the axonal content appeared similar. Analysis showed that neither nerve had a significant reduction in cross sectional area of the fascicles following stretch. However, fascicles from stretched tibial nerves become significantly more oval compared with those from unstretched controls and peroneal nerves. Tibial nerves had a greater proportion that was extrafascicular tissue (50-55%) compared with peroneal nerves (38%-42%). This epineurium was typically adipose tissue. Perineurial thickness in both nerves was directly related to fascicular size. Tibial nerves have several unique histological features associated with size, shape and tissue composition compared with the peroneal nerve. We suggest that more fascicles with their tightly bound perineurium and more robust epineurium afford protection against stretch injury. Mechanical studies should clarify how size and shape contribute to nerve protection and/or neurapraxia. PMID:26529568

  18. Effect of mechanical stretching on DNA conductance.

    PubMed

    Bruot, Christopher; Xiang, Limin; Palma, Julio L; Tao, Nongjian

    2015-01-27

    Studying the structural and charge transport properties in DNA is important for unraveling molecular scale processes and developing device applications of DNA molecules. Here we study the effect of mechanical stretching-induced structural changes on charge transport in single DNA molecules. The charge transport follows the hopping mechanism for DNA molecules with lengths varying from 6 to 26 base pairs, but the conductance is highly sensitive to mechanical stretching, showing an abrupt decrease at surprisingly short stretching distances and weak dependence on DNA length. We attribute this force-induced conductance decrease to the breaking of hydrogen bonds in the base pairs at the end of the sequence and describe the data with a mechanical model. PMID:25530305

  19. Stretching and folding in finite time.

    PubMed

    Ma, Tian; Ouellette, Nicholas T; Bollt, Erik M

    2016-02-01

    Complex flows mix efficiently, and this process can be understood by considering the stretching and folding of material volumes. Although many metrics have been devised to characterize stretching, fewer are able to capture folding in a quantitative way in spatiotemporally variable flows. Here, we extend our previous methods based on the finite-time curving of fluid-element trajectories to nonzero scales and show that this finite-scale finite-time curvature contains information about both stretching and folding. We compare this metric to the more commonly used finite-time Lyapunov exponent and illustrate our methods using experimental flow-field data from a quasi-two-dimensional laboratory flow. Our new analysis tools add to the growing set of Lagrangian methods for characterizing mixing in complex, aperiodic fluid flows. PMID:26931593

  20. Stretching and folding in finite time

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Tian; Ouellette, Nicholas T.; Bollt, Erik M.

    2016-02-01

    Complex flows mix efficiently, and this process can be understood by considering the stretching and folding of material volumes. Although many metrics have been devised to characterize stretching, fewer are able to capture folding in a quantitative way in spatiotemporally variable flows. Here, we extend our previous methods based on the finite-time curving of fluid-element trajectories to nonzero scales and show that this finite-scale finite-time curvature contains information about both stretching and folding. We compare this metric to the more commonly used finite-time Lyapunov exponent and illustrate our methods using experimental flow-field data from a quasi-two-dimensional laboratory flow. Our new analysis tools add to the growing set of Lagrangian methods for characterizing mixing in complex, aperiodic fluid flows.

  1. Stretched arc discharge in produced water.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y I; Wright, K C; Kim, H S; Cho, D J; Rabinovich, A; Fridman, A

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost. PMID:25638080

  2. System performance analysis of stretched membrane heliostats

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, J V; Murphy, L M; Short, W; Wendelin, T

    1985-12-01

    The optical performance of both focused and unfocused stretched membrane heliostats was examined in the context of the overall cost and performance of central receiver systems. The sensitivity of optical performance to variations in design parameters such as the system size (capacity), delivery temperature, heliostat size, and heliostat surface quality was also examined. The results support the conclusion that focused stretched membrane systems provide an economically attractive alternative to current glass/metal heliostats over essentially the entire range of design parameters studied. In addition, unfocused stretched membrane heliostats may be attractive for a somewhat more limited range of applications, which would include the larger plant sizes (e.g., 450 MW) and lower delivery temperatures (e.g., 450/sup 0/C), or situations in which the heliostat size could economically be reduced.

  3. Live Cell Imaging during Mechanical Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Rápalo, Gabriel; Herwig, Josh D.; Hewitt, Robert; Wilhelm, Kristina R.; Waters, Christopher M.; Roan, Esra

    2015-01-01

    There is currently a significant interest in understanding how cells and tissues respond to mechanical stimuli, but current approaches are limited in their capability for measuring responses in real time in live cells or viable tissue. A protocol was developed with the use of a cell actuator to distend live cells grown on or tissues attached to an elastic substrate while imaging with confocal and atomic force microscopy (AFM). Preliminary studies show that tonic stretching of human bronchial epithelial cells caused a significant increase in the production of mitochondrial superoxide. Moreover, using this protocol, alveolar epithelial cells were stretched and imaged, which showed direct damage to the epithelial cells by overdistention simulating one form of lung injury in vitro. A protocol to conduct AFM nano-indentation on stretched cells is also provided. PMID:26325607

  4. All-optical time-stretch digitizer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fard, A. M.; Buckley, B.; Zlatanovic, S.; Brès, C.-S.; Radic, S.; Jalali, B.

    2012-07-01

    We propose and demonstrate an all-optical time-stretch digitizer for real-time capture of ultrafast optical signals, beyond the bandwidths achievable by electronics. This approach uniquely combines four-wave mixing and photonic time-stretch technique to slow down and record high-speed optical signals. As a proof-of-concept, real-time recording of 40-Gb/s non-return-to-zero on-off-keying optical data stream is experimentally demonstrated using a stretch factor of 54 and 1.5-GHz back-end electronic bandwidth. We also report on the observation of dispersion penalty and its mitigation via single-sideband conversion enabled by an optical bandpass filter. Our technique may provide a path to real-time capture of ultrahigh-speed optical data streams.

  5. Anisotropic dewetting on stretched elastomeric substrates.

    PubMed

    Qiao, L; He, L H

    2008-08-01

    We study the instability of a very thin liquid film resting on a uniformly stretched soft elastomeric substrate driven by van der Waals forces. A linear stability analysis shows that the critical fluctuation wavelength in the tensile direction is larger than those in the other directions. The magnitudes of the critical wavelengths are adjustable in the sense that they depend on the principal stretch of the substrate. For example, when the principal stretch of the substrate varies from 1.0 (unstretched) to 3.0, the range of the critical wavelength in the tensile direction increases by 7.0% while that normal to the tensile direction decreases by 8.7%. Therefore, the phenomenon may find potential applications in creating tunable topographically patterned surfaces with nano- to microscale features. PMID:19230211

  6. Stretched arc discharge in produced water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cho, Y. I.; Wright, K. C.; Kim, H. S.; Cho, D. J.; Rabinovich, A.; Fridman, A.

    2015-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to investigate the feasibility of stretching an arc discharge in produced water to increase the volume of produced water treated by plasma. Produced water is the wastewater generated by hydraulic fracturing of shale during the production phase in shale-oil or shale-gas exploration. The electric conductivity of produced water is in the range of 50-200 mS/cm, which provides both a challenge and opportunity for the application of plasmas. Stretching of an arc discharge in produced water was accomplished using a ground electrode and two high-voltage electrodes: one positioned close to the ground electrode and the other positioned farther away from the ground. The benefit of stretching the arc is that the contact between the arc and water is significantly increased, resulting in more efficient plasma treatment in both performance and energy cost.

  7. Optical Data Compression in Time Stretch Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Claire Lifan; Mahjoubfar, Ata; Jalali, Bahram

    2015-01-01

    Time stretch imaging offers real-time image acquisition at millions of frames per second and subnanosecond shutter speed, and has enabled detection of rare cancer cells in blood with record throughput and specificity. An unintended consequence of high throughput image acquisition is the massive amount of digital data generated by the instrument. Here we report the first experimental demonstration of real-time optical image compression applied to time stretch imaging. By exploiting the sparsity of the image, we reduce the number of samples and the amount of data generated by the time stretch camera in our proof-of-concept experiments by about three times. Optical data compression addresses the big data predicament in such systems. PMID:25906244

  8. Modification by previous afferent discharge of the adaptation of frog muscle spindles following an extension.

    PubMed Central

    Brokensha, G; Westbury, D R

    1978-01-01

    1. Extension of a frog muscle spindle evoked a discharge of impulses in its sensory axon. The adaptation of the discharge after the dynamic phase of stretching occurred in two phases. At first the impulse train was almost regular and adapted quickly, but later this gave place to a phase of slower adaptation in which the variability of discharge was much increased. 2. The discharge of action potentials by the muscle spindle depressed the response of the receptor to a subsequent extension. This was true whether they were elicited antidromically by afferent stimulation or orthodromically by longitudinal vibration. This depression had its most marked effect on the first phase of adaptation where it greatly increased the rate of adaptation. The second, slower, phase of adaptation was little influenced. 3. The depression increased with the duration and with the frequency of afferent stimulation. It persisted for about 300 msec. 4. The results show that the properties of the spike generating mechanisms in the muscle spindle are modified by previous discharge and that this modification may influence the overall properties of the receptor. 5. The fact that afferent stimulation has different effects on the two phases of adaptation is consistent with the suggestion that the impulse train evoked by extension is derived from more than one spike generator within the muscle spindle. PMID:146734

  9. Antigen Receptor-Intrinsic Non-Self: The Key to Understanding Regulatory Lymphocyte-Mediated Idiotypic Control of Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Hilmar

    2016-01-01

    The clone-specific or idiotypic characters of B as well as T cell antigen receptors (BCRs/TCRs) are associated with (1) the third-complementarity-determining regions (CDR3s) that are created during V(D)J recombination (they scarcely occur in antibody light chains) and (2) BCR idiotopes created by somatic hypermutations (SHMs) during immune responses. Therefore, BCR/TCR idiotypic sites are antigen receptor-intrinsic Non-Self (AgR-iNS) portions that fulfill two tasks: serving as a crucial component of the epitope-binding paratope and serving as target sites for anti-idiotypic BCR/TCR paratopes of other anti-Non-Self clones that are contained in both normal repertoires. The antigen-induced immune response is thus directed not only toward the environmental stimulus but also against the AgR-iNS portions of the directly and further activated clones that form a subsiding idiotypic cascade. These idiotypic chain reactions form a completely integrated idiotypic control circuit among B and T cells which contains all regulatory T and B cells. However, this circuit cannot be viewed as a network of fixed interacting nodes but rather uses the genetic Self as reference. Hence, AgR-iNS offers a mechanistic understanding of regulatory lymphocyte-mediated idiotypic control of adaptive immune responses and reconciles clonal selection and idiotypic network theories hitherto believed to be incompatible. PMID:27480901

  10. Effects of transient receptor potential (TRP) channel agonists and antagonists on slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptors in the rat sinus hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Cahusac, Peter M B

    2009-12-01

    The possible functional role of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels was investigated by testing various TRP agonists and antagonists in an isolated rat sinus hair follicle preparation. Extracellular recordings from slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptor units were made. The antagonist capsazepine depressed spontaneous and mechanically evoked activity, with an IC(50) of 82 microM. In one-third of units, capsazepine caused a selective depression of mechanically evoked firing, such that the existing spontaneous firing was interrupted by an absence of activity during the mechanical stimulus. The broad spectrum TRP blocker ruthenium red (30 microM) had inconsistent effects, although in some units a delayed onset (following wash) bursting and paroxysmal firing ensued. The agonist icilin (50-100 microM) had an excitatory effect on spontaneous firing, and (-)-menthol (200 microM) had inconsistent effects. Cinnamaldehyde (1-2 mM) depressed all types of activity equally, mechanically evoked and spontaneous. Camphor (0.5-2 mM) also depressed all types of activity, although it had a preferential effect on spontaneous activity. Capsaicin (1-10 microM) and allyl isothiocyanate (50-100 microM) had no clear effects. These results rule out any role for TRPA1 and TRPV1 channels in mechanotransduction processes of slowly adapting type II mechanoreceptors. PMID:20021572

  11. Role of the D2 dopamine receptor in molecular adaptation to chronic hypoxia in PC12 cells.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, S; Conforti, L; Zhu, W H; Beitner-Johnson, D; Millhorn, D E

    1999-11-01

    We have previously shown that pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells rapidly depolarize and undergo Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in response to moderate hypoxia and that intracellular free Ca2+ is modulated by activation of dopamine D2 receptors in this cell type. The present study shows that D2 (quinpirole-mediated) inhibition of a voltage-dependent Ca2+ current (ICa) in PC12 cells is dramatically attenuated after chronic exposure to moderate hypoxia (24 h at 10% O2). Pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin abolished D2-mediated inhibition of ICa. The D2-induced inhibition of ICa did not depend on protein kinase A (PKA), as it persisted both in the presence of a specific PKA inhibitor (PKI) and in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. Prolonged exposure to hypoxia (24 h) significantly reduced the level of Gi/o alpha immunoreactivity, but did not alter G beta levels. Furthermore, dialysis of recombinant G(o) alpha protein through the patch pipette restored the inhibitory effect of quinpirole in cells chronically exposed to hypoxia. We conclude that the attenuation of the D2-mediated inhibition of ICa by chronic hypoxia is caused by impaired receptor-G protein coupling, due to reduced levels of G(o) alpha protein. This attenuated feedback modulation of ICa by dopamine may allow for a more sustained Ca2+ influx and enhanced cellular excitation during prolonged hypoxia. PMID:10591061

  12. Quantifying stretch and secretion in the embryonic lung: Implications for morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    George, Uduak Z; Bokka, Kishore K; Warburton, David; Lubkin, Sharon R

    2015-11-01

    Branching in the embryonic lung is controlled by a variety of morphogens. Mechanics is also believed to play a significant role in lung branching. The relative roles and interactions of these two broad factors are challenging to determine. We considered three hypotheses for explaining why tracheal occlusion triples branching with no overall increase in size. Both hypotheses are based on tracheal occlusion blocking the exit of secretions. (H1) Increased lumen pressure stretches tissues; stretch receptors at shoulders of growing tips increase local rate of branching. (H2) Blocking exit of secretions blocks advective transport of morphogens, leading to (H2a) increased overall concentration of morphogens or (H2b) increased flux of morphogens at specific locations. We constructed and analyzed computational models of tissue stretch and solute transport in a 3D lung geometry. Observed tissue stresses and stretches were predominantly in locations unrelated to subsequent branch locations, suggesting that tissue stretch (H1) is not the mechanism of enhancement of branching. Morphogen concentration in the mesenchyme (H2a) increased with tracheal occlusion, consistent with previously reported results. Morphogen flux at the epithelial surface (H2b) completely changed its distribution pattern when the trachea was occluded, tripling the number of locations at which it was elevated. Our results are consistent with the hypothesis that tracheal occlusion blocks outflow of secretions, leading to a higher number of high-flux locations at branching tips, in turn leading to a large increase in number of branching locations. PMID:26189687

  13. microRNA-21 Mediates Stretch-Induced Osteogenic Differentiation in Human Periodontal Ligament Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Dongxu; Feng, Cheng; Zhang, Fan; Yang, Shuangyan; Hu, Yijun; Ding, Gang

    2015-01-01

    microRNAs (miRNAs) are short 20- to 22-nucleotide noncoding RNAs that negatively regulate the expression of target genes at the post-transcriptional level. The expression of specific miRNAs and their roles in the osteogenic differentiation of human periodontal ligament stem cells (PDLSCs) exposed to mechanical stretch remain unclear. Here, we found that stretch induced both osteogenic differentiation and the differential expression of miR-21 in PDLSCs. Furthermore, we identified activin receptor type IIB (ACVR2B) as a target gene of miR-21. Luciferase reporter assays showed that miR-21 interacts directly with the 3′-untranslated repeat sequence of ACVR2B mRNA. Mechanical stretch suppressed ACVR2B protein levels in PDLSCs, and this suppressive effect was modulated when endogenous miR-21 levels were either enhanced or inhibited. Both stretch and the expression of miR-21 altered endogenous ACVR2B protein levels and thus the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. In addition, gain- and loss of function of ACVR2B mediated the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs. This study demonstrates that miR-21 is a mechanosensitive gene that plays an important role in the osteogenic differentiation of PDLSCs exposed to stretch. PMID:25203845

  14. Parallel Anisotropic Tetrahedral Adaptation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Park, Michael A.; Darmofal, David L.

    2008-01-01

    An adaptive method that robustly produces high aspect ratio tetrahedra to a general 3D metric specification without introducing hybrid semi-structured regions is presented. The elemental operators and higher-level logic is described with their respective domain-decomposed parallelizations. An anisotropic tetrahedral grid adaptation scheme is demonstrated for 1000-1 stretching for a simple cube geometry. This form of adaptation is applicable to more complex domain boundaries via a cut-cell approach as demonstrated by a parallel 3D supersonic simulation of a complex fighter aircraft. To avoid the assumptions and approximations required to form a metric to specify adaptation, an approach is introduced that directly evaluates interpolation error. The grid is adapted to reduce and equidistribute this interpolation error calculation without the use of an intervening anisotropic metric. Direct interpolation error adaptation is illustrated for 1D and 3D domains.

  15. Cloud Network Helps Stretch IT Dollars

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Collins, Hilton

    2012-01-01

    No matter how many car washes or bake sales schools host to raise money, adding funds to their coffers is a recurring problem. This perpetual financial difficulty makes expansive technology purchases or changes seem like a pipe dream for school CIOs and has education technologists searching for ways to stretch money. In 2005, state K-12 school…

  16. Project Stretch Final Narrative Report. Year III.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    American Camping Association, Martinsville, IN.

    In June, 1979, the American Camping Association implemented Project STRETCH (Strategies to Try out Resources to Enhance the Training of Camp Directors serving the Handicapped), a nationwide in-service training program for personnel providing services to handicapped children and youth in regularly and specially designed camping and outdoor…

  17. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a Mbp-long fragment of DNA that is flow-stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field-of-view. Instead we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. Fitted parameters agree well with simplified expressions, where the DNA is modeled as a cylinder in a parallel flow.

  18. A computational model of the response of adherent cells to stretch and changes in substrate stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Lutchen, Kenneth R.; Suki, Béla

    2014-01-01

    Cells in the body exist in a dynamic mechanical environment where they are subject to mechanical stretch as well as changes in composition and stiffness of the underlying extracellular matrix (ECM). However, the underlying mechanisms by which cells sense and adapt to their dynamic mechanical environment, in particular to stretch, are not well understood. In this study, we hypothesized that emergent phenomena at the level of the actin network arising from active structural rearrangements driven by nonmuscle myosin II molecular motors play a major role in the cellular response to both stretch and changes in ECM stiffness. To test this hypothesis, we introduce a simple network model of actin-myosin interactions that links active self-organization of the actin network to the stiffness of the network and the traction forces generated by the network. We demonstrate that such a network replicates not only the effect of changes in substrate stiffness on cellular traction and stiffness and the dependence of rate of force development by a cell on the stiffness of its substrate, but also explains the physical response of adherent cells to transient and cyclic stretch. Our results provide strong indication that network phenomena governed by the active reorganization of the actin-myosin structure plays an important role in cellular mechanosensing and response to both changes in ECM stiffness and externally applied mechanical stretch. PMID:24408996

  19. How to determine local stretching and tension in a flow-stretched DNA molecule

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pedersen, Jonas N.; Marie, Rodolphe; Kristensen, Anders; Flyvbjerg, Henrik

    2016-04-01

    We determine the nonuniform stretching of and tension in a mega base pairs-long fragment of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) that is flow stretched in a nanofluidic chip. We use no markers, do not know the contour length of the DNA, and do not have the full DNA molecule inside our field of view. Instead, we analyze the transverse thermal motion of the DNA. Tension at the center of the DNA adds up to 16 pN, giving almost fully stretched DNA. This method was devised for optical mapping of DNA, specifically, DNA denaturation patterns. It may be useful also for other studies, e.g., DNA-protein interactions, specifically, their tension dependence. Generally, wherever long strands of DNA—e.g., native DNA extracted from human cells or bacteria—must be stretched with ease for inspection, this method applies.

  20. Toll-like receptor signaling adapter proteins govern spread of neuropathic pain and recovery following nerve injury in male mice

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spinal Toll-like receptors (TLRs) and signaling intermediaries have been implicated in persistent pain states. We examined the roles of two major TLR signaling pathways and selected TLRs in a mononeuropathic allodynia. Methods L5 spinal nerve ligation (SNL) was performed in wild type (WT, C57BL/6) male and female mice and in male Tlr2 -/- Tlr3 -/- , Tlr4 -/- , Tlr5 -/- , Myd88 -/- , Trif lps2 , Myd88/Trif lps2 , Tnf -/- , and Ifnar1 -/- mice. We also examined L5 ligation in Tlr4 -/- female mice. We examined tactile allodynia using von Frey hairs. Iba-1 (microglia) and GFAP (astrocytes) were assessed in spinal cords by immunostaining. Tactile thresholds were analyzed by 1- and 2-way ANOVA and the Bonferroni post hoc test was used. Results In WT male and female mice, SNL lesions resulted in a persistent and robust ipsilateral, tactile allodynia. In males with TLR2, 3, 4, or 5 deficiencies, tactile allodynia was significantly, but incompletely, reversed (approximately 50%) as compared to WT. This effect was not seen in female Tlr4 -/- mice. Increases in ipsilateral lumbar Iba-1 and GFAP were seen in mutant and WT mice. Mice deficient in MyD88, or MyD88 and TRIF, showed an approximately 50% reduction in withdrawal thresholds and reduced ipsilateral Iba-1. In contrast, TRIF and interferon receptor null mice developed a profound ipsilateral and contralateral tactile allodynia. In lumbar sections of the spinal cords, we observed a greater increase in Iba-1 immunoreactivity in the TRIF-signaling deficient mice as compared to WT, but no significant increase in GFAP. Removing MyD88 abrogated the contralateral allodynia in the TRIF signaling-deficient mice. Conversely, IFNβ, released downstream to TRIF signaling, administered intrathecally, temporarily reversed the tactile allodynia. Conclusions These observations suggest a critical role for the MyD88 pathway in initiating neuropathic pain, but a distinct role for the TRIF pathway and interferon in regulating

  1. Ryanodine receptor antagonists adapt NPC1 proteostasis to ameliorate lipid storage in Niemann-Pick type C disease fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yu, Ting; Chung, Chan; Shen, Dongbiao; Xu, Haoxing; Lieberman, Andrew P

    2012-07-15

    Niemann-Pick type C disease is a lysosomal storage disorder most often caused by loss-of-function mutations in the NPC1 gene. The encoded multipass transmembrane protein is required for cholesterol efflux from late endosomes and lysosomes. Numerous missense mutations in the NPC1 gene cause disease, including the prevalent I1061T mutation that leads to protein misfolding and degradation. Here, we sought to modulate the cellular proteostasis machinery to achieve functional recovery in primary patient fibroblasts. We demonstrate that targeting endoplasmic reticulum (ER) calcium levels using ryanodine receptor (RyR) antagonists increased steady-state levels of the NPC1 I1061T protein. These compounds also promoted trafficking of mutant NPC1 to late endosomes and lysosomes and rescued the aberrant storage of cholesterol and sphingolipids that is characteristic of disease. Similar rescue was obtained using three distinct RyR antagonists in cells with missense alleles, but not with null alleles, or by over-expressing calnexin, a calcium-dependent ER chaperone. Our work highlights the utility of proteostasis regulators to remodel the protein-folding environment in the ER to recover function in the setting of disease-causing missense alleles. PMID:22505584

  2. Functional Adaptation of a Plant Receptor- Kinase Paved the Way for the Evolution of Intracellular Root Symbioses with Bacteria

    PubMed Central

    Markmann, Katharina; Giczey, Gábor; Parniske, Martin

    2008-01-01

    Nitrogen-fixing root nodule symbioses (RNS) occur in two major forms—Actinorhiza and legume-rhizobium symbiosis—which differ in bacterial partner, intracellular infection pattern, and morphogenesis. The phylogenetic restriction of nodulation to eurosid angiosperms indicates a common and recent evolutionary invention, but the molecular steps involved are still obscure. In legumes, at least seven genes—including the symbiosis receptor-kinase gene SYMRK—are essential for the interaction with rhizobia bacteria and for the Arbuscular Mycorrhiza (AM) symbiosis with phosphate-acquiring fungi, which is widespread in occurrence and believed to date back to the earliest land plants. We show that SYMRK is also required for Actinorhiza symbiosis of the cucurbit Datisca glomerata with actinobacteria of the genus Frankia, revealing a common genetic basis for both forms of RNS. We found that SYMRK exists in at least three different structural versions, of which the shorter forms from rice and tomato are sufficient for AM, but not for functional endosymbiosis with bacteria in the legume Lotus japonicus. Our data support the idea that SYMRK sequence evolution was involved in the recruitment of a pre-existing signalling network from AM, paving the way for the evolution of intracellular root symbioses with nitrogen-fixing bacteria. PMID:18318603

  3. Role of the D2 dopamine receptor in molecular adaptation to chronic hypoxia in PC12 cells

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Shuichi; Conforti, Laura; Zhu Dana Beitner-Johnson, Wylie H.; Millhorn, David E.

    2006-01-01

    We have previously shown that pheochromocytoma (PC12) cells rapidly depolarize and undergo Ca2+ influx through voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in response to moderate hypoxia and that intracellular free Ca2+ is modulated by activation of dopamine D2 receptors in this cell type. The present study shows that D2 (quinpirole-mediated) inhibition of a voltage-dependent Ca2+ current (ICa) in PC12 cells is dramatically attenuated after chronic exposure to moderate hypoxia (24 h at 10% O2). Pretreatment of cells with pertussis toxin abolished D2-mediated inhibition of ICa. The D2-induced inhibition of ICa did not depend on protein kinase A (PKA), as it persisted both in the presence of a specific PKA inhibitor (PKI) and in PKA-deficient PC12 cells. Prolonged exposure to hypoxia (24 h) significantly reduced the level of Gi/oα immunoreactivity, but did not alter Gβ levels. Furthermore, dialysis of recombinant Goα protein through the patch pipette restored the inhibitory effect of quinpirole in cells chronically exposed to hypoxia. We conclude that the attenuation of the D2-mediated inhibition of ICa by chronic hypoxia is caused by impaired receptor–G protein coupling, due to reduced levels of Goα protein. This attenuated feedback modulation of ICa by dopamine may allow for a more sustained Ca2+ influx and enhanced cellular excitation during prolonged hypoxia. PMID:10591061

  4. MTOR-independent induction of autophagy in trabecular meshwork cells subjected to biaxial stretch.

    PubMed

    Porter, Kristine M; Jeyabalan, Nallathambi; Liton, Paloma B

    2014-06-01

    The trabecular meshwork (TM) is part of a complex tissue that controls the exit of aqueous humor from the anterior chamber of the eye, and therefore helps maintaining intraocular pressure (IOP). Because of variations in IOP with changing pressure gradients and fluid movement, the TM and its contained cells undergo morphological deformations, resulting in distention and stretching. It is therefore essential for TM cells to continuously detect and respond to these mechanical forces and adapt their physiology to maintain proper cellular function and protect against mechanical injury. Here we demonstrate the activation of autophagy, a pro-survival pathway responsible for the degradation of long-lived proteins and organelles, in TM cells when subjected to biaxial static stretch (20% elongation), as well as in high-pressure perfused eyes (30mmHg). Morphological and biochemical markers for autophagy found in the stretched cells include elevated LC3-II levels, increased autophagic flux, and the presence of autophagic figures in electron micrographs. Furthermore, our results indicate that the stretch-induced autophagy in TM cells occurs in an MTOR- and BAG3-independent manner. We hypothesize that activation of autophagy is part of the physiological response that allows TM cells to cope and adapt to mechanical forces. PMID:24583119

  5. Acute Myocardial Response to Stretch: What We (don't) Know

    PubMed Central

    Neves, João S.; Leite-Moreira, André M.; Neiva-Sousa, Manuel; Almeida-Coelho, João; Castro-Ferreira, Ricardo; Leite-Moreira, Adelino F.

    2016-01-01

    Myocardial stretch, as result of acute hemodynamic overload, is one of the most frequent challenges to the heart and the ability of the heart to intrinsically adapt to it is essential to prevent circulatory congestion. In this review, we highlight the historical background, the currently known mechanisms, as well as the gaps in the understanding of this physiological response. The systolic adaptation to stretch is well-known for over 100 years, being dependent on an immediate increase in contractility—known as the Frank-Starling mechanism—and a further progressive increase—the slow force response. On the other hand, its diastolic counterpart remains largely unstudied. Mechanosensors are structures capable of perceiving mechanical signals and activating pathways that allow their transduction into biochemical responses. Although the connection between these structures and stretch activated pathways remains elusive, we emphasize those most likely responsible for the initiation of the acute response. Calcium-dependent pathways, including angiotensin- and endothelin-related pathways; and cGMP-dependent pathways, comprising the effects of nitric oxide and cardiac natriuretic hormones, embody downstream signaling. The ischemic setting, a paradigmatic situation of acute hemodynamic overload, is also touched upon. Despite the relevant knowledge accumulated, there is much that we still do not know. The quest for further understanding the myocardial response to acute stretch may provide new insights, not only in its physiological importance, but also in the prevention and treatment of cardiovascular diseases. PMID:26779036

  6. Evolution of an adaptive behavior and its sensory receptors promotes eye regression in blind cavefish: response to Borowsky (2013).

    PubMed

    Yoshizawa, Masato; O'Quin, Kelly E; Jeffery, William R

    2013-01-01

    Vibration attraction behavior (VAB) is the swimming of fish toward an oscillating object, a behavior that is likely adaptive because it increases foraging efficiency in darkness. VAB is seen in a small proportion of Astyanax surface-dwelling populations (surface fish) but is pronounced in cave-dwelling populations (cavefish). In a recent study, we identified two quantitative trait loci for VAB on Astyanax linkage groups 2 and 17. We also demonstrated that a small population of superficial neuromast sensors located within the eye orbit (EO SN) facilitate VAB, and two quantitative trait loci (QTL) were identified for EO SN that were congruent with those for VAB. Finally, we showed that both VAB and EO SN are negatively correlated with eye size, and that two (of several) QTL for eye size overlap VAB and EO SN QTLs. From these results, we concluded that the adaptive evolution of VAB and EO SN has contributed to the indirect loss of eyes in cavefish, either as a result of pleiotropy or tight physical linkage of the mutations underlying these traits. In a subsequent commentary, Borowsky argues that there is poor experimental support for our conclusions. Specifically, Borowsky states that: (1) linkage groups (LGs) 2 and 17 harbor QTL for many traits and, therefore, no evidence exists for an exclusive interaction among the overlapping VAB, EO SN and eye size QTL; (2) some of the QTL we identified are too broad (>20 cM) to support the hypothesis of correlated evolution due to pleiotropy or hitchhiking; and (3) VAB is unnecessary to explain the indirect evolution of eye-loss since the negative polarity of numerous eye QTL is consistent with direct selection against eyes. Borowsky further argues that (4) it is difficult to envision an evolutionary scenario whereby VAB and EO SN drive eye loss, since the eyes must first be reduced in order to increase the number of EO SN and, therefore, VAB. In this response, we explain why the evidence of one trait influencing eye reduction

  7. Eye regression in blind Astyanax cavefish may facilitate the evolution of an adaptive behavior and its sensory receptors.

    PubMed

    Borowsky, Richard

    2013-01-01

    The forces driving the evolutionary loss or simplification of traits such as vision and pigmentation in cave animals are still debated. Three alternative hypotheses are direct selection against the trait, genetic drift, and indirect selection due to antagonistic pleiotropy. Recent work establishes that Astyanax cavefish exhibit vibration attraction behavior (VAB), a presumed behavioral adaptation to finding food in the dark not exhibited by surface fish. Genetic analysis revealed two regions in the genome with quantitative trait loci (QTL) for both VAB and eye size. These observations were interpreted as genetic evidence that selection for VAB indirectly drove eye regression through antagonistic pleiotropy and, further, that this is a general mechanism to account for regressive evolution. These conclusions are unsupported by the data; the analysis fails to establish pleiotropy and ignores the numerous other QTL that map to, and potentially interact, in the same regions. It is likely that all three forces drive evolutionary change. We will be able to distinguish among them in individual cases only when we have identified the causative alleles and characterized their effects. PMID:23844714

  8. NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW ACROSS CANAL PRISM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW ACROSS CANAL PRISM TO TOWPATH BERM (LATER FILL ENCROACHING LEFT) NEAR CENTER OF THIS STRETCH; VIEW TO SOUTHWEST - Blackstone Canal Worcester-Millbury Segment, Eastern bank of Blackstone River, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  9. Stretching a self-interacting semiflexible polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosa, A.; Marenduzzo, D.; Kumar, S.

    2006-09-01

    We present results from three-dimensional off-lattice Monte Carlo simulations to investigate the stretching response of a semi-flexible polymer subjected to self-attractive interactions. We employ the quasi-static approximation and consider both the fixed elongation and the fixed force ensemble, which can equally well be reproduced in experiments nowadays. The force vs. elongation curves are in general non-monotonic, and the quantity and height of peaks increase with decreasing temperature, and with increasing stiffness. We finally compute the variation of unfolding force with temperature. Our results should be relevant for stretching experimental studies, and for more refined theoretical modeling, taking non-equilibrium and kinetic effects into account.

  10. Stretching cells and delivering drugs with bubbles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohl, Claus-Dieter; Li, Fenfang; Chon U, Chan; Gao, Yu; Xu, Chenjie

    2015-11-01

    In this talk we'll review our work on impulsive cell stretching using cavitation bubbles and magnetic microbubbles for drug delivery. For sufficient short times cells can sustain a much larger areal strain than the yield strain obtained from quasi-static stretching. Experiments with red blood cells show that even then the rupture of the cell is slow process; it is caused by diffusive swelling rather than mechanical violation of the plasma membrane. In the second part we'll discuss bubbles coated with magnetic and drug loaded particles. These bubbles offer an interesting vector for on demand delivery of drugs using mild ultrasound and magnetic fields. We report on basic experiments in microfluidic channels revealing the release of the agent during bubble oscillations and first in vivo validation with a mouse tumor model. Singapore National Research Foundations Competitive Research Program funding (NRF-CRP9-2011-04).

  11. Modeling aftershocks as a stretched exponential relaxation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mignan, A.

    2015-11-01

    The decay rate of aftershocks has been modeled as a power law since the pioneering work of Omori in the late nineteenth century. Although other expressions have been proposed in recent decades to describe the temporal behavior of aftershocks, the number of model comparisons remains limited. After reviewing the aftershock models published from the late nineteenth century until today, I solely compare the power law, pure exponential and stretched exponential expressions defined in their simplest forms. By applying statistical methods recommended recently in applied mathematics, I show that all aftershock sequences tested in three regional earthquake catalogs (Southern and Northern California, Taiwan) and with three declustering techniques (nearest-neighbor, second-order moment, window methods) follow a stretched exponential instead of a power law. These results infer that aftershocks are due to a simple relaxation process, in accordance with most other relaxation processes observed in Nature.

  12. Vibrational overtone stretching transitions in sarin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Michael W. P.

    2006-10-01

    The CH stretching overtone transitions of the nerve agent sarin (O-isopropyl methylphosphonofluoridate) are of interest to the standoff detection of chemical warfare agents, as many of these transitions occur near regions where small, efficient, portable diode lasers (originally developed for use in the telecommunications industry) operate. However, the interpretation of experimental vibrational overtone spectra is often difficult, and the computational simulation of overtone transitions in a molecule is challenging. Presented herein are the simulated CH overtone stretching transitions in sarin. Spectral regions are simulated from overtone transition energies and intensities, both of which are calculated within the harmonically coupled anharmonic oscillator (HCAO) model. Data for HCAO calculations are obtained from ab initio calculations, without any recourse to experimental data.

  13. NASA/MSFC Large Stretch Press Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Choate, M. W.; Nealson, W. P.; Jay, G. C.; Buss, W. D.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to: A. assess and document the advantages/disadvantages of a government agency investment in a large stretch form press on the order of 5000 tons capacity (per jaw); B. develop a procurement specification for the press; and C. provide trade study data that will permit an optimum site location. Tasks were separated into four major elements: cost study, user survey, site selection, and press design/procurement specification.

  14. Stretch-induced cervicobrachial pain syndrome.

    PubMed

    Quintner, J

    1990-01-01

    The case records of 22 patients who presented with severe and persistent cervicobrachial pain were reviewed. The onset of their pain followed the performance of a forceful activity (lifting, pulling or pushing) using one or both arms in the outstretched position. Their symptoms and the findings on physical examination were both consistent with stretch-induced damage to neural tissues related to the painful upper limb. The predominant site of painful neural pathology appeared to be within the cervical spine. PMID:25025877

  15. Image enhancement by local histogram stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alparslan, E.; Fuatince, Mr.

    1981-05-01

    An image enhancement algorithm that makes use of local histogram stretching is introduced. This algorithm yields considerable improvements in human observation of details in an image, compared to straightforward histogram equalization and a number of other enhancement techniques. The algorithm is especially suitable for producing hard copies of images on electrostatic plotters with limited gray levels, as shown in applications to the Girl's image and a Landsat image.

  16. Stretch Moduli of Ribonucleotide Embedded Short DNAs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chiu, Hsiang-Chih; Koh, Kyung Duk; Riedo, Elisa; Storici, Francesca

    2013-03-01

    Understanding the mechanical properties of DNA is essential to comprehending the dynamics of many cellular functions. DNA deformations are involved in many mechanisms when genetic information needs to be stored and used. In addition, recent studies have found that Ribonucleotides (rNMPs) are among the most common non-standard nucleotides present in DNA. The presences of rNMPs in DNA might cause mutation, fragility or genotoxicity of chromosome but how they influence the structure and mechanical properties of DNA remains unclear. By means of Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM) based single molecule spectroscopy, we measure the stretch moduli of double stranded DNAs (dsDNA) with 30 base pairs and 5 equally embedded rNMPs. The dsDNAs are anchored on gold substrate via thiol chemistry, while the AFM tip is used to pick up and stretch the dsDNA from its free end through biotin-streptavidin bonding. Our preliminary results indicate that the inclusion of rNMPs in dsDNA might significantly change its stretch modulus, which might be important in some biological processes.

  17. Dynamics and structure of stretched flames

    SciTech Connect

    Law, C.K.

    1993-12-01

    This program aims to gain fundamental understanding on the structure, geometry, and dynamics of laminar premixed flames, and relate these understanding to the practical issues of flame extinction and stabilization. The underlying fundamental interest here is the recent recognition that the response of premixed flames can be profoundly affected by flame stretch, as manifested by flow nonuniformity, flame curvature, and flame/flow unsteadiness. As such, many of the existing understanding on the behavior of premixed flames need to be qualitatively revised. The research program consists of three major thrusts: (1) detailed experimental and computational mapping of the structure of aerodynamically-strained planar flames, with emphasis on the effects of heat loss, nonequidiffusion, and finite residence time on the flame thickness, extent of incomplete reaction, and the state of extinction. (2) Analytical study of the geometry and dynamics of stretch-affected wrinkled flame sheets in simple configurations, as exemplified by the Bunsen flame and the spatially-periodic flame, with emphasis on the effects of nonlinear stretch, the phenomena of flame cusping, smoothing, and tip opening, and their implications on the structure and burning rate of turbulent flames. (3) Stabilization and blowoff of two-dimensional inverted premixed and stabilization and determining the criteria governing flame blowoff. The research is synergistically conducted through the use of laser-based diagnostics, computational simulation of the flame structure with detailed chemistry and transport, and mathematical analysis of the flame dynamics.

  18. Adaptation by the collecting duct to an exogenous acid load is blunted by deletion of the proton-sensing receptor GPR4.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xuming; Stephens, Lisa; DuBose, Thomas D; Petrovic, Snezana

    2015-07-15

    We previously reported that the deletion of the pH sensor GPR4 causes a non-gap metabolic acidosis and defective net acid excretion (NAE) in the GPR4 knockout mouse (GPR4-/-) (Sun X, Yang LV, Tiegs BC, Arend LJ, McGraw DW, Penn RB, and Petrovic S. J Am Soc Nephrol 21: 1745-1755, 2010). Since the major regulatory site of NAE in the kidney is the collecting duct (CD), we examined acid-base transport proteins in intercalated cells (ICs) of the CD and found comparable mRNA expression of kidney anion exchanger 1 (kAE1), pendrin, and the a4 subunit of H(+)-ATPase in GPR4-/- vs. +/+. However, NH4Cl loading elicited adaptive doubling of AE1 mRNA in GPR4+/+, but a 50% less pronounced response in GPR4-/-. In GPR4+/+, NH4Cl loading evoked a cellular response characterized by an increase in AE1-labeled and a decrease in pendrin-labeled ICs similar to what was reported in rabbits and rats. This response did not occur in GPR4-/-. Microperfusion experiments demonstrated that the activity of the basolateral Cl(-)/HCO3(-) exchanger, kAE1, in CDs isolated from GPR4-/- failed to increase with NH4Cl loading, in contrast to the increase observed in GPR4+/+. Therefore, the deficiency of GPR4 blunted, but did not eliminate the adaptive response to an acid load, suggesting a compensatory response from other pH/CO2/bicarbonate sensors. Indeed, the expression of the calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) was nearly doubled in GPR4-/- kidneys, in the absence of apparent disturbances of Ca(2+) homeostasis. In summary, the expression and activity of the key transport proteins in GPR4-/- mice are consistent with spontaneous metabolic acidosis, but the adaptive response to a superimposed exogenous acid load is blunted and might be partially compensated for by CaSR. PMID:25972512

  19. Stretch-activated cation channel from larval bullfrog skin.

    PubMed

    Hillyard, Stanley D; Willumsen, Niels J; Marrero, Mario B

    2010-05-01

    Cell-attached patches from isolated epithelial cells from larval bullfrog skin revealed a cation channel that was activated by applying suction (-1 kPa to -4.5 kPa) to the pipette. Activation was characterized by an initial large current spike that rapidly attenuated to a stable value and showed a variable pattern of opening and closing with continuing suction. Current-voltage plots demonstrated linear or inward rectification and single channel conductances of 44-56 pS with NaCl or KCl Ringer's solution as the pipette solution, and a reversal potential (-V(p)) of 20-40 mV. The conductance was markedly reduced with N-methyl-D-glucamide (NMDG)-Cl Ringer's solution in the pipette. Neither amiloride nor ATP, which are known to stimulate an apical cation channel in Ussing chamber preparations of larval frog skin, produced channel activation nor did these compounds affect the response to suction. Stretch activation was not affected by varying the pipette concentrations of Ca(2+) between 0 mmol l(-1) and 4 mmol l(-1) or by varying pH between 6.8 and 8.0. However, conductance was reduced with 4 mmol l(-1) Ca(2+). Western blot analysis of membrane homogenates from larval bullfrog and larval toad skin identified proteins that were immunoreactive with mammalian TRPC1 and TRPC5 (TRPC, canonical transient receptor potential channel) antibodies while homogenates of skin from newly metamorphosed bullfrogs were positive for TRPC1 and TRPC3/6/7 antibodies. The electrophysiological response of larval bullfrog skin resembles that of a stretch-activated cation channel characterized in Xenopus oocytes and proposed to be TRPC1. These results indicate this channel persists in all life stages of anurans and that TRP isoforms may be important for sensory functions of their skin. PMID:20435829

  20. Short Durations of Static Stretching when Combined with Dynamic Stretching do not Impair Repeated Sprints and Agility

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Del P.; Chaouachi, Anis; Lau, Patrick W.C.; Behm, David G.

    2011-01-01

    This study aimed to compare the effect of different static stretching durations followed by dynamic stretching on repeated sprint ability (RSA) and change of direction (COD). Twenty-five participants performed the RSA and COD tests in a randomized order. After a 5 min aerobic warm up, participants performed one of the three static stretching protocols of 30 s, 60 s or 90 s total duration (3 stretches x 10 s, 20 s or 30 s). Three dynamic stretching exercises of 30 s duration were then performed (90 s total). Sit-and-reach flexibility tests were conducted before the aerobic warm up, after the combined static and dynamic stretching, and post- RSA/COD test. The duration of static stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit-and-reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). However there were no significant differences in RSA and COD performance between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. Furthermore, the short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. Key points The duration of combined static and dynamic stretching had a positive effect on flexibility with 36.3% and 85.6% greater sit and reach scores with the 60 s and 90 s static stretching conditions respectively than with the 30 s condition (p ≤ 0.001). No significant differences in RSA and COD between the 3 stretching conditions. The lack of change in RSA and COD might be attributed to a counterbalancing of static and dynamic stretching effects. The short duration (≤ 90 s) static stretching may not have provided sufficient stimulus to elicit performance impairments. PMID:24149890

  1. Mechanical stretch regulates hypertrophic phenotype of the myometrium during pregnancy.

    PubMed

    Shynlova, Oksana; Kwong, Ruth; Lye, Stephen J

    2010-01-01

    The adaptive growth of the uterus is a critical event that involves changes in cellular phenotypes throughout pregnancy. In early pregnancy, uterine growth is due to hyperplasia of uterine smooth muscle cells (SMCs) within the myometrium; however, the major component of myometrial growth occurs after mid-gestation. This study sought to test the hypothesis that increase in myometrial growth seen during late pregnancy is due to SMC hypertrophy caused by mechanical stretch of uterine tissue by a growing fetus(es) by providing direct measurements of individual SMC size. We employed a stereological approach to calculate the average cell volumes of uterine myocytes through diameter measurements using the Stereoinvestigator statistical software. Uterine tissues were collected from nonpregnant Wistar rats, as well as from gravid and nongravid horns of unilaterally pregnant animals on gestational days (d) 8 (early gestation), 14 (mid-gestation), 19 (late gestation), 22 (term), and 4 days post partum. Anti-caveolin-1 immunostaining was used to clearly delineate SMC boundaries. The stereological analysis revealed that the dramatic increase in myometrial growth seen during late gestation (d19-22) is due to a threefold increase in the size of uterine myocytes. A significant increase in SMC volumes was detected in the gravid uterine horn as compared with the corresponding empty horn of unilateral term pregnant animals (day 22, mean cell volume 1114 vs 361 microm(3), P<0.05), indicating the effect of uterine occupancy. The restriction of the hypertrophy to cells within the gravid horn suggests that it may be a response to the biological mechanical stretch of uterine walls by the growing fetus(es) and placenta(s). PMID:19776098

  2. Secondary structure of double-stranded DNA under stretching: Elucidation of the stretched form

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maaloum, M.; Beker, A.-F.; Muller, P.

    2011-03-01

    Almost two decades ago, measurements of force versus extension on isolated double-stranded DNA molecules revealed a force plateau. This unusual stretching phenomenon in DNA suggests that the long molecules may be extended from the usual B form into a new conformation. Different models have been proposed to describe the nature of DNA in its stretched form, S-DNA. Using atomic force microscopy combined with a molecular combing method, we identified the structure of λ-phage DNA for different stretching values. We provide strong evidence for the existence of a first-order transition between B form and S form. Beyond a certain extension of the natural length, DNA molecules adopt a new double-helix conformation characterized by a diameter of 1.2 nm and a helical pitch of 18 nm.

  3. Secondary structure of double-stranded DNA under stretching: Elucidation of the stretched form

    SciTech Connect

    Maaloum, M.; Muller, P.; Beker, A-F.

    2011-03-15

    Almost two decades ago, measurements of force versus extension on isolated double-stranded DNA molecules revealed a force plateau. This unusual stretching phenomenon in DNA suggests that the long molecules may be extended from the usual B form into a new conformation. Different models have been proposed to describe the nature of DNA in its stretched form, S-DNA. Using atomic force microscopy combined with a molecular combing method, we identified the structure of {lambda}-phage DNA for different stretching values. We provide strong evidence for the existence of a first-order transition between B form and S form. Beyond a certain extension of the natural length, DNA molecules adopt a new double-helix conformation characterized by a diameter of 1.2 nm and a helical pitch of18 nm.

  4. Effects of cervical self-stretching on slow vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Han, Dongwook; Yoon, Nayoon; Jeong, Yeongran; Ha, Misook; Nam, Kunwoo

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated the effects of self-stretching of cervical muscles, because the accessory inspiratory muscle is considered to improve pulmonary function. [Subjects] The subjects were 30 healthy university students 19–21 years old who did not have any lung disease, respiratory dysfunction, cervical injury, or any problems upon cervical stretching. [Methods] Spirometry was used as a pulmonary function test to measure the slow vital capacity before and after stretching. The slow vital capacity of the experimental group was measured before and after cervical self-stretching. Meanwhile, the slow vital capacity of the control group, which did not perform stretching, was also measured before and after the intervention. [Results] The expiratory vital capacity, inspiratory reserve volume, and expiratory reserve volume of the experimental group increased significantly after the cervical self-stretching. [Conclusion] Self-stretching of the cervical muscle (i.e., the inspiratory accessory muscle) improves slow vital capacity. PMID:26311984

  5. Unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mavriplis, D. J.

    1995-01-01

    An overview of current unstructured mesh generation and adaptivity techniques is given. Basic building blocks taken from the field of computational geometry are first described. Various practical mesh generation techniques based on these algorithms are then constructed and illustrated with examples. Issues of adaptive meshing and stretched mesh generation for anisotropic problems are treated in subsequent sections. The presentation is organized in an education manner, for readers familiar with computational fluid dynamics, wishing to learn more about current unstructured mesh techniques.

  6. Acute effects of dynamic stretching, static stretching, and light aerobic activity on muscular performance in women.

    PubMed

    Curry, Brad S; Chengkalath, Devendra; Crouch, Gordon J; Romance, Michelle; Manns, Patricia J

    2009-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare three warm-up protocols--static stretching, dynamic stretching, and light aerobic activity--on selected measures of range of motion and power in untrained females and to investigate the sustained effects at 5 and 30 minutes after warm-up. A total of 24 healthy females (ages 23-29 years) attended one familiarization session and three test sessions on nonconsecutive days within 2 weeks. A within-subject design protocol with the testing investigators blinded to the subjects' warm-up was followed. Each session started with 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling followed by pretest baseline measures. Another 5 minutes of light aerobic cycling was completed and followed by one of the three randomly selected warm-up interventions (static stretching, dynamic stretching, or light aerobic activity). The following posttest outcome measures were collected 5 and 30 minutes following the intervention: modified Thomas test, countermovement jump, and isometric time to peak force knee extension measured by dynamometer. Analysis of the data revealed significant time effects on range of motion and countermovement jump changes. No significant differences (p > 0.05) were found between the warm-up conditions on any of the variables. The variation in responses to warm-up conditions emphasizes the unique nature of individual reactions to different warm-ups; however, there was a tendency for warm-ups with an active component to have beneficial effects. The data suggests dynamic stretching has greater applicability to enhance performance on power outcomes compared to static stretching. PMID:19675479

  7. Uni-Directional Cell Stretching Device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Feeback, Daniel L. (Inventor); Clarke, Mark S. F. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    The present invention relates to an apparatus and method for applying various degrees of linear, mechanical loads on mammalian tissues, and in particular, for effecting linear stretching of tissue and simulating changes in hydrostatic pressures encountered during tissue contraction in vivo. The apparatus is useful for the study of mechanical loading in human tissue, and specifically, for permitting the evaluation of the effects of mechanical loading of skeletal or cardiac tissue and of the effects of removal of mechanical loading due to inactivity or the like, and the subsequent reapplication of load to these tissues.

  8. To Stretch and Search for Better Ways

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moore, John W.

    2000-06-01

    There's a lot to do to get each issue of this Journal ready for publication, and there's a lot that can go awry during that process. We the editorial staff do our utmost to make certain that each issue is the best it can possibly be, but, of necessity, a lot of our effort is focused on solving problems, correcting errors, and avoiding pitfalls. It is not surprising that we sometimes lose sight of the bigger picture--all of the things that came out as well as or better than we hoped they would. Therefore it gives us great pleasure when a reader applauds (and thereby rewards) our efforts. One such communication inspired this editorial.

    I have appreciated the extra effort put forward by the staff to make the Journal really come alive. The high quality of the Journal serves as an incentive to chemical educators to stretch and search for better ways to inspire our students.
    I fervently hope that we do encourage you "to stretch and search for better ways", not only to inspire students but in everything you do. Stretching and searching for better ways is what life, science, chemistry, and teaching are all about, and it is a wonderfully stimulating and exciting way to approach anything and everything. Sometimes, though, one's ability to stretch is akin to that of a rubber band exposed too long to sunlight. Change becomes a threat or a burden instead of an opportunity. This often happens in one area but not others, as in the case of someone doing original research but whose lecture notes are yellow with age, or someone who experiments with new teaching approaches but neglects the latest chemical discoveries. Whatever its manifestation, failure to stretch and search for better ways is a great loss, both for the individual directly involved and for others. Fortunately there are many who continually stretch and search, often in conjunction with JCE. For example, some time ago the Chair of the Board of Publication, Jerry Bell, challenged Journal

  9. Stretching of proteins in a uniform flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szymczak, P.; Cieplak, Marek

    2006-10-01

    Stretching of a protein by a fluid flow is compared to that in a force-clamp apparatus. The comparison is made within a simple topology-based dynamical model of a protein in which the effects of the flow are implemented using Langevin dynamics. We demonstrate that unfolding induced by a uniform flow shows a richer behavior than that in the force clamp. The dynamics of unfolding is found to depend strongly on the selection of the amino acid, usually one of the termini, which is anchored. These features offer potentially wider diagnostic tools to investigate structure of proteins compared to experiments based on the atomic force microscopy.

  10. Real-time imaging of ATP release induced by mechanical stretch in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Norihiro; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells within the airway walls are continually exposed to mechanical stimuli, and exhibit various functions in response to these mechanical stresses. ATP acts as an extracellular mediator in the airway. Moreover, extracellular ATP is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, it is not known whether ASM cells are cellular sources of ATP secretion in the airway. We therefore investigated whether mechanical stretch induces ATP release from ASM cells. Mechanical stretch was applied to primary human ASM cells cultured on a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Concentrations of ATP in cell culture supernatants measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence were significantly elevated by cyclic stretch (12 and 20% strain). We further visualized the stretch-induced ATP release from the cells in real time using a luminescence imaging system, while acquiring differential interference contrast cell images with infrared optics. Immediately after a single uniaxial stretch for 1 second, strong ATP signals were produced by a certain population of cells and spread to surrounding spaces. The cyclic stretch-induced ATP release was significantly reduced by inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular exocytosis, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide, and bafilomycin. In contrast, the stretch-induced ATP release was not inhibited by a hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone, or blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 by short interfering RNA transfection or ruthenium red. These findings reveal a novel property of ASM cells: mechanically induced ATP release may be a cellular source of ATP in the airway. PMID:24885163

  11. Effects of the Q223R mutation in the hemagglutinin (HA) of egg-adapted pandemic 2009 (H1N1) influenza A virus on virus growth and binding of HA to human- and avian-type cell receptors.

    PubMed

    Suptawiwat, O; Jeamtua, W; Boonarkart, Ch; Kongchanagul, A; Puthawathana, P; Auewarakul, P

    2013-01-01

    The 2009 swine-origin influenza A virus (H1N1) and its initial reassortant vaccine strains did not grow well in embryonated eggs. The glutamine to arginine mutation at the amino acid position 223 (Q223R) of the hemagglutinin (HA) gene is the major mutation previously found in egg-adapted 2009 H1N1 strains and shown to enhance viral growth in embryonated eggs. However, the effect of this mutation on the receptor-binding preference had not been directly demonstrated. In this study, the Q223R mutation was shown to change the viral HA binding preference from the human-type receptor, α2,6-linked sialic acid, to the avian-type receptor, α2,3-linked sialic acid; and to enhance the viral growth in embryonated eggs but not in cell culture. PMID:24020758

  12. Effects of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation stretching on stiffness and force-producing characteristics of the ankle in active women.

    PubMed

    Rees, Sven S; Murphy, Aron J; Watsford, Mark L; McLachlan, Ken A; Coutts, Aaron J

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effect of proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching on musculotendinous unit (MTU) stiffness of the ankle joint. Twenty active women were assessed for maximal ankle range of motion, maximal strength of planter flexors, rate of force development, and ankle MTU stiffness. Subjects were randomly allocated into an experimental (n = 10) group or control group (n = 10). The experimental group performed PNF stretching on the ankle joint 3 times per week for 4 weeks, with physiological testing performed before and after the training period. After training, the experimental group significantly increased ankle range of motion (7.8%), maximal isometric strength (26%), rate of force development (25%), and MTU stiffness (8.4%) (p < 0.001). Four weeks of PNF stretching contributed to an increase in MTU stiffness, which occurred concurrently with gains to ankle joint range of motion. The results confirm that MTU stiffness and joint range of motion measurements appear to be separate entities. The increased MTU stiffness after the training period is explained by adaptations to maximal isometric muscle contractions, which were a component of PNF stretching. Because a stiffer MTU system is linked with an improved the ability to store and release elastic energy, PNF stretching would benefit certain athletic performance due to a reduced contraction time or greater mechanical efficiency. The results of this study suggest PNF stretching is a useful modality at increasing a joint's range of motion and its strength. PMID:17530973

  13. Study on Stretching Methods of Biaxially Stretched Co-polyester Film with Has Uniaxially Heat Shrinkage Properties

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haruta, Masayuki; Mukouyama, Yukinobu; Tabota, Norimi; Ito, Katsuya; Nonomura, Chisato

    Heat shrinkable film made of stretched film is widely used for decorative labels by attaching on PET bottles with heat shrinkage by steam or dry heating. Trouble cancellation in the installation process of the PET bottle is necessary. The purpose of this study is development of uniaxially heat shrinkable co-polyester film that has strength both in the machine direction (MD) and transverse direction (TD). The film production was performed using sequential biaxial stretched process that combined roll stretching with TD stretching. Cast film was processed in the order of TD stretching-Anneal 1-MD stretching-Anneal 2. As a result, the heat shrinkable film that shrunk only in MD got high tensile strength both in MD and TD. The anneal 1 temperature over Tg (Glass transition temperature) of material resin was needed to obtain the heat shrinkable film shrunk in MD after TD stretching.

  14. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A; MacKenzie, Duncan S; Crocker, Daniel E; Ortiz, Rudy M

    2013-12-15

    Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5-7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic-pituitary-thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism. PMID:24307712

  15. Prolonged food deprivation increases mRNA expression of deiodinase 1 and 2, and thyroid hormone receptor β-1 in a fasting-adapted mammal

    PubMed Central

    Martinez, Bridget; Soñanez-Organis, José G.; Vázquez-Medina, José Pablo; Viscarra, Jose A.; MacKenzie, Duncan S.; Crocker, Daniel E.; Ortiz, Rudy M.

    2013-01-01

    SUMMARY Food deprivation in mammals is typically associated with reduced thyroid hormone (TH) concentrations and deiodinase content and activity to suppress metabolism. However, in prolonged-fasted, metabolically active elephant seal pups, TH levels are maintained, if not elevated. The functional relevance of this apparent paradox is unknown and demonstrates variability in the regulation of TH levels, metabolism and function in food-deprived mammals. To address our hypothesis that cellular TH-mediated activity is upregulated with fasting duration, we quantified the mRNA expression and protein content of adipose and muscle deiodinase type I (DI1) and type II (DI2), and TH receptor beta-1 (THrβ-1) after 1, 3 and 7 weeks of fasting in northern elephant seal pups (N=5–7 per week). Fasting did not decrease the concentrations of plasma thyroid stimulating hormone, total triiodothyronine (tT3), free T3, total thyroxine (tT4) or free T4, suggesting that the hypothalamic–pituitary–thyroid axis is not suppressed, but rather maintained during fasting. Mean mRNA expression of adipose DI1 and DI2 increased threefold and fourfold, respectively, and 20- and 30-fold, respectively, in muscle. With the exception of adipose DI1, protein expression of adipose DI2 and muscle DI1 and DI2 increased twofold to fourfold. Fasting also increased adipose (fivefold) and muscle (fourfold) THrβ-1 mRNA expression, suggesting that the mechanisms mediating cellular TH activity are upregulated with prolonged fasting. The data demonstrate a unique, atypical mechanism of TH activity and regulation in mammals adapted to prolonged food deprivation in which the potential responsiveness of peripheral tissues and cellular TH activity are increased, which may contribute to their lipid-based metabolism. PMID:24307712

  16. Filament-stretching rheometry of complex fluids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McKinley, Gareth H.; Sridhar, Tamarapu

    Filament-stretching rheometers are devices for measuring the extensional viscosity of moderately viscous non-Newtonian fluids such as polymer solutions. In these devices, a cylindrical liquid bridge is initially formed between two circular end-plates. The plates are then moved apart in a prescribed manner such that the fluid sample is subjected to a strong extensional deformation. Asymptotic analysis and numerical computation show that the resulting kinematics closely approximate those of an ideal homogeneous uniaxial elongation. The evolution in the tensile stress (measured mechanically) and the molecular conformation (measured optically) can be followed as functions of the rate of stretching and the total strain imposed. The resulting rheological measurements are a sensitive discriminant of molecularly based constitutive equations proposed for complex fluids. The dynamical response of the elongating filament is also coupled to the extensional rheology of the polymeric test fluid, and this can lead to complex viscoelastic-flow instabilities such as filament necking and rupture or elastic peeling from the rigid end-plates.

  17. Characteristic infrared intensities of carbonyl stretching vibrations.

    PubMed

    Richter, Wagner E; Silva, Arnaldo F; Vidal, Luciano N; Bruns, Roy E

    2016-07-14

    The experimental infrared fundamental intensities of gas phase carbonyl compounds obtained by the integration of spectral bands in the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) spectral database are in good agreement with the intensities reported by other laboratories having a root mean square error of 27 km mol(-1) or about 13% of the average intensity value. The Quantum Theory of Atoms in Molecules/Charge-Charge Transfer-Counterpolarization (QTAIM/CCTCP) model indicates that the large intensity variation from 61.7 to 415.4 km mol(-1) is largely due to static atomic charge contributions, whereas charge transfer and counterpolarization effects essentially cancel one another leaving only a small net effect. The Characteristic Substituent Shift Model estimates the atomic charge contributions to the carbonyl stretching intensities within 30 km mol(-1) or 10% of the average contribution. However, owing to the size of the 2 × C × CTCP interaction contribution, the total intensities cannot be estimated with this degree of accuracy. The dynamic intensity contributions of the carbon and oxygen atoms account for almost all of the total stretching intensities. These contributions vary over large ranges with the dynamic contributions of carbon being about twice the size of the oxygen ones for a large majority of carbonyls. Although the carbon monoxide molecule has an almost null dipole moment contrary to the very polar bond of the characteristic carbonyl group, its QTAIM/CCTCP model is very similar to those found for the carbonyl compounds. PMID:27306140

  18. Curved Piezoelectric Actuators for Stretching Optical Fibers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Allison, Sidney G.; Shams, Qamar A.; Fox, Robert L.

    2008-01-01

    Assemblies containing curved piezoceramic fiber composite actuators have been invented as means of stretching optical fibers by amounts that depend on applied drive voltages. Piezoceramic fiber composite actuators are conventionally manufactured as sheets or ribbons that are flat and flexible, but can be made curved to obtain load-carrying ability and displacement greater than those obtainable from the flat versions. In the primary embodiment of this invention, piezoceramic fibers are oriented parallel to the direction of longitudinal displacement of the actuators so that application of drive voltage causes the actuator to flatten, producing maximum motion. Actuator motion can be transmitted to the optical fiber by use of hinges and clamp blocks. In the original application of this invention, the optical fiber contains a Bragg grating and the purpose of the controlled stretching of the fiber is to tune the grating as part of a small, lightweight, mode-hop-free, rapidly tunable laser for demodulating strain in Bragg-grating strain-measurement optical fibers attached to structures. The invention could also be used to apply controllable tensile force or displacement to an object other than an optical fiber.

  19. Stretched Exponential relaxation in pure Se glass

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dash, S.; Ravindren, S.; Boolchand, P.

    A universal feature of glasses is the stretched exponential relaxation, f (t) = exp[ - t / τ ] β . The model of diffusion of excitations to randomly distributed traps in a glass by Phillips1 yields the stretched exponent β = d[d +2] where d, the effective dimensionality. We have measured the enthalpy of relaxation ΔHnr (tw) at Tg of Se glass in modulated DSC experiments as glasses age at 300K and find β = 0.43(2) for tw in the 0

  20. Patents for stretching and shaping meats.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Johanne M; Hopkins, David L

    2011-05-01

    Attempts over the years to speed up the slaughter and processing of meat have been limited by the impact on important meat quality traits, such as tenderness. A number of methods and equipment have been developed for stretching and/or shaping to enhance the tenderness of meat, reducing the need for long term storage and ageing of meat. The more successful methods and equipment to improve the tenderness of meat - Tenderstretch (pelvic suspension), Tendercut (skeletal separation), SmartStretch™/Smartshape™ and Tenderbound (Pi-Vac Elasto-Pack system) are the subject of this review. Minimal research has been performed to compare these methods of tenderising meat. Tenderstretch and Tendercut are relatively easy to implement and require no specialised equipment, but they are relatively inflexible and only impact on a small number of muscles. The adoption of Tenderstretch has also been limited by increased resource requirements (chiller space and labour). SmartStretch™/Smartshape™ and Tenderbound, which wrap hot-boned pre-rigor muscles to prevent muscle contraction and shortening during rigor, are systems that do require specialised equipment. The major advantage of these systems is that they are very flexible and can be applied to any target muscle. Further research needs to be undertaken to compare these methods to better facilitate their commercial adoption. The article presents some promising patents on stretching and shaping meats. PMID:21428872

  1. Stretch sensors for human body motion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Brien, Ben; Gisby, Todd; Anderson, Iain A.

    2014-03-01

    Sensing motion of the human body is a difficult task. From an engineers' perspective people are soft highly mobile objects that move in and out of complex environments. As well as the technical challenge of sensing, concepts such as comfort, social intrusion, usability, and aesthetics are paramount in determining whether someone will adopt a sensing solution or not. At the same time the demands for human body motion sensing are growing fast. Athletes want feedback on posture and technique, consumers need new ways to interact with augmented reality devices, and healthcare providers wish to track recovery of a patient. Dielectric elastomer stretch sensors are ideal for bridging this gap. They are soft, flexible, and precise. They are low power, lightweight, and can be easily mounted on the body or embedded into clothing. From a commercialisation point of view stretch sensing is easier than actuation or generation - such sensors can be low voltage and integrated with conventional microelectronics. This paper takes a birds-eye view of the use of these sensors to measure human body motion. A holistic description of sensor operation and guidelines for sensor design will be presented to help technologists and developers in the space.

  2. Monte Carlo simulation of chromatin stretching.

    PubMed

    Aumann, Frank; Lankas, Filip; Caudron, Maïwen; Langowski, Jörg

    2006-04-01

    We present Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the stretching of a single chromatin fiber. The model approximates the DNA by a flexible polymer chain with Debye-Hückel electrostatics and uses a two-angle zigzag model for the geometry of the linker DNA connecting the nucleosomes. The latter are represented by flat disks interacting via an attractive Gay-Berne potential. Our results show that the stiffness of the chromatin fiber strongly depends on the linker DNA length. Furthermore, changing the twisting angle between nucleosomes from 90 degrees to 130 degrees increases the stiffness significantly. An increase in the opening angle from 22 degrees to 34 degrees leads to softer fibers for small linker lengths. We observe that fibers containing a linker histone at each nucleosome are stiffer compared to those without the linker histone. The simulated persistence lengths and elastic moduli agree with experimental data. Finally, we show that the chromatin fiber does not behave as an isotropic elastic rod, but its rigidity depends on the direction of deformation: Chromatin is much more resistant to stretching than to bending. PMID:16711856

  3. Monte Carlo simulation of chromatin stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aumann, Frank; Lankas, Filip; Caudron, Maïwen; Langowski, Jörg

    2006-04-01

    We present Monte Carlo (MC) simulations of the stretching of a single 30nm chromatin fiber. The model approximates the DNA by a flexible polymer chain with Debye-Hückel electrostatics and uses a two-angle zigzag model for the geometry of the linker DNA connecting the nucleosomes. The latter are represented by flat disks interacting via an attractive Gay-Berne potential. Our results show that the stiffness of the chromatin fiber strongly depends on the linker DNA length. Furthermore, changing the twisting angle between nucleosomes from 90° to 130° increases the stiffness significantly. An increase in the opening angle from 22° to 34° leads to softer fibers for small linker lengths. We observe that fibers containing a linker histone at each nucleosome are stiffer compared to those without the linker histone. The simulated persistence lengths and elastic moduli agree with experimental data. Finally, we show that the chromatin fiber does not behave as an isotropic elastic rod, but its rigidity depends on the direction of deformation: Chromatin is much more resistant to stretching than to bending.

  4. Stretching the Spines of Gymnasts: A Review.

    PubMed

    Sands, William A; McNeal, Jeni R; Penitente, Gabriella; Murray, Steven Ross; Nassar, Lawrence; Jemni, Monèm; Mizuguchi, Satoshi; Stone, Michael H

    2016-03-01

    Gymnastics is noted for involving highly specialized strength, power, agility and flexibility. Flexibility is perhaps the single greatest discriminator of gymnastics from other sports. The extreme ranges of motion achieved by gymnasts require long periods of training, often occupying more than a decade. Gymnasts also start training at an early age (particularly female gymnasts), and the effect of gymnastics training on these young athletes is poorly understood. One of the concerns of many gymnastics professionals is the training of the spine in hyperextension-the ubiquitous 'arch' seen in many gymnastics positions and movements. Training in spine hyperextension usually begins in early childhood through performance of a skill known as a back-bend. Does practising a back-bend and other hyperextension exercises harm young gymnasts? Current information on spine stretching among gymnasts indicates that, within reason, spine stretching does not appear to be an unusual threat to gymnasts' health. However, the paucity of information demands that further study be undertaken. PMID:26581832

  5. Levator Ani Muscle Stretch Induced by Simulated Vaginal Birth

    PubMed Central

    Lien, Kuo-Cheng; Mooney, Brian; DeLancey, John O. L.; Ashton-Miller, James A.

    2005-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To develop a three-dimensional computer model to predict levator ani muscle stretch during vaginal birth. METHODS: Serial magnetic resonance images from a healthy nulliparous 34-year-old woman, published anatomic data, and engineering graphics software were used to construct a structural model of the levator ani muscles along with related passive tissues. The model was used to quantify pelvic floor muscle stretch induced during the second stage of labor as a model fetal head progressively engaged and then stretched the iliococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles. RESULTS: The largest tissue strain reached a stretch ratio (tissue length under stretch/original tissue length) of 3.26 in medial pubococcygeus muscle, the shortest, most medial and ventral levator ani muscle. Regions of the ileococcygeus, pubococcygeus, and puborectalis muscles reached maximal stretch ratios of 2.73, 2.50, and 2.28, respectively. Tissue stretch ratios were proportional to fetal head size: For example, increasing fetal head diameter by 9% increased medial pubococcygeus stretch by the same amount. CONCLUSION: The medial pubococcygeus muscles undergo the largest stretch of any levator ani muscles during vaginal birth. They are therefore at the greatest risk for stretch-related injury. PMID:14704241

  6. Membrane stretch and cytoplasmic Ca2+ independently modulate stretch-activated BK channel activity.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hu-Cheng; Agula, Hasi; Zhang, Wei; Wang, Fa; Sokabe, Masahiro; Li, Lu-Ming

    2010-11-16

    Large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) (BK) channels are responsible for changes in chemical and physical signals such as Ca(2+), Mg(2+) and membrane potentials. Previously, we reported that a BK channel cloned from chick heart (SAKCaC) is activated by membrane stretch. Molecular cloning and subsequent functional characterization of SAKCaC have shown that both the membrane stretch and intracellular Ca(2+) signal allosterically regulate the channel activity via the linker of the gating ring complex. Here we investigate how these two gating principles interact with each other. We found that stretch force activated SAKCaC in the absence of cytoplasmic Ca(2+). Lack of Ca(2+) bowl (a calcium binding motif) in SAKCaC diminished the Ca(2+)-dependent activation, but the mechanosensitivity of channel was intact. We also found that the abrogation of STREX (a proposed mechanosensing apparatus) in SAKCaC abolished the mechanosensitivity without altering the Ca(2+) sensitivity of channels. These observations indicate that membrane stretch and intracellular Ca(2+) could independently modulate SAKCaC activity. PMID:20673577

  7. The influence of passive stretch on muscle oxygen saturation.

    PubMed

    McCully, Kevin K

    2010-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that chronic stretch might be able to produce skeletal muscle hypertrophy. However, stretching might also restrict blood flow, which could in turn influence any stretch-training program. This study evaluated the influence of muscle stretch on muscle oxygen saturation using near infrared spectroscopy (NIRS). A 16 channel NIRS probes were placed on the medial gastrocnemius, quadriceps, and hamstring muscles of young healthy adults. Oxygen saturation during maximal tolerated stretch was measured and normalized with cuff-induced ischemia and reperfusion. Oxygen saturation decreased in the gastrocnemius and quadriceps in a position dependent fashion, but did not change in the hamstring muscles. Passive stretching may also have a significant hypoxic component in some muscles but not others. PMID:20204809

  8. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-06-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study's methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC. PMID:27390425

  9. Effects of stretching the scalene muscles on slow vital capacity

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Juncheol; Hwang, Sehee; Han, Seungim; Han, Dongwook

    2016-01-01

    [Purpose] The purpose of this study was to examine whether stretching of the scalene muscles would improve slow vital capacity (SVC). [Subjects and Methods] The subjects of this study were 20 healthy female students to whom the study’s methods and purpose were explained and their agreement for participation was obtained. The SVC was measured using spirometry (Pony FX, COSMED Inc., Italy). The intervention used was stretching of the scalene muscles. Stretching was carried out for 15 min, 10 times at per each portion of scalene muscles: the anterior, middle, and posterior parts. [Results] Expiratory vital capacity (EVC) and tidal volume (Vt) noticeably increased after stretching. However, there were no changes in any of the SVC items in the control group. [Conclusion] This study demonstrated that stretching of the scalene muscles can effectively improve SVC. In particular, we confirmed that stretching of the scalene muscles was effective in increasing EVC and Vt, which are items of SVC. PMID:27390425

  10. Aerothermodynamic properties of stretched flames in enclosures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rotman, D. A.; Oppenheim, A. K.

    Flames are stretched by being pulled along their frontal surface by the flow field in which they reside. Their trajectories tend to approach particle paths, acquiring eventually the role of contact boundaries, -interfaces between the burnt and unburnt medium that may broaden solely as a consequence of diffusion. Fundamental properties of flow fields governing such flames are determined here on the basis of the zero Mach number model, providng a rational method of approach to the computational analysis of combustion fields in enclosures where, besides the aerodynamic properties flow, the thermodynamic process of compression must be taken into account. To illustrate its application, the method is used to reveal the mechanism of formation of a tulip-shape flame in a rectangular enclosure under nonturbulent flow conditions.

  11. Universal stretched exponential relaxation in nanoconfined water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shekhar, Adarsh; Kalia, Rajiv K.; Nakano, Aiichiro; Vashishta, Priya; Alm, Camilla K.; Malthe-Sørenssen, Anders

    2014-10-01

    Understanding the behavior of water confined at the nanometer scale is a fundamental problem not only in physics but also in life sciences, geosciences, and atmospheric sciences. Here, we examine spatial and dynamic heterogeneities in water confined in nanoporous silica using molecular dynamics (MD) simulations. The simulations reveal intermixed low-density water and high-density water with distinct local structures in nanopores of silica. The MD simulations also show dynamic heterogeneities in nanoconfined water. The temporal decay of cage correlation functions for room temperature and supercooled, nanoconfined water is very well described by stretched exponential relaxation, exp(-(t/τ)β). The exponent β has a unique value, d/(d + 2), which agrees with an exact result for diffusion in systems with static, random traps in d = 3 dimensions.

  12. Stretched Lens Array Photovoltaic Concentrator Technology Developed

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael F., Jr.; O'Neill, Mark J.

    2004-01-01

    Solar arrays have been and continue to be the mainstay in providing power to nearly all commercial and government spacecraft. Light from the Sun is directly converted into electrical energy using solar cells. One way to reduce the cost of future space power systems is by minimizing the size and number of expensive solar cells by focusing the sunlight onto smaller cells using concentrator optics. The stretched lens array (SLA) is a unique concept that uses arched Fresnel lens concentrators to focus sunlight onto a line of high-efficiency solar cells located directly beneath. The SLA concept is based on the Solar Concentrator Array with Refractive Linear Element Technology (SCARLET) design that was used on NASA's New Millennium Deep Space 1 mission. The highly successful asteroid/comet rendezvous mission (1998 to 2001) demonstrated the performance and long-term durability of the SCARLET/SLA solar array design and set the foundation for further improvements to optimize its performance.

  13. Force fluctuations in stretching a tethered polymer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varghese, Anoop; Vemparala, Satyavani; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    The recently proposed fluctuation relation in unfolding forces [Phys. Rev. E1539-375510.1103/PhysRevE.84.060101 84, 060101(R) (2011)] is reexamined taking into account the explicit time dependence of the force distribution. The stretching of a tethered Rouse polymer is exactly solved and the ratio of the probabilities of positive to negative forces is shown to be an exponential in force. Extensive steered molecular dynamics simulations of unfolding of deca alanine peptide confirm the form of fluctuation relation proposed earlier, but with explicit correct time dependence of unfolding forces taken into account. From exact calculations and simulations, a linear dependence of the constant in the exponential of the fluctuation relation on average unfolding forces and inverse temperature is proposed.

  14. Mechanical stretching of proteins: calmodulin and titin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cieplak, Marek

    2005-07-01

    Mechanical unfolding of several domains of calmodulin and titin is studied using a Go-like model with a realistic contact map and Lennard-Jones contact interactions. It is shown that this simple model captures the experimentally observed difference between the two proteins: titin is a spring that is tough and strong whereas calmodulin acts like a weak spring with featureless force-displacement curves. The difference is related to the dominance of the α secondary structures in the native structure of calmodulin. The tandem arrangements of calmodulin unwind simultaneously in each domain whereas the domains in titin unravel in a serial fashion. The sequences of contact events during unravelling are correlated with the contact order, i.e., with the separation between contact making amino acids along the backbone in the native state. Temperature is found to affect stretching in a profound way.

  15. Constellation Stretch Goals: Review of Industry Inputs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lang, John

    2006-01-01

    Many good ideas received based on industry experience: a) Shuttle operations; b) Commercial aircraft production; c) NASA's historical way of doing business; d) Military and commercial programs. Aerospace performed preliminary analysis: a) Potential savings; b) Cost of implementation; c) Performance or other impact/penalties; d) Roadblocks; e) Unintended consequences; f) Bottom line. Significant work ahead for a "Stretch Goal"to become a good, documented requirement: 1) As a group, the relative "value" of goals are uneven; 2) Focused analysis on each goal is required: a) Need to ensure that a new requirement produces the desired consequence; b) It is not certain that some goals will not create problems elsewhere. 3) Individual implementation path needs to be studied: a) Best place to insert requirement (what level, which document); b) Appropriate wording for the requirement. Many goals reflect "best practices" based on lessons learned and may have value beyond near-term CxP requirements process.

  16. Sh-Stretching Intensities and Intramolecular Hydrogen Bonding in Alkanethiols

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, B. J.; Lane, J. R.; Sodergren, A. H.; Kjaergaard, H. G.; Dunn, M. E.; Vaida, V.

    2009-06-01

    The SH-stretching overtone transitions of tert-butylthiol and ethanethiol are observed using FT-IR, NIR and photoacoustic spectroscopies. The intensities of these are compared with OH-stretching overtones from the corresponding alcohols. We explain the paucity of SH-stretching intensity using an anharmonic oscillator local mode model. SH- and OH-stretching overtone spectra of 1,2-ethanedithiol and 2-mercaptoethanol are recorded to observe the different effects that hydrogen bonding involving SH - - - S, SH - - - O and OH - - - S have on the spectra. We discuss these effects with the help of high level ab initio calculations.

  17. Do Stretch Durations Affect Muscle Mechanical and Neurophysiological Properties?

    PubMed

    Opplert, J; Genty, J-B; Babault, N

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the study was to determine whether stretching durations influence acute changes of mechanical and neurophysiological properties of plantar flexor muscles. Plantar flexors of 10 active males were stretched in passive conditions on an isokinetic dynamometer. Different durations of static stretching were tested in 5 randomly ordered experimental trials (1, 2, 3, 4 and 10×30-s). Fascicle stiffness index, evoked contractile properties and spinal excitability (Hmax/Mmax) were examined before (PRE), immediately after (POST0) and 5 min after (POST5) stretching. No stretch duration effect was recorded for any variable. Moreover, whatever the stretching duration, stiffness index, peak twitch torque and rate of force development were significantly lower at POST0 and POST5 as compared to PRE (P<0.05). Electromechanical delay was longer at POST0 and POST5 as compared to PRE (P<0.05). Whatever the stretch duration, no significant changes of Hmax/Mmax ratio were recorded. In conclusion, 30 s of static stretching to maximum tolerated discomfort is sufficient enough to alter mechanical properties of plantar flexor muscles, but 10×30 s does not significantly affect these properties further. Stretching does not impair spinal excitability. PMID:27191211

  18. Large Deviation Statistics of Vorticity Stretching in Isotropic Turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry; Meneveau, Charles

    2015-11-01

    A key feature of 3D fluid turbulence is the stretching/re-alignment of vorticity by the action of the strain-rate. It is shown using the cumulant-generating function that cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence behaves statistically like a sum of i.i.d. variables. The Cramer function for vorticity stretching is computed from the JHTDB isotropic DNS (Reλ = 430) and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain-rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramer functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of largest FTLE. A model Fokker-Planck equation is constructed by approximating the viscous destruction of vorticity with a deterministic non-linear relaxation law matching conditional statistics, while the fluctuations in vorticity stretching are modelled by stochastic noise matching the statistics encoded in the Cramer function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude PDF, with good agreement for the exponent but significant error (30-40%) in the pre-factor. Supported by NSF Graduate Fellowship (DGE-1232825) and NSF Grant CMMI-0941530.

  19. Enhancement of multispectral thermal infrared images - Decorrelation contrast stretching

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.

    1992-01-01

    Decorrelation contrast stretching is an effective method for displaying information from multispectral thermal infrared (TIR) images. The technique involves transformation of the data to principle components ('decorrelation'), independent contrast 'stretching' of data from the new 'decorrelated' image bands, and retransformation of the stretched data back to the approximate original axes, based on the inverse of the principle component rotation. The enhancement is robust in that colors of the same scene components are similar in enhanced images of similar scenes, or the same scene imaged at different times. Decorrelation contrast stretching is reviewed in the context of other enhancements applied to TIR images.

  20. Constraint effects observed in crack initiation stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Lambert, D.M.; Ernst, H.A.

    1995-12-31

    The current paper characterizes constraint in fracture: J-modified resistance (Jr) curves were developed for two tough structural materials, 6061-T651 (aluminum) and IN718-STA1 (nickel-base superalloy). A wide variety of configurations was tested to consider load configurations from bending to tension including three specimen types (compact tension, center-crack tension, and single-edge notched tension), and a range of ligament lengths and thicknesses, as well as side-grooved and smooth-sided ligaments. The Jr curves exhibited an inflection point after some crack extension, and the data were excluded beyond the inflection. Qualified Jr curves for the two materials showed similar behavior, but R-curves were identical for equal ligament length-to-thickness ratio (RL), for the aluminum alloy, with increasing slope for increasing RL, while for the nickel, the resistance curves aligned for equal ligament thickness, B, and the slope increased for decreasing B. Displacements at the original crack tip (CToD) were recorded throughout the test for several specimens. CToD-versus-crack extension curves were developed, and data were excluded beyond the inflection point (as with the Jr curves). The data collapsed into two distinct curves, thought to represent the surface, plane stress effect and the central, plane strain effect. This was observed for both materials. A technique called profiling is presented for the aluminum alloy only, where the crack face displacements are recorded at the final point of the test as a function of the position throughout the crack cavity, along with an effort to extract the observations in a usable form. Displacements were consistent throughout the cross-section at and behind the original crack tip. In the region where the crack grew, this displacement was developed by a combination of stretch and crack growth. The stretch required to initiate crack extension was a function of the depth beneath the surface into the cross-section.

  1. Development of a stretched-membrane dish

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1991-07-01

    Solar Kinetics, Inc., successfully designed and constructed the optical element of a 7-meter diameter stretched-membrane dish as Task 2 of the second phase of a contract directed by Sandia National Laboratories. Earlier work on this project defined the configuration of the optical element and demonstrated the membrane-forming process on 1.4- and 3.7-meter diameter membranes. In Task 2, the membrane-forming process was successfully scaled to 7-meters in diameter, and an innovative hub-and-spoke structure optical element was fabricated. The slope error, as measured with Solar Kinetics' laser-ray-trace system, was within 3.6 mrad of a perfect parabola. Four major technical issues were successfully addressed in this work: (1) The technique of large-scale membrane forming was shown to be predictable, accurate, and repeatable. Three 7-meter membranes were formed without any contoured tooling. (2) A tensioned hub-and-spoke structure was demonstrated to be practical to fabricate. This innovative structure, like a bicycle wheel, was shown to be very stiff. Optical effects from ring distortion were not apparent. (3) The use of field-replaceable, unattached polymer reflective membrane was demonstrated. This approach allows for the practical field replacement of the reflective membrane when it has degraded due to weathering. (4) A technique was developed and demonstrated to ship the formed membranes from the factory to the dish-installation site. This allows the critical forming of the membrane to be performed in a controlled factory environment, and the membrane then to be shipped using standard-dimension shipping containers. This development further reduces manufacturing and installation costs of the completed dish. This effort indicates that the stretch-membrane dish concept is a promising approach for solar concentration. The prototype optical element is a significant step in the development of the complete, full-sized dish. 9 refs., 53 figs., 2 tabs.

  2. [Treatment of ankylosed teeth by segmental corticotomy: the Orthodontic Bone Stretching technique. Preliminary study].

    PubMed

    Bousquet, Philippe; Artz, Christèle; Canal, Pierre

    2013-12-01

    Ankylosed anterior teeth are associated with infraclusion and can lead to a concomitant significant esthetic defect. After a review of the techniques used move these teeth into the arch, this article describes a new technique to restore occlusion and improve esthetics, or to prepare the case for either a prosthetic or implant treatment, Orthodontic Bone Stretching (OBS). This technic combines partial corticotomy and orthodontic treatment and produces bone stretching. After 8 to 12 weeks of force application, the ankylosed teeth are repositioned into occlusion or, if extraction is necessary, the bone crest is at a level consistent with a prosthetic or implant treatment. OBS technique can be adapted to implant infraclusion, or the vertical regeneration of atrophied ridge. PMID:24280548

  3. Griffiths phases and the stretching of criticality in brain networks.

    PubMed

    Moretti, Paolo; Muñoz, Miguel A

    2013-01-01

    Hallmarks of criticality, such as power-laws and scale invariance, have been empirically found in cortical-network dynamics and it has been conjectured that operating at criticality entails functional advantages, such as optimal computational capabilities, memory and large dynamical ranges. As critical behaviour requires a high degree of fine tuning to emerge, some type of self-tuning mechanism needs to be invoked. Here we show that, taking into account the complex hierarchical-modular architecture of cortical networks, the singular critical point is replaced by an extended critical-like region that corresponds--in the jargon of statistical mechanics--to a Griffiths phase. Using computational and analytical approaches, we find Griffiths phases in synthetic hierarchical networks and also in empirical brain networks such as the human connectome and that of Caenorhabditis elegans. Stretched critical regions, stemming from structural disorder, yield enhanced functionality in a generic way, facilitating the task of self-organizing, adaptive and evolutionary mechanisms selecting for criticality. PMID:24088740

  4. Griffiths phases and the stretching of criticality in brain networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moretti, Paolo; Muñoz, Miguel A.

    2013-10-01

    Hallmarks of criticality, such as power-laws and scale invariance, have been empirically found in cortical-network dynamics and it has been conjectured that operating at criticality entails functional advantages, such as optimal computational capabilities, memory and large dynamical ranges. As critical behaviour requires a high degree of fine tuning to emerge, some type of self-tuning mechanism needs to be invoked. Here we show that, taking into account the complex hierarchical-modular architecture of cortical networks, the singular critical point is replaced by an extended critical-like region that corresponds—in the jargon of statistical mechanics—to a Griffiths phase. Using computational and analytical approaches, we find Griffiths phases in synthetic hierarchical networks and also in empirical brain networks such as the human connectome and that of Caenorhabditis elegans. Stretched critical regions, stemming from structural disorder, yield enhanced functionality in a generic way, facilitating the task of self-organizing, adaptive and evolutionary mechanisms selecting for criticality.

  5. Interactions between limb and environmental mechanics influence stretch reflex sensitivity in the human arm.

    PubMed

    Krutky, Matthew A; Ravichandran, Vengateswaran J; Trumbower, Randy D; Perreault, Eric J

    2010-01-01

    Stretch reflexes contribute to arm impedance and longer-latency stretch reflexes exhibit increased sensitivity during interactions with compliant or unstable environments. This increased sensitivity is consistent with a regulation of arm impedance to compensate for decreased stability of the environment, but the specificity of this modulation has yet to be investigated. Many tasks, such as tool use, compromise arm stability along specific directions, and stretch reflexes tuned to those directions could present an efficient mechanism for regulating arm impedance in a task-appropriate manner. To be effective, such tuning should adapt not only to the mechanical properties of the environment but to those properties in relation to the arm, which also has directionally specific mechanical properties. The purpose of this study was to investigate the specificity of stretch reflex modulation during interactions with mechanical environments that challenge arm stability. The tested environments were unstable, having the characteristics of a negative stiffness spring. These were either aligned or orthogonal to the direction of maximal endpoint stiffness for each subject. Our results demonstrate preferential increases in reflexes, elicited within 50-100 ms of perturbation onset, to perturbations applied specifically along the direction of the destabilizing environments. This increase occurred only when the magnitude of the environmental instability exceeded endpoint stiffness along the same direction. These results are consistent with task-specific reflex modulation tuned to the mechanical properties of the environment relative to those of the human arm. They demonstrate a highly adaptable, involuntary mechanism that may be used to modulate limb impedance along specific directions. PMID:19906880

  6. Cyclic Stretch Facilitates Myogenesis in C2C12 Myoblasts and Rescues Thiazolidinedione-Inhibited Myotube Formation.

    PubMed

    Chang, Ya-Ju; Chen, Yun-Ju; Huang, Chia-Wei; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Bu-Miin; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Tsai, Yau-Sheng; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Thiazolidinedione (TZD), a specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist, was developed to control blood glucose in diabetes patients. However, several side effects were reported that increased the risk of heart failure. We used C2C12 myoblasts to investigate the role of PPARs and their transcriptional activity during myotube formation. The role of mechanical stretch during myogenesis was also explored by applying cyclic stretch to the differentiating C2C12 myoblasts with 10% strain deformation at 1 Hz. The myogenesis medium (MM), composed of Dulbecco's modified Eagle's medium with 2% horse serum, facilitated myotube formation with increased myosin heavy chain and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) protein expression. The PPARγ protein and PPAR response element (PPRE) promoter activity decreased during MM induction. Cyclic stretch further facilitated the myogenesis in MM with increased α-SMA and decreased PPARγ protein expression and inhibited PPRE promoter activity. Adding a PPARγ agonist (TZD) to the MM stopped the myogenesis and restored the PPRE promoter activity, whereas a PPARγ antagonist (GW9662) significantly increased the myotube number and length. During the myogenesis induction, application of cyclic stretch rescued the inhibitory effects of TZD. These results provide novel perspectives for mechanical stretch to interplay and rescue the dysfunction of myogenesis with the involvement of PPARγ and its target drugs. PMID:27047938

  7. Cyclic Stretch Facilitates Myogenesis in C2C12 Myoblasts and Rescues Thiazolidinedione-Inhibited Myotube Formation

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ya-Ju; Chen, Yun-Ju; Huang, Chia-Wei; Fan, Shih-Chen; Huang, Bu-Miin; Chang, Wen-Tsan; Tsai, Yau-Sheng; Su, Fong-Chin; Wu, Chia-Ching

    2016-01-01

    Thiazolidinedione (TZD), a specific peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ) agonist, was developed to control blood glucose in diabetes patients. However, several side effects were reported that increased the risk of heart failure. We used C2C12 myoblasts to investigate the role of PPARs and their transcriptional activity during myotube formation. The role of mechanical stretch during myogenesis was also explored by applying cyclic stretch to the differentiating C2C12 myoblasts with 10% strain deformation at 1 Hz. The myogenesis medium (MM), composed of Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium with 2% horse serum, facilitated myotube formation with increased myosin heavy chain and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) protein expression. The PPARγ protein and PPAR response element (PPRE) promoter activity decreased during MM induction. Cyclic stretch further facilitated the myogenesis in MM with increased α-SMA and decreased PPARγ protein expression and inhibited PPRE promoter activity. Adding a PPARγ agonist (TZD) to the MM stopped the myogenesis and restored the PPRE promoter activity, whereas a PPARγ antagonist (GW9662) significantly increased the myotube number and length. During the myogenesis induction, application of cyclic stretch rescued the inhibitory effects of TZD. These results provide novel perspectives for mechanical stretch to interplay and rescue the dysfunction of myogenesis with the involvement of PPARγ and its target drugs. PMID:27047938

  8. Role of lateral parabrachial nucleus in the inhibition of water intake produced by right atrial stretch

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ohman, Lynne E.

    1995-01-01

    Rats with either bilateral electrolytic or sham lesions of the ventrolateral portion of the lateral parabrachial nucleus (VLLPBN) were implanted with latex balloons that lay at the right superior vena cava/atrial junction (RSVC/AJ). Water intake in response to isoproterenol was measured both with and without inflation of the balloon. Water intake of the sham-lesioned rats was significantly depressed by balloon inflation during the first hour of the experiment. In contrast, water intake in the VLLPBN-lesioned rats was unaffected by balloon inflation. These results suggest that the VLLPBN is involved in the processing of afferent input from stretch-activated RSVC/AJ receptors.

  9. Effect of gonadectomy of biochemical indices of striatal dopamine D/sub 1/ and D/sub 2/ receptors, their activity and adaptive response to antipsychotic drug treatment in rat

    SciTech Connect

    Jastrow, T.L.R.

    1987-01-01

    Endogenous gonadal steroids in male and female rats were removed by gonadectomy (Gnx). Striatal D/sub 1/ receptors and their activity were characterized by (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding parameters and D/sub 1/ receptor-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in striatal membranes. Striatal D/sub 2/ receptors and their activity were characterized by (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters in striatal slices and D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activity in striatal membranes. Sub-chronic D/sub 2/ receptor blockade consisted of the administration of the D/sub 2/ specific antagonist sulpiride (20 mg/kg) or vehicle i.p., 2x daily for 21 days followed by a 3 day drug withdrawal period. Gnx of female rats had no affect on striatal D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity nor on the striatal D/sub 2/ receptor-mediated inhibition of forskolin-activated adenylate cyclase activity. Sub-chronic sulpiride treatment produced no adaptive changes in D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity in sham-operated or Gnx female rats. Gnx of male rats produced a statistically significant 10% decrease in striatal (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding sites with no change in D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity and no change in striatal(/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. Sub-chronic sulpiride treatment of sham-operated male rats produced a desensitization of the striatal D/sub 1/-stimulated adenylate cyclase activity with no change in the number of (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 binding sites and no change in (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. Gnx of male rats blocked the development of the striatal D/sub 1/ receptor desensitization response elicited by sub-chronic sulpiride treatment, without affecting striatal (/sup 3/H)SCH23390 or (/sup 3/H)sulpiride binding parameters. We have demonstrated that sub-chronic D/sub 2/ receptor blockade in sham-operated male rats results in the desensitization of striatal D/sub 1/ receptor activity.

  10. Cyclic mechanical stretch down-regulates cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide expression and activates a pro-inflammatory response in human bronchial epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Gudjonsson, Thorarinn; Karason, Sigurbergur

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical ventilation (MV) of patients can cause damage to bronchoalveolar epithelium, leading to a sterile inflammatory response, infection and in severe cases sepsis. Limited knowledge is available on the effects of MV on the innate immune defense system in the human lung. In this study, we demonstrate that cyclic stretch of the human bronchial epithelial cell lines VA10 and BCi NS 1.1 leads to down-regulation of cathelicidin antimicrobial peptide (CAMP) gene expression. We show that treatment of VA10 cells with vitamin D3 and/or 4-phenyl butyric acid counteracted cyclic stretch mediated down-regulation of CAMP mRNA and protein expression (LL-37). Further, we observed an increase in pro-inflammatory responses in the VA10 cell line subjected to cyclic stretch. The mRNA expression of the genes encoding pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-8 and IL-1β was increased after cyclic stretching, where as a decrease in gene expression of chemokines IP-10 and RANTES was observed. Cyclic stretch enhanced oxidative stress in the VA10 cells. The mRNA expression of toll-like receptor (TLR) 3, TLR5 and TLR8 was reduced, while the gene expression of TLR2 was increased in VA10 cells after cyclic stretch. In conclusion, our in vitro results indicate that cyclic stretch may differentially modulate innate immunity by down-regulation of antimicrobial peptide expression and increase in pro-inflammatory responses. PMID:26664810

  11. An ESL Instructor's Perspective on the Stretch Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Todorovska, Viktorija

    Stretch 107 is a version of English 107 (a first-year composition course for international students at Arizona State University), designed to provide those with low proficiency in English with various strategies for writing acceptable prose in English. Since it is a 2-semester course, Stretch 107 gives students more time to work on their…

  12. Does Postexercise Static Stretching Alleviate Delayed Muscle Soreness?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Buroker, Katherine C.; Schwane, James A.

    1989-01-01

    Because many experts recommend stretching after exercise to relieve muscle soreness, 23 subjects performed a 30-minute step test to induce delayed muscle soreness. There was neither temporary relief of pain immediately after stretching nor a reduction in pain during the 3-day postexercise period. (Author/SM)

  13. Cyclic stretch of airway epithelium inhibits prostanoid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Savla, U; Sporn, P H; Waters, C M

    1997-11-01

    Airway epithelial cells (AEC) metabolize arachidonic acid (AA) to biologically active eicosanoids, which contribute to regulation of airway smooth muscle tone and inflammatory responses. Although in vivo the airways undergo cyclical stretching during ventilation, the effect of cyclic stretch on airway epithelial AA metabolism is unknown. In this study, cat and human AEC were grown on flexible membranes and were subjected to cyclic stretch using the Flexercell strain unit. Cyclic stretch downregulated synthesis of prostaglandin (PG) E2, PGI2, and thromboxane A2 by both cell types in a frequency-dependent manner. The percent inhibition of prostanoid synthesis in both cell types ranged from 53 +/- 7 to 75 +/- 8% (SE; n = 4 and 5, respectively). Treatment of cat AEC with exogenous AA (10 micrograms/ml) had no effect on the stretch-induced inhibition of PGE2 synthesis, whereas treatment with exogenous PGH2 (10 micrograms/ml) overcame the stretch-induced decrease in PGE2 production. These results indicate that stretch inhibits prostanoid synthesis by inactivating cyclooxygenase. When cells were pretreated with the antioxidants catalase (100 micrograms/ml, 150 U/ml) and N-acetylcysteine (1 mM), there was a partial recovery of eicosanoid production, suggesting that cyclic stretch-induced inactivation of cyclooxygenase is oxidant mediated. These results may have important implications for inflammatory diseases in which airway mechanics are altered. PMID:9374729

  14. A Stretching Device for High Resolution Live-Cell Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Lawrence; Mathieu, Pattie S.; Helmke, Brian P.

    2012-01-01

    Several custom-built and commercially available devices are available to investigate cellular responses to substrate strain. However, analysis of structural dynamics by microscopy in living cells during stretch is not readily feasible. We describe a novel stretch device optimized for high-resolution live-cell imaging. The unit assembles onto standard inverted microscopes and applies constant magnitude or cyclic stretch at physiological magnitudes to cultured cells on elastic membranes. Interchangeable modular indenters enable delivery of equibiaxial and uniaxial stretch profiles. Strain analysis performed by tracking fluorescent microspheres adhered onto the substrate demonstrated reproducible application of stretch profiles. In endothelial cells transiently expressing EGFP-vimentin and paxillin-DsRed2 and subjected to constant magnitude equibiaxial stretch, the 2-D strain tensor demonstrated efficient transmission through the extracellular matrix and focal adhesions. Decreased transmission to the intermediate filament network was measured, and a heterogeneous spatial distribution of maximum stretch magnitude revealed discrete sites of strain focusing. Spatial correlation of vimentin and paxillin displacement vectors provided an estimate of the extent of mechanical coupling between the structures. Interestingly, switching the spatial profile of substrate strain reveals that actin-mediated edge ruffling is not desensitized to repeated mechano-stimulation. These initial observations show that the stretch device is compatible with live-cell microscopy and is a novel tool for measuring dynamic structural remodeling under mechanical strain. PMID:20195762

  15. Dielectrophoretic stretching of DNA tethered to a fiber tip

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S.; Li, Jiali

    2015-03-01

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under ac electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, ac frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the DEP force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules.

  16. Dielectrophoretic Stretching of DNA Tethered to a Fiber Tip

    PubMed Central

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S.; Li, Jiali

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under AC electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, AC frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the dielectrophoretic force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules. PMID:25741602

  17. Stretched Lens Array Squarerigger (SLASR) Technology Maturation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Mark; McDanal, A.J.; Howell, Joe; Lollar, Louis; Carrington, Connie; Hoppe, David; Piszczor, Michael; Suszuki, Nantel; Eskenazi, Michael; Aiken, Dan; Fulton, Michael; Brandhorst, Henry; Schuller, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Since April 2005, our team has been underway on a competitively awarded program sponsored by NASA s Exploration Systems Mission Directorate to develop, refine, and mature the unique solar array technology known as Stretched Lens Array SquareRigger (SLASR). SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, SLASR offers an unprecedented portfolio of performance metrics, including the following: Areal Power Density = 300 W/m2 (2005) - 400 W/m2 (2008 Target) Specific Power = 300 W/kg (2005) - 500 W/kg (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Stowed Power = 80 kW/cu m (2005) - 120 kW/m3 (2008 Target) for a Full 100 kW Solar Array Scalable Array Capacity = 100 s of W s to 100 s of kW s Super-Insulated Small Cell Circuit = High-Voltage (300-600 V) Operation at Low Mass Penalty Super-Shielded Small Cell Circuit = Excellent Radiation Hardness at Low Mass Penalty 85% Cell Area Savings = 75% Lower Array Cost per Watt than One-Sun Array Modular, Scalable, & Mass-Producible at MW s per Year Using Existing Processes and Capacities

  18. Single, stretched membrane, structural module experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Wood, R.L.

    1986-02-01

    This report describes tests done on stretched-membrane heliostats used to reflect solar radiation onto a central receiver. The tests were used to validate prior analysis and mathematical models developed to describe module performance. The modules tested were three meters in diameter and had reflective polymer film laminated to the membrane. The frames were supported at three points equally spaced around the ring. Three modules were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended at the bottom support, two were pneumatically attached with their weight suspended from the upper mounts, and one was rigidly attached with its weight suspended at the bottom mount. By varying the membrane tension we could simulate a uniform wind loading normal to the mirror's surface. A video camera 15+ meters away from the mirror recorded the virtual image of a target grid as reflected by the mirrors' surface. The image was digitized and stored on a microcomputer. Using the law of reflection and analytic geometry, we computed the surface slopes of a sampling of points on the surface. The dominant module response was consistent with prior SERI analyses. The simple analytical model is quite adequate for designing and sizing single-membrane modules if the initial imperfections and their amplification are appropriately controlled. To avoid potential problems resulting from the fundamentally n = 2 deformation phenomena, we advise using either relatively stiffer ring frames or more than three support points.

  19. Reflectors Made from Membranes Stretched Between Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Dooley, Jennifer; Dragovan, Mark; Tolomeo, Jason

    2009-01-01

    Lightweight cylindrical reflectors of a proposed type would be made from reflective membranes stretched between pairs of identically curved and identically oriented end rails. In each such reflector, the curvature of the two beams would define the reflector shape required for the intended application. For example, the beams could be curved to define a reflector of parabolic cross section, so that light incident along the axis of symmetry perpendicular to the cylindrical axis would be focused to a line. In addition, by applying suitable forces to the ends of the beams, one could bend the beams to adjust the reflector surface figure to within a precision of the order of the wavelength of the radiation to be reflected. The figure depicts an example of beams shaped so that in the absence of applied forces, each would be flat on one side and would have a radius of curvature R on the opposite side. Alternatively, the curvature of the reflector-membrane side could be other than circular. In general, the initial curvature would be chosen to optimize the final reflector shape. Then by applying forces F between the beam ends in the positions and orientations shown in the figure, one could bend beams to adjust their shape to a closer approximation of the desired precise circular or noncircular curvature.

  20. Adaptive Natural Killer Cell and Killer Cell Immunoglobulin-Like Receptor-Expressing T Cell Responses are Induced by Cytomegalovirus and Are Associated with Protection against Cytomegalovirus Reactivation after Allogeneic Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Davis, Zachary B; Cooley, Sarah A; Cichocki, Frank; Felices, Martin; Wangen, Rose; Luo, Xianghua; DeFor, Todd E; Bryceson, Yenan T; Diamond, Don J; Brunstein, Claudio; Blazar, Bruce R; Wagner, John E; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Horowitz, Amir; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Parham, Peter; Verneris, Michael R; Miller, Jeffrey S

    2015-09-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) reactivates in >30% of CMV-seropositive patients after allogeneic hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT). Previously, we reported an increase of natural killer (NK) cells expressing NKG2C, CD57, and inhibitory killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in response to CMV reactivation after HCT. These NK cells persist after the resolution of infection and display "adaptive" or memory properties. Despite these findings, the differential impact of persistent/inactive versus reactivated CMV on NK versus T cell maturation after HCT from different graft sources has not been defined. We compared the phenotype of NK and T cells from 292 recipients of allogeneic sibling (n = 118) or umbilical cord blood (UCB; n = 174) grafts based on recipient pretransplantation CMV serostatus and post-HCT CMV reactivation. This cohort was utilized to evaluate CMV-dependent increases in KIR-expressing NK cells exhibiting an adaptive phenotype (NKG2C(+)CD57(+)). Compared with CMV-seronegative recipients, those who reactivated CMV had the highest adaptive cell frequencies, whereas intermediate frequencies were observed in CMV-seropositive recipients harboring persistent/nonreplicating CMV. The same effect was observed in T cells and CD56(+) T cells. These adaptive lymphocyte subsets were increased in CMV-seropositive recipients of sibling but not UCB grafts and were correlated with lower rates of CMV reactivation (sibling 33% versus UCB 51%; P < .01). These data suggest that persistent/nonreplicating recipient CMV induces rapid production of adaptive NK and T cells from mature cells from sibling but not UCB grafts. These adaptive lymphocytes are associated with protection from CMV reactivation. PMID:26055301

  1. Rho kinase signaling pathways during stretch in primary alveolar epithelia.

    PubMed

    DiPaolo, Brian C; Margulies, Susan S

    2012-05-15

    Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) maintain integrity of the blood-gas barrier with actin-anchored intercellular tight junctions. Stretched type I-like AECs undergo magnitude- and frequency-dependent actin cytoskeletal remodeling into perijunctional actin rings. On the basis of published studies in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs), we hypothesize that RhoA activity, Rho kinase (ROCK) activity, and phosphorylation of myosin light chain II (MLC2) increase in stretched type I-like AECs in a manner that is dependent on stretch magnitude, and that RhoA, ROCK, or MLC2 activity inhibition will attenuate stretch-induced actin remodeling and preserve barrier properties. Primary type I-like AEC monolayers were stretched biaxially to create a change in surface area (ΔSA) of 12%, 25%, or 37% in a cyclic manner at 0.25 Hz for up to 60 min or left unstretched. Type I-like AECs were also treated with Rho pathway inhibitors (ML-7, Y-27632, or blebbistatin) and stained for F-actin or treated with the myosin phosphatase inhibitor calyculin-A and quantified for monolayer permeability. Counter to our hypothesis, ROCK activity and MLC2 phosphorylation decreased in type I-like AECs stretched to 25% and 37% ΔSA and did not change in monolayers stretched to 12% ΔSA. Furthermore, RhoA activity decreased in type I-like AECs stretched to 37% ΔSA. In contrast, MLC2 phosphorylation in HPAECs increased when HPAECs were stretched to 12% ΔSA but then decreased when they were stretched to 37% ΔSA, similar to type I-like AECs. Perijunctional actin rings were observed in unstretched type I-like AECs treated with the Rho pathway inhibitor blebbistatin. Myosin phosphatase inhibition increased MLC2 phosphorylation in stretched type I-like AECs but had no effect on monolayer permeability. In summary, stretch alters RhoA activity, ROCK activity, and MLC2 phosphorylation in a manner dependent on stretch magnitude and cell type. PMID:22287611

  2. Low Stretch Diffusion Flames Over a Solid Fuel

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; T'ien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    A unique new way to study low gravity flames in normal gravity has been developed. To study flame structure and extinction characteristics in low stretch environments, a normal gravity low-stretch diffusion flame is generated using a cylindrical PMMA sample of varying large radii. Foutch and T'ien used the radiative loss as well as a densimetric Froude number to characterize the blowoff (small Da) and quenching extinction (large Da) boundaries in stagnation-point diffusion flames under various convective conditions. An important conclusion of this study was that the shape and location of the extinction boundary, as well as a number of important flame characteristics, were almost identical for the buoyant, forced, and mixed convective environments they modeled. This theory indicates it should be possible to understand a material's burning characteristics in the low stretch environment of spacecraft (induced by fans and crew movements) by understanding its burning characteristics in an equivalent Earth-based stretch environment (induced by normal gravity buoyancy). Similarly, the material's burning characteristics in Lunar or Martian stretch environments (induced by partial gravity buoyancy) can be assessed. Equivalent stretch rates can be determined as a function of gravity, imposed flow, and geometry. A generalized expression for stretch rate which captures mixed convection includes both buoyant and forced stretch is defined as a = a(sub f) ((1 + (a(sub b))exp 2/(a(sub b))exp 2))exp 1/2. For purely buoyant flow, the equivalent stretch rate is a(sub b) = [(rho(exp e)-rho(exp *)/rho(sub e)][g/R](exp 1/2). For purely forced flow, the equivalent stretch rate is characterized by either a(sub f)= 2U(sub infinity)/R for a cylinder, or a(sub f)=U(sub jet)/d(sub jet) for a jet impinging on a planar surface. In these experiments, the buoyant stretch is varied through R, the radius of curvature, but the buoyant stretch could also be varied through g, the gravity level. In

  3. Rho kinase signaling pathways during stretch in primary alveolar epithelia

    PubMed Central

    DiPaolo, Brian C.

    2012-01-01

    Alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) maintain integrity of the blood-gas barrier with actin-anchored intercellular tight junctions. Stretched type I-like AECs undergo magnitude- and frequency-dependent actin cytoskeletal remodeling into perijunctional actin rings. On the basis of published studies in human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs), we hypothesize that RhoA activity, Rho kinase (ROCK) activity, and phosphorylation of myosin light chain II (MLC2) increase in stretched type I-like AECs in a manner that is dependent on stretch magnitude, and that RhoA, ROCK, or MLC2 activity inhibition will attenuate stretch-induced actin remodeling and preserve barrier properties. Primary type I-like AEC monolayers were stretched biaxially to create a change in surface area (ΔSA) of 12%, 25%, or 37% in a cyclic manner at 0.25 Hz for up to 60 min or left unstretched. Type I-like AECs were also treated with Rho pathway inhibitors (ML-7, Y-27632, or blebbistatin) and stained for F-actin or treated with the myosin phosphatase inhibitor calyculin-A and quantified for monolayer permeability. Counter to our hypothesis, ROCK activity and MLC2 phosphorylation decreased in type I-like AECs stretched to 25% and 37% ΔSA and did not change in monolayers stretched to 12% ΔSA. Furthermore, RhoA activity decreased in type I-like AECs stretched to 37% ΔSA. In contrast, MLC2 phosphorylation in HPAECs increased when HPAECs were stretched to 12% ΔSA but then decreased when they were stretched to 37% ΔSA, similar to type I-like AECs. Perijunctional actin rings were observed in unstretched type I-like AECs treated with the Rho pathway inhibitor blebbistatin. Myosin phosphatase inhibition increased MLC2 phosphorylation in stretched type I-like AECs but had no effect on monolayer permeability. In summary, stretch alters RhoA activity, ROCK activity, and MLC2 phosphorylation in a manner dependent on stretch magnitude and cell type. PMID:22287611

  4. No difference in pre- and postexercise stretching on flexibility.

    PubMed

    Beedle, Barry B; Leydig, Summer N; Carnucci, Jennifer M

    2007-08-01

    According to the American College of Sports Medicine (1), there is limited information about when to stretch during an exercise session. The purpose of this study was to determine if the placement of static stretching, either before or after a workout, would affect flexibility in the hip, knee, and ankle. Thirty college-age men (n = 12) and women (n = 18) volunteered to participate. Nine were highly trained, 13 were moderately trained, and 8 were sedentary. Subjects participated in both treatments, which were randomly assigned and were 48-72 hours apart. In one treatment, subjects warmed-up first by walking on a treadmill for 5 minutes at approximately 50% of their age-predicted maximum heart rate, and then performed 3 static stretches: quadriceps, hamstrings, and calf muscles. Each stretch was held 3 times, 15 seconds each. Next, flexibility measurements were determined for the hip, hamstrings, and ankle using a goniometer. The other treatment consisted of performing 20 minutes of walking or jogging at a moderate intensity, then the same stretching exercises were performed and the same flexibility measurements were taken. Reliability coefficients ranged from 0.90-0.96. There were no significant differences in any of the flexibility measurements except for hip flexibility, which approached significance (p = 0.06) and therefore favored stretching after the workout. The placement of stretching, before or after a workout, does not make a difference in its effect on flexibility. PMID:17685710

  5. Mechanical stretch induces lung α-epithelial Na(+) channel expression.

    PubMed

    Mustafa, Shamimunisa B; Isaac, John; Seidner, Steven R; Dixon, Patricia S; Henson, Barbara M; DiGeronimo, Robert J

    2014-10-01

    ABSTRACT During fetal development physiological stretching helps drive lung growth and maturation. At birth, the α-subunit of the alveolar epithelial sodium channel (α-ENaC) is a critical factor in helping to facilitate clearance of lung fluid during the perinatal period. The effects of stretch, however, on α-ENaC expression in the fetal lung have yet to be elucidated. In an effort to explore this question, we used both an in vitro cell culture model that exposes cells to repetitive cyclic stretch (CS) as well as an in vivo preterm animal model of mechanical ventilation (MV). We found that murine lung epithelial (MLE-12) cells exposed to repetitive CS showed a significant rise in α-ENaC mRNA expression. Total and cell-surface protein abundance of α-ENaC were also elevated after 24 h of CS. Stretch-induced increases in α-ENaC expression were suppressed in the presence of either actinomycin D or cycloheximide. Pharmacological inhibition of the extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) did not attenuate stretch-induced increases in α-ENaC protein, whereas inhibition of p38 MAPK or c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase (JNK) did. In 29-day preterm rabbits, alveolar stretching secondary to postnatal MV markedly elevated fetal lung α-ENaC expression compared to spontaneously breathing counterparts. In summary, our findings indicate that mechanical stretch promotes α-ENaC expression. PMID:25058750

  6. Elucidating the Coupling in the CH Stretch Spectral Region

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buchanan, Evan G.; Zwier, Timothy S.; Sibert, Edwin L.

    2012-06-01

    An important aspect of single conformation spectroscopy, aided by vibrational frequency calculations, is analyzing and assigning observed spectra to particular conformational isomers. However, certain infrared spectral regions have traditionally been considered less diagnostic, even ambiguous, despite the rich information content contained in the chromophores. One such chromophore, prevalent in most molecules, is the CH stretch vibration, where the CH stretch and bend overtone often participate in Fermi resonance. We have employed a parameterized reduced dimension Hamiltonian that incorporates cubic terms due to stretch/bend coupling, using the comparison with single-conformation spectra on a series of test molecules which include 1,2-diphenylethane, 2,2,2-tricyclophane, 1,2-diphenoxyethane, and dibenzo-15-crown-5 ether. This has led to excellent fits of the alkyl CH stretch region, particularly for tricyclophane, leading to a firm assignment for the conformations observed, and to a quantitative determination of the stretch-stretch and stretch-bend coupling present in the molecules. Details specific to the methodology as well as the success of the strategy will be discussed.

  7. Cyclic stretching of soft substrates induces spreading and growth

    PubMed Central

    Cui, Yidan; Hameed, Feroz M.; Yang, Bo; Lee, Kyunghee; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Park, Sungsu; Sheetz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the body, soft tissues often undergo cycles of stretching and relaxation that may affect cell behaviour without changing matrix rigidity. To determine whether transient forces can substitute for a rigid matrix, we stretched soft pillar arrays. Surprisingly, 1–5% cyclic stretching over a frequency range of 0.01–10 Hz caused spreading and stress fibre formation (optimum 0.1 Hz) that persisted after 4 h of stretching. Similarly, stretching increased cell growth rates on soft pillars comparative to rigid substrates. Of possible factors linked to fibroblast growth, MRTF-A (myocardin-related transcription factor-A) moved to the nucleus in 2 h of cyclic stretching and reversed on cessation; but YAP (Yes-associated protein) moved much later. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP blocked stretch-dependent growth. Thus, we suggest that the repeated pulling from a soft matrix can substitute for a stiff matrix in stimulating spreading, stress fibre formation and growth. PMID:25704457

  8. Cyclic stretching of soft substrates induces spreading and growth.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yidan; Hameed, Feroz M; Yang, Bo; Lee, Kyunghee; Pan, Catherine Qiurong; Park, Sungsu; Sheetz, Michael

    2015-01-01

    In the body, soft tissues often undergo cycles of stretching and relaxation that may affect cell behaviour without changing matrix rigidity. To determine whether transient forces can substitute for a rigid matrix, we stretched soft pillar arrays. Surprisingly, 1-5% cyclic stretching over a frequency range of 0.01-10 Hz caused spreading and stress fibre formation (optimum 0.1 Hz) that persisted after 4 h of stretching. Similarly, stretching increased cell growth rates on soft pillars comparative to rigid substrates. Of possible factors linked to fibroblast growth, MRTF-A (myocardin-related transcription factor-A) moved to the nucleus in 2 h of cyclic stretching and reversed on cessation; but YAP (Yes-associated protein) moved much later. Knockdown of either MRTF-A or YAP blocked stretch-dependent growth. Thus, we suggest that the repeated pulling from a soft matrix can substitute for a stiff matrix in stimulating spreading, stress fibre formation and growth. PMID:25704457

  9. Membrane stretching triggers mechanosensitive Ca2+ channel activation in Chara.

    PubMed

    Kaneko, Toshiyuki; Takahashi, Naoya; Kikuyama, Munehiro

    2009-03-01

    In order to confirm that mechanosensitive Ca(2+) channels are activated by membrane stretching, we stretched or compressed the plasma membrane of Chara by applying osmotic shrinkage or swelling of the cell by varying the osmotic potential of the bathing medium. Aequorin studies revealed that treatments causing membrane stretching induced a transient but large increase in cytoplasmic concentration of Ca(2+) (Delta[Ca(2+)](c)). However, the observed Delta[Ca(2+)](c) decreased during the treatments, resulting in membrane compression. A second experiment was carried out to study the relationship between changes in membrane potential (DeltaE(m)) and stretching or compression of the plasma membrane. Significant DeltaE(m) values, often accompanied by an action potential, were observed during the initial exchange of the bathing medium from a hypotonic medium to a hypertonic one (plasmolysis). DeltaE(m) appears to be triggered by a partial stretching of the membrane as it was peeled from the cell wall. After plasmolysis, other exchanges from hypertonic to hypotonic media, with their accompanying membrane stretching, always induced large DeltaE(m) values and were often accompanied by an action potential. By contrast, action potentials were scarcely observed during other exchanges from hypotonic to hypertonic solutions (=membrane compression). Thus, we concluded that activation of the mechanosensitive channels is triggered by membrane stretching in Chara. PMID:19234734

  10. Cutoffs, stretched horizons, and black hole radiators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kaloper, Nemanja

    2012-11-01

    We argue that if the UV cutoff of an effective field theory with many low energy degrees of freedom is of the order, or below, the scale of the stretched horizon in a black hole background, which in turn is significantly lower than the Planck scale, the black hole radiance rate may not be enhanced by the emission of all the light IR modes. Instead, there may be additional suppressions hidden in the UV completion of the field theory, which really control which light modes can be emitted by the black hole. It could turn out that many degrees of freedom cannot be efficiently emitted by the black hole, and so the radiance rate may be much smaller than its estimate based on the counting of the light IR degrees of freedom. If we apply this argument to the Randall-Sundrum II (RS2) brane world, it implies that the emission rates of the low energy conformal field theory modes will be dramatically suppressed: its UV completion is given by the bulk gravity on AdS5×S5, and the only bulk modes which could be emitted by a black hole are the 4-dimensional (4D) s waves of bulk modes with small 5-dimensional momentum, or equivalently, small 4D masses. Further, their emission is suppressed by bulk warping, which lowers the radiation rate much below the IR estimate, yielding a radiation flux ˜(TBHL)2LHawking˜(TBH/MPl)2NLHawking, where LHawking is the Hawking radiation rate of a single light species. This follows directly from low conformal field theory cutoff μ˜L-1≪MPl, a large number of modes N≫1 and the fact that 4D gravity in RS2 is induced, MPl2≃Nμ2.

  11. Structural Transitions in Supercoiled Stretched DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    v, Croquette

    1998-03-01

    Using magnetic micromanipulation techniques [Strick 96]( uc(T.R.) Strick, J.-F. Allemand, D. Bensimon, A. Bensimon) and uc(V.) Croquette, "The elasticity of a single supercoiled DNA molecule", Science, 271, 1835 (1996)., we have studied the mechanical properties (force versus extension) of single DNA molecules under a wide range of torsional stresses (supercoiling). We show that unwinding the DNA double helix leads to a phase separation between regular B-DNA and denaturation bubbles. The fraction of denatured molecule increases linearly with the degree of unwinding, beginning at a value of 1% unwinding. We have confirmed this denatured state by hybridization of homologous single-stranded DNA probes and by a chemical attack of the exposed bases. Surprisingly, when we overwind the molecule, the elasticity curves we obtain may also be interpreted by the coexistence of two phases, B-DNA and a new phase which we note P-DNA. The fraction of this new phase increases smoothly with overwinding, beginning at 3 % and continuing up to 300 %. Our results indicate that this new phase is four times more twisted that the standard B-DNA and is 1.75 times longer. Although the structure of this phase is not yet known, such a high twisting can only be attained if the sugar-phosphate backbones of the two strands are twisted closely while the bases are expelled outside of the molecule's core, in a structure reminiscent of the one proposed by Pauling. Indeed we have shown that this new phase is sensitive to chemical attack whereas the B-DNA is not. This new phase begins to appear on a molecule overwound by 3 % and stretched by a force of 5 pN, conditions typically encountered in vivo during gene transcription. This new phase may thus play a biological role (for more details).

  12. Large-deviation statistics of vorticity stretching in isotropic turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Perry L.; Meneveau, Charles

    2016-03-01

    A key feature of three-dimensional fluid turbulence is the stretching and realignment of vorticity by the action of the strain rate. It is shown in this paper, using the cumulant-generating function, that the cumulative vorticity stretching along a Lagrangian path in isotropic turbulence obeys a large deviation principle. As a result, the relevant statistics can be described by the vorticity stretching Cramér function. This function is computed from a direct numerical simulation data set at a Taylor-scale Reynolds number of Reλ=433 and compared to those of the finite-time Lyapunov exponents (FTLE) for material deformation. As expected, the mean cumulative vorticity stretching is slightly less than that of the most-stretched material line (largest FTLE), due to the vorticity's preferential alignment with the second-largest eigenvalue of strain rate and the material line's preferential alignment with the largest eigenvalue. However, the vorticity stretching tends to be significantly larger than the second-largest FTLE, and the Cramér functions reveal that the statistics of vorticity stretching fluctuations are more similar to those of the largest FTLE. In an attempt to relate the vorticity stretching statistics to the vorticity magnitude probability density function in statistically stationary conditions, a model Kramers-Moyal equation is constructed using the statistics encoded in the Cramér function. The model predicts a stretched-exponential tail for the vorticity magnitude probability density function, with good agreement for the exponent but significant difference (35%) in the prefactor.

  13. Effects of Active Individual Muscle Stretching on Muscle Function

    PubMed Central

    Nakamura, Kouichi; Kodama, Takayuki; Mukaino, Yoshito

    2014-01-01

    [Purpose] We investigated the effect of active individual muscle stretching (AID) on muscle function. [Subjects] We used the right legs of 40 healthy male students. [Methods] Subjects were divided into an AID group, which performed stretching, and a control group, which did not. We examined and compared muscle function before and after stretching in the AID and control groups using a goniometer and Cybex equipment. [Results] A significant increase in flexibility and a significant decrease in muscle strength output were observed in the AID group after the intervention. [Conclusion] These results suggest that AID induces an increase in flexibility and a temporary decrease in muscle output strength. PMID:24707080

  14. Characterizing the stretch-flangeability of hot rolled multiphase steels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pathak, N.; Butcher, C.; Worswick, M.; Gao, J.

    2013-12-01

    Hole expansion tests are commonly used to characterize the edge stretching limit of a material. Traditionally, a conical punch is used to expand a punched hole until a through-thickness crack appears. However, many automotive stretch flanging operations involve in-plane edge stretching that is best captured with a flat punch. In this paper, hole expansion tests were carried out on two different hot-rolled multiphase steels using both flat and conical punches. The fracture mechanisms for both punch types were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM).

  15. Characterizing the stretch-flangeability of hot rolled multiphase steels

    SciTech Connect

    Pathak, N.; Butcher, C.; Worswick, M.; Gao, J.

    2013-12-16

    Hole expansion tests are commonly used to characterize the edge stretching limit of a material. Traditionally, a conical punch is used to expand a punched hole until a through-thickness crack appears. However, many automotive stretch flanging operations involve in-plane edge stretching that is best captured with a flat punch. In this paper, hole expansion tests were carried out on two different hot-rolled multiphase steels using both flat and conical punches. The fracture mechanisms for both punch types were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM)

  16. Buckling dynamics of a solvent-stimulated stretched elastomeric sheet.

    PubMed

    Lucantonio, Alessandro; Roché, Matthieu; Nardinocchi, Paola; Stone, Howard A

    2014-04-28

    When stretched uniaxially, a thin elastic sheet may exhibit buckling. The occurrence of buckling depends on the geometrical properties of the sheet and the magnitude of the applied strain. Here we show that an elastomeric sheet initially stable under uniaxial stretching can destabilize when exposed to a solvent that swells the elastomer. We demonstrate experimentally and computationally that the features of the buckling pattern depend on the magnitude of stretching, and this observation offers a new way for controlling the shape of a swollen homogeneous thin sheet. PMID:24668079

  17. Acute effects of muscle stretching on physical performance, range of motion, and injury incidence in healthy active individuals: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Behm, David G; Blazevich, Anthony J; Kay, Anthony D; McHugh, Malachy

    2016-01-01

    Recently, there has been a shift from static stretching (SS) or proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching within a warm-up to a greater emphasis on dynamic stretching (DS). The objective of this review was to compare the effects of SS, DS, and PNF on performance, range of motion (ROM), and injury prevention. The data indicated that SS- (-3.7%), DS- (+1.3%), and PNF- (-4.4%) induced performance changes were small to moderate with testing performed immediately after stretching, possibly because of reduced muscle activation after SS and PNF. A dose-response relationship illustrated greater performance deficits with ≥60 s (-4.6%) than with <60 s (-1.1%) SS per muscle group. Conversely, SS demonstrated a moderate (2.2%) performance benefit at longer muscle lengths. Testing was performed on average 3-5 min after stretching, and most studies did not include poststretching dynamic activities; when these activities were included, no clear performance effect was observed. DS produced small-to-moderate performance improvements when completed within minutes of physical activity. SS and PNF stretching had no clear effect on all-cause or overuse injuries; no data are available for DS. All forms of training induced ROM improvements, typically lasting <30 min. Changes may result from acute reductions in muscle and tendon stiffness or from neural adaptations causing an improved stretch tolerance. Considering the small-to-moderate changes immediately after stretching and the study limitations, stretching within a warm-up that includes additional poststretching dynamic activity is recommended for reducing muscle injuries and increasing joint ROM with inconsequential effects on subsequent athletic performance. PMID:26642915

  18. Microstructural evolution of PET under stretching and during stretch blow moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Picard, Martine; Billon, Noëlle

    2007-04-01

    Strain induced crystallisation of PET designed for stretch blow molding is studied combining well-controlled tensile tests and free blowing on a stretch blow prototype. Microstructure evolution is followed by WAXS and SAXS. Observations on blown parts clearly show that the microstructure can differ along the bottle and from processing conditions to another. Difference can be observed on crystalline orientation, periodic arrangement at the level of lamellae and long period. Range of long period, 8.5 to 13 nm is in agreement with literature. In certain case lamellar organisation disappears. Despite of high level of strain and evidence for strain hardening to occur during blowing no perfect crystalline pattern is observed, except in very thick zones. Interrupted tensile tests followed by quenching demonstrates that strain hardening is not correlated to prefect crystallisation. Microstructure clearly depends on the three parameters: temperature, strain rate and strain. It is concluded that strain hardening is mainly controlled by first stages of crystallisation and that actual crystallisation occurs during a following relaxation step. This later is then highly dependent upon cooling step.

  19. [Sciatica. From stretch rack to microdiscectomy].

    PubMed

    Gruber, P; Böni, T

    2015-12-01

    In ancient times as well as in the Middle Ages treatment options for discogenic nerve compression syndrome were limited and usually not very specific because of low anatomical and pathophysiological knowledge. The stretch rack (scamnum Hippocratis) was particularly prominent but was widely used as a therapeutic device for very different spinal disorders. Since the beginning of the nineteenth century anatomical knowledge increased and the advances in the fields of asepsis, anesthesia and surgery resulted in an increase in surgical interventions on the spine. In 1908 the first successful lumbar discectomy was initiated and performed by the German neurologist Heinrich O. Oppenheim (1858-1919) and the surgeon Fedor Krause (1857-1937); however, neither recognized the true pathological condition of discogenic nerve compression syndrome. With the landmark report in the New England Journal of Medicine in 1934, the two American surgeons William Jason Mixter (1880-1958) and Joseph Seaton Barr (1901-1963) finally clarified the pathomechanism of lumbar disc herniation and furthermore, propagated discectomy as the standard therapy. Since then interventions on intervertebral discs rapidly increased and the treatment options for lumbar disc surgery quickly evolved. The surgical procedures changed over time and were continuously being refined. In the late 1960s the surgical microscope was introduced for spinal surgery by the work of the famous neurosurgeon Mahmut Gazi Yasargil and his colleague Wolfhard Caspar and so-called microdiscectomy was introduced. Besides open discectomy other interventional techniques were developed to overcome the side effects of surgical procedures. In 1964 the American orthopedic surgeon Lyman Smith (1912-1991) introduced chemonucleolysis, a minimally invasive technique consisting only of a cannula and the proteolytic enzyme chymopapain, which is injected into the disc compartment to dissolve the displaced disc material. In 1975 the Japanese orthopedic

  20. Unconsciously triggered conflict adaptation.

    PubMed

    van Gaal, Simon; Lamme, Victor A F; Ridderinkhof, K Richard

    2010-01-01

    In conflict tasks such as the Stroop, the Eriksen flanker or the Simon task, it is generally observed that the detection of conflict in the current trial reduces the impact of conflicting information in the subsequent trial; a phenomenon termed conflict adaptation. This higher-order cognitive control function has been assumed to be restricted to cases where conflict is experienced consciously. In the present experiment we manipulated the awareness of conflict-inducing stimuli in a metacontrast masking paradigm to directly test this assumption. Conflicting response tendencies were elicited either consciously (through primes that were weakly masked) or unconsciously (strongly masked primes). We demonstrate trial-by-trial conflict adaptation effects after conscious as well as unconscious conflict, which could not be explained by direct stimulus/response repetitions. These findings show that unconscious information can have a longer-lasting influence on our behavior than previously thought and further stretch the functional boundaries of unconscious cognition. PMID:20634898

  1. Myoelectric silence following unopposed passive stretch in normal man.

    PubMed Central

    Angel, R W; Waxman, S G; Kocsis, J D

    1980-01-01

    The response to unopposed passive muscle stretch applied during sustained contraction was studied in normal man. When the subject did not resist the stretching force, the initial response was a brief cessation of EMG activity in the elongated muscle. The myoelectric silence was observed repeatedly in muscles of the upper and lower limbs. The response to passive stretch is discussed in relation to the lengthening reaction and the inverse myotatic reflex. The silent period observed under these experimental conditions is unlikely to be caused by Renshaw inhibition, a pause in spindle afferent discharge, or activity of the group II afferent reflex pathway. Possible mechanisms include autogenetic inhibition and a stretch-evoked decrease of fusimotor activity. PMID:7431031

  2. Stretched cavity soliton in dispersion-managed Kerr resonators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bao, Chengying; Yang, Changxi

    2015-08-01

    Stretched cavity soliton (SCS) in dispersion-managed nonlinear resonators is numerically investigated. SCS is found to stretch and compress twice during a round-trip propagation inside the dispersion-managed resonator, exhibiting a pulse dynamics similar to dispersion-managed mode-locked femtosecond lasers. Even though the breathing ratio is relatively small, the characteristics of SCS are significantly modified by the pulse stretching dynamics in the resonator. The output pulse will have a flatter spectrum around the center frequency. However, the power for the comb lines at the wing of the spectrum decays faster than the conventional sech-shaped CS, making dispersion wave emission harder to be excited in dispersion-managed resonators. Furthermore, stretching of the pulse lowers the nonlinear phase shift and makes it more resistant towards breather soliton instability. When shortening the cavity length to the microresonator scale, we find that ultrashort pulses can be generated through dispersion management, even in a low Q -factor cavity.

  3. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH SQUARE SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PITS CENTER, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  4. VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    VIEW OF INTERIOR SPACE WITH RECTANGULAR SHAPE STRETCH PRESS CONTAINMENT PIT IN BACKGROUND, FACING NORTH. - Douglas Aircraft Company Long Beach Plant, Aircraft Parts Shipping & Receiving Building, 3855 Lakewood Boulevard, Long Beach, Los Angeles County, CA

  5. Cell stretching devices as research tools: engineering and biological considerations.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Harshad; Barton, Matthew J; Jun, Myeongjun; Park, Sungsu; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-08-16

    Cells within the human body are subjected to continuous, cyclic mechanical strain caused by various organ functions, movement, and growth. Cells are well known to have the ability to sense and respond to mechanical stimuli. This process is referred to as mechanotransduction. A better understanding of mechanotransduction is of great interest to clinicians and scientists alike to improve clinical diagnosis and understanding of medical pathology. However, the complexity involved in in vivo biological systems creates a need for better in vitro technologies, which can closely mimic the cells' microenvironment using induced mechanical strain. This technology gap motivates the development of cell stretching devices for better understanding of the cell response to mechanical stimuli. This review focuses on the engineering and biological considerations for the development of such cell stretching devices. The paper discusses different types of stretching concepts, major design consideration and biological aspects of cell stretching and provides a perspective for future development in this research area. PMID:27440436

  6. Development of Internal Fine Structure in Stretched Rubber Vulcanizates

    SciTech Connect

    M Tosaka; S Toki; J Che; L Rong; B Hsiao

    2011-12-31

    Small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS) pattern and tensile stress during relaxation of stretched rubber vulcanizates (synthetic polyisoprene) were measured simultaneously at room temperature and at 0 C. The samples were quickly stretched to the prefixed strain and then allowed to relax for 1 h. In every SAXS pattern, the intensity distribution was elongated along the equator, indicating the formation of structures elongated in the stretching direction. The so-called two-spots pattern corresponding to the long period of stacked lamellar crystals did not appear even when the critical strain to induce crystallization was exceeded. On the other hand, even below the critical strain, additional development of equatorial streaks was detected in the differential SAXS patterns. This result suggests the growth of the density fluctuation elongated in the stretching direction, which is not directly related to strain-induced crystallization.

  7. Saturation of Zeldovich stretch-twist-fold map dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seta, Amit; Bhat, Pallavi; Subramanian, Kandaswamy

    2015-10-01

    > value is determined by the relative importance of the increased diffusion versus the reduced stretching. These saturation properties are akin to the range of possibilities that have been discussed in the context of fluctuation dynamos.

  8. Stretching Response of Knotted and Unknotted Polymer Chains

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caraglio, Michele; Micheletti, Cristian; Orlandini, Enzo

    2015-10-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental advances have clarified the major effects of knotting on the properties of stretched chains. Yet, how knotted chains respond to weak mechanical stretching and how this behavior differs from the unknotted case are still open questions and we address them here by profiling the complete stretching response of chains of hundreds of monomers and different topology. We find that the ratio of the knotted and unknotted chain extensions varies nonmonotonically with the applied force. This surprising feature is shown to be a signature of the crossover between the well-known high-force stretching regime and the previously uncharacterized low-force one. The observed differences of knotted and unknotted chain response increases with knot complexity and are sufficiently marked that they could be harnessed in single-molecule contexts to infer the presence and complexity of physical knots in micron-long biomolecules.

  9. Short-stretch compression bandages and the foot pump.

    PubMed

    Lindsay, Ellie; Muldoon, Jeanette; Hampton, Sylvie

    Short-stretch compression bandages have been shown to be as cost-effective and efficient as other compression systems in healing venous ulcers, independent of associated factors (Scriven et al, 1998; Nelson, 1996). However, as they do not contract around a limb they do not exert pressure during inactivity (resting pressure) (Klose Norton, 2003). But their stability creates a high resistance to stretch when pressure is applied through internal muscle contraction and joint movement (working pressure) (Tuckwood, 1996). PMID:12861646

  10. STATIC STRETCHING DOES NOT REDUCE VARIABILITY, JUMP AND SPEED PERFORMANCE

    PubMed Central

    Rama, Luís Manuel Pinto Lopes

    2016-01-01

    Background Stretching is often part of the warm-up routine prior to athletic participation; however, controversial evidence exists on the effects of stretching on countermovement jump (CMJ) and sprint performance. Additionally, analysis of variability between repeated tasks is useful for monitoring players, to analyze factors that could affect the performance, and to guide clinical decisions for training strategies. Purpose The purpose of this study was to examine whether static stretching (SS) prior to CMJ and 20-meter (20-m) sprint would affect performance, and to investigate whether SS affects an athlete's ability to perform these tasks consistently. Methods Twenty-two trained healthy athletes (23.2 ± 5.0 years) attended, randomly, two testing sessions, separated by 48 hours. At session one, all participants underwent 10 minutes of dynamic running warm-up followed by the experimental tasks (three CMJ and three 20-m sprint), whereas five minutes of stretching was added after the warm-up routine at session two. All participants performed the same experimental tasks in both sessions. The stretching protocol consisted of five stretching exercises for each lower limb. Results The paired-samples t-test revealed no significant differences between the stretching protocol condition and no stretching condition for the 20-m sprint (t(21)=.920; p=.368) and CMJ (t(21)=.709; p=.486). There were no significant differences in trial-by-trial variability on 20-m sprint (t(21)=1.934; p=.067) and CMJ scores (t(21)=.793; p=.437) as result of SS. Conclusion The SS protocol did not modify jumping and running ability in trained healthy athletes. The SS prior to training or competition may not cause detrimental effects to athletic performance. Level of evidence Level III, Nonrandomized controlled trial. PMID:27104057

  11. Image stretching on a curved surface to improve satellite gridding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ormsby, J. P.

    1975-01-01

    A method for substantially reducing gridding errors due to satellite roll, pitch and yaw is given. A gimbal-mounted curved screen, scaled to 1:7,500,000, is used to stretch the satellite image whereby visible landmarks coincide with a projected map outline. The resulting rms position errors averaged 10.7 km as compared with 25.6 and 34.9 km for two samples of satellite imagery upon which image stretching was not performed.

  12. Optimization of dielectrophoretic DNA stretching in microfabricated devices

    PubMed Central

    Sung, Kyung Eun; Burns, Mark A.

    2008-01-01

    We have found that the surface and bulk solution properties in a microfabricated device affect the degree and probability of electrostretching of DNA molecules. Using lambda phage DNA, we found that significantly hydrophilic surfaces between the electrodes decreases the efficiency of stretching. Surfaces treated with higher silane (trimethyl chlorosilane) concentrations performed better presumably due to the decreased non-specific adsorption of DNA on these surfaces compared to their more hydrophilic counterparts. The shape and dimensions of the electrodes also affected the efficiency of stretching. Both lift-off and metal etching methods produced electrodes with random microscopic peaks along the electrode’s edge and were poorly suited for stretching. Annealing the electrodes (450°C for 10 min) removed most of these peaks and allowed for more controlled stretching to be obtained. We also found that thin electrodes (65nm) gave close to a 90% success rate of DNA stretching but stretching with thick electrodes (350nm) produced only a 20% success rate. PMID:16642979

  13. Incorporating spike-rate adaptation into a rate code in mathematical and biological neurons.

    PubMed

    Ralston, Bridget N; Flagg, Lucas Q; Faggin, Eric; Birmingham, John T

    2016-06-01

    For a slowly varying stimulus, the simplest relationship between a neuron's input and output is a rate code, in which the spike rate is a unique function of the stimulus at that instant. In the case of spike-rate adaptation, there is no unique relationship between input and output, because the spike rate at any time depends both on the instantaneous stimulus and on prior spiking (the "history"). To improve the decoding of spike trains produced by neurons that show spike-rate adaptation, we developed a simple scheme that incorporates "history" into a rate code. We utilized this rate-history code successfully to decode spike trains produced by 1) mathematical models of a neuron in which the mechanism for adaptation (IAHP) is specified, and 2) the gastropyloric receptor (GPR2), a stretch-sensitive neuron in the stomatogastric nervous system of the crab Cancer borealis, that exhibits long-lasting adaptation of unknown origin. Moreover, when we modified the spike rate either mathematically in a model system or by applying neuromodulatory agents to the experimental system, we found that changes in the rate-history code could be related to the biophysical mechanisms responsible for altering the spiking. PMID:26888106

  14. Central Adaptation to Repeated Galvanic Vestibular Stimulation: Implications for Pre-Flight Astronaut Training

    PubMed Central

    Dilda, Valentina; Morris, Tiffany R.; Yungher, Don A.; MacDougall, Hamish G.; Moore, Steven T.

    2014-01-01

    Healthy subjects (N = 10) were exposed to 10-min cumulative pseudorandom bilateral bipolar Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) on a weekly basis for 12 weeks (120 min total exposure). During each trial subjects performed computerized dynamic posturography and eye movements were measured using digital video-oculography. Follow up tests were conducted 6 weeks and 6 months after the 12-week adaptation period. Postural performance was significantly impaired during GVS at first exposure, but recovered to baseline over a period of 7–8 weeks (70–80 min GVS exposure). This postural recovery was maintained 6 months after adaptation. In contrast, the roll vestibulo-ocular reflex response to GVS was not attenuated by repeated exposure. This suggests that GVS adaptation did not occur at the vestibular end-organs or involve changes in low-level (brainstem-mediated) vestibulo-ocular or vestibulo-spinal reflexes. Faced with unreliable vestibular input, the cerebellum reweighted sensory input to emphasize veridical extra-vestibular information, such as somatosensation, vision and visceral stretch receptors, to regain postural function. After a period of recovery subjects exhibited dual adaption and the ability to rapidly switch between the perturbed (GVS) and natural vestibular state for up to 6 months. PMID:25409443

  15. Central adaptation to repeated galvanic vestibular stimulation: implications for pre-flight astronaut training.

    PubMed

    Dilda, Valentina; Morris, Tiffany R; Yungher, Don A; MacDougall, Hamish G; Moore, Steven T

    2014-01-01

    Healthy subjects (N = 10) were exposed to 10-min cumulative pseudorandom bilateral bipolar Galvanic vestibular stimulation (GVS) on a weekly basis for 12 weeks (120 min total exposure). During each trial subjects performed computerized dynamic posturography and eye movements were measured using digital video-oculography. Follow up tests were conducted 6 weeks and 6 months after the 12-week adaptation period. Postural performance was significantly impaired during GVS at first exposure, but recovered to baseline over a period of 7-8 weeks (70-80 min GVS exposure). This postural recovery was maintained 6 months after adaptation. In contrast, the roll vestibulo-ocular reflex response to GVS was not attenuated by repeated exposure. This suggests that GVS adaptation did not occur at the vestibular end-organs or involve changes in low-level (brainstem-mediated) vestibulo-ocular or vestibulo-spinal reflexes. Faced with unreliable vestibular input, the cerebellum reweighted sensory input to emphasize veridical extra-vestibular information, such as somatosensation, vision and visceral stretch receptors, to regain postural function. After a period of recovery subjects exhibited dual adaption and the ability to rapidly switch between the perturbed (GVS) and natural vestibular state for up to 6 months. PMID:25409443

  16. Controlled cyclic stretch bioreactor for tissue-engineered heart valves.

    PubMed

    Syedain, Zeeshan H; Tranquillo, Robert T

    2009-09-01

    A tissue-engineered heart valve (TEHV) represents the ultimate valve replacement, especially for juvenile patients given its growth potential. To date, most TEHV bioreactors have been developed based on pulsed flow of culture medium through the valve lumen to induce strain in the leaflets. Using a strategy for controlled cyclic stretching of tubular constructs reported previously, we developed a controlled cyclic stretch bioreactor for TEHVs that leads to improved tensile and compositional properties. The TEHV is mounted inside a latex tube, which is then cyclically pressurized with culture medium. The root and leaflets stretch commensurately with the latex, the stretching being dictated by the stiffer latex and thus controllable. Medium is also perfused through the lumen at a slow rate in a flow loop to provide nutrient delivery. Fibrin-based TEHVs prepared with human dermal fibroblasts were subjected to three weeks of cyclic stretching with incrementally increasing strain amplitude. The TEHV possessed the tensile stiffness and stiffness anisotropy of leaflets from sheep pulmonary valves and could withstand cyclic pulmonary pressures with similar distension as for a sheep pulmonary artery. PMID:19473698

  17. Dielectrophoretic stretching of DNA tethered to a fiber tip.

    PubMed

    Hyun, Changbae; Kaur, Harpreet; McNabb, David S; Li, Jiali

    2015-03-27

    In this work, we studied the stretching of λ phage DNA molecules immobilized on an optical fiber tip attached to a force sensitive tuning fork under ac electric fields. We designed a two electrodes stretching system in a small chamber: one is a gold-coated optical fiber tip electrode, and the other is a gold-coated flat electrode. By applying a dielectrophoretic (DEP) force, the immobilized λ DNA molecules on the tip are stretched and the stretching process is monitored by a fluorescent microscope. The DNA stretching in three-dimensional space is optimized by varying electrode shape, electrode gap distance, ac frequency, and solution conductivity. By observing the vibrational amplitude change of a quartz tuning fork, we measured the effects due to Joule heating and the DEP force on the tethered DNA molecules in solution. This work demonstrates a method to manipulate and characterize immobilized λ DNA molecules on a probe tip for further study of single DNA molecules. PMID:25741602

  18. Physiological tremor enhanced by manoeuvres affecting the segmental stretch reflex.

    PubMed Central

    Young, R R; Hagbarth, K E

    1980-01-01

    In view of recent evidence that physiological tremor can be enhanced by positive feedback via the segmental stretch reflex, several manoeuvres and procedures were employed to enhance the finger and hand tremor of healthy subjects--the purpose being to determine if tremorogenic effects, at least in part, are due to increase efficacy of the stretch reflex servo. Mechanical events during tremor (and during voluntary or electrically induced muscle twitches) were recorded together with EMG activity from wrist and finger flexor muscles and discharges from primary spindle endings in these muscles. Physiological tremor can be enhanced not only by manoeuvres which increase the gain of segmental stretch reflexes (Jendrassik manoeuvre) but also by manoeuvres which increase the contrast in spindle firing during stretch versus shortening phases of tremor, thus enhancing reflex modulation. Effects of the latter type can be achieved by procedures which alter mechanical twitch properties of extrafusal fibres (isoproterenol infusions and fatigue) and by procedures which involve application of spindle stimuli acting preferentially during stretch phases of tremor movements (muscle vibrations). Physiological tremor, which can be temporarily enhanced by an externally applied muscle perturbation, also becomes accentuated by those small "pseudo-myoclonic" jerks which occur in all normal subjects attempting to perform slow, smooth movements. PMID:7373322

  19. Buoyant Low Stretch Diffusion Flames Beneath Cylindrical PMMA Samples

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Olson, S. L.; Tien, J. S.

    1999-01-01

    A unique new way to study low gravity flames in normal gravity has been developed. To study flame structure and extinction characteristics in low stretch environments, a normal gravity low-stretch diffusion flame is generated using a cylindrical PMMA sample of varying large radii. Burning rates, visible flame thickness, visible flame standoff distance, temperature profiles in the solid and gas, and radiative loss from the system were measured. A transition from the blowoff side of the flammability map to the quenching side of the flammability map is observed at approximately 6-7/ sec, as determined by curvefits to the non-monotonic trends in peak temperatures, solid and gas-phase temperature gradients, and non-dimensional standoff distances. A surface energy balance reveals that the fraction of heat transfer from the flame that is lost to in-depth conduction and surface radiation increases with decreasing stretch until quenching extinction is observed. This is primarily due to decreased heat transfer from the flame, while the magnitude of the losses remains the same. A unique local extinction flamelet phenomena and associated pre-extinction oscillations are observed at very low stretch. An ultimate quenching extinction limit is found at low stretch with sufficiently high induced heat losses.

  20. Stretch activates myosin light chain kinase in arterial smooth muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Barany, K.; Rokolya, A.; Barany, M. )

    1990-11-30

    Stretching of porcine carotid arterial muscle increased the phosphorylation of the 20 kDa myosin light chain from 0.23 to 0.68 mol (32P)phosphate/mol light chain, whereas stretching of phorbol dibutyrate treated muscle increased the phosphorylation from 0.30 to 0.91 mol/mol. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis followed by two-dimensional tryptic phosphopeptide mapping was used to identify the enzyme involved in the stretch-induced phosphorylation. Quantitation of the (32P)phosphate content of the peptides revealed considerable light chain phosphorylation by protein kinase C only in the phorbol dibutyrate treated arterial muscle, whereas most of the light chain phosphorylation was attributable to myosin light chain kinase. Upon stretch of either the untreated or treated muscle, the total increment in (32P)phosphate incorporation into the light chain could be accounted for by peptides characteristic for myosin light chain kinase catalyzed phosphorylation, demonstrating that the stretch-induced phosphorylation is caused by this enzyme exclusively.

  1. Printable low-cost, sustained and dynamic cell stretching apparatus.

    PubMed

    Toume, Samer; Gefen, Amit; Weihs, Daphne

    2016-05-24

    Deformations that are applied on body tissues during daily activities, as a result of morbid conditions, or during various medical treatments, affect cell viability and biological function. Such mechanobiological phenomena are often studied in vitro, in monolayer cultures. To facilitate such studies cost effectively, we have developed a novel, printable cell stretching apparatus. The apparatus is used to apply tensile strains on cells cultured on elastic, stretchable substrata, either by sustained or by dynamic-cyclic application. Most of the apparatus parts are three-dimensionally printed (excluding motors), and stretching is automatically performed by two direct current geared motors that are controlled by a programmable microcontroller platform. To demonstrate functionality of this novel printable device, which can be produced in multiple copies in research labs at a cost of under 100 US$ per unit, including motors and controller, we performed cell culture studies monitored by fluorescence microscopy. Specifically, we have applied sustained and cyclic, radial stretching at large strains to NIH3T3 mouse fibroblasts, and have demonstrated that cell viability, adhesion and morphology were maintained following stretching. Our apparatus is designed to be low-cost, rapidly manufactured at a university or small-company setting, and simple to use and control, where its flexible, versatile design allows users to experimentally induce different stretching regimes with varying amplitudes and frequencies. PMID:27038541

  2. Data on calcium increases depending on stretch in dystrophic cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Aguettaz, E; Lopez, J J; Krzesiak, A; Constantin, B; Cognard, C; Sebille, S

    2016-09-01

    In this data article, intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) was measured in isolated ventricular Wild Type (WT) and mdx cardiomyocytes in two different conditions: at rest and during the application of an axial stretch. Using a carbon microfibers technique, axial stretch was applied to mimic effects of physiological conditions of ventricular filling. A study of cation entry with the same experimental model and the manganese quenching method reported (i) a constitutive cation entry in mdx cardiomyocytes and (ii) the involvement of TRPV2 channels in axial-stretch dependant cation entry, "Axial stretch-dependent cation entry in dystrophic cardiomyopathy: involvement of several TRPs channels" (Aguettaz et al., 2016) [1]. Here, the Ca(2+) dye fluo-8 was used for [Ca(2+)]i measurement, in both resting and stretching conditions, using a perfusion protocol starting initially with a calcium free Tyrode solution followed by the perfusion of 1.8 mM Ca(2+) Tyrode solution. The variation of [Ca(2+)]i was found higher in mdx cardiomyocytes. PMID:27617280

  3. Expression and purification of soluble and stable ectodomain of natural killer cell receptor LLT1 through high-density transfection of suspension adapted HEK293S GnTI(-) cells.

    PubMed

    Bláha, Jan; Pachl, Petr; Novák, Petr; Vaněk, Ondřej

    2015-05-01

    Lectin-like transcript 1 (LLT1, gene clec2d) was identified to be a ligand for the single human NKR-P1 receptor present on NK and NK-T lymphocytes. Naturally, LLT1 is expressed on the surface of NK cells, stimulating IFN-γ production, and is up-regulated upon activation of other immune cells, e.g. TLR-stimulated dendritic cells and B cells or T cell receptor-activated T cells. While in normal tissues LLT1:NKR-P1 interaction (representing an alternative "missing-self" recognition system) play an immunomodulatory role in regulation of crosstalk between NK and antigen presenting cells, LLT1 is upregulated in glioblastoma cells, one of the most lethal tumors, where it acts as a mediator of immune escape of glioma cells. Here we report transient expression and characterization of soluble His176Cys mutant of LLT1 ectodomain in an eukaryotic expression system of human suspension-adapted HEK293S GnTI(-) cell line with uniform N-glycans. The His176Cys mutation is critical for C-type lectin-like domain stability, leading to the reconstruction of third canonical disulfide bridge in LLT1, as shown by mass spectrometry. Purified soluble LLT1 is homogeneous, deglycosylatable and forms a non-covalent homodimer whose dimerization is not dependent on presence of its N-glycans. As a part of production of soluble LLT1, we have adapted HEK293S GnTI(-) cell line to growth in suspension in media facilitating transient transfection and optimized novel high cell density transfection protocol, greatly enhancing protein yields. This transfection protocol is generally applicable for protein production within this cell line, especially for protein crystallography. PMID:25623399

  4. Prolonged Monoacylglycerol Lipase Blockade Causes Equivalent Cannabinoid Receptor Type 1 Receptor–Mediated Adaptations in Fatty Acid Amide Hydrolase Wild-Type and Knockout Mice

    PubMed Central

    Kinsey, Steven G.; Ignatowska-Jankowska, Bogna; Ramesh, Divya; Abdullah, Rehab A.; Tao, Qing; Booker, Lamont; Long, Jonathan Z.; Selley, Dana E.; Cravatt, Benjamin F.; Lichtman, Aron H.

    2014-01-01

    Complementary genetic and pharmacological approaches to inhibit monoacylglycerol lipase (MAGL) and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), the primary hydrolytic enzymes of the respective endogenous cannabinoids 2-arachidonoylglycerol (2-AG) and N-arachidonoylethanolamine, enable the exploration of potential therapeutic applications and physiologic roles of these enzymes. Complete and simultaneous inhibition of both FAAH and MAGL produces greatly enhanced cannabimimetic responses, including increased antinociception, and other cannabimimetic effects, far beyond those seen with inhibition of either enzyme alone. While cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CB1) function is maintained following chronic FAAH inactivation, prolonged excessive elevation of brain 2-AG levels, via MAGL inhibition, elicits both behavioral and molecular signs of cannabinoid tolerance and dependence. Here, we evaluated the consequences of a high dose of the MAGL inhibitor JZL184 [4-nitrophenyl 4-(dibenzo[d][1,3]dioxol-5-yl(hydroxy)methyl)piperidine-1-carboxylate; 40 mg/kg] given acutely or for 6 days in FAAH(−/−) and (+/+) mice. While acute administration of JZL184 to FAAH(−/−) mice enhanced the magnitude of a subset of cannabimimetic responses, repeated JZL184 treatment led to tolerance to its antinociceptive effects, cross-tolerance to the pharmacological effects of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol, decreases in CB1 receptor agonist–stimulated guanosine 5′-O-(3-[35S]thio)triphosphate binding, and dependence as indicated by rimonabant-precipitated withdrawal behaviors, regardless of genotype. Together, these data suggest that simultaneous elevation of both endocannabinoids elicits enhanced cannabimimetic activity but MAGL inhibition drives CB1 receptor functional tolerance and cannabinoid dependence. PMID:24849924

  5. Vibrational transitions of coupled stretching and bending overtones in chloroform

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beckmann, Kai; Gerhards, Markus; Kleist, Einhard; Bettermann, Hans

    1995-08-01

    The intensities and frequencies of Fermi-coupled stretching and bending overtone transitions in CHCl3 were calculated by means of a variational method. Symmetrized two-dimensional ab initio potential and dipole moment surfaces were determined at the MP2 level using the 6-31G** basis set. The Hamiltonian for the CH- stretching motion and the simultaneously excited twofold degenerate CH- bending vibration is expressed most easily in cylindrical coordinates. Absorption intensities up to the Δv=7 CH-stretching overtone above 16 300 cm-1 are calculated and are compared to former experimental values and theoretical results. New quantitative intracavity measurements for the N=6 polyad are presented. Relative errors between absolute experimental intensities and the calculated values are less than 30%.

  6. Determination of the stretch tensor for structural transformations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Xian; Song, Yintao; Tamura, Nobumichi; James, Richard D.

    2016-08-01

    Structural transformations in crystalline solids are increasingly the basis of the functional behavior of materials. Recently, in diverse alloy systems, both low hysteresis and reversibility of phase transformations have been linked to the satisfaction of the nongeneric conditions of compatibility between phases. According to the Cauchy-Born rule, these conditions are expressed as properties of transformation stretch tensor. The transformation stretch tensor is difficult to measure directly due to the lack of knowledge about the exact transforming pathway during the structural change, and the complicating effects of microstructure. In this paper we give a rigorous algorithmic approach for determining the transformation stretch tensor from X-ray measurements of structure and lattice parameters. For some traditional and emerging phase transformations, the results given by the algorithm suggest unexpected transformation mechanisms.

  7. Polymer stretching in the inertial range of turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ahmad, Adeel; Vincenzi, Dario

    2016-05-01

    We study the deformation of flexible polymers whose contour length lies in the inertial range of a homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow. By using the elastic dumbbell model and a stochastic velocity field with nonsmooth spatial correlations, we obtain the probability density function of the extension as a function of the Weissenberg number and of the scaling exponent of the velocity structure functions. In a spatially rough flow, as in the inertial range of turbulence, the statistics of polymer stretching differs from that observed in laminar flows or in smooth chaotic flows. In particular, the probability distribution of polymer extensions decays as a stretched exponential, and the most probable extension grows as a power law of the Weissenberg number. Furthermore, the ability of the flow to stretch polymers weakens as the flow becomes rougher in space. PMID:27300949

  8. Single particle measurements of material line stretching in turbulence: Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kramel, Stefan; Tympel, Saskia; Toschi, Federico; Voth, Greg

    2015-11-01

    We find that particles in the shape of chiral dipoles display a preferential rotation direction in three dimensional isotropic turbulence. The particles consist of two helical ends with opposite chirality that are connected by a straight rod. They are fabricated using 3D printing and have an aspect ratio of 10 and a length in the inertial range of our flow between oscillating grids. Due to their high aspect ratio, they move like material lines. Because material lines align with the extentional eigenvectors of the velocity gradient tensor they experience a mean stretching in turbulence. The stretching of a chiral dipole produces a rotation about the dipole axis and so chiral dipoles experience a non-zero mean spinning rate in turbulence. These results provide a first direct experimental measurement of the rate of material line stretching in turbulence.

  9. Polymer stretching in the inertial range of turbulence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahmad, Adeel; Vincenzi, Dario

    2016-05-01

    We study the deformation of flexible polymers whose contour length lies in the inertial range of a homogeneous and isotropic turbulent flow. By using the elastic dumbbell model and a stochastic velocity field with nonsmooth spatial correlations, we obtain the probability density function of the extension as a function of the Weissenberg number and of the scaling exponent of the velocity structure functions. In a spatially rough flow, as in the inertial range of turbulence, the statistics of polymer stretching differs from that observed in laminar flows or in smooth chaotic flows. In particular, the probability distribution of polymer extensions decays as a stretched exponential, and the most probable extension grows as a power law of the Weissenberg number. Furthermore, the ability of the flow to stretch polymers weakens as the flow becomes rougher in space.

  10. Simple assembly of long nanowires through substrate stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dong, Jianjin; Mohieddin Abukhdeir, Nasser; Goldthorpe, Irene A.

    2015-12-01

    Although nanowire (NW) alignment has been previously investigated, minimizing limitations such as process complexity and NW breakage, as well as quantifying the quality of alignment, have not been sufficiently addressed. A simple, low cost, large-area, and versatile alignment method is reported that is applicable for NWs either grown on a substrate or synthesized in solution. Metal and semiconductor NWs with average lengths of up to 16 μm are aligned through the stretching of polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) films, which compared to other stretching methods results in superior alignment because of the large stretching ratio of PVA. Poly[oxy(methyl-1,2-ethanediyl)] is employed as lubricant to prevent NW breakage. To quantify NW alignment, a simple and effective image processing method is presented. The alignment process results in an order parameter (S) of NW alignment as high as 0.97.

  11. EMG and peak force responses to PNF stretching and the relationship between stretching-induced force deficits and bilateral deficits

    PubMed Central

    Cengiz, Asim

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The aim of the present study was to investigate the possibility of an interaction between stretching induced deficit (SFD) and bilateral deficits (BLD) during maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion under PNF stretch and no-stretch conditions through measurement of EMG and force production. [Subjects and Methods] Ten physically active male Caucasian students (age, 24.1±2.38 years; body mass, 79.48±11.40 kg; height, 174.15±0.8 cm) volunteered to participate in this study. EMG and force measurements of the subjects were recorded during either unilateral or bilateral 3-second maximal voluntary isometric hand flexion (MVC) against a force transducer. The paired sample t-test was used to examine the significance of differences among several conditions. Pearson product-moment correlation was used to evaluate the associations between different parameters. [Results] Stretching-induced deficits correlated with bilateral deficits in both force (r=0.85) and iEMG (r=0.89). PNF stretching caused significant decrements in the bilateral and unilateral conditions for both the right and left sides. [Conclusion] Since both force and iEMG decreases were observed in most measurements; it suggests there is a neural mechanism behinnd both the BLD and the SFD. PMID:25931696

  12. Structure of low-stretch methane nonpremixed flames

    SciTech Connect

    Han, Bai; Ibarreta, Alfonso F.; Sung, Chih-Jen; T'ien, James S.

    2007-04-15

    The present study experimentally and numerically investigates the structure associated with extremely low-stretch ({proportional_to}2 s{sup -1}) gaseous nonpremixed flames. The study of low-stretch flames aims to improve our fundamental understanding of the flame radiation effects on flame response and extinction limits. Low-stretch flames are also relevant to fire safety in reduced-gravity environments and to large buoyant fires, where localized areas of low stretch are attainable. In this work, ultra-low-stretch flames are established in normal gravity by bottom burning of a methane/nitrogen mixture discharged from a porous spherically symmetric burner of large radius of curvature. The large thickness of the resulting nonpremixed flame allows detailed mapping of the flame structure. Several advanced nonintrusive optical diagnostics are used to study the flame structure. Gas phase temperatures are measured by Raman scattering, while the burner surface temperatures are obtained by IR imaging. In addition, OH-PLIF and chemiluminescence imaging techniques are used to help characterize the extent of the flame reaction zone. These experimental results allow direct comparison with a quasi-one-dimensional numerical model including detailed chemistry, thermodynamic/transport properties, and radiation treatment. In addition, the radiative interactions between the flame and porous burner (modeled as a gray surface) are accounted for in the present model. The numerical modeling is demonstrated to be able to simulate the low-stretch flame structure. Using the current model, the extinction limits under different conditions are also examined. The computational results are consistent with experimental observations. (author)

  13. Can Treadmill Perturbations Evoke Stretch Reflexes in the Calf Muscles?

    PubMed Central

    Sloot, Lizeth H.; van den Noort, Josien C.; van der Krogt, Marjolein M.; Bruijn, Sjoerd M.; Harlaar, Jaap

    2015-01-01

    Disinhibition of reflexes is a problem amongst spastic patients, for it limits a smooth and efficient execution of motor functions during gait. Treadmill belt accelerations may potentially be used to measure reflexes during walking, i.e. by dorsal flexing the ankle and stretching the calf muscles, while decelerations show the modulation of reflexes during a reduction of sensory feedback. The aim of the current study was to examine if belt accelerations and decelerations of different intensities applied during the stance phase of treadmill walking can evoke reflexes in the gastrocnemius, soleus and tibialis anterior in healthy subjects. Muscle electromyography and joint kinematics were measured in 10 subjects. To determine whether stretch reflexes occurred, we assessed modelled musculo-tendon length and stretch velocity, the amount of muscle activity, as well as the incidence of bursts or depressions in muscle activity with their time delays, and co-contraction between agonist and antagonist muscle. Although the effect on the ankle angle was small with 2.8±1.0°, the perturbations caused clear changes in muscle length and stretch velocity relative to unperturbed walking. Stretched muscles showed an increasing incidence of bursts in muscle activity, which occurred after a reasonable electrophysiological time delay (163–191 ms). Their amplitude was related to the muscle stretch velocity and not related to co-contraction of the antagonist muscle. These effects increased with perturbation intensity. Shortened muscles showed opposite effects, with a depression in muscle activity of the calf muscles. The perturbations only slightly affected the spatio-temporal parameters, indicating that normal walking was retained. Thus, our findings showed that treadmill perturbations can evoke reflexes in the calf muscles and tibialis anterior. This comprehensive study could form the basis for clinical implementation of treadmill perturbations to functionally measure reflexes during

  14. In situ longitudinal pre-stretch in the human femoropopliteal artery

    PubMed Central

    Kamenskiy, Alexey; Seas, Andreas; Bowen, Grant; Deegan, Paul; Desyatova, Anastasia; Bohlim, Nick; Poulson, William; MacTaggart, Jason

    2016-01-01

    In situ longitudinal (axial) pre-stretch (LPS) plays a fundamental role in the mechanics of the femoropopliteal artery (FPA). It conserves energy during pulsation and prevents buckling of the artery during limb movement. We investigated how LPS is affected by demographics and risk factors, and how these patient characteristics associate with the structural and physiologic features of the FPA. LPS was measured in n = 148 fresh human FPAs (14–80 years old). Mechanical properties were characterized with biaxial extension and histopathological characteristics were quantified with Verhoeff–Van Gieson Staining. Constitutive modeling was used to calculate physiological stresses and stretches which were then analyzed in the context of demographics, risk factors and structural characteristics. Age had the strongest negative effect (r = −0.812, p < 0.01) on LPS and could alone explain 66% of LPS variability. Male gender, higher body mass index, hypertension, diabetes, coronary artery disease, dyslipidemia and tobacco use had negative effects on LPS, but only the effect of tobacco was not associated with aging. FPAs with less pre-stretch had thicker medial layers, but thinner intramural elastic fibers with less dense and more fragmented external elastic laminae. Elastin degradation was associated with decreased physiological tethering force and longitudinal stress, while circumferential stress remained constant. FPA wall pathology was negatively associated with LPS (r = −0.553, p < 0.01), but the effect was due primarily to aging. LPS in the FPA may serve as an energy reserve for adaptive remodeling. Reduction of LPS due to degradation and fragmentation of intramural longitudinal elastin during aging can be accelerated in tobacco users. PMID:26766633

  15. Stretched Exponential Relaxation of Glasses at Low Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yingtian; Wang, Mengyi; Zhang, Dawei; Wang, Bu; Sant, Gaurav; Bauchy, Mathieu

    2015-10-01

    The question of whether glass continues to relax at low temperature is of fundamental and practical interest. Here, we report a novel atomistic simulation method allowing us to directly access the long-term dynamics of glass relaxation at room temperature. We find that the potential energy relaxation follows a stretched exponential decay, with a stretching exponent β =3 /5 , as predicted by Phillips's diffusion-trap model. Interestingly, volume relaxation is also found. However, it is not correlated to the energy relaxation, but it is rather a manifestation of the mixed alkali effect.

  16. Interventions for the treatment of stretch marks: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liping; Ma, Hong; Li, Yumei

    2014-08-01

    Stretch marks are a common disfiguring skin condition that can have a deep psychological impact on affected patients. Although there are a variety of treatments available, no consistently effective therapies have been established. In this systematic review, we evaluate 8 randomized controlled trials (RCTs) to assess the efficacy and safety of currently available therapies for the treatment of stretch marks. Due to the limited number of patients and high or unclear risk of bias in the studies included in this assessment, the evidence from this review is insufficient to provide clear guidelines for practice. Therefore, more high-quality RCTs are needed. PMID:25184641

  17. Effect of uniaxial stretching on rat bone mesenchymal stem cell: orientation and expressions of collagen types I and III and tenascin-C.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Kahn, Cyril J F; Chen, Huai-Qing; Tran, Nguyen; Wang, Xiong

    2008-03-01

    Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSC) have the potential to differentiate into a variety of cell types like osteoblasts, chondroblasts, adipocytes, etc. It is well known that mechanical forces regulate the biological function of cells. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of uniaxial stretching on the orientation and biological functions of BMSC. Rat BMSCs were harvested from femoral and tibial bone marrow by density gradient centrifugation. Cells from passages 1-6 were characterized by flow cytometry using monoclonal antibodies. The recovered cells were stably positive for the markers CD90 and CD44 and negative for CD34 and CD45. A cyclic 10% uniaxial stretching at 1Hz was applied on rat BMSC for different time-courses. The length, width, and orientation of the cells were subsequently determined. Expression of collagen types I and III and tenascin-C mRNAs was measured by real-time RT-PCR, and the synthesis of these receptors was determined by radioimmunoassay. Results showed that uniaxial stretching lengthened and rearranged the cells. Compared with control groups, expression of collagen types I and III mRNAs was up-regulated after 12-h of stretching, while significant increase in synthesis of the two collagen protein types was not observed until after 24-h stretching. The expression of tenascin-C mRNA was significantly increased after a 24-h stretching. These data suggest that cyclic stretching promotes the synthesis of collagen types I and III and tenascin-C by the rat BMSC. PMID:18294871

  18. Eccentric Muscle Contraction and Stretching Evoke Mechanical Hyperalgesia and Modulate CGRP and P2X3 Expression in a Functionally Relevant Manner

    PubMed Central

    Dessem, Dean; Ambalavanar, Ranjinidevi; Evancho, Melena; Moutanni, Aicha; Yallampalli, Chandrasekhar; Bai, Guang

    2010-01-01

    Non-invasive, movement-based models were used to investigate muscle pain. In rats, the masseter muscle was rapidly stretched or electrically stimulated during forced lengthening to produce eccentric muscle contractions (EC). Both EC and stretching disrupted scattered myofibers and produced intramuscular plasma extravasation. Pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, TNF-α, IL-6) and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) were elevated in the masseter 24h following EC. At 48h, neutrophils increased and ED1 macrophages infiltrated myofibers while ED2 macrophages were abundant at 4d. Mechanical hyperalgesia was evident in the ipsilateral head 4h-4d after a single bout of EC and for 7d following multiple bouts (1 bout/d for 4d). Calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) mRNA increased in the trigeminal ganglion 24h following EC while immunoreactive CGRP decreased. By 2d, CGRP-muscle afferent numbers equaled naive numbers implying that CGRP is released following EC and replenished within 2d. EC elevated P2X3 mRNA and increased P2X3-muscle afferent neuron number for 12d while electrical stimulation without muscle contraction altered neither CGRP nor P2X3 mRNA levels. Muscle stretching produced hyperalgesia for 2d whereas contraction alone produced no hyperalgesia. Stretching increased CGRP mRNA at 24h but not CGRP-muscle afferent number at 2–12d. In contrast, stretching significantly increased the number of P2X3-muscle afferent neurons for 12d. The sustained, elevated P2X3 expression evoked by EC and stretching may enhance nociceptor responsiveness to ATP released during subsequent myofiber damage. Movement-based actions such as EC and muscle stretching produce unique tissue responses and modulate neuropeptide and nociceptive receptor expression in a manner particularly relevant to repeated muscle damage. PMID:20207080

  19. Non-destructive quantification of alignment of nanorods embedded in uniaxially stretched polymer films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoenescu, Stefan; Truong, Vo-Van; Packirisamy, Muthukumaran

    2014-03-01

    Among several methods developed for uniaxial alignment of metallic nanorods for optical applications, alignment by film stretching consists in embedding the rods in a transparent thin film of thermoplastic polymer, followed by simultaneous heating and uniaxial stretching of the composite film. As to the quantification of the resulting alignment, it has been limited to statistical calculations based on microscopic examination, which is incomplete, subject to errors due to geometric distortions of the scanning electron microscope images and destructive, since it involves cutting of samples. In contrast, we present in this paper a non-destructive quantification of the average orientation of the rods, based on a probabilistic approach combined with numerical simulations of absorbance spectra and spectrometric characterization of the composite film. Assuming electromagnetically non-interacting rods, we consider the longitudinal absorbance peak of their ensemble to consist of the superposition of their individual spectra that we obtain by numerical simulation using the size and shape adapted dielectric function of the metal and the finite difference time domain method. The accuracy of the solution depends on the number of discretization intervals, the accuracy of the numerical simulations, and the accurate knowledge of the polydispersity of the rods. For the sake of concreteness, we used nanorods to describe the quantification steps but the method is equally valid for any dichroic particles.

  20. Forced convective heat transfer in boundary layer flow of Sisko fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet.

    PubMed

    Munir, Asif; Shahzad, Azeem; Khan, Masood

    2014-01-01

    The major focus of this article is to analyze the forced convective heat transfer in a steady boundary layer flow of Sisko fluid over a nonlinear stretching sheet. Two cases are studied, namely (i) the sheet with variable temperature (PST case) and (ii) the sheet with variable heat flux (PHF case). The heat transfer aspects are investigated for both integer and non-integer values of the power-law index. The governing partial differential equations are reduced to a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations using appropriate similarity variables and solved numerically. The numerical results are obtained by the shooting method using adaptive Runge Kutta method with Broyden's method in the domain[Formula: see text]. The numerical results for the temperature field are found to be strongly dependent upon the power-law index, stretching parameter, wall temperature parameter, material parameter of the Sisko fluid and Prandtl number. In addition, the local Nusselt number versus wall temperature parameter is also graphed and tabulated for different values of pertaining parameters. Further, numerical results are validated by comparison with exact solutions as well as previously published results in the literature. PMID:24949738

  1. Non-destructive quantification of alignment of nanorods embedded in uniaxially stretched polymer films

    SciTech Connect

    Stoenescu, Stefan Packirisamy, Muthukumaran; Truong, Vo-Van

    2014-03-21

    Among several methods developed for uniaxial alignment of metallic nanorods for optical applications, alignment by film stretching consists in embedding the rods in a transparent thin film of thermoplastic polymer, followed by simultaneous heating and uniaxial stretching of the composite film. As to the quantification of the resulting alignment, it has been limited to statistical calculations based on microscopic examination, which is incomplete, subject to errors due to geometric distortions of the scanning electron microscope images and destructive, since it involves cutting of samples. In contrast, we present in this paper a non-destructive quantification of the average orientation of the rods, based on a probabilistic approach combined with numerical simulations of absorbance spectra and spectrometric characterization of the composite film. Assuming electromagnetically non-interacting rods, we consider the longitudinal absorbance peak of their ensemble to consist of the superposition of their individual spectra that we obtain by numerical simulation using the size and shape adapted dielectric function of the metal and the finite difference time domain method. The accuracy of the solution depends on the number of discretization intervals, the accuracy of the numerical simulations, and the accurate knowledge of the polydispersity of the rods. For the sake of concreteness, we used nanorods to describe the quantification steps but the method is equally valid for any dichroic particles.

  2. NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION, GENERAL VIEW SHOWING TOWPATH BERM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    NORTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION, GENERAL VIEW SHOWING TOWPATH BERM (CENTER/RIGHT) AND CANAL PRISM (LEFT); VIEW TO SOUTH FROM FOOT OF THE "TOWN-LINE DUMP" - Blackstone Canal Worcester-Millbury Segment, Eastern bank of Blackstone River, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  3. SOUTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; CLOSER VIEW OF TRUNCATED NORTHERLY ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; CLOSER VIEW OF TRUNCATED NORTHERLY END OF TOWPATH BERM (RIGHT) AND CANAL PRISM (LEFT); VIEW TO SOUTH FROM LATER BORROW PIT - Blackstone Canal Worcester-Millbury Segment, Eastern bank of Blackstone River, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  4. SOUTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW OF TOWPATH BERM ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    SOUTHERLY STRETCH OF MILLBURY PORTION; GENERAL VIEW OF TOWPATH BERM (LEFT) AND CANAL PRISM (CENTER) WITH LATER EMBANKMENT OF U.S. ROUTE 20 RAMP ENCROACHING RIGHT; VIEW TO NORTH - Blackstone Canal Worcester-Millbury Segment, Eastern bank of Blackstone River, Millbury, Worcester County, MA

  5. Effects of Warm-Up Stretching Exercises on Sprint Performance

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Makaruk, Hubert; Makaruk, Beata; Kedra, Stanislaw

    2008-01-01

    Study aim: To assess direct effects of warm-up consisting of static and dynamic stretching exercises on sprint results attained by students differing in sprint performance. Material and methods: A group of 24 male and 19 female physical education students, including 12 and 9 sprinters, respectively. They performed warm-ups consisting of dynamic…

  6. Lesson Plans Are Being Reworked To Stretch Construction Dollars.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rubin, Debra K.; Rosta, Paul; Gonchar, Joann; Illia, Tony

    2002-01-01

    Discusses the search by school systems and construction professionals for new efficiencies in the face of economic pressures. Some are shrinking or stretching out construction programs and demanding better economies. Others are seeking new financial partners and non-traditional funding methods, or deciding that creating new school space does not…

  7. Laser-induced structure formation on stretched polymer foils

    SciTech Connect

    Bityurin, Nikita; Arnold, Nikita; Baeuerle, Dieter; Arenholz, Enno

    2007-04-15

    Noncoherent structures that develop during UV laser ablation of stretched semicrystalline polymer foils are a very general phenomenon. A thermodynamic model based on stress relaxation within the modified layer of the polymer surface describes the main features of the observed phenomena, and, in particular, the dependence of the period of structures on laser wavelength, fluence, and number of laser pulses.

  8. Crystallization of Stretched Polyimides: A Structure-Property Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hinkley, Jeffrey A.; Dezern, James F.

    2002-01-01

    A simple rotational isomeric state model was used to detect the degree to which polyimide repeat units might align to give an extended crystal. It was found experimentally that the hallmarks of stretch-crystallization were more likely to occur in materials whose molecules could readily give extended, aligned conformations. A proposed screening criterion was 84% accurate in selecting crystallizing molecules.

  9. Flow of Magnetohydrodynamic Micropolar Fluid Induced by Radially Stretching Sheets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayat, Tasawar; Nawaz, Muhammad; Hendi, Awatif A.

    2011-02-01

    We investigate the flow of a micropolar fluid between radial stretching sheets. The magnetohydrodynamic (MHD) nonlinear problem is treated using the homotopy analysis method (HAM) and the velocity profiles are predicted for the pertinent parameters. The values of skin friction and couple shear stress coefficients are obtained for various values of Reynolds number, Hartman number, and micropolar fluid parameter.

  10. Cooperativity among Short Amyloid Stretches in Long Amyloidogenic Sequences

    PubMed Central

    He, Zhisong; Shi, Xiaohe; Feng, Kaiyan; Ma, Buyong; Cai, Yu-Dong

    2012-01-01

    Amyloid fibrillar aggregates of polypeptides are associated with many neurodegenerative diseases. Short peptide segments in protein sequences may trigger aggregation. Identifying these stretches and examining their behavior in longer protein segments is critical for understanding these diseases and obtaining potential therapies. In this study, we combined machine learning and structure-based energy evaluation to examine and predict amyloidogenic segments. Our feature selection method discovered that windows consisting of long amino acid segments of ∼30 residues, instead of the commonly used short hexapeptides, provided the highest accuracy. Weighted contributions of an amino acid at each position in a 27 residue window revealed three cooperative regions of short stretch, resemble the β-strand-turn-β-strand motif in A-βpeptide amyloid and β-solenoid structure of HET-s(218–289) prion (C). Using an in-house energy evaluation algorithm, the interaction energy between two short stretches in long segment is computed and incorporated as an additional feature. The algorithm successfully predicted and classified amyloid segments with an overall accuracy of 75%. Our study revealed that genome-wide amyloid segments are not only dependent on short high propensity stretches, but also on nearby residues. PMID:22761773

  11. Stretching of DNA confined in nanochannels with charged walls

    PubMed Central

    Manneschi, Chiara; Fanzio, Paola; Angeli, Elena; Repetto, Luca; Valbusa, Ugo

    2014-01-01

    There is currently a growing interest in control of stretching of DNA inside nanoconfined regions due to the possibility to analyze and manipulate single biomolecules for applications such as DNA mapping and barcoding, which are based on stretching the DNA in a linear fashion. In the present work, we couple Finite Element Methods and Monte Carlo simulations in order to study the conformation of DNA molecules confined in nanofluidic channels with neutral and charged walls. We find that the electrostatic forces become more and more important when lowering the ionic strength of the solution. The influence of the nanochannel cross section geometry is also studied by evaluating the DNA elongation in square, rectangular, and triangular channels. We demonstrate that coupling electrostatically interacting walls with a triangular geometry is an efficient way to stretch DNA molecules at the scale of hundreds of nanometers. The paper reports experimental observations of λ-DNA molecules in poly(dimethylsiloxane) nanochannels filled with solutions of different ionic strength. The results are in good agreement with the theoretical predictions, confirming the crucial role of the electrostatic repulsion of the constraining walls on the molecule stretching. PMID:25553196

  12. Amplified stretch of bottlebrush-coated DNA in nanofluidic channels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ce; Hernandez-Garcia, Armando; Jiang, Kai; Gong, Zongying; Guttula, Durgarao; Ng, Siow Yee; Malar, Piravi P.; van Kan, Jeroen A.; Dai, Liang; Doyle, Patrick S.; de Vries, Renko; van der Maarel, Johan R. C.

    2013-01-01

    The effect of a cationic-neutral diblock polypeptide on the conformation of single DNA molecules confined in rectangular nanochannels is investigated with fluorescence microscopy. An enhanced stretch along the channel is observed with increased binding of the cationic block of the polypeptide to DNA. A maximum stretch of 85% of the contour length can be achieved inside a channel with a cross-sectional diameter of 200 nm and at a 2-fold excess of polypeptide with respect to DNA charge. With site-specific fluorescence labelling, it is demonstrated that this maximum stretch is sufficient to map large-scale genomic organization. Monte Carlo computer simulation shows that the amplification of the stretch inside the nanochannels is owing to an increase in bending rigidity and thickness of bottlebrush-coated DNA. The persistence lengths and widths deduced from the nanochannel data agree with what has been estimated from the analysis of atomic force microscopy images of dried complexes on silica. PMID:24003032

  13. Electrohydrodynamic direct-writing microfiber patterns under stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Gaofeng; Sun, Lingling; Wang, Xiang; Wei, Jin; Xu, Lei; Liu, Yifang; Zheng, Jianyi; Liu, Juan

    2016-02-01

    In this paper, the rheology and deposition behaviors of electrohydrodynamic direct-write (EDW) jet under stretching tension are studied. The EDW jet is stretched into tightened state by the drag force from moving collector, when moving speed of collector is higher than deposition velocity of jet. The drag force from the moving collector provides an extra force to stretch the charged jet, which promotes the stability and decreases the diameter of direct-written fiber. The whipping and bending motion of jet can be overcome by the drag force, and then, straight orderly fibers are direct-written along the trajectory of collector. The falling jet would be also deviated from the extension line of spinneret by the drag force. As the collector velocity increases from 10 to 1000 mm/s, the average line width of direct-written microfiber decreases from 18.89 to 0.89 µm. The thickness of microfiber ranges from 100 nm to 1.5 µm. The moving collector leads to large deviation of charged jet. The tightened charged jet has good resistance against the interference of charge repulsion force, which helps to direct-write orderly nanofiber. During the EDW process, the mechanical stretching force had provided an excellent function to control the morphology and deposition pattern of micro-/nanofiber.

  14. Impact of Cyclic Stretch on Induced Elastogenesis Within Collagenous Conduits

    PubMed Central

    Venkataraman, Lavanya; Bashur, Chris A.

    2014-01-01

    In vitro tissue engineering of vascular conduits requires a synergy between several external factors, including biochemical supplementation and mechanotranductive stimulation. The goal of this study was to improve adult human vascular smooth muscle cell orientation and elastic matrix synthesis within 3D tubular collagen gel constructs. We used a combination of elastogenic factors (EFs) previously tested in our lab, along with cyclic circumferential strains at low amplitude (2.5%) delivered at a range of frequencies (0.5, 1.5, and 3 Hz). After 21 days of culture, the constructs were analyzed for elastic matrix outcomes, activity of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs)-2 and −9, cell densities and phenotype, and mechanical properties of constructs. While cell densities remained unaffected by the addition of stretch, contractile phenotypic markers were elevated in all stretched constructs relative to control. Constructs cultured with EFs stretched at 1.5 Hz exhibited the maximum elastin mRNA expression and total matrix elastin (over sixfold vs. the static EFs control). MMP-2 content was comparable in all treatment conditions, but MMP-9 levels were elevated at the higher frequencies (1.5 and 3 Hz). Minimal circumferential orientation was achieved and the mechanical properties remained comparable among the treatment conditions. Overall, constructs treated with EFs and stretched at 1.5 Hz exhibited the most elastogenic outcomes. PMID:24313750

  15. Activation of a signaling cascade by cytoskeleton stretch.

    PubMed

    Tamada, Masako; Sheetz, Michael P; Sawada, Yasuhiro

    2004-11-01

    Cells sense and respond to mechanical force. However, the mechanisms of transduction of extracellular matrix (ECM) forces to biochemical signals are not known. After removing the cell membrane and soluble proteins by Triton X-100 extraction, we found that the remaining complex (Triton cytoskeletons) activated Rap1 upon stretch. Rap1 guanine nucleotide exchange factor, C3G, was required for this activation; C3G as well as the adaptor protein, CrkII, in cell extract bound to Triton cytoskeletons in a stretch-dependent manner. CrkII binding, which was Cas dependent, correlated with stretch-dependent tyrosine phosphorylation of proteins in Triton cytoskeletons including Cas at the contacts with ECM. These in vitro findings were compatible with in vivo observations of stretch-enhanced phosphotyrosine signals, accumulation of CrkII at cell-ECM contacts, and CrkII-Cas colocalization. We suggest that mechanical force on Triton cytoskeletons activates local tyrosine phosphorylation, which provides docking sites for cytosolic proteins, and initiates signaling to activate Rap1. PMID:15525532

  16. Effect of stretch on passive transport in toad urinary bladder.

    PubMed

    Lief, P D; Mutz, B F; Bank, N

    1976-06-01

    In order to gain further information about the effect of stretch on the urinary bladder of the toad, transepithelial movement of radioactive sucrose, chloride, and urea was measured across bladder sacs during acute changes in the internal volume. Short-circuit current (SCC) and total tissue conductance (Kt) were also measured in each experiment. It was found that sudden large increases or smaller graded increases in volume resulted in a consistent fall in the tracer permeability (P*) of all three isotopes. However, this fall was due entirely to the larger area term in the calculation of P* rather than any real change in isotope movement. When total diffusion (TD) of each isotope was calculated by a method that eliminated the changes in surface area, it was apparent that stretch produced no significant effects on the transepithelial movement of any of these three molecules. Large stretch also resulted in parallel increases in SCC and Kt in most bladders. We conclude from these observations that the intercellular pathway for sucrose and chloride and the transcellular pathway for urea are unaltered by degrees of stretch that enhance SCC and sodium transport. By inference, the observed increases in Kt appear to represent changes in specific active pathway conductance (Ka), and may relate importantly to the changes in sodium transport. PMID:820207

  17. Mass Spectrometry Imaging Using the Stretched Sample Approach

    PubMed Central

    Zimmerman, Tyler A.; Rubakhin, Stanislav S.; Sweedler, Jonathan V.

    2011-01-01

    Matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization (MALDI) mass spectrometry imaging (MSI) can determine tissue localization for a variety of analytes with high sensitivity, chemical specificity, and spatial resolution. MS image quality typically depends on the MALDI matrix application method used, particularly when the matrix solution or powder is applied directly to the tissue surface. Improper matrix application results in spatial redistribution of analytes and reduced MS signal quality. Here we present a stretched sample imaging protocol that removes the dependence of MS image quality on the matrix application process and improves analyte extraction and sample desalting. First, the tissue sample is placed on a monolayer of solid support beads that are embedded in a hydrophobic membrane. Stretching the membrane fragments the tissue into thousands of nearly single-cell sized islands, with the pieces physically isolated from each other by the membrane. This spatial isolation prevents analyte transfer between beads, allowing for longer exposure of the tissue fragments to the MALDI matrix, thereby improving detectability of small analyte quantities without sacrificing spatial resolution. When using this method to reconstruct chemical images, complications result from non-uniform stretching of the supporting membrane. Addressing this concern, several computational tools enable automated data acquisition at individual bead locations and allow reconstruction of ion images corresponding to the original spatial conformation of the tissue section. Using mouse pituitary, we demonstrate the utility of this stretched imaging technique for characterizing peptide distributions in heterogeneous tissues at nearly single-cell resolution. PMID:20680608

  18. Anticipatory motor patterns limit muscle stretch during landing in toads.

    PubMed

    Azizi, Emanuel; Abbott, Emily M

    2013-02-23

    To safely land after a jump or hop, muscles must be actively stretched to dissipate mechanical energy. Muscles that dissipate energy can be damaged if stretched to long lengths. The likelihood of damage may be mitigated by the nervous system, if anticipatory activation of muscles prior to impact alters the muscle's operating length. Anticipatory motor recruitment is well established in landing studies and motor patterns have been shown to be modulated based on the perceived magnitude of the impact. In this study, we examine whether motor recruitment in anticipation of landing can serve a protective function by limiting maximum muscle length during a landing event. We use the anconeus muscle of toads, a landing muscle whose recruitment is modulated in anticipation of landing. We combine in vivo measurements of muscle length during landing with in vitro characterization of the force-length curve to determine the muscle's operating length. We show that muscle shortening prior to impact increases with increasing hop distance. This initial increase in muscle shortening functions to accommodate the larger stretches required when landing after long hops. These predictive motor strategies may function to reduce stretch-induced muscle damage by constraining maximum muscle length, despite variation in the magnitude of impact. PMID:23256184

  19. Role of stretch reflex in voluntary movements. [of human foot

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gottlieb, G. L.; Agarwal, G. C.

    1975-01-01

    The stretch reflex is often described as a spinal servomechanism, a device for assisting in the regulation of muscle length. Observation of the EMG response to mechanical interruption of voluntary movements fails to demonstrate a significant role for spinal reflexes at 40 msec latency. Two functional responses with latencies of 120 msec and 200 msec, implying supraspinal mediation, are observed.

  20. Perspective view of the Fifteenth Street facade; this facade stretches ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    Perspective view of the Fifteenth Street facade; this facade stretches almost three city blocks but is partially masked by trees and relieved by four pedimented pavilions. At the time of its construction, this was the largest office building in the world. - United States Department of Commerce, Bounded by Fourteenth, Fifteenth, and E streets and Constitution Avenue, Washington, District of Columbia, DC

  1. Effects of stretching on maintaining the Kuroshio meander

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kurogi, Masao; Hasumi, Hiroyasu; Tanaka, Yukio

    2013-03-01

    Using a two-way nested-grid ocean general circulation model driven by a repeat annual cycle forcing, the Kuroshio path variation is examined by varying the strength of wind forcing. For climatological or 10% weaker wind forcing, both large-meander (LM) and non-large-meander (NLM) paths alternately appear, with each type of path continuing for a few years to a decade. This timescale and path transition processes are generally consistent with observations. For the LM path, the main balance in the depth-integrated vorticity equation for the upper ocean is shown to be between the beta, advection, and stretching terms. The stretching term is comparable to and has the same sign as the beta term at the western side of the meandering part, indicating that the stretching term has the effects of shortening the wavelength and stabilizing the LM path. The stretching term is mainly determined by downwelling caused by crossing of the upper and deep flows. Contrary to the above two cases, only the NLM path appears for 10% stronger wind forcing. It is suggested that the strength of climatological wind forcing is near the upper limit that allows the LM path to occur. In this study, the control experiment is carried out by choosing parameterizations and parameter values to reproduce the Kuroshio path variation as realistic as possible. Therefore, the results from the two sensitivity experiments are expected to represent a realistic response of the Kuroshio path variation.

  2. Hele-Shaw Experiments on Plume Stretching and Folding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foster, M.; Mays, D. C.; Neupauer, R. M.

    2013-12-01

    Fluid mixing in laminar flow is important in a number of practical applications, including remediation of contaminated groundwater. Recent modeling studies have shown that mixing can be accelerated and amplified by imposing a flow that generates stretching and folding of an injected plume of treatment solution. Stretching and folding, in turn, results from engineered injection and extraction of clean water through an array of wells surrounding the treatment solution. This poster describes a series of experiments whose goal is to demonstrate plume stretching and folding in a Hele-Shaw apparatus. An initial plume of treatment solution is injected into the center of the Hele-Shaw apparatus, which is assumed to represent a zone of contaminated groundwater, with four wells spaced evenly around the treatment solution. In order to spread the treatment solution into the groundwater, the four wells perform a series of infusions and withdrawals that push and pull apart the plume of treatment solution. With the proper steps, it will be shown that the plume can be stretched and folded to greatly increase the reactive interface area between the treatment solution and the contaminated groundwater. Consideration is given to two qualitative differences with respect to previous modeling studies. First, constant volume is required by the no-flow boundary used at the edge of the Hele-Shaw cell; any pump that is withdrawing water must have a complementary pump adding water at the same rate. Second, in these experiments, mixing results from a physical process, namely Taylor dispersion, eliminating the uncertainty resulting from the need to assume dispersion mechanisms in numerical models. Therefore, these experiments further elucidate the benefits and challenges of imposing plume stretching and folding in systems (like aquifers) where dispersion is unavoidable, providing new insight into the required logistics of using this approach in groundwater treatment.

  3. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R; Crone, Wendy C; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H; Chesler, Naomi C

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  4. Stretch calculated from grip distance accurately approximates mid-specimen stretch in large elastic arteries in uniaxial tensile tests

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Lian; Henningsen, Joseph; Salick, Max R.; Crone, Wendy C.; Gunderson, McLean; Dailey, Seth H.; Chesler, Naomi C.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical properties of vascular tissues affect hemodynamics and can alter disease progression. The uniaxial tensile test is a simple and effective method for determining the stress-strain relationship in arterial tissue ex vivo. To enable calculation of strain, stretch can be measured directly with image tracking of markers on the tissue or indirectly from the distance between the grips used to hold the specimen. While the imaging technique is generally considered more accurate, it also requires more analysis, and the grip distance method is more widely used. The purpose of this study is to compare the stretch of the testing specimen calculated from the grip distance method to that obtained from the imaging method for canine descending aortas and large proximal pulmonary arteries. Our results showed a significant difference in stretch between the two methods; however, this difference was consistently less than 2%. Therefore, the grip distance method is an accurate approximation of the stretch in large elastic arteries in the uniaxial tensile test. PMID:25881308

  5. Stretch-activation and stretch-inactivation of Shaker-IR, a voltage-gated K+ channel.

    PubMed Central

    Gu, C X; Juranka, P F; Morris, C E

    2001-01-01

    Mechanosensitive (MS) ion channels are ubiquitous in eukaryotic cell types but baffling because of their contentious physiologies and diverse molecular identities. In some cellular contexts mechanically responsive ion channels are undoubtedly mechanosensory transducers, but it does not follow that all MS channels are mechanotransducers. Here we demonstrate, for an archetypical voltage-gated channel (Shaker-IR; inactivation-removed), robust MS channel behavior. In oocyte patches subjected to stretch, Shaker-IR exhibits both stretch-activation (SA) and stretch-inactivation (SI). SA is seen when prestretch P(open) (set by voltage) is low, and SI is seen when it is high. The stretch effects occur in cell-attached and excised patches at both macroscopic and single-channel levels. Were one ignorant of this particular MS channel's identity, one might propose it had been designed as a sophisticated reporter of bilayer tension. Knowing Shaker-IR's provenance and biology, however, such a suggestion would be absurd. We argue that the MS responses of Shaker-IR reflect not overlooked "mechano-gating" specializations of Shaker, but a common property of multiconformation membrane proteins: inherent susceptibility to bilayer tension. The molecular diversity of MS channels indicates that susceptibility to bilayer tension is hard to design out of dynamic membrane proteins. Presumably the cost of being insusceptible to bilayer tension often outweighs the benefits, especially where the in situ milieu of channels can provide mechanoprotection. PMID:11371444

  6. Effects of Bed Rest on Conduction Velocity of the Triceps Surae Stretch Reflex and Postural Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reschke, M. F.; Wood, S. J.; Cerisano, J. M.; Kofman, I. S.; Fisher, E. A.; Esteves, J. T.; Taylor, L. C.; DeDios, Y. E.; Harm, D. L.

    2011-01-01

    Despite rigorous exercise and nutritional management during space missions, astronauts returning from microgravity exhibit neuromuscular deficits and a significant loss in muscle mass in the postural muscles of the lower leg. Similar changes in the postural muscles occur in subjects participating in long-duration bed rest studies. These adaptive muscle changes manifest as a reduction in reflex conduction velocity during head-down bed rest. Because the stretch reflex encompasses both the peripheral (muscle spindle and nerve axon) and central (spinal synapse) components involved in adaptation to calf muscle unloading, it may be used to provide feedback on the general condition of neuromuscular function, and might be used to evaluate the effectiveness of countermeasures aimed at preserving muscle mass and function during periods of unloading. Stretch reflexes were measured on 18 control subjects who spent 60 to 90 days in continuous 6 deg head-down bed rest. Using a motorized system capable of rotating the foot around the ankle joint (dorsiflexion) through an angle of 10 degrees at a peak velocity of about 250 deg/sec, a stretch reflex was recorded from the subject's left triceps surae muscle group. Using surface electromyography, about 300 reflex responses were obtained and ensemble-averaged on 3 separate days before bed rest, 3 to 4 times in bed, and 3 times after bed rest. The averaged responses for each test day were examined for reflex latency and conduction velocity (CV) across gender. Computerized posturography was also conducted on these same subjects before and after bed rest as part of the standard measures. Peak-to-peak sway was measured during Sensory Organization Tests (SOTs) to evaluate changes in the ability to effectively use or suppress visual, vestibular, and proprioceptive information for postural control. Although no gender differences were found, a significant increase in reflex latency and a significant decrease in CV were observed during the bed

  7. Ethanol induced adaptations in 5-HT2c receptor signaling in the bed nucleus of the stria terminalis: implications for anxiety during ethanol withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Marcinkiewcz, Catherine A; Dorrier, Cayce E; Lopez, Alberto J; Kash, Thomas L

    2015-02-01

    One of the hallmarks of alcohol dependence is the presence of a withdrawal syndrome during abstinence, which manifests as physical craving for alcohol accompanied by subjective feelings of anxiety. Using a model of chronic intermittent ethanol (CIE) vapor in mice, we investigated the role of serotonin2c receptor (5HT2c-R) signaling in the BNST as a neural substrate underlying ethanol-induced anxiety during withdrawal. Mice were subjected to a 5-day CIE regimen of 16 h of ethanol vapor exposure followed by an 8 h "withdrawal" period between exposures. After the 5th and final exposure, mice were withdrawn for 24 h or 1 week before experiments began. Anxiety-like behavior was assessed in the social approach, light dark, and open field tests with mice showing deficits in social, but not general anxiety-like behavior that was alleviated by pretreatment with the 5HT2c-R antagonist SB 242,084 (3 mg/kg, i.p.) 24 h and 1 week post-CIE. Using immunohistochemistry and whole cell patch clamp electrophysiology, we also found that CIE increased FOS-IR and enhanced neuronal excitability in the ventral BNST (vBNST) 24 h into withdrawal in a 5HT2c-R dependent manner. This enhanced excitability persisted for 1 week post-CIE. We also found that mCPP, a 5HT2c/b agonist, induced a more robust depolarization in cells of the vBNST in CIE mice, confirming that 5HT2c-R signaling is upregulated in the vBNST following CIE. Taken together, these results suggest that CIE upregulates 5HT2c-R signaling in the vBNST, leading to increased excitability. This enhanced excitability of the vBNST may drive increased anxiety-like behavior during ethanol withdrawal. PMID:25229718

  8. Impaired recovery of brain muscarinic receptor sites following an adaptive down-regulation induced by repeated administration of diisopropyl fluorophosphate in aged rats

    SciTech Connect

    Pintor, A.; Fortuna, S.; De Angelis, S.; Michalek, H. )

    1990-01-01

    Potential age-related differences in the recovery rate of brain cholinesterase activity (ChE) and muscarinic acetylcholine receptor binding sites (mAChRs) following reduction induced by repeated treatment with diisopropyl fluorophosphate (DFP) were evaluated in Sprague-Dawley rats. Male 3- and 24-month old rats were s.c. injected with DFP on alternate days for 2 weeks and killed 48 hr and 7, 14, 21, 28 and 35 days after the last treatment. In the hippocampus and striatum, but not in the cerebral cortex, of control rats there as a significant age-related decline of ChE activity and maximal density of 3H-QNB binding sites (Bmax). The repeated administration of DFP during the first week caused a syndrome of cholinergic stimulation both in aged and young rats. The syndrome was more pronounced, in terms of intensity and duration in aged than in young animals resulting in 40 and 12% mortality, respectively; during the second week the syndrome attenuated in the two age-groups. The percentage inhibition of brain ChE at the end of DFP treatment did not differ between young and surviving aged rats. The down-regulation of mACRs was present in the three brain regions of both young and age rats (from 20 to 40%). Factorial analysis of variance showed significant differences for age, recovery rate, and significant interaction between age and recovery rate, both for ChE and mAChRs in young rats the three brain areas.

  9. Signaling through Purinergic Receptors for ATP Induces Human Cutaneous Innate and Adaptive Th17 Responses: Implications in the Pathogenesis of Psoriasis

    PubMed Central

    Killeen, Meaghan E.; Ferris, Laura; Kupetsky, Erine A.; Falo, Louis; Mathers, Alicia R.

    2013-01-01

    Human cutaneous DCs have the ability to prime and bias Th17 lymphocytes. However, the factors that stimulate cutaneous DCs to induce Th17 responses are not well known. Alarmins, such as ATP, likely play a pivotal role in the induction and maintenance of cutaneous immune responses by stimulating DC maturation, chemotaxis, and secretion of IL-1β and IL-6, Th17 biasing cytokines. Here, utilizing a well-established human skin model we have demonstrated that signaling purinergic receptors, predominantly P2X7R, via an ATP analog initiates innate proinflammatory inflammation, DC17 differentiation, and the subsequent induction of Th17 biased immunity. Moreover, our results suggest a potential role for P2X7R signaling in the initiation of psoriasis pathogenesis, a Th17 dependent autoimmune disease. In support of this, we observed the increased presence of P2X7R in non-lesional and lesional psoriatic skin compared to normal healthy tissues. Interestingly, there was also a P2X7R variant (P2X7RB) that was highly expressed in lesional psoriatic skin compared to non-lesional psoriatic and normal healthy skin. Furthermore, we demonstrated that psoriatic responses could be initiated via P2X7R signaling in non-lesional skin following treatment with a P2X7R agonist. Mechanistic studies revealed a P2X7R-dependent mir-21 angiogenesis pathway that leads to the expression of VEGF and IL-6, and which may be involved in the development of psoriatic lesions. In conclusion, we have established that purinergic signaling in the skin induces innate inflammation leading to the differentiation of human Th17 responses, which have implications in the pathogenesis and potential treatment of psoriasis. PMID:23479230

  10. A vorticity stretching diagnostic for turbulent and transitional flows

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Malm, Johan; Schlatter, Philipp; Sandham, Neil D.

    2012-12-01

    Vorticity stretching in wall-bounded turbulent and transitional flows has been investigated by means of a new diagnostic measure, denoted by Γ, designed to pick up regions with large amounts of vorticity stretching. It is based on the maximum vorticity stretching component in every spatial point, thus yielding a three-dimensional scalar field. The measure was applied in four different flows with increasing complexity: (a) the near-wall cycle in an asymptotic suction boundary layer (ASBL), (b) K-type transition in a plane channel flow, (c) fully turbulent channel flow at Re τ = 180 and (d) a complex turbulent three-dimensional separated flow. Instantaneous data show that the coherent structures associated with intense vorticity stretching in all four cases have the shape of flat `pancake' structures in the vicinity of high-speed streaks, here denoted `h-type' events. The other event found is of `l-type', present on top of an unstable low-speed streak. These events (l-type) are further thought to be associated with the exponential growth of streamwise vorticity in the turbulent near-wall cycle. It was found that the largest occurrence of vorticity stretching in the fully turbulent wall-bounded flows is present at a wall-normal distance of y + = 6.5, i.e. in the transition between the viscous sublayer and buffer layer. The associated structures have a streamwise length of ~200-300 wall units. In K-type transition, the Γ-measure accurately locates the regions of interest, in particular the formation of high-speed streaks near the wall (h-type) and the appearance of the hairpin vortex (l-type). In the turbulent separated flow, the structures containing large amounts of vorticity stretching increase in size and magnitude in the shear layer upstream of the separation bubble but vanish in the backflow region itself. Overall, the measure proved to be useful in showing growing instabilities before they develop into structures, highlighting the mechanisms creating high

  11. "Stretch Your Body and Your Mind" (Tai Chi as an Adaptive Activity).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crider, Duane A.; Klinger, William

    Tai Chi may be an ideal activity for accommodating a wide variety of individuals with varying interests and physical skills while providing substantial health benefits. Theory suggests that children, adolescents, and healthy adults, as well as senior citizens and people debilitated by illness or injury, may benefit from the practice of Tai Chi…

  12. Force responses to controlled stretches of electrically stimulated human muscle-tendon complex.

    PubMed

    Cook, C S; McDonagh, M J

    1995-05-01

    Human first dorsal interosseus muscle was tetanized using percutaneous electrical stimulation. During the tetanus the muscle was subjected to constant velocity stretches. The stretch produced an enhancement of muscular force of up to 80% during the stretch. The size of the enhancement was dependent on both the amplitude and the velocity of the stretch. During an isometric hold phase after the stretch, the force decayed quickly for the first 100 ms and thereafter much more slowly, reaching a level 30% higher than the isometric force without pre-stretch. The force during this hold phase was dependent on amplitude of stretch but was independent of stretch velocity. The interaction of tendon elasticity and muscle fibre mechanics in producing these responses is discussed. Implications for normal human movements are also explored. PMID:7640012

  13. A systematic literature review of the relationship between stretching and athletic injury prevention.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Athletic-related injuries are a major cause for healthcare visits and financial burden for an otherwise healthy population of adults. The purpose of this article was to investigate the effects of stretching on injury prevention and to determine whether current stretching guidelines are beneficial for athletes. A systematic review of the literature was conducted through searching MEDLINE and CINAHL on topics related to stretching and injury prevention. Current belief is that stretching reduces injury incidence and that it should be performed prior to athletic activities. An examination of 11 articles provided inconclusive outcomes regarding the positive effect of stretching on injury prevention. A sport or activity-specific tailored stretch and warm-up program yielded the best outcomes in relation to preventing injuries. Direct negative effects of stretching were not identified; therefore, the application of stretching should be performed on an individual basis. PMID:25401202

  14. Color enhancement of highly correlated images. I - Decorrelation and HSI contrast stretches. [hue saturation intensity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gillespie, Alan R.; Kahle, Anne B.; Walker, Richard E.

    1986-01-01

    Conventional enhancements for the color display of multispectral images are based on independent contrast modifications or 'stretches' of three input images. This approach is not effective if the image channels are highly correlated or if the image histograms are strongly bimodal or more complex. Any of several procedures that tend to 'stretch' color saturation while leaving hue unchanged may better utilize the full range of colors for the display of image information. Two conceptually different enhancements are discussed: the 'decorrelation stretch', based on principal-component (PC) analysis, and the 'stretch' of 'hue' - 'saturation' - intensity (HSI) transformed data. The PC transformation in scene-dependent, but the HSI transformation is invariant. Examples of images enhanced by conventional linear stretches, decorrelation stretch, and by stretches of HSI transformed data are compared. Schematic variation diagrams or two- and three-dimensional histograms are used to illustrate the 'decorrelation stretch' method and the effect of the different enhancements.

  15. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  16. Crack opening stretch in a plate of finite width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Bakioglu, M.

    1974-01-01

    The problem of a uniaxially stressed plate of finite width containing a centrally located damage zone is considered. It is assumed that the flaw may be represented by a part-through crack perpendicular to the plate surface, the net ligaments in the plane of the crack and through-the-thickness narrow strips ahead of the crack ends are fully yielded, and in the yielded sections the material may carry only a constant normal traction with magnitude equal to the yield strength. The problem is solved by neglecting the bending effects and the crack opening stretches at the center and the ends of the crack are obtained. Some applications of the results are indicated by using the concepts of critical crack opening stretch and constant slope plastic instability.

  17. Stretching and bending in cross-linked biopolymer networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heussinger, Claus; Frey, Erwin

    2007-03-01

    The elastic response of cross-linked biopolymer networks is usually interpreted in terms of affine stretching models, adopted from the theory of rubber-elasticity valid for flexible polymer gels. Unlike flexible polymers, however, stiff polymers have a highly anisotropic elastic response, where the low-energy elastic excitations are actually of bending nature. As a consequence, similar to springs connected in series, one would expect the softer bending mode to dominate the elastic energy rather than the stiff stretching mode. We propose a theory that, unlike recent affine models, properly accounts for the soft bending response of stiff polymers. It allows calculating the macroscopic elastic moduli starting from a microscopic characterization of the (non-affine) deformation field. The calculated scaling properties for the shear modulus are in excellent agreement with the results of recent simulations obtained in simple two-dimensional model networks, and can also be applied to rationalize bulk rheological data in reconstituted actin networks.

  18. Quantized Evolution of the Plasmonic Response in a Stretched Nanorod

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rossi, Tuomas P.; Zugarramurdi, Asier; Puska, Martti J.; Nieminen, Risto M.

    2015-12-01

    Quantum aspects, such as electron tunneling between closely separated metallic nanoparticles, are crucial for understanding the plasmonic response of nanoscale systems. We explore quantum effects on the response of the conductively coupled metallic nanoparticle dimer. This is realized by stretching a nanorod, which leads to the formation of a narrowing atomic contact between the two nanorod ends. Based on first-principles time-dependent density-functional-theory calculations, we find a discontinuous evolution of the plasmonic response as the nanorod is stretched. This is especially pronounced for the intensity of the main charge-transfer plasmon mode. We show the correlation between the observed discontinuities and the discrete nature of the conduction channels supported by the formed atomic-sized junction.

  19. Rotational stretched exponential relaxation in random trap-barrier model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aydiner, Ekrem

    2015-07-01

    The relaxation behavior of complex-disordered systems, such as spin glasses, polymers, colloidal suspensions, structural glasses,and granular media, has not been clarified. Theoretical studies show that relaxation in these systems has a topological origin. In this paper, we focus on the rotational stretched exponential relaxation behavior in complex-disordered systems and introduce a simple phase space model to understand the mechanism of the non-exponential relaxation of these systems. By employing the Monte Carlo simulation method to the model, we obtain the rotational relaxation function as a function of temperature. We show that the relaxation function has a stretched exponential form under the critical temperature while it obeys the Debye law above the critical temperature. Project supported by Istanbul University (Grant Nos. 28432 and 45662).

  20. Crack opening stretch in a plate of finite width

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erdogan, F.; Bakioglu, M.

    1975-01-01

    The problem of a uniaxially stressed plate of finite width containing a centrally located damage zone is considered. It is assumed that the flaw may be represented by a part-through crack perpendicular to the plate surface, the net ligaments in the plane of the crack and through-the-thickness narrow strips ahead of the crack ends are fully yielded, and in the yielded sections the material may carry only a constant normal traction with magnitude equal to the yield strength. The problem is solved by neglecting the bending effects and the crack opening stretches at the center and the ends of the crack are obtained. Some applications of the results are indicated by using the concepts of critical crack opening stretch and constant slope plastic instability.

  1. Vibrational overtone stretching transitions in trimethyl phosophate and triethyl phosophate

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Petryk, Michael W. P.

    2007-04-01

    The CH stretching overtone transitions of chemical warfare agents are of interest in the area of threat detection, including standoff threat detection, as many of these transitions occur near regions where small, efficient diode lasers operate. Further, detectors which operate in the regions where CH overtone transitions occur (i.e., in the near infrared and visible regions) are usually much more sensitive than detectors which operate in the region where fundamental CH vibrational transitions occur (i.e., in the mid infrared). However, the interpretation of experimental overtone spectra is complex, and the computational simulation of overtone spectra is challenging. Presented herein are the simulated vapour phase CH overtone stretching transitions in the nerve agent simulants trimethyl phosophate and triethyl phosophate. Spectral regions are simulated using the harmonically coupled anharmonic oscillator (HCAO) model. Data for HCAO calculations are obtained from ab initio calculations, without recourse to experimental data.

  2. Growth on demand: Reviewing the mechanobiology of stretched skin

    PubMed Central

    Zöllner, Alexander M.; Holland, Maria A.; Honda, Kord S.; Gosain, Arun K.; Kuhl, Ellen

    2013-01-01

    Skin is a highly dynamic, autoregulated, living system that responds to mechanical stretch through a net gain in skin surface area. Tissue expansion uses the concept of controlled overstretch to grow extra skin for defect repair in situ. While the short-term mechanics of stretched skin have been studied intensely by testing explanted tissue samples ex vivo, we know very little about the long-term biomechanics and mechanobiology of living skin in vivo. redHere we explore the long-term effects of mechanical stretch on the characteristics of living skin using a mathematical model for skin growth. We review the molecular mechanisms by which skin responds to mechanical loading and model their effects collectively in a single scalar-valued internal variable, the surface area growth. redThis allows us to adopt a continuum model for growing skin based on the multiplicative decomposition of the deformation gradient into a reversible elastic and an irreversible growth part.redTo demonstrate the inherent modularity of this approach, we implement growth as a user-defined constitutive subroutine into the general purpose implicit finite element program Abaqus/Standard. To illustrate the features of the model, we simulate the controlled area growth of skin in response to tissue expansion with multiple filling points in time. Our results demonstrate that the field theories of continuum mechanics can reliably predict the manipulation of thin biological membranes through mechanical overstretch. Our model could serve as a valuable tool to rationalize clinical process parameters such as expander geometry, expander size, filling volume, filling pressure, and inflation timing to minimize tissue necrosis and maximize patient comfort in plastic and reconstructive surgery. While initially developed for growing skin, our model can easily be generalized to arbitrary biological structures to explore the physiology and pathology of stretch-induced growth of other living systems such as hearts

  3. Revisiting the Galileo Probe results by a stretched atmospheric mode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Cheng; Ingersoll, Andrew P.; Janssen, Michael A.

    2015-11-01

    The Juno spacecraft will arrive at Jupiter in the late 2016. One of its major scientific target is to measure the deep water abundance through its Microwave Radiometer (MWR). Prior to the arrival of Juno, the only observation of the weather layer of Jupiter was the Galileo probe (Niemann et al. 1996; Wong et al. 2004), which returned puzzling results. In contrast to the detected 2 - 5 times enrichment of CH4, NH3 and H2S with respect to the solar values, the amount of water was severely subsolar. Three dimensional modeling (Showman & Dowling 2000) shows that dynamic dry downdrafts could create a huge trough in the material surface, such that air flowing through the hot spots undergoes a temporary increase in pressure by a factor of 2, though it is still too small to explain the Galileo probe results. Inspired by the 3D modeling result, we constructed a stretched atmospheric model to parameterize the alteration of the thermodynamic state of air parcel by dynamics. In our model, an air parcel is initially in its equilibrium condensation state and later has been dynamically stretched to higher pressure modeled by a multiplicative factor S. When S=1, the atmosphere is unaltered by dynamics, representing the equilibrium condensation model. We found that, when S=4, the mixing ratios of H2O, NH3 and H2S match all observations coming from the Galileo probe site. Thus, this stretch parameter provides a continuous representation of dynamic processes from the equilibrium condensation model to the Galileo probe results. We also show that the strength of stretch (S) can be retrieved from Juno/MWR limb darkening observations.

  4. The effects of strain heating in lithospheric stretching models

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stanton, M.; Hodge, D.; Cozzarelli, F.

    1985-01-01

    The deformation by stretching of a continental type lithosphere has been formulated so that the problem can be solved by a continuum mechanical approach. The deformation, stress state, and temperature distribution are constrained to satisfy the physical laws of conservation of mass, energy, momentum, and an experimentally defined rheological response. The conservation of energy equation including a term of strain energy dissipation is given. The continental lithosphere is assumed to have the rheology of an isotropic, incompressible, nonlinear viscous, two layered solid.

  5. 34. VIEW FROM STATION 78 OF STRETCH SLING HYDRAULIC CYLINDER, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    34. VIEW FROM STATION 78 OF STRETCH SLING HYDRAULIC CYLINDER, PULLEY, AND LANYARDS LOCATED ON EAST SIDE OF SLC-3W MST STATION 85.5. LANYARDS (STOWED BEHIND SOME TUBING ON STATION 78 IN THIS PHOTO) PASS THROUGH OPENINGS IN STATION 78 TO BE ATTACHED NEAR TOP OF ATLAS AIRFRAME. - Vandenberg Air Force Base, Space Launch Complex 3, Launch Pad 3 West, Napa & Alden Roads, Lompoc, Santa Barbara County, CA

  6. Regulation of dendritic cell migration and adaptive immune response by leukotriene B4 receptors: a role for LTB4 in up-regulation of CCR7 expression and function

    PubMed Central

    Del Prete, Annalisa; Shao, Wen-Hai; Mitola, Stefania; Santoro, Giuseppe; Sozzani, Silvano; Haribabu, Bodduluri

    2007-01-01

    Trafficking of dendritic cells (DCs) to peripheral tissues and to secondary lymphoid organs depends on chemokines and lipid mediators. Here, we show that bone marrow–derived DCs (BM-DCs) express functional leukotriene B4 (LTB4) receptors as observed in dose-dependent chemotaxis and calcium mobilization responses. LTB4, at low concentrations, promoted the migration of immature and mature DCs to CCL19 and CCL21, which was associated with a rapid (30-minute) increase of CCR7 expression at the membrane level. At longer incubation times (6 hours), gene array analysis revealed a promoting role of LTB4, showing a significant increase of CCR7 and CCL19 mRNA levels. BM-DCs cultured from BLT1−/− or BLT1/2−/− mice showed a normal phenotype, but in vivo BLT1/2−/−DCs showed dramatic decrease in migration to the draining lymph nodes relative to wild-type (WT) DCs. Consistent with these observations, BLT1/2−/− mice showed a reduced response in a model of 2,4-dinitro-fluorobenzene (DNFB)–induced contact hypersensitivity. Adoptive transfer of 2,4-dinitrobenzene sulfonic acid (DNBS)–pulsed DCs directly implicated the defect in DC migration to lymph node with the defect in contact hypersensitivity. These results provide strong evidence for a role of LTB4 in regulating DC migration and the induction of adaptive immune responses. PMID:16985179

  7. Toll-Like Receptor Adaptor MyD88 is Essential for Pathogen Control During Oral Toxoplasma gondii Infection but not Adaptive Immunity Induced by a Vaccine Strain of the Parasite1

    PubMed Central

    Sukhumavasi, Woraporn; Egan, Charlotte E.; Warren, Amy L.; Taylor, Gregory A.; Fox, Barbara A.; Bzik, David J.; Denkers, Eric Y.

    2008-01-01

    Toll-like receptor (TLR)/MyD88 activation is important in host resistance to Toxoplasma gondii during i. p. infection, but the function of this signaling pathway during oral infection, in which mucosal immunity assumes a predominant role, has not been examined. Here, we show that MyD88−/− mice fail to control the parasite and succumb within two weeks of oral infection. Early during infection, T cell IFN-γ production, recruitment of neutrophils and induction of p47 GTPase Irgm3/IGTP in the intestinal mucosa were dependent upon functional MyD88. Unexpectedly, these responses were MyD88-independent later during acute infection. In particular, CD4+ T cell IFN-γ reached normal levels independently of MyD88, despite continued absence of IL-12 in these animals. Intraperitoneal vaccination of MyD88−/− mice with an avirulent T. gondii uracil axotroph elicited robust IFN-γ responses and protective immunity to challenge with a high virulence T. gondii strain. Our results demonstrate that MyD88 is required to control Toxoplasma infection, but that the parasite can trigger adaptive immunity without the need for this TLR adaptor molecule. PMID:18714019

  8. Platelet activation via the collagen receptor GPVI is not altered in platelets from chronic myeloid leukaemia patients despite the presence of the constitutively phosphorylated adapter protein CrkL.

    PubMed

    Best, D; Pasquet, S; Littlewood, T J; Brunskill, S J; Pallister, C J; Watson, S P

    2001-03-01

    In this study, we show that the adapter proteins CrkL and Cbl undergo increases in tyrosine phosphorylation and form an intracellular complex in platelets stimulated with the snake venom toxin convulxin, a selective agonist at the collagen receptor glycoprotein VI (GPVI). Constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of CrkL has previously been reported in platelets from chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML) patients. This was confirmed in the present study, and shown to result in a weak constitutive association of CrkL with Cbl and a number of other unidentified tyrosine-phosphorylated proteins. There was no further increase in phosphorylation of CrkL in CML platelets in response to GPVI activation, whereas phosphorylation of Cbl and its association with CrkL were potentiated. In addition, this was accompanied by a small increase in p42/ 44 mapkinase (MAPK) activity in CML platelets. The functional consequence of the presence of constitutively phosphorylated proteins in CML platelets was investigated by measurement of aminophospholipid exposure and alpha-granule secretion. This revealed little alteration in the concentration-response curves for either in CML platelets stimulated via GPVI, although maximal levels of P-selectin were depressed. Despite the minimal effect on platelet activation in CML patients, we cannot exclude a role for CrkL or Cbl in signal transduction pathways stimulated via GPVI. PMID:11260061

  9. Fibril orientation redistribution induced by stretching of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Josefsson, Gabriella; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel; Gamstedt, E. Kristofer

    2015-06-01

    The mechanical performance of materials reinforced by cellulose nanofibrils is highly affected by the orientation of these fibrils. This paper investigates the nanofibril orientation distribution of films of partly oriented cellulose nanofibrils. Stripes of hydrogel films were subjected to different amount of strain and, after drying, examined with X-ray diffraction to obtain the orientation of the nanofibrils in the films, caused by the stretching. The cellulose nanofibrils had initially a random in-plane orientation in the hydrogel films and the strain was applied to the films before the nanofibrils bond tightly together, which occurs during drying. The stretching resulted in a reorientation of the nanofibrils in the films, with monotonically increasing orientation towards the load direction with increasing strain. Estimation of nanofibril reorientation by X-ray diffraction enables quantitative comparison of the stretch-induced orientation ability of different cellulose nanofibril systems. The reorientation of nanofibrils as a consequence of an applied strain is also predicted by a geometrical model of deformation of nanofibril hydrogels. Conversely, in high-strain cold-drawing of wet cellulose nanofibril materials, the enhanced orientation is promoted by slipping of the effectively stiff fibrils.

  10. Anomalous thermal response of silicene to uniaxial stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Ming; Zhang, Xiaoliang; Poulikakos, Dimos

    2013-05-01

    Silicene—the silicon counterpart of graphene—has a two-dimensional structure that leads to a host of interesting physical and chemical properties of significant utility. We report here an investigation with nonequilibrium molecular dynamics simulations of thermal transport in a single-layer silicene sheet under uniaxial stretching. We discovered that, contrary to its counterpart of graphene and despite the similarity of their honeycomb lattice structure, silicene exhibits an anomalous thermal response to tensile strain: The thermal conductivity of silicene and silicene nanoribbons first increases significantly with applied tensile strain rather than decreasing and then fluctuates at an elevated plateau. By quantifying the relative contribution from different phonon polarizations, we show first that the phonon transport in silicene is dominated by the out-of-plane flexural modes, similar to graphene. We attribute subsequently the unexpected and markedly different behavior of silicene to the interplay between two competing mechanisms governing heat conduction in a stretched silicene sheet, namely, (1) uniaxial stretching modulation in the longitudinal direction significantly depressing the phonon group velocities of longitudinal and transverse modes (phonon softening) and hindering heat conduction, and (2) phonon stiffening in the flexural modes counteracting the phonon softening effect and facilitating thermal transport. The abnormal behavior of the silicene sheet is further correlated to the unique deformation characteristics of its hexagonal lattice. Our study offers perspectives of modulating the thermal properties of low-dimensional structures for applications such as thermoelectric, photovoltaic, and optoelectronic devices.

  11. Electret properties of biaxially stretched polypropylene films containing various additives

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hillenbrand, J.; Behrendt, N.; Altstädt, V.; Schmidt, H.-W.; Sessler, G. M.

    2006-02-01

    Isotactic polypropylene (i-PP) films containing additives such as the commercial α -nucleation agent NA11 and the anorganic filler particles CaCO3 and Al2O3 were biaxially stretched. As a result, the films assume a cellular morphology with oblong cavities extending in the direction of the film elongation. In the present study, stretched films of 50 µm thickness with additive concentrations of 0.05-10 mass per cent were charged with a corona method to potentials of 400 or 500 V. The stability of the charges was tested isothermally at temperatures of 90 and 120 °C and by means of thermally stimulated discharge (TSD) experiments. The isothermal measurements show, for the above additives with concentrations higher than about 0.3%, a reduction of the charge decay with increasing additive concentrations. Compared with reference films of pure PP, the potential decay of the films containing additive concentrations of 10% is significantly reduced. Correspondingly, the TSD measurements indicate a shift of the main discharge peak to higher temperatures up to the melting temperature. Generally, the voiding and thus the stability also increases with the stretching ratio. These improvements of the charge stability are attributed to the barrier effect of the cavities. The results are of interest with respect to the various applications of PP electrets, such as ferroelectret devices and air filters.

  12. Study on stretching effect of multiple die forming technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Park, Ji-woo; Kim, Jeong; Kang, Beom-soo

    2013-12-01

    The multiple die forming (MDF) technology is suitable for flexible manufacturing, and it affords several advantages including its applicability to various forming processes such as single-curved surface forming, and double-curved surface forming. In sheet metal forming process, the elastic recovery has become a problem. Therefore, the stretch forming process is applied MDF technology to reduce elastic recovery effect. Numerical simulation is carried out for a saddle-type surface forming using ABAQUS. Every simulation case performs spring-back analysis to find elastic recovery effect after forming simulation. In this simulation, urethane pads are defined based on a hyperelastic material model as a cushion for the smoothness of forming surface. The elastic recovery deformation behavior is also investigated to consider the exact result after the last forming process, and then, the actual experiments are performed to confirm the formability of this forming process. By comparing the simulation and the experimental results, the tendency of the decreased amount of elastic recovery from the application of stretch process is verified. Consequently, it is confirmed that the multiple die stretch forming process has the capability and feasibility of being used to manufacture the curved surfaces of sheet metal.

  13. Mapping cyclic stretch in the postpneumonectomy murine lung

    PubMed Central

    Filipovic, Nenad; Gibney, Barry C.; Kojic, Milos; Nikolic, Dalibor; Isailovic, Velibor; Ysasi, Alexandra; Konerding, Moritz A.; Tsuda, Akira

    2013-01-01

    In many mammalian species, the removal of one lung [pneumonectomy (PNX)] is associated with the compensatory growth of the remaining lung. To investigate the hypothesis that parenchymal deformation may trigger lung regeneration, we used respiratory-gated micro-computed tomography scanning to create three-dimensional finite-element geometric models of the murine cardiac lobe with cyclic breathing. Models were constructed of respiratory-gated micro-computed tomography scans pre-PNX and 24 h post-PNX. The computational models demonstrated that the maximum stretch ratio map was patchy and heterogeneous, particularly in subpleural, juxta-diaphragmatic, and cephalad regions of the lobe. In these parenchymal regions, the material line segments at peak inspiration were frequently two- to fourfold greater after PNX; some regions of the post-PNX cardiac lobe demonstrated parenchymal compression at peak inspiration. Similarly, analyses of parenchymal maximum shear strain demonstrated heterogeneous regions of mechanical stress with focal regions demonstrating a threefold increase in shear strain after PNX. Consistent with previously identified growth patterns, these subpleural regions of enhanced stretch and shear strain are compatible with a mechanical signal, likely involving cyclic parenchymal stretch, triggering lung growth. PMID:23990237

  14. Fibril orientation redistribution induced by stretching of cellulose nanofibril hydrogels

    SciTech Connect

    Josefsson, Gabriella; Gamstedt, E. Kristofer; Ahvenainen, Patrik; Mushi, Ngesa Ezekiel

    2015-06-07

    The mechanical performance of materials reinforced by cellulose nanofibrils is highly affected by the orientation of these fibrils. This paper investigates the nanofibril orientation distribution of films of partly oriented cellulose nanofibrils. Stripes of hydrogel films were subjected to different amount of strain and, after drying, examined with X-ray diffraction to obtain the orientation of the nanofibrils in the films, caused by the stretching. The cellulose nanofibrils had initially a random in-plane orientation in the hydrogel films and the strain was applied to the films before the nanofibrils bond tightly together, which occurs during drying. The stretching resulted in a reorientation of the nanofibrils in the films, with monotonically increasing orientation towards the load direction with increasing strain. Estimation of nanofibril reorientation by X-ray diffraction enables quantitative comparison of the stretch-induced orientation ability of different cellulose nanofibril systems. The reorientation of nanofibrils as a consequence of an applied strain is also predicted by a geometrical model of deformation of nanofibril hydrogels. Conversely, in high-strain cold-drawing of wet cellulose nanofibril materials, the enhanced orientation is promoted by slipping of the effectively stiff fibrils.

  15. Modeling the Constitutive Behaviour of PET for Stretch Blow Moulding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yan, S. Y.; Menary, G.

    2011-05-01

    There are a substantial amount of constitutive models that have been developed to capture the finite deformation behavior of polymers for forming simulations. Most of these models have been used to capture the behavior in uniaxial and simultaneous biaxial modes of deformation. However, very few have attempted to model the sequential biaxial deformation behavior which is more appropriate for the stretch blow moulding process. The aim of this work is to develop a model for PET to successfully capture the sequential stress-strain behavior as a function of temperature and strain rate, thus making it suitable for use in simulations of stretch blow moulding. Biaxial test data has been generated at temperatures and strain rates appropriate for stretch blow moulding and a model developed by Buckley et al. has been implemented within the commercial finite element package Abaqus/Explicit. In parallel, an efficient automatic curve fitting procedure has been developed to enable the material parameters to be easily found from biaxial test data. The results show that the Buckley model can predict the stress response of equibiaxial deformation well, but cannot predict the sequential biaxial deformation.

  16. Stretch fast dynamo mechanism via conformal mapping in Riemannian manifolds

    SciTech Connect

    Garcia de Andrade, L. C.

    2007-10-15

    Two new analytical solutions of the self-induction equation in Riemannian manifolds are presented. The first represents a twisted magnetic flux tube or flux rope in plasma astrophysics, where the rotation of the flow implies that the poloidal field is amplified from toroidal field, in the spirit of dynamo theory. The value of the amplification depends on the Frenet torsion of the magnetic axis of the tube. Actually this result illustrates the Zeldovich stretch, twist, and fold method to generate dynamos from straight and untwisted ropes. Based on the fact that this problem was previously handled, using a Riemannian geometry of twisted magnetic flux ropes [Phys Plasmas 13, 022309 (2006)], investigation of a second dynamo solution, conformally related to the Arnold kinematic fast dynamo, is obtained. In this solution, it is shown that the conformal effect on the fast dynamo metric enhances the Zeldovich stretch, and therefore a new dynamo solution is obtained. When a conformal mapping is performed in an Arnold fast dynamo line element, a uniform stretch is obtained in the original line element.

  17. Stretching Diagnostics and Mixing Properties In The Stratosphere

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Legras, B.; Shuckburgh, E.

    The "finite size Lyapunov exponent" and the "effective diffusivity" are two diagnos- tics of mixing which have been recently introduced to investigate atmospheric flows. Both have been used to successfully identify the barriers to transport, for instance at the edge of the stratospheric polar vortex. Here we compare the two diagnostics in detail. The equivalent length has the advantage of arising as a mixing quantification from a rigid theoretical framework, however it has the disadvantage of being an aver- age quantity (the average around a tracer contour). The finite size Lyapunov exponent may be defined at any point in the flow, and quantifies the stretching properties expe- rienced by a fluid parcel both in its past and future evolution. In particular, the lines of maximum stretching at any time delineate the building blocks of the chaotic stirring. However the interpretation of the finite size Lyapunov exponent as a mixing time is less direct and depends on the alignment of tracer contours with the stretching lines.

  18. The SNAP-25 Linker as an Adaptation Toward Fast Exocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Nagy, Gábor; Milosevic, Ira; Mohrmann, Ralf; Wiederhold, Katrin; Walter, Alexander M.

    2008-01-01

    The assembly of four soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor domains into a complex is essential for membrane fusion. In most cases, the four SNARE-domains are encoded by separate membrane-targeted proteins. However, in the exocytotic pathway, two SNARE-domains are present in one protein, connected by a flexible linker. The significance of this arrangement is unknown. We characterized the role of the linker in SNAP-25, a neuronal SNARE, by using overexpression techniques in synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa (SNAP-25) null mouse chromaffin cells and fast electrophysiological techniques. We confirm that the palmitoylated linker-cysteines are important for membrane association. A SNAP-25 mutant without cysteines supported exocytosis, but the fusion rate was slowed down and the fusion pore duration prolonged. Using chimeric proteins between SNAP-25 and its ubiquitous homologue SNAP-23, we show that the cysteine-containing part of the linkers is interchangeable. However, a stretch of 10 hydrophobic and charged amino acids in the C-terminal half of the SNAP-25 linker is required for fast exocytosis and in its absence the calcium dependence of exocytosis is shifted toward higher concentrations. The SNAP-25 linker therefore might have evolved as an adaptation toward calcium triggering and a high rate of execution of the fusion process, those features that distinguish exocytosis from other membrane fusion pathways. PMID:18579690

  19. A Single 30-s Stretch Is Sufficient to Inhibit Maximal Voluntary Strength

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Winchester, Jason B.; Nelson, Arnold G.; Kokkonen, Joke

    2009-01-01

    While it has been well established that an acute stretching program can inhibit maximal muscle performance, the amount of stretching needed to produce the deleterious response is unknown. Therefore this study examined the dose-response relationship between acute stretching and strength inhibition. Eighteen college students performed a one…

  20. Can Stretching Prior to Exercise and Sports Improve Performance and Prevent Injury?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bracko, Michael R.

    2002-01-01

    Examines data from research on stretching as it relates to enhanced performance and injury prevention so that fitness, exercise, and sports performance professionals can make informed decisions about stretching programs for clients. The paper notes that stretching is a misunderstood component of fitness and sports training. Few studies show…

  1. A Discrete Electromechanical Model for Human Cardiac Tissue: Effects of Stretch-Activated Currents and Stretch Conditions on Restitution Properties and Spiral Wave Dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Weise, Louis D.; Panfilov, Alexander V.

    2013-01-01

    We introduce an electromechanical model for human cardiac tissue which couples a biophysical model of cardiac excitation (Tusscher, Noble, Noble, Panfilov, 2006) and tension development (adjusted Niederer, Hunter, Smith, 2006 model) with a discrete elastic mass-lattice model. The equations for the excitation processes are solved with a finite difference approach, and the equations of the mass-lattice model are solved using Verlet integration. This allows the coupled problem to be solved with high numerical resolution. Passive mechanical properties of the mass-lattice model are described by a generalized Hooke's law for finite deformations (Seth material). Active mechanical contraction is initiated by changes of the intracellular calcium concentration, which is a variable of the electrical model. Mechanical deformation feeds back on the electrophysiology via stretch-activated ion channels whose conductivity is controlled by the local stretch of the medium. We apply the model to study how stretch-activated currents affect the action potential shape, restitution properties, and dynamics of spiral waves, under constant stretch, and dynamic stretch caused by active mechanical contraction. We find that stretch conditions substantially affect these properties via stretch-activated currents. In constantly stretched medium, we observe a substantial decrease in conduction velocity, and an increase of action potential duration; whereas, with dynamic stretch, action potential duration is increased only slightly, and the conduction velocity restitution curve becomes biphasic. Moreover, in constantly stretched medium, we find an increase of the core size and period of a spiral wave, but no change in rotation dynamics; in contrast, in the dynamically stretching medium, we observe spiral drift. Our results may be important to understand how altered stretch conditions affect the heart's functioning. PMID:23527160

  2. Movement-induced gain modulation of somatosensory potentials and soleus H-reflexes evoked from the leg. II. Correlation with rate of stretch of extensor muscles of the leg.

    PubMed

    Staines, W R; Brooke, J D; Misiaszek, J E; McIlroy, W E

    1997-06-01

    Attenuation of initial somatosensory evoked potential (SEP) gain becomes more pronounced with increased rates of movement. Manipulation of the range of movement also might alter the SEP gain. It could alter joint receptor discharge; it should alter the discharge of muscle stretch receptors. We hypothesized that: (1) SEP gain reduction correlates with both the range and the rate of movement, and (2) manipulation of range and rate of movement to achieve similar estimated rates of stretch of a leg extensor muscle group (the vasti) results in similar decreases in SEP gain. SEPs from Cz', referenced to Fpz' (2 cm caudal to Cz and Fpz, respectively, according to the International 10-20 System), along with soleus H-reflexes were elicited by electrical stimulation of the tibial nerve at the popliteal fossa. Stable magnitudes of small M-waves indicated stability of stimulation. A modified cycle ergometer with an adjustable pedal crank and electric motor was used to passively rotate the right leg over three ranges (producing estimated vasti stretch of 12, 24 and 48 mm) and four rates (0, 20, 40 and 80 rpm) of movement. Two experiments were conducted. Ranges and rates of pedalling movement were combined to produce two or three equivalent estimated rates of tissue stretch of the vasti muscles at each of 4, 16, 32 and 64 mm/s. Tibial nerve stimuli were delivered when the knee was moved through its most flexed position and the hip was nearing its most flexed position. Means of SEP, H-reflex and M-wave magnitudes were tested for rate and range effects (ANOVA). A priori contrasts compared means produced by equivalent estimated rates of vasti stretch. Increasing the rate of movement significantly increased the attenuation of SEP and H-reflex gain (P<0.05). Increasing the range of movement also significantly increased these gain attenuations (P<0.05). Combining these to achieve equivalent rates of stretch, through different combinations of rate and range, resulted in equivalent

  3. Differences in plantarflexor function during a stretch-shortening cycle task due to limb preference.

    PubMed

    Furlong, Laura-Anne M; Harrison, Andrew J

    2015-01-01

    Most healthy humans move symmetrically at gross limb level but large kinetic and kinematic asymmetries have been observed at joint level during locomotion. The aim of this study was to assess muscle function asymmetries in healthy, active adults using an adapted force sledge apparatus which isolates the plantarflexors during a stretch-shortening cycle (SSC) task. Peak force, rate of force development and SSC function of preferred and non-preferred limbs were assessed in 21 healthy, active individuals using the adapted sledge and three-dimensional motion analysis. Between-limb differences and relationships were determined using paired t-tests/Wilcoxon Signed-rank test, Cohen's dz, absolute symmetry index and Pearson's r/Spearman's rho. Significant differences with moderate effect size (ES) were observed in peak force (ES: 0.66), rate of peak force development (ES: 0.78), rate of force development in the first 50 ms (ES: 0.76), flight time (ES: 0.64) and SSC function (0.68), with no difference in contact time or duration of eccentric loading. A small ES (0.56) was observed in rate of force development in the first 30 ms. The upper range of asymmetry observed (up to 44.6%) was larger than previously reported for healthy individuals, indicating compensations occur at proximal joints during locomotion to ensure symmetrical movement. PMID:24877621

  4. A simple constrained uniaxial tensile apparatus for in situ investigation of film stretching processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Meng, Lingpu; Li, Jing; Cui, Kunpeng; Chen, Xiaowei; Lin, Yuanfei; Xu, Jiali; Li, Liangbin

    2013-11-01

    A simple constrained uniaxial tensile apparatus was designed and constructed to obtain stress-strain curve during stretching and subsequent structural evolution of polymeric films. Stretch is carried out through two motor driven clamps in the machine direction and scissor-like clamps in the transverse direction keeping the sample width constant. The force information during film stretching process is recorded by a tension sensor and structural evolution can be obtained by in situ X-ray scattering technique. All parameters related to film stretching manufacturing, such as temperature, draw ratio, and stretching speed can be set independently, making the apparatus an effective method to explore the relationship between processing parameters and structure.

  5. Ultrafast redistribution of vibrational energy after excitation of NH stretching modes in DNA oligomers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kozich, V.; Szyc, Ł.; Nibbering, E. T. J.; Werncke, W.; Elsaesser, T.

    2009-04-01

    Vibrational relaxation after spectrally selective excitation within the NH stretching band of adenine-thymine base pairs in DNA oligomers was studied by subpicosecond infrared-pump/anti-Stokes Raman-probe spectroscopy. The decay of the different NH stretching vibrations populates distinct accepting modes in the NH bending range with a rise time of 0.6 ps that is close to the NH stretching decay times. The population of thymine fingerprint modes after excitation of the adenine antisymmetric NH 2 stretching mode points to an ultrafast excitation transfer to the thymine NH stretching vibration before relaxation. The nonequilibrium fingerprint populations decay on a time scale of several picoseconds.

  6. On the Fabrication, Characterization and Mechanical Properties of Melt-Stretched Stochastic Honeycombs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hostetter, Megan

    This thesis presents a new type of polypropylene (PP) cellular material fabricated through a simple melt-stretching process. Stochastic honeycombs have an open cell, random honeycomb structure, with webs oriented perpendicular to built-in skins. This process has the advantage that, for example, PP pellets can be turned into a sandwich panel in one step. It was demonstrated that despite the randomness in the web structure, the out-of-plane compressive strength of stochastic honeycombs was repeatable, and exceeded that of commercial PP foams and was comparable to commercial PP honeycombs. The key material properties required to produce an this architecture were shown to be a high melt strength and a high viscosity, branched polymer. The viscosity was shown to affect the total length of the webs in cross-section and the relative partitioning of material through the skin, transition region and webs. Web thickness was affected by the areal density of the polymer during fabrication. Mechanical testing methods were adapted from ASTM standards for honeycombs, and the fabrication method was advanced from a manual to a machine controlled process. Stochastic honeycombs were shown to buckle elastically, plastically, and fracture after the peak strength. Elastic and plastic buckling were dominant at lower densities, and plastic buckling and fracture at higher densities. A thin-plate buckling model for the strength of stochastic honeycombs was developed and verified experimentally. The crystallinity of the polymer affected the tensile strength and stiffness, having a linear effect on the buckling strength. The architecture was composed of webs bound on both sides and webs bound on one side and free on the other. A greater fraction of bound webs increased the strength of the structure in the buckling model. A fabrication study showed that melt-stretching the polymer at higher strain rates increased the connectivity and fraction of bound webs. Additionally, higher density led to a

  7. Aging affects response to cyclic tensile stretch: paradigm for intervertebral disc degeneration.

    PubMed

    Cho, Hongsik; Seth, Aman; Warmbold, Jenna; Robertson, James T; Hasty, Karen A

    2011-01-01

    Much evidence supports a fundamental role for mechanical forces in modulating differentiation, homeostasis, and remodelling of musculoskeletal cells. Little is known, however, regarding mechanobiology and gene expression of intervertebral disc (IVD) cells from older individuals. To characterise the effect of mechanical stimulation on cells from older discs, an in vitro study of IVD cells harvested from different aged pigs was conducted to measure extracellular matrix (ECM) gene expression in response to cyclic tensile stress (CTS). Gene expression of annulus fibrosus (AF) cells from IVDs of mature and older pigs was quantified for the predominant ECM genes; type I collagen, type II collagen and aggrecan, and matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1), a collagenase that degrades fibrillar collagens. AF cells cultured on flexible-bottom plates were stretched 10 % at 0.5 Hz frequency. After 24 h, gene expression was assayed using reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Basal mRNA levels without stretching for type II collagen and aggrecan were lower in older annular cells whereas MMP-1 levels were higher compared to mature cells. Following CTS, an adaptive response was elicited in annular cells from both age groups. ECM protein genes were upregulated, whereas MMP-1 was downregulated. The magnitude of response was significantly greater in older cells as compared to mature cells. These data suggest that the cells from the AF of older animals manifest lower basal levels of mRNA for type II collagen and aggrecan and higher levels of MMP-1 possibly due to decreased tensile stress experienced in vivo and is not the result of reduced capacity for response. PMID:21932191

  8. The relevance of stretch intensity and position—a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Apostolopoulos, Nikos; Metsios, George S.; Flouris, Andreas D.; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A.

    2015-01-01

    Stretching exercises to increase the range of motion (ROM) of joints have been used by sports coaches and medical professionals for improving performance and rehabilitation. The ability of connective and muscular tissues to change their architecture in response to stretching is important for their proper function, repair, and performance. Given the dearth of relevant data in the literature, this review examined two key elements of stretching: stretch intensity and stretch position; and their significance to ROM, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and inflammation in different populations. A search of three databases, Pub-Med, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Reviews, identified 152 articles, which were subsequently categorized into four groups: athletes (24), clinical (29), elderly (12), and general population (87). The use of different populations facilitated a wider examination of the stretching components and their effects. All 152 articles incorporated information regarding duration, frequency and stretch position, whereas only 79 referred to the intensity of stretching and 22 of these 79 studies were deemed high quality. It appears that the intensity of stretching is relatively under-researched, and the importance of body position and its influence on stretch intensity, is largely unknown. In conclusion, this review has highlighted areas for future research, including stretch intensity and position and their effect on musculo-tendinous tissue, in relation to the sensation of pain, delayed onset muscle soreness, inflammation, as well as muscle health and performance. PMID:26347668

  9. Time course of the effects of static stretching on cycling economy.

    PubMed

    Wolfe, Alyson E; Brown, Lee E; Coburn, Jared W; Kersey, Robert D; Bottaro, Martim

    2011-11-01

    Stretching has been implemented as part of the warm-up before physical events and widely thought to promote increased sport performance and decreased injury risk. However, recent research has concluded that static stretching before many exercises inhibits acute power, strength, and sprinting performance. There is little research examining the time course of these effects on moderate intensity cycling. The purpose of this study was to examine the time course of static stretching on cycling economy. The subjects consisted of 5 men and 5 women highly trained endurance cyclists. The first of 3 visits was baseline testing of their cycling VO2max. The second and third visits were either stretching or no stretching before a 30-minute stationary ride at 65% of their VO2max. The stretching condition consisted of four 30-second repetitions of 5 stretches with an average total stretching time of 16 minutes. VO2 demonstrated a significant condition by time interaction with the 5-minute time point being significantly less in the nonstretching condition (32.66 ± 5.35 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)) than stretching (34.39 ± 5.39 ml·kg(-1)·min(-1)). No other time points were different. Our results demonstrate that static stretching yielded an acute increase in submaximal VO2; therefore, coaches and highly trained endurance cyclists should exclude static stretching immediately before moderate intensity cycling because it reduces acute cycling economy. PMID:21904241

  10. The relevance of stretch intensity and position-a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Apostolopoulos, Nikos; Metsios, George S; Flouris, Andreas D; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Wyon, Matthew A

    2015-01-01

    Stretching exercises to increase the range of motion (ROM) of joints have been used by sports coaches and medical professionals for improving performance and rehabilitation. The ability of connective and muscular tissues to change their architecture in response to stretching is important for their proper function, repair, and performance. Given the dearth of relevant data in the literature, this review examined two key elements of stretching: stretch intensity and stretch position; and their significance to ROM, delayed onset muscle soreness (DOMS), and inflammation in different populations. A search of three databases, Pub-Med, Google Scholar, and Cochrane Reviews, identified 152 articles, which were subsequently categorized into four groups: athletes (24), clinical (29), elderly (12), and general population (87). The use of different populations facilitated a wider examination of the stretching components and their effects. All 152 articles incorporated information regarding duration, frequency and stretch position, whereas only 79 referred to the intensity of stretching and 22 of these 79 studies were deemed high quality. It appears that the intensity of stretching is relatively under-researched, and the importance of body position and its influence on stretch intensity, is largely unknown. In conclusion, this review has highlighted areas for future research, including stretch intensity and position and their effect on musculo-tendinous tissue, in relation to the sensation of pain, delayed onset muscle soreness, inflammation, as well as muscle health and performance. PMID:26347668

  11. Mechanical Stretching for Tissue Engineering: Two-Dimensional and Three-Dimensional Constructs

    PubMed Central

    Riehl, Brandon D.; Park, Jae-Hong; Kwon, Il Keun

    2012-01-01

    Mechanical cell stretching may be an attractive strategy for the tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues. It has been demonstrated that cell growth and differentiation can be guided by cell stretch with minimal help from soluble factors and engineered tissues that are mechanically stretched in bioreactors may have superior organization, functionality, and strength compared with unstretched counterparts. This review explores recent studies on cell stretching in both two-dimensional (2D) and three-dimensional (3D) setups focusing on the applications of stretch stimulation as a tool for controlling cell orientation, growth, gene expression, lineage commitment, and differentiation and for achieving successful tissue engineering of mechanically functional tissues, including cardiac, muscle, vasculature, ligament, tendon, bone, and so on. Custom stretching devices and lab-specific mechanical bioreactors are described with a discussion on capabilities and limitations. While stretch mechanotransduction pathways have been examined using 2D stretch, studying such pathways in physiologically relevant 3D environments may be required to understand how cells direct tissue development under stretch. Cell stretch study using 3D milieus may also help to develop tissue-specific stretch regimens optimized with biochemical feedback, which once developed will provide optimal tissue engineering protocols. PMID:22335794

  12. Laryngeal pressure receptors.

    PubMed

    Mathew, O P; Sant'Ambrogio, G; Fisher, J T; Sant'Ambrogio, F B

    1984-07-01

    We studied the response characteristics of laryngeal pressure receptors in anesthetized dogs, breathing through a tracheal cannula, by recording single unit action potentials from the peripheral cut end of the internal branch of the superior laryngeal nerve. The larynx, with the rest of the upper airway, was isolated and cannulated separately for the application of distending and collapsing pressures. We identified receptors responding to either negative or positive pressure and a few responding to both. All these receptors showed a marked dynamic sensitivity and had the characteristics of slowly adapting mechanoreceptors. The majority of pressure receptors were active at zero transmural pressure and the gain of their response to pressure was higher at lower values, suggesting a role for these receptors in eupnea. Reflex alterations in breathing pattern and upper airway muscle activity during upper airway pressure changes, previously reported, are presumably mediated by the receptors described here. Moreover, these receptors may play a role in certain pathological states, such as obstructive sleep apnea, in which the upper airway is transiently subjected to large collapsing pressure. PMID:6484319

  13. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  14. Fine-Scale Road Stretch Forecasting along Main Danish Roads

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahura, A.; Petersen, C.; Sattler, K.; Sass, B.

    2009-09-01

    The DMI has in collaboration with the Danish Road Directorate (DRD) for almost two decades used a Road Condition Model (RCM) system (based on a dense road observations network and the numerical weather prediction model - HIgh Resolution Limited Area Model, HIRLAM) to provide operational forecasts of main road conditions at selected road stations of the Danish road network. As of Jan 2009, there are 357 road stations (equipped in total with 456 sensors), where measurements and forecasts of road surface temperature, air and dew point temperatures are conducted. Forecasts of other important meteorological parameters such as cloud cover and precipitations as well as radar and satellite images are also distributed to the users through the web-based interface vejvejr.dk and through DMI and DRD web-pages. For icing conditions, new technology has made it easy to vary the dose of spreaded salt, making it possible to use salt only on the parts of the road network where it is really needed. In our study measurements of road surface temperature from road stations and salt spreaders have additionally been used to examine both road stations and road stretches forecasts along the main roads of the Danish Road Network (accounting almost 23 thousand points located at distances of 250 m). These results showed critical importance of availability of detailed characteristics of the roads surroundings. To make local forecasts in a specific point all possible local detailed information is needed. Since high resolution models running at faster supercomputers as well as detailed physiographic datasets now are available, it is possible to improve the modelling and parameterization of significant physical processes influencing the formation of the slippery road conditions. First of all, it is based on a new dataset available from Kort og Matrikel styrelsen, the so-called Danish Height Model (Danmarks Højdemodel) which is a very detailed set of data with horizontal resolution of a few meters

  15. Ultrafast quantitative time-stretch imaging flow cytometry of phytoplankton

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Queenie T. K.; Lau, Andy K. S.; Tang, Anson H. L.; Wong, Kenneth K. Y.; Tsia, Kevin K.

    2016-03-01

    Comprehensive quantification of phytoplankton abundance, sizes and other parameters, e.g. biomasses, has been an important, yet daunting task in aquatic sciences and biofuel research. It is primarily because of the lack of effective tool to image and thus accurately profile individual microalgae in a large population. The phytoplankton species are highly diversified and heterogeneous in terms of their sizes and the richness in morphological complexity. This fact makes time-stretch imaging, a new ultrafast real-time optical imaging technology, particularly suitable for ultralarge-scale taxonomic classification of phytoplankton together with quantitative image recognition and analysis. We here demonstrate quantitative imaging flow cytometry of single phytoplankton based on quantitative asymmetric-detection time-stretch optical microscopy (Q-ATOM) - a new time-stretch imaging modality for label-free quantitative phase imaging without interferometric implementations. Sharing the similar concept of Schlieren imaging, Q-ATOM accesses multiple phase-gradient contrasts of each single phytoplankton, from which the quantitative phase profile is computed. We employ such system to capture, at an imaging line-scan rate of 11.6 MHz, high-resolution images of two phytoplankton populations (scenedesmus and chlamydomonas) in ultrafast microfluidic flow (3 m/s). We further perform quantitative taxonomic screening analysis enabled by this technique. More importantly, the system can also generate quantitative phase images of single phytoplankton. This is especially useful for label-free quantification of biomasses (e.g. lipid droplets) of the particular species of interest - an important task adopted in biofuel applications. Combining machine learning for automated classification, Q-ATOM could be an attractive platform for continuous and real-time ultralarge-scale single-phytoplankton analysis.

  16. Elastography Study of Hamstring Behaviors during Passive Stretching

    PubMed Central

    Le Sant, Guillaume; Ates, Filiz; Brasseur, Jean-Louis; Nordez, Antoine

    2015-01-01

    Introduction The mechanical properties of hamstring muscles are usually inferred from global passive torque/angle relationships, in combination with adjoining tissues crossing the joint investigated. Shear modulus measurement provides an estimate of changes in muscle-tendon stiffness and passive tension. This study aimed to assess the passive individual behavior of each hamstring muscle in different stretching positions using shear wave elastography. Methods/Results The muscle shear modulus of each hamstring muscle was measured during a standardized slow passive knee extension (PKE, 80% of maximal range of motion) on eighteen healthy male volunteers. Firstly, we assessed the reliability of the measurements. Results were good for semitendinosus (ST, CV: 8.9%-13.4%), semimembranosus (SM, CV: 10.3%-11.2%) and biceps femoris long-head (BF-lh, CV: 8.6%-13.3%), but not for biceps femoris short-head (BF-sh, CV: 20.3%-44.9%). Secondly, we investigated each reliable muscle in three stretch positions: 70°, 90° and 110° of hip flexion. The results showed different values of shear modulus for the same amount of perceived stretch, with the highest measurements in the high-flexed hip situation. Moreover, individual muscles displayed different values, with values increasing or BF-lh, SM and ST, respectively. The inter-subject variability was 35.3% for ST, 27.4% for SM and 30.2% for BF-lh. Conclusion This study showed that the hip needs to be high-flexed to efficiently tension the hamstrings, and reports a higher muscle-tendon stress tolerance at 110° of hip angle. In addition muscles have different passive behaviors, and future works will clarify if it can be linked with rate of injury. PMID:26418862

  17. The Different Muscle-Energetics during Shortening and Stretch

    PubMed Central

    Jarosch, Robert

    2011-01-01

    The helical shape of the thin filaments causes their passive counterclockwise rotation during muscle stretch that increases tensile stress and torque at first by unwinding and then by winding up the four anchoring Z-filaments. This means storage of energy in the series elastic Z-filaments and a considerable decrease of the liberated energy of heat and work to (h—wap), where h is the heat energy and wap the stretch energy induced from outside by an apparatus. The steep thin filament helix with an inclination angle of 70° promotes the passive rotation during stretch, but impedes the smooth sliding of shortening by increased friction and production of frictional heat. The frictional heat may be produced by the contact with the myosin cross-bridges: (1) when they passively snap on drilling thin filaments from cleft to cleft over a distance 2 × 2.7 nm = 5.4 nm between the globular actin monomers in one groove, causing stepwise motion; or (2) when they passively cycle from one helical groove to the next (distance 36 nm). The latter causes more heat and may take place on rotating thin filaments without an effective forward drilling (“idle rotation”), e.g., when they produce “unexplained heat” at the beginning of an isometric tetanus. In an Appendix to this paper the different states of muscle are defined. The function of its most important components is described and rotation model and power-stroke model of muscular contraction is compared. PMID:21686156

  18. Specificity of endothelial cell reorientation in response to cyclic mechanical stretching.

    PubMed

    Wang, J H; Goldschmidt-Clermont, P; Wille, J; Yin, F C

    2001-12-01

    Evidence suggests that cellular responses to mechanical stimuli depend specifically on the type of stimuli imposed. For example, when subjected to fluid shear stress, endothelial cells align along the flow direction. In contrast, in response to cyclic stretching, cells align away from the stretching direction. However, a few aspects of this cell alignment response remain to be clarified: (1) Is the cell alignment due to actual cell reorientation or selective cell detachment? (2) Does the resulting cell alignment represent a response of the cells to elongation or shortening, or both? (3) Does the cell alignment depend on the stretching magnitude or rate, or both? Finally, the role of the actin cytoskeleton and microtubules in the cell alignment response remains unclear. To address these questions, we grew human aortic endothelial cells on deformable silicone membranes and subjected them to three types of cyclic stretching: simple elongation, pure uniaxial stretching and equi-biaxial stretching. Examination of the same cells before and after stretching revealed that they reoriented. Cells subjected to either simple elongation or pure uniaxial stretching reoriented specifically toward the direction of minimal substrate deformation, even though the directions for the two types of stretching differed by only about 20 degrees. At comparable stretching durations, the extent of cell reorientation was more closely related to the stretching magnitude than the stretching rate. The actin cytoskeleton of the endothelial cell subjected to either type of stretching was reorganized into parallel arrays of actin filaments (i.e., stress fibers) aligned in the direction of the minimal substrate deformation. Furthermore, in response to equi-biaxial stretching, the actin cytoskeleton was remodeled into a "tent-like" structure oriented out of the membrane plane-again towards the direction of the minimal substrate deformation. Finally, abolishing microtubules prevented neither the

  19. Boundary layer flow of nanofluid over an exponentially stretching surface

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    The steady boundary layer flow of nanofluid over an exponential stretching surface is investigated analytically. The transport equations include the effects of Brownian motion parameter and thermophoresis parameter. The highly nonlinear coupled partial differential equations are simplified with the help of suitable similarity transformations. The reduced equations are then solved analytically with the help of homotopy analysis method (HAM). The convergence of HAM solutions are obtained by plotting h-curve. The expressions for velocity, temperature and nanoparticle volume fraction are computed for some values of the parameters namely, suction injection parameter α, Lewis number Le, the Brownian motion parameter Nb and thermophoresis parameter Nt. PMID:22289390

  20. Research on stretched membrane with electrostatic curvature (SMEC) mirrors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sun, X. W.; Jin, G.

    Stretched Membrane with Electrostatic Curvature SMEC Mirrors is a new spatial optical technology recently developed in foreign countries which performed modification of figuration of SMEC Mirror in control of Electrostatic With the folding property of membrane when it was loaded this technology have taken on important prospect in system of spatial remote sensing in the future In this paper the fundamental of SMEC Mirror was introduced the more deeply analyzing of cybernetic model completed and at present research method based on synthesis of foreign development in the field was put forward

  1. Stretched Lens Array (SLA) Photovoltaic Concentrator Hardware Development and Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Piszczor, Michael; O'Neill, Mark J.; Eskenazi, Michael

    2003-01-01

    Over the past two years, the Stretched Lens Array (SLA) photovoltaic concentrator has evolved, under a NASA contract, from a concept with small component demonstrators to operational array hardware that is ready for space validation testing. A fully-functional four panel SLA solar array has been designed, built and tested. This paper will summarize the focus of the hardware development effort, discuss the results of recent testing conducted under this program and present the expected performance of a full size 7kW array designed to meet the requirements of future space missions.

  2. An energetic model for macromolecules unfolding in stretching experiments

    PubMed Central

    De Tommasi, D.; Millardi, N.; Puglisi, G.; Saccomandi, G.

    2013-01-01

    We propose a simple approach, based on the minimization of the total (entropic plus unfolding) energy of a two-state system, to describe the unfolding of multi-domain macromolecules (proteins, silks, polysaccharides, nanopolymers). The model is fully analytical and enlightens the role of the different energetic components regulating the unfolding evolution. As an explicit example, we compare the analytical results with a titin atomic force microscopy stretch-induced unfolding experiment showing the ability of the model to quantitatively reproduce the experimental behaviour. In the thermodynamic limit, the sawtooth force–elongation unfolding curve degenerates to a constant force unfolding plateau. PMID:24047874

  3. Mutation at positively selected positions in the binding site for HLA-C shows that KIR2DL1 is a more refined but less adaptable NK cell receptor than KIR2DL3.

    PubMed

    Hilton, Hugo G; Vago, Luca; Older Aguilar, Anastazia M; Moesta, Achim K; Graef, Thorsten; Abi-Rached, Laurent; Norman, Paul J; Guethlein, Lisbeth A; Fleischhauer, Katharina; Parham, Peter

    2012-08-01

    Through recognition of HLA class I, killer cell Ig-like receptors (KIR) modulate NK cell functions in human immunity and reproduction. Although a minority of HLA-A and -B allotypes are KIR ligands, HLA-C allotypes dominate this regulation, because they all carry either the C1 epitope recognized by KIR2DL2/3 or the C2 epitope recognized by KIR2DL1. The C1 epitope and C1-specific KIR evolved first, followed several million years later by the C2 epitope and C2-specific KIR. Strong, varying selection pressure on NK cell functions drove the diversification and divergence of hominid KIR, with six positions in the HLA class I binding site of KIR being targets for positive diversifying selection. Introducing each naturally occurring residue at these positions into KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3 produced 38 point mutants that were tested for binding to 95 HLA- A, -B, and -C allotypes. Modulating specificity for HLA-C is position 44, whereas positions 71 and 131 control cross-reactivity with HLA-A*11:02. Dominating avidity modulation is position 70, with lesser contributions from positions 68 and 182. KIR2DL3 has lower avidity and broader specificity than KIR2DL1. Mutation could increase the avidity and change the specificity of KIR2DL3, whereas KIR2DL1 specificity was resistant to mutation, and its avidity could only be lowered. The contrasting inflexibility of KIR2DL1 and adaptability of KIR2DL3 fit with C2-specific KIR having evolved from C1-specific KIR, and not vice versa. Substitutions restricted to activating KIR all reduced the avidity of KIR2DL1 and KIR2DL3, further evidence that activating KIR function often becomes subject to selective attenuation. PMID:22772445

  4. Stretch-induced increase in cardiac contractility is independent of myocyte Ca2+ while block of stretch channels by streptomycin improves contractility after ischemic stunning

    PubMed Central

    Rhodes, Samhita S; Camara, Amadou K S; Aldakkak, Mohammed; Heisner, James S; Stowe, David F

    2015-01-01

    Stretching the cardiac left ventricle (LV) enhances contractility but its effect on myoplasmic [Ca2+] is controversial. We measured LV pressure (LVP) and [Ca2+] as a function of intra-LV stretch in guinea pig intact hearts before and after 15 min global stunning ± perfusion with streptomycin (STM), a stretch-activated channel blocker. LV wall [Ca2+] was measured by indo-1 fluorescence and LVP by a saline-filled latex balloon inflated in 50 μL steps to stretch the LV. We implemented a mathematical model to interpret cross-bridge dynamics and myofilament Ca2+ responsiveness from the instantaneous relationship between [Ca2+] and LVP ± stretching. We found that: (1) stretch enhanced LVP but not [Ca2+] before and after stunning in either control (CON) and STM groups, (2) after stunning [Ca2+] increased in both groups although higher in STM versus CON (56% vs. 39%), (3) STM-enhanced LVP after stunning compared to CON (98% vs. 76% of prestunning values), and (4) stretch-induced effects on LVP were independent of [Ca2+] before or after stunning in both groups. Mathematical modeling suggested: (1) cooperativity in cross-bridge kinetics and myofilament Ca2+ handling is reduced after stunning in the unstretched heart, (2) stunning results in depressed myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity in the presence of attached cross-bridges regardless of stretch, and (3) the initial mechanism responsible for increased contractility during stretch may be enhanced formation of cross-bridges. Thus stretch-induced enhancement of contractility is not due to increased [Ca2+], whereas enhanced contractility after stunning in STM versus CON hearts results from improved Ca2+ handling and/or enhanced actinomyosin cross-bridge cycling. PMID:26290532

  5. First Measurements and Results With a Stretched Wire Test Setup

    SciTech Connect

    Peters, Franz

    2010-12-13

    The LINAC Coherent Light Source [LCLS] is a free electron laser, designed to produce high brilliant X-ray beams using Self Amplified Spontaneous Emission [SASE]. Due to the physics of SASE, the electron beam has to be held very precisely on the same trajectory as the X-ray light beam generated by the undulator magnets. To optimize the SASE output, trajectory deviations between both beams have to be minimized to a few micrometers along the entire undulator section and held stable over the time period between beam-based-alignment processes. Consequently, extremely high position stability of all magnets in the undulator section is required to operate the LCLS successfully. The knowledge of any magnet movement exceeding few micrometers during periods of several weeks is essential for efficient X-ray generation. A well known principle of monitoring transverse component positions along beam lines is the application of stretched wires, associated with suitable wire position sensors and electronics. The particular challenge at LCLS is the required wire system performance in conjunction with the length of the undulator section and the large number of monitors. Verification of system stability and resolution under real conditions is the primary goal of this test setup. A stretched wire test setup has been implemented to gain experience for the final design of a wire system, which will meet the position monitoring requirements in the LCLS undulator section. The report briefly introduces the system's architecture and describes first measurements and results.

  6. Stretching of Single Polymer Chains Using the Atomic Force Microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ortiz, C.; van der Vegte, E. W.; van Swieten, E.; Robillard, G. T.; Hadziioannou, G.

    1998-03-01

    A variety of macroscopic phenomenon involve "nanoscale" polymer deformation including rubber elasticity, shear yielding, strain hardening, stress relaxation, fracture, and flow. With the advent of new and improved experimental techniques, such as the atomic force microscope (AFM), the probing of physical properties of polymers has reached finer and finer scales. The development of mixed self-assembling monolayer techniques and the chemical functionalization of AFM probe tips has allowed for mechanical experiments on single polymer chains of molecular dimensions. In our experiments, mixed monolayers are prepared in which end-functionalized, flexible polymer chains of thiol-terminated poly(methacrylic acid) are covalently bonded, isolated, and randomly distributed on gold substrates. The coils are then imaged, tethered to a gold-coated AFM tip, and stretched between the tip and the substrate in a conventional force / distance experiment. An increase in the attractive force due to entropic, elastic resistance to stretching, as well as fracture of the polymer chain is observed. The effect of chain stiffness, topological constraints, strain rate, mechanical hysteresis, and stress relaxation were investigated. Force modulation techniques were also employed in order to image the viscoelastic character of the polymer chains. Parallel work includes similar studies of biological systems such as wheat gluten proteins and polypeptides.

  7. The southwestern Nansen Basin: Crustal stretching and sea floor spreading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berglar, Kai; Ehrhardt, Axel; Damm, Volkmar; Heyde, Ingo; Schreckenberger, Bernd; Barckhausen, Udo

    2014-05-01

    New geophysical data were collected in August/September 2013 north of Svalbard in the zone from the North Barents shelf towards the oceanic Nansen Basin. We acquired 1056 km of multi-channel seismic data, 2658 km of magnetic data and more than 5000 km of gravity, bathymetric and sediment echosounder data. In the east of the working area, the transition from the Yermak Plateau to the Nansen Basin is characterized by block faulting and well developed syn-rift basins. A large crustal block located about 80 km east of the Yermak Plateau and 120 km north of the slope of the Barents shelf indicates extensive rifting and east-west directed crustal stretching and the absence of oceanic crust in that area. A different picture is found north of Kvitoya Island, in the western part of the working area. There, the slope of the Barents shelf is very steep and a distinct continent-ocean-boundary seems to be located directly at the foot of the slope where we interpret oceanic crust characterized by irregular topography based on the multi-channel seismic data. This will be tested by an analysis of the gravity and magnetic data which is currently work in progress. The combination of east-west-directed continental stretching east of the Yermak Plateau and adjacent oceanic crust to the west points to an opening of the southwesternmost part of the Nansen Basin prior to the spreading of the Gakkel Ridge, possibly related to the opening of the Amerasian Basin.

  8. Transcranial Doppler and angiographic findings in adolescent stretch syncope.

    PubMed Central

    Sturzenegger, M; Newell, D W; Douville, C M; Byrd, S; Schoonover, K D; Nicholls, S C

    1995-01-01

    The clinical, angiographic, and Doppler findings are reported for two young patients with recurrent syncope induced by neck hyperextension during stretching. Transcranial Doppler monitoring of both posterior cerebral arteries was performed during head manoeuvres. There were reproducible rapid decreases in blood flow velocities in both patients to an average of 28% and 41% of baseline values when they performed neck hyperextension. These decreases were regularly associated with the patients' symptoms and were not found during rotation or flexion. On return to a neutral head position there was a transient increase of the blood flow velocities to an average of 131% and 136% of baseline values (reactive hyperaemia). Routine four vessel angiography was normal except for the demonstration of very small posterior communicating arteries in one patient. Dynamic angiography showed evidence of extracranial compression of the craniocervical arteries in both patients. It is concluded that decreased blood flow to the posterior circulation is an important factor in the pathogenesis of adolescent stretch syncope. Images PMID:7897424

  9. Stretching and Bending Fluctuations of Short DNA Molecules

    PubMed Central

    Padinhateeri, Ranjith; Menon, Gautam I.

    2013-01-01

    Recent measurements of the distribution of end-to-end distance in short DNA molecules infer cooperative stretching fluctuations. The assumptions underlying the analysis can be questioned if transient, thermally induced defects producing a localized decrease in bending stiffness are present in thermal equilibrium, such as regions in which DNA melts locally (bubbles), sustains large-angle bends (kinks), or can locally transform into an alternative (S-DNA) state. We study a generalized discrete worm-like chain model for DNA, capable of describing these experiments, showing that the model yields accurate fits to available experimental data. Our results indicate that DNA bending arising from such localized defects, rather than solely stretching, can be an equal contributor to end-to-end distance fluctuations for 35-bp DNA and contributes nontrivially to such fluctuations at all scales below the persistence length. The analysis suggests that such fluctuations should exhibit a scale-dependent cooperativity, specifically relevant in determining the behavior of short chains, but which saturates rapidly to a length-independent value for longer DNA, to ensure a consistent physical description of DNA across multiple scales. Our approach provides a minimal, yet accurate, coarse-grained description of DNA at the subpersistence length scales of current experimental interest. PMID:23442868

  10. Dynamic rotation and stretch tensors from a dynamic polar decomposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haller, George

    2016-01-01

    The local rigid-body component of continuum deformation is typically characterized by the rotation tensor, obtained from the polar decomposition of the deformation gradient. Beyond its well-known merits, the polar rotation tensor also has a lesser known dynamical inconsistency: it does not satisfy the fundamental superposition principle of rigid-body rotations over adjacent time intervals. As a consequence, the polar rotation diverts from the observed mean material rotation of fibers in fluids, and introduces a purely kinematic memory effect into computed material rotation. Here we derive a generalized polar decomposition for linear processes that yields a unique, dynamically consistent rotation component, the dynamic rotation tensor, for the deformation gradient. The left dynamic stretch tensor is objective, and shares the principal strain values and axes with its classic polar counterpart. Unlike its classic polar counterpart, however, the dynamic stretch tensor evolves in time without spin. The dynamic rotation tensor further decomposes into a spatially constant mean rotation tensor and a dynamically consistent relative rotation tensor that is objective for planar deformations. We also obtain simple expressions for dynamic analogues of Cauchy's mean rotation angle that characterize a deforming body objectively.

  11. Grafted polymers inside cylindrical tubes: Chain stretching vs layer thickness

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suo, Tongchuan; Whitmore, Mark D.

    2013-04-01

    We present a study of the detailed structure of grafted polymer chains and the layers they form inside cylindrical tubes, using the finitely extensible nonlinear elastic chain model and numerical self-consistent field theory. For very large tube radius, the chain stretching and layer thicknesses are the same as for polymers grafted to a planar surface. For decreasing radius, our calculations indicate that the layer almost always gets thinner, although there can be situations where it is very slightly thicker. However, we find that this thinning is not necessarily due to changes to the polymers: in fact, the root-mean-squared layer thickness would decrease even if the polymers themselves are completely unchanged. Furthermore, we find that the polymer stretching can increase at the same time that the layer thickness decreases. These apparent paradoxes are resolved by analyzing and distinguishing between the volume fraction profiles and monomer number distributions in these systems, including how they change and why. We also find that, in a given system, parts of each polymer move towards the curved surface and parts away from it, and that these differences are key to understanding the behavior.

  12. Development of a stretched membrane dish: Phase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Not Available

    1989-03-01

    A stretched-membrane dish concentrator design was developed in Phase I of a contract directed by Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque. The concentrating optical element was investigated in detail, and conceptual designs were provided for the collector support system. The optical element was defined by a monolithic, single-facet, parabolic design with an f/D ratio of 0.6. The conceptual support system was a hub and spoke structure similar to a bicycle wheel. The estimated optical element weight was 2.3 lb/ft/sup 2/ (11 kg/m/sup 2/), and 6.6 lb/ft/sup 2/ (32 kg/m/sup 2/) for the entire collector. A 0.010 in. (0.25-mm) thick aluminum diaphragm was plastically deformed without the use of a mold or mandrel to create the optical membrane. This free-form yield process was demonstrated with 1.4-m and 3.7-m diameter tests. The one-sigma slope error of these test membranes, based on a peak flux bound, was less than 2 mrad at the smaller scale, and less than 4 mrad at the larger scale. The aluminum membrane defined the concentrator shape for a separate, reflective polymer film membrane. Contact between the two membranes was maintained with a vacuum. The stretched-membrane dish technology, applied to a parabolic dish, demonstrated the potential for high performance with low weight. 33 refs., 56 figs., 7 tabs.

  13. Cellular deformation and intracellular stress propagation during optical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teo, Soo-Kng; Goryachev, Andrew B.; Parker, Kim H.; Chiam, K.-H.

    2010-05-01

    Experiments have shown that mechanical stress can regulate many cellular processes. However, in most cases, the exact regulatory mechanisms are still not well understood. One approach in improving our understanding of such mechanically induced regulation is the quantitative study of cell deformation under an externally applied stress. In this paper, an axisymmetric finite-element model is developed and used to study the deformation of single, suspended fibroblasts in an optical stretcher in which a stretching force is applied onto the surface of the cell. A feature of our physical model is a viscoelastic material equation whose parameters vary spatially to mimic the experimentally observed spatial heterogeneity of cellular material properties. Our model suggests that cell size is a more important factor in determining the maximal strain of the optically stretched fibroblasts compared to the thickness of the actin cortical region. This result could explain the higher deformability observed experimentally for malignant fibroblasts in the optical stretcher. Our model also shows that maximal stress propagates into the nuclear region for malignant fibroblasts whereas for normal fibroblasts, it does not. We discuss how this may impact the transduction of cancer signaling pathways.

  14. Nonlinear effects of stretch on the flame front propagation

    SciTech Connect

    Halter, F.; Tahtouh, T.; Mounaim-Rousselle, C.

    2010-10-15

    In all experimental configurations, the flames are affected by stretch (curvature and/or strain rate). To obtain the unstretched flame speed, independent of the experimental configuration, the measured flame speed needs to be corrected. Usually, a linear relationship linking the flame speed to stretch is used. However, this linear relation is the result of several assumptions, which may be incorrected. The present study aims at evaluating the error in the laminar burning speed evaluation induced by using the traditional linear methodology. Experiments were performed in a closed vessel at atmospheric pressure for two different mixtures: methane/air and iso-octane/air. The initial temperatures were respectively 300 K and 400 K for methane and iso-octane. Both methodologies (linear and nonlinear) are applied and results in terms of laminar speed and burned gas Markstein length are compared. Methane and iso-octane were chosen because they present opposite evolutions in their Markstein length when the equivalence ratio is increased. The error induced by the linear methodology is evaluated, taking the nonlinear methodology as the reference. It is observed that the use of the linear methodology starts to induce substantial errors after an equivalence ratio of 1.1 for methane/air mixtures and before an equivalence ratio of 1 for iso-octane/air mixtures. One solution to increase the accuracy of the linear methodology for these critical cases consists in reducing the number of points used in the linear methodology by increasing the initial flame radius used. (author)

  15. Simultaneous Stretching and Contraction of Stress Fibers In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Lynda J.; Rajfur, Zenon; Maddox, Amy S.; Freel, Christopher D.; Chen, Yun; Edlund, Magnus; Otey, Carol; Burridge, Keith

    2004-01-01

    To study the dynamics of stress fiber components in cultured fibroblasts, we expressed α-actinin and the myosin II regulatory myosin light chain (MLC) as fusion proteins with green fluorescent protein. Myosin activation was stimulated by treatment with calyculin A, a serine/threonine phosphatase inhibitor that elevates MLC phosphorylation, or with LPA, another agent that ultimately stimulates phosphorylation of MLC via a RhoA-mediated pathway. The resulting contraction caused stress fiber shortening and allowed observation of changes in the spacing of stress fiber components. We have observed that stress fibers, unlike muscle myofibrils, do not contract uniformly along their lengths. Although peripheral regions shortened, more central regions stretched. We detected higher levels of MLC and phosphorylated MLC in the peripheral region of stress fibers. Fluorescence recovery after photobleaching revealed more rapid exchange of myosin and α-actinin in the middle of stress fibers, compared with the periphery. Surprisingly, the widths of the myosin and α-actinin bands in stress fibers also varied in different regions. In the periphery, the banding patterns for both proteins were shorter, whereas in central regions, where stretching occurred, the bands were wider. PMID:15133124

  16. Analysis of a Stretched Derivative Aircraft with Open Rotor Propulsion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Berton, Jeffrey J.; Hendricks, Eric S.; Haller, William J.; Guynn, Mark D.

    2015-01-01

    Research into advanced, high-speed civil turboprops received significant attention during the 1970s and 1980s when fuel efficiency was the driving focus of U.S. aeronautical research. But when fuel prices declined sharply there was no longer sufficient motivation to continue maturing the technology. Recent volatility in fuel prices and increasing concern for aviation's environmental impact, however, have renewed interest in unducted, open rotor propulsion and revived research by NASA and a number of engine manufacturers. Recently, NASA and General Electric have teamed to conduct several investigations into the performance and noise of an advanced, single-aisle transport with open rotor propulsion. The results of these initial studies indicate open rotor engines have the potential to provide significant reduction in fuel consumption compared to aircraft using turbofan engines with equivalent core technology. In addition, noise analysis of the concept indicates that an open rotor aircraft in the single-aisle transport class would be able to meet current noise regulations with margin. The behavior of derivative open rotor transports is of interest. Heavier, "stretched" derivative aircraft tend to be noisier than their lighter relatives. Of particular importance to the business case for the concept is how the noise margin changes relative to regulatory limits within a family of similar open rotor aircraft. The subject of this report is a performance and noise assessment of a notional, heavier, stretched derivative airplane equipped with throttle-push variants of NASA's initial open rotor engine design.

  17. Uniaxial cell stretching device for live-cell imaging of mechanosensitive cellular functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shao, Yue; Tan, Xinyu; Novitski, Roman; Muqaddam, Mishaal; List, Paul; Williamson, Laura; Fu, Jianping; Liu, Allen P.

    2013-11-01

    External mechanical stretch plays an important role in regulating cellular behaviors through intracellular mechanosensitive and mechanotransductive machineries such as the F-actin cytoskeleton (CSK) structures and focal adhesions (FAs) anchoring the F-actin CSK to the extracellular environment. Studying the mechanoresponsive behaviors of the F-actin CSK and FAs in response to cell stretch has great importance for further understanding mechanotransduction and mechanobiology. In this work, we developed a novel cell stretching device combining dynamic directional cell stretch with in situ subcellular live-cell imaging. Using a cam and follower mechanism and applying a standard mathematical model for cam design, we generated different dynamic stretch outputs. By examining stretch-mediated FA dynamics under step-function static stretch and the realignment of cell morphology and the F-actin CSK under cyclic stretch, we demonstrated successful applications of our cell stretching device for mechanobiology studies where external stretch plays an important role in regulating subcellular molecular dynamics and cellular phenotypes.

  18. Caveolae in Ventricular Myocytes are Required for Stretch-Dependent Conduction Slowing

    PubMed Central

    Pfeiffer, E.R.; Wright, A.T.; Edwards, A.G.; Stowe, J.C.; McNall, K.; Tan, J.; Niesman, I.; Patel, H.H.; Roth, D.M.; Omens, J.H.; McCulloch, A.D.

    2014-01-01

    Mechanical stretch of cardiac muscle modulates action potential propagation velocity, causing potentially arrhythmogenic conduction slowing. The mechanisms by which stretch alters cardiac conduction remain unknown, but previous studies suggest that stretch can affect the conformation of caveolae in myocytes and other cell types. We tested the hypothesis that slowing of action potential conduction due to cardiac myocyte stretch is dependent on caveolae. Cardiac action potential propagation velocities, measured by optical mapping in isolated mouse hearts and in micropatterned mouse cardiomyocyte cultures, decreased reversibly with volume loading or stretch, respectively (by 19±5% and 26±4%). Stretch-dependent conduction slowing was not altered by stretch-activated channel blockade with gadolinium or by GsMTx-4 peptide, but was inhibited when caveolae were disrupted via genetic deletion of caveolin-3 (Cav3 KO) or membrane cholesterol depletion by methyl-β-cyclodextrin. In wild-type mouse hearts, stretch coincided with recruitment of caveolae to the sarcolemma, as observed by electron microscopy. In myocytes from wild-type but not Cav3 KO mice, stretch significantly increased cell membrane capacitance (by 98±64%), electrical time constant (by 285±149%), and lipid recruitment to the bilayer (by 84±39%). Recruitment of caveolae to the sarcolemma during physiologic cardiomyocyte stretch slows ventricular action potential propagation by increasing cell membrane capacitance. PMID:25257915

  19. Uniaxial cell stretching device for live-cell imaging of mechanosensitive cellular functions

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Yue; Tan, Xinyu; Novitski, Roman; Muqaddam, Mishaal; List, Paul; Williamson, Laura; Fu, Jianping; Liu, Allen P.

    2013-01-01

    External mechanical stretch plays an important role in regulating cellular behaviors through intracellular mechanosensitive and mechanotransductive machineries such as the F-actin cytoskeleton (CSK) structures and focal adhesions (FAs) anchoring the F-actin CSK to the extracellular environment. Studying the mechanoresponsive behaviors of the F-actin CSK and FAs in response to cell stretch has great importance for further understanding mechanotransduction and mechanobiology. In this work, we developed a novel cell stretching device combining dynamic directional cell stretch with in situ subcellular live-cell imaging. Using a cam and follower mechanism and applying a standard mathematical model for cam design, we generated different dynamic stretch outputs. By examining stretch-mediated FA dynamics under step-function static stretch and the realignment of cell morphology and the F-actin CSK under cyclic stretch, we demonstrated successful applications of our cell stretching device for mechanobiology studies where external stretch plays an important role in regulating subcellular molecular dynamics and cellular phenotypes. PMID:24289415

  20. The effects of dynamic stretching on plantar flexor muscle-tendon tissue properties.

    PubMed

    Samukawa, Mina; Hattori, Masaki; Sugama, Naoko; Takeda, Naoki

    2011-12-01

    Dynamic stretching is commonly used in warm-up routines for athletic activities. Even though several positive effects of dynamic stretching on athletic performance have been reported, the effects on the muscle-tendon unit (MTU) itself are still unclear. The objective of this study is to determine the effects of dynamic stretching on the ankle plantar flexor muscle-tendon properties by use of ultrasonography. Twenty healthy male subjects participated in the present study. The subjects were asked to engage in dynamic stretching of plantar flexors for 30 s and to repeat for 5 sets. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM was measured before and after the dynamic stretching. Changes in the displacement of the myotendinous junction (MTJ), pennation angle, and fascicle length were also determined by using ultrasonography. Ankle dorsiflexion ROM increased significantly after the dynamic stretching (p < 0.0001). A significant distal displacement of the MTJ was observed until the second stretching set (p < 0.001) with no significant changes thereafter. Pennation angle, and fascicle length were unaffected by the dynamic stretching. Dynamic stretching was shown to be effective in increasing ankle joint flexibility. Outcomes that could have indicated changes in muscle tissue (such as the pennation angle and fascicle length) were unaltered. However, a significant displacement of the MTJ was found, indicating some change in the tendon tissues. Therefore, dynamic stretching of the plantar flexors was considered an effective means of lengthening the tendon tissues. PMID:21813313

  1. Acute Effects of Different Agonist and Antagonist Stretching Arrangements on Static and Dynamic Range of Motion

    PubMed Central

    Amiri-Khorasani, Mohammadtaghi; Kellis, Eleftherios

    2015-01-01

    Background: Traditionally, stretching exercises are considered as basic components of warm up aiming to prepare the musculoskeletal system for performance and to prevent injuries. Objectives: The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of different agonist and antagonist stretching arrangements within a pre-exercise warm-up on hip static (SROM) and dynamic range of motion (DROM). Materials and Methods: Sixty trained male subjects (Mean ± SD: height, 177.38 ± 6.92 cm; body mass, 68.4 ± 10.22 kg; age, 21.52 ± 1.17 years) volunteered to participate in this study. SROM was measured by V-sit test and DROM captured by a motion analysis system before and after (i) static stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (SFSE), (ii) dynamic stretching for both hip flexor and extensor muscles (DFDE), (iii) static stretching for the hip flexors and dynamic stretching for hip extensors (SFDE), and (iv) dynamic stretching for the hip flexors and static stretching for hip extensors (DFSE). Results: DFSE showed a significantly higher increase in DROM and SROM than the remainder of the stretching protocols (P < 0.05). There were significant differences between DFDE with SFSE and SFDE (P < 0.05) and SFSE showed significant increase as compared to SFDE (P < 0.05). Conclusions: In conclusion, DFSE is probably the best stretching arrangement due to producing more post activation potentiation on agonist muscles and less muscle stiffness in antagonist muscles. PMID:26715975

  2. Morphology and Mechanical Properties of Poly(Ethylene Terephthalate) Stretched Above the Glass Transition Temperature

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Todorov, Lyudmil V.; Viana, Júlio C.

    2007-04-01

    This study presents an experimental investigation into the development of the strain-induced morphology of amorphous poly(ethylene terephthalate), PET, stretched above its glass transition temperature. The present work aims at: i) defining the most important processing parameters that govern the structure formation and its significance; ii) characterising the mechanical properties of uniaxial stretched glassy PET, as an approach for industrial stretch-blow moulding techniques; iii) establishing structure-properties relationships. Compression moulded amorphous PET was uniaxial stretched with variations of following stretching parameters: stretching temperature, Tst, stretching velocity, Vst, and stretching ratio, λst, that were varied in two levels according to a L8 Taguchi orthogonal array. The developed morphologies were observed by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC), birefringence and Wide-Angle X-ray Scattering (WAXS). The mechanical behaviour was assessed in tensile testing at 15 mm.min-1 and room temperature. The results were treated by a statistical ANOVA tool. A strong thermal and mechanical coupling is evidenced in the stretching process, significantly influencing the morphology development. The main stretching parameters controlling microstructure formation were defined. The relationships between the microstructure and mechanical properties were established too.

  3. Adaptation of rat soleus muscles to 4 wk of intermittent strain

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stauber, W. T.; Miller, G. R.; Grimmett, J. G.; Knack, K. K.

    1994-01-01

    The effect of repeated strains on rat soleus muscles was investigated by stretching active muscles 3 times/wk for 4 wk with two different methods of stretching. The adaptation of myofibers and noncontractile tissue was followed by histochemical techniques and computer-assisted image analysis. Muscle hypertrophy was seen in the slow-stretched muscles, which increased in mass by 13% and increased in myofiber cross-sectional area by 30%. In the fast-stretched muscle, mass increased by 10% but myofiber cross-sectional area actually decreased. This decrease in mean fiber area was the result of a population of very small fibers (population A) that coexisted with slightly smaller normal-sized fibers (population B). Fibers in population A did not have the distribution expected from atrophy compared with atrophic fibers from unloaded muscles; they were much smaller. In addition, there was a 44% increase in noncontractile tissue in the fast-stretched muscles. Thus, soleus muscles subjected to repeated strains respond differently to slow and fast stretching. Slow stretching results in typical muscle hypertrophy, whereas fast stretching produces somewhat larger muscles but with a mixture of small and normal-sized myofibers accompanied by a marked proliferation of noncontractile tissue.

  4. Evolutionary adaptation to thermosensation.

    PubMed

    Gracheva, Elena O; Bagriantsev, Sviatoslav N

    2015-10-01

    Organisms continuously evolve to adapt to changing environmental conditions. Chief among these are daily and seasonal temperature fluctuations. Relatively small in terms of real physical values, temperature fluctuations of just a few degrees can profoundly affect organismal functions. In vertebrates, temperature is detected by primary afferents of somatosensory neurons, which express thermo-gated ion channels. Most of our knowledge about temperature receptors comes from seminal studies in mice and rats. Recent work uncovered thermosensory mechanisms in other vertebrates, shedding light onto the diversity of thermosensory adaptations. Here, we summarize molecular mechanisms of thermosensation in different species and discuss the need to use the standard laboratory rodents and non-standard species side-by-side in order to understand fundamental principles of somatosensation. PMID:25698346

  5. Transient Receptor Potential Channels and Corneal Stromal Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Okada, Yuka; Reinach, Peter S; Shirai, Kumi; Kitano-Izutani, Ai; Miyajima, Masayasu; Yamanaka, Osamu; Sumioka, Takayoshi; Saika, Shizuya

    2015-11-01

    Corneal transparency is dependent on the maintenance of the structural integrity and functional activity of its epithelial and endothelial limiting layers and the stroma. Different transient receptor potential (TRP) channel subtypes are expressed in cells and on corneal sensory nerve endings. They serve as sensors and transducers of environmental stimuli that can reduce tissue transparency. These nonselective cation channels are members of a superfamily sharing TRP box protein sequence homology having 6 membrane spanning domains with a pore between the fifth and sixth segments. TRP channels are composed of 4 monomeric subunits that oligomerize in homomeric or heteromeric configurations derived from different TRP subtypes belonging to the same or any of 6 different subfamilies. TRP subfamily members identified in the cornea include those belonging to the canonical, vanilloid, ankyrin, or melastatin subfamilies. In this review, we specifically focus on the functional roles of TRPV1 and TRPA1 expression in the cornea as their activation provides adaptive nociceptive and immune responses to noxious environmental stresses such as irritating ligands, temperature fluctuations, rises in ambient osmolarity, mechanical stretch, decline in pH, and tissue injury. Our previous studies have indicated that TRPV1 and TRPA1 subtypes are potential drug targets for improving corneal wound healing after alkali burns, because injury-induced fibrosis, neovascularization, and inflammation in either TRPV1 or TRPA1 gene-silenced mice were all significantly reduced. PMID:26448171

  6. Genetics of taste receptors.

    PubMed

    Bachmanov, Alexander A; Bosak, Natalia P; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R; Nelson, Theodore M

    2014-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical "tastes" as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  7. Genetics of Taste Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Bachmanov, Alexander A.; Bosak, Natalia P.; Lin, Cailu; Matsumoto, Ichiro; Ohmoto, Makoto; Reed, Danielle R.; Nelson, Theodore M.

    2016-01-01

    Taste receptors function as one of the interfaces between internal and external milieus. Taste receptors for sweet and umami (T1R [taste receptor, type 1]), bitter (T2R [taste receptor, type 2]), and salty (ENaC [epithelial sodium channel]) have been discovered in the recent years, but transduction mechanisms of sour taste and ENaC-independent salt taste are still poorly understood. In addition to these five main taste qualities, the taste system detects such noncanonical “tastes” as water, fat, and complex carbohydrates, but their reception mechanisms require further research. Variations in taste receptor genes between and within vertebrate species contribute to individual and species differences in taste-related behaviors. These variations are shaped by evolutionary forces and reflect species adaptations to their chemical environments and feeding ecology. Principles of drug discovery can be applied to taste receptors as targets in order to develop novel taste compounds to satisfy demand in better artificial sweeteners, enhancers of sugar and sodium taste, and blockers of bitterness of food ingredients and oral medications. PMID:23886383

  8. Mechanical Stretch-Induced Activation of ROS/RNS Signaling in Striated Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Christopher W.; Prosser, Benjamin L.

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Mechanical activation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) occurs in striated muscle and affects Ca2+ signaling and contractile function. ROS/RNS signaling is tightly controlled, spatially compartmentalized, and source specific. Recent Advances: Here, we review the evidence that within the contracting myocyte, the trans-membrane protein NADPH oxidase 2 (Nox2) is the primary source of ROS generated during contraction. We also review a newly characterized signaling cascade in cardiac and skeletal muscle in which the microtubule network acts as a mechanotransduction element that activates Nox2-dependent ROS generation during mechanical stretch, a pathway termed X-ROS signaling. Critical Issues: In the heart, X-ROS acts locally and affects the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca2+ release channels (ryanodine receptors) and tunes Ca2+ signaling during physiological behavior, but excessive X-ROS can promote Ca2+-dependent arrhythmias in pathology. In skeletal muscle, X-ROS sensitizes Ca2+-permeable sarcolemmal “transient receptor potential” channels, a pathway that is critical for sustaining SR load during repetitive contractions, but when in excess, it is maladaptive in diseases such as Duchenne Musclar dystrophy. Future Directions: New advances in ROS/RNS detection as well as molecular manipulation of signaling pathways will provide critical new mechanistic insights into the details of X-ROS signaling. These efforts will undoubtedly reveal new avenues for therapeutic intervention in the numerous diseases of striated muscle in which altered mechanoactivation of ROS/RNS production has been identified. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 20, 929–936. PMID:23971496

  9. Magnitude-dependent regulation of pulmonary endothelial cell barrier function by cyclic stretch.

    PubMed

    Birukov, Konstantin G; Jacobson, Jeffrey R; Flores, Alejandro A; Ye, Shui Q; Birukova, Anna A; Verin, Alexander D; Garcia, Joe G N

    2003-10-01

    Ventilator-induced lung injury syndromes are characterized by profound increases in vascular leakiness and activation of inflammatory processes. To explore whether excessive cyclic stretch (CS) directly causes vascular barrier disruption or enhances endothelial cell sensitivity to edemagenic agents, human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAEC) were exposed to physiologically (5% elongation) or pathologically (18% elongation) relevant levels of strain. CS produced rapid (10 min) increases in myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation, activation of p38 and extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 MAP kinases, and actomyosin remodeling. Acute (15 min) and chronic (48 h) CS markedly enhanced thrombin-induced MLC phosphorylation (2.1-fold and 3.2-fold for 15-min CS at 5 and 18% elongation and 2.1-fold and 3.1-fold for 48-h CS at 5 and 18% elongation, respectively). HPAEC preconditioned at 18% CS, but not at 5% CS, exhibited significantly enhanced thrombin-induced reduction in transendothelial electrical resistance but did not affect barrier protective effect of sphingosine-1-phosphate (0.5 microM). Finally, expression profiling analysis revealed a number of genes, including small GTPase rho, apoptosis mediator ZIP kinase, and proteinase activated receptor-2, to be regulated by CS in an amplitude-dependent manner. Thus our study demonstrates a critical role for the magnitude of CS in regulation of agonist-mediated pulmonary endothelial cell permeability and strongly suggests phenotypic regulation of HPAEC barrier properties by CS. PMID:12639843

  10. Cyclical mechanical stretch enhances degranulation and IL-4 secretion in RBL-2H3 mast cells.

    PubMed

    Komiyama, Hidenori; Miyake, Koichi; Asai, Kuniya; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Shimada, Takashi

    2014-01-01

    Mast cells are widely distributed in the body and affect their surrounding environment through degranulation and secretion of cytokines. Conversely, mast cells are influenced by environmental stimuli such as cyclical mechanical stretch (CMS), such as that induced by heartbeat and respiration. Peripherally distributed mast cells are surrounded by extracellular matrix, where they bind IgE on their surface by expressing the high-affinity Fc receptor for IgE (FcεRI), and they release mediators after cross-linking of surface-bound IgE by allergen. To analyse how CMS affects mast cell responses, we examined the effect of applying CMS on the behaviour of IgE-bound mast cells (RBL-2H3 cell line) adhering to fibronectin as a substitute for extracellular matrix. We found that CMS enhanced FcεRI-mediated secretion in the presence of antigen (2,4-dinitrophenol-bovine serum albumin). CMS increased expression of IL-4 mRNA and secretion of IL-4 protein. Western blot analysis showed that CMS changes the signal transduction in mitogen-activated protein kinases and AKT, which in turn alters the regulation of IL-4 and increases the secretion of IL-4. These results suggest that CMS modulates the effect of mast cells on inflammation and resultant tissue remodelling. Understanding how CMS affects mast cell responses is crucial for developing therapies to treat mast cell-related diseases. PMID:23584980

  11. Effect of Biaxial Stretching at Temperatures and Strain Histories Comparable to Injection Stretch Blow Moulding on Tensile Modulus for Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tan, C. W.; Menary, G. H.; Harkin-Jones, E. M. A.; Armstrong, C. G.; Martin, P. J.

    2007-04-01

    This study is particularly relevant to the injection stretch blow moulding (ISBM) process where PET material is typically biaxially stretched to form bottles for the water and carbonated soft drinks industry. The aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of biaxial stretching on the mechanical properties of Polyethylene Terephthalate (PET) using a custom built biaxial testing machine. An initially amorphous PET sample was prepared via injection moulding to form a square sample (76mm × 76mm) suitable for stretching on the machine. This sample was then subjected to a series of biaxial tests (simultaneous and sequential) within a temperature range between 85°C and 110 °C, strain rates in the range of 1s-1 to 32s-1 and stretch ratios in the range of 1.5 to 3. Specimens were subsequently cut from the biaxial stretched sheets and used to measure the tensile modulus. Results showed that there is almost no effect found for strain rate and temperature on modulus development whilst stretch ratio and mode of deformation played the most important role on modulus development on PET under biaxial deformation.

  12. Tuning the period of nanogratings using mechanical stretching and nanoimprint lithography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qian, Mingcheng; Zhang, Weichao; Trefilov, Denis; Ji, Min; Cui, Yushuang; Yuan, Changsheng; Li, Wendi; Ge, Haixiong; Chen, Yanfeng

    2016-06-01

    We report a method to tune the nanogratings' period using mechanical stretching and transfer the tuned gratings using a UV-curing nanoimprint process. A hybrid mold with nanogratings was stretched perpendicularly or parallel to the grating lines. The perpendicular stretching caused a continuous enlargement of the grating period, and the parallel stretching led to a continuous shrinkage of the period. As a demonstration, we tuned a grating pattern with a period of 550 nm to a wide range of periods from 450 to 750 nm. The stretched hybrid mold was used to perform a UV-curing imprint process and to transfer the tuned grating structures onto a substrate in combination with a reactive ion etching process. A larger tuning range was achieved by repeating the grating stretching and pattern transfer steps. A grating pattern with a smaller period of 140 nm was also successfully shrunk to 125 nm using this method.

  13. Effect of Lower Extremity Stretching Exercises on Balance in Geriatric Population

    PubMed Central

    Reddy, Ravi Shankar; Alahmari, Khalid A

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objective The purpose of this study was to find “Effect of lower extremity stretching exercises on balance in the geriatric population. Method 60 subjects (30 male and 30 female) participated in the study. The subjects underwent 10 weeks of lower limb stretching exercise program. Pre and post 10 weeks stretching exercise program, the subjects were assessed for balance, using single limb stance time in seconds and berg balance score. These outcome measures were analyzed. Results Pre and post lower extremity stretching on balance was analyzed using paired t test. Of 60 subjects 50 subjects completed the stretching exercise program. Paired sample t test analysis showed a significant improvement in single limb stance time (eyes open and eyes closed) (p<0.001) and berg balance score (p<0.001). Conclusion Lower extremity stretching exercises enhances balance in the geriatric population and thereby reduction in the number of falls. PMID:27610062

  14. Infusing Stretch Goal Requirements into the Constellation Program

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Young H.; Galpin, Roger A.; Ingoldsby, Kevin

    2008-01-01

    established to identify operability requirements to influence flight vehicle and ground infrastructure design in order to impact the life cycle operations costs, and stretch goal requirements were introduced to the Program. This paper will describe how these stretch goal requirements were identified, developed, refined, matured, approved, and infused into the CARD. The paper will also document several challenges encountered when infusing the stretch goal requirements into the Constellation Program.

  15. Comparing the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men.

    PubMed

    Ferguson, Steven L; Kim, Eonho; Seo, Dong-Il; Bemben, Michael G

    2013-12-01

    This study compared the effects of 3 weeks of upper-body vibration training, vibration and stretching, and stretching alone on shoulder flexibility in college-aged men. Twenty-one men were randomly assigned to vibration-stretching (VS; n = 8), vibration only (VO; n = 6), or stretching only (SO; n = 7) groups that trained 3 times per week for 3 weeks. All 3 groups performed 9 total sets of 30-second stretches. The VS group performed four 30-second upper-body vibration exercises and five 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. The VO group performed nine 30-second upper-body vibration exercises. The SO group performed nine 30-second upper-body stretching exercises. Shoulder flexion (SF), shoulder extension (SE), and shoulder transverse extension (STE) were assessed by a Leighton Flexometer and back scratch tests bilaterally (BSR, BSL) were measured via tape measure. A 1-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) evaluated groups at baseline and a 2-way repeated-measures ANOVA evaluated the interventions over time. At baseline, there were no group differences in age, height, or weight. There was a significant (p < 0.01) time main effect for each flexibility outcome variable (SF: +6.1%, +3.9%, +3.4%; SE: +8.9%, +13.5%, +26.9%; STE: +12.8%, +8.7%, +24.3%; BSR: +4.4 cm, +3.4 cm, +3.1 cm; BSL: +3.6 cm, +2.3 cm, +6.1 cm) for SO, VO, and VS, respectively. Shoulder extension was the only variable that showed a significant (p < 0.05) interaction effect for group by time. In conclusion, vibration training, alone or combined with stretching, is a viable alternative to a standard stretching routine when attempting to increase shoulder flexibility. Adding vibration training to a flexibility regimen may improve the likelihood of regularly performing flexibility sessions because of increased variety. PMID:23478479

  16. Adaptation of active tone in the mouse descending thoracic aorta under acute changes in loading.

    PubMed

    Murtada, S-I; Lewin, S; Arner, A; Humphrey, J D

    2016-06-01

    Arteries can adapt to sustained changes in blood pressure and flow, and it is thought that these adaptive processes often begin with an altered smooth muscle cell activity that precedes any detectable changes in the passive wall components. Yet, due to the intrinsic coupling between the active and passive properties of the arterial wall, it has been difficult to delineate the adaptive contributions of active smooth muscle. To address this need, we used a novel experimental-computational approach to quantify adaptive functions of active smooth muscle in arterial rings excised from the proximal descending thoracic aorta of mice and subjected to short-term sustained circumferential stretches while stimulated with various agonists. A new mathematical model of the adaptive processes was derived and fit to data to describe and predict the effects of active tone adaptation. It was found that active tone was maintained when the artery was adapted close to the optimal stretch for maximal active force production, but it was reduced when adapted below the optimal stretch; there was no significant change in passive behavior in either case. Such active adaptations occurred only upon smooth muscle stimulation with phenylephrine, however, not stimulation with KCl or angiotensin II. Numerical simulations using the proposed model suggested further that active tone adaptation in vascular smooth muscle could play a stabilizing role for wall stress in large elastic arteries. PMID:26220455

  17. Lewis lung carcinoma regulation of mechanical stretch-induced protein synthesis in cultured myotubes.

    PubMed

    Gao, Song; Carson, James A

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical stretch can activate muscle and myotube protein synthesis through mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) signaling. While it has been established that tumor-derived cachectic factors can induce myotube wasting, the effect of this catabolic environment on myotube mechanical signaling has not been determined. We investigated whether media containing cachectic factors derived from Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC) can regulate the stretch induction of myotube protein synthesis. C2C12 myotubes preincubated in control or LLC-derived media were chronically stretched. Protein synthesis regulation by anabolic and catabolic signaling was then examined. In the control condition, stretch increased mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis. The LLC treatment decreased basal mTORC1 activity and protein synthesis and attenuated the stretch induction of protein synthesis. LLC media increased STAT3 and AMP-activated protein kinase phosphorylation in myotubes, independent of stretch. Both stretch and LLC independently increased ERK1/2, p38, and NF-κB phosphorylation. In LLC-treated myotubes, the inhibition of ERK1/2 and p38 rescued the stretch induction of protein synthesis. Interestingly, either leukemia inhibitory factor or glycoprotein 130 antibody administration caused further inhibition of mTORC1 signaling and protein synthesis in stretched myotubes. AMP-activated protein kinase inhibition increased basal mTORC1 signaling activity and protein synthesis in LLC-treated myotubes, but did not restore the stretch induction of protein synthesis. These results demonstrate that LLC-derived cachectic factors can dissociate stretch-induced signaling from protein synthesis through ERK1/2 and p38 signaling, and that glycoprotein 130 signaling is associated with the basal stretch response in myotubes. PMID:26491045

  18. The effects of passive stretching plus vibration on strength and activation of the plantar flexors.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jonathan D; Herda, Trent J; Trevino, Michael A; Mosier, Eric M

    2016-09-01

    This study examined the effects of passive stretching only (PS+CON) and passive stretching with the addition of continuous vibration (VIB) during post-passive stretching tests (PS+VIB) on peak torque (PT), percent voluntary inactivation (%VI), single stimulus twitch torque (TTSINGLE), and doublet stimuli twitch torque (TTDOUBLET) of the plantar flexors at a short (20° plantar flexion (PF)) and long muscle length (15° dorsiflexion (DF)). Fourteen healthy men (age = 22 ± 3 years) performed isometric maximal voluntary contractions at PF and DF, and passive range of motion (PROM) assessments before and after 8 × 30-s passive stretches without (PS+CON) or with VIB (PS+VIB) administered continuously throughout post-passive stretching tests. The passive properties of the muscle tendon unit were assessed pre- and post-passive stretching via PROM, passive torque (PASSTQ), and musculotendinous stiffness (MTS) measurements. PT, TTSINGLE, and TTDOUBLET decreased, whereas, %VI increased following passive stretching at PF and DF (P < 0.05) with no significant differences between PS+CON and PS+VIB. PASSTQ and MTS decreased while PROM increased post-passive stretching during both trials (P < 0.05). The stretching-induced force/torque deficit and increases in %VI were evident following passive stretching at short and long muscle lengths. Although not statistically significant, effect size calculations suggested large and moderate differences in the absolute changes in PT (Cohen's d = 1.14) and %VI (Cohen's d = 0.54) from pre- to post-passive stretching between treatments, with PS+VIB having greater decreases of PT and higher %VI than PS+CON. The decrement in PT following passive stretching may be primarily neural in origin. PMID:27512816

  19. Automation of a single-DNA molecule stretching device.

    PubMed

    Sørensen, Kristian Tølbøl; Lopacinska, Joanna M; Tommerup, Niels; Silahtaroglu, Asli; Kristensen, Anders; Marie, Rodolphe

    2015-06-01

    We automate the manipulation of genomic-length DNA in a nanofluidic device based on real-time analysis of fluorescence images. In our protocol, individual molecules are picked from a microchannel and stretched with pN forces using pressure driven flows. The millimeter-long DNA fragments free flowing in micro- and nanofluidics emit low fluorescence and change shape, thus challenging the image analysis for machine vision. We demonstrate a set of image processing steps that increase the intrinsically low signal-to-noise ratio associated with single-molecule fluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, we demonstrate how to estimate the length of molecules by continuous real-time image stitching and how to increase the effective resolution of a pressure controller by pulse width modulation. The sequence of image-processing steps addresses the challenges of genomic-length DNA visualization; however, they should also be general to other applications of fluorescence-based microfluidics. PMID:26133839

  20. Recent Progress on the Stretched Lens Array (SLA)

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, Markl; McDanal, A. J.; Piszczor, Michael; George, Patrick; Eskenazi, Michael; Botke, Matthew; Edwards, David; Hoppe, David; Brandhorst, Henry

    2005-01-01

    At the last Space Photovoltaic Research and Technology Conference, SPRAT XVII, held during the fateful week of 9/11/01, our team presented a paper on the early developments related to the new Stretched Lens Array (SLA), including its evolution from the successful SCARLET array on the NASA/JPL Deep Space 1 spacecraft. Within the past two years, the SLA team has made significant progress in the SLA technology, including the successful fabrication and testing of a complete four-panel prototype solar array wing (Fig. 1). The prototype wing verified the mechanical and structural design of the rigid-panel SLA approach, including multiple successful demonstrations of automatic wing deployment. One panel in the prototype wing included four fully functional photovoltaic receivers, employing triple-junction solar cells.

  1. Vortex stretching as a mechanism for quantum kinetic energy decay.

    PubMed

    Kerr, Robert M

    2011-06-01

    A pair of perturbed antiparallel quantum vortices, simulated using the three-dimensional Gross-Pitaevskii equations, is shown to be unstable to vortex stretching. This results in kinetic energy K(∇ψ) being converted into interaction energy E(I) and eventually local kinetic energy depletion that is similar to energy decay in a classical fluid, even though the governing equations are Hamiltonian and energy conserving. The intermediate stages include the generation of vortex waves, their deepening, multiple reconnections, the emission of vortex rings and phonons, and the creation of an approximately -5/3 kinetic energy spectrum at high wave numbers. All of the wave generation and reconnection steps follow from interactions between the two original vortices. A four vortex example is given to demonstrate that some of these steps might be general. PMID:21702604

  2. Small bending and stretching of sandwich-type shells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reissner, Eric

    1950-01-01

    A theory has been developed for small bending and stretching of sandwich-type shells. This theory is an extension of the known theory of homogeneous thin elastic shells. It was found that two effects are important in the present problem, which are not normally of importance in the theory of curved shells: (1) the effect of transverse shear deformation and (2) the effect of transverse normal stress deformation. The first of these two effects has been known to be of importance in the theory of plates and beams. The second effect was found to occur in a manner which is typical for shells and has no counterpart in flat-plate theory. The general results of this report have been applied to the solution of problems concerning flat plates, circular rings, circular cylindrical shells, and spherical shells. In each case numerical examples have been given, illustrating the magnitude of the effects of transverse shear and normal stress deformation.

  3. Direct observation of amyloid nucleation under nanomechanical stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varongchayakul, Nitinun

    Self-assembly of amyloid nanofiber is associated with functional and pathological processes such as in neurodegenerative diseases. Despite intensive studies, stochastic nature of the process has made it difficult to elucidate molecular mechanisms for the key amyloid nucleation. Here, we investigated the amyloid nucleation of silk-elastin-like peptide (SELP) using time-lapse lateral force microscopy (LFM). By repeated scanning a single line on a SELP-coated mica surface, we observed sudden stepwise height increases, corresponds to nucleation of an amyloid fiber. The lateral force profiles followed either a worm-like chain model or an exponential function, suggesting that the atomic force microscopy (AFM) tip stretches a single or multiple SELP molecules along the scanning direction, serves as the template for further self-assembly perpendicular to the scan direction. Such mechanically induced nucleation of amyloid fibrils allows positional and directional control of amyloid assembly in vitro , which we demonstrate by generating single nanofibers at predetermined nucleation sites.

  4. Stretched exponential distribution of recurrent time of wars in China

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tang, Da-Hai; Han, Xiao-Pu; Wang, Bing-Hong

    2010-07-01

    As a killing machine and a decisive factor of history, wars play an important role in social system. In this paper, we present an empirical exploration of the distribution of recurrent time of wars in ancient China and find that it obeys a stretched exponential form. The pattern we found implies that there are undetected mechanisms that underlie the dynamics of wars. In order to explain the origin of this form, a model mainly based on the correlation between two consecutive wars is constructed, which is somewhat similar to the Bak-Sneppen model. The simulation results of the model are in agreement with the empirical statistics and suggest that the dynamics of wars could relate with self-organized criticality.

  5. High thermopower of mechanically stretched single-molecule junctions

    PubMed Central

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; He, Yuhui; Arima, Akihide

    2015-01-01

    Metal-molecule-metal junction is a promising candidate for thermoelectric applications that utilizes quantum confinement effects in the chemically defined zero-dimensional atomic structure to achieve enhanced dimensionless figure of merit ZT. A key issue in this new class of thermoelectric nanomaterials is to clarify the sensitivity of thermoelectricity on the molecular junction configurations. Here we report simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and conductance on Au-1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT)-Au junctions mechanically-stretched in-situ at sub-nanoscale. We obtained the average single-molecule conductance and thermopower of 0.01 G0 and 15 μV/K, respectively, suggesting charge transport through the highest occupied molecular orbital. Meanwhile, we found the single-molecule thermoelectric transport properties extremely-sensitive to the BDT bridge configurations, whereby manifesting the importance to design the electrode-molecule contact motifs for optimizing the thermoelectric performance of molecular junctions. PMID:26112999

  6. Laser Pulse-Stretching Using Multiple Optical Ring-Cavities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kojima, Jun; Nguyen, Quang-Viet; Lee, Chi-Ming (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    We describe a simple and passive nanosecond-long (ns-long) laser 'pulse-stretcher' using multiple optical ring-cavities. We present a model of the pulse-stretching process for an arbitrary number of optical ring-cavities. Using the model, we optimize the design of a pulse-stretcher for use in a spontaneous Raman scattering excitation system that avoids laser-induced plasma spark problems. From the optimized design, we then experimentally demonstrate and verify the model with a 3-cavity pulse-stretcher system that converts a 1000 mJ, 8.4 ns-long input laser pulse into an approximately 75 ns-long (FWHM) output laser pulse with a peak power reduction of 0.10X, and an 83% efficiency.

  7. Hydraulic fracture and resilience of epithelial monolayers under stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Arroyo, Marino; Lucantonio, Alessandro; Noselli, Giovanni; Casares, Laura; Desimone, Antonio; Trepat, Xavier

    Epithelial monolayers are very simple and prevalent tissues. Their functions include delimiting distinct physicochemical containers and protecting us from pathogens. Epithelial fracture disrupts the mechanical integrity of this barrier, and hence compromises these functions. Here, we show that in addition to the conventional fracture resulting from excessive tissue tension, epithelia can hydraulically fracture under stretch as a result of the poroelastic nature of the matrix. We will provide experimental evidence of this counterintuitive mechanism of fracture, in which cracks appear under compression. Intriguingly, unlike tensional fracture, which is localized and catastrophic, hydraulic epithelial fracture is distributed and reversible. We will also describe the active mechanisms responsible for crack healing, and the physical principles by which the poroelastic matrix contributes to this resilient behavior.

  8. DNA-cisplatin interaction studied with single molecule stretching experiments.

    PubMed

    Crisafuli, F A P; Cesconetto, E C; Ramos, E B; Rocha, M S

    2012-05-01

    By performing single molecule stretching experiments with optical tweezers, we have studied the changes in the mechanical properties of DNA-cisplatin complexes as a function of some variables of interest such as the drug diffusion time and concentration in the sample. We propose a model to explain the behavior of the persistence length as a function of the drug concentration, extracting the binding data from pure mechanical measurements. Such analysis has allowed us to show that cisplatin binds cooperatively to the DNA molecule. In addition, DNA compaction by the action of the drug was also observed under our experimental conditions by studying the kinetics of some mechanical properties such as the radius of gyration and the end-to-end distance, e.g. Crisafuli et al., Integr. Biol., 2011, xx, xxxx. PMID:22513758

  9. Development of the Ultra-Light Stretched Lens Array

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    O'Neill, M. J.; McDanal, A. J.; George, P. J.; Piszczor, M. F.; Edwards, D. L.; Botke, M. M.; Jaster, P. A.; Brandhorst, H. W.; Eskenazi, M.I.; Munafo, Paul M. (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    At the last IEEE (Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers) PVSC (Photovoltaic Specialists Conference), the new stretched lens array (SLA) concept was introduced. Since that conference, the SLA team has made significant advances in the SLA technology, including component level improvements, array level optimization, space environment exposure testing, and prototype hardware fabrication and evaluation. This paper will describe the evolved version of the SLA, highlighting the improvements in the lens, solar cell, rigid panel structure, and complete solar array wing. The near term SLA will provide outstanding wing level performance: greater than 180 W/kg specific power, greater than 300 W/sq m power density, greater than 300 V operational voltage, and excellent durability in the space environment.

  10. Programmable Extreme Pseudomagnetic Fields in Graphene by a Uniaxial Stretch

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhu, Shuze; Stroscio, Joseph A.; Li, Teng

    2015-12-01

    Many of the properties of graphene are tied to its lattice structure, allowing for tuning of charge carrier dynamics through mechanical strain. The graphene electromechanical coupling yields very large pseudomagnetic fields for small strain fields, up to hundreds of Tesla, which offer new scientific opportunities unattainable with ordinary laboratory magnets. Significant challenges exist in investigation of pseudomagnetic fields, limited by the nonplanar graphene geometries in existing demonstrations and the lack of a viable approach to controlling the distribution and intensity of the pseudomagnetic field. Here we reveal a facile and effective mechanism to achieve programmable extreme pseudomagnetic fields with uniform distributions in a planar graphene sheet over a large area by a simple uniaxial stretch. We achieve this by patterning the planar graphene geometry and graphene-based heterostructures with a shape function to engineer a desired strain gradient. Our method is geometrical, opening up new fertile opportunities of strain engineering of electronic properties of 2D materials in general.

  11. Programmable Extreme Pseudomagnetic Fields in Graphene by a Uniaxial Stretch.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Shuze; Stroscio, Joseph A; Li, Teng

    2015-12-11

    Many of the properties of graphene are tied to its lattice structure, allowing for tuning of charge carrier dynamics through mechanical strain. The graphene electromechanical coupling yields very large pseudomagnetic fields for small strain fields, up to hundreds of Tesla, which offer new scientific opportunities unattainable with ordinary laboratory magnets. Significant challenges exist in investigation of pseudomagnetic fields, limited by the nonplanar graphene geometries in existing demonstrations and the lack of a viable approach to controlling the distribution and intensity of the pseudomagnetic field. Here we reveal a facile and effective mechanism to achieve programmable extreme pseudomagnetic fields with uniform distributions in a planar graphene sheet over a large area by a simple uniaxial stretch. We achieve this by patterning the planar graphene geometry and graphene-based heterostructures with a shape function to engineer a desired strain gradient. Our method is geometrical, opening up new fertile opportunities of strain engineering of electronic properties of 2D materials in general. PMID:26705640

  12. Gastric mucosal barrier: hydrophobicity of stretched stomach lining.

    PubMed

    Hills, B A; Lichtenberger, L M

    1985-06-01

    Surface hydrophobicity of the luminal lining of the canine stomach has been studied as a very convenient means of following the adsorbed monolayer of surfactant believed to provide the gastric mucosal barrier. Hydrophobicity has been measured as the contact angle (theta) produced when a drop of saline is placed upon the surface. theta was found to decrease from 82 to 62 degrees upon 50% linear extension of samples of oxyntic mucosa from 10 dogs. When the phospholipid believed to cause the hydrophobicity was absorbed to glass slides, the contact angle was found to decrease with lower surface concentration. Thinning or "crazing" of the absorbed surfactant monolayer imparting the very hydrophobic nature of the luminal lining is discussed as a possible reason why ulcers tend to form at the crests of the folds, i.e., at points where the surface has been stretched and the monolayer disrupted. PMID:4003546

  13. Direct measurement of surface stress of stretched soft solids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Qin; Dufresne, Eric

    The wetting profile of liquid droplets on soft solids is determined by the competition between elasticity and solid surface stress. Near the contact point, the bulk elasticity becomes negligible such that Neumann's classic analysis nicely captures the wetting geometry and provides us an effective approach to directly measure the solid surface stress. Here, we report our experiments using confocal microscopy in studying the wetting of liquids on soft PDMS gels. While the droplets are sitting on the top, the substrates are biaxially strained. We observe that the wetting profiles and the three-phase contact angles are changing dramatically as the substrate is stretched. With Neumann's principle, we obtain the quantitative relation between surface stress of the PDMS and the applied strain. These results suggest a significant strain-dependence of surface energy and surface stress for our PDMS.

  14. High thermopower of mechanically stretched single-molecule junctions.

    PubMed

    Tsutsui, Makusu; Morikawa, Takanori; He, Yuhui; Arima, Akihide; Taniguchi, Masateru

    2015-01-01

    Metal-molecule-metal junction is a promising candidate for thermoelectric applications that utilizes quantum confinement effects in the chemically defined zero-dimensional atomic structure to achieve enhanced dimensionless figure of merit ZT. A key issue in this new class of thermoelectric nanomaterials is to clarify the sensitivity of thermoelectricity on the molecular junction configurations. Here we report simultaneous measurements of the thermoelectric voltage and conductance on Au-1,4-benzenedithiol (BDT)-Au junctions mechanically-stretched in-situ at sub-nanoscale. We obtained the average single-molecule conductance and thermopower of 0.01 G0 and 15 μV/K, respectively, suggesting charge transport through the highest occupied molecular orbital. Meanwhile, we found the single-molecule thermoelectric transport properties extremely-sensitive to the BDT bridge configurations, whereby manifesting the importance to design the electrode-molecule contact motifs for optimizing the thermoelectric performance of molecular junctions. PMID:26112999

  15. Driven anomalous diffusion: An example from polymer stretching

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saito, Takuya; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2015-07-01

    The way tension propagates along a chain is a key to govern many anomalous dynamics in macromolecular systems. After introducing the weak and the strong force regimes of the tension propagation, we focus on the latter, in which the dynamical fluctuations of a segment in a long polymer during its stretching process is investigated. We show that the response, i.e., average drift, is anomalous, which is characterized by the nonlinear memory kernel, and its relation to the fluctuation is nontrivial. These features are discussed on the basis of the generalized Langevin equation, in which the role of the temporal change in spring constant due to the stress hardening is pinpointed. We carried out the molecular dynamics simulation, which supports our theory.

  16. Driven anomalous diffusion: An example from polymer stretching.

    PubMed

    Saito, Takuya; Sakaue, Takahiro

    2015-07-01

    The way tension propagates along a chain is a key to govern many anomalous dynamics in macromolecular systems. After introducing the weak and the strong force regimes of the tension propagation, we focus on the latter, in which the dynamical fluctuations of a segment in a long polymer during its stretching process is investigated. We show that the response, i.e., average drift, is anomalous, which is characterized by the nonlinear memory kernel, and its relation to the fluctuation is nontrivial. These features are discussed on the basis of the generalized Langevin equation, in which the role of the temporal change in spring constant due to the stress hardening is pinpointed. We carried out the molecular dynamics simulation, which supports our theory. PMID:26274194

  17. Stretching-induced nanostructures on shape memory polyurethane films and their regulation to osteoblasts morphology.

    PubMed

    Xing, Juan; Ma, Yufei; Lin, Manping; Wang, Yuanliang; Pan, Haobo; Ruan, Changshun; Luo, Yanfeng

    2016-10-01

    Programming such as stretching, compression and bending is indispensible to endow polyurethanes with shape memory effects. Despite extensive investigations on the contributions of programming processes to the shape memory effects of polyurethane, less attention has been paid to the nanostructures of shape memory polyurethanes surface during the programming process. Here we found that stretching could induce the reassembly of hard domains and thereby change the nanostructures on the film surfaces with dependence on the stretching ratios (0%, 50%, 100%, and 200%). In as-cast polyurethane films, hard segments sequentially assembled into nano-scale hard domains, round or fibrillar islands, and fibrillar apophyses. Upon stretching, the islands packed along the stretching axis to form reoriented fibrillar apophyses along the stretching direction. Stretching only changed the chemical patterns on polyurethane films without significantly altering surface roughness, with the primary composition of fibrillar apophyses being hydrophilic hard domains. Further analysis of osteoblasts morphology revealed that the focal adhesion formation and osteoblasts orientation were in accordance with the chemical patterns of the underlying stretched films, which corroborates the vital roles of stretching-induced nanostructures in regulating osteoblasts morphology. These novel findings suggest that programming might hold great potential for patterning polyurethane surfaces so as to direct cellular behavior. In addition, this work lays groundwork for guiding the programming of shape memory polyurethanes to produce appropriate nanostructures for predetermined medical applications. PMID:27395036

  18. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players.

    PubMed

    Lee, Joong-Chul; Lee, Sung-Wan; Yeo, Yun-Ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-04-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed. PMID:25995553

  19. Effects of special composite stretching on the swing of amateur golf players

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Joong-chul; Lee, Sung-wan; Yeo, Yun-ghi; Park, Gi Duck

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] The study investigated stretching for safer a golf swing compared to present stretching methods for proper swings in order to examine the effects of stretching exercises on golf swings. [Subjects] The subjects were 20 amateur golf club members who were divided into two groups: an experimental group which performed stretching, and a control group which did not. The subjects had no bone deformity, muscle weakness, muscle soreness, or neurological problems. [Methods] A swing analyzer and a ROM measuring instrument were used as the measuring tools. The swing analyzer was a GS400-golf hit ball analyzer (Korea) and the ROM measuring instrument was a goniometer (Korea). [Results] The experimental group showed a statistically significant improvement in driving distance. After the special stretching training for golf, a statistically significant difference in hit-ball direction deviation after swings were found between the groups. The experimental group showed statistically significant decreases in hit ball direction deviation. After the special stretching training for golf, statistically significant differences in hit-ball speed were found between the groups. The experimental group showed significant increases in hit-ball speed. [Conclusion] To examine the effects of a special stretching program for golf on golf swing-related factors, 20 male amateur golf club members performed a 12-week stretching training program. After the golf stretching training, statistically significant differences were found between the groups in hit-ball driving distance, direction deviation, deflection distance, and speed. PMID:25995553

  20. MHD Flow Of Walters' Liquid B Over A Nonlinearly Stretching Sheet

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siddheshwar, P. G.; Mahabaleshwar, U. S.; Chan, A.

    2015-08-01

    The paper discusses the boundary layer flow of a weak electrically conducting viscoelastic Walters' liquid B over a nonlinearly stretching sheet subjected to an applied transverse magnetic field, when the liquid far away from the surface is at rest. The stretching is assumed to be a quadratic function of the coordinate along the direction of stretching. An analytical expression is obtained for the stream function and velocity components as a function of the viscoelastic parameter, the Chandrasekhar number and stretching related parameters. The results have possible technological applications in liquid based systems involving stretchable materials.

  1. The Influence of Two Stretching Techniques on Standing Hip Range of Motion.

    PubMed

    Lobel, Elin E

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to describe the effects of two stretching techniques on standing hip range of motion (ROM) in female dancers. The participants were 18 university students. They were randomly assigned to one of three groups: active stretch group (Bartenieff Fundamentals(TM) thigh lift), passive stretch group (contract-release-contract form of PNF), or a control group. The participants assigned to the stretching groups completed 12 sessions of their randomly assigned stretch technique over a 3-week period. A repeated measures ANOVA (group x day) was used to analyze statistically the data gathered on the pre- and post-standing hip ROM tests. Both of the stretching groups had statistically significant increases in standing hip flexion angles during the standing hip flexion test. The passive stretch group had greater increases than the active stretch group [F(4, 86) = 7.03, p < 0.01]. The results of this study provide evidence that the effects of supine stretching transfer to standing hip flexion. PMID:27025451

  2. Mechanical Stretch on Human Skin Equivalents Increases the Epidermal Thickness and Develops the Basement Membrane

    PubMed Central

    Tokuyama, Eijiro; Nagai, Yusuke; Takahashi, Ken; Kimata, Yoshihiro; Naruse, Keiji

    2015-01-01

    All previous reports concerning the effect of stretch on cultured skin cells dealt with experiments on epidermal keratinocytes or dermal fibroblasts alone. The aim of the present study was to develop a system that allows application of stretch stimuli to human skin equivalents (HSEs), prepared by coculturing of these two types of cells. In addition, this study aimed to analyze the effect of a stretch on keratinization of the epidermis and on the basement membrane. HSEs were prepared in a gutter-like structure created with a porous silicone sheet in a silicone chamber. After 5-day stimulation with stretching, HSEs were analyzed histologically and immunohistologically. Stretch-stimulated HSEs had a thicker epidermal layer and expressed significantly greater levels of laminin 5 and collagen IV/VII in the basal layer compared with HSEs not subjected to stretch stimulation. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the structure of the basement membrane was more developed in HSEs subjected to stretching. Our model may be relevant for extrapolating the effect of a stretch on the skin in a state similar to an in vivo system. This experimental system may be useful for analysis of the effects of stretch stimuli on skin properties and wound healing and is also expected to be applicable to an in vitro model of a hypertrophic scar in the future. PMID:26528823

  3. 49 CFR 180.413 - Repair, modification, stretching, rebarrelling, or mounting of specification cargo tanks.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., stretching, or rebarrelling must: (i) Have knowledge of the original design concept, particularly with respect to structural design analysis, material and welding procedures. (ii) Assure compliance of...

  4. Molecular candidates for cardiac stretch-activated ion channels

    PubMed Central

    Reed, Alistair; Kohl, Peter; Peyronnet, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    The heart is a mechanically-active organ that dynamically senses its own mechanical environment. This environment is constantly changing, on a beat-by-beat basis, with additional modulation by respiratory activity and changes in posture or physical activity, and further overlaid with more slowly occurring physiological (e.g. pregnancy, endurance training) or pathological challenges (e.g. pressure or volume overload). Far from being a simple pump, the heart detects changes in mechanical demand and adjusts its performance accordingly, both via heart rate and stroke volume alteration. Many of the underlying regulatory processes are encoded intracardially, and are thus maintained even in heart transplant recipients. Over the last three decades, molecular substrates of cardiac mechanosensitivity have gained increasing recognition in the scientific and clinical communities. Nonetheless, the processes underlying this phenomenon are still poorly understood. Stretch-activated ion channels (SAC) have been identified as one contributor to mechanosensitive autoregulation of the heartbeat. They also appear to play important roles in the development of cardiac pathologies – most notably stretch-induced arrhythmias. As recently discovered, some established cardiac drugs act, in part at least, via mechanotransduction pathways suggesting SAC as potential therapeutic targets. Clearly, identification of the molecular substrate of cardiac SAC is of clinical importance and a number of candidate proteins have been identified. At the same time, experimental studies have revealed variable–and at times contrasting–results regarding their function. Further complication arises from the fact that many ion channels that are not classically defined as SAC, including voltage and ligand-gated ion channels, can respond to mechanical stimulation. Here, we summarise what is known about the molecular substrate of the main candidates for cardiac SAC, before identifying potential further

  5. Factors that influence muscle shear modulus during passive stretch.

    PubMed

    Koo, Terry K; Hug, François

    2015-09-18

    Although elastography has been increasingly used for evaluating muscle shear modulus associated with age, sex, musculoskeletal, and neurological conditions, its physiological meaning is largely unknown. This knowledge gap may hinder data interpretation, limiting the potential of using elastography to gain insights into muscle biomechanics in health and disease. We derived a mathematical model from a widely-accepted Hill-type passive force-length relationship to gain insight about the physiological meaning of resting shear modulus of skeletal muscles under passive stretching, and validated the model by comparing against the ex-vivo animal data reported in our recent work (Koo et al. 2013). The model suggested that resting shear modulus of a slack muscle is a function of specific tension and parameters that govern the normalized passive muscle force-length relationship as well as the degree of muscle anisotropy. The model also suggested that although the slope of the linear shear modulus-passive force relationship is primarily related to muscle anatomical cross-sectional area (i.e. the smaller the muscle cross-sectional area, the more the increase in shear modulus to result in the same passive muscle force), it is also governed by the normalized passive muscle force-length relationship and the degree of muscle anisotropy. Taken together, although muscle shear modulus under passive stretching has a strong linear relationship with passive muscle force, its actual value appears to be affected by muscle's mechanical, material, and architectural properties. This should be taken into consideration when interpreting the muscle shear modulus values. PMID:26113291

  6. Wave Propagation of Myocardial Stretch: Correlation with Myocardial Stiffness

    PubMed Central

    Pislaru, Cristina; Pellikka, Patricia A.; Pislaru, Sorin V.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism of flow propagation during diastole in the left ventricle (LV) has been well described. Little is known about the associated waves propagating along the heart wall s. These waves may have a mechanism similar to pulse wave propagation in arteries. The major goal of the study was to evaluate the effect of myocardial stiffness and preload on this wave transmission. Methods Longitudinal late diastolic deformation and wave speed (Vp) of myocardial stretch in the anterior LV wall were measured using sonomicrometry in sixteen pigs. Animals with normal and altered myocardial stiffness (acute myocardial infarction) were studied with and without preload alterations. Elastic modulus estimated from Vp (EVP; Moens-Korteweg equation) was compared to incremental elastic modulus obtained from exponential end -diastolic stress-strain relation (ESS). Myocardial distensibility and α-and β-coefficients of stress-strain relations were calculated. Results Vp was higher at reperfusion compared to baseline (2.6±1.3 m/s vs. 1.3±0.4 m/s; p=0.005) and best correlated with ESS (r 2=0.80, p<0.0001), β-coefficient (r2=0.78, p<0.0001), distensibility (r2=0.47, p=0.005), and wall thickness/diameter ratio (r2=0.42, p=0.009). Elastic moduli (EVP and ESS) were strongly correlated (r2=0.83, p<0.0001). Increasing preload increased Vp and EVP and decreased distensibility. At multivariate analysis, ESS, wall thickness, and end-diastolic and systolic LV pressures were independent predictors of Vp (r2model=0.83, p<0.0001). Conclusions The main determinants of wave propagation of longitudinal myocardial stretch were myocardial stiffness and LV geometry and pressure. This local wave speed could potentially be measured noninvasively by echocardiography. PMID:25193091

  7. Ultralight stretched Fresnel lens solar concentrator for space power applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Neill, Mark J.; Piszczor, Michael F.; Eskenazi, Michael I.; McDanal, A. J.; George, Patrick J.; Botke, Matthew M.; Brandhorst, Henry W.; Edwards, David L.; Hoppe, David T.

    2003-12-01

    A unique ultra-light solar concentrator has recently been developed for space power applications. The concentrator comprises a flexible, 140-micron-thick, line-focus Fresnel lens, made in a continuous process from space-qualified transparent silicone rubber material. For deployment and support in space, end arches are used to tension the lens material in a lengthwise fashion, forming a cylindrical stressed membrane structure. The resultant lens provides high optical efficiency, outstanding tolerance for real-world errors and aberrations, and excellent focusing performance. The stretched lens is used to collect and focus sunlight at 8X concentration onto high-efficiency multi-junction photovoltaic cells, which directly convert the incident solar energy to electricity. The Stretched Lens Array (SLA) has been measured at over 27% net solar-to-electric conversion efficiency for space sunlight, and over 30% net solar-to-electric conversion efficiency for terrestrial sunlight. More importantly, the SLA provides over 180 W/kg specific power at a greatly reduced cost compared to conventional planar photovoltaic arrays in space. The cost savings are due to the use of 85% less of the expensive solar cell material per unit of power produced. SLA is a direct descendent of the award-winning SCARLET array which performed flawlessly on the NASA/JPL Deep Space 1 spacecraft from 1998-2001. The paper describes the new concentrator in more detail, including its materials and configuration, and shows the novel approach to deployment and support, which leads to unprecedented performance metrics for a space power system.

  8. Toll-Like Receptor 2-Mediated Innate Immune Responses against Junín Virus in Mice Lead to Antiviral Adaptive Immune Responses during Systemic Infection and Do Not Affect Viral Replication in the Brain

    PubMed Central

    Cuevas, Christian D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Successful adaptive immunity to virus infection often depends on the initial innate response. Previously, we demonstrated that Junín virus, the etiological agent responsible for Argentine hemorrhagic fever (AHF), activates an early innate immune response via an interaction between the viral glycoprotein and Toll-like receptor 2 (TLR2). Here we show that TLR2/6 but not TLR1/2 heterodimers sense Junín virus glycoprotein and induce a cytokine response, which in turn upregulates the expression of the RNA helicases RIG-I and MDA5. NF-κB and Erk1/2 were important in the cytokine response, since both proteins were phosphorylated as a result of the interaction of virus with TLR2, and treatment with an Erk1/2-specific inhibitor blocked cytokine production. We show that the Junín virus glycoprotein activates cytokine production in a human macrophage cell line as well. Moreover, we show that TLR2-mediated immune response plays a role in viral clearance because wild-type mice cleared Candid 1 (JUNV C1), the vaccine strain of Junín virus, more rapidly than did TLR2 knockout mice. This clearance correlated with the generation of Junín virus-specific CD8+ T cells. However, infected wild-type and TLR2 knockout mice developed TLR2-independent blocking antibody responses with similar kinetics. We also show that microglia and astrocytes but not neurons are susceptible to infection with JUNV C1. Although JUNV C1 infection of the brain also triggered a TLR2-dependent cytokine response, virus levels were equivalent in wild-type and TLR2 knockout mice. IMPORTANCE Junín virus is transmitted by rodents native to Argentina and is associated with both systemic disease and, in some patients, neurological symptoms. Humans become infected when they inhale aerosolized Junín virus. AHF has a 15 to 30% mortality rate, and patients who clear the infection develop a strong antibody response to Junín virus. Here we investigated what factors determine the immune response to Jun

  9. Brownian dynamic simulations of electrophoresis and electro-stretching of DNA molecules in polymer gels.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Larson, Ronald; Graham, Richard

    2006-03-01

    We derive a model for the motion of long DNA chains entangled in a concentrated gel matrix in the presence of a strong electric field. The model is adapted from a tube-based slip-link approach, which was originally intended to model the rheology of entangled polymer fluids, and is suitable for solution by Brownian dynamic simulation. We account for the constraining effect of the surrounding matrix, motion due to the electric field and finite extensibility of the DNA chain. We are able investigate the effect of molecular weight and field strength on the DNA drift velocity in a constant electric field, along with molecular stretching in an oscillating field. Both examples have applications in DNA separation and sequencing. Our approach includes a detailed treatment of the chain end motion through the matrix, which our simulations demonstrate has a significant role in the DNA dynamics, particularly in oscillating fields. The model provides a convenient formalism for further refinements. For example, large fields may tend to cause hernia-like chain loops to protrude from the main tube. Furthermore, to model matrices comprised of linear polymers we can include the effect of constraint release, in which the confinement experienced by the DNA is diminished by the motion of the matrix chains.

  10. Muscle afferent potential (`A-wave') in the surface electromyogram of a phasic stretch reflex in normal humans

    PubMed Central

    Clarke, Alex. M.; Michie, Patricia T.; Glue, Leonard C. T.

    1972-01-01

    The experiments reported in this paper tested the hypothesis that the afferent potential elicited by a tendon tap in an isometrically recorded phasic stretch reflex can be detected in the surface EMG of normal humans when appropriate techniques are used. These techniques involved (1) training the subjects to relax mentally and physically so that the EMG was silent before and immediately after the diphasic MAP which reflects a highly synchronous discharge of afferent impulses from low threshold muscle stretch receptors after a tendon tap, and (2) using a data retrieval computer to summate stimulus-locked potentials in the EMG over a series of 16 samples using taps of uniform peak force and duration on the Achilles tendon to elicit the tendon jerk in the calf muscles. A discrete, diphasic potential (`A-wave') was recorded from EMG electrodes placed on the surface of the skin over the medial gastrocnemius muscle. The `A-wave' afferent potential had the opposite polarity to the corresponding efferent MAP. Under control conditions of relaxation the `A-wave' had a latency after the onset of the tap of 2 msec, the peak to peak amplitude was of the order of 5 μV and the duration was in the range of 6 to 10 msec. Further experiments were conducted to show that the `A-wave' (1) was not an artefact of the instrumentation used, (2) had a threshold at low intensities of stimulation, and (3) could be reliably augmented by using a Jendrassik manoeuvre compared with the potential observed during control (relaxation) conditions. The results support the conclusion that the `A-wave' emanates from the pool of muscle spindles which discharges impulses along group Ia nerve fibres in response to the phasic stretch stimulus because the primary ending of the spindles is known to initiate the stretch reflex and the spindles can be sensitized by fusimotor impulses so that their threshold is lowered as a result of a Jendrassik manoeuvre. The finding has important implications for the

  11. Unilateral Plantar Flexors Static-Stretching Effects on Ipsilateral and Contralateral Jump Measures

    PubMed Central

    da Silva, Josinaldo Jarbas; Behm, David George; Gomes, Willy Andrade; Silva, Fernando Henrique Domingues de Oliveira; Soares, Enrico Gori; Serpa, Érica Paes; Vilela Junior, Guanis de Barros; Lopes, Charles Ricardo; Marchetti, Paulo Henrique

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the acute effects of unilateral ankle plantar flexors static-stretching (SS) on the passive range of movement (ROM) of the stretched limb, surface electromyography (sEMG) and single-leg bounce drop jump (SBDJ) performance measures of the ipsilateral stretched and contralateral non-stretched lower limbs. Seventeen young men (24 ± 5 years) performed SBDJ before and after (stretched limb: immediately post-stretch, 10 and 20 minutes and non-stretched limb: immediately post-stretch) unilateral ankle plantar flexor SS (6 sets of 45s/15s, 70-90% point of discomfort). SBDJ performance measures included jump height, impulse, time to reach peak force, contact time as well as the sEMG integral (IEMG) and pre-activation (IEMGpre-activation) of the gastrocnemius lateralis. Ankle dorsiflexion passive ROM increased in the stretched limb after the SS (pre-test: 21 ± 4° and post-test: 26.5 ± 5°, p < 0.001). Post-stretching decreases were observed with peak force (p = 0.029), IEMG (P<0.001), and IEMGpre-activation (p = 0.015) in the stretched limb; as well as impulse (p = 0.03), and jump height (p = 0.032) in the non-stretched limb. In conclusion, SS effectively increased passive ankle ROM of the stretched limb, and transiently (less than 10 minutes) decreased muscle peak force and pre-activation. The decrease of jump height and impulse for the non-stretched limb suggests a SS-induced central nervous system inhibitory effect. Key points When considering whether or not to SS prior to athletic activities, one must consider the potential positive effects of increased ankle dorsiflexion motion with the potential deleterious effects of power and muscle activity during a simple jumping task or as part of the rehabilitation process. Since decreased jump performance measures can persist for 10 minutes in the stretched leg, the timing of SS prior to performance must be taken into consideration. Athletes, fitness enthusiasts and therapists should

  12. Comparative study of stretching modalities in healthy women: heating and application time.

    PubMed

    Rosario, Jose Luis; Foletto, Álexis

    2015-01-01

    A lack of muscle flexibility affects the functionality of the human body, making it difficult to carry out certain activities of daily living. The aim of the present study was to compare the technique of passive static stretching on hamstring muscles in isolation, or combined with heating techniques and different application times. Fifty women were randomly assigned to 5 groups (n = 10 each): The Microwave Diathermy Group had the hamstrings heated by microwave before stretching; Treadmill Group, in which warm-up walking was performed before stretching; 30-Second Group, in which 30 s of stretching was performed; 10-Minute Group, which involved stretching for 10 min and Control Group. In all groups, the leg extension range of motion was assessed, and the flexibility by the third finger-ground test was performed before and after application. The individuals in the experimental groups performed three stretching sessions on three consecutive days. All statistical analysis was performed with p ≤ 0.05. The results showed that all treatments were effective compared to the control group. The Treadmill Group and the 10-Minute group were superior for an acute effect (soon after the stretch--related to a decreased muscular viscoelasticity). The 10-Minute Group was the most effective for the chronic effect (long lasting--related to increased numbers of sarcomeres). A 10-minute stretch, when performed over four subsequent days, is suggested for faster increase in flexibility. The results could suggest a systemic warming (such as the one provided by a treadmill workout) before stretching for an acute gain of flexibility in the same day. It was possible to identify the inefficiencies associated with the use of microwaves in terms of stretching to gain flexibility. In fact, the values recorded were similar to stretching without any heat at all. PMID:25603738

  13. Effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness and risk of injury: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Herbert, Rob D; Gabriel, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Objective To determine the effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness after exercise, risk of injury, and athletic performance. Method Systematic review. Data sources Randomised or quasi-randomised studies identified by searching Medline, Embase, CINAHL, SPORTDiscus, and PEDro, and by recursive checking of bibliographies. Main outcome measures Muscle soreness, incidence of injury, athletic performance. Results Five studies, all of moderate quality, reported sufficient data on the effects of stretching on muscle soreness to be included in the analysis. Outcomes seemed homogeneous. Stretching produced small and statistically non-significant reductions in muscle soreness. The pooled estimate of reduction in muscle soreness 24 hours after exercising was only 0.9 mm on a 100 mm scale (95% confidence interval −2.6 mm to 4.4 mm). Data from two studies on army recruits in military training show that muscle stretching before exercising does not produce useful reductions in injury risk (pooled hazard ratio 0.95, 0.78 to 1.16). Conclusions Stretching before or after exercising does not confer protection from muscle soreness. Stretching before exercising does not seem to confer a practically useful reduction in the risk of injury, but the generality of this finding needs testing. Insufficient research has been done with which to determine the effects of stretching on sporting performance. What is already known on this topicReviews of the effects of stretching before exercising have drawn conflicting conclusionsThe literature on effects of stretching before and after exercising on muscle soreness and risk of injury has not been systematically reviewedWhat this study addsStretching before and after exercising does not confer protection from muscle soreness and stretching before exercise does not seem to confer a practically useful reduction in the risk of injury PMID:12202327

  14. Magnetic field stretching at the top of the shell of numerical dynamos

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peña, Diego; Amit, Hagay; Pinheiro, Katia J.

    2016-05-01

    The process of magnetic field stretching transfers kinetic energy to magnetic energy and by that maintains dynamos against Ohmic dissipation. Stretching at the top of the outer core may play an important role at specific regions. High-latitude intense magnetic flux patches may be concentrated by flow convergence. Reversed flux patches may emerge due to expulsion of toroidal field advected to the core-mantle boundary by fluid upwelling. Here we analyze snapshots from self-consistent 3D numerical dynamos to unravel the nature of field-flow interactions that induces stretching secular variation at the top of the core. We find that stretching at the top of the shell has a significant influence on the secular variation despite the relatively weak poloidal flow. In addition, locally stretching is often more effective than advection in particular at regions of significant field-aligned flow. Magnetic flux patches are concentrated by fluid downwelling and dispersed by fluid upwelling. Stretching is more efficient than advection in intensifying magnetic flux patches. Both stretching and the poloidal flow mostly depend on the magnetic Prandtl number Pm. Decreasing Pm gives smaller poloidal flow but stronger stretching. Accounting for field-flow interactions in both the advection and stretching terms suggests that the magnetic Reynolds number overestimates the actual ratio of magnetic advection to diffusion by ˜50 %. Morphological resemblance between local stretching in our dynamo models and local observed geomagnetic secular variation may suggest the presence of stretching at the top of the Earth's core. Our results shed light on the kinematic origin of intense geomagnetic flux patches and may have implications to the convective state of the upper outer core.

  15. Local intensity adaptive image coding

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huck, Friedrich O.

    1989-01-01

    The objective of preprocessing for machine vision is to extract intrinsic target properties. The most important properties ordinarily are structure and reflectance. Illumination in space, however, is a significant problem as the extreme range of light intensity, stretching from deep shadow to highly reflective surfaces in direct sunlight, impairs the effectiveness of standard approaches to machine vision. To overcome this critical constraint, an image coding scheme is being investigated which combines local intensity adaptivity, image enhancement, and data compression. It is very effective under the highly variant illumination that can exist within a single frame or field of view, and it is very robust to noise at low illuminations. Some of the theory and salient features of the coding scheme are reviewed. Its performance is characterized in a simulated space application, the research and development activities are described.

  16. Immediate effect of passive and active stretching on hamstrings flexibility: a single-blinded randomized control trial

    PubMed Central

    Nishikawa, Yuichi; Aizawa, Junya; Kanemura, Naohiko; Takahashi, Tetsuya; Hosomi, Naohisa; Maruyama, Hirofumi; Kimura, Hiroaki; Matsumoto, Masayasu; Takayanagi, Kiyomi

    2015-01-01

    [Purpose] This study compared the efficacy of passive and active stretching techniques on hamstring flexibility. [Subjects] Fifty-four healthy young subjects were randomly assigned to one of three groups (2 treatment groups and 1 control group). [Methods] Subjects in the passive stretching group had their knees extended by an examiner while lying supine 90° of hip flexion. In the same position, subjects in the active stretching group extended their knees. The groups performed 3 sets of the assigned stretch, with each stretch held for 10 seconds at the point where tightness in the hamstring muscles was felt. Subjects in the control group did not perform stretching. Before and immediately after stretching, hamstring flexibility was assessed by a blinded assessor, using the active knee-extension test. [Results] After stretching, there was a significant improvement in the hamstring flexibilities of the active and passive stretching groups compared with the control group. Furthermore, the passive stretching group showed significantly greater improvement in hamstring flexibility than the active stretching group. [Conclusion] Improvement in hamstring flexibility measured by the active knee-extension test was achieved by both stretching techniques; however, passive stretching was more effective than active stretching at achieving an immediate increase in hamstring flexibility. PMID:26644667

  17. Adaptive Development

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    2005-01-01

    The goal of this research is to develop and demonstrate innovative adaptive seal technologies that can lead to dramatic improvements in engine performance, life, range, and emissions, and enhance operability for next generation gas turbine engines. This work is concentrated on the development of self-adaptive clearance control systems for gas turbine engines. Researchers have targeted the high-pressure turbine (HPT) blade tip seal location for following reasons: Current active clearance control (ACC) systems (e.g., thermal case-cooling schemes) cannot respond to blade tip clearance changes due to mechanical, thermal, and aerodynamic loads. As such they are prone to wear due to the required tight running clearances during operation. Blade tip seal wear (increased clearances) reduces engine efficiency, performance, and service life. Adaptive sealing technology research has inherent impact on all envisioned 21st century propulsion systems (e.g. distributed vectored, hybrid and electric drive propulsion concepts).

  18. Using Atomic Orbitals and Kinesthetic Learning to Authentically Derive Molecular Stretching Vibrations

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bridgeman, Adam J.; Schmidt, Timothy W.; Young, Nigel A.

    2013-01-01

    The stretching modes of ML[subscript "x"] complexes have the same symmetry as the atomic orbitals on M that are used to form its s bonds. In the exercise suggested here, the atomic orbitals are used to derive the form of the stretching modes without the need for formal group theory. The analogy allows students to help understand many…

  19. Acute effects of static stretching on squat jump performance at different knee starting angles.

    PubMed

    La Torre, Antonio; Castagna, Carlo; Gervasoni, Elisa; Cè, Emiliano; Rampichini, Susanna; Ferrarin, Maurizio; Merati, Giampiero

    2010-03-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the effects of static stretching on leg extensor muscles during squat jump (SJ) at different knee starting angles. Seventeen male subjects (23 +/- 3 years, 179 +/- 5 cm, and 74 +/- 6 kg) performed on a force platform 2 series (preceded or not [control condition] by 10-minute static stretching of quadriceps and triceps surae muscles) of SJs at different knee starting angles: 50 degrees, 70 degrees, 90 degrees, and 110 degrees. Squat jump height, peak force, maximal acceleration, velocity, and power were calculated for each jump. The angle that maximized power development was obtained from the power-angle relationship. The SJ height, peak force, and maximal velocity increased according to angle amplitude in both control and stretching conditions (p < 0.01), performance being significantly lower in the stretching condition (p < 0.01). Peak power was obtained at 90 degrees in both control and stretching conditions, but was significantly lower (p < 0.01) after stretching. These results suggest that an acute bout of static stretching reduces power and force development during SJ, decrements being significantly higher at lower knee starting angles. Therefore, the use of static stretching may be questionable in those power activities requiring maximal power output at knee angles near full extension. PMID:20145567

  20. The Acute Effects of Upper Extremity Stretching on Throwing Velocity in Baseball Throwers

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael; Harveson, Lanisa; Melton, Jason; Delobel, Ashley; Puentedura, Emilio J.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To examine the effects of static and proprioceptive neuromuscular facilitation (PNF) stretching of the shoulder internal rotators on throwing velocity. Subjects. 27 male throwers (mean age = 25.1 years old, SD = 2.4) with adequate knowledge of demonstrable throwing mechanics. Study Design. Randomized crossover trial with repeated measures. Methods. Subjects warmed up, threw 10 pitches at their maximum velocity, were randomly assigned to 1 of 3 stretching protocols (static, PNF, or no stretch), and then repeated their 10 pitches. Velocities were recorded after each pitch and average and peak velocities were recorded after each session. Results. Data were analyzed using a 3 × 2 repeated measures ANOVA. No significant interaction between stretching and throwing velocity was observed. Main effects for time were not statistically significant. Main effects for the stretching groups were statistically significant. Discussion. Results suggest that stretching of the shoulder internal rotators did not significantly affect throwing velocity immediately after stretching. This may be due to the complexity of the throwing task. Conclusions. Stretching may be included in a thrower's warm-up without any effects on throwing velocity. Further research should be performed using a population with more throwing experience and skill. PMID:26464880