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Sample records for adaptive bone remodeling

  1. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula's material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element's remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than actual

  2. Adaptive scapula bone remodeling computational simulation: Relevance to regenerative medicine

    SciTech Connect

    Sharma, Gulshan B.; Robertson, Douglas D.

    2013-07-01

    Shoulder arthroplasty success has been attributed to many factors including, bone quality, soft tissue balancing, surgeon experience, and implant design. Improved long-term success is primarily limited by glenoid implant loosening. Prosthesis design examines materials and shape and determines whether the design should withstand a lifetime of use. Finite element (FE) analyses have been extensively used to study stresses and strains produced in implants and bone. However, these static analyses only measure a moment in time and not the adaptive response to the altered environment produced by the therapeutic intervention. Computational analyses that integrate remodeling rules predict how bone will respond over time. Recent work has shown that subject-specific two- and three dimensional adaptive bone remodeling models are feasible and valid. Feasibility and validation were achieved computationally, simulating bone remodeling using an intact human scapula, initially resetting the scapular bone material properties to be uniform, numerically simulating sequential loading, and comparing the bone remodeling simulation results to the actual scapula’s material properties. Three-dimensional scapula FE bone model was created using volumetric computed tomography images. Muscle and joint load and boundary conditions were applied based on values reported in the literature. Internal bone remodeling was based on element strain-energy density. Initially, all bone elements were assigned a homogeneous density. All loads were applied for 10 iterations. After every iteration, each bone element’s remodeling stimulus was compared to its corresponding reference stimulus and its material properties modified. The simulation achieved convergence. At the end of the simulation the predicted and actual specimen bone apparent density were plotted and compared. Location of high and low predicted bone density was comparable to the actual specimen. High predicted bone density was greater than

  3. Biomechanical competence of microstructural bone in the progress of adaptive bone remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mueller, Ralph; Hayes, Wilson C.

    1997-10-01

    The mechanical behavior of trabecular bone depends on the internal bone structure as well as the load applied. Mechanical stresses and strains influence the modeling process and subsequently the structure and strength of the bone. Although the basic concepts of adaptive bone remodeling are generally accepted, the mathematical laws relating bone remodeling to the stress/strain relations are still under investigation. The aim of this project was to develop an algorithm which allows simulation of the response of the trabecular bone is age-related bone loss and to determine the biomechanical consequences of such a response based on realistic 3D models of the trabecular microstructure. Today, such models can be generated directly using micro-computed tomography ((mu) CT). For the purpose of the study, a compact fan-beam type tomograph was used, also referred to as desktop (mu) CT, providing a nominal isotropic resolution of 14 micrometers . Two groups of seven trabecular bone specimens were measured including specimens from pre- menopausal and post-menopausal women respectively. In order to control bone loss over age, a novel algorithm to simulate bone resorption and adaptive process was developed. The algorithm, also referred to as simulated bone atrophy, generates a set of microstructural models, iteratively derived from the original 3D structure. Simulated bone atrophy was used to 'age-match' the first and the second group incorporating an underlying realistic time-frame for the simulation. Using quantitative bone morphometry and 3D animation tools, the changes in bone density and bone architecture could be monitored in the progress of age- related bone loss over a total observation time of 28 years. The structures at the end-point of the simulations were then compared qualitatively and quantitatively to the structures of the post-menopausal group directly assessed by (mu) CT. The results suggest the possibility of transforming 'normal' to osteopenic' bone on a

  4. Numerical simulation of strain-adaptive bone remodelling in the ankle joint

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The use of artificial endoprostheses has become a routine procedure for knee and hip joints while ankle arthritis has traditionally been treated by means of arthrodesis. Due to its advantages, the implantation of endoprostheses is constantly increasing. While finite element analyses (FEA) of strain-adaptive bone remodelling have been carried out for the hip joint in previous studies, to our knowledge there are no investigations that have considered remodelling processes of the ankle joint. In order to evaluate and optimise new generation implants of the ankle joint, as well as to gain additional knowledge regarding the biomechanics, strain-adaptive bone remodelling has been calculated separately for the tibia and the talus after providing them with an implant. Methods FE models of the bone-implant assembly for both the tibia and the talus have been developed. Bone characteristics such as the density distribution have been applied corresponding to CT scans. A force of 5,200 N, which corresponds to the compression force during normal walking of a person with a weight of 100 kg according to Stauffer et al., has been used in the simulation. The bone adaptation law, previously developed by our research team, has been used for the calculation of the remodelling processes. Results A total bone mass loss of 2% in the tibia and 13% in the talus was calculated. The greater decline of density in the talus is due to its smaller size compared to the relatively large implant dimensions causing remodelling processes in the whole bone tissue. In the tibia, bone remodelling processes are only calculated in areas adjacent to the implant. Thus, a smaller bone mass loss than in the talus can be expected. There is a high agreement between the simulation results in the distal tibia and the literature regarding. Conclusions In this study, strain-adaptive bone remodelling processes are simulated using the FE method. The results contribute to a better understanding of the

  5. Functional adaptation in long bones: establishing in vivo values for surface remodeling rate coefficients.

    PubMed

    Cowin, S C; Hart, R T; Balser, J R; Kohn, D H

    1985-01-01

    In this paper we describe a computational means, based on beam theory, for application of the theory of adaptive elasticity to examples of real bone geometries. The results of the animal experiments were taken from the literature, and each documented the temporal evolution of a change in bone shape after a significant change in the mechanical loading environment of the bone. For each of these studies, we establish preliminary estimates of the in vivo values of the surface remodeling rate coefficients--the key parameters in the theory of surface remodeling. Our preliminary parameter estimates are established by comparison of published animal experimental results with surface remodeling theory predictions generated by the computational method. PMID:4077864

  6. Adaptive Bone Remodeling of the Femoral Bone After Tumor Resection Arthroplasty With an Uncemented Proximally Hydroxyapatite-Coated Stem.

    PubMed

    Andersen, Mikkel R; Petersen, Michael M

    2016-01-01

    Loss of bone stock and stress shielding is a significant challenge in limb salvage surgery. This study investigates the adaptive bone remodeling of the femoral bone after implantation of a tumor prosthesis with an uncemented press fit stem. We performed a prospective 1 yr follow-up of 6 patients (mean age: 55 (26-78) yr, female/male=3/3) who underwent bone tumor resection surgery of the proximal femur (n=3) or distal femur (n=3). Reconstruction was done using a Global Modular Replacement System (Stryker® Orthopaedics, Mahwah, NJ) tumor prosthesis, and all patients received a straight-fluted 125-mm uncemented press-fit titanium alloy stem with hydroxyapatite coating of the proximal part of the stem. Measurements of bone mineral density (BMD; g/cm2) were done postoperatively and after 3, 6, and 12 mo in the part of the femur bone containing the Global Modular Replacement System stem using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. BMD was measured in 3 regions of interest (ROIs) in the femur bone. Nonparametric analysis of variance (Friedman test) for evaluation of changes in BMD over time. BMD decreased in all 3 ROIs with time. In ROI 1 (p=0.01), BMD decreased by 10% after 3 mo and ended with a total decrease of 14% after 1 yr. In ROI 2 (p=0.006), BMD was decreased by 6% after 3 and 6 mo; after 1 yr of follow-up, BMD was 9% below the postoperative value. In ROI 3 (p=0.009), BMD decreased by 6% after 3 and 6 mo; after 1 yr of follow-up, BMD was 8% below the postoperative value. A bone loss of 8%-9% during the first postoperative year was seen along the femoral stem, but in the bone containing the hydroxyapatite-coated part of the stem, the decrease in BMD was 14%, thus indicating that stress shielding of this part of the bone may play a role for the adaptive bone remodeling. PMID:25843447

  7. Numerical investigations on the strain-adaptive bone remodelling in the periprosthetic femur: Influence of the boundary conditions

    PubMed Central

    Behrens, Bernd-Arno; Nolte, Ingo; Wefstaedt, Patrick; Stukenborg-Colsman, Christina; Bouguecha, Anas

    2009-01-01

    Background There are several numerical investigations on bone remodelling after total hip arthroplasty (THA) on the basis of the finite element analysis (FEA). For such computations certain boundary conditions have to be defined. The authors chose a maximum of three static load situations, usually taken from the gait cycle because this is the most frequent dynamic activity of a patient after THA. Materials and methods The numerical study presented here investigates whether it is useful to consider only one static load situation of the gait cycle in the FE calculation of the bone remodelling. For this purpose, 5 different loading cases were examined in order to determine their influence on the change in the physiological load distribution within the femur and on the resulting strain-adaptive bone remodelling. First, four different static loading cases at 25%, 45%, 65% and 85% of the gait cycle, respectively, and then the whole gait cycle in a loading regime were examined in order to regard all the different loadings of the cycle in the simulation. Results The computed evolution of the apparent bone density (ABD) and the calculated mass losses in the periprosthetic femur show that the simulation results are highly dependent on the chosen boundary conditions. Conclusion These numerical investigations prove that a static load situation is insufficient for representing the whole gait cycle. This causes severe deviations in the FE calculation of the bone remodelling. However, accompanying clinical examinations are necessary to calibrate the bone adaptation law and thus to validate the FE calculations. PMID:19371424

  8. Immunoregulation of bone remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Singh, Ajai; Mehdi, Abbass A; Srivastava, Rajeshwer N; Verma, Nar Singh

    2012-01-01

    Remodeling, a continuous physiological process maintains the strength of the bones, which maintains a delicate balance between bone formation and resorption process. This review gives an insight to the complex interaction and correlation between the bone remodeling and the corresponding changes in host immunological environment and also summarises the most recent developments occuring in the understanding of this complex field. T cells, both directly and indirectly increase the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kB ligand (RANKL); a vital step in the activation of osteoclasts, thus positively regulates the osteoclastogenesis. Though various cytokines, chemikines, transcription factors and co-stimulatory molecules are shared by both skeletal and immune systems, but researches are being conducted to establish and analyse their role and / or control on this complex but vital process. The understanding of this part of research may open new horizons in the management of inflammatory and autoimmune diseases, resulting into bone loss and that of osteoporosis also. PMID:22837895

  9. Changes of cell-vascular complex in zones of adaptive remodeling of the bone tissue under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, N. V.; Oganov, V. S.

    2003-10-01

    We examined the peculiarities of the structure of the blood-vascular bed and perivascular cells in zones of osteogenesis in the epiphyses and metaphises of femoral bones of rats, flown aboard the US laboratory SLS-2 for two weeks by electron microscopy and histochemistry. In zones of bone remodeling, there was a tendency for a reduction of sinusoid capillary specific volume. Endotheliocytes preserve the typical structure. In the population of perivascular cells, we discovered differentiating osteogenic cells that contained alkaline phosphomonoesterase as well as cells that don't contain this enzyme and differentiate into fibroblasts. The fibroblasts genesis in zones of adaptive remodeling of spongy bones leads to a further development of fibrous tissue that is not subject to mineralization.

  10. Changes of vessel-cells complex in zones of adaptive remodeling of the bone tissue under microgravity conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, N.; Oganov, V.; Nosova, L.

    The development and differentiation of osteogenic cells in organism happen in closely topographical and functional connection with blood capillaries. We formerly proofed, that small-differentiated cells, which are in the population of perivascular cells are osteogenic cells -precursors . At the present time it is actually to clear up, how these biostructures react on conditions of less of biomechanical load on skeleton bones. We researched peculiarities of blood-bed structure and perivascular cells in metaphises of thighbones and tibial bones in rats, which were onboard the American space station SLS-2 and in experiments of modeling hypokinesia. There were used methods of cytochemistry, histology and electron microscopy. We established, that under the support and functional load decreasing in zones of bones adaptive remodeling, comparatively to control, on histosections the own volume of sinusoid capillaries reduces. The small vessels prevail here. The spaces of sinusoid capillaries are limited by 1 2 cells of the endothelia. Endotheliocytes in- general have the typical ultrastructure. Basal membranes are expressed not-distinctly. Perivascular cells don't create the unbroken layer. The population of these cells is not-homogeneous. It includes enclosed to endothelia small-differentiated forms and separating cells with sings of fibroblastic differentiation (the own volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm induces). The part of these cells reacts on the alkaline phosphatase (the marker of the osteogenic differentiation). Under the conditions of support load decreasing (especially under the microgravity) there is a tendency to reducing of separating osteogenic cells number. We noted the priority of differentiating fibroblasts. It leads to further development in zones of bone remodeling of hearths of fibrous tissue, that doesn't mineralize. The obtained data are seen as one of mechanisms of osteoporosis and osteopenia development under the deficite of support

  11. Bone Remodeling Under Pathological Conditions.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Wenmei; Li, Shuai; Pacios, Sandra; Wang, Yu; Graves, Dana T

    2016-01-01

    Bone is masterfully programmed to repair itself through the coupling of bone formation following bone resorption, a process referred to as coupling. In inflammatory or other conditions, the balance between bone resorption and bone formation shifts so that a net bone loss results. This review focuses on four pathologic conditions in which remodeling leads to net loss of bone, postmenopausal osteoporosis, arthritis, periodontal disease, and disuse bone loss, which is similar to bone loss associated with microgravity. In most of these there is an acceleration of the resorptive process due to increased formation of bone metabolic units. This initially leads to a net bone loss since the time period of resorption is much faster than the time needed for bone formation that follows. In addition, each of these processes is characterized by an uncoupling that leads to net bone loss. Mechanisms responsible for increased rates of bone resorption, i.e. the formation of more bone metabolic units, involve enhanced expression of inflammatory cytokines and increased expression of RANKL. Moreover, the reasons for uncoupling are discussed which range from a decrease in expression of growth factors and bone morphogenetic proteins to increased expression of factors that inhibit Wnt signaling. PMID:26599114

  12. Osteocyte-Driven Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Bellido, Teresita

    2013-01-01

    Osteocytes, the most abundant cells in bone, have been long postulated to detect and respond to mechanical and hormonal stimuli and to coordinate the function of osteoblasts and osteoclasts. The discovery that the inhibitor of bone formation sclerostin is primarily expressed in osteocytes in bone and it is downregulated by anabolic stimuli provided a mechanism by which osteocytes influence the activity of osteoblasts. Advances of the last few years provided experimental evidence demonstrating that osteocytes also participate in the recruitment of osteoclasts and the initiation of bone remodeling. Apoptotic osteocytes trigger yet to be identified signals that attract osteoclast precursors to specific areas of bone, which in turn differentiate to mature, bone resorbing osteoclasts. Osteocytes are also the source of molecules that regulate generation and activity of osteoclasts, such as OPG and RANKL; and genetic manipulations of the mouse genome leading to loss or gain of function, or to altered expression of either molecule in osteocytes, markedly affect bone resorption. This review highlights these investigations and discusses how the novel concept of osteocyte-driven bone resorption and formation impacts our understanding of the mechanisms by which current therapies control bone remodeling. PMID:24002178

  13. Bone Remodeling Monitor

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Foucar, Charlie; Goldberg, Leslie; Hon, Bodin; Moore, Shannon; Williams, Evan

    2009-01-01

    The impact of bone loss due to different mechanical loadings in microgravity is a major concern for astronauts upon reintroduction to gravitational forces in exploration missions to the Moon and Mars. it has been shown that astronauts not only lose bone at differing rates, with levels up to 2% per month, but each astronaut will respond to bone loss treatments differently. Pre- and post-flight imaging techniques and frozen urine samples for post-flight laboratory immunoassays To develop a novel, non-invasive, highly . sensitive, portable, intuitive, and low-powered device to measure bone resorption levels in 'real time' to provide rapid and Individualized feedback to maximize the efficacy of bone loss countermeasures 1. Collect urine specimen and analyze the level of bone resorption marker, DPD (deoxypridinoline) excreted. 2. Antibodies specific to DPD conjugated with nanoshells and mixed with specimen, the change in absorbance from agglutination is measured by an optical device. 3. The concentration of DPD is displayed and recorded on a PDA

  14. Effects of different loading patterns on the trabecular bone morphology of the proximal femur using adaptive bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Banijamali, S Mohammad Ali; Oftadeh, Ramin; Nazarian, Ara; Goebel, Ruben; Vaziri, Ashkan; Nayeb-Hashemi, Hamid

    2015-01-01

    In this study, the changes in the bone density of human femur model as a result of different loadings were investigated. The model initially consisted of a solid shell representing cortical bone encompassing a cubical network of interconnected rods representing trabecular bone. A computationally efficient program was developed that iteratively changed the structure of trabecular bone by keeping the local stress in the structure within a defined stress range. The stress was controlled by either enhancing existing beam elements or removing beams from the initial trabecular frame structure. Analyses were performed for two cases of homogenous isotropic and transversely isotropic beams.Trabecular bone structure was obtained for three load cases: walking, stair climbing and stumbling without falling. The results indicate that trabecular bone tissue material properties do not have a significant effect on the converged structure of trabecular bone. In addition, as the magnitude of the loads increase, the internal structure becomes denser in critical zones. Loading associated with the stumbling results in the highest density;whereas walking, considered as a routine daily activity, results in the least internal density in different regions. Furthermore, bone volume fraction at the critical regions of the converged structure is in good agreement with previously measured data obtained from combinations of dual X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) and computed tomography (CT). The results indicate that the converged bone architecture consisting of rods and plates are consistent with the natural bone morphology of the femur. The proposed model shows a promising means to understand the effects of different individual loading patterns on the bone density. PMID:25392856

  15. Remodeling of the bone material containing microcracks: A theoretical analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ramtani, S.; Zidi, M.

    1999-12-01

    The question is, what happens when the bone loses its ability for load-driven adaptation, when damage is no longer repaired as it seems to be the case for bone loss associated with age, medication or disease? In this study, we tempt to show how damage can influence the remodeling process. A thermodynamic theoretical framework is therefore provided as a basis for a consistent formulation of bone remodeling involving a chemical reaction and mass transfer between two constituents in presence of microcracks.

  16. Densitometric evaluation of periprosthetic bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Parchi, Paolo Domenico; Cervi, Valentina; Piolanti, Nicola; Ciapini, Gianluca; Andreani, Lorenzo; Castellini, Iacopo; Poggetti, Andrea; Lisanti, Michele

    2014-01-01

    Summary The application of Dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DEXA) in orthopaedic surgery gradually has been extended from the study of osteoporosis to different areas of interest like the study of the relation between bone and prosthetic implants. Aim of this review is to analyze changes that occur in periprosthetic bone after the implantation of a total hip arthroplasty (THA) or a total knee arthroplasty (TKA). In THA the pattern of adaptive bone remodeling with different cementless femoral stems varies and it appears to be strictly related to the design and more specifically to where the femoral stem is fixed on bone. Short stems with metaphyseal fixation allow the maintenance of a more physiologic load transfer to the proximal femur decreasing the entity of bone loss. Femoral bone loss after TKA seems to be related to the stress shielding induced by the implants while tibial bone remodeling seems to be related to postoperative changes in knee alignment (varus/valgus) and consequently in tibial load transfer. After both THA and TKA stress shielding seems to be an inevitable phenomenon that occurs mainly in the first year after surgery. PMID:25568658

  17. Bone remodeling and silicon deficiency in rats

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Alveolar bone undergoes continuous remodeling to meet physiologic and functional demands. The aim of the present work was to evaluate histologically and histomorphometrically the effect of silicon deficiency on bone modeling and remodeling in the periodontal cortical plate. Two groups of weaning mal...

  18. [Bone quality and strength relating with bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Mori, Satoshi

    2016-01-01

    The bone has the functions of mineral reservoir and mechanical support as skeleton. Bone remodeling is the adult mode of bone metabolism, replacing old bone tissue to new one. Bone strength is determined by bone volume, structure and quality such as micro damage, degree of mineralization and collagen cross linkage, which are all controlled by bone remodeling. Bone strength decreases under high turn-over condition by decreasing bone volume and deterioration of bone structure, which also decreases under low turn-over condition by increased micro damage, increasing mineralization and AGE collagen cross linkage. PMID:26728527

  19. Pulsatile Fluid Shear in Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frangos, John A.

    1997-01-01

    The objective of this investigation was to elucidate the sensitivity to transients in fluid shear stress in bone remodeling. Bone remodeling is clearly a function of the local mechanical environment which includes interstitial fluid flow. Traditionally, load-induced remodeling has been associated with low frequency (1-2 Hz) signals attributed to normal locomotion. McLeod and Rubin, however, demonstrated in vivo remodeling events associated with high frequency (15-30 Hz) loading. Likewise, other in vivo studies demonstrated that slowly applied strains did not trigger remodeling events. We therefore hypothesized that the mechanosensitive pathways which control bone maintenance and remodeling are differentially sensitive to varying rates of applied fluid shear stress.

  20. Hierarchical Structure and Repair of Bone: Deformation, Remodelling, Healing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fratzl, Peter; Weinkamer, Richard

    The design of natural materials follows a radically different paradigm as compared to engineering materials: organs are growing rather than being fabricated. As a main consequence, adaptation to changing conditions remains possible during the whole lifetime of a biological material. As a typical example of such a biological material, bone is constantly laid down by bone forming cells, osteoblasts, and removed by bone resorbing cells, osteoclasts. With this remodelling cycle of bone resorption and formation, the skeleton is able to adapt to changing needs at all levels of structural hierarchy. The hierarchical structure of bone is summarized in the second part of this chapter.

  1. Assessment of bone vascularization and its role in bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Lafage-Proust, Marie-Hélène; Roche, Bernard; Langer, Max; Cleret, Damien; Vanden Bossche, Arnaud; Olivier, Thomas; Vico, Laurence

    2015-01-01

    Bone is a composite organ that fulfils several interconnected functions, which may conflict with each other in pathological conditions. Bone vascularization is at the interface between these functions. The roles of bone vascularization are better documented in bone development, growth and modeling than in bone remodeling. However, every bone remodeling unit is associated with a capillary in both cortical and trabecular envelopes. Here we summarize the most recent data on vessel involvement in bone remodeling, and we present the characteristics of bone vascularization. Finally, we describe the various techniques used for bone vessel imaging and quantitative assessment, including histology, immunohistochemistry, microtomography and intravital microscopy. Studying the role of vascularization in adult bone should provide benefits for the understanding and treatment of metabolic bone diseases. PMID:25861447

  2. [Determinants of bone quality and strength independent of bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Saito, Mitsuru; Marumo, Keishi

    2016-01-01

    Bone mineral density(BMD)and bone microstructure are regulated mainly by bone remodeling. In contrast, bone collagen enzymatic immature and mature cross-links and advanced glycation end products such as pentosidine and carboxyl methyl lysine are affected by various factors. Aging bone tissue is repaired in the process of bone remodeling. However, deterioration of bone material properties markedly advances due to increases in oxidative stress, glycation stress, reactive oxygen species, carbonyl stress associated with aging and reduced sex hormone levels, and glucocorticoid use. To improve bone material properties in osteoporosis, we should use different drug (Saito M, Calcif Tissue Int, REVIEW, 97;242-261, 2015). In this review, we summarized determinants of bone quality and strength independent of bone remodeling. PMID:26728528

  3. Effect of strontium-containing hydroxyapatite bone cement on bone remodeling following hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ni, Guo X; Lin, Jian H; Chiu, Peter K Y; Li, Zhao Y; Lu, William W

    2010-01-01

    It is uncertain whether the use of bioactive bone cement has any beneficial effect on local bone adaptation following hip replacement. In this study, twelve goats underwent cemented hip hemiarthroplasty unilaterally, with either PMMA bone cement or strontium-containing hydroxyapatite (Sr-HA) bioactive bone cement. Nine months later, the femoral cortical bones at different levels were analyzed by microhardness testing and micro-CT scanning. Extensive bone remodeling was found at proximal and mid-levels in both PMMA and Sr-HA groups. However, with regard to the differences of bone mineral density, cortical bone area and bone hardness between implanted and non-implanted femur, less decreases were found in Sr-HA group than PMMA group at proximal and mid-levels, and significant differences were shown for bone area and hardness at proximal level. The results suggested that the use of Sr-HA cement might alleviate femoral bone remodeling after hip replacement. PMID:19728042

  4. Effect of material damping on bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Misra, J C; Samanta, S

    1987-01-01

    This paper considers the effect of internal material damping on the stresses, strains, and surface and internal remodelling behaviour in a section of axisymmetrical bone with a force-fitted axially oriented medullary pin. The bone response to several loading situations is modelled using visco-elastic equations. An approximate method is developed to analyse the proposed mathematical model. By considering a numerical example, the effect of material damping on the remodelling stresses is quantified. PMID:3584150

  5. Connecting Mechanics and Bone Cell Activities in the Bone Remodeling Process: An Integrated Finite Element Modeling

    PubMed Central

    Hambli, Ridha

    2014-01-01

    Bone adaptation occurs as a response to external loadings and involves bone resorption by osteoclasts followed by the formation of new bone by osteoblasts. It is directly triggered by the transduction phase by osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix. The bone remodeling process is governed by the interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts through the expression of several autocrine and paracrine factors that control bone cell populations and their relative rate of differentiation and proliferation. A review of the literature shows that despite the progress in bone remodeling simulation using the finite element (FE) method, there is still a lack of predictive models that explicitly consider the interaction between osteoblasts and osteoclasts combined with the mechanical response of bone. The current study attempts to develop an FE model to describe the bone remodeling process, taking into consideration the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain–damage stimulus function is proposed, which controls the level of autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.’s (2003) dynamic law, which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cells dynamic rather than adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed FE model has been implemented in the FE code Abaqus (UMAT routine). An example of human proximal femur is investigated using the model developed. The model was able to predict final human proximal femur adaptation similar to the patterns observed in a human proximal femur. The results obtained reveal complex spatio-temporal bone

  6. Abnormal bone remodelling in inflammatory arthritis

    PubMed Central

    Bogoch, Earl R.; Moran, Erica

    1998-01-01

    Osteopenia is responsible for substantial comorbidity in patients suffering from rheumatoid arthritis and is an important factor in the surgical management of joint disease. In animal models of bone loss stimulated by inflammatory arthritis, increased bone remodelling and altered microstructure of bone have been documented. The subchondral bone plate near the joint surface is narrow and perforated by vascular inflammatory invasion, and in the shaft the thin cortices are weakened by giant resorption defects. Biomechanical tests and a mathematical model of bone strength suggest that cortical defects, much larger than those found in normal osteonal remodelling, are principally responsible for the experimentally observed loss of strength. Similarly, these defects may explain the increased femoral fracture risk in rheumatoid arthritis. The osteoclast, the cell resorbing bone, is demonstrated in increased number and activity in rheumatoid arthritis and in animal models. Bisphosphonates, drugs that inhibit osteoclast function, have been shown experimentally to reduce both focal and generalized osteopenia and to prevent loss of bone strength. Bisphosphonates also protect articular cartilage from damage characteristic of inflammatory arthritis. The mechanism of chondroprotection may be prevention of subchondral bone resorption by the osteoclast and also an altered distribution of bone marrow cells. Thus, bisphosphonates, currently in clinical use for other bone metabolic diseases, appear to have potential as prophylaxis and treatment for osteopenia and joint damage in inflammatory arthritis. PMID:9711159

  7. Osteocytes: The master cells in bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Prideaux, Matthew; Findlay, David M; Atkins, Gerald J

    2016-06-01

    Bone remodelling is an essential process for shaping and maintaining bone mass in the mature skeleton. During our lifetime bone is constantly being removed by osteoclasts and new bone is formed by osteoblasts. The activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts must be regulated under a strict balance to ensure that bone homeostasis is maintained. Osteocytes, which form an extensive, multi-functional syncytium throughout the bone, are increasingly considered to be the cells that maintain this balance. Current research is elucidating key signalling pathways by which the osteocyte exerts control over the other cell types in bone and over its own activities, and potential ways in which these pathways may be exploited therapeutically. PMID:26927500

  8. Intracortical remodeling parameters are associated with measures of bone robustness

    PubMed Central

    Goldman, Haviva M.; Hampson, Naomi A.; Guth, J. Jared; Lin, David; Jepsen, Karl J.

    2014-01-01

    Prior work identified a novel association between bone robustness and porosity, which may be part of a broader interaction whereby the skeletal system compensates for the natural variation in robustness (bone width relative to length) by modulating tissue-level mechanical properties to increase stiffness of slender bones and to reduce mass of robust bones. To further understand this association, we tested the hypothesis that the relationship between robustness and porosity is mediated through intracortical, BMU-based (basic multicellular unit) remodeling. We quantified cortical porosity, mineralization, and histomorphometry at two sites (38 and 66% of the length) in human cadaveric tibiae. We found significant correlations between robustness and several histomorphometric variables (e.g., % secondary tissue [R2 = 0.68, p < 0.004], total osteon area [R2=0.42, p<0.04]) at the 66% site. Although these associations were weaker at the 38% site, significant correlations between histological variables were identified between the two sites indicating that both respond to the same global effects and demonstrate a similar character at the whole bone level. Thus, robust bones tended to have larger and more numerous osteons with less infilling, resulting in bigger pores and more secondary bone area. These results suggest that local regulation of BMU-based remodeling may be further modulated by a global signal associated with robustness, such that remodeling is suppressed in slender bones but not in robust bones. Elucidating this mechanism further is crucial for better understanding the complex adaptive nature of the skeleton, and how inter-individual variation in remodeling differentially impacts skeletal aging and an individuals’ potential response to prophylactic treatments. PMID:24962664

  9. Bone Remodeling and Energy Metabolism: New Perspectives

    PubMed Central

    de Paula, Francisco J. A.; Rosen, Clifford J.

    2013-01-01

    Bone mineral, adipose tissue and energy metabolism are interconnected by a complex and multilevel series of networks. Calcium and phosphorus are utilized for insulin secretion and synthesis of high energy compounds. Adipose tissue store lipids and cholecalciferol, which, in turn, can influence calcium balance and energy expenditure. Hormones long-thought to solely modulate energy and mineral homeostasis may influence adipocytic function. Osteoblasts are a target of insulin action in bone. Moreover, endocrine mediators, such as osteocalcin, are synthesized in the skeleton but regulate carbohydrate disposal and insulin secretion. Finally, osteoblasts and adipocytes originate from the same mesenchymal progenitor. The mutual crosstalk between osteoblasts and adipocytes within the bone marrow microenvironment plays a crucial role in bone remodeling. In the present review we provide an overview of the reciprocal control between bone and energy metabolism and its clinical implications. PMID:26273493

  10. Development of Bone Remodeling Model for Spaceflight Bone Physiology Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Werner, Christopher R.; Lewandowski, Beth; Thompson, Bill; Sibonga, Jean; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2015-01-01

    Current spaceflight exercise countermeasures do not eliminate bone loss. Astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1-2% a month (Lang et al. 2004, Buckey 2006, LeBlanc et al. 2007). This may lead to early onset osteoporosis and place the astronauts at greater risk of fracture later in their lives. NASA seeks to improve understanding of the mechanisms of bone remodeling and demineralization in 1g in order to appropriately quantify long term risks to astronauts and improve countermeasures. NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with NASA's bone discipline to develop a validated computational model to augment research efforts aimed at achieving this goal.

  11. [Histamine in regulation of bone remodeling processes].

    PubMed

    Wiercigroch, Marek; Folwarczna, Joanna

    2013-01-01

    Bone remodeling is under autocrine, paracrine, endocrine and central nervous system control. One of the potential endogenous factors affecting bone remodeling is histamine, an endogenous amine which acts as a mediator of allergic reactions and neuromediator, and induces production of gastric acid. Histamine H₁ receptor antagonists are widely used in the treatment of allergic conditions, H₂ receptor antagonists in peptic ulcer disease, and betahistine (an H₃ receptor antagonist and H₁ receptor agonist) is used in the treatment of Ménière's disease. Excess histamine release in mastocytosis and allergic diseases may lead to development of osteoporosis. Clinical and population-based studies on the effects of histamine receptor antagonists on the skeletal system have not delivered unequivocal results. Expression of mRNA of histamine receptors has been discovered in bone cells (osteoblasts and osteoclasts). Histamine synthesis has been demonstrated in osteoclast precursors. Histamine increases bone resorption both by direct effects on osteoclast precursors and osteoclasts, and indirectly, by increasing the expression of RANKL in osteoblasts. In in vivo studies, H₁ and H₂ receptor antagonists exerted protective effects on the bone tissue, although not in all experimental models. In the present article, in vitro and in vivo studies conducted so far, concerning the effects of histamine and drugs modifying its activity on the skeletal system, have been reviewed. PMID:24018454

  12. Phase field approaches of bone remodeling based on TIP

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ganghoffer, Jean-François; Rahouadj, Rachid; Boisse, Julien; Forest, Samuel

    2016-01-01

    The process of bone remodeling includes a cycle of repair, renewal, and optimization. This adaptation process, in response to variations in external loads and chemical driving factors, involves three main types of bone cells: osteoclasts, which remove the old pre-existing bone; osteoblasts, which form the new bone in a second phase; osteocytes, which are sensing cells embedded into the bone matrix, trigger the aforementioned sequence of events. The remodeling process involves mineralization of the bone in the diffuse interface separating the marrow, which contains all specialized cells, from the newly formed bone. The main objective advocated in this contribution is the setting up of a modeling and simulation framework relying on the phase field method to capture the evolution of the diffuse interface between the new bone and the marrow at the scale of individual trabeculae. The phase field describes the degree of mineralization of this diffuse interface; it varies continuously between the lower value (no mineral) and unity (fully mineralized phase, e.g. new bone), allowing the consideration of a diffuse moving interface. The modeling framework is the theory of continuous media, for which field equations for the mechanical, chemical, and interfacial phenomena are written, based on the thermodynamics of irreversible processes. Additional models for the cellular activity are formulated to describe the coupling of the cell activity responsible for bone production/resorption to the kinetics of the internal variables. Kinetic equations for the internal variables are obtained from a pseudo-potential of dissipation. The combination of the balance equations for the microforce associated to the phase field and the kinetic equations lead to the Ginzburg-Landau equation satisfied by the phase field with a source term accounting for the dissipative microforce. Simulations illustrating the proposed framework are performed in a one-dimensional situation showing the evolution of

  13. [Morphological analysis of bone dynamics and metabolic bone disease. Histomorphometric concepts of bone remodeling and modeling].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Hideaki E

    2011-04-01

    In tissue level turnover of bone cells, bone remodeling shows a sequential events of activation, resorption, reversal and formation. This may be observed as secondary osteons in the cortical bone and trabecular packets in the cancellous bone. Microcracks are repaired by targeted remodeling, and calcium is released by non-targeted remodeling. In macromodeling, a macroscopic size of a bone increases with growth, without changing its basic figure. In micromodelimg, a shift of trabecula, a minishift, is biomechnically controlled. New lamellar bone is added parallel to compressive and tensile force, and bone resorption occurs at the opposite surface of formation. In minimodeling new lamellar bone is formed with a sequence of activation, then directly formation, without scalloping at the cement line between newly formed bone and its basic bone. PMID:21447918

  14. Parallel mechanisms suppress cochlear bone remodeling to protect hearing.

    PubMed

    Jáuregui, Emmanuel J; Akil, Omar; Acevedo, Claire; Hall-Glenn, Faith; Tsai, Betty S; Bale, Hrishikesh A; Liebenberg, Ellen; Humphrey, Mary Beth; Ritchie, Robert O; Lustig, Lawrence R; Alliston, Tamara

    2016-08-01

    Bone remodeling, a combination of bone resorption and formation, requires precise regulation of cellular and molecular signaling to maintain proper bone quality. Whereas osteoblasts deposit and osteoclasts resorb bone matrix, osteocytes both dynamically resorb and replace perilacunar bone matrix. Osteocytes secrete proteases like matrix metalloproteinase-13 (MMP13) to maintain the material quality of bone matrix through perilacunar remodeling (PLR). Deregulated bone remodeling impairs bone quality and can compromise hearing since the auditory transduction mechanism is within bone. Understanding the mechanisms regulating cochlear bone provides unique ways to assess bone quality independent of other aspects that contribute to bone mechanical behavior. Cochlear bone is singular in its regulation of remodeling by expressing high levels of osteoprotegerin. Since cochlear bone expresses a key PLR enzyme, MMP13, we examined whether cochlear bone relies on, or is protected from, osteocyte-mediated PLR to maintain hearing and bone quality using a mouse model lacking MMP13 (MMP13(-/-)). We investigated the canalicular network, collagen organization, lacunar volume via micro-computed tomography, and dynamic histomorphometry. Despite finding defects in these hallmarks of PLR in MMP13(-/-) long bones, cochlear bone revealed no differences in these markers, nor hearing loss as measured by auditory brainstem response (ABR) or distortion product oto-acoustic emissions (DPOAEs), between wild type and MMP13(-/-) mice. Dynamic histomorphometry revealed abundant PLR by tibial osteocytes, but near absence in cochlear bone. Cochlear suppression of PLR corresponds to repression of several key PLR genes in the cochlea relative to long bones. These data suggest that cochlear bone uniquely maintains bone quality and hearing independent of MMP13-mediated osteocytic PLR. Furthermore, the cochlea employs parallel mechanisms to inhibit remodeling by osteoclasts and osteoblasts, and by

  15. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells and TGF-β signaling in bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Crane, Janet L.; Cao, Xu

    2014-01-01

    During bone resorption, abundant factors previously buried in the bone matrix are released into the bone marrow microenvironment, which results in recruitment and differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) for subsequent bone formation, temporally and spatially coupling bone remodeling. Parathyroid hormone (PTH) orchestrates the signaling of many pathways that direct MSC fate. The spatiotemporal release and activation of matrix TGF-β during osteoclast bone resorption recruits MSCs to bone-resorptive sites. Dysregulation of TGF-β alters MSC fate, uncoupling bone remodeling and causing skeletal disorders. Modulation of TGF-β or PTH signaling may reestablish coupled bone remodeling and be a potential therapy. PMID:24487640

  16. Physiological bases of bone regeneration II. The remodeling process.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Tresguerres-Hernández-Gil, Isabel; Alobera-Gracia, Miguel Angel; del-Canto-Pingarrón, Mariano; Blanco-Jerez, Luis

    2006-03-01

    Bone remodeling is the restructuring process of existing bone, which is in constant resorption and formation. Under normal conditions, this balanced process allows the renewal of 5-10% of bone volume per year. At the microscopic level, bone remodeling is produced in basic multicellular units, where osteoclasts resorb a certain quantity of bone and osteoblasts form the osteoid matrix and mineralize it to fill the previously created cavity. These units contain osteoclasts, macrophages, preosteoblasts and osteoblasts, and are controlled by a series of factors, both general and local, allowing normal bone function and maintaining the bone mass. When this process becomes unbalanced then bone pathology appears, either in excess (osteopetrosis) or deficit (osteoporosis). The purpose of this study is to undertake a revision of current knowledge on the physiological and biological mechanisms of the bone remodeling process; highlighting the role played by the regulating factors, in particular that of the growth factors. PMID:16505794

  17. Bone ingrowth: an application of the boundary element method to bone remodeling at the implant interface.

    PubMed

    Sadegh, A M; Luo, G M; Cowin, S C

    1993-02-01

    Surface bone remodeling theory and the boundary element method are employed to investigate the microstructural remodeling of bone at the bone-implant interface. Three situations are considered: remodeling-induced penetration between the screw threads of an implanted screw, penetration of bone tissue into a slot or cavity in an implant, and the interaction of individual trabeculae in the remodeling processes near an implant. For each case the bone ingrowth is determined as a function of the geometry and the applied load. PMID:8429059

  18. Control of bone remodelling by applied dynamic loads

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyon, L. E.; Rubin, C. T.

    1984-01-01

    The data showing the relationship between bone mass and peak strain magnitude prepared and submitted for publication. The data from experiments relating remodelling activity with static or dynamic loads were prepared and submitted for publication. Development of programs to relate the location of remodelling activity with he natural and artificial dynamic strain distributions continued. Experiments on the effect of different strain rates on the remodelling response continued.

  19. Subject-specific bone remodelling of the scapula.

    PubMed

    Quental, Carlos; Folgado, João; Fernandes, Paulo R; Monteiro, Jacinto

    2014-08-01

    Finite element analyses, with increasing levels of detail and complexity, are becoming effective tools to evaluate the performance of joint replacement prostheses and to predict the behaviour of bone. As a first step towards the study of the complications of shoulder arthroplasty, the aim of this work was the development and validation of a 3D finite element model of an intact scapula for the prediction of the bone remodelling process based on a previously published model that attempts to follow Wolff's law. The boundary conditions applied include full muscle and joint loads taken from a multibody system of the upper limb based on the same subject whose scapula was here analysed. To validate the bone remodelling simulations, qualitative and quantitative comparisons between the predicted and the specimen's bone density distribution were performed. The results showed that the bone remodelling model was able to successfully reproduce the actual bone density distribution of the analysed scapula. PMID:23210487

  20. Bone tissue remodeling and development: focus on matrix metalloproteinase functions.

    PubMed

    Paiva, Katiucia Batista Silva; Granjeiro, José Mauro

    2014-11-01

    Bone-forming cells originate from distinct embryological layers, mesoderm (axial and appendicular bones) and ectoderm (precursor of neural crest cells, which mainly form facial bones). These cells will develop bones by two principal mechanisms: intramembranous and endochondral ossification. In both cases, condensation of multipotent mesenchymal cells occurs, at the site of the future bone, which differentiate into bone and cartilage-forming cells. During long bone development, an initial cartilaginous template is formed and replaced by bone in a coordinated and refined program involving chondrocyte proliferation and maturation, vascular invasion, recruitment of adult stem cells and intense remodeling of cartilage and bone matrix. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) are the most important enzymes for cleaving structural components of the extracellular matrix (ECM), as well as other non-ECM molecules in the ECM space, pericellular perimeter and intracellularly. Thus, the bioactive molecules generated act on several biological events, such as development, tissue remodeling and homeostasis. Since the discovery of collagenase in bone cells, more than half of the MMP members have been detected in bone tissues under both physiological and pathological conditions. Pivotal functions of MMPs during development and bone regeneration have been revealed by knockout mouse models, such as chondrocyte proliferation and differentiation, osteoclast recruitment and function, bone modeling, coupling of bone resorption and formation (bone remodeling), osteoblast recruitment and survival, angiogenesis, osteocyte viability and function (biomechanical properties); as such alterations in MMP function may alter bone quality. In this review, we look at the principal properties of MMPs and their inhibitors (TIMPs and RECK), provide an up-date on their known functions in bone development and remodeling and discuss their potential application to Bone Bioengineering. PMID:25157440

  1. Chemistry of bone remodelling preserved in extant and fossil Sirenia.

    PubMed

    Anné, Jennifer; Wogelius, Roy A; Edwards, Nicholas P; van Veelen, Arjen; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Manning, Phillip L

    2016-05-01

    Bone remodelling is a crucial biological process needed to maintain elemental homeostasis. It is important to understand the trace elemental inventories that govern these processes as malfunctions in bone remodelling can have devastating effects on an organism. In this study, we use a combination of X-ray techniques to map, quantify, and characterise the coordination chemistry of trace elements within the highly remodelled bone tissues of extant and extinct Sirenia (manatees and dugongs). The dense bone structure and unique body chemistry of sirenians represent ideal tissues for studying both high remodelling rates as well as unique fossilisation pathways. Here, elemental maps revealed uncorrelated patterning of Ca and Zn within secondary osteons in both extant and fossil sirenians, as well as elevated Sr within the connecting canals of fossil sirenians. Concentrations of these elements are comparable between extant and fossil material indicating geochemical processing of the fossil bone has been minimal. Zn was found to be bound in the same coordination within the apatite structure in both extant and fossil bone. Accurate quantification of trace elements in extant material was only possible when the organic constituents of the bone were included. The comparable distributions, concentrations, and chemical coordination of these physiologically important trace elements indicate the chemistry of bone remodelling has been preserved for 19 million years. This study signifies the powerful potential of merging histological and chemical techniques in the understanding of physiological processes in both extant and extinct vertebrates. PMID:26923825

  2. Bone Adaptation and Regeneration - New Developments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klein-Nulend, Jenneke; Bacabac, Rommel Gaud

    Bone is a dynamic tissue that is constantly renewed and adapts to its local loading environment. Mechanical loading results in adaptive changes in bone size and shape that strengthen bone structure. The mechanisms for adaptation involve a multistep process called mechanotransduction, which is the ability of resident bone cells to perceive and translate mechanical energy into a cascade of structural and biochemical changes within the cells. The transduction of a mechanical signal to a biochemical response involves pathways within the cell membrane and cytoskeleton of the osteocytes, the professional mechansensor cells of bone. During the last decade the role of mechanosensitive osteocytes in bone metabolism and turnover, and the lacuno-canalicular porosity as the structure that mediates mechanosensing, is likely to reveal a new paradigm for understanding the bone formation response to mechanical loading, and the bone resorption response to disuse. Strain-derived fluid flow of interstitial fluid through the lacuno-canalicular porosity seems to mechanically activate the osteocytes, as well as ensures transport of cell signaling molecules, nutrients and waste products. Cell-cell signaling from the osteocyte sensor cells to the effector cells (osteoblasts or osteoclasts), and the effector cell response - either bone formation or resorption, allow an explanation of local bone gain and loss as well as remodeling in response to fatigue damage as processes supervised by mechanosensitive osteocytes. The osteogenic activity of cultured bone cells has been quantitatively correlated with varying stress stimulations highlighting the importance of the rate of loading. Theoretically a possible mechanism for the stress response by osteocytes is due to strain amplification at the pericellular matrix. Single cell studies on molecular responses of osteocytes provide insight on local architectural alignment in bone during remodeling. Alignment seems to occur as a result of the

  3. Computational biomechanics of bone's responses to dental prostheses - osseointegration, remodeling and resorption

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Wei; Rungsiyakull, Chaiy; Field, Clarice; Lin, Daniel; Zhang, Leo; Li, Qing; Swain, Michael

    2010-06-01

    Clinical and experimental studies showed that human bone has the ability to remodel itself to better adapt to its biomechanical environment by changing both its material properties and geometry. As a consequence of the rapid development and extensive applications of major dental restorations such as implantation and fixed partial denture (FPD), the effect of bone remodeling on the success of a dental restorative surgery is becoming critical for prosthetic design and pre-surgical assessment. This paper aims to provide a computational biomechanics framework to address dental bone's responses as a result of dental restoration. It explored three important issues of resorption, apposition and osseointegration in terms of remodeling simulation. The published remodeling data in long bones were regulated to drive the computational remodeling prediction for the dental bones by correlating the results to clinical data. It is anticipated that the study will provide a more predictive model of dental bone response and help develop a new design methodology for patient-specific dental prosthetic restoration.

  4. Trabecular bone remodelling simulated by a stochastic exchange of discrete bone packets from the surface.

    PubMed

    Hartmann, M A; Dunlop, J W C; Bréchet, Y J M; Fratzl, P; Weinkamer, R

    2011-08-01

    Human bone is constantly renewed through life via the process of bone remodelling, in which individual packets of bone are removed by osteoclasts and replaced by osteoblasts. Remodelling is mechanically controlled, where osteocytes embedded within the bone matrix are thought to act as mechanical sensors. In this computational work, a stochastic model for bone remodelling is used in which the renewal of bone material occurs by exchange of discrete bone packets. We tested different hypotheses of how the mechanical stimulus for bone remodelling is integrated by osteocytes and sent to actor cells on the bone's surface. A collective (summed) signal from multiple osteocytes as opposed to an individual (maximal) signal from a single osteocyte was found to lead to lower inner porosity and surface roughness of the simulated bone structure. This observation can be interpreted in that collective osteocyte signalling provides an effective surface tension to the remodelling process. Furthermore, the material heterogeneity due to remodelling was studied on a network of trabeculae. As the model is discrete, the age of individual bone packets can be monitored with time. The simulation results were compared with experimental data coming from quantitative back scattered electron imaging by transforming the information about the age of the bone packet into a mineral content. Discrepancies with experiments indicate that osteoclasts preferentially resorb low mineralized, i.e. young, bone at the bone's surface. PMID:21616469

  5. The role of microRNAs in bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Jing, Dian; Hao, Jin; Shen, Yu; Tang, Ge; Li, Mei-Le; Huang, Shi-Hu; Zhao, Zhi-He

    2015-01-01

    Bone remodeling is balanced by bone formation and bone resorption as well as by alterations in the quantities and functions of seed cells, leading to either the maintenance or deterioration of bone status. The existing evidence indicates that microRNAs (miRNAs), known as a family of short non-coding RNAs, are the key post-transcriptional repressors of gene expression, and growing numbers of novel miRNAs have been verified to play vital roles in the regulation of osteogenesis, osteoclastogenesis, and adipogenesis, revealing how they interact with signaling molecules to control these processes. This review summarizes the current knowledge of the roles of miRNAs in regulating bone remodeling as well as novel applications for miRNAs in biomaterials for therapeutic purposes. PMID:26208037

  6. A Computational Model for Simulating Spaceflight Induced Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2014-01-01

    An overview of an initial development of a model of bone loss due to skeletal unloading in weight bearing sites is presented. The skeletal site chosen for the initial application of the model is the femoral neck region because hip fractures can be debilitating to the overall performance health of astronauts. The paper begins with the motivation for developing such a model of the time course of change in bone in order to understand the mechanism of bone demineralization experienced by astronauts in microgravity, to quantify the health risk, and to establish countermeasures. Following this, a general description of a mathematical formulation of the process of bone remodeling is discussed. Equations governing the rate of change of mineralized bone volume fraction and active osteoclast and osteoblast are illustrated. Some of the physiology of bone remodeling, the theory of how imbalance in remodeling can cause bone loss, and how the model attempts to capture this is discussed. The results of a preliminary validation analysis that was carried out are presented. The analysis compares a set of simulation results against bone loss data from control subjects who participated in two different bed rest studies. Finally, the paper concludes with outlining the current limitations and caveats of the model, and planned future work to enhance the state of the model.

  7. Nutritional modulators of bone remodeling during aging.

    PubMed

    Mundy, Gregory R

    2006-02-01

    Bone mass declines progressively with age in both men and women from the age of approximately 30 y. Increased longevity will inevitability be associated with an increase in the incidence of osteoporosis, its associated complications, and incurred health care costs. Current pharmacologic approaches focus on inhibiting bone resorption in those with osteoporosis but do little to improve bone mass. Increased understanding of the cellular events responsible for normal bone formation has led to multiple pathways that can be targeted to positively influence bone mass. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs) have been shown to stimulate bone formation, and the BMP2 gene was recently linked to osteoporosis. BMP-2 therefore represents one potential molecular target to identify new agents to simulate bone formation. Research is accumulating on the positive effects of dietary sources that stimulate the BMP2 promoter and their effects on bone formation. Flavonoids and statins occur naturally in food products and have been shown to promote bone formation. It may be possible to influence peak bone mass by dietary means and to decrease the risk of osteoporosis in later life. To ease the future burden of osteoporosis, focusing on prevention will be key, and this could include dietary interventions to stimulate bone formation. PMID:16470007

  8. The Digital Astronaut Project Bone Remodeling Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, J. A.; Mulugeta, L.; Lewandowski, B. E.; Thompson, W. K.; Sibonga, J. D.

    2013-01-01

    One of the main objectives is to provide a tool to help HHC address Bone Gap Osteo 4: We don't know the contribution of each risk factor on bone loss and recovery of bone strength and which factors are the best targets for countermeasure application; and Osteo7: We need to identify options for mitigation of early onset osteoporosis before, during, and after spaceflight.

  9. Evaluation of bone remodeling around single dental implants of different lengths: a mechanobiological numerical simulation and validation using clinical data.

    PubMed

    Sotto-Maior, Bruno Salles; Mercuri, Emílio Graciliano Ferreira; Senna, Plinio Mendes; Assis, Neuza Maria Souza Picorelli; Francischone, Carlos Eduardo; Del Bel Cury, Altair Antoninha

    2016-01-01

    Algorithmic models have been proposed to explain adaptive behavior of bone to loading; however, these models have not been applied to explain the biomechanics of short dental implants. Purpose of present study was to simulate bone remodeling around single implants of different lengths using mechanoregulatory tissue differentiation model derived from the Stanford theory, using finite elements analysis (FEA) and to validate the theoretical prediction with the clinical findings of crestal bone loss. Loading cycles were applied on 7-, 10-, or 13-mm-long dental implants to simulate daily mastication and bone remodeling was assessed by changes in the strain energy density of bone after a 3, 6, and 12 months of function. Moreover, clinical findings of marginal bone loss in 45 patients rehabilitated with same implant designs used in the simulation (n = 15) were computed to validate the theoretical results. FEA analysis showed that although the bone density values reduced over time in the cortical bone for all groups, bone remodeling was independent of implant length. Clinical data showed a similar pattern of bone resorption compared with the data generated from mathematical analyses, independent of implant length. The results of this study showed that the mechanoregulatory tissue model could be employed in monitoring the morphological changes in bone that is subjected to biomechanical loads. In addition, the implant length did not influence the bone remodeling around single dental implants during the first year of loading. PMID:26249362

  10. Response and adaptation of bone cells to simulated microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Lifang; Li, Runzhi; Su, Peihong; Arfat, Yasir; Zhang, Ge; Shang, Peng; Qian, Airong

    2014-11-01

    Bone loss induced by microgravity during space flight is one of the most deleterious factors on astronaut's health and is mainly attributed to an unbalance in the process of bone remodeling. Studies from the space microgravity have demonstrated that the disruption of bone remodeling is associated with the changes of four main functional bone cells, including osteoblast, osteoclast, osteocyte, and mesenchymal stem cells. For the limited availability, expensive costs and confined experiment conditions for conducting space microgravity studies, the mechanism of bone cells response and adaptation to microgravity is still unclear. Therefore, some ground-based simulated microgravity methods have been developed to investigate the bioeffects of microgravity and the mechanisms. Here, based on our studies and others, we review how bone cells (osteoblasts, osteoclasts, osteocytes and mesenchymal stem cells) respond and adapt to simulated microgravity.

  11. Activity and loading influence the predicted bone remodeling around cemented hip replacements.

    PubMed

    Dickinson, Alexander S

    2014-04-01

    Periprosthetic bone remodeling is frequently observed after total hip replacement. Reduced bone density increases the implant and bone fracture risk, and a gross loss of bone density challenges fixation in subsequent revision surgery. Computational approaches allow bone remodeling to be predicted in agreement with the general clinical observations of proximal resorption and distal hypertrophy. However, these models do not reproduce other clinically observed bone density trends, including faster stabilizing mid-stem density losses, and loss-recovery trends around the distal stem. These may resemble trends in postoperative joint loading and activity, during recovery and rehabilitation, but the established remodeling prediction approach is often used with identical pre- and postoperative load and activity assumptions. Therefore, this study aimed to evaluate the influence of pre- to postoperative changes in activity and loading upon the predicted progression of remodeling. A strain-adaptive finite element model of a femur implanted with a cemented Charnley stem was generated, to predict 60 months of periprosthetic remodeling. A control set of model input data assumed identical pre- and postoperative loading and activity, and was compared to the results obtained from another set of inputs with three varying activity and load profiles. These represented activity changes during rehabilitation for weak, intermediate and strong recoveries, and pre- to postoperative joint force changes due to hip center translation and the use of walking aids. Predicted temporal bone density change trends were analyzed, and absolute bone density changes and the time to homeostasis were inspected, alongside virtual X-rays. The predicted periprosthetic bone density changes obtained using modified loading inputs demonstrated closer agreement with clinical measurements than the control. The modified inputs also predicted the clinically observed temporal density change trends, but still under

  12. Remodeling of tissue-engineered bone structures in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Sandra; Hilbe, Monika; Fajardo, Robert J; Hagenmüller, Henri; Nuss, Katja; Arras, Margarete; Müller, Ralph; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kaplan, David L; Merkle, Hans P; Meinel, Lorenz

    2013-09-01

    Implant design for bone regeneration is expected to be optimized when implant structures resemble the anatomical situation of the defect site. We tested the validity of this hypothesis by exploring the feasibility of generating different in vitro engineered bone-like structures originating from porous silk fibroin scaffolds decorated with RGD sequences (SF-RGD), seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Scaffolds with small (106-212 μm), medium (212-300 μm), and large pore diameter ranges (300-425 μm) were seeded with hMSC and subsequently differentiated in vitro into bone-like tissue resembling initial scaffold geometries and featuring bone-like structures. Eight weeks after implantation into calvarial defects in mice, the in vitro engineered bone-like tissues had remodeled into bone featuring different proportions of woven/lamellar bone bridging the defects. Regardless of pore diameter, all implants integrated well, vascularization was advanced, and bone marrow ingrowth had started. Ultimately, in this defect model, the geometry of the in vitro generated tissue-engineered bone structure, trabecular- or plate-like, had no significant impact on the healing of the defect, owing to an efficient remodeling of its structure after implantation. PMID:23958323

  13. Remodeling of tissue-engineered bone structures in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Hofmann, Sandra; Hilbe, Monika; Fajardo, Robert J.; Hagenmüller, Henri; Nuss, Katja; Arras, Margarete; Müller, Ralph; von Rechenberg, Brigitte; Kaplan, David L.; Merkle, Hans P.; Meinel, Lorenz

    2013-01-01

    Implant design for bone regeneration is expected to be optimized when implant structures resemble the anatomical situation of the defect site. We tested the validity of this hypothesis by exploring the feasibility of generating different in vitro engineered bone-like structures originating from porous silk fibroin scaffolds decorated with RGD sequences (SF-RGD), seeded with human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). Scaffolds with small (106 – 212 μm), medium (212 – 300 μm) and large pore diameter ranges (300 – 425 μm) were seeded with hMSC and subsequently differentiated in vitro into bone-like tissue resembling initial scaffold geometries and featuring bone-like structures. Eight weeks after implantation into calvarial defects in mice, the in vitro engineered bone-like tissues had remodeled into bone featuring different proportions of woven/lamellar bone bridging the defects. Regardless of pore diameter all implants integrated well, vascularization was advanced and, bone marrow ingrowth had started. Ultimately, in this defect model, the geometry of the in vitro generated tissue-engineered bone structure, trabecular- or plate-like, had no significant impact on the healing of the defect, owing to an efficient remodeling of its structure after implantation. PMID:23958323

  14. The Digital Astronaut Project Bone Remodeling Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Lewandowski, Beth E.; Thompson, William K.; Sibonga, Jean D.

    2014-01-01

    Under the conditions of microgravity, astronauts lose bone mass at a rate of 1% to 2% a month, particularly in the lower extremities such as the proximal femur: (1) The most commonly used countermeasure against bone loss has been prescribed exercise, (2) However, current exercise countermeasures do not completely eliminate bone loss in long duration, 4 to 6 months, spaceflight, (3,4) leaving the astronaut susceptible to early onset osteoporosis and a greater risk of fracture later in their lives. The introduction of the Advanced Resistive Exercise Device, coupled with improved nutrition, has further minimized the 4 to 6 month bone loss. But further work is needed to implement optimal exercise prescriptions, and (5) In this light, NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) is working with NASA physiologists to implement well-validated computational models that can help understand the mechanisms of bone demineralization in microgravity, and enhance exercise countermeasure development.

  15. Expression of RANKL/OPG during bone remodeling in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Tanaka, H.; Mine, T.; Ogasa, H.; Taguchi, T.; Liang, C.T.

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} This is the first study to determine the relationship between osteogenic differentiation and RANKL/OPG expression during bone remodeling in vivo. {yields} The OPG expression peak occurred during the bone formation phase, whereas the marked elevation of RANKL expression was observed during the bone resorption phase. {yields} Histological analysis showed that RANKL/OPG immunoreactivity was predominantly associated with bone marrow cells in the marrow cavity. {yields} The present study confirmed that RANKL/OPG are key factors linking bone formation to resorption during the bone remodeling process. -- Abstract: The interaction between receptor activator of nuclear factor {kappa}B ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) plays a dominant role in osteoclastogenesis. As both proteins are produced by osteoblast lineage cells, they are considered to represent a key link between bone formation and resorption. In this study, we investigated the expression of RANKL and OPG during bone remodeling in vivo to determine the relationship between osteoclastogenic stimulation and osteoblastic differentiation. Total RNA was prepared from rat femurs after marrow ablation on days 0, 3, 6, and 9. The temporal activation patterns of osteoblast-related genes (procollagen {alpha}1 (I), alkaline phosphatase, osteopontin, and osteocalcin) were examined by Northern blot analysis. An appreciable increase in the expression of these osteoblast markers was observed on day 3. The peak increase in gene expression was observed on day 6 followed by a slight reduction by day 9. Real-time PCR analysis showed that the OPG mRNA expression was markedly upregulated on day 6 and slightly decreased on day 9. In contrast, RANKL mRNA expression was increased by more than 20-fold on day 9. The RANKL/OPG ratio, an index of osteoclastogenic stimulation, peaked on day 9. Histological analysis showed that RANKL and OPG immunoreactivity were predominantly associated with bone marrow cells. The

  16. Uranium inhibits bone formation in physiologic alveolar bone modeling and remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Ubios, A.M.; Guglielmotti, M.B.; Steimetz, T.; Cabrini, R.L. )

    1991-02-01

    The toxic effect of uranium (U) on bone modeling and remodeling was studied by performing histomorphometric measurements in the periodontal cortical bone of rats. Two different single intraperitoneal doses of uranyl nitrate (238U) were administered to two sets of rats respectively (2 and 0.8 mg/kg body wt). Rats treated with the first dose were killed 14 days postinjection (PI) and those treated with the second were killed 14, 30, and 60 days PI. The results revealed a decrease in bone formation in rats treated with uranium. On the remodeling side the decrease in bone formation was coupled to an increase in bone resorption on the 14th day PI. On the modeling side no bone resorption was observed and the decrease in bone formation was linked to an increase in resting bone zones. Bone formation depression as a key event in U intoxication is stressed.

  17. Osteocalcin enhances bone remodeling around hydroxyapatite/collagen composites.

    PubMed

    Rammelt, Stefan; Neumann, Mirjam; Hanisch, Uwe; Reinstorf, Antje; Pompe, Wolfgang; Zwipp, Hans; Biewener, Achim

    2005-06-01

    The effect of osteocalcin (OC), an extracellular bone matrix protein, on bone healing around hydroxyapatite/collagen composites was investigated. Cylindrical nanocrystalline hydroxyapatite implants of 2.5-mm diameter containing 2.5% biomimetically mineralized collagen type I were inserted press-fit into the tibial head of adult Wistar rats. To one implant group, 10 mug/g OC was added. Six specimens per group were analyzed at 2, 7, 14, 28, and 56 days. After 14 days, newly formed woven bone had reached the implant surface of the OC implants whereas a broad fibrous interface could still be observed around controls. Woven bone was formed directly around both implant groups after 28 days and had been replaced partially by lamellar bone around the OC implants only. No significant differences in total bone contact were seen between both groups after 56 days. The higher number of phagocytosing cells and osteoclasts characterized immunohistochemically with ED1, cathepsin D, and tartate-resistant alkaline phosphatase around the OC implants at the early stages of bone healing suggests an earlier onset of bone remodeling. The earlier and increased expression of bone-specific matrix proteins and multifunctional adhesion proteins (osteopontin, bone sialoprotein, CD44) at the interface around the OC implants indicates that OC may accelerate bone formation and regeneration. This study supports the observations from in vitro studies that OC activates both osteoclasts and osteoblasts during early bone formation. PMID:15800855

  18. ATF3 controls proliferation of osteoclast precursor and bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Fukasawa, Kazuya; Park, Gyujin; Iezaki, Takashi; Horie, Tetsuhiro; Kanayama, Takashi; Ozaki, Kakeru; Onishi, Yuki; Takahata, Yoshifumi; Yoneda, Yukio; Takarada, Takeshi; Kitajima, Shigetaka; Vacher, Jean; Hinoi, Eiichi

    2016-01-01

    Bone homeostasis is maintained by the sophisticated coupled actions of bone-resorbing osteoclasts and bone-forming osteoblasts. Here we identify activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) as a pivotal transcription factor for the regulation of bone resorption and bone remodeling under a pathological condition through modulating the proliferation of osteoclast precursors. The osteoclast precursor-specific deletion of ATF3 in mice led to the prevention of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB (RANK) ligand (RANKL)-induced bone resorption and bone loss, although neither bone volume nor osteoclastic parameter were markedly altered in these knockout mice under the physiological condition. RANKL-dependent osteoclastogenesis was impaired in vitro in ATF3-deleted bone marrow macrophages (BMM). Mechanistically, the deficiency of ATF3 impaired the RANKL-induced transient increase in cell proliferation of osteoclast precursors in bone marrow in vivo as well as of BMM in vitro. Moreover, ATF3 regulated cyclin D1 mRNA expression though modulating activator protein-1-dependent transcription in the osteoclast precursor, and the introduction of cyclin D1 significantly rescued the impairment of osteoclastogenesis in ATF3-deleted BMM. Therefore, these findings suggest that ATF3 could have a pivotal role in osteoclastogenesis and bone homeostasis though modulating cell proliferation under pathological conditions, thereby providing a target for bone diseases. PMID:27480204

  19. Prediction of denosumab effects on bone remodeling: A combined pharmacokinetics and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    Hambli, Ridha; Boughattas, Mohamed Hafedh; Daniel, Jean-Luc; Kourta, Azeddine

    2016-07-01

    Denosumab is a fully human monoclonal antibody that inhibits receptor activator of nuclearfactor-kappa B ligand (RANKL). This key mediator of osteoclast activities has been shown to inhibit osteoclast differentiation and hence, to increase bone mineral density (BMD) in treated patients. In the current study, we develop a computer model to simulate the effects of denosumab treatments (dose and duration) on the proximal femur bone remodeling process quantified by the variation in proximal femur BMD. The simulation model is based on a coupled pharmacokinetics model of denosumab with a pharmacodynamics model consisting of a mechanobiological finite element remodeling model which describes the activities of osteoclasts and osteoblasts. The mechanical behavior of bone is described by taking into account the bone material fatigue damage accumulation and mineralization. A coupled strain-damage stimulus function is proposed which controls the level of bone cell autocrine and paracrine factors. The cellular behavior is based on Komarova et al.׳s (2003) dynamic law which describes the autocrine and paracrine interactions between osteoblasts and osteoclasts and computes cell population dynamics and changes in bone mass at a discrete site of bone remodeling. Therefore, when an external mechanical stress is applied, bone formation and resorption is governed by cell dynamics rather than by adaptive elasticity approaches. The proposed finite element model was implemented in the finite element code Abaqus (UMAT routine). In order to perform a preliminary validation, in vivo human proximal femurs were selected and scanned at two different time intervals (at baseline and at a 36-month interval). Then, a 3D FE model was generated and the denosumab-remodeling algorithm was applied to the scans at t0 simulating daily walking activities for a duration of 36 months. The predicted results (density variation) were compared to existing published ones performed on a human cohort (FREEDOM

  20. Altered thermogenesis and impaired bone remodeling in Misty mice.

    PubMed

    Motyl, Katherine J; Bishop, Kathleen A; DeMambro, Victoria E; Bornstein, Sheila A; Le, Phuong; Kawai, Masanobu; Lotinun, Sutada; Horowitz, Mark C; Baron, Roland; Bouxsein, Mary L; Rosen, Clifford J

    2013-09-01

    Fat mass may be modulated by the number of brown-like adipocytes in white adipose tissue (WAT) in humans and rodents. Bone remodeling is dependent on systemic energy metabolism and, with age, bone remodeling becomes uncoupled and brown adipose tissue (BAT) function declines. To test the interaction between BAT and bone, we employed Misty (m/m) mice, which were reported be deficient in BAT. We found that Misty mice have accelerated age-related trabecular bone loss and impaired brown fat function (including reduced temperature, lower expression of Pgc1a, and less sympathetic innervation compared to wild-type (+/ +)). Despite reduced BAT function, Misty mice had normal core body temperature, suggesting heat is produced from other sources. Indeed, upon acute cold exposure (4°C for 6 hours), inguinal WAT from Misty mice compensated for BAT dysfunction by increasing expression of Acadl, Pgc1a, Dio2, and other thermogenic genes. Interestingly, acute cold exposure also decreased Runx2 and increased Rankl expression in Misty bone, but only Runx2 was decreased in wild-type. Browning of WAT is under the control of the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) and, if present at room temperature, could impact bone metabolism. To test whether SNS activity could be responsible for accelerated trabecular bone loss, we treated wild-type and Misty mice with the β-blocker, propranolol. As predicted, propranolol slowed trabecular bone volume/total volume (BV/TV) loss in the distal femur of Misty mice without affecting wild-type. Finally, the Misty mutation (a truncation of DOCK7) also has a significant cell-autonomous role. We found DOCK7 expression in whole bone and osteoblasts. Primary osteoblast differentiation from Misty calvaria was impaired, demonstrating a novel role for DOCK7 in bone remodeling. Despite the multifaceted effects of the Misty mutation, we have shown that impaired brown fat function leads to altered SNS activity and bone loss, and for the first time that cold

  1. Suppressed bone remodeling in black bears conserves energy and bone mass during hibernation

    PubMed Central

    McGee-Lawrence, Meghan; Buckendahl, Patricia; Carpenter, Caren; Henriksen, Kim; Vaughan, Michael; Donahue, Seth

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Decreased physical activity in mammals increases bone turnover and uncouples bone formation from bone resorption, leading to hypercalcemia, hypercalcuria, bone loss and increased fracture risk. Black bears, however, are physically inactive for up to 6 months annually during hibernation without losing cortical or trabecular bone mass. Bears have been shown to preserve trabecular bone volume and architectural parameters and cortical bone strength, porosity and geometrical properties during hibernation. The mechanisms that prevent disuse osteoporosis in bears are unclear as previous studies using histological and serum markers of bone remodeling show conflicting results. However, previous studies used serum markers of bone remodeling that are known to accumulate with decreased renal function, which bears have during hibernation. Therefore, we measured serum bone remodeling markers (BSALP and TRACP) that do not accumulate with decreased renal function, in addition to the concentrations of serum calcium and hormones involved in regulating bone remodeling in hibernating and active bears. Bone resorption and formation markers were decreased during hibernation compared with when bears were physically active, and these findings were supported by histomorphometric analyses of bone biopsies. The serum concentration of cocaine and amphetamine regulated transcript (CART), a hormone known to reduce bone resorption, was 15-fold higher during hibernation. Serum calcium concentration was unchanged between hibernation and non-hibernation seasons. Suppressed and balanced bone resorption and formation in hibernating bears contributes to energy conservation, eucalcemia and the preservation of bone mass and strength, allowing bears to survive prolonged periods of extreme environmental conditions, nutritional deprivation and anuria. PMID:26157160

  2. Osteoprotegerin in breast cancer: beyond bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Weichhaus, Michael; Chung, Stephanie Tsang Mui; Connelly, Linda

    2015-01-01

    Osteoprotegerin (OPG) is a secreted protein and member of the Tumor Necrosis Factor (TNF) Receptor superfamily. OPG has been well characterized as a regulator of bone metabolism which acts by blocking osteoclast maturation and preventing bone breakdown. Given this role, early studies on OPG in breast cancer focused on the administration of OPG in order to prevent the osteolysis observed with bone metastases. However OPG is also produced by the breast tumor cells themselves. Research focusing on OPG produced by breast tumor cells has revealed actions of OPG which promote tumor progression. In vitro studies into the role of OPG produced by breast tumor cells have demonstrated that OPG can block TNF-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL)-mediated apoptosis. Furthermore, in vivo studies show that OPG expression by breast tumors can promote tumor growth and metastasis. In addition it has been shown that OPG stimulates endothelial cell survival and tube formation thus it may indirectly promote breast tumor progression through impacting angiogenesis. This article will present a summary of the data concerning the tumor-promoting effects of OPG in breast cancer. PMID:26054853

  3. Probabilistic Study of Bone Remodeling Using Finite Element Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Werner, C.; Gorla, R. S. R.

    2013-08-01

    The dynamic bone remodeling process is a computationally challenging research area that struggles to understand the actual mechanisms. It has been observed that a mechanical stimulus in the bone greatly affects the remodeling process. A 3D finite element model of a femur is created and a probabilistic analysis is performed on the model. The probabilistic analysis measures the sensitivities of various parameters related to the material properties, geometric properties, and the three load cases defined as Single Leg Stance, Abduction, and Adduction. The sensitivity of each parameter is based on the calculated maximum mechanical stimulus and analyzed at various values of probabilities ranging from 0.001 to 0.999. The analysis showed that the parameters associated with the Single Leg Stance load case had the highest sensitivity with a probability of 0.99 and the angle of the force applied to the joint of the proximal femur had the overall highest sensitivity

  4. Changes in the population of perivascular cells in the bone tissue remodeling zones under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Katkova, Olena; Rodionova, Natalia; Shevel, Ivan

    2016-07-01

    Microgravity and long-term hypokinesia induce reduction both in bone mass and mineral saturation, which can lead to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia. (Oganov, 2003). Reorganizations and adaptive remodeling processes in the skeleton bones occur in the topographical interconnection with blood capillaries and perivascular cells. Radioautographic studies with 3H- thymidine (Kimmel, Fee, 1980; Rodionova, 1989, 2006) have shown that in osteogenesis zones there is sequential differentiation process of the perivascular cells into osteogenic. Hence the study of populations of perivascular stromal cells in areas of destructive changes is actual. Perivascular cells from metaphysis of the rat femoral bones under conditions of modeling microgravity were studied using electron microscopy and cytochemistry (hindlimb unloading, 28 days duration) and biosatellite «Bion-M1» (duration of flight from April 19 till May 19, 2013 on C57, black mice). It was revealed that both control and test groups populations of the perivascular cells are not homogeneous in remodeling adaptive zones. These populations comprise of adjacent to endothelium poorly differentiated forms and isolated cells with signs of differentiation (specific increased volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm). Majority of the perivascular cells in the control group (modeling microgravity) reveals reaction to alkaline phosphatase (marker of the osteogenic differentiation). In poorly differentiated cells this reaction is registered in nucleolus, nucleous and cytoplasm. In differentiating cells activity of the alkaline phosphatase is also detected on the outer surface of the cellular membrane. Unlike the control group in the bones of experimental animals reaction to the alkaline phosphatase is registered not in all cells of perivascular population. Part of the differentiating perivascular cells does not contain a product of the reaction. Under microgravity some poorly differentiated perivascular

  5. Retinoid X receptors orchestrate osteoclast differentiation and postnatal bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menéndez-Gutiérrez, María P.; Rőszer, Tamás; Fuentes, Lucía; Núñez, Vanessa; Escolano, Amelia; Redondo, Juan Miguel; De Clerck, Nora; Metzger, Daniel; Valledor, Annabel F.; Ricote, Mercedes

    2015-01-01

    Osteoclasts are bone-resorbing cells that are important for maintenance of bone remodeling and mineral homeostasis. Regulation of osteoclast differentiation and activity is important for the pathogenesis and treatment of diseases associated with bone loss. Here, we demonstrate that retinoid X receptors (RXRs) are key elements of the transcriptional program of differentiating osteoclasts. Loss of RXR function in hematopoietic cells resulted in formation of giant, nonresorbing osteoclasts and increased bone mass in male mice and protected female mice from bone loss following ovariectomy, which induces osteoporosis in WT females. The increase in bone mass associated with RXR deficiency was due to lack of expression of the RXR-dependent transcription factor v-maf musculoaponeurotic fibrosarcoma oncogene family, protein B (MAFB) in osteoclast progenitors. Evaluation of osteoclast progenitor cells revealed that RXR homodimers directly target and bind to the Mafb promoter, and this interaction is required for proper osteoclast proliferation, differentiation, and activity. Pharmacological activation of RXRs inhibited osteoclast differentiation due to the formation of RXR/liver X receptor (LXR) heterodimers, which induced expression of sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c), resulting in indirect MAFB upregulation. Our study reveals that RXR signaling mediates bone homeostasis and suggests that RXRs have potential as targets for the treatment of bone pathologies such as osteoporosis. PMID:25574839

  6. Alteration of proteoglycan sulfation affects bone growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gualeni, Benedetta; de Vernejoul, Marie-Christine; Marty-Morieux, Caroline; De Leonardis, Fabio; Franchi, Marco; Monti, Luca; Forlino, Antonella; Houillier, Pascal; Rossi, Antonio; Geoffroy, Valerie

    2013-01-01

    Diastrophic dysplasia (DTD) is a chondrodysplasia caused by mutations in the SLC26A2 gene, leading to reduced intracellular sulfate pool in chondrocytes, osteoblasts and fibroblasts. Hence, proteoglycans are undersulfated in the cartilage and bone of DTD patients. To characterize the bone phenotype of this skeletal dysplasia we used the Slc26a2 knock-in mouse (dtd mouse), that was previously validated as an animal model of DTD in humans. X-rays, bone densitometry, static and dynamic histomorphometry, and in vitro studies revealed a primary bone defect in the dtd mouse model. We showed in vivo that this primary bone defect in dtd mice is due to decreased bone accrual associated with a decreased trabecular and periosteal appositional rate at the cell level in one month-old mice. Although the osteoclast number evaluated by histomorphometry was not different in dtd compared to wild-type mice, urine analysis of deoxypyridinoline cross-links and serum levels of type I collagen C-terminal telopeptides showed a higher resorption rate in dtd mice compared to wild-type littermates. Electron microscopy studies showed that collagen fibrils in bone were thinner and less organized in dtd compared to wild-type mice. These data suggest that the low bone mass observed in mutant mice could possibly be linked to the different bone matrix compositions/organizations in dtd mice triggering changes in osteoblast and osteoclast activities. Overall, these results suggest that proteoglycan undersulfation not only affects the properties of hyaline cartilage, but can also lead to unbalanced bone modeling and remodeling activities, demonstrating the importance of proteoglycan sulfation in bone homeostasis. PMID:23369989

  7. Epigenetic Regulation of Bone Remodeling and Its Impacts in Osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Ghayor, Chafik; Weber, Franz E

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetics describes mechanisms which control gene expression and cellular processes without changing the DNA sequence. The main mechanisms in epigenetics are DNA methylation in CpG-rich promoters, histone modifications and non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs). DNA methylation modifies the function of the DNA and correlates with gene silencing. Histone modifications including acetylation/deacetylation and phosphorylation act in diverse biological processes such as transcriptional activation/inactivation and DNA repair. Non-coding RNAs play a large part in epigenetic regulation of gene expression in addition to their roles at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. Osteoporosis is the most common skeletal disorder, characterized by compromised bone strength and bone micro-architectural deterioration that predisposes the bones to an increased risk of fracture. It is most often caused by an increase in bone resorption that is not sufficiently compensated by a corresponding increase in bone formation. Nowadays it is well accepted that osteoporosis is a multifactorial disorder and there are genetic risk factors for osteoporosis and bone fractures. Here we review emerging evidence that epigenetics contributes to the machinery that can alter DNA structure, gene expression, and cellular differentiation during physiological and pathological bone remodeling. PMID:27598138

  8. Simulating Bone Loss in Microgravity Using Mathematical Formulations of Bone Remodeling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James A.

    2009-01-01

    Most mathematical models of bone remodeling are used to simulate a specific bone disease, by disrupting the steady state or balance in the normal remodeling process, and to simulate a therapeutic strategy. In this work, the ability of a mathematical model of bone remodeling to simulate bone loss as a function of time under the conditions of microgravity is investigated. The model is formed by combining a previously developed set of biochemical, cellular dynamics, and mechanical stimulus equations in the literature with two newly proposed equations; one governing the rate of change of the area of cortical bone tissue in a cross section of a cylindrical section of bone and one governing the rate of change of calcium in the bone fluid. The mechanical stimulus comes from a simple model of stress due to a compressive force on a cylindrical section of bone which can be reduced to zero to mimic the effects of skeletal unloading in microgravity. The complete set of equations formed is a system of first order ordinary differential equations. The results of selected simulations are displayed and discussed. Limitations and deficiencies of the model are also discussed as well as suggestions for further research.

  9. Remodeling in bone without osteocytes: Billfish challenge bone structure–function paradigms

    PubMed Central

    Atkins, Ayelet; Dean, Mason N.; Habegger, Maria Laura; Motta, Phillip J.; Ofer, Lior; Repp, Felix; Shipov, Anna; Weiner, Steve; Currey, John D.; Shahar, Ron

    2014-01-01

    A remarkable property of tetrapod bone is its ability to detect and remodel areas where damage has accumulated through prolonged use. This process, believed vital to the long-term health of bone, is considered to be initiated and orchestrated by osteocytes, cells within the bone matrix. It is therefore surprising that most extant fishes (neoteleosts) lack osteocytes, suggesting their bones are not constantly repaired, although many species exhibit long lives and high activity levels, factors that should induce considerable fatigue damage with time. Here, we show evidence for active and intense remodeling occurring in the anosteocytic, elongated rostral bones of billfishes (e.g., swordfish, marlins). Despite lacking osteocytes, this tissue exhibits a striking resemblance to the mature bone of large mammals, bearing structural features (overlapping secondary osteons) indicating intensive tissue repair, particularly in areas where high loads are expected. Billfish osteons are an order of magnitude smaller in diameter than mammalian osteons, however, implying that the nature of damage in this bone may be different. Whereas billfish bone material is as stiff as mammalian bone (unlike the bone of other fishes), it is able to withstand much greater strains (relative deformations) before failing. Our data show that fish bone can exhibit far more complex structure and physiology than previously known, and is apparently capable of localized repair even without the osteocytes believed essential for this process. These findings challenge the unique and primary role of osteocytes in bone remodeling, a basic tenet of bone biology, raising the possibility of an alternative mechanism driving this process. PMID:25331870

  10. Differentiation potentials of perivascular cells in the bone tissue remodeling zones under microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, Natalia; Katkova, Olena

    Adaptive remodeling processes in the skeleton bones occur in the close topographical interconnection with blood capillaries followed by perivascular cells. Radioautographic studies with 3Н- thymidine (Kimmel D.B., Fee W.S., 1980; Rodionova N.V., 1989, 2006) has shown that in osteogenesis zones there is sequential differentiation process of the perivascular cells into osteogenic ones. Using electron microscopy and cytochemistry we studied perivsacular cells in metaphysis of the rats femoral bones under conditions of modeling microgravity (28 days duration) and in femoral bonеs metaphyses of rats flown on board of the space laboratory (Spacelab - 2) It was revealed that population of the perivascular cells is not homogeneous in adaptive zones of the remodeling in both control and test groups (lowering support loading). This population comprises adjacent to endothelium little differentiated forms and isolated cells with differentiation features (specific volume of rough endoplasmic reticulum in cytoplasm is increased). Majority of the perivascular cells in the control group reveals reaction to alkaline phosphatase (marker of the osteogenic differentiation). In little differentiated cells this reaction is registered in nucleolus, nucleous and cytoplasm. In differentiating cells activity of the alkaline phosphatase is also detected on the outer surface of the cellular membrane. Unlike the control group in the bones of animals under microgravitaty reaction to the alkaline phosphatase is registered not for all cells of perivascular population. Part of the differentiating perivascular cells does not contain a product of the reaction. There is also visible trend of individual alkaline phosphatase containing perivascular cells amounts decrease (i.e. osteogenic cells-precursors). Under microgravity some little differentiated perivascular cells reveal destruction signs. Found decrease trend of the alkaline phosphatase containing cells (i.e. osteogenic cells) number in

  11. Retinoid Receptors in Bone and Their Role in Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Henning, Petra; Conaway, H. Herschel; Lerner, Ulf H.

    2015-01-01

    Vitamin A (retinol) is a necessary and important constituent of the body which is provided by food intake of retinyl esters and carotenoids. Vitamin A is known best for being important for vision, but in addition to the eye, vitamin A is necessary in numerous other organs in the body, including the skeleton. Vitamin A is converted to an active compound, all-trans-retinoic acid (ATRA), which is responsible for most of its biological actions. ATRA binds to intracellular nuclear receptors called retinoic acid receptors (RARα, RARβ, RARγ). RARs and closely related retinoid X receptors (RXRα, RXRβ, RXRγ) form heterodimers which bind to DNA and function as ligand-activated transcription factors. It has been known for many years that hypervitaminosis A promotes skeleton fragility by increasing osteoclast formation and decreasing cortical bone mass. Some epidemiological studies have suggested that increased intake of vitamin A and increased serum levels of retinoids may decrease bone mineral density and increase fracture rate, but the literature on this is not conclusive. The current review summarizes how vitamin A is taken up by the intestine, metabolized, stored in the liver, and processed to ATRA. ATRA’s effects on formation and activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts are outlined, and a summary of clinical data pertaining to vitamin A and bone is presented. PMID:25814978

  12. A mechanostatistical approach to cortical bone remodelling: an equine model.

    PubMed

    Wang, X; Thomas, C D L; Clement, J G; Das, R; Davies, H; Fernandez, J W

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the development of a mechanostatistical model of three-dimensional cortical bone remodelling informed with in vivo equine data is presented. The equine model was chosen as it is highly translational to the human condition due to similar Haversian systems, availability of in vivo bone strain and biomarker data, and furthermore, equine models are recommended by the US Federal Drugs Administration for comparative joint research. The model was derived from micro-computed tomography imaged specimens taken from the equine third metacarpal bone, and the Frost-based 'mechanostat' was informed from both in vivo strain gauges and biomarkers to estimate bone growth rates. The model also described the well-known 'cutting cone' phenomena where Haversian canals tunnel and replace bone. In order to make this model useful in practice, a partial least squares regression (PLSR) surrogate model was derived based on training data from finite element simulations with different loads. The PLSR model was able to predict microstructure and homogenised Young's modulus with errors less than 2.2% and 0.6%, respectively. PMID:25862068

  13. Static versus dynamic loads as an influence on bone remodelling

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lanyon, L. E.; Rubin, C. T.

    1983-01-01

    Bone remodelling activity in the avian ulna was assessed under conditions of disuse alone, disuse with a superimposed continuous compressive load, and disuse interrupted by a short daily period of intermittent loading. The ulna preparation is made by two submetaphyseal osteotomies, the cut ends of the bone being covered with stainless steel caps which, together with the bone they enclosed, are pierced by pins emerging transcutaneously on the dorsal and ventral surfaces of the wing. The 110 mm long undisturbed section of the bone shaft can be protected from functional loading, loaded continuously in compression by joining the pins with springs, or loaded intermittently in compression by engaging the pins in an Instron machine. Similar loads (525 n) were used in both static and dynamic cases engendering similar peak strains at the bone's midshaft (-2000 x 10-6). The intermitent load was applied at a frequency of 1 Hz during a single 100 second period per day as a ramped square wave, with a rate of change of strain during the ramp of 0.01 per second.

  14. The effects of proteasome inhibitors on bone remodeling in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Zangari, Maurizio; Suva, Larry J

    2016-05-01

    Bone disease is a characteristic feature of multiple myeloma, a malignant plasma cell dyscrasia. In patients with multiple myeloma, the normal process of bone remodeling is dysregulated by aberrant bone marrow plasma cells, resulting in increased bone resorption, prevention of new bone formation, and consequent bone destruction. The ubiquitin-proteasome system, which is hyperactive in patients with multiple myeloma, controls the catabolism of several proteins that regulate bone remodeling. Clinical studies have reported that treatment with the first-in-class proteasome inhibitor bortezomib reduces bone resorption and increases bone formation and bone mineral density in patients with multiple myeloma. Since the introduction of bortezomib in 2003, several next-generation proteasome inhibitors have also been used clinically, including carfilzomib, oprozomib, ixazomib, and delanzomib. This review summarizes the available preclinical and clinical evidence regarding the effect of proteasome inhibitors on bone remodeling in multiple myeloma. PMID:26947893

  15. The Effect of Inital-Phase Bone Remodeling on Implant Wound Healing.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Yung-Ting; Oh, Tae-Ju; Rudek, Ivan; Wang, Hom-Lay

    2016-01-01

    This case series aimed to investigate the initial-phase bone remodeling during implant wound healing and to discuss the possible contributing factors. A total of 11 implants with polished collars were placed in premaxillary regions via flapless approach with the aid of computer technology. After 15 months of follow-up, the results suggested that the presence of polished collars triggered bone resorption via a bone remodeling mechanism. The overall vertical crestal resorption was 0.78 ± 0.46 mm on average. This initial-phase bone remodeling primarily occurred within the first 3 months postoperatively. The slightly exposed polished collar may not worsen crestal bone level. PMID:27560679

  16. Bone remodelling in Neanderthal mandibles from the El Sidrón site (Asturias, Spain)

    PubMed Central

    Martinez-Maza, Cayetana; Rosas, Antonio; García-Vargas, Samuel; Estalrrich, Almudena; de la Rasilla, Marco

    2011-01-01

    Skull morphology results from the bone remodelling mechanism that underlies the specific bone growth dynamics. Histological study of the bone surface from Neanderthal mandible specimens of El Sidrón (Spain) provides information about the distribution of the remodelling fields (bone remodelling patterns or BRP) indicative of the bone growth directions. In comparison with other primate species, BRP shows that Neanderthal mandibles from the El Sidrón (Spain) sample present a specific BRP. The interpretation of this map allows inferences concerning the growth directions that explain specific morphological traits of the Neanderthal mandible, such as its quadrangular shape and the posterior location of the mental foramen. PMID:21307043

  17. Concise review: Insights from normal bone remodeling and stem cell-based therapies for bone repair.

    PubMed

    Khosla, Sundeep; Westendorf, Jennifer J; Mödder, Ulrike I

    2010-12-01

    There is growing interest in the use of mesenchymal stem cells for bone repair. As a major reason for normal bone remodeling is the removal of fatigue microcracks, advances in our understanding of this process may inform approaches to enhance fracture healing. Increasing evidence now indicates that physiological bone remodeling occurs in close proximity to blood vessels and that these vessels carry perivascular stem cells that differentiate into osteoblasts. Similarly, fracture healing is critically dependent on the ingrowth of blood vessels not only for a nutrient supply but also for the influx of osteoblasts. A number of animal and human studies have now shown the potential benefit of bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in enhancing bone repair. However, as in other tissues, the question of whether these cells improve fracture healing directly by differentiating into osteoblasts or indirectly by secreting paracrine factors that recruit blood vessels and the accompanying perivascular stem cells remains a major unresolved issue. Moreover, CD34+ cells, which are enriched for endothelial/hematopoietic cells, have also shown efficacy in various bone repair models, at least in part due to the induction of angiogenesis and recruitment of host progenitor cells. Thus, mesenchymal and nonmesenchymal stem/progenitor cells are attractive options for bone repair. It is possible that they contribute directly to bone repair, but it is also likely that they express paracrine factors in the appropriate amounts and combinations that promote and sustain the healing process. PMID:20960512

  18. Assessment of failure of cemented polyethylene acetabular component due to bone remodeling: A finite element study.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Rajesh

    2016-09-01

    The aim of the study is to determine failure of the cemented polyethylene acetabular component, which might occur due to excessive bone resorption, cement-bone interface debonding and fatigue failure of the cement mantle. Three-dimensional finite element models of intact and implanted pelvic bone were developed and bone remodeling algorithm was implemented for present analysis. Soderberg fatigue failure diagram was used for fatigue assessment of the cement mantle. Hoffman failure criterion was considered for prediction of cement-bone interface debonding. Results indicate fatigue failure of the cement mantle and implant-bone interface debonding might not occur due to bone remodeling. PMID:27408485

  19. Numerical model of bone remodeling sensitive to loading frequency through a poroelastic behavior and internal fluid movements.

    PubMed

    Malachanne, Etienne; Dureisseix, David; Jourdan, Franck

    2011-08-01

    In this article, a phenomenological numerical model of bone remodeling is proposed. This model is based on the poroelasticity theory in order to take into account the effects of fluid movements in bone adaptation. Moreover, the proposed remodeling law is based on the classical 'Stanford' law, enriched in order to take into account the loading frequency, through fluid movements. This coupling is materialized by a quadratic function of Darcy velocity. The numerical model is carried out, using a finite element method, and calibrated using experimental results at macroscopic level, from the literature. First results concern cyclic loadings on a mouse ulna, at different frequencies between 1 Hz and 30 Hz, for a force amplitude of 1.5 N and 2 N. Experimental results exhibit a sensitivity to the loading frequency, with privileged frequency for bone remodeling between 5 Hz and 10 Hz, for the force amplitude of 2 N. For the force amplitude of 1.5 N, no privileged frequencies for bone remodeling are highlighted. This tendency is reproduced by the proposed numerical computations. The model is identified on a single case (one frequency and one force amplitude) and validated on the other ones. The second experimental validation deals with a different loading regime, an internal fluid pressure at 20 Hz on a turkey ulna. The same framework is applied, and the numerical and experimental data are still matching in terms of gain in bone mass density. PMID:21616466

  20. Computational simulation of the bone remodeling using the finite element method: an elastic-damage theory for small displacements

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The resistance of the bone against damage by repairing itself and adapting to environmental conditions is its most important property. These adaptive changes are regulated by physiological process commonly called the bone remodeling. Better understanding this process requires that we apply the theory of elastic-damage under the hypothesis of small displacements to a bone structure and see its mechanical behavior. Results The purpose of the present study is to simulate a two dimensional model of a proximal femur by taking into consideration elastic-damage and mechanical stimulus. Here, we present a mathematical model based on a system of nonlinear ordinary differential equations and we develop the variational formulation for the mechanical problem. Then, we implement our mathematical model into the finite element method algorithm to investigate the effect of the damage. Conclusion The results are consistent with the existing literature which shows that the bone stiffness drops in damaged bone structure under mechanical loading. PMID:23663260

  1. Control of Bone Remodeling by the Peripheral Sympathetic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, Preston; Ma, Yun

    2013-01-01

    The skeleton is no longer seen as a static, isolated, and mostly structural organ. Over the last two decades, a more complete picture of the multiple functions of the skeleton has emerged, and its interactions with a growing number of apparently unrelated organs have become evident. The skeleton not only reacts to mechanical loading and inflammatory, hormonal, and mineral challenges, but also acts of its own accord by secreting factors controlling the function of other tissues, including the kidney and possibly the pancreas and gonads. It is thus becoming widely recognized that it is by nature an endocrine organ, in addition to a structural organ and site of mineral storage and hematopoiesis. Consequently and by definition, bone homeostasis must be tightly regulated and integrated with the biology of other organs to maintain whole body homeostasis, and data uncovering the involvement of the central nervous system (CNS) in the control of bone remodeling support this concept. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) represents one of the main links between the CNS and the skeleton, based on a number of anatomic, pharmacologic, and genetic studies focused on β-adrenergic receptor (βAR) signaling in bone cells. The goal of this report was to review the data supporting the role of the SNS and βAR signaling in the regulation of skeletal homeostasis. PMID:23765388

  2. Exploring the Bone Proteome to Help Explain Altered Bone Remodeling and Preservation of Bone Architecture and Strength in Hibernating Marmots.

    PubMed

    Doherty, Alison H; Roteliuk, Danielle M; Gookin, Sara E; McGrew, Ashley K; Broccardo, Carolyn J; Condon, Keith W; Prenni, Jessica E; Wojda, Samantha J; Florant, Gregory L; Donahue, Seth W

    2016-01-01

    Periods of physical inactivity increase bone resorption and cause bone loss and increased fracture risk. However, hibernating bears, marmots, and woodchucks maintain bone structure and strength, despite being physically inactive for prolonged periods annually. We tested the hypothesis that bone turnover rates would decrease and bone structural and mechanical properties would be preserved in hibernating marmots (Marmota flaviventris). Femurs and tibias were collected from marmots during hibernation and in the summer following hibernation. Bone remodeling was significantly altered in cortical and trabecular bone during hibernation with suppressed formation and no change in resorption, unlike the increased bone resorption that occurs during disuse in humans and other animals. Trabecular bone architecture and cortical bone geometrical and mechanical properties were not different between hibernating and active marmots, but bone marrow adiposity was significantly greater in hibernators. Of the 506 proteins identified in marmot bone, 40 were significantly different in abundance between active and hibernating marmots. Monoaglycerol lipase, which plays an important role in fatty acid metabolism and the endocannabinoid system, was 98-fold higher in hibernating marmots compared with summer marmots and may play a role in regulating the changes in bone and fat metabolism that occur during hibernation. PMID:27617358

  3. Remodeling of the thoracic aorta after bone marrow cell transplantation

    PubMed Central

    Felix, Alyne; Monteiro, Nemesis; Rocha, Vinícius Novaes; Oliveira, Genilza; Moraes, Alan Cesar; Andrade, Cherley; Nascimento, Ana Lucia; de Carvalho, Laís; Thole, Alessandra; Carvalho, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells are characterized by their ability to differentiate into multiple cell lineages and display the paracrine effect. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of therapy with bone marrow cells (BMCs) on blood glucose, lipid metabolism and aortic wall remodeling in mice through the administration of a high fat diet and subsequent BMCs transplantation. C57BL/6 mice were fed a control diet (CO group) or an atherogenic diet (AT group). After 16 weeks, the AT group was divided into four groups: an AT 14 days group and AT 21 days group, that were given an injection of vehicle and sacrificed at 14 and 21 days after, respectively; AT-BMC 14 days group and AT-BMC 21 days group that was given an injection of BMCs and sacrificed at 14 and 21 days after. The CO group was sacrificed along with other groups. The BMCs transplant had reduced blood glucose, triglycerides and total cholesterol. The Qa (1/mm2) was quantitatively reduced in AT 14 days group, AT 21 days group and was high in AT-BMC 21 days group. The AT 21 days group exhibited increased tunica media and elastic system fibers. The immunolabeling for α-SMA and VEGF showed less immunolabeling in transplanted groups with BMCs. The immunostaining for PCNA seems to be more expressive in the group AT-BMC 21 days group. To conclude, our results support the concept that in mice, the injection of BMCs improve glucose levels, lipid metabolism and remodeling of the aortic wall in animals using atherogenic diet. PMID:25337194

  4. Bone microdamage, remodeling and bone fragility: how much damage is too much damage?

    PubMed

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Kennedy, Oran D; Schaffler, Mitchell B

    2015-01-01

    Microdamage resulting from fatigue or 'wear and tear' loading contributes to bone fragility; however, the full extent of its influence is not completely understood. Linear microcracks (∼50-100 μm) and diffuse damage (clusters of sublamellar-sized cracks) are the two major bone microdamage types, each with different mechanical and biological consequences. Healthy bone, due to its numerous microstructural interfaces and its ability to affect matrix level repair, deals effectively with microdamage. From a material standpoint, healthy bone behaves much like engineering composites like carbon-fiber reinforced plastics. Both materials allow matrix damage to form during fatigue loading and use microstructural interfaces to dissipate energy and limit microcrack propagation to slow fracture. The terms fracture toughness and 'toughening mechanism', respectively, describe mechanical behavior and microstructural features that prevent crack growth and make it harder to fracture a material. Critically, toughness is independent of strength. In bone, primary toughening features include mineral and collagen interfaces, lamellae and tissue heterogeneity among osteons. The damage tolerance of bone and other composites can be overcome with sustained loading and/or matrix changes such that the microstructure no longer limits microcrack propagation. With reduced remodeling due to aging, disease or remodeling suppression, microdamage accumulation can occur along with loss of tissue heterogeneity. Both contribute additively to reduced fracture toughness. Thus, the answer to the key question for bone fragility of how much microdamage is too much is extremely complex. It ultimately depends on the interplay between matrix damage content, internal repair and effectiveness of matrix-toughening mechanisms. PMID:25848533

  5. Bone microdamage, remodeling and bone fragility: how much damage is too much damage?

    PubMed Central

    Seref-Ferlengez, Zeynep; Kennedy, Oran D; Schaffler, Mitchell B

    2015-01-01

    Microdamage resulting from fatigue or ‘wear and tear' loading contributes to bone fragility; however, the full extent of its influence is not completely understood. Linear microcracks (∼50–100 μm) and diffuse damage (clusters of sublamellar-sized cracks) are the two major bone microdamage types, each with different mechanical and biological consequences. Healthy bone, due to its numerous microstructural interfaces and its ability to affect matrix level repair, deals effectively with microdamage. From a material standpoint, healthy bone behaves much like engineering composites like carbon-fiber reinforced plastics. Both materials allow matrix damage to form during fatigue loading and use microstructural interfaces to dissipate energy and limit microcrack propagation to slow fracture. The terms fracture toughness and 'toughening mechanism', respectively, describe mechanical behavior and microstructural features that prevent crack growth and make it harder to fracture a material. Critically, toughness is independent of strength. In bone, primary toughening features include mineral and collagen interfaces, lamellae and tissue heterogeneity among osteons. The damage tolerance of bone and other composites can be overcome with sustained loading and/or matrix changes such that the microstructure no longer limits microcrack propagation. With reduced remodeling due to aging, disease or remodeling suppression, microdamage accumulation can occur along with loss of tissue heterogeneity. Both contribute additively to reduced fracture toughness. Thus, the answer to the key question for bone fragility of how much microdamage is too much is extremely complex. It ultimately depends on the interplay between matrix damage content, internal repair and effectiveness of matrix-toughening mechanisms. PMID:25848533

  6. The Digital Astronaut Project Computational Bone Remodeling Model (Beta Version) Bone Summit Summary Report

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Pennline, James; Mulugeta, Lealem

    2013-01-01

    changes in bone cell populations that remove and replace bone in packets within the bone region. The DAP bone model is unique in several respects. In particular in takes former models of volume fraction changes one step higher in fidelity and separates BVF into separate equations for mineralized and osteoid volume fractions governed by a mineralization rate. This more closely follows the physiology of the remodeling unit cycles where bone is first resorbed and then followed by the action of osteoblasts to lay down collagen matrix which eventually becomes mineralized. In another respect, the modules allow the functional description of the time rate of change of other parameters and variables in the model during a computational simulation. More detailed description of the model, preliminary validation results, current limitation and caveats, and planned advancements are provided in sections 2 through 5. The DAP bone model is being developed primarily as a research tool, and not as a clinical tool like QCT. Even if it transitions to a clinical tool, it is not intended to replace QCT or any other clinical tool. Moreover, the DAP bone model does not predict bone fracture. Its purpose is to provide valuable additional data via "forward prediction" simulations for during and after spaceflight missions to gain insight on, (1) mechanisms of bone demineralization in microgravity, and (2) the volumetric changes at the various bone sites in response to in-flight and post-flight exercise countermeasures. This data can then be used as input to the Keyak [8] (or equivalent) FE analysis method to gain insight on how bone strength may change during and after flight. This information can also be useful to help optimize exercise countermeasure protocols to minimize changes in bone strength during flight, and improve regain of bone strength post-flight. To achieve this goal, the bone model will be integrated with DAP's exercise countermeasure models to simulate the effect of exercise

  7. Soy Isoflavones and Osteoporotic Bone Loss: A Review with an Emphasis on Modulation of Bone Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Xi; Lee, Sun-Kyeong; Chun, Ock K

    2016-01-01

    Osteoporosis is an age-related disorder that affects both women and men, although estrogen deficiency induced by menopause accelerates bone loss in older women. As the demographic shifts to a more aged population, a growing number of men and women will be afflicted with osteoporosis. Since the current drug therapies available have multiple side effects, including increased risk of developing certain types of cancer or complications, a search for potential nonpharmacologic alternative therapies for osteoporosis is of prime interest. Soy isoflavones (SI) have demonstrated potential bone-specific effects in a number of studies. This article provides a systematic review of studies on osteoporotic bone loss in relation to SI intake from diet or supplements to comprehensively explain how SI affect the modulation of bone remodeling. Evidence from epidemiologic studies supports that dietary SI attenuate menopause-induced osteoporotic bone loss by decreasing bone resorption and stimulating bone formation. Other studies have also illustrated that bone site-specific trophic and synergistic effects combined with exercise intervention might contribute to improve the bioavailability of SI or strengthen the bone-specific effects. To date, however, the effects of dietary SI on osteoporotic bone loss remain inconclusive, and study results vary from study to study. The current review will discuss the potential factors that result in the conflicting outcomes of these studies, including dosages, intervention materials, study duration, race, and genetic differences. Further well-designed studies are needed to fully understand the underlying mechanism and evaluate the effects of SI on osteoporosis in humans. PMID:26670451

  8. A secreted bacterial protease tailors the Staphylococcus aureus virulence repertoire to modulate bone remodeling during osteomyelitis

    PubMed Central

    Cassat, James E.; Hammer, Neal D.; Campbell, J. Preston; Benson, Meredith A.; Perrien, Daniel S.; Mrak, Lara N.; Smeltzer, Mark S.; Torres, Victor J.; Skaar, Eric P.

    2013-01-01

    Summary Osteomyelitis is a common manifestation of invasive Staphylococcus aureus infection. Pathogen-induced bone destruction limits antimicrobial penetration to the infectious focus and compromises treatment of osteomyelitis. To investigate mechanisms of S. aureus-induced bone destruction, we developed a murine model of osteomyelitis. Micro-computed tomography of infected femurs revealed that S. aureus triggers profound alterations in bone turnover. The bacterial regulatory locus sae was found to be critical for osteomyelitis pathogenesis, as Sae-regulated factors promote pathologic bone remodeling and intraosseous bacterial survival. Exoproteome analyses revealed the Sae-regulated protease aureolysin as a major determinant of the S. aureus secretome and identified the phenol soluble modulins as aureolysin-degraded, osteolytic peptides that trigger osteoblast cell death and bone destruction. These studies establish a murine model for pathogen-induced bone remodeling, define Sae as critical for osteomyelitis pathogenesis, and identify protease-dependent exoproteome remodeling as a major determinant of the staphylococcal virulence repertoire. PMID:23768499

  9. Remodeling of the Mandibular Bone Induced by Overdentures Supported by Different Numbers of Implants.

    PubMed

    Li, Kai; Xin, Haitao; Zhao, Yanfang; Zhang, Zhiyuan; Wu, Yulu

    2016-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the process of mandibular bone remodeling induced by implant-supported overdentures. computed tomography (CT) images were collected from edentulous patients to reconstruct the geometry of the mandibular bone and overdentures supported by implants. Based on the theory of strain energy density (SED), bone remodeling models were established using the user material subroutine (UMAT) in abaqus. The stress distribution in the mandible and bone density change was investigated to determine the effect of implant number on the remodeling of the mandibular bone. The results indicated that the areas where high Mises stress values were observed were mainly situated around the implants. The stress was concentrated in the distal neck region of the distal-most implants. With an increased number of implants, the biting force applied on the dentures was almost all taken up by implants. The stress and bone density in peri-implant bone increased. When the stress reached the threshold of remodeling, the bone density began to decrease. In the posterior mandible area, the stress was well distributed but increased with decreased implant numbers. Changes in bone density were not observed in this area. The computational results were consistent with the clinical data. The results demonstrate that the risk of bone resorption around the distal-most implants increases with increased numbers of implants and that the occlusal force applied to overdentures should be adjusted to be distributed more in the distal areas of the mandible. PMID:26963740

  10. Modalities for Visualization of Cortical Bone Remodeling: The Past, Present, and Future.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Kimberly D; Cooper, David M L

    2015-01-01

    Bone's ability to respond to load-related phenomena and repair microdamage is achieved through the remodeling process, which renews bone by activating groups of cells known as basic multicellular units (BMUs). The products of BMUs, secondary osteons, have been extensively studied via classic two-dimensional techniques, which have provided a wealth of information on how histomorphology relates to skeletal structure and function. Remodeling is critical in maintaining healthy bone tissue; however, in osteoporotic bone, imbalanced resorption results in increased bone fragility and fracture. With increasing life expectancy, such degenerative bone diseases are a growing concern. The three-dimensional (3D) morphology of BMUs and their correlation to function, however, are not well-characterized and little is known about the specific mechanisms that initiate and regulate their activity within cortical bone. We believe a key limitation has been the lack of 3D information about BMU morphology and activity. Thus, this paper reviews methodologies for 3D investigation of cortical bone remodeling and, specifically, structures associated with BMU activity (resorption spaces) and the structures they create (secondary osteons), spanning from histology to modern ex vivo imaging modalities, culminating with the growing potential of in vivo imaging. This collection of papers focuses on the theme of "putting the 'why' back into bone architecture." Remodeling is one of two mechanisms "how" bone structure is dynamically modified and thus an improved 3D understanding of this fundamental process is crucial to ultimately understanding the "why." PMID:26322017

  11. The reversal phase of the bone-remodeling cycle: cellular prerequisites for coupling resorption and formation

    PubMed Central

    Delaisse, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-01

    The reversal phase couples bone resorption to bone formation by generating an osteogenic environment at remodeling sites. The coupling mechanism remains poorly understood, despite the identification of a number of ‘coupling' osteogenic molecules. A possible reason is the poor attention for the cells leading to osteogenesis during the reversal phase. This review aims at creating awareness of these cells and their activities in adult cancellous bone. It relates cell events (i) on the bone surface, (ii) in the mesenchymal envelope surrounding the bone marrow and appearing as a canopy above remodeling surfaces and (iii) in the bone marrow itself within a 50-μm distance of this canopy. When bone remodeling is initiated, osteoprogenitors at these three different levels are activated, likely as a result of a rearrangement of cell–cell and cell–matrix interactions. Notably, canopies are brought under the osteogenic influence of capillaries and osteoclasts, whereas bone surface cells become exposed to the eroded matrix and other osteoclast products. In several diverse pathophysiological situations, including osteoporosis, a decreased availability of osteoprogenitors from these local reservoirs coincides with decreased osteoblast recruitment and impaired initiation of bone formation, that is, uncoupling. Overall, this review stresses that coupling does not only depend on molecules able to activate osteogenesis, but that it also demands the presence of osteoprogenitors and ordered cell rearrangements at the remodeling site. It points to protection of local osteoprogenitors as a critical strategy to prevent bone loss. PMID:25120911

  12. Bone remodeling rates and skeletal maturation in three archaeological skeletal populations.

    PubMed

    Stout, S D; Lueck, R

    1995-10-01

    Cortical bone remodeling rates for rib samples from three archaeological populations and a modern autopsy sample were determined using an algorithm developed by Frost (Frost [1987a] Calcif. Tissue Res. 3:211-237). When plotted against the relative antiquities for population samples, histomorphometric variables; i.e., activation frequency (mu rc), net bone formation (netVf,r,t), and mean annual bone formation rate (Vf,r,t), exhibit a concordant trend of increased cortical bone remodeling activity levels over time. Two intensive foraging populations, Windover and Gibson, are similar for all bone remodeling parameters and have the lowest remodeling activity levels among the samples. The more recent Ledders sample, which is reported to practice agricultural subsistence, is consistently intermediate between these and a modern autopsy sample. Although there appear to be differences in bone formation rates among the populations it is concluded that these differences cannot be attributed to differences in bone remodeling rates among the populations, but rather are reflecting different effective ages of adult compacta for their ribs. These findings suggest that the earlier populations, particularly Windsor and Gibson, appear to have reached skeletal maturity at an older age than observed for modern. PMID:8644877

  13. Morphologic changes associated with functional adaptation of the navicular bone of horses.

    PubMed

    Bentley, V A; Sample, S J; Livesey, M A; Scollay, M C; Radtke, C L; Frank, J D; Kalscheur, V L; Muir, P

    2007-11-01

    Failure of functional adaptation to protect the skeleton from damage is common and is often associated with targeted remodeling of bone microdamage. Horses provide a suitable model for studying loading-related skeletal disease because horses are physically active, their exercise is usually regulated, and adaptive failure of various skeletal sites is common. We performed a histologic study of the navicular bone of three groups of horses: (1) young racing Thoroughbreds (n = 10); (2) young unshod ponies (n = 10); and (3) older horses with navicular syndrome (n = 6). Navicular syndrome is a painful condition that is a common cause of lameness and is associated with extensive remodeling of the navicular bone; a sesamoid bone located within the hoof which articulates with the second and third phalanges dorsally. The following variables were quantified: volumetric bone mineral density; cortical thickness (Ct.Th); bone volume fraction, microcrack surface density; density of osteocytes and empty lacunae; and resorption space density. Birefringence of bone collagen was also determined using circularly polarized light microscopy and disruption of the lacunocanalicular network was examined using confocal microscopy. Remodeling of the navicular bone resulted in formation of transverse secondary osteons orientated in a lateral to medial direction; bone collagen was similarly orientated. In horses with navicular syndrome, remodeling often led to the formation of intracortical cysts and development of multiple tidemarks at the articular surface. These changes were associated with high microcrack surface density, low bone volume fraction, low density of osteocytes, and poor osteocyte connectivity. Empty lacunae were increased in Thoroughbreds. Resorption space density was not increased in horses with navicular syndrome. Taken together, these data suggest that the navicular bone may experience habitual bending across the sagittal plane. Consequences of cumulative cyclic loading in

  14. A multiscale mechanobiological model of bone remodelling predicts site-specific bone loss in the femur during osteoporosis and mechanical disuse.

    PubMed

    Lerebours, C; Buenzli, P R; Scheiner, S; Pivonka, P

    2016-02-01

    We propose a multiscale mechanobiological model of bone remodelling to investigate the site-specific evolution of bone volume fraction across the midshaft of a femur. The model includes hormonal regulation and biochemical coupling of bone cell populations, the influence of the microstructure on bone turnover rate, and mechanical adaptation of the tissue. Both microscopic and tissue-scale stress/strain states of the tissue are calculated from macroscopic loads by a combination of beam theory and micromechanical homogenisation. This model is applied to simulate the spatio-temporal evolution of a human midshaft femur scan subjected to two deregulating circumstances: (i) osteoporosis and (ii) mechanical disuse. Both simulated deregulations led to endocortical bone loss, cortical wall thinning and expansion of the medullary cavity, in accordance with experimental findings. Our model suggests that these observations are attributable to a large extent to the influence of the microstructure on bone turnover rate. Mechanical adaptation is found to help preserve intracortical bone matrix near the periosteum. Moreover, it leads to non-uniform cortical wall thickness due to the asymmetry of macroscopic loads introduced by the bending moment. The effect of mechanical adaptation near the endosteum can be greatly affected by whether the mechanical stimulus includes stress concentration effects or not. PMID:26239380

  15. A bone remodelling model including the effect of damage on the steering of BMUs.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Reina, J; Reina, I; Domínguez, J; García-Aznar, J M

    2014-04-01

    Bone remodelling in cortical bone is performed by the so-called basic multicellular units (BMUs), which produce osteons after completing the remodelling sequence. Burger et al. (2003) hypothesized that BMUs follow the direction of the prevalent local stress in the bone. More recently, Martin (2007) has shown that BMUs must be somehow guided by microstructural damage as well. The interaction of both variables, strain and damage, in the guidance of BMUs has been incorporated into a bone remodelling model for cortical bone. This model accounts for variations in porosity, anisotropy and damage level. The bone remodelling model has been applied to a finite element model of the diaphysis of a human femur. The trajectories of the BMUs have been analysed throughout the diaphysis and compared with the orientation of osteons measured experimentally. Some interesting observations, like the typical fan arrangement of osteons near the periosteum, can be explained with the proposed remodelling model. Moreover, the efficiency of BMUs in damage repairing has been shown to be greater if BMUs are guided by damage. PMID:24445006

  16. Monitoring in vivo (re)modeling: a computational approach using 4D microCT data to quantify bone surface movements.

    PubMed

    Birkhold, Annette I; Razi, Hajar; Weinkamer, Richard; Duda, Georg N; Checa, Sara; Willie, Bettina M

    2015-06-01

    Bone undergoes continual damage repair and structural adaptation to changing external loads with the aim of maintaining skeletal integrity throughout life. The ability to monitor bone (re)modeling would allow for a better understanding in how various pathologies and interventions affect bone turnover and subsequent bone strength. To date, however, current methods to monitor bone (re)modeling over time and in space are limited. We propose a novel method to visualize and quantify bone turnover, based on in vivo microCT imaging and a 4D computational approach. By in vivo tracking of spatially correlated formation and resorption sites over time it classifies bone restructuring into (re)modeling sequences, the spatially and temporally linked sequences of formation, resorption and quiescent periods on the bone surface. The microCT based method was validated using experimental data from an in vivo mouse tibial loading model and ex vivo data of the mouse tibia. In this application, the method allows the visualization of time-resolved cortical (re)modeling and the quantification of short-term and long-term modeling on the endocortical and periosteal surface at the mid-diaphysis of loaded and control mice tibiae. Both short-term and long-term modeling processes, independent formation and resorption events, could be monitored and modeling (spatially not correlated formation and resorption) and remodeling (resorption followed by new formation at the same site) could be distinguished on the bone surface. This novel method that combines in vivo microCT with a computational approach is a powerful tool to monitor bone turnover in animal models now and is waiting to be applied to human patients in the near future. PMID:25746796

  17. A mathematical model of cortical bone remodeling at cellular level under mechanical stimulus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Qin, Qing-Hua; Wang, Ya-Nan

    2012-12-01

    A bone cell population dynamics model for cortical bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus is developed in this paper. The external experiments extracted from the literature which have not been used in the creation of the model are used to test the validity of the model. Not only can the model compare reasonably well with these experimental results such as the increase percentage of final values of bone mineral content (BMC) and bone fracture energy (BFE) among different loading schemes (which proves the validity of the model), but also predict the realtime development pattern of BMC and BFE, as well as the dynamics of osteoblasts (OBA), osteoclasts (OCA), nitric oxide (NO) and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) for each loading scheme, which can hardly be monitored through experiment. In conclusion, the model is the first of its kind that is able to provide an insight into the quantitative mechanism of bone remodeling at cellular level by which bone cells are activated by mechanical stimulus in order to start resorption/formation of bone mass. More importantly, this model has laid a solid foundation based on which future work such as systemic control theory analysis of bone remodeling under mechanical stimulus can be investigated. The to-be identified control mechanism will help to develop effective drugs and combined nonpharmacological therapies to combat bone loss pathologies. Also this deeper understanding of how mechanical forces quantitatively interact with skeletal tissue is essential for the generation of bone tissue for tissue replacement purposes in tissue engineering.

  18. On the Use of Bone Remodelling Models to Estimate the Density Distribution of Bones. Uniqueness of the Solution

    PubMed Central

    Martínez-Reina, Javier; Ojeda, Joaquín; Mayo, Juana

    2016-01-01

    Bone remodelling models are widely used in a phenomenological manner to estimate numerically the distribution of apparent density in bones from the loads they are daily subjected to. These simulations start from an arbitrary initial distribution, usually homogeneous, and the density changes locally until a bone remodelling equilibrium is achieved. The bone response to mechanical stimulus is traditionally formulated with a mathematical relation that considers the existence of a range of stimulus, called dead or lazy zone, for which no net bone mass change occurs. Implementing a relation like that leads to different solutions depending on the starting density. The non-uniqueness of the solution has been shown in this paper using two different bone remodelling models: one isotropic and another anisotropic. It has also been shown that the problem of non-uniqueness is only mitigated by removing the dead zone, but it is not completely solved unless the bone formation and bone resorption rates are limited to certain maximum values. PMID:26859888

  19. Systemic zoledronate treatment both prevents resorption of allograft bone and increases the retention of new formed bone during revascularization and remodelling. A bone chamber study in rats

    PubMed Central

    Åstrand, Jörgen; Harding, Anna Kajsa; Aspenberg, Per; Tägil, Magnus

    2006-01-01

    Background In osteonecrosis the vascular supply of the bone is interrupted and the living cells die. The inorganic mineral network remains intact until ingrowing blood vessels invade the graft. Accompanying osteoclasts start to resorb the bone trabeculae and gradually replace the bone. If the osteonecrosis occurs in mechanically loaded parts, like in the subchondral bone of a loaded joint, the remodelling might lead to a weakening of the bone and, in consequence to a joint collapse. Systemic bisphosphonate treatment can reduce the resorption of necrotic bone. In the present study we investigate if zoledronate, the most potent of the commercially available bisphosphonates, can be used to reduce the amount or speed of bone graft remodeling. Methods Bone grafts were harvested and placed in a bone chamber inserted into the tibia of a rat. Host tissue could grow into the graft through openings in the chamber. Weekly injections with 1.05 μg zoledronate or saline were given subcutaneously until the rats were harvested after 6 weeks. The specimens were fixed, cut and stained with haematoxylin/eosin and used for histologic and histomorphometric analyses. Results By histology, the control specimens were almost totally resorbed in the remodeled area and the graft replaced by bone marrow. In the zoledronate treated specimens, both the old graft and new-formed bone remained and the graft trabeculas were lined with new bone. By histomorphometry, the total amount of bone (graft+ new bone) within the remodelled area was 35 % (SD 13) in the zoledronate treated grafts and 19 % (SD 12) in the controls (p = 0.001). Also the amount of new bone was increased in the treated specimens (22 %, SD 7) compared to the controls (14 %, SD 9, p = 0.032). Conclusion We show that zoledronate can be used to decrease the resorption of both old graft and new-formed bone during bone graft remodelling. This might be useful in bone grafting procedure but also in other orthopedic conditions, both where

  20. A reconciliation of local and global models for bone remodeling through optimization theory.

    PubMed

    Subbarayan, G; Bartel, D L

    2000-02-01

    Remodeling rules with either a global or a local mathematical form have been proposed for load-bearing bones in the literature. In the local models, the bone architecture (shape, density) is related to the strains/energies sensed at any point in the bone, while in the global models, a criterion believed to be applicable to the whole bone is used. In the present paper, a local remodeling rule with a strain "error" form is derived as the necessary condition for the optimum of a global remodeling criterion, suggesting that many of the local error-driven remodeling rules may have corresponding global optimization-based criteria. The global criterion proposed in the present study is a trade-off between the cost of metabolic growth and use, mathematically represented by the mass, and the cost of failure, mathematically represented by the total strain energy. The proposed global criterion is shown to be related to the optimality criteria methods of structural optimization by the equivalence of the model solution and the fully stressed solution for statically determinate structures. In related work, the global criterion is applied to simulate the strength recovery in bones with screw holes left behind after removal of fracture fixation plates. The results predicted by the model are shown to be in good agreement with experimental results, leading to the conclusion that load-bearing bones are structures with optimal shape and property for their function. PMID:10790832

  1. A qualitative evaluation of scaphoid remodeling in bone-grafted scaphoid nonunions.

    PubMed

    Grewal, Ruby; Boyd, Kirsty U; Macdermid, Joy; McMurtry, Robert Y

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this case series is to identify and illustrate the phenomenon of scaphoid remodeling in skeletally mature subjects following bone grafting for scaphoid nonunion. Nine patients with scaphoid nonunions were treated with interpositional bone grafting (with iliac crest bone graft) and K-wire fixation. The mean length of follow-up was 28.6 ± 9 months. Radiographs and CT scans were reviewed and assessed for degree of union and a qualitative assessment of scaphoid architecture. Following surgery, there was marked distortion of the scaphoid. Once healed, the contour of the scaphoid was still significantly distorted in all nine patients. Remodeling then became evident along the articular surfaces between 8 and 12 months. By 3 years, the scaphoid was completely recontoured and the normal architecture was completely restored in all nine patients. We conclude that the articular surface of the scaphoid remodels over time in skeletally mature subjects. PMID:22131928

  2. Miniplates and mini-implants: bone remodeling as their biological foundation1

    PubMed Central

    Consolaro, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Abstract The tridimensional network formed by osteocytes controls bone design by coordinating cell activity on trabecular and cortical bone surfaces, especially osteoblasts and clasts. Miniplates and mini-implants provide anchorage, allowing all other orthodontic and orthopedic components, albeit afar, to deform and stimulate the network of osteocytes to command bone design remodeling upon "functional demand" established by force and its vectors. By means of transmission of forces, whether near or distant, based on anchorage provided by miniplates, it is possible to change the position, shape and size as well as the relationship established between the bones of the jaws. Understanding bone biology and the continuous remodeling of the skeleton allows the clinician to perform safe and accurate rehabilitation treatment of patients, thus increasing the possibilities and types of intervention procedures to be applied in order to restore patient's esthetics and function. PMID:26691966

  3. Simulated bone remodeling around tilted dental implants in the anterior maxilla.

    PubMed

    Wang, Chao; Zhang, Weiping; Ajmera, Deepal Haresh; Zhang, Yun; Fan, Yubo; Ji, Ping

    2016-06-01

    Dental implants have to be placed with the long axis in different angulations due to the change in bone morphology. The objective of this study was to investigate the different bone remodeling response induced by the tilted dental implants and to assess whether it could lead to bone loss and implant failure. In this study, bone remodeling due to palato-labially inclined dental implants placed in the anterior maxillary incisor region was simulated. CT-based finite element models of a maxillary bone with dental implants were created herein. Five dental implants were placed at [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text], [Formula: see text] and [Formula: see text], respectively. The remodeling progression was recorded and compared. Model [Formula: see text] (palatal side) shows the highest bone density values, but the inclined implant at [Formula: see text] (labial side) leads to significant bone loss. From a biomechanical perspective, it is speculated that a palatally inclined implant is more likely to enhance the bone density in the maxillary anterior region, but labial inclination of implant could jeopardize its stability. PMID:26285769

  4. Cytokine Combination Therapy Prediction for Bone Remodeling in Tissue Engineering Based on the Intracellular Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Xiaoqiang; Su, Jing; Bao, Jiguang; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Le; Zhang, Yuanyuan; Yang, Yunzhi; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2012-01-01

    The long-term performance of tissue-engineered bone grafts is determined by a dynamic balance between bone regeneration and resorption. We proposed using embedded cytokine slow-releasing hydrogels to tune this balance toward a desirable final bone density. In this study we established a systems biology model, and quantitatively explored the combinatorial effects of delivered cytokines from hydrogels on final bone density. We hypothesized that: 1) bone regeneration was driven by transcription factors Runx2 and Osterix, which responded to released cytokines, such as Wnt, BMP2, and TGFβ, drove the development of osteoblast lineage, and contributed to bone mass generation; and 2) the osteoclast lineage, on the other hand, governed the bone resorption, and communications between these two lineages determined the dynamics of bone remodeling. In our model, Intracellular signaling pathways were represented by ordinary differential equations, while the intercellular communications and cellular population dynamics were modeled by stochastic differential equations. Effects of synergistic cytokine combinations were evaluated by Loewe index and Bliss index. Simulation results revealed that the Wnt/BMP2 combinations released from hydrogels showed best control of bone regeneration and synergistic effects, and suggested optimal dose ratios of given cytokine combinations released from hydrogels to most efficiently control the long-term bone remodeling. We revealed the characteristics of cytokine combinations of Wnt/BMP2 which could be used to guide the design of in vivo bone scaffolds and the clinical treatment of some diseases such as osteoporosis. PMID:22910219

  5. Bone remodeling adjacent to total hip replacements: A naturally occurring material design problem

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harrigan, Timothy P.; Hamilton, James J.

    1993-10-01

    The reaction of bone to orthopedic implants is an example of a self-adjusting material which changes from a ‘normal state’ to an altered state, based on the mechanical features of the implant and the loads applied to it. The changes in bone around cemented and uncemented femoral total hip components are well documented, and many numerical characterizations of the material reaction to stress have attempted to mimic the natural remodeling process. In this study we review the development of a simple material remodeling rule which yields a stable structure which is optimal and which allows a unique solution. We then use this algorithm to assess the effect of prosthesis stiffness and the presence of a compliant layer on bone remodeling around these implants. An axisymmetric model for axial loading is used to model changes in bone density through the thickness of the cancellous bone around the implants. With cortical remodeling left out of the simulation, the simulations showed density distributions that agreed in general with the results in the literature, and showed a marked difference in response if a compliant layer was added to the prosthesis.

  6. Integration of a Finite Element Model with the DAP Bone Remodeling Model to Characterize Bone Response to Skeletal Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Werner, Christopher R.; Mulugeta, Lealem; Myers, J. G.; Pennline, J. A.

    2015-01-01

    NASA's Digital Astronaut Project (DAP) has developed a bone remodeling model that has been validated for predicting volumetric bone mineral density (vBMD) changes of trabecular and cortical bone in the absence of mechanical loading. The model was recently updated to include skeletal loading from exercise and free living activities to maintain healthy bone using a new daily load stimulus (DLS). This new formula was developed based on an extensive review of existing DLS formulas, as discussed in the abstract by Pennline et al. The DLS formula incorporated into the bone remodeling model utilizes strains and stress calculated from finite element model (FEM) of the bone region of interest. The proximal femur was selected for the initial application of the DLS formula, with a specific focus on the femoral neck. METHODS: The FEM was generated from CAD geometry of a femur using de-identified CT data. The femur was meshed using linear tetrahedral elements Figure (1) with higher mesh densities in the femoral neck region, which is the primary region of interest for the initial application of the DLS formula in concert with the DAP bone remodeling model. Nodal loads were applied to the femoral head and the greater trochanter and the base of the femur was held fixed. An L2 norm study was conducted to reduce the length of the femoral shaft without significantly impacting the stresses in the femoral neck. The material properties of the FEM of the proximal femur were separated between cortical and trabecular regions to work with the bone remodeling model. Determining the elements with cortical material properties in the FEM was based off of publicly available CT hip scans [4] that were segmented, cleaned, and overlaid onto the FEM.

  7. Modalities for Visualization of Cortical Bone Remodeling: The Past, Present, and Future

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Kimberly D.; Cooper, David M. L.

    2015-01-01

    Bone’s ability to respond to load-related phenomena and repair microdamage is achieved through the remodeling process, which renews bone by activating groups of cells known as basic multicellular units (BMUs). The products of BMUs, secondary osteons, have been extensively studied via classic two-dimensional techniques, which have provided a wealth of information on how histomorphology relates to skeletal structure and function. Remodeling is critical in maintaining healthy bone tissue; however, in osteoporotic bone, imbalanced resorption results in increased bone fragility and fracture. With increasing life expectancy, such degenerative bone diseases are a growing concern. The three-dimensional (3D) morphology of BMUs and their correlation to function, however, are not well-characterized and little is known about the specific mechanisms that initiate and regulate their activity within cortical bone. We believe a key limitation has been the lack of 3D information about BMU morphology and activity. Thus, this paper reviews methodologies for 3D investigation of cortical bone remodeling and, specifically, structures associated with BMU activity (resorption spaces) and the structures they create (secondary osteons), spanning from histology to modern ex vivo imaging modalities, culminating with the growing potential of in vivo imaging. This collection of papers focuses on the theme of “putting the ‘why’ back into bone architecture.” Remodeling is one of two mechanisms “how” bone structure is dynamically modified and thus an improved 3D understanding of this fundamental process is crucial to ultimately understanding the “why.” PMID:26322017

  8. Genetic determination of the cellular basis of the ghrelin-dependent bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chengshan; Fukuda, Toru; Ochi, Hiroki; Sunamura, Satoko; Xu, Cheng; Xu, Ren; Okawa, Atsushi; Takeda, Shu

    2015-01-01

    Objective Bone mass is maintained through a balance of bone formation and resorption. This homeostatic balance is regulated by various systems involving humoral and local factors. The discovery that the anorexigenic hormone leptin regulates bone mass via neuronal pathways revealed that neurons and neuropeptides are intimately involved in bone homeostasis. Ghrelin is a stomach-derived orexigenic hormone that counteracts leptin's action. However, the physiological role of ghrelin in bone homeostasis remains unknown. In this study, through the global knockout of ghrelin receptor (Ghsr) followed by tissue-specific re-expression, we addressed the molecular basis of the action of ghrelin in bone remodeling in vivo. Methods We performed molecular, genetic and cell biological analyses of Ghsr-null mice and Ghsr-null mice with tissue specific Ghsr restoration. Furthermore, we evaluated the molecular mechanism of ghrelin by molecular and cell-based assays. Results Ghsr-null mice showed a low bone mass phenotype with poor bone formation. Restoring the expression of Ghsr specifically in osteoblasts, and not in osteoclasts or the central nervous system, ameliorated bone abnormalities in Ghsr-null mice. Cell-based assays revealed ghrelin induced the phosphorylation of CREB and the expression of Runx2, which in turn accelerated osteoblast differentiation. Conclusions Our data show that ghrelin regulates bone remodeling through Ghsr in osteoblasts by modulating the CREB and Runx2 pathways. PMID:25737953

  9. Twelve Months of Voluntary Heavy Alcohol Consumption in Male Rhesus Macaques Suppresses Intracortical Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Gaddini, Gino W.; Grant, Kathleen A.; Woodall, Andrew; Stull, Cara; Maddalozzo, Gianni F.; Zhang, Bo; Turner, Russell T.; Iwaniec, Urszula T.

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heavy alcohol consumption is a risk factor for cortical bone fractures in males. The increase in fracture risk may be due, in part, to reduced bone quality. Intracortical (osteonal) bone remodeling is the principle mechanism for maintaining cortical bone quality. However, it is not clear how alcohol abuse impacts intracortical bone remodeling. This study investigated the effects of long-duration heavy alcohol consumption on intracortical bone remodeling in a non-human primate model. Following a 4-month induction period, male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, n = 21) were allowed to voluntarily self-administer water or alcohol (4% ethanol w/v) for 22 h/d, 7 d/wk for 12 months. Control monkeys (n = 13) received water and an isocaloric maltose-dextrin solution. Tetracycline hydrochloride was administered orally 17 and 3 days prior to sacrifice for determination of active mineralization sites. Animals in the alcohol group consumed 2.7 ± 0.2 g alcohol/kg/d (mean ± SE) during the 12 months of self-administration, resulting in a mean daily blood alcohol concentration of 77 ± 9 mg/dl from samples taken at 7 h after the start of a daily session. However, blood alcohol concentration varied widely from day to day, with peak levels exceeding 250 mg/dl, modeling a binge-drinking pattern of alcohol consumption. The skeletal response to alcohol was determined by densitometry, microcomputed tomography and histomorphometry. Significant differences in tibial bone mineral content, bone mineral density, and cortical bone architecture (cross-sectional volume, cortical volume, marrow volume, cortical thickness, and polar moment of inertia) in the tibial diaphysis were not detected with treatment. However, cortical porosity was lower (1.8 ± 0.5 % versus 0.6 ± 0.1 %, p = 0.021) and labeled osteon density was lower (0.41 ± 0.2/mm2 versus 0.04 ± 0.01/mm2, p < 0.003) in alcohol-consuming monkeys compared to controls, indicating a reduced rate of intracortical bone remodeling

  10. Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor κB Ligand and Osteoprotegerin Regulation of Bone Remodeling in Health and Disease

    PubMed Central

    Kearns, Ann E.; Khosla, Sundeep; Kostenuik, Paul J.

    2008-01-01

    Osteoclasts and osteoblasts dictate skeletal mass, structure, and strength via their respective roles in resorbing and forming bone. Bone remodeling is a spatially coordinated lifelong process whereby old bone is removed by osteoclasts and replaced by bone-forming osteoblasts. The refilling of resorption cavities is incomplete in many pathological states, which leads to a net loss of bone mass with each remodeling cycle. Postmenopausal osteoporosis and other conditions are associated with an increased rate of bone remodeling, which leads to accelerated bone loss and increased risk of fracture. Bone resorption is dependent on a cytokine known as RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand), a TNF family member that is essential for osteoclast formation, activity, and survival in normal and pathological states of bone remodeling. The catabolic effects of RANKL are prevented by osteoprotegerin (OPG), a TNF receptor family member that binds RANKL and thereby prevents activation of its single cognate receptor called RANK. Osteoclast activity is likely to depend, at least in part, on the relative balance of RANKL and OPG. Studies in numerous animal models of bone disease show that RANKL inhibition leads to marked suppression of bone resorption and increases in cortical and cancellous bone volume, density, and strength. RANKL inhibitors also prevent focal bone loss that occurs in animal models of rheumatoid arthritis and bone metastasis. Clinical trials are exploring the effects of denosumab, a fully human anti-RANKL antibody, on bone loss in patients with osteoporosis, bone metastasis, myeloma, and rheumatoid arthritis. PMID:18057140

  11. Frontal bone remodeling for gender reassignment of the male forehead: a gender-reassignment surgery.

    PubMed

    Hoenig, Johannes Franz

    2011-12-01

    Gender-reassignment therapy, especially for reshaping of the forehead, can be an effective treatment to improve self-esteem. Contouring of the cranial vault, especially of the forehead, still is a rarely performed surgical procedure for gender reassignment. In addition to surgical bone remodeling, several materials have been used for remodeling and refinement of the frontal bone. But due to shortcomings of autogenous bone material and the disadvantages of polyethylene or methylmethacrylate, hydroxyapatite cement (HAC) composed of tetracalcium phosphate and dicalcium phosphate seems to be an alternative. This study aimed to analyze the clinical outcome after frontal bone remodeling with HAC for gender male-to-female reassignment. The 21 patients in the study were treated for gender reassignment of the male frontal bone using HAC. The average age of these patients was 33.4 years (range, 21-42 years). The average volume of HAC used per patient was 3.83 g. The authors' clinical series demonstrated a satisfactory result. The surgery was easy to perform, and HAC was easy to apply and shape to suit individual needs. Overall satisfaction was very high. Therefore, HAC is a welcome alternative to the traditional use of autogenous bone graft for correction of cranial vault irregularities. PMID:21573830

  12. Bone Remodeling in Choroidal Osteoma Monitored by Fundus Photography and Spectral-Domain Optical Coherence Tomography

    PubMed Central

    Kamalden, Tengku Ain; Lingam, Gopal; Sundar, Gangadhara

    2014-01-01

    Choroidal osteoma is a benign ossifying tumor of the choroid, consisting of mature bone tissue. It has been described to enlarge and evolve at varying rates over time. Here, we report and quantify the progression of a unilateral choroidal osteoma in a 7-year-old boy by fundus photography, and document tumor remodeling by spectral domain optical coherence tomography images. PMID:27175357

  13. Does Simulated Spaceflight Modify Epigenetic Status During Bone Remodeling?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Thomas, Nicholas J.; Stevick, Rebecca J.; Tran, Luan H.; Nalavadi, Mohit O.; Almeida, Eduardo A.C.; Globus, Ruth K.; Alwood, Joshua S.

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about the effects of spaceflight conditions on epigenetics. The term epigenetics describes changes to the genome that can affect expression of a gene without changes to the sequence of DNA. Epigenetic processes are thought to underlie cellular differentiation, where transcription of specific genes occurs in response to key stimuli, and may be heritable - passing from one cell to its daughter cell. We hypothesize that the mechanical environment during spaceflight, namely microgravity-induced weightlessness or exercise regulate gene expression in the osteoblast-lineage cells both to control bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts, which continually shapes bone structure throughout life. Similarly we intend to evaluate how radiation regulates these same bone cell activity and differentiation related genes. We further hypothesize that the regulation in bone cell gene expression is at least partially controlled through epigenetic mechanisms of methylation or small non-coding RNA (microRNAs). We have acquired preliminary data suggesting that global genome methylation is modified in response to axial compression of the tibia - a model of exercise. We intend to pursue these hypotheses wherein we will evaluate changes in gene expression and, congruently, changes in epigenetic state in bones from mice subjected to the aforementioned conditions: hindlimb unloading to simulate weightlessness, axial compression of the tibia, or radiation exposure in order to gain insight into the role of epigenetics in spaceflight-induced bone loss.

  14. Effect of subchronic exposure to tetradifon on bone remodelling and metabolism in female rat.

    PubMed

    Badraoui, Riadh; Abdelmoula, Nouha Bouayed; Sahnoun, Zouhaier; Fakhfakh, Zouhaier; Rebai, Tarek

    2007-12-01

    This study investigates the effect of subchronic exposure to tetradifon, an organochlorine pesticide with an oestrogen-like structure, in female rat. A single cumulative dose of 2430 mg/kg BW was administrated orally for 12 female rats of 190 g BW. Twelve non-treated additional rats have served as controls. Animals were sacrificed after 6 and 12 weeks of treatment. We studied bone remodelling through histomorphometry and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) analyses. The serum and the right femora were used to determine phosphatase alkaline (AlkP) and/or calcium and phosphorus content. No sign of toxicity was observed until the end of the experiment. The SEM results revealed no structural alteration of the treated animal bone tissue. However, in both treated groups, we have noted an increase in the trabecular distance and a heterogeneous aspect of the endosteum that could be explained by bone-remodelling disturbance, with relative delay of ossification. Following histomorphomotric analysis, these results were coupled with significant increases in Tb.Th and OS/BS. Elsewhere, tetradifon intoxication increased significant serum AlkP level in the group treated for 12 weeks, which could be explained by an osteoblastic hyperactivity. Tetradifon intoxication decreased significantly bone calcium end phosphorus contents. Tetradifon seems not to exert major effects on bone remodelling. However, the osteoblastic hyperactivity could be explained by the oestrogen-like activity of tetradifon and its fatty metabolism. In fact, oestrogen inhibits bone remodelling, and enhances bone formation, which could result in an increase of the osteoid surface and explain the relative delay of ossification. PMID:18068648

  15. Bone remodeling during pregnancy and post-partum assessed by metal lead levels and isotopic concentrations.

    PubMed

    Gulson, Brian; Taylor, Alan; Eisman, John

    2016-08-01

    Bone remodeling is normally evaluated using bone turnover markers/indices as indicators of bone resorption and formation. However, during pregnancy and post-partum, there have been inconsistent results between and within biomarkers for bone formation and resorption. These differences may relate to pregnancy-related changes in metabolism and/or hemodilution altering measured marker levels. An alternative approach to evaluating bone remodeling is to use the metal lead (Pb) concentrations and Pb isotopic compositions in blood. These measurements can also provide information on the amount of Pb that is mobilized from the maternal skeleton. Despite some similarities with accepted bone turnover markers, the Pb data demonstrate increased bone resorption throughout pregnancy that further continues post-partum independent of length of breast-feeding, dietary intake and resumption of menses. Furthermore the isotopic measurements are not affected by hemodilution. These data confirm calcium balance studies that indicate increased bone resorption throughout pregnancy and lactation. They also indicate potentially major public health implications of the transfer of maternal Pb burden to the fetus and new born. PMID:27233973

  16. Restraint stress delays endometrial adaptive remodeling during mouse embryo implantation.

    PubMed

    Liu, Guanhui; Dong, Yulan; Wang, Zixu; Cao, Jing; Chen, Yaoxing

    2015-01-01

    In mice, previously, we showed that restraint stress reduces the number of embryo implantation sites in the endometrium. Here, we hypothesized that the uterine microenvironment is altered by restraint stress and consequently is suboptimal for embryo implantation. On embryonic day 1 (E1), 60 of 154 pregnant CD1 mice underwent restraint stress (4 h), repeated daily to E3, E5 or E7 (n = 10 mice per group). Restraint stress decreased food intake and suppressed body weight gain on E3, E5 and E7. Restraint stress decreased the actual and relative weight (percent body weight) of uterus and ovary on E5 (by 14.9%, p = 0.03; 16.1%, p = 0.004) and E7 (by 16.8%, p = 0.03; 20.0%, p = 0.01). Morphologically, restraint stress decreased relative endometrial area (by 8.94-18.8%, p = 0.003-0.021) and uterine gland area (by 30.6%, p < 0.01 on E3 and 44.5%, p < 0.01 on E5). Immunohistochemistry showed that restraint stress decreased microvessel density (by 12.9-70.5%, p < 0.01) and vascular endothelial growth factor expression (by 14.6-45.9%, p = 0.007-0.02). Restraint stress decreased by 32.4-39.8% (p = 0.002-0.01) the mean optical density ratio for proliferating cell nuclear antigen/terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling. Methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium assay showed a dose-dependent decrease in proliferative activity of endometrial stromal cells (from 52 of 154 pregnant E5 control mice) incubated with H2O2 (100-1000 μM) in vitro. These findings supported the hypothesis that restraint stress negatively influences endometrial adaptive remodeling via an oxidative stress pathway, which resulted in fewer implantation sites. PMID:26365550

  17. Activation of bone remodeling after fatigue: differential response to linear microcracks and diffuse damage.

    PubMed

    Herman, B C; Cardoso, L; Majeska, R J; Jepsen, K J; Schaffler, M B

    2010-10-01

    Recent experiments point to two predominant forms of fatigue microdamage in bone: linear microcracks (tens to a few hundred microns in length) and "diffuse damage" (patches of diffuse stain uptake in fatigued bone comprised of clusters of sublamellar-sized cracks). The physiological relevance of diffuse damage in activating bone remodeling is not known. In this study microdamage amount and type were varied to assess whether linear or diffuse microdamage has similar effects on the activation of intracortical resorption. Activation of resorption was correlated to the number of linear microcracks (Cr.Dn) in the bone (R(2)=0.60, p<0.01). In contrast, there was no activation of resorption in response to diffuse microdamage alone. Furthermore, there was no significant change in osteocyte viability in response to diffuse microdamage, suggesting that osteocyte apoptosis, which is known to activate remodeling at typical linear microcracks in bone, does not result from sublamellar damage. These findings indicate that inability of diffuse microdamage to activate resorption may be due to lack of a focal injury response. Finally, we found that duration of loading does not affect the remodeling response. In conclusion, our data indicate that osteocytes activate resorption in response to linear microcracks but not diffuse microdamage, perhaps due to lack of a focal injury-induced apoptotic response. PMID:20633708

  18. Immunohistochemical localization of tenascin-C in rat periodontal ligament with reference to alveolar bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Sato, Rei; Fukuoka, Hiroki; Yokohama-Tamaki, Tamaki; Kaku, Masaru; Shibata, Shunichi

    2016-03-01

    We investigated the immunohistochemical localization of tenascin-C in 8-week-old rat periodontal ligaments. Tenascin-C immunoreactivity was detected in zones along with cementum and alveolar bone, and more intensely on the resorption surface of alveolar bone than on the formation surface. On the resorbing surface, tenascin-C immunoreactivity was detected in Howship's lacunae without osteoclasts, and in the interfibrous space of the periodontal ligaments, indicating that this molecule works as an adhesion molecule between bone and fibers of periodontal ligaments. Upon experimental tooth movement by inserting elastic bands (Waldo method), the physiological resorption surface of alveolar bone under compressive force showed enhanced bone resorption and enhanced tenascin-C immunoreactivity. However, on the physiological bone formation surface under compressive force, bone resorption was seen only occasionally, and no enhanced tenascin-C immunoreactivity was noted. In an experiment involving excessive occlusal loading to rat molars, transient bone resorption occurred within interradicular septa, but no enhanced tenascin-C immunoreactivity was seen in the periodontal ligaments. These results indicate that tenascin-C works effectively on the bone resorbing surface of physiological alveolar bone remodeling sites, rather than on the non-physiological transient bone resorbing surface. Fibronectin immunoreactivity was distributed evenly in the periodontal ligaments under experimental conditions. Co-localization of tenascin-C and fibronectin immunoreactivity was observed in many regions, but mutually exclusive expression patterns were also seen in some regions, indicating that fibronectin might not be directly involved in alveolar bone remodeling, but may play a role via interaction with tenascin-C. PMID:25957016

  19. Modulation of bone remodeling via mechanically activated ion channels

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Duncan, Randall L. (Principal Investigator)

    1996-01-01

    A critical factor in the maintenance of bone mass is the physical forces imposed upon the skeleton. Removal of these forces, such as in a weightless environment, results in a rapid loss of bone, whereas application of exogenous mechanical strain has been shown to increase bone formation. Numerous flight and ground-based experiments indicate that the osteoblast is the key bone cell influenced by mechanical stimulation. Aside from early transient fluctuations in response to unloading, osteoclast number and activity seem unaffected by removal of strain. However, bone formation is drastically reduced in weightlessness and osteoblasts respond to mechanical strain with an increase in the activity of a number of second messenger pathways resulting in increased anabolic activity. Unfortunately, the mechanism by which the osteoblast converts physical stimuli into a biochemical message, a process we have termed biochemical coupling, remains elusive. Prior to the application of this grant, we had characterized a mechanosensitive, cation nonselective channel (SA-cat) in osteoblast-like osteosarcoma cells that we proposed is the initial signalling mechanism for mechanotransduction. During the execution of this grant, we have made considerable progress to further characterize this channel as well as to determine its role in the osteoblastic response to mechanical strain. To achieve these goals, we combined electrophysiologic techniques with cellular and molecular biology methods to examine the role of these channels in the normal function of the osteoblast in vitro.

  20. Influence of ingrowth regions on bone remodelling around a cementless hip resurfacing femoral implant.

    PubMed

    Haider, Ifaz T; Speirs, Andrew D; Beaulé, Paul E; Frei, Hanspeter

    2015-01-01

    Hip resurfacing arthroplasty is an alternative to traditional hip replacement that can conserve proximal bone stock and has gained popularity but bone resorption may limit implant survival and remains a clinical concern. The goal of this study was to analyze bone remodelling patterns around an uncemented resurfacing implant and the influence of ingrowth regions on resorption. A computed tomography-derived finite element model of a proximal femur with a virtually implanted resurfacing component was simulated under peak walking loads. Bone ingrowth was simulated by six interface conditions: fully bonded; fully friction; bonded cap with friction stem; a small bonded region at the stem-cup intersection with the remaining surface friction; fully frictional, except for a bonded band along the distal end of the cap and superior half of the cap bonded with the rest frictional. Interface condition had a large influence on remodelling patterns. Bone resorption was minimized when no ingrowth occurred at the bone-implant interface. Bonding only the superior half of the cap increased bone resorption slightly but allowed for a large ingrowth region to improve secondary stability. PMID:24697332

  1. Subchondral bone remodeling: comparing nanofracture with microfracture. An ovine in vivo study

    PubMed Central

    ZEDDE, PIETRO; CUDONI, SEBASTIANO; GIACHETTI, GIACOMO; MANUNTA, MARIA LUCIA; MASALA, GEROLAMO; BRUNETTI, ANTONIO; MANUNTA, ANDREA FABIO

    2016-01-01

    Purpose microfracture, providing direct stimulation of chondrogenic mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in the subchondral bone, remains the most frequently used primary cartilage repair technique. However, the newly formed type I collagen-rich fibrocartilaginous tissue has poor biomechanical properties and a tendency to degenerate. To overcome these limitations the nanofracture technique was introduced. Our purpose was to compare subchondral bone remodeling 6 months after microfracture versus nanofracture (subchondral needling) treatment in an ovine model. Methods full-thickness chondral lesions were created in the load-bearing area of the medial femoral condyles in four adult sheep. Each animal was then treated on one side with microfracture and on the contralateral side with nanofracture. Subchondral bone remodeling was assessed by micro-CT using a Bruker® SKYSCAN and CTVOX 2.7 software (Bruker Corp., Billerica, MA, USA) for image reconstruction; trabecular bone density measurements were performed through a color-representation structure thickness analysis. Results at the six-month endpoint, the microfracture-treated samples showed limited perforation depth and cone-shaped channels with large diameters at the joint surface. The channel walls displayed a high degree of regularity with significant trabecular bone compaction leading to a sealing effect with limited communication with the surrounding trabecular canals. Condyles treated with nanofracture showed channels characterized by greater depth and smaller diameters and natural irregularities of the channel walls, absence of trabecular compaction around the perforation, remarkable communication with trabecular canals, and neo-trabecular remodeling inside the channels. Conclusions nanofracture is an effective and innovative repair technique allowing deeper perforation into subchondral bone with less trabecular fragmentation and compaction when compared to microfracture; it results in better restoration of the normal

  2. Predicting bone remodeling in response to total hip arthroplasty: computational study using mechanobiochemical model.

    PubMed

    Tavakkoli Avval, Pouria; Klika, Václav; Bougherara, Habiba

    2014-05-01

    Periprosthetic bone loss following total hip arthroplasty (THA) is a serious concern leading to the premature failure of prosthetic implant. Therefore, investigating bone remodeling in response to hip arthroplasty is of paramount for the purpose of designing long lasting prostheses. In this study, a thermodynamic-based theory, which considers the coupling between the mechanical loading and biochemical affinity as stimulus for bone formation and resorption, was used to simulate the femoral density change in response to THA. The results of the numerical simulations using 3D finite element analysis revealed that in Gruen zone 7, after remarkable postoperative bone loss, the bone density started recovering and got stabilized after 9% increase. The most significant periprosthetic bone loss was found in Gruen zone 7 (-17.93%) followed by zone 1 (-13.77%). Conversely, in zone 4, bone densification was observed (+4.63%). The results have also shown that the bone density loss in the posterior region of the proximal metaphysis was greater than that in the anterior side. This study provided a quantitative figure for monitoring the distribution variation of density throughout the femoral bone. The predicted bone density distribution before and after THA agree well with the bone morphology and previous results from the literature. PMID:24509505

  3. Impact of targeted PPAR gamma disruption on bone remodeling

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPAR gamma), known as the master regulator of adipogenesis, has been regarded as a promising target for new anti-osteoporosis therapy due to its role in regulating bone marrow mesenchymal stem/progenitor cell (BMSC) lineage commitment. However, the p...

  4. [Bone formation and corticotomy-induced accelerated bone remodeling: can alveolar corticotomy induce bone formation?].

    PubMed

    Moreau, Nathan; Charrier, Jean-Baptiste

    2015-03-01

    Current orthodontic treatments must answer an increasing demand for faster yet as efficient treatments, especially in adult patients. These past years, the amelioration of orthodontic, anesthetic and orthognathic surgery techniques have allowed considerable improvement of orthodontico-surgical treatments and of adult orthodontic treatments. Alveolar corticotomy (an example of such techniques) accelerates orthodontic tooth movements by local modifications of bone metabolism, inducing a transient osteopenia. This osteopenia allows greater tooth movements than conventional techniques. Whereas there is a growing understanding of the underlying biological mechanisms of alveolar corticotomies, there is little data regarding the osteogenic potential of such technique. In the present article, we review the literature pertaining to alveolar corticotomies and their underlying biological mechanisms and present a clinical case underlining the osteogenic potential of the technique. PMID:25888047

  5. The role of the gastrointestinal tract in calcium homeostasis and bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Keller, J; Schinke, T

    2013-11-01

    While skeletal biology was approached in a rather isolated fashion in the past, an increasing understanding of the interplay between extraskeletal organs and bone remodeling has been obtained in recent years. This review will discuss recent advances in the field that have shed light on how the gastrointestinal tract and bone relate to each other. In particular, the importance of the GI tract in maintaining calcium homeostasis and skeletal integrity will be reviewed as impaired gastric acid production represents a major public health problem with possible implications for sufficient calcium absorption. Osteoporosis, the most prevalent bone disease worldwide, is caused not only by intrinsic defects affecting bone cell differentiation and function but also by a large set of extrinsic factors including hormonal disturbances, malnutrition, and iatrogenic drug application. Given the skeletal requirements of calcium, amino acids, and energy for bone turnover and renewal, it is not surprising that the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is of major importance for skeletal integrity. PMID:23536255

  6. A supra-cellular model for coupling of bone resorption to formation during remodeling: lessons from two bone resorption inhibitors affecting bone formation differently.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Andersen, Thomas Levin; Pennypacker, Brenda L; Duong, Le T; Engelholm, Lars H; Delaissé, Jean-Marie

    2014-01-10

    The bone matrix is maintained functional through the combined action of bone resorbing osteoclasts and bone forming osteoblasts, in so-called bone remodeling units. The coupling of these two activities is critical for securing bone replenishment and involves osteogenic factors released by the osteoclasts. However, the osteoclasts are separated from the mature bone forming osteoblasts in time and space. Therefore the target cell of these osteoclastic factors has remained unknown. Recent explorations of the physical microenvironment of osteoclasts revealed a cell layer lining the bone marrow and forming a canopy over the whole remodeling surface, spanning from the osteoclasts to the bone forming osteoblasts. Several observations show that these canopy cells are a source of osteoblast progenitors, and we hypothesized therefore that they are the likely cells targeted by the osteogenic factors of the osteoclasts. Here we provide evidence supporting this hypothesis, by comparing the osteoclast-canopy interface in response to two types of bone resorption inhibitors in rabbit lumbar vertebrae. The bisphosphonate alendronate, an inhibitor leading to low bone formation levels, reduces the extent of canopy coverage above osteoclasts. This effect is in accordance with its toxic action on periosteoclastic cells. In contrast, odanacatib, an inhibitor preserving bone formation, increases the extent of the osteoclast-canopy interface. Interestingly, these distinct effects correlate with how fast bone formation follows resorption during these respective treatments. Furthermore, canopy cells exhibit uPARAP/Endo180, a receptor able to bind the collagen made available by osteoclasts, and reported to mediate osteoblast recruitment. Overall these observations support a mechanism where the recruitment of bone forming osteoblasts from the canopy is induced by osteoclastic factors, thereby favoring initiation of bone formation. They lead to a model where the osteoclast-canopy interface is

  7. Evaluation of bone remodeling in regard to the age of scaphoid non-unions

    PubMed Central

    Rein, Susanne; Hanisch, Uwe; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Zwipp, Hans; Rammelt, Stefan; Weindel, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    AIM: To analyse bone remodeling in regard to the age of scaphoid non-unions (SNU) with immunohistochemistry. METHODS: Thirty-six patients with symptomatic SNU underwent surgery with resection of the pseudarthrosis. The resected material was evaluated histologically after staining with hematoxylin-eosin (HE), tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP), CD 68, osteocalcin (OC) and osteopontin (OP). Histological examination was performed in a blinded fashion. RESULTS: The number of multinuclear osteoclasts in the TRAP-staining correlated with the age of the SNU and was significantly higher in younger SNU (P = 0.034; r = 0.75). A higher number of OP-immunoreactive osteoblasts significantly correlated with a higher number of OC-immunoreactive osteoblasts (P = 0.001; r = 0.55). Furthermore, a greater number of OP-immunoreactive osteoblasts correlated significantly with a higher number of OP-immunoreactive multinuclear osteoclasts (P = 0.008; r = 0.43). SNU older than 6 mo showed a significant decrease of the number of fibroblasts (P = 0.04). Smoking and the age of the patients had no influence on bone remodeling in SNU. CONCLUSION: Multinuclear osteoclasts showed a significant decrease in relation to the age of SNU. However, most of the immunhistochemical findings of bone remodeling do not correlate with the age of the SNU. This indicates a permanent imbalance of bone formation and resorption as indicated by a concurrent increase in both osteoblast and osteoclast numbers. A clear histological differentiation into phases of bone remodeling in SNU is not possible. PMID:27458552

  8. Inner Ear Vestibular Signals Regulate Bone Remodeling via the Sympathetic Nervous System.

    PubMed

    Vignaux, Guillaume; Ndong, Jean Dlc; Perrien, Daniel S; Elefteriou, Florent

    2015-06-01

    The inner ear vestibular system has numerous projections on central brain centers that regulate sympathetic outflow, and skeletal sympathetic projections affect bone remodeling by inhibiting bone formation by osteoblasts and promoting bone resorption by osteoclasts. In this study, we show that bilateral vestibular lesions in mice cause a low bone mass phenotype associated with decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption. This reduction in bone mass is most pronounced in lower limbs, is not associated with reduced locomotor activity or chronic inflammation, and could be prevented by the administration of the β-blocker propranolol and by genetic deletion of the β2-adrenergic receptor, globally or specifically in osteoblasts. These results provide novel experimental evidence supporting a functional autonomic link between central proprioceptive vestibular structures and the skeleton. Because vestibular dysfunction often affects the elderly, these results also suggest that age-related bone loss might have a vestibular component and that patients with inner ear pathologies might be at risk for fracture. Lastly, these data might have relevance to the bone loss observed in microgravity, as vestibular function is altered in this condition as well. © 2015 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. PMID:25491117

  9. Would increased interstitial fluid flow through in situ mechanical stimulation enhance bone remodeling?

    PubMed

    Letechipia, J E; Alessi, A; Rodriguez, G; Asbun, J

    2010-08-01

    Bone accommodates to changes in its functional environment ensuring that sufficient skeletal mass is appropriately positioned to withstand the mechanical loads that result from functional activities. Increasing physical activity will result in increased bone mass, while the removal of functional loading would result in bone loss. Bone is a composite material made up of a collagen-hydroxyapatite matrix and a complex network of lacunae-canaliculi channels occupied by osteocyte and osteoblast processes, immersed in interstitial fluid. There are strong indications that changes in interstitial fluid flow velocity or pressure are the means by which an external load signal is communicated to the cell. In vitro studies indicate that shear stress, induced by interstitial fluid flow, is a potent bone cell behavior regulator. One of the forms of altering interstitial fluid flow is through the mechanical deformation of skeletal tissue in response to applied loads. Other methods include increased intramedullary pressure, negative-pressure tissue regeneration, or external mechanical stimulation. Analysis of these methods poses the question of process effectiveness. The efficacy of each method theoretically will depend on the mechanical efficiency of transmitting an external load and converting it into changes in interstitial fluid flow. In this paper, we combine recent knowledge on the effect of the bone's interstitial fluid flow, different fluid patterns, the role of gap junctions, and the concept of mechanical effectiveness of different methods that influence interstitial fluid flow within bone, and we hypothesize that the efficiency of bone remodeling can be improved if a small mechanical percussion device could be placed directly in contact with the bone, thus inducing local interstitial fluid flow variations. Enhancement of bone repair and remodeling through controlled interstitial fluid flow possesses many clinical applications. Further investigations and in vivo

  10. [Effect of dosed diet restriction on physiological remodeling and bioelectric properties of bone].

    PubMed

    Levashov, M I; Ianko, R V; Chaka, E G; Safonov, S L

    2014-07-01

    The effect of dosed diet restriction on the physiological remodeling and bioelectric properties of bone tissue was studied in 48 male Wistar rats 3- and 18-months of age. The rate of bone tissue apposition was studied by the dynamic histomorphometry method (intravital tetracycline labeling). Electric potentials on the periosteal surface of the freshly isolated femurs were recorded. The magnitude of dielectric loss factor was determined to assess the quality of bone tissue. The control rats received a standard diet. The experimental rats received a limited diet (60 % of the standard mass) for 28 days. The magnitude and rate of the bone tissue apposition on the endosteal and periosteal surface of the tibia were less by 38.4% and 122.7% respectively in experimental rats after dosed diet restriction. Electric potential in the metaphyseal-epiphyseal growth zones of the femur was 29.7% lower, and the dielectric loss factor increased by 15.8%. The bone tissue apposition rate and the electric potential magnitude were increased 10 days after completion of the dosed diet restriction. The magnitude of the dielectric loss factor decreased after returning to the standard diet. Key words: dosed diet restriction, bone, remodelling, bioelectric properties. PMID:25669112

  11. Human proximal femur bone adaptation to variations in hip geometry.

    PubMed

    Machado, M M; Fernandes, P R; Zymbal, V; Baptista, F

    2014-10-01

    The study of bone mass distribution at proximal femur may contribute to understand the role of hip geometry on hip fracture risk. We examined how bone mineral density (BMD) of proximal femur adapts to inter individual variations in the femoral neck length (FNL), femoral neck width (FNW) and neck shaft angle (NSA). A parameterized and dimensionally scalable 3-D finite element model of a reference proximal femur geometry was incrementally adjusted to adopt physiological ranges at FNL (3.90-6.90cm), FNW (2.90-3.46cm), and NSA (109-141º), yielding a set of femora with different geometries. The bone mass distribution for each femur was obtained with a suitable bone remodelling model. The BMDs at the integral femoral neck (FN) and at the intertrochanteric (ITR) region, as well as the BMD ratio of inferomedial to superolateral (IM:SL) regions of FN and BMD ratio of FN:ITR were used to represent bone mass distribution. Results revealed that longer FNLs present greater BMD (g/cm(3)) at the FN, mainly at the SL region, and at the ITR region. Wider FNs were associated with reduced BMD at the FN, particularly at the SL region, and at the ITR region. Larger NSAs up to 129° were associated with BMD diminutions at the FN and ITR regions and with increases of the IM:SL BMD ratio while NSAs larger than 129° resulted in decrease of the IM:SL BMD ratio. These findings suggest hip geometry as moderator of the mechanical loading influence on bone mass distribution at proximal femur with higher FNL favoring the BMD of FN and ITR regions and greater FNW and NSA having the opposite effect. Augmented values of FNL and FNW seem also to favor more the BMD at the superolateral than at the inferomedial FN region. PMID:25016094

  12. Inner Ear Vestibular Signals Regulate Bone Remodeling via the Sympathetic Nervous System

    PubMed Central

    Vignaux, Guillaume; Ndong, Jean DLC; Perrien, Daniel S; Elefteriou, Florent

    2016-01-01

    The inner ear vestibular system has numerous projections on central brain centers that regulate sympathetic outflow, and skeletal sympathetic projections affect bone remodeling by inhibiting bone formation by osteoblasts and promoting bone resorption by osteoclasts. In this study, we show that bilateral vestibular lesions in mice cause a low bone mass phenotype associated with decreased bone formation and increased bone resorption. This reduction in bone mass is most pronounced in lower limbs, is not associated with reduced locomotor activity or chronic inflammation, and could be prevented by the administration of the β-blocker propranolol and by genetic deletion of the β2-adrenergic receptor, globally or specifically in osteoblasts. These results provide novel experimental evidence supporting a functional autonomic link between central proprioceptive vestibular structures and the skeleton. Because vestibular dysfunction often affects the elderly, these results also suggest that age-related bone loss might have a vestibular component and that patients with inner ear pathologies might be at risk for fracture. Lastly, these data might have relevance to the bone loss observed in microgravity, as vestibular function is altered in this condition as well. PMID:25491117

  13. Roles of the kidney in the formation, remodeling and repair of bone.

    PubMed

    Wei, Kai; Yin, Zhiwei; Xie, Yuansheng

    2016-06-01

    The relationship between the kidney and bone is highly complex, and the kidney plays an important role in the regulation of bone development and metabolism. The kidney is the major organ involved in the regulation of calcium and phosphate homeostasis, which is essential for bone mineralization and development. Many substances synthesized by the kidney, such as 1,25(OH)2D3, Klotho, bone morphogenetic protein-7, and erythropoietin, are involved in different stages of bone formation, remodeling and repair. In addition, some cytokines which can be affected by the kidney, such as osteoprotegerin, sclerostin, fibroblast growth factor -23 and parathyroid hormone, also play important roles in bone metabolism. In this paper, we summarize the possible effects of these kidney-related cytokines on bone and their possible mechanisms. Most of these cytokines can interact with one another, constituting an intricate network between the kidney and bone. Therefore, kidney diseases should be considered among patients presenting with osteodystrophy and disturbances in bone and mineral metabolism, and treatment for renal dysfunction may accelerate their recovery. PMID:26943181

  14. Moderate-intensity rotating magnetic fields do not affect bone quality and bone remodeling in hindlimb suspended rats.

    PubMed

    Jing, Da; Cai, Jing; Wu, Yan; Shen, Guanghao; Zhai, Mingming; Tong, Shichao; Xu, Qiaoling; Xie, Kangning; Wu, Xiaoming; Tang, Chi; Xu, Xinmin; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Maogang; Luo, Erping

    2014-01-01

    Abundant evidence has substantiated the positive effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) and static magnetic fields (SMF) on inhibiting osteopenia and promoting fracture healing. However, the osteogenic potential of rotating magnetic fields (RMF), another common electromagnetic application modality, remains poorly characterized thus far, although numerous commercial RMF treatment devices have been available on the market. Herein the impacts of RMF on osteoporotic bone microarchitecture, bone strength and bone metabolism were systematically investigated in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty two 3-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the Control (n = 10), HU (n = 10) and HU with RMF exposure (HU+RMF, n = 12) groups. Rats in the HU+RMF group were subjected to daily 2-hour exposure to moderate-intensity RMF (ranging from 0.60 T to 0.38 T) at 7 Hz for 4 weeks. HU caused significant decreases in body mass and soleus muscle mass of rats, which were not obviously altered by RMF. Three-point bending test showed that the mechanical properties of femurs in HU rats, including maximum load, stiffness, energy absorption and elastic modulus were not markedly affected by RMF. µCT analysis demonstrated that 4-week RMF did not significantly prevent HU-induced deterioration of femoral trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture. Serum biochemical analysis showed that RMF did not significantly change HU-induced decrease in serum bone formation markers and increase in bone resorption markers. Bone histomorphometric analysis further confirmed that RMF showed no impacts on bone remodeling in HU rats, as evidenced by unchanged mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, osteoblast numbers and osteoclast numbers in cancellous bone. Together, our findings reveal that RMF do not significantly affect bone microstructure, bone mechanical strength and bone remodeling in HU-induced disuse osteoporotic rats. Our study indicates potentially

  15. Moderate-Intensity Rotating Magnetic Fields Do Not Affect Bone Quality and Bone Remodeling in Hindlimb Suspended Rats

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Guanghao; Zhai, Mingming; Tong, Shichao; Xu, Qiaoling; Xie, Kangning; Wu, Xiaoming; Tang, Chi; Xu, Xinmin; Liu, Juan; Guo, Wei; Jiang, Maogang; Luo, Erping

    2014-01-01

    Abundant evidence has substantiated the positive effects of pulsed electromagnetic fields (PEMF) and static magnetic fields (SMF) on inhibiting osteopenia and promoting fracture healing. However, the osteogenic potential of rotating magnetic fields (RMF), another common electromagnetic application modality, remains poorly characterized thus far, although numerous commercial RMF treatment devices have been available on the market. Herein the impacts of RMF on osteoporotic bone microarchitecture, bone strength and bone metabolism were systematically investigated in hindlimb-unloaded (HU) rats. Thirty two 3-month-old male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to the Control (n = 10), HU (n = 10) and HU with RMF exposure (HU+RMF, n = 12) groups. Rats in the HU+RMF group were subjected to daily 2-hour exposure to moderate-intensity RMF (ranging from 0.60 T to 0.38 T) at 7 Hz for 4 weeks. HU caused significant decreases in body mass and soleus muscle mass of rats, which were not obviously altered by RMF. Three-point bending test showed that the mechanical properties of femurs in HU rats, including maximum load, stiffness, energy absorption and elastic modulus were not markedly affected by RMF. µCT analysis demonstrated that 4-week RMF did not significantly prevent HU-induced deterioration of femoral trabecular and cortical bone microarchitecture. Serum biochemical analysis showed that RMF did not significantly change HU-induced decrease in serum bone formation markers and increase in bone resorption markers. Bone histomorphometric analysis further confirmed that RMF showed no impacts on bone remodeling in HU rats, as evidenced by unchanged mineral apposition rate, bone formation rate, osteoblast numbers and osteoclast numbers in cancellous bone. Together, our findings reveal that RMF do not significantly affect bone microstructure, bone mechanical strength and bone remodeling in HU-induced disuse osteoporotic rats. Our study indicates potentially

  16. A thermodynamic model of bone remodelling: the influence of dynamic loading together with biochemical control.

    PubMed

    Klika, V; Marsik, F

    2010-09-01

    Understanding of the bone remodelling process has considerably increased during the last 20 years. Since the ability to simulate (and predict) the effects of bone remodelling offers substantial insights, several models have been proposed to describe this phenomenon. The strength of the presented model is that it includes biochemical control factors (e.g., the necessity of cell-to-cell contact, which is mediated by the RANKL-RANK-OPG chain during osteoclastogenesis) and mechanical stimulation, the governing equations are derived from interaction kinetics (e.g., mass is preserved in running reactions), and the parameters are measurable. Behaviour of the model is in accordance with experimental and clinical observations, such as the role of dynamic loading, the inhibitory effect of dynamic loading on osteoclastogenesis, the observation that polykaryon osteoclasts are activated and formed by a direct cell-to-cell contact, and the correct concentrations of osteoblasts, osteoclasts, and osteocytes. The model does not yet describe the bone remodelling process in complete detail, but the implemented simplifications describe the key features and further details of control mechanisms may be added. PMID:20811146

  17. BREAST CANCER-INDUCED BONE REMODELING, SKELETAL PAIN AND SPROUTING OF SENSORY NERVE FIBERS

    PubMed Central

    Bloom, Aaron P.; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan M.; Taylor, Reid N.; Castañeda-Corral, Gabriela; Kaczmarska, Magdalena J.; Freeman, Katie T.; Coughlin, Kathleen A.; Ghilardi, Joseph R.; Kuskowski, Michael A.; Mantyh, Patrick W.

    2011-01-01

    Breast cancer metastasis to bone is frequently accompanied by pain. What remains unclear is why this pain tends to become more severe and difficult to control with disease progression. Here we test the hypothesis that with disease progression sensory nerve fibers that innervate the breast cancer bearing bone undergo a pathological sprouting and reorganization, which in other non-malignant pathologies has been shown to generate and maintain chronic pain. Injection of human breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231-BO) into the femoral intramedullary space of female athymic nude mice induces sprouting of calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP+) sensory nerve fibers. Nearly all CGRP+ nerve fibers that undergo sprouting also co-express tropomyosin receptor kinase A (TrkA+) and growth associated protein-43 (GAP43+). This ectopic sprouting occurs in periosteal sensory nerve fibers that are in close proximity to breast cancer cells, tumor-associated stromal cells and remodeled cortical bone. Therapeutic treatment with an antibody that sequesters nerve growth factor (NGF), administered when the pain and bone remodeling were first observed, blocks this ectopic sprouting and attenuates cancer pain. The present data suggest that the breast cancer cells and tumor-associated stromal cells express and release NGF, which drives bone pain and the pathological reorganization of nearby CGRP+ / TrkA+ / GAP43+ sensory nerve fibers. PMID:21497141

  18. Variants of Osteoprotegerin Lacking TRAIL Binding for Therapeutic Bone Remodeling in Osteolytic Malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Higgs, Jerome T.; Jarboe, John S.; Lee, Joo Hyoung; Chanda, Diptiman; Lee, Carnellia M.; Deivanayagam, Champion; Ponnazhagan, Selvarangan

    2015-01-01

    Osteolytic bone damage is a major cause of morbidity in several metastatic pathologies. Current therapies using bisphosphonates provide modest improvement, but cytotoxic side effects still occur prompting the need to develop more effective therapies to target aggressive osteoclastogenesis. Increased levels of Receptor Activator of Nuclear Factor Kappa B Ligand (TNFSF11/RANKL), leading to RANKL-RANK signaling, remains the key axis for osteoclast activation and bone resorption. Osteoprotegerin (TNFRSF11B/OPG), a decoy receptor for RANKL is significantly decreased in patients who present with bone lesions. Despite its potential in inhibiting osteoclast activation, OPG also binds to tumor necrosis factor related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TNFSF10/TRAIL), making tumor cells resistant to apoptosis. Towards uncoupling the events of TRAIL binding of OPG and to improve its utility for bone remodeling without inducing tumor resistance to apoptosis, OPG mutants were developed by structural homology modeling based on interactive domain identification and by superimposing models of OPG, TRAIL and its receptor DR5 (TNFRSF10B) to identify regions of OPG for rational design. The OPG mutants were purified and extensively characterized for their ability to decrease osteoclast damage without affecting tumor apoptosis pathway both in vitro and in vivo, confirming their potential in bone remodeling following cancer-induced osteolytic damage. PMID:25636966

  19. A comparative study of orthotropic and isotropic bone adaptation in the femur

    PubMed Central

    Geraldes, Diogo M; Phillips, Andrew T M

    2014-01-01

    Functional adaptation of the femur has been studied extensively by embedding remodelling algorithms in finite element models, with bone commonly assumed to have isotropic material properties for computational efficiency. However, isotropy is insufficient in predicting the directionality of bone's observed microstructure. A novel iterative orthotropic 3D adaptation algorithm is proposed and applied to a finite element model of the whole femur. Bone was modelled as an optimised strain-driven adaptive continuum with local orthotropic symmetry. Each element's material orientations were aligned with the local principal stress directions and their corresponding directional Young's moduli updated proportionally to the associated strain stimuli. The converged predicted density distributions for a coronal section of the whole femur were qualitatively and quantitatively compared with the results obtained by the commonly used isotropic approach to bone adaptation and with ex vivo imaging data. The orthotropic assumption was shown to improve the prediction of bone density distribution when compared with the more commonly used isotropic approach, whilst producing lower comparative mass, structurally optimised models. It was also shown that the orthotropic approach can provide additional directional information on the material properties distributions for the whole femur, an advantage over isotropic bone adaptation. Orthotropic bone models can help in improving research areas in biomechanics where local structure and mechanical properties are of key importance, such as fracture prediction and implant assessment. © 2014 The Authors. International Journal for Numerical Methods in Biomedical Engineering published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24753477

  20. Peptide YY Regulates Bone Remodeling in Mice: A Link between Gut and Skeletal Biology

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Iris P. L.; Driessler, Frank; Khor, Ee Cheng; Shi, Yan-Chuan; Hörmer, Birgit; Nguyen, Amy D.; Enriquez, Ronaldo F.; Eisman, John A.; Sainsbury, Amanda; Herzog, Herbert; Baldock, Paul A.

    2012-01-01

    Background & Aims Gastrointestinal peptides are increasingly being linked to processes controlling the maintenance of bone mass. Peptide YY (PYY), a gut-derived satiety peptide of the neuropeptide Y family, is upregulated in some states that also display low bone mass. Importantly, PYY has high affinity for Y-receptors, particularly Y1R and Y2R, which are known to regulate bone mass. Anorexic conditions and bariatric surgery for obesity influence circulating levels of PYY and have a negative impact on bone mass, but the precise mechanism behind this is unclear. We thus examined whether alterations in PYY expression affect bone mass. Methods Bone microstructure and cellular activity were analyzed in germline PYY knockout and conditional adult-onset PYY over-expressing mice at lumbar and femoral sites using histomorphometry and micro-computed tomography. Results PYY displayed a negative relationship with osteoblast activity. Male and female PYY knockout mice showed enhanced osteoblast activity, with greater cancellous bone mass. Conversely, PYY over-expression lowered osteoblast activity in vivo, via a direct Y1 receptor mediated mechanism involving MAPK stimulation evident in vitro. In contrast to PYY knockout mice, PYY over expression also altered bone resorption, as indicated by greater osteoclast surface, despite the lack of Y-receptor expression in osteoclastic cells. While evident in both sexes, cellular changes were generally more pronounced in females. Conclusions These data demonstrate that the gut peptide PYY is critical for the control of bone remodeling. This regulatory axis from the intestine to bone has the potential to contribute to the marked bone loss observed in situations of extreme weight loss and higher circulating PYY levels, such as anorexia and bariatric obesity surgery, and may be important in the maintenance of bone mass in the general population. PMID:22792209

  1. Analyzing bone remodeling patterns after total hip arthroplasty using quantitative computed tomography and patient-specific 3D computational models

    PubMed Central

    Arachchi, Shanika; Pitto, Rocco P.; Anderson, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    Background Computational models in the form of finite element analysis technique that incorporates bone remodeling theories along with DEXA scans has been extensively used in predicting bone remodeling patterns around the implant. However, majority of such studies used generic models. Therefore, the aim of this study is to develop patient-specific finite element models of total hip replacement patients using their quantitative computed tomography (QCT) scans and accurately analyse bone remodelling patterns after total hip arthroplasty (THA). Methods Patient-specific finite element models have been generated using the patients’ QCT scans from a previous clinical follow-up study. The femur was divided into five regions in proximal-distal direction and then further divided into four quadrants for detailed analysis of bone remodeling patterns. Two types of analysis were performed—inter-patient and intra patient to compare them and then the resulting bone remodeling patterns were quantitatively analyzed. Results Our results show that cortical bone density decrease is higher in diaphyseal region over time and the cancellous bone density decreases significantly in metaphyseal region over time. In metaphyseal region, posterior-medial (P-M) quadrant showed high bone loss while diaphyseal regions show high bone loss in anterior-lateral (A-L) quadrant. Conclusions Our study demonstrated that combining QCT with 3D patient-specific models has the ability of monitoring bone density change patterns after THA in much finer details. Future studies include using these findings for the development of a bone remodelling algorithm capable of predicting surgical outcomes for THA patients. PMID:26435921

  2. Bone morphogenetic protein-2: a potential regulator in scleral remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Jianmin; Cui, Dongmei; Yang, Xiao; Wang, Shaowei; Hu, Shoulong; Li, Chuanxu

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP-2) is a member of the main subgroup of bone morphogenetic proteins within the transforming growth factor-β superfamily. BMP-2 is involved in numerous cellular functions including development, cell proliferation, apoptosis, and extracellular matrix synthesis. We examined BMP-2 expression in human scleral fibroblasts (HSF) and assessed the effects of recombinant human BMP-2 (rhBMP-2) on HSF proliferation, matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2), and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-2 (TIMP-2). Methods We used confocal fluorescence microscopy (CFM) to study BMP-2 distribution in HSF cells and frozen human scleral sections. The influence of rhBMP-2 on cell proliferation at different concentrations (0 ng/ml, 1 ng/ml, 10 ng/ml, and 100 ng/ml) was evaluated by the 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. The effects of rhBMP-2 on the cell cycle were investigated with flow cytometric analysis. Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT–PCR) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to examine MMP-2 and TIMP-2 mRNAs and secreted proteins in HSF that were incubated with rhBMP-2. Results BMP-2 protein expression from human sclera was confirmed by CFM. Cell proliferation was significantly increased with 100 ng/ml rhBMP-2 in a time-dependent manner (p<0.05). The HSF cell cycle moved to the S and S+G2M phases after rhBMP-2 stimulation at 100 ng/ml compared to normal cells (p<0.05). TIMP-2 mRNA levels were significantly increased in HSF incubated for 24 h with 100 ng/ml rhBMP-2 (p<0.01). A 48 h incubation with 10 ng/ml or 100 ng/ml rhBMP-2 resulted in significantly increased TIMP-2 mRNA and protein expression and significantly decreased MMP-2 mRNA expression (p<0.01) while MMP-2 protein expression significantly decreased at 100 ng/ml rhBMP-2 (p<0.01). Conclusions Human sclera fibroblasts expressed BMP-2, which promoted cell proliferation, and elicited changes in MMP-2 and TIMP-2

  3. Subchondral bone microstructural damage by increased remodelling aggravates experimental osteoarthritis preceded by osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Osteoporosis (OP) increases cartilage damage in a combined rabbit model of OP and osteoarthritis (OA). Accordingly, we assessed whether microstructure impairment at subchondral bone aggravates cartilage damage in this experimental model. Methods OP was induced in 20 female rabbits, by ovariectomy and intramuscular injections of methylprednisolone hemisuccinate for four weeks. Ten healthy animals were used as controls. At week 7, OA was surgically induced in left knees of all rabbits. At 22 weeks, after sacrifice, microstructure parameters were assessed by micro-computed tomography, and osteoprotegerin (OPG), receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL), alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and metalloproteinase 9 (MMP9) protein expressions were evaluated by Western Blot at subchondral bone. In addition, cartilage damage was estimated using the histopathological Mankin score. Mann-Whitney and Spearman statistical tests were performed as appropriate, using SPSS software v 11.0. Significant difference was established at P < 0.05. Results Subchondral bone area/tissue area, trabecular thickness and polar moment of inertia were diminished in OPOA knees compared with control or OA knees (P < 0.05). A decrease of plate thickness, ALP expression and OPG/RANKL ratio as well as an increased fractal dimension and MMP9 expression occurred at subchondral bone of OA, OP and OPOA knees vs. controls (P < 0.05). In addition, the severity of cartilage damage was increased in OPOA knees vs. controls (P < 0.05). Remarkably, good correlations were observed between structural and remodelling parameters at subchondral bone, and furthermore, between subchondral structural parameters and cartilage Mankin score. Conclusions Microstructure impairment at subchondral bone associated with an increased remodelling aggravated cartilage damage in OA rabbits with previous OP. Our results suggest that an increased subchondral bone resorption may account for the exacerbation of cartilage

  4. Influence of different mechanical stimuli in a multi-scale mechanobiological isotropic model for bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Mercuri, E G F; Daniel, A L; Hecke, M B; Carvalho, L

    2016-09-01

    This work represents a study of a mathematical model that describes the biological response to different mechanical stimuli in a cellular dynamics model for bone remodelling. The biological system discussed herein consists of three specialised cellular types, responsive osteoblasts, active osteoblasts and osteoclasts, three types of signalling molecules, transforming growth factor beta (TGF-β), receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-b ligand (RANKL) and osteoprotegerin (OPG) and the parathyroid hormone (PTH). Three proposals for mechanical stimuli were tested: strain energy density (SED), hydrostatic and deviatoric parts of SED. The model was tested in a two-dimensional geometry of a standard human femur. The spatial discretization was performed by the finite element method while the temporal evolution of the variables was calculated by the 4th order Runge-Kutta method. The obtained results represent the temporal evolution of the apparent density distribution and the mean apparent density and thickness for the cortical bone after 600 days of remodelling simulation. The main contributions of this paper are the coupling of mechanical and biological models and the exploration of how the different mechanical stimuli affect the cellular activity in different types of physical activities. The results revealed that hydrostatic SED stimulus was able to form more cortical bone than deviatoric SED and total SED stimuli. The computational model confirms how different mechanical stimuli can impact in the balance of bone homeostasis. PMID:27215171

  5. The Regulatory Roles of MicroRNAs in Bone Remodeling and Perspectives as Biomarkers in Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Mengge; Zhou, Xiaoya; Chen, Lili; Huang, Shishu; Leung, Victor; Wu, Nan; Pan, Haobo; Zhen, Wanxin; Lu, William; Peng, Songlin

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs are involved in many cellular and molecular activities and played important roles in many biological and pathological processes, such as tissue formation, cancer development, diabetes, neurodegenerative diseases, and cardiovascular diseases. Recently, it has been reported that microRNAs can modulate the differentiation and activities of osteoblasts and osteoclasts, the key cells that are involved in bone remodeling process. Meanwhile, the results from our and other research groups showed that the expression profiles of microRNAs in the serum and bone tissues are significantly different in postmenopausal women with or without fractures compared to the control. Therefore, it can be postulated that microRNAs might play important roles in bone remodeling and that they are very likely to be involved in the pathological process of postmenopausal osteoporosis. In this review, we will present the updated research on the regulatory roles of microRNAs in osteoblasts and osteoclasts and the expression profiles of microRNAs in osteoporosis and osteoporotic fracture patients. The perspective of serum microRNAs as novel biomarkers in bone loss disorders such as osteoporosis has also been discussed. PMID:27073801

  6. Notch regulation of bone development and remodeling and related skeletal disorders.

    PubMed

    Zanotti, Stefano; Canalis, Ernesto

    2012-02-01

    Notch signaling mediates cell-to-cell interactions that are critical for embryonic development and tissue renewal. In the canonical signaling pathway, the Notch receptor is cleaved following ligand binding, resulting in the release and nuclear translocation of the Notch intracellular domain (NICD). NICD induces gene expression by forming a ternary complex with the DNA binding protein CBF1/Rbp-Jk, Suppressor of Hairless, Lag1, and Mastermind-Like (Maml). Hairy Enhancer of Split (Hes) and Hes related with YRPW motif (Hey) are classic Notch targets. Notch canonical signaling plays a central role in skeletal development and bone remodeling by suppressing the differentiation of skeletal cells. The skeletal phenotype of mice misexpressing Hes1 phenocopies partially the effects of Notch misexpression, suggesting that Hey proteins mediate most of the skeletal effects of Notch. Dysregulation of Notch signaling is associated with diseases affecting human skeletal development, such as Alagille syndrome, brachydactyly and spondylocostal dysostosis. Somatic mutations in Notch receptors and ligands are found in tumors of the skeletal system. Overexpression of NOTCH1 is associated with osteosarcoma, and overexpression of NOTCH3 or JAGGED1 in breast cancer cells favors the formation of osteolytic bone metastasis. Activating mutations in NOTCH2 cause Hajdu-Cheney syndrome, which is characterized by skeletal defects and fractures, and JAG1 polymorphisms, are associated with variations in bone mineral density. In conclusion, Notch is a regulator of skeletal development and bone remodeling, and abnormal Notch signaling is associated with developmental and postnatal skeletal disorders. PMID:22002679

  7. Postextractive implants in aesthetic areas: evaluation of perimplant bone remodeling over time

    PubMed Central

    Figliuzzi, Michele Mario; Giudice, Amerigo; Cristofaro, Maria Giulia; Pacifico, Delfina; Biamonte, Pasquale; Fortunato, Leonzio

    2015-01-01

    Summary Aim The aim of this research was to assess peri-implant bone remodeling of post-extractive implants over 2 years. Material and methods 30 patients meeting pre-established inclusion criteria were enrolled for the study. One implant for each patient was inserted in the post-extraction sockets according to a defined surgical protocol (atramautic extraction, curettage of extraction socket, implant insertion, grafting with collagenated cortico-cancellous porcine bone, and a trimmed collagen membrane to completely cover the socket, suture). A temporary adhesive bridge, with an adequate profile, was bonded to the adjacent teeth. X-ray evaluation with a standardized stent was carried out at different times. Measurements were obtained from the implant edge to the bone peak. The values obtained at time 0 and at 2 years were compared by t-student test. Result Our results showed that after one year 73% of patient had 0 mm of bone reabsorption, 20% of patient had 0 mm ≤ x ≤ 0.5mm, 7% of patient had 0.5 mm ≤ x ≤ 2 mm of bone reabsorption. After two years 62% of patient had 0 mm of bone reabsorption, 24% had 0 mm ≤ x ≤ 0.5mm, 14% had 0.5 mm ≤ x ≤ 2 mm. Conclusions The results showed no significant differences in bone reabsorption in most patients over 2 years. PMID:26161250

  8. Histological Comparison in Rats between Carbonate Apatite Fabricated from Gypsum and Sintered Hydroxyapatite on Bone Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Ayukawa, Yasunori; Suzuki, Yumiko; Tsuru, Kanji; Koyano, Kiyoshi; Ishikawa, Kunio

    2015-01-01

    Carbonate apatite (CO3Ap), the form of apatite found in bone, has recently attracted attention. The purpose of the present study was to histologically evaluate the tissue/cellular response toward the low-crystalline CO3Ap fabricated using a dissolution-precipitation reaction with set gypsum as a precursor. When set gypsum was immersed in a 100°C 1 mol/L Na3PO4 aqueous solution for 24 h, the set gypsum transformed into CO3Ap. Both CO3Ap and sintered hydroxyapatite (s-HAp), which was used as a control, were implanted into surgically created tibial bone defects of rats for histological evaluation. Two and 4 weeks after the implantation, histological sections were created and observed using light microscopy. The CO3Ap granules revealed both direct apposition of the bone matrix by osteoblasts and osteoclastic resorption. In contrast, the s-HAp granules maintained their contour even after 4 weeks following implantation which implied that there was a lack of replacement into the bone. The s-HAp granules were sometimes encapsulated with fibrous tissue, and macrophage polykaryon was occasionally observed directly apposed to the implanted granules. From the viewpoint of bone remodeling, the CO3Ap granules mimicked the bone matrix, suggesting that CO3Ap may be an appropriate bone substitute. PMID:26504813

  9. Effect of sintered silicate-substituted hydroxyapatite on remodelling processes at the bone-implant interface.

    PubMed

    Porter, Alexandra E; Patel, Nelesh; Skepper, Jeremy N; Best, Serena M; Bonfield, William

    2004-07-01

    Phase pure, sintered granules of hydroxyapatite (HA) and silicon-substituted hydroxyapatite (Si-HA) were implanted for 6 and 12 weeks in an ovine model. Samples containing the bone-implant interface were prepared for ultramicrotomy and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) using an anhydrous sample preparation procedure. The results demonstrate that the morphology of apatite deposits and the sequence of events at the interfaces of bone with pure HA and with Si-HA implants, were different. Organised collagen fibrils were first found at the bone/Si-HA interface after 6 weeks, whereas they were found only after 12 weeks around the pure HA implant. Many more nodular aggregates comprised of plate-like apatite crystallites were observed in the vicinity of Si-HA than around the pure HA after 12 weeks in vivo. These findings suggest that the incorporation of silicate ions into HA promotes processes of bone remodelling at the bone/HA interface. TEM observations suggested that the trabecular bone weaves over the Si-HA and that the collagen fibrils form a mechanical interlock with the Si-HA ceramic implants. High-resolution lattice imaging illustrated apatite crystallites contiguous with the Si-HA ceramic and revealed a direct relationship between the bone mineral and the Si-HA ceramic. PMID:14980425

  10. Periosteal PTHrP Regulates Cortical Bone Remodeling During Fracture Healing.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meina; Nasiri, Ali R; Broadus, Arthur E; Tommasini, Steven M

    2015-12-01

    Parathyroid hormone-related protein (PTHrP) is widely expressed in the fibrous outer layer of the periosteum (PO), and the PTH/PTHrP type I receptor (PTHR1) is expressed in the inner PO cambial layer. The cambial layer gives rise to the PO osteoblasts (OBs) and osteoclasts (OCs) that model/remodel the cortical bone surface during development as well as during fracture healing. PTHrP has been implicated in the regulation of PO modeling during development, but nothing is known as regards a role of PTHrP in this location during fracture healing. We propose that PTHrP in the fibrous layer of the PO may be a key regulatory factor in remodeling bone formation during fracture repair. We first assessed whether PTHrP expression in the fibrous PO is associated with PO osteoblast induction in the subjacent cambial PO using a tibial fracture model in PTHrP-lacZ mice. Our results revealed that both PTHrP expression and osteoblast induction in PO were induced 3 days post-fracture. We then investigated a potential functional role of PO PTHrP during fracture repair by performing tibial fracture surgery in 10-week-old CD1 control and PTHrP conditional knockout (PTHrP cKO) mice that lack PO PTHrP. We found that callus size and formation as well as woven bone mineralization in PTHrP cKO mice were impaired compared to that in CD1 mice. Concordant with these findings, functional enzyme staining revealed impaired OB formation and OC activity in the cKO mice. We conclude that deleting PO PTHrP impairs cartilaginous callus formation, maturation and ossification as well as remodeling during fracture healing. These data are the initial genetic evidence suggesting that PO PTHrP may induce osteoblastic activity and regulate fracture healing on the cortical bone surface. PMID:26164475

  11. Bone remodelation markers are useful in the management of monoclonal gammopathies.

    PubMed

    Hernández, José M; Suquía, Begoña; Queizan, José A; Fisac, Rosa M; Sanchez, José J; Fernández-Calvo, Francisco J; García-Sanz, Ramón; Olivier, Carmen; Bárez, Abelardo; Calmuntia, María J; García-Frade, Javier; Portero, Juan A; López, Rosa; Aguilera, Carmen; Navajo, Jose A; San-Miguel, Jesús F

    2004-01-01

    The evaluation of bone disease in multiple myeloma (MM) by conventional radiology has low reproducibility. In the last decade, several serum and urine biochemical parameters, for evaluation of bone turnover, have become available. The present study was designed to explore the value of six bone remodelation markers. It was studied in a series of 176 newly diagnosed patients with monoclonal gammopathies (107 MM and 69 monoclonal gammopathies of unknown significance (MGUS)). As control groups we used 25 patients with benign osteoporosis (BO) and 32 healthy individuals (HI). The bone markers analyzed included: bone resorption markers (BRM) (total pyridinoline, total deoxypyridinoline, free deoxypyridinoline and C-terminal telopeptide of collagen I) and bone formation markers (BFM) (bone alkaline phosphatase (bAP) and osteocalcin (OC)). Serum or urinary levels of BRM were significantly higher in MM patients than in MGUS patients, BO patients or HI (P < 0.001, respectively). BRM were higher in MM patients with lytic lesions. However, only C-terminal telopeptide discriminated MM patients without bone lesions from MGUS patients. BFM did not show significant differences in the aforementioned comparisons, although a trend toward higher values of OC and lower values of bAP in patients with early bone affectation was observed. Ratios BRM/BFM that contained bAP exhibited differences that were most significant between the MM group and other entities, as well as between the different MM subgroups. In fact, the ratios BRM/bAP provided discrimination between the MM subgroup without lyses and MGUS group (P < 0.01). BRM and BFM, especially the ratios, are useful in the evaluation of bone lesions in patients with monoclonal gammopathies. PMID:15570289

  12. A histomorphometric study of alveolar bone modeling and remodeling in mice fed a boron-deficient diet

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Background and Objective: Emerging evidence indicates that boron (B) plays a role in bone formation and maintenance. Thus, a study was performed to determine whether dietary B-deficiency affects periodontal alveolar bone modeling and remodeling. Material and Methods: Weanling Swiss mice (n=30) were ...

  13. Impaired bone remodeling and its correction by combination therapy in a mouse model of mucopolysaccharidosis-I.

    PubMed

    Kuehn, Sonja C; Koehne, Till; Cornils, Kerstin; Markmann, Sandra; Riedel, Christoph; Pestka, Jan M; Schweizer, Michaela; Baldauf, Christina; Yorgan, Timur A; Krause, Matthias; Keller, Johannes; Neven, Mona; Breyer, Sandra; Stuecker, Ralf; Muschol, Nicole; Busse, Bjoern; Braulke, Thomas; Fehse, Boris; Amling, Michael; Schinke, Thorsten

    2015-12-15

    Mucopolysaccharidosis-I (MPS-I) is a lysosomal storage disease (LSD) caused by inactivating mutations of IDUA, encoding the glycosaminoglycan-degrading enzyme α-l-iduronidase. Although MPS-I is associated with skeletal abnormalities, the impact of IDUA deficiency on bone remodeling is poorly defined. Here we report that Idua-deficient mice progressively develop a high bone mass phenotype with pathological lysosomal storage in cells of the osteoblast lineage. Histomorphometric quantification identified shortening of bone-forming units and reduced osteoclast numbers per bone surface. This phenotype was not transferable into wild-type mice by bone marrow transplantation (BMT). In contrast, the high bone mass phenotype of Idua-deficient mice was prevented by BMT from wild-type donors. At the cellular level, BMT did not only normalize defects of Idua-deficient osteoblasts and osteocytes but additionally caused increased osteoclastogenesis. Based on clinical observations in an individual with MPS-I, previously subjected to BMT and enzyme replacement therapy (ERT), we treated Idua-deficient mice accordingly and found that combining both treatments normalized all histomorphometric parameters of bone remodeling. Our results demonstrate that BMT and ERT profoundly affect skeletal remodeling of Idua-deficient mice, thereby suggesting that individuals with MPS-I should be monitored for their bone remodeling status, before and after treatment, to avoid long-term skeletal complications. PMID:26427607

  14. Diet-induced Obesity Alters Bone Remodeling Leading to Decreased Femoral Trabecular Bone Mass in Mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Body mass derived from an obesity condition may be detrimental to bone health but the mechanism is unknown. This study was to examine changes in bone structure and serum cytokines related to bone metabolism in obese mice induced by a high-fat diet(HFD). Mice fed the HFD were obese and had higher ser...

  15. Lenalidomide inhibits osteoclastogenesis, survival factors and bone-remodeling markers in multiple myeloma.

    PubMed

    Breitkreutz, I; Raab, M S; Vallet, S; Hideshima, T; Raje, N; Mitsiades, C; Chauhan, D; Okawa, Y; Munshi, N C; Richardson, P G; Anderson, K C

    2008-10-01

    Osteolytic bone disease in multiple myeloma (MM) is caused by enhanced osteoclast (OCL) activation and inhibition of osteoblast function. Lenalidomide and bortezomib have shown promising response rates in relapsed and newly diagnosed MM, and bortezomib has recently been reported to inhibit OCLs. We here investigated the effect of lenalidomide on OCL formation and osteoclastogenesis in comparison with bortezomib. Both drugs decreased alpha V beta 3-integrin, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase-positive cells and bone resorption on dentin disks. In addition, both agents decreased receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB ligand (RANKL) secretion of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) derived from MM patients. We identified PU.1 and pERK as major targets of lenalidomide, and nuclear factor of activated T cells of bortezomib, resulting in inhibition of osteoclastogenesis. Furthermore, downregulation of cathepsin K, essential for resorption of the bone collagen matrix, was observed. We demonstrated a significant decrease of growth and survival factors including macrophage inflammatory protein-alpha, B-cell activating factor and a proliferation-inducing ligand. Importantly, in serum from MM patients treated with lenalidomide, the essential bone-remodeling factor RANKL, as well as the RANKL/OPG ratio, were significantly reduced, whereas osteoprotegerin (OPG) was increased. We conclude that both agents specifically target key factors in osteoclastogenesis, and could directly affect the MM-OCL-BMSCs activation loop in osteolytic bone disease. PMID:18596740

  16. Bone remodeling markers and bone metastases: From cancer research to clinical implications

    PubMed Central

    Ferreira, Arlindo; Alho, Irina; Casimiro, Sandra; Costa, Luís

    2015-01-01

    Bone metastasis is a frequent finding in the natural history of several types of cancers. However, its anticipated risk, diagnosis and response to therapy are still challenging to assess in clinical practice. Markers of bone metabolism are biochemical by-products that provide insight into the tumor–bone interaction, with potential to enhance the clinical management of patients with bone metastases. In fact, these markers had a cornerstone role in the development of bone-targeted agents; however, its translation to routine practice is still unclear, as reflected by current international guidelines. In this review, we aimed to capture several of the research and clinical translational challenges regarding the use of bone metabolism markers that we consider relevant for future research in bone metastasis. PMID:25908969

  17. Diet-induced obesity alters bone remodeling leading to decreased femoral trabecular bone mass in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, Jay J; Sun, Li; Gao, Hongwei

    2010-03-01

    Obesity-derived body mass may be detrimental to bone health through not well-defined mechanisms. In this study we determined changes in bone structure and serum cytokines related to bone metabolism in diet-induced obese mice. Mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) had higher serum tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) and leptin but lower osteocalcin concentrations than those fed the normal-fat diet. The HFD increased multinucleated TRAP-positive osteoclasts in bone marrow compared to the control diet. Despite being much heavier, mice fed the HFD had lower femoral bone volume, trabecular number, and connectivity density and higher trabecular separation than mice on the control diet. These findings suggest that obesity induced by a HFD increases bone resorption that may blunt any positive effects of increased body weight on bone. PMID:20392249

  18. The effect of bisphosphonate treatment on the biochemical and cellular events during bone remodelling in response to microinjury stimulation.

    PubMed

    Mulcahy, L E; Curtin, C M; McCoy, R J; O'Brien, F J; Taylor, D; Lee, T C; Duffy, G P

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is one of the most prevalent bone diseases worldwide and is characterised by high levels of bone turnover, a marked loss in bone mass and accumulation of microdamage, which leads to an increased fracture incidence that places a huge burden on global health care systems. Bisphosphonates have been used to treat osteoporosis and have shown great success in conserving bone mass and reducing fracture incidence. In spite of the existing knowledge of the in vivo responses of bone to bisphosphonates, the cellular responses to these drugs have yet to be fully elucidated. In vitro model systems that allow the decoupling of complex highly integrated events, such as bone remodelling, provide a tool whereby these biological processes may be studied in a more simplified context. This study firstly utilised an in vitro model system of bone remodelling and comprising all three major cell types of the bone (osteocytes, osteoclasts and osteoblasts), which was representative of the bone's capacity to sense microdamage and subsequently initiate a basic multicellular unit response. Secondly, this system was used to study the effect of two commonly utilised aminobisphosphonate treatments for osteoporosis, alendronate and zoledronate. We demonstrated that microinjury to osteocyte networks being treated with bisphosphonates modulates receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand and osteoprotegerin activity, and subsequently osteoclastogenesis. Furthermore, bisphosphonates increased the osteogenic potential following microinjury. Thus, we have shown for the first time that bisphosphonates act at all three stages of bone remodelling, from microinjury to osteoclastogenesis and ultimately osteogenesis. PMID:26614482

  19. Role of Periostin in Adhesion and Migration of Bone Remodeling Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cobo, Teresa; Viloria, Cristina G.; Solares, Laura; Fontanil, Tania; González-Chamorro, Elena; De Carlos, Félix; Cobo, Juan; Cal, Santiago; Obaya, Alvaro J.

    2016-01-01

    Periostin is an extracellular matrix protein highly expressed in collagen-rich tissues subjected to continuous mechanical stress. Functionally, periostin is involved in tissue remodeling and its altered function is associated to numerous pathological processes. In orthodontics, periostin plays key roles in the maintenance of dental tissues and it is mainly expressed in those areas where tension or pressing forces are taking place. In this regard, high expression of periostin is essential to promote migration and proliferation of periodontal ligament fibroblasts. However little is known about the participation of periostin in migration and adhesion processes of bone remodeling cells. In this work we employ the mouse pre-osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 and the macrophage-like RAW 264.7 cell lines to overexpress periostin and perform different cell-based assays to study changes in cell behavior. Our data indicate that periostin overexpression not only increases adhesion capacity of MC3T3-E1 cells to different matrix proteins but also hampers their migratory capacity. Changes on RNA expression profile of MC3T3-E1 cells upon periostin overexpression have been also analyzed, highlighting the alteration of genes implicated in processes such as cell migration, adhesion or bone metabolism but not in bone differentiation. Overall, our work provides new evidence on the impact of periostin in osteoblasts physiology. PMID:26809067

  20. Disease Modification of Breast Cancer–Induced Bone Remodeling by Cannabinoid 2 Receptor Agonists

    PubMed Central

    Symons-Liguori, Ashley M; Largent-Milnes, Tally M; Havelin, Josh J; Ferland, Henry L; Chandramouli, Anupama; Owusu-Ankomah, Mabel; Nikolich-Zugich, Tijana; Bloom, Aaron P; Jimenez-Andrade, Juan Miguel; King, Tamara; Porreca, Frank; Nelson, Mark A; Mantyh, Patrick W; Vanderah, Todd W

    2015-01-01

    Most commonly originating from breast malignancies, metastatic bone cancer causes bone destruction and severe pain. Although novel chemotherapeutic agents have increased life expectancy, patients are experiencing higher incidences of fracture, pain, and drug-induced side effects; furthermore, recent findings suggest that patients are severely undertreated for their cancer pain. Strong analgesics, namely opiates, are first-line therapy in alleviating cancer-related pain despite the severe side effects, including enhanced bone destruction with sustained administration. Bone resorption is primarily treated with bisphosphonates, which are associated with highly undesirable side effects, including nephrotoxicity and osteonecrosis of the jaw. In contrast, cannabinoid receptor 2 (CB2) receptor-specific agonists have been shown to reduce bone loss and stimulate bone formation in a model of osteoporosis. CB2 agonists produce analgesia in both inflammatory and neuropathic pain models. Notably, mixed CB1/CB2 agonists also demonstrate a reduction in ErbB2-driven breast cancer progression. Here we demonstrate for the first time that CB2 agonists reduce breast cancer–induced bone pain, bone loss, and breast cancer proliferation via cytokine/chemokine suppression. Studies used the spontaneously-occurring murine mammary cell line (66.1) implanted into the femur intramedullary space; measurements of spontaneous pain, bone loss, and cancer proliferation were made. The systemic administration of a CB2 agonist, JWH015, for 7 days significantly attenuated bone remodeling, assuaged spontaneous pain, and decreased primary tumor burden. CB2-mediated effects in vivo were reversed by concurrent treatment with a CB2 antagonist/inverse agonist but not with a CB1 antagonist/inverse agonist. In vitro, JWH015 reduced cancer cell proliferation and inflammatory mediators that have been shown to promote pain, bone loss, and proliferation. Taken together, these results suggest CB2 agonists as a

  1. Impaired mitochondrial fat oxidation induces adaptive remodeling of muscle metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Wicks, Shawna E.; Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Haynie, Kimberly R.; Fuller, Scott E.; Warfel, Jaycob D.; Stephens, Jacqueline M.; Wang, Miao; Han, Xianlin; Zhang, Jingying; Noland, Robert C.; Mynatt, Randall L.

    2015-01-01

    The correlations between intramyocellular lipid (IMCL), decreased fatty acid oxidation (FAO), and insulin resistance have led to the hypothesis that impaired FAO causes accumulation of lipotoxic intermediates that inhibit muscle insulin signaling. Using a skeletal muscle-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase-1 KO model, we show that prolonged and severe mitochondrial FAO inhibition results in increased carbohydrate utilization, along with reduced physical activity; increased circulating nonesterified fatty acids; and increased IMCLs, diacylglycerols, and ceramides. Perhaps more importantly, inhibition of mitochondrial FAO also initiates a local, adaptive response in muscle that invokes mitochondrial biogenesis, compensatory peroxisomal fat oxidation, and amino acid catabolism. Loss of its major fuel source (lipid) induces an energy deprivation response in muscle coordinated by signaling through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1α) to maintain energy supply for locomotion and survival. At the whole-body level, these adaptations result in resistance to obesity. PMID:26056297

  2. Involvement of the Nonneuronal Cholinergic System in Bone Remodeling in Rat Midpalatal Suture after Rapid Maxillary Expansion

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Jie; Wang, Lue; Miao, Cong; Ge, Lihua; Tian, Zhenchuan; Wang, Jianhong

    2016-01-01

    Few studies sought to analyze the expression and function of the nonneuronal acetylcholine system in bone remodeling in vivo due to the lack of suitable models. We established a rat maxilla expansion model in which the midline palatine suture of the rat was rapidly expanded under mechanical force application, inducing tissue remodeling and new bone formation, which could be a suitable model to investigate the role of the nonneuronal acetylcholine system in bone remodeling in vivo. During the expansion, the expression pattern changes of the nonneuronal cholinergic system components and the mRNA levels of OPG/RANKL were detected by immunohistochemistry or real-time PCR. The value of the RANKL/OPG ratio significantly increased after 1 day of expansion, indicating dominant bone resorption induced by the mechanical stimulation; however after 3 days of expansion, the value of the RANKL/OPG ratio significantly decreased, suggesting a dominant role of the subsequent bone formation process. Increasing expression of Ach was detected after 3 days of expansion which indicated that ACh might play a role in bone formation. The mRNA expression levels of other components also showed observable changes during the expansion which confirmed the involvement of the nonneuronal cholinergic system in the process of bone remodeling in vivo. Further researches are still needed to figure out the detailed functions of the nonneuronal cholinergic system and its components. PMID:27478838

  3. Microarray gene expression profiling of osteoarthritic bone suggests altered bone remodelling, WNT and transforming growth factor-β/bone morphogenic protein signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hopwood, Blair; Tsykin, Anna; Findlay, David M; Fazzalari, Nicola L

    2007-01-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is characterized by alterations to subchondral bone as well as articular cartilage. Changes to bone in OA have also been identified at sites distal to the affected joint, which include increased bone volume fraction and reduced bone mineralization. Altered bone remodelling has been proposed to underlie these bone changes in OA. To investigate the molecular basis for these changes, we performed microarray gene expression profiling of bone obtained at autopsy from individuals with no evidence of joint disease (control) and from individuals undergoing joint replacement surgery for either degenerative hip OA, or fractured neck of femur (osteoporosis [OP]). The OP sample set was included because an inverse association, with respect to bone density, has been observed between OA and the low bone density disease OP. Compugen human 19K-oligo microarray slides were used to compare the gene expression profiles of OA, control and OP bone samples. Four sets of samples were analyzed, comprising 10 OA-control female, 10 OA-control male, 10 OA-OP female and 9 OP-control female sample pairs. Print tip Lowess normalization and Bayesian statistical analyses were carried out using linear models for microarray analysis, which identified 150 differentially expressed genes in OA bone with t scores above 4. Twenty-five of these genes were then confirmed to be differentially expressed (P < 0.01) by real-time PCR analysis. A substantial number of the top-ranking differentially expressed genes identified in OA bone are known to play roles in osteoblasts, osteocytes and osteoclasts. Many of these genes are targets of either the WNT (wingless MMTV integration) signalling pathway (TWIST1, IBSP, S100A4, MMP25, RUNX2 and CD14) or the transforming growth factor (TGF)-β/bone morphogenic protein (BMP) signalling pathway (ADAMTS4, ADM, MEPE, GADD45B, COL4A1 and FST). Other differentially expressed genes included WNT (WNT5B, NHERF1, CTNNB1 and PTEN) and TGF-β/BMP (TGFB1, SMAD3

  4. sFRP4-dependent Wnt signal modulation is critical for bone remodeling during postnatal development and age-related bone loss

    PubMed Central

    Haraguchi, Ryuma; Kitazawa, Riko; Mori, Kiyoshi; Tachibana, Ryosuke; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Imai, Yuuki; Abe, Takaya; Kitazawa, Sohei

    2016-01-01

    sFRP4 is an extracellular Wnt antagonist that fine-tunes its signal activity by direct binding to Wnts. Bone fragility under oxidative stress by diabetes and aging is partly related to the suppression of the Wnt signal through upregulated sFRP4. Here, to explore the functions of sFRP4 as a balancer molecule in bone development and remodeling, we analyzed the sFRP4 knock-in mouse strain. X-gal and immunohistochemically stained signals in sFRP4-LacZ heterozygous mice were detectable in restricted areas, mostly in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, of the femoral diaphysis after neonatal and postnatal stages. Histological and μCT analyses showed increased trabecular bone mass with alteration of the Wnt signal and osteogenic activity in sFRP4 mutants; this augmented the effect of the buildup of trabecular bone during the ageing period. Our results indicate that sFRP4 plays a critical role in bone development and remodeling by regulating osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and that its functional loss prevents age-related bone loss in the trabecular bone area. These findings imply that sFRP4 functions as a key potential endogenous balancer of the Wnt signaling pathway by efficiently having direct influence on both bone formation and bone absorption during skeletal bone development and maintenance through remodeling. PMID:27117872

  5. sFRP4-dependent Wnt signal modulation is critical for bone remodeling during postnatal development and age-related bone loss.

    PubMed

    Haraguchi, Ryuma; Kitazawa, Riko; Mori, Kiyoshi; Tachibana, Ryosuke; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Imai, Yuuki; Abe, Takaya; Kitazawa, Sohei

    2016-01-01

    sFRP4 is an extracellular Wnt antagonist that fine-tunes its signal activity by direct binding to Wnts. Bone fragility under oxidative stress by diabetes and aging is partly related to the suppression of the Wnt signal through upregulated sFRP4. Here, to explore the functions of sFRP4 as a balancer molecule in bone development and remodeling, we analyzed the sFRP4 knock-in mouse strain. X-gal and immunohistochemically stained signals in sFRP4-LacZ heterozygous mice were detectable in restricted areas, mostly in osteoblasts and osteoclasts, of the femoral diaphysis after neonatal and postnatal stages. Histological and μCT analyses showed increased trabecular bone mass with alteration of the Wnt signal and osteogenic activity in sFRP4 mutants; this augmented the effect of the buildup of trabecular bone during the ageing period. Our results indicate that sFRP4 plays a critical role in bone development and remodeling by regulating osteoblasts and osteoclasts, and that its functional loss prevents age-related bone loss in the trabecular bone area. These findings imply that sFRP4 functions as a key potential endogenous balancer of the Wnt signaling pathway by efficiently having direct influence on both bone formation and bone absorption during skeletal bone development and maintenance through remodeling. PMID:27117872

  6. Analysis of vitamin D metabolism gene expression in human bone: evidence for autocrine control of bone remodelling.

    PubMed

    Ormsby, Renee T; Findlay, David M; Kogawa, Masakazu; Anderson, Paul H; Morris, Howard A; Atkins, Gerald J

    2014-10-01

    The metabolism of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25D) to active 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D (1,25D) by endogenous expression of 25D 1-α hydroxylase (CYP27B1) in bone cells appears to have functional effects in both osteoclasts and osteoblasts. To examine relationships between CYP27B1 expression in bone and its potential function in vivo, we examined the expression of vitamin D metabolism genes (CYP27B1, CYP24A1, VDR) in human trabecular bone samples and compared them by linear regression analysis with the expression of osteoclast (TRAP, CA2, CATK, NFATC1), osteoblast (TNAP, COL1A1, OCN, MEPE, BRIL), osteocyte (DMP1, SOST, PHEX, MEPE, FGF23)-related gene markers, genes associated with osteoblast/osteocyte control of osteoclastogenesis (RANKL, M-CSF, OPG, IL-8, TWEAK) and transcription factors (NFATC1, RUNX2, OSX, MSX2, HIF1A). This revealed multiple significant gene expression relationships between CYP27B1 and the transcription factors RUNX2, NFATC1, consistent with the coordinated expression of this gene by both osteoblast and osteoclast-lineage cells, and with MSX2 and the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor, HIF1A. CYP27B1 expression associated mainly with gene markers of bone resorption. VDR mRNA expression was also associated with resorption-related genes. Against expectations, CYP27B1 expression did not associate with bone expressed genes known to be 1,25D responsive, such as OCN, RANKL and DMP1. The major implication of these relationships in gene expression is that endogenous 1,25D synthesis and the response to 1,25D in human trabecular bone is linked with coordinated functions in both the osteoclastic and osteoblastic compartments towards the control of bone remodelling. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled '16th Vitamin D Workshop'. PMID:24120913

  7. E-selectin ligand 1 regulates bone remodeling by limiting bioactive TGF-β in the bone microenvironment

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Tao; Grafe, Ingo; Bae, Yangjin; Chen, Shan; Chen, Yuqing; Bertin, Terry K.; Jiang, Ming-Ming; Ambrose, Catherine G.; Lee, Brendan

    2013-01-01

    TGF-β is abundantly produced in the skeletal system and plays a crucial role in skeletal homeostasis. E-selectin ligand-1 (ESL-1), a Golgi apparatus-localized protein, acts as a negative regulator of TGF-β bioavailability by attenuating maturation of pro–TGF-β during cartilage homeostasis. However, whether regulation of intracellular TGF-β maturation by ESL-1 is also crucial during bone homeostasis has not been well defined. Here, we show that Esl-1−/− mice exhibit a severe osteopenia with elevated bone resorption and decreased bone mineralization. In primary culture, Esl-1−/− osteoclast progenitors show no difference in osteoclastogenesis. However, Esl-1−/− osteoblasts show delayed differentiation and mineralization and stimulate osteoclastogenesis more potently in the osteoblast–osteoclast coculture, suggesting that ESL-1 primarily acts in osteoblasts to regulate bone homeostasis. In addition, Esl-1−/− calvaria exhibit an elevated mature TGF-β/pro–TGF-β ratio, with increased expression of TGF-β downstream targets (plasminogen activator inhibitor-1, parathyroid hormone-related peptide, connective tissue growth factor, and matrix metallopeptidase 13, etc.) and a key regulator of osteoclastogenesis (receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand). Moreover, in vivo treatment with 1D11, a pan–TGF-β antibody, significantly improved the low bone mass of Esl-1−/− mice, suggesting that elevated TGF-β signaling is the major cause of osteopenia in Esl-1−/− mice. In summary, our study identifies ESL-1 as an important regulator of bone remodeling and demonstrates that the modulation of TGF-β maturation is pivotal in the maintenance of a homeostatic bone microenvironment and for proper osteoblast–osteoclast coupling. PMID:23589896

  8. Synchrotron imaging reveals bone healing and remodelling strategies in extinct and extant vertebrates

    PubMed Central

    Anné, Jennifer; Edwards, Nicholas P.; Wogelius, Roy A.; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R.; Sellers, William I.; van Veelen, Arjen; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Egerton, Victoria M.; Manning, Phillip L.

    2014-01-01

    Current understanding of bone healing and remodelling strategies in vertebrates has traditionally relied on morphological observations through the histological analysis of thin sections. However, chemical analysis may also be used in such interpretations, as different elements are known to be absorbed and used by bone for different physiological purposes such as growth and healing. These chemical signatures are beyond the detection limit of most laboratory-based analytical techniques (e.g. scanning electron microscopy). However, synchrotron rapid scanning–X-ray fluorescence (SRS–XRF) is an elemental mapping technique that uniquely combines high sensitivity (ppm), excellent sample resolution (20–100 µm) and the ability to scan large specimens (decimetre scale) approximately 3000 times faster than other mapping techniques. Here, we use SRS–XRF combined with microfocus elemental mapping (2–20 µm) to determine the distribution and concentration of trace elements within pathological and normal bone of both extant and extinct archosaurs (Cathartes aura and Allosaurus fragilis). Results reveal discrete chemical inventories within different bone tissue types and preservation modes. Chemical inventories also revealed detail of histological features not observable in thin section, including fine structures within the interface between pathological and normal bone as well as woven texture within pathological tissue. PMID:24806709

  9. Synchrotron imaging reveals bone healing and remodelling strategies in extinct and extant vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Anné, Jennifer; Edwards, Nicholas P; Wogelius, Roy A; Tumarkin-Deratzian, Allison R; Sellers, William I; van Veelen, Arjen; Bergmann, Uwe; Sokaras, Dimosthenis; Alonso-Mori, Roberto; Ignatyev, Konstantin; Egerton, Victoria M; Manning, Phillip L

    2014-07-01

    Current understanding of bone healing and remodelling strategies in vertebrates has traditionally relied on morphological observations through the histological analysis of thin sections. However, chemical analysis may also be used in such interpretations, as different elements are known to be absorbed and used by bone for different physiological purposes such as growth and healing. These chemical signatures are beyond the detection limit of most laboratory-based analytical techniques (e.g. scanning electron microscopy). However, synchrotron rapid scanning-X-ray fluorescence (SRS-XRF) is an elemental mapping technique that uniquely combines high sensitivity (ppm), excellent sample resolution (20-100 µm) and the ability to scan large specimens (decimetre scale) approximately 3000 times faster than other mapping techniques. Here, we use SRS-XRF combined with microfocus elemental mapping (2-20 µm) to determine the distribution and concentration of trace elements within pathological and normal bone of both extant and extinct archosaurs (Cathartes aura and Allosaurus fragilis). Results reveal discrete chemical inventories within different bone tissue types and preservation modes. Chemical inventories also revealed detail of histological features not observable in thin section, including fine structures within the interface between pathological and normal bone as well as woven texture within pathological tissue. PMID:24806709

  10. The mouse fibula as a suitable bone for the study of functional adaptation to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    Moustafa, Alaa; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Saxon, Leanne K.; Zaman, Gul; Sunters, Andrew; Armstrong, Victoria J.; Javaheri, Behzad; Lanyon, Lance E.; Price, Joanna S.

    2009-01-01

    Bones' functionally adaptive responses to mechanical loading can usefully be studied in the tibia by the application of loads between the knee and ankle in normal and genetically modified mice. Such loading also deforms the fibula. Our present study was designed to ascertain whether the fibula adapts to loading in a similar way to the tibia and could thus provide an additional bone in which to study functional adaptation. The right tibiae/fibulae in C57BL/6 mice were subjected to a single period of axial loading (40 cycles at 10 Hz with 10-second intervals between each cycle; approximately 7 min/day, 3 alternate days/week, 2 weeks). The left tibiae/fibulae were used as non-loaded, internal controls. Both left and right fibulae and tibiae were analyzed by micro-computed tomography at the levels of the mid-shaft of the fibula and 25% from its proximal and distal ends. We also investigated the effects of intermittent parathyroid hormone (iPTH) on the (re)modelling response to 2-weeks of loading and the effect of 2-consecutive days of loading on osteocytes' sclerostin expression. These in vivo experiments confirmed that the fibula showed similar loading-related (re)modelling responses to those previously documented in the tibia and similar synergistic increases in osteogenesis between loading and iPTH. The numbers of sclerostin-positive osteocytes at the proximal and middle fibulae were markedly decreased by loading. Collectively, these data suggest that the mouse fibula, as well as the tibia and ulna, is a useful bone in which to assess bone cells' early responses to mechanical loading and the adaptive (re)modelling that this engenders. PMID:19442626

  11. Early reversal cells in adult human bone remodeling: osteoblastic nature, catabolic functions and interactions with osteoclasts.

    PubMed

    Abdelgawad, Mohamed Essameldin; Delaisse, Jean-Marie; Hinge, Maja; Jensen, Pia Rosgaard; Alnaimi, Ragad Walid; Rolighed, Lars; Engelholm, Lars H; Marcussen, Niels; Andersen, Thomas Levin

    2016-06-01

    The mechanism coupling bone resorption and formation is a burning question that remains incompletely answered through the current investigations on osteoclasts and osteoblasts. An attractive hypothesis is that the reversal cells are likely mediators of this coupling. Their nature is a big matter of debate. The present study performed on human cancellous bone is the first one combining in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry to demonstrate their osteoblastic nature. It shows that the Runx2 and CD56 immunoreactive reversal cells appear to take up TRAcP released by neighboring osteoclasts. Earlier preclinical studies indicate that reversal cells degrade the organic matrix left behind by the osteoclasts and that this degradation is crucial for the initiation of the subsequent bone formation. To our knowledge, this study is the first addressing these catabolic activities in adult human bone through electron microscopy and analysis of molecular markers. Periosteoclastic reversal cells show direct contacts with the osteoclasts and with the demineralized resorption debris. These early reversal cells show (1) ¾-collagen fragments typically generated by extracellular collagenases of the MMP family, (2) MMP-13 (collagenase-3) and (3) the endocytic collagen receptor uPARAP/Endo180. The prevalence of these markers was lower in the later reversal cells, which are located near the osteoid surfaces and morphologically resemble mature bone-forming osteoblasts. In conclusion, this study demonstrates that reversal cells colonizing bone surfaces right after resorption are osteoblast-lineage cells, and extends to adult human bone remodeling their role in rendering eroded surfaces osteogenic. PMID:26860863

  12. Application of an anisotropic bone-remodelling model based on a damage-repair theory to the analysis of the proximal femur before and after total hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Doblaré, M; García, J M

    2001-09-01

    In this work, a new model for internal anisotropic bone remodelling is applied to the study of the remodelling behaviour of the proximal femur before and after total hip replacement (THR). This model considers bone remodelling under the scope of a general damage-repair theory following the principles of continuum damage mechanics. A "damage-repair" tensor is defined in terms of the apparent density and Cowin's "fabric tensor", respectively, associated with porosity and directionality of the trabeculae. The different elements of a thermodynamically consistent damage theory are established, including resorption and apposition criteria, evolution law and rate of remodelling. All of these elements were introduced and discussed in detail in a previous paper (García, J. M., Martinez, M. A., Doblaré, M., 2001. An anisotrophic internal-external bone adaptation model based on a combination of CAO and continuum damage mechanics technologies. Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering 4(4), 355-378.), including the definition of the proposed mechanical stimulus and the qualitative properties of the model. In this paper, the fundamentals of the proposed model are briefly reviewed and the computational aspects of its implementation are discussed. This model is then applied to the analysis of the remodelling behaviour of the intact femur obtaining densities and mass principal values and directions very close to the experimental data. The second application involved the proximal femoral extremity after THR and the inclusion of an Exeter prosthesis. As a result of the simulation process, some well-known features previously detected in medical clinics were recovered, such as the stress yielding effect in the proximal part of the implant or the enlargement of the cortical layer at the distal part of the implant. With respect to the anisotropic properties, bone microstructure and local stiffness are known to tend to align with the stress principal directions. This

  13. Radiation dose to trabecular bone marrow stem cells from 3H, 14C and selected α-emitters incorporated in a bone remodeling compartment

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nie, Huiling; Richardson, Richard B.

    2009-02-01

    A Monte Carlo simulation of repeated cubic units representing trabecular bone cavities in adult bone was employed to determine absorbed dose fractions evaluated for 3H, 14C and a set of α-emitters incorporated within a bone remodeling compartment (BRC). The BRC consists of a well-oxygenated vascular microenvironment located within a canopy of bone-lining cells. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) considers that an important target for radiation-induced bone cancer is the endosteum marrow layer adjacent to bone surface where quiescent bone stem cells reside. It is proposed that the active stem cells and progenitor cells located above the BRC canopy, the 'BRC stem cell niche', is a more important radiation-induced cancer target volume. Simulation results from a static model, where no remodeling occurs, indicate that the mean dose from bone and bone surface to the 50 µm quiescent bone stem cell niche, the current ICRP target, was substantially lower (two to three times lower) than that to the narrower and hypoxic 10 µm endosteum for 3H, 14C and α-particles with energy range 0.5-10 MeV. The results from a dynamic model indicate that the temporal α-radiation dose to active stem/progenitor cells located in the BRC stem cell niche from the material incorporated in and buried by forming bone was 9- to 111-fold greater than the dose to the quiescent bone stem cell niche. This work indicates that the remodeling portion of the bone surface, rather than the quiescent (endosteal) surface, has the greatest risk of radiation-induced bone cancer, particularly from short-range radiation, due to the elevated dose and the radiosensitizing oxygen effect.

  14. Various effects of antidepressant drugs on bone microarchitectecture, mechanical properties and bone remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Bonnet, N. . E-mail: nicolas.bonnet15@wanadoo.fr; Bernard, P.; Beaupied, H; Bizot, J.C.; Trovero, F.; Courteix, D.; Benhamou, C.L.

    2007-05-15

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of various drugs which present antidepressant properties: selective serotonin-reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs, fluoxetine), serotonin and noradrenaline-reuptake inhibitors (Desipramine) and phosphodiesterase inhibitors (PDE, rolipram and tofisopam) on bone microarchitecture and biomechanical properties. Twelve female mice were studied per group starting at an age of 10 weeks. During 4 weeks, they received subcutaneously either placebo or 20 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} of desipramine, fluoxetine or 10 mg kg{sup -1} day{sup -1} of rolipram or tofisopam. Serum Osteocalcin and CTx were evaluated by ELISA. Bone microarchitecture of the distal femur was characterized by X-ray microCT (Skyscan1072). Mechanical properties were assessed by three-point bending test (Instron 4501) and antidepressant efficacy by forced swimming and open field tests. Fluoxetine displayed lower TbTh (- 6.1%, p < 0.01) and tofisopam higher TbTh (+ 5.0%, p < 0.05) versus placebo. Rolipram and tofisopam treatments induced higher BV/TV than placebo (+ 23.8% and + 18.3% respectively). Desipramine group had significantly higher cortical area (+ 4.8%, p < 0.01) and fluoxetine lower cortical area (- 6.1%, p < 0.01) compared to placebo. The stiffness and Young's modulus were lower in the fluoxetine group (77 {+-} 13 N mm{sup -1}, 6431 {+-} 1182 MPa) than in placebo (101 {+-} 9 N mm{sup -1}, 8441 {+-} 1180 MPa). Bone markers indicated a significantly higher bone formation in tofisopam (+ 8.6%) and a lower in fluoxetine (- 56.1%) compared to placebo. These data suggest deleterious effects for SSRIs, both on trabecular and cortical bone and a positive effect of PDE inhibitors on trabecular bone. Furthermore tofisopam anabolic effect in terms of bone markers, suggests a potential therapeutic effect of the PDE inhibitors on bone.

  15. Regulators of G protein signaling 12 promotes osteoclastogenesis in bone remodeling and pathological bone loss.

    PubMed

    Yuan, X; Cao, J; Liu, T; Li, Y-P; Scannapieco, F; He, X; Oursler, M J; Zhang, X; Vacher, J; Li, C; Olson, D; Yang, S

    2015-12-01

    Regulators of G protein signaling (Rgs) have pivotal roles in controlling various cellular processes, such as cell differentiation. How Rgs proteins regulate osteoclast (OC) differentiation, function and bone homeostasis is poorly understood. It was previously demonstrated that Rgs12, the largest protein in the Rgs family, is predominantly expressed in OCs and regulates OC differentiation in vitro. To further understand the role and mechanism of Rgs12 in OC differentiation and bone diseases in vivo, we created OC-targeted Rgs12 knockout mice by using inducible Mx1-Cre and CD11b-Cre. Deletion of Rgs12 in hematopoietic cells or specifically in OC precursors resulted in increased bone mass with decreased OC numbers. Loss of Rgs12 impaired OC differentiation and function with impaired Ca(2+) oscillations and reduced nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT) 2 expression. The introduction of wild-type osteoblasts did not rescue the defective osteoclastogenesis. Ectopic expression of NFAT2 rescued defective OC differentiation in CD11b;Rgs12(fl/fl) cells and promoted normal OC differentiation. Moreover, deletion of Rgs12 significantly inhibited pathological osteoclastogenesis and bone destruction in Rgs12-deficient mice that were subjected to ovariectomy and lipodysaccharide for bone loss. Thus our findings demonstrate that Rgs12 is an important regulator in OC differentiation and function and identify Rgs12 as a potential therapeutic target for osteoporosis and inflammation-induced bone loss. PMID:25909889

  16. Morphology of bone development and bone remodeling in embryonic chick limbs.

    PubMed

    Pechak, D G; Kujawa, M J; Caplan, A I

    1986-01-01

    Staged embryos from White Leghorn chicken eggs were used to assemble a detailed morphological sequence of events occurring in long bone development from Hamburger-Hamilton stage 32 through stage 44 and 2 days post hatching. The detailed patterning of osteoblasts, osteoid, mineral, and vasculature were observed at the mid-diaphysis of the tibia. At stage 32, the cartilage core is composed of hypertrophic chondrocytes and is surrounded by a continuous ring of mineralized osteoid on which osteoblasts and vasculature reside. At stage 35, the vasculature and associated cell types invade the cartilage core region. By stage 37, marrow occupies the entire cartilage core region at the mid-diaphysis. Anastamosing channels, containing vasculature, interconnect with each other and the marrow region to the inside and the periosteal region to the outside. Clearly, the cartilage is replaced by marrow, not bone. Mineral deposition at the periosteal surface continues through stage 44 as does mineral resorption on the endosteal surface, although the rate of mineral deposition and resorption varies at different developmental stages. Vasculature plays an important role in the pattern formation of the trabeculae and their channels as can be seen in the developmental sequence within one bone (the tibia) or comparisons between two bones (the tibia and fibula). A model is presented which considers the possibility that osteoprogenitor cells are formed as early as the chondroprogenitor cells. This model also emphasizes the observation that cartilage is not replaced by bone but is replaced by marrow. PMID:3801237

  17. Study of bone remodeling of two models of femoral cementless stems by means of DEXA and finite elements

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background A hip replacement with a cemented or cementless femoral stem produces an effect on the bone called adaptive remodelling, attributable to mechanical and biological factors. All of the cementless prostheses designs try to achieve an optimal load transfer in order to avoid stress-shielding, which produces an osteopenia. Long-term densitometric studies taken after implanting ABG-I and ABG-II stems confirm that the changes made to the design and alloy of the ABG-II stem help produce less proximal atrophy of the femur. The simulation with FE allowed us to study the biomechanical behaviour of two stems. The aim of this study was, if possible, to correlate the biological and mechanical findings. Methods Both models with prostheses ABG-I and II have been simulated in five different moments of time which coincide with the DEXA measurements: postoperative, 6 months, 1, 3 and 5 years, in addition to the healthy femur as the initial reference. For the complete comparative analysis of both stems, all of the possible combinations of bone mass (group I and group II of pacients in two controlled studies for ABG-I and II stems, respectively), prosthetic geometry (ABG-I and ABG-II) and stem material (Wrought Titanium or TMZF) were simulated. Results and Discussion In both groups of bone mass an increase of stress in the area of the cancellous bone is produced, which coincides with the end of the HA coating, as a consequence of the bottleneck effect which is produced in the transmission of loads, and corresponds to Gruen zones 2 and 6, where no osteopenia can be seen in contrast to zones 1 and 7. Conclusions In this study it is shown that the ABG-II stem is more effective than the ABG-I given that it generates higher tensional values on the bone, due to which proximal bone atrophy diminishes. This biomechanical behaviour with an improved transmission of loads confirmed by means of FE simulation corresponds to the biological findings obtained with Dual-Energy X

  18. IKKβ Is Essential for Adipocyte Survival and Adaptive Adipose Remodeling in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Park, Se-Hyung; Liu, Zun; Sui, Yipeng; Helsley, Robert N; Zhu, Beibei; Powell, David K; Kern, Philip A; Zhou, Changcheng

    2016-06-01

    IκB kinase β (IKKβ), a central coordinator of inflammatory responses through activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), has been implicated as a critical molecular link between inflammation and metabolic disorders; however, the role of adipocyte IKKβ in obesity and related metabolic disorders remains elusive. Here we report an essential role of IKKβ in the regulation of adipose remodeling and adipocyte survival in diet-induced obesity. Targeted deletion of IKKβ in adipocytes does not affect body weight, food intake, and energy expenditure but results in an exaggerated diabetic phenotype when challenged with a high-fat diet (HFD). IKKβ-deficient mice have multiple histopathologies in visceral adipose tissue, including increased adipocyte death, amplified macrophage infiltration, and defective adaptive adipose remodeling. Deficiency of IKKβ also leads to increased adipose lipolysis, elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels, and impaired insulin signaling. Mechanistic studies demonstrated that IKKβ is a key adipocyte survival factor and that IKKβ protects murine and human adipocytes from HFD- or FFA-elicited cell death through NF-κB-dependent upregulation of antiapoptotic proteins and NF-κB-independent inactivation of proapoptotic BAD protein. Our findings establish IKKβ as critical for adipocyte survival and adaptive adipose remodeling in obesity. PMID:26993069

  19. One carbon metabolism and bone homeostasis and remodeling: A review of experimental research and population studies.

    PubMed

    Feigerlova, Eva; Demarquet, Lea; Guéant, Jean-Louis

    2016-07-01

    Homocysteine (HCY) is a degradation product of the methionine pathway. The B vitamins, in particular vitamin B12 and folate, are the primary nutritional determinant of HCY levels and therefore their deficiencies result in hyperhomocysteinaemia (HHCY). Prevalence of hyperhomocysteinemia (HHCY) and related dietary deficiencies in B vitamins and folate increase with age and have been related to osteoporosis and abnormal development of epiphyseal cartilage and bone in rodents. Here we provide a review of experimental and population studies. The negative effects of HHCY and/or B vitamins and folate deficiencies on bone formation and remodeling are documented by cell models, including primary osteoblasts, osteoclast and bone progenitor cells as well as by animal and human studies. However, underlying pathophysiological mechanisms are complex and remain poorly understood. Whether these associations are the direct consequences of impaired one carbon metabolism is not clarified and more studies are still needed to translate these findings to human population. To date, the evidence is limited and somewhat conflicting, however further trials in groups most vulnerable to impaired one carbon metabolism are required. PMID:27086080

  20. Blood flow for bone remodelling correlates with locomotion in living and extinct birds.

    PubMed

    Allan, Georgina H; Cassey, Phillip; Snelling, Edward P; Maloney, Shane K; Seymour, Roger S

    2014-08-15

    Nutrient arteries enter limb bones through discrete foramina on the shafts. They are required for bone remodelling in response to mechanical loading and dynamic forces imposed by locomotion. The cross-sectional area of the nutrient foramen of the femur represents an index of blood flow rate to the shaft and thus provides insight into the animal's level of activity. Morphometric data on femoral length, mass and foramen size from 100 extant bird species and eight extinct moa species were analysed allometrically and phylogenetically. The nutrient foramen blood flow index (Qi) and femur mass (Mf) increase with body mass (Mb). At 1 kg body mass, cursorial species have approximately 2.1 times higher Qi and 1.9 times heavier Mf than volant species. The scaling of Qi on Mf is independent of the primary mode of locomotion, but the ratio Qi/Mf decreases significantly in larger birds, although absolute Qi increases. The overall avian equation for Qi on Mb is not significantly different from previous data from mammals, but when differences in blood pressure are accounted for, estimated blood flow to the femur is approximately 1.9 times higher in cursorial birds than in mammals, possibly in relation to bipedalism and quadrupedalism, respectively. Femoral bone blood flow in both endothermic groups is estimated to be 50-100 times higher than in ectothermic reptiles. PMID:24902751

  1. Effect of cyclical forces on the periodontal ligament and alveolar bone remodeling during orthodontic tooth movement

    PubMed Central

    Kalajzic, Zana; Peluso, Elizabeth Blake; Utreja, Achint; Dyment, Nathaniel; Nihara, Jun; Xu, Manshan; Chen, Jing; Uribe, Flavio; Wadhwa, Sunil

    2014-01-01

    Objective To investigate the effect of externally applied cyclical (vibratory) forces on the rate of tooth movement, the structural integrity of the periodontal ligament, and alveolar bone remodeling. Methods Twenty-six female Sprague-Dawley rats (7 weeks old) were divided into four groups: CTRL (unloaded), VBO (molars receiving a vibratory stimulus only), TMO (molars receiving an orthodontic spring only), and TMO+VB (molars receiving an orthodontic spring and the additional vibratory stimulus). In TMO and TMO+VB groups, the rat first molars were moved mesially for 2 weeks using Nickel-Titanium coil spring delivering 25 g of force. In VBO and TMO+VB groups, cyclical forces at 0.4 N and 30 Hz were applied occlusally twice a week for 10 minutes. Microfocus X-ray computed tomography analysis and tooth movement measurements were performed on the dissected rat maxillae. Tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining and collagen fiber assessment were performed on histological sections. Results Cyclical forces significantly inhibited the amount of tooth movement. Histological analysis showed marked disorganization of the collagen fibril structure of the periodontal ligament during tooth movement. Tooth movement caused a significant increase in osteoclast parameters on the compression side of alveolar bone and a significant decrease in bone volume fraction in the molar region compared to controls. Conclusions Tooth movement was significantly inhibited by application of cyclical forces. PMID:23937517

  2. X-ray image review of the bone remodeling around an osseointegrated trans-femoral implant and a finite element simulation case study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Wei; Robinson, Kingsley

    2008-03-01

    The insertion of an implant into a bone leads to stress/strain redistribution, hence bone remodeling occurs adjacent to the implant. The study of the bone remodeling around the osseointegration implants can predict the long-term clinical success of the implant. The clinical medial-lateral X-rays of 11 patients were reviewed. To eliminate geometrical distortion of different X-rays, they were converted into a digital format and geometrical correction was carried out. Furthermore, the finite element (FE) method was used to investigate how the bone remodeling was affected by the stress/strain distribution in the femur. The review of clinical X-rays showed cortical bone growth around the proximal end of the implant and absorbtion at the distal end of the femur. The FE simulation revealed the stress/strain distribution in the femur of a selected patient. This provided a biomechanical interpretation of the bone remodeling. The existing bone remodeling theories such as minimal strain and strain rate theories were unable to offer satisfactory explanation for the cortical bone growth at the implant side of the proximal femur, where the stress/strain level was much lower than the one in the intact side of the femur. The study established the correlation between stress/strain distribution obtained from FE simulations and the bone remodeling of the clinical review. The cortical bone growth was initiated by the stress/strain gradient in the bone. Through the review of clinical X-rays and FE simulations, the study confirmed that the bone remodeling in a femur with an implant was influenced by the stress/strain redistribution. The strain level and stress gradient hypothesis is presented to offer an explanation for the implanted cortical bone remodeling observed in this study. PMID:18197477

  3. Development of the lateral line canal system through a bone remodeling process in zebrafish.

    PubMed

    Wada, Hironori; Iwasaki, Miki; Kawakami, Koichi

    2014-08-01

    The lateral line system of teleost fish is composed of mechanosensory receptors (neuromasts), comprising superficial receptors and others embedded in canals running under the skin. Canal diameter and size of the canal neuromasts are correlated with increasing body size, thus providing a very simple system to investigate mechanisms underlying the coordination between organ growth and body size. Here, we examine the development of the trunk lateral line canal system in zebrafish. We demonstrated that trunk canals originate from scales through a bone remodeling process, which we suggest is essential for the normal growth of canals and canal neuromasts. Moreover, we found that lateral line cells are required for the formation of canals, suggesting the existence of mutual interactions between the sensory system and surrounding connective tissues. PMID:24836859

  4. Integrity of the osteocyte bone cell network in osteoporotic fracture: Implications for mechanical load adaptation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuliwaba, J. S.; Truong, L.; Codrington, J. D.; Fazzalari, N. L.

    2010-06-01

    The human skeleton has the ability to modify its material composition and structure to accommodate loads through adaptive modelling and remodelling. The osteocyte cell network is now considered to be central to the regulation of skeletal homeostasis; however, very little is known of the integrity of the osteocyte cell network in osteoporotic fragility fracture. This study was designed to characterise osteocyte morphology, the extent of osteocyte cell apoptosis and expression of sclerostin protein (a negative regulator of bone formation) in trabecular bone from the intertrochanteric region of the proximal femur, for postmenopausal women with fragility hip fracture compared to age-matched women who had not sustained fragility fracture. Osteocyte morphology (osteocyte, empty lacunar, and total lacunar densities) and the degree of osteocyte apoptosis (percent caspase-3 positive osteocyte lacunae) were similar between the fracture patients and non-fracture women. The fragility hip fracture patients had a lower proportion of sclerostin-positive osteocyte lacunae in comparison to sclerostin-negative osteocyte lacunae, in contrast to similar percent sclerostin-positive/sclerostin-negative lacunae for non-fracture women. The unexpected finding of decreased sclerostin expression in trabecular bone osteocytes from fracture cases may be indicative of elevated bone turnover and under-mineralisation, characteristic of postmenopausal osteoporosis. Further, altered osteocytic expression of sclerostin may be involved in the mechano-responsiveness of bone. Optimal function of the osteocyte cell network is likely to be a critical determinant of bone strength, acting via mechanical load adaptation, and thus contributing to osteoporotic fracture risk.

  5. Role of Cbl-PI3K Interaction during Skeletal Remodeling in a Murine Model of Bone Repair.

    PubMed

    Scanlon, Vanessa; Soung, Do Yu; Adapala, Naga Suresh; Morgan, Elise; Hansen, Marc F; Drissi, Hicham; Sanjay, Archana

    2015-01-01

    Mice in which Cbl is unable to bind PI3K (YF mice) display increased bone volume due to enhanced bone formation and repressed bone resorption during normal bone homeostasis. We investigated the effects of disrupted Cbl-PI3K interaction on fracture healing to determine whether this interaction has an effect on bone repair. Mid-diaphyseal femoral fractures induced in wild type (WT) and YF mice were temporally evaluated via micro-computed tomography scans, biomechanical testing, histological and histomorphometric analyses. Imaging analyses revealed no change in soft callus formation, increased bony callus formation, and delayed callus remodeling in YF mice compared to WT mice. Histomorphometric analyses showed significantly increased osteoblast surface per bone surface and osteoclast numbers in the calluses of YF fractured mice, as well as increased incorporation of dynamic bone labels. Furthermore, using laser capture micro-dissection of the fracture callus we found that cells lacking Cbl-PI3K interaction have higher expression of Osterix, TRAP, and Cathepsin K. We also found increased expression of genes involved in propagating PI3K signaling in cells isolated from the YF fracture callus, suggesting that the lack of Cbl-PI3K interaction perhaps results in enhanced PI3K signaling, leading to increased bone formation, but delayed remodeling in the healing femora. PMID:26393915

  6. Bone-Remodeling Transcript Levels Are Independent of Perching in End-of-Lay White Leghorn Chickens

    PubMed Central

    Dale, Maurice D.; Mortimer, Erin M.; Kolli, Santharam; Achramowicz, Erik; Borchert, Glenn; Juliano, Steven A.; Halkyard, Scott; Sietz, Nick; Gatto, Craig; Hester, Patricia Y.; Rubin, David A.

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a bone disease that commonly results in a 30% incidence of fracture in hens used to produce eggs for human consumption. One of the causes of osteoporosis is the lack of mechanical strain placed on weight-bearing bones. In conventionally-caged hens, there is inadequate space for chickens to exercise and induce mechanical strain on their bones. One approach is to encourage mechanical stress on bones by the addition of perches to conventional cages. Our study focuses on the molecular mechanism of bone remodeling in end-of-lay hens (71 weeks) with access to perches. We examined bone-specific transcripts that are actively involved during development and remodeling. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we examined seven transcripts (COL2A1 (collagen, type II, alpha 1), RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand), OPG (osteoprotegerin), PTHLH (PTH-like hormone), PTH1R (PTH/PTHLH type-1 receptor), PTH3R (PTH/PTHLH type-3 receptor), and SOX9 (Sry-related high mobility group box)) in phalange, tibia and femur. Our results indicate that the only significant effect was a difference among bones for COL2A1 (femur > phalange). Therefore, we conclude that access to a perch did not alter transcript expression. Furthermore, because hens have been used as a model for human bone metabolism and osteoporosis, the results indicate that bone remodeling due to mechanical loading in chickens may be a product of different pathways than those involved in the mammalian model. PMID:25625518

  7. Bone-remodeling transcript levels are independent of perching in end-of-lay white leghorn chickens.

    PubMed

    Dale, Maurice D; Mortimer, Erin M; Kolli, Santharam; Achramowicz, Erik; Borchert, Glenn; Juliano, Steven A; Halkyard, Scott; Sietz, Nick; Gatto, Craig; Hester, Patricia Y; Rubin, David A

    2015-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a bone disease that commonly results in a 30% incidence of fracture in hens used to produce eggs for human consumption. One of the causes of osteoporosis is the lack of mechanical strain placed on weight-bearing bones. In conventionally-caged hens, there is inadequate space for chickens to exercise and induce mechanical strain on their bones. One approach is to encourage mechanical stress on bones by the addition of perches to conventional cages. Our study focuses on the molecular mechanism of bone remodeling in end-of-lay hens (71 weeks) with access to perches. We examined bone-specific transcripts that are actively involved during development and remodeling. Using real-time quantitative PCR, we examined seven transcripts (COL2A1 (collagen, type II, alpha 1), RANKL (receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand), OPG (osteoprotegerin), PTHLH (PTH-like hormone), PTH1R (PTH/PTHLH type-1 receptor), PTH3R (PTH/PTHLH type-3 receptor), and SOX9 (Sry-related high mobility group box)) in phalange, tibia and femur. Our results indicate that the only significant effect was a difference among bones for COL2A1 (femur > phalange). Therefore, we conclude that access to a perch did not alter transcript expression. Furthermore, because hens have been used as a model for human bone metabolism and osteoporosis, the results indicate that bone remodeling due to mechanical loading in chickens may be a product of different pathways than those involved in the mammalian model. PMID:25625518

  8. Novel anatomic adaptation of cortical bone to meet increased mineral demands of reproduction.

    PubMed

    Macica, Carolyn M; King, Helen E; Wang, Meina; McEachon, Courtney L; Skinner, Catherine W; Tommasini, Steven M

    2016-04-01

    The goal of this study was to investigate the effects of reproductive adaptations to mineral homeostasis on the skeleton in a mouse model of compromised mineral homeostasis compared to adaptations in control, unaffected mice. During pregnancy, maternal adaptations to high mineral demand include more than doubling intestinal calcium absorption by increasing calcitriol production. However, calcitriol biosynthesis is impaired in HYP mice, a murine model of X-linked hypophosphatemia (XLH). In addition, there is a paucity of mineralized trabecular bone, a primary target of bone resorption during pregnancy and lactation. Because the highest density of mineral is in mature cortical bone, we hypothesized that mineral demand is met by utilizing intracortical mineral reserves. Indeed, analysis of HYP mice revealed dramatic increases in intracortical porosity characterized by elevated serum PTH and type-I collagen matrix-degrading enzyme MMP-13. We discovered an increase in carbonate ion substitution in the bone mineral matrix during pregnancy and lactation of HYP mice, suggesting an alternative mechanism of bone remodeling that maintains maternal bone mass during periods of high mineral demand. This phenomenon is not restricted to XLH, as increased carbonate in the mineral matrix also occurred in wild-type mice during lactation. Taken together, these data suggest that increased intracortical perilacunar mineral turnover also contributes to maintaining phosphate levels during periods of high mineral demand. Understanding the mechanisms of skeletal contribution to mineral homeostasis is important to improving the treatment and prevention of fracture risk and bone fragility for female patients with XLH, but also provides important insight into the role and unique adaptations of the maternal skeleton to the demands of fetal development and the needs of postnatal nutrition. PMID:26825813

  9. Numerical evaluation of bone remodelling associated with trans-femoral osseointegration implant--A 68 month follow-up study.

    PubMed

    Xu, D H; Crocombe, A D; Xu, W

    2016-02-01

    Osseointegrated trans-femoral implant is a relatively new orthopaedic anchoring method for connecting a stump with a prosthesis. Through a follow-up study of a patient over six years, significant bone remodelling has been observed. Finite element (FE) simulations were carried out to investigate the relationship between the bone remodelling and the strain re-distribution around the trans-femoral osseointegrated implant system. An initial FE model representing the original status of the femur-implant assembly was created from CT scans of the subject prior to osseointegration. Follow-up X-ray images were acquired at various stages post-surgery, which allowed the changes in bone wall thickness to be measured. By updating the bone thickness in the initial model, a series of follow-up FE models were created. Representative load associated with the subject's body weight was applied to the models, and the strain re-distributions were calculated. The results showed that in order to minimise the adverse effect of bone remodelling, an osseointegration implant made by functionally gradient materials are preferred over homogeneous materials. PMID:26776932

  10. Mid-term study of bone remodeling after femoral cemented stem implantation: comparison between DXA and finite element simulation.

    PubMed

    Herrera, Antonio; Rebollo, Sarai; Ibarz, Elena; Mateo, Jesús; Gabarre, Sergio; Gracia, Luis

    2014-01-01

    This five-year prospective study was designed to investigate periprosthetic bone remodeling associated with two cemented stem models, ABG-II (Stryker) and VerSys (Zimmer), randomly implanted in patients older than 75 years. The sample consisted of 64 cases (32, ABG-II; 32, VerSys). Inclusion criterion was diagnosis of osteoarthritis recommended for cemented total hip arthroplasty. Besides clinical study, Finite Element (FE) simulation was used to analyze biomechanical changes caused by hip arthroplasty. Bone Mineral Density (BMD) measurements showed a progressive increase in bone mass throughout the entire follow-up period for both stems, well correlated with FE results except in Gruen zones 4, 5, 6 for ABG-II and in zones 4, 5 for VerSys, denoting that remodeling in those zones does not depend on mechanical factors but rather on biological or physiological ones. PMID:23725926

  11. Effects of Resveratrol Supplementation on Bone Growth in Young Rats and Microarchitecture and Remodeling in Ageing Rats

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Alice M. C.; Shandala, Tetyana; Nguyen, Long; Muhlhausler, Beverly S.; Chen, Ke-Ming; Howe, Peter R.; Xian, Cory J.

    2014-01-01

    Osteoporosis is a highly prevalent skeletal disorder in the elderly that causes serious bone fractures. Peak bone mass achieved at adolescence has been shown to predict bone mass and osteoporosis related risk fracture later in life. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol compound, may have the potential to promote bone formation and reduce bone resorption. However, it is unclear whether it can aid bone growth and bone mass accumulation during rapid growth and modulate bone metabolism during ageing. Using rat models, the current study investigated the potential effects of resveratrol supplementation during the rapid postnatal growth period and in late adulthood (early ageing) on bone microarchitecture and metabolism. In the growth trial, 4-week-old male hooded Wistar rats on a normal chow diet were given resveratrol (2.5 mg/kg/day) or vehicle control for 5 weeks. In the ageing trial, 6-month-old male hooded Wistar rats were treated with resveratrol (20 mg/kg/day) or vehicle for 3 months. Treatment effects in the tibia were examined by μ-computer tomography (μ-CT) analysis, bone histomorphometric measurements and reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) gene expression analysis. Resveratrol treatment did not affect trabecular bone volume and bone remodeling indices in the youth animal model. Resveratrol supplementation in the early ageing rats tended to decrease trabecular bone volume, Sirt1 gene expression and increased expression of adipogenesis-related genes in bone, all of which were statistically insignificant. However, it decreased osteocalcin expression (p = 0.03). Furthermore, serum levels of bone resorption marker C-terminal telopeptides type I collagen (CTX-1) were significantly elevated in the resveratrol supplementation group (p = 0.02) with no changes observed in serum levels of bone formation marker alkaline phosphatase (ALP). These results in rat models suggest that resveratrol supplementation does not significantly affect bone volume

  12. Effects of particle size and porosity on in vivo remodeling of settable allograft bone/polymer composites.

    PubMed

    Prieto, Edna M; Talley, Anne D; Gould, Nicholas R; Zienkiewicz, Katarzyna J; Drapeau, Susan J; Kalpakci, Kerem N; Guelcher, Scott A

    2015-11-01

    Established clinical approaches to treat bone voids include the implantation of autograft or allograft bone, ceramics, and other bone void fillers (BVFs). Composites prepared from lysine-derived polyurethanes and allograft bone can be injected as a reactive liquid and set to yield BVFs with mechanical strength comparable to trabecular bone. In this study, we investigated the effects of porosity, allograft particle size, and matrix mineralization on remodeling of injectable and settable allograft/polymer composites in a rabbit femoral condyle plug defect model. Both low viscosity and high viscosity grafts incorporating small (<105 μm) particles only partially healed at 12 weeks, and the addition of 10% demineralized bone matrix did not enhance healing. In contrast, composite grafts with large (105-500 μm) allograft particles healed at 12 weeks postimplantation, as evidenced by radial μCT and histomorphometric analysis. This study highlights particle size and surface connectivity as influential parameters regulating the remodeling of composite bone scaffolds. PMID:25581686

  13. Histone deacetylase 3 supports endochondral bone formation by controlling cytokine signaling and matrix remodeling.

    PubMed

    Carpio, Lomeli R; Bradley, Elizabeth W; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan E; Weivoda, Megan M; Poston, Daniel D; Dudakovic, Amel; Xu, Ming; Tchkonia, Tamar; Kirkland, James L; van Wijnen, Andre J; Oursler, Merry Jo; Westendorf, Jennifer J

    2016-01-01

    Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors are efficacious epigenetic-based therapies for some cancers and neurological disorders; however, each of these drugs inhibits multiple HDACs and has detrimental effects on the skeleton. To better understand how HDAC inhibitors affect endochondral bone formation, we conditionally deleted one of their targets, Hdac3, pre- and postnatally in type II collagen α1 (Col2α1)-expressing chondrocytes. Embryonic deletion was lethal, but postnatal deletion of Hdac3 delayed secondary ossification center formation, altered maturation of growth plate chondrocytes, and increased osteoclast activity in the primary spongiosa. HDAC3-deficient chondrocytes exhibited increased expression of cytokine and matrix-degrading genes (Il-6, Mmp3, Mmp13, and Saa3) and a reduced abundance of genes related to extracellular matrix production, bone development, and ossification (Acan, Col2a1, Ihh, and Col10a1). Histone acetylation increased at and near genes that had increased expression. The acetylation and activation of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) were also increased in HDAC3-deficient chondrocytes. Increased cytokine signaling promoted autocrine activation of Janus kinase (JAK)-signal transducer and activator of transcription (STAT) and NF-κB pathways to suppress chondrocyte maturation, as well as paracrine activation of osteoclasts and bone resorption. Blockade of interleukin-6 (IL-6)-JAK-STAT signaling, NF-κB signaling, and bromodomain extraterminal proteins, which recognize acetylated lysines and promote transcriptional elongation, significantly reduced Il-6 and Mmp13 expression in HDAC3-deficient chondrocytes and secondary activation in osteoclasts. The JAK inhibitor ruxolitinib also reduced osteoclast activity in Hdac3 conditional knockout mice. Thus, HDAC3 controls the temporal and spatial expression of tissue-remodeling genes and inflammatory responses in chondrocytes to ensure proper endochondral ossification during development. PMID:27507649

  14. Redox Remodeling Is Pivotal in Murine Diaphragm Muscle Adaptation to Chronic Sustained Hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lewis, Philip; Sheehan, David; Soares, Renata; Coelho, Ana Varela; O'Halloran, Ken D

    2016-07-01

    Mechanisms underpinning chronic sustained hypoxia (CH)-induced structural and functional adaptations in respiratory muscles are unclear despite the clinical relevance to respiratory diseases. The objectives of the present study were to thoroughly assess the putative role of CH-induced redox remodeling in murine diaphragm muscle over time and the subsequent effects on metabolic enzyme activities, catabolic signaling and catabolic processes, and diaphragm muscle contractile function. C57Bl6/J mice were exposed to normoxia or normobaric CH (fraction of inspired oxygen = 0.1) for 1, 3, or 6 weeks. A second cohort was exposed to CH for 6 weeks with and without antioxidant supplementation (tempol or N-acetyl cysteine). After CH exposure, we performed two-dimensional redox proteomics with mass spectrometry, enzyme activity assays, and cell-signaling assays on diaphragm homogenates. We also assessed diaphragm isotonic contractile and endurance properties ex vivo. Global protein redox changes in the diaphragm after CH are indicative of oxidation. Remodeling of proteins key to contractile, metabolic, and homeostatic functions was observed. Several oxidative and glycolytic enzyme activities were decreased by CH. Redox-sensitive chymotrypsin-like proteasome activity of the diaphragm was increased. CH decreased phospho-forkhead box O3a (FOXO3a) and phospho-mammalian target of rapamycin content. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α and phospho-p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase content was increased in CH diaphragm, and this was attenuated by antioxidant treatment. CH exposure decreased force- and power-generating capacity of the diaphragm, and this was prevented by antioxidant supplementation with N-acetyl cysteine but not tempol. Redox remodeling is pivotal for diaphragm adaptation to CH, affecting metabolic activity, atrophy signaling, and functional performance. Antioxidant supplementation may be useful as an adjunctive therapy in respiratory-related diseases characterized by

  15. Mechanism of Action of Bortezomib and the New Proteasome Inhibitors on Myeloma Cells and the Bone Microenvironment: Impact on Myeloma-Induced Alterations of Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Accardi, Fabrizio; Toscani, Denise; Bolzoni, Marina; Dalla Palma, Benedetta; Aversa, Franco; Giuliani, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by a high capacity to induce alterations in the bone remodeling process. The increase in osteoclastogenesis and the suppression of osteoblast formation are both involved in the pathophysiology of the bone lesions in MM. The proteasome inhibitor (PI) bortezomib is the first drug designed and approved for the treatment of MM patients by targeting the proteasome. However, recently novel PIs have been developed to overcome bortezomib resistance. Interestingly, several preclinical data indicate that the proteasome complex is involved in both osteoclast and osteoblast formation. It is also evident that bortezomib either inhibits osteoclast differentiation induced by the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) or stimulates the osteoblast differentiation. Similarly, the new PIs including carfilzomib and ixazomib can inhibit bone resorption and stimulate the osteoblast differentiation. In a clinical setting, PIs restore the abnormal bone remodeling by normalizing the levels of bone turnover markers. In addition, a bone anabolic effect was described in responding MM patients treated with PIs, as demonstrated by the increase in the osteoblast number. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical evidence on the effects of bortezomib and other new PIs on myeloma bone disease. PMID:26579531

  16. Mechanism of Action of Bortezomib and the New Proteasome Inhibitors on Myeloma Cells and the Bone Microenvironment: Impact on Myeloma-Induced Alterations of Bone Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Accardi, Fabrizio; Toscani, Denise; Bolzoni, Marina; Dalla Palma, Benedetta; Aversa, Franco; Giuliani, Nicola

    2015-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is characterized by a high capacity to induce alterations in the bone remodeling process. The increase in osteoclastogenesis and the suppression of osteoblast formation are both involved in the pathophysiology of the bone lesions in MM. The proteasome inhibitor (PI) bortezomib is the first drug designed and approved for the treatment of MM patients by targeting the proteasome. However, recently novel PIs have been developed to overcome bortezomib resistance. Interestingly, several preclinical data indicate that the proteasome complex is involved in both osteoclast and osteoblast formation. It is also evident that bortezomib either inhibits osteoclast differentiation induced by the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) ligand (RANKL) or stimulates the osteoblast differentiation. Similarly, the new PIs including carfilzomib and ixazomib can inhibit bone resorption and stimulate the osteoblast differentiation. In a clinical setting, PIs restore the abnormal bone remodeling by normalizing the levels of bone turnover markers. In addition, a bone anabolic effect was described in responding MM patients treated with PIs, as demonstrated by the increase in the osteoblast number. This review summarizes the preclinical and clinical evidence on the effects of bortezomib and other new PIs on myeloma bone disease. PMID:26579531

  17. Preoperative bone quality as a factor in dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry analysis comparing bone remodelling between two implant types

    PubMed Central

    Rahmy, Ali; Grimm, Bernd; Heyligers, Ide; Tonino, Alphons

    2006-01-01

    Recently it was shown that the design changes from the ABG-I to ABG-II hip stem resulted in a better, although not significant, proximal bone preservation. Our hypothesis was that by matching patients for preoperative bone quality, statistical power would increase and that the trend of better proximal bone preservation in ABG-II might become significant. Twenty-four ABG-II patients were compared to two different ABG-I groups: (1) 25 patients from our earlier prospective study and (2) a group of 24 patients selected to perfectly match the ABG-II group regarding gender, age and preoperative bone quality. Postoperative changes in periprosthetic bone mineral density (BMD) were quantified at 2 years postoperatively using DEXA scanning. Bone preservation (less BMD loss) was better for the ABG-II than the ABG-I (all two groups) in the proximal zones 1 and 7. In Gruen zone 7, a statistically significant difference was found for group B (p = 0.03). By matching patients for preoperative bone quality and gender, a statistical significant difference was found in proximal bone preservation in favour of ABG-II. In future comparative bone remodelling studies using DEXA, patients should be matched for preoperative bone quality and gender. PMID:17086429

  18. Adaptive responses of mitochondria to mild copper deprivation involve changes in morphology, OXPHOS remodeling and bioenergetics.

    PubMed

    Ruiz, Lina María; Jensen, Erik L; Bustos, Rodrigo I; Argüelloa, Graciela; Gutierrez-Garcia, Ricardo; González, Mauricio; Hernández, Claudia; Paredes, Rodolfo; Simon, Felipe; Riedel, Claudia; Ferrick, David; Elorza, Alvaro A

    2014-05-01

    Copper is an essential cofactor of complex IV of the electron transfer chain, and it is directly involved in the generation of mitochondrial membrane potential. Its deficiency induces the formation of ROS, large mitochondria and anemia. Thus, there is a connection between copper metabolism and bioenergetics, mitochondrial dynamics and erythropoiesis. Copper depletion might end in cellular apoptosis or necrosis. However, before entering into those irreversible processes, mitochondria may execute a series of adaptive responses. Mitochondrial adaptive responses (MAR) may involve multiple and diverse mechanisms for preserving cell life, such as mitochondrial dynamics, OXPHOS remodeling and bioenergetics output. In this study, a mild copper deficiency was produced in an animal model through intraperitoneal injections of bathocuproine disulfonate in order to study the MAR. Under these conditions, a new type of mitochondrial morphology was discovered in the liver. Termed the "butternut squash" mitochondria, it coexisted with normal and swollen mitochondria. Western blot analyses of mitochondrial dynamics proteins showed an up-regulation of MFN-2 and OPA1 fusion proteins. Furthermore, isolated liver mitochondria displayed OXPHOS remodeling through a decrease in supercomplex activity with a concomitant increase at an individual level of complexes I and IV, higher respiratory rates at complex I and II levels, higher oligomycin-insensitive respiration, and lower respiratory control ratio values when compared to the control group. As expected, total ATP and ATP/ADP values were not significantly different, since animal's health was not compromised. As a whole, these results describe a compensatory and adaptive response of metabolism and bioenergetics under copper deprivation. PMID:24446197

  19. Extracellular matrix remodeling and its contribution to protective adaptation following lengthening contractions in human muscle.

    PubMed

    Hyldahl, Robert D; Nelson, Brad; Xin, Ling; Welling, Tyson; Groscost, Logan; Hubal, Monica J; Chipkin, Stuart; Clarkson, Priscilla M; Parcell, Allen C

    2015-07-01

    This study determined the contribution of extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling to the protective adaptation of human skeletal muscle known as the repeated-bout effect (RBE). Muscle biopsies were obtained 3 hours, 2 days, and 27 days following an initial bout (B1) of lengthening contractions (LCs) and 2 days following a repeated bout (B2) in 2 separate studies. Biopsies from the nonexercised legs served as controls. In the first study, global transcriptomic analysis indicated widespread changes in ECM structural, deadhesive, and signaling transcripts, 3 hours following LC. To determine if ECM remodeling is involved in the RBE, we conducted a second study by use of a repeated-bout paradigm. TNC immunoreactivity increased 10.8-fold following B1, was attenuated following B2, and positively correlated with LC-induced strength loss (r(2) = 0.45; P = 0.009). Expression of collagen I, III, and IV (COL1A1, COL3A1, COL4A1) transcripts was unchanged early but increased 5.7 ± 2.5-, 3.2 ± 0.9-, and 2.1 ± 0.4-fold (P < 0.05), respectively, 27 days post-B1 and were unaffected by B2. Likewise, TGF-β signaling demonstrated a delayed response following LC. Satellite cell content increased 80% (P < 0.05) 2 days post-B1 (P < 0.05), remained elevated 27 days post-B1, and was unaffected by B2. Collectively, the data suggest sequential ECM remodeling characterized by early deadhesion and delayed reconstructive activity that appear to contribute to the RBE. PMID:25808538

  20. Bioprinting Organotypic Hydrogels with Improved Mesenchymal Stem Cell Remodeling and Mineralization Properties for Bone Tissue Engineering.

    PubMed

    Duarte Campos, Daniela Filipa; Blaeser, Andreas; Buellesbach, Kate; Sen, Kshama Shree; Xun, Weiwei; Tillmann, Walter; Fischer, Horst

    2016-06-01

    3D-manufactured hydrogels with precise contours and biological adhesion motifs are interesting candidates in the regenerative medicine field for the culture and differentiation of human bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). 3D-bioprinting is a powerful technique to approach one step closer the native organization of cells. This study investigates the effect of the incorporation of collagen type I in 3D-bioprinted polysaccharide-based hydrogels to the modulation of cell morphology, osteogenic remodeling potential, and mineralization. By combining thermo-responsive agarose hydrogels with collagen type I, the mechanical stiffness and printing contours of printed constructs can be improved compared to pure collagen hydrogels which are typically used as standard materials for MSC osteogenic differentiation. The results presented here show that MSC not only survive the 3D-bioprinting process but also maintain the mesenchymal phenotype, as proved by live/dead staining and immunocytochemistry (vimentin positive, CD34 negative). Increased solids concentrations of collagen in the hydrogel blend induce changes in cell morphology, namely, by enhancing cell spreading, that ultimately contribute to enhanced and directed MSC osteogenic differentiation. 3D-bioprinted agarose-collagen hydrogels with high-collagen ratio are therefore feasible for MSC osteogenic differentiation, contrarily to low-collagen blends, as proved by two-photon microscopy, Alizarin Red staining, and real-time polymerase chain reaction. PMID:27072652

  1. The Contribution of Experimental in vivo Models to Understanding the Mechanisms of Adaptation to Mechanical Loading in Bone

    PubMed Central

    Meakin, Lee B.; Price, Joanna S.; Lanyon, Lance E.

    2014-01-01

    Changing loading regimens by natural means such as exercise, with or without interference such as osteotomy, has provided useful information on the structure:function relationship in bone tissue. However, the greatest precision in defining those aspects of the overall strain environment that influence modeling and remodeling behavior has been achieved by relating quantified changes in bone architecture to quantified changes in bones’ strain environment produced by direct, controlled artificial bone loading. Jiri Hert introduced the technique of artificial loading of bones in vivo with external devices in the 1960s using an electromechanical device to load rabbit tibiae through transfixing stainless steel pins. Quantifying natural bone strains during locomotion by attaching electrical resistance strain gages to bone surfaces was introduced by Lanyon, also in the 1960s. These studies in a variety of bones in a number of species demonstrated remarkable uniformity in the peak strains and maximum strain rates experienced. Experiments combining strain gage instrumentation with artificial loading in sheep, pigs, roosters, turkeys, rats, and mice has yielded significant insight into the control of strain-related adaptive (re)modeling. This diversity of approach has been largely superseded by non-invasive transcutaneous loading in rats and mice, which is now the model of choice for many studies. Together such studies have demonstrated that over the physiological strain range, bone’s mechanically adaptive processes are responsive to dynamic but not static strains; the size and nature of the adaptive response controlling bone mass is linearly related to the peak loads encountered; the strain-related response is preferentially sensitive to high strain rates and unresponsive to static ones; is most responsive to unusual strain distributions; is maximized by remarkably few strain cycles, and that these are most effective when interrupted by short periods of rest between them

  2. Adaptive and injury response of bone to mechanical loading

    PubMed Central

    McBride, Sarah H; Silva, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    Bone responds to supraphysiological mechanical loads by increasing bone formation. Depending on the applied strain magnitude (and other loading parameters) the response can be either adaptive (mostly lamellar bone) or injury (mostly woven bone). Seminal studies of Hert, Lanyon and Rubin originally established the basic 'rules' of bone mechanosensitivity. These were reinforced by subsequent studies using noninvasive rodent loading models, most notably by Turner et al. More recent works with these models have been able to explore the structural, transcriptional and molecular mechanisms which distinguish the two responses (lamellar vs woven). Wnt/Lrp signaling has emerged as a key mechanoresponsive pathway for lamellar bone. However, there is still much to study with regard to effects of ageing, osteocytes, other signaling pathways, and the molecular regulation that modulates lamellar vs woven bone formation. This review summarizes not only the historical findings but also the current data for these topics. PMID:23505338

  3. The influence of different loads on the remodeling process of a bone and bioresorbable material mixture with voids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Giorgio, Ivan; Andreaus, Ugo; Madeo, Angela

    2016-03-01

    A model of a mixture of bone tissue and bioresorbable material with voids was used to numerically analyze the physiological balance between the processes of bone growth and resorption and artificial material resorption in a plate-like sample. The adopted model was derived from a theory for the behavior of porous solids in which the matrix material is linearly elastic and the interstices are void of material. The specimen—constituted by a region of bone living tissue and one of bioresorbable material—was acted by different in-plane loading conditions, namely pure bending and shear. Ranges of load magnitudes were identified within which physiological states become possible. Furthermore, the consequences of applying different loading conditions are examined at the end of the remodeling process. In particular, maximum value of bone and material mass densities, and extensions of the zones where bone is reconstructed were identified and compared in the two different load conditions. From the practical view point, during surgery planning and later rehabilitation, some choice of the following parameters is given: porosity of the graft, material characteristics of the graft, and adjustment of initial mixture tissue/bioresorbable material and later, during healing and remodeling, optimal loading conditions.

  4. Uncemented Total Hip Replacement Stem Loosening after Long Term Compressive Stress Application: A Simulated FEA Study of Cortical Bone Remodeling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Duk-Young; Tsutsumi, Sadami; Nakai, Ryusuke; Ikeuchi, Ken; Sekel, Ron

    The purpose of this study is to predict with the use of FEA, the differing predisposition to cortical bone resorption and subsequent distal migration of an un-cemented femoral hip replacement stem subjected to long term biomechanical high compressive stresses, while varying the load angles, the material properties of the stem, and the stem length. A two-dimensional hip model was constructed to estimate the minimum principle stresses (P3) and migration magnitudes. Bone remodeling at the interface between the bone and the prosthesis was performed by comparison of the local compressive stress to physiological stress values governing bone resorption. With respect to load angles, migrations of the hip prosthesis did not occur with load angles between 63° and 74° load angle in relation to the longitudinal axis of the bony femur, as the compressive stress generated on the cortical bone was under the criteria threshold for bone resorption (-50MPa). In addition, the magnitude of migration (17%decrease) was relatively more sensitive to changes in stem length than those (92%decrease) of changes of material properties. In conclusion, using an FEA model for bone remodeling, based on the high compressive stresses exerted on distal cortical bone, it is possible to estimate migration magnitudes of cementless hip prostheses in the long term. The load angles have been shown to be an important parameter affecting the migration magnitudes and furthermore, it can be demonstrated that the stiffer materials and reduction of stem length can decrease the migration of cementless hip prosthesis in the long term.

  5. Curved bones: An adaptation to habitual loading.

    PubMed

    Milne, Nick

    2016-10-21

    Why are long bones curved? It has long been considered a paradox that many long bones supporting mammalian bodies are curved, since this curvature results in the bone undergoing greater bending, with higher strains and so greater fracture risk under load. This study develops a theoretical model wherein the curvature is a response to bending strains imposed by the requirements of locomotion. In particular the radioulna of obligate quadrupeds is a lever operated by the triceps muscle, and the bending strains induced by the triceps muscle counter the bending resulting from longitudinal loads acting on the curved bone. Indeed the theoretical model reverses this logic and suggests that the curvature is itself a response to the predictable bending strains induced by the triceps muscle. This, in turn, results in anatomical arrangements of bone, muscle and tendon that create a simple physiological mechanism whereby the bone can resist the bending due to the action of triceps in supporting and moving the body. The model is illustrated by contrasting the behaviour of a finite element model of a llama radioulna to that of a straightened version of the same bone. The results show that longitudinal and flexor muscle forces produce bending strains that effectively counter strains due to the pull of the triceps muscle in the curved but not in the straightened model. It is concluded that the curvature of these and other curved bones adds resilience to the skeleton by acting as pre-stressed beams or strainable pre-buckled struts. It is also proposed that the cranial bending strains that result from triceps, acting on the lever that is the radioulna, can explain the development of the curvature of such bones. PMID:27444401

  6. Small body size and extreme cortical bone remodeling indicate phyletic dwarfism in Magyarosaurus dacus (Sauropoda: Titanosauria)

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Koen; Csiki, Zoltan; Rogers, Kristina Curry; Weishampel, David B.; Redelstorff, Ragna; Carballido, Jose L.; Sander, P. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Sauropods were the largest terrestrial tetrapods (>105 kg) in Earth's history and grew at rates that rival those of extant mammals. Magyarosaurus dacus, a titanosaurian sauropod from the Upper Cretaceous (Maastrichtian) of Romania, is known exclusively from small individuals (<103 kg) and conflicts with the idea that all sauropods were massive. The diminutive M. dacus was a classical example of island dwarfism (phyletic nanism) in dinosaurs, but a recent study suggested that the small Romanian titanosaurs actually represent juveniles of a larger-bodied taxon. Here we present strong histological evidence that M. dacus was indeed a dwarf (phyletic nanoid). Bone histological analysis of an ontogenetic series of Magyarosaurus limb bones indicates that even the smallest Magyarosaurus specimens exhibit a bone microstructure identical to fully mature or old individuals of other sauropod taxa. Comparison of histologies with large-bodied sauropods suggests that Magyarosaurus had an extremely reduced growth rate, but had retained high basal metabolic rates typical for sauropods. The uniquely decreased growth rate and diminutive body size in Magyarosaurus were adaptations to life on a Cretaceous island and show that sauropod dinosaurs were not exempt from general ecological principles limiting body size. PMID:20435913

  7. Osteocytes, not Osteoblasts or Lining Cells, are the Main Source of the RANKL Required for Osteoclast Formation in Remodeling Bone

    PubMed Central

    Xiong, Jinhu; Piemontese, Marilina; Onal, Melda; Campbell, Josh; Goellner, Joseph J.; Dusevich, Vladimir; Bonewald, Lynda; Manolagas, Stavros C.; O’Brien, Charles A.

    2015-01-01

    The cytokine receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa B ligand (RANKL), encoded by the Tnfsf11 gene, is essential for osteoclastogenesis and previous studies have shown that deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene using a Dmp1-Cre transgene reduces osteoclast formation in cancellous bone by more than 70%. However, the Dmp1-Cre transgene used in those studies leads to recombination in osteocytes, osteoblasts, and lining cells making it unclear whether one or more of these cell types produce the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in cancellous bone. Because osteoblasts, osteocytes, and lining cells have distinct locations and functions, distinguishing which of these cell types are sources of RANKL is essential for understanding the orchestration of bone remodeling. To distinguish between these possibilities, we have now created transgenic mice expressing the Cre recombinase under the control of regulatory elements of the Sost gene, which is expressed in osteocytes but not osteoblasts or lining cells in murine bone. Activity of the Sost-Cre transgene in osteocytes, but not osteoblast or lining cells, was confirmed by crossing Sost-Cre transgenic mice with tdTomato and R26R Cre-reporter mice, which express tdTomato fluorescent protein or LacZ, respectively, only in cells expressing the Cre recombinase or their descendants. Deletion of the Tnfsf11 gene in Sost-Cre mice led to a threefold decrease in osteoclast number in cancellous bone and increased cancellous bone mass, mimicking the skeletal phenotype of mice in which the Tnfsf11 gene was deleted using the Dmp1-Cre transgene. These results demonstrate that osteocytes, not osteoblasts or lining cells, are the main source of the RANKL required for osteoclast formation in remodeling cancellous bone. PMID:26393791

  8. Strontium-Doped Calcium Phosphate and Hydroxyapatite Granules Promote Different Inflammatory and Bone Remodelling Responses in Normal and Ovariectomised Rats

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Wei; Emanuelsson, Lena; Norlindh, Birgitta; Omar, Omar; Thomsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The healing of bone defects may be hindered by systemic conditions such as osteoporosis. Calcium phosphates, with or without ion substitutions, may provide advantages for bone augmentation. However, the mechanism of bone formation with these materials is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing process in bone defects implanted with hydroxyapatite (HA) or strontium-doped calcium phosphate (SCP) granules, in non-ovariectomised (non-OVX) and ovariectomised (OVX) rats. After 0 (baseline), six and 28d, bone samples were harvested for gene expression analysis, histology and histomorphometry. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), at six days, was higher in the HA, in non-OVX and OVX, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6), at six and 28d, was higher in SCP, but only in non-OVX. Both materials produced a similar expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). Higher expression of osteoclastic markers, calcitonin receptor (CR) and cathepsin K (CatK), were detected in the HA group, irrespective of non-OVX or OVX. The overall bone formation was comparable between HA and SCP, but with topological differences. The bone area was higher in the defect centre of the HA group, mainly in the OVX, and in the defect periphery of the SCP group, in both non-OVX and OVX. It is concluded that HA and SCP granules result in comparable bone formation in trabecular bone defects. As judged by gene expression and histological analyses, the two materials induced different inflammatory and bone remodelling responses. The modulatory effects are associated with differences in the spatial distribution of the newly formed bone. PMID:24376855

  9. Strontium-doped calcium phosphate and hydroxyapatite granules promote different inflammatory and bone remodelling responses in normal and ovariectomised rats.

    PubMed

    Cardemil, Carina; Elgali, Ibrahim; Xia, Wei; Emanuelsson, Lena; Norlindh, Birgitta; Omar, Omar; Thomsen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The healing of bone defects may be hindered by systemic conditions such as osteoporosis. Calcium phosphates, with or without ion substitutions, may provide advantages for bone augmentation. However, the mechanism of bone formation with these materials is unclear. The aim of this study was to evaluate the healing process in bone defects implanted with hydroxyapatite (HA) or strontium-doped calcium phosphate (SCP) granules, in non-ovariectomised (non-OVX) and ovariectomised (OVX) rats. After 0 (baseline), six and 28d, bone samples were harvested for gene expression analysis, histology and histomorphometry. Tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), at six days, was higher in the HA, in non-OVX and OVX, whereas interleukin-6 (IL-6), at six and 28d, was higher in SCP, but only in non-OVX. Both materials produced a similar expression of the receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL). Higher expression of osteoclastic markers, calcitonin receptor (CR) and cathepsin K (CatK), were detected in the HA group, irrespective of non-OVX or OVX. The overall bone formation was comparable between HA and SCP, but with topological differences. The bone area was higher in the defect centre of the HA group, mainly in the OVX, and in the defect periphery of the SCP group, in both non-OVX and OVX. It is concluded that HA and SCP granules result in comparable bone formation in trabecular bone defects. As judged by gene expression and histological analyses, the two materials induced different inflammatory and bone remodelling responses. The modulatory effects are associated with differences in the spatial distribution of the newly formed bone. PMID:24376855

  10. Impaired differentiation of macrophage lineage cells attenuates bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis in Ndrg1 deficient mice

    PubMed Central

    Watari, Kosuke; Shibata, Tomohiro; Nabeshima, Hiroshi; Shinoda, Ai; Fukunaga, Yuichi; Kawahara, Akihiko; Karasuyama, Kazuyuki; Fukushi, Jun-ichi; Iwamoto, Yukihide; Kuwano, Michihiko; Ono, Mayumi

    2016-01-01

    N-myc downstream regulated gene 1 (NDRG1) is a responsible gene for a hereditary motor and sensory neuropathy-Lom (Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease type 4D). This is the first study aiming to assess the contribution of NDRG1 to differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, which has important implications for bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. Ndrg1 knockout (KO) mice exhibited abnormal curvature of the spine, high trabecular bone mass, and reduced number of osteoclasts. We observed that serum levels of macrophage colony-stimulating factor (M-CSF) and macrophage-related cytokines were markedly decreased in KO mice. Differentiation of bone marrow (BM) cells into osteoclasts, M1/M2-type macrophages and dendritic cells was all impaired. Furthermore, KO mice also showed reduced tumor growth and angiogenesis by cancer cells, accompanied by decreased infiltration of tumor-associated macrophages. The transfer of BM-derived macrophages from KO mice into BM-eradicated wild type (WT) mice induced much less tumor angiogenesis than observed in WT mice. Angiogenesis in corneas in response to inflammatory stimuli was also suppressed with decreased infiltration of macrophages. Taken together, these results indicate that NDRG1 deficiency attenuates the differentiation of macrophage lineage cells, suppressing bone remodeling and inflammatory angiogenesis. This study strongly suggests the crucial role of NDRG1 in differentiation process for macrophages. PMID:26778110

  11. Bone Marrow-Derived Cell-Specific Chemokine (C-C motif) Receptor-2 Expression is Required for Arteriolar Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Nickerson, Meghan M.; Song, Ji; Meisner, Joshua K.; Bajikar, Sameer; Burke, Caitlin W.; Shuptrine, Casey W.; Owens, Gary K.; Skalak, Thomas C.; Price, Richard J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective Bone marrow-derived cells (BMCs) and inflammatory chemokine receptors regulate arteriogenesis and angiogenesis. Here, we tested whether arteriolar remodeling in response to an inflammatory stimulus is dependent on BMC-specific chemokine (C-C motif) receptor 2 (CCR2) expression and whether this response involves BMC transdifferentiation into smooth muscle. Methods and Results Dorsal skinfold window chambers were implanted into C57Bl/6 wild-type (WT) mice, as well as the following bone marrow chimeras (donor-host): WT-WT, CCR2−/−-WT, WT-CCR2−/−, and EGFP+-WT. One day after implantation, tissue MCP-1 levels rose from “undetectable” to 463pg/mg, and the number of EGFP+ cells increased more than 4-fold, indicating marked inflammation. A 66% (28μm) increase in maximum arteriolar diameter was observed over 7 days in WT-WT mice. This arteriolar remodeling response was completely abolished in CCR2−/−-WT mice but largely rescued in WT-CCR2−/− mice. EGFP+ BMCs were numerous throughout the tissue, but we found no evidence that EGFP+ BMCs transdifferentiate into smooth muscle, based on examination of >800 arterioles and venules. Conclusions BMC-specific CCR2 expression is required for injury/inflammation-associated arteriolar remodeling, but this response is not characterized by the differentiation of BMCs into smooth muscle. PMID:19734197

  12. A second gradient continuum model accounting for some effects of micro-structure on reconstructed bone remodelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Madeo, Angela; George, D.; Lekszycki, T.; Nierenberger, Mathieu; Rémond, Yves

    2012-08-01

    We propose a second gradient, two-solids, continuum mixture model with variable masses to describe the effect of micro-structure on mechanically-driven remodelling of bones grafted with bio-resorbable materials. A one-dimensional numerical simulation is addressed showing the potentialities of the proposed generalized continuum model. In particular, we show that the used second gradient model allows for the description of some micro-structure-related size effects which are known to be important in hierarchically heterogeneous materials like reconstructed bones. Moreover, the influence of the introduced second gradient parameters on the final percentages of replacement of artificial bio-material with natural bone tissue is presented and discussed.

  13. The osteocyte: key player in regulating bone turnover

    PubMed Central

    Goldring, Steven R

    2015-01-01

    Osteocytes are the most abundant cell type in bone and are distributed throughout the mineralised bone matrix forming an interconnected network that ideally positions them to sense and to respond to local biomechanical and systemic stimuli to regulate bone remodelling and adaptation. The adaptive process is dependent on the coordinated activity of osteoclasts and osteoblasts that form a so called bone multicellular unit that remodels cortical and trabecular bone through a process of osteoclast-mediated bone resorption, followed by a phase of bone formation mediated by osteoblasts. Osteocytes mediate their effects on bone remodelling via both cell–cell interactions with osteoclasts and osteoblasts, but also via signaling through the release of soluble mediators. The remodelling process provides a mechanism for adapting the skeleton to local biomechanical factors and systemic hormonal influences and for replacing bone that has undergone damage from repetitive mechanical loading. PMID:26557372

  14. On bone adaptation due to venous stasis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Liyun; Fritton, Susannah P.; Weinbaum, Sheldon; Cowin, Stephen C.

    2014-01-01

    This paper addresses the question of whether or not interstitial fluid flow due to the blood circulation accounts for the observed periosteal bone formation associated with comprised venous return (venous stasis). Increased interstitial fluid flow induced by increased intramedullary pressure has been proposed to account for the periosteal response in venous stasis. To investigate the shear stresses acting on bone cell processes due to the blood circulation-driven interstitial fluid flow, a poroelastic model is extended to the situation in which the interstitial fluid flow in an osteon is driven by the pulsatile extravascular pressure in the osteonal canal as well as by the applied cyclic mechanical loading. Our results show that under normal conditions, the pulsatile extravascular pressure in the osteonal canal due to cardiac contraction (10mm Hg at 2 Hz) and skeletal muscle contraction (30mm Hg at 1 Hz) induce peak shear stresses on the osteocyte cell processes that are two orders of magnitude lower than those induced by physiological mechanical loading (100 microstrain at 1 Hz). In venous stasis the induced peak shear stress is reduced further compared to the normal conditions because, although the mean intramedullary pressure is increased, the amplitude of its pulsatile component is decreased. These results suggest that the interstitial fluid flow is unlikely to cause the periosteal bone formation in venous stasis. However, the mean interstitial fluid pressure is found to increase in venous stasis, which may pressurize the periosteum and thus play a role in periosteal bone formation. PMID:14499293

  15. The remodeling pattern of human mandibular alveolar bone during prenatal formation from 19 to 270mm CRL.

    PubMed

    Radlanski, Ralf J; Renz, Herbert; Tsengelsaikhan, Nyamdorj; Schuster, Felix; Zimmermann, Camilla A

    2016-05-01

    The underlying mechanisms of human bone morphogenesis leading to a topologically specific shape remain unknown, despite increasing knowledge of the basic molecular aspects of bone formation and its regulation. The formation of the alveolar bone, which houses the dental primordia, and later the dental roots, may serve as a model to approach general questions of bone formation. Twenty-five heads of human embryos and fetuses (Radlanski-Collection, Berlin) ranging from 19mm to 270mm (crown-rump-length) CRL were prepared as histological serial sections. For each stage, virtual 3D-reconstructions were made in order to study the morphogenesis of the mandibular molar primordia with their surrounding bone. Special focus was given to recording the bone-remodeling pattern, as diagnosed from the histological sections. In early stages (19-31mm CRL) developing bone was characterized by appositional only. At 41, in the canine region, mm CRL bony extensions were found forming on the bottom of the trough. Besides general apposition, regions with resting surfaces were also found. At a fetal size of 53mm CRL, septa have developed and led to a compartment for canine development. Furthermore, one shared compartment for the incisor primordia and another shared compartment for the molars also developed. Moreover, the inner surfaces of the dental crypts showed resorption of bone. From this stage on, a general pattern became established such that the compartmentalizing ridges and septa between all of the dental primordia and the brims of the crypts were noted, and were due to appositional growth of bone, while the crypts enlarged on their inner surfaces by resorption. By 160mm CRL, the dental primordia were larger, and all of the bony septa had become reduced in size. The primordia for the permanent teeth became visible at 225mm CRL and shared the crypts of their corresponding deciduous primordia. PMID:26921449

  16. Temperature adaptation in two bivalve species from different thermal habitats: energetics and remodelling of membrane lipids.

    PubMed

    Pernet, Fabrice; Tremblay, Réjean; Comeau, Luc; Guderley, Helga

    2007-09-01

    We compared lipid dynamics and the physiological responses of blue mussels Mytilus edulis, a cold-adapted species, and oysters Crassostrea virginica, a warmer-water species, during simulated overwintering and passage to spring conditions. To simulate overwintering, animals were held at 0 degrees C, 4 degrees C and 9 degrees C for 3 months and then gradually brought to and maintained at 20 degrees C for 5 weeks to simulate spring-summer conditions. Changes in lipid class and fatty acid composition were related to clearance rate and oxygen consumption. We found major differences between species in triglyceride (TAG) metabolism during overwintering. Mussels used digestive gland TAG stores for energy metabolism or reproductive processes during the winter, whereas oysters did not accumulate large TAG stores prior to overwintering. Mussel TAG contained high levels of 20:5n-3 compared to levels in oysters and in the diet. This may help to counteract the effect of low temperature by reducing the melting point of TAG and thus increasing the availability of storage fats at low temperature. Mussels seemed better able to mobilise 20:5n-3 and 18:4n-3 than other fatty acids. We also found that both bivalves underwent a major remodelling of membrane phospholipids. The unsaturation index decreased in the gills and digestive glands of both species during the early stages of warming, principally due to decreases in 22:6n-3 and 20:5n-3. In digestive glands, the unsaturation index did not increase with decreasing temperature beyond a threshold attained at 9 degrees C whereas a perfect negative relationship was observed in gills, as predicted by homeoviscous adaptation. The presence of digestive enzymes and acids in the digestive gland microenvironment may lead to specific requirements for membrane stability. That oysters had lower metabolic rates than mussels coincides with a lower unsaturation index of their lipids, as predicted by Hulbert's theory of membranes as metabolic

  17. Tooth Eruption Results from Bone Remodelling Driven by Bite Forces Sensed by Soft Tissue Dental Follicles: A Finite Element Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Sarrafpour, Babak; Swain, Michael; Li, Qing; Zoellner, Hans

    2013-01-01

    Intermittent tongue, lip and cheek forces influence precise tooth position, so we here examine the possibility that tissue remodelling driven by functional bite-force-induced jaw-strain accounts for tooth eruption. Notably, although a separate true ‘eruptive force’ is widely assumed, there is little direct evidence for such a force. We constructed a three dimensional finite element model from axial computerized tomography of an 8 year old child mandible containing 12 erupted and 8 unerupted teeth. Tissues modelled included: cortical bone, cancellous bone, soft tissue dental follicle, periodontal ligament, enamel, dentine, pulp and articular cartilage. Strain and hydrostatic stress during incisive and unilateral molar bite force were modelled, with force applied via medial and lateral pterygoid, temporalis, masseter and digastric muscles. Strain was maximal in the soft tissue follicle as opposed to surrounding bone, consistent with follicle as an effective mechanosensor. Initial numerical analysis of dental follicle soft tissue overlying crowns and beneath the roots of unerupted teeth was of volume and hydrostatic stress. To numerically evaluate biological significance of differing hydrostatic stress levels normalized for variable finite element volume, ‘biological response units’ in Nmm were defined and calculated by multiplication of hydrostatic stress and volume for each finite element. Graphical representations revealed similar overall responses for individual teeth regardless if incisive or right molar bite force was studied. There was general compression in the soft tissues over crowns of most unerupted teeth, and general tension in the soft tissues beneath roots. Not conforming to this pattern were the unerupted second molars, which do not erupt at this developmental stage. Data support a new hypothesis for tooth eruption, in which the follicular soft tissues detect bite-force-induced bone-strain, and direct bone remodelling at the inner surface of

  18. Dynamic skeletal muscle stimulation and its potential in bone adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Y-X.; Lam, H.; Ferreri, S.; Rubin, C.

    2016-01-01

    To identify mechanotransductive signals for combating musculoskeletal deterioration, it is essential to determine the components and mechanisms critical to the anabolic processes of musculoskeletal tissues. It is hypothesized that the interaction between bone and muscle may depend on fluid exchange in these tissues by mechanical loading. It has been shown that intramedullary pressure (ImP) and low-level bone strain induced by muscle stimulation (MS) has the potential to mitigate bone loss induced by disuse osteopenia. Optimized MS signals, i.e., low-intensity and high frequency, may be critical in maintaining bone mass and mitigating muscle atrophy. The objectives for this review are to discuss the potential for MS to induce ImP and strains on bone, to regulate bone adaptation, and to identify optimized stimulation frequency in the loading regimen. The potential for MS to regulate blood and fluid flow will also be discussed. The results suggest that oscillatory MS regulates fluid dynamics with minimal mechanical strain in bone. The response was shown to be dependent on loading frequency, serving as a critical mediator in mitigating bone loss. A specific regimen of dynamic MS may be optimized in vivo to attenuate disuse osteopenia and serve as a biomechanical intervention in the clinical setting. PMID:20190376

  19. The Amiloride Derivative Phenamil Attenuates Pulmonary Vascular Remodeling by Activating NFAT and the Bone Morphogenetic Protein Signaling Pathway ▿

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Mun Chun; Weisman, Alexandra S.; Kang, Hara; Nguyen, Peter H.; Hickman, Tyler; Mecker, Samantha V.; Hill, Nicholas S.; Lagna, Giorgio; Hata, Akiko

    2011-01-01

    Pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) is characterized by elevated pulmonary artery resistance and increased medial thickness due to deregulation of vascular remodeling. Inactivating mutations of the BMPRII gene, which encodes a receptor for bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), are identified in ∼60% of familial PAH (FPAH) and ∼30% of idiopathic PAH (IPAH) patients. It has been hypothesized that constitutive reduction in BMP signal by BMPRII mutations may cause abnormal vascular remodeling by promoting dedifferentiation of vascular smooth muscle cells (vSMCs). Here, we demonstrate that infusion of the amiloride analog phenamil during chronic-hypoxia treatment in rat attenuates development of PAH and vascular remodeling. Phenamil induces Tribbles homolog 3 (Trb3), a positive modulator of the BMP pathway that acts by stabilizing the Smad family signal transducers. Through induction of Trb3, phenamil promotes the differentiated, contractile vSMC phenotype characterized by elevated expression of contractile genes and reduced cell growth and migration. Phenamil activates the Trb3 gene transcription via activation of the calcium-calcineurin-nuclear factor of activated T cell (NFAT) pathway. These results indicate that constitutive elevation of Trb3 by phenamil is a potential therapy for IPAH and FPAH. PMID:21135135

  20. Effects of long term treatment with high doses of odanacatib on bone mass, bone strength, and remodeling/modeling in newly ovariectomized monkeys.

    PubMed

    Duong, L T; Pickarski, M; Cusick, T; Chen, C M; Zhuo, Y; Scott, K; Samadfam, R; Smith, S Y; Pennypacker, B L

    2016-07-01

    The objectives here were to evaluate the effects of odanacatib (ODN) at doses exceeding the clinical exposure on biomechanical properties of lumbar vertebrae (LV), hip and central femur (CF), and compare ODN to alendronate (ALN) on bone remodeling/modeling in ovariectomized (OVX) monkeys. Ten days post-surgery, animals were treated with vehicle (VEH), ODN-L (2mg/kg/day, p.o.), ODN-H (8/4mg/kg/day), or ALN (30μg/kg/week, s.c.) for 20months. An intact group was also included. ODN-L provided systemic exposures of 1.8-fold of clinical exposure. ODN-H started at 20-fold for 5.5months, and then reduced to 7.8-fold of clinical exposure, compared to ALN at approximated clinical exposure. From cross sectional analyses, LV density and peak load in ODN at both doses or ALN were not different from VEH or Intact. However, cortical thickness of femoral neck (FN) and CF in ODN were higher (21-34%, p<0.05) than VEH, due to smaller endocortical (Ec) perimeter of FN (10-11%; p<0.05) and CF (9-12%; ODN-L, p<0.05), and larger CF periosteal (Ps) perimeter (2-12%; ODN-H, p<0.001) versus VEH. ODN groups also showed slightly higher cortical porosity and Ps non-lamellar bone in CF. ODN-H treatment resulted in higher CF peak load (p<0.05) versus VEH. For all bone sites analyzed, a positive, linear relationship (r(2)=0.46-0.69, p<0.0001) of peak load to density or structural parameters was demonstrated. No treatment-related differences in the derived intrinsic strength properties were evidenced as compared between groups. ALN reduced all remodeling surfaces without affecting Ps modeling. Trabecular and intracortical remodeling were reduced in ODN groups, similar to ALN. Ec mineralizing surface in ODN-H trended to be lower than VEH by month 20, but Ec bone formation indices in ODN groups generally were not different from VEH. Ps modeling in ODN groups was significantly higher than other treatment groups. This study overall demonstrated the bone safety profile of ODN and its unique mechanism

  1. Prostate cancer specific integrin αvβ3 modulates bone metastatic growth and tissue remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McCabe, NP; De, S; Vasanji, A; Brainard, J; Byzova, TV

    2009-01-01

    The management of pain and morbidity owing to the spreading and growth of cancer within bone remains to be a paramount problem in clinical care. Cancer cells actively transform bone, however, the molecular requirements and mechanisms of this process remain unclear. This study shows that functional modulation of the αvβ3 integrin receptor in prostate cancer cells is required for progression within bone and determines tumor-induced bone tissue transformation. Using histology and quantitative microCT analysis, we show that αvβ3 integrin is required not only for tumor growth within the bone but for tumor-induced bone gain, a response resembling bone lesions in prostate cancer patients. Expression of normal, fully functional αvβ3 enabled tumor growth in bone (incidence: 4/4), whereas αvβ3 (—), inactive or constitutively active mutants of αvβ3 did not (incidence: 0/4, 0/6 and 1/7, respectively) within a 35-day-period. This response appeared to be bone-specific in comparison to the subcutis where tumor incidence was greater than 60% for all groups. Interestingly, bone residing prostate cancer cells expressing normal or dis-regulated αvβ3 (either inactive of constitutively active), but not those lacking β3 promoted bone gain or afforded protection from bone loss in the presence or absence of histologically detectable tumor 35 days following implantation. As bone is replete with ligands for β3 integrin, we next demonstrated that αvβ3 integrin activation on tumor cells is essential for the recognition of key bone-specific matrix proteins. As a result, prostate cancer cells expressing fully functional but not dis-regulated αvβ3 integrin are able to control their own adherence and migration to bone matrix, functions that facilitate tumor growth and control bone lesion development. PMID:17369840

  2. Determination of remodeling parameters for a strain-adaptive finite element model of the distal ulna.

    PubMed

    Neuert, Mark A C; Dunning, Cynthia E

    2013-09-01

    Strain energy-based adaptive material models are used to predict bone resorption resulting from stress shielding induced by prosthetic joint implants. Generally, such models are governed by two key parameters: a homeostatic strain-energy state (K) and a threshold deviation from this state required to initiate bone reformation (s). A refinement procedure has been performed to estimate these parameters in the femur and glenoid; this study investigates the specific influences of these parameters on resulting density distributions in the distal ulna. A finite element model of a human ulna was created using micro-computed tomography (µCT) data, initialized to a homogeneous density distribution, and subjected to approximate in vivo loading. Values for K and s were tested, and the resulting steady-state density distribution compared with values derived from µCT images. The sensitivity of these parameters to initial conditions was examined by altering the initial homogeneous density value. The refined model parameters selected were then applied to six additional human ulnae to determine their performance across individuals. Model accuracy using the refined parameters was found to be comparable with that found in previous studies of the glenoid and femur, and gross bone structures, such as the cortical shell and medullary canal, were reproduced. The model was found to be insensitive to initial conditions; however, a fair degree of variation was observed between the six specimens. This work represents an important contribution to the study of changes in load transfer in the distal ulna following the implementation of commercial orthopedic implants. PMID:23804949

  3. Cybernetic aspects of bone modeling and remodeling, with special reference to osteoporosis and whole-bone strength.

    PubMed

    Frost, H M

    2001-01-01

    Assume mythical physiologists were taught that renal physiology and its disorders depend on "kidney cells" and their regulation by nonmechanical factors, but were taught nothing about nephrons. For decades they "knew" that idea was correct, just as Ptolemy "knew" the universe centers on our planet. But then others began to describe nephrons, their roles in renal physiology and disorders, and problems they revealed in former views, so doubts and controversies began. Today real physiologists encounter a similar situation for bone health and its disorders. A 1960 paradigm attributed such things to bone's effector cells (osteoblasts and osteoclasts) and their regulation by nonmechanical factors, without "nephron-equivalent" or biomechanical input. But both mechanical and nonmechanical factors regulate bone's nephron equivalents. Adding features of those equivalents to the 1960 views led to the Utah paradigm, which suggests problems in former views and better explanations for "osteoporosis," whole-bone strength, and other bone disorders. Such things incited controversies among current skeletal physiologists. Cybernetics concerns the relationships, mechanisms, signals, and message traffic that help to control the behavior and other features of dynamic systems. A cybernetic analysis of the bone physiology in the Utah paradigm can add many features to the 1960 paradigm that help to understand osteoporoses, other bone disorders, and whole-bone strength (and bone mass). The added features also show new and pertinent targets for the related research. PMID:11460869

  4. [Effects of weightlessness on phosphorus and calcium metabolism and bone remodeling].

    PubMed

    Alexandre, C; Chappard, D; Vico, L; Minaire, P; Riffat, G

    1986-05-17

    Weightlessness results in negative calcium balance which can only reflect a redistribution of calcium in the body: the loss of calcium in the faeces and/or urine is constant, but an increase in urinary hydroxyproline indicating bone collagen destruction is not always detectable; moreover, a slowing down of collagen maturation may be suspected. Bone analysis by histomorphometry in animals and by indirect, non-invasive methods in man shows a decrease in bone mass. However, this bone tissue atrophy might only reflect excessive ageing of the bone during weightlessness, as suggested by slow bone formation and lack of variation in bone resorption. Since the experimental results obtained in men and animals during simulated weightlessness on earth are not strictly identical with those observed in space- flights, their validity may be questioned. Additional studies (notably histomorphometric studies) are therefore required for a better knowledge, as well as prevention, of the problems raised by human life in space. PMID:2940573

  5. Enhancement of local bone remodeling in osteoporotic rabbits by biomimic multilayered structures on Ti6Al4V implants.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ling; Luo, Zhong; Hu, Yan; Shen, Xinkun; Li, Menghuan; Li, Liqi; Zhang, Yuan; Yang, Weihu; Liu, Peng; Cai, Kaiyong

    2016-06-01

    To enhance long-term survival of titanium implants in patients with osteoporosis, chitosan/gelatin multilayers containing bone morphogenetic protein 2(BMP2) and an antiosteoporotic agent of calcitonin (CT) are deposited on the Ti6Al4V (TC4) implants through layer-by-layer (LBL) electrostatic assembly technique. Here, the obtained titanium alloy implant (TC4/LBL/CT/BMP2) can regulate the release of loaded calcitonin and BMP2 agents in a sustaining manner to accelerate the bone formation and simultaneously inhibit bone resorption. In vitro results show that the bone-related cells on TC4/LBL/CT/BMP2 present the lowest production level of tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) but the highest (p < 0.05) level of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, osteocalcin production, mineralization capacity and osteoblast-related gene expression among all groups after treatment for 7 or 21 days, respectively. Besides, in vivo studies of micro-CT analysis, routine histological and immunohistochemical analysis also collectively demonstrate that the TC4/LBL/CT/BMP2 implant can dramatically promote the formation and remodeling of new bone in osteoporotic rabbits after implantation for 30 days and 90 days, respectively. In vivo push-out testing further confirms that the TC4/LBL/CT/BMP2 implant has the highest (p < 0.01) interfacial shear strength and favorable bone-implant osseointegration. Overall, this study establishes a simple and profound methodology to fabricate a biofunctional TC4 implant for the treatment of local osteoporotic fractures in vivo. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1437-1451, 2016. PMID:26822259

  6. Adaptive Remodeling of the Bacterial Proteome by Specific Ribosomal Modification Regulates Pseudomonas Infection and Niche Colonisation

    PubMed Central

    Little, Richard H.; Grenga, Lucia; Saalbach, Gerhard; Howat, Alexandra M.; Pfeilmeier, Sebastian; Trampari, Eleftheria; Malone, Jacob G.

    2016-01-01

    Post-transcriptional control of protein abundance is a highly important, underexplored regulatory process by which organisms respond to their environments. Here we describe an important and previously unidentified regulatory pathway involving the ribosomal modification protein RimK, its regulator proteins RimA and RimB, and the widespread bacterial second messenger cyclic-di-GMP (cdG). Disruption of rimK affects motility and surface attachment in pathogenic and commensal Pseudomonas species, with rimK deletion significantly compromising rhizosphere colonisation by the commensal soil bacterium P. fluorescens, and plant infection by the pathogens P. syringae and P. aeruginosa. RimK functions as an ATP-dependent glutamyl ligase, adding glutamate residues to the C-terminus of ribosomal protein RpsF and inducing specific effects on both ribosome protein complement and function. Deletion of rimK in P. fluorescens leads to markedly reduced levels of multiple ribosomal proteins, and also of the key translational regulator Hfq. In turn, reduced Hfq levels induce specific downstream proteomic changes, with significant increases in multiple ABC transporters, stress response proteins and non-ribosomal peptide synthetases seen for both ΔrimK and Δhfq mutants. The activity of RimK is itself controlled by interactions with RimA, RimB and cdG. We propose that control of RimK activity represents a novel regulatory mechanism that dynamically influences interactions between bacteria and their hosts; translating environmental pressures into dynamic ribosomal changes, and consequently to an adaptive remodeling of the bacterial proteome. PMID:26845436

  7. Spatial distribution and remodeling of elastic modulus of bone in micro-regime as prediction of early stage osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Grover, Kartikey; Lin, Liangjun; Hu, Minyi; Muir, Jesse; Qin, Yi-Xian

    2016-01-25

    We assessed the local distribution of bone mechanical properties on a micro-nano-scale and its correlation to strain distribution. Left tibia samples were obtained from 5-month old female Sprague Dawley rats, including baseline control (n=9) and hindlimb suspended (n=9) groups. Elastic modulus was measured by nanoindentation at the dedicated locations. Three additional tibias from control rats were loaded axially to measure bone strain, with 6-10N at 1Hz on a Bose machine for strain measurements. In the control group, the difference of the elastic modulus between periosteum and endosteum was much higher at the anterior and posterior regions (2.6GPa), where higher strain differences were observed (45μɛ). Minimal elastic modulus difference between periosteum and endosteum was observed at the medial region (0.2GPa), where neutral axis of the strain distribution was oriented with lower strain difference (5μɛ). In the disuse group, however, the elastic modulus differences in the anterior posterior regions reduced to 1.2GPa from 2.6GPa in the control group, and increased in the medial region to 2.7GPa from 0.2GPa. It is suggested that the remodeling rate in a region of bone is possibly influenced by the strain gradient from periosteum to endosteum. Such pattern of moduli gradients was compromised in disuse osteopenia, suggesting that the remodeling in distribution of micro-nano-elastic moduli among different regions may serve as a predictor for early stage of osteoporosis. PMID:26705110

  8. 17ß-Estradiol Regulates mTORC2 Sensitivity to Rapamycin in Adaptive Cardiac Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Kusch, Angelika; Schmidt, Maria; Gürgen, Dennis; Postpieszala, Daniel; Catar, Rusan; Hegner, Björn; Davidson, Merci M.; Mahmoodzadeh, Shokoufeh; Dragun, Duska

    2015-01-01

    Adaptive cardiac remodeling is characterized by enhanced signaling of mTORC2 downstream kinase Akt. In females, 17ß-estradiol (E2), as well as Akt contribute essentially to sex-related premenopausal cardioprotection. Pharmacologic mTOR targeting with rapamycin is increasingly used for various clinical indications, yet burdened with clinical heterogeneity in therapy responses. The drug inhibits mTORC1 and less-so mTORC2. In male rodents, rapamycin decreases maladaptive cardiac hypertrophy whereas it leads to detrimental dilative cardiomyopathy in females. We hypothesized that mTOR inhibition could interfere with 17β-estradiol (E2)-mediated sexual dimorphism and adaptive cell growth and tested responses in murine female hearts and cultured female cardiomyocytes. Under physiological in vivo conditions, rapamycin compromised mTORC2 function only in female, but not in male murine hearts. In cultured female cardiomyocytes, rapamycin impaired simultaneously IGF-1 induced activation of both mTOR signaling branches, mTORC1 and mTORC2 only in presence of E2. Use of specific estrogen receptor (ER)α- and ERβ-agonists indicated involvement of both estrogen receptors (ER) in rapamycin effects on mTORC1 and mTORC2. Classical feedback mechanisms common in tumour cells with upregulation of PI3K signaling were not involved. E2 effect on Akt-pS473 downregulation by rapamycin was independent of ERK as shown by sequential mTOR and MEK-inhibition. Furthermore, regulatory mTORC2 complex defining component rictor phosphorylation at Ser1235, known to interfere with Akt-substrate binding to mTORC2, was not altered. Functionally, rapamycin significantly reduced trophic effect of E2 on cell size. In addition, cardiomyocytes with reduced Akt-pS473 under rapamycin treatment displayed decreased SERCA2A mRNA and protein expression suggesting negative functional consequences on cardiomyocyte contractility. Rictor silencing confirmed regulation of SERCA2A expression by mTORC2 in E2-cultured

  9. Influence of Exercise on Bone Remodeling-Related Hormones and Cytokines in Ovariectomized Rats: A Model of Postmenopausal Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Li, Lihui; Chen, Xi; Lv, Shuang; Dong, Miaomiao; Zhang, Li; Tu, Jiaheng; Yang, Jie; Zhang, Lingli; Song, Yinan; Xu, Leiting; Zou, Jun

    2014-01-01

    This study aims to explore the effects of exercise on postmenopausal osteoporosis and the mechanisms by which exercise affects bone remodeling. Sixty-three Wistar female rats were randomly divided into five groups: (1) control group, (2) sham-operated group, (3) OVX (Ovariectomy) group, (4) DES-OVX (Diethylstilbestrol-OVX) group, and (5) Ex-OVX (Exercise-OVX) group. The rat osteoporosis model was established through ovariectomy. The Ex-OVX rats were made to run 251.2 meters every day, 6 d/wk for 3 months in a running wheel. Trabecular bone volume (TBV%), total resorption surface (TRS%), trabecular formation surface (TFS%), mineralization rate (MAR), bone cortex mineralization rate (mAR), and osteoid seam width (OSW) were determined by bone histomorphometry. The mRNA and protein levels of interleukin-1β (IL-1β2), interleukin-6 (IL-6), and cyclooxygenase-2 (Cox-2) were determined by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry, respectively. Serum levels of estrogen estradiol (E2), calcitonin (CT), osteocalcin (BGP), and parathyroid hormone (PTH) were determined by ELISA assays. The investigation revealed that compared to the control and the sham-operated groups, the OVX group showed significantly lower levels of TBV%, E2, and CT, but much higher levels of TRS%, TFS%, MAR, OSW, BGP, and PTH. The Ex-OVX group showed increased TBV% and serum levels of E2 and CT compared to the OVX group. Ovariectomy also led to a significant increase in IL-1β mRNA and protein levels in the bone marrow and IL-6 and Cox-2 protein levels in tibias. In addition, the Ex-OVX group showed lower levels of IL-1 mRNA and protein, IL-6 mRNA, and Cox-2 mRNA and protein than those in the OVX group. The upshot of the study suggests that exercise can significantly increase bone mass in postmenopausal osteoporosis rat models by inhibiting bone resorption and increasing bone formation, especially in trabecular bones. PMID:25393283

  10. Effects of remifemin treatment on bone integrity and remodeling in rats with ovariectomy-induced osteoporosis.

    PubMed

    Cui, Guangxia; Leng, Huijie; Wang, Ke; Wang, Jianwei; Zhu, Sainan; Jia, Jing; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Weiguang; Qin, Lihua; Bai, Wenpei

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of Remifemin (isopropanolic extract of Cimicifuga Racemosa) on postmenopausal osteoporosis. 120 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups: sham surgery with vehicle, ovariectomy with vehicle, ovariectomy with estradiol valerate, or ovariectomy with Remifemin. Daily oral administrations of the vehicle, estradiol valerate, or Remifemin began 2 weeks after surgery and lasted to 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Ten rats in each group were sacrificed at each timestep with assessment of bone mineral density, trabecular bone structure, and biomechanical parameters of the femur and lumbar vertebra. Bone turnover markers were evaluated 12 weeks after surgery. Both drugs prevented bone density loss in the distal end of the femur and preserved the trabecular bone structure in both the lumbar vertebra and distal end of the femur following ovariectomy. Both drugs protected bone stiffness at the tested regions and reduced bone reabsorption in ovariectomized rats. The preventive effects of Remifemin against bone-loss can rival those of estradiol valerate if treatment duration is adequately extended. In conclusion, Remifemin may demonstrate equivalent effects to estradiol valerate in terms of preventing postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:24349369

  11. Effects of Remifemin Treatment on Bone Integrity and Remodeling in Rats with Ovariectomy-Induced Osteoporosis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ke; Wang, Jianwei; Zhu, Sainan; Jia, Jing; Chen, Xing; Zhang, Weiguang; Qin, Lihua; Bai, Wenpei

    2013-01-01

    This study aims to evaluate the effects of Remifemin (isopropanolic extract of Cimicifuga Racemosa) on postmenopausal osteoporosis. 120 female Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to four groups: sham surgery with vehicle, ovariectomy with vehicle, ovariectomy with estradiol valerate, or ovariectomy with Remifemin. Daily oral administrations of the vehicle, estradiol valerate, or Remifemin began 2 weeks after surgery and lasted to 4, 8, or 12 weeks. Ten rats in each group were sacrificed at each timestep with assessment of bone mineral density, trabecular bone structure, and biomechanical parameters of the femur and lumbar vertebra. Bone turnover markers were evaluated 12 weeks after surgery. Both drugs prevented bone density loss in the distal end of the femur and preserved the trabecular bone structure in both the lumbar vertebra and distal end of the femur following ovariectomy. Both drugs protected bone stiffness at the tested regions and reduced bone reabsorption in ovariectomized rats. The preventive effects of Remifemin against bone-loss can rival those of estradiol valerate if treatment duration is adequately extended. In conclusion, Remifemin may demonstrate equivalent effects to estradiol valerate in terms of preventing postmenopausal osteoporosis. PMID:24349369

  12. In Vivo Hypobaric Hypoxia Performed During the Remodeling Process Accelerates Bone Healing in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Durand, Marjorie; Collombet, Jean-Marc; Frasca, Sophie; Begot, Laurent; Lataillade, Jean-Jacques; Le Bousse-Kerdilès, Marie-Caroline

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the effects of respiratory hypobaric hypoxia on femoral bone-defect repair in mice because hypoxia is believed to influence both mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) and hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, a process involved in the bone-healing mechanism. To mimic conditions of non-weight-bearing limb immobilization in patients suffering from bone trauma, our hypoxic mouse model was further subjected to hind-limb unloading. A hole was drilled in the right femur of adult male C57/BL6J mice. Four days after surgery, mice were subjected to hind-limb unloading for 1 week. Seven days after surgery, mice were either housed for 4 days in a hypobaric room (FiO2 at 10%) or kept under normoxic conditions. Unsuspended control mice were housed in either hypobaric or normoxic conditions. Animals were sacrificed on postsurgery day 11 to allow for collection of both contralateral and lesioned femurs, blood, and spleen. As assessed by microtomography, delayed hypoxia enhanced bone-healing efficiency by increasing the closing of the cortical defect and the newly synthesized bone volume in the cavity by +55% and +35%, respectively. Proteome analysis and histomorphometric data suggested that bone-repair improvement likely results from the acceleration of the natural bone-healing process rather than from extended mobilization of MSC-derived osteoprogenitors. Hind-limb unloading had hardly any effect beyond delayed hypoxia-enhanced bone-healing efficiency. PMID:24944208

  13. Ventricular structure, function, and mechanics at high altitude: chronic remodeling in Sherpa vs. short-term lowlander adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Ainslie, Philip N.; Hughes, Michael G.; Stöhr, Eric J.; Cotter, James D.; Nio, Amanda Q. X.; Shave, Rob

    2014-01-01

    Short-term, high-altitude (HA) exposure raises pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and decreases left-ventricular (LV) volumes. However, relatively little is known of the long-term cardiac consequences of prolonged exposure in Sherpa, a highly adapted HA population. To investigate short-term adaptation and potential long-term cardiac remodeling, we studied ventricular structure and function in Sherpa at 5,050 m (n = 11; 31 ± 13 yr; mass 68 ± 10 kg; height 169 ± 6 cm) and lowlanders at sea level (SL) and following 10 ± 3 days at 5,050 m (n = 9; 34 ± 7 yr; mass 82 ± 10 kg; height 177 ± 6 cm) using conventional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. At HA, PASP was higher in Sherpa and lowlanders compared with lowlanders at SL (both P < 0.05). Sherpa had smaller right-ventricular (RV) and LV stroke volumes than lowlanders at SL with lower RV systolic strain (P < 0.05) but similar LV systolic mechanics. In contrast to LV systolic mechanics, LV diastolic, untwisting velocity was significantly lower in Sherpa compared with lowlanders at both SL and HA. After partial acclimatization, lowlanders demonstrated no change in the RV end-diastolic area; however, both RV strain and LV end-diastolic volume were reduced. In conclusion, short-term hypoxia induced a reduction in RV systolic function that was also evident in Sherpa following chronic exposure. We propose that this was consequent to a persistently higher PASP. In contrast to the RV, remodeling of LV volumes and normalization of systolic mechanics indicate structural and functional adaptation to HA. However, altered LV diastolic relaxation after chronic hypoxic exposure may reflect differential remodeling of systolic and diastolic LV function. PMID:24876358

  14. Ventricular structure, function, and mechanics at high altitude: chronic remodeling in Sherpa vs. short-term lowlander adaptation.

    PubMed

    Stembridge, Mike; Ainslie, Philip N; Hughes, Michael G; Stöhr, Eric J; Cotter, James D; Nio, Amanda Q X; Shave, Rob

    2014-08-01

    Short-term, high-altitude (HA) exposure raises pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) and decreases left-ventricular (LV) volumes. However, relatively little is known of the long-term cardiac consequences of prolonged exposure in Sherpa, a highly adapted HA population. To investigate short-term adaptation and potential long-term cardiac remodeling, we studied ventricular structure and function in Sherpa at 5,050 m (n = 11; 31 ± 13 yr; mass 68 ± 10 kg; height 169 ± 6 cm) and lowlanders at sea level (SL) and following 10 ± 3 days at 5,050 m (n = 9; 34 ± 7 yr; mass 82 ± 10 kg; height 177 ± 6 cm) using conventional and speckle-tracking echocardiography. At HA, PASP was higher in Sherpa and lowlanders compared with lowlanders at SL (both P < 0.05). Sherpa had smaller right-ventricular (RV) and LV stroke volumes than lowlanders at SL with lower RV systolic strain (P < 0.05) but similar LV systolic mechanics. In contrast to LV systolic mechanics, LV diastolic, untwisting velocity was significantly lower in Sherpa compared with lowlanders at both SL and HA. After partial acclimatization, lowlanders demonstrated no change in the RV end-diastolic area; however, both RV strain and LV end-diastolic volume were reduced. In conclusion, short-term hypoxia induced a reduction in RV systolic function that was also evident in Sherpa following chronic exposure. We propose that this was consequent to a persistently higher PASP. In contrast to the RV, remodeling of LV volumes and normalization of systolic mechanics indicate structural and functional adaptation to HA. However, altered LV diastolic relaxation after chronic hypoxic exposure may reflect differential remodeling of systolic and diastolic LV function. PMID:24876358

  15. Bone adaptation to altered loading after spinal cord injury: a study of bone and muscle strength.

    PubMed

    Rittweger, J; Gerrits, K; Altenburg, T; Reeves, N; Maganaris, C N; de Haan, A

    2006-01-01

    Bone loss from the paralysed limbs after spinal cord injury (SCI) is well documented. Under physiological conditions, bones are adapted to forces which mainly emerge from muscle pull. After spinal cord injury (SCI), muscles can no longer contract voluntarily and are merely activated during spasms. Based on the Ashworth scale, previous research has suggested that these spasms may mitigate bone losses. We therefore wished to assess muscle forces after SCI with a more direct measure and compare it to measures of bone strength. We hypothesized that the bones in SCI patients would be in relation to the loss of muscle forces. Six male patients with SCI 6.4 (SD 4.3) years earlier and 6 age-matched, able-bodied control subjects were investigated. Bone scans from the right knee were obtained by pQCT. The knee extensor muscles were electrically stimulated via the femoral nerve, isometric knee extension torque was measured and patellar tendon force was estimated. Tendon force upon electrical stimulation in the SCI group was 75% lower than in the control subjects (p<0.01). Volumetric bone mineral density of the patella and of the proximal tibia epiphysis were 50% lower in the SCI group than in the control subjects (p<0.01). Cortical area was lower by 43% in the SCI patients at the proximal tibia metaphysis, and by 33% at the distal femur metaphysis. No group differences were found in volumetric cortical density. Close curvilinear relationships were found between stress and volumetric density for the tibia epiphysis (r(2)=0.90) and for the patella (r(2)=0.91). A weaker correlation with the tendon force was found for the cortical area of the proximal tibia metaphysis (r(2)=0.63), and none for the distal femur metaphysis. These data suggest that, under steady state conditions after SCI, epiphyseal bones are well adapted to the muscular forces. For the metaphysis of the long bones, such an adaptation appears to be less evident. The reason for this remains unclear. PMID:17142949

  16. Regulators of G protein signaling 12 (Rgs12) promotes osteoclastogenesis in bone remodeling and pathologic bone loss

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium (Ca2+) signaling plays a pivotal role in controlling various cellular processes such as secretion, differentiation, proliferation, motility, and cell death through the release of Ca2+ from internal stores and entry from extracellular fluid. In bone, receptor activator of NF-kB ligand (RANKL)...

  17. In vivo micro-CT analysis of bone remodeling in a rat calvarial defect model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Umoh, Joseph U.; Sampaio, Arthur V.; Welch, Ian; Pitelka, Vasek; Goldberg, Harvey A.; Underhill, T. Michael; Holdsworth, David W.

    2009-04-01

    The rodent calvarial defect model is commonly used to investigate bone regeneration and wound healing. This study presents a micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) methodology for measuring the bone mineral content (BMC) in a rat calvarial defect and validates it by estimating its precision error. Two defect models were implemented. A single 6 mm diameter defect was created in 20 rats, which were imaged in vivo for longitudinal experiments. Three 5 mm diameter defects were created in three additional rats, which were repeatedly imaged ex vivo to determine precision. Four control rats and four rats treated with bone morphogenetic protein were imaged at 3, 6, 9 and 12 weeks post-surgery. Scan parameters were 80 kVp, 0.45 mA and 180 mAs. Images were reconstructed with an isotropic resolution of 45 µm. At 6 weeks, the BMC in control animals (4.37 ± 0.66 mg) was significantly lower (p < 0.05) than that in treated rats (11.29 ± 1.01 mg). Linear regression between the BMC and bone fractional area, from 20 rats, showed a strong correlation (r2 = 0.70, p < 0.0001), indicating that the BMC can be used, in place of previous destructive analysis techniques, to characterize bone growth. The high precision (2.5%) of the micro-CT methodology indicates its utility in detecting small BMC changes in animals.

  18. Augmented mandibular bone structurally adapts to functional loading.

    PubMed

    Verhoeven, J W; Ruijter, J M; Koole, R; de Putter, C; Terlou, M; Cune, M S

    2013-12-01

    Long-term changes in trabecular bone structure during the 10 years following onlay grafting with simultaneous mandibular implant placement were studied. Extraoral radiographs of both mandibular sides in eight patients were taken regularly. Bone structure was analysed using a custom-written image analysis program. Parameters studied were trabecular area and perimeter and marrow cavity area and perimeter. After skeletonisation of the trabecular network, the number of end points and branching points, skeleton length, and branch angle were determined. The observed structural changes agree with the development of a more complex and more delicate or fine osseous structure. The bone shows more trabecular branching. All changes are most pronounced in the graft spongiosa, but are also found in the graft cortex and in the original mandible. The mean trabecular branch angle becomes more horizontal. The applied technique can be used to analyse long-term changes in the architecture of bone grafts. Changes found in the graft architecture correspond to changes expected after functional adaptation to loading. PMID:23791249

  19. Bone loss and human adaptation to lunar gravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Keller, T. S.; Strauss, A. M.

    1992-01-01

    Long-duration space missions and establishment of permanently manned bases on the Moon and Mars are currently being planned. The weightless environment of space and the low-gravity environments of the Moon and Mars pose an unknown challenge to human habitability and survivability. Of particular concern in the medical research community today is the effect of less than Earth gravity on the human skeleton, since the limits, if any, of human endurance in low-gravity environments are unknown. This paper provides theoretical predictions on bone loss and skeletal adaptation to lunar and other nonterrestrial-gravity environments based upon the experimentally derived relationship, density approximately (mass x gravity)(exp 1/8). The predictions are compared to skeletal changes reported during bed rest, immobilization, certrifugation, and spaceflight. Countermeasures to reduce bone losses in fractional gravity are also discussed.

  20. Genetic and Hormonal Control of Bone Volume, Architecture, and Remodeling in XXY Mice

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Peter Y; Kalak, Robert; Lue, YanHe; Jia, Yue; Erkkila, Krista; Zhou, Hong; Seibel, Markus J; Wang, Christina; Swerdloff, Ronald S; Dunstan, Colin R

    2010-01-01

    Klinefelter syndrome is the most common chromosomal aneuploidy in men (XXY karyotype, 1 in 600 live births) and results in testicular (infertility and androgen deficiency) and nontesticular (cognitive impairment and osteoporosis) deficits. The extent to which skeletal changes are due to testosterone deficiency or arise directly from gene overdosage cannot be determined easily in humans. To answer this, we generated XXY mice through a four-generation breeding scheme. Eight intact XXY and 9 XY littermate controls and 8 castrated XXY mice and 8 castrated XY littermate controls were euthanized at 1 year of age. Castration occurred 6 months prior to killing. A third group of 9 XXY and 11 XY littermates were castrated and simultaneously implanted with a 1-cm Silastic testosterone capsule 8 weeks prior to sacrifice. Tibias were harvested from all three groups and examined by micro–computed tomography and histomorphometry. Blood testosterone concentration was assayed by radioimmunoassay. Compared with intact XY controls, intact androgen-deficient XXY mice had lower bone volume (6.8% ± 1.2% versus8.8% ± 1.7%, mean ± SD, p = .01) and thinner trabeculae (50 ± 4 µm versus 57 ± 5 µm, p = .007). Trabecular separation (270 ± 20 µm versus 270 ± 20 µm) or osteoclast number relative to bone surface (2.4 ± 1.0/mm2 versus 2.7 ± 1.5/mm2) did not differ significantly. Testosterone-replaced XXY mice continued to show lower bone volume (5.5% ± 2.4% versus 8.1% ± 3.5%, p = .026). They also exhibited greater trabecular separation (380 ± 69 µm versus 324 ± 62 µm, p = .040) but equivalent blood testosterone concentrations (6.3 ± 1.8 ng/mL versus 8.2 ± 4.2 ng/mL, p = .28) compared with testosterone-replaced XY littermates. In contrast, castration alone drastically decreased bone volume (p < .001), trabecular thickness (p = .05), and trabecular separation (p < .01) to such a great extent that differences between XXY and XY mice were undetectable. In conclusion, XXY mice

  1. Cartilage Repair and Subchondral Bone Remodeling in Response to Focal Lesions in a Mini-Pig Model: Implications for Tissue Engineering

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Matthew B.; Belkin, Nicole S.; Milby, Andrew H.; Henning, Elizabeth A.; Bostrom, Marc; Kim, Minwook; Pfeifer, Christian; Meloni, Gregory; Dodge, George R.; Burdick, Jason A.; Schaer, Thomas P.; Steinberg, David R.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Preclinical large animal models are essential for evaluating new tissue engineering (TE) technologies and refining surgical approaches for cartilage repair. Some preclinical animal studies, including the commonly used minipig model, have noted marked remodeling of the subchondral bone. However, the mechanisms underlying this response have not been well characterized. Thus, our objective was to compare in-vivo outcomes of chondral defects with varied injury depths and treatments. Design: Trochlear chondral defects were created in 11 Yucatan minipigs (6 months old). Groups included an untreated partial-thickness defect (PTD), an untreated full-thickness defect (FTD), and FTDs treated with microfracture, autologous cartilage transfer (FTD-ACT), or an acellular hyaluronic acid hydrogel. Six weeks after surgery, micro-computed tomography (μCT) was used to quantitatively assess defect fill and subchondral bone remodeling. The quality of cartilage repair was assessed using the ICRS-II histological scoring system and immunohistochemistry for type II collagen. A finite element model (FEM) was developed to assess load transmission. Results: Using μCT, substantial bone remodeling was observed for all FTDs, but not for the PTD group. The best overall histological scores and greatest type II collagen staining was found for the FTD-ACT and PTD groups. The FEM confirmed that only the FTD-ACT group could initially restore appropriate transfer of compressive loads to the underlying bone. Conclusions: The bony remodeling observed in this model system appears to be a biological phenomena and not a result of altered mechanical loading, with the depth of the focal chondral defect (partial vs. full thickness) dictating the bony remodeling response. The type of cartilage injury should be carefully controlled in studies utilizing this model to evaluate TE approaches for cartilage repair. PMID:25318414

  2. Effects of vitamin E on bone remodeling in perimenopausal women: mini review.

    PubMed

    Guralp, Onur

    2014-12-01

    Vitamin E is known to be the most important antioxidant in the body, protecting against the effects of toxic radicals. The main idea behind the studies on vitamin E and bone metabolism stems from the concept that oxidative stress may interfere with the bone formation activity of osteoblasts which in turn can lead to osteoporosis. This mini-review, summarizes the studies on the effects of vitamin E on bone mineral density, fracture risk, bone formation, and resorption markers in perimenopausal women. Current evidence does not the support daily use of vitamin E for protection against osteoporosis and hip fracture risk in perimenopausal women. However some benefit has been shown in some observational studies. Low vitamin E (>6.2mg/day) intake seems to be associated with an OR of 3.0 of hip fracture in current smokers. Compared with the highest quintile of alpha-tocopherol intake, the lowest quintile of intake conferred a multivariable-adjusted HR of 1.86 for hip fracture and 1.20 for any fracture. Alpha-tocopherol supplementation may alter the alpha-tocopherol/gamma-tocopherol ratio; which in turn may be associated with decreased osteoblastic activity. Interventional studies, especially randomized controlled trials (RCT), evaluating a possible causal relationship between serum vitamin E levels and BMD and hip fracture risk in perimenopausal women are needed. PMID:25248856

  3. Crosstalk of osteoblast and osteoclast precursors on mineralized collagen--towards an in vitro model for bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Bernhardt, A; Thieme, S; Domaschke, H; Springer, A; Rösen-Wolff, A; Gelinsky, M

    2010-12-01

    Bone remodeling and, therefore, integration of implant materials require the coordinated regulation of osteoblast and osteoclast activity. This is why the in vitro evaluation of biomaterials for bone regeneration should involve not only the analysis of osteoblast differentiation but also the formation and differentiation of osteoclasts. In the present study, we applied a material made of mineralized collagen I that mimics extracellular bone matrix to establish a culture system, which allows the cocultivation of human monocytes and human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs), which were differentiated into osteoclast-like cells and osteoblasts, respectively. Both cell types were cultivated on membrane-like structures from mineralized collagen. Transwell inserts were used to spatially separate the cell types but allowed exchange of soluble factors. The osteoclastogenesis and osteogenic differentiation were evaluated by analysis of gene expression, determination of alkaline phosphatase (ALP), and tartrate-resistant acidic phosphatase (TRAP) activity. Furthermore, cell morphology was studied using scanning electron and transmission electron microscopy. Osteogenically induced hMSC showed an increased specific ALP activity as well as increased gene expression of gene coding for alkaline phosphatase (ALPL), when cocultivated with differentiating osteoclasts. Adipogenic differentiation of hMSCs was suppressed by the presence of osteoclasts as indicated by a major decrease in adipocyte cell number and a decrease in gene expression of adipogenic markers. The formation of multinucleated osteoclasts seems to be decreased in the presence of osteogenically induced hMSC as indicated by electron microscopic evaluation and determination of TRAP activity. However, gene expression of osteoclast markers was not decreased in coculture with osteogenically induced hMSC. PMID:20824694

  4. Suppressive effect of compact bone-derived mesenchymal stem cells on chronic airway remodeling in murine model of asthma.

    PubMed

    Ogulur, Ismail; Gurhan, Gulben; Aksoy, Ayca; Duruksu, Gokhan; Inci, Cigdem; Filinte, Deniz; Kombak, Faruk Erdem; Karaoz, Erdal; Akkoc, Tunc

    2014-05-01

    New therapeutic strategies are needed in the treatment of asthma besides vaccines and pharmacotherapies. For the development of novel therapies, the use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) is a promising approach in regenerative medicine. Delivery of compact bone (CB) derived MSCs to the injured lungs is an alternative treatment strategy for chronic asthma. In this study, we aimed to isolate highly enriched population of MSCs from mouse CB with regenerative capacity, and to investigate the impact of these cells in airway remodeling and inflammation in experimental ovalbumin-induced mouse model of chronic asthma. mCB-MSCs were isolated, characterized, labeled with GFP and then transferred into mice with chronic asthma developed by ovalbumin (OVA) provocation. Histopathological changes including basement membrane, epithelium, subepithelial smooth thickness and goblet cell hyperplasia, and MSCs migration to lung tissues were evaluated. These histopathological alterations were increased in ovalbumin-treated mice compared to PBS group (P<0.001). Intravenous administration of mCB-MSC significantly reduced these histopathological changes in both distal and proximal airways (P<0.001). We showed that GFP-labeled MSCs were located in the lungs of OVA group 2weeks after intravenous induction. mCB-MSCs also significantly promoted Treg response in ovalbumin-treated mice (OVA+MSC group) (P<0.037). Our studies revealed that mCB-MSCs migrated to lung tissue and suppressed histopathological changes in murine model of asthma. The results reported here provided evidence that mCB-MSCs may be an alternative strategy for the treatment of remodeling and inflammation associated with chronic asthma. PMID:24613203

  5. Osteoimmunology: the expanding role of immunoreceptors in osteoclasts and bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Long, Courtney L; Humphrey, Mary Beth

    2012-01-01

    The study of bone and immunology (termed osteoimmunology) has led to the discovery of many important similarities between the two systems including shared niches, mechanisms, cytokines and receptors. The bone marrow provides a niche for hematopoietic cells including those of the lymphoid and myeloid lineage. Osteoclasts, specialized polykarons arising from myeloid precursors, bind to bone and resorb the organic and inorganic components through secretion of acid and proteases. Osteoclasts are differentiated and activated by cytokines that can be produced by immune cells and osteoclast activity can be dysregulated in states of autoimmunity or high inflammation. Similar to B and T cells, osteoclasts require coordinated co-stimulation of signaling pathways provided in the form of receptor-associated immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif adaptor proteins, DAP12 and FcRγ, to drive differentiation and activation. In this review, we will cover the differentiation process of osteoclasts from the earliest precursors shown to have differentiation potential and the signals needed to drive these cells into osteoclast commitment and activation. PMID:23789115

  6. The effects of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol, parathyroid hormone, and thyroxine on trabecular bone remodeling in adult dogs. A histomorphometric study.

    PubMed Central

    High, W. B.; Capen, C. C.; Black, H. E.

    1981-01-01

    The effects of 1,25-dihydroxycholecalciferol (1,25-(OH)2D3), parathyroid hormone (PTH), and L-thyroxine (T4) on trabecular bone remodeling were evaluated by histomorphometric methods in adult female beagle dogs. Intravenous 1,25-(OH)2D3 (1.25 micrograms/day in equally divided doses) was administered intermittently for 6 days and withdrawn 14 days for three complete cycles. PTH was administered intravenously (2.5 U/kg/day) in divided doses 6 hours apart for 60 days. Thyroxine was given orally (1.0 mg/kg/day) in divided doses for a similar interval. Static and dynamic changes were evaluated using tetracycline and DCAF (2,4 BIS) N, N', Di (carboxymethyl) (amino methyl fluorescein) in vivo double labeling of bone from the iliac crest taken before treatment and after 60 days. The intermittent administration of 1,25-(OH)2D3 stimulated the bone resorption rate and depressed the formation rate. 1,25-(OH)2D3 increased trabecular resorption surfaces; osteoid surface, volume, and thickness; mineralization lag time; and osteoblast number but decreased the bone volume. Multiple small daily doses of PTH resulted in an overall negative balance in trabecular bone. This was associated with an increased trabecular surface-to-volume ratio, bone resorption and formation rates, active forming surfaces, osteoid volume and surface, life span of bone forming and resorbing sites, and the number of osteoclast nuclei. Thyroxine appeared to increase bone mass by enhancing the switch-over from the resorptive to the formative phase of remodeling. Coupling between osteoid apposition and mineralization was increased by recruiting more forming sites and prolonging their life span. Thyroxine increased bone resorption and formation rates, trabecular bone volume and balance, number of osteoclast nuclei, and life span of bone forming sites. The osteoid seam thickness and mineralization lag time were decreased. The present study demonstrated that 1,25-(OH)2D3, PTH, and thyroxine at the dose and

  7. Functional adaptation of long bone extremities involves the localized ``tuning'' of the cortical bone composition; evidence from Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buckley, Kevin; Kerns, Jemma G.; Birch, Helen L.; Gikas, Panagiotis D.; Parker, Anthony W.; Matousek, Pavel; Goodship, Allen E.

    2014-11-01

    In long bones, the functional adaptation of shape and structure occurs along the whole length of the organ. This study explores the hypothesis that adaptation of bone composition is also site-specific and that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of bone (and, thus, its mechanical properties) varies along the organ's length. Raman spectroscopy was used to map the chemical composition of long bones along their entire length in fine spatial resolution (1 mm), and then biochemical analysis was used to measure the mineral, collagen, water, and sulfated glycosaminoglycan content where site-specific differences were seen. The results show that the mineral-to-collagen ratio of the bone material in human tibiae varies by <5% along the mid-shaft but decreases by >10% toward the flared extremities of the bone. Comparisons with long bones from other large animals (horses, sheep, and deer) gave similar results with bone material composition changing across tens of centimeters. The composition of the bone apatite also varied with the phosphate-to-carbonate ratio decreasing toward the ends of the tibia. The data highlight the complexity of adaptive changes and raise interesting questions about the biochemical control mechanisms involved. In addition to their biological interest, the data provide timely information to researchers developing Raman spectroscopy as a noninvasive tool for measuring bone composition in vivo (particularly with regard to sampling and measurement protocol).

  8. In vivo bone tunnel remodeling in symptomatic patients after ACL reconstruction: a retrospective comparison of articular and extra-articular fixation

    PubMed Central

    Mathis, Dominic T.; Rasch, Helmut; Hirschmann, Michael T.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Background there is only a paucity of studies dealing with bone remodeling within the tunnels after anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) reconstruction. The objective of this study was to evaluate the influence of tendon graft type and surgical fixation technique on bone tunnel remodeling in patients with symptomatic knees after ACL reconstruction. Methods in a retrospective study 99mTc-HDP bone tracer uptake (BTU) in SPECT/CT of 57 knees with symptoms of pain and/or instability after ACL reconstruction was investigated. All 57 knees were subdivided according their anatomy (femur and tibia), fixation (articular versus extra-articular fixation) and graft types into eight groups: femoral-articular versus extra-articular fixation using bone-patellar tendon-bone (BPTB) and hamstring autografts; tibial-articular versus extra-articular fixation using patellar tendon and hamstring autografts; BTU grading for each area of the localisation scheme were recorded. Tunnel diameter and length was measured in the CT scans. Results BTU was higher for the articular fixation in the femur and for the extra-articular fixation in the tibial tunnel. Patellar tendon graft fixation showed a significantly higher BTU in the superior-lateral and posterior-central area of the tibia, meaning the areas of the tibial tunnel near the entrance into the joint. Tunnel enlargement correlated significantly with increased BTU (p<0.05). Conclusion assessment of in vivo bone tunnel remodelling in symptomatic patients after ACL reconstruction revealed different patterns of BTU with regards to graft and fixation method. PMID:26958543

  9. Osteoporosis and alzheimer pathology: Role of cellular stress response and hormetic redox signaling in aging and bone remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Cornelius, Carolin; Koverech, Guido; Crupi, Rosalia; Di Paola, Rosanna; Koverech, Angela; Lodato, Francesca; Scuto, Maria; Salinaro, Angela T.; Cuzzocrea, Salvatore; Calabrese, Edward J.; Calabrese, Vittorio

    2014-01-01

    Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and osteoporosis are multifactorial progressive degenerative disorders. Increasing evidence shows that osteoporosis and hip fracture are common complication observed in AD patients, although the mechanisms underlying this association remain poorly understood. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are emerging as intracellular redox signaling molecules involved in the regulation of bone metabolism, including receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand-dependent osteoclast differentiation, but they also have cytotoxic effects that include lipoperoxidation and oxidative damage to proteins and DNA. ROS generation, which is implicated in the regulation of cellular stress response mechanisms, is an integrated, highly regulated, process under control of redox sensitive genes coding for redox proteins called vitagenes. Vitagenes, encoding for proteins such as heat shock proteins (Hsps) Hsp32, Hsp70, the thioredoxin, and the sirtuin protein, represent a systems controlling a complex network of intracellular signaling pathways relevant to life span and involved in the preservation of cellular homeostasis under stress conditions. Consistently, nutritional anti-oxidants have demonstrated their neuroprotective potential through a hormetic-dependent activation of vitagenes. The biological relevance of dose–response affects those strategies pointing to the optimal dosing to patients in the treatment of numerous diseases. Thus, the heat shock response has become an important hormetic target for novel cytoprotective strategies focusing on the pharmacological development of compounds capable of modulating stress response mechanisms. Here we discuss possible signaling mechanisms involved in the activation of vitagenes which, relevant to bone remodeling and through enhancement of cellular stress resistance provide a rationale to limit the deleterious consequences associated to homeostasis disruption with consequent impact on the aging process. PMID:24959146

  10. Using PET/CT Bone Scan Dynamic Data to Evaluate Tibia Remodeling When a Taylor Spatial Frame Is Used: Short and Longer Term Differences

    PubMed Central

    Lundblad, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q.; Karlsson-Thur, Charlotte; Jonsson, Cathrine; Noz, Marilyn E.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Jacobsson, Hans; Weidenhielm, Lars

    2015-01-01

    Eighteen consecutive patients, treated with a Taylor Spatial Frame for complex tibia conditions, gave their informed consent to undergo Na18F− PET/CT bone scans. We present a Patlak-like analysis utilizing an approximated blood time-activity curve eliminating the need for blood aliquots. Additionally, standardized uptake values (SUV) derived from dynamic acquisitions were compared to this Patlak-like approach. Spherical volumes of interest (VOIs) were drawn to include broken bone, other (normal) bone, and muscle. The SUVm(t) (m = max, mean) and a series of slopes were computed as (SUVm(ti) − SUVm(tj))/(ti − tj), for pairs of time values ti and tj. A Patlak-like analysis was performed for the same time values by computing ((VOIp(ti)/VOIe(ti))−(VOIp(tj)/VOIe(tj)))/(ti − tj), where p = broken bone, other bone, and muscle and e = expected activity in a VOI. Paired comparisons between Patlak-like and SUVm slopes showed good agreement by both linear regression and correlation coefficient analysis (r = 84%, rs = 78%-SUVmax, r = 92%, and rs = 91%-SUVmean), suggesting static scans could substitute for dynamic studies. Patlak-like slope differences of 0.1 min−1 or greater between examinations and SUVmax differences of ~5 usually indicated good remodeling progress, while negative Patlak-like slope differences of −0.06 min−1 usually indicated poor remodeling progress in this cohort. PMID:26436093

  11. A Finite Element Based Constrained Mixture Implementation for Arterial Growth, Remodeling, and Adaptation: Theory and Numerical Verification

    PubMed Central

    Valentín, A.; Humphrey, J. D.; Holzapfel, G. A.

    2013-01-01

    We implemented a constrained mixture model of arterial growth and remodeling (G&R) in a nonlinear finite element framework to facilitate numerical analyses of diverse cases of arterial adaptation and maladaptation, including disease progression, resulting in complex evolving geometries and compositions. This model enables hypothesis testing by predicting consequences of postulated characteristics of cell and matrix turnover, including evolving quantities and orientations of fibrillar constituents and non-homogenous degradation of elastin or loss of smooth muscle function. The non-linear finite element formulation is general within the context of arterial mechanics, but we restricted our present numerical verification to cylindrical geometries to allow comparisons to prior results for two special cases: uniform transmural changes in mass and differential G&R within a two-layered cylindrical model of the human aorta. The present finite element model recovers the results of these simplified semi-inverse analyses with good agreement. PMID:23713058

  12. Long-Term Administration of High-Fat Diet Corrects Abnormal Bone Remodeling in the Tibiae of Interleukin-6-Deficient Mice.

    PubMed

    Feng, Wei; Liu, Bo; Liu, Di; Hasegawa, Tomoka; Wang, Wei; Han, Xiuchun; Cui, Jian; Yimin; Oda, Kimimitsu; Amizuka, Norio; Li, Minqi

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we aimed to evaluate the influence of diet-induced obesity on IL-6 deficiency-induced bone remodeling abnormality. Seven-week-old IL-6(-/-) mice and their wild type (WT) littermates were fed a standard diet (SD) or high-fat diet (HFD) for 25 weeks. Lipid formation and bone metabolism in mice tibiae were investigated by histochemical analysis. Both IL-6(-/-) and WT mice fed the HFD showed notable body weight gain, thickened cortical bones, and adipose accumulation in the bone marrow. Notably, the HFD normalized the bone phenotype of IL-6(-/-) mice to that of their WT counterpart, as characterized by a decrease in bone mass and the presence of an obliquely arranged, plate-like morphology in the trabecular bone. Alkaline phosphatase and osteocalcin expressions were attenuated in both genotypes after HFD feeding, especially for the IL-6(-/-) mice. Meanwhile, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase staining was inhibited, osteoclast apoptosis rate down-regulated (revealed by TUNEL assay), and the proportion of cathepsin K (CK)-positive osteoclasts significantly increased in IL-6(-/-) mice on a HFD as compared with IL-6(-/-) mice on standard chow. Our results demonstrate that HFD-induced obesity reverses IL-6 deficiency-associated bone metabolic disorders by suppressing osteoblast activity, upregulating osteoclastic activity, and inhibiting osteoclast apoptosis. PMID:26416243

  13. The effects of a systemic single dose of zoledronic acid on post-implantation bone remodelling and inflammation in an ovariectomised rat model.

    PubMed

    Cardemil, Carina; Omar, Omar M; Norlindh, Birgitta; Wexell, Cecilia L; Thomsen, Peter

    2013-02-01

    Bisphosphonates reverse the negative effects of ovariectomy on bone, but they have also been associated with adverse processes in human jawbone. The molecular events determining bone regeneration and implant integration in osteoporotic conditions, with and without bisphosphonate treatment, are unclear. In this study, ovariectomised rats, to which a single dose of saline (NaCl) or zoledronic acid (Zol) was administered, received titanium alloy implants in their tibiae and mandibles. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay, gene expression analysis and histomorphometry were performed. The results show that ovariectomy, per se, upregulated the expression of genes denoting bone formation in the tibia, bone remodelling in the mandible and apoptosis in the tibia and mandible. Zoledronic acid administration resulted in lower levels of a remodelling marker in serum and downregulated gene expression for inflammation, bone formation, angiogenesis and apoptosis, mainly in the mandible, after 28 d of healing. Histomorphometry revealed improved bone-to-implant contact in the tibia, while the opposite was observed in the mandible. The present data show that a systemic single dose of zoledronic acid, in ovariectomised animals, results in site-specific differences in the regulation of genes involved in bone healing and regeneration in association with implant installation. These events occur in parallel with site-specific differences in the rate of osseointegration, indicating diverse tissue responses in the tibia and mandible after zoledronic acid treatment. The zoledronic acid effect on gene expression, during the late phase of healing in the mandible, suggests negative effects by the anti-resorptive agent on osseointegration at that particular site. PMID:23182921

  14. Can Na18F PET/CT Be Used to Study Bone Remodeling in the Tibia When Patients Are Being Treated with a Taylor Spatial Frame?

    PubMed Central

    Lundblad, Henrik; Maguire, Gerald Q.; Olivecrona, Henrik; Jonsson, Cathrine; Jacobsson, Hans; Noz, Marilyn E.; Zeleznik, Michael P.; Weidenhielm, Lars; Sundin, Anders

    2014-01-01

    Monitoring and quantifying bone remodeling are of interest, for example, in correction osteotomies, delayed fracture healing pseudarthrosis, bone lengthening, and other instances. Seven patients who had operations to attach an Ilizarov-derived Taylor Spatial Frame to the tibia gave informed consent. Each patient was examined by Na18F PET/CT twice, at approximately six weeks and three months after the operation. A validated software tool was used for the following processing steps. The first and second CT volumes were aligned in 3D and the respective PET volumes were aligned accordingly. In the first PET volume spherical volumes of interest (VOIs) were delineated for the crural fracture and normal bone and transferred to the second PET volume for SUVmax evaluation. This method potentially provides clinical insight into questions such as, when has the bone remodeling progressed well enough to safely remove the TSF? and when is intervention required, in a timelier manner than current methods? For example, in two patients who completed treatment, the SUVmax between the first and second PET/CT examination decreased by 42% and 13%, respectively. Further studies in a larger patient population are needed to verify these preliminary results by correlating regional Na18F PET measurements to clinical and radiological findings. PMID:24778581

  15. Cross-Talk Between Human Tenocytes and Bone Marrow Stromal Cells Potentiates Extracellular Matrix Remodeling In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Ekwueme, Emmanuel C.; Shah, Jay V.; Mohiuddin, Mahir; Ghebes, Corina A.; Crispim, João F.; Saris, Daniël B.F.; Fernandes, Hugo A.M.; Freeman, Joseph W.

    2016-01-01

    Tendon and ligament (T/L) pathologies account for a significant portion of musculoskeletal injuries and disorders. Tissue engineering has emerged as a promising solution in the regeneration of both tissues. Specifically, the use of multipotent human mesenchymal stromal cells (hMSC) has shown great promise to serve as both a suitable cell source for tenogenic regeneration and a source of trophic factors to induce tenogenesis. Using four donor sets, we investigated the bidirectional paracrine tenogenic response between human hamstring tenocytes (hHT) and bone marrow-derived hMSC. Cell metabolic assays showed that only one hHT donor experienced sustained notable increases in cell metabolic activity during co-culture. Histological staining confirmed that co-culture induced elevated collagen protein levels in both cell types at varying time-points in two of four donor sets assessed. Gene expression analysis using qPCR showed the varied up-regulation of anabolic and catabolic markers involved in extracellular matrix maintenance for hMSC and hHT. Furthermore, analysis of hMSC/hHT co-culture secretome using a reporter cell line for TGF-β, a potent inducer of tenogenesis, revealed a trend of higher TGF-β bioactivity in hMSC secretome compared to hHT. Finally, hHT cytoskeletal immunostaining confirmed that both cell types released soluble factors capable of inducing favorable tenogenic morphology, comparable to control levels of soluble TGF-β1. These results suggest a potential for TGF-β-mediated signaling mechanism that is involved during the paracrine interplay between the two cell types that is reminiscent of T/L matrix remodeling/ turnover. These findings have significant implications in the clinical use of hMSC for common T/L pathologies. PMID:26308651

  16. Bone morphogenic protein-2 regulates the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs in CBDL rat serum-induced pulmonary microvascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chang; Chen, Lin; Zeng, Jing; Cui, Jian; Ning, Jiao-Nin; Wang, Guan-Song; Belguise, Karine; Wang, Xiaobo; Qian, Gui-Sheng; Lu, Kai-Zhi; Yi, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is characterized by an arterial oxygenation defect induced by intrapulmonary vasodilation (IPVD) that increases morbidity and mortality. In our previous study, it was determined that both the proliferation and the myogenic differentiation of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) play a key role in the development of IPVD. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the relationship between IPVD and the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs remains unknown. Additionally, it has been shown that bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP2), via the control of protein expression, may regulate cell differentiation including cardiomyocyte differentiation, neuronal differentiation and odontoblastic differentiation. In this study, we observed that common bile duct ligation (CBDL)-rat serum induced the upregulation of the expression of several myogenic proteins (SM-α-actin, calponin, SM-MHC) and enhanced the expression levels of BMP2 mRNA and protein in PMVECs. We also observed that both the expression levels of Smad1/5 and the activation of phosphorylated Smad1/5 were significantly elevated in PMVECs following exposure to CBDL-rat serum, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of Smurf1. The blockage of the BMP2/Smad signaling pathway with Noggin inhibited the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs, a process that was associated with relatively low expression levels of both SM-α-actin and calponin in the setting of CBDL-rat serum exposure, although SM-MHC expression was not affected. These findings suggested that the BMP2/Smad signaling pathway is involved in the myogenic differentiation of the PMVECs. In conclusion, our data highlight the pivotal role of BMP2 in the CBDL-rat serum-induced myogenic differentiation of PMVECs via the activation of both Smad1 and Smad5 and the down-regulation of Smurf1, which may represent a potential therapy for HPS-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. PMID:26071935

  17. Differential remodelling of peroxisome function underpins the environmental and metabolic adaptability of diplonemids and kinetoplastids.

    PubMed

    Morales, Jorge; Hashimoto, Muneaki; Williams, Tom A; Hirawake-Mogi, Hiroko; Makiuchi, Takashi; Tsubouchi, Akiko; Kaga, Naoko; Taka, Hikari; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Koike, Masato; Mita, Toshihiro; Bringaud, Frédéric; Concepción, Juan L; Hashimoto, Tetsuo; Embley, T Martin; Nara, Takeshi

    2016-05-11

    The remodelling of organelle function is increasingly appreciated as a central driver of eukaryotic biodiversity and evolution. Kinetoplastids including Trypanosoma and Leishmania have evolved specialized peroxisomes, called glycosomes. Glycosomes uniquely contain a glycolytic pathway as well as other enzymes, which underpin the physiological flexibility of these major human pathogens. The sister group of kinetoplastids are the diplonemids, which are among the most abundant eukaryotes in marine plankton. Here we demonstrate the compartmentalization of gluconeogenesis, or glycolysis in reverse, in the peroxisomes of the free-living marine diplonemid, Diplonema papillatum Our results suggest that peroxisome modification was already under way in the common ancestor of kinetoplastids and diplonemids, and raise the possibility that the central importance of gluconeogenesis to carbon metabolism in the heterotrophic free-living ancestor may have been an important selective driver. Our data indicate that peroxisome modification is not confined to the kinetoplastid lineage, but has also been a factor in the success of their free-living euglenozoan relatives. PMID:27170716

  18. Autonomous Extracellular Matrix Remodeling Controls a Progressive Adaptation in Muscle Stem Cell Regenerative Capacity during Development.

    PubMed

    Tierney, Matthew Timothy; Gromova, Anastasia; Sesillo, Francesca Boscolo; Sala, David; Spenlé, Caroline; Orend, Gertraud; Sacco, Alessandra

    2016-03-01

    Muscle stem cells (MuSCs) exhibit distinct behavior during successive phases of developmental myogenesis. However, how their transition to adulthood is regulated is poorly understood. Here, we show that fetal MuSCs resist progenitor specification and exhibit altered division dynamics, intrinsic features that are progressively lost postnatally. After transplantation, fetal MuSCs expand more efficiently and contribute to muscle repair. Conversely, niche colonization efficiency increases in adulthood, indicating a balance between muscle growth and stem cell pool repopulation. Gene expression profiling identified several extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules preferentially expressed in fetal MuSCs, including tenascin-C, fibronectin, and collagen VI. Loss-of-function experiments confirmed their essential and stage-specific role in regulating MuSC function. Finally, fetal-derived paracrine factors were able to enhance adult MuSC regenerative potential. Together, these findings demonstrate that MuSCs change the way in which they remodel their microenvironment to direct stem cell behavior and support the unique demands of muscle development or repair. PMID:26904948

  19. Improving peri-prosthetic bone adaptation around cementless hip stems: a clinical and finite element study.

    PubMed

    ten Broeke, René H M; Tarala, Maria; Arts, Jacobus J; Janssen, Dennis W; Verdonschot, Nico; Geesink, Rudolph G T

    2014-03-01

    This study assessed whether the Symax™ implant, a modification of the Omnifit(®) stem (in terms of shape, proximal coating and distal surface treatment), would yield improved bone remodelling in a clinical DEXA study, and if these results could be predicted in a finite element (FE) simulation study. In a randomized clinical trial, 2 year DEXA measurements between the uncemented Symax™ and Omnifit(®) stem (both n=25) showed bone mineral density (BMD) loss in Gruen zone 7 of 14% and 20%, respectively (p<0.05). In contrast, the FE models predicted a 28% (Symax™) and 26% (Omnifit(®)) bone loss. When the distal treatment to the Symax™ was not modelled in the simulation, bone loss of 35% was predicted, suggesting the benefit of this surface treatment for proximal bone maintenance. The theoretical concept for enhanced proximal bone loading by the Symax™, and the predicted remodelling pattern were confirmed by DEXA-results, but there was no quantitative match between clinical and FE findings. This was due to a simulation based on incomplete assumptions concerning the yet unknown biological and mechanical effects of the new coating and surface treatment. Study listed under ClinicalTrials.gov with number NCT01695213. PMID:24378381

  20. Long-term Bone Remodeling in HA-coated Stems: A Radiographic Review of 208 Total Hip Arthroplasties (THAs) with 15 to 20 Years Follow-up.

    PubMed

    Boldt, Jens G; Cartillier, Jean-Claude; Machenaud, Alain; Vidalain, Jean-Pierre

    2015-11-01

    We present a prospective study focused on radiographic long-term outcomes and bone remodeling at a mean of 17.0 years (range: 15 to 20) in 208 cementless fully HA-coated femoral stems (Corail, DePuy International Ltd, Leeds, UK). Total hip replacements in this study were performed by three members of the surgeon design group between 1986 and 1991. Radiographic evaluation focused on periprosthetic osteolysis, bone remodeling, osseous integration, subsidence, metaphyseal or diaphyseal load transfer, and femoral stress shielding. The radiographs were digitized and examined with contrast-enhancing software for analysis of the trabecular architecture. Radiographic signs of aseptic stem loosening were visible in two cases (1%). Three stems (1.4%) showed metaphyseal periprosthetic osteolysis in four of seven Gruen zones associated with eccentric polyethylene wear awaiting metaphyseal bone grafting and cup liner exchange. One stem (0.5%) was revised due to infection. No stem altered in varus or valgus alignment more than two degrees, and mean subsidence was 0.1 mm (range: 0 to 2 mm) after a mean of 17.0 years. A total of 5 stems (2.4%) required or are awaiting revision surgery. Trabecular orientation and micro-anatomy suggested main proximal load-transfer patterns in all except 3 cases (98.6%). Combined metaphyseal and diaphyseal osseointegration and bone remodeling were visible in 100 stems (48%). Diaphyseal stress shielding and cortical thickening were observed in 3 stems (1.4%). Other radiographic features are discussed in depth. This long-term study of 208 fully HA-coated Corail stems showed satisfactory osseointegration and fixation in 203 cases (97.6%) after a mean of 17.0 years follow-up. Stem failures were associated with extreme eccentric polyethylene wear. PMID:26680411

  1. Bone fatigue and its implications for injuries in racehorses.

    PubMed

    Martig, S; Chen, W; Lee, P V S; Whitton, R C

    2014-07-01

    Musculoskeletal injuries are a common cause of lost training days and wastage in racehorses. Many bone injuries are a consequence of repeated high loading during fast work, resulting in chronic damage accumulation and material fatigue of bone. The highest joint loads occur in the fetlock, which is also the most common site of subchondral bone injury in racehorses. Microcracks in the subchondral bone at sites where intra-articular fractures and palmar osteochondral disease occur are similar to the fatigue damage detected experimentally after repeated loading of bone. Fatigue is a process that has undergone much study in material science in order to avoid catastrophic failure of engineering structures. The term 'fatigue life' refers to the numbers of cycles of loading that can be sustained before failure occurs. Fatigue life decreases exponentially with increasing load. This is important in horses as loads within the limb increase with increasing speed. Bone adapts to increased loading by modelling to maintain the strains within the bone at a safe level. Bone also repairs fatigued matrix through remodelling. Fatigue injuries develop when microdamage accumulates faster than remodelling can repair. Remodelling of the equine metacarpus is reduced during race training and accelerated during rest periods. The first phase of remodelling is bone resorption, which weakens the bone through increased porosity. A bone that is porous following a rest period may fail earlier than a fully adapted bone. Maximising bone adaptation is an important part of training young racehorses. However, even well-adapted bones accumulate microdamage and require ongoing remodelling. If remodelling inhibition at the extremes of training is unavoidable then the duration of exposure to high-speed work needs to be limited and appropriate rest periods instituted. Further research is warranted to elucidate the effect of fast-speed work and rest on bone damage accumulation and repair. PMID:24528139

  2. Trabecular Bone Adaptation to Low-Magnitude High-Frequency Loading in Microgravity

    PubMed Central

    Torcasio, Antonia; Jähn, Katharina; Van Guyse, Maarten; Spaepen, Pieter; Tami, Andrea E.; Vander Sloten, Jos; Stoddart, Martin J.; van Lenthe, G. Harry

    2014-01-01

    Exposure to microgravity causes loss of lower body bone mass in some astronauts. Low-magnitude high-frequency loading can stimulate bone formation on earth. Here we hypothesized that low-magnitude high-frequency loading will also stimulate bone formation under microgravity conditions. Two groups of six bovine cancellous bone explants were cultured at microgravity on a Russian Foton-M3 spacecraft and were either loaded dynamically using a sinusoidal curve or experienced only a static load. Comparable reference groups were investigated at normal gravity. Bone structure was assessed by histology, and mechanical competence was quantified using μCT and FE modelling; bone remodelling was assessed by fluorescent labelling and secreted bone turnover markers. Statistical analyses on morphometric parameters and apparent stiffness did not reveal significant differences between the treatment groups. The release of bone formation marker from the groups cultured at normal gravity increased significantly from the first to the second week of the experiment by 90.4% and 82.5% in response to static and dynamic loading, respectively. Bone resorption markers decreased significantly for the groups cultured at microgravity by 7.5% and 8.0% in response to static and dynamic loading, respectively. We found low strain magnitudes to drive bone turnover when applied at high frequency, and this to be valid at normal as well as at microgravity. In conclusion, we found the effect of mechanical loading on trabecular bone to be regulated mainly by an increase of bone formation at normal gravity and by a decrease in bone resorption at microgravity. Additional studies with extended experimental time and increased samples number appear necessary for a further understanding of the anabolic potential of dynamic loading on bone quality and mechanical competence. PMID:24787094

  3. Mammalian cortical bone in tension is non-Haversian

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayya, Ashwij; Banerjee, Anuradha; Rajesh, R.

    2013-08-01

    Cortical bone, found in the central part of long bones like femur, is known to adapt to local mechanical stresses. This adaptation has been linked exclusively with Haversian remodelling involving bone resorption and formation of secondary osteons. Compared to primary/plexiform bone, the Haversian bone has lower stiffness, fatigue strength and fracture toughness, raising the question why nature prefers an adaptation that is detrimental to bone's primary function of bearing mechanical stresses. Here, we show that in the goat femur, Haversian remodelling occurs only at locations of high compressive stresses. At locations corresponding to high tensile stresses, we observe a microstructure that is non-Haversian. Compared with primary/plexiform bone, this microstructure's mineralisation is significantly higher with a distinctly different spatial pattern. Thus, the Haversian structure is an adaptation only to high compressive stresses rendering its inferior tensile properties irrelevant as the regions with high tensile stresses have a non-Haversian, apparently primary microstructure.

  4. Stress and strain adaptation in load-dependent remodeling of the embryonic left ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Faas, Daniela; Sedmera, David

    2013-01-01

    Altered pressure in the developing left ventricle (LV) results in altered morphology and tissue material properties. Mechanical stress and strain may play a role in the regulating process. This study showed that confocal microscopy, three-dimensional reconstruction, and finite element analysis can provide a detailed model of stress and strain in the trabeculated embryonic heart. The method was used to test the hypothesis that end-diastolic strains are normalized after altered loading of the LV during the stages of trabecular compaction and chamber formation. Stage-29 chick LVs subjected to pressure overload and underload at stage 21 were reconstructed with full trabecular morphology from confocal images and analyzed with finite element techniques. Measured material properties and intraventricular pressures were specified in the models. The results show volume-weighted end-diastolic von Mises stress and strain averaging 50–82% higher in the trabecular tissue than in the compact wall. The volume-weighted-average stresses for the entire LV were 115, 64, and 147 Pa in control, underloaded, and overloaded models, while strains were 11, 7, and 4%; thus, neither was normalized in a volume-weighted sense. Localized epicardial strains at mid-longitudinal level were similar among the three groups and to strains measured from high-resolution ultrasound images. Sensitivity analysis showed changes in material properties are more significant than changes in geometry in the overloaded strain adaptation, although resulting stress was similar in both types of adaptation. These results emphasize the importance of appropriate metrics and the role of trabecular tissue in evaluating the evolution of stress and strain in relation to pressure-induced adaptation. PMID:23254562

  5. Targeted gene correction in the mdx mouse using short DNA fragments: towards application with bone marrow-derived cells for autologous remodeling of dystrophic muscle.

    PubMed

    Kapsa, R M; Quigley, A F; Vadolas, J; Steeper, K; Ioannou, P A; Byrne, E; Kornberg, A J

    2002-06-01

    In muscle, mutant genes can be targeted and corrected directly by intramuscular (i.m.) injection of corrective DNA, or by ex vivo delivery of DNA to myogenic cells, followed by cell transplantation. Short fragment homologous replacement (SFHR) has been used to repair the exon 23 nonsense transition at the Xp21.1 dys locus in cultured cells and also, directly in tibialis anterior from male mdx mice. Whilst mdx dys locus correction can be achieved in up to 20% of cells in culture, much lower efficiency is evident by i.m. injection. The major consideration for application of targeted gene correction to muscle is delivery throughout relevant tissues. Systemically injected bone marrow (BM)-derived cells from wt C57BL/10 ScSn mice are known to remodel mdx muscle when injected into the systemic route. Provided that non muscle-derived cell types most capable of muscle remodeling activity can be more specifically identified, isolated and expanded, cell therapy seems presently the most favorable vehicle by which to deliver gene correction throughout muscle tissues. Using wt bone marrow as a model, this study investigates systemic application of bone marrow-derived cells as potential vehicles to deliver corrected (ie wt) dys locus to dystrophic muscle. Intravenous (i.v.) and intraperitoneal (i.p.) injections of wt BM were given to lethally and sub-lethally irradiated mdx mice. Despite both i.v. and surviving i.p. groups containing wt dys loci in 100% and less than 1% of peripheral blood nuclei, respectively, both groups displayed equivalent levels of wt dys transcript in muscle RNA. These results suggest that the muscle remodeling activity observed in systemically injected BM cells is not likely to be found in the hemopoietic fraction. PMID:12032690

  6. Understanding How Space Travel Affects Blood Vessels: Arterial Remodeling and Functional Adaptations Induced by Microgravity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Delp, Michael; Vasques, Marilyn; Aquilina, Rudy (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Ever rise quickly from the couch to get something from the kitchen and suddenly feel dizzy? With a low heart rate and relaxed muscles, the cardiovascular system does not immediately provide the resistance necessary to keep enough blood going to your head. Gravity wins, at least for a short time, before your heart and blood vessels can respond to the sudden change in position and correct the situation. Actually, the human cardiovascular system is quite well adapted to the constant gravitational force of the Earth. When standing, vessels in the legs constrict to prevent blood from collecting in the lower extremities. In the space environment, the usual head-to-foot blood pressure and tissue fluid gradients that exist during the upright posture on Earth are removed. The subsequent shift in fluids from the lower to the upper portions of the body triggers adaptations within the cardiovascular system to accommodate the new pressure and fluid gradients. In animal models that simulate microgravity, the vessels in the head become more robust while those in the lower limbs become thin and lax. Similar changes may also occur in humans during spaceflight and while these adaptations are appropriate for a microgravity environment, they can cause problems when the astronauts return to Earth or perhaps another planet. Astronauts often develop orthostatic intolerance which means they become dizzy or faint when standing upright. This dizziness can persist for a number of days making routine activities difficult. In an effort to understand the physiological details of these cardiovascular adaptations, Dr. Michael Delp at Texas A&M University, uses the rat as a model for his studies. For the experiment flown on STS-107, he will test the hypothesis that blood vessels in the rats' hindlimbs become thinner, weaker, and constrict less in response to pressure changes and to chemical signals when exposed to microgravity. In addition, he will test the hypothesis that arteries in the brain

  7. Predicting cortical bone adaptation to axial loading in the mouse tibia

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, A. F.; Javaheri, B.; Pitsillides, A. A.; Shefelbine, S. J.

    2015-01-01

    The development of predictive mathematical models can contribute to a deeper understanding of the specific stages of bone mechanobiology and the process by which bone adapts to mechanical forces. The objective of this work was to predict, with spatial accuracy, cortical bone adaptation to mechanical load, in order to better understand the mechanical cues that might be driving adaptation. The axial tibial loading model was used to trigger cortical bone adaptation in C57BL/6 mice and provide relevant biological and biomechanical information. A method for mapping cortical thickness in the mouse tibia diaphysis was developed, allowing for a thorough spatial description of where bone adaptation occurs. Poroelastic finite-element (FE) models were used to determine the structural response of the tibia upon axial loading and interstitial fluid velocity as the mechanical stimulus. FE models were coupled with mechanobiological governing equations, which accounted for non-static loads and assumed that bone responds instantly to local mechanical cues in an on–off manner. The presented formulation was able to simulate the areas of adaptation and accurately reproduce the distributions of cortical thickening observed in the experimental data with a statistically significant positive correlation (Kendall's τ rank coefficient τ = 0.51, p < 0.001). This work demonstrates that computational models can spatially predict cortical bone mechanoadaptation to a time variant stimulus. Such models could be used in the design of more efficient loading protocols and drug therapies that target the relevant physiological mechanisms. PMID:26311315

  8. Bone morphogenic protein-2 regulates the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs in CBDL rat serum-induced pulmonary microvascular remodeling

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Chang; Chen, Lin; Zeng, Jing; Cui, Jian; Ning, Jiao-nin; Wang, Guan-song; Belguise, Karine; Wang, Xiaobo; Qian, Gui-sheng; Lu, Kai-zhi; Yi, Bin

    2015-08-01

    Hepatopulmonary syndrome (HPS) is characterized by an arterial oxygenation defect induced by intrapulmonary vasodilation (IPVD) that increases morbidity and mortality. In our previous study, it was determined that both the proliferation and the myogenic differentiation of pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVECs) play a key role in the development of IPVD. However, the molecular mechanism underlying the relationship between IPVD and the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs remains unknown. Additionally, it has been shown that bone morphogenic protein-2 (BMP2), via the control of protein expression, may regulate cell differentiation including cardiomyocyte differentiation, neuronal differentiation and odontoblastic differentiation. In this study, we observed that common bile duct ligation (CBDL)-rat serum induced the upregulation of the expression of several myogenic proteins (SM-α-actin, calponin, SM-MHC) and enhanced the expression levels of BMP2 mRNA and protein in PMVECs. We also observed that both the expression levels of Smad1/5 and the activation of phosphorylated Smad1/5 were significantly elevated in PMVECs following exposure to CBDL-rat serum, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of Smurf1. The blockage of the BMP2/Smad signaling pathway with Noggin inhibited the myogenic differentiation of PMVECs, a process that was associated with relatively low expression levels of both SM-α-actin and calponin in the setting of CBDL-rat serum exposure, although SM-MHC expression was not affected. These findings suggested that the BMP2/Smad signaling pathway is involved in the myogenic differentiation of the PMVECs. In conclusion, our data highlight the pivotal role of BMP2 in the CBDL-rat serum-induced myogenic differentiation of PMVECs via the activation of both Smad1 and Smad5 and the down-regulation of Smurf1, which may represent a potential therapy for HPS-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling. - Highlights: • CBDL-rat serum promotes the myogenic

  9. Experiment K-310: The effect of space flight on ostenogenesis and dentinogenesis in the mandible of rats. Supplement 1: The effects of space flight on alveolar bone modeling and remodeling in the rat mandible

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Van, P. T.; Vignery, A.; Bacon, R.

    1981-01-01

    The histomorphometric study of alveolar bone, a non-weight-bearing bone submitted mainly to the mechanical stimulations of mastication, showed that space flight decreases the remodeling activity but does not induce a negative balance between resorption and formation. The most dramatic effect of space flight has been observed along the periosteal surface, and especially in areas not covered with masticatory muscles, where bone formation almost stopped completely during the flight period. This bone, having been submitted to the same mechanical forces in the flight animals and the controls, leads to the conclusion that factors other than mechanical loading might be involved in the decreased bone formation during flight.

  10. Bone adaptation to a polyester fiber anterior cruciate ligament replacement.

    PubMed

    Amis, A A; Kempson, S A

    1999-01-01

    A series of polyester fiber ACL implants was studied in ovine stifle joints up to 2 years postimplantation. The implants were linked to the bone-tunnel wall by oriented fibrous tissue. Cross-sections of the tunnels showed bone ingrowth among the implant fibers at 2 years. A human trial of the Apex implant yielded a series of retrievals, some associated with gross bone-tunnel enlargement. There was no evidence of bone ingrowth in the human implants. It was hypothesized that-tunnel enlargement resulted from fretting at the implant-tissue interface in response to cyclic loads in use. PMID:10537586

  11. Non-Invasive Investigation of Bone Adaptation in Humans to Mechanical Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, R.

    1999-01-01

    Experimental studies have identified peak cyclic forces, number of loading cycles, and loading rate as contributors to the regulation of bone metabolism. We have proposed a theoretical model that relates bone density to a mechanical stimulus derived from average daily cumulative peak cyclic 'effective' tissue stresses. In order to develop a non-invasive experimental model to test the theoretical model we need to: (1) monitor daily cumulative loading on a bone, (2) compute the internal stress state(s) resulting from the imposed loading, and (3) image volumetric bone density accurately, precisely, and reproducibly within small contiguous volumes throughout the bone. We have chosen the calcaneus (heel) as an experimental model bone site because it is loaded by ligament, tendon and joint contact forces in equilibrium with daily ground reaction forces that we can measure; it is a peripheral bone site and therefore more easily and accurately imaged with computed tomography; it is composed primarily of cancellous bone; and it is a relevant site for monitoring bone loss and adaptation in astronauts and the general population. This paper presents an overview of our recent advances in the areas of monitoring daily ground reaction forces, biomechanical modeling of the forces on the calcaneus during gait, mathematical modeling of calcaneal bone adaptation in response to cumulative daily activity, accurate and precise imaging of the calcaneus with quantitative computed tomography (QCT), and application to long duration space flight.

  12. The use of biochemical markers of bone remodeling in multiple myeloma: a report of the International Myeloma Working Group.

    PubMed

    Terpos, E; Dimopoulos, M A; Sezer, O; Roodman, D; Abildgaard, N; Vescio, R; Tosi, P; Garcia-Sanz, R; Davies, F; Chanan-Khan, A; Palumbo, A; Sonneveld, P; Drake, M T; Harousseau, J-L; Anderson, K C; Durie, B G M

    2010-10-01

    Lytic bone disease is a frequent complication of multiple myeloma (MM). Lytic lesions rarely heal and X-rays are of limited value in monitoring bone destruction during anti-myeloma or anti-resorptive treatment. Biochemical markers of bone resorption (amino- and carboxy-terminal cross-linking telopeptide of type I collagen (NTX and CTX, respectively) or CTX generated by matrix metalloproteinases (ICTP)) and bone formation provide information on bone dynamics and reflect disease activity in bone. These markers have been investigated as tools for evaluating the extent of bone disease, risk of skeletal morbidity and response to anti-resorptive treatment in MM. Urinary NTX, serum CTX and serum ICTP are elevated in myeloma patients with osteolytic lesions and correlate with advanced disease stage. Furthermore, urinary NTX and serum ICTP correlate with risk for skeletal complications, disease progression and overall survival. Bone markers have also been used for the early diagnosis of bone lesions. This International Myeloma Working Group report summarizes the existing data for the role of bone markers in assessing the extent of MM bone disease and in monitoring bone turnover during anti-myeloma therapies and provides information on novel markers that may be of particular interest in the near future. PMID:20811404

  13. Histochemical examination of the effects of high-dose 1,25(OH)2D3 on bone remodeling in young growing rats.

    PubMed

    Sun, Jing; Sun, Bao; Wang, Wei; Han, Xiuchun; Liu, Hongrui; Du, Juan; Feng, Wei; Liu, Bo; Amizuka, Norio; Li, Minqi

    2016-08-01

    Vitamin D has an anabolic effect on bone developmental processes and is involved in maintaining skeletal integrity. In recent years, pediatric cases of vitamin D intoxication have attracted attention. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the influence of long-term administration of physiologically-high-dose calcitriol (1,25(OH)2D3) on bone remodeling in young developing rats. Neonatal rats received once-daily subcutaneous injection of calcitriol (250 ng/kg body weight), or PBS only as a control, for 3 weeks. At 1, 2 and 4 weeks' post-administration, rats were sacrificed and fixed by transcardial perfusion with 4 % paraformaldehyde, following which tibiae were extracted for histochemical analysis. Compared with the control group, the number of tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase- and Cathepsin K-positive osteoclasts were significantly increased, and the expression of alkaline phosphatase in osteoblasts was decreased in trabecular bone of rats administered high-dose 1,25(OH)2D3, leading to decreased trabecular bone volume. In addition, the expression of receptor activator of nuclear factor kappa-B ligand (RANKL) was increased, while that of osteoprotegerin was weaker in osteoblasts in the experimental group compared with the control group. Moreover, there was weaker immunoreactivity for EphrinB2 in osteoclasts and EphB4 in osteoblasts of trabecular bone in the experimental group compared with the control group. These findings suggest that long-term use of physiologically-high dose calcitriol may result in bone loss through RANKL/RANK/osteoprotegerin and EphrinB2-EphB4 signaling pathways, and that these negative effects could continue after drug withdrawal. Therefore, optimal limits for vitamin D administration need to be established for children and adolescents. PMID:27255234

  14. Development of a protocol to quantify local bone adaptation over space and time: Quantification of reproducibility.

    PubMed

    Lu, Yongtao; Boudiffa, Maya; Dall'Ara, Enrico; Bellantuono, Ilaria; Viceconti, Marco

    2016-07-01

    In vivo micro-computed tomography (µCT) scanning of small rodents is a powerful method for longitudinal monitoring of bone adaptation. However, the life-time bone growth in small rodents makes it a challenge to quantify local bone adaptation. Therefore, the aim of this study was to develop a protocol, which can take into account large bone growth, to quantify local bone adaptations over space and time. The entire right tibiae of eight 14-week-old C57BL/6J female mice were consecutively scanned four times in an in vivo µCT scanner using a nominal isotropic image voxel size of 10.4µm. The repeated scan image datasets were aligned to the corresponding baseline (first) scan image dataset using rigid registration. 80% of tibia length (starting from the endpoint of the proximal growth plate) was selected as the volume of interest and partitioned into 40 regions along the tibial long axis (10 divisions) and in the cross-section (4 sectors). The bone mineral content (BMC) was used to quantify bone adaptation and was calculated in each region. All local BMCs have precision errors (PE%CV) of less than 3.5% (24 out of 40 regions have PE%CV of less than 2%), least significant changes (LSCs) of less than 3.8%, and 38 out of 40 regions have intraclass correlation coefficients (ICCs) of over 0.8. The proposed protocol allows to quantify local bone adaptations over an entire tibia in longitudinal studies, with a high reproducibility, an essential requirement to reduce the number of animals to achieve the necessary statistical power. PMID:27262181

  15. [Bone histomorphometry;A role of evaluation for bone quality and mechanical strength].

    PubMed

    Yamamoto, Noriaki; Takahashi, Hideaki; Shimakura, Taketoshi

    2016-01-01

    Bone histomorphometry is defined as a quantitative evaluation of bone remodeling and bone turnover. Bone remodeling is the important mechanism for calcium metabolism and mechanical usage. The changes of bone remodeling in special condition with metabolic bone disease or osteoporosis agents have the effectiveness on bone mechanical strength. PMID:26728526

  16. In vitro assessment of biomaterial-induced remodeling of subchondral and cancellous bone for the early intervention of joint degeneration with focus on the spinal disc

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    McCanless, Jonathan D.

    Osteoarthritis-associated pain of the spinal disc, knee, and hip derives from degeneration of cartilagenous tissues in these joints. Traditional therapies have focused on these cartilage (and disc specific nucleus pulposus) changes as a means of treatment through tissue grafting, regenerative synthetic implants, non-regenerative space filling implants, arthroplasty, and arthrodesis. Although such approaches may seem apparent upon initial consideration of joint degeneration, tissue pathology has shown changes in the underlying bone and vascular bed precede the onset of cartilaginous changes. It is hypothesized that these changes precedent joint degeneration and as such may provide a route for early prevention. The current work proposes an injectable biomaterial-based therapy within these subchondral and cancellous bone regions as a means of preventing or reversing osteoarthritis. Two human concentrated platelet releasate-containing alginate hydrogel/beta-tricalcium phosphate composites have been developed for this potential biomaterial application. The undertaking of assessing these materials through bench-, in vitro, and ex vivo work is described herein. These studies showed the capability of the biomaterials to initiate a wound healing response in monocytes, angiogenic and differentiation behavior in immature endothelial cells, and early osteochondral differentiation in mesenchymal stem cells. These cellular activities are associated with fracture healing and endochondral bone formation, demonstrating the potential of the biomaterials to induce osseous and vascular tissue remodeling underlying osteoarthritic joints as a novel therapy for a disease with rapidly growing healthcare costs.

  17. Cabozantinib inhibits growth of androgen-sensitive and castration-resistant prostate cancer and affects bone remodeling.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Holly M; Ruppender, Nazanin; Zhang, Xiaotun; Brown, Lisha G; Gross, Ted S; Morrissey, Colm; Gulati, Roman; Vessella, Robert L; Schimmoller, Frauke; Aftab, Dana T; Corey, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Cabozantinib is an inhibitor of multiple receptor tyrosine kinases, including MET and VEGFR2. In a phase II clinical trial in advanced prostate cancer (PCa), cabozantinib treatment improved bone scans in 68% of evaluable patients. Our studies aimed to determine the expression of cabozantinib targets during PCa progression and to evaluate its efficacy in hormone-sensitive and castration-resistant PCa in preclinical models while delineating its effects on tumor and bone. Using immunohistochemistry and tissue microarrays containing normal prostate, primary PCa, and soft tissue and bone metastases, our data show that levels of MET, P-MET, and VEGFR2 are increasing during PCa progression. Our data also show that the expression of cabozantinib targets are particularly pronounced in bone metastases. To evaluate cabozantinib efficacy on PCa growth in the bone environment and in soft tissues we used androgen-sensitive LuCaP 23.1 and castration-resistant C4-2B PCa tumors. In vivo, cabozantinib inhibited the growth of PCa in bone as well as growth of subcutaneous tumors. Furthermore, cabozantinib treatment attenuated the bone response to the tumor and resulted in increased normal bone volume. In summary, the expression pattern of cabozantinib targets in primary and castration-resistant metastatic PCa, and its efficacy in two different models of PCa suggest that this agent has a strong potential for the effective treatment of PCa at different stages of the disease. PMID:24205338

  18. Numerical Modeling of Long Bone Adaptation due to Mechanical Loading: Correlation with Experiments

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Natarajan Chennimalai; Dantzig, Jonathan A.; Jasiuk, Iwona M.; Robling, Alex G.; Turner, Charles H.

    2011-01-01

    The process of external bone adaptation in cortical bone is modeled mathematically using finite element (FE) stress analysis coupled with an evolution model, in which adaptation response is triggered by mechanical stimulus represented by strain energy density. The model is applied to experiments in which a rat ulna is subjected to cyclic loading, and the results demonstrate the ability of the model to predict the bone adaptation response. The FE mesh is generated from micro-computed tomography (μCT) images of the rat ulna, and the stress analysis is carried out using boundary and loading conditions on the rat ulna obtained from the experiments [Robling, A. G., F. M. Hinant, D. B. Burr, and C. H. Turner. J. Bone Miner. Res. 17:1545–1554, 2002]. The external adaptation process is implemented in the model by moving the surface nodes of the FE mesh based on an evolution law characterized by two parameters: one that captures the rate of the adaptation process (referred to as gain); and the other characterizing the threshold value of the mechanical stimulus required for adaptation (referred to as threshold-sensitivity). A parametric study is carried out to evaluate the effect of these two parameters on the adaptation response. We show, following comparison of results from the simulations to the experimental observations of Robling et al. (J. Bone Miner. Res. 17:1545–1554, 2002), that splitting the loading cycles into different number of bouts affects the threshold-sensitivity but not the rate of adaptation. We also show that the threshold-sensitivity parameter can quantify the mechanosensitivity of the osteocytes. PMID:20013156

  19. Bone Markers

    MedlinePlus

    ... Alkaline Phosphatase; Osteocalcin; P1NP; Procollagen Type 1 N-Terminal Propeptide Formal name: Biochemical Markers of Bone Remodeling ... tests for evaluating bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker ...

  20. The role of midkine in skeletal remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Liedert, A; Schinke, T; Ignatius, A; Amling, M

    2014-01-01

    Bone tissue is subjected to continuous remodelling, replacing old or damaged bone throughout life. In bone remodelling, the coordinated activities of bone-forming osteoblasts and bone-resorbing osteoclasts ensure the maintenance of bone mass and strength. In early life, the balance of these cellular activities is tightly regulated by various factors, including systemic hormones, the mechanical environment and locally released growth factors. Age-related changes in the activity of these factors in bone remodelling can result in diseases with low bone mass, such as osteoporosis. Osteoporosis is a systemic and age-related skeletal disease characterized by low bone mass and structural degeneration of bone tissue, predisposing the patient to an increased fracture risk. The growth factor midkine (Mdk) plays a key role in bone remodelling and it is expressed during bone formation and fracture repair. Using a mouse deficient in Mdk, our group have identified this protein as a negative regulator of bone formation and mechanically induced bone remodelling. Thus, specific Mdk antagonists might represent a therapeutic option for diseases characterized by low bone mass, such as osteoporosis. Linked Articles This article is part of a themed section on Midkine. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2014.171.issue-4 PMID:24102259

  1. Does subchondral bone of the equine proximal phalanx adapt to race training?

    PubMed

    Noble, Phillipa; Singer, Ellen R; Jeffery, Nathan S

    2016-07-01

    Sagittal fractures of the first phalanx are a common, potentially catastrophic injury in racehorses. These fractures are often linked to an acute, one time, biomechanical event; however, recent evidence implies that chronic exposure to stress can lead to the accumulation of bony changes that affect the structural integrity of the bone and increase the likelihood of fracture. The aim of the study was to compare variations of two common metrics of bone adaptation - subchondral bone density and thickness across the proximal articular surface of the first phalanx in Thoroughbred horses that (1) raced but never experienced a first phalanx fracture (Raced Control); (2) raced and had experienced fracture of the contralateral first phalanx (Contralateral to Fracture); (3) had never raced or experienced a first phalanx fracture (Unraced Control). A total of 22 first phalangeal bones were sampled post-mortem and imaged using micro-computed tomography calibrated for mineral density measures. Measurements of volumetric subchondral bone mineral density and thickness were taken from images at five sites from medial to lateral, in three coronal planes (25, 50 and 75% dorsal-palmar). At each of the 15 sites, measurements were repeated and averaged across 10 adjacent micro-computed tomography slices of bone, spanning 0.75 mm. The magnitude and variance of these measurements were compared between sites and between cohorts with non-parametric statistical tests. Across the proximal osteochondral surface of the first phalanx, the pattern of subchondral bone volumetric bone mineral density and thickness varied with each coronal section studied. The subchondral bone thickness was greater for the central and dorsal coronal sections, compared with the palmar section. For the race-fit groups (Raced Control and Contralateral to Fracture), the highest volumetric bone mineral density was in the central sagittal groove. The volumetric bone mineral density was significantly greater in the

  2. Adaptation of Cancellous Bone to Aging and Immobilization in Growing Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Meng-Meng; Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua-Zhu; Lin, Bai-Yun; Li, Qing-Nan; Li, Xiao-Jian

    1992-01-01

    Two-and-half-month-old female rats were subjected to right hindlimb immobilization or served as controls for 0, 1, 2, 8, 14, and 20 weeks. The right hindlimb was immobilized by bandaging it against the abdomen, thus unloading it. Cancellous bone histomorphometry was performed on microradiographs and double-fluorescent labeled 20 tLm sections of the distal femoral metaphyses. Primary spongiosa bone loss occurred rapidly by 2 weeks, and secondary spongiosa bone loss occurred rapidly by 8 weeks of immobilization, and then equilibrated at 60% less bone mass than age-related controls. The negative bone balance induced by immobilization was caused by transient increase in bone resorption, decrease in bone formation, and longitudinal bone growth. The dynamic data of secondary spongiosa cancellous bone showed that percent eroded perimeter was transiently elevated by 55 to 82% between 1 and 8 weeks, percent labeled perimeter was transiently depressed by 32% to 50% between 1 and 14 weeks, mineral apposition rate was depressed by 23% and 19% at I and 2 weeks, and bone formation rate-bone area referent was transiently depressed by 35% and 59% at 1 and 2 weeks. All the above parameters were at age-related control levels by 20 weeks of immobiliza- tion. However, bone formation rate-tissue area referent was depressed (-65%) throughout the study. Immobilization depressed completely longitudinal bone growth by 2 weeks and remained so. Only 0.65 mm of new metaphysis was generated in the immobilized versus 2.1 mm in controls during the study period. The immobilization induced an early cancellous bone loss which equilibrated at a new steady state with less bone and a normal (age-related control) bone turnover rate. When these findings were compared to an earlier study of 9-month-old virgin females subjected to right hindlimb immobilization up to 26 weeks, we found the adaptive responses of the cancellous bone were identical except that they occurred earlier and equilibrated sooner in

  3. Adaptation of Cancellous Bone to Aging and Immobilization in Growing Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Meng Meng; Jee, Webster S. S.; Ke, Hua Zhu; Lin, Bia Yun; Li, Qing Nan; Li, Xiao Jian

    1992-01-01

    Two-and-a half month-old female rats were subjected to right hindlimb immobilization or served as controls for 0, 1, 2, 8, 14, and 20 weeks. The right hindlimb was immobilized by bandaging it against the abdomen, thus unloading it. Cancellous bone histomorphometry was performed on microradiographs and double-fluorescent labeled 20 micron sections of the distal femoral metaphyses. Primary spongiosa bone loss occurred rapidly by 2 weeks, and secondary spongiosa bone loss occurred rapidly by 8 weeks of immobilization, and then equilibrated at 60% less bone mass than age-related controls. The negative bone balance induced by immobilization was caused by transient increase in bone resorption, decrease in bone formation, and longitudinal bone growth. The dynamic data of secondary spongiosa cancellous bone showed that percent eroded perimeter was transiently elevated by 55% to 82% between 1 and 8 weeks, percent labeled perimeter was transiently depressed by 32% to 50% between 1 and 14 weeks, mineral apposition rate was depressed by 23% and 19% at 1 and 2 weeks, and bone formation rate-bone area referent was transiently depressed by 35% and 59%c at 1 and 2 weeks. All the above parameters were at age-related control levels by 20 weeks of immobilization. However, bone formation rate-tissue area referent was depressed (-65%) throughout the study. Immobilization depressed completely longitudinal bone growth by 2 weeks and remained so. Only 0.65 mm of new metaphysis was generated in the immobilized versus 2.1 mm in controls during the study period. The immobilization induced an early cancellous bone loss which equilibrated at a new steady state with less bone and a normal (age-related control) bone turnover rate. When these findings were compared to an earlier study of 9 month-old virgin females subjected to right hindlimb immobilization up to 26 weeks, we found the adaptive responses of the cancellous bone were identical except that they occurred earlier and equilibrated

  4. Bone Marrow-Derived Multipotent Stromal Cells Promote Myocardial Fibrosis and Reverse Remodeling of the Left Ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Fatkhudinov, Timur; Bolshakova, Galina; Arutyunyan, Irina; Elchaninov, Andrey; Makarov, Andrey; Kananykhina, Evgeniya; Khokhlova, Oksana; Murashev, Arkady; Glinkina, Valeria; Goldshtein, Dmitry; Sukhikh, Gennady

    2015-01-01

    Cell therapy is increasingly recognized as a beneficial practice in various cardiac conditions, but its fundamentals remain largely unclear. The fates of transplanted multipotent stromal cells in postinfarction cardiac microenvironments are particularly understudied. To address this issue, labeled multipotent stromal cells were infused into rat myocardium at day 30 after myocardial infarction, against the background of postinfarction cardiosclerosis. Therapeutic effects of the transplantation were assessed by an exercise tolerance test. Histological examination at 14 or 30 days after the transplantation was conducted by means of immunostaining and quantitative image analysis. An improvement in the functional status of the cardiovascular system was observed after both the autologous and the allogeneic transplantations. Location of the label-positive cells within the heart was restricted to the affected part of myocardium. The transplanted cells could give rise to fibroblasts or myofibroblasts but not to cardiac myocytes or blood vessel cells. Both types of transplantation positively influenced scarring processes, and no expansion of fibrosis to border myocardium was observed. Left ventricular wall thickening associated with reduced dilatation index was promoted by transplantation of the autologous cells. According to the results, multipotent stromal cell transplantation prevents adverse remodeling and stimulates left ventricular reverse remodeling. PMID:25685158

  5. Adaptive growth factor delivery from a polyelectrolyte coating promotes synergistic bone tissue repair and reconstruction

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Nisarg J.; Hyder, Md. Nasim; Quadir, Mohiuddin A.; Dorval Courchesne, Noémie-Manuelle; Seeherman, Howard J.; Nevins, Myron; Spector, Myron; Hammond, Paula T.

    2014-01-01

    Traumatic wounds and congenital defects that require large-scale bone tissue repair have few successful clinical therapies, particularly for craniomaxillofacial defects. Although bioactive materials have demonstrated alternative approaches to tissue repair, an optimized materials system for reproducible, safe, and targeted repair remains elusive. We hypothesized that controlled, rapid bone formation in large, critical-size defects could be induced by simultaneously delivering multiple biological growth factors to the site of the wound. Here, we report an approach for bone repair using a polyelectrolye multilayer coating carrying as little as 200 ng of bone morphogenetic protein-2 and platelet-derived growth factor-BB that were eluted over readily adapted time scales to induce rapid bone repair. Based on electrostatic interactions between the polymer multilayers and growth factors alone, we sustained mitogenic and osteogenic signals with these growth factors in an easily tunable and controlled manner to direct endogenous cell function. To prove the role of this adaptive release system, we applied the polyelectrolyte coating on a well-studied biodegradable poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) support membrane. The released growth factors directed cellular processes to induce bone repair in a critical-size rat calvaria model. The released growth factors promoted local bone formation that bridged a critical-size defect in the calvaria as early as 2 wk after implantation. Mature, mechanically competent bone regenerated the native calvaria form. Such an approach could be clinically useful and has significant benefits as a synthetic, off-the-shelf, cell-free option for bone tissue repair and restoration. PMID:25136093

  6. Changes of blood parameters associated with bone remodeling following experimentally induced fatty liver disorder in laying hens

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Studies have demonstrated that obesity and osteoporosis are two linked disorders in humans. This study examined if excessive lipid consumption affects bone metabolism in laying hens. One hundred 63-week-old laying hens were randomly divided into two treatments, i.e., fed with a regular diet (control...

  7. Structural adaptation of trabecular bone revealed by position resolved analysis of proximal femora of different primates.

    PubMed

    Saparin, Peter; Scherf, Heike; Hublin, Jean-Jacques; Fratzl, Peter; Weinkamer, Richard

    2011-01-01

    The anisotropic arrangement of trabeculae in the proximal femur of humans and primates is seen as striking evidence for the functional adaptation of trabecular bone architecture. Quantitative evidence to demonstrate this adaptation for trabecular bone is still scarce, because experimental design of controlled load change is difficult. In this work, we use the natural variation of loading caused by a different main locomotor behavior of primates. Using high-resolution computed tomography and advanced image analysis techniques, we analyze the heterogeneity of the architecture in four proximal femora of four primate species. Although the small sample number does not allow an interspecies comparison, the very differently loaded bones are well suited to search for common structural features as a result of adaptation. A cubic volume of interest of size (5 mm)(3) was moved through the proximal femur and a morphometric analysis including local anisotropy was performed on 209 positions on average. The correlation of bone volume fraction (BV/TV) with trabecular number (Tb.N) and trabecular thickness (Tb.Th) leads to the suggestion of two different mechanisms of trabecular bone adaptation. Higher values of BV/TV in highly loaded regions of the proximal femur are due to a thickening of the trabeculae, whereas Tb.N does not change. In less loaded regions, however, lower values of BV/TV are found, caused by a reduction of the number of the trabeculae, whereas Tb.Th remains constant. This reduction in Tb.N goes along with an increase in the degree of anisotropy, indicating an adaptive selection of trabeculae. PMID:21157916

  8. Adenylyl cyclase 6 mediates loading-induced bone adaptation in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kristen L.; Hoey, David A.; Spasic, Milos; Tang, Tong; Hammond, H. Kirk; Jacobs, Christopher R.

    2014-01-01

    Primary cilia are single, nonmotile, antenna-like structures extending from the apical membrane of most mammalian cells. They may mediate mechanotransduction, the conversion of external mechanical stimuli into biochemical intracellular signals. Previously we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase 6 (AC6), a membrane-bound enzyme enriched in primary cilia of MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells, may play a role in a primary cilium-dependent mechanism of osteocyte mechanotransduction in vitro. In this study, we determined whether AC6 deletion impairs loading-induced bone formation in vivo. Skeletally mature mice with a global knockout of AC6 exhibited normal bone morphology and responded to osteogenic chemical stimuli similar to wild-type mice. Following ulnar loading over 3 consecutive days, bone formation parameters were assessed using dynamic histomorphometry. Mice lacking AC6 formed significantly less bone than control animals (41% lower bone formation rate). Furthermore, there was an attenuated flow-induced increase in COX-2 mRNA expression levels in primary bone cells isolated from AC6 knockout mice compared to controls (1.3±0.1- vs. 2.6±0.2-fold increase). Collectively, these data indicate that AC6 plays a role in loading-induced bone adaptation, and these findings are consistent with our previous studies implicating primary cilia and AC6 in a novel mechanism of osteocyte mechanotransduction.—Lee, K. L., Hoey, D. A., Spasic, M., Tang, T., Hammond, H. K., Jacobs, C. R. Adenylyl cyclase 6 mediates loading-induced bone adaptation in vivo. PMID:24277577

  9. Adenylyl cyclase 6 mediates loading-induced bone adaptation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kristen L; Hoey, David A; Spasic, Milos; Tang, Tong; Hammond, H Kirk; Jacobs, Christopher R

    2014-03-01

    Primary cilia are single, nonmotile, antenna-like structures extending from the apical membrane of most mammalian cells. They may mediate mechanotransduction, the conversion of external mechanical stimuli into biochemical intracellular signals. Previously we demonstrated that adenylyl cyclase 6 (AC6), a membrane-bound enzyme enriched in primary cilia of MLO-Y4 osteocyte-like cells, may play a role in a primary cilium-dependent mechanism of osteocyte mechanotransduction in vitro. In this study, we determined whether AC6 deletion impairs loading-induced bone formation in vivo. Skeletally mature mice with a global knockout of AC6 exhibited normal bone morphology and responded to osteogenic chemical stimuli similar to wild-type mice. Following ulnar loading over 3 consecutive days, bone formation parameters were assessed using dynamic histomorphometry. Mice lacking AC6 formed significantly less bone than control animals (41% lower bone formation rate). Furthermore, there was an attenuated flow-induced increase in COX-2 mRNA expression levels in primary bone cells isolated from AC6 knockout mice compared to controls (1.3±0.1- vs. 2.6±0.2-fold increase). Collectively, these data indicate that AC6 plays a role in loading-induced bone adaptation, and these findings are consistent with our previous studies implicating primary cilia and AC6 in a novel mechanism of osteocyte mechanotransduction. PMID:24277577

  10. Cone Beam Computed Tomography Evaluation of Bone Remodeling Following the Osteotome Sinus Floor Elevation Technique for Future Site Development.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Kazutoshi; Kusama, Yukio

    2016-01-01

    The effectiveness of the osteotome technique for sinus augmentation was evaluated using cone beam computed tomography (CBCT) analysis. Clinical results of two-stage sinus floor elevation using the osteotome technique performed on 15 patients at the Nakajima Dental Clinic between 2006 and 2013 were evaluated retrospectively. CBCT imaging revealed that the maxillary sinus floor was elevated by an average of 7.28 mm (SD 1.62) immediately following surgery, with a mean bone height of 9.55 mm (SD 1.43). In all cases, the osteotome technique provided sufficient bone height for implant placement. No pre- or postoperative complications (eg, mucosal perforation) were reported. The minimal surgical stress and morbidity further underscore the practicality of this approach for two-stage maxillary sinus floor augmentation. PMID:27333007

  11. Dynamic Cross Talk between S1P and CXCL12 Regulates Hematopoietic Stem Cells Migration, Development and Bone Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Golan, Karin; Kollet, Orit; Lapidot, Tsvee

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are mostly retained in a quiescent non-motile mode in their bone marrow (BM) niches, shifting to a migratory cycling and differentiating state to replenish the blood with mature leukocytes on demand. The balance between the major chemo-attractants CXCL12, predominantly in the BM, and S1P, mainly in the blood, dynamically regulates HSC recruitment to the circulation versus their retention in the BM. During alarm situations, stress-signals induce a decrease in CXCL12 levels in the BM, while S1P levels are rapidly and transiently increased in the circulation, thus favoring mobilization of stem cells as part of host defense and repair mechanisms. Myeloid cytokines, including G-CSF, up-regulate S1P signaling in the BM via the PI3K pathway. Induced CXCL12 secretion from stromal cells via reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation and increased S1P1 expression and ROS signaling in HSCs, all facilitate mobilization. Bone turnover is also modulated by both CXCL12 and S1P, regulating the dynamic BM stromal microenvironment, osteoclasts and stem cell niches which all functionally express CXCL12 and S1P receptors. Overall, CXCL12 and S1P levels in the BM and circulation are synchronized to mutually control HSC motility, leukocyte production and osteoclast/osteoblast bone turnover during homeostasis and stress situations. PMID:24276423

  12. The effects of pullet body weight, dietary nonpyhtate phosphorus intake, and breeder feeding regimen on production performance, chick quality, and bone remodeling in broiler breeders.

    PubMed

    Ekmay, R D; Salas, C; England, J; Cerrate, S; Coon, C N

    2012-04-01

    A 3 × 2 × 2 factorial experiment, consisting of 52 hens per treatment, was conducted to determine the effects of pullet BW, dietary nonphytate phosphorus (NPP), and feeding regimen on performance, progeny quality, and bone remodeling. Cobb 500 broiler breeder pullets were reared to 3 different growth curves: 20% under, Cobb standard, and 20% over. Body weights were recorded weekly and feed adjustments made accordingly. At 21 wk, 624 hens were fed one of 2 breeder diets differing only in the amount of dietary NPP: 0.15 or 0.40%. A normal feeding regimen was appropriate for the particular growth curve; an alternative regimen considered the 3 growth curves together as a flock. At 24, 26, and 29 wk, blood was collected from 5 hens per treatment every 4 h over a 24-h period. Plasma samples were analyzed for total alkaline phosphatase, tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase, parathyroid hormone-related peptide, Ca, and inorganic P. Eggs per hen housed were diminished in hens fed the low dietary NPP and by low pullet target weight. Hens fed low dietary NPP also had lower egg weights but better eggshell quality. Mortality was significantly higher in hens fed low dietary NPP. Breeder tibia relative strength and ash were also significantly lower in hens fed low dietary NPP, regardless of the quantitative amount. Progeny tibia ash was not affected by any treatment. Total alkaline phosphatase responded to pullet BW, however by wk 29, total alkaline phosphatase also became sensitive to dietary NPP. The NPP by pullet BW interaction for tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase levels became significant by 29 wk, and pullet BW was significant at wk 24. The NPP by pullet growth curve interaction was also critical for plasma inorganic P levels throughout the sampling period. In summary, both 0.15% dietary NPP and reared pullets 20% under standard BW negatively affect egg production but do not impair progeny productivity. Body composition appears to be a main contributor in bone remodeling

  13. First Reported Cases of Biomechanically Adaptive Bone Modeling in Non-Avian Dinosaurs

    PubMed Central

    Cubo, Jorge; Woodward, Holly; Wolff, Ewan; Horner, John R.

    2015-01-01

    Predator confrontation or predator evasion frequently produces bone fractures in potential prey in the wild. Although there are reports of healed bone injuries and pathologies in non-avian dinosaurs, no previously published instances of biomechanically adaptive bone modeling exist. Two tibiae from an ontogenetic sample of fifty specimens of the herbivorous dinosaur Maiasaura peeblesorum (Ornithopoda: Hadrosaurinae) exhibit exostoses. We show that these outgrowths are cases of biomechanically adaptive periosteal bone modeling resulting from overstrain on the tibia after a fibula fracture. Histological and biomechanical results are congruent with predictions derived from this hypothesis. Histologically, the outgrowths are constituted by radial fibrolamellar periosteal bone tissue formed at very high growth rates, as expected in a process of rapid strain equilibration response. These outgrowths show greater compactness at the periphery, where tensile and compressive biomechanical constraints are higher. Moreover, these outgrowths increase the maximum bending strength in the direction of the stresses derived from locomotion. They are located on the antero-lateral side of the tibia, as expected in a presumably bipedal one year old individual, and in the posterior position of the tibia, as expected in a presumably quadrupedal individual at least four years of age. These results reinforce myological evidence suggesting that Maiasaura underwent an ontogenetic shift from the primitive ornithischian bipedal condition when young to a derived quadrupedal posture when older. PMID:26153689

  14. Wing bone laminarity is not an adaptation for torsional resistance in bats.

    PubMed

    Lee, Andrew H; Simons, Erin L R

    2015-01-01

    Torsional loading is a common feature of skeletal biomechanics during vertebrate flight. The importance of resisting torsional loads is best illustrated by the convergence of wing bone structure (e.g., long with thin walls) across extant bats and birds. Whether or not such a convergence occurs at the microstructural level is less clear. In volant birds, the humeri and ulnae often contain abundant laminar bony tissue in which primary circumferential vascular canals course concentrically about the long axis of the bone. These circumferential canals and the matrix surrounding them presumably function to resist the tissue-level shear stress caused by flight-induced torsion. Here, we assess whether or not laminar bone is a general adaptive feature in extant flying vertebrates using a histological analysis of bat bones. We sampled the humeri from six adult taxa representing a broad phylogenetic and body size range (6-1,000 g). Transverse thick sections were prepared from the midshaft of each humerus. Bone tissue was classified based on the predominant orientation of primary vascular canals. Our results show that humeri from bats across a wide phylogenetic and body size range do not contain any laminar bone. Instead, humeri are essentially avascular in bats below about 100 g and are poorly vascularized with occasional longitudinal to slightly radial canals in large bats. In contrast, humeri from birds across a comparable size range (40-1,000 g) are highly vascularized with a wide range in bone laminarity. Phylogenetically-informed scaling analyses reveal that the difference in vascularity between birds and bats is best explained by higher somatic relative growth rates in birds. The presence of wing bone laminarity in birds and its absence in bats suggests that laminar bone is not a necessary biomechanical feature in flying vertebrates and may be apomorphic to birds. PMID:25780775

  15. Wing bone laminarity is not an adaptation for torsional resistance in bats

    PubMed Central

    Simons, Erin L.R.

    2015-01-01

    Torsional loading is a common feature of skeletal biomechanics during vertebrate flight. The importance of resisting torsional loads is best illustrated by the convergence of wing bone structure (e.g., long with thin walls) across extant bats and birds. Whether or not such a convergence occurs at the microstructural level is less clear. In volant birds, the humeri and ulnae often contain abundant laminar bony tissue in which primary circumferential vascular canals course concentrically about the long axis of the bone. These circumferential canals and the matrix surrounding them presumably function to resist the tissue-level shear stress caused by flight-induced torsion. Here, we assess whether or not laminar bone is a general adaptive feature in extant flying vertebrates using a histological analysis of bat bones. We sampled the humeri from six adult taxa representing a broad phylogenetic and body size range (6–1,000 g). Transverse thick sections were prepared from the midshaft of each humerus. Bone tissue was classified based on the predominant orientation of primary vascular canals. Our results show that humeri from bats across a wide phylogenetic and body size range do not contain any laminar bone. Instead, humeri are essentially avascular in bats below about 100 g and are poorly vascularized with occasional longitudinal to slightly radial canals in large bats. In contrast, humeri from birds across a comparable size range (40–1,000 g) are highly vascularized with a wide range in bone laminarity. Phylogenetically-informed scaling analyses reveal that the difference in vascularity between birds and bats is best explained by higher somatic relative growth rates in birds. The presence of wing bone laminarity in birds and its absence in bats suggests that laminar bone is not a necessary biomechanical feature in flying vertebrates and may be apomorphic to birds. PMID:25780775

  16. Bone Inner Structure Suggests Increasing Aquatic Adaptations in Desmostylia (Mammalia, Afrotheria)

    PubMed Central

    Hayashi, Shoji; Houssaye, Alexandra; Nakajima, Yasuhisa; Chiba, Kentaro; Ando, Tatsuro; Sawamura, Hiroshi; Inuzuka, Norihisa; Kaneko, Naotomo; Osaki, Tomohiro

    2013-01-01

    Background The paleoecology of desmostylians has been discussed controversially with a general consensus that desmostylians were aquatic or semi-aquatic to some extent. Bone microanatomy can be used as a powerful tool to infer habitat preference of extinct animals. However, bone microanatomical studies of desmostylians are extremely scarce. Methodology/Principal Findings We analyzed the histology and microanatomy of several desmostylians using thin-sections and CT scans of ribs, humeri, femora and vertebrae. Comparisons with extant mammals allowed us to better understand the mode of life and evolutionary history of these taxa. Desmostylian ribs and long bones generally lack a medullary cavity. This trait has been interpreted as an aquatic adaptation among amniotes. Behemotops and Paleoparadoxia show osteosclerosis (i.e. increase in bone compactness), and Ashoroa pachyosteosclerosis (i.e. combined increase in bone volume and compactness). Conversely, Desmostylus differs from these desmostylians in displaying an osteoporotic-like pattern. Conclusions/Significance In living taxa, bone mass increase provides hydrostatic buoyancy and body trim control suitable for poorly efficient swimmers, while wholly spongy bones are associated with hydrodynamic buoyancy control in active swimmers. Our study suggests that all desmostylians had achieved an essentially, if not exclusively, aquatic lifestyle. Behemotops, Paleoparadoxia and Ashoroa are interpreted as shallow water swimmers, either hovering slowly at a preferred depth, or walking on the bottom, and Desmostylus as a more active swimmer with a peculiar habitat and feeding strategy within Desmostylia. Therefore, desmostylians are, with cetaceans, the second mammal group showing a shift from bone mass increase to a spongy inner organization of bones in their evolutionary history. PMID:23565143

  17. Exercise protocol induces muscle, tendon, and bone adaptations in the rat shoulder

    PubMed Central

    Rooney, Sarah Ilkhanipour; Loro, Emanuele; Sarver, Joseph J.; Peltz, Cathryn D.; Hast, Michael W.; Tseng, Wei-Ju; Kuntz, Andrew F.; Liu, X. Sherry; Khurana, Tejvir S.; Soslowsky, Louis J.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Background: a rat model of supraspinatus overuse has suggested mechanisms governing tendon degeneration; however, delineating which changes are pathologic or simply physiologic adaptations to increased loading remains a question. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a rat exercise model that induces systemic and local shoulder adaptations without mechanical injury to the supraspinatus tendon. Methods: exercise rats completed a treadmill training protocol for 12 weeks. Body, fat pad, and heart weights were determined. Supraspinatus tendon collagen content, cross-sectional area, and mechanical properties were measured. Supraspinatus muscle cross-sectional area, weight, and the expression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) proteins were measured. Humeri were analyzed with μCT and mechanically tested. Results: exercise decreased fat pad mass. Supraspinatus muscle hypertrophied and had increased OXPHOS proteins. Humerus trabecular bone had increased anisotropic orientation, and cortical bone showed increased bone and tissue mineral density. Importantly, the supraspinatus tendon did not have diminished mechanical properties, indicating that this protocol was not injurious to the tendon. Conclusion: this study establishes the first rat exercise protocol that induces adaptations in the shoulder. Future research can use this as a comparison model to study how the supraspinatus tendon adapts to loading and undergoes degeneration with overuse. PMID:25767777

  18. Antioxidant Impregnated Ultra-High Molecular Weight Polyethylene Wear Debris Particles Display Increased Bone Remodeling and a Superior Osteogenic:Osteolytic Profile vs. Conventional UHMWPE Particles in a Murine Calvaria Model

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yu; Hallab, Nadim J.; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M.; Xie, Chao

    2015-01-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major limitation of long-term successful total hip replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. As intra and extracellular reactive oxygen species are know to contribute to wear debris-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation, antioxidant doped UHMWPE has emerged as an approach to reduce the osteolytic potential of wear debris and maintain coupled bone remodeling. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we evaluated the effects of crosslinked UHMWPE wear debris particles (AltrX™), versus similar wear particles made from COVERNOX™ containing UHMWPE (AOX™), in an established murine calvaria model. Eight-week-old female C57B/6 mice (n=10/Group) received a pre-op micro-CT scan prior to surgical implantation of the UHMWPE particles (2mg), or surgery without particles (sham). Dynamic labeling was performed by intraperitoneal injection of calcein on day 7 and alizarin on day 9, and the calvaria were harvested for micro-CT and histology on day 10. Surprisingly, we found that AOX particles induced significantly more bone resorption (1.72-fold) and osteoclast numbers (1.99-fold) vs. AltrX (p<0.001). However, AOX also significantly induced 1.64-fold more new bone formation vs. AltrX (p<0.01). Moreover, while the osteolytic:osteogenic ratio of both particles was very close to 1.0, which is indicative of coupled remodeling, AOX was more osteogenic (Slope=1.13±0.10 vs. 0.97±0.10). Histomorphometry of the metabolically labeled undecalcified calvaria revealed a consistent trend of greater MAR in AOX vs. AltrX. Collectively, these results demonstrate that anti-oxidant impregnated UHMWPE particles have decreased osteolytic potential due to their increased osteogenic properties that support coupled bone remodeling. PMID:26495749

  19. Reoxygenation‐Derived Toxic Reactive Oxygen/Nitrogen Species Modulate the Contribution of Bone Marrow Progenitor Cells to Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Moldovan, Nicanor I.; Anghelina, Mirela; Varadharaj, Saradhadevi; Butt, Omer I.; Wang, Tiangshen; Yang, Fuchun; Moldovan, Leni; Zweier, Jay L.

    2014-01-01

    Background The core region of a myocardial infarction is notoriously unsupportive of cardiomyocyte survival. However, there has been less investigation of the potentially beneficial spontaneous recruitment of endogenous bone marrow progenitor cells (BMPCs) within infarcted areas. In the current study we examined the role of tissue oxygenation and derived toxic species in the control of BMPC engraftment during postinfarction heart remodeling. Methods and Results For assessment of cellular origin, local oxygenation, redox status, and fate of cells in the infarcted region, myocardial infarction in mice with or without LacZ+ bone marrow transplantation was induced by coronary ligation. Sham‐operated mice served as controls. After 1 week, LacZ+ BMPC‐derived cells were found inhomogeneously distributed into the infarct zone, with a lower density at its core. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) oximetry showed that pO2 in the infarct recovered starting on day 2 post–myocardial infarction, concomitant with wall thinning and erythrocytes percolating through muscle microruptures. Paralleling this reoxygenation, increased generation of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species was detected at the infarct core. This process delineated a zone of diminished BMPC engraftment, and at 1 week infiltrating cells displayed immunoreactive 3‐nitrotyrosine and apoptosis. In vivo treatment with a superoxide dismutase mimetic significantly reduced reactive oxygen species formation and amplified BMPC accumulation. This treatment also salvaged wall thickness by 43% and left ventricular ejection fraction by 27%, with significantly increased animal survival. Conclusions BMPC engraftment in the infarct inversely mirrored the distribution of reactive oxygen/nitrogen species. Antioxidant treatment resulted in increased numbers of engrafted BMPCs, provided functional protection to the heart, and decreased the incidence of myocardial rupture and death. PMID:24419735

  20. Assessment of femoral bone quality using co-occurrence matrices and adaptive regions of interest

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fritscher, Karl David; Schuler, Benedikt; Grünerbl, Agnes; Hänni, Markus; Schwieger, Karsten; Suhm, Norbert; Schubert, Rainer

    2007-03-01

    The surgical treatment of femur fractures, which often result from osteoporosis, is highly dependent on the quality of the femoral bone. Unsatisfying results of surgical interventions like early loosening of implants may be one result of altered bone quality. However, clinical diagnostic techniques to quantify local bone quality are limited and often highly observer dependent. Therefore, the development of tools, which automatically and reproducibly place regions of interest (ROI) and asses the local quality of the femoral bone in these ROIs would be of great help for clinicians. For this purpose, a method to position and deform ROIs automatically and reproducibly depending on the size and shape of the femur will be presented. Moreover, an approach to asses the femur quality, which is based on calculating texture features using co-occurrence matrices and these adaptive regions, will be proposed. For testing purposes, 15 CT-datasets of anatomical specimen of human femora are used. The correlation between the texture features and biomechanical properties of the proximal femoral bone is calculated. First results are very promising and show high correlation between the calculated features and biomechanical properties. Testing the method on a larger data pool and refining the algorithms to further increase its sensitivity for altered bone quality will be the next steps in this project.

  1. PTH signaling mediates perilacunar remodeling during exercise.

    PubMed

    Gardinier, Joseph D; Al-Omaishi, Salam; Morris, Michael D; Kohn, David H

    2016-01-01

    Mechanical loading and release of endogenous parathyroid hormone (PTH) during exercise facilitate the adaptation of bone. However, it remains unclear how exercise and PTH influence the composition of bone and how exercise and PTH-mediated compositional changes influence the mechanical properties of bone. Thus, the primary purpose of this study was to establish compositional changes within osteocytes' perilacunar region of cortical bone following exercise, and evaluate the influence of endogenous PTH signaling on this perilacunar adaptation. Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) were used to evaluate tissue composition surrounding individual lacuna within the tibia of 19week old male mice exposed to treadmill running for 3weeks. As a result of exercise, tissue within the perilacunar region (within 0-5μm of the lacuna wall) had a lower mineral-to-matrix ratio (MMR) compared to sedentary controls. In addition, exercise also increased the carbonate-to-phosphate ratio (CPR) across both perilacunar and non-perilacunar regions (5-10μm and 10-15μm from the lacuna walls). Tibial post-yield work had a significant negative correlation with perilacunar MMR. Inhibition of PTH activity with PTH(7-34) demonstrated that perilacunar remodeling during exercise was dependent on the cellular response to endogenous PTH. The osteocytes' response to endogenous PTH during exercise was characterized by a significant reduction in SOST expression and significant increase in FGF-23 expression. The potential reduction in phosphate levels due to FGF-23 expression may explain the increase in carbonate substitution. Overall, this is the first study to demonstrate that adaptation in tissue composition is localized around individual osteocytes, may contribute to the changes in whole bone mechanics during exercise, and that PTH signaling during exercise contributes to these adaptations. PMID:26924474

  2. Changes of blood parameters associated with bone remodeling following experimentally induced fatty liver disorder in laying hens.

    PubMed

    Jiang, S; Cheng, H W; Cui, L Y; Zhou, Z L; Hou, J F

    2013-06-01

    Studies have demonstrated that obesity and osteoporosis are linked disorders in humans. This study examined the hypothesis that excessive lipid consumption affects bone metabolism in laying hens. A total of one hundred 63-wk-old laying hens were randomly divided into 2 treatments and fed either a regular layer diet (control) or a high energy and low protein diet (HE-LP; experimental treatment) for 80 d. Egg production, feed intake, and BW were recorded at various days during the treatment. At d 80, ten randomly chosen birds per treatment group were killed. Abdominal fat weight, liver weight, and liver fat content were determined. Serum levels of total calcium, inorganic phosphate, and alkaline phosphatase were measured using a biochemical analyzer. Serum concentrations of osteocalcin, leptin-like protein, and estrogen were measured by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Tibia length and width were measured using a vernier caliper; density of the right tibias was determined using an x-ray scanner; and mechanical properties of the left tibias were analyzed using a material testing machine. The expression of osteocalcin and osteoprotegerin mRNA in the keel bone was analyzed by real-time PCR. The concentration of osteocalcin protein in the keels was measured using western blot. Compared with control hens, hens fed the HE-LP diet had lower egg production, lower feed intake, greater liver fat content, and greater abdominal fat pad mass (P < 0.05). Feeding the HE-LP diet increased serum alkaline phosphatase activity, osteocalcin, leptin-like protein, and estrogen concentrations (P < 0.05), and decreased the keel osteocalcin concentrations (P < 0.05). There were significant positive correlations between the serum concentrations of leptin-like protein, estrogen, and osteocalcin regardless of treatment (P < 0.05). The results indicated that HE-LP diet induced a fatty liver disorder in laying hens with an upregulation in bone turnover and exacerbated skeletal damage. The data

  3. Gradual adaptation of bone structure to aquatic lifestyle in extinct sloths from Peru.

    PubMed

    Amson, Eli; de Muizon, Christian; Laurin, Michel; Argot, Christine; de Buffrénil, Vivian

    2014-05-01

    Non-pathological densification (osteosclerosis) and swelling (pachyostosis) of bones are the main modifications affecting the skeleton of land vertebrates (tetrapods) that returned to water. However, a precise temporal calibration of the acquisition of such adaptations is still wanting. Here, we assess the timing of such acquisition using the aquatic sloth Thalassocnus, from the Neogene of the Pisco Formation, Peru. This genus is represented by five species occurring in successive vertebrate-bearing horizons of distinct ages. It yields the most detailed data about the gradual acquisition of aquatic adaptations among tetrapods, in displaying increasing osteosclerosis and pachyostosis through time. Such modifications, reflecting a shift in the habitat from terrestrial to aquatic, occurred over a short geological time span (ca 4 Myr). Otherwise, the bones of terrestrial pilosans (sloths and anteaters) are much more compact than the mean mammalian condition, which suggests that the osteosclerosis of Thalassocnus may represent an exaptation. PMID:24621950

  4. Gradual adaptation of bone structure to aquatic lifestyle in extinct sloths from Peru

    PubMed Central

    Amson, Eli; de Muizon, Christian; Laurin, Michel; Argot, Christine; de Buffrénil, Vivian

    2014-01-01

    Non-pathological densification (osteosclerosis) and swelling (pachyostosis) of bones are the main modifications affecting the skeleton of land vertebrates (tetrapods) that returned to water. However, a precise temporal calibration of the acquisition of such adaptations is still wanting. Here, we assess the timing of such acquisition using the aquatic sloth Thalassocnus, from the Neogene of the Pisco Formation, Peru. This genus is represented by five species occurring in successive vertebrate-bearing horizons of distinct ages. It yields the most detailed data about the gradual acquisition of aquatic adaptations among tetrapods, in displaying increasing osteosclerosis and pachyostosis through time. Such modifications, reflecting a shift in the habitat from terrestrial to aquatic, occurred over a short geological time span (ca 4 Myr). Otherwise, the bones of terrestrial pilosans (sloths and anteaters) are much more compact than the mean mammalian condition, which suggests that the osteosclerosis of Thalassocnus may represent an exaptation. PMID:24621950

  5. Positional behavior and limb bone adaptations in red howling monkeys (Alouatta seniculus).

    PubMed

    Schön Ybarra, M A; Schön, M A

    1987-01-01

    Morphological adaptations to climbing (a scansorial mode of quadrupedal, arboreal locomotion practised on twigs and small branches) are identified by relating anatomical details of limb bones to a sample of 6,136 instantaneous observational recordings on the positional behavior and support uses of 20 different free-ranging, adult red howlers. Our findings are used to infer the original habitat in which proto-red howlers may have acquired such adaptations and to hypothesize that climbing and its related anatomy are a primitive condition for anthropoids. PMID:3454342

  6. Receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition causes simultaneous bone loss and excess bone formation within growing bone in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Nurmio, Mirja; Joki, Henna; Kallio, Jenny; Maeaettae, Jorma A.; Vaeaenaenen, H. Kalervo; Toppari, Jorma; Jahnukainen, Kirsi; Laitala-Leinonen, Tiina

    2011-08-01

    During postnatal skeletal growth, adaptation to mechanical loading leads to cellular activities at the growth plate. It has recently become evident that bone forming and bone resorbing cells are affected by the receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) inhibitor imatinib mesylate (STI571, Gleevec (registered)) . Imatinib targets PDGF, ABL-related gene, c-Abl, c-Kit and c-Fms receptors, many of which have multiple functions in the bone microenvironment. We therefore studied the effects of imatinib in growing bone. Young rats were exposed to imatinib (150 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-7, or 100 mg/kg on postnatal days 5-13), and the effects of RTK inhibition on bone physiology were studied after 8 and 70 days (3-day treatment), or after 14 days (9-day treatment). X-ray imaging, computer tomography, histomorphometry, RNA analysis and immunohistochemistry were used to evaluate bone modeling and remodeling in vivo. Imatinib treatment eliminated osteoclasts from the metaphyseal osteochondral junction at 8 and 14 days. This led to a resorption arrest at the growth plate, but also increased bone apposition by osteoblasts, thus resulting in local osteopetrosis at the osteochondral junction. The impaired bone remodelation observed on day 8 remained significant until adulthood. Within the same bone, increased osteoclast activity, leading to bone loss, was observed at distal bone trabeculae on days 8 and 14. Peripheral quantitative computer tomography (pQCT) and micro-CT analysis confirmed that, at the osteochondral junction, imatinib shifted the balance from bone resorption towards bone formation, thereby altering bone modeling. At distal trabecular bone, in turn, the balance was turned towards bone resorption, leading to bone loss. - Research Highlights: > 3-Day imatinib treatment. > Causes growth plate anomalies in young rats. > Causes biomechanical changes and significant bone loss at distal trabecular bone. > Results in loss of osteoclasts at osteochondral junction.

  7. [Effects of antiresorptive therapy on the structural and material properties of bone strength].

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Hideaki

    2016-01-01

    Bone strength depends on its structural and material properties. Structural properties are determined by the size and shape of bone and also the microarchitecture. Material properties are determined by mineral crystallinity, collagen structure and microdamage in bone. The strength of bone is adapted to the needs of physical activities by biologic mechanisms, bone modeling and remodeling. The deterioration of bone strength in postmenopausal women is characterized by a trabecular bone deficit with poor trabecular connectivity and followed by a cortical bone deficit with trabeculation of endocortical bone and intracortical porosity due to accelerated bone remodeling. In high turnover osteoporosis antiresorptive therapy is effective in preventing the structural deficit and in increasing the stiffness and the toughness(bone strength)by increasing the mean degree of mineralization of bone tissue through the prolongation of secondary mineralization. But the long-term use of strong antiresorber, i.e. bisphosphonate or denosumab, would result in highly mineralized bone and disturbed repair of microcracks by inhibition of bone remodeling. Intermittent use or discontinuation of strong antiresorber after about 3-5 years of administration could be recommended to avoid the deterioration of bone strength. PMID:26728537

  8. Adaptation of BAp crystal orientation to stress distribution in rat mandible during bone growth

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nakano, T.; Fujitani, W.; Ishimoto, T.; Umakoshi, Y.

    2009-05-01

    Biological apatite (BAp) c-axis orientation strongly depends on stress distribution in vivo and tends to align along the principal stress direction in bones. Dentulous mandible is subjected to a complicated stress condition in vivo during chewing but few studies have been carried out on the BAp c-axis orientation; so the adaptation of BAp crystal orientation to stress distribution was examined in rat dentulous mandible during bone growth and mastication. Female SD rats 4 to 14 weeks old were prepared, and the bone mineral density (BMD) and BAp crystal orientation were analyzed in a cross-section of mandible across the first molar focusing on two positions: separated from and just under the tooth root on the same cross-section perpendicular to the mesiodistal axis. The degree of BAp orientation was analyzed by a microbeam X-ray diffractometer using Cu-Kα radiation equipped with a detector of curved one-dimensional PSPC and two-dimensional PSPC in the reflection and transmission optics, respectively. BMD quickly increased during bone growth up to 14 weeks, although it was independent of the position from the tooth root. In contrast, BAp crystal orientation strongly depended on the age and the position from the tooth root, even in the same cross-section and direction, especially along the mesiodistal and the biting axes. With increased biting stress during bone growth, the degree of BAp orientation increased along the mesiodistal axis in a position separated from the tooth root more than that near the tooth root. In contrast, BAp preferential alignment clearly appeared along the biting axis near the tooth root. We conclude that BAp orientation rather than BMD sensitively adapts to local stress distribution, especially from the chewing stress in vivo in the mandible.

  9. Adaptive remodelling of intestinal epithelium assessed using stereology: correlation of single cell and whole organ data with nutrient transport.

    PubMed

    Mayhew, T M

    1996-07-01

    Adaptation in the intestinal epithelium depends on cell number and the properties of individual cells but these responses operate within different time frames. Changes in number take days to accomplish but those in behaviour may occur within hours. This article reviews the value of stereology for characterising structural features of the average enterocyte and the entire organ (mammalian small intestine or avian lower intestine) during adaptation. Stereological data are correlated with the physiology and molecular biology of glucose and Na+ transport. In small intestine, account is taken of vertical (crypt-villus) and longitudinal (craniocaudal) gradients and of adaptations to chemically-induced diabetes and diet. Results show that longer-term adaptation depends critically on epithelial renewal. In diabetic small intestine, changes in glucose transport are accompanied by changes in the number, but not morphology, of villous enterocytes. In avian, lower intestine, increased Na+ transport requires changes in cell number and the extent of their apical, but not basolateral membrane surfaces. These changes allow opportunities to incorporate more (or more active) transport sites in apical and basolateral membrane domains of individual cells and of whole organs. PMID:8839763

  10. Pilot Study: Unique Response of Bone Tissue During an Investigation of Radio-Adaptive Effects in Mice

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sibonga, J. D.; Iwaniec, U.; Wu, H.

    2011-01-01

    PURPOSE: We obtained bone tissue to evaluate the collateral effects of experiments designed to investigate molecular mechanisms of radio-adaptation in a mouse model. Radio-adaptation describes a process by which the prior exposure to low dose radiation can protect against the toxic effect of a subsequent high dose exposure. In the radio-adaptation experiments, C57Bl/6 mice were exposed to either a Sham or a priming Low Dose (5 cGy) of Cs-137 gamma rays before being exposed to either a Sham or High Dose (6 Gy) 24 hours later. ANALYSIS: Bone tissue were obtained from two experiments where mice were sacrificed at 3 days (n=3/group, 12 total) and at 14 days (n=6/group, 24 total) following high dose exposure. Tissues were analyzed to 1) evaluate a radio-adaptive response in bone tissue and 2) describe cellular and microstructural effects for two skeletal sites with different rates of bone turnover. One tibia and one lumbar vertebrae (LV2), collected at the 3-day time-point, were analyzed by bone histomorphometry and micro-CT to evaluate the cellular response and any evidence of microarchitectural impact. Likewise, tibia and LV2, collected at the 14-day time-point, were analyzed by micro-CT alone to evaluate resulting changes to bone structure and microarchitecture. The data were analyzed by 2-way ANOVA to evaluate the effects of the priming low dose radiation, of the high dose radiation, and of any interaction between the priming low and high doses of radiation. Bone histomorphometry was performed in the cancellous bone (aka trabecular bone) compartments of the proximal tibial metaphysis and of LV2. RESULTS: Cellular Response @ 3 Days The priming Low Dose radiation decreased osteoblast-covered bone perimeter in the proximal tibia and the total cell density in the bone marrow in the LV2. High Dose radiation, regardless of prior exposure to priming dose, dramatically reduced total cell density in bone marrow of both the long bone and vertebra. However, in the proximal

  11. Conception on the Cell Mechanisms of Bone Tissue Loss

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, N. V.

    2008-06-01

    Basing on the analysis of available literature, the results of our own electron microscopic and radioautographic researches the data are presented about the morphofunctional peculiarities and succession of cellular interactions in adaptive remodeling of bone structures after exposure of animals (rats, monkeys) to microgravity (station SLS-2, Bion-11). The probable cellular mechanisms of the development of osteopenia and osteoporosis are considered.

  12. Antioxidant impregnated ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene wear debris particles display increased bone remodeling and a superior osteogenic:osteolytic profile vs. conventional UHMWPE particles in a murine calvaria model.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yu; Hallab, Nadim J; Liao, Yen-Shuo; Narayan, Venkat; Schwarz, Edward M; Xie, Chao

    2016-05-01

    Periprosthetic osteolysis remains a major limitation of long-term successful total hip replacements with ultra-high molecular weight polyethylene (UHMWPE) bearings. As intra and extracellular reactive oxygen species are know to contribute to wear debris-induced osteoclastic bone resorption and decreased osteoblastic bone formation, antioxidant doped UHMWPE has emerged as an approach to reduce the osteolytic potential of wear debris and maintain coupled bone remodeling. To test this hypothesis in vivo, we evaluated the effects of crosslinked UHMWPE wear debris particles (AltrX(™) ), versus similar wear particles made from COVERNOX(™) containing UHMWPE (AOX(™) ), in an established murine calvaria model. Eight-week-old female C57B/6 mice (n = 10/Group) received a pre-op micro-CT scan prior to surgical implantation of the UHMWPE particles (2mg), or surgery without particles (sham). Dynamic labeling was performed by intraperitoneal injection of calcein on day 7 and alizarin on day 9, and the calvaria were harvested for micro-CT and histology on day 10. Surprisingly, we found that AOX particles induced significantly more bone resorption (1.72-fold) and osteoclast numbers (1.99-fold) vs. AltrX (p < 0.001). However, AOX also significantly induced 1.64-fold more new bone formation vs. AltrX (p < 0.01). Moreover, while the osteolytic:osteogenic ratio of both particles was very close to 1.0, which is indicative of coupled remodeling, AOX was more osteogenic (Slope = 1.13 ± 0.10 vs. 0.97 ± 0.10). Histomorphometry of the metabolically labeled undecalcified calvaria revealed a consistent trend of greater MAR in AOX vs. AltrX. Collectively, these results demonstrate that anti-oxidant impregnated UHMWPE particles have decreased osteolytic potential due to their increased osteogenic properties that support coupled bone remodeling. © 2015 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:845-851, 2016. PMID:26495749

  13. Transplantation of expanded bone marrow-derived very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSEL-SCs) improves left ventricular function and remodelling after myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    Zuba-Surma, Ewa K; Guo, Yiru; Taher, Hisham; Sanganalmath, Santosh K; Hunt, Greg; Vincent, Robert J; Kucia, Magda; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Tang, Xian-Liang; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z; Dawn, Buddhadeb; Bolli, Roberto

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Adult bone marrow-derived very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSEL-SCs) exhibit a Sca-1+/Lin–/CD45– phenotype and can differentiate into various cell types, including cardiomyocytes and endothelial cells. We have previously reported that transplantation of a small number (1 × 106) of freshly isolated, non-expanded VSEL-SCs into infarcted mouse hearts resulted in improved left ventricular (LV) function and anatomy. Clinical translation, however, will require large numbers of cells. Because the frequency of VSEL-SCs in the marrow is very low, we examined whether VSEL-SCs can be expanded in culture without loss of therapeutic efficacy. Mice underwent a 30 min. coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion and, 48 hrs later, received an intramyocardial injection of vehicle (group I, n= 11), 1 × 105 enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labelled expanded untreated VSEL-SCs (group II, n= 7), or 1 × 105 EGFP-labelled expanded VSEL-SCs pre-incubated in a cardiogenic medium (group III, n= 8). At 35 days after myocardial infarction (MI), mice treated with pre-incubated VSEL-SCs exhibited better global and regional LV systolic function and less LV hypertrophy compared with vehicle-treated controls. In contrast, transplantation of expanded but untreated VSEL-SCs did not produce appreciable reparative benefits. Scattered EGFP+ cells expressing α-sarcomeric actin, platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM)-1, or von Willebrand factor were present in VSEL-SC-treated mice, but their numbers were very small. No tumour formation was observed. We conclude that VSEL-SCs expanded in culture retain the ability to alleviate LV dysfunction and remodelling after a reperfused MI provided that they are exposed to a combination of cardiomyogenic growth factors and cytokines prior to transplantation. Counter intuitively, the mechanism whereby such pre-incubation confers therapeutic efficacy does not involve differentiation into new cardiac cells. These results

  14. Ecomorphological disparity in an adaptive radiation: opercular bone shape and stable isotopes in Antarctic icefishes

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Laura A B; Colombo, Marco; Hanel, Reinhold; Salzburger, Walter; Sánchez-Villagra, Marcelo R

    2013-01-01

    To assess how ecological and morphological disparity is interrelated in the adaptive radiation of Antarctic notothenioid fish we used patterns of opercle bone evolution as a model to quantify shape disparity, phylogenetic patterns of shape evolution, and ecological correlates in the form of stable isotope values. Using a sample of 25 species including representatives from four major notothenioid clades, we show that opercle shape disparity is higher in the modern fauna than would be expected under the neutral evolution Brownian motion model. Phylogenetic comparative methods indicate that opercle shape data best fit a model of directional selection (Ornstein–Uhlenbeck) and are least supported by the “early burst” model of adaptive radiation. The main evolutionary axis of opercle shape change reflects movement from a broad and more symmetrically tapered opercle to one that narrows along the distal margin, but with only slight shape change on the proximal margin. We find a trend in opercle shape change along the benthic–pelagic axis, underlining the importance of this axis for diversification in the notothenioid radiation. A major impetus for the study of adaptive radiations is to uncover generalized patterns among different groups, and the evolutionary patterns in opercle shape among notothenioids are similar to those found among other adaptive radiations (three-spined sticklebacks) promoting the utility of this approach for assessing ecomorphological interactions on a broad scale. PMID:24102002

  15. Testing Adaptive Hypotheses of Convergence with Functional Landscapes: A Case Study of Bone-Cracking Hypercarnivores

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Zhijie Jack

    2013-01-01

    Morphological convergence is a well documented phenomenon in mammals, and adaptive explanations are commonly employed to infer similar functions for convergent characteristics. I present a study that adopts aspects of theoretical morphology and engineering optimization to test hypotheses about adaptive convergent evolution. Bone-cracking ecomorphologies in Carnivora were used as a case study. Previous research has shown that skull deepening and widening are major evolutionary patterns in convergent bone-cracking canids and hyaenids. A simple two-dimensional design space, with skull width-to-length and depth-to-length ratios as variables, was used to examine optimized shapes for two functional properties: mechanical advantage (MA) and strain energy (SE). Functionality of theoretical skull shapes was studied using finite element analysis (FEA) and visualized as functional landscapes. The distribution of actual skull shapes in the landscape showed a convergent trend of plesiomorphically low-MA and moderate-SE skulls evolving towards higher-MA and moderate-SE skulls; this is corroborated by FEA of 13 actual specimens. Nevertheless, regions exist in the landscape where high-MA and lower-SE shapes are not represented by existing species; their vacancy is observed even at higher taxonomic levels. Results highlight the interaction of biomechanical and non-biomechanical factors in constraining general skull dimensions to localized functional optima through evolution. PMID:23734244

  16. Prostaglandin E2 Exerts Multiple Regulatory Actions on Human Obese Adipose Tissue Remodeling, Inflammation, Adaptive Thermogenesis and Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    García-Alonso, Verónica; Titos, Esther; Alcaraz-Quiles, Jose; Rius, Bibiana; Lopategi, Aritz; López-Vicario, Cristina; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Delgado, Salvadora; Lozano, Juanjo; Clària, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Obesity induces white adipose tissue (WAT) dysfunction characterized by unremitting inflammation and fibrosis, impaired adaptive thermogenesis and increased lipolysis. Prostaglandins (PGs) are powerful lipid mediators that influence the homeostasis of several organs and tissues. The aim of the current study was to explore the regulatory actions of PGs in human omental WAT collected from obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. In addition to adipocyte hypertrophy, obese WAT showed remarkable inflammation and total and pericellular fibrosis. In this tissue, a unique molecular signature characterized by altered expression of genes involved in inflammation, fibrosis and WAT browning was identified by microarray analysis. Targeted LC-MS/MS lipidomic analysis identified increased PGE2 levels in obese fat in the context of a remarkable COX-2 induction and in the absence of changes in the expression of terminal prostaglandin E synthases (i.e. mPGES-1, mPGES-2 and cPGES). IPA analysis established PGE2 as a common top regulator of the fibrogenic/inflammatory process present in this tissue. Exogenous addition of PGE2 significantly reduced the expression of fibrogenic genes in human WAT explants and significantly down-regulated Col1α1, Col1α2 and αSMA in differentiated 3T3 adipocytes exposed to TGF-β. In addition, PGE2 inhibited the expression of inflammatory genes (i.e. IL-6 and MCP-1) in WAT explants as well as in adipocytes challenged with LPS. PGE2 anti-inflammatory actions were confirmed by microarray analysis of human pre-adipocytes incubated with this prostanoid. Moreover, PGE2 induced expression of brown markers (UCP1 and PRDM16) in WAT and adipocytes, but not in pre-adipocytes, suggesting that PGE2 might induce the trans-differentiation of adipocytes towards beige/brite cells. Finally, PGE2 inhibited isoproterenol-induced adipocyte lipolysis. Taken together, these findings identify PGE2 as a regulator of the complex network of interactions

  17. Bone microenvironment-mediated resistance of cancer cells to bisphosphonates and impact on bone osteocytes/stem cells.

    PubMed

    Alasmari, Abeer; Lin, Shih-Chun; Dibart, Serge; Salih, Erdjan

    2016-08-01

    Anti-resorptive bisphosphonates (BPs) have been clinically used to prevent cancer-bone metastasis and cancer-induced bone pathologies despite the fact that the phenotypic response of the cancer-bone interactions to BP exposure is "uncharted territory". This study offers unique insights into the interplay between cancer stem cells and osteocytes/osteoblasts and mesenchymal stem cells using a three-dimensional (3D) live cancer-bone interactive model. We provide extraordinary cryptic details of the biological events that occur as a result of alendronate (ALN) treatment using 3D live cancer-bone model systems under specific bone remodeling stages. While cancer cells are susceptible to BP treatment in the absence of bone, they are totally unaffected in the presence of bone. Cancer cells colonize live bone irrespective of whether the bone is committed to bone resorption or formation and hence, cancer-bone metastasis/interactions are though to be "independent of bone remodeling stages". In our 3D live bone model systems, ALN inhibited bone resorption at the osteoclast differentiation level through effects of mineral-bound ALN on osteocytes and osteoblasts. The mineral-bound ALN rendered bone incapable of osteoblast differentiation, while cancer cells colonize the bone with striking morphological adaptations which led to a conclusion that a direct anti-cancer effect of BPs in a "live or in vivo" bone microenvironment is implausible. The above studies were complemented with mass spectrometric analysis of the media from cancer-bone organ cultures in the absence and presence of ALN. The mineral-bound ALN impacts the bone organs by limiting transformation of mesenchymal stem cells to osteoblasts and leads to diminished endosteal cell population and degenerated osteocytes within the mineralized bone matrix. PMID:27155840

  18. Redox regulation of vascular remodeling.

    PubMed

    Karimi Galougahi, Keyvan; Ashley, Euan A; Ali, Ziad A

    2016-01-01

    Vascular remodeling is a dynamic process of structural and functional changes in response to biochemical and biomechanical signals in a complex in vivo milieu. While inherently adaptive, dysregulation leads to maladaptive remodeling. Reactive oxygen species participate in homeostatic cell signaling in tightly regulated- and compartmentalized cellular circuits. It is well established that perturbations in oxidation-reduction (redox) homeostasis can lead to a state of oxidative-, and more recently, reductive stress. We provide an overview of the redox signaling in the vasculature and review the role of oxidative- and reductive stress in maladaptive vascular remodeling. Particular emphasis has been placed on essential processes that determine phenotype modulation, migration and fate of the main cell types in the vessel wall. Recent advances in systems biology and the translational opportunities they may provide to specifically target the redox pathways driving pathological vascular remodeling are discussed. PMID:26483132

  19. Numerical analysis of an osseointegrated prosthesis fixation with reduced bone failure risk and periprosthetic bone loss.

    PubMed

    Tomaszewski, P K; van Diest, M; Bulstra, S K; Verdonschot, N; Verkerke, G J

    2012-07-26

    Currently available implants for direct attachment of prosthesis to the skeletal system after transfemoral amputation (OPRA system, Integrum AB, Sweden and ISP Endo/Exo prosthesis, ESKA Implants AG, Germany) show many advantages over the conventional socket fixation. However, restraining biomechanical issues such as considerable bone loss around the stem and peri-prosthetic bone fractures are present. To overcome these limiting issues a new concept of the direct intramedullary fixation was developed. We hypothesize that the new design will reduce the peri-prosthetic bone failure risk and adverse bone remodeling by restoring the natural load transfer in the femur. Generic CT-based finite element models of an intact femur and amputated bones implanted with 3 analyzed implants were created and loaded with a normal walking and a forward fall load. The strain adaptive bone remodeling theory was used to predict long-term bone changes around the implants and the periprosthetic bone failure risk was evaluated by the von Mises stress criterion. The results show that the new design provides close to physiological distribution of stresses in the bone and lower bone failure risk for the normal walking as compared to the OPRA and the ISP implants. The bone remodeling simulations did not reveal any overall bone loss around the new design, as opposed to the OPRA and the ISP implants, which induce considerable bone loss in the distal end of the femur. This positive outcome shows that the presented concept has a potential to considerably improve safety of the rehabilitation with the direct fixation implants. PMID:22677337

  20. Endocrine Regulation of Bone and Energy Metabolism in Hibernating Mammals

    PubMed Central

    Doherty, Alison H.; Florant, Gregory L.; Donahue, Seth W.

    2014-01-01

    Precise coordination among organs is required to maintain homeostasis throughout hibernation. This is particularly true in balancing bone remodeling processes (bone formation and resorption) in hibernators experiencing nutritional deprivation and extreme physical inactivity, two factors normally leading to pronounced bone loss in non-hibernating mammals. In recent years, important relationships between bone, fat, reproductive, and brain tissues have come to light. These systems share interconnected regulatory mechanisms of energy metabolism that potentially protect the skeleton during hibernation. This review focuses on the endocrine and neuroendocrine regulation of bone/fat/energy metabolism in hibernators. Hibernators appear to have unique mechanisms that protect musculoskeletal tissues while catabolizing their abundant stores of fat. Furthermore, the bone remodeling processes that normally cause disuse-induced bone loss in non-hibernators are compared to bone remodeling processes in hibernators, and possible adaptations of the bone signaling pathways that protect the skeleton during hibernation are discussed. Understanding the biological mechanisms that allow hibernators to survive the prolonged disuse and fasting associated with extreme environmental challenges will provide critical information regarding the limit of convergence in mammalian systems and of skeletal plasticity, and may contribute valuable insight into the etiology and treatment of human diseases. PMID:24556365

  1. Bone Targeted Therapies for Bone Metastasis in Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Razaq, Wajeeha

    2013-01-01

    Cancer metastasis to the bone develops commonly in patients with various malignancies, and is a major cause of morbidity and diminished quality of life in many affected patients. Emerging treatments for metastatic bone disease have arisen from advances in our understanding of the unique cellular and molecular mechanisms that contribute to the bone metastasis. The tendency of cancer cells to metastasize to bone is probably the end result of many factors including vascular pathways, the highly vascular nature of the bone marrow (which increases the probability that cancer cells will be deposited in bone marrow capillaries), and molecular characteristics of the cancer cells that allow them to adapt to the bone marrow microenvironment. The goals of treating osseous metastases are manifold. Proper treatment can lead to significant improvements in pain control and function, and maintain skeletal integrity. The treatment plan requires a multidisciplinary approach. Widespread metastatic disease necessitates systemic therapy, while a localized problem is best managed with surgery, external beam radiotherapy, or both. Patients with bone metastasis can have prolonged survival, and proper management can have a significant impact on their quality of life. We will review the factors in this article that are promising molecular bone-targeted therapies or will be likely targets for future therapeutic intervention to restore bone remodeling and suppress tumor growth. PMID:26237142

  2. Mechanical properties of femoral cortical bone following cemented hip replacement.

    PubMed

    Ni, G X; Lu, W W; Chiu, P K Y; Wang, Y; Li, Z Y; Zhang, Y G; Xu, B; Deng, L F; Luk, K D K

    2007-11-01

    Femoral bone remodeling following total hip replacement is a big concern and has never been examined mechanically. In this study, six goats underwent unilateral cemented hip hemiarthroplasty with polymethyl methacrylate (PMMA) bone cement. Nine months later animals were sacrificed, and the femoral cortical bone slices at different levels were analysed using microhardness testing and microcomputed tomography (micro-CT) scanning. Implanted femurs were compared to contralateral nonimplanted femurs. Extensive bone remodeling was demonstrated at both the proximal and middle levels, but not at the distal level. Compared with the nonimplanted side, significant decreases were found in the implanted femur in cortical bone area, bone mineral density, and cortical bone hardness at the proximal level, as well as in bone mineral density and bone hardness at the middle level. However, no significant difference was observed in either variable for the distal level. In addition, similar proximal-to-distal gradient changes were revealed both in cortical bone microhardness and bone mineral density. From the mechanical point of view, the results of the present study suggested that stress shielding is an important mechanical factor associated with bone adaptation following total hip replacement. PMID:17506504

  3. Role of Osteocyte-derived Insulin-Like Growth Factor I in Developmental Growth, Modeling, Remodeling, and Regeneration of the Bone

    PubMed Central

    Sheng, Matilda H. C.; Lau, K. H. William

    2014-01-01

    The osteocyte has long been considered to be the primary mechanosensory cell in the bone. Recent evidence has emerged that the osteocyte is also a key regulator of various bone and mineral metabolism and that its regulatory effects are in part mediated through locally produced osteocyte-derived factors, such as sclerostin, receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappa B ligand (RANKL), and fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-23. Osteocytes secrete large amounts of insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I in bone. Although IGF-I produced locally by other bone cells, such as osteoblasts and chondrocytes, has been shown to play important regulatory roles in bone turnover and developmental bone growth, the functional role of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the bone and mineral metabolism has not been investigated and remains unclear. However, results of recent studies in osteocyte Igf1 conditional knockout transgenic mice have suggested potential regulatory roles of osteocyte-derived IGF-I in various aspects of bone and mineral metabolism. In this review, evidence supporting a regulatory role for osteocyte-derived IGF-I in the osteogenic response to mechanical loading, the developmental bone growth, the bone response to dietary calcium depletion and repletion, and in fracture repair is discussed. A potential coordinated regulatory relationship between the effect of osteocyte-derived IGF-I on bone size and the internal organ size is also proposed. PMID:24707466

  4. The Impact of Occlusal Function on Structural Adaptation in Alveolar Bone of the Growing Pig, Sus Scrofa

    PubMed Central

    Yeh, Kuang-Dah; Popowics, Tracy Ellen

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study investigated the effects of growth and tooth loading on the structural adaptation of the developing alveolar bone adjacent to the tooth root as the tooth erupted into function. Growth and occlusal function were expected to lead to increased alveolar bone density. Meanwhile, the supporting alveolar bone was expected to develop a dominant trabecular orientation (anisotropy) only after occlusal loading. Design Minipigs with erupting and occluding mandibular first molars (M1’s) were used to study the effects of growth and occlusal function on developing alveolar bone structure through comparison of alveolar bone surrounding M1’s. A second minipig model with one side upper opponent teeth extracted prior to occlusal contact with the M1 was raised until the non-extraction side M1’s developed full occlusal contact. The comparisons between extraction and non-extraction side M1 alveolar bone were used to emphasize the impact of occlusal loading on alveolar bone structure. Specimens were scanned on a Scanco Medical μCT 20 at a 22μm voxel resolution for structural analysis. Results With growth and occlusal function a distinct alveolar bone proper tended to develop immediately adjacent to the tooth root. The cancellous bone had thicker but fewer and more separated trabeculae after growth or occlusal loading. On the other hand, occlusal function did not lead to increased alveolar structural anisotropy. Conclusion During tooth eruption, growth and masticatory loads effect structural change in alveolar bone. The impact of occlusal function on cancellous bone anisotropy may need a more extensive period of time to demonstrate. PMID:20855059

  5. Automatic adaptive parameterization in local phase feature-based bone segmentation in ultrasound.

    PubMed

    Hacihaliloglu, Ilker; Abugharbieh, Rafeef; Hodgson, Antony J; Rohling, Robert N

    2011-10-01

    Intensity-invariant local phase features based on Log-Gabor filters have been recently shown to produce highly accurate localizations of bone surfaces from three-dimensional (3-D) ultrasound. A key challenge, however, remains in the proper selection of filter parameters, whose values have so far been chosen empirically and kept fixed for a given image. Since Log-Gabor filter responses widely change when varying the filter parameters, actual parameter selection can significantly affect the quality of extracted features. This article presents a novel method for contextual parameter selection that autonomously adapts to image content. Our technique automatically selects the scale, bandwidth and orientation parameters of Log-Gabor filters for optimizing local phase symmetry. The proposed approach incorporates principle curvature computed from the Hessian matrix and directional filter banks in a phase scale-space framework. Evaluations performed on carefully designed in vitro experiments demonstrate 35% improvement in accuracy of bone surface localization compared with empirically-set parameterization results. Results from a pilot in vivo study on human subjects, scanned in the operating room, show similar improvements. PMID:21821346

  6. Using digital image correlation to determine bone surface strains during loading and after adaptation of the mouse tibia.

    PubMed

    Sztefek, Pavel; Vanleene, Maximilien; Olsson, Robin; Collinson, Rebecca; Pitsillides, Andrew A; Shefelbine, Sandra

    2010-03-01

    Previous models of cortical bone adaptation, in which loading is imposed on the bone, have estimated the strains in the tissue using strain gauges, analytical beam theory, or finite element analysis. We used digital image correlation (DIC), tracing a speckle pattern on the surface of the bone during loading, to determine surface strains in a murine tibia during compressive loading through the knee joint. We examined whether these surface strains in the mouse tibia are modified following two weeks of load-induced adaptation by comparison with contralateral controls. Results indicated non-uniform strain patterns with isolated areas of high strain (0.5%), particularly on the medial side. Strain measurements were reproducible (standard deviation of the error 0.03%), similar between specimens, and in agreement with strain gauge measurements (between 0.1 and 0.2% strain). After structural adaptation, strains were more uniform across the tibial surface, particularly on the medial side where peak strains were reduced from 0.5% to 0.3%. Because DIC determines local strains over the entire surface, it will provide a better understanding of how strain stimulus influences the bone response during adaptation. PMID:20005517

  7. Muscle and bone plasticity after spinal cord injury: Review of adaptations to disuse and to electrical muscle stimulation

    PubMed Central

    Dudley-Javoroski, Shauna; Shields, Richard K.

    2009-01-01

    The paralyzed musculoskeletal system retains a remarkable degree of plasticity after spinal cord injury (SCI). In response to reduced activity, muscle atrophies and shifts toward a fast-fatigable phenotype arising from numerous changes in histochemistry and metabolic enzymes. The loss of routine gravitational and muscular loads removes a critical stimulus for maintenance of bone mineral density (BMD), precipitating neurogenic osteoporosis in paralyzed limbs. The primary adaptations of bone to reduced use are demineralization of epiphyses and thinning of the diaphyseal cortical wall. Electrical stimulation of paralyzed muscle markedly reduces deleterious post-SCI adaptations. Recent studies demonstrate that physiological levels of electrically induced muscular loading hold promise for preventing post-SCI BMD decline. Rehabilitation specialists will be challenged to develop strategies to prevent or reverse musculoskeletal deterioration in anticipation of a future cure for SCI. Quantifying the precise dose of stress needed to efficiently induce a therapeutic effect on bone will be paramount to the advancement of rehabilitation strategies. PMID:18566946

  8. How the osteoclast degrades bone.

    PubMed

    Blair, H C

    1998-10-01

    Osteoclasts are multinucleated monocyte-macrophage derivatives that degrade bone. Their specialized role is central to a process that continuously removes and replaces segments of the skeleton in the higher vertebrates. Osteoclasts allow skeletal mineral to be used to manage extracellular calcium activity, which is an important adaptation for life on land, and solid skeletal structure to be replaced by hollow architecture that has a superior strength-to-weight ratio. Degrading bone also allows periodic repair and remodeling for ordered growth and efficient response to mechanical loads. A fairly comprehensive view of osteoclastic ontogeny and function is emerging from recent studies. Osteoclasts dissolve bone mineral by massive acid secretion and secrete specialized proteinases that degrade the organic matrix, mainly type I collagen, in this acidic milieu. The site of bone dissolution is a high-calcium environment; removal of degradation products by transcytosis of membrane vesicles allows the osteoclast to maintain a normal intracellular calcium. Osteoclastic differentiation is normally balanced with bone formation, although bone formation is the function of unrelated stromal cell-derived osteoblasts. Interactions between osteoclast precursors and bone-forming cells are believed to control osteoclast differentiation under most circumstances, preserving bone architecture over many cycles of bone replacement. PMID:9819571

  9. Conception on the cell mechanisms of bone tissue loss under spase flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, Natalia; Oganov, Victor; Kabitskaya, Olga

    Basing on the analysis of available literature and the results of our own electron microscopic and radioautographic researches the data are presented about the morpho-functional peculiarities and succession of cellular interactions in adaptive remodeling of bone structures under normal conditions and after exposure of animals (rats, monkeys, mice) to microgravity (SLS-2, Bion-11, BionM-1). The probable cellular mechanisms of the development of osteopenia and osteoporosis are considered. Our conception on remodeling proposes the following sequence in the development of cellular interactions after decrease of the mechanical loading: a primary response of osteocytes (mechanosensory cells) to the mechanical stimulus; osteocytic remodeling (osteolysis); transmission of the mechanical signals through a system of canals and processes to functionally active osteoblasts and surface osteocytes as well as to the bone-marrow stromal cells and to those lying on bone surfaces. As a response to the mechanical stimulus (microgravity) the system of stromal cell-preosteoblast-osteoblast shows a delay in proliferation, differentiation and specific functioning of the osteogenetic cells, some of the osteoblasts undergo apoptosis. Then the osteoclastic reaction occurs (attraction of monocytes and formation of osteoclasts and bone matrix resorption in the loci of apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteocytes). The macrophagal reaction is followed by osteoblastogenesis, which appears to be a rehabilitating process. However, during prolonged absence of mechanical stimuli (microgravity, long-time immobilization) the adaptive activization of osteoblastogenesis doesn’t occur (as it is the case during the physiological remodeling of bone tissue) or it occurs to a smaller degree. The loading deficit leads to an adaptive differentiation of stromal cells to fibroblastic cells and adipocytes in these remodeling loci. These cell reactions are considered as adaptive-compensatory, but they don’t result

  10. Vibrational spectroscopy in biomedical science: bone

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gamsjäger, Sonja; Zoehrer, R.; Roschger, P.; Fratzl, P.; Klaushofer, K.; Mendelsohn, R.; Paschalis, E. P.

    2009-02-01

    Fourier transform infrared imaging (FTIR) and Raman Microspectroscopy are powerful tools for characterizing the distribution of different chemical moieties in heterogeneous materials. FTIR and Raman measurements have been adapted to assess the maturity of the mineral and the quality of the organic component (collagen and non-collagenous proteins) of the mineralized tissue in bone. Unique to the FTIRI analysis is the capability to provide the spatial distribution of two of the major collagen cross-links (pyridinoline, and dehydro-dihydroxylysinonorleucine) and through the study of normal and diseased bone, relate them to bone strength. These FTIR parameters have been validated based on analysis of model compounds. It is widely accepted that bone strength is determined by bone mass and bone quality. The latter is a multifactorial term encompassing the material and structural properties of bone, and one important aspect of the bone material properties is the organic matrix. The bone material properties can be defined by parameters of mineral and collagen, as determined by FTIR and Raman analysis. Considerably less attention has been directed at collagen, although there are several publications in the literature reporting altered collagen properties associated with fragile bone, in both animals and humans. Since bone is a heterogeneous tissue due to the remodeling process, microscopic areas may be carefully selected based on quantitative Backscattered Electron Imaging or histological staining, thus ensuring comparison of areas with similar metabolic activity and mineral content. In conclusion, FTIRI and Raman vibrational spectroscopy are proving to be powerful tools in bone-related medical research.

  11. A decade of bisphosphonate bone complications: what it has taught us about bone physiology.

    PubMed

    Marx, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    While the AIDS epidemic of the 1980s taught the medical and dental professions much about immune cells and the immune system's cellular relationships, the bisphosphonate-induced osteonecrosis epidemic of the past decade has taught these same professions much about bone turnover, bone cell cross talk, the response and functional relationship of bone cells to loading, and drug effects on cellular dynamic relationships. The present article explores the literature as well as both evidence- and experience-based data to discuss known bone pathologies and physiologic mechanisms as well as uncover new findings: (1) bone remodeling is the mechanism by which bone adapts to loading stresses, termed either bone modeling or Wolff's law, and it is also the mechanism for bone renewal; (2) osteoclastic bone resorption triggers bone renewal at a rate of about 0.7%/day by its release of growth factors; (3) bisphosphonates prevent the renewal of old and injured bone, thus making it brittle and more likely to fracture over time; (4) bisphosphonates have a half-life in bone of 11 years because of their irreversible binding to bone via their central carbon atom; (5) when administered intravenously, bisphosphonate loads bone and accumulates in bone 142.8 times faster than when administered orally; (6) osteoclastic resorption of bisphosphonate-loaded bone results in osteoclast death in which the cell bursts, releasing the bisphosphonate molecules to reenter the local bone or bone marrow in a re-dosing effect; (7) endosteal osteoblasts are dependent on the osteoclastic resorption/growth factor release/new bone formation mechanism of bone renewal, whereas periosteal osteoblasts are not; and (8) it is likely that endosteal osteoblasts and periosteal osteoblasts have different cell membrane receptors and arise from separate embryologic niches. PMID:24683588

  12. Calcium-regulating hormones, bone mineral content, breaking load and trabecular remodeling are altered in growing pigs fed calcium-deficient diets.

    PubMed

    Eklou-Kalonji, E; Zerath, E; Colin, C; Lacroix, C; Holy, X; Denis, I; Pointillart, A

    1999-01-01

    Studies on calcium nutrition in appropriate large animal models can be directly relevant to humans. We have examined the effect of dietary Ca deficiency on various bone and bone-related variables, including plasma markers, histomorphometry, mineral content and breaking strength in pigs. Three groups of eight 38-d-old female pigs were fed adequate (0.9%; control), low (0.4%; LCa) or very low (0.1%; VLCa) Ca diets for 32 d. Plasma Ca significantly decreased over time only in the VLCa-deficient pigs. The concentrations of the parathyroid hormones (PTH) and calcitriol increased as Ca deficiency developed, and the plasma PTH and calcitriol levels varied inversely with dietary Ca. The total bone ash contents, bending moments, trabecular bone volume and the mineral apposition rate all decreased as the calcium intake decreased. The osteoclast surface areas were greater than those of controls in both Ca-deficient groups, whereas the osteoblast surface areas were greater only in the VLCa group. The plasma osteoblast-related markers (alkaline phosphatase, carboxy-terminal propeptide of type I procollagen and osteocalcin) were either greater or unaffected in the Ca-deficient pigs. The results indicate that deficient bone mineralization combined with an increased bone resorption led to bone loss and fragility. The differences in the changes in bone cells (number and activity) between LCa and VLCa groups might be due to differences (time and extent) of circulating PTH and calcitriol. The defective mineralization in both Ca-depleted groups resulted mainly from the lack of Ca because their osteoblast activity was either maintained or stimulated. The results also underline the progressive sensitivity of pigs to Ca supply and the usefulness of this model. PMID:9915898

  13. Bone formation: roles of genistein and daidzein

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone remodeling consists of a balance between bone formation by osteoblasts and bone resorption by osteoclasts. Osteoporosis is the result of increased bone resorption and decreased bone formation causing a decreased bone mass density, loss of bone microarchitecture, and an increased risk of fractu...

  14. Biomechanical adaptations of mice cortical bone submitted to three different exercise modalities

    PubMed Central

    Frajacomo, Fernando Tadeu Trevisan; Falcai, Maurício José; Fernandes, Cleverson Rodrigues; Shimano, Antonio Carlos; Garcia, Sérgio Britto

    2013-01-01

    Objective To compare the adaptive effects of three non-weight bearing exercise on bone mechanical properties. Methods 24 male Balb/c mice (22-25g), were randomly divided into four groups (n=6): sedentary group (S); swimming group (N) which performed sessions five times per week for 60 min progressively; resistance group (R), which performed climbing exercise with progressive load, three times per week; and combined group (C), which performed the same protocols aforementioned being three times a week according to N protocol and two times a week the R protocol during eight weeks. Biomechanical tests, load until failure and stiffness evaluation of shinbone was performed after animals have been sacrificed. Results Stiffness values were statistically higher only in the isolated modalities groups (N and R, 41.68 ± 10.43 and 41.21 ± 11.38 N/mm, respectively) compared with the S group (28.48 ± 7.34 N/mm). However, taking into consideration the final body mass, relative values, there was no difference in the biomechanical tests among the groups. Conclusion Data from the present investigation demonstrated a favorable influence of muscle contraction in lower impact isolated exercise modalities on absolute stiffness values, i.e.groups N and R, whereas the combined group (C) did not present any statistical significant difference compared to sedentary group. Level of Evidence II, Prospective Comparative Study. PMID:24453691

  15. Aberration correction during real time in vivo imaging of bone marrow with sensorless adaptive optics confocal microscope

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Zhibin; Wei, Dan; Wei, Ling; He, Yi; Shi, Guohua; Wei, Xunbin; Zhang, Yudong

    2014-08-01

    We have demonstrated adaptive correction of specimen-induced aberration during in vivo imaging of mouse bone marrow vasculature with confocal fluorescence microscopy. Adaptive optics system was completed with wavefront sensorless correction scheme based on stochastic parallel gradient descent algorithm. Using image sharpness as the optimization metric, aberration correction was performed based upon Zernike polynomial modes. The experimental results revealed the improved signal and resolution leading to a substantially enhanced image contrast with aberration correction. The image quality of vessels at 38- and 75-μm depth increased three times and two times, respectively. The corrections allowed us to detect clearer bone marrow vasculature structures at greater contrast and improve the signal-to-noise ratio.

  16. Biomechanical stability of novel mechanically adapted open-porous titanium scaffolds in metatarsal bone defects of sheep.

    PubMed

    Wieding, Jan; Lindner, Tobias; Bergschmidt, Philipp; Bader, Rainer

    2015-04-01

    Open-porous titanium scaffolds for large segmental bone defects offer advantages like early weight-bearing and limited risk of implant failure. The objective of this experimental study was to determine the biomechanical behavior of novel open-porous titanium scaffolds with mechanical-adapted properties in vivo. Two types of the custom-made, open-porous scaffolds made of Ti6Al4V (Young's modulus: 6-8 GPa and different pore sizes) were implanted into a 20 mm segmental defect in the mid-diaphysis of the metatarsus of sheep, and were stabilized with an osteosynthesis plate. After 12 and 24 weeks postoperatively, torsional testing was performed on the implanted bone and compared to the contralateral non-treated side. Maximum torque, maximum angle, torsional stiffness, fracture energy, shear modulus and shear stress were investigated. Furthermore, bone mineral density (BMD) of the newly formed bone was determined. Mechanical loading capabilities for both scaffolds were similar and about 50% after 12 weeks (e.g., max. torque of approximately 20 Nm). A further increase after 24 weeks was found for most of the investigated parameters. Results for torsional stiffness and shear modulus as well as bone formation depended on the type of scaffold. Increased BMD after 24 weeks was found for one scaffold type but remained constant for the other one. The present data showed the capability of mechanically adapted open-porous titanium scaffolds to function as bone scaffolds for large segmental defects and the influence of the scaffold's stiffness. A further increase in the biomechanical stability can be assumed for longer observation periods of greater than six months. PMID:25678114

  17. Noninvasive Investigation of Bone Adaptation in Humans Cumulative Daily Mechanical Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert T.; Pelc, Norbert J.; Cleek, Tammy M.; Sode, Miki

    2004-01-01

    Our Research Objective is to measure the spatial distribution of bone mass throughout the entire internal volume of a bone such as the human calcaneus or heel bone. Currently, x-ray computed tomography (CT) is the only practical three-dimensional imaging technology capable of measuring bone density within small contiguous volumetric regions of a bone. spectrum of energies in the x-ray beam producing the image. We have developed a computational method of correcting these errors, provided the x-ray spectrum is known or measured (Yan et al., 2000). Monitoring serial changes in volumetric bone density with age, disuse, exercise or A CT image contains measurement errors in bone density caused by the broad drug therapy also requires accurate image registration.

  18. Intracoronary infusion of autologous mononuclear cells from bone marrow or G-CSF mobilised apheresis product may not improve remodelling, contractile function, perfusion or infarct size in a swine model of large myocardial infarction

    PubMed Central

    de Silva, Ranil; Raval, Amish N.; Hadi, Mohiuddin; Gildea, Karena M.; Bonifacino, Aylin C.; Yu, Zu-Xi; Yau, Yu Ying; Leitman, Susan F.; Bacharach, Stephen L.; Donahue, Robert E.; Read, Elizabeth J.; Lederman, Robert J.

    2008-01-01

    Background In a blinded, placebo controlled study, we investigated whether intracoronary infusion of autologous mononuclear cells from G-CSF mobilised apheresis product or bone marrow (BM) improved sensitive outcome measures in a swine model of large MI. Methods and Results Four days after LAD occlusion and reperfusion, cells from BM or apheresis product of saline (Placebo) or G-CSF injected animals were infused into the LAD. Large infarcts were created: baseline ejection fraction (EF) by MRI of 35.3 ± 8.5%, no difference between the Placebo, G-CSF and BM groups (p=0.16 by ANOVA). At 6 weeks EF fell to a similar degree in the Placebo, G-CSF and BM groups (−7.9±6.0%, −8.5±8.8% and −10.9±7.6%, p=0.78 by ANOVA). Left ventricular volumes and infarct size by MRI deteriorated similarly in all 3 groups. Quantitative PET demonstrated significant decline in FDG uptake rate in the LAD territory at follow-up, with no histological, angiographic or PET perfusion evidence of functional neovascularisation. Immunofluorescence failed to demonstrate transdifferentiation of infused cells. Conclusion Intracoronary infusion of mononuclear cells from either bone marrow or G-CSF mobilised apheresis product may not improve or limit deterioration in systolic function, adverse ventricular remodelling, infarct size or perfusion in a swine model of large MI. PMID:18502738

  19. Morphological and histological adaptation of muscle and bone to loading induced by repetitive activation of muscle

    PubMed Central

    Vickerton, Paula; Jarvis, Jonathan C.; Gallagher, James A.; Akhtar, Riaz; Sutherland, Hazel; Jeffery, Nathan

    2014-01-01

    Muscular contraction plays a pivotal role in the mechanical environment of bone, but controlled muscular contractions are rarely used to study the response of bone to mechanical stimuli. Here, we use implantable stimulators to elicit programmed contractions of the rat tibialis anterior (TA) muscle. Miniature stimulators were implanted in Wistar rats (n = 9) to induce contraction of the left TA every 30 s for 28 days. The right limb was used as a contralateral control. Hindlimbs were imaged using microCT. Image data were used for bone measurements, and to construct a finite-element (FE) model simulation of TA forces propagating through the bone. This simulation was used to target subsequent bone histology and measurement of micromechanical properties to areas of high strain. FE mapping of simulated strains revealed peak values in the anterodistal region of the tibia (640 µε ± 30.4 µε). This region showed significant increases in cross-sectional area (28.61%, p < 0.05) and bone volume (30.29%, p < 0.05) in the stimulated limb. Histology revealed a large region of new bone, containing clusters of chondrocytes, indicative of endochondral ossification. The new bone region had a lower elastic modulus (8.8 ± 2.2 GPa) when compared with established bone (20 ± 1.4 GPa). Our study provides compelling new evidence of the interplay between muscle and bone. PMID:24966314

  20. Stemmed femoral knee prostheses: effects of prosthetic design and fixation on bone loss.

    PubMed

    van Lenthe, G Harry; Willems, Marieke M M; Verdonschot, Nico; de Waal Malefijt, Maarten C; Huiskes, Rik

    2002-12-01

    Although the revision rates for modern knee prostheses have decreased drastically, the total number of revisions a year is increasing because many more primary knee replacements are being done. At the time of revision, bone loss is common, which compromises prosthetic stability. To improve stability, intramedullary stems are often used. The aim of this study was to estimate the effects of a stem, its diameter and the interface bonding conditions on patterns of the bone remodeling in the distal femur. We created finite element models of the distal half of a femur in which 4 types of knee prostheses were placed. The bone remodeling process was simulated using a strain-adaptive bone remodeling theory. The amount of such remodeling was determined by calculating the changes in bone mineral density in 9 regions of interest from simulated DEXA scans. The computer simulation model showed that revision prostheses tend to cause more bone resorption than primary ones, especially in the most distal regions. Predicted long-term bone loss due to a revision prosthesis with a thin stem equalled that around a prosthesis with an intercondylar box. However, strong regional differences were found--the stemmed prostheses having more bone loss in the most distal areas and some bone gain in the more proximal ones. A prosthesis with a thick stem led to an increase in bone loss. When the prosthesis-cement interface was bonded, more bone loss was predicted than with an unbonded interface. These results suggest that a stem which increases stability initially may reduce stability in the long term. This is due to an increase in stress shielding and bone resorption. PMID:12553509

  1. Non-Invasive Investigation of Bone Adaptation in Humans to Cumulative Daily Mechanical Loading

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert; Cleek, Tammy; Sode, Miki

    2003-01-01

    The goal of our research is to better understand the functional relationship between cumulative daily skeletal loading generated by daily activity and the regulation of bone density and bone structure. We have proposed the calcaneus and tibia as useful model bone sites loaded by internal forces in equilibrium with the ground reaction force during gait. The daily history of the ground reaction force is a good relative measure of daily lower limb and calcaneal loading that can be compared to bone density and structure of the calcaneus and cross-sectional geometry of the tibia and fibula. Over the past several years, we have developed image-processing technologies to improve our ability to measure bone density and structure in the calcaneus and lower leg non-invasively with computed tomography and bone densitometry, or DXA. The objective of our current research effort is to determine the accuracy and precision of our CT and DXA image processing methods.

  2. Development of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for detection of chicken osteocalcin and its use in evaluation of perch effects on bone remodeling in caged White Leghorns

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Osteocalcin (OC) is a sensitive biochemical marker for evaluating bone turnover in mammals. The role of avian OC is less clear because of a need for a chicken assay. Our objectives were to develop an assay using indirect competitive ELISA for detecting chicken serum OC and use the assay to examine t...

  3. The turnover of mineralized growth plate cartilage into bone may be regulated by osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Cox, Lieke G E; van Rietbergen, B; van Donkelaar, C C; Ito, K

    2011-06-01

    During endochondral ossification, growth plate cartilage is replaced with bone. Mineralized cartilage matrix is resorbed by osteoclasts, and new bone tissue is formed by osteoblasts. As mineralized cartilage does not contain any cells, it is unclear how this process is regulated. We hypothesize that, in analogy with bone remodeling, osteoclast and osteoblast activity are regulated by osteocytes, in response to mechanical loading. Since the cartilage does not contain osteocytes, this means that cartilage turnover during endochondral ossification would be regulated by the adjacent bone tissue. We investigated this hypothesis with an established computational bone adaptation model. In this model, osteocytes stimulate osteoblastic bone formation in response to the mechanical bone tissue loading. Osteoclasts resorb bone near randomly occurring microcracks that are assumed to block osteocyte signals. We used finite element modeling to evaluate our hypothesis in a 2D-domain representing part of the growth plate and adjacent bone. Cartilage was added at a constant physiological rate to simulate growth. Simulations showed that osteocyte signals from neighboring bone were sufficient for successful cartilage turnover, since equilibrium between cartilage remodeling and growth was obtained. Furthermore, there was good agreement between simulated bone structures and rat tibia histology, and the development of the trabecular architecture resembled that of infant long bones. Additionally, prohibiting osteoclast invasion resulted in thickened mineralized cartilage, similar to observations in a knock-out mouse model. We therefore conclude that it is well possible that osteocytes regulate the turnover of mineralized growth plate cartilage. PMID:21546025

  4. Frontiers in growth and remodeling.

    PubMed

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-06-01

    Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. PMID:22919118

  5. Frontiers in growth and remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Menzel, Andreas; Kuhl, Ellen

    2012-01-01

    Unlike common engineering materials, living matter can autonomously respond to environmental changes. Living structures can grow stronger, weaker, larger, or smaller within months, weeks, or days as a result of a continuous microstructural turnover and renewal. Hard tissues can adapt by increasing their density and grow strong. Soft tissues can adapt by increasing their volume and grow large. For more than three decades, the mechanics community has actively contributed to understand the phenomena of growth and remodeling from a mechanistic point of view. However, to date, there is no single, unified characterization of growth, which is equally accepted by all scientists in the field. Here we shed light on the continuum modeling of growth and remodeling of living matter, and give a comprehensive overview of historical developments and trends. We provide a state-of-the-art review of current research highlights, and discuss challenges and potential future directions. Using the example of volumetric growth, we illustrate how we can establish and utilize growth theories to characterize the functional adaptation of soft living matter. We anticipate this review to be the starting point for critical discussions and future research in growth and remodeling, with a potential impact on life science and medicine. PMID:22919118

  6. Bone Microstructure of the Stereospondyl Lydekkerina Huxleyi Reveals Adaptive Strategies to the Harsh Post Permian-Extinction Environment.

    PubMed

    Canoville, Aurore; Chinsamy, Anusuya

    2015-07-01

    The small-bodied stereospondyl Lydekkerina huxleyi, dominated the amphibian fauna of the South African Lower Triassic. Even though the anatomy of this amphibian has been well described, its growth strategies and lifestyle habits have remained controversial. Previous studies attributed the relative uniformity in skull sizes to a predominance of subadult and adult specimens recovered in the fossil record. Anatomical and taphonomic data suggested that the relatively small body-size of this genus, as compared to its Permo-Triassic relatives, could be linked to a shortened, rapid developmental period as an adaptation to maintain successful breeding populations under harsh environmental conditions. Moreover, Lydekkerina's habitat has been hypothesized to be either aquatic or mainly terrestrial. The current study, utilizes bone microstructure to reassess previous hypotheses pertaining to the biology and ecology of Lydekkerina. Various skeletal elements of different-sized specimens are analyzed to understand its growth dynamics, intraskeletal variability, and lifestyle adaptations. Bone histology revealed that our sample comprises individuals at different ontogenetic stages i.e., juveniles to mature individuals. Our results show that these amphibians, despite exhibiting plasticity in growth, experienced an overall faster growth during early ontogeny (thereby attaining sexual maturity sooner), as compared to most other temnospondyls. The microanatomy of the long bones with their thick bone walls and distinctive medullary cavity suggests that Lydekkerina may have been amphibious with a tendency to be more terrestrial. Our study concludes that Lydekkerina employed a peculiar growth strategy and lifestyle adaptations, which enabled it to endure the harsh, dry conditions of the Early Triassic. PMID:25857487

  7. Personalized articulated atlas with a dynamic adaptation strategy for bone segmentation in CT or CT/MR head and neck images

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Steger, Sebastian; Jung, Florian; Wesarg, Stefan

    2014-03-01

    This paper presents a novel segmentation method for the joint segmentation of individual bones in CT- or CT/MR- head and neck images. It is based on an articulated atlas for CT images that learned the shape and appearance of the individual bones along with the articulation between them from annotated training instances. First, a novel dynamic adaptation strategy for the atlas is presented in order to increase the rate of successful adaptations. Then, if a corresponding CT image is available the atlas can be enriched with personalized information about shape, appearance and size of the individual bones from that image. Using mutual information, this personalized atlas is adapted to an MR image in order to propagate segmentations. For evaluation, a head and neck bone atlas created from 15 manually annotated training images was adapted to 58 clinically acquired head andneck CT datasets. Visual inspection showed that the automatic dynamic adaptation strategy was successful for all bones in 86% of the cases. This is a 22% improvement compared to the traditional gradient descent based approach. In leave-one-out cross validation manner the average surface distance of the correctly adapted items was found to be 0.6 8mm. In 20 cases corresponding CT/MR image pairs were available and the atlas could be personalized and adapted to the MR image. This was successful in 19 cases.

  8. Dermal bone in early tetrapods: a palaeophysiological hypothesis of adaptation for terrestrial acidosis

    PubMed Central

    Janis, Christine M.; Devlin, Kelly; Warren, Daniel E.; Witzmann, Florian

    2012-01-01

    The dermal bone sculpture of early, basal tetrapods of the Permo-Carboniferous is unlike the bone surface of any living vertebrate, and its function has long been obscure. Drawing from physiological studies of extant tetrapods, where dermal bone or other calcified tissues aid in regulating acid–base balance relating to hypercapnia (excess blood carbon dioxide) and/or lactate acidosis, we propose a similar function for these sculptured dermal bones in early tetrapods. Unlike the condition in modern reptiles, which experience hypercapnia when submerged in water, these animals would have experienced hypercapnia on land, owing to likely inefficient means of eliminating carbon dioxide. The different patterns of dermal bone sculpture in these tetrapods largely correlates with levels of terrestriality: sculpture is reduced or lost in stem amniotes that likely had the more efficient lung ventilation mode of costal aspiration, and in small-sized stem amphibians that would have been able to use the skin for gas exchange. PMID:22535781

  9. Dermal bone in early tetrapods: a palaeophysiological hypothesis of adaptation for terrestrial acidosis.

    PubMed

    Janis, Christine M; Devlin, Kelly; Warren, Daniel E; Witzmann, Florian

    2012-08-01

    The dermal bone sculpture of early, basal tetrapods of the Permo-Carboniferous is unlike the bone surface of any living vertebrate, and its function has long been obscure. Drawing from physiological studies of extant tetrapods, where dermal bone or other calcified tissues aid in regulating acid-base balance relating to hypercapnia (excess blood carbon dioxide) and/or lactate acidosis, we propose a similar function for these sculptured dermal bones in early tetrapods. Unlike the condition in modern reptiles, which experience hypercapnia when submerged in water, these animals would have experienced hypercapnia on land, owing to likely inefficient means of eliminating carbon dioxide. The different patterns of dermal bone sculpture in these tetrapods largely correlates with levels of terrestriality: sculpture is reduced or lost in stem amniotes that likely had the more efficient lung ventilation mode of costal aspiration, and in small-sized stem amphibians that would have been able to use the skin for gas exchange. PMID:22535781

  10. Bone architecture adaptations after spinal cord injury: impact of long-term vibration of a constrained lower limb

    PubMed Central

    Dudley-Javoroski, S.; Petrie, M. A.; McHenry, C. L.; Amelon, R. E.; Saha, P. K.

    2015-01-01

    Summary This study examined the effect of a controlled dose of vibration upon bone density and architecture in people with spinal cord injury (who eventually develop severe osteoporosis). Very sensitive computed tomography (CT) imaging revealed no effect of vibration after 12 months, but other doses of vibration may still be useful to test. Introduction The purposes of this report were to determine the effect of a controlled dose of vibratory mechanical input upon individual trabecular bone regions in people with chronic spinal cord injury (SCI) and to examine the longitudinal bone architecture changes in both the acute and chronic state of SCI. Methods Participants with SCI received unilateral vibration of the constrained lower limb segment while sitting in a wheelchair (0.6g, 30 Hz, 20 min, three times weekly). The opposite limb served as a control. Bone mineral density (BMD) and trabecular micro-architecture were measured with high-resolution multi-detector CT. For comparison, one participant was studied from the acute (0.14 year) to the chronic state (2.7 years). Results Twelve months of vibration training did not yield adaptations of BMD or trabecular micro-architecture for the distal tibia or the distal femur. BMD and trabecular network length continued to decline at several distal femur sub-regions, contrary to previous reports suggesting a “steady state” of bone in chronic SCI. In the participant followed from acute to chronic SCI, BMD and architecture decline varied systematically across different anatomical segments of the tibia and femur. Conclusions This study supports that vibration training, using this study’s dose parameters, is not an effective antiosteoporosis intervention for people with chronic SCI. Using a high-spatial-resolution CT methodology and segmental analysis, we illustrate novel longitudinal changes in bone that occur after spinal cord injury. PMID:26395887

  11. Improving the textural characterization of trabecular bone structure to quantify its changes: the locally adapted scaling vector method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Raeth, Christoph W.; Mueller, Dirk; Boehm, Holger F.; Rummeny, Ernst J.; Link, Thomas M.; Monetti, Roberto

    2005-04-01

    We extend the recently introduced scaling vector method (SVM) to improve the textural characterization of oriented trabecular bone structures in the context of osteoporosis. Using the concept of scaling vectors one obtains non-linear structural information from data sets, which can account for global anisotropies. In this work we present a method which allows us to determine the local directionalities in images by using scaling vectors. Thus it becomes possible to better account for local anisotropies and to implement this knowledge in the calculation of the scaling properties of the image. By applying this adaptive technique, a refined quantification of the image structure is possible: we test and evaluate our new method using realistic two-dimensional simulations of bone structures, which model the effect of osteoblasts and osteoclasts on the local change of relative bone density. The partial differential equations involved in the model are solved numerically using cellular automata (CA). Different realizations with slightly varying control parameters are considered. Our results show that even small changes in the trabecular structures, which are induced by variation of a control parameters of the system, become discernible by applying the locally adapted scaling vector method. The results are superior to those obtained by isotropic and/or bulk measures. These findings may be especially important for monitoring the treatment of patients, where the early recognition of (drug-induced) changes in the trabecular structure is crucial.

  12. Architectural and Biochemical Adaptations in Skeletal Muscle and Bone Following Rotator Cuff Injury in a Rat Model

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Eugene J.; Killian, Megan L.; Choi, Anthony J.; Lin, Evie; Choo, Alexander D.; Rodriguez-Soto, Ana E.; Lim, Chanteak T.; Thomopoulos, Stavros; Galatz, Leesa M.; Ward, Samuel R.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Injury to the rotator cuff can cause irreversible changes to the structure and function of the associated muscles and bones. The temporal progression and pathomechanisms associated with these adaptations are unclear. The purpose of this study was to investigate the time course of structural muscle and osseous changes in a rat model of a massive rotator cuff tear. Methods: Supraspinatus and infraspinatus muscle architecture and biochemistry and humeral and scapular morphological parameters were measured three days, eight weeks, and sixteen weeks after dual tenotomy with and without chemical paralysis via botulinum toxin A (BTX). Results: Muscle mass and physiological cross-sectional area increased over time in the age-matched control animals, decreased over time in the tenotomy+BTX group, and remained nearly the same in the tenotomy-alone group. Tenotomy+BTX led to increased extracellular collagen in the muscle. Changes in scapular bone morphology were observed in both experimental groups, consistent with reductions in load transmission across the joint. Conclusions: These data suggest that tenotomy alone interferes with normal age-related muscle growth. The addition of chemical paralysis yielded profound structural changes to the muscle and bone, potentially leading to impaired muscle function, increased muscle stiffness, and decreased bone strength. Clinical Relevance: Structural musculoskeletal changes occur after tendon injury, and these changes are severely exacerbated with the addition of neuromuscular compromise. PMID:25834081

  13. Long-term results of remodelling the facial bones with a soft moulding helmet in beagles: the "reciprocally stimulated growth" hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Hyoseob; Chung, Jaiho; Park, Dong Ha; Yoon, Soo Han

    2016-01-01

    Facial deformity is often seen in infants with deformational plagiocephaly and it usually improves with conservative management. However, we know of few studies of the effect of helmet treatment on the facial skeleton. Our aim therefore was to find out its long-term effects on skull remodelling, and on the shape of the face. Seven beagles wore helmets for seven weeks after birth. Seven study beagles and 3 controls were killed and we measured the length, width, and height of the skulls, maxillas, and mandibles. Statistical analysis showed that the total craniofacial length and skull length did not differ significantly, and skull volumes were similar. Maximal craniofacial, skull, maxillary, and mandibular width were all significantly less in the study group. The maximal craniofacial, maxillary, and mandibular widths were strongly correlated with changes in the skull width, and the width:length ratios of the skulls, maxillas, and mandibles did differ significantly. The skull widths in the study group were significantly smaller, which suggests that a soft moulding helmet may change the growth pattern permanently. The effect of a soft moulding helmet on the lateral aspect of the skull affected the width of the face semipermanently. This modulation in the shape of the skull vault and base may change the shape of the maxilla and mandible, which may serve as a background for the use of helmet treatment to change the facial configuration. PMID:26621214

  14. Cell Mechanisms of Bone Tissue Loss Under Space Flight Conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, Natalia

    bone tissue. The macrophages are incorporated into resorption lacunaes and utilize the organic matrix and cellular detritus. The products are secreted to remodeling zones and act as haemoattractants for recruiting and subsequent differentiation here of the osteogenic precursor cells. However, as shown by our results with 3H-glycine, in absence of mechanical stimulus the activization of osteoblastogenesis either doesn't occur, or takes place on a smaller scale. According to our electron-microscopic data a load deficit leads to an adaptive differentiation of fibroblasts and adipocytes in this remodeling zones. This sequence of events is considered as a mechanism of bone tissue loss which underlies the development of osteopenia and osteoporosis under space flight condition.

  15. Adaptations of young adult rat cortical bone to 14 days of spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, A. C.; Vanderby, R., Jr.; Martinez, D. A.; Ashman, R. B.; Ulm, M. J.; Grindeland, R. E.; Durnova, G. N.; Kaplanskii, A.

    1992-01-01

    To determine whether mature humeral cortical bone would be modified significantly by an acute exposure to weightlessness, adult rats (110 days old) were subjected to 14 days of microgravity on the COSMOS 2044 biosatellite. There were no significant changes in peak force, stiffness, energy to failure, and displacement at failure in the flight rats compared with ground-based controls. Concentrations and contents of hydroxyproline, calcium, and mature stable hydroxylysylpyridinoline and lysylpyridinoline collagen cross-links remained unchanged after spaceflight. Bone lengths, cortical and endosteal areas, and regionl thicknesses showed no significant differences between flight animals and ground controls. The findings suggest that responsiveness of cortical bone to microgravity is less pronounced in adult rats than in previous spaceflight experiments in which young growing animals were used. It is hypothesized that 14 days of spaceflight may not be sufficient to impact the biochemical and biomechanical properties of cortical bone in the mature rat skeleton.

  16. Influence of forces on peri-implant bone.

    PubMed

    Isidor, Flemming

    2006-10-01

    Occlusal forces affect an oral implant and the surrounding bone. According to bone physiology theories, bones carrying mechanical loads adapt their strength to the load applied on it by bone modeling/remodeling. This also applies to bone surrounding an oral implant. The response to an increased mechanical stress below a certain threshold will be a strengthening of the bone by increasing the bone density or apposition of bone. On the other hand, fatigue micro-damage resulting in bone resorption may be the result of mechanical stress beyond this threshold. In the present paper literature dealing with the relationship between forces on oral implants and the surrounding bone is reviewed. Randomized controlled as well as prospective cohorts studies were not found. Although the results are conflicting, animal experimental studies have shown that occlusal load might result in marginal bone loss around oral implants or complete loss of osseointegration. In clinical studies an association between the loading conditions and marginal bone loss around oral implants or complete loss of osseointegration has been stated, but a causative relationship has not been shown. PMID:16968378

  17. Mitochondria, myocardial remodeling, and cardiovascular disease.

    PubMed

    Verdejo, Hugo E; del Campo, Andrea; Troncoso, Rodrigo; Gutierrez, Tomás; Toro, Barbra; Quiroga, Clara; Pedrozo, Zully; Munoz, Juan Pablo; Garcia, Lorena; Castro, Pablo F; Lavandero, Sergio

    2012-12-01

    The process of muscle remodeling lies at the core of most cardiovascular diseases. Cardiac adaptation to pressure or volume overload is associated with a complex molecular change in cardiomyocytes which leads to anatomic remodeling of the heart muscle. Although adaptive at its beginnings, the sustained cardiac hypertrophic remodeling almost unavoidably ends in progressive muscle dysfunction, heart failure and ultimately death. One of the features of cardiac remodeling is a progressive impairment in mitochondrial function. The heart has the highest oxygen uptake in the human body and accordingly it has a large number of mitochondria, which form a complex network under constant remodeling in order to sustain the high metabolic rate of cardiac cells and serve as Ca(2+) buffers acting together with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). However, this high dependence on mitochondrial metabolism has its costs: when oxygen supply is threatened, high leak of electrons from the electron transport chain leads to oxidative stress and mitochondrial failure. These three aspects of mitochondrial function (Reactive oxygen species signaling, Ca(2+) handling and mitochondrial dynamics) are critical for normal muscle homeostasis. In this article, we will review the latest evidence linking mitochondrial morphology and function with the process of myocardial remodeling and cardiovascular disease. PMID:22972531

  18. Local Mechanical Stimuli Regulate Bone Formation and Resorption in Mice at the Tissue Level

    PubMed Central

    Schulte, Friederike A.; Ruffoni, Davide; Lambers, Floor M.; Christen, David; Webster, Duncan J.; Kuhn, Gisela; Müller, Ralph

    2013-01-01

    Bone is able to react to changing mechanical demands by adapting its internal microstructure through bone forming and resorbing cells. This process is called bone modeling and remodeling. It is evident that changes in mechanical demands at the organ level must be interpreted at the tissue level where bone (re)modeling takes place. Although assumed for a long time, the relationship between the locations of bone formation and resorption and the local mechanical environment is still under debate. The lack of suitable imaging modalities for measuring bone formation and resorption in vivo has made it difficult to assess the mechanoregulation of bone three-dimensionally by experiment. Using in vivo micro-computed tomography and high resolution finite element analysis in living mice, we show that bone formation most likely occurs at sites of high local mechanical strain (p<0.0001) and resorption at sites of low local mechanical strain (p<0.0001). Furthermore, the probability of bone resorption decreases exponentially with increasing mechanical stimulus (R2 = 0.99) whereas the probability of bone formation follows an exponential growth function to a maximum value (R2 = 0.99). Moreover, resorption is more strictly controlled than formation in loaded animals, and ovariectomy increases the amount of non-targeted resorption. Our experimental assessment of mechanoregulation at the tissue level does not show any evidence of a lazy zone and suggests that around 80% of all (re)modeling can be linked to the mechanical micro-environment. These findings disclose how mechanical stimuli at the tissue level contribute to the regulation of bone adaptation at the organ level. PMID:23637993

  19. Changes of trabecular bone under control of biologically mechanical mechanism

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, C.; Zhang, C. Q.; Dong, X.; Wu, H.

    2008-10-01

    In this study, a biological process of bone remodeling was considered as a closed loop feedback control system, which enables bone to optimize and renew itself over a lifetime. A novel idea of combining strain-adaptive and damage-induced remodeling algorithms at Basic Multicellular Unit (BMU) level was introduced. In order to make the outcomes get closer to clinical observation, the stochastic occurrence of microdamage was involved and a hypothesis that remodeling activation probability is related to the value of damage rate was assumed. Integrated with Finite Element Analysis (FEA), the changes of trabecular bone in morphology and material properties were simulated in the course of five years. The results suggest that deterioration and anisotropy of trabecluar bone are inevitable with natural aging, and that compression rather than tension can be applied to strengthen the ability of resistance to fracture. This investigation helps to gain more insight the mechanism of bone loss and identify improved treatment and prevention for osteoporosis or stress fracture.

  20. Systemic effects of fluoxetine on the amount of tooth movement, root resorption, and alveolar bone remodeling during orthodontic force application in rat

    PubMed Central

    Rafiei, Mehdi; Sadeghian, Soosan; Torabinia, Nakisa; Hajhashemi, Valiollah

    2015-01-01

    Background: Antidepressant drugs such as fluoxetine are of the most commonly used drugs among the public. These drugs may impact the regulation of bone cell functioning, and thus affect orthodontic tooth movement. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of fluoxetine on tooth movements during orthodontic treatment in rats. Materials and Methods: In this study, 30 male rats were randomly assigned into two groups and injected with fluoxetine 10 mg/kg (experimental group) and normal saline (control group) for a period of 1-month intraperitoneally 5 times/week. Then, the rats were anesthetized and a nickel-titanium closed-coil spring was placed between the left maxillary first molar and left maxillary central incisors of all samples, and then fluoxetine (experimental group) and normal saline (control group) were injected for another 3 weeks by the same method. After measuring tooth movements, rats were sacrificed, and histomorphometric analyses were conducted and the obtained data were statistically analyzed using independent t-test and the significance was set at 0.05. Results: Following the fluoxetine injection, the mean amount of tooth movements in the experimental group was reduced compared to the control group, which was not statistically significant (P = 0.14). There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding bone apposition rate (P = 0.83), external root resorption rate (P = 0.1), and mean number of root resorption lacunae (P = 0.16). Conclusion: Within the limitations of this study, systemic use of fluoxetine may cause insignificant reduction of tooth movement rate in rats; however, this subject needs more evaluations. PMID:26604964

  1. The Periosteal Bone Surface is Less Mechano-Responsive than the Endocortical

    PubMed Central

    Birkhold, Annette I.; Razi, Hajar; Duda, Georg N.; Weinkamer, Richard; Checa, Sara; Willie, Bettina M.

    2016-01-01

    Dynamic processes modify bone micro-structure to adapt to external loading and avoid mechanical failure. Age-related cortical bone loss is thought to occur because of increased endocortical resorption and reduced periosteal formation. Differences in the (re)modeling response to loading on both surfaces, however, are poorly understood. Combining in-vivo tibial loading, in-vivo micro-tomography and finite element analysis, remodeling in C57Bl/6J mice of three ages (10, 26, 78 week old) was analyzed to identify differences in mechano-responsiveness and its age-related change on the two cortical surfaces. Mechanical stimulation enhanced endocortical and periosteal formation and reduced endocortical resorption; a reduction in periosteal resorption was hardly possible since it was low, even without additional loading. Endocortically a greater mechano-responsiveness was identified, evident by a larger bone-forming surface and enhanced thickness of formed bone packets, which was not detected periosteally. Endocortical mechano-responsiveness was better conserved with age, since here adaptive response declined continuously with aging, whereas periosteally the main decay in formation response occurred already before adulthood. Higher endocortical mechano-responsiveness is not due to higher endocortical strains. Although it is clear structural adaptation varies between different bones in the skeleton, this study demonstrates that adaptation varies even at different sites within the same bone. PMID:27004741

  2. The Periosteal Bone Surface is Less Mechano-Responsive than the Endocortical

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Birkhold, Annette I.; Razi, Hajar; Duda, Georg N.; Weinkamer, Richard; Checa, Sara; Willie, Bettina M.

    2016-03-01

    Dynamic processes modify bone micro-structure to adapt to external loading and avoid mechanical failure. Age-related cortical bone loss is thought to occur because of increased endocortical resorption and reduced periosteal formation. Differences in the (re)modeling response to loading on both surfaces, however, are poorly understood. Combining in-vivo tibial loading, in-vivo micro-tomography and finite element analysis, remodeling in C57Bl/6J mice of three ages (10, 26, 78 week old) was analyzed to identify differences in mechano-responsiveness and its age-related change on the two cortical surfaces. Mechanical stimulation enhanced endocortical and periosteal formation and reduced endocortical resorption; a reduction in periosteal resorption was hardly possible since it was low, even without additional loading. Endocortically a greater mechano-responsiveness was identified, evident by a larger bone-forming surface and enhanced thickness of formed bone packets, which was not detected periosteally. Endocortical mechano-responsiveness was better conserved with age, since here adaptive response declined continuously with aging, whereas periosteally the main decay in formation response occurred already before adulthood. Higher endocortical mechano-responsiveness is not due to higher endocortical strains. Although it is clear structural adaptation varies between different bones in the skeleton, this study demonstrates that adaptation varies even at different sites within the same bone.

  3. Morpho-functional adaptations in the bone tissue under the space flight conditions.

    PubMed

    Rodionova, N V; Oganov, V S

    2001-07-01

    Microgravity in space flight--situation of a maximum deficit of supporting loading on the skeleton and good model for finding-out of osteopenia and osteoporosis development laws, which are wide-spreading now and are "civilization diseases". Most typical for bones in conditions of a microgravitation by changes are: a decrease of intensity growth and osteoplastic processes, osteopenia and osteoporosis, decreasing of a mechanical strength and the risk of breaches arising (Oganov V.S., Schneider V. (1996)). Cytological mechanisms of gravity-dependent reactions in a bone tissue remain in many respects not-clear. By the purpose of our work was the analysis of some ultrastructural changes in bone tissue cells of the monkeys (Macaca mulatta), staying during two weeks onboard the biosatellite BION -11. PMID:12650186

  4. Adaptations of trabecular bone to low magnitude vibrations result in more uniform stress and strain under load.

    PubMed

    Judex, Stefan; Boyd, Steve; Qin, Yi-Xian; Turner, Simon; Ye, Kenny; Müller, Ralph; Rubin, Clinton

    2003-01-01

    Extremely low magnitude mechanical stimuli (<10 microstrain) induced at high frequencies are anabolic to trabecular bone. Here, we used finite element (FE) modeling to investigate the mechanical implications of a one year mechanical intervention. Adult female sheep stood with their hindlimbs either on a vibrating plate (30 Hz, 0.3 g) for 20 min/d, 5 d/wk or on an inactive plate. Microcomputed tomography data of 1 cm bone cubes extracted from the medial femoral condyles were transformed into FE meshes. Simulated compressive loads applied to the trabecular meshes in the three orthogonal directions indicated that the low level mechanical intervention significantly increased the apparent trabecular tissue stiffness of the femoral condyle in the longitudinal (+17%, p<0.02), anterior-posterior (+29%, p<0.01), and medial-lateral (+37%, p<0.01) direction, thus reducing apparent strain magnitudes for a given applied load. For a given apparent input strain (or stress), the resultant stresses and strains within trabeculae were more uniformly distributed in the off-axis loading directions in cubes of mechanically loaded sheep. These data suggest that trabecular bone responds to low level mechanical loads with intricate adaptations beyond a simple reduction in apparent strain magnitude, producing a structure that is stiffer and less prone to fracture for a given load. PMID:12572652

  5. Age-Related Adaptation of Bone-PDL-Tooth Complex: Rattus-Norvegicus as a Model System

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Narita L.; Hurng, Jonathan M.; Djomehri, Sabra I.; Gansky, Stuart A.; Ryder, Mark I.; Ho, Sunita P.

    2012-01-01

    Functional loads on an organ induce tissue adaptations by converting mechanical energy into chemical energy at a cell-level. The transducing capacity of cells alters physico-chemical properties of tissues, developing a positive feedback commonly recognized as the form-function relationship. In this study, organ and tissue adaptations were mapped in the bone-tooth complex by identifying and correlating biomolecular expressions to physico-chemical properties in rats from 1.5 to 15 months. However, future research using hard and soft chow over relevant age groups would decouple the function related effects from aging affects. Progressive curvature in the distal root with increased root resorption was observed using micro X-ray computed tomography. Resorption was correlated to the increased activity of multinucleated osteoclasts on the distal side of the molars until 6 months using tartrate resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP). Interestingly, mononucleated TRAP positive cells within PDL vasculature were observed in older rats. Higher levels of glycosaminoglycans were identified at PDL-bone and PDL-cementum entheses using alcian blue stain. Decreasing biochemical gradients from coronal to apical zones, specifically biomolecules that can induce osteogenic (biglycan) and fibrogenic (fibromodulin, decorin) phenotypes, and PDL-specific negative regulator of mineralization (asporin) were observed using immunohistochemistry. Heterogeneous distribution of Ca and P in alveolar bone, and relatively lower contents at the entheses, were observed using energy dispersive X-ray analysis. No correlation between age and microhardness of alveolar bone (0.7±0.1 to 0.9±0.2 GPa) and cementum (0.6±0.1 to 0.8±0.3 GPa) was observed using a microindenter. However, hardness of cementum and alveolar bone at any given age were significantly different (P<0.05). These observations should be taken into account as baseline parameters, during development (1.5 to 4 months), growth (4 to 10 months

  6. Mechanism of chromatin remodeling.

    PubMed

    Lorch, Yahli; Maier-Davis, Barbara; Kornberg, Roger D

    2010-02-23

    Results from biochemical and structural studies of the RSC chromatin-remodeling complex prompt a proposal for the remodeling mechanism: RSC binding to the nucleosome releases the DNA from the histone surface and initiates DNA translocation (through one or a small number of DNA base pairs); ATP binding completes translocation, and ATP hydrolysis resets the system. Binding energy thus plays a central role in the remodeling process. RSC may disrupt histone-DNA contacts by affecting histone octamer conformation and through extensive interaction with the DNA. Bulging of the DNA from the octamer surface is possible, and twisting is unavoidable, but neither is the basis of remodeling. PMID:20142505

  7. Transplantation of Bone Marrow-Derived Very Small Embryonic-Like Stem Cells Attenuates Left Ventricular Dysfunction and Remodeling After Myocardial Infarction

    PubMed Central

    Dawn, Buddhadeb; Tiwari, Sumit; Kucia, Magdalena J.; Zuba-Surma, Ewa K.; Guo, Yiru; SanganalMath, Santosh K.; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Hunt, Greg; Vincent, Robert J.; Taher, Hisham; Reed, Nathan J.; Ratajczak, Mariusz Z.; Bolli, Roberto

    2013-01-01

    Adult bone marrow (BM) contains Sca-1+/Lin−/CD45− very small embryonic-like stem cells (VSELs) that express markers of several lineages, including cardiac markers, and differentiate into cardiomyocytes in vitro. We examined whether BM-derived VSELs promote myocardial repair after a reperfused myocardial infarction (MI). Mice underwent a 30-minute coronary occlusion followed by reperfusion and received intramyocardial injection of vehicle (n = 11), 1 × 105 Sca-1+/Lin−/CD45+ enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP)-labeled hematopoietic stem cells (n = 13 [cell control group]), or 1 × 104 Sca-1+/Lin−/CD45− EGFP-labeled cells (n = 14 [VSEL-treated group]) at 48 hours after MI. At 35 days after MI, VSEL-treated mice exhibited improved global and regional left ventricular (LV) systolic function (echocardiography) and attenuated myocyte hypertrophy in surviving tissue (histology and echocardiography) compared with vehicle-treated controls. In contrast, transplantation of Sca-1+/Lin−/CD45+ cells failed to confer any functional or structural benefits. Scattered EGFP+ myocytes and capillaries were present in the infarct region in VSEL-treated mice, but their numbers were very small. These results indicate that transplantation of a relatively small number of CD45− VSELs is sufficient to improve LV function and alleviate myocyte hypertrophy after MI, supporting the potential therapeutic utility of these cells for cardiac repair. PMID:18420834

  8. The in situ mechanics of trabecular bone marrow: the potential for mechanobiological response.

    PubMed

    Metzger, Thomas A; Kreipke, Tyler C; Vaughan, Ted J; McNamara, Laoise M; Niebur, Glen L

    2015-01-01

    Bone adapts to habitual loading through mechanobiological signaling. Osteocytes are the primary mechanical sensors in bone, upregulating osteogenic factors and downregulating osteoinhibitors, and recruiting osteoclasts to resorb bone in response to microdamage accumulation. However, most of the cell populations of the bone marrow niche,which are intimately involved with bone remodeling as the source of bone osteoblast and osteoclast progenitors, are also mechanosensitive. We hypothesized that the deformation of trabecular bone would impart mechanical stress within the entrapped bone marrow consistent with mechanostimulation of the constituent cells. Detailed fluid-structure interaction models of porcine femoral trabecular bone and bone marrow were created using tetrahedral finite element meshes. The marrow was allowed to flow freely within the bone pores, while the bone was compressed to 2000 or 3000 microstrain at the apparent level.Marrow properties were parametrically varied from a constant 400 mPas to a power law rule exceeding 85 Pas. Deformation generated almost no shear stress or pressure in the marrow for the low viscosity fluid, but exceeded 5 Pa when the higher viscosity models were used. The shear stress was higher when the strain rate increased and in higher volume fraction bone. The results demonstrate that cells within the trabecular bone marrow could be mechanically stimulated by bone deformation, depending on deformation rate, bone porosity, and bone marrow properties. Since the marrow contains many mechanosensitive cells, changes in the stimulatory levels may explain the alterations in bone marrow morphology with aging and disease, which may in turn affect the trabecular bone mechanobiology and adaptation. PMID:25363343

  9. Microanatomical and Histological Features in the Long Bones of Mosasaurine Mosasaurs (Reptilia, Squamata) – Implications for Aquatic Adaptation and Growth Rates

    PubMed Central

    Houssaye, Alexandra; Lindgren, Johan; Pellegrini, Rodrigo; Lee, Andrew H.; Germain, Damien; Polcyn, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Background During their evolution in the Late Cretaceous, mosasauroids attained a worldwide distribution, accompanied by a marked increase in body size and open ocean adaptations. This transition from land-dwellers to highly marine-adapted forms is readily apparent not only at the gross anatomic level but also in their inner bone architecture, which underwent profound modifications. Methodology/Principal Findings The present contribution describes, both qualitatively and quantitatively, the internal organization (microanatomy) and tissue types and characteristics (histology) of propodial and epipodial bones in one lineage of mosasauroids; i.e., the subfamily Mosasaurinae. By using microanatomical and histological data from limb bones in combination with recently acquired knowledge on the inner structure of ribs and vertebrae, and through comparisons with extant squamates and semi-aquatic to fully marine amniotes, we infer possible implications on mosasaurine evolution, aquatic adaptation, growth rates, and basal metabolic rates. Notably, we observe the occurrence of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone, with large and randomly shaped osteocyte lacunae (otherwise typical of fibrous bone) and particular microanatomical features in Dallasaurus, which displays, rather than a spongious inner organization, bone mass increase in its humeri and a tubular organization in its femora and ribs. Conclusions/Significance The dominance of an unusual type of parallel-fibered bone suggests growth rates and, by extension, basal metabolic rates intermediate between that of the extant leatherback turtle, Dermochelys, and those suggested for plesiosaur and ichthyosaur reptiles. Moreover, the microanatomical features of the relatively primitive genus Dallasaurus differ from those of more derived mosasaurines, indicating an intermediate stage of adaptation for a marine existence. The more complete image of the various microanatomical trends observed in mosasaurine skeletal elements

  10. Effect of Chromatin-Remodeling Agents in Hepatic Differentiation of Rat Bone Marrow-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Vitro and In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ye, Danna; Li, Tong; Heraud, Philip; Parnpai, Rangsun

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic events, including covalent histone modifications and DNA methylation, play fundamental roles in the determination of lineage-specific gene expression and cell fates. The aim of this study was to determine whether the DNA methyltransferase inhibitor (DNMTi) 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine (5-aza-dC) and the histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) trichostatin A (TSA) promote the hepatic differentiation of rat bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBM-MSCs) and their therapeutic effect on liver damage. 1 μM TSA and 20 μM 5-aza-dC were added to standard hepatogenic medium especially at differentiation and maturation steps and their potential function on hepatic differentiation in vitro and in vivo was determined. Exposure of rBM-MSCs to 1 μM TSA at both the differentiation and maturation steps considerably improved hepatic differentiation. TSA enhanced the development of the hepatocyte shape, promoted the chronological expression of hepatocyte-specific markers, and improved hepatic functions. In contrast, treatment of rBM-MSCs with 20 μM 5-aza-dC alone or in combination with TSA was ineffective in improving hepatic differentiation in vitro. TSA and/or 5-aza-dC derived hepatocytes-like cells failed to improve the therapeutic potential in liver damage. We conclude that HDACis enhance hepatic differentiation in a time-dependent manner, while DNMTis do not induce the hepatic differentiation of rBM-MSCs in vitro. Their in vivo function needs further investigation. PMID:27242905

  11. The effect of bone marrow- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell transplantation on myocardial remodelling in the rat model of ischaemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Karpov, Andrey A; Uspenskaya, Yulia K; Minasian, Sarkis M; Puzanov, Maxim V; Dmitrieva, Renata I; Bilibina, Anna A; Anisimov, Sergey V; Galagudza, Michael M

    2013-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of bone marrow- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cell (BM-MSC and AD-MSC respectively) transplantation on left ventricular function and infarct area (IA) in the rat model of ischaemic heart failure. In anaesthetized Wistar rats, the left coronary artery (LCA) was occluded for 40 min with subsequent reperfusion for 7 days. Seven days following surgery, the animals with LCA occlusion/reperfusion were randomized into three groups: (i) Controls received intramyocardial injection of vehicle at three different locations within the peri-infarct zone, (ii) BM-MSC: cells were injected in the same way as in previous group (10(6) ), (iii) AD-MSC: using the same protocol as used in the BM-MSC group. In addition there was also a sham-treated group that had no injection. Two weeks following MSC transplantation, the hearts were isolated and perfused according to the Langendorff method followed by 30-min global ischaemia and 90-min reperfusion. After this IA was determined histologically. During Langendorff perfusion initial and postischaemic LV functions were the same in all groups although LV pressure at the 10th minute of reperfusion was higher in the AD-MSC group compared to controls. However, LV pressure during 30-min global ischaemia was significantly higher in BM-MSC as compared to controls and AD-MSC. The sham treated animals showed the same results as those seen with BM-MSC. Thus, BM-MSC transplantation, in contrast to transplantation of AD-MSC, resulted in better preservation of the LV ability to contract during ischaemia. Furthermore, IA was significantly smaller in BM-MSC group as compared to the controls and the AD-MSC groups. Thus this study has demonstrated that treatment with BM-MSC both ameliorates LV function and reduces histological scar size. PMID:23560418

  12. A Replication Study for Genome-Wide Gene Expression Levels in Two Layer Lines Elucidates Differentially Expressed Genes of Pathways Involved in Bone Remodeling and Immune Responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Habig, Christin; Geffers, Robert; Distl, Ottmar

    2014-01-01

    The current replication study confirmed significant differences in gene expression profiles of the cerebrum among the two commercial layer lines Lohmann Selected Leghorn (LSL) and Lohmann Brown (LB). Microarray analyses were performed for 30 LSL and another 30 LB laying hens kept in the small group housing system Eurovent German. A total of 14,103 microarray probe sets using customized Affymetrix ChiGene-1_0-st Arrays with 20,399 probe sets were differentially expressed among the two layer lines LSL and LB (FDR adjusted P-value <0.05). An at least 2-fold change in expression levels could be observed for 388 of these probe sets. In LSL, 214 of the 388 probe sets were down- and 174 were up-regulated and vice versa for the LB layer line. Among the 174 up-regulated probe sets in LSL, we identified 51 significantly enriched Gene ontology (GO) terms of the biological process category. A total of 63 enriched GO-terms could be identified for the 214 down-regulated probe sets of the layer line LSL. We identified nine genes significantly differentially expressed between the two layer lines in both microarray experiments. These genes play a crucial role in protection of neuronal cells from oxidative stress, bone mineral density and immune response among the two layer lines LSL and LB. Thus, the different regulation of these genes may significantly contribute to phenotypic trait differences among these layer lines. In conclusion, these novel findings provide a basis for further research to improve animal welfare in laying hens and these layer lines may be of general interest as an animal model. PMID:24922511

  13. Numerical simulation on the adaptation of forms in trabecular bone to mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit activation threshold at menopause

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, He; Fan, Yubo; Zhang, Ming

    2008-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to identify the effects of mechanical disuse and basic multi-cellular unit (BMU) activation threshold on the form of trabecular bone during menopause. A bone adaptation model with mechanical- biological factors at BMU level was integrated with finite element analysis to simulate the changes of trabecular bone structure during menopause. Mechanical disuse and changes in the BMU activation threshold were applied to the model for the period from 4 years before to 4 years after menopause. The changes in bone volume fraction, trabecular thickness and fractal dimension of the trabecular structures were used to quantify the changes of trabecular bone in three different cases associated with mechanical disuse and BMU activation threshold. It was found that the changes in the simulated bone volume fraction were highly correlated and consistent with clinical data, and that the trabecular thickness reduced significantly during menopause and was highly linearly correlated with the bone volume fraction, and that the change trend of fractal dimension of the simulated trabecular structure was in correspondence with clinical observations. The numerical simulation in this paper may help to better understand the relationship between the bone morphology and the mechanical, as well as biological environment; and can provide a quantitative computational model and methodology for the numerical simulation of the bone structural morphological changes caused by the mechanical environment, and/or the biological environment.

  14. The role of macrophages in bone metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Vasiliadou, Ifigenia; Holen, Ingunn

    2013-01-01

    The skeleton is one of the most common sites of metastatic disease, affecting a large number of patients with advanced cancer. Although an increasing number of therapies are available for treatment of bone metastasis, this remains incurable, highlighting the need for better understanding of the underlying biology. Metastatic tumour spread to distant organs is a multistage process, involving not only cancer cells but also those of the surrounding host microenvironment. Tumour associated macrophages are multifunctional cells that contribute both to tumour development and response to treatment by regulating adaptive immunity, remodelling of stroma, mediating basement membrane breakdown and angiogenesis. Although direct evidence for a specific role of macrophages in bone metastasis is limited, their involvement in metastasis in general is well documented. In this review we provide an overview of role of macrophages in tumour progression, with particular emphasis on their potential role in bone metastasis. PMID:26909287

  15. Using bone's adaptation ability to lower the incidence of stress fractures.

    PubMed

    Milgrom, C; Simkin, A; Eldad, A; Nyska, M; Finestone, A

    2000-01-01

    In three prospective epidemiologic studies of the effect of pre-military-induction sport activities on the incidence of lower extremity stress fractures during infantry basic training, recruits who played ball sports (principally basketball) regularly for at least 2 years before basic training had a significantly lower incidence of stress fractures (13.2%, 16.7%, and 3.6% in the three studies, respectively) than recruits who did not play ball sports (28.9%, 27%, and 18.8%, respectively). Preinduction running was not related to the incidence of stress fracture. To assess the tibial strain environment during these sport activities, we made in vivo strain measurements on three male volunteers from the research team. Peak tibial compression and tension strain and strain rates during basketball reached levels 2 to 5.5 times higher than during walking and about 10% to 50% higher than during running. The high bone strain and strain rates that occurred in recruits while playing basketball in the years before military induction may have increased their bone stiffness, according to Wolff's Law. The stiffer bone could tolerate higher stresses better, resulting in lower strains for a given activity and a lower incidence of stress fractures during basic training. PMID:10751003

  16. Alterations in periarticular bone and cross talk between subchondral bone and articular cartilage in osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Goldring, Steven R

    2012-08-01

    The articular cartilage and the subchondral bone form a biocomposite that is uniquely adapted to the transfer of loads across the diarthrodial joint. During the evolution of the osteoarthritic process biomechanical and biological processes result in alterations in the composition, structure and functional properties of these tissues. Given the intimate contact between the cartilage and bone, alterations of either tissue will modulate the properties and function of the other joint component. The changes in periarticular bone tend to occur very early in the development of OA. Although chondrocytes also have the capacity to modulate their functional state in response to loading, the capacity of these cells to repair and modify their surrounding extracellular matrix is relatively limited in comparison to the adjacent subchondral bone. This differential adaptive capacity likely underlies the more rapid appearance of detectable skeletal changes in OA in comparison to the articular cartilage. The OA changes in periarticular bone include increases in subchondral cortical bone thickness, gradual decreases in subchondral trabeular bone mass, formation of marginal joint osteophytes, development of bone cysts and advancement of the zone of calcified cartilage between the articular cartilage and subchondral bone. The expansion of the zone of calcified cartilage contributes to overall thinning of the articular cartilage. The mechanisms involved in this process include the release of soluble mediators from chondrocytes in the deep zones of the articular cartilage and/or the influences of microcracks that have initiated focal remodeling in the calcified cartilage and subchondral bone in an attempt to repair the microdamage. There is the need for further studies to define the pathophysiological mechanisms involved in the interaction between subchondral bone and articular cartilage and for applying this information to the development of therapeutic interventions to improve the

  17. Macrophage plasticity and polarization in tissue repair and remodelling.

    PubMed

    Mantovani, Alberto; Biswas, Subhra K; Galdiero, Maria Rosaria; Sica, Antonio; Locati, Massimo

    2013-01-01

    Mononuclear phagocyte plasticity includes the expression of functions related to the resolution of inflammation, tissue repair and remodelling, particularly when these cells are set in an M2 or an M2-like activation mode. Macrophages are credited with an essential role in remodelling during ontogenesis. In extraembryonic life, under homeostatic conditions, the macrophage trophic and remodelling functions are recapitulated in tissues such as bone, mammary gland, decidua and placenta. In pathology, macrophages are key components of tissue repair and remodelling that occur during wound healing, allergy, parasite infection and cancer. Interaction with cells bearing stem or progenitor cell properties is likely an important component of the role of macrophages in repair and remodelling. These properties of cells of the monocyte-macrophage lineage may represent a tool and a target for therapeutic exploitation. PMID:23096265

  18. Modeling Pb (II) adsorption from aqueous solution by ostrich bone ash using adaptive neural-based fuzzy inference system.

    PubMed

    Amiri, Mohammad J; Abedi-Koupai, Jahangir; Eslamian, Sayed S; Mousavi, Sayed F; Hasheminejad, Hasti

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the performance of Adaptive Neural-Based Fuzzy Inference System (ANFIS) model in estimating the efficiency of Pb (II) ions removal from aqueous solution by ostrich bone ash, a batch experiment was conducted. Five operational parameters including adsorbent dosage (C(s)), initial concentration of Pb (II) ions (C(o)), initial pH, temperature (T) and contact time (t) were taken as the input data and the adsorption efficiency (AE) of bone ash as the output. Based on the 31 different structures, 5 ANFIS models were tested against the measured adsorption efficiency to assess the accuracy of each model. The results showed that ANFIS5, which used all input parameters, was the most accurate (RMSE = 2.65 and R(2) = 0.95) and ANFIS1, which used only the contact time input, was the worst (RMSE = 14.56 and R(2) = 0.46). In ranking the models, ANFIS4, ANFIS3 and ANFIS2 ranked second, third and fourth, respectively. The sensitivity analysis revealed that the estimated AE is more sensitive to the contact time, followed by pH, initial concentration of Pb (II) ions, adsorbent dosage, and temperature. The results showed that all ANFIS models overestimated the AE. In general, this study confirmed the capabilities of ANFIS model as an effective tool for estimation of AE. PMID:23383640

  19. Skeletal Adaptation to Daily Activity: A Biochemical Perspective

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whalen, Robert T.; Dalton, Bonnie (Technical Monitor)

    2002-01-01

    Musculoskeletal forces generated by normal daily activity on Earth maintain the functional and structural properties of muscle and bone throughout most of one's adult life. A reduction in the level of cumulative daily loading caused by space flight, bed rest or spinal cord injury induces rapid muscle atrophy, functional changes in muscle, and bone resorption in regions subjected to the reduced loading. Bone cells in culture and bone tissue reportedly respond to a wide variety of non-mechanical and mechanical stimuli ranging, from electromagnetic fields, and hormones to small amplitude, high frequency vibrations, fluid flow, strain rate, and stress/strain magnitude. However, neither the transduction mechanism that transforms the mechanical input into a muscle or bone metabolic response nor the characteristics, of the loading history that directly or indirectly stimulates the cell is known. Identifying the factors contributing to the input stimulus will have a major impact on the design of effective countermeasures for long duration space flight. This talk will present a brief overview of current theories of bone remodeling and functional adaptation to mechanical loading. Work from our lab will be presented from the perspective of daily cumulative loading on Earth and its relationship to bone density and structure. Our objective is to use the tibia and calcaneus as model bone sites of cortical and cancellous bone adaptation, loaded daily by musculoskeletal forces in equilibrium with the ground reaction force. All materials that will be discussed are in the open scientific literature.

  20. Intracranial pressure and skull remodeling

    PubMed Central

    McCulley, Timothy J.; Jordan Piluek, W.; Chang, Jessica

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review bony changes resulting from alterations in intracranial pressure (ICP) and the implications for ophthalmologists and the patients for whom we care. Before addressing ophthalmic implications, we will begin with a brief overview of bone remodeling. Bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension and hypertension will be discussed. The primary objective of this review was to bring attention to bony changes seen with chronic intracranial hypotension. Intracranial hypotension skull remodeling can result in enophthalmos. In advanced disease enophthalmos develops to a degree that is truly disfiguring. The most common finding for which subjects are referred is ocular surface disease, related to loss of contact between the eyelids and the cornea. Other abnormalities seen include abnormal ocular motility and optic atrophy. Recognition of such changes is important to allow for diagnosis and treatment prior to advanced clinical deterioration. Routine radiographic assessment of bony changes may allow for the identification of patient with abnormal ICP prior to the development of clinically significant disease. PMID:25859141

  1. Rapid alterations of avian medullary bone material during the daily egg-laying cycle.

    PubMed

    Kerschnitzki, Michael; Zander, Thomas; Zaslansky, Paul; Fratzl, Peter; Shahar, Ron; Wagermaier, Wolfgang

    2014-12-01

    Bone is a dynamic tissue which is continuously adapting not only to external mechanical stimuli but also to internal metabolic calcium demands. During normal bone remodeling, bone-resorbing osteoclasts release calcium from the bone and digest the collagenous bone matrix, after which bone-depositing osteoblasts form unmineralized collagen matrix, which subsequently mineralizes. The detailed mechanism by which calcium is deposited at the site of mineralization and removed from it during bone resorption is largely unknown. Experimental studies are difficult to conduct because in adult bone only a small fraction of bone tissue is remodeled at any moment in time. Thus, one promising approach is to study mineral deposition and resorption in model systems in which a large fraction of the bone mineral is mobilized in a relatively short period of time. We investigated the microscopic and nanoscopic alterations of avian medullary bone architecture during the egg-laying (oviposition) cycle of hens. Medullary bone forms a labile calcium reservoir for eggshell production and is characterized by an extremely rapid and high-flux calcium metabolism. It thus, provides the unique opportunity to study processes of bone remodeling in their most intensive form. We used a combination of synchrotron X-ray tomography together with small angle X-ray scattering (SAXS), wide angle X-ray diffraction (WAXD) and X-ray fluorescence (XRF) to correlate microscopic medullary bone attributes such as the mineral content, medullary bone volume fraction and medullary bone trabecular thickness with nanoscopic alterations in the mineral particle size (thickness parameter T and length parameter L) during the oviposition cycle. To identify the timing of the different stages of the cycle, ionic calcium, phosphorus and PTH concentrations in the blood of the layers were monitored. We found that the microscopic and nanoscopic architecture of avian medullary bone material changes rapidly during the oviposition

  2. Biomechanical and biophysical environment of bone from the macroscopic to the pericellular and molecular level.

    PubMed

    Ren, Li; Yang, Pengfei; Wang, Zhe; Zhang, Jian; Ding, Chong; Shang, Peng

    2015-10-01

    Bones with complicated hierarchical configuration and microstructures constitute the load-bearing system. Mechanical loading plays an essential role in maintaining bone health and regulating bone mechanical adaptation (modeling and remodeling). The whole-bone or sub-region (macroscopic) mechanical signals, including locomotion-induced loading and external actuator-generated vibration, ultrasound, oscillatory skeletal muscle stimulation, etc., give rise to sophisticated and distinct biomechanical and biophysical environments at the pericellular (microscopic) and collagen/mineral molecular (nanoscopic) levels, which are the direct stimulations that positively influence bone adaptation. While under microgravity, the stimulations decrease or even disappear, which exerts a negative influence on bone adaptation. A full understanding of the biomechanical and biophysical environment at different levels is necessary for exploring bone biomechanical properties and mechanical adaptation. In this review, the mechanical transferring theories from the macroscopic to the microscopic and nanoscopic levels are elucidated. First, detailed information of the hierarchical structures and biochemical composition of bone, which are the foundations for mechanical signal propagation, are presented. Second, the deformation feature of load-bearing bone during locomotion is clarified as a combination of bending and torsion rather than simplex bending. The bone matrix strains at microscopic and nanoscopic levels directly induced by bone deformation are critically discussed, and the strain concentration mechanism due to the complicated microstructures is highlighted. Third, the biomechanical and biophysical environments at microscopic and nanoscopic levels positively generated during bone matrix deformation or by dynamic mechanical loadings induced by external actuators, as well as those negatively affected under microgravity, are systematically discussed, including the interstitial fluid flow

  3. Adaptation.

    PubMed

    Broom, Donald M

    2006-01-01

    The term adaptation is used in biology in three different ways. It may refer to changes which occur at the cell and organ level, or at the individual level, or at the level of gene action and evolutionary processes. Adaptation by cells, especially nerve cells helps in: communication within the body, the distinguishing of stimuli, the avoidance of overload and the conservation of energy. The time course and complexity of these mechanisms varies. Adaptive characters of organisms, including adaptive behaviours, increase fitness so this adaptation is evolutionary. The major part of this paper concerns adaptation by individuals and its relationships to welfare. In complex animals, feed forward control is widely used. Individuals predict problems and adapt by acting before the environmental effect is substantial. Much of adaptation involves brain control and animals have a set of needs, located in the brain and acting largely via motivational mechanisms, to regulate life. Needs may be for resources but are also for actions and stimuli which are part of the mechanism which has evolved to obtain the resources. Hence pigs do not just need food but need to be able to carry out actions like rooting in earth or manipulating materials which are part of foraging behaviour. The welfare of an individual is its state as regards its attempts to cope with its environment. This state includes various adaptive mechanisms including feelings and those which cope with disease. The part of welfare which is concerned with coping with pathology is health. Disease, which implies some significant effect of pathology, always results in poor welfare. Welfare varies over a range from very good, when adaptation is effective and there are feelings of pleasure or contentment, to very poor. A key point concerning the concept of individual adaptation in relation to welfare is that welfare may be good or poor while adaptation is occurring. Some adaptation is very easy and energetically cheap and

  4. Adaptation of bone and tendon to prolonged hindlimb suspension in rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Vailas, Arthur C.; Deluna, Diane M.; Lewis, Lisa L.; Curwin, Sandra L.; Roy, Roland R.

    1988-01-01

    The effect of a sustained deprivation of ground reaction forces on mineralized and soft connective tissues was investigated in rats subjected to 28-d-long hind-limb suspension. The results of morphological and biochemical studies carried out on femurs and patellar tendons obtained from suspended and nonsuspended 110-d-old rats showed that prolonged suspension led to an increase of the minimum diameter of the femur middiaphysis (by 12 percent), without any significant alterations in cortical area, density, mineral and collagen concentrations, femur wet weight, length, and DNA and uronic acid concentrations. However, in the patellar tendons of suspended rats, the collagen and proteoglycan concentrations were 28 percent lower than in tendons obtained from nonsuspended animals. These results suggest that ground reaction forces are important for the maintenance of cortical bone and patellar tendon homeostasis during weight-bearing conditions.

  5. Biology of Bone Tissue: Structure, Function, and Factors That Influence Bone Cells

    PubMed Central

    Florencio-Silva, Rinaldo; Sasso, Gisela Rodrigues da Silva; Sasso-Cerri, Estela; Simões, Manuel Jesus; Cerri, Paulo Sérgio

    2015-01-01

    Bone tissue is continuously remodeled through the concerted actions of bone cells, which include bone resorption by osteoclasts and bone formation by osteoblasts, whereas osteocytes act as mechanosensors and orchestrators of the bone remodeling process. This process is under the control of local (e.g., growth factors and cytokines) and systemic (e.g., calcitonin and estrogens) factors that all together contribute for bone homeostasis. An imbalance between bone resorption and formation can result in bone diseases including osteoporosis. Recently, it has been recognized that, during bone remodeling, there are an intricate communication among bone cells. For instance, the coupling from bone resorption to bone formation is achieved by interaction between osteoclasts and osteoblasts. Moreover, osteocytes produce factors that influence osteoblast and osteoclast activities, whereas osteocyte apoptosis is followed by osteoclastic bone resorption. The increasing knowledge about the structure and functions of bone cells contributed to a better understanding of bone biology. It has been suggested that there is a complex communication between bone cells and other organs, indicating the dynamic nature of bone tissue. In this review, we discuss the current data about the structure and functions of bone cells and the factors that influence bone remodeling. PMID:26247020

  6. Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 Adapts to 2,4-Dichlorophenoxyacetic Acid with “Auxin-Like” Morphological Changes, Cell Envelope Remodeling and Upregulation of Central Metabolic Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Bhat, Supriya V.; Booth, Sean C.; McGrath, Seamus G. K.; Dahms, Tanya E. S.

    2015-01-01

    There is a growing need to characterize the effects of environmental stressors at the molecular level on model organisms with the ever increasing number and variety of anthropogenic chemical pollutants. The herbicide 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (2,4-D), as one of the most widely applied pesticides in the world, is one such example. This herbicide is known to have non-targeted undesirable effects on humans, animals and soil microbes, but specific molecular targets at sublethal levels are unknown. In this study, we have used Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841 (Rlv) as a nitrogen fixing, beneficial model soil organism to characterize the effects of 2,4-D. Using metabolomics and advanced microscopy we determined specific target pathways in the Rlv metabolic network and consequent changes to its phenotype, surface ultrastructure, and physical properties during sublethal 2,4-D exposure. Auxin and 2,4-D, its structural analogue, showed common morphological changes in vitro which were similar to bacteroids isolated from plant nodules, implying that these changes are related to bacteroid differentiation required for nitrogen fixation. Rlv showed remarkable adaptation capabilities in response to the herbicide, with changes to integral pathways of cellular metabolism and the potential to assimilate 2,4-D with consequent changes to its physical and structural properties. This study identifies biomarkers of 2,4-D in Rlv and offers valuable insights into the mode-of-action of 2,4-D in soil bacteria. PMID:25919284

  7. Interindividual Variation in Functionally Adapted Trait Sets Is Established During Postnatal Growth and Predictable Based on Bone Robustness

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Nirnimesh; Bhola, Siddharth; Goldstone, Andrew; Chen, Fred; Chrzanowski, Jessica; Terranova, Carl J.; Ghillani, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Adults acquire unique sets of morphological and tissue-quality bone traits that are predictable based on robustness and deterministic of strength and fragility. How and when individual trait sets arise during growth has not been established. Longitudinal structural changes of the metacarpal diaphysis were measured for boys and girls from 3 mo to 8 yr of age using hand radiographs obtained from the Bolton-Brush collection. Robustness varied ∼2-fold among boys and girls, and individual values were established by 2 yr of age, indicating that genetic and environmental factors controlling the relationship between growth in width and growth in length were established early during postnatal growth. Significant negative correlations between robustness and relative cortical area and a significant positive correlation between robustness and a novel measure capturing the efficiency of growth indicated that coordination of the subperiosteal and endocortical surfaces was responsible for this population acquiring a narrow range of trait sets that was predictable based on robustness. Boys and girls with robust diaphyses had proportionally thinner cortices to minimize mass, whereas children with slender diaphyses had proportionally thicker cortices to maximize stiffness. Girls had more slender metacarpals with proportionally thicker cortices compared with boys at all prepubertal ages. Although postnatal growth patterns varied in fundamentally different ways with sex and robustness, the dependence of trait sets on robustness indicated that children sustained variants affecting subperiosteal growth because they shared a common biological factor regulating functional adaptation. Considering the natural variation in acquired trait sets may help identify determinants of fracture risk, because age-related bone loss and gain will affect slender and robust structures differently. PMID:20001599

  8. Hard tissue remodeling using biofabricated coralline biomaterials.

    PubMed

    Vago, Razi; Plotquin, Daniel; Bunin, Alex; Sinelnikov, Igor; Atar, Dan; Itzhak, David

    2002-01-01

    Biotechnical and biomedical approaches were combined in an attempt to identify potential uses of biofabricated marine carbonate materials in biomedical applications, particularly as biomatrices for remodeling bone and cartilage tissue. After grafting, it is desirable for bone ingrowth to proceed as quickly as possible because the strength of the implanted region depends on a good mechanical bond forming between the implant and surrounding regions in the body. Ingrowth can take place as a result of growth of tissue and cells into the implanted porous material, or it may be promoted by transplanting cells seeded onto such a material. The rate at which ingrowth occurs is dependent on many factors, including pore size and the interconnectivity of the implanted structure. In vivo graftings into osteochondral defects demonstrated that our biofabricated porous material is highly biocompatible with cartilage and bone tissue. The biofabricated matrix was well incorporated into the biphasic osteochondral area. Resorption was followed by bone and cartilage formation, and after 4 months, the biomaterial had been replaced by new tissue. Ossification was induced and enhanced without introduction of additional factors. We believe that this is the first time that such biofabricated materials have been used for biomedical purposes. In face of the obvious environmental disadvantages of harvesting from limited natural resources, we propose the use of bioengineered coralline and other materials such as those cultured by our group under field and laboratory conditions as a possible biomatrix for hard tissue remodeling. PMID:11741712

  9. Bisphosphonates and bone quality

    PubMed Central

    Pazianas, Michael; van der Geest, Stefan; Miller, Paul

    2014-01-01

    Bisphosphonates (BPs) are bone-avid compounds used as first-line medications for the prevention and treatment of osteoporosis. They are also used in other skeletal pathologies such as Paget's and metastatic bone disease. They effectively reduce osteoclast viability and also activity in the resorptive phase of bone remodelling and help preserve bone micro-architecture, both major determinants of bone strength and ultimately of the susceptibility to fractures. The chemically distinctive structure of each BP used in the clinic determines their unique affinity, distribution/penetration throughout the bone and their individual effects on bone geometry, micro-architecture and composition or what we call ‘bone quality'. BPs have no clinically significant anabolic effects. This review will touch upon some of the components of bone quality that could be affected by the administration of BPs. PMID:24876930

  10. Adapt

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bargatze, L. F.

    2015-12-01

    Active Data Archive Product Tracking (ADAPT) is a collection of software routines that permits one to generate XML metadata files to describe and register data products in support of the NASA Heliophysics Virtual Observatory VxO effort. ADAPT is also a philosophy. The ADAPT concept is to use any and all available metadata associated with scientific data to produce XML metadata descriptions in a consistent, uniform, and organized fashion to provide blanket access to the full complement of data stored on a targeted data server. In this poster, we present an application of ADAPT to describe all of the data products that are stored by using the Common Data File (CDF) format served out by the CDAWEB and SPDF data servers hosted at the NASA Goddard Space Flight Center. These data servers are the primary repositories for NASA Heliophysics data. For this purpose, the ADAPT routines have been used to generate data resource descriptions by using an XML schema named Space Physics Archive, Search, and Extract (SPASE). SPASE is the designated standard for documenting Heliophysics data products, as adopted by the Heliophysics Data and Model Consortium. The set of SPASE XML resource descriptions produced by ADAPT includes high-level descriptions of numerical data products, display data products, or catalogs and also includes low-level "Granule" descriptions. A SPASE Granule is effectively a universal access metadata resource; a Granule associates an individual data file (e.g. a CDF file) with a "parent" high-level data resource description, assigns a resource identifier to the file, and lists the corresponding assess URL(s). The CDAWEB and SPDF file systems were queried to provide the input required by the ADAPT software to create an initial set of SPASE metadata resource descriptions. Then, the CDAWEB and SPDF data repositories were queried subsequently on a nightly basis and the CDF file lists were checked for any changes such as the occurrence of new, modified, or deleted

  11. Impairment of osteoclastic bone resorption in rapidly growing female p47phox knockout mice

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bone formation is dependent on the activity and differentiation of osteoblasts; whereas resorption of preexisting mineralized bone matrix by osteoclasts is necessary not only for bone development but also for regeneration and remodeling. Bone remodeling is a process in which osteoblasts and osteocla...

  12. Comparative functional anatomy of hindlimb muscles and bones with reference to aquatic adaptation of the sea otter.

    PubMed

    Mori, Kent; Suzuki, Satoshi; Koyabu, Daisuke; Kimura, Junpei; Han, Sung-Yong; Endo, Hideki

    2015-05-01

    Although the sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a complete aquatic species, spending its entire life in the ocean, it has been considered morphologically to be a semi-aquatic animal. This study aimed to clarify the unique hindlimb morphology and functional adaptations of E. lutris in comparison to other Mustelidae species. We compared muscle mass and bone measurements of five Mustelidae species: the sea otter, Eurasian river otter (Lutra lutra), American mink (Neovison vison), Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi) and Siberian weasel (M. sibirica). In comparison with the other 4 species, E. lutris possessed significantly larger gluteus, popliteus and peroneus muscles, but smaller adductor and ischiopubic muscles. The popliteus muscle may act as a medial rotator of the crus, and the peroneus muscle may act as an abductor of the fifth toe and/or the pronator of the foot. The bundles of the gluteus superficialis muscle of E. lutris were fused with those of the tensor fasciae latae muscle and gluteofemoralis muscles, and they may play a role in femur abduction. These results suggest that E. lutris uses the abducted femur, medially rotated crus, eversion of the ankle and abducted fifth digit or extended interdigital web as a powerful propulsion generator. Therefore, we conclude that E. lutris is a complete aquatic animal, possessing differences in the proportions of the hindlimb muscles compared with those in other semi-aquatic and terrestrial mustelids. PMID:25715875

  13. Comparative functional anatomy of hindlimb muscles and bones with reference to aquatic adaptation of the sea otter

    PubMed Central

    MORI, Kent; SUZUKI, Satoshi; KOYABU, Daisuke; KIMURA, Junpei; HAN, Sung-Yong; ENDO, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Although the sea otter (Enhydra lutris) is a complete aquatic species, spending its entire life in the ocean, it has been considered morphologically to be a semi-aquatic animal. This study aimed to clarify the unique hindlimb morphology and functional adaptations of E. lutris in comparison to other Mustelidae species. We compared muscle mass and bone measurements of five Mustelidae species: the sea otter, Eurasian river otter (Lutra lutra), American mink (Neovison vison), Japanese weasel (Mustela itatsi) and Siberian weasel (M. sibirica). In comparison with the other 4 species, E. lutris possessed significantly larger gluteus, popliteus and peroneus muscles, but smaller adductor and ischiopubic muscles. The popliteus muscle may act as a medial rotator of the crus, and the peroneus muscle may act as an abductor of the fifth toe and/or the pronator of the foot. The bundles of the gluteus superficialis muscle of E. lutris were fused with those of the tensor fasciae latae muscle and gluteofemoralis muscles, and they may play a role in femur abduction. These results suggest that E. lutris uses the abducted femur, medially rotated crus, eversion of the ankle and abducted fifth digit or extended interdigital web as a powerful propulsion generator. Therefore, we conclude that E. lutris is a complete aquatic animal, possessing differences in the proportions of the hindlimb muscles compared with those in other semi-aquatic and terrestrial mustelids. PMID:25715875

  14. A review of trabecular bone functional adaptation: what have we learned from trabecular analyses in extant hominoids and what can we apply to fossils?

    PubMed

    Kivell, Tracy L

    2016-04-01

    Many of the unresolved debates in palaeoanthropology regarding evolution of particular locomotor or manipulative behaviours are founded in differing opinions about the functional significance of the preserved external fossil morphology. However, the plasticity of internal bone morphology, and particularly trabecular bone, allowing it to respond to mechanical loading during life means that it can reveal greater insight into how a bone or joint was used during an individual's lifetime. Analyses of trabecular bone have been commonplace for several decades in a human clinical context. In contrast, the study of trabecular bone as a method for reconstructing joint position, joint loading and ultimately behaviour in extant and fossil non-human primates is comparatively new. Since the initial 2D studies in the late 1970s and 3D analyses in the 1990 s, the utility of trabecular bone to reconstruct behaviour in primates has grown to incorporate experimental studies, expanded taxonomic samples and skeletal elements, and improved methodologies. However, this work, in conjunction with research on humans and non-primate mammals, has also revealed the substantial complexity inherent in making functional inferences from variation in trabecular architecture. This review addresses the current understanding of trabecular bone functional adaptation, how it has been applied to hominoids, as well as other primates and, ultimately, how this can be used to better interpret fossil hominoid and hominin morphology. Because the fossil record constrains us to interpreting function largely from bony morphology alone, and typically from isolated bones, analyses of trabecular structure, ideally in conjunction with that of cortical structure and external morphology, can offer the best resource for reconstructing behaviour in the past. PMID:26879841

  15. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  16. Lymphoid Tissue Mesenchymal Stromal Cells in Development and Tissue Remodeling.

    PubMed

    Genovese, Luca; Brendolan, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Secondary lymphoid organs (SLOs) are sites that facilitate cell-cell interactions required for generating adaptive immune responses. Nonhematopoietic mesenchymal stromal cells have been shown to play a critical role in SLO function, organization, and tissue homeostasis. The stromal microenvironment undergoes profound remodeling to support immune responses. However, chronic inflammatory conditions can promote uncontrolled stromal cell activation and aberrant tissue remodeling including fibrosis, thus leading to tissue damage. Despite recent advancements, the origin and role of mesenchymal stromal cells involved in SLO development and remodeling remain unclear. PMID:27190524

  17. Proteomics in bone research.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hengwei; Recker, Robert; Lee, Wai-Nang Paul; Xiao, Gary Guishan

    2010-02-01

    Osteoporosis is prevalent among the elderly and is a major cause of bone fracture in this population. Bone integrity is maintained by the dynamic processes of bone resorption and bone formation (bone remodeling). Osteoporosis results when there is an imbalance of the two counteracting processes. Bone mineral density, measured by dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry has been the primary method to assess fracture risk for decades. Recent studies demonstrated that measurement of bone turnover markers allows for a dynamic assessment of bone remodeling, while imaging techniques, such as dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, do not. The application of proteomics has permitted discoveries of new, sensitive, bone turnover markers, which provide unique information for clinical diagnosis and treatment of patients with bone diseases. This review summarizes the recent findings of proteomic studies on bone diseases, properties of mesenchymal stem cells with high expansion rates and osteoblast and osteoclast differentiation, with emphasis on the role of quantitative proteomics in the study of signaling dynamics, biomarkers and discovery of therapeutic targets. PMID:20121480

  18. Stem cell niches and other factors that influence the sensitivity of bone marrow to radiation-induced bone cancer and leukaemia in children and adults

    PubMed Central

    Richardson, Richard B

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: This paper reviews and reassesses the internationally accepted niches or ‘targets’ in bone marrow that are sensitive to the induction of leukaemia and primary bone cancer by radiation. Conclusions: The hypoxic conditions of the 10 μm thick endosteal/osteoblastic niche where preleukemic stem cells and hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) reside provides a radioprotective microenvironment that is 2-to 3-fold less radiosensitive than vascular niches. This supports partitioning the whole marrow target between the low haematological cancer risk of irradiating HSC in the endosteum and the vascular niches within central marrow. There is a greater risk of induced bone cancer when irradiating a 50 μm thick peripheral marrow adjacent to the remodelling/reforming portion of the trabecular bone surface, rather than marrow next to the quiescent bone surface. This choice of partitioned bone cancer target is substantiated by the greater radiosensitivity of: (i) Bone with high remodelling rates, (ii) the young, (iii) individuals with hypermetabolic benign diseases of bone, and (iv) the epidemiology of alpha-emitting exposures. Evidence is given to show that the absence of excess bone-cancer in atomic-bomb survivors may be partially related to the extremely low prevalence among Japanese of Paget's disease of bone. Radiation-induced fibrosis and the wound healing response may be implicated in not only radiogenic bone cancers but also leukaemia. A novel biological mechanism for adaptive response, and possibility of dynamic targets, is advocated whereby stem cells migrate from vascular niches to stress-mitigated, hypoxic niches. PMID:21204614

  19. Age- and direction-related adaptations of lumbar vertebral trabecular bone with respect to apparent stiffness and tissue level stress distribution

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gong, He; Fan, Yubo; Zhang, Ming; Qin, Ling

    2009-02-01

    The objective of this study was to study the age-related adaptation of lumbar vertebral trabecular bone at the apparent level, as well as the tissue level in three orthogonal directions. Ninety trabecular specimens were obtained from six normal L4 vertebral bodies of six male cadavers in two age groups, three aged 62 years and three aged 69 years, and were scanned using a high-resolution micro-computed tomography (micro-CT) system, then converted to micro-finite element models to do micro-finite element analyses. The relationship between apparent stiffness and bone volume fraction, and the tissue level von Mises stress distribution for each trabecular specimen when compressed separately in the longitudinal direction, medial-lateral and anterior-posterior directions (transverse directions) were derived and compared between two age groups. The results showed that at the apparent level, trabecular bones from 69-year group had stiffer bone structure relative to their volume fractions in all three directions, and in both age groups, changes in bone volume fraction could explain more variations in apparent stiffness in the longitudinal direction than the transverse directions; at the tissue level, aging had little effect on the tissue von Mises stress distributions for the compressions in all the three directions. The novelty of the present study was that it provided quantitative assessments on the age and direction-related adaptation of Chinese male lumbar vertebral trabecular bone from two different levels: stiffness at the apparent level and stress distribution at the tissue level. It may help to understand the failure mechanisms and fracture risks of vertebral body associated with aging and direction for the prevention of fracture risks in elder individuals.

  20. Adenosine and Bone Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Mediero, Aránzazu; Cronstein, Bruce N.

    2013-01-01

    Bone is a dynamic organ that undergoes continuous remodeling whilst maintaining a balance between bone formation and resorption. Osteoblasts, which synthesize and mineralize new bone, and osteoclasts, the cells that resorb bone, act in concert to maintain bone homeostasis. In recent years, there has been increasing appreciation of purinergic regulation of bone metabolism. Adenosine, released locally, mediates its physiologic and pharmacologic actions via interactions with G-protein coupled receptors and recent work has indicated that these receptors are involved in the regulation of osteoclast differentiation and function, as well as osteoblast differentiation and bone formation. Moreover, adenosine receptors also regulate chondrocyte and cartilage homeostasis. These recent findings underscore the potential therapeutic importance of adenosine receptors in regulating bone physiology and pathology. PMID:23499155

  1. The multifactorial nature of microRNAs in vascular remodelling.

    PubMed

    Welten, S M J; Goossens, E A C; Quax, P H A; Nossent, A Y

    2016-05-01

    Vascular remodelling is a multifactorial process that involves both adaptive and maladaptive changes of the vessel wall through, among others, cell proliferation and migration, but also apoptosis and necrosis of the various cell types in the vessel wall. Vascular remodelling can be beneficial, e.g. during neovascularization after ischaemia, as well as pathological, e.g. during atherosclerosis and aneurysm formation. In recent years, it has become clear that microRNAs are able to target many genes that are involved in vascular remodelling processes and either can promote or inhibit structural changes of the vessel wall. Since many different processes of vascular remodelling are regulated by similar mechanisms and factors, both positive and negative vascular remodelling can be affected by the same microRNAs. A large number of microRNAs has been linked to various aspects of vascular remodelling and indeed, several of these microRNAs regulate multiple vascular remodelling processes, including both the adaptive processes angiogenesis and arteriogenesis as well as maladaptive processes of atherosclerosis, restenosis and aneurysm formation. Here, we discuss the multifactorial role of microRNAs and microRNA clusters that were reported to play a role in multiple forms of vascular remodelling and are clearly linked to cardiovascular disease (CVD). The microRNAs reviewed are miR-126, miR-155 and the microRNA gene clusters 17-92, 23/24/27, 143/145 and 14q32. Understanding the contribution of these microRNAs to the entire spectrum of vascular remodelling processes is important, especially as these microRNAs may have great potential as therapeutic targets for treatment of various CVDs. PMID:26912672

  2. Age-related impairment of bones' adaptive response to loading in mice is associated with sex-related deficiencies in osteoblasts but no change in osteocytes.

    PubMed

    Meakin, Lee B; Galea, Gabriel L; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Lanyon, Lance E; Price, Joanna S

    2014-08-01

    Bones adjust their mass and architecture to be sufficiently robust to withstand functional loading by adapting to their strain environment. This mechanism appears less effective with age, resulting in low bone mass. In male and female young adult (17-week-old) and old (19-month-old) mice, we investigated the effect of age in vivo on bones' adaptive response to loading and in vitro in primary cultures of osteoblast-like cells derived from bone cortices. Right tibias were axially loaded on alternate days for 2 weeks. Left tibias were non-loaded controls. In a separate group, the number of sclerostin-positive osteocytes and the number of periosteal osteoblasts were analyzed 24 hours after a single loading episode. The responses to strain of the primary osteoblast-like cells derived from these mice were assessed by EGR2 expression, change in cell number and Ki67 immunofluorescence. In young male and female mice, loading increased trabecular thickness and the number of trabecular connections. Increase in the number of trabecular connections was impaired with age but trabecular thickness was not. In old mice, the loading-related increase in periosteal apposition of the cortex was less than in young ones. Age was associated with a lesser loading-related increase in osteoblast number on the periosteal surface but had no effect on loading-related reduction in the number of sclerostin-positive osteocytes. In vitro, strain-related proliferation of osteoblast-like cells was lower in cells from old than young mice. Cells from aged female mice demonstrated normal entry into the cell cycle but subsequently arrested in G2 phase, reducing strain-related increases in cell number. Thus, in both male and female mice, loading-related adaptive responses are impaired with age. This impairment is different in females and males. The deficit appears to occur in osteoblasts' proliferative responses to strain rather than earlier strain-related responses in the osteocytes. PMID:24644060

  3. [Inflammation and bone : Osteoimmunological aspects].

    PubMed

    Frommer, K W; Neumann, E; Lange, U

    2016-06-01

    Microscopic fractures (so-called microcracks) or traumatic macrofractures require bone, as the basic scaffold of the human body, to have a high regenerative capability. In order to be able to provide this regenerative capability, bone is in a constant process of remodeling. This finely tuned homeostasis of bone formation and degradation can become disrupted, which leads to osteoporosis or other bone disorders. It has been shown that the immune system is substantially involved in the regulation of bone homeostasis and that chronic inflammation in particular can disturb this balance; therefore, this article reviews the osteoimmunological aspects contributing to osteoporosis and other diseases associated with bone degradation. PMID:27250491

  4. A T Cell View of the Bone Marrow

    PubMed Central

    Bonomo, Adriana; Monteiro, Ana Carolina; Gonçalves-Silva, Triciana; Cordeiro-Spinetti, Eric; Galvani, Rômulo Gonçalves; Balduino, Alex

    2016-01-01

    The majority of T cells present in the bone marrow (BM) represent an activated/memory phenotype and most of these, if not all, are circulating T cells. Their lodging in the BM keeps them activated, turning the BM microenvironment into a “memory reservoir.” This article will focus on how T cell activation in the BM results in both direct and indirect effects on the hematopoiesis. The hematopoietic stem cell niche will be presented, with its main components and organization, along with the role played by T lymphocytes in basal and pathologic conditions and their effect on the bone remodeling process. Also discussed herein will be how “normal” bone mass peak is achieved only in the presence of an intact adaptive immune system, with T and B cells playing critical roles in this process. Our main hypothesis is that the partnership between T cells and cells of the BM microenvironment orchestrates numerous processes regulating immunity, hematopoiesis, and bone remodeling. PMID:27242791

  5. Muscle and bone-aging and space.

    PubMed

    Rittweger, J; Gunga, H C; Felsenberg, D; Kirsch, K A

    1999-07-01

    One of the major concerns of aging, but also during and after spaceflight, is loss of muscle and bone mass. In aging, this is associated with an increasing risk of fractures. Recently, the possibility of aged and aging astronauts has been arisen. Thus considering the perspectives of aging and space we want to discuss, in how far the adaptations during spaceflight and during aging interfere. In other words: does spaceflight push the astronauts along the irreversible axis of aging? And which of the spaceflight effects will be reversible? Bones adapt to their mechanical function. For convenience, a simple model has been proposed: Bone, as a 'mechanostat', keeps the strains within certain thresholds, namely one threshold for modeling, i.e. formation of new bone, and one for remodeling, i.e. repair and removal. These thresholds are usually expressed as strains. A crucial role in physiological strain detection is obviously played by the osteocytes. The largest forces in the musculo-skeletal systems arise from muscle contractions. The reason for this are the poor levers, against which the muscles pull. For example: during a one-leg vertical jump, a young subject (body weight 70 kg) exerts a vertical ground reaction force of 2500 N. Due to the lever ratio of os calcis and forefoot around the tibio-talar joint, the calf muscles must exert a force 3 times greater, so that together with the body weight the bones of the lower leg are loaded with 10000 N, i.e. 14 times the body weight. Accordingly, good correlations can be observed between muscle strength and bone strength, or muscle mass and bone mass. It is therefore reasonable to discuss the accumulated knowledge about loss of muscle and bone in a combined approach. In this respect, two points must be considered: (i) for structural adaptation of bone, the muscular variable of interest arc force and rate of force development, but not power, and (ii) women before menopause have a greater bone to muscle ratio than men. PMID

  6. Age-Related Impairment of Bones' Adaptive Response to Loading in Mice Is Associated With Sex-Related Deficiencies in Osteoblasts but No Change in Osteocytes†

    PubMed Central

    Meakin, Lee B; Galea, Gabriel L; Sugiyama, Toshihiro; Lanyon, Lance E; Price, Joanna S

    2014-01-01

    Bones adjust their mass and architecture to be sufficiently robust to withstand functional loading by adapting to their strain environment. This mechanism appears less effective with age, resulting in low bone mass. In male and female young adult (17-week-old) and old (19-month-old) mice, we investigated the effect of age in vivo on bones' adaptive response to loading and in vitro in primary cultures of osteoblast-like cells derived from bone cortices. Right tibias were axially loaded on alternate days for 2 weeks. Left tibias were non-loaded controls. In a separate group, the number of sclerostin-positive osteocytes and the number of periosteal osteoblasts were analyzed 24 hours after a single loading episode. The responses to strain of the primary osteoblast-like cells derived from these mice were assessed by EGR2 expression, change in cell number and Ki67 immunofluorescence. In young male and female mice, loading increased trabecular thickness and the number of trabecular connections. Increase in the number of trabecular connections was impaired with age but trabecular thickness was not. In old mice, the loading-related increase in periosteal apposition of the cortex was less than in young ones. Age was associated with a lesser loading-related increase in osteoblast number on the periosteal surface but had no effect on loading-related reduction in the number of sclerostin-positive osteocytes. In vitro, strain-related proliferation of osteoblast-like cells was lower in cells from old than young mice. Cells from aged female mice demonstrated normal entry into the cell cycle but subsequently arrested in G2 phase, reducing strain-related increases in cell number. Thus, in both male and female mice, loading-related adaptive responses are impaired with age. This impairment is different in females and males. The deficit appears to occur in osteoblasts' proliferative responses to strain rather than earlier strain-related responses in the osteocytes. © 2014 The Authors

  7. Surface delivery of tunable doses of BMP-2 from an adaptable polymeric scaffold induces volumetric bone regeneration.

    PubMed

    Bouyer, Michael; Guillot, Raphael; Lavaud, Jonathan; Plettinx, Cedric; Olivier, Cécile; Curry, Véronique; Boutonnat, Jean; Coll, Jean-Luc; Peyrin, Françoise; Josserand, Véronique; Bettega, Georges; Picart, Catherine

    2016-10-01

    The rapid and effective bone regeneration of large non-healing defects remains challenging. Bioactive proteins, such as bone morphogenetic protein (BMP)-2, are proved their osteoinductivity, but their clinical use is currently limited to collagen as biomaterial. Being able to deliver BMP-2 from any other biomaterial would broaden its clinical use. This work presents a novel means for repairing a critical size volumetric bone femoral defect in the rat by combining a osteoinductive surface coating (2D) to a polymeric scaffold (3D hollow tube) made of commercially-available PLGA. Using a polyelectrolyte film as BMP-2 carrier, we tune the amount of BMP-2 loaded in and released from the polyelectrolyte film coating over a large extent by controlling the film crosslinking level and initial concentration of BMP-2 in solution. Using microcomputed tomography and quantitative analysis of the regenerated bone growth kinetics, we show that the amount of newly formed bone and kinetics can be modulated: an effective and fast repair was obtained in 1-2 weeks in the best conditions, including complete defect bridging, formation of vascularized and mineralized bone tissue. Histological staining and high-resolution computed tomography revealed the presence of bone regeneration inside and around the tube with spatially distinct organization for trabecular-like and cortical bones. The amount of cortical bone and its thickness increased with the BMP-2 dose. In view of the recent developments in additive manufacturing techniques, this surface-coating technology may be applied in combination with various types of polymeric or metallic scaffolds to offer new perspectives of bone regeneration in personalized medicine. PMID:27454063

  8. Biophotonics and Bone Biology

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zimmerli, Gregory; Fischer, David; Asipauskas, Marius; Chauhan, Chirag; Compitello, Nicole; Burke, Jamie; Tate, Melissa Knothe

    2004-01-01

    One of the more serious side effects of extended space flight is an accelerated bone loss. Rates of bone loss are highest in the weight-bearing bones of the hip and spine regions, and the average rate of bone loss as measured by bone mineral density measurements is around 1.2% per month for persons in a microgravity environment. It is well known that bone remodeling responds to mechanical forces. We are developing two-photon microscopy techniques to study bone tissue and bone cell cultures to better understand the fundamental response mechanism in bone remodeling. Osteoblast and osteoclast cell cultures are being studied, and the goal is to use molecular biology techniques in conjunction with Fluorescence Lifetime Imaging Microscopy (FLIM) to study the physiology of in-vitro cell cultures in response to various stimuli, such as fluid flow induced shear stress and mechanical stress. We have constructed a two-photon fluorescence microscope for these studies, and are currently incorporating FLIM detection. Current progress will be reviewed. This work is supported by the NASA John Glenn Biomedical Engineering Consortium.

  9. Remodeling and Shuttling

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigueza, Wendi V.; Williams, Kevin Jon; Rothblat, George H.; Phillips, Michael C.

    2016-01-01

    In normal physiology, cells are exposed to cholesterol acceptors of different sizes simultaneously. The current study examined the possible interactions between two different classes of acceptors, one large (large unilamellar phospholipid vesicles, LUVs) and one small (HDL or other small acceptors), added separately or in combination to Fu5AH rat hepatoma cells. During a 24-hour incubation, LUVs of palmitoyl-oleoyl phosphatidylcholine at 1 mg phospholipid (PL) per milliliter extracted ≈20% of cellular unesterified cholesterol (UC) label and mass in a slow, continuous fashion (half-time [t½] for UC efflux was ≈50 hours) and human HDL3 at 25 μg PL per milliliter extracted ≈15% cellular UC label with no change in cellular cholesterol mass (t½ of ≈8 hours). In contrast, the combination of LUVs and HDL3 extracted over 90% of UC label (t½ of ≈4 hours) and ≈50% of the UC mass, indicating synergy. To explain this synergy, specific particle interactions were examined, namely, remodeling, in which the two acceptors alter each other’s composition and thus the ability to mobilize cellular cholesterol, and shuttling, in which the small acceptor ferries cholesterol from cells to the large acceptor. To examine remodeling, LUVs and HDL were coincubated and reisolated before application to cells. This HDL became UC depleted, PL enriched, and lost a small amount of apolipoprotein A-I. Compared with equivalent numbers of control HDL particles, remodeled HDL caused faster efflux (t½ ≈4 hours) and exhibited a greater capacity to sequester cellular cholesterol over 24 hours (≈38% versus ≈15% for control HDL), consistent with their enrichment in PL. Remodeled LUVs still extracted ≈20% of cellular UC. Thus, remodeling accounted for some but not all of the synergy between LUVs and HDL. To examine shuttling, several approaches were used. First, reisolation of particles after an 8-hour exposure to cells revealed that HDL contained very little of the cellular UC

  10. Three dimensional mapping of strontium in bone by dual energy K-edge subtraction imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, D. M. L.; Chapman, L. D.; Carter, Y.; Wu, Y.; Panahifar, A.; Britz, H. M.; Bewer, B.; Zhouping, W.; Duke, M. J. M.; Doschak, M.

    2012-09-01

    The bones of many terrestrial vertebrates, including humans, are continually altered through an internal process of turnover known as remodeling. This process plays a central role in bone adaptation and disease. The uptake of fluorescent tetracyclines within bone mineral is widely exploited as a means of tracking new tissue formation. While investigation of bone microarchitecture has undergone a dimensional shift from 2D to 3D in recent years, we lack a 3D equivalent to fluorescent labeling. In the current study we demonstrate the ability of synchrotron radiation dual energy K-edge subtraction (KES) imaging to map the 3D distribution of elemental strontium within rat vertebral samples. This approach has great potential for ex vivo analysis of preclinical models and human tissue samples. KES also represents a powerful tool for investigating the pharmokinetics of strontium-based drugs recently approved in many countries around the globe for the treatment of osteoporosis.

  11. The interactions of the cells in the development of osteoporotic changes in bones under space flight conditions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, Natalia; Kabitskaya, Olga

    2016-07-01

    Using the methods of electron microscopy and autoradiography with ³N-glycine and ³N-thymidine on biosatellites "Bion-11" (Macaca mulatta, the duration of the experiments -10 days), "Bion-M1" (mouse C57 Black, duration of the flight - 30 days) in the experiments with modeled hypokinesia (white rats, hind limbs unloading, the duration of the experiments 28 days) new data about the morpho-functional peculiarities of cellular interactions in adaptive remodeling zones of bone structures under normal conditions and after exposure of animals to microgravity. Our conception on remodeling proposes the following sequence in the development of cellular interactions after decrease of the mechanical loading: a primary response of osteocytes (mechanosensory cells) to the mechanical stimulus; osteocytic remodeling (osteolysis); transmission of the mechanical signals through a system of canals and processes to functionally active osteoblasts and paving endost one as well as to the bone-marrow stromal cells and perivascular cells. As a response to the mechanical stimulus (microgravity) the system of perivascular cell-stromal cell-preosteoblast-osteoblast shows a delay in proliferation, differentiation and specific functioning of the osteogenetic cells, the number of apoptotic osteoblasts increases. Then the osteoclastic reaction occurs (attraction of monocytes and formation of osteoclasts, bone matrix resorption in the loci of apoptosis of osteoblasts and osteocytes). The macrophagal reaction is followed by osteoblastogenesis, which appears to be a rehabilitating process. However, during prolonged absence of mechanical stimuli (microgravity, long-time immobilization) the adaptive activization of osteoblastogenesis doesn't occur (as it is the case during the physiological remodeling of bone tissue) or it occurs to a smaller degree. The loading deficit leads to an adaptive differentiation of stromal cells to fibroblastic cells and adipocytes in remodeling loci. These cell reactions

  12. Periostin deficiency increases bone damage and impairs injury response to fatigue loading in adult mice.

    PubMed

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Gineyts, Evelyne; Ammann, Patrick; Conway, Simon J; Garnero, Patrick; Ferrari, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Bone damage removal and callus formation in response to fatigue loading are essential to prevent fractures. Periostin (Postn) is a matricellular protein that mediates adaptive response of cortical bone to loading. Whether and how periostin influences damage and the injury response to fatigue remains unknown. We investigated the skeletal response of Postn(-/-) and Postn(+/+) mice after fatigue stimulus by axial compression of their tibia. In Postn(+/+) mice, cracks number and surface (CsNb, CsS) increased 1h after fatigue, with a decrease in strength compared to non-fatigued tibia. At 15 days, CsNb had started to decline, while CtTV and CtBV increased in fatigued vs non-fatigued tibia, reflecting a woven bone response that was present in 75% of the fatigued bones. Cortical porosity and remodelling also prominently increased in the fatigued tibia of Postn(+/+) mice. At 30 days, paralleling a continuous removal of cortical damage, strength of the fatigued tibia was similar to the non-fatigue tibia. In Postn(-/-) mice, cracks were detectable even in the absence of fatigue, while the amount of collagen crosslinks and tissue hardness was decreased compared to Postn(+/+). Fatigue significantly increased CsNb and CsS in Postn(-/-), but was not associated with changes in CtTV and CtBV, as only 16% of the fatigued bones formed some woven bone. Cortical porosity and remodelling did not increase either after fatigue in Postn(-/-), and the level of damage remained high even after 30 days. As a result, strength remained compromised in Postn(-/-) mice. Contrary to Postn(+/+), which osteocytic lacunae showed a change in the degree of anisotropy (DA) after fatigue, Postn(-/-) showed no DA change. Hence periostin appears to influence bone materials properties, damage accumulation and repair, including local modeling/remodeling processes in response to fatigue. These observations suggest that the level of periostin expression could influence the propensity to fatigue fractures. PMID

  13. Periostin Deficiency Increases Bone Damage and Impairs Injury Response to Fatigue Loading in Adult Mice

    PubMed Central

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Gineyts, Evelyne; Ammann, Patrick; Conway, Simon J.; Garnero, Patrick; Ferrari, Serge

    2013-01-01

    Bone damage removal and callus formation in response to fatigue loading are essential to prevent fractures. Periostin (Postn) is a matricellular protein that mediates adaptive response of cortical bone to loading. Whether and how periostin influences damage and the injury response to fatigue remains unknown. We investigated the skeletal response of Postn-/- and Postn+/+ mice after fatigue stimulus by axial compression of their tibia. In Postn+/+ mice, cracks number and surface (CsNb, CsS) increased 1h after fatigue, with a decrease in strength compared to non-fatigued tibia. At 15 days, CsNb had started to decline, while CtTV and CtBV increased in fatigued vs non-fatigued tibia, reflecting a woven bone response that was present in 75% of the fatigued bones. Cortical porosity and remodelling also prominently increased in the fatigued tibia of Postn+/+ mice. At 30 days, paralleling a continuous removal of cortical damage, strength of the fatigued tibia was similar to the non-fatigue tibia. In Postn-/- mice, cracks were detectable even in the absence of fatigue, while the amount of collagen crosslinks and tissue hardness was decreased compared to Postn+/+. Fatigue significantly increased CsNb and CsS in Postn-/-, but was not associated with changes in CtTV and CtBV, as only 16% of the fatigued bones formed some woven bone. Cortical porosity and remodelling did not increase either after fatigue in Postn-/- , and the level of damage remained high even after 30 days. As a result, strength remained compromised in Postn-/- mice. Contrary to Postn+/+ , which osteocytic lacunae showed a change in the degree of anisotropy (DA) after fatigue, Postn-/- showed no DA change. Hence periostin appears to influence bone materials properties, damage accumulation and repair, including local modeling/remodeling processes in response to fatigue. These observations suggest that the level of periostin expression could influence the propensity to fatigue fractures. PMID:24167618

  14. Urokinase plasminogen activator gene deficiency inhibits fracture cartilage remodeling.

    PubMed

    Popa, Nicoleta L; Wergedal, Jon E; Lau, K-H William; Mohan, Subburaman; Rundle, Charles H

    2014-03-01

    Urokinase plasminogen activator (uPA) regulates a proteolytic cascade of extracellular matrix degradation that functions in tissue development and tissue repair. The development and remodeling of the skeletal extracellular matrix during wound healing suggests that uPA might regulate bone development and repair. To determine whether uPA functions regulate bone development and repair, we examined the basal skeletal phenotype and endochondral bone fracture repair in uPA-deficient mice. The skeletal phenotype of uPA knockout mice was compared with that of control mice under basal conditions by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry and micro-CT analysis, and during femur fracture repair by micro-CT and histological examination of the fracture callus. No effects of uPA gene deficiency were observed in the basal skeletal phenotype of the whole body or the femur. However, uPA gene deficiency resulted in increased fracture callus cartilage abundance during femur fracture repair at 14 days healing. The increase in cartilage corresponded to reduced tartrate-resistant acid phosphatase (TRAP) staining for osteoclasts in the uPA knockout fracture callus at this time, consistent with impaired osteoclast-mediated remodeling of the fracture cartilage. CD31 staining was reduced in the knockout fracture tissues at this time, suggesting that angiogenesis was also reduced. Osteoclasts also colocalized with CD31 expression in the endothelial cells of the fracture tissues during callus remodeling. These results indicate that uPA promotes remodeling of the fracture cartilage by osteoclasts that are associated with angiogenesis and suggest that uPA promotes angiogenesis and remodeling of the fracture cartilage at this time of bone fracture repair. PMID:23700285

  15. Remodeling with the sun

    SciTech Connect

    Bodzin, S.

    1997-05-01

    Remodeling is the perfect time to improve daylighting, direct gain heating and shading with passive solar techniques. It can also provide the best opportunity to add solar water heating or even photoboltaics to a home. This article describes addition of such energy efficient plans to a home in terms of what is needed and what the benefits are: adding windows, North glass, east and west glass, south glass, daylighting, the roof, shingles and roofing tiles, walls and floors, solar hot water, photovoltaics. Two side bars discuss the sunplace: a passive solar room and angles and overhangs.

  16. Changes of the intensity of morphogenetic process in the bone skeleton under lowering of gravitational loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasilievna Rodionova, Natalia; Zolotova-Haidamaka, Nadezhda

    The development of long skeleton bones and reconstruction of bone structures in ontogenesis during adaptive remodeling are performed due to a combination of the bone apposition and bone resorption processes. With the use of radioactive markers of specific biosyntheses -3H- thymidine and 3H-glycine we studied the dynamics and peculiarities of these processes under modeling microgravity conditions by unloading the hind limbs of young white rats (tail suspension method) during 28 days. The radionuclides were administered in a single dose at the end of the experiment and the biomaterial was taken 1, 24, 48, 120 and 192 h. after injection. In histoautographs the counts were made of a nuclei labeling index (3H-thymidine), of the number of silver grains over the cells and in the forming bone matrix in growth and remodeling zones of the femoral bone (3H-glycine). The tendency for a reduction of a labeling index in the 3H-thymidine-labeled osteogenic cells in the periost and endost has been established. The dynamics of labeled cells following various intervals after 3H-thymidine injection testifies to a delay in the rates of osteoblasts' differentiation and their transformation to osteocytes in the experiment animals. 3H-glycine is assimilated by osteogenic cells 30 min after the radionuclide injection and following 24 h. it is already incorporated into the forming bone matrix. As a result an appositional bone addition by 192 h. the silver grains are registered in the bone matrix as "labeling lines". A lower 3H-glycine uptake by the osteogenic cells and bone matrix as compared with a control is indicative of a decrease of the osteoplastic process under hypokinesia, particulary in the periost. At the same time the resorption and remodeling bone zones reveal regions of an intensive 3H-glycine uptake after 1 and 24 h. We associate this latter fact with an activation of collagen proteins in the differentiating fibroblasts (instead of osteoblasts) in these locations. This is

  17. Autoradiographic studies of the intensity of morphogenetic processes in the bone skeleton under modeling microgravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rodionova, N. V.; Zolotova-Haidamaka, N. V.; Nithevich, T. P.

    In ontogenesis the development of long skeleton bones and reconstruction of bone structures during adaptive remodeling are performed due to a combination of the bone apposition and bone resorption processes. With the use of radioactive markers of specific biosyntheses -3H-thymidine and 3H-glycine we studied the dynamics and peculiarities of these processes under hypokinesia by unloading the hind limbs of young white rats (tail suspension method) during 28 days. The radionuclides were administered in a single dose at the end of the experiment and the biomaterial was taken 1, 24, 48, 120 and 192 h. after injection. In histoautographs the counts were made of a nuclei labeling index (3H-thymidine), of the number of silver grains over the cells and in the forming bone matrix in growth and remodeling zones of the femoral bone (3H-glycine). The tendency for a reduction of a labeling index in the 3H-thymidine-labeled osteogenic cells in the periost and endost has been established. The dynamics of labeled cells following various intervals after 3H-thymidine injection testifies to a delay in the rates of osteoblasts' differentiation and their transformation to osteocytes in the experiment animals. 3H-glycine is assimilated by osteogenic cells 30 min after the radionuclide injection and following 24 h. it is already incorporated into the forming bone matrix. As a result an appositional bone addition by 192 h. the silver grains are registered in the bone matrix as "labeling lines". A lower 3H-glycine uptake by the osteogenic cells and bone matrix as compared with a control is indicative of a decrease of the osteoplastic process under hypokinesia, particulary in the periost. At the same time the resorption and remodeling bone zones reveal regions of an intensive 3H-glycine uptake after 1 and 24 h. We associate this latter fact with an activation of collagen proteins in the differentiating fibroblasts (instead of osteoblasts) in these locations. This is confirmed by our previous

  18. Analyzing the cellular contribution of bone marrow to fracture healing using bone marrow transplantation in mice

    SciTech Connect

    Colnot, C. . E-mail: colnotc@orthosurg.ucsf.edu; Huang, S.; Helms, J.

    2006-11-24

    The bone marrow is believed to play important roles during fracture healing such as providing progenitor cells for inflammation, matrix remodeling, and cartilage and bone formation. Given the complex nature of bone repair, it remains difficult to distinguish the contributions of various cell types. Here we describe a mouse model based on bone marrow transplantation and genetic labeling to track cells originating from bone marrow during fracture healing. Following lethal irradiation and engraftment of bone marrow expressing the LacZ transgene constitutively, wild type mice underwent tibial fracture. Donor bone marrow-derived cells, which originated from the hematopoietic compartment, did not participate in the chondrogenic and osteogenic lineages during fracture healing. Instead, the donor bone marrow contributed to inflammatory and bone resorbing cells. This model can be exploited in the future to investigate the role of inflammation and matrix remodeling during bone repair, independent from osteogenesis and chondrogenesis.

  19. The G-factor as a tool to learn more about bone structure and function.

    PubMed

    Zerath, E

    1999-07-01

    In normal life on earth, the locomotor system is exposed to two types of stimulation: gravity (passive stimulation) and motion (active stimulation). Both permanently combine, and the interactions between locomotion and gravity induce an overall recruitment which is repeated daily and maintains the bone tissue structure within the range of constraints to which it is adapted. This range is one of the basic hypotheses underlying the mechanical concepts of bone structure control, and it has been considered as logical to assume that weightlessness of spaceflight should produce bone loss since astronauts are outside of the terrestrial gravitational field of forces, no longer relying on muscular work to change positions or move. But, thirty years after the first changes in phospho-calcium metabolism were observed in astronauts after spaceflight, current knowledge does not provide a full understanding of this pathogeny, and prove the G-factor is now considered as an essential component of the experimental tools available to study bone physiology. The study of the physiology of bone tissue usually consists in the investigation of its two fundamental roles, i.e. reservoir of inorganic elements (calcium, phosphorus, magnesium) and mechanical support for soft tissues. Together with the combined action of muscles, tendons, and ligaments, this support permits motion and locomotion. These two functions rely on a sophisticated bone tissue architecture, and on the adaptability of this structure, with modeling and remodeling processes, themselves associated with the coupled activity of specialized bone cell populations. PMID:11543035

  20. Precocious Ossification of the Tympanoperiotic Bone in Fetal and Newborn Dolphins: An Evolutionary Adaptation to the Aquatic Environment?

    PubMed

    Cozzi, Bruno; Podestà, Michela; Vaccaro, Calogero; Poggi, Roberto; Mazzariol, Sandro; Huggenberger, Stefan; Zotti, Alessandro

    2015-07-01

    The present study, performed with a dual-energy X-ray (DXA) bone densitometer on a series of fetal and newborn striped and short-beaked common dolphins, shows that the bone density of the area of the tympanic bulla within the tympanoperiotic complex starts with 0.483 g cm(-2) in 5- to 6-month-old specimens of striped (or common) dolphin fetuses and reaches 1.841 g cm(-2) in newborn striped dolphins, with values consistently higher than in other parts of the skull or elsewhere in the skeleton. The same results apply to the common bottlenose dolphins, in which the area of the tympanic bulla has a density of 0.312 g cm(-2) in 5-month-old specimens and becomes four times as much in newborns. Regardless of the areal bone density results correlated to the DXA-technique, comparisons with DXA-bone density data in the literature referred to other mammals emphasize the presence of very high mineral deposition in the area of the tympanoperiotic bone in fetal and newborn dolphins and the most dense part of it belongs to the tympanic bulla. The early osseous maturation of the tympanic bulla area may be compared to what described in fin whales and may represent an unique ontogenetic and phylogenetic feature of cetaceans, possibly related to the development of essential acoustic sense and establishment of immediate post-natal mother-calf relationship. PMID:25676796

  1. Age-related changes in mouse bone permeability.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez-Florez, Naiara; Oyen, Michelle L; Shefelbine, Sandra J

    2014-03-21

    The determination of lacunar-canalicular permeability is essential for understanding local fluid flow in bone, which may indicate how bone senses changes in the mechanical environment to regulate mechano-adaptation. The estimates of lacunar-canalicular permeability found in the literature vary by up to eight orders of magnitude, and age-related permeability changes have not been measured in non-osteonal mouse bone. The objective of this study is to use a poroelastic approach based on nanoindentation data to characterize lacunar-canalicular permeability in murine bone as a function of age. Nine wild type C57BL/6 mice of different ages (2, 7 and 12 months) were used. Three tibiae from each age group were embedded in epoxy resin, cut in half and indented in the longitudinal direction in the mid-cortex using two spherical fluid indenter tips (R=238 μm and 500 μm). Results suggest that the lacunar-canalicular intrinsic permeability of mouse bone decreases from 2 to 7 months, with no significant changes from 7 to 12 months. The large indenter tip imposed larger contact sizes and sampled larger ranges of permeabilities, particularly for the old bone. This age-related difference in the distribution was not seen for indents with the smaller radius tip. We conclude that the small tip effectively measured lacunar-canalicular permeability, while larger tip indents were influenced by vascular permeability. Exploring the age-related changes in permeability of bone measured by nanoindentation will lead to a better understanding of the role of fluid flow in mechano-transduction. This understanding may help indicate alterations in bone adaptation and remodeling. PMID:24433671

  2. To Remodel or To Build?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rosenblum, Todd

    2009-01-01

    The question of remodeling an existing house to make it wheelchair accessible or building a new barrier-free house is a difficult decision. This article presents some initial questions and considerations followed by a list of pros and cons for remodeling an existing house vs. building a new house.

  3. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty

    PubMed Central

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-01-01

    Background and purpose Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3–6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  4. Periprosthetic tibial bone mineral density changes after total knee arthroplasty.

    PubMed

    Jaroma, Antti; Soininvaara, Tarja; Kröger, Heikki

    2016-06-01

    Background and purpose - Total knee arthroplasty (TKA) may cause postoperative periprosthetic bone loss due to stress shielding. Bone also adapts to mechanical alterations such as correction of malalignment. We investigated medium-term changes in bone mineral density (BMD) in tibial periprosthetic bone after TKA. Patients and methods - 86 TKA patients were prospectively measured with dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA), the baseline measurement being within 1 week after TKA and the follow-up measurements being at 3 and 6 months, and at 1, 2, 4, and 7 years postoperatively. Long standing radiographs were taken and clinical evaluation was done with the American Knee Society (AKS) score. Results - The baseline BMD of the medial tibial metaphyseal region of interest (ROI) was higher in the varus aligned knees (25%; p < 0.001). Medial metaphyseal BMD decreased in subjects with preoperatively varus aligned knees (13%, p < 0.001) and in those with preoperatively valgus aligned knees (12%, p = 0.02) between the baseline and 7-year measurements. No statistically significant changes in BMD were detected in lateral metaphyseal ROIs. No implant failures or revision surgery due to tibial problems occurred. Interpretation - Tibial metaphyseal periprosthetic bone is remodeled after TKA due to mechanical axis correction, resulting in more balanced bone stock below the tibial tray. The diaphyseal BMD remains unchanged after the initial drop, within 3-6 months. This remodeling process was related to good component survival, as there were no implant failures or revision operations due to tibial problems in this medium-term follow-up. PMID:27120266

  5. No-Regrets Remodeling, 2nd Edition

    SciTech Connect

    2013-12-01

    No-Regrets Remodeling, sponsored by Oak Ridge National Laboratory, is an informative publication that walks homeowners and/or remodelers through various home remodeling projects. In addition to remodeling information, the publication provides instruction on how to incorporate energy efficiency into the remodeling process. The goal of the publication is to improve homeowner satisfaction after completing a remodeling project and to provide the homeowner with a home that saves energy and is comfortable and healthy.

  6. Impaired remodeling phase of fracture repair in the absence of matrix metalloproteinase-2

    PubMed Central

    Lieu, Shirley; Hansen, Erik; Dedini, Russell; Behonick, Danielle; Werb, Zena; Miclau, Theodore; Marcucio, Ralph; Colnot, Céline

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY The matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) family of extracellular proteases performs crucial roles in development and repair of the skeleton owing to their ability to remodel the extracellular matrix (ECM) and release bioactive molecules. Most MMP-null skeletal phenotypes that have been previously described are mild, thus permitting the assessment of their functions during bone repair in the adult. In humans and mice, MMP2 deficiency causes a musculoskeletal phenotype. In this study, we assessed the role of MMP2 during mouse fracture repair and compared it with the roles of MMP9 and MMP13. Mmp2 was expressed at low levels in the normal skeleton and was broadly expressed in the fracture callus. Treatment of wild-type mice with a general MMP inhibitor, GM6001, caused delayed cartilage remodeling and bone formation during fracture repair, which resembles the defect observed in Mmp9–/– mice. Unlike Mmp9- and Mmp13-null mutations, which affect both cartilage and bone in the callus, the Mmp2-null mutation delayed bone remodeling but not cartilage remodeling. This remodeling defect occurred without changes in either osteoclast recruitment or vascular invasion of the fracture callus compared with wild type. However, we did not detect changes in expression of Mmp9, Mmp13 or Mt1-Mmp (Mmp14) in the calluses of Mmp2-null mice compared with wild type by in situ hybridization, but we observed decreased expression of Timp2 in the calluses of Mmp2-, Mmp9- and Mmp13-null mice. In keeping with the skeletal phenotype of Mmp2-null mice, MMP2 plays a role in the remodeling of new bone within the fracture callus and impacts later stages of bone repair compared with MMP9 and MMP13. Taken together, our results indicate that MMPs play unique and distinct roles in regulating skeletal tissue deposition and remodeling during fracture repair. PMID:21135056

  7. Implant-induced microdamage in osteoporotic bone.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhi-Feng; Tang, Ting-Ting; Qiu, Shi-Jing

    2012-01-01

    With the increase of elderly population, more and more implant operations need to be performed in osteoporotic bone, while different forms of microdamage will be produced in peri-implant bone intraoperatively, including high- and low-density diffuse damages, as well as linear cracks. The length and location of the microcracks are the main factors in affecting the biomechanical performance of bone. Suppression of bone remodeling by bisphosphonates may lead to microdamage accumulation, which is often accompanied with the decrease of bone strength and the increase of bone fragility. Microdamage can be repaired by bone remodeling or mineralization to maintain the strength and structural integrity. Both remo- deling and mineralization can affect the bone quality and long-term implant stability. In this paper, we make a brief summary of some important issues and research progresses in this field. PMID:22480676

  8. Prostaglandin E2 Prevents Bone Loss and Adds Extra Bone to Immobilized Distal Femoral Metaphysis in Female Rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Akamine, T.; Jee, W. S. S.; Ke, H. Z.; Li, X. J.; Lin, B. Y.

    1992-01-01

    The object of this study was to determine whether prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) can prevent disuse (underloading)-induced cancellous bone loss. Thirteen-month-old retired female Sprague-Dawley breeders served as controls or were subjected to right hindlimb immobilization by bandaging and simultaneously treated subcutaneously daily with 0, 1, 3, or 6 mg PGE2/kg/d for two and six weeks. Histomorphometric analyses were performed on the cancellous bone using double-fluorescent labeled, 20 micron thick, undecalcified distal femoral metaphysis sections. We found that PGE2 administration not only prevented disuse-induced bone loss, but also added extra bone to disuse cancellous bone in a dose-response manner. PGE2 prevented the disuse-induced osteopenia by stimulating more bone formation than and shortening the period of bone remodeling. It activated woven bone formation, stimulated lamellar bone formation, and increased the eroded bone surface above that caused by disuse alone. While underloading increased the remodeling period (sigma), PGE2 treatment of underloaded bone shortened the time for osteoclastic bone resorption and bone remodeling, and thus reduc