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Sample records for adaptive acid tolerance

  1. Adaptation and tolerance of bacteria against acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Trček, Janja; Mira, Nuno Pereira; Jarboe, Laura R

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid is a weak organic acid exerting a toxic effect to most microorganisms at concentrations as low as 0.5 wt%. This toxic effect results mostly from acetic acid dissociation inside microbial cells, causing a decrease of intracellular pH and metabolic disturbance by the anion, among other deleterious effects. These microbial inhibition mechanisms enable acetic acid to be used as a preservative, although its usefulness is limited by the emergence of highly tolerant spoilage strains. Several biotechnological processes are also inhibited by the accumulation of acetic acid in the growth medium including production of bioethanol from lignocellulosics, wine making, and microbe-based production of acetic acid itself. To design better preservation strategies based on acetic acid and to improve the robustness of industrial biotechnological processes limited by this acid's toxicity, it is essential to deepen the understanding of the underlying toxicity mechanisms. In this sense, adaptive responses that improve tolerance to acetic acid have been well studied in Escherichia coli and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strains highly tolerant to acetic acid, either isolated from natural environments or specifically engineered for this effect, represent a unique reservoir of information that could increase our understanding of acetic acid tolerance and contribute to the design of additional tolerance mechanisms. In this article, the mechanisms underlying the acetic acid tolerance exhibited by several bacterial strains are reviewed, with emphasis on the knowledge gathered in acetic acid bacteria and E. coli. A comparison of how these bacterial adaptive responses to acetic acid stress fit to those described in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is also performed. A systematic comparison of the similarities and dissimilarities of the ways by which different microbial systems surpass the deleterious effects of acetic acid toxicity has not been performed so far, although such exchange

  2. Adaptive laboratory evolution of ethanologenic Zymomonas mobilis strain tolerant to furfural and acetic acid inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Shui, Zong-Xia; Qin, Han; Wu, Bo; Ruan, Zhi-yong; Wang, Lu-shang; Tan, Fu-Rong; Wang, Jing-Li; Tang, Xiao-Yu; Dai, Li-Chun; Hu, Guo-Quan; He, Ming-Xiong

    2015-07-01

    Furfural and acetic acid from lignocellulosic hydrolysates are the prevalent inhibitors to Zymomonas mobilis during cellulosic ethanol production. Developing a strain tolerant to furfural or acetic acid inhibitors is difficul by using rational engineering strategies due to poor understanding of their underlying molecular mechanisms. In this study, strategy of adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) was used for development of a furfural and acetic acid-tolerant strain. After three round evolution, four evolved mutants (ZMA7-2, ZMA7-3, ZMF3-2, and ZMF3-3) that showed higher growth capacity were successfully obtained via ALE method. Based on the results of profiling of cell growth, glucose utilization, ethanol yield, and activity of key enzymes, two desired strains, ZMA7-2 and ZMF3-3, were achieved, which showed higher tolerance under 7 g/l acetic acid and 3 g/l furfural stress condition. Especially, it is the first report of Z. mobilis strain that could tolerate higher furfural. The best strain, Z. mobilis ZMF3-3, has showed 94.84% theoretical ethanol yield under 3-g/l furfural stress condition, and the theoretical ethanol yield of ZM4 is only 9.89%. Our study also demonstrated that ALE method might also be used as a powerful metabolic engineering tool for metabolic engineering in Z. mobilis. Furthermore, the two best strains could be used as novel host for further metabolic engineering in cellulosic ethanol or future biorefinery. Importantly, the two strains may also be used as novel-tolerant model organisms for the genetic mechanism on the "omics" level, which will provide some useful information for inverse metabolic engineering.

  3. Adaptive response and tolerance to weak acids in Saccharomyces cerevisiae: a genome-wide view.

    PubMed

    Mira, Nuno P; Teixeira, Miguel Cacho; Sá-Correia, Isabel

    2010-10-01

    Weak acids are widely used as food preservatives (e.g., acetic, propionic, benzoic, and sorbic acids), herbicides (e.g., 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid), and as antimalarial (e.g., artesunic and artemisinic acids), anticancer (e.g., artesunic acid), and immunosuppressive (e.g., mycophenolic acid) drugs, among other possible applications. The understanding of the mechanisms underlying the adaptive response and resistance to these weak acids is a prerequisite to develop more effective strategies to control spoilage yeasts, and the emergence of resistant weeds, drug resistant parasites or cancer cells. Furthermore, the identification of toxicity mechanisms and resistance determinants to weak acid-based pharmaceuticals increases current knowledge on their cytotoxic effects and may lead to the identification of new drug targets. This review integrates current knowledge on the mechanisms of toxicity and tolerance to weak acid stress obtained in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae using genome-wide approaches and more detailed gene-by-gene analysis. The major features of the yeast response to weak acids in general, and the more specific responses and resistance mechanisms towards a specific weak acid or a group of weak acids, depending on the chemical nature of the side chain R group (R-COOH), are highlighted. The involvement of several transcriptional regulatory networks in the genomic response to different weak acids is discussed, focusing on the regulatory pathways controlled by the transcription factors Msn2p/Msn4p, War1p, Haa1p, Rim101p, and Pdr1p/Pdr3p, which are known to orchestrate weak acid stress response in yeast. The extrapolation of the knowledge gathered in yeast to other eukaryotes is also attempted.

  4. Acid tolerance in amphibians

    SciTech Connect

    Pierce, B.A.

    1985-04-01

    Studies of amphibian acid tolerance provide information about the potential effects of acid deposition on amphibian communities. Amphibians as a group appear to be relatively acid tolerant, with many species suffering increased mortality only below pH 4. However, amphibians exhibit much intraspecific variation in acid tolerance, and some species are sensitive to even low levels of acidity. Furthermore, nonlethal effects, including depression of growth rates and increases in developmental abnormalities, can occur at higher pH.

  5. The acid adaptive tolerance response in Campylobacter jejuni induces a global response, as suggested by proteomics and microarrays

    PubMed Central

    Varsaki, Athanasia; Murphy, Caroline; Barczynska, Alicja; Jordan, Kieran; Carroll, Cyril

    2015-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni CI 120 is a natural isolate obtained during poultry processing and has the ability to induce an acid tolerance response (ATR) to acid + aerobic conditions in early stationary phase. Other strains tested they did not induce an ATR or they induced it in exponential phase. Campylobacter spp. do not contain the genes that encode the global stationary phase stress response mechanism. Therefore, the aim of this study was to identify genes that are involved in the C. jejuni CI 120 early stationary phase ATR, as it seems to be expressing a novel mechanism of stress tolerance. Two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was used to examine the expression profile of cytosolic proteins during the C. jejuni CI 120 adaptation to acid + aerobic stress and microarrays to determine the genes that participate in the ATR. The results indicate induction of a global response that activated a number of stress responses, including several genes encoding surface components and genes involved with iron uptake. The findings of this study provide new insights into stress tolerance of C. jejuni, contribute to a better knowledge of the physiology of this bacterium and highlight the diversity among different strains. PMID:26221965

  6. UV Tolerance of Spoilage Microorganisms and Acid-Shocked and Acid-Adapted Escherichia coli in Apple Juice Treated with a Commercial UV Juice-Processing Unit.

    PubMed

    Usaga, Jessie; Padilla-Zakour, Olga I; Worobo, Randy W

    2016-02-01

    The enhanced thermal tolerance and survival responses of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in acid and acidified foods is a major safety concern for the production of low-pH products, including beverages. Little is known about this phenomenon when using UV light treatments. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of strain (E. coli O157:H7 strains C7927, ATCC 35150, ATCC 43895, and ATCC 43889 and E. coli ATCC 25922) and physiological state (control-unadapted, acid adapted, and acid shocked) on the UV tolerance of E. coli in apple juice treated under conditions stipulated in current U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. A greater than 5-log reduction of E. coli was obtained under all tested conditions. A significant effect of strain (P < 0.05) was observed, but the physiological state did not influence pathogen inactivation (P ≥ 0.05). The UV sensitivity of three spoilage microorganisms (Aspergillus niger, Penicillium commune, and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris) was also determined at UV doses of 0 to 98 mJ/cm(2). Alicyclobacillus was the most UV sensitive, followed by Penicillium and Aspergillus. Because of the nonsignificant differences in UV sensitivity of E. coli in different physiological states, the use of an unadapted inoculum would be adequate to conduct challenge studies with the commercial UV unit used in this study at a UV dose of 14 mJ/cm(2). The high UV tolerance of spoilage microorganisms supports the need to use a hurdle approach (e.g., coupling of refrigeration, preservatives, and/or other technologies) to extend the shelf life of UV-treated beverages. PMID:26818991

  7. UV Tolerance of Spoilage Microorganisms and Acid-Shocked and Acid-Adapted Escherichia coli in Apple Juice Treated with a Commercial UV Juice-Processing Unit.

    PubMed

    Usaga, Jessie; Padilla-Zakour, Olga I; Worobo, Randy W

    2016-02-01

    The enhanced thermal tolerance and survival responses of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in acid and acidified foods is a major safety concern for the production of low-pH products, including beverages. Little is known about this phenomenon when using UV light treatments. This study was conducted to evaluate the effects of strain (E. coli O157:H7 strains C7927, ATCC 35150, ATCC 43895, and ATCC 43889 and E. coli ATCC 25922) and physiological state (control-unadapted, acid adapted, and acid shocked) on the UV tolerance of E. coli in apple juice treated under conditions stipulated in current U.S. Food and Drug Administration regulations. A greater than 5-log reduction of E. coli was obtained under all tested conditions. A significant effect of strain (P < 0.05) was observed, but the physiological state did not influence pathogen inactivation (P ≥ 0.05). The UV sensitivity of three spoilage microorganisms (Aspergillus niger, Penicillium commune, and Alicyclobacillus acidoterrestris) was also determined at UV doses of 0 to 98 mJ/cm(2). Alicyclobacillus was the most UV sensitive, followed by Penicillium and Aspergillus. Because of the nonsignificant differences in UV sensitivity of E. coli in different physiological states, the use of an unadapted inoculum would be adequate to conduct challenge studies with the commercial UV unit used in this study at a UV dose of 14 mJ/cm(2). The high UV tolerance of spoilage microorganisms supports the need to use a hurdle approach (e.g., coupling of refrigeration, preservatives, and/or other technologies) to extend the shelf life of UV-treated beverages.

  8. Adaptation and Transcriptome Analysis of Aureobasidium pullulans in Corncob Hydrolysate for Increased Inhibitor Tolerance to Malic Acid Production

    PubMed Central

    Zou, Xiang; Wang, Yongkang; Tu, Guangwei; Zan, Zhanquan; Wu, Xiaoyan

    2015-01-01

    Malic acid is a dicarboxylic acid widely used in the food industry, and is also a potential C4 platform chemical. Corncob is a low-cost renewable feedstock from agricultural industry. However, side-reaction products (furfural, 5-hydroxymethylfurfural (HMF), formic acid, and acetic acid) that severely hinder fermentation are formed during corncob pretreatment. The process for producing malic acid from a hydrolysate of corncob was investigated with a polymalic acid (PMA)-producing Aureobasidium pullulans strain. Under the optimal hydrolysate sugar concentration 110 g/L, A. pullulans was further adapted in an aerobic fibrous bed bioreactor (AFBB) by gradually increasing the sugar concentration of hydrolysate. After nine batches of fermentation, the production and productivity of malic acid reached 38.6 g/L and 0.4 g/L h, respectively, which was higher than that in the first batch (27.6 g/L and 0.29 g/L h, respectively). The adapted strain could grow under the stress of 0.5 g/L furfural, 3 g/L HMF, 2g/L acetic acid, and 0.5 g/L formic acid, whereas the wild type did not. Transcriptome analysis revealed that the differentially expressed genes were related to carbohydrate transport and metabolism, lipid transport and metabolism, signal transduction mechanism, redox metabolism, and energy production and conversion under 0.5 g/L furfural and 3 g/L HMF stress conditions. In total, 42 genes in the adapted strain were upregulated by 15-fold or more, and qRT-PCR also confirmed that the expression levels of key genes (i.e. SIR, GSS, CYS, and GSR) involved in sulfur assimilation pathway were upregulated by over 10-fold in adapted strain for cellular protection against oxidative stress. PMID:25793624

  9. Adaptive alterations in the fatty acids composition under induced oxidative stress in heavy metal-tolerant filamentous fungus Paecilomyces marquandii cultured in ascorbic acid presence.

    PubMed

    Słaba, Mirosława; Gajewska, Ewa; Bernat, Przemysław; Fornalska, Magdalena; Długoński, Jerzy

    2013-05-01

    The ability of the heavy metal-tolerant fungus Paecilomyces marquandii to modulate whole cells fatty acid composition and saturation in response to IC50 of Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni, and Cu was studied. Cadmium and nickel caused the most significant growth reduction. In the mycelia cultured with all tested metals, with the exception of nickel, a rise in the fatty acid unsaturation was noted. The fungus exposure to Pb, Cu, and Ni led to significantly higher lipid peroxidation. P. marquandii incubated in the presence of the tested metals responded with an increase in the level of linoleic acid and escalation of electrolyte leakage. The highest efflux of electrolytes was caused by lead. In these conditions, the fungus was able to bind up to 100 mg g(-1) of lead, whereas the content of the other metals in the mycelium was significantly lower and reached from 3.18 mg g(-1) (Cu) to 15.21 mg g(-1) (Zn). Additionally, it was shown that ascorbic acid at the concentration of 1 mM protected fungal growth and prevented the changes in the fatty acid composition and saturation but did not alleviate lipid peroxidation or affect the increased permeability of membranes after lead exposure. Pro-oxidant properties of ascorbic acid in the copper-stressed cells manifested strong growth inhibition and enhanced metal accumulation as a result of membrane damage. Toxic metals action caused cellular modulations, which might contributed to P. marquandii tolerance to the studied metals. Moreover, these changes can enhance metal removal from contaminated environment. PMID:23132407

  10. Adaptive alterations in the fatty acids composition under induced oxidative stress in heavy metal-tolerant filamentous fungus Paecilomyces marquandii cultured in ascorbic acid presence.

    PubMed

    Słaba, Mirosława; Gajewska, Ewa; Bernat, Przemysław; Fornalska, Magdalena; Długoński, Jerzy

    2013-05-01

    The ability of the heavy metal-tolerant fungus Paecilomyces marquandii to modulate whole cells fatty acid composition and saturation in response to IC50 of Cd, Pb, Zn, Ni, and Cu was studied. Cadmium and nickel caused the most significant growth reduction. In the mycelia cultured with all tested metals, with the exception of nickel, a rise in the fatty acid unsaturation was noted. The fungus exposure to Pb, Cu, and Ni led to significantly higher lipid peroxidation. P. marquandii incubated in the presence of the tested metals responded with an increase in the level of linoleic acid and escalation of electrolyte leakage. The highest efflux of electrolytes was caused by lead. In these conditions, the fungus was able to bind up to 100 mg g(-1) of lead, whereas the content of the other metals in the mycelium was significantly lower and reached from 3.18 mg g(-1) (Cu) to 15.21 mg g(-1) (Zn). Additionally, it was shown that ascorbic acid at the concentration of 1 mM protected fungal growth and prevented the changes in the fatty acid composition and saturation but did not alleviate lipid peroxidation or affect the increased permeability of membranes after lead exposure. Pro-oxidant properties of ascorbic acid in the copper-stressed cells manifested strong growth inhibition and enhanced metal accumulation as a result of membrane damage. Toxic metals action caused cellular modulations, which might contributed to P. marquandii tolerance to the studied metals. Moreover, these changes can enhance metal removal from contaminated environment.

  11. Can crops tolerate acid rain

    SciTech Connect

    Kaplan, J.K.

    1989-11-01

    This brief article describes work by scientists at the ARS Air Quality-Plant Growth and Development Laboratory in Raleigh, North Carolina, that indicates little damage to crops as a result of acid rain. In studies with simulated acid rain and 216 exposed varieties of 18 crops, there were no significant injuries nor was there reduced growth in most species. Results of chronic and acute exposures were correlated in sensitive tomato and soybean plants and in tolerant winter wheat and lettuce plants. These results suggest that 1-hour exposures could be used in the future to screen varieties for sensitivity to acid rain.

  12. Plant salt tolerance: adaptations in halophytes

    PubMed Central

    Flowers, Timothy J.; Colmer, Timothy D.

    2015-01-01

    Background Most of the water on Earth is seawater, each kilogram of which contains about 35 g of salts, and yet most plants cannot grow in this solution; less than 0·2 % of species can develop and reproduce with repeated exposure to seawater. These ‘extremophiles’ are called halophytes. Scope Improved knowledge of halophytes is of importance to understanding our natural world and to enable the use of some of these fascinating plants in land re-vegetation, as forages for livestock, and to develop salt-tolerant crops. In this Preface to a Special Issue on halophytes and saline adaptations, the evolution of salt tolerance in halophytes, their life-history traits and progress in understanding the molecular, biochemical and physiological mechanisms contributing to salt tolerance are summarized. In particular, cellular processes that underpin the ability of halophytes to tolerate high tissue concentrations of Na+ and Cl−, including regulation of membrane transport, their ability to synthesize compatible solutes and to deal with reactive oxygen species, are highlighted. Interacting stress factors in addition to salinity, such as heavy metals and flooding, are also topics gaining increased attention in the search to understand the biology of halophytes. Conclusions Halophytes will play increasingly important roles as models for understanding plant salt tolerance, as genetic resources contributing towards the goal of improvement of salt tolerance in some crops, for re-vegetation of saline lands, and as ‘niche crops’ in their own right for landscapes with saline soils. PMID:25844430

  13. Method and system for environmentally adaptive fault tolerant computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Copenhaver, Jason L. (Inventor); Jeremy, Ramos (Inventor); Wolfe, Jeffrey M. (Inventor); Brenner, Dean (Inventor)

    2010-01-01

    A method and system for adapting fault tolerant computing. The method includes the steps of measuring an environmental condition representative of an environment. An on-board processing system's sensitivity to the measured environmental condition is measured. It is determined whether to reconfigure a fault tolerance of the on-board processing system based in part on the measured environmental condition. The fault tolerance of the on-board processing system may be reconfigured based in part on the measured environmental condition.

  14. Acid tolerance mechanisms utilized by Streptococcus mutans

    PubMed Central

    Matsui, Robert; Cvitkovitch, Dennis

    2010-01-01

    Since its discovery in 1924 by J Clarke, Streptococcus mutans has been the focus of rigorous research efforts due to its involvement in caries initiation and progression. Its ability to ferment a range of dietary carbohydrates can rapidly drop the external environmental pH, thereby making dental plaque inhabitable to many competing species and can ultimately lead to tooth decay. Acid production by this oral pathogen would prove suicidal if not for its remarkable ability to withstand the acid onslaught by utilizing a wide variety of highly evolved acid-tolerance mechanisms. The elucidation of these mechanisms will be discussed, serving as the focus of this review. PMID:20210551

  15. Intermittent adaptation. A theory of drug tolerance, dependence and addiction.

    PubMed

    Peper, A

    2009-05-01

    A mathematical model of drug tolerance and its underlying theory is presented. The model is essentially more complex than the generally used model of homeostasis, which is demonstrated to fail in describing tolerance development to repeated drug administrations. The model assumes the development of tolerance to a repeatedly administered drug to be the result of a regulated adaptive process. The oral detection and analysis of endogenous substances is proposed to be the primary stimulus for the mechanism of drug tolerance. Anticipation and environmental cues are in the model considered secondary stimuli, becoming primary only in dependence and addiction or when the drug administration bypasses the natural--oral--route, as is the case when drugs are administered intravenously. The model considers adaptation to the effect of a drug and adaptation to the interval between drug taking autonomous tolerance processes. Simulations with the mathematical model demonstrate the model's behaviour to be consistent with important characteristics of the development of tolerance to repeatedly administered drugs: the gradual decrease in drug effect when tolerance develops, the high sensitivity to small changes in drug dose, the rebound phenomenon and the large reactions following withdrawal in dependence. Simulations of different ways withdrawal can be accomplished, demonstrates the practical applicability of the model.

  16. Usnic acid controls the acidity tolerance of lichens.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus; Jürgens, Sascha-René

    2008-11-01

    The hypotheses were tested that, firstly, lichens producing the dibenzofuran usnic acid colonize substrates characterized by specific pH ranges, secondly, this preferred pH is in a range where soluble usnic acid and its corresponding anion occur in similar concentrations, and thirdly, usnic acid makes lichens vulnerable to acidity. Lichens with usnic acid prefer an ambient pH range between 3.5 and 5.5 with an optimum between 4.0 and 4.5. This optimum is close to the pK(a1) value of usnic acid of 4.4. Below this optimum pH, dissolved SO(2) reduces the chlorophyll fluorescence yield more in lichens with than without their natural content of usnic acid. This suggests that usnic acid influences the acidity tolerance of lichens. The putative mechanism of the limited acidity tolerance of usnic acid-containing lichens is the acidification of the cytosol by molecules of protonated usnic acid shuttling protons through the plasma membrane at an apoplastic pH

  17. Stress tolerance in plants via habitat-adapted symbiosis

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Rodriguez, R.J.; Henson, J.; Van Volkenburgh, E.; Hoy, M.; Wright, L.; Beckwith, F.; Kim, Y.-O.; Redman, R.S.

    2008-01-01

    We demonstrate that native grass species from coastal and geothermal habitats require symbiotic fungal endophytes for salt and heat tolerance, respectively. Symbiotically conferred stress tolerance is a habitat-specific phenomenon with geothermal endophytes conferring heat but not salt tolerance, and coastal endophytes conferring salt but not heat tolerance. The same fungal species isolated from plants in habitats devoid of salt or heat stress did not confer these stress tolerances. Moreover, fungal endophytes from agricultural crops conferred disease resistance and not salt or heat tolerance. We define habitat-specific, symbiotically-conferred stress tolerance as habitat-adapted symbiosis and hypothesize that it is responsible for the establishment of plants in high-stress habitats. The agricultural, coastal and geothermal plant endophytes also colonized tomato (a model eudicot) and conferred disease, salt and heat tolerance, respectively. In addition, the coastal plant endophyte colonized rice (a model monocot) and conferred salt tolerance. These endophytes have a broad host range encompassing both monocots and eudicots. Interestingly, the endophytes also conferred drought tolerance to plants regardless of the habitat of origin. Abiotic stress tolerance correlated either with a decrease in water consumption or reactive oxygen sensitivity/generation but not to increased osmolyte production. The ability of fungal endophytes to confer stress tolerance to plants may provide a novel strategy for mitigating the impacts of global climate change on agricultural and native plant communities.The ISME Journal (2008) 2, 404-416; doi:10.1038/ismej.2007.106; published online 7 February 2008. ?? 2008 International Society for Microbial Ecology All rights reserved.

  18. A Decentralized Adaptive Approach to Fault Tolerant Flight Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wu, N. Eva; Nikulin, Vladimir; Heimes, Felix; Shormin, Victor

    2000-01-01

    This paper briefly reports some results of our study on the application of a decentralized adaptive control approach to a 6 DOF nonlinear aircraft model. The simulation results showed the potential of using this approach to achieve fault tolerant control. Based on this observation and some analysis, the paper proposes a multiple channel adaptive control scheme that makes use of the functionally redundant actuating and sensing capabilities in the model, and explains how to implement the scheme to tolerate actuator and sensor failures. The conditions, under which the scheme is applicable, are stated in the paper.

  19. [Advances in functional genomics studies underlying acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Xinqing; Zhang, Mingming; Xu, Guihong; Xu, Jianren; Bai, Fengwu

    2014-03-01

    Industrial microorganisms are subject to various stress conditions, including products and substrates inhibitions. Therefore, improvement of stress tolerance is of great importance for industrial microbial production. Acetic acid is one of the major inhibitors in the cellulosic hydrolysates, which affects seriously on cell growth and metabolism of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Studies on the molecular mechanisms underlying adaptive response and tolerance of acetic acid of S. cerevisiae benefit breeding of robust strains of industrial yeast for more efficient production. In recent years, more insights into the molecular mechanisms underlying acetic acid tolerance have been revealed through analysis of global gene expression and metabolomics analysis, as well as phenomics analysis by single gene deletion libraries. Novel genes related to response to acetic acid and improvement of acetic acid tolerance have been identified, and novel strains with improved acetic acid tolerance were constructed by modifying key genes. Metal ions including potassium and zinc play important roles in acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae, and the effect of zinc was first discovered in our previous studies on flocculating yeast. Genes involved in cell wall remodeling, membrane transport, energy metabolism, amino acid biosynthesis and transport, as well as global transcription regulation were discussed. Exploration and modification of the molecular mechanisms of yeast acetic acid tolerance will be done further on levels such as post-translational modifications and synthetic biology and engineering; and the knowledge obtained will pave the way for breeding robust strains for more efficient bioconversion of cellulosic materials to produce biofuels and bio-based chemicals.

  20. [Lipid synthesis by an acidic acid tolerant Rhodotorula glutinis].

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhangnan; Liu, Hongjuan; Zhang, Jian'an; Wang, Gehua

    2016-03-01

    Acetic acid, as a main by-product generated in the pretreatment process of lignocellulose hydrolysis, significantly affects cell growth and lipid synthesis of oleaginous microorganisms. Therefore, we studied the tolerance of Rhodotorula glutinis to acetic acid and its lipid synthesis from substrate containing acetic acid. In the mixed sugar medium containing 6 g/L glucose and 44 g/L xylose, and supplemented with acetic acid, the cell growth was not:inhibited when the acetic acid concentration was below 10 g/L. Compared with the control, the biomass, lipid concentration and lipid content of R. glutinis increased 21.5%, 171% and 122% respectively when acetic acid concentration was 10 g/L. Furthermore, R. glutinis could accumulate lipid with acetate as the sole carbon source. Lipid concentration and lipid yield reached 3.20 g/L and 13% respectively with the initial acetic acid concentration of 25 g/L. The lipid composition was analyzed by gas chromatograph. The main composition of lipid produced with acetic acid was palmitic acid, stearic acid, oleic acid, linoleic acid and linolenic acid, including 40.9% saturated fatty acids and 59.1% unsaturated fatty acids. The lipid composition was similar to that of plant oil, indicating that lipid from oleaginous yeast R. glutinis had potential as the feedstock of biodiesel production. These results demonstrated that a certain concentration of acetic acid need not to be removed in the detoxification process when using lignocelluloses hydrolysate to produce microbial lipid by R. glutinis. PMID:27349116

  1. Coral thermal tolerance shaped by local adaptation of photosymbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, E. J.; Beltran, V. H.; Larsen, N. W.; Bay, L. K.; Willis, B. L.; van Oppen, M. J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Coral thermal tolerance is strongly influenced by the identity of obligate photosymbionts, which encompass numerous types belonging to the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium. Physiological advantages achieved by partnering with functionally diverse symbionts have been assumed to be available only to corals that can form associations with multiple Symbiodinium types. Functional variation among populations of the same type of Symbiodinium has been overlooked, despite local adaptation being feasible because of large population sizes, genetic isolation and short asexual generation times. Here we demonstrate divergent thermal tolerance in a generalist Symbiodinium type from two different thermal environments. Symbiodinium from the warmer reef maintained greater photo-chemical performance and survivorship when exposed to an elevated temperature of 32°C, both in symbiosis and in culture. Juvenile corals associated with Symbiodinium from the warmer reef grew rapidly when exposed to 32°C, yet underwent bleaching and tissue death when associated with Symbiodinium from the cooler reef. These results demonstrate that Symbiodinium types can adapt to local differences in thermal climate and that this adaptation shapes the fitness of coral hosts. If Symbiodinium populations are able to further adapt to increases in temperature at the pace at which ocean climates warm, they may assist corals to increase their thermal tolerance and persist into the future.

  2. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains.

  3. Adaptive evolution of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced ethanol tolerance for Chinese rice wine fermentation.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shuang; Xu, Yan

    2014-08-01

    High tolerance towards ethanol is a desirable property for the Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains used in the alcoholic beverage industry. To improve the ethanol tolerance of an industrial Chinese rice wine yeast, a sequential batch fermentation strategy was used to adaptively evolve a chemically mutagenized Chinese rice wine G85 strain. The high level of ethanol produced under Chinese rice wine-like fermentation conditions was used as the selective pressure. After adaptive evolution of approximately 200 generations, mutant G85X-8 was isolated and shown to have markedly increased ethanol tolerance. The evolved strain also showed higher osmotic and temperature tolerances than the parental strain. Laboratory Chinese rice wine fermentation showed that the evolved G85X-8 strain was able to catabolize sugars more completely than the parental G85 strain. A higher level of yeast cell activity was found in the fermentation mash produced by the evolved strain, but the aroma profiles were similar between the evolved and parental strains. The improved ethanol tolerance in the evolved strain might be ascribed to the altered fatty acids composition of the cell membrane and higher intracellular trehalose concentrations. These results suggest that adaptive evolution is an efficient approach for the non-recombinant modification of industrial yeast strains.

  4. Survival of acid adapted and non-acid adapted Salmonella Typhimurium in pasteurized orange juice and yogurt under different storage temperatures.

    PubMed

    Álvarez-Ordóñez, Avelino; Valdés, Lorena; Bernardo, Ana; Prieto, Miguel; López, Mercedes

    2013-10-01

    The survival capacity of Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium acid adapted and non-acid adapted cells was monitored in pasteurized yogurt (pH 4.1) and orange juice (pH 3.6) during storage at different temperatures (4, 10, 25 and 37 ). Acid adapted and non-acid adapted cells were obtained by means of their growth for 36 h in Brain Heart Infusion broth acidified at pH 4.8 with citric acid and buffered (pH 7.0) Brain Heart Infusion broth, respectively. S. typhimurium showed a great ability to survive in both foodstuffs and, especially, in yogurt, where both acid adapted and non-acid adapted populations suffered only a reduction of about 1.3-1.9 log10 cycles after 43 days of storage in the range of temperatures 4-25 . At 37  a higher bacterial inactivation was observed (4.0-4.4 log10 cycles). In orange juice, a different behaviour was observed for acid-adapted and non-acid adapted cells. Whereas non-acid adapted cells survived better than acid adapted cells at 4 and 10 , acid adapted cells showed enhanced survival abilities at higher temperatures (25 and 37 ). Thus, the times required to achieve a 5 log10 cycles reduction for non-acid adapted and acid adapted cells were 10.2 and 6.0 (4 ), 6.3 and 4.2 (10 ), 0.6 and 1.0 (25 ) and 0.10 and 0.15 (37 ) days, respectively. Evidence found in this study demonstrates that refrigeration temperatures protect S. typhimurium from inactivation in acid foods and indicates that S. typhimurium acid tolerance response (ATR) is determined by storage temperature and food composition.

  5. Trehalose accumulation enhances tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Yoshiyama, Yoko; Tanaka, Koichi; Yoshiyama, Kohei; Hibi, Makoto; Ogawa, Jun; Shima, Jun

    2015-02-01

    Trehalose confers protection against various environmental stresses on yeast cells. In this study, trehalase gene deletion mutants that accumulate trehalose at high levels showed significant stress tolerance to acetic acid. The enhancement of trehalose accumulation can thus be considered a target in the breeding of acetic acid-tolerant yeast strains.

  6. On a quest for stress tolerance genes: membrane transporters in sensing and adapting to hostile soils.

    PubMed

    Shabala, Sergey; Bose, Jayakumar; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Pottosin, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, and flooding severely limit food and fibre production and result in penalties of in excess of US$100 billion per annum to the agricultural sector. Improved abiotic stress tolerance to these environmental constraints via traditional or molecular breeding practices requires a good understanding of the physiological and molecular mechanisms behind roots sensing of hostile soils, as well as downstream signalling cascades to effectors mediating plant adaptive responses to the environment. In this review, we discuss some common mechanisms conferring plant tolerance to these three major abiotic stresses. Central to our discussion are: (i) the essentiality of membrane potential maintenance and ATP production/availability and its use for metabolic versus adaptive responses; (ii) reactive oxygen species and Ca(2+) 'signatures' mediating stress signalling; and (iii) cytosolic K(+) as the common denominator of plant adaptive responses. We discuss in detail how key plasma membrane and tonoplast transporters are regulated by various signalling molecules and processes observed in plants under stress conditions (e.g. changes in membrane potential; cytosolic pH and Ca(2+); reactive oxygen species; polyamines; abscisic acid) and how these stress-induced changes are related to expression and activity of specific ion transporters. The reported results are then discussed in the context of strategies for breeding crops with improved abiotic stress tolerance. We also discuss a classical trade-off between tolerance and yield, and possible avenues for resolving this dilemma.

  7. On a quest for stress tolerance genes: membrane transporters in sensing and adapting to hostile soils.

    PubMed

    Shabala, Sergey; Bose, Jayakumar; Fuglsang, Anja Thoe; Pottosin, Igor

    2016-02-01

    Abiotic stresses such as salinity, drought, and flooding severely limit food and fibre production and result in penalties of in excess of US$100 billion per annum to the agricultural sector. Improved abiotic stress tolerance to these environmental constraints via traditional or molecular breeding practices requires a good understanding of the physiological and molecular mechanisms behind roots sensing of hostile soils, as well as downstream signalling cascades to effectors mediating plant adaptive responses to the environment. In this review, we discuss some common mechanisms conferring plant tolerance to these three major abiotic stresses. Central to our discussion are: (i) the essentiality of membrane potential maintenance and ATP production/availability and its use for metabolic versus adaptive responses; (ii) reactive oxygen species and Ca(2+) 'signatures' mediating stress signalling; and (iii) cytosolic K(+) as the common denominator of plant adaptive responses. We discuss in detail how key plasma membrane and tonoplast transporters are regulated by various signalling molecules and processes observed in plants under stress conditions (e.g. changes in membrane potential; cytosolic pH and Ca(2+); reactive oxygen species; polyamines; abscisic acid) and how these stress-induced changes are related to expression and activity of specific ion transporters. The reported results are then discussed in the context of strategies for breeding crops with improved abiotic stress tolerance. We also discuss a classical trade-off between tolerance and yield, and possible avenues for resolving this dilemma. PMID:26507891

  8. Adaptive phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation for temperature tolerance in freshwater zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Yampolsky, Lev Y; Schaer, Tobias M M; Ebert, Dieter

    2014-02-01

    Many organisms have geographical distributions extending from the tropics to near polar regions or can experience up to 30°C temperature variation within the lifespan of an individual. Two forms of evolutionary adaptation to such wide ranges in ambient temperatures are frequently discussed: local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity. The freshwater planktonic crustacean Daphnia magna, whose range extends from South Africa to near arctic sites, shows strong phenotypic and genotypic variation in response to temperature. In this study, we use D. magna clones from 22 populations (one clone per population) ranging from latitude 0° (Kenya) to 66° North (White Sea) to explore the contributions of phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation to high temperature tolerance. Temperature tolerance was studied as knockout time (time until immobilization, T(imm)) at 37°C in clones acclimatized to either 20°C or 28°C. Acclimatization to 28°C strongly increased T(imm), testifying to adaptive phenotypic plasticity. At the same time, Timm significantly correlated with average high temperature at the clones' sites of origin, suggesting local adaptation. As earlier studies have found that haemoglobin expression contributes to temperature tolerance, we also quantified haemoglobin concentration in experimental animals and found that both acclimatization temperature (AccT) and temperature at the site of origin are positively correlated with haemoglobin concentration. Furthermore, Daphnia from warmer climates upregulate haemoglobin much more strongly in response to AccT, suggesting local adaptation for plasticity in haemoglobin expression. Our results show that both local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity contribute to temperature tolerance, and elucidate a possible role of haemoglobin in mediating these effects that differs along a cold-warm gradient.

  9. Adaptive phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation for temperature tolerance in freshwater zooplankton.

    PubMed

    Yampolsky, Lev Y; Schaer, Tobias M M; Ebert, Dieter

    2014-02-01

    Many organisms have geographical distributions extending from the tropics to near polar regions or can experience up to 30°C temperature variation within the lifespan of an individual. Two forms of evolutionary adaptation to such wide ranges in ambient temperatures are frequently discussed: local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity. The freshwater planktonic crustacean Daphnia magna, whose range extends from South Africa to near arctic sites, shows strong phenotypic and genotypic variation in response to temperature. In this study, we use D. magna clones from 22 populations (one clone per population) ranging from latitude 0° (Kenya) to 66° North (White Sea) to explore the contributions of phenotypic plasticity and local adaptation to high temperature tolerance. Temperature tolerance was studied as knockout time (time until immobilization, T(imm)) at 37°C in clones acclimatized to either 20°C or 28°C. Acclimatization to 28°C strongly increased T(imm), testifying to adaptive phenotypic plasticity. At the same time, Timm significantly correlated with average high temperature at the clones' sites of origin, suggesting local adaptation. As earlier studies have found that haemoglobin expression contributes to temperature tolerance, we also quantified haemoglobin concentration in experimental animals and found that both acclimatization temperature (AccT) and temperature at the site of origin are positively correlated with haemoglobin concentration. Furthermore, Daphnia from warmer climates upregulate haemoglobin much more strongly in response to AccT, suggesting local adaptation for plasticity in haemoglobin expression. Our results show that both local adaptation and phenotypic plasticity contribute to temperature tolerance, and elucidate a possible role of haemoglobin in mediating these effects that differs along a cold-warm gradient. PMID:24352948

  10. Exercise-induced stress response as an adaptive tolerance strategy.

    PubMed Central

    Sonneborn, J S; Barbee, S A

    1998-01-01

    Interaction between the quality of the environment and the health of the exposed population determines the survival response of living organisms. The phenomenon of induced tolerance by exposure to threshold levels of stressors to stimulate natural defense mechanisms has potential therapeutic value. The paucity of information on predictability of individual response and information on the operative fundamental mechanisms limit applicability of the adaptive tolerance strategy. A potential biomarker of the stress response includes members of the stress-inducible ubiquitin gene family. Transcript sizes detected with Northern blot analysis identify different classes of ubiquitin gene family members and the intensity of the radioactive signal allows abundance determinations. Using moderate exercise as the stressor, significant increase (p < 0.028) in abundance of inducible polyubiquitin genes was found in human blood. Both the potential of exercise as a model system of a natural stress inducer and polyubiquitin as a biomarker of stress were established in these studies. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:9539026

  11. Acid tolerance of rhizobium trifolii in culture media

    SciTech Connect

    Thornton, F.C.; Davey, C.B.

    1983-01-01

    Tolerance to acidity (pH 4.2 to 4.6), low P (1 to 6 ..mu..M) and high Al (15 to 40..mu..M) for 100 strains of Rhizobium trifolii was assessed in liquid culture media in the laboratory. Response to acidity and Al varied among strains as evidenced by lower maximum cell densities and reduced growth rates, most preceded by a lag phase. Tolerance to acidity did not imply tolerance to Al in all cases. Strains were capable of tolerating higher levels of Al if acidity was reduced. Limitations in rhizobial growth due to low P concentrations were not as severe a stress as high acidity or high Al concentration.

  12. Most acid-tolerant chickpea mesorhizobia show induction of major chaperone genes upon acid shock.

    PubMed

    Brígido, Clarisse; Oliveira, Solange

    2013-01-01

    Our goals were to evaluate the tolerance of mesorhizobia to acid and alkaline conditions as well as to investigate whether acid tolerance is related to the species or the origin site of the isolates. In addition, to investigate the molecular basis of acid tolerance, the expression of chaperone genes groEL and dnaKJ was analyzed using acid-tolerant and sensitive mesorhizobia. Tolerance to pH 5 and 9 was evaluated in liquid medium for 98 Portuguese chickpea mesorhizobia belonging to four species clusters. All isolates showed high sensitivity to pH 9. In contrast, mesorhizobia revealed high diversity in terms of tolerance to acid stress: 35 % of the isolates were acid sensitive and 45 % were highly tolerant to pH 5 or moderately acidophilic. An association between mesorhizobia tolerance to acid conditions and the origin soil pH was found. Furthermore, significant differences between species clusters regarding tolerance to acidity were obtained. Ten isolates were used to investigate the expression levels of the chaperone genes by northern hybridization. Interestingly, most acid-tolerant isolates displayed induction of the dnaK and groESL genes upon acid shock while the sensitive ones showed repression. This study suggests that acid tolerance in mesorhizobia is related to the pH of the origin soil and to the species cluster of the isolates. Additionally, the transcriptional analysis suggests a relationship between induction of major chaperone genes and higher tolerance to acid pH in mesorhizobia. This is the first report on transcriptional analysis of the major chaperones genes in mesorhizobia under acidity, contributing to a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms of rhizobia acidity tolerance.

  13. Acid tolerance response of Bordetella bronchiseptica in avirulent phase.

    PubMed

    Fingermann, M; Hozbor, D

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for respiratory diseases in many mammalian hosts, including humans. This pathogen has been shown as able to persist inside the host cells, even in the phagosomes that are acidified to pH 4.5-5.0 after bacterial infection. Here we evaluated the resistance of B. bronchiseptica to survive under acidic conditions. In particular we analyzed the bacterial capacity to develop the mechanism known as acid tolerance response (ATR). Our studies were mainly focused on the avirulent phase of the bacteria since this phenotypic phase was reported to be more resistant to environmental stress conditions than the virulent phase. Results from B. bronchiseptica in virulent phase were also included for comparison purposes. In fact, for B. bronchiseptica 9.73 bacteria in virulent phase we observed that the viability of bacteria does not decrease significantly when grown at pH as low as 4.5, but it is affected when the pH of the medium was equal to or less than 4.0. After acid-adaptation at pH 5.5 for several hours, the survival rate of B. bronchiseptica 9.73 at lethal pH 4.0 for 6h was increased. Interestingly, the avirulent phase mediated by the two-component BvgAS system conferred further resistance to lethal acid challenge and a marked increase in the magnitude of the expressed ATR. The ATR for this avirulent phase seems to be associated with changes in LPS and surface protein profiles. 2D-gel electrophoresis revealed at least 25 polypeptides differentially expressed, 17 of which were only expressed or over-expressed under acid conditions. Using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, 10 of these differentially expressed polypeptides were identified. PMID:26640052

  14. Acid tolerance response of Bordetella bronchiseptica in avirulent phase.

    PubMed

    Fingermann, M; Hozbor, D

    2015-12-01

    Bordetella bronchiseptica is a Gram-negative bacterium responsible for respiratory diseases in many mammalian hosts, including humans. This pathogen has been shown as able to persist inside the host cells, even in the phagosomes that are acidified to pH 4.5-5.0 after bacterial infection. Here we evaluated the resistance of B. bronchiseptica to survive under acidic conditions. In particular we analyzed the bacterial capacity to develop the mechanism known as acid tolerance response (ATR). Our studies were mainly focused on the avirulent phase of the bacteria since this phenotypic phase was reported to be more resistant to environmental stress conditions than the virulent phase. Results from B. bronchiseptica in virulent phase were also included for comparison purposes. In fact, for B. bronchiseptica 9.73 bacteria in virulent phase we observed that the viability of bacteria does not decrease significantly when grown at pH as low as 4.5, but it is affected when the pH of the medium was equal to or less than 4.0. After acid-adaptation at pH 5.5 for several hours, the survival rate of B. bronchiseptica 9.73 at lethal pH 4.0 for 6h was increased. Interestingly, the avirulent phase mediated by the two-component BvgAS system conferred further resistance to lethal acid challenge and a marked increase in the magnitude of the expressed ATR. The ATR for this avirulent phase seems to be associated with changes in LPS and surface protein profiles. 2D-gel electrophoresis revealed at least 25 polypeptides differentially expressed, 17 of which were only expressed or over-expressed under acid conditions. Using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry, 10 of these differentially expressed polypeptides were identified.

  15. Comprehensive molecular characterization of Methylobacterium extorquens AM1 adapted for 1-butanol tolerance

    DOE PAGES

    Hu, Bo; Yang, Yi -Ming; Beck, David A. C.; Wang, Qian -Wen; Chen, Wen -Jing; Yang, Jing; Lidstrom, Mary E.; Yang, Song

    2016-04-11

    In this study, the toxicity of alcohols is one of the major roadblocks of biological fermentation for biofuels production. Methylobacterium extorquens AM1, a facultative methylotrophic α-proteobacterium, has been engineered to generate 1-butanol from cheap carbon feedstocks through a synthetic metabolic pathway. However, M. extorquens AM1 is vulnerable to solvent stress, which impedes further development for 1-butanol production. Only a few studies have reported the general stress response of M. extorquens AM1 to solvent stress. Therefore, it is highly desirable to obtain a strain with ameliorated 1-butanol tolerance and elucidate the molecular mechanism of 1-butnaol tolerance in M. extorquens AM1 formore » future strain improvement. In this work, adaptive laboratory evolution was used as a tool to isolate mutants with 1-butanol tolerance up to 0.5 %. The evolved strains, BHBT3 and BHBT5, demonstrated increased growth rates and higher survival rates with the existence of 1-butanol. Whole genome sequencing revealed a SNP mutation at kefB in BHBT5, which was confirmed to be responsible for increasing 1-butanol tolerance through an allelic exchange experiment. Global metabolomic analysis further discovered that the pools of multiple key metabolites, including fatty acids, amino acids, and disaccharides, were increased in BHBT5 in response to 1-butanol stress. Additionally, the carotenoid synthesis pathway was significantly down-regulated in BHBT5. In conclusion, we successfully screened mutants resistant to 1-butanol and provided insights into the molecular mechanism of 1-butanol tolerance in M. extorquens AM1. This research will be useful for uncovering the mechanism of cellular response of M. extorquens AM1 to solvent stress, and will provide the genetic blueprint for the rational design of a strain of M. extorquens AM1 with increased 1-butanol tolerance in the future.« less

  16. Amino acids improve acid tolerance and internal pH maintenance in Bacillus cereus ATCC14579 strain.

    PubMed

    Senouci-Rezkallah, Khadidja; Schmitt, Philippe; Jobin, Michel P

    2011-05-01

    This study investigated the involvement of glutamate-, arginine- and lysine-dependent systems in the Acid Tolerance Response (ATR) of Bacillus cereus ATCC14579 strain. Cells were grown in a chemostat at external pH (pH(e)) 7.0 and 5.5. Population reduction after acid shock at pH 4.0 was strongly limited in cells grown at pH 5.5 (acid-adapted) compared with cells grown at pH 7.0 (unadapted), indicating that B. cereus cells grown at low pH(e) were able to induce a marked ATR. Glutamate, arginine and lysine enhanced the resistance of unadapted cells to pH 4.0 acid shock of 1-log or 2-log populations, respectively. Amino acids had no detectable effect on acid resistance in acid-adapted cells. An acid shock at pH 4.0 resulted in a marked drop in internal pH (pH(i)) in unadapted cells compared with acid-adapted cells. When acid shock was achieved in the presence of glutamate, arginine or lysine, pH(i) was maintained at higher values (6.31, 6.69 or 6.99, respectively) compared with pH(i) in the absence of amino acids (4.88). Acid-adapted cells maintained their pH(i) at around 6.4 whatever the condition. Agmatine (a competitive inhibitor of arginine decarboxylase) had a negative effect on the ability of B. cereus cells to survive and maintain their pH(i) during acid shock. Our data demonstrate that B. cereus is able to induce an ATR during growth at low pH. This adaptation depends on pH(i) homeostasis and is enhanced in the presence of glutamate, arginine and lysine. Hence evaluations of the pathogenicity of B. cereus must take into account its ability to adapt to acid stress.

  17. Abscisic Acid and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Crop Plants

    PubMed Central

    Sah, Saroj K.; Reddy, Kambham R.; Li, Jiaxu

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a primary threat to fulfill the demand of agricultural production to feed the world in coming decades. Plants reduce growth and development process during stress conditions, which ultimately affect the yield. In stress conditions, plants develop various stress mechanism to face the magnitude of stress challenges, although that is not enough to protect them. Therefore, many strategies have been used to produce abiotic stress tolerance crop plants, among them, abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone engineering could be one of the methods of choice. ABA is an isoprenoid phytohormone, which regulates various physiological processes ranging from stomatal opening to protein storage and provides adaptation to many stresses like drought, salt, and cold stresses. ABA is also called an important messenger that acts as the signaling mediator for regulating the adaptive response of plants to different environmental stress conditions. In this review, we will discuss the role of ABA in response to abiotic stress at the molecular level and ABA signaling. The review also deals with the effect of ABA in respect to gene expression. PMID:27200044

  18. Abscisic Acid and Abiotic Stress Tolerance in Crop Plants.

    PubMed

    Sah, Saroj K; Reddy, Kambham R; Li, Jiaxu

    2016-01-01

    Abiotic stress is a primary threat to fulfill the demand of agricultural production to feed the world in coming decades. Plants reduce growth and development process during stress conditions, which ultimately affect the yield. In stress conditions, plants develop various stress mechanism to face the magnitude of stress challenges, although that is not enough to protect them. Therefore, many strategies have been used to produce abiotic stress tolerance crop plants, among them, abscisic acid (ABA) phytohormone engineering could be one of the methods of choice. ABA is an isoprenoid phytohormone, which regulates various physiological processes ranging from stomatal opening to protein storage and provides adaptation to many stresses like drought, salt, and cold stresses. ABA is also called an important messenger that acts as the signaling mediator for regulating the adaptive response of plants to different environmental stress conditions. In this review, we will discuss the role of ABA in response to abiotic stress at the molecular level and ABA signaling. The review also deals with the effect of ABA in respect to gene expression. PMID:27200044

  19. Mechanistic basis of adaptive maternal effects: egg jelly water balance mediates embryonic adaptation to acidity in Rana arvalis.

    PubMed

    Shu, Longfei; Suter, Marc J-F; Laurila, Anssi; Räsänen, Katja

    2015-11-01

    Environmental stress, such as acidification, can challenge persistence of natural populations and act as a powerful evolutionary force at ecological time scales. The ecological and evolutionary responses of natural populations to environmental stress at early life-stages are often mediated via maternal effects. During early life-stages, maternal effects commonly arise from egg coats (the extracellular structures surrounding the embryo), but the role of egg coats has rarely been studied in the context of adaptation to environmental stress. Previous studies on the moor frog Rana arvalis found that the egg coat mediated adaptive divergence along an acidification gradient in embryonic acid stress tolerance. However, the exact mechanisms underlying these adaptive maternal effects remain unknown. Here, we investigated the role of water balance and charge state (zeta potential) of egg jelly coats in embryonic adaptation to acid stress in three populations of R. arvalis. We found that acidic pH causes severe water loss in the egg jelly coat, but that jelly coats from an acid-adapted population retained more water than jelly coats from populations not adapted to acidity. Moreover, embryonic acid tolerance (survival at pH 4.0) correlated with both water loss and charge state of the jelly, indicating that negatively charged glycans influence jelly water balance and contribute to embryonic adaptation to acidity. These results indicate that egg coats can harbor extensive intra-specific variation, probably facilitated in part via strong selection on water balance and glycosylation status of egg jelly coats. These findings shed light on the molecular mechanisms of environmental stress tolerance and adaptive maternal effects.

  20. Mechanistic basis of adaptive maternal effects: egg jelly water balance mediates embryonic adaptation to acidity in Rana arvalis.

    PubMed

    Shu, Longfei; Suter, Marc J-F; Laurila, Anssi; Räsänen, Katja

    2015-11-01

    Environmental stress, such as acidification, can challenge persistence of natural populations and act as a powerful evolutionary force at ecological time scales. The ecological and evolutionary responses of natural populations to environmental stress at early life-stages are often mediated via maternal effects. During early life-stages, maternal effects commonly arise from egg coats (the extracellular structures surrounding the embryo), but the role of egg coats has rarely been studied in the context of adaptation to environmental stress. Previous studies on the moor frog Rana arvalis found that the egg coat mediated adaptive divergence along an acidification gradient in embryonic acid stress tolerance. However, the exact mechanisms underlying these adaptive maternal effects remain unknown. Here, we investigated the role of water balance and charge state (zeta potential) of egg jelly coats in embryonic adaptation to acid stress in three populations of R. arvalis. We found that acidic pH causes severe water loss in the egg jelly coat, but that jelly coats from an acid-adapted population retained more water than jelly coats from populations not adapted to acidity. Moreover, embryonic acid tolerance (survival at pH 4.0) correlated with both water loss and charge state of the jelly, indicating that negatively charged glycans influence jelly water balance and contribute to embryonic adaptation to acidity. These results indicate that egg coats can harbor extensive intra-specific variation, probably facilitated in part via strong selection on water balance and glycosylation status of egg jelly coats. These findings shed light on the molecular mechanisms of environmental stress tolerance and adaptive maternal effects. PMID:25983113

  1. Genetic dissection of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Geng, Peng; Xiao, Yin; Hu, Yun; Sun, Haiye; Xue, Wei; Zhang, Liang; Shi, Gui-Yang

    2016-09-01

    Dissection of the hereditary architecture underlying Saccharomyces cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for ethanol fermentation. In this work, a genomics approach was used to dissect hereditary variations in acetic acid tolerance between two phenotypically different strains. A total of 160 segregants derived from these two strains were obtained. Phenotypic analysis indicated that the acetic acid tolerance displayed a normal distribution in these segregants, and suggested that the acetic acid tolerant traits were controlled by multiple quantitative trait loci (QTLs). Thus, 220 SSR markers covering the whole genome were used to detect QTLs of acetic acid tolerant traits. As a result, three QTLs were located on chromosomes 9, 12, and 16, respectively, which explained 38.8-65.9 % of the range of phenotypic variation. Furthermore, twelve genes of the candidates fell into the three QTL regions by integrating the QTL analysis with candidates of acetic acid tolerant genes. These results provided a novel avenue to obtain more robust strains. PMID:27430512

  2. Tolerance of Bifidobacterium human isolates to bile, acid and oxygen.

    PubMed

    Andriantsoanirina, Valérie; Allano, Solène; Butel, Marie José; Aires, Julio

    2013-06-01

    Bifidobacteria are part of the human gastrointestinal microbiota and are used as probiotics in functional food products because of their health promoting properties. However, only few data are available on the phenotypic characteristics displayed by human bifidobacteria strain populations. In this study we compared the in vitro tolerance to acid, bile and oxygen of the largest number of independent human intestinal strains. Bile and acid tolerance varied among species and independent strains within a species: B. adolescentis strains were the most tolerant to bile followed by Bifidobacterium longum and B. breve; B. longum, B. breve and B. dentium showed the highest viability levels after exposure to acid pH. Oxygen tolerance was largely distributed among intestinal bifidobacteria: B. longum, B. breve and B. bifidum showed the highest oxygen tolerance. B. adolescentis showed the highest susceptibility to acid and oxygen stresses. The present study gave us the opportunity to update our knowledge about the phenotypic characteristics of human intestinal bifidobacteria. B. longum and B. breve harboured the best tolerance to oxygen, bile and acid stresses. Based on such biological characters, B. longum and B. breve species showed the highest interest in terms of potential selection of human probiotics.

  3. Fatty acid composition and extreme temperature tolerance following exposure to fluctuating temperatures in a soil arthropod.

    PubMed

    van Dooremalen, Coby; Suring, Wouter; Ellers, Jacintha

    2011-09-01

    Ectotherms commonly adjust their lipid composition to ambient temperature to counteract detrimental thermal effects on lipid fluidity. However, the extent of lipid remodeling and the associated fitness consequences under continuous temperature fluctuations are not well-described. The objective of this study was to investigate the effect of repeated temperature fluctuations on fatty acid composition and thermal tolerance. We exposed the springtail Orchesella cincta to two constant temperatures of 5 and 20°C, and a continuously fluctuating treatment between 5 and 20°C every 2 days. Fatty acid composition differed significantly between constant low and high temperatures. As expected, animals were most cold tolerant in the low temperature treatment, while heat tolerance was highest under high temperature. Under fluctuating temperatures, fatty acid composition changed with temperature initially, but later in the experiment fatty acid composition stabilized and closely resembled that found under constant warm temperatures. Consistent with this, heat tolerance in the fluctuating temperature treatment was comparable to the constant warm treatment. Cold tolerance in the fluctuating temperature treatment was intermediate compared to animals acclimated to constant cold or warmth, despite the fact that fatty acid composition was adjusted to warm conditions. This unexpected finding suggests that in animals acclimated to fluctuating temperatures an additional underlying mechanism is involved in the cold shock response. Other aspects of homeoviscous adaptation may protect animals during extreme cold. This paper forms a next step to fully understand the functioning of ectotherms in more thermally variable environments. PMID:21704631

  4. Parameter Estimation Analysis for Hybrid Adaptive Fault Tolerant Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eshak, Peter B.

    Research efforts have increased in recent years toward the development of intelligent fault tolerant control laws, which are capable of helping the pilot to safely maintain aircraft control at post failure conditions. Researchers at West Virginia University (WVU) have been actively involved in the development of fault tolerant adaptive control laws in all three major categories: direct, indirect, and hybrid. The first implemented design to provide adaptation was a direct adaptive controller, which used artificial neural networks to generate augmentation commands in order to reduce the modeling error. Indirect adaptive laws were implemented in another controller, which utilized online PID to estimate and update the controller parameter. Finally, a new controller design was introduced, which integrated both direct and indirect control laws. This controller is known as hybrid adaptive controller. This last control design outperformed the two earlier designs in terms of less NNs effort and better tracking quality. The performance of online PID has an important role in the quality of the hybrid controller; therefore, the quality of the estimation will be of a great importance. Unfortunately, PID is not perfect and the online estimation process has some inherited issues; the online PID estimates are primarily affected by delays and biases. In order to ensure updating reliable estimates to the controller, the estimator consumes some time to converge. Moreover, the estimator will often converge to a biased value. This thesis conducts a sensitivity analysis for the estimation issues, delay and bias, and their effect on the tracking quality. In addition, the performance of the hybrid controller as compared to direct adaptive controller is explored. In order to serve this purpose, a simulation environment in MATLAB/SIMULINK has been created. The simulation environment is customized to provide the user with the flexibility to add different combinations of biases and delays to

  5. Differential soil acidity tolerance of dry bean genotypes

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Soil acidity is a major yield limiting factors for bean production in the tropical regions. Using soil acidity tolerant genotypes is an important strategy in improving bean yields and reducing cost of production. A greenhouse experiment was conducted with the objective of evaluating 20 dry bean geno...

  6. Nucleic acid molecules conferring enhanced ethanol tolerance and microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol

    SciTech Connect

    Brown, Steven; Guss, Adam; Yang, Shihui; Karpinets, Tatiana; Lynd, Lee; Shao, Xiongjun

    2014-01-14

    The present invention provides isolated nucleic acid molecules which encode a mutant acetaldehyde-CoA/alcohol dehydrogenase or mutant alcohol dehydrogenase and confer enhanced tolerance to ethanol. The invention also provides related expression vectors, genetically engineered microorganisms having enhanced tolerance to ethanol, as well as methods of making and using such genetically modified microorganisms for production of biofuels based on fermentation of biomass materials.

  7. Organic acids induce tolerance to zinc- and copper-exposed fungi under various growth conditions.

    PubMed

    Sazanova, Katerina; Osmolovskaya, Natalia; Schiparev, Sergey; Yakkonen, Kirill; Kuchaeva, Ludmila; Vlasov, Dmitry

    2015-04-01

    Heavy metals, Zn and Cu, in high concentration (2 mM for Zn and 0.5 mM for Cu) have some inhibiting effect on the growth of Aspergillus niger and Penicillium citrinum. Toxic effects of these metals considerably depend on cultivation conditions including nitrogen sources, pH of nutrient media, and its consistency (presence or absence of agar). In general, nitrate media provides less inhibiting effect on fungal growth under heavy metal exposure than ammonium-containing media. Adding of Zn in nitrate media induces oxalic acid production by fungi. Importance of oxalic acid production in detoxification of heavy metals is confirmed by the formation of Zn-containing crystals in fungal cultures. Cu bringing to the cultural media had no stimulating effect on oxalic acid production as well as no copper-containing crystals were observed. But proceeding from essential increase in oxalic acid production during a long-term fungi adaptation to Cu, it may be proposed that oxalic acid plays some functional role in Cu tolerance of fungi as well. It may be concluded that the role of organic acids and oxalate, in particular, in fungi tolerance and adaptation to heavy metals can be determined by the nature of the metal and its ability to form stable complexes with an acid anion. Stimulating effect of metals on acid production is not universal for all species of fungi and largely depends on metal concentration, nitrogen form in a medium, and other cultivation conditions.

  8. Physiological and proteomic analysis of Lactobacillus casei in response to acid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; He, Guiqiang; Zhang, Juan

    2014-10-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the acid tolerance response (ATR) in Lactobacillus casei by a combined physiological and proteomic analysis. To optimize the ATR induction, cells were acid adapted for 1 h at different pHs, and then acid challenged at pH 3.5. The result showed that acid adaptation improved acid tolerance, and the highest survival was observed in cells adapted at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the acid-adapted cells exhibited higher intracellular pH (pHi), intracellular NH4 (+) content, and lower inner permeability compared with the cells without adaptation. Proteomic analysis was performed upon acid adaptation to different pHs (pH 6.5 vs. pH 4.5) using two-dimensional electrophoresis. A total of 24 proteins that exhibited at least 1.5-fold differential expression were identified. Four proteins (Pgk, LacD, Hpr, and Galm) involved in carbohydrate catabolism and five classic stress response proteins (GroEL, GrpE, Dnak, Hspl, and LCAZH_2811) were up-regulated after acid adaptation at pH 4.5 for 1 h. Validation of the proteomic data was performed by quantitative RT-PCR, and transcriptional regulation of all selected genes showed a positive correlation with the proteomic patterns of the identified proteins. Results presented in this study may be useful for further elucidating the acid tolerance mechanisms and may help in formulating new strategies to improve the industrial performance of this species during acid stress. PMID:25062817

  9. Influence of acid tolerance responses on survival, growth, and thermal cross-protection of Escherichia coli O157:H7 in acidified media and fruit juices.

    PubMed

    Ryu, J H; Beuchat, L R

    1998-12-22

    A study was done to determine survival and growth characteristics of acid-adapted, acid-shocked, and control cells of Escherichia coli O157:H7 inoculated into tryptic soy broth (TSB) acidified with organic acids and three commercial brands of apple cider and orange juice. The three types of cells behaved similarly in TSB acidified with acetic acid; however, in TSB (pH 3.9) acidified with lactic acid, acid-adapted cells were more tolerant than acid-shocked cells which, in turn, were more tolerant than control cells. The ability of the three types of cells to grow after inoculation into acidified TSB, then plated on tryptic soy agar containing sodium chloride was determined. Tolerance of acid-adapted cells and, less markedly, acid-shocked cells to sodium chloride was diminished, compared to control cells. The pathogen showed extraordinary tolerance to the low pH of apple cider and orange juice held at 5 or 25 degrees C for up to 42 days. Growth occurred in one brand of apple cider (pH 3.98) incubated at 25 degrees C. Regardless of test parameters, there was no indication that cell types differed in tolerance to the acidic environment in apple cider or orange juice. Survival of control, acid-adapted, and acid-shocked cells heated in apple cider and orange juice was studied. Within each apple cider or orange juice, D(52 degrees C)-values of acid-adapted cells were considerably higher than those of acid-shocked or control cells, which indicates that heat tolerance can be substantially enhanced by acid adaptation compared to acid shock. PMID:9926995

  10. Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and uses thereof for producing organic acids

    DOEpatents

    Pfleger, Brian Frederick; Begemann, Matthew Brett

    2014-05-06

    Organic acid-tolerant microorganisms and methods of using same. The organic acid-tolerant microorganisms comprise modifications that reduce or ablate AcsA activity or AcsA homolog activity. The modifications increase tolerance of the microorganisms to such organic acids as 3-hydroxypropionic acid (3HP), acrylic acid, and propionic acid. Further modifications to the microorganisms such as increasing expression of malonyl-CoA reductase and/or acetyl-CoA carboxylase provide or increase the ability of the microorganisms to produce 3HP. Methods of generating an organic acid with the modified microorganisms are provided. Methods of using acsA or homologs thereof as counter-selectable markers include replacing acsA or homologs thereof in cells with genes of interest and selecting for the cells comprising the genes of interest with amounts of organic acids effective to inhibit growth of cells harboring acsA or the homologs.

  11. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  12. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  13. 40 CFR 180.318 - 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...)butanoic acid, and its metabolite MCPA, (4-chloro-2-methylphenoxy)acetic acid, in or on the following food... acid; tolerance for residues. 180.318 Section 180.318 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL... FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.318 4-(2-Methyl-4-chlorophenoxy) butyric acid; tolerance for...

  14. Environmental adaptability and stress tolerance of Laribacter hongkongensis: a genome-wide analysis

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Laribacter hongkongensis is associated with community-acquired gastroenteritis and traveler's diarrhea and it can reside in human, fish, frogs and water. In this study, we performed an in-depth annotation of the genes in its genome related to adaptation to the various environmental niches. Results L. hongkongensis possessed genes for DNA repair and recombination, basal transcription, alternative σ-factors and 109 putative transcription factors, allowing DNA repair and global changes in gene expression in response to different environmental stresses. For acid stress, it possessed a urease gene cassette and two arc gene clusters. For alkaline stress, it possessed six CDSs for transporters of the monovalent cation/proton antiporter-2 and NhaC Na+:H+ antiporter families. For heavy metals acquisition and tolerance, it possessed CDSs for iron and nickel transport and efflux pumps for other metals. For temperature stress, it possessed genes related to chaperones and chaperonins, heat shock proteins and cold shock proteins. For osmotic stress, 25 CDSs were observed, mostly related to regulators for potassium ion, proline and glutamate transport. For oxidative and UV light stress, genes for oxidant-resistant dehydratase, superoxide scavenging, hydrogen peroxide scavenging, exclusion and export of redox-cycling antibiotics, redox balancing, DNA repair, reduction of disulfide bonds, limitation of iron availability and reduction of iron-sulfur clusters are present. For starvation, it possessed phosphorus and, despite being asaccharolytic, carbon starvation-related CDSs. Conclusions The L. hongkongensis genome possessed a high variety of genes for adaptation to acid, alkaline, temperature, osmotic, oxidative, UV light and starvation stresses and acquisition of and tolerance to heavy metals. PMID:21711489

  15. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Tolerances § 180.155 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues. (a) General. Tolerances are established for the combined residues of the plant growth regulator 1-naphthaleneacetic acid and its... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid;...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1210 - Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Phosphorous acid; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1210 Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of phosphorous acid and...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1210 - Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Phosphorous acid; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1210 Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of phosphorous acid and...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1210 - Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Phosphorous acid; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1210 Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of phosphorous acid and...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1210 - Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Phosphorous acid; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1210 Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of phosphorous acid and...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1210 - Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Phosphorous acid; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1210 Phosphorous acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for residues of phosphorous acid and...

  1. Intracellular pH of acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria.

    PubMed Central

    Russell, J B

    1991-01-01

    Acid-tolerant ruminal bacteria (Bacteroides ruminicola B1(4), Selenomonas ruminantium HD4, Streptococcus bovis JB1, Megasphaera elsdenii B159, and strain F) allowed their intracellular pH to decline as a function of extracellular pH and did not generate a large pH gradient across the cell membrane until the extracellular pH was low (less than 5.2). This decline in intracellular pH prevented an accumulation of volatile fatty acid anions inside the cells. PMID:1781695

  2. Proteomic Adaptations to Starvation Prepare Escherichia coli for Disinfection Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Du, Zhe; Nandakumar, Renu; Nickerson, Kenneth; Li, Xu

    2015-01-01

    Despite the low nutrient level and constant presence of secondary disinfectants, bacterial re-growth still occurs in drinking water distribution systems. The molecular mechanisms that starved bacteria use to survive low-level chlorine-based disinfectants are not well understood. The objective of this study is to investigate these molecular mechanisms at the protein level that prepare starved cells for disinfection tolerance. Two commonly used secondary disinfectants chlorine and monochloramine, both at 1 mg/L, were used in this study. The proteomes of normal and starved Escherichia coli (K12 MG1655) cells were studied using quantitative proteomics. Over 60-min disinfection, starved cells showed significantly higher disinfection tolerance than normal cells based on the inactivation curves for both chlorine and monochloramine. Proteomic analyses suggest that starvation may prepare cells for the oxidative stress that chlorine-based disinfection will cause by affecting glutathione metabolism. In addition, proteins involved in stress regulation and stress responses were among the ones up-regulated under both starvation and chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. By comparing the fold changes under different conditions, it is suggested that starvation prepares E. coli for disinfection tolerance by increasing the expression of enzymes that can help cells survive chlorine/monochloramine disinfection. Protein co-expression analyses show that proteins in glycolysis and pentose phosphate pathway that were up-regulated under starvation are also involved in disinfection tolerance. Finally, the production and detoxification of methylglyoxal may be involved in the chlorine-based disinfection and cell defense mechanisms. PMID:25463932

  3. Acid tolerance response (ATR) of microbial communities during the enhanced biohydrogen process via cascade acid stress.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xiaoqin; Xia, Yan; Yan, Qun; Shen, Wei; Zhao, Mingxing

    2014-03-01

    Enhanced biohydrogen production via cascade acid stress on microbial communities, structure patterns of the microbial communities revealed by PLFAs, and the succession of biohydrogen related species against cascade acid stress were all investigated. It was found that hydrogen production could be improved from 48.7 to 79.4mL/gVS after cascade acid stress. In addition, the Gram negative (G(-)) bacteria were found to be more tolerant to organic acids than those of the Gram positive (G(+)) bacteria, regardless of the dominance of G(+) bacteria within the microbial communities. Moreover, Clostridium butyricum, Clostridium aciditolerans and Azospira oryzae, were proved to be enriched, and then might play indispensable roles for the enhanced biohydrogen production after cascade acid stress, as which were responsible for the biohydrogen accumulation, acid tolerance and nitrogen removal, respectively.

  4. Variation in soil aluminium tolerance genes is associated with local adaptation to soils at the Park Grass Experiment.

    PubMed

    Gould, Billie; McCouch, Susan; Geber, Monica

    2014-12-01

    Studies of the wild grass Anthoxanthum odoratum at the long-term Park Grass Experiment (PGE, Harpenden, UK) document a well-known example of rapid plant evolution in response to environmental change. Repeated fertilizer applications have acidified the soil in some experimental plots over the past 150+ years, and Anthoxanthum subpopulations have quickly become locally adapted. Early reciprocal transplants showed subpopulation differentiation specifically in response to soil aluminium (Al) toxicity across the experiment, even at small (30 m) spatial scales. Almost 40 years after its original measurement, we reassessed the degree of local adaptation to soil Al at the PGE using updated phenotyping methods and identified genes with variation linked to the tolerance trait. Root growth assays show that plants are locally adapted to soil Al at both the seedling and adult growth stages, but to a smaller extent than previously inferred. Among a large suite of candidate loci that were previously shown to have Al-sensitive expression differences between sensitive and tolerant plants, three loci contained SNPs that are associated with both Al tolerance and soil acidity: an Al-sensitive malate transporter (ALMT), a tonoplast intrinsic protein (TIP) and the putative homolog of the rice cell-wall modification gene STAR1. Natural genetic variation at these loci is likely to have contributed to the recent rapid evolution at PGE. Continued study of Al tolerance variants in Anthoxanthum will allow us to test hypotheses about the nature and source of genetic variation that enables some species to adapt to soil acidification and other types of rapid environmental change.

  5. 40 CFR 180.1187 - L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1187 Section 180.1187 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1187 L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  6. 40 CFR 180.1187 - L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1187 Section 180.1187 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1187 L-glutamic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance....

  7. Adaptive Engineering of Phytochelatin-based Heavy Metal Tolerance*

    PubMed Central

    Cahoon, Rebecca E.; Lutke, W. Kevin; Cameron, Jeffrey C.; Chen, Sixue; Lee, Soon Goo; Rivard, Rebecca S.; Rea, Philip A.; Jez, Joseph M.

    2015-01-01

    Metabolic engineering approaches are increasingly employed for environmental applications. Because phytochelatins (PC) protect plants from heavy metal toxicity, strategies directed at manipulating the biosynthesis of these peptides hold promise for the remediation of soils and groundwaters contaminated with heavy metals. Directed evolution of Arabidopsis thaliana phytochelatin synthase (AtPCS1) yields mutants that confer levels of cadmium tolerance and accumulation greater than expression of the wild-type enzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis, or Brassica juncea. Surprisingly, the AtPCS1 mutants that enhance cadmium tolerance and accumulation are catalytically less efficient than wild-type enzyme. Metabolite analyses indicate that transformation with AtPCS1, but not with the mutant variants, decreases the levels of the PC precursors, glutathione and γ-glutamylcysteine, upon exposure to cadmium. Selection of AtPCS1 variants with diminished catalytic activity alleviates depletion of these metabolites, which maintains redox homeostasis while supporting PC synthesis during cadmium exposure. These results emphasize the importance of metabolic context for pathway engineering and broaden the range of tools available for environmental remediation. PMID:26018077

  8. Adaptive Engineering of Phytochelatin-based Heavy Metal Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, Rebecca E; Lutke, W Kevin; Cameron, Jeffrey C; Chen, Sixue; Lee, Soon Goo; Rivard, Rebecca S; Rea, Philip A; Jez, Joseph M

    2015-07-10

    Metabolic engineering approaches are increasingly employed for environmental applications. Because phytochelatins (PC) protect plants from heavy metal toxicity, strategies directed at manipulating the biosynthesis of these peptides hold promise for the remediation of soils and groundwaters contaminated with heavy metals. Directed evolution of Arabidopsis thaliana phytochelatin synthase (AtPCS1) yields mutants that confer levels of cadmium tolerance and accumulation greater than expression of the wild-type enzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis, or Brassica juncea. Surprisingly, the AtPCS1 mutants that enhance cadmium tolerance and accumulation are catalytically less efficient than wild-type enzyme. Metabolite analyses indicate that transformation with AtPCS1, but not with the mutant variants, decreases the levels of the PC precursors, glutathione and γ-glutamylcysteine, upon exposure to cadmium. Selection of AtPCS1 variants with diminished catalytic activity alleviates depletion of these metabolites, which maintains redox homeostasis while supporting PC synthesis during cadmium exposure. These results emphasize the importance of metabolic context for pathway engineering and broaden the range of tools available for environmental remediation. PMID:26018077

  9. Adaptive Engineering of Phytochelatin-based Heavy Metal Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Cahoon, Rebecca E; Lutke, W Kevin; Cameron, Jeffrey C; Chen, Sixue; Lee, Soon Goo; Rivard, Rebecca S; Rea, Philip A; Jez, Joseph M

    2015-07-10

    Metabolic engineering approaches are increasingly employed for environmental applications. Because phytochelatins (PC) protect plants from heavy metal toxicity, strategies directed at manipulating the biosynthesis of these peptides hold promise for the remediation of soils and groundwaters contaminated with heavy metals. Directed evolution of Arabidopsis thaliana phytochelatin synthase (AtPCS1) yields mutants that confer levels of cadmium tolerance and accumulation greater than expression of the wild-type enzyme in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Arabidopsis, or Brassica juncea. Surprisingly, the AtPCS1 mutants that enhance cadmium tolerance and accumulation are catalytically less efficient than wild-type enzyme. Metabolite analyses indicate that transformation with AtPCS1, but not with the mutant variants, decreases the levels of the PC precursors, glutathione and γ-glutamylcysteine, upon exposure to cadmium. Selection of AtPCS1 variants with diminished catalytic activity alleviates depletion of these metabolites, which maintains redox homeostasis while supporting PC synthesis during cadmium exposure. These results emphasize the importance of metabolic context for pathway engineering and broaden the range of tools available for environmental remediation.

  10. 40 CFR 180.1090 - Lactic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... (2-hydroxypropanoic acid) is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance when used as a plant...

  11. 40 CFR 180.1090 - Lactic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... (2-hydroxypropanoic acid) is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance when used as a plant...

  12. 40 CFR 180.1090 - Lactic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... (2-hydroxypropanoic acid) is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance when used as a plant...

  13. 40 CFR 180.1090 - Lactic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... (2-hydroxypropanoic acid) is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance when used as a plant...

  14. 40 CFR 180.1090 - Lactic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... (2-hydroxypropanoic acid) is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance when used as a plant...

  15. Acid tolerance, proton permeabilities, and membrane ATPases of oral streptococci.

    PubMed Central

    Bender, G R; Sutton, S V; Marquis, R E

    1986-01-01

    Differences in acid tolerance among representative oral streptococci were found to be related more closely to the dynamic permeabilities of the bacteria to protons than to differences in the sensitivities of cell membranes to gross damage caused by environmental acidification. For Streptococcus mutans GS-5, Streptococcus sanguis NCTC 10904, and Streptococcus salivarius ATCC 13419, gross membrane damage, indicated by the release of magnesium from whole cells, occurred at pH values below about 4 and was rapid and extensive at pH values of about 3 or less. A more aciduric, lactic acid bacterium, Lactobacillus casei ATCC 4646, was more resistant to environmental acidification, and gross membrane damage was evident only at pH values below 3. Assessments of the movements of protons into S. mutans cells after an acid pulse at various pH values indicated that permeability to protons was minimal at a pH value of about 5, at which the average half time for pH equilibration across the cell membrane was about 12 min. The corresponding values for the less aciduric organism S. sanguis were pH 7 and 8.2 min, and the values for the intermediate organism S. salivarius were pH 6 and 6.6 min. The ATPase inhibitor dicyclohexylcarbodiimide acted to increase markedly the permeability of each organism to protons, and this action indicated that permeability involved not only the passive inflow of protons but also active outflow through the proton-translocating membrane ATPase. Membranes were isolated from each of the bacteria, and pH profiles for ATPase activities indicated pH optima of about 7.5, 7.0, 6.0, and 5.0 for S. sanguis, S. salivarius, S. mutans, and L. casei, respectively. Thus, the pH profiles for the enzymes reflected the acid tolerances of the bacteria and the permeabilities of whole cells to protons. PMID:3015800

  16. Degree of adaptive response in urban tolerant birds shows influence of habitat-of-origin

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Urban exploiters and adapters are often coalesced under a term of convenience as ‘urban tolerant’. This useful but simplistic characterisation masks a more nuanced interplay between and within assemblages of birds that are more or less well adapted to a range of urban habitats. I test the hypotheses that objectively-defined urban exploiter and suburban adapter assemblages within the broad urban tolerant grouping in Melbourne vary in their responses within the larger group to predictor variables, and that the most explanatory predictor variables vary between the two assemblages. A paired, partitioned analysis of exploiter and adapter preferences for points along the urban–rural gradient was undertaken to decompose the overall trend into diagnosable parts for each assemblage. In a similar way to that in which time since establishment has been found to be related to high urban densities of some bird species and biogeographic origin predictive of urban adaptation extent, habitat origins of members of bird assemblages influence the degree to which they become urban tolerant. Bird species that objectively classify as urban tolerant will further classify as either exploiters or adapters according to the degree of openness of their habitats-of-origin. PMID:24688881

  17. Comparative transcriptomics elucidates adaptive phenol tolerance and utilization in lipid-accumulating Rhodococcus opacus PD630

    DOE PAGES

    Yoneda, Aki; Henson, William R.; Goldner, Nicholas K.; Park, Kun Joo; Forsberg, Kevin J.; Kim, Soo Ji; Pesesky, Mitchell W.; Foston, Marcus; Dantas, Gautam; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-02-02

    Lignin-derived (e.g. phenolic) compounds can compromise the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals due to their toxicity and recalcitrance. The lipid-accumulating bacterium Rhodococcus opacus PD630 has recently emerged as a promising microbial host for lignocellulose conversion to value-added products due to its natural ability to tolerate and utilize phenolics. To gain a better understanding of its phenolic tolerance and utilization mechanisms, we adaptively evolved R. opacus over 40 passages using phenol as its sole carbon source (up to 373% growth improvement over wild-type), and extensively characterized two strains from passages 33 and 40. The two adapted strains showedmore » higher phenol consumption rates (~20 mg/l/h) and ~2-fold higher lipid production from phenol than the wild-type strain.Whole-genome sequencing and comparative transcriptomics identified highly-upregulated degradation pathways and putative transporters for phenol in both adapted strains, highlighting the important linkage between mechanisms of regulated phenol uptake, utilization, and evolved tolerance. Our study shows that the R. opacus mutants are likely to use their transporters to import phenol rather than export them, suggesting a new aromatic tolerance mechanism. The identified tolerance genes and pathways are promising candidates for future metabolic engineering in R. opacus for improved lignin conversion to lipid-based products.« less

  18. Comparative transcriptomics elucidates adaptive phenol tolerance and utilization in lipid-accumulating Rhodococcus opacus PD630.

    PubMed

    Yoneda, Aki; Henson, William R; Goldner, Nicholas K; Park, Kun Joo; Forsberg, Kevin J; Kim, Soo Ji; Pesesky, Mitchell W; Foston, Marcus; Dantas, Gautam; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-03-18

    Lignin-derived (e.g. phenolic) compounds can compromise the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals due to their toxicity and recalcitrance. The lipid-accumulating bacterium Rhodococcus opacus PD630 has recently emerged as a promising microbial host for lignocellulose conversion to value-added products due to its natural ability to tolerate and utilize phenolics. To gain a better understanding of its phenolic tolerance and utilization mechanisms, we adaptively evolved R. opacus over 40 passages using phenol as its sole carbon source (up to 373% growth improvement over wild-type), and extensively characterized two strains from passages 33 and 40. The two adapted strains showed higher phenol consumption rates (∼20 mg/l/h) and ∼2-fold higher lipid production from phenol than the wild-type strain. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative transcriptomics identified highly-upregulated degradation pathways and putative transporters for phenol in both adapted strains, highlighting the important linkage between mechanisms of regulated phenol uptake, utilization, and evolved tolerance. Our study shows that the R. opacus mutants are likely to use their transporters to import phenol rather than export them, suggesting a new aromatic tolerance mechanism. The identified tolerance genes and pathways are promising candidates for future metabolic engineering in R. opacus for improved lignin conversion to lipid-based products.

  19. Comparative transcriptomics elucidates adaptive phenol tolerance and utilization in lipid-accumulating Rhodococcus opacus PD630

    PubMed Central

    Yoneda, Aki; Henson, William R.; Goldner, Nicholas K.; Park, Kun Joo; Forsberg, Kevin J.; Kim, Soo Ji; Pesesky, Mitchell W.; Foston, Marcus; Dantas, Gautam; Moon, Tae Seok

    2016-01-01

    Lignin-derived (e.g. phenolic) compounds can compromise the bioconversion of lignocellulosic biomass to fuels and chemicals due to their toxicity and recalcitrance. The lipid-accumulating bacterium Rhodococcus opacus PD630 has recently emerged as a promising microbial host for lignocellulose conversion to value-added products due to its natural ability to tolerate and utilize phenolics. To gain a better understanding of its phenolic tolerance and utilization mechanisms, we adaptively evolved R. opacus over 40 passages using phenol as its sole carbon source (up to 373% growth improvement over wild-type), and extensively characterized two strains from passages 33 and 40. The two adapted strains showed higher phenol consumption rates (∼20 mg/l/h) and ∼2-fold higher lipid production from phenol than the wild-type strain. Whole-genome sequencing and comparative transcriptomics identified highly-upregulated degradation pathways and putative transporters for phenol in both adapted strains, highlighting the important linkage between mechanisms of regulated phenol uptake, utilization, and evolved tolerance. Our study shows that the R. opacus mutants are likely to use their transporters to import phenol rather than export them, suggesting a new aromatic tolerance mechanism. The identified tolerance genes and pathways are promising candidates for future metabolic engineering in R. opacus for improved lignin conversion to lipid-based products. PMID:26837573

  20. 40 CFR 180.1258 - Acetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Acetic acid; exemption from the... Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1258 Acetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. (a) An... acetic acid when used as a preservative on post-harvest agricultural commodities intended for animal...

  1. Adaptive evolution of baker's yeast in a dough-like environment enhances freeze and salinity tolerance.

    PubMed

    Aguilera, Jaime; Andreu, Pasqual; Randez-Gil, Francisca; Prieto, Jose Antonio

    2010-03-01

    We used adaptive evolution to improve freeze tolerance of industrial baker's yeast. Our hypothesis was that adaptation to low temperature is accompanied by enhanced resistance of yeast to freezing. Based on this hypothesis, yeast was propagated in a flour-free liquid dough model system, which contained sorbitol and NaCl, by successive batch refreshments maintained constantly at 12°C over at least 200 generations. Relative to the parental population, the maximal growth rate (µ(max)) under the restrictive conditions, increased gradually over the time course of the experiment. This increase was accompanied by enhanced freeze tolerance. However, these changes were not the consequence of genetic adaptation to low temperature, a fact that was confirmed by prolonged selection of yeast cells in YPD at 12°C. Instead, the experimental populations showed a progressive increase in NaCl tolerance. This phenotype was likely achieved at the expense of others traits, since evolved cells showed a ploidy reduction, a defect in the glucose derepression mechanism and a loss in their ability to utilize gluconeogenic carbon sources. We discuss the genetic flexibility of S. cerevisiae in terms of adaptation to the multiple constraints of the experimental design applied to drive adaptive evolution and the technologically advantageous phenotype of the evolved population. PMID:21255321

  2. 40 CFR 180.1258 - Acetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Acetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1258 Section 180.1258 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1258...

  3. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues. 180.155 Section 180.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.155 1-Naphthaleneacetic...

  4. 40 CFR 180.155 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; tolerances for residues. 180.155 Section 180.155 Protection of Environment ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances § 180.155 1-Naphthaleneacetic...

  5. Multi-tolerance to heavy metals in Plantago arenaria Waldst. & Kit.: adaptative versus constitutive characters.

    PubMed

    Remon, E; Bouchardon, J-L; Faure, O

    2007-08-01

    Tolerance to Cu, Cd, Ni and Zn was investigated in a population of the pioneer species Plantago arenaria growing in a metallurgical landfill. Tolerance levels were compared with those of two other pioneer species (Coniza sumatrensis and Verbascum densiflorum) growing in the same location, and with a control population taken from an uncontaminated site. Results showed that the metalliferous population of P. arenaria was more tolerant to metal toxicity than C. sumatrensis and V. densiflorum. Comparisons with literature data confirmed that the metalliferous population of P. arenaria was highly tolerant to Cu, moderately tolerant to Cd and Ni, but not particularly tolerant to Zn. The control population of P. arenaria responded the same as the metalliferous one excepted for Cu, for which it was much more sensitive. This suggested that multi-metal tolerances in the metalliferous population of P. arenaria resulted both from constitutive and adaptative traits, depending on the metal. To check whether P. arenaria was able to cope with high internal metal levels, accumulation patterns were evaluated in pot experiments. Results showed that metals accumulated in roots and leaves, at levels proportional to soil content. Metal content was much higher in roots than in leaves and the leaf:root concentration ratio was kept constant over a wide range of soil metal contents. This suggested that metal tolerance was related to the ability to retain metal ions in roots and to tightly control their translocation to leaves. Finally metal tolerance in P. arenaria is discussed in relation to its pioneer and xerophytic characteristics. PMID:17568652

  6. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a zinc-finger-based artificial transcription factor and identification of novel genes involved in acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cui; Wei, Xiaowen; Sun, Cuihuan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Jianren; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-03-01

    Acetic acid is present in cellulosic hydrolysate as a potent inhibitor, and the superior acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ensures good cell viability and efficient ethanol production when cellulosic raw materials are used as substrates. In this study, a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae ATCC4126 (Sc4126-M01) with improved acetic acid tolerance was obtained through screening strains transformed with an artificial zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) library. Further analysis indicated that improved acetic acid tolerance was associated with improved catalase (CAT) activity. The ZFP coding sequence associated with the improved phenotype was identified, and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that three of the possible genes involved in the enhanced acetic acid tolerance regulated by this ZFP-TF, namely YFL040W, QDR3, and IKS1, showed decreased transcription levels in Sc4126-M01 in the presence of acetic acid, compared to those in the control strain. Sc4126-M01 mutants having QDR3 and IKS1 deletion (ΔQDR3 and ΔIKS1) exhibited higher acetic acid tolerance than the wild-type strain under acetic acid treatment. Glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of 5 g/L acetic acid were improved in the ΔQDR3 mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Our studies demonstrated that the synthetic ZFP-TF library can be used to improve acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae and that the employment of an artificial transcription factor can facilitate the exploration of novel functional genes involved in stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae.

  7. Improvement of acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using a zinc-finger-based artificial transcription factor and identification of novel genes involved in acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ma, Cui; Wei, Xiaowen; Sun, Cuihuan; Zhang, Fei; Xu, Jianren; Zhao, Xinqing; Bai, Fengwu

    2015-03-01

    Acetic acid is present in cellulosic hydrolysate as a potent inhibitor, and the superior acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae ensures good cell viability and efficient ethanol production when cellulosic raw materials are used as substrates. In this study, a mutant strain of S. cerevisiae ATCC4126 (Sc4126-M01) with improved acetic acid tolerance was obtained through screening strains transformed with an artificial zinc finger protein transcription factor (ZFP-TF) library. Further analysis indicated that improved acetic acid tolerance was associated with improved catalase (CAT) activity. The ZFP coding sequence associated with the improved phenotype was identified, and real-time RT-PCR analysis revealed that three of the possible genes involved in the enhanced acetic acid tolerance regulated by this ZFP-TF, namely YFL040W, QDR3, and IKS1, showed decreased transcription levels in Sc4126-M01 in the presence of acetic acid, compared to those in the control strain. Sc4126-M01 mutants having QDR3 and IKS1 deletion (ΔQDR3 and ΔIKS1) exhibited higher acetic acid tolerance than the wild-type strain under acetic acid treatment. Glucose consumption rate and ethanol productivity in the presence of 5 g/L acetic acid were improved in the ΔQDR3 mutant compared to the wild-type strain. Our studies demonstrated that the synthetic ZFP-TF library can be used to improve acetic acid tolerance of S. cerevisiae and that the employment of an artificial transcription factor can facilitate the exploration of novel functional genes involved in stress tolerance of S. cerevisiae. PMID:25698512

  8. Adaptive Fault-Tolerant Control of Uncertain Nonlinear Large-Scale Systems With Unknown Dead Zone.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mou; Tao, Gang

    2016-08-01

    In this paper, an adaptive neural fault-tolerant control scheme is proposed and analyzed for a class of uncertain nonlinear large-scale systems with unknown dead zone and external disturbances. To tackle the unknown nonlinear interaction functions in the large-scale system, the radial basis function neural network (RBFNN) is employed to approximate them. To further handle the unknown approximation errors and the effects of the unknown dead zone and external disturbances, integrated as the compounded disturbances, the corresponding disturbance observers are developed for their estimations. Based on the outputs of the RBFNN and the disturbance observer, the adaptive neural fault-tolerant control scheme is designed for uncertain nonlinear large-scale systems by using a decentralized backstepping technique. The closed-loop stability of the adaptive control system is rigorously proved via Lyapunov analysis and the satisfactory tracking performance is achieved under the integrated effects of unknown dead zone, actuator fault, and unknown external disturbances. Simulation results of a mass-spring-damper system are given to illustrate the effectiveness of the proposed adaptive neural fault-tolerant control scheme for uncertain nonlinear large-scale systems.

  9. Acid-Tolerant Sulfate-Reducing Bacteria Play a Major Role in Iron Cycling in Acidic Iron Rich Sediments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enright, K. A.; Moreau, J. W.

    2008-12-01

    acidic conditions. The dsrAB genes are related to other novel SRB lineages derived from acidic environments in previous reports, suggesting that these species have adapted to the acidity rather than colonized more circumneutral microenvironments. In an acidic hypersaline lake system in NW Victoria (Australia), previous studies suggested that pore water bisulfide derived from anoxic groundwater transported from distal locations. However, isolated potholes of oxic Fe(III)-rich springwater exhibited nearly a two-fold increase in conductivity and pH increase from 4.5 to 8.0 over time periods on the order of days; and biogeochemical and mineralogical observations were consistent with the presence of active acid- and halo-tolerant SRB. Furthermore, stratified active microbial mat communities, with zones of black FeS formation localized several millimeters below the sediment-air interface, were identified in cross-section from lakeshore sediments near groundwater discharge springs. Culture-independent and culture-based work to characterize the SRB population is ongoing at this site. We infer, from previous sulfur isotope tracer experiments at the lake, that overall sulfate reduction rates may be slow, but are nonetheless proceeding and contributing to the recycling of oxidized iron to a significant degree given the abundance of sulfate evidenced by widespread gypsum precipitation. We conclude from the two study-sites described above that acid-tolerant SRB species play an important role in the linked S, Fe and C cycles in acidifying, iron-rich environments, and their phylogenetic and physiological diversity should be further investigated.

  10. High cell density propionic acid fermentation with an acid tolerant strain of Propionibacterium acidipropionici.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhongqiang; Jin, Ying; Yang, Shang-Tian

    2015-03-01

    Propionic acid is an important chemical with wide applications and its production via fermentation is of great interest. However, economic production of bio-based propionic acid requires high product titer, yield, and productivity in the fermentation. A highly efficient and stable high cell density (HCD) fermentation process with cell recycle by centrifugation was developed for propionic acid production from glucose using an acid-tolerant strain of Propionibacterium acidipropionici, which had a higher specific growth rate, productivity, and acid tolerance compared to the wild type ATCC 4875. The sequential batch HCD fermentation at pH 6.5 produced propionic acid at a high titer of ∼40 g/L and productivity of 2.98 g/L h, with a yield of ∼0.44 g/g. The product yield increased to 0.53-0.62 g/g at a lower pH of 5.0-5.5, which, however, decreased the productivity to 1.28 g/L h. A higher final propionic acid titer of >55 g/L with a productivity of 2.23 g/L h was obtained in fed-batch HCD fermentation at pH 6.5. A 3-stage simulated fed-batch process in serum bottles produced 49.2 g/L propionic acid with a yield of 0.53 g/g and productivity of 0.66 g/L h. These productivities, yields and propionic acid titers were among the highest ever obtained in free-cell propionic acid fermentation.

  11. Iron Transformations Induced by an Acid-Tolerant Desulfosporosinus Species

    PubMed Central

    Bertel, Doug; Peck, John; Quick, Thomas J.

    2012-01-01

    The mineralogical transformations of Fe phases induced by an acid-tolerant, Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfosporosinus sp. strain GBSRB4.2 were evaluated under geochemical conditions associated with acid mine drainage-impacted systems (i.e., low pH and high Fe concentrations). X-ray powder diffractometry coupled with magnetic analysis by first-order reversal curve diagrams were used to evaluate mineral phases produced by GBSRB4.2 in media containing different ratios of Fe(II) and Fe(III). In medium containing Fe predominately in the +II oxidation state, ferrimagnetic, single-domain greigite (Fe3S4) was formed, but the addition of Fe(III) inhibited greigite formation. In media that contained abundant Fe(III) [as schwertmannite; Fe8O8(OH)6SO4 · nH2O], the activities of strain GBSRB4.2 enhanced the transformation of schwertmannite to goethite (α-FeOOH), due to the increased pH and Fe(II) concentrations that resulted from the activities of GBSRB4.2. PMID:22038606

  12. Iron transformations induced by an acid-tolerant Desulfosporosinus species.

    PubMed

    Bertel, Doug; Peck, John; Quick, Thomas J; Senko, John M

    2012-01-01

    The mineralogical transformations of Fe phases induced by an acid-tolerant, Fe(III)- and sulfate-reducing bacterium, Desulfosporosinus sp. strain GBSRB4.2 were evaluated under geochemical conditions associated with acid mine drainage-impacted systems (i.e., low pH and high Fe concentrations). X-ray powder diffractometry coupled with magnetic analysis by first-order reversal curve diagrams were used to evaluate mineral phases produced by GBSRB4.2 in media containing different ratios of Fe(II) and Fe(III). In medium containing Fe predominately in the +II oxidation state, ferrimagnetic, single-domain greigite (Fe₃S₄) was formed, but the addition of Fe(III) inhibited greigite formation. In media that contained abundant Fe(III) [as schwertmannite; Fe₈O₈(OH)₆SO₄ · nH₂O], the activities of strain GBSRB4.2 enhanced the transformation of schwertmannite to goethite (α-FeOOH), due to the increased pH and Fe(II) concentrations that resulted from the activities of GBSRB4.2. PMID:22038606

  13. Adaptive Fault Tolerance for Many-Core Based Space-Borne Computing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    James, Mark; Springer, Paul; Zima, Hans

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes an approach to providing software fault tolerance for future deep-space robotic NASA missions, which will require a high degree of autonomy supported by an enhanced on-board computational capability. Such systems have become possible as a result of the emerging many-core technology, which is expected to offer 1024-core chips by 2015. We discuss the challenges and opportunities of this new technology, focusing on introspection-based adaptive fault tolerance that takes into account the specific requirements of applications, guided by a fault model. Introspection supports runtime monitoring of the program execution with the goal of identifying, locating, and analyzing errors. Fault tolerance assertions for the introspection system can be provided by the user, domain-specific knowledge, or via the results of static or dynamic program analysis. This work is part of an on-going project at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory in Pasadena, California.

  14. An Adaptive Fault-Tolerant Communication Scheme for Body Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Guowei; Ren, Jiankang; Xia, Feng; Xu, Zichuan

    2010-01-01

    A high degree of reliability for critical data transmission is required in body sensor networks (BSNs). However, BSNs are usually vulnerable to channel impairments due to body fading effect and RF interference, which may potentially cause data transmission to be unreliable. In this paper, an adaptive and flexible fault-tolerant communication scheme for BSNs, namely AFTCS, is proposed. AFTCS adopts a channel bandwidth reservation strategy to provide reliable data transmission when channel impairments occur. In order to fulfill the reliability requirements of critical sensors, fault-tolerant priority and queue are employed to adaptively adjust the channel bandwidth allocation. Simulation results show that AFTCS can alleviate the effect of channel impairments, while yielding lower packet loss rate and latency for critical sensors at runtime. PMID:22163428

  15. Tolerance adaptation and precipitation changes complicate latitudinal patterns of climate change impacts.

    PubMed

    Bonebrake, Timothy C; Mastrandrea, Michael D

    2010-07-13

    Global patterns of biodiversity and comparisons between tropical and temperate ecosystems have pervaded ecology from its inception. However, the urgency in understanding these global patterns has been accentuated by the threat of rapid climate change. We apply an adaptive model of environmental tolerance evolution to global climate data and climate change model projections to examine the relative impacts of climate change on different regions of the globe. Our results project more adverse impacts of warming on tropical populations due to environmental tolerance adaptation to conditions of low interannual variability in temperature. When applied to present variability and future forecasts of precipitation data, the tolerance adaptation model found large reductions in fitness predicted for populations in high-latitude northern hemisphere regions, although some tropical regions had comparable reductions in fitness. We formulated an evolutionary regional climate change index (ERCCI) to additionally incorporate the predicted changes in the interannual variability of temperature and precipitation. Based on this index, we suggest that the magnitude of climate change impacts could be much more heterogeneous across latitude than previously thought. Specifically, tropical regions are likely to be just as affected as temperate regions and, in some regions under some circumstances, possibly more so.

  16. Anhydrobiosis and freezing-tolerance: adaptations that facilitate the establishment of Panagrolaimus nematodes in polar habitats.

    PubMed

    McGill, Lorraine M; Shannon, Adam J; Pisani, Davide; Félix, Marie-Anne; Ramløv, Hans; Dix, Ilona; Wharton, David A; Burnell, Ann M

    2015-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic animals can survive the loss of both free and bound water from their cells. While in this state they are also resistant to freezing. This physiology adapts anhydrobiotes to harsh environments and it aids their dispersal. Panagrolaimus davidi, a bacterial feeding anhydrobiotic nematode isolated from Ross Island Antarctica, can survive intracellular ice formation when fully hydrated. A capacity to survive freezing while fully hydrated has also been observed in some other Antarctic nematodes. We experimentally determined the anhydrobiotic and freezing-tolerance phenotypes of 24 Panagrolaimus strains from tropical, temperate, continental and polar habitats and we analysed their phylogenetic relationships. We found that several other Panagrolaimus isolates can also survive freezing when fully hydrated and that tissue extracts from these freezing-tolerant nematodes can inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We show that P. davidi belongs to a clade of anhydrobiotic and freezing-tolerant panagrolaimids containing strains from temperate and continental regions and that P. superbus, an early colonizer at Surtsey island, Iceland after its volcanic formation, is closely related to a species from Pennsylvania, USA. Ancestral state reconstructions show that anhydrobiosis evolved deep in the phylogeny of Panagrolaimus. The early-diverging Panagrolaimus lineages are strongly anhydrobiotic but weakly freezing-tolerant, suggesting that freezing tolerance is most likely a derived trait. The common ancestors of the davidi and the superbus clades were anhydrobiotic and also possessed robust freezing tolerance, along with a capacity to inhibit the growth and recrystallization of ice crystals. Unlike other endemic Antarctic nematodes, the life history traits of P. davidi do not show evidence of an evolved response to polar conditions. Thus we suggest that the colonization of Antarctica by P. davidi and of Surtsey by P. superbus may be examples of recent "ecological fitting

  17. Anhydrobiosis and Freezing-Tolerance: Adaptations That Facilitate the Establishment of Panagrolaimus Nematodes in Polar Habitats

    PubMed Central

    McGill, Lorraine M.; Shannon, Adam J.; Pisani, Davide; Félix, Marie-Anne; Ramløv, Hans; Dix, Ilona; Wharton, David A.; Burnell, Ann M.

    2015-01-01

    Anhydrobiotic animals can survive the loss of both free and bound water from their cells. While in this state they are also resistant to freezing. This physiology adapts anhydrobiotes to harsh environments and it aids their dispersal. Panagrolaimus davidi, a bacterial feeding anhydrobiotic nematode isolated from Ross Island Antarctica, can survive intracellular ice formation when fully hydrated. A capacity to survive freezing while fully hydrated has also been observed in some other Antarctic nematodes. We experimentally determined the anhydrobiotic and freezing-tolerance phenotypes of 24 Panagrolaimus strains from tropical, temperate, continental and polar habitats and we analysed their phylogenetic relationships. We found that several other Panagrolaimus isolates can also survive freezing when fully hydrated and that tissue extracts from these freezing-tolerant nematodes can inhibit the growth of ice crystals. We show that P. davidi belongs to a clade of anhydrobiotic and freezing-tolerant panagrolaimids containing strains from temperate and continental regions and that P. superbus, an early colonizer at Surtsey island, Iceland after its volcanic formation, is closely related to a species from Pennsylvania, USA. Ancestral state reconstructions show that anhydrobiosis evolved deep in the phylogeny of Panagrolaimus. The early-diverging Panagrolaimus lineages are strongly anhydrobiotic but weakly freezing-tolerant, suggesting that freezing tolerance is most likely a derived trait. The common ancestors of the davidi and the superbus clades were anhydrobiotic and also possessed robust freezing tolerance, along with a capacity to inhibit the growth and recrystallization of ice crystals. Unlike other endemic Antarctic nematodes, the life history traits of P. davidi do not show evidence of an evolved response to polar conditions. Thus we suggest that the colonization of Antarctica by P. davidi and of Surtsey by P. superbus may be examples of recent “ecological fitting

  18. Butyric acid fermentation from pretreated and hydrolysed wheat straw by an adapted Clostridium tyrobutyricum strain

    PubMed Central

    Baroi, G N; Baumann, I; Westermann, P; Gavala, H N

    2015-01-01

    Butyric acid is a valuable building-block for the production of chemicals and materials and nowadays it is produced exclusively from petroleum. The aim of this study was to develop a suitable and robust strain of Clostridium tyrobutyricum that produces butyric acid at a high yield and selectivity from lignocellulosic biomasses. Pretreated (by wet explosion) and enzymatically hydrolysed wheat straw (PHWS), rich in C6 and C5 sugars (71.6 and 55.4 g l−1 of glucose and xylose respectively), was used as substrate. After one year of serial selections, an adapted strain of C. tyrobutyricum was developed. The adapted strain was able to grow in 80% (v v−1) PHWS without addition of yeast extract compared with an initial tolerance to less than 10% PHWS and was able to ferment both glucose and xylose. It is noticeable that the adapted C. tyrobutyricum strain was characterized by a high yield and selectivity to butyric acid. Specifically, the butyric acid yield at 60–80% PHWS lie between 0.37 and 0.46 g g−1 of sugar, while the selectivity for butyric acid was as high as 0.9–1.0 g g−1 of acid. Moreover, the strain exhibited a robust response in regards to growth and product profile at pH 6 and 7. PMID:26230610

  19. Tolerance to acetic acid is improved by mutations of the TATA-binding protein gene.

    PubMed

    An, Jieun; Kwon, Hyeji; Kim, Eunjung; Lee, Young Mi; Ko, Hyeok Jin; Park, Hongjae; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Sooah; Kim, Kyoung Heon; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-03-01

    Screening a library of overexpressing mutant alleles of the TATA-binding gene SPT15 yielded two Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains (MRRC 3252 and 3253) with enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. They were also tolerant to propionic acid and hydrogen peroxide. Transcriptome profile analysis identified 58 upregulated genes and 106 downregulated genes in MRRC 3252. Stress- and protein synthesis-related transcription factors were predominantly enriched in the upregulated and downregulated genes respectively. Eight deletion mutants for some of the highly downregulated genes were acetic acid-tolerant. The level of intracellular reactive oxygen species was considerably lessened in MRRC 3252 and 3253 upon exposure to acetic acid. Metabolome profile analysis revealed that intracellular concentrations of 5 and 102 metabolites were increased and decreased, respectively, in MRRC 3252, featuring a large increase of urea and a significant decrease of amino acids. The dur1/2Δmutant, in which the urea degradation gene DUR1/2 is deleted, displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid. Enhanced tolerance to acetic acid was also observed on the medium containing a low concentration of amino acids. Taken together, this study identified two SPT15 alleles, nine gene deletions and low concentration of amino acids in the medium that confer enhanced tolerance to acetic acid.

  20. Comparative metabolomic analysis reveals a reactive oxygen species-dominated dynamic model underlying chilling environment adaptation and tolerance in rice.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Jingyu; Luo, Wei; Zhao, Yuan; Xu, Yunyuan; Song, Shuhui; Chong, Kang

    2016-09-01

    Cold, a major environmental stress for plants, has been studied intensively for decades. Its response system has been revealed, especially at the transcriptional level. The mechanisms underlying recovery growth and environmental adaptation, however, remain unknown. Taking advantage of a naturally existing system, two subspecies of Asian cultivated rice (Oryza sativa) with significant divergence in chilling tolerance, we analyzed representative japonica and indica varieties, Nipponbare and 93-11, using comparative metabolomic analysis at six time points covering chilling treatment and recovery. In total, 223 known metabolites were detected. During chilling treatment, significant biochemical changes were centered on antioxidation. During recovery, a wide-ranging chilling response was observed. Large-scale amino acid accumulation occurred, consistent with the appearance of chilling injury. At the mid-treatment stage, the accumulation of antioxidation-related compounds appeared earlier in Nipponbare than in 93-11, consistent with the higher reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels in japonica vs indica varieties. A significant contribution of ROS-mediated gene regulation, rather than the C-repeat binding factor/dehydration-responsive-element binding factor (CBF/DREB) regulon, to the more vigorous transcriptional stress response in Nipponbare was revealed by RNA-seq. Accordingly, during recovery, the induction of stress-tolerant-related metabolites was more active in the chilling-tolerant variety Nipponbare. Senescence-related compounds accumulated only in the chilling-sensitive variety 93-11. Our study uncovers the dynamic metabolic models underlying chilling response and recovery, and reveals a ROS-dominated rice adaptation mechanism to low-temperature environments. PMID:27198693

  1. A robust adaptive nonlinear fault-tolerant controller via norm estimation for reusable launch vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Chaofang; Gao, Zhifei; Ren, Yanli; Liu, Yunbing

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, a reusable launch vehicle (RLV) attitude control problem with actuator faults is addressed via the robust adaptive nonlinear fault-tolerant control (FTC) with norm estimation. Firstly, the accurate tracking task of attitude angles in the presence of parameter uncertainties and external disturbances is considered. A fault-free controller is proposed using dynamic surface control (DSC) combined with fuzzy adaptive approach. Furthermore, the minimal learning parameter strategy via norm estimation technique is introduced to reduce the multi-parameter adaptive computation burden of fuzzy approximation of the lump uncertainties. Secondly, a compensation controller is designed to handle the partial loss fault of actuator effectiveness. The unknown maximum eigenvalue of actuator efficiency loss factors is estimated online. Moreover, stability analysis guarantees that all signals of the closed-loop control system are semi-global uniformly ultimately bounded. Finally, illustrative simulations show the effectiveness of the proposed method.

  2. Phenotypically Adapted Mycobacterium tuberculosis Populations from Sputum Are Tolerant to First-Line Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Turapov, Obolbek; O'Connor, Benjamin D.; Sarybaeva, Asel A.; Williams, Caroline; Patel, Hemu; Kadyrov, Abdullaat S.; Sarybaev, Akpay S.; Woltmann, Gerrit; Barer, Michael R.

    2016-01-01

    Tuberculous sputum contains multiple Mycobacterium tuberculosis populations with different requirements for isolation in vitro. These include cells that form colonies on solid media (plateable M. tuberculosis), cells requiring standard liquid medium for growth (nonplateable M. tuberculosis), and cells requiring supplementation of liquid medium with culture supernatant (SN) for growth (SN-dependent M. tuberculosis). Here, we describe protocols for the cryopreservation and direct assessment of antimicrobial tolerance of these M. tuberculosis populations within sputum. Our results show that first-line drugs achieved only modest bactericidal effects on all three populations over 7 days (1 to 2.5 log10 reductions), and SN-dependent M. tuberculosis was more tolerant to streptomycin and isoniazid than the plateable and nonplateable M. tuberculosis strains. Susceptibility of plateable M. tuberculosis to bactericidal drugs was significantly increased after passage in vitro; thus, tolerance observed in the sputum samples from the population groups was likely associated with mycobacterial adaptation to the host environment at some time prior to expectoration. Our findings support the use of a simple ex vivo system for testing drug efficacies against mycobacteria that have phenotypically adapted during tuberculosis infection. PMID:26883695

  3. Amino acids implicated in plant defense are higher in Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus-tolerant citrus varieties.

    PubMed

    Killiny, Nabil; Hijaz, Faraj

    2016-01-01

    Citrus Huanglongbing (HLB), also known as citrus greening, has been threatening the citrus industry since the early 1900's and up to this date there are no effective cures for this disease. Field observations and greenhouse controlled studies demonstrated that some citrus genotypes are more tolerant to Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) pathogen than others. However, the mechanisms underpinning tolerance has not been determined yet. The phloem sap composition of CLas-tolerant and sensitive citrus varieties was studied to identify metabolites that could be responsible for their tolerance to CLas. The citrus phloem sap was collected by centrifugation and was analyzed with gas chromatography-mass spectrometry after methyl chloroformate derivatization. Thirty-three metabolites were detected in the phloem sap of the studied varieties: twenty 20 amino acids, eight 8 organic acids, and five 5 fatty acids. Interestingly, the levels of most amino acids, especially those implicated in plantdefense to pathogens such as phenylalanine, tyrosine, tryptophan, lysine, and asparagine were higher in tolerant varieties. Although the level of organic acids varied between cultivars, this variation was not correlated with citrus resistance to CLas and could be cultivar specific. The fatty acids were found in trace amounts and in most cases their levels were not significantly different among varieties. Better understanding of the mechanisms underpinning citrus tolerance to CLas will help in developing economically tolerant varieties.

  4. 40 CFR 180.1178 - Formic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... pesticide formic acid is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on honey and honeycomb when used to control tracheal mites and suppress varroa mites in bee colonies, and applied in accordance...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1178 - Formic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... pesticide formic acid is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on honey and honeycomb when used to control tracheal mites and suppress varroa mites in bee colonies, and applied in accordance...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1178 - Formic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... pesticide formic acid is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on honey and honeycomb when used to control tracheal mites and suppress varroa mites in bee colonies, and applied in accordance...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1178 - Formic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... pesticide formic acid is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on honey and honeycomb when used to control tracheal mites and suppress varroa mites in bee colonies, and applied in accordance...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1178 - Formic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... pesticide formic acid is exempted from the requirement of a tolerance in or on honey and honeycomb when used to control tracheal mites and suppress varroa mites in bee colonies, and applied in accordance...

  9. Screening of Non- Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Tolerance to Formic Acid in Bioethanol Fermentation.

    PubMed

    Oshoma, Cyprian E; Greetham, Darren; Louis, Edward J; Smart, Katherine A; Phister, Trevor G; Powell, Chris; Du, Chenyu

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid is one of the major inhibitory compounds present in hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic materials, the presence of which can significantly hamper the efficiency of converting available sugars into bioethanol. This study investigated the potential for screening formic acid tolerance in non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains, which could be used for the development of advanced generation bioethanol processes. Spot plate and phenotypic microarray methods were used to screen the formic acid tolerance of 7 non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. S. kudriavzeii IFO1802 and S. arboricolus 2.3319 displayed a higher formic acid tolerance when compared to other strains in the study. Strain S. arboricolus 2.3319 was selected for further investigation due to its genetic variability among the Saccharomyces species as related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and availability of two sibling strains: S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 in the lab. The tolerance of S. arboricolus strains (2.3317, 2.3318 and 2.3319) to formic acid was further investigated by lab-scale fermentation analysis, and compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC2592. S. arboricolus 2.3319 demonstrated improved formic acid tolerance and a similar bioethanol synthesis capacity to S. cerevisiae NCYC2592, while S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 exhibited an overall inferior performance. Metabolite analysis indicated that S. arboricolus strain 2.3319 accumulated comparatively high concentrations of glycerol and glycogen, which may have contributed to its ability to tolerate high levels of formic acid.

  10. Screening of Non- Saccharomyces cerevisiae Strains for Tolerance to Formic Acid in Bioethanol Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Oshoma, Cyprian E.; Greetham, Darren; Louis, Edward J.; Smart, Katherine A.; Phister, Trevor G.; Powell, Chris; Du, Chenyu

    2015-01-01

    Formic acid is one of the major inhibitory compounds present in hydrolysates derived from lignocellulosic materials, the presence of which can significantly hamper the efficiency of converting available sugars into bioethanol. This study investigated the potential for screening formic acid tolerance in non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast strains, which could be used for the development of advanced generation bioethanol processes. Spot plate and phenotypic microarray methods were used to screen the formic acid tolerance of 7 non-Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeasts. S. kudriavzeii IFO1802 and S. arboricolus 2.3319 displayed a higher formic acid tolerance when compared to other strains in the study. Strain S. arboricolus 2.3319 was selected for further investigation due to its genetic variability among the Saccharomyces species as related to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and availability of two sibling strains: S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 in the lab. The tolerance of S. arboricolus strains (2.3317, 2.3318 and 2.3319) to formic acid was further investigated by lab-scale fermentation analysis, and compared with S. cerevisiae NCYC2592. S. arboricolus 2.3319 demonstrated improved formic acid tolerance and a similar bioethanol synthesis capacity to S. cerevisiae NCYC2592, while S. arboricolus 2.3317 and 2.3318 exhibited an overall inferior performance. Metabolite analysis indicated that S. arboricolus strain 2.3319 accumulated comparatively high concentrations of glycerol and glycogen, which may have contributed to its ability to tolerate high levels of formic acid. PMID:26284784

  11. A novel cold-adapted and highly salt-tolerant esterase from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3 from the sediment of a soda lake.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guozeng; Wang, Qiaohuang; Lin, Xianju; Ng, Tzi Bun; Yan, Renxiang; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2016-01-01

    A novel esterase gene (estSL3) was cloned from the Alkalibacterium sp. SL3, which was isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. The 636-bp full-length gene encodes a polypeptide of 211 amino acid residues that is closely related with putative GDSL family lipases from Alkalibacterium and Enterococcus. The gene was successfully expressed in E. coli, and the recombinant protein (rEstSL3) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. rEstSL3 exhibited the highest activity towards pNP-acetate and had no activity towards pNP-esters with acyl chains longer than C8. The enzyme was highly cold-adapted, showing an apparent temperature optimum of 30 °C and remaining approximately 70% of the activity at 0 °C. It was active and stable over the pH range from 7 to 10, and highly salt-tolerant up to 5 M NaCl. Moreover, rEstSL3 was strongly resistant to most tested metal ions, chemical reagents, detergents and organic solvents. Amino acid composition analysis indicated that EstSL3 had fewer proline residues, hydrogen bonds and salt bridges than mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, but more acidic amino acids and less hydrophobic amino acids when compared with other salt-tolerant esterases. The cold active, salt-tolerant and chemical-resistant properties make it a promising enzyme for basic research and industrial applications.

  12. A novel cold-adapted and highly salt-tolerant esterase from Alkalibacterium sp. SL3 from the sediment of a soda lake

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guozeng; Wang, Qiaohuang; Lin, Xianju; Bun Ng, Tzi; Yan, Renxiang; Lin, Juan; Ye, Xiuyun

    2016-01-01

    A novel esterase gene (estSL3) was cloned from the Alkalibacterium sp. SL3, which was isolated from the sediment of soda lake Dabusu. The 636-bp full-length gene encodes a polypeptide of 211 amino acid residues that is closely related with putative GDSL family lipases from Alkalibacterium and Enterococcus. The gene was successfully expressed in E. coli, and the recombinant protein (rEstSL3) was purified to electrophoretic homogeneity and characterized. rEstSL3 exhibited the highest activity towards pNP-acetate and had no activity towards pNP-esters with acyl chains longer than C8. The enzyme was highly cold-adapted, showing an apparent temperature optimum of 30 °C and remaining approximately 70% of the activity at 0 °C. It was active and stable over the pH range from 7 to 10, and highly salt-tolerant up to 5 M NaCl. Moreover, rEstSL3 was strongly resistant to most tested metal ions, chemical reagents, detergents and organic solvents. Amino acid composition analysis indicated that EstSL3 had fewer proline residues, hydrogen bonds and salt bridges than mesophilic and thermophilic counterparts, but more acidic amino acids and less hydrophobic amino acids when compared with other salt-tolerant esterases. The cold active, salt-tolerant and chemical-resistant properties make it a promising enzyme for basic research and industrial applications. PMID:26915906

  13. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite p... million Bean, mung, sprouts 0.2 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  14. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite p... million Bean, mung, sprouts 0.2 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  15. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite p... million Bean, mung, sprouts 0.2 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  16. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite p... million Bean, mung, sprouts 0.2 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  17. 40 CFR 180.202 - p-Chlorophenoxyacetic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... established for the combined residues of the plant regulator p-chlorophenoxyacetic acid and its metabolite p... million Bean, mung, sprouts 0.2 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances with...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1258 - Acetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... acetic acid when used as a preservative on post-harvest agricultural commodities intended for animal...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1225 - Decanoic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., breweries, wineries, beverage and food processing plants. ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... acid (up to 170 ppm per application) on food contact surfaces such as equipment, pipelines, tanks,...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1225 - Decanoic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., breweries, wineries, beverage and food processing plants. ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... acid (up to 170 ppm per application) on food contact surfaces such as equipment, pipelines, tanks,...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1225 - Decanoic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., breweries, wineries, beverage and food processing plants. ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... acid (up to 170 ppm per application) on food contact surfaces such as equipment, pipelines, tanks,...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1225 - Decanoic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., breweries, wineries, beverage and food processing plants. ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... acid (up to 170 ppm per application) on food contact surfaces such as equipment, pipelines, tanks,...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1225 - Decanoic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., breweries, wineries, beverage and food processing plants. ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... acid (up to 170 ppm per application) on food contact surfaces such as equipment, pipelines, tanks,...

  4. 40 CFR 180.289 - Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... commodity. Commodity Parts per million Expiration/Revocation Date Cotton, undelinted seed 0.7 None Cotton, hulls 0.9 None Fruit, citrus 0.35 12/31/12 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances...

  5. 40 CFR 180.289 - Methanearsonic acid; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... commodity. Commodity Parts per million Expiration/Revocation Date Cotton, undelinted seed 0.7 None Cotton, hulls 0.9 None Fruit, citrus 0.35 12/31/12 (b) Section 18 emergency exemptions. (c) Tolerances...

  6. Acid stress mediated adaptive divergence in ion channel function during embryogenesis in Rana arvalis

    PubMed Central

    Shu, Longfei; Laurila, Anssi; Räsänen, Katja

    2015-01-01

    Ion channels and pumps are responsible for ion flux in cells, and are key mechanisms mediating cellular function. Many environmental stressors, such as salinity and acidification, are known to severely disrupt ionic balance of organisms thereby challenging fitness of natural populations. Although ion channels can have several vital functions during early life-stages (e.g. embryogenesis), it is currently not known i) how developing embryos maintain proper intracellular conditions when exposed to environmental stress and ii) to what extent environmental stress can drive intra-specific divergence in ion channels. Here we studied the moor frog, Rana arvalis, from three divergent populations to investigate the role of different ion channels and pumps for embryonic survival under acid stress (pH 4 vs 7.5) and whether populations adapted to contrasting acidities differ in the relative role of different ion channel/pumps. We found that ion channels that mediate Ca2+ influx are essential for embryonic survival under acidic pH, and, intriguingly, that populations differ in calcium channel function. Our results suggest that adaptive divergence in embryonic acid stress tolerance of amphibians may in part be mediated by Ca2+ balance. We suggest that ion flux may mediate adaptive divergence of natural populations at early life-stages in the face of environmental stress. PMID:26381453

  7. Fatty acid composition of brown adipose tissue in genetically heat-tolerant FOK rats

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ohno, T.; Furuyama, F.; Kuroshima, A.

    The phospholipid fatty acid composition of brown adipose tissue (BAT) was examined in inbred heat-tolerant FOK rats and compared with that in conventional Wistar rats not previously exposed to heat. The FOK rats showed higher unsaturation states, as indicated by higher levels of polyunsaturated fatty acids and a higher unsaturation index and polyunsaturated fatty acids/saturated fatty acids ratio. This higher level of unsaturation was characterized by the higher amount of polyunsaturated fatty acids such as linoleic acid, arachidonic acid and docosahexaenoic acid. It may be concluded that the increased docosahexaenoic acid level in BAT phospholipids brings about the hyperplasia of BAT, causing an enhancement of its in vivo thermogernic activity as well as the systemic non-shivering thermogenesis observed in heat-tolerant FOK rats.

  8. Radiation induces acid tolerance of Clostridium tyrobutyricum and enhances bioproduction of butyric acid through a metabolic switch

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Butyric acid as a renewable resource has become an increasingly attractive alternative to petroleum-based fuels. Clostridium tyrobutyricum ATCC 25755T is well documented as a fermentation strain for the production of acids. However, it has been reported that butyrate inhibits its growth, and the accumulation of acetate also inhibits biomass synthesis, making production of butyric acid from conventional fermentation processes economically challenging. The present study aimed to identify whether irradiation of C. tyrobutyricum cells makes them more tolerant to butyric acid inhibition and increases the production of butyrate compared with wild type. Results In this work, the fermentation kinetics of C. tyrobutyricum cultures after being classically adapted for growth at 3.6, 7.2 and 10.8 g·L-1 equivalents were studied. The results showed that, regardless of the irradiation used, there was a gradual inhibition of cell growth at butyric acid concentrations above 10.8 g·L-1, with no growth observed at butyric acid concentrations above 3.6 g·L-1 for the wild-type strain during the first 54 h of fermentation. The sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis also showed significantly different expression levels of proteins with molecular mass around the wild-type and irradiated strains. The results showed that the proportion of proteins with molecular weights of 85 and 106 kDa was much higher for the irradiated strains. The specific growth rate decreased by 50% (from 0.42 to 0.21 h-1) and the final concentration of butyrate increased by 68% (from 22.7 to 33.4 g·L-1) for the strain irradiated at 114 AMeV and 40 Gy compared with the wild-type strains. Conclusions This study demonstrates that butyric acid production from glucose can be significantly improved and enhanced by using 12C6+ heavy ion-irradiated C. tyrobutyricum. The approach is economical, making it competitive compared with similar fermentation processes. It may prove useful as

  9. Identification of novel factors involved in colonization and acid tolerance of Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Merrell, D Scott; Hava, David L; Camilli, Andrew

    2002-03-01

    Despite over 100 years of study, the intestinal pathogen Vibrio cholerae still causes epidemic disease in areas of the world where there is poor sanitation. While cholera toxin and the toxin-coregulated pilus (TCP) are known to be essential for full virulence, the role that other factors play has remained ill-defined. Herein, we describe a large-scale signature-tagged mutagenesis (STM) screen utilizing 100 pools of 96 mutants each to identify factors involved in colonization of the infant mouse small intestine. A total of 164 mutants representing transposition events into 95 different open reading frames were shown to be recovered at greatly reduced numbers from the infant mouse model. Analysis of the sites of insertion revealed multiple independent mutations within the rfb gene cluster, needed for synthesis of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and the tcp gene cluster, needed for synthesis of the TCP. More importantly, in addition to these previously known colonization factors, we identified many genes whose activity in colonization was not previously appreciated. These can be divided into a number of functional groups, which include production of factors involved in metabolic activities, regulation of cellular processes, transport, adaptation to stress and unknown functions. In addition, we describe the reiterative use of STM, whereby colonization-defective mutants were assembled into virulence-attenuated pools (VAPs), which were used to begin to reveal roles that the identified virulence factors play in the infection process. Nine new factors were shown to be crucial for the V. cholerae acid tolerance response, which has previously been hypothesized to be important for epidemic spread of cholera. Competition assays of these nine acid tolerance response (ATR)-defective mutants revealed that mutations in gshB, hepA and recO result in a 1000-fold reduction in colonization. PMID:11952899

  10. 40 CFR 180.550 - Arsanilic acid [(4-aminophenyl) arsonic acid]; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... connection with the use of the pesticide under section 5 experimental use permit. The tolerance will...

  11. 40 CFR 180.550 - Arsanilic acid [(4-aminophenyl) arsonic acid]; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... connection with the use of the pesticide under section 5 experimental use permit. The tolerance will...

  12. 40 CFR 180.550 - Arsanilic acid [(4-aminophenyl) arsonic acid]; tolerances for residues.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Specific Tolerances... connection with the use of the pesticide under section 5 experimental use permit. The tolerance will...

  13. YfdW and YfdU are required for oxalate-induced acid tolerance in Escherichia coli K-12.

    PubMed

    Fontenot, Elise M; Ezelle, Karen E; Gabreski, Lauren N; Giglio, Eleanor R; McAfee, John M; Mills, Alexandria C; Qureshi, Maryam N; Salmon, Kristin M; Toyota, Cory G

    2013-04-01

    Escherichia coli has several mechanisms for surviving low-pH stress. We report that oxalic acid, a small-chain organic acid (SCOA), induces a moderate acid tolerance response (ATR) in two ways. Adaptation of E. coli K-12 at pH 5.5 with 50 mM oxalate and inclusion of 25 mM oxalate in pH 3.0 minimal challenge medium separately conferred protection, with 67% ± 7% and 87% ± 17% survival after 2 h, respectively. The combination of oxalate adaptation and oxalate supplementation in the challenge medium resulted in increased survival over adaptation or oxalate in the challenge medium alone. The enzymes YfdW, a formyl coenzyme A (CoA) transferase, and YfdU, an oxalyl-CoA decarboxylase, are required for the adaptation effect but not during challenge. Unlike other SCOAs, this oxalate ATR is not a part of the RpoS regulon but appears to be linked to the signal protein GadE. We theorize that this oxalate ATR could enhance the pathogenesis of virulent E. coli consumed with oxalate-containing foods like spinach.

  14. YfdW and YfdU Are Required for Oxalate-Induced Acid Tolerance in Escherichia coli K-12

    PubMed Central

    Fontenot, Elise M.; Ezelle, Karen E.; Gabreski, Lauren N.; Giglio, Eleanor R.; McAfee, John M.; Mills, Alexandria C.; Qureshi, Maryam N.; Salmon, Kristin M.

    2013-01-01

    Escherichia coli has several mechanisms for surviving low-pH stress. We report that oxalic acid, a small-chain organic acid (SCOA), induces a moderate acid tolerance response (ATR) in two ways. Adaptation of E. coli K-12 at pH 5.5 with 50 mM oxalate and inclusion of 25 mM oxalate in pH 3.0 minimal challenge medium separately conferred protection, with 67% ± 7% and 87% ± 17% survival after 2 h, respectively. The combination of oxalate adaptation and oxalate supplementation in the challenge medium resulted in increased survival over adaptation or oxalate in the challenge medium alone. The enzymes YfdW, a formyl coenzyme A (CoA) transferase, and YfdU, an oxalyl-CoA decarboxylase, are required for the adaptation effect but not during challenge. Unlike other SCOAs, this oxalate ATR is not a part of the RpoS regulon but appears to be linked to the signal protein GadE. We theorize that this oxalate ATR could enhance the pathogenesis of virulent E. coli consumed with oxalate-containing foods like spinach. PMID:23335415

  15. Mixed cropping has the potential to enhance flood tolerance of drought-adapted grain crops.

    PubMed

    Iijima, Morio; Awala, Simon K; Watanabe, Yoshinori; Kawato, Yoshimasa; Fujioka, Yuichiro; Yamane, Koji; Wada, Kaede C

    2016-03-15

    Recently, the occurrences of extreme flooding and drought, often in the same areas, have increased due to climate change. Wetland plant species are known to oxygenate their rhizospheres by releasing oxygen (O2) from their roots. We tested the hypothesis that wetland species could help upland species under flood conditions; that is, O2 released from the wetland crop roots would ameliorate rhizosphere O2-deficient stress and hence facilitate upland crop root function. Flooding tolerance of upland-adapted staple crops-pearl millet (Pennisetum glaucum) and sorghum (Sorghum bicolor) mix-cropped with rice (Oryza spp.) was investigated in glasshouse and laboratory. We found a phenomenon that strengthens the flood tolerance of upland crops when two species-one wetland and one drought tolerant-were grown using the mixed cropping technique that results in close tangling of their root systems. This technique improved the photosynthetic and transpiration rates of upland crops subjected to flood stress (O2-deficient nutrient culture). Shoot relative growth rates during the flooding period (24 days) tended to be higher under mixed cropping compared with single cropping. Radial oxygen loss from the wetland crop roots might be contributed to the phenomenon observed. Mixed cropping of wet and dryland crops is a new concept that has the potential to overcome flood stress under variable environmental conditions. PMID:26803216

  16. Adaptability and stability of genotypes of sweet sorghum by GGEBiplot and Toler methods.

    PubMed

    de Figueiredo, U J; Nunes, J A R; da C Parrella, R A; Souza, E D; da Silva, A R; Emygdio, B M; Machado, J R A; Tardin, F D

    2015-01-01

    Sweet sorghum has considerable potential for ethanol and energy production. The crop is adaptable and can be grown under a wide range of cultivation conditions in marginal areas; however, studies of phenotypic stability are lacking under tropical conditions. Various methods can be used to assess the stability of the crop. Some of these methods generate the same basic information, whereas others provide additional information on genotype x environment (G x E) interactions and/or a description of the genotypes and environments. In this study, we evaluated the complementarity of two methods, GGEBiplot and Toler, with the aim of achieving more detailed information on G x E interactions and their implications for selection of sweet sorghum genotypes. We used data from 25 sorghum genotypes grown in different environments and evaluated the following traits: flowering (FLOW), green mass yield (GMY), total soluble solids (TSS), and tons of Brix per hectare (TBH). Significant G x E interactions were found for all traits. The most stable genotypes identified with the GGEBiplot method were CMSXS643 for FLOW, CMSXS644 and CMSXS647 for GMY, CMSXS646 and CMSXS637 for TSS, and BRS511 and CMSXSS647 for TBH. Especially for TBH, the genotype BRS511 was classified as doubly desirable by the Toler method; however, unlike the result of the GGEBiplot method, the genotype CMSXS647 was also found to be doubly undesirable. The two analytical methods were complementary and enabled a more reliable identification of adapted and stable genotypes.

  17. Adaptive tolerance to a pathogenic fungus drives major histocompatibility complex evolution in natural amphibian populations

    PubMed Central

    Savage, Anna E.; Zamudio, Kelly R.

    2016-01-01

    Amphibians have been affected globally by the disease chytridiomycosis, caused by the fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), and we are just now beginning to understand how immunogenetic variability contributes to disease susceptibility. Lineages of an expressed major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II locus involved in acquired immunity are associated with chytridiomycosis susceptibility in controlled laboratory challenge assays. Here, we extend these findings to natural populations that vary both in exposure and response to Bd. We find that MHC alleles and supertypes associated with Bd survival in the field show a molecular signal of positive selection, while those associated with susceptibility do not, supporting the hypothesis that heritable Bd tolerance is rapidly evolving. We compare MHC supertypes to neutral loci to demonstrate where selection versus demography is shaping MHC variability. One population with Bd tolerance in nature shows a significant signal of directional selection for the same allele (allele Q) that was significantly associated with survival in an earlier laboratory study. Our findings indicate that selective pressure for Bd survival drives rapid immunogenetic adaptation in some natural populations, despite differences in environment and demography. Our field-based analysis of immunogenetic variation confirms that natural amphibian populations have the evolutionary potential to adapt to chytridiomycosis. PMID:27009220

  18. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    PubMed Central

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves II, H. James

    2015-01-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or “chemistry space.” Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set. PMID:25802223

  19. Extraordinarily Adaptive Properties of the Genetically Encoded Amino Acids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ilardo, Melissa; Meringer, Markus; Freeland, Stephen; Rasulev, Bakhtiyor; Cleaves, H. James, II

    2015-03-01

    Using novel advances in computational chemistry, we demonstrate that the set of 20 genetically encoded amino acids, used nearly universally to construct all coded terrestrial proteins, has been highly influenced by natural selection. We defined an adaptive set of amino acids as one whose members thoroughly cover relevant physico-chemical properties, or ``chemistry space.'' Using this metric, we compared the encoded amino acid alphabet to random sets of amino acids. These random sets were drawn from a computationally generated compound library containing 1913 alternative amino acids that lie within the molecular weight range of the encoded amino acids. Sets that cover chemistry space better than the genetically encoded alphabet are extremely rare and energetically costly. Further analysis of more adaptive sets reveals common features and anomalies, and we explore their implications for synthetic biology. We present these computations as evidence that the set of 20 amino acids found within the standard genetic code is the result of considerable natural selection. The amino acids used for constructing coded proteins may represent a largely global optimum, such that any aqueous biochemistry would use a very similar set.

  20. Host adaptation and unexpected symbiont partners enable reef-building corals to tolerate extreme temperatures.

    PubMed

    Howells, Emily J; Abrego, David; Meyer, Eli; Kirk, Nathan L; Burt, John A

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the potential for coral adaptation to warming seas is complicated by interactions between symbiotic partners that define stress responses and the difficulties of tracking selection in natural populations. To overcome these challenges, we characterized the contribution of both animal host and symbiotic algae to thermal tolerance in corals that have already experienced considerable warming on par with end-of-century projections for most coral reefs. Thermal responses in Platygyra daedalea corals from the hot Persian Gulf where summer temperatures reach 36°C were compared with conspecifics from the milder Sea of Oman. Persian Gulf corals had higher rates of survival at elevated temperatures (33 and 36°C) in both the nonsymbiotic larval stage (32-49% higher) and the symbiotic adult life stage (51% higher). Additionally, Persian Gulf hosts had fixed greater potential to mitigate oxidative stress (31-49% higher) and their Symbiodinium partners had better retention of photosynthetic performance under elevated temperature (up to 161% higher). Superior thermal tolerance of Persian Gulf vs. Sea of Oman corals was maintained after 6-month acclimatization to a common ambient environment and was underpinned by genetic divergence in both the coral host and symbiotic algae. In P. daedalea host samples, genomewide SNP variation clustered into two discrete groups corresponding with Persian Gulf and Sea of Oman sites. Symbiodinium within host tissues predominantly belonged to ITS2 rDNA type C3 in the Persian Gulf and type D1a in the Sea of Oman contradicting patterns of Symbiodinium thermal tolerance from other regions. Our findings provide evidence that genetic adaptation of both host and Symbiodinium has enabled corals to cope with extreme temperatures in the Persian Gulf. Thus, the persistence of coral populations under continued warming will likely be determined by evolutionary rates in both, rather than single, symbiotic partners. PMID:26864257

  1. Comparative proteomic analysis of differentially expressed proteins in β-aminobutyric acid enhanced Arabidopsis thaliana tolerance to simulated acid rain.

    PubMed

    Liu, Tingwu; Jiang, Xinwu; Shi, Wuliang; Chen, Juan; Pei, Zhenming; Zheng, Hailei

    2011-05-01

    Acid rain is a worldwide environmental issue that has seriously destroyed forest ecosystems. As a highly effective and broad-spectrum plant resistance-inducing agent, β-aminobutyric acid could elevate the tolerance of Arabidopsis when subjected to simulated acid rain. Using comparative proteomic strategies, we analyzed 203 significantly varied proteins of which 175 proteins were identified responding to β-aminobutyric acid in the absence and presence of simulated acid rain. They could be divided into ten groups according to their biological functions. Among them, the majority was cell rescue, development and defense-related proteins, followed by transcription, protein synthesis, folding, modification and destination-associated proteins. Our conclusion is β-aminobutyric acid can lead to a large-scale primary metabolism change and simultaneously activate antioxidant system and salicylic acid, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid signaling pathways. In addition, β-aminobutyric acid can reinforce physical barriers to defend simulated acid rain stress.

  2. Inverse metabolic engineering based on transient acclimation of yeast improves acid-containing xylose fermentation and tolerance to formic and acetic acids.

    PubMed

    Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Sakamoto, Takatoshi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-01-01

    Improving the production of ethanol from xylose is an important goal in metabolic engineering of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Furthermore, S. cerevisiae must produce ethanol in the presence of weak acids (formate and acetate) generated during pre-treatment of lignocellulosic biomass. In this study, weak acid-containing xylose fermentation was significantly improved using cells that were acclimated to the weak acids during pre-cultivation. Transcriptome analyses showed that levels of transcripts for transcriptional/translational machinery-related genes (RTC3 and ANB1) were enhanced by formate and acetate acclimation. Recombinant yeast strains overexpressing RTC3 and ANB1 demonstrated improved ethanol production from xylose in the presence of the weak acids, along with improved tolerance to the acids. Novel metabolic engineering strategy based on the combination of short-term acclimation and system-wide analysis was developed, which can develop stress-tolerant strains in a short period of time, although conventional evolutionary engineering approach has required long periods of time to isolate inhibitor-adapted strains.

  3. Adaptation of sweeteners in water and in tannic acid solutions.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, S S; Pecore, S D; Booth, B J; Losee, M L; Carr, B T; Sattely-Miller, E; Graham, B G; Warwick, Z S

    1994-03-01

    Repeated exposure to a tastant often leads to a decrease in magnitude of the perceived intensity; this phenomenon is termed adaptation. The purpose of this study was to determine the degree of adaptation of the sweet response for a variety of sweeteners in water and in the presence of two levels of tannic acid. Sweetness intensity ratings were given by a trained panel for 14 sweeteners: three sugars (fructose, glucose, sucrose), two polyhydric alcohols (mannitol, sorbitol), two terpenoid glycosides (rebaudioside-A, stevioside), two dipeptide derivatives (alitame, aspartame), one sulfamate (sodium cyclamate), one protein (thaumatin), two N-sulfonyl amides (acesulfame-K, sodium saccharin), and one dihydrochalcone (neohesperidin dihydrochalcone). Panelists were given four isointense concentrations of each sweetener by itself and in the presence of two concentrations of tannic acid. Each sweetener concentration was tasted and rated four consecutive times with a 30 s interval between each taste and a 2 min interval between each concentration. Within a taste session, a series of concentrations of a given sweetener was presented in ascending order of magnitude. Adaptation was calculated as the decrease in intensity from the first to the fourth sample. The greatest adaptation in water solutions was found for acesulfame-K, Na saccharin, rebaudioside-A, and stevioside. This was followed by the dipeptide sweeteners, alitame and aspartame. The least adaptation occurred with the sugars, polyhydric alcohols, and neohesperidin dihydrochalcone. Adaptation was greater in tannic acid solutions than in water for six sweeteners. Adaptation of sweet taste may result from the desensitization of sweetener receptors analogous to the homologous desensitization found in the beta adrenergic system.

  4. Mechanism of aluminum tolerance in snapbeans : root exudation of citric Acid.

    PubMed

    Miyasaka, S C; Buta, J G; Howell, R K; Foy, C D

    1991-07-01

    One proposed mechanism of aluminum (Al) tolerance in plants is the release of an Al-chelating compound into the rhizosphere. In this experiment, two cultivars of snapbeans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. "Romano" and "Dade") that differ in Al tolerance were grown hydroponically with and without Al under aseptic conditions. After growth in nutrient solutions for 8 days, aliphatic and phenolic organic acids were analyzed in the culture solutions with an ion chromatograph and a high pressure liquid chromatograph. The tolerant snapbean, "Dade", when exposed to Al, exuded citric acid into the rhizosphere in a concentration that was 70 times as great as that of "Dade" grown without Al, and 10 times as great as that of "Romano" grown with or without Al. The sensitive cultivar, "Romano", exuded only slightly more citric acid into the growing medium under Al-stress, compared to nonstressed conditions. Citric acid is known to chelate Al strongly and to reverse its phytotoxic effects. Also, citric acid has been shown previously to enhance the availability of phosphorus (P) from insoluble Al phosphates. Thus, one mechanism of Al-tolerance in snapbeans appears to be the exudation of citric acid into the rhizosphere, induced either by toxic levels of Al or by low P due to the precipitation of insoluble Al phosphates. Our experiment was not able to distinguish between these two factors; however, tolerance to both primary and secondary Al-stress injuries are important for plants growing in Al-toxic soils. PMID:16668249

  5. Mechanism of aluminum tolerance in snapbeans. Root exudation of citric acid

    SciTech Connect

    Miyasaka, S.C. ); Buta, J.G.; Howell, R.K.; Foy, C.D. )

    1991-07-01

    One proposed mechanism of aluminum (Al) tolerance in plants is the release of an Al-chelating compound into the rhizosphere. In this experiment, two cultivars of snapbeans (Phaseolus vulgaris L. Romano and Dade) that differ in Al tolerance were grown hydroponically with and without Al under aseptic conditions. After growth in nutrient solutions for 8 days, aliphatic and phenolic organic acids were analyzed in the culture solutions with an ion chromatograph and a high pressure liquid chromatograph. The tolerant snapbean, Dade when exposed to Al, exuded citric acid into the rhizosphere in a concentration that was 70 times as great as that of Dade grown without Al, and 10 times as great as that of Romano grown without Al, and 10 times as great as that of Romano, exuded only slightly more citric acid into the growing medium under Al-stress, compared to nonstressed conditions. Citric acid is known to chelate Al strongly and to reverse its phytotoxic effects. Also, citric acid has been shown previously to enhance the availability of phosphorus (P) from insoluble Al phosphates, Thus, one mechanism of Al-tolerance in snapbeans appears to be the exudation of citric acid into the rhizosphere, induced either by toxic levels of Al or by low P due to the precipitation of insoluble Al phosphates. The experiment was not able to distinguish between these two factors; however, tolerance to both primary and secondary Al-stress injuries are important for plants growing in Al-toxic soils.

  6. 40 CFR 180.1258 - Acetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... acetic acid when used as a preservative on post-harvest agricultural commodities intended for animal feed... of acetic acid in or on all food crops resulting from unintentional spray and drift to...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1258 - Acetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD... acetic acid when used as a preservative on post-harvest agricultural commodities intended for animal feed... of acetic acid in or on all food crops resulting from unintentional spray and drift to...

  8. Fault-tolerant nonlinear adaptive flight control using sliding mode online learning.

    PubMed

    Krüger, Thomas; Schnetter, Philipp; Placzek, Robin; Vörsmann, Peter

    2012-08-01

    An expanded nonlinear model inversion flight control strategy using sliding mode online learning for neural networks is presented. The proposed control strategy is implemented for a small unmanned aircraft system (UAS). This class of aircraft is very susceptible towards nonlinearities like atmospheric turbulence, model uncertainties and of course system failures. Therefore, these systems mark a sensible testbed to evaluate fault-tolerant, adaptive flight control strategies. Within this work the concept of feedback linearization is combined with feed forward neural networks to compensate for inversion errors and other nonlinear effects. Backpropagation-based adaption laws of the network weights are used for online training. Within these adaption laws the standard gradient descent backpropagation algorithm is augmented with the concept of sliding mode control (SMC). Implemented as a learning algorithm, this nonlinear control strategy treats the neural network as a controlled system and allows a stable, dynamic calculation of the learning rates. While considering the system's stability, this robust online learning method therefore offers a higher speed of convergence, especially in the presence of external disturbances. The SMC-based flight controller is tested and compared with the standard gradient descent backpropagation algorithm in the presence of system failures.

  9. An Autonomous Self-Aware and Adaptive Fault Tolerant Routing Technique for Wireless Sensor Networks

    PubMed Central

    Abba, Sani; Lee, Jeong-A

    2015-01-01

    We propose an autonomous self-aware and adaptive fault-tolerant routing technique (ASAART) for wireless sensor networks. We address the limitations of self-healing routing (SHR) and self-selective routing (SSR) techniques for routing sensor data. We also examine the integration of autonomic self-aware and adaptive fault detection and resiliency techniques for route formation and route repair to provide resilience to errors and failures. We achieved this by using a combined continuous and slotted prioritized transmission back-off delay to obtain local and global network state information, as well as multiple random functions for attaining faster routing convergence and reliable route repair despite transient and permanent node failure rates and efficient adaptation to instantaneous network topology changes. The results of simulations based on a comparison of the ASAART with the SHR and SSR protocols for five different simulated scenarios in the presence of transient and permanent node failure rates exhibit a greater resiliency to errors and failure and better routing performance in terms of the number of successfully delivered network packets, end-to-end delay, delivered MAC layer packets, packet error rate, as well as efficient energy conservation in a highly congested, faulty, and scalable sensor network. PMID:26295236

  10. Altered macrophage arachidonic acid metabolism induced by endotoxin tolerance: characterization and mechanisms

    SciTech Connect

    Rogers, T.S.

    1986-01-01

    Altered macrophage arachidonic acid (AA) metabolism may play a role in endotoxic shock and the phenomenon of endotoxin tolerance induced by repeated injections of endotoxin. Studies were initiated to characterize both lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase metabolite formation by endotoxin tolerant and non-tolerant macrophages in response to 4 different stimuli, i.e., endotoxin, glucan, zymosan, and the calcium ionophore A23187. In contrast to previous reports of decreased prostaglandin synthesis by tolerant macrophages, A23187-stimulated immunoreactive (i) leukotriene (LT) C/sub 4/D/sub 4/ and prostaglandin (PG) E/sub 2/ production by tolerant cells was greater than that by non-tolerant controls (p <0.001). However, A23187-stimulated i6-keto PGF/sub 1a/ levels were lower in tolerant macrophages compared to controls (P < 0.05). iL TC/sub 4/D/sub 4/ production was not significantly stimulated by endotoxin or glucan, but was stimulated by zymosan in non-tolerant cells. Synthesis of iLTB/sub 4/ by control macrophages was stimulated by endotoxin (p <0.01). The effect of tolerance on factors that affect AA release was investigated by measuring /sup 14/C-AA incorporation and release and phospholipase A/sub 2/ activity

  11. Naturally evolved enhanced Cd tolerance of Dianthus carthusianorum L. is not related to accumulation of thiol peptides and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Małgorzata; Dresler, Sławomir; Plak, Andrzej; Tukiendorf, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Two contrasting ecotypes of Dianthus carthusianorum L., metallicolous (M) and nonmetallicolous (NM), were cultivated in hydroponics at 0-50 μM Cd for 14 days to compare their Cd accumulation, sensitivity and tolerance mechanisms. While both ecotypes contained similar concentrations of Cd in the shoots and roots, the M ecotype was more Cd-tolerant (as measured by fresh weight production and root and leaf viability). Both ecotypes accumulated phytochelatins (PCs) in response to Cd with a higher amount thereof found in the NM ecotype. Concentrations of PCs remained unchanged with increasing Cd concentrations in the root tissues, but their content in the shoots increased. The addition of L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) diminished glutathione (GSH) accumulation and arrested PC production, which increased the sensitivity to Cd of the NM, but not M ecotype. Organic acids (malate and citrate) as well as proline accumulation did not change significantly after Cd exposition and was at the same level in both ecotypes. The enhanced Cd tolerance of the M ecotype of D. carthusianorum cannot be explained in terms of restricted Cd uptake and differential production of PCs, organic acids or proline; some other mechanisms must be involved in its adaptation to the high Cd content in the environment. PMID:25510617

  12. Naturally evolved enhanced Cd tolerance of Dianthus carthusianorum L. is not related to accumulation of thiol peptides and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Wójcik, Małgorzata; Dresler, Sławomir; Plak, Andrzej; Tukiendorf, Anna

    2015-05-01

    Two contrasting ecotypes of Dianthus carthusianorum L., metallicolous (M) and nonmetallicolous (NM), were cultivated in hydroponics at 0-50 μM Cd for 14 days to compare their Cd accumulation, sensitivity and tolerance mechanisms. While both ecotypes contained similar concentrations of Cd in the shoots and roots, the M ecotype was more Cd-tolerant (as measured by fresh weight production and root and leaf viability). Both ecotypes accumulated phytochelatins (PCs) in response to Cd with a higher amount thereof found in the NM ecotype. Concentrations of PCs remained unchanged with increasing Cd concentrations in the root tissues, but their content in the shoots increased. The addition of L-buthionine-sulfoximine (BSO) diminished glutathione (GSH) accumulation and arrested PC production, which increased the sensitivity to Cd of the NM, but not M ecotype. Organic acids (malate and citrate) as well as proline accumulation did not change significantly after Cd exposition and was at the same level in both ecotypes. The enhanced Cd tolerance of the M ecotype of D. carthusianorum cannot be explained in terms of restricted Cd uptake and differential production of PCs, organic acids or proline; some other mechanisms must be involved in its adaptation to the high Cd content in the environment.

  13. Acid-tolerant microaerophilic Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria promote Fe(III)-accumulation in a fen.

    PubMed

    Lüdecke, Claudia; Reiche, Marco; Eusterhues, Karin; Nietzsche, Sandor; Küsel, Kirsten

    2010-10-01

    The ecological importance of Fe(II)-oxidizing bacteria (FeOB) at circumneutral pH is often masked in the presence of O(2) where rapid chemical oxidation of Fe(II) predominates. This study addresses the abundance, diversity and activity of microaerophilic FeOB in an acidic fen (pH ∼ 5) located in northern Bavaria, Germany. Mean O(2) penetration depth reached 16 cm where the highest dissolved Fe(II) concentrations (up to 140 µM) were present in soil water. Acid-tolerant FeOB cultivated in gradient tubes were most abundant (10(6) cells g(-1) peat) at the 10-20 cm depth interval. A stable enrichment culture was active at up to 29% O(2) saturation and Fe(III) accumulated 1.6 times faster than in abiotic controls. An acid-tolerant, microaerophilic isolate (strain CL21) was obtained which was closely related to the neutrophilic, lithoautotrophic FeOB Sideroxydans lithotrophicus strain LD-1. CL21 oxidized Fe(II) between pH 4 and 6.0, and produced nanoscale-goethites with a clearly lower mean coherence length (7 nm) perpendicular to the (110) plane than those formed abiotically (10 nm). Our results suggest that an acid-tolerant population of FeOB is thriving at redox interfaces formed by diffusion-limited O(2) transport in acidic peatlands. Furthermore, this well-adapted population is successfully competing with chemical oxidation and thereby playing an important role in the microbial iron cycle.

  14. System-level understanding of the potential acid-tolerance components of Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 under extreme acid stress.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shoushuai; Yang, Hailin; Wang, Wu

    2015-09-01

    In previous study, two extremely acidophilic strains Acidithiobacillus thiooxidans ZJJN-3 (collection site: bioleaching leachate) and ZJJN-5 (collection site: bioleaching wastewater) were isolated from a typical industrial bio-heap in China. Here, we unraveled the potential acid-tolerance components of ZJJN-3 by comparing the physiological differences with ZJJN-5 under different acid stresses. The parameters used for comparison included intracellular pH (pHin), capsule morphology, fatty acid composition of cell membrane, transcription of key molecular chaperones, H(+)-ATPase activities and NAD(+)/NADH ratio. It was indicated that the acid-tolerance of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 was systematically regulated. Capsule first thickened and then shed off along with increased acid stress. Cell membrane maintained the intracellular stability by up-regulating the proportion of unsaturated fatty acid and cyclopropane fatty acids. Meanwhile, the transcription of key repair molecular chaperones (GrpE-DnaK-DnaJ) was up-regulated by 2.2-3.5 folds for ensuring the proper folding of peptide. Moreover, low pHin promoted ZJJN-3 to biosynthesize more H(+)-ATPase for pumping H(+) out of cells. Furthermore, the NAD(+)/NADH ratio increased due to the decreased H(+) concentration. Based on the above physiological analysis, the potential acid-tolerance components of A. thiooxidans ZJJN-3 were first proposed and it would be useful for better understanding how these extremophiles responded to the high acid stress.

  15. Physiological basis for high CO2 tolerance in marine ectothermic animals: pre-adaptation through lifestyle and ontogeny?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzner, F.; Gutowska, M. A.; Langenbuch, M.; Dupont, S.; Lucassen, M.; Thorndyke, M. C.; Bleich, M.; Pörtner, H.-O.

    2009-05-01

    compensation of pH disturbances during exposure to elevated environmental pCO2. Compensation of extracellular acid-base status in turn may be extremely important in avoiding metabolic depression. So far, maintained "performance" at higher seawater pCO2 (>0.3 to 0.6 kPa) has only been observed in adults/juveniles of active, high metabolic species with a powerful ion regulatory apparatus. However, while some of these taxa are adapted to cope with elevated pCO2 during their regular embryonic development, unicellular gametes, which lack specialized ion-regulatory epithelia, may be the true bottleneck for ecological success - even of the more tolerant taxa.

  16. An Adaptive Fault-Tolerance Agent Running on Situation-Aware Environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Soongohn; Ko, Eungnam

    The focus of situation-aware ubiquitous computing has increased lately. An example of situation-aware applications is a multimedia education system. Since ubiquitous applications need situation-aware middleware services and computing environment keeps changing as the applications change, it is challenging to detect errors and recover them in order to provide seamless services and avoid a single point of failure. This paper proposes an Adaptive Fault Tolerance Agent (AFTA) in situation-aware middleware framework and presents its simulation model of AFT-based agents. The strong point of this system is to detect and recover error automatically in case that the session's process comes to an end through a software error.

  17. Genome-wide identification of Saccharomyces cerevisiae genes required for tolerance to acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Acetic acid is a byproduct of Saccharomyces cerevisiae alcoholic fermentation. Together with high concentrations of ethanol and other toxic metabolites, acetic acid may contribute to fermentation arrest and reduced ethanol productivity. This weak acid is also a present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates, a highly interesting non-feedstock substrate in industrial biotechnology. Therefore, the better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying S. cerevisiae tolerance to acetic acid is essential for the rational selection of optimal fermentation conditions and the engineering of more robust industrial strains to be used in processes in which yeast is explored as cell factory. Results The yeast genes conferring protection against acetic acid were identified in this study at a genome-wide scale, based on the screening of the EUROSCARF haploid mutant collection for susceptibility phenotypes to this weak acid (concentrations in the range 70-110 mM, at pH 4.5). Approximately 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid were identified. Clustering of these acetic acid-resistance genes based on their biological function indicated an enrichment of genes involved in transcription, internal pH homeostasis, carbohydrate metabolism, cell wall assembly, biogenesis of mitochondria, ribosome and vacuole, and in the sensing, signalling and uptake of various nutrients in particular iron, potassium, glucose and amino acids. A correlation between increased resistance to acetic acid and the level of potassium in the growth medium was found. The activation of the Snf1p signalling pathway, involved in yeast response to glucose starvation, is demonstrated to occur in response to acetic acid stress but no evidence was obtained supporting the acetic acid-induced inhibition of glucose uptake. Conclusions Approximately 490 of the 650 determinants of tolerance to acetic acid identified in this work are implicated, for the first time, in tolerance to this weak acid. These are

  18. 40 CFR 180.1068 - C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1068 C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. C12-C18 fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated) potassium salts...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1068 - C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 25 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1068 C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. C12-C18 fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated) potassium salts...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1068 - C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1068 C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. C12-C18 fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated) potassium salts...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1068 - C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 24 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1068 C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. C12-C18 fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated) potassium salts...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1068 - C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 23 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts... RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions From Tolerances § 180.1068 C12-C18 fatty acid potassium salts; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. C12-C18 fatty acids (saturated and unsaturated) potassium salts...

  3. Toxicity and tolerance of aluminum in plants: tailoring plants to suit to acid soils.

    PubMed

    Sade, Hemalatha; Meriga, Balaji; Surapu, Varalakshmi; Gadi, Jogeswar; Sunita, M S L; Suravajhala, Prashanth; Kavi Kishor, P B

    2016-04-01

    Aluminum (Al) stress is one of the serious limiting factors in plant productivity in acidic soils, which constitute about 50 % of the world's potentially arable lands and causes anywhere between 25 and 80 % of yield losses depending upon the species. The mechanism of Al toxicity and tolerance has been examined in plants, which is vital for crop improvement and enhanced food production in the future. Two mechanisms that facilitate Al tolerance in plants are Al exclusion from the roots and the ability to tolerate Al in the symplast or both. Although efforts have been made to unravel Al-resistant factors, many aspects remain unclear. Certain gene families such as MATE, ALMT, ASR, and ABC transporters have been implicated in some plants for resistance to Al which would enhance the opportunities for creating crop plants suitable to grow in acidic soils. Though QTLs have been identified related to Al-tolerance, no crop plant that is tolerant to Al has been evolved so far using breeding or molecular approaches. The remarkable changes that plants experience at the physiological, biochemical and molecular level under Al stress, the vast array of genes involved in Al toxicity-tolerance, the underlying signaling events and the holistic image of the molecular regulation, and the possibility of creating transgenics for Al tolerance are discussed in this review. PMID:26796895

  4. Priming effect of abscisic acid on alkaline stress tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-Xing; Lv, Bing-Sheng; Wang, Ming-Ming; Ma, Hong-Yuan; Yang, Hao-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Liang, Zheng-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Saline-alkaline stress is characterized by high salinity and high alkalinity (high pH); alkaline stress has been shown to be the primary factor inhibiting rice seedling growth. In this study, we investigated the potential priming effect of abscisic acid (ABA) on tolerance of rice seedlings to alkaline stress simulated by Na2CO3. Seedlings were pretreated with ABA at concentrations of 0 (control), 10, and 50 μM by root-drench for 24 h and then transferred to a Na2CO3 solution that did not contain ABA. Compared to control treatment, pretreatment with ABA substantially improved the survival rate of rice seedlings and increased biomass accumulation after 7 days under the alkaline condition. ABA application at 10 μM also alleviated the inhibitory effects of alkaline stress on the total root length and root surface area. Physiologically, ABA increased relative water content (RWC) and decreased cell membrane injury degree (MI) and Na(+)/K(+) ratios. In contrast, fluridone (an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor) decreased the RWC and increased MI in shoots under the alkaline conditions. These data suggest that ABA has a potent priming effect on the adaptive response to alkaline stress in rice and may be useful for improving rice growth in saline-alkaline paddy fields.

  5. Priming effect of abscisic acid on alkaline stress tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Wei, Li-Xing; Lv, Bing-Sheng; Wang, Ming-Ming; Ma, Hong-Yuan; Yang, Hao-Yu; Liu, Xiao-Long; Jiang, Chang-Jie; Liang, Zheng-Wei

    2015-05-01

    Saline-alkaline stress is characterized by high salinity and high alkalinity (high pH); alkaline stress has been shown to be the primary factor inhibiting rice seedling growth. In this study, we investigated the potential priming effect of abscisic acid (ABA) on tolerance of rice seedlings to alkaline stress simulated by Na2CO3. Seedlings were pretreated with ABA at concentrations of 0 (control), 10, and 50 μM by root-drench for 24 h and then transferred to a Na2CO3 solution that did not contain ABA. Compared to control treatment, pretreatment with ABA substantially improved the survival rate of rice seedlings and increased biomass accumulation after 7 days under the alkaline condition. ABA application at 10 μM also alleviated the inhibitory effects of alkaline stress on the total root length and root surface area. Physiologically, ABA increased relative water content (RWC) and decreased cell membrane injury degree (MI) and Na(+)/K(+) ratios. In contrast, fluridone (an ABA biosynthesis inhibitor) decreased the RWC and increased MI in shoots under the alkaline conditions. These data suggest that ABA has a potent priming effect on the adaptive response to alkaline stress in rice and may be useful for improving rice growth in saline-alkaline paddy fields. PMID:25780993

  6. Experimental Evolution of UV-C Radiation Tolerance: Emergence of Adaptive and Non-Adaptive Traits in Escherichia coli Under Differing Flux Regimes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moffet, A.; Okansinski, A.; Sloan, C.; Grace, J. M.; Paulino-Lima, I. G.; Gentry, D.; Rothschild, L. J.; Camps, M.

    2014-12-01

    High-energy ultraviolet (UV-C) radiation is a significant challenge to life in environments such as high altitude areas, the early Earth, the Martian surface, and space. As UV-C exposure is both a selection pressure and a mutagen, adaptation dynamics in such environments include a high rate of change in both tolerance-related and non-tolerance-related genes, as well changes in linkages between the resulting traits. Determining the relationship between the intensity and duration of the UV-C exposure, mutation rate, and emergence of UV-C resistance will inform our understanding of both the emergence of radiation-related extremophily in natural environments and the optimal strategies for generating artificial extremophiles. In this study, we iteratively exposed an Escherichia colistrain to UV-C radiation of two different fluxes, 3.3 J/m^2/s for 6 seconds and 0.5 J/m^2/s for 40 seconds, with the same overall fluence of 20 J/m^2. After each iteration, cells from each exposure regime were assayed for increased UV-C tolerance as an adaptive trait. The exposed cells carried a plasmid bearing a TEM beta-lactamase gene, which in the absence of antibiotic treatment is a neutral reporter for mutagenesis. Sequencing of this gene allowed us to determine the baseline mutation frequency for each flux. As an additional readout for adaptation, the presence of extended-spectrum beta-lactamase mutations was tested by plating UV-exposed cultures in cefotaxime plates. We observed an increase of approximately one-million-fold in UV-C tolerance over seven iterations; no significant difference between the two fluxes was found. Future work will focus on identifying the genomic changes responsible for the change in UV-C tolerance; determining the mechanisms of the emerged UV-C tolerance; and performing competition experiments between the iteration strains to quantify fitness tradeoffs resulting from UV-C adaptation.

  7. 75 FR 71556 - Polyoxyalkylated Glycerol Fatty Acid Esters; Tolerance Exemption

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-11-24

    ... unsaturated, fatty acids containing up to 15% water by weight reacted with a minimum of three moles of either... unsaturated, fatty acids containing up to 15% water by weight reacted with a minimum of three moles of either...-5805. II. Background and Statutory Findings In the Federal Register of June 8, 2010 (75 FR 32463)...

  8. Seasonal changes in phospholipid class and class-specific fatty acid composition associated with the onset of freeze tolerance in third-instar larvae of Eurosta solidaginis.

    PubMed

    Pruitt, Nancy L; Lu, Changrui

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Third-instar larvae of the goldenrod gall fly Eurosta solidaginis (Diptera: Tephritidae) are freeze tolerant in winter. During freezing, cell membranes must compensate for both low temperature and partial dehydration. Documented adaptations to low temperature include increased fatty acid unsaturation and enrichment of cone-shaped phosphatides, both of which inhibit formation of gel phase lipid domains. These changes appear inconsistent with adaptations known to prevent formation of the hexagonal II phospholipid phase at low water activities, namely, increased fatty acid saturation and increased proportions of cylindrical phosphatides. To address these inconsistencies, changes in E. solidaginis phospholipid composition and class-specific fatty acid composition were studied from August to November 2002. Cylindrical phosphatides, mostly phosphatidylcholine (PC), increased transiently and significantly, from 35% of the total to nearly 50%, during the transition from freeze susceptible to freeze tolerant. Monoenes in both PC and phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) represented 35% of total fatty acids in freeze-susceptible larvae but accumulated in PC to 48% and in PE to 42% in freeze-tolerant larvae. Moreover, PC accumulated the most unsaturated acid in this species, 18:3(n-3), to a significantly greater degree than PE. This combination of changes may represent a finely tailored response to both low temperatures and freeze-induced dehydration.

  9. Tolerance to LSD and DOB induced shaking behaviour: differential adaptations of frontocortical 5-HT(2A) and glutamate receptor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Buchborn, Tobias; Schröder, Helmut; Dieterich, Daniela C; Grecksch, Gisela; Höllt, Volker

    2015-03-15

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethoxy-bromoamphetamine (DOB), provoke stereotype-like shaking behaviour in rodents, which is hypothesised to engage frontocortical glutamate receptor activation secondary to serotonin2A (5-HT2A) related glutamate release. Challenging this hypothesis, we here investigate whether tolerance to LSD and DOB correlates with frontocortical adaptations of 5-HT2A and/or overall-glutamate binding sites. LSD and DOB (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) induce a ketanserin-sensitive (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30-min pretreatment) increase in shaking behaviour (including head twitches and wet dog shakes), which with repeated application (7× in 4 ds) is undermined by tolerance. Tolerance to DOB, as indexed by DOB-sensitive [(3)H]spiroperidol and DOB induced [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding, is accompanied by a frontocortical decrease in 5-HT2A binding sites and 5-HT2 signalling, respectively; glutamate-sensitive [(3)H]glutamate binding sites, in contrast, remain unchanged. As to LSD, 5-HT2 signalling and 5-HT2A binding, respectively, are not or only marginally affected, yet [(3)H]glutamate binding is significantly decreased. Correlation analysis interrelates tolerance to DOB to the reduced 5-HT2A (r=.80) as well as the unchanged [(3)H]glutamate binding sites (r=.84); tolerance to LSD, as opposed, shares variance with the reduction in [(3)H]glutamate binding sites only (r=.86). Given that DOB and LSD both induce tolerance, one correlating with 5-HT2A, the other with glutamate receptor adaptations, it might be inferred that tolerance can arise at either level. That is, if a hallucinogen (like LSD in our study) fails to induce 5-HT2A (down-)regulation, glutamate receptors (activated postsynaptic to 5-HT2A related glutamate release) might instead adapt and thus prevent further overstimulation of the cortex. PMID:25513973

  10. Tolerance to LSD and DOB induced shaking behaviour: differential adaptations of frontocortical 5-HT(2A) and glutamate receptor binding sites.

    PubMed

    Buchborn, Tobias; Schröder, Helmut; Dieterich, Daniela C; Grecksch, Gisela; Höllt, Volker

    2015-03-15

    Serotonergic hallucinogens, such as lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and dimethoxy-bromoamphetamine (DOB), provoke stereotype-like shaking behaviour in rodents, which is hypothesised to engage frontocortical glutamate receptor activation secondary to serotonin2A (5-HT2A) related glutamate release. Challenging this hypothesis, we here investigate whether tolerance to LSD and DOB correlates with frontocortical adaptations of 5-HT2A and/or overall-glutamate binding sites. LSD and DOB (0.025 and 0.25 mg/kg, i.p.) induce a ketanserin-sensitive (0.5 mg/kg, i.p., 30-min pretreatment) increase in shaking behaviour (including head twitches and wet dog shakes), which with repeated application (7× in 4 ds) is undermined by tolerance. Tolerance to DOB, as indexed by DOB-sensitive [(3)H]spiroperidol and DOB induced [(35)S]GTP-gamma-S binding, is accompanied by a frontocortical decrease in 5-HT2A binding sites and 5-HT2 signalling, respectively; glutamate-sensitive [(3)H]glutamate binding sites, in contrast, remain unchanged. As to LSD, 5-HT2 signalling and 5-HT2A binding, respectively, are not or only marginally affected, yet [(3)H]glutamate binding is significantly decreased. Correlation analysis interrelates tolerance to DOB to the reduced 5-HT2A (r=.80) as well as the unchanged [(3)H]glutamate binding sites (r=.84); tolerance to LSD, as opposed, shares variance with the reduction in [(3)H]glutamate binding sites only (r=.86). Given that DOB and LSD both induce tolerance, one correlating with 5-HT2A, the other with glutamate receptor adaptations, it might be inferred that tolerance can arise at either level. That is, if a hallucinogen (like LSD in our study) fails to induce 5-HT2A (down-)regulation, glutamate receptors (activated postsynaptic to 5-HT2A related glutamate release) might instead adapt and thus prevent further overstimulation of the cortex.

  11. Physiological basis for high CO2 tolerance in marine ectothermic animals: pre-adaptation through lifestyle and ontogeny?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Melzner, F.; Gutowska, M. A.; Langenbuch, M.; Dupont, S.; Lucassen, M.; Thorndyke, M. C.; Bleich, M.; Pörtner, H.-O.

    2009-10-01

    pH disturbances during exposure to elevated environmental pCO2. Compensation of extracellular acid-base status in turn may be important in avoiding metabolic depression. So far, maintained "performance" at higher seawater pCO2 (>0.3 to 0.6 kPa) has only been observed in adults/juveniles of active, high metabolic species with a powerful ion regulatory apparatus. However, while some of these taxa are adapted to cope with elevated pCO2 during their regular embryonic development, gametes, zygotes and early embryonic stages, which lack specialized ion-regulatory epithelia, may be the true bottleneck for ecological success - even of the more tolerant taxa. Our current understanding of which marine animal taxa will be affected adversely in their physiological and ecological fitness by projected scenarios of anthropogenic ocean acidification is quite incomplete. While a growing amount of empirical evidence from CO2 perturbation experiments suggests that several taxa might react quite sensitively to ocean acidification, others seem to be surprisingly tolerant. However, there is little mechanistic understanding on what physiological traits are responsible for the observed differential sensitivities (see reviews of Seibel and Walsh, 2003; Pörtner et al., 2004; Fabry et al., 2008; Pörtner, 2008). This leads us to the first very basic question of how to define general CO2 tolerance on the species level.

  12. A distance-aware replica adaptive data gathering protocol for Delay Tolerant Mobile Sensor Networks.

    PubMed

    Feng, Yong; Gong, Haigang; Fan, Mingyu; Liu, Ming; Wang, Xiaomin

    2011-01-01

    In Delay Tolerant Mobile Sensor Networks (DTMSNs) that have the inherent features of intermitted connectivity and frequently changing network topology it is reasonable to utilize multi-replica schemes to improve the data gathering performance. However, most existing multi-replica approaches inject a large amount of message copies into the network to increase the probability of message delivery, which may drain each mobile node's limited battery supply faster and result in too much contention for the restricted resources of the DTMSN, so a proper data gathering scheme needs a trade off between the number of replica messages and network performance. In this paper, we propose a new data gathering protocol called DRADG (for Distance-aware Replica Adaptive Data Gathering protocol), which economizes network resource consumption through making use of a self-adapting algorithm to cut down the number of redundant replicas of messages, and achieves a good network performance by leveraging the delivery probabilities of the mobile sensors as main routing metrics. Simulation results have shown that the proposed DRADG protocol achieves comparable or higher message delivery ratios at the cost of the much lower transmission overhead than several current DTMSN data gathering schemes.

  13. Adaptive backstepping fault-tolerant control for flexible spacecraft with unknown bounded disturbances and actuator failures.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ye; Hu, Qinglei; Ma, Guangfu

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, a robust adaptive fault-tolerant control approach to attitude tracking of flexible spacecraft is proposed for use in situations when there are reaction wheel/actuator failures, persistent bounded disturbances and unknown inertia parameter uncertainties. The controller is designed based on an adaptive backstepping sliding mode control scheme, and a sufficient condition under which this control law can render the system semi-globally input-to-state stable is also provided such that the closed-loop system is robust with respect to any disturbance within a quantifiable restriction on the amplitude, as well as the set of initial conditions, if the control gains are designed appropriately. Moreover, in the design, the control law does not need a fault detection and isolation mechanism even if the failure time instants, patterns and values on actuator failures are also unknown for the designers, as motivated from a practical spacecraft control application. In addition to detailed derivations of the new controller design and a rigorous sketch of all the associated stability and attitude error convergence proofs, illustrative simulation results of an application to flexible spacecraft show that high precise attitude control and vibration suppression are successfully achieved using various scenarios of controlling effective failures.

  14. Adaptive response of Rhodococcus opacus PWD4 to salt and phenolic stress on the level of mycolic acids.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Fischer, Martin A; Kirsten, Sandra; Würz, Birgit; Wick, Lukas Y; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-12-01

    Mycolata form a group of Gram-positive bacteria with unique cell envelope structures that are known for their high tolerance against antibiotics and both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. An important part of the unique surface structure of the mycolata is the presence of long chain α-alkyl-β-hydroxy fatty acids, the mycolic acids. In order to investigate the adaptive changes in the mycolic acid composition, we investigated the composition of mycolic acids during the response both to osmotic stress caused by NaCl and to 4-chlorophenol in Rhodococcus opacus PWD4. This bacterium was chosen as it is known to adapt to different kinds of stresses. In addition, it is a potential biocatalyst in bioremediation as well as for biotechnological applications. In the present study, cells of R. opacus PWD4, grown in liquid cultures, responded to toxic concentrations of NaCl by increasing the ratio between mycolic acids and membrane phospholipid fatty acids (MA/PLFA-ratio). Cells reacted to both NaCl and 4-chlorophenol by decreasing both the average chain length and the unsaturation index of their mycolic acids. These changes in mycolic acid composition correlated with increases in cell surface hydrophobicity and saturation of membrane fatty acids, demonstrating the relation between mycolic acid and phospholipid synthesis and their contribution to cell surface properties of R. opacus PWD4. PMID:27620730

  15. Adaptive response of Rhodococcus opacus PWD4 to salt and phenolic stress on the level of mycolic acids.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Fischer, Martin A; Kirsten, Sandra; Würz, Birgit; Wick, Lukas Y; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2016-12-01

    Mycolata form a group of Gram-positive bacteria with unique cell envelope structures that are known for their high tolerance against antibiotics and both aromatic and aliphatic hydrocarbons. An important part of the unique surface structure of the mycolata is the presence of long chain α-alkyl-β-hydroxy fatty acids, the mycolic acids. In order to investigate the adaptive changes in the mycolic acid composition, we investigated the composition of mycolic acids during the response both to osmotic stress caused by NaCl and to 4-chlorophenol in Rhodococcus opacus PWD4. This bacterium was chosen as it is known to adapt to different kinds of stresses. In addition, it is a potential biocatalyst in bioremediation as well as for biotechnological applications. In the present study, cells of R. opacus PWD4, grown in liquid cultures, responded to toxic concentrations of NaCl by increasing the ratio between mycolic acids and membrane phospholipid fatty acids (MA/PLFA-ratio). Cells reacted to both NaCl and 4-chlorophenol by decreasing both the average chain length and the unsaturation index of their mycolic acids. These changes in mycolic acid composition correlated with increases in cell surface hydrophobicity and saturation of membrane fatty acids, demonstrating the relation between mycolic acid and phospholipid synthesis and their contribution to cell surface properties of R. opacus PWD4.

  16. High sustained +Gz acceleration: physiological adaptation to high-G tolerance

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Convertino, V. A.

    1998-01-01

    Since the early 1940s, a significant volume of research has been conducted in an effort to describe the impact of acute exposures to high-G acceleration on cardiovascular mechanisms responsible to maintaining cerebral perfusion and conscious in high performance aircraft pilots during aerial combat maneuvers. The value of understanding hemodynamic characteristics that underlie G-induced loss of consciousness has been instrumental in the evolution of optimal technology development (e.g., G-suits, positive pressure breathing, COMBAT EDGE, etc.) and pilot training (e.g., anti-G straining maneuvers). Although the emphasis of research has been placed on the development of protection against acute high +Gz acceleration effects, recent observations suggest that adaptation of cardiovascular mechanism associated with blood pressure regulation may contribute to a protective 'G-training' effect. Regular training at high G enhances G tolerance in humans, rats, guinea pigs, and dogs while prolonged layoff from exposure in high G profiles (G-layoff) can result in reduced G endurance. It seems probable that adaptations in physiological functions following chronically-repeated high G exposure (G training) or G-layoff could have significant impacts on performance during sustained high-G acceleration since protective technology such as G-suits and anit-G straining maneuvers are applied consistently during these periods of training. The purpose of this paper is to present a review of new data from three experiments that support the notion that repeated exposure on a regular basis to high sustained +Gz acceleration induces significant physiological adaptations which are associated with improved blood pressure regulation and subsequent protection of cerebral perfusion during orthostatic challenges.

  17. Point mutation of H3/H4 histones affects acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xiangyong; Zhang, Xiaohua; Zhang, Zhaojie

    2014-10-10

    The molecular mechanism of acetic acid tolerance in yeast remains unclear despite of its importance for efficient cellulosic ethanol production. In this study, we examined the effects of histone H3/H4 point mutations on yeast acetic acid tolerance by comprehensively screening a histone H3/H4 mutant library. A total of 24 histone H3/H4 mutants (six acetic acid resistant and 18 sensitive) were identified. Compared to the wild-type strain, the histone acetic acid-resistant mutants exhibited improved ethanol fermentation performance under acetic acid stress. Genome-wide transcriptome analysis revealed that changes in the gene expression in the acetic acid-resistant mutants H3 K37A and H4 K16Q were mainly related to energy production, antioxidative stress. Our results provide novel insights into yeast acetic acid tolerance on the basis of histone, and suggest a novel approach to improve ethanol production by altering the histone H3/H4 sequences.

  18. Azetidine-2-carboxylic acid resistant mutants of Arabidopsis thaliana with increased salt tolerance

    SciTech Connect

    Lehle, F.R.; Murphy, M.A.; Khan, R.A. )

    1989-04-01

    Nineteen mutant Arabidopsis families resistant to the proline analog azetidine-2-carboxylic acid (ACA) were characterized in terms of NaCl tolerance and proline content. Mutants were selected from about 64,000 progeny of about 16,000 self-pollinated Columbia parents which had been mutated with ethyl methane sulfonate during seed imbibition. Selections were performed during seed germination on aseptic agar medium containing 0.2 to 0.25 mM ACA. Nineteen mutant families, 12 clearly independent, retained resistance to ACA in the M{sub 4} generation. Based on germination on 150 mM NaCl, 13 of the mutant families were more tolerant than the wild type. Two mutants of intermediate resistance to ACA were markedly more salt tolerant than the others. Four mutant families appeared to overproduce proline. Of these, only 3 showed slight increases in salt tolerance.

  19. Adaptive responses of Bacillus cereus ATCC14579 cells upon exposure to acid conditions involve ATPase activity to maintain their internal pH

    PubMed Central

    Senouci-Rezkallah, Khadidja; Jobin, Michel P; Schmitt, Philippe

    2015-01-01

    This study examined the involvement of ATPase activity in the acid tolerance response (ATR) of Bacillus cereus ATCC14579 strain. In the current work, B. cereus cells were grown in anaerobic chemostat culture at external pH (pHe) 7.0 or 5.5 and at a growth rate of 0.2 h−1. Population reduction and internal pH (pHi) after acid shock at pH 4.0 was examined either with or without ATPase inhibitor N,N’-dicyclohexylcarbodiimide (DCCD) and ionophores valinomycin and nigericin. Population reduction after acid shock at pH 4.0 was strongly limited in cells grown at pH 5.5 (acid-adapted cells) compared with cells grown at pH 7.0 (unadapted cells), indicating that B. cereus cells grown at low pHe were able to induce a significant ATR and Exercise-induced increase in ATPase activity. However, DCCD and ionophores had a negative effect on the ability of B. cereus cells to survive and maintain their pHi during acid shock. When acid shock was achieved after DCCD treatment, pHi was markedly dropped in unadapted and acid-adapted cells. The ATPase activity was also significantly inhibited by DCCD and ionophores in acid-adapted cells. Furthermore, transcriptional analysis revealed that atpB (ATP beta chain) transcripts was increased in acid-adapted cells compared to unadapted cells before and after acid shock. Our data demonstrate that B. cereus is able to induce an ATR during growth at low pH. These adaptations depend on the ATPase activity induction and pHi homeostasis. Our data demonstrate that the ATPase enzyme can be implicated in the cytoplasmic pH regulation and in acid tolerance of B. cereus acid-adapted cells. PMID:25740257

  20. PlsX deletion impacts fatty acid synthesis and acid adaptation in Streptococcus mutans.

    PubMed

    Cross, Benjamin; Garcia, Ariana; Faustoferri, Roberta; Quivey, Robert G

    2016-04-01

    Streptococcus mutans, one of the primary causative agents of dental caries in humans, ferments dietary sugars in the mouth to produce organic acids. These acids lower local pH values, resulting in demineralization of the tooth enamel, leading to caries. To survive acidic environments, Strep. mutans employs several adaptive mechanisms, including a shift from saturated to unsaturated fatty acids in membrane phospholipids. PlsX is an acyl-ACP : phosphate transacylase that links the fatty acid synthase II (FASII) pathway to the phospholipid synthesis pathway, and is therefore central to the movement of unsaturated fatty acids into the membrane. Recently, we discovered that plsX is not essential in Strep. mutans. A plsX deletion mutant was not a fatty acid or phospholipid auxotroph. Gas chromatography of fatty acid methyl esters indicated that membrane fatty acid chain length in the plsX deletion strain differed from those detected in the parent strain, UA159. The deletion strain displayed a fatty acid shift similar to WT, but had a higher percentage of unsaturated fatty acids at low pH. The deletion strain survived significantly longer than the parent strain when cultures were subjected to an acid challenge of pH 2.5.The ΔplsX strain also exhibited elevated F-ATPase activity at pH 5.2, compared with the parent. These results indicate that the loss of plsX affects both the fatty acid synthesis pathway and the acid-adaptive response of Strep. mutans. PMID:26850107

  1. 78 FR 30213 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic acid; Pesticide Tolerances

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-22

    ... Classification System (NAICS) codes is not intended to be exhaustive, but rather provides a guide to help readers... May 2, 2012 (77 FR 25954) (FRL-9346-1), EPA issued a document pursuant to FFDCA section 408(d)(3), 21..., all forms degrade to the acid fairly quickly in the field and in biological systems. ] Therefore,...

  2. Differential Soil Acidity Tolerance of Tropical Legume Cover Crops

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    In tropical regions, soil acidity and low soil fertility are the most important yield limiting factors for sustainable crop production. Using legume cover crops as mulch is an important strategy not only to protect the soil loss from erosion but also ameliorating soil fertility. Information is limit...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1023 - Propanoic acid; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ...) Propanoic acid is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or on cattle, meat; cattle, meat byproducts; goat, meat; goat, meat byproducts; hog, meat; hog meat byproducts; horse, meat; horse, meat byproducts; sheep, meat; sheep meat byproducts; and, poultry, fat; poultry meat; poultry......

  4. 40 CFR 180.1023 - Propanoic acid; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ...) Propanoic acid is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or on cattle, meat; cattle, meat byproducts; goat, meat; goat, meat byproducts; hog, meat; hog meat byproducts; horse, meat; horse, meat byproducts; sheep, meat; sheep meat byproducts; and, poultry, fat; poultry meat; poultry......

  5. 40 CFR 180.1023 - Propanoic acid; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ...) Propanoic acid is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or on cattle, meat; cattle, meat byproducts; goat, meat; goat, meat byproducts; hog, meat; hog meat byproducts; horse, meat; horse, meat byproducts; sheep, meat; sheep meat byproducts; and, poultry, fat; poultry meat; poultry......

  6. 40 CFR 180.1023 - Propanoic acid; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ...) Propanoic acid is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or on cattle, meat; cattle, meat byproducts; goat, meat; goat, meat byproducts; hog, meat; hog meat byproducts; horse, meat; horse, meat byproducts; sheep, meat; sheep meat byproducts; and, poultry, fat; poultry meat; poultry......

  7. 40 CFR 180.1023 - Propanoic acid; exemptions from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ...) Propanoic acid is exempt from the requirement of a tolerance for residues in or on cattle, meat; cattle, meat byproducts; goat, meat; goat, meat byproducts; hog, meat; hog meat byproducts; horse, meat; horse, meat byproducts; sheep, meat; sheep meat byproducts; and, poultry, fat; poultry meat; poultry......

  8. Heat tolerance of automotive lead-acid batteries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Albers, Joern

    Starter batteries have to withstand a quite large temperature range. In Europe, the battery temperature can be -30 °C in winter and may even exceed +60 °C in summer. In most modern cars, there is not much space left in the engine compartment to install the battery. So the mean battery temperature may be higher than it was some decades ago. In some car models, the battery is located in the passenger or luggage compartment, where ambient temperatures are more moderate. Temperature effects are discussed in detail. The consequences of high heat impact into the lead-acid battery may vary for different battery technologies: While grid corrosion is often a dominant factor for flooded lead-acid batteries, water loss may be an additional influence factor for valve-regulated lead-acid batteries. A model was set up that considers external and internal parameters to estimate the water loss of AGM batteries. Even under hot climate conditions, AGM batteries were found to be highly durable and superior to flooded batteries in many cases. Considering the real battery temperature for adjustment of charging voltage, negative effects can be reduced. Especially in micro-hybrid applications, AGM batteries cope with additional requirements much better than flooded batteries, and show less sensitivity to high temperatures than suspected sometimes.

  9. Establishing tolerable dungeness crab (Cancer magister) and razor clam (Siliqua patula) domoic acid contaminant levels.

    PubMed Central

    Mariën, K

    1996-01-01

    Domoic acid has been found in razor clams (Siliqua patula) and dungeness crabs (Cancer magister) in Washington State and elsewhere on the West Coast of the United States. Due to toxic effects associated with domoic acid exposure, an effort has been made to establish tolerable domoic acid levels in crabs and clams obtained from commercial harvest and sale and from individual recreational harvesting. To accomplish this, the amount of clams and crabs consumed by populations of concern was determined, a tolerable daily intake (TDI) was developed for individuals most sensitive to effects of this compound, and the TDI was equated with consumption patterns to determine tolerable clam and crab domoic acid levels. Results indicate that the primary health effects associated with domoic acid toxicity can be averted in populations of concern and for others consuming crabs or clams less frequently (or in lesser quantity) if domoic acid contaminant concentration does not exceed 30 mg/kg in the hepatopancreas and viscera of dungeness crabs or 20 mg/kg in clams. PMID:8959413

  10. Adaptive response of bacteria: Multiple hurdles, cross-tolerance and tools to illustrate underlying mechanisms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paramythiotis, Spyridon; Skandamis, Panagiotis N.

    2015-01-01

    A basic principle in the bacterial resistance against lethal stresses is that exposure of microbial cells to a sublethal hurdle (e.g., pH 5.0, 3% NaCl, or 48°C) may induce resistance to lethal level of the same or different stress. The latter is called "cross-tolerance" and the bacteria experiencing such situations are termed "stress-hardened". The majority of scientific reports on the adaptive responses of bacteria to stresses have recently addressed the need to elucidate the underlying mechanisms controlling bacterial stress response. This in turn, will assist in the efficient application of the multiple hurdle approach, e.g., by selecting specific sanitizers, combining stress treatments or antimicrobials, especially in mild processing, against specific cellular targets, eliminating the possibility of the development of stress adapted cells. Common scientific approaches for studying the link between phenotype (e.g., inactivation, survival, or growth) and physiology is the assessment of global transcriptional changes (up- or down-regulation) or those of certain genes, as well as of proteins involved in certain metabolic pathways, occurring during exposure to stress. This may also be performed in parallel to comparative evaluation of the phenotypic response of wild and mutant strains. The post-genomics research on foodborne pathogens has extended our knowledge beyond their phenotypic behavior and may offer mechanistic insights in the following: (i) the top-down approach (induction), which is the search of the underlying mechanisms (low level) responsible for a specific phenotype based on "-omic" studies; and (ii) the bottom-up approach (deduction), which starts from intracellular level and forms a mechanistic (functional) basis for the cellular response. All these may eventually enable the development of mechanistic microbial models and efficient strategies for controlling survival and growth of pathogens in foods.

  11. Adaptive response and tolerance to sugar and salt stress in the food yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii.

    PubMed

    Dakal, Tikam Chand; Solieri, Lisa; Giudici, Paolo

    2014-08-18

    The osmotolerant and halotolerant food yeast Zygosaccharomyces rouxii is known for its ability to grow and survive in the face of stress caused by high concentrations of non-ionic (sugars and polyols) and ionic (mainly Na(+) cations) solutes. This ability determines the success of fermentation on high osmolarity food matrices and leads to spoilage of high sugar and high salt foods. The knowledge about the genes, the metabolic pathways, and the regulatory circuits shaping the Z. rouxii sugar and salt-tolerance, is a prerequisite to develop effective strategies for fermentation control, optimization of food starter culture, and prevention of food spoilage. This review summarizes recent insights on the mechanisms used by Z. rouxii and other osmo and halotolerant food yeasts to endure salts and sugars stresses. Using the information gathered from S. cerevisiae as guide, we highlight how these non-conventional yeasts integrate general and osmoticum-specific adaptive responses under sugar and salts stresses, including regulation of Na(+) and K(+)-fluxes across the plasma membrane, modulation of cell wall properties, compatible osmolyte production and accumulation, and stress signalling pathways. We suggest how an integrated and system-based knowledge on these mechanisms may impact food and biotechnological industries, by improving the yeast spoilage control in food, enhancing the yeast-based bioprocess yields, and engineering the osmotolerance in other organisms.

  12. A cold-adapted, solvent and salt tolerant esterase from marine bacterium Psychrobacter pacificensis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Gaobing; Zhang, Xiangnan; Wei, Lu; Wu, Guojie; Kumar, Ashok; Mao, Tao; Liu, Ziduo

    2015-11-01

    Lipolytic enzymes with unique physico-chemical characteristics are gaining more attention for their immense industrial importance. In this study, a novel lipolytic enzyme (Est11) was cloned from the genomic library of a marine bacterium Psychrobacter pacificensis. The enzyme was expressed in Escherichia coli and purified to homogeneity with molecular mass of 32.9kDa. The recombinant Est11 was able to hydrolyze short chain esters (C2-C8) and displayed an optimum activity against butyrate ester (C4). The optimal temperature and pH were 25°C and 7.5, respectively. Est11 retained more than 70% of its original activity at 10°C, suggesting that it was a cold-active esterase. The enzyme was highly active and stable at high concentration of NaCl (5M). Further, incubation with ethanol, isopropanol, propanediol, DMSO, acetonitrile, and glycerol rendered remarkable positive effects on Est11 activity. Typically, even at the concentration of 30% (v/v), ethanol, DMSO, and propanediol increased Est11 activity by 1.3, 2.0, and 2.4-folds, respectively. This new robust enzyme with remarkable properties like cold-adaptability, exceptional tolerance to salt and organic solvents provides us a promising candidate to meet the needs of some harsh industrial processes. PMID:26231332

  13. Variation-Tolerant Capture and Multiplex Detection of Nucleic Acids: Application to Detection of Microbes

    PubMed Central

    Öhrmalm, Christina; Eriksson, Ronnie; Jobs, Magnus; Simonson, Magnus; Strømme, Maria; Bondeson, Kåre; Herrmann, Björn; Melhus, Åsa

    2012-01-01

    In contrast to ordinary PCRs, which have a limited multiplex capacity and often return false-negative results due to target variation or inhibition, our new detection strategy, VOCMA (variation-tolerant capture multiplex assay), allows variation-tolerant, target-specific capture and detection of many nucleic acids in one test. Here we demonstrate the use of a single-tube, dual-step amplification strategy that overcomes the usual limitations of PCR multiplexing, allowing at least a 22-plex format with retained sensitivity. Variation tolerance was achieved using long primers and probes designed to withstand variation at known sites and a judicious mix of degeneration and universal bases. We tested VOCMA in situations where enrichment from a large sample volume with high sensitivity and multiplexity is important (sepsis; streptococci, enterococci, and staphylococci, several enterobacteria, candida, and the most important antibiotic resistance genes) and where variation tolerance and high multiplexity is important (gastroenteritis; astrovirus, adenovirus, rotavirus, norovirus genogroups I and II, and sapovirus, as well as enteroviruses, which are not associated with gastroenteritis). Detection sensitivities of 10 to 1,000 copies per reaction were achieved for many targets. VOCMA is a highly multiplex, variation-tolerant, general purpose nucleic acid detection concept. It is a specific and sensitive method for simultaneous detection of nucleic acids from viruses, bacteria, fungi, and protozoa, as well as host nucleic acid, in the same test. It can be run on an ordinary PCR and a Luminex machine and is suitable for both clinical diagnoses and microbial surveillance. PMID:22814465

  14. Substitutions in woolly mammoth hemoglobin confer biochemical properties adaptive for cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kevin L; Roberts, Jason E E; Watson, Laura N; Stetefeld, Jörg; Sloan, Angela M; Signore, Anthony V; Howatt, Jesse W; Tame, Jeremy R H; Rohland, Nadin; Shen, Tong-Jian; Austin, Jeremy J; Hofreiter, Michael; Ho, Chien; Weber, Roy E; Cooper, Alan

    2010-06-01

    We have genetically retrieved, resurrected and performed detailed structure-function analyses on authentic woolly mammoth hemoglobin to reveal for the first time both the evolutionary origins and the structural underpinnings of a key adaptive physiochemical trait in an extinct species. Hemoglobin binds and carries O(2); however, its ability to offload O(2) to respiring cells is hampered at low temperatures, as heme deoxygenation is inherently endothermic (that is, hemoglobin-O(2) affinity increases as temperature decreases). We identify amino acid substitutions with large phenotypic effect on the chimeric beta/delta-globin subunit of mammoth hemoglobin that provide a unique solution to this problem and thereby minimize energetically costly heat loss. This biochemical specialization may have been involved in the exploitation of high-latitude environments by this African-derived elephantid lineage during the Pleistocene period. This powerful new approach to directly analyze the genetic and structural basis of physiological adaptations in an extinct species adds an important new dimension to the study of natural selection.

  15. Substitutions in woolly mammoth hemoglobin confer biochemical properties adaptive for cold tolerance.

    PubMed

    Campbell, Kevin L; Roberts, Jason E E; Watson, Laura N; Stetefeld, Jörg; Sloan, Angela M; Signore, Anthony V; Howatt, Jesse W; Tame, Jeremy R H; Rohland, Nadin; Shen, Tong-Jian; Austin, Jeremy J; Hofreiter, Michael; Ho, Chien; Weber, Roy E; Cooper, Alan

    2010-06-01

    We have genetically retrieved, resurrected and performed detailed structure-function analyses on authentic woolly mammoth hemoglobin to reveal for the first time both the evolutionary origins and the structural underpinnings of a key adaptive physiochemical trait in an extinct species. Hemoglobin binds and carries O(2); however, its ability to offload O(2) to respiring cells is hampered at low temperatures, as heme deoxygenation is inherently endothermic (that is, hemoglobin-O(2) affinity increases as temperature decreases). We identify amino acid substitutions with large phenotypic effect on the chimeric beta/delta-globin subunit of mammoth hemoglobin that provide a unique solution to this problem and thereby minimize energetically costly heat loss. This biochemical specialization may have been involved in the exploitation of high-latitude environments by this African-derived elephantid lineage during the Pleistocene period. This powerful new approach to directly analyze the genetic and structural basis of physiological adaptations in an extinct species adds an important new dimension to the study of natural selection. PMID:20436470

  16. Engineering Clostridium beijerinckii with the Cbei_4693 gene knockout for enhanced ferulic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jun; Guo, Ting; Shen, Xiaoning; Xu, Jiahui; Wang, Junzhi; Wang, Yanyan; Liu, Dong; Niu, Huanqing; Liang, Lei; Ying, Hanjie

    2016-07-10

    A mutant strain of Clostridium beijerinckii NCIMB 8052, C. beijerinckii M11, which exhibited ferulic acid tolerance up to 0.9g/L, was generated using atmospheric pressure glow discharge and high-throughput screening. Comparative genomic analysis revealed that this strain harbored a mutation of the Cbei_4693 gene, which encodes a hypothetical protein suspected to be an NADPH-dependent FMN reductase. After disrupting the Cbei_4693 gene in C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052 using the ClosTron group II intron-based gene inactivation system, we obtained the Cbei_4693 gene inactivated mutant strain, C. beijerinckii 4693::int. Compared with C. beijerinckii NCIMB 8052, 6.23g/L of butanol was produced in P2 medium containing 0.5g/L of ferulic acid by 4693::int, and the ferulic acid tolerance was also significantly increased up to 0.8g/L. These data showed, for the first time, that the Cbei_4693 gene plays an important role in regulating ferulic acid tolerance in ABE fermentation by C. beijerinckii. PMID:27164255

  17. Metabolic engineering and adaptive evolution for efficient production of D-lactic acid in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Baek, Seung-Ho; Kwon, Eunice Y; Kim, Yong Hwan; Hahn, Ji-Sook

    2016-03-01

    There is an increasing demand for microbial production of lactic acid (LA) as a monomer of biodegradable poly lactic acid (PLA). Both optical isomers, D-LA and L-LA, are required to produce stereocomplex PLA with improved properties. In this study, we developed Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains for efficient production of D-LA. D-LA production was achieved by expressing highly stereospecific D-lactate dehydrogenase gene (ldhA, LEUM_1756) from Leuconostoc mesenteroides subsp. mesenteroides ATCC 8293 in S. cerevisiae lacking natural LA production activity. D-LA consumption after glucose depletion was inhibited by deleting DLD1 encoding D-lactate dehydrogenase and JEN1 encoding monocarboxylate transporter. In addition, ethanol production was reduced by deleting PDC1 and ADH1 genes encoding major pyruvate decarboxylase and alcohol dehydrogenase, respectively, and glycerol production was eliminated by deleting GPD1 and GPD2 genes encoding glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. LA tolerance of the engineered D-LA-producing strain was enhanced by adaptive evolution and overexpression of HAA1 encoding a transcriptional activator involved in weak acid stress response, resulting in effective D-LA production up to 48.9 g/L without neutralization. In a flask fed-batch fermentation under neutralizing condition, our evolved strain produced 112.0 g/L D-LA with a yield of 0.80 g/g glucose and a productivity of 2.2 g/(L · h).

  18. Quantitative Proteomics Reveals the Flooding-Tolerance Mechanism in Mutant and Abscisic Acid-Treated Soybean.

    PubMed

    Yin, Xiaojian; Nishimura, Minoru; Hajika, Makita; Komatsu, Setsuko

    2016-06-01

    Flooding negatively affects the growth of soybean, and several flooding-specific stress responses have been identified; however, the mechanisms underlying flooding tolerance in soybean remain unclear. To explore the initial flooding tolerance mechanisms in soybean, flooding-tolerant mutant and abscisic acid (ABA)-treated plants were analyzed. In the mutant and ABA-treated soybeans, 146 proteins were commonly changed at the initial flooding stress. Among the identified proteins, protein synthesis-related proteins, including nascent polypeptide-associated complex and chaperonin 20, and RNA regulation-related proteins were increased in abundance both at protein and mRNA expression. However, these proteins identified at the initial flooding stress were not significantly changed during survival stages under continuous flooding. Cluster analysis indicated that glycolysis- and cell wall-related proteins, such as enolase and polygalacturonase inhibiting protein, were increased in abundance during survival stages. Furthermore, lignification of root tissue was improved even under flooding stress. Taken together, these results suggest that protein synthesis- and RNA regulation-related proteins play a key role in triggering tolerance to the initial flooding stress in soybean. Furthermore, the integrity of cell wall and balance of glycolysis might be important factors for promoting tolerance of soybean root to flooding stress during survival stages.

  19. Roles of Organic Acid Anion Secretion in Aluminium Tolerance of Higher Plants

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Chen, Li-Song

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of the world's total land area and over 50% of the world's potential arable lands are acidic. Furthermore, the acidity of the soils is gradually increasing as a result of the environmental problems including some farming practices and acid rain. At mildly acidic or neutral soils, aluminium(Al) occurs primarily as insoluble deposits and is essentially biologically inactive. However, in many acidic soils throughout the tropics and subtropics, Al toxicity is a major factor limiting crop productivity. The Al-induced secretion of organic acid (OA) anions, mainly citrate, oxalate, and malate, from roots is the best documented mechanism of Al tolerance in higher plants. Increasing evidence shows that the Al-induced secretion of OA anions may be related to the following several factors, including (a) anion channels or transporters, (b) internal concentrations of OA anions in plant tissues, (d) temperature, (e) root plasma membrane (PM) H+-ATPase, (f) magnesium (Mg), and (e) phosphorus (P). Genetically modified plants and cells with higher Al tolerance by overexpressing genes for the secretion and the biosynthesis of OA anions have been obtained. In addition, some aspects needed to be further studied are also discussed. PMID:23509687

  20. Roles of organic acid anion secretion in aluminium tolerance of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Chen, Li-Song

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of the world's total land area and over 50% of the world's potential arable lands are acidic. Furthermore, the acidity of the soils is gradually increasing as a result of the environmental problems including some farming practices and acid rain. At mildly acidic or neutral soils, aluminium (Al) occurs primarily as insoluble deposits and is essentially biologically inactive. However, in many acidic soils throughout the tropics and subtropics, Al toxicity is a major factor limiting crop productivity. The Al-induced secretion of organic acid (OA) anions, mainly citrate, oxalate, and malate, from roots is the best documented mechanism of Al tolerance in higher plants. Increasing evidence shows that the Al-induced secretion of OA anions may be related to the following several factors, including (a) anion channels or transporters, (b) internal concentrations of OA anions in plant tissues, (d) temperature, (e) root plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase, (f) magnesium (Mg), and (e) phosphorus (P). Genetically modified plants and cells with higher Al tolerance by overexpressing genes for the secretion and the biosynthesis of OA anions have been obtained. In addition, some aspects needed to be further studied are also discussed.

  1. Roles of organic acid anion secretion in aluminium tolerance of higher plants.

    PubMed

    Yang, Lin-Tong; Qi, Yi-Ping; Jiang, Huan-Xin; Chen, Li-Song

    2013-01-01

    Approximately 30% of the world's total land area and over 50% of the world's potential arable lands are acidic. Furthermore, the acidity of the soils is gradually increasing as a result of the environmental problems including some farming practices and acid rain. At mildly acidic or neutral soils, aluminium (Al) occurs primarily as insoluble deposits and is essentially biologically inactive. However, in many acidic soils throughout the tropics and subtropics, Al toxicity is a major factor limiting crop productivity. The Al-induced secretion of organic acid (OA) anions, mainly citrate, oxalate, and malate, from roots is the best documented mechanism of Al tolerance in higher plants. Increasing evidence shows that the Al-induced secretion of OA anions may be related to the following several factors, including (a) anion channels or transporters, (b) internal concentrations of OA anions in plant tissues, (d) temperature, (e) root plasma membrane (PM) H(+)-ATPase, (f) magnesium (Mg), and (e) phosphorus (P). Genetically modified plants and cells with higher Al tolerance by overexpressing genes for the secretion and the biosynthesis of OA anions have been obtained. In addition, some aspects needed to be further studied are also discussed. PMID:23509687

  2. Low Temperature Adaptation Is Not the Opposite Process of High Temperature Adaptation in Terms of Changes in Amino Acid Composition

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ling-Ling; Tang, Shu-Kun; Huang, Ying; Zhi, Xiao-Yang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies focused on psychrophilic adaptation generally have demonstrated that multiple mechanisms work together to increase protein flexibility and activity, as well as to decrease the thermostability of proteins. However, the relationship between high and low temperature adaptations remains unclear. To investigate this issue, we collected the available predicted whole proteome sequences of species with different optimal growth temperatures, and analyzed amino acid variations and substitutional asymmetry in pairs of homologous proteins from related species. We found that changes in amino acid composition associated with low temperature adaptation did not exhibit a coherent opposite trend when compared with changes in amino acid composition associated with high temperature adaptation. This result indicates that during their evolutionary histories the proteome-scale evolutionary patterns associated with prokaryotes exposed to low temperature environments were distinct from the proteome-scale evolutionary patterns associated with prokaryotes exposed to high temperature environments in terms of changes in amino acid composition of the proteins. PMID:26614525

  3. 40 CFR 180.1110 - 3-Carbamyl-2,4,5-trichloro-benzoic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1110 Section 180.1110 Protection of... acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for the residues of 3-carbamyl-2,4,5-trichlorobenzoic acid in or on all...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1110 - 3-Carbamyl-2,4,5-trichloro-benzoic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1110 Section 180.1110 Protection of... acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for the residues of 3-carbamyl-2,4,5-trichlorobenzoic acid in or on all...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1110 - 3-Carbamyl-2,4,5-trichloro-benzoic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1110 Section 180.1110 Protection of... acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for the residues of 3-carbamyl-2,4,5-trichlorobenzoic acid in or on all...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1110 - 3-Carbamyl-2,4,5-trichloro-benzoic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1110 Section 180.1110 Protection of... acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for the residues of 3-carbamyl-2,4,5-trichlorobenzoic acid in or on all...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1110 - 3-Carbamyl-2,4,5-trichloro-benzoic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. 180.1110 Section 180.1110 Protection of... acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance. An exemption from the requirement of a tolerance is established for the residues of 3-carbamyl-2,4,5-trichlorobenzoic acid in or on all...

  8. Role of a major facilitator superfamily transporter in adaptation capacity of Penicillium funiculosum under extreme acidic stress.

    PubMed

    Xu, Xiaoxue; Chen, Jinyin; Xu, Houjuan; Li, Duochuan

    2014-08-01

    Fungal species present in extreme low pH environments are expected to have adapted for tolerance to high H(+) concentrations. However, their adaptability mechanism is unclear. In this study, we isolated an acid-tolerant strain of Penicillium funiculosum, which can grow actively at pH 1.0 and thrived in pH 0.6. A major facilitator superfamily transporter (PfMFS) was isolated from an acid-sensitive random insertional mutant (M4) of the fungus. It encodes a putative protein of 551 residues and contains 14 transmembrane-spanning segments. A targeted mutant (M7) carrying an inactivated copy of PfMFS showed an obvious reduction of growth compared with the wild type (WT) and complementation of M7 with PfMFS restored the wild-type level of growth at pH 1.0. Further data showed that the wild-type showed higher intracellular pH than M7 in response to pH 1. Subcellular localization showed that PfMFS was a cell membrane protein. Homology modeling showed structural similarity with an MFS transporter EmrD from Escherichiacoli. These results demonstrate that the PfMFS transporter is involved in the acid resistance and intracellular pH homeostasis of P. funiculosum.

  9. Metabolite profiling of barley grain subjected to induced drought stress: responses of free amino acids in differently adapted cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lanzinger, Alexandra; Frank, Thomas; Reichenberger, Gabriela; Herz, Markus; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2015-04-29

    To investigate cultivar-specific metabolite changes upon drought stress in barley grain, differently adapted cultivars were field-grown under drought conditions using a rain-out shelter and under normal weather conditions (2010-2012). The grain was subjected to a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling approach allowing the analyses of a broad spectrum of lipophilic and hydrophilic low molecular weight constituents. Multi- and univariate analyses demonstrated that there are grain metabolites which were significantly changed upon drought stress, either decreased or increased in all cultivars. On the other hand, for proteinogenic free amino acids increased concentrations were consistently observed in all seasons only in cultivars for which no drought resistance/tolerance had been described. Consistent decreases were seen only in the group of stress tolerant/resistant cultivars. These cultivar-specific correlations were particularly pronounced for branched-chain amino acids. The results indicate that free amino acids may serve as potential markers for cultivars differently adapted to drought stress.

  10. Metabolite profiling of barley grain subjected to induced drought stress: responses of free amino acids in differently adapted cultivars.

    PubMed

    Lanzinger, Alexandra; Frank, Thomas; Reichenberger, Gabriela; Herz, Markus; Engel, Karl-Heinz

    2015-04-29

    To investigate cultivar-specific metabolite changes upon drought stress in barley grain, differently adapted cultivars were field-grown under drought conditions using a rain-out shelter and under normal weather conditions (2010-2012). The grain was subjected to a gas chromatography-mass spectrometry-based metabolite profiling approach allowing the analyses of a broad spectrum of lipophilic and hydrophilic low molecular weight constituents. Multi- and univariate analyses demonstrated that there are grain metabolites which were significantly changed upon drought stress, either decreased or increased in all cultivars. On the other hand, for proteinogenic free amino acids increased concentrations were consistently observed in all seasons only in cultivars for which no drought resistance/tolerance had been described. Consistent decreases were seen only in the group of stress tolerant/resistant cultivars. These cultivar-specific correlations were particularly pronounced for branched-chain amino acids. The results indicate that free amino acids may serve as potential markers for cultivars differently adapted to drought stress. PMID:25867895

  11. Glutamic acid decarboxylase and glutamate receptor changes during tolerance and dependence to benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Izzo, Emanuela; Auta, James; Impagnatiello, Francesco; Pesold, Christine; Guidotti, Alessandro; Costa, Erminio

    2001-01-01

    Protracted administration of diazepam elicits tolerance, whereas discontinuation of treatment results in signs of dependence. Tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of diazepam is present in an early phase (6, 24, and 36 h) but disappears in a late phase (72–96 h) of withdrawal. In contrast, signs of dependence such as decrease in open-arm entries on an elevated plus-maze and increased susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures were apparent 96 h (but not 12, 24, or 48 h) after diazepam withdrawal. During the first 72 h of withdrawal, tolerance is associated with changes in the expression of GABAA (γ-aminobutyric acid type A) receptor subunits (decrease in γ2 and α1; increase in α5) and with an increase of mRNA expression of the most abundant form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD67. In contrast, dl-α-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit mRNA and cognate protein, which are normal during the early phase of diazepam withdrawal, increase by approximately 30% in cortex and hippocampus in association with the appearance of signs of dependence 96 h after diazepam withdrawal. Immunohistochemical studies of GluR1 subunit expression with gold-immunolabeling technique reveal that the increase of GluR1 subunit protein is localized to layer V pyramidal neurons and their apical dendrites in the cortex, and to pyramidal neurons and in their dendritic fields in hippocampus. The results suggest an involvement of GABA-mediated processes in the development and maintenance of tolerance to diazepam, whereas excitatory amino acid-related processes (presumably via AMPA receptors) may be involved in the expression of signs of dependence after withdrawal. PMID:11248104

  12. Glutamic acid decarboxylase and glutamate receptor changes during tolerance and dependence to benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Izzo, E; Auta, J; Impagnatiello, F; Pesold, C; Guidotti, A; Costa, E

    2001-03-13

    Protracted administration of diazepam elicits tolerance, whereas discontinuation of treatment results in signs of dependence. Tolerance to the anticonvulsant action of diazepam is present in an early phase (6, 24, and 36 h) but disappears in a late phase (72-96 h) of withdrawal. In contrast, signs of dependence such as decrease in open-arm entries on an elevated plus-maze and increased susceptibility to pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures were apparent 96 h (but not 12, 24, or 48 h) after diazepam withdrawal. During the first 72 h of withdrawal, tolerance is associated with changes in the expression of GABA(A) (gamma-aminobutyric acid type A) receptor subunits (decrease in gamma(2) and alpha(1); increase in alpha(5)) and with an increase of mRNA expression of the most abundant form of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD), GAD(67). In contrast, dl-alpha-amino-3-hydroxy-5-methylisoxazole-4-propionic acid (AMPA) receptor GluR1 subunit mRNA and cognate protein, which are normal during the early phase of diazepam withdrawal, increase by approximately 30% in cortex and hippocampus in association with the appearance of signs of dependence 96 h after diazepam withdrawal. Immunohistochemical studies of GluR1 subunit expression with gold-immunolabeling technique reveal that the increase of GluR1 subunit protein is localized to layer V pyramidal neurons and their apical dendrites in the cortex, and to pyramidal neurons and in their dendritic fields in hippocampus. The results suggest an involvement of GABA-mediated processes in the development and maintenance of tolerance to diazepam, whereas excitatory amino acid-related processes (presumably via AMPA receptors) may be involved in the expression of signs of dependence after withdrawal.

  13. A Novel Small RNA Regulates Tolerance and Virulence in Shigella flexneri by Responding to Acidic Environmental Changes.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ligui; Yang, Guang; Qi, Lihua; Li, Xiang; Jia, Leili; Xie, Jing; Qiu, Shaofu; Li, Peng; Hao, RongZhang; Wu, Zhihao; Du, Xinying; Li, Wuju; Song, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    Shigella flexneri is an important cause of bacillary dysentery in developing countries. Small regulatory RNAs (sRNAs) play essential roles in diverse cellular processes. We found a novel sRNA Ssr1 based on RT-PCR, northern blot, and 5'RACE in S. flexneri. Ssr1 responds to acidic environmental changes, as shown by a strong linear correlation between the pH value and Ssr1 expression (R = 0.785, P < 0.05) using the qRT-PCR method. Deletion of Ssr1 results in growth retardation at pH values ranging from 5.0 to 7.0 (P < 0.05), and the survival rate was reduced by 22% in acidic conditions (pH 3.0). Additionally, virulence was significantly increased in an Ssr1 mutant strain, as revealed in a murine lung invasion model and survival model assays. By using the sTarPicker method and proteomic analysis, we considered that DnaK, which is a major factor that confers acidic stress tolerance, may be a direct target of Ssr1. We also found that Ssr1 may enhance virulence by directly targeting OmpA; this leads to altered expression of genes in the type three secretion system (T3SS). This work provides new insight into the mechanism of adaptation to environmental stress and into the pathogenesis of Shigella. PMID:27014636

  14. Screening and characterization of ethanol-tolerant and thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria from Chinese vinegar Pei.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Bai, Ye; Li, Dongsheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Ning; Hu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are important microorganisms in the vinegar industry. However, AAB have to tolerate the presence of ethanol and high temperatures, especially in submerged fermentation (SF), which inhibits AAB growth and acid yield. In this study, seven AAB that are tolerant to temperatures above 40 °C and ethanol concentrations above 10% (v/v) were isolated from Chinese vinegar Pei. All the isolated AAB belong to Acetobacter pasteurianus according to 16S rDNA analysis. Among all AAB, AAB4 produced the highest acid yield under high temperature and ethanol test conditions. At 4% ethanol and 30-40 °C temperatures, AAB4 maintained an alcohol-acid transform ratio of more than 90.5 %. High alcohol-acid transform ratio was still maintained even at higher temperatures, namely, 87.2, 77.1, 14.5 and 2.9% at 41, 42, 43 and 44 °C, respectively. At 30 °C and different initial ethanol concentrations (4-10%), the acid yield by AAB4 increased gradually, although the alcohol-acid transform ratio decreased to some extent. However, 46.5, 8.7 and 0.9% ratios were retained at ethanol concentrations of 11, 12 and 13%, respectively. When compared with AS1.41 (an AAB widely used in China) using a 10 L fermentor, AAB4 produced 42.0 g/L acetic acid at 37 °C with 10% ethanol, whereas AS1.41 almost stopped producing acetic acid. In conclusion, these traits suggest that AAB4 is a valuable strain for vinegar production in SF.

  15. Screening and characterization of ethanol-tolerant and thermotolerant acetic acid bacteria from Chinese vinegar Pei.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yang; Bai, Ye; Li, Dongsheng; Wang, Chao; Xu, Ning; Hu, Yong

    2016-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) are important microorganisms in the vinegar industry. However, AAB have to tolerate the presence of ethanol and high temperatures, especially in submerged fermentation (SF), which inhibits AAB growth and acid yield. In this study, seven AAB that are tolerant to temperatures above 40 °C and ethanol concentrations above 10% (v/v) were isolated from Chinese vinegar Pei. All the isolated AAB belong to Acetobacter pasteurianus according to 16S rDNA analysis. Among all AAB, AAB4 produced the highest acid yield under high temperature and ethanol test conditions. At 4% ethanol and 30-40 °C temperatures, AAB4 maintained an alcohol-acid transform ratio of more than 90.5 %. High alcohol-acid transform ratio was still maintained even at higher temperatures, namely, 87.2, 77.1, 14.5 and 2.9% at 41, 42, 43 and 44 °C, respectively. At 30 °C and different initial ethanol concentrations (4-10%), the acid yield by AAB4 increased gradually, although the alcohol-acid transform ratio decreased to some extent. However, 46.5, 8.7 and 0.9% ratios were retained at ethanol concentrations of 11, 12 and 13%, respectively. When compared with AS1.41 (an AAB widely used in China) using a 10 L fermentor, AAB4 produced 42.0 g/L acetic acid at 37 °C with 10% ethanol, whereas AS1.41 almost stopped producing acetic acid. In conclusion, these traits suggest that AAB4 is a valuable strain for vinegar production in SF. PMID:26712629

  16. The fatty acid profile of rainbow trout liver cells modulates their tolerance to methylmercury and cadmium.

    PubMed

    Ferain, Aline; Bonnineau, Chloé; Neefs, Ineke; Rees, Jean François; Larondelle, Yvan; Schamphelaere, Karel A C De; Debier, Cathy

    2016-08-01

    The polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA) composition of fish tissues, which generally reflects that of the diet, affects various cellular properties such as membrane structure and fluidity, energy metabolism and susceptibility to oxidative stress. Since these cellular parameters can play an important role in the cellular response to organic and inorganic pollutants, a variation of the PUFA supply might modify the toxicity induced by such xenobiotics. In this work, we investigated whether the cellular fatty acid profile has an impact on the in vitro cell sensitivity to two environmental pollutants: methylmercury and cadmium. Firstly, the fatty acid composition of the rainbow trout liver cell line RTL-W1 was modified by enriching the growth medium with either alpha-linolenic acid (ALA, 18:3n-3), eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA, 20:5n-3), docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, 22:6n-3), linoleic acid (LA, 18:2n-6), arachidonic acid (AA, 20:4n-6) or docosapentaenoic acid (DPA, 22:5n-6). These modified cells and their control (no PUFA enrichment) were then challenged for 24h with increasing concentrations of methylmercury or cadmium. We observed that (i) the phospholipid composition of the RTL-W1 cells was profoundly modulated by changing the PUFA content of the growth medium: major modifications were a high incorporation of the supplemented PUFA in the cellular phospholipids, the appearance of direct elongation and desaturation metabolites in the cellular phospholipids as well as a change in the gross phospholipid composition (PUFA and monounsaturated fatty acid (MUFA) levels and n-3/n-6 ratio); (ii) ALA, EPA and DPA enrichment significantly protected the RTL-W1 cells against both methylmercury and cadmium; (iv) DHA enrichment significantly protected the cells against cadmium but not methylmercury; (v) AA and LA enrichment had no impact on the cell tolerance to both methylmercury and cadmium; (vi) the abundance of 20:3n-6, a metabolite of the n-6 biotransformation pathway, in

  17. Safety and tolerability of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid in the treatment of alcohol-dependent patients.

    PubMed

    Beghè, F; Carpanini, M T

    2000-04-01

    Gamma-hydroxybutyric acid (GHB) has been in clinical use in Italy since 1991 for treatment of alcohol dependence. Results of phase III and phase IV studies have shown that the drug is effective and well tolerated in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal syndrome and in reducing alcohol consumption and alcohol craving. Pharmacosurveillance indicates that abuse of gamma-hydroxybutyric acid is a limited phenomenon in clinical settings when the drug is dispensed under strict medical surveillance and entrusted to a referring familiar member of the patient.

  18. Withania somnifera attenuates acid production, acid tolerance and extra-cellular polysaccharide formation of Streptococcus mutans biofilms.

    PubMed

    Pandit, Santosh; Song, Kwang-Yeob; Jeon, Jae-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Withania somnifera (Ashwagandha) is a plant of the Solanaceae family. It has been widely used as a remedy for a variety of ailments in India and Nepal. The plant has also been used as a controlling agent for dental diseases. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the activity of the methanol extract of W. somnifera against the physiological ability of cariogenic biofilms and to identify the components of the extract. To determine the activity of the extract, assays for sucrose-dependent bacterial adherence, glycolytic acid production, acid tolerance, and extracellular polysaccharide formation were performed using Streptococcus mutans biofilms. The viability change of S. mutans biofilms cells was also determined. A phytochemical analysis of the extract was performed using TLC and LC/MS/MS. The extract showed inhibitory effects on sucrose-dependent bacterial adherence (≥ 100 μg/ml), glycolytic acid production (≥ 300 μg/ml), acid tolerance (≥ 300 μg/ml), and extracellular polysaccharide formation (≥ 300 μg/ml) of S. mutans biofilms. However, the extract did not alter the viability of S. mutans biofilms cells in all concentrations tested. Based on the phytochemical analysis, the activity of the extract may be related to the presence of alkaloids, anthrones, coumarines, anthraquinones, terpenoids, flavonoids, and steroid lactones (withanolide A, withaferin A, withanolide B, withanoside IV, and 12-deoxy withastramonolide). These data indicate that W. somnifera may be a potential agent for restraining the physiological ability of cariogenic biofilms.

  19. GID1 modulates stomatal response and submergence tolerance involving abscisic acid and gibberellic acid signaling in rice.

    PubMed

    Du, Hao; Chang, Yu; Huang, Fei; Xiong, Lizhong

    2015-11-01

    Plant responses to abiotic stresses are coordinated by arrays of growth and developmental programs. Gibberellic acid (GA) and abscisic acid (ABA) play critical roles in the developmental programs and environmental responses, respectively, through complex signaling and metabolism networks. However, crosstalk between the two phytohormones in stress responses remains largely unknown. In this study, we report that GIBBERELLIN-INSENSITIVE DWARF 1 (GID1), a soluble receptor for GA, regulates stomatal development and patterning in rice (Oryza sativa L.). The gid1 mutant showed impaired biosynthesis of endogenous ABA under drought stress conditions, but it exhibited enhanced sensitivity to exogenous ABA. Scanning electron microscope and infrared thermal image analysis indicated an increase in the stomatal conductance in the gid1 mutant under drought conditions. Interestingly, the gid1 mutant had increased levels of chlorophyll and carbohydrates under submergence conditions, and showed enhanced reactive oxygen species (ROS)-scavenging ability and submergence tolerance compared with the wild-type. Further analyses suggested that the function of GID1 in submergence responses is partially dependent on ABA, and GA signaling by GID1 is involved in submergence tolerance by modulating carbohydrate consumption. Taken together, these findings suggest GID1 plays distinct roles in stomatal response and submergence tolerance through both the ABA and GA signaling pathways in rice.

  20. The NF-YA transcription factor OsNF-YA7 confers drought stress tolerance of rice in an abscisic acid independent manner.

    PubMed

    Lee, Dong-Keun; Kim, Hyung Il; Jang, Geupil; Chung, Pil Joong; Jeong, Jin Seo; Kim, Youn Shic; Bang, Seung Woon; Jung, Harin; Choi, Yang Do; Kim, Ju-Kon

    2015-12-01

    The mechanisms of plant response and adaptation to drought stress require the regulation of transcriptional networks via the induction of drought-responsive transcription factors. Nuclear Factor Y (NF-Y) transcription factors have aroused interest in roles of plant drought stress responses. However, the molecular mechanism of the NF-Y-induced drought tolerance is not well understood. Here, we functionally analyzed two rice NF-YA genes, OsNF-YA7 and OsNF-YA4. Expression of OsNF-YA7 was induced by drought stress and its overexpression in transgenic rice plants improved their drought tolerance. In contrast, OsNF-YA4 expression was not increased by drought stress and its overexpression in transgenic rice plants did not affect their sensitivity to drought stress. OsNF-YA4 expression was highly induced by the stress-related hormone abscisic acid (ABA), while OsNF-YA7 was not, indicating that OsNF-YA7 mediates drought tolerance in an ABA-independent manner. Analysis of the OsNF-YA7 promoter revealed three ABA-independent DRE/CTR elements and RNA-seq analysis identified 48 genes downstream of OsNFYA7 action putatively involved in the OsNF-YA7-mediated drought tolerance pathway. Taken together, our results suggest an important role for OsNF-YA7 in rice drought stress tolerance.

  1. Behavioral tolerance to lysergic acid diethylamide is associated with reduced serotonin-2A receptor signaling in rat cortex.

    PubMed

    Gresch, Paul J; Smith, Randy L; Barrett, Robert J; Sanders-Bush, Elaine

    2005-09-01

    Tolerance is defined as a decrease in responsiveness to a drug after repeated administration. Tolerance to the behavioral effects of hallucinogens occurs in humans and animals. In this study, we used drug discrimination to establish a behavioral model of lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) tolerance and examined whether tolerance to the stimulus properties of LSD is related to altered serotonin receptor signaling. Rats were trained to discriminate 60 microg/kg LSD from saline in a two-lever drug discrimination paradigm. Two groups of animals were assigned to either chronic saline treatment or chronic LSD treatment. For chronic treatment, rats from each group were injected once per day with either 130 microg/kg LSD or saline for 5 days. Rats were tested for their ability to discriminate either saline or 60 microg/kg LSD, 24 h after the last chronic injection. Rats receiving chronic LSD showed a 44% reduction in LSD lever selection, while rats receiving chronic vehicle showed no change in percent choice on the LSD lever. In another group of rats receiving the identical chronic LSD treatment, LSD-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding, an index of G-protein coupling, was measured in the rat brain by autoradiography. After chronic LSD, a significant reduction in LSD-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding was observed in the medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex. Furthermore, chronic LSD produced a significant reduction in 2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodoamphetamine-stimulated [35S]GTPgammaS binding in medial prefrontal cortex and anterior cingulate cortex, which was blocked by MDL 100907, a selective 5-HT2A receptor antagonist, but not SB206553, a 5-HT2C receptor antagonist, indicating a reduction in 5-HT2A receptor signaling. 125I-LSD binding to 5-HT2A receptors was reduced in cortical regions, demonstrating a reduction in 5-HT2A receptor density. Taken together, these results indicate that adaptive changes in LSD-stimulated serotonin receptor signaling may mediate tolerance

  2. Transcriptional Adaptation of Drug-tolerant Mycobacterium tuberculosis During Treatment of Human Tuberculosis

    PubMed Central

    Walter, Nicholas D.; Dolganov, Gregory M.; Garcia, Benjamin J.; Worodria, William; Andama, Alfred; Musisi, Emmanuel; Ayakaka, Irene; Van, Tran T.; Voskuil, Martin I.; de Jong, Bouke C.; Davidson, Rebecca M.; Fingerlin, Tasha E.; Kechris, Katerina; Palmer, Claire; Nahid, Payam; Daley, Charles L.; Geraci, Mark; Huang, Laurence; Cattamanchi, Adithya; Strong, Michael; Schoolnik, Gary K.; Davis, John Lucian

    2015-01-01

    Background. Treatment initiation rapidly kills most drug-susceptible Mycobacterium tuberculosis, but a bacterial subpopulation tolerates prolonged drug exposure. We evaluated drug-tolerant bacilli in human sputum by comparing messenger RNA (mRNA) expression of drug-tolerant bacilli that survive the early bactericidal phase with treatment-naive bacilli. Methods. M. tuberculosis gene expression was quantified via reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction in serial sputa from 17 Ugandans treated for drug-susceptible pulmonary tuberculosis. Results. Within 4 days, bacterial mRNA abundance declined >98%, indicating rapid killing. Thereafter, the rate of decline slowed >94%, indicating drug tolerance. After 14 days, 16S ribosomal RNA transcripts/genome declined 96%, indicating slow growth. Drug-tolerant bacilli displayed marked downregulation of genes associated with growth, metabolism, and lipid synthesis and upregulation in stress responses and key regulatory categories—including stress-associated sigma factors, transcription factors, and toxin-antitoxin genes. Drug efflux pumps were upregulated. The isoniazid stress signature was induced by initial drug exposure, then disappeared after 4 days. Conclusions. Transcriptional patterns suggest that drug-tolerant bacilli in sputum are in a slow-growing, metabolically and synthetically downregulated state. Absence of the isoniazid stress signature in drug-tolerant bacilli indicates that physiological state influences drug responsiveness in vivo. These results identify novel drug targets that should aid in development of novel shorter tuberculosis treatment regimens. PMID:25762787

  3. Habituation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus to Origanum vulgare L. essential oil does not induce direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to salts and organic acids

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Adassa Gama; do Monte, Daniel Farias Marinho; Albuquerque, Allan dos Reis; Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Magnani, Marciane; de Siqueira, José Pinto; de Souza, Evandro Leite

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains that were isolated from foods were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), lactic acid (LA) and acetic acid (AA) after habituation in sublethal amounts (1/2 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/2 MIC and 1/4 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/4 MIC) of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO). The habituation of S. aureus to 1/2 MIC and 1/4 MIC of OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by modulation of MIC values. Otherwise, exposing the strains to OVEO at sublethal concentrations maintained or increased the sensitivity of the cells to the tested stressing agents because the MIC values of OVEO, NaCl, KCl, LA and AA against the cells that were previously habituated to OVEO remained the same or decreased when compared with non-habituated cells. These data indicate that OVEO does not have an inductive effect on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested enterotoxigenic strains of S. aureus to antimicrobial agents that are typically used in food preservation. PMID:26413067

  4. Habituation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus to Origanum vulgare L. essential oil does not induce direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to salts and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Adassa Gama; Monte, Daniel Farias Marinho do; Albuquerque, Allan Dos Reis; Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Magnani, Marciane; Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto de; Souza, Evandro Leite de

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains that were isolated from foods were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), lactic acid (LA) and acetic acid (AA) after habituation in sublethal amounts (1/2 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/2 MIC and 1/4 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/4 MIC) of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO). The habituation of S. aureus to 1/2 MIC and 1/4 MIC of OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by modulation of MIC values. Otherwise, exposing the strains to OVEO at sublethal concentrations maintained or increased the sensitivity of the cells to the tested stressing agents because the MIC values of OVEO, NaCl, KCl, LA and AA against the cells that were previously habituated to OVEO remained the same or decreased when compared with non-habituated cells. These data indicate that OVEO does not have an inductive effect on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested enterotoxigenic strains of S. aureus to antimicrobial agents that are typically used in food preservation. PMID:26413067

  5. Habituation of enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus to Origanum vulgare L. essential oil does not induce direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to salts and organic acids.

    PubMed

    Tavares, Adassa Gama; Monte, Daniel Farias Marinho do; Albuquerque, Allan Dos Reis; Sampaio, Fábio Correia; Magnani, Marciane; Siqueira Júnior, José Pinto de; Souza, Evandro Leite de

    2015-01-01

    Enterotoxigenic Staphylococcus aureus strains that were isolated from foods were investigated for their ability to develop direct-tolerance and cross-tolerance to sodium chloride (NaCl), potassium chloride (KCl), lactic acid (LA) and acetic acid (AA) after habituation in sublethal amounts (1/2 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/2 MIC and 1/4 of the minimum inhibitory concentration - 1/4 MIC) of Origanum vulgare L. essential oil (OVEO). The habituation of S. aureus to 1/2 MIC and 1/4 MIC of OVEO did not induce direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested strains, as assessed by modulation of MIC values. Otherwise, exposing the strains to OVEO at sublethal concentrations maintained or increased the sensitivity of the cells to the tested stressing agents because the MIC values of OVEO, NaCl, KCl, LA and AA against the cells that were previously habituated to OVEO remained the same or decreased when compared with non-habituated cells. These data indicate that OVEO does not have an inductive effect on the acquisition of direct-tolerance or cross-tolerance in the tested enterotoxigenic strains of S. aureus to antimicrobial agents that are typically used in food preservation.

  6. Integrated phospholipidomics and transcriptomics analysis of Saccharomyces cerevisiae with enhanced tolerance to a mixture of acetic acid, furfural, and phenol

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    A mixture of acetic acid, furfural and phenol (AFP), three representative lignocellulose derived inhibitors, significantly inhibited the growth and bioethanol production of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In order to uncover mechanisms behind the enhanced tolerance of an inhibitor-tolerant S.cerevisiae s...

  7. Local adaptation constrains the distribution potential of heat-tolerant Symbiodinium from the Persian/Arabian Gulf.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Cecilia; Hume, Benjamin C C; Burt, John; Smith, Edward G; Achterberg, Eric P; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    The symbiotic association of corals and unicellular algae of the genus Symbiodinium in the southern Persian/Arabian Gulf (PAG) display an exceptional heat tolerance, enduring summer peak temperatures of up to 36 °C. As yet, it is not clear whether this resilience is related to the presence of specific symbiont types that are exclusively found in this region. Therefore, we used molecular markers to identify the symbiotic algae of three Porites species along >1000 km of coastline in the PAG and the Gulf of Oman and found that a recently described species, Symbiodinium thermophilum, is integral to coral survival in the southern PAG, the world's hottest sea. Despite the geographic isolation of the PAG, we discovered that representatives of the S. thermophilum group can also be found in the adjacent Gulf of Oman providing a potential source of thermotolerant symbionts that might facilitate the adaptation of Indian Ocean populations to the higher water temperatures expected for the future. However, corals from the PAG associated with S. thermophilum show strong local adaptation not only to high temperatures but also to the exceptionally high salinity of their habitat. We show that their superior heat tolerance can be lost when these corals are exposed to reduced salinity levels common for oceanic environments elsewhere. Consequently, the salinity prevailing in most reefs outside the PAG might represent a distribution barrier for extreme temperature-tolerant coral/Symbiodinium associations from the PAG.

  8. Local adaptation constrains the distribution potential of heat-tolerant Symbiodinium from the Persian/Arabian Gulf

    PubMed Central

    D'Angelo, Cecilia; Hume, Benjamin C C; Burt, John; Smith, Edward G; Achterberg, Eric P; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2015-01-01

    The symbiotic association of corals and unicellular algae of the genus Symbiodinium in the southern Persian/Arabian Gulf (PAG) display an exceptional heat tolerance, enduring summer peak temperatures of up to 36 °C. As yet, it is not clear whether this resilience is related to the presence of specific symbiont types that are exclusively found in this region. Therefore, we used molecular markers to identify the symbiotic algae of three Porites species along >1000 km of coastline in the PAG and the Gulf of Oman and found that a recently described species, Symbiodinium thermophilum, is integral to coral survival in the southern PAG, the world's hottest sea. Despite the geographic isolation of the PAG, we discovered that representatives of the S. thermophilum group can also be found in the adjacent Gulf of Oman providing a potential source of thermotolerant symbionts that might facilitate the adaptation of Indian Ocean populations to the higher water temperatures expected for the future. However, corals from the PAG associated with S. thermophilum show strong local adaptation not only to high temperatures but also to the exceptionally high salinity of their habitat. We show that their superior heat tolerance can be lost when these corals are exposed to reduced salinity levels common for oceanic environments elsewhere. Consequently, the salinity prevailing in most reefs outside the PAG might represent a distribution barrier for extreme temperature-tolerant coral/Symbiodinium associations from the PAG. PMID:25989370

  9. Local adaptation constrains the distribution potential of heat-tolerant Symbiodinium from the Persian/Arabian Gulf.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, Cecilia; Hume, Benjamin C C; Burt, John; Smith, Edward G; Achterberg, Eric P; Wiedenmann, Jörg

    2015-12-01

    The symbiotic association of corals and unicellular algae of the genus Symbiodinium in the southern Persian/Arabian Gulf (PAG) display an exceptional heat tolerance, enduring summer peak temperatures of up to 36 °C. As yet, it is not clear whether this resilience is related to the presence of specific symbiont types that are exclusively found in this region. Therefore, we used molecular markers to identify the symbiotic algae of three Porites species along >1000 km of coastline in the PAG and the Gulf of Oman and found that a recently described species, Symbiodinium thermophilum, is integral to coral survival in the southern PAG, the world's hottest sea. Despite the geographic isolation of the PAG, we discovered that representatives of the S. thermophilum group can also be found in the adjacent Gulf of Oman providing a potential source of thermotolerant symbionts that might facilitate the adaptation of Indian Ocean populations to the higher water temperatures expected for the future. However, corals from the PAG associated with S. thermophilum show strong local adaptation not only to high temperatures but also to the exceptionally high salinity of their habitat. We show that their superior heat tolerance can be lost when these corals are exposed to reduced salinity levels common for oceanic environments elsewhere. Consequently, the salinity prevailing in most reefs outside the PAG might represent a distribution barrier for extreme temperature-tolerant coral/Symbiodinium associations from the PAG. PMID:25989370

  10. Local adaptation is associated with zinc tolerance in Pseudomonas endophytes of the metal-hyperaccumulator plant Noccaea caerulescens.

    PubMed

    Fones, H N; McCurrach, H; Mithani, A; Smith, J A C; Preston, G M

    2016-05-11

    Metal-hyperaccumulating plants, which are hypothesized to use metals for defence against pests and pathogens, provide a unique context in which to study plant-pathogen coevolution. Previously, we demonstrated that the high concentrations of zinc found in leaves of the hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens provide protection against bacterial pathogens, with a potential trade-off between metal-based and pathogen-induced defences. We speculated that an evolutionary arms race between zinc-based defences in N. caerulescens and zinc tolerance in pathogens might have driven the development of the hyperaccumulation phenotype. Here, we investigate the possibility of local adaptation by bacteria to the zinc-rich environment of N. caerulescens leaves and show that leaves sampled from the contaminated surroundings of a former mine site harboured endophytes with greater zinc tolerance than those within plants of an artificially created hyperaccumulating population. Experimental manipulation of zinc concentrations in plants of this artificial population influenced the zinc tolerance of recovered endophytes. In laboratory experiments, only endophytic bacteria isolated from plants of the natural population were able to grow to high population densities in any N. caerulescens plants. These findings suggest that long-term coexistence with zinc-hyperaccumulating plants leads to local adaptation by endophytic bacteria to the environment within their leaves. PMID:27170725

  11. Synthesis and role of salicylic acid in wheat varieties with different levels of cadmium tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Viktória; Gondor, Orsolya K; Szalai, Gabriella; Darkó, Eva; Majláth, Imre; Janda, Tibor; Pál, Magda

    2014-09-15

    Wheat genotypes with different endogenous SA contents were investigated, in order to reveal how cadmium influences salicylic acid (SA) synthesis, and to find possible relationships between SA and certain protective compounds (members of the antioxidants and the heavy metal detoxification system) and between the SA content and the level of cadmium tolerance. Cadmium exposure induced SA synthesis, especially in the leaves, and it is suggested that the phenyl-propanoid synthesis pathway is responsible for the accumulation of SA observed after cadmium stress. Cadmium influenced the synthesis and activation of protective compounds to varying extents in wheat genotypes with different levels of tolerance; the roots and leaves also responded differently to cadmium stress. Although a direct relationship was not found between the initial SA levels and the degree of cadmium tolerance, the results suggest that the increase in the root SA level during cadmium stress in the Mv varieties could be related with the enhancement of the internal glutathione cycle, thus inducing the antioxidant and metal detoxification systems, which promote Cd stress tolerance in wheat seedlings. The positive correlation between certain SA-related compounds and protective compounds suggests that SA-related signalling may also play a role in the acclimation to heavy metal stress. PMID:25113613

  12. Synthesis and role of salicylic acid in wheat varieties with different levels of cadmium tolerance.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Viktória; Gondor, Orsolya K; Szalai, Gabriella; Darkó, Eva; Majláth, Imre; Janda, Tibor; Pál, Magda

    2014-09-15

    Wheat genotypes with different endogenous SA contents were investigated, in order to reveal how cadmium influences salicylic acid (SA) synthesis, and to find possible relationships between SA and certain protective compounds (members of the antioxidants and the heavy metal detoxification system) and between the SA content and the level of cadmium tolerance. Cadmium exposure induced SA synthesis, especially in the leaves, and it is suggested that the phenyl-propanoid synthesis pathway is responsible for the accumulation of SA observed after cadmium stress. Cadmium influenced the synthesis and activation of protective compounds to varying extents in wheat genotypes with different levels of tolerance; the roots and leaves also responded differently to cadmium stress. Although a direct relationship was not found between the initial SA levels and the degree of cadmium tolerance, the results suggest that the increase in the root SA level during cadmium stress in the Mv varieties could be related with the enhancement of the internal glutathione cycle, thus inducing the antioxidant and metal detoxification systems, which promote Cd stress tolerance in wheat seedlings. The positive correlation between certain SA-related compounds and protective compounds suggests that SA-related signalling may also play a role in the acclimation to heavy metal stress.

  13. Bacterial drug tolerance under clinical conditions is governed by anaerobic adaptation but not anaerobic respiration.

    PubMed

    Hemsley, Claudia M; Luo, Jamie X; Andreae, Clio A; Butler, Clive S; Soyer, Orkun S; Titball, Richard W

    2014-10-01

    Noninherited antibiotic resistance is a phenomenon whereby a subpopulation of genetically identical bacteria displays phenotypic tolerance to antibiotics. We show here that compared to Escherichia coli, the clinically relevant genus Burkholderia displays much higher levels of cells that tolerate ceftazidime. By measuring the dynamics of the formation of drug-tolerant cells under conditions that mimic in vivo infections, we show that in Burkholderia bacteria, oxygen levels affect the formation of these cells. The drug-tolerant cells are characterized by an anaerobic metabolic signature and can be eliminated by oxygenating the system or adding nitrate. The transcriptome profile suggests that these cells are not dormant persister cells and are likely to be drug tolerant as a consequence of the upregulation of anaerobic nitrate respiration, efflux pumps, β-lactamases, and stress response proteins. These findings have important implications for the treatment of chronic bacterial infections and the methodologies and conditions that are used to study drug-tolerant and persister cells in vitro.

  14. Thermal resistance parameters of acid-adapted and unadapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 in apple-carrot juice blends: effect of organic acids and pH.

    PubMed

    Usaga, Jessie; Worobo, Randy W; Padilla-Zakour, Olga I

    2014-04-01

    Numerous outbreaks involving fresh juices contaminated with Escherichia coli O157:H7 have occurred in the United States and around the world, raising concern for the safety of these products. Until now, only a few studies regarding the thermal tolerance of this pathogen in acidic juices over a wide range of pH values have been published. Therefore, the effect of varying the pH with different organic acids on the thermal inactivation of non-acid-adapted and acid-adapted E. coli O157:H7 (strain C7927) was determined. The decimal reduction times (D-values) and the change in temperature required for the thermal destruction curve to traverse 1 log cycle (z-values) were calculated for non-acid-adapted E. coli in an apple-carrot juice blend (80:20) adjusted to three pH values (3.3, 3.5, and 3.7) by the addition of lactic, malic, or acetic acid and at a pH of 4.5 adjusted with NaOH. Thermal parameters were also determined for acid-adapted cells in juices acidified with malic acid. The effect of the soluble solids content on the thermal tolerance was studied in samples with a pH of 3.7 at 9.4 to 11.5 °Brix. The D-values were determined at 54, 56, and 58 °C, and trials were conducted in triplicate. Non-acid-adapted E. coli exhibited the highest thermal tolerance at pH 4.5 (D-value at 54 °C [D54 °C] of 20 ± 4 min and z-value of 6.2 °C), although on average, the D-values increased significantly (P < 0.01) due to acid adaptation. In acidified juices, the highest tolerance was observed in acid-adapted E. coli in samples adjusted to pH 3.7 with malic acid (D54 °C of 9 ± 2 min and z-value of 5.4 °C) and the lowest in unadapted E. coli at pH 3.3 acidified with acetic acid (D58 °C of 0.03 ± 0.01 min and z-value of 10.4 °C). For juices acidified to the same endpoint pH with different acids, E. coli was found to be more tolerant in samples acidified with malic acid, followed by lactic and acetic acids. Increasing the soluble solids content from 9.4 to 11.5 °Brix showed no

  15. Enhance nisin yield via improving acid-tolerant capability of Lactococcus lactis F44

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jian; Caiyin, Qinggele; Feng, Wenjing; Zhao, Xiuli; Qiao, Bin; Zhao, Guangrong; Qiao, Jianjun

    2016-01-01

    Traditionally, nisin was produced industrially by using Lactococcus lactis in the neutral fermentation process. However, nisin showed higher activity in the acidic environment. How to balance the pH value for bacterial normal growth and nisin activity might be the key problem. In this study, 17 acid-tolerant genes and 6 lactic acid synthetic genes were introduced in L. lactis F44, respectively. Comparing to the 2810 IU/mL nisin yield of the original strain F44, the nisin titer of the engineered strains over-expressing hdeAB, ldh and murG, increased to 3850, 3979 and 4377 IU/mL, respectively. These engineered strains showed more stable intracellular pH value during the fermentation process. Improvement of lactate production could partly provide the extra energy for the expression of acid tolerance genes during growth. Co-overexpression of hdeAB, murG, and ldh(Z) in strain F44 resulted in the nisin titer of 4913 IU/mL. The engineered strain (ABGL) could grow on plates with pH 4.2, comparing to the surviving pH 4.6 of strain F44. The fed-batch fermentation showed nisin titer of the co-expression L. lactis strain could reach 5563 IU/mL with lower pH condition and longer cultivation time. This work provides a novel strategy of constructing robust strains for use in industry process. PMID:27306587

  16. Transcriptome analysis of acetic-acid-treated yeast cells identifies a large set of genes whose overexpression or deletion enhances acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yeji; Nasution, Olviyani; Choi, Eunyong; Choi, In-Geol; Kim, Wankee; Choi, Wonja

    2015-08-01

    Acetic acid inhibits the metabolic activities of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Therefore, a better understanding of how S. cerevisiae cells acquire the tolerance to acetic acid is of importance to develop robust yeast strains to be used in industry. To do this, we examined the transcriptional changes that occur at 12 h post-exposure to acetic acid, revealing that 56 and 58 genes were upregulated and downregulated, respectively. Functional categorization of them revealed that 22 protein synthesis genes and 14 stress response genes constituted the largest portion of the upregulated and downregulated genes, respectively. To evaluate the association of the regulated genes with acetic acid tolerance, 3 upregulated genes (DBP2, ASC1, and GND1) were selected among 34 non-protein synthesis genes, and 54 viable mutants individually deleted for the downregulated genes were retrieved from the non-essential haploid deletion library. Strains overexpressing ASC1 and GND1 displayed enhanced tolerance to acetic acid, whereas a strain overexpressing DBP2 was sensitive. Fifty of 54 deletion mutants displayed enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Three chosen deletion mutants (hsps82Δ, ato2Δ, and ssa3Δ) were also tolerant to benzoic acid but not propionic and sorbic acids. Moreover, all those five (two overexpressing and three deleted) strains were more efficient in proton efflux and lower in membrane permeability and internal hydrogen peroxide content than controls. Individually or in combination, those physiological changes are likely to contribute at least in part to enhanced acetic acid tolerance. Overall, information of our transcriptional profile was very useful to identify molecular factors associated with acetic acid tolerance.

  17. Investigation of Growth Phase-Dependent Acid Tolerance in Bifidobacteria longum BBMN68.

    PubMed

    Jin, Junhua; Song, Jingyi; Ren, Fazheng; Zhang, Hongxing; Xie, Yuanhong; Ma, Jingsheng; Li, Xue

    2016-11-01

    The underlying mechanisms imparting the growth phase-dependent acid tolerance have not been extensively investigated. In this study, we compared the acid resistance of the Bifidobacterium longum strain BBMN68 from different growth phases at lethal pH values (pH 2.5, 3.0, and 3.5), and analyzed the activity of H(+)-ATPase, the composition of fatty acids, and the mRNA abundance of ffh, uvrA, recA, lexA, groES, and dnaK in cells from different growth phases. The results indicated that the survival rates of cells from early stationary (ES) and late stationary (LS) growth phases at lethal pH values were significantly higher than those of exponential growth phase cells. Our findings indicated that by inducing a continuously auto-acidizing environment during cell growth, the acid resistance of ES and LS cells was strengthened. The higher activity of H(+)-ATPase, the decrease in unsaturated fatty acids, and the increased expression of genes involved in DNA repair and protein protection in the cells in stationary growth phase were all implicated in the significantly increased acid resistance of ES and LS cells compared with exponential growth phase cells of the B. longum strain BBMN68.

  18. Supported zirconium sulfate on carbon nanotubes as water-tolerant solid acid catalyst

    SciTech Connect

    Juan, Joon Ching; Jiang Yajie; Meng Xiujuan; Cao Weiliang; Yarmo, Mohd Ambar; Zhang Jingchang . E-mail: zhangjc1@mail.buct.edu.cn

    2007-07-03

    A new solid acid of zirconium sulfate (CZ) was successfully supported on carbon nanotube (CNT) for esterification reaction. Preparation conditions of the supported CZ have been investigated, to obtain highest catalytic activity for esterification reaction. XRD, TEM, BET, X-ray photoelectron spectra (XPS) and in situ FTIR analysis has also been carried out to understand the characteristics of the catalyst. In the esterification of acrylic acid with n-octanol, the supported CZ exhibited high catalytic activity and stability. The catalytic activity was nearly unchanged during four times of reuse. XRD and TEM analysis indicated that CZ was finely dispersed on CNT. XPS analysis shows that the CZ species was preserved and the chemical environment of the CZ has changed after loaded on CNT. This finding show that CNT as CZ support is an efficient water-tolerant solid acid.

  19. Tandem Catalytic Depolymerization of Lignin by Water-Tolerant Lewis Acids and Rhodium Complexes.

    PubMed

    Jastrzebski, Robin; Constant, Sandra; Lancefield, Christopher S; Westwood, Nicholas J; Weckhuysen, Bert M; Bruijnincx, Pieter C A

    2016-08-23

    Lignin is an attractive renewable feedstock for aromatic bulk and fine chemicals production, provided that suitable depolymerization procedures are developed. Here, we describe a tandem catalysis strategy for ether linkage cleavage within lignin, involving ether hydrolysis by water-tolerant Lewis acids followed by aldehyde decarbonylation by a Rh complex. In situ decarbonylation of the reactive aldehydes limits loss of monomers by recondensation, a major issue in acid-catalyzed lignin depolymerization. Rate of hydrolysis and decarbonylation were matched using lignin model compounds, allowing the method to be successfully applied to softwood, hardwood, and herbaceous dioxasolv lignins, as well as poplar sawdust, to give the anticipated decarbonylation products and, rather surprisingly, 4-(1-propenyl)phenols. Promisingly, product selectivity can be tuned by variation of the Lewis-acid strength and lignin source. PMID:27440544

  20. Klebsiella sp. strain C2A isolated from olive oil mill waste is able to tolerate and degrade tannic acid in very high concentrations.

    PubMed

    Pepi, Milva; Cappelli, Serena; Hachicho, Nancy; Perra, Guido; Renzi, Monia; Tarabelli, Alessandro; Altieri, Roberto; Esposito, Alessandro; Focardi, Silvano E; Heipieper, Hermann J

    2013-06-01

    Four bacterial strains capable of growing in the presence of tannic acid as sole carbon and energy source were isolated from olive mill waste mixtures. 16S rRNA gene sequencing assigned them to the genus Klebsiella. The most efficient strain, Klebsiella sp. strain C2A, was able to degrade 3.5 g L(-1) tannic acid within 35 h with synthesizing gallic acid as main product. The capability of Klebsiella sp. strain C2A to produce tannase was evidenced at high concentrations of tannic acid up to 50 g L(-1) . The bacteria adapted to the toxicity of tannic acids by an increase in the membrane lipid fatty acids degree of saturation, especially in the presence of concentrations higher than 20 g L(-1) . The highly tolerant and adaptable bacterial strain characterized in this study could be used in bioremediation processes of wastes rich in polyphenols such as those derived from olive mills, winery or tanneries.

  1. Environmental systems biology of cold-tolerant phenotype in Saccharomyces species adapted to grow at different temperatures

    PubMed Central

    Paget, Caroline Mary; Schwartz, Jean-Marc; Delneri, Daniela

    2014-01-01

    Temperature is one of the leading factors that drive adaptation of organisms and ecosystems. Remarkably, many closely related species share the same habitat because of their different temporal or micro-spatial thermal adaptation. In this study, we seek to find the underlying molecular mechanisms of the cold-tolerant phenotype of closely related yeast species adapted to grow at different temperatures, namely S. kudriavzevii CA111 (cryo-tolerant) and S. cerevisiae 96.2 (thermo-tolerant). Using two different systems approaches, i. thermodynamic-based analysis of a genome-scale metabolic model of S. cerevisiae and ii. large-scale competition experiment of the yeast heterozygote mutant collection, genes and pathways important for the growth at low temperature were identified. In particular, defects in lipid metabolism, oxidoreductase and vitamin pathways affected yeast fitness at cold. Combining the data from both studies, a list of candidate genes was generated and mutants for two predicted cold-favouring genes, GUT2 and ADH3, were created in two natural isolates. Compared with the parental strains, these mutants showed lower fitness at cold temperatures, with S. kudriavzevii displaying the strongest defect. Strikingly, in S. kudriavzevii, these mutations also significantly improve the growth at warm temperatures. In addition, overexpression of ADH3 in S. cerevisiae increased its fitness at cold. These results suggest that temperature-induced redox imbalances could be compensated by increased glycerol accumulation or production of cytosolic acetaldehyde through the deletion of GUT2 or ADH3, respectively. PMID:25243355

  2. Production of lactic acid from paper sludge using acid-tolerant, thermophilic Bacillus coagulan strains.

    PubMed

    Budhavaram, Naresh K; Fan, Zhiliang

    2009-12-01

    Production of lactic acid from paper sludge was studied using thermophilic Bacillus coagulan strains 36D1 and P4-102B. More than 80% of lactic acid yield and more than 87% of cellulose conversion were achieved using both strains without any pH control due to the buffering effect of CaCO(3) in paper sludge. The addition of CaCO(3) as the buffering reagent in rich medium increased lactic acid yield but had little effect on cellulose conversion; when lean medium was utilized, the addition of CaCO(3) had little effect on either cellulose conversion or lactic acid yield. Lowering the fermentation temperature lowered lactic acid yield but increased cellulose conversion. Semi-continuous simultaneous saccharification and co-fermentation (SSCF) using medium containing 100 g/L cellulose equivalent paper sludge without pH control was carried out in serum bottles for up to 1000 h. When rich medium was utilized, the average lactic acid concentrations in steady state for strains 36D1 and P4-102B were 92 g/L and 91.7 g/L, respectively, and lactic acid yields were 77% and 78%. The average lactic acid concentrations produced using semi-continuous SSCF with lean medium were 77.5 g/L and 77.0 g/L for strains 36D1 and P4-102B, respectively, and lactic acid yields were 72% and 75%. The productivities at steady state were 0.96 g/L/h and 0.82 g/L/h for both strains in rich medium and lean medium, respectively. Our data support that B. coagulan strains 36D1 and P4-102B are promising for converting paper sludge to lactic acid via SSCF.

  3. Stability of sublethal acid stress adaptation and induced cross protection against lauric arginate in Listeria monocytogenes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Qian; Soni, Kamlesh A; Nannapaneni, Ramakrishna

    2015-06-16

    The stability of acid stress adaptation in Listeria monocytogenes and its induced cross protection effect against GRAS (generally recognized as safe) antimicrobial compounds has never been investigated before. In the present study, the acid stress adaptation in L. monocytogenes was initially induced in pH 5.0 tryptic soy broth supplemented with 0.6% yeast extract (TSB-YE) at 37 °C. Subsequently, the stability of acid stress adaptation, which was defined as the capacity to maintain its acquired acid adaptation after induction in the absence of sublethal acid stress, was determined at 37 °C, 22 °C or 4 °C in broth and in different food substrates. Then, the acid stress adaptation induced cross protection against lauric arginate (LAE) and its stability was investigated in TSB-YE, milk and carrot juice. Our findings show that the acid stress adaptation was stable at 4 °C up to 24h but was reversed at 37 °C or 22 °C within 2h. In the cross protection assay with LAE, the acid stress adapted cells had approximately 2 log CFU/ml greater survival than non-adapted cells in broth at 22 °C or in milk and carrot juice at 4 °C. The acid adaptation induced cross protection against LAE in L. monocytogenes was reversible within 1h at 4 °C in the absence of sublethal acid stress. Our findings suggest that the stability of acid adaptation in L. monocytogenes under cold conditions should be taken into account when the risk analysis is performed during food processing.

  4. Role of fatty acids in Bacillus environmental adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Diomandé, Sara E.; Nguyen-The, Christophe; Guinebretière, Marie-Hélène; Broussolle, Véronique; Brillard, Julien

    2015-01-01

    The large bacterial genus Bacillus is widely distributed in the environment and is able to colonize highly diverse niches. Some Bacillus species harbor pathogenic characteristics. The fatty acid (FA) composition is among the essential criteria used to define Bacillus species. Some elements of the FA pattern composition are common to Bacillus species, whereas others are specific and can be categorized in relation to the ecological niches of the species. Bacillus species are able to modify their FA patterns to adapt to a wide range of environmental changes, including changes in the growth medium, temperature, food processing conditions, and pH. Like many other Gram-positive bacteria, Bacillus strains display a well-defined FA synthesis II system that is equilibrated with a FA degradation pathway and regulated to efficiently respond to the needs of the cell. Like endogenous FAs, exogenous FAs may positively or negatively affect the survival of Bacillus vegetative cells and the spore germination ability in a given environment. Some of these exogenous FAs may provide a powerful strategy for preserving food against contamination by the Bacillus pathogenic strains responsible for foodborne illness. PMID:26300876

  5. Effect of chronic acetaldehyde intoxication on ethanol tolerance and membrane fatty acids.

    PubMed

    Latge, C; Lamboeuf, Y; Roumec, C; de Saint Blanquat, G

    1987-09-01

    Recent studies have suggested that acetaldehyde participates directly in the pathogenesis of alcoholism. Its action has been attributed mainly to its physico-chemical properties. Results of direct intoxication of laboratory animals with acetaldehyde have been reported, but only for short periods of exposure and at high doses. These are probably not representative of the conditions found during alcohol intoxication. The pulmonary route of administration described here enables long term intoxication with acetaldehyde, at levels corresponding to values measured during chronic ethanol intoxication. Chronic administration of acetaldehyde during 3 weeks induced a metabolic tolerance to ethanol as tested by the sleeping time after a challenge dose of ethanol; behavioural tolerance (measured by blood alcohol levels on waking) was not observed. At the end of the intoxication, phospholipid fatty acids of erythrocyte and synaptosome membranes were also analysed. Small changes in levels of the shorter fatty acids were observed in the phosphatidyl-choline fraction. By comparison with the effects of ethanol on the same membrane preparations, only a small part of this effect can be attributed to acetaldehyde. The first metabolite of ethanol has, however, a sure effect on the pattern of fatty acid phospholipids.

  6. Discovery and characterization of ionic liquid-tolerant thermophilic cellulases from a switchgrass-adapted microbial community

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The development of advanced biofuels from lignocellulosic biomass will require the use of both efficient pretreatment methods and new biomass-deconstructing enzyme cocktails to generate sugars from lignocellulosic substrates. Certain ionic liquids (ILs) have emerged as a promising class of compounds for biomass pretreatment and have been demonstrated to reduce the recalcitrance of biomass for enzymatic hydrolysis. However, current commercial cellulase cocktails are strongly inhibited by most of the ILs that are effective biomass pretreatment solvents. Fortunately, recent research has shown that IL-tolerant cocktails can be formulated and are functional on lignocellulosic biomass. This study sought to expand the list of known IL-tolerant cellulases to further enable IL-tolerant cocktail development by developing a combined in vitro/in vivo screening pipeline for metagenome-derived genes. Results Thirty-seven predicted cellulases derived from a thermophilic switchgrass-adapted microbial community were screened in this study. Eighteen of the twenty-one enzymes that expressed well in E. coli were active in the presence of the IL 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium acetate ([C2mim][OAc]) concentrations of at least 10% (v/v), with several retaining activity in the presence of 40% (v/v), which is currently the highest reported tolerance to [C2mim][OAc] for any cellulase. In addition, the optimum temperatures of the enzymes ranged from 45 to 95°C and the pH optimum ranged from 5.5 to 7.5, indicating these enzymes can be used to construct cellulase cocktails that function under a broad range of temperature, pH and IL concentrations. Conclusions This study characterized in detail twenty-one cellulose-degrading enzymes derived from a thermophilic microbial community and found that 70% of them were [C2mim][OAc]-tolerant. A comparison of optimum temperature and [C2mim][OAc]-tolerance demonstrates that a positive correlation exists between these properties for those enzymes

  7. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera)

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  8. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-07-26

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis.

  9. Metabolic pathways regulated by γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) contributing to heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass (Agrostis stolonifera).

    PubMed

    Li, Zhou; Yu, Jingjin; Peng, Yan; Huang, Bingru

    2016-01-01

    γ-Aminobutyric acid is a non-protein amino acid involved in various metabolic processes. The objectives of this study were to examine whether increased GABA could improve heat tolerance in cool-season creeping bentgrass through physiological analysis, and to determine major metabolic pathways regulated by GABA through metabolic profiling. Plants were pretreated with 0.5 mM GABA or water before exposed to non-stressed condition (21/19 °C) or heat stress (35/30 °C) in controlled growth chambers for 35 d. The growth and physiological analysis demonstrated that exogenous GABA application significantly improved heat tolerance of creeping bentgrass. Metabolic profiling found that exogenous application of GABA led to increases in accumulations of amino acids (glutamic acid, aspartic acid, alanine, threonine, serine, and valine), organic acids (aconitic acid, malic acid, succinic acid, oxalic acid, and threonic acid), sugars (sucrose, fructose, glucose, galactose, and maltose), and sugar alcohols (mannitol and myo-inositol). These findings suggest that GABA-induced heat tolerance in creeping bentgrass could involve the enhancement of photosynthesis and ascorbate-glutathione cycle, the maintenance of osmotic adjustment, and the increase in GABA shunt. The increased GABA shunt could be the supply of intermediates to feed the tricarboxylic acid cycle of respiration metabolism during a long-term heat stress, thereby maintaining metabolic homeostasis. PMID:27455877

  10. Genetic analysis of Physcomitrella patens identifies ABSCISIC ACID NON-RESPONSIVE, a regulator of ABA responses unique to basal land plants and required for desiccation tolerance

    DOE PAGES

    Stevenson, Sean Ross; Kamisugi, Yasuko; Trinh, Chi H.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Jerry W.; Grimwood, Jane; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A.; Rensing, Stefan A.; Lang, Daniel; et al

    2016-05-18

    The anatomically simple plants that first colonized land must have acquired molecular and biochemical adaptations to drought stress. Abscisic acid (ABA) coordinates responses leading to desiccation tolerance in all land plants. We identified ABA nonresponsive mutants in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and genotyped a segregating population to map and identify the ABA NON-RESPONSIVE (ANR) gene encoding a modular protein kinase comprising an N-terminal PAS domain, a central EDR domain, and a C-terminal MAPKKK-like domain. anr mutants fail to accumulate dehydration tolerance-associated gene products in response to drought, ABA, or osmotic stress and do not acquire ABA-dependent desiccation tolerance. Themore » crystal structure of the PAS domain, determined to 1.7-Å resolution, shows a conserved PAS-fold that dimerizes through a weak dimerization interface. Targeted mutagenesis of a conserved tryptophan residue within the PAS domain generates plants with ABA nonresponsive growth and strongly attenuated ABA-responsive gene expression, whereas deleting this domain retains a fully ABA-responsive phenotype. ANR orthologs are found in early-diverging land plant lineages and aquatic algae but are absent from more recently diverged vascular plants. Lastly, we propose that ANR genes represent an ancestral adaptation that enabled drought stress survival of the first terrestrial colonizers but were lost during land plant evolution.« less

  11. Genetic Analysis of Physcomitrella patens Identifies ABSCISIC ACID NON-RESPONSIVE, a Regulator of ABA Responses Unique to Basal Land Plants and Required for Desiccation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Sean R; Kamisugi, Yasuko; Trinh, Chi H; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Jerry W; Grimwood, Jane; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A; Rensing, Stefan A; Lang, Daniel; Reski, Ralf; Melkonian, Michael; Rothfels, Carl J; Li, Fay-Wei; Larsson, Anders; Wong, Gane K-S; Edwards, Thomas A; Cuming, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    The anatomically simple plants that first colonized land must have acquired molecular and biochemical adaptations to drought stress. Abscisic acid (ABA) coordinates responses leading to desiccation tolerance in all land plants. We identified ABA nonresponsive mutants in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and genotyped a segregating population to map and identify the ABA NON-RESPONSIVE (ANR) gene encoding a modular protein kinase comprising an N-terminal PAS domain, a central EDR domain, and a C-terminal MAPKKK-like domain. anr mutants fail to accumulate dehydration tolerance-associated gene products in response to drought, ABA, or osmotic stress and do not acquire ABA-dependent desiccation tolerance. The crystal structure of the PAS domain, determined to 1.7-Å resolution, shows a conserved PAS-fold that dimerizes through a weak dimerization interface. Targeted mutagenesis of a conserved tryptophan residue within the PAS domain generates plants with ABA nonresponsive growth and strongly attenuated ABA-responsive gene expression, whereas deleting this domain retains a fully ABA-responsive phenotype. ANR orthologs are found in early-diverging land plant lineages and aquatic algae but are absent from more recently diverged vascular plants. We propose that ANR genes represent an ancestral adaptation that enabled drought stress survival of the first terrestrial colonizers but were lost during land plant evolution. PMID:27194706

  12. Genetic Analysis of Physcomitrella patens Identifies ABSCISIC ACID NON-RESPONSIVE, a Regulator of ABA Responses Unique to Basal Land Plants and Required for Desiccation Tolerance[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Kamisugi, Yasuko; Trinh, Chi H.; Schmutz, Jeremy; Muchero, Wellington; Melkonian, Michael; Rothfels, Carl J.; Li, Fay-Wei; Larsson, Anders; Edwards, Thomas A.

    2016-01-01

    The anatomically simple plants that first colonized land must have acquired molecular and biochemical adaptations to drought stress. Abscisic acid (ABA) coordinates responses leading to desiccation tolerance in all land plants. We identified ABA nonresponsive mutants in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and genotyped a segregating population to map and identify the ABA NON-RESPONSIVE (ANR) gene encoding a modular protein kinase comprising an N-terminal PAS domain, a central EDR domain, and a C-terminal MAPKKK-like domain. anr mutants fail to accumulate dehydration tolerance-associated gene products in response to drought, ABA, or osmotic stress and do not acquire ABA-dependent desiccation tolerance. The crystal structure of the PAS domain, determined to 1.7-Å resolution, shows a conserved PAS-fold that dimerizes through a weak dimerization interface. Targeted mutagenesis of a conserved tryptophan residue within the PAS domain generates plants with ABA nonresponsive growth and strongly attenuated ABA-responsive gene expression, whereas deleting this domain retains a fully ABA-responsive phenotype. ANR orthologs are found in early-diverging land plant lineages and aquatic algae but are absent from more recently diverged vascular plants. We propose that ANR genes represent an ancestral adaptation that enabled drought stress survival of the first terrestrial colonizers but were lost during land plant evolution. PMID:27194706

  13. Genetic Analysis of Physcomitrella patens Identifies ABSCISIC ACID NON-RESPONSIVE, a Regulator of ABA Responses Unique to Basal Land Plants and Required for Desiccation Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Stevenson, Sean R; Kamisugi, Yasuko; Trinh, Chi H; Schmutz, Jeremy; Jenkins, Jerry W; Grimwood, Jane; Muchero, Wellington; Tuskan, Gerald A; Rensing, Stefan A; Lang, Daniel; Reski, Ralf; Melkonian, Michael; Rothfels, Carl J; Li, Fay-Wei; Larsson, Anders; Wong, Gane K-S; Edwards, Thomas A; Cuming, Andrew C

    2016-06-01

    The anatomically simple plants that first colonized land must have acquired molecular and biochemical adaptations to drought stress. Abscisic acid (ABA) coordinates responses leading to desiccation tolerance in all land plants. We identified ABA nonresponsive mutants in the model bryophyte Physcomitrella patens and genotyped a segregating population to map and identify the ABA NON-RESPONSIVE (ANR) gene encoding a modular protein kinase comprising an N-terminal PAS domain, a central EDR domain, and a C-terminal MAPKKK-like domain. anr mutants fail to accumulate dehydration tolerance-associated gene products in response to drought, ABA, or osmotic stress and do not acquire ABA-dependent desiccation tolerance. The crystal structure of the PAS domain, determined to 1.7-Å resolution, shows a conserved PAS-fold that dimerizes through a weak dimerization interface. Targeted mutagenesis of a conserved tryptophan residue within the PAS domain generates plants with ABA nonresponsive growth and strongly attenuated ABA-responsive gene expression, whereas deleting this domain retains a fully ABA-responsive phenotype. ANR orthologs are found in early-diverging land plant lineages and aquatic algae but are absent from more recently diverged vascular plants. We propose that ANR genes represent an ancestral adaptation that enabled drought stress survival of the first terrestrial colonizers but were lost during land plant evolution.

  14. Tolerability and Efficacy of Retinoic Acid Given after Full-face Peel Treatment of Photodamaged Skin

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Judy Y.; Biron, Julie A.; Yatskayer, Margarita; Dahl, Amanda; Oresajo, Christian

    2011-01-01

    Objective: All-trans retinoic acid is a well-established topical treatment of photodamaged skin. This study assessed the tolerance and efficacy of all-trans retinoic acid after full-face treatment with a chemical peel. Design: This was a split-face, randomized study. One side of each face was treated with peel and the other side with peel and all-trans retinoic acid (3%). Four treatments were given during the 10-week study period. Setting: Physician office. Participants: Fifteen female subjects 39 to 55 years of age. Measurements: Results were evaluated at Baseline; Weeks 4, 7, and 10; and at a 13-week follow-up visit by dermal grading of visual symptoms of irritation, subjective experiences of irritation, clinical grading of skin condition, and self-assessment questionnaires. Results: Both peel and peel plus all-trans retinoic acid treatments achieved significant improvement in fine lines, radiance, roughness, skin tone clarity, skin tone evenness, and hyperpigmentation appearance. Improvement in wrinkles and firmness was not observed in the peel plus all-trans retinoic acid arm, while pore appearance failed to improve in either treatment arm. Improvement in overall facial appearance was greater in the peel alone arm. Peel alone and the addition of all-trans retinoic acid did not cause dryness, edema, or peeling, and the frequency of peel-induced erythema did not increase with the addition of all-trans retinoic acid. Subject-perceived improvements with the peel treatment did not differ significantly from subject-perceived improvements of the peel plus all-trans retinoic acid treatment. Adverse events requiring intervention or discontinuing treatment were not observed in either treatment arm. Conclusion: The addition of all-trans retinoic acid after peel treatment does not significantly enhance peel-induced improvement in photoaging parameters, peel-induced adverse effects, and subject-perceived improvements. PMID:22010055

  15. Sll0751 and Sll1041 are involved in acid stress tolerance in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803.

    PubMed

    Tahara, Hiroko; Matsuhashi, Ayumi; Uchiyama, Junji; Ogawa, Satoru; Ohta, Hisataka

    2015-08-01

    The ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporter is a multi-subunit membrane protein complex involved in lipid transport and acid stress tolerance in the cyanobacterium Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. This organism has two sets of three ABC transporter subunits: Slr1045 and Slr1344, Sll0751 and Sll1002, and Sll1001 and Sll1041. We previously found that Slr1045 is essential for survival under acid stress condition (Tahara et al. 2012). In the present study, we examined the participation of other ABC transporter subunits in acid stress tolerance using a deletion mutant series of Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803. Although Slr1344 is highly homologous to Slr1045, Δslr1344 cells were not susceptible to acid stress. Δsll0751 and Δsll1041 cells displayed acid stress sensitivity, whereas Δsll1001/sll1002 double mutant cells grew normally. Under high- and low-temperature stress conditions, the growth rate of Δslr1344 and Δsll1001/sll1002 cells did not differ from WT cells, whereas Δsll0751 and Δsll1041 cells showed significant growth retardation, as previously observed in Δslr1045 cells. Moreover, nile red staining showed more lipid accumulation in Δslr1045, Δsll0751, and Δsll1041 cells than in WT cells. These results suggest that Slr1045, Sll0751, and Sll1041 function together as a lipid transport complex in Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 and are essential for growth under various stresses.

  16. Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria: from health-promoting benefits to stress tolerance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Caggianiello, Graziano; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Spano, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is able to produce capsular or extracellular polysaccharides, with various chemical compositions and properties. Polysaccharides produced by LAB alter the rheological properties of the matrix in which they are dispersed, leading to typically viscous and "ropy" products. Polysaccharides are involved in several mechanisms such as prebiosis and probiosis, tolerance to stress associated to food process, and technological properties of food. In this paper, we summarize the beneficial properties of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by LAB with particular attention to prebiotic properties and to the effect of exopolysaccharides on the LAB-host interaction mechanisms, such as bacterial tolerance to gastrointestinal tract conditions, ability of ESP-producing probiotics to adhere to intestinal epithelium, their immune-modulatory activity, and their role in biofilm formation. The pro-technological aspect of exopolysaccharides is discussed, focusing on advantageous applications of EPS in the food industry, i.e., yogurt and gluten-free bakery products, since it was found that these microbial biopolymers positively affect the texture of foods. Finally, the involvement of EPS in tolerance to stress conditions that are commonly encountered in fermented beverages such as wine is discussed.

  17. Salicylic acid-induced abiotic stress tolerance and underlying mechanisms in plants

    PubMed Central

    Khan, M. Iqbal R.; Fatma, Mehar; Per, Tasir S.; Anjum, Naser A.; Khan, Nafees A.

    2015-01-01

    Abiotic stresses (such as metals/metalloids, salinity, ozone, UV-B radiation, extreme temperatures, and drought) are among the most challenging threats to agricultural system and economic yield of crop plants. These stresses (in isolation and/or combination) induce numerous adverse effects in plants, impair biochemical/physiological and molecular processes, and eventually cause severe reductions in plant growth, development and overall productivity. Phytohormones have been recognized as a strong tool for sustainably alleviating adverse effects of abiotic stresses in crop plants. In particular, the significance of salicylic acid (SA) has been increasingly recognized in improved plant abiotic stress-tolerance via SA-mediated control of major plant-metabolic processes. However, the basic biochemical/physiological and molecular mechanisms that potentially underpin SA-induced plant-tolerance to major abiotic stresses remain least discussed. Based on recent reports, this paper: (a) overviews historical background and biosynthesis of SA under both optimal and stressful environments in plants; (b) critically appraises the role of SA in plants exposed to major abiotic stresses; (c) cross-talks potential mechanisms potentially governing SA-induced plant abiotic stress-tolerance; and finally (d) briefly highlights major aspects so far unexplored in the current context. PMID:26175738

  18. Exopolysaccharides produced by lactic acid bacteria: from health-promoting benefits to stress tolerance mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Caggianiello, Graziano; Kleerebezem, Michiel; Spano, Giuseppe

    2016-05-01

    A wide range of lactic acid bacteria (LAB) is able to produce capsular or extracellular polysaccharides, with various chemical compositions and properties. Polysaccharides produced by LAB alter the rheological properties of the matrix in which they are dispersed, leading to typically viscous and "ropy" products. Polysaccharides are involved in several mechanisms such as prebiosis and probiosis, tolerance to stress associated to food process, and technological properties of food. In this paper, we summarize the beneficial properties of exopolysaccharides (EPS) produced by LAB with particular attention to prebiotic properties and to the effect of exopolysaccharides on the LAB-host interaction mechanisms, such as bacterial tolerance to gastrointestinal tract conditions, ability of ESP-producing probiotics to adhere to intestinal epithelium, their immune-modulatory activity, and their role in biofilm formation. The pro-technological aspect of exopolysaccharides is discussed, focusing on advantageous applications of EPS in the food industry, i.e., yogurt and gluten-free bakery products, since it was found that these microbial biopolymers positively affect the texture of foods. Finally, the involvement of EPS in tolerance to stress conditions that are commonly encountered in fermented beverages such as wine is discussed. PMID:27020288

  19. Effect of nicotinic acid on the sleep time and tolerance induced by ethanol in the rat

    SciTech Connect

    Basilio, C.; Toro, A.; Yojay, L.

    1986-05-01

    The intraperitoneal (i.p.) administration (50 mg/kg) of nicotinic acid (NA), markedly decreased the sleep time of rats pretreated (10 min before), post-treated (10 min after) or simultaneously treated with ethanol (4 g/Kg i.p.). A similar effect was observed on the sleep time induced by pentobarbital (37 mg/Kg i.p.). Blood alcohol levels (BAL) were the same or slightly higher in the animals pretreated with NA than in the control animals pre-injected with saline. Nicotinamide and NAD had no effect. A total of three doses of ethanol, each one administered weekly or biweekly, induced tolerance, which persisted for approximately six weeks. After this period, a hypersensitivity to ethanol appeared to develop. This phenomenon was not observed when NA was pre-injected 10 min before each dose of ethanol. The sleep time of the latter animals did not change neither during the treatment period nor after six weeks without any treatment. BAL were slightly higher in NA treated than in control animals. The authors concluded that the effect of NA on the sleep time and tolerance induced by ethanol is not due to an increased rate of its metabolism and/or elimination but to a long-lasting effect that decreases the sensitivity of the nervous cells to ethanol. The mechanisms involved in the shortening of the sleep time as well as those responsible for the loss of the capacity to develop tolerance are under current investigation.

  20. Ectopic Expression of JcWRKY Transcription Factor Confers Salinity Tolerance via Salicylic Acid Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Parinita; Dabi, Mitali; Sapara, Komal K.; Joshi, Priyanka S.; Agarwal, Pradeep K.

    2016-01-01

    Plants, being sessile, have developed intricate signaling network to specifically respond to the diverse environmental stress. The plant-specific WRKY TFs form one of the largest TF family and are involved in diverse plant processes, involving growth, development and stress signaling through auto and cross regulation with different genes and TFs. Here, we report the functional characterization of a salicylic acid -inducible JcWRKY TF. The JcWRKY overexpression confers salinity tolerance in transgenic tobacco, as was evident by increased chlorophyll content and seed germination potential. The transgenic plants showed increased soluble sugar, membrane stability, reduced electrolyte leakage and generation of reactive oxygen species (H2O2 and O2•-) as compared to the wild type. Furthermore, the low SA treatment along with salinity improved the tolerance potential of the transgenics by maintaining ROS homeostasis and high K+/Na+ ratio. The transcript expression of SA biosynthetic gene ICS1 and antioxidative enzymes (CAT and SOD) showed upregulation during stress. Thus, the present study reflects that JcWRKY is working in co-ordination with SA signaling to orchestrate the different biochemical and molecular pathways to maneuvre salt stress tolerance of the transgenic plants. PMID:27799936

  1. Abscisic acid (ABA) sensitivity regulates desiccation tolerance in germinated Arabidopsis seeds.

    PubMed

    Maia, Julio; Dekkers, Bas J W; Dolle, Miranda J; Ligterink, Wilco; Hilhorst, Henk W M

    2014-07-01

    During germination, orthodox seeds lose their desiccation tolerance (DT) and become sensitive to extreme drying. Yet, DT can be rescued, in a well-defined developmental window, by the application of a mild osmotic stress before dehydration. A role for abscisic acid (ABA) has been implicated in this stress response and in DT re-establishment. However, the path from the sensing of an osmotic cue and its signaling to DT re-establishment is still largely unknown. Analyses of DT, ABA sensitivity, ABA content and gene expression were performed in desiccation-sensitive (DS) and desiccation-tolerant Arabidopsis thaliana seeds. Furthermore, loss and re-establishment of DT in germinated Arabidopsis seeds was studied in ABA-deficient and ABA-insensitive mutants. We demonstrate that the developmental window in which DT can be re-established correlates strongly with the window in which ABA sensitivity is still present. Using ABA biosynthesis and signaling mutants, we show that this hormone plays a key role in DT re-establishment. Surprisingly, re-establishment of DT depends on the modulation of ABA sensitivity rather than enhanced ABA content. In addition, the evaluation of several ABA-insensitive mutants, which can still produce normal desiccation-tolerant seeds, but are impaired in the re-establishment of DT, shows that the acquisition of DT during seed development is genetically different from its re-establishment during germination.

  2. Transcriptomic analysis of Escherichia coli O157:H7 and K-12 cultures exposed to inorganic and organic acids in stationary phase reveals acidulant- and strain-specific acid tolerance responses.

    PubMed

    King, Thea; Lucchini, Sacha; Hinton, Jay C D; Gobius, Kari

    2010-10-01

    The food-borne pathogen Escherichia coli O157:H7 is commonly exposed to organic acid in processed and preserved foods, allowing adaptation and the development of tolerance to pH levels otherwise lethal. Since little is known about the molecular basis of adaptation of E. coli to organic acids, we studied K-12 MG1655 and O157:H7 Sakai during exposure to acetic, lactic, and hydrochloric acid at pH 5.5. This is the first analysis of the pH-dependent transcriptomic response of stationary-phase E. coli. Thirty-four genes and three intergenic regions were upregulated by both strains during exposure to all acids. This universal acid response included genes involved in oxidative, envelope, and cold stress resistance and iron and manganese uptake, as well as 10 genes of unknown function. Acidulant- and strain-specific responses were also revealed. The acidulant-specific response reflects differences in the modes of microbial inactivation, even between weak organic acids. The two strains exhibited similar responses to lactic and hydrochloric acid, while the response to acetic acid was distinct. Acidulant-dependent differences between the strains involved induction of genes involved in the heat shock response, osmoregulation, inorganic ion and nucleotide transport and metabolism, translation, and energy production. E. coli O157:H7-specific acid-inducible genes were identified, suggesting that the enterohemorrhagic E. coli strain possesses additional molecular mechanisms contributing to acid resistance that are absent in K-12. While E. coli K-12 was most resistant to lactic and hydrochloric acid, O157:H7 may have a greater ability to survive in more complex acidic environments, such as those encountered in the host and during food processing.

  3. Antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid and its preventive activity against development of morphine tolerance and dependence in animal models.

    PubMed

    Hajhashemi, V; Dehdashti, Kh

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate has a key role in pain perception and also development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. It has been reported that clavulanic acid affects glutamatergic transmission via activation of glutamate transporter. Therefore the present study was aimed to evaluate the possible antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid and its preventive activity against development of morphine tolerance and dependence in animal models. Male Swiss mice (25-30 g) were used in this study. Acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin test and hot plate method were used to assess the antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid. Morphine (30 mg/kg, s.c.) was administered to the mice two times a day (8 AM and 4 PM) for 3 days in order to produce tolerance. To develop morphine dependence, morphine sulfate (50, 50 and 75 mg/kg) was injected at 8 and 12 AM and 16 PM respectively and for 3 consecutive days. Naloxone (5 mg/kg, i.p) was used to induce morphine withdrawal syndrome and the number of jumps and presence of ptosis, piloerection, tremor, sniffing and diarrhea were recorded and compared with control group. Clavulanic acid at doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg inhibited abdominal constriction and licking behavior of acetic acid and formalin-induced pain respectively. Clavulanic acid was not able to show any antinociception in hot plate model and could not prevent development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. Clavulanic acid has considerable antinociceptive activity and further studies are needed to clarify its exact mechanism.

  4. Mutants of the pentose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus tolerant to hardwood spent sulfite liquor and acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Harner, Nicole K; Bajwa, Paramjit K; Habash, Marc B; Trevors, Jack T; Austin, Glen D; Lee, Hung

    2014-01-01

    A strain development program was initiated to improve the tolerance of the pentose-fermenting yeast Pachysolen tannophilus to inhibitors in lignocellulosic hydrolysates. Several rounds of UV mutagenesis followed by screening were used to select for mutants of P. tannophilus NRRL Y2460 with improved tolerance to hardwood spent sulfite liquor (HW SSL) and acetic acid in separate selection lines. The wild type (WT) strain grew in 50 % (v/v) HW SSL while third round HW SSL mutants (designated UHW301, UHW302 and UHW303) grew in 60 % (v/v) HW SSL, with two of these isolates (UHW302 and UHW303) being viable and growing, respectively, in 70 % (v/v) HW SSL. In defined liquid media containing acetic acid, the WT strain grew in 0.70 % (w/v) acetic acid, while third round acetic acid mutants (designated UAA301, UAA302 and UAA303) grew in 0.80 % (w/v) acetic acid, with one isolate (UAA302) growing in 0.90 % (w/v) acetic acid. Cross-tolerance of HW SSL-tolerant mutants to acetic acid and vice versa was observed with UHW303 able to grow in 0.90 % (w/v) acetic acid and UAA302 growing in 60 % (v/v) HW SSL. The UV-induced mutants retained the ability to ferment glucose and xylose to ethanol in defined media. These mutants of P. tannophilus are of considerable interest for bioconversion of the sugars in lignocellulosic hydrolysates to ethanol.

  5. The LysR-type regulator LeuO regulates the acid tolerance response in Vibrio cholerae.

    PubMed

    Ante, Vanessa M; Bina, X Renee; Bina, James E

    2015-12-01

    Vibrio cholerae is a neutrophilic enteric pathogen that is extremely sensitive to acid. As V. cholerae passages through the host gastrointestinal tract it is exposed to a variety of environmental stresses including low pH and volatile fatty acids. Exposure to acidic environments induces expression of the V. cholerae acid tolerance response. A key component of the acid tolerance response is the cad system, which is encoded by cadC and the cadBA operon. CadB is a lysine/cadaverine antiporter and CadA is a lysine decarboxylase and these function together to counter low intracellular and extracellular pH. CadC is a membrane-associated transcription factor that activates cadBA expression in response to acidic conditions. Herein we investigated the role of the LysR-type transcriptional regulator LeuO in the V. cholerae acid tolerance response. Transcriptional reporter assays revealed that leuO expression repressed cadC transcription, indicating that LeuO was a cadC repressor. Consistent with this, leuO expression was inversely linked to lysine decarboxylase production and leuO overexpression resulted in increased sensitivity to organic acids. Overexpression of leuO in a cadA mutant potentiated killing by organic acids, suggesting that the function of leuO in the acid tolerance response extended beyond its regulation of the cad system. Collectively, these studies have identified a new physiological role for LeuO in V. cholerae acid tolerance.

  6. Pathway analysis of the transcriptome and metabolome of salt sensitive and tolerant poplar species reveals evolutionary adaption of stress tolerance mechanisms

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Populus euphratica is a salt tolerant and Populus × canescens a salt sensitive poplar species. Because of low transcriptional responsiveness of P. euphratica to salinity we hypothesized that this species exhibits an innate activation of stress protective genes compared with salt sensitive poplars. To test this hypothesis, the transcriptome and metabolome of mature unstressed leaves of P. euphratica and P. × canescens were compared by whole genome microarray analyses and FT-ICR-MS metabolite profiling. Results Direct cross-species comparison of the transcriptomes of the two poplar species from phylogenetically different sections required filtering of the data set. Genes assigned to the GO slim categories 'mitochondria', 'cell wall', 'transport', 'energy metabolism' and 'secondary metabolism' were significantly enriched, whereas genes in the categories 'nucleus', 'RNA or DNA binding', 'kinase activity' and 'transcription factor activity' were significantly depleted in P. euphratica compared with P. × canescens. Evidence for a general activation of stress relevant genes in P. euphratica was not detected. Pathway analyses of metabolome and transcriptome data indicated stronger accumulation of primary sugars, activation of pathways for sugar alcohol production, and faster consumption of secondary metabolites in P. euphratica compared to P. × canescens. Physiological measurements showing higher respiration, higher tannin and soluble phenolic contents as well as enrichment of glucose and fructose in P. euphratica compared to P. × canescens corroborated the results of pathway analyses. Conclusion P. euphratica does not rely on general over-expression of stress pathways to tolerate salt stress. Instead, it exhibits permanent activation of control mechanisms for osmotic adjustment (sugar and sugar alcohols), ion compartmentalization (sodium, potassium and other metabolite transporters) and detoxification of reactive oxygen species (phenolic compounds). The

  7. Mycobacterial Acid Tolerance Enables Phagolysosomal Survival and Establishment of Tuberculous Infection In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Levitte, Steven; Adams, Kristin N; Berg, Russell D; Cosma, Christine L; Urdahl, Kevin B; Ramakrishnan, Lalita

    2016-08-10

    The blockade of phagolysosomal fusion is considered a critical mycobacterial strategy to survive in macrophages. However, viable mycobacteria have been observed in phagolysosomes during infection of cultured macrophages, and mycobacteria have the virulence determinant MarP, which confers acid resistance in vitro. Here we show in mice and zebrafish that innate macrophages overcome mycobacterial lysosomal avoidance strategies to rapidly deliver a substantial proportion of infecting bacteria to phagolysosomes. Exploiting the optical transparency of the zebrafish, we tracked the fates of individual mycobacteria delivered to phagosomes versus phagolysosomes and discovered that bacteria survive and grow in phagolysosomes, though growth is slower. MarP is required specifically for phagolysosomal survival, making it an important determinant for the establishment of mycobacterial infection in their hosts. Our work suggests that if pathogenic mycobacteria fail to prevent lysosomal trafficking, they tolerate the resulting acidic environment of the phagolysosome to establish infection. PMID:27512905

  8. Salicylic acid and methyl jasmonate improve chilling tolerance in cold-stored lemon fruit (Citrus limon).

    PubMed

    Siboza, Xolani Irvin; Bertling, Isa; Odindo, Alfred Oduor

    2014-11-15

    Chilling injury (CI) is associated with the degradation of membrane integrity which can be aligned to phenolic oxidation activated by polyphenol oxidase (PPO) and peroxidase (POD), enzymes responsible for tissue browning. Phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) is a further enzyme prominent in the phenolic metabolism that is involved in acclimation against chilling stress. It was hypothesized that treatment with methyl jasmonate (MJ) and salicylic acid (SA) may enhance chilling tolerance in lemon fruit by increasing the synthesis of total phenolics and PAL by activating the key enzyme regulating the shikimic acid pathway whilst inhibiting the activity of POD and PPO. Lemon fruit were treated with 10μM MJ, 2mM SA or 10μM MJ plus 2mM SA, waxed, stored at -0.5, 2 or 4.5°C for up to 28 days plus 7 days at 23°C. Membrane integrity was studied by investigating membrane permeability and the degree of membrane lipid peroxidation in lemon flavedo following cold storage. The 10μM MJ plus 2mM SA treatment was most effective in enhancing chilling tolerance of lemon fruit, significantly reducing chilling-induced membrane permeability and membrane lipid peroxidation of lemon flavedo tissue. This treatment also increased total phenolics and PAL activity in such tissue while inhibiting POD activity, the latter possibly contributing to the delay of CI manifestation. PPO activity was found to be a poor biochemical marker of CI. Treatment with 10μM MJ plus 2mM SA resulted in an alteration of the phenolic metabolism, enhancing chilling tolerance, possibly through increased production of total phenolics and the activation of PAL and inhibition of POD.

  9. Genus-wide acid tolerance accounts for the biogeographical distribution of soil Burkholderia populations.

    PubMed

    Stopnisek, Nejc; Bodenhausen, Natacha; Frey, Beat; Fierer, Noah; Eberl, Leo; Weisskopf, Laure

    2014-06-01

    Bacteria belonging to the genus Burkholderia are highly versatile with respect to their ecological niches and lifestyles, ranging from nodulating tropical plants to causing melioidosis and fatal infections in cystic fibrosis patients. Despite the clinical importance and agronomical relevance of Burkholderia species, information about the factors influencing their occurrence, abundance and diversity in the environment is scarce. Recent findings have demonstrated that pH is the main predictor of soil bacterial diversity and community structure, with the highest diversity observed in neutral pH soils. As many Burkholderia species have been isolated from low pH environments, we hypothesized that acid tolerance may be a general feature of this genus, and pH a good predictor of their occurrence in soils. Using a combination of environmental surveys at trans-continental and local scales, as well as in vitro assays, we show that, unlike most bacteria, Burkholderia species have a competitive advantage in acidic soils, but are outcompeted in alkaline soils. Physiological assays and diversity analysis based on 16S rRNA clone libraries demonstrate that pH tolerance is a general phenotypic trait of the genus Burkholderia. Our results provide a basis for building a predictive understanding of the biogeographical patterns exhibited by Burkholderia sp.

  10. Trading-off tolerable risk with climate change adaptation costs in water supply systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borgomeo, Edoardo; Mortazavi-Naeini, Mohammad; Hall, Jim W.; O'Sullivan, Michael J.; Watson, Tim

    2016-02-01

    Choosing secure water resource management plans inevitably requires trade-offs between risks (for a variety of stakeholders), costs, and other impacts. We have previously argued that water resources planning should focus upon metrics of risk of water restrictions, accompanied by extensive simulation and scenario-based exploration of uncertainty. However, the results of optimization subject to risk constraints can be sensitive to the specification of tolerable risk, which may not be precisely or consistently defined by different stakeholders. In this paper, we recast the water resources planning problem as a multiobjective optimization problem to identify least cost schemes that satisfy a set of criteria for tolerable risk, where tolerable risk is defined in terms of the frequency of water use restrictions of different levels of severity. Our proposed method links a very large ensemble of climate model projections to a water resource system model and a multiobjective optimization algorithm to identify a Pareto optimal set of water resource management plans across a 25 years planning period. In a case study application to the London water supply system, we identify water resources management plans that, for a given financial cost, maximize performance with respect to one or more probabilistic criteria. This illustrates trade-offs between financial costs of plans and risk, and between risk criteria for four different severities of water use restrictions. Graphical representation of alternative sequences of investments in the Pareto set helps to identify water management options for which there is a robust case for including them in the plan.

  11. Involvement of vacuolar sequestration and active transport in tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to hop iso-alpha-acids.

    PubMed

    Hazelwood, Lucie A; Walsh, Michael C; Pronk, Jack T; Daran, Jean-Marc

    2010-01-01

    The hop plant, Humulus lupulus L., has an exceptionally high content of secondary metabolites, the hop alpha-acids, which possess a range of beneficial properties, including antiseptic action. Studies performed on the mode of action of hop iso-alpha-acids have hitherto been restricted to lactic acid bacteria. The present study investigated molecular mechanisms of hop iso-alpha-acid resistance in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Growth inhibition occurred at concentrations of hop iso-alpha-acids that were an order of magnitude higher than those found with hop-tolerant prokaryotes. Chemostat-based transcriptome analysis and phenotype screening of the S. cerevisiae haploid gene deletion collection were used as complementary methods to screen for genes involved in hop iso-alpha-acid detoxification and tolerance. This screening and further analysis of deletion mutants confirmed that yeast tolerance to hop iso-alpha-acids involves three major processes, active proton pumping into the vacuole by the vacuolar-type ATPase to enable vacuolar sequestration of iso-alpha-acids and alteration of cell wall structure and, to a lesser extent, active export of iso-alpha-acids across the plasma membrane. Furthermore, iso-alpha-acids were shown to affect cellular metal homeostasis by acting as strong zinc and iron chelators.

  12. Differential effects of abscisic acid on desiccation tolerance and carbohydrates in three species of liverworts.

    PubMed

    Pence, Valerie C; Dunford, Susan S; Redella, Steven

    2005-12-01

    Tissues of three species of in vitro grown liverworts, Riccia fluitans, Pallavicinia lyellii, and Marchantia polymorpha, were subjected to rapid drying with and without preculture for 1 week on medium containing 10 microM ABA. ABA preculture initiated total desiccation tolerance in R. fluitans, whereas control tissues were killed after 30 min of drying. Survival was also improved in P. lyellii, whereas ABA did not affect survival of M. polymorpha after rapid drying. ABA treatment did, however, reduce the rate of water loss in M. polymorpha. Total soluble carbohydrates were increased in ABA-treated R. fluitans and P. lyellii, but not in M. polymorpha, although there was no correlation between survival and changes in the percentage of these carbohydrates as reducing sugars. These differences in response to ABA and desiccation likely reflect different adaptations of these three species to conditions in situ.

  13. Slr2019, lipid A transporter homolog, is essential for acidic tolerance in Synechocystis sp. PCC6803.

    PubMed

    Matsuhashi, Ayumi; Tahara, Hiroko; Ito, Yutaro; Uchiyama, Junji; Ogawa, Satoru; Ohta, Hisataka

    2015-08-01

    Living organisms must defend themselves against various environmental stresses. Extracellular polysaccharide-producing cells exhibit enhanced tolerance toward adverse environmental stress. In Synechocystis sp. PCC6803 (Synechocystis), lipopolysaccharide (LPS) may play a role in this protection. To examine the relationship between stress tolerance of Synechocystis and LPS, we focused on Slr2019 because Slr2019 is homologous to MsbA in Escherichia coli, which is related to LPS synthesis. First, to obtain a defective mutant of LPS, we constructed the slr2019 insertion mutant (slr2019) strain. Sodium deoxycholate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis indicated that slr2019 strain did not synthesize normal LPS. Second, to clarify the participation of LPS in acid tolerance, wild type (WT) and slr2019 strain were grown under acid stress; slr2019 strain growth was significantly weaker than WT growth. Third, to examine influences on stress tolerance, slr2019 strain was grown under various stresses. Under salinity and temperature stress, slr2019 strain grew significantly slower than WT. To confirm cell morphology, cell shape and envelope of slr2019 strain were observed by transmission electron microscopy; slr2019 cells contained more electron-transparent bodies than WT cells. Finally, to confirm whether electron-transparent bodies are poly-3-hydroxybutyrate (PHB), slr2019 strain was stained with Nile Blue A, a PHB detector, and observed by fluorescence microscopy. The PHB granule content ratio of WT and slr2019 strain grown at BG-11 pH 8.0 was each 7.18 and 8.41 %. At pH 6.0, the PHB granule content ratio of WT and slr2019 strain was 2.99 and 2.60 %. However, the PHB granule content ratio of WT and slr2019 strain grown at BG-11N-reduced was 10.82 and 0.56 %. Because slr2019 strain significantly decreased PHB under BG-11N-reduced compared with WT, LPS synthesis may be related to PHB under particular conditions. These results indicated that Slr2019 is necessary for

  14. Cinnamic acid exerts anti-diabetic activity by improving glucose tolerance in vivo and by stimulating insulin secretion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hafizur, Rahman M; Hameed, Abdul; Shukrana, Mishkat; Raza, Sayed Ali; Chishti, Sidra; Kabir, Nurul; Siddiqui, Rehan A

    2015-02-15

    Although the anti-diabetic activity of cinnamic acid, a pure compound from cinnamon, has been reported but its mechanism(s) is not yet clear. The present study was designed to explore the possible mechanism(s) of anti-diabetic activity of cinnamic acid in in vitro and in vivo non-obese type 2 diabetic rats. Non-obese type 2 diabetes was developed by injecting 90 mg/kg streptozotocin in 2-day-old Wistar pups. Cinnamic acid and cinnamaldehyde were administered orally to diabetic rats for assessing acute blood glucose lowering effect and improvement of glucose tolerance. Additionally, insulin secretory activity of cinnamic acid and cinnamaldehyde was evaluated in isolated mice islets. Cinnamic acid, but not cinnamaldehyde, decreased blood glucose levels in diabetic rats in a time- and dose-dependent manner. Oral administration of cinnamic acid with 5 and 10 mg/kg doses to diabetic rats improved glucose tolerance in a dose-dependent manner. The improvement by 10 mg/kg cinnamic acid was comparable to that of standard drug glibenclamide (5 mg/kg). Further in vitro studies showed that cinnamaldehyde has little or no effect on glucose-stimulated insulin secretion; however, cinnamic acid significantly enhanced glucose-stimulated insulin secretion in isolated islets. In conclusion, it can be said that cinnamic acid exerts anti-diabetic activity by improving glucose tolerance in vivo and stimulating insulin secretion in vitro.

  15. Adaptive tolerance in mice upon subchronic exposure to chloroform: Increased exhalation and target tissue regeneration

    SciTech Connect

    Anand, Sathanandam S. . E-mail: sanand@rx.uga.edu; Philip, Binu K.; Palkar, Prajakta S.; Mumtaz, Moiz M.; Latendresse, John R.; Mehendale, Harihara M. . E-mail: mehendale@ulm.edu

    2006-06-15

    The aims of the present study were to characterize the subchronic toxicity of chloroform by measuring tissue injury, repair, and distribution of chloroform and to assess the reasons for the development of tolerance to subchronic chloroform toxicity. Male Swiss Webster (SW) mice were given three dose levels of chloroform (150, 225, and 300 mg/kg/day) by gavage in aqueous vehicle for 30 days. Liver and kidney injury were measured by plasma ALT and BUN, respectively, and by histopathology. Tissue regeneration was assessed by {sup 3}H-thymidine incorporation into hepato- and nephro-nuclear DNA and by proliferating cell nuclear antigen staining. In addition, GSH and CYP2E1 in liver and kidney were assessed at selected time points. The levels of chloroform were measured in blood, liver, and kidney during the dosing regimen (1, 7, 14, and 30 days). Kidney injury was evident after 1 day with all three doses and sustained until 7 days followed by complete recovery. Mild to moderate liver injury was observed from 1 to 14 days with all three dose levels followed by gradual decrease. Significantly higher regenerative response was evident in liver and kidney at 7 days, but the response was robust in kidney, preventing progression of injury beyond first week of exposure. While the kidney regeneration reached basal levels by 21 days, moderate liver regeneration with two higher doses sustained through the end of the dosing regimen and 3 days after that. Following repeated exposure for 7, 14, and 30 days, the blood and tissue levels of chloroform were substantially lower with all three dose levels compared to the levels observed with single exposure. Increased exhalation of {sup 14}C-chloroform after repeated exposures explains the decreased chloroform levels in circulation and tissues. These results suggest that toxicokinetics and toxicodynamics (tissue regeneration) contribute to the tolerance observed in SW mice to subchronic chloroform toxicity. Neither bioactivation nor

  16. Thermal tolerance and survival of Cronobacter sakazakii in powdered infant formula supplemented with vanillin, ethyl vanillin, and vanillic acid.

    PubMed

    Yemiş, Gökçe Polat; Pagotto, Franco; Bach, Susan; Delaquis, Pascal

    2012-09-01

    The thermal tolerance Cronobacter sakazakii was examined in sterile powdered infant formula (PIF) rehydrated at 58 °C in water or apple juice supplemented with vanillin, ethyl vanillin, or vanillic acid. All three compounds decreased thermal tolerance during-rehydration and the lowest decimal reduction time (D-value, 0.19 ± 0.01 min) was measured in PIF rehydrated in apple juice supplemented with 20 mM vanillic acid. At this level of supplementation no C. sakazakii were detected in PIF stored for 48 h at 10 and 24 h at 21 °C subsequent to a sublethal heat treatment. Thermal tolerance during rehydration and survival in reconstituted PIF were influenced by compound type, concentration, and temperature. Supplementation of PIF with vanillin, ethyl vanillin, or vanillic acid could enhance the safety of PIF or other dehydrated foods contaminated with C. sakazakii.

  17. Modification of Fatty acids in membranes of bacteria: implication for an adaptive mechanism to the toxicity of carbon nanotubes.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Baotong; Xia, Xinghui; Xia, Na; Zhang, Shangwei; Guo, Xuejun

    2014-04-01

    -chain fatty acids, which was also favorable to counteract the toxic effect of CNTs. This study suggests that the bacterial tolerances to CNTs are associated with both the adaptive modification of fatty acids in the membrane and the physicochemical properties of CNTs. This is the first report about the physiologically adaptive response of bacteria to CNTs, and may help to further understand the ecotoxicological effects of CNTs.

  18. Fault-tolerant adaptive control for load-following in static space nuclear power systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Parlos, Alexander G.; Onbasioglu, Fetiye O.; Peddicord, Kenneth L.; Metzger, John D.

    1992-01-01

    The possible use of a dual-loop model-based adaptive control system for load following in static space nuclear power systems is investigated. The proposed approach has thus far been applied only to a thermoelectric space nuclear power system but is equally applicable to other static space nuclear power systems such as thermionic systems.

  19. Fault Tolerance Analysis of L1 Adaptive Control System for Unmanned Aerial Vehicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krishnamoorthy, Kiruthika

    Trajectory tracking is a critical element for the better functionality of autonomous vehicles. The main objective of this research study was to implement and analyze L1 adaptive control laws for autonomous flight under normal and upset flight conditions. The West Virginia University (WVU) Unmanned Aerial Vehicle flight simulation environment was used for this purpose. A comparison study between the L1 adaptive controller and a baseline conventional controller, which relies on position, proportional, and integral compensation, has been performed for a reduced size jet aircraft, the WVU YF-22. Special attention was given to the performance of the proposed control laws in the presence of abnormal conditions. The abnormal conditions considered are locked actuators (stabilator, aileron, and rudder) and excessive turbulence. Several levels of abnormal condition severity have been considered. The performance of the control laws was assessed over different-shape commanded trajectories. A set of comprehensive evaluation metrics was defined and used to analyze the performance of autonomous flight control laws in terms of control activity and trajectory tracking errors. The developed L1 adaptive control laws are supported by theoretical stability guarantees. The simulation results show that L1 adaptive output feedback controller achieves better trajectory tracking with lower level of control actuation as compared to the baseline linear controller under nominal and abnormal conditions.

  20. Selection and evaluation of CO2 tolerant indigenous microalga Scenedesmus dimorphus for unsaturated fatty acid rich lipid production under different culture conditions.

    PubMed

    Vidyashankar, S; Deviprasad, K; Chauhan, V S; Ravishankar, G A; Sarada, R

    2013-09-01

    Five indigenous microalgal strains of Scenedesmus, Chlorococcum, Coelastrum, and Ankistrodesmus genera, isolated from Indian fresh water habitats, were studied for carbon-dioxide tolerance and its effect on growth, lipid and fatty acid profile. Scenedesmus dimorphus strain showed maximum growth (1.5 g/L) and lipid content (17.83% w/w) under CO2 supplementation, hence selected for detailed evaluation. The selected strain was alkaline adapted but tolerated (i) wide range of pH (5-11); (ii) elevated salinity levels (up to 100 mM, NaCl) with low biomass yields and increased carotenoids (19.34 mg/g biomass); (iii) elevated CO2 levels up to 15% v/v with enhancement in specific growth rate (0.137 d(-1)), biomass yield (1.57 g/L), lipid content (19.6% w/w) and CO2 biofixation rate (0.174 g L(-1) d(-1)). Unsaturated fatty acid content (alpha linolenic acid) increased with CO2 supplementation in the strain.

  1. Adaptive mechanisms and genomic plasticity for drought tolerance identified in European black poplar (Populus nigra L.)

    PubMed Central

    Viger, Maud; Smith, Hazel K.; Cohen, David; Dewoody, Jennifer; Trewin, Harriet; Steenackers, Marijke; Bastien, Catherine; Taylor, Gail

    2016-01-01

    Summer droughts are likely to increase in frequency and intensity across Europe, yet long-lived trees may have a limited ability to tolerate drought. It is therefore critical that we improve our understanding of phenotypic plasticity to drought in natural populations for ecologically and economically important trees such as Populus nigra L. A common garden experiment was conducted using ∼500 wild P. nigra trees, collected from 11 river populations across Europe. Phenotypic variation was found across the collection, with southern genotypes from Spain and France characterized by small leaves and limited biomass production. To examine the relationship between phenotypic variation and drought tolerance, six genotypes with contrasting leaf morphologies were subjected to a water deficit experiment. ‘North eastern’ genotypes were collected at wet sites and responded to water deficit with reduced biomass growth, slow stomatal closure and reduced water use efficiency (WUE) assessed by Δ13C. In contrast, ‘southern’ genotypes originating from arid sites showed rapid stomatal closure, improved WUE and limited leaf loss. Transcriptome analyses of a genotype from Spain (Sp2, originating from an arid site) and another from northern Italy (Ita, originating from a wet site) revealed dramatic differences in gene expression response to water deficit. Transcripts controlling leaf development and stomatal patterning, including SPCH, ANT, ER, AS1, AS2, PHB, CLV1, ERL1–3 and TMM, were down-regulated in Ita but not in Sp2 in response to drought. PMID:27174702

  2. Adaptive mechanisms and genomic plasticity for drought tolerance identified in European black poplar (Populus nigra L.).

    PubMed

    Viger, Maud; Smith, Hazel K; Cohen, David; Dewoody, Jennifer; Trewin, Harriet; Steenackers, Marijke; Bastien, Catherine; Taylor, Gail

    2016-07-01

    Summer droughts are likely to increase in frequency and intensity across Europe, yet long-lived trees may have a limited ability to tolerate drought. It is therefore critical that we improve our understanding of phenotypic plasticity to drought in natural populations for ecologically and economically important trees such as Populus nigra L. A common garden experiment was conducted using ∼500 wild P. nigra trees, collected from 11 river populations across Europe. Phenotypic variation was found across the collection, with southern genotypes from Spain and France characterized by small leaves and limited biomass production. To examine the relationship between phenotypic variation and drought tolerance, six genotypes with contrasting leaf morphologies were subjected to a water deficit experiment. 'North eastern' genotypes were collected at wet sites and responded to water deficit with reduced biomass growth, slow stomatal closure and reduced water use efficiency (WUE) assessed by Δ(13)C. In contrast, 'southern' genotypes originating from arid sites showed rapid stomatal closure, improved WUE and limited leaf loss. Transcriptome analyses of a genotype from Spain (Sp2, originating from an arid site) and another from northern Italy (Ita, originating from a wet site) revealed dramatic differences in gene expression response to water deficit. Transcripts controlling leaf development and stomatal patterning, including SPCH, ANT, ER, AS1, AS2, PHB, CLV1, ERL1-3 and TMM, were down-regulated in Ita but not in Sp2 in response to drought. PMID:27174702

  3. DENTINE CARIES: ACID-TOLERANT MICROORGANISMS AND ASPECTS ON COLLAGEN DEGRADATION.

    PubMed

    Lager, Anders Hedenbjörk

    2014-01-01

    Dental caries is a common disease all over the world, despite the fact that it can be both effectively prevented and treated. It is driven by acids produced by oral microorganisms as a consequence of their metabolism of dietary carbohydrates. Given enough acid challenge, eventually the tooth enamel barrier will be broken down, and the carious lesion will extend into underlying hard tissue, forming a macroscopic cavity in the dentine. In comparison to biofilm on enamel, a dentine carious lesion provides a vastly different environment for the residing microorganisms. The environment influences the types and numbers of microorganisms that can colonize the dentine caries lesion. The overall aims for this thesis are to enumerate and further study microorganisms found in established dentine caries lesions and also to illuminate how host-derived proteolytic enzymes might contribute to this degradation, not only to better understand the caries process in dentine but also to find incitements for new methods to influence the natural progression of caries lesions. In Paper I, the numbers of remaining viable microorganisms after completed excavation using two excavation methods were investigated. Samples of carious dentine tissue were collected before and after excavation and cultivated on different agar media in different atmospheres. Analysis was performed by counting the number of colony-forming units (CFUs). Key findings: The number of remaining microorganisms after excavation was low for both methods, but some microorganisms always remained in the cavity floors even when the cavities were judged as caries free using normal clinical criteria. In Paper II, the acid tolerant microbiota in established dentine caries lesions was investigated. Samples were taken as in Paper I, but on three levels (superficial, center of lesion, floor of lesion after completed excavation). The samples were cultivated in anaerobic conditions on solid pH-selective agar media of different acidity

  4. Use of Fatty Acid Methyl Ester Profiles to Compare Copper-Tolerant and Copper-Sensitive Strains of Pantoea ananatis.

    PubMed

    Nischwitz, C; Gitaitis, R; Sanders, H; Langston, D; Mullinix, B; Torrance, R; Boyhan, G; Zolobowska, L

    2007-10-01

    ABSTRACT A survey was conducted to evaluate differences in fatty acid methyl ester (FAME) profiles among strains of Pantoea ananatis, causal agent of center rot of onion (Allium cepa), isolated from 15 different onion cultivars in three different sites in Georgia. Differences in FAME composition were determined by plotting principal components (PCs) in two-dimensional plots. Euclidean distance squared (ED(2)) values indicated a high degree of similarity among strains. Plotting of PCs calculated from P. ananatis strains capable of growing on media amended with copper sulfate pentahydrate (200 mug/ml) indicated that copper-tolerant strains grouped into tight clusters separate from clusters formed by wild-type strains. However, unlike copper-sensitive strains, the copper-tolerant strains tended to cluster by location. A total of 80, 60, and 73% of the strains from Tift1, Tift2, and Tattnall, respectively, exhibited either confluent growth or partial growth on copper-amended medium. However, all strains were sensitive to a mixture of copper sulfate pentahydrate (200 mug/ml) and maneb (40 mug/ml). When copper-tolerant clones were analyzed and compared with their wild-type parents, in all cases the plotting of PCs developed from copper-tolerant clones formed tight clusters separate from clusters formed by the parents. Eigenvalues generated from these tests indicated that two components provided a good summary of the data, accounting for 98, 98, and 96% of the standardized variance for strains Pna 1-15B, Pna 1-12B, and Pna 2-5A, respectively. Furthermore, feature 4 (cis-9-hexadecenoic acid/2-hydroxy-13-methyltetradecanoic acid) and feature 7 (cis-9/trans-12/cis-7-octadecenoic acid) were the highest or second highest absolute values for PC1 in all three strains of the parents versus copper-tolerant clones, and hexadecanoic acid was the highest absolute value for PC2 in all three strains. Along with those fatty acids, dodecanoic acid and feature 3 (3-hydroxytetradecanoic

  5. Methylomonas paludis sp. nov., the first acid-tolerant member of the genus Methylomonas, from an acidic wetland.

    PubMed

    Danilova, Olga V; Kulichevskaya, Irina S; Rozova, Olga N; Detkova, Ekaterina N; Bodelier, Paul L E; Trotsenko, Yuri A; Dedysh, Svetlana N

    2013-06-01

    An aerobic methanotrophic bacterium was isolated from an acidic (pH 3.9) Sphagnum peat bog in north-eastern Russia and designated strain MG30(T). Cells of this strain were Gram-negative, pale pink-pigmented, non-motile, thick rods that were covered by large polysaccharide capsules and contained an intracytoplasmic membrane system typical of type I methanotrophs. They possessed a particulate methane monooxygenase enzyme (pMMO) and utilized only methane and methanol. Carbon was assimilated via the ribulose-monophosphate pathway; nitrogen was fixed via an oxygen-sensitive nitrogenase. Strain MG30(T) was able to grow at a pH range of 3.8-7.3 (optimum pH 5.8-6.4) and at temperatures between 8 and 30 °C (optimum 20-25 °C). The major cellular fatty acids were C16:1ω5t, C16:1ω8c, C16:1ω7c and C14:0; the DNA G+C content was 48.5 mol%. The isolate belongs to the family Methylococcaceae of the class Gammaproteobacteria and displayed 94.7-96.9% 16S rRNA gene sequence similarity to members of the genus Methylomonas. However, strain MG30(T) differed from all taxonomically characterized members of this genus by the absence of motility, the ability to grow in acidic conditions and low DNA G+C content. Therefore, we propose to classify this strain as representing a novel, acid-tolerant species of the genus Methylomonas, Methylomonas paludis sp. nov. Strain MG30(T) (=DSM 24973(T)=VKM B-2745(T)) is the type strain. PMID:23159751

  6. Improving high carbon dioxide tolerance and carbon dioxide fixation capability of Chlorella sp. by adaptive laboratory evolution.

    PubMed

    Li, Dengjin; Wang, Liang; Zhao, Quanyu; Wei, Wei; Sun, Yuhan

    2015-06-01

    CO2 capture by microalgae is a promising method to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. It is critical to construct a highly efficient way to obtain a microalgal strain tolerant to high CO2 concentrations with high CO2 fixation capability. In this study, two evolved Chlorella sp. strains, AE10 and AE20 were obtained after 31 cycles of adaptive laboratory evolution (ALE) under 10% and 20% CO2, respectively. Both of them grew rapidly in 30% CO2 and the maximal biomass concentration of AE10 was 3.68±0.08g/L, which was 1.22 and 2.94 times to those of AE20 and original strain, respectively. The chlorophyll contents of AE10 and AE20 were significantly higher than those of the original one under 1-30% CO2. The influences of ALE process on biochemical compositions of Chlorella cells were also investigated. This study proved that ALE was an effective approach to improve high CO2 tolerance of Chlorella sp.

  7. Expression of Vitis amurensis NAC26 in Arabidopsis enhances drought tolerance by modulating jasmonic acid synthesis.

    PubMed

    Fang, Linchuan; Su, Lingye; Sun, Xiaoming; Li, Xinbo; Sun, Mengxiang; Karungo, Sospeter Karanja; Fang, Shuang; Chu, Jinfang; Li, Shaohua; Xin, Haiping

    2016-04-01

    The growth and fruit quality of grapevines are widely affected by abnormal climatic conditions such as water deficits, but many of the precise mechanisms by which grapevines respond to drought stress are still largely unknown. Here, we report that VaNAC26, a member of the NAC transcription factor family, was upregulated dramatically during cold, drought and salinity treatments in Vitis amurensis, a cold and drought-hardy wild Vitis species. Heterologous overexpression of VaNAC26 enhanced drought and salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Higher activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower concentrations of H2O2 and O2 (-) were found in VaNAC26-OE lines than in wild type plants under drought stress. These results indicated that scavenging by reactive oxygen species (ROS) was enhanced by VaNAC26 in transgenic lines. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis revealed that genes related to jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis and signaling were upregulated in VaNAC26-OE lines under both normal and drought conditions. VaNAC26 showed a specific binding ability on the NAC recognition sequence (NACRS) motif, which broadly exists in the promoter regions of upregulated genes in transgenic lines. Endogenous JA content significantly increased in the VaNAC26-OE lines 2 and 3. Our data suggest that VaNAC26 responds to abiotic stresses and may enhance drought tolerance by transcriptional regulation of JA synthesis in Arabidopsis.

  8. Expression of Vitis amurensis NAC26 in Arabidopsis enhances drought tolerance by modulating jasmonic acid synthesis

    PubMed Central

    Fang, Linchuan; Su, Lingye; Sun, Xiaoming; Li, Xinbo; Sun, Mengxiang; Karungo, Sospeter Karanja; Fang, Shuang; Chu, Jinfang; Li, Shaohua; Xin, Haiping

    2016-01-01

    The growth and fruit quality of grapevines are widely affected by abnormal climatic conditions such as water deficits, but many of the precise mechanisms by which grapevines respond to drought stress are still largely unknown. Here, we report that VaNAC26, a member of the NAC transcription factor family, was upregulated dramatically during cold, drought and salinity treatments in Vitis amurensis, a cold and drought-hardy wild Vitis species. Heterologous overexpression of VaNAC26 enhanced drought and salt tolerance in transgenic Arabidopsis. Higher activities of antioxidant enzymes and lower concentrations of H2O2 and O2 − were found in VaNAC26-OE lines than in wild type plants under drought stress. These results indicated that scavenging by reactive oxygen species (ROS) was enhanced by VaNAC26 in transgenic lines. Microarray-based transcriptome analysis revealed that genes related to jasmonic acid (JA) synthesis and signaling were upregulated in VaNAC26-OE lines under both normal and drought conditions. VaNAC26 showed a specific binding ability on the NAC recognition sequence (NACRS) motif, which broadly exists in the promoter regions of upregulated genes in transgenic lines. Endogenous JA content significantly increased in the VaNAC26-OE lines 2 and 3. Our data suggest that VaNAC26 responds to abiotic stresses and may enhance drought tolerance by transcriptional regulation of JA synthesis in Arabidopsis. PMID:27162276

  9. Enhanced thermal tolerance in a mutant of Arabidopsis deficient in palmitic acid unsaturation

    SciTech Connect

    Kunst, L.; Somerville, C. ); Browse, J. )

    1989-09-01

    A mutant of Arabidopsis thaliana, deficient in the activity of a chloroplast {omega}9 fatty acid desaturase, accumulates high amounts of palmitic acid (16:0), and exhibits an overall reduction in the level of unsaturation of chloroplast lipids. Under standard conditions the altered membrane lipid composition had only minor effects on growth rate of the mutant, net photosynthetic CO{sub 2} fixation, photosynthetic electron transport, or chloroplast ultrastructure. Similarly, fluorescence polarization measurements indicated that the fluidity of the membranes was not significantly different in the mutant and the wild type. However, at temperatures above 28{degree}C, the mutant grew more rapidly than the wild type suggesting that the altered fatty acid composition enhanced the thermal tolerance of the mutant. Similarly, the chloroplast membranes of the mutant were more resistant than wild type to thermal inactivation of photosynthetic electron transport. These observations lend support to previous suggestions that chloroplast membrane lipid composition may be an important component of the thermal acclimation response observed in many plant species which are photosynthetically active during periods of seasonally variable temperature extremes.

  10. A two component system is involved in acid adaptation of Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus.

    PubMed

    Cui, Yanhua; Liu, Wei; Qu, Xiaojun; Chen, Zhangting; Zhang, Xu; Liu, Tong; Zhang, Lanwei

    2012-05-20

    The Gram-positive bacterium Lactobacillus delbrueckii subsp. bulgaricus is of vital importance to the food industry, especially to the dairy industry. Two component systems (TCSs) are one of the most important mechanisms for environmental sensing and signal transduction in the majority of Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. A typical TCS consists of a histidine protein kinase (HPK) and a cytoplasmic response regulator (RR). To investigate the functions of TCSs during acid adaptation in L. bulgaricus, we used quantitative PCR to reveal how TCSs expression changes during acid adaptation. Two TCSs (JN675228/JN675229 and JN675230/JN675231) and two HPKs (JN675236 and JN675240) were induced during acid adaptation. These TCSs were speculated to be related with the acid adaptation ability of L. bulgaricus. The mutants of JN675228/JN675229 were constructed in order to investigate the functions of JN675228/JN675229. The mutants showed reduced acid adaptation compared to that of wild type, and the complemented strains were similar to the wild-type strain. These observations suggested that JN675228 and JN675229 were involved in acid adaptation in L. bulgaricus. The interaction between JN675228 and JN675229 was identified by means of yeast two-hybrid system. The results indicated there is interaction between JN675228 and JN675229.

  11. Infectious tolerance via the consumption of essential amino acids and mTOR signaling.

    PubMed

    Cobbold, Stephen P; Adams, Elizabeth; Farquhar, Claire A; Nolan, Kathleen F; Howie, Duncan; Lui, Kathy O; Fairchild, Paul J; Mellor, Andrew L; Ron, David; Waldmann, Herman

    2009-07-21

    Infectious tolerance describes the process of CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) converting naïve T cells to become additional Tregs. We show that antigen-specific Tregs induce, within skin grafts and dendritic cells, the expression of enzymes that consume at least 5 different essential amino acids (EAAs). T cells fail to proliferate in response to antigen when any 1, or more, of these EAAs are limiting, which is associated with a reduced mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling. Inhibition of the mTOR pathway by limiting EAAs, or by specific inhibitors, induces the Treg-specific transcription factor forkhead box P3, which depends on both T cell receptor activation and synergy with TGF-beta. PMID:19567830

  12. Safety and Tolerability of Nebulized Amoxicillin-Clavulanic Acid in Patients with COPD (STONAC 1 and STONAC 2).

    PubMed

    Nijdam, L C; Assink, M D M; Kuijvenhoven, J C; de Saegher, M E A; van der Valk, P D L P M; van der Palen, J; Brusse-Keizer, M G J; Movig, K L L

    2016-08-01

    The safety and tolerability of nebulized amoxicillin clavulanic acid were determined in patients with stable COPD and during severe exacerbations of COPD. Nine stable COPD patients received doses ranging from 50:10 mg up to 300:60 mg amoxicillin clavulanic acid and eight patients hospitalised for a COPD exacerbation received fixed doses 200/40 mg twice daily. Safety was evaluated by spirometry before and after inhalation. Tolerability was evaluated by questionnaire. Plasma and expectorated sputum samples were assayed for amoxicillin content. Seventeen patients underwent in total 100 nebulizations with amoxicillin clavulanic acid. In this safety and tolerability study no clinically relevant deteriorations in FEV1 were observed. Nebulized amoxicillin clavulanic acid produces sputum concentrations well above the Minimal Inhibiting Concentration of 90% for potential pathogenic micro-organisms, with low concentrations in the central compartment (low systemic exposure). Based on spirometry and reported side effects, inhalation of nebulized amoxicillin clavulanic acid seems to be safe and well tolerated, both in stable patients with COPD as in those experiencing a severe exacerbation. Levels of amoxicillin were adequate.

  13. Evaluation of the tolerance of acetic acid and 2-furaldehyde on the growth of Pichia stipitis and its respiratory deficient.

    PubMed

    Ortiz-Muñiz, B; Rasgado-Mellado, J; Solis-Pacheco, J; Nolasco-Hipólito, C; Domínguez-González, J M; Aguilar-Uscanga, M G

    2014-10-01

    The use of lignocellulosic residues for ethanol production is limited by toxic compounds in fermenting yeasts present in diluted acid hydrolysates like acetic acid and 2-furaldehyde. The respiratory deficient phenotype gives the cell the ability to resist several toxic compounds. So the aim of this work was to evaluate the tolerance to toxic compounds present in lignocellulosic hydrolysates like acetic acid and 2-furaldehyde in Pichia stipitis and its respiratory deficient strains. The respiratory deficient phenotype was induced by exposure to chemical agents such as acriflavine, acrylamide and rhodamine; 23 strains were obtained. The selection criterion was based on increasing specific ethanol yield (g ethanol g(-1) biomass) with acetic acid and furaldehyde tolerance. The screening showed that P. stipitis NRRL Y-7124 ACL 2-1RD (lacking cytochrome c), obtained using acrylamide, presented the highest specific ethanol production rate (1.82 g g(-1 )h(-1)). Meanwhile, the ACF8-3RD strain showed the highest acetic acid tolerance (7.80 g L(-1)) and the RHO2-3RD strain was able to tolerate up to 1.5 g L(-1) 2-furaldehyde with a growth and ethanol production inhibition of 23 and 22 %, respectively. The use of respiratory deficient yeast phenotype is a strategy for ethanol production improvement in a medium with toxic compounds such as hydrolysed sugarcane bagasse amongst others.

  14. Endogenous salicylic acid accumulation is required for chilling tolerance in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Dong, Chun-Juan; Li, Liang; Shang, Qing-Mao; Liu, Xin-Yan; Zhang, Zhi-Gang

    2014-10-01

    Salicylic acid (SA) is an important plant hormone, and its exogenous application can induce tolerance to multiple environmental stresses in plants. In this study, we examine the potential involvement of endogenous SA in response to chilling in cucumber (Cucumis sativus L.) seedlings. A low temperature of 8 °C induces a moderate increase in endogenous SA levels. Chilling stimulates the enzymatic activities and the expression of genes for phenylalanine ammonia-lyase (PAL) and benzoic acid-2-hydroxylase rather than isochorismate synthase. This indicates that the PAL enzymatic pathway contributes to chilling-induced SA production. Cucumber seedlings pretreated with SA biosynthesis inhibitors accumulate less endogenous SA and suffer more from chilling damage. The expression of cold-responsive genes is also repressed by SA inhibitors. The reduction in stress tolerance and in gene expression can be restored by the exogenous application of SA, confirming the critical roles of SA in chilling responses in cucumber seedlings. Furthermore, the inhibition of SA biosynthesis under chilling stress results in a prolonged and enhanced hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) accumulation. The application of exogenous SA and the chemical scavenger of H2O2 reduces the excess H2O2 and alleviates chilling injury. In contrast, the protective effects of SA are negated by foliar spraying with high concentrations of H2O2 and an inhibitor of the antioxidant enzyme. These results suggest that endogenous SA is required in response to chilling stress in cucumber seedlings, by modulating the expression of cold-responsive genes and the precise induction of cellular H2O2 levels.

  15. Simultaneous induction of jasmonic acid and disease-responsive genes signifies tolerance of American elm to Dutch elm disease

    PubMed Central

    Sherif , S. M.; Shukla, M. R.; Murch, S. J.; Bernier, L.; Saxena, P. K.

    2016-01-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by three fungal species in the genus Ophiostoma, is the most devastating disease of both native European and North American elm trees. Although many tolerant cultivars have been identified and released, the tolerance mechanisms are not well understood and true resistance has not yet been achieved. Here we show that the expression of disease-responsive genes in reactions leading to tolerance or susceptibility is significantly differentiated within the first 144 hours post-inoculation (hpi). Analysis of the levels of endogenous plant defense molecules such as jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in tolerant and susceptible American elm saplings suggested SA and methyl-jasmonate as potential defense response elicitors, which was further confirmed by field observations. However, the tolerant phenotype can be best characterized by a concurrent induction of JA and disease-responsive genes at 96 hpi. Molecular investigations indicated that the expression of fungal genes (i.e. cerato ulmin) was also modulated by endogenous SA and JA and this response was unique among aggressive and non-aggressive fungal strains. The present study not only provides better understanding of tolerance mechanisms to DED, but also represents a first, verified template for examining simultaneous transcriptomic changes during American elm-fungus interactions. PMID:26902398

  16. Simultaneous induction of jasmonic acid and disease-responsive genes signifies tolerance of American elm to Dutch elm disease.

    PubMed

    Sherif, S M; Shukla, M R; Murch, S J; Bernier, L; Saxena, P K

    2016-01-01

    Dutch elm disease (DED), caused by three fungal species in the genus Ophiostoma, is the most devastating disease of both native European and North American elm trees. Although many tolerant cultivars have been identified and released, the tolerance mechanisms are not well understood and true resistance has not yet been achieved. Here we show that the expression of disease-responsive genes in reactions leading to tolerance or susceptibility is significantly differentiated within the first 144 hours post-inoculation (hpi). Analysis of the levels of endogenous plant defense molecules such as jasmonic acid (JA) and salicylic acid (SA) in tolerant and susceptible American elm saplings suggested SA and methyl-jasmonate as potential defense response elicitors, which was further confirmed by field observations. However, the tolerant phenotype can be best characterized by a concurrent induction of JA and disease-responsive genes at 96 hpi. Molecular investigations indicated that the expression of fungal genes (i.e. cerato ulmin) was also modulated by endogenous SA and JA and this response was unique among aggressive and non-aggressive fungal strains. The present study not only provides better understanding of tolerance mechanisms to DED, but also represents a first, verified template for examining simultaneous transcriptomic changes during American elm-fungus interactions. PMID:26902398

  17. Adaptive amino acid composition in collagens of parasitic nematodes.

    PubMed

    Hughes, Austin L

    2015-04-01

    Amino acid composition was analyzed in the glycine-rich repeat region of 306 collagens belonging to three major families of collagens from both parasitic and free-living nematodes. The collagens of parasitic species showed a tendency toward decreased usage of the hydrophilic residues A, D, and Q and increased usage of the hydrophobic resides I, L, and M; and this trend was seen in parasitic species of both the order Rhabdita and the order Spirurida. The amino acid composition of collagens of parasitic Rhabdita thus tended to resemble those of Spirurida more than that of free-living Rhabdita, suggesting an association between amino acid composition and a parasitic lifestyle. Computer predictions suggested that the more hydrophobic amino acid composition was associated with a reduction of the propensity towards B-cell epitope formation, suggesting that evasion of host immune responses may be a major selective factor responsible for the parasite-specific trend in collagen amino acid composition.

  18. Microarray and genetic analysis reveals that csa-miR159b plays a critical role in abscisic acid-mediated heat tolerance in grafted cucumber plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Wang, Yu; Wang, Ze; Guo, Xie; Wang, Feng; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Zhou, Jie; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jing-Quan; Zhou, Yan-Hong

    2016-08-01

    Root-shoot communication plays a vital role in plant growth, development and adaptation to environmental stimuli. Grafting-induced stress tolerance is associated with the induction of plentiful stress-related genes and proteins; the mechanism involved, however, remains obscure. Here, we show that the enhanced tolerance against heat stress in cucumber plants with luffa as rootstock was accompanied with an increased accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA), down-regulation of a subset of microRNAs (miRNAs) but up-regulation of their target genes and CsHSP70 accumulation in the shoots. Significantly, luffa rootstock and foliar application of ABA both down-regulated csa-miR159b and up-regulated its target mRNAs CsGAMYB1 and CsMYB29-like and CsHSP70 accumulation in cucumber, while ectopic expression of csa-miR159b led to decreased heat tolerance, AtMYB33 transcript and AtHSP70 accumulation in Arabidopsis plants. Taken together, our results suggest that root-originated signals such as ABA could alter miRNAs in the shoots, which have a major role in the post-transcriptional regulation of the stress-responsive genes. PMID:27037862

  19. A highly pleiotropic amino acid polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor contributes to life-history adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Paaby, Annalise B.; Bergland, Alan O.; Behrman, Emily L.; Schmidt, Paul S.

    2016-01-01

    Finding the specific nucleotides that underlie adaptive variation is a major goal in evolutionary biology, but polygenic traits pose a challenge because the complex genotype–phenotype relationship can obscure the effects of individual alleles. However, natural selection working in large wild populations can shift allele frequencies and indicate functional regions of the genome. Previously, we showed that the two most common alleles of a complex amino acid insertion–deletion polymorphism in the Drosophila insulin receptor show independent, parallel clines in frequency across the North American and Australian continents. Here, we report that the cline is stable over at least a five-year period and that the polymorphism also demonstrates temporal shifts in allele frequency concurrent with seasonal change. We tested the alleles for effects on levels of insulin signaling, fecundity, development time, body size, stress tolerance, and life span. We find that the alleles are associated with predictable differences in these traits, consistent with patterns of Drosophila life-history variation across geography that likely reflect adaptation to the heterogeneous climatic environment. These results implicate insulin signaling as a major mediator of life-history adaptation in Drosophila, and suggest that life-history trade-offs can be explained by extensive pleiotropy at a single locus. PMID:25319083

  20. Adaptations to exercise training within skeletal muscle in adults with type 2 diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yi; Simar, David; Fiatarone Singh, Maria A

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this investigation was to review morphological and metabolic adaptations within skeletal muscle to exercise training in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) or impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). A comprehensive, systematic database search for manuscripts was performed from 1966 to March 2008 using computerized databases, including Medline, Premedline, CINAHL, AMED, EMBASE and SportDiscus. Three reviewers independently assessed studies for potential inclusion (exposure to exercise training, T2DM or IGT, muscle biopsy performed). A total of 18 exercise training studies were reviewed. All morphological and metabolic outcomes from muscle biopsies were collected. The metabolic outcomes were divided into six domains: glycogen, glucose facilitated transporter 4 (GLUT4) and insulin signalling, enzymes, markers of inflammation, lipids metabolism and so on. Beneficial adaptations to exercise were seen primarily in muscle fiber area and capillary density, glycogen, glycogen synthase and GLUT4 protein expressions. Few randomized controlled trials including muscle biopsy data existed, with a small number of subjects involved. More trials, especially robustly designed exercise training studies, are needed in this field. Future research should focus on the insulin signalling pathway to better understand the mechanism of the improvements in insulin sensitivity and glucose homeostasis in response to various modalities and doses of exercise in this cohort.

  1. Genome structures and transcriptomes signify niche adaptation for the multiple-ion-tolerant extremophyte Schrenkiella parvula.

    PubMed

    Oh, Dong-Ha; Hong, Hyewon; Lee, Sang Yeol; Yun, Dae-Jin; Bohnert, Hans J; Dassanayake, Maheshi

    2014-04-01

    Schrenkiella parvula (formerly Thellungiella parvula), a close relative of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) and Brassica crop species, thrives on the shores of Lake Tuz, Turkey, where soils accumulate high concentrations of multiple-ion salts. Despite the stark differences in adaptations to extreme salt stresses, the genomes of S. parvula and Arabidopsis show extensive synteny. S. parvula completes its life cycle in the presence of Na⁺, K⁺, Mg²⁺, Li⁺, and borate at soil concentrations lethal to Arabidopsis. Genome structural variations, including tandem duplications and translocations of genes, interrupt the colinearity observed throughout the S. parvula and Arabidopsis genomes. Structural variations distinguish homologous gene pairs characterized by divergent promoter sequences and basal-level expression strengths. Comparative RNA sequencing reveals the enrichment of ion-transport functions among genes with higher expression in S. parvula, while pathogen defense-related genes show higher expression in Arabidopsis. Key stress-related ion transporter genes in S. parvula showed increased copy number, higher transcript dosage, and evidence for subfunctionalization. This extremophyte offers a framework to identify the requisite adjustments of genomic architecture and expression control for a set of genes found in most plants in a way to support distinct niche adaptation and lifestyles. PMID:24563282

  2. Antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid and its preventive activity against development of morphine tolerance and dependence in animal models

    PubMed Central

    Hajhashemi, V.; Dehdashti, Kh.

    2014-01-01

    Glutamate has a key role in pain perception and also development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. It has been reported that clavulanic acid affects glutamatergic transmission via activation of glutamate transporter. Therefore the present study was aimed to evaluate the possible antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid and its preventive activity against development of morphine tolerance and dependence in animal models. Male Swiss mice (25-30 g) were used in this study. Acetic acid-induced writhing, formalin test and hot plate method were used to assess the antinociceptive effect of clavulanic acid. Morphine (30 mg/kg, s.c.) was administered to the mice two times a day (8 AM and 4 PM) for 3 days in order to produce tolerance. To develop morphine dependence, morphine sulfate (50, 50 and 75 mg/kg) was injected at 8 and 12 AM and 16 PM respectively and for 3 consecutive days. Naloxone (5 mg/kg, i.p) was used to induce morphine withdrawal syndrome and the number of jumps and presence of ptosis, piloerection, tremor, sniffing and diarrhea were recorded and compared with control group. Clavulanic acid at doses of 10, 20 and 40 mg/kg inhibited abdominal constriction and licking behavior of acetic acid and formalin-induced pain respectively. Clavulanic acid was not able to show any antinociception in hot plate model and could not prevent development of tolerance and dependence to morphine. Clavulanic acid has considerable antinociceptive activity and further studies are needed to clarify its exact mechanism. PMID:25657803

  3. Improved adaptation to heat, cold, and solvent tolerance in Lactobacillus plantarum.

    PubMed

    Fiocco, D; Capozzi, V; Goffin, P; Hols, P; Spano, Giuseppe

    2007-12-01

    The effect of overproducing each of the three small heat shock proteins (Hsp; Hsp 18.5, Hsp 18.55, and Hsp 19.3) was investigated in Lactobacillus plantarum strain WCFS1. Overproduction of the three genes, hsp 18.5, hsp 18.55, and hsp 19.3, translationally fused to the start codon of the ldhL gene yielded a protein of approximately 19 kDa, as estimated from Tricine sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in agreement with the predicted molecular weight of small Hsps. Small Hsp overproduction alleviated the reduction in growth rate triggered by exposing exponentially growing cells to heat shock (37 or 40 degrees C) and cold shock (12 degrees C). Moreover, overproduction of Hsp 18.55 and Hsp 19.3 led to an enhanced survival in the presence of butanol (1% v/v) or ethanol (12% v/v) treatment suggesting a potential role of L. plantarum small Hsps in solvent tolerance.

  4. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    PubMed Central

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-01-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events. PMID:26627576

  5. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L.; McCulloch, Malcolm T.

    2015-12-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events.

  6. Limits to the thermal tolerance of corals adapted to a highly fluctuating, naturally extreme temperature environment.

    PubMed

    Schoepf, Verena; Stat, Michael; Falter, James L; McCulloch, Malcolm T

    2015-01-01

    Naturally extreme temperature environments can provide important insights into the processes underlying coral thermal tolerance. We determined the bleaching resistance of Acropora aspera and Dipsastraea sp. from both intertidal and subtidal environments of the naturally extreme Kimberley region in northwest Australia. Here tides of up to 10 m can cause aerial exposure of corals and temperatures as high as 37 °C that fluctuate daily by up to 7 °C. Control corals were maintained at ambient nearshore temperatures which varied diurnally by 4-5 °C, while treatment corals were exposed to similar diurnal variations and heat stress corresponding to ~20 degree heating days. All corals hosted Symbiodinium clade C independent of treatment or origin. Detailed physiological measurements showed that these corals were nevertheless highly sensitive to daily average temperatures exceeding their maximum monthly mean of ~31 °C by 1 °C for only a few days. Generally, Acropora was much more susceptible to bleaching than Dipsastraea and experienced up to 75% mortality, whereas all Dipsastraea survived. Furthermore, subtidal corals, which originated from a more thermally stable environment compared to intertidal corals, were more susceptible to bleaching. This demonstrates that while highly fluctuating temperatures enhance coral resilience to thermal stress, they do not provide immunity to extreme heat stress events. PMID:26627576

  7. Low pH, Aluminum, and Phosphorus Coordinately Regulate Malate Exudation through GmALMT1 to Improve Soybean Adaptation to Acid Soils1[W][OA

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Cuiyue; Piñeros, Miguel A.; Tian, Jiang; Yao, Zhufang; Sun, Lili; Liu, Jiping; Shaff, Jon; Coluccio, Alison; Kochian, Leon V.; Liao, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Low pH, aluminum (Al) toxicity, and low phosphorus (P) often coexist and are heterogeneously distributed in acid soils. To date, the underlying mechanisms of crop adaptation to these multiple factors on acid soils remain poorly understood. In this study, we found that P addition to acid soils could stimulate Al tolerance, especially for the P-efficient genotype HN89. Subsequent hydroponic studies demonstrated that solution pH, Al, and P levels coordinately altered soybean (Glycine max) root growth and malate exudation. Interestingly, HN89 released more malate under conditions mimicking acid soils (low pH, +P, and +Al), suggesting that root malate exudation might be critical for soybean adaptation to both Al toxicity and P deficiency on acid soils. GmALMT1, a soybean malate transporter gene, was cloned from the Al-treated root tips of HN89. Like root malate exudation, GmALMT1 expression was also pH dependent, being suppressed by low pH but enhanced by Al plus P addition in roots of HN89. Quantitative real-time PCR, transient expression of a GmALMT1-yellow fluorescent protein chimera in Arabidopsis protoplasts, and electrophysiological analysis of Xenopus laevis oocytes expressing GmALMT1 demonstrated that GmALMT1 encodes a root cell plasma membrane transporter that mediates malate efflux in an extracellular pH-dependent and Al-independent manner. Overexpression of GmALMT1 in transgenic Arabidopsis, as well as overexpression and knockdown of GmALMT1 in transgenic soybean hairy roots, indicated that GmALMT1-mediated root malate efflux does underlie soybean Al tolerance. Taken together, our results suggest that malate exudation is an important component of soybean adaptation to acid soils and is coordinately regulated by three factors, pH, Al, and P, through the regulation of GmALMT1 expression and GmALMT1 function. PMID:23341359

  8. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Tolerability of Melissa officinalis Extract which Contained Rosmarinic Acid in Healthy Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Trial.

    PubMed

    Noguchi-Shinohara, Moeko; Ono, Kenjiro; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Iwasa, Kazuo; Nagai, Toshitada; Kobayashi, Shoko; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of single dose of Melissa officinalis extract which contained rosmarinic acid, including food-effects in healthy individuals. A total of eleven healthy individuals were randomly assigned to treatment arms in the two studies [Study 1 (fasted state) and Study 2 (fed state)]. Rosmarinic acid in serum was measured by a coulometric detection method using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography electrochemical detector. The serum concentration of total rosmarinic acid peaked at 1 hour after administration of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500mg rosmarinic acid in fasted state, with a maximum serum concentration 162.20 nmol/ L. The area under the curve for intact rosmarinic acid was calculated from the serum concentration-time profile to be 832.13 nmol • hour/ L. Food intake increases area under the curve and delayed time at which the maximum serum concentration. Rosmarinic acid supplementation did not affect liver, kidney, or blood cell function parameters. No adverse event was reported by any of the participants due to the study treatment. Single dose of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500 mg rosmarinic acid appears to be safe and tolerable in healthy individuals. Food intake increased the exposure of rosmarinic acid and delayed absorption of rosmarinic acid in healthy individuals.

  9. Pharmacokinetics, Safety and Tolerability of Melissa officinalis Extract which Contained Rosmarinic Acid in Healthy Individuals: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Noguchi-Shinohara, Moeko; Ono, Kenjiro; Hamaguchi, Tsuyoshi; Iwasa, Kazuo; Nagai, Toshitada; Kobayashi, Shoko; Nakamura, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Masahito

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the safety, tolerability and pharmacokinetics of single dose of Melissa officinalis extract which contained rosmarinic acid, including food-effects in healthy individuals. A total of eleven healthy individuals were randomly assigned to treatment arms in the two studies [Study 1 (fasted state) and Study 2 (fed state)]. Rosmarinic acid in serum was measured by a coulometric detection method using High-Performance Liquid Chromatography electrochemical detector. The serum concentration of total rosmarinic acid peaked at 1 hour after administration of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500mg rosmarinic acid in fasted state, with a maximum serum concentration 162.20 nmol/ L. The area under the curve for intact rosmarinic acid was calculated from the serum concentration-time profile to be 832.13 nmol • hour/ L. Food intake increases area under the curve and delayed time at which the maximum serum concentration. Rosmarinic acid supplementation did not affect liver, kidney, or blood cell function parameters. No adverse event was reported by any of the participants due to the study treatment. Single dose of Melissa officinalis extract containing 500 mg rosmarinic acid appears to be safe and tolerable in healthy individuals. Food intake increased the exposure of rosmarinic acid and delayed absorption of rosmarinic acid in healthy individuals. Trial Registration Trial Registration: UMIN-CTR UMIN000004997 PMID:25978046

  10. Comparison of Sub1 markers and their combinations for submergence tolerance and analysis of adaptation strategies of rice in rainfed lowland ecology.

    PubMed

    Pradhan, Sharat Kumar; Barik, Saumya Ranjan; Sahoo, Jayashree; Pandit, Elssa; Nayak, Deepak Kumar; Pani, Dipti Ranjan; Anandan, Annamalai

    2015-10-01

    Ninety lowland rice cultivars of the eastern region of India were collected and screened for submergence and water logging tolerance and further used for validating the efficiency of molecular markers and their combinations for submergence tolerance. Submergence tolerance and elongation ability of the tested genotypes were measured in screening tanks along with tolerant and susceptible checks. The genotypes FR13A, Khoda, CR Dhan 300, Savitri Sub1, IR64 Sub1, IC-568009 and IC-568842 exhibited high submergence tolerance may be used as donor in the breeding program. Landrace 'Khoda' showed tolerance to submergence with moderate elongation ability for adaption. Boitalpakhia, Gayatri, Atiranga, Aghonibora, Chakaakhi, Moti, IC-567993 and IC-568921 possessed both characters of moderate elongation ability and moderate tolerance to submergence. Both of these traits are required for lowland varieties of eastern India to survive under flash flood and accumulated stagnant water conditions. RM8300, Sub1A203, AEX, Sub1BC2 and Sub1C173 were employed for molecular screening to identify the submergence-tolerant genotypes. Sub1A203 was capable of differentiating the tolerant and susceptible genotypes into groups. RM8300 and Sub1BC2 could also differentiate the genotypes with inclusion of some susceptible genotypes. The AEX and Sub1C173 marker could not show discrimination among the genotypes with respect to the traits. Using Sub1A203+Sub1BC2 was better amongst the combinations studied. The results of the study indicated a trend toward a negative association of Sub1BC2 with submergence tolerance while AEX and Sub1C marker did not show any significant association. The donors identified can be useful as parental lines while the molecular markers can be used for marker-assisted breeding work. PMID:26321658

  11. Concommitant adaptation of a GH11 xylanase by directed evolution to create an alkali-tolerant/thermophilic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ruller, Roberto; Alponti, Juliana; Deliberto, Laila Aparecida; Zanphorlin, Letícia Maria; Machado, Carla Botelho; Ward, Richard John

    2014-08-01

    As part of an ongoing directed evolution program, the catalytic performance of the Xylanase A from Bacillus subtilis (XynA), which presents temperature and pH optima of 50°C and 6.0, respectively, has been enhanced to create a highly thermostable and alkali-tolerant enzyme. A library of random XynA mutants generated by error-prone polymerase chain reaction was screened by halo formation on agar containing xylan at pH 8.0. Two mutants showing higher catalytic activity at elevated pH in relation to the wild-type XynA were selected, and pooled with a further 5 XynA variants selected by screening thermostable XynA obtained from a previous directed evolution study for activity at alkaline pH. This pool of variants was used as a template for a further round of error-prone polymerase chain reaction and DNase fragment shuffling, with screening at pH 12.0 at 55°C. Selected mutants were subjected to further DNase shuffling, and a final round of screening at pH 12.0 and 80°C. A XynA variant containing eight mutations was isolated (Q7H/G13R/S22P/S31Y/T44A/I51V/I107L/S179C) that presented a temperature optimum of 80°C, a 3-fold increase in the specific activity compared with the wild-type enzyme at pH 8.0, and a 50% loss of activity (t50) of 60 min at 80°C (wild type <2 min). This directed evolution strategy therefore allows the concomitant adaption of increased thermostability and alkali tolerance of an endo-xylanase. PMID:25096197

  12. Concommitant adaptation of a GH11 xylanase by directed evolution to create an alkali-tolerant/thermophilic enzyme.

    PubMed

    Ruller, Roberto; Alponti, Juliana; Deliberto, Laila Aparecida; Zanphorlin, Letícia Maria; Machado, Carla Botelho; Ward, Richard John

    2014-08-01

    As part of an ongoing directed evolution program, the catalytic performance of the Xylanase A from Bacillus subtilis (XynA), which presents temperature and pH optima of 50°C and 6.0, respectively, has been enhanced to create a highly thermostable and alkali-tolerant enzyme. A library of random XynA mutants generated by error-prone polymerase chain reaction was screened by halo formation on agar containing xylan at pH 8.0. Two mutants showing higher catalytic activity at elevated pH in relation to the wild-type XynA were selected, and pooled with a further 5 XynA variants selected by screening thermostable XynA obtained from a previous directed evolution study for activity at alkaline pH. This pool of variants was used as a template for a further round of error-prone polymerase chain reaction and DNase fragment shuffling, with screening at pH 12.0 at 55°C. Selected mutants were subjected to further DNase shuffling, and a final round of screening at pH 12.0 and 80°C. A XynA variant containing eight mutations was isolated (Q7H/G13R/S22P/S31Y/T44A/I51V/I107L/S179C) that presented a temperature optimum of 80°C, a 3-fold increase in the specific activity compared with the wild-type enzyme at pH 8.0, and a 50% loss of activity (t50) of 60 min at 80°C (wild type <2 min). This directed evolution strategy therefore allows the concomitant adaption of increased thermostability and alkali tolerance of an endo-xylanase.

  13. Drought and salt stress tolerance of an Arabidopsis glutathione S-transferase U17 knockout mutant are attributed to the combined effect of glutathione and abscisic acid.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jui-Hung; Jiang, Han-Wei; Hsieh, En-Jung; Chen, Hsing-Yu; Chien, Ching-Te; Hsieh, Hsu-Liang; Lin, Tsan-Piao

    2012-01-01

    Although glutathione S-transferases (GSTs) are thought to play major roles in oxidative stress metabolism, little is known about the regulatory functions of GSTs. We have reported that Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana) GLUTATHIONE S-TRANSFERASE U17 (AtGSTU17; At1g10370) participates in light signaling and might modulate various aspects of development by affecting glutathione (GSH) pools via a coordinated regulation with phytochrome A. Here, we provide further evidence to support a negative role of AtGSTU17 in drought and salt stress tolerance. When AtGSTU17 was mutated, plants were more tolerant to drought and salt stresses compared with wild-type plants. In addition, atgstu17 accumulated higher levels of GSH and abscisic acid (ABA) and exhibited hyposensitivity to ABA during seed germination, smaller stomatal apertures, a lower transpiration rate, better development of primary and lateral root systems, and longer vegetative growth. To explore how atgstu17 accumulated higher ABA content, we grew wild-type plants in the solution containing GSH and found that they accumulated ABA to a higher extent than plants grown in the absence of GSH, and they also exhibited the atgstu17 phenotypes. Wild-type plants treated with GSH also demonstrated more tolerance to drought and salt stresses. Furthermore, the effect of GSH on root patterning and drought tolerance was confirmed by growing the atgstu17 in solution containing l-buthionine-(S,R)-sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH biosynthesis. In conclusion, the atgstu17 phenotype can be explained by the combined effect of GSH and ABA. We propose a role of AtGSTU17 in adaptive responses to drought and salt stresses by functioning as a negative component of stress-mediated signal transduction pathways.

  14. QTL mapping in three tropical maize populations reveals a set of constitutive and adaptive genomic regions for drought tolerance.

    PubMed

    Almeida, Gustavo Dias; Makumbi, Dan; Magorokosho, Cosmos; Nair, Sudha; Borém, Aluízio; Ribaut, Jean-Marcel; Bänziger, Marianne; Prasanna, Boddupalli M; Crossa, Jose; Babu, Raman

    2013-03-01

    Despite numerous published reports of quantitative trait loci (QTL) for drought-related traits, practical applications of such QTL in maize improvement are scarce. Identifying QTL of sizeable effects that express more or less uniformly in diverse genetic backgrounds across contrasting water regimes could significantly complement conventional breeding efforts to improve drought tolerance. We evaluated three tropical bi-parental populations under water-stress (WS) and well-watered (WW) regimes in Mexico, Kenya and Zimbabwe to identify genomic regions responsible for grain yield (GY) and anthesis-silking interval (ASI) across multiple environments and diverse genetic backgrounds. Across the three populations, on average, drought stress reduced GY by more than 50 % and increased ASI by 3.2 days. We identified a total of 83 and 62 QTL through individual environment analyses for GY and ASI, respectively. In each population, most QTL consistently showed up in each water regime. Across the three populations, the phenotypic variance explained by various individual QTL ranged from 2.6 to 17.8 % for GY and 1.7 to 17.8 % for ASI under WS environments and from 5 to 19.5 % for GY under WW environments. Meta-QTL (mQTL) analysis across the three populations and multiple environments identified seven genomic regions for GY and one for ASI, of which six mQTL on chr.1, 4, 5 and 10 for GY were constitutively expressed across WS and WW environments. One mQTL on chr.7 for GY and one on chr.3 for ASI were found to be 'adaptive' to WS conditions. High throughput assays were developed for SNPs that delimit the physical intervals of these mQTL. At most of the QTL, almost equal number of favorable alleles was donated by either of the parents within each cross, thereby demonstrating the potential of drought tolerant × drought tolerant crosses to identify QTL under contrasting water regimes.

  15. LSPV+7, a branch-point-tolerant reconstructor for strong turbulence adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Steinbock, Michael J; Hyde, Milo W; Schmidt, Jason D

    2014-06-20

    Optical wave propagation through long paths of extended turbulence presents unique challenges to adaptive optics (AO) systems. As scintillation and branch points develop in the beacon phase, challenges arise in accurately unwrapping the received wavefront and optimizing the reconstructed phase with respect to branch cut placement on a continuous facesheet deformable mirror. Several applications are currently restricted by these capability limits: laser communication, laser weapons, remote sensing, and ground-based astronomy. This paper presents a set of temporally evolving AO simulations comparing traditional least-squares reconstruction techniques to a complex-exponential reconstructor and several other reconstructors derived from the postprocessing congruence operation. The reconstructors' behavior in closed-loop operation is compared and discussed, providing several insights into the fundamental strengths and limitations of each reconstructor type. This research utilizes a self-referencing interferometer (SRI) as the high-order wavefront sensor, driving a traditional linear control law in conjunction with a cooperative point source beacon. The SRI model includes practical optical considerations and frame-by-frame fiber coupling effects to allow for realistic noise modeling. The "LSPV+7" reconstructor is shown to offer the best performance in terms of Strehl ratio and correction stability-outperforming the traditional least-squares reconstructed system by an average of 120% in the studied scenarios. Utilizing a continuous facesheet deformable mirror, these reconstructors offer significant AO performance improvements in strong turbulence applications without the need for segmented deformable mirrors. PMID:24979411

  16. LSPV+7, a branch-point-tolerant reconstructor for strong turbulence adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Steinbock, Michael J; Hyde, Milo W; Schmidt, Jason D

    2014-06-20

    Optical wave propagation through long paths of extended turbulence presents unique challenges to adaptive optics (AO) systems. As scintillation and branch points develop in the beacon phase, challenges arise in accurately unwrapping the received wavefront and optimizing the reconstructed phase with respect to branch cut placement on a continuous facesheet deformable mirror. Several applications are currently restricted by these capability limits: laser communication, laser weapons, remote sensing, and ground-based astronomy. This paper presents a set of temporally evolving AO simulations comparing traditional least-squares reconstruction techniques to a complex-exponential reconstructor and several other reconstructors derived from the postprocessing congruence operation. The reconstructors' behavior in closed-loop operation is compared and discussed, providing several insights into the fundamental strengths and limitations of each reconstructor type. This research utilizes a self-referencing interferometer (SRI) as the high-order wavefront sensor, driving a traditional linear control law in conjunction with a cooperative point source beacon. The SRI model includes practical optical considerations and frame-by-frame fiber coupling effects to allow for realistic noise modeling. The "LSPV+7" reconstructor is shown to offer the best performance in terms of Strehl ratio and correction stability-outperforming the traditional least-squares reconstructed system by an average of 120% in the studied scenarios. Utilizing a continuous facesheet deformable mirror, these reconstructors offer significant AO performance improvements in strong turbulence applications without the need for segmented deformable mirrors.

  17. Characterization of the sat Operon in Streptococcus mutans: Evidence for a Role of Ffh in Acid Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Kremer, Bas H. A.; van der Kraan, Marieke; Crowley, Paula J.; Hamilton, Ian R.; Brady, L. Jeannine; Bleiweis, Arnold S.

    2001-01-01

    An essential protein translocation pathway in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis involves the signal recognition particle (SRP), of which the 54-kDa homolog (Ffh) is an essential component. In a previous study, we found that a transposon insertion in the ylxM-ffh intergenic region of the designated secretion and acid tolerance (sat) operon of Streptococcus mutans resulted in an acid-sensitive phenotype. In the present study, we further characterized this genomic region in S. mutans after construction of bonafide sat operon mutants and confirmed the role of the SRP pathway in acid resistance. Northern blot and primer extension analyses identified an acid-inducible promoter upstream of ylxM that was responsible for upregulating the coordinate expression of all five genes of the sat operon when cells were grown at acid pH. Two constitutive promoters, one immediately upstream of satD and one just 3′ to the acid-inducible promoter, were also identified. Except for Ffh, the functions of the sat operon gene products are unknown. SatC, SatD, and SatE have no homology to proteins with known functions, although YlxM may function as a transcriptional regulator linked to genes encoding SRP pathway proteins. Nonpolar mutations created in each of the five genes of the sat locus resulted in viable mutants. Most striking, however, was the finding that a mutation in ffh did not result in loss of cell viability, as is the case in all other microbial species in which this pathway has been described. This mutant also lacked immunologically detectable Ffh and was severely affected in resistance to acid. Complementation of the mutation resulted in restoration of acid tolerance and reappearance of cytoplasmic Ffh. These data provide evidence that the SRP pathway plays an important role in acid tolerance in S. mutans. PMID:11274114

  18. Extracellular functional noncoding nucleic acid bioaptamers and angiotropin RNP ribokines in vascularization and self-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wissler, Josef H; Wissler, Joerg E; Logemann, Enno

    2008-08-01

    Endogenous extracellular and circulating functional small noncoding nucleic acids (ncNAs; <200 nucleotides) and complexes with proteins (ribonucleoproteins; RNPs) make up varying biolibraries of molecular imprints of cellular histories. They are nascently formed upon cellular activation by extrinsic (environmental) factors, including mitogens, cell-mediated immune memory reactions (Landsteiner-Chase-Lawrence transfer factors), and metabolic (hypoxia) and (physical) shear stress forces. Those factors are conventional models for epigenetic (non-Mendelian) vascular remodeling variations directed rather to proteinaceous gene expression and regulation than genomic DNA sequence changes. Structurally defined ncNAs are described as small hairpin nc-shRNA bioaptamers in interaction with proteins forming functional (Cu,Ca,Na,K)-metalloregulated complexes (CuRNP; angiotropins). As nonmitogenic angiomorphogen cytokines (ribokines), they may reprogram confluent quiescent (contact-inhibited) endothelial cell types to migratory, phagokinetically active phenotypes in the morphogenesis of tolerated neovascular patterns. Their functions in organized and mess-chaotic vascular patterns were investigated with regard to master gene, information, epigenetic, vascular, and tumor factors. Some ncNAs feature three-dimensional codes (3D episcripts) for distinct protein conformer phases. They are suggested as being specific recognition types, the estimated repertoires of which are superior in diversity and specificity to conventional immune (glyco-)proteins. For episcription of phenotype variations, they may address and integrate information flow on molecular shapes to protein-mediated nucleic acid processing and [post-]translational modification mechanisms in ncNA-, redox, and metalloregulated conformation phase pathway-locked loops (CPLL). Several vascular and cancer epigenetic regulator proteins are shown to be entangled by sharing helix-nucleating structural (proteomic) domains for

  19. Arsenite tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) involves coordinated role of metabolic pathways of thiols and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Preeti; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Singh, Rana Pratap; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh K; Adhikari, Bijan

    2013-02-01

    Thiolic ligands and several amino acids (AAs) are known to build up in plants against heavy metal stress. In the present study, alteration of various AAs in rice and its synchronized role with thiolic ligand was explored for arsenic (As) tolerance and detoxification. To understand the mechanism of As tolerance and stress response, rice seedlings of one tolerant (Triguna) and one sensitive (IET-4786) cultivar were exposed to arsenite (0-25 μM) for 7 days for various biochemical analyses using spectrophotometer, HPLC and ICPMS. Tolerant and sensitive cultivars respond differentially in terms of thiol metabolism, essential amino acids (EEAs) and nonessential amino acids (NEEAs) vis-á-vis As accumulation. Thiol biosynthesis-related enzymes were positively correlated to As accumulation in Triguna. Conversely, these enzymes, cysteine content and GSH/GSSG ratio declined significantly in IET-4786 upon As exposure. The level of identified phytochelatin (PC) species (PC(2), PC(3) and PC(4)) and phytochelatin synthase activity were also more pronounced in Triguna than IET-4786. Nearly all EAAs were negatively affected by As-induced oxidative stress (except phenylalanine in Triguna), but more significantly in IET-4786 than Triguna. However, most of the stress-responsive NEAAs like glutamic acid, histidine, alanine, glycine, tyrosine, cysteine and proline were enhanced more prominently in Triguna than IET-4786 upon As exposure. The study suggests that IET-4786 appears sensitive to As due to reduction of AAs and thiol metabolic pathway. However, a coordinated response of thiolic ligands and stress-responsive AAs seems to play role for As tolerance in Triguna to achieve the effective complexation of As by PCs.

  20. Arsenite tolerance in rice (Oryza sativa L.) involves coordinated role of metabolic pathways of thiols and amino acids.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Preeti; Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Singh, Rana Pratap; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chakrabarty, Debasis; Trivedi, Prabodh K; Adhikari, Bijan

    2013-02-01

    Thiolic ligands and several amino acids (AAs) are known to build up in plants against heavy metal stress. In the present study, alteration of various AAs in rice and its synchronized role with thiolic ligand was explored for arsenic (As) tolerance and detoxification. To understand the mechanism of As tolerance and stress response, rice seedlings of one tolerant (Triguna) and one sensitive (IET-4786) cultivar were exposed to arsenite (0-25 μM) for 7 days for various biochemical analyses using spectrophotometer, HPLC and ICPMS. Tolerant and sensitive cultivars respond differentially in terms of thiol metabolism, essential amino acids (EEAs) and nonessential amino acids (NEEAs) vis-á-vis As accumulation. Thiol biosynthesis-related enzymes were positively correlated to As accumulation in Triguna. Conversely, these enzymes, cysteine content and GSH/GSSG ratio declined significantly in IET-4786 upon As exposure. The level of identified phytochelatin (PC) species (PC(2), PC(3) and PC(4)) and phytochelatin synthase activity were also more pronounced in Triguna than IET-4786. Nearly all EAAs were negatively affected by As-induced oxidative stress (except phenylalanine in Triguna), but more significantly in IET-4786 than Triguna. However, most of the stress-responsive NEAAs like glutamic acid, histidine, alanine, glycine, tyrosine, cysteine and proline were enhanced more prominently in Triguna than IET-4786 upon As exposure. The study suggests that IET-4786 appears sensitive to As due to reduction of AAs and thiol metabolic pathway. However, a coordinated response of thiolic ligands and stress-responsive AAs seems to play role for As tolerance in Triguna to achieve the effective complexation of As by PCs. PMID:23054772

  1. High acidity tolerance in lichens with fumarprotocetraric, perlatolic or thamnolic acids is correlated with low pKa1 values of these lichen substances.

    PubMed

    Hauck, Markus; Jürgens, Sascha-René; Huneck, Siegfried; Leuschner, Christoph

    2009-10-01

    The depsidone fumarprotocetraric acid as well as the depsides perlatolic and thamnolic acids are lichen secondary metabolites. Their first dissociation constants (pK(a1)) in methanol were determined to be 2.7 for perlatolic acid and 2.8 for fumarprotocetraric and thamnolic acids by UV spectroscopy. Lower pK(a1) values are, so far, not known from lichen substances. Several lichens producing at least one of these compounds are known for their outstanding tolerance to acidic air pollution. This is demonstrated by evaluating published pH preferences for central European lichens. The low pK(a1) values suggest that strong dissociation of the studied lichen substances is a prerequisite for the occurrence of lichens with these compounds on very acidic substrata, as protonated lichen substances of different chemical groups, but not their conjugated bases, are known to shuttle protons into the cytoplasm and thereby apparently damage lichens.

  2. Versatile and sustainable synthesis of cyclic imides from dicarboxylic acids and amines by Nb2O5 as a base-tolerant heterogeneous Lewis acid catalyst.

    PubMed

    Ali, Md Ayub; Siddiki, S M A Hakim; Kon, Kenichi; Hasegawa, Junya; Shimizu, Ken-Ichi

    2014-10-27

    Catalytic condensation of dicarboxylics acid and amines without excess amount of activating reagents is the most atom-efficient but unprecedented synthetic method of cyclic imides. Here we present the first general catalytic method, proceeding selectively and efficiently in the presence of a commercial Nb2 O5 as a reusable and base-tolerant heterogeneous Lewis acid catalyst. The method is effective for the direct synthesis of pharmaceutically or industrially important cyclic imides, such as phensuximide, N-hydroxyphthalimide (NHPI), and unsubstituted cyclic imides from dicarboxylic acid or anhydrides with amines, hydroxylamine, or ammonia.

  3. A novel cold-adapted and glucose-tolerant GH1 β-glucosidase from Exiguobacterium antarcticum B7.

    PubMed

    Crespim, Elaine; Zanphorlin, Letícia M; de Souza, Flavio H M; Diogo, José A; Gazolla, Alex C; Machado, Carla B; Figueiredo, Fernanda; Sousa, Amanda S; Nóbrega, Felipe; Pellizari, Vivian H; Murakami, Mário T; Ruller, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    A novel GH1 β-glucosidase (EaBgl1A) from a bacterium isolated from Antarctica soil samples was recombinantly overexpressed in Escherichia coli cells and characterized. The enzyme showed unusual pH dependence with maximum activity at neutral pH and retention of high catalytic activity in the pH range 6 to 9, indicating a catalytic machinery compatible with alkaline conditions. EaBgl1A is also a cold-adapted enzyme, exhibiting activity in the temperature range from 10 to 40°C with optimal activity at 30°C, which allows its application in industrial processes using low temperatures. Kinetic characterization revealed an enzymatic turnover (Kcat) of 6.92s(-1) (cellobiose) and 32.98s(-1) (pNPG) and a high tolerance for product inhibition, which is an extremely desirable feature for biotechnological purposes. Interestingly, the enzyme was stimulated by up to 200 mM glucose, whereas the commercial cocktails tested were found fully inhibited at this concentration. These properties indicate EaBgl1A as a promising biocatalyst for biotechnological applications where low temperatures are required.

  4. Tolerance of transgenic canola expressing 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid deaminase to growth inhibition by nickel.

    PubMed

    Stearns, Jennifer C; Shah, Saleh; Greenberg, Bruce M; Dixon, D George; Glick, Bernard R

    2005-07-01

    Plant growth-promoting bacteria are useful to phytoremediation strategies in that they confer advantages to plants in contaminated soil. When plant growth-promoting bacteria contain the enzyme 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylic acid (ACC) deaminase, the bacterial cell acts as a sink for ACC, the immediate biosynthetic precursor of the plant growth regulator ethylene thereby lowering plant ethylene levels and decreasing the negative effects of various environmental stresses. In an effort to gain the advantages provided by bacterial ACC deaminase in the phytoremediation of metals from the environment two transgenic canola lines with the gene for this enzyme were generated and tested. In these transgenic canola plants, expression of the ACC deaminase gene is driven by either tandem constitutive cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV) 35S promoters or the root specific rolD promoter from Agrobacterium rhizogenes. Following the growth of transgenic and non-transformed canola in nickel contaminated soil, it was observed that the rolD plants demonstrate significantly increased tolerance to nickel compared to the non-transformed control plants.

  5. Fumarate Production by Torulopsis glabrata: Engineering Heterologous Fumarase Expression and Improving Acid Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiulai; Song, Wei; Gao, Cong; Qin, Wen; Luo, Qiuling; Liu, Jia; Liu, Liming

    2016-01-01

    Fumarate is a well-known biomass building block compound. However, the poor catalytic efficiency of fumarase is one of the major factors preventing its widespread production. To address this issue, we selected residues 159HPND162 of fumarase from Rhizopus oryzae as targets for site-directed mutagenesis based on molecular docking analysis. Twelve mutants were generated and characterized in detail. Kinetic studies showed that the Km values of the P160A, P160T, P160H, N161E, and D162W mutants were decreased, whereas Km values of H159Y, H159V, H159S, N161R, N161F, D162K, and D162M mutants were increased. In addition, all mutants displayed decreased catalytic efficiency except for the P160A mutant, whose kcat/Km was increased by 33.2%. Moreover, by overexpressing the P160A mutant, the engineered strain T.G-PMS-P160A was able to produce 5.2 g/L fumarate. To further enhance fumarate production, the acid tolerance of T.G-PMS-P160A was improved by deleting ade12, a component of the purine nucleotide cycle, and the resulting strain T.G(△ade12)-PMS-P160A produced 9.2 g/L fumarate. The strategy generated in this study opens up new avenues for pathway optimization and efficient production of natural products. PMID:27711153

  6. 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic acid metabolism in transgenic tolerant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum).

    PubMed

    Laurent, F; Debrauwer, L; Rathahao, E; Scalla, R

    2000-11-01

    The metabolic fate of 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D) was studied in leaves of transgenic 2,4-D-tolerant cotton (Gossypium hirsutum), which is obtained by transfer of the tfdA gene from the bacterium Alcaligenes eutrophus. The tdfA gene codes for a dioxygenase catalyzing the degradation of 2,4-D to 2, 4-dichlorophenol (2,4-DCP). [phenyl-(14)C]-2,4-D was administered by petiolar absorption followed by an 18 h water chase or converted to the isopropyl ester and sprayed onto the leaf surface; the leaves were harvested 48 h later. The herbicide was degraded to 2,4-DCP by the bacterial enzyme expressed in the plants. 2,4-DCP was rapidly converted to more polar metabolites and was never found in detectable amounts. Metabolite structures were deduced from enzymatic hydrolysis studies and mass spectrometric analyses. The first metabolite was the glucoside conjugate of 2,4-DCP (2, 4-DCP-beta-O-glucoside). The major terminal metabolites were two more complex glucosides: 2,4-DCP-(6-O-malonyl)glucoside and 2, 4-DCP-(6-O-sulfate)glucoside.

  7. Modulation of chlorogenic acid biosynthesis in Solanum lycopersicum; consequences for phenolic accumulation and UV-tolerance.

    PubMed

    Clé, Carla; Hill, Lionel M; Niggeweg, Ricarda; Martin, Cathie R; Guisez, Yves; Prinsen, Els; Jansen, Marcel A K

    2008-08-01

    Chlorogenic acid (CGA) is one of the most abundant phenolic compounds in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum). Hydroxycinnamoyl CoA quinate transferase (HQT) is the key enzyme catalysing CGA biosynthesis in tomato. We have studied the relationship between phenolic accumulation and UV-susceptibility in transgenic tomato plants with altered HQT expression. Overall, increased CGA accumulation was associated with increased UV-protection. However, the genetic manipulation of HQT expression also resulted in more complex alterations in the profiles of phenolics. Levels of rutin were relatively high in both HQT gene-silenced and HQT-overexpressing plants raised in plant growth tunnels. This suggests plasticity in the flux along different branches of phenylpropanoid metabolism and the existence of regulatory mechanisms that direct the flow of phenolic precursors in response to both metabolic parameters and environmental conditions. These changes in composition of the phenolic pool affected the relative levels of UV-tolerance. We conclude that the capability of the phenolic compounds to protect against potentially harmful UV radiation is determined both by the total levels of phenolics that accumulate in leaves as well as by the specific composition of the phenolic profile.

  8. Role of Hog1, Tps1 and Sod1 in boric acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin; Akasaka, Kento; Messerly, Jeffrey T; Boyer, Michael P

    2012-10-01

    In order to identify genetic contributions to boric acid (BA) resistance, a yeast knockout collection was screened for BA-sensitive mutants. Prominent among the BA-sensitive mutants were strains with defects in the cytoplasmic part of the high osmolarity/glycerol (HOG) signalling pathway, the trehalose-synthesis pathway (TPS1/TPS2) and the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase SOD1. An analysis of HOG-pathway mutants and fluorescence microscopy of Hog1-GFP fusions showed that the non-redundant cytoplasmic components of the pathway, Pbs2p and Hog1p, are required to maintain BA resistance, but that import of the activated Hog1p kinase into the nucleus neither occurs during BA stress nor is necessary for wild-type-like BA tolerance. Pbs2p and Hog1p are also required to support normal morphogenesis during BA stress as their absence leads to BA-induced hyperpolarized growth. An analysis of Sod1p and Tps1p expression revealed that BA stress induces superoxide dismutase and increases trehalose synthesis activity, albeit only after a 7 h delay. We conclude that normal BA resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on the functioning of HOG signalling, the trehalose synthesis pathway and superoxide dismutase activity. PMID:22902726

  9. Role of Hog1, Tps1 and Sod1 in boric acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Schmidt, Martin; Akasaka, Kento; Messerly, Jeffrey T; Boyer, Michael P

    2012-10-01

    In order to identify genetic contributions to boric acid (BA) resistance, a yeast knockout collection was screened for BA-sensitive mutants. Prominent among the BA-sensitive mutants were strains with defects in the cytoplasmic part of the high osmolarity/glycerol (HOG) signalling pathway, the trehalose-synthesis pathway (TPS1/TPS2) and the copper-zinc superoxide dismutase SOD1. An analysis of HOG-pathway mutants and fluorescence microscopy of Hog1-GFP fusions showed that the non-redundant cytoplasmic components of the pathway, Pbs2p and Hog1p, are required to maintain BA resistance, but that import of the activated Hog1p kinase into the nucleus neither occurs during BA stress nor is necessary for wild-type-like BA tolerance. Pbs2p and Hog1p are also required to support normal morphogenesis during BA stress as their absence leads to BA-induced hyperpolarized growth. An analysis of Sod1p and Tps1p expression revealed that BA stress induces superoxide dismutase and increases trehalose synthesis activity, albeit only after a 7 h delay. We conclude that normal BA resistance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae depends on the functioning of HOG signalling, the trehalose synthesis pathway and superoxide dismutase activity.

  10. Relative gene expression in acid-adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 during lactoperoxidase and lactic acid challenge in Tryptone Soy Broth.

    PubMed

    Parry-Hanson, Angela A; Jooste, Piet J; Buys, Elna M

    2010-09-20

    Cross-protection of acid-adapted Escherichia coli O157:H7 against inimical stresses is mediated by the glucose-repressed sigma factor RpoS. However, many food systems in which E. coli O157:H7 occurs are complex and contain glucose. This study was aimed at investigating the contribution of acid and lactoperoxidase (LP)-inducible genes to cross-protection of E. coli O157:H7 against LP system and lactic acid (LA) in Tryptone Soy Broth (TSB). Acid-adapted and non-adapted E. coli O157:H7 were challenged to activated LP and LA at pH 4.0 and 5.0 in TSB for 6h at 25°C followed by expression of acid and LP-inducible genes. Acid-adapted E. coli showed cross-protection against activated LP and LA. All the acid-inducible genes tested were repressed at pH 4.0 with or without activated LP system. At pH 7.4, gadA, ompC and ompF were induced in acid-adapted cells. Induction of corA occurred in non-adapted cells but was repressed in acid-adapted cells. Although acid-inducible genes were repressed at pH 4.0, high resistance of acid-adapted cells indicates that expression of acid-inducible genes occurred during acid adaptation and not the actual challenge. Repression of rpoS indicates that RpoS-independent systems contribute to cross-protection in acid-adapted E. coli O157:H7.

  11. Patterns of host-parasite adaptation in three populations of monarch butterflies infected with a naturally occurring protozoan disease: virulence, resistance, and tolerance.

    PubMed

    Sternberg, Eleanore D; Li, Hui; Wang, Rebecca; Gowler, Camden; de Roode, Jacobus C

    2013-12-01

    Many studies have used host-parasite systems to study local adaptation, but few of these studies have found unequivocal evidence for adaptation. One potential reason is that most studies have focused on limited measures of host and parasite fitness that are generally assumed to be under negative frequency-dependent selection. We have used reciprocal cross-infection experiments to test for local adaptation in Hawaiian, south Floridian, and eastern North American populations of monarch butterflies and their protozoan parasites. Sympatric host-parasite combinations did not result in greater host or parasite fitness, as would be expected under coevolutionary dynamics driven by negative frequency-dependent selection. Instead, we found that Hawaiian hosts were more resistant and carried more infective and virulent parasites, which is consistent with theoretical predictions for virulence evolution and coevolutionary arms race dynamics. We also found that Hawaiian hosts were more tolerant, particularly of Hawaiian parasites, indicating that increased resistance does not preclude increased tolerance within a population and that hosts may be more tolerant of local parasites. We did not find a similar pattern in the south Floridian or eastern populations, possibly because host-parasite adaptation occurs within the context of a greater ecological community.

  12. 40 CFR 180.1321 - Complex Polymeric Polyhydroxy Acids; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL... plant growth regulator and used in accordance with good agricultural practices....

  13. Tolerability in the elderly population of high-dose alpha lipoic acid: a potential antioxidant therapy for the eye

    PubMed Central

    Sarezky, Daniel; Raquib, Aaishah R; Dunaief, Joshua L; Kim, Benjamin J

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Alpha lipoic acid (ALA) is an antioxidant and iron-chelating supplement that has potential benefits for geographic atrophy in dry age-related macular degeneration as well as other eye diseases. The purpose of this study was to determine the tolerability of ALA in the elderly population. Patients and methods Fifteen subjects, age ≥65 years, took sequential ALA doses of 600, 800, and 1,200 mg. Each dose was taken once daily with a meal for 5 days. After each dose was taken by the subjects for 5 days, the subjects were contacted by phone, a review of systems was performed, and they were asked if they thought they could tolerate taking that dose of ALA for an extended period of time. Results The 600 mg dose was well tolerated. At the 800 mg dose, one subject had an intolerable flushing sensation. At the 1,200 mg dose, two subjects had intolerable upper gastrointestinal side effects and one subject had an intolerable flushing sensation. Subjects taking gastrointestinal prophylaxis medications had no upper gastrointestinal side effects. Conclusion High-dose ALA is not completely tolerated by the elderly. These preliminary data suggest that gastrointestinal prophylaxis may improve tolerability. (ClinicalTrials.gov, NCT02613572). PMID:27729766

  14. Arsenic accumulation and tolerance in rootless macrophyte Najas indica are mediated through antioxidants, amino acids and phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Singh, Ragini; Tripathi, Preeti; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chauhan, Reshu; Adhikari, Bijan; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Arsenic (As) accumulation and tolerance response of a submerged rootless macrophyte Najas indica were evaluated during arsenate (As(V); 10-250 μM) and arsenite (As(III); 1-50 μM) exposure. Higher As accumulation at As(III) exposure and more tolerance upon As(V) exposure resulted in more toxicity during As(III) stress than As(V), which was evident through measurement of growth parameters and oxidative stress related parameters viz., lipid peroxidation (MDA content), electrical conductivity (EC) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. Antioxidant enzymes and various amino acids were more prominent during moderate exposure of As(V), suggesting their possible role in As tolerance and detoxification. Various non-enzymatic antioxidant metabolites viz., ascorbic acid (ASC), glutathione (GSH), non-protein thiols (NPTs) and phytochelatins (PCs) biosynthesis involving phytochelatin synthase (PCS) activity increased more significantly during As(III) stress. However, PCs content seems inadequate in response to As accumulation leading to lower PC-SH:As molar ratio and higher As phytotoxicity during As(III) stress. N. indica may prove useful plant species for phytoremediation purpose in moderately As contaminated water bodies due to high As accumulation and tolerance potential. PMID:25456221

  15. Arsenic accumulation and tolerance in rootless macrophyte Najas indica are mediated through antioxidants, amino acids and phytochelatins.

    PubMed

    Tripathi, Rudra Deo; Singh, Ragini; Tripathi, Preeti; Dwivedi, Sanjay; Chauhan, Reshu; Adhikari, Bijan; Trivedi, Prabodh Kumar

    2014-12-01

    Arsenic (As) accumulation and tolerance response of a submerged rootless macrophyte Najas indica were evaluated during arsenate (As(V); 10-250 μM) and arsenite (As(III); 1-50 μM) exposure. Higher As accumulation at As(III) exposure and more tolerance upon As(V) exposure resulted in more toxicity during As(III) stress than As(V), which was evident through measurement of growth parameters and oxidative stress related parameters viz., lipid peroxidation (MDA content), electrical conductivity (EC) and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) levels. Antioxidant enzymes and various amino acids were more prominent during moderate exposure of As(V), suggesting their possible role in As tolerance and detoxification. Various non-enzymatic antioxidant metabolites viz., ascorbic acid (ASC), glutathione (GSH), non-protein thiols (NPTs) and phytochelatins (PCs) biosynthesis involving phytochelatin synthase (PCS) activity increased more significantly during As(III) stress. However, PCs content seems inadequate in response to As accumulation leading to lower PC-SH:As molar ratio and higher As phytotoxicity during As(III) stress. N. indica may prove useful plant species for phytoremediation purpose in moderately As contaminated water bodies due to high As accumulation and tolerance potential.

  16. The fraction of cells that resume growth after acetic acid addition is a strain-dependent parameter of acetic acid tolerance in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Swinnen, Steve; Fernández-Niño, Miguel; González-Ramos, Daniel; van Maris, Antonius J A; Nevoigt, Elke

    2014-06-01

    High acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a relevant phenotype in industrial biotechnology when using lignocellulosic hydrolysates as feedstock. A screening of 38 S. cerevisiae strains for tolerance to acetic acid revealed considerable differences, particularly with regard to the duration of the latency phase. To understand how this phenotype is quantitatively manifested, four strains exhibiting significant differences were studied in more detail. Our data show that the duration of the latency phase is primarily determined by the fraction of cells within the population that resume growth. Only this fraction contributed to the exponential growth observed after the latency phase, while all other cells persisted in a viable but non-proliferating state. A remarkable variation in the size of the fraction was observed among the tested strains differing by several orders of magnitude. In fact, only 11 out of 10(7)  cells of the industrial bioethanol production strain Ethanol Red resumed growth after exposure to 157 mM acetic acid at pH 4.5, while this fraction was 3.6 × 10(6) (out of 10(7)  cells) in the highly acetic acid tolerant isolate ATCC 96581. These strain-specific differences are genetically determined and represent a valuable starting point to identify genetic targets for future strain improvement.

  17. Bile Acid Metabolome after an Oral Lipid Tolerance Test by Liquid Chromatography-Tandem Mass Spectrometry (LC-MS/MS)

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Andreas; Neumann, Hannah; Karrasch, Thomas; Liebisch, Gerhard; Schäffler, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    Context Besides their role in intestinal resorption of lipids, bile acids are regarded as endocrine and metabolic signaling molecules. The detailed profile of bile acid species in peripheral blood after an oral lipid tolerance test (OLTT) is unknown. Objective We quantified the regulation of 18 bile acids after OLTT in healthy individuals. Material and methods 100 volunteers were characterized by anthropometric and laboratory parameters and underwent OLTT. Venous blood was drawn in the fasted state (0 h) and at 2h, 4h, and 6 h after OLTT. Serum concentrations of 18 bile acids were measured by LC-MS/MS. Results All of the 6 taurine-conjugated bile acids (TUDCA, THDCA, TCA, TCDCA, TDCA, TLCA) and all of the 6 glycine-conjugated bile acids (GUDCA, GHDCA, GCA, GCDCA, GDCA, GLCA) rose significantly at 2h and remained elevated during OLTT. Of the primary bile acids, CA remained unchanged, whereas CDCA significantly decreased at 4h. Of the secondary bile acids, DCA, UDCA and HDCA were not altered, whereas LCA decreased. There was a significant positive correlation between the intestinal feed-back regulator of bile acid synthesis FGF-19 and bile acids. This correlation seems to depend on all of the six taurine-conjugated bile acids and on GCA, GDCA, and GCDCA. Females and users of hormonal contraception displayed higher levels of taurine-conjugated bile acids. Conclusions The novelty of the study is based on the identification of single bile acids during OLTT. LC-MS/MS-based quantification of bile acids in serum provides a reliable tool for future investigation of endocrine and metabolic effects of bile acids. PMID:26863103

  18. The Cytosolic pH of Individual Saccharomyces cerevisiae Cells Is a Key Factor in Acetic Acid Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Niño, Miguel; Marquina, Maribel; Swinnen, Steve; Rodríguez-Porrata, Boris; Nevoigt, Elke; Ariño, Joaquín

    2015-11-01

    It was shown recently that individual cells of an isogenic Saccharomyces cerevisiae population show variability in acetic acid tolerance, and this variability affects the quantitative manifestation of the trait at the population level. In the current study, we investigated whether cell-to-cell variability in acetic acid tolerance could be explained by the observed differences in the cytosolic pHs of individual cells immediately before exposure to the acid. Results obtained with cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D in synthetic medium containing 96 mM acetic acid (pH 4.5) showed a direct correlation between the initial cytosolic pH and the cytosolic pH drop after exposure to the acid. Moreover, only cells with a low initial cytosolic pH, which experienced a less severe drop in cytosolic pH, were able to proliferate. A similar correlation between initial cytosolic pH and cytosolic pH drop was also observed in the more acid-tolerant strain MUCL 11987-9. Interestingly, a fraction of cells in the MUCL 11987-9 population showed initial cytosolic pH values below the minimal cytosolic pH detected in cells of the strain CEN.PK113-7D; consequently, these cells experienced less severe drops in cytosolic pH. Although this might explain in part the difference between the two strains with regard to the number of cells that resumed proliferation, it was observed that all cells from strain MUCL 11987-9 were able to proliferate, independently of their initial cytosolic pH. Therefore, other factors must also be involved in the greater ability of MUCL 11987-9 cells to endure strong drops in cytosolic pH.

  19. Arabidopsis Fatty Acid Desaturase FAD2 Is Required for Salt Tolerance during Seed Germination and Early Seedling Growth

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Jian; Li, Bei; Zhu, Qiang; Chen, Shaoliang; Zhang, Hongxia

    2012-01-01

    Fatty acid desaturases play important role in plant responses to abiotic stresses. However, their exact function in plant resistance to salt stress is unknown. In this work, we provide the evidence that FAD2, an endoplasmic reticulum localized ω-6 desaturase, is required for salt tolerance in Arabidopsis. Using vacuolar and plasma membrane vesicles prepared from the leaves of wild-type (Col-0) and the loss-of-function Arabidopsis mutant, fad2, which lacks the functional FAD2, we examined the fatty acid composition and Na+-dependent H+ movements of the isolated vesicles. We observed that, when compared to Col-0, the level of vacuolar and plasma membrane polyunsaturation was lower, and the Na+/H+ exchange activity was reduced in vacuolar and plasma membrane vesicles isolated from fad2 mutant. Consistent with the reduced Na+/H+ exchange activity, fad2 accumulated more Na+ in the cytoplasm of root cells, and was more sensitive to salt stress during seed germination and early seedling growth, as indicated by CoroNa-Green staining, net Na+ efflux and salt tolerance analyses. Our results suggest that FAD2 mediated high-level vacuolar and plasma membrane fatty acid desaturation is essential for the proper function of membrane attached Na+/H+ exchangers, and thereby to maintain a low cytosolic Na+ concentration for salt tolerance during seed germination and early seedling growth in Arabidopsis. PMID:22279586

  20. Expression of PprI from Deinococcus radiodurans Improves Lactic Acid Production and Stress Tolerance in Lactococcus lactis

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xiangrong; Tian, Bing; Dai, Shang; Li, Tao; Guo, Linna; Tan, Zhongfang; Jiao, Zhen; Jin, Qingsheng; Wang, Yanping; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    PprI is a general switch protein that regulates the expression of certain proteins involved in pathways of cellular resistance in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In this study, we transformed pprI into Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 using the lactococcal shuttle vector pMG36e and investigated its effects on the tolerance and lactic acid production of L. lactis while under stress. PprI was stably expressed in L. lactis as confirmed by western blot assays. L. lactis expressing PprI exhibited significantly improved resistance to oxidative stress and high osmotic pressure. This enhanced cellular tolerance to stressors might be due to the regulation of resistance-related genes (e.g., recA, recO, sodA, and nah) by pprI. Moreover, transformed L. lactis demonstrated increased lactic acid production, attributed to enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity. These results suggest that pprI can improve the tolerance of L. lactis to environmental stresses, and this transformed bacterial strain is a promising candidate for industrial applications of lactic acid production. PMID:26562776

  1. Acid-Tolerant Moderately Thermophilic Methanotrophs of the Class Gammaproteobacteria Isolated From Tropical Topsoil with Methane Seeps.

    PubMed

    Islam, Tajul; Torsvik, Vigdis; Larsen, Øivind; Bodrossy, Levente; Øvreås, Lise; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial tropical methane seep habitats are important ecosystems in the methane cycle. Methane oxidizing bacteria play a key role in these ecosystems as they reduce methane emissions to the atmosphere. Here, we describe the isolation and initial characterization of two novel moderately thermophilic and acid-tolerant obligate methanotrophs, assigned BFH1 and BFH2 recovered from a tropical methane seep topsoil habitat. The new isolates were strictly aerobic, non-motile, coccus-shaped and utilized methane and methanol as sole carbon and energy source. Isolates grew at pH range 4.2-7.5 (optimal 5.5-6.0) and at a temperature range of 30-60°C (optimal 51-55°C). 16S rRNA gene phylogeny placed them in a well-separated branch forming a cluster together with the genus Methylocaldum as the closest relatives (93.1-94.1% sequence similarity). The genes pmoA, mxaF, and cbbL were detected, but mmoX was absent. Strains BFH1 and BFH2 are, to our knowledge, the first isolated acid-tolerant moderately thermophilic methane oxidizers of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Each strain probably denotes a novel species and they most likely represent a novel genus within the family Methylococcaceae of type I methanotrophs. Furthermore, the isolates increase our knowledge of acid-tolerant aerobic methanotrophs and signify a previously unrecognized biological methane sink in tropical ecosystems. PMID:27379029

  2. Expression of PprI from Deinococcus radiodurans Improves Lactic Acid Production and Stress Tolerance in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiangrong; Tian, Bing; Dai, Shang; Li, Tao; Guo, Linna; Tan, Zhongfang; Jiao, Zhen; Jin, Qingsheng; Wang, Yanping; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    PprI is a general switch protein that regulates the expression of certain proteins involved in pathways of cellular resistance in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In this study, we transformed pprI into Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 using the lactococcal shuttle vector pMG36e and investigated its effects on the tolerance and lactic acid production of L. lactis while under stress. PprI was stably expressed in L. lactis as confirmed by western blot assays. L. lactis expressing PprI exhibited significantly improved resistance to oxidative stress and high osmotic pressure. This enhanced cellular tolerance to stressors might be due to the regulation of resistance-related genes (e.g., recA, recO, sodA, and nah) by pprI. Moreover, transformed L. lactis demonstrated increased lactic acid production, attributed to enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity. These results suggest that pprI can improve the tolerance of L. lactis to environmental stresses, and this transformed bacterial strain is a promising candidate for industrial applications of lactic acid production. PMID:26562776

  3. Acid-Tolerant Moderately Thermophilic Methanotrophs of the Class Gammaproteobacteria Isolated From Tropical Topsoil with Methane Seeps

    PubMed Central

    Islam, Tajul; Torsvik, Vigdis; Larsen, Øivind; Bodrossy, Levente; Øvreås, Lise; Birkeland, Nils-Kåre

    2016-01-01

    Terrestrial tropical methane seep habitats are important ecosystems in the methane cycle. Methane oxidizing bacteria play a key role in these ecosystems as they reduce methane emissions to the atmosphere. Here, we describe the isolation and initial characterization of two novel moderately thermophilic and acid-tolerant obligate methanotrophs, assigned BFH1 and BFH2 recovered from a tropical methane seep topsoil habitat. The new isolates were strictly aerobic, non-motile, coccus-shaped and utilized methane and methanol as sole carbon and energy source. Isolates grew at pH range 4.2–7.5 (optimal 5.5–6.0) and at a temperature range of 30–60°C (optimal 51–55°C). 16S rRNA gene phylogeny placed them in a well-separated branch forming a cluster together with the genus Methylocaldum as the closest relatives (93.1–94.1% sequence similarity). The genes pmoA, mxaF, and cbbL were detected, but mmoX was absent. Strains BFH1 and BFH2 are, to our knowledge, the first isolated acid-tolerant moderately thermophilic methane oxidizers of the class Gammaproteobacteria. Each strain probably denotes a novel species and they most likely represent a novel genus within the family Methylococcaceae of type I methanotrophs. Furthermore, the isolates increase our knowledge of acid-tolerant aerobic methanotrophs and signify a previously unrecognized biological methane sink in tropical ecosystems. PMID:27379029

  4. Expression of PprI from Deinococcus radiodurans Improves Lactic Acid Production and Stress Tolerance in Lactococcus lactis.

    PubMed

    Dong, Xiangrong; Tian, Bing; Dai, Shang; Li, Tao; Guo, Linna; Tan, Zhongfang; Jiao, Zhen; Jin, Qingsheng; Wang, Yanping; Hua, Yuejin

    2015-01-01

    PprI is a general switch protein that regulates the expression of certain proteins involved in pathways of cellular resistance in the extremophilic bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans. In this study, we transformed pprI into Lactococcus lactis strain MG1363 using the lactococcal shuttle vector pMG36e and investigated its effects on the tolerance and lactic acid production of L. lactis while under stress. PprI was stably expressed in L. lactis as confirmed by western blot assays. L. lactis expressing PprI exhibited significantly improved resistance to oxidative stress and high osmotic pressure. This enhanced cellular tolerance to stressors might be due to the regulation of resistance-related genes (e.g., recA, recO, sodA, and nah) by pprI. Moreover, transformed L. lactis demonstrated increased lactic acid production, attributed to enhanced lactate dehydrogenase activity. These results suggest that pprI can improve the tolerance of L. lactis to environmental stresses, and this transformed bacterial strain is a promising candidate for industrial applications of lactic acid production.

  5. Exogenous jasmonic acid can enhance tolerance of wheat seedlings to salt stress.

    PubMed

    Qiu, ZongBo; Guo, JunLi; Zhu, AiJing; Zhang, Liang; Zhang, ManMan

    2014-06-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is regarded as endogenous regulator that plays an important role in regulating stress responses, plant growth and development. To investigate the physiological mechanisms of salt stress mitigated by exogenous JA, foliar application of 2mM JA was done to wheat seedlings for 3days and then they were subjected to 150mM NaCl. Our results showed that 150mM NaCl treatment significantly decreased plant height, root length, shoot dry weight, root dry weight, the concentration of glutathione (GSH), chlorophyll b (Chl b) and carotenoid (Car), the activities of superoxide dismutase (SOD), peroxidase (POD), catalase (CAT), ascorbate peroxidase (APX), enhanced the concentration of malondialdehyde (MDA), hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) and the rate of superoxide radical (O2•-) generation in the wheat seedlings when compared with the control. However, treatments with exogenous JA for 3 days significantly enhanced salt stress tolerance in wheat seedlings by decreasing the concentration of MDA and H2O2, the production rate of O2•- and increasing the transcript levels and activities of SOD, POD, CAT and APX and the contents of GSH, Chl b and Car, which, in turn, enhanced the growth of salt stressed seedlings. These results suggested that JA could effectively protect wheat seedlings from salt stress damage by enhancing activities of antioxidant enzymes and the concentration of antioxidative compounds to quench the excessive reactive oxygen species caused by salt stress and presented a practical implication for wheat cultivation in salt-affected soils.

  6. Absence of Rtt109p, a fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase, results in improved acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhao, Xinqing; Zhang, Mingming; Bai, Fengwu

    2016-03-01

    RTT109 is a histone acetyltransferase for the acetylation of histone H3. It is still not clear whether RTT109 plays a role in regulation of gene expression under environmental stresses. In this study, the involvement of RTT109 in acetic acid stress tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. It was revealed that the absence of RTT109 enhanced resistance to 5.5 g L(-1) acetic acid, which was indicated by improved growth of RTT109Δ mutant compared with that of the wild-type BY4741 strain. Meanwhile, the lag phase was shortened for 48 h and glucose consumption completed 36 h in advance for RTT109Δ mutant compared to the wild-type strain, with ethanol production rate increased from 0.39 to 0.60 g L(-1) h(-1). Significantly, elevated transcription levels of HSP12, CTT1 and GSH1, as well as increased activities of antioxidant enzymes were observed in RTT109Δ under acetic acid stress. Improved flocculation of RTT109Δ compared to that of the control strain BY4741 under the acetic acid stress was also observed. These results suggest that the absence of RTT109 not only activates transcription of stress responsive genes, but also improves resistance to oxidative stress, which ultimately contributes to improved acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae.

  7. Absence of Rtt109p, a fungal-specific histone acetyltransferase, results in improved acetic acid tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Zhao, Xinqing; Zhang, Mingming; Bai, Fengwu

    2016-03-01

    RTT109 is a histone acetyltransferase for the acetylation of histone H3. It is still not clear whether RTT109 plays a role in regulation of gene expression under environmental stresses. In this study, the involvement of RTT109 in acetic acid stress tolerance of Saccharomyces cerevisiae was investigated. It was revealed that the absence of RTT109 enhanced resistance to 5.5 g L(-1) acetic acid, which was indicated by improved growth of RTT109Δ mutant compared with that of the wild-type BY4741 strain. Meanwhile, the lag phase was shortened for 48 h and glucose consumption completed 36 h in advance for RTT109Δ mutant compared to the wild-type strain, with ethanol production rate increased from 0.39 to 0.60 g L(-1) h(-1). Significantly, elevated transcription levels of HSP12, CTT1 and GSH1, as well as increased activities of antioxidant enzymes were observed in RTT109Δ under acetic acid stress. Improved flocculation of RTT109Δ compared to that of the control strain BY4741 under the acetic acid stress was also observed. These results suggest that the absence of RTT109 not only activates transcription of stress responsive genes, but also improves resistance to oxidative stress, which ultimately contributes to improved acetic acid tolerance in S. cerevisiae. PMID:26851403

  8. Phytochrome A and B Function Antagonistically to Regulate Cold Tolerance via Abscisic Acid-Dependent Jasmonate Signaling1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Zhixin; Li, Huizi; Wang, Mengmeng; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiaojian; Shi, Kai; Yu, Jingquan

    2016-01-01

    Light signaling and phytohormones both influence plant growth, development, and stress responses; however, cross talk between these two signaling pathways in response to cold remains underexplored. Here, we report that far-red light (FR) and red light (R) perceived by phytochrome A (phyA) and phyB positively and negatively regulated cold tolerance, respectively, in tomato (Solanum lycopersicum), which were associated with the regulation of levels of phytohormones such as abscisic acid (ABA) and jasmonic acid (JA) and transcript levels of ABA- and JA-related genes and the C-REPEAT BINDING FACTOR (CBF) stress signaling pathway genes. A reduction in the R/FR ratio did not alter cold tolerance, ABA and JA accumulation, and transcript levels of ABA- and JA-related genes and the CBF pathway genes in phyA mutant plants; however, those were significantly increased in wild-type and phyB plants with the reduction in the R/FR ratio. Even though low R/FR treatments did not confer cold tolerance in ABA-deficient (notabilis [not]) and JA-deficient (prosystemin-mediated responses2 [spr2]) mutants, it up-regulated ABA accumulation and signaling in the spr2 mutant, with no effect on JA levels and signaling in the not mutant. Foliar application of ABA and JA further confirmed that JA functioned downstream of ABA to activate the CBF pathway in light quality-mediated cold tolerance. It is concluded that phyA and phyB function antagonistically to regulate cold tolerance that essentially involves FR light-induced activation of phyA to induce ABA signaling and, subsequently, JA signaling, leading to an activation of the CBF pathway and a cold response in tomato plants. PMID:26527654

  9. Acyl-CoA dehydrogenase drives heat adaptation by sequestering fatty acids

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Dengke K.; Li, Zhijie; Lu, Alice Y.; Sun, Fang; Chen, Sidi; Rothe, Michael; Menzel, Ralph; Sun, Fei; Horvitz, H. Robert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Cells adapt to temperature shifts by adjusting levels of lipid desaturation and membrane fluidity. This fundamental process occurs in nearly all forms of life, but its mechanism in eukaryotes is unknown. We discovered that the evolutionarily conserved C. elegans gene acdh-11 (acyl-CoA-dehydrogenase, ACDH) facilitates heat adaptation by regulating the lipid desaturase FAT-7. Human ACDH deficiency causes the most common inherited disorders of fatty acid oxidation, with syndromes that are exacerbated by hyperthermia. Heat up-regulates acdh-11 expression to decrease fat-7 expression. We solved the high-resolution crystal structure of ACDH-11 and established the molecular basis of its selective and high-affinity binding to C11/C12-chain fatty acids. ACDH-11 sequesters C11/C12-chain fatty acids and prevents these fatty acids from activating nuclear hormone receptors and driving fat-7 expression. Thus, the ACDH-11 pathway drives heat adaptation by linking temperature shifts to regulation of lipid desaturase levels and membrane fluidity via an unprecedented mode of fatty acid signaling. PMID:25981666

  10. Screening of Cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pigs, and Evaluation of Its Tolerance to Oxygen, Acid, and Bile.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rujiao; He, Laping; Zhang, Ling; Li, Cuiqin; Zhu, Qiujin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases seriously harm human health, and Bifidobacterium is the most beneficial probiotic in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. This work aimed to screen cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pig and evaluate its tolerance to oxygen, acid, and bile. Twenty-seven aerotolerant strains with similar colony to Bifidobacterium were isolated through incubation at 37℃ in 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air by using Mupirocin lithium modified MRS agar medium, modified PTYG with added CaCO3, and modified PTYG supplemented with X-gal. Ten strains with cholesterol-lowering rates above 20% (w/w) were used for further screening. The selected strains' tolerance to acid and bile was then determined. A combination of colony and cell morphology, physiological, and biochemical experiments, as well as 16S rRNA gene-sequence analysis, was performed. Results suggested that BZ25 with excellent characteristics of high cholesterol-removal rate of 36.32% (w/w), as well as tolerance to acid and bile, was identified as Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. To further evaluate Bifidobacterium BZ25's growth characteristic and tolerance to oxygen, culture experiments were performed in liquid medium and an agar plate. Findings suggested that BZ25 grew well both in environmental 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air and in 100% atmospheric air because BZ25 reached an absorbance of 1.185 at 600 nm in 100% atmospheric air. Moreover, BZ25 was aerotolerant and can grow in an agar medium under the environmental condition of 100% atmospheric air. This study can lay a preliminary foundation for the potential industrial applications of BZ25. PMID:27499662

  11. Screening of Cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pigs, and Evaluation of Its Tolerance to Oxygen, Acid, and Bile

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Rujiao; He, Laping; Zhang, Ling; Li, Cuiqin; Zhu, Qiujin

    2016-01-01

    Cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases seriously harm human health, and Bifidobacterium is the most beneficial probiotic in the gastrointestinal tract of humans. This work aimed to screen cholesterol-lowering Bifidobacterium from Guizhou Xiang Pig and evaluate its tolerance to oxygen, acid, and bile. Twenty-seven aerotolerant strains with similar colony to Bifidobacterium were isolated through incubation at 37℃ in 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air by using Mupirocin lithium modified MRS agar medium, modified PTYG with added CaCO3, and modified PTYG supplemented with X-gal. Ten strains with cholesterol-lowering rates above 20% (w/w) were used for further screening. The selected strains’ tolerance to acid and bile was then determined. A combination of colony and cell morphology, physiological, and biochemical experiments, as well as 16S rRNA gene-sequence analysis, was performed. Results suggested that BZ25 with excellent characteristics of high cholesterol-removal rate of 36.32% (w/w), as well as tolerance to acid and bile, was identified as Bifidobacterium animalis subsp. lactis. To further evaluate Bifidobacterium BZ25’s growth characteristic and tolerance to oxygen, culture experiments were performed in liquid medium and an agar plate. Findings suggested that BZ25 grew well both in environmental 20% (v/v) CO2-80% (v/v) atmospheric air and in 100% atmospheric air because BZ25 reached an absorbance of 1.185 at 600 nm in 100% atmospheric air. Moreover, BZ25 was aerotolerant and can grow in an agar medium under the environmental condition of 100% atmospheric air. This study can lay a preliminary foundation for the potential industrial applications of BZ25. PMID:27499662

  12. Highly efficient bioethanol production by a Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain with multiple stress tolerance to high temperature, acid and ethanol.

    PubMed

    Benjaphokee, Suthee; Hasegawa, Daisuke; Yokota, Daiki; Asvarak, Thipa; Auesukaree, Choowong; Sugiyama, Minetaka; Kaneko, Yoshinobu; Boonchird, Chuenchit; Harashima, Satoshi

    2012-02-15

    Use of super strains exhibiting tolerance to high temperature, acidity and ethanol is a promising way to make ethanol production economically feasible. We describe here the breeding and performance of such a multiple-tolerant strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae generated by a spore-to-cell hybridization technique without recombinant DNA technology. A heterothallic strain showing a high-temperature (41°C) tolerant (Htg(+)) phenotype, a derivative from a strain isolated from nature, was crossed with a homothallic strain displaying high-ethanol productivity (Hep(+)), a stock culture at the Thailand Institute of Scientific and Technological Research. The resultant hybrid TJ14 displayed ability to rapidly utilize glucose, and produced ethanol (46.6g/l) from 10% glucose fermentation medium at high temperature (41°C). Not only ethanol productivity at 41°C but also acid tolerance (Acd(+)) was improved in TJ14 as compared with its parental strains, enabling TJ14 to grow in liquid medium even at pH 3. TJ14 maintained high ethanol productivity (46.0g/l) from 10% glucose when fermentation was done under multiple-stress conditions (41°C and pH 3.5). Furthermore, when TJ14 was subjected to a repeated-batch fermentation scheme, the growth and ethanol production of TJ14 were maintained at excellent levels over ten cycles of fermentation. Thus, the multiple-stress (Htg(+) Hep(+) Acd(+)) resistant strain TJ14 should be useful for cost-effective bioethanol production under high-temperature and acidic conditions.

  13. Regulation of Leaf Starch Degradation by Abscisic Acid Is Important for Osmotic Stress Tolerance in Plants.

    PubMed

    Thalmann, Matthias; Pazmino, Diana; Seung, David; Horrer, Daniel; Nigro, Arianna; Meier, Tiago; Kölling, Katharina; Pfeifhofer, Hartwig W; Zeeman, Samuel C; Santelia, Diana

    2016-08-01

    Starch serves functions that range over a timescale of minutes to years, according to the cell type from which it is derived. In guard cells, starch is rapidly mobilized by the synergistic action of β-AMYLASE1 (BAM1) and α-AMYLASE3 (AMY3) to promote stomatal opening. In the leaves, starch typically accumulates gradually during the day and is degraded at night by BAM3 to support heterotrophic metabolism. During osmotic stress, starch is degraded in the light by stress-activated BAM1 to release sugar and sugar-derived osmolytes. Here, we report that AMY3 is also involved in stress-induced starch degradation. Recently isolated Arabidopsis thaliana amy3 bam1 double mutants are hypersensitive to osmotic stress, showing impaired root growth. amy3 bam1 plants close their stomata under osmotic stress at similar rates as the wild type but fail to mobilize starch in the leaves. (14)C labeling showed that amy3 bam1 plants have reduced carbon export to the root, affecting osmolyte accumulation and root growth during stress. Using genetic approaches, we further demonstrate that abscisic acid controls the activity of BAM1 and AMY3 in leaves under osmotic stress through the AREB/ABF-SnRK2 kinase-signaling pathway. We propose that differential regulation and isoform subfunctionalization define starch-adaptive plasticity, ensuring an optimal carbon supply for continued growth under an ever-changing environment. PMID:27436713

  14. 40 CFR 180.1019 - Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... requirement of a tolerance in cattle, meat; goat, meat; hog, meat; horse, meat; sheep, meat; poultry, fat; poultry, meat; poultry, meat, byproducts; egg; milk; fish, shellfish, and irrigated crops when it...

  15. 40 CFR 180.1019 - Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... requirement of a tolerance in cattle, meat; goat, meat; hog, meat; horse, meat; sheep, meat; poultry, fat; poultry, meat; poultry, meat, byproducts; egg; milk; fish, shellfish, and irrigated crops when it...

  16. 40 CFR 180.1019 - Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... requirement of a tolerance in cattle, meat; goat, meat; hog, meat; horse, meat; sheep, meat; poultry, fat; poultry, meat; poultry, meat, byproducts; egg; milk; fish, shellfish, and irrigated crops when it...

  17. 40 CFR 180.1019 - Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... requirement of a tolerance in cattle, meat; goat, meat; hog, meat; horse, meat; sheep, meat; poultry, fat; poultry, meat; poultry, meat, byproducts; egg; milk; fish, shellfish, and irrigated crops when it...

  18. 40 CFR 180.1019 - Sulfuric acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... requirement of a tolerance in cattle, meat; goat, meat; hog, meat; horse, meat; sheep, meat; poultry, fat; poultry, meat; poultry, meat, byproducts; egg; milk; fish, shellfish, and irrigated crops when it...

  19. 40 CFR 180.1196 - Peroxyacetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., evaporators, pasteurizers, aseptic equipment, milking equipment, and other food processing equipment in food... operations, breweries, wineries, and beverage and food processing plants. (c) An exemption from the... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN...

  20. 40 CFR 180.1196 - Peroxyacetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., evaporators, pasteurizers, aseptic equipment, milking equipment, and other food processing equipment in food... operations, breweries, wineries, and beverage and food processing plants. (c) An exemption from the... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN...

  1. 40 CFR 180.1159 - Pelargonic acid; exemption from the requirement of tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., dairies, breweries, wineries, beverage and food processing plants. ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions... food commodities when used as a plant regulator on plants, seeds, or cuttings and on all...

  2. 40 CFR 180.1196 - Peroxyacetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., evaporators, pasteurizers, aseptic equipment, milking equipment, and other food processing equipment in food... operations, breweries, wineries, and beverage and food processing plants. (c) An exemption from the... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN...

  3. 40 CFR 180.1159 - Pelargonic acid; exemption from the requirement of tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., dairies, breweries, wineries, beverage and food processing plants. ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions... food commodities when used as a plant regulator on plants, seeds, or cuttings and on all...

  4. 40 CFR 180.1159 - Pelargonic acid; exemption from the requirement of tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., dairies, breweries, wineries, beverage and food processing plants. ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions... food commodities when used as a plant regulator on plants, seeds, or cuttings and on all...

  5. 40 CFR 180.1196 - Peroxyacetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., evaporators, pasteurizers, aseptic equipment, milking equipment, and other food processing equipment in food... operations, breweries, wineries, and beverage and food processing plants. (c) An exemption from the... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN...

  6. 40 CFR 180.1159 - Pelargonic acid; exemption from the requirement of tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., dairies, breweries, wineries, beverage and food processing plants. ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions... food commodities when used as a plant regulator on plants, seeds, or cuttings and on all...

  7. 40 CFR 180.1159 - Pelargonic acid; exemption from the requirement of tolerances.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., dairies, breweries, wineries, beverage and food processing plants. ... (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN FOOD Exemptions... food commodities when used as a plant regulator on plants, seeds, or cuttings and on all...

  8. 40 CFR 180.1196 - Peroxyacetic acid; exemption from the requirement of a tolerance.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ..., evaporators, pasteurizers, aseptic equipment, milking equipment, and other food processing equipment in food... operations, breweries, wineries, and beverage and food processing plants. ... AGENCY (CONTINUED) PESTICIDE PROGRAMS TOLERANCES AND EXEMPTIONS FOR PESTICIDE CHEMICAL RESIDUES IN...

  9. Hydrogen peroxide mediates abscisic acid-induced HSP70 accumulation and heat tolerance in grafted cucumber plants.

    PubMed

    Li, Hao; Liu, Shan-Shan; Yi, Chang-Yu; Wang, Feng; Zhou, Jie; Xia, Xiao-Jian; Shi, Kai; Zhou, Yan-Hong; Yu, Jing-Quan

    2014-12-01

    Root-shoot communications play important roles in plant stress responses. Here, we examined the roles of root-sourced signals in the shoot response to heat in cucumber plants. Cucumber plants grafted onto their own roots and luffa roots were exposed to aerial and root-zone heat to examine their tolerance by assessing the levels of oxidative stress, PSII photoinhibition, accumulation of abscisic acid (ABA), H2 O2 and heat shock protein (HSP) 70 using immunoblotting, chlorophyll fluorescence, immunoassay, CeCl3 staining and Western blotting, respectively. Grafting onto the luffa rootstock enhanced the shoot tolerance to the heat. This enhanced tolerance was associated with increased accumulation of ABA and apoplastic H2 O2 , RBOH transcripts and HSP70 expression and a decrease in oxidative stress in the shoots. The increases in the ABA and H2 O2 concentrations in the shoots were attributed to an increase in ABA transport from roots and an increase in ABA biosynthesis in the shoots when the root-zone and shoots were heat stressed, respectively. Inhibition of H2 O2 accumulation compromised luffa rootstock-induced HSP70 expression and heat tolerance. These results suggest that, under heat stress, ABA triggers the expression of HSP70 in an apoplastic H2 O2 -dependent manner, implicating the role of an ABA-dependent H2 O2 -driven mechanism in a systemic response involving root-shoot communication.

  10. Acute Effects of Decaffeinated Coffee and the Major Coffee Components Chlorogenic Acid and Trigonelline on Glucose Tolerance

    PubMed Central

    van Dijk, Aimée E.; Olthof, Margreet R.; Meeuse, Joke C.; Seebus, Elin; Heine, Rob J.; van Dam, Rob M.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Coffee consumption has been associated with lower risk of type 2 diabetes. We evaluated the acute effects of decaffeinated coffee and the major coffee components chlorogenic acid and trigonelline on glucose tolerance. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We conducted a randomized crossover trial of the effects of 12 g decaffeinated coffee, 1 g chlorogenic acid, 500 mg trigonelline, and placebo (1 g mannitol) on glucose and insulin concentrations during a 2-h oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) in 15 overweight men. RESULTS Chlorogenic acid and trigonelline ingestion significantly reduced glucose (−0.7 mmol/l, P = 0.007, and −0.5 mmol/l, P = 0.024, respectively) and insulin (−73 pmol/l, P = 0.038, and −117 pmol/l, P = 0.007) concentrations 15 min following an OGTT compared with placebo. None of the treatments affected insulin or glucose area under the curve values during the OGTT compared with placebo. CONCLUSIONS Chlorogenic acid and trigonelline reduced early glucose and insulin responses during an OGTT. PMID:19324944

  11. Nonspecific Phospholipase C NPC4 Promotes Responses to Abscisic Acid and Tolerance to Hyperosmotic Stress in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Peters, Carlotta; Li, Maoyin; Narasimhan, Rama; Roth, Mary; Welti, Ruth; Wang, Xuemin

    2010-01-01

    Diacyglycerol (DAG) is an important class of cellular lipid messengers, but its function in plants remains elusive. Here, we show that knockout of the Arabidopsis thaliana nonspecific phospholipase C (NPC4) results in a decrease in DAG levels and compromises plant response to abscisic acid (ABA) and hyperosmotic stresses. NPC4 hydrolyzes various phospholipids in a calcium-independent manner, producing DAG and a phosphorylated head group. NPC4 knockout (KO) plants display decreased ABA sensitivity in seed germination, root elongation, and stomatal movement and had decreased tolerance to high salinity and water deficiency. Overexpression of NPC4 renders plants more sensitive to ABA and more tolerant to hyperosmotic stress than wild-type plants. Addition of a short-chain DAG or a short-chain phosphatidic acid (PA) restores the ABA response of NPC4-KO to that of the wild type, but the addition of DAG together with a DAG kinase inhibitor does not result in a wild-type phenotype. These data suggest that NPC4-produced DAG is converted to PA and that NPC4 and its derived lipids positively modulate ABA response and promote plant tolerance to drought and salt stresses. PMID:20699393

  12. Ascorbic acid enhances oxidative stress tolerance and biological control efficacy of Pichia caribbica against postharvest blue mold decay of apples.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaolan; Zhang, Hongyin; Yang, Qiya; Komla, Mahunu Gustav; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Shuyun

    2014-07-30

    The effect of ascorbic acid (VC) on improving oxidative stress tolerance of Pichia caribbica and biocontrol efficacy against blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum on apples was investigated. P. caribbica showed susceptibility to the oxidative stress in vitro test, and 250 μg/mL VC treatment improved its oxidative stress tolerance. The higher viability exhibited by VC-treated yeast was associated with a lower intracellular ROS level. The activities of antioxidant enzymes of P. caribbica were improved by VC treatment, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Additionally, VC-treated yeast exhibited greater biocontrol activity against P. expansum and faster growth when stored at 25 and 4 °C, respectively, compared to the performance of the non-VC-treated yeast. In response to the VC treatment under oxidative stress, several differentially expressed proteins were identified in P. caribbica, and most of the poteins were confirmed to be related to basic metabolism. Therefore, the application of ascorbic acid is a useful approach to improve oxidative stress tolerance of P. caribbica and its biocontrol efficacy on apples. PMID:25029482

  13. Ascorbic acid enhances oxidative stress tolerance and biological control efficacy of Pichia caribbica against postharvest blue mold decay of apples.

    PubMed

    Li, Chaolan; Zhang, Hongyin; Yang, Qiya; Komla, Mahunu Gustav; Zhang, Xiaoyun; Zhu, Shuyun

    2014-07-30

    The effect of ascorbic acid (VC) on improving oxidative stress tolerance of Pichia caribbica and biocontrol efficacy against blue mold caused by Penicillium expansum on apples was investigated. P. caribbica showed susceptibility to the oxidative stress in vitro test, and 250 μg/mL VC treatment improved its oxidative stress tolerance. The higher viability exhibited by VC-treated yeast was associated with a lower intracellular ROS level. The activities of antioxidant enzymes of P. caribbica were improved by VC treatment, including catalase (CAT), superoxide dismutase (SOD), and glutathione peroxidase (GPX). Additionally, VC-treated yeast exhibited greater biocontrol activity against P. expansum and faster growth when stored at 25 and 4 °C, respectively, compared to the performance of the non-VC-treated yeast. In response to the VC treatment under oxidative stress, several differentially expressed proteins were identified in P. caribbica, and most of the poteins were confirmed to be related to basic metabolism. Therefore, the application of ascorbic acid is a useful approach to improve oxidative stress tolerance of P. caribbica and its biocontrol efficacy on apples.

  14. The expansion of amino-acid repeats is not associated to adaptive evolution in mammalian genes

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background The expansion of amino acid repeats is determined by a high mutation rate and can be increased or limited by selection. It has been suggested that recent expansions could be associated with the potential of adaptation to new environments. In this work, we quantify the strength of this association, as well as the contribution of potential confounding factors. Results Mammalian positively selected genes have accumulated more recent amino acid repeats than other mammalian genes. However, we found little support for an accelerated evolutionary rate as the main driver for the expansion of amino acid repeats. The most significant predictors of amino acid repeats are gene function and GC content. There is no correlation with expression level. Conclusions Our analyses show that amino acid repeat expansions are causally independent from protein adaptive evolution in mammalian genomes. Relaxed purifying selection or positive selection do not associate with more or more recent amino acid repeats. Their occurrence is slightly favoured by the sequence context but mainly determined by the molecular function of the gene. PMID:20021652

  15. Large-scale proteome analysis of abscisic acid and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3-dependent proteins related to desiccation tolerance in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yotsui, Izumi; Serada, Satoshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Saruhashi, Masashi; Taji, Teruaki; Hayashi, Takahisa; Quatrano, Ralph S; Sakata, Yoichi

    2016-03-18

    Desiccation tolerance is an ancestral feature of land plants and is still retained in non-vascular plants such as bryophytes and some vascular plants. However, except for seeds and spores, this trait is absent in vegetative tissues of vascular plants. Although many studies have focused on understanding the molecular basis underlying desiccation tolerance using transcriptome and proteome approaches, the critical molecular differences between desiccation tolerant plants and non-desiccation plants are still not clear. The moss Physcomitrella patens cannot survive rapid desiccation under laboratory conditions, but if cells of the protonemata are treated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) prior to desiccation, it can survive 24 h exposure to desiccation and regrow after rehydration. The desiccation tolerance induced by ABA (AiDT) is specific to this hormone, but also depends on a plant transcription factor ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3). Here we report the comparative proteomic analysis of AiDT between wild type and ABI3 deleted mutant (Δabi3) of P. patens using iTRAQ (Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification). From a total of 1980 unique proteins that we identified, only 16 proteins are significantly altered in Δabi3 compared to wild type after desiccation following ABA treatment. Among this group, three of the four proteins that were severely affected in Δabi3 tissue were Arabidopsis orthologous genes, which were expressed in maturing seeds under the regulation of ABI3. These included a Group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein, a short-chain dehydrogenase, and a desiccation-related protein. Our results suggest that at least three of these proteins expressed in desiccation tolerant cells of both Arabidopsis and the moss are very likely to play important roles in acquisition of desiccation tolerance in land plants. Furthermore, our results suggest that the regulatory machinery of ABA- and ABI3-mediated gene expression for desiccation

  16. Large-scale proteome analysis of abscisic acid and ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3-dependent proteins related to desiccation tolerance in Physcomitrella patens.

    PubMed

    Yotsui, Izumi; Serada, Satoshi; Naka, Tetsuji; Saruhashi, Masashi; Taji, Teruaki; Hayashi, Takahisa; Quatrano, Ralph S; Sakata, Yoichi

    2016-03-18

    Desiccation tolerance is an ancestral feature of land plants and is still retained in non-vascular plants such as bryophytes and some vascular plants. However, except for seeds and spores, this trait is absent in vegetative tissues of vascular plants. Although many studies have focused on understanding the molecular basis underlying desiccation tolerance using transcriptome and proteome approaches, the critical molecular differences between desiccation tolerant plants and non-desiccation plants are still not clear. The moss Physcomitrella patens cannot survive rapid desiccation under laboratory conditions, but if cells of the protonemata are treated by the phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) prior to desiccation, it can survive 24 h exposure to desiccation and regrow after rehydration. The desiccation tolerance induced by ABA (AiDT) is specific to this hormone, but also depends on a plant transcription factor ABSCISIC ACID INSENSITIVE3 (ABI3). Here we report the comparative proteomic analysis of AiDT between wild type and ABI3 deleted mutant (Δabi3) of P. patens using iTRAQ (Isobaric Tags for Relative and Absolute Quantification). From a total of 1980 unique proteins that we identified, only 16 proteins are significantly altered in Δabi3 compared to wild type after desiccation following ABA treatment. Among this group, three of the four proteins that were severely affected in Δabi3 tissue were Arabidopsis orthologous genes, which were expressed in maturing seeds under the regulation of ABI3. These included a Group 1 late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) protein, a short-chain dehydrogenase, and a desiccation-related protein. Our results suggest that at least three of these proteins expressed in desiccation tolerant cells of both Arabidopsis and the moss are very likely to play important roles in acquisition of desiccation tolerance in land plants. Furthermore, our results suggest that the regulatory machinery of ABA- and ABI3-mediated gene expression for desiccation

  17. Thermal tolerances of reef corals in the Gulf: a review of the potential for increasing coral survival and adaptation to climate change through assisted translocation.

    PubMed

    Coles, Steve L; Riegl, Bernhard M

    2013-07-30

    Corals in the Gulf withstand summer temperatures up to 10 °C higher than corals elsewhere and have recovered from extreme temperature events in 10 years or less. This heat-tolerance of Gulf corals has positive implications for the world's coral populations to adapt to increasing water temperatures. However, survival of Gulf corals has been severely tested by 35-37 °C temperatures five times in the last 15 years, each time causing extensive coral bleaching and mortality. Anticipated future temperature increases may therefore challenge survival of already highly stressed Gulf corals. Previously proposed translocation of Gulf corals to introduce temperature-adapted corals outside of the Gulf is assessed and determined to be problematical, and to be considered a tool of last resort. Coral culture and transplantation within the Gulf is feasible for helping maintain coral species populations and preserving genomes and adaptive capacities of Gulf corals that are endangered by future thermal stress events.

  18. Acquired tolerance in cadmium-adapted lung epithelial cells: Roles of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway and basal level of metallothionein

    SciTech Connect

    Lau, Andy T.Y.; Zhang Jian; Chiu, J.-F. . E-mail: jfchiu@hkucc.hku.hk

    2006-08-15

    Cadmium-resistant cells were developed in our laboratory with rat lung epithelial cells (LECs) by stepwise exposure of LECs to cadmium chloride from 1 {mu}M to 20 {mu}M after 20 passages. To investigate the Cd-resistant phenotype in a long-term perspective, cadmium-resistant cells adapted to 20 {mu}M cadmium (Cd{sup R}) were then cultured in the absence of cadmium for various passages [Cd{sup R}(-n)]. All these adapted cells were significantly protected from cadmium toxicity as compared to parental cadmium-sensitive LECs (Cd{sup S}). The cadmium-resistant phenotype of adapted cells was relatively stable in the absence of cadmium for as long as 40 passages. Basal mRNA level of metallothionein-1 (MT-1) was dramatically higher in Cd{sup R} than in Cd{sup R}(-), which may account for the higher Cd-resistance of Cd{sup R} than Cd{sup R}(-). MT-1 mRNA level decreased drastically in Cd{sup R} after cadmium removal, suggesting that the high basal level of MT-1 in Cd{sup R} may be only partially responsible for cadmium-resistance. Treatment of cells with high levels of cadmium resulted in decreased phosphorylation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK1/2) in adapted cells than in sensitive cells and this cadmium-induced JNK activity was blocked by JNK inhibitor II, SP600125. Ro318220, a strong activator of JNK, reverted cadmium-sensitive phenotype in adapted cells. Taken together, our results suggest that during cadmium adaptation, cells develop tolerance to cell death, generally due to perturbation of the JNK signaling pathway and the nonresponsiveness of JNK phosphorylation is critical for the Cd-tolerance in these cells.

  19. Nuclear-localized AtHSPR links abscisic acid-dependent salt tolerance and antioxidant defense in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Yang, Tao; Zhang, Liang; Hao, Hongyan; Zhang, Peng; Zhu, Haowei; Cheng, Wei; Wang, Yongli; Wang, Xinyu; Wang, Chongying

    2015-12-01

    Salt stress from soil or irrigation water limits plant growth. A T-DNA insertion mutant in C24, named athspr (Arabidopsis thaliana heat shock protein-related), showed several phenotypes, including reduced organ size and enhanced sensitivity to environmental cues. The athspr mutant is severely impaired under salinity levels at which wild-type (WT) plants grow normally. AtHSPR encodes a nuclear-localized protein with ATPase activity, and its expression was enhanced by high salinity and abscisic acid (ABA). Overexpression (OE) of AtHSPR significantly enhanced tolerance to salt stress by increasing the activities of the antioxidant system and by maintaining K(+) /Na(+) homeostasis. Quantitative RT-PCR analyses showed that OE of AtHSPR increased the expression of ABA/stress-responsive, salt overly sensitive (SOS)-related and antioxidant-related genes. In addition, ABA content was reduced in athspr plants with or without salt stress, and exogenous ABA restored WT-like salt tolerance to athspr plants. athspr exhibited increased leaf stomatal density and stomatal index, slower ABA-induced stomatal closure and reduced drought tolerance relative to the WT. AtHSPR OE enhanced drought tolerance by reducing leaf water loss and stomatal aperture. Transcript profiling in athspr showed a differential salt-stress response for genes involved in accumulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), ABA signaling, cell death, stress response and photosynthesis. Taken together, our results suggested that AtHSPR is involved in salt tolerance in Arabidopsis through modulation of ROS levels, ABA-dependent stomatal closure, photosynthesis and K(+) /Na(+) homeostasis. PMID:26603028

  20. Cellular fatty acid profile and H(+)-ATPase activity to assess acid tolerance of Bacillus sp. for potential probiotic functional attributes.

    PubMed

    Shobharani, P; Halami, Prakash M

    2014-11-01

    The present study has been focused widely on comparative account of probiotic qualities of Bacillus spp. for safer usage. Initially, 170 heat resistant flora were isolated and selected for non-pathogenic cultures devoid of cytK, hblD, and nhe1 virulence genes. Subsequently, through biochemical tests along with 16S rRNA gene sequencing and fatty acid profiling, the cultures were identified as Bacillus megaterium (AR-S4), Bacillus subtilis (HR-S1), Bacillus licheniformis (Csm1-1a and HN-S1), and Bacillus flexus (CDM4-3c and CDM3-1). The selected cultures showed 70-80 % survival under simulated gastrointestinal condition which was also confirmed through H(+)-ATPase production. The amount of H(+)-ATPase increased by more than 2-fold when grown at pH 2 which support for the acid tolerance ability of Bacillus isolates. The study also examined the influence of acidic pH on cellular fatty acid composition of Bacillus spp. A remarkable shift in the fatty acid profile was observed at acidic pH through an increased amount of even numbered fatty acid (C16 and C18) in comparison with odd numbered (C15 and C17). Additionally, the cultures exhibited various probiotic functional properties. Overall, the study increases our understanding of Bacillus spp. and will allow both industries and consumers to choose for well-defined probiotic with possible health benefits. PMID:25125040

  1. Gene expression analysis of Corynebacterium glutamicum subjected to long-term lactic acid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Jakob, Kinga; Satorhelyi, Peter; Lange, Christian; Wendisch, Volker F; Silakowski, Barbara; Scherer, Siegfried; Neuhaus, Klaus

    2007-08-01

    Corynebacteria form an important part of the red smear cheese microbial surface consortium. To gain a better understanding of molecular adaptation due to low pH induced by lactose fermentation, the global gene expression profile of Corynebacterium glutamicum adapted to pH 5.7 with lactic acid under continuous growth in a chemostat was characterized by DNA microarray analysis. Expression of a total of 116 genes was increased and that of 90 genes was decreased compared to pH 7.5 without lactic acid, representing 7% of the genes in the genome. The up-regulated genes encode mainly transcriptional regulators, proteins responsible for export, import, and metabolism, and several proteins of unknown function. As much as 45% of the up-regulated open reading frames code for hypothetical proteins. These results were validated using real-time reverse transcription-PCR. To characterize the functions of 38 up-regulated genes, 36 single-crossover disruption mutants were generated and analyzed for their lactic acid sensitivities. However, only a sigB knockout mutant showed a highly significant negative effect on growth at low pH, suggesting a function in organic-acid adaptation. A sigE mutant already displayed growth retardation at neutral pH but grew better at acidic pH than the sigB mutant. The lack of acid-sensitive phenotypes in 34 out of 36 disrupted genes suggests either a considerable redundancy in acid adaptation response or coincidental effects. Other up-regulated genes included genes for ion transporters and metabolic pathways, including carbohydrate and respiratory metabolism. The enhanced expression of the nrd (ribonucleotide reductase) operon and a DNA ATPase repair protein implies a cellular response to combat acid-induced DNA damage. Surprisingly, multiple iron uptake systems (totaling 15% of the genes induced >or=2-fold) were induced at low pH. This induction was shown to be coincidental and could be attributed to iron-sequestering effects in complex media at low p

  2. Solid and liquid media for isolating and cultivating acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacteria.

    PubMed

    Ňancucheo, Ivan; Rowe, Owen F; Hedrich, Sabrina; Johnson, D Barrie

    2016-05-01

    Growth media have been developed to facilitate the enrichment and isolation of acidophilic and acid-tolerant sulfate-reducing bacteria (aSRB) from environmental and industrial samples, and to allow their cultivation in vitro The main features of the 'standard' solid and liquid devised media are as follows: (i) use of glycerol rather than an aliphatic acid as electron donor; (ii) inclusion of stoichiometric concentrations of zinc ions to both buffer pH and to convert potentially harmful hydrogen sulphide produced by the aSRB to insoluble zinc sulphide; (iii) inclusion of Acidocella aromatica (an heterotrophic acidophile that does not metabolize glycerol or yeast extract) in the gel underlayer of double layered (overlay) solid media, to remove acetic acid produced by aSRB that incompletely oxidize glycerol and also aliphatic acids (mostly pyruvic) released by acid hydrolysis of the gelling agent used (agarose). Colonies of aSRB are readily distinguished from those of other anaerobes due to their deposition and accumulation of metal sulphide precipitates. Data presented illustrate the effectiveness of the overlay solid media described for isolating aSRB from acidic anaerobic sediments and low pH sulfidogenic bioreactors.

  3. Best of both worlds: simultaneous high-light and shade-tolerance adaptations within individual leaves of the living stone Lithops aucampiae.

    PubMed

    Field, Katie J; George, Rachel; Fearn, Brian; Quick, W Paul; Davey, Matthew P

    2013-01-01

    "Living stones" (Lithops spp.) display some of the most extreme morphological and physiological adaptations in the plant kingdom to tolerate the xeric environments in which they grow. The physiological mechanisms that optimise the photosynthetic processes of Lithops spp. while minimising transpirational water loss in both above- and below-ground tissues remain unclear. Our experiments have shown unique simultaneous high-light and shade-tolerant adaptations within individual leaves of Lithops aucampiae. Leaf windows on the upper surfaces of the plant allow sunlight to penetrate to photosynthetic tissues within while sunlight-blocking flavonoid accumulation limits incoming solar radiation and aids screening of harmful UV radiation. Increased concentration of chlorophyll a and greater chlorophyll a:b in above-ground regions of leaves enable maximum photosynthetic use of incoming light, while inverted conical epidermal cells, increased chlorophyll b, and reduced chlorophyll a:b ensure maximum absorption and use of low light levels within the below-ground region of the leaf. High NPQ capacity affords physiological flexibility under variable natural light conditions. Our findings demonstrate unprecedented physiological flexibility in a xerophyte and further our understanding of plant responses and adaptations to extreme environments.

  4. Best of Both Worlds: Simultaneous High-Light and Shade-Tolerance Adaptations within Individual Leaves of the Living Stone Lithops aucampiae

    PubMed Central

    Field, Katie J.; George, Rachel; Fearn, Brian; Quick, W. Paul; Davey, Matthew P.

    2013-01-01

    “Living stones” (Lithops spp.) display some of the most extreme morphological and physiological adaptations in the plant kingdom to tolerate the xeric environments in which they grow. The physiological mechanisms that optimise the photosynthetic processes of Lithops spp. while minimising transpirational water loss in both above- and below-ground tissues remain unclear. Our experiments have shown unique simultaneous high-light and shade-tolerant adaptations within individual leaves of Lithops aucampiae. Leaf windows on the upper surfaces of the plant allow sunlight to penetrate to photosynthetic tissues within while sunlight-blocking flavonoid accumulation limits incoming solar radiation and aids screening of harmful UV radiation. Increased concentration of chlorophyll a and greater chlorophyll a∶b in above-ground regions of leaves enable maximum photosynthetic use of incoming light, while inverted conical epidermal cells, increased chlorophyll b, and reduced chlorophyll a∶b ensure maximum absorption and use of low light levels within the below-ground region of the leaf. High NPQ capacity affords physiological flexibility under variable natural light conditions. Our findings demonstrate unprecedented physiological flexibility in a xerophyte and further our understanding of plant responses and adaptations to extreme environments. PMID:24194825

  5. Biological Function of Acetic Acid-Improvement in Obesity and Glucose Tolerance by Acetic Acid in Type 2 Diabetic Rats.

    PubMed

    Yamashita, Hiromi

    2016-07-29

    Fatty acids derived from adipose tissue are oxidized by β-oxidation to form ketone bodies as final products under the starving condition. Previously, we found that free acetic acid was formed concomitantly with the production of ketone bodies in isolated rat liver perfusion, and mitochondrial acetyl CoA hydrolase was appeared to be involved with the acetic acid production. It was revealed that acetic acid was formed as a final product of enhanced β-oxidation of fatty acids and utilized as a fuel in extrahepatic tissues under the starving condition. Under the fed condition, β-oxidation is suppressed and acetic acid production is decreased. When acetic acid was taken daily by obesity-linked type 2 diabetic Otsuka Long-Evans Tokushima Fatty (OLETF) rats under the fed condition, it protected OLETF rats against obesity. Furthermore, acetic acid contributed to protect from the accumulation of lipid in the liver as well as abdominal fat in OLETF rats. Transcripts of lipogenic genes in the liver were decreased, while transcripts of myoglobin and Glut4 genes in abdominal muscles were increased in the acetic acid-administered OLETF rats. It is indicated that exogenously administered acetic acid would have effects on lipid metabolism in both the liver and the skeletal muscles, and have function that works against obesity and obesity-linked type 2 diabetes.

  6. Rice G-protein subunits qPE9-1 and RGB1 play distinct roles in abscisic acid responses and drought adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Ping; Zhou, Yong; Yin, Jian-Feng; Yan, Xue-Jiao; Lin, Sheng; Xu, Wei-Feng; Baluška, František; Wang, Yi-Ping; Xia, Yi-Ji; Liang, Guo-hua; Liang, Jian-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein (G-protein)-mediated abscisic acid (ABA) and drought-stress responses have been documented in numerous plant species. However, our understanding of the function of rice G-protein subunits in ABA signalling and drought tolerance is limited. In this study, the function of G-protein subunits in ABA response and drought resistance in rice plants was explored. It was found that the transcription level of qPE9-1 (rice Gγ subunit) gradually decreased with increasing ABA concentration and the lack of qPE9-1 showed an enhanced drought tolerance in rice plants. In contrast, mRNA levels of RGB1 (rice Gβ subunit) were significantly upregulated by ABA treatment and the lack of RGB1 led to reduced drought tolerance. Furthermore, the results suggested that qPE9-1 negatively regulates the ABA response by suppressing the expression of key transcription factors involved in ABA and stress responses, while RGB1 positively regulates ABA biosynthesis by upregulating NCED gene expression under both normal and drought stress conditions. Taken together, it is proposed that RGB1 is a positive regulator of the ABA response and drought adaption in rice plants, whereas qPE9-1 is modulated by RGB1 and functions as a negative regulator in the ABA-dependent drought-stress responses.

  7. Rice G-protein subunits qPE9-1 and RGB1 play distinct roles in abscisic acid responses and drought adaptation.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Dong-Ping; Zhou, Yong; Yin, Jian-Feng; Yan, Xue-Jiao; Lin, Sheng; Xu, Wei-Feng; Baluška, František; Wang, Yi-Ping; Xia, Yi-Ji; Liang, Guo-hua; Liang, Jian-Sheng

    2015-10-01

    Heterotrimeric GTP-binding protein (G-protein)-mediated abscisic acid (ABA) and drought-stress responses have been documented in numerous plant species. However, our understanding of the function of rice G-protein subunits in ABA signalling and drought tolerance is limited. In this study, the function of G-protein subunits in ABA response and drought resistance in rice plants was explored. It was found that the transcription level of qPE9-1 (rice Gγ subunit) gradually decreased with increasing ABA concentration and the lack of qPE9-1 showed an enhanced drought tolerance in rice plants. In contrast, mRNA levels of RGB1 (rice Gβ subunit) were significantly upregulated by ABA treatment and the lack of RGB1 led to reduced drought tolerance. Furthermore, the results suggested that qPE9-1 negatively regulates the ABA response by suppressing the expression of key transcription factors involved in ABA and stress responses, while RGB1 positively regulates ABA biosynthesis by upregulating NCED gene expression under both normal and drought stress conditions. Taken together, it is proposed that RGB1 is a positive regulator of the ABA response and drought adaption in rice plants, whereas qPE9-1 is modulated by RGB1 and functions as a negative regulator in the ABA-dependent drought-stress responses. PMID:26175353

  8. Lack of Physiological Depth Patterns in Conspecifics of Endemic Antarctic Brown Algae: A Trade-Off between UV Stress Tolerance and Shade Adaptation?

    PubMed Central

    Gómez, Iván; Huovinen, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    A striking characteristic of endemic Antarctic brown algae is their broad vertical distribution. This feature is largely determined by the shade adaptation in order to cope with the seasonal variation in light availability. However, during spring-summer months, when light penetrates deep in the water column these organisms have to withstand high levels of solar radiation, including UV. In the present study we examine the light use characteristics in parallel to a potential for UV tolerance (measured as content of phenolic compounds, antioxidant activity and maximum quantum yield of fluorescence) in conspecific populations of four Antarctic brown algae (Ascoseira mirabilis, Desmarestia menziesii, D. anceps and Himantothallus grandifolius) distributed over a depth gradient between 5 and 30 m. The main results indicated that a) photosynthetic efficiency was uniform along the depth gradient in all the studied species, and b) short-term (6 h) exposure to UV radiation revealed a high tolerance measured as chlorophyll fluorescence, phlorotannin content and antioxidant capacity. Multivariate analysis of similarity indicated that light requirements for photosynthesis, soluble phlorotannins and antioxidant capacity are the variables determining the responses along the depth gradient in all the studied species. The suite of physiological responses of algae with a shallower distribution (A. mirabilis and D. menziesii) differed from those with deeper vertical range (D. anceps and H. grandifolius). These patterns are consistent with the underwater light penetration that defines two zones: 0–15 m, with influence of UV radiation (1% of UV-B and UV-A at 9 m and 15 m respectively) and a zone below 15 m marked by PAR incidence (1% up to 30 m). These results support the prediction that algae show a UV stress tolerance capacity along a broad depth range according to their marked shade adaptation. The high contents of phlorotannins and antioxidant potential appear to be strongly

  9. 75 FR 37738 - 1-Naphthaleneacetic Acid; Time-Limited Tolerance, Technical Correction

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-06-30

    ... August 12, 2009 (74 FR 40513) (FRL-8428-3) establishing a time-limited tolerance for residues of 1... rule in the Federal Register of September 11, 2009, (74 FR 46689) (FRL-8426-2) concerning azinphos... final rule published in the Federal Register of September 11, 2009 (74 FR 46689) (FRL-8426-2)....

  10. Endogenous salicylic acid is required for promoting cadmium tolerance of Arabidopsis by modulating glutathione metabolisms.

    PubMed

    Guo, Bin; Liu, Chen; Li, Hua; Yi, Keke; Ding, Nengfei; Li, Ningyu; Lin, Yicheng; Fu, Qinglin

    2016-10-01

    A few studies with NahG transgenic lines of Arabidopsis show that depletion of SA enhances cadmium (Cd) tolerance. However, it remains some uncertainties that the defence signaling may be a result of catechol accumulation in NahG transgenic lines but not SA deficiency. Here, we conducted a set of hydroponic assays with another SA-deficient mutant sid2 to examine the endogenous roles of SA in Cd tolerance, especially focusing on the glutathione (GSH) cycling. Our results showed that reduced SA resulted in negative effects on Cd tolerance, including decreased Fe uptake and chlorophyll concentration, aggravation of oxidative damage and growth inhibition. Cd exposure significantly increased SA concentration in wild-type leaves, but did not affect it in sid2 mutants. Depletion of SA did not disturb the Cd uptake in either roots or shoots. The reduced Cd tolerance in sid2 mutants is due to the lowered GSH status, which is associated with the decreased expression of serine acetyltransferase along with a decline in contents of non-protein thiols, phytochelatins, and the lowered transcription and activities of glutathione reductase1 (GR1) which reduced GSH regeneration. Finally, the possible mode of SA signaling through the GR/GSH pathway during Cd exposure is discussed. PMID:27209521

  11. 75 FR 60231 - Acephate, Cacodylic Acid, Dicamba, Dicloran, et al.; Tolerance Actions

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-09-29

    ... not limited to: Crop production (NAICS code 111). Animal production (NAICS code 112). Food... FR 28155) (FRL-8821-3), EPA ] issued a proposal to revoke, modify, and establish specific tolerances... insecticide acephate. Also, the proposal of May 19, 2010 (75 FR 28155) provided a 60-day comment period...

  12. Organism-adapted specificity of the allosteric regulation of pyruvate kinase in lactic acid bacteria.

    PubMed

    Veith, Nadine; Feldman-Salit, Anna; Cojocaru, Vlad; Henrich, Stefan; Kummer, Ursula; Wade, Rebecca C

    2013-01-01

    Pyruvate kinase (PYK) is a critical allosterically regulated enzyme that links glycolysis, the primary energy metabolism, to cellular metabolism. Lactic acid bacteria rely almost exclusively on glycolysis for their energy production under anaerobic conditions, which reinforces the key role of PYK in their metabolism. These organisms are closely related, but have adapted to a huge variety of native environments. They include food-fermenting organisms, important symbionts in the human gut, and antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In contrast to the rather conserved inhibition of PYK by inorganic phosphate, the activation of PYK shows high variability in the type of activating compound between different lactic acid bacteria. System-wide comparative studies of the metabolism of lactic acid bacteria are required to understand the reasons for the diversity of these closely related microorganisms. These require knowledge of the identities of the enzyme modifiers. Here, we predict potential allosteric activators of PYKs from three lactic acid bacteria which are adapted to different native environments. We used protein structure-based molecular modeling and enzyme kinetic modeling to predict and validate potential activators of PYK. Specifically, we compared the electrostatic potential and the binding of phosphate moieties at the allosteric binding sites, and predicted potential allosteric activators by docking. We then made a kinetic model of Lactococcus lactis PYK to relate the activator predictions to the intracellular sugar-phosphate conditions in lactic acid bacteria. This strategy enabled us to predict fructose 1,6-bisphosphate as the sole activator of the Enterococcus faecalis PYK, and to predict that the PYKs from Streptococcus pyogenes and Lactobacillus plantarum show weaker specificity for their allosteric activators, while still having fructose 1,6-bisphosphate play the main activator role in vivo. These differences in the specificity of allosteric activation may

  13. Lipophilisation of Caffeic Acid through Esterification with Propanol Using Water-tolerable Acidic Ionic Liquid as Catalyst.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wei; Han, Liya

    2015-01-01

    Propyl caffeate was synthesized to produce lipophilic antioxidant, which used caffeic acid and propanol as starting materials, acidic ionic liquid as catalyst. The highest yield of propyl caffeate (98.7±0.8%) have been achieved under the optimum as follows: 1-butylsulfonic-3-methylimidazolium tosylate showed the best catalytic performance, molar ratio of caffeic acid to propanol was 1:20, reaction temperature was 90°C and the amount of acidic ionic liquid was 40%. The relationship between temperature and the forward rate constant gave the activation energy of 33.6 kJ mol(-1), which indicated that acidic ionic liquid possesses high catalytic activity in the synthesis of PC. And the activity of acidic ionic liquid was not inhibited by the water produced during the esterification process. More importantly, this reaction system can even proceed smoothly when initial water content was 5%.

  14. Synergistic effect of antioxidant system and osmolyte in hydrogen sulfide and salicylic acid crosstalk-induced heat tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings

    PubMed Central

    Li, Zhong-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), is a plant hormone with multifunction that is involved in plant growth, development and the acquisition of stress tolerance. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is emerging similar functions, but crosstalk between SA and H2S in the acquisition of heat tolerance is not clear. Our recent study firstly reported that SA treatment enhanced the activity of L-cysteine desulfhydrase (L-DES), a key enzyme in H2S biosynthesis, followed by induced endogenous H2S accumulation, which in turn improved the heat tolerance of maize seedlings.1 In addition, NaHS, a H2S donor, enhanced SA-induced heat tolerance, while its biosynthesis inhibitor DL-propargylglycine (PAG) and scavenger hydroxylamine (HT) weakened SA-induced heat tolerance. Also, NaHS had no significant effect on SA accumulation and its biosynthesis enzymes phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and benzoic-acid-2-hydroxylase (BA2H) activities, as well as significant difference was not observed in NaHS-induced heat tolerance of maize seedlings by SA biosynthesis inhibitors paclobutrazol (PAC) and 2-aminoindan-2-phosph- onic acid (AIP) treatment.1 Further study displayed that SA induced osmolytes (proline, betaine and trehalose) accumulation and enhancement in activity of antioxidant system in maize seedlings. These results showed that antioxidant system and osmolyte play a synergistic role in SA and H2S crosstalk-induced heat tolerance of maize seedlings. PMID:26337076

  15. Synergistic effect of antioxidant system and osmolyte in hydrogen sulfide and salicylic acid crosstalk-induced heat tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Guang

    2015-01-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), is a plant hormone with multifunction that is involved in plant growth, development and the acquisition of stress tolerance. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is emerging similar functions, but crosstalk between SA and H2S in the acquisition of heat tolerance is not clear. Our recent study firstly reported that SA treatment enhanced the activity of L-cysteine desulfhydrase (L-DES), a key enzyme in H2S biosynthesis, followed by induced endogenous H2S accumulation, which in turn improved the heat tolerance of maize seedlings. (1) In addition, NaHS, a H2S donor, enhanced SA-induced heat tolerance, while its biosynthesis inhibitor DL-propargylglycine (PAG) and scavenger hydroxylamine (HT) weakened SA-induced heat tolerance. Also, NaHS had no significant effect on SA accumulation and its biosynthesis enzymes phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and benzoic-acid-2-hydroxylase (BA2H) activities, as well as significant difference was not observed in NaHS-induced heat tolerance of maize seedlings by SA biosynthesis inhibitors paclobutrazol (PAC) and 2-aminoindan-2-phosph- onic acid (AIP) treatment. (1) Further study displayed that SA induced osmolytes (proline, betaine and trehalose) accumulation and enhancement in activity of antioxidant system in maize seedlings. These results showed that antioxidant system and osmolyte play a synergistic role in SA and H2S crosstalk-induced heat tolerance of maize seedlings.

  16. Feeding a Diet Enriched in Docosahexaenoic Acid to Lactating Dams Improves the Tolerance Response to Egg Protein in Suckled Pups

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Caroline; Lewis, Erin D.; Goruk, Susan; Field, Catherine J.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the effect of feeding a maternal diet supplemented with docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) during the suckling period on the development of the immune system and oral tolerance (OT) in offspring. Dams were randomized to consume one of two nutritionally adequate diets throughout the suckling period: control (N = 12, 0% DHA) or DHA (N = 8, 0.9% DHA) diet. At 11 days, pups from each dam were randomly assigned to a mucosal OT challenge: the placebo or the ovalbumin (OVA) treatment. At three weeks, plasma immunoglobulins and splenocyte cytokine production ex vivo were measured. OVA-tolerized pups had a lower Th2 (IL-13) response to OVA despite the presence of more activated T cells and memory cells (CD27+, all p < 0.05). Feeding a high DHA diet improved the ability of splenocytes to respond to mitogens toward a skewed Th1 response and led to a higher IL-10 and a lower TGF-β production after stimulation with OVA (all p < 0.05). Untolerized DHA-fed pups had lower plasma concentrations of OVA-specific immunoglobulin E (p for interaction < 0.05). Overall, feeding a high DHA maternal diet improves the tolerance response in untolerized suckled pups in a direction that is thought to be beneficial for the establishment of OT. PMID:26907333

  17. Acid-adapted strains of Escherichia coli K-12 obtained by experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Harden, Mark M; He, Amanda; Creamer, Kaitlin; Clark, Michelle W; Hamdallah, Issam; Martinez, Keith A; Kresslein, Robert L; Bush, Sean P; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2015-03-01

    Enteric bacteria encounter a wide range of pHs throughout the human intestinal tract. We conducted experimental evolution of Escherichia coli K-12 to isolate clones with increased fitness during growth under acidic conditions (pH 4.5 to 4.8). Twenty-four independent populations of E. coli K-12 W3110 were evolved in LBK medium (10 g/liter tryptone, 5 g/liter yeast extract, 7.45 g/liter KCl) buffered with homopiperazine-N,N'-bis-2-(ethanosulfonic acid) and malate at pH 4.8. At generation 730, the pH was decreased to 4.6 with HCl. By 2,000 generations, all populations had achieved higher endpoint growth than the ancestor at pH 4.6 but not at pH 7.0. All evolving populations showed a progressive loss of activity of lysine decarboxylase (CadA), a major acid stress enzyme. This finding suggests a surprising association between acid adaptation and moderation of an acid stress response. At generation 2,000, eight clones were isolated from four populations, and their genomes were sequenced. Each clone showed between three and eight missense mutations, including one in a subunit of the RNA polymerase holoenzyme (rpoB, rpoC, or rpoD). Missense mutations were found in adiY, the activator of the acid-inducible arginine decarboxylase (adiA), and in gcvP (glycine decarboxylase), a possible acid stress component. For tests of fitness relative to that of the ancestor, lacZ::kan was transduced into each strain. All acid-evolved clones showed a high fitness advantage at pH 4.6. With the cytoplasmic pH depressed by benzoate (at external pH 6.5), acid-evolved clones showed decreased fitness; thus, there was no adaptation to cytoplasmic pH depression. At pH 9.0, acid-evolved clones showed no fitness advantage. Thus, our acid-evolved clones showed a fitness increase specific to low external pH.

  18. Acid-adapted strains of Escherichia coli K-12 obtained by experimental evolution.

    PubMed

    Harden, Mark M; He, Amanda; Creamer, Kaitlin; Clark, Michelle W; Hamdallah, Issam; Martinez, Keith A; Kresslein, Robert L; Bush, Sean P; Slonczewski, Joan L

    2015-03-01

    Enteric bacteria encounter a wide range of pHs throughout the human intestinal tract. We conducted experimental evolution of Escherichia coli K-12 to isolate clones with increased fitness during growth under acidic conditions (pH 4.5 to 4.8). Twenty-four independent populations of E. coli K-12 W3110 were evolved in LBK medium (10 g/liter tryptone, 5 g/liter yeast extract, 7.45 g/liter KCl) buffered with homopiperazine-N,N'-bis-2-(ethanosulfonic acid) and malate at pH 4.8. At generation 730, the pH was decreased to 4.6 with HCl. By 2,000 generations, all populations had achieved higher endpoint growth than the ancestor at pH 4.6 but not at pH 7.0. All evolving populations showed a progressive loss of activity of lysine decarboxylase (CadA), a major acid stress enzyme. This finding suggests a surprising association between acid adaptation and moderation of an acid stress response. At generation 2,000, eight clones were isolated from four populations, and their genomes were sequenced. Each clone showed between three and eight missense mutations, including one in a subunit of the RNA polymerase holoenzyme (rpoB, rpoC, or rpoD). Missense mutations were found in adiY, the activator of the acid-inducible arginine decarboxylase (adiA), and in gcvP (glycine decarboxylase), a possible acid stress component. For tests of fitness relative to that of the ancestor, lacZ::kan was transduced into each strain. All acid-evolved clones showed a high fitness advantage at pH 4.6. With the cytoplasmic pH depressed by benzoate (at external pH 6.5), acid-evolved clones showed decreased fitness; thus, there was no adaptation to cytoplasmic pH depression. At pH 9.0, acid-evolved clones showed no fitness advantage. Thus, our acid-evolved clones showed a fitness increase specific to low external pH. PMID:25556191

  19. A combined physiological and proteomic approach to reveal lactic-acid-induced alterations in Lactobacillus casei Zhang and its mutant with enhanced lactic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Wu, Chongde; Zhang, Juan; Chen, Wei; Wang, Miao; Du, Guocheng; Chen, Jian

    2012-01-01

    Lactobacillus casei has traditionally been recognized as a probiotic and frequently used as an adjunct culture in fermented dairy products, where acid stress is an environmental condition commonly encountered. In the present study, we carried out a comparative physiological and proteomic study to investigate lactic-acid-induced alterations in Lactobacillus casei Zhang (WT) and its acid-resistant mutant. Analysis of the physiological data showed that the mutant exhibited 33.8% higher glucose phosphoenolpyruvate:sugar phosphotransferase system activity and lower glycolytic pH compared with the WT under acidic conditions. In addition, significant differences were detected in both cells during acid stress between intracellular physiological state, including intracellular pH, H(+)-ATPase activity, and intracellular ATP pool. Comparison of the proteomic data based on 2D-DIGE and i-TRAQ indicated that acid stress invoked a global change in both strains. The mutant protected the cells against acid damage by regulating the expression of key proteins involved in cellular metabolism, DNA replication, RNA synthesis, translation, and some chaperones. Proteome results were validated by Lactobacillus casei displaying higher intracellular aspartate and arginine levels, and the survival at pH 3.3 was improved 1.36- and 2.10-fold by the addition of 50-mM aspartate and arginine, respectively. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that aspartate may be involved in acid tolerance in Lactobacillus casei. Results presented here may help us understand acid resistance mechanisms and help formulate new strategies to enhance the industrial applications of this species. PMID:22159611

  20. An organic solvent-tolerant phenolic acid decarboxylase from Bacillus licheniformis for the efficient bioconversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to vinyl phenol derivatives.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongfei; Li, Lulu; Ding, Shaojun

    2015-06-01

    A new phenolic acid decarboxylase gene (blpad) from Bacillus licheniformis was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. The full-length blpad encodes a 166-amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass and pI of 19,521 Da and 5.02, respectively. The recombinant BLPAD displayed maximum activity at 37 °C and pH 6.0. This enzyme possesses a broad substrate specificity and is able to decarboxylate p-coumaric, ferulic, caffeic, and sinapic acids at the relative ratios of specific activities 100:74.59:34.41:0.29. Kinetic constant K m values toward p-coumaric, ferulic, caffeic, and sinapic acids were 1.64, 1.55, 1.93, and 2.45 mM, and V max values were 268.43, 216.80, 119.07, and 0.78 U mg(-1), respectively. In comparison with other phenolic acid decarboxylases, BLPAD exhibited remarkable organic solvent tolerance and good thermal stability. BLPAD showed excellent catalytic performance in biphasic organic/aqueous systems and efficiently converted p-coumaric and ferulic acids into 4-vinylphenol and 4-vinylguaiacol. At 500 mM of p-coumaric and ferulic acids, the recombinant BLPAD produced a total 60.63 g l(-1) 4-vinylphenol and 58.30 g l(-1) 4-vinylguaiacol with the conversion yields 97.02 and 70.96 %, respectively. The low yield and product concentration are the crucial drawbacks to the practical bioproduction of vinyl phenol derivatives using phenolic acid decarboxylases. These unusual properties make BLPAD a desirable biocatalyst for commercial use in the bioconversion of hydroxycinnamic acids to vinyl phenol derivatives via enzymatic decarboxylation in a biphasic organic/aqueous reaction system. PMID:25547838

  1. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  2. Abscisic acid, ethylene and gibberellic acid act at different developmental stages to instruct the adaptation of young leaves to stress

    PubMed Central

    Verelst, Wim; Skirycz, Aleksandra

    2010-01-01

    Drought stress represents a particularly great environmental challenge for plants. A decreased water availability can severely limit growth, and this jeopardizes the organism's primary goal—to survive and sustain growth long enough to ensure the plentiful production of viable seeds within the favorable growth season. It is therefore vital for a growing plant to sense oncoming drought as early as possible, and to respond to it rapidly and appropriately in all organs. A typical, fast energy-saving response is the arrest of growth in young organs, which is likely mediated by root-derived signals. A recent publication indicates that three plant hormones (abscisic acid, ethylene and gibberellic acid) mediate the adaptation of leaf growth in response to drought, and that they act at different developmental stages. Abscisic acid mainly acts in mature cells, while ethylene and gibberellic acid function in expanding and dividing leaf cells. This provides the plant with a means to differentially control the developmental zones of a growing leaf, and to integrate environmental signals differently in sink and source tissues. Here we discuss the biological implications of this discovery in the context of long-distance xylem and phloem transport. PMID:20383070

  3. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance

    PubMed Central

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H.; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T.

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification. PMID:25673654

  4. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification.

  5. Overexpression of acetyl-CoA synthetase in Saccharomyces cerevisiae increases acetic acid tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jun; Holzwarth, Garrett; Penner, Michael H; Patton-Vogt, Jana; Bakalinsky, Alan T

    2015-01-01

    Acetic acid-mediated inhibition of the fermentation of lignocellulose-derived sugars impedes development of plant biomass as a source of renewable ethanol. In order to overcome this inhibition, the capacity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to synthesize acetyl-CoA from acetic acid was increased by overexpressing ACS2 encoding acetyl-coenzyme A synthetase. Overexpression of ACS2 resulted in higher resistance to acetic acid as measured by an increased growth rate and shorter lag phase relative to a wild-type control strain, suggesting that Acs2-mediated consumption of acetic acid during fermentation contributes to acetic acid detoxification. PMID:25673654

  6. Renal cortex taurine content regulates renal adaptive response to altered dietary intake of sulfur amino acids.

    PubMed Central

    Chesney, R W; Gusowski, N; Dabbagh, S

    1985-01-01

    Rats fed a reduced sulfur amino acid diet (LTD) or a high-taurine diet (HTD) demonstrate a renal adaptive response. The LTD results in hypotaurinuria and enhanced brush border membrane vesicle (BBMV) accumulation of taurine. The HTD causes hypertaurinuria and reduced BBMV uptake. This adaptation may relate to changes in plasma or renal cortex taurine concentration. Rats were fed a normal-taurine diet (NTD), LTD, or HTD for 14 d or they underwent: (a) 3% beta-alanine for the last 8 d of each diet; (b) 3 d of fasting; or (c) a combination of 3% beta-alanine added for 8 d and 3 d of fasting. Each maneuver lowered the cortex taurine concentration, but did not significantly lower plasma taurine values compared with controls. Increased BBMV taurine uptake occurred after each manipulation. Feeding 3% glycine did not alter the plasma, renal cortex, or urinary taurine concentrations, or BBMV uptake of taurine. Feeding 3% methionine raised plasma and urinary taurine excretion but renal tissue taurine was unchanged, as was initial BBMV uptake. Hence, nonsulfur-containing alpha-amino acids did not change beta-amino acid transport. The increase in BBMV uptake correlates with the decline in renal cortex and plasma taurine content. However, since 3% methionine changed plasma taurine without altering BBMV uptake, it is more likely that the change in BBMV uptake and the adaptive response expressed at the brush border surface relate to changes in renal cortex taurine concentrations. Finally, despite changes in urine and renal cortex taurine content, brain taurine values were unchanged, which suggests that this renal adaptive response maintains stable taurine concentrations where taurine serves as a neuromodulator. PMID:3935668

  7. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid

    PubMed Central

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Ždralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  8. Molecular mechanisms of Saccharomyces cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid.

    PubMed

    Giannattasio, Sergio; Guaragnella, Nicoletta; Zdralević, Maša; Marra, Ersilia

    2013-01-01

    Beyond its classical biotechnological applications such as food and beverage production or as a cell factory, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model organism to study fundamental mechanisms of cell response to stressful environmental changes. Acetic acid is a physiological product of yeast fermentation and it is a well-known food preservative due to its antimicrobial action. Acetic acid has recently been shown to cause yeast cell death and aging. Here we shall focus on the molecular mechanisms of S. cerevisiae stress adaptation and programmed cell death in response to acetic acid. We shall elaborate on the intracellular signaling pathways involved in the cross-talk of pro-survival and pro-death pathways underlying the importance of understanding fundamental aspects of yeast cell homeostasis to improve the performance of a given yeast strain in biotechnological applications. PMID:23430312

  9. Adaptive enhancement of amino acid uptake and exodus by thymic lymphocytes: influence of pH.

    PubMed

    Peck, W A; Rockwell, L H; Lichtman, M A

    1976-11-01

    Entry of certain free amino acids (alpha aminoisobutyric acid (AIB), alanine and proline), but not of leucine into rat thymic lymphocytes increased progressively when the cells were incubated in amino acid deficient medium. Actinomycin D, cycloheximide, or a high concentration of AIB abolished the time-related increase in AIB accumulation, whereas exposure to a high concentration of leucine had no effect. This phenomenon could not be attributed to a progressive alteration in the nature of the incubation medium nor to reduced transinhibition of AIB uptake. The exodus of AIB also increased with time, but to a smaller degree than AIB entry. Initial rates of AIB entry and exodus increased with increases in the pH of the incubation medium over the range 6.5-8.0. The effects of pH on entry and exodus were time-related, increasing progressively oveb nullified the magnified time related increments in AIB transport caused by prolonged incubation at pH 8.0. The influence of a given pH on transport of AIB decreased rapidly when the cells were transferred to medium of another pH, but this tendency diminished the longer the cells were exposed to the initial pH. pH influenced the entry of alanine and proline in the same fashion as that of AIB, but did not affect leucine entry. These results indicate that thymic lymphocytes exhibit adaptive enhancement in the accumulation of free amino acids that are transported largley by the A or alanine-preferring system, and that the adaptive process involves both entry and exodus. Moreover, alterations in pH modify entry and exodus of these same amino acids, profoundly affect the magnitude of time-released increases, and may induce fundamental changes in the mechanism(s) serving amino acid transport.

  10. Life-history evolution at the molecular level: adaptive amino acid composition of avian vitellogenins

    PubMed Central

    Hughes, Austin L.

    2015-01-01

    Avian genomes typically encode three distinct vitellogenin (VTG) egg yolk proteins (VTG1, VTG2 and VTG3), which arose by gene duplication prior to the most recent common ancestor of birds. Analysis of VTG sequences from 34 avian species in a phylogenetic framework supported the hypothesis that VTG amino acid composition has co-evolved with embryo incubation time. Embryo incubation time was positively correlated with the proportions of dietary essential amino acids (EAAs) in VTG1 and VTG2, and with the proportion of sulfur-containing amino acids in VTG3. These patterns were seen even when only semi-altricial and/or altricial species were considered, suggesting that the duration of embryo incubation is a major selective factor on the amino acid composition of VTGs, rather than developmental mode alone. The results are consistent with the hypothesis that the level of EAAs provided to the egg represents an adaptation to the loss of amino acids through breakdown over the course of incubation and imply that life-history phenotypes and VTG amino acid composition have co-evolved throughout the evolutionary history of birds. PMID:26224713

  11. Deficiency of PdxR in Streptococcus mutans affects vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Liao, S; Bitoun, J P; Nguyen, A H; Bozner, D; Yao, X; Wen, Z T

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of the human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in tenacious biofilms. The SMU864 locus, designated pdxR, is predicted to encode a member of the novel MocR/GabR family proteins, which are featured with a winged helix DNA-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain highly homologous to the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent aspartate aminotransferases. A pdxR-deficient mutant, TW296, was constructed using allelic exchange. PdxR deficiency in S. mutans had little effect on cell morphology and growth when grown in brain heart infusion. However, when compared with its parent strain, UA159, the PdxR-deficient mutant displayed major defects in acid tolerance response and formed significantly fewer biofilms (P < 0.01). When analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, PdxR deficiency was found to drastically reduce expression of an apparent operon encoding a pyridoxal kinase (SMU865) and a pyridoxal permease (SMU866) of the salvage pathway of vitamin B6 biosynthesis. In addition, PdxR deficiency also altered the expression of genes for ClpL protease, glucosyltransferase B and adhesin SpaP, which are known to play important roles in stress tolerance and biofilm formation. Consistently, PdxR-deficiency affected the growth of the deficient mutant when grown in defined medium with and without vitamin B6 . Further studies revealed that although S. mutans is known to require vitamin B6 to grow in defined medium, B6 vitamers, especially pyridoxal, were strongly inhibitory at millimolar concentrations, against S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. Our results suggest that PdxR in S. mutans plays an important role in regulation of vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation. PMID:25421565

  12. Deficiency of PdxR in Streptococcus mutans affects vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

    PubMed

    Liao, S; Bitoun, J P; Nguyen, A H; Bozner, D; Yao, X; Wen, Z T

    2015-08-01

    Streptococcus mutans, a key etiological agent of the human dental caries, lives primarily on the tooth surface in tenacious biofilms. The SMU864 locus, designated pdxR, is predicted to encode a member of the novel MocR/GabR family proteins, which are featured with a winged helix DNA-binding N-terminal domain and a C-terminal domain highly homologous to the pyridoxal phosphate-dependent aspartate aminotransferases. A pdxR-deficient mutant, TW296, was constructed using allelic exchange. PdxR deficiency in S. mutans had little effect on cell morphology and growth when grown in brain heart infusion. However, when compared with its parent strain, UA159, the PdxR-deficient mutant displayed major defects in acid tolerance response and formed significantly fewer biofilms (P < 0.01). When analyzed by real-time polymerase chain reaction, PdxR deficiency was found to drastically reduce expression of an apparent operon encoding a pyridoxal kinase (SMU865) and a pyridoxal permease (SMU866) of the salvage pathway of vitamin B6 biosynthesis. In addition, PdxR deficiency also altered the expression of genes for ClpL protease, glucosyltransferase B and adhesin SpaP, which are known to play important roles in stress tolerance and biofilm formation. Consistently, PdxR-deficiency affected the growth of the deficient mutant when grown in defined medium with and without vitamin B6 . Further studies revealed that although S. mutans is known to require vitamin B6 to grow in defined medium, B6 vitamers, especially pyridoxal, were strongly inhibitory at millimolar concentrations, against S. mutans growth and biofilm formation. Our results suggest that PdxR in S. mutans plays an important role in regulation of vitamin B6 metabolism, acid tolerance response and biofilm formation.

  13. Identification, stress tolerance, and antioxidant activity of lactic acid bacteria isolated from tropically grown fruits and leaves.

    PubMed

    Fessard, Amandine; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Payet, Bertrand; Remize, Fabienne

    2016-07-01

    From 6 samples of tropically grown fruits and leaves, 10 lactic acid bacteria belonging Leuconostoc, Weissella, and Lactobacillus species were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and (GTG)5 fingerprinting. Acidification kinetics determined from BHI broth cultures showed genus-related patterns. In particular, Weissella cibaria appeared to act as a potent acidifier. Tolerance of isolates to acid, oxidative, or salt stress was highly variable and strain dependent. Isolate S14 (Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides) growth was not affected by the presence of 0.05% H2O2, while Lactobacillus spp. isolates (S17 and S29) were the most tolerant to pH 4.5. The growth of 4 isolates, S5 (Leuconostoc mesenteroides), S14 and S10 (Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides), and S27 (W. cibaria), was not affected by 5% NaCl. Nutritional beneficial properties were examined through measurement of antioxidant activities of short-term fermented pineapple juice, such as LDL oxidation and polyphenol content, and through exopolysaccharide formation from sucrose. Two isolates, S14 and S27, increased the antioxidant capacity of pineapple juice. The robust capacity of W. cibaria and of Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides for vegetable lactic fermentation aimed to ameliorate food nutritional and functional quality was highlighted. PMID:27197991

  14. Identification, stress tolerance, and antioxidant activity of lactic acid bacteria isolated from tropically grown fruits and leaves.

    PubMed

    Fessard, Amandine; Bourdon, Emmanuel; Payet, Bertrand; Remize, Fabienne

    2016-07-01

    From 6 samples of tropically grown fruits and leaves, 10 lactic acid bacteria belonging Leuconostoc, Weissella, and Lactobacillus species were isolated and identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing and (GTG)5 fingerprinting. Acidification kinetics determined from BHI broth cultures showed genus-related patterns. In particular, Weissella cibaria appeared to act as a potent acidifier. Tolerance of isolates to acid, oxidative, or salt stress was highly variable and strain dependent. Isolate S14 (Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides) growth was not affected by the presence of 0.05% H2O2, while Lactobacillus spp. isolates (S17 and S29) were the most tolerant to pH 4.5. The growth of 4 isolates, S5 (Leuconostoc mesenteroides), S14 and S10 (Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides), and S27 (W. cibaria), was not affected by 5% NaCl. Nutritional beneficial properties were examined through measurement of antioxidant activities of short-term fermented pineapple juice, such as LDL oxidation and polyphenol content, and through exopolysaccharide formation from sucrose. Two isolates, S14 and S27, increased the antioxidant capacity of pineapple juice. The robust capacity of W. cibaria and of Leuconostoc pseudomesenteroides for vegetable lactic fermentation aimed to ameliorate food nutritional and functional quality was highlighted.

  15. Open fermentative production of fuel ethanol from food waste by an acid-tolerant mutant strain of Zymomonas mobilis.

    PubMed

    Ma, Kedong; Ruan, Zhiyong; Shui, Zongxia; Wang, Yanwei; Hu, Guoquan; He, Mingxiong

    2016-03-01

    The aim of present study was to develop a process for open ethanol fermentation from food waste using an acid-tolerant mutant of Zymomonas mobilis (ZMA7-2). The mutant showed strong tolerance to acid condition of food waste hydrolysate and high ethanol production performance. By optimizing fermentation parameters, ethanol fermentation with initial glucose concentration of 200 g/L, pH value around 4.0, inoculum size of 10% and without nutrient addition was considered as best conditions. Moreover, the potential of bench scales fermentation and cell reusability was also examined. The fermentation in bench scales (44 h) was faster than flask scale (48 h), and the maximum ethanol concentration and ethanol yield (99.78 g/L, 0.50 g/g) higher than that of flask scale (98.31 g/L, 0.49 g/g). In addition, the stable cell growth and ethanol production profile in five cycles successive fermentation was observed, indicating the mutant was suitable for industrial ethanol production.

  16. Cotton GhDREB1 increases plant tolerance to low temperature and is negatively regulated by gibberellic acid.

    PubMed

    Shan, Da-Peng; Huang, Jin-Guang; Yang, Yu-Tao; Guo, Ying-Hui; Wu, Chang-Ai; Yang, Guo-Dong; Gao, Zheng; Zheng, Cheng-Chao

    2007-01-01

    The transcription factors C-repeat binding factors/dehydration-responsive element binding proteins (CBFs/DREBs) control the expression of many stress-inducible genes in Arabidopsis. A cDNA clone, designated GhDREB1, was isolated from cotton (Gossypium hirsutum) by cDNA library screening. Northern blot analysis indicated that mRNA accumulation of GhDREB1 was induced by low temperatures and salt stress, but was not induced by abscisic acid (ABA) or drought stress in cotton seedlings. Transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) plants overexpressing GhDREB1 displayed stronger chilling tolerance than wild-type plants. Their leaf chlorophyll fluorescence, net photosynthetic rate and proline concentrations were higher than those of control plants during low-temperature treatment. However, under normal growth conditions, the transgenic tobacco plants exhibited retarded growth and delayed flowering. Interestingly, GhDREB1 transcripts in cotton seedlings were negatively regulated by gibberellic acid (GA(3)) treatment. Analysis of the promoter of the GhDREB1 gene revealed the presence of one low-temperature and four gibberellin-responsive elements. Green fluorescent protein (GFP) signal intensity or beta-glucuronidase (GUS) activity driven by the GhDREB1 promoter was clearly enhanced by low temperature but repressed by GA(3). These results suggest that GhDREB1 functions as a transcription factor and plays an important role in improving cold tolerance, and also affects plant growth and development via GA(3).

  17. Effects of short-term acid and aluminum exposure on the parr-smolt transformation in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar): Disruption of seawater tolerance and endocrine status

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monette, M.Y.; Bjornsson, Bjorn Thrandur; McCormick, S.D.

    2008-01-01

    Episodic acidification resulting in increased acidity and inorganic aluminum (Ali) is known to interfere with the parr-smolt transformation of Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar), and has been implicated as a possible cause of population decline. To determine the extent and mechanism(s) by which short-term acid/Al exposure compromises smolt development, Atlantic salmon smolts were exposed to either control (pH 6.7-6.9) or acid/Al (pH 5.4-6.3, 28-64 ??g l-1 Ali) conditions for 2 and 5 days, and impacts on freshwater (FW) ion regulation, seawater (SW) tolerance, plasma hormone levels and stress response were examined. Gill Al concentrations were elevated in all smolts exposed to acid/Al relative to controls confirming exposure to increased Ali. There was no effect of acid/Al on plasma ion concentrations in FW however, smolts exposed to acid/Al followed by a 24 h SW challenge exhibited greater plasma Cl- levels than controls, indicating reduced SW tolerance. Loss of SW tolerance was accompanied by reductions in gill Na+,K+-ATPase (NKA) activity and Na+,K+,2Cl- (NKCC) cotransporter protein abundance. Acid/Al exposure resulted in decreased plasma insulin-like growth factor (IGF-I) and 3,3???,5???-triiodo-l-thyronine (T3) levels, whereas no effect of treatment was seen on plasma cortisol, growth hormone (GH), or thyroxine (T4) levels. Acid/Al exposure resulted in increased hematocrit and plasma glucose levels in FW, but both returned to control levels after 24 h in SW. The results indicate that smolt development and SW tolerance are compromised by short-term exposure to acid/Al in the absence of detectable impacts on FW ion regulation. Loss of SW tolerance during short-term acid/Al exposure likely results from reductions in gill NKA and NKCC, possibly mediated by decreases in plasma IGF-I and T3. ?? 2008 Elsevier Inc.

  18. Fault-Tolerant Trajectory Tracking of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles Using Immunity-Based Model Reference Adaptive Control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wilburn, Brenton K.

    This dissertation presents the design, development, and simulation testing of an adaptive trajectory tracking algorithm capable of compensating for various aircraft subsystem failures and upset conditions. A comprehensive adaptive control framework, here within referred to as the immune model reference adaptive control (IMRAC) algorithm, is developed by synergistically merging core concepts from the biologically- inspired artificial immune system (AIS) paradigm with more traditional optimal and adaptive control techniques. In particular, a model reference adaptive control (MRAC) algorithm is enhanced with the detection and learning capabilities of a novel, artificial neural network augmented AIS scheme. With the given modifications, the MRAC scheme is capable of detecting and identifying a given failure or upset condition, learning how to adapt to the problem, responding in a manner specific to the given failure condition, and retaining the learning parameters for quicker adaptation to subsequent failures of the same nature. The IMRAC algorithm developed in this dissertation is applicable to a wide range of control problems. However, the proposed methodology is demonstrated in simulation for an unmanned aerial vehicle. The results presented show that the IMRAC algorithm is an effective and valuable extension to traditional optimal and adaptive control techniques. The implementation of this methodology can potentially have significant impacts on the operational safety of many complex systems.

  19. Importance of Branched-Chain Amino Acid Utilization in Francisella Intracellular Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Gesbert, Gael; Ramond, Elodie; Tros, Fabiola; Dairou, Julien; Frapy, Eric; Barel, Monique

    2014-01-01

    Intracellular bacterial pathogens have adapted their metabolism to optimally utilize the nutrients available in infected host cells. We recently reported the identification of an asparagine transporter required specifically for cytosolic multiplication of Francisella. In the present work, we characterized a new member of the major super family (MSF) of transporters, involved in isoleucine uptake. We show that this transporter (here designated IleP) plays a critical role in intracellular metabolic adaptation of Francisella. Inactivation of IleP severely impaired intracellular F. tularensis subsp. novicida multiplication in all cell types tested and reduced bacterial virulence in the mouse model. To further establish the importance of the ileP gene in F. tularensis pathogenesis, we constructed a chromosomal deletion mutant of ileP (ΔFTL_1803) in the F. tularensis subsp. holarctica live vaccine strain (LVS). Inactivation of IleP in the F. tularensis LVS provoked comparable intracellular growth defects, confirming the critical role of this transporter in isoleucine uptake. The data presented establish, for the first time, the importance of isoleucine utilization for efficient phagosomal escape and cytosolic multiplication of Francisella and suggest that virulent F. tularensis subspecies have lost their branched-chain amino acid biosynthetic pathways and rely exclusively on dedicated uptake systems. This loss of function is likely to reflect an evolution toward a predominantly intracellular life style of the pathogen. Amino acid transporters should be thus considered major players in the adaptation of intracellular pathogens. PMID:25332124

  20. Physiological and molecular analysis of selected Kenyan maize lines for aluminum tolerance

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aluminum (Al) toxicity is an important limitation to maize production in many tropical and sub-tropical acid soil areas. The aim of this study was to survey the variation in Al tolerance in a panel of maize lines adapted for Kenya and look for novel sources of Al tolerance. 112 Kenyan maize accessio...

  1. Tolerability and pharmacokinetics of ACT-280778, a novel nondihydropyridine dual L/T-type calcium channel blocker: early clinical studies in healthy male subjects using adaptive designs.

    PubMed

    Mueller, Markus S; Shakeri-Nejad, Kasra; Gutierrez, Marcelo M; Krause, Andreas; Täubel, Jörg; Sanderson, Brian; Dingemanse, Jasper

    2014-02-01

    ACT-280778 is a novel nondihydropyridine dual L/T-type calcium channel blocker. Two clinical studies (AC-067-101 and AC-067-102) were conducted to characterize its safety, tolerability, and pharmacokinetics in healthy male subjects after oral administration of single and multiple doses. Both trials were single-center, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled, adaptive design, ascending-dose studies, in which ACT-280778 was administrated as single doses of 2, 5, 15, or 40 mg, or as once-daily doses of 5 or 15 mg for 7 days. Single and multiple doses up to and including 15 mg were well tolerated, and no serious or severe adverse event was reported in either study. A single dose of 40 mg was associated with abnormal electrocardiogram findings resulting in the discontinuation of further treatment at this dose or higher doses. ACT-280778 was rapidly absorbed, and larger than dose-proportional increases of the maximum plasma concentration and area under the plasma concentration-time curve were observed. Food intake delayed the time to maximum plasma concentration and doubled exposure. Urinary excretion of unchanged ACT-280778 was negligible, and accumulation at steady state was modest. Overall, pharmacokinetic and tolerability profiles of ACT-280778 observed in these 2 studies warranted further evaluation of ACT-280778 in a proof-of-concept study in patients with hypertension.

  2. Acetic acid bacteria genomes reveal functional traits for adaptation to life in insect guts.

    PubMed

    Chouaia, Bessem; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Crotti, Elena; Comandatore, Francesco; Degli Esposti, Mauro; Ricci, Irene; Alma, Alberto; Favia, Guido; Bandi, Claudio; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2014-04-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) live in sugar rich environments, including food matrices, plant tissues, and the gut of sugar-feeding insects. By comparing the newly sequenced genomes of Asaia platycodi and Saccharibacter sp., symbionts of Anopheles stephensi and Apis mellifera, respectively, with those of 14 other AAB, we provide a genomic view of the evolutionary pattern of this bacterial group and clues on traits that explain the success of AAB as insect symbionts. A specific pre-adaptive trait, cytochrome bo3 ubiquinol oxidase, appears ancestral in AAB and shows a phylogeny that is congruent with that of the genomes. The functional properties of this terminal oxidase might have allowed AAB to adapt to the diverse oxygen levels of arthropod guts.

  3. Acetic Acid Bacteria Genomes Reveal Functional Traits for Adaptation to Life in Insect Guts

    PubMed Central

    Chouaia, Bessem; Gaiarsa, Stefano; Crotti, Elena; Comandatore, Francesco; Degli Esposti, Mauro; Ricci, Irene; Alma, Alberto; Favia, Guido; Bandi, Claudio; Daffonchio, Daniele

    2014-01-01

    Acetic acid bacteria (AAB) live in sugar rich environments, including food matrices, plant tissues, and the gut of sugar-feeding insects. By comparing the newly sequenced genomes of Asaia platycodi and Saccharibacter sp., symbionts of Anopheles stephensi and Apis mellifera, respectively, with those of 14 other AAB, we provide a genomic view of the evolutionary pattern of this bacterial group and clues on traits that explain the success of AAB as insect symbionts. A specific pre-adaptive trait, cytochrome bo3 ubiquinol oxidase, appears ancestral in AAB and shows a phylogeny that is congruent with that of the genomes. The functional properties of this terminal oxidase might have allowed AAB to adapt to the diverse oxygen levels of arthropod guts. PMID:24682158

  4. Thermal and acid tolerant beta xylosidases, arabinofuranosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N; Thompson, Vicki S; Schaller, Kastli D; Apel, William A; Reed, David W; Lacey, Jeffrey A

    2013-04-30

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose, xylobiose, and/or arabinofuranose-substituted xylan using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  5. Thermal and acid tolerant beta-xylosidases, genes encoding, related organisms, and methods

    DOEpatents

    Thompson, David N.; Thompson, Vicki S.; Schaller, Kastli D.; Apel, William A.; Lacey, Jeffrey A.; Reed, David W.

    2011-04-12

    Isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof are provided. Further provided are methods of at least partially degrading xylotriose and/or xylobiose using isolated and/or purified polypeptides and nucleic acid sequences encoding polypeptides from Alicyclobacillus acidocaldarius and variations thereof.

  6. Plasma Membrane Na+ Transport in a Salt-Tolerant Charophyte (Isotopic Fluxes, Electrophysiology, and Thermodynamics in Plants Adapted to Saltwater and Freshwater).

    PubMed

    Kiegle, E. A.; Bisson, M. A.

    1996-08-01

    In salt-tolerant Chara longifolia, enhanced Na+ efflux plays an important role in maintaining low cytoplasmic Na+. When it is cultured in fresh water (FW), C. longifolia has a higher Na+ efflux than the obligate FW Chara corallina, although pH dependence and inhibitor profiles are similar for both species (J. Whittington and M.A. Bisson [1994] J Exp Bot 45: 657-665). When it is cultured in saltwater, C. longifolia has a Na+ efflux of 264 [plus or minus] 14 nmol m-2 s-1 at pH 7, 13 times higher than FW-adapted cultures and 31 times higher than C. corallina. As in FW-adapted plants, efflux is highest at pH 5, but pH dependence is less steep and more linear in cells adapted to saltwater. In plants of both species from FW cultures, Na+ efflux is inhibited by Li+ at pH 5 but not at pH 7 or 9, whereas in the salt-adapted C. longifolia, Li+ inhibits Na+ efflux at pH 7 and 9 but not at pH 5. Amiloride inhibits Na+ efflux in salt-adapted cells but not in FW cells. We conclude that a new type of Na+ efflux system is induced in salt-adapted plants, although both systems have characteristics suggestive of a Na+/H+ antiport. In all cases, a 1:1 Na+/H+ antiport would have sufficient energy to maintain the cytoplasmic Na+ activities measured at pH 5 and 7 but not at pH 9, which suggests that another efflux system must be operating at pH 9.

  7. Viability, Acid and Bile Tolerance of Spray Dried Probiotic Bacteria and Some Commercial Probiotic Supplement Products Kept at Room Temperature.

    PubMed

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Mishra, Vijay; Shah, Nagendra P

    2016-06-01

    Production of probiotic food supplements that are shelf-stable at room temperature has been developed for consumer's convenience, but information on the stability in acid and bile environment is still scarce. Viability and acid and bile tolerance of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus acidophilus and 4 commercial probiotic supplements were evaluated. Bifidobacterium and L. acidophilus were encapsulated with casein-based emulsion using spray drying. Water activity (aw ) of the microspheres containing Bifidobacterium or L. acidophilus (SD GM product) was adjusted to 0.07 followed by storage at 25 °C for 10 wk. Encapsulated Bifidobacterium spp. and Lactobacillus acidophilus and 4 commercial probiotic supplement products (AL, GH, RE, and BM) were tested. Since commercial probiotic products contained mixed bacteria, selective media MRS-LP (containing L-cysteine and Na-propionate) and MRS-clindamycin agar were used to grow Bifidobacterium spp. or L. acidophilus, respectively, and to inhibit the growth of other strains. The results showed that aw had a strong negative correlation with the viability of dehydrated probiotics of the 6 products. Viable counts of Bifidobacterium spp. and L. acidophilus of SD GM, AL, and GH were between 8.3 and 9.2 log CFU/g, whereas that of BM and RE were between 6.7 and 7.3 log CFU/g. Bifidobacterium in SD GM, in AL, and in GH products and L. acidophilus in SD GM, in AL, and in BM products demonstrated high tolerance to acid. Most of dehydrated probiotic bacteria were able to survive in bile environment except L. acidophilus in RE product. Exposure to gastric juice influenced bacterial survivability in subsequent bile environment. PMID:27145163

  8. Adaptation of in vivo amino acid kinetics facilitates increased amino acid availability for fetal growth in adolescent and adult pregnancies alike

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    During pregnancy, adult women with a normal BMI synthesize extra amino acids after an overnight fast by increasing body protein breakdown and decreasing amino acid oxidation. It is not known whether adolescent girls can make these adaptations during pregnancy. The present study aimed to measure and ...

  9. Flight Test Comparison of Different Adaptive Augmentations for Fault Tolerant Control Laws for a Modified F-15

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Burken, John J.; Hanson, Curtis E.; Lee, James A.; Kaneshinge, John T.

    2009-01-01

    This report describes the improvements and enhancements to a neural network based approach for directly adapting to aerodynamic changes resulting from damage or failures. This research is a follow-on effort to flight tests performed on the NASA F-15 aircraft as part of the Intelligent Flight Control System research effort. Previous flight test results demonstrated the potential for performance improvement under destabilizing damage conditions. Little or no improvement was provided under simulated control surface failures, however, and the adaptive system was prone to pilot-induced oscillations. An improved controller was designed to reduce the occurrence of pilot-induced oscillations and increase robustness to failures in general. This report presents an analysis of the neural networks used in the previous flight test, the improved adaptive controller, and the baseline case with no adaptation. Flight test results demonstrate significant improvement in performance by using the new adaptive controller compared with the previous adaptive system and the baseline system for control surface failures.

  10. Postnatal neonatal myocardial adaptation is associated with loss of tolerance to tachycardia: a simultaneous invasive and noninvasive assessment.

    PubMed

    Fortin-Pellerin, Etienne; Khoo, Nee S; Mills, Lindsay; Coe, James Y; Serrano-Lomelin, Jesus; Cheung, Po-Yin; Hornberger, Lisa K

    2016-03-01

    Doppler studies at rest suggest left ventricular (LV) diastolic function rapidly improves from the neonate to infant. Whether this translates to its response to hemodynamic challenges is uncertain. We sought to explore the impact of early LV maturation on its ability to tolerate atrial tachycardia. As tachycardia reduces filling time, we hypothesized that the neonatal LV would be less tolerant of atrial tachycardia. Landrace cross piglets of two age groups (1-3 days; NPs; 14-17 days, YPs; n = 7/group) were instrumented for an atrial pacing protocol (from 200 to 300 beats/min) and assessed by invasive monitoring and echocardiography. NPs maintained their LV output and blood pressure, whereas YPs did not. Although negative dP/dt in NPs at baseline was lower than that of YPs (-1,599 ± 83 vs. -2,470 ± 226 mmHg/s, respectively, P = 0.007), with increasing tachycardia negative dP/dt converged between groups and was not different. Both groups had similar preload reduction during tachycardia; however, NPs maintained shortening fraction while YPs decreased (NPs: 35.4 ± 1.4 vs. 31.8 ± 2.2%, P = 0.35; YPs: 31.4 ± 0.8 vs. 22.9 ± 0.8%, P < 0.001). Contractility measures did not differ between groups. Peak LV twist and untwisting rate also did not differ; however, NPs tended to augment LV twist through increased apical rotation and YPs through increasing basal rotation (P = 0.009). The NPs appear more tolerant of atrial tachycardia than the YPs. They have at least similar diastolic performance, enhanced systolic performance, and different LV twist mechanics, which may contribute to improved tachycardia tolerance of NPs.

  11. Mechanisms of acid tolerance in bacteria and prospects in biotechnology and bioremediation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuping; Tang, Hongzhi; Lin, Zhanglin; Xu, Ping

    2015-11-15

    Acidogenic and aciduric bacteria have developed several survival systems in various acidic environments to prevent cell damage due to acid stress such as that on the human gastric surface and in the fermentation medium used for industrial production of acidic products. Common mechanisms for acid resistance in bacteria are proton pumping by F1-F0-ATPase, the glutamate decarboxylase system, formation of a protective cloud of ammonia, high cytoplasmic urease activity, repair or protection of macromolecules, and biofilm formation. The field of synthetic biology has rapidly advanced and generated an ever-increasing assortment of genetic devices and biological modules for applications in biofuel and novel biomaterial productions. Better understanding of aspects such as overproduction of general shock proteins, molecular mechanisms, and responses to cell density adopted by microorganisms for survival in low pH conditions will prove useful in synthetic biology for potential industrial and environmental applications.

  12. Improving Escherichia coli FucO for furfural tolerance by saturation mutagenesis of individual amino acid positions.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Huabao; Wang, Xuan; Yomano, Lorraine P; Geddes, Ryan D; Shanmugam, Keelnatham T; Ingram, Lonnie O

    2013-05-01

    Furfural is an inhibitory side product formed during the depolymerization of hemicellulose with mineral acids. In Escherichia coli, furfural tolerance can be increased by expressing the native fucO gene (encoding lactaldehyde oxidoreductase). This enzyme also catalyzes the NADH-dependent reduction of furfural to the less toxic alcohol. Saturation mutagenesis was combined with growth-based selection to isolate a mutated form of fucO that confers increased furfural tolerance. The mutation responsible, L7F, is located within the interfacial region of FucO homodimers, replacing the most abundant codon for leucine with the most abundant codon for phenylalanine. Plasmid expression of the mutant gene increased FucO activity by more than 10-fold compared to the wild-type fucO gene and doubled the rate of furfural metabolism during fermentation. No inclusion bodies were evident with either the native or the mutated gene. mRNA abundance for the wild-type and mutant fucO genes differed by less than 2-fold. The Km (furfural) for the mutant enzyme was 3-fold lower than that for the native enzyme, increasing efficiency at low substrate concentrations. The L7F mutation is located near the FucO N terminus, within the ribosomal binding region associated with translational initiation. Free-energy calculations for mRNA folding in this region (nucleotides -7 to +37) were weak for the native gene (-4.1 kcal mol(-1)) but weaker still for the fucO mutant (-1.0 to -0.1 kcal mol(-1)). The beneficial L7F mutation in FucO is proposed to increase furfural tolerance by improving gene expression and increasing enzyme effectiveness at low substrate levels.

  13. A Single Amino-Acid Substitution in the Sodium Transporter HKT1 Associated with Plant Salt Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhtar; Raddatz, Natalia; Aman, Rashid; Kim, Songmi; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Jan, Masood; Baek, Dongwon; Khan, Irfan Ullah; Oh, Dong-Ha; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bressan, Ray A; Lee, Keun Woo; Maggio, Albino; Pardo, Jose M; Bohnert, Hans J; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2016-07-01

    A crucial prerequisite for plant growth and survival is the maintenance of potassium uptake, especially when high sodium surrounds the root zone. The Arabidopsis HIGH-AFFINITY K(+) TRANSPORTER1 (HKT1), and its homologs in other salt-sensitive dicots, contributes to salinity tolerance by removing Na(+) from the transpiration stream. However, TsHKT1;2, one of three HKT1 copies in Thellungiella salsuginea, a halophytic Arabidopsis relative, acts as a K(+) transporter in the presence of Na(+) in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Amino-acid sequence comparisons indicated differences between TsHKT1;2 and most other published HKT1 sequences with respect to an Asp residue (D207) in the second pore-loop domain. Two additional T salsuginea and most other HKT1 sequences contain Asn (n) in this position. Wild-type TsHKT1;2 and altered AtHKT1 (AtHKT1(N-D)) complemented K(+)-uptake deficiency of yeast cells. Mutant hkt1-1 plants complemented with both AtHKT1(N) (-) (D) and TsHKT1;2 showed higher tolerance to salt stress than lines complemented by the wild-type AtHKT1 Electrophysiological analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirmed the functional properties of these transporters and the differential selectivity for Na(+) and K(+) based on the n/d variance in the pore region. This change also dictated inward-rectification for Na(+) transport. Thus, the introduction of Asp, replacing Asn, in HKT1-type transporters established altered cation selectivity and uptake dynamics. We describe one way, based on a single change in a crucial protein that enabled some crucifer species to acquire improved salt tolerance, which over evolutionary time may have resulted in further changes that ultimately facilitated colonization of saline habitats.

  14. A Single Amino-Acid Substitution in the Sodium Transporter HKT1 Associated with Plant Salt Tolerance1[OPEN

    PubMed Central

    Ali, Akhtar; Aman, Rashid; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Jan, Masood; Baek, Dongwon; Khan, Irfan Ullah; Oh, Dong-Ha; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bressan, Ray A.; Lee, Keun Woo; Maggio, Albino; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2016-01-01

    A crucial prerequisite for plant growth and survival is the maintenance of potassium uptake, especially when high sodium surrounds the root zone. The Arabidopsis HIGH-AFFINITY K+ TRANSPORTER1 (HKT1), and its homologs in other salt-sensitive dicots, contributes to salinity tolerance by removing Na+ from the transpiration stream. However, TsHKT1;2, one of three HKT1 copies in Thellungiella salsuginea, a halophytic Arabidopsis relative, acts as a K+ transporter in the presence of Na+ in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Amino-acid sequence comparisons indicated differences between TsHKT1;2 and most other published HKT1 sequences with respect to an Asp residue (D207) in the second pore-loop domain. Two additional T. salsuginea and most other HKT1 sequences contain Asn (n) in this position. Wild-type TsHKT1;2 and altered AtHKT1 (AtHKT1N-D) complemented K+-uptake deficiency of yeast cells. Mutant hkt1-1 plants complemented with both AtHKT1N-D and TsHKT1;2 showed higher tolerance to salt stress than lines complemented by the wild-type AtHKT1. Electrophysiological analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirmed the functional properties of these transporters and the differential selectivity for Na+ and K+ based on the n/d variance in the pore region. This change also dictated inward-rectification for Na+ transport. Thus, the introduction of Asp, replacing Asn, in HKT1-type transporters established altered cation selectivity and uptake dynamics. We describe one way, based on a single change in a crucial protein that enabled some crucifer species to acquire improved salt tolerance, which over evolutionary time may have resulted in further changes that ultimately facilitated colonization of saline habitats. PMID:27208305

  15. Ectopic expression of ABSCISIC ACID 2/GLUCOSE INSENSITIVE 1 in Arabidopsis promotes seed dormancy and stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lin, Pei-Chi; Hwang, San-Gwang; Endo, Akira; Okamoto, Masanori; Koshiba, Tomokazu; Cheng, Wan-Hsing

    2007-02-01

    Abscisic acid (ABA) is an important phytohormone that plays a critical role in seed development, dormancy, and stress tolerance. 9-cis-Epoxycarotenoid dioxygenase is the key enzyme controlling ABA biosynthesis and stress tolerance. In this study, we investigated the effect of ectopic expression of another ABA biosynthesis gene, ABA2 (or GLUCOSE INSENSITIVE 1 [GIN1]) encoding a short-chain dehydrogenase/reductase in Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). We show that ABA2-overexpressing transgenic plants with elevated ABA levels exhibited seed germination delay and more tolerance to salinity than wild type when grown on agar plates and/or in soil. However, the germination delay was abolished in transgenic plants showing ABA levels over 2-fold higher than that of wild type grown on 250 mm NaCl. The data suggest that there are distinct mechanisms underlying ABA-mediated inhibition of seed germination under diverse stress. The ABA-deficient mutant aba2, with a shorter primary root, can be restored to normal root growth by exogenous application of ABA, whereas transgenic plants overexpressing ABA2 showed normal root growth. The data reflect that the basal levels of ABA are essential for maintaining normal primary root elongation. Furthermore, analysis of ABA2 promoter activity with ABA2::beta-glucuronidase transgenic plants revealed that the promoter activity was enhanced by multiple prolonged stresses, such as drought, salinity, cold, and flooding, but not by short-term stress treatments. Coincidently, prolonged drought stress treatment led to the up-regulation of ABA biosynthetic and sugar-related genes. Thus, the data support ABA2 as a late expression gene that might have a fine-tuning function in mediating ABA biosynthesis through primary metabolic changes in response to stress. PMID:17189333

  16. A Single Amino-Acid Substitution in the Sodium Transporter HKT1 Associated with Plant Salt Tolerance.

    PubMed

    Ali, Akhtar; Raddatz, Natalia; Aman, Rashid; Kim, Songmi; Park, Hyeong Cheol; Jan, Masood; Baek, Dongwon; Khan, Irfan Ullah; Oh, Dong-Ha; Lee, Sang Yeol; Bressan, Ray A; Lee, Keun Woo; Maggio, Albino; Pardo, Jose M; Bohnert, Hans J; Yun, Dae-Jin

    2016-07-01

    A crucial prerequisite for plant growth and survival is the maintenance of potassium uptake, especially when high sodium surrounds the root zone. The Arabidopsis HIGH-AFFINITY K(+) TRANSPORTER1 (HKT1), and its homologs in other salt-sensitive dicots, contributes to salinity tolerance by removing Na(+) from the transpiration stream. However, TsHKT1;2, one of three HKT1 copies in Thellungiella salsuginea, a halophytic Arabidopsis relative, acts as a K(+) transporter in the presence of Na(+) in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae). Amino-acid sequence comparisons indicated differences between TsHKT1;2 and most other published HKT1 sequences with respect to an Asp residue (D207) in the second pore-loop domain. Two additional T salsuginea and most other HKT1 sequences contain Asn (n) in this position. Wild-type TsHKT1;2 and altered AtHKT1 (AtHKT1(N-D)) complemented K(+)-uptake deficiency of yeast cells. Mutant hkt1-1 plants complemented with both AtHKT1(N) (-) (D) and TsHKT1;2 showed higher tolerance to salt stress than lines complemented by the wild-type AtHKT1 Electrophysiological analysis in Xenopus laevis oocytes confirmed the functional properties of these transporters and the differential selectivity for Na(+) and K(+) based on the n/d variance in the pore region. This change also dictated inward-rectification for Na(+) transport. Thus, the introduction of Asp, replacing Asn, in HKT1-type transporters established altered cation selectivity and uptake dynamics. We describe one way, based on a single change in a crucial protein that enabled some crucifer species to acquire improved salt tolerance, which over evolutionary time may have resulted in further changes that ultimately facilitated colonization of saline habitats. PMID:27208305

  17. Exogenous jasmonic acid induces stress tolerance in tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) exposed to imazapic.

    PubMed

    Kaya, Armagan; Doganlar, Zeynep Banu

    2016-02-01

    Jasmonic acid (JA) is one of the important phytohormones, regulating the stress responses as well as plant growth and development. The aim of this study is to determine the effects of exogenous JA application on stress responses of tobacco plant exposed to imazapic. In this study, phytotoxic responses resulting from both imazapic and imazapic combined with JA treatment are investigated comparatively for tobacco plants. For plants treated with imazapic at different concentrations (0.030, 0.060 and 0.120mM), antioxidant enzyme activities (catalase, ascorbate peroxidase, glutathione S-transferase and glutathione reductase), carotenoids, glutathione and malondialdehyte (MDA) contents, jasmonic acid, abscisic acid and indole-3-acetic acid levels as well as herbicide residue amounts on leaves increased in general compared to the control group. In the plants treated with 45µM jasmonic acid, pigment content, antioxidant activity and phytohormone level increased whereas MDA content and the amount of herbicidal residue decreased compared to the non-treated plants. Our findings show that imazapic treatment induces some phytotoxic responses on tobacco leaves and that exogenous jasmonic acid treatment alleviates the negative effects of herbicide treatment by regulating these responses. PMID:26629659

  18. Hydrogen sulfide acts as a downstream signal molecule in salicylic acid-induced heat tolerance in maize (Zea mays L.) seedlings.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhong-Guang; Xie, Lin-Run; Li, Xiao-Juan

    2015-04-01

    Salicylic acid (SA), 2-hydroxy benzoic acid, is a small phenolic compound with multifunction that is involved in plant growth, development, and the acquisition of stress tolerance. In recent years, hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has been found to have similar functions, but cross talk between SA and H2S in the acquisition of heat tolerance is not clear. In this study, pretreatment of maize seedlings with SA improved the survival percentage of seedlings under heat stress, indicating that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings. In addition, treatment with SA enhanced the activity of L-cysteine desulfhydrase (L-DES), a key enzyme in H2S biosynthesis, which in turn induced accumulation of endogenous H2S. Interestingly, SA-induced heat tolerance was enhanced by addition of NaHS, a H2S donor, but weakened by specific inhibitors of H2S biosynthesis DL-propargylglycine (PAG) and its scavenger hydroxylamine (HT). Furthermore, pretreatment with paclobutrazol (PAC) and 2-aminoindan-2-phosphonic acid (AIP), inhibitors of SA biosynthesis, had no significant effect on NaHS-induced heat tolerance of maize seedlings. Similarly, significant change in the activities of phenylalanine ammonia lyase (PAL) and benzoic-acid-2-hydroxylase (BA2H), the key enzymes in SA biosynthesis, and the content of endogenous SA, was not observed in maize seedlings by NaHS treatment. All of the above-mentioned results suggest that SA pretreatment could improve the heat tolerance of maize seedlings, and H2S might be a novel downstream signal molecule in SA-induced heat tolerance.

  19. Protein cold adaptation strategy via a unique seven-amino acid domain in the icefish (Chionodraco hamatus) PEPT1 transporter.

    PubMed

    Rizzello, Antonia; Romano, Alessandro; Kottra, Gabor; Acierno, Raffaele; Storelli, Carlo; Verri, Tiziano; Daniel, Hannelore; Maffia, Michele

    2013-04-23

    Adaptation of organisms to extreme environments requires proteins to work at thermodynamically unfavorable conditions. To adapt to subzero temperatures, proteins increase the flexibility of parts of, or even the whole, 3D structure to compensate for the lower thermal kinetic energy available at low temperatures. This may be achieved through single-site amino acid substitutions in regions of the protein that undergo large movements during the catalytic cycle, such as in enzymes or transporter proteins. Other strategies of cold adaptation involving changes in the primary amino acid sequence have not been documented yet. In Antarctic icefish (Chionodraco hamatus) peptide transporter 1 (PEPT1), the first transporter cloned from a vertebrate living at subzero temperatures, we came upon a unique principle of cold adaptation. A de novo domain composed of one to six repeats of seven amino acids (VDMSRKS), placed as an extra stretch in the cytosolic COOH-terminal region, contributed per se to cold adaptation. VDMSRKS was in a protein region uninvolved in transport activity and, notably, when transferred to the COOH terminus of a warm-adapted (rabbit) PEPT1, it conferred cold adaptation to the receiving protein. Overall, we provide a paradigm for protein cold adaptation that relies on insertion of a unique domain that confers greater affinity and maximal transport rates at low temperatures. Due to its ability to transfer a thermal trait, the VDMSRKS domain represents a useful tool for future cell biology or biotechnological applications. PMID:23569229

  20. Melatonin enhances cold tolerance in drought-primed wild-type and abscisic acid-deficient mutant barley.

    PubMed

    Li, Xiangnan; Tan, Dun-Xian; Jiang, Dong; Liu, Fulai

    2016-10-01

    Melatonin is involved in multiple plant developmental processes and various stress responses. To explore the roles of melatonin played as well as its association with abscisic acid (ABA) in a process of drought priming-induced cold tolerance (DPICT), a wild-type barley and its ABA-deficient mutant Az34 counterpart were selected for comparison, in which the effects of melatonin application (either foliarly or rhizospherically) and/or drought priming on the cold tolerance of both types of barleys were systematically investigated. It was demonstrated that the early drought priming induced an increase of endogenous melatonin production, which is not ABA dependent. In addition, exogenously applied melatonin resulted in higher ABA concentration in the drought-primed plants than in the nonprimed plants when exposed to cold stress, indicating that ABA responded in a drought-dependent manner. The interplay of melatonin and ABA leads to plants maintaining better water status. Drought priming-induced melatonin accumulation enhanced the antioxidant capacity in both chloroplasts and mitochondria, which sustained the photosynthetic electron transport in photosynthetic apparatus of the plants under cold stress. These results suggest that the exogenous melatonin application enhances the DPICT by modulating subcellular antioxidant systems and ABA levels in barley. PMID:27299847

  1. Abscisic acid-induced rearrangement of intracellular structures associated with freezing and desiccation stress tolerance in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Akter, Khaleda; Kato, Masahiro; Sato, Yuki; Kaneko, Yasuko; Takezawa, Daisuke

    2014-09-15

    The plant growth regulator abscisic acid (ABA) is known to be involved in triggering responses to various environmental stresses such as freezing and desiccation in angiosperms, but little is known about its role in basal land plants, especially in liverworts, representing the earliest land plant lineage. We show here that survival rate after freezing and desiccation of Marchantia polymorpha gemmalings was increased by pretreatment with ABA in the presence of increasing concentrations of sucrose. ABA treatment increased accumulation of soluble sugars in gemmalings, and sugar accumulation was further increased by addition of sucrose to the culture medium. ABA treatment of gemmalings also induced accumulation of transcripts for proteins with similarity to late embryogenesis abundant (LEA) proteins, which accumulate in association with acquisition of desiccation tolerance in maturing seeds. Observation by light and electron microscopy indicated that the ABA treatment caused fragmentation of vacuoles with increased cytosolic volume, which was more prominent in the presence of a high concentration of external sucrose. ABA treatment also increased the density of chloroplast distribution and remarkably enlarged their volume. These results demonstrate that ABA induces drastic physiological changes in liverwort cells for stress tolerance, accompanied by accumulation of protectants against dehydration and rearrangement and morphological alterations of cellular organelles. PMID:25046754

  2. NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signaling is not involved in elevated CO2-induced heat stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Li, Xin; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Elevated CO2 can protect plants from heat stress (HS); however, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we used a set of Arabidopsis mutants such as salicylic acid (SA) signaling mutants nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1 (npr1-1 and npr1-5) and heat-shock proteins (HSPs) mutants (hsp21 and hsp70-1) to understand the requirement of SA signaling and HSPs in elevated CO2-induced HS tolerance. Under ambient CO2 (380 µmol mol(-1)) conditions, HS (42°C, 24 h) drastically decreased maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) in all studied plant groups. Enrichment of CO2 (800 µmol mol(-1)) with HS remarkably increased the Fv/Fm value in all plant groups except hsp70-1, indicating that NPR1-dependent SA signaling is not involved in the elevated CO2-induced HS tolerance. These results also suggest an essentiality of HSP70-1, but not HSP21 in elevated CO2-induced HS mitigation. PMID:25874349

  3. NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signaling is not involved in elevated CO2-induced heat stress tolerance in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Ahammed, Golam Jalal; Li, Xin; Yu, Jingquan; Shi, Kai

    2015-01-01

    Elevated CO2 can protect plants from heat stress (HS); however, the underlying mechanisms are largely unknown. Here, we used a set of Arabidopsis mutants such as salicylic acid (SA) signaling mutants nonexpressor of pathogenesis-related gene 1 (npr1-1 and npr1-5) and heat-shock proteins (HSPs) mutants (hsp21 and hsp70-1) to understand the requirement of SA signaling and HSPs in elevated CO2-induced HS tolerance. Under ambient CO2 (380 µmol mol(-1)) conditions, HS (42°C, 24 h) drastically decreased maximum photochemical efficiency of PSII (Fv/Fm) in all studied plant groups. Enrichment of CO2 (800 µmol mol(-1)) with HS remarkably increased the Fv/Fm value in all plant groups except hsp70-1, indicating that NPR1-dependent SA signaling is not involved in the elevated CO2-induced HS tolerance. These results also suggest an essentiality of HSP70-1, but not HSP21 in elevated CO2-induced HS mitigation.

  4. A tolerant lactic acid bacteria, Lactobacillus paracasei, and its immunoregulatory function.

    PubMed

    Kou, Xiaohong; Chen, Qiong; Ju, Xiaoying; Liu, Huiping; Chen, Wenrong; Xue, Zhaohui

    2014-11-01

    The aim of the present investigation was to isolate a probiotic strain from 23 samples of yurts cheese and 21 samples of kumiss (collected from scattered households in Xinjiang and Inner Mongolia), and from eN-Lac Capsules, a health-promoting product. The isolates were subjected to biochemical characterization analysis and were tested for tolerance to low pH, sodium salt, bile salt, pepsin, and trypsin. 16S DNA sequence analysis was conducted to identify the strain. The possible dose-dependent role of strain LP2 in immunomodulation was investigated using the ICR mouse model (from the Institute of Cancer Research). Daily, we conducted clinical observations, a carbon clearance test, a spleen lymphocyte proliferation test, and measurements of body mass and lymphoid organ index. Natural killer cell activity and delayed-type hypersensitivity reaction were determined. The results showed that 3 selected strains (LP2, LP4, and LP9) had high tolerance to low pH, sodium chloride, and bile salt and were not significantly different from Lactobacillus paracasei in terms of morphology, colony, and biochemistry characterizations. A further tolerance test showed that LP2 had the highest survival rate (90%) under the conditions of pH 3.0, 0.3% bile salt, 10 mg/mL pepsin, and 10 mg/mL trypsin for 24 h. The sequence heterogeneities within the 16S rDNA genes molecularly elucidated that the LP2 belongs to the L. paracasei family, on the basis of a homology of 99.6%. A significant enhanced footpad swelling reaction and natural killer cell activity in the middle-dose (10(8) cfu/mL) and the high-dose (10(9) cfu/mL) groups were observed but without obvious dose dependence (P < 0.05). Lymphocyte proliferation was also increased significantly in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.01) compared with that of the control group, indicating a positive immunoregulatory effect.

  5. Comparative study of aluminum and copper transport and toxicity in an acid-tolerant freshwater green alga

    SciTech Connect

    Folsom, B.R.; Popescu, N.A.; Wood, J.M.

    1986-06-01

    A comparative study of the transport and toxicity of one nonessential metal (aluminum), and one essential metal (copper), has been performed with the acid-tolerant green alga Chlorella saccarophila. This organism was isolated from a naturally acidified lake and grows well in laboratory cultures at pH 3.0. Our results show that the fast-exchange ions Ca/sup 2 +/, Mg/sup 2 +/, and Na/sup +/ offer some protection against both Al/sup 3 +/ and Cu/sup 2 +/ toxicity whereas K/sup +/ protects against Al/sup 3 +/ toxicity but enhances Cu/sup 2 +/ toxicity. Plasma emission spectroscopy shows that complexation of Al/sup 3 +/ and Fe/sup 3 +/ to cell surfaces is important in preventing toxic cytoplasmic levels of these metals, both in culture media and in acid mine water. The aqueous ion chemistry for toxic metal uptake is simplified considerably in acidic conditions, where competing hydrolysis and precipitation reactions are eliminated. Therefore, simple competitive experiments can be performed quantitatively. 12 references, 7 figures, 1 table.

  6. Abscisic acid induces biosynthesis of bisbibenzyls and tolerance to UV-C in the liverwort Marchantia polymorpha.

    PubMed

    Kageyama, Akito; Ishizaki, Kimitsune; Kohchi, Takayuki; Matsuura, Hideyuki; Takahashi, Kosaku

    2015-09-01

    Environmental stresses are effective triggers for the biosynthesis of various secondary metabolites in plants, and phytohormones such as jasmonic acid and abscisic acid are known to mediate such responses in flowering plants. However, the detailed mechanism underlying the regulation of secondary metabolism in bryophytes remains unclear. In this study, the induction mechanism of secondary metabolites in the model liverwort Marchantia polymorpha was investigated. Abscisic acid (ABA) and ultraviolet irradiation (UV-C) were found to induce the biosynthesis of isoriccardin C, marchantin C, and riccardin F, which are categorized as bisbibenzyls, characteristic metabolites of liverworts. UV-C led to the significant accumulation of ABA. Overexpression of MpABI1, which encodes protein phosphatase 2C (PP2C) as a negative regulator of ABA signaling, suppressed accumulation of bisbibenzyls in response to ABA and UV-C irradiation and conferred susceptibility to UV-C irradiation. These data show that ABA plays a significant role in the induction of bisbibenzyl biosynthesis, which might confer tolerance against UV-C irradiation in M. polymorpha. PMID:26055979

  7. Increased acid resistance of the archaeon, Metallosphaera sedula by adaptive laboratory evolution.

    PubMed

    Ai, Chenbing; McCarthy, Samuel; Eckrich, Valerie; Rudrappa, Deepak; Qiu, Guanzhou; Blum, Paul

    2016-10-01

    Extremely thermoacidophilic members of the Archaea such as the lithoautotroph, Metallosphaera sedula, are among the most acid resistant forms of life and are of great relevance in bioleaching. Here, adaptive laboratory evolution was used to enhance the acid resistance of this organism while genomics and transcriptomics were used in an effort to understand the molecular basis for this trait. Unlike the parental strain, the evolved derivative, M. sedula SARC-M1, grew well at pH of 0.90. Enargite (Cu3AsS4) bioleaching conducted at pH 1.20 demonstrated SARC-M1 leached 23.78 % more copper relative to the parental strain. Genome re-sequencing identified two mutations in SARC-M1 including a nonsynonymous mutation in Msed_0408 (an amino acid permease) and a deletion in pseudogene Msed_1517. Transcriptomic studies by RNA-seq of wild type and evolved strains at various low pH values demonstrated there was enhanced expression of genes in M. sedula SARC-M1 encoding membrane complexes and enzymes that extrude protons or that catalyze proton-consuming reactions. In addition, M. sedula SARC-M1 exhibited reduced expression of genes encoding enzymes that catalyze proton-generating reactions. These unique genomic and transcriptomic features support a model for increased acid resistance arising from enhanced control over cytoplasmic pH. PMID:27520549

  8. Role of the tissue free amino acids in adaptation of medicinal leeches Hirudo medicinalis L., 1758 to extreme climatic conditions.

    PubMed

    Chernaya, L V; Kovalchuk, L A; Nokhrina, E S

    2016-01-01

    The first comparison of the spectra of free amino acids in tissues of the medicinal leeches H. medicinalis from different climatic and geographical Eurasian areas has been performed. Adaptation of H. medicinalis to extreme climatic conditions occurs via intensification of the amino acid metabolism resulting from a significant increase in the content of essential amino acids. Accumulation of arginine, histidine, and lysine (3.6-, 3.9-, and 2.0-fold increases, respectively) has proved to play a special protective role in adaptation of H. medicinalis to the low positive temperatures.

  9. Do sensory neurons mediate adaptive cytoprotection of gastric mucosa against bile acid injury?

    PubMed

    Mercer, D W; Ritchie, W P; Dempsey, D T

    1992-01-01

    Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate protects the gastric mucosa from the injury induced by the subsequent application of 5 mmol acidified taurocholate, a phenomenon referred to as "adaptive cytoprotection." How this occurs remains an enigma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of sensory neurons and mucus secretion in this phenomenon. Prior to injury with 5 mmol acidified taurocholate (pH 1.2), the stomachs of six groups of rats were subjected to the following protocol. Two groups were topically pretreated with either saline or the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Two other groups received the topical anesthetic 1% lidocaine prior to pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. The last two groups got the mucolytic agent 10% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Injury was assessed by measuring net transmucosal ion fluxes, luminal appearance of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and gross and histologic injury. Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate significantly decreased bile acid-induced luminal ion fluxes and DNA accumulation, suggesting mucosal protection (corroborated by gross and histologic injury analysis). This effect was negated by lidocaine but not by NAC. Thus, it appears that sensory neurons, and not increased mucus secretion, play a critical role in adaptive cytoprotection. PMID:1733359

  10. Do sensory neurons mediate adaptive cytoprotection of gastric mucosa against bile acid injury?

    PubMed

    Mercer, D W; Ritchie, W P; Dempsey, D T

    1992-01-01

    Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate protects the gastric mucosa from the injury induced by the subsequent application of 5 mmol acidified taurocholate, a phenomenon referred to as "adaptive cytoprotection." How this occurs remains an enigma. The purpose of this study was to investigate the role of sensory neurons and mucus secretion in this phenomenon. Prior to injury with 5 mmol acidified taurocholate (pH 1.2), the stomachs of six groups of rats were subjected to the following protocol. Two groups were topically pretreated with either saline or the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Two other groups received the topical anesthetic 1% lidocaine prior to pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. The last two groups got the mucolytic agent 10% N-acetylcysteine (NAC) after pretreatment with either saline or 1 mmol acidified taurocholate. Injury was assessed by measuring net transmucosal ion fluxes, luminal appearance of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA), and gross and histologic injury. Pretreatment with the mild irritant 1 mmol acidified taurocholate significantly decreased bile acid-induced luminal ion fluxes and DNA accumulation, suggesting mucosal protection (corroborated by gross and histologic injury analysis). This effect was negated by lidocaine but not by NAC. Thus, it appears that sensory neurons, and not increased mucus secretion, play a critical role in adaptive cytoprotection.

  11. Single-Cell Protein Production by the Acid-Tolerant Fungus Scytalidium acidophilum from Acid Hydrolysates of Waste Paper †

    PubMed Central

    Ivarson, K. C.; Morita, H.

    1982-01-01

    The bioconversion of waste paper to single-cell protein at pH <1 by Scytalidium acidophilum is described. Waste paper pretreated with 72% H2SO4 at 4°C was diluted with water to a pH of <0.1 and hydrolyzed. This yielded an adequate sugar-containing substrate for the growth of the fungus. A total of 97% of the sugars (glucose, galactose, mannose, xylose, arabinose) in the hydrolysates were converted to cell biomass. Microbial contamination was not observed. Based on the sugars consumed, S. acidophilum produced higher yields in shake cultures than many other Fungi Imperfecti. In aerated cultures, productivity increased, and yields of 43 to 46% containing 44 to 47% crude protein were obtained. This compares favorably with Candida utilis, a yeast used commercially to produce single-cell protein. The chemical constituents and the essential amino acids of the fungal cells were similar to those of other fungi. The nucleic acid content was characteristic of microbes containing low levels of nucleic acid. The advantages of using S. acidophilum for single-cell protein production are discussed. PMID:16345970

  12. The rice R2R3-MYB transcription factor OsMYB55 is involved in the tolerance to high temperature and modulates amino acid metabolism.

    PubMed

    El-Kereamy, Ashraf; Bi, Yong-Mei; Ranathunge, Kosala; Beatty, Perrin H; Good, Allen G; Rothstein, Steven J

    2012-01-01

    Temperatures higher than the optimum negatively affects plant growth and development. Tolerance to high temperature is a complex process that involves several pathways. Understanding this process, especially in crops such as rice, is essential to prepare for predicted climate changes due to global warming. Here, we show that OsMYB55 is induced by high temperature and overexpression of OsMYB55 resulted in improved plant growth under high temperature and decreased the negative effect of high temperature on grain yield. Transcriptome analysis revealed an increase in expression of several genes involved in amino acids metabolism. We demonstrate that OsMYB55 binds to the promoter regions of target genes and directly activates expression of some of those genes including glutamine synthetase (OsGS1;2) glutamine amidotransferase (GAT1) and glutamate decarboxylase 3 (GAD3). OsMYB55 overexpression resulted in an increase in total amino acid content and of the individual amino acids produced by the activation of the above mentioned genes and known for their roles in stress tolerance, namely L-glutamic acid, GABA and arginine especially under high temperature condition. In conclusion, overexpression of OsMYB55 improves rice plant tolerance to high temperature, and this high tolerance is associated with enhanced amino acid metabolism through transcription activation.

  13. Expression of Mitochondrial Cytochrome C Oxidase Chaperone Gene (COX20) Improves Tolerance to Weak Acid and Oxidative Stress during Yeast Fermentation

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Vinod; Hart, Andrew J.; Keerthiraju, Ethiraju R.; Waldron, Paul R.; Tucker, Gregory A.; Greetham, Darren

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Saccharomyces cerevisiae is the micro-organism of choice for the conversion of fermentable sugars released by the pre-treatment of lignocellulosic material into bioethanol. Pre-treatment of lignocellulosic material releases acetic acid and previous work identified a cytochrome oxidase chaperone gene (COX20) which was significantly up-regulated in yeast cells in the presence of acetic acid. Results A Δcox20 strain was sensitive to the presence of acetic acid compared with the background strain. Overexpressing COX20 using a tetracycline-regulatable expression vector system in a Δcox20 strain, resulted in tolerance to the presence of acetic acid and tolerance could be ablated with addition of tetracycline. Assays also revealed that overexpression improved tolerance to the presence of hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress. Conclusion This is a study which has utilised tetracycline-regulated protein expression in a fermentation system, which was characterised by improved (or enhanced) tolerance to acetic acid and oxidative stress. PMID:26427054

  14. Synthetic tolerance: three noncoding small RNAs, DsrA, ArcZ and RprA, acting supra-additively against acid stress

    PubMed Central

    Gaida, Stefan M.; Al-Hinai, Mohab A.; Indurthi, Dinesh C.; Nicolaou, Sergios A.; Papoutsakis, Eleftherios T.

    2013-01-01

    Synthetic acid tolerance, especially during active cell growth, is a desirable phenotype for many biotechnological applications. Natively, acid resistance in Escherichia coli is largely a stationary-phase phenotype attributable to mechanisms mostly under the control of the stationary-phase sigma factor RpoS. We show that simultaneous overexpression of noncoding small RNAs (sRNAs), DsrA, RprA and ArcZ, which are translational RpoS activators, increased acid tolerance (based on a low-pH survival assay) supra-additively up to 8500-fold during active cell growth, and provided protection against carboxylic acid and oxidative stress. Overexpression of rpoS without its regulatory 5′-UTR resulted in inferior acid tolerance. The supra-additive effect of overexpressing the three sRNAs results from the impact their expression has on RpoS-protein levels, and the beneficial perturbation of the interconnected RpoS and H-NS networks, thus leading to superior tolerance during active growth. Unlike the overexpression of proteins, overexpression of sRNAs imposes hardly any metabolic burden on cells, and constitutes a more effective strain engineering strategy. PMID:23892399

  15. Sensing and adaptation to low pH mediated by inducible amino acid decarboxylases in Salmonella.

    PubMed

    Viala, Julie P M; Méresse, Stéphane; Pocachard, Bérengère; Guilhon, Aude-Agnès; Aussel, Laurent; Barras, Frédéric

    2011-01-01

    During the course of infection, Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium must successively survive the harsh acid stress of the stomach and multiply into a mild acidic compartment within macrophages. Inducible amino acid decarboxylases are known to promote adaptation to acidic environments. Three low pH inducible amino acid decarboxylases were annotated in the genome of S. Typhimurium, AdiA, CadA and SpeF, which are specific for arginine, lysine and ornithine, respectively. In this study, we characterized and compared the contributions of those enzymes in response to acidic challenges. Individual mutants as well as a strain deleted for the three genes were tested for their ability (i) to survive an extreme acid shock, (ii) to grow at mild acidic pH and (iii) to infect the mouse animal model. We showed that the lysine decarboxylase CadA had the broadest range of activity since it both had the capacity to promote survival at pH 2.3 and growth at pH 4.5. The arginine decarboxylase AdiA was the most performant in protecting S. Typhimurium from a shock at pH 2.3 and the ornithine decarboxylase SpeF conferred the best growth advantage under anaerobiosis conditions at pH 4.5. We developed a GFP-based gene reporter to monitor the pH of the environment as perceived by S. Typhimurium. Results showed that activities of the lysine and ornithine decarboxylases at mild acidic pH did modify the local surrounding of S. Typhimurium both in culture medium and in macrophages. Finally, we tested the contribution of decarboxylases to virulence and found that these enzymes were dispensable for S. Typhimurium virulence during systemic infection. In the light of this result, we examined the genomes of Salmonella spp. normally responsible of systemic infection and observed that the genes encoding these enzymes were not well conserved, supporting the idea that these enzymes may be not required during systemic infection.

  16. Experimental evaluation of the contribution of acidic pH and Fe concentration to the structure, function and tolerance to metals (Cu and Zn) exposure in fluvial biofilms.

    PubMed

    Luís, Ana Teresa; Bonet, Berta; Corcoll, Natàlia; Almeida, Salomé F P; da Silva, Eduardo Ferreira; Figueira, Etelvina; Guasch, Helena

    2014-09-01

    An indoor channel system was colonised with fluvial biofilms to study the chronic effects of high Fe and SO4(2-) concentrations and acidic pH, the water chemistry in the surrounding streams of Aljustrel mining area (Alentejo, Portugal), and their contribution to community (in)tolerance to metal toxicity by short-term experiments with Cu and Zn. Biofilms were subjected to four different treatments during 8 weeks: high Fe and SO4(2-) concentrations (1 mg Fe l(-1)+ 700 mg SO4(2-) l(-1)) and acidic pH, high Fe and SO4(2-) at alkaline pH; lower Fe and SO4(2-) at acidic pH: and lower Fe and SO4(2-) concentrations at alkaline pH as negative control. During chronic exposure, acidic pH affected growth negatively, based on low values of algal biomass and the autotrophic index, high values of the antioxidant enzyme activities and low diversity diatom communities, dominated by acidophilic species (Pinnularia aljustrelica) in acidic treatments, being the effects more marked with high Fe and SO4(2-). Co-tolerance to metals (Cu and Zn) was also shown in biofilms from the acidic treatments, contrasting with the higher sensitivity observed in the alkaline treatments. We can conclude that the Aljustrel mining area acidic environment limits algal growth and exerts a strong selection pressure on the community composition which is in turn, more tolerant to metal exposure. PMID:25011920

  17. Exogenous gibberellic acid reprograms soybean to higher growth and salt stress tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hamayun, Muhammad; Khan, Sumera Afzal; Khan, Abdul Latif; Shin, Jae-Ho; Ahmad, Bashir; Shin, Dong-Hyun; Lee, In-Jung

    2010-06-23

    The agricultural industry is severely affected by salinity due to its high magnitude of adverse impacts and worldwide distribution. We observed the role of exogenous gibberellic acid (GA(3)) in salinity alleviation of soybean. We found that GA(3) application significantly promoted plant length and plant fresh/dry biomass while markedly hindered by NaCl induced salt stress. The adverse effect of salt stress was mitigated by GA(3), as growth attributes significantly recovered, when GA(3) was added to salt stressed soybean plants. Elevated GA(3) treatments increased daidzein and genistein contents (commonly known as phytoestrogens) of soybean leaves under control and salt stress conditions. Phytohormonal analysis of soybean showed that the level of bioactive gibberellins (GA(1) and GA(4)) and jasmonic acid increased in GA(3) treated plants, while the endogenous abscisic acid and salicylic acid contents declined under the same treatment. GA(3) mitigated the adverse effects of salt stress by regulating the level of phytohormones, thus aiding the plant in resuming its normal growth and development. The presence of GA(1) and GA(4) showed that both early-C13-hydroxylation and non-C13-hydroxylation pathways of GA biosynthesis are functional in soybean. It was concluded that GA(3) ameliorates the adverse effects of salt stress and restores normal growth and development of soybean.

  18. 76 FR 11965 - Peroxyacetic Acid; Amendment to an Exemption From the Requirement of a Tolerance

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... degradates, including hydrogen peroxide (HP) and acetic acid (AA), in or on all food commodities, when PAA is..., colorless, organic compound that is formed, and only exists in equilibrium, with hydrogen peroxide and... hydrogen peroxide. PAA is always sold in solution with AA and HP to maintain stability of the...

  19. Characterization of VuMATE1 Expression in Response to Iron Nutrition and Aluminum Stress Reveals Adaptation of Rice Bean (Vigna umbellata) to Acid Soils through Cis Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Meiya; Xu, Jiameng; Lou, Heqiang; Fan, Wei; Yang, Jianli; Zheng, Shaojian

    2016-01-01

    Rice bean (Vigna umbellata) VuMATE1 appears to be constitutively expressed at vascular system but root apex, and Al stress extends its expression to root apex. Whether VuMATE1 participates in both Al tolerance and Fe nutrition, and how VuMATE1 expression is regulated is of great interest. In this study, the role of VuMATE1 in Fe nutrition was characterized through in planta complementation assays. The transcriptional regulation of VuMATE1 was investigated through promoter analysis and promoter-GUS reporter assays. The results showed that the expression of VuMATE1 was regulated by Al stress but not Fe status. Complementation of frd3-1 with VuMATE1 under VuMATE1 promoter could not restore phenotype, but restored with 35SCaMV promoter. Immunostaining of VuMATE1 revealed abnormal localization of VuMATE1 in vasculature. In planta GUS reporter assay identified Al-responsive cis-acting elements resided between -1228 and -574 bp. Promoter analysis revealed several cis-acting elements, but transcription is not simply regulated by one of these elements. We demonstrated that cis regulation of VuMATE1 expression is involved in Al tolerance mechanism, while not involved in Fe nutrition. These results reveal the evolution of VuMATE1 expression for better adaptation of rice bean to acid soils where Al stress imposed but Fe deficiency pressure released. PMID:27148333

  20. Characterization of a pH and detergent-tolerant, cold-adapted type I pullulanase from Exiguobacterium sp. SH3.

    PubMed

    Rajaei, Sarah; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani

    2015-11-01

    A pullulanase-encoding gene from psychrotrophic Exiguobacterium sp. SH3 was cloned and expressed in both E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. The functional recombinant enzyme (Pul-SH3) was purified as a His-tagged protein. Pul-SH3 was characterized to be a cold-adapted type I pullulanase with maximum activity at 45 °C. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, the melting temperature of Pul-SH3 was determined to be about 52 °C. The enzyme was able to hydrolyze pullulan, soluble starch, potato starch, and rice flour. It was exceptionally tolerant in the pH range of 4-11, exhibiting maximum activity at pH 8.5 and more than 60% of the activity in the pH range of 5-11. Being a detergent-tolerant pullulanase, Pul-SH3 retained 99, 89, and 54% of its activity at 10% concentration of Triton-X100, Tween 20, and SDS, respectively. The enzyme also exhibited an activity of 80.4 and 93.7% in the presence of two commercial detergents, Rika (7.5% v/v) and Fadisheh (2.5% w/v), respectively. The enzyme was even able to remain active by 54.5 and 85% after 10-day holding with the commercial detergents. Thermal stability of the enzyme could w on silica. Pul-SH3 with several industrially important characteristics seems desirable for cold hydrolysis of starch.

  1. Characterization of a pH and detergent-tolerant, cold-adapted type I pullulanase from Exiguobacterium sp. SH3.

    PubMed

    Rajaei, Sarah; Noghabi, Kambiz Akbari; Sadeghizadeh, Majid; Zahiri, Hossein Shahbani

    2015-11-01

    A pullulanase-encoding gene from psychrotrophic Exiguobacterium sp. SH3 was cloned and expressed in both E. coli and Bacillus subtilis. The functional recombinant enzyme (Pul-SH3) was purified as a His-tagged protein. Pul-SH3 was characterized to be a cold-adapted type I pullulanase with maximum activity at 45 °C. Using fluorescence spectroscopy, the melting temperature of Pul-SH3 was determined to be about 52 °C. The enzyme was able to hydrolyze pullulan, soluble starch, potato starch, and rice flour. It was exceptionally tolerant in the pH range of 4-11, exhibiting maximum activity at pH 8.5 and more than 60% of the activity in the pH range of 5-11. Being a detergent-tolerant pullulanase, Pul-SH3 retained 99, 89, and 54% of its activity at 10% concentration of Triton-X100, Tween 20, and SDS, respectively. The enzyme also exhibited an activity of 80.4 and 93.7% in the presence of two commercial detergents, Rika (7.5% v/v) and Fadisheh (2.5% w/v), respectively. The enzyme was even able to remain active by 54.5 and 85% after 10-day holding with the commercial detergents. Thermal stability of the enzyme could w on silica. Pul-SH3 with several industrially important characteristics seems desirable for cold hydrolysis of starch. PMID:26349928

  2. Effects of cyanobacterial extracellular products and gibberellic acid on salinity tolerance in Oryza sativa L

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez, AA; Stella, AM; Storni, MM; Zulpa, G; Zaccaro, MC

    2006-01-01

    Salt stress is one of the most serious factors limiting the productivity of rice, the staple diet in many countries. Gibberellic acid has been reported to reduce NaCl-induced growth inhibition in some plants including rice. Most paddy soils have a natural population of Cyanobacteria, prokaryotic photosynthethic microorganisms, which synthesize and liberate plant growth regulators such as gibberellins that could exert a natural beneficial effect on salt stressed rice plants. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of the cyanobacterium Scytonema hofmanni extracellular products on the growth of rice seedlings inhibited by NaCl and to compare it with the effect of the gibberellic acid in the same stress condition. Growth (length and weight of the seedlings) and biochemical parameters (5-aminolevulinate dehydratase activity, total free porphyrin and pigments content) were evaluated. Salt exposure negatively affected all parameters measured, with the exception of chlorophyll. Chlrorophyll concentrations nearly doubled upon exposure to high salt. Gibberellic acid counteracted the effect of salt on the length and dry weight of the shoot, and on carotenoid and chlorophyll b contents. Extracellular products nullified the salt effect on shoot dry weight and carotenoid content; partially counteracted the effect on shoot length (from 54% to 38% decrease), root dry weight (from 59% to 41% decrease) and total free porphyrin (from 31 to 13% decrease); reduced by 35% the salt increase of chlorophyll a; had no effect on root length and chlorophyll b. Gibberellic acid and extracellular products increased 5-aminolevulinate dehydratase activity over the control without salt. When coincident with high salinity, exposure to either EP or GA3, resulted in a reversal of shoot-related responses to salt stress. We propose that Scytonema hofmanni extracellular products may counteract altered hormone homeostasis of rice seedlings under salt stress by producing gibberellin-like plant

  3. Influence of Salicylic Acid on In Vitro Micropropagation and Salt Tolerance in Two Hibiscus Species, H. acetosella and H. moscheutos (cv ‘Luna Red’)

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Salicylic acid (SA) is a hormone-like substance that plays an important role in the regulation of plant growth and development. It has been reported to improve in vitro regeneration as well as induce abiotic stress tolerance in plants. The effects of varying SA concentrations (0, 0.5, and 1 mM) on i...

  4. Draft genome sequence of Sporolactobacillus inulinus strain CASD, an efficient D-lactic acid-producing bacterium with high-concentration lactate tolerance capability.

    PubMed

    Yu, Bo; Su, Fei; Wang, Limin; Xu, Ke; Zhao, Bo; Xu, Ping

    2011-10-01

    Sporolactobacillus inulinus CASD is an efficient D-lactic acid producer with high optical purity. Here we report for the first time the draft genome sequence of S. inulinus (2,930,096 bp). The large number of annotated two-component system genes makes it possible to explore the mechanism of extraordinary lactate tolerance of S. inulinus CASD.

  5. Two Theobroma cacao genotypes with contrasting pathogen tolerance show aberrant transcriptional and ROS responses after salicylic acid treatment

    PubMed Central

    Fister, Andrew S.; O’Neil, Shawn T.; Shi, Zi; Zhang, Yufan; Tyler, Brett M.; Guiltinan, Mark J.; Maximova, Siela N.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of pathogen susceptibility in various crop plants is crucial to increasing the stability of food, feed, and fuel production. Varietal differences in defence responses provide insights into the mechanisms of resistance and are a key resource for plant breeders. To explore the role of salicylic acid in the regulation of defence in cacao, we demonstrated that SA treatment decreased susceptibility to a pod rot pathogen, Phytophthora tropicalis in two genotypes, Scavina 6 and Imperial College Selection 1, which differ in their resistance to several agriculturally important pathogens. Transient overexpression of TcNPR1, a major transcriptional regulator of the SA-dependent plant immune system, also increased pathogen tolerance in cacao leaves. To explore further the genetic basis of resistance in cacao, we used microarrays to measure gene expression profiles after salicylic acid (SA) treatment in these two cacao genotypes. The two genotypes displayed distinct transcriptional responses to SA. Unexpectedly, the expression profile of the susceptible genotype ICS1 included a larger number of pathogenesis-related genes that were induced by SA at 24h after treatment, whereas genes encoding many chloroplast and mitochondrial proteins implicated in reactive oxygen species production were up-regulated in the resistant genotype, Sca6. Sca6 accumulated significantly more superoxide at 24h after treatment of leaves with SA. These experiments revealed critical insights regarding the molecular differences between cacao varieties, which will allow a better understanding of defence mechanisms to help guide breeding programmes. PMID:26163705

  6. Multiple-unit tablet of probiotic bacteria for improved storage stability, acid tolerability, and in vivo intestinal protective effect

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee Jun; Lee, Ga Hyeon; Jun, Joonho; Son, Miwon; Kang, Myung Joo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate probiotics-loaded pellets in a tablet form to improve storage stability, acid tolerability, and in vivo intestinal protective effect. Bacteria-loaded pellets primarily prepared with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate were compressed into tablets with highly compressible excipients and optimized for flow properties, hardness, and disintegration time. The optimized probiotic tablet consisted of enteric-coated pellets (335 mg), microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH102, 37.5 mg), and porous calcium silicate (25 mg) and allowed whole survival of living bacteria during the compaction process with sufficient tablet hardness (13 kp) and disintegration time (14 minutes). The multiple-unit tablet showed remarkably higher storage stability under ambient conditions (25°C/60% relative humidity) over 6 months and resistance to acidic medium compared to uncoated strains or pellets. Repeated intake of this multiple-unit tablet significantly lowered plasma level of endotoxin, a pathogenic material, compared to repeated intake of bare probiotics or marketed products in rats. These results, therefore, suggest that the multiple-unit tablet is advantageous to better bacterial viability and gain the beneficial effects on the gut flora, including the improvement of intestinal barrier function. PMID:27103789

  7. Genome sequence of the acid-tolerant Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 from Karijini National Park, Australia

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Robert; Watkin, Elizabeth; Tian, Rui; Bräu, Lambert; O’Hara, Graham; Goodwin, Lynne; Han, James; Reddy, Tatiparthi; Huntemann, Marcel; Pati, Amrita; Woyke, Tanja; Mavromatis, Konstantinos; Markowitz, Victor; Ivanova, Natalia; Kyrpides, Nikos; Reeve, Wayne

    2013-01-01

    Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232 is an aerobic, motile, Gram-negative, non-spore-forming acid-tolerant rod that was trapped in 2001 from acidic soil collected from Karijini National Park (Australia) using Gastrolobium capitatum as a host. WSM2232 was effective in nitrogen fixation with G. capitatum but subsequently lost symbiotic competence during long-term storage. Here we describe the features of Burkholderia sp. strain WSM2232, together with genome sequence information and its annotation. The 7,208,311 bp standard-draft genome is arranged into 72 scaffolds of 72 contigs containing 6,322 protein-coding genes and 61 RNA-only encoding genes. The loss of symbiotic capability can now be attributed to the loss of nodulation and nitrogen fixation genes from the genome. This rhizobial genome is one of 100 sequenced as part of the DOE Joint Genome Institute 2010 Genomic Encyclopedia for Bacteria and Archaea-Root Nodule Bacteria (GEBA-RNB) project. PMID:25197442

  8. Two Theobroma cacao genotypes with contrasting pathogen tolerance show aberrant transcriptional and ROS responses after salicylic acid treatment.

    PubMed

    Fister, Andrew S; O'Neil, Shawn T; Shi, Zi; Zhang, Yufan; Tyler, Brett M; Guiltinan, Mark J; Maximova, Siela N

    2015-10-01

    Understanding the genetic basis of pathogen susceptibility in various crop plants is crucial to increasing the stability of food, feed, and fuel production. Varietal differences in defence responses provide insights into the mechanisms of resistance and are a key resource for plant breeders. To explore the role of salicylic acid in the regulation of defence in cacao, we demonstrated that SA treatment decreased susceptibility to a pod rot pathogen, Phytophthora tropicalis in two genotypes, Scavina 6 and Imperial College Selection 1, which differ in their resistance to several agriculturally important pathogens. Transient overexpression of TcNPR1, a major transcriptional regulator of the SA-dependent plant immune system, also increased pathogen tolerance in cacao leaves. To explore further the genetic basis of resistance in cacao, we used microarrays to measure gene expression profiles after salicylic acid (SA) treatment in these two cacao genotypes. The two genotypes displayed distinct transcriptional responses to SA. Unexpectedly, the expression profile of the susceptible genotype ICS1 included a larger number of pathogenesis-related genes that were induced by SA at 24h after treatment, whereas genes encoding many chloroplast and mitochondrial proteins implicated in reactive oxygen species production were up-regulated in the resistant genotype, Sca6. Sca6 accumulated significantly more superoxide at 24h after treatment of leaves with SA. These experiments revealed critical insights regarding the molecular differences between cacao varieties, which will allow a better understanding of defence mechanisms to help guide breeding programmes.

  9. Multiple-unit tablet of probiotic bacteria for improved storage stability, acid tolerability, and in vivo intestinal protective effect.

    PubMed

    Park, Hee Jun; Lee, Ga Hyeon; Jun, Joonho; Son, Miwon; Kang, Myung Joo

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to formulate probiotics-loaded pellets in a tablet form to improve storage stability, acid tolerability, and in vivo intestinal protective effect. Bacteria-loaded pellets primarily prepared with hydroxypropyl methylcellulose acetate succinate were compressed into tablets with highly compressible excipients and optimized for flow properties, hardness, and disintegration time. The optimized probiotic tablet consisted of enteric-coated pellets (335 mg), microcrystalline cellulose (Avicel PH102, 37.5 mg), and porous calcium silicate (25 mg) and allowed whole survival of living bacteria during the compaction process with sufficient tablet hardness (13 kp) and disintegration time (14 minutes). The multiple-unit tablet showed remarkably higher storage stability under ambient conditions (25°C/60% relative humidity) over 6 months and resistance to acidic medium compared to uncoated strains or pellets. Repeated intake of this multiple-unit tablet significantly lowered plasma level of endotoxin, a pathogenic material, compared to repeated intake of bare probiotics or marketed products in rats. These results, therefore, suggest that the multiple-unit tablet is advantageous to better bacterial viability and gain the beneficial effects on the gut flora, including the improvement of intestinal barrier function. PMID:27103789

  10. Functional roles of the pepper RING finger protein gene, CaRING1, in abscisic acid signaling and dehydration tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-09-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, which include pathogens and conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and drought. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major plant hormone involved in signal transduction pathways that mediate the defense response of plants to abiotic stress. Previously, we isolated Ring finger protein gene (CaRING1) from pepper (Capsicum annuum), which is associated with resistance to bacterial pathogens, accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Here, we report a new function of the CaRING1 gene product in the ABA-mediated defense responses of plants to dehydration stress. The expression of the CaRING1 gene was induced in pepper leaves treated with ABA or exposed to dehydration or NaCl. Virus-induced gene silencing of CaRING1 in pepper plants exhibited low degree of ABA-induced stomatal closure and high levels of transpirational water loss in dehydrated leaves. These led to be more vulnerable to dehydration stress in CaRING1-silenced pepper than in the control pepper, accompanied by reduction of ABA-regulated gene expression and low accumulation of ABA and H2O2. In contrast, CaRING1-overexpressing transgenic plants showed enhanced sensitivity to ABA during the seedling growth and establishment. These plants were also more tolerant to dehydration stress than the wild-type plants because of high ABA accumulation, enhanced stomatal closure and increased expression of stress-responsive genes. Together, these results suggest that the CaRING1 acts as positive factor for dehydration tolerance in Arabidopsis by modulating ABA biosynthesis and ABA-mediated stomatal closing and gene expression.

  11. Functional roles of the pepper RING finger protein gene, CaRING1, in abscisic acid signaling and dehydration tolerance.

    PubMed

    Lim, Chae Woo; Hwang, Byung Kook; Lee, Sung Chul

    2015-09-01

    Plants are constantly exposed to a variety of biotic and abiotic stresses, which include pathogens and conditions of high salinity, low temperature, and drought. Abscisic acid (ABA) is a major plant hormone involved in signal transduction pathways that mediate the defense response of plants to abiotic stress. Previously, we isolated Ring finger protein gene (CaRING1) from pepper (Capsicum annuum), which is associated with resistance to bacterial pathogens, accompanied by hypersensitive cell death. Here, we report a new function of the CaRING1 gene product in the ABA-mediated defense responses of plants to dehydration stress. The expression of the CaRING1 gene was induced in pepper leaves treated with ABA or exposed to dehydration or NaCl. Virus-induced gene silencing of CaRING1 in pepper plants exhibited low degree of ABA-induced stomatal closure and high levels of transpirational water loss in dehydrated leaves. These led to be more vulnerable to dehydration stress in CaRING1-silenced pepper than in the control pepper, accompanied by reduction of ABA-regulated gene expression and low accumulation of ABA and H2O2. In contrast, CaRING1-overexpressing transgenic plants showed enhanced sensitivity to ABA during the seedling growth and establishment. These plants were also more tolerant to dehydration stress than the wild-type plants because of high ABA accumulation, enhanced stomatal closure and increased expression of stress-responsive genes. Together, these results suggest that the CaRING1 acts as positive factor for dehydration tolerance in Arabidopsis by modulating ABA biosynthesis and ABA-mediated stomatal closing and gene expression. PMID:26249046

  12. The NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signalling pathway is pivotal for enhanced salt and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jayakannan, Maheswari; Bose, Jayakumar; Babourina, Olga; Shabala, Sergey; Massart, Amandine; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Rengel, Zed

    2015-04-01

    The role of endogenous salicylic acid (SA) signalling cascades in plant responses to salt and oxidative stresses is unclear. Arabidopsis SA signalling mutants, namely npr1-5 (non-expresser of pathogenesis related gene1), which lacks NPR1-dependent SA signalling, and nudt7 (nudix hydrolase7), which has both constitutively expressed NPR1-dependent and NPR1-independent SA signalling pathways, were compared with the wild type (Col-0) during salt or oxidative stresses. Growth and viability staining showed that, compared with wild type, the npr1-5 mutant was sensitive to either salt or oxidative stress, whereas the nudt7 mutant was tolerant. Acute salt stress caused the strongest membrane potential depolarization, highest sodium and proton influx, and potassium loss from npr1-5 roots in comparison with the wild type and nudt7 mutant. Though salt stress-induced hydrogen peroxide production was lowest in the npr1-5 mutant, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress (induced by 1mM of hydroxyl-radical-generating copper-ascorbate mix, or either 1 or 10mM hydrogen peroxide) caused a higher potassium loss from the roots of the npr1-5 mutant than the wild type and nudt7 mutant. Long-term salt exposure resulted in the highest sodium and the lowest potassium concentration in the shoots of npr1-5 mutant in comparison with the wild type and nudt7 mutant. The above results demonstrate that NPR1-dependent SA signalling is pivotal to (i) controlling Na(+) entry into the root tissue and its subsequent long-distance transport into the shoot, and (ii) preventing a potassium loss through depolarization-activated outward-rectifying potassium and ROS-activated non-selective cation channels. In conclusion, NPR1-dependent SA signalling is central to the salt and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:25614660

  13. The NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signalling pathway is pivotal for enhanced salt and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis

    PubMed Central

    Jayakannan, Maheswari; Bose, Jayakumar; Babourina, Olga; Shabala, Sergey; Massart, Amandine; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Rengel, Zed

    2015-01-01

    The role of endogenous salicylic acid (SA) signalling cascades in plant responses to salt and oxidative stresses is unclear. Arabidopsis SA signalling mutants, namely npr1-5 (non-expresser of pathogenesis related gene1), which lacks NPR1-dependent SA signalling, and nudt7 (nudix hydrolase7), which has both constitutively expressed NPR1-dependent and NPR1-independent SA signalling pathways, were compared with the wild type (Col-0) during salt or oxidative stresses. Growth and viability staining showed that, compared with wild type, the npr1-5 mutant was sensitive to either salt or oxidative stress, whereas the nudt7 mutant was tolerant. Acute salt stress caused the strongest membrane potential depolarization, highest sodium and proton influx, and potassium loss from npr1-5 roots in comparison with the wild type and nudt7 mutant. Though salt stress-induced hydrogen peroxide production was lowest in the npr1-5 mutant, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress (induced by 1mM of hydroxyl-radical-generating copper-ascorbate mix, or either 1 or 10mM hydrogen peroxide) caused a higher potassium loss from the roots of the npr1-5 mutant than the wild type and nudt7 mutant. Long-term salt exposure resulted in the highest sodium and the lowest potassium concentration in the shoots of npr1-5 mutant in comparison with the wild type and nudt7 mutant. The above results demonstrate that NPR1-dependent SA signalling is pivotal to (i) controlling Na+ entry into the root tissue and its subsequent long-distance transport into the shoot, and (ii) preventing a potassium loss through depolarization-activated outward-rectifying potassium and ROS-activated non-selective cation channels. In conclusion, NPR1-dependent SA signalling is central to the salt and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis. PMID:25614660

  14. The NPR1-dependent salicylic acid signalling pathway is pivotal for enhanced salt and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

    PubMed

    Jayakannan, Maheswari; Bose, Jayakumar; Babourina, Olga; Shabala, Sergey; Massart, Amandine; Poschenrieder, Charlotte; Rengel, Zed

    2015-04-01

    The role of endogenous salicylic acid (SA) signalling cascades in plant responses to salt and oxidative stresses is unclear. Arabidopsis SA signalling mutants, namely npr1-5 (non-expresser of pathogenesis related gene1), which lacks NPR1-dependent SA signalling, and nudt7 (nudix hydrolase7), which has both constitutively expressed NPR1-dependent and NPR1-independent SA signalling pathways, were compared with the wild type (Col-0) during salt or oxidative stresses. Growth and viability staining showed that, compared with wild type, the npr1-5 mutant was sensitive to either salt or oxidative stress, whereas the nudt7 mutant was tolerant. Acute salt stress caused the strongest membrane potential depolarization, highest sodium and proton influx, and potassium loss from npr1-5 roots in comparison with the wild type and nudt7 mutant. Though salt stress-induced hydrogen peroxide production was lowest in the npr1-5 mutant, the reactive oxygen species (ROS) stress (induced by 1mM of hydroxyl-radical-generating copper-ascorbate mix, or either 1 or 10mM hydrogen peroxide) caused a higher potassium loss from the roots of the npr1-5 mutant than the wild type and nudt7 mutant. Long-term salt exposure resulted in the highest sodium and the lowest potassium concentration in the shoots of npr1-5 mutant in comparison with the wild type and nudt7 mutant. The above results demonstrate that NPR1-dependent SA signalling is pivotal to (i) controlling Na(+) entry into the root tissue and its subsequent long-distance transport into the shoot, and (ii) preventing a potassium loss through depolarization-activated outward-rectifying potassium and ROS-activated non-selective cation channels. In conclusion, NPR1-dependent SA signalling is central to the salt and oxidative stress tolerance in Arabidopsis.

  15. Clostridium aciditolerans sp. nov., an acid-tolerant spore-forming anaerobic bacterium from constructed wetland sediment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yong-Jin; Romanek, Christopher S; Wiegel, Juergen

    2007-02-01

    An obligately anaerobic, spore-forming, moderately acid-tolerant bacterium, strain JW/YJL-B3T, was isolated from a sediment sample from a constructed wetland system receiving acid sulfate water. Based on 16S rRNA gene sequence analysis, the isolate belonged to the Firmicutes branch with Clostridium drakei SL1T (96.2 % gene sequence similarity) as its closest relative. The G+C content of the genomic DNA was 30.8 mol% (HPLC). Cells were straight to curved rods, 0.5-1.0 microm in diameter and 3.0-9.0 microm in length. The temperature range for growth was 20-45 degrees C, with an optimum around 35 degrees C. Growth was not detected below 18 degrees C or above 47 degrees C. The pH range for growth was broad, pH(25 degrees C) 3.8-8.9, with an optimum at 7.0-7.5. However at pH 4.5, the strain grew at 52 % of the optimal growth rate. The salinity range was 0-1.5 % NaCl (w/v). Strain JW/YJL-B3T utilized beef extract, Casamino acids, peptone, tryptone, arabinose, cellobiose, fructose, galactose, glucose, lactose, maltose, mannose, raffinose, ribose, sucrose, xylose, pyruvate, glutamate and inulin as a carbon and energy source. There were no indications of growth under aerobic or autotrophic conditions. The isolate produced acetate, butyrate and ethanol as fermentation end products from glucose. Based on these characteristics and other physiological properties, the isolate is placed into the novel taxon, Clostridium aciditolerans sp. nov., with strain JW/YJL-B3T (=DSM 17425T=ATCC BAA-1220T) as the type strain.

  16. Sequence-Specific Peptide Nucleic Acid-Based Antisense Inhibitors of TEM-1 β-Lactamase and Mechanism of Adaptive Resistance.

    PubMed

    Courtney, Colleen M; Chatterjee, Anushree

    2015-06-12

    The recent surge of drug-resistant superbugs and shrinking antibiotic pipeline are serious challenges to global health. In particular, the emergence of β-lactamases has caused extensive resistance against the most frequently prescribed class of β-lactam antibiotics. Here, we develop novel synthetic peptide nucleic acid-based antisense inhibitors that target the start codon and ribosomal binding site of the TEM-1 β-lactamase transcript and act via translation inhibition mechanism. We show that these antisense inhibitors are capable of resensitizing drug-resistant Escherichia coli to β-lactam antibiotics exhibiting 10-fold reduction in the minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC). To study the mechanism of resistance, we adapted E. coli at MIC levels of the β-lactam/antisense inhibitor combination and observed a nonmutational, bet-hedging based adaptive antibiotic resistance response as evidenced by phenotypic heterogeneity as well as heterogeneous expression of key stress response genes. Our data show that both the development of new antimicrobials and an understanding of cellular response during the development of tolerance could aid in mitigating the impending antibiotic crisis. PMID:27622741

  17. Uranium Binding Mechanisms of the Acid-Tolerant Fungus Coniochaeta fodinicola.

    PubMed

    Vázquez-Campos, Xabier; Kinsela, Andrew S; Collins, Richard N; Neilan, Brett A; Aoyagi, Noboru; Waite, T David

    2015-07-21

    The uptake and binding of uranium [as (UO2)(2+)] by a moderately acidophilic fungus, Coniochaeta fodinicola, recently isolated from a uranium mine site, is examined in this work in order to better understand the potential impact of organisms such as this on uranium sequestration in hydrometallurgical systems. Our results show that the viability of the fungal biomass is critical to their capacity to remove uranium from solution. Indeed, live biomass (viable cells based on vital staining) were capable of removing ∼16 mg U/g dry weight in contrast with dead biomass (autoclaved) which removed ∼45 mg U/g dry weight after 2 h. Furthermore, the uranium binds with different strength, with a fraction ranging from ∼20-50% being easily leached from the exposed biomass by a 10 min acid wash. Results from X-ray absorption spectroscopy measurements show that the strength of uranium binding is strongly influenced by cell viability, with live cells showing a more well-ordered uranium bonding environment, while the distance to carbon or phosphorus second neighbors is similar in all samples. When coupled with time-resolved laser fluorescence and Fourier transformed infrared measurements, the importance of organic acids, phosphates, and polysaccharides, likely released with fungal cell death, appear to be the primary determinants of uranium binding in this system. These results provide an important progression to our understanding with regard to uranium sequestration in hydrometallurgical applications with implications to the unwanted retention of uranium in biofilms and/or its mobility in a remediation context.

  18. Salmonella transcriptional signature in Tetrahymena phagosomes and role of acid tolerance in passage through the protist

    PubMed Central

    Rehfuss, Marc Yi Ming; Parker, Craig Thomas; Brandl, Maria Theresa

    2011-01-01

    Salmonella enterica Typhimurium remains undigested in the food vacuoles of the common protist, Tetrahymena. Contrary to its interaction with Acanthamoeba spp., S. Typhimurium is not cytotoxic to Tetrahymena and is egested as viable cells in its fecal pellets. Through microarray gene expression profiling we investigated the factors in S. Typhimurium that are involved in its resistance to digestion by Tetrahymena. The transcriptome of S. Typhimurium in Tetrahymena phagosomes showed that 989 and 1282 genes were altered in expression compared with that in water and in LB culture medium, respectively. A great proportion of the upregulated genes have a role in anaerobic metabolism and the use of alternate electron acceptors. Many genes required for survival and replication within macrophages and human epithelial cells also had increased expression in Tetrahymena, including mgtC, one of the most highly induced genes in all three cells types. A ΔmgtC mutant of S. Typhimurium did not show decreased viability in Tetrahymena, but paradoxically, was egested at a higher cell density than the wild type. The expression of adiA and adiY, which are involved in arginine-dependent acid resistance, also was increased in the protozoan phagosome. A ΔadiAY mutant had lower viability after passage through Tetrahymena, and a higher proportion of S. Typhimurium wild-type cells within pellets remained viable after exposure to pH 3.4 as compared with uningested cells. Our results provide evidence that acid resistance has a role in the resistance of Salmonella to digestion by Tetrahymena and that passage through the protist confers physiological advantages relevant to its contamination cycle. PMID:20686510

  19. Modeling fortification of corn masa flour with folic acid: the potential impact on exceeding the tolerable upper intake level for folic acid, NHANES 2001–2008

    PubMed Central

    Hamner, Heather C.; Tinker, Sarah C.; Berry, R.J.; Mulinare, Joe

    2013-01-01

    Background The Institute of Medicine set a tolerable upper intake level (UL) for usual daily total folic acid intake (1,000 µg). Less than 3% of US adults currently exceed the UL. Objective The objective of this study was to determine if folic acid fortification of corn masa flour would increase the percentage of the US population who exceed the UL. Design We used dietary intake data from NHANES 2001–2008 to estimate the percentage of adults and children who would exceed the UL if corn masa flour were fortified at 140 µg of folic acid/100 g. Results In 2001–2008, 2.5% of the US adult population (aged≥19 years) exceeded the UL, which could increase to 2.6% if fortification of corn masa flour occurred. With corn masa flour fortification, percentage point increases were small and not statistically significant for US adults exceeding the UL regardless of supplement use, sex, race/ethnicity, or age. Children aged 1–8 years, specifically supplement users, were the most likely to exceed their age-specific UL. With fortification of corn masa flour, there were no statistically significant increases in the percentage of US children who were exceeding their age-specific UL, and the percentage point increases were small. Conclusions Our results suggest that fortification of corn masa flour would not significantly increase the percentage of individuals who would exceed the UL. Supplement use was the main factor related to exceeding the UL with or without fortification of corn masa flour and within all strata of sex, race/ethnicity, and age group. PMID:23316130

  20. 2-3H-Benzoxazolinone (BOA) induces loss of salt tolerance in salt-adapted plants.

    PubMed

    Sánchez-Moreiras, A M; Pedrol, N; González, L; Reigosa, M J

    2009-07-01

    In order to test the stress hypothesis of allelopathy of Reigosa et al. (1999, 2002), the combined action of a well-established allelochemical compound (2-3H-benzoxazolinone, BOA) and a common abiotic stress (salt stress) were investigated in lettuce (Lactuca sativa L.). In a previous study (Baerson et al. 2005), we demonstrated that the primary effects of BOA are related to the expression of genes involved in detoxification and stress responses, which might serve to simultaneously alleviate biotic and abiotic stresses. Through analysis of the same physiological and biochemical parameters previously studied for BOA alone (Sánchez-Moreiras & Reigosa 2005), we observed specific effects of salt stress alone, as well as for the two stresses together (BOA and salt). This paper demonstrates that plants showing tolerance to salt stress (reduced stomatal density, increased proline content, higher K(+) concentration, etc.) become salt sensitive (markedly low Psiw values, high putrescine content, increased lipid peroxidation, etc.) when simultaneously treated with the allelochemical BOA. We also report additional information on the mechanisms of action of BOA, and general stress responses in this plant species.

  1. Pressure adaptation of 3-isopropylmalate dehydrogenase from an extremely piezophilic bacterium is attributed to a single amino acid substitution.

    PubMed

    Hamajima, Yuki; Nagae, Takayuki; Watanabe, Nobuhisa; Ohmae, Eiji; Kato-Yamada, Yasuyuki; Kato, Chiaki

    2016-03-01

    3-Isopropylmalate dehydrogenase (IPMDH) from the extreme piezophile Shewanella benthica (SbIPMDH) is more pressure-tolerant than that from the atmospheric pressure-adapted Shewanella oneidensis (SoIPMDH). To understand the molecular mechanisms of this pressure tolerance, we analyzed mutated enzymes. The results indicate that only a single mutation at position 266, corresponding to Ala (SbIPMDH) and Ser (SoIPMDH), essentially affects activity under higher-pressure conditions. Structural analyses of SoIPMDH suggests that penetration of three water molecules into the cleft around Ser266 under high-pressure conditions could reduce the activity of the wild-type enzyme; however, no water molecule is observed in the Ala266 mutant. PMID:26847201

  2. Physiological, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of impaired seawater tolerance following exposure of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, smolts to acid and aluminum

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Monette, M.Y.; Yada, T.; Matey, V.; McCormick, S.D.

    2010-01-01

    We examined the physiological, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of impaired ion regulation in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, smolts following acute acid and aluminum (Al) exposure. Smolts were exposed to: control (pH 6.5, 3.4??gl-1 Al), acid and low Al (LAl: pH 5.4, 11??gl-1 Al), acid and moderate Al (MAl: pH 5.3, 42??gl-1 Al), and acid and high Al (HAl: pH 5.4, 56??gl-1 Al) for two and six days. At each time-point, smolts were sampled directly from freshwater treatment tanks and after a 24h seawater challenge. Exposure to acid/MAl and acid/HAl led to accumulation of gill Al, substantial alterations in gill morphology, reduced gill Na+/K+-ATPase (NKA) activity, and impaired ion regulation in both freshwater and seawater. Exposure to acid/MAl for six days also led to a decrease in gill mRNA expression of the apical Cl- channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator I), increased apoptosis upon seawater exposure, an increase in the surface expression of mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) within the filament epithelium of the gill, but reduced abundance of gill NKA-positive MRCs. By contrast, smolts exposed to acid and the lowest Al concentration exhibited minor gill Al accumulation, slight morphological modifications in the gill, and impaired seawater tolerance in the absence of a detectable effect on freshwater ion regulation. These impacts were accompanied by decreased cell proliferation, a slight increase in the surface expression of MRCs within the filament epithelium, but no impact on gill apoptosis or total MRC abundance was observed. However, MRCs in the gills of smolts exposed to acid/LAl exhibited morphological alterations including decreased size, staining intensity, and shape factor. We demonstrate that the seawater tolerance of Atlantic salmon smolts is extremely sensitive to acute exposure to acid and low levels of Al, and that the mechanisms underlying this depend on the time-course and severity of Al exposure. We propose that when smolts are

  3. Physiological, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of impaired seawater tolerance following exposure of Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, smolts to acid and aluminum.

    PubMed

    Monette, Michelle Y; Yada, Takashi; Matey, Victoria; McCormick, Stephen D

    2010-08-01

    We examined the physiological, molecular, and cellular mechanisms of impaired ion regulation in Atlantic salmon, Salmo salar, smolts following acute acid and aluminum (Al) exposure. Smolts were exposed to: control (pH 6.5, 3.4 micrpg l(-1) Al), acid and low Al (LAl: pH 5.4, 11 microg l(-1) Al), acid and moderate Al (MAl: pH 5.3, 42 microg l(-1) Al), and acid and high Al (HAl: pH 5.4, 56 microg l(-1) Al) for two and six days. At each time-point, smolts were sampled directly from freshwater treatment tanks and after a 24h seawater challenge. Exposure to acid/MAl and acid/HAl led to accumulation of gill Al, substantial alterations in gill morphology, reduced gill Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) activity, and impaired ion regulation in both freshwater and seawater. Exposure to acid/MAl for six days also led to a decrease in gill mRNA expression of the apical Cl(-) channel (cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator I), increased apoptosis upon seawater exposure, an increase in the surface expression of mitochondria-rich cells (MRCs) within the filament epithelium of the gill, but reduced abundance of gill NKA-positive MRCs. By contrast, smolts exposed to acid and the lowest Al concentration exhibited minor gill Al accumulation, slight morphological modifications in the gill, and impaired seawater tolerance in the absence of a detectable effect on freshwater ion regulation. These impacts were accompanied by decreased cell proliferation, a slight increase in the surface expression of MRCs within the filament epithelium, but no impact on gill apoptosis or total MRC abundance was observed. However, MRCs in the gills of smolts exposed to acid/LAl exhibited morphological alterations including decreased size, staining intensity, and shape factor. We demonstrate that the seawater tolerance of Atlantic salmon smolts is extremely sensitive to acute exposure to acid and low levels of Al, and that the mechanisms underlying this depend on the time-course and severity of Al

  4. Characteristics of U.S. Adults with Usual Daily Folic Acid Intake above the Tolerable Upper Intake Level: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003–2010

    PubMed Central

    Orozco, Angela M.; Yeung, Lorraine F.; Guo, Jing; Carriquiry, Alicia; Berry, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration mandated that by 1998, all enriched cereal grain products (ECGP) be fortified with folic acid in order to prevent the occurrence of neural tube defects. The Institute of Medicine established the tolerable upper intake level (UL) for folic acid (1000 µg/day for adults) in 1998. We characterized U.S. adults with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL. Using NHANES 2003–2010 data, we estimated the percentage of 18,321 non-pregnant adults with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL, and among them, we calculated the weighted percentage by sex, age, race/ethnicity, sources of folic acid intake, supplement use and median usual daily folic acid intakes. Overall, 2.7% (standard error 0.6%) of participants had usual daily intake exceeding the UL for folic acid; 62.2% were women; 86.3% were non-Hispanic whites; and 98.5% took supplements containing folic acid. When stratified by sex and age groups among those with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL, 20.8% were women aged 19–39 years. Those with usual daily intake exceeding the folic acid UL were more likely to be female, non-Hispanic white, supplement users or to have at least one chronic medical condition compared to those not exceeding the folic acid UL. Among those with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL who also took supplements, 86.6% took on average >400 µg of folic acid/day from supplements. Everyone with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL consumed folic acid from multiple sources. No one in our study population had usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL through consumption of mandatorily-fortified enriched cereal grain products alone. Voluntary consumption of supplements containing folic acid is the main factor associated with usual daily intake exceeding the folic acid UL. PMID:27043623

  5. Characteristics of U.S. Adults with Usual Daily Folic Acid Intake above the Tolerable Upper Intake Level: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2010.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Angela M; Yeung, Lorraine F; Guo, Jing; Carriquiry, Alicia; Berry, Robert J

    2016-04-01

    The Food and Drug Administration mandated that by 1998, all enriched cereal grain products (ECGP) be fortified with folic acid in order to prevent the occurrence of neural tube defects. The Institute of Medicine established the tolerable upper intake level (UL) for folic acid (1000 µg/day for adults) in 1998. We characterized U.S. adults with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL. Using NHANES 2003-2010 data, we estimated the percentage of 18,321 non-pregnant adults with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL, and among them, we calculated the weighted percentage by sex, age, race/ethnicity, sources of folic acid intake, supplement use and median usual daily folic acid intakes. Overall, 2.7% (standard error 0.6%) of participants had usual daily intake exceeding the UL for folic acid; 62.2% were women; 86.3% were non-Hispanic whites; and 98.5% took supplements containing folic acid. When stratified by sex and age groups among those with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL, 20.8% were women aged 19-39 years. Those with usual daily intake exceeding the folic acid UL were more likely to be female, non-Hispanic white, supplement users or to have at least one chronic medical condition compared to those not exceeding the folic acid UL. Among those with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL who also took supplements, 86.6% took on average >400 µg of folic acid/day from supplements. Everyone with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL consumed folic acid from multiple sources. No one in our study population had usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL through consumption of mandatorily-fortified enriched cereal grain products alone. Voluntary consumption of supplements containing folic acid is the main factor associated with usual daily intake exceeding the folic acid UL.

  6. Characteristics of U.S. Adults with Usual Daily Folic Acid Intake above the Tolerable Upper Intake Level: National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, 2003-2010.

    PubMed

    Orozco, Angela M; Yeung, Lorraine F; Guo, Jing; Carriquiry, Alicia; Berry, Robert J

    2016-01-01

    The Food and Drug Administration mandated that by 1998, all enriched cereal grain products (ECGP) be fortified with folic acid in order to prevent the occurrence of neural tube defects. The Institute of Medicine established the tolerable upper intake level (UL) for folic acid (1000 µg/day for adults) in 1998. We characterized U.S. adults with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL. Using NHANES 2003-2010 data, we estimated the percentage of 18,321 non-pregnant adults with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL, and among them, we calculated the weighted percentage by sex, age, race/ethnicity, sources of folic acid intake, supplement use and median usual daily folic acid intakes. Overall, 2.7% (standard error 0.6%) of participants had usual daily intake exceeding the UL for folic acid; 62.2% were women; 86.3% were non-Hispanic whites; and 98.5% took supplements containing folic acid. When stratified by sex and age groups among those with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL, 20.8% were women aged 19-39 years. Those with usual daily intake exceeding the folic acid UL were more likely to be female, non-Hispanic white, supplement users or to have at least one chronic medical condition compared to those not exceeding the folic acid UL. Among those with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL who also took supplements, 86.6% took on average >400 µg of folic acid/day from supplements. Everyone with usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL consumed folic acid from multiple sources. No one in our study population had usual daily folic acid intake exceeding the UL through consumption of mandatorily-fortified enriched cereal grain products alone. Voluntary consumption of supplements containing folic acid is the main factor associated with usual daily intake exceeding the folic acid UL. PMID:27043623

  7. Survival, acid and bile tolerance, and surface hydrophobicity of microencapsulated B. animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 during storage at room temperature.

    PubMed

    Dianawati, Dianawati; Shah, Nagendra P

    2011-01-01

    Survival, acid and bile tolerance, and surface hydrophobicity of microencapsulated Bifidobacterium animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 were studied during storage at room temperature (25 °C) at low water activity (0.07, 0.1, and 0.2). Two types of alginate-based systems were prepared with and without mannitol as microencapsulant of B. animalis ssp. lactis Bb12. Formation of gel beads containing cells was achieved by dropping each emulsion into CaCl(2) solution; then, the beads were freeze dried. Survival, acid tolerance during 2-h exposure in de Man, Rogosa, Sharpe (MRS) broth at pH 2.0, bile tolerance during 8-h exposure in MRS broth containing taurocholic acid at pH 5.8, and retention of surface hydrophobicity were determined after freeze drying and during storage. The result showed that neither alginate nor alginate-mannitol formulation was effective in protecting B. animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 during freezing and freeze drying. The viability in alginate-mannitol and alginate formulations after freeze drying was 6.61 and 6.34 log CFU/g, respectively. Storage at low a(w) improved survival, acid tolerance, bile tolerance, and surface hydrophobicity retention of microencapsulated B. animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 when compared with controlled storage in an aluminum foil (with a(w) of 0.38 and 0.40 for alginate-mannitol and alginate formulations, respectively). Alginate mannitol was more effective than the alginate system during a short period of storage, but its effectiveness decreased during a long period of storage (80% survival at 10 wk). Nevertheless, storage of microencapsulated B. animalis ssp. lactis Bb12 in an aluminum foil without a(w) adjustment during 10 wk at room temperature was not effective (survival was 64% to 65%). PMID:22416710

  8. Survival and expression of acid resistance genes in Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli acid adapted in pineapple juice and exposed to synthetic gastric fluid

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Aims: The aim of this research was to examine relative transcriptional expression of acid resistance (AR) genes, rpoS, gadA and adiA, in O157:H7 and non-O157 Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli (STEC) serotypes after adaptation to pineapple juice (PJ) and subsequently to determine survival with e...

  9. Gamma-aminobutyric acid depletion affects stomata closure and drought tolerance of Arabidopsis thaliana.

    PubMed

    Mekonnen, Dereje Worku; Flügge, Ulf-Ingo; Ludewig, Frank

    2016-04-01

    A rapid accumulation of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) during biotic and abiotic stresses is well documented. However, the specificity of the response and the primary role of GABA under such stress conditions are hardly understood. To address these questions, we investigated the response of the GABA-depleted gad1/2 mutant to drought stress. GABA is primarily synthesized from the decarboxylation of glutamate by glutamate decarboxylase (GAD) which exists in five copies in the genome of Arabidopsis thaliana. However, only GAD1 and GAD2 are abundantly expressed, and knockout of these two copies dramatically reduced the GABA content. Phenotypic analysis revealed a reduced shoot growth of the gad1/2 mutant. Furthermore, the gad1/2 mutant was wilted earlier than the wild type following a prolonged drought stress treatment. The early-wilting phenotype was due to an increase in stomata aperture and a defect in stomata closure. The increase in stomata aperture contributed to higher stomatal conductance. The drought oversensitive phenotype of the gad1/2 mutant was reversed by functional complementation that increases GABA level in leaves. The functionally complemented gad1/2 x pop2 triple mutant contained more GABA than the wild type. Our findings suggest that GABA accumulation during drought is a stress-specific response and its accumulation induces the regulation of stomatal opening thereby prevents loss of water.

  10. Mycophenolic acid formulations in adult renal transplantation – update on efficacy and tolerability

    PubMed Central

    Golshayan, Déla; Pascual, M; Vogt, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    The description more than 30 years ago of the role of de novo purine synthesis in T and B lymphocytes clonal proliferation opened the possibility for selective immunosuppression by targeting specific enzymatic pathways. Mycophenolic acid (MPA) blocks the key enzyme inosine monophosphate dehydrogenase and the production of guanosine nucleotides required for DNA synthesis. Two MPA formulations are currently used in clinical transplantation as part of the maintenance immunosuppressive regimen. Mycophenolate mofetil (MMF) was the first MPA agent to be approved for the prevention of acute rejection following renal transplantation, in combination with cyclosporine and steroids. Enteric-coated mycophenolate sodium (EC-MPS) is an alternative MPA formulation available in clinical transplantation. In this review, we will discuss the clinical trials that have evaluated the efficacy and safety of MPA in adult kidney transplantation for the prevention of acute rejection and their use in new combination regimens aiming at minimizing calcineurin inhibitor toxicity and chronic allograft nephropathy. We will also discuss MPA pharmacokinetics and the rationale for therapeutic drug monitoring in optimizing the balance between efficacy and safety in individual patients. PMID:19753127