Science.gov

Sample records for adaptive biased coin

  1. Natural Biased Coin Encoded in the Genome Determines Cell Strategy

    PubMed Central

    Dorri, Faezeh; Mahini, Hamid; Sharifi-Zarchi, Ali; Totonchi, Mehdi; Tusserkani, Ruzbeh; Pezeshk, Hamid; Sadeghi, Mehdi

    2014-01-01

    Decision making at a cellular level determines different fates for isogenic cells. However, it is not yet clear how rational decisions are encoded in the genome, how they are transmitted to their offspring, and whether they evolve and become optimized throughout generations. In this paper, we use a game theoretic approach to explain how rational decisions are made in the presence of cooperators and competitors. Our results suggest the existence of an internal switch that operates as a biased coin. The biased coin is, in fact, a biochemical bistable network of interacting genes that can flip to one of its stable states in response to different environmental stimuli. We present a framework to describe how the positions of attractors in such a gene regulatory network correspond to the behavior of a rational player in a competing environment. We evaluate our model by considering lysis/lysogeny decision making of bacteriophage lambda in E. coli. PMID:25090629

  2. Balance and randomness in sequential clinical trials: the dominant biased coin design.

    PubMed

    Antognini, Alessandro Baldi; Zagoraiou, Maroussa

    2014-01-01

    Efron's biased coin design (BCD) is a well-known randomization technique that helps neutralize selection bias, while keeping the experiment fairly balanced for every sample size. Several extensions of this rule have been proposed, and their properties were analyzed from an asymptotic viewpoint and compared via simulations in a finite setup. The aim of this paper is to push forward these comparisons by taking also into account the adjustable BCD, which is never considered up to now. Firstly, we show that the adjustable BCD performs better than Efron's coin with respect to both loss of precision and randomness. Moreover, the adjustable BCD is always more balanced than the other coins and, only for some sample sizes, slightly more predictable. Therefore, we suggest the dominant BCD, namely a new and flexible class of procedures that can change the allocation rule step by step in order to ensure very good performance in terms of both balance and selection bias for any sample size. Our simulations demonstrate that the dominant BCD is more balanced and, at the same time, less or equally predictable than Atkinson's optimum BCD.

  3. Adaptable history biases in human perceptual decisions

    PubMed Central

    Abrahamyan, Arman; Silva, Laura Luz; Dakin, Steven C.; Gardner, Justin L.

    2016-01-01

    When making choices under conditions of perceptual uncertainty, past experience can play a vital role. However, it can also lead to biases that worsen decisions. Consistent with previous observations, we found that human choices are influenced by the success or failure of past choices even in a standard two-alternative detection task, where choice history is irrelevant. The typical bias was one that made the subject switch choices after a failure. These choice history biases led to poorer performance and were similar for observers in different countries. They were well captured by a simple logistic regression model that had been previously applied to describe psychophysical performance in mice. Such irrational biases seem at odds with the principles of reinforcement learning, which would predict exquisite adaptability to choice history. We therefore asked whether subjects could adapt their irrational biases following changes in trial order statistics. Adaptability was strong in the direction that confirmed a subject’s default biases, but weaker in the opposite direction, so that existing biases could not be eradicated. We conclude that humans can adapt choice history biases, but cannot easily overcome existing biases even if irrational in the current context: adaptation is more sensitive to confirmatory than contradictory statistics. PMID:27330086

  4. Adaptive Variable Bias Magnetic Bearing Control

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Johnson, Dexter; Brown, Gerald V.; Inman, Daniel J.

    1998-01-01

    Most magnetic bearing control schemes use a bias current with a superimposed control current to linearize the relationship between the control current and the force it delivers. With the existence of the bias current, even in no load conditions, there is always some power consumption. In aerospace applications, power consumption becomes an important concern. In response to this concern, an alternative magnetic bearing control method, called Adaptive Variable Bias Control (AVBC), has been developed and its performance examined. The AVBC operates primarily as a proportional-derivative controller with a relatively slow, bias current dependent, time-varying gain. The AVBC is shown to reduce electrical power loss, be nominally stable, and provide control performance similar to conventional bias control. Analytical, computer simulation, and experimental results are presented in this paper.

  5. Free energy calculations: an efficient adaptive biasing potential method.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Bradley M; Legoll, Frédéric; Lelièvre, Tony; Stoltz, Gabriel; Fleurat-Lessard, Paul

    2010-05-06

    We develop an efficient sampling and free energy calculation technique within the adaptive biasing potential (ABP) framework. By mollifying the density of states we obtain an approximate free energy and an adaptive bias potential that is computed directly from the population along the coordinates of the free energy. Because of the mollifier, the bias potential is "nonlocal", and its gradient admits a simple analytic expression. A single observation of the reaction coordinate can thus be used to update the approximate free energy at every point within a neighborhood of the observation. This greatly reduces the equilibration time of the adaptive bias potential. This approximation introduces two parameters: strength of mollification and the zero of energy of the bias potential. While we observe that the approximate free energy is a very good estimate of the actual free energy for a large range of mollification strength, we demonstrate that the errors associated with the mollification may be removed via deconvolution. The zero of energy of the bias potential, which is easy to choose, influences the speed of convergence but not the limiting accuracy. This method is simple to apply to free energy or mean force computation in multiple dimensions and does not involve second derivatives of the reaction coordinates, matrix manipulations nor on-the-fly adaptation of parameters. For the alanine dipeptide test case, the new method is found to gain as much as a factor of 10 in efficiency as compared to two basic implementations of the adaptive biasing force methods, and it is shown to be as efficient as well-tempered metadynamics with the postprocess deconvolution giving a clear advantage to the mollified density of states method.

  6. A reduced bias delay lock loop for adaptive filters

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fan, Guangteng; Huang, Yangbo; Su, Yingxue; Li, Jingyuan; Sun, Guangfu

    2017-01-01

    Narrowband interferences (NBIs) severely degrade the quality of a received signal and can hinder the operation of GPS receivers, and therefore, they are commonly excised using an adaptive transversal filter. This filter does not cause code tracking bias in the case of an ideal analog receiver channel when its magnitude and phase response are constant; however, distortion is induced by RF cables, amplifiers, and mixers that results in an asymmetric correlation function. This correlation function is further deformed by the adaptive transversal filter, resulting in a nonzero bias. Given the adaptive nature of this transversal filter, the bias varies based on the jamming pattern. For precision navigation applications, this bias must be mitigated. With this problem in mind, a new technique called amplitude estimating delay lock loop (AEDLL) is presented. By using data related to a known structure of the adaptive transversal filter, the proposed method only needs to estimate the amplitude of the correlation function and revise the correlation function for code tracking. Simulations show that the AEDLL method is capable of reducing the RMSE of code tracking bias to less than 0.12 ns, which is significantly smaller than that achieved using existing methods.

  7. A Nonlinear Adaptive Filter for Gyro Thermal Bias Error Cancellation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Galante, Joseph M.; Sanner, Robert M.

    2012-01-01

    Deterministic errors in angular rate gyros, such as thermal biases, can have a significant impact on spacecraft attitude knowledge. In particular, thermal biases are often the dominant error source in MEMS gyros after calibration. Filters, such as J\\,fEKFs, are commonly used to mitigate the impact of gyro errors and gyro noise on spacecraft closed loop pointing accuracy, but often have difficulty in rapidly changing thermal environments and can be computationally expensive. In this report an existing nonlinear adaptive filter is used as the basis for a new nonlinear adaptive filter designed to estimate and cancel thermal bias effects. A description of the filter is presented along with an implementation suitable for discrete-time applications. A simulation analysis demonstrates the performance of the filter in the presence of noisy measurements and provides a comparison with existing techniques.

  8. Coining seal

    DOEpatents

    Mancebo, Lloyd

    1976-01-01

    A bakeable high pressure-vacuum seal is provided in which an inductile sealing element having a butterfly shaped crosssection with protruding sharp edges at each of the four corners, is sandwiched between two ductile sealing elements, the sandwiched assembly then being compressed between the surfaces of the flange elements of a high pressure or high vacuum vessel to coin the ductile sealing element into the surface of the inductile sealing element as well as the surfaces of the flange elements.

  9. Visual Bias Predicts Gait Adaptability in Novel Sensory Discordant Conditions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brady, Rachel A.; Batson, Crystal D.; Peters, Brian T.; Mulavara, Ajitkumar P.; Bloomberg, Jacob J.

    2010-01-01

    We designed a gait training study that presented combinations of visual flow and support-surface manipulations to investigate the response of healthy adults to novel discordant sensorimotor conditions. We aimed to determine whether a relationship existed between subjects visual dependence and their postural stability and cognitive performance in a new discordant environment presented at the conclusion of training (Transfer Test). Our training system comprised a treadmill placed on a motion base facing a virtual visual scene that provided a variety of sensory challenges. Ten healthy adults completed 3 training sessions during which they walked on a treadmill at 1.1 m/s while receiving discordant support-surface and visual manipulations. At the first visit, in an analysis of normalized torso translation measured in a scene-movement-only condition, 3 of 10 subjects were classified as visually dependent. During the Transfer Test, all participants received a 2-minute novel exposure. In a combined measure of stride frequency and reaction time, the non-visually dependent subjects showed improved adaptation on the Transfer Test compared to their visually dependent counterparts. This finding suggests that individual differences in the ability to adapt to new sensorimotor conditions may be explained by individuals innate sensory biases. An accurate preflight assessment of crewmembers biases for visual dependence could be used to predict their propensities to adapt to novel sensory conditions. It may also facilitate the development of customized training regimens that could expedite adaptation to alternate gravitational environments.

  10. Smoothed Biasing Forces Yield Unbiased Free Energies with the Extended-System Adaptive Biasing Force Method.

    PubMed

    Lesage, Adrien; Lelièvre, Tony; Stoltz, Gabriel; Hénin, Jérôme

    2016-12-27

    We report a theoretical description and numerical tests of the extended-system adaptive biasing force method (eABF), together with an unbiased estimator of the free energy surface from eABF dynamics. Whereas the original ABF approach uses its running estimate of the free energy gradient as the adaptive biasing force, eABF is built on the idea that the exact free energy gradient is not necessary for efficient exploration, and that it is still possible to recover the exact free energy separately with an appropriate estimator. eABF does not directly bias the collective coordinates of interest, but rather fictitious variables that are harmonically coupled to them; therefore is does not require second derivative estimates, making it easily applicable to a wider range of problems than ABF. Furthermore, the extended variables present a smoother, coarse-grain-like sampling problem on a mollified free energy surface, leading to faster exploration and convergence. We also introduce CZAR, a simple, unbiased free energy estimator from eABF trajectories. eABF/CZAR converges to the physical free energy surface faster than standard ABF for a wide range of parameters.

  11. Experimental loss-tolerant quantum coin flipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berlín, Guido; Brassard, Gilles; Bussières, Félix; Godbout, Nicolas; Slater, Joshua A.; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2011-11-01

    Coin flipping is a cryptographic primitive in which two distrustful parties wish to generate a random bit to choose between two alternatives. This task is impossible to realize when it relies solely on the asynchronous exchange of classical bits: one dishonest player has complete control over the final outcome. It is only when coin flipping is supplemented with quantum communication that this problem can be alleviated, although partial bias remains. Unfortunately, practical systems are subject to loss of quantum data, which allows a cheater to force a bias that is complete or arbitrarily close to complete in all previous protocols and implementations. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of a quantum coin-flipping protocol for which loss cannot be exploited to cheat better. By eliminating the problem of loss, which is unavoidable in any realistic setting, quantum coin flipping takes a significant step towards real-world applications of quantum communication.

  12. Experimental loss-tolerant quantum coin flipping

    PubMed Central

    Berlín, Guido; Brassard, Gilles; Bussières, Félix; Godbout, Nicolas; Slater, Joshua A.; Tittel, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Coin flipping is a cryptographic primitive in which two distrustful parties wish to generate a random bit to choose between two alternatives. This task is impossible to realize when it relies solely on the asynchronous exchange of classical bits: one dishonest player has complete control over the final outcome. It is only when coin flipping is supplemented with quantum communication that this problem can be alleviated, although partial bias remains. Unfortunately, practical systems are subject to loss of quantum data, which allows a cheater to force a bias that is complete or arbitrarily close to complete in all previous protocols and implementations. Here we report on the first experimental demonstration of a quantum coin-flipping protocol for which loss cannot be exploited to cheat better. By eliminating the problem of loss, which is unavoidable in any realistic setting, quantum coin flipping takes a significant step towards real-world applications of quantum communication. PMID:22127057

  13. Adaptive Control in the Presence of Simultaneous Sensor Bias and Actuator Failures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Joshi, Suresh M.

    2012-01-01

    The problem of simultaneously accommodating unknown sensor biases and unknown actuator failures in uncertain systems is considered in a direct model reference adaptive control (MRAC) setting for state tracking using state feedback. Sensor biases and actuator faults may be present at the outset or may occur at unknown instants of time during operation. A modified MRAC law is proposed, which combines sensor bias estimation with control gain adaptation for accommodation of sensor biases and actuator failures. This control law is shown to provide signal boundedness in the resulting system. For the case when an external asymptotically stable sensor bias estimator is available, an MRAC law is developed to accomplish asymptotic state tracking and signal boundedness. For a special case wherein biases are only present in the rate measurements and bias-free position measurements are available, an MRAC law is developed using a model-independent bias estimator, and is shown to provide asymptotic state tracking with signal boundedness.

  14. Boccioni's coin.

    PubMed

    Giuntini, Sergio; Teja, Angela

    2011-01-01

    The Ardito was a fighter as well as a competitor whose status as a 'warrior' was based on courage and superior physical performance: a superior man. In addition, his exuberant conduct, both on and off the battlefield, introduced a significant new sub-culture into post-war Italian society, contributing to the attachment of notable value to virility and Mussolini's cult of the 'strong man'. The purpose of this research is to analyse the impact of this 'arditismo' (spirit of daring) on the early post-war period in particular, including the different 'male image' of the Italian citizen, and to study the sense of virility in the transition from the liberal, easy-going 'Little Italy' of Giovanni Giolitti (1842-1928) to a manly, combative, and ambitious nation. Together with some of the vitalistic tendencies in the Futurist movement, the main characteristics and mentality of the ex-Ardito (former Special Forces) would thus be significantly influential in the ideology of nascent Fascism. Indeed, the 'arditismo' influence, together with the article and social movement known as Futurism would constitute the two most highly structured foundations of early Fascist culture, bringing a political and social revolution necessary to create a 'new man'. It was as if the Arditi and the new method of military training had transferred their experience from the military into civilian life, contributing to a renewal of the image of the Italian male in the collective imagination. Indirectly, the image of women would also begin to absorb and adapt to new sports models imported from abroad, which would create for the Italian Ardito, a grudgingly tolerated rival. The main sources for this paper are the archives of the Historical Office of the Army, advertising and manuals from the late nineteenth to the early twentieth century, placards and graphic publicity from books and journals or private collections, and exhibition catalogues.

  15. On the nature of cultural transmission networks: evidence from Fijian villages for adaptive learning biases.

    PubMed

    Henrich, Joseph; Broesch, James

    2011-04-12

    Unlike other animals, humans are heavily dependent on cumulative bodies of culturally learned information. Selective processes operating on this socially learned information can produce complex, functionally integrated, behavioural repertoires-cultural adaptations. To understand such non-genetic adaptations, evolutionary theorists propose that (i) natural selection has favoured the emergence of psychological biases for learning from those individuals most likely to possess adaptive information, and (ii) when these psychological learning biases operate in populations, over generations, they can generate cultural adaptations. Many laboratory experiments now provide evidence for these psychological biases. Here, we bridge from the laboratory to the field by examining if and how these biases emerge in a small-scale society. Data from three cultural domains-fishing, growing yams and using medicinal plants-show that Fijian villagers (ages 10 and up) are biased to learn from others perceived as more successful/knowledgeable, both within and across domains (prestige effects). We also find biases for sex and age, as well as proximity effects. These selective and centralized oblique transmission networks set up the conditions for adaptive cultural evolution.

  16. On the nature of cultural transmission networks: evidence from Fijian villages for adaptive learning biases

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Joseph; Broesch, James

    2011-01-01

    Unlike other animals, humans are heavily dependent on cumulative bodies of culturally learned information. Selective processes operating on this socially learned information can produce complex, functionally integrated, behavioural repertoires—cultural adaptations. To understand such non-genetic adaptations, evolutionary theorists propose that (i) natural selection has favoured the emergence of psychological biases for learning from those individuals most likely to possess adaptive information, and (ii) when these psychological learning biases operate in populations, over generations, they can generate cultural adaptations. Many laboratory experiments now provide evidence for these psychological biases. Here, we bridge from the laboratory to the field by examining if and how these biases emerge in a small-scale society. Data from three cultural domains—fishing, growing yams and using medicinal plants—show that Fijian villagers (ages 10 and up) are biased to learn from others perceived as more successful/knowledgeable, both within and across domains (prestige effects). We also find biases for sex and age, as well as proximity effects. These selective and centralized oblique transmission networks set up the conditions for adaptive cultural evolution. PMID:21357236

  17. Some Considerations for Eliminating Biases in Ability Estimation in Computerized Adaptive Testing.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Samejima, Fumiko

    Item response theory (IRT) has been adapted as the theoretical foundation of computerized adaptive testing (CAT) for several decades. In applying IRT to CAT, there are certain considerations that are essential, and yet tend to be neglected. These essential issues are addressed in this paper, and then several ways of eliminating noise and bias in…

  18. Experimental quantum-walk revival with a time-dependent coin.

    PubMed

    Xue, P; Zhang, R; Qin, H; Zhan, X; Bian, Z H; Li, J; Sanders, Barry C

    2015-04-10

    We demonstrate a quantum walk with time-dependent coin bias. With this technique we realize an experimental single-photon one-dimensional quantum walk with a linearly ramped time-dependent coin flip operation and thereby demonstrate two periodic revivals of the walker distribution. In our beam-displacer interferometer, the walk corresponds to movement between discretely separated transverse modes of the field serving as lattice sites, and the time-dependent coin flip is effected by implementing a different angle between the optical axis of half-wave plate and the light propagation at each step. Each of the quantum-walk steps required to realize a revival comprises two sequential orthogonal coin-flip operators, with one coin having constant bias and the other coin having a time-dependent ramped coin bias, followed by a conditional translation of the walker.

  19. Learning to speciate: The biased learning of mate preferences promotes adaptive radiation

    PubMed Central

    Gilman, R. Tucker; Kozak, Genevieve M.

    2015-01-01

    Bursts of rapid repeated speciation called adaptive radiations have generated much of Earth's biodiversity and fascinated biologists since Darwin, but we still do not know why some lineages radiate and others do not. Understanding what causes assortative mating to evolve rapidly and repeatedly in the same lineage is key to understanding adaptive radiation. Many species that have undergone adaptive radiations exhibit mate preference learning, where individuals acquire mate preferences by observing the phenotypes of other members of their populations. Mate preference learning can be biased if individuals also learn phenotypes to avoid in mates, and shift their preferences away from these avoided phenotypes. We used individual‐based computational simulations to study whether biased and unbiased mate preference learning promotes ecological speciation and adaptive radiation. We found that ecological speciation can be rapid and repeated when mate preferences are biased, but is inhibited when mate preferences are learned without bias. Our results suggest that biased mate preference learning may play an important role in generating animal biodiversity through adaptive radiation. PMID:26459795

  20. Learning to speciate: The biased learning of mate preferences promotes adaptive radiation.

    PubMed

    Gilman, R Tucker; Kozak, Genevieve M

    2015-11-01

    Bursts of rapid repeated speciation called adaptive radiations have generated much of Earth's biodiversity and fascinated biologists since Darwin, but we still do not know why some lineages radiate and others do not. Understanding what causes assortative mating to evolve rapidly and repeatedly in the same lineage is key to understanding adaptive radiation. Many species that have undergone adaptive radiations exhibit mate preference learning, where individuals acquire mate preferences by observing the phenotypes of other members of their populations. Mate preference learning can be biased if individuals also learn phenotypes to avoid in mates, and shift their preferences away from these avoided phenotypes. We used individual-based computational simulations to study whether biased and unbiased mate preference learning promotes ecological speciation and adaptive radiation. We found that ecological speciation can be rapid and repeated when mate preferences are biased, but is inhibited when mate preferences are learned without bias. Our results suggest that biased mate preference learning may play an important role in generating animal biodiversity through adaptive radiation.

  1. Constrained adaptive bias correction for satellite radiances assimilation in the ECMWF 4D-Var

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Wei; Bormann, Niels

    2016-04-01

    Satellite radiance observations are typically affected by biases that arise from uncertainties in the absolute calibration, the radiative transfer modeling, or other aspects. These biases have to be removed for the successful assimilation of the data in NWP systems. Two key problems have been identified in bias correction: Firstly, bias corrections can drift towards unrealistic values in regions where there is strong model error and relatively few "anchor" observations, ie, observations that have little systematic error and therefore allow the separation between model and observation bias. Examples where this has been particularly problematic are channels sensitive to ozone or stratospheric temperature. Secondly, there is undesired interaction between the quality control and bias correction for observations where bias-corrected observation departures are used for quality control and where these departures show skewed distributions (e.g., in case of cloud detection). In the study, we investigated potential solutions to these problems by providing further constraints using potential available information, such as constraints on the size of the bias correction and innovative bias correction metrics using uncertainty estimation from calibration and radiative transfer. This has been studied in the full ECMWF global 4D-Var system, using data from microwave sounders which are sensitive to stratospheric temperature. The resulting enhanced bias corrections was assessed in the context of other assimilated observations (in particular radiosondes and GPS radio occultation measurements), and through comparisons of MLS temperature retrieval data in stratosphere and mesosphere. The constrained adaptive bias correction of AMSU-A stratospheric sounding channels reduces the biases in stratosphere and improves the medium range forecasts in both stratosphere and troposphere.

  2. CRISPR adaptation biases explain preference for acquisition of foreign DNA.

    PubMed

    Levy, Asaf; Goren, Moran G; Yosef, Ido; Auster, Oren; Manor, Miriam; Amitai, Gil; Edgar, Rotem; Qimron, Udi; Sorek, Rotem

    2015-04-23

    CRISPR-Cas (clustered, regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats coupled with CRISPR-associated proteins) is a bacterial immunity system that protects against invading phages or plasmids. In the process of CRISPR adaptation, short pieces of DNA ('spacers') are acquired from foreign elements and integrated into the CRISPR array. So far, it has remained a mystery how spacers are preferentially acquired from the foreign DNA while the self chromosome is avoided. Here we show that spacer acquisition is replication-dependent, and that DNA breaks formed at stalled replication forks promote spacer acquisition. Chromosomal hotspots of spacer acquisition were confined by Chi sites, which are sequence octamers highly enriched on the bacterial chromosome, suggesting that these sites limit spacer acquisition from self DNA. We further show that the avoidance of self is mediated by the RecBCD double-stranded DNA break repair complex. Our results suggest that, in Escherichia coli, acquisition of new spacers largely depends on RecBCD-mediated processing of double-stranded DNA breaks occurring primarily at replication forks, and that the preference for foreign DNA is achieved through the higher density of Chi sites on the self chromosome, in combination with the higher number of forks on the foreign DNA. This model explains the strong preference to acquire spacers both from high copy plasmids and from phages.

  3. The Problem of Bias in Person Parameter Estimation in Adaptive Testing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Doebler, Anna

    2012-01-01

    It is shown that deviations of estimated from true values of item difficulty parameters, caused for example by item calibration errors, the neglect of randomness of item difficulty parameters, testlet effects, or rule-based item generation, can lead to systematic bias in point estimation of person parameters in the context of adaptive testing.…

  4. Experimental Quantum Coin Tossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Molina-Terriza, G.; Vaziri, A.; Ursin, R.; Zeilinger, A.

    2005-01-01

    In this Letter we present the first implementation of a quantum coin-tossing protocol. This protocol belongs to a class of “two-party” cryptographic problems, where the communication partners distrust each other. As with a number of such two-party protocols, the best implementation of the quantum coin tossing requires qutrits, resulting in a higher security than using qubits. In this way, we have also performed the first complete quantum communication protocol with qutrits. In our experiment the two partners succeeded to remotely toss a row of coins using photons entangled in the orbital angular momentum. We also show the experimental bounds of a possible cheater and the ways of detecting him.

  5. Pandemic influenza A virus codon usage revisited: biases, adaptation and implications for vaccine strain development

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Influenza A virus (IAV) is a member of the family Orthomyxoviridae and contains eight segments of a single-stranded RNA genome with negative polarity. The first influenza pandemic of this century was declared in April of 2009, with the emergence of a novel H1N1 IAV strain (H1N1pdm) in Mexico and USA. Understanding the extent and causes of biases in codon usage is essential to the understanding of viral evolution. A comprehensive study to investigate the effect of selection pressure imposed by the human host on the codon usage of an emerging, pandemic IAV strain and the trends in viral codon usage involved over the pandemic time period is much needed. Results We performed a comprehensive codon usage analysis of 310 IAV strains from the pandemic of 2009. Highly biased codon usage for Ala, Arg, Pro, Thr and Ser were found. Codon usage is strongly influenced by underlying biases in base composition. When correspondence analysis (COA) on relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU) is applied, the distribution of IAV ORFs in the plane defined by the first two major dimensional factors showed that different strains are located at different places, suggesting that IAV codon usage also reflects an evolutionary process. Conclusions A general association between codon usage bias, base composition and poor adaptation of the virus to the respective host tRNA pool, suggests that mutational pressure is the main force shaping H1N1 pdm IAV codon usage. A dynamic process is observed in the variation of codon usage of the strains enrolled in these studies. These results suggest a balance of mutational bias and natural selection, which allow the virus to explore and re-adapt its codon usage to different environments. Recoding of IAV taking into account codon bias, base composition and adaptation to host tRNA may provide important clues to develop new and appropriate vaccines. PMID:23134595

  6. Prism adaptation reverses the local processing bias in patients with right temporo-parietal junction lesions

    PubMed Central

    Rafal, Robert D.; List, Alexandra

    2009-01-01

    Lesions to the right temporo-parietal cortex commonly result in hemispatial neglect. Lesions to the same area are also associated with hyperattention to local details of a scene and difficulty perceiving the global structure. This local processing bias is an important factor contributing to neglect and may contribute to the higher prevalence of the disorder following right compared with left hemisphere strokes. In recent years, visuomotor adaptation to rightward-shifting prisms has been introduced as a promising treatment for hemispatial neglect. Explanations for these improvements have generally described a leftward realignment of attention, however, the present investigation provides evidence that prism adaptation reduces the local processing bias. Five patients with right temporal-parietal junction lesions were asked to identify the global or local levels of hierarchical figures before and after visuomotor adaptation to rightward-shifting prisms. Prior to prism adaptation the patients had difficulty ignoring the local elements when identifying the global component. Following prism adaptation, however, this pattern was reversed, with greater global interference during local level identification. The results suggest that prism adaptation may improve non-spatially lateralized deficits that contribute to the neglect syndrome. PMID:19416951

  7. An adaptive scaling and biasing scheme for OFDM-based visible light communication systems.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhaocheng; Wang, Qi; Chen, Sheng; Hanzo, Lajos

    2014-05-19

    Orthogonal frequency-division multiplexing (OFDM) has been widely used in visible light communication systems to achieve high-rate data transmission. Due to the nonlinear transfer characteristics of light emitting diodes (LEDs) and owing the high peak-to-average-power ratio of OFDM signals, the transmitted signal has to be scaled and biased before modulating the LEDs. In this contribution, an adaptive scaling and biasing scheme is proposed for OFDM-based visible light communication systems, which fully exploits the dynamic range of the LEDs and improves the achievable system performance. Specifically, the proposed scheme calculates near-optimal scaling and biasing factors for each specific OFDM symbol according to the distribution of the signals, which strikes an attractive trade-off between the effective signal power and the clipping-distortion power. Our simulation results demonstrate that the proposed scheme significantly improves the performance without changing the LED's emitted power, while maintaining the same receiver structure.

  8. Adaptation to leftward-shifting prisms reduces the global processing bias of healthy individuals.

    PubMed

    Bultitude, Janet H; Woods, Jill M

    2010-05-01

    When healthy individuals are presented with peripheral figures in which small letters are arranged to form a large letter, they are faster to identify the global- than the local-level information, and have difficulty ignoring global information when identifying the local level. The global reaction time (RT) advantage and global interference effect imply preferential processing of global-level information in the normal brain. This contrasts with the local processing bias demonstrated following lesions to the right temporo-parietal junction (TPJ), such as those that lead to hemispatial neglect (neglect). Recent research from our lab demonstrated that visuo-motor adaptation to rightward-shifting prisms, which ameliorates many leftward performance deficits of neglect patients, improved the local processing bias of patients with right TPJ lesions (Bultitude, Rafal, & List, 2009). Here we demonstrate that adaptation to leftward-shifting prisms, which can induce neglect-like performance in neurologically healthy individuals, also reduces the normal global processing bias. Forty-eight healthy participants were asked to identify the global or local forms of hierarchical figures before and after adaptation to leftward- or rightward-shifting prisms. Prior to prism adaptation, both groups had greater difficulty ignoring irrelevant global information when identifying the local level (global interference) compared to their ability to ignore irrelevant local-level information when identifying the global level (local interference). Participants who adapted to leftward-shifting prisms showed a significant reduction in global interference, but there was no change in the performance of the rightward-shifting Prism Group. These results show, for the first time, that in addition to previously demonstrated effects on lateralised attention, prism adaptation can influence non-lateralised spatial attention in healthy individuals.

  9. Large family of quantum weak coin-flipping protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Mochon, Carlos

    2005-08-15

    Each classical public-coin protocol for coin flipping is naturally associated with a quantum protocol for weak coin flipping. The quantum protocol is obtained by replacing classical randomness with quantum entanglement and by adding a cheat detection test in the last round that verifies the integrity of this entanglement. The set of such protocols defines a family which contains the protocol with bias 0.192 previously found by the author, as well as protocols with bias as low as 1/6 described herein. The family is analyzed by identifying a set of optimal protocols for every number of messages. In the end, tight lower bounds for the bias are obtained which prove that 1/6 is optimal for all protocols within the family.

  10. Fixation light hue bias revisited: implications for using adaptive optics to study color vision.

    PubMed

    Hofer, H J; Blaschke, J; Patolia, J; Koenig, D E

    2012-03-01

    Current vision science adaptive optics systems use near infrared wavefront sensor 'beacons' that appear as red spots in the visual field. Colored fixation targets are known to influence the perceived color of macroscopic visual stimuli (Jameson, D., & Hurvich, L. M. (1967). Fixation-light bias: An unwanted by-product of fixation control. Vision Research, 7, 805-809.), suggesting that the wavefront sensor beacon may also influence perceived color for stimuli displayed with adaptive optics. Despite its importance for proper interpretation of adaptive optics experiments on the fine scale interaction of the retinal mosaic and spatial and color vision, this potential bias has not yet been quantified or addressed. Here we measure the impact of the wavefront sensor beacon on color appearance for dim, monochromatic point sources in five subjects. The presence of the beacon altered color reports both when used as a fixation target as well as when displaced in the visual field with a chromatically neutral fixation target. This influence must be taken into account when interpreting previous experiments and new methods of adaptive correction should be used in future experiments using adaptive optics to study color.

  11. 3D design and electric simulation of a silicon drift detector using a spiral biasing adapter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yu-yun; Xiong, Bo; Li, Zheng

    2016-09-01

    The detector system of combining a spiral biasing adapter (SBA) with a silicon drift detector (SBA-SDD) is largely different from the traditional silicon drift detector (SDD), including the spiral SDD. It has a spiral biasing adapter of the same design as a traditional spiral SDD and an SDD with concentric rings having the same radius. Compared with the traditional spiral SDD, the SBA-SDD separates the spiral's functions of biasing adapter and the p-n junction definition. In this paper, the SBA-SDD is simulated using a Sentaurus TCAD tool, which is a full 3D device simulation tool. The simulated electric characteristics include electric potential, electric field, electron concentration, and single event effect. Because of the special design of the SBA-SDD, the SBA can generate an optimum drift electric field in the SDD, comparable with the conventional spiral SDD, while the SDD can be designed with concentric rings to reduce surface area. Also the current and heat generated in the SBA are separated from the SDD. To study the single event response, we simulated the induced current caused by incident heavy ions (20 and 50 μm penetration length) with different linear energy transfer (LET). The SBA-SDD can be used just like a conventional SDD, such as X-ray detector for energy spectroscopy and imaging, etc.

  12. The Adaptive Biasing Force Method: Everything You Always Wanted To Know but Were Afraid To Ask

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    In the host of numerical schemes devised to calculate free energy differences by way of geometric transformations, the adaptive biasing force algorithm has emerged as a promising route to map complex free-energy landscapes. It relies upon the simple concept that as a simulation progresses, a continuously updated biasing force is added to the equations of motion, such that in the long-time limit it yields a Hamiltonian devoid of an average force acting along the transition coordinate of interest. This means that sampling proceeds uniformly on a flat free-energy surface, thus providing reliable free-energy estimates. Much of the appeal of the algorithm to the practitioner is in its physically intuitive underlying ideas and the absence of any requirements for prior knowledge about free-energy landscapes. Since its inception in 2001, the adaptive biasing force scheme has been the subject of considerable attention, from in-depth mathematical analysis of convergence properties to novel developments and extensions. The method has also been successfully applied to many challenging problems in chemistry and biology. In this contribution, the method is presented in a comprehensive, self-contained fashion, discussing with a critical eye its properties, applicability, and inherent limitations, as well as introducing novel extensions. Through free-energy calculations of prototypical molecular systems, many methodological aspects are examined, from stratification strategies to overcoming the so-called hidden barriers in orthogonal space, relevant not only to the adaptive biasing force algorithm but also to other importance-sampling schemes. On the basis of the discussions in this paper, a number of good practices for improving the efficiency and reliability of the computed free-energy differences are proposed. PMID:25247823

  13. The adaptive biasing force method: everything you always wanted to know but were afraid to ask.

    PubMed

    Comer, Jeffrey; Gumbart, James C; Hénin, Jérôme; Lelièvre, Tony; Pohorille, Andrew; Chipot, Christophe

    2015-01-22

    In the host of numerical schemes devised to calculate free energy differences by way of geometric transformations, the adaptive biasing force algorithm has emerged as a promising route to map complex free-energy landscapes. It relies upon the simple concept that as a simulation progresses, a continuously updated biasing force is added to the equations of motion, such that in the long-time limit it yields a Hamiltonian devoid of an average force acting along the transition coordinate of interest. This means that sampling proceeds uniformly on a flat free-energy surface, thus providing reliable free-energy estimates. Much of the appeal of the algorithm to the practitioner is in its physically intuitive underlying ideas and the absence of any requirements for prior knowledge about free-energy landscapes. Since its inception in 2001, the adaptive biasing force scheme has been the subject of considerable attention, from in-depth mathematical analysis of convergence properties to novel developments and extensions. The method has also been successfully applied to many challenging problems in chemistry and biology. In this contribution, the method is presented in a comprehensive, self-contained fashion, discussing with a critical eye its properties, applicability, and inherent limitations, as well as introducing novel extensions. Through free-energy calculations of prototypical molecular systems, many methodological aspects are examined, from stratification strategies to overcoming the so-called hidden barriers in orthogonal space, relevant not only to the adaptive biasing force algorithm but also to other importance-sampling schemes. On the basis of the discussions in this paper, a number of good practices for improving the efficiency and reliability of the computed free-energy differences are proposed.

  14. Digital Coin Business Model Using the Coin ATM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Won-Gyo; Park, Sang-Sung; Shin, Young-Geun; Jang, Dong-Sik

    2009-08-01

    Because about 83.6 billion won worth coins are not collected annually, 35 billion won of government money is being wasted for producing new coins in Korea. In order to improve unnecessary government money leakage, we now have to develop a proper way of managing small valued money such as coins. We have already developed the coin ATM to solve such problem in the previous study. In this study, we proposed business model, which enables users to deposit or consume such small amount of money with the coin ATM. The proposed business model has advantages that enable to connect various payment system and is efficient to consume such small amount of money. This business model improves not only the way of managing small valued money but also the way of consuming small valued money. Furthermore, our business model can contribute to activating circulation of coins as well as preventing leakage of government money.

  15. Serial composition of quantum coin flipping and bounds on cheat detection for bit commitment

    SciTech Connect

    Mochon, Carlos

    2004-09-01

    Quantum protocols for coin flipping can be composed in series in such a way that a cheating party gains no extra advantage from using entanglement between different rounds. This composition principle applies to coin-flipping protocols with cheat sensitivity as well, and is used to derive two results: There are no quantum strong coin-flipping protocols with cheat sensitivity that is linear in the bias (or bit-commitment protocols with linear cheat detection) because these can be composed to produce strong coin flipping with arbitrarily small bias. On the other hand, it appears that quadratic cheat detection cannot be composed in series to obtain even weak coin flipping with arbitrarily small bias.

  16. A Pilot Study of an Adaptive, Idiographic, and Multi-Component Attention Bias Modification Program for Social Anxiety Disorder.

    PubMed

    Amir, Nader; Kuckertz, Jennie M; Strege, Marlene V

    2016-10-01

    An attentional bias toward threat may be one mechanism underlying clinical anxiety. Attention bias modification (ABM) aims to reduce symptoms of anxiety disorders by directly modifying this deficit. However, existing ABM training programs have not consistently modified attentional bias and may not reflect optimal learning needs of participants (i.e., lack of explicit instruction, training goal unclear to participants, lack of feedback, non-adaptive, inability to differentiate or target different components of attentional bias). In the current study, we introduce a new adaptive ABM program (AABM) and test its feasibility in individuals with social anxiety disorder. We report task characteristics and preliminary evidence that this task consistently modifies attentional bias and that changes in attentional bias (but not number of trials) correlate with the level of symptom reduction. These results suggest that AABM may be a targeted method for the next generation of studies examining the utility of attention training.

  17. When we should worry more: using cognitive bias modification to drive adaptive health behaviour.

    PubMed

    Notebaert, Lies; Chrystal, Jessica; Clarke, Patrick J F; Holmes, Emily A; MacLeod, Colin

    2014-01-01

    A lack of behavioural engagement in health promotion or disease prevention is a problem across many health domains. In these cases where people face a genuine danger, a reduced focus on threat and low levels of anxiety or worry are maladaptive in terms of promoting protection or prevention behaviour. Therefore, it is possible that increasing the processing of threat will increase worry and thereby enhance engagement in adaptive behaviour. Laboratory studies have shown that cognitive bias modification (CBM) can increase or decrease anxiety and worry when increased versus decreased processing of threat is encouraged. In the current study, CBM for interpretation (CBM-I) is used to target engagement in sun protection behaviour. The goal was to investigate whether inducing a negative rather than a positive interpretation bias for physical threat information can enhance worry elicited when viewing a health campaign video (warning against melanoma skin cancer), and consequently lead to more adaptive behaviour (sun protection). Participants were successfully trained to either adopt a positive or negative interpretation bias using physical threat scenarios. However, contrary to expectations results showed that participants in the positive training condition reported higher levels of worry elicited by the melanoma video than participants in the negative training condition. Video elicited worry was, however, positively correlated with a measure of engagement in sun protection behaviour, suggesting that higher levels of worry do promote adaptive behaviour. These findings imply that more research is needed to determine under which conditions increased versus decreased processing of threat can drive adaptive worry. Various potential explanations for the current findings and suggestions for future research are discussed.

  18. When We Should Worry More: Using Cognitive Bias Modification to Drive Adaptive Health Behaviour

    PubMed Central

    Notebaert, Lies; Chrystal, Jessica; Clarke, Patrick J. F.; Holmes, Emily A.; MacLeod, Colin

    2014-01-01

    A lack of behavioural engagement in health promotion or disease prevention is a problem across many health domains. In these cases where people face a genuine danger, a reduced focus on threat and low levels of anxiety or worry are maladaptive in terms of promoting protection or prevention behaviour. Therefore, it is possible that increasing the processing of threat will increase worry and thereby enhance engagement in adaptive behaviour. Laboratory studies have shown that cognitive bias modification (CBM) can increase or decrease anxiety and worry when increased versus decreased processing of threat is encouraged. In the current study, CBM for interpretation (CBM-I) is used to target engagement in sun protection behaviour. The goal was to investigate whether inducing a negative rather than a positive interpretation bias for physical threat information can enhance worry elicited when viewing a health campaign video (warning against melanoma skin cancer), and consequently lead to more adaptive behaviour (sun protection). Participants were successfully trained to either adopt a positive or negative interpretation bias using physical threat scenarios. However, contrary to expectations results showed that participants in the positive training condition reported higher levels of worry elicited by the melanoma video than participants in the negative training condition. Video elicited worry was, however, positively correlated with a measure of engagement in sun protection behaviour, suggesting that higher levels of worry do promote adaptive behaviour. These findings imply that more research is needed to determine under which conditions increased versus decreased processing of threat can drive adaptive worry. Various potential explanations for the current findings and suggestions for future research are discussed. PMID:24416344

  19. Adaptive and maladaptive components of rumination? Diagnostic specificity and relation to depressive biases.

    PubMed

    Joormann, Jutta; Dkane, Marco; Gotlib, Ian H

    2006-09-01

    The present study investigated the validity of the two-factor solution of items selected from the Rumination Scale of the Response Style Questionnaire proposed by Treynor, Gonzalez, and Nolen-Hoeksema (2003). In the first part of this study we used samples of currently depressed (MDD), formerly depressed (FD), socially anxious (SP), and healthy control participants to examine whether the brooding and reflective pondering components differentiate participants with an anxiety disorder from participants with depression. In the second part of this study we examined whether these components of rumination were differentially related to cognitive biases in depression. Overall, the MDD group exhibited higher brooding scores than did all other groups; SP and FD groups did not differ from each other but obtained higher brooding scores than did the control participants. Only the MDD and the control groups differed on the reflective pondering factor. Importantly, brooding and reflective pondering were differentially related to cognitive biases. Specifically, the correlation between brooding/reflective pondering and memory bias was not significant when depressive symptoms were partialed out. The correlation between brooding and attentional bias for sad faces, however, remained significant even when current depressive symptoms were taken into account. In sum, our results support the formulation that rumination is composed of an adaptive reflective pondering factor and a maladaptive brooding factor.

  20. Localizing ingested coins with a metal detector.

    PubMed

    Bassett, K E; Schunk, J E; Logan, L

    1999-07-01

    This study was conducted to determine the utility of metal detection in coin localization by inexperienced operators, and determine the rate of spontaneous passage of asymptomatic esophageal coins. All children who presented to the emergency department of an urban children's hospital with a suspected coin ingestion were eligible. Coin location was predicted from metal detector results, while radiographs confirmed location. Asymptomatic patients with esophageal coins were observed for spontaneous passage. Ninety-one children (ages 9 months to 17 years) were prospectively enrolled. The metal detector had a sensitivity of 98% (53/54) in coin detection and 98% (81/83) in determining coin location as esophageal. Symptoms were poor predictors of coin location. Six of eight asymptomatic patients with esophageal coins spontaneously passed their coins. These results show that metal detection is a good screening test for coin presence and to determine coin location as esophageal. Spontaneous passage of asymptomatic esophageal coins warrants further study.

  1. Adaptive biased urn randomization in small strata when blinding is impossible.

    PubMed

    Schouten, H J

    1995-12-01

    Adaptive biased urn randomization, applied in, e.g., a clinical trial, has certain attractive properties. If stratified randomization is desired, a good balance between group sizes can be guaranteed, even in (very) small strata. Yet treatment assignment may be kept unpredictable, which is necessary to avoid selection bias if blinding is impossible. In the present paper a more flexible urn model is described. The investigator may choose assignment probabilities that strongly depend on the degree of imbalance when the groups are still small, but with a tendency toward complete randomization when the groups become large. It is also possible to keep the difference in group size below a chosen maximum, which is useful if population characteristics may change during the course of a trial. The new urn model includes random permutations and complete randomization as special cases. An extension of the model allows the promotion of unequal group sizes. Some attention is paid to a randomized version of the minimization method.

  2. Analysis of Synonymous Codon Usage Bias of Zika Virus and Its Adaption to the Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Hongju; Liu, Siqing; Zhang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne virus (arbovirus) in the family Flaviviridae, and the symptoms caused by ZIKV infection in humans include rash, fever, arthralgia, myalgia, asthenia and conjunctivitis. Codon usage bias analysis can reveal much about the molecular evolution and host adaption of ZIKV. To gain insight into the evolutionary characteristics of ZIKV, we performed a comprehensive analysis on the codon usage pattern in 46 ZIKV strains by calculating the effective number of codons (ENc), codon adaptation index (CAI), relative synonymous codon usage (RSCU), and other indicators. The results indicate that the codon usage bias of ZIKV is relatively low. Several lines of evidence support the hypothesis that translational selection plays a role in shaping the codon usage pattern of ZIKV. The results from a correspondence analysis (CA) indicate that other factors, such as base composition, aromaticity, and hydrophobicity may also be involved in shaping the codon usage pattern of ZIKV. Additionally, the results from a comparative analysis of RSCU between ZIKV and its hosts suggest that ZIKV tends to evolve codon usage patterns that are comparable to those of its hosts. Moreover, selection pressure from Homo sapiens on the ZIKV RSCU patterns was found to be dominant compared with that from Aedes aegypti and Aedes albopictus. Taken together, both natural translational selection and mutation pressure are important for shaping the codon usage pattern of ZIKV. Our findings contribute to understanding the evolution of ZIKV and its adaption to its hosts. PMID:27893824

  3. Quantum coin flipping secure against channel noises

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Sheng; Zhang, Yuexin

    2015-08-01

    So far, most existing single-shot quantum coin flipping (QCF) protocols have failed in a noisy quantum channel. Here, we present a nested-structure framework that makes it possible to achieve partially noise-tolerant QCF, due to a trade-off between the security and the justice correctness. It is showed that noise-tolerant single-shot QCF protocols can be produced by filling the presented framework up with existing or even future protocols. We also proved a lower bound of 0.25, with which a cheating Alice or Bob could bias the outcome.

  4. Practical quantum coin flipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pappa, Anna; Chailloux, André; Diamanti, Eleni; Kerenidis, Iordanis

    2011-11-01

    We show that in the unconditional security model, a single quantum strong coin flip with security guarantees that are strictly better than in any classical protocol is possible to implement with current technology. Our protocol takes into account all aspects of an experimental implementation, including losses, multiphoton pulses emitted by practical photon sources, channel noise, detector dark counts, and finite quantum efficiency. We calculate the abort probability when both players are honest, as well as the probability of one player forcing his desired outcome. For a channel length up to 21 km and commonly used parameter values, we can achieve honest abort and cheating probabilities that are better than in any classical protocol. Our protocol is, in principle, implementable using attenuated laser pulses, with no need for entangled photons or any other specific resources.

  5. Adaptive on-line estimation and control of overlay tool bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, Victor M.; Finn, Karen; Edgar, Thomas F.

    2003-06-01

    Modern lithographic manufacturing processes rely on various types of exposure tools, used in a mix-and-match fashion. The motivation to use older tools alongside state-of-the-art tools is lower cost and one of the tradeoffs is a degradation in overlay performance. While average prices of semiconductor products continue to fall, the cost of manufacturing equipment rises with every product generation. Lithography processing, including the cost of ownership for tools, accounts for roughly 30% of the wafer processing costs, thus the importance of mix-and-match strategies. Exponentially Weighted Moving Average (EWMA) run-by-run controllers are widely used in the semiconductor manufacturing industry. This type of controller has been implemented successfully in volume manufacturing, improving Cpk values dramatically in processes like photolithography and chemical mechanical planarization. This simple, but powerful control scheme is well suited for adding corrections to compensate for Overlay Tool Bias (OTB). We have developed an adaptive estimation technique to compensate for overlay variability due to differences in the processing tools. The OTB can be dynamically calculated for each tool, based on the most recent measurements available, and used to correct the control variables. One approach to tracking the effect of different tools is adaptive modeling and control. The basic premise of an adaptive system is to change or adapt the controller as the operating conditions of the system change. Using closed-loop data, the adaptive control algorithm estimates the controller parameters using a recursive estimation technique. Once an updated model of the system is available, modelbased control becomes feasible. In the simplest scenario, the control law can be reformulated to include the current state of the tool (or its estimate) to compensate dynamically for OTB. We have performed simulation studies to predict the impact of deploying this strategy in production. The results

  6. COIN Goes "GLOCAL": Traditional COIN With a Global Perspective: Does the Current US Strategy Reflect COIN Theory, Doctrine and Principles

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-05-17

    COIN goes “ GLOCAL ”: Traditional COIN with a Global Perspective: Does the Current US Strategy Reflect COIN Theory, Doctrine and Principles? A...TITLE AND SUBTITLE COIN goes “ GLOCAL ”: Traditional COIN with a Global P ti D th C t US St t R fl t COIN 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Perspective: Does...Monograph: COIN goes “ GLOCAL ”: Traditional COIN with a Global Perspective: Does the Current US Strategy Reflect COIN Theory, Doctrine and Principles

  7. Fair loss-tolerant quantum coin flipping

    SciTech Connect

    Berlin, Guido; Brassard, Gilles; Bussieres, Felix; Godbout, Nicolas

    2009-12-15

    Coin flipping is a cryptographic primitive in which two spatially separated players, who do not trust each other, wish to establish a common random bit. If we limit ourselves to classical communication, this task requires either assumptions on the computational power of the players or it requires them to send messages to each other with sufficient simultaneity to force their complete independence. Without such assumptions, all classical protocols are so that one dishonest player has complete control over the outcome. If we use quantum communication, on the other hand, protocols have been introduced that limit the maximal bias that dishonest players can produce. However, those protocols would be very difficult to implement in practice because they are susceptible to realistic losses on the quantum channel between the players or in their quantum memory and measurement apparatus. In this paper, we introduce a quantum protocol and we prove that it is completely impervious to loss. The protocol is fair in the sense that either player has the same probability of success in cheating attempts at biasing the outcome of the coin flip. We also give explicit and optimal cheating strategies for both players.

  8. The Adaptive Significance of Sensory Bias in a Foraging Context: Floral Colour Preferences in the Bumblebee Bombus terrestris

    PubMed Central

    Raine, Nigel E.; Chittka, Lars

    2007-01-01

    Innate sensory biases could play an important role in helping naïve animals to find food. As inexperienced bees are known to have strong innate colour biases we investigated whether bumblebee (Bombus terrestris) colonies with stronger biases for the most rewarding flower colour (violet) foraged more successfully in their local flora. To test the adaptive significance of variation in innate colour bias, we compared the performance of colour-naïve bees, from nine bumblebee colonies raised from local wild-caught queens, in a laboratory colour bias paradigm using violet (bee UV-blue) and blue (bee blue) artificial flowers. The foraging performance of the same colonies was assessed under field conditions. Colonies with a stronger innate bias for violet over blue flowers in the laboratory harvested more nectar per unit time under field conditions. In fact, the colony with the strongest bias for violet (over blue) brought in 41% more nectar than the colony with the least strong bias. As violet flowers in the local area produce more nectar than blue flowers (the next most rewarding flower colour), these data are consistent with the hypothesis that local variation in flower traits could drive selection for innate colour biases. PMID:17579727

  9. Application of adaptive kinetic modelling for bias propagation reduction in direct 4D image reconstruction.

    PubMed

    Kotasidis, F A; Matthews, J C; Reader, A J; Angelis, G I; Zaidi, H

    2014-10-21

    Parametric imaging in thoracic and abdominal PET can provide additional parameters more relevant to the pathophysiology of the system under study. However, dynamic data in the body are noisy due to the limiting counting statistics leading to suboptimal kinetic parameter estimates. Direct 4D image reconstruction algorithms can potentially improve kinetic parameter precision and accuracy in dynamic PET body imaging. However, construction of a common kinetic model is not always feasible and in contrast to post-reconstruction kinetic analysis, errors in poorly modelled regions may spatially propagate to regions which are well modelled. To reduce error propagation from erroneous model fits, we implement and evaluate a new approach to direct parameter estimation by incorporating a recently proposed kinetic modelling strategy within a direct 4D image reconstruction framework. The algorithm uses a secondary more general model to allow a less constrained model fit in regions where the kinetic model does not accurately describe the underlying kinetics. A portion of the residuals then is adaptively included back into the image whilst preserving the primary model characteristics in other well modelled regions using a penalty term that trades off the models. Using fully 4D simulations based on dynamic [(15)O]H2O datasets, we demonstrate reduction in propagation-related bias for all kinetic parameters. Under noisy conditions, reductions in bias due to propagation are obtained at the cost of increased noise, which in turn results in increased bias and variance of the kinetic parameters. This trade-off reflects the challenge of separating the residuals arising from poor kinetic modelling fits from the residuals arising purely from noise. Nonetheless, the overall root mean square error is reduced in most regions and parameters. Using the adaptive 4D image reconstruction improved model fits can be obtained in poorly modelled regions, leading to reduced errors potentially propagating

  10. Long-Time Convergence of an Adaptive Biasing Force Method: The Bi-Channel Case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lelièvre, T.; Minoukadeh, K.

    2011-10-01

    We present convergence results for an adaptive algorithm to compute free energies, namely the adaptive biasing force (ABF) method (D arve and P ohorille in J Chem Phys 115(20):9169-9183, 2001; H énin and C hipot in J Chem Phys 121:2904, 2004). The free energy is the effective potential associated to a so-called reaction coordinate ξ( q), where q = ( q 1, … , q 3 N ) is the position vector of an N-particle system. Computing free energy differences remains an important challenge in molecular dynamics due to the presence of metastable regions in the potential energy surface. The ABF method uses an on-the-fly estimate of the free energy to bias dynamics and overcome metastability. Using entropy arguments and logarithmic Sobolev inequalities, previous results have shown that the rate of convergence of the ABF method is limited by the metastable features of the canonical measures conditioned to being at fixed values of ξ (L elièvre et al. in Nonlinearity 21(6):1155-1181, 2008). In this paper, we present an improvement on the existing results in the presence of such metastabilities, which is a generic case encountered in practice. More precisely, we study the so-called bi-channel case, where two channels along the reaction coordinate direction exist between an initial and final state, the channels being separated from each other by a region of very low probability. With hypotheses made on `channel-dependent' conditional measures, we show on a bi-channel model, which we introduce, that the convergence of the ABF method is, in fact, not limited by metastabilities in directions orthogonal to ξ under two crucial assumptions: (i) exchange between the two channels is possible for some values of ξ and (ii) the free energy is a good bias in each channel. This theoretical result supports recent numerical experiments (M inoukadeh et al. in J Chem Theory Comput 6:1008-1017, 2010), where the efficiency of the ABF approach is demonstrated for such a multiple-channel situation.

  11. Buffon's Coin Problem and beyond

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schneiter, Kady

    2011-01-01

    This article describes an investigation of Buffon's coin problem and related problems with the aid of an applet. The problems are accessible at a variety of grade levels and facilitate making connections between geometry and probability.

  12. Revisiting COIN Theory and Instruction

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-13

    because he believed that there was plenty of research on insurgencies but not nearly enough on how to fight insurgencies, the COIN side. I would argue...us definitional precision which in turn aids with research and comprehension. Political science and political theory offer major contributions to COIN...nder/ OP Deser t Light ning II PE (12-24 Dec) B-10* Analy st Note book/ ARC GIS/ OP Dese rt Light ning II PE B-9

  13. Family of loss-tolerant quantum coin-flipping protocols

    SciTech Connect

    Aharon, N.; Massar, S.; Silman, J.

    2010-11-15

    We present a family of loss-tolerant quantum strong-coin-flipping protocols, each protocol differing in the number of qubits employed. For a single qubit we obtain a bias of 0.4, reproducing the result of Berlin et al. [Phys. Rev. A 80, 062321 (2009)], while for two qubits we obtain a bias of 0.3975. Numerical evidence based on semidefinite programming indicates that the bias continues to decrease as the number of qubits increases but at a small rate.

  14. Asymmetrical effects of adaptation to left- and right-shifting prisms depends on pre-existing attentional biases.

    PubMed

    Goedert, Kelly M; Leblanc, Andrew; Tsai, Sen-Wei; Barrett, Anna M

    2010-09-01

    Proposals that adaptation with left-shifting prisms induces neglect-like symptoms in normal individuals rely on a dissociation between the postadaptation performance of individuals trained with left- versus right-shifting prisms (e.g., Colent, Pisella, & Rossetti, 2000). A potential problem with this evidence is that normal young adults have an a priori leftward bias (e.g., Jewell & McCourt, 2000). In Experiment 1, we compared the line bisection performance of young adults to that of aged adults, who as a group may lack a leftward bias in line bisection. Participants trained with both left- and right-shifting prisms. Consistent with our hypothesis, while young adults demonstrated aftereffects for left, but not right prisms, aged adults demonstrated reliable aftereffects for both prisms. In Experiment 2, we recruited a larger sample of young adults, some of whom were right-biased at baseline. We observed an interaction between baseline bias and prism-shift, consistent with the results of Experiment 1: Left-biased individuals showed a reduced aftereffect when training with right-shifting prisms and right-biased individuals showed a reduced aftereffect when training with left-shifting prisms. These results suggest that previous failures to find generalizable aftereffects with right-shifting prisms may be driven by participants' baseline biases rather than specific effects of the prism itself.

  15. Direct calculation of 1-octanol-water partition coefficients from adaptive biasing force molecular dynamics simulations.

    PubMed

    Bhatnagar, Navendu; Kamath, Ganesh; Chelst, Issac; Potoff, Jeffrey J

    2012-07-07

    The 1-octanol-water partition coefficient log K(ow) of a solute is a key parameter used in the prediction of a wide variety of complex phenomena such as drug availability and bioaccumulation potential of trace contaminants. In this work, adaptive biasing force molecular dynamics simulations are used to determine absolute free energies of hydration, solvation, and 1-octanol-water partition coefficients for n-alkanes from methane to octane. Two approaches are evaluated; the direct transfer of the solute from 1-octanol to water phase, and separate transfers of the solute from the water or 1-octanol phase to vacuum, with both methods yielding statistically indistinguishable results. Calculations performed with the TIP4P and SPC∕E water models and the TraPPE united-atom force field for n-alkanes show that the choice of water model has a negligible effect on predicted free energies of transfer and partition coefficients for n-alkanes. A comparison of calculations using wet and dry octanol phases shows that the predictions for log K(ow) using wet octanol are 0.2-0.4 log units lower than for dry octanol, although this is within the statistical uncertainty of the calculation.

  16. Semi-loss-tolerant strong quantum coin-flipping protocol using quantum non-demolition measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Qian; Ma, Jia-Jun; Guo, Fen-Zhuo; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2014-07-01

    In this paper, we present a semi-loss-tolerant strong quantum coin-flipping (QCF) protocol with the best bias of 0.3536. Our manuscript applies quantum non-demolition measurement to quantum coin-flipping protocol. Furthermore, a single photon as a single qubit is used to avoid the difficult implementation of EPR resources. We also analyze the security of our protocol obtaining the best result among all coin-flipping protocols considering loss. A semi-loss-tolerant quantum dice rolling (QDR) protocol is first proposed, and the security of corresponding three-party QDR is analyzed to better demonstrate the security of our QCF.

  17. Attentional bias toward infant faces - Review of the adaptive and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Lucion, Marta Knijnik; Oliveira, Vanessa; Bizarro, Lisiane; Bischoff, Adrianne Rahde; Silveira, Patricia Pelufo; Kauer-Sant'Anna, Marcia

    2017-04-01

    Human survival depends on care received early in life. Infants need to capture adults' attention to have their basic needs met. Therefore, infant stimuli are prioritized by the attention system in adults, resulting in an attentional bias toward infant faces. We conducted a systematic review of the literature on behavioral measures of attentional bias toward infant faces. PubMed, PsycINFO, and ISI Web of Knowledge databases were used. The review suggests the existence of a measurable attentional bias toward infant faces and a positive correlation between attentional bias toward infant distress and the quality of mother-infant relationship. Depressive symptoms and breastfeeding modulate this behavior in women. Parental status and sex also influence the attentional prioritization of infant faces. Evidence indicates that differences in attentional bias are associated with clinical symptoms and variations in maternal behavior, reinforcing the potential use of attentional bias as a behavioral marker of clinical outcomes.

  18. Ancient and Modern Coins Unit Plans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    United States Mint (Dept. of Treasury), Washington, DC.

    Ancient times comes to life when a student can hold in his/her hand or read about an artifact, such as a coin of the Greek or Roman era. Students are familiar with coins, and this commonality helps them understand the similarities and differences between their lives and times in ancient Greece or Rome. Many symbols on the ancient coins can be…

  19. Microchemical investigations of historical coins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Caridi, F.; Fazio, E.; Scibilia, S.; Sabatino, G.; Mezzasalma, A. M.; Neri, F.; Castrizio, D.

    2015-07-01

    Microchemical investigations were carried out on ancient silver coins originated from the same country but of different historical periods between the fifth and the second centuries B.C. Energy-Dispersive X-ray microanalysis in a Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM-EDX) was employed to obtain qualitative and semi-quantitative information about the chemical composition of these coins. SEM-EDX analyses employ an electron beam of 20 keV, which interacts with the sample leading to the emission of characteristic X-rays, to determine elements present in the surface patina, closely related to the sample preservation. In the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis a monochromatic Al Kα radiation (1486.6 eV) interacts with the sample and photoelectrons are detected as secondary radiation, to investigate about coins elemental composition. Moreover a beam of Ar+ ions with an energy of 3 keV was used for the sputtering procedure in order to perform depth profile measurements, from the surface (patina composition) down to deeper layers. Useful information about production, chronological period and utilization places of coins are obtained to support a correct dating of these samples.

  20. Left to Right: Representational Biases for Numbers and the Effect of Visuomotor Adaptation

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Loftus, Andrea M.; Nicholls, Michael E. R.; Mattingley, Jason B.; Bradshaw, John L.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptation to right-shifting prisms improves left neglect for mental number line bisection. This study examined whether adaptation affects the mental number line in normal participants. Thirty-six participants completed a mental number line task before and after adaptation to either: left-shifting prisms, right-shifting prisms or control…

  1. The Role of Scale and Model Bias in ADAPT's Photospheric Eatimation

    SciTech Connect

    Godinez Vazquez, Humberto C.; Hickmann, Kyle Scott; Arge, Charles Nicholas; Henney, Carl

    2015-05-20

    The Air Force Assimilative Photospheric flux Transport model (ADAPT), is a magnetic flux propagation based on Worden-Harvey (WH) model. ADAPT would be used to provide a global photospheric map of the Earth. A data assimilation method based on the Ensemble Kalman Filter (EnKF), a method of Monte Carlo approximation tied with Kalman filtering, is used in calculating the ADAPT models.

  2. An A-T linker adapter polymerase chain reaction method for chromosome walking without restriction site cloning bias.

    PubMed

    Trinh, Quoclinh; Xu, Wentao; Shi, Hui; Luo, Yunbo; Huang, Kunlun

    2012-06-01

    A-T linker adapter polymerase chain reaction (PCR) was modified and employed for the isolation of genomic fragments adjacent to a known DNA sequence. The improvements in the method focus on two points. The first is the modification of the PO(4) and NH(2) groups in the adapter to inhibit the self-ligation of the adapter or the generation of nonspecific products. The second improvement is the use of the capacity of rTaq DNA polymerase to add an adenosine overhang at the 3' ends of digested DNA to suppress self-ligation in the digested DNA and simultaneously resolve restriction site clone bias. The combination of modifications in the adapter and in the digested DNA leads to T/A-specific ligation, which enhances the flexibility of this method and makes it feasible to use many different restriction enzymes with a single adapter. This novel A-T linker adapter PCR overcomes the inherent limitations of the original ligation-mediated PCR method such as low specificity and a lack of restriction enzyme choice. Moreover, this method also offers higher amplification efficiency, greater flexibility, and easier manipulation compared with other PCR methods for chromosome walking. Experimental results from 143 Arabidopsis mutants illustrate that this method is reliable and efficient in high-throughput experiments.

  3. Laser cleaning on Roman coins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Drakaki, E.; Karydas, A. G.; Klinkenberg, B.; Kokkoris, M.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Stavrou, E.; Vlastou, R.; Zarkadas, C.

    Ancient metal objects react with moisture and environmental chemicals to form various corrosion products. Because of the unique character and high value of such objects, any cleaning procedure should guarantee minimum destructiveness. The most common treatment used is mechanical stripping, in which it is difficult to avoid surface damage when employed. Lasers are currently being tested for a wide range of conservation applications. Since they are highly controllable and can be selectively applied, lasers can be used to achieve more effective and safer cleaning of archaeological artifacts and protect their surface details. The basic criterion that motivated us to use lasers to clean Roman coins was the requirement of pulsed emission, in order to minimize heat-induced damages. In fact, the laser interaction with the coins has to be short enough, to produce a fast removal of the encrustation, avoiding heat conduction into the substrate. The cleaning effects of three lasers operating at different wavelengths, namely a TEA CO2 laser emitting at 10.6 μm, an Er:YAG laser at 2.94 μm, and a 2ω-Nd:YAG laser at 532 nm have been compared on corroded Romans coins and various atomic and nuclear techniques have also been applied to evaluate the efficiency of the applied procedure.

  4. Codon usage bias in phylum Actinobacteria: relevance to environmental adaptation and host pathogenicity.

    PubMed

    Lal, Devi; Verma, Mansi; Behura, Susanta K; Lal, Rup

    2016-10-01

    Actinobacteria are Gram-positive bacteria commonly found in soil, freshwater and marine ecosystems. In this investigation, bias in codon usages of ninety actinobacterial genomes was analyzed by estimating different indices of codon bias such as Nc (effective number of codons), SCUO (synonymous codon usage order), RSCU (relative synonymous codon usage), as well as sequence patterns of codon contexts. The results revealed several characteristic features of codon usage in Actinobacteria, as follows: 1) C- or G-ending codons are used frequently in comparison with A- and U ending codons; 2) there is a direct relationship of GC content with use of specific amino acids such as alanine, proline and glycine; 3) there is an inverse relationship between GC content and Nc estimates, 4) there is low SCUO value (<0.5) for most genes; and 5) GCC-GCC, GCC-GGC, GCC-GAG and CUC-GAC are the frequent context sequences among codons. This study highlights the fact that: 1) in Actinobacteria, extreme GC content and codon bias are driven by mutation rather than natural selection; (2) traits like aerobicity are associated with effective natural selection and therefore low GC content and low codon bias, demonstrating the role of both mutational bias and translational selection in shaping the habitat and phenotype of actinobacterial species.

  5. Ditching Career Centric COIN: Exhuming Robert Komer with the Drawdown in Afghanistan

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-09-10

    there remains a void, virtually ignored by scholars and pundits alike. That void is filled by the questions surrounding the actual organization of COIN...enemy centric, and leader centric COIN are sill in common and official use by the community at large. Their usefulness, however, has been diminished by...could they learn and adapt.17 While Afghanistan experts are realistically wary of centralization, they might do well to look at the conduct of the

  6. Scholarly Research on Educational Adaptation of Social Media: Is There Evidence of Publication Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Piotrowski, Chris

    2015-01-01

    The sizeable majority of research findings on educational adaptation of social media (SM) is based on college student samples. A cursory review of the extant literature on the educational use of SM appears to convey an uncritical spirit regarding adaptations of modern Web 2.0 technology. This article examines the issue of whether "publication…

  7. How structural adaptability exists alongside HLA-A2 bias in the human αβ TCR repertoire

    PubMed Central

    Blevins, Sydney J.; Pierce, Brian G.; Singh, Nishant K.; Riley, Timothy P.; Wang, Yuan; Spear, Timothy T.; Nishimura, Michael I.; Weng, Zhiping; Baker, Brian M.

    2016-01-01

    How T-cell receptors (TCRs) can be intrinsically biased toward MHC proteins while simultaneously display the structural adaptability required to engage diverse ligands remains a controversial puzzle. We addressed this by examining αβ TCR sequences and structures for evidence of physicochemical compatibility with MHC proteins. We found that human TCRs are enriched in the capacity to engage a polymorphic, positively charged “hot-spot” region that is almost exclusive to the α1-helix of the common human class I MHC protein, HLA-A*0201 (HLA-A2). TCR binding necessitates hot-spot burial, yielding high energetic penalties that must be offset via complementary electrostatic interactions. Enrichment of negative charges in TCR binding loops, particularly the germ-line loops encoded by the TCR Vα and Vβ genes, provides this capacity and is correlated with restricted positioning of TCRs over HLA-A2. Notably, this enrichment is absent from antibody genes. The data suggest a built-in TCR compatibility with HLA-A2 that biases receptors toward, but does not compel, particular binding modes. Our findings provide an instructional example for how structurally pliant MHC biases can be encoded within TCRs. PMID:26884163

  8. Adapting Minority Group Threat to Examine the Social Control of Sexual Orientation Bias.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Michele

    2016-02-24

    Blalock proposed that the threat of a minority group toward a majority in sheer size, economic competition, or power will result in an increase in discrimination toward that group. His original formulation of this theory of minority group threat, and its subsequent extensions, has focused almost exclusively on racial minority-majority relationships; however, Blalock asserted that his theory would apply to any minority-majority group relationship. Extensions to religious groups have shown this is likely the case. The current analysis assesses a further extension of minority group threat by reframing the arguments of the theory and adding two additional sources of threat to examine sexual orientation bias. Data from the Uniform Crime Reports Hate Crime Statistics program are used to assess whether the minority group threat hypotheses explain the reporting of sexual orientation bias crimes. The findings indicate that the original formulation of Blalock's theory does not suffice to explain the reporting of anti-Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual bias crime, but the proposed extensions may explain some of this variation.

  9. Differential evolution for many-particle adaptive quantum metrology.

    PubMed

    Lovett, Neil B; Crosnier, Cécile; Perarnau-Llobet, Martí; Sanders, Barry C

    2013-05-31

    We devise powerful algorithms based on differential evolution for adaptive many-particle quantum metrology. Our new approach delivers adaptive quantum metrology policies for feedback control that are orders-of-magnitude more efficient and surpass the few-dozen-particle limitation arising in methods based on particle-swarm optimization. We apply our method to the binary-decision-tree model for quantum-enhanced phase estimation as well as to a new problem: a decision tree for adaptive estimation of the unknown bias of a quantum coin in a quantum walk and show how this latter case can be realized experimentally.

  10. Providing Effective Access to Shared Resources: A COIN Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Airiau, Stephane; Wolpert, David H.

    2004-01-01

    Managers of systems of shared resources typically have many separate goals. Examples are efficient utilization of the resources among its users and ensuring no user s satisfaction in the system falls below a preset minimal level. Since such goals will usually conflict with one another, either implicitly or explicitly the manager must determine the relative importance of the goals, encapsulating that into an overall utility function rating the possible behaviors of the entire system. Here we demonstrate a distributed, robust, and adaptive way to optimize that overall function. Our approach is to interpose adaptive agents between each user and the system, where each such agent is working to maximize its own private utility function. In turn, each such agent's function should be both relatively easy for the agent to learn to optimize, and "aligned" with the overall utility function of the system manager - an overall function that is based on but in general different from the satisfaction functions of the individual users. To ensure this we enhance the Collective INtelligence (COIN) framework to incorporate user satisfaction functions in the overall utility function of the system manager and accordingly in the associated private utility functions assigned to the users agents. We present experimental evaluations of different COIN-based private utility functions and demonstrate that those COIN-based functions outperform some natural alternatives.

  11. Providing Effective Access to Shared Resources: A COIN Approach

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Airiau, Stephane; Wolpert, David H.; Sen, Sandip; Tumer, Kagan

    2003-01-01

    Managers of systems of shared resources typically have many separate goals. Examples are efficient utilization of the resources among its users and ensuring no user's satisfaction in the system falls below a preset minimal level. Since such goals will usually conflict with one another, either implicitly or explicitly the manager must determine the relative importance of the goals, encapsulating that into an overall utility function rating the possible behaviors of the entire system. Here we demonstrate a distributed, robust, and adaptive way to optimize that overall function. Our approach is to interpose adaptive agents between each user and the system, where each such agent is working to maximize its own private utility function. In turn, each such agent's function should be both relatively easy for the agent to learn to optimize, and 'aligned' with the overall utility function of the system manager - an overall function that is based on but in general different from the satisfaction functions of the individual users. To ensure this we enhance the COllective INtelligence (COIN) framework to incorporate user satisfaction functions in the overall utility function of the system manager and accordingly in the associated private utility functions assigned to the users agents. We present experimental evaluations of different COIN-based private utility functions and demonstrate that those COIN-based functions outperform some natural alternatives.

  12. Microscopical Examination of Ancient Silver Coins

    SciTech Connect

    Pistofidis, N.; Vourlias, G.; Pavlidou, El.; Stergioudis, G.; Polychroniadis, E. K.; Dilo, T.; Prifti, I.; Bilani, O.; Civici, N.; Stamati, F.; Gjongecaj, Sh.

    2007-04-23

    The microstructure of three silver coins of the IIId century B.C. from the Illyrian king Monounios, the ancient Greek city of Dyrrachion and of Korkyra was studied with XRF and microscopy. From this investigation it turned out that these coins have different chemical composition and microstructure that imply different minting method.

  13. Gender Bias in the Courts.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gill, Wanda E.

    The term gender bias was coined by the National Judicial Education Program to Promote Equality for Women and Men in the Courts and is defined as the predisposition or tendency to think about and behave toward people primarily on the basis of their sex rather than their status, professional accomplishments, or aspirations. An effective method for…

  14. A fast, open source implementation of adaptive biasing potentials uncovers a ligand design strategy for the chromatin regulator BRD4

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dickson, Bradley M.; de Waal, Parker W.; Ramjan, Zachary H.; Xu, H. Eric; Rothbart, Scott B.

    2016-10-01

    In this communication we introduce an efficient implementation of adaptive biasing that greatly improves the speed of free energy computation in molecular dynamics simulations. We investigated the use of accelerated simulations to inform on compound design using a recently reported and clinically relevant inhibitor of the chromatin regulator BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4). Benchmarking on our local compute cluster, our implementation achieves up to 2.5 times more force calls per day than plumed2. Results of five 1 μs-long simulations are presented, which reveal a conformational switch in the BRD4 inhibitor between a binding competent and incompetent state. Stabilization of the switch led to a -3 kcal/mol improvement of absolute binding free energy. These studies suggest an unexplored ligand design principle and offer new actionable hypotheses for medicinal chemistry efforts against this druggable epigenetic target class.

  15. A fast, open source implementation of adaptive biasing potentials uncovers a ligand design strategy for the chromatin regulator BRD4.

    PubMed

    Dickson, Bradley M; de Waal, Parker W; Ramjan, Zachary H; Xu, H Eric; Rothbart, Scott B

    2016-10-21

    In this communication we introduce an efficient implementation of adaptive biasing that greatly improves the speed of free energy computation in molecular dynamics simulations. We investigated the use of accelerated simulations to inform on compound design using a recently reported and clinically relevant inhibitor of the chromatin regulator BRD4 (bromodomain-containing protein 4). Benchmarking on our local compute cluster, our implementation achieves up to 2.5 times more force calls per day than plumed2. Results of five 1 μs-long simulations are presented, which reveal a conformational switch in the BRD4 inhibitor between a binding competent and incompetent state. Stabilization of the switch led to a -3 kcal/mol improvement of absolute binding free energy. These studies suggest an unexplored ligand design principle and offer new actionable hypotheses for medicinal chemistry efforts against this druggable epigenetic target class.

  16. A High-Speed Adaptively-Biased Current-to-Current Front-End for SSPM Arrays

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Bob; Walder, Jean-Pierre; Lippe, Henrik vonder; Moses, William; Janecek, Martin

    Solid-state photomultiplier (SSPM) arrays are an interesting technology for use in PET detector modules due to their low cost, high compactness, insensitivity to magnetic fields, and sub-nanosecond timing resolution. However, the large intrinsic capacitance of SSPM arrays results in RC time constants that can severely degrade the response time, which leads to a trade-off between array size and speed. Instead, we propose a front-end that utilizes an adaptively biased current-to-current converter that minimizes the resistance seen by the SSPM array, thus preserving the timing resolution for both large and small arrays. This enables the use of large SSPM arrays with resistive networks, which creates position information and minimizes the number of outputs for compatibility with general PET multiplexing schemes. By tuning the bias of the feedback amplifier, the chip allows for precise control of the close-loop gain, ensuring stability and fast operation from loads as small as 50pF to loads as large as 1nF. The chip has 16 input channels, and 4 outputs capable of driving 100 n loads. The power consumption is 12mW per channel and 360mW for the entire chip. The chip has been designed and fabricated in an AMS 0.35um high-voltage technology, and demonstrates a fast rise-time response and low noise performances.

  17. Research of intelligent bus coin box

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xin, Shihao

    2017-03-01

    In the energy-saving emission reduction of the social context, in response to low-carbon travel, buses become the majority of people choose. We have designed this sorting machine for the present situation that the bus company has received a large amount of mixed zero coins and employed a large amount of manpower to sort out and lower the efficiency. Its function is to separate the coins and notes mixed, and the coins sort storage, the display shows the value of the received coins, so that the whole mechanized inventory classification, reduce the cost of clearing up and improve the efficiency of zero cash recycling, use Simple mechanical principles for classification, to be efficient, accurate and practical. Really meet the current city bus companies, commerce and banking and other industries in order to zero notes, zero coins in the actual demand. The size and specification of this machine are designed according to the size of the bus coin box. It is suitable for almost all buses. It can be installed in the coin box directly, real-time sorting and real-time counting. The difficulty of clearing change.

  18. Heads We Win: The Cognitive Side of Counterinsurgency (COIN)

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    the soldiers, police, intelligence agents , and diplomats directly involved with COIN operations. Cognitive Capabilities for COIN Smarter COIN demands...by which ordinary Muslims travel the path to becoming suicide terrorists, including Islamic attitudes, ideals, and grievances, as well as...assignment, and empowerment of the soldiers, intelligence agents , diplomats, and analysts engaged in COIN. In sum, this paper is about how minds, not

  19. 75 FR 2933 - Notification of Pricing for United States Mint 2010 Native American $1 Coin 25-Coin Rolls, 2010...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-01-19

    ... United States Mint Notification of Pricing for United States Mint 2010 Native American $1 Coin 25-Coin... Presidential $1 Coin 25-Coin Rolls SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing the prices of the 2010 Native... both the United States Mint facilities at Philadelphia and Denver will be available. The 2010...

  20. XRF analysis of Roman Imperial coins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gorghinian, Astrik; Esposito, Adolfo; Ferretti, Marco; Catalli, Fiorenzo

    2013-08-01

    X-ray Fluorescence analysis has been applied on 477 ancient coins, issued in different mints active during the First Roman Emperor's reign Augustus. The study of the different denominations has been related to their composition and place/date of struck. The alloys studied were based on gold, silver and copper. The X-ray micro-beam supplied by a polycapillary optics has been often extremely precious in the analysis of very small coin's spot with no patina due to usage.

  1. How to Cope with Bias While Adapting for Inclusion in Physical Education and Sports: A Judgment and Decision-Making Perspective

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hutzler, Yeshayahu; Bar-Eli, Michael

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this article is to describe a theoretical model and practice examples of judgment and decision making bias within the context of inclusion in physical education and sports. After presenting the context of adapting for inclusion, the theoretical roots of judgment and decision are described, and are linked to the practice of physical…

  2. Modular high-voltage bias generator powered by dual-looped self-adaptive wireless power transmission.

    PubMed

    Xie, Kai; Huang, An-Feng; Li, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Shi-Zhong; Zhang, Han-Lu

    2015-04-01

    We proposed a modular high-voltage (HV) bias generator powered by a novel transmitter-sharing inductive coupled wireless power transmission technology, aimed to extend the generator's flexibility and configurability. To solve the problems caused through an uncertain number of modules, a dual-looped self-adaptive control method is proposed that is capable of tracking resonance frequency while maintaining a relatively stable induction voltage for each HV module. The method combines a phase-locked loop and a current feedback loop, which ensures an accurate resonance state and a relatively constant boost ratio for each module, simplifying the architecture of the boost stage and improving the total efficiency. The prototype was built and tested. The input voltage drop of each module is less than 14% if the module number varies from 3 to 10; resonance tracking is completed within 60 ms. The efficiency of the coupling structure reaches up to 95%, whereas the total efficiency approaches 73% for a rated output. Furthermore, this technology can be used in various multi-load wireless power supply applications.

  3. Modular high-voltage bias generator powered by dual-looped self-adaptive wireless power transmission

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xie, Kai; Huang, An-Feng; Li, Xiao-Ping; Guo, Shi-Zhong; Zhang, Han-Lu

    2015-04-01

    We proposed a modular high-voltage (HV) bias generator powered by a novel transmitter-sharing inductive coupled wireless power transmission technology, aimed to extend the generator's flexibility and configurability. To solve the problems caused through an uncertain number of modules, a dual-looped self-adaptive control method is proposed that is capable of tracking resonance frequency while maintaining a relatively stable induction voltage for each HV module. The method combines a phase-locked loop and a current feedback loop, which ensures an accurate resonance state and a relatively constant boost ratio for each module, simplifying the architecture of the boost stage and improving the total efficiency. The prototype was built and tested. The input voltage drop of each module is less than 14% if the module number varies from 3 to 10; resonance tracking is completed within 60 ms. The efficiency of the coupling structure reaches up to 95%, whereas the total efficiency approaches 73% for a rated output. Furthermore, this technology can be used in various multi-load wireless power supply applications.

  4. Extended Adaptive Biasing Force Algorithm. An On-the-Fly Implementation for Accurate Free-Energy Calculations.

    PubMed

    Fu, Haohao; Shao, Xueguang; Chipot, Christophe; Cai, Wensheng

    2016-08-09

    Proper use of the adaptive biasing force (ABF) algorithm in free-energy calculations needs certain prerequisites to be met, namely, that the Jacobian for the metric transformation and its first derivative be available and the coarse variables be independent and fully decoupled from any holonomic constraint or geometric restraint, thereby limiting singularly the field of application of the approach. The extended ABF (eABF) algorithm circumvents these intrinsic limitations by applying the time-dependent bias onto a fictitious particle coupled to the coarse variable of interest by means of a stiff spring. However, with the current implementation of eABF in the popular molecular dynamics engine NAMD, a trajectory-based post-treatment is necessary to derive the underlying free-energy change. Usually, such a posthoc analysis leads to a decrease in the reliability of the free-energy estimates due to the inevitable loss of information, as well as to a drop in efficiency, which stems from substantial read-write accesses to file systems. We have developed a user-friendly, on-the-fly code for performing eABF simulations within NAMD. In the present contribution, this code is probed in eight illustrative examples. The performance of the algorithm is compared with traditional ABF, on the one hand, and the original eABF implementation combined with a posthoc analysis, on the other hand. Our results indicate that the on-the-fly eABF algorithm (i) supplies the correct free-energy landscape in those critical cases where the coarse variables at play are coupled to either each other or to geometric restraints or holonomic constraints, (ii) greatly improves the reliability of the free-energy change, compared to the outcome of a posthoc analysis, and (iii) represents a negligible additional computational effort compared to regular ABF. Moreover, in the proposed implementation, guidelines for choosing two parameters of the eABF algorithm, namely the stiffness of the spring and the mass

  5. Fully Distrustful Quantum Bit Commitment and Coin Flipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Silman, J.; Chailloux, A.; Aharon, N.; Kerenidis, I.; Pironio, S.; Massar, S.

    2011-06-01

    In the distrustful quantum cryptography model the parties have conflicting interests and do not trust one another. Nevertheless, they trust the quantum devices in their labs. The aim of the device-independent approach to cryptography is to do away with the latter assumption, and, consequently, significantly increase security. It is an open question whether the scope of this approach also extends to protocols in the distrustful cryptography model, thereby rendering them “fully” distrustful. In this Letter, we show that for bit commitment—one of the most basic primitives within the model—the answer is positive. We present a device-independent (imperfect) bit-commitment protocol, where Alice’s and Bob’s cheating probabilities are ≃0.854 and (3)/(4), which we then use to construct a device-independent coin flipping protocol with bias ≲0.336.

  6. Discovering characteristic landmarks on ancient coins using convolutional networks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Jongpil; Pavlovic, Vladimir

    2017-01-01

    We propose a method to find characteristic landmarks and recognize ancient Roman imperial coins using deep convolutional neural networks (CNNs) combined with expert-designed domain hierarchies. We first propose a framework to recognize Roman coins that exploits the hierarchical knowledge structure embedded in the coin domain, which we combine with the CNN-based category classifiers. We next formulate an optimization problem to discover class-specific salient coin regions. Analysis of discovered salient regions confirms that they are largely consistent with human expert annotations. Experimental results show that the proposed framework is able to effectively recognize ancient Roman coins as well as successfully identify landmarks on the coins. For this research, we have collected a Roman coin dataset where all coins are annotated and consist of obverse (head) and reverse (tail) images.

  7. Driving quantum-walk spreading with the coin operator

    SciTech Connect

    Romanelli, A.

    2009-10-15

    We generalize the discrete quantum walk on the line using a time-dependent unitary coin operator. We find an analytical relation between the long-time behaviors of the standard deviation and the coin operator. Selecting the coin time sequence allows to obtain a variety of predetermined asymptotic wave-function spreadings: ballistic, sub-ballistic, diffusive, subdiffusive, and localized.

  8. Adaptively biased sequential importance sampling for rare events in reaction networks with comparison to exact solutions from finite buffer dCME method.

    PubMed

    Cao, Youfang; Liang, Jie

    2013-07-14

    Critical events that occur rarely in biological processes are of great importance, but are challenging to study using Monte Carlo simulation. By introducing biases to reaction selection and reaction rates, weighted stochastic simulation algorithms based on importance sampling allow rare events to be sampled more effectively. However, existing methods do not address the important issue of barrier crossing, which often arises from multistable networks and systems with complex probability landscape. In addition, the proliferation of parameters and the associated computing cost pose significant problems. Here we introduce a general theoretical framework for obtaining optimized biases in sampling individual reactions for estimating probabilities of rare events. We further describe a practical algorithm called adaptively biased sequential importance sampling (ABSIS) method for efficient probability estimation. By adopting a look-ahead strategy and by enumerating short paths from the current state, we estimate the reaction-specific and state-specific forward and backward moving probabilities of the system, which are then used to bias reaction selections. The ABSIS algorithm can automatically detect barrier-crossing regions, and can adjust bias adaptively at different steps of the sampling process, with bias determined by the outcome of exhaustively generated short paths. In addition, there are only two bias parameters to be determined, regardless of the number of the reactions and the complexity of the network. We have applied the ABSIS method to four biochemical networks: the birth-death process, the reversible isomerization, the bistable Schlögl model, and the enzymatic futile cycle model. For comparison, we have also applied the finite buffer discrete chemical master equation (dCME) method recently developed to obtain exact numerical solutions of the underlying discrete chemical master equations of these problems. This allows us to assess sampling results objectively

  9. Adaptively biased sequential importance sampling for rare events in reaction networks with comparison to exact solutions from finite buffer dCME method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Youfang; Liang, Jie

    2013-07-01

    Critical events that occur rarely in biological processes are of great importance, but are challenging to study using Monte Carlo simulation. By introducing biases to reaction selection and reaction rates, weighted stochastic simulation algorithms based on importance sampling allow rare events to be sampled more effectively. However, existing methods do not address the important issue of barrier crossing, which often arises from multistable networks and systems with complex probability landscape. In addition, the proliferation of parameters and the associated computing cost pose significant problems. Here we introduce a general theoretical framework for obtaining optimized biases in sampling individual reactions for estimating probabilities of rare events. We further describe a practical algorithm called adaptively biased sequential importance sampling (ABSIS) method for efficient probability estimation. By adopting a look-ahead strategy and by enumerating short paths from the current state, we estimate the reaction-specific and state-specific forward and backward moving probabilities of the system, which are then used to bias reaction selections. The ABSIS algorithm can automatically detect barrier-crossing regions, and can adjust bias adaptively at different steps of the sampling process, with bias determined by the outcome of exhaustively generated short paths. In addition, there are only two bias parameters to be determined, regardless of the number of the reactions and the complexity of the network. We have applied the ABSIS method to four biochemical networks: the birth-death process, the reversible isomerization, the bistable Schlögl model, and the enzymatic futile cycle model. For comparison, we have also applied the finite buffer discrete chemical master equation (dCME) method recently developed to obtain exact numerical solutions of the underlying discrete chemical master equations of these problems. This allows us to assess sampling results objectively

  10. Is Airpower Relevant in a COIN Fight?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-03-01

    venture--so airpower is at a discount simply because it is a military tool . Second, airpower is a military tool 3 inherently incapable of engaging ‘up... tools that possess a precision that did not exist in the mid-twentieth century COIN fights. In addition to precision, airpower now further enhances...increasing number and capability of ISR assets, the Air Force exploits these tools producing actionable information. Michael W. Isherwood in Airpower

  11. Coining: an ancient treatment widely practiced among asians.

    PubMed

    Tan, Ak; Mallika, Ps

    2011-01-01

    Coining is a technique used in treating many illnesses since ancient times. It is a form of dermabrasion therapy still widely practiced in China and South East Asia. This ancient treatment method is employed to rid the body of "heatiness" or "negative energies". Coining is associated with serious complications, and has been confused with child abuse by physicians unfamiliar to Asian cultures. Despite the availability of more simple and effective treatment for fever, coining is still widely practiced among Asians.

  12. Multiple-Replica Strategies for Free-Energy Calculations in NAMD: Multiple-Walker Adaptive Biasing Force and Walker Selection Rules.

    PubMed

    Comer, Jeffrey; Phillips, James C; Schulten, Klaus; Chipot, Christophe

    2014-12-09

    From the most powerful supercomputers to multicore desktops and laptops, parallel computing architectures have been in the mainstream for some time. However, numerical schemes for calculating free energies in molecular systems that directly leverage this hardware paradigm, usually taking the form of multiple-replica strategies, are just now on the cusp of becoming standard practice. Here, we present a modification of the popular molecular dynamics program NAMD that is envisioned to facilitate the use of powerful multiple-replica strategies to improve ergodic sampling for a specific class of free-energy methods known as adaptive biasing force. We describe the software implementation in a so-called multiple-walker context, alongside the interface that makes the proposed approach accessible to the end users. We further evaluate the performance of the adaptive biasing force multiple-walker strategy for a model system, namely, the reversible folding of a short peptide, and show, in particular, in regions of the transition coordinate where convergence of the free-energy calculation is encumbered by hidden barriers, that the multiple-walker strategy can yield far more reliable results in appreciably less real time on parallel architectures, relative to standard, single-replica calculations.

  13. Adaptive social learning strategies in temporally and spatially varying environments : how temporal vs. spatial variation, number of cultural traits, and costs of learning influence the evolution of conformist-biased transmission, payoff-biased transmission, and individual learning.

    PubMed

    Nakahashi, Wataru; Wakano, Joe Yuichiro; Henrich, Joseph

    2012-12-01

    Long before the origins of agriculture human ancestors had expanded across the globe into an immense variety of environments, from Australian deserts to Siberian tundra. Survival in these environments did not principally depend on genetic adaptations, but instead on evolved learning strategies that permitted the assembly of locally adaptive behavioral repertoires. To develop hypotheses about these learning strategies, we have modeled the evolution of learning strategies to assess what conditions and constraints favor which kinds of strategies. To build on prior work, we focus on clarifying how spatial variability, temporal variability, and the number of cultural traits influence the evolution of four types of strategies: (1) individual learning, (2) unbiased social learning, (3) payoff-biased social learning, and (4) conformist transmission. Using a combination of analytic and simulation methods, we show that spatial-but not temporal-variation strongly favors the emergence of conformist transmission. This effect intensifies when migration rates are relatively high and individual learning is costly. We also show that increasing the number of cultural traits above two favors the evolution of conformist transmission, which suggests that the assumption of only two traits in many models has been conservative. We close by discussing how (1) spatial variability represents only one way of introducing the low-level, nonadaptive phenotypic trait variation that so favors conformist transmission, the other obvious way being learning errors, and (2) our findings apply to the evolution of conformist transmission in social interactions. Throughout we emphasize how our models generate empirical predictions suitable for laboratory testing.

  14. From non-Abelian anyons to quantum computation to coin-flipping by telephone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mochon, Carlos

    Following their divorce, Alice and Bob would like to split some of their possessions by flipping a coin. Unwilling to meet in person, and without a trusted third party, they must figure out a scheme to flip the coin over a telephone that guarantees that neither party can cheat. The preceding scenario is the traditional definition of two-party coin-flipping. In a classical setting, without limits on the available computational power, one player can always guarantee a coin-flipping victory by cheating. However, by employing quantum communication it is possible to guarantee, with only information-theoretic assumptions, that neither party can win by cheating, with a probability greater than two thirds. Along with the description of such a protocol, this thesis derives a tight lower bound on the bias for a large family of quantum weak coin-flipping protocols, proving such a protocol optimal within the family. The protocol described herein is an improvement and generalization of one examined by Spekkens and Rudolph. The key steps of the analysis involve Kitaev's description of quantum coin-flipping as a semidefinite program whose dual problem provides a certificate that upper bounds the amount of cheating for each party. In order for such quantum protocols to be viable, though, a number of practical obstacles involving the communication and processing of quantum information must be resolved. In the second half of this thesis, a scheme for processing quantum information is presented, which uses non-abelian anyons that are the magnetic and electric excitations of a discrete-group quantum gauge theory. In particular, the connections between group structure and computational power are examined, generalizing previous work by Kitaev, Ogburn and Preskill. Anyon based computation has the advantage of being topological, which exponentially suppresses the rate of decoherence and the errors associated with the elementary quantum gates. Though no physical systems with such

  15. 31 CFR 100.12 - Exchange of fused and mixed coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... as U.S. coins. (b) The United States Mint will not accept fused or mixed coins for redemption. (c... redeemed only at the United States Mint, P.O. Box 400, Philadelphia, PA 19105. Coins are shipped at...

  16. Effects of Estimation Bias on Multiple-Category Classification with an IRT-Based Adaptive Classification Procedure

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yang, Xiangdong; Poggio, John C.; Glasnapp, Douglas R.

    2006-01-01

    The effects of five ability estimators, that is, maximum likelihood estimator, weighted likelihood estimator, maximum a posteriori, expected a posteriori, and Owen's sequential estimator, on the performances of the item response theory-based adaptive classification procedure on multiple categories were studied via simulations. The following…

  17. COINS: A composites information database system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siddiqi, Shahid; Vosteen, Louis F.; Edlow, Ralph; Kwa, Teck-Seng

    1992-01-01

    An automated data abstraction form (ADAF) was developed to collect information on advanced fabrication processes and their related costs. The information will be collected for all components being fabricated as part of the Advanced Composite Technology (ACT) program and included in a COmposites INformation System (COINS) data base. The aim of the COINS development effort is to provide future airframe preliminary design and fabrication teams with a tool through which production cost can become a deterministic variable in the design optimization process. The effort was initiated by NASA Langley to implement the recommendations of a working group comprised of representatives from the commercial airframe companies. The principal working group recommendation was to reinstitute collection of composite part fabrication data in a format similar to the DOD/NASA Structural Composites Fabrication Guide. The fabrication information collection form was automated with current user friendly computer technology. The new automated form and features that make the form easy to use by an aircraft structural design manufacturing team are described.

  18. COINS: A composites information database system

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Siddiqi, Shahid; Vosteen, Louis F.; Edlow, Ralph; Kwa, Teck-Seng

    1992-01-01

    An automated data abstraction form (ADAF) was developed to collect information on advanced fabrication processes and their related costs. The information will be collected for all components being fabricated as part of the ACT program and include in a COmposites INformation System (COINS) database. The aim of the COINS development effort is to provide future airframe preliminary design and fabrication teams with a tool through which production cost can become a deterministic variable in the design optimization process. The effort was initiated by the Structures Technology Program Office (STPO) of the NASA LaRC to implement the recommendations of a working group comprised of representatives from the commercial airframe companies. The principal working group recommendation was to re-institute collection of composite part fabrication data in a format similar to the DOD/NASA Structural Composites Fabrication Guide. The fabrication information collection form was automated with current user friendly computer technology. This work in progress paper describes the new automated form and features that make the form easy to use by an aircraft structural design-manufacturing team.

  19. Coined quantum walks on percolation graphs

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leung, Godfrey; Knott, Paul; Bailey, Joe; Kendon, Viv

    2010-12-01

    Quantum walks, both discrete (coined) and continuous time, form the basis of several quantum algorithms and have been used to model processes such as transport in spin chains and quantum chemistry. The enhanced spreading and mixing properties of quantum walks compared with their classical counterparts have been well studied on regular structures and also shown to be sensitive to defects and imperfections in the lattice. As a simple example of a disordered system, we consider percolation lattices, in which edges or sites are randomly missing, interrupting the progress of the quantum walk. We use numerical simulation to study the properties of coined quantum walks on these percolation lattices in one and two dimensions. In one dimension (the line), we introduce a simple notion of quantum tunnelling and determine how this affects the properties of the quantum walk as it spreads. On two-dimensional percolation lattices, we show how the spreading rate varies from linear in the number of steps down to zero as the percolation probability decreases towards the critical point. This provides an example of fractional scaling in quantum-walk dynamics.

  20. Make a wish: coins falling in water

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vincent, Lionel; Heisinger, Luke; Kanso, Eva

    2014-11-01

    Accurate prediction of the flight range and landing site of an object descending under the influence of gravitational and aerodynamic forces is relevant to many engineering and science applications. Examples range from forecasting the touchdown locations of re-entry space vehicles to understanding the settlement patterns of seeds. While the descent motion follows the laws of classical mechanics, the delicate interplay between the fluid medium and the physical properties of the descending object makes the exact landing site difficult to predict a priori and thus best treated probabilistically. Indeed, objects falling in a fluid medium rarely descend in a straight line. The descent motion is generally complex, even for regularly shaped objects such as coins and cards. For such objects, four types of descent regimes have been identified: steady, fluttering, chaotic, or tumbling. Here, we assess the dependence of landing sites on the type of descent motion through controlled experiments of coins falling in water where we quantify the spread in the landing sites and probability of landing heads up. Interestingly, we find that, in certain descent regimes, the fluid medium acts as a randomization device, while other regimes only cause small uncertainties in the landing sites.

  1. Teaching coin discrimination to children with visual impairments.

    PubMed

    Hanney, Nicole M; Tiger, Jeffrey H

    2012-01-01

    We taught 2 children with visual impairments to select a coin from an array using tactile cues after hearing its name and then to select a coin after hearing its value. Following the acquisition of these listener (receptive language) skills, we then observed the emergence of speaker (expressive language) skills without direct instruction.

  2. Teaching Coin Discrimination to Children with Visual Impairments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hanney, Nicole M.; Tiger, Jeffrey H.

    2012-01-01

    We taught 2 children with visual impairments to select a coin from an array using tactile cues after hearing its name and then to select a coin after hearing its value. Following the acquisition of these listener (receptive language) skills, we then observed the emergence of speaker (expressive language) skills without direct instruction.…

  3. What Are the 50 Cent Euro Coins Made of?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peralta, Luis; Farinha, Ana Catarina; Rego, Florbela

    2008-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence is a non-destructive technique that allows elemental composition analysis. In this paper we describe a prescription to obtain the elemental composition of homogeneous coins, like 50 cent Euro coins, and how to get the quantitative proportions of each element with the help of Monte Carlo simulation. Undergraduate students can…

  4. 31 CFR 100.3 - Lawfully held coin and currencies in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Lawfully held coin and currencies in... EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.3 Lawfully held coin and currencies in general. The official agencies of the Department of the Treasury will continue to exchange lawfully held coins...

  5. The music of gold: can gold counterfeited coins be detected by ear?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Manas, Arnaud

    2015-07-01

    In this paper I investigate whether it is true and to what extent counterfeit coins can be detected by their sound frequency. I describe the different types of counterfeit coins encountered and their respective characteristics. I then use the Kirchoff thin plate theory to model a coin, and confirm the validity of the theory by listening to the tone of genuine and counterfeit coins.

  6. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  7. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  8. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued before January 30, 1934, are exchangeable, as...

  9. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  10. 31 CFR 100.4 - Gold coin and gold certificates in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Gold coin and gold certificates in... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General § 100.4 Gold coin and gold certificates in general. Gold coins, and gold certificates of the type issued...

  11. Quantum protocol for cheat-sensitive weak coin flipping.

    PubMed

    Spekkens, R W; Rudolph, Terry

    2002-11-25

    We present a quantum protocol for the task of weak coin flipping. We find that, for one choice of parameters in the protocol, the maximum probability of a dishonest party winning the coin flip if the other party is honest is 1/sqrt[2]. We also show that if parties restrict themselves to strategies wherein they cannot be caught cheating, their maximum probability of winning can be even smaller. As such, the protocol offers additional security in the form of cheat sensitivity.

  12. Forward-deployed Medical Assets and the COIN Offensive

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2013-01-01

    sur- gical teams ( FSTs ) are scattered over the battlefield and generally care for a young, fit force operating on the relatively nonkinetic COIN...forward-deployed military medical units, such as medical companies and FSTs . Not coincidentally, these areas tend to be havens for insurgents because...forward-deployed medical assets can participate in direct COIN engagements with ready availability and low cost. Con- ventional medical companies and FSTs

  13. Hot water use at coin laundries

    SciTech Connect

    Lowenstein, A.; Hiller, C.C.

    1999-07-01

    Detailed data on hot water use for one year are presented for two coin laundries. The first is a three-machine laundry that serves half a 50-unit apartment house, and the second is an eight-machine laundry that serves an 82-unit apartment house. For the smaller laundry, the maximum possible demand--i.e., three machines simultaneously filling with hot water--occurred more than once per month. For the larger laundry, the maximum instantaneous demand was equivalent to four machines simultaneously filling with hot water. At this site, the shortest interval in which hot water use equaled that for all eight machines running hot washes was 35 minutes. The data on hot water use for the two laundries were used to validate a methodology for sizing hot water heaters that had been presented at an ASHRAE Symposium. This methodology, which accounts for heating rate, storage capacity, and water temperatures, successfully predicted the conditions when the water heaters would and would not be adequate for the measured loads. The data are an important part of ongoing efforts to characterize the highly diverse universe of hot water use in commercial buildings.

  14. Eliminating Bias

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Learn how to eliminate bias from monitoring systems by instituting appropriate installation, operation, and quality assurance procedures. Provides links to download An Operator's Guide to Eliminating Bias in CEM Systems.

  15. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  16. Intergroup bias.

    PubMed

    Hewstone, Miles; Rubin, Mark; Willis, Hazel

    2002-01-01

    This chapter reviews the extensive literature on bias in favor of in-groups at the expense of out-groups. We focus on five issues and identify areas for future research: (a) measurement and conceptual issues (especially in-group favoritism vs. out-group derogation, and explicit vs. implicit measures of bias); (b) modern theories of bias highlighting motivational explanations (social identity, optimal distinctiveness, uncertainty reduction, social dominance, terror management); (c) key moderators of bias, especially those that exacerbate bias (identification, group size, status and power, threat, positive-negative asymmetry, personality and individual differences); (d) reduction of bias (individual vs. intergroup approaches, especially models of social categorization); and (e) the link between intergroup bias and more corrosive forms of social hostility.

  17. Micro-XRF analysis of silver coins from medieval Poland

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    del Hoyo-Meléndez, Julio M.; Świt, Paweł; Matosz, Marta; Woźniak, Mateusz; Klisińska-Kopacz, Anna; Bratasz, Łukasz

    2015-04-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) analysis has become a standard method in archaeological science due to its non-invasive and non-destructive nature. This technique has extensively been used for the study of numismatic collections since the data derived from it can be correlated with manufacturing processes, provenance of raw materials, and geographical distribution of ancient mints. A group of 71 silver coins of the first Piasts: Boleslaus the Brave (996-1025) and Mieszko II Lambert (1025-1034) belonging to the collections of the National Museum in Krakow have been characterized using micro-XRF spectrometry. This is the most numerous collection of their coins representing nearly 30% of all known coins from these rulers. The research has focused on evaluating the use of this technique as a screening tool for elemental surface characterization of the alloys. Surveyed coins are mainly constituted by Ag, Cu and Pb along with trace levels of Fe, Ni, Zn, Au, Hg, Bi, and Br. Quantitative analyses have revealed Ag contents in the 81.6-97.5% range for all the evaluated coins. This study had the goal of providing information about the elemental composition of these objects, which will serve to enhance the existing knowledge about geographical and chronological diversification of Polish numismatic collections.

  18. Paper money and coins as potential vectors of transmissible disease.

    PubMed

    Angelakis, Emmanouil; Azhar, Esam I; Bibi, Fehmida; Yasir, Muhammad; Al-Ghamdi, Ahmed K; Ashshi, Ahmad M; Elshemi, Adel G; Raoult, Didier

    2014-01-01

    Paper currency and coins may be a public health risk when associated with the simultaneous handling of food and could lead to the spread of nosocomial infections. Banknotes recovered from hospitals may be highly contaminated by Staphylococcus aureus. Salmonella species, Escherichia coli and S. aureus are commonly isolated from banknotes from food outlets. Laboratory simulations revealed that methicillin-resistant S. aureus can easily survive on coins, whereas E. coli, Salmonella species and viruses, including human influenza virus, Norovirus, Rhinovirus, hepatitis A virus, and Rotavirus, can be transmitted through hand contact. Large-scale, 16S rRNA, metagenomic studies and culturomics have the capacity to dramatically expand the known diversity of bacteria and viruses on money and fomites. This review summarizes the latest research on the potential of paper currency and coins to serve as sources of pathogenic agents.

  19. 77 FR 31069 - Pricing for the 2012 America the Beautiful Quarters Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated CoinsTM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-05-24

    ... Beautiful Quarters Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins TM AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the... Beautiful Quarters Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins TM . The coins will be offered for sale at a...

  20. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  1. Quantum dice rolling: a multi-outcome generalization of quantum coin flipping

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Aharon, N.; Silman, J.

    2010-03-01

    The problem of quantum dice rolling (DR)—a generalization of the problem of quantum coin flipping (CF) to more than two outcomes and parties—is studied in both its weak and strong variants. We prove by construction that quantum mechanics allows for (i) weak N-sided DR admitting arbitrarily small bias for any N and (ii) two-party strong N-sided DR saturating Kitaev's bound for any N. To derive (ii) we also prove by construction that quantum mechanics allows for (iii) strong imbalanced CF saturating Kitaev's bound for any degree of imbalance. Furthermore, as a corollary of (ii) we introduce a family of optimal 2m-party strong nm-sided DR protocols for any pair m and n.

  2. Characterizations of silver alloys used in modern Mexican coins

    SciTech Connect

    Mendoza-Lopez, M.L.; Perez-Bueno, J.J.; Rodriguez-Garcia, M.E.

    2009-09-15

    This paper presents a complete methodology for the characterization of silver alloys used in modern coin production. Mexican coins with a nominal silver concentration from 10% to 99.99% were used in this study. Calibrated Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectrometers were used to determine the chemical composition of the alloys as a function of the depth, while inductively coupled plasma was used to determine the total element composition in bulk. Scanning Electron Microscope was used to study the phase distributions in the different silver coins. According to Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectrometers and inductively coupled plasma, the silver content found in the studied samples was consistently greater than that of the nominal silver content reported by the Mexican mint. This may lead to a review of the new methods of analysis used nowadays in contemporary coin minting. This result is very important because silver is increasing in value as metal and, considering the volume of production of silver coins, this may increase further as a consequence of a growing popular confidence in silver currency. In the case of silver studies, an advantage of the absence of silver detector in the Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectrometers system is that it allows for the recalibration to have a better range of detection of other metals present in the alloys. A calibration curve using the copper content obtained by inductively coupled plasma (bulk) and Glow Discharge Optical Emission Spectrometers (depth profile) was performed. The relevance of control in modern silver coin minting was clarified, especially in minimizing the discrepancy between the nominal and the core fineness. The physical and chemical properties of the alloys studied are defined, revealing important variations in silver and copper contents. A new methodology and metrology for the control of coinage are suggested.

  3. Silver coins analyses by X-ray fluorescence methods.

    PubMed

    Torrisi, L; Italiano, A; Cutroneo, M; Gentile, C; Torrisi, A

    2013-01-01

    The investigation on the differences occurring in the manufacture of silver coins allows to get information on their elemental composition and represents a powerful support to the methodology to identify the producing technologies, workshops being also instrumental to distinguish between original and counterfeit ones. Aim of the present work is to study recent and old silver coins through non-destructive X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis. The XRF was applied to extend the analysis to the deepest layers of the coins; for surface layers an X-ray tube or an electron beam were employed to induce the atom fluorescence to obtain information on the surface elemental composition. Moreover, a detailed study has been performed to evaluate the influence of the surface curvature on the measurement, by deducing a proper corrective factor to keep into account in the data analysis. The elemental atomic composition was measured for each coin, mainly by means of the X-ray tube excitation for the bulk and the electron Scanning Electron Microscope (SEM) microbeam probe for the surface patina analysis. Ionization was induced by an X-ray tube using an Ag anode for the bulk and by an electron microprobe for the surface composition. X-ray detection was performed by using a semiconductor Si device cooled by a Peltier system. The Ag L-lines X-ray yield is affected by coin surface morphology and geometry. The comparison between coin spectra and standard samples, shows that the Ag quantitative analysis is influenced by error of the atomic concentration lower that 10%.

  4. 31 CFR 100.12 - Exchange of fused and mixed coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ..., but are readily and clearly identifiable as U.S. coins. (b) The United States Mint will not accept... site. Fused and mixed coins will be redeemed only at the United States Mint, P.O. Box 400,...

  5. 31 CFR 100.12 - Exchange of fused and mixed coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ..., but are readily and clearly identifiable as U.S. coins. (b) The United States Mint will not accept... site. Fused and mixed coins will be redeemed only at the United States Mint, P.O. Box 400,...

  6. 31 CFR 100.12 - Exchange of fused and mixed coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ..., but are readily and clearly identifiable as U.S. coins. (b) The United States Mint will not accept... site. Fused and mixed coins will be redeemed only at the United States Mint, P.O. Box 400,...

  7. 31 CFR 100.12 - Exchange of fused and mixed coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ..., but are readily and clearly identifiable as U.S. coins. (b) The United States Mint will not accept... site. Fused and mixed coins will be redeemed only at the United States Mint, P.O. Box 400,...

  8. Successful use of a metal detector in locating coins ingested by children.

    PubMed

    Ros, S P; Cetta, F

    1992-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to examine the accuracy of a metal detector in locating coins ingested by children. The metal detector correctly identified the presence or absence of coins in 13 patients (93%), as confirmed by radiologic studies.

  9. 77 FR 61475 - Price for the 2012 Annual Uncirculated Dollar Coin Set

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-09

    ... silver, the United States Mint is announcing a new price of $59.95 for the 2012 Annual Uncirculated... Native American $1 Coin and one American Eagle Silver Coin. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: B.B....

  10. 78 FR 19799 - United States Mint Kids' Baseball Coin Design Challenge

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... United States Mint United States Mint Kids' Baseball Coin Design Challenge ACTION: Notification of the Opening of the United States Mint Kids' Baseball Coin Design Challenge on April 11, 2013. SUMMARY: The United States Mint announces the opening of a national kids' baseball coin design challenge on April...

  11. 76 FR 33026 - Pricing for the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-06-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin AGENCY: United States Mint... 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin. The coin will be offered for sale at a price of $59.95....

  12. 76 FR 65563 - Pricing for 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof and Uncirculated Coins

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... United States Mint Pricing for 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof and Uncirculated Coins AGENCY: United... the re-pricing of the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof and Uncirculated Coins. The price of the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coins will be lowered from $68.45 to $58.95, and the price of the 2011...

  13. 76 FR 67799 - Pricing for the American Eagle 25th Anniversary Silver Coin Set

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-11-02

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the American Eagle 25th Anniversary Silver Coin Set AGENCY: United States... price of the American Eagle 25th Anniversary Silver Coin Set. The coin set will be offered for sale at...

  14. 76 FR 53717 - Pricing for the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin AGENCY: United States Mint... the 2011 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin. The price of the coins will be raised from $59.95 to...

  15. 77 FR 40704 - Price for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-10

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Price for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coin AGENCY: United States Mint... 2012 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coin. The coin will be offered for sale at a price of...

  16. 78 FR 24816 - Pricing for the 2013 American Eagle West Point Two-Coin Silver Set

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-26

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2013 American Eagle West Point Two-Coin Silver Set AGENCY: United... the price of the 2013 American Eagle West Point Two-Coin Silver Set. The coin set will be offered...

  17. 76 FR 65563 - Pricing for America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated CoinsTM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-10-21

    ... United States Mint Pricing for America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins TM AGENCY... announcing the re-pricing of the America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins. The price of the America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins will be lowered from $279.95 to $229.95....

  18. 77 FR 840 - Pricing for America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated CoinsTM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... United States Mint Pricing for America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins TM AGENCY... announcing the re-pricing of the America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins. The price of the America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins will be lowered from $229.95 to $204.95....

  19. 77 FR 15457 - Pricing for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-03-15

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin AGENCY: United States Mint... 2012 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin. The coins will be offered for sale at a price of $59.95....

  20. NaI Measurements of Plutonium & Other Sources with the INL Coin

    SciTech Connect

    Karpius, Peter Joseph

    2016-09-06

    This report is a presentation for the NEOD training course at SNL. Its purpose is to summarize the effects of the INL coin on gamma ray spectra for 60Co, 137Cs, and plutonium. Spectra recorded with and without the INL Coin illustrate how transmission plays a role in the dose-ratio factors written on the coin.

  1. 31 CFR 101.4 - Extraction of gold bullion from the counterfeit coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2010-07-01 2010-07-01 false Extraction of gold bullion from the... MITIGATION OF FORFEITURE OF COUNTERFEIT GOLD COINS § 101.4 Extraction of gold bullion from the counterfeit coins. If the petition is approved, the Assistant Secretary shall then forward the gold coins to...

  2. Curriculum and Assessment: Two Sides of the Same Coin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shoemaker, Berry Jean Eklund; Lewin, Larry

    1993-01-01

    Eugene (Oregon) Public Schools want to replace the traditional content-driven curriculum with a general concepts-based curriculum stressing the relationships among ideas. To help district educators understand the new model, a coin metaphor describing the two interlocking areas of curriculum (learning core conceptual knowledge and strategic…

  3. $158 per Quart: The Value of a Volume of Coins

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kcenich, Stephen; Boss'e, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    The ubiquitous change jar (or any other container) is the focus of this investigation. Using random pocket change, a distribution is determined and statistical tools are employed to calculate the value of given volumes of coins. This brief investigation begins by considering money, which piques the interest of most students, and uses this…

  4. 77 FR 840 - Pricing for 2012 Products Featuring $1 Coins

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... United States Mint Pricing for 2012 Products Featuring $1 Coins AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing 2012 pricing for products... States Mint; 801 9th Street NW., Washington, DC 20220; or call (202) 354-7500. Authority: 31 U.S.C....

  5. Analysis of the Indian Army’s COIN experience.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-10

    isolated during the British era with limited governmental control over the Naga tribes. Soon after independence, seeds of resentment over autonomy... germinated into a violent struggle for independence from India. This phase signifies the creation of the COIN doctrine in its nascent stage. In...insurgency can be annihilated through the vigorous application of force and repression.) Escalating repression can crush an insurgency. Amnesty

  6. An Analysis of the Indian Army’s COIN Experience

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-05-10

    isolated during the British era with limited governmental control over the Naga tribes. Soon after independence, seeds of resentment over autonomy... germinated into a violent struggle for independence from India. This phase signifies the creation of the COIN doctrine in its nascent stage. In...insurgency can be annihilated through the vigorous application of force and repression.) Escalating repression can crush an insurgency. Amnesty

  7. Quantum coins, dice, and children: Probability and quantum statistics

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chow, Chi-Keung; Cohen, Thomas D.

    2000-09-01

    We discuss counterintuitive aspects of probabilities for systems of identical particles obeying quantum statistics. Quantum coins and children (two level systems) and quantum dice (many level systems) are used as examples. It is emphasized that, even in the absence of interactions, (anti)symmetrizations of multiparticle wave functions destroy statistical independences and often lead to dramatic departures from our intuitive expectations.

  8. Statistical Significance and Effect Size: Two Sides of a Coin.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fan, Xitao

    This paper suggests that statistical significance testing and effect size are two sides of the same coin; they complement each other, but do not substitute for one another. Good research practice requires that both should be taken into consideration to make sound quantitative decisions. A Monte Carlo simulation experiment was conducted, and a…

  9. Manufacturing Ultra-Precision Meso-scale Products by Coining

    SciTech Connect

    Seugling, R M; Davis, P J; Rickens, K; Osmer, J; Brinksmeier, E

    2010-02-18

    A method for replicating ultra-precision, meso-scale features onto a near-net-shape metallic blank has been demonstrated. The 'coining' technology can be used to imprint a wide range of features and/or profiles into two opposing surfaces. The instrumented system provides the ability to measure and control the product thickness and total thickness variation (TTV). The coining mechanism relies on kinematic principles to accurately and efficiently produce ultra-precision work pieces without the production of by products such as machining chips, or grinding swarf while preserving surface finish, material structure and overall form. Coining has been developed as a niche process for manufacturing difficult to machine, millimeter size components made from materials that may present hazardous conditions. In the case described in this paper a refractory metal part, tantalum (Ta) was produced with 4 {micro}m peak to valley 50 {micro}m special wavelength sine wave coined into the surface of 50 {micro}m blank. This technique shows promise for use on ductile materials that cannot be precision machined with conventional single crystal diamond tooling and/or has strict requirements on subsurface damage, surface impurities and grain structure. As a production process, it can be used to reduce manufacturing costs where large numbers of ultra-precision, repetitive designs are required and produce parts out of hazardous materials without generating added waste.

  10. French Counterinsurgency (COIN) Efforts in Spain During the Napoleonic Era - A Modern Analysis Through the Lens of the Principles of COIN In US Joint Doctrine

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-11-01

    NAPOLEONIC ERA – A MODERN ANALYSIS THROUGH THE LENS OF THE PRINCIPLES OF COIN IN US JOINT DOCTRINE By Brent C. Carter, MAJ, US Army A Research...The Napoleonic Era- A Modern Analysis Through The Lens Of The Principles Of Coin In Us Joint Doctrine 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c...COIN doctrine that encases principles that have been battle tested in two wars over the last ten years. These tenets can be the lens through which

  11. Construction and testing of coin cells of lithium ion batteries.

    PubMed

    Kayyar, Archana; Huang, Jiajia; Samiee, Mojtaba; Luo, Jian

    2012-08-02

    Rechargeable lithium ion batteries have wide applications in electronics, where customers always demand more capacity and longer lifetime. Lithium ion batteries have also been considered to be used in electric and hybrid vehicles or even electrical grid stabilization systems. All these applications simulate a dramatic increase in the research and development of battery materials, including new materials, doping, nanostructuring, coatings or surface modifications and novel binders. Consequently, an increasing number of physicists, chemists and materials scientists have recently ventured into this area. Coin cells are widely used in research laboratories to test new battery materials; even for the research and development that target large-scale and high-power applications, small coin cells are often used to test the capacities and rate capabilities of new materials in the initial stage. In 2010, we started a National Science Foundation (NSF) sponsored research project to investigate the surface adsorption and disordering in battery materials (grant no. DMR-1006515). In the initial stage of this project, we have struggled to learn the techniques of assembling and testing coin cells, which cannot be achieved without numerous help of other researchers in other universities (through frequent calls, email exchanges and two site visits). Thus, we feel that it is beneficial to document, by both text and video, a protocol of assembling and testing a coin cell, which will help other new researchers in this field. This effort represents the "Broader Impact" activities of our NSF project, and it will also help to educate and inspire students. In this video article, we document a protocol to assemble a CR2032 coin cell with a LiCoO2 working electrode, a Li counter electrode, and (the mostly commonly used) polyvinylidene fluoride (PVDF) binder. To ensure new learners to readily repeat the protocol, we keep the protocol as specific and explicit as we can. However, it is important

  12. Cognitive Mechanisms of Insight: The Role of Heuristics and Representational Change in Solving the Eight-Coin Problem

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Öllinger, Michael; Jones, Gary; Faber, Amory H.; Knoblich, Günther

    2013-01-01

    The 8-coin insight problem requires the problem solver to move 2 coins so that each coin touches exactly 3 others. Ormerod, MacGregor, and Chronicle (2002) explained differences in task performance across different versions of the 8-coin problem using the availability of particular moves in a 2-dimensional search space. We explored 2 further…

  13. Large deviation theory for coin tossing and turbulence.

    PubMed

    Chakraborty, Sagar; Saha, Arnab; Bhattacharjee, Jayanta K

    2009-11-01

    Large deviations play a significant role in many branches of nonequilibrium statistical physics. They are difficult to handle because their effects, though small, are not amenable to perturbation theory. Even the Gaussian model, which is the usual initial step for most perturbation theories, fails to be a starting point while discussing intermittency in fluid turbulence, where large deviations dominate. Our contention is: in the large deviation theory, the central role is played by the distribution associated with the tossing of a coin and the simple coin toss is the "Gaussian model" of problems where rare events play significant role. We illustrate this by applying it to calculate the multifractal exponents of the order structure factors in fully developed turbulence.

  14. Coins as intermediate targets: reconstructive analysis with synthetic body models.

    PubMed

    Thali, Michael J; Kneubuehl, Beat P; Rodriguez, William R; Smirniotopoulos, James G; Richardson, A Charles; Fowler, David; Godwin, Michael; Jurrus, Aaron; Fletcher, Douglas; Mallak, Craig

    2009-06-01

    The phenomenon of intermediate targets is well known in wound ballistics. In forensic science, models are used to reconstruct injury patterns to answer questions regarding the dynamic formation of these unusual injuries. Soft-tissue substitutes or glycerin soap and ordnance gelatin have been well established. Recently, based on previous experiences with artificial bone, a skull-brain model was developed. The goal of this study was to create and analyze a model-supported reconstruction of a real forensic case with a coin as an intermediate target. It was possible not only to demonstrate the "bullet-coin interaction," but also to recreate the wound pattern found in the victim. This case demonstrates that by using ballistic models, gunshot cases can be reproduced simply and economically, without coming into conflict with ethical guidelines.

  15. Flipping the COIN and Winning: Lessons from Colombia

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-03-01

    Flipping the COIN and Winning: Lessons from Colombia 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR( S ) Commander Joseph F...Hester III 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) Colonel Alex Crowther Strategic...Studies Institute 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING / MONITORING AGENCY NAME( S ) AND ADDRESS(ES) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM( S

  16. Journal bias or author bias?

    PubMed

    Harris, Ian

    2016-01-01

    I read with interest the comment by Mark Wilson in the Indian Journal of Medical Ethics regarding bias and conflicts of interest in medical journals. Wilson targets one journal (the New England Journal of Medicine: NEJM) and one particular "scandal" to make his point that journals' decisions on publication are biased by commercial conflicts of interest (CoIs). It is interesting that he chooses the NEJM which, by his own admission, had one of the strictest CoI policies and had published widely on this topic. The feeling is that if the NEJM can be guilty, they can all be guilty.

  17. Analysis of Historical Coins by X-ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raddell, Mark; Manukyan, Khatchatur; Aprahamian, Ani; Jordan, Louis

    2016-09-01

    Using different setups of the EDAX Orbis Micro X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) Analyzer, we have learned more about the limitations and optimizations of the XRF method and collected data about early British and Spanish colonial silver coins. XRF spectrometry was used to study Mexican, Bolivian, and Massachusetts silver coins from the University of Notre Dame's Rare Books and Special Collections Department. Runs were performed in both air and vacuum conditions, and the x-ray beam diameter was compared between 1 and 0.03 mm. Using these methods we were able to contribute to the understanding of the historical coinage as well as learn about the best ways to use the method. During analysis we found significant differences in the spectra for silver L shell excitation and silver K shell excitation when switching from 0.03 to 1mm x-ray beam widths. Our data trends also fit with the historical theory that the coinage from the Massachusetts' mint were created by melting down Spanish silver coins (like the ones made from Mexico and Bolivia) and adding a small percent more of copper. We have the intent to build on what we have learned by also studying some Roman Denarii in the future, and by trying to create a custom designed version of the XRF which can be moved more easily and provide quick scans for a larger number of artifacts.

  18. Analysis of surface stains on modern gold coins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Corregidor, V.; Alves, L. C.; Cruz, J.

    2013-07-01

    It is a mandatory practice in the European Mint Houses to provide a certificate of guarantee of their products specially when issuing commemorative gold or silver coins. This practise should assure satisfaction and trust both for the mint house and for the demanding numismatic collector. For these reasons the Mint Houses follow a strict quality control in all the production steps in order to ensure a no-defect, fully supervised output. In spite of all the undertaken precautions, different surface stains with diverse origin on gold coins recently minted in Europe were observed. Those were compositionally studied by means of IBA techniques at the end-stage nuclear microprobe installed at IST/ITN. From this study it was possible to identify several possible sources for these stains. The presence of defects at the surface of these commemorative coins address the need of improving the quality control system and the results here presented point out where these improvements should occur, in order to reduce/eliminate them and give the customer a product that with time probably will be revalued.

  19. Double propensity-score adjustment: A solution to design bias or bias due to incomplete matching

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Propensity-score matching is frequently used to reduce the effects of confounding when using observational data to estimate the effects of treatments. Matching allows one to estimate the average effect of treatment in the treated. Rosenbaum and Rubin coined the term “bias due to incomplete matching” to describe the bias that can occur when some treated subjects are excluded from the matched sample because no appropriate control subject was available. The presence of incomplete matching raises important questions around the generalizability of estimated treatment effects to the entire population of treated subjects. We describe an analytic solution to address the bias due to incomplete matching. Our method is based on using optimal or nearest neighbor matching, rather than caliper matching (which frequently results in the exclusion of some treated subjects). Within the sample matched on the propensity score, covariate adjustment using the propensity score is then employed to impute missing potential outcomes under lack of treatment for each treated subject. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that the proposed method resulted in estimates of treatment effect that were essentially unbiased. This method resulted in decreased bias compared to caliper matching alone and compared to either optimal matching or nearest neighbor matching alone. Caliper matching alone resulted in design bias or bias due to incomplete matching, while optimal matching or nearest neighbor matching alone resulted in bias due to residual confounding. The proposed method also tended to result in estimates with decreased mean squared error compared to when caliper matching was used. PMID:25038071

  20. Double propensity-score adjustment: A solution to design bias or bias due to incomplete matching.

    PubMed

    Austin, Peter C

    2017-02-01

    Propensity-score matching is frequently used to reduce the effects of confounding when using observational data to estimate the effects of treatments. Matching allows one to estimate the average effect of treatment in the treated. Rosenbaum and Rubin coined the term "bias due to incomplete matching" to describe the bias that can occur when some treated subjects are excluded from the matched sample because no appropriate control subject was available. The presence of incomplete matching raises important questions around the generalizability of estimated treatment effects to the entire population of treated subjects. We describe an analytic solution to address the bias due to incomplete matching. Our method is based on using optimal or nearest neighbor matching, rather than caliper matching (which frequently results in the exclusion of some treated subjects). Within the sample matched on the propensity score, covariate adjustment using the propensity score is then employed to impute missing potential outcomes under lack of treatment for each treated subject. Using Monte Carlo simulations, we found that the proposed method resulted in estimates of treatment effect that were essentially unbiased. This method resulted in decreased bias compared to caliper matching alone and compared to either optimal matching or nearest neighbor matching alone. Caliper matching alone resulted in design bias or bias due to incomplete matching, while optimal matching or nearest neighbor matching alone resulted in bias due to residual confounding. The proposed method also tended to result in estimates with decreased mean squared error compared to when caliper matching was used.

  1. Exact simulation of coined quantum walks with the continuous-time model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Philipp, Pascal; Portugal, Renato

    2017-01-01

    The connection between coined and continuous-time quantum walk models has been addressed in a number of papers. In most of those studies, the continuous-time model is derived from coined quantum walks by employing dimensional reduction and taking appropriate limits. In this work, we produce the evolution of a coined quantum walk on a generic graph using a continuous-time quantum walk on a larger graph. In addition to expanding the underlying structure, we also have to switch on and off edges during the continuous-time evolution to accommodate the alternation between the shift and coin operators from the coined model. In one particular case, the connection is very natural, and the continuous-time quantum walk that simulates the coined quantum walk is driven by the graph Laplacian on the dynamically changing expanded graph.

  2. A study of degradation of plates for nickel-cadmium spacecraft cells. [feasibility of coining

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Scott, W. R.

    1973-01-01

    The relative merits of coining and not coining of sintered nickel-oxide and cadmium plates was investigated. A survey of the industry including cell manufactures and users was made and results summarized. Sample plate materials from most commercial cell suppliers were obtained and characterized for properties that may correlate with the tendency toward physical disintegration during handling and over long periods of time in the cell. Special test methods were developed to obtain comparative data in a short time. A wide range of physical properties and coining thicknesses was observed, resulting in a range of responses. The stronger, less brittle materials resisted loss of sinter better than weaker materials whether or not coined. Coining improved handling and resistance to electrochemical cycling in all materials tested. An apparent exception was found to be due to improper coining of a tapered edge.

  3. Analysis of ancient Indian silver punch-marked coins by external PIXE.

    PubMed

    Rautray, Tapash R; Nayak, Suman S; Tripathy, Bipin B; Das, Saubhagyalaxmi; Das, Manas R; Das, Satya R; Chattopadhyay, Pranab K

    2011-10-01

    Seven silver punch-marked coins were analysed using external particle induced X-ray emission technique. The main group of elements like Ag, Cu, Au, Pb and Fe were estimated along with a number of trace/minor elements such as K, Ca, Ti, V, Cr, Mn, Co, Ni and Rb in the analysed silver coins. Gold was found in all the coins and varied between 0.7% and 6.2% indicating the better economic condition of that civilisation.

  4. The Ilac-Project Supporting Ancient Coin Classification by Means of Image Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kavelar, A.; Zambanini, S.; Kampel, M.; Vondrovec, K.; Siegl, K.

    2013-07-01

    This paper presents the ILAC project, which aims at the development of an automated image-based classification system for ancient Roman Republican coins. The benefits of such a system are manifold: operating at the suture between computer vision and numismatics, ILAC can reduce the day-to-day workload of numismatists by assisting them in classification tasks and providing a preselection of suitable coin classes. This is especially helpful for large coin hoard findings comprising several thousands of coins. Furthermore, this system could be implemented in an online platform for hobby numismatists, allowing them to access background information about their coin collection by simply uploading a photo of obverse and reverse for the coin of interest. ILAC explores different computer vision techniques and their combinations for the use of image-based coin recognition. Some of these methods, such as image matching, use the entire coin image in the classification process, while symbol or legend recognition exploit certain characteristics of the coin imagery. An overview of the methods explored so far and the respective experiments is given as well as an outlook on the next steps of the project.

  5. Adapted Physical Activity Programme and Self-Perception in Obese Adolescents with Intellectual Disability: Between Morphological Awareness and Positive Illusory Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salaun, Laureline; Reynes, Eric; Berthouze-Aranda, Sophie E.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In adolescents with intellectual disability, the management of obesity is a crucial issue, yet also quite complex because of their particular perception of themselves. This study investigated the relationship between self-perception variables and morphological variables and their changes after a 9-month Adapted Physical Activity (APA)…

  6. Translation failure and medical reversal: Two sides to the same coin.

    PubMed

    Prasad, Vinay

    2016-01-01

    Translation failure occurs when the results of preclinical, observational and/or early phase studies fail to predict the results of well done (i.e. appropriately controlled, adequately powered, and properly conducted) phase III or randomised clinical trials. Some failures occur when promising basic science findings fail to replicate in human studies, while others happen when promising uncontrolled trial data show an exaggerated effect that vanishes in the setting of a randomised trial. Medical reversals occur when the results of preclinical, observational and/or early phase studies fail to predict the results of subsequent randomized clinical trials, but the practice has already gained widespread acceptance. Oncologic examples include bevacizumab and the use of autologous stem cell transplant in metastatic breast cancer. In a well-intentioned effort to reduce the rate of translation failure, oncologists must be careful that changes to regulatory processes and clinical trial design do not actually work to increase the approval of ineffective compounds. By trying to cure translation failure, we should be careful to avoid medical reversal. The rise of surrogate end-points and role of hard-wired bias in oncology trials suggest that we may be currently ignoring the simple fact that translation failure and medical reversal are two sides to the same coin.

  7. Airpower in Counterinsurgency (COIN) Operations: Considerations for Low-Tech Aircraft for Effective Close Air Support in COIN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-03-30

    1960s, and the Salvadorans of the A-37 in El Salvador in the 1980s. In all three of these conflicts, the light attack aircraft have proven to be...34Afghanistan: Fire Support for Operation Anaconda." 8. 63 McElroy, "Afghanistan: Fire Support for Operation Anaconda." 7-8. 28 64 Steve Daly , A Canadian...true&db=aph&AN=52594275&site=ehost- live. 46 Daly , Steve. "A Canadian Forces AT -6B for the COIN Role in Afghanistan." 2008 [cited 1127 2011

  8. A coin vibrational motor swimming at low Reynolds number

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Quillen, Alice C.; Askari, Hesam; Kelley, Douglas H.; Friedmann, Tamar; Oakes, Patrick W.

    2016-12-01

    Low-cost coin vibrational motors, used in haptic feedback, exhibit rotational internal motion inside a rigid case. Because the motor case motion exhibits rotational symmetry, when placed into a fluid such as glycerin, the motor does not swim even though its oscillatory motions induce steady streaming in the fluid. However, a piece of rubber foam stuck to the curved case and giving the motor neutral buoyancy also breaks the rotational symmetry allowing it to swim. We measured a 1 cm diameter coin vibrational motor swimming in glycerin at a speed of a body length in 3 seconds or at 3 mm/s. The swim speed puts the vibrational motor in a low Reynolds number regime similar to bacterial motility, but because of the oscillations of the motor it is not analogous to biological organisms. Rather the swimming vibrational motor may inspire small inexpensive robotic swimmers that are robust as they contain no external moving parts. A time dependent Stokes equation planar sheet model suggests that the swim speed depends on a steady streaming velocity V stream Re s 1/2 U 0 where U 0 is the velocity of surface oscillations, and streaming Reynolds number Re s = U 0 2 /( ων) for motor angular frequency ω and fluid kinematic viscosity ν.

  9. Isolation of cultivable microorganisms from Polish notes and coins.

    PubMed

    Kalita, Michal; Palusińska-Szysz, Marta; Turska-Szewczuk, Anna; Wdowiak-Wróbel, Sylwia; Urbanik-Sypniewska, Teresa

    2013-01-01

    The potential role of currency in the spread of pathogenic microflora has been evaluated in many countries. In this study Polish paper notes and the coins in general circulation were assayed for the presence of cultivable bacteria and fungi. Bacterial isolates identification was based on cultural and biochemical characters and by comparison of the 16S rRNA gene sequence. Fungal isolates were recognized with biochemical and morphological criteria. Coagulase-negative staphylococci, (43.6% of the total bacterial count) including Staphylococcus saprophyticus, S. epidermidis, and S. hominis, and Enteroccus spp. (30.8% of the total bacterial count), i.e. E.faecalis, E.faecium and E. durans, were the most numerous bacterial contamination. Penicillium spp., and Aspergillus spp. were the most frequently detected moulds whereas Candida spp. was the most frequent yeast isolated from currency. A visible dependence between the banknote denomination, the physical condition of paper currency, and the number of bacteria and fungi was found. The overall count of bacteria isolated from currency was thousand-fold higher than that of fungal isolates. The total amount of bacteria and fungi recovered from the coins was approximately 2.7-fold lower than that isolated from the notes. In summary, the Polish currency notes were found to be contaminated mainly with commensal bacteria and fungi while the opportunistic pathogenic microorganisms Escherichia coli, Pseudomonas stutzeri and C. albicans were detected at a low frequency.

  10. The Formation of COINS: Equity and Inclusion in SDSS

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Sarah J.; Sanchez-Gallego, Jose Ramon; Chanover, Nancy J.; Holley-Bockelmann, Kelly; Lucatello, Sara; Aragon-Salamanca, Alfonso; Belfiore, Francesco; Cherinka, Brian; Feuillet, Diane; Jones, Amy; Masters, Karen; Simmons, Audrey; Ross, Ashley; Stassun, Keivan G.; Tayar, Jamie

    2017-01-01

    In the era of large surveys, collaborations like the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS) are becoming a new normal for many scientists, and collaboration policies and climate have a considerable affect on scientific careers. As such, it is essential that collaborations actively strive to include all scientists regardless of gender, gender identity, race, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, career stage, geographic location, economic background, social and cultural backgrounds, and all possible intersections thereof. We report on the formation and progress of the Committee On INclusiveness in the SDSS (COINS). COINS was formed to assess the SDSS-IV project and collaboration's climate and demographics, to recommend new policies or practices with regard to increasing inclusiveness, and to assist in the implementation of these new activities where necessary. We report on our current activities, which include ongoing support for the SDSS Research Experience for Undergraduates program, support for the SDSS Faculty and Student Teams initiative, administering and analyzing the SDSS demographic surveys, working towards collaboration meeting inclusiveness and accessibility, and adopting strategies for integrating and mentoring new members. We welcome input from SDSS members and non-members about how to work towards a more equitable and inclusive collaboration.

  11. 76 FR 12225 - Authority To Conduct Research and Development on All Circulating Coins

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-04

    ... United States Mint Authority To Conduct Research and Development on All Circulating Coins AGENCY: United... costs for all circulating coin denominations have risen dramatically for the past several years. Most.... II. Request for Comment The United States Mint requests public comment from all interested...

  12. 78 FR 19799 - National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Program Design Competition

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-04-02

    ... United States Mint National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Program Design Competition ACTION: Notification of the Opening of the National Baseball Hall of Fame Commemorative Coin Program Design Competition... competition that will culminate in the Secretary of the Treasury's selection of the image for the...

  13. Design, installation, and monitorig of a water-preheat system for coin laundries

    SciTech Connect

    Cloud, N. E.

    1983-01-01

    This project involved the design, installation, and monitoring of a water-preheat system for coin laundries. The system has two components. One component is solar, the other is waste heat reclamation from the clothes dryer exhaust. The energy savings achieved amount to roughly 50% of the total water heating load for a typical coin laundry.

  14. 48 CFR 52.237-11 - Accepting and Dispensing of $1 Coin.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ..., unless the vending machine does not receive currency denominations greater than $1. (c) The Contractor... clause: Accepting and Dispensing of $1 Coin (SEP 2008) (a) This clause applies to service contracts that involve business operations conducted in U.S. coin and currency, including vending machines, on...

  15. 31 CFR 100.11 - Exchange of bent and partial coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... each category. Bent and partial coins shall be redeemed on the basis of their weight and denomination category rates (which is the weight equivalent of face value). If not presented separately by denomination... redeemed at the face value equivalent of copper one cent coins. (c) Redemption site. Bent and partial...

  16. 75 FR 17832 - Pricing for 2010 Lincoln One-Cent Coin Two-Roll Set

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-04-07

    ... United States Mint Pricing for 2010 Lincoln One-Cent Coin Two-Roll Set AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing the price of the... $8.95. This set will contain rolls of coins struck at both the United States Mint facilities...

  17. Metal detectors: an alternative approach to the evaluation of coin ingestions in children?

    PubMed

    Ros, S P; Cetta, F

    1992-06-01

    Foreign body ingestions constitute a common problem in pediatric emergency medicine. Recent data indicate that, despite current recommendations, most children who ingest coins do not undergo radiologic evaluation. The purpose of this study was to determine the accuracy of a metal detector in locating coins in a model simulating coin ingestions in children. Initially, the distance between the anterior chest wall (ACW) and the esophagus was measured on 17 chest computed tomograms obtained on children between the ages of three months and six years. Subsequently, a distance equal to the mean ACW-to-gastroesophageal junction measurement was marked across the investigator's forearm. A second investigator then attempted to detect the presence of the coin through the forearm by using a Super Scanner (Garrett Security Systems, Inc, Garland, TX) metal detector. The study was conducted in a blinded manner and consisted of 50 attempts equally divided among pennies, nickels, dimes, quarters, and controls (no coin). The accuracy of the metal detector in identifying the presence or absence of coins in our model was 100%. We conclude that the metal detector evaluated by us is highly accurate in identifying coins through human tissues and that it should become a valuable and practical tool in the evaluation of children following a coin ingestion.

  18. The Weight of Euro Coins: Its Distribution Might Not Be as Normal as You Would Expect

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shkedy, Ziv; Aerts, Marc; Callaert, Herman

    2006-01-01

    Classical regression models, ANOVA models and linear mixed models are just three examples (out of many) in which the normal distribution of the response is an essential assumption of the model. In this paper we use a dataset of 2000 euro coins containing information (up to the milligram) about the weight of each coin, to illustrate that the…

  19. Coins and Costs: A Simple and Rapid Assessment of Basic Financial Knowledge

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Willner, Paul; Bailey, Rebecca; Dymond, Simon; Parry, Rhonwen

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: We describe a simple and rapid screening test for basic financial knowledge that is suitable for administration to people with mild intellectual disabilities. Method: The Coins and Costs test asks respondents to name coins, and to estimate prices of objects ranging between 1 British Pound (an ice cream) and 100K British Pounds (a…

  20. 77 FR 43662 - Price for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Price for the 2012 American Eagle Silver Proof Coin AGENCY: United States Mint... American Eagle Silver Proof Coin. The product will now be offered for sale at a price of $54.95....

  1. 76 FR 17485 - Pricing for America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Bullion Coin Presentation Case

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-03-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Bullion Coin Presentation Case... is announcing the price of the America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Bullion Coin Presentation...

  2. 78 FR 41195 - Re-pricing of Several Silver Coin Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-07-09

    ... United States Mint Re-pricing of Several Silver Coin Products AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Because of the recent decrease in the market price of silver, the United States Mint is lowering the price of several silver coin products as follows: 2013...

  3. 77 FR 839 - Pricing for 2011 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coins

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-06

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for 2011 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coins Agency: United States Mint... the 2011 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coins. The price of the 2011 American Eagle...

  4. 77 FR 42365 - Price for the Making American History Coin and Currency Set

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-07-18

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Price for the Making American History Coin and Currency Set AGENCY: United States Mint... for the Making American History Coin and Currency Set. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: B.B....

  5. 31 CFR 100.19 - Disposition of counterfeit notes and coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Disposition of counterfeit notes and coins. 100.19 Section 100.19 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN Other Information §...

  6. 31 CFR 100.19 - Disposition of counterfeit notes and coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Disposition of counterfeit notes and coins. 100.19 Section 100.19 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN Other Information §...

  7. 31 CFR 100.3 - Lawfully held coin and currencies in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Lawfully held coin and currencies in general. 100.3 Section 100.3 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General §...

  8. 31 CFR 100.3 - Lawfully held coin and currencies in general.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Lawfully held coin and currencies in general. 100.3 Section 100.3 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY EXCHANGE OF PAPER CURRENCY AND COIN In General §...

  9. 12 CFR 250.260 - Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and bullion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and... interpretations; gold coin and bullion. The Board has received numerous inquiries from member banks relating to the repeal of the ban on ownership of gold by United States citizens. Listed below are questions...

  10. 12 CFR 250.260 - Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and bullion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2013-01-01 2013-01-01 false Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and... Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and bullion. The Board has received numerous inquiries from member banks relating to the repeal of the ban on ownership of gold by United States citizens. Listed below...

  11. 31 CFR 101.4 - Extraction of gold bullion from the counterfeit coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Extraction of gold bullion from the... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MITIGATION OF FORFEITURE OF COUNTERFEIT GOLD COINS § 101.4 Extraction of gold bullion from the counterfeit coins. If the petition is approved, the Assistant...

  12. 31 CFR 101.4 - Extraction of gold bullion from the counterfeit coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2011-07-01 2011-07-01 false Extraction of gold bullion from the... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MITIGATION OF FORFEITURE OF COUNTERFEIT GOLD COINS § 101.4 Extraction of gold bullion from the counterfeit coins. If the petition is approved, the Assistant...

  13. 12 CFR 250.260 - Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and bullion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2014-01-01 2014-01-01 false Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and... Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and bullion. The Board has received numerous inquiries from member banks relating to the repeal of the ban on ownership of gold by United States citizens. Listed below...

  14. 12 CFR 250.260 - Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and bullion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 3 2011-01-01 2011-01-01 false Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and... interpretations; gold coin and bullion. The Board has received numerous inquiries from member banks relating to the repeal of the ban on ownership of gold by United States citizens. Listed below are questions...

  15. 31 CFR 101.4 - Extraction of gold bullion from the counterfeit coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Extraction of gold bullion from the... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MITIGATION OF FORFEITURE OF COUNTERFEIT GOLD COINS § 101.4 Extraction of gold bullion from the counterfeit coins. If the petition is approved, the Assistant...

  16. 12 CFR 250.260 - Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and bullion.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-01-01

    ... 12 Banks and Banking 4 2012-01-01 2012-01-01 false Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and... Miscellaneous interpretations; gold coin and bullion. The Board has received numerous inquiries from member banks relating to the repeal of the ban on ownership of gold by United States citizens. Listed below...

  17. 31 CFR 101.4 - Extraction of gold bullion from the counterfeit coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false Extraction of gold bullion from the... MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY MITIGATION OF FORFEITURE OF COUNTERFEIT GOLD COINS § 101.4 Extraction of gold bullion from the counterfeit coins. If the petition is approved, the Assistant...

  18. 31 CFR 100.16 - Exchange of paper and coin to be handled through Federal Reserve banks and branches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... handled through Federal Reserve banks and branches. 100.16 Section 100.16 Money and Finance: Treasury... exchange of paper currency and coin shall be handled through the Federal Reserve banks and branches. ... CURRENCY AND COIN Other Information § 100.16 Exchange of paper and coin to be handled through...

  19. 31 CFR 100.16 - Exchange of paper and coin to be handled through Federal Reserve banks and branches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... handled through Federal Reserve banks and branches. 100.16 Section 100.16 Money and Finance: Treasury... exchange of paper currency and coin shall be handled through the Federal Reserve banks and branches. ... CURRENCY AND COIN Other Information § 100.16 Exchange of paper and coin to be handled through...

  20. 31 CFR 100.16 - Exchange of paper and coin to be handled through Federal Reserve banks and branches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... handled through Federal Reserve banks and branches. 100.16 Section 100.16 Money and Finance: Treasury... exchange of paper currency and coin shall be handled through the Federal Reserve banks and branches. ... CURRENCY AND COIN Other Information § 100.16 Exchange of paper and coin to be handled through...

  1. 31 CFR 100.16 - Exchange of paper and coin to be handled through Federal Reserve banks and branches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... handled through Federal Reserve banks and branches. 100.16 Section 100.16 Money and Finance: Treasury... exchange of paper currency and coin shall be handled through the Federal Reserve banks and branches. ... CURRENCY AND COIN Other Information § 100.16 Exchange of paper and coin to be handled through...

  2. 77 FR 32716 - Price for the 2012 American Eagle San Francisco Two-Coin Silver Proof Set

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-06-01

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Price for the 2012 American Eagle San Francisco Two-Coin Silver Proof Set AGENCY... announcing the price of the 2012 American Eagle San Francisco Two-Coin Silver Proof Set. The coin set will...

  3. Neutrophils in Cancer: Two Sides of the Same Coin.

    PubMed

    Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in blood and are considered to be the first line of defense during inflammation and infections. In addition, neutrophils are also found infiltrating many types of tumors. Tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) have relevant roles in malignant disease. Indeed neutrophils may be potent antitumor effector cells. However, increasing clinical evidence shows TANs correlate with poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment controls neutrophil recruitment and in turn TANs help tumor progression. Hence, TANs can be beneficial or detrimental to the host. It is the purpose of this review to highlight these two sides of the neutrophil coin in cancer and to describe recent studies that provide some light on the mechanisms for neutrophil recruitment to the tumor, for neutrophils supporting tumor progression, and for neutrophil activation to enhance their antitumor functions.

  4. Coin hoards speak of population declines in Ancient Rome.

    PubMed

    Turchin, Peter; Scheidel, Walter

    2009-10-13

    In times of violence, people tend to hide their valuables, which are later recovered unless the owners had been killed or driven away. Thus, the temporal distribution of unrecovered coin hoards is an excellent proxy for the intensity of internal warfare. We use this relationship to resolve a long-standing controversy in Roman history. Depending on who was counted in the early Imperial censuses (adult males or the entire citizenry including women and minors), the Roman citizen population of Italy either declined, or more than doubled, during the first century BCE. This period was characterized by a series of civil wars, and historical evidence indicates that high levels of sociopolitical instability are associated with demographic contractions. We fitted a simple model quantifying the effect of instability (proxied by hoard frequency) on population dynamics to the data before 100 BCE. The model predicts declining population after 100 BCE. This suggests that the vigorous growth scenario is highly implausible.

  5. Coin hoards speak of population declines in Ancient Rome

    PubMed Central

    Turchin, Peter; Scheidel, Walter

    2009-01-01

    In times of violence, people tend to hide their valuables, which are later recovered unless the owners had been killed or driven away. Thus, the temporal distribution of unrecovered coin hoards is an excellent proxy for the intensity of internal warfare. We use this relationship to resolve a long-standing controversy in Roman history. Depending on who was counted in the early Imperial censuses (adult males or the entire citizenry including women and minors), the Roman citizen population of Italy either declined, or more than doubled, during the first century BCE. This period was characterized by a series of civil wars, and historical evidence indicates that high levels of sociopolitical instability are associated with demographic contractions. We fitted a simple model quantifying the effect of instability (proxied by hoard frequency) on population dynamics to the data before 100 BCE. The model predicts declining population after 100 BCE. This suggests that the vigorous growth scenario is highly implausible. PMID:19805043

  6. Using alien coins to test whether simple inference is Bayesian.

    PubMed

    Cassey, Peter; Hawkins, Guy E; Donkin, Chris; Brown, Scott D

    2016-03-01

    Reasoning and inference are well-studied aspects of basic cognition that have been explained as statistically optimal Bayesian inference. Using a simplified experimental design, we conducted quantitative comparisons between Bayesian inference and human inference at the level of individuals. In 3 experiments, with more than 13,000 participants, we asked people for prior and posterior inferences about the probability that 1 of 2 coins would generate certain outcomes. Most participants' inferences were inconsistent with Bayes' rule. Only in the simplest version of the task did the majority of participants adhere to Bayes' rule, but even in that case, there was a significant proportion that failed to do so. The current results highlight the importance of close quantitative comparisons between Bayesian inference and human data at the individual-subject level when evaluating models of cognition.

  7. Genetic testing in the workplace: the employer's coin toss.

    PubMed

    French, Samantha

    2002-09-05

    A toss of the coin by the modern-day employer reveals two options regarding genetic testing in the workplace. The employer may choose to take advantage of increasingly precise, available, and affordable genetic testing in order to ascertain the genetic characteristics--and deficiencies--of its employees. This outcome exposes the employer to a vast array of potential litigation and liability relating to the Americans with Disabilities Act, the Fourth Amendment, Title VII of the Civil Rights Act, and state legislation designed to protect genetic privacy. Alternatively, the employer may neglect to indulge in this trend of genetic testing and may face liability for employer negligence, violations of federal legislation such as OSHA regulations, and increased costs associated with insuring the health of genetically endangered employees. In the rapidly developing universe of genetic intelligence, the employer is faced with a staggering dilemma.

  8. Quantum walks with coins undergoing different quantum noisy channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hao, Qin; Xue, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Quantum walks have significantly different properties compared to classical random walks, which have potential applications in quantum computation and quantum simulation. We study Hadamard quantum walks with coins undergoing different quantum noisy channels and deduce the analytical expressions of the first two moments of position in the long-time limit. Numerical simulations have been done, the results are compared with the analytical results, and they match extremely well. We show that the variance of the position distributions of the walks grows linearly with time when enough steps are taken and the linear coefficient is affected by the strength of the quantum noisy channels. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11174052 and 11474049) and the CAST Innovation Fund, China.

  9. Neutrophils in Cancer: Two Sides of the Same Coin

    PubMed Central

    Uribe-Querol, Eileen; Rosales, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Neutrophils are the most abundant leukocytes in blood and are considered to be the first line of defense during inflammation and infections. In addition, neutrophils are also found infiltrating many types of tumors. Tumor-associated neutrophils (TANs) have relevant roles in malignant disease. Indeed neutrophils may be potent antitumor effector cells. However, increasing clinical evidence shows TANs correlate with poor prognosis. The tumor microenvironment controls neutrophil recruitment and in turn TANs help tumor progression. Hence, TANs can be beneficial or detrimental to the host. It is the purpose of this review to highlight these two sides of the neutrophil coin in cancer and to describe recent studies that provide some light on the mechanisms for neutrophil recruitment to the tumor, for neutrophils supporting tumor progression, and for neutrophil activation to enhance their antitumor functions. PMID:26819959

  10. Berkson's bias, selection bias, and missing data.

    PubMed

    Westreich, Daniel

    2012-01-01

    Although Berkson's bias is widely recognized in the epidemiologic literature, it remains underappreciated as a model of both selection bias and bias due to missing data. Simple causal diagrams and 2 × 2 tables illustrate how Berkson's bias connects to collider bias and selection bias more generally, and show the strong analogies between Berksonian selection bias and bias due to missing data. In some situations, considerations of whether data are missing at random or missing not at random are less important than the causal structure of the missing data process. Although dealing with missing data always relies on strong assumptions about unobserved variables, the intuitions built with simple examples can provide a better understanding of approaches to missing data in real-world situations.

  11. Detection of coins ingested by children using a handheld metal detector: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Lee, J B; Ahmad, S; Gale, C P

    2005-12-01

    To determine if the use of a handheld metal detector (HHMD) can safely reduce the number of radiographs requested in cases of coins ingested by children, a search was performed to identify prospective studies of the ability of an HHMD to identify the presence or absence of ingested coin in children (17 years or younger). Outcome measures were presence or absence of coin on metal detector screening, and accuracy of coin localisation. Inclusion and exclusion criteria were defined. Mantel-Haenszel (fixed effect model) pooling with 95% confidence intervals (CI) was used to calculate overall sensitivities and specificities. In total, 11 studies met the inclusion criteria. The overall sensitivity of the HHMD at detecting the presence of coins was 99.4% (95% CI 98.0 to 99.9%) and accuracy at localisation was 99.8% (98.5 to 100.0%). The overall specificity of the HHMD was 100% (76.8 to 100%). Use of the HHMD is an accurate, radiation free, and cost effective method of identifying and localising coins ingested by children. An algorithm for investigating children with coin ingestion is proposed.

  12. Ancient bronze coins from Mediterranean basin: LAMQS potentiality for lead isotopes comparative analysis with former mineral

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Torrisi, L.; Italiano, A.; Torrisi, A.

    2016-11-01

    Bronze coins coming from the area of the Mediterranean basin, dated back the II-X Cent. A.D., were analyzed using different physical analytical techniques. Characteristic X-ray fluorescence was used with electrons and photons, in order to investigate the elemental composition of both the surface layers and bulk. Moreover, the quadrupole mass spectrometry coupled to laser ablation (LAMQS technique) in high vacuum was used to analyse typical material compounds from surface contamination. Mass spectrometry, at high resolution and sensitivity, extended up to 300 amu, allowed measuring the 208Pb/206Pb and 207Pb/206Pb isotopic ratios into the coins. Quantitative relative analyses of these isotopic ratios identify the coin composition such as a ;fingerprint; depending on the mineral used to extract the lead. Isotopic ratios in coins can be compared to those of the possible minerals used to produce the bronze alloy. A comparison between the measured isotope ratios in the analyzed coins and the literature database, related to the mineral containing Pb as a function of its geological and geophysical extraction mine, is presented. The analysis, restricted to old coins and the mines of the Mediterranean basin, indicates a possible correlation between the coin compositions and the possible geological sites of the extracted mineral.

  13. Using the Optical Mouse Sensor as a Two-Euro Counterfeit Coin Detector

    PubMed Central

    Tresanchez, Marcel; Pallejà, Tomàs; Teixidó, Mercè; Palacín, Jordi

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, the sensor of an optical mouse is presented as a counterfeit coin detector applied to the two-Euro case. The detection process is based on the short distance image acquisition capabilities of the optical mouse sensor where partial images of the coin under analysis are compared with some partial reference coin images for matching. Results show that, using only the vision sense, the counterfeit acceptance and rejection rates are very similar to those of a trained user and better than those of an untrained user. PMID:22399987

  14. Bacterial diversity assessed by cultivation-based techniques shows predominance of Staphylococccus species on coins collected in Lisbon and Casablanca.

    PubMed

    de Carvalho, Carla C C R; Caramujo, Maria José

    2014-04-01

    Money is usually considered a source of infections, yet survival of bacteria on dry metal surfaces is limited. The aim of this work was to assess the bacterial numbers and diversity on coins collected in Casablanca and Lisbon as these two cities, on different continents and only 585 km apart, have diverse cultural habitats, but have similar climate. A cultivation-based characterisation of the bacterial community showed that a relatively low number of cells per area of coin were found on both Moroccan Dirhams and Euros (0.014 and 0.125 colony-forming units (CFU) mm(-2) , respectively). Most of the bacterial isolates were located near the rim of the coins, and coins collected in Europe contained more CFU/area of coin. Coins collected in Europe and transported in pockets presented a higher number of bacterial isolates (maximum 0.125 CFU mm(-2) ) than coins transported in wallets (maximum 0.042 CFU mm(-2) ), regardless of the gender of the person transporting them, suggesting that temperature and moisture might be key parameters for bacterial survival on metallic coins. Bacterial diversity was higher for coins collected in Casablanca relative to coins collected in Lisbon, and there was no evidence that it was dependent on the gender of the person transporting the coins or the place of transport (pockets or wallets). Curiously, the percentage of Staphylococcus strains was 44% of the total isolates on both currencies.

  15. Human Adaptation to the Computer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1986-09-01

    8217"’ TECHNOSTRESS " 5 5’..,:. VI I. CONCLUSIONS-------------------------59 -- LIST OF REFERENCES-------------------------61 BI BLI OGRAPHY...computer has not developed. Instead, what has developed is a "modern disease of adaptation" called " technostress ," a phrase coined by Brod. Craig...34 technostress ." Managers (according to Brod) have been implementing computers in ways that contribute directly to this stress: [Ref. 3:p. 38) 1. They

  16. 31 CFR 403.1 - Delivery of counterfeit obligations and other securities and coins authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) SECRET SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AUTHORIZATION OF ALL... Department through the Secret Service all counterfeit obligations and other securities and coins of...

  17. 31 CFR 403.1 - Delivery of counterfeit obligations and other securities and coins authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) SECRET SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AUTHORIZATION OF ALL... Department through the Secret Service all counterfeit obligations and other securities and coins of...

  18. 31 CFR 403.1 - Delivery of counterfeit obligations and other securities and coins authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) SECRET SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AUTHORIZATION OF ALL... Department through the Secret Service all counterfeit obligations and other securities and coins of...

  19. 31 CFR 403.1 - Delivery of counterfeit obligations and other securities and coins authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-07-01

    ... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) SECRET SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AUTHORIZATION OF ALL... Department through the Secret Service all counterfeit obligations and other securities and coins of...

  20. 31 CFR 403.1 - Delivery of counterfeit obligations and other securities and coins authorized.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... Relating to Money and Finance (Continued) SECRET SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY AUTHORIZATION OF ALL... Department through the Secret Service all counterfeit obligations and other securities and coins of...

  1. Isolation of Copper from a 5-Cent Coin: An Example of Electrorefining

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sogo, Steven G.

    2004-01-01

    Copper is isolated from a 5-cent coin with the help of electrolysis. This experiment is useful for conceptual understanding of the significance of reduction potentials in situation of competition for electrons.

  2. Analysis of corrosion layers in ancient Roman silver coins with high resolution surface spectroscopic techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Keturakis, Christopher J.; Notis, Ben; Blenheim, Alex; Miller, Alfred C.; Pafchek, Rob; Notis, Michael R.; Wachs, Israel E.

    2016-07-01

    Determination of the microchemistry of surface corrosion layers on ancient silver alloy coins is important both in terms of understanding the nature of archaeological environmental conditions to which these ancient coins were exposed and also to help in their conservation. In this present study, five ancient silver alloy coins (225 BCE-244 CE) were used as test vehicles to measure their immediate surface microchemistry and evaluate the appropriateness and limitations of High Sensitivity-Low Energy Ion Scattering Spectroscopy (HS-LEIS, 0.3 nm depth analysis), High Resolution-X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (HR-XPS, 1-3 nm depth analysis) and High Resolution-Raman Spectroscopy (HR-Raman, ∼1000 nm depth analysis). Additional information about the deeper corrosion layers, up to ∼300-1000 nm, was provided by dynamic HS-LEIS and HR-Raman spectroscopy. While not archeologically significant, the use of these coins of small commercial value provides data that is more representative of the weaker signals typically obtained from ancient corroded objects, which can be in stark contrast to pristine data often obtained from carefully prepared alloys of known composition. The oldest coins, from 225 to 214 BCE, possessed an outermost surface layer containing Cu2O, Na, Al, Pb, and adsorbed hydrocarbons, while the more recent coins, from 98 to 244 CE, contained Cu2O, Ag, N, F, Na, Al, S, Cl, and adsorbed hydrocarbons in similar corresponding surface layers. It thus appears that alloying with copper, even in small amounts, leads to the formation of an outer Cu2O layer. Depth profiling revealed the presence of K, Na, Cl, and S as key corrosion components for both sets of coins with S, most likely as Ag2S, concentrated towards the surface while the Cl, most likely as AgCl, penetrated deeper. Schema to understand the overall chemistry of the corrosion layers present on these silver alloy coins were developed from the equipment limitations encountered and are presented.

  3. The COIN Approach to Mexican Drug Cartels: Square Peg in a Round Hole

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-10-28

    drug trafficking and lawlessness that we see in northern Mexico does not constitute on insurgency. Drug cartels have no ideology beyond profit, no...Petraeus and James Mattis in 2006, is therefore inappropriate for Mexico . Some COIN principles and practices – what the author calls COIN a la...of Afghanistan and Iraq to Mexico . NOTE: Components of the OPS/JMO Paper are: Standard Form (SF) 298 Cover Page Table of Contents (not

  4. A TorPath to TorCoin: Proof-of-Bandwidth Altcoins for Compensating Relays

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2014-07-18

    anonymity of clients as they make transactions, we must also account for well-known concerns about the limited anonymity the basic Bitcoin transaction...coin: Anonymity for Bitcoin with accountable mixes. In: Financial Cryptography and Data Security. (March 2014) 20. Ruffing, T., Moreno-Sanchez, P... anonymity of clients [1–7]. This paper outlines one possible solution, embodying two complementary novel ideas: 1. TorCoin is an alternative cryptocurrency

  5. The Coin Conundrum: The Future of Counterinsurgency and U.S. Land Power

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-12-01

    Army force structure in a time of shrinking defense budgets. The author, Dr. Thomas R. Mockaitis, considers what role, if any, COIN should play in...military capacity for addressing iden- tified threats. That capacity includes force structure , doctrine, and learning institutions. Building on this...conventional war and relegating COIN to a small Special Operations Command (SOCOM). It could reconfigure its force structure to focus on

  6. Ancient coins: cluster analysis applied to find a correlation between corrosion process and burial soil characteristics.

    PubMed

    Reale, Rita; Plattner, Susanne H; Guida, Giuseppe; Sammartino, Maria Pia; Visco, Giovanni

    2012-05-02

    Although it is well known that any material degrades faster when exposed to an aggressive environment as well as that "aggressive" cannot be univocally defined as depending also on the chemical-physical characteristics of material, few researches on the identification of the most significant parameters influencing the corrosion of metallic object are available.A series of ancient coins, coming from the archaeological excavation of Palazzo Valentini (Rome) were collected together with soils, both near and far from them, and then analysed using different analytical techniques looking for a correlation between the corrosion products covering the coins and the chemical-physical soil characteristics. The content of soluble salts in the water-bearing stratum and surfacing in the archaeological site, was also measured.The obtained results stress the influence of alkaline soils on formation of patina. Cerussite, probably due to the circulation of water in layers rich in marble and plaster fragments, was the main corrosion product identified by X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Copper, lead and vanadium were found in soil surrounding coins. By measuring conductivity, pH and soluble salts content of the washing solutions from both coins and soils, we could easily separate coins coming from different stratigraphic units of the site.Data were treated by cluster and multivariate analysis, revealing a correlation between part of the coins and the nearby soil samples.

  7. Ancient coins: cluster analysis applied to find a correlation between corrosion process and burial soil characteristics

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Although it is well known that any material degrades faster when exposed to an aggressive environment as well as that "aggressive" cannot be univocally defined as depending also on the chemical-physical characteristics of material, few researches on the identification of the most significant parameters influencing the corrosion of metallic object are available. A series of ancient coins, coming from the archaeological excavation of Palazzo Valentini (Rome) were collected together with soils, both near and far from them, and then analysed using different analytical techniques looking for a correlation between the corrosion products covering the coins and the chemical-physical soil characteristics. The content of soluble salts in the water-bearing stratum and surfacing in the archaeological site, was also measured. The obtained results stress the influence of alkaline soils on formation of patina. Cerussite, probably due to the circulation of water in layers rich in marble and plaster fragments, was the main corrosion product identified by X-ray Diffraction (XRD). Copper, lead and vanadium were found in soil surrounding coins. By measuring conductivity, pH and soluble salts content of the washing solutions from both coins and soils, we could easily separate coins coming from different stratigraphic units of the site. Data were treated by cluster and multivariate analysis, revealing a correlation between part of the coins and the nearby soil samples. PMID:22594444

  8. Renormalization of the unitary evolution equation for coined quantum walks

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Boettcher, Stefan; Li, Shanshan; Portugal, Renato

    2017-03-01

    We consider discrete-time evolution equations in which the stochastic operator of a classical random walk is replaced by a unitary operator. Such a problem has gained much attention as a framework for coined quantum walks that are essential for attaining the Grover limit for quantum search algorithms in physically realizable, low-dimensional geometries. In particular, we analyze the exact real-space renormalization group (RG) procedure recently introduced to study the scaling of quantum walks on fractal networks. While this procedure, when implemented numerically, was able to provide some deep insights into the relation between classical and quantum walks, its analytic basis has remained obscure. Our discussion here is laying the groundwork for a rigorous implementation of the RG for this important class of transport and algorithmic problems, although some instances remain unresolved. Specifically, we find that the RG fixed-point analysis of the classical walk, which typically focuses on the dominant Jacobian eigenvalue {λ1} , with walk dimension dw\\text{RW}={{log}2}{λ1} , needs to be extended to include the subdominant eigenvalue {λ2} , such that the dimension of the quantum walk obtains dw\\text{QW}={{log}2}\\sqrt{{λ1}{λ2}} . With that extension, we obtain analytically previously conjectured results for dw\\text{QW} of Grover walks on all but one of the fractal networks that have been considered.

  9. Reduction of Photodiode Nonlinearities by Adaptive Biasing

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-10-14

    NONLINEARITY In principle, the photodiode is a linear device. That is, each incident photon has a high probability of creating an electron- hole pair in...that the photodiode efficiently harvests electron- hole pairs created by ab- sorbed photons.1 For a given incident optical signal, the carrier pairs...1.9GHz (dashed colors). For comparison, the RF powers were scaled for variations in current, and the lower power tones were shifted by 37.9 dBm. A black

  10. Metacognitive Awareness and Adaptive Recognition Biases

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Selmeczy, Diana; Dobbins, Ian G.

    2013-01-01

    Prior literature has primarily focused on the negative influences of misleading external sources on memory judgments. This study investigated whether participants can capitalize on generally reliable recommendations in order to improve their net performance; the focus was on potential roles for metacognitive monitoring (i.e., knowledge about one's…

  11. The interaction of perceptual biases in bistable perception

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xue; Xu, Qian; Jiang, Yi; Wang, Ying

    2017-01-01

    When viewing ambiguous stimuli, people tend to perceive some interpretations more frequently than others. Such perceptual biases impose various types of constraints on visual perception, and accordingly, have been assumed to serve distinct adaptive functions. Here we demonstrated the interaction of two functionally distinct biases in bistable biological motion perception, one regulating perception based on the statistics of the environment – the viewing-from-above (VFA) bias, and the other with the potential to reduce costly errors resulting from perceptual inference – the facing-the-viewer (FTV) bias. When compatible, the two biases reinforced each other to enhance the bias strength and induced less perceptual reversals relative to when they were in conflict. Whereas in the conflicting condition, the biases competed with each other, with the dominant percept varying with visual cues that modulate the two biases separately in opposite directions. Crucially, the way the two biases interact does not depend on the dominant bias at the individual level, and cannot be accounted for by a single bias alone. These findings provide compelling evidence that humans robustly integrate biases with different adaptive functions in visual perception. It may be evolutionarily advantageous to dynamically reweight diverse biases in the sensory context to resolve perceptual ambiguity. PMID:28165061

  12. Study of archaeological coins of different dynasties using libs coupled with multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Awasthi, Shikha; Kumar, Rohit; Rai, G. K.; Rai, A. K.

    2016-04-01

    Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) is an atomic emission spectroscopic technique having unique capability of an in-situ monitoring tool for detection and quantification of elements present in different artifacts. Archaeological coins collected form G.R. Sharma Memorial Museum; University of Allahabad, India has been analyzed using LIBS technique. These coins were obtained from excavation of Kausambi, Uttar Pradesh, India. LIBS system assembled in the laboratory (laser Nd:YAG 532 nm, 4 ns pulse width FWHM with Ocean Optics LIBS 2000+ spectrometer) is employed for spectral acquisition. The spectral lines of Ag, Cu, Ca, Sn, Si, Fe and Mg are identified in the LIBS spectra of different coins. LIBS along with Multivariate Analysis play an effective role for classification and contribution of spectral lines in different coins. The discrimination between five coins with Archaeological interest has been carried out using Principal Component Analysis (PCA). The results show the potential relevancy of the methodology used in the elemental identification and classification of artifacts with high accuracy and robustness.

  13. Demonstrating the Correspondence Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Howell, Jennifer L.; Shepperd, James A.

    2011-01-01

    Among the best-known and most robust biases in person perception is the correspondence bias--the tendency for people to make dispositional, rather than situational, attributions for an actor's behavior. The correspondence bias appears in virtually every social psychology textbook and in many introductory psychology textbooks, yet the authors'…

  14. Oaths and hypothetical bias.

    PubMed

    Stevens, T H; Tabatabaei, Maryam; Lass, Daniel

    2013-09-30

    Results from experiments using an oath to eliminate hypothetical bias in stated preference valuation are presented. An oath has several potential advantages relative to other methods for reducing hypothetical bias. Our empirical results suggest that with an oath, mean hypothetical payments are not different from mean actual payments and that when controlling for experimental participants' characteristics using regression analyses, the oath eliminated hypothetical bias.

  15. Recalibrating Academic Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yancey, George

    2012-01-01

    Whether political and/or religious academic bias exists is a question with important ramifications for the educational institutions. Those arguing for the presence of such bias contend that political conservatives and the highly religious in academia are marginalized and face discrimination. The question of academic bias tends to be cast in a…

  16. Queries for Bias Testing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Gordon, Diana F.

    1992-01-01

    Selecting a good bias prior to concept learning can be difficult. Therefore, dynamic bias adjustment is becoming increasingly popular. Current dynamic bias adjustment systems, however, are limited in their ability to identify erroneous assumptions about the relationship between the bias and the target concept. Without proper diagnosis, it is difficult to identify and then remedy faulty assumptions. We have developed an approach that makes these assumptions explicit, actively tests them with queries to an oracle, and adjusts the bias based on the test results.

  17. Adaptive COIN in Sri Lanka: What Contributed to the Demise of the LTTE?

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-06-01

    urban, terrain.”25 Hence, a state’s ability to dominate these spaces ensured its success. One of the most important arguments for analyzing the...other previous event. Moreover, it was pivotal for the LTTE to legitimize its unrestrained use of violence in the following decades.85 The same...during the peace process was the political ambition of UNF Prime Minister Ranil Wickramasinghe. His primary objective while continuing the peace

  18. Studies on the survival and inactivation of herpes simplex virus type 1 on coins.

    PubMed

    Bardell, D

    1994-01-01

    Survival of herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV-1) in saliva at room temperature (21-23 degrees C) on 1, 5, 10, and 25 cent coins was studied. There was little or no loss of infectious HSV-1 before 30 min. Between 30 and 60 min there was a 2- to 3-log drop in titre, and with the exception of the 1 cent coin, some infectious virus was still present after 2 h, the longest period studied. The most conspicuous drop in titre occurred with loss of moisture from the saliva. In addition to the drying process, the metals of the coins also contributed to the decline in titre of HSV-1.

  19. "Catching" Social Bias.

    PubMed

    Skinner, Allison L; Meltzoff, Andrew N; Olson, Kristina R

    2017-02-01

    Identifying the origins of social bias is critical to devising strategies to overcome prejudice. In two experiments, we tested the hypothesis that young children can catch novel social biases from brief exposure to biased nonverbal signals demonstrated by adults. Our results are consistent with this hypothesis. In Experiment 1, we found that children who were exposed to a brief video depicting nonverbal bias in favor of one individual over another subsequently explicitly preferred, and were more prone to behave prosocially toward, the target of positive nonverbal signals. Moreover, in Experiment 2, preschoolers generalized such bias to other individuals. The spread of bias observed in these experiments lays a critical foundation for understanding the way that social biases may develop and spread early in childhood.

  20. Renormalized halo bias

    SciTech Connect

    Assassi, Valentin; Baumann, Daniel; Green, Daniel; Zaldarriaga, Matias E-mail: dbaumann@damtp.cam.ac.uk E-mail: matiasz@ias.edu

    2014-08-01

    This paper provides a systematic study of renormalization in models of halo biasing. Building on work of McDonald, we show that Eulerian biasing is only consistent with renormalization if non-local terms and higher-derivative contributions are included in the biasing model. We explicitly determine the complete list of required bias parameters for Gaussian initial conditions, up to quartic order in the dark matter density contrast and at leading order in derivatives. At quadratic order, this means including the gravitational tidal tensor, while at cubic order the velocity potential appears as an independent degree of freedom. Our study naturally leads to an effective theory of biasing in which the halo density is written as a double expansion in fluctuations and spatial derivatives. We show that the bias expansion can be organized in terms of Galileon operators which aren't renormalized at leading order in derivatives. Finally, we discuss how the renormalized bias parameters impact the statistics of halos.

  1. Evasion and Immuno-Endocrine Regulation in Parasite Infection: Two Sides of the Same Coin in Chagas Disease?

    PubMed Central

    Morrot, Alexandre; Villar, Silvina R.; González, Florencia B.; Pérez, Ana R.

    2016-01-01

    Chagas disease is a serious illness caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. Nearly 30% of chronically infected people develop cardiac, digestive, or mixed alterations, suggesting a broad range of host-parasite interactions that finally impact upon chronic disease outcome. The ability of T. cruzi to persist and cause pathology seems to depend on diverse factors like T. cruzi strains, the infective load and the route of infection, presence of virulence factors, the parasite capacity to avoid protective immune response, the strength and type of host defense mechanisms and the genetic background of the host. The host-parasite interaction is subject to a constant neuro-endocrine regulation that is thought to influence the adaptive immune system, and as the infection proceeds it can lead to a broad range of outcomes, ranging from pathogen elimination to its continued persistence in the host. In this context, T. cruzi evasion strategies and host defense mechanisms can be envisioned as two sides of the same coin, influencing parasite persistence and different outcomes observed in Chagas disease. Understanding how T. cruzi evade host's innate and adaptive immune response will provide important clues to better dissect mechanisms underlying the pathophysiology of Chagas disease. PMID:27242726

  2. Combined elemental and microstructural analysis of genuine and fake copper-alloy coins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bartoli, L.; Agresti, J.; Mascalchi, M.; Mencaglia, A.; Cacciari, I.; Siano, Salvatore

    2011-07-01

    Innovative noninvasive material analysis techniques are applied to determine archaeometallurgical characteristics of copper-alloy coins from Florence's National Museum of Archaeology. Three supposedly authentic Roman coins and three hypothetically fraudolent imitations are thoroughly investigated using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy and time of flight neutron diffraction along with 3D videomicroscopy and electron microscopy. Material analyses are aimed at collecting data allowing for objective discrimination between genuine Roman productions and late fakes. The results show the mentioned techniques provide quantitative compositional and textural data, which are strictly related to the manufacturing processes and aging of copper alloys.

  3. Combined elemental and microstructural analysis of genuine and fake copper-alloy coins

    SciTech Connect

    Bartoli, L; Agresti, J; Mascalchi, M; Mencaglia, A; Cacciari, I; Siano, Salvatore

    2011-07-31

    Innovative noninvasive material analysis techniques are applied to determine archaeometallurgical characteristics of copper-alloy coins from Florence's National Museum of Archaeology. Three supposedly authentic Roman coins and three hypothetically fraudolent imitations are thoroughly investigated using laser-induced plasma spectroscopy and time of flight neutron diffraction along with 3D videomicroscopy and electron microscopy. Material analyses are aimed at collecting data allowing for objective discrimination between genuine Roman productions and late fakes. The results show the mentioned techniques provide quantitative compositional and textural data, which are strictly related to the manufacturing processes and aging of copper alloys. (laser applications)

  4. Training and Organization for COIN Conflicts: A Historic Perspective With Contemporary Applications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-12-01

    generated results, as have the countless hours caring for two children still in diapers , whilst I was locked in my office, or sequestered in the library...on the modern force structure relative to a COIN environment; the articles “Let’s Win the Wars We’re In” and “Let’s Build an Army to Win All Wars...Edward Luttwak in his article “Notes on Low Intensity Conflict” (1987) discusses various historical COIN fights and salient principals behind them

  5. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated...

  6. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated...

  7. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated...

  8. 26 CFR 49.4254-2 - Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated telephones. 49.4254-2 Section 49.4254-2 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE... Communications § 49.4254-2 Payment for toll telephone service or telegraph service in coin-operated...

  9. 45 CFR 2102.11 - Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like. 2102.11 Section 2102.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating..., insignia, coins, seals, and the like. Each submission of the design for a proposed item which is within...

  10. 45 CFR 2102.11 - Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like. 2102.11 Section 2102.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating..., insignia, coins, seals, and the like. Each submission of the design for a proposed item which is within...

  11. 45 CFR 2102.11 - Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like. 2102.11 Section 2102.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating..., insignia, coins, seals, and the like. Each submission of the design for a proposed item which is within...

  12. Using Conditional Discrimination Training to Produce Emergent Relations between Coins and Their Values in Children with Autism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keintz, Krista S.; Miguel, Caio F.; Kao, Betty; Finn, Heather E.

    2011-01-01

    The current study evaluated the effects of conditional discrimination (listener) training with coins on the emergence of novel stimulus relations, textual behavior, tacts, and intraverbals. Two preschoolers with autism were taught 3 relations among coins, their names, and values. After initial training, 4 relations emerged for the first…

  13. 77 FR 61661 - Price for the American Eagle Silver Proof and Uncirculated Coins and the America the Beautiful...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-10-10

    ... United States Mint Price for the American Eagle Silver Proof and Uncirculated Coins and the America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins\\TM\\ AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Because of the recent increase in the market price of silver, the United...

  14. 76 FR 21802 - Notice Announcing the Price of the 2010 America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated CoinsTM

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-04-18

    ... United States Mint Notice Announcing the Price of the 2010 America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver... America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins TM . In accordance with 31 U.S.C. 5112(u) & 9701(b), the United States Mint 2010 America the Beautiful Five Ounce Silver Uncirculated Coins TM...

  15. More Than Two Sides to Every Coin: Using Melville's "Moby Dick" to Teach Objective and Subjective Description.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Drake, David B.

    1995-01-01

    Explains a descriptive analysis exercise based on Chapter 99 of "Moby Dick." Notes that students are given a description of a coin, asked to draw the coin, and then freewrite about what they and their classmates have drawn. States that the exercise is intended to illustrate the relationship between objective and subjective description.…

  16. Analyzing Lead Content in Ancient Bronze Coins by Flame Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy: An Archaeometry Laboratory with Nonscience Majors

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Donais, Mary Kate; Whissel, Greg; Dumas, Ashley; Golden, Kathleen

    2009-01-01

    A unique, interdisciplinary collaboration between chemistry and classics has led to the development of an experiment for nonscience majors. This instrumental analysis experiment was designed for use in an archaeology course to quantify the amount of lead in ancient bronze coins. The coins were corroded beyond visual identification, so provenance…

  17. 45 CFR 2102.11 - Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 45 Public Welfare 4 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Scope and content of submissions for proposed medals, insignia, coins, seals, and the like. 2102.11 Section 2102.11 Public Welfare Regulations Relating..., insignia, coins, seals, and the like. Each submission of the design for a proposed item which is within...

  18. Bias in clinical chemistry.

    PubMed

    Theodorsson, Elvar; Magnusson, Bertil; Leito, Ivo

    2014-01-01

    Clinical chemistry uses automated measurement techniques and medical knowledge in the interest of patients and healthy subjects. Automation has reduced repeatability and day-to-day variation considerably. Bias has been reduced to a lesser extent by reference measurement systems. It is vital to minimize clinically important bias, in particular bias within conglomerates of laboratories that measure samples from the same patients. Small and variable bias components will over time show random error properties and conventional random-error based methods for calculating measurement uncertainty can then be applied. The present overview of bias presents the general principles of error and uncertainty concepts, terminology and analysis, and suggests methods to minimize bias and measurement uncertainty in the interest of healthcare.

  19. Bias in research.

    PubMed

    Simundić, Ana-Maria

    2013-01-01

    By writing scientific articles we communicate science among colleagues and peers. By doing this, it is our responsibility to adhere to some basic principles like transparency and accuracy. Authors, journal editors and reviewers need to be concerned about the quality of the work submitted for publication and ensure that only studies which have been designed, conducted and reported in a transparent way, honestly and without any deviation from the truth get to be published. Any such trend or deviation from the truth in data collection, analysis, interpretation and publication is called bias. Bias in research can occur either intentionally or unintentionally. Bias causes false conclusions and is potentially misleading. Therefore, it is immoral and unethical to conduct biased research. Every scientist should thus be aware of all potential sources of bias and undertake all possible actions to reduce or minimize the deviation from the truth. This article describes some basic issues related to bias in research.

  20. Interpretation biases in paranoia.

    PubMed

    Savulich, George; Freeman, Daniel; Shergill, Sukhi; Yiend, Jenny

    2015-01-01

    Information in the environment is frequently ambiguous in meaning. Emotional ambiguity, such as the stare of a stranger, or the scream of a child, encompasses possible good or bad emotional consequences. Those with elevated vulnerability to affective disorders tend to interpret such material more negatively than those without, a phenomenon known as "negative interpretation bias." In this study we examined the relationship between vulnerability to psychosis, measured by trait paranoia, and interpretation bias. One set of material permitted broadly positive/negative (valenced) interpretations, while another allowed more or less paranoid interpretations, allowing us to also investigate the content specificity of interpretation biases associated with paranoia. Regression analyses (n=70) revealed that trait paranoia, trait anxiety, and cognitive inflexibility predicted paranoid interpretation bias, whereas trait anxiety and cognitive inflexibility predicted negative interpretation bias. In a group comparison those with high levels of trait paranoia were negatively biased in their interpretations of ambiguous information relative to those with low trait paranoia, and this effect was most pronounced for material directly related to paranoid concerns. Together these data suggest that a negative interpretation bias occurs in those with elevated vulnerability to paranoia, and that this bias may be strongest for material matching paranoid beliefs. We conclude that content-specific biases may be important in the cause and maintenance of paranoid symptoms.

  1. 17 CFR 31.3 - Fraud in connection with certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other commodities. 31.3 Section 31.3... in connection with certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other commodities... transaction for the purchase, sale or delivery of silver bullion, gold bullion, bulk silver coins, bulk...

  2. 17 CFR 31.3 - Fraud in connection with certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other commodities. 31.3 Section 31.3... in connection with certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other commodities... transaction for the purchase, sale or delivery of silver bullion, gold bullion, bulk silver coins, bulk...

  3. 17 CFR 31.3 - Fraud in connection with certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other commodities. 31.3 Section 31.3... in connection with certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other commodities... transaction for the purchase, sale or delivery of silver bullion, gold bullion, bulk silver coins, bulk...

  4. 17 CFR 31.3 - Fraud in connection with certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other commodities. 31.3 Section 31.3... in connection with certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other commodities... transaction for the purchase, sale or delivery of silver bullion, gold bullion, bulk silver coins, bulk...

  5. 17 CFR 31.3 - Fraud in connection with certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other...

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other commodities. 31.3 Section 31.3... in connection with certain transactions in silver or gold bullion or bulk coins, or other commodities... transaction for the purchase, sale or delivery of silver bullion, gold bullion, bulk silver coins, bulk...

  6. Interactive effect of microstructure and cavity dimension on filling behavior in micro coining of pure nickel

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chuanjie; Wang, Chunju; Xu, Jie; Zhang, Peng; Shan, Debin; Guo, Bin

    2016-01-01

    In this study, interactive effects of microstructure and cavity dimension on the filling behaviors in micro coining were investigated. The results indicate that the filling ability is dependent on both the cavity width t and the ratio of cavity width to grain size t/d strongly. The critical ratio t/d for the worst filling ability increases with cavity width t and tends to disappear when the cavity width t increases to 300 μm. A polycrystalline filling model considering the friction size effect, effect of constrained grains by the tools, grain size, cavity width and ratio of cavity width to grain size is proposed to reveal the filling size effect in micro coining. A quasi in-situ Electron Backscatter Diffraction (EBSD) method is proposed to investigate filling mechanism in micro coining. When several grains across the cavity width, each grain deforms heterogeneously to ordinate the deformation compatibility. When there is only one grain across the cavity width, the grain is fragmented into several smaller grains with certain prolongation along the extrusion direction to coordinate the deformation in the cavity. This is different from the understandings before. Then the filling deformation mechanism is revealed by a proposed model considering the plastic flow in micro coining. PMID:27049754

  7. Militares medici in nummis repraesentati: the heritage of military medicine in coins and medals.

    PubMed

    Pearn, John

    2002-01-01

    Coins and commemorative medals constitute one special repository of the history of military medicine. The numismatic record has proven to be the most enduring, albeit one of the most selective, records of the progress of history. Matters of health, and especially of military medicine, have been central to the endeavors and indeed the survival of many cultures and societies. Many such themes in the national and international history of military medicine are preserved in the medallic record. Coins and medallions thus constitute one record of the chronology of this profession, one parallel to that of the more traditional history to be found in oral and written records. This account presents a four-part classification of medical coins and medals of military interest. These examples include (1) medals that portray military surgeons and physicians; (2) medals that commemorate special events of military medicine: (3) coins that portray the themes of the discipline of military medicine and health; and (4) a miscellaneous group that includes such examples as disease "touch pieces" and the militarily worn medals of such bodies as the International Red Cross and the Order of St. John, the latter of which are awarded inter alia for contributions to prehospital care in the field. A representative photo archive of such exemplars is included in this account.

  8. Non-aqueous Electrode Processing and Construction of Lithium-ion Coin Cells.

    PubMed

    Stein, Malcolm; Chen, Chien-Fan; Robles, Daniel J; Rhodes, Christopher; Mukherjee, Partha P

    2016-02-01

    Research into new and improved materials to be utilized in lithium-ion batteries (LIB) necessitates an experimental counterpart to any computational analysis. Testing of lithium-ion batteries in an academic setting has taken on several forms, but at the most basic level lies the coin cell construction. In traditional LIB electrode preparation, a multi-phase slurry composed of active material, binder, and conductive additive is cast out onto a substrate. An electrode disc can then be punched from the dried sheet and used in the construction of a coin cell for electrochemical evaluation. Utilization of the potential of the active material in a battery is critically dependent on the microstructure of the electrode, as an appropriate distribution of the primary components are crucial to ensuring optimal electrical conductivity, porosity, and tortuosity, such that electrochemical and transport interaction is optimized. Processing steps ranging from the combination of dry powder, wet mixing, and drying can all critically affect multi-phase interactions that influence the microstructure formation. Electrochemical probing necessitates the construction of electrodes and coin cells with the utmost care and precision. This paper aims at providing a step-by-step guide of non-aqueous electrode processing and coin cell construction for lithium-ion batteries within an academic setting and with emphasis on deciphering the influence of drying and calendaring.

  9. 26 CFR 49.4253-1 - Exemption for certain coin-operated service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 true Exemption for certain coin-operated service. 49.4253-1 Section 49.4253-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications §...

  10. 26 CFR 49.4253-1 - Exemption for certain coin-operated service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Exemption for certain coin-operated service. 49.4253-1 Section 49.4253-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications §...

  11. 26 CFR 49.4253-1 - Exemption for certain coin-operated service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Exemption for certain coin-operated service. 49.4253-1 Section 49.4253-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications §...

  12. 26 CFR 49.4253-1 - Exemption for certain coin-operated service.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 26 Internal Revenue 16 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Exemption for certain coin-operated service. 49.4253-1 Section 49.4253-1 Internal Revenue INTERNAL REVENUE SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY (CONTINUED) MISCELLANEOUS EXCISE TAXES FACILITIES AND SERVICES EXCISE TAXES Communications §...

  13. Effect of Context on Internal and External Actor’s Perception on COIN

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-05-19

    thorough understanding of the environment is extremely important before undertaking COIN. This understanding is extremely difficult to grasp based on...envelopment and started to collapse under this pincer movement. The speed of the operation and the failure of the militants to mount a strong defense

  14. 31 CFR 92.3 - Manufacture and sale of “proof” coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic Operations § 92.3 Manufacture and sale of “proof” coins... the Director of the Mint and are sold at a price sufficient to cover their face value plus the... Director of the Mint, Treasury Department, Washington, DC 20220....

  15. 77 FR 54659 - Price for the 2012 Annual Uncirculated Dollar Coin Set

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-09-05

    ...-54660] [FR Doc No: 2012-21739] DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Price for the 2012 Annual Uncirculated Dollar Coin Set AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: The United States Mint is announcing a price of $54.95 for the 2012 Annual Uncirculated Dollar...

  16. Child Abuse and Neglect in Japan: Coin-Operated-Locker Babies.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kouno, Akihisa; Johnson, Charles F.

    1995-01-01

    This paper reviews Japan's child abuse/neglect history, including the incidence of "coin-operated-locker babies," where murdered infants are hidden in railway and airport lockers, and actions taken to reduce this problem. The incidence of child abuse in Japan and the United States is compared, and social influences on the number of…

  17. Unasked but Answered: Comparing the Relative Probabilities of Coin Flip Sequence Attributes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chernoff, Egan J.; Mamolo, Ami

    2015-01-01

    The objective of this article is to contribute to research on teachers' probabilistic knowledge and reasoning. To meet this objective, prospective mathematics teachers were presented coin flip sequences and were asked to determine and explain which of the sequences was least likely to occur. This research suggests that certain individuals, when…

  18. Draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas psychrotolerans L19, isolated from copper alloy coins.

    PubMed

    Santo, Christophe Espírito; Lin, Yanbing; Hao, Xiuli; Wei, Gehong; Rensing, Christopher; Grass, Gregor

    2012-03-01

    We report the draft genome sequence of Pseudomonas psychrotolerans strain L19, isolated from a European 50-cent copper alloy coin. Multiple genes potentially involved in copper resistance were identified; however, it is unknown if these copper ion resistance determinants contribute to prolonged survival of this strain on dry metallic copper.

  19. Currency notes and coins as a possible source of transmitting fungal pathogens of man and plants.

    PubMed

    Wanule, Dinesh; Jalander, Vaghmare; Gachande, B D; Sirsikar, A N

    2011-10-01

    Currency (notes and coins) handling by people during transaction is one of the most mobile objects within the community, which has a potential of transmitting pathogens. A survey carried out recently in Nanded city (Maharashtra) revealed heavy contamination of currency notes and coins by important fungal pathogens of plants and man, i.e. Aspergillus niger (60.37%), A. flavus (3.98%), A.nidulans (0.2%), Penicillium citrinum (17.80%), Alternaria tenuis (0.20%), Curvularia pallescens (0.20%), Cladosporium cladosporioides (10.69%), Rhizopus stolonifer (1.04%), an unidentified Aspergillus species .1 (0.20%) and another unidentified Aspergillus species.2 (3.14%), Fusarium sp. (0.20%), Trichoderma viride (0.20%),white sterile mycelium (0.62%) and brown sterile mycelium (0.62%). The study highlights the importance of preventing and controlling fungal contamination of currency notes and coins in public health and plant protection. Currency notes or coins are rarely suspected as infection sources and often not quarantined at airport or seaport terminal. Possible transmission of pathogens or "alien", invasive species through currency across borders or across countries needs to be taken into consideration especially under circumstances of serious outbreak of important disease or when there is a threat of biological warfare.

  20. The Facts Are on the Table: Analyzing the Geometry of Coin Collisions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Theilmann, Florian

    2014-01-01

    In a typical high school course, the complex physics of collisions is broken up into the dichotomy of perfectly elastic versus completely inelastic collisions. Real-life collisions, however, generally fall between these two extremes. An accurate treatment is still possible, as demonstrated in an investigation of coin collisions. Simple…

  1. 75 FR 62184 - Notification of United States Mint Silver Eagle Bullion Coin Premium Increase

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-10-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Notification of United States Mint Silver Eagle Bullion Coin Premium Increase ACTION... Sales and Marketing; United States Mint; 801 9th Street, NW., Washington, DC 20220; or call...

  2. 76 FR 53717 - Pricing for the 2011 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coin

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2011-08-29

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2011 American Eagle Silver Uncirculated Coin AGENCY: United States... FURTHER INFORMATION CONTACT: B. B. Craig, Associate Director for Sales and Marketing, United States...

  3. 78 FR 70414 - Pricing for the 2013 Coin and Chronicles Set-Theodore Roosevelt

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-11-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY United States Mint Pricing for the 2013 Coin and Chronicles Set--Theodore Roosevelt AGENCY: United States...: Marc Landry, Acting Associate Director for Sales and Marketing; United States Mint; 801 9th Street...

  4. Parental restriction and children's diets. The chocolate coin and Easter egg experiments.

    PubMed

    Ogden, Jane; Cordey, Phillipa; Cutler, Laura; Thomas, Hayley

    2013-02-01

    Two naturalistic experiments are reported exploring the impact of parental restriction on children's diets. For study 1, 53 parents gave 75 g of chocolate coins to their child over a weekend. For study 2, 86 parents were recruited prior to the 2 week Easter break when their children would be receiving chocolate Easter eggs. For both studies, parents were randomly allocated to either the non-restriction or restriction conditions and rated their child's preoccupation with the target food and other sweet foods (demanding and eating) at the start and end of the interventions. Perceived and actual food intake was assessed. Children in the restriction conditions consumed fewer chocolate coins and Easter eggs. All children showed decreased preoccupation with chocolate coins or Easter eggs over the course of the studies yet by the end the restriction group were more preoccupied with the target food. In contrast, all children showed an increased preoccupation with other sweet foods as the studies progressed which was greater in the non-restriction group for the chocolate coins study. Overall, restriction resulted in reduced intake but relative increased preoccupation with the food being restricted. Non-restriction resulted in a greater preoccupation with other sweet foods once the target foods had been consumed.

  5. 78 FR 25784 - Re-pricing of Several Silver Coin Products

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2013-05-02

    ... United States Mint Re-pricing of Several Silver Coin Products AGENCY: United States Mint, Department of the Treasury. ACTION: Notice. SUMMARY: Because of the recent decrease in the market price of silver, the United States Mint is lowering the price of several numismatic products that contain silver...

  6. 31 CFR 92.3 - Manufacture and sale of “proof” coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false Manufacture and sale of âproofâ coins. 92.3 Section 92.3 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic...

  7. 31 CFR 92.3 - Manufacture and sale of “proof” coins.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 31 Money and Finance: Treasury 1 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false Manufacture and sale of âproofâ coins. 92.3 Section 92.3 Money and Finance: Treasury Regulations Relating to Money and Finance MONETARY OFFICES, DEPARTMENT OF THE TREASURY UNITED STATES MINT OPERATIONS AND PROCEDURES Numismatic...

  8. 75 FR 43943 - Defense Science Board; Task Force on Counter Insurgency (COIN) Intelligence, Surveillance and...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2010-07-27

    ... of the Secretary Defense Science Board; Task Force on Counter Insurgency (COIN) Intelligence...) Intelligence, Surveillance and Reconnaissance (ISR) Operations will meet in closed session on August 24-26, and... perceived needs of the Department of Defense. These meetings will identify how DoD intelligence can...

  9. An Introduction to Biological Modeling Using Coin Flips to Predict the Outcome of a Diffusion Activity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Butcher, Greg Q.; Rodriguez, Juan; Chirhart, Scott; Messina, Troy C.

    2016-01-01

    In order to increase students' awareness for and comfort with mathematical modeling of biological processes, and increase their understanding of diffusion, the following lab was developed for use in 100-level, majors/non-majors biology and neuroscience courses. The activity begins with generation of a data set that uses coin-flips to replicate…

  10. The Development of Spatial Frequency Biases in Face Recognition

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Leonard, Hayley C.; Karmiloff-Smith, Annette; Johnson, Mark H.

    2010-01-01

    Previous research has suggested that a mid-band of spatial frequencies is critical to face recognition in adults, but few studies have explored the development of this bias in children. We present a paradigm adapted from the adult literature to test spatial frequency biases throughout development. Faces were presented on a screen with particular…

  11. The Bias Fallacy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Linvill, Darren L.

    2013-01-01

    Do those who complain about liberal bias in higher education have any actionable point at all? Critics of the politicization of higher education claim that political partisanship in the classroom is pervasive and that it affects student learning. Although the existence of such partisanship has not been empirically proven, allegations of bias are…

  12. Preliminary study of statistical pattern recognition-based coin counterfeit detection by means of high resolution 3D scanners

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Leich, Marcus; Kiltz, Stefan; Krätzer, Christian; Dittmann, Jana; Vielhauer, Claus

    2011-03-01

    According to the European Commission around 200,000 counterfeit Euro coins are removed from circulation every year. While approaches exist to automatically detect these coins, satisfying error rates are usually only reached for low quality forgeries, so-called "local classes". High-quality minted forgeries ("common classes") pose a problem for these methods as well as for trained humans. This paper presents a first approach for statistical analysis of coins based on high resolution 3D data acquired with a chromatic white light sensor. The goal of this analysis is to determine whether two coins are of common origin. The test set for these first and new investigations consists of 62 coins from not more than five different sources. The analysis is based on the assumption that, apart from markings caused by wear such as scratches and residue consisting of grease and dust, coins from equal origin have a more similar height field than coins from different mints. First results suggest that the selected approach is heavily affected by influences of wear like dents and scratches and the further research is required the eliminate this influence. A course for future work is outlined.

  13. Expectancy biases in fear and anxiety and their link to biases in attention.

    PubMed

    Aue, Tatjana; Okon-Singer, Hadas

    2015-12-01

    Healthy individuals often exhibit prioritized processing of aversive information, as manifested in enhanced orientation of attention to threatening stimuli compared with neutral items. In contrast to this adaptive behavior, anxious, fearful, and phobic individuals show exaggerated attention biases to threat. In addition, they overestimate the likelihood of encountering their feared stimulus and the severity of the consequences; both are examples of expectancy biases. The co-occurrence of attention and expectancy biases in fear and anxiety raises the question about causal influences. Herein, we summarize findings related to expectancy biases in fear and anxiety, and their association with attention biases. We suggest that evidence calls for more comprehensive research strategies in the investigation of mutual influences between expectancy and attention biases, as well as their combined effects on fear and anxiety. Moreover, both types of bias need to be related to other types of distorted information processing commonly observed in fear and anxiety (e.g., memory and interpretation biases). Finally, we propose new research directions that may be worth considering in developing more effective treatments for anxiety disorders.

  14. Biased predecision processing.

    PubMed

    Brownstein, Aaron L

    2003-07-01

    Decision makers conduct biased predecision processing when they restructure their mental representation of the decision environment to favor one alternative before making their choice. The question of whether biased predecision processing occurs has been controversial since L. Festinger (1957) maintained that it does not occur. The author reviews relevant research in sections on theories of cognitive dissonance, decision conflict, choice certainty, action control, action phases, dominance structuring, differentiation and consolidation, constructive processing, motivated reasoning, and groupthink. Some studies did not find evidence of biased predecision processing, but many did. In the Discussion section, the moderators are summarized and used to assess the theories.

  15. Both Male-Biased and Female-Biased Genes Evolve Faster in Fish Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Liandong; Zhang, Zhaolei; He, Shunping

    2016-01-01

    Males and females often display extensive phenotypic differences, and many of these sexual dimorphisms are thought to result from differences between males and females in expression of genes present in both sexes. Sex-biased genes have been shown to exhibit accelerated rates of evolution in a wide array of species, however the cause of this remains enigmatic. In this study, we investigate the extent and evolutionary dynamics of sex-biased gene expression in zebrafish. Our results indicate that both male-biased genes and female-biased genes exhibit accelerated evolution at the protein level. In order to differentiate between adaptive and nonadaptive causes, we tested for codon usage bias and signatures of different selective regimes in our sequence data. Our results show that both male- and female-biased genes show signatures consistent with adaptive evolution. In order to test the generality of our findings across fish, we also analyzed publicly available data on sticklebacks, and found results consistent with our findings in zebrafish. PMID:27742722

  16. Estimating Bias Error Distributions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Liu, Tian-Shu; Finley, Tom D.

    2001-01-01

    This paper formulates the general methodology for estimating the bias error distribution of a device in a measuring domain from less accurate measurements when a minimal number of standard values (typically two values) are available. A new perspective is that the bias error distribution can be found as a solution of an intrinsic functional equation in a domain. Based on this theory, the scaling- and translation-based methods for determining the bias error distribution arc developed. These methods are virtually applicable to any device as long as the bias error distribution of the device can be sufficiently described by a power series (a polynomial) or a Fourier series in a domain. These methods have been validated through computational simulations and laboratory calibration experiments for a number of different devices.

  17. Introduction to Unconscious Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmelz, Joan T.

    2010-05-01

    We all have biases, and we are (for the most part) unaware of them. In general, men and women BOTH unconsciously devalue the contributions of women. This can have a detrimental effect on grant proposals, job applications, and performance reviews. Sociology is way ahead of astronomy in these studies. When evaluating identical application packages, male and female University psychology professors preferred 2:1 to hire "Brian” over "Karen” as an assistant professor. When evaluating a more experienced record (at the point of promotion to tenure), reservations were expressed four times more often when the name was female. This unconscious bias has a repeated negative effect on Karen's career. This talk will introduce the concept of unconscious bias and also give recommendations on how to address it using an example for a faculty search committee. The process of eliminating unconscious bias begins with awareness, then moves to policy and practice, and ends with accountability.

  18. Modeling the Overalternating Bias with an Asymmetric Entropy Measure

    PubMed Central

    Gronchi, Giorgio; Raglianti, Marco; Noventa, Stefano; Lazzeri, Alessandro; Guazzini, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Psychological research has found that human perception of randomness is biased. In particular, people consistently show the overalternating bias: they rate binary sequences of symbols (such as Heads and Tails in coin flipping) with an excess of alternation as more random than prescribed by the normative criteria of Shannon's entropy. Within data mining for medical applications, Marcellin proposed an asymmetric measure of entropy that can be ideal to account for such bias and to quantify subjective randomness. We fitted Marcellin's entropy and Renyi's entropy (a generalized form of uncertainty measure comprising many different kinds of entropies) to experimental data found in the literature with the Differential Evolution algorithm. We observed a better fit for Marcellin's entropy compared to Renyi's entropy. The fitted asymmetric entropy measure also showed good predictive properties when applied to different datasets of randomness-related tasks. We concluded that Marcellin's entropy can be a parsimonious and effective measure of subjective randomness that can be useful in psychological research about randomness perception. PMID:27458418

  19. Increasingly minimal bias routing

    DOEpatents

    Bataineh, Abdulla; Court, Thomas; Roweth, Duncan

    2017-02-21

    A system and algorithm configured to generate diversity at the traffic source so that packets are uniformly distributed over all of the available paths, but to increase the likelihood of taking a minimal path with each hop the packet takes. This is achieved by configuring routing biases so as to prefer non-minimal paths at the injection point, but increasingly prefer minimal paths as the packet proceeds, referred to herein as Increasing Minimal Bias (IMB).

  20. Habituation of visual adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Xue; Gao, Yi; Lv, Lili; Bao, Min

    2016-01-01

    Our sensory system adjusts its function driven by both shorter-term (e.g. adaptation) and longer-term (e.g. learning) experiences. Most past adaptation literature focuses on short-term adaptation. Only recently researchers have begun to investigate how adaptation changes over a span of days. This question is important, since in real life many environmental changes stretch over multiple days or longer. However, the answer to the question remains largely unclear. Here we addressed this issue by tracking perceptual bias (also known as aftereffect) induced by motion or contrast adaptation across multiple daily adaptation sessions. Aftereffects were measured every day after adaptation, which corresponded to the degree of adaptation on each day. For passively viewed adapters, repeated adaptation attenuated aftereffects. Once adapters were presented with an attentional task, aftereffects could either reduce for easy tasks, or initially show an increase followed by a later decrease for demanding tasks. Quantitative analysis of the decay rates in contrast adaptation showed that repeated exposure of the adapter appeared to be equivalent to adaptation to a weaker stimulus. These results suggest that both attention and a non-attentional habituation-like mechanism jointly determine how adaptation develops across multiple daily sessions. PMID:26739917

  1. Randomness in a Galton board from the viewpoint of predictability: sensitivity and statistical bias of output states.

    PubMed

    Arai, Kenichi; Harayama, Takahisa; Sunada, Satoshi; Davis, Peter

    2012-11-01

    The Galton board is a classic example of the appearance of randomness and stochasticity. In the dynamical model of the Galton board, the macroscopic motion is governed by deterministic equations of motion, and predictability depends on uncertainty in the initial conditions and its evolution by the dynamics. In this sense the Galton board is similar to coin tossing. In this paper, we analyze a simple dynamical model which is inspired by the Galton board. Especially, we focus on the predictability, considering the relation between the uncertainty of initial states and the structure of basins of initial states that result in the same exit state. The model has basins with fractal basin structure, unlike the basins in coin tossing models which have only finite structure. Arbitrarily small uncertainty of initial conditions can cause unpredictability of final states if the initial conditions are chosen in fractal regions. In this sense, our model is in a different category from the coin tossing model. We examine the predictability of a small Galton board model from the viewpoint of the sensitivity and the statistical bias of final states. We show that it is possible to determine the radii of scatterers corresponding to a given predictability criterion, specified as a statistical bias, and a given uncertainty of initial conditions.

  2. N-dimensional alternate coined quantum walks from a dispersion-relation perspective

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roldán, Eugenio; Di Franco, Carlo; Silva, Fernando; de Valcárcel, Germán J.

    2013-02-01

    We suggest an alternative definition of N-dimensional coined quantum walk by generalizing a recent proposal [Di Franco , Phys. Rev. Lett.0031-9007PRLTAO10.1103/PhysRevLett.106.080502 106, 080502 (2011)]. This N-dimensional alternate quantum walk, AQW(N), in contrast with the standard definition of the N-dimensional quantum walk, QW(N), requires only a coin qubit. We discuss the quantum diffusion properties of AQW(2) and AQW(3) by analyzing their dispersion relations that reveal, in particular, the existence of diabolical points. This allows us to highlight interesting similarities with other well-known physical phenomena. We also demonstrate that AQW(3) generates considerable genuine multipartite entanglement. Finally, we discuss the implementability of AQW(N).

  3. Remote Education Using Web Conference System in a Company of Coin Parking Business

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yoshioka, Yoshio; Mito, Hiroyuki; Azuma, Kouji

    Maintenance jobs at coin parking places (CP) are very important for keeping trouble free operation. Such maintenance jobs include special inspection at the initiation of new CP and ordinal maintenance works. In order to level up the skill of maintenance people in the company, education of the basic knowlege of electricity, facility and maintenance skills are required. We made an original text for maintenance people, and practiced education by use of web conference system, because they are distributed in whole country, This paper describes a content of text on fundamental knowledge of electricity, facility of coin parking system and trouble experiences, and also a practice of remote education using web conference system. Problems of remote education which were found by practice and the future education plan of practical skill are also described.

  4. CoinCalc-A new R package for quantifying simultaneities of event series

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siegmund, Jonatan F.; Siegmund, Nicole; Donner, Reik V.

    2017-01-01

    We present the new R package CoinCalc for performing event coincidence analysis (ECA), a novel statistical method to quantify the simultaneity of events contained in two series of observations, either as simultaneous or lagged coincidences within a user-specific temporal tolerance window. The package also provides different analytical as well as surrogate-based significance tests (valid under different assumptions about the nature of the observed event series) as well as an intuitive visualization of the identified coincidences. We demonstrate the usage of CoinCalc based on two typical geoscientific example problems addressing the relationship between meteorological extremes and plant phenology as well as that between soil properties and land cover.

  5. The Brown Water Navy in the Mekong Delta: COIN in the Littorals and Inland Waters

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-01-01

    Apocalypse Insurgency & Terrorism, 2nd ed. (Washington, DC: Potomac Books, Inc, 2005) 164-187 4 Mark Moyar, Phoenix and the Birds of Prey...Mark. Phoenix and the Birds of Prey, Lincoln, NE: University of(:J Nebraska Press. 1997. 27 The Brown Water Navy in the Mekong Delta: COIN in the...Advisors in Vietnam, Annapolis, MD: Naval Institute Press, 2000. \\ Moyar , Mark. Phoenix and the Birds of Prey, Lincoln, NE: University of Nebraska

  6. COINS: An Innovative Informatics and Neuroimaging Tool Suite Built for Large Heterogeneous Datasets

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Adam; Courtney, Will; Wood, Dylan; de la Garza, Raul; Lane, Susan; King, Margaret; Wang, Runtang; Roberts, Jody; Turner, Jessica A.; Calhoun, Vince D.

    2011-01-01

    The availability of well-characterized neuroimaging data with large numbers of subjects, especially for clinical populations, is critical to advancing our understanding of the healthy and diseased brain. Such data enables questions to be answered in a much more generalizable manner and also has the potential to yield solutions derived from novel methods that were conceived after the original studies’ implementation. Though there is currently growing interest in data sharing, the neuroimaging community has been struggling for years with how to best encourage sharing data across brain imaging studies. With the advent of studies that are much more consistent across sites (e.g., resting functional magnetic resonance imaging, diffusion tensor imaging, and structural imaging) the potential of pooling data across studies continues to gain momentum. At the mind research network, we have developed the collaborative informatics and neuroimaging suite (COINS; http://coins.mrn.org) to provide researchers with an information system based on an open-source model that includes web-based tools to manage studies, subjects, imaging, clinical data, and other assessments. The system currently hosts data from nine institutions, over 300 studies, over 14,000 subjects, and over 19,000 MRI, MEG, and EEG scan sessions in addition to more than 180,000 clinical assessments. In this paper we provide a description of COINS with comparison to a valuable and popular system known as XNAT. Although there are many similarities between COINS and other electronic data management systems, the differences that may concern researchers in the context of multi-site, multi-organizational data sharing environments with intuitive ease of use and PHI security are emphasized as important attributes. PMID:22275896

  7. Money in the Bank. Lessons Learned from Past Counterinsurgency (COIN) Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2007-01-01

    Derechos Humanos de El Salvador] CIA Central Intelligence Agency COIN counterinsurgency CORDS Civil Operations and Revolutionary Development Support...states; labor unions in Britain and the United States were openly calling for Algerian Muslim self-determination; and in France a growing antiwar...1974 by the ERP and two radical Catholic priests. The FAPU con- ducted numerous strikes, marches, and propaganda distribution projects in the labor move

  8. Hormesis: Decoding Two Sides of the Same Coin

    PubMed Central

    Bhakta-Guha, Dipita; Efferth, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    In the paradigm of drug administration, determining the correct dosage of a therapeutic is often a challenge. Several drugs have been noted to demonstrate contradictory effects per se at high and low doses. This duality in function of a drug at different concentrations is known as hormesis. Therefore, it becomes necessary to study these biphasic functions in order to understand the mechanistic basis of their effects. In this article, we focus on different molecules and pathways associated with diseases that possess a duality in their function and thus prove to be the seat of hormesis. In particular, we have highlighted the pathways and factors involved in the progression of cancer and how the biphasic behavior of the molecules involved can alter the manifestations of cancer. Because of the pragmatic role that it exhibits, the imminent need is to draw attention to the concept of hormesis. Herein, we also discuss different stressors that trigger hormesis and how stress-mediated responses increase the overall adaptive response of an individual to stress stimulus. We talk about common pathways through which cancer progresses (such as nuclear factor erythroid 2-related factor 2-Kelch-like ECH-associated protein 1 (Nrf2-Keap1), sirtuin-forkhead box O (SIRT-FOXO) and others), analyzing how diverse molecules associated with these pathways conform to hormesis. PMID:26694419

  9. Three-dimensional reconstruction of Roman coins from photometric image sets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacDonald, Lindsay; Moitinho de Almeida, Vera; Hess, Mona

    2017-01-01

    A method is presented for increasing the spatial resolution of the three-dimensional (3-D) digital representation of coins by combining fine photometric detail derived from a set of photographic images with accurate geometric data from a 3-D laser scanner. 3-D reconstructions were made of the obverse and reverse sides of two ancient Roman denarii by processing sets of images captured under directional lighting in an illumination dome. Surface normal vectors were calculated by a "bounded regression" technique, excluding both shadow and specular components of reflection from the metallic surface. Because of the known difficulty in achieving geometric accuracy when integrating photometric normals to produce a digital elevation model, the low spatial frequencies were replaced by those derived from the point cloud produced by a 3-D laser scanner. The two datasets were scaled and registered by matching the outlines and correlating the surface gradients. The final result was a realistic rendering of the coins at a spatial resolution of 75 pixels/mm (13-μm spacing), in which the fine detail modulated the underlying geometric form of the surface relief. The method opens the way to obtain high quality 3-D representations of coins in collections to enable interactive online viewing.

  10. [Wishes for recovery on bronze--comments on a coin in honour of L. Aelius Caesar].

    PubMed

    Moog, Ferdinand Peter

    2006-01-01

    L. Aelius Caesar is a little known co-regent of Hadrian who, having already been taken ill, was elected Princeps as Hadrian's successor and died soon afterwards. The city of Mytilene in Lesbos dedicated a bronze coin for him while he was still alive. The reverse of the coin shows the arrival of Asclepios in the shape of a snake. It is certainly a reference to the mythic translation of the cult of Asclepios to Rome in the third century B. C. which introduced the worship of the healing god on the Tiber Island. The community of Mytilene that struck the coin wanted to wish the ruler, whose illness was generally known, a good recovery or even to encourage him to convalesce at the famous ancient spa of Mytilene. At the same time they wanted to make a request on their own behalf. They wanted to gain the favour of the putative successor to the ruling Princeps in order to keep or regain certain liberties for their city which have been reduced by Vespasian in his centralization of the Roman Empire.

  11. Ancient Coins and their Modern Fakes: An Attempt of Physico-Chemical Unmasking.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mezzasalma, A. M.; Mondio, G.; Serafino, T.; De Fulvio, G.; Romeo, M.; Salici, A.

    As a consequence of police operations in Messina (Sicily), a huge quantity of perfect imitations of ancient coins, realized by a sicilian forger, has been recently found. Such fakes have been realized by the lost wax casting technique and reproduce coins issued by different authorities in different historical epochs. In order to overcome the obvious subjectivity of the traditional (autoptical) numismatic analysis, which sometime provides contrasting interpretations, five of these fakes have been analysed by Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM) and Energy Dispersed X-Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF). The results obtained have given information on the microstructure, the homogeneity and the elemental composition of the alloys used by the forger. Furthermore, evident traces of the chemical treatment utilized for the artificial ageing of the coins have been found. Due to the presumable and dangerous large diffusion of these sicilian fakes in the international market, the results of such analyses may certainly be of noticeable interest for Numismatics and forensic applications as well, representing a set of proofs to be used in the unmasking of analogous counterfeiting cases.

  12. The Relevance Of The Preform Design In Coining Processes Of Cupronickel Alloy

    SciTech Connect

    Buffa, G.; Fratini, L.; Micari, F.

    2007-05-17

    Coining is a forging process in which a metallic disk, characterized by a low volume-surface ratio, is deformed with the aim to impress 3D images on its three surfaces. Due to the large production volumes and, at the same time, to the high quality standards required to the final products in terms of final dimensions, tolerances and surface finishing, such closed-die, cold forging process requires a careful evaluation and choice of the proper operative parameters. In particular, along with technological parameters as the die velocity, die stroke and lubrication, which, in turn, contribute to affect the pressure values on the die surfaces, and thus the press choice, geometrical parameters as the side ring inner diameter and, above all, the preform geometry, strongly affect the quality of the obtained parts. In this paper, a 3D FEM model for coining processes is proposed, that is Lagrangian implicit, rigid-viscoplastic. The relationships between the obtained geometry and the starting preform shape is numerically investigated, allowing, through the analysis of the effective stresses, strain, and strain rate on the coin, as well as of the loads on the dies, to highlight the significance of the perform design in order to obtain a final product that satisfies the strict geometrical tolerances required. It is found that the best results on the final part are obtained with chamfered preform geometries, though larger values of force on the dies are observed.

  13. Archaeometric analysis of Roman bronze coins from the Magna Mater temple using solid-state voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Di Turo, Francesca; Montoya, Noemí; Piquero-Cilla, Joan; De Vito, Caterina; Coletti, Fulvio; Favero, Gabriele; Doménech-Carbó, Antonio

    2017-02-22

    Voltammetry of microparticles (VMP) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques, complemented by SEM-EDX and Raman spectroscopy, were applied to a set of 15 Roman bronze coins and one Tessera from the temple of Magna Mater (Rome, Italy). The archaeological site, dated back between the second half and the end of the 4th century A.D., presented a complicated stratigraphic context. Characteristic voltammetric patterns for cuprite and tenorite for sub-microsamples of the corrosion layers of the coins deposited onto graphite electrodes in contact with 0.10 M HClO4 aqueous solution yielded a grouping of the coins into three main groups. This grouping was confirmed and refined using EIS experiments of the coins immersed in air-saturated mineral water using the reduction of dissolved oxygen as a redox probe. The electrochemical grouping of coins corroborated the complex stratigraphy of the archaeological site and, above all, the reuse of the coins during the later periods due to the economic issues related to the fall of the Roman Empire.

  14. A Meta-Analysis of the Effect of Cognitive Bias Modification on Anxiety and Depression

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hallion, Lauren S.; Ruscio, Ayelet Meron

    2011-01-01

    Cognitive biases have been theorized to play a critical role in the onset and maintenance of anxiety and depression. Cognitive bias modification (CBM), an experimental paradigm that uses training to induce maladaptive or adaptive cognitive biases, was developed to test these causal models. Although CBM has generated considerable interest in the…

  15. Analysis of medieval Serbian silver coins from XIV and XV century by means of wavelength-dispersive X-ray spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gržetić, Ivan; Orlić, Jovana; Radić, Vesna; Radić, Milica; Ilijević, Konstantin

    2016-01-01

    X-ray fluorescence (XRF) spectrometry is known as excellent nondestructive technique for analysis of artifacts, in our case, medieval numismatic coins. Collections of 30 silver coins, owned by National Museum in Belgrade, were investigated during our research. Coins from the historical period from 1389 to 1458 belong to the reign of two Serbian rulers, Stefan Lazarević and Đurđe Branković. The aim of this study was to determine elemental composition of silver coins and to characterize alloys from which the coins were minted. The dominant elements detected in all coins were Ag, Cu, Zn and Pb. In some coins Fe, Si and S were detected as well. Results from quantitative analysis shows that the content of Ag in all investigated silver coins exceed 90%, except in two coins that were assumed to be forged. The concentration of Cu ranged from 3% to 5%, and the contents of Zn and Pb varied around 1%. Characterization of coins provided us information about raw materials and employed metallurgical processes.

  16. Frontal theta overrides pavlovian learning biases.

    PubMed

    Cavanagh, James F; Eisenberg, Ian; Guitart-Masip, Marc; Huys, Quentin; Frank, Michael J

    2013-05-08

    Pavlovian biases influence learning and decision making by intricately coupling reward seeking with action invigoration and punishment avoidance with action suppression. This bias is not always adaptive-it can often interfere with instrumental requirements. The prefrontal cortex is thought to help resolve such conflict between motivational systems, but the nature of this control process remains unknown. EEG recordings of midfrontal theta band power are sensitive to conflict and predictive of adaptive control over behavior, but it is not clear whether this signal reflects control over conflict between motivational systems. Here we used a task that orthogonalized action requirements and outcome valence while recording concurrent EEG in human participants. By applying a computational model of task performance, we derived parameters reflective of the latent influence of Pavlovian bias and how it was modulated by midfrontal theta power during motivational conflict. Between subjects, those who performed better under Pavlovian conflict exhibited higher midfrontal theta power. Within subjects, trial-to-trial variance in theta power was predictive of ability to overcome the influence of the Pavlovian bias, and this effect was most pronounced in subjects with higher midfrontal theta to conflict. These findings demonstrate that midfrontal theta is not only a sensitive index of prefrontal control, but it can also reflect the application of top-down control over instrumental processes.

  17. Distinguishing Selection Bias and Confounding Bias in Comparative Effectiveness Research.

    PubMed

    Haneuse, Sebastien

    2016-04-01

    Comparative effectiveness research (CER) aims to provide patients and physicians with evidence-based guidance on treatment decisions. As researchers conduct CER they face myriad challenges. Although inadequate control of confounding is the most-often cited source of potential bias, selection bias that arises when patients are differentially excluded from analyses is a distinct phenomenon with distinct consequences: confounding bias compromises internal validity, whereas selection bias compromises external validity. Despite this distinction, however, the label "treatment-selection bias" is being used in the CER literature to denote the phenomenon of confounding bias. Motivated by an ongoing study of treatment choice for depression on weight change over time, this paper formally distinguishes selection and confounding bias in CER. By formally distinguishing selection and confounding bias, this paper clarifies important scientific, design, and analysis issues relevant to ensuring validity. First is that the 2 types of biases may arise simultaneously in any given study; even if confounding bias is completely controlled, a study may nevertheless suffer from selection bias so that the results are not generalizable to the patient population of interest. Second is that the statistical methods used to mitigate the 2 biases are themselves distinct; methods developed to control one type of bias should not be expected to address the other. Finally, the control of selection and confounding bias will often require distinct covariate information. Consequently, as researchers plan future studies of comparative effectiveness, care must be taken to ensure that all data elements relevant to both confounding and selection bias are collected.

  18. BeiDou inter-satellite-type bias evaluation and calibration for mixed receiver attitude determination.

    PubMed

    Nadarajah, Nandakumaran; Teunissen, Peter J G; Raziq, Noor

    2013-07-22

    The Chinese BeiDou system (BDS), having different types of satellites, is an important addition to the ever growing system of Global Navigation Satellite Systems (GNSS). It consists of Geostationary Earth Orbit (GEO) satellites, Inclined Geosynchronous Satellite Orbit (IGSO) satellites and Medium Earth Orbit (MEO) satellites. This paper investigates the receiver-dependent bias between these satellite types, for which we coined the name "inter-satellite-type bias" (ISTB), and its impact on mixed receiver attitude determination. Assuming different receiver types may have different delays/biases for different satellite types, we model the differential ISTBs among three BeiDou satellite types and investigate their existence and their impact on mixed receiver attitude determination. Our analyses using the real data sets from Curtin's GNSS array consisting of different types of BeiDou enabled receivers and series of zero-baseline experiments with BeiDou-enabled receivers reveal the existence of non-zero ISTBs between different BeiDou satellite types. We then analyse the impact of these biases on BeiDou-only attitude determination using the constrained (C-)LAMBDA method, which exploits the knowledge of baseline length. Results demonstrate that these biases could seriously affect the integer ambiguity resolution for attitude determination using mixed receiver types and that a priori correction of these biases will dramatically improve the success rate.

  19. Sex Bias in Children.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zalk, Sue Rosenberg; And Others

    This study investigated children's sex biased attitudes as a function of the sex, age, and race of the child as well as a geographical-SES factor. Two attitudes were measured on a 55-item questionnaire: Sex Pride (attributing positive characteristics to a child of the same sex) and Sex Prejudice (attributing negative characteristics to a child of…

  20. A significant bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Eades, Alwyn

    2013-09-01

    While I do not wish to belittle the unfortunate conclusions that may be drawn from your news article "Gender bias judges research by women more critically" (May p12), I do want to comment on the way the article is presented.

  1. Own Variety Bias

    PubMed Central

    García, Andrea Ariza

    2015-01-01

    In a language identification task, native Belgian French and native Swiss French speakers identified French from France as their own variety. However, Canadian French was not subject to this bias. Canadian and French listeners didn’t claim a different variety as their own. PMID:27648211

  2. Synergetic effect of laser patterning and micro coining for controlled lubricant propagation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rosenkranz, Andreas; Gruetzmacher, Philipp G.; Szurdak, Adam; Gachot, Carsten; Hirt, Gerhard; Muecklich, Frank

    2016-09-01

    In this study, the anisotropic spreading behavior of Poly-(alpha)-olefin oil (kinematic viscosity of 7.8 cSt at 100 °C) on stainless steel samples (AISI 403) having periodic, channel-like structures produced by hot micro-coining (periodicity of 400 μm and depth of 40 μm) as well as multi-scale structures (coining and laser patterning) was investigated. These results were compared to the behavior of periodic channels fabricated by direct laser interference patterning (periodicity of 5 μm and depth of 1 μm). The spreading behavior of a droplet (3 μl) was studied for a polished reference as well as for all modified surfaces and recorded by a digital light microscope. From this study, it can be concluded that the polished reference leads to an isotropic spreading behavior resulting from the stochastic surface roughness without any preferential orientation whereas all structured samples induce an anisotropic spreading behavior but with different degrees of anisotropy. The observed behavior can be well correlated with pinning induced by the grooves thus hindering the droplet propagation perpendicular to the grooves and the generation of capillary forces which favor the droplet movement along the grooves. It could be proved that the structural depth is a very desicive parameter with regard to the resulting spreading behavior. The multi-scale surface combining large structural depths and the steeper pattern geometry of the micro-coined surface with much smaller grooves of the laser-structure shows the largest anisotropic spreading behavior due to a stronger pinning and increased capillary forces.

  3. From Coin to Medal: A Metallurgical Study of the Brazing Drop on a 19th Century Scudo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breda, M.; Canovaro, C.; Pérez, A. F. Miranda; Calliari, I.

    2012-11-01

    In the past, it was customary to use out-of-circulation coins as pendants by brazing a peg or ring on the edge of the coin in order to transform it into a devotional or decorative object; this practice was very common for specimens of the Papal States, especially for silver coins. This metallurgical investigation of a 19th century Scudo aimed to relate the internal structure of the coin to the minting technology with a special focus on the brazing drop, in order to provide information on the solidification microstructure arising from a strongly nonequilibrium process such as brazing. The results show that the Ag content in the coin ranges from 92% in the bulk up to 97% on the surface, due to enrichment, while analysis of the brazing revealed that it consists of an Ag-Cu-Zn-Pb alloy, for which the melting temperature has been estimated. Considering the distribution of minor elements, Zn segregates in the secondary (Cu-rich) β-dendrites and inside the whole eutectic structure, while Pb is only present in the Ag-based phases and seems to reduce the solubility of Zn inside the primary (Ag-rich) α-dendrites.

  4. Thoughts on The Battle for the Minds: IO and COIN in the Pashtun Belt

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-10-01

    Corps 1LT Michael Kuiper , with 1st Battalion, 5th Marine Regiment, talks with an Afghan man during a civil affairs group patrol in the Nawa District...of Helmand Province, Afghanistan, 19 July 2009. Kuiper is talking with citizens in order to gauge the needs of the populace and provide...Thoughts on The Battle for the Minds: IO and COIN in the Pashtun Belt 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d

  5. Temperature trend biases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Venema, Victor; Lindau, Ralf

    2016-04-01

    In an accompanying talk we show that well-homogenized national dataset warm more than temperatures from global collections averaged over the region of common coverage. In this poster we want to present auxiliary work about possible biases in the raw observations and on how well relative statistical homogenization can remove trend biases. There are several possible causes of cooling biases, which have not been studied much. Siting could be an important factor. Urban stations tend to move away from the centre to better locations. Many stations started inside of urban areas and are nowadays more outside. Even for villages the temperature difference between the centre and edge can be 0.5°C. When a city station moves to an airport, which often happened around WWII, this takes the station (largely) out of the urban heat island. During the 20th century the Stevenson screen was established as the dominant thermometer screen. This screen protected the thermometer much better against radiation than earlier designs. Deficits of earlier measurement methods have artificially warmed the temperatures in the 19th century. Newer studies suggest we may have underestimated the size of this bias. Currently we are in a transition to Automatic Weather Stations. The net global effect of this transition is not clear at this moment. Irrigation on average decreases the 2m-temperature by about 1 degree centigrade. At the same time, irrigation has increased significantly during the last century. People preferentially live in irrigated areas and weather stations serve agriculture. Thus it is possible that there is a higher likelihood that weather stations are erected in irrigated areas than elsewhere. In this case irrigation could lead to a spurious cooling trend. In the Parallel Observations Science Team of the International Surface Temperature Initiative (ISTI-POST) we are studying influence of the introduction of Stevenson screens and Automatic Weather Stations using parallel measurements

  6. Thermally induced filter bias in TEOM mass measurement.

    PubMed

    Page, Steven J; Tuchman, Donald P; Vinson, Robert P

    2007-07-01

    Researchers at the National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) have long used stationary tapered element oscillating microbalances (TEOMs) in laboratory settings. They have served to assess the mass concentration of laboratory-generated particulates in experimental dust chambers and they provide a reference method for comparison with other particulate-measuring instruments. Current NIOSH research is focused on further adapting TEOM technology as a wearable personal dust monitor (PDM) for coal mining occupations. This investigation's goal is to help identify, quantify, and provide means for resolving certain TEOM-related error. The present research investigated bias caused by thermal effects on filter assemblies. New filters used in the PDM for 8 h tests show an average positive bias of 25.5 microg, while similar tests of equivalent filters used in two 1400A model TEOMs show an average positive bias of 34.3 microg. The derived bias values allow correction of previously collected biased data. Also, pre-heating the filters for 24 h at 46 degrees C shows significant bias reduction, with PDM pre-heated filters subsequently averaging -3.3 microg and 1400A TEOM filters averaging 5.9 microg. On a single-point comparison to gravimetric sampling, a 25.5 microg bias is only significant at low mass loadings. At 2.5 mg, this bias represents a negligible 1% of the mass measurement. If ordinary linear regression is used, the bias is still insignificant. However, if the more valid weighted linear regression is used, it gives more weight to the smaller dependent variable values, which are more impacted by the bias. Consequently, what is 1% bias on a single high-mass value can translate into a larger bias percentage at high-mass values when performing a weighted regression on data that include a large number of low-mass values.

  7. Adaptive Telemetry Multiplexer

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sinderson, R. L.; Salazar, G. A.; Haddick, C. M., Jr.; Spahn, C. J.; Venkatesh, C. N.

    1989-01-01

    Telemetry-data-acquisition unit adjusted remotely to produce changes in sampling rate, sampling channels, measurement scale, and output-bias level. Functional configuration adapted to changing conditions or new requirements by distant operator over telemetry link. Reconfiguration done in real time, without removing equipment from service. Bus-interface unit accepts reprogramming commands and translates them for low-rate adaptive multiplexer. Reprogrammable equipment reduces need for spare parts, since not necessary to stock variety of hardware with fixed characteristics. Adaptive multiplexer performs well in tests, amplitude errors less than 0.5 percent, distortion less than 0.25 percent, and crosstalk and common-mode rejection indiscernible.

  8. Operationalizing Coin

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    nation- al objectives designed to influence the opinions, emotions, attitudes, or behavior of any group in order to benefit the sponsor, either... influence their emotions, motives, objective reasoning, and ultimately the behavior of foreign governments, organiza- tions, groups, and individuals. The...to Professional Military Education institutions—the staff colleges and war colleges. It advances SOF strategic influence by its interaction in

  9. Analysis of antique bronze coins by Laser Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy and multivariate analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bachler, M. Orlić; Bišćan, M.; Kregar, Z.; Jelovica Badovinac, I.; Dobrinić, J.; Milošević, S.

    2016-09-01

    This work presents a feasibility study of applying the Principal Component Analysis (PCA) to data obtained by Laser-Induced Breakdown Spectroscopy (LIBS) with the aim of determining correlation between different samples. The samples were antique bronze coins coated in silver (follis) dated in the Roman Empire period and were made during different rulers in different mints. While raw LIBS data revealed that in the period from the year 286 to 383 CE content of silver was constantly decreasing, the PCA showed that the samples can be somewhat grouped together based on their place of origin, which could be a useful hint when analysing unknown samples. It was also found that PCA can help in discriminating spectra corresponding to ablation from the surface and from the bulk. Furthermore, Partial Least Squares method (PLS) was used to obtain, based on a set of samples with known composition, an estimation of relative copper concentration in studied ancient coins. This analysis showed that copper concentration in surface layers ranged from 83% to 90%.

  10. Child abuse and neglect in Japan: coin-operated-locker babies.

    PubMed

    Kouno, A; Johnson, C F

    1995-01-01

    The coin-operated-locker baby is a type of child abuse that may be unique to Japan. The term refers to newborns who are placed, while alive or dead, in coin-operated lockers. This practice has been decreased by specific measures. It is likely that social and economic variables in Japan account for differences in the frequency and types of child abuse cases when compared to American or European societies as social conditions in Japan change the reported incidence of child abuse may increase in the future. Recently, the government of Osaka organized a group specifically designed to deal with the detection and protection of abused and neglected children. In 1993, they published a manual on how to deal with child abuse, but the Japanese judicial administration still uses old laws for abuse cases. The development of new laws is occurring in parts of the country now. This paper introduces the present status of coping with child abuse and neglect in Japan.

  11. Alternate two-dimensional quantum walk with a single-qubit coin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    di Franco, C.; Mc Gettrick, M.; Machida, T.; Busch, Th.

    2011-10-01

    We have recently proposed a two-dimensional quantum walk where the requirement of a higher dimensionality of the coin space is substituted with the alternance of the directions in which the walker can move [C. Di Franco, M. Mc Gettrick, and Th. Busch, Phys. Rev. Lett.PRLTAO0031-900710.1103/PhysRevLett.106.080502 106, 080502 (2011)]. For a particular initial state of the coin, this walk is able to perfectly reproduce the spatial probability distribution of the nonlocalized case of the Grover walk. Here, we present a more detailed proof of this equivalence. We also extend the analysis to other initial states in order to provide a more complete picture of our walk. We show that this scheme outperforms the Grover walk in the generation of x-y spatial entanglement for any initial condition, with the maximum entanglement obtained in the case of the particular aforementioned state. Finally, the equivalence is generalized to wider classes of quantum walks and a limit theorem for the alternate walk in this context is presented.

  12. Characterisation of corrosion layers formed under burial environment of copper-based Greek and Roman coins from Pompeii

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pronti, Lucilla; Felici, Anna Candida; Alesiani, Marcella; Tarquini, Ombretta; Bracciale, Maria Paola; Santarelli, Maria Laura; Pardini, Giacomo; Piacentini, Mario

    2015-10-01

    This paper reports on a study carried out on patinas covering copper-based Greek and Roman coins found in the archaeological excavation of Regio VIII.7.1-15 in Pompeii (Italy). Since in cultural heritage ancient artefacts should not be damaged, non-destructive and micro-destructive techniques have been used to identify typical and uncommon compounds and to characterize the surface morphology. The chlorine content of light green patinas and the presence of typical minerals allowed us to identify the bronze disease. Coins from the same stratigraphic unit have shown different morphologies of corrosion, probably due to different micro-environmental conditions.

  13. Two success-biased social learning strategies.

    PubMed

    Baldini, Ryan

    2013-06-01

    I compare the evolutionary dynamics of two success-biased social learning strategies, which, by definition, use the success of others to inform one's social learning decisions. The first, "Compare Means", causes a learner to adopt cultural variants with highest mean payoff in her sample. The second, "Imitate the Best", causes a learner to imitate the single most successful individual in her sample. I summarize conditions under which each strategy performs well or poorly, and investigate their evolution via a gene-culture coevolutionary model. Despite the adaptive appeal of these strategies, both encounter conditions under which they systematically perform worse than simply imitating at random. Compare Means performs worst when the optimal cultural variant is usually at high frequency, while Imitate the Best performs worst when suboptimal variants sometimes produce high payoffs. The extent to which it is optimal to use success-biased social learning depends strongly on the payoff distributions and environmental conditions that human social learners face.

  14. Biasing GPCR signaling from inside.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Arun K

    2014-01-28

    The discovery of "functional selectivity" or "biased signaling" through G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) has redefined the classical GPCR signaling paradigm. Moreover, the therapeutic potential of biased signaling by and biased ligands for GPCRs is changing the landscape of GPCR drug discovery. The concept of biased signaling has primarily been developed and discussed in the context of ligands that bind to the extracellular regions of GPCRs. However, two recent reports demonstrate that it is also possible to bias GPCR signaling from inside the cell by targeting intracellular regions of these receptors. These findings present a novel handle for delineating the functional outcomes of biased signaling by GPCRs. Moreover, these approaches also uncover a previously unexplored framework for biasing GPCR signaling for drug discovery.

  15. Promoting Institutional Change Through Bias Literacy.

    PubMed

    Carnes, Molly; Devine, Patricia G; Isaac, Carol; Manwell, Linda Baier; Ford, Cecelia E; Byars-Winston, Angela; Fine, Eve; Sheridan, Jennifer Thurik

    2012-06-01

    The National Science Foundation and others conclude that institutional transformation is required to ensure equal opportunities for the participation and advancement of men and women in academic science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM). Such transformation requires changing the habitual attitudes and behaviors of faculty. Approaching implicit bias as a remediable habit, we present the theoretical basis and conceptual model underpinning an educational intervention to promote bias literacy among university faculty as a step toward institutional transformation regarding gender equity. We describe the development and implementation of a Bias Literacy Workshop in detail so others can replicate or adapt it to their setting. Of the 220 (167 faculty and 53 nonfaculty) attendees from the initial 17 departments/divisions offered this workshop, all 180 who completed a written evaluation found the workshop at least "somewhat useful" and 74% found it "very useful." Over 68% indicated increased knowledge of the workshop material. Of the 186 participants who wrote a commitment to engage in new activities to promote gender equity, 87% incorporated specific workshop content. Twenty-four participants were interviewed 4-6 months after attending the workshop; 75% of these not only demonstrated increased bias awareness, but described plans to change-or had actually changed-behaviors because of the workshop. Based on our sample of faculty from a Midwestern university, we conclude that at least one third of STEMM faculty who are invited will attend a 2.5-hr Bias Literacy Workshop, that nearly all will find it useful, and that most will complete a written commitment to promoting gender equity. These findings suggest that this educational intervention may effectively promote institutional change regarding gender equity.

  16. Promoting Institutional Change Through Bias Literacy

    PubMed Central

    Carnes, Molly; Devine, Patricia G.; Isaac, Carol; Manwell, Linda Baier; Ford, Cecelia E.; Byars-Winston, Angela; Fine, Eve; Sheridan, Jennifer Thurik

    2012-01-01

    The National Science Foundation and others conclude that institutional transformation is required to ensure equal opportunities for the participation and advancement of men and women in academic science, technology, engineering, mathematics, and medicine (STEMM). Such transformation requires changing the habitual attitudes and behaviors of faculty. Approaching implicit bias as a remediable habit, we present the theoretical basis and conceptual model underpinning an educational intervention to promote bias literacy among university faculty as a step toward institutional transformation regarding gender equity. We describe the development and implementation of a Bias Literacy Workshop in detail so others can replicate or adapt it to their setting. Of the 220 (167 faculty and 53 nonfaculty) attendees from the initial 17 departments/divisions offered this workshop, all 180 who completed a written evaluation found the workshop at least “somewhat useful” and 74% found it “very useful.” Over 68% indicated increased knowledge of the workshop material. Of the 186 participants who wrote a commitment to engage in new activities to promote gender equity, 87% incorporated specific workshop content. Twenty-four participants were interviewed 4–6 months after attending the workshop; 75% of these not only demonstrated increased bias awareness, but described plans to change—or had actually changed—behaviors because of the workshop. Based on our sample of faculty from a Midwestern university, we conclude that at least one third of STEMM faculty who are invited will attend a 2.5-hr Bias Literacy Workshop, that nearly all will find it useful, and that most will complete a written commitment to promoting gender equity. These findings suggest that this educational intervention may effectively promote institutional change regarding gender equity. PMID:22822416

  17. Adaptation and perceptual norms

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Michael A.; Yasuda, Maiko; Haber, Sara; Leonard, Deanne; Ballardini, Nicole

    2007-02-01

    We used adaptation to examine the relationship between perceptual norms--the stimuli observers describe as psychologically neutral, and response norms--the stimulus levels that leave visual sensitivity in a neutral or balanced state. Adapting to stimuli on opposite sides of a neutral point (e.g. redder or greener than white) biases appearance in opposite ways. Thus the adapting stimulus can be titrated to find the unique adapting level that does not bias appearance. We compared these response norms to subjectively defined neutral points both within the same observer (at different retinal eccentricities) and between observers. These comparisons were made for visual judgments of color, image focus, and human faces, stimuli that are very different and may depend on very different levels of processing, yet which share the property that for each there is a well defined and perceptually salient norm. In each case the adaptation aftereffects were consistent with an underlying sensitivity basis for the perceptual norm. Specifically, response norms were similar to and thus covaried with the perceptual norm, and under common adaptation differences between subjectively defined norms were reduced. These results are consistent with models of norm-based codes and suggest that these codes underlie an important link between visual coding and visual experience.

  18. Accommodating Sensor Bias in MRAC for State Tracking

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Patre, Parag; Joshi, Suresh M.

    2011-01-01

    The problem of accommodating unknown sensor bias is considered in a direct model reference adaptive control (MRAC) setting for state tracking using state feedback. Sensor faults can occur during operation, and if the biased state measurements are directly used with a standard MRAC control law, neither closed-loop signal boundedness, nor asymptotic tracking can be guaranteed and the resulting tracking errors may be unbounded or unacceptably large. A modified MRAC law is proposed, which combines a bias estimator with control gain adaptation, and it is shown that signal boundedness can be accomplished, although the tracking error may not go to zero. Further, for the case wherein an asymptotically stable sensor bias estimator is available, an MRAC control law is proposed to accomplish asymptotic tracking and signal boundedness. Such a sensor bias estimator can be designed if additional sensor measurements are available, as illustrated for the case wherein bias is present in the rate gyro and airspeed measurements. Numerical example results are presented to illustrate each of the schemes.

  19. X-ray Fluorescence analytical criteria to assess the fineness of ancient silver coins: Application on Ptolemaic coinage

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kantarelou, Vasiliki; Ager, Francisco José; Eugenidou, Despoina; Chaves, Francisca; Andreou, Alexandros; Kontou, Elena; Katsikosta, Niki; Respaldiza, Miguel Angel; Serafin, Patrizia; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Zarkadas, Charalambos; Polikreti, Kyriaki; Karydas, Andreas Germanos

    2011-09-01

    The application of X-ray Fluorescence (XRF) analysis in a non-invasive manner on ancient silver coins may not provide reliable bulk compositional data due to possible presence of a surface, silver enriched layer. The present work proposes a set of three complementary analytical methodologies to assess and improve the reliability of XRF data in such cases: a) comparison of XRF data on original and cleaned micro-spots on coin surface, b) Ag K/L ratio test and c) comparison of experimental and theoretically simulated intensities of the Rayleigh characteristic radiation emitted from the anode. The proposed methodology was applied on 82 silver coins from the collection of Ioannes Demetriou, donated to the Numismatic Museum of Athens in the 1890s. The coins originate from different mints and are attributed to the first five Ptolemaic kings' reign (321-180 B.C.). They were analyzed in-situ by using a milli-probe XRF spectrometer. The presence of an Ag-enriched layer was excluded for the majority of them. The silver fineness was found to be high, with very low concentrations of copper and lead. The composition data provide important information about possible sources of silver during the Ptolemaic period and indications of a gradual coinage debasement after 270 B.C. due to economic or technical reasons.

  20. 77 FR 6865 - Pricing for 2012 Infantry Soldier Silver Dollar and 2012 Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-02-09

    ... United States Mint Pricing for 2012 Infantry Soldier Silver Dollar and 2012 Star- Spangled Banner... Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coin products: Introductory Product price Regular price Infantry... Infantry Soldier Silver Dollar Special N/A 51.95 Set Star-Spangled Banner Proof Silver Dollar 49.95...

  1. 77 FR 4084 - Prices for 2012 Infantry Soldier Silver Dollar and 2012 Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coin...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... United States Mint Prices for 2012 Infantry Soldier Silver Dollar and 2012 Star- Spangled Banner... Star-Spangled Banner Commemorative Coin Program products. Prices for the silver products are in the... Dollar N/A $61.95. Defenders of Freedom Set. 2012 Star-Spangled Banner Proof $5 See Attached Grid...

  2. 31 CFR 100.16 - Exchange of paper and coin to be handled through Federal Reserve banks and branches.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-07-01

    ... handled through Federal Reserve banks and branches. 100.16 Section 100.16 Money and Finance: Treasury... Exchange of paper and coin to be handled through Federal Reserve banks and branches. Other than as provided... through the Federal Reserve banks and branches....

  3. Bias modification training can alter approach bias and chocolate consumption.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Sophie E; Kemps, Eva; Tiggemann, Marika

    2016-01-01

    Recent evidence has demonstrated that bias modification training has potential to reduce cognitive biases for attractive targets and affect health behaviours. The present study investigated whether cognitive bias modification training could be applied to reduce approach bias for chocolate and affect subsequent chocolate consumption. A sample of 120 women (18-27 years) were randomly assigned to an approach-chocolate condition or avoid-chocolate condition, in which they were trained to approach or avoid pictorial chocolate stimuli, respectively. Training had the predicted effect on approach bias, such that participants trained to approach chocolate demonstrated an increased approach bias to chocolate stimuli whereas participants trained to avoid such stimuli showed a reduced bias. Further, participants trained to avoid chocolate ate significantly less of a chocolate muffin in a subsequent taste test than participants trained to approach chocolate. Theoretically, results provide support for the dual process model's conceptualisation of consumption as being driven by implicit processes such as approach bias. In practice, approach bias modification may be a useful component of interventions designed to curb the consumption of unhealthy foods.

  4. Outcome predictability biases learning.

    PubMed

    Griffiths, Oren; Mitchell, Chris J; Bethmont, Anna; Lovibond, Peter F

    2015-01-01

    Much of contemporary associative learning research is focused on understanding how and when the associative history of cues affects later learning about those cues. Very little work has investigated the effects of the associative history of outcomes on human learning. Three experiments extended the "learned irrelevance" paradigm from the animal conditioning literature to examine the influence of an outcome's prior predictability on subsequent learning of relationships between cues and that outcome. All 3 experiments found evidence for the idea that learning is biased by the prior predictability of the outcome. Previously predictable outcomes were readily associated with novel predictive cues, whereas previously unpredictable outcomes were more readily associated with novel nonpredictive cues. This finding highlights the importance of considering the associative history of outcomes, as well as cues, when interpreting multistage designs. Associative and cognitive explanations of this certainty matching effect are discussed.

  5. 'Magic coins' and 'magic squares': the discovery of astrological sigils in the Oldenburg Letters.

    PubMed

    Roos, Anna Marie

    2008-09-20

    Enclosed in a 1673 letter to Henry Oldenburg were two drawings of a series of astrological sigils, coins and amulets from the collection of Strasbourg mathematician Julius Reichelt (1637-1719). As portrayals of particular medieval and early modern sigils are relatively rare, this paper will analyse the role of these medals in medieval and early modern medicine, the logic behind their perceived efficacy, and their significance in early modern astrological and cabalistic practice. I shall also demonstrate their change in status in the late seventeenth century from potent magical healing amulets tied to the mysteries of the heavens to objects kept in a cabinet for curiosos. The evolving perception of the purpose of sigils mirrored changing early modem beliefs in the occult influences of the heavens upon the body and the natural world, as well as the growing interests among virtuosi in collecting, numismatics and antiquities.

  6. Two sides of the same coin: stem cells in cancer and regenerative medicine.

    PubMed

    Ilmer, Matthias; Vykoukal, Jody; Recio Boiles, Alejandro; Coleman, Michael; Alt, Eckhard

    2014-07-01

    Multipotent stromal cells (MSCs) derived from bone marrow, adipose tissue, cord blood, and other origins have recently received much attention as potential therapeutic agents with beneficial immunomodulatory and regenerative properties. In their native tissue environment, however, such cells also appear to have essential functions in building and supporting tumor microenvironments, providing metastatic niches, and maintaining cancer hallmarks. Here, we consider the varied roles of these tissue-resident stroma-associated cells, synthesize recent and emerging discoveries, and discuss the role, potential, and clinical applications of MSCs in cancer and regenerative medicine.-Ilmer, M., Vykoukal, J., Recio Boiles, A., Coleman, M., Alt, E. Two sides of the same coin: stem cells in cancer and regenerative medicine.

  7. The intentionality bias and schizotypy.

    PubMed

    Moore, J W; Pope, A

    2014-01-01

    The "intentionality bias" refers to our automatic tendency to judge other people's actions to be intentional. In this experiment we extended research on this effect in two key ways. First, we developed a novel nonlinguistic task for assessing the intentionality bias. This task used video stimuli of ambiguous movements. Second, we investigated the relationship between the strength of this bias and schizotypy (schizophrenia-like symptoms in healthy individuals). Our results showed that the intentionality bias was replicated for the video stimuli and also that this bias is stronger in those individuals scoring higher on the schizotypy rating scales. Overall these findings lend further support for the existence of the intentionality bias. We also discuss the possible relevance of these findings for our understanding of certain symptoms of schizophrenic illness.

  8. Size Bias in Galaxy Surveys

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Schmidt, Fabian; Rozo, Eduardo; Dodelson, Scott; Hui, Lam; Sheldon, Erin

    2009-07-01

    Only certain galaxies are included in surveys: those bright and large enough to be detectable as extended sources. Because gravitational lensing can make galaxies appear both brighter and larger, the presence of foreground inhomogeneities can scatter galaxies across not only magnitude cuts but also size cuts, changing the statistical properties of the resulting catalog. Here we explore this size bias and how it combines with magnification bias to affect galaxy statistics. We demonstrate that photometric galaxy samples from current and upcoming surveys can be even more affected by size bias than by magnification bias.

  9. Fandom Biases Retrospective Judgments Not Perception

    PubMed Central

    Huff, Markus; Papenmeier, Frank; Maurer, Annika E.; Meitz, Tino G. K.; Garsoffky, Bärbel; Schwan, Stephan

    2017-01-01

    Attitudes and motivations have been shown to affect the processing of visual input, indicating that observers may see a given situation each literally in a different way. Yet, in real-life, processing information in an unbiased manner is considered to be of high adaptive value. Attitudinal and motivational effects were found for attention, characterization, categorization, and memory. On the other hand, for dynamic real-life events, visual processing has been found to be highly synchronous among viewers. Thus, while in a seminal study fandom as a particularly strong case of attitudes did bias judgments of a sports event, it left the question open whether attitudes do bias prior processing stages. Here, we investigated influences of fandom during the live TV broadcasting of the 2013 UEFA-Champions-League Final regarding attention, event segmentation, immediate and delayed cued recall, as well as affect, memory confidence, and retrospective judgments. Even though we replicated biased retrospective judgments, we found that eye-movements, event segmentation, and cued recall were largely similar across both groups of fans. Our findings demonstrate that, while highly involving sports events are interpreted in a fan dependent way, at initial stages they are processed in an unbiased manner. PMID:28233877

  10. Fandom Biases Retrospective Judgments Not Perception.

    PubMed

    Huff, Markus; Papenmeier, Frank; Maurer, Annika E; Meitz, Tino G K; Garsoffky, Bärbel; Schwan, Stephan

    2017-02-24

    Attitudes and motivations have been shown to affect the processing of visual input, indicating that observers may see a given situation each literally in a different way. Yet, in real-life, processing information in an unbiased manner is considered to be of high adaptive value. Attitudinal and motivational effects were found for attention, characterization, categorization, and memory. On the other hand, for dynamic real-life events, visual processing has been found to be highly synchronous among viewers. Thus, while in a seminal study fandom as a particularly strong case of attitudes did bias judgments of a sports event, it left the question open whether attitudes do bias prior processing stages. Here, we investigated influences of fandom during the live TV broadcasting of the 2013 UEFA-Champions-League Final regarding attention, event segmentation, immediate and delayed cued recall, as well as affect, memory confidence, and retrospective judgments. Even though we replicated biased retrospective judgments, we found that eye-movements, event segmentation, and cued recall were largely similar across both groups of fans. Our findings demonstrate that, while highly involving sports events are interpreted in a fan dependent way, at initial stages they are processed in an unbiased manner.

  11. Summary of relationships between exchangeability, biasing paths and bias.

    PubMed

    Flanders, William Dana; Eldridge, Ronald Curtis

    2015-10-01

    Definitions and conceptualizations of confounding and selection bias have evolved over the past several decades. An important advance occurred with development of the concept of exchangeability. For example, if exchangeability holds, risks of disease in an unexposed group can be compared with risks in an exposed group to estimate causal effects. Another advance occurred with the use of causal graphs to summarize causal relationships and facilitate identification of causal patterns that likely indicate bias, including confounding and selection bias. While closely related, exchangeability is defined in the counterfactual-model framework and confounding paths in the causal-graph framework. Moreover, the precise relationships between these concepts have not been fully described. Here, we summarize definitions and current views of these concepts. We show how bias, exchangeability and biasing paths interrelate and provide justification for key results. For example, we show that absence of a biasing path implies exchangeability but that the reverse implication need not hold without an additional assumption, such as faithfulness. The close links shown are expected. However confounding, selection bias and exchangeability are basic concepts, so comprehensive summarization and definitive demonstration of links between them is important. Thus, this work facilitates and adds to our understanding of these important biases.

  12. Sequential biases in accumulating evidence

    PubMed Central

    Huggins, Richard; Dogo, Samson Henry

    2015-01-01

    Whilst it is common in clinical trials to use the results of tests at one phase to decide whether to continue to the next phase and to subsequently design the next phase, we show that this can lead to biased results in evidence synthesis. Two new kinds of bias associated with accumulating evidence, termed ‘sequential decision bias’ and ‘sequential design bias’, are identified. Both kinds of bias are the result of making decisions on the usefulness of a new study, or its design, based on the previous studies. Sequential decision bias is determined by the correlation between the value of the current estimated effect and the probability of conducting an additional study. Sequential design bias arises from using the estimated value instead of the clinically relevant value of an effect in sample size calculations. We considered both the fixed‐effect and the random‐effects models of meta‐analysis and demonstrated analytically and by simulations that in both settings the problems due to sequential biases are apparent. According to our simulations, the sequential biases increase with increased heterogeneity. Minimisation of sequential biases arises as a new and important research area necessary for successful evidence‐based approaches to the development of science. © 2015 The Authors. Research Synthesis Methods Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd. PMID:26626562

  13. Classifying sex biased congenital anomalies

    SciTech Connect

    Lubinsky, M.S.

    1997-03-31

    The reasons for sex biases in congenital anomalies that arise before structural or hormonal dimorphisms are established has long been unclear. A review of such disorders shows that patterning and tissue anomalies are female biased, and structural findings are more common in males. This suggests different gender dependent susceptibilities to developmental disturbances, with female vulnerabilities focused on early blastogenesis/determination, while males are more likely to involve later organogenesis/morphogenesis. A dual origin for some anomalies explains paradoxical reductions of sex biases with greater severity (i.e., multiple rather than single malformations), presumably as more severe events increase the involvement of an otherwise minor process with opposite biases to those of the primary mechanism. The cause for these sex differences is unknown, but early dimorphisms, such as differences in growth or presence of H-Y antigen, may be responsible. This model provides a useful rationale for understanding and classifying sex-biased congenital anomalies. 42 refs., 7 tabs.

  14. Correcting for Visuo-Haptic Biases in 3D Haptic Guidance.

    PubMed

    van Beek, Femke E; Kuling, Irene A; Brenner, Eli; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M; Kappers, Astrid M L

    2016-01-01

    Visuo-haptic biases are observed when bringing your unseen hand to a visual target. The biases are different between, but consistent within participants. We investigated the usefulness of adjusting haptic guidance to these user-specific biases in aligning haptic and visual perception. By adjusting haptic guidance according to the biases, we aimed to reduce the conflict between the modalities. We first measured the biases using an adaptive procedure. Next, we measured performance in a pointing task using three conditions: 1) visual images that were adjusted to user-specific biases, without haptic guidance, 2) veridical visual images combined with haptic guidance, and 3) shifted visual images combined with haptic guidance. Adding haptic guidance increased precision. Combining haptic guidance with user-specific visual information yielded the highest accuracy and the lowest level of conflict with the guidance at the end point. These results show the potential of correcting for user-specific perceptual biases when designing haptic guidance.

  15. Correcting for Visuo-Haptic Biases in 3D Haptic Guidance

    PubMed Central

    Kuling, Irene A.; Brenner, Eli; Bergmann Tiest, Wouter M.; Kappers, Astrid M. L.

    2016-01-01

    Visuo-haptic biases are observed when bringing your unseen hand to a visual target. The biases are different between, but consistent within participants. We investigated the usefulness of adjusting haptic guidance to these user-specific biases in aligning haptic and visual perception. By adjusting haptic guidance according to the biases, we aimed to reduce the conflict between the modalities. We first measured the biases using an adaptive procedure. Next, we measured performance in a pointing task using three conditions: 1) visual images that were adjusted to user-specific biases, without haptic guidance, 2) veridical visual images combined with haptic guidance, and 3) shifted visual images combined with haptic guidance. Adding haptic guidance increased precision. Combining haptic guidance with user-specific visual information yielded the highest accuracy and the lowest level of conflict with the guidance at the end point. These results show the potential of correcting for user-specific perceptual biases when designing haptic guidance. PMID:27438009

  16. Toward a clearer portrayal of confounding bias in instrumental variable applications.

    PubMed

    Jackson, John W; Swanson, Sonja A

    2015-07-01

    Recommendations for reporting instrumental variable analyses often include presenting the balance of covariates across levels of the proposed instrument and levels of the treatment. However, such presentation can be misleading as relatively small imbalances among covariates across levels of the instrument can result in greater bias because of bias amplification. We introduce bias plots and bias component plots as alternative tools for understanding biases in instrumental variable analyses. Using previously published data on proposed preference-based, geography-based, and distance-based instruments, we demonstrate why presenting covariate balance alone can be problematic, and how bias component plots can provide more accurate context for bias from omitting a covariate from an instrumental variable versus non-instrumental variable analysis. These plots can also provide relevant comparisons of different proposed instruments considered in the same data. Adaptable code is provided for creating the plots.

  17. A 2.5 mW/ch, 50 Mcps, 10-Analog Channel, Adaptively Biased Read-Out Front-End IC With Low Intrinsic Timing Resolution for Single-Photon Time-of-Flight PET Applications With Time-Dependent Noise Analysis in 90 nm CMOS.

    PubMed

    Cruz, Hugo; Huang, Hong-Yi; Luo, Ching-Hsing; Lee, Shuenn-Yuh

    2017-04-01

    This paper presents a 10-channel time-of-flight application-specific integrated circuit (ASIC) for positron emission tomography in a 90 nm standard CMOS process. To overcome variations in channel-to-channel timing resolution caused by mismatch and process variations, adaptive biases and a digital-to-analog converter (DAC) are utilized. The main contributions of this work are as follows. First, multistage architectures reduce the total power consumption, and detection bandwidths of analog preamplifiers and comparators are increased to 1 and 1.5 GHz, respectively, relative to those in previous studies. Second, a total intrinsic electronic timing resolution of 9.71 ps root-mean-square (RMS) is achieved (13.88 ps peak and 11.8 ps average of the 10 channels in 5 ASICs). Third, the proposed architecture reduces variations in channel-to-channel timing resolution to 2.6 bits (equivalent to 4.17 ps RMS) by calibrating analog comparator threshold levels. A 181.5 ps full-width-at-half-maximum timing resolution is measured with an avalanche photo diode and a laser setup. The power consumption is 2.5 mW using 0.5 and 1.2 V power supplies. The proposed ASIC is implemented in a 90 nm TSMC CMOS process with a total area of 3.3 mm × 2.7 mm.

  18. Molecular evolution of sex-biased genes in the Drosophila ananassae subgroup

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Background Genes with sex-biased expression often show rapid molecular evolution between species. Previous population genetic and comparative genomic studies of Drosophila melanogaster and D. simulans revealed that male-biased genes have especially high rates of adaptive evolution. To test if this is also the case for other lineages within the melanogaster group, we investigated gene expression in D. ananassae, a species that occurs in structured populations in tropical and subtropical regions. We used custom-made microarrays and published microarray data to characterize the sex-biased expression of 129 D. ananassae genes whose D. melanogaster orthologs had been classified previously as male-biased, female-biased, or unbiased in their expression and had been studied extensively at the population-genetic level. For 43 of these genes we surveyed DNA sequence polymorphism in a natural population of D. ananassae and determined divergence to the sister species D. atripex and D. phaeopleura. Results Sex-biased expression is generally conserved between D. melanogaster and D. ananassae, with the majority of genes exhibiting the same bias in the two species. However, about one-third of the genes have either gained or lost sex-biased expression in one of the species and a small proportion of genes (~4%) have changed bias from one sex to the other. The male-biased genes of D. ananassae show evidence of positive selection acting at the protein level. However, the signal of adaptive protein evolution for male-biased genes is not as strong in D. ananassae as it is in D. melanogaster and is limited to genes with conserved male-biased expression in both species. Within D. ananassae, a significant signal of adaptive evolution is also detected for female-biased and unbiased genes. Conclusions Our findings extend previous observations of widespread adaptive protein evolution to an independent Drosophila lineage, the D. ananassae subgroup. However, the rate of adaptive evolution is

  19. Approach-Induced Biases in Human Information Sampling

    PubMed Central

    Hunt, Laurence T.; Rutledge, Robb B.; Malalasekera, W. M. Nishantha; Kennerley, Steven W.; Dolan, Raymond J.

    2016-01-01

    Information sampling is often biased towards seeking evidence that confirms one’s prior beliefs. Despite such biases being a pervasive feature of human behavior, their underlying causes remain unclear. Many accounts of these biases appeal to limitations of human hypothesis testing and cognition, de facto evoking notions of bounded rationality, but neglect more basic aspects of behavioral control. Here, we investigated a potential role for Pavlovian approach in biasing which information humans will choose to sample. We collected a large novel dataset from 32,445 human subjects, making over 3 million decisions, who played a gambling task designed to measure the latent causes and extent of information-sampling biases. We identified three novel approach-related biases, formalized by comparing subject behavior to a dynamic programming model of optimal information gathering. These biases reflected the amount of information sampled (“positive evidence approach”), the selection of which information to sample (“sampling the favorite”), and the interaction between information sampling and subsequent choices (“rejecting unsampled options”). The prevalence of all three biases was related to a Pavlovian approach-avoid parameter quantified within an entirely independent economic decision task. Our large dataset also revealed that individual differences in the amount of information gathered are a stable trait across multiple gameplays and can be related to demographic measures, including age and educational attainment. As well as revealing limitations in cognitive processing, our findings suggest information sampling biases reflect the expression of primitive, yet potentially ecologically adaptive, behavioral repertoires. One such behavior is sampling from options that will eventually be chosen, even when other sources of information are more pertinent for guiding future action. PMID:27832071

  20. "Heads or Tails?"--A Reachability Bias in Binary Choice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bar-Hillel, Maya; Peer, Eyal; Acquisti, Alessandro

    2014-01-01

    When asked to mentally simulate coin tosses, people generate sequences that differ systematically from those generated by fair coins. It has been rarely noted that this divergence is apparent already in the very 1st mental toss. Analysis of several existing data sets reveals that about 80% of respondents start their sequence with Heads. We…

  1. Observational biases for transiting planets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kipping, David M.; Sandford, Emily

    2016-12-01

    Observational biases distort our view of nature, such that the patterns we see within a surveyed population of interest are often unrepresentative of the truth we seek. Transiting planets currently represent the most informative data set on the ensemble properties of exoplanets within 1 au of their star. However, the transit method is inherently biased due to both geometric and detection-driven effects. In this work, we derive the overall observational biases affecting the most basic transit parameters from first principles. By assuming a trapezoidal transit and using conditional probability, we infer the expected distribution of these terms both as a joint distribution and in a marginalized form. These general analytic results provide a baseline against which to compare trends predicted by mission-tailored injection/recovery simulations and offer a simple way to correct for observational bias. Our results explain why the observed population of transiting planets displays a non-uniform impact parameter distribution, with a bias towards near-equatorial geometries. We also find that the geometric bias towards observed planets transiting near periastron is attenuated by the longer durations which occur near apoastron. Finally, we predict that the observational bias with respect to ratio-of-radii is super-quadratic, scaling as (RP/R⋆)5/2, driven by an enhanced geometric transit probability and modestly longer durations.

  2. Cognitive Bias in Systems Verification

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Larson, Steve

    2012-01-01

    Working definition of cognitive bias: Patterns by which information is sought and interpreted that can lead to systematic errors in decisions. Cognitive bias is used in diverse fields: Economics, Politics, Intelligence, Marketing, to name a few. Attempts to ground cognitive science in physical characteristics of the cognitive apparatus exceed our knowledge. Studies based on correlations; strict cause and effect is difficult to pinpoint. Effects cited in the paper and discussed here have been replicated many times over, and appear sound. Many biases have been described, but it is still unclear whether they are all distinct. There may only be a handful of fundamental biases, which manifest in various ways. Bias can effect system verification in many ways . Overconfidence -> Questionable decisions to deploy. Availability -> Inability to conceive critical tests. Representativeness -> Overinterpretation of results. Positive Test Strategies -> Confirmation bias. Debiasing at individual level very difficult. The potential effect of bias on the verification process can be managed, but not eliminated. Worth considering at key points in the process.

  3. Adaptation to blur

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Webster, Michael A.; Webster, Shernaaz M.; MacDonald, Jennifer; Bahradwadj, Shrikant R.

    2001-06-01

    Blur is an intrinsic property of the retinal image that can vary substantially in natural viewing. We examined how processes of contrast adaptation might adjust the visual system to regulate the perception of blur. Observers viewed a blurred or sharpened image for 2-5 minutes, and then judged the apparent focus of a series of 0.5-sec test images interleaved with 6-sec of readaptation. A 2AFC staircase procedure was used to vary the amplitude spectrum of successive test to find the image that appeared in focus. Adapting to a blurred image causes a physically focused image to appear too sharp. Opposite after-effects occur for sharpened adapting images. Pronounced biases were observed over a wide range of magnitudes of adapting blur, and were similar for different types of blur. After-effects were also similar for different classes of images but were generally weaker when the adapting and test stimuli were different images, showing that the adaptation is not adjusting simply to blur per se. These adaptive adjustments may strongly influence the perception of blur in normal vision and how it changes with refractive errors.

  4. BitCoin meets Google Trends and Wikipedia: quantifying the relationship between phenomena of the Internet era.

    PubMed

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2013-12-04

    Digital currencies have emerged as a new fascinating phenomenon in the financial markets. Recent events on the most popular of the digital currencies--BitCoin--have risen crucial questions about behavior of its exchange rates and they offer a field to study dynamics of the market which consists practically only of speculative traders with no fundamentalists as there is no fundamental value to the currency. In the paper, we connect two phenomena of the latest years--digital currencies, namely BitCoin, and search queries on Google Trends and Wikipedia--and study their relationship. We show that not only are the search queries and the prices connected but there also exists a pronounced asymmetry between the effect of an increased interest in the currency while being above or below its trend value.

  5. First attempt to obtain the bulk composition of ancient silver-copper coins by using XRF and GRT

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Suárez, A. I.; Ager, F. J.; Scrivano, S.; Ortega-Feliu, I.; Gómez-Tubío, B.; Respaldiza, M. A.

    2015-09-01

    Archeological silver-copper pieces often show surface enrichments in silver, either intentional or fortuitous. When this happens, non-destructive techniques like PIXE (Proton Induced X-ray Emission) and XRF (X-Ray Fluorescence) are not sufficient to access the whole bulk pieces because their penetration depths are typically of a few tens microns. If the archeological pieces cannot be cut or polished, it is necessary to apply other non-destructive techniques to access the bulk pieces. That way, archeological bronze pieces have been successfully studied combining XRF (or PIXE) with GRT (Gamma-Ray Transmission). In this work, the bulk composition of five silver Roman coins have been indirectly measured by combining XRF and GRT. These results were compared with previous works made by our group using the same coins by direct means of PIXE and XRF, so the accuracy of this indirect method could be tested.

  6. BitCoin meets Google Trends and Wikipedia: Quantifying the relationship between phenomena of the Internet era

    PubMed Central

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2013-01-01

    Digital currencies have emerged as a new fascinating phenomenon in the financial markets. Recent events on the most popular of the digital currencies – BitCoin – have risen crucial questions about behavior of its exchange rates and they offer a field to study dynamics of the market which consists practically only of speculative traders with no fundamentalists as there is no fundamental value to the currency. In the paper, we connect two phenomena of the latest years – digital currencies, namely BitCoin, and search queries on Google Trends and Wikipedia – and study their relationship. We show that not only are the search queries and the prices connected but there also exists a pronounced asymmetry between the effect of an increased interest in the currency while being above or below its trend value. PMID:24301322

  7. BitCoin meets Google Trends and Wikipedia: Quantifying the relationship between phenomena of the Internet era

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristoufek, Ladislav

    2013-12-01

    Digital currencies have emerged as a new fascinating phenomenon in the financial markets. Recent events on the most popular of the digital currencies - BitCoin - have risen crucial questions about behavior of its exchange rates and they offer a field to study dynamics of the market which consists practically only of speculative traders with no fundamentalists as there is no fundamental value to the currency. In the paper, we connect two phenomena of the latest years - digital currencies, namely BitCoin, and search queries on Google Trends and Wikipedia - and study their relationship. We show that not only are the search queries and the prices connected but there also exists a pronounced asymmetry between the effect of an increased interest in the currency while being above or below its trend value.

  8. Automated Confocal Microscope Bias Correction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dorval, Thierry; Genovesio, Auguste

    2006-10-01

    Illumination artifacts systematically occur in 2D cross-section confocal microscopy imaging . These bias can strongly corrupt an higher level image processing such as a segmentation, a fluorescence evaluation or even a pattern extraction/recognition. This paper presents a new fully automated bias correction methodology based on large image database preprocessing. This method is very appropriate to the High Content Screening (HCS), method dedicated to drugs discovery. Our method assumes that the amount of pictures available is large enough to allow a reliable statistical computation of an average bias image. A relevant segmentation evaluation protocol and experimental results validate our correction algorithm by outperforming object extraction on non corrupted images.

  9. The corrosion phenomena in the coin cell BR2325 of the ``superstoichiometric fluorocarbon-lithium'' system

    SciTech Connect

    Mitkin, V.N.; Galkin, P.S.; Denisova, T.N.

    1998-07-01

    It was noted at the earlier study and at the longer observations of the novel various types of superstoichiometric fluorocarbon materials CF{sub 1+x}, where x = 0.1--0.33 (FCM) and their behavior, that despite of their known hygroscopity during a storage of samples in laboratory and technological utensils nevertheless occurs an appreciable sorption of atmospheric moisture. The color of samples does not change but sometimes there appears a smell of hydrogen fluoride and even corrosion of glasswares at a long storage. On the basis of these facts was assumed that at a long storage the slow reactions of HF producing with a sorption moisture can proceed. This phenomena is necessary to take into account for successful manufacturing of long life lithium cells based on superstoichiometric fluorocarbon composite cathodes (FCC). The chemistry of such slow hydrolytic process and especially of processes which can proceed at manufacturing of FCC earlier was not investigated also of any data in the literature in this occasion is not present. Just for this reason the authors undertook a study of the corrosion phenomena which can proceed in industrial sources of a current at a long storage under influence of slow hydrolysis of C-F bonds by moisture. The goal of the study was to search long term damages in the slightly wet FCM and based on these materials cathodic composites for fluorocarbon-lithium cells. As a model for corrosion process investigation they have chosen a standard coin lithium battery of a type BR2325.

  10. Two sides of the coin. Part 1. Lipid and surfactant self-assembly revisited.

    PubMed

    Ninham, Barry W; Larsson, Kåre; Lo Nostro, Pierandrea

    2017-04-01

    Hofmeister, specific ion effects, hydration and van der Waals forces at and between interfaces are factors that determine curvature and microstructure in self assembled aggregates of surfactants and lipids; and in microemulsions. Lipid and surfactant head group interactions and between aggregates vary enormously and are highly specific. They act on the hydrophilic side of a bilayer, micelle or other self assembled aggregate. It is only over the last three decades that the origin of Hofmeister effects has become generally understood. Knowledge of their systematics now provides much flexibility in designing nanostructured fluids. The other side of the coin involves equally specific forces. These (opposing) forces work on the hydrophobic side of amphiphilic interfaces. They are due to the interaction of hydrocarbons and other "oils" with hydrophobic tails of surfactants and lipids. The specificity of oleophilic solutes in microemulsions and lipid membranes provides a counterpoint to Hofmeister effects and hydration. Together with global packing constraints these effects determine microstructure. Another factor that has hardly been recognised is the role of dissolved gas. This introduces further, qualitative changes in forces that prescribe microstructure. The systematics of these effects and their interplay are elucidated. Awareness of these competing factors facilitates formulation of self assembled nanostructured fluids. New and predictable geometries that emerge naturally provide insights into a variety of biological phenomena like anaesthetic and pheromone action and transmission of the nervous impulse (see Part 2).

  11. Attacks exploiting deviation of mean photon number in quantum key distribution and coin tossing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sajeed, Shihan; Radchenko, Igor; Kaiser, Sarah; Bourgoin, Jean-Philippe; Pappa, Anna; Monat, Laurent; Legré, Matthieu; Makarov, Vadim

    2015-03-01

    The security of quantum communication using a weak coherent source requires an accurate knowledge of the source's mean photon number. Finite calibration precision or an active manipulation by an attacker may cause the actual emitted photon number to deviate from the known value. We model effects of this deviation on the security of three quantum communication protocols: the Bennett-Brassard 1984 (BB84) quantum key distribution (QKD) protocol without decoy states, Scarani-Acín-Ribordy-Gisin 2004 (SARG04) QKD protocol, and a coin-tossing protocol. For QKD we model both a strong attack using technology possible in principle and a realistic attack bounded by today's technology. To maintain the mean photon number in two-way systems, such as plug-and-play and relativistic quantum cryptography schemes, bright pulse energy incoming from the communication channel must be monitored. Implementation of a monitoring detector has largely been ignored so far, except for ID Quantique's commercial QKD system Clavis2. We scrutinize this implementation for security problems and show that designing a hack-proof pulse-energy-measuring detector is far from trivial. Indeed, the first implementation has three serious flaws confirmed experimentally, each of which may be exploited in a cleverly constructed Trojan-horse attack. We discuss requirements for a loophole-free implementation of the monitoring detector.

  12. Model-Biased, Data-Driven Adaptive Failure Prediction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Leen, Todd K.

    2004-01-01

    This final report, which contains a research summary and a viewgraph presentation, addresses clustering and data simulation techniques for failure prediction. The researchers applied their techniques to both helicopter gearbox anomaly detection and segmentation of Earth Observing System (EOS) satellite imagery.

  13. Codon Adaptation of Plastid Genes

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Haruo; Morton, Brian R.

    2016-01-01

    Codon adaptation is codon usage bias that results from selective pressure to increase the translation efficiency of a gene. Codon adaptation has been studied across a wide range of genomes and some early analyses of plastids have shown evidence for codon adaptation in a limited set of highly expressed plastid genes. Here we study codon usage bias across all fully sequenced plastid genomes which includes representatives of the Rhodophyta, Alveolata, Cryptophyta, Euglenozoa, Glaucocystophyceae, Rhizaria, Stramenopiles and numerous lineages within the Viridiplantae, including Chlorophyta and Embryophyta. We show evidence that codon adaptation occurs in all genomes except for two, Theileria parva and Heicosporidium sp., both of which have highly reduced gene contents and no photosynthesis genes. We also show evidence that selection for codon adaptation increases the representation of the same set of codons, which we refer to as the adaptive codons, across this wide range of taxa, which is probably due to common features descended from the initial endosymbiont. We use various measures to estimate the relative strength of selection in the different lineages and show that it appears to be fairly strong in certain Stramenopiles and Chlorophyta lineages but relatively weak in many members of the Rhodophyta, Euglenozoa and Embryophyta. Given these results we propose that codon adaptation in plastids is widespread and displays the same general features as adaptation in eubacterial genomes. PMID:27196606

  14. Variation in global codon usage bias among prokaryotic organisms is associated with their lifestyles

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background It is widely acknowledged that synonymous codons are used unevenly among genes in a genome. In organisms under translational selection, genes encoding highly expressed proteins are enriched with specific codons. This phenomenon, termed codon usage bias, is common to many organisms and has been recognized as influencing cellular fitness. This suggests that the global extent of codon usage bias of an organism might be associated with its phenotypic traits. Results To test this hypothesis we used a simple measure for assessing the extent of codon bias of an organism, and applied it to hundreds of sequenced prokaryotes. Our analysis revealed a large variability in this measure: there are organisms showing very high degrees of codon usage bias and organisms exhibiting almost no differential use of synonymous codons among different genes. Remarkably, we found that the extent of codon usage bias corresponds to the lifestyle of the organism. Especially, organisms able to live in a wide range of habitats exhibit high extents of codon usage bias, consistent with their need to adapt efficiently to different environments. Pathogenic prokaryotes also demonstrate higher extents of codon usage bias than non-pathogenic prokaryotes, in accord with the multiple environments that many pathogens occupy. Our results show that the previously observed correlation between growth rate and metabolic variability is attributed to their individual associations with codon usage bias. Conclusions Our results suggest that the extent of codon usage bias of an organism plays a role in the adaptation of prokaryotes to their environments. PMID:22032172

  15. Negativity Bias in Dangerous Drivers

    PubMed Central

    Chai, Jing; Qu, Weina; Sun, Xianghong; Zhang, Kan; Ge, Yan

    2016-01-01

    The behavioral and cognitive characteristics of dangerous drivers differ significantly from those of safe drivers. However, differences in emotional information processing have seldom been investigated. Previous studies have revealed that drivers with higher anger/anxiety trait scores are more likely to be involved in crashes and that individuals with higher anger traits exhibit stronger negativity biases when processing emotions compared with control groups. However, researchers have not explored the relationship between emotional information processing and driving behavior. In this study, we examined the emotional information processing differences between dangerous drivers and safe drivers. Thirty-eight non-professional drivers were divided into two groups according to the penalty points that they had accrued for traffic violations: 15 drivers with 6 or more points were included in the dangerous driver group, and 23 drivers with 3 or fewer points were included in the safe driver group. The emotional Stroop task was used to measure negativity biases, and both behavioral and electroencephalograph data were recorded. The behavioral results revealed stronger negativity biases in the dangerous drivers than in the safe drivers. The bias score was correlated with self-reported dangerous driving behavior. Drivers with strong negativity biases reported having been involved in mores crashes compared with the less-biased drivers. The event-related potentials (ERPs) revealed that the dangerous drivers exhibited reduced P3 components when responding to negative stimuli, suggesting decreased inhibitory control of information that is task-irrelevant but emotionally salient. The influence of negativity bias provides one possible explanation of the effects of individual differences on dangerous driving behavior and traffic crashes. PMID:26765225

  16. Socially biased learning in monkeys.

    PubMed

    Fragaszy, D; Visalberghi, E

    2004-02-01

    We review socially biased learning about food and problem solving in monkeys, relying especially on studies with tufted capuchin monkeys (Cebus apella) and callitrichid monkeys. Capuchin monkeys most effectively learn to solve a new problem when they can act jointly with an experienced partner in a socially tolerant setting and when the problem can be solved by direct action on an object or substrate, but they do not learn by imitation. Capuchin monkeys are motivated to eat foods, whether familiar or novel, when they are with others that are eating, regardless of what the others are eating. Thus, social bias in learning about foods is indirect and mediated by facilitation of feeding. In most respects, social biases in learning are similar in capuchins and callitrichids, except that callitrichids provide more specific behavioral cues to others about the availability and palatability of foods. Callitrichids generally are more tolerant toward group members and coordinate their activity in space and time more closely than capuchins do. These characteristics support stronger social biases in learning in callitrichids than in capuchins in some situations. On the other hand, callitrichids' more limited range of manipulative behaviors, greater neophobia, and greater sensitivity to the risk of predation restricts what these monkeys learn in comparison with capuchins. We suggest that socially biased learning is always the collective outcome of interacting physical, social, and individual factors, and that differences across populations and species in social bias in learning reflect variations in all these dimensions. Progress in understanding socially biased learning in nonhuman species will be aided by the development of appropriately detailed models of the richly interconnected processes affecting learning.

  17. MRI tissue segmentation incorporating a bias field modulated smoothness prior

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Enmin; Cardenas, Valerie A.; Sacrey, Diana; Blumenfeld, Robert; Weiner, Michael W.; Studholme, Colin

    2003-05-01

    This paper examines a refinement to probabilistic intensity based tissue segmentation methods, which makes use of knowledge derived from an MRI bias field estimate. Intensity based labeling techniques have employed local smoothness priors to reduce voxel level tissue labeling errors, by making use of the assumption that, within uniform regions of tissue, a voxel should be highly likely to have a similar tissue assignment to its neighbors. Increasing the size of this neighborhood provides more robustness to noise, but reduces the ability to describe small structures. However, when intensity bias due to RF field inhomogeneity is present within the MRI data, local contrast to noise may vary across the image. We therefore propose an approach to refining the labeling by making use of the bias field estimate, to adapt the neighborhood size applied to reduce local labeling errors. We explore the use of a radially symmetric Gaussian weighted neighborhood, and the use of the mean and median of the adapted region probabilities, to refine local probabilistic labeling. The approach is evaluated using the Montreal brainweb MRI simulator as a gold standard providing known gray, white and CSF tissue segmentation. These results show that the method is capable of improving the local tissue labeling in areas most influenced by inhomogeneity. The method appears most promising in its application to regional tissue volume analysis or higher field MRI data where bias field inhomogeneity can be significant.

  18. COIN Project: Towards a zero-waste technology for concrete aggregate production in Norway

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cepuritis, Rolands; Willy Danielsen, Svein

    2014-05-01

    COIN Project: Towards a zero-waste technology for concrete aggregate production in Norway Rolands Cepuritis, Norcem/NTNU and Svein Willy Danielsen, SINTEF Aggregate production is a mining operation where no purification of the "ore" is necessary. Still it is extremely rare that an aggregate production plant is operating on the basis of zero-waste concept. This is since historically the fine crushed aggregate (particles with a size of less than 2, 4 or sometimes 8 mm) has been regarded as a by-product or waste of the more valuable coarse aggregate production. The reason is that the crushed coarse aggregates can easily replace coarse rounded natural stones in almost any concrete composition; while, the situation with the sand is different. The production of coarse aggregate normally yields fine fractions with rough surface texture, flaky or elongated particles an inadequate gradation. When such a material replaces smooth and rounded natural sand grains in a concrete mix, the result is usually poor and much more water and cement has to be used to achieve adequate concrete flow. The consequences are huge stockpiles of the crushed fine fractions that can't be sold (mass balance problems) for the aggregate producers, sustainability problems for the whole industry and environmental issues for society due to dumping and storing of the fine co-generated material. There have been attempts of utilising the material in concrete before; however, they have mostly ended up in failure. There have been attempts to adjust the crushed sand to the properties of the natural sand, which would still give a lot of waste, especially if the grading would have to be adjusted and the high amounts of fines abundantly present in the crushed sand would have to be removed. Another fundamental reason for failure has been that historically such attempts have mainly ended up in a research carried out by people (both industrial and academic) with aggregate background (= parties willing to find market

  19. Chlamydia trachomatis Infection and Anti-Hsp60 Immunity: The Two Sides of the Coin

    PubMed Central

    Cappello, Francesco; Conway de Macario, Everly; Di Felice, Valentina; Zummo, Giovanni; Macario, Alberto J. L.

    2009-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis (CT) infection is one of the most common causes of reproductive tract diseases and infertility. CT-Hsp60 is synthesized during infection and is released in the bloodstream. As a consequence, immune cells will produce anti-CT-Hsp60 antibodies. Hsp60, a ubiquitous and evolutionarily conserved chaperonin, is normally sequestered inside the cell, particularly into mitochondria. However, upon cell stress, as well as during carcinogenesis, the chaperonin becomes exposed on the cell surface (sf-Hsp60) and/or is secreted from cells into the extracellular space and circulation. Reports in the literature on circulating Hsp and anti-Hsp antibodies are in many cases short on details about Hsp60 concentrations, and about the specificity spectra of the antibodies, their titers, and their true, direct, pathogenetic effects. Thus, more studies are still needed to obtain a definitive picture on these matters. Nevertheless, the information already available indicates that the concurrence of persistent CT infection and appearance of sf-Hsp60 can promote an autoimmune aggression towards stressed cells and the development of diseases such as autoimmune arthritis, multiple sclerosis, atherosclerosis, vasculitis, diabetes, and thyroiditis, among others. At the same time, immunocomplexes composed of anti-CT-Hsp60 antibodies and circulating Hsp60 (both CT and human) may form deposits in several anatomical locations, e.g., at the glomerular basal membrane. The opposite side of the coin is that pre-tumor and tumor cells with sf-Hsp60 can be destroyed with participation of the anti-Hsp60 antibody, thus stopping cancer progression before it is even noticed by the patient or physician. PMID:19714222

  20. Roseomonas pecuniae sp. nov., isolated from the surface of a copper-alloy coin.

    PubMed

    Lopes, André; Esp Rito Santo, Christophe; Grass, Gregor; Chung, Ana Paula; Morais, Paula V

    2011-03-01

    Strain N75(T) was isolated from the surface of a copper-alloy 50 Euro cent coin collected from general circulation. Phylogenetic analysis of the 16S rRNA gene sequence revealed that strain N75(T) formed a distinct branch within the genus Roseomonas and placed it in the Alphaproteobacteria. Strain N75(T) showed 16S rRNA gene sequence similarities of 92.4-97.1  % to type strains of species of the genus Roseomonas. Strain N75(T) was a Gram-negative, non-spore-forming, non-motile coccoid, with an optimum growth temperature of about 30 °C; the strain did not grow at 5 or 37 °C. Strain N75(T) did not grow in medium containing NaCl. The major respiratory quinone was ubiquinone 10 (Q-10). The major fatty acids were unsaturated C₁₆:₁ω7c/C₁₆:₁ω6c and C₁₈:₁ω7c (around 70 % of the total fatty acids); the third most abundant fatty acid was the hydroxylated C₁₈:₁ 2-OH. The major polar lipids were phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine and an unknown aminolipid. The DNA G+C content was 72.8 mol%. On the basis of the phylogenetic analysis and physiological and biochemical characteristics, we conclude that strain N75(T) represents a novel species of the genus Roseomonas, for which we propose the name Roseomonas pecuniae sp. nov. (type strain N75(T) =LMG 25481(T) =CIP 110074(T)).

  1. Who Really Coined the Word Supernova? Who First Predicted Neutron Stars?

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Osterbrock, D. E.

    2001-12-01

    The answer to both questions is Walter Baade and Fritz Zwicky. They used the word and postulated that the remnants could be neutron stars in the abstract of their joint paper ``Supernovae and Cosmic Rays," presented orally by Zwicky at an American Physical Society meeting at Stanford in December 1933. The abstract was published in the Physical Review in early 1934, and was a condensation of their two joint papers in PNAS in 1934. The concept that there is a special class of ``much more luminous novae" (Lundmark 1923), which we today call supernovae, was put forward by Knut Lundmark (1920), who called them ``giant novae," and independently by Heber D. Curtis (1921). Hubble (1929) referred to them as ``exceptional novae," and Baade (1929), writing in German, as ``Hauptnovae" (chief novae). According to a review article by Zwicky (1940), he and Baade introduced the term supernovae in seminars and an astrophysics course at Caltech in 1931. Lundmark (1933) actually first published the word (as ``super-Novae") in a paper dated December 31, 1932 but published in 1933. He was at Lick and Mount Wilson during the fall and winter of 1932-33, and it is much more probable that he heard it there than that he coined it himself. In their abstract and PNAS papers Baade and Zwicky ``advanced the view" that supernovae represent the collapse of ``ordinary stars into neutron stars," because that gave about the right total energy released in the outburst. Many physicists believe that Lev Landau (1932) had introduced this concept, but actually his paper is about relativistically degenerate stars and does not mention neutrons, neutron stars, nor a density. Freeman Dyson (1971) in his published lectures on neutron stars and pulsars correctly credited the concept to Baade and Zwicky (1934). Extracts from these and other related papers will be posted.

  2. Exchange-biased magnetic vortices.

    SciTech Connect

    Hoffmann, A.; Sort, J.; Buchanan, K. S.; Nogues, J.; Inst. Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats; Univ. Autonoma de Barcelona

    2008-07-01

    This paper reviews our work on the interplay between exchange bias due to the coupling of a ferromagnet to an antiferromagnet and the formation of magnetic vortices, which occur due to the patterning of a ferromagnet. Depending on the thermal and magnetic history, a variety of different effects can be observed. Thermal annealing in a saturating magnetic field establishes a spatially homogeneous exchange bias with a uniform unidirectional anisotropy. This results in an angular dependence of the magnetization reversal mode, which can be either via magnetization rotation or vortex nucleation and annihilation. In contrast, thermal annealing in a field smaller than the vortex annihilation field imprints the ferromagnetic vortex configuration in the antiferromagnet with high fidelity resulting in unusual asymmetric hysteresis loops. Furthermore, we discuss how the interfacial nature of the exchange bias can modify the vortex magnetization along the thickness of the ferromagnet.

  3. Heuristic-biased stochastic sampling

    SciTech Connect

    Bresina, J.L.

    1996-12-31

    This paper presents a search technique for scheduling problems, called Heuristic-Biased Stochastic Sampling (HBSS). The underlying assumption behind the HBSS approach is that strictly adhering to a search heuristic often does not yield the best solution and, therefore, exploration off the heuristic path can prove fruitful. Within the HBSS approach, the balance between heuristic adherence and exploration can be controlled according to the confidence one has in the heuristic. By varying this balance, encoded as a bias function, the HBSS approach encompasses a family of search algorithms of which greedy search and completely random search are extreme members. We present empirical results from an application of HBSS to the realworld problem of observation scheduling. These results show that with the proper bias function, it can be easy to outperform greedy search.

  4. Measurement Bias Detection through Factor Analysis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Barendse, M. T.; Oort, F. J.; Werner, C. S.; Ligtvoet, R.; Schermelleh-Engel, K.

    2012-01-01

    Measurement bias is defined as a violation of measurement invariance, which can be investigated through multigroup factor analysis (MGFA), by testing across-group differences in intercepts (uniform bias) and factor loadings (nonuniform bias). Restricted factor analysis (RFA) can also be used to detect measurement bias. To also enable nonuniform…

  5. Without Bias: A Guidebook for Nondiscriminatory Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pickens, Judy E., Ed.; And Others

    This guidebook discusses ways to eliminate various types of discrimination from business communications. Separately authored chapters discuss eliminating racial and ethnic bias; eliminating sexual bias; achieving communication sensitive about handicaps of disabled persons; eliminating bias from visual media; eliminating bias from meetings,…

  6. The Truth and Bias Model of Judgment

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    West, Tessa V.; Kenny, David A.

    2011-01-01

    We present a new model for the general study of how the truth and biases affect human judgment. In the truth and bias model, judgments about the world are pulled by 2 primary forces, the truth force and the bias force, and these 2 forces are interrelated. The truth and bias model differentiates force and value, where the force is the strength of…

  7. Unpacking the Evidence of Gender Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fulmer, Connie L.

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate gender bias in pre-service principals using the Gender-Leader Implicit Association Test. Analyses of student-learning narratives revealed how students made sense of gender bias (biased or not-biased) and how each reacted to evidence (surprised or not-surprised). Two implications were: (1) the need for…

  8. Collection Development and the Psychology of Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Quinn, Brian

    2012-01-01

    The library literature addressing the role of bias in collection development emphasizes a philosophical approach. It is based on the notion that bias can be controlled by the conscious act of believing in certain values and adhering to a code of ethics. It largely ignores the psychological research on bias, which suggests that bias is a more…

  9. The Threshold of Embedded M Collider Bias and Confounding Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelcey, Benjamin; Carlisle, Joanne

    2011-01-01

    Of particular import to this study, is collider bias originating from stratification on retreatment variables forming an embedded M or bowtie structural design. That is, rather than assume an M structural design which suggests that "X" is a collider but not a confounder, the authors adopt what they consider to be a more reasonable…

  10. Bias correction with Data Assimilation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canter, Martin; Barth, Alexander

    2015-04-01

    With this work, we aim at developping a new method of bias correction using data assimilation. This method is based on the stochastic forcing of a model to correct bias. First, through a preliminary run, we estimate the bias of the model and its possible sources. Then, we establish a forcing term which is directly added inside the model's equations. We create an ensemble of runs and consider the forcing term as a control variable during the assimilation of observations. We then use this analysed forcing term to correct the bias of the model. Since the forcing is added inside the model, it acts as a source term, unlike external forcings such as wind. This procedure has been developed and successfully tested with a twin experiment on a Lorenz 95 model. Indeed, we were able to estimate and recover an artificial bias that had been added into the model. This bias had a spatial structure and was constant through time. The mean and behaviour of the corrected model corresponded to those the reference model. It is currently being applied and tested on the sea ice ocean NEMO LIM model, which is used in the PredAntar project. NEMO LIM is a global and low resolution (2 degrees) coupled model (hydrodynamic model and sea ice model) with long time steps allowing simulations over several decades. Due to its low resolution, the model is subject to bias in area where strong currents are present. We aim at correcting this bias by using perturbed current fields from higher resolution models and randomly generated perturbations. The random perturbations need to be constrained in order to respect the physical properties of the ocean, and not create unwanted phenomena. To construct those random perturbations, we first create a random field with the Diva tool (Data-Interpolating Variational Analysis). Using a cost function, this tool penalizes abrupt variations in the field, while using a custom correlation length. It also decouples disconnected areas based on topography. Then, we filter

  11. Solar array/spacecraft biasing

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitzgerald, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    Biasing techniques and their application to the control of spacecraft potential is discussed. Normally when a spacecraft is operated with ion thrusters, the spacecraft will be 10-20 volts negative of the surrounding plasma. This will affect scientific measurements and will allow ions from the charge-exchange plasma to bombard the spacecraft surfaces with a few tens of volts of energy. This condition may not be tolerable. A proper bias system is described that can bring the spacecraft to or near the potential of the surrounding plasma.

  12. The Electrically Controlled Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harper, Jacob

    Controlling magnetism via voltage in the virtual absence of electric current is the key to reduce power consumption while enhancing processing speed, integration density and functionality in comparison with present-day information technology. Almost all spintronic devices rely on tailored interface magnetism. Controlling magnetism at thin-film interfaces, preferably by purely electrical means, is therefore a key challenge to better spintronics. However, there is no direct interaction between magnetization and electric fields, thus making voltage control of magnetism in general a scientific challenge. The significance of controlled interface magnetism started with the exchange-bias effect. Exchange bias is a coupling phenomenon at magnetic interfaces that manifests itself prominently in the shift of the ferromagnetic hysteresis loop along the magnetic-field axis. Various attempts on controlling exchange bias via voltage utilizing different scientific principles have been intensively studied recently. The majority of present research is emphasizing on various complex oxides. Our approach can be considered as a paradigm shift away from complex oxides. We focus on a magnetoelectric antiferromagnetic simple oxide Cr2O3. From a combination of experimental and theoretical efforts, we show that the (0001) surface of magnetoelectric Cr2O3 has a roughness-insensitive, electrically switchable magnetization. Using a ferromagnetic Pd/Co multilayer deposited on the (0001) surface of a Cr2O3 single crystal, we achieve reversible, room-temperature isothermal switching of the exchange-bias between positive and negative values by reversing the electric field while maintaining a permanent magnetic field. This is a significant scientific breakthrough providing a new route towards potentially revolutionizing information technology. In addition, a second path of electrically controlled exchange bias is introduced by exploiting the piezoelectric property of BaTiO3. An exchange-bias Co

  13. Bias in Dynamic Monte Carlo Alpha Calculations

    SciTech Connect

    Sweezy, Jeremy Ed; Nolen, Steven Douglas; Adams, Terry R.; Trahan, Travis John

    2015-02-06

    A 1/N bias in the estimate of the neutron time-constant (commonly denoted as α) has been seen in dynamic neutronic calculations performed with MCATK. In this paper we show that the bias is most likely caused by taking the logarithm of a stochastic quantity. We also investigate the known bias due to the particle population control method used in MCATK. We conclude that this bias due to the particle population control method is negligible compared to other sources of bias.

  14. Visual Adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Webster, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    Sensory systems continuously mold themselves to the widely varying contexts in which they must operate. Studies of these adaptations have played a long and central role in vision science. In part this is because the specific adaptations remain a powerful tool for dissecting vision, by exposing the mechanisms that are adapting. That is, “if it adapts, it's there.” Many insights about vision have come from using adaptation in this way, as a method. A second important trend has been the realization that the processes of adaptation are themselves essential to how vision works, and thus are likely to operate at all levels. That is, “if it's there, it adapts.” This has focused interest on the mechanisms of adaptation as the target rather than the probe. Together both approaches have led to an emerging insight of adaptation as a fundamental and ubiquitous coding strategy impacting all aspects of how we see. PMID:26858985

  15. Cascaded Bayesian processes: an account of bias in orientation perception.

    PubMed

    Langley, Keith; Lefebvre, Veronique; Anderson, Stephen J

    2009-10-01

    Following adaptation to an oriented (1-d) signal in central vision, the orientation of subsequently viewed test signals may appear repelled away from or attracted towards the adapting orientation. Small angular differences between the adaptor and test yield 'repulsive' shifts, while large angular differences yield 'attractive' shifts. In peripheral vision, however, both small and large angular differences yield repulsive shifts. To account for these tilt after-effects (TAEs), a cascaded model of orientation estimation that is optimized using hierarchical Bayesian methods is proposed. The model accounts for orientation bias through adaptation-induced losses in information that arise because of signal uncertainties and neural constraints placed upon the propagation of visual information. Repulsive (direct) TAEs arise at early stages of visual processing from adaptation of orientation-selective units with peak sensitivity at the orientation of the adaptor (theta). Attractive (indirect) TAEs result from adaptation of second-stage units with peak sensitivity at theta and theta+90 degrees , which arise from an efficient stage of linear compression that pools across the responses of the first-stage orientation-selective units. A spatial orientation vector is estimated from the transformed oriented unit responses. The change from attractive to repulsive TAEs in peripheral vision can be explained by the differing harmonic biases resulting from constraints on signal power (in central vision) versus signal uncertainties in orientation (in peripheral vision). The proposed model is consistent with recent work by computational neuroscientists in supposing that visual bias reflects the adjustment of a rational system in the light of uncertain signals and system constraints.

  16. Combating Anti-Muslim Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Shah, Nirvi

    2011-01-01

    America's 2.5 million Muslims make up less than 1% of the U.S. population, according to the Pew Research Center. Many Muslim students face discrimination and some cases have warranted investigation by the U.S. Department of Education's Office of Civil Rights. Muslim groups have reported widespread bias as well. For many Muslim…

  17. Stereotype Formation: Biased by Association

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Pelley, Mike E.; Reimers, Stian J.; Calvini, Guglielmo; Spears, Russell; Beesley, Tom; Murphy, Robin A.

    2010-01-01

    We propose that biases in attitude and stereotype formation might arise as a result of learned differences in the extent to which social groups have previously been predictive of behavioral or physical properties. Experiments 1 and 2 demonstrate that differences in the experienced predictiveness of groups with respect to evaluatively neutral…

  18. Test Bias and Construct Validity.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jensen, Arthur R.

    The several statistical methods described for detecting test bias in terms of various internal features of a person's test performances and the test's construct validity can be applied to any groups in the population. But the evidence regarding groups other than U.S. blacks and whites is either lacking or is still too sketchy to permit any strong…

  19. Response Bias in Hospice Evaluation.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hayslip, Bert, Jr.; And Others

    1991-01-01

    Analyzed response bias among 34 recipients of care in hospice. Found nonrespondents to have better bereavement prognoses and tended to care for patients who were younger, male, and in program for shorter time. Nonrespondents were in contact with staff less than were respondents. Data are consistent with earlier research showing significant…

  20. Key Words in Instruction. Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Callison, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    Two challenging criteria for judging information involve bias and authority. In both cases, judgments may not be clearly possible. In both cases, there may be degrees or levels of acceptability. For students to gain experience and to demonstrate skills in making judgments, they need opportunities to consider a wide spectrum of resources under a…

  1. Sex Bias in Counseling Materials

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harway, Michele

    1977-01-01

    This article reviews findings of bias in counseling materials and presents results of three original studies. Indications are that textbooks used by practitioners present the sexes in stereotypical fashion, and a greater proportion of college catalog context is devoted to men than to women. (Author)

  2. Report of the Defense Science Board Task Force on Defense Intelligence - Counterinsurgency (COIN) Intelligence, Surveillance, and Reconnaissance (ISR) Operations

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2011-02-01

    technical  intelligence  collection by  airborne  platforms   ISR   capabilities  have  not  been  applied  effectively  against COIN  operations  that... Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance ( ISR ) Operations   February 2011   Office of the Under Secretary of Defense for Acquisition, Technology and...COIN) Intelligence , Surveillance, and Reconnaissance ( ISR ) Operations 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S

  3. The other side of the coin: growing up with a learning disability.

    PubMed

    Fanchiang, S P

    1996-04-01

    This study is a narrative analysis of the life history of Dale, a 25-year-old man with a learning disability who received sensory integrative treatment in early childhood. The analysis revealed that Dale's self likely developed through occupational engagement with three interconnected themes: "my mother said" and "parental tricks"; "adrenaline surges" and "hell-raising"; and work, "deal making," and self-construction. These themes depict Dale's self-construction, character development, occupation selection, and adaptation. In addition, these themes revealed how his parents used principles based on his sensory needs and learning problems to organize his childhood occupations and assist with his adaptation. The concept of occupational metamorphosis is also proposed to describe a person's search for and selection of occupations that satisfy biological and sensory needs. This study supports the idea that the complex nature of adaptation can be revealed through an occupational history, and that adaptation is multifaceted and not absolute.

  4. Adaptive manifold learning.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Zhenyue; Wang, Jing; Zha, Hongyuan

    2012-02-01

    Manifold learning algorithms seek to find a low-dimensional parameterization of high-dimensional data. They heavily rely on the notion of what can be considered as local, how accurately the manifold can be approximated locally, and, last but not least, how the local structures can be patched together to produce the global parameterization. In this paper, we develop algorithms that address two key issues in manifold learning: 1) the adaptive selection of the local neighborhood sizes when imposing a connectivity structure on the given set of high-dimensional data points and 2) the adaptive bias reduction in the local low-dimensional embedding by accounting for the variations in the curvature of the manifold as well as its interplay with the sampling density of the data set. We demonstrate the effectiveness of our methods for improving the performance of manifold learning algorithms using both synthetic and real-world data sets.

  5. Adaptive Management

    EPA Science Inventory

    Adaptive management is an approach to natural resource management that emphasizes learning through management where knowledge is incomplete, and when, despite inherent uncertainty, managers and policymakers must act. Unlike a traditional trial and error approach, adaptive managem...

  6. New techniques to test fatigue properties of coined sheet specimens. Part 2: Comparison of different materials, forming operations and life prediction techniques for a simple test geometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gustavsson, A.; Larsson, M.; Melander, A.; McDowell, D. L.

    The present research was devoted to the problem of fatigue of coinings in sheet steels. A typical application is in the automotive industry where coinings are introduced to increase the stiffness of sheet panels. The aim of the present work was to illuminate how the method of forming of the coinings influenced the fatigue life. The two forming methods investigated were bending and a deep-drawing like operation. The investigation was carried out for three high strength sheet steels: two dual-phase sheet steels and a Si-P alloyed sheet steel. The results indicate that the samples formed in the deep-drawing operation tend to carry somewhat higher local stresses than specimens formed in bending. However, if the life is assessed in terms of local bending moment, the results are reversed, which could be explained in terms of the locally reduced sheet thickness for deep-drawn specimens.

  7. Types of Research Bias Encountered in IR.

    PubMed

    Gabr, Ahmed; Kallini, Joseph Ralph; Desai, Kush; Hickey, Ryan; Thornburg, Bartley; Kulik, Laura; Lewandowski, Robert J; Salem, Riad

    2016-04-01

    Bias is a systemic error in studies that leads to inaccurate deductions. Relevant biases in the field of IR and interventional oncology were identified after reviewing articles published in the Journal of Vascular and Interventional Radiology and CardioVascular and Interventional Radiology. Biases cited in these articles were divided into three categories: preinterventional (health care access, participation, referral, and sample biases), periinterventional (contamination, investigator, and operator biases), and postinterventional (guarantee-time, lead time, loss to follow-up, recall, and reporting biases).

  8. Automated Monte Carlo biasing for photon-generated electrons near surfaces.

    SciTech Connect

    Franke, Brian Claude; Crawford, Martin James; Kensek, Ronald Patrick

    2009-09-01

    This report describes efforts to automate the biasing of coupled electron-photon Monte Carlo particle transport calculations. The approach was based on weight-windows biasing. Weight-window settings were determined using adjoint-flux Monte Carlo calculations. A variety of algorithms were investigated for adaptivity of the Monte Carlo tallies. Tree data structures were used to investigate spatial partitioning. Functional-expansion tallies were used to investigate higher-order spatial representations.

  9. Giant hepatic metastasis in a patient with coin-like small cell lung carcinoma incidentally diagnosed at autopsy

    PubMed Central

    Fodor, Decebal; Gurzu, Simona; Contac, Anca Otilia; Jung, Ioan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Encephalopathy is a rare complication of hepatic metastases. In this paper we present a case of a patient with lung cancer and metastatic-related giant hepatomegaly. Patient concerns: A 78-year-old previously healthy male was admitted in the Emergency room in hepatic coma. Diagnoses: The abdominal CT scan examination revealed a huge liver filled with solid nodules. Interventions: No interventions were performed. Outcomes: The patient died at few hours after hospitalization. The autopsy showed a 6.5 kilograms liver with several whitish metastatic nodules and an occult prostate adenocarcinoma. The hilum of both lungs was free of tumor and a 10 mm white nodule was identified surrounding a small bronchus. No peripheral nodules were macroscopically identified. Under microscope, cluster of small cells were observed encasing a small bronchus with multiple minute coin-shaped subpleural foci. A massive intrapulmonary angiolymphatic invasion and metastases from small cell carcinoma in liver, lymph nodes and iliac crest bone marrow were also diagnosed. Lessons: This case highlights the difficulty of diagnosis of aggressive lung carcinomas and the necessity of checking for metachronous tumors. The encephalopathy might be the result of metastatic damage of the liver parenchyma combined with the paraneoplastic effect of the tumor cells. Few than 25 cases of SCLCs with diffuse liver metastases and fulminant liver failure were reported to December 2016. This is the first reported case with a synchronous prostate cancer and a “coin-like” aspect of the SCLC. PMID:28296775

  10. A coin-like peripheral small cell lung carcinoma associated with acute paraneoplastic axonal Guillain-Barre-like syndrome.

    PubMed

    Jung, Ioan; Gurzu, Simona; Balasa, Rodica; Motataianu, Anca; Contac, Anca Otilia; Halmaciu, Ioana; Popescu, Septimiu; Simu, Iunius

    2015-06-01

    A 65-year-old previously healthy male heavy smoker was hospitalized with a 2-week history of progressive muscle weakness in the lower and upper extremities. After 10 days of hospitalization, urinary sphincter incompetence and fecal incontinence were added and tetraparesis was established. The computer-tomography scan examination revealed a massive right hydrothorax and multifocal solid acinar structures with peripheral localization in the left lung, which suggested pulmonary cancer. Bone marrow metastases were also suspected. Based on the examination results, the final diagnosis was acute paraneoplastic axonal Guillain-Barre-like syndrome. The patient died 3 weeks after hospitalization. At autopsy, bronchopneumonia and a right hydrothorax were confirmed. Several 4 to 5-mm-sized round peripherally located white nodules were identified in the left lung, without any central tumor mass. Under microscope, a coin-shaped peripheral/subpleural small cell carcinoma was diagnosed, with generalized bone metastases. A huge thrombus in the abdominal aorta and acute pancreatitis was also seen at autopsy. This case highlights the difficulty of diagnosis of lung carcinomas and the necessity of a complex differential diagnosis of severe progressive ascending neuropathies. This is the 6th reported case of small cell lung cancer-associated acute Guillain-Barre-like syndrome and the first report about an association with a coin-like peripheral pattern.

  11. Aligning Spinoza with Descartes: An informed Cartesian account of the truth bias.

    PubMed

    Street, Chris N H; Kingstone, Alan

    2016-08-11

    There is a bias towards believing information is true rather than false. The Spinozan account claims there is an early, automatic bias towards believing. Only afterwards can people engage in an effortful re-evaluation and disbelieve the information. Supporting this account, there is a greater bias towards believing information is true when under cognitive load. However, developing on the Adaptive Lie Detector (ALIED) theory, the informed Cartesian can equally explain this data. The account claims the bias under load is not evidence of automatic belief; rather, people are undecided, but if forced to guess they can rely on context information to make an informed judgement. The account predicts, and we found, that if people can explicitly indicate their uncertainty, there should be no bias towards believing because they are no longer required to guess. Thus, we conclude that belief formation can be better explained by an informed Cartesian account - an attempt to make an informed judgment under uncertainty.

  12. Induced biases in emotional interpretation influence stress vulnerability and endure despite changes in context.

    PubMed

    Mackintosh, Bundy; Mathews, Andrew; Yiend, Jenny; Ridgeway, Valerie; Cook, Emma

    2006-09-01

    Previous research has shown that interpretation biases can be experimentally induced and endure for 24 hours. In two experiments, we show that induced biases not only persist but survive changes in environmental context, including transferring to different rooms with different experimenters. In one experiment, training and testing materials were also presented in different sensory modalities without significantly reducing the magnitude of the induced bias. Furthermore, we found evidence of changes in emotional vulnerability, congruent with the direction of induced bias, which also persisted for 24 hours. Together with earlier results, these findings show that induced biases generalize over contexts and have persisting emotional consequences, suggesting that appropriately adapted training methods may contribute to developing therapeutic techniques within clinical settings.

  13. Feasibility of different cleaning methods for silver-copper alloys by X-ray fluorescence: Application to ancient Greek silver coins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Moreno-Suárez, A. I.; Ager, F. J.; Rodríquez-Segovia, C.; Gómez-Morón, A.; Chaves, F.; Scrivano, S.; Gómez-Tubío, B.; Pliego, R.; Respaldiza, M. A.

    2016-02-01

    Archeological pieces with high Ag concentrations often have a surface enrichment of Ag. Usually, researchers in this field do not agree on the causes of these enrichments, one of which could be the cleaning procedures. In this work, a set of 18 ancient Greek silver coins was selected to study the effects of different cleaning procedures in terms of producing a surface Ag enrichment. The aim of this study is to find and select the less aggressive one in terms of the lower modification of Ag concentrations and visual aspect. These coins were analyzed by X-ray fluorescence (XRF) before and after each cleaning procedure.

  14. Mindfulness reduces the correspondence bias.

    PubMed

    Hopthrow, Tim; Hooper, Nic; Mahmood, Lynsey; Meier, Brian P; Weger, Ulrich

    2017-03-01

    The correspondence bias (CB) refers to the idea that people sometimes give undue weight to dispositional rather than situational factors when explaining behaviours and attitudes. Three experiments examined whether mindfulness, a non-judgmental focus on the present moment, could reduce the CB. Participants engaged in a brief mindfulness exercise (the raisin task), a control task, or an attention to detail task before completing a typical CB measure involving an attitude-attribution paradigm. The results indicated that participants in the mindfulness condition experienced a significant reduction in the CB compared to participants in the control or attention to detail conditions. These results suggest that mindfulness training can play a unique role in reducing social biases related to person perception.

  15. Preliminary Examination of a Cartoon-Based Hostile Attributional Bias Measure for Urban African American Boys

    PubMed Central

    Leff, Stephen S.; Lefler, Elizabeth K.; Khera, Gagan S.; Paskewich, Brooke; Jawad, Abbas F.

    2014-01-01

    The current study illustrates how researchers developed and validated a cartoon-based adaptation of a written hostile attributional bias measure for a sample of urban, low-income, African American boys. A series of studies were conducted to develop cartoon illustrations to accompany a standard written hostile attributional bias vignette measure (Study 1), to determine initial psychometric properties (Study 2) and acceptability (Study 3), and to conduct a test-retest reliability trial of the adapted measure in a separate sample (Study 4). These studies utilize a participatory action research approach to measurement design and adaptation, and suggest that collaborations between researchers and key school stakeholders can lead to measures that are psychometrically strong, developmentally appropriate, and culturally sensitive. In addition, the cartoon-based hostile attributional bias measure appears to have promise as an assessment and/or outcome measure for aggression and bullying prevention programs conducted with urban African American boys. PMID:21800228

  16. Good practices for quantitative bias analysis.

    PubMed

    Lash, Timothy L; Fox, Matthew P; MacLehose, Richard F; Maldonado, George; McCandless, Lawrence C; Greenland, Sander

    2014-12-01

    Quantitative bias analysis serves several objectives in epidemiological research. First, it provides a quantitative estimate of the direction, magnitude and uncertainty arising from systematic errors. Second, the acts of identifying sources of systematic error, writing down models to quantify them, assigning values to the bias parameters and interpreting the results combat the human tendency towards overconfidence in research results, syntheses and critiques and the inferences that rest upon them. Finally, by suggesting aspects that dominate uncertainty in a particular research result or topic area, bias analysis can guide efficient allocation of sparse research resources. The fundamental methods of bias analyses have been known for decades, and there have been calls for more widespread use for nearly as long. There was a time when some believed that bias analyses were rarely undertaken because the methods were not widely known and because automated computing tools were not readily available to implement the methods. These shortcomings have been largely resolved. We must, therefore, contemplate other barriers to implementation. One possibility is that practitioners avoid the analyses because they lack confidence in the practice of bias analysis. The purpose of this paper is therefore to describe what we view as good practices for applying quantitative bias analysis to epidemiological data, directed towards those familiar with the methods. We focus on answering questions often posed to those of us who advocate incorporation of bias analysis methods into teaching and research. These include the following. When is bias analysis practical and productive? How does one select the biases that ought to be addressed? How does one select a method to model biases? How does one assign values to the parameters of a bias model? How does one present and interpret a bias analysis?. We hope that our guide to good practices for conducting and presenting bias analyses will encourage

  17. Self regulating body bias generator

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hass, Kenneth (Inventor)

    2004-01-01

    The back bias voltage on a functional circuit is controlled through a closed loop process. A delay element receives a clock pulse and produces a delay output. The delay element is advantageously constructed of the same materials as the functional circuit so that the aging and degradation of the delay element parallels the degradation of the functional circuit. As the delay element degrades, the transistor switching time increases, increasing the time delay of the delay output. An AND gate compares a clock pulse to an output pulse of the delay element, the AND output forming a control pulse. A duty cycle of the control pulse is determined by the delay time between the clock pulse and the delay element output. The control pulse is received at the input of a charge pump. The charge pump produces a back bias voltage which is then applied to the delay element and to the functional circuit. If the time delay produced by the delay element exceeds the optimal delay, the duty cycle of the control pulse is shortened, and the back bias voltage is lowered, thereby increasing the switching speed of the transistors in the delay element and reducing the time delay. If the throughput of the delay element is too fast, the duty cycle of the control pulse is lengthened, raising the back bias voltage produced by the charge pump. This, in turn, lowers the switching speed of the transistors in both the delay element and the functional circuit. The slower switching speed in the delay element increases time delay. In this manner, the switching speed of the delay element, and of the functional circuit, is maintained at a constant level over the life of the circuit.

  18. Galaxy formation and physical bias

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cen, Renyue; Ostriker, Jeremiah P.

    1992-01-01

    We have supplemented our code, which computes the evolution of the physical state of a representative piece of the universe to include, not only the dynamics of dark matter (with a standard PM code), and the hydrodynamics of the gaseous component (including detailed collisional and radiative processes), but also galaxy formation on a heuristic but plausible basis. If, within a cell the gas is Jeans' unstable, collapsing, and cooling rapidly, it is transformed to galaxy subunits, which are then followed with a collisionless code. After grouping them into galaxies, we estimate the relative distributions of galaxies and dark matter and the relative velocities of galaxies and dark matter. In a large scale CDM run of 80/h Mpc size with 8 x 10 exp 6 cells and dark matter particles, we find that physical bias b is on the 8/h Mpc scale is about 1.6 and increases towards smaller scales, and that velocity bias is about 0.8 on the same scale. The comparable HDM simulation is highly biased with b = 2.7 on the 8/h Mpc scale. Implications of these results are discussed in the light of the COBE observations which provide an accurate normalization for the initial power spectrum. CDM can be ruled out on the basis of too large a predicted small scale velocity dispersion at greater than 95 percent confidence level.

  19. Response bias in plaintiffs' histories.

    PubMed

    Lees-Haley, P R; Williams, C W; Zasler, N D; Marguilies, S; English, L T; Stevens, K B

    1997-11-01

    This study investigated response bias in self-reported history of factors relevant to the assessment of traumatic brain injury, toxic brain injury and related emotional distress. Response bias refers to systematic error in self-report data. A total of 446 subjects (comprising 131 litigating and 315 non-litigating adults from five locations in the United States) completed a symptom questionnaire. Data were obtained from university faculty and students, from patients in clinics specializing in physiatry neurology, and family medicine, and from plaintiffs undergoing forensic neuropsychological evaluations. Comparisons were made for litigant and non litigant ratings of their past and current cognitive and emotional functioning, including life in general, ability to concentrate, memory, depression, anxiety, alcohol, drugs, ability to work or attend school, irritability, headaches, confusion, self-esteem, and fatigue. Although there is no basis for hypothesizing plaintiffs to be healthier than the general population, plaintiffs rated their pre-injury functioning superior to non-plaintiffs. These findings suggest that response biases need to be taken into account by forensic examiners when relying on litigants' self-reports of pre-injury status.

  20. The Nonverbal Transmission of Intergroup Bias: A Model of Bias Contagion with Implications for Social Policy

    PubMed Central

    Weisbuch, Max; Pauker, Kristin

    2013-01-01

    Social and policy interventions over the last half-century have achieved laudable reductions in blatant discrimination. Yet members of devalued social groups continue to face subtle discrimination. In this article, we argue that decades of anti-discrimination interventions have failed to eliminate intergroup bias because such bias is contagious. We present a model of bias contagion in which intergroup bias is subtly communicated through nonverbal behavior. Exposure to such nonverbal bias “infects” observers with intergroup bias. The model we present details two means by which nonverbal bias can be expressed—either as a veridical index of intergroup bias or as a symptom of worry about appearing biased. Exposure to this nonverbal bias can increase perceivers’ own intergroup biases through processes of implicit learning, informational influence, and normative influence. We identify critical moderators that may interfere with these processes and consequently propose several social and educational interventions based on these moderators. PMID:23997812

  1. Outcome-Reporting Bias in Education Research

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pigott, Therese D.; Valentine, Jeffrey C.; Polanin, Joshua R.; Williams, Ryan T.; Canada, Dericka D.

    2013-01-01

    Outcome-reporting bias occurs when primary studies do not include information about all outcomes measured in a study. When studies omit findings on important measures, efforts to synthesize the research using systematic review techniques will be biased and interpretations of individual studies will be incomplete. Outcome-reporting bias has been…

  2. Ion Accelerator With Negatively Biased Decelerator Grid

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brophy, John R.

    1994-01-01

    Three-grid ion accelerator in which accelerator grid is biased at negative potential and decelerator grid downstream of accelerator grid biased at smaller negative potential. This grid and bias arrangement reduces frequency of impacts, upon accelerator grid, of charge-exchange ions produced downstream in collisions between accelerated ions and atoms and molecules of background gas. Sputter erosion of accelerator grid reduced.

  3. Using Newspapers to Study Media Bias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kirman, Joseph M.

    1992-01-01

    Suggests that students can learn to recognize media bias by studying media reports of current events or historical topics. Describes a study unit using media coverage of the second anniversary of the Palestinian uprising against Israel. Discusses lesson objectives, planning, defining bias teaching procedures, and criteria for determining bias. (DK)

  4. Attentional Bias for Exercise-Related Images

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Berry, Tanya R.; Spence, John C.; Stolp, Sean M.

    2011-01-01

    This research examined attentional bias toward exercise-related images using a visual probe task. It was hypothesized that more-active participants would display attentional bias toward the exercise-related images. The results showed that men displayed attentional bias for the exercise images. There was a significant interaction of activity level…

  5. Gender Bias: Recent Research and Interventions.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New Jersey Research Bulletin, 1996

    1996-01-01

    This annotated bibliography lists 14 publications about recent research on gender bias and interventions to reduce gender bias in schools. The bibliography is divided into two sections: current research and intervention. The first includes descriptions of studies examining the following topics: gender bias in U.S. schools and its effects;…

  6. Understanding Errors, Biases that Can Affect Journalists.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stocking, S. Holly; Gross, Paget H.

    1989-01-01

    Outlines some of the errors and biases in thinking that psychologists have documented in recent years, including the eyewitness fallacy, underutilization of statistics, confirmation bias, misperceptions of risk, sample errors and biases, and misunderstanding of regression. Argues that journalism educators need to bring these to the attention of…

  7. Integrating Implicit Bias into Counselor Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Boysen, Guy A.

    2010-01-01

    The author reviews the empirical and theoretical literature on implicit bias as it relates to counselor education. Counselor educators can integrate implicit bias into the concepts of multicultural knowledge, awareness, and skill. Knowledge about implicit bias includes its theoretical explanation, measurement, and impact on counseling. Awareness…

  8. Class Size and Student Diversity: Two Sides of the Same Coin. Teacher Voice

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Froese-Germain, Bernie; Riel, Rick; McGahey, Bob

    2012-01-01

    Among Canadian teacher unions, discussions of class size are increasingly being informed by the importance of considering the diversity of student needs within the classroom (often referred to as class composition). For teachers, both class size and diversity matter. Teachers consistently adapt their teaching to address the individual needs of the…

  9. Adaptive SPECT

    PubMed Central

    Barrett, Harrison H.; Furenlid, Lars R.; Freed, Melanie; Hesterman, Jacob Y.; Kupinski, Matthew A.; Clarkson, Eric; Whitaker, Meredith K.

    2008-01-01

    Adaptive imaging systems alter their data-acquisition configuration or protocol in response to the image information received. An adaptive pinhole single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) system might acquire an initial scout image to obtain preliminary information about the radiotracer distribution and then adjust the configuration or sizes of the pinholes, the magnifications, or the projection angles in order to improve performance. This paper briefly describes two small-animal SPECT systems that allow this flexibility and then presents a framework for evaluating adaptive systems in general, and adaptive SPECT systems in particular. The evaluation is in terms of the performance of linear observers on detection or estimation tasks. Expressions are derived for the ideal linear (Hotelling) observer and the ideal linear (Wiener) estimator with adaptive imaging. Detailed expressions for the performance figures of merit are given, and possible adaptation rules are discussed. PMID:18541485

  10. Food-specific spatial memory biases in an omnivorous bird.

    PubMed

    Sulikowski, Danielle; Burke, Darren

    2007-06-22

    The tendency of nectarivorous birds to perform better on tasks requiring them to avoid previously rewarding locations (to win-shift) than to return to them (win-stay) has been explained as an adaptation to the depleting nature of nectar. This interpretation relies on the previously untested assumption that the win-shift tendency is not associated with food types possessing a different distribution. To test this assumption, we examined the specificity of this bias to different food types in an omnivorous honeyeater, the noisy miner (Manorina melanocephala). As predicted, we found that the win-shift bias was sensitive to foraging context, manifesting only in association with foraging for nectar, not with foraging for invertebrates.

  11. Opinion Dynamics with Confirmation Bias

    PubMed Central

    Allahverdyan, Armen E.; Galstyan, Aram

    2014-01-01

    Background Confirmation bias is the tendency to acquire or evaluate new information in a way that is consistent with one's preexisting beliefs. It is omnipresent in psychology, economics, and even scientific practices. Prior theoretical research of this phenomenon has mainly focused on its economic implications possibly missing its potential connections with broader notions of cognitive science. Methodology/Principal Findings We formulate a (non-Bayesian) model for revising subjective probabilistic opinion of a confirmationally-biased agent in the light of a persuasive opinion. The revision rule ensures that the agent does not react to persuasion that is either far from his current opinion or coincides with it. We demonstrate that the model accounts for the basic phenomenology of the social judgment theory, and allows to study various phenomena such as cognitive dissonance and boomerang effect. The model also displays the order of presentation effect–when consecutively exposed to two opinions, the preference is given to the last opinion (recency) or the first opinion (primacy) –and relates recency to confirmation bias. Finally, we study the model in the case of repeated persuasion and analyze its convergence properties. Conclusions The standard Bayesian approach to probabilistic opinion revision is inadequate for describing the observed phenomenology of persuasion process. The simple non-Bayesian model proposed here does agree with this phenomenology and is capable of reproducing a spectrum of effects observed in psychology: primacy-recency phenomenon, boomerang effect and cognitive dissonance. We point out several limitations of the model that should motivate its future development. PMID:25007078

  12. Negatively-Biased Credulity and the Cultural Evolution of Beliefs

    PubMed Central

    Fessler, Daniel M. T.; Pisor, Anne C.; Navarrete, Carlos David

    2014-01-01

    The functions of cultural beliefs are often opaque to those who hold them. Accordingly, to benefit from cultural evolution’s ability to solve complex adaptive problems, learners must be credulous. However, credulity entails costs, including susceptibility to exploitation, and effort wasted due to false beliefs. One determinant of the optimal level of credulity is the ratio between the costs of two types of errors: erroneous incredulity (failing to believe information that is true) and erroneous credulity (believing information that is false). This ratio can be expected to be asymmetric when information concerns hazards, as the costs of erroneous incredulity will, on average, exceed the costs of erroneous credulity; no equivalent asymmetry characterizes information concerning benefits. Natural selection can therefore be expected to have crafted learners’ minds so as to be more credulous toward information concerning hazards. This negatively-biased credulity extends general negativity bias, the adaptive tendency for negative events to be more salient than positive events. Together, these biases constitute attractors that should shape cultural evolution via the aggregated effects of learners’ differential retention and transmission of information. In two studies in the U.S., we demonstrate the existence of negatively-biased credulity, and show that it is most pronounced in those who believe the world to be dangerous, individuals who may constitute important nodes in cultural transmission networks. We then document the predicted imbalance in cultural content using a sample of urban legends collected from the Internet and a sample of supernatural beliefs obtained from ethnographies of a representative collection of the world’s cultures, showing that beliefs about hazards predominate in both. PMID:24736596

  13. Charge amplifier with bias compensation

    DOEpatents

    Johnson, Gary W.

    2002-01-01

    An ion beam uniformity monitor for very low beam currents using a high-sensitivity charge amplifier with bias compensation. The ion beam monitor is used to assess the uniformity of a raster-scanned ion beam, such as used in an ion implanter, and utilizes four Faraday cups placed in the geometric corners of the target area. Current from each cup is integrated with respect to time, thus measuring accumulated dose, or charge, in Coulombs. By comparing the dose at each corner, a qualitative assessment of ion beam uniformity is made possible. With knowledge of the relative area of the Faraday cups, the ion flux and areal dose can also be obtained.

  14. Attentional Bias in Children with Asthma with and without Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Dudeney, Joanne; Sharpe, Louise; Sicouri, Gemma; Lorimer, Sarah; Dear, Blake F; Jaffe, Adam; Selvadurai, Hiran; Hunt, Caroline

    2017-01-09

    Children with asthma have a high prevalence of anxiety disorders, however, very little is known about the mechanisms that confer vulnerability for anxiety in this population. This study investigated whether children with asthma and anxiety disorders display attentional biases towards threatening stimuli, similar to what has been seen in children with anxiety disorders more generally. We also examined the relationships between attentional biases and anxiety symptomatology and asthma control for children with asthma. Ninety-three children, aged 8-13, took part in the study and were recruited into one of four conditions (asthma/anxiety, asthma, anxiety, control). Asthma was medically confirmed and anxiety was assessed through clinical interview. We used self- and parent-report questionnaires to measure child asthma (ATAQ) and anxiety (SCAS, CASI) variables. Participants completed a visual dot-probe task designed to measure attentional bias towards two types of stimuli: asthma related words and general threat words, as well as tasks to assess reading ability and attentional control. Results showed that attentional biases did not differ between the groups, although children with anxiety disorders displayed poorer attentional control. A significant correlation was found between poor asthma control and an attentional bias of asthma stimuli. While we found no evidence that anxiety disorders in children with asthma were associated with threat- or asthma-related attentional biases, preliminary evidence suggested that children with poor asthma control displayed biases towards asthma-specific stimuli. Future research is needed to explore whether these attentional biases are adaptive.

  15. Experimental study on the effect of wavelength and fluence in the laser cleaning of silvering in late Roman coins (Mid 3rd/4th century AD)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vlachou-Mogire, C.; Drakaki, E.; Serafetinides, A. A.; Zergioti, I.; Boukos, N.

    2007-03-01

    The political problems in Late Roman Empire caused significant changes in the coin technology. The silver content dropped severely and a new technology, in all the mints operating around the Empire, was introduced. For the production of these coins, copper based quaternary alloys were used and their surface was covered by a silver amalgam plating layer. Hoards of these coins have been recovered in thousands from across the Empire, however, their treatment has been problematic. Both mechanical and chemical cleaning results in the damage or the complete destruction of the thin silver layer. The use of laser technology in the cleaning of works of art has a wide range of applications which includes metallic objects. The main aim of this work was to investigate the use of lasers in the cleaning of the thin silver plating layers found in late Roman coins. The optimisation of laser parameters was achieved through comparative cleaning tests by employing Nd:YAG (532 nm and 266 nm) laser systems. The cleaning results on the plated areas were characterised by optical microscopy, and SEM-EDX analysis. Following a systematic investigation and many cleaning trials on two different wavelengths and fluence values, optimum irradiation parameters were thoroughly demonstrated. Microscopic observations of the cleaned areas evidenced complete removal of the encrustation and high selectivity of the laser cleaning. Neither thermal or mechanical injuries, nor cuprite blackening were observed on the cleaned surfaces at the optimum laser cleaning technique, using 532 nm of the Nd: YAG laser.

  16. Basic and Special Criteria for the Evaluation of Manually Activated and/or Coin Activated Vending Machines for Foods and/or Beverages. Revised February 1963.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    National Sanitation Foundation, Ann Arbor, MI.

    Appraisal of various types of manually activated and/or coin activated vending machines is discussed in this standard. The following are included--(1) introduction and definitions and discussion of various types of food and beverage vending machines, (2) general provisions including minimum requirements, alternate materials, and a classification…

  17. Challenges in bias correcting climate change simulations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Maraun, Douglas; Shepherd, Ted; Zappa, Giuseppe; Gutierrez, Jose; Widmann, Martin; Hagemann, Stefan; Richter, Ingo; Soares, Pedro; Mearns, Linda

    2016-04-01

    Biases in climate model simulations - if these are directly used as input for impact models - will introduce further biases in subsequent impact simulations. In response to this issue, so-called bias correction methods have been developed to post-process climate model output. These methods are now widely used and a crucial component in the generation of high resolution climate change projections. Bias correction is conceptually similar to model output statistics, which has been successfully used for several decades in numerical weather prediction. Yet in climate science, some authors outrightly dismiss any form of bias correction. Starting from this seeming contradiction, we highlight differences between the two contexts and infer consequences and limitations for the applicability of bias correction to climate change projections. We first show that cross validation approaches successfully used to evaluate weather forecasts are fundamentally insufficient to evaluate climate change bias correction. We further demonstrate that different types of model mismatches with observations require different solutions, and some may not sensibly be mitigated. In particular we consider the influence of large-scale circulation biases, biases in the persistence of weather regimes, and regional biases caused by an insufficient representation of the flow-topography interaction. We conclude with a list of recommendations and suggestions for future research to reduce, to post-process, and to cope with climate model biases.

  18. Winning the Genetic Lottery: Biasing Birth Sex Ratio Results in More Grandchildren

    PubMed Central

    Thogerson, Collette M.; Brady, Colleen M.; Howard, Richard D.; Mason, Georgia J.; Pajor, Edmond A.; Vicino, Greg A.; Garner, Joseph P.

    2013-01-01

    Population dynamics predicts that on average parents should invest equally in male and female offspring; similarly, the physiology of mammalian sex determination is supposedly stochastic, producing equal numbers of sons and daughters. However, a high quality parent can maximize fitness by biasing their birth sex ratio (SR) to the sex with the greatest potential to disproportionately outperform peers. All SR manipulation theories share a fundamental prediction: grandparents who bias birth SR should produce more grandoffspring via the favored sex. The celebrated examples of biased birth SRs in nature consistent with SR manipulation theories provide compelling circumstantial evidence. However, this prediction has never been directly tested in mammals, primarily because the complete three-generation pedigrees needed to test whether individual favored offspring produce more grandoffspring for the biasing grandparent are essentially impossible to obtain in nature. Three-generation pedigrees were constructed using 90 years of captive breeding records from 198 mammalian species. Male and female grandparents consistently biased their birth SR toward the sex that maximized second-generation success. The most strongly male-biased granddams and grandsires produced respectively 29% and 25% more grandoffspring than non-skewing conspecifics. The sons of the most male-biasing granddams were 2.7 times as fecund as those of granddams with a 50∶50 bias (similar results are seen in grandsires). Daughters of the strongest female-biasing granddams were 1.2 times as fecund as those of non-biasing females (this effect is not seen in grandsires). To our knowledge, these results are the first formal test of the hypothesis that birth SR manipulation is adaptive in mammals in terms of grandchildren produced, showing that SR manipulation can explain biased birth SR in general across mammalian species. These findings also have practical implications: parental control of birth SR has the

  19. Sexual dimorphism and the evolution of sex-biased gene expression in the brown alga ectocarpus.

    PubMed

    Lipinska, Agnieszka; Cormier, Alexandre; Luthringer, Rémy; Peters, Akira F; Corre, Erwan; Gachon, Claire M M; Cock, J Mark; Coelho, Susana M

    2015-06-01

    Males and females often have marked phenotypic differences, and the expression of these dissimilarities invariably involves sex differences in gene expression. Sex-biased gene expression has been well characterized in animal species, where a high proportion of the genome may be differentially regulated in males and females during development. Male-biased genes tend to evolve more rapidly than female-biased genes, implying differences in the strength of the selective forces acting on the two sexes. Analyses of sex-biased gene expression have focused on organisms that exhibit separate sexes during the diploid phase of the life cycle (diploid sexual systems), but the genetic nature of the sexual system is expected to influence the evolutionary trajectories of sex-biased genes. We analyze here the patterns of sex-biased gene expression in Ectocarpus, a brown alga with haploid sex determination (dioicy) and a low level of phenotypic sexual dimorphism. In Ectocarpus, female-biased genes were found to be evolving as rapidly as male-biased genes. Moreover, genes expressed at fertility showed faster rates of evolution than genes expressed in immature gametophytes. Both male- and female-biased genes had a greater proportion of sites experiencing positive selection, suggesting that their accelerated evolution is at least partly driven by adaptive evolution. Gene duplication appears to have played a significant role in the generation of sex-biased genes in Ectocarpus, expanding previous models that propose this mechanism for the resolution of sexual antagonism in diploid systems. The patterns of sex-biased gene expression in Ectocarpus are consistent both with predicted characteristics of UV (haploid) sexual systems and with the distinctive aspects of this organism's reproductive biology.

  20. Numeracy and framing bias in epilepsy.

    PubMed

    Choi, Hyunmi; Wong, John B; Mendiratta, Anil; Heiman, Gary A; Hamberger, Marla J

    2011-01-01

    Patients with epilepsy are frequently confronted with complex treatment decisions. Communicating treatment risks is often difficult because patients may have difficulty with basic statistical concepts (i.e., low numeracy) or might misconceive the statistical information based on the way information is presented, a phenomenon known as "framing bias." We assessed numeracy and framing bias in 95 adults with chronic epilepsy and explored cognitive correlates of framing bias. Compared with normal controls, patients with epilepsy had significantly poorer performance on the Numeracy scale (P=0.02), despite a higher level of education than normal controls (P<0.001). Compared with patients with higher numeracy, patients with lower numeracy were significantly more likely to exhibit framing bias. Abstract problem solving performance correlated with the degree of framing bias (r=0.631, P<0.0001), suggesting a relationship between aspects of executive functioning and framing bias. Poor numeracy and susceptibility framing bias place patients with epilepsy at risk for uninformed decisions.

  1. Two sides of one coin: massive hepatic necrosis and progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in acute liver failure

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Hong-Lei; Cai, Xiaobo; Yuan, Xiaodong; Liebe, Roman; Dooley, Steven; Li, Hai; Wang, Tai-Ling

    2015-01-01

    Massive hepatic necrosis is a key event underlying acute liver failure, a serious clinical syndrome with high mortality. Massive hepatic necrosis in acute liver failure has unique pathophysiological characteristics including extremely rapid parenchymal cell death and removal. On the other hand, massive necrosis rapidly induces the activation of liver progenitor cells, the so-called “second pathway of liver regeneration.” The final clinical outcome of acute liver failure depends on whether liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration can efficiently restore parenchymal mass and function within a short time. This review summarizes the current knowledge regarding massive hepatic necrosis and liver progenitor cell-mediated regeneration in patients with acute liver failure, the two sides of one coin. PMID:26136687

  2. Asymmetric bias in user guided segmentations of brain structures

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Styner, Martin; Smith, Rachel G.; Graves, Michael M.; Mosconi, Matthew W.; Peterson, Sarah; White, Scott; Blocher, Joe; El-Sayed, Mohammed; Hazlett, Heather C.

    2007-03-01

    Brain morphometric studies often incorporate comparative asymmetry analyses of left and right hemispheric brain structures. In this work we show evidence that common methods of user guided structural segmentation exhibit strong left-right asymmetric biases and thus fundamentally influence any left-right asymmetry analyses. We studied several structural segmentation methods with varying degree of user interaction from pure manual outlining to nearly fully automatic procedures. The methods were applied to MR images and their corresponding left-right mirrored images from an adult and a pediatric study. Several expert raters performed the segmentations of all structures. The asymmetric segmentation bias is assessed by comparing the left-right volumetric asymmetry in the original and mirrored datasets, as well as by testing each sides volumetric differences to a zero mean standard t-tests. The structural segmentations of caudate, putamen, globus pallidus, amygdala and hippocampus showed a highly significant asymmetric bias using methods with considerable manual outlining or landmark placement. Only the lateral ventricle segmentation revealed no asymmetric bias due to the high degree of automation and a high intensity contrast on its boundary. Our segmentation methods have been adapted in that they are applied to only one of the hemispheres in an image and its left-right mirrored image. Our work suggests that existing studies of hemispheric asymmetry without similar precautions should be interpreted in a new, skeptical light. Evidence of an asymmetric segmentation bias is novel and unknown to the imaging community. This result seems less surprising to the visual perception community and its likely cause is differences in perception of oppositely curved 3D structures.

  3. Climate adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kinzig, Ann P.

    2015-03-01

    This paper is intended as a brief introduction to climate adaptation in a conference devoted otherwise to the physics of sustainable energy. Whereas mitigation involves measures to reduce the probability of a potential event, such as climate change, adaptation refers to actions that lessen the impact of climate change. Mitigation and adaptation differ in other ways as well. Adaptation does not necessarily have to be implemented immediately to be effective; it only needs to be in place before the threat arrives. Also, adaptation does not necessarily require global, coordinated action; many effective adaptation actions can be local. Some urban communities, because of land-use change and the urban heat-island effect, currently face changes similar to some expected under climate change, such as changes in water availability, heat-related morbidity, or changes in disease patterns. Concern over those impacts might motivate the implementation of measures that would also help in climate adaptation, despite skepticism among some policy makers about anthropogenic global warming. Studies of ancient civilizations in the southwestern US lends some insight into factors that may or may not be important to successful adaptation.

  4. Learning to adapt: Dynamics of readaptation to geometrical distortions.

    PubMed

    Yehezkel, Oren; Sagi, Dov; Sterkin, Anna; Belkin, Michael; Polat, Uri

    2010-07-21

    The visual system can adapt to optical blur, whereby the adapted image is perceived as sharp. Here we show that adaptation reduces blur-induced biases in shape perception, with repeated adaptations (perceptual learning), leading to unbiased perception upon re-exposure to blur. Observers wore a cylindrical lens of +1.00 D on one eye, thus simulating monocular astigmatism. The other eye was either masked with a translucent blurred lens (monocular) or unmasked (dichoptic). Adaptation was tested in several repeated sessions with a proximity-grouping task, using horizontally or vertically arranged dot-arrays, without feedback, before, after, and throughout the adaptation period. A robust bias in global-orientation judgment was observed with the lens, in accordance with the blur axes. After the observer wore the lens for 2 h, there was no significant change in the bias, but after 4 h, the monocular condition, but not the dichoptic, resulted in reduced bias. The adaptation effect of the monocular 4-h adaptation was preserved, and even improved, when the lens was re-applied the next day, indicating learning. After-effects were observed under all experimental conditions except for the 4-h monocular condition, where learning took place. We suggest that, with long experience, adaptation is transferred to a long-term memory that can be instantly engaged when blur is re-applied, or disengaged when blur is removed, thus leaving no after-effects. The comparison between the monocular and dichoptic conditions indicates a binocular cortical site of plasticity.

  5. Importance biasing scheme implemented in the PRIZMA code

    SciTech Connect

    Kandiev, I.Z.; Malyshkin, G.N.

    1997-12-31

    PRIZMA code is intended for Monte Carlo calculations of linear radiation transport problems. The code has wide capabilities to describe geometry, sources, material composition, and to obtain parameters specified by user. There is a capability to calculate path of particle cascade (including neutrons, photons, electrons, positrons and heavy charged particles) taking into account possible transmutations. Importance biasing scheme was implemented to solve the problems which require calculation of functionals related to small probabilities (for example, problems of protection against radiation, problems of detection, etc.). The scheme enables to adapt trajectory building algorithm to problem peculiarities.

  6. Observations and Models of Galaxy Assembly Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Campbell, Duncan A.

    2017-01-01

    The assembly history of dark matter haloes imparts various correlations between a halo’s physical properties and its large scale environment, i.e. assembly bias. It is common for models of the galaxy-halo connection to assume that galaxy properties are only a function of halo mass, implicitly ignoring how assembly bias may affect galaxies. Recently, programs to model and constrain the degree to which galaxy properties are influenced by assembly bias have been undertaken; however, the extent and character of galaxy assembly bias remains a mystery. Nevertheless, characterizing and modeling galaxy assembly bias is an important step in understanding galaxy evolution and limiting any systematic effects assembly bias may pose in cosmological measurements using galaxy surveys.I will present work on modeling and constraining the effect of assembly bias in two galaxy properties: stellar mass and star-formation rate. Conditional abundance matching allows for these galaxy properties to be tied to halo formation history to a variable degree, making studies of the relative strength of assembly bias possible. Galaxy-galaxy clustering and galactic conformity, the degree to which galaxy color is correlated between neighbors, are sensitive observational measures of galaxy assembly bias. I will show how these measurements can be used to constrain galaxy assembly bias and the peril of ignoring it.

  7. Model free audit methodology for bias evaluation of tumour progression in oncology.

    PubMed

    Stone, Andrew; Macpherson, Euan; Smith, Ann; Jennison, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Many oncology studies incorporate a blinded independent central review (BICR) to make an assessment of the integrity of the primary endpoint, progression free survival. Recently, it has been suggested that, in order to assess the potential for bias amongst investigators, a BICR amongst only a sample of patients could be performed; if evidence of bias is detected, according to a predefined threshold, the BICR is then assessed in all patients, otherwise, it is concluded that the sample was sufficient to rule out meaningful levels of bias. In this paper, we present an approach that adapts a method originally created for defining futility bounds in group sequential designs. The hazard ratio ratio, the ratio of the hazard ratio (HR) for the treatment effect estimated from the BICR to the corresponding HR for the investigator assessments, is used as the metric to define bias. The approach is simple to implement and ensures a high probability that a substantial true bias will be detected. In the absence of bias, there is a high probability of accepting the accuracy of local evaluations based on the sample, in which case an expensive BICR of all patients is avoided. The properties of the approach are demonstrated by retrospective application to a completed Phase III trial in colorectal cancer. The same approach could easily be adapted for other disease settings, and for test statistics other than the hazard ratio.

  8. Visual adaptation to thin and fat bodies transfers across identity.

    PubMed

    Hummel, Dennis; Rudolf, Anne K; Untch, Karl-Heinz; Grabhorn, Ralph; Mohr, Harald M

    2012-01-01

    Visual perception is highly variable and can be influenced by the surrounding world. Previous research has revealed that body perception can be biased due to adaptation to thin or fat body shapes. The aim of the present study was to show that adaptation to certain body shapes and the resulting perceptual biases transfer across different identities of adaptation and test stimuli. We designed two similar adaptation experiments in which healthy female participants adapted to pictures of either thin or fat bodies and subsequently compared more or less distorted pictures of their own body to their actual body shape. In the first experiment (n = 16) the same identity was used as adaptation and test stimuli (i.e. pictures of the participant's own body) while in the second experiment (n = 16) we used pictures of unfamiliar thin or fat bodies as adaptation stimuli. We found comparable adaptation effects in both experiments: After adaptation to a thin body, participants rated a thinner than actual body picture to be the most realistic and vice versa. We therefore assume that adaptation to certain body shapes transfers across different identities. These results raise the questions of whether some type of natural adaptation occurs in everyday life. Natural and predominant exposure to certain bodily features like body shape--especially the thin ideal in Western societies--could bias perception for these features. In this regard, further research might shed light on aspects of body dissatisfaction and the development of body image disturbances in terms of eating disorders.

  9. Asymmetric divertor biasing in MAST

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Helander, P.; Cohen, R.; Counsell, G. C.; Ryutov, D. D.

    2002-11-01

    Experiments are being carried out on the Mega-Ampere Spherical Tokamak (MAST) where the divertor tiles are electrically biased in a toroidally alternating way. The aim is to induce convective cells in the divertor plasma, broaden the SOL and reduce the divertor heat load. This paper describes the underlying theory and experimental results. Criteria are presented for achieving strong broadening and exciting shear-flow turbulence in the SOL, and properties of the expected turbulence are derived. It is also shown that magnetic shear near the X-point is likely to confine the potential perturbations to the divertor region, leaving the part of the SOL that is in direct contact with the core plasma intact. Preliminary comparison of the theory with MAST data is encouraging: the distortion of the heat deposition pattern, its broadening, and the incremental heat load are qualitatively in agreement; quantitative comparisons are underway.

  10. Reexamining our bias against heuristics.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Kevin; Eva, Kevin W; Norman, Geoff R

    2014-08-01

    Using heuristics offers several cognitive advantages, such as increased speed and reduced effort when making decisions, in addition to allowing us to make decision in situations where missing data do not allow for formal reasoning. But the traditional view of heuristics is that they trade accuracy for efficiency. Here the authors discuss sources of bias in the literature implicating the use of heuristics in diagnostic error and highlight the fact that there are also data suggesting that under certain circumstances using heuristics may lead to better decisions that formal analysis. They suggest that diagnostic error is frequently misattributed to the use of heuristics and propose an alternative view whereby content knowledge is the root cause of diagnostic performance and heuristics lie on the causal pathway between knowledge and diagnostic error or success.

  11. Social reward shapes attentional biases.

    PubMed

    Anderson, Brian A

    2016-01-01

    Paying attention to stimuli that predict a reward outcome is important for an organism to survive and thrive. When visual stimuli are associated with tangible, extrinsic rewards such as money or food, these stimuli acquire high attentional priority and come to automatically capture attention. In humans and other primates, however, many behaviors are not motivated directly by such extrinsic rewards, but rather by the social feedback that results from performing those behaviors. In the present study, I examine whether positive social feedback can similarly influence attentional bias. The results show that stimuli previously associated with a high probability of positive social feedback elicit value-driven attentional capture, much like stimuli associated with extrinsic rewards. Unlike with extrinsic rewards, however, such stimuli also influence task-specific motivation. My findings offer a potential mechanism by which social reward shapes the information that we prioritize when perceiving the world around us.

  12. Understanding bias in provenance studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Garzanti, Eduardo; Andò, Sergio; Malusà, Marco; Vezzoli, Giovanni

    2010-05-01

    Innumerable pieces of information are stored in the sedimentary archive. Each single sediment layer contains billions of detrital grains, and every grain preserves imprints of its geological story. If we learn to read, compare, and combine these messages properly, through a deeper understanding of physical and chemical processes that modify sediment composition during the sedimentary cycle, provenance analysis may eventually enable us to reconstruct more accurately the geological processes that shaped the Earth's crust in the past. Interpreting detrital modes is not straightforward because provenance signals issued from source rocks become progressively blurred by multiple noises in the sedimentary environment ("environmental bias"; Komar, 2007), and finally during post-depositional history ("diagenetic bias"; Morton and Hallsworth, 2007). During transport and deposition, detrital minerals are segregated in different size fractions and environments according to their size, density and shape (Rubey, 1933; Garzanti et al., 2008). Heavy-mineral concentration can increase by an order of magnitude due to selective-entrainment effects, with potentially overwhelming impact on chemical composition and provenance estimates based on detrital-geochronology data (Garzanti et al., 2009). Conversely, heavy-mineral concentration is typically reduced by an order of magnitude in Alpine and Himalayan foreland-basin deposits older than the Pleistocene (Garzanti and Andò, 2007). Extensive chemical dissolution can occur even prior to deposition during weathering in hot humid climates (Velbel, 2007). Primary provenance signals can be isolated and assessed by studying first modern sediments in hyperarid settings (i.e., free from diagenetic and weathering bias). Next, weathering, hydraulic-sorting, and diagenetic effects can be singled out by analysing sediments of similar provenance produced in contrasting climatic conditions, sediments transported in diverse modes and deposited in

  13. On evolutionary explanations of cognitive biases.

    PubMed

    Marshall, James A R; Trimmer, Pete C; Houston, Alasdair I; McNamara, John M

    2013-08-01

    Apparently irrational biases such as overconfidence, optimism, and pessimism are increasingly studied by biologists, psychologists, and neuroscientists. Functional explanations of such phenomena are essential; we argue that recent proposals, focused on benefits from overestimating the probability of success in conflicts or practising self-deception to better deceive others, are still lacking in crucial regards. Attention must be paid to the difference between cognitive and outcome biases; outcome biases are suboptimal, yet cognitive biases can be optimal. However, given that cognitive biases are subjectively experienced by affected individuals, developing theory and collecting evidence on them poses challenges. An evolutionary theory of cognitive bias might require closer integration of function and mechanism, analysing the evolution of constraints imposed by the mechanisms that determine behaviour.

  14. Professional Culture and Climate: Addressing Unconscious Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Knezek, Patricia

    2016-10-01

    Unconscious bias reflects expectations or stereotypes that influence our judgments of others (regardless of our own group). Everyone has unconscious biases. The end result of unconscious bias can be an accumulation of advantage or disadvantage that impacts the long term career success of individuals, depending on which biases they are subject to. In order to foster a professional culture and climate, being aware of these unconscious biases and mitigating against them is a first step. This is particularly important when judgements are needed, such as in cases for recruitment, choice of speakers for conferences, and even reviewing papers submitted for publication. This presentation will cover how unconscious bias manifests itself, what evidence exists to demonstrate it exists, and ways it can be addressed.

  15. Symmetry as Bias: Rediscovering Special Relativity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lowry, Michael R.

    1992-01-01

    This paper describes a rational reconstruction of Einstein's discovery of special relativity, validated through an implementation: the Erlanger program. Einstein's discovery of special relativity revolutionized both the content of physics and the research strategy used by theoretical physicists. This research strategy entails a mutual bootstrapping process between a hypothesis space for biases, defined through different postulated symmetries of the universe, and a hypothesis space for physical theories. The invariance principle mutually constrains these two spaces. The invariance principle enables detecting when an evolving physical theory becomes inconsistent with its bias, and also when the biases for theories describing different phenomena are inconsistent. Structural properties of the invariance principle facilitate generating a new bias when an inconsistency is detected. After a new bias is generated. this principle facilitates reformulating the old, inconsistent theory by treating the latter as a limiting approximation. The structural properties of the invariance principle can be suitably generalized to other types of biases to enable primal-dual learning.

  16. Publication Bias in Methodological Computational Research

    PubMed Central

    Boulesteix, Anne-Laure; Stierle, Veronika; Hapfelmeier, Alexander

    2015-01-01

    The problem of publication bias has long been discussed in research fields such as medicine. There is a consensus that publication bias is a reality and that solutions should be found to reduce it. In methodological computational research, including cancer informatics, publication bias may also be at work. The publication of negative research findings is certainly also a relevant issue, but has attracted very little attention to date. The present paper aims at providing a new formal framework to describe the notion of publication bias in the context of methodological computational research, facilitate and stimulate discussions on this topic, and increase awareness in the scientific community. We report an exemplary pilot study that aims at gaining experiences with the collection and analysis of information on unpublished research efforts with respect to publication bias, and we outline the encountered problems. Based on these experiences, we try to formalize the notion of publication bias. PMID:26508827

  17. Cognitive Biases and Nonverbal Cue Availability in Detecting Deception

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Burgoon, Judee K.; Blair, J. Pete; Strom, Renee E.

    2008-01-01

    In potentially deceptive situations, people rely on mental shortcuts to help process information. These heuristic judgments are often biased and result in inaccurate assessments of sender veracity. Four such biases--truth bias, visual bias, demeanor bias, and expectancy violation bias--were examined in a judgment experiment that varied nonverbal…

  18. When Do Children Exhibit a "Yes" Bias?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Okanda, Mako; Itakura, Shoji

    2010-01-01

    This study investigated whether one hundred and thirty-five 3- to 6-year-old children exhibit a yes bias to various yes-no questions and whether their knowledge status affects the production of a yes bias. Three-year-olds exhibited a yes bias to all yes-no questions such as "preference-object" and "knowledge-object" questions pertaining to…

  19. Electric Control of Exchange Bias Training

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echtenkamp, W.; Binek, Ch.

    2013-11-01

    Voltage-controlled exchange bias training and tunability are introduced. Isothermal voltage pulses are used to reverse the antiferromagnetic order parameter of magnetoelectric Cr2O3, and thus continuously tune the exchange bias of an adjacent CoPd film. Voltage-controlled exchange bias training is initialized by tuning the antiferromagnetic interface into a nonequilibrium state incommensurate with the underlying bulk. Interpretation of these hitherto unreported effects contributes to new understanding in electrically controlled magnetism.

  20. Three-input majority function as the unique optimal function for the bias amplification using nonlocal boxes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mori, Ryuhei

    2016-11-01

    Brassard et al. [Phys. Rev. Lett. 96, 250401 (2006), 10.1103/PhysRevLett.96.250401] showed that shared nonlocal boxes with a CHSH (Clauser, Horne, Shimony, and Holt) probability greater than 3/+√{6 } 6 yield trivial communication complexity. There still exists a gap with the maximum CHSH probability 2/+√{2 } 4 achievable by quantum mechanics. It is an interesting open question to determine the exact threshold for the trivial communication complexity. Brassard et al.'s idea is based on recursive bias amplification by the three-input majority function. It was not obvious if another choice of function exhibits stronger bias amplification. We show that the three-input majority function is the unique optimal function, so that one cannot improve the threshold 3/+√{6 } 6 by Brassard et al.'s bias amplification. In this work, protocols for computing the function used for the bias amplification are restricted to be nonadaptive protocols or a particular adaptive protocol inspired by Pawłowski et al.'s protocol for information causality [Nature (London) 461, 1101 (2009), 10.1038/nature08400]. We first show an adaptive protocol inspired by Pawłowski et al.'s protocol, and then show that the adaptive protocol improves upon nonadaptive protocols. Finally, we show that the three-input majority function is the unique optimal function for the bias amplification if we apply the adaptive protocol to each step of the bias amplification.

  1. Alcohol-attentional bias and motivational structure as independent predictors of social drinkers' alcohol consumption.

    PubMed

    Fadardi, Javad Salehi; Cox, W Miles

    2008-10-01

    Prior studies aimed at explaining cognitive-motivational reasons for drinking have focused on either cognitive or motivational factors, but not on both. This study examined the ability of both alcohol-attentional bias and motivational structure to predict alcohol consumption. Participants were university students (N=87) who completed a battery of tests, including the Personal Concerns Inventory (a measure of adaptive and maladaptive motivation), an alcohol Stroop test (a measure of alcohol-attentional bias), and an alcohol-use inventory. Regression, moderation, and mediation analyses showed that (a) maladaptive motivation and alcohol-attentional bias were positive predictors of alcohol consumption after participants' age, gender, and executive cognitive functioning had been controlled, and (b) maladaptive motivation and alcohol-attentional bias independently predicted alcohol consumption. The implications of the results for both theory and practice are discussed.

  2. Toothbrush Adaptations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Exceptional Parent, 1987

    1987-01-01

    Suggestions are presented for helping disabled individuals learn to use or adapt toothbrushes for proper dental care. A directory lists dental health instructional materials available from various organizations. (CB)

  3. Chronic and acute biases in perceptual stabilization

    PubMed Central

    Al-Dossari, Munira; Blake, Randolph; Brascamp, Jan W.; Freeman, Alan W.

    2015-01-01

    When perceptually ambiguous stimuli are presented intermittently, the percept on one presentation tends to be the same as that on the previous presentation. The role of short-term, acute biases in the production of this perceptual stability is relatively well understood. In addition, however, long-lasting, chronic bias may also contribute to stability. In this paper we develop indices for both biases and for stability, and show that stability can be expressed as a sum of contributions from the two types of bias. We then apply this analytical procedure to binocular rivalry, showing that adjustment of the monocular contrasts can alter the relative contributions of the two biases. Stability is mainly determined by chronic bias when the contrasts are equal, but acute bias dominates stability when right-eye contrast is set lower than left-eye contrast. Finally, we show that the right-eye bias persists in continuous binocular rivalry. Our findings reveal a previously unappreciated contribution of chronic bias to stable perception. PMID:26641947

  4. Detecting Gender Bias Through Test Item Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    González-Espada, Wilson J.

    2009-03-01

    Many physical science and physics instructors might not be trained in pedagogically appropriate test construction methods. This could lead to test items that do not measure what they are intended to measure. A subgroup of these items might show bias against some groups of students. This paper describes how the author became aware of potentially biased items against females in his examinations, which led to the exploration of fundamental issues related to item validity, gender bias, and differential item functioning, or DIF. A brief discussion of DIF in the context of university courses, as well as practical suggestions to detect possible gender-biased items, follows.

  5. Identifying and Avoiding Bias in Research

    PubMed Central

    Pannucci, Christopher J.; Wilkins, Edwin G.

    2010-01-01

    This narrative review provides an overview on the topic of bias as part of Plastic and Reconstructive Surgery's series of articles on evidence-based medicine. Bias can occur in the planning, data collection, analysis, and publication phases of research. Understanding research bias allows readers to critically and independently review the scientific literature and avoid treatments which are suboptimal or potentially harmful. A thorough understanding of bias and how it affects study results is essential for the practice of evidence-based medicine. PMID:20679844

  6. Bayesian long branch attraction bias and corrections.

    PubMed

    Susko, Edward

    2015-03-01

    Previous work on the star-tree paradox has shown that Bayesian methods suffer from a long branch attraction bias. That work is extended to settings involving more taxa and partially resolved trees. The long branch attraction bias is confirmed to arise more broadly and an additional source of bias is found. A by-product of the analysis is methods that correct for biases toward particular topologies. The corrections can be easily calculated using existing Bayesian software. Posterior support for a set of two or more trees can thus be supplemented with corrected versions to cross-check or replace results. Simulations show the corrections to be highly effective.

  7. Bayesian Item Selection in Constrained Adaptive Testing Using Shadow Tests

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Veldkamp, Bernard P.

    2010-01-01

    Application of Bayesian item selection criteria in computerized adaptive testing might result in improvement of bias and MSE of the ability estimates. The question remains how to apply Bayesian item selection criteria in the context of constrained adaptive testing, where large numbers of specifications have to be taken into account in the item…

  8. Recursive bias estimation for high dimensional regression smoothers

    SciTech Connect

    Hengartner, Nicolas W; Cornillon, Pierre - Andre; Matzner - Lober, Eric

    2009-01-01

    In multivariate nonparametric analysis, sparseness of the covariates also called curse of dimensionality, forces one to use large smoothing parameters. This leads to biased smoother. Instead of focusing on optimally selecting the smoothing parameter, we fix it to some reasonably large value to ensure an over-smoothing of the data. The resulting smoother has a small variance but a substantial bias. In this paper, we propose to iteratively correct of the bias initial estimator by an estimate of the latter obtained by smoothing the residuals. We examine in details the convergence of the iterated procedure for classical smoothers and relate our procedure to L{sub 2}-Boosting, For multivariate thin plate spline smoother, we proved that our procedure adapts to the correct and unknown order of smoothness for estimating an unknown function m belonging to H({nu}) (Sobolev space where m should be bigger than d/2). We apply our method to simulated and real data and show that our method compares favorably with existing procedures.

  9. Robust object tracking via online dynamic spatial bias appearance models.

    PubMed

    Chen, Datong; Yang, Jie

    2007-12-01

    This paper presents a robust object tracking method via a spatial bias appearance model learned dynamically in video. Motivated by the attention shifting among local regions of a human vision system during object tracking, we propose to partition an object into regions with different confidences and track the object using a dynamic spatial bias appearance model (DSBAM) estimated from region confidences. The confidence of a region is estimated to re ect the discriminative power of the region in a feature space, and the probability of occlusion. We propose a novel hierarchical Monte Carlo (HAMC) algorithm to learn region confidences dynamically in every frame. The algorithm consists of two levels of Monte Carlo processes implemented using two particle filtering procedures at each level and can efficiently extract high confidence regions through video frames by exploiting the temporal consistency of region confidences. A dynamic spatial bias map is then generated from the high confidence regions, and is employed to adapt the appearance model of the object and to guide a tracking algorithm in searching for correspondences in adjacent frames of video images. We demonstrate feasibility of the proposed method in video surveillance applications. The proposed method can be combined with many other existing tracking systems to enhance the robustness of these systems.

  10. Biased introgression of mitochondrial and nuclear genes: a comparison of diploid and haplodiploid systems.

    PubMed

    Patten, Manus M; Carioscia, Sara A; Linnen, Catherine R

    2015-10-01

    Hybridization between recently diverged species, even if infrequent, can lead to the introgression of genes from one species into another. The rates of mitochondrial and nuclear introgression often differ, with some taxa showing biases for mitochondrial introgression and others for nuclear introgression. Several hypotheses exist to explain such biases, including adaptive introgression, sex differences in dispersal rates, sex-specific prezygotic isolation and sex-specific fitness of hybrids (e.g. Haldane's rule). We derive a simple population genetic model that permits an analysis of sex-specific demographic and fitness parameters and measures the relative rates of mitochondrial and nuclear introgression between hybridizing pairs. We do this separately for diploid and haplodiploid species. For diploid taxa, we recover results consistent with previous hypotheses: an excess of one sex among the hybridizing migrants or sex-specific prezygotic isolation causes a bias for one type of marker or the other; when Haldane's rule is obeyed, we find a mitochondrial bias in XY systems and a nuclear bias in ZW systems. For haplodiploid taxa, the model reveals that owing to their unique transmission genetics, they are seemingly assured of strong mitochondrial biases in introgression rates, unlike diploid taxa, where the relative fitness of male and female hybrids can tip the bias in either direction. This heretofore overlooked aspect of hybridization in haplodiploids provides what is perhaps the most likely explanation for differential introgression of mitochondrial and nuclear markers and raises concerns about the use of mitochondrial DNA barcodes for species delimitation in these taxa.

  11. A meta-analysis of the effect of cognitive bias modification on anxiety and depression.

    PubMed

    Hallion, Lauren S; Ruscio, Ayelet Meron

    2011-11-01

    Cognitive biases have been theorized to play a critical role in the onset and maintenance of anxiety and depression. Cognitive bias modification (CBM), an experimental paradigm that uses training to induce maladaptive or adaptive cognitive biases, was developed to test these causal models. Although CBM has generated considerable interest in the past decade, both as an experimental paradigm and as a form of treatment, there have been no quantitative reviews of the effect of CBM on anxiety and depression. This meta-analysis of 45 studies (2,591 participants) assessed the effect of CBM on cognitive biases and on anxiety and depression. CBM had a medium effect on biases (g = 0.49) that was stronger for interpretation (g = 0.81) than for attention (g = 0.29) biases. CBM further had a small effect on anxiety and depression (g = 0.13), although this effect was reliable only when symptoms were assessed after participants experienced a stressor (g = 0.23). When anxiety and depression were examined separately, CBM significantly modified anxiety but not depression. There was a nonsignificant trend toward a larger effect for studies including multiple training sessions. These findings are broadly consistent with cognitive theories of anxiety and depression that propose an interactive effect of cognitive biases and stressors on these symptoms. However, the small effect sizes observed here suggest that this effect may be more modest than previously believed.

  12. PEST reduces bias in forced choice psychophysics.

    PubMed

    Taylor, M M; Forbes, S M; Creelman, C D

    1983-11-01

    Observers performed several different detection tasks using both the PEST adaptive psychophysical procedure and a fixed-level (method of constant stimuli) psychophysical procedure. In two experiments, PEST runs targeted at P (C) = 0.80 were immediately followed by fixed-level detection runs presented at the difficulty level resulting from the PEST run. The fixed-level runs yielded P (C) about 0.75. During the fixed-level runs, the probability of a correct response was greater when the preceding response was correct than when it was wrong. Observers, even highly trained ones, perform in a nonstationary manner. The sequential dependency data can be used to determine a lower bound for the observer's "true" capability when performing optimally; this lower bound is close to the PEST target, and well above the forced choice P (C). The observer's "true" capability is the measure used by most theories of detection performance. A further experiment compared psychometric functions obtained from a set of PEST runs using different targets with those obtained from blocks of fixed-level trials at different levels. PEST results were more stable across observers, performance at all but the highest signal levels was better with PEST, and the PEST psychometric functions had shallower slopes. We hypothesize that PEST permits the observer to keep track of what he is trying to detect, whereas in the fixed-level method performance is disrupted by memory failure. Some recently suggested "more virulent" versions of PEST may be subject to biases similar to those of the fixed-level procedures.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  13. Countermeasures to Enhance Sensorimotor Adaptability

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Bloomberg, J. J.; Peters, B. T.; Mulavara, A. P.; Brady, R. A.; Batson, C. C.; Miller, C. A.; Cohen, H. S.

    2011-01-01

    During exploration-class missions, sensorimotor disturbances may lead to disruption in the ability to ambulate and perform functional tasks during the initial introduction to a novel gravitational environment following a landing on a planetary surface. The goal of our current project is to develop a sensorimotor adaptability (SA) training program to facilitate rapid adaptation to novel gravitational environments. We have developed a unique training system comprised of a treadmill placed on a motion-base facing a virtual visual scene that provides an unstable walking surface combined with incongruent visual flow designed to enhance sensorimotor adaptability. We have conducted a series of studies that have shown: Training using a combination of modified visual flow and support surface motion during treadmill walking enhances locomotor adaptability to a novel sensorimotor environment. Trained individuals become more proficient at performing multiple competing tasks while walking during adaptation to novel discordant sensorimotor conditions. Trained subjects can retain their increased level of adaptability over a six months period. SA training is effective in producing increased adaptability in a more complex over-ground ambulatory task on an obstacle course. This confirms that for a complex task like walking, treadmill training contains enough of the critical features of overground walking to be an effective training modality. The structure of individual training sessions can be optimized to promote fast/strategic motor learning. Training sessions that each contain short-duration exposures to multiple perturbation stimuli allows subjects to acquire a greater ability to rapidly reorganize appropriate response strategies when encountering a novel sensory environment. Individual sensory biases (i.e. increased visual dependency) can predict adaptive responses to novel sensory environments suggesting that customized training prescriptions can be developed to enhance

  14. Monocular motion adaptation affects the perceived trajectory of stereomotion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Brooks, Kevin R.

    2002-01-01

    Perceived stereomotion trajectory was measured before and after adaptation to lateral motion in the dominant or nondominant eye to assess the relative contributions of 2 cues: changing disparity and interocular velocity difference. Perceived speed for monocular lateral motion and perceived binocular visual direction (BVD) was also assessed. Unlike stereomotion trajectory perception, the BVD of static targets showed an ocular dominance bias, even without adaptation. Adaptation caused equivalent biases in perceived trajectory and monocular motion speed, without significantly affecting perceived BVD. Predictions from monocular motion data closely match trajectory perception data, unlike those from BVD sources. The results suggest that the interocular velocity differences make a significant contribution to stereomotion trajectory perception.

  15. Adaptive Control for Microgravity Vibration Isolation System

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, Bong-Jun; Calise, Anthony J.; Craig, James I.; Whorton, Mark S.

    2005-01-01

    Most active vibration isolation systems that try to a provide quiescent acceleration environment for space science experiments have utilized linear design methods. In this paper, we address adaptive control augmentation of an existing classical controller that employs a high-gain acceleration feedback together with a low-gain position feedback to center the isolated platform. The control design feature includes parametric and dynamic uncertainties because the hardware of the isolation system is built as a payload-level isolator, and the acceleration Sensor exhibits a significant bias. A neural network is incorporated to adaptively compensate for the system uncertainties, and a high-pass filter is introduced to mitigate the effect of the measurement bias. Simulations show that the adaptive control improves the performance of the existing acceleration controller and keep the level of the isolated platform deviation to that of the existing control system.

  16. Haploinsufficiency predictions without study bias

    PubMed Central

    Steinberg, Julia; Honti, Frantisek; Meader, Stephen; Webber, Caleb

    2015-01-01

    Any given human individual carries multiple genetic variants that disrupt protein-coding genes, through structural variation, as well as nucleotide variants and indels. Predicting the phenotypic consequences of a gene disruption remains a significant challenge. Current approaches employ information from a range of biological networks to predict which human genes are haploinsufficient (meaning two copies are required for normal function) or essential (meaning at least one copy is required for viability). Using recently available study gene sets, we show that these approaches are strongly biased towards providing accurate predictions for well-studied genes. By contrast, we derive a haploinsufficiency score from a combination of unbiased large-scale high-throughput datasets, including gene co-expression and genetic variation in over 6000 human exomes. Our approach provides a haploinsufficiency prediction for over twice as many genes currently unassociated with papers listed in Pubmed as three commonly-used approaches, and outperforms these approaches for predicting haploinsufficiency for less-studied genes. We also show that fine-tuning the predictor on a set of well-studied ‘gold standard’ haploinsufficient genes does not improve the prediction for less-studied genes. This new score can readily be used to prioritize gene disruptions resulting from any genetic variant, including copy number variants, indels and single-nucleotide variants. PMID:26001969

  17. Modeling confirmation bias and polarization

    PubMed Central

    Del Vicario, Michela; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H. Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Online users tend to select claims that adhere to their system of beliefs and to ignore dissenting information. Confirmation bias, indeed, plays a pivotal role in viral phenomena. Furthermore, the wide availability of content on the web fosters the aggregation of likeminded people where debates tend to enforce group polarization. Such a configuration might alter the public debate and thus the formation of the public opinion. In this paper we provide a mathematical model to study online social debates and the related polarization dynamics. We assume the basic updating rule of the Bounded Confidence Model (BCM) and we develop two variations a) the Rewire with Bounded Confidence Model (RBCM), in which discordant links are broken until convergence is reached; and b) the Unbounded Confidence Model, under which the interaction among discordant pairs of users is allowed even with a negative feedback, either with the rewiring step (RUCM) or without it (UCM). From numerical simulations we find that the new models (UCM and RUCM), unlike the BCM, are able to explain the coexistence of two stable final opinions, often observed in reality. Lastly, we present a mean field approximation of the newly introduced models. PMID:28074874

  18. Modeling confirmation bias and polarization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Del Vicario, Michela; Scala, Antonio; Caldarelli, Guido; Stanley, H. Eugene; Quattrociocchi, Walter

    2017-01-01

    Online users tend to select claims that adhere to their system of beliefs and to ignore dissenting information. Confirmation bias, indeed, plays a pivotal role in viral phenomena. Furthermore, the wide availability of content on the web fosters the aggregation of likeminded people where debates tend to enforce group polarization. Such a configuration might alter the public debate and thus the formation of the public opinion. In this paper we provide a mathematical model to study online social debates and the related polarization dynamics. We assume the basic updating rule of the Bounded Confidence Model (BCM) and we develop two variations a) the Rewire with Bounded Confidence Model (RBCM), in which discordant links are broken until convergence is reached; and b) the Unbounded Confidence Model, under which the interaction among discordant pairs of users is allowed even with a negative feedback, either with the rewiring step (RUCM) or without it (UCM). From numerical simulations we find that the new models (UCM and RUCM), unlike the BCM, are able to explain the coexistence of two stable final opinions, often observed in reality. Lastly, we present a mean field approximation of the newly introduced models.

  19. Exploratory Studies of Bias in Achievement Tests.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Green, Donald Ross; Draper, John F.

    This paper considers the question of bias in group administered academic achievement tests, bias which is inherent in the instruments themselves. A body of data on the test of performance of three disadvantaged minority groups--northern, urban black; southern, rural black; and, southwestern, Mexican-Americans--as tryout samples in contrast to…

  20. Attributional Biases among Clinicians and Nonclinicians.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harari, Oren; Hosey, Karen R.

    1981-01-01

    Clinicians and nonclinicians made causal attributions to actor behaviors. Analysis showed clear observer attribution bias for both groups. A greater bias occurred with deviant actor behavior and in situations that featured actor actions over opinions over emotions. Results are discussed in terms of applicability to clinical practice. (Author/JAC)

  1. Hindsight Bias and Developing Theories of Mind

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Daniel M.; Atance, Cristina; Meltzoff, Andrew N.; Loftus, Geoffrey R.

    2007-01-01

    Although "hindsight bias" (the "I knew it all along" phenomenon) has been documented in adults, its development has not been investigated. This is despite the fact that hindsight bias errors closely resemble the errors children make on theory of mind (ToM) tasks. Two main goals of the present work were to (a) create a battery of hindsight tasks…

  2. Understanding Unconscious Bias and Unintentional Racism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moule, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Unconscious biases affect one's relationships, whether they are fleeting relationships in airports or longer term relationships between teachers and students, teachers and parents, teachers and other educators. In this article, the author argues that understanding one's possible biases is essential for developing community in schools.…

  3. Developmental Changes in the Whole Number Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Braithwaite, David W.; Siegler, Robert S.

    2017-01-01

    Many students' knowledge of fractions is adversely affected by whole number bias, the tendency to focus on the separate whole number components (numerator and denominator) of a fraction rather than on the fraction's integrated magnitude (ratio of numerator to denominator). Although whole number bias appears early in the fraction learning process…

  4. Definition of the Situation and Observer Bias.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolman, Anita Sue

    An experiment is reported in which an attempt was made to bias college students' observations of a videotape of children at play. The study is framed in terms of W.I. Thomas' ideas concerning the definition of the situation. Observer bias is an instance when a definition of a situation is based primarily on subjective situational factors. Reliance…

  5. Biases in Children's and Adults' Moral Judgments

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Powell, Nina L.; Derbyshire, Stuart W. G.; Guttentag, Robert E.

    2012-01-01

    Two experiments examined biases in children's (5/6- and 7/8-year-olds) and adults' moral judgments. Participants at all ages judged that it was worse to produce harm when harm occurred (a) through action rather than inaction (omission bias), (b) when physical contact with the victim was involved (physical contact principle), and (c) when the harm…

  6. Distinctive characteristics of sexual orientation bias crimes.

    PubMed

    Stacey, Michele

    2011-10-01

    Despite increased attention in the area of hate crime research in the past 20 years, sexual orientation bias crimes have rarely been singled out for study. When these types of crimes are looked at, the studies are typically descriptive in nature. This article seeks to increase our knowledge of sexual orientation bias by answering the question: What are the differences between sexual orientation motivated bias crimes and racial bias crimes? This question is examined using data from the National Incident Based Reporting System (NIBRS) and multiple regression techniques. This analysis draws on the strengths of NIBRS to look at the incident characteristics of hate crimes and distinguishing characteristics of sexual orientation crimes. Specifically this analysis looks at the types and seriousness of offenses motivated by sexual orientation bias as opposed to race bias as well as victim and offender characteristics. The findings suggest that there are differences between these two types of bias crimes, suggesting a need for further separation of the bias types in policy and research.

  7. Distinctive Characteristics of Sexual Orientation Bias Crimes

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Stacey, Michele

    2011-01-01

    Despite increased attention in the area of hate crime research in the past 20 years, sexual orientation bias crimes have rarely been singled out for study. When these types of crimes are looked at, the studies are typically descriptive in nature. This article seeks to increase our knowledge of sexual orientation bias by answering the question:…

  8. Racially Biased Policing: Determinants of Citizen Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weitzer, Ronald; Tuch, Steven A.

    2005-01-01

    The current controversy surrounding racial profiling in America has focused renewed attention on the larger issue of racial bias by the police. Yet little is known about the extent of police racial bias and even less about public perceptions of the problem. This article analyzes recent national survey data on citizens' views of and reported…

  9. The Battle over Studies of Faculty Bias

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gravois, John

    2007-01-01

    The American Federation of Teachers (AFT) recently commissioned a study to review the research that finds liberal bias run amok in academe. Believing that the AFT is not a dispassionate observer of this debate, this article provides "The Chronicle of Higher Education's" survey of the genre. The studies reviewed include: (1) "Political Bias in the…

  10. How Many Hindsight Biases Are There?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, Hartmut; Nestler, Steffen; von Collani, Gernot; Fischer, Volkhard

    2008-01-01

    The answer is three: questioning a conceptual default assumption in hindsight bias research, we argue that the hindsight bias is not a unitary phenomenon but consists of three separable and partially independent subphenomena or components, namely, memory distortions, impressions of foreseeability and impressions of necessity. Following a detailed…

  11. Distractors--Can They Be Biased Too?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Alagumalai, Sivakumar; Keeves, John P.

    1999-01-01

    How distractors in a test item function differentially is discussed. Also discussed are methods to identify distractor bias, including the Pearson chi square, likelihood-ratio chi square, and the Neyman weighted-least squares chi square tests. Problems from a physics test illustrate possible causes of distractor bias. (SLD)

  12. Understanding Implicit Bias: What Educators Should Know

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Staats, Cheryl

    2016-01-01

    The desire to ensure the best for children is precisely why educators should become aware of the concept of implicit bias: the attitudes or stereotypes that affect our understanding, actions, and decisions in an unconscious manner. Operating outside of our conscious awareness, implicit biases are pervasive, and they can challenge even the most…

  13. Analysis of Catalonian silver coins from the Spanish War of Independence period (1808-1814) by Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pitarch, A.; Queralt, I.; Alvarez-Perez, A.

    2011-02-01

    Between the years 1808 and 1814, the Spanish War of Independence took place. This period, locally known as "Guerra del Francès", generated the need for money and consequently five mints were opened around the Catalan territory. To mark the 200th anniversary of the beginning of the war, an extensive campaign of Energy Dispersive X-ray Fluorescence measurements of some of these "emergency coins" was carried out. Apart from the silver (major constituent of all the studied coins) it has been possible to recognize copper as main metal alloying element. Likewise, the presence of zinc, tin, lead, gold, platinum, antimony, nickel and iron has been also identified. The obtained results have been useful not only for the characterization of the alloys, but also to determine the differences and analogies between the emissions and for historical explanations.

  14. Full Electric Control of Exchange Bias

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, S. M.; Cybart, Shane A.; Yi, D.; Parker, James M.; Ramesh, R.; Dynes, R. C.

    2013-02-01

    We report the creation of a multiferroic field effect device with a BiFeO3 (BFO) (antiferromagnetic-ferroelectric) gate dielectric and a La0.7Sr0.3MnO3 (LSMO) (ferromagnetic) conducting channel that exhibits direct, bipolar electrical control of exchange bias. We show that exchange bias is reversibly switched between two stable states with opposite exchange bias polarities upon ferroelectric poling of the BFO. No field cooling, temperature cycling, or additional applied magnetic or electric field beyond the initial BFO polarization is needed for this bipolar modulation effect. Based on these results and the current understanding of exchange bias, we propose a model to explain the control of exchange bias. In this model the coupled antiferromagnetic-ferroelectric order in BFO along with the modulation of interfacial exchange interactions due to ionic displacement of Fe3+ in BFO relative to Mn3+/4+ in LSMO cause bipolar modulation.

  15. A catalog of biases in questionnaires.

    PubMed

    Choi, Bernard C K; Pak, Anita W P

    2005-01-01

    Bias in questionnaires is an important issue in public health research. To collect the most accurate data from respondents, investigators must understand and be able to prevent or at least minimize bias in the design of their questionnaires. This paper identifies and categorizes 48 types of bias in questionnaires based on a review of the literature and offers an example of each type. The types are categorized according to three main sources of bias: the way a question is designed, the way the questionnaire as a whole is designed, and how the questionnaire is administered. This paper is intended to help investigators in public health understand the mechanism and dynamics of problems in questionnaire design and to provide a checklist for identifying potential bias in a questionnaire before it is administered.

  16. Sampling Bias on Cup Anemometer Mean Winds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kristensen, L.; Hansen, O. F.; Højstrup, J.

    2003-10-01

    The cup anemometer signal can be sampled in several ways to obtain the mean wind speed. Here we discuss the sampling of series of mean wind speeds from consecutive rotor rotations, followed by unweighted and weighted averaging. It is shown that the unweighted averaging creates a positive bias on the long-term mean wind speed, which is at least one order of magnitude larger than the positive bias from the weighted averaging, also known as the sample-and-hold method. For a homogeneous, neutrally stratified flow the first biases are 1%-2%. For comparison the biases due to fluctuations of the three wind velocity components and due to calibration non-linearity are determined under the same conditions. The largest of these is the v-bias from direction fluctuations. The calculations pertain to the Risø P2546A model cup anemometer.

  17. Are all biases missing data problems?

    PubMed

    Howe, Chanelle J; Cain, Lauren E; Hogan, Joseph W

    2015-09-01

    Estimating causal effects is a frequent goal of epidemiologic studies. Traditionally, there have been three established systematic threats to consistent estimation of causal effects. These three threats are bias due to confounders, selection, and measurement error. Confounding, selection, and measurement bias have typically been characterized as distinct types of biases. However, each of these biases can also be characterized as missing data problems that can be addressed with missing data solutions. Here we describe how the aforementioned systematic threats arise from missing data as well as review methods and their related assumptions for reducing each bias type. We also link the assumptions made by the reviewed methods to the missing completely at random (MCAR) and missing at random (MAR) assumptions made in the missing data framework that allow for valid inferences to be made based on the observed, incomplete data.

  18. G Protein-Coupled Receptor Biased Agonism

    PubMed Central

    Hodavance, Sima Y.; Gareri, Clarice; Torok, Rachel D.; Rockman, Howard A.

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCR) are the largest family of targets for current therapeutics. The classic model of their activation was binary, where agonist binding induced an active conformation and subsequent downstream signaling. Subsequently, the revised concept of biased agonism emerged, where different ligands at the same GPCR selectively activate one downstream pathway versus another. Advances in understanding the mechanism of biased agonism has led to the development of novel ligands, which have the potential for improved therapeutic and safety profiles. In this review, we summarize the theory and most recent breakthroughs in understanding biased signaling, examine recent laboratory investigations concerning biased ligands across different organ systems, and discuss the promising clinical applications of biased agonism. PMID:26751266

  19. Evidence Of Nationalistic Bias In Muaythai

    PubMed Central

    Myers, Tony D.; Balmer, Nigel J.; Nevill, Alan M.; Nakeeb, Yahya Al

    2006-01-01

    MuayThai is a combat sport with a growing international profile but limited research conducted into judging practices and processes. Problems with judging of other subjectively judged combat sports have caused controversy at major international tournaments that have resulted in changes to scoring methods. Nationalistic bias has been central to these problems and has been identified across a range of sports. The aim of this study was to examine nationalistic bias in MuayThai. Data were collected from the International Federation of MuayThai Amateur (IFMA) World Championships held in Almaty, Kazakhstan September 2003 and comprised of tournament results from 70 A-class MuayThai bouts each judged by between five and nine judges. Bouts examined featured 62 competitors from 21 countries and 25 judges from 11 countries. Results suggested that nationalistic bias was evident. The bias observed equated to approximately one round difference between opposing judges over the course of a bout (a mean of 1.09 (SE=0.50) points difference between judges with opposing affilations). The number of neutral judges used meant that this level of bias generally did not influence the outcome of bouts. Future research should explore other ingroup biases, such as nearest neighbour bias and political bias as well as investigating the feasibility adopting an electronic scoring system. Key Points Nationalistic bias is evident in international amateur MuayThai judging. The impact on the outcome of bouts is limited. The practice of using a large number of neutral judges appears to reduce the impact of nationalistic bias. PMID:24357972

  20. Medical journal peer review: process and bias.

    PubMed

    Manchikanti, Laxmaiah; Kaye, Alan D; Boswell, Mark V; Hirsch, Joshua A

    2015-01-01

    Scientific peer review is pivotal in health care research in that it facilitates the evaluation of findings for competence, significance, and originality by qualified experts. While the origins of peer review can be traced to the societies of the eighteenth century, it became an institutionalized part of the scholarly process in the latter half of the twentieth century. This was a response to the growth of research and greater subject specialization. With the current increase in the number of specialty journals, the peer review process continues to evolve to meet the needs of patients, clinicians, and policy makers. The peer review process itself faces challenges. Unblinded peer review might suffer from positive or negative bias towards certain authors, specialties, and institutions. Peer review can also suffer when editors and/or reviewers might be unable to understand the contents of the submitted manuscript. This can result in an inability to detect major flaws, or revelations of major flaws after acceptance of publication by the editors. Other concerns include potentially long delays in publication and challenges uncovering plagiarism, duplication, corruption and scientific misconduct. Conversely, a multitude of these challenges have led to claims of scientific misconduct and an erosion of faith. These challenges have invited criticism of the peer review process itself. However, despite its imperfections, the peer review process enjoys widespread support in the scientific community. Peer review bias is one of the major focuses of today's scientific assessment of the literature. Various types of peer review bias include content-based bias, confirmation bias, bias due to conservatism, bias against interdisciplinary research, publication bias, and the bias of conflicts of interest. Consequently, peer review would benefit from various changes and improvements with appropriate training of reviewers to provide quality reviews to maintain the quality and integrity of