Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive beam shaping

  1. Adaptive slit beam shaping for direct laser written waveguides.

    PubMed

    Salter, P S; Jesacher, A; Spring, J B; Metcalf, B J; Thomas-Peter, N; Simmonds, R D; Langford, N K; Walmsley, I A; Booth, M J

    2012-02-15

    We demonstrate an improved method for fabricating optical waveguides in bulk materials by means of femtosecond laser writing. We use an LC spatial light modulator (SLM) to shape the beam focus by generating adaptive slit illumination in the pupil of the objective lens. A diffraction grating is applied in a strip across the SLM to simulate a slit, with the first diffracted order mapped onto the pupil plane of the objective lens while the zeroth order is blocked. This technique enables real-time control of the beam-shaping parameters during writing, facilitating the fabrication of more complicated structures than is possible using nonadaptive methods. Waveguides are demonstrated in fused silica with a coupling loss to single-mode fibers in the range of 0.2 to 0.5 dB and propagation loss <0.4 dB/cm.

  2. Adaptive optimisation of a generalised phase contrast beam shaping system

    PubMed Central

    Kenny, F.; Choi, F.S.; Glückstad, J.; Booth, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    The generalised phase contrast (GPC) method provides versatile and efficient light shaping for a range of applications. We have implemented a generalised phase contrast system that used two passes on a single spatial light modulator (SLM). Both the pupil phase distribution and the phase contrast filter were generated by the SLM. This provided extra flexibility and control over the parameters of the system including the phase step magnitude, shape, radius and position of the filter. A feedback method for the on-line optimisation of these properties was also developed. Using feedback from images of the generated light field, it was possible to dynamically adjust the phase filter parameters to provide optimum contrast. PMID:26089573

  3. Design of computer-generated beam-shaping holograms by iterative finite-element mesh adaption.

    PubMed

    Dresel, T; Beyerlein, M; Schwider, J

    1996-12-10

    Computer-generated phase-only holograms can be used for laser beam shaping, i.e., for focusing a given aperture with intensity and phase distributions into a pregiven intensity pattern in their focal planes. A numerical approach based on iterative finite-element mesh adaption permits the design of appropriate phase functions for the task of focusing into two-dimensional reconstruction patterns. Both the hologram aperture and the reconstruction pattern are covered by mesh mappings. An iterative procedure delivers meshes with intensities equally distributed over the constituting elements. This design algorithm adds new elementary focuser functions to what we call object-oriented hologram design. Some design examples are discussed.

  4. Adaptive optical beam shaping for compensating projection-induced focus deformation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Loosen, Peter

    2016-02-01

    Scanner-based applications are already widely used for the processing of surfaces, as they allow for highly dynamic deflection of the laser beam. Particularly, the processing of three-dimensional surfaces with laser radiation initiates the development of highly innovative manufacturing techniques. Unfortunately, the focused laser beam suffers from deformation caused by the involved projection mechanisms. The degree of deformation is field variant and depends on both the surface geometry and the working position of the laser beam. Depending on the process sensitivity, the deformation affects the process quality, which motivates a method of compensation. Current approaches are based on a local adaption of the laser power to maintain constant intensity within the interaction zone. For advanced manufacturing, this approach is insufficient, as the residual deformation of the initial circular laser spot is not taken into account. In this paper, an alternative approach is discussed. Additional beam-shaping devices are integrated between the laser source and the scanner, and allow for an in situ compensation to ensure a field-invariant circular focus spot within the interaction zone. Beyond the optical design, the approach is challenging with respect to the control theory's point of view, as both the beam deflection and the compensation have to be synchronized.

  5. Beam shaping for holographic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2014-09-01

    Uniform intensity of laser radiation is very important in holographic and interferometry technologies, therefore transformation of typical Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat) is an actual technical task, it is solved by applying beam shaping optics. Holography and interferometry have specific requirements to a uniform laser beam, most important of them are flatness of phase front and extended depth of field. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality demanding holography and interferometry. We suggest applying refractive field mapping beam shapers piShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. This approach is used in SLM-based technologies of Computer Generated Holography, Dot-Matrix mastering of security holograms, holographic data storage, holographic projection, lithography, interferometric recording of Volume Bragg Gratings. High optical quality of resulting flat-top beam allows applying additional optical components to vary beam size and shape, thus adapting an optical system to requirements of a particular application. This paper will describe design basics of refractive beam shapers and optical layouts of their applying in holographic systems. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  6. Shaping propagation invariant laser beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soskind, Michael; Soskind, Rose; Soskind, Yakov

    2015-11-01

    Propagation-invariant structured laser beams possess several unique properties and play an important role in various photonics applications. The majority of propagation invariant beams are produced in the form of laser modes emanating from stable laser cavities. Therefore, their spatial structure is limited by the intracavity mode formation. We show that several types of anamorphic optical systems (AOSs) can be effectively employed to shape laser beams into a variety of propagation invariant structured fields with different shapes and phase distributions. We present a propagation matrix approach for designing AOSs and defining mode-matching conditions required for preserving propagation invariance of the output shaped fields. The propagation matrix approach was selected, as it provides a more straightforward approach in designing AOSs for shaping propagation-invariant laser beams than the alternative technique based on the Gouy phase evolution, especially in the case of multielement AOSs. Several practical configurations of optical systems that are suitable for shaping input laser beams into a diverse variety of structured propagation invariant laser beams are also presented. The laser beam shaping approach was applied by modeling propagation characteristics of several input laser beam types, including Hermite-Gaussian, Laguerre-Gaussian, and Ince-Gaussian structured field distributions. The influence of the Ince-Gaussian beam semifocal separation parameter and the azimuthal orientation between the input laser beams and the AOSs onto the resulting shape of the propagation invariant laser beams is presented as well.

  7. Concept for image-guided vitreo-retinal fs-laser surgery: adaptive optics and optical coherence tomography for laser beam shaping and positioning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matthias, Ben; Brockmann, Dorothee; Hansen, Anja; Horke, Konstanze; Knoop, Gesche; Gewohn, Timo; Zabic, Miroslav; Krüger, Alexander; Ripken, Tammo

    2015-03-01

    Fs-lasers are well established in ophthalmic surgery as high precision tools for corneal flap cutting during laser in situ keratomileusis (LASIK) and increasingly utilized for cutting the crystalline lens, e.g. in assisting cataract surgery. For addressing eye structures beyond the cornea, an intraoperative depth resolved imaging is crucial to the safety and success of the surgical procedure due to interindividual anatomical disparities. Extending the field of application even deeper to the posterior eye segment, individual eye aberrations cannot be neglected anymore and surgery with fs-laser is impaired by focus degradation. Our demonstrated concept for image-guided vitreo-retinal fs-laser surgery combines adaptive optics (AO) for spatial beam shaping and optical coherence tomography (OCT) for focus positioning guidance. The laboratory setup comprises an adaptive optics assisted 800 nm fs-laser system and is extended by a Fourier domain optical coherence tomography system. Phantom structures are targeted, which mimic tractional epiretinal membranes in front of excised porcine retina within an eye model. AO and OCT are set up to share the same scanning and focusing optics. A Hartmann-Shack sensor is employed for aberration measurement and a deformable mirror for aberration correction. By means of adaptive optics the threshold energy for laser induced optical breakdown is lowered and cutting precision is increased. 3D OCT imaging of typical ocular tissue structures is achieved with sufficient resolution and the images can be used for orientation of the fs-laser beam. We present targeted dissection of the phantom structures and its evaluation regarding retinal damage.

  8. LED beam shaping using microlens arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Yun-Chi; Hsieh, Hsin-Ta; Hsu, Wei-Yao; Su, Guo-Dung J.

    2009-08-01

    Light-emitting diodes (LEDs) are very popular light sources in the market currently because of their numerous advantages such as high efficiency, long life time, wide color gamut and cheap production costs [1]. For many applications, such as illumination tasks, backlight modules and projector light sources, a homogeneous illumination of the entrance pupil is desired. Because of LED's high brightness, we can combine the homogeneous illuminance areas in the target plane together as a backlight module for LCD display to solve unreadable problems in the portable devices under the sun. Mostly, the typical light distribution of a LED shows distinct Lambertian profile which is not suitable for the applications. To achieve a better adapted beam profile, an optical system with beam shaping qualities can be used. We design an optical system consisting of refractive microlens arrays and reflection-tubes that collimates and homogenizes LED's beam [2]. The smaller angle of beams, the higher contrast ratio we will get. And the design is less than 10mm in thickness, we can use it in many ways, such as backlight module of cell phones and head-up displays (HUDs). We believe this technology has advantages and provides us a high-brightness display to read information easily.

  9. Square shaped flat-top beam in refractive beam shapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2015-08-01

    Lossless transformation of round Gaussian to square shaped flat-top collimated beam is important in building highpower solid state laser systems to improve optical pumping or amplification. There are industrial micromachining applications like scribing, display repair, which performance is improved when a square shaped spot with uniform intensity is created. Proved beam shaping solutions to these techniques are refractive field mapping beam shapers having some important features: flatness of output phase front, small output divergence, high transmittance, extended depth of field, operation with TEM00 and multimode lasers. Usual approach to design refractive beam shapers implies that input and output beams have round cross-section, therefore the only way to create a square shaped output beam is using a square mask, which leads to essential losses. When an input laser beam is linearly polarized it is suggested to generate square shaped flat-top output by applying beam shaper lenses from birefringent materials or by using additional birefringent components. Due to birefringence there is introduced phase retardation in beam parts and is realized a square shaped interference pattern at the beam shaper output. Realization of this approach requires small phase retardation, therefore weak birefringence effect is enough and birefringent optical components, operating in convergent or divergent beams, can be made from refractive materials, which crystal optical axis is parallel to optical axis of entire beam shaper optical system. There will be considered design features of beam shapers creating square shaped flat-top beams. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  10. A Novel Wideband Subarray Technique for Shaped Pattern Generation and Adaptively Interference Rejection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alfred, Q. Md.; Chakravarty, T.; Singh, G.; Sanyal, S. K.

    2008-03-01

    In this article, a simple and efficient technique for the wideband shaped beam and sector beam pattern generation with their adaptive interference rejection is proposed. A microcontroller controlled and time delay based beam forming network for simultaneously generating multiple beams, shaped beam and sector beam is conceptualized. The antenna patterns considered here is formed by linear array of isotropic elements grouped as subarray. The shaped and sector beam synthesis procedure is practically simplified by simultaneous adding the constituents beams from the subarrays, was theoretically established by Woodward and Lawson (Proc. IEE. 95(1):362 370, 1948). Apart from the shaped beam generation a technique for adaptive interference rejection in shaped patterns using combination of time delay and phase shifter is discussed. This topic promises good prospect for wideband pattern generation and interference rejection.

  11. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, John W.; O'Brien, Dennis W.

    1996-01-01

    An apparatus and method for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: 1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and 2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1000 .mu.m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 .mu.m diameter of laser drilling.

  12. Electron beam machining using rotating and shaped beam power distribution

    DOEpatents

    Elmer, J.W.; O`Brien, D.W.

    1996-07-09

    An apparatus and method are disclosed for electron beam (EB) machining (drilling, cutting and welding) that uses conventional EB guns, power supplies, and welding machine technology without the need for fast bias pulsing technology. The invention involves a magnetic lensing (EB optics) system and electronic controls to: (1) concurrently bend, focus, shape, scan, and rotate the beam to protect the EB gun and to create a desired effective power-density distribution, and (2) rotate or scan this shaped beam in a controlled way. The shaped beam power-density distribution can be measured using a tomographic imaging system. For example, the EB apparatus of this invention has the ability to drill holes in metal having a diameter up to 1,000 {micro}m (1 mm or larger), compared to the 250 {micro}m diameter of laser drilling. 5 figs.

  13. Diffractive beam shaping for enhanced laser polymer welding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rauschenberger, J.; Vogler, D.; Raab, C.; Gubler, U.

    2015-03-01

    Laser welding of polymers increasingly finds application in a large number of industries such as medical technology, automotive, consumer electronics, textiles or packaging. More and more, it replaces other welding technologies for polymers, e. g. hot-plate, vibration or ultrasonic welding. At the same rate, demands on the quality of the weld, the flexibility of the production system and on processing speed have increased. Traditionally, diode lasers were employed for plastic welding with flat-top beam profiles. With the advent of fiber lasers with excellent beam quality, the possibility to modify and optimize the beam profile by beam-shaping elements has opened. Diffractive optical elements (DOE) can play a crucial role in optimizing the laser intensity profile towards the optimal M-shape beam for enhanced weld seam quality. We present results on significantly improved weld seam width constancy and enlarged process windows compared to Gaussian or flat-top beam profiles. Configurations in which the laser beam diameter and shape can be adapted and optimized without changing or aligning the laser, fiber-optic cable or optical head are shown.

  14. Beam shaping in high-power laser systems with using refractive beam shapers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2012-06-01

    Beam Shaping of the spatial (transverse) profile of laser beams is highly desirable by building optical systems of high-power lasers as well in various applications with these lasers. Pumping of the crystals of Ti:Sapphire lasers by the laser radiation with uniform (flattop) intensity profile improves performance of these ultrashort pulse high-power lasers in terms of achievable efficiency, peak-power and stability, output beam profile. Specifications of the solid-state lasers built according to MOPA configuration can be also improved when radiation of the master oscillator is homogenized and then is amplified by the power amplifier. Features of building these high power lasers require that a beam shaping solution should be capable to work with single mode and multimode beams, provide flattop and super-Gauss intensity distributions, the consistency and divergence of a beam after the intensity re-distribution should be conserved and low absorption provided. These specific conditions are perfectly fulfilled by the refractive field mapping beam shapers due to their unique features: almost lossless intensity profile transformation, low output divergence, high transmittance and flatness of output beam profile, extended depth of field, adaptability to real intensity profiles of TEM00 and multimode laser sources. Combining of the refractive field mapping beam shapers with other optical components, like beam-expanders, relay imaging lenses, anamorphic optics makes it possible to generate the laser spots of necessary shape, size and intensity distribution. There are plenty of applications of high-power lasers where beam shaping bring benefits: irradiating photocathode of Free Electron Lasers (FEL), material ablation, micromachining, annealing in display making techniques, cladding, heat treating and others. This paper will describe some design basics of refractive beam shapers of the field mapping type, with emphasis on the features important for building and applications

  15. Beam shaping for cosmetic hair removal

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.; Tuttle, Tracie

    2007-09-01

    Beam shaping has the potential to provide comfort to people who require or seek laser based cosmetic skin procedures. Of immediate interest is the procedure of aesthetic hair removal. Hair removal is performed using a variety of wavelengths from 480 to 1200 nm by means of filtered Xenon flash lamps (pulsed light) or 810 nm diode lasers. These wavelengths are considered the most efficient means available for hair removal applications, but current systems use simple reflector designs and plane filter windows to direct the light to the surface being exposed. Laser hair removal is achieved when these wavelengths at sufficient energy levels are applied to the epidermis. The laser energy is absorbed by the melanin (pigment) in the hair and hair follicle which in turn is transformed into heat. This heat creates the coagulation process, which causes the removal of the hair and prevents growth of new hair [1]. This paper outlines a technique of beam shaping that can be applied to a non-contact based hair removal system. Several features of the beam shaping technique including beam uniformity and heat dispersion across its operational treatment area will be analyzed. A beam shaper design and its fundamental testing will be discussed in detail.

  16. Laser beam shaping profiles and propagation.

    PubMed

    Shealy, David L; Hoffnagle, John A

    2006-07-20

    We consider four families of functions--the super-Gaussian, flattened Gaussian, Fermi-Dirac, and super-Lorentzian--that have been used to describe flattened irradiance profiles. We determine the shape and width parameters of the different distributions, when each flattened profile has the same radius and slope of the irradiance at its half-height point, and then we evaluate the implicit functional relationship between the shape and width parameters for matched profiles, which provides a quantitative way to compare profiles described by different families of functions. We conclude from an analysis of each profile with matched parameters using Kirchhoff-Fresnel diffraction theory and M2 analysis that the diffraction patterns as they propagate differ by small amounts, which may not be distinguished experimentally. Thus, beam shaping optics is designed to produce either of these four flattened output irradiance distributions with matched parameters will yield similar irradiance distributions as the beam propagates.

  17. Laser beam shaping for biomedical microscopy techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Kaiser, Peter; Laskin, Vadim; Ostrun, Aleksei

    2016-04-01

    Uniform illumination of a working field is very important in optical systems of confocal microscopy and various implementations of fluorescence microscopy like TIR, SSIM, STORM, PALM to enhance performance of these laser-based research techniques. Widely used TEM00 laser sources are characterized by essentially non-uniform Gaussian intensity profile which leads usually to non-uniform intensity distribution in a microscope working field or in a field of microlenses array of a confocal microscope optical system, this non-uniform illumination results in instability of measuring procedure and reducing precision of quantitative measurements. Therefore transformation of typical Gaussian distribution of a TEM00 laser to flat-top (top hat) profile is an actual technical task, it is solved by applying beam shaping optics. Due to high demands to optical image quality the mentioned techniques have specific requirements to a uniform laser beam: flatness of phase front and extended depth of field, - from this point of view the microscopy techniques are similar to holography and interferometry. There are different refractive and diffractive beam shaping approaches used in laser industrial and scientific applications, but only few of them are capable to fulfil the optimum conditions for beam quality required in discussed microscopy techniques. We suggest applying refractive field mapping beam shapers πShaper, which operational principle presumes almost lossless transformation of Gaussian to flat-top beam with flatness of output wavefront, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated low divergent output beam, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with several lasers with different wavelengths simultaneously. The main function of a beam shaper is transformation of laser intensity profile, further beam transformation to provide optimum for a particular technique spot size and shape has to

  18. Engineering of automated assembly of beam-shaping optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Sinhoff, Volker; Müller, Tobias; Brecher, Christian

    2014-03-01

    Beam-shaping is essential for any kind of laser application. Assembly technologies for beam-shaping subassemblies are subject to intense research and development activities and their technical feasibility has been proven in recent years while economic viability requires more efficient engineering tools for process planning and production ramp up of complex assembly tasks for micro-optical systems. The work presented in this paper aims for significant reduction of process development and production ramp up times for the automated assembly of micro-optical subassemblies for beam-collimation and beam-tilting. The approach proposed bridges the gap between the product development phase and the realization of automation control through integration of established software tools such as optics simulation and CAD modeling as well as through introduction of novel software tools and methods to efficiently describe active alignment strategies. The focus of the paper is put on the methodological approach regarding the engineering of assembly processes for beam-shaping micro-optics and the formal representation of assembly objectives similar to representation in mechanical assemblies. Main topic of the paper is the engineering methodology for active alignment processes based on the classification of optical functions for beam-shaping optics and corresponding standardized measurement setups including adaptable alignment algorithms. The concepts are applied to industrial use-cases: (1) integrated collimation module for fast- and slow-axis and (2) beam-tilting subassembly consisting of a fast-axis collimator and micro-lens array. The paper concludes with an overview of current limitations as well as an outlook on the next development steps considering adhesive bonding processes.

  19. Aspherical lens shapes for focusing synchrotron beams.

    PubMed

    Sanchez del Rio, Manuel; Alianelli, Lucia

    2012-05-01

    Aspherical surfaces required for focusing collimated and divergent synchrotron beams using a single refractive element (lens) are reviewed. The Cartesian oval, a lens shape that produces perfect point-to-point focusing for monochromatic radiation, is studied in the context of X-ray beamlines. Optical surfaces that approximate ideal shapes are compared. Results are supported by ray-tracing simulations. Elliptical lenses, rather than parabolic, are preferred for nanofocusing X-rays because of the higher peak and lower tails in the intensity distribution. Cartesian ovals will improve the gain when using high-demagnification lenses of high numerical aperture. PMID:22514171

  20. Intracavity beam shaping using an SLM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burger, L.; Litvin, I.; Ngcobo, S.; Forbes, A.

    2015-08-01

    Intracavity laser beam shaping has been achieved by adding intensity or phase filters to a Fabry-Perot resonator. Changing the output beam from one mode to another is a tedious process, requiring the replacing of custom optical elements, and careful realignment. The digital laser [1] is an innovation which allows the laser beam produced by a laser to be dynamically controlled by a computer. Essentially, one of the resonator mirrors is replaced by a spatial light modulator (SLM), which is a computer controlled, pixellated, liquid-crystal device. While the concept is the device is simple, the implementation revealed subtle properties of spatial light modulators and the liquid crystals contained in them. These properties had to be well understood before their undesirable characteristics could be overcome, allowing the laser to function as conceived in the design.

  1. Beam shaping for laser initiated optical primers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd E.

    2008-08-01

    Remington was one of the first firearm manufacturing companies to file a patent for laser initiated firearms, in 1969. Nearly 40 years later, the development of laser initiated firearms has not become a mainstream technology in the civilian market. Requiring a battery is definitely a short coming, so it is easy to see how such a concept would be problematic. Having a firearm operate reliably and the delivery of laser energy in an efficient manner to ignite the shock-sensitive explosive primer mixtures is a tall task indeed. There has been considerable research on optical element based methods of transferring or compressing laser energy to ignite primer charges, including windows, laser chip primers and various lens shaped windows to focus the laser energy. The focusing of laser light needs to achieve igniting temperatures upwards of >400°C. Many of the patent filings covering this type of technology discuss simple approaches where a single point of light might be sufficient to perform this task. Alternatively a multi-point method might provide better performance, especially for mission critical applications, such as precision military firearms. This paper covers initial design and performance test of the laser beam shaping optics to create simultaneous multiple point ignition locations and a circumferential intense ring for igniting primer charge compounds. A simple initial test of the ring beam shaping technique was evaluated on a standard large caliber primer to determine its effectiveness on igniting the primer material. Several tests were conducted to gauge the feasibility of laser beam shaping, including optic fabrication and mounting on a cartridge, optic durability and functional ignition performance. Initial data will be presented, including testing of optically elements and empirical primer ignition / burn analysis.

  2. Annular beam shaping and optical trepanning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Danyong

    Percussion drilling and trepanning are two laser drilling methods. Percussion drilling is accomplished by focusing the laser beam to approximately the required diameter of the hole, exposing the material to one or a series of laser pulses at the same spot to melt and vaporize the material. Drilling by trepanning involves cutting a hole by rotating a laser beam with an optical element or an x-y galvo-scanner. Optical trepanning is a new laser drilling method using an annular beam. The annular beams allow numerous irradiance profiles to supply laser energy to the workpiece and thus provide more flexibility in affecting the hole quality than a traditional circular laser beam. Heating depth is important for drilling application. Since there are no good ways to measure the temperature inside substrate during the drilling process, an analytical model for optical trepanning has been developed by considering an axisymmetric, transient heat conduction equation, and the evolutions of the melting temperature isotherm, which is referred to as the melt boundary in this study, are calculated to investigate the influences of the laser pulse shapes and intensity profiles on the hole geometry. This mathematical model provides a means of understanding the thermal effect of laser irradiation with different annular beam shapes. To take account of conduction in the solid, vaporization and convection due to the melt flow caused by an assist gas, an analytical two-dimensional model is developed for optical trepanning. The influences of pulse duration, laser pulse length, pulse repetition rate, intensity profiles and beam radius are investigated to examine their effects on the recast layer thickness, hole depth and taper. The ray tracing technique of geometrical optics is employed to design the necessary optics to transform a Gaussian laser beam into an annular beam of different intensity profiles. Such profiles include half Gaussian with maximum intensities at the inner and outer

  3. Injection of beam shaped locally with nonlinear optics.

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, C.-X.; Accelerator Systems Division

    2007-01-01

    We discuss nonlinear beam shaping by octupole and sextupole to fold the tails of a Gaussian beam into its core, for the purpose of improving betatron injection in storage rings by significantly reducing the beam width at the injection septurn and thus reducing beam centroid offset from the stored beam. Necessary conditions as well as challenges for such nonlinear injections are explored.

  4. Active Beam Shaping System and Method Using Sequential Deformable Mirrors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Norman, Colin A. (Inventor); Pueyo, Laurent A. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    An active optical beam shaping system includes a first deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept an entrance beam of light and to provide a first reflected beam of light, a second deformable mirror arranged to at least partially intercept the first reflected beam of light from the first deformable mirror and to provide a second reflected beam of light, and a signal processing and control system configured to communicate with the first and second deformable mirrors. The first deformable mirror, the second deformable mirror and the signal processing and control system together provide a large amplitude light modulation range to provide an actively shaped optical beam.

  5. Beam shaping for CARS measurements in turbulent environments.

    PubMed

    Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D; Danehy, Paul M

    2012-07-10

    This paper describes a new technique to mitigate the effect of beam steering on CARS measurements in turbulent, variable density environments. The new approach combines planar BOXCARS phase-matching with elliptical shaping of one of the beams to generate a signal robust to beam steering, while keeping the same spatial resolution. Numerical and experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. One experiment investigates the effect of beam shaping in the presence of a controlled and well quantified displacement of the beams at the focal plane. Another experiment, more qualitative, proves the effectiveness of the technique in the presence of severe beam steering due to turbulence. PMID:22781249

  6. Multiple-beam pulse shaping and preamplification

    SciTech Connect

    Wilcox, R.B.; VanWonterghem, B.W.; Burkhart, S.C.; Davin, J.M.

    1994-11-09

    Glass fusion laser systems typically use a master oscillator-power amplifier (MOPA) architecture, where control of the optical pulse temporal and spatial parameters is accomplished mainly in the master oscillator and low power optics. The pulses from this low power ``front end`` are amplified in the power amplifier, which modifies the pulse shape temporally and spatially. Nonlinear frequency conversion crystals following the amplifier further change the pulse before it reaches the target. To effectively control the optical pulse on target for different types of experiments, and compensate for nonlinearity in the preceding optics, the front end system must be versatile enough to easily control many pulse parameters over a large range. The front end pulse generation system described in this article represents a new approach to this problem. The proposed National Ignition Facility (NIF) has 192 beamlines, each of which requires an input pulse of up to 12 Joules in around 4 ns equivalent square pulse length. Considerations of laser architecture for supplying each of these beamlines from a central oscillator system were crucial in the design of the front end. Previous lasers have used bulk optics to split a single oscillator signal and report beams to multiple amplifier chains. A key idea in the current design is to replace bulk optic transport with fibers, eliminating large opto-mechanical subsystems. Another important concept is convenient pulse forming using low voltage integrated optic modulators. The integrated optic and fiber optic concepts resulted in the current pulse generation designs for NEF. An important advantage is that each of the beamlines can have an independently controlled temporal pulse shape, which provides for precise balance of instantaneous power on target.

  7. Synthesis of multiple shaped beam antenna patterns

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stutzman, W. L.; Coffey, E. L.

    1973-01-01

    Results are presented of research into the problem of finding an excitation of a given antenna such that the desired radiation pattern is approximated to within acceptable limits. This is to be done in such a fashion that boundary conditions involving hardware limitations may be inserted into the problem. The intended application is synthesis of multiple shaped beam antennas. Since this is perhaps the most difficult synthesis problem an antenna engineer is likely to encounter, the approach taken was to include as a by-product capability for synthesizing simpler patterns. The synthesis technique has been almost totally computerized. The class of antennas which may be synthesized with the computer program are those which may be represented as planar (continuous or discrete) current distributions. The technique is not limited in this sense and could indeed by extended to include, for example, the synthesis of conformal arrays or current distributions on the surface of reflectors. The antenna types which the program is set up to synthesize are: line source, rectangular aperture, circular aperture, linear array, rectangular array, and arbitrary planar array.

  8. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiujie; Burton, Deborah; Turner, Travis L.; Brinson, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    Shape memory alloy hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions are simulated using finite element analysis. The composite structure is a laminated fiber-polymer composite beam with embedded SMA ribbons at various positions with respect to the neutral axis of the beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating of the SMA ribbons or uniform thermal loads on the beam. The thermomechanical behavior of these composites was simulated in ABAQUS using user-defined SMA elements. The examples demonstrate the usefulness of the methods for the design and simulation of SMA hybrid composites. Keywords: shape memory alloys, Nitinol, ABAQUS, finite element analysis, post-buckling control, shape control, deflection control, adaptive stiffening, morphing, constitutive modeling, user element

  9. Optical fiber antenna generating spiral beam shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Sarkar Pal, S.; Mondal, S. K. Kumar, R.; Akula, A.; Ghosh, R.; Bhatnagar, R.; Kumbhakar, D.

    2014-01-20

    A simple method is proposed here to generate vortex beam and spiral intensity patterns from a Gaussian source. It uses a special type of optical fiber antenna of aperture ∼80 nm having naturally grown surface curvature along its length. The antenna converts linearly polarized Gaussian beam into a beam with spiral intensity patterns. The experimentally obtained spiral patterns with single and double spiral arms manifest the orbital angular momentum, l = ±1, 2, carried by the output beam. Such beam can be very useful for optical tweezer, metal machining, and similar applications.

  10. The effect of object shape and laser beam shape on lidar system resolution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cheng, Hongchang; Wang, Jingyi; Ke, Jun

    2016-06-01

    In a LIDAR system, a pulsed laser beam is propagated to a scene, and then reflected back by objects. Ideally if the beam diameter and the pulse width are close to zero, then the reflected beam in time domain is similar to a delta function, which can accurately locate an object's position. However, in a practical system, the beam has finite size. Therefore, even if the pulse width is small, an object shape will make the reflected beam stretched along the time axis, then affect system resolution. In this paper, we assume the beam with Gaussian shape. The beam can be formulated as a delta function convolved with a shape function, such as a rectangular function, in time domain. Then the reflected beam can be defined as a system response function convolved with the shape function. We use symmetric objects to analyze the reflected beam. Corn, sphere, and cylinder objects are used to find a LIDAR system's response function. The case for large beam size is discussed. We assume the beam shape is similar to a plane wave. With this assumption, we get the simplified LIDAR system response functions for the three kinds of objects. Then we use tiny spheres to emulate an arbitrary object, and study its effect to the returned beam.

  11. Optical simulation of laser beam phase-shaping focusing optimization in biological tissues

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gomes, Ricardo; Vieira, Pedro; Coelho, João. M. P.

    2013-11-01

    In this paper we report the development of an optical simulator that can be used in the development of methodologies for compensate/decrease the light scattering effect of most biological tissues through phase-shaping methods. In fact, scattering has long been a major limitation for the medical applications of lasers where in-depth tissues concerns due to the turbid nature of most biological media in the human body. In developing the simulator, two different approaches were followed: one using multiple identical beams directed to the same target area and the other using a phase-shaped beam. In the multiple identical beams approach (used mainly to illustrate the limiting effect of scattering on the beam's propagation) there was no improvement in the beam focus at 1 mm compared to a single beam layout but, in phase-shaped beam approach, a 8x improvement on the radius of the beam at the same depth was achieved. The models were created using the optical design software Zemax and numerical algorithms created in Matlab programming language to shape the beam wavefront. A dedicated toolbox allowed communication between both programs. The use of the two software's proves to be a simple and powerful solution combining the best of the two and allowing a significant potential for adapting the simulations to new systems and thus allow to assess their response and define critical engineering parameters prior to laboratorial implementation.

  12. A Beam Shape Oscillation Monitor for HERA

    SciTech Connect

    Afanasyev, O. V.; Baluev, A. B.; Gubrienko, K. I.; Merker, E. A.; Wittenburg, K.; Krouptchenkow, I.

    2006-11-20

    The perfect matching of the injecting beam phase space with the accelerator lattice is a very important problem. Its successful solution allows excluding possible mismatch emittance blow-up and worsening of the beam characteristics, that is necessary to get the highest possible luminosity in hadron accelerators. The mismatch can be controlled by measuring sizes oscillation on the first revolutions of the injected beam at a certain orbit point. Designed for this purpose the construction, acquisition electronics, software controlling of the operation and data processing of such a monitor are described. A first test result with beam is presented.

  13. Beam Shape Effects on Grating Spectrometer Resolution

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Erickson, Edwin F.; Rabanus, David; DeVincenzi, Donald L. (Technical Monitor)

    2000-01-01

    The collimated optical beam in a grating spectrometer may be circular or elliptical in cross section, so that different parts of the beam illuminate different numbers of grooves on the grating. Here we estimate the consequent loss in spectral resolution relative to that obtained with a beam which illuminates a fixed number of grooves. For representative diffraction resolution functions, the effect is to reduce the intrinsic resolving power of the spectrometer by about 13%, exclusive of other contributions such as finite entrance slit width.

  14. Asymmetrical prism for beam shaping of laser diode stacks.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Xiaodong; Cao, Changqing; An, Yuying

    2005-09-10

    A beam-shaping scheme for a laser diode stack to obtain a flattop output intensity profile is proposed. The shaping element consists of an asymmetrical glass prism. The large divergence-angle compression in the direction perpendicular to the junction plane and the small divergence-angle expansion in the parallel direction are performed simultaneously by a single shaping element. The transformation characteristics are presented, and the optimization performance is investigated based on the ray-tracing method. Analysis shows that a flattop intensity profile can be obtained. This beam-shaping system can be fabricated easily and has a large alignment tolerance.

  15. Adaptive Vlasov Simulations of Intense Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Sonnendruecker, Eric; Gutnic, Michael; Haefele, Matthieu; Lemaire, Jean-Louis

    2005-06-08

    Most simulations of intense particle beams are performed nowadays using Particle In Cell (PIC) techniques. Direct grid based Vlasov methods have also been used but mostly for 1D simulations as they become very costly in higher dimensions when using uniform phase space grids. We have recently introduced adaptive mesh refinement techniques that allow us to automatically concentrate the grid points at places where the distribution function is varying most. In this paper we shall introduce this technique and show how it can be used to improve the efficiency of grid based Vlasov solvers.

  16. Multiple beam communicating satellites with remote beam steering and beam shaping

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sielman, P. F.; Schwartz, L.; Noji, T. T.

    1974-01-01

    Multiple beam phased arrays are shown to enhance the performance of several anticipated geostationary communications satellite programs because of the greater efficiency and flexibility of the phased array. It is shown that the efficiency of arrays can be significantly greater than corresponding multiple feed dishes and that the problems of crossover loss and performance degradation with parts failures are thereby avoided. On an open loop basis, it is shown that a multiple beam array can provide higher EIRP over a coverage area. On a closed loop basis, it is shown that an adaptive array can provide nulling of unwanted signals while simultaneously providing gain in the direction of a desired signal.

  17. C-shaped electron beams: design, experimental production and application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousley, M.; Thirunavukkarasu, G.; Babiker, M.; Yuan, J.

    2015-08-01

    The development of metamaterials operating at visible light wavelengths requires metamaterials to be produced with nanoscale structure over large areas. Improvements in the efficiency of electron beam lithography (EBL) could play an important role in accelerating this development. In this paper we show the production of a shaped probe for use in EBL. A phase structured electron wave containing vortices can be focused to produce a C-shaped cross section. Local spatial frequency analysis shows that both the gap and overall size of the C-shape can be easily controlled. We present the generation of such a C-shaped electron beam using a holographic binary amplitude diffraction mask. Thin AlF3 film is exposed to the C-shaped diffraction order and demonstrates the facile production of both a metallic C-shaped structure as well as the etching of a C-shaped hole.

  18. Beam Shaping for CARS Measurements in Turbulent Environments

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Magnotti, Gaetano; Cutler, Andrew D.; Danehy, Paul M.

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes a new technique to mitigate the effect of beam steering on CARS measurements in turbulent, variable density environments. The new approach combines Planar BOXCARS phase-matching with elliptical shaping of one of the beams to generate a signal insensitive to beam steering, while keeping the same spatial resolution. Numerical and experimental results are provided to demonstrate the effectiveness of this approach. One set of experiments investigated the effect of beam shaping in the presence of a controlled and well quantified displacement of the beams at the focal plane. Another set of experiments, more qualitative, proved the effectiveness of the technique in the presence of severe beam steering due to turbulence.

  19. Shaping Bessel beams with a generalized differential operator approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lopez-Mago, Dorilian; Gutiérrez-Vega, Julio C.

    2016-09-01

    We apply a differential creation operator to an integer order Bessel beam in order to generate novel nondiffracting structures. The resulting phase structure and orbital angular momentum are discussed in detail. We find the parameters that preserve the orbital angular momentum of the seed beam and show how to produce and control shape preserving vortex arrays. In analogy to the Poincaré sphere, our approach is used to develop an operator sphere connecting higher-order Bessel beams.

  20. Beam shaping characteristics of an unstable-waveguide hybrid resonator.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Longsheng; Qin, Yingxiong; Tang, Xiahui; Wan, Chenhao; Li, Gen; Zhong, Lijing

    2014-04-01

    The unstable-waveguide hybrid resonator emits a rectangular, simple astigmatic beam with a large number of high-spatial-frequency oscillations in the unstable direction. To equalize the beam quality, in this paper, a beam shaping system with a spatial filter for the hybrid resonator was investigated by numerical simulation and experimental method. The high-frequency components and fundamental mode of the output beam of the hybrid resonator in the unstable direction are separated by a focus lens. The high-frequency components of the beam are eliminated by the following spatial filter. A nearly Gaussian-shaped beam with approximately equal beam propagation factor M² in the two orthogonal directions was obtained. The effects of the width of the spatial filter on the beam quality, power loss, and intensity distribution of the shaped beam were investigated. The M² factor in the unstable direction is changed from 1.6 to 1.1 by optimum design. The power loss is only 9.5%. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results. PMID:24787183

  1. Beam shaping characteristics of an unstable-waveguide hybrid resonator.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Longsheng; Qin, Yingxiong; Tang, Xiahui; Wan, Chenhao; Li, Gen; Zhong, Lijing

    2014-04-01

    The unstable-waveguide hybrid resonator emits a rectangular, simple astigmatic beam with a large number of high-spatial-frequency oscillations in the unstable direction. To equalize the beam quality, in this paper, a beam shaping system with a spatial filter for the hybrid resonator was investigated by numerical simulation and experimental method. The high-frequency components and fundamental mode of the output beam of the hybrid resonator in the unstable direction are separated by a focus lens. The high-frequency components of the beam are eliminated by the following spatial filter. A nearly Gaussian-shaped beam with approximately equal beam propagation factor M² in the two orthogonal directions was obtained. The effects of the width of the spatial filter on the beam quality, power loss, and intensity distribution of the shaped beam were investigated. The M² factor in the unstable direction is changed from 1.6 to 1.1 by optimum design. The power loss is only 9.5%. The simulation results are in good agreement with the experimental results.

  2. HERA BEAM TAIL SHAPING BY TUNE MODULATION.

    SciTech Connect

    MONTAG,C.

    2003-05-19

    To study CP violation, the HEM-B experiment uses an internal wire target in the transverse halo of the stored HERA proton beam. Operational experience shows that the resulting interaction rates are extremely sensitive to tiny orbit jitter amplitudes. Various methods have been studied to stabilize these interaction rates by increasing diffusion in the transverse proton beam tails without affecting the luminosity at the electron-proton collider experiments ZEUS and H1. Tune modulation was found to be a promising method for this task. Experiments performed in recent years will be reported.

  3. Simple Array Beam-Shaping Using Phase-Only Adjustments.

    SciTech Connect

    Doerry, Armin W.

    2015-07-01

    Conventional beam-shaping for array antennas is accomplished via an amplitude-taper on the elemental radiators. It is well known that proper manipulation of the elemental phases can also shape the antenna far-field pattern. A fairly simple transformation from a desired amplitude-taper to a phase-taper can yield nearly equivalent results.

  4. Optical beam shaping and diffraction free waves: A variational approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gemmer, John A.; Venkataramani, Shankar C.; Durfee, Charles G.; Moloney, Jerome V.

    2014-08-01

    We investigate the problem of shaping radially symmetric annular beams into desired intensity patterns along the optical axis. Within the Fresnel approximation, we show that this problem can be expressed in a variational form equivalent to the one arising in phase retrieval. Using the uncertainty principle we prove various rigorous lower bounds on the functional; these lower bounds estimate the L2 error for the beam shaping problem in terms of the design parameters. We also use the method of stationary phase to construct a natural ansatz for a minimizer in the short wavelength limit. We illustrate the implications of our results by applying the method of stationary phase coupled with the Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm to beam shaping problems arising in the remote delivery of beams and pulses.

  5. Beam profile shaping for laser radars that use detector arrays.

    PubMed

    Veldkamp, W B; Kastner, C J

    1982-01-15

    The beam shaper we developed shapes the transmit beam of a CO(2) laser radar that uses a linear detector array. It consists of a diffraction grating and an anamorphic prism beam compressor and produces a stretched profile that efficiently and uniformly illuminates the far-field footprint of the detector array. The diffraction grating phase modulates the near field or the laser beam to generate a far-field flattop intensity profile, whereas the compressor produces the necessary profile eccentricity. We have achieved conversion efficiencies in the 70-90% range.

  6. On the description of electromagnetic arbitrary shaped beams: The relationship between beam shape coefficients and plane wave spectra

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, Gérard; Lock, James A.

    2015-09-01

    A strong effort has been devoted during the last three decades, and more, to the study of electromagnetic scattering of arbitrary shaped beams by particles. For this topic, the most important issue concerns the description of the illuminating beam as an expansion over a basis of functions. There are essentially two kinds of expansions that have been used: (i) a discrete expansion involving beam shape coefficients and (ii) a continuous expansion in terms of plane wave spectra. In this paper, we provide a formal relationship between these two kinds of expansions.

  7. Venom Evolution: Gene Loss Shapes Phenotypic Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Casewell, Nicholas R

    2016-09-26

    Snake venoms are variable protein mixtures with a multitude of bioactivities. New work shows, surprisingly, that it is the loss of toxin-encoding genes that strongly influences venom function in rattlesnakes, highlighting how gene loss can underpin adaptive phenotypic change. PMID:27676304

  8. An Adaptable Metric Shapes Perceptual Space.

    PubMed

    Hisakata, Rumi; Nishida, Shin'ya; Johnston, Alan

    2016-07-25

    How do we derive a sense of the separation of points in the world within a space-variant visual system? Visual directions are thought to be coded directly by a process referred to as local sign, in which a neuron acts as a labeled line for the perceived direction associated with its activation [1, 2]. The separations of visual directions, however, are not given, nor are they directly related to the separations of signals on the receptive surface or in the brain, which are modified by retinal and cortical magnification, respectively [3]. To represent the separation of directions veridically, the corresponding neural signals need to be scaled in some way. We considered this scaling process may be influenced by adaptation. Here, we describe a novel adaptation paradigm, which can alter both apparent spatial separation and size. We measured the perceived separation of two dots and the size of geometric figures after adaptation to random dot patterns. We show that adapting to high-density texture not only increases the apparent sparseness (average element separation) of a lower-density pattern, as expected [4], but paradoxically, it reduces the apparent separation of dot pairs and induces apparent shrinkage of geometric form. This demonstrates for the first time a contrary linkage between perceived density and perceived extent. Separation and size appear to be expressed relative to a variable spatial metric whose properties, while not directly observable, are revealed by reductions in both apparent size and texture density. PMID:27426520

  9. Broadband beam shaping with harmonic diffractive optics.

    PubMed

    Singh, Manisha; Tervo, Jani; Turunen, Jari

    2014-09-22

    We consider spatial shaping of broadband (either stationary or pulsed) spatially coherent light, comparing refractive, standard diffractive, and harmonic diffractive (modulo 2πM) elements. Considering frequency-integrated target profiles we show that, contrary to common belief, standard diffractive (M = 1) elements work reasonably well for, e.g., Gaussian femtosecond pulses and spatially coherent amplified-spontaneous-emission sources such as superluminescent diodes. It is also shown that harmonic elements with M ≥ 5 behave in essentially the same way as refractive elements and clearly outperform standard diffractive elements for highly broadband light.

  10. Freeform beam shaping for high-power multimode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2014-03-01

    Widening of using high power multimode lasers in industrial laser material processing is accompanied by special requirements to irradiance profiles in such technologies like metal or plastics welding, cladding, hardening, brazing, annealing, laser pumping and amplification in MOPA lasers. Typical irradiance distribution of high power multimode lasers: free space solid state, fiber-coupled solid state and diodes lasers, fiber lasers, is similar to Gaussian. Laser technologies can be essentially improved when irradiance distribution on a workpiece is uniform (flattop) or inverse-Gauss; when building high-power pulsed lasers it is possible to enhance efficiency of pumping and amplification by applying super-Gauss irradiance distribution with controlled convexity. Therefore, "freeform" beam shaping of multimode laser beams is an important task. A proved solution is refractive field mapping beam shaper like Shaper capable to control resulting irradiance profile - with the same unit it is possible to get various beam profiles and choose optimum one for a particular application. Operational principle of these devices implies transformation of laser irradiance distribution by conserving beam consistency, high transmittance, providing collimated low divergent output beam. Using additional optics makes it possible to create resulting laser spots of necessary size and round, elliptical or linear shape. Operation out of focal plane and, hence, in field of lower wavefront curvature, allows extending depth of field. The refractive beam shapers are implemented as telescopes and collimating systems, which can be connected directly to fiber-coupled lasers or fiber lasers, thus combining functions of beam collimation and irradiance transformation.

  11. Beam shaping to provide round and square-shaped beams in optical systems of high-power lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2016-05-01

    Optical systems of modern high-power lasers require control of irradiance distribution: round or square-shaped flat-top or super-Gaussian irradiance profiles are optimum for amplification in MOPA lasers and for thermal load management while pumping of crystals of solid-state ultra-short pulse lasers to control heat and minimize its impact on the laser power and beam quality while maximizing overall laser efficiency, variable profiles are also important in irradiating of photocathode of Free Electron lasers (FEL). It is suggested to solve the task of irradiance re-distribution using field mapping refractive beam shapers like piShaper. The operational principle of these devices presumes transformation of laser beam intensity from Gaussian to flat-top one with high flatness of output wavefront, saving of beam consistency, providing collimated output beam of low divergence, high transmittance, extended depth of field, negligible residual wave aberration, and achromatic design provides capability to work with ultra-short pulse lasers having broad spectrum. Using the same piShaper device it is possible to realize beams with flat-top, inverse Gauss or super Gauss irradiance distribution by simple variation of input beam diameter, and the beam shape can be round or square with soft edges. This paper will describe some design basics of refractive beam shapers of the field mapping type and optical layouts of their applying in optical systems of high-power lasers. Examples of real implementations and experimental results will be presented as well.

  12. Alternative Shapes and Shaping Techniques for Enhanced Transformer Ratios in Beam Driven Techniques

    SciTech Connect

    Lemery, F.; Piot, P.

    2014-01-01

    The transformer ration of collinear beam-driven techniques can be significantly improved by shaping the current profile of the drive bunch. To date, several current shapes have been proposed to increase the transformer ratio and produce quasi-uniform energy loss within the drive bunch. Some of these tailoring techniques are possible as a results of recent beam-dynamics advances, e.g., transverse-to-longitudinal emittance exchanger. In ths paper, we propose an alternative class of longitudinal shapes that enable high transformer ratio and uniform energy loss across the drive bunch. We also suggest a simple method based on photocathode-laser shaping and passive shaping in wakefield structure to realize shape close to the theoretically optimized current profiles.

  13. Shaping non-diffracting beams with a digital micromirror device

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ren, Yu-Xuan; Fang, Zhao-Xiang; Lu, Rong-De

    2016-02-01

    The micromechanical digital micromirror device (DMD) performs as a spatial light modulator to shape the light wavefront. Different from the liquid crystal devices, which use the birefringence to modulate the light wave, the DMD regulates the wavefront through an amplitude modulation with the digitally controlled mirrors switched on and off. The advantages of such device are the fast speed, polarization insensitivity, and the broadband modulation ability. The fast switching ability for the DMD not only enables the shaping of static light mode, but also could dynamically compensate for the wavefront distortion due to scattering medium. We have employed such device to create the higher order modes, including the Laguerre-Gaussian, Hermite-Gaussian, as well as Mathieu modes. There exists another kind of beam with shape-preservation against propagation, and self-healing against obstacles. Representative modes are the Bessel modes, Airy modes, and the Pearcey modes. Since the DMD modulates the light intensity, a series of algorithms are developed to calculate proper amplitude hologram for shaping the light. The quasi-continuous gray scale images could imitate the continuous amplitude hologram, while the binary amplitude modulation is another means to create the modulation pattern for a steady light field. We demonstrate the generation of the non-diffracting beams with the binary amplitude modulation via the DMD, and successfully created the non-diffracting Bessel beam, Airy beam, and the Pearcey beam. We have characterized the non-diffracting modes through propagation measurements as well as the self-healing measurements.

  14. Laser Beam Steering/shaping for Free Space Optical Communication

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Xinghua; Wang, Bin; Bos, Philip J.; Anderson, James E.; Pouch, John; Miranda, Felix; McManamon, Paul F.

    2004-01-01

    The 2-D Optical Phased Array (OPA) antenna based on a Liquid Crystal On Silicon (LCoS) device can be considered for use in free space optical communication as an active beam controlling device. Several examples of the functionality of the device include: beam steering in the horizontal and elevation direction; high resolution wavefront compensation in a large telescope; and beam shaping with the computer generated kinoform. Various issues related to the diffraction efficiency, steering range, steering accuracy as well as the magnitude of wavefront compensation are discussed.

  15. Adaptive beam shaper based on a single liquid crystal cell

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zenou, Michael; Reznikov, Mitya; Manevich, Michael; Varshal, Joseph; Reznikov, Yuriy; Kotler, Zvi

    2013-03-01

    We describe a method allowing rapid transformation of a Gaussian input laser beam into a variety of beam profiles such as top-hat and ring-shaped. A liquid crystal cell with a simple binary phase structure was designed and prepared using microlithographic processes. The new design provides an electrically tunable, variable mode, beam shaping device with millisecond response time (ton˜5 ms and toff˜35 ms).

  16. Shape threat detection via adaptive computed tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masoudi, Ahmad; Thamvichai, Ratchaneekorn; Neifeld, Mark A.

    2016-05-01

    X-ray Computed Tomography (CT) is used widely for screening purposes. Conventional x-ray threat detection systems employ image reconstruction and segmentation algorithms prior to making threat/no-threat decisions. We find that in many cases these pre-processing steps can degrade detection performance. Therefore in this work we will investigate methods that operate directly on the CT measurements. We analyze a fixed-gantry system containing 25 x-ray sources and 2200 photon counting detectors. We present a new method for improving threat detection performance. This new method is a so-called greedy adaptive algorithm which at each time step uses information from previous measurements to design the next measurement. We utilize sequential hypothesis testing (SHT) in order to derive both the optimal "next measurement" and the stopping criterion to insure a target probability of error Pe. We find that selecting the next x-ray source according to such a greedy adaptive algorithm, we can reduce Pe by a factor of 42.4× relative to the conventional measurement sequence employing all 25 sources in sequence.

  17. Adaptive evolution of plastron shape in emydine turtles.

    PubMed

    Angielczyk, Kenneth D; Feldman, Chris R; Miller, Gretchen R

    2011-02-01

    Morphology reflects ecological pressures, phylogeny, and genetic and biophysical constraints. Disentangling their influence is fundamental to understanding selection and trait evolution. Here, we assess the contributions of function, phylogeny, and habitat to patterns of plastron (ventral shell) shape variation in emydine turtles. We quantify shape variation using geometric morphometrics, and determine the influence of several variables on shape using path analysis. Factors influencing plastron shape variation are similar between emydine turtles and the more inclusive Testudinoidea. We evaluate the fit of various evolutionary models to the shape data to investigate the selective landscape responsible for the observed morphological patterns. The presence of a hinge on the plastron accounts for most morphological variance, but phylogeny and habitat also correlate with shape. The distribution of shape variance across emydine phylogeny is most consistent with an evolutionary model containing two adaptive zones--one for turtles with kinetic plastra, and one for turtles with rigid plastra. Models with more complex adaptive landscapes often fit the data only as well as the null model (purely stochastic evolution). The adaptive landscape of plastron shape in Emydinae may be relatively simple because plastral kinesis imposes overriding mechanical constraints on the evolution of form.

  18. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses

    PubMed Central

    Leliefeld, Pieter H. C.; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell–cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  19. How Neutrophils Shape Adaptive Immune Responses.

    PubMed

    Leliefeld, Pieter H C; Koenderman, Leo; Pillay, Janesh

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are classically considered as cells pivotal for the first line of defense against invading pathogens. In recent years, evidence has accumulated that they are also important in the orchestration of adaptive immunity. Neutrophils rapidly migrate in high numbers to sites of inflammation (e.g., infection, tissue damage, and cancer) and are subsequently able to migrate to draining lymph nodes (LNs). Both at the site of inflammation as well as in the LNs, neutrophils can engage with lymphocytes and antigen-presenting cells. This crosstalk occurs either directly via cell-cell contact or via mediators, such as proteases, cytokines, and radical oxygen species. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding locations and mechanisms of interaction between neutrophils and lymphocytes in the context of homeostasis and various pathological conditions. In addition, we will highlight the complexity of the microenvironment that is involved in the generation of suppressive or stimulatory neutrophil phenotypes. PMID:26441976

  20. Shaped reflector beam waveguide and high gain antenna systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galindo-Israel, V.; Mittra, R.

    1983-01-01

    In this paper the problem of synthesizing dual reflector antennas for both amplitude and phase control of the final aperture distribution is discussed. An approximate procedure for the offset synthesis problem is presented and applications of the procedure to the shaping of beam waveguides and reflectors for high-gain antenna systems are illustrated.

  1. Meta-q-plate for complex beam shaping.

    PubMed

    Ji, Wei; Lee, Chun-Hong; Chen, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ming, Yang; Zhang, Lijian; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Optical beam shaping plays a key role in optics and photonics. In this work, meta-q-plate featured by arbitrarily space-variant optical axes is proposed and demonstrated via liquid crystal photoalignment based on a polarization-sensitive alignment agent and a dynamic micro-lithography system. Meta-q-plates with multiple-, azimuthally/radially variant topological charges and initial azimuthal angles are fabricated. Accordingly, complex beams with elliptical, asymmetrical, multi-ringed and hurricane transverse profiles are generated, making the manipulation of optical vortex up to an unprecedented flexibility. The evolution, handedness and Michelson interferogram of the hurricane one are theoretically analysed and experimentally verified. The design facilitates the manipulation of polarization and spatial degrees of freedom of light in a point-to-point manner. The realization of meta-q-plate drastically enhances the capability of beam shaping and may pave a bright way towards optical manipulations, OAM based informatics, quantum optics and other fields. PMID:27149897

  2. Meta-q-plate for complex beam shaping

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Wei; Lee, Chun-Hong; Chen, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ming, Yang; Zhang, Lijian; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2016-01-01

    Optical beam shaping plays a key role in optics and photonics. In this work, meta-q-plate featured by arbitrarily space-variant optical axes is proposed and demonstrated via liquid crystal photoalignment based on a polarization-sensitive alignment agent and a dynamic micro-lithography system. Meta-q-plates with multiple-, azimuthally/radially variant topological charges and initial azimuthal angles are fabricated. Accordingly, complex beams with elliptical, asymmetrical, multi-ringed and hurricane transverse profiles are generated, making the manipulation of optical vortex up to an unprecedented flexibility. The evolution, handedness and Michelson interferogram of the hurricane one are theoretically analysed and experimentally verified. The design facilitates the manipulation of polarization and spatial degrees of freedom of light in a point-to-point manner. The realization of meta-q-plate drastically enhances the capability of beam shaping and may pave a bright way towards optical manipulations, OAM based informatics, quantum optics and other fields. PMID:27149897

  3. Meta-q-plate for complex beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Wei; Lee, Chun-Hong; Chen, Peng; Hu, Wei; Ming, Yang; Zhang, Lijian; Lin, Tsung-Hsien; Chigrinov, Vladimir; Lu, Yan-Qing

    2016-05-01

    Optical beam shaping plays a key role in optics and photonics. In this work, meta-q-plate featured by arbitrarily space-variant optical axes is proposed and demonstrated via liquid crystal photoalignment based on a polarization-sensitive alignment agent and a dynamic micro-lithography system. Meta-q-plates with multiple-, azimuthally/radially variant topological charges and initial azimuthal angles are fabricated. Accordingly, complex beams with elliptical, asymmetrical, multi-ringed and hurricane transverse profiles are generated, making the manipulation of optical vortex up to an unprecedented flexibility. The evolution, handedness and Michelson interferogram of the hurricane one are theoretically analysed and experimentally verified. The design facilitates the manipulation of polarization and spatial degrees of freedom of light in a point-to-point manner. The realization of meta-q-plate drastically enhances the capability of beam shaping and may pave a bright way towards optical manipulations, OAM based informatics, quantum optics and other fields.

  4. A method for generating double-ring-shaped vector beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huan, Chen; Xiao-Hui, Ling; Zhi-Hong, Chen; Qian-Guang, Li; Hao, Lv; Hua-Qing, Yu; Xu-Nong, Yi

    2016-07-01

    We propose a method for generating double-ring-shaped vector beams. A step phase introduced by a spatial light modulator (SLM) first makes the incident laser beam have a nodal cycle. This phase is dynamic in nature because it depends on the optical length. Then a Pancharatnam–Berry phase (PBP) optical element is used to manipulate the local polarization of the optical field by modulating the geometric phase. The experimental results show that this scheme can effectively create double-ring-shaped vector beams. It provides much greater flexibility to manipulate the phase and polarization by simultaneously modulating the dynamic and the geometric phases. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11547017), the Hubei Engineering University Research Foundation, China (Grant No. z2014001), and the Natural Science Foundation of Hubei Province, China (Grant No. 2014CFB578).

  5. Femtosecond laser processing with a holographic line-shaped beam.

    PubMed

    Hasegawa, Satoshi; Shiono, Koji; Hayasaki, Yoshio

    2015-09-01

    Line-shaped femtosecond pulses are well-suited to large-area machining with high throughput in laser cutting, peeling, and grooving of materials. First, we demonstrated the single-shot fabrication of a line structure in a glass surface using a line-shaped pulse generated by a holographic cylindrical lens displayed on a liquid-crystal spatial light modulator. We found the line structure was uniform and smooth near the ends because of the ability to precisely control the intensity distribution and to achieve single-shot fabrication. Second, we demonstrated a line-shaped beam deformed three-dimensionally for showing the potential of holographic line-shaped beam processing. Third, we demonstrated laser peeling of an indium tin oxide film. We found that little debris around the fabricated area was observed, because the debris was removed by the beam itself. Last, we demonstrated laser grooving of stainless steel. We found the swelling of the surface included upwardly growing nanogratings, although many line-shaped pulse irradiations were given. The swelling was caused by the depositions of the debris on the top of the nanogratings.

  6. Adaptive optics for laser power beaming

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leland, Robert P.

    1992-01-01

    It has been proposed to use a high energy pulsed laser to beam power into space for satellites or a lunar base. The effects of atmospheric transmission are critical to such a system. Thermal blooming in the atmosphere can cause the beam to spread rapidly. Atmospheric turbulence can cause beam bending or beam spreading, resulting in the loss of transmitted energy that fails to hit the target receiver.

  7. Gaussian beam profile shaping apparatus, method therefor and evaluation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dickey, Fred M.; Holswade, Scott C.; Romero, Louis A.

    1999-01-01

    A method and apparatus maps a Gaussian beam into a beam with a uniform irradiance profile by exploiting the Fourier transform properties of lenses. A phase element imparts a design phase onto an input beam and the output optical field from a lens is then the Fourier transform of the input beam and the phase function from the phase element. The phase element is selected in accordance with a dimensionless parameter which is dependent upon the radius of the incoming beam, the desired spot shape, the focal length of the lens and the wavelength of the input beam. This dimensionless parameter can also be used to evaluate the quality of a system. In order to control the radius of the incoming beam, optics such as a telescope can be employed. The size of the target spot and the focal length can be altered by exchanging the transform lens, but the dimensionless parameter will remain the same. The quality of the system, and hence the value of the dimensionless parameter, can be altered by exchanging the phase element. The dimensionless parameter provides design guidance, system evaluation, and indication as to how to improve a given system.

  8. Gaussian beam profile shaping apparatus, method therefore and evaluation thereof

    DOEpatents

    Dickey, F.M.; Holswade, S.C.; Romero, L.A.

    1999-01-26

    A method and apparatus maps a Gaussian beam into a beam with a uniform irradiance profile by exploiting the Fourier transform properties of lenses. A phase element imparts a design phase onto an input beam and the output optical field from a lens is then the Fourier transform of the input beam and the phase function from the phase element. The phase element is selected in accordance with a dimensionless parameter which is dependent upon the radius of the incoming beam, the desired spot shape, the focal length of the lens and the wavelength of the input beam. This dimensionless parameter can also be used to evaluate the quality of a system. In order to control the radius of the incoming beam, optics such as a telescope can be employed. The size of the target spot and the focal length can be altered by exchanging the transform lens, but the dimensionless parameter will remain the same. The quality of the system, and hence the value of the dimensionless parameter, can be altered by exchanging the phase element. The dimensionless parameter provides design guidance, system evaluation, and indication as to how to improve a given system. 27 figs.

  9. Electron-beam-assisted superplastic shaping of nanoscale amorphous silica

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Kun; Wang, Chengcai; Cheng, Yong-Qiang; Yue, Yonghai; Han, Xiaodong; Zhang, Ze; Shan, Zhiwei; Mao, Scott X; Ye, Miaomiao; Yin, Yadong; Ma, Evan

    2010-01-01

    Glasses are usually shaped through the viscous flow of a liquid before its solidification, as practiced in glass blowing. At or near room temperature (RT), oxide glasses are known to be brittle and fracture upon any mechanical deformation for shape change. Here, we show that with moderate exposure to a low-intensity (<1.8×10−2 A cm−2) electron beam (e-beam), dramatic shape changes can be achieved for nanoscale amorphous silica, at low temperatures and strain rates >10−4 per second. We show not only large homogeneous plastic strains in compression for nanoparticles but also superplastic elongations >200% in tension for nanowires (NWs). We also report the first quantitative comparison of the load-displacement responses without and with the e-beam, revealing dramatic difference in the flow stress (up to four times). This e-beam-assisted superplastic deformability near RT is useful for processing amorphous silica and other conventionally-brittle materials for their applications in nanotechnology. PMID:20975693

  10. Optical Manipulation with Plasmonic Beam Shaping Antenna Structures

    DOE PAGES

    Jun, Young Chul; Brener, Igal

    2012-01-01

    Near-field optical trapping of objects using plasmonic antenna structures has recently attracted great attention. However, metal nanostructures also provide a compact platform for general wavefront engineering of intermediate and far-field beams. Here, we analyze optical forces generated by plasmonic beam shaping antenna structures and show that they can be used for general optical manipulation such as guiding of a dielectric particle along a linear or curved trajectory. This removes the need for bulky diffractive optical components and facilitates the integration of optical force manipulation into a highly functional, compact system.

  11. Ultra-precise holographic beam shaping for microscopic quantum control.

    PubMed

    Zupancic, Philip; Preiss, Philipp M; Ma, Ruichao; Lukin, Alexander; Eric Tai, M; Rispoli, Matthew; Islam, Rajibul; Greiner, Markus

    2016-06-27

    High-resolution addressing of individual ultracold atoms, trapped ions or solid state emitters allows for exquisite control in quantum optics experiments. This becomes possible through large aperture magnifying optics that project microscopic light patterns with diffraction limited performance. We use programmable amplitude holograms generated on a digital micromirror device to create arbitrary microscopic beam shapes with full phase and amplitude control. The system self-corrects for aberrations of up to several λ and reduces them to λ/50, leading to light patterns with a precision on the 10-4 level. We demonstrate aberration-compensated beam shaping in an optical lattice experiment and perform single-site addressing in a quantum gas microscope for 87Rb. PMID:27410551

  12. Gaussian beam scattering from arbitrarily shaped objects with rough surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Hui; Wu, Zhensen; Yang, Ruike; Bai, Lu

    2004-07-01

    The scattered field of Gaussian beam scattering from arbitrarily shaped dielectric objects with rough surfaces is investigated for optical and infrared frequencies by using the plane wave spectrum method and the Kirchhoff approximation, and the formulae for the coherent and incoherent scattering cross sections are obtained theoretically based on geometrical optics and tangent plane approximations. The infrared laser scattering cross sections of a rough sphere are calculated at 1.06 µm, and the influence of the beam size is analysed numerically. It is shown that when the beam size is much larger than the size of the object, the results in this paper will be close to those of an incident plane wave.

  13. Application of contoured beam shaped reflector antennas to mission requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pearson, R. A.; Kalatidazeh, Y.; Driscoll, B. G.; Philippou, G. Y.; Claydon, B.; Brain, D. J.

    Contoured beam antennas are now widely used on-board communications and broadcast satellites to provide the optimum coverage of irregular shaped regions on earth and to minimize the interference outside the coverage boundaries. Unshaped array-fed reflector systems have been successfully implemented, for example in the EUTELSAT 2 series, however these systems suffer from the need for relatively large feed arrays. A number of international satellite organizations, including INTELSAT, EUTELSAT, and European Space Agency (ESA) are interested in the use of shaped reflector antennas for single and multiple coverage scenarios. This technology offers the potential to reduce or completely remove the beamforming network and its associated losses and weight. In recent years, ERA has carried out a number of studies involving the design of shaped reflector antennas for particular mission requirements. This paper reviews a number of these case studies and highlights the coverage specifications and the advantages of adopting shaped reflectors, as well as the factors which limit their use. A description of a number of contoured beam scenarios is provided, and a summary of these is given.

  14. Wave propagation in beams with periodic arrays of airfoil-shaped resonating units

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casadei, Filippo; Bertoldi, Katia

    2014-12-01

    This paper presents an analytical and numerical study on the dispersion properties of an Euler-Bernoulli beam immersed in a steady fluid flow with periodic arrays of airfoil-shaped vibration absorbers attached to it. The resonance characteristics of the airfoils generate strong attenuation of flexural waves in the beam occurring at frequencies defined by the properties of the airfoils and the speed of the incident fluid. Analytical and numerical tools are developed to investigate the effects of the incident flow on the dispersion properties and the bandgaps of the system. Both steady and unsteady aerodynamic models are used to model the lift force and the pitching moment acting on the resonators and their effect on the dispersion relations of the system is evaluated. Finally, an effective medium description of the beam is developed to capture its behavior at long-wavelengths. In this regime, the system can be effectively considered as an acoustic metamaterial with adaptive dispersion properties.

  15. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. 892.5710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5710 Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy beam-shaping block is a device made of a...

  16. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. 892.5710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5710 Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy beam-shaping block is a device made of a...

  17. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. 892.5710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5710 Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy beam-shaping block is a device made of a...

  18. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. 892.5710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5710 Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy beam-shaping block is a device made of a...

  19. 21 CFR 892.5710 - Radiation therapy beam-shaping block.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. 892.5710... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES RADIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 892.5710 Radiation therapy beam-shaping block. (a) Identification. A radiation therapy beam-shaping block is a device made of a...

  20. Finite Element Analysis of Adaptive-Stiffening and Shape-Control SMA Hybrid Composites

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gao, Xiu-Jie; Turner, Travis L.; Burton, Deborah; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2005-01-01

    The usage of shape memory materials has extended rapidly to many fields, including medical devices, actuators, composites, structures and MEMS devices. For these various applications, shape memory alloys (SMAs) are available in various forms: bulk, wire, ribbon, thin film, and porous. In this work, the focus is on SMA hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions. These composites are created by using SMA ribbons or wires embedded in a polymeric based composite panel/beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating or uniform thermal loads. To simulate the thermomechanical behavior of these composites, a SMA model was implemented using ABAQUS user element interface and finite element simulations of the systems were studied. Several examples are presented which show that the implemented model can be a very useful design and simulation tool for SMA hybrid composites.

  1. Finite element analysis of adaptive-stiffening and shape-control SMA hybrid composites

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Xiujie; Turner, Travis L.; Burton, Deborah; Brinson, L. Catherine

    2005-05-01

    The usage of shape memory materials has extended rapidly to many fields, including medical devices, actuators, composites, structures and MEMS devices. For these various applications, shape memory alloys (SMAs) are available in various forms: bulk, wire, ribbon, thin film, and porous. In this work, the focus is on SMA hybrid composites with adaptive-stiffening or morphing functions. These composites are created by using SMA ribbons or wires embedded in a polymeric based composite panel/beam. Adaptive stiffening or morphing is activated via selective resistance heating or uniform thermal loads. To simulate the thermomechanical behavior of these composites, a SMA model was implemented using ABAQUS' user element interface and finite element simulations of the systems were studied. Several examples are presented which show that the implemented model can be a very useful design and simulation tool for SMA hybrid composites.

  2. Research on method for laser beam shape parameters detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Su, Jun-hong; Bai, Zhao-feng

    2014-09-01

    The laser beam quality measurement has become a hot topic in the field of laser engineering nowadays. Based on the method of Hartmann-Shack, the four-wave lateral shearing interferometer is presented in this paper to achieve the laser beam shape parameters. The principle of shearing technology is described in detail. Parameters of semiconductor laser at 532nm and ZYGO interferometer laser are tested based on the method of four-wave lateral shearing interference and their test results are compared with the nominal parameters. As the results, the test results are basically consistent with the nominal value, which fully shows the feasibility of the four-wave lateral shearing interference method.

  3. Shape adaptive, robust iris feature extraction from noisy iris images.

    PubMed

    Ghodrati, Hamed; Dehghani, Mohammad Javad; Danyali, Habibolah

    2013-10-01

    In the current iris recognition systems, noise removing step is only used to detect noisy parts of the iris region and features extracted from there will be excluded in matching step. Whereas depending on the filter structure used in feature extraction, the noisy parts may influence relevant features. To the best of our knowledge, the effect of noise factors on feature extraction has not been considered in the previous works. This paper investigates the effect of shape adaptive wavelet transform and shape adaptive Gabor-wavelet for feature extraction on the iris recognition performance. In addition, an effective noise-removing approach is proposed in this paper. The contribution is to detect eyelashes and reflections by calculating appropriate thresholds by a procedure called statistical decision making. The eyelids are segmented by parabolic Hough transform in normalized iris image to decrease computational burden through omitting rotation term. The iris is localized by an accurate and fast algorithm based on coarse-to-fine strategy. The principle of mask code generation is to assign the noisy bits in an iris code in order to exclude them in matching step is presented in details. An experimental result shows that by using the shape adaptive Gabor-wavelet technique there is an improvement on the accuracy of recognition rate. PMID:24696801

  4. Phylogeny and adaptation shape the teeth of insular mice.

    PubMed

    Ledevin, Ronan; Chevret, Pascale; Ganem, Guila; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Hardouin, Emilie A; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Pisanu, Benoit; da Luz Mathias, Maria; Schlager, Stefan; Auffray, Jean-Christophe; Renaud, Sabrina

    2016-02-10

    By accompanying human travels since prehistorical times, the house mouse dispersed widely throughout the world, and colonized many islands. The origin of the travellers determined the phylogenetic source of the insular mice, which encountered diverse ecological and environmental conditions on the various islands. Insular mice are thus an exceptional model to disentangle the relative role of phylogeny, ecology and climate in evolution. Molar shape is known to vary according to phylogeny and to respond to adaptation. Using for the first time a three-dimensional geometric morphometric approach, compared with a classical two-dimensional quantification, the relative effects of size variation, phylogeny, climate and ecology were investigated on molar shape diversity across a variety of islands. Phylogeny emerged as the factor of prime importance in shaping the molar. Changes in competition level, mostly driven by the presence or absence of the wood mouse on the different islands, appeared as the second most important effect. Climate and size differences accounted for slight shape variation. This evidences a balanced role of random differentiation related to history of colonization, and of adaptation possibly related to resource exploitation. PMID:26842576

  5. Phylogeny and adaptation shape the teeth of insular mice.

    PubMed

    Ledevin, Ronan; Chevret, Pascale; Ganem, Guila; Britton-Davidian, Janice; Hardouin, Emilie A; Chapuis, Jean-Louis; Pisanu, Benoit; da Luz Mathias, Maria; Schlager, Stefan; Auffray, Jean-Christophe; Renaud, Sabrina

    2016-02-10

    By accompanying human travels since prehistorical times, the house mouse dispersed widely throughout the world, and colonized many islands. The origin of the travellers determined the phylogenetic source of the insular mice, which encountered diverse ecological and environmental conditions on the various islands. Insular mice are thus an exceptional model to disentangle the relative role of phylogeny, ecology and climate in evolution. Molar shape is known to vary according to phylogeny and to respond to adaptation. Using for the first time a three-dimensional geometric morphometric approach, compared with a classical two-dimensional quantification, the relative effects of size variation, phylogeny, climate and ecology were investigated on molar shape diversity across a variety of islands. Phylogeny emerged as the factor of prime importance in shaping the molar. Changes in competition level, mostly driven by the presence or absence of the wood mouse on the different islands, appeared as the second most important effect. Climate and size differences accounted for slight shape variation. This evidences a balanced role of random differentiation related to history of colonization, and of adaptation possibly related to resource exploitation.

  6. Adaptive laser beam forming for laser shock micro-forming for 3D MEMS devices fabrication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zou, Ran; Wang, Shuliang; Wang, Mohan; Li, Shuo; Huang, Sheng; Lin, Yankun; Chen, Kevin P.

    2016-07-01

    Laser shock micro-forming is a non-thermal laser forming method that use laser-induced shockwave to modify surface properties and to adjust shapes and geometry of work pieces. In this paper, we present an adaptive optical technique to engineer spatial profiles of the laser beam to exert precision control on the laser shock forming process for free-standing MEMS structures. Using a spatial light modulator, on-target laser energy profiles are engineered to control shape, size, and deformation magnitude, which has led to significant improvement of the laser shock processing outcome at micrometer scales. The results presented in this paper show that the adaptive-optics laser beam forming is an effective method to improve both quality and throughput of the laser forming process at micrometer scales.

  7. Design of a shape adaptive airfoil actuated by a Shape Memory Alloy strip for airplane tail

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shirzadeh, R.; Raissi Charmacani, K.; Tabesh, M.

    2011-04-01

    Of the factors that mainly affect the efficiency of the wing during a special flow regime, the shape of its airfoil cross section is the most significant. Airfoils are generally designed for a specific flight condition and, therefore, are not fully optimized in all flight conditions. It is very desirable to have an airfoil with the ability to change its shape based on the current regime. Shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators activate in response to changes in the temperature and can recover their original configuration after being deformed. This study presents the development of a method to control the shape of an airfoil using SMA actuators. To predict the thermomechanical behaviors of an SMA thin strip, 3D incremental formulation of the SMA constitutive model is implemented in FEA software package ABAQUS. The interactions between the airfoil structure and SMA thin strip actuator are investigated. Also, the aerodynamic performance of a standard airfoil with a plain flap is compared with an adaptive airfoil.

  8. Beaconless adaptive-optics technique for HEL beam control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khizhnyak, Anatoliy; Markov, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    Effective performance of forthcoming laser systems capable of power delivery on a distant target requires an adaptive optics system to correct atmospheric perturbations on the laser beam. The turbulence-induced effects are responsible for beam wobbling, wandering, and intensity scintillation, resulting in degradation of the beam quality and power density on the target. Adaptive optics methods are used to compensate for these negative effects. In its turn, operation of the AOS system requires a reference wave that can be generated by the beacon on the target. This report discusses a beaconless approach for wavefront correction with its performance based on the detection of the target-scattered light. Postprocessing of the beacon-generated light field enables retrieval and detailed characterization of the turbulence-perturbed wavefront -data that is essential to control the adaptive optics module of a high-power laser system.

  9. A Programmable Beam Shaping System for Tailoring the Profile of High Fluence Laser Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Henesian, M; Haynam, C; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Scanlan, M; Budge, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J

    2010-11-10

    Customized spatial light modulators have been designed and fabricated for use as precision beam shaping devices in fusion class laser systems. By inserting this device in a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain, 'blocker' obscurations can be programmed into the beam profile to shadow small isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. In this two stage system, 1920 x 1080 bitmap images are first imprinted on incoherent, 470 nm address beams via pixilated liquid crystal on silicon (LCoS) modulators. To realize defined masking functions with smooth apodized shapes and no pixelization artifacts, address beam images are projected onto custom fabricated optically-addressable light valves. Each valve consists of a large, single pixel liquid cell in series with a photoconductive Bismuth silicon Oxide (BSO) crystal. The BSO crystal enables bright and dark regions of the address image to locally control the voltage supplied to the liquid crystal layer which in turn modulates the amplitude of the coherent beams at 1053 nm. Valves as large as 24 mm x 36 mm have been fabricated with low wavefront distortion (<0.5 waves) and antireflection coatings for high transmission (>90%) and etalon suppression to avoid spectral and temporal ripple. This device in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy represents a new approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics.

  10. Laser beacon adaptive optics for power beaming applications

    SciTech Connect

    Fugate, R.Q.

    1994-12-31

    This paper discusses the laser beam control system requirements for power beaming applications. Power beaming applications include electric and thermal engine propulsion for orbit transfer, station changing, and recharging batteries. Beam control includes satellite acquisition, high accuracy tracking, higher order atmospheric compensation using adaptive optics, and precision point-ahead. Beam control may also include local laser beam clean-up with a low order adaptive optics system. This paper also presents results of tracking and higher-order correction experiments on astronomical objects. The results were obtained with a laser beacon adaptive optics system at Phillips Laboratory`s Starfire Optical Range near Albuquerque, NM. At a wavelength of 0.85 {mu}m, the author has achieved Strehl ratios of {approximately}0.50 using laser beacons and {approximately}0.65 using natural stars for exposures longer than one minute on objects of {approximately}8{sup th} magnitude. The resulting point spread function has a full width half maximum (FWHM) of 0.13 arcsec.

  11. Debye series expansion of shaped beam scattering by GI-POF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Renxian, Li; Xiang'e, Han; Fang, Ren Kuan

    2009-11-01

    We derive Debye series expansion (DSE) for infinitely long multilayered cylinders normally incident by shaped beam. Typically the interaction between multilayered cylinders and Gaussian beam is derived in detail, and localized approximation is introduced to calculate the beam shaped coefficients. Finally DSE is employed to the study of rainbow scattering by graded-index polymer optical fiber (GI-POF).

  12. Measurement and Prediction of the Thermomechanical Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Brian; Turner, Travis L.; Seelecke, Stefan

    2008-01-01

    An experimental and numerical investigation into the static and dynamic responses of shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) beams is performed to provide quantitative validation of a recently commercialized numerical analysis/design tool for SMAHC structures. The SMAHC beam specimens consist of a composite matrix with embedded pre-strained SMA actuators, which act against the mechanical boundaries of the structure when thermally activated to adaptively stiffen the structure. Numerical results are produced from the numerical model as implemented into the commercial finite element code ABAQUS. A rigorous experimental investigation is undertaken to acquire high fidelity measurements including infrared thermography and projection moire interferometry for full-field temperature and displacement measurements, respectively. High fidelity numerical results are also obtained from the numerical model and include measured parameters, such as geometric imperfection and thermal load. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured results of the static and dynamic thermomechanical response, thereby providing quantitative validation of the numerical tool.

  13. Shape memory alloy actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle for jet engine

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Song, Gangbing (Inventor); Ma, Ning (Inventor)

    2009-01-01

    The proposed adaptive exhaust nozzle features an innovative use of the shape memory alloy (SMA) actuators for actively control of the opening area of the exhaust nozzle for jet engines. The SMA actuators remotely control the opening area of the exhaust nozzle through a set of mechanism. An important advantage of using SMA actuators is the reduction of weight of the actuator system for variable area exhaust nozzle. Another advantage is that the SMA actuator can be activated using the heat from the exhaust and eliminate the need of other energy source. A prototype has been designed and fabricated. The functionality of the proposed SMA actuated adaptive exhaust nozzle is verified in the open-loop tests.

  14. Low Temperature Shape Memory Alloys for Adaptive, Autonomous Systems Project

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Falker, John; Zeitlin, Nancy; Williams, Martha; Benafan, Othmane; Fesmire, James

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this joint activity between Kennedy Space Center (KSC) and Glenn Research Center (GRC) is to develop and evaluate the applicability of 2-way SMAs in proof-of-concept, low-temperature adaptive autonomous systems. As part of this low technology readiness (TRL) activity, we will develop and train low-temperature novel, 2-way shape memory alloys (SMAs) with actuation temperatures ranging from 0 C to 150 C. These experimental alloys will also be preliminary tested to evaluate their performance parameters and transformation (actuation) temperatures in low- temperature or cryogenic adaptive proof-of-concept systems. The challenge will be in the development, design, and training of the alloys for 2-way actuation at those temperatures.

  15. Coral thermal tolerance shaped by local adaptation of photosymbionts

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Howells, E. J.; Beltran, V. H.; Larsen, N. W.; Bay, L. K.; Willis, B. L.; van Oppen, M. J. H.

    2012-02-01

    Coral thermal tolerance is strongly influenced by the identity of obligate photosymbionts, which encompass numerous types belonging to the dinoflagellate genus Symbiodinium. Physiological advantages achieved by partnering with functionally diverse symbionts have been assumed to be available only to corals that can form associations with multiple Symbiodinium types. Functional variation among populations of the same type of Symbiodinium has been overlooked, despite local adaptation being feasible because of large population sizes, genetic isolation and short asexual generation times. Here we demonstrate divergent thermal tolerance in a generalist Symbiodinium type from two different thermal environments. Symbiodinium from the warmer reef maintained greater photo-chemical performance and survivorship when exposed to an elevated temperature of 32°C, both in symbiosis and in culture. Juvenile corals associated with Symbiodinium from the warmer reef grew rapidly when exposed to 32°C, yet underwent bleaching and tissue death when associated with Symbiodinium from the cooler reef. These results demonstrate that Symbiodinium types can adapt to local differences in thermal climate and that this adaptation shapes the fitness of coral hosts. If Symbiodinium populations are able to further adapt to increases in temperature at the pace at which ocean climates warm, they may assist corals to increase their thermal tolerance and persist into the future.

  16. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E.

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  17. Seed Pubescence and Shape Modulate Adaptive Responses to Fire Cues.

    PubMed

    Gómez-González, Susana; Ojeda, Fernando; Torres-Morales, Patricio; Palma, Jazmín E

    2016-01-01

    Post-fire recruitment by seeds is regarded as an adaptive response in fire-prone ecosystems. Nevertheless, little is known about which heritable seed traits are functional to the main signals of fire (heat and smoke), thus having the potential to evolve. Here, we explored whether three seed traits (pubescence, dormancy and shape) and fire regime modulate seed response to fire cues(heat and smoke). As a model study system, we used Helenium aromaticum (Asteraceae), a native annual forb from the Chilean matorral, where fires are anthropogenic. We related seed trait values with fitness responses (germination and survival) after exposure to heat-shock and smoke experimental treatments on seeds from 10 H. aromaticum wild populations. We performed a phenotypic selection experiment to examine the relationship of seed traits with post-treatment fitness within a population (adaptive hypothesis). We then explored whether fire frequency in natural habitats was associated with trait expression across populations, and with germination and survival responses to experimental fire-cues. We found that populations subjected to higher fire frequency had, in average, more rounded and pubescent seeds than populations from rarely burned areas. Populations with more rounded and pubescent seeds were more resistant to 80°C heat-shock and smoke treatments.There was correlated selection on seed traits: pubescent-rounded or glabrouscent-elongated seeds had the highest probability of germinating after heat-shock treatments. Seed pubescence and shape in H. aromaticum are heritable traits that modulate adaptive responses to fire. Our results provide new insights into the process of plant adaptation to fire and highlight the relevance of human-made fires as a strong evolutionary agent in the Anthropocene. PMID:27438267

  18. Effects of laser beam propagation and saturation on the spatial shape of sodium laser guide stars.

    PubMed

    Marc, Fabien; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2009-03-30

    The possibility to produce diffraction-limited images by large telescopes through Adaptive Optics is closely linked to the precision of measurement of the position of the guide star on the wavefront sensor. In the case of laser guide stars, many parameters can lead to a strong distortion on the shape of the LGS spot. Here we study the influence of both the saturation of the sodium layer excited by different types of lasers, the spatial quality of the laser mode at the ground and the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the upward propagation of the laser beam. Both shape and intensity of the LGS spot are found to depend strongly on these three effects with important consequences on the precision on the wavefront analysis. PMID:19333251

  19. Effects of laser beam propagation and saturation on the spatial shape of sodium laser guide stars.

    PubMed

    Marc, Fabien; Guillet de Chatellus, Hugues; Pique, Jean-Paul

    2009-03-30

    The possibility to produce diffraction-limited images by large telescopes through Adaptive Optics is closely linked to the precision of measurement of the position of the guide star on the wavefront sensor. In the case of laser guide stars, many parameters can lead to a strong distortion on the shape of the LGS spot. Here we study the influence of both the saturation of the sodium layer excited by different types of lasers, the spatial quality of the laser mode at the ground and the influence of the atmospheric turbulence on the upward propagation of the laser beam. Both shape and intensity of the LGS spot are found to depend strongly on these three effects with important consequences on the precision on the wavefront analysis.

  20. Extension of Ko Straight-Beam Displacement Theory to Deformed Shape Predictions of Slender Curved Structures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ko, William L.; Fleischer, Van Tran

    2011-01-01

    The Ko displacement theory originally developed for shape predictions of straight beams is extended to shape predictions of curved beams. The surface strains needed for shape predictions were analytically generated from finite-element nodal stress outputs. With the aid of finite-element displacement outputs, mathematical functional forms for curvature-effect correction terms are established and incorporated into straight-beam deflection equations for shape predictions of both cantilever and two-point supported curved beams. The newly established deflection equations for cantilever curved beams could provide quite accurate shape predictions for different cantilever curved beams, including the quarter-circle cantilever beam. Furthermore, the newly formulated deflection equations for two-point supported curved beams could provide accurate shape predictions for a range of two-point supported curved beams, including the full-circular ring. Accuracy of the newly developed curved-beam deflection equations is validated through shape prediction analysis of curved beams embedded in the windward shallow spherical shell of a generic crew exploration vehicle. A single-point collocation method for optimization of shape predictions is discussed in detail

  1. Programmable Beam Spatial Shaping System for the National Ignition Facility

    SciTech Connect

    Heebner, J; Borden, M; Miller, P; Hunter, S; Christensen, K; Scanlan, M; Haynam, C; Wegner, P; Hermann, M; Brunton, G; Tse, E; Awwal, A; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Franks, M; Marley, E; Wong, N; Seppala, L; Franks, M; Marley, E; Williams, K; Budge, T; Henesian, M; Stolz, C; Suratwala, T; Monticelli, M; Walmer, D; Dixit, S; Widmayer, C; Wolfe, J; Bude, J; McCarty, K; DiNicola, J M

    2011-01-21

    A system of customized spatial light modulators has been installed onto the front end of the laser system at the National Ignition Facility (NIF). The devices are capable of shaping the beam profile at a low-fluence relay plane upstream of the amplifier chain. Their primary function is to introduce 'blocker' obscurations at programmed locations within the beam profile. These obscurations are positioned to shadow small, isolated flaws on downstream optical components that might otherwise limit the system operating energy. The modulators were designed to enable a drop-in retrofit of each of the 48 existing Pre Amplifier Modules (PAMs) without compromising their original performance specifications. This was accomplished by use of transmissive Optically Addressable Light Valves (OALV) based on a Bismuth Silicon Oxide photoconductive layer in series with a twisted nematic liquid crystal (LC) layer. These Programmable Spatial Shaper packages in combination with a flaw inspection system and optic registration strategy have provided a robust approach for extending the operational lifetime of high fluence laser optics on NIF.

  2. Towards top-hat spatial shaping of ultrafast laser beam based on Zernike polynomials

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mauclair, Cyril; Faure, Nicolas; Houzet, Julien

    2016-04-01

    Femtosecond laser micro machining of surfaces knows a gain of interest as it demonstrates efficient and precise processing with reduced side effects around the irradiated zone, and also because of the remarkable costs reduction and reliability improvements of nowadays commercially available sources. Controlling the intensity distribution spatially can offer a supplementary degree of flexibility and precision in achieving user-defined ablation spatial profile, drilling, cutting of materials or in-volume laser-induced modifications. In this scope, the possibility to generate a top-hat intensity distribution by spatially shaping the beam wavefront is studied in this work. An optimization of Zernike polynomials coefficients is conducted to numerically determine an adequate phase mask that shapes the laser intensity distribution following a targeted top hat distribution in the processing plane, usually at the focal length of a converging lens. The efficiency of the method is numerically investigated in the optimization by evaluation of the root mean square error (RMS) between the top-hat target and the calculated laser distribution in the far field. We numerically verify that acceptable top-hat beam shaping of various size can be achieved with a sufficient number of Zernike polynomials, opening the way to phase mask calculations adapted to the wavefront modulator ability to reproduce Zernike polynomials.

  3. Finishing of additively manufactured titanium alloy by shape adaptive grinding (SAG)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beaucamp, Anthony T.; Namba, Yoshiharu; Charlton, Phillip; Jain, Samyak; Graziano, Arthur A.

    2015-06-01

    In recent years, rapid prototyping of titanium alloy components for medical and aeronautics application has become viable thanks to advances in technologies such as electron beam melting (EBM) and selective laser sintering (SLS). However, for many applications the high surface roughness generated by additive manufacturing techniques demands a post-finishing operation to improve the surface quality prior to usage. In this paper, the novel shape adaptive grinding process has been applied to finishing titanium alloy (Ti6Al4V) additively manufactured by EBM and SLS. It is shown that the micro-structured surface layer resulting from the melting process can be removed, and the surface can then be smoothed down to less than 10 nm Ra (starting from 4-5 μm Ra) using only three different diamond grit sizes. This paper also demonstrates application of the technology to freeform shapes, and documents the dimensional accuracy of finished artifacts.

  4. Beam-shaping technique for improving the beam quality of a high-power laser-diode stack.

    PubMed

    Gao, Xin; Ohashi, Hiroyuki; Okamoto, Hiroshi; Takasaka, Masaomi; Shinoda, Kazunori

    2006-06-01

    We report a beam-shaping technique that reconfigures the beams to improve the beam quality and enhance the power density for a ten-array high-power laser-diode stack by using two optical rectangular cubes and two stripe-mirror plates. The reshaped beam has threefold improvement in beam quality, and its power density is effectively enhanced. On the basis of this technique, we focus the beam of the high-power laser-diode stack to effectively end pump a high-power fiber laser.

  5. Exploring the unlimited possibilities of modular aspheric Gauss to top-hat beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Möhl, Anna; Fuchs, Ulrike

    2016-06-01

    Beam shaping is a field of research with growing importance. Therefore, a new refractive beam shaping system is presented. The knowledge gained from analyzing patent systems was used to derive our own improved design. It is compared to a patent system, and some selected results are presented in this work. Furthermore, possibilities to scale the entrance and exit beam diameters with the help of SPA™ Beam Expander Kit and SPA™ AspheriColl (both from asphericon GmbH, Jena, Germany) are shown, so that a modular top-hat generation is achievable. Additionally, the large spectral range in which the beam shaping system is applicable is demonstrated, and it is demonstrated how the beam shaping system can be used to improve the performance of other optical elements that require a top-hat beam profile.

  6. Adaptive Shape Functions and Internal Mesh Adaptation for Modelling Progressive Failure in Adhesively Bonded Joints

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stapleton, Scott; Gries, Thomas; Waas, Anthony M.; Pineda, Evan J.

    2014-01-01

    Enhanced finite elements are elements with an embedded analytical solution that can capture detailed local fields, enabling more efficient, mesh independent finite element analysis. The shape functions are determined based on the analytical model rather than prescribed. This method was applied to adhesively bonded joints to model joint behavior with one element through the thickness. This study demonstrates two methods of maintaining the fidelity of such elements during adhesive non-linearity and cracking without increasing the mesh needed for an accurate solution. The first method uses adaptive shape functions, where the shape functions are recalculated at each load step based on the softening of the adhesive. The second method is internal mesh adaption, where cracking of the adhesive within an element is captured by further discretizing the element internally to represent the partially cracked geometry. By keeping mesh adaptations within an element, a finer mesh can be used during the analysis without affecting the global finite element model mesh. Examples are shown which highlight when each method is most effective in reducing the number of elements needed to capture adhesive nonlinearity and cracking. These methods are validated against analogous finite element models utilizing cohesive zone elements.

  7. Experimental evaluation of shape memory alloy actuation technique in adaptive antenna design concepts

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kefauver, W. Neill; Carpenter, Bernie F.

    1994-01-01

    Creation of an antenna system that could autonomously adapt contours of reflecting surfaces to compensate for structural loads induced by a variable environment would maximize performance of space-based communication systems. Design of such a system requires the comprehensive development and integration of advanced actuator, sensor, and control technologies. As an initial step in this process, a test has been performed to assess the use of a shape memory alloy as a potential actuation technique. For this test, an existing, offset, cassegrain antenna system was retrofit with a subreflector equipped with shape memory alloy actuators for surface contour control. The impacts that the actuators had on both the subreflector contour and the antenna system patterns were measured. The results of this study indicate the potential for using shape memory alloy actuation techniques to adaptively control antenna performance; both variations in gain and beam steering capabilities were demonstrated. Future development effort is required to evolve this potential into a useful technology for satellite applications.

  8. Adaptive shape coding for perceptual decisions in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Kourtzi, Zoe; Welchman, Andrew E

    2015-01-01

    In its search for neural codes, the field of visual neuroscience has uncovered neural representations that reflect the structure of stimuli of variable complexity from simple features to object categories. However, accumulating evidence suggests an adaptive neural code that is dynamically shaped by experience to support flexible and efficient perceptual decisions. Here, we review work showing that experience plays a critical role in molding midlevel visual representations for perceptual decisions. Combining behavioral and brain imaging measurements, we demonstrate that learning optimizes feature binding for object recognition in cluttered scenes, and tunes the neural representations of informative image parts to support efficient categorical judgements. Our findings indicate that similar learning mechanisms may mediate long-term optimization through development, tune the visual system to fundamental principles of feature binding, and optimize feature templates for perceptual decisions. PMID:26024511

  9. Adaptive shape coding for perceptual decisions in the human brain

    PubMed Central

    Kourtzi, Zoe; Welchman, Andrew E.

    2015-01-01

    In its search for neural codes, the field of visual neuroscience has uncovered neural representations that reflect the structure of stimuli of variable complexity from simple features to object categories. However, accumulating evidence suggests an adaptive neural code that is dynamically shaped by experience to support flexible and efficient perceptual decisions. Here, we review work showing that experience plays a critical role in molding midlevel visual representations for perceptual decisions. Combining behavioral and brain imaging measurements, we demonstrate that learning optimizes feature binding for object recognition in cluttered scenes, and tunes the neural representations of informative image parts to support efficient categorical judgements. Our findings indicate that similar learning mechanisms may mediate long-term optimization through development, tune the visual system to fundamental principles of feature binding, and optimize feature templates for perceptual decisions. PMID:26024511

  10. Simultaneous beam sampling and aperture shape optimization for SPORT

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, Masoud; Li, Ruijiang; Xing, Lei; Ye, Yinyu

    2015-02-15

    Purpose: Station parameter optimized radiation therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital linear accelerators, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle, can be optimized simultaneously. SPORT promises to deliver remarkable radiation dose distributions in an efficient manner, yet there exists no optimization algorithm for its implementation. The purpose of this work is to develop an algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: The authors build a mathematical model with the fundamental station point parameters as the decision variables. To solve the resulting large-scale optimization problem, the authors devise an effective algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques: column generation, subgradient method, and pattern search. Column generation adds the most beneficial stations sequentially until the plan quality improvement saturates and provides a good starting point for the subsequent optimization. It also adds the new stations during the algorithm if beneficial. For each update resulted from column generation, the subgradient method improves the selected stations locally by reshaping the apertures and updating the beam angles toward a descent subgradient direction. The algorithm continues to improve the selected stations locally and globally by a pattern search algorithm to explore the part of search space not reachable by the subgradient method. By combining these three techniques together, all plausible combinations of station parameters are searched efficiently to yield the optimal solution. Results: A SPORT optimization framework with seamlessly integration of three complementary algorithms, column generation, subgradient method, and pattern search, was established. The proposed technique was applied to two previously treated clinical cases: a head and

  11. Ultrafast rotating dipole or propeller-shaped patterns: subwavelength shaping of a beam of light on a femtosecond time scale.

    PubMed

    Khonina, Svetlana N; Golub, Ilya

    2016-04-01

    We report on a remarkable property of azimuthally (radially) polarized light beams containing a vortex or an orbital angular momentum: upon tight focusing of a first-order vortex beam, the subwavelength spot has a shape of an electric (magnetic) dipole rotating at an optical frequency. For beams with a vortex of order m, the generated pattern is propeller-shaped and rotates at a 1/m fraction of the optical frequency. The applications include petahertz control of electrical or optical conductance between two electrodes or waveguides of two-terminal junctions.

  12. Adaptive damping in shape memory TiNi during cavitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jardine, A. Peter

    Recent studies by this author and others has demonstrated that cavitation-erosion of NiTi coatings or bulk NiTi is exceptiona. Studies were undertaken to ascertain whether this property is a consequence of either the general intermetallic properties of NiTi or by an adaptive stress-dissipation mechanism of the cavitation-generated shock wave by a microstructural mechanism related to the shape memory effect. In cavitation, an oscillating pressure field causes the formation and implosion of air bubbles. As a surface easily nucleates bubbles, the subsequent implosion of the bubbles generates stresses approaching several MPa, which are large enough to ablate material, ansd are also high enough to generate stress-induced Martensite or Austenite, depending on whether the applied stress is tensile or compressive. The implication is that the stress wave may be partially accommodated by the stress-induced transformation, which can dissipate the energy as heat on retransformation to the materials unstressed phase. Calculations concerning the variation of the cavitation-induced stresses and temperature distribution with depth into the TiNi coupled with the associated problems of heat transfer will be presented. It will be shown that an adaptive mechanism is plausible.

  13. Annular beam shaping system for advanced 3D laser brazing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pütsch, Oliver; Stollenwerk, Jochen; Kogel-Hollacher, Markus; Traub, Martin

    2012-10-01

    As laser brazing benefits from advantages such as smooth joints and small heat-affected zones, it has become established as a joining technology that is widely used in the automotive industry. With the processing of complex-shaped geometries, recent developed brazing heads suffer, however, from the need for continuous reorientation of the optical system and/or limited accessibility due to lateral wire feeding. This motivates the development of a laser brazing head with coaxial wire feeding and enhanced functionality. An optical system is designed that allows to generate an annular intensity distribution in the working zone. The utilization of complex optical components avoids obscuration of the optical path by the wire feeding. The new design overcomes the disadvantages of the state-of-the-art brazing heads with lateral wire feeding and benefits from the independence of direction while processing complex geometries. To increase the robustness of the brazing process, the beam path also includes a seam tracking system, leading to a more challenging design of the whole optical train. This paper mainly discusses the concept and the optical design of the coaxial brazing head, and also presents the results obtained with a prototype and selected application results.

  14. An interpretation and guide to single-pass beam shaping methods using SLMs and DMDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Kashchuk, Anatolii V.; Preece, Daryl; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Exquisite manipulations of light can be performed with devices such as spatial light modulators (SLMs) and digital micromirror devices (DMDs). These devices can be used to simulate transverse paraxial beam wavefunction eigenstates such as the Hermite-Laguerre-Gaussian mode families. We investigate several beam shaping methods in terms of the wavefunctions of scattered light. Our analysis of the efficiency, behaviour and limitations of beam shaping methods is applied to both theory and experiment. The deviation from the ideal output from a valid beam shaping method is shown to be due to experimental factors which are not necessarily being accounted for. Incident beam mode shape, aberration, and the amplitude/phase transfer functions of the DMD and SLM impact the distribution of scattered light and hence the effectiveness and efficiency of a beam shaping method. Correcting for these particular details of the optical system accounts for all differences in efficiency and mode fidelity between experiment and theory. We explicitly show the impact of experimental parameter variations so that these problems may be diagnosed and corrected in an experimental beam shaping apparatus. We show that several beam shaping methods can be used for the production of beam modes in a single pass and the choice is based on the particular experimental conditions.

  15. An interpretation and guide to single-pass beam shaping methods using SLMs and DMDs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stilgoe, Alexander B.; Kashchuk, Anatolii V.; Preece, Daryl; Rubinsztein-Dunlop, Halina

    2016-06-01

    Exquisite manipulations of light can be performed with devices such as spatial light modulators (SLMs) and digital micromirror devices (DMDs). These devices can be used to simulate transverse paraxial beam wavefunction eigenstates such as the Hermite–Laguerre–Gaussian mode families. We investigate several beam shaping methods in terms of the wavefunctions of scattered light. Our analysis of the efficiency, behaviour and limitations of beam shaping methods is applied to both theory and experiment. The deviation from the ideal output from a valid beam shaping method is shown to be due to experimental factors which are not necessarily being accounted for. Incident beam mode shape, aberration, and the amplitude/phase transfer functions of the DMD and SLM impact the distribution of scattered light and hence the effectiveness and efficiency of a beam shaping method. Correcting for these particular details of the optical system accounts for all differences in efficiency and mode fidelity between experiment and theory. We explicitly show the impact of experimental parameter variations so that these problems may be diagnosed and corrected in an experimental beam shaping apparatus. We show that several beam shaping methods can be used for the production of beam modes in a single pass and the choice is based on the particular experimental conditions.

  16. Measurement and Prediction of the Thermomechanical Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Brian; Turner, Travis L.; Seelecke, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    Previous work at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) involved fabrication and testing of composite beams with embedded, pre-strained shape memory alloy (SMA) ribbons within the beam structures. That study also provided comparison of experimental results with numerical predictions from a research code making use of a new thermoelastic model for shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures. The previous work showed qualitative validation of the numerical model. However, deficiencies in the experimental-numerical correlation were noted and hypotheses for the discrepancies were given for further investigation. The goal of this work is to refine the experimental measurement and numerical modeling approaches in order to better understand the discrepancies, improve the correlation between prediction and measurement, and provide rigorous quantitative validation of the numerical analysis/design tool. The experimental investigation is refined by a more thorough test procedure and incorporation of higher fidelity measurements such as infrared thermography and projection moire interferometry. The numerical results are produced by a recently commercialized version of the constitutive model as implemented in ABAQUS and are refined by incorporation of additional measured parameters such as geometric imperfection. Thermal buckling, post-buckling, and random responses to thermal and inertial (base acceleration) loads are studied. The results demonstrate the effectiveness of SMAHC structures in controlling static and dynamic responses by adaptive stiffening. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured results of the static and dynamic thermomechanical response, thereby providing quantitative validation of the numerical tool.

  17. Flexible assembly module for beam-shaping product families based on support structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Rübenach, Olaf; Beleke, Andreas; Haverkamp, Tobias; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel; Wenzel, Christian; Brecher, Christian

    2016-03-01

    Depending on the application, high-power diode lasers (HPDL) have individual requirements on their beam-shaping as well as their mechanical fixation. In order to reduce assembly efforts, laser system manufacturers request pre-assembled beam-shaping systems consisting of a support structure for adhesive bonding as well as one, two or more lenses. Therefore, manufacturers of micro-optics for HPDL need flexible solutions for assembling beam-shaping subassemblies. This paper discusses current solutions for mounting optical subassemblies for beam-shaping of high-power diode lasers and their drawbacks regarding quality and scalability. Subsequently, the paper presents a device which can be used for the sensor-guided assembly of beam-shaping systems based on bottomtab support structures. Results from test productions of several hundred modules are presented showing that repeatability in the range of 1 μm is feasible on an industrial level.

  18. Beam shaping design for coupling high power diode laser stack to fiber.

    PubMed

    Ghasemi, Seyed Hamed; Hantehzadeh, Mohammad-Reza; Sabbaghzadeh, Jamshid; Dorranian, Davoud; Lafooti, Majid; Vatani, Vahid; Rezaei-Nasirabad, Reza; Hemmati, Atefeh; Amidian, Ali Asghar; Alavian, Seyed Ali

    2011-06-20

    A beam shaping technique that rearranges the beam for improving the beam symmetry and power density of a ten-bar high power diode laser stack is simulated considering a stripe mirror plate and a V-Stack mirror in the beam shaping system. In this technique, the beam of a high power diode laser stack is effectively coupled into a standard 550 μm core diameter and a NA=0.22 fiber. By this technique, compactness, higher efficiency, and lower cost production of the diode are possible.

  19. Description of arbitrary shaped beams in elliptical cylinder coordinates, by using a plane wave spectrum approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, Gérard; Mees, Loic; Gréhan, Gérard; Ren, Kuan Fang

    1999-03-01

    The description of arbitrary shaped beams in elliptical cylinder coordinates is presented by using a plane wave spectrum approach. It is demonstrated and exemplified that this approach is equivalent to a formally more rigorous approach in terms of distributions. Beam shape coefficients are evaluated by using quadratures. The behavior of these quadratures is discussed in the case of a first-order Davis beam which does not exactly satisfy Maxwell's equations.

  20. Correction of linear-array lidar intensity data using an optimal beam shaping approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Fan; Wang, Yuanqing; Yang, Xingyu; Zhang, Bingqing; Li, Fenfang

    2016-08-01

    The linear-array lidar has been recently developed and applied for its superiority of vertically non-scanning, large field of view, high sensitivity and high precision. The beam shaper is the key component for the linear-array detection. However, the traditional beam shaping approaches can hardly satisfy our requirement for obtaining unbiased and complete backscattered intensity data. The required beam distribution should roughly be oblate U-shaped rather than Gaussian or uniform. Thus, an optimal beam shaping approach is proposed in this paper. By employing a pair of conical lenses and a cylindrical lens behind the beam expander, the expanded Gaussian laser was shaped to a line-shaped beam whose intensity distribution is more consistent with the required distribution. To provide a better fit to the requirement, off-axis method is adopted. The design of the optimal beam shaping module is mathematically explained and the experimental verification of the module performance is also presented in this paper. The experimental results indicate that the optimal beam shaping approach can effectively correct the intensity image and provide ~30% gain of detection area over traditional approach, thus improving the imaging quality of linear-array lidar.

  1. 32 nm imprint masks using variable shape beam pattern generators

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Selinidis, Kosta; Thompson, Ecron; Schmid, Gerard; Stacey, Nick; Perez, Joseph; Maltabes, John; Resnick, Douglas J.; Yeo, Jeongho; Kim, Hoyeon; Eynon, Ben

    2008-05-01

    Imprint lithography has been included on the ITRS Lithography Roadmap at the 32, 22 and 16 nm nodes. Step and Flash Imprint Lithography (S-FIL ®) is a unique method that has been designed from the beginning to enable precise overlay for creating multilevel devices. A photocurable low viscosity monomer is dispensed dropwise to meet the pattern density requirements of the device, thus enabling imprint patterning with a uniform residual layer across a field and across entire wafers. Further, S-FIL provides sub-100 nm feature resolution without the significant expense of multi-element, high quality projection optics or advanced illumination sources. However, since the technology is 1X, it is critical to address the infrastructure associated with the fabrication of templates. For sub-32 nm device manufacturing, one of the major technical challenges remains the fabrication of full-field 1x templates with commercially viable write times. Recent progress in the writing of sub-40 nm patterns using commercial variable shape e-beam tools and non-chemically amplified resists has demonstrated a very promising route to realizing these objectives, and in doing so, has considerably strengthened imprint lithography as a competitive manufacturing technology for the sub 32nm node. Here we report the first imprinting results from sub-40 nm full-field patterns, using Samsung's current flash memory production device design. The fabrication of the template is discussed and the resulting critical dimension control and uniformity are discussed, along with image placement results. The imprinting results are described in terms of CD uniformity, etch results, and overlay.

  2. Soft shape-adaptive gripping device made from artificial muscle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hamburg, E.; Vunder, V.; Johanson, U.; Kaasik, F.; Aabloo, A.

    2016-04-01

    We report on a multifunctional four-finger gripper for soft robotics, suitable for performing delicate manipulation tasks. The gripping device is comprised of separately driven gripping and lifting mechanisms, both made from a separate single piece of smart material - ionic capacitive laminate (ICL) also known as artificial muscle. Compared to other similar devices the relatively high force output of the ICL material allows one to construct a device able to grab and lift objects exceeding multiple times its own weight. Due to flexible design of ICL grips, the device is able to adapt the complex shapes of different objects and allows grasping single or multiple objects simultaneously without damage. The performance of the gripper is evaluated in two different configurations: a) the ultimate grasping strength of the gripping hand; and b) the maximum lifting force of the lifting actuator. The ICL is composed of three main layers: a porous membrane consisting of non-ionic polymer poly(vinylidene fluoride-co-hexafluoropropene) (PVdF-HFP), ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium trifluoromethane-sulfonate (EMITFS), and a reinforcing layer of woven fiberglass cloth. Both sides of the membrane are coated with a carbonaceous electrode. The electrodes are additionally covered with thin gold layers, serving as current collectors. Device made of this material operates silently, requires low driving voltage (<3 V), and is suitable for performing tasks in open air environment.

  3. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively. PMID:27343191

  4. Proteasome function shapes innate and adaptive immune responses.

    PubMed

    Kammerl, Ilona E; Meiners, Silke

    2016-08-01

    The proteasome system degrades more than 80% of intracellular proteins into small peptides. Accordingly, the proteasome is involved in many essential cellular functions, such as protein quality control, transcription, immune responses, cell signaling, and apoptosis. Moreover, degradation products are loaded onto major histocompatibility class I molecules to communicate the intracellular protein composition to the immune system. The standard 20S proteasome core complex contains three distinct catalytic active sites that are exchanged upon stimulation with inflammatory cytokines to form the so-called immunoproteasome. Immunoproteasomes are constitutively expressed in immune cells and have different proteolytic activities compared with standard proteasomes. They are rapidly induced in parenchymal cells upon intracellular pathogen infection and are crucial for priming effective CD8(+) T-cell-mediated immune responses against infected cells. Beyond shaping these adaptive immune reactions, immunoproteasomes also regulate the function of immune cells by degradation of inflammatory and immune mediators. Accordingly, they emerge as novel regulators of innate immune responses. The recently unraveled impairment of immunoproteasome function by environmental challenges and by genetic variations of immunoproteasome genes might represent a currently underestimated risk factor for the development and progression of lung diseases. In particular, immunoproteasome dysfunction will dampen resolution of infections, thereby promoting exacerbations, may foster autoimmunity in chronic lung diseases, and possibly contributes to immune evasion of tumor cells. Novel pharmacological tools, such as site-specific inhibitors of the immunoproteasome, as well as activity-based probes, however, hold promises as innovative therapeutic drugs for respiratory diseases and biomarker profiling, respectively.

  5. Shaped beam scattering by an aggregate of particles using generalized Lorenz-Mie theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Briard, Paul; Wang, Jia jie; Han, Yi Ping

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the light scattering by an aggregate of particles illuminated by an arbitrary shaped beam is analyzed within the framework of generalized Lorenz-Mie theory (GLMT). The theoretical derivations of aggregated particles illuminated by an arbitrary shaped beam are revisited, with special attention paid to the computation of beam shape coefficients of a shaped beam for aggregated particles. The theoretical treatments as well as a home-made code are then verified by making comparisons between our numerical results and those calculated using a public available T-Matrix code MSTM. Good agreements are achieved which partially indicate the correctness of both codes. Additionally, more numerical results are presented to study the scattered fields of aggregated particles illuminated by a focused Gaussian beam. Several large enhancements in the scattered intensity distributions are found which are believed to be due to the Bragg's scattering by a linear chain of spheres.

  6. Effects of laser beam shapes on depths of penetration in dermatology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saghafi, S.; Withford, M.; Farhadi, M.; Ghaderi, R.; Granmayeh, A.; Ghoranneviss, Z.; Moravej, F.

    2006-04-01

    For many medical laser applications, a particular beam shape is required. The output beam of a laser can be approximated by a Gaussian, higher-order Gaussian, annular or a flat-top (uniform) distribution. Here, we investigate, analytically and experimentally, the effects of laser beam shapes on the depths of penetration in treatments of any types of vascular malformation. In order to do this, the physical and optical parameters of the skin must be known and measured correctly. Using the Monte-Carlo method for seven layers of skin, a software predicting the beam propagation and intensity distribution inside of tissue has been developed in our centre. In this paper, a 15 watts copper vapour laser producing (511nm and 578 nm) for treatments of patients having PWS (Port Wine Stains) of different sizes is employed. The output beam of this laser was Gaussian. We have designed a beam homogenizer converting a Gaussian beam into flat-top distribution. Therefore, the effects of the laser irradiance beam shape (before and after beam shaping) on the depth of penetration have been investigated before people's treatments. Initially, two laser beams having Gaussian output distribution of the same power are considered. The diameter of one beam is 5mm and the other one is 10 mm. The intensity distribution of these beam inside of similar tissues are predicted and it is concluded that for deep but small size PWS the Gaussian beam having smaller beam diameter is more suitable than the larger spot size. Then, the beam intensity distribution inside of the same tissue (similar parameters) for two flat-top beams of the same power but different diameters (one is 5mm and the other is 10 mm) is calculated. It can be seen that the flat top beam of bigger spot-size has smaller penetration depth but it illuminates a larger area uniformly (suitable for large but not deep area). The depth of penetration of flat-top beam with smaller spot size is deeper but it illuminates a smaller area uniformly

  7. Manufacture of refractive and diffractive beam-shaping elements in higher quantities using glass molding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wolz, Michael; Blöcher, Ullrich; Dross, Gerhard; Schmitt, Jana; Bischoff, Christian; Umhofer, Udo

    2015-03-01

    Laser beam shaping elements can be used e.g. for material processing. The results of these processes can be improved when the usually Gaussian profile of the laser is transformed into a top hat profile, which can be circular or rectangular in shape. Another frequently used type of beam-forming devices are beam splitters for parallel processing using only one laser. These types of beam formers can be implemented as diffractive or refractive elements. So far these optics are produced either directly by means of lithography e.g. in glass or in plastic using a hot embossing process or nanoimprint technology. Elements produced in this way have either the disadvantage of high costs or they are limited in temperature range, laser power or wavelength. A newly developed molding process for glass allows the manufacture of larger numbers of optics with reduced cost. The production of molds for refractive top hat beam shaping devices requires very high precision of the applied grinding process. Form deviations below 100 nm are necessary to obtain a homogeneous illumination. Measurements of the surface topography of gauss to top hat beam shaping elements using white light interferometry are presented as well as results of optical measurements of the beam profile using a camera. Continuous diffractive beam shaping elements for beam splitting applications are designed to generate several sub-beams each carrying the same energy. In order to achieve this, form deviations of less than 50 nm are required. Measurements of the surface of a 1 x 5 beam splitter are compared with ideal beam splitter profiles. The resulting beam intensity distribution of a molded element is presented.

  8. High-speed femtosecond laser beam shaping based on binary holography using a digital micromirror device.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Jiyi; Gu, Chenglin; Zhang, Dapeng; Chen, Shih-Chi

    2015-11-01

    In this Letter, we present a digital micromirror device (DMD)-based ultrafast beam shaper, i.e., DUBS. To our knowledge, the DUBS is the first binary laser beam shaper that can generate high-resolution (1140×912 pixels) arbitrary beam modes for femtosecond lasers at a rate of 4.2 kHz; the resolution and pattern rate are limited by the DMD. In the DUBS, the spectrum of the input pulsed laser is first angularly dispersed by a transmission grating and subsequently imaged to a DMD with beam modulation patterns; the transmission grating and a high-reflectivity mirror together compensate the angular dispersion introduced by the DMD. The mode of the output beam is monitored by a CCD camera. In the experiments, the DUBS is programmed to generate four different beam modes, including an Airy beam, Bessel beam, Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam, and a custom-designed "peace-dove" beam via the principle of binary holography. To verify the high shaping rate, the Airy beam and LG beam are generated alternately at 4.2 kHz, i.e., the maximum pattern rate of our DMD. The overall efficiency of the DUBS is measured to be 4.7%. With the high-speed and high-resolution beam-shaping capability, the DUBS may find important applications in nonlinear microscopy, optical manipulation, and microscale/nanoscale laser machining, etc.

  9. Adaptive Shape Kernel-Based Mean Shift Tracker in Robot Vision System.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chunmei; Wang, Yirui; Gao, Shangce

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive shape kernel-based mean shift tracker using a single static camera for the robot vision system. The question that we address in this paper is how to construct such a kernel shape that is adaptive to the object shape. We perform nonlinear manifold learning technique to obtain the low-dimensional shape space which is trained by training data with the same view as the tracking video. The proposed kernel searches the shape in the low-dimensional shape space obtained by nonlinear manifold learning technique and constructs the adaptive kernel shape in the high-dimensional shape space. It can improve mean shift tracker performance to track object position and object contour and avoid the background clutter. In the experimental part, we take the walking human as example to validate that our method is accurate and robust to track human position and describe human contour. PMID:27379165

  10. Adaptive Shape Kernel-Based Mean Shift Tracker in Robot Vision System

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    This paper proposes an adaptive shape kernel-based mean shift tracker using a single static camera for the robot vision system. The question that we address in this paper is how to construct such a kernel shape that is adaptive to the object shape. We perform nonlinear manifold learning technique to obtain the low-dimensional shape space which is trained by training data with the same view as the tracking video. The proposed kernel searches the shape in the low-dimensional shape space obtained by nonlinear manifold learning technique and constructs the adaptive kernel shape in the high-dimensional shape space. It can improve mean shift tracker performance to track object position and object contour and avoid the background clutter. In the experimental part, we take the walking human as example to validate that our method is accurate and robust to track human position and describe human contour. PMID:27379165

  11. Transverse beam shape measurements of intense proton beams using optical transition radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Scarpine, Victor E.; /Fermilab

    2012-03-01

    A number of particle physics experiments are being proposed as part of the Department of Energy HEP Intensity Frontier. Many of these experiments will utilize megawatt level proton beams onto targets to form secondary beams of muons, kaons and neutrinos. These experiments require transverse size measurements of the incident proton beam onto target for each beam spill. Because of the high power levels, most beam intercepting profiling techniques will not work at full beam intensity. The possibility of utilizing optical transition radiation (OTR) for high intensity proton beam profiling is discussed. In addition, previous measurements of OTR beam profiles from the NuMI beamline are presented.

  12. Novel shaping optics of CO2 laser beam: LSV optics--principles and applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miyamoto, Isamu; Horiguchi, Yukihiro; Maruo, Hiroshi

    1990-10-01

    A novel beam shaping optics, Linear-polarized Shape Variable (LSV) optics for high power CO2 laser beam has been developed, which provides a beam spot with variable beam shape in terms of different aspect ratios, and negligible shaping loss of 5% with high beam absorptivity of 50% in non-coated steel, which is as high as carbon coated steel, The high efficiencies both in shaping and metal heating are attained by utilizing linear-polarized CO2 laser beam. In laser hardening, the case depth larger than 2mm (width=l5mm) was obtained without any absorption coating. By changing the beam width in the direction of beam motion, D, in accordance with the traveling speed, hardened depth from 0.3mm to 2.5mm (width=l5mm) was obtained at constant surface temperature of 1400 C at 3kW power level. LSV optics was also used for local heating up to 1100 C in brazing Si3N4 ceramics with insertion of Al foil, and joint strength as high as 400 MPa was obtained in an irradiation time of about 20 sec without any preheating.

  13. Identification of multiple damage in beams based on robust curvature mode shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Maosen; Radzieński, Maciej; Xu, Wei; Ostachowicz, Wiesław

    2014-06-01

    Multiple damage identification in beams using curvature mode shape has become a research focus of increasing interest during the last few years. On this topic, most existing studies address the sensitivity of curvature mode shape to multiple damage. A noticeable deficiency of curvature mode shape, however, is its susceptibility to measurement noise, easily impairing its advantage of sensitivity to multiple damage. To overcome this drawback, the synergy between a wavelet transform (WT) and a Teager energy operator (TEO) is explored, with the aim of ameliorating the curvature mode shape. The improved curvature mode shape, termed the TEO-WT curvature mode shape, has inherent capabilities of immunity to noise and sensitivity to multiple damage. The efficacy of the TEO-WT curvature mode shape is analytically verified by identifying multiple cracks in cantilever beams, with particular emphasis on its ability to locate multiple damage in noisy conditions; the applicability of the proposed curvature mode shape is experimentally validated by detecting multiple fairly thin slots in steel beams with mode shapes acquired by a scanning laser vibrometer. The proposed curvature mode shape appears sensitive to multiple damage and robust against noise, and therefore is well suited to identification of multiple damage in beams in noisy environments.

  14. Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration with funnel-shaped-hole target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Peng; Fan, Da Peng; Li, Yu Xiao

    2016-03-01

    Improve beam quality of laser proton acceleration using a funnel-shaped-hole target is demonstrated through particle simulations. When an intense short pulse laser illuminates a thin foil target with a hole at the rear surface, the proton beam divergence is suppressed compared with that obtained in a traditional flat target. In this paper, a funnel-shaped-hole target is proposed to improve the proton beam quality. Using two-dimensional particle-in-cell (PIC) simulations, three different shapes of target (funnel-shaped-hole target, cylinder-shaped-hole target and flat target) are simulated and compared. The funnel-shaped hole in the rear surface of the target helps to focus the electron cloud significantly and improve the maximum proton energy and suppress the proton beam divergence. Different thicknesses of the new target are also simulated, and the effects of thickness on the divergence angle and proton spectra are investigated. The optimal size of the new target is obtained and the quality of the proton beam is improved significantly. The funnel-shaped-hole target serves as a new method to improve the proton beam quality in laser-plasma interactions.

  15. The use of intensity-modulated radiation therapy photon beams for improving the dose uniformity of electron beams shaped with MLC

    SciTech Connect

    Mosalaei, Homeira; Karnas, Scott; Shah, Sheel; Van Doodewaard, Sharon; Foster, Tim; Chen, Jeff

    2012-04-01

    Electrons are ideal for treating shallow tumors and sparing adjacent normal tissue. Conventionally, electron beams are collimated by cut-outs that are time-consuming to make and difficult to adapt to tumor shape throughout the course of treatment. We propose that electron cut-outs can be replaced using photon multileaf collimator (MLC). Two major problems of this approach are that the scattering of electrons causes penumbra widening because of a large air gap, and available commercial treatment planning systems (TPSs) do not support MLC-collimated electron beams. In this study, these difficulties were overcome by (1) modeling electron beams collimated by photon MLC for a commercial TPS, and (2) developing a technique to reduce electron beam penumbra by adding low-energy intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT) photons (4 MV). We used blocks to simulate MLC shielding in the TPS. Inverse planning was used to optimize boost photon beams. This technique was applied to a parotid and a central nervous system (CNS) clinical case. Combined photon and electron plans were compared with conventional plans and verified using ion chamber, film, and a 2D diode array. Our studies showed that the beam penumbra for mixed beams with 90 cm source to surface distance (SSD) is comparable with electron applicators and cut-outs at 100 cm SSD. Our mixed-beam technique yielded more uniform dose to the planning target volume and lower doses to various organs at risk for both parotid and CNS clinical cases. The plans were verified with measurements, with more than 95% points passing the gamma criteria of 5% in dose difference and 5 mm for distance to agreement. In conclusion, the study has demonstrated the feasibility and potential advantage of using photon MLC to collimate electron beams with boost photon IMRT fields.

  16. Temporal E-Beam Shaping in an S-Band Accelerator

    SciTech Connect

    Loos, H.; Dowell, D.; Gilevich, A.; Limborg-Deprey, C.; Boscolo, M.; Ferrario, M.; Petrarca, M.; Vicario, C.; Murphy, J.B.; Sheehy, B.; Shen, Y.; Tsang, T.; Wang, X.J.; Wu, Z.; Serafini, L.; /INFN, Milan

    2006-02-15

    New short-wavelength SASE light sources will require very bright electron beams, brighter in some cases than is now possible. One method for improving brightness involves the careful shaping of the electron bunch to control the degrading effects of its space charge forces. We study this experimentally in an S-band system, by using an acousto-optical programmable dispersive filter to shape the photocathode laser pulse that drives the RF photoinjector. We report on the efficacy of shaping from the IR through the UV, and the effects of shaping on the electron beam dynamics.

  17. Design a freeform microlens array module for any arbitrary-shape collimated beam shaping and color mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Enguo; Wu, Rengmao; Guo, Tailiang

    2014-06-01

    Collimated beam shaping with freeform surface usually employs a predefined mapping to tailor one or multiple freeform surfaces. Limitation on those designs is that the source, the freeform optics and the target are in fixed one-to-one correspondence with each other. To overcome this drawback, this paper presents a kind of freeform microlens array module integrated with an ultra-thin freeform microlens array and a condenser lens to reshape any arbitrary-shape collimated beam into a prescribed uniform rectangular illumination and achieve color mixing. The design theory is explicitly given, and some key issues are addressed. Several different application examples are given, and the target is obtained with high uniformity and energy efficiency. This freeform microlens array module, which shows better flexibility and practicality than the regular designs, can be used not only to reshape any arbitrary-shape collimated beam (or a collimated beam integrated with several sub-collimated beams), but also most importantly to achieve color mixing. With excellent optical performance and ultra-compact volume, this optical module together with the design theory can be further introduced into other applications and will have a huge market potential in the near future.

  18. Surface profiling of X-ray mirrors for shaping focused beams.

    PubMed

    Laundy, David; Alianelli, Lucia; Sutter, John; Evans, Gwyndaf; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-01-26

    Grazing incidence mirrors are a standard optic for focusing X-rays. Active mirrors, whose surface profile can be finely adjusted, allow control of beam shape and size at the sample. However, progress towards their routine use for beam shaping has been hampered by the strong striations in reflected beams away from the focal plane. Re-entrant (partly concave and partly convex) surface modifications are proposed for shaping X-ray beams to a top-hat in the focal plane while reducing the striations caused by unavoidable polishing errors. A method for constructing such surfaces with continuous height and slope (but only piecewise continuous curvature) will be provided. Ray tracing and wave propagation calculations confirm its effectiveness. A mirror system is proposed allowing vertical beam sizes in the range 0.5 to 10μm. A prototype will be fabricated and is expected to have applications on many synchrotron X-ray beamlines.

  19. Intense Bessel-like beams arising from pyramid-shaped microtips.

    PubMed

    Martin, Jérôme; Proust, Julien; Gérard, Davy; Bijeon, Jean-Louis; Plain, Jérôme

    2012-04-01

    We show both numerically and experimentally that intense, narrow, and low-divergence beams of light are produced at the apex of dielectric pyramid-shaped microtips. These beams exhibit a Bessel transverse profile but are narrower than the usual Bessel beam, allowing for a significant enhancement of the light intensity inside the beam. They are generated by axicon-like structures with submicrometric height imprinted in glass by combining optical lithography and chemical etching. The resulting beams are experimentally imaged using fluorescence microscopy, in remarkable agreement with numerical computations.

  20. Optimum shape control of flexible beams by piezo-electric actuators

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Baz, A.; Poh, S.

    1987-01-01

    The utilization of piezoelectric actuators in controlling the static deformation and shape of flexible beams is examined. An optimum design procedure is presented to enable the selection of the optimal location, thickness and excitation voltage of the piezoelectric actuators in a way that would minimize the deflection of the beam to which these actuators are bonded. Numerical examples are presented to illustrate the application of the developed optimization procedure in minimizing structural deformation of beams using ceramic and polymeric piezoelectric actuators bonded to the beams with a typical bonding agent. The obtained results emphasize the importance of the devised rational produce in designing beam-actuator systems with minimal elastic distortions.

  1. Ultrafast laser spatial beam shaping based on Zernike polynomials for surface processing.

    PubMed

    Houzet, J; Faure, N; Larochette, M; Brulez, A-C; Benayoun, S; Mauclair, C

    2016-03-21

    In femtosecond laser machining, spatial beam shaping can be achieved with wavefront modulators. The wavefront modulator displays a pre-calculated phase mask that modulates the laser wavefront to generate a target intensity distribution in the processing plane. Due to the non-perfect optical response of wavefront modulators, the experimental distribution may significantly differ from the target, especially for continuous shapes. We propose an alternative phase mask calculation method that can be adapted to the phase modulator optical performance. From an adjustable number of Zernike polynomials according to this performance, a least square fitting algorithm numerically determines their coefficients to obtain the desired wavefront modulation. We illustrate the technique with an optically addressed liquid-crystal light valve to produce continuous intensity distributions matching a desired ablation profile, without the need of a wavefront sensor. The projection of the experimental laser distribution shows a 5% RMS error compared to the calculated one. Ablation of steel is achieved following user-defined micro-dimples and micro-grooves targets on mold surfaces. The profiles of the microgrooves and the injected polycarbonate closely match the target (RMS below 4%). PMID:27136844

  2. Multistable wireless micro-actuator based on antagonistic pre-shaped double beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, X.; Lamarque, F.; Doré, E.; Pouille, P.

    2015-07-01

    This paper presents a monolithic multistable micro-actuator based on antagonistic pre-shaped double beams. The designed micro-actuator is formed by two rows of bistable micro-actuators providing four stable positions. The bistable mechanism for each row is a pair of antagonistic pre-shaped beams. This bistable mechanism has an easier pre-load operation compared to the pre-compressed bistable beams method. Furthermore, it solves the asymmetrical force output problem of parallel pre-shaped bistable double beams. At the same time, the geometrical limit is lower than parallel pre-shaped bistable double beams, which ensures a smaller stroke of the micro-actuator with the same dimensions. The designed micro-actuator is fabricated using laser cutting machine on medium density fiberboard (MDF). The bistability and merits of antagonistic pre-shaped double beams are experimentally validated. Finally, a contactless actuation test is performed using 660 nm wavelength laser heating shape memory alloy (SMA) active elements.

  3. Narrowing of Doppler and hyperfine line shapes of Rb - D2 transition using a Vortex beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Bankim Chandra; Bhattacharyya, Dipankar; De, Sankar

    2016-01-01

    We performed an experimental and theoretical study on saturation absorption spectroscopy on 87Rb and 85Rb atoms in D2 transition using a Laguerre-Gaussian (LG) beam with higher orders. We observed narrow line shapes of the Doppler and hyperfine absorption profiles due to the introduction of the LG beam in comparison to the fundamental Gaussian beam. Narrowing of the line shape is dependent on the azimuthal mode index of the LG field. It is observed that the spatially dependent Rabi frequency plays a significant role behind these narrowing phenomenon.

  4. Novel adaptive fiber-optics collimator for coherent beam combination.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Pengfei; Ma, Yanxing; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2014-12-15

    In this manuscript, we experimentally validate a novel design of adaptive fiber-optics collimator (AFOC), which utilizes two levers to enlarge the movable range of the fiber end cap. The enlargement of the range makes the new AFOC possible to compensate the end-cap/tilt aberration in fiber laser beam combining system. The new AFOC based on flexible hinges and levers was fabricated and the performance of the new AFOC was tested carefully, including its control range, frequency response and control accuracy. Coherent beam combination (CBC) of two 5-W fiber amplifiers array with simultaneously end-cap/tilt control and phase-locking control was implemented successfully with the novel AFOC. Experimental results show that the average normalized power in the bucket (PIB) value increases from 0.311 to 0.934 with active phasing and tilt aberration compensation simultaneously, and with both controls on, the fringe contrast improves to more than 82% from 0% for the case with both control off. This work presents a promising structure for tilt aberration control in high power CBC system.

  5. Hybrid laser-beam-shaping system for rotatable dual beams with long depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Fu-Lung; Chen, Cheng-Huan; Lin, Yu-Chung; Lin, Mao-Chi

    2016-10-01

    A laser processing system consisting of two diffractive elements and one refractive element is proposed enabling a Gaussian laser beam to be transformed into two beams with a depth of focus of up to 150 µm and focal spot smaller than 5 µm. For specific laser processing, the two beams are rotatable when the beam-splitting diffractive element is rotated. The overall system is versatile for laser cutting and drilling.

  6. Hybrid laser-beam-shaping system for rotatable dual beams with long depth of focus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chou, Fu-Lung; Chen, Cheng-Huan; Lin, Yu-Chung; Lin, Mao-Chi

    2016-08-01

    A laser processing system consisting of two diffractive elements and one refractive element is proposed enabling a Gaussian laser beam to be transformed into two beams with a depth of focus of up to 150 µm and focal spot smaller than 5 µm. For specific laser processing, the two beams are rotatable when the beam-splitting diffractive element is rotated. The overall system is versatile for laser cutting and drilling.

  7. Design of focal beam shaping system through irradiance and phase control

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Meijie; Meuret, Youri; Vervaeke, Michael; Thienpont, Hugo; Duerr, Fabian

    2016-04-01

    Focal beam shaping (FBS), or laser beam shaping at focus, is required in many laser applications. The most common approach is to use a phase element and a Fourier transform lens to generate at the focal plane of the lens the desired irradiance pattern, usually a at-top. The shaping quality depends strongly on a dimensionless parameter β. In case of long focal length and/or small focal spot, the input laser beam should be sufficiently large in order to get a large β value for a satisfying shaping quality. Therefore additional beam expansions might be needed. In this work, we propose a different approach with two plano-aspheric lenses that allows to control both irradiance and phase at focus. The two lenses are designed by an extended ray mapping technique combined with a rigorous backward wave propagation method, so that diffraction effects around laser focus can be implemented in a reliable way. With the developed approach, the shaping quality is guaranteed without the possible need for extra beam expanders, which makes the system more compact. The advantage of our design approach is demonstrated in direct comparison with the conventional Fourier approach for the same design example to transform a Gaussian beam to have a circular flat-top irradiance pattern.

  8. Woven type smart soft composite beam with in-plane shape retention

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Renzhe; Han, Min-Woo; Lee, Gil-Yong; Ahn, Sung-Hoon

    2013-12-01

    Shape memory alloy (SMA) wire embedded composites (SMAECs) are widely used as morphing structures in small-size and high-output systems. However, conventional SMAECs cannot keep deformed shapes without additional energy. In this paper, a new kind of smart structure named the woven type smart soft composite (SSC) beam is introduced, which is not only capable of morphing, but also maintaining its deformed shape without additional energy. The woven type SSC beam consists of two parts: woven wires and matrix. The selected woven wires are nitinol (Ni-Ti) SMA wires and glass fibers, while the matrix part is polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS). In order to evaluate the performance of the woven type SSC beam in areas such as in-plane deformation, blocking force and repeatability, a beam-shape specimen is prepared of size 100 mm (length) × 8 mm (width) ×3 mm (thickness). The fabricated SSC beam achieved 21 mm deformation and 16 mm shape retention. Blocking force was measured using a dynamometer, and was about 60 mN. In the repeatability test, it recovered almost the same position when its cooling time was 90 s more. Consequently, the woven type SSC beam can be applied to bio-mimicking, soft morphing actuators, consuming less energy than traditional SMAECs.

  9. Shaping single walled nanotubes with an electron beam

    SciTech Connect

    Zobelli, A.; Gloter, A.; Colliex, C.; Ewels, C. P.

    2008-01-15

    We show that electron irradiation in a dedicated scanning transmission microscope can be used as a nano-electron-lithography technique allowing the controlled reshaping of single walled carbon and boron nitride nanotubes. The required irradiation conditions have been optimized on the basis of total knock-on cross sections calculated within density functional based methods. It is then possible to induce morphological modifications, such as a local change of the tube chirality, by sequentially removing several tens of atoms with a nanometrical spatial resolution. We show that electron beam heating effects are limited. Thus, electron beam induced vacancy migration and nucleation might be excluded. These irradiation techniques could open new opportunities for nanoengineering a large variety of nanostructured materials.

  10. Beam-shape effects in nonlinear Compton and Thomson scattering

    SciTech Connect

    Heinzl, T.; Seipt, D.; Kaempfer, B.

    2010-02-15

    We discuss intensity effects in collisions between beams of optical photons from a high-power laser and relativistic electrons. Our main focus is on the modifications of the emission spectra due to realistic finite-beam geometries. By carefully analyzing the classical limit we precisely quantify the distinction between strong-field QED Compton scattering and classical Thomson scattering. A purely classical, but fully covariant, calculation of the bremsstrahlung emitted by an electron in a plane-wave laser field yields radiation into harmonics, as expected. This result is generalized to pulses of finite duration and explains the appearance of line broadening and harmonic substructure as an interference phenomenon. The ensuing numerical treatment confirms that strong focusing of the laser leads to a broad continuum while higher harmonics become visible only at moderate focusing, and hence lower intensity. We present a scaling law for the backscattered photon spectral density which facilitates averaging over electron beam phase space. Finally, we propose a set of realistic parameters such that the observation of intensity-induced spectral red shift, higher harmonics, and their substructure becomes feasible.

  11. Layerwise Analysis of Thermal Shape Control in Graded Piezoelectric Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lee, Ho-Jun

    2003-01-01

    A layerwise finite element formulation developed for piezoelectric materials is used to investigate the displacement and stress response of a functionally graded piezoelectric bimorph actuator. The formulation is based on the principles of linear thermopiezoelectricity and accounts for the coupled mechanical, electrical, and thermal response of piezoelectric materials. The layerwise laminate theory is implemented into a linear beam element in order to provide a more accurate representation of the transverse and shear effects that are induced by increased inhomogeneities introduced through-the-thickness by using functionally graded materials. The accuracy of the formulation is verified with previously published experimental results for a piezoelectric bimorph actuator. Additional studies are conducted to analyze the impact of electric and thermal loads on the deflections and stresses in a bimorph actuator. Results of the study help demonstrate the capability of the layerwise theory to provide a more complete representation of shear effects that are no longer negligible even in thin piezoelectric beams. In addition, the effects of varying piezoelectric properties through-the-thickness of the beam are shown to provide additional benefits in minimizing the induced deformations and stresses.

  12. Automatic online adaptive radiation therapy techniques for targets with significant shape change: a feasibility study.

    PubMed

    Court, Laurence E; Tishler, Roy B; Petit, Joshua; Cormack, Robert; Chin, Lee

    2006-05-21

    This work looks at the feasibility of an online adaptive radiation therapy concept that would detect the daily position and shape of the patient, and would then correct the daily treatment to account for any changes compared with planning position. In particular, it looks at the possibility of developing algorithms to correct for large complicated shape change. For co-planar beams, the dose in an axial plane is approximately associated with the positions of a single multi-leaf collimator (MLC) pair. We start with a primary plan, and automatically generate several secondary plans with gantry angles offset by regular increments. MLC sequences for each plan are calculated keeping monitor units (MUs) and number of segments constant for a given beam (fluences are different). Bulk registration (3D) of planning and daily CT images gives global shifts. Slice-by-slice (2D) registration gives local shifts and rotations about the longitudinal axis for each axial slice. The daily MLC sequence is then created for each axial slice/MLC leaf pair combination, by taking the MLC positions from the pre-calculated plan with the nearest rotation, and shifting using a beam's-eye-view calculation to account for local linear shifts. A planning study was carried out using two head and neck region MR images of a healthy volunteer which were contoured to simulate a base-of-tongue treatment: one with the head straight (used to simulate the planning image) and the other with the head tilted to the left (the daily image). Head and neck treatment was chosen to evaluate this technique because of its challenging nature, with varying internal and external contours, and multiple degrees of freedom. Shape change was significant: on a slice-by-slice basis, local rotations in the daily image varied from 2 to 31 degrees, and local shifts ranged from -0.2 to 0.5 cm and -0.4 to 0.0 cm in right-left and posterior-anterior directions, respectively. The adapted treatment gave reasonable target coverage (100

  13. Dynamic plasmonic beam shaping by vector beams with arbitrary locally linear polarization states

    SciTech Connect

    Man, Zhongsheng; Zhang, Yuquan; Zhang, Chonglei; Du, Luping; Min, Changjun E-mail: xcyuan@szu.edu.cn; Yuan, X.-C. E-mail: xcyuan@szu.edu.cn; Zhu, Siwei; Paul Urbach, H.

    2014-07-07

    Vector beams, which have space-variant state of polarization (SOP) comparing with scalar beams with spatially homogeneous SOP, are used to manipulate surface plasmon polarizations (SPPs). We find that the excitation, orientation, and distribution of the focused SPPs excited in a high numerical aperture microscopic configuration highly depend on the space-variant polarization of the incident vector beam. When it comes to vector beam with axial symmetry, multi-foci of SPPs with the same size and uniform intensity can be obtained, and the number of foci is depending on the polarization order n. Those properties can be of great value in biological sensor and plasmonic tweezers applications.

  14. New vistas in refractive laser beam shaping with an analytic design approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Duerr, Fabian; Thienpont, Hugo

    2014-05-01

    Many commercial, medical and scientific applications of the laser have been developed since its invention. Some of these applications require a specific beam irradiance distribution to ensure optimal performance. Often, it is possible to apply geometrical methods to design laser beam shapers. This common design approach is based on the ray mapping between the input plane and the output beam. Geometric ray mapping designs with two plano-aspheric lenses have been thoroughly studied in the past. Even though analytic expressions for various ray mapping functions do exist, the surface profiles of the lenses are still calculated numerically. In this work, we present an alternative novel design approach that allows direct calculation of the rotational symmetric lens profiles described by analytic functions. Starting from the example of a basic beam expander, a set of functional differential equations is derived from Fermat's principle. This formalism allows calculating the exact lens profiles described by Taylor series coefficients up to very high orders. To demonstrate the versatility of this new approach, two further cases are solved: a Gaussian to at-top irradiance beam shaping system, and a beam shaping system that generates a more complex dark-hollow Gaussian (donut-like) irradiance profile with zero intensity in the on-axis region. The presented ray tracing results confirm the high accuracy of all calculated solutions and indicate the potential of this design approach for refractive beam shaping applications.

  15. Optical apparatus using liquid crystals for shaping the spatial intensity of optical beams having designated wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, S.D.; Cerqua, K.A.

    1987-07-14

    The spatial intensity profile of an optical beam of designated wavelengths, such as a laser beam, is shaped (the beam is apodized) by means of cholesteric liquid crystals of opposite chirality disposed successively along the path of the beam. The crystals have curved surfaces, which may be defined by a lens which defines the thickness of the liquid crystal fluid gap in a liquid crystal cell, so as to vary the selective reflection of the designated wavelength across the aperture of the beam. In this way, a soft aperture is provided. By using tandem cell pairs having liquid crystals of opposite chirality, but of different pitch, and with lenses of different curvature, beams of different wavelengths which are projected colinearly along the path may be individually tailored in spatial intensity profile. 11 figs.

  16. Effect of shape of elastic beam hair on its adhesion with wavy surfaces

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hemthavy, Pasomphone; Yazaki, Takehiko; Wang, Boqing; Sekiguchi, Yu; Takahashi, Kunio

    2014-08-01

    An analysis on a tapered elastic beam whose side surface partially adhered to a rigid surface was carried out to study the effect of the beam shape on the gripping force. Considering the total energy of the system, the relation between the gripping force and the displacement was obtained analytically in closed form. The analytical result is significant because it provides an intuitive picture of the gripping force. Although, an individually tapered beam can generate less gripping force for flat or slightly wavy surfaces, compared to a rectangular beam, the analysis result suggests that the tapered beam has more ability to absorb surface waviness. This result can be applied to a multi-beam structure.

  17. Optical apparatus using liquid crystals for shaping the spatial intensity of optical beams having designated wavelengths

    DOEpatents

    Jacobs, Stephen D.; Cerqua, Kathleen A.

    1987-01-01

    The spatial intensity profile of an optical beam of designated wavelengths, such as a laser beam, is shaped (the beam is apodized) by means of cholesteric liquid crystals of opposite chirality disposed successively along the path of the beam. The crystals have curved surfaces, which may be defined by a lens which defines the thickness of the liquid crystal fluid gap in a liquid crystal cell, so as to vary the selective reflection of the designated wavelength across the aperture of the beam. In this way, a soft aperture is provided. By using tandem cell pairs having liquid crystals of opposite chirality, but of different pitch, and with lenses of different curvature, beams of different wavelengths which are projected colinearly along the path may be individually tailored in spatial intensity profile.

  18. Cyclic response of shape memory alloy smart composite beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Friend, Clifford M.; Morgan, Neil B.

    1994-09-01

    'Smart' structure are an emerging technology which will provide the possibility of engineering structures with enhanced functionality for a wide range of applications. In most current Smart Structural Concepts a mechatronic or 'Frankenstein' approach is adopted where separate sensors, signal processing and actuators are 'bolted-together' to produce a 'Smart' system response. In the majority of these concepts the sensors and actuators are integrated within the host structure itself, and many of the sensor and actuator materials are familiar from other more conventional sensing/actuation applications. Amongst the materials used/proposed for actuators are Shape- Memory Alloys (SMAs) since these materials offer a range of attractive properties, including the possibility of high strain/stress actuation. The literature-base on the integration of SMA actuators into composite structures is not extensive. However, their use has been investigated for vibration [1], acoustic radiation [1,2], damage [3], buckling [1,2], and shape [1] control. An interesting feature of this work has been a heavy bias towards modelling, with only limited attempts to experimentally verify the calculated results. Previous work has also failed to produce a systematic database on one other key issue. This is the durability of SPA hybrid composites. The present work was therefore undertaken to provide a preliminary appraisal of the durability issues associated with the use of SMA hybrid composites. This work addressed a number of issues including (i) the effect of actuator fraction on strain outputs, (ii) the effect of actuator fraction and maximum strain on the cyclic stability of shape changes, and (iii) the effect of these variables on damage accumulation within the hybrid structures.

  19. Shape anomaly detection under strong measurement noise: An analytical approach to adaptive thresholding

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Krasichkov, Alexander S.; Grigoriev, Eugene B.; Bogachev, Mikhail I.; Nifontov, Eugene M.

    2015-10-01

    We suggest an analytical approach to the adaptive thresholding in a shape anomaly detection problem. We find an analytical expression for the distribution of the cosine similarity score between a reference shape and an observational shape hindered by strong measurement noise that depends solely on the noise level and is independent of the particular shape analyzed. The analytical treatment is also confirmed by computer simulations and shows nearly perfect agreement. Using this analytical solution, we suggest an improved shape anomaly detection approach based on adaptive thresholding. We validate the noise robustness of our approach using typical shapes of normal and pathological electrocardiogram cycles hindered by additive white noise. We show explicitly that under high noise levels our approach considerably outperforms the conventional tactic that does not take into account variations in the noise level.

  20. Ecomorphological disparity in an adaptive radiation: opercular bone shape and stable isotopes in Antarctic icefishes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B; Colombo, Marco; Hanel, Reinhold; Salzburger, Walter; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    To assess how ecological and morphological disparity is interrelated in the adaptive radiation of Antarctic notothenioid fish we used patterns of opercle bone evolution as a model to quantify shape disparity, phylogenetic patterns of shape evolution, and ecological correlates in the form of stable isotope values. Using a sample of 25 species including representatives from four major notothenioid clades, we show that opercle shape disparity is higher in the modern fauna than would be expected under the neutral evolution Brownian motion model. Phylogenetic comparative methods indicate that opercle shape data best fit a model of directional selection (Ornstein–Uhlenbeck) and are least supported by the “early burst” model of adaptive radiation. The main evolutionary axis of opercle shape change reflects movement from a broad and more symmetrically tapered opercle to one that narrows along the distal margin, but with only slight shape change on the proximal margin. We find a trend in opercle shape change along the benthic–pelagic axis, underlining the importance of this axis for diversification in the notothenioid radiation. A major impetus for the study of adaptive radiations is to uncover generalized patterns among different groups, and the evolutionary patterns in opercle shape among notothenioids are similar to those found among other adaptive radiations (three-spined sticklebacks) promoting the utility of this approach for assessing ecomorphological interactions on a broad scale. PMID:24102002

  1. Load carrying capacity of RCC beams by replacing steel reinforcement bars with shape memory alloy bars

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bajoria, Kamal M.; Kaduskar, Shreya S.

    2016-04-01

    In this paper the structural behavior of reinforced concrete (RC) beams with smart rebars under two point loading system has been numerically studied, using Finite Element Method. The material used in this study is Super-elastic Shape Memory Alloys (SE SMAs) which contains nickel and titanium. In this study, different quantities of steel and SMA rebars have been used for reinforcement and the behavior of these models under two point bending loading system is studied. A comparison of load carrying capacity for the model between steel reinforced concrete beam and the beam reinforced with S.M.A and steel are performed. The results show that RC beams reinforced with combination of shape memory alloy and steel show better performance.

  2. Precision shape modification of nanodevices with a low-energy electron beam

    DOEpatents

    Zettl, Alex; Yuzvinsky, Thomas David; Fennimore, Adam

    2010-03-09

    Methods of shape modifying a nanodevice by contacting it with a low-energy focused electron beam are disclosed here. In one embodiment, a nanodevice may be permanently reformed to a different geometry through an application of a deforming force and a low-energy focused electron beam. With the addition of an assist gas, material may be removed from the nanodevice through application of the low-energy focused electron beam. The independent methods of shape modification and material removal may be used either individually or simultaneously. Precision cuts with accuracies as high as 10 nm may be achieved through the use of precision low-energy Scanning Electron Microscope scan beams. These methods may be used in an automated system to produce nanodevices of very precise dimensions. These methods may be used to produce nanodevices of carbon-based, silicon-based, or other compositions by varying the assist gas.

  3. Continuous adaptive beam pointing and tracking for laser power transmission.

    PubMed

    Schäfer, Christian A

    2010-06-21

    The adaptive beam pointing concept has been revisited for the purpose of controlled transmission of laser energy from an optical transmitter to a target. After illumination, a bidirectional link is established by a retro-reflector on the target and an amplifier-phase conjugate mirror (A-PCM) on the transmitter. By setting the retro-reflector's aperture smaller than the diffraction limited spot size but big enough to provide sufficient amount of optical feedback, a stable link can be maintained and light that hits the retro-reflector's surrounded area can simultaneously be reconverted into usable electric energy. The phase conjugate feedback ensures that amplifier's distortions are compensated and the target tracked accurately.After deriving basic arithmetic expressions for the proposed system, a section is devoted for the motivation of free-space laser power transmission which is supposed to find varied applicability in space. As an example, power transmission from a satellite to the earth is described where recently proposed solar power generating structures on high-altitudes receive the power above the clouds to provide constant energy supply.In the experimental part, an A-PCM setup with reflectivity of about R(A-PCM) = 100 was realized using a semiconductor optical amplifier and a photorefractive self-pumped PCM. Simulation results show that a reflectivity of R(A-PCM)>1000 could be obtained by improving the self-pumped PCM's efficiency. That would lead to a transmission efficiency of eta>90%.

  4. Ring beam shaping optics fabricated with ultra-precision cutting for YAG laser processing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuwano, Ryoichi; Koga, Toshihiko; Tokunaga, Tsuyoshi; Wakayama, Toshitaka; Otani, Yukitoshi; Fujii, Nobuyuki

    2012-03-01

    In this study, a method for generating ring intensity distribution at a refraction-type lens with an aspheric element was proposed, and the beam shaping optical element was finished using only ultra-precision cutting. The shape of the optical element and its irradiance pattern were determined from numerical calculation based on its geometrical and physical optics. An ultra-precision lathe was employed to fabricate beam shaping optical elements, and acrylic resin was used as the material. The transmittance of an optical element (a rotationally symmetrical body) with an aspheric surface fabricated using a single-crystal diamond tool was over 98%, and its surface roughness was 9.6 nm Ra. The method enabled the formation of a circular melting zone on a piece of stainless steel with a thickness of 300 μm through pulse YAG laser ( λ 1:06 μm) processing such that the average radius was 610 μm and the width was 100-200 μm. Circular processing using a ring beam shaping optical element can be realized by single-pulse beam irradiation without beam scanning.

  5. Far field diffraction of an optical vortex beam by a fork-shaped grating

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoyanov, Lyubomir; Topuzoski, Suzana; Stefanov, Ivan; Janicijevic, Ljiljana; Dreischuh, Alexander

    2015-09-01

    In this work we report experimental data confirming the analytically predicted transformation of the topological charge (TC) of an input optical vortex (OV) beam, generated by means of fork-shaped binary computer-generated hologram (CGH), after a second fork-shaped binary CGH. The final TC of the vortex is confirmed to be equal to the TC of the incident beam plus the diffraction order (with its sign) times the TC encoded in the binary grating. The radii of the transformed OVs in the far field also are found to agree fairly well with these predicted by the analytical theory.

  6. Scattering of sharply focused beams by arbitrarily shaped dielectric particles: an exact solution.

    PubMed

    Yeh, C; Colak, S; Barber, P

    1982-12-15

    By expanding the incident focused beam field in terms of its plane wave spectrum and by using the technique we developed earlier to treat the problem of the scattering of plane waves by arbitrarily shaped dielectric obstacles, we have been successful in solving the problem of the scattering of sharply focused beams by arbitrarily shaped dielectric particles. It was found that the presence of the curvature of the incident wave front and the nonuniformity of the incident wave intensity affect greatly the scattering characteristics.

  7. Micro drilling using deformable mirror for beam shaping of ultra-short laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smarra, Marco; Strube, Anja; Dickmann, Klaus

    2016-03-01

    Using ultra-short laser pulses for micro structuring or drilling applications reduces the thermal influence to the surrounding material. The best achievable beam profile equals a Gaussian beam. Drilling with this beam profile results in cylindrical holes. To vary the shape of the holes, the beam can either be scanned or - for single pulse and percussion drilling - manipulated by masks or lenses. A high flexible method for beam shaping can be realized by using a deformable mirror. This mirror contains a piezo-electric ceramic, which can be deformed by an electric potential. By separating the ceramic into independent controllable segments, the shape of the surface can be varied individually. Due to the closed surface of the mirror, there is no loss of intensity due to diffraction. The mirror deformation is controlled by Zernike polynomials and results e.g. in a lens behavior. In this study a deformable mirror was used to generate e.g. slits in thin steel foils by percussion drilling using ultra-short laser pulses. The influence of the cylindrical deformation to the laser beam and the resulting geometry of the generated holes was studied. It was demonstrated that due to the high update rate up to 150 Hz the mirror surface can be varied in each scan cycle, which results in a high flexible drilling process.

  8. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors.

  9. Beam shaping assembly optimization for (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be accelerator based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2014-06-01

    Within the framework of accelerator-based BNCT, a project to develop a folded Tandem-ElectroStatic-Quadrupole accelerator is under way at the Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina. The proposed accelerator is conceived to deliver a proton beam of 30mA at about 2.5MeV. In this work we explore a Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) design based on the (7)Li(p,n)(7)Be neutron production reaction to obtain neutron beams to treat deep seated tumors. PMID:24345525

  10. Tailoring of keV-ion beams by image charge when transmitting through rhombic and rectangular shaped nanocapillaries.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H-Q; Akram, N; Skog, P; Soroka, I L; Trautmann, C; Schuch, R

    2012-05-11

    We report on an unexpected effect of tailoring transmission profiles of Ne(7+) ions through nanocapillaries of rhombic and rectangular cross sections in mica. We find that capillaries of rhombic cross sections produce rectangular shaped ion transmission profiles and, vice versa, that capillaries of rectangular geometry give a rhombic beam shape. This shaping effect only occurs for transmitted ions and is absent for the small fraction of neutralized particles. The experimental findings and simulations of the projectile trajectories give clear evidence that the observed effect is due to the image forces experienced by the transmitting ions. This novel beam shaping mechanism suggests applications for the guiding, focusing, and shaping of ion beams.

  11. Tailoring of keV-Ion Beams by Image Charge when Transmitting through Rhombic and Rectangular Shaped Nanocapillaries

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, H.-Q.; Akram, N.; Skog, P.; Soroka, I. L.; Trautmann, C.; Schuch, R.

    2012-05-01

    We report on an unexpected effect of tailoring transmission profiles of Ne7+ ions through nanocapillaries of rhombic and rectangular cross sections in mica. We find that capillaries of rhombic cross sections produce rectangular shaped ion transmission profiles and, vice versa, that capillaries of rectangular geometry give a rhombic beam shape. This shaping effect only occurs for transmitted ions and is absent for the small fraction of neutralized particles. The experimental findings and simulations of the projectile trajectories give clear evidence that the observed effect is due to the image forces experienced by the transmitting ions. This novel beam shaping mechanism suggests applications for the guiding, focusing, and shaping of ion beams.

  12. Transformations of spherical beam shape coefficients in generalized Lorenz-Mie theories through rotations of coordinate systems. IV. Plane waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, G.; Wang, J. J.; Han, Y. P.; G. Grehan

    2010-09-01

    This paper is the fourth of a series devoted to the transformation of beam shape coefficients through rotations of coordinate systems. These coefficients are required to express electromagnetic fields of laser beams in expanded forms, for instance for use in some generalized Lorenz-Mie theories. The main result of Part I has been the theorem of transformation of beam shape coefficients under rotations. Part II dealt with the special case of on-axis axisymmetric beams. Part III dealt with other special cases, namely when the Euler angles specifying the rotation are given some special values. The present Part IV studies another special case, namely the one of plane waves viewed as special on-axis axisymmetric beams, and can therefore be viewed as a special case of Part II. Unexpectedly, it is found that, in general, although plane waves are fairly trivial, their expansions require using non trivial beam shape coefficients, exactly as required when dealing with arbitrary shaped beams.

  13. Generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam CT using a patient-specific bladder shape model

    SciTech Connect

    Schoot, A. J. A. J. van de Schooneveldt, G.; Wognum, S.; Stalpers, L. J. A.; Rasch, C. R. N.; Bel, A.; Hoogeman, M. S.; Chai, X.

    2014-03-15

    Purpose: The aim of this study is to develop and validate a generic method for automatic bladder segmentation on cone beam computed tomography (CBCT), independent of gender and treatment position (prone or supine), using only pretreatment imaging data. Methods: Data of 20 patients, treated for tumors in the pelvic region with the entire bladder visible on CT and CBCT, were divided into four equally sized groups based on gender and treatment position. The full and empty bladder contour, that can be acquired with pretreatment CT imaging, were used to generate a patient-specific bladder shape model. This model was used to guide the segmentation process on CBCT. To obtain the bladder segmentation, the reference bladder contour was deformed iteratively by maximizing the cross-correlation between directional grey value gradients over the reference and CBCT bladder edge. To overcome incorrect segmentations caused by CBCT image artifacts, automatic adaptations were implemented. Moreover, locally incorrect segmentations could be adapted manually. After each adapted segmentation, the bladder shape model was expanded and new shape patterns were calculated for following segmentations. All available CBCTs were used to validate the segmentation algorithm. The bladder segmentations were validated by comparison with the manual delineations and the segmentation performance was quantified using the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), surface distance error (SDE) and SD of contour-to-contour distances. Also, bladder volumes obtained by manual delineations and segmentations were compared using a Bland-Altman error analysis. Results: The mean DSC, mean SDE, and mean SD of contour-to-contour distances between segmentations and manual delineations were 0.87, 0.27 cm and 0.22 cm (female, prone), 0.85, 0.28 cm and 0.22 cm (female, supine), 0.89, 0.21 cm and 0.17 cm (male, supine) and 0.88, 0.23 cm and 0.17 cm (male, prone), respectively. Manual local adaptations improved the segmentation

  14. Adaptive local thresholding for robust nucleus segmentation utilizing shape priors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xiuzhong; Srinivas, Chukka

    2016-03-01

    This paper describes a novel local thresholding method for foreground detection. First, a Canny edge detection method is used for initial edge detection. Then, tensor voting is applied on the initial edge pixels, using a nonsymmetric tensor field tailored to encode prior information about nucleus size, shape, and intensity spatial distribution. Tensor analysis is then performed to generate the saliency image and, based on that, the refined edge. Next, the image domain is divided into blocks. In each block, at least one foreground and one background pixel are sampled for each refined edge pixel. The saliency weighted foreground histogram and background histogram are then created. These two histograms are used to calculate a threshold by minimizing the background and foreground pixel classification error. The block-wise thresholds are then used to generate the threshold for each pixel via interpolation. Finally, the foreground is obtained by comparing the original image with the threshold image. The effective use of prior information, combined with robust techniques, results in far more reliable foreground detection, which leads to robust nucleus segmentation.

  15. Double freeform surfaces design for laser beam shaping with Monge-Ampère equation method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Yaqin; Wu, Rengmao; Liu, Peng; Zheng, Zhenrong; Li, Haifeng; Liu, Xu

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents a method for designing double freeform surfaces to simultaneously control the intensity distribution and phase profile of the laser beam. Based on Snell’s law, the conservation law of energy and the constraint imposed on the optical path length between the input and output wavefronts, the double surfaces design is converted into an elliptic Monge-Ampère (MA) equation with a nonlinear boundary problem. A generalized approach is introduced to find the numerical solution of the design model. Two different layouts of the beam shaping system are introduced and detailed comparisons are also made between the two layouts. Design examples are given and the results indicate that good matching is achieved by the MA method with more than 98% of the energy efficiency. The MA method proposed in this paper provides a reasonably good means for laser beam shaping.

  16. Laser diode stack beam shaping by reflective two-wedge-angle prism arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Guoxing; Du, Chunlei; Zhou, Chongxi; Zheng, Chunyan

    2005-04-01

    An innovative beam-shaping method for laser diode stacking is presented by employing a pair of reflective two-wedge-angle prism arrays. Each subprism with two variable wedge angles is designed for deflecting the partial emission from different bars to the dead spaces of the stack, according to the configuration of the real laser diode (LD) stack and the requirement of the system. The formula to determine the parameters of each subprism is deduced by way of geometrical analysis. A beam-shaping system for stack laser diodes with three bars is designed and simulated, and the results show that the stack laser beam is well transformed into a required distribution efficiently.

  17. Beam shaping system based on a prism array for improving the throughput of a dispersive spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhendong; Fang, Liang; Fan, Bin; Zhou, Chongxi

    2015-04-01

    A beam shaping system (BSS) for improving the throughput of a dispersive spectrometer is presented by employing two anamorphic lenses and a prism array to segment the beam. The BSS was designed based on the inverse method of beam shaping for laser diode bars and the means of an optical slicer. In an experiment, a BSS was set up so that the incident light of a neon lamp with a circular spot from an input fiber was transformed into an elliptical spot coupled into a slit of a spectrometer without a change of divergence. Spectral measurement results demonstrate that the throughput of the dispersive spectrometer was doubled without loss of spectral resolution. The BSS can be combined with the existing dispersive spectrometer to improve the luminous flux and signal-to-noise ratio.

  18. Beam shaping system based on a prism array for improving the throughput of a dispersive spectrometer.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhendong; Fang, Liang; Fan, Bin; Zhou, Chongxi

    2015-04-01

    A beam shaping system (BSS) for improving the throughput of a dispersive spectrometer is presented by employing two anamorphic lenses and a prism array to segment the beam. The BSS was designed based on the inverse method of beam shaping for laser diode bars and the means of an optical slicer. In an experiment, a BSS was set up so that the incident light of a neon lamp with a circular spot from an input fiber was transformed into an elliptical spot coupled into a slit of a spectrometer without a change of divergence. Spectral measurement results demonstrate that the throughput of the dispersive spectrometer was doubled without loss of spectral resolution. The BSS can be combined with the existing dispersive spectrometer to improve the luminous flux and signal-to-noise ratio. PMID:25967181

  19. Generalization of the extended optical theorem for scalar arbitrary-shape acoustical beams in spherical coordinates.

    PubMed

    Mitri, F G; Silva, G T

    2014-11-01

    The extended optical theorem is generalized for scalar acoustical beams of arbitrary character with any angle of incidence interacting with an object of arbitrary geometric shape and size, and placed randomly in the beam's path with any scattering angle. Analytical expressions for the extinction, absorption, and scattering cross sections are derived, and the connections with the axial (i.e., along the direction of wave propagation) torque and radiation force calculations are discussed. As examples to illustrate the analysis for a viscoelastic object, the extinction, absorption, and scattering cross sections are provided for an infinite plane progressive wave, infinite nondiffracting Bessel beams, a zero-order spherical quasi-Gaussian beam, and a Bessel-Gauss vortex beam emanating from a finite circular aperture, which reduces to a finite high-order Bessel beam, a finite zero-order Bessel beam, and a finite piston radiator vibrating uniformly with appropriate selection of beam parameters. The similarity with the asymptotic quantum inelastic cross sections is also mentioned.

  20. Single and dual-Gregorian reflector antenna shaped beam far-field synthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehler, M. J.

    The direct far-field G.O. synthesis of shaped beam reflector antennas has recently been treated by Mehler, Tun and Adatia (1986). These authors use a synthesis technique which exploits complex coordinates and which is based on a method originally considered by Norris and Westcott (1976). They describe the synthesis of single reflector antennas which radiate both elliptical beams and European coverage patterns. Here this technique is extended to consider a class of dual reflector antennas which possess shaped main reflectors and conic subreflectors. An example is given of a Gregorian duel reflector antenna which radiates a cross-polar field significantly smaller than that radiated by single shaped reflector antennas. In addition, the behavior of the radiation pattern as a function of the reflector diameter is investigated.

  1. Adaptive merit function in SPGD algorithm for beam combining

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Guo-qing; Liu, Li-sheng; Jiang, Zhen-hua; Wang, Ting-feng; Guo, Jin

    2016-09-01

    The beam pointing is the most crucial issue for beam combining to achieve high energy laser output. In order to meet the turbulence situation, a beam pointing method that cooperates with the stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm is proposed. The power-in-the-bucket ( PIB) is chosen as the merit function, and its radius changes gradually during the correction process. The linear radius and the exponential radius are simulated. The results show that the exponential radius has great promise for beam pointing.

  2. Experimental investigation on the beam quality improvement of the fiber laser by adaptive optics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bian, Q.; Huang, L.; Wang, X. J.; Ma, X. K.; Yan, P.; Gong, M. L.

    2015-12-01

    This paper describes an adaptive optical system that is introduced to improve the beam quality of a fiber laser. Since a distorted wavefront would degrade the beam quality of a laser beam, a deformable mirror is employed to compensate for the wavefront aberration using closed-loop control in this system. The beam quality factor is measured and the far-field focus spot is detected as well. The experiment results show that the beam quality factor can be improved from 5-7 to 3-4 and the focus spot can be improved as well. The feasibility of the system is proved.

  3. Beam splitter for guided polar molecules with a Y-shaped charged wire.

    PubMed

    Deng, Lianzhong; Yin, Jianping

    2007-06-15

    We propose a beam splitter for cold polar molecules in weak-field-seeking states that uses a Y-shaped charged wire half embedded in a substrate and sandwiched by a charged metallic parallel-plate capacitor. We demonstrate our molecular-beam splitter and study its dynamic beam-splitting process for the guided cold molecules by using Monte Carlo simulation. Our study shows that cold polar molecules from a supersonic beam source with a mean velocity of a few hundred meters per second can be split with a fixed 0.5/0.5 splitting ratio, and an adjustable splitting ratio of about 0.03-0.97 can be realized by introducing a small alteration to the scheme.

  4. Rigorous Justification of the Localized Approximation to the Beam-Shape Coefficients in Generalized Lorenz-Mie Theory. Part 1; On-Axis Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lock, James A.; Gouesbet, Gerard

    1994-01-01

    Generalized Lorenz-Mie theory describes electromagnetic scattering of an arbitrary light beam by a spherical particle. The computationally most expensive feature of the theory is the evaluation of the beam-shape coefficients, which give the decomposition of the incident light beam into partial waves. The so-called localized approximation to these coefficients for a focused Gaussian beam is an analytical function whose use greatly simplifies Gaussian-beam scattering calculations. A mathematical justification and physical interpretation of the localized approximation is presented for on-axis beams.

  5. An inverse finite element method for beam shape sensing: theoretical framework and experimental validation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gherlone, Marco; Cerracchio, Priscilla; Mattone, Massimiliano; Di Sciuva, Marco; Tessler, Alexander

    2014-04-01

    Shape sensing, i.e., reconstruction of the displacement field of a structure from surface-measured strains, has relevant implications for the monitoring, control and actuation of smart structures. The inverse finite element method (iFEM) is a shape-sensing methodology shown to be fast, accurate and robust. This paper aims to demonstrate that the recently presented iFEM for beam and frame structures is reliable when experimentally measured strains are used as input data. The theoretical framework of the methodology is first reviewed. Timoshenko beam theory is adopted, including stretching, bending, transverse shear and torsion deformation modes. The variational statement and its discretization with C0-continuous inverse elements are briefly recalled. The three-dimensional displacement field of the beam structure is reconstructed under the condition that least-squares compatibility is guaranteed between the measured strains and those interpolated within the inverse elements. The experimental setup is then described. A thin-walled cantilevered beam is subjected to different static and dynamic loads. Measured surface strains are used as input data for shape sensing at first with a single inverse element. For the same test cases, convergence is also investigated using an increasing number of inverse elements. The iFEM-recovered deflections and twist rotations are then compared with those measured experimentally. The accuracy, convergence and robustness of the iFEM with respect to unavoidable measurement errors, due to strain sensor locations, measurement systems and geometry imperfections, are demonstrated for both static and dynamic loadings.

  6. Electro-bending characterization of adaptive 3D fiber reinforced plastics based on shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ashir, Moniruddoza; Hahn, Lars; Kluge, Axel; Nocke, Andreas; Cherif, Chokri

    2016-03-01

    The industrial importance of fiber reinforced plastics (FRPs) is growing steadily in recent years, which are mostly used in different niche products, has been growing steadily in recent years. The integration of sensors and actuators in FRP is potentially valuable for creating innovative applications and therefore the market acceptance of adaptive FRP is increasing. In particular, in the field of highly stressed FRP, structural integrated systems for continuous component parts monitoring play an important role. This presented work focuses on the electro-mechanical characterization of adaptive three-dimensional (3D)FRP with integrated textile-based actuators. Here, the friction spun hybrid yarn, consisting of shape memory alloy (SMA) in wire form as core, serves as an actuator. Because of the shape memory effect, the SMA-hybrid yarn returns to its original shape upon heating that also causes the deformation of adaptive 3D FRP. In order to investigate the influences of the deformation behavior of the adaptive 3D FRP, investigations in this research are varied according to the structural parameters such as radius of curvature of the adaptive 3D FRP, fabric types and number of layers of the fabric in the composite. Results show that reproducible deformations can be realized with adaptive 3D FRP and that structural parameters have a significant impact on the deformation capability.

  7. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, Stanley; Kessler, Terrance J.; Letzring, Samuel A.

    1993-01-01

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse.

  8. System for generating shaped optical pulses and measuring optical pulses using spectral beam deflection (SBD)

    DOEpatents

    Skupsky, S.; Kessler, T.J.; Letzring, S.A.

    1993-11-16

    A temporally shaped or modified optical output pulse is generated from a bandwidth-encoded optical input pulse in a system in which the input pulse is in the form of a beam which is spectrally spread into components contained within the bandwidth, followed by deflection of the spectrally spread beam (SBD) thereby spatially mapping the components in correspondence with the temporal input pulse profile in the focal plane of a lens, and by spatially selective attenuation of selected components in that focal plane. The shaped or modified optical output pulse is then reconstructed from the attenuated spectral components. The pulse-shaping system is particularly useful for generating optical pulses of selected temporal shape over a wide range of pulse duration, such pulses finding application in the fields of optical communication, optical recording and data storage, atomic and molecular spectroscopy and laser fusion. An optical streak camera is also provided which uses SBD to display the beam intensity in the focal plane as a function of time during the input pulse. 10 figures.

  9. Research on relation between bending stress and characteristic frequency of H-shaped beam by free vibration deflection

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Tsutomu; Watanabe, Takeshi

    2014-05-27

    In order to investigate a relation between a bending stress and a characteristic frequency of a beam, 4-point loading which had constant moment region was conducted to a beam with H shape configuration experimentally and numerically. H-shaped beam has many characteristic deformation modes. Axial tensile stress in the beam made its characteristic frequency higher, and compressive stress lower. In the experiment, some characteristic frequencies got higher by a bending stress, and the others stayed in a small frequency fluctuation. The distinction is anticipated as a capability to measure a bending stress of a beam by its characteristic frequencies.

  10. Laser forming of a bowl shaped surface with a stationary laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chakraborty, Shitanshu Shekhar; More, Harshit; Nath, Ashish Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Despite a lot of research done in the field of laser forming, generation of a symmetric bowl shaped surface by this process is still a challenge mainly because only a portion of the sheet is momentarily deformed in this process, unlike conventional sheet metal forming like deep drawing where the entire blank undergoes forming simultaneously reducing asymmetry to a minimum. The motion of laser beam also makes the process asymmetric. To counter these limitations this work proposes a new approach for laser forming of a bowl shaped surface by irradiating the centre of a flat circular blank with a stationary laser beam. With high power lasers, power density sufficient for laser forming, can be availed at reasonably large spot sizes. This advantage is exploited in this technique. Effects of duration of laser irradiation and beam spot diameter on the amount of bending and asymmetry in the formed surface were investigated. Laser power was kept constant while varying irradiation time. While varying laser spot diameter laser power was chosen so as to keep the surface temperature nearly constant at just below melting. Experimental conditions promoted almost uniform heating through sheet thickness. The amount of bending increased with irradiation time and spot diameter. It was interesting to observe that blanks bent towards the laser beam for smaller laser beam diameters and the reverse happened for larger spot diameters (~10 times of the sheet thickness). Effect of spot diameter variation has been explained with the help of coupled thermal-structural finite element simulations.

  11. Simultaneous power and beam-shape optimization of an OPSL resonator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Sauer, Sebastian; Garlich, Torsten; Seelert, Wolf; Brecher, Christian; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel

    2015-03-01

    In the assembly of optical resonators of optically pumped semiconductor lasers (OPSL), the highly reflective resonator mirror is the most crucial component. In previous cooperation, Coherent and Fraunhofer IPT have developed a robust active alignment strategy to optimize the output power of the OPSL resonator using search strategies for finding the laser threshold as well as hill-climbing algorithms for maximizing the output power. Beam-shape as well as the laser mode have major influence on the quality and the duration of subsequent beam-shaping and fiber-coupling steps. Therefore, the alignment algorithm optimizing the output power has been extended recently by simultaneous image processing for ensuring a Gaussian beam as the result of alignment. The paper describes the enhanced approach of automated alignment by additionally scanning along the optical resonator and subsequently evaluating and optimizing the roundness of the beam as well as minimizing the beam radius through twisting and tilting of the mirror. A quality metric combining these measures is defined substituting an M² measurement. The paper also describes the approach for automated assembly including the measuring setup, micromanipulation and dispensing devices.

  12. Estimating the vibration level of an L-shaped beam using power flow techniques

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cuschieri, J. M.; Mccollum, M.; Rassineux, J. L.; Gilbert, T.

    1986-01-01

    The response of one component of an L-shaped beam, with point force excitation on the other component, is estimated using the power flow method. The transmitted power from the source component to the receiver component is expressed in terms of the transfer and input mobilities at the excitation point and the joint. The response is estimated both in narrow frequency bands, using the exact geometry of the beams, and as a frequency averaged response using infinite beam models. The results using this power flow technique are compared to the results obtained using finite element analysis (FEA) of the L-shaped beam for the low frequency response and to results obtained using statistical energy analysis (SEA) for the high frequencies. The agreement between the FEA results and the power flow method results at low frequencies is very good. SEA results are in terms of frequency averaged levels and these are in perfect agreement with the results obtained using the infinite beam models in the power flow method. The narrow frequency band results from the power flow method also converge to the SEA results at high frequencies. The advantage of the power flow method is that detail of the response can be retained while reducing computation time, which will allow the narrow frequency band analysis of the response to be extended to higher frequencies.

  13. Application of nondiffracting Bessel beams for shaping of surface metal microstructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drampyan, Rafael; Leonov, Nikita; Vartanyan, Tigran

    2016-08-01

    A novel method of laser-controlled shaping of metal microstructures based on the processes of metal atoms adsorption on the surface of crystalline substrate and simultaneous control of photostimulated desorption of atoms by spatially modulated nondiffracting laser beam illumination is presented. The experiments were performed for sodium atoms deposition to the sapphire substrate, which was illuminated by Bessel beam at 532 nm wavelength and 2 W/cm2 intensity. Experiments showed that the optical pattern was well reproduced in the sodium deposits thus creating the annularly microstructured metal film with few tens nanometre thickness.

  14. Efficient pump beam shaping for high-power thin-disk laser systems.

    PubMed

    Pereira, Rui; Weichelt, Birgit; Liang, Dawei; Morais, Paulo J; Gouveia, Helena; Abdou-Ahmed, Marwan; Voss, Andreas; Graf, Thomas

    2010-09-20

    We report a beam-shaping technique whereby the output power from a high-power laser-diode stack is efficiently coupled, reconfigured, and transmitted to a thin-disk laser by means of a compact optical fiber bundle. By using this technique, the power density is increased by a factor of 2 when compared to direct coupling with a octagonal fused silica rod while the numerical aperture is kept constant. Transmission efficiency of 80% was measured for the beam shaper without antireflection coating. The top-hat distribution is numerically calculated at the thin-disk laser crystal.

  15. High brightness beam shaping and fiber coupling of laser-diode bars.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junhong; Guo, Linui; Wu, Hualing; Wang, Zhao; Tan, Hao; Gao, Songxin; Wu, Deyong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-04-10

    The strong beam quality mismatch in the fast and slow axes of laser-diode bars requires a significant beam shaping method to reach the parameters needed for fiber coupling. An effective solution to this problem is proposed that is based on a right-angle prism array and a distributed cylinder-lens stack. Coupling 12 mini-bars into a standard 100 μm core diameter and 0.15 numerical aperture fiber is achieved, and the output power can reach 400 W. Using this technique, production of compact and high brightness fiber-coupled laser-diode modules is possible.

  16. Scattering of a focused laser beam by a cluster of axisymmetric shaped microparticles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khaled, Elsayed Esam M.; Ibrahim, Hany L. S.

    2016-04-01

    Scattering of an arbitrarily focused electromagnetic Gaussian beam by a cluster consisting of a chain of axisymmetric microparticles is presented. The illustrated technique in this work combines the plane-waves spectrum method and a modification of the cluster T-matrix method. This combination provides a powerful tool to calculate the scattered fields from a cluster of different shaped particles illuminated with an arbitrarily incident electromagnetic wave. The presented technique is used to calculate the scattering matrix elements of different cases of a cluster illuminated with different beam focusing.

  17. Obtaining the Bunch Shape in a Linac from Beam Spectrum Measurements

    SciTech Connect

    Bane, Karl LF

    1999-04-14

    In linacs with high single-bunch charge, and tight tolerances for energy spread and emittance growth, controlling the short-range wakefield effects becomes extremely important. The effects of the wakefields, in turn, depend on the bunch length and also on the bunch shape. It was shown in the linac of the Stanford Linear Collider (SLC), for example, that by shaping the bunch, the final rms energy spread could be greatly reduced, compared to for the standard Gaussian bunch shape[1]. Therefore, in machines with high single-bunch charge, a method of measuring bunch shape can be an important beam diagnostic. In a linac with low single-bunch charge, the longitudinal bunch shape can be obtained relatively easily from a single measurement of the beam's final energy spectrum, provided that the final to initial energy ratio is large. One merely shifts the average phase of the beam, so that it rides off-crest sufficiently to induce an energy variation that is monotonic with longitudinal position. Then, by knowing the initial and final energies, the rf wave number, and the average beam phase, one can directly map the spectrum into the bunch shape. In a linac with high single-bunch charge, however, due to the effect of the longitudinal wakefield, this method either does not work at all, or it requires such a large shift in beam phase as to become impractical. In earlier work[2],[3] it was shown that, even when wakefields are important, if one measures the final beam spectrum for two different (properly chosen) values of beam phase, then one can again obtain the bunch shape, and--as a by-product--also the form of the wakefield induced voltage; this method was then illustrated using data from the linac of the SLC. These SLC measurements, however, had been performed with the machine in a special configuration, where the current was low; in addition, the noise the data was low and the measured spectra were smooth distributions. Under normal SLC conditions, however, the currents

  18. Thermomechanical Characterization and Modeling of Superelastic Shape Memory Alloy Beams and Frames

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Watkins, Ryan

    Of existing applications, the majority of shape memory alloy (SMA) devices consist of beam (orthodontic wire, eye glasses frames, catheter guide wires) and framed structures (cardiovascular stents, vena cava filters). Although uniaxial tension data is often sufficient to model basic beam behavior (which has been the main focus of the research community), the tension-compression asymmetry and complex phase transformation behavior of SMAs suggests more information is necessary to properly model higher complexity states of loading. In this work, SMA beams are experimentally characterized under general loading conditions (including tension, compression, pure bending, and buckling); furthermore, a model is developed with respect to general beam deformation based on the relevant phenomena observed in the experimental characterization. Stress induced phase transformation within superelastic SMA beams is shown to depend on not only the loading mode, but also kinematic constraints imposed by beam geometry (such as beam cross-section and length). In the cases of tension and pure bending, the structural behavior is unstable and corresponds to phase transformation localization and propagation. This unstable behavior is the result of a local level up--down--up stress/strain response in tension, which is measured here using a novel composite-based experimental technique. In addition to unstable phase transformation, intriguing post-buckling straightening is observed in short SMA columns during monotonic loading (termed unbuckling here). Based on this phenomenological understanding of SMA beam behavior, a trilinear based material law is developed in the context of a Shanley column model and is found to capture many of the relevant features of column buckling, including the experimentally observed unbuckling behavior. Due to the success of this model, it is generalized within the context of beam theory and, in conjunction with Bloch wave stability analysis, is used to model and

  19. A Shape Memory Polymer Dialysis Needle Adapter for the Reduction of Hemodynamic Stress within Arteriovenous Grafts

    SciTech Connect

    Ortega, J M; Small, W; Wilson, T S; Benett, W; Loge, J; Maitland, D J

    2006-08-16

    A deployable, shape memory polymer adapter is investigated for reducing the hemodynamic stress caused by a dialysis needle flow within an arteriovenous graft. Computational fluid dynamics simulations of dialysis sessions with and without the adapter demonstrate that the adapter provides a significant decrease in the wall shear stress. In vitro flow visualization measurements are made within a graft model following delivery and actuation of a prototype shape memory polymer adapter. Vascular access complications resulting from arteriovenous (AV) graft failures account for over $1 billion per year in the health care costs of dialysis patients in the U.S.[1] The primary mode of failure of arteriovenous fistulas (AVF's) and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) grafts is the development of intimal hyperplasia (IH) and the subsequent formation of stenotic lesions, resulting in a graft flow decline. The hemodynamic stresses arising within AVF's and PTFE grafts play an important role in the pathogenesis of IH. Studies have shown that vascular damage can occur in regions where there is flow separation, oscillation, or extreme values of wall shear stress (WSS).[2] Nevaril et al.[3] show that exposure of red blood cells to WSS's on the order of 1500 dynes/cm2 can result in hemolysis. Hemodynamic stress from dialysis needle flow has recently been investigated for the role it plays in graft failure. Using laser Doppler velocimetry measurements, Unnikrishnan et al.[4] show that turbulence intensities are 5-6 times greater in the AV flow when the needle flow is present and that increased levels of turbulence exist for approximately 7-8cm downstream of the needle. Since the AVF or PTFE graft is exposed to these high levels of hemodynamic stress several hours each week during dialysis sessions, it is quite possible that needle flow is an important contributor to vascular access occlusion.[4] We present a method for reducing the hemodynamic stress in an AV graft by tailoring the fluid

  20. Ion beam sputter deposition of TiNi shape memory alloy thin films

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Davies, Sam T.; Tsuchiya, Kazuyoshi

    1999-08-01

    The development of functional or smart materials for integration into microsystem is of increasing interest. An example is the shape memory effect exhibited by certain metal alloys which, in principle, can be exploited in the fabrication of micro-scale manipulators or actuators, thereby providing on-chip micromechanical functionality. We have investigated an ion beam sputter deposition process for the growth of TiNi shape memory alloy thin films and demonstrated the required control to produce equiatomic composition, uniform coverage and atomic layer-by-layer growth rates on engineering surfaces. The process uses argon ions at intermediate energy produced by a Kaufman-type ion source to sputter non-alloyed targets of high purity titanium and nickel. Precise measurements of deposition rates allows compositional control during thin film growth. As the sputtering targets and substrates are remote from the discharge plasma, deposition occurs under good vacuum of approximately 10-6 mtorr thus promoting high quality films. Furthermore, the ion beam energetics allow deposition at relatively low substrate temperatures of < 150 degrees C with as-deposited films exhibiting shape memory properties without post-process high temperature annealing. Thermal imagin is used to monitor changes which are characteristic of the shape memory effect and is indicative of changes in specific heat capacity and thermal conductivity as the TiNi shape memory alloy undergoes martensitic to austenitic phase transformations.

  1. Overview of Alternative Bunching and Current-shaping Techniques for Low-Energy Electron Beams

    SciTech Connect

    Piot, Philippe

    2015-12-01

    Techniques to bunch or shape an electron beam at low energies (E <15 MeV) have important implications toward the realization of table-top radiation sources [1] or to the design of compact multi-user free-electron lasers[2]. This paper provides an overview of alternative methods recently developed including techniques such as wakefield-based bunching, space-charge-driven microbunching via wave-breaking [3], ab-initio shaping of the electron-emission process [4], and phase space exchangers. Practical applications of some of these methods to foreseen free-electron-laser configurations are also briefly discussed [5].

  2. Shape-model-based adaptation of 3D deformable meshes for segmentation of medical images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pekar, Vladimir; Kaus, Michael R.; Lorenz, Cristian; Lobregt, Steven; Truyen, Roel; Weese, Juergen

    2001-07-01

    Segmentation methods based on adaptation of deformable models have found numerous applications in medical image analysis. Many efforts have been made in the recent years to improve their robustness and reliability. In particular, increasingly more methods use a priori information about the shape of the anatomical structure to be segmented. This reduces the risk of the model being attracted to false features in the image and, as a consequence, makes the need of close initialization, which remains the principal limitation of elastically deformable models, less crucial for the segmentation quality. In this paper, we present a novel segmentation approach which uses a 3D anatomical statistical shape model to initialize the adaptation process of a deformable model represented by a triangular mesh. As the first step, the anatomical shape model is parametrically fitted to the structure of interest in the image. The result of this global adaptation is used to initialize the local mesh refinement based on an energy minimization. We applied our approach to segment spine vertebrae in CT datasets. The segmentation quality was quantitatively assessed for 6 vertebrae, from 2 datasets, by computing the mean and maximum distance between the adapted mesh and a manually segmented reference shape. The results of the study show that the presented method is a promising approach for segmentation of complex anatomical structures in medical images.

  3. Unveiling the photonic spin Hall effect of freely propagating fan-shaped cylindrical vector vortex beams.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yi; Li, Peng; Liu, Sheng; Zhao, Jianlin

    2015-10-01

    An intriguing photonic spin Hall effect (SHE) for a freely propagating fan-shaped cylindrical vector (CV) vortex beam in a paraxial situation is theoretically and experimentally studied. A developed model to describe this kind of photonic SHE is proposed based on angular spectrum diffraction theory. With this model, the close dependences of spin-dependent splitting on the azimuthal order of polarization, the topological charge of the spiral phase, and the propagation distance are accurately revealed. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that the asymmetric spin-dependent splitting of a fan-shaped CV beam can be consciously managed, even with a constant azimuthal order of polarization. Such a controllable photonic SHE is experimentally verified by measuring the Stokes parameters.

  4. Phase-only shaping algorithm for Gaussian-apodized Bessel beams.

    PubMed

    Durfee, Charles G; Gemmer, John; Moloney, Jerome V

    2013-07-01

    Gaussian-apodized Bessel beams can be used to create a Bessel-like axial line focus at a distance from the focusing lens. For many applications it is desirable to create an axial intensity profile that is uniform along the Bessel zone. In this article, we show that this can be accomplished through phase-only shaping of the wavefront in the far field where the beam has an annular ring structure with a Gaussian cross section. We use a one-dimensional transform to map the radial input field to the axial Bessel field and then optimized the axial intensity with a Gerchberg-Saxton algorithm. By separating out the quadratic portion of the shaping phase the algorithm converges more rapidly. PMID:23842364

  5. Noseleaf furrows in a horseshoe bat act as resonance cavities shaping the biosonar beam.

    PubMed

    Zhuang, Qiao; Müller, Rolf

    2006-11-24

    Horseshoe bats emit their ultrasonic biosonar pulses through nostrils surrounded by intricately shaped protuberances (noseleaves). While these noseleaves have been hypothesized to affect the sonar beam, their physical function has never been analyzed. Using numerical methods, we show that conspicuous furrows in the noseleaf act as resonance cavities shaping the sonar beam. This demonstrates that (a) animals can use resonances in external, half-open cavities to direct sound emissions, (b) structural detail in the faces of bats can have acoustic effects even if it is not adjacent to the emission sites, and (c) specializations in the biosonar system of horseshoe bats allow for differential processing of subbands of the pulse in the acoustic domain.

  6. Beam shaping concepts for kW-class CW and QCW diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Unger, Andreas; Fassbender, Willhelm; Müntz, Holger; Köhler, Bernd; Biesenbach, Jens

    2016-03-01

    In modern diode lasers beam shaping of the highly asymmetric laser beam, which exits the front facet of the semiconductor laser material, is a crucial step towards cost efficient high brightness laser modules which in turn can be further combined towards kW-class diode lasers and can be efficiently fiber coupled. In order to scale up the power of a single laser module in an economic way, high fill factor laser bars are employed. The increased power density from such a laser bar requires improved cooling technologies. On the other hand the increased fill factor of the bar makes advanced beam shaping necessary to be able to achieve small focal spot sizes and couple the laser module efficiently into optical fibers. Finally, to be able to mass produce the laser modules, it is desirable to design the module in a way that allows automated packaging and optics alignment. In this talk, the beam shaping concepts developed at DILAS for high fill factor bars are presented. Starting from optical simulation and choice of optical elements the laser modules incorporating these bars are presented. The concepts developed enable very compact laser modules of up to 2kW of power at a single wavelength with beam qualities of less than 40mm x mrad. Optionally these modules can be wavelength stabilized via external feedback. The packaging technology developed enables the automated alignment of the optics and cooling is DI-water free. Based on the same concepts very compact free space and fiber coupled QCW packages are presented as well.

  7. Evaluation of intensity based beam-shaping method with Rib-phantom HIFU sonications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tillander, Matti; Köhler, Max; Koskela, Julius; Ylihautala, Mika

    2012-11-01

    The relation between rib bone heating during HIFU therapy and incident intensity on the bone surface was examined using an experimental setup and simulations with ray-tracer. The relation was found to be linear yet the data had large variance. The result was successfully applied to an intensity-based beam-shaping algorithm, which was fast enough for online therapy planning, and used to protect the ribs from overheating during intercostal sonications to a HIFU phantom containing two porcine rib bones.

  8. Treatment planning capability assessment of a beam shaping assembly for accelerator-based BNCT.

    PubMed

    Herrera, M S; González, S J; Burlon, A A; Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J

    2011-12-01

    Within the frame of an ongoing project to develop a folded Tandem-Electrostatic-Quadrupole accelerator facility for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT) a theoretical study was performed to assess the treatment planning capability of different configurations of an optimized beam shaping assembly for such a facility. In particular this study aims at evaluating treatment plans for a clinical case of Glioblastoma.

  9. Advanced in situ metrology for x-ray beam shaping with super precision.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongchang; Sutter, John; Sawhney, Kawal

    2015-01-26

    We report a novel method for in situ metrology of an X-ray bimorph mirror by using the speckle scanning technique. Both the focusing beam and the "tophat" defocussed beam have been generated by optimizing the bimorph mirror in a single iteration. Importantly, we have demonstrated that the angular sensitivity for measuring the slope error of an optical surface can reach accuracy in the range of two nanoradians. When compared with conventional ex-situ metrology techniques, the method enables a substantial increase of around two orders of magnitude in the angular sensitivity and opens the way to a previously inaccessible region of slope error measurement. Such a super precision metrology technique will be beneficial for both the manufacture of polished mirrors and the optimization of beam shaping.

  10. Spatial beam shaping for high-power frequency tripling lasers based on a liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Sensen; Wang, Yulei; Lu, Zhiwei; Ding, Lei; Cui, Can; Chen, Yi; Pengyuan, Du; Ba, Dexin; Zheng, Zhenxing; Yuan, Hang; Shi, Lei; Bai, Zhenxu; Liu, Zhaohong; Zhu, Chengyu; Dong, Yongkang; Zhou, Luoxian

    2016-05-01

    We propose and demonstrate a spatial beam shaping method to achieve high-quality near-field for a high-power frequency tripling laser system by using a liquid crystal spatial light modulator (SLM). Considering the nonlinear relationship between the output 3ω intensity and the input 1ω intensity of the frequency conversion system and the transmittance nonuniformity of the whole laser system, we introduce an efficient spatial beam shaping method that improves the output near-field beam quality of frequency tripling laser dramatically. Results show that the near-field peak-to-mean value of the frequency tripling laser improves from 1.83:1 to 1.42:1 after spatial beam shaping within four shots. This method provides effective guidance for spatial beam shaping of high-power frequency tripling laser systems.

  11. Shape-modification of patterned nanoparticles by an ion beam treatment

    PubMed Central

    Heo, Kyong Chan; Gwag, Jin Seog

    2015-01-01

    This paper evaluated a practical approach to the fabrication of arrays of non-spherical nanoparticles by colloidal etching without a mask involving exposure to a low energy ion beam. A spherical nanoparticle array was transferred using a soft nanolithography technique, which is a simple and effective pattern transfer method for nanostructures on the surface of thin adhesive polymers on a planar substrate, after placing the spherical nanoparticles on a patterned PDMS [poly(dimethysiloxane)] stamp produced from a patterned Si wafer. The resulting non-spherical nanoparticle array was driven from a spherical nanoparticle array shape-modified by ion beam irradiation. A well-arrayed layer of cone-like-shapes were produced using a head-on ion beam for different exposure times. Also, a variety of mushroom-like-shapes depending on the exposure angle were produced on a substrate with a well-arranged spherical nanoparticle array. This technique has potential applications in nanophotonics, field emission displays (FEDs) and microfluid. PMID:25687920

  12. Shape-modification of patterned nanoparticles by an ion beam treatment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Heo, Kyong Chan; Gwag, Jin Seog

    2015-02-01

    This paper evaluated a practical approach to the fabrication of arrays of non-spherical nanoparticles by colloidal etching without a mask involving exposure to a low energy ion beam. A spherical nanoparticle array was transferred using a soft nanolithography technique, which is a simple and effective pattern transfer method for nanostructures on the surface of thin adhesive polymers on a planar substrate, after placing the spherical nanoparticles on a patterned PDMS [poly(dimethysiloxane)] stamp produced from a patterned Si wafer. The resulting non-spherical nanoparticle array was driven from a spherical nanoparticle array shape-modified by ion beam irradiation. A well-arrayed layer of cone-like-shapes were produced using a head-on ion beam for different exposure times. Also, a variety of mushroom-like-shapes depending on the exposure angle were produced on a substrate with a well-arranged spherical nanoparticle array. This technique has potential applications in nanophotonics, field emission displays (FEDs) and microfluid.

  13. Laser beam shape and curvature radius of the laser wavefront passing through ZnO nanostructures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mousavi, S. H.; Haratizadeh, H.

    2012-03-01

    In the present work, we focus on synthesis and optical properties of ZnO nanostructures prepared by the chemical vapour deposition method. The nonlinear optical properties of ZnO nanostructures in ethanol solution were studied by the Z-scan technique using CW He-Ne laser at 632.8 nm. The results show a negative nonlinearity and a large nonlinear refractive index. The magnitude and the sign of nonlinear refractive index, n2, were measured using the single beam Z-scan technique. The effect of morphology on nonlinear optical properties of ZnO nanowires is investigated. The laser beam shape and variation of the curvature radius of the wavefront have been simulated when the Gaussian laser beam passes through ZnO nanowires in ethanol. The effect of concentration is investigated in the nonlinearity. We have reported the curvature radius of the wavefront to the nonlinearity for ZnO nanowires as nonlinear sample. Also we found good agreement between the results of theoretical laser beam shape passing through ZnO nanostructure and the experimental data.

  14. Adaptive robust control of longitudinal and transverse electron beam profiles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rezaeizadeh, Amin; Schilcher, Thomas; Smith, Roy S.

    2016-05-01

    Feedback control of the longitudinal and transverse electron beam profiles are considered to be critical for beam control in accelerators. In the feedback scheme, the longitudinal or transverse beam profile is measured and compared to a desired profile to give an error estimate. The error is then used to act on the appropriate actuators to correct the profile. The role of the transverse feedback is to steer the beam in a particular trajectory, known as the "orbit." The common approach for orbit correction is based on approximately inverting the response matrix, and in the best case, involves regulating or filtering the singular values. In the current contribution, a more systematic and structured way of handling orbit correction is introduced giving robustness against uncertainties in the response matrix. Moreover, the input bounds are treated to avoid violating the limits of the corrector currents. The concept of the robust orbit correction has been successfully tested at the SwissFEL injector test facility. In the SwissFEL machine, a photo-injector laser system extracts electrons from a cathode and a similar robust control method is developed for the longitudinal feedback control of the current profile of the electron bunch. The method manipulates the angles of the crystals in the laser system to produce a desired charge distribution over the electron bunch length. This approach paves the way towards automation of laser pulse stacking.

  15. Adaptive optics compensation of multiple orbital angular momentum beams propagating through emulated atmospheric turbulence.

    PubMed

    Ren, Yongxiong; Xie, Guodong; Huang, Hao; Bao, Changjing; Yan, Yan; Ahmed, Nisar; Lavery, Martin P J; Erkmen, Baris I; Dolinar, Samuel; Tur, Moshe; Neifeld, Mark A; Padgett, Miles J; Boyd, Robert W; Shapiro, Jeffrey H; Willner, Alan E

    2014-05-15

    We propose an adaptive optics compensation scheme to simultaneously compensate multiple orbital angular momentum (OAM) beams propagating through atmospheric turbulence. A Gaussian beam on one polarization is used to probe the turbulence-induced wavefront distortions and derive the correction pattern for compensating the OAM beams on the orthogonal polarization. By using this scheme, we experimentally demonstrate simultaneous compensation of multiple OAM beams, each carrying a 100  Gbit/s data channel through emulated atmospheric turbulence. The experimental results indicate that the correction pattern obtained from the Gaussian probe beam could be used to simultaneously compensate multiple turbulence-distorted OAM beams with different orders. It is found that the turbulence-induced crosstalk effects on neighboring modes are efficiently reduced by 12.5 dB, and the system power penalty is improved by 11 dB after compensation.

  16. Diversity Takes Shape: Understanding the Mechanistic and Adaptive Basis of Bacterial Morphology

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    The modern age of metagenomics has delivered unprecedented volumes of data describing the genetic and metabolic diversity of bacterial communities, but it has failed to provide information about coincident cellular morphologies. Much like metabolic and biosynthetic capabilities, morphology comprises a critical component of bacterial fitness, molded by natural selection into the many elaborate shapes observed across the bacterial domain. In this essay, we discuss the diversity of bacterial morphology and its implications for understanding both the mechanistic and the adaptive basis of morphogenesis. We consider how best to leverage genomic data and recent experimental developments in order to advance our understanding of bacterial shape and its functional importance. PMID:27695035

  17. High-resolution adaptive nulling performance for a lightweight agile EHF multiple beam antenna

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fenn, A. J.; Johnson, J. R.; Rispin, L. W.; Cummings, W. C.; Potts, B. M.

    The design and experimental performance of a lightweight high-resolution adaptive nulling extremely high-frequency multiple beam antenna (MBA) are addressed. A 127-beam MBA and a four-channel RF nulling network operating over the 43.5-to-45.5-GHz band were used to adaptively null a jammer in anechoic chamber measurements. Lightweight waveguide transmission lines together with ferrite switches were used to select beam ports from the 127-beam MBA. The MBA was designed to provide simultaneous coverage for three communications system users while providing pattern discrimination or nulling of jammers located within 0.1 deg of the user. Cancellation greater than 30 dB when operating in a wideband mode was experimentally demonstrated.

  18. Force-displacement characteristics of simply supported beam laminated with shape memory alloys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhi-Qiang; Zhang, Zhen-Hua

    2011-12-01

    As a preliminary step in the nonlinear design of shape memory alloy (SMA) composite structures, the force-displacement characteristics of the SMA layer are studied. The bilinear hysteretic model is adopted to describe the constitutive relationship of SMA material. Under the assumption that there is no point of SMA layer finishing martensitic phase transformation during the loading and unloading process, the generalized restoring force generated by SMA layer is deduced for the case that the simply supported beam vibrates in its first mode. The generalized force is expressed as piecewise-nonlinear hysteretic function of the beam transverse displacement. Furthermore the energy dissipated by SMA layer during one period is obtained by integration, then its dependencies are discussed on the vibration amplitude and the SMA's strain (Ms-Strain) value at the beginning of martensitic phase transformation. It is shown that SMA's energy dissipating capacity is proportional to the stiffness difference of bilinear model and nonlinearly dependent on Ms-Strain. The increasing rate of the dissipating capacity gradually reduces with the amplitude increasing. The condition corresponding to the maximum dissipating capacity is deduced for given value of the vibration amplitude. The obtained results are helpful for designing beams laminated with shape memory alloys.

  19. Stability of adaptive control of a light beam in the presence of nonstationary thermal blooming in a moving medium

    SciTech Connect

    Egorov, K.D.

    1988-06-01

    The adaptive control problem for a nonlinearly propagating light beam in a moving atmosphere presupposes continuous optimization of the beam parameters while the characteristics of the medium are varying. If the time scales of such variations are comparable to the characteristic times for the establishment of a thermal lens along the ray path, the beam can be controlled under highly nonstationary propagation conditions. We investigate the mechanism of stability loss during adaptive focusing of a light beam subject to wind refraction. In the aberrationless approximation, we examine the dynamics of beam parameters controlled by adaptive systems capable of operating at different speeds.

  20. Focusing, wavelength tuning, beam steering and beam shaping of circular grating surface emitting distributed Bragg reflector lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Penner, Robert Scott

    Over the past decade, circular grating surface emitting DBR lasers (CGSELs) have progressed from theory to reality. These devices possess several properties that make them attractive options for such applications as optical interconnects and laser arrays. These advantages include low divergence angles, circular beam profiles, and high power output. In this dissertation, the addition of new functionality to these lasers including wavelength tunability, focusing, beam steering and beam shaping is investigated. The theory governing device operation is presented. Pertinent discussions include the coupled mode equations, grating coupling, focusing and changes to the effective index of refraction resulting from current injection through a transparent electrode on the grating. The development and refinement of the device fabrication process is detailed. Key milestones in the grating writing process included achieving first order gratings (Λ = 0.15 μm), creating chirped period gratings for focusing and optimizing the linewidth and uniformity of the grating for high power devices. Of equal importance in obtaining high efficiency devices was the reactive ion etch process. Two different etch recipes were developed: one for mesa-definition and a shallower grating-defining etch. Significant evaluation of the electrical and optical properties of the transparent electrode, Indium Tin Oxide, was performed. Incorporating ITO into the fabrication process required optimization of deposition, patterning, etching and annealing. Device performance, efficiency and functionality improved with each generation. Consequentially, over 225 mW of output power for a injection current of 600 mA, or a slope efficiency of 0.43 mW/mA, was produced by the final generation of high power CGSELs. Focusing was demonstrated by the creation of individual devices with different focal lengths. Coarse mode selection was obtained by removing radial segments of the circular grating thereby eliminating both

  1. Brain shape convergence in the adaptive radiation of New World monkeys

    PubMed Central

    Aristide, Leandro; dos Reis, Sergio Furtado; Machado, Alessandra C.; Lima, Inaya; Lopes, Ricardo T.; Perez, S. Ivan

    2016-01-01

    Primates constitute one of the most diverse mammalian clades, and a notable feature of their diversification is the evolution of brain morphology. However, the evolutionary processes and ecological factors behind these changes are largely unknown. In this work, we investigate brain shape diversification of New World monkeys during their adaptive radiation in relation to different ecological dimensions. Our results reveal that brain diversification in this clade can be explained by invoking a model of adaptive peak shifts to unique and shared optima, defined by a multidimensional ecological niche hypothesis. Particularly, we show that the evolution of convergent brain phenotypes may be related to ecological factors associated with group size (e.g., social complexity). Together, our results highlight the complexity of brain evolution and the ecological significance of brain shape changes during the evolutionary diversification of a primate clade. PMID:26858427

  2. Brain shape convergence in the adaptive radiation of New World monkeys.

    PubMed

    Aristide, Leandro; dos Reis, Sergio Furtado; Machado, Alessandra C; Lima, Inaya; Lopes, Ricardo T; Perez, S Ivan

    2016-02-23

    Primates constitute one of the most diverse mammalian clades, and a notable feature of their diversification is the evolution of brain morphology. However, the evolutionary processes and ecological factors behind these changes are largely unknown. In this work, we investigate brain shape diversification of New World monkeys during their adaptive radiation in relation to different ecological dimensions. Our results reveal that brain diversification in this clade can be explained by invoking a model of adaptive peak shifts to unique and shared optima, defined by a multidimensional ecological niche hypothesis. Particularly, we show that the evolution of convergent brain phenotypes may be related to ecological factors associated with group size (e.g., social complexity). Together, our results highlight the complexity of brain evolution and the ecological significance of brain shape changes during the evolutionary diversification of a primate clade.

  3. Implementation of a real-time adaptive digital shaping for nuclear spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Regadío, Alberto; Sánchez-Prieto, Sebastián; Prieto, Manuel; Tabero, Jesús

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents the structure, design and implementation of a new adaptive digital shaper for processing the pulses generated in nuclear particle detectors. The proposed adaptive algorithm has the capacity to automatically adjust the coefficients for shaping an input signal with a desired profile in real-time. Typical shapers such as triangular, trapezoidal or cusp-like ones can be generated, but more exotic unipolar shaping could also be performed. A practical prototype was designed, implemented and tested in a Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA). Particular attention was paid to the amount of internal FPGA resources required and to the sampling rate, making the design as simple as possible in order to minimize power consumption. Lastly, its performance and capabilities were measured using simulations and a real benchmark.

  4. Optimal piezoelectric beam shape for single and broadband vibration energy harvesting: Modeling, simulation and experimental results

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muthalif, Asan G. A.; Nordin, N. H. Diyana

    2015-03-01

    Harvesting energy from the surroundings has become a new trend in saving our environment. Among the established ones are solar panels, wind turbines and hydroelectric generators which have successfully grown in meeting the world's energy demand. However, for low powered electronic devices; especially when being placed in a remote area, micro scale energy harvesting is preferable. One of the popular methods is via vibration energy scavenging which converts mechanical energy (from vibration) to electrical energy by the effect of coupling between mechanical variables and electric or magnetic fields. As the voltage generated greatly depends on the geometry and size of the piezoelectric material, there is a need to define an optimum shape and configuration of the piezoelectric energy scavenger. In this research, mathematical derivations for unimorph piezoelectric energy harvester are presented. Simulation is done using MATLAB and COMSOL Multiphysics software to study the effect of varying the length and shape of the beam to the generated voltage. Experimental results comparing triangular and rectangular shaped piezoelectric beam are also presented.

  5. Y-shaped jets driven by an ultrasonic beam reflecting on a wall.

    PubMed

    Moudjed, Brahim; Botton, Valéry; Henry, Daniel; Millet, Séverine; Ben Hadid, Hamda

    2016-05-01

    This paper presents an original experimental and numerical investigation of acoustic streaming driven by an acoustic beam reflecting on a wall. The water experiment features a 2 MHz acoustic beam totally reflecting on one of the tank glass walls. The velocity field in the plane containing the incident and reflected beam axes is investigated using Particle Image Velocimetry (PIV). It exhibits an original y-shaped structure: the impinging jet driven by the incident beam is continued by a wall jet, and a second jet is driven by the reflected beam, making an angle with the impinging jet. The flow is also numerically modeled as that of an incompressible fluid undergoing a volumetric acoustic force. This is a classical approach, but the complexity of the acoustic field in the reflection zone, however, makes it difficult to derive an exact force field in this area. Several approximations are thus tested; we show that the observed velocity field only weakly depends on the approximation used in this small region. The numerical model results are in good agreement with the experimental results. The spreading of the jets around their impingement points and the creeping of the wall jets along the walls are observed to allow the interaction of the flow with a large wall surface, which can even extend to the corners of the tank; this could be an interesting feature for applications requiring efficient heat and mass transfer at the wall. More fundamentally, the velocity field is shown to have both similarities and differences with the velocity field in a classical centered acoustic streaming jet. In particular its magnitude exhibits a fairly good agreement with a formerly derived scaling law based on the balance of the acoustic forcing with the inertia due to the flow acceleration along the beam axis. PMID:26907890

  6. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser beam correction in fast ignition experiments

    SciTech Connect

    Homoelle, D C; Baker, K L; Patel, P K; Utterback, E; Rushford, M C; Siders, C W; Barty, C J

    2009-10-22

    We present the design for a high-speed adaptive optics system that will be used to achieve the necessary laser pointing and beam-quality performance for initial fast-ignition coupling experiments. This design makes use of a 32 x 32 pixellated MEMS device as the adaptive optic and a two-channel interferometer as the wave-front sensor. We present results from a system testbed that demonstrates improvement of the Strehl ratio from 0.09 to 0.61 and stabilization of beam pointing from {approx}75{micro}rad to <2{micro}rad.

  7. Interferometric adaptive optics for high-power laser beam correction in fast ignition experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Homoelle, D.; Baker, K. L.; Patel, P. K.; Utterback, E.; Rushford, M. C.; Siders, C. W.; Barty, C. P. J.

    2010-08-01

    We present the design for a high-speed adaptive optics system that will be used to achieve the necessary laser pointing and beam-quality performance for initial fast-ignition coupling experiments. This design makes use of a 32×32 pixellated MEMS device as the adaptive optic and a two-channel interferometer as the wave-front sensor. We present results from a system testbed that demonstrates improvement of the Strehl ratio from 0.09 to 0.61 and stabilization of beam pointing from ~75μrad to <2μrad.

  8. Shaping plasmon beams via the controlled illumination of finite-size plasmonic crystals.

    PubMed

    Bouillard, J-S; Segovia, P; Dickson, W; Wurtz, G A; Zayats, A V

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic crystals provide many passive and active optical functionalities, including enhanced sensing, optical nonlinearities, light extraction from LEDs and coupling to and from subwavelength waveguides. Here we study, both experimentally and numerically, the coherent control of SPP beam excitation in finite size plasmonic crystals under focussed illumination. The correct combination of the illuminating spot size, its position relative to the plasmonic crystal, wavelength and polarisation enables the efficient shaping and directionality of SPP beam launching. We show that under strongly focussed illumination, the illuminated part of the crystal acts as an antenna, launching surface plasmon waves which are subsequently filtered by the surrounding periodic lattice. Changing the illumination conditions provides rich opportunities to engineer the SPP emission pattern. This offers an alternative technique to actively modulate and control plasmonic signals, either via micro- and nano-electromechanical switches or with electro- and all-optical beam steering which have direct implications for the development of new integrated nanophotonic devices, such as plasmonic couplers and switches and on-chip signal demultiplexing. This approach can be generalised to all kinds of surface waves, either for the coupling and discrimination of light in planar dielectric waveguides or the generation and control of non-diffractive SPP beams.

  9. Fresnel and Fraunhofer diffraction of a Gaussian laser beam by fork-shaped gratings.

    PubMed

    Janicijevic, Ljiljana; Topuzoski, Suzana

    2008-11-01

    Expressions describing the vortex beams that are generated by the process of Fresnel diffraction of a Gaussian beam incident out of waist on fork-shaped gratings of arbitrary integer charge p, and vortex spots in the case of Fraunhofer diffraction by these gratings, are deduced. The common general transmission function of the gratings is defined and specialized for the cases of amplitude holograms, binary amplitude gratings, and their phase versions. Optical vortex beams, or carriers of phase singularity with charges mp and -mp, are the higher negative and positive diffraction-order beams. The radial part of their wave amplitudes is described by the product of the mpth-order Gauss-doughnut function and a Kummer function, or by the first-order Gauss-doughnut function and the difference of two modified Bessel functions whose orders do not match the singularity charge value. The wave amplitude and the intensity distributions are discussed for the near and far fields in the focal plane of a convergent lens, as well as the specialization of the results when the grating charge p=0; i.e., the grating turns from forked into rectilinear. The analytical expressions for the vortex radii are also discussed.

  10. Shaping plasmon beams via the controlled illumination of finite-size plasmonic crystals

    PubMed Central

    Bouillard, J.-S.; Segovia, P.; Dickson, W.; Wurtz, G. A.; Zayats, A. V.

    2014-01-01

    Plasmonic crystals provide many passive and active optical functionalities, including enhanced sensing, optical nonlinearities, light extraction from LEDs and coupling to and from subwavelength waveguides. Here we study, both experimentally and numerically, the coherent control of SPP beam excitation in finite size plasmonic crystals under focussed illumination. The correct combination of the illuminating spot size, its position relative to the plasmonic crystal, wavelength and polarisation enables the efficient shaping and directionality of SPP beam launching. We show that under strongly focussed illumination, the illuminated part of the crystal acts as an antenna, launching surface plasmon waves which are subsequently filtered by the surrounding periodic lattice. Changing the illumination conditions provides rich opportunities to engineer the SPP emission pattern. This offers an alternative technique to actively modulate and control plasmonic signals, either via micro- and nano-electromechanical switches or with electro- and all-optical beam steering which have direct implications for the development of new integrated nanophotonic devices, such as plasmonic couplers and switches and on-chip signal demultiplexing. This approach can be generalised to all kinds of surface waves, either for the coupling and discrimination of light in planar dielectric waveguides or the generation and control of non-diffractive SPP beams. PMID:25429786

  11. Transformations of spherical beam shape coefficients in generalized Lorenz-Mie theories through rotations of coordinate systems. V. Localized beam models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gouesbet, G.; Lock, J. A.; Wang, J. J.; Gréhan, G.

    2011-01-01

    This paper is the fifth of a series of papers devoted to the transformation of beam shape coefficients through rotations of coordinate systems. These coefficients are required to express electromagnetic fields of laser beams in expanded forms, for use in some generalized Lorenz-Mie theories, or in other light scattering approaches such as Extended Boundary Condition Method. Part I was devoted to the general formulation. Parts II, III, IV were devoted to special cases, namely axisymmetric beams, special values of Euler angles, and plane waves respectively. The present Part V is devoted to the study of localized approximation and localized beam models, and of their behavior under the rotation of coordinate systems.

  12. Optimal Neutron Source & Beam Shaping Assembly for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    J. Vujic; E. Greenspan; W.E. Kastenber; Y. Karni; D. Regev; J.M. Verbeke, K.N. Leung; D. Chivers; S. Guess; L. Kim; W. Waldron; Y. Zhu

    2003-04-30

    There were three objectives to this project: (1) The development of the 2-D Swan code for the optimization of the nuclear design of facilities for medical applications of radiation, radiation shields, blankets of accelerator-driven systems, fusion facilities, etc. (2) Identification of the maximum beam quality that can be obtained for Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (BNCT) from different reactor-, and accelerator-based neutron sources. The optimal beam-shaping assembly (BSA) design for each neutron source was also to e obtained. (3) Feasibility assessment of a new neutron source for NCT and other medical and industrial applications. This source consists of a state-of-the-art proton or deuteron accelerator driving and inherently safe, proliferation resistant, small subcritical fission assembly.

  13. Reciprocity breaking during nonlinear propagation of adapted beams through random media.

    PubMed

    Palastro, J P; Peñano, J; Nelson, W; DiComo, G; Helle, M; Johnson, L A; Hafizi, B

    2016-08-22

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems rely on the principle of reciprocity, or symmetry with respect to the interchange of point sources and receivers. These systems use the light received from a low power emitter on or near a target to compensate phase aberrations acquired by a laser beam during linear propagation through random media. If, however, the laser beam propagates nonlinearly, reciprocity is broken, potentially undermining AO correction. Here we examine the consequences of this breakdown, providing the first analysis of AO applied to high peak power laser beams. While discussed for general random and nonlinear media, we consider specific examples of Kerr-nonlinear, turbulent atmosphere.

  14. Reciprocity breaking during nonlinear propagation of adapted beams through random media.

    PubMed

    Palastro, J P; Peñano, J; Nelson, W; DiComo, G; Helle, M; Johnson, L A; Hafizi, B

    2016-08-22

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems rely on the principle of reciprocity, or symmetry with respect to the interchange of point sources and receivers. These systems use the light received from a low power emitter on or near a target to compensate phase aberrations acquired by a laser beam during linear propagation through random media. If, however, the laser beam propagates nonlinearly, reciprocity is broken, potentially undermining AO correction. Here we examine the consequences of this breakdown, providing the first analysis of AO applied to high peak power laser beams. While discussed for general random and nonlinear media, we consider specific examples of Kerr-nonlinear, turbulent atmosphere. PMID:27557166

  15. Applications of generalised G.O. reflector synthesis to highly-shaped beam antennas

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mehler, M. J.; Westcott, B. S.

    1985-05-01

    An approach to reflector synthesis for highly-shaped beam antennas is presented which is based on a previously published (Norris and Westcott, 1976) method whereby a single reflector is synthesized to produce a general power pattern when illuminated by a point source. Phase is not monitored in this technique. The approach, which uses a nonuniform finite difference grid rather than the uniform grid used in the original method, is illustrated by an example involving the synthesis of an antenna capable of producing constant power density coverage of the earth from a low earth orbit.

  16. Beam shaping design for compact and high-brightness fiber-coupled laser-diode system.

    PubMed

    Yu, Junhong; Guo, Linui; Wu, Hualing; Wang, Zhao; Tan, Hao; Gao, Songxin; Wu, Deyong; Zhang, Kai

    2015-06-20

    Fiber-coupled laser diodes have become essential sources for fiber laser pumping and direct energy applications. A compact and high-brightness fiber-coupled system has been designed based on a significant beam shaping method. The laser-diode stack consists of eight mini-bars and is effectively coupled into a standard 100 μm core diameter and NA=0.22 fiber. The simulative result indicates that the module will have an output power over 440 W. Using this technique, compactness and high-brightness production of a fiber-coupled laser-diode module is possible.

  17. Investigation of the Thermomechanical Response of Shape Memory Alloy Hybrid Composite Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Davis, Brian A.

    2005-01-01

    Previous work at NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) involved fabrication and testing of composite beams with embedded, pre-strained shape memory alloy (SMA) ribbons. That study also provided comparison of experimental results with numerical predictions from a research code making use of a new thermoelastic model for shape memory alloy hybrid composite (SMAHC) structures. The previous work showed qualitative validation of the numerical model. However, deficiencies in the experimental-numerical correlation were noted and hypotheses for the discrepancies were given for further investigation. The goal of this work is to refine the experimental measurement and numerical modeling approaches in order to better understand the discrepancies, improve the correlation between prediction and measurement, and provide rigorous quantitative validation of the numerical model. Thermal buckling, post-buckling, and random responses to thermal and inertial (base acceleration) loads are studied. Excellent agreement is achieved between the predicted and measured results, thereby quantitatively validating the numerical tool.

  18. Time course of shape and category selectivity revealed by EEG rapid adaptation.

    PubMed

    Scholl, Clara A; Jiang, Xiong; Martin, Jacob G; Riesenhuber, Maximilian

    2014-02-01

    A hallmark of human cognition is the ability to rapidly assign meaning to sensory stimuli. It has been suggested that this fast visual object categorization ability is accomplished by a feedforward processing hierarchy consisting of shape-selective neurons in occipito-temporal cortex that feed into task circuits in frontal cortex computing conceptual category membership. We performed an EEG rapid adaptation study to test this hypothesis. Participants were trained to categorize novel stimuli generated with a morphing system that precisely controlled both stimulus shape and category membership. We subsequently performed EEG recordings while participants performed a category matching task on pairs of successively presented stimuli. We used space-time cluster analysis to identify channels and latencies exhibiting selective neural responses. Neural signals before 200 msec on posterior channels demonstrated a release from adaptation for shape changes, irrespective of category membership, compatible with a shape- but not explicitly category-selective neural representation. A subsequent cluster with anterior topography appeared after 200 msec and exhibited release from adaptation consistent with explicit categorization. These signals were subsequently modulated by perceptual uncertainty starting around 300 msec. The degree of category selectivity of the anterior signals was strongly predictive of behavioral performance. We also observed a posterior category-selective signal after 300 msec exhibiting significant functional connectivity with the initial anterior category-selective signal. In summary, our study supports the proposition that perceptual categorization is accomplished by the brain within a quarter second through a largely feedforward process culminating in frontal areas, followed by later category-selective signals in posterior regions. PMID:24001003

  19. Measurement of Jovian decametric Io-related source location and beam shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Maeda, K.; Carr, T. D.

    1992-01-01

    The paper presents new information on the locations of the Io-related sources A and C (i.e., Io-A and Io-C) and on the shapes of their emission beams on the basis of measurements of the Jovian decametric activity that was recorded by Voyager 1 and 2. In two instances, the same dynamic spectral arc event in the recorded data of the two spacecraft was recorded, providing in each case an opportunity to observe the same emission beam over a wide range of frequencies from two considerably different directions. The propagation-corrected centroid times of each of the Voyager-1 arcs are found to be coincident with those of the corresponding Voyager-2 arc in a particular frequency range, but not at other frequencies. The hypothesis that emission beams are in the form of thin, almost conical sheets, the cone opening angle decreasing with increasing frequency, is confirmed. It is demonstrated that both the Io-A and Io-C sources were located near the northern foot of the magnetic flux tube that was connected to Io.

  20. Three-dimensional piezoelectric vibration energy harvester using spiral-shaped beam with triple operating frequencies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nian; Yang, Jin; Yu, Qiangmo; Zhao, Jiangxin; Liu, Jun; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This work has demonstrated a novel piezoelectric energy harvester without a complex structure and appended component that is capable of scavenging vibration energy from arbitrary directions with multiple resonant frequencies. In this harvester, a spiral-shaped elastic thin beam instead of a traditional thin cantilever beam was adopted to absorb external vibration with arbitrary direction in three-dimensional (3D) spaces owing to its ability to bend flexibly and stretch along arbitrary direction. Furthermore, multiple modes in the elastic thin beam contribute to a possibility to widen the working bandwidth with multiple resonant frequencies. The experimental results show that the harvester was capable of scavenging the vibration energy in 3D arbitrary directions; they also exhibited triple power peaks at about 16 Hz, 21 Hz, and 28 Hz with the powers of 330 μW, 313 μW, and 6 μW, respectively. In addition, human walking and water wave energies were successfully converted into electricity, proving that our harvester was practical to scavenge the time-variant or multi-directional vibration energies in our daily life. PMID:26827346

  1. Three-dimensional piezoelectric vibration energy harvester using spiral-shaped beam with triple operating frequencies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhao, Nian; Yang, Jin; Yu, Qiangmo; Zhao, Jiangxin; Liu, Jun; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This work has demonstrated a novel piezoelectric energy harvester without a complex structure and appended component that is capable of scavenging vibration energy from arbitrary directions with multiple resonant frequencies. In this harvester, a spiral-shaped elastic thin beam instead of a traditional thin cantilever beam was adopted to absorb external vibration with arbitrary direction in three-dimensional (3D) spaces owing to its ability to bend flexibly and stretch along arbitrary direction. Furthermore, multiple modes in the elastic thin beam contribute to a possibility to widen the working bandwidth with multiple resonant frequencies. The experimental results show that the harvester was capable of scavenging the vibration energy in 3D arbitrary directions; they also exhibited triple power peaks at about 16 Hz, 21 Hz, and 28 Hz with the powers of 330 μW, 313 μW, and 6 μW, respectively. In addition, human walking and water wave energies were successfully converted into electricity, proving that our harvester was practical to scavenge the time-variant or multi-directional vibration energies in our daily life.

  2. Three-dimensional piezoelectric vibration energy harvester using spiral-shaped beam with triple operating frequencies.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Nian; Yang, Jin; Yu, Qiangmo; Zhao, Jiangxin; Liu, Jun; Wen, Yumei; Li, Ping

    2016-01-01

    This work has demonstrated a novel piezoelectric energy harvester without a complex structure and appended component that is capable of scavenging vibration energy from arbitrary directions with multiple resonant frequencies. In this harvester, a spiral-shaped elastic thin beam instead of a traditional thin cantilever beam was adopted to absorb external vibration with arbitrary direction in three-dimensional (3D) spaces owing to its ability to bend flexibly and stretch along arbitrary direction. Furthermore, multiple modes in the elastic thin beam contribute to a possibility to widen the working bandwidth with multiple resonant frequencies. The experimental results show that the harvester was capable of scavenging the vibration energy in 3D arbitrary directions; they also exhibited triple power peaks at about 16 Hz, 21 Hz, and 28 Hz with the powers of 330 μW, 313 μW, and 6 μW, respectively. In addition, human walking and water wave energies were successfully converted into electricity, proving that our harvester was practical to scavenge the time-variant or multi-directional vibration energies in our daily life.

  3. Shape inspection system with real-time adaptation to the luminance of the objects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garcia, Daniel F.; Usamentiaga, Ruben; Marin, Ignacio; Gonzalez, Juan A.; de Abajo, Nicolas

    2001-04-01

    This work presents an automated shape inspection system for 2D objects with variable luminance. The system installed in the steel industry, captures linear images of plates at high temperature (700 - 1200 degree(s)C) while they are moving on a roll path. The main objective of the system is to capture the shape of the head and tail of the plates. These shapes are used to optimize the rolling parameters of the plate mill in order to minimize waste. The radiation generated by the plates in the visible and infrared zones of the spectrum (largely dependent on their temperature) is directly captured by the linear camera of the system with no additional artificial illumination. While most of the research work has been focused on obtaining the optimal illumination for the objects inspected, this work deals with the particular case of objects which irradiate their own light. This system automatically adapts itself to acquire images of plates with different levels of luminance using a mechanisms that calculates the proper exposure time to acquire each image. The mechanism integrates two basic actions: a feedforward control and an adaptive feedback control loop.

  4. Supine proton beam craniospinal radiotherapy using a novel tabletop adapter.

    PubMed

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C; Besemer, Abby; Simmons, Joseph; Hoene, Ted; Simoneaux, Victor; Sandefur, Amy; Wolanski, Mark; Li, Zhao; Cheng, Chee-Wei

    2013-01-01

    To develop a device that allows supine craniospinal proton and photon therapy to the vast majority of proton and photon facilities currently experiencing limitations as a result of couch design issues. Plywood and carbon fiber were used for the development of a prototype unit. Once this was found to be satisfactory after all design issues were addressed, computer-assisted design (CAD) was used and carbon fiber tables were built to our specifications at a local manufacturer of military and racing car carbon fiber parts. Clinic-driven design was done using real-time team discussion for a prototype design. A local machinist was able to construct a prototype unit for us in <2 weeks after the start of our project. Once the prototype had been used successfully for several months and all development issues were addressed, a custom carbon fiber design was developed in coordination with a carbon fiber manufacturer in partnership. CAD methods were used to design the units to allow oblique fields from head to thigh on patients up to 200 cm in height. Two custom-designed carbon fiber craniospinal tabletop designs now exist: one long and one short. Four are in successful use in our facility. Their weight tolerance is greater than that of our robot table joint (164 kg). The long unit allows for working with taller patients and can be converted into a short unit as needed. An affordable, practical means of doing supine craniospinal therapy with protons or photons can be used in most locations via the use of these devices. This is important because proton therapy provides a much lower integral dose than all other therapy methods for these patients and the supine position is easier for patients to tolerate and for anesthesia delivery. These units have been successfully used for adult and pediatric supine craniospinal therapy, proton therapy using oblique beams to the low pelvis, treatment of various spine tumors, and breast-sparing Hodgkin's therapy. PMID:22951538

  5. Supine proton beam craniospinal radiotherapy using a novel tabletop adapter

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, Jeffrey C.; Besemer, Abby; Simmons, Joseph; Hoene, Ted; Simoneaux, Victor; Sandefur, Amy; Wolanski, Mark; Li, Zhao; Cheng, Chee-Wei

    2013-04-01

    To develop a device that allows supine craniospinal proton and photon therapy to the vast majority of proton and photon facilities currently experiencing limitations as a result of couch design issues. Plywood and carbon fiber were used for the development of a prototype unit. Once this was found to be satisfactory after all design issues were addressed, computer-assisted design (CAD) was used and carbon fiber tables were built to our specifications at a local manufacturer of military and racing car carbon fiber parts. Clinic-driven design was done using real-time team discussion for a prototype design. A local machinist was able to construct a prototype unit for us in <2 weeks after the start of our project. Once the prototype had been used successfully for several months and all development issues were addressed, a custom carbon fiber design was developed in coordination with a carbon fiber manufacturer in partnership. CAD methods were used to design the units to allow oblique fields from head to thigh on patients up to 200 cm in height. Two custom-designed carbon fiber craniospinal tabletop designs now exist: one long and one short. Four are in successful use in our facility. Their weight tolerance is greater than that of our robot table joint (164 kg). The long unit allows for working with taller patients and can be converted into a short unit as needed. An affordable, practical means of doing supine craniospinal therapy with protons or photons can be used in most locations via the use of these devices. This is important because proton therapy provides a much lower integral dose than all other therapy methods for these patients and the supine position is easier for patients to tolerate and for anesthesia delivery. These units have been successfully used for adult and pediatric supine craniospinal therapy, proton therapy using oblique beams to the low pelvis, treatment of various spine tumors, and breast-sparing Hodgkin's therapy.

  6. Adaptive step-size algorithm for Fourier beam-propagation method with absorbing boundary layer of auto-determined width

    DOE PAGES

    Learn, R.; Feigenbaum, E.

    2016-05-27

    Two algorithms that enhance the utility of the absorbing boundary layer are presented, mainly in the framework of the Fourier beam-propagation method. One is an automated boundary layer width selector that chooses a near-optimal boundary size based on the initial beam shape. Furthermore, the second algorithm adjusts the propagation step sizes based on the beam shape at the beginning of each step in order to reduce aliasing artifacts.

  7. Adaptable beam profiles from a dual-cavity Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Mackenzie, J I; Kim, J W

    2016-04-15

    We report a technique to tailor a laser beam profile from a donut to quasi-top-hat intensity distribution, directly from the laser, simply achieved by simultaneous excitation and control of the relative contributions of the fundamental (TEM00) and first-order Laguerre-Gaussian (LG01) transverse modes. Exploiting a dual-cavity configuration with a single Nd:YAG gain element, adaptable continuous-wave laser beam profiles from the primary cavity could be obtained by varying the diffraction loss of an acousto-optic modulator in the secondary cavity. We investigate the resultant beam profiles as a function of pump power and the AOM diffraction loss, and discuss the prospects for tunable laser beams profiles. PMID:27082333

  8. Adaptable beam profiles from a dual-cavity Nd:YAG laser.

    PubMed

    Kim, D J; Mackenzie, J I; Kim, J W

    2016-04-15

    We report a technique to tailor a laser beam profile from a donut to quasi-top-hat intensity distribution, directly from the laser, simply achieved by simultaneous excitation and control of the relative contributions of the fundamental (TEM00) and first-order Laguerre-Gaussian (LG01) transverse modes. Exploiting a dual-cavity configuration with a single Nd:YAG gain element, adaptable continuous-wave laser beam profiles from the primary cavity could be obtained by varying the diffraction loss of an acousto-optic modulator in the secondary cavity. We investigate the resultant beam profiles as a function of pump power and the AOM diffraction loss, and discuss the prospects for tunable laser beams profiles.

  9. Inverted Gabor holography principle for tailoring arbitrary shaped three-dimensional beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that by modifying the wavefront in a certain manner, the light intensity can be turned into a certain shape. However, all known light modulation techniques allow for limited light modifications only: focusing within a restricted region in space, shaping into a certain class of parametric curves along the optical axis or bending described by a quadratic-dependent deflection as in the case of Airy beams. We show a general case of classical light wavefront shaping that allows for intensity and phase redistribution into an arbitrary profile including pre-determined switching-off of the intensity. To create an arbitrary three-dimensional path of intensity, we represent the path as a sequence of closely packed individual point-like absorbers and simulate the in-line hologram of the created object set; when such a hologram is contrast inverted, thus giving rise to a diffractor, it creates the pre-determined three-dimensional path of intensity behind the diffractor under illumination. The crucial parameter for a smooth optical path is the sampling of the predetermined curves, which is given by the lateral and axial resolution of the optical system. We provide both, simulated and experimental results to demonstrate the power of this novel method.

  10. Ion beam shaping of Au nanoparticles in silica: Particle size and concentration dependence

    SciTech Connect

    Dawi, E. A.; Mink, M. P.; Vredenberg, A. M.; Habraken, F. H. P. M.; Rizza, G.

    2009-04-01

    Irradiation with swift heavy ions of spherical Au nanoparticles confined within a silica matrix shapes them into prolate nanorods and nanowires whose principal axes are aligned along the beam direction. In the present paper, we investigate the role that is played by the initial nanoparticle size and concentration in this so-called ion-shaping mechanism. We have produced silica films wherein Au nanoparticles with average diameters of 15, 30, and 45 nm were embedded within a single plane and have irradiated these films at 300 K at normal incidence with 18, 25, and 54 MeV Ag ions. We demonstrate the existence of both threshold and saturation fluences for the elongation effects mentioned. The values of these critical fluences depend both on the ion energy and the initial nanoparticle size. Moreover, we show that 45 nm Au particles are not deformed when irradiated with 18 MeV Ag ions, such that this value corresponds to an energy threshold for the deformation process. As far as the influence of the nanoparticle concentration on the shaping characteristics is concerned, we have found that above the critical irradiation fluence, the deformation effect becomes very sensitive to the initial concentration of the nanoparticles.

  11. Inverted Gabor holography principle for tailoring arbitrary shaped three-dimensional beams

    PubMed Central

    Latychevskaia, Tatiana; Fink, Hans-Werner

    2016-01-01

    It is well known that by modifying the wavefront in a certain manner, the light intensity can be turned into a certain shape. However, all known light modulation techniques allow for limited light modifications only: focusing within a restricted region in space, shaping into a certain class of parametric curves along the optical axis or bending described by a quadratic-dependent deflection as in the case of Airy beams. We show a general case of classical light wavefront shaping that allows for intensity and phase redistribution into an arbitrary profile including pre-determined switching-off of the intensity. To create an arbitrary three-dimensional path of intensity, we represent the path as a sequence of closely packed individual point-like absorbers and simulate the in-line hologram of the created object set; when such a hologram is contrast inverted, thus giving rise to a diffractor, it creates the pre-determined three-dimensional path of intensity behind the diffractor under illumination. The crucial parameter for a smooth optical path is the sampling of the predetermined curves, which is given by the lateral and axial resolution of the optical system. We provide both, simulated and experimental results to demonstrate the power of this novel method. PMID:27199254

  12. Capacity achieving nonbinary LDPC coded non-uniform shaping modulation for adaptive optical communications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changyu; Zou, Ding; Liu, Tao; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2016-08-01

    A mutual information inspired nonbinary coded modulation design with non-uniform shaping is proposed. Instead of traditional power of two signal constellation sizes, we design 5-QAM, 7-QAM and 9-QAM constellations, which can be used in adaptive optical networks. The non-uniform shaping and LDPC code rate are jointly considered in the design, which results in a better performance scheme for the same SNR values. The matched nonbinary (NB) LDPC code is used for this scheme, which further improves the coding gain and the overall performance. We analyze both coding performance and system SNR performance. We show that the proposed NB LDPC-coded 9-QAM has more than 2dB gain in symbol SNR compared to traditional LDPC-coded star-8-QAM. On the other hand, the proposed NB LDPC-coded 5-QAM and 7-QAM have even better performance than LDPC-coded QPSK.

  13. Capacity achieving nonbinary LDPC coded non-uniform shaping modulation for adaptive optical communications.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changyu; Zou, Ding; Liu, Tao; Djordjevic, Ivan B

    2016-08-01

    A mutual information inspired nonbinary coded modulation design with non-uniform shaping is proposed. Instead of traditional power of two signal constellation sizes, we design 5-QAM, 7-QAM and 9-QAM constellations, which can be used in adaptive optical networks. The non-uniform shaping and LDPC code rate are jointly considered in the design, which results in a better performance scheme for the same SNR values. The matched nonbinary (NB) LDPC code is used for this scheme, which further improves the coding gain and the overall performance. We analyze both coding performance and system SNR performance. We show that the proposed NB LDPC-coded 9-QAM has more than 2dB gain in symbol SNR compared to traditional LDPC-coded star-8-QAM. On the other hand, the proposed NB LDPC-coded 5-QAM and 7-QAM have even better performance than LDPC-coded QPSK. PMID:27505775

  14. A method for robust segmentation of arbitrarily shaped radiopaque structures in cone-beam CT projections

    SciTech Connect

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Fledelius, Walther; Keall, Paul J.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Lu Jun; Brackbill, Emily; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2011-04-15

    Purpose: Implanted markers are commonly used in radiotherapy for x-ray based target localization. The projected marker position in a series of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projections can be used to estimate the three dimensional (3D) target trajectory during the CBCT acquisition. This has important applications in tumor motion management such as motion inclusive, gating, and tumor tracking strategies. However, for irregularly shaped markers, reliable segmentation is challenged by large variations in the marker shape with projection angle. The purpose of this study was to develop a semiautomated method for robust and reliable segmentation of arbitrarily shaped radiopaque markers in CBCT projections. Methods: The segmentation method involved the following three steps: (1) Threshold based segmentation of the marker in three to six selected projections with large angular separation, good marker contrast, and uniform background; (2) construction of a 3D marker model by coalignment and backprojection of the threshold-based segmentations; and (3) construction of marker templates at all imaging angles by projection of the 3D model and use of these templates for template-based segmentation. The versatility of the segmentation method was demonstrated by segmentation of the following structures in the projections from two clinical CBCT scans: (1) Three linear fiducial markers (Visicoil) implanted in or near a lung tumor and (2) an artificial cardiac valve in a lung cancer patient. Results: Automatic marker segmentation was obtained in more than 99.9% of the cases. The segmentation failed in a few cases where the marker was either close to a structure of similar appearance or hidden behind a dense structure (data cable). Conclusions: A robust template-based method for segmentation of arbitrarily shaped radiopaque markers in CBCT projections was developed.

  15. Reciprocity breaking during nonlinear propagation of adapted beams through random media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Palastro, J. P.; Peñano, J.; Nelson, W.; DiComo, G.; Helle, M.; Johnson, L. A.; Hafizi, B.

    2016-08-01

    Adaptive optics (AO) systems rely on the principle of reciprocity, or symmetry with respect to the interchange of point sources and receivers. These systems use the light received from a low power emitter on or near a target to compensate profile aberrations acquired by a laser beam during linear propagation through random media. If, however, the laser beam propagates nonlinearly, reciprocity is broken, potentially undermining AO correction. Here we examine the consequences of this breakdown. While discussed for general random and nonlinear media, we consider specific examples of Kerr-nonlinear, turbulent atmosphere.

  16. Directionality effects in the transfer of X-rays from a magnetized atmosphere: Beam pulse shape

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Meszaros, P.; Bonazzola, S.

    1981-01-01

    A formalism is presented for radiation transfer in two normal polarization modes in finite and semiinfinite plane parallel uniform atmospheres with a magnetic field perpendicular to the surface and arbitrary propagation angles. This method is based on the coupled integral equations of transfer, including emission, absorption, and scattering. Calculations are performed for atmosphere parameters typical of X-ray pulsars. The directionality of the escaping radiation is investigated for several cases, varying the input distributions. Theoretical pencil beam profiles and X-ray pulse shapes are obtained assuming the radiation is emitted from the polar caps of spinning neutron stars. Implications for realistic models of accreting magnetized X-ray sources are briefly discussed.

  17. Solving tolerancing and 3D beam shaping problems by multifunctional wave optical design

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buehling, Sven; Wyrowski, Frank

    2000-10-01

    A strategy for designing optical systems that are optimized for multiple optical functions on the basis of wave optics is presented. Each optical function is composed of an input field, a set of fixed system parameters, and a merit function. A design algorithm is proposed which is applicable for optical systems consisting of an transmission operator followed by an arbitrary linear operator. The goal is to find the transmission operator which is optimal for all optical functions simultaneously. In later design steps, the found transmission operator can be transformed to real optical elements, for instance by using the thin element approximation. It is shown that the algorithm is efficiently applicable by investigating two sample applications for multifunctional wave optical design: the design of tolerant systems and 3D beam shaping.

  18. Treatment of absolute painful glaucoma with dynamic arcs using novalis shaped beam radiosurgery

    SciTech Connect

    Gonzalez-Olhovich, Irene . E-mail: irenegonol@hotmail.com; Celis, Miguel Angel; Larraga-Gutierrez, Jose; Lopez-Ayala, Temuchino; Suarez-Campos, Jose; Garcia-Garduno, Amanda; Herrera-Gomez, Leopoldo; Hernandez-Bojorquez, Mariana B.Sc.

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: We assessed the effect of shaped beam conformal stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) in 1 patient with chronic painful glaucoma in one eye refractory to medical treatment. Methods and Materials: Left eye ciliary body was targeted at 18 Gy (90% isodose curve) with a dedicated linear accelerator (Novalis, BrainLAB, Germany) SRS. Interval follow-up was performed weekly for the first month, and every 2 months until 1 year was completed with clinical examinations and intraocular pressure (IOP) measurements. Results: Ocular pain resolved at 6 weeks after SRS treatment. IOP decreased and normalized at 1 year. Conclusions: We present a case in which SRS appears to be an effective treatment of chronic refractory painful glaucoma. Further Phase I studies are needed to know the best parameters for radiation dose, tolerance of organs at risk, and pathophysiologic effects.

  19. Laser beam propagation through turbulence and adaptive optics for beam delivery improvement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nicolas, Stephane

    2015-10-01

    We report results from numerical simulations of laser beam propagation through atmospheric turbulence. In particular, we study the statistical variations of the fractional beam energy hitting inside an optical aperture placed at several kilometer distance. The simulations are performed for different turbulence conditions and engagement ranges, with and without the use of turbulence mitigation. Turbulence mitigation is simulated with phase conjugation. The energy fluctuations are deduced from time sequence realizations. It is shown that turbulence mitigation leads to an increase of the mean energy inside the aperture and decrease of the fluctuations even in strong turbulence conditions and long distance engagement. As an example, the results are applied to a high energy laser countermeasure system, where we determine the probability that a single laser pulse, or one of the pulses in a sequence, will provide a lethal energy inside the target aperture. Again, turbulence mitigation contributes to increase the performance of the system at long-distance and for strong turbulence conditions in terms of kill probability. We also discuss a specific case where turbulence contributes to increase the pulse energy within the target aperture. The present analysis can be used to evaluate the performance of a variety of systems, such as directed countermeasures, laser communication, and laser weapons.

  20. Local stereo matching with adaptive shape support window based cost aggregation.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yafan; Zhao, Yan; Ji, Mengqi

    2014-10-10

    Cost aggregation is the most important step in a local stereo algorithm. In this work, a novel local stereo-matching algorithm with a cost-aggregation method based on adaptive shape support window (ASSW) is proposed. First, we compute the initial cost volume, which uses both absolute intensity difference and gradient similarity to measure dissimilarity. Second, we apply an ASSW-based cost-aggregation method to get the aggregated cost within the support window. There are two main parts: at first we construct a local support skeleton anchoring each pixel with four varying arm lengths decided on color similarity; as a result, the support window integral of multiple horizontal segments spanned by pixels in the neighboring vertical is established. Then we utilize extended implementation of guided filter to aggregate cost volume within the ASSW, which has better edge-preserving smoothing property than bilateral filter independent of the filtering kernel size. In this way, the number of bad pixels located in the incorrect depth regions can be effectively reduced through finding optimal support windows with an arbitrary shape and size adaptively. Finally, the initial disparity value of each pixel is selected using winner takes all optimization and post processing symmetrically, considering both the reference and the target image, is adopted. The experimental results demonstrate that the proposed algorithm achieves outstanding matching performance compared with other existing local algorithms on the Middlebury stereo benchmark, especially in depth discontinuities and piecewise smooth regions. PMID:25322396

  1. Automatic Iceball Segmentation With Adapted Shape Priors for MRI-Guided Cryoablation

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Xinyang; Tuncali, Kemal; Wells, William M.; Zientara, Gary P.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose To develop and evaluate an automatic segmentation method that extracts the 3D configuration of the ablation zone, the iceball, from images acquired during the freezing phase of MRI-guided cryoablation. Materials and Methods Intraprocedural images at 63 timepoints from 13 kidney tumor cryoablation procedures were examined retrospectively. The images were obtained using a 3 Tesla wide-bore MRI scanner and axial HASTE sequence. Initialized with semiautomatically localized cryoprobes, the iceball was segmented automatically at each timepoint using the graph cut (GC) technique with adapted shape priors. Results The average Dice Similarity Coefficients (DSC), compared with manual segmentations, were 0.88, 0.92, 0.92, 0.93, and 0.93 at 3, 6, 9, 12, and 15 min time-points, respectively, and the average DSC of the total 63 segmentations was 0.92 ± 0.03. The proposed method improved the accuracy significantly compared with the approach without shape prior adaptation (P = 0.026). The number of probes involved in the procedure had no apparent influence on the segmentation results using our technique. The average computation time was 20 s, which was compatible with an intraprocedural setting. Conclusion Our automatic iceball segmentation method demonstrated high accuracy and robustness for practical use in monitoring the progress of MRI-guided cryoablation. PMID:24338961

  2. Shaping symmetric Airy beam through binary amplitude modulation for ultralong needle focus

    SciTech Connect

    Fang, Zhao-Xiang; Gong, Lei; Ren, Yu-Xuan; Vaveliuk, Pablo; Chen, Yue; Lu, Rong-De

    2015-11-28

    Needle-like electromagnetic field has various advantages for the applications in high-resolution imaging, Raman spectroscopy, as well as long-distance optical transportation. The realization of such field often requires high numerical aperture (NA) objective lens and the transmission masks. We demonstrate an ultralong needle-like focus in the optical range produced with an ordinary lens. This is achieved by focusing a symmetric Airy beam (SAB) generated via binary spectral modulation with a digital micromirror device. Such amplitude modulation technique is able to shape traditional Airy beams, SABs, as well as the dynamic transition modes between the one-dimensional and two-dimensional (2D) symmetric Airy modes. The created 2D SAB was characterized through measurement of the propagating fields with one of the four main lobes blocked by an opaque mask. The 2D SAB was verified to exhibit self-healing property against propagation with the obstructed major lobe reconstructed after a certain distance. We further produced an elongated focal line by concentrating the SAB via lenses with different NAs and achieved an ultralong longitudinal needle focus. The produced long needle focus will be applied in optical, chemical, and biological sciences.

  3. Correction of resist heating effect on variable shaped beam mask writer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakayamada, Noriaki; Suganuma, Mizuna; Nomura, Haruyuki; Kato, Yasuo; Kamikubo, Takashi; Ogasawara, Munehiro; Zable, Harold; Masuda, Yukihiro; Fujimura, Aki

    2016-04-01

    The specifications for critical dimension (CD) accuracy and line edge roughness are getting tighter to promote every photomask manufacturer to choose electron beam resists of lower sensitivity. When the resist is exposed by too many electrons, it is excessively heated up to have higher sensitivity at a higher temperature, which results in degraded CD uniformity. This effect is called "resist heating effect" and is now the most critical error source in CD control on a variable shaped beam (VSB) mask writer. We have developed an on-tool, real-time correction system for the resist heating effect. The system is composed of correction software based on a simple thermal diffusion model and computational hardware equipped with more than 100 graphical processing unit chips. We have demonstrated that the designed correction accuracy was obtained and the runtime of correction was sufficiently shorter than the writing time. The system is ready to be deployed for our VSB mask writers to retain the writing time as short as possible for lower sensitivity resists by removing the need for increased pass count.

  4. Shaping of Au nanoparticles embedded in various layered structures by swift heavy ion beam irradiation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dawi, E. A.; ArnoldBik, W. M.; Ackermann, R.; Habraken, F. H. P. M.

    2016-10-01

    We present a novel method to extend the ion-beam induced shaping of metallic nanoparticles in various layered structures. Monodisperse Au nanoparticles having mean diameter of 30 nm and their ion-shaping process is investigated for a limited number of experimental conditions. Au nanoparticles were embedded within a single plane in various layered structures of silicon nitride films (Si3N4), combinations of oxide-nitride films (SiO2-Si3N4) and amorphous silicon films (a-Si) and have been sequentially irradiated at 300 K at normal incidence with 50 and 25 MeV Ag ions, respectively. Under irradiation with heavy Ag ions and with sequential increase of the irradiation fluence, the evolution of the Au peak derived from the Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry show broadening in Au peak, which indicates that the Au becomes distributed over a larger depth region, indicative of the elongation of the nanoparticles. The latter is observed almost for every layer structure investigated except for Au nanoparticles embedded in pure a-Si matrix. The largest elongation rate at all fluences is found for the Au nanoparticles encapsulated in pure Si3N4 films. For all irradiation energy applied, we again demonstrate the existence of both threshold and saturation fluences for the elongation effects mentioned.

  5. Adaptive digital fringe projection technique for high dynamic range three-dimensional shape measurement.

    PubMed

    Lin, Hui; Gao, Jian; Mei, Qing; He, Yunbo; Liu, Junxiu; Wang, Xingjin

    2016-04-01

    It is a challenge for any optical method to measure objects with a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Image saturation results in incorrect intensities in captured fringe pattern images, leading to phase and measurement errors. This paper presents a new adaptive digital fringe projection technique which avoids image saturation and has a high signal to noise ratio (SNR) in the three-dimensional (3-D) shape measurement of objects that has a large range of reflectivity variation across the surface. Compared to previous high dynamic range 3-D scan methods using many exposures and fringe pattern projections, which consumes a lot of time, the proposed technique uses only two preliminary steps of fringe pattern projection and image capture to generate the adapted fringe patterns, by adaptively adjusting the pixel-wise intensity of the projected fringe patterns based on the saturated pixels in the captured images of the surface being measured. For the bright regions due to high surface reflectivity and high illumination by the ambient light and surfaces interreflections, the projected intensity is reduced just to be low enough to avoid image saturation. Simultaneously, the maximum intensity of 255 is used for those dark regions with low surface reflectivity to maintain high SNR. Our experiments demonstrate that the proposed technique can achieve higher 3-D measurement accuracy across a surface with a large range of reflectivity variation. PMID:27137056

  6. Decentralized adaptive sliding mode control for beam synchronization of tethered InSAR system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jinxiu; Zhang, Zhigang; Wu, Baolin

    2016-10-01

    Beam synchronization problem of tethered interferometric synthetic aperture radar (InSAR) is addressed in this paper. Two antennas of the system are carried by separate satellites connected through a tether to obtain a preferable baseline. A Total Zero Doppler Steering (TZDS) is implemented to mother-satellite to cancel the residual Doppler. Subsequently attitude reference trajectories for the two satellites are generated to achieve the beam synchronization and TZDS. Thereafter, a decentralized adaptive sliding mode control law is proposed to track these reference trajectories in the presence of model uncertainties and external disturbances. Finally, the stability of closed-loop system is proved by the corollary of Barbalat's Lemma. Simulation results show the proposed control law is effective to achieve beam synchronization of the system.

  7. Adaptive beam tracking and steering via electrowetting-controlled liquid prism

    SciTech Connect

    Cheng, JT; Chen, CL

    2011-11-07

    We report an electrowetting-controlled optofluidic system for adaptive beam tracking and agile steering. With two immiscible fluids in a transparent cell, we can actively control the contact angle along the fluid-fluid-solid tri-junction line and hence the orientation of the fluid-fluid interface via electrowetting. The naturally formed meniscus between the two liquids can function as an optical prism. We have fabricated a liquid prism module with an aperture size of 10 mm -10mm. With 1 wt.% KCl and 1 wt.% Sodium Dodecyl Sulfate added into deionized water, the orientation of the water-silicone oil interface has been modulated between -26 degrees and 26 degrees that can deflect and steer beam within the incidence angle of 0 degrees-15 degrees. The wide-range beam tracking and steering enables the liquid prism work as an electrowetting solar cell. (C) 2011 American Institute of Physics. [doi: 10.1063/1.3660578

  8. Truss beam having convex-curved rods, shear web panels, and self-aligning adapters

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fernandez, Ian M. (Inventor)

    2013-01-01

    A truss beam comprised of a plurality of joined convex-curved rods with self-aligning adapters (SAA) adhesively attached at each end of the truss beam is disclosed. Shear web panels are attached to adjacent pairs of rods, providing buckling resistance for the truss beam. The rods are disposed adjacent to each other, centered around a common longitudinal axis, and oriented so that adjacent rod ends converge to at least one virtual convergence point on the common longitudinal axis, with the rods' curvature designed to increase prevent buckling for the truss beam. Each SAA has longitudinal bores that provide self-aligning of the rods in the SAA, the self-aligning feature enabling creation of strong adhesive bonds between each SAA and the rods. In certain embodiments of the present invention, pultruded unidirectional carbon fiber rods are coupled with carbon fiber shear web panels and metal SAA(s), resulting in a lightweight, low-cost but strong truss beam that is highly resistant to buckling.

  9. Preliminary results of a prototype C-shaped PET designed for an in-beam PET system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hyun-Il; Chung, Yong Hyun; Lee, Kisung; Kim, Kyeong Min; Kim, Yongkwon; Joung, Jinhun

    2016-06-01

    Positron emission tomography (PET) can be utilized in particle beam therapy to verify the dose distribution of the target volume as well as the accuracy of the treatment. We present an in-beam PET scanner that can be integrated into a particle beam therapy system. The proposed PET scanner consisted of 14 detector modules arranged in a C-shape to avoid blockage of the particle beam line by the detector modules. Each detector module was composed of a 9×9 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals optically coupled to four 29-mm-diameter PMTs using the photomultiplier-quadrant-sharing (PQS) technique. In this study, a Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) simulation study was conducted to design a C-shaped PET scanner and then experimental evaluation of the proposed design was performed. The spatial resolution and sensitivity were measured according to NEMA NU2-2007 standards and were 6.1 mm and 5.61 cps/kBq, respectively, which is in good agreement with our simulation, with an error rate of 12.0%. Taken together, our results demonstrate the feasibility of the proposed C-shaped in-beam PET system, which we expect will be useful for measuring dose distribution in particle therapy.

  10. On the natural frequencies and mode shapes of a multispan Timoshenko beam carrying a number of various concentrated elements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lin, Hsien-Yuan

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this paper is to utilize the numerical assembly method (NAM) to determine the exact natural frequencies and mode shapes of the multispan Timoshenko beam carrying a number of various concentrated elements including point masses, rotary inertias, linear springs, rotational springs and spring-mass systems. First, the coefficient matrices for an intermediate pinned support, an intermediate concentrated element, left- and right-end support of a Timoshenko beam are derived. Next, the overall coefficient matrix for the whole structural system is obtained using the numerical assembly technique of the finite element method. Finally, the exact natural frequencies and the associated mode shapes of the vibrating system are determined by equating the determinant of the last overall coefficient matrix to zero and substituting the corresponding values of integration constants into the associated eigenfunctions, respectively. The effects of distribution of in-span pinned supports and various concentrated elements on the dynamic characteristics of the Timoshenko beam are also studied.

  11. Adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction for stationary digital breast tomosynthesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Gongting; Inscoe, Christine; Calliste, Jabari; Lee, Yueh Z.; Zhou, Otto; Lu, Jianping

    2015-03-01

    Digital breast tomosynthesis (DBT) provides 3D images which remove tissue overlapping and enables better cancer detection. Stationary DBT (s-DBT) uses a fixed X-ray source array to eliminate image blur associated with the x-ray tube motion and provides better image quality as well as faster scanning speed. For limited angle tomography, it is known that iterative reconstructions generally produces better images with fewer artifacts. However classical iterative tomosynthesis reconstruction methods are considerably slower than the filtered back-projection (FBP) reconstruction. The linear x-ray source array used in s-DBT enables a computationally more efficient volume reconstruction using adapted fan beam slice sampling, which transforms the 3-D cone beam reconstruction to a series of 2-D fan beam slice reconstructions. In this paper, we report the first results of the adapted fan-beam volume reconstruction (AFVR) for the s-DBT system currently undergoing clinical trial at UNC, using a simultaneous algebraic reconstruction technique (SART). An analytic breast phantom is used to quantitatively analyze the performance of the AFVR. Image quality of a CIRS biopsy phantom reconstructed using the AFVR method are compared to that using FBP algorithm with a commercial package. Our results show a significant reduction in memory usage and an order of magnitude speed increase in reconstructing speed using AFVR compared to that of classical 3-D cone beam reconstruction. We also observed that images reconstructed by AFVR with SART had a better sharpness and contrast compared to that using FBP. Preliminary results on patient images demonstrates the improved detectability of the s-DBT system over the mammography. By utilizing parallel computing with graphics processing unit (GPU), it is expected that the AFVR method will enable iterative reconstruction technique to be practical for clinical applications.

  12. Shape control of structures with semi-definite stiffness matrices for adaptive wings

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Austin, Fred; Van Nostrand, William C.; Rossi, Michael J.

    1993-09-01

    Maintaining an optimum-wing cross section during transonic cruise can dramatically reduce the shock-induced drag and can result in significant fuel savings and increased range. Our adaptive-wing concept employs actuators as truss elements of active ribs to reshape the wing cross section by deforming the structure. In our previous work, to derive the shape control- system gain matrix, we developed a procedure that requires the inverse of the stiffness matrix of the structure without the actuators. However, this method cannot be applied to designs where the actuators are required structural elements since the stiffness matrices are singular when the actuator are removed. Consequently, a new method was developed, where the order of the problem is reduced and only the inverse of a small nonsingular partition of the stiffness matrix is required to obtain the desired gain matrix. The procedure was experimentally validated by achieving desired shapes of a physical model of an aircraft-wing rib. The theory and test results are presented.

  13. Adaptation of TRIPND Field Line Tracing Code to a Shaped, Poloidal Divertor Geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Monat, P.; Moyer, R. A.; Evans, T. E.

    2001-10-01

    The magnetic field line tracing code TRIPND(T.E. Evans, Proc. 18th Conf. on Control. Fusion and Plasma Phys., Berlin, Germany, Vol. 15C, Part II (European Physical Society, 1991) p. 65.) has been modified to use the axisymmetric equilibrium magnetic fields from an EFIT reconstruction in place of circular equilibria with multi-filament current profile expansions. This adaptation provides realistic plasma current profiles in shaped geometries. A major advantage of this modification is that it allows investigation of magnetic field line trajectories in any device for which an EFIT reconstruction is available. The TRIPND code has been used to study the structure of the magnetic field line topology in circular, limiter tokamaks, including Tore Supra and TFTR and has been benchmarked against the GOURDON code used in Europe for magnetic field line tracing. The new version of the code, called TRIP3D, is used to investigate the sensitivity of various shaped equilibria to non-axisymmetric perturbations such as a shifted F coil or error field correction coils.

  14. Controlled Aeroelastic Response and Airfoil Shaping Using Adaptive Materials and Integrated Systems

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-01-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the Adaptive Neural Control of Aeroelastic Response (ANCAR) program; the Actively Controlled Response of Buffet Affected Tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to Ascertain Characteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant rcductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. Th,e ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using Thin-Layer Composite-Uimorph Piezoelectric Driver and Sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  15. Controlled aeroelastic response and airfoil shaping using adaptive materials and integrated systems

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinkerton, Jennifer L.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.; Moses, Robert W.; Scott, Robert C.; Heeg, Jennifer

    1996-05-01

    This paper presents an overview of several activities of the Aeroelasticity Branch at the NASA Langley Research Center in the area of applying adaptive materials and integrated systems for controlling both aircraft aeroelastic response and airfoil shape. The experimental results of four programs are discussed: the Piezoelectric Aeroelastic Response Tailoring Investigation (PARTI); the adaptive neural control of aeroelastic response (ANCAR) program; the actively controlled response of buffet affected tails (ACROBAT) program; and the Airfoil THUNDER Testing to ascertain charcteristics (ATTACH) project. The PARTI program demonstrated active flutter control and significant reductions in aeroelastic response at dynamic pressures below flutter using piezoelectric actuators. The ANCAR program seeks to demonstrate the effectiveness of using neural networks to schedule flutter suppression control laws. The ACROBAT program studied the effectiveness of a number of candidate actuators, including a rudder and piezoelectric actuators, to alleviate vertical tail buffeting. In the ATTACH project, the feasibility of using thin-layer composite-unimorph piezoelectric driver and sensor (THUNDER) wafers to control airfoil aerodynamic characteristics was investigated. Plans for future applications are also discussed.

  16. Analytical and finite-element study of optimal strain distribution in various beam shapes for energy harvesting applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ooi, B. L.; Gilbert, J. M.; Aziz, A. Rashid A.

    2016-08-01

    Owing to the increasing demand for harvesting energy from environmental vibration for use in self-powered electronic applications, cantilever-based vibration energy harvesting has attracted considerable interest from various parties and has become one of the most common approaches to converting redundant mechanical energy into electrical energy. As the output voltage produced from a piezoelectric material depends largely on the geometric shape and the size of the beam, there is a need to model and compare the performance of cantilever beams of differing geometries. This paper presents the study of strain distribution in various shapes of cantilever beams, including a convex and concave edge profile elliptical beam that have not yet been discussed in any prior literature. Both analytical and finite-element models are derived and the resultant strain distributions in the beam are computed based on a MATLAB solver and ANSYS finite-element analysis tools. An optimum geometry for a vibration-based energy harvesting system is verified. Finally, experimental results comparing the power density for triangular and rectangular piezoelectric beams are also presented to validate the findings of the study, and the claim, as suggested in the literature, is verified.

  17. Simulation of electrostatic turbulence in the plasma sheet boundary layer with electron currents and bean-shaped ion beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nishikawa, K.-I.; Frank, L. A.; Huang, C. Y.

    1988-01-01

    Plasma data from ISEE-1 show the presence of electron currents as well as energetic ion beams in the plasma sheet boundary layer. Broadband electrostatic noise and low-frequency electromagnetic bursts are detected in the plasma sheet boundary layer, especially in the presence of strong ion flows, currents, and steep spacial gradients in the fluxes of few-keV electrons and ions. Particle simulations have been performed to investigate electrostatic turbulence driven by a cold electron beam and/or ion beams with a bean-shaped velocity distribution. The simulation results show that the counterstreaming ion beams as well as the counterstreaming of the cold electron beam and the ion beam excite ion acoustic waves with a given Doppler-shifted real frequency. However, the effect of the bean-shaped ion velocity distributions reduces the growth rates of ion acoustic instability. The simulation results also show that the slowing down of the ion bean is larger at the larger perpendicular velocity. The wave spectra of the electric fields at some points of the simulations show turbulence generated by growing waves.

  18. A simulation study of a C-shaped in-beam PET system for dose verification in carbon ion therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung An, Su; Beak, Cheol-Ha; Lee, Kisung; Hyun Chung, Yong

    2013-01-01

    The application of hadrons such as carbon ions is being developed for the treatment of cancer. The effectiveness of such a technique is due to the eligibility of charged particles in delivering most of their energy near the end of the range, called the Bragg peak. However, accurate verification of dose delivery is required since misalignment of the hadron beam can cause serious damage to normal tissue. PET scanners can be utilized to track the carbon beam to the tumor by imaging the trail of the hadron-induced positron emitters in the irradiated volume. In this study, we designed and evaluated (through Monte Carlo simulations) an in-beam PET scanner for monitoring patient dose in carbon beam therapy. A C-shaped PET and a partial-ring PET were designed to avoid interference between the PET detectors and the therapeutic carbon beam delivery. Their performance was compared with that of a full-ring PET scanner. The C-shaped, partial-ring, and full-ring scanners consisted of 14, 12, and 16 detector modules, respectively, with a 30.2 cm inner diameter for brain imaging. Each detector module was composed of a 13×13 array of 4.0 mm×4.0 mm×20.0 mm LYSO crystals and four round 25.4 mm diameter PMTs. To estimate the production yield of positron emitters such as 10C, 11C, and 15O, a cylindrical PMMA phantom (diameter, 20 cm; thickness, 20 cm) was irradiated with 170, 290, and 350 AMeV 12C beams using the GATE code. Phantom images of the three types of scanner were evaluated by comparing the longitudinal profile of the positron emitters, measured along the carbon beam as it passed a simulated positron emitter distribution. The results demonstrated that the development of a C-shaped PET scanner to characterize carbon dose distribution for therapy planning is feasible.

  19. Adaptive correction of vortex laser beam in a closed-loop system with phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ma, Haotong; Liu, Zejin; Wu, Huiyun; Xu, Xiaojun; Chen, Jinbao

    2012-03-01

    We propose and demonstrate the wave front correction of a vortex laser beam by using dual phase only liquid crystal spatial light modulators (LC-SLMs) and a stochastic parallel gradient descent (SPGD) algorithm. One phase only LC-SLM is used to generate vortex laser beam by loading spiral phase screen onto the wave front of input quasi-Gaussian beam. The other phase only LC-SLM under SPGD controller based on the subzone control method adaptively compensates the wave front of vortex laser beam. Numerical simulation and experimental results show that after correction, vortex doughnut like beam is focused into a beam with airy disk pattern distribution in the far field. The adaptive corrections of vortex laser beam with different optical topological charges are studied. The results show that the optical topological charge has little influence on adaptive correction. The powers in the main lobe of far field intensity distributions of vortex laser beams with different optical topological charges are all greatly improved by adaptive correction. The technique proposed in this paper can be used in optical communication, relay mirror and atmospheric turbulence correction.

  20. Sub-second pencil beam dose calculation on GPU for adaptive proton therapy.

    PubMed

    da Silva, Joakim; Ansorge, Richard; Jena, Rajesh

    2015-06-21

    Although proton therapy delivered using scanned pencil beams has the potential to produce better dose conformity than conventional radiotherapy, the created dose distributions are more sensitive to anatomical changes and patient motion. Therefore, the introduction of adaptive treatment techniques where the dose can be monitored as it is being delivered is highly desirable. We present a GPU-based dose calculation engine relying on the widely used pencil beam algorithm, developed for on-line dose calculation. The calculation engine was implemented from scratch, with each step of the algorithm parallelized and adapted to run efficiently on the GPU architecture. To ensure fast calculation, it employs several application-specific modifications and simplifications, and a fast scatter-based implementation of the computationally expensive kernel superposition step. The calculation time for a skull base treatment plan using two beam directions was 0.22 s on an Nvidia Tesla K40 GPU, whereas a test case of a cubic target in water from the literature took 0.14 s to calculate. The accuracy of the patient dose distributions was assessed by calculating the γ-index with respect to a gold standard Monte Carlo simulation. The passing rates were 99.2% and 96.7%, respectively, for the 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria, matching those produced by a clinical treatment planning system.

  1. Sub-second pencil beam dose calculation on GPU for adaptive proton therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    da Silva, Joakim; Ansorge, Richard; Jena, Rajesh

    2015-06-01

    Although proton therapy delivered using scanned pencil beams has the potential to produce better dose conformity than conventional radiotherapy, the created dose distributions are more sensitive to anatomical changes and patient motion. Therefore, the introduction of adaptive treatment techniques where the dose can be monitored as it is being delivered is highly desirable. We present a GPU-based dose calculation engine relying on the widely used pencil beam algorithm, developed for on-line dose calculation. The calculation engine was implemented from scratch, with each step of the algorithm parallelized and adapted to run efficiently on the GPU architecture. To ensure fast calculation, it employs several application-specific modifications and simplifications, and a fast scatter-based implementation of the computationally expensive kernel superposition step. The calculation time for a skull base treatment plan using two beam directions was 0.22 s on an Nvidia Tesla K40 GPU, whereas a test case of a cubic target in water from the literature took 0.14 s to calculate. The accuracy of the patient dose distributions was assessed by calculating the γ-index with respect to a gold standard Monte Carlo simulation. The passing rates were 99.2% and 96.7%, respectively, for the 3%/3 mm and 2%/2 mm criteria, matching those produced by a clinical treatment planning system.

  2. Beam width and transmitter power adaptive to tracking system performance for free-space optical communication.

    PubMed

    Arnon, S; Rotman, S; Kopeika, N S

    1997-08-20

    The basic free-space optical communication system includes at least two satellites. To communicate between them, the transmitter satellite must track the beacon of the receiver satellite and point the information optical beam in its direction. Optical tracking and pointing systems for free space suffer during tracking from high-amplitude vibration because of background radiation from interstellar objects such as the Sun, Moon, Earth, and stars in the tracking field of view or the mechanical impact from satellite internal and external sources. The vibrations of beam pointing increase the bit error rate and jam communication between the two satellites. One way to overcome this problem is to increase the satellite receiver beacon power. However, this solution requires increased power consumption and weight, both of which are disadvantageous in satellite development. Considering these facts, we derive a mathematical model of a communication system that adapts optimally the transmitter beam width and the transmitted power to the tracking system performance. Based on this model, we investigate the performance of a communication system with discrete element optical phased array transmitter telescope gain. An example for a practical communication system between a Low Earth Orbit Satellite and a Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite is presented. From the results of this research it can be seen that a four-element adaptive transmitter telescope is sufficient to compensate for vibration amplitude doubling. The benefits of the proposed model are less required transmitter power and improved communication system performance. PMID:18259455

  3. Beam width and transmitter power adaptive to tracking system performance for free-space optical communication.

    PubMed

    Arnon, S; Rotman, S; Kopeika, N S

    1997-08-20

    The basic free-space optical communication system includes at least two satellites. To communicate between them, the transmitter satellite must track the beacon of the receiver satellite and point the information optical beam in its direction. Optical tracking and pointing systems for free space suffer during tracking from high-amplitude vibration because of background radiation from interstellar objects such as the Sun, Moon, Earth, and stars in the tracking field of view or the mechanical impact from satellite internal and external sources. The vibrations of beam pointing increase the bit error rate and jam communication between the two satellites. One way to overcome this problem is to increase the satellite receiver beacon power. However, this solution requires increased power consumption and weight, both of which are disadvantageous in satellite development. Considering these facts, we derive a mathematical model of a communication system that adapts optimally the transmitter beam width and the transmitted power to the tracking system performance. Based on this model, we investigate the performance of a communication system with discrete element optical phased array transmitter telescope gain. An example for a practical communication system between a Low Earth Orbit Satellite and a Geostationary Earth Orbit Satellite is presented. From the results of this research it can be seen that a four-element adaptive transmitter telescope is sufficient to compensate for vibration amplitude doubling. The benefits of the proposed model are less required transmitter power and improved communication system performance.

  4. Fabrication and evaluation results of a micro elliptical collimator lens for a beam shape form of laser diode

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, K.; Oohira, F.; Hosogi, M.; Hashiguchi, G.; Mihara, Y.; Ogawa, K.

    2005-12-01

    This paper describes a new fabrication process of a micro elliptical collimator lens to form a beam shape for LD(Laser Diode), and the evaluation results of the optical characteristic for this lens. Beam shape of LD is an ellipse because divergent light angle is different between horizontal and vertical direction, which increases a coupling loss with an optical fiber. In this presentation, we propose the lens to form the divergent light of an elliptical beam shape to the collimated light of a circular beam shape. This lens makes it possible to reduce the coupling loss with the optical fiber. For this purpose, we designed one lens, which has different curvature radiuses between incident and output surfaces. In the incident surface, the divergent light is formed to the convergent light, and in the output surface, the convergent light is formed to the collimated light. We simulated the optical characteristic of this lens, and designed for various parameters. In order to fabricate this lens, we propose a new process using a chemically absorbed monomolecular layer, which has an excellent hydrophobic property. This layer is patterned and deposited by a photolithographic technique. Next, we drop a UV(Ultra Violet) cure material on the hydrophilic area, as the result, we can fabricate a micro elliptical lens shape. The curvature radius of this lens can be controlled by the amount of a dropped UV cure material and an elliptical pattern size in horizontal and vertical direction. The formed lens shapes are transferred by the electro-plating and then the micro dies are fabricated. And they are used for molding the plastic lens.

  5. Measuring contact angle and meniscus shape with a reflected laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Eibach, T. F.; Nguyen, H.; Butt, H. J.; Auernhammer, G. K.; Fell, D.

    2014-01-15

    Side-view imaging of the contact angle between an extended planar solid surface and a liquid is problematic. Even when aligning the view perfectly parallel to the contact line, focusing one point of the contact line is not possible. We describe a new measurement technique for determining contact angles with the reflection of a widened laser sheet on a moving contact line. We verified this new technique measuring the contact angle on a cylinder, rotating partially immersed in a liquid. A laser sheet is inclined under an angle φ to the unperturbed liquid surface and is reflected off the meniscus. Collected on a screen, the reflection image contains information to determine the contact angle. When dividing the laser sheet into an array of laser rays by placing a mesh into the beam path, the shape of the meniscus can be reconstructed from the reflection image. We verified the method by measuring the receding contact angle versus speed for aqueous cetyltrimethyl ammonium bromide solutions on a smooth hydrophobized as well as on a rough polystyrene surface.

  6. 3D-structures with arbitrary shapes created in negative resists by grayscale proton beam writing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Menzel, F.; Spemann, D.; Koal, T.; Butz, T.

    2011-10-01

    The direct and maskless technique of proton beam writing (PBW) was used for grayscale lithography which allows to create 3D microstructures with arbitrary surface topographies. For this purpose, several micrometer thick layers of the negative resists ma-N and SU-8 were irradiated with 2.25 MeV H+ and 1.125 MeV H2+ in arbitrary shapes using different fluences on different areas with values smaller than the threshold fluence for complete exposure. These irradiations result in multilevel microstructures, whose heights increase with increasing fluence. However, the comparison of the measured structure height with calculated predictions from SRIM simulations disproves the assumption that the structure height is proportional to the linear energy transfer (LET). In fact, the fluence reduction below the threshold for sufficient exposure is responsible for grayscale structuring due to reduced etching of the insufficiently exposed regions. The artifacts obtained with the first grayscale structures created by PBW in ma-N and strongly affecting the structure quality could be reduced by optimizing the scanning procedure, e.g. reducing the pixel distance. Therewith, a micro-Fresnel-lens could be fabricated in ma-N. The first PBW grayscale structures in SU-8 exhibited very strong mechanical instabilities which could be reduced by the use of a post exposure bake step, normally omitted for PBW with SU-8.

  7. Microstructural and micromechanical characterization of IN718 theta shaped specimens built with electron beam melting

    DOE PAGES

    Cakmak, Ercan; Kirka, Michael M.; Watkins, Thomas R.; Cooper, Ryan C.; An, Ke; Choo, Hahn; Wu, Wei; Dehoff, Ryan R.; Babu, Sudarsanam S.

    2016-02-23

    Theta-shaped specimens were additively manufactured out of Inconel 718 powders using an electron beam melting technique, as a model complex load bearing structure. We employed two different build strategies; producing two sets of specimens. Microstructural and micro-mechanical characterizations were performed using electron back-scatter, synchrotron x-ray and in-situ neutron diffraction techniques. In particular, the cross-members of the specimens were the focus of the synchrotron x-ray and in-situ neutron diffraction measurements. The build strategies employed resulted in the formation of distinct microstructures and crystallographic textures, signifying the importance of build-parameter manipulation for microstructural optimization. Large strain anisotropy of the different lattice planesmore » was observed during in-situ loading. Texture was concluded to have a distinct effect upon both the axial and transverse strain responses of the cross-members. In particular, the (200), (220) and (420) transverse lattice strains all showed unexpected overlapping trends in both builds. This was related to the strong {200} textures along the build/loading direction, providing agreement between the experimental and calculated results.« less

  8. The effect of spatial light modulator (SLM) dependent dispersion on spatial beam shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Spangenberg, Dirk-Mathys; Dudley, Angela; Neethling, Pieter; Forbes, Andrew; Rohwer, Erich

    2013-09-01

    SLMs used for spatial modulation of lasers are often used in conjunction with very narrow bandwidth laser light where diffractive dispersion could be approximated as a constant. It is known that diffractive dispersion is inversely proportional to wavelength and this effect can be compensated for depending on the optical set-up. SLMs use birefringent liquid crystal (LC) pixels each with an adjustable refractive index at a specific polarization. The range of the adjustable refractive index is wavelength dependent. This adds an additional SLM dependent dispersion. Note that we distinguish between diffractive dispersion and SLM dependent dispersion. SLMs are therefore calibrated in order to have linearly adjustable phase retardation of light incident on the pixels between zero and two pi for a specific wavelength. It is therefore unavoidable when using the same SLM, to do beam shaping of a source which emits multiple wavelengths or a wide bandwidth, that the device will not modulate all wavelengths between zero and two pi. We numerically and experimentally investigate the effect of SLM dependent dispersion on spatial modulation of light incident on a 2D SLM. We further discuss why it is possible to modulate multiple wavelengths between zero and two pi despite SLM dependent dispersion.

  9. Experimental and Simulated Characterization of a Beam Shaping Assembly for Accelerator- Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT)

    SciTech Connect

    Burlon, Alejandro A.; Valda, Alejandro A.; Girola, Santiago; Minsky, Daniel M.; Kreiner, Andres J.

    2010-08-04

    In the frame of the construction of a Tandem Electrostatic Quadrupole Accelerator facility devoted to the Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy, a Beam Shaping Assembly has been characterized by means of Monte-Carlo simulations and measurements. The neutrons were generated via the {sup 7}Li(p, n){sup 7}Be reaction by irradiating a thick LiF target with a 2.3 MeV proton beam delivered by the TANDAR accelerator at CNEA. The emerging neutron flux was measured by means of activation foils while the beam quality and directionality was evaluated by means of Monte Carlo simulations. The parameters show compliance with those suggested by IAEA. Finally, an improvement adding a beam collimator has been evaluated.

  10. An adaptive metamaterial beam with hybrid shunting circuits for extremely broadband control of flexural waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Y. Y.; Hu, G. K.; Huang, G. L.

    2016-10-01

    A great deal of research has been devoted to controlling the dynamic behaviors of phononic crystals and metamaterials by directly tuning the frequency regions and/or widths of their inherent band gaps. Here, we report a new class of adaptive metamaterial beams with hybrid shunting circuits to realize super broadband Lamb-wave band gaps at an extreme subwavelength scale. The proposed metamaterial is made of a homogeneous host beam on which tunable local resonators consisting of hybrid shunted piezoelectric stacks with proof masses are attached. The hybrid shunting circuits are composed of negative-capacitance and negative-inductance elements connected in series or in parallel in order to tune the desired frequency-dependent stiffness. It is shown theoretically and numerically that by properly modifying the shunting impedance, the adaptive mechanical mechanism within the tunable resonator can produce high-pass and low-pass wave filtering capabilities for the zeroth-order anti-symmetric Lamb-wave modes. These unique behaviors are due to the hybrid effects from the negative-capacitance and negative-inductance circuit elements. Such a system opens up important perspectives for the development of adaptive vibration or wave-attenuation devices for broadband frequency applications.

  11. The adaptation of megavoltage cone beam CT for use in standard radiotherapy treatment planning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thomas, T. Hannah Mary; Devakumar, D.; Purnima, S.; Ravindran, B. Paul

    2009-04-01

    Potential areas where megavoltage computed tomography (MVCT) could be used are second- and third-phase treatment planning in 3D conformal radiotherapy and IMRT, adaptive radiation therapy, single fraction palliative treatment and for the treatment of patients with metal prostheses. A feasibility study was done on using MV cone beam CT (CBCT) images generated by proprietary 3D reconstruction software based on the FDK algorithm for megavoltage treatment planning. The reconstructed images were converted to a DICOM file set. The pixel values of megavoltage cone beam computed tomography (MV CBCT) were rescaled to those of kV CT for use with a treatment planning system. A calibration phantom was designed and developed for verification of geometric accuracy and CT number calibration. The distance measured between two marker points on the CBCT image and the physical dimension on the phantom were in good agreement. Point dose verification for a 10 cm × 10 cm beam at a gantry angle of 0° and SAD of 100 cm were performed for a 6 MV beam for both kV and MV CBCT images. The point doses were found to vary between ±6.1% of the dose calculated from the kV CT image. The isodose curves for 6 MV for both kV CT and MV CBCT images were within 2% and 3 mm distance-to-agreement. A plan with three beams was performed on MV CBCT, simulating a treatment plan for cancer of the pituitary. The distribution obtained was compared with those corresponding to that obtained using the kV CT. This study has shown that treatment planning with MV cone beam CT images is feasible.

  12. Modelling and control of an adaptive tuned mass damper based on shape memory alloys and eddy currents

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berardengo, M.; Cigada, A.; Guanziroli, F.; Manzoni, S.

    2015-08-01

    Tuned mass dampers have long since been used to attenuate vibrations. The need to make them adaptive in order to function even after changes of the dynamic characteristics of the system to be controlled has led to using many different technologies with the aim of improving adaptation performances. Shape memory alloys have already been proven to have properties suitable for creating adaptive tuned mass dampers for light structures. However, the literature has evidenced a number of issues concerning tuned mass dampers based on shape memory alloys, for instance the limited range of adaptation for the eigenfrequency of the damper. The present paper proposes a new layout for adaptive tuned mass dampers based on shape memory alloys, which allows to overcome many of the limitations and to reach a wide range of adaptation for the eigenfrequency. This layout relies on the use of shape memory alloy wires, so that the change of eigenfrequency is achieved by changing the axial load acting on these wires. The new tuned mass damper is then made fully adaptive by including a device that uses the principle of eddy currents, which allows also to change the damping of the tuned mass damper. Indeed, this new kind of damper is designed to dampen vibrations in systems excited by a random disturbance. The paper illustrates the layout and the model of the whole damper and validates it. This model moreover evidences all the advantages allowed by the new layout proposed. Finally, two different strategies to control the dynamic characteristics of the new adaptive tuned mass damper are presented and compared, both numerically as well as experimentally, so to illustrate strengths and drawbacks of each. The experiments and the simulations show that this new damper is fully capable of functioning when random excitation acts as disturbance on the system to control.

  13. 0.25-μm lithography using a 50-kV shaped electron-beam vector scan system

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gesley, Mark A.; Mulera, Terry; Nurmi, C.; Radley, J.; Sagle, Allan L.; Standiford, Keith P.; Tan, Zoilo C. H.; Thomas, John R.; Veneklasen, Lee

    1995-05-01

    Performance data from a prototype 50 kV shaped electron-beam (e-beam) pattern generator is presented. This technology development is targeted towards 180-130 nm device design rules. It will be able to handle 1X NIST X-ray membranes, glass reduction reticles, and 4- to 8-inch wafers. The prototype system uses a planar stage adapted from the IBM EL-4 design. The electron optics is an 50 kV extension of the AEBLE%+TM) design. Lines and spaces of 0.12 micrometers with < 40 nm corner radius are resolved in 0.4 micrometers thick resist at 50 kV. This evolutionary platform will evolve further to include a new 100 kV column with telecentric deflection and a 21-bit (0.5 mm) major field for improved placement accuracy. A unique immersion shaper, faster data path electronics, and 15-bit (32 micrometers ) minor field deflection electronics will substantially increase the flash rate. To match its much finer address structure, the pattern generator figure word size will increase from 80 to 96 bits. The data path electronics uses field programmable gate array (FPGA) logic allowing writing strategy optimization via software reconfiguration. An advanced stage position control (ASPC) includes three-axis, (lambda) /1024 interferometry and a high bandwidth dynamic corrections processor (DCP). Along with its normal role of coordinate transformation and dynamic correction of deflection distortion, astigmatism, and defocus; the DCP improves accuracy by modifying deflection conditions and focus according to measured substrate height variations. It also enables yaw calibration and correction for Write-on-the FlyTM motion. The electronics incorporates JTAG components for built-in self- test (BIST), as well as syndrome checking to ensure data integrity. The design includes diagnostic capabilities from offsite as well as from the operator console. A combination of third-party software and an internal job preparation software system is used to fracture patterns. It handles tone reversal

  14. Effect of frequency tuning on bremsstrahlung spectra, beam intensity, and shape in the 10 GHz NANOGAN electron cyclotron resonance ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Rodrigues, G. Mal, Kedar; Kumar, Narender; Lakshmy, P. S.; Mathur, Y.; Kumar, P.; Kanjilal, D.; Roy, A.; Baskaran, R.

    2014-02-15

    Studies on the effect of the frequency tuning on the bremsstrahlung spectra, beam intensities, and beam shape of various ions have been carried out in the 10 GHz NANOGAN ECR ion source. The warm and cold components of the electrons were found to be directly correlated with beam intensity enhancement in case of Ar{sup 9+} but not so for O{sup 5+}. The warm electron component was, however, much smaller compared to the cold component. The effect of the fine tuning of the frequency on the bremsstrahlung spectrum, beam intensities and beam shape is presented.

  15. SU-E-T-295: Simultaneous Beam Sampling and Aperture Shape Optimization for Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT)

    SciTech Connect

    Zarepisheh, M; Li, R; Xing, L; Ye, Y; Boyd, S

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Station Parameter Optimized Radiation Therapy (SPORT) was recently proposed to fully utilize the technical capability of emerging digital LINACs, in which the station parameters of a delivery system, (such as aperture shape and weight, couch position/angle, gantry/collimator angle) are optimized altogether. SPORT promises to deliver unprecedented radiation dose distributions efficiently, yet there does not exist any optimization algorithm to implement it. The purpose of this work is to propose an optimization algorithm to simultaneously optimize the beam sampling and aperture shapes. Methods: We build a mathematical model whose variables are beam angles (including non-coplanar and/or even nonisocentric beams) and aperture shapes. To solve the resulting large scale optimization problem, we devise an exact, convergent and fast optimization algorithm by integrating three advanced optimization techniques named column generation, gradient method, and pattern search. Column generation is used to find a good set of aperture shapes as an initial solution by adding apertures sequentially. Then we apply the gradient method to iteratively improve the current solution by reshaping the aperture shapes and updating the beam angles toward the gradient. Algorithm continues by pattern search method to explore the part of the search space that cannot be reached by the gradient method. Results: The proposed technique is applied to a series of patient cases and significantly improves the plan quality. In a head-and-neck case, for example, the left parotid gland mean-dose, brainstem max-dose, spinal cord max-dose, and mandible mean-dose are reduced by 10%, 7%, 24% and 12% respectively, compared to the conventional VMAT plan while maintaining the same PTV coverage. Conclusion: Combined use of column generation, gradient search and pattern search algorithms provide an effective way to optimize simultaneously the large collection of station parameters and significantly improves

  16. The potential for optical beam shaping of UV laser sources for mass scale quarantine disinfection applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd

    2010-08-01

    disinfection systems using high intensity UV laser sources instead of UV bulb techniques by using laser beam shaping optics in conjunction with traditional optical laser beam delivery techniques.

  17. Multiconjugate adaptive optics for large telescopes: analytical control of the mirror shapes.

    PubMed

    Owner-Petersen, Mette; Goncharov, Alexander

    2002-03-01

    We present an analytical algorithm for deriving the shapes of the deformable mirrors to be used for multiconjugate adaptive correction on a large telescope. The algorithm is optimal in the limit where the overlap of the wave-front contributions from relevant atmospheric layers probed by the guide stars is close to the size of the pupil. The fundamental principle for correction is based on a minimization of the sum of the residual power spectra of the phase fluctuations seen by the guide stars after correction. On the basis of the expressions for the mirror shapes, so-called layer transfer functions describing the distribution of the correction of a single atmospheric layer among the deformable mirrors and the resulting correction of that layer have been derived. It is shown that for five guide stars distributed in a regular cross, two- and three-mirror correction will be possible only up to a maximum frequency defined by the largest separation of the conjugate altitudes of the mirrors and by the angular separation of the guide stars. The performance of the algorithm is investigated in the K band by using a standard seven-layer atmosphere. We present results obtained for two guide-star configurations: a continuous distribution within a given angular radius and a five-star cross pattern with a given angular arm length. The wave-front fluctuations are subjected to correction using one, two, and three deformable mirrors. The needed mirror dynamic range is derived as required root-mean-square stroke and actuator pitch. Finally the performance is estimated in terms of the Strehl ratio obtained by the correction as a function of field angle. No noise has been included in the present analysis, and the guide stars are assumed to be at infinity.

  18. Adaptive planning using megavoltage fan-beam CT for radiation therapy with testicular shielding

    SciTech Connect

    Yadav, Poonam; Kozak, Kevin; Tolakanahalli, Ranjini; Ramasubramanian, V.; Paliwal, Bhudatt R.; Welsh, James S.; Rong, Yi

    2012-07-01

    This study highlights the use of adaptive planning to accommodate testicular shielding in helical tomotherapy for malignancies of the proximal thigh. Two cases of young men with large soft tissue sarcomas of the proximal thigh are presented. After multidisciplinary evaluation, preoperative radiation therapy was recommended. Both patients were referred for sperm banking and lead shields were used to minimize testicular dose during radiation therapy. To minimize imaging artifacts, kilovoltage CT (kVCT) treatment planning was conducted without shielding. Generous hypothetical contours were generated on each 'planning scan' to estimate the location of the lead shield and generate a directionally blocked helical tomotherapy plan. To ensure the accuracy of each plan, megavoltage fan-beam CT (MVCT) scans were obtained at the first treatment and adaptive planning was performed to account for lead shield placement. Two important regions of interest in these cases were femurs and femoral heads. During adaptive planning for the first patient, it was observed that the virtual lead shield contour on kVCT planning images was significantly larger than the actual lead shield used for treatment. However, for the second patient, it was noted that the size of the virtual lead shield contoured on the kVCT image was significantly smaller than the actual shield size. Thus, new adaptive plans based on MVCT images were generated and used for treatment. The planning target volume was underdosed up to 2% and had higher maximum doses without adaptive planning. In conclusion, the treatment of the upper thigh, particularly in young men, presents several clinical challenges, including preservation of gonadal function. In such circumstances, adaptive planning using MVCT can ensure accurate dose delivery even in the presence of high-density testicular shields.

  19. Shape, size and multiplicity of main-belt asteroids I. Keck Adaptive Optics survey.

    PubMed

    Marchis, F; Kaasalainen, M; Hom, E F Y; Berthier, J; Enriquez, J; Hestroffer, D; Le Mignant, D; de Pater, I

    2006-11-01

    This paper presents results from a high spatial resolution survey of 33 main-belt asteroids with diameters >40 km using the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) facility. Five of these (45 Eugenia, 87 Sylvia, 107 Camilla, 121 Hermione, 130 Elektra) were confirmed to have satellite. Assuming the same albedo as the primary, these moonlets are relatively small (∼5% of the primary size) suggesting that they are fragments captured after a disruptive collision of a parent body or captured ejecta due to an impact. For each asteroid, we have estimated the minimum size of a moonlet that can positively detected within the Hill sphere of the system by estimating and modeling a 2-σ detection profile: in average on the data set, a moonlet located at 2/100 × R(Hill) (1/4 × R(Hill)) with a diameter larger than 6 km (4 km) would have been unambiguously seen. The apparent size and shape of each asteroid was estimated after deconvolution using a new algorithm called AIDA. The mean diameter for the majority of asteroids is in good agreement with IRAS radiometric measurements, though for asteroids with a D < 200 km, it is underestimated on average by 6-8%. Most asteroids had a size ratio that was very close to those determined by lightcurve measurements. One observation of 104 Klymene suggests it has a bifurcated shape. The bi-lobed shape of 121 Hermione described in Marchis et al. [Marchis, F., Hestroffer, D., Descamps, P., Berthier, J., Laver, C., de Pater, I., 2005c. Icarus 178, 450-464] was confirmed after deconvolution. The ratio of contact binaries in our survey, which is limited to asteroids larger than 40 km, is surprisingly high (∼6%), suggesting that a non-single configuration is common in the main-belt. Several asteroids have been analyzed with lightcurve inversions. We compared lightcurve inversion models for plane-of-sky predictions with the observed images (9 Metis, 52 Europa, 87 Sylvia, 130 Elektra, 192 Nausikaa, and 423 Diotima, 511 Davida). The AO images allowed us to

  20. Shape, size and multiplicity of main-belt asteroids I. Keck Adaptive Optics survey

    PubMed Central

    Marchis, F.; Kaasalainen, M.; Hom, E.F.Y.; Berthier, J.; Enriquez, J.; Hestroffer, D.; Le Mignant, D.; de Pater, I.

    2008-01-01

    This paper presents results from a high spatial resolution survey of 33 main-belt asteroids with diameters >40 km using the Keck II Adaptive Optics (AO) facility. Five of these (45 Eugenia, 87 Sylvia, 107 Camilla, 121 Hermione, 130 Elektra) were confirmed to have satellite. Assuming the same albedo as the primary, these moonlets are relatively small (∼5% of the primary size) suggesting that they are fragments captured after a disruptive collision of a parent body or captured ejecta due to an impact. For each asteroid, we have estimated the minimum size of a moonlet that can positively detected within the Hill sphere of the system by estimating and modeling a 2-σ detection profile: in average on the data set, a moonlet located at 2/100 × RHill (1/4 × RHill) with a diameter larger than 6 km (4 km) would have been unambiguously seen. The apparent size and shape of each asteroid was estimated after deconvolution using a new algorithm called AIDA. The mean diameter for the majority of asteroids is in good agreement with IRAS radiometric measurements, though for asteroids with a D < 200 km, it is underestimated on average by 6–8%. Most asteroids had a size ratio that was very close to those determined by lightcurve measurements. One observation of 104 Klymene suggests it has a bifurcated shape. The bi-lobed shape of 121 Hermione described in Marchis et al. [Marchis, F., Hestroffer, D., Descamps, P., Berthier, J., Laver, C., de Pater, I., 2005c. Icarus 178, 450–464] was confirmed after deconvolution. The ratio of contact binaries in our survey, which is limited to asteroids larger than 40 km, is surprisingly high (∼6%), suggesting that a non-single configuration is common in the main-belt. Several asteroids have been analyzed with lightcurve inversions. We compared lightcurve inversion models for plane-of-sky predictions with the observed images (9 Metis, 52 Europa, 87 Sylvia, 130 Elektra, 192 Nausikaa, and 423 Diotima, 511 Davida). The AO images allowed us to

  1. Object-adapted trapping and shape-tracking to probe a bacterial protein chain motor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roth, Julian; Koch, Matthias; Rohrbach, Alexander

    2015-03-01

    The helical bacterium Spiroplasma is a motile plant and anthropod pathogen which swims by propagating pairs of kinks along its cell body. As a well suited model system for bacterial locomotion, understanding the cell's molecular motor is of vital interest also regarding the combat of bacterial diseases. The extensive deformations related to these kinks are caused by a contractile cytoskeletal protein ribbon representing a linear motor in contrast to common rotary motors as, e.g., flagella. We present new insights into the working of this motor through experiments with object-adapted optical traps and shape-tracking techniques. We use the given laser irradiation from the optical trap to hinder bacterial energy (ATP) production through the production of O2 radicals. The results are compared with experiments performed under the influence of an O2-Scavenger and ATP inhibitors, respectively. Our results show clear dependences of the kinking properties on the ATP concentration inside the bacterium. The experiments are supported by a theoretical model which we developed to describe the switching of the ribbon's protein subunits.

  2. Population diversity and adaptive evolution in keratinization genes: impact of environment in shaping skin phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Gautam, Pramod; Chaurasia, Amit; Bhattacharya, Aniket; Grover, Ritika; Mukerji, Mitali; Natarajan, Vivek T

    2015-03-01

    Several studies have demonstrated the role of climatic factors in shaping skin phenotypes, particularly pigmentation. Keratinization is another well-designed feature of human skin, which is involved in modulating transepidermal water loss (TEWL). Although this physiological process is closely linked to climate, presently it is not clear whether genetic diversity is observed in keratinization and whether this process also responds to the environmental pressure. To address this, we adopted a multipronged approach, which involved analysis of 1) copy number variations in diverse Indian and HapMap populations from varied geographical regions; 2) genetic association with geoclimatic parameters in 61 populations of dbCLINE database in a set of 549 genes from four processes namely keratinization, pigmentation, epidermal differentiation, and housekeeping functions; 3) sequence divergence in 4,316 orthologous promoters and corresponding exonic regions of human and chimpanzee with macaque as outgroup, and 4) protein sequence divergence (Ka/Ks) across nine vertebrate classes, which differ in their extent of TEWL. Our analyses demonstrate that keratinization and epidermal differentiation genes are under accelerated evolution in the human lineage, relative to pigmentation and housekeeping genes. We show that this entire pathway may have been driven by environmental selection pressure through concordant functional polymorphisms across several genes involved in skin keratinization. Remarkably, this underappreciated function of skin may be a crucial determinant of adaptation to diverse environmental pressures across world populations.

  3. Conservative Treatment of an Invaginated Maxillary Lateral Incisor with a C-shaped Canal Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Forghani, Maryam; Moghim Farooji, Elaheh; Abuchenari, Javad; Bidar, Maryam; Eslami, Neda

    2015-01-01

    This report describes the non-surgical treatment of an invaginated maxillary lateral incisor with two fused roots. The mesial root had a C-shaped canal, while the distal one had a type III dens invagination. Cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) was used to help with the diagnosis and treatment decision making. Clinical and radiographic follow-up revealed satisfactory periapical repair and absence of symptoms after 15 months. PMID:26576164

  4. Design of a beam shaping assembly and preliminary modelling of a treatment room for accelerator-based BNCT at CNEA.

    PubMed

    Burlon, A A; Girola, S; Valda, A A; Minsky, D M; Kreiner, A J; Sánchez, G

    2011-12-01

    This work reports on the characterisation of a neutron beam shaping assembly (BSA) prototype and on the preliminary modelling of a treatment room for BNCT within the framework of a research programme for the development and construction of an accelerator-based BNCT irradiation facility in Buenos Aires, Argentina. The BSA prototype constructed has been characterised by means of MCNP simulations as well as a set of experimental measurements performed at the Tandar accelerator at the National Atomic Energy Commission of Argentina.

  5. Adaptive optics system for fast automatic control of laser beam jitters in air

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Grasso, Salvatore; Acernese, Fausto; Romano, Rocco; Barone, Fabrizio

    2010-04-01

    Adaptive Optics (AO) Systems can operate fast automatic control of laser beam jitters for several applications of basic research as well as for the improvement of industrial and medical devices. We here present our theoretical and experimental research showing the opportunity of suppressing laser beam geometrical fluctuations of higher order Hermite Gauss modes in interferometric Gravitational Waves (GW) antennas. This in turn allows to significantly reduce the noise that originates from the coupling of the laser source oscillations with the interferometer asymmetries and introduces the concrete possibility of overcoming the sensitivity limit of the GW antennas actually set at 10-23 1 Hz value. We have carried out the feasibility study of a novel AO System which performs effective laser jitters suppression in the 200 Hz bandwidth. It extracts the wavefront error signals in terms of Hermite Gauss (HG) coefficients and performs the wavefront correction using the Zernike polynomials. An experimental Prototype of the AO System has been implemented and tested in our laboratory at the University of Salerno and the results we have achieved fully confirm effectiveness and robustness of the control upon first and second order laser beam geometrical fluctuations, in good accordance with GW antennas requirements. Above all, we have measured 60 dB reduction of astigmatism and defocus modes at low frequency below 1 Hz and 20 dB reduction in the 200 Hz bandwidth.

  6. Adaptive beamlet-based finite-size pencil beam dose calculation for independent verification of IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Park, Justin C.; Li, Jonathan G.; Arhjoul, Lahcen; Yan, Guanghua; Lu, Bo; Fan, Qiyong; Liu, Chihray

    2015-04-15

    Purpose: The use of sophisticated dose calculation procedure in modern radiation therapy treatment planning is inevitable in order to account for complex treatment fields created by multileaf collimators (MLCs). As a consequence, independent volumetric dose verification is time consuming, which affects the efficiency of clinical workflow. In this study, the authors present an efficient adaptive beamlet-based finite-size pencil beam (AB-FSPB) dose calculation algorithm that minimizes the computational procedure while preserving the accuracy. Methods: The computational time of finite-size pencil beam (FSPB) algorithm is proportional to the number of infinitesimal and identical beamlets that constitute an arbitrary field shape. In AB-FSPB, dose distribution from each beamlet is mathematically modeled such that the sizes of beamlets to represent an arbitrary field shape no longer need to be infinitesimal nor identical. As a result, it is possible to represent an arbitrary field shape with combinations of different sized and minimal number of beamlets. In addition, the authors included the model parameters to consider MLC for its rounded edge and transmission. Results: Root mean square error (RMSE) between treatment planning system and conventional FSPB on a 10 × 10 cm{sup 2} square field using 10 × 10, 2.5 × 2.5, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm{sup 2} beamlet sizes were 4.90%, 3.19%, and 2.87%, respectively, compared with RMSE of 1.10%, 1.11%, and 1.14% for AB-FSPB. This finding holds true for a larger square field size of 25 × 25 cm{sup 2}, where RMSE for 25 × 25, 2.5 × 2.5, and 0.5 × 0.5 cm{sup 2} beamlet sizes were 5.41%, 4.76%, and 3.54% in FSPB, respectively, compared with RMSE of 0.86%, 0.83%, and 0.88% for AB-FSPB. It was found that AB-FSPB could successfully account for the MLC transmissions without major discrepancy. The algorithm was also graphical processing unit (GPU) compatible to maximize its computational speed. For an intensity modulated radiation therapy (

  7. Tunable beam shaping with a phased array acousto-optic modulator.

    PubMed

    Grinenko, A; MacDonald, M P; Courtney, C R P; Wilcox, P D; Demore, C E M; Cochran, S; Drinkwater, B W

    2015-01-12

    We demonstrate the generation of Bessel beams using an acousto-optic array based on a liquid filled cavity surrounded by a cylindrical multi-element ultrasound transducer array. Conversion of a Gaussian laser mode into a Bessel beam with tunable order and position is shown. Also higher-order Bessel beams up to the fourth order are successfully generated with experimental results very closely matching simulations.

  8. Multiple beam interference lithography: A tool for rapid fabrication of plasmonic arrays of arbitrary shaped nanomotifs.

    PubMed

    Vala, M; Homola, J

    2016-07-11

    A novel method enabling rapid fabrication of 2D periodic arrays of plasmonic nanoparticles across large areas is presented. This method is based on the interference of multiple coherent beams originating from diffraction of large-diameter collimated beam on a transmission phase mask. Mutual orientation of the interfering beams is determined by parameters of the used phase mask. Herein, parameters of the phase mask (periods and modulation depth) are selected to yield an interference pattern with high contrast and narrow well-separated maxima. Finally, multiple beam interference lithography (MBIL)-based fabrication of periodic plasmonic arrays with selected nanomotifs including discs, disc dimers, rods and bowtie antennas is demonstrated. PMID:27410838

  9. SU-E-J-135: Feasibility of Using Quantitative Cone Beam CT for Proton Adaptive Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Jingqian, W; Wang, Q; Zhang, X; Wen, Z; Zhu, X; Frank, S; Li, H; Tsui, T; Zhu, L; Wei, J

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the feasibility of using scatter corrected cone beam CT (CBCT) for proton adaptive planning. Methods: Phantom study was used to evaluate the CT number difference between the planning CT (pCT), quantitative CBCT (qCBCT) with scatter correction and calibrated Hounsfield units using adaptive scatter kernel superposition (ASKS) technique, and raw CBCT (rCBCT). After confirming the CT number accuracy, prostate patients, each with a pCT and several sets of weekly CBCT, were investigated for this study. Spot scanning proton treatment plans were independently generated on pCT, qCBCT and rCBCT. The treatment plans were then recalculated on all images. Dose-volume-histogram (DVH) parameters and gamma analysis were used to compare between dose distributions. Results: Phantom study suggested that Hounsfield unit accuracy for different materials are within 20 HU for qCBCT and over 250 HU for rCBCT. For prostate patients, proton dose could be calculated accurately on qCBCT but not on rCBCT. When the original plan was recalculated on qCBCT, tumor coverage was maintained when anatomy was consistent with pCT. However, large dose variance was observed when patient anatomy change. Adaptive plan using qCBCT was able to recover tumor coverage and reduce dose to normal tissue. Conclusion: It is feasible to use qu antitative CBCT (qCBCT) with scatter correction and calibrated Hounsfield units for proton dose calculation and adaptive planning in proton therapy. Partly supported by Varian Medical Systems.

  10. Design optimization of a smooth headlamp reflector to SAE/DOT beam-shape requirements

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shatz, Narkis E.; Bortz, John C.; Dassanayake, Mahendra S.

    1999-10-01

    The optical design of Ford Motor Company's 1992 Mercury Grand Marquis headlamp utilized a Sylvania 9007 filament source, a paraboloidal reflector and an array of cylindrical lenses (flutes). It has been of interest to Ford to determine the practicality of closely reproducing the on- road beam pattern performance of this headlamp, with an alternate optical arrangement whereby the control of the beam would be achieved solely by means of the geometry of the surface of the reflector, subject to a requirement of smooth-surface continuity; replacing the outer lens with a clear plastic cover having no beam-forming function. To this end the far-field intensity distribution produced by the 9007 bulb was measured at the low-beam setting. These measurements were then used to develop a light-source model for use in ray tracing simulations of candidate reflector geometries. An objective function was developed to compare candidate beam patterns with the desired beam pattern. Functional forms for the 3D reflector geometry were developed with free parameters to be subsequently optimized. A solution was sought meeting the detailed US SAE/DOT constraints for minimum and maximum permissible levels of illumination in the different portions of the beam pattern. Simulated road scenes were generated by Ford Motor Company to compare the illumination properties of the new design with those of the original Grand Marquis headlamp.

  11. Seismic performance of RC shear wall structure with novel shape memory alloy dampers in coupling beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mao, Chenxi; Dong, Jinzhi; Li, Hui; Ou, Jinping

    2012-04-01

    Shear wall system is widely adopted in high rise buildings because of its high lateral stiffness in resisting earthquakes. According to the concept of ductility seismic design, coupling beams in shear wall structure are required to yield prior to the damage of wall limb. However, damage in coupling beams results in repair cost post earthquake and even in some cases it is difficult to repair the coupling beams if the damage is severe. In order to solve this problem, a novel passive SMA damper was proposed in this study. The coupling beams connecting wall limbs are split in the middle, and the dampers are installed between the ends of the two cantilevers. Then the relative flexural deformation of the wall limbs is transferred to the ends of coupling beams and then to the SMA dampers. After earthquakes the deformation of the dampers can recover automatically because of the pseudoelasticity of austenite SMA material. In order to verify the validity of the proposed dampers, seismic responses of a 12-story coupled shear wall with such passive SMA dampers in coupling beams was investigated. The additional stiffness and yielding deformation of the dampers and their ratios to the lateral stiffness and yielding displacements of the wall limbs are key design parameters and were addressed. Analytical results indicate that the displacement responses of the shear wall structure with such dampers are reduced remarkably. The deformation of the structure is concentrated in the dampers and the damage of coupling beams is reduced.

  12. Polyhedral shape model for terrain correction of gravity and gravity gradient data based on an adaptive mesh

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Zhikui; Chen, Chao; Tao, Chunhui

    2016-04-01

    Since 2007, there are four China Da yang cruises (CDCs), which have been carried out to investigate polymetallic sulfides in the southwest Indian ridge (SWIR) and have acquired both gravity data and bathymetry data on the corresponding survey lines(Tao et al., 2014). Sandwell et al. (2014) published a new global marine gravity model including the free air gravity data and its first order vertical gradient (Vzz). Gravity data and its gradient can be used to extract unknown density structure information(e.g. crust thickness) under surface of the earth, but they contain all the mass effect under the observation point. Therefore, how to get accurate gravity and its gradient effect of the existing density structure (e.g. terrain) has been a key issue. Using the bathymetry data or ETOPO1 (http://www.ngdc.noaa.gov/mgg/global/global.html) model at a full resolution to calculate the terrain effect could spend too much computation time. We expect to develop an effective method that takes less time but can still yield the desired accuracy. In this study, a constant-density polyhedral model is used to calculate the gravity field and its vertical gradient, which is based on the work of Tsoulis (2012). According to gravity field attenuation with distance and variance of bathymetry, we present an adaptive mesh refinement and coarsening strategies to merge both global topography data and multi-beam bathymetry data. The local coarsening or size of mesh depends on user-defined accuracy and terrain variation (Davis et al., 2011). To depict terrain better, triangular surface element and rectangular surface element are used in fine and coarse mesh respectively. This strategy can also be applied to spherical coordinate in large region and global scale. Finally, we applied this method to calculate Bouguer gravity anomaly (BGA), mantle Bouguer anomaly(MBA) and their vertical gradient in SWIR. Further, we compared the result with previous results in the literature. Both synthetic model

  13. Adaptive frequency comb illumination for interferometry in the case of nested two-beam cavities

    SciTech Connect

    Harder, Irina; Leuchs, Gerd; Mantel, Klaus; Schwider, Johannes

    2011-09-01

    The homogeneity test of glass plates in a Fizeau interferometer is hampered by the superposition of multiple interference signals coming from the surfaces of the glass plate as well as the empty Fizeau cavity. To evaluate interferograms resulting from such nested cavities, various approaches such as the use of broadband light sources have been applied. In this paper, we propose an adaptive frequency comb interferometer to accomplish the cavity selection. An adjustable Fabry-Perot resonator is used to generate a variable frequency comb that can be matched to the length of the desired cavity. Owing to its flexibility, the number of measurements needed for the homogeneity test can be reduced to four. Furthermore, compared to approaches using a two-beam interferometer as a filter for the broadband light source, the visibility of the fringe system is considerably higher if a Fabry-Perot filter is applied.

  14. TU-C-17A-07: FusionARC Treatment with Adaptive Beam Selection Method

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, H; Li, R; Xing, L; Lee, R

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: Recently, a new treatment scheme, FusionARC, has been introduced to compensate for the pitfalls in single-arc VMAT planning. It basically allows for the static field treatment in selected locations, while the remaining is treated by single-rotational arc delivery. The important issue is how to choose the directions for static field treatment. This study presents an adaptive beam selection method to formulate fusionARC treatment scheme. Methods: The optimal plan for single-rotational arc treatment is obtained from two-step approach based on the reweighted total-variation (TV) minimization. To choose the directions for static field treatment with extra segments, a value of our proposed cost function at each field is computed on the new fluence-map, which adds an extra segment to the designated field location only. The cost function is defined as a summation of equivalent uniform dose (EUD) of all structures with the fluence-map, while assuming that the lower cost function value implies the enhancement of plan quality. Finally, the extra segments for static field treatment would be added to the selected directions with low cost function values. A prostate patient data was applied and evaluated with three different plans: conventional VMAT, fusionARC, and static IMRT. Results: The 7 field locations, corresponding to the lowest cost function values, are chosen to insert extra segment for step-and-shoot dose delivery. Our proposed fusionARC plan with the selected angles improves the dose sparing to the critical organs, relative to static IMRT and conventional VMAT plans. The dose conformity to the target is significantly enhanced at the small expense of treatment time, compared with VMAT plan. Its estimated treatment time, however, is still much faster than IMRT. Conclusion: The fusionARC treatment with adaptive beam selection method could improve the plan quality with insignificant damage in the treatment time, relative to the conventional VMAT.

  15. Particle manipulation with acoustic vortex beam induced by a brass plate with spiral shape structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Tian; Ke, Manzhu; Li, Weiping; Yang, Qian; Qiu, Chunyin; Liu, Zhengyou

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we give direct demonstration of acoustic radiation force and acoustic torque on particles exerted by an acoustic vortex beam, which is realized by an acoustic artificial structure plate instead of traditional transducer arrays. First, the first order acoustic vortex beam, which has the distinctive features of a linear and continuous phase variation from -π to π around its propagation axis and a magnitude null at its core, is obtained through one single acoustic source incident upon a structured brass plate with Archimedean spiral grating engraved on the back surface. Second, annular self-patterning of polystyrene particles with a radius of 90 μm is realized in the gradient field of this acoustic vortex beam. In addition, we further exhibit acoustic angular momentum transfer to an acoustic absorptive matter, which is verified by a millimeter-sized polylactic acid disk self-rotating in water in the acoustic field of the generated vortex beam.

  16. Cone Beam Computed Tomographic Analysis of the Shape, Height, and Location of the Mandibular Lingula in a Population of Children

    PubMed Central

    Sekerci, Ahmet Ercan; Cantekin, Kenan; Aydinbelge, Mustafa

    2013-01-01

     Objectives. This is the first study to identify and classify the different morphological shapes of the mandibular lingula (ML) in children using cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT). Material and Methods. A retrospective study was performed to evaluate the shape, height, and location of the ML in relation to the surrounding structures using CBCT images of mandibles obtained from 269 children. The shape of the ML was classified into triangular, truncated, nodular, or assimilated types. The location was determined by five distances. The height of the lingula was also measured from the lingular tip to the mandibular foramen. Results. A nodular shape of the ML was most commonly found (48.3%, n = 260) followed by truncated (23.4%, n = 126), assimilated (14.4%, n = 78), and triangular (13.7%, n = 74). The mean distance of ML from the anterior and posterior borders of mandibular ramus was 13.3 ± 2.3 mm and 10.2 ± 1.6 mm, respectively. In the majority of the mandibles studied, the ML was located above the occlusal plane. Conclusion. The present study provides new information to the literature concerning the shape, height, and location of the lingula in a Turkish pediatric population. This finding may assist clinicians to localize the lingula and avoid intraoperative complications. PMID:24490173

  17. Evaluation of mounting bolt loads for Space Shuttle Get Away Special (GAS) adapter beam

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Talapatra, D. C.

    1983-01-01

    During the prototype vibration tests of the GAS adapter beam, significant impacting of the beam at its support points was observed. The cause of the impacting was traced to gaps under the mounting bolt heads. Because of the nonlinear nature of the response, it was difficult to evaluate the effects which Shuttle launch dynamics might have on the mounting bolt loads. A series of tests were conducted on an electrodynamic exciter in which the transient acceleration time histories, which had been measured during the Space Transportation System-1 (STS-1; Space Shuttle mission 1) launch, were simulated. The actual flight data had to be filtered and compensated so that it could be reproduced on the shaker without exceeding displacement and velocity limitations. Mounting bolt loads were measured directly by strain gages applied to the bolts. Various gap thicknesses and bolt torques were investigated. Although increased gap thickness resulted in greater accelerations due to impacting, the bolt loads were not significantly affected. This is attributed to the fact that impacting excited mostly higher frequency modes which do not have significant modal mass.

  18. Large deflection angle, high-power adaptive fiber optics collimator with preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality.

    PubMed

    Zhi, Dong; Ma, Yanxing; Chen, Zilun; Wang, Xiaolin; Zhou, Pu; Si, Lei

    2016-05-15

    We report on the development of a monolithic adaptive fiber optics collimator, with a large deflection angle and preserved near-diffraction-limited beam quality, that has been tested at a maximal output power at the 300 W level. Additionally, a new measurement method of beam quality (M2 factor) is developed. Experimental results show that the deflection angle of the collimated beam is in the range of 0-0.27 mrad in the X direction and 0-0.19 mrad in the Y direction. The effective working frequency of the device is about 710 Hz. By employing the new measurement method of the M2 factor, we calculate that the beam quality is Mx2=1.35 and My2=1.24, which is in agreement with the result from the beam propagation analyzer and is preserved well with the increasing output power.

  19. Plasma shaping in laser-plasma accelerators: injection, energy boost and beam collimation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Thaury, Cedric

    2015-11-01

    The longitudinal density profile is a key parameter to optimize the properties of electron beams in laser-plasma accelerators. Tailored density profile can notably be used to control injection or increase the electron energy via density tapering. Here we present three different experiments illustrating the use of density tailoring for injecting, increasing the energy or focusing relativistic electron beams. First, we discuss results on shock-front injection in a gas mixture. We show that shocks allow to confine injection and hence to reduce significantly the beam energy spread, compared to pure ionization injection. Then we demonstrate that, with a different setup, shock fronts can also be used to rephase the electron beam with the wakefield. Using this setup we obtained an increase of the electron energy by almost 50 percent. Finally, we present the principle of the laser-plasma lens and show that this device can be used to reduce the electron beam divergence by a factor of almost 3. This last result is of particular importance for applications requiring beam transport; the divergence reduction should actually be sufficient to avoid transverse emittance growth in quadrupole triplets, provided that the energy spread is lower than 3 percent (chromatic emittance growth is due to the combination of large divergence and energy spread).

  20. Factors shaping the adaptive landscape for arboviruses: implications for the emergence of disease

    PubMed Central

    Coffey, Lark L; Forrester, Naomi; Tsetsarkin, Konstantin; Vasilakis, Nikos; Weaver, Scott C

    2013-01-01

    Many examples of the emergence or re-emergence of infectious diseases involve the adaptation of zoonotic viruses to new amplification hosts or to humans themselves. These include several instances of simple mutational adaptations, often to hosts closely related to the natural reservoirs. However, based on theoretical grounds, arthropod-borne viruses, or arboviruses, may face several challenges for adaptation to new hosts. Here, we review recent findings regarding adaptive evolution of arboviruses and its impact on disease emergence. We focus on the zoonotic alphaviruses Venezuelan equine encephalitis and chikungunya viruses, which have undergone adaptive evolution that mediated recent outbreaks of disease, as well as the flaviviruses dengue and West Nile viruses, which have emerged via less dramatic adaptive mechanisms. PMID:23374123

  1. Scatter correction for cone-beam computed tomography using self-adaptive scatter kernel superposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Shi-Peng; Luo, Li-Min

    2012-06-01

    The authors propose a combined scatter reduction and correction method to improve image quality in cone beam computed tomography (CBCT). The scatter kernel superposition (SKS) method has been used occasionally in previous studies. However, this method differs in that a scatter detecting blocker (SDB) was used between the X-ray source and the tested object to model the self-adaptive scatter kernel. This study first evaluates the scatter kernel parameters using the SDB, and then isolates the scatter distribution based on the SKS. The quality of image can be improved by removing the scatter distribution. The results show that the method can effectively reduce the scatter artifacts, and increase the image quality. Our approach increases the image contrast and reduces the magnitude of cupping. The accuracy of the SKS technique can be significantly improved in our method by using a self-adaptive scatter kernel. This method is computationally efficient, easy to implement, and provides scatter correction using a single scan acquisition.

  2. Three-dimensional anisotropic adaptive filtering of projection data for noise reduction in cone beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Maier, Andreas; Wigstroem, Lars; Hofmann, Hannes G.; Hornegger, Joachim; Zhu Lei; Strobel, Norbert; Fahrig, Rebecca

    2011-11-15

    speed-up of the processing (from 1336 to 150 s). Conclusions: Adaptive anisotropic filtering has the potential to substantially improve image quality and/or reduce the radiation dose required for obtaining 3D image data using cone beam CT.

  3. High-pressure generation using double stage micro-paired diamond anvils shaped by focused ion beam

    SciTech Connect

    Sakai, Takeshi Ohfuji, Hiroaki; Yagi, Takehiko; Irifune, Tetsuo; Ohishi, Yasuo; Hirao, Naohisa; Suzuki, Yuya; Kuroda, Yasushi; Asakawa, Takayuki; Kanemura, Takashi

    2015-03-15

    Micron-sized diamond anvils with a 3 μm culet were successfully processed using a focused ion beam (FIB) system and the generation of high pressures was confirmed using the double stage diamond anvil cell technique. The difficulty of aligning two second-stage micro-anvils was solved via the paired micro-anvil method. Micro-manufacturing using a FIB system enables us to control anvil shape, process any materials, including nano-polycrystalline diamond and single crystal diamond, and assemble the sample exactly in a very small space between the second-stage anvils. This method is highly reproducible. High pressures over 300 GPa were achieved, and the pressure distribution around the micro-anvil culet was evaluated by using a well-focused synchrotron micro-X-ray beam.

  4. FK506 binding protein 51 integrates pathways of adaptation: FKBP51 shapes the reactivity to environmental change.

    PubMed

    Rein, Theo

    2016-09-01

    This review portraits FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 as "reactivity protein" and collates recent publications to develop the concept of FKBP51 as contributor to different levels of adaptation. Adaptation is a fundamental process that enables unicellular and multicellular organisms to adjust their molecular circuits and structural conditions in reaction to environmental changes threatening their homeostasis. FKBP51 is known as chaperone and co-chaperone of heat shock protein (HSP) 90, thus involved in processes ensuring correct protein folding in response to proteotoxic stress. In mammals, FKBP51 both shapes the stress response and is calibrated by the stress levels through an ultrashort molecular feedback loop. More recently, it has been linked to several intracellular pathways related to the reactivity to drug exposure and stress. Through its role in autophagy and DNA methylation in particular it influences adaptive pathways, possibly also in a transgenerational fashion. Also see the video abstract here. PMID:27374865

  5. Inquiry in Interaction: How Local Adaptations of Curricula Shape Classroom Communities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Enyedy, Noel; Goldberg, Jennifer

    2004-01-01

    In this study, we seek a better understanding of how individuals and their daily interactions shape and reshape social structures that constitute a classroom community. Moreover, we provide insight into how discourse and classroom interactions shape the nature of a learning community, as well as which aspects of the classroom culture may be…

  6. Emittance control of a beam by shaping the transverse charge distribution, using a tomography diagnostic

    SciTech Connect

    Yakimenko, V.; Babzien, M.; Ben-Zvi, I.; Malone, R.; Wang, X.J.

    1998-06-01

    A high-brightness beam is very important for many applications. A diagnostic that measures the multi-dimensional phase-space density-distribution of the electron bunch is a must for obtaining such beams. Measurement of a slice emittance has been achieved. Tomographic reconstruction of phase space was suggested and implemented using a single quadrupole scan. In the present work the authors give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This diagnostic, coupled with control of the radial charge distribution of presents an opportunity to improve the beam brightness. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics lead to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections.

  7. EMITTANCE CONTROL OF A BEAM BY SHAPING THE TRANSVERSE CHARGE DISTRIBUTION, USING A TOMOGRAPHY DIAGNOSTIC.

    SciTech Connect

    YAKIMENKO,V.

    1998-06-26

    A high-brightness beam is very important for many applications. A diagnostic that measures the multi-dimensional phase-space density-distribution of the electron bunch is a must for obtaining such beams. Measurement of a slice emittance has been achieved [1]. Tomographic reconstruction of phase space was suggested [2] and implemented [3,4] using a single quadrupole scan. In the present work we give special attention to the accuracy of the phase space reconstruction and present an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases. This diagnostic, coupled with control of the radial charge distribution of presents an opportunity to improve the beam brightness. Combining the slice emittance and tomography diagnostics lead to an unprecedented visualization of phase space distributions in 5 dimensional phase-space and an opportunity to perform high-order emittance corrections.

  8. Strut Shaping of 34m Beam Waveguide Antenna for Reductions in Near-Field RF and Noise Temeperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayatian, Behrouz; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Britcliffe, Michael J.; Gama, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Struts shaping of the NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing structure. Reduction in the RF near-field exposure will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas. Both reductions of RF near-field exposure and antenna noise temperature were verified through measurements and agree very well with calculated results.

  9. Strut Shaping of 34m Beam Waveguide Antenna for Reductions in Near-Field RF and Noise Temperature

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Khayatian, Behrouz; Hoppe, Daniel J.; Britcliffe, Michael J.; Gama, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Strut shaping of NASA's Deep Space Network (DSN) 34m Beam Waveguide (BWG) antenna has been implemented to reduce near-field RF exposure while improving the antenna noise temperature. Strut shaping was achieved by introducing an RF shield that does not compromise the structural integrity of the existing antenna. Reduction in the RF near-field level will compensate for the planned transmit power increase of the antenna from 20 kW to 80 kW while satisfying safety requirements for RF exposure. Measured antenna noise temperature was also improved by as much as 1.5 K for the low elevation angles and 0.5 K in other areas.

  10. Laser pulse shaping for generating uniform three-dimensional ellipsoidal electron beams.

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Y.; Chmnerisov, S.; Lewellen, J. W.

    2009-02-01

    A scheme of generating a uniform ellipsoidal laser pulse for high-brightness photoinjectors is discussed. The scheme is based on the chromatic aberration of a dispersive lens. Fourier optics simulation reveals the interplay of group velocity delay and dispersion in the scheme, as well as diffractions. Particle tracking simulation shows that the beam generated by such a laser pulse approaches the performance of that by an ideal ellipsoidal laser pulse and represents a significant improvement from the traditionally proposed cylindrical beam geometry. The scheme is tested in an 800-nm, optical proof-of-principle experiment at lower peak power with excellent agreement between the measurement and simulation.

  11. Analysis of stationary roving mass effect for damage detection in beams using wavelet analysis of mode shapes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Solís, Mario; Benjumea, Antonio J.; Algaba, Mario; Galvín, Pedro

    2015-07-01

    One of the main challenges in damage detection techniques is sensitivity to damage. During the last years, a large number of papers have used wavelet analysis as a sensitive mathematical tool for identifying changes in mode shapes induced by damage. This paper analyzes the effect of adding a mass to the structure at different positions. Depending on the location and severity of damage, the presence of the mass affects the natural frequencies and mode shapes in a different way. The paper applies a damage detection methodology proposed by the authors, although it has been modified in order to consider the addition of the mas. This methodology is based on a wavelet analysis of the difference of mode shapes of a damaged and a reference state. The singular behavior of a normalized weighted addition of wavelet coefficients is used as an indicator of damage. The presence of damage is detected by combining all the information provided by mode shapes and natural frequencies for different positions of the roving mass. A continuous wavelet transform is used to detect the difference between the response of a healthy state and a damaged one. The paper shows the results obtained for a beam with different cracks. The paper analyzes the sensitivity to damage of the proposed methodology by considering some practical issues such as the size of the crack, the number of measuring points and the effect of experimental noise.

  12. Evolution of opercle shape in cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika - adaptive trait interactions in extant and extinct species flocks

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A. B.; Colombo, Marco; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R.; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-01-01

    Phenotype-environment correlations and the evolution of trait interactions in adaptive radiations have been widely studied to gain insight into the dynamics underpinning rapid species diversification. In this study we explore the phenotype-environment correlation and evolution of operculum shape in cichlid fishes using an outline-based geometric morphometric approach combined with stable isotope indicators of macrohabitat and trophic niche. We then apply our method to a sample of extinct saurichthyid fishes, a highly diverse and near globally distributed group of actinopterygians occurring throughout the Triassic, to assess the utility of extant data to inform our understanding of ecomorphological evolution in extinct species flocks. A series of comparative methods were used to analyze shape data for 54 extant species of cichlids (N = 416), and 6 extinct species of saurichthyids (N = 44). Results provide evidence for a relationship between operculum shape and feeding ecology, a concentration in shape evolution towards present along with evidence for convergence in form, and significant correlation between the major axes of shape change and measures of gut length and body elongation. The operculum is one of few features that can be compared in extant and extinct groups, enabling reconstruction of phenotype-environment interactions and modes of evolutionary diversification in deep time. PMID:26584885

  13. Evolution of opercle shape in cichlid fishes from Lake Tanganyika - adaptive trait interactions in extant and extinct species flocks.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Laura A B; Colombo, Marco; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R; Salzburger, Walter

    2015-11-20

    Phenotype-environment correlations and the evolution of trait interactions in adaptive radiations have been widely studied to gain insight into the dynamics underpinning rapid species diversification. In this study we explore the phenotype-environment correlation and evolution of operculum shape in cichlid fishes using an outline-based geometric morphometric approach combined with stable isotope indicators of macrohabitat and trophic niche. We then apply our method to a sample of extinct saurichthyid fishes, a highly diverse and near globally distributed group of actinopterygians occurring throughout the Triassic, to assess the utility of extant data to inform our understanding of ecomorphological evolution in extinct species flocks. A series of comparative methods were used to analyze shape data for 54 extant species of cichlids (N = 416), and 6 extinct species of saurichthyids (N = 44). Results provide evidence for a relationship between operculum shape and feeding ecology, a concentration in shape evolution towards present along with evidence for convergence in form, and significant correlation between the major axes of shape change and measures of gut length and body elongation. The operculum is one of few features that can be compared in extant and extinct groups, enabling reconstruction of phenotype-environment interactions and modes of evolutionary diversification in deep time.

  14. Adaptive-Predictive Organ Localization Using Cone-Beam Computed Tomography for Improved Accuracy in External Beam Radiotherapy for Bladder Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Lalondrelle, Susan; Huddart, Robert; Warren-Oseni, Karole; Hansen, Vibeke Nordmark; McNair, Helen; Thomas, Karen; Dearnaley, David; Horwich, Alan; Khoo, Vincent

    2011-03-01

    Purpose: To examine patterns of bladder wall motion during high-dose hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy and to validate a novel adaptive planning method, A-POLO, to prevent subsequent geographic miss. Methods and Materials: Patterns of individual bladder filling were obtained with repeat computed tomography planning scans at 0, 15, and 30 minutes after voiding. A series of patient-specific plans corresponding to these time-displacement points was created. Pretreatment cone-beam computed tomography was performed before each fraction and assessed retrospectively for adaptive intervention. In fractions that would have required intervention, the most appropriate plan was chosen from the patient's 'library,' and the resulting target coverage was reassessed with repeat cone-beam computed tomography. Results: A large variation in patterns of bladder filling and interfraction displacement was seen. During radiotherapy, predominant translations occurred cranially (maximum 2.5 cm) and anteriorly (maximum 1.75 cm). No apparent explanation was found for this variation using pretreatment patient factors. A need for adaptive planning was demonstrated by 51% of fractions, and 73% of fractions would have been delivered correctly using A-POLO. The adaptive strategy improved target coverage and was able to account for intrafraction motion also. Conclusions: Bladder volume variation will result in geographic miss in a high proportion of delivered bladder radiotherapy treatments. The A-POLO strategy can be used to correct for this and can be implemented from the first fraction of radiotherapy; thus, it is particularly suited to hypofractionated bladder radiotherapy regimens.

  15. Morphological integration and pleiotropy in the adaptive body shape of the snail-feeding carabid beetle Damaster blaptoides.

    PubMed

    Konuma, Junji; Yamamoto, Satoshi; Sota, Teiji

    2014-12-01

    The snail-feeding carabid beetle Damaster blaptoides exhibits diverse head and thorax morphologies, and these morphotypes are linked with two alternative feeding behaviours. Stout-shaped beetles feed on snails by crushing the shells, whereas slender-shaped beetles consume snails by inserting their heads into the shells. A trade-off exists between these feeding strategies. Because intermediate-shaped beetles are less proficient in these two behaviours, stout-slender morphological divergence occurs between related species feeding on land snails. To examine the genetic basis of these morphotypes, we conducted morphological analyses and quantitative trait locus (QTL) mapping using backcross offspring between the stout and slender subspecies. The morphological analyses showed that the width and length of the beetle body parts were correlated with each other; in particular, the head width (HW) and thorax length (TL) were strongly negatively correlated. QTL mapping showed that QTLs for HW and TL are located in close proximity to one another on the longest linkage group and that they have positive and negative additive genetic effects. Our results suggest that the adaptive phenotypic sets of a wide head and short thorax and a narrow head and long thorax are based on the closeness of these QTLs. Morphological integration between the head and thorax may play an important role in the adaptive divergence of these beetles.

  16. Method for shaping and aiming narrow beams. [sonar mapping and target identification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Heyser, R. C. (Inventor)

    1981-01-01

    A sonar method and apparatus is discribed which utilizes a linear frequency chirp in a transmitter/receiver having a correlator to synthesize a narrow beamwidth pattern from otherwise broadbeam transducers when there is relative velocity between the transmitter/receiver and the target. The chirp is so produced in a generator in bandwidth, B, and time, T, as to produce a time bandwidth product, TB, that is increased for a narrower angle. A replica of the chirp produced in a generator is time delayed and Doppler shifted for use as a reference in the receiver for correlation of received chirps from targets. This reference is Doppler shifted to select targets preferentially, thereby to not only synthesize a narrow beam but also aim the beam in azimuth and elevation.

  17. Low-speckle holographic beam shaping of high-coherence EUV sources

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, Christopher N.; Miyakawa, Ryan H.; Naulleau, Patrick

    2010-08-01

    This paper describes a method to arbitrarily shape and homogenize high-coherence extreme ultraviolet sources using time-varying holographic optical elements and a scanning subsystem to mitigate speckle. In systems with integration times longer than 100 ms, a speckle contrast below 1% can be achieved.

  18. Light adaptation alters inner retinal inhibition to shape OFF retinal pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Mazade, Reece E; Eggers, Erika D

    2016-06-01

    The retina adjusts its signaling gain over a wide range of light levels. A functional result of this is increased visual acuity at brighter luminance levels (light adaptation) due to shifts in the excitatory center-inhibitory surround receptive field parameters of ganglion cells that increases their sensitivity to smaller light stimuli. Recent work supports the idea that changes in ganglion cell spatial sensitivity with background luminance are due in part to inner retinal mechanisms, possibly including modulation of inhibition onto bipolar cells. To determine how the receptive fields of OFF cone bipolar cells may contribute to changes in ganglion cell resolution, the spatial extent and magnitude of inhibitory and excitatory inputs were measured from OFF bipolar cells under dark- and light-adapted conditions. There was no change in the OFF bipolar cell excitatory input with light adaptation; however, the spatial distributions of inhibitory inputs, including both glycinergic and GABAergic sources, became significantly narrower, smaller, and more transient. The magnitude and size of the OFF bipolar cell center-surround receptive fields as well as light-adapted changes in resting membrane potential were incorporated into a spatial model of OFF bipolar cell output to the downstream ganglion cells, which predicted an increase in signal output strength with light adaptation. We show a prominent role for inner retinal spatial signals in modulating the modeled strength of bipolar cell output to potentially play a role in ganglion cell visual sensitivity and acuity.

  19. Light adaptation alters inner retinal inhibition to shape OFF retinal pathway signaling.

    PubMed

    Mazade, Reece E; Eggers, Erika D

    2016-06-01

    The retina adjusts its signaling gain over a wide range of light levels. A functional result of this is increased visual acuity at brighter luminance levels (light adaptation) due to shifts in the excitatory center-inhibitory surround receptive field parameters of ganglion cells that increases their sensitivity to smaller light stimuli. Recent work supports the idea that changes in ganglion cell spatial sensitivity with background luminance are due in part to inner retinal mechanisms, possibly including modulation of inhibition onto bipolar cells. To determine how the receptive fields of OFF cone bipolar cells may contribute to changes in ganglion cell resolution, the spatial extent and magnitude of inhibitory and excitatory inputs were measured from OFF bipolar cells under dark- and light-adapted conditions. There was no change in the OFF bipolar cell excitatory input with light adaptation; however, the spatial distributions of inhibitory inputs, including both glycinergic and GABAergic sources, became significantly narrower, smaller, and more transient. The magnitude and size of the OFF bipolar cell center-surround receptive fields as well as light-adapted changes in resting membrane potential were incorporated into a spatial model of OFF bipolar cell output to the downstream ganglion cells, which predicted an increase in signal output strength with light adaptation. We show a prominent role for inner retinal spatial signals in modulating the modeled strength of bipolar cell output to potentially play a role in ganglion cell visual sensitivity and acuity. PMID:26912599

  20. Multiscale registration of planning CT and daily cone beam CT images for adaptive radiation therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Paquin, Dana; Levy, Doron; Xing Lei

    2009-01-15

    Adaptive radiation therapy (ART) is the incorporation of daily images in the radiotherapy treatment process so that the treatment plan can be evaluated and modified to maximize the amount of radiation dose to the tumor while minimizing the amount of radiation delivered to healthy tissue. Registration of planning images with daily images is thus an important component of ART. In this article, the authors report their research on multiscale registration of planning computed tomography (CT) images with daily cone beam CT (CBCT) images. The multiscale algorithm is based on the hierarchical multiscale image decomposition of E. Tadmor, S. Nezzar, and L. Vese [Multiscale Model. Simul. 2(4), pp. 554-579 (2004)]. Registration is achieved by decomposing the images to be registered into a series of scales using the (BV, L{sup 2}) decomposition and initially registering the coarsest scales of the image using a landmark-based registration algorithm. The resulting transformation is then used as a starting point to deformably register the next coarse scales with one another. This procedure is iterated at each stage using the transformation computed by the previous scale registration as the starting point for the current registration. The authors present the results of studies of rectum, head-neck, and prostate CT-CBCT registration, and validate their registration method quantitatively using synthetic results in which the exact transformations our known, and qualitatively using clinical deformations in which the exact results are not known.

  1. Deformable image registration of CT and truncated cone-beam CT for adaptive radiation therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhen, Xin; Yan, Hao; Zhou, Linghong; Jia, Xun; Jiang, Steve B.

    2013-11-01

    Truncation of a cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) image, mainly caused by the limited field of view (FOV) of CBCT imaging, poses challenges to the problem of deformable image registration (DIR) between computed tomography (CT) and CBCT images in adaptive radiation therapy (ART). The missing information outside the CBCT FOV usually causes incorrect deformations when a conventional DIR algorithm is utilized, which may introduce significant errors in subsequent operations such as dose calculation. In this paper, based on the observation that the missing information in the CBCT image domain does exist in the projection image domain, we propose to solve this problem by developing a hybrid deformation/reconstruction algorithm. As opposed to deforming the CT image to match the truncated CBCT image, the CT image is deformed such that its projections match all the corresponding projection images for the CBCT image. An iterative forward-backward projection algorithm is developed. Six head-and-neck cancer patient cases are used to evaluate our algorithm, five with simulated truncation and one with real truncation. It is found that our method can accurately register the CT image to the truncated CBCT image and is robust against image truncation when the portion of the truncated image is less than 40% of the total image. Part of this work was presented at the 54th AAPM Annual Meeting (Charlotte, NC, USA, 29 July-2 August 2012).

  2. Effect of Beam Smoothing and Pulse Shape on the Implosion of DD-Filled CH Shell Targets on OMEGA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Delettrez, J. A.; Glebov, V. Yu.; Marshall, F. J.; Stoeckl, C.; Yaakobi, B.; Meyerhofer, D. D.

    1999-11-01

    Over the past two years several implosion experiments were carried out on the 60-beam OMEGA laser in which DD-filled CH shells (some with a CHTi layer imbedded) were irradiated with various laser pulse shapes and smoothing conditions. Target CH shell thicknesses varied from 20 μm to 27 μm with DD-fill variations from 3 to 20 atm, sometimes mixed with ^3He. Two pulse shapes---a 1-ns square pulse and a 2.5-ns pulse with a 10%, 1-ns foot, with and without SSD---provide several levels of laser imprint. Diagnostics include measured neutron yields, fuel ion temperatures, fuel ρR, and shell ρR. Simulations for these experimental conditions were carried out with the 2-D hydrocode ORCHID. The results are compared with the experimental results. The degradation of target performance due to laser nonuniformity is analyzed by comparing the 2-D results with those of 1-D simulations. The effects of pulse shape, target thickness, convergence ratio, and smoothing are presented. This work was supported by the U.S. Department of Energy Office of Inertial Confinement Fusion under Cooperative Agreement No. DE-FC03-92SF19460, the University of Rochester, and the New York State Energy Research and Development Authority.

  3. Particle System Based Adaptive Sampling on Spherical Parameter Space to Improve the MDL Method for Construction of Statistical Shape Models

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Xiangrong; Hirano, Yasushi; Tachibana, Rie; Hara, Takeshi; Kido, Shoji; Fujita, Hiroshi

    2013-01-01

    Minimum description length (MDL) based group-wise registration was a state-of-the-art method to determine the corresponding points of 3D shapes for the construction of statistical shape models (SSMs). However, it suffered from the problem that determined corresponding points did not uniformly spread on original shapes, since corresponding points were obtained by uniformly sampling the aligned shape on the parameterized space of unit sphere. We proposed a particle-system based method to obtain adaptive sampling positions on the unit sphere to resolve this problem. Here, a set of particles was placed on the unit sphere to construct a particle system whose energy was related to the distortions of parameterized meshes. By minimizing this energy, each particle was moved on the unit sphere. When the system became steady, particles were treated as vertices to build a spherical mesh, which was then relaxed to slightly adjust vertices to obtain optimal sampling-positions. We used 47 cases of (left and right) lungs and 50 cases of livers, (left and right) kidneys, and spleens for evaluations. Experiments showed that the proposed method was able to resolve the problem of the original MDL method, and the proposed method performed better in the generalization and specificity tests. PMID:23861721

  4. Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy-active substrates: adapting the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles for different biological applications.

    PubMed

    Vitol, Elina A; Friedman, Gary; Gogotsi, Yury

    2014-04-01

    We discuss the relationship between the shape of plasmonic nanoparticles and the biological surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) applications which they can enable. As a step forward in developing SERS-active substrates adapted to a particular application, we demonstrate that a modification of the widely used protocol for the sodium citrate mediated reduction of chloroauric acid, which is typically employed only for obtaining spherical gold nanoparticles, can yield flat polygonal nanoparticles at room temperature and a decreased amount of the reducing agent. The significant advantage of the described approach is that it allows for synthesis of nanoparticles with different geometries using a well-established synthesis protocol without the need for any additional chemicals or special synthesis apparatus. By contrasting spherical and anisotropically shaped nanoparticles, we demonstrate that multifaceted nanoparticles with sharp edges are better suitable for SERS analysis of low concentration analytes requiring strong SERS enhancement. On the other hand, gold nanoparticles with isotropic shapes, while giving a smaller enhancement, can provide a more reproducible SERS signal. This is important for analytical applications of complex biological systems where large SERS enhancement may not always be required, whereas data reproducibility and minimal false positive rate are imperative. Using a SERS-active substrate comprising isotropically shaped gold nanoparticles, we demonstrate the differences between Gram-negative (E. coli) and Gram-positive (S. aureus) bacteria, attributable to the outer membrane and peptidoglycan layer, with the level of detail which has not been previously reported with optical spectroscopic techniques. PMID:24734732

  5. A Computational Approach to Model Vascular Adaptation During Chronic Hemodialysis: Shape Optimization as a Substitute for Growth Modeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mahmoudzadeh Akherat, S. M. Javid; Boghosian, Michael; Cassel, Kevin; Hammes, Mary

    2015-11-01

    End-stage-renal disease patients depend on successful long-term hemodialysis via vascular access, commonly facilitated via a Brachiocephalic Fistula (BCF). The primary cause of BCF failure is Cephalic Arch Stenosis (CAS). It is believed that low Wall Shear Stress (WSS) regions, which occur because of the high flow rates through the natural bend in the cephalic vein, create hemodynamic circumstances that trigger the onset and development of Intimal Hyperplasia (IH) and subsequent CAS. IH is hypothesized to be a natural effort to reshape the vessel, aiming to bring the WSS values back to a physiologically acceptable range. We seek to explore the correlation between regions of low WSS and subsequent IH and CAS in patient-specific geometries. By utilizing a shape optimization framework, a method is proposed to predict cardiovascular adaptation that could potentially be an alternative to vascular growth and remodeling. Based on an objective functional that seeks to alter the vessel shape in such a way as to readjust the WSS to be within the normal physiological range, CFD and shape optimization are then coupled to investigate whether the optimal shape evolution is correlated with actual patient-specific geometries thereafter. Supported by the National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases of the National Institutes of Health (R01 DK90769).

  6. Different collimators in convergent beam irradiation of irregularly shaped intracranial target volumes.

    PubMed

    Otto-Oelschläger, S; Schlegel, W; Lorenz, W

    1994-02-01

    We compare different collimator forms (circular, elliptic and multi-leaf) in 3-D multiple arc rotation therapy for irregularly shaped intracranial tumors. When homogeneous irradiation of the tumor is ensured, the efficiency of treatment is expressed by the sparing of normal tissue outside the target volume to high dose irradiation. By utilizing integral dose-volume histograms we demonstrate that the multi-leaf collimator has considerable advantages. PMID:8184118

  7. Nanoscale nickel-titanium shape memory alloys thin films fabricated by using biased target ion beam deposition

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hou, Huilong

    Shape memory alloys offer the highest work output per unit volume among smart materials and have both high actuation stress and large recoverable strain. Miniaturization of materials and devices requires shape memory actuation which is uncompromised at a small scale. However, size effects need to be understood in order to scale shape memory actuation with the minimum size critical to device design. Controlling material quality and properties is essential in fabrication of shape memory alloys into nanometer regime. This work demonstrates a novel fabrication technique, biased target ion beam deposition (BTIBD), which uses additional adatom energy in order to fabricate high-quality nickel-titanium (NiTi) alloys thin films with nanometer thickness. These fabricated ultrathin NiTi films provide insight into the size scale dependence of shape memory functionality at nanoscale regime. BTIBD provides additional adatom energy to the growing film in order to fundamentally tailor the film growth mode for quality and properties. An independent ion beam source is customized in BTIBD to provide low-energy ions (tens of eV) during growth of films on substrates. Pure Ti and pure Ni targets are co-sputtering in BTIBD to fabricate NiTi thin films. The prepared NiTi films are continuous, and the thickness ranges from several tens to a few hundreds nanometers. The composition is controllable over the range of Ni-rich (>50.5 at% Ni), near-equiatomic, and Ti-rich (<49.5 at% Ni). The film surfaces are consistently ultra-smooth --- twice as smooth as conventional NiTi thin films fabricated by magnetron sputtering --- over all the composition ranges and over wide surface areas. The substrate/film interface is smooth and the interfacial diffusion is a minimal portion of the film thickness. Crystallographic phases and grain size in BTIBD NiTi films with thickness on the order of 100 nm are tunable via heat treatment. The as-deposited BTIBD films are amorphous. A pure B2 phase (without other

  8. Adaptive Aft Signature Shaping of a Low-Boom Supersonic Aircraft Using Off-Body Pressures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ordaz, Irian; Li, Wu

    2012-01-01

    The design and optimization of a low-boom supersonic aircraft using the state-of-the- art o -body aerodynamics and sonic boom analysis has long been a challenging problem. The focus of this paper is to demonstrate an e ective geometry parameterization scheme and a numerical optimization approach for the aft shaping of a low-boom supersonic aircraft using o -body pressure calculations. A gradient-based numerical optimization algorithm that models the objective and constraints as response surface equations is used to drive the aft ground signature toward a ramp shape. The design objective is the minimization of the variation between the ground signature and the target signature subject to several geometric and signature constraints. The target signature is computed by using a least-squares regression of the aft portion of the ground signature. The parameterization and the deformation of the geometry is performed with a NASA in- house shaping tool. The optimization algorithm uses the shaping tool to drive the geometric deformation of a horizontal tail with a parameterization scheme that consists of seven camber design variables and an additional design variable that describes the spanwise location of the midspan section. The demonstration cases show that numerical optimization using the state-of-the-art o -body aerodynamic calculations is not only feasible and repeatable but also allows the exploration of complex design spaces for which a knowledge-based design method becomes less effective.

  9. Fluidic origami: a plant-inspired adaptive structure with shape morphing and stiffness tuning

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Suyi; Wang, K. W.

    2015-10-01

    Inspired by the physics behind the rapid plant movements and the rich topologies in origami folding, this research creates a unique class of multi-functional adaptive structure through exploring the innovation of fluidic origami. The idea is to connect multiple Miura folded sheets along their crease lines into a space-filling structure, and fill the tubular cells in-between with working fluids. The pressure and fluid flow in these cells can be strategically controlled much like in plants for nastic movements. The relationship between the internal fluid volume and the overall structure deformation is primarily determined by the kinematics of folding. This relationship can be exploited so that fluidic origami can achieve actuation/morphing by actively changing the internal fluid volume, and stiffness tuning by constraining the fluid volume. In order to characterize the working principles and performance potentials of these two adaptive functions, this research develops an equivalent truss frame model on a fluidic origami unit cell to analyze its fundamental elastic characteristics. Eigen-stiffness analysis based on this model reveals the primary modes of deformation and their relationships with initial folding configurations. Performances of the adaptive functions are correlated to the crease pattern design. In parallel to analytical studies, the feasibility of the morphing and stiffness tuning is also examined experimentally via a 3D printed multi-material prototype demonstrator. The research reported in this paper could lead to the synthesis of adaptive fluidic origami cellular metastructures or metamaterial systems for various engineering applications.

  10. Susceptibility to a metal under global warming is shaped by thermal adaptation along a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Dinh Van, Khuong; Janssens, Lizanne; Debecker, Sara; De Jonge, Maarten; Lambret, Philippe; Nilsson-Örtman, Viktor; Bervoets, Lieven; Stoks, Robby

    2013-09-01

    Global warming and contamination represent two major threats to biodiversity that have the potential to interact synergistically. There is the potential for gradual local thermal adaptation and dispersal to higher latitudes to mitigate the susceptibility of organisms to contaminants and global warming at high latitudes. Here, we applied a space-for-time substitution approach to study the thermal dependence of the susceptibility of Ischnura elegans damselfly larvae to zinc in a common garden warming experiment (20 and 24 °C) with replicated populations from three latitudes spanning >1500 km in Europe. We observed a striking latitude-specific effect of temperature on the zinc-induced mortality pattern; local thermal adaptation along the latitudinal gradient made Swedish, but not French, damselfly larvae more susceptible to zinc at 24 °C. Latitude- and temperature-specific differences in zinc susceptibility may be related to the amount of energy available to defend against and repair damage since Swedish larvae showed a much stronger zinc-induced reduction of food intake at 24 °C. The pattern of local thermal adaptation indicates that the predicted temperature increase of 4 °C by 2100 will strongly magnify the impact of a contaminant such as zinc at higher latitudes unless there is thermal evolution and/or migration of lower latitude genotypes. Our results underscore the critical importance of studying the susceptibility to contaminants under realistic warming scenarios taking into account local thermal adaptation across natural temperature gradients. PMID:23640735

  11. Susceptibility to a metal under global warming is shaped by thermal adaptation along a latitudinal gradient.

    PubMed

    Dinh Van, Khuong; Janssens, Lizanne; Debecker, Sara; De Jonge, Maarten; Lambret, Philippe; Nilsson-Örtman, Viktor; Bervoets, Lieven; Stoks, Robby

    2013-09-01

    Global warming and contamination represent two major threats to biodiversity that have the potential to interact synergistically. There is the potential for gradual local thermal adaptation and dispersal to higher latitudes to mitigate the susceptibility of organisms to contaminants and global warming at high latitudes. Here, we applied a space-for-time substitution approach to study the thermal dependence of the susceptibility of Ischnura elegans damselfly larvae to zinc in a common garden warming experiment (20 and 24 °C) with replicated populations from three latitudes spanning >1500 km in Europe. We observed a striking latitude-specific effect of temperature on the zinc-induced mortality pattern; local thermal adaptation along the latitudinal gradient made Swedish, but not French, damselfly larvae more susceptible to zinc at 24 °C. Latitude- and temperature-specific differences in zinc susceptibility may be related to the amount of energy available to defend against and repair damage since Swedish larvae showed a much stronger zinc-induced reduction of food intake at 24 °C. The pattern of local thermal adaptation indicates that the predicted temperature increase of 4 °C by 2100 will strongly magnify the impact of a contaminant such as zinc at higher latitudes unless there is thermal evolution and/or migration of lower latitude genotypes. Our results underscore the critical importance of studying the susceptibility to contaminants under realistic warming scenarios taking into account local thermal adaptation across natural temperature gradients.

  12. Shaping the Cities of Tomorrow: Integrating Local Urban Adaptation within an Environmental Framework

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Georgescu, M.

    2014-12-01

    Contemporary methods focused on increasing urban sustainability are largely based on the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions. While these efforts are essential steps forward, continued characterization of urban sustainability solely within a biogeochemical framework, with neglect of the biophysical impact of the built environment, omits regional hydroclimatic forcing of the same order of magnitude as greenhouse gas emissions. Using a suite of continuous, multi-year and multi-member continental scale numerical simulations with the WRF model for the U.S., we examine hydroclimatic impacts for a variety of U.S. urban expansion scenarios (for the year 2100) and urban adaptation futures (cool roofs, green roofs, and a hypothetical hybrid approach integrating biophysical properties of both cool and green roofs), and compare those to experiments utilizing a contemporary urban extent. Widespread adoption of adaptation strategies exhibits regionally and seasonally dependent hydroclimatic impacts. For some regions and seasons, urban-induced warming in excess of 3°C can be completely offset by all adaptation approaches examined. For other regions, widespread adoption of some adaptation approaches leads to significant rainfall decline. Sustainable urban expansion therefore requires an integrated assessment that also incorporates biophysically induced urban impacts, and demands tradeoff assessment of various strategies aimed to ameliorate deleterious consequences of growth (e.g., urban heat island reduction).

  13. Code OK2—A simulation code of ion-beam illumination on an arbitrary shape and structure target

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ogoyski, A. I.; Kawata, S.; Someya, T.

    2004-08-01

    For computer simulations on heavy ion beam (HIB) irradiation on a spherical fuel pellet in heavy ion fusion (HIF) the code OK1 was developed and presented in [Comput. Phys. Commun. 157 (2004) 160-172]. The new code OK2 is a modified upgraded computer program for more common purposes in research fields of medical treatment, material processing as well as HIF. OK2 provides computational capabilities of a three-dimensional ion beam energy deposition on a target with an arbitrary shape and structure. Program summaryTitle of program: OK2 Catalogue identifier: ADTZ Other versions of this program [1] : Title of the program: OK1 Catalogue identifier: ADST Program summary URL:http://cpc.cs.qub.as.uk/summaries/ADTZ Program obtainable from: CPC Program Library, Queen's University of Belfast, N. Ireland Computer: PC (Pentium 4, ˜1 GHz or more recommended) Operating system: Windows or UNIX Program language used: C++ Memory required to execute with typical data: 2048 MB No. of bits in a word: 32 No. of processors used: 1CPU Has the code been vectorized or parallelized: No No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data: 17 334 No of lines in distributed program, including test date: 1487 Distribution format: tar gzip file Nature of physical problem: In research areas of HIF (Heavy Ion Beam Inertial Fusion) energy [1-4] and medical material sciences [5], ion energy deposition profiles need to be evaluated and calculated precisely. Due to a favorable energy deposition behavior of ions in matter [1-4] it is expected that ion beams would be one of preferable candidates in various fields including HIF and material processing. Especially in HIF for a successful fuel ignition and a sufficient fusion energy release, a stringent requirement is imposed on the HIB irradiation non-uniformity, which should be less than a few percent [4,6,7]. In order to meet this requirement we need to evaluate the uniformity of a realistic HIB irradiation and energy deposition pattern. The HIB

  14. A method for robust segmentation of arbitrarily shaped radiopaque structures in cone-beam CT projections1

    PubMed Central

    Poulsen, Per Rugaard; Fledelius, Walther; Keall, Paul J.; Weiss, Elisabeth; Lu, Jun; Brackbill, Emily; Hugo, Geoffrey D.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Implanted markers are commonly used in radiotherapy for x-ray based target localization. The projected marker position in a series of cone-beam CT (CBCT) projections can be used to estimate the three dimensional (3D) target trajectory during the CBCT acquisition. This has important applications in tumor motion management such as motion inclusive, gating, and tumor tracking strategies. However, for irregularly shaped markers, reliable segmentation is challenged by large variations in the marker shape with projection angle. The purpose of this study was to develop a semiautomated method for robust and reliable segmentation of arbitrarily shaped radiopaque markers in CBCT projections. Methods: The segmentation method involved the following three steps: (1) Threshold based segmentation of the marker in three to six selected projections with large angular separation, good marker contrast, and uniform background; (2) construction of a 3D marker model by coalignment and backprojection of the threshold-based segmentations; and (3) construction of marker templates at all imaging angles by projection of the 3D model and use of these templates for template-based segmentation. The versatility of the segmentation method was demonstrated by segmentation of the following structures in the projections from two clinical CBCT scans: (1) Three linear fiducial markers (Visicoil) implanted in or near a lung tumor and (2) an artificial cardiac valve in a lung cancer patient. Results: Automatic marker segmentation was obtained in more than 99.9% of the cases. The segmentation failed in a few cases where the marker was either close to a structure of similar appearance or hidden behind a dense structure (data cable). Conclusions: A robust template-based method for segmentation of arbitrarily shaped radiopaque markers in CBCT projections was developed. PMID:21626948

  15. Investigation on adaptive wing structure based on shape memory polymer composite hinge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Yuemin; Li, Xinbo; Zhang, Wei; Leng, Jinsong

    2007-07-01

    This paper describes the design and investigation of the SMP composite hinge and the morphing wing structure. The SMP composite hinge was based on SMP and carbon fiber fabric. The twisting recoverability of it was investigated by heating and then cooling repeatedly above and below the Tg. The twisting recoverability characterized by the twisting angle. Results show that the SMP composite hinge have good shape recoverability, Recovery time has a great influence on the twisting recoverability. The twisting recovery ratio became large with the increment of recovery time. The morphing wing can changes shape for different tasks. For the advantages of great recovery force and stable performances, we adopt SMP composite hinge as actuator to apply into the structure of the wing which can realize draw back wings to change sweep angle according to the speed and other requirements of military airplanes. Finally, a series of simulations and experiments are performed to investigate the deformations of morphing wings have been performed successfully. It can be seen that the sweep angle change became large with the increment of initial angle. The area reduction became large with the increment of initial angle, but after 75° the area reduction became smaller and smaller. The deformations of the triangle wing became large with the increment of temperature. The area and the sweep angle of wings can be controlled by adjusting the stimulate temperature and the initial twisting angle of shape memory polymer composite hinge.

  16. Laser beam deflection monitoring of Nd: YAG laser ablation: pulse shape and repetition rate effects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Diaci, Janez; Možina, Janez

    1993-05-01

    The laser beam deflection probe has been employed to study blast waves generated during ablation of metallic surfaces by sequences of 1.06 μm Nd:YAG laser pulses separated by less than 1μs. A fluence threshold has been found, below which the effects of individual pulses can be resolved by the laser probe. Above that, the deflection signal has a similar form as if the surface were irradiated with a single pulse. Analysis of the signals in terms of the spherical blast wave theory shows that a pulse sequence generates a weaker blast wave than a single pulse of equal total energy. On the other hand, the sequence yields a higher etch depth than the single pulse.

  17. Effects of higher order aberrations on beam shape in an optical recording system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wang, Mark S.; Milster, Tom D.

    1992-01-01

    An unexpected irradiance pattern in the detector plane of an optical data storage system was observed. Through wavefront measurement and scalar diffraction modeling, it was discovered that the energy redistribution is due to residual third-order and fifth-order spherical aberration of the objective lens and cover-plate assembly. The amount of residual aberration is small, and the beam focused on the disk would be considered diffraction limited by several criteria. Since the detector is not in the focal plane, even this small amount of aberration has a significant effect on the energy distribution. We show that the energy redistribution can adversely affect focus error signals, which are responsible for maintaining sub-micron spot diameters on the spinning disk.

  18. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions. PMID:26561090

  19. Fast spatial beam shaping by acousto-optic diffraction for 3D non-linear microscopy.

    PubMed

    Akemann, Walther; Léger, Jean-François; Ventalon, Cathie; Mathieu, Benjamin; Dieudonné, Stéphane; Bourdieu, Laurent

    2015-11-01

    Acousto-optic deflection (AOD) devices offer unprecedented fast control of the entire spatial structure of light beams, most notably their phase. AOD light modulation of ultra-short laser pulses, however, is not straightforward to implement because of intrinsic chromatic dispersion and non-stationarity of acousto-optic diffraction. While schemes exist to compensate chromatic dispersion, non-stationarity remains an obstacle. In this work we demonstrate an efficient AOD light modulator for stable phase modulation using time-locked generation of frequency-modulated acoustic waves at the full repetition rate of a high power laser pulse amplifier of 80 kHz. We establish the non-local relationship between the optical phase and the generating acoustic frequency function and verify the system for temporal stability, phase accuracy and generation of non-linear two-dimensional phase functions.

  20. Optimized mirror shape tuning using beam weightings based on distance, angle of incidence, reflectivity, and power.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Kenneth A; Yashchuk, Valeriy V

    2016-05-01

    For glancing-incidence optical systems, such as short-wavelength optics used for nano-focusing, incorporating physical factors in the calculations used for shape optimization can improve performance. Wavefront metrology, including the measurement of a mirror's shape or slope, is routinely used as input for mirror figure optimization on mirrors that can be bent, actuated, positioned, or aligned. Modeling shows that when the incident power distribution, distance from focus, angle of incidence, and the spatially varying reflectivity are included in the optimization, higher Strehl ratios can be achieved. Following the works of Maréchal and Mahajan, optimization of the Strehl ratio (for peak intensity with a coherently illuminated system) occurs when the expectation value of the phase error's variance is minimized. We describe an optimization procedure based on regression analysis that incorporates these physical parameters. This approach is suitable for coherently illuminated systems of nearly diffraction-limited quality. Mathematically, this work is an enhancement of the methods commonly applied for ex situ alignment based on uniform weighting of all points on the surface (or a sub-region of the surface). It follows a similar approach to the optimization of apodized and non-uniformly illuminated optical systems. Significantly, it reaches a different conclusion than a more recent approach based on minimization of focal plane ray errors. PMID:27250372

  1. Optimized mirror shape tuning using beam weightings based on distance, angle of incidence, reflectivity, and power.

    PubMed

    Goldberg, Kenneth A; Yashchuk, Valeriy V

    2016-05-01

    For glancing-incidence optical systems, such as short-wavelength optics used for nano-focusing, incorporating physical factors in the calculations used for shape optimization can improve performance. Wavefront metrology, including the measurement of a mirror's shape or slope, is routinely used as input for mirror figure optimization on mirrors that can be bent, actuated, positioned, or aligned. Modeling shows that when the incident power distribution, distance from focus, angle of incidence, and the spatially varying reflectivity are included in the optimization, higher Strehl ratios can be achieved. Following the works of Maréchal and Mahajan, optimization of the Strehl ratio (for peak intensity with a coherently illuminated system) occurs when the expectation value of the phase error's variance is minimized. We describe an optimization procedure based on regression analysis that incorporates these physical parameters. This approach is suitable for coherently illuminated systems of nearly diffraction-limited quality. Mathematically, this work is an enhancement of the methods commonly applied for ex situ alignment based on uniform weighting of all points on the surface (or a sub-region of the surface). It follows a similar approach to the optimization of apodized and non-uniformly illuminated optical systems. Significantly, it reaches a different conclusion than a more recent approach based on minimization of focal plane ray errors.

  2. Improved compressed sensing-based cone-beam CT reconstruction using adaptive prior image constraints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Ho; Xing, Lei; Davidi, Ran; Li, Ruijiang; Qian, Jianguo; Lee, Rena

    2012-04-01

    Volumetric cone-beam CT (CBCT) images are acquired repeatedly during a course of radiation therapy and a natural question to ask is whether CBCT images obtained earlier in the process can be utilized as prior knowledge to reduce patient imaging dose in subsequent scans. The purpose of this work is to develop an adaptive prior image constrained compressed sensing (APICCS) method to solve this problem. Reconstructed images using full projections are taken on the first day of radiation therapy treatment and are used as prior images. The subsequent scans are acquired using a protocol of sparse projections. In the proposed APICCS algorithm, the prior images are utilized as an initial guess and are incorporated into the objective function in the compressed sensing (CS)-based iterative reconstruction process. Furthermore, the prior information is employed to detect any possible mismatched regions between the prior and current images for improved reconstruction. For this purpose, the prior images and the reconstructed images are classified into three anatomical regions: air, soft tissue and bone. Mismatched regions are identified by local differences of the corresponding groups in the two classified sets of images. A distance transformation is then introduced to convert the information into an adaptive voxel-dependent relaxation map. In constructing the relaxation map, the matched regions (unchanged anatomy) between the prior and current images are assigned with smaller weight values, which are translated into less influence on the CS iterative reconstruction process. On the other hand, the mismatched regions (changed anatomy) are associated with larger values and the regions are updated more by the new projection data, thus avoiding any possible adverse effects of prior images. The APICCS approach was systematically assessed by using patient data acquired under standard and low-dose protocols for qualitative and quantitative comparisons. The APICCS method provides an

  3. Design of an adaptive controller for dive-plane control of a torpedo-shaped AUV

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Jian; Su, Yumin; Zhao, Jinxin

    2011-09-01

    Underwater vehicles operating in complex ocean conditions present difficulties in determining accurate dynamic models. To guarantee robustness against parameter uncertainty, an adaptive controller for dive-plane control, based on Lyapunov theory and back-stepping techniques, was proposed. In the closed-loop system, asymptotic tracking of the reference depth and pitch angle trajectories was accomplished. Simulation results were presented which show effective dive-plane control in spite of the uncertainties in the system parameters.

  4. Feasibility of sealed D-T neutron generator as neutron source for liver BNCT and its beam shaping assembly.

    PubMed

    Liu, Zheng; Li, Gang; Liu, Linmao

    2014-04-01

    This paper involves the feasibility of boron neutron capture therapy (BNCT) for liver tumor with four sealed neutron generators as neutron source. Two generators are placed on each side of the liver. The high energy of these emitted neutrons should be reduced by designing a beam shaping assembly (BSA) to make them useable for BNCT. However, the neutron flux decreases as neutrons pass through different materials of BSA. Therefore, it is essential to find ways to increase the neutron flux. In this paper, the feasibility of using low enrichment uranium as a neutron multiplier is investigated to increase the number of neutrons emitted from D-T neutron generators. The neutron spectrum related to our system has a proper epithermal flux, and the fast and thermal neutron fluxes comply with the IAEA recommended values.

  5. Population variability in biological adaptive responses to DNA damage and the shapes of carcinogen dose-response curves

    SciTech Connect

    Conolly, Rory B. . E-mail: Conolly.Rory@epa.gov; Gaylor, David W.; Lutz, Werner K.

    2005-09-01

    Carcinogen dose-response curves for both ionizing radiation and chemicals are typically assumed to be linear at environmentally relevant doses. This assumption is used to ensure protection of the public health in the absence of relevant dose-response data. A theoretical justification for the assumption has been provided by the argument that low dose linearity is expected when an exogenous agent adds to an ongoing endogenous process. Here, we use computational modeling to evaluate (1) how two biological adaptive processes, induction of DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, may affect the shapes of dose-response curves for DNA-damaging carcinogens and (2) how the resulting dose-response behaviors may vary within a population. Each model incorporating an adaptive process was capable of generating not only monotonic dose-responses but also nonmonotonic (J-shaped) and threshold responses. Monte Carlo analysis suggested that all these dose-response behaviors could coexist within a population, as the spectrum of qualitative differences arose from quantitative changes in parameter values. While this analysis is largely theoretical, it suggests that (a) accurate prediction of the qualitative form of the dose-response requires a quantitative understanding of the mechanism (b) significant uncertainty is associated with human health risk prediction in the absence of such quantitative understanding and (c) a stronger experimental and regulatory focus on biological mechanisms and interindividual variability would allow flexibility in regulatory treatment of environmental carcinogens without compromising human health.

  6. Mutation of a cuticular protein, BmorCPR2, alters larval body shape and adaptability in silkworm, Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Qiao, Liang; Xiong, Gao; Wang, Ri-xin; He, Song-zhen; Chen, Jie; Tong, Xiao-ling; Hu, Hai; Li, Chun-lin; Gai, Ting-ting; Xin, Ya-qun; Liu, Xiao-fan; Chen, Bin; Xiang, Zhong-huai; Lu, Cheng; Dai, Fang-yin

    2014-04-01

    Cuticular proteins (CPs) are crucial components of the insect cuticle. Although numerous genes encoding cuticular proteins have been identified in known insect genomes to date, their functions in maintaining insect body shape and adaptability remain largely unknown. In the current study, positional cloning led to the identification of a gene encoding an RR1-type cuticular protein, BmorCPR2, highly expressed in larval chitin-rich tissues and at the mulberry leaf-eating stages, which is responsible for the silkworm stony mutant. In the Dazao-stony strain, the BmorCPR2 allele is a deletion mutation with significantly lower expression, compared to the wild-type Dazao strain. Dysfunctional BmorCPR2 in the stony mutant lost chitin binding ability, leading to reduced chitin content in larval cuticle, limitation of cuticle extension, abatement of cuticle tensile properties, and aberrant ratio between internodes and intersegmental folds. These variations induce a significant decrease in cuticle capacity to hold the growing internal organs in the larval development process, resulting in whole-body stiffness, tightness, and hardness, bulging intersegmental folds, and serious defects in larval adaptability. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report the corresponding phenotype of stony in insects caused by mutation of RR1-type cuticular protein. Our findings collectively shed light on the specific role of cuticular proteins in maintaining normal larval body shape and will aid in the development of pest control strategies for the management of Lepidoptera. PMID:24514903

  7. Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster.

    PubMed

    Williams, Caroline M; Watanabe, Miki; Guarracino, Mario R; Ferraro, Maria B; Edison, Arthur S; Morgan, Theodore J; Boroujerdi, Arezue F B; Hahn, Daniel A

    2014-12-01

    When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it difficult to decisively test adaptive hypotheses. We use replicated lines of Drosophila melanogaster selected in the laboratory for fast (hardy) or slow (susceptible) chill-coma recovery times to investigate modifications to metabolic profiles associated with cold adaptation. We measured metabolite concentrations of flies before, during, and after cold exposure using nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy to test the hypotheses that hardy flies maintain metabolic homeostasis better during cold exposure and recovery, and that their metabolic networks are more robust to cold-induced perturbations. The metabolites of cold-hardy flies were less cold responsive and their metabolic networks during cold exposure were more robust, supporting our hypotheses. Metabolites involved in membrane lipid synthesis, tryptophan metabolism, oxidative stress, energy balance, and proline metabolism were altered by selection on cold tolerance. We discuss the potential significance of these alterations.

  8. Cold adaptation shapes the robustness of metabolic networks in Drosophila melanogaster

    PubMed Central

    Williams, CM; Watanabe, M; Guarracino, MR; Ferraro, MB; Edison, AS; Morgan, TJ; Boroujerdi, AFB; Hahn, DA

    2015-01-01

    When ectotherms are exposed to low temperatures, they enter a cold-induced coma (chill coma) that prevents resource acquisition, mating, oviposition, and escape from predation. There is substantial variation in time taken to recover from chill coma both within and among species, and this variation is correlated with habitat temperatures such that insects from cold environments recover more quickly. This suggests an adaptive response, but the mechanisms underlying variation in recovery times are unknown, making it difficult to decisively test adaptive hypotheses. We use replicated lines of Drosophila melanogaster selected in the laboratory for fast (hardy) or slow (susceptible) chill-coma recovery times to investigate modifications to metabolic profiles associated with cold adaptation. We measured metabolite concentrations of flies before, during, and after cold exposure using NMR spectroscopy to test the hypotheses that hardy flies maintain metabolic homeostasis better during cold exposure and recovery, and that their metabolic networks are more robust to cold-induced perturbations. The metabolites of cold-hardy flies were less cold responsive and their metabolic networks during cold exposure were more robust, supporting our hypotheses. Metabolites involved in membrane lipid synthesis, tryptophan metabolism, oxidative stress, energy balance, and proline metabolism were altered by selection on cold tolerance. We discuss the potential significance of these alterations. PMID:25308124

  9. Adaptive Radiotherapy for Prostate Cancer Using Kilovoltage Cone-Beam Computed Tomography: First Clinical Results

    SciTech Connect

    Nijkamp, Jasper; Pos, Floris J. Nuver, Tonnis T.; Jong, Rianne de; Remeijer, Peter; Sonke, Jan-Jakob; Lebesque, Joos V.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the first clinical results of an off-line adaptive radiotherapy (ART) protocol for prostate cancer using kilovoltage cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in combination with a diet and mild laxatives. Methods and Materials: Twenty-three patients began treatment with a planning target volume (PTV) margin of 10 mm. The CBCT scans acquired during the first six fractions were used to generate an average prostate clinical target volume (AV-CTV), and average rectum (AV-Rect). Using these structures, a new treatment plan was generated with a 7-mm PTV margin. Weekly CBCT scans were used to monitor the CTV coverage. A diet and mild laxatives were introduced to improve image quality and reduce prostate motion. Results: Twenty patients were treated with conform ART protocol. For these patients, 91% of the CBCT scans could be used to calculate the AV-CTV and AV-Rect. In 96% of the follow-up CBCT scans, the CTV was located within the average PTV. In the remaining 4%, the prostate extended the PTV by a maximum of 1 mm. Systematic and random errors for organ motion were reduced by a factor of two compared with historical data without diet and laxatives. An average PTV reduction of 29% was achieved. The volume of the AV-Rect that received >65 Gy was reduced by 19%. The mean dose to the anal wall was reduced on average by 4.8 Gy. Conclusions: We safely reduced the high-dose region by 29%. The reduction in irradiated volume led to a significant reduction in the dose to the rectum. The diet and laxatives improved the image quality and tended to reduce prostate motion.

  10. Robust breathing signal extraction from cone beam CT projections based on adaptive and global optimization techniques.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ming; Wei, Jie; Li, Tianfang; Yuan, Yading; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-04-21

    We present a study of extracting respiratory signals from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections within the framework of the Amsterdam Shroud (AS) technique. Acquired prior to the radiotherapy treatment, CBCT projections were preprocessed for contrast enhancement by converting the original intensity images to attenuation images with which the AS image was created. An adaptive robust z-normalization filtering was applied to further augment the weak oscillating structures locally. From the enhanced AS image, the respiratory signal was extracted using a two-step optimization approach to effectively reveal the large-scale regularity of the breathing signals. CBCT projection images from five patients acquired with the Varian Onboard Imager on the Clinac iX System Linear Accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were employed to assess the proposed technique. Stable breathing signals can be reliably extracted using the proposed algorithm. Reference waveforms obtained using an air bellows belt (Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH) were exported and compared to those with the AS based signals. The average errors for the enrolled patients between the estimated breath per minute (bpm) and the reference waveform bpm can be as low as -0.07 with the standard deviation 1.58. The new algorithm outperformed the original AS technique for all patients by 8.5% to 30%. The impact of gantry rotation on the breathing signal was assessed with data acquired with a Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, Canada) and found to be minimal on the signal frequency. The new technique developed in this work will provide a practical solution to rendering markerless breathing signal using the CBCT projections for thoracic and abdominal patients.

  11. Robust breathing signal extraction from cone beam CT projections based on adaptive and global optimization techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chao, Ming; Wei, Jie; Li, Tianfang; Yuan, Yading; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E.; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-04-01

    We present a study of extracting respiratory signals from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections within the framework of the Amsterdam Shroud (AS) technique. Acquired prior to the radiotherapy treatment, CBCT projections were preprocessed for contrast enhancement by converting the original intensity images to attenuation images with which the AS image was created. An adaptive robust z-normalization filtering was applied to further augment the weak oscillating structures locally. From the enhanced AS image, the respiratory signal was extracted using a two-step optimization approach to effectively reveal the large-scale regularity of the breathing signals. CBCT projection images from five patients acquired with the Varian Onboard Imager on the Clinac iX System Linear Accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were employed to assess the proposed technique. Stable breathing signals can be reliably extracted using the proposed algorithm. Reference waveforms obtained using an air bellows belt (Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH) were exported and compared to those with the AS based signals. The average errors for the enrolled patients between the estimated breath per minute (bpm) and the reference waveform bpm can be as low as  -0.07 with the standard deviation 1.58. The new algorithm outperformed the original AS technique for all patients by 8.5% to 30%. The impact of gantry rotation on the breathing signal was assessed with data acquired with a Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, Canada) and found to be minimal on the signal frequency. The new technique developed in this work will provide a practical solution to rendering markerless breathing signal using the CBCT projections for thoracic and abdominal patients.

  12. Robust breathing signal extraction from cone beam CT projections based on adaptive and global optimization techniques.

    PubMed

    Chao, Ming; Wei, Jie; Li, Tianfang; Yuan, Yading; Rosenzweig, Kenneth E; Lo, Yeh-Chi

    2016-04-21

    We present a study of extracting respiratory signals from cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) projections within the framework of the Amsterdam Shroud (AS) technique. Acquired prior to the radiotherapy treatment, CBCT projections were preprocessed for contrast enhancement by converting the original intensity images to attenuation images with which the AS image was created. An adaptive robust z-normalization filtering was applied to further augment the weak oscillating structures locally. From the enhanced AS image, the respiratory signal was extracted using a two-step optimization approach to effectively reveal the large-scale regularity of the breathing signals. CBCT projection images from five patients acquired with the Varian Onboard Imager on the Clinac iX System Linear Accelerator (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) were employed to assess the proposed technique. Stable breathing signals can be reliably extracted using the proposed algorithm. Reference waveforms obtained using an air bellows belt (Philips Medical Systems, Cleveland, OH) were exported and compared to those with the AS based signals. The average errors for the enrolled patients between the estimated breath per minute (bpm) and the reference waveform bpm can be as low as -0.07 with the standard deviation 1.58. The new algorithm outperformed the original AS technique for all patients by 8.5% to 30%. The impact of gantry rotation on the breathing signal was assessed with data acquired with a Quasar phantom (Modus Medical Devices Inc., London, Canada) and found to be minimal on the signal frequency. The new technique developed in this work will provide a practical solution to rendering markerless breathing signal using the CBCT projections for thoracic and abdominal patients. PMID:27008349

  13. Spontaneous decoration of Au nanoparticles on micro-patterned reduced graphene oxide shaped by focused laser beam

    SciTech Connect

    Wan, Y. C.; Tok, E. S.; Teoh, H. F.; Sow, C. H.

    2015-02-07

    We report a facile, two-step method for the micro-landscaping of Au nanoparticles(NPs) on reduced graphene oxide (rGO) film en route to micro-patterned Au(NPs)-rGO hybrid functional materials. This method employs a focused laser beam to first locally convert GO to rGO before immersing the micro-patterned GO-rGO film into HAuCl{sub 4} solution. The rGO micro-pattern, shaped by the focused laser beam, serves as nucleation sites for the reduction of Au ions. The reduction mechanism that governs the decoration of Au NPs on rGO films is akin to electroless deposition process. In this instance, surface charges that are formed during laser reduction of GO to rGO provide active nucleation sites for Au{sup 3+} ions to form Au NPs when HAuCl{sub 4} solution is introduced. The number density, the size, and size distribution of the Au NPs can thus be directly tuned and preferentially anchored onto the rGO micro-pattern by varying the incident laser power, the scanning speed of the laser, or the concentration of HAuCl{sub 4}. The resulting hybrid materials can be used as a substrate for Surface Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (SERS). Using Rhodamine 6G as the test subject, we found an improvement of SERS enhancement over bare rGO of up to four times, depending on the size of the Au NPs.

  14. Laser Beam Shaping For Lithography on Inclined and Curved Surfaces Using a liquid crystal Spatial Light Modulator

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gatabi, Javad R.; Geerts, Wilhelmus; Tamir, Dan; Pandey, Kumar

    2013-03-01

    An exposure tool for lithography on non-flat substrates that includes a real time photoresist thickness and surface topography monitor is under development at Texas State University. Exposure dose and focusing are corrected on curved parts of the sample using novel laser beam shaping techniques: two approaches using a Holoeye liquid crystal spatial light modulator (LC-SLM) are being investigated: (1) the implementation of multiple lenses with different focal lengths to split the beam into several parts and keeping each part in focus depending on sample topography; (2) the implementation of a tilted lens function resulting in a tilt of the image plane. Image quality is limited by quantization aberration, caused by the phase modulator's bit depth limitation, and pixelation aberration, caused by the modulator's pixel size. A statistical analysis on lenses with different focal lengths provides a detailed description of the mentioned aberrations. The image quality, i.e. resolution and contrast of both techniques, are determined from developed photoresist patterns on curved samples and compared to the theory.

  15. Beam shaping assembly of a D-T neutron source for BNCT and its dosimetry simulation in deeply-seated tumor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Faghihi, F.; Khalili, S.

    2013-08-01

    This article involves two aims for BNCT. First case includes a beam shaping assembly estimation for a D-T neutron source to find epi-thermal neutrons which are the goal in the BNCT. Second issue is the percent depth dose calculation in the adult Snyder head phantom. Monte-Carlo simulations and verification of a suggested beam shaping assembly (including internal neutron multiplier, moderator, filter, external neutron multiplier, collimator, and reflector dimensions) for thermalizing a D-T neutron source as well as increasing neutron flux are carried out and our results are given herein. Finally, we have simulated its corresponding doses for treatment planning of a deeply-seated tumor.

  16. GaN nanowires with pentagon shape cross-section by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy

    DOE PAGES

    Lin, Yong; Leung, Benjamin; Li, Qiming; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-07-14

    In this study, ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) was used to grow catalyst-assisted GaN nanowires on (11¯02) r-plane sapphire substrates. Dislocation free [112¯0] oriented nanowires are formed with pentagon shape cross-section, instead of the usual triangular shape facet configuration. Specifically, the cross-section is the result of the additional two nonpolar {101¯0} side facets, which appear due to a decrease in relative growth rate of the {101¯0} facets to the {101¯1} and {101¯1} facets under the growth regime in NH3-MBE. Compared to GaN nanowires grown by Ni-catalyzed metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, the NH3-MBE grown GaN nanowires show more than an ordermore » of magnitude increase in band-edge to yellow luminescence intensity ratio, as measured by cathodoluminescence, indicating improved microstructural and optical properties.« less

  17. GaN nanowires with pentagon shape cross-section by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Yong; Leung, Benjamin; Li, Qiming; Figiel, Jeffrey J.; Wang, George T.

    2015-07-14

    In this study, ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy (NH3-MBE) was used to grow catalyst-assisted GaN nanowires on (11¯02) r-plane sapphire substrates. Dislocation free [112¯0] oriented nanowires are formed with pentagon shape cross-section, instead of the usual triangular shape facet configuration. Specifically, the cross-section is the result of the additional two nonpolar {101¯0} side facets, which appear due to a decrease in relative growth rate of the {101¯0} facets to the {101¯1} and {101¯1} facets under the growth regime in NH3-MBE. Compared to GaN nanowires grown by Ni-catalyzed metal–organic chemical vapor deposition, the NH3-MBE grown GaN nanowires show more than an order of magnitude increase in band-edge to yellow luminescence intensity ratio, as measured by cathodoluminescence, indicating improved microstructural and optical properties.

  18. Investigation Into the Optimum Beam Shape and Fluence for Selective Ablation of Dental Calculus at lambda = 400 nm

    SciTech Connect

    Schoenly, J.E.; Seka. W.; Rechmann, P.

    2010-02-25

    A frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser is shown to selectively ablate dental calculus. The optimal transverse shape of the laser beam, including its variability under water-cooling, is determined for selective ablation of dental calculus. Intensity profiles under various water-cooling conditions were optically observed. The 400-nm laser was coupled into a multimode optical fiber using an f = 2.5-cm lens and light-shaping diffuser. Water-cooling was supplied coaxially around the fiber. Five human tooth samples (four with calculus and one pristine) were irradiated perpendicular to the tooth surface while the tooth was moved back and forth at 0.3 mm/second, varying between 20 and 180 iterations. The teeth were imaged before and after irradiation using light microscopy with a flashing blue light-emitting diode (LED). An environmental scanning electron microscope imaged each tooth after irradiation. High-order super-Gaussian intensity profiles are observed at the output of a fiber coiled around a 4-in. diameter drum. Super-Gaussian beams have a morehomogenous fluence distribution than Gaussian beams and have a higher energy efficiency for selective ablation. Coaxial water-cooling does not noticeably distort the intensity distribution within 1 mm from the optical fiber. In contrast, lasers focused to a Gaussian cross section (<=50-mm diameter) without fiber propagation and cooled by a water spray are heavily distorted and may lead to variable ablation. Calculus is preferentially ablated at high fluences (>= 2 J/cm^2); below this fluence, stalling occurs because of photo-bleaching of the calculus. Healthy dental hard tissue is not removed at fluences <=3 J/cm^2. Supplying laser light to a tooth using an optical fiber with coaxial water-cooling is determined to be the most appropriate method when selectively removing calculus with a frequency-doubled Ti:sapphire laser. Fluences over 2 J/cm^2 are required to remove calculus efficiently since photo-bleaching stalls calculus

  19. A Mode-Shape-Based Fault Detection Methodology for Cantilever Beams

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tejada, Arturo

    2009-01-01

    An important goal of NASA's Internal Vehicle Health Management program (IVHM) is to develop and verify methods and technologies for fault detection in critical airframe structures. A particularly promising new technology under development at NASA Langley Research Center is distributed Bragg fiber optic strain sensors. These sensors can be embedded in, for instance, aircraft wings to continuously monitor surface strain during flight. Strain information can then be used in conjunction with well-known vibrational techniques to detect faults due to changes in the wing's physical parameters or to the presence of incipient cracks. To verify the benefits of this technology, the Formal Methods Group at NASA LaRC has proposed the use of formal verification tools such as PVS. The verification process, however, requires knowledge of the physics and mathematics of the vibrational techniques and a clear understanding of the particular fault detection methodology. This report presents a succinct review of the physical principles behind the modeling of vibrating structures such as cantilever beams (the natural model of a wing). It also reviews two different classes of fault detection techniques and proposes a particular detection method for cracks in wings, which is amenable to formal verification. A prototype implementation of these methods using Matlab scripts is also described and is related to the fundamental theoretical concepts.

  20. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication (EBF3) for Cost Effective Near-Net Shape Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Manufacturing of structural metal parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data has been investigated by numerous researchers over the past decade. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a new solid freeform fabrication process, electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3), as a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. EBF3 deposits of 2219 aluminium and Ti-6Al-4V have exhibited a range of grain morphologies depending upon the deposition parameters. These materials have exhibited excellent tensile properties comparable to typical handbook data for wrought plate product after post-processing heat treatments. The EBF3 process is capable of bulk metal deposition at deposition rates in excess of 2500 cubic centimeters per hour (150 in3/hr) or finer detail at lower deposition rates, depending upon the desired application. This process offers the potential for rapidly adding structural details to simpler cast or forged structures rather than the conventional approach of machining large volumes of chips to produce a monolithic metallic structure. Selective addition of metal onto simpler blanks of material can have a significant effect on lead time reduction and lower material and machining costs.

  1. Electron Beam Freeform Fabrication for Cost Effective Near-Net Shape Manufacturing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Taminger, Karen M.; Hafley, Robert A.

    2006-01-01

    Manufacturing of structural metal parts directly from computer aided design (CAD) data has been investigated by numerous researchers over the past decade. Researchers at NASA Langley Research Center are developing a new solid freeform fabrication process, electron beam freeform fabrication (EBF3), as a rapid metal deposition process that works efficiently with a variety of weldable alloys. EBF3 deposits of 2219 aluminium and Ti-6Al-4V have exhibited a range of grain morphologies depending upon the deposition parameters. These materials have exhibited excellent tensile properties comparable to typical handbook data for wrought plate product after post-processing heat treatments. The EBF3 process is capable of bulk metal deposition at deposition rates in excess of 2500 cm3/hr (150 in3/hr) or finer detail at lower deposition rates, depending upon the desired application. This process offers the potential for rapidly adding structural details to simpler cast or forged structures rather than the conventional approach of machining large volumes of chips to produce a monolithic metallic structure. Selective addition of metal onto simpler blanks of material can have a significant effect on lead time reduction and lower material and machining costs.

  2. A spiral-shaped harvester with an improved harvesting element and an adaptive storage circuit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongping; Xue, Huan; Hu, Yuantai

    2007-06-01

    A piezoelectric energy harvester consists of a spiral-shaped piezoelectric bimorph to transfer mechanical energy into electric energy, an electrochemical battery to store the scavenged electric energy, and a rectifier together with a step-down dc-dc converter to connect the two components as an integrated system. A spiral-shaped harvesting structure is studied in this paper because it is very useful in the microminiaturization of advanced sensing technology. The aim of employing a step-down dc-dc converter in the storage circuit is to match the optimal output voltage of the piezoelectric bimorph with the battery voltage for efficient charging. In order to raise the output power density of a harvesting element, moreover, we apply a synchronized switch harvesting on inductor (SSHI) in parallel with the piezoelectric bimorph to artificially extend the closed-circuit interval of the rectifier. Numerical results show that the introduction of a dc-dc converter in the storage circuit or a SSHI in the harvesting structure can raise the charging efficiency several times higher than a harvester without a dc-dc converter or an SSHI.

  3. Inquiry in interaction: How local adaptations of curricula shape classroom communities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enyedy, Noel; Goldberg, Jennifer

    2004-11-01

    In this study, we seek a better understanding of how individuals and their daily interactions shape and reshape social structures that constitute a classroom community. Moreover, we provide insight into how discourse and classroom interactions shape the nature of a learning community, as well as which aspects of the classroom culture may be consequential for learning. The participants in this study include two teachers who are implementing a new environmental science program, Global Learning through Observation to Benefit the Environment (GLOBE), and interacting with 54 children in an urban middle school. Both qualitative and quantitative data are analyzed and presented. To gain a better understanding of the inquiry teaching within classroom communities, we compare and contrast the discourse and interactions of the two teachers during three parallel environmental science lessons. The focus of our analysis includes (1) how the community identifies the object or goal of its activity; and (2) how the rights, rules, and roles for members are established and inhabited in interaction. Quantitative analyses of student pre- and posttests suggest greater learning for students in one classroom over the other, providing support for the influence of the classroom community and interactional choices of the teacher on student learning. Implications of the findings from this study are discussed in the context of curricular design, professional development, and educational reform. ? 2004 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Res Sci Teach 41: 905-935, 2004.

  4. A spiral-shaped harvester with an improved harvesting element and an adaptive storage circuit.

    PubMed

    Hu, Hongping; Xue, Huan; Hu, Yuantai

    2007-06-01

    A piezoelectric energy harvester consists of a spiral-shaped piezoelectric bimorph to transfer mechanical energy into electric energy, an electrochemical battery to store the scavenged electric energy, and a rectifier together with a step-down dc-dc converter to connect the two components as an integrated system. A spiral-shaped harvesting structure is studied in this paper because it is very useful in the microminiaturization of advanced sensing technology. The aim of employing a step-down dc-dc converter in the storage circuit is to match the optimal output voltage of the piezoelectric bimorph with the battery voltage for efficient charging. In order to raise the output power density of a harvesting element, moreover, we apply a synchronized switch harvesting on inductor (SSHI) in parallel with the piezoelectric bimorph to artificially extend the closed-circuit interval of the rectifier. Numerical results show that the introduction of a dc-dc converter in the storage circuit or a SSHI in the harvesting structure can raise the charging efficiency several times higher than a harvester without a dc-dc converter or an SSHI. PMID:17571816

  5. Eco-physiological adaptation shapes the response of calcifying algae to nutrient limitation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Šupraha, Luka; Gerecht, Andrea C.; Probert, Ian; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2015-11-01

    The steady increase in global ocean temperature will most likely lead to nutrient limitation in the photic zone. This will impact the physiology of marine algae, including the globally important calcifying coccolithophores. Understanding their adaptive patterns is essential for modelling carbon production in a low-nutrient ocean. We investigated the physiology of Helicosphaera carteri, a representative of the abundant but under-investigated flagellated functional group of coccolithophores. Two strains isolated from contrasting nutrient regimes (South Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea) were grown in phosphorus-replete and phosphorus-limited batch cultures. While growing exponentially in a phosphorus-replete medium, the Mediterranean strain exhibited on average 24% lower growth rate, 36% larger coccosphere volume and 21% lower particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) production than the Atlantic strain. Under phosphorus limitation, the same strain was capable of reaching a 2.6 times higher cell density than the Atlantic strain due to lower phosphorus requirements. These results suggest that local physiological adaptation can define the performance of this species under nutrient limitation.

  6. Eco-physiological adaptation shapes the response of calcifying algae to nutrient limitation

    PubMed Central

    Šupraha, Luka; Gerecht, Andrea C.; Probert, Ian; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2015-01-01

    The steady increase in global ocean temperature will most likely lead to nutrient limitation in the photic zone. This will impact the physiology of marine algae, including the globally important calcifying coccolithophores. Understanding their adaptive patterns is essential for modelling carbon production in a low-nutrient ocean. We investigated the physiology of Helicosphaera carteri, a representative of the abundant but under-investigated flagellated functional group of coccolithophores. Two strains isolated from contrasting nutrient regimes (South Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea) were grown in phosphorus-replete and phosphorus-limited batch cultures. While growing exponentially in a phosphorus-replete medium, the Mediterranean strain exhibited on average 24% lower growth rate, 36% larger coccosphere volume and 21% lower particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) production than the Atlantic strain. Under phosphorus limitation, the same strain was capable of reaching a 2.6 times higher cell density than the Atlantic strain due to lower phosphorus requirements. These results suggest that local physiological adaptation can define the performance of this species under nutrient limitation. PMID:26560531

  7. Thermal adaptation and phosphorus shape thermal performance in an assemblage of rainforest ants.

    PubMed

    Kaspari, Michael; Clay, Natalie A; Lucas, Jane; Revzen, Shai; Kay, Adam; Yanoviak, Stephen P

    2016-04-01

    We studied the Thermal Performance Curves (TPCs) of 87 species of rainforest ants and found support for both the Thermal Adaptation and Phosphorus-Tolerance hypotheses. TPCs relate a fitness proxy (here, worker speed) to environmental temperature. Thermal Adaptation posits that thermal generalists (ants with flatter, broader TPCs) are favored in the hotter, more variable tropical canopy compared to the cooler, less variable litter below. As predicted, species nesting in the forest canopy 1) had running speeds less sensitive to temperature; 2) ran over a greater range of temperatures; and 3) ran at lower maximum speeds. Tradeoffs between tolerance and maximum performance are often invoked for constraining the evolution of thermal generalists. There was no evidence that ant species traded off thermal tolerance for maximum speed, however. Phosphorus-Tolerance is a second mechanism for generating ectotherms able to tolerate thermal extremes. It posits that ants active at high temperatures invest in P-rich machinery to buffer their metabolism against thermal extremes. Phosphorus content in ant tissue varied three-fold, and as predicted, temperature sensitivity was lower and thermal range was higher in P-rich species. Combined, we show how the vertical distribution of hot and variable vs. cooler and stable microclimates in a single forest contribute to a diversity of TPCs and suggest that a widely varying P stoichiometry among these ants may drive some of these differences. PMID:27220219

  8. Eco-physiological adaptation shapes the response of calcifying algae to nutrient limitation.

    PubMed

    Šupraha, Luka; Gerecht, Andrea C; Probert, Ian; Henderiks, Jorijntje

    2015-11-12

    The steady increase in global ocean temperature will most likely lead to nutrient limitation in the photic zone. This will impact the physiology of marine algae, including the globally important calcifying coccolithophores. Understanding their adaptive patterns is essential for modelling carbon production in a low-nutrient ocean. We investigated the physiology of Helicosphaera carteri, a representative of the abundant but under-investigated flagellated functional group of coccolithophores. Two strains isolated from contrasting nutrient regimes (South Atlantic and Mediterranean Sea) were grown in phosphorus-replete and phosphorus-limited batch cultures. While growing exponentially in a phosphorus-replete medium, the Mediterranean strain exhibited on average 24% lower growth rate, 36% larger coccosphere volume and 21% lower particulate inorganic carbon (PIC) production than the Atlantic strain. Under phosphorus limitation, the same strain was capable of reaching a 2.6 times higher cell density than the Atlantic strain due to lower phosphorus requirements. These results suggest that local physiological adaptation can define the performance of this species under nutrient limitation.

  9. Thermal adaptation and phosphorus shape thermal performance in an assemblage of rainforest ants.

    PubMed

    Kaspari, Michael; Clay, Natalie A; Lucas, Jane; Revzen, Shai; Kay, Adam; Yanoviak, Stephen P

    2016-04-01

    We studied the Thermal Performance Curves (TPCs) of 87 species of rainforest ants and found support for both the Thermal Adaptation and Phosphorus-Tolerance hypotheses. TPCs relate a fitness proxy (here, worker speed) to environmental temperature. Thermal Adaptation posits that thermal generalists (ants with flatter, broader TPCs) are favored in the hotter, more variable tropical canopy compared to the cooler, less variable litter below. As predicted, species nesting in the forest canopy 1) had running speeds less sensitive to temperature; 2) ran over a greater range of temperatures; and 3) ran at lower maximum speeds. Tradeoffs between tolerance and maximum performance are often invoked for constraining the evolution of thermal generalists. There was no evidence that ant species traded off thermal tolerance for maximum speed, however. Phosphorus-Tolerance is a second mechanism for generating ectotherms able to tolerate thermal extremes. It posits that ants active at high temperatures invest in P-rich machinery to buffer their metabolism against thermal extremes. Phosphorus content in ant tissue varied three-fold, and as predicted, temperature sensitivity was lower and thermal range was higher in P-rich species. Combined, we show how the vertical distribution of hot and variable vs. cooler and stable microclimates in a single forest contribute to a diversity of TPCs and suggest that a widely varying P stoichiometry among these ants may drive some of these differences.

  10. a New Dynamic Finite Element (dfe) Formulation for Lateral Free Vibrations of EULER-BERNOULLI Spinning Beams Using Trigonometric Shape Functions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hashemi, S. M.; Richard, M. J.; Dhatt, G.

    1999-03-01

    This paper presents a new Dynamic Finite Element (DFE) formulation for the vibrational analysis of spinning beams. A non-dimensional formulation is adopted, and the frequency dependent trigonometric shape functions are used to find a simple frequency dependent element stiffness matrix which has both mass and stiffness properties. An appropriate bisection method, based on a Sturm sequence root counting technique, is used and the flexural natural frequencies of cantilevered beams, for a variety of configurations, are studied. The results are compared to those found by the Dynamic Stiffness Matrix and the classical Finite Elements Method, using “Hermite” beam elements. Much better convergency rates are found using the proposed DFE method.

  11. Accurate axial localization by conical diffraction beam shaping generating a dark-helix PSF

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fallet, Clement; Lassalle, Astrid; Dubois-Delumeau, Maxime; Sirat, Gabriel Y.

    2016-02-01

    We present here a new PSF-shaping technique using biaxial crystals to generate a highly z-dependent distribution in single molecule localization microscopy (SMLM). This distribution features two zeros of intensity that rotate together with defocus. This PSF features similarities to the double-helix introduced by Moerner and Piestun and thus has been dubbed dark-helix since we track zeros of intensity. Preliminary numerical studies based on Cramer-Rao Lower Bound (CRLB) show that this PSF has the potential to obtain up to 20nm localization precision. This PSF can be easily generated by a very simple, monolithic add-on added in front of the detection camera. Additionally, the PSF remains of the approximate size of the Airy PSF, the x-y localization precision is not substantially affected and no trade-off is required. The xy compacity of the PSF also enables theoretically a higher density of emitters than the double-helix which spreads on a larger scale. Limiting factors for SMLM such as loss of photons, complexity and robustness will be discussed and considerations about the practical implementation of such techniques will be given.

  12. Mandible shape and dwarfism in squirrels (Mammalia, Rodentia): interaction of allometry and adaptation.

    PubMed

    Hautier, Lionel; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Michaux, Jacques

    2009-06-01

    Squirrels include several independent lineages of dwarf forms distributed into two ecological groups: the dwarf tree and flying squirrels. The mandible of dwarf tree squirrels share a highly reduced coronoid process and a condylar process drawn backwards. Dwarf flying squirrels on the other hand, have an elongated coronoid process and a well-differentiated condylar process. To interpret such a difference, Elliptic Fourier Transform was used to evaluate how mandible shape varies with dwarfism in sciurids. The results obtained show that this clear-cut difference cannot be explained by a simple allometric relationship in relation with size decrease. We concluded that the retention of anteriorly positioned eye sockets, in relation with distance estimation, allowed the conservation of a well-differentiated coronoid process in all flying species, despite the trend towards its reduction observed among sciurids as their size decreases. PMID:19288073

  13. Mandible shape and dwarfism in squirrels (Mammalia, Rodentia): interaction of allometry and adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hautier, Lionel; Fabre, Pierre-Henri; Michaux, Jacques

    2009-06-01

    Squirrels include several independent lineages of dwarf forms distributed into two ecological groups: the dwarf tree and flying squirrels. The mandible of dwarf tree squirrels share a highly reduced coronoid process and a condylar process drawn backwards. Dwarf flying squirrels on the other hand, have an elongated coronoid process and a well-differentiated condylar process. To interpret such a difference, Elliptic Fourier Transform was used to evaluate how mandible shape varies with dwarfism in sciurids. The results obtained show that this clear-cut difference cannot be explained by a simple allometric relationship in relation with size decrease. We concluded that the retention of anteriorly positioned eye sockets, in relation with distance estimation, allowed the conservation of a well-differentiated coronoid process in all flying species, despite the trend towards its reduction observed among sciurids as their size decreases.

  14. Dietary resources shape the adaptive changes of cyanide detoxification function in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca)

    PubMed Central

    Huang, He; Yie, Shangmian; Liu, Yuliang; Wang, Chengdong; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Wenping; Lan, Jingchao; Huang, Xiangming; Luo, Li; Cai, Kailai; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-01-01

    The functional adaptive changes in cyanide detoxification in giant panda appear to be response to dietary transition from typical carnivore to herbivorous bear. We tested the absorption of cyanide contained in bamboo/bamboo shoots with a feeding trial in 20 adult giant pandas. We determined total cyanide content in bamboo shoots and giant panda’s feces, levels of urinary thiocyanate and tissue rhodanese activity using color reactions with a spectrophotometer. Rhodanese expression in liver and kidney at transcription and translation levels were measured using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We compared differences of rhodanese activity and gene expressions among giant panda, rabbit (herbivore) and cat (carnivore), and between newborn and adult giant pandas. Bamboo shoots contained 3.2 mg/kg of cyanide and giant pandas absorbed more than 65% of cyanide. However, approximately 80% of absorbed cyanide was metabolized to less toxic thiocyanate that was discharged in urine. Rhodanese expression and activity in liver and kidney of giant panda were significantly higher than in cat, but lower than in rabbit (all P < 0.05). Levels in adult pandas were higher than that in newborn cub. Phylogenetic analysis of both nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the rhodanese gene supported a closer relationship of giant panda with carnivores than with herbivores. PMID:27703267

  15. A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy based on deuterium-tritium neutron generators.

    PubMed

    Martín, Guido; Abrahantes, Arian

    2004-05-01

    A conceptual design of a beam-shaping assembly for boron neutron capture therapy using deuterium-tritium accelerator based neutrons source is developed. Calculations based on a simple geometry model for the radiation transport are initially performed to estimate the assembly materials and their linear dimensions. Afterward, the assembly geometry is produced, optimized and verified. In order to perform these calculations the general-purpose MCNP code is used. Irradiation time and therapeutic gain are utilized as beam assessment parameters. Metallic uranium and manganese are successfully tested for fast-to-epithermal neutron moderation. In the present beam-shaping assembly proposal, the therapeutic gain is improved by 23% and the accelerator current required for a fixed irradiation period is reduced by six times compared to previous proposals based on the same D-T reaction.

  16. Characterization, adaptive traffic shaping, and multiplexing of real-time MPEG II video

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agrawal, Sanjay; Barry, Charles F.; Binnai, Vinay; Kazovsky, Leonid G.

    1997-01-01

    We obtain network traffic model for real-time MPEG-II encoded digital video by analyzing video stream samples from real-time encoders from NUKO Information Systems. MPEG-II sample streams include a resolution intensive movie, City of Joy, an action intensive movie, Aliens, a luminance intensive (black and white) movie, Road To Utopia, and a chrominance intensive (color) movie, Dick Tracy. From our analysis we obtain a heuristic model for the encoded video traffic which uses a 15-stage Markov process to model the I,B,P frame sequences within a group of pictures (GOP). A jointly-correlated Gaussian process is used to model the individual frame sizes. Scene change arrivals are modeled according to a gamma process. Simulations show that our MPEG-II traffic model generates, I,B,P frame sequences and frame sizes that closely match the sample MPEG-II stream traffic characteristics as they relate to latency and buffer occupancy in network queues. To achieve high multiplexing efficiency we propose a traffic shaping scheme which sets preferred 1-frame generation times among a group of encoders so as to minimize the overall variation in total offered traffic while still allowing the individual encoders to react to scene changes. Simulations show that our scheme results in multiplexing gains of up to 10% enabling us to multiplex twenty 6 Mbps MPEG-II video streams instead of 18 streams over an ATM/SONET OC3 link without latency or cell loss penalty. This scheme is due for a patent.

  17. Climate sensitivity across marine domains of life: limits to evolutionary adaptation shape species interactions.

    PubMed

    Storch, Daniela; Menzel, Lena; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Pörtner, Hans-O

    2014-10-01

    Organisms in all domains, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya will respond to climate change with differential vulnerabilities resulting in shifts in species distribution, coexistence, and interactions. The identification of unifying principles of organism functioning across all domains would facilitate a cause and effect understanding of such changes and their implications for ecosystem shifts. For example, the functional specialization of all organisms in limited temperature ranges leads us to ask for unifying functional reasons. Organisms also specialize in either anoxic or various oxygen ranges, with animals and plants depending on high oxygen levels. Here, we identify thermal ranges, heat limits of growth, and critically low (hypoxic) oxygen concentrations as proxies of tolerance in a meta-analysis of data available for marine organisms, with special reference to domain-specific limits. For an explanation of the patterns and differences observed, we define and quantify a proxy for organismic complexity across species from all domains. Rising complexity causes heat (and hypoxia) tolerances to decrease from Archaea to Bacteria to uni- and then multicellular Eukarya. Within and across domains, taxon-specific tolerance limits likely reflect ultimate evolutionary limits of its species to acclimatization and adaptation. We hypothesize that rising taxon-specific complexities in structure and function constrain organisms to narrower environmental ranges. Low complexity as in Archaea and some Bacteria provide life options in extreme environments. In the warmest oceans, temperature maxima reach and will surpass the permanent limits to the existence of multicellular animals, plants and unicellular phytoplankter. Smaller, less complex unicellular Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea will thus benefit and predominate even more in a future, warmer, and hypoxic ocean. PMID:24890266

  18. Climate sensitivity across marine domains of life: limits to evolutionary adaptation shape species interactions.

    PubMed

    Storch, Daniela; Menzel, Lena; Frickenhaus, Stephan; Pörtner, Hans-O

    2014-10-01

    Organisms in all domains, Archaea, Bacteria, and Eukarya will respond to climate change with differential vulnerabilities resulting in shifts in species distribution, coexistence, and interactions. The identification of unifying principles of organism functioning across all domains would facilitate a cause and effect understanding of such changes and their implications for ecosystem shifts. For example, the functional specialization of all organisms in limited temperature ranges leads us to ask for unifying functional reasons. Organisms also specialize in either anoxic or various oxygen ranges, with animals and plants depending on high oxygen levels. Here, we identify thermal ranges, heat limits of growth, and critically low (hypoxic) oxygen concentrations as proxies of tolerance in a meta-analysis of data available for marine organisms, with special reference to domain-specific limits. For an explanation of the patterns and differences observed, we define and quantify a proxy for organismic complexity across species from all domains. Rising complexity causes heat (and hypoxia) tolerances to decrease from Archaea to Bacteria to uni- and then multicellular Eukarya. Within and across domains, taxon-specific tolerance limits likely reflect ultimate evolutionary limits of its species to acclimatization and adaptation. We hypothesize that rising taxon-specific complexities in structure and function constrain organisms to narrower environmental ranges. Low complexity as in Archaea and some Bacteria provide life options in extreme environments. In the warmest oceans, temperature maxima reach and will surpass the permanent limits to the existence of multicellular animals, plants and unicellular phytoplankter. Smaller, less complex unicellular Eukarya, Bacteria, and Archaea will thus benefit and predominate even more in a future, warmer, and hypoxic ocean.

  19. The adaptive nature of eye movements in linguistic tasks: how payoff and architecture shape speed-accuracy trade-offs.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Richard L; Shvartsman, Michael; Singh, Satinder

    2013-07-01

    We explore the idea that eye-movement strategies in reading are precisely adapted to the joint constraints of task structure, task payoff, and processing architecture. We present a model of saccadic control that separates a parametric control policy space from a parametric machine architecture, the latter based on a small set of assumptions derived from research on eye movements in reading (Engbert, Nuthmann, Richter, & Kliegl, 2005; Reichle, Warren, & McConnell, 2009). The eye-control model is embedded in a decision architecture (a machine and policy space) that is capable of performing a simple linguistic task integrating information across saccades. Model predictions are derived by jointly optimizing the control of eye movements and task decisions under payoffs that quantitatively express different desired speed-accuracy trade-offs. The model yields distinct eye-movement predictions for the same task under different payoffs, including single-fixation durations, frequency effects, accuracy effects, and list position effects, and their modulation by task payoff. The predictions are compared to-and found to accord with-eye-movement data obtained from human participants performing the same task under the same payoffs, but they are found not to accord as well when the assumptions concerning payoff optimization and processing architecture are varied. These results extend work on rational analysis of oculomotor control and adaptation of reading strategy (Bicknell & Levy, ; McConkie, Rayner, & Wilson, 1973; Norris, 2009; Wotschack, 2009) by providing evidence for adaptation at low levels of saccadic control that is shaped by quantitatively varying task demands and the dynamics of processing architecture. PMID:23757203

  20. Improvement of uniformity of the negative ion beams by tent-shaped magnetic field in the JT-60 negative ion source

    SciTech Connect

    Yoshida, Masafumi Hanada, Masaya; Kojima, Atsushi; Kashiwagi, Mieko; Akino, Noboru; Endo, Yasuei; Komata, Masao; Mogaki, Kazuhiko; Nemoto, Shuji; Ohzeki, Masahiro; Seki, Norikazu; Sasaki, Shunichi; Shimizu, Tatsuo; Terunuma, Yuto; Grisham, Larry R.

    2014-02-15

    Non-uniformity of the negative ion beams in the JT-60 negative ion source with the world-largest ion extraction area was improved by modifying the magnetic filter in the source from the plasma grid (PG) filter to a tent-shaped filter. The magnetic design via electron trajectory calculation showed that the tent-shaped filter was expected to suppress the localization of the primary electrons emitted from the filaments and created uniform plasma with positive ions and atoms of the parent particles for the negative ions. By modifying the magnetic filter to the tent-shaped filter, the uniformity defined as the deviation from the averaged beam intensity was reduced from 14% of the PG filter to ∼10% without a reduction of the negative ion production.

  1. Ablation depth control with 40 nm resolution on ITO thin films using a square, flat top beam shaped femtosecond NIR laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Hoon-Young; Yoon, Ji-Wook; Choi, Won-Suk; Kim, Kwang-Ryul; Cho, Sung-Hak

    2016-09-01

    We reported on the ablation depth control with a resolution of 40 nm on indium tin oxide (ITO) thin film using a square beam shaped femtosecond (190 fs) laser (λp=1030 nm). A slit is used to make the square, flat top beam shaped from the Gaussian spatial profile of the femtosecond laser. An ablation depth of 40 nm was obtained using the single pulse irradiation at a peak intensity of 2.8 TW/cm2. The morphologies of the ablated area were characterized using an optical microscope, atomic force microscope (AFM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS). Ablations with square and rectangular types with various sizes were demonstrated on ITO thin film using slits with varying x-y axes. The stereo structure of the ablation with the depth resolution of approximately 40 nm was also fabricated successfully using the irradiation of single pulses with different shaped sizes of femtosecond laser.

  2. SU-E-J-78: Adaptive Planning Workflow in a Pencil Beam Scanning Proton Therapy Center

    SciTech Connect

    Blakey, M; Price, S; Robison, B; Niek, S; Moe, S; Renegar, J; Mark, A; Spenser, W

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: The susceptibility of proton therapy to changes in patient setup and anatomy necessitates an adaptive planning process. With the right planning tools and clinical workflow, an adaptive plan can be created in a timely manner without adding significant workload to the treatment planning staff. Methods: In our center, a weekly QA CT is performed on most patients to assess setup, anatomy change, and tumor response. The QA CT is fused to the treatment planning CT, the contours are transferred via deformable registration, and the plan dose is recalculated on the QA CT. A physicist assesses the dose distribution, and an adaptive plan is requested based on tumor coverage or OAR dose changes. After the physician confirms or alters the deformed contours, a dosimetrist develops an adaptive plan using our TPS adaptation module. The plan is assessed for robustness and is then reviewed by the physician. Patient QA is performed within three days following the first adapted treatment. Results: Of the patients who received QA CTs, 19% required at least one adaptive plan (18.5% H&N, 18.5% brain, 11.1% breast, 14.8% chestwall, 14.8% lung, 18.5% pelvis and 3.8% abdomen). Of these patients, 14% went on a break, while the remainder was treated with the previous plan during the re-planning process. Adaptive plans were performed based on tumor shrinkage, anatomy change or positioning uncertainties for 37.9%, 44.8%, and 17.3% of the patients, respectively. On average, 3 full days are required between the QA CT and the first adapted plan treatment. Conclusion: Adaptive planning is a crucial component of proton therapy and should be applied to any site when the QA CT shows significant deviation from the plan. With an efficient workflow, an adaptive plan can be applied without delaying patient treatment or burdening the dosimetry and medical physics team.

  3. In-vivo dosimetry for field sizes down to 6 × 6 mm2 in shaped beam radiosurgery with microMOSFET.

    PubMed

    Sors, A; Cassol, E; Latorzeff, I; Duthil, P; Sabatier, J; Lotterie, J A; Redon, A; Berry, I; Franceries, X

    2014-09-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate microMOSFET as in-vivo dosimeter in 6 MV shaped-beam radiosurgery for field sizes down to 6 × 6 mm2. A homemade build-up cap was developed and its use with microMOSFET was evaluated down to 6 × 6 mm2. The study with the homemade build-up cap was performed considering its influence on field size over-cover occurring at surface, achievement of the overall process of electronic equilibrium, dose deposition along beam axis and dose attenuation. An optimized calibration method has been validated using MOSFET in shaped-beam radiosurgery for field sizes from 98 × 98 down to 18 × 18 mm2. The method was detailed in a previous study and validated in irregular field shapes series measurements performed on a head phantom. The optimized calibration method was applied to microMOSFET equipped with homemade build-up cap down to 6 × 6 mm2. Using the same irregular field shapes, dose measurements were performed on head phantom. MicroMOSFET results were compared to previous MOSFET ones. Additional irregular field shapes down to 8.8 × 8.8 mm2 were studied with microMOSFET. Isocenter dose attenuation due to the homemade build-up cap over the microMOSFET was near 2% irrespective of field size. Our results suggested that microMOSFET equipped with homemade build-up cap is suitable for in-vivo dosimetry in shaped-beam radiosurgery for field sizes down to 6 × 6 mm2 and therefore that the required build-up cap dimensions to perform entrance in-vivo dosimetry in small-fields have to ensure only partial charge particle equilibrium.

  4. Beam transport and focusing layout based on adaptive optics for the SQS scientific instrument at the European XFEL

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mazza, Tommaso; Signorato, Riccardo; Meyer, Michael; La Civita, Daniele; Vannoni, Maurizio; Sinn, Harald

    2014-09-01

    The SQS scientific instrument at the European XFEL is dedicated to investigations in the soft X-rays regime, in particular to studies of non-linear and ultrafast processes in atoms, molecules and clusters using a variety of spectroscopic techniques. It will be equipped with a Kirkpatrick-Baez (KB) adaptive mirror system enabling submicron focusing and access to variable focal distances. In this paper we describe the conceptual design of the beam transport and focusing layout based on the KB system. The design includes a study of feasibility based on the comparison between the required source and image positions and the theoretical limits for the accessible mirror profiles.

  5. Input shaping for vibration-damped slewing of a flexible beam using a heavy-lift hydraulic robot

    SciTech Connect

    Parker, G.G.; Eisler, R.; Phelan, J.; Robinett, R.D.

    1994-08-01

    An input shaping scheme originally used to slew flexible beams via a tabletop D.C. motor is modified for use with an industrial-type, hydraulic-drive robot. This trajectory generation method was originally developed to produce symmetric, rest-to-rest maneuvers of flexible rotating rods where the angular velocity vector and gravitational vector were collinear. In that configuration, out-of-plane oscillations were excited due to centripetal acceleration of the rod. The bang-coast-bang acceleration profile resulted in no oscillations in either plane at the end of the symmetric slew maneuver. In this paper, a smoothed version of the bang-coast-bang acceleration is used for symmetric maneuvers where the angular velocity vector is orthogonal to the gravitational vector. Furthermore, the hydraulic robot servo dynamics are considered explicitly in determining the input joint angle trajectory. An instrumented mass is attached to the tip of a flexible aluminum rod. The first natural frequency of this system is about 1.0Hz. Joint angle responses obtained with encoder sensors are used to identify the servo actuator dynamics.

  6. Adjustable mounting device for high-volume production of beam-shaping systems for high-power diode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Haag, Sebastian; Bernhardt, Henning; Rübenach, Olaf; Haverkamp, Tobias; Müller, Tobias; Zontar, Daniel; Brecher, Christian

    2015-02-01

    In many applications for high-power diode lasers, the production of beam-shaping and homogenizing optical systems experience rising volumes and dynamical market demands. The automation of assembly processes on flexible and reconfigurable machines can contribute to a more responsive and scalable production. The paper presents a flexible mounting device designed for the challenging assembly of side-tab based optical systems. It provides design elements for precisely referencing and fixating two optical elements in a well-defined geometric relation. Side tabs are presented to the machine allowing the application of glue and a rotating mechanism allows the attachment to the optical elements. The device can be adjusted to fit different form factors and it can be used in high-volume assembly machines. The paper shows the utilization of the device for a collimation module consisting of a fast-axis and a slow-axis collimation lens. Results regarding the repeatability and process capability of bonding side tab assemblies as well as estimates from 3D simulation for overall performance indicators achieved such as cycle time and throughput will be discussed.

  7. A shape-modification strategy of electron-beam direct writing considering circuit performance in LSI interconnects

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Midoh, Yoshihiro; Osaki, Atsushi; Nakamae, Koji

    2014-03-01

    As the feature size of LSI shrinks, the cost of mask manufacturing and turn-around-time continue to increase. Maskless lithography using electron beam direct writing (EBDW) technology attracts attention. On the other hands, with continuous scaling and the introduction of low-k dielectrics in Cu interconnect technology, reliability degradation caused by time-dependent dielectric breakdown (TDDB) and electromigration has become important issues. Therefore, EBDW in backend process is needed to ensure superior patterning quality and reliability using high-accuracy proximity effect correction (PEC). We have already proposed a dose-modification strategy of EBDW considering reliability for TDDB degradation. In this paper, furthermore, we propose a shape-modification strategy of EBDW considering circuit performance in LSI interconnects for improving EB drawing throughput. We use effectively patterns with rounded corner in order to reduce EB shots increased by PEC and avoid the local high current density at the corner of metal lines. We applied the proposed method to a microprocessor layout synthesized with the Nangate 45nm Open Cell Library. As a result, the drawn pattern by corner rounding and coarse dose adjustment achieved 2.5% higher throughput than that by no corner rounding and fine dose adjustment.

  8. Ear deformations give bats a physical mechanism for fast adaptation of ultrasonic beam patterns.

    PubMed

    Gao, Li; Balakrishnan, Sreenath; He, Weikai; Yan, Zhen; Müller, Rolf

    2011-11-18

    A large number of mammals, including humans, have intricate outer ear shapes that diffract incoming sound in a direction- and frequency-specific manner. Through this physical process, the outer ear shapes encode sound-source information into the sensory signals from each ear. Our results show that horseshoe bats could dynamically control these diffraction processes through fast nonrigid ear deformations. The bats' ear shapes can alter between extreme configurations in about 100 ms and thereby change their acoustic properties in ways that would suit different acoustic sensing tasks.

  9. Ear Deformations Give Bats a Physical Mechanism for Fast Adaptation of Ultrasonic Beam Patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gao, Li; Balakrishnan, Sreenath; He, Weikai; Yan, Zhen; Müller, Rolf

    2011-11-01

    A large number of mammals, including humans, have intricate outer ear shapes that diffract incoming sound in a direction- and frequency-specific manner. Through this physical process, the outer ear shapes encode sound-source information into the sensory signals from each ear. Our results show that horseshoe bats could dynamically control these diffraction processes through fast nonrigid ear deformations. The bats’ ear shapes can alter between extreme configurations in about 100 ms and thereby change their acoustic properties in ways that would suit different acoustic sensing tasks.

  10. Thermal deformation of cryogenically cooled silicon crystals under intense X-ray beams: measurement and finite-element predictions of the surface shape

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Sánchez del Río, Manuel; Monaco, Giulio; Detlefs, Carsten; Roth, Thomas; Chumakov, Aleksandr I.; Glatzel, Pieter

    2013-01-01

    X-ray crystal monochromators exposed to white-beam X-rays in third-generation synchrotron light sources are subject to thermal deformations that must be minimized using an adequate cooling system. A new approach was used to measure the crystal shape profile and slope of several cryogenically cooled (liquid nitrogen) silicon monochromators as a function of beam power in situ and under heat load. The method utilizes multiple angular scans across the Bragg peak (rocking curve) at various vertical positions of a narrow-gap slit downstream from the monochromator. When increasing the beam power, the surface of the liquid-nitrogen-cooled silicon crystal deforms from a concave shape at low heat load to a convex shape at high heat load, passing through an approximately flat shape at intermediate heat load. Finite-element analysis is used to calculate the crystal thermal deformations. The simulated crystal profiles and slopes are in excellent agreement with experiments. The parameters used in simulations, such as material properties, absorbed power distribution on the crystal and cooling boundary conditions, are described in detail as they are fundamental for obtaining accurate results. PMID:23765298

  11. Adaptation of ion beam technology to microfabrication of solid state devices and transducers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Topich, J. A.

    1978-01-01

    A number of areas were investigated to determine the potential uses of ion beam techniques in the construction of solid state devices and transducers and the packaging of implantable electronics for biomedical applications. The five areas investigated during the past year were: (1) diode-like devices fabricated on textured silicon; (2) a photolithographic technique for patterning ion beam sputtered PVC (polyvinyl chloride); (3) use of sputtered Teflon as a protective coating for implantable pressure sensors; (4) the sputtering of Macor to seal implantable hybrid circuits; and (5) the use of sputtered Teflon to immobilize enzymes.

  12. Effect of femoral canal shape on mechanical stress distribution and adaptive bone remodelling around a cementless tapered-wedge stem

    PubMed Central

    Oba, M.; Kobayashi, N.; Ike, H.; Tezuka, T.; Saito, T.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives In total hip arthroplasty (THA), the cementless, tapered-wedge stem design contributes to achieving initial stability and providing optimal load transfer in the proximal femur. However, loading conditions on the femur following THA are also influenced by femoral structure. Therefore, we determined the effects of tapered-wedge stems on the load distribution of the femur using subject-specific finite element models of femurs with various canal shapes. Patients and Methods We studied 20 femurs, including seven champagne flute-type femurs, five stovepipe-type femurs, and eight intermediate-type femurs, in patients who had undergone cementless THA using the Accolade TMZF stem at our institution. Subject–specific finite element (FE) models of pre- and post-operative femurs with stems were constructed and used to perform FE analyses (FEAs) to simulate single-leg stance. FEA predictions were compared with changes in bone mineral density (BMD) measured for each patient during the first post-operative year. Results Stovepipe models implanted with large-size stems had significantly lower equivalent stress on the proximal-medial area of the femur compared with champagne-flute and intermediate models, with a significant loss of BMD in the corresponding area at one year post-operatively. Conclusions The stovepipe femurs required a large-size stem to obtain an optimal fit of the stem. The FEA result and post-operative BMD change of the femur suggest that the combination of a large-size Accolade TMZF stem and stovepipe femur may be associated with proximal stress shielding. Cite this article: M. Oba, Y. Inaba, N. Kobayashi, H. Ike, T. Tezuka, T. Saito. Effect of femoral canal shape on mechanical stress distribution and adaptive bone remodelling around a cementless tapered-wedge stem. Bone Joint Res 2016;5:362–369. DOI: 10.1302/2046-3758.59.2000525. PMID:27601435

  13. Experimental Profiling of a Non-truncated Focused Gaussian Beam and Fine-tuning of the Quadratic Phase in the Fresnel Gaussian Shape Invariant

    SciTech Connect

    S., Juan Manuel Franco; Cywiak, Moises; Cywiak, David; Mourad, Idir

    2015-06-24

    A homodyne profiler is used for recording the intensity distribution of focused non-truncated Gaussian beams. The spatial distributions are obtained at planes in the vicinity of the back-focal plane of a focusing lens placed at different distances from a He–Ne laser beam with a Gaussian intensity profile. Comparisons of the experimental data with those obtained from the analytical equations for an ideal focusing lens allow us to propose formulae to fine-tune the quadratic term in the Fresnel Gaussian shape invariant at each interface of the propagated field. Furthermore, we give analytical expressions to calculate adequately the propagation of the field through an optical system.

  14. A highly shape-adaptive, stretchable design based on conductive liquid for energy harvesting and self-powered biomechanical monitoring

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Fang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Simiao; Li, Shengming; Yin, Yajiang; Dai, Keren; Zhang, Guangjie; Lin, Long; Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Jie; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Zi, Yunlong; Liao, Qingliang; You, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-01-01

    The rapid growth of deformable and stretchable electronics calls for a deformable and stretchable power source. We report a scalable approach for energy harvesters and self-powered sensors that can be highly deformable and stretchable. With conductive liquid contained in a polymer cover, a shape-adaptive triboelectric nanogenerator (saTENG) unit can effectively harvest energy in various working modes. The saTENG can maintain its performance under a strain of as large as 300%. The saTENG is so flexible that it can be conformed to any three-dimensional and curvilinear surface. We demonstrate applications of the saTENG as a wearable power source and self-powered sensor to monitor biomechanical motion. A bracelet-like saTENG worn on the wrist can light up more than 80 light-emitting diodes. Owing to the highly scalable manufacturing process, the saTENG can be easily applied for large-area energy harvesting. In addition, the saTENG can be extended to extract energy from mechanical motion using flowing water as the electrode. This approach provides a new prospect for deformable and stretchable power sources, as well as self-powered sensors, and has potential applications in various areas such as robotics, biomechanics, physiology, kinesiology, and entertainment. PMID:27386560

  15. A highly shape-adaptive, stretchable design based on conductive liquid for energy harvesting and self-powered biomechanical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Simiao; Li, Shengming; Yin, Yajiang; Dai, Keren; Zhang, Guangjie; Lin, Long; Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Jie; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Zi, Yunlong; Liao, Qingliang; You, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-01

    The rapid growth of deformable and stretchable electronics calls for a deformable and stretchable power source. We report a scalable approach for energy harvesters and self-powered sensors that can be highly deformable and stretchable. With conductive liquid contained in a polymer cover, a shape-adaptive triboelectric nanogenerator (saTENG) unit can effectively harvest energy in various working modes. The saTENG can maintain its performance under a strain of as large as 300%. The saTENG is so flexible that it can be conformed to any three-dimensional and curvilinear surface. We demonstrate applications of the saTENG as a wearable power source and self-powered sensor to monitor biomechanical motion. A bracelet-like saTENG worn on the wrist can light up more than 80 light-emitting diodes. Owing to the highly scalable manufacturing process, the saTENG can be easily applied for large-area energy harvesting. In addition, the saTENG can be extended to extract energy from mechanical motion using flowing water as the electrode. This approach provides a new prospect for deformable and stretchable power sources, as well as self-powered sensors, and has potential applications in various areas such as robotics, biomechanics, physiology, kinesiology, and entertainment.

  16. A highly shape-adaptive, stretchable design based on conductive liquid for energy harvesting and self-powered biomechanical monitoring.

    PubMed

    Yi, Fang; Wang, Xiaofeng; Niu, Simiao; Li, Shengming; Yin, Yajiang; Dai, Keren; Zhang, Guangjie; Lin, Long; Wen, Zhen; Guo, Hengyu; Wang, Jie; Yeh, Min-Hsin; Zi, Yunlong; Liao, Qingliang; You, Zheng; Zhang, Yue; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2016-06-01

    The rapid growth of deformable and stretchable electronics calls for a deformable and stretchable power source. We report a scalable approach for energy harvesters and self-powered sensors that can be highly deformable and stretchable. With conductive liquid contained in a polymer cover, a shape-adaptive triboelectric nanogenerator (saTENG) unit can effectively harvest energy in various working modes. The saTENG can maintain its performance under a strain of as large as 300%. The saTENG is so flexible that it can be conformed to any three-dimensional and curvilinear surface. We demonstrate applications of the saTENG as a wearable power source and self-powered sensor to monitor biomechanical motion. A bracelet-like saTENG worn on the wrist can light up more than 80 light-emitting diodes. Owing to the highly scalable manufacturing process, the saTENG can be easily applied for large-area energy harvesting. In addition, the saTENG can be extended to extract energy from mechanical motion using flowing water as the electrode. This approach provides a new prospect for deformable and stretchable power sources, as well as self-powered sensors, and has potential applications in various areas such as robotics, biomechanics, physiology, kinesiology, and entertainment. PMID:27386560

  17. Beam Halo Measurements at UMER and the JLAB FEL Using an Adaptive Masking Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, H D; Fiorito, R B; Kishek, R A; O'Shea, P G; Shkvarunets, A G; Benson, S V; Douglas, D; Wilson, F G; Zhang, S

    2011-03-01

    Beam halo is a chal­leng­ing issue for in­tense beams since it can cause beam loss, emit­tance growth, nu­cle­ar ac­ti­va­tion and sec­ondary elec­tron emis­sion. Be­cause of the po­ten­tial­ly low num­ber of par­ti­cles in the halo com­pared with beam core, tra­di­tion­al imag­ing meth­ods may not have suf­fi­cient con­trast to de­tect faint halos. We have de­vel­oped a high dy­nam­ic range, adap­tive mask­ing method to mea­sure halo using a dig­i­tal mi­cro-mir­ror array de­vice and demon­strat­ed its ef­fec­tive­ness ex­per­i­men­tal­ly on the Uni­ver­si­ty of Mary­land Elec­tron Ring (UMER). We also re­port on sim­i­lar ex­per­i­ments cur­rent­ly in progress at the Jef­fer­son Lab Free Elec­tron Laser (FEL) using this method.

  18. Uniform longitudinal beam profiles in the Fermilab Recycler using adaptive rf correction

    SciTech Connect

    Hu, Martin; Broemmelsiek, Daniel Robert; Chase, Brian; Crisp, James L.; Eddy, Nathan; Joireman, Paul W.; Ng, King Yuen; /Fermilab

    2007-06-01

    The Fermilab Recycler Ring is a permanent magnet based 8 GeV anti-proton storage ring. A wideband RF system, driven with ARB's (ARBitrary waveform generators), allows the system to produce programmable barrier waveforms. Beam current profile distortion was observed, its origin verified both experimentally and theoretically, and an FPGA-based correction system was designed, tested and implemented to level the bunch profile.

  19. Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy with adaptive optics controlled multiplexed beams.

    PubMed

    Samim, Masood; Sandkuijl, Daaf; Tretyakov, Ian; Cisek, Richard; Barzda, Virginijus

    2013-01-01

    Differential polarization nonlinear optical microscopy has the potential to become an indispensable tool for structural investigations of ordered biological assemblies and microcrystalline aggregates. Their microscopic organization can be probed through fast and sensitive measurements of nonlinear optical signal anisotropy, which can be achieved with microscopic spatial resolution by using time-multiplexed pulsed laser beams with perpendicular polarization orientations and photon-counting detection electronics for signal demultiplexing. In addition, deformable membrane mirrors can be used to correct for optical aberrations in the microscope and simultaneously optimize beam overlap using a genetic algorithm. The beam overlap can be achieved with better accuracy than diffraction limited point-spread function, which allows to perform polarization-resolved measurements on the pixel-by-pixel basis. We describe a newly developed differential polarization microscope and present applications of the differential microscopy technique for structural studies of collagen and cellulose. Both, second harmonic generation, and fluorescence-detected nonlinear absorption anisotropy are used in these investigations. It is shown that the orientation and structural properties of the fibers in biological tissue can be deduced and that the orientation of fluorescent molecules (Congo Red), which label the fibers, can be determined. Differential polarization microscopy sidesteps common issues such as photobleaching and sample movement. Due to tens of megahertz alternating polarization of excitation pulses fast data acquisition can be conveniently applied to measure changes in the nonlinear signal anisotropy in dynamically changing in vivo structures.

  20. Conceptual design of a high precision dual directional beam position monitoring system for beam crosstalk cancellation and improved output pulse shapes

    SciTech Connect

    Thieberger P.; Dawson, C.; Fischer, W.; Gassner, D.; Hulsart, R.; Mernick, K.; Michnoff, R.; Minty, M.

    2012-04-15

    The Relativistic Heavy Ions Collider (RHIC) would benefit from improved beam position measurements near the interaction points that see both beams, especially as the tolerances become tighter when reducing the beam sizes to obtain increased luminosity. Two limitations of the present beam position monitors (BPMs) would be mitigated if the proposed approach is successful. The small but unavoidable cross-talk between signals from bunches traveling in opposite directions when using conventional BPMs will be reduced by adopting directional BPMs. Further improvements will be achieved by cancelling residual cross-talk using pairs of such BPMs. Appropriately delayed addition and integration of the signals will also provide pulses with relatively flat maxima that will be easier to digitize by relaxing the presently very stringent timing requirements.

  1. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  2. Design, development, and performance of an adapter for simulation of ocular melanoma patients in supine position for proton beam therapy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Daftari, I.; Phillips, T. L.

    2003-06-01

    A patient assembly adapter system for ocular melanoma patient simulation was developed and its performance evaluated. The aim for the construction of the apparatus was to simulate the patients in supine position using a commercial x-ray simulator. The apparatus consists of a base plate, head immobilization holder, patient assembly system that includes fixation light and collimator system. The reproducibility of the repeated fixation was initially tested with a head phantom. Simulation and verification films were studied for seven consecutive patients treated with proton beam therapy. Patient's simulation was performed in a supine position using a dental fixation bite block and a thermoplastic head mask immobilization device with a patient adapter system. Two orthogonal x rays were used to obtain the x, y, and z coordinates of sutured tantalum rings for treatment planning with the EYEPLAN software. The verification films were obtained in treatment position with the fixation light along the central axis of the eye. The results indicate good agreement within 0.5 mm deviations. The results of this investigation showed that the same planning accuracy could be achieved by performing simulation using the adapter described above with a patient in the supine position as that obtained by performing simulation with the patient in the seated, treatment position. The adapter can also be attached to the head of the chair for simulating in the seated position using a fixed x-ray unit. This has three advantages: (1) this will save radiation therapists time; (2) it eliminates the need for arranging access to the treatment room, thus avoiding potential conflicts in treatment room usage; and (3) it allows the use of a commercial simulator.

  3. A new adaptive light beam focusing principle for scanning light stimulation systems

    SciTech Connect

    Bitzer, L. A.; Meseth, M.; Benson, N.; Schmechel, R.

    2013-02-15

    In this article a novel principle to achieve optimal focusing conditions or rather the smallest possible beam diameter for scanning light stimulation systems is presented. It is based on the following methodology: First, a reference point on a camera sensor is introduced where optimal focusing conditions are adjusted and the distance between the light focusing optic and the reference point is determined using a laser displacement sensor. In a second step, this displacement sensor is used to map the topography of the sample under investigation. Finally, the actual measurement is conducted, using optimal focusing conditions in each measurement point at the sample surface, that are determined by the height difference between camera sensor and the sample topography. This principle is independent of the measurement values, the optical or electrical properties of the sample, the used light source, or the selected wavelength. Furthermore, the samples can be tilted, rough, bent, or of different surface materials. In the following the principle is implemented using an optical beam induced current system, but basically it can be applied to any other scanning light stimulation system. Measurements to demonstrate its operation are shown, using a polycrystalline silicon solar cell.

  4. The novel adaptive rotating beam test unmasks sensorimotor impairments in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, Julia; Bauer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Richter, Angelika; Richter, Franziska

    2016-05-01

    Development of disease modifying therapeutics for Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, relies on availability of animal models which recapitulate the disease hallmarks. Only few transgenic mouse models, which mimic overexpression of alpha-synuclein, show dopamine loss, behavioral impairments and protein aggregation. Mice overexpressing human wildtype alpha-synuclein under the Thy-1 promotor (Thy1-aSyn) replicate these features. However, female mice do not exhibit a phenotype. This was attributed to a potentially lower transgene expression located on the X chromosome. Here we support that female mice overexpress human wildtype alpha-synuclein only about 1.5 fold in the substantia nigra, compared to about 3 fold in male mice. Since female Thy1-aSyn mice were shown previously to exhibit differences in corticostriatal communication and synaptic plasticity similar to their male counterparts we hypothesized that female mice use compensatory mechanisms and strategies to not show overt motor deficits despite an underlying endophenotype. In order to unmask these deficits we translated recent findings in PD patients that sensory abnormalities can enhance motor dysfunction into a novel behavioral test, the adaptive rotating beam test. We found that under changing sensory input female Thy1-aSyn mice showed an overt phenotype. Our data supports that the integration of sensorimotor information is likely a major contributor to symptoms of movement disorders and that even low levels of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein has the potential to disrupt processing of these information. The here described adaptive rotating beam test represents a sensitive behavioral test to detect moderate sensorimotor alterations in mouse models. PMID:26880341

  5. The novel adaptive rotating beam test unmasks sensorimotor impairments in a transgenic mouse model of Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Gerstenberger, Julia; Bauer, Anne; Helmschrodt, Christin; Richter, Angelika; Richter, Franziska

    2016-05-01

    Development of disease modifying therapeutics for Parkinson's disease (PD), the second most common neurodegenerative disorder, relies on availability of animal models which recapitulate the disease hallmarks. Only few transgenic mouse models, which mimic overexpression of alpha-synuclein, show dopamine loss, behavioral impairments and protein aggregation. Mice overexpressing human wildtype alpha-synuclein under the Thy-1 promotor (Thy1-aSyn) replicate these features. However, female mice do not exhibit a phenotype. This was attributed to a potentially lower transgene expression located on the X chromosome. Here we support that female mice overexpress human wildtype alpha-synuclein only about 1.5 fold in the substantia nigra, compared to about 3 fold in male mice. Since female Thy1-aSyn mice were shown previously to exhibit differences in corticostriatal communication and synaptic plasticity similar to their male counterparts we hypothesized that female mice use compensatory mechanisms and strategies to not show overt motor deficits despite an underlying endophenotype. In order to unmask these deficits we translated recent findings in PD patients that sensory abnormalities can enhance motor dysfunction into a novel behavioral test, the adaptive rotating beam test. We found that under changing sensory input female Thy1-aSyn mice showed an overt phenotype. Our data supports that the integration of sensorimotor information is likely a major contributor to symptoms of movement disorders and that even low levels of overexpression of human wildtype alpha-synuclein has the potential to disrupt processing of these information. The here described adaptive rotating beam test represents a sensitive behavioral test to detect moderate sensorimotor alterations in mouse models.

  6. Theoretical explanation of the polarization-converting system achieved by beam shaping and combination technique and its performance under high power conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Peng; Li, Xiao; Shang, YaPing; Xu, XiaoJun

    2015-10-01

    The fiber laser has very obvious advantages and broad applications in remote welding, 3D cutting and national defense compared with the traditional solid laser. But influenced by heat effect of gain medium, nonlinear effect, stress birefringence effect and other negative factors, it's very difficult to get high power linearly polarized laser just using a single laser. For these limitations a polarization-converting system is designed using beam shaping and combination technique which is able to transform naturally polarized laser to linearly polarized laser at real time to resolve difficulties of generating high-power linearly polarized laser from fiber lasers in this paper. The principle of the Gaussian beam changing into the hollow beam passing through two axicons and the combination of the Gaussian beam and the hollow beam is discussed. In the experimental verification the energy conversion efficiency reached 93.1% with a remarkable enhancement of the extinction ratio from 3% to 98% benefited from the high conversion efficiency of axicons and the system worked fine under high power conditions. The system also kept excellent far field divergence. The experiment phenomenon also agreed with the simulation quite well. The experiment proves that this polarization-converting system will not affect laser structure which controls easily and needs no feedback and controlling system with stable and reliable properties at the same time. It can absolutely be applied to the polarization-conversion of high power laser.

  7. SU-E-T-107: Development of a GPU-Based Dose Delivery System for Adaptive Pencil Beam Scanning

    SciTech Connect

    Giordanengo, S; Russo, G; Marchetto, F; Attili, A; Monaco, V; Varasteh, M; Pella, A

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: A description of a GPU-based dose delivery system (G-DDS) to integrate a fast forward planning implementing in real-time the prescribed sequence of pencil beams. The system, which is under development, is designed to evaluate the dose distribution deviations due to range variations and interplay effects affecting mobile tumors treatments. Methods: The Dose Delivery System (DDS) in use at the Italian Centro Nazionale di Adroterapia Oncologica (CNAO), is the starting point for the presented system. A fast and partial forward planning (FP) tool has been developed to evaluate in few seconds the delivered dose distributions using the DDS data (on-line measurements of spot properties, i.e. number of particles and positions). The computation is performed during the intervals between synchrotron spills and, made available at the end of each spill. In the interval between two spills, the G-DDS will evaluate the delivered dose distributions taking into account the real-time target positions measured by a tracking system. The sequence of prescribed pencil beams for the following spill will be adapted taking into account the variations with respect to the original plan due to the target motion. In order to speed up the computation required to modify pencil beams distribution (up to 400 times has been reached), the Graphics Processing Units (GPUs) and advanced Field Programmable Gate Arrays (FPGAs) are used. Results: An existing offline forward planning is going to be optimized for the CUDA architecture: the gain in time will be presented. The preliminary performances of the developed GPU-based FP algorithms will be shown. Conclusion: A prototype of a GPU-based dose delivery system is under development and will be presented. The system workflow will be illustrated together with the approach adopted to integrate the three main systems, i.e. CNAO dose delivery system, fast forward planning, and tumor tracking system.

  8. Shaping ability of Reciproc and TF Adaptive systems in severely curved canals of rapid microCT-based prototyping molar replicas

    PubMed Central

    ORDINOLA-ZAPATA, Ronald; BRAMANTE, Clovis Monteiro; DUARTE, Marco Antonio Húngaro; CAVENAGO, Bruno Cavalini; JARAMILLO, David; VERSIANI, Marco Aurélio

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the shaping ability of Reciproc and Twisted-File Adaptive systems in rapid prototyping replicas. Material and Methods: Two mandibular molars showing S-shaped and 62-degree curvatures in the mesial root were scanned by using a microcomputed tomography (μCT) system. The data were exported in the stereolitograhic format and 20 samples of each molar were printed at 16 µm resolution. The mesial canals of 10 replicas of each specimen were prepared with each system. Transportation was measured by overlapping radiographs taken before and after preparation and resin thickness after instrumentation was measured by μCT. Results: Both systems maintained the original shape of the apical third in both anatomies (P>0.05). Overall, considering the resin thickness in the 62-degree replicas, no statistical difference was found between the systems (P>0.05). In the S-shaped curvature replica, Reciproc significantly decreased the thickness of the resin walls in comparison with TF Adaptive. Conclusions: The evaluated systems were able to maintain the original shape at the apical third of severely curved mesial canals of molar replicas. PMID:24918662

  9. Simple beam profile monitor

    SciTech Connect

    Gelbart, W.; Johnson, R. R.; Abeysekera, B.

    2012-12-19

    An inexpensive beam profile monitor is based on the well proven rotating wire method. The monitor can display beam position and shape in real time for particle beams of most energies and beam currents up to 200{mu}A. Beam shape, position cross-section and other parameters are displayed on a computer screen.

  10. Shaped by the environment--adaptation in plants: meeting report based on the presentations at the FEBS Workshop 'Adaptation Potential in Plants' 2009 (Vienna, Austria).

    PubMed

    Siomos, Maria F

    2009-09-01

    As sessile organisms that are unable to escape from inhospitable environments, plants are at the mercy of the elements. Nonetheless, plants have managed to adapt, evolve and survive in some of the harshest conditions on earth. The FEBS Workshop 'Adaptation Potential in Plants', held at the Gregor Mendel Institute of Molecular Plant Biology, Vienna, Austria from 19 to 21 March 2009, provided a forum (including 18 invited talks, 8 selected short talks and 69 posters) for about 100 plant biologists from 32 countries, working in the diverse fields of genetics, epigenetics, stress signalling, and growth and development, to come together and discuss adaptation potential in plants at all its levels.

  11. Adaptation of a polyphagous herbivore to a novel host plant extensively shapes the transcriptome of herbivore and host.

    PubMed

    Wybouw, Nicky; Zhurov, Vladimir; Martel, Catherine; Bruinsma, Kristie A; Hendrickx, Frederik; Grbić, Vojislava; Van Leeuwen, Thomas

    2015-09-01

    Generalist arthropod herbivores rapidly adapt to a broad range of host plants. However, the extent of transcriptional reprogramming in the herbivore and its hosts associated with adaptation remains poorly understood. Using the spider mite Tetranychus urticae and tomato as models with available genomic resources, we investigated the reciprocal genomewide transcriptional changes in both spider mite and tomato as a consequence of mite's adaptation to tomato. We transferred a genetically diverse mite population from bean to tomato where triplicated populations were allowed to propagate for 30 generations. Evolving populations greatly increased their reproductive performance on tomato relative to their progenitors when reared under identical conditions, indicative of genetic adaptation. Analysis of transcriptional changes associated with mite adaptation to tomato revealed two main components. First, adaptation resulted in a set of mite genes that were constitutively downregulated, independently of the host. These genes were mostly of an unknown function. Second, adapted mites mounted an altered transcriptional response that had greater amplitude of changes when re-exposed to tomato, relative to nonadapted mites. This gene set was enriched in genes encoding detoxifying enzymes and xenobiotic transporters. Besides the direct effects on mite gene expression, adaptation also indirectly affected the tomato transcriptional responses, which were attenuated upon feeding of adapted mites, relative to the induced responses by nonadapted mite feeding. Thus, constitutive downregulation and increased transcriptional plasticity of genes in a herbivore may play a central role in adaptation to host plants, leading to both a higher detoxification potential and reduced production of plant defence compounds. PMID:26211543

  12. Mechanically adaptive and shape-memory behaviour of chitosan-modified cellulose whisker/elastomer composites in different pH environments.

    PubMed

    Wu, Tongfei; Su, Yuli; Chen, Biqiong

    2014-09-15

    Biomimetic polymer composites with water-active mechanically adaptive and shape-memory behaviour in different pH environments are synthesised by using chitosan-modified cellulose whiskers (CS-CWs) as the stimulus-responsive phase and thermoplastic polyurethane (TPU) as the resilient matrix. The effect of surface modification on the mechanically adaptive behaviour of CS-CW/TPU composites is investigated by using three representative solutions with various pH values. The results show that surface modification significantly enhances the modulus contrast under wet and dry conditions with the acidic solution as the stimulus, while maintaining the high modulus contrast with the basic solution as the stimulus. CS-CW/TPU composites also exhibit excellent shape-memory effects in all three solutions that are comparable to those pristine CW/TPU composites. Furthermore, activation of force generation in the stretched CS-CW/TPU composites by water absorption/desorption was observed.

  13. Optimization of the beam shaping assembly in the D-D neutron generators-based BNCT using the response matrix method.

    PubMed

    Kasesaz, Y; Khalafi, H; Rahmani, F

    2013-12-01

    Optimization of the Beam Shaping Assembly (BSA) has been performed using the MCNP4C Monte Carlo code to shape the 2.45 MeV neutrons that are produced in the D-D neutron generator. Optimal design of the BSA has been chosen by considering in-air figures of merit (FOM) which consists of 70 cm Fluental as a moderator, 30 cm Pb as a reflector, 2mm (6)Li as a thermal neutron filter and 2mm Pb as a gamma filter. The neutron beam can be evaluated by in-phantom parameters, from which therapeutic gain can be derived. Direct evaluation of both set of FOMs (in-air and in-phantom) is very time consuming. In this paper a Response Matrix (RM) method has been suggested to reduce the computing time. This method is based on considering the neutron spectrum at the beam exit and calculating contribution of various dose components in phantom to calculate the Response Matrix. Results show good agreement between direct calculation and the RM method.

  14. Static shape determination and control for large space structures. I - The flexible beam. II - A large space antenna

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Weeks, C. J.

    1984-01-01

    A method for determining and controlling the shape of large, continuous space structures by means of discrete or pointwise observations and control devices is presented. The general linear boundary value problem satisfied by a one-dimensional shape function is defined, and the existence of solutions is studied. The static shape control problems for one-dimensional systems with and without rigid body modes and the static shape estimation problem are presented and solved. Eigenfunction expansions are presented which provide approximations to the algorithm terms when the associated Green's function is not known. An integral operator approach is applied to the multidimensional static problem, and the results are illustrated with a finite element model of the disk of a large space antenna which assumes no rigid body modes. It is shown that the shape control algorithm must be modified for systems with rigid body modes.

  15. Development and Beam-Shape Analysis of an Integrated Fiber-Optic Confocal Probe for High-Precision Central Thickness Measurement of Small-Radius Lenses

    PubMed Central

    Sutapun, Boonsong; Somboonkaew, Armote; Amarit, Ratthasart; Chanhorm, Sataporn

    2015-01-01

    This work describes a new design of a fiber-optic confocal probe suitable for measuring the central thicknesses of small-radius optical lenses or similar objects. The proposed confocal probe utilizes an integrated camera that functions as a shape-encoded position-sensing device. The confocal signal for thickness measurement and beam-shape data for off-axis measurement can be simultaneously acquired using the proposed probe. Placing the probe’s focal point off-center relative to a sample’s vertex produces a non-circular image at the camera’s image plane that closely resembles an ellipse for small displacements. We were able to precisely position the confocal probe’s focal point relative to the vertex point of a ball lens with a radius of 2.5 mm, with a lateral resolution of 1.2 µm. The reflected beam shape based on partial blocking by an aperture was analyzed and verified experimentally. The proposed confocal probe offers a low-cost, high-precision technique, an alternative to a high-cost three-dimensional surface profiler, for tight quality control of small optical lenses during the manufacturing process. PMID:25871720

  16. Analysis of C-shaped root canal configuration in maxillary molars in a Korean population using cone-beam computed tomography

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Hyoung-Hoon; Min, Jeong-Bum

    2016-01-01

    Objectives The purpose of this study was to investigate the incidence of root fusion and C-shaped root canals in maxillary molars, and to classify the types of C-shaped canal by analyzing cone-beam computed tomography (CBCT) in a Korean population. Materials and Methods Digitized CBCT images from 911 subjects were obtained in Chosun University Dental Hospital between February 2010 and July 2012 for orthodontic treatment. Among them, a total of selected 3,553 data of maxillary molars were analyzed retrospectively. Tomography sections in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes were displayed by PiViewstar and Rapidia MPR software (Infinitt Co.). The incidence and types of root fusion and C-shaped root canals were evaluated and the incidence between the first and the second molar was compared using Chi-square test. Results Root fusion was present in 3.2% of the first molars and 19.5% of the second molars, and fusion of mesiobuccal and palatal root was dominant. C-shaped root canals were present in 0.8% of the first molars and 2.7% of the second molars. The frequency of root fusion and C-shaped canal was significantly higher in the second molar than the first molar (p < 0.001). Conclusions In a Korean population, maxillary molars showed total 11.3% of root fusion and 1.8% of C-shaped root canals. Furthermore, root fusion and C-shaped root canals were seen more frequently in the maxillary second molars. PMID:26877991

  17. Incorporation of fiber optic beam shaping into a laparoscopic probe for laser stimulation of the cavernous nerves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tozburun, Serhat; Lagoda, Gwen A.; Mayeh, Mona; Burnett, Arthur L.; Farahi, Faramarz; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2010-02-01

    The cavernous nerves (CN) course along the prostate surface and are responsible for erectile function. Improved identification and preservation of the CN's is critical to maintaining sexual potency after prostate cancer surgery. Noncontact optical nerve stimulation (ONS) of the CN's was recently demonstrated in a rat model, in vivo, as a potential alternative to electrical nerve stimulation (ENS) for identification of the CN's during prostate surgery. However, the therapeutic window for ONS is narrow, so optimal design of the fiber optic delivery system is critical for safe, reproducible stimulation. This study describes modeling, assembly, and testing of an ONS probe for delivering a small, collimated, flat-top laser beam for uniform CN stimulation. A direct comparison of the magnitude and response time of the intracavernosal pressure (ICP) for both Gaussian and flat-top spatial beam profiles was performed. Thulium fiber laser radiation (λ=1870 nm) was delivered through a 200-μm fiber, with distal fiber tip chemically etched to convert a Gaussian to flat-top beam profile. The laser beam was collimated to a 1-mm-diameter spot using an aspheric lens. Computer simulations of light propagation were used to optimize the probe design. The 10-Fr (3.4-mm-OD) laparoscopic probe provided a constant radiant exposure at the nerve surface. The probe was tested in four rats, in vivo. ONS of the CN's was performed with a 1-mm-diameter spot, 5- ms pulse duration, and pulse rate of 20 Hz for a duration of 15-30 s. The flat-top laser beam profile consistently produced a faster and higher ICP response at a lower radiant exposure than the Gaussian beam profile due, in part, to easier alignment of the more uniform beam with nerve. With further development, ONS may be used as a diagnostic tool for identification of the CN's during laparoscopic and robotic nerve-sparing prostate cancer surgery.

  18. Adaptive array antenna for satellite cellular and direct broadcast communications

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Horton, Charles R.; Abend, Kenneth

    1993-01-01

    Adaptive phased-array antennas provide cost-effective implementation of large, light weight apertures with high directivity and precise beamshape control. Adaptive self-calibration allows for relaxation of all mechanical tolerances across the aperture and electrical component tolerances, providing high performance with a low-cost, lightweight array, even in the presence of large physical distortions. Beam-shape is programmable and adaptable to changes in technical and operational requirements. Adaptive digital beam-forming eliminates uplink contention by allowing a single electronically steerable antenna to service a large number of receivers with beams which adaptively focus on one source while eliminating interference from others. A large, adaptively calibrated and fully programmable aperture can also provide precise beam shape control for power-efficient direct broadcast from space. Advanced adaptive digital beamforming technologies are described for: (1) electronic compensation of aperture distortion, (2) multiple receiver adaptive space-time processing, and (3) downlink beam-shape control. Cost considerations for space-based array applications are also discussed.

  19. Fabrication of metrology test structures for future technology nodes using high-resolution variable-shaped e-beam direct write

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Szikszai, László; Jaschinsky, Philipp; Keil, Katja; Hauptmann, Marc; Mört, Manfred; Seifert, Uwe; Hohle, Christoph; Choi, Kang-Hoon; Thrum, Frank; Kretz, Johannes; Ferreras Paz, Vaeriano; den Boef, Arie

    2009-03-01

    Electron beam direct write (EBDW) can be utilized for developing metrology methods for future technology nodes. Due to its advantage of high resolution and flexibility combined with suitable throughput capability, variable-shaped E-Beam lithography is the appropriate method to fabricate sub 40nm resist structures with accurately defined properties, such as critical dimension (CD), pitch, line edge roughness (LER) and line width roughness (LWR). In this study we present results of exposure experiments intended to serve as an important instrument for testing and fitting various metrology and defect density measurement methods for future technology nodes. We successfully fabricated sub 40nm gratings with varying CD, pitch, programmed defects and LER/LWR. First metrology measurements by means of optical scatterometry on these dense structures show that variation of the signal response is sufficient to detect sub 10nm fluctuations with a satisfying repeatability.

  20. A Structural Approach to Establishing a Platform Chemistry for the Tunable, Bulk Electron Beam Cross-Linking of Shape Memory Polymer Systems

    PubMed Central

    Hearon, Keith; Besset, Celine J.; Lonnecker, Alexander T.; Ware, Taylor; Voit, Walter E.; Wilson, Thomas S.; Wooley, Karen L.; Maitland, Duncan J.

    2014-01-01

    The synthetic design and thermomechanical characterization of shape memory polymers (SMPs) built from a new polyurethane chemistry that enables facile, bulk and tunable cross-linking of low-molecular weight thermoplastics by electron beam irradiation is reported in this study. SMPs exhibit stimuli-induced geometry changes and are being proposed for applications in numerous fields. We have previously reported a polyurethane SMP system that exhibits the complex processing capabilities of thermoplastic polymers and the mechanical robustness and tunability of thermomechanical properties that are often characteristic of thermoset materials. These previously reported polyurethanes suffer practically because the thermoplastic molecular weights needed to achieve target cross-link densities severely limit high-throughput thermoplastic processing and because thermally unstable radiation-sensitizing additives must be used to achieve high enough cross-link densities to enable desired tunable shape memory behavior. In this study, we demonstrate the ability to manipulate cross-link density in low-molecular weight aliphatic thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs (Mw as low as ~1.5 kDa) without radiation-sensitizing additives by incorporating specific structural motifs into the thermoplastic polymer side chains that we hypothesized would significantly enhance susceptibility to e-beam cross-linking. A custom diol monomer was first synthesized and then implemented in the synthesis of neat thermoplastic polyurethane SMPs that were irradiated at doses ranging from 1 to 500 kGy. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA) demonstrated rubbery moduli to be tailorable between 0.1 and 55 MPa, and both DMA and sol/gel analysis results provided fundamental insight into our hypothesized mechanism of electron beam cross-linking, which enables controllable bulk cross-linking to be achieved in highly processable, low-molecular weight thermoplastic shape memory polymers without sensitizing additives. PMID

  1. The combination of digital surface scanners and cone beam computed tomography technology for guided implant surgery using 3Shape implant studio software: a case history report.

    PubMed

    Lanis, Alejandro; Álvarez Del Canto, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of virtual engineering into dentistry and the digitization of information are providing new perspectives and innovative alternatives for dental treatment modalities. The use of digital surface scanners with surgical planning software allows for the combination of the radiographic, prosthetic, surgical, and laboratory fields under a common virtual scenario, permitting complete digital treatment planning. In this article, the authors present a clinical case in which a guided implant surgery was performed based on a complete digital surgical plan combining the information from a cone beam computed tomography scan and the virtual simulation obtained from the 3Shape TRIOS intraoral surface scanner. The information was imported to and combined in the 3Shape Implant Studio software for guided implant surgery planning. A surgical guide was obtained by a 3D printer, and the surgical procedure was done using the Biohorizons Guided Surgery Kit and its protocol. PMID:25822304

  2. The combination of digital surface scanners and cone beam computed tomography technology for guided implant surgery using 3Shape implant studio software: a case history report.

    PubMed

    Lanis, Alejandro; Álvarez Del Canto, Orlando

    2015-01-01

    The incorporation of virtual engineering into dentistry and the digitization of information are providing new perspectives and innovative alternatives for dental treatment modalities. The use of digital surface scanners with surgical planning software allows for the combination of the radiographic, prosthetic, surgical, and laboratory fields under a common virtual scenario, permitting complete digital treatment planning. In this article, the authors present a clinical case in which a guided implant surgery was performed based on a complete digital surgical plan combining the information from a cone beam computed tomography scan and the virtual simulation obtained from the 3Shape TRIOS intraoral surface scanner. The information was imported to and combined in the 3Shape Implant Studio software for guided implant surgery planning. A surgical guide was obtained by a 3D printer, and the surgical procedure was done using the Biohorizons Guided Surgery Kit and its protocol.

  3. Adaptive Radiation Therapy for Postprostatectomy Patients Using Real-Time Electromagnetic Target Motion Tracking During External Beam Radiation Therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Mingyao; Bharat, Shyam; Michalski, Jeff M.; Gay, Hiram A.; Hou, Wei-Hsien; Parikh, Parag J.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Using real-time electromagnetic (EM) transponder tracking data recorded by the Calypso 4D Localization System, we report inter- and intrafractional target motion of the prostate bed, describe a strategy to evaluate treatment adequacy in postprostatectomy patients receiving intensity modulated radiation therapy (IMRT), and propose an adaptive workflow. Methods and Materials: Tracking data recorded by Calypso EM transponders was analyzed for postprostatectomy patients that underwent step-and-shoot IMRT. Rigid target motion parameters during beam delivery were calculated from recorded transponder positions in 16 patients with rigid transponder geometry. The delivered doses to the clinical target volume (CTV) were estimated from the planned dose matrix and the target motion for the first 3, 5, 10, and all fractions. Treatment adequacy was determined by comparing the delivered minimum dose (D{sub min}) with the planned D{sub min} to the CTV. Treatments were considered adequate if the delivered CTV D{sub min} is at least 95% of the planned CTV D{sub min}. Results: Translational target motion was minimal for all 16 patients (mean: 0.02 cm; range: −0.12 cm to 0.07 cm). Rotational motion was patient-specific, and maximum pitch, yaw, and roll were 12.2, 4.1, and 10.5°, respectively. We observed inadequate treatments in 5 patients. In these treatments, we observed greater target rotations along with large distances between the CTV centroid and transponder centroid. The treatment adequacy from the initial 10 fractions successfully predicted the overall adequacy in 4 of 5 inadequate treatments and 10 of 11 adequate treatments. Conclusion: Target rotational motion could cause underdosage to partial volume of the postprostatectomy targets. Our adaptive treatment strategy is applicable to post-prostatectomy patients receiving IMRT to evaluate and improve radiation therapy delivery.

  4. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR).

    PubMed

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O'Brien, Ricky T; Cooper, Benjamin J; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J

    2015-01-21

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating the general knowledge of the thoracic anatomy via anatomy segmentation into the reconstruction. The proposed method, referred as the anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR) method, utilizes the adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) framework, but introduces an additional anatomy segmentation step in every iteration. The anatomy segmentation information is implemented in the reconstruction using a heuristic approach to adaptively suppress over-smoothing at anatomical structures of interest. The performance of AAIR depends on parameters describing the weighting of the anatomy segmentation prior and segmentation threshold values. A sensitivity study revealed that the reconstruction outcome is not sensitive to these parameters as long as they are chosen within a suitable range. AAIR was validated using a digital phantom and a patient scan and was compared to FDK, ASD-POCS and the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) method. For the phantom case, AAIR reconstruction was quantitatively shown to be the most accurate as indicated by the mean absolute difference and the structural similarity index. For the patient case, AAIR resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. the lowest level of noise and streaking) and the highest contrast-to-noise ratios for the tumor and the bony anatomy (i.e. the best visibility of anatomical details). Overall, AAIR was much less prone to over-smoothing anatomical details compared to ASD-POCS and did

  5. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O'Brien, Ricky T.; Cooper, Benjamin J.; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating the general knowledge of the thoracic anatomy via anatomy segmentation into the reconstruction. The proposed method, referred as the anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR) method, utilizes the adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) framework, but introduces an additional anatomy segmentation step in every iteration. The anatomy segmentation information is implemented in the reconstruction using a heuristic approach to adaptively suppress over-smoothing at anatomical structures of interest. The performance of AAIR depends on parameters describing the weighting of the anatomy segmentation prior and segmentation threshold values. A sensitivity study revealed that the reconstruction outcome is not sensitive to these parameters as long as they are chosen within a suitable range. AAIR was validated using a digital phantom and a patient scan and was compared to FDK, ASD-POCS and the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) method. For the phantom case, AAIR reconstruction was quantitatively shown to be the most accurate as indicated by the mean absolute difference and the structural similarity index. For the patient case, AAIR resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. the lowest level of noise and streaking) and the highest contrast-to-noise ratios for the tumor and the bony anatomy (i.e. the best visibility of anatomical details). Overall, AAIR was much less prone to over-smoothing anatomical details compared to ASD-POCS and did

  6. Improving thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam CT reconstruction with anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR)

    PubMed Central

    Shieh, Chun-Chien; Kipritidis, John; O’Brien, Ricky T; Cooper, Benjamin J; Kuncic, Zdenka; Keall, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    Total-variation (TV) minimization reconstructions can significantly reduce noise and streaks in thoracic four-dimensional cone-beam computed tomography (4D CBCT) images compared to the Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used in practice. TV minimization reconstructions are, however, prone to over-smoothing anatomical details and are also computationally inefficient. The aim of this study is to demonstrate a proof of concept that these disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating the general knowledge of the thoracic anatomy via anatomy segmentation into the reconstruction. The proposed method, referred as the anatomical-adaptive image regularization (AAIR) method, utilizes the adaptive-steepest-descent projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) framework, but introduces an additional anatomy segmentation step in every iteration. The anatomy segmentation information is implemented in the reconstruction using a heuristic approach to adaptively suppress over-smoothing at anatomical structures of interest. The performance of AAIR depends on parameters describing the weighting of the anatomy segmentation prior and segmentation threshold values. A sensitivity study revealed that the reconstruction outcome is not sensitive to these parameters as long as they are chosen within a suitable range. AAIR was validated using a digital phantom and a patient scan, and was compared to FDK, ASD-POCS, and the prior image constrained compressed sensing (PICCS) method. For the phantom case, AAIR reconstruction was quantitatively shown to be the most accurate as indicated by the mean absolute difference and the structural similarity index. For the patient case, AAIR resulted in the highest signal-to-noise ratio (i.e. the lowest level of noise and streaking) and the highest contrast-to-noise ratios for the tumor and the bony anatomy (i.e. the best visibility of anatomical details). Overall, AAIR was much less prone to over-smoothing anatomical details compared to ASD-POCS, and

  7. Production data from a Leica ZBA31H+ shaped e-beam mask writer located at the Photronics facility, Manchester, England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stephen; Loughran, Dominic; Osborne, Peter; Sixt, Pierre; Doering, Hans-Joachim

    1999-06-01

    The ZBA31H+) is a variable shaped spot, vector scan e- beam lithography system operating at 20 keV. The specified performance is designed to produce reticles to 250 nanometer design rules, and beyond. In November 98 the acceptance results of a newly installed Leica ZBA31H+), at Photonic Manchester, were presented in a paper at the VDE/VDI 15th European Conference on Mask Technology. This paper is a continuation of that work and presents data from a capability study carried out, on 4000 angstrom EBR9 HS31 resist. Analysis of: mean to target, uniformity, X/Y bias, isolated vs. dense linewidths, linearity, and registration performance of the tool is presented, and the effects of re- iterative develop on process capability compared. Theoretically, a shaped beam system has advantages over raster scan in terms of write time and edge definition capabilities. In this paper, comparative write times against an Etec Mebes 4500 system are included. The ZBA31H+) has to write very small polygons in order to image non-axial or non-45 degree features. The resulting effect on image quality and write time is investigated. In order to improve the fidelity of small OPC structures, Leica have investigated alternative writing strategies, and their results to data are presented here.

  8. Relativistic electron beam generator

    DOEpatents

    Mooney, L.J.; Hyatt, H.M.

    1975-11-11

    A relativistic electron beam generator for laser media excitation is described. The device employs a diode type relativistic electron beam source having a cathode shape which provides a rectangular output beam with uniform current density.

  9. Initial results from a Leica ZBA31H+ shaped E-beam mask writer located at the Photronics Advanced Mask Shop in Manchester, England

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, Stephen; Marshall, Paul; Osborne, Peter; Doering, Hans-Joachim; Ehrlich, Christian

    1999-04-01

    Since production started at the Photronics site in Manchester, England, mask writing capability had been centered on laser based technology. The Manchester site has now taken delivery of its first e-beam system: the ZBA 31H+, manufactured by Leica Microsystems Lithography GMBH. The ZBA 31H+) system was designed for the production of reticles utilizing 250 nanometer design technology and is expected to play a key role in Photronics' future reticle development. The addition of an e-beam system to the current laser based technology, in this instance, has been driven by increasing customer demand and the requirement for reticles containing high resolution OPC structures. The ZBA 31H+) is a variable shaped spot, vector scan electron beam lithography system operating at 20 keV. Enhancements from the previous generation system include improved deflection systems, stage metrology, pattern data handling, and an address grid down to 10 nanometers. This system's specified performance enablers it to produce reticles designed to support semiconductor fabrication utilizing 250 nanometer design rules, and beyond, with high accuracy and productivity.

  10. Comparison of canal transportation and centering ability of rotary protaper, one shape system and wave one system using cone beam computed tomography: An in vitro study

    PubMed Central

    Tambe, Varsha Harshal; Nagmode, Pradnya Sunil; Abraham, Sathish; Patait, Mahendra; Lahoti, Pratik Vinod; Jaju, Neha

    2014-01-01

    Aim: The aim of the present study was to compare the canal transportation and centering ability of Rotary ProTaper, One Shape and Wave One systems using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) in curved root canals to find better instrumentation technique for maintaining root canal geometry. Materials and Methods: Total 30 freshly extracted premolars having curved root canals with at least 10 degrees of curvature were divided into three groups of 10 teeth each. All teeth were scanned by CBCT to determine the root canal shape before instrumentation. In Group 1, the canals were prepared with Rotary ProTaper files, in Group 2 the canals were prepared with One Shape files and in Group 3 canals were prepared with Wave One files. After preparation, post-instrumentation scan was performed. Pre-instrumentation and post-instrumentation images were obtained at three levels, 3 mm apical, 3 mm coronal and 8 mm apical above the apical foramen were compared using CBCT software. Amount of transportation and centering ability were assessed. The three groups were statistically compared with analysis of variance and Tukey honestly significant. Results: All instruments maintained the original canal curvature with significant differences between the different files. Data suggested that Wave One files presented the best outcomes for both the variables evaluated. Wave One files caused lesser transportation and remained better centered in the canal than One Shape and Rotary ProTaper files. Conclusion: The canal preparation with Wave One files showed lesser transportation and better centering ability than One Shape and ProTaper. PMID:25506145

  11. Efficient generation of cylindrically polarized beams in an Yb:YAG thin-disk laser enabled by a ring-shaped pumping distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dietrich, Tom; Rumpel, Martin; Graf, Thomas; Abdou Ahmed, Marwan

    2016-04-01

    The efficient generation of a cylindrically (radially or azimuthally) polarized LG01 mode was investigated using a ring-shaped pumping distribution in a high-power Yb:YAG thin-disk laser setup. This was realized by implementing a 300 mm long customized fused silica fiber capillary in the pump beam path of the pumping optics of a thin-disk laser. Furthermore, a grating waveguide mirror based on the leaky-mode coupling mechanism was used as one of the cavity end mirrors to allow sufficient reduction of the reflectivity of the polarization state to be suppressed in the resonator. In order to achieve efficient laser operation, an optimized mode overlap between the ring-shaped pump spot and the excited first order Laguerre-Gaussian doughnut mode is required. This was investigated theoretically by analyzing the intensity distribution generated by different fiber geometries using a commercially raytracing software (Zemax). The output power, polarization state and efficiency of the emitted laser beam were compared to that obtained with a standard flattop pumping distribution. In particular, the thermal behavior of the disk was investigated since the excessive fluorescence caused by the non-saturated excitation in the center of the homogeneously pumped disk leads to a strong heating of the crystal. This considerable heating source is avoided in the case of the ring-shaped pumping and a reduction of the temperature increase on the disk surface of about 21% (at 280 W of pump power) was observed. This should allow higher pump power densities without increasing the risk of damaging the disk or distorting the polarization purity. With a laser efficiency of 41.2% to be as high as in the case of the flattop pumping, a maximum output power of 107 W was measured.

  12. Pattern nulling by reflector shaping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Havens, D. A.

    1983-12-01

    The applicability of adaptive array concepts to continuous aperture antennas was studied and appropriate aperture field distributions for pattern nulling were found from them. The adaptive array weights were found to be useful as discrete points in a continuous distribution. This distribution could then be used in an aperture integration scheme to produce a nulled pattern. Also studied was the use of geometrical optics to calculate the aperture field distribution of an arbitrarily shaped reflector. Under some restrictions, geometrical optics can provide a useful approximation. Constructing the aperture field of a reflector defined by a discrete grid of points using a numerical ray tracing scheme was also investigated. Certain numerical problems were identified. Finally, an attempt was made to implement the nulled pattern by a well known beam shaping method based on geometrical optics principles. This technique was found to be inadequate. More promising techniques for implementing the aperture distributions were suggested but not pursued in this work.

  13. Rotor-bearing system integrated with shape memory alloy springs for ensuring adaptable dynamics and damping enhancement-Theory and experiment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enemark, Søren; Santos, Ilmar F.

    2016-05-01

    Helical pseudoelastic shape memory alloy (SMA) springs are integrated into a dynamic system consisting of a rigid rotor supported by passive magnetic bearings. The aim is to determine the utility of SMAs for vibration attenuation via their mechanical hysteresis, and for adaptation of the dynamic behaviour via their temperature dependent stiffness properties. The SMA performance, in terms of vibration attenuation and adaptability, is compared to a benchmark configuration of the system having steel springs instead of SMA springs. A theoretical multidisciplinary approach is used to quantify the weakly nonlinear coupled dynamics of the rotor-bearing system. The nonlinear forces from the thermo-mechanical shape memory alloy springs and from the passive magnetic bearings are coupled to the rotor and bearing housing dynamics. The equations of motion describing rotor tilt and bearing housing lateral motion are solved in the time domain. The SMA behaviour is also described by the complex modulus to form approximative equations of motion, which are solved in the frequency domain using continuation techniques. Transient responses, ramp-ups and steady-state frequency responses of the system are investigated experimentally and numerically. By using the proper SMA temperature, vibration reductions up to around 50 percent can be achieved using SMAs instead of steel. Regarding system adaptability, both the critical speeds, the mode shapes and the modes' sensitivity to disturbances (e.g. imbalance) highly depend on the SMA temperature. Examples show that vibration reduction at constant rotational speeds up to around 75 percent can be achieved by changing the SMA temperature, primarily because of stiffness change, whereas hysteresis only limits large vibrations. The model is able to capture and explain the experimental dynamic behaviour.

  14. Gravitational effects on weld pool shape and microstructural evolution during gas tungsten arc and laser beam welding on 304 stainless steel, nickel, and aluminum-4 wt.% copper alloy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kang, Namhyun

    The objective of the present work was to investigate effects of gravitational (acceleration) level and orientation on Ni 200 alloy (99.5% Ni purity), 304 stainless steel, and Al-4 wt.% Cu alloy during gas tungsten arc welding (GTAW) and laser beam welding (LBW). Main characterization was focused on the weld pool shape, microstructure, and solute distribution as a function of gravitational level and orientation. The welds were divided into two classes, i.e., 'stable' and 'unstable' welds, in view of the variation of weld pool shape as a function of gravitational level and orientation. In general, higher arc current and translational GTAW produced more significant effects of gravitational orientation on the weld pool shape than the case of lower arc current and spot welding. Cross-sectional area (CSA) was a secondary factor in determining the stability of weld pool shape. For the 'stable' weld of 304 stainless steel GTAW, the II-U weld showed less convexity in the pool bottom and more depression of the free surface, therefore producing deeper penetration (10--20%) than the case of II-D weld. The II-D weld of 304 stainless steel showed 31% deeper penetration, 28% narrower width, and more hemispherical shape of the weld pool than the case of II-U weld. For GTAW on 304 stainless steel, gravitational level variation from low gravity (LG ≈ 1.2 go) to high gravity (HG ≈ 1.8 go) caused 10% increase in width and 10% decrease in depth while maintaining the overall weld pool volume. Furthermore, LBW on 304 stainless steels showed mostly constant shape of weld pool as a function of gravitational orientation. GTAW on Ni showed similar trends of weld pool shape compared with GTAW on 304 stainless steel, i.e., the weld pool became unstable by showing more penetration in the II-D weld for slower arc translational velocity (V a) and larger weld pool size. However, the Ni weld pool shape had greater stability of the weld pool shape with respect to the gravitational orientation

  15. Transverse writing of three-dimensional tubular optical waveguides in glass with a slit-shaped femtosecond laser beam

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yang; Qi, Jia; Wang, Peng; Chu, Wei; Wang, Zhaohui; Qiao, Lingling; Cheng, Ya

    2016-01-01

    We report on fabrication of tubular optical waveguides buried in ZBLAN glass based on transverse femtosecond laser direct writing. Irradiation in ZBLAN with focused femtosecond laser pulses leads to decrease of refractive index in the modified region. Tubular optical waveguides of variable mode areas are fabricated by forming the four sides of the cladding with slit-shaped femtosecond laser pulses, ensuring single mode waveguiding with a mode field dimension as small as ~4 μm. PMID:27346285

  16. Transverse writing of three-dimensional tubular optical waveguides in glass with a slit-shaped femtosecond laser beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liao, Yang; Qi, Jia; Wang, Peng; Chu, Wei; Wang, Zhaohui; Qiao, Lingling; Cheng, Ya

    2016-06-01

    We report on fabrication of tubular optical waveguides buried in ZBLAN glass based on transverse femtosecond laser direct writing. Irradiation in ZBLAN with focused femtosecond laser pulses leads to decrease of refractive index in the modified region. Tubular optical waveguides of variable mode areas are fabricated by forming the four sides of the cladding with slit-shaped femtosecond laser pulses, ensuring single mode waveguiding with a mode field dimension as small as ~4 μm.

  17. Functional adaptations in the craniofacial morphology of Malagasy primates: shape variations associated with gummivory in the family Cheirogaleidae.

    PubMed

    Viguier, Bénédicte

    2004-12-01

    The infraorder Lemuriformes is characterized by a high level of homoplasy that clouds the evolutionary signal. The analysis of the morphological disparity of the Malagasy primates' crania and mandibles demonstrates the high determinism of functional specializations and developmental constraints, regardless of the phylogeny. In the present work, the weight of functional constraints linked to diet--a putative source of homoplasy--is analyzed first at the level of the infraorder Lemuriformes as a whole, and secondly at the level of a single family, the Cheirogaleidae, chosen because it contains taxa with two different diets (omnivory and gummivory). Malagasy primates are characterized by a great variety of dietary habits: some of them are omnivores, folivores, frugivores, gummivores, insectivores or even specialized hard-object feeders. All cheirogaleids feed on tree exudates, but while gum consumption is occasional or limited for Microcebus, Cheirogaleus and Mirza, gums are the dominant food source for Phaner and Allocebus. Craniofacial shape variations are analyzed using geometric morphometrics: methods based on landmark identification (Procrustes superimpositions) are chosen for cranium shape analysis, and methods based on outline decomposition (elliptical Fourier functions) for study of mandible shape. The morphospaces obtained at the level of the infraorder appear to be highly constrained by dietary habits, especially in the case of the mandibles. At the finer level of the family Cheirogaleidae, the analyses permit (1) separation of craniomandibular shape variation associated with the two dietary categories and (2) among the omnivorous category, to distinguish variation associated with the percentage of gum consumption.

  18. Shape transitions and island nucleation for Si/Ge molecular beam epitaxy on stripe-patterned Si (001) substrate

    SciTech Connect

    Sanduijav, B.; Chen, G.; Springholz, G.; Matei, D.

    2009-09-15

    Si and Ge growth on the stripe patterned Si (001) substrates is studied using scanning tunneling microscopy. During Si buffer growth, the stripe morphology rapidly evolves from multifaceted ''U'' to ''V''-shaped forms. This involves successive transitions between different low energy (11n) side facets, where n continuously decreases from n=3 to 20. Ge growth on such stripes induces the formation of a pronounced side wall ripple structure when the Ge thickness exceeds three monolayers. This ripple structure consists of alternating (105) microfacets oriented perpendicularly to the stripes. Depending of the side wall geometry, Ge nanoislands subsequently nucleate either on the side walls or at the bottom of grooves. The latter only occurs for ''V''-shaped stripes, where the side wall ripples extend all the way from the top to the bottom of the grooves, allowing efficient downward mass transport. For multifaceted ''U'' stripes, the side wall ripples are interrupted by steeper side wall segments such that mounds and subsequently, pyramids and domes grow on the side walls instead of at the bottom of the grooves. The island shapes strongly depend on their position on the pattern topography, which also affects the critical coverage for island nucleation as well as for the transition from pyramids to domes. The mechanisms for nucleation at different positions are clarified by detailed analysis and the role of kinetic as well as energetic factors identified.

  19. SU-D-207-04: GPU-Based 4D Cone-Beam CT Reconstruction Using Adaptive Meshing Method

    SciTech Connect

    Zhong, Z; Gu, X; Iyengar, P; Mao, W; Wang, J; Guo, X

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Due to the limited number of projections at each phase, the image quality of a four-dimensional cone-beam CT (4D-CBCT) is often degraded, which decreases the accuracy of subsequent motion modeling. One of the promising methods is the simultaneous motion estimation and image reconstruction (SMEIR) approach. The objective of this work is to enhance the computational speed of the SMEIR algorithm using adaptive feature-based tetrahedral meshing and GPU-based parallelization. Methods: The first step is to generate the tetrahedral mesh based on the features of a reference phase 4D-CBCT, so that the deformation can be well captured and accurately diffused from the mesh vertices to voxels of the image volume. After the mesh generation, the updated motion model and other phases of 4D-CBCT can be obtained by matching the 4D-CBCT projection images at each phase with the corresponding forward projections of the deformed reference phase of 4D-CBCT. The entire process of this 4D-CBCT reconstruction method is implemented on GPU, resulting in significantly increasing the computational efficiency due to its tremendous parallel computing ability. Results: A 4D XCAT digital phantom was used to test the proposed mesh-based image reconstruction algorithm. The image Result shows both bone structures and inside of the lung are well-preserved and the tumor position can be well captured. Compared to the previous voxel-based CPU implementation of SMEIR, the proposed method is about 157 times faster for reconstructing a 10 -phase 4D-CBCT with dimension 256×256×150. Conclusion: The GPU-based parallel 4D CBCT reconstruction method uses the feature-based mesh for estimating motion model and demonstrates equivalent image Result with previous voxel-based SMEIR approach, with significantly improved computational speed.

  20. How well do women adapt to changes in their body size and shape across the course of pregnancy?

    PubMed

    Duncombe, Dianne; Wertheim, Eleanor H; Skouteris, Helen; Paxton, Susan J; Kelly, Leanne

    2008-05-01

    This study examined body image across pregnancy. Pregnant women ( N = 158) completed measures of general attractiveness, feeling fat, fitness and strength, salience of weight and shape, and ideal and current body size at pre-pregnancy (retrospective), and in early, middle and late pregnancy. Body image was found to be fairly stable across pregnancy such that women who started with greater body concerns maintained them over time. Although women were least satisfied with their stomach size at late pregnancy, women's ideal body shape increased in parallel with increases in body size. Women with the most body concerns reported more depressive symptoms, tendency towards dieting, and smoking during pregnancy suggesting they were at greater risk in terms of health and well-being during pregnancy. PMID:18420758

  1. Laser-Driven Coherent Betatron Oscillation in a Laser-Wakefield Cavity: Formation of Sinusoid Beam Shapes and Coherent Trajectories

    SciTech Connect

    Nemeth, Karoly; Li Yuelin; Shang Hairong; Harkay, Katherine C.; Shen Baifei; Crowell, Robert; Cary, John R.

    2009-01-22

    High amplitude coherent electron-trajectories have been seen in 3D particle-in-cell simulations of the colliding pulse injection scheme of laser-wakefield accelerators in the bubble regime, and explained as a consequence of laser-driven coherent betatron oscillation in our recent paper [K. Nemeth et al., Phys. Rev. Lett. 100, 095002 (2008)]. In the present paper we provide more details on the shape of the trajectories, their relationship to the phase velocity of the laser and indicate the dependence of the phenomenon on the accuracy of the numerical representation and choice of laser/plasma parameters.

  2. Complex interplay between neutral and adaptive evolution shaped differential genomic background and disease susceptibility along the Italian peninsula

    PubMed Central

    Sazzini, Marco; Gnecchi Ruscone, Guido Alberto; Giuliani, Cristina; Sarno, Stefania; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Boattini, Alessio; Gentilini, Davide; Fiorito, Giovanni; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Boiardi, Luigi; Croci, Stefania; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Mantovani, Vilma; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Matullo, Giuseppe; Salvarani, Carlo; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Garagnani, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata

    2016-01-01

    The Italian peninsula has long represented a natural hub for human migrations across the Mediterranean area, being involved in several prehistoric and historical population movements. Coupled with a patchy environmental landscape entailing different ecological/cultural selective pressures, this might have produced peculiar patterns of population structure and local adaptations responsible for heterogeneous genomic background of present-day Italians. To disentangle this complex scenario, genome-wide data from 780 Italian individuals were generated and set into the context of European/Mediterranean genomic diversity by comparison with genotypes from 50 populations. To maximize possibility of pinpointing functional genomic regions that have played adaptive roles during Italian natural history, our survey included also ~250,000 exomic markers and ~20,000 coding/regulatory variants with well-established clinical relevance. This enabled fine-grained dissection of Italian population structure through the identification of clusters of genetically homogeneous provinces and of genomic regions underlying their local adaptations. Description of such patterns disclosed crucial implications for understanding differential susceptibility to some inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes of diverse Italian subpopulations, suggesting the evolutionary causes that made some of them particularly exposed to the metabolic and immune challenges imposed by dietary and lifestyle shifts that involved western societies in the last centuries. PMID:27582244

  3. Inversions and adaptation to the plant toxin ouabain shape DNA sequence variation within and between chromosomal inversions of Drosophila subobscura.

    PubMed Central

    Pegueroles, Cinta; Ferrés-Coy, Albert; Martí-Solano, Maria; Aquadro, Charles F; Pascual, Marta; Mestres, Francesc

    2016-01-01

    Adaptation is defined as an evolutionary process allowing organisms to succeed in certain habitats or conditions. Chromosomal inversions have the potential to be key in the adaptation processes, since they can contribute to the maintenance of favoured combinations of adaptive alleles through reduced recombination between individuals carrying different inversions. We have analysed six genes (Pif1A, Abi, Sqd, Yrt, Atpα and Fmr1), located inside and outside three inversions of the O chromosome in European populations of Drosophila subobscura. Genetic differentiation was significant between inversions despite extensive recombination inside inverted regions, irrespective of gene distance to the inversion breakpoints. Surprisingly, the highest level of genetic differentiation between arrangements was found for the Atpα gene, which is located outside the O1 and O7 inversions. Two derived unrelated arrangements (O3+4+1 and O3+4+7) are nearly fixed for several amino acid substitutions at the Atpα gene that have been described to confer resistance in other species to the cardenolide ouabain, a plant toxin capable of blocking ATPases. Similarities in the Atpα variants, conferring ouabain resistance in both arrangements, may be the result of convergent substitution and be favoured in response to selective pressures presumably related to the presence of plants containing ouabain in the geographic locations where both inversions are present. PMID:27029337

  4. Complex interplay between neutral and adaptive evolution shaped differential genomic background and disease susceptibility along the Italian peninsula.

    PubMed

    Sazzini, Marco; Gnecchi Ruscone, Guido Alberto; Giuliani, Cristina; Sarno, Stefania; Quagliariello, Andrea; De Fanti, Sara; Boattini, Alessio; Gentilini, Davide; Fiorito, Giovanni; Catanoso, Mariagrazia; Boiardi, Luigi; Croci, Stefania; Macchioni, Pierluigi; Mantovani, Vilma; Di Blasio, Anna Maria; Matullo, Giuseppe; Salvarani, Carlo; Franceschi, Claudio; Pettener, Davide; Garagnani, Paolo; Luiselli, Donata

    2016-01-01

    The Italian peninsula has long represented a natural hub for human migrations across the Mediterranean area, being involved in several prehistoric and historical population movements. Coupled with a patchy environmental landscape entailing different ecological/cultural selective pressures, this might have produced peculiar patterns of population structure and local adaptations responsible for heterogeneous genomic background of present-day Italians. To disentangle this complex scenario, genome-wide data from 780 Italian individuals were generated and set into the context of European/Mediterranean genomic diversity by comparison with genotypes from 50 populations. To maximize possibility of pinpointing functional genomic regions that have played adaptive roles during Italian natural history, our survey included also ~250,000 exomic markers and ~20,000 coding/regulatory variants with well-established clinical relevance. This enabled fine-grained dissection of Italian population structure through the identification of clusters of genetically homogeneous provinces and of genomic regions underlying their local adaptations. Description of such patterns disclosed crucial implications for understanding differential susceptibility to some inflammatory/autoimmune disorders, coronary artery disease and type 2 diabetes of diverse Italian subpopulations, suggesting the evolutionary causes that made some of them particularly exposed to the metabolic and immune challenges imposed by dietary and lifestyle shifts that involved western societies in the last centuries. PMID:27582244

  5. RECENT PROGRESS IN EMITTANCE CONTROL OF THE PHOTOELECTRON BEAM USING TRANSVERSE LASER SHAPE MODULATION AND TOMOGRAPHY TECHNIQUE.

    SciTech Connect

    BABZIEN,M.; BEN-ZVI,I.; MALONE,R.; WANG,X.J.; YAKIMENKO,V.

    1999-03-29

    A low emittance beam is very important for many applications, such as short-wavelength Free-Electron Lasers. A diagnostic that provides detailed information on the density distribution of the electron bunch in multi-dimensional phase-space is an essential tool for obtaining small emittance at a reasonable charge. Accurate phase space reconstruction and an analysis using a transport line with nine focusing magnets and techniques to control the optical functions and phases was demonstrated in previous publication. Relatively long time of measurements (approximately 30 minutes) was improved by installing Hall probes into each quadrupole magnet. This eliminated necessity to degauss all quadrupoles between each measurement points. Additional phase control of RF system and driving laser should also improve confidence in 5 dimensional phase space reconstruction.

  6. Spectral shape of a signal in light-induced diffusive pulling (pushing) of particles into a light beam

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Parkhomenko, A. I.; Shalagin, A. M.

    2015-02-01

    We study theoretically how the dependences of transport collision frequencies νi, collision broadening γ and collision shift Δ of the levels on the velocity v of resonant particles influence lightinduced diffusive pulling (pushing) (LDP) effects in the framework of a generalised model of strong collisions in the case of velocitydependent collision rates (so-called kangaroo model). It is found that allowance for the dependences νi(v), γ(v) and Δ(v) does not change the spectral shape of an LDP signal. In particular, in the case of low-intensity radiation, the spectral dependence of the LDP signal coincides with the absorption line shape. It is shown that the magnitude of the LDP effect is proportional to the difference between the diffusion coefficients of particles in the excited and ground states. It is found that the spectral anomalies previously predicted in the LDP effect [Gel'mukhanov F.Kh. JETP Lett., 55, 214 (1992)] for an idealised model of the Lorentz gas (the limiting case of heavy buffer particles), which arise due to the dependences νi(v), γ(v) and Δ(v), are typical only for this gas. At a realistic ratio of the masses of absorbing and buffer particles, spectral anomalies do not occur in the LDP effect.

  7. Pulse shaping effects on weld porosity in laser beam spot welds : contrast of long- & short- pulse welds.

    SciTech Connect

    Ellison, Chad M.; Perricone, Matthew J.; Faraone, Kevin M.; Norris, Jerome T.

    2007-10-01

    Weld porosity is being investigated for long-pulse spot welds produced by high power continuous output lasers. Short-pulse spot welds (made with a pulsed laser system) are also being studied but to a much small extent. Given that weld area of a spot weld is commensurate with weld strength, the loss of weld area due to an undefined or unexpected pore results in undefined or unexpected loss in strength. For this reason, a better understanding of spot weld porosity is sought. Long-pulse spot welds are defined and limited by the slow shutter speed of most high output power continuous lasers. Continuous lasers typically ramp up to a simmer power before reaching the high power needed to produce the desired weld. A post-pulse ramp down time is usually present as well. The result is a pulse length tenths of a second long as oppose to the typical millisecond regime of the short-pulse pulsed laser. This study will employ a Lumonics JK802 Nd:YAG laser with Super Modulation pulse shaping capability and a Lasag SLS C16 40 W pulsed Nd:YAG laser. Pulse shaping will include square wave modulation of various peak powers for long-pulse welds and square (or top hat) and constant ramp down pulses for short-pulse welds. Characterization of weld porosity will be performed for both pulse welding methods.

  8. Study on the Temperature Field Loaded by a Shaped Laser Beam on the Top Surface of a Cylinder Head for Thermal Fatigue Test

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, S.-Z.; Yu, J.; Yu, G.; Tan, Q.-F.; Fan, Z.-W.

    2014-09-01

    In thermal fatigue test, the key point is whether the temperature field on the top surface of cylinder head induced by the heat source can well match it in real service. In order to produce the target temperature field in service which is measured by thermocouples, shaped laser beam generated by diffractive optics element (DOE) is chosen as the heat source to irradiate on the top surface of cylinder head. The DOE is designed based on the Gerchberg-Saxton (GS) algorithm and the simulated temperature field is calculated by finite element model (FEM). The results show that the simulated and experimental temperature field can well match the target one which demonstrates that this method is feasible to produce the target temperature field and can be used in thermal fatigue test.

  9. An innovative approach to achieve re-centering and ductility of cement mortar beams through randomly distributed pseudo-elastic shape memory alloy fibers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shajil, N.; Srinivasan, S. M.; Santhanam, M.

    2012-04-01

    Fibers can play a major role in post cracking behavior of concrete members, because of their ability to bridge cracks and distribute the stress across the crack. Addition of steel fibers in mortar and concrete can improve toughness of the structural member and impart significant energy dissipation through slow pull out. However, steel fibers undergo plastic deformation at low strain levels, and cannot regain their shape upon unloading. This is a major disadvantage in strong cyclic loading conditions, such as those caused by earthquakes, where self-centering ability of the fibers is a desired characteristic in addition to ductility of the reinforced cement concrete. Fibers made from an alternative material such as shape memory alloy (SMA) could offer a scope for re-centering, thus improving performance especially after a severe loading has occurred. In this study, the load-deformation characteristics of SMA fiber reinforced cement mortar beams under cyclic loading conditions were investigated to assess the re-centering performance. This study involved experiments on prismatic members, and related analysis for the assessment and prediction of re-centering. The performances of NiTi fiber reinforced mortars are compared with mortars with same volume fraction of steel fibers. Since re-entrant corners and beam columns joints are prone to failure during a strong ground motion, a study was conducted to determine the behavior of these reinforced with NiTi fiber. Comparison is made with the results of steel fiber reinforced cases. NiTi fibers showed significantly improved re-centering and energy dissipation characteristics compared to the steel fibers.

  10. TH-E-BRE-11: Adaptive-Beamlet Based Finite Size Pencil Beam (AB-FSPB) Dose Calculation Algorithm for Independent Verification of IMRT and VMAT

    SciTech Connect

    Park, C; Arhjoul, L; Yan, G; Lu, B; Li, J; Liu, C

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: In current IMRT and VMAT settings, the use of sophisticated dose calculation procedure is inevitable in order to account complex treatment field created by MLCs. As a consequence, independent volumetric dose verification procedure is time consuming which affect the efficiency of clinical workflow. In this study, the authors present an efficient Pencil Beam based dose calculation algorithm that minimizes the computational procedure while preserving the accuracy. Methods: The computational time of Finite Size Pencil Beam (FSPB) algorithm is proportional to the number of infinitesimal identical beamlets that constitute the arbitrary field shape. In AB-FSPB, the dose distribution from each beamlet is mathematically modelled such that the sizes of beamlets to represent arbitrary field shape are no longer needed to be infinitesimal nor identical. In consequence, it is possible to represent arbitrary field shape with combinations of different sized and minimal number of beamlets. Results: On comparing FSPB with AB-FSPB, the complexity of the algorithm has been reduced significantly. For 25 by 25 cm2 squared shaped field, 1 beamlet of 25 by 25 cm2 was sufficient to calculate dose in AB-FSPB, whereas in conventional FSPB, minimum 2500 beamlets of 0.5 by 0.5 cm2 size were needed to calculate dose that was comparable to the Result computed from Treatment Planning System (TPS). The algorithm was also found to be GPU compatible to maximize its computational speed. On calculating 3D dose of IMRT (∼30 control points) and VMAT plan (∼90 control points) with grid size 2.0 mm (200 by 200 by 200), the dose could be computed within 3∼5 and 10∼15 seconds. Conclusion: Authors have developed an efficient Pencil Beam type dose calculation algorithm called AB-FSPB. The fast computation nature along with GPU compatibility has shown performance better than conventional FSPB. This completely enables the implantation of AB-FSPB in the clinical environment for independent

  11. Influence of the shape and surface oxidation in the magnetization reversal of thin iron nanowires grown by focused electron beam induced deposition

    PubMed Central

    Córdoba, Rosa; Magén, César; Snoeck, Etienne; Koopmans, Bert

    2015-01-01

    Summary Iron nanostructures grown by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) are promising for applications in magnetic sensing, storage and logic. Such applications require a precise design and determination of the coercive field (H C), which depends on the shape of the nanostructure. In the present work, we have used the Fe2(CO)9 precursor to grow iron nanowires by FEBID in the thickness range from 10 to 45 nm and width range from 50 to 500 nm. These nanowires exhibit an Fe content between 80 and 85%, thus giving a high ferromagnetic signal. Magneto-optical Kerr characterization indicates that H C decreases for increasing thickness and width, providing a route to control the magnetization reversal field through the modification of the nanowire dimensions. Transmission electron microscopy experiments indicate that these wires have a bell-type shape with a surface oxide layer of about 5 nm. Such features are decisive in the actual value of H C as micromagnetic simulations demonstrate. These results will help to make appropriate designs of magnetic nanowires grown by FEBID. PMID:26199835

  12. Influence of the shape and surface oxidation in the magnetization reversal of thin iron nanowires grown by focused electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Luis A; Deen, Lorenz; Córdoba, Rosa; Magén, César; Snoeck, Etienne; Koopmans, Bert; De Teresa, José M

    2015-01-01

    Iron nanostructures grown by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) are promising for applications in magnetic sensing, storage and logic. Such applications require a precise design and determination of the coercive field (H C), which depends on the shape of the nanostructure. In the present work, we have used the Fe2(CO)9 precursor to grow iron nanowires by FEBID in the thickness range from 10 to 45 nm and width range from 50 to 500 nm. These nanowires exhibit an Fe content between 80 and 85%, thus giving a high ferromagnetic signal. Magneto-optical Kerr characterization indicates that H C decreases for increasing thickness and width, providing a route to control the magnetization reversal field through the modification of the nanowire dimensions. Transmission electron microscopy experiments indicate that these wires have a bell-type shape with a surface oxide layer of about 5 nm. Such features are decisive in the actual value of H C as micromagnetic simulations demonstrate. These results will help to make appropriate designs of magnetic nanowires grown by FEBID.

  13. Influence of the shape and surface oxidation in the magnetization reversal of thin iron nanowires grown by focused electron beam induced deposition.

    PubMed

    Rodríguez, Luis A; Deen, Lorenz; Córdoba, Rosa; Magén, César; Snoeck, Etienne; Koopmans, Bert; De Teresa, José M

    2015-01-01

    Iron nanostructures grown by focused electron beam induced deposition (FEBID) are promising for applications in magnetic sensing, storage and logic. Such applications require a precise design and determination of the coercive field (H C), which depends on the shape of the nanostructure. In the present work, we have used the Fe2(CO)9 precursor to grow iron nanowires by FEBID in the thickness range from 10 to 45 nm and width range from 50 to 500 nm. These nanowires exhibit an Fe content between 80 and 85%, thus giving a high ferromagnetic signal. Magneto-optical Kerr characterization indicates that H C decreases for increasing thickness and width, providing a route to control the magnetization reversal field through the modification of the nanowire dimensions. Transmission electron microscopy experiments indicate that these wires have a bell-type shape with a surface oxide layer of about 5 nm. Such features are decisive in the actual value of H C as micromagnetic simulations demonstrate. These results will help to make appropriate designs of magnetic nanowires grown by FEBID. PMID:26199835

  14. Sports teams as complex adaptive systems: manipulating player numbers shapes behaviours during football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro; Vilar, Luís; Davids, Keith; Araújo, Duarte; Garganta, Júlio

    2016-01-01

    Small-sided and conditioned games (SSCGs) in sport have been modelled as complex adaptive systems. Research has shown that the relative space per player (RSP) formulated in SSCGs can impact on emergent tactical behaviours. In this study we adopted a systems orientation to analyse how different RSP values, obtained through manipulations of player numbers, influenced four measures of interpersonal coordination observed during performance in SSCGs. For this purpose we calculated positional data (GPS 15 Hz) from ten U-15 football players performing in three SSCGs varying in player numbers (3v3, 4v4 and 5v5). Key measures of SSCG system behaviours included values of (1) players' dispersion, (2) teams' separateness, (3) coupling strength and time delays between participants' emerging movements, respectively. Results showed that values of participants' dispersion increased, but the teams' separateness remained identical across treatments. Coupling strength and time delay also showed consistent values across SSCGs. These results exemplified how complex adaptive systems, like football teams, can harness inherent degeneracy to maintain similar team spatial-temporal relations with opponents through changes in inter-individual coordination modes (i.e., players' dispersion). The results imply that different team behaviours might emerge at different ratios of field dimension/player numbers. Therefore, sport pedagogists should carefully evaluate the effects of changing RSP in SSCGs as a way of promoting increased or decreased pressure on players. PMID:27026887

  15. Sports teams as complex adaptive systems: manipulating player numbers shapes behaviours during football small-sided games.

    PubMed

    Silva, Pedro; Vilar, Luís; Davids, Keith; Araújo, Duarte; Garganta, Júlio

    2016-01-01

    Small-sided and conditioned games (SSCGs) in sport have been modelled as complex adaptive systems. Research has shown that the relative space per player (RSP) formulated in SSCGs can impact on emergent tactical behaviours. In this study we adopted a systems orientation to analyse how different RSP values, obtained through manipulations of player numbers, influenced four measures of interpersonal coordination observed during performance in SSCGs. For this purpose we calculated positional data (GPS 15 Hz) from ten U-15 football players performing in three SSCGs varying in player numbers (3v3, 4v4 and 5v5). Key measures of SSCG system behaviours included values of (1) players' dispersion, (2) teams' separateness, (3) coupling strength and time delays between participants' emerging movements, respectively. Results showed that values of participants' dispersion increased, but the teams' separateness remained identical across treatments. Coupling strength and time delay also showed consistent values across SSCGs. These results exemplified how complex adaptive systems, like football teams, can harness inherent degeneracy to maintain similar team spatial-temporal relations with opponents through changes in inter-individual coordination modes (i.e., players' dispersion). The results imply that different team behaviours might emerge at different ratios of field dimension/player numbers. Therefore, sport pedagogists should carefully evaluate the effects of changing RSP in SSCGs as a way of promoting increased or decreased pressure on players.

  16. Reconstructing cone-beam CT with spatially varying qualities for adaptive radiotherapy: a proof-of-principle study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Wenting; Yan, Hao; Gu, Xuejun; Tian, Zhen; Ouyang, Luo; Yang, Liu; Zhou, Linghong; Cervino, Laura; Wang, Jing; Jiang, Steve; Jia, Xun

    2014-10-01

    With the aim of maximally reducing imaging dose while meeting requirements for adaptive radiation therapy (ART), we propose in this paper a new cone beam CT (CBCT) acquisition and reconstruction method that delivers images with a low noise level inside a region of interest (ROI) and a relatively high noise level outside the ROI. The acquired projection images include two groups: densely sampled projections at a low exposure with a large field of view (FOV) and sparsely sampled projections at a high exposure with a small FOV corresponding to the ROI. A new algorithm combining the conventional filtered back-projection algorithm and the tight-frame iterative reconstruction algorithm is also designed to reconstruct the CBCT based on these projection data. We have validated our method on a simulated head-and-neck (HN) patient case, a semi-real experiment conducted on a HN cancer patient under a full-fan scan mode, as well as a Catphan phantom under a half-fan scan mode. Relative root-mean-square errors (RRMSEs) of less than 3% for the entire image and ~1% within the ROI compared to the ground truth have been observed. These numbers demonstrate the ability of our proposed method to reconstruct high-quality images inside the ROI. As for the part outside ROI, although the images are relatively noisy, it can still provide sufficient information for radiation dose calculations in ART. Dose distributions calculated on our CBCT image and on a standard CBCT image are in agreement, with a mean relative difference of 0.082% inside the ROI and 0.038% outside the ROI. Compared with the standard clinical CBCT scheme, an imaging dose reduction of approximately 3-6 times inside the ROI was achieved, as well as an 8 times outside the ROI. Regarding computational efficiency, it takes 1-3 min to reconstruct a CBCT image depending on the number of projections used. These results indicate that the proposed method has the potential for application in ART.

  17. Radiosurgery of functioning pituitary adenomas: Comparison of different treatment techniques including dynamic and conformal arcs, shaped beams, and IMRT

    SciTech Connect

    Grabenbauer, Gerhard G. . E-mail: gg@strahlen.imed.uni-erlangen.de; Ernst-Stecken, Antje; Schneider, Florian; Lambrecht, Ulrike; Ganslandt, Oliver

    2006-11-15

    Purpose: Evaluation of different techniques including intensity-modulated radiotherapy (IMRT) for stereotactic radiosurgery (SRS) of pituitary adenoma (PA). Methods and Materials: Between January 2003 and February 2005, 152 SRS procedures were performed. Ten patients with PA were compared: conformal vs. dynamic arc treatment with micromultileaf collimator (mMLC) vs. circular collimators vs. 8-10 conformal static mMLC beams with and without IMRT. Prescribed total dose: 18 Gy (90%). Constraints: D{sub max} optic chiasm <8 Gy, Vol{sub 10Gy} temporal lobe <10 mL. End points: coverage, conformity index, homogeneity index (HI), Vol{sub 10Gy} temporal lobe. Results: For the end point 'improvement in coverage,' an advantage with IMRT was noted for 5 of 10 patients as compared with the dynamic arc approach. Volume treated >18 Gy outside the planning target volume was lowest in 9 of 10 patients after IMRT; 1 patient achieved better conformity with circular collimators. As for Vol{sub 10Gy} temporal lobe, an advantage was depicted for 1 of 10 patients with IMRT, the other techniques appearing equally effective in shielding the temporal lobe. With all techniques Vol{sub 10Gy} temporal lobe was <10 mL and D{sub max} optic chiasm <8 Gy. However, using circular collimators yielded the highest maximum dose with 39.8 Gy (HI, 2.2) as compared with 20.46-21.74 Gy (HI, 1.13-1.2) for other approaches. Conclusions: Novalis-based radiosurgery using dynamic arc treatment with mMLC is considered a safe and appropriate approach for SRS of PA.

  18. Adaptation of a ladder beam walking task to assess locomotor recovery in mice following spinal cord injury.

    PubMed

    Cummings, Brian J; Engesser-Cesar, Christie; Cadena, Gilbert; Anderson, Aileen J

    2007-02-27

    Locomotor impairments after spinal cord injury (SCI) are often assessed using open-field rating scales. These tasks have the advantage of spanning the range from complete paralysis to normal walking; however, they lack sensitivity at specific levels of recovery. Additionally, most supplemental assessments were developed in rats, not mice. For example, the horizontal ladder beam has been used to measure recovery in the rat after SCI. This parametric task results in a videotaped archival record of the event, is easily administered, and is unambiguously scored. Although a ladder beam apparatus for mice is available, its use in the assessment of recovery in SCI mice is rare, possibly because normative data for uninjured mice and the type of step misplacements injured mice exhibit is lacking. We report the development of a modified ladder beam instrument and scoring system to measure hindlimb recovery in vertebral T9 contusion spinal cord injured mice. The mouse ladder beam allows for the use of standard parametric statistical tests to assess locomotor recovery. Ladder beam performance is consistent across four strains of mice, there are no sex differences, and inter-rater reliability between observers is high. The ladder beam score is proportional to injury severity and can be used to easily separate mice capable of weight-supported stance up to mice with consistent forelimb to hindlimb coordination. Critically, horizontal ladder beam testing discriminates between mice that score identically in terms of stepping frequency in open-field testing. PMID:17197044

  19. Development length of 0.6-inch prestressing strand in standard I-shaped pretensioned concrete beams

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barnes, Robert Wesley

    The use of 0.6 in prestressing strand at a center-to-center spacing of 2 in allows for the optimal implementation of High Strength Concrete (HSC) in precast, prestressed concrete bridge superstructures. For this strand configuration, partial debonding of strands is a desirable alternative to the more traditional method of draping strands to alleviate extreme concrete stresses after prestress release. Recent experimental evidence suggests that existing code provisions addressing the anchorage of pretensioned strands do not adequately describe the behavior of these strands. In addition, the anchorage behavior of partially debonded strands is not fully understood. These uncertainties have combined to hinder the full exploitation of HSC in pretensioned concrete construction. A research study was conducted to determine the anchorage behavior of 0.6 in strands at 2 in spacing in full-size bridge members. The experimental program consisted of assessing transfer and development lengths in plant-cast AASHTO Type I I-beams. The influence of concrete compressive strengths ranging from 5700 to 14,700 psi was examined. In order to consider the full range of strand surface conditions found in practice, the prestressing strand featured either a bright mill finish or a rusted surface condition. The anchorage behavior of partially debonded strands was investigated by using a variety of strand debonding configurations---including debonded strand percentages as high as 75 percent. A limited investigation of the effect of horizontal web reinforcement on anchorage behavior was performed. Pull-out tests were performed in an attempt to correlate results with the bond quality of the strands used in the study. The correlation between strand draw-in and the anchorage behavior of prestressing strands was also examined. A review of the evolution and shortcomings of existing code provisions for the anchorage of prestressing strands is presented. Results of the experimental program are reported

  20. Optimization of a neutron production target and a beam shaping assembly based on the 7Li( p, n) 7Be reaction for BNCT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Burlon, A. A.; Kreiner, A. J.; Valda, A. A.; Minsky, D. M.; Somacal, H. R.; Debray, M. E.; Stoliar, P.

    2005-02-01

    In this work a thick LiF target was studied through the 7Li( p, n) 7Be reaction as a neutron source for Accelerator-Based Boron Neutron Capture Therapy (AB-BNCT) to provide a testing ground for numerical simulations aimed at producing an optimized neutron production target and beam shaping assembly design. Proton beams in the 1.88-2.0 MeV energy range were produced with the tandem accelerator TANDAR ( TANDem ARgentino) at the Comisión Nacional de Energía Atómica (CNEA) in Buenos Aires, Argentina. A cylindrical water-filled head-phantom, containing a boric acid sample, was irradiated to study the resulting neutron flux. The dose deposited in the boric acid sample was inferred through the Compton-suppressed detection of the gamma radiation produced from the 10B( n, αγ) 7Li capture reaction. The thermal neutron flux was evaluated using bare and Cd-covered activation gold foils. In all cases, Monte Carlo simulations have been done showing good agreement with the experimental results. Extensive MCNP simulation trials have then been performed after the preliminary calculation tool validation in order to optimize a neutron beam shaping assembly. These simulations include a thick Li metal target (instead of LiF), a whole-body phantom, two different moderator-reflector assemblies (Al/AlF 3/LiF, Fluental ®, as moderator and lead as reflector and a combination of Al, PTFE (polytetrafluoroethylene) and LiF as moderator and lead as reflector) and the treatment room. The doses were evaluated for proton bombarding energies of 1.92 MeV (near to the threshold of the reaction), 2.0 MeV, 2.3 MeV (near the reaction resonance) and 2.5 MeV, and for three Fluental ® and Al/PTFE/LiF moderator thicknesses (18, 26 and 34 cm). In a later instance, the effect of the specific skin radiosensitivity (an RBE of 2.5 for the 10B( n, α) 7Li reaction) and a 10B uptake 50% greater than the healthy tissue one, was considered for the scalp. To evaluate the doses in the phantom, a comparison of

  1. Retinoblastoma external beam photon irradiation with a special ‘D’-shaped collimator: a comparison between measurements, Monte Carlo simulation and a treatment planning system calculation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brualla, L.; Mayorga, P. A.; Flühs, A.; Lallena, A. M.; Sempau, J.; Sauerwein, W.

    2012-11-01

    Retinoblastoma is the most common eye tumour in childhood. According to the available long-term data, the best outcome regarding tumour control and visual function has been reached by external beam radiotherapy. The benefits of the treatment are, however, jeopardized by a high incidence of radiation-induced secondary malignancies and the fact that irradiated bones grow asymmetrically. In order to better exploit the advantages of external beam radiotherapy, it is necessary to improve current techniques by reducing the irradiated volume and minimizing the dose to the facial bones. To this end, dose measurements and simulated data in a water phantom are essential. A Varian Clinac 2100 C/D operating at 6 MV is used in conjunction with a dedicated collimator for the retinoblastoma treatment. This collimator conforms a ‘D’-shaped off-axis field whose irradiated area can be either 5.2 or 3.1 cm2. Depth dose distributions and lateral profiles were experimentally measured. Experimental results were compared with Monte Carlo simulations’ run with the penelope code and with calculations performed with the analytical anisotropic algorithm implemented in the Eclipse treatment planning system using the gamma test. penelope simulations agree reasonably well with the experimental data with discrepancies in the dose profiles less than 3 mm of distance to agreement and 3% of dose. Discrepancies between the results found with the analytical anisotropic algorithm and the experimental data reach 3 mm and 6%. Although the discrepancies between the results obtained with the analytical anisotropic algorithm and the experimental data are notable, it is possible to consider this algorithm for routine treatment planning of retinoblastoma patients, provided the limitations of the algorithm are known and taken into account by the medical physicist and the clinician. Monte Carlo simulation is essential for knowing these limitations. Monte Carlo simulation is required for optimizing the

  2. Shaping of adaptive immune responses to soluble proteins by TLR agonists: a role for IFN-alpha/beta.

    PubMed

    Durand, Vanessa; Wong, Simon Yc; Tough, David F; Le Bon, Agnes

    2004-12-01

    Toll-like receptors (TLR) are believed to play a major role in the recognition of invading organisms, although their ability to shape immune responses is not completely understood. Our aim was to investigate in vivo the effect of different TLR stimuli on the generation of antibody responses and the induction of CD8+ T-cell cross-priming after immunization with soluble protein antigens. While all TLR agonists tested elicited the production of immunomodulatory cytokines, marked differences were observed in their ability to stimulate antigen-specific immune responses. Zymosan, poly(I:C) and CpG DNA, which signal through TLR2/6, 3 and 9, respectively, were found to strongly induce the production of IgG2a antibodies, whereas R-848 (TLR7) and LPS (TLR4) did so much more weakly. In contrast, LPS, poly(I:C) and CpG DNA, but not zymosan, induced functional CD8+ T-cell responses against OVA; peptidoglycan (TLR2/?) and R-848 were also ineffective in stimulating cross-priming. Experiments using IFN-alpha/beta R-deficient mice showed that the induction of cross-priming by LPS and poly(I:C) was abrogated in the absence of IFN-alpha/beta signalling, and induction by CpG DNA was greatly reduced. Overall, our results identify LPS as another TLR agonist that is able to generate functional cross-priming against a soluble protein antigen. In addition, our results demonstrate that the ability of TLR stimuli to initiate CD8+ T-cell responses against soluble protein antigens is largely dependent on the IFN-alpha/beta signalling pathway. PMID:15550117

  3. Vacuum isostatic micro/macro molding of PTFE materials for laser beam shaping in environmental applications: large scale UV laser water purification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lizotte, Todd; Ohar, Orest

    2009-08-01

    Accessibility to fresh clean water has determined the location and survival of civilizations throughout the ages [1]. The tangible economic value of water is demonstrated by industry's need for water in fields such as semiconductor, food and pharmaceutical manufacturing. Economic stability for all sectors of industry depends on access to reliable volumes of good quality water. As can be seen on television a nation's economy is seriously affected by water shortages through drought or mismanagement and as such those water resources must therefore be managed both for the public interest and the economic future. For over 50 years ultraviolet water purification has been the mainstay technology for water treatment, killing potential microbiological agents in water for leisure activities such as swimming pools to large scale waste water treatment facilities where the UV light photo-oxidizes various pollutants and contaminants. Well tailored to the task, UV provides a cost effective way to reduce the use of chemicals in sanitization and anti-biological applications. Predominantly based on low pressure Hg UV discharge lamps, the system is plagued with lifetime issues (~1 year normal operation), the last ten years has shown that the technology continues to advance and larger scale systems are turning to more advanced lamp designs and evaluating solidstate UV light sources and more powerful laser sources. One of the issues facing the treatment of water with UV lasers is an appropriate means of delivering laser light efficiently over larger volumes or cross sections of water. This paper examines the potential advantages of laser beam shaping components made from isostatically micro molding microstructured PTFE materials for integration into large scale water purification and sterilization systems, for both lamps and laser sources. Applying a unique patented fabrication method engineers can form micro and macro scale diffractive, holographic and faceted reflective structures

  4. Monte Carlo study for designing a dedicated “D”-shaped collimator used in the external beam radiotherapy of retinoblastoma patients

    SciTech Connect

    Mayorga, P. A.; Brualla, L.; Sauerwein, W.; Lallena, A. M.

    2014-01-15

    Purpose: Retinoblastoma is the most common intraocular malignancy in the early childhood. Patients treated with external beam radiotherapy respond very well to the treatment. However, owing to the genotype of children suffering hereditary retinoblastoma, the risk of secondary radio-induced malignancies is high. The University Hospital of Essen has successfully treated these patients on a daily basis during nearly 30 years using a dedicated “D”-shaped collimator. The use of this collimator that delivers a highly conformed small radiation field, gives very good results in the control of the primary tumor as well as in preserving visual function, while it avoids the devastating side effects of deformation of midface bones. The purpose of the present paper is to propose a modified version of the “D”-shaped collimator that reduces even further the irradiation field with the scope to reduce as well the risk of radio-induced secondary malignancies. Concurrently, the new dedicated “D”-shaped collimator must be easier to build and at the same time produces dose distributions that only differ on the field size with respect to the dose distributions obtained by the current collimator in use. The scope of the former requirement is to facilitate the employment of the authors' irradiation technique both at the authors' and at other hospitals. The fulfillment of the latter allows the authors to continue using the clinical experience gained in more than 30 years. Methods: The Monte Carlo codePENELOPE was used to study the effect that the different structural elements of the dedicated “D”-shaped collimator have on the absorbed dose distribution. To perform this study, the radiation transport through a Varian Clinac 2100 C/D operating at 6 MV was simulated in order to tally phase-space files which were then used as radiation sources to simulate the considered collimators and the subsequent dose distributions. With the knowledge gained in that study, a new, simpler, “D”-shaped

  5. The effect of laser pulse duration and beam shape on the selective removal of novel thin film layers for flexible electronic devices

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moorhouse, C.; Karnakis, D. M.; Kapnopoulos, C.; Laskarakis, A.; Logothetidis, S.; Antonopoulos, G.; Mekeridis, E.

    2015-07-01

    Lightweight, flexible substrates coated with thin film layers <0.5μm thick are commonly utilized for modern electronic devices that are portable and constantly reducing in size, weight, power consumption and material cost. Patterning techniques for these thin films are required to provide device functionality and alternatives to photolithography such as direct write laser processes are particularly attractive. However, for complex devices with multiple thin layers, the quality requirements for laser scribing are extremely high, since each individual thin film layer must be patterned without damaging the underlying thin film layer(s) and also provide a suitable topography for subsequent layers to be deposited upon. Hence, the choice of the laser parameters is critical for a number of emerging thin film materials used in flexible electronic devices such as ITO, pedot:PSS, silver nanoparticle inks, amongst others. These thin films can be extremely sensitive to the thermal interaction with lasers and this report outlines the influence of laser pulse duration and beam shaping techniques on laser patterning of these thin films and the implications for laser system design.

  6. Transport and optical properties of c-axis oriented wedge shaped GaN nanowall network grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    SciTech Connect

    Bhasker, H. P.; Dhar, S.; Thakur, Varun; Kesaria, Manoj; Shivaprasad, S. M.

    2014-02-21

    The transport and optical properties of wedge-shaped nanowall network of GaN grown spontaneously on cplane sapphire substrate by Plasma-Assisted Molecular Beam Epitaxy (PAMBE) show interesting behavior. The electron mobility at room temperature in these samples is found to be orders of magnitude higher than that of a continuous film. Our study reveals a strong correlation between the mobility and the band gap in these nanowall network samples. However, it is seen that when the thickness of the tips of the walls increases to an extent such that more than 70% of the film area is covered, it behaves close to a flat sample. In the sample with lower surface coverage (≈40% and ≈60%), it was observed that the conductivity, mobility as well as the band gap increase with the decrease in the average tip width of the walls. Photoluminescence (PL) experiments show a strong and broad band edge emission with a large (as high as ≈ 90 meV) blue shift, compared to that of a continuous film, suggesting a confinement of carriers on the top edges of the nanowalls. The PL peak width remains wide at all temperatures suggesting the existence of a high density of tail states at the band edge, which is further supported by the photoconductivity result. The high conductivity and mobility observed in these samples is believed to be due to a “dissipation less” transport of carriers, which are localized at the top edges (edge states) of the nanowalls.

  7. General shape optimization capability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chargin, Mladen K.; Raasch, Ingo; Bruns, Rudolf; Deuermeyer, Dawson

    1991-01-01

    A method is described for calculating shape sensitivities, within MSC/NASTRAN, in a simple manner without resort to external programs. The method uses natural design variables to define the shape changes in a given structure. Once the shape sensitivities are obtained, the shape optimization process is carried out in a manner similar to property optimization processes. The capability of this method is illustrated by two examples: the shape optimization of a cantilever beam with holes, loaded by a point load at the free end (with the shape of the holes and the thickness of the beam selected as the design variables), and the shape optimization of a connecting rod subjected to several different loading and boundary conditions.

  8. A shape-adaptive thin-film-based approach for 50% high-efficiency energy generation through micro-grating sliding electrification.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Guang; Zhou, Yu Sheng; Bai, Peng; Meng, Xian Song; Jing, Qingshen; Chen, Jun; Wang, Zhong Lin

    2014-06-18

    Effectively harvesting ambient mechanical energy is the key for realizing self-powered and autonomous electronics, which addresses limitations of batteries and thus has tremendous applications in sensor networks, wireless devices, and wearable/implantable electronics, etc. Here, a thin-film-based micro-grating triboelectric nanogenerator (MG-TENG) is developed for high-efficiency power generation through conversion of mechanical energy. The shape-adaptive MG-TENG relies on sliding electrification between complementary micro-sized arrays of linear grating, which offers a unique and straightforward solution in harnessing energy from relative sliding motion between surfaces. Operating at a sliding velocity of 10 m/s, a MG-TENG of 60 cm(2) in overall area, 0.2 cm(3) in volume and 0.6 g in weight can deliver an average output power of 3 W (power density of 50 mW cm(-2) and 15 W cm(-3)) at an overall conversion efficiency of ∼ 50%, making it a sufficient power supply to regular electronics, such as light bulbs. The scalable and cost-effective MG-TENG is practically applicable in not only harvesting various mechanical motions but also possibly power generation at a large scale. PMID:24692147

  9. TH-E-17A-09: High Quality and Artifact-Free 4D Cone Beam CT and Its Application in Adaptive Treatment Planning

    SciTech Connect

    Niu, K; Li, K; Smilowitz, J; Chen, G

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a high quality 4D cone beam CT (4DCBCT) method that is immune to patient/couch truncations and to investigate its application in adaptive replanning of lung XRT. Methods: In this study, IRB-approved human subject CBCT data was acquired using a Varian on-board imager with 1 minute rotation time. The acquired projection data was retrospectively sorted into 20 respiratory phase bins, from which 4DCBCT images with high SNR and high temporal resolution were generated using Prior Image Constrained Compressed Sensing (PICCS). Couch and patient truncations generate strong data inconsistency in the projection data and artifacts in the 4DCBCT image. They were addressed using an adaptive PICCS method. The artifact-free PICCS-4DCBCT images were used to generate adaptive treatment plans for the same patient at the 10th (day 21) and 30th (day 47) fractions. Dosimetric impacts with and without PICCS- 4DCBCT were evaluated by isodose distributions, DVHs, and other dosimetric factors. Results: The adaptive PICCS-4DCBCT method improves image quality by removing residue truncation artifacts; measured universal image quality increased 37%. The isodose lines and DVHs with PICCS-4DCBCT-based adaptive replanning were significantly more conformal to PTV than without replanning due to changes in patient anatomy caused by progress of the treatment. The mean dose to PTV at the 10th fraction was 63.1Gy with replanning and 64.2Gy without replanning, where the prescribed dose was 60Gy, in 2Gy × 30 fractions. The mean dose to PTV at the 30th fraction was 61.6Gy with replanning and 64.9Gy without replanning. Lung V20 was 37.1%, 41.9% and 43.3% for original plan, 10th fraction plan and 30th fraction plan; with re-planning, Lung V20 was 37.1%, 32%, 27.8%. Conclusion: 4DCBCT imaging using adaptive PICCS is able to generate high quality, artifact-free images that potentially can be used to create replanning for improving radiotherapy of the lung. K Niu, K Li, J Smilowitz: Nothing

  10. SU-E-J-151: Dosimetric Evaluation of DIR Mapped Contours for Image Guided Adaptive Radiotherapy with 4D Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Balik, S; Weiss, E; Williamson, J; Hugo, G; Jan, N; Zhang, L; Roman, N; Christensen, G

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: To estimate dosimetric errors resulting from using contours deformably mapped from planning CT to 4D cone beam CT (CBCT) images for image-guided adaptive radiotherapy of locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: Ten locally advanced non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) patients underwent one planning 4D fan-beam CT (4DFBCT) and weekly 4DCBCT scans. Multiple physicians delineated the gross tumor volume (GTV) and normal structures in planning CT images and only GTV in CBCT images. Manual contours were mapped from planning CT to CBCTs using small deformation, inverse consistent linear elastic (SICLE) algorithm for two scans in each patient. Two physicians reviewed and rated the DIR-mapped (auto) and manual GTV contours as clinically acceptable (CA), clinically acceptable after minor modification (CAMM) and unacceptable (CU). Mapped normal structures were visually inspected and corrected if necessary, and used to override tissue density for dose calculation. CTV (6mm expansion of GTV) and PTV (5mm expansion of CTV) were created. VMAT plans were generated using the DIR-mapped contours to deliver 66 Gy in 33 fractions with 95% and 100% coverage (V66) to PTV and CTV, respectively. Plan evaluation for V66 was based on manual PTV and CTV contours. Results: Mean PTV V66 was 84% (range 75% – 95%) and mean CTV V66 was 97% (range 93% – 100%) for CAMM scored plans (12 plans); and was 90% (range 80% – 95%) and 99% (range 95% – 100%) for CA scored plans (7 plans). The difference in V66 between CAMM and CA was significant for PTV (p = 0.03) and approached significance for CTV (p = 0.07). Conclusion: The quality of DIR-mapped contours directly impacted the plan quality for 4DCBCT-based adaptation. Larger safety margins may be needed when planning with auto contours for IGART with 4DCBCT images. Reseach was supported by NIH P01CA116602.

  11. Vibration control of a flexible beam driven by a ball-screw stage with adaptive notch filters and a line enhancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Shang-Teh; Lian, Sing-Han; Chen, Sheng-Han

    2015-07-01

    For a low-stiffness beam driven by a ball-screw stage, the lateral vibrations cannot be adequately controlled by a collocated compensator based on rotary-encoder feedback alone. Acceleration signals at the tip of the flexible beam are measured for active vibration control in addition to the collocated compensator. A second-order bandpass filter (a line enhancer) and two notch filters are included in the acceleration-feedback loop to raise modal dampings for the first and the second flexible modes without exciting higher-frequency resonances. A novel adaptation algorithm is devised to tune the center frequencies of the notch filters in real time. It consists of a second-order low-pass filter, a second-order bandpass filter and a phase detector. Improvement of the control system is elaborated progressively with the root-locus and bode-plot analyses, along with a physical interpretation. Extensive testings are conducted on an experimental device to verify the effectiveness of the control method.

  12. Programming balanced optical beam splitters in white paint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huisman, Simon R.; Huisman, Thomas J.; Goorden, Sebastianus A.; Mosk, Allard P.; Pinkse, Pepijn W. H.

    2014-04-01

    Wavefront shaping allows for ultimate control of light propagation in multiple-scattering media by adaptive manipulation of incident waves. We shine two separate wavefront-shaped beams on a layer of dry white paint to create two enhanced output speckle spots of equal intensity. We experimentally confirm by interference measurements that the output speckle spots are almost correlated like the two outputs of an ideal balanced beam splitter. The observed deviations from the phase behavior of an ideal beam splitter are analyzed with a transmission matrix model. Our experiments demonstrate that wavefront shaping in multiple-scattering media can be used to approximate the functionality of linear optical devices with multiple inputs and outputs.

  13. Coherent free space optics communications over the maritime atmosphere with use of adaptive optics for beam wavefront correction.

    PubMed

    Li, Ming; Cvijetic, Milorad

    2015-02-20

    We evaluate the performance of the coherent free space optics (FSO) employing quadrature array phase-shift keying (QPSK) modulation over the maritime atmosphere with atmospheric turbulence compensated by use of adaptive optics (AO). We have established a comprehensive FSO channel model for maritime conditions and also made a comprehensive comparison of performance between the maritime and terrestrial atmospheric links. The FSO links are modeled based on the intensity attenuation resulting from scattering and absorption effects, the log-amplitude fluctuations, and the phase distortions induced by turbulence. The obtained results show that the FSO system performance measured by the bit-error-rate (BER) can be significantly improved when the optimization of the AO system is achieved. Also, we find that the higher BER is observed in the maritime FSO channel with atmospheric turbulence, as compared to the terrestrial FSO systems if they experience the same turbulence strength.

  14. EFFECTS OF LASER RADIATION ON MATTER. LASER PLASMA: Surface hardening of steels with a strip-shaped beam of a high-power CO2 laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubovskii, P. E.; Kovsh, Ivan B.; Strekalova, M. S.; Sisakyan, I. N.

    1994-12-01

    A comparative analysis was made of the surface hardening of steel 45 by high-power CO2 laser beams with a rectangular strip-like cross section and a traditional circular cross section. This was done under various conditions. The treatment with the strip-like beam ensured a higher homogeneity of the hardened layer and made it possible to increase the productivity by a factor of 2-4 compared with the treatment by a beam of the same power but with a circular cross section.

  15. Refractive beam shapers for material processing with high power single mode and multimode lasers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laskin, Alexander; Laskin, Vadim

    2013-02-01

    The high power multimode fiber-coupled laser sources, like solid state lasers or laser diodes as well as single mode and multimode fiber lasers, are now widely used in various industrial laser material processing technologies like metal or plastics welding, cladding, hardening, brazing, annealing. Performance of these technologies can be essentially improved by varying the irradiance profile of a laser beam with using beam shaping optics, for example, the field mapping refractive beam shapers like piShaper. Operational principle of these devices presumes transformation of laser beam irradiance distribution from Gaussian to flattop, super-Gauss, or inverse-Gauss profile with high flatness of output wave front, conserving of beam consistency, providing collimated output beam of low divergence, high transmittance, extended depth of field. Important feature of piShaper is in capability to operate with TEM00 and multimode lasers, the beam shapers can be implemented not only as telescopic optics but also as collimating systems, which can be connected directly to fiber-coupled lasers or fiber lasers, thus combining functions of beam collimation and irradiance transformation. This paper will describe some features of beam shaping of high-power laser sources, including multimode fiber coupled lasers, and ways of adaptation of beam shaping optical systems design to meet requirements of modern laser technologies. Examples of real implementations will be presented as well.

  16. Reduction of laser spot elongation in adaptive optics.

    PubMed

    Ribak, Erez N; Ragazzoni, Roberto

    2004-06-15

    Adaptive optics systems measure the wave front to be corrected by use of a reference source, a star, or a laser beacon. Such laser guide stars are a few kilometers long, and when observed near the edges of large telescopes they appear elongated. This limits their utility significantly. However, with more sophisticated launch optics their shape and length can be controlled. We propose to string around the rim of a telescope a number of small telescopes that will add laser beams in the scattering medium to create a compact spot. The method could also be adapted for ocular adaptive optics.

  17. Development of Underwater Laser Scaling Adapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bluss, Kaspars

    2012-12-01

    In this paper the developed laser scaling adapter is presented. The scaling adapter is equipped with a twin laser unit where the two parallel laser beams are projected onto any target giving an exact indication of scale. The body of the laser scaling adapter is made of Teflon, the density of which is approximately two times the water density. The development involved multiple challenges - numerical hydrodynamic calculations for choosing an appropriate shape which would reduce the effects of turbulence, an accurate sealing of the power supply and the laser diodes, and others. The precision is estimated by the partial derivation method. Both experimental and theoretical data conclude the overall precision error to be in the 1% margin. This paper presents the development steps of such an underwater laser scaling adapter for a remotely operated vehicle (ROV).

  18. Probing Shell Structure and Shape Changes in Neutron-Rich Sulfur Isotopes through Transient-Field g-Factor Measurements on Fast Radioactive Beams of {sup 38}S and {sup 40}S

    SciTech Connect

    Davies, A.D.; Becerril, A.; Brown, B.A.; Campbell, C.M.; Cook, J.M.; Dinca, D.C.; Terry, J.R.; Zwahlen, H.; Stuchbery, A.E.; Davidson, P.M.; Mantica, P.F.; Liddick, S.N.; Tomlin, B.E.; Wilson, A.N.; Gade, A.; Mertzimekis, T.J.; Mueller, W.F.; Yoneda, K.

    2006-03-24

    The shell structure underlying shape changes in neutron-rich nuclei near N=28 has been investigated by a novel application of the transient-field technique to measure the first-excited-state g factors in {sup 38}S and {sup 40}S produced as fast radioactive beams. There is a fine balance between proton and neutron contributions to the magnetic moments in both nuclei. The g factor of deformed {sup 40}S does not resemble that of a conventional collective nucleus because spin contributions are more important than usual.

  19. TH-E-17A-06: Anatomical-Adaptive Compressed Sensing (AACS) Reconstruction for Thoracic 4-Dimensional Cone-Beam CT

    SciTech Connect

    Shieh, C; Kipritidis, J; OBrien, R; Cooper, B; Kuncic, Z; Keall, P

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: The Feldkamp-Davis-Kress (FDK) algorithm currently used for clinical thoracic 4-dimensional (4D) cone-beam CT (CBCT) reconstruction suffers from noise and streaking artifacts due to projection under-sampling. Compressed sensing theory enables reconstruction of under-sampled datasets via total-variation (TV) minimization, but TV-minimization algorithms such as adaptive-steepest-descent-projection-onto-convex-sets (ASD-POCS) often converge slowly and are prone to over-smoothing anatomical details. These disadvantages can be overcome by incorporating general anatomical knowledge via anatomy segmentation. Based on this concept, we have developed an anatomical-adaptive compressed sensing (AACS) algorithm for thoracic 4D-CBCT reconstruction. Methods: AACS is based on the ASD-POCS framework, where each iteration consists of a TV-minimization step and a data fidelity constraint step. Prior to every AACS iteration, four major thoracic anatomical structures - soft tissue, lungs, bony anatomy, and pulmonary details - were segmented from the updated solution image. Based on the segmentation, an anatomical-adaptive weighting was applied to the TV-minimization step, so that TV-minimization was enhanced at noisy/streaky regions and suppressed at anatomical structures of interest. The image quality and convergence speed of AACS was compared to conventional ASD-POCS using an XCAT digital phantom and a patient scan. Results: For the XCAT phantom, the AACS image represented the ground truth better than the ASD-POCS image, giving a higher structural similarity index (0.93 vs. 0.84) and lower absolute difference (1.1*10{sup 4} vs. 1.4*10{sup 4}). For the patient case, while both algorithms resulted in much less noise and streaking than FDK, the AACS image showed considerably better contrast and sharpness of the vessels, tumor, and fiducial marker than the ASD-POCS image. In addition, AACS converged over 50% faster than ASD-POCS in both cases. Conclusions: The proposed AACS

  20. Evaluation of deformable image registration for contour propagation between CT and cone-beam CT images in adaptive head and neck radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Li, X; Zhang, Y Y; Shi, Y H; Zhou, L H; Zhen, X

    2016-04-29

    Deformable image registration (DIR) is a critical technic in adaptive radiotherapy (ART) to propagate contours between planning computerized tomography (CT) images and treatment CT/Cone-beam CT (CBCT) image to account for organ deformation for treatment re-planning. To validate the ability and accuracy of DIR algorithms in organ at risk (OAR) contours mapping, seven intensity-based DIR strategies are tested on the planning CT and weekly CBCT images from six Head & Neck cancer patients who underwent a 6 ∼ 7 weeks intensity-modulated radiation therapy (IMRT). Three similarity metrics, i.e. the Dice similarity coefficient (DSC), the percentage error (PE) and the Hausdorff distance (HD), are employed to measure the agreement between the propagated contours and the physician delineated ground truths. It is found that the performance of all the evaluated DIR algorithms declines as the treatment proceeds. No statistically significant performance difference is observed between different DIR algorithms (p> 0.05), except for the double force demons (DFD) which yields the worst result in terms of DSC and PE. For the metric HD, all the DIR algorithms behaved unsatisfactorily with no statistically significant performance difference (p= 0.273). These findings suggested that special care should be taken when utilizing the intensity-based DIR algorithms involved in this study to deform OAR contours between CT and CBCT, especially for those organs with low contrast. PMID:27259084